WorldWideScience

Sample records for automated microscale experimentation

  1. An efficient approach to bioconversion kinetic model generation based on automated microscale experimentation integrated with model driven experimental design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, B. H.; Micheletti, M.; Baganz, F.;

    2009-01-01

    design. It incorporates a model driven approach to the experimental design that minimises the number of experiments to be performed, while still generating accurate values of kinetic parameters. The approach has been illustrated with the transketolase mediated asymmetric synthesis of L...... experimental design.]it comparison with conventional methodology, the modelling approach enabled a nearly 4-fold decrease in the number of experiments while the microwell experimentation enabled a 45-fold decrease in material requirements and a significant increase in experimental throughput. The approach......Reliable models of enzyme kinetics are required for the effective design of bioconversion processes. Kinetic expressions of the enzyme-catalysed reaction rate however, are frequently complex and establishing accurate values of kinetic parameters normally requires a large number of experiments...

  2. Control and Automation of Fluid Flow, Mass Transfer and Chemical Reactions in Microscale Segmented Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abolhasani, Milad

    Flowing trains of uniformly sized bubbles/droplets (i.e., segmented flows) and the associated mass transfer enhancement over their single-phase counterparts have been studied extensively during the past fifty years. Although the scaling behaviour of segmented flow formation is increasingly well understood, the predictive adjustment of the desired flow characteristics that influence the mixing and residence times, remains a challenge. Currently, a time consuming, slow and often inconsistent manual manipulation of experimental conditions is required to address this task. In my thesis, I have overcome the above-mentioned challenges and developed an experimental strategy that for the first time provided predictive control over segmented flows in a hands-off manner. A computer-controlled platform that consisted of a real-time image processing module within an integral controller, a silicon-based microreactor and automated fluid delivery technique was designed, implemented and validated. In a first part of my thesis I utilized this approach for the automated screening of physical mass transfer and solubility characteristics of carbon dioxide (CO2) in a physical solvent at a well-defined temperature and pressure and a throughput of 12 conditions per hour. Second, by applying the segmented flow approach to a recently discovered CO2 chemical absorbent, frustrated Lewis pairs (FLPs), I determined the thermodynamic characteristics of the CO2-FLP reaction. Finally, the segmented flow approach was employed for characterization and investigation of CO2-governed liquid-liquid phase separation process. The second part of my thesis utilized the segmented flow platform for the preparation and shape control of high quality colloidal nanomaterials (e.g., CdSe/CdS) via the automated control of residence times up to approximately 5 minutes. By introducing a novel oscillatory segmented flow concept, I was able to further extend the residence time limitation to 24 hours. A case study of a

  3. An experimental study on micro-scale flow boiling heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, new experimental flow boiling heat transfer results in micro-scale tubes are presented. The experimental data were obtained in a horizontal 2.32 mm I.D. stainless steel tube with heating length of 464 mm, R134a as working fluid, mass velocities ranging from 50 to 600 kg/m2s, heat flux from 5 to 55 kW/m2, exit saturation temperatures of 22, 31 and 41 deg C, and vapor qualities from 0.05 to 0.98. Flow pattern characterization was also performed from images obtained by high speed filming. Heat transfer coefficient results from 2 to 14 kW/m2K were measured. It was found that the heat transfer coefficient is a strong function of the saturation pressure, heat flux, mass velocity and vapor quality. The experimental data were compared against the following micro-scale flow boiling predictive methods from the literature: Saitoh et al., Kandlikar, Zhang et al. and Thome et al. Comparisons against these methods based on the data segregated according to flow patterns were also performed. Though not satisfactory, Saitoh et al. worked the best and was able of capturing most of the experimental heat transfer trends. (author)

  4. NDAUTO:An Experimental Software Automation System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐家福; 戴敏; 等

    1989-01-01

    This paper describer the design and implementation of an experimental software automation system(NDAUTO).By combining the transformational and procedural approaches in software gutomation,the system can tansform software unctional specifications written in a graphical specification language GSPEC to executable programs sutomatically,The equivalence between a specification and its corresponding program can be guaranteed by the system,and the correctness of the specification can also be validated.The main new points of the work lie in the design of the specification languange,the transformation mechanism and the correctness validation of the specification.

  5. Field enhancement factor dependence on electric field and implications on microscale gas breakdown: Theory and experimental interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejandro Buendia, Jose; Venkattraman, Ayyaswamy

    2015-12-01

    In this letter, we obtain a better understanding of effective field enhancement factors (β eff) in the context of microscale gas breakdown with specific emphasis on its dependence on applied electric field. The theoretical dependence of β eff on electric field for various hemi-ellipsoidal asperities indicates that the value of β eff decreases with increasing electric field. The interpretation of experimental data using a typical one-dimensional modified Paschen law indicates a qualitatively similar electric field dependence even though the data could not be completely explained using a single effective asperity size. The values of β eff extracted from seven independent experimental datasets for microscale breakdown of argon and air are shown to be consistent and an empirical dependence on electric field is determined.

  6. An experimental study of micro-scale deformation in a soft sandstone

    OpenAIRE

    Fonseca, J.; Bésuelle, P.; G. Viggiani

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the grain scale mechanisms that lead to failure by strain localisation in a slightly cemented sandstone. While the effects of interparticle bonding on the mechanical behaviour of granular geomaterials, including soft rocks, have been largely studied, the physical micro-scale mechanisms governing the material deformation are still poorly understood. In this study, laboratory techniques have been developed to allow a non-invasive investigation of the internal deformation...

  7. Creating Cycling-Friendly Environments for Children: Which Micro-Scale Factors Are Most Important? An Experimental Study Using Manipulated Photographs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariane Ghekiere

    Full Text Available Increasing participation in transportation cycling represents a useful strategy for increasing children's physical activity levels. Knowledge on how to design environments to encourage adoption and maintenance of transportation cycling is limited and relies mainly on observational studies. The current study experimentally investigates the relative importance of micro-scale environmental factors for children's transportation cycling, as these micro-scale factors are easier to change within an existing neighborhood compared to macro-scale environmental factors (i.e. connectivity, land-use mix, ….Researchers recruited children and their parents (n = 1232 via 45 randomly selected schools across Flanders and completed an online questionnaire which consisted of 1 demographic questions; and 2 a choice-based conjoint (CBC task. During this task, participants chose between two photographs which we had experimentally manipulated in seven micro-scale environmental factors: type of cycle path; evenness of cycle path; traffic speed; traffic density; presence of speed bumps; environmental maintenance; and vegetation. Participants indicated which route they preferred to (let their child cycle along. To find the relative importance of these micro-scale environmental factors, we conducted Hierarchical Bayes analyses.Type of cycle path emerged as the most important factor by far among both children and their parents, followed by traffic density and maintenance, and evenness of the cycle path among children. Among parents, speed limits and maintenance emerged as second most important, followed by evenness of the cycle path, and traffic density.Findings indicate that improvements in micro-scale environmental factors might be effective for increasing children's transportation cycling, since they increase the perceived supportiveness of the physical environment for transportation cycling. Investments in creating a clearly designated space for the young cyclist

  8. Creating Cycling-Friendly Environments for Children: Which Micro-Scale Factors Are Most Important? An Experimental Study Using Manipulated Photographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghekiere, Ariane; Deforche, Benedicte; Mertens, Lieze; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Clarys, Peter; de Geus, Bas; Cardon, Greet; Nasar, Jack; Salmon, Jo; Van Cauwenberg, Jelle

    2015-01-01

    Background Increasing participation in transportation cycling represents a useful strategy for increasing children’s physical activity levels. Knowledge on how to design environments to encourage adoption and maintenance of transportation cycling is limited and relies mainly on observational studies. The current study experimentally investigates the relative importance of micro-scale environmental factors for children’s transportation cycling, as these micro-scale factors are easier to change within an existing neighborhood compared to macro-scale environmental factors (i.e. connectivity, land-use mix, …). Methods Researchers recruited children and their parents (n = 1232) via 45 randomly selected schools across Flanders and completed an online questionnaire which consisted of 1) demographic questions; and 2) a choice-based conjoint (CBC) task. During this task, participants chose between two photographs which we had experimentally manipulated in seven micro-scale environmental factors: type of cycle path; evenness of cycle path; traffic speed; traffic density; presence of speed bumps; environmental maintenance; and vegetation. Participants indicated which route they preferred to (let their child) cycle along. To find the relative importance of these micro-scale environmental factors, we conducted Hierarchical Bayes analyses. Results Type of cycle path emerged as the most important factor by far among both children and their parents, followed by traffic density and maintenance, and evenness of the cycle path among children. Among parents, speed limits and maintenance emerged as second most important, followed by evenness of the cycle path, and traffic density. Conclusion Findings indicate that improvements in micro-scale environmental factors might be effective for increasing children’s transportation cycling, since they increase the perceived supportiveness of the physical environment for transportation cycling. Investments in creating a clearly designated

  9. Micro-scale finite element modeling of ultrasound propagation in aluminum trabecular bone-mimicking phantoms: A comparison between numerical simulation and experimental results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafaeian, B; Le, L H; Tran, T N H T; El-Rich, M; El-Bialy, T; Adeeb, S

    2016-05-01

    The present study investigated the accuracy of micro-scale finite element modeling for simulating broadband ultrasound propagation in water-saturated trabecular bone-mimicking phantoms. To this end, five commercially manufactured aluminum foam samples as trabecular bone-mimicking phantoms were utilized for ultrasonic immersion through-transmission experiments. Based on micro-computed tomography images of the same physical samples, three-dimensional high-resolution computational samples were generated to be implemented in the micro-scale finite element models. The finite element models employed the standard Galerkin finite element method (FEM) in time domain to simulate the ultrasonic experiments. The numerical simulations did not include energy dissipative mechanisms of ultrasonic attenuation; however, they expectedly simulated reflection, refraction, scattering, and wave mode conversion. The accuracy of the finite element simulations were evaluated by comparing the simulated ultrasonic attenuation and velocity with the experimental data. The maximum and the average relative errors between the experimental and simulated attenuation coefficients in the frequency range of 0.6-1.4 MHz were 17% and 6% respectively. Moreover, the simulations closely predicted the time-of-flight based velocities and the phase velocities of ultrasound with maximum relative errors of 20 m/s and 11 m/s respectively. The results of this study strongly suggest that micro-scale finite element modeling can effectively simulate broadband ultrasound propagation in water-saturated trabecular bone-mimicking structures.

  10. The Microscale Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipp, Arden P., Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Described are two microscale chemistry laboratory experiments including "Microscale Syntheses of Heterocyclic Compounds," and "Microscale Acid-Base Extraction--A Colorful Introduction." Materials, procedures and probable results are discussed. (CW)

  11. Micro-manufacturing of micro-scale porous surface structures for enhanced heat transfer applications: an experimental process optimization study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Integrated and compact products necessitate the use of advanced thermal management systems with reduced footprint and cost as well as increased efficiency. Micro-scale, porous and modulated (i.e. channels, pyramids, etc) surfaces offer increased surface area for a given volume and lead to two-phase heat transfer conditions with efficiency enhancements up to 300%. Such surfaces made of copper powders were demonstrated to be quite effective by several researchers after they were produced in controlled lab environments. Similar surfaces made of high temperature resistant materials such as stainless steel, nickel and titanium can also be used in fuel processor, SOFC and PEM fuel cell applications as bipolar/interconnect plates. However, their fabrication under mass-production conditions for marketable and cost-effective products requires well-established process parameters. In this study, warm compaction of copper powders onto thin copper solid substrates was experimented with under different compaction pressure (15–50 MPa), temperature (350–500 °C) and surface geometry (flat, large and small channeled) parameters using a design of experiment (DOE) approach to determine the proper process conditions. Porosity and bonding strength of compacted samples were measured to characterize their feasibility for compact and/or micro-scale heat/mass transfer applications. Results showed that a minimum 350 °C temperature and 15 MPa pressure level is necessary to obtain sound porous and micro-channeled surface layers. It was also found that at higher pressure levels (50 MPa), fabrication of micro-scale surface structures is highly repeatable with enhanced bonding strength characteristics. DOE findings will be used to establish proper process conditions to produce such porous surfaces using a continuous roll compaction process in the future

  12. Micro-manufacturing of micro-scale porous surface structures for enhanced heat transfer applications: an experimental process optimization study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cora, Ömer N.; Usta, Yusuf; Koç, Muammer

    2009-04-01

    Integrated and compact products necessitate the use of advanced thermal management systems with reduced footprint and cost as well as increased efficiency. Micro-scale, porous and modulated (i.e. channels, pyramids, etc) surfaces offer increased surface area for a given volume and lead to two-phase heat transfer conditions with efficiency enhancements up to 300%. Such surfaces made of copper powders were demonstrated to be quite effective by several researchers after they were produced in controlled lab environments. Similar surfaces made of high temperature resistant materials such as stainless steel, nickel and titanium can also be used in fuel processor, SOFC and PEM fuel cell applications as bipolar/interconnect plates. However, their fabrication under mass-production conditions for marketable and cost-effective products requires well-established process parameters. In this study, warm compaction of copper powders onto thin copper solid substrates was experimented with under different compaction pressure (15-50 MPa), temperature (350-500 °C) and surface geometry (flat, large and small channeled) parameters using a design of experiment (DOE) approach to determine the proper process conditions. Porosity and bonding strength of compacted samples were measured to characterize their feasibility for compact and/or micro-scale heat/mass transfer applications. Results showed that a minimum 350 °C temperature and 15 MPa pressure level is necessary to obtain sound porous and micro-channeled surface layers. It was also found that at higher pressure levels (50 MPa), fabrication of micro-scale surface structures is highly repeatable with enhanced bonding strength characteristics. DOE findings will be used to establish proper process conditions to produce such porous surfaces using a continuous roll compaction process in the future.

  13. Experimental verification of the feasibility of a 100 W class micro-scale gas turbine at an impeller diameter of 10 mm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isomura, Kousuke; Murayama, Motohide; Teramoto, Susumu; Hikichi, Kousuke; Endo, Yuki; Togo, Shinichi; Tanaka, Shuji

    2006-09-01

    The feasibility of a 100 W class micro-scale gas turbine with a centrifugal impeller of 10 mm diameter has been studied by experimentally verifying the four major component performance requirements found from cycle analysis. The rotor is required to rotate at 870 000 rpm to generate the compressor pressure ratio 3, and it has successfully been achieved by using hydroinertia gas bearings. A compressor efficiency higher than that required by the target cycle has been measured. After correcting the effect of the heat leakage, approximately 65% of the compressor adiabatic efficiency is estimated to be achievable. The combustor has achieved stable self-sustained combustion at a combustion efficiency higher than 99.9%. The heat conduction analysis based on measured data showed that it is possible to keep the compressor below 170 °C when the turbine inlet temperature is 1050 °C. All four requirements are proven to be achievable, and hence, the feasibility of the micro-scale gas turbine at an impeller of 10 mm diameter has successfully been proven at component level.

  14. Micro-scale experimental investigation of the effect of flow rate on trapping in sandstone and carbonate rock samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khishvand, Mahdi; Akbarabadi, Morteza; Piri, Mohammad

    2016-08-01

    We present the results of a pore-scale experimental study of residual trapping in consolidated sandstone and carbonate rock samples under confining stress. We investigate how the changes in wetting phase flow rate impacts pore-scale distribution of fluids during imbibition in natural, water-wet porous media. We systematically study pore-scale trapping of the nonwetting phase as well as size and distribution of its disconnected globules. Seven sets of drainage-imbibition experiments were performed with brine and oil as the wetting and nonwetting phases, respectively. We utilized a two-phase miniature core-flooding apparatus integrated with an X-ray microtomography system to examine pore-scale fluid distributions in small Bentheimer sandstone (D = 4.9 mm and L = 13 mm) and Gambier limestone (D = 4.4 mm and L = 75 mm) core samples. The results show that with increase in capillary number, the residual oil saturation at the end of the imbibition reduces from 0.46 to 0.20 in Bemtheimer sandstone and from 0.46 to 0.28 in Gambier limestone. We use pore-scale displacement mechanisms, in-situ wettability characteristics, and pore size distribution information to explain the observed capillary desaturation trends. The reduction was believed to be caused by alteration of the order in which pore-scale displacements took place during imbibition. Furthermore, increase in capillary number produced significantly different pore-scale fluid distributions during imbibition. We explored the pore fluid occupancies and studied size and distribution of the trapped oil clusters during different imbibition experiments. The results clearly show that as the capillary number increases, imbibition produces smaller trapped oil globules. In other words, the volume of individual trapped oil globules decreased at higher brine flow rates. Finally, we observed that the pore space in the limestone sample was considerably altered through matrix dissolution at extremely high brine flow rates. This

  15. Theoretical and experimental study of the dynamic response of absorber-based, micro-scale, oscillatory probes for contact sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafashi, Sajad; Strayhorn, Ralph; Eldredge, Jeff D.; Kelly, Scott D.; Woody, Shane C.; Smith, Stuart T.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents two models for predicting the frequency response of micro-scale oscillatory probes. These probes are manufactured by attaching a thin fiber to the free end of one tine of a quartz tuning fork oscillator. In these studies, the attached fibers were either 75 μm diameter tungsten or 7 μm diameter carbon with lengths ranging from around 1 to 15 mm. The oscillators used in these studies were commercial 32.7 kHz quartz tuning forks. The first theoretical model considers lateral vibration of two beams serially connected and provides a characteristic equation from which the roots (eigenvalues) are extracted to determine the natural frequencies of the probe. A second, lumped model approximation is used to derive an approximate frequency response function for prediction of tine displacements as a function of a modal force excitation corresponding to the first mode of the tine in the absence of a fiber. These models are used to evaluate the effect of changes in both length and diameter of the attached fibers. Theoretical values of the natural frequencies of different modes show an asymptotic relationship with the length and a linear relationship with the diameter of the attached fiber. Similar results are observed from experiment, one with a tungsten probe having an initial fiber length of 14.11 mm incrementally etched down to 0.83 mm, and another tungsten probe of length 8.16 mm incrementally etched in diameter, in both cases using chronocoulometry to determine incremental volumetric material removal. The lumped model is used to provide a frequency response again reveals poles and zeros that are consistent with experimental measurements. Finite element analysis shows mode shapes similar to experimental microscope observations of the resonating carbon probes. This model provides a means of interpreting measured responses in terms of the relative motion of the tine and attached fibers. Of particular relevance is that, when a "zero" is observed in the

  16. Automation in dairy cattle milking: experimental results and considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisanna Speroni

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of two experimental programs financed to the Istituto Sperimentale per la Zootecnia are presented. The objective of the two Italian programs was the verify if automatic milking is a suitable practice for Italian dairy system. Results are summarised and compared to those obtained in other international projects. Results refer to animal behaviour, milk yield, milk quality an animal welfare. In a trial comparing cows milked with an automatic milking system and cows milked in a milking parlour, we observed that when the temperature and humidity are very high cows reduce their activity, have lower milking frequency and milk yield than in cold seasons. In comparison to milking parlour, automatic milking system did not increase milk yield which was affected significantly by season, stage of lactation, parity, season per treatment and parity per treatment. The causes of the negative results obtained by this group and by other international groups are discussed. We also presented the results obtained in four trials thereby four appetizers or flavourings were tested to improve efficiency of automatic milking system. Comparing the two milking systems, automatic milking determined a worsening of milk quality, but from these data is not possible to exclude the possibility to use automatic milking for Grana Padano and Parmigiano Reggiano-type cheeses. Animal welfare is not negatively influenced by automatic milking system, which has the potentiality to improve the control and care of cows.

  17. Automated comparison of Bayesian reconstructions of experimental profiles with physical models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work we developed an expert system that carries out in an integrated and fully automated way i) a reconstruction of plasma profiles from the measurements, using Bayesian analysis ii) a prediction of the reconstructed quantities, according to some models and iii) an intelligent comparison of the first two steps. This system includes systematic checking of the internal consistency of the reconstructed quantities, enables automated model validation and, if a well-validated model is used, can be applied to help detecting interesting new physics in an experiment. The work shows three applications of this quite general system. The expert system can successfully detect failures in the automated plasma reconstruction and provide (on successful reconstruction cases) statistics of agreement of the models with the experimental data, i.e. information on the model validity. (author)

  18. Attempt of automated space network operations at ETS-VI experimental data relay system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Kiyoomi; Sugawara, Masayuki

    1994-01-01

    National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) is to perform experimental operations to acquire necessary technology for the future inter-satellite communications configured with a data relay satellite. This paper intends to overview functions of the experimental ground system which NASDA has developed for the Engineering Test Satellite VI (ETS-VI) Data Relay and Tracking Experiment, and to introduce Space Network System Operations Procedure (SNSOP) method with an example of Ka-band Single Access (KSA) acquisition sequence. To reduce operational load, SNSOP is developed with the concept of automated control and monitor of both ground terminal and data relay satellite. To perform acquisition and tracking operations fluently, the information exchange with user spacecraft controllers is automated by SNSOP functions.

  19. Down Microscale Way

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuer, Stephen W.

    2011-01-01

    Microscale chemistry has become accepted and introduced into teaching worldwide. It can be applied to all areas of chemistry and under most circumstances, including where the usual infrastructure is absent. Anyone considering its introduction must be prepared to do a lot of work on it to ensure its success as an educational innovation. (Contains 1…

  20. MICROSCALE CHEMISTRY IN LATIN AMERICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge G. Ibáñez

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available A brief account of the development of Microscale Chemistry in Latin America is here presented. The US National Microscale Chemistry Center (Merrimack College, Massachusetts was instrumental in the initiationof several centers. Its Mexican counterpart, the Mexican Microscale Chemistry Center (CMQM, has been a key player in this process. Other participating countries include Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Cuba,Guatemala, Perú and Uruguay.

  1. Automated detection of discourse segment and experimental types from the text of cancer pathway results sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Gully A.P.C.; Dasigi, Pradeep; de Waard, Anita; Hovy, Eduard H.

    2016-01-01

    Automated machine-reading biocuration systems typically use sentence-by-sentence information extraction to construct meaning representations for use by curators. This does not directly reflect the typical discourse structure used by scientists to construct an argument from the experimental data available within a article, and is therefore less likely to correspond to representations typically used in biomedical informatics systems (let alone to the mental models that scientists have). In this study, we develop Natural Language Processing methods to locate, extract, and classify the individual passages of text from articles’ Results sections that refer to experimental data. In our domain of interest (molecular biology studies of cancer signal transduction pathways), individual articles may contain as many as 30 small-scale individual experiments describing a variety of findings, upon which authors base their overall research conclusions. Our system automatically classifies discourse segments in these texts into seven categories (fact, hypothesis, problem, goal, method, result, implication) with an F-score of 0.68. These segments describe the essential building blocks of scientific discourse to (i) provide context for each experiment, (ii) report experimental details and (iii) explain the data’s meaning in context. We evaluate our system on text passages from articles that were curated in molecular biology databases (the Pathway Logic Datum repository, the Molecular Interaction MINT and INTACT databases) linking individual experiments in articles to the type of assay used (coprecipitation, phosphorylation, translocation etc.). We use supervised machine learning techniques on text passages containing unambiguous references to experiments to obtain baseline F1 scores of 0.59 for MINT, 0.71 for INTACT and 0.63 for Pathway Logic. Although preliminary, these results support the notion that targeting information extraction methods to experimental results could provide

  2. Automated detection of discourse segment and experimental types from the text of cancer pathway results sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Gully A P C; Dasigi, Pradeep; de Waard, Anita; Hovy, Eduard H

    2016-01-01

    Automated machine-reading biocuration systems typically use sentence-by-sentence information extraction to construct meaning representations for use by curators. This does not directly reflect the typical discourse structure used by scientists to construct an argument from the experimental data available within a article, and is therefore less likely to correspond to representations typically used in biomedical informatics systems (let alone to the mental models that scientists have). In this study, we develop Natural Language Processing methods to locate, extract, and classify the individual passages of text from articles' Results sections that refer to experimental data. In our domain of interest (molecular biology studies of cancer signal transduction pathways), individual articles may contain as many as 30 small-scale individual experiments describing a variety of findings, upon which authors base their overall research conclusions. Our system automatically classifies discourse segments in these texts into seven categories (fact, hypothesis, problem, goal, method, result, implication) with an F-score of 0.68. These segments describe the essential building blocks of scientific discourse to (i) provide context for each experiment, (ii) report experimental details and (iii) explain the data's meaning in context. We evaluate our system on text passages from articles that were curated in molecular biology databases (the Pathway Logic Datum repository, the Molecular Interaction MINT and INTACT databases) linking individual experiments in articles to the type of assay used (coprecipitation, phosphorylation, translocation etc.). We use supervised machine learning techniques on text passages containing unambiguous references to experiments to obtain baseline F1 scores of 0.59 for MINT, 0.71 for INTACT and 0.63 for Pathway Logic. Although preliminary, these results support the notion that targeting information extraction methods to experimental results could provide

  3. Automated detection of discourse segment and experimental types from the text of cancer pathway results sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Gully A P C; Dasigi, Pradeep; de Waard, Anita; Hovy, Eduard H

    2016-01-01

    Automated machine-reading biocuration systems typically use sentence-by-sentence information extraction to construct meaning representations for use by curators. This does not directly reflect the typical discourse structure used by scientists to construct an argument from the experimental data available within a article, and is therefore less likely to correspond to representations typically used in biomedical informatics systems (let alone to the mental models that scientists have). In this study, we develop Natural Language Processing methods to locate, extract, and classify the individual passages of text from articles' Results sections that refer to experimental data. In our domain of interest (molecular biology studies of cancer signal transduction pathways), individual articles may contain as many as 30 small-scale individual experiments describing a variety of findings, upon which authors base their overall research conclusions. Our system automatically classifies discourse segments in these texts into seven categories (fact, hypothesis, problem, goal, method, result, implication) with an F-score of 0.68. These segments describe the essential building blocks of scientific discourse to (i) provide context for each experiment, (ii) report experimental details and (iii) explain the data's meaning in context. We evaluate our system on text passages from articles that were curated in molecular biology databases (the Pathway Logic Datum repository, the Molecular Interaction MINT and INTACT databases) linking individual experiments in articles to the type of assay used (coprecipitation, phosphorylation, translocation etc.). We use supervised machine learning techniques on text passages containing unambiguous references to experiments to obtain baseline F1 scores of 0.59 for MINT, 0.71 for INTACT and 0.63 for Pathway Logic. Although preliminary, these results support the notion that targeting information extraction methods to experimental results could provide

  4. Influence of Cultural, Organizational, and Automation Capability on Human Automation Trust: A Case Study of Auto-GCAS Experimental Test Pilots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koltai, Kolina; Ho, Nhut; Masequesmay, Gina; Niedober, David; Skoog, Mark; Cacanindin, Artemio; Johnson, Walter; Lyons, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses a case study that examined the influence of cultural, organizational and automation capability upon human trust in, and reliance on, automation. In particular, this paper focuses on the design and application of an extended case study methodology, and on the foundational lessons revealed by it. Experimental test pilots involved in the research and development of the US Air Force's newly developed Automatic Ground Collision Avoidance System served as the context for this examination. An eclectic, multi-pronged approach was designed to conduct this case study, and proved effective in addressing the challenges associated with the case's politically sensitive and military environment. Key results indicate that the system design was in alignment with pilot culture and organizational mission, indicating the potential for appropriate trust development in operational pilots. These include the low-vulnerability/ high risk nature of the pilot profession, automation transparency and suspicion, system reputation, and the setup of and communications among organizations involved in the system development.

  5. Semi-Automated Experimental Set-Up for CAD-oriented Low Frequency Noise Modeling of Bipolar Transistors

    OpenAIRE

    Borgarino, M.; Bogoni, A; Fantini, F.; Peroni, M.; Cetronio, A.

    2004-01-01

    The present work addresses the hardware and software development of a semi-automated experimental set-up devoted to the extraction of low frequency noise compact models of bipolar transistors for microwave circuit applications (e.g. oscillators). The obtained experimental setup is applied to GaInP/GaAs Heterojunction Bipolar Transistors.

  6. Experimental saltwater intrusion in coastal aquifers using automated image analysis: Applications to homogeneous aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, G.; Ahmed, Ashraf A.; Hamill, G. A.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents the applications of a novel methodology to quantify saltwater intrusion parameters in laboratory-scale experiments. The methodology uses an automated image analysis procedure, minimising manual inputs and the subsequent systematic errors that can be introduced. This allowed the quantification of the width of the mixing zone which is difficult to measure in experimental methods that are based on visual observations. Glass beads of different grain sizes were tested for both steady-state and transient conditions. The transient results showed good correlation between experimental and numerical intrusion rates. The experimental intrusion rates revealed that the saltwater wedge reached a steady state condition sooner while receding than advancing. The hydrodynamics of the experimental mixing zone exhibited similar traits; a greater increase in the width of the mixing zone was observed in the receding saltwater wedge, which indicates faster fluid velocities and higher dispersion. The angle of intrusion analysis revealed the formation of a volume of diluted saltwater at the toe position when the saltwater wedge is prompted to recede. In addition, results of different physical repeats of the experiment produced an average coefficient of variation less than 0.18 of the measured toe length and width of the mixing zone.

  7. Microscale surface modifications for heat transfer enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostanci, Huseyin; Singh, Virendra; Kizito, John P; Rini, Daniel P; Seal, Sudipta; Chow, Louis C

    2013-10-01

    In this experimental study, two surface modification techniques were investigated for their effect on heat transfer enhancement. One of the methods employed the particle (grit) blasting to create microscale indentations, while the other used plasma spray coating to create microscale protrusions on Al 6061 (aluminum alloy 6061) samples. The test surfaces were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal scanning laser microscopy. Because of the surface modifications, the actual surface area was increased up to 2.8× compared to the projected base area, and the arithmetic mean roughness value (Ra) was determined to vary from 0.3 μm for the reference smooth surface to 19.5 μm for the modified surfaces. Selected samples with modified surfaces along with the reference smooth surface were then evaluated for their heat transfer performance in spray cooling tests. The cooling system had vapor-atomizing nozzles and used anhydrous ammonia as the coolant in order to achieve heat fluxes up to 500 W/cm(2) representing a thermal management setting for high power systems. Experimental results showed that the microscale surface modifications enhanced heat transfer coefficients up to 76% at 500 W/cm(2) compared to the smooth surface and demonstrated the benefits of these practical surface modification techniques to enhance two-phase heat transfer process.

  8. Parkinson's disease plasma biomarkers: an automated literature analysis followed by experimental validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberio, Tiziana; Bucci, Enrico M; Natale, Massimo; Bonino, Dario; Di Giovanni, Marco; Bottacchi, Edo; Fasano, Mauro

    2013-09-01

    Diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD) is currently assessed by the clinical evaluation of extrapyramidal signs. The identification of specific biomarkers would be advisable, however most studies stop at the discovery phase, with no biomarkers reaching clinical exploitation. To this purpose, we developed an automated literature analysis procedure to retrieve all the background knowledge available in public databases. The bioinformatic platform allowed us to analyze more than 51,000 scientific papers dealing with PD, containing information on 4121 proteins. Out of these, we could track back 35 PD-related proteins as present in at least two published 2-DE maps of human plasma. Then, 9 different proteins (haptoglobin, transthyretin, apolipoprotein A-1, serum amyloid P component, apolipoprotein E, complement factor H, fibrinogen γ, thrombin, complement C3) split into 32 spots were identified as a potential diagnostic pattern. Eventually, we compared the collected literature data to experimental gels from 90 subjects (45 PD patients, 45 non-neurodegenerative control subjects) to experimentally verify their potential as plasma biomarkers of PD.

  9. Nanoporous microscale microbial incubators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Zhifei; Girguis, Peter R; Buie, Cullen R

    2016-02-01

    Reconstruction of phylogenetic trees based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing reveals abundant microbial diversity that has not been cultured in the laboratory. Many attribute this so-called 'great plate count anomaly' to traditional microbial cultivation techniques, which largely facilitate the growth of a single species. Yet, it is widely recognized that bacteria in nature exist in complex communities. One technique to increase the pool of cultivated bacterial species is to co-culture multiple species in a simulated natural environment. Here, we present nanoporous microscale microbial incubators (NMMI) that enable high-throughput screening and real-time observation of multi-species co-culture. The key innovation in NMMI is that they facilitate inter-species communication while maintaining physical isolation between species, which is ideal for genomic analysis. Co-culture of a quorum sensing pair demonstrates that the NMMI can be used to culture multiple species in chemical communication while monitoring the growth dynamics of individual species. PMID:26584739

  10. Advanced automation concepts applied to Experimental Breeder Reactor-II startup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The major objective of this work is to demonstrate through simulations that advanced liquid-metal reactor plants can be operated from low power by computer control. Development of an automatic control system with this objective will help resolve specific issues and provide proof through demonstration that automatic control for plant startup is feasible. This paper presents an advanced control system design for startup of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-2 (EBR-2) located at Idaho Falls, Idaho. The design incorporates recent methods in nonlinear control with advanced diagnostics techniques such as neural networks to form an integrated architecture. The preliminary evaluations are obtained in a simulated environment by a low-order, valid nonlinear model. Within the framework of phase 1 research, the design includes an inverse dynamics controller, a fuzzy controller, and an artificial neural network controller. These three nonlinear control modules are designed to follow the EBR-2 startup trajectories in a multi-input/output regime. They are coordinated by a supervisory routine to yield a fault-tolerant, parallel operation. The control system operates in three modes: manual, semiautomatic, and fully automatic control. The simulation results of the EBR-2 startup transients proved the effectiveness of the advanced concepts. The work presented in this paper is a preliminary feasibility analysis and does not constitute a final design of an automated startup control system for EBR-2. 14 refs., 43 figs

  11. Fabrication and optimization of micro-scale speckle patterns for digital image correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental investigations are performed on the fabrication and optimization of micro-scale speckle patterns formed by spinning an epoxy resin and powder for digital image correlation measurements. New factors influencing the fabrication process, including the ambient temperature, centrifugal velocity, and solidifying time, are carefully analyzed and are evaluated in terms of the average gray gradient and particle agglomeration, and the optimal micro-scale speckle pattern is obtained with the proposed parameters in the fabrication process. Additionally, the micro-scale speckle pattern is experimentally verified by performing prescribed rigid-body translation tests, and the relative errors are approximately 1.5%. Finally, the micro-scale speckle patterns are transferred to tensile specimens of aluminum and a polymer material with a V notch. The measurement results are consistent with the theoretical predictions, and this agreement demonstrates the feasibility and accuracy of the micro-scale speckle patterns. (paper)

  12. Experimental Evaluation of an Integrated Datalink and Automation-Based Strategic Trajectory Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Eric

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents research on the interoperability of trajectory-based automation concepts and technologies with modern Flight Management Systems and datalink communication available on many of today s commercial aircraft. A tight integration of trajectory-based ground automation systems with the aircraft Flight Management System through datalink will enable mid-term and far-term benefits from trajectory-based automation methods. A two-way datalink connection between the trajectory-based automation resident in the Center/TRACON Automation System and the Future Air Navigation System-1 integrated FMS/datalink in NASA Ames B747-400 Level D simulator has been established and extensive simulation of the use of datalink messages to generate strategic trajectories completed. A strategic trajectory is defined as an aircraft deviation needed to solve a conflict or honor a route request and then merge the aircraft back to its nominal preferred trajectory using a single continuous trajectory clearance. Engineers on the ground side of the datalink generated lateral and vertical trajectory clearances and transmitted them to the Flight Management System of the 747; the airborne automation then flew the new trajectory without human intervention, requiring the flight crew only to review and to accept the trajectory. This simulation established the protocols needed for a significant majority of the trajectory change types required to solve a traffic conflict or deviate around weather. This demonstration provides a basis for understanding the requirements for integration of trajectory-based automation with current Flight Management Systems and datalink to support future National Airspace System operations.

  13. An experimental study on the environmental performance of the automated blind in summer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji-Hyun [Daewoo Institute of Construction Technology, Daewoo Engineering and Construction Co., Ltd., 60, Songjuk-dong, Jangan-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-210 (Korea); Park, Young-Joon; Yeo, Myoung-Souk; Kim, Kwang-Woo [Department of Architecture, College of Engineering, Seoul National University, San 56-1, Shillim-dong, Kwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea)

    2009-07-15

    Blinds are used widely in numerous buildings to conserve energy and provide for occupants' comfort in the perimeter zone. However, manual or motorized blinds are limited in their ability to reduce energy consumption and to provide comfort because occupants themselves must operate blinds to block direct solar radiation. Thus, the use of automated blinds would more fully exploit the full benefits of blinds. This study aims to find out whether the environmental performance of a building can be improved by the application of an automated Venetian blind in comparison to a manual or motorized Venetian blind and whether occupants may feel discomfort by the application of an automated Venetian blind in the summer season. This study also aims to find out the insufficiency of the automatic control algorithm of that automated Venetian blind for future study of the development of that algorithm. Through this study, the potential energy savings and the comfort enhancement when using the automated blind was confirmed and the insufficiency of the automatic control algorithm of that was also found out. (author)

  14. Development and Experimental Evaluation of an Automated Multi-Media Course on Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitted, J.H., Jr.; And Others

    A completely automated multi-media self-study program for teaching a portion of electronic solid-state fundamentals was developed. The subject matter areas included were fundamental theory of transistors, transistor amplifier fundamentals, and simple mathematical analysis of transistors including equivalent circuits, parameters, and characteristic…

  15. A microscale thermophoretic turbine driven by external diffusive heat flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mingcheng; Liu, Rui; Ripoll, Marisol; Chen, Ke

    2014-10-01

    We propose a theoretical prototype of a micro-scale turbine externally driven by diffusive heat flux without the need for macroscopic particle flux, which is in sharp contrast to conventional turbines. The prototypes are described analytically and validated by computer simulations. Our results indicate that a micro-scale turbine composed of anisotropic blades can rotate unidirectionally in an external temperature gradient due to the anisotropic thermophoresis effect. The rotational direction and speed depend on the temperature gradient, the geometry and the thermophoretic properties of the turbine. The proposed thermophoretic turbines can be experimentally realized and implemented on micro-devices such as computer-chips to recover waste heat or to facilitate cooling.We propose a theoretical prototype of a micro-scale turbine externally driven by diffusive heat flux without the need for macroscopic particle flux, which is in sharp contrast to conventional turbines. The prototypes are described analytically and validated by computer simulations. Our results indicate that a micro-scale turbine composed of anisotropic blades can rotate unidirectionally in an external temperature gradient due to the anisotropic thermophoresis effect. The rotational direction and speed depend on the temperature gradient, the geometry and the thermophoretic properties of the turbine. The proposed thermophoretic turbines can be experimentally realized and implemented on micro-devices such as computer-chips to recover waste heat or to facilitate cooling. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr03990d

  16. Microscale and nanoscale heat transfer fundamentals and engineering applications

    CERN Document Server

    Sobhan, CB

    2008-01-01

    Preface Introduction to Microscale Heat Transfer Microscale Heat Transfer: A Recent Avenue in Energy Transport State of the Art: Some Introductory Remarks Overview of Microscale Transport Phenomena Discussions on Size-Effect Behavior Fundamental Approach for Microscale Heat Transfer Introduction to Engineering Applications of Microscale Heat Transfer Microscale Heat Conduction Review of Conduction Heat Transfer Conduction at the Microscale Space and Timescales Fundamental Approach Thermal Conductivity Boltzmann Equation and Phonon Transport Conduction in Thin Films

  17. Microscale technologies for cell engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Gaharwar, Akhilesh

    2016-01-01

    This book offers readers cutting-edge research at the interface of polymer science and engineering, biomedical engineering, materials science, and biology. State-of-the-art developments in microscale technologies for cell engineering applications are covered, including technologies relevant to both pluripotent and adult stem cells, the immune system, and somatic cells of the animal and human origin. This book bridges the gap in the understanding of engineering biology at multiple length scale, including microenvironmental control, bioprocessing, and tissue engineering in the areas of cardiac, cartilage, skeletal, and vascular tissues, among others. This book also discusses unique, emerging areas of micropatterning and three-dimensional printing models of cellular engineering, and contributes to the better understanding of the role of biophysical factors in determining the cell fate. Microscale Technologies for Cell Engineering is valuable for bioengineers, biomaterial scientists, tissue engineers, clinicians,...

  18. Microscale Immune Studies Laboratory.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poschet, Jens Fredrich; Carroll-Portillo, Amanda; Wu, Meiye; Manginell, Ronald Paul; Herr, Amy Elizabeth; Martino, Anthony A.; Perroud, Thomas D.; Branda, Catherine; Srivastava, Nimisha; Sinclair, Michael B.; Moorman, Matthew Wallace; Apblett, Christopher Alan; Sale, Kenneth L.; James, Conrad D.; Carles, Elizabeth L.; Lidke, Diane S. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Van Benthem, Mark Hilary; Rebeil, Roberto; Kaiser, Julie; Seaman, William (University of California, San Francisco, CA); Rempe, Susan; Brozik, Susan Marie; Jones, Howland D. T.; Gemperline, Paul (East Carolina University, Greenville, NC); Throckmorton, Daniel J.; Misra, Milind; Murton, Jaclyn K.; Carson, Bryan D.; Zhang, Zhaoduo; Plimpton, Steven James; Renzi, Ronald F.; Lane, Todd W.; Ndiaye-Dulac, Elsa; Singh, Anup K.; Haaland, David Michael; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Davis, Ryan W.; Ricken, James Bryce; Branda, Steven S.; Patel, Kamlesh D.; Joo, Jaewook; Kubiak, Glenn D.; Brennan, James S.; Martin, Shawn Bryan; Brasier, Allan (University of Texas Mecial Branch, Galveston, TX)

    2009-01-01

    by E. coli and Y. pestis LPS. The chip revealed an oscillation pattern in translocation of NF-kB indicating the presence of a negative feedback loop involving IKK. Activation of NF-kB is preceded by phosphorylation of many kinases and to correlate the kinase activity with translocation, we performed flow cytometric assays in the PhosphoChip module. Phopshorylated forms of p38. ERK and RelA were measured in macrophage cells challenged with LPS and showed a dynamic response where phosphorylation increases with time reaching a maximum at {approx}30-60min. To allow further downstream analysis on selected cells, we also implemented an optical-trapping based sorting of cells. This has allowed us to sort macrophages infected with bacteria from uninfected cells with the goal of obtaining data only on the infected (the desired) population. The various microfluidic chip modules and the accessories required to operate them such as pumps, heaters, electronic control and optical detectors are being assembled in a bench-top, semi-automated device. The data generated is being utilized to refine existing TLR pathway model by adding kinetic rate constants and concentration information. The microfluidic platform allows high-resolution imaging as well as quantitative proteomic measurements with high sensitivity (

  19. Microscale Immune Studies Laboratory.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poschet, Jens Fredrich; Carroll-Portillo, Amanda; Wu, Meiye; Manginell, Ronald Paul; Herr, Amy Elizabeth; Martino, Anthony A.; Perroud, Thomas D.; Branda, Catherine; Srivastava, Nimisha; Sinclair, Michael B.; Moorman, Matthew Wallace; Apblett, Christopher Alan; Sale, Kenneth L.; James, Conrad D.; Carles, Elizabeth L.; Lidke, Diane S. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Van Benthem, Mark Hilary; Rebeil, Roberto; Kaiser, Julie; Seaman, William (University of California, San Francisco, CA); Rempe, Susan; Brozik, Susan Marie; Jones, Howland D. T.; Gemperline, Paul (East Carolina University, Greenville, NC); Throckmorton, Daniel J.; Misra, Milind; Murton, Jaclyn K.; Carson, Bryan D.; Zhang, Zhaoduo; Plimpton, Steven James; Renzi, Ronald F.; Lane, Todd W.; Ndiaye-Dulac, Elsa; Singh, Anup K.; Haaland, David Michael; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Davis, Ryan W.; Ricken, James Bryce; Branda, Steven S.; Patel, Kamlesh D.; Joo, Jaewook; Kubiak, Glenn D.; Brennan, James S.; Martin, Shawn Bryan; Brasier, Allan (University of Texas Mecial Branch, Galveston, TX)

    2009-01-01

    by E. coli and Y. pestis LPS. The chip revealed an oscillation pattern in translocation of NF-kB indicating the presence of a negative feedback loop involving IKK. Activation of NF-kB is preceded by phosphorylation of many kinases and to correlate the kinase activity with translocation, we performed flow cytometric assays in the PhosphoChip module. Phopshorylated forms of p38. ERK and RelA were measured in macrophage cells challenged with LPS and showed a dynamic response where phosphorylation increases with time reaching a maximum at {approx}30-60min. To allow further downstream analysis on selected cells, we also implemented an optical-trapping based sorting of cells. This has allowed us to sort macrophages infected with bacteria from uninfected cells with the goal of obtaining data only on the infected (the desired) population. The various microfluidic chip modules and the accessories required to operate them such as pumps, heaters, electronic control and optical detectors are being assembled in a bench-top, semi-automated device. The data generated is being utilized to refine existing TLR pathway model by adding kinetic rate constants and concentration information. The microfluidic platform allows high-resolution imaging as well as quantitative proteomic measurements with high sensitivity (

  20. Tractor beam in micro-scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzobohatý, O.; Karásek, V.; Šiler, M.; Chvátal, L.; Čižmár, T.; Zemánek, P.

    2014-12-01

    Following the Keplerian idea of radiative forces one would intuitively expect that an object illuminated by sunlight radiation or a laser beam is accelerated along the direction of the photon flow. Such radiation pressure forms the basis for the concept of solar sail, or laser acceleration of micro-particles. In contrast, a hypothetical optical field known from the realm of science-fiction as the "tractor" beam attracts the matter from large distances against the beam propagation. We present a geometry of such"tractor" beam in micro-scale and experimentally demonstrate how it acts upon spherical micro-particles of various sizes or optically self-arranged structures of micro-particles.

  1. The control and automation of a complex experimental plant: The Sesta test facility; L`automazione di un impiuanto sperimentale complesso: La stazione di Sesta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maini, Michele; Prandoni, Walter [ENEL Spa, Cologno Monzese (Italy). Polo Elettrico e Automazione. Unita` Robotica

    1997-05-01

    The running of complex experimental plants in the field of energetic sources involves a strong component of automation. Since they are unique and innovative plants there are not well defined ways to run them. So it is necessary to design the automation each time and then to select the proper resources for the implementation. The plant for the testing of gas turbine components of Sesta is an important example of this type of approach.

  2. Modeling microscale heat transfer using Calore.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallis, Michail A.; Rader, Daniel John; Wong, Chung-Nin Channy; Bainbridge, Bruce L.; Torczynski, John Robert; Piekos, Edward Stanley

    2005-09-01

    Modeling microscale heat transfer with the computational-heat-transfer code Calore is discussed. Microscale heat transfer problems differ from their macroscopic counterparts in that conductive heat transfer in both solid and gaseous materials may have important noncontinuum effects. In a solid material, three noncontinuum effects are considered: ballistic transport of phonons across a thin film, scattering of phonons from surface roughness at a gas-solid interface, and scattering of phonons from grain boundaries within the solid material. These processes are modeled for polycrystalline silicon, and the thermal-conductivity values predicted by these models are compared to experimental data. In a gaseous material, two noncontinuum effects are considered: ballistic transport of gas molecules across a thin gap and accommodation of gas molecules to solid conditions when reflecting from a solid surface. These processes are modeled for arbitrary gases by allowing the gas and solid temperatures across a gas-solid interface to differ: a finite heat transfer coefficient (contact conductance) is imposed at the gas-solid interface so that the temperature difference is proportional to the normal heat flux. In this approach, the behavior of gas in the bulk is not changed from behavior observed under macroscopic conditions. These models are implemented in Calore as user subroutines. The user subroutines reside within Sandia's Source Forge server, where they undergo version control and regression testing and are available to analysts needing these capabilities. A Calore simulation is presented that exercises these models for a heated microbeam separated from an ambient-temperature substrate by a thin gas-filled gap. Failure to use the noncontinuum heat transfer models for the solid and the gas causes the maximum temperature of the microbeam to be significantly underpredicted.

  3. Design and scaling of microscale Tesla turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the scaling properties and loss mechanisms of Tesla turbines and provide design recommendations for scaling such turbines to the millimeter scale. Specifically, we provide design, fabrication and experimental data for a low-pressure head hydro Tesla micro-turbine. We derive the analytical turbine performance for incompressible flow and then develop a more detailed model that predicts experimental performance by including a variety of loss mechanisms. We report the correlation between them and the experimental results. Turbines with 1 cm rotors, 36% peak efficiency (at 2 cm3 s−1 flow) and 45 mW unloaded peak power (at 12 cm3 s−1 flow) are demonstrated. We analyze the causes for head loss and shaft power loss and derive constraints on turbine design. We then analyze the effect of scaling down on turbine efficiency, power density and rotor revolutions/min. Based on the analysis, we make recommendations for the design of ∼1 mm microscale Tesla turbines. (paper)

  4. Design and scaling of microscale Tesla turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Vedavalli G.; Romanin, Vince; Carey, Van P.; Maharbiz, Michel M.

    2013-12-01

    We report on the scaling properties and loss mechanisms of Tesla turbines and provide design recommendations for scaling such turbines to the millimeter scale. Specifically, we provide design, fabrication and experimental data for a low-pressure head hydro Tesla micro-turbine. We derive the analytical turbine performance for incompressible flow and then develop a more detailed model that predicts experimental performance by including a variety of loss mechanisms. We report the correlation between them and the experimental results. Turbines with 1 cm rotors, 36% peak efficiency (at 2 cm3 s-1 flow) and 45 mW unloaded peak power (at 12 cm3 s-1 flow) are demonstrated. We analyze the causes for head loss and shaft power loss and derive constraints on turbine design. We then analyze the effect of scaling down on turbine efficiency, power density and rotor revolutions/min. Based on the analysis, we make recommendations for the design of ˜1 mm microscale Tesla turbines.

  5. 微型分析化学实验教学与“两型社会”观教育%Microscale Analytical Chemistry Experimental Teaching and Education on Concept of "Two-oriented Society"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭亮; 杨素芳; 马铭; 唐浩; 郭宾

    2012-01-01

    The construction of a resource-conserving and environment-friendly society is the only way to realize the sustainable development of society and economy, which requires the concern and efforts of the whole society. Microscale analytical chemistry experiment has become one of trends of teaching reform in analytical chemistry experiments. It is also an important method and content for actualization of "quality-education and creativity-education idea" in chemistry education. This paper defines the significance of the construction of " two-oriented society" and positive roles of microscale analytical chemistry experiment. Some practices in the teaching process of microscale analytical chemistry experiment are displayed. It is expected that the work related will increase the comprehensive ability of students and induce them to make due contributions for the construction of "two-oriented society".%建设资源节约型和环境友好型社会是实现社会经济可持续发展的必由之路,需要全社会的参与.微型分析化学实验是分析化学实验教学改革的趋势之一,也是在化学专业教学中实施创新教育和素质教育的重要途径和内容之一.论文阐明了“两型社会”建设的重要意义、微型分析化学实验的积极作用以及开展微型分析化学实验教学的一些做法.相关工作有助于提高学生的综合素质,为“两型社会”建设做出应有的贡献.

  6. pynoddy 1.0: an experimental platform for automated 3-D kinematic and potential field modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. Wellmann

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel methodology for performing experiments with subsurface structural models using a set of flexible and extensible Python modules. We utilise the ability of kinematic modelling techniques to describe major deformational, tectonic, and magmatic events at low computational cost to develop experiments testing the interactions between multiple kinematic events, effect of uncertainty regarding event timing, and kinematic properties. These tests are simple to implement and perform, as they are automated within the Python scripting language, allowing the encapsulation of entire kinematic experiments within high-level class definitions and fully reproducible results. In addition, we provide a~link to geophysical potential-field simulations to evaluate the effect of parameter uncertainties on maps of gravity and magnetics. We provide relevant fundamental information on kinematic modelling and our implementation, and showcase the application of our novel methods to investigate the interaction of multiple tectonic events on a pre-defined stratigraphy, the effect of changing kinematic parameters on simulated geophysical potential-fields, and the distribution of uncertain areas in a full 3-D kinematic model, based on estimated uncertainties in kinematic input parameters. Additional possibilities for linking kinematic modelling to subsequent process simulations are discussed, as well as additional aspects of future research. Our modules are freely available on github, including documentation and tutorial examples, and we encourage the contribution to this project.

  7. pynoddy 1.0: an experimental platform for automated 3-D kinematic and potential field modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florian Wellmann, J.; Thiele, Sam T.; Lindsay, Mark D.; Jessell, Mark W.

    2016-03-01

    We present a novel methodology for performing experiments with subsurface structural models using a set of flexible and extensible Python modules. We utilize the ability of kinematic modelling techniques to describe major deformational, tectonic, and magmatic events at low computational cost to develop experiments testing the interactions between multiple kinematic events, effect of uncertainty regarding event timing, and kinematic properties. These tests are simple to implement and perform, as they are automated within the Python scripting language, allowing the encapsulation of entire kinematic experiments within high-level class definitions and fully reproducible results. In addition, we provide a link to geophysical potential-field simulations to evaluate the effect of parameter uncertainties on maps of gravity and magnetics. We provide relevant fundamental information on kinematic modelling and our implementation, and showcase the application of our novel methods to investigate the interaction of multiple tectonic events on a pre-defined stratigraphy, the effect of changing kinematic parameters on simulated geophysical potential fields, and the distribution of uncertain areas in a full 3-D kinematic model, based on estimated uncertainties in kinematic input parameters. Additional possibilities for linking kinematic modelling to subsequent process simulations are discussed, as well as additional aspects of future research. Our modules are freely available on github, including documentation and tutorial examples, and we encourage the contribution to this project.

  8. Turbulence in a microscale planar confined impinging-jets reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Olsen, Michael G; Fox, Rodney O

    2009-04-21

    Confined impinging-jets reactors (CIJR) offer many advantages for rapid chemical processing at the microscale in applications such as precipitation and the production of organic nanoparticles. It has been demonstrated that computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is a promising tool for "experiment-free" design and scale-up of such reactors. However, validation of the CFD model used for the microscale turbulence applications requires detailed experimental data on the unsteady flow, the availability of which has until now been very limited. In this work, microscopic particle-image velocimetry (microPIV) techniques were employed to measure the instantaneous velocity field for various Reynolds numbers in a planar CIJR. In order to illustrate the validation procedure, the performance of a particular CFD model, the two-layer k-epsilon model, was evaluated by comparing the predicted flow field with the experimental data. To our knowledge, this study represents the first attempt to directly measure and quantify velocity and turbulence in a microreactor and to use the results to validate a CFD model for microscale turbulent flows. PMID:19350093

  9. Laboratory Experiments on Electrochemical Remediation of the Environment Part 3: Microscale Electrokinetic Processing of Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibanez, Jorge G.; Singh, Mono M.; Pike, Ronald M.; Szafran, Zvi

    1998-05-01

    Electrochemical remediation of the environment is gaining widespread acceptance due to the mild conditions used, the cleanliness of the electron as a reagent, the easiness for automation, its versatility, etc. In this paper three phenomena are presented at the microscale level, originating from the application of an electric field to a simulated soil sample: a) Demonstration of metal ion migration, b) Demonstration of the creation and movement of an acidic and a basic front, and c) Demonstration of water movement through soil.

  10. Microscale chemistry technology exchange at Argonne National Laboratory - east.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pausma, R.

    1998-06-04

    The Division of Educational Programs (DEP) at Argonne National Laboratory-East interacts with the education community at all levels to improve science and mathematics education and to provide resources to instructors of science and mathematics. DEP conducts a wide range of educational programs and has established an enormous audience of teachers, both in the Chicago area and nationally. DEP has brought microscale chemistry to the attention of this huge audience. This effort has been supported by the U.S. Department of Energy through the Environmental Management Operations organization within Argonne. Microscale chemistry is a teaching methodology wherein laboratory chemistry training is provided to students while utilizing very small amounts of reagents and correspondingly small apparatus. The techniques enable a school to reduce significantly the cost of reagents, the cost of waste disposal and the dangers associated with the manipulation of chemicals. The cost reductions are achieved while still providing the students with the hands-on laboratory experience that is vital to students who might choose to pursue careers in the sciences. Many universities and colleges have already begun to switch from macroscale to microscale chemistry in their educational laboratories. The introduction of these techniques at the secondary education level will lead to freshman being better prepared for the type of experimentation that they will encounter in college.

  11. A computer-based automated algorithm for assessing acinar cell loss after experimental pancreatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F Eisses

    Full Text Available The change in exocrine mass is an important parameter to follow in experimental models of pancreatic injury and regeneration. However, at present, the quantitative assessment of exocrine content by histology is tedious and operator-dependent, requiring manual assessment of acinar area on serial pancreatic sections. In this study, we utilized a novel computer-generated learning algorithm to construct an accurate and rapid method of quantifying acinar content. The algorithm works by learning differences in pixel characteristics from input examples provided by human experts. HE-stained pancreatic sections were obtained in mice recovering from a 2-day, hourly caerulein hyperstimulation model of experimental pancreatitis. For training data, a pathologist carefully outlined discrete regions of acinar and non-acinar tissue in 21 sections at various stages of pancreatic injury and recovery (termed the "ground truth". After the expert defined the ground truth, the computer was able to develop a prediction rule that was then applied to a unique set of high-resolution images in order to validate the process. For baseline, non-injured pancreatic sections, the software demonstrated close agreement with the ground truth in identifying baseline acinar tissue area with only a difference of 1% ± 0.05% (p = 0.21. Within regions of injured tissue, the software reported a difference of 2.5% ± 0.04% in acinar area compared with the pathologist (p = 0.47. Surprisingly, on detailed morphological examination, the discrepancy was primarily because the software outlined acini and excluded inter-acinar and luminal white space with greater precision. The findings suggest that the software will be of great potential benefit to both clinicians and researchers in quantifying pancreatic acinar cell flux in the injured and recovering pancreas.

  12. Trust in automation. Part II. Experimental studies of trust and human intervention in a process control simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, B M; Moray, N

    1996-03-01

    Two experiments are reported which examined operators' trust in and use of the automation in a simulated supervisory process control task. Tests of the integrated model of human trust in machines proposed by Muir (1994) showed that models of interpersonal trust capture some important aspects of the nature and dynamics of human-machine trust. Results showed that operators' subjective ratings of trust in the automation were based mainly upon their perception of its competence. Trust was significantly reduced by any sign of incompetence in the automation, even one which had no effect on overall system performance. Operators' trust changed very little with experience, with a few notable exceptions. Distrust in one function of an automatic component spread to reduce trust in another function of the same component, but did not generalize to another independent automatic component in the same system, or to other systems. There was high positive correlation between operators' trust in and use of the automation; operators used automation they trusted and rejected automation they distrusted, preferring to do the control task manually. There was an inverse relationship between trust and monitoring of the automation. These results suggest that operators' subjective ratings of trust and the properties of the automation which determine their trust, can be used to predict and optimize the dynamic allocation of functions in automated systems. PMID:8849495

  13. Automated system for monitoring groundwater levels at an experimental low-level waste disposal site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the major problems with disposing of low-level solid wastes in the eastern United States is the potential for water-waste interactions and leachate migration. To monitor groundwater fluctuations and the frequency with which groundwater comes into contact with a group of experimental trenches, work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Engineered Test Facility (ETF) has employed a network of water level recorders that feed information from 15 on-site wells to a centralized data recording system. The purpose of this report is to describe the monitoring system being used and to document the computer programs that have been developed to process the data. Included in this report are data based on more than 2 years of water level information for ETF wells 1 through 12 and more than 6 months of data from all 15 wells. The data thus reflect both long-term trends as well as a large number of short-term responses to individual storm events. The system was designed to meet the specific needs of the ETF, but the hardware and computer routines have generic application to a variety of groundwater monitoring situations. 5 references

  14. Microscale Gas-Surface Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trott, W. M.; Rader, D. J.; Gallis, M. A.; Torczynski, J. R.

    2004-11-01

    In gas-filled microsystems, noncontinuum phenomena such as velocity slip and temperature jump become increasingly important as devices become smaller or packaging pressures are reduced. These phenomena are governed by the interaction of gas molecules with the adjacent solid surfaces. Experiments are performed to quantify the interaction of common gases (e.g., nitrogen, argon, helium) with solids of interest for microsystems (e.g., stainless steel, aluminum, gold, silicon dioxide, silicon). The gas is confined between two parallel plates at unequal temperatures, and the gas-phase heat flux is inferred from temperature measurements (radiation is accounted for). For comparison purposes, heat-flux values are also inferred from electron-beam-fluorescence measurements of the gas-phase density gradient. Heat-flux values at several pressures allow the accommodation coefficient to be determined. As well as being useful in its own right, this type of information enables molecular gas dynamics simulations of microscale gas flow using Bird's Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  15. Optimization of ultra-high-performance concrete with nano- and micro-scale reinforcement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libya Ahmed Sbia

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Ultra-high-performance concrete (UHPC incorporates a relatively large volume fraction of very dense cementitious binder with microscale fibers. The dense binder in UHPC can effectively interact with nano- and microscale reinforcement, which offers the promise to overcome the brittleness of UHPC. Nanoscale reinforcement can act synergistically with microscale fibers by providing reinforcing action of a finer scale, and also by improving the bond and pullout behavior of microscale fibers. Carbon nanofiber (CNF and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA fiber were used as nano- and microscale reinforcement, respectively, in UHPC. An optimization experimental program was conducted in order to identify the optimum dosages of CNF and PVA fiber for realizing balanced gains in flexural strength, energy absorption capacity, ductility, impact resistance, abrasion resistance, and compressive strength of UHPC without compromising the fresh mix workability. Experimental results indicated that significant and balanced gains in the UHPC performance characteristics could be realized when a relatively low volume fraction of CNF (0.047 vol.% of concrete is used in combination with a moderate volume fraction of PVA fibers (0.37 vol.% of concrete.

  16. Instrumentation of Microscale Techniques for Biochemistry Teaching at FES Zaragoza, UNAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araceli García-del Valle

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Biochemistry teaching requires many laboratory sessions where theoretical knowledge may be put on test. At the same time, there is always some risk due to exposure to toxic materials, dangerous chemicals storage and waste disposal. Compliance with new regulations to prevent environmental contamination may also constitute a real hindrance for biochemistry teaching as experimental science. Therefore, we have designed microscale techniques, in order to reduce costs as well as the negative impact of laboratory practical sessions due to risk and environmental contamination. To develop microscale techniques does not only mean to reduce equipment size and amount of the reagents that are required for the usual experiments. Microscale techniques serve particularly well as a motivating approach to experimental biochemistry teaching that produces highly motivated students at the same time that requires minor costs, decreases working time, laboratory space, reagents volume and diminishes the generation of dangerous waste. We have demonstrated all these positive effects in biochemistry teaching and prompted the formal implementation of microscale techniques into the formal activities from the Cell and Tissue Biochemistry Laboratory I (BCT-I from the Chemistry, Pharmacy and Biology (QFB curricula at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM. First, we reviewed the BCT-I manual, choosing all the laboratory practices that might be microscaled. Then, we elaborated and validated all necessary protocols to analyse linearity, accuracy and reproducibility of the determinations, demonstrating that microscale techniques allow truthful results, comparable to full scale techniques.

  17. Towards microscale electrohydrodynamic three-dimensional printing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is challenging for the existing three-dimensional (3D) printing techniques to fabricate high-resolution 3D microstructures with low costs and high efficiency. In this work we present a solvent-based electrohydrodynamic 3D printing technique that allows fabrication of microscale structures like single walls, crossed walls, lattice and concentric circles. Process parameters were optimized to deposit tiny 3D patterns with a wall width smaller than 10 μm and a high aspect ratio of about 60. Tight bonding among neighbour layers could be achieved with a smooth lateral surface. In comparison with the existing microscale 3D printing techniques, the presented method is low-cost, highly efficient and applicable to multiple polymers. It is envisioned that this simple microscale 3D printing strategy might provide an alternative and innovative way for application in MEMS, biosensor and flexible electronics. (paper)

  18. Scaling law for direct current field emission-driven microscale gas breakdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of field emission on direct current breakdown in microscale gaps filled with an ambient neutral gas are studied numerically and analytically. Fundamental numerical experiments using the particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo collisions method are used to systematically quantify microscale ionization and space-charge enhancement of field emission. The numerical experiments are then used to validate a scaling law for the modified Paschen curve that bridges field emission-driven breakdown with the macroscale Paschen law. Analytical expressions are derived for the increase in cathode electric field, total steady state current density, and the ion-enhancement coefficient including a new breakdown criterion. It also includes the effect of all key parameters such as pressure, operating gas, and field-enhancement factor providing a better predictive capability than existing microscale breakdown models. The field-enhancement factor is shown to be the most sensitive parameter with its increase leading to a significant drop in the threshold breakdown electric field and also to a gradual merging with the Paschen law. The proposed scaling law is also shown to agree well with two independent sets of experimental data for microscale breakdown in air. The ability to accurately describe not just the breakdown voltage but the entire pre-breakdown process for given operating conditions makes the proposed model a suitable candidate for the design and analysis of electrostatic microscale devices.

  19. Characterizing the effects of scale and heating rate on micro-scale explosive ignition criteria.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hafenrichter, Everett Shingo; Pahl, Robert J.

    2005-01-01

    Laser diode ignition experiments were conducted in an effort to characterize the effects of scale and heating rate on micro-scale explosive ignition criteria. Over forty experiments were conducted with various laser power densities and laser spot sizes. In addition, relatively simple analytical and numerical calculations were performed to assist with interpretation of the experimental data and characterization of the explosive ignition criteria.

  20. Use of information-retrieval languages in automated retrieval of experimental data from long-term storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khovanskiy, Y. D.; Kremneva, N. I.

    1975-01-01

    Problems and methods are discussed of automating information retrieval operations in a data bank used for long term storage and retrieval of data from scientific experiments. Existing information retrieval languages are analyzed along with those being developed. The results of studies discussing the application of the descriptive 'Kristall' language used in the 'ASIOR' automated information retrieval system are presented. The development and use of a specialized language of the classification-descriptive type, using universal decimal classification indices as the main descriptors, is described.

  1. Microscale immunosensors for biological agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bange, Adam; Wong, Danny K. Y.; Seliskar, Carl J.; Halsall, H. B.; Heineman, William R.

    2005-01-01

    Microbead immunoassay with electrochemical detection has been developed as a sensitive and selective technique for rapid and small volume analyses. In this assay, applications of paramagnetic microbeads in a microfluidic system have aided the automation of all assay steps to enable near-continuous monitoring. These mobile microbeads can be transported through microchannels, captured and held at specific points by a magnet. Hence, by performing immunoassay on microbeads, they can be dispersed throughout a small sample of water, where they provide a large surface area to sample volume ratio that enhances the capture of the target antigen by minimizing diffusional distances. They can then be collected magnetically and manipulated to accomplish all the assay steps to determine if any target was captured. In addition, the microbeads can be accommodated in small volumes, which reduces the dilution of the enzyme product in the detection step thus maximizing sensitivity. Further, electrochemical detection coupled with enzyme-labeled immunoassay has led to the development of a sensitive analytical technique. In this area, interdigitated array electrodes are particularly suited to microfluidics. Improved sensitivity is obtained by redox cycling of the species being detected. In this work, the microbead immunoassays is demonstrated for the virus MS2 bacteriophage.

  2. Simulation of the PEM fuel cell hybrid power train of an automated guided vehicle and comparison with experimental results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenhuizen, Bram; Bosma, J.C.N.

    2009-01-01

    At HAN University research has been started into the development of a PEM fuel cell hybrid power train to be used in an automated guided vehicle. For this purpose a test facility is used with the possibility to test all important functional aspects of a PEM fuel cell hybrid power train. In this pape

  3. Comparison of cell counting methods in rodent pulmonary toxicity studies: automated and manual protocols and considerations for experimental design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeidler-Erdely, Patti C; Antonini, James M; Meighan, Terence G; Young, Shih-Houng; Eye, Tracy J; Hammer, Mary Ann; Erdely, Aaron

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary toxicity studies often use bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) to investigate potential adverse lung responses to a particulate exposure. The BAL cellular fraction is counted, using automated (i.e. Coulter Counter®), flow cytometry or manual (i.e. hemocytometer) methods, to determine inflammatory cell influx. The goal of the study was to compare the different counting methods to determine which is optimal for examining BAL cell influx after exposure by inhalation or intratracheal instillation (ITI) to different particles with varying inherent pulmonary toxicities in both rat and mouse models. General findings indicate that total BAL cell counts using the automated and manual methods tended to agree after inhalation or ITI exposure to particle samples that are relatively nontoxic or at later time points after exposure to a pneumotoxic particle when the response resolves. However, when the initial lung inflammation and cytotoxicity was high after exposure to a pneumotoxic particle, significant differences were observed when comparing cell counts from the automated, flow cytometry and manual methods. When using total BAL cell count for differential calculations from the automated method, depending on the cell diameter size range cutoff, the data suggest that the number of lung polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) varies. Importantly, the automated counts, regardless of the size cutoff, still indicated a greater number of total lung PMN when compared with the manual method, which agreed more closely with flow cytometry. The results suggest that either the manual method or flow cytometry would be better suited for BAL studies where cytotoxicity is an unknown variable. PMID:27251196

  4. Analysis of 3-panel and 4-panel microscale ionization sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two designs of a microscale electron ionization (EI) source are analyzed herein: a 3-panel design and a 4-panel design. Devices were fabricated using microelectromechanical systems technology. Field emission from carbon nanotube provided the electrons for the EI source. Ion currents were measured for helium, nitrogen, and xenon at pressures ranging from 10-4 to 0.1 Torr. A comparison of the performance of both designs is presented. The 4-panel microion source showed a 10x improvement in performance compared to the 3-panel device. An analysis of the various factors affecting the performance of the microion sources is also presented. SIMION, an electron and ion optics software, was coupled with experimental measurements to analyze the ion current results. The electron current contributing to ionization and the ion collection efficiency are believed to be the primary factors responsible for the higher efficiency of the 4-panel microion source. Other improvements in device design that could lead to higher ion source efficiency in the future are also discussed. These microscale ion sources are expected to find application as stand alone ion sources as well as in miniature mass spectrometers.

  5. Numerical and experimental analysis of a ducted propeller designed by a fully automated optimization process under open water condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Long; Druckenbrod, Markus; Greve, Martin; Wang, Ke-qi; Abdel-Maksoud, Moustafa

    2015-10-01

    A fully automated optimization process is provided for the design of ducted propellers under open water conditions, including 3D geometry modeling, meshing, optimization algorithm and CFD analysis techniques. The developed process allows the direct integration of a RANSE solver in the design stage. A practical ducted propeller design case study is carried out for validation. Numerical simulations and open water tests are fulfilled and proved that the optimum ducted propeller improves hydrodynamic performance as predicted.

  6. Deformation and shape of flexible, microscale helices in viscous flow

    CERN Document Server

    Pham, Jonathan T; Crosby, Alfred J; Lindner, Anke; Roure, Olivia du

    2015-01-01

    We examine experimentally the deformation of flexible, microscale helical ribbons with nanoscale thickness subject to viscous flow in a microfluidic channel. Two aspects of flexible microhelices are quantified: the overall shape of the helix and the viscous frictional properties. The frictional coefficients determined by our experiments are consistent with calculated values in the context of resistive force theory. Deformation of helices by viscous flow is well-described by non-linear finite extensibility. Under distributed loading, the pitch distribution is non-uniform and from this, we identify both linear and non-linear behavior along the contour length of a single helix. Moreover, flexible helices are found to display reversible global to local helical transitions at high flow rate.

  7. Micro-scale mechanics of the surface-nanocrystalline Al-alloy material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Yueguang; ZHU Chen; WU Xiaolei

    2004-01-01

    Based on the microscopic observations and measurements, the mechanical behavior of the surface-nanocrystallized Al-alloy material at microscale is investigated experimentally and theoretically. In the experimental research, the compressive stress-strain curves and the hardness depth curves are measured. In the theoretical simulation, based on the material microstructure characteristics and the experimental features of the compression and indentation, the microstructure cell models are developed and the strain gradient plasticity theory is adopted. The material compressive stress-strain curves and the hardness depth curves are predicted and simulated. Through comparison of the experimental results with the simulation results, the material and model parameters are determined.

  8. Spectral Imaging at the Microscale and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Paquet-Mercier

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Here we give context to the special issue “Spectral Imaging at the Microscale and Beyond” in Sensors. We start with an introduction and motivation for the need for spectral imaging and then present important definitions and background concepts. Following this, we review new developments and applications in environmental monitoring, biomaterials, microfluidics, nanomaterials, healthcare, agriculture and food science, with a special focus on the articles published in the special issue. Some concluding remarks put the presented developments in context vis-à-vis the future of spectral imaging.

  9. Microscale autonomous sensor and communications module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okandan, Murat; Nielson, Gregory N

    2014-03-25

    Various technologies pertaining to a microscale autonomous sensor and communications module are described herein. Such a module includes a sensor that generates a sensor signal that is indicative of an environmental parameter. An integrated circuit receives the sensor signal and generates an output signal based at least in part upon the sensor signal. An optical emitter receives the output signal and generates an optical signal as a function of the output signal. An energy storage device is configured to provide power to at least the integrated circuit and the optical emitter, and wherein the module has a relatively small diameter and thickness.

  10. Nanoscale and microscale phenomena fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Khandekar, Sameer

    2015-01-01

    The book is an outcome of research work in the areas of nanotechnology, interfacial science, nano- and micro-fluidics and manufacturing, soft matter, and transport phenomena at nano- and micro-scales. The contributing authors represent prominent research groups from Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur and Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore. The book has 13 chapters and the entire work presented in the chapters is based on research carried out over past three years. The chapters are designed with number of coloured illustrations, figures and tables. The book will be highly beneficial to academicians as well as industrial professionals working in the mentioned areas.

  11. Bacterial Societies: Cooperation, Colonization, and Competition in Micro-Scale Ecosystems

    OpenAIRE

    Hol, F.J.H.

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis, I describe experiments aimed at understanding bacterial population dynamics in ecosystems that are spatially structured at the micro-scale. We combine microfabrication and microfluidics to create synthetic ecosystems that have a complex yet well-defined geometry and chemical composition. Bacteria that inhabit such ecosystems can be observed at high spatiotemporal resolution using fluorescence microscopy. Using this experimental approach we have gained deeper insight into diver...

  12. Microbial metabolomics in open microscale platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkal, Layla J.; Theberge, Ashleigh B.; Guo, Chun-Jun; Spraker, Joe; Rappert, Lucas; Berthier, Jean; Brakke, Kenneth A.; Wang, Clay C. C.; Beebe, David J.; Keller, Nancy P.; Berthier, Erwin

    2016-01-01

    The microbial secondary metabolome encompasses great synthetic diversity, empowering microbes to tune their chemical responses to changing microenvironments. Traditional metabolomics methods are ill-equipped to probe a wide variety of environments or environmental dynamics. Here we introduce a class of microscale culture platforms to analyse chemical diversity of fungal and bacterial secondary metabolomes. By leveraging stable biphasic interfaces to integrate microculture with small molecule isolation via liquid–liquid extraction, we enable metabolomics-scale analysis using mass spectrometry. This platform facilitates exploration of culture microenvironments (including rare media typically inaccessible using established methods), unusual organic solvents for metabolite isolation and microbial mutants. Utilizing Aspergillus, a fungal genus known for its rich secondary metabolism, we characterize the effects of culture geometry and growth matrix on secondary metabolism, highlighting the potential use of microscale systems to unlock unknown or cryptic secondary metabolites for natural products discovery. Finally, we demonstrate the potential for this class of microfluidic systems to study interkingdom communication between fungi and bacteria. PMID:26842393

  13. Microbial metabolomics in open microscale platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkal, Layla J; Theberge, Ashleigh B; Guo, Chun-Jun; Spraker, Joe; Rappert, Lucas; Berthier, Jean; Brakke, Kenneth A; Wang, Clay C C; Beebe, David J; Keller, Nancy P; Berthier, Erwin

    2016-01-01

    The microbial secondary metabolome encompasses great synthetic diversity, empowering microbes to tune their chemical responses to changing microenvironments. Traditional metabolomics methods are ill-equipped to probe a wide variety of environments or environmental dynamics. Here we introduce a class of microscale culture platforms to analyse chemical diversity of fungal and bacterial secondary metabolomes. By leveraging stable biphasic interfaces to integrate microculture with small molecule isolation via liquid-liquid extraction, we enable metabolomics-scale analysis using mass spectrometry. This platform facilitates exploration of culture microenvironments (including rare media typically inaccessible using established methods), unusual organic solvents for metabolite isolation and microbial mutants. Utilizing Aspergillus, a fungal genus known for its rich secondary metabolism, we characterize the effects of culture geometry and growth matrix on secondary metabolism, highlighting the potential use of microscale systems to unlock unknown or cryptic secondary metabolites for natural products discovery. Finally, we demonstrate the potential for this class of microfluidic systems to study interkingdom communication between fungi and bacteria. PMID:26842393

  14. Home Automation

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Zeeshan

    2010-01-01

    In this paper I briefly discuss the importance of home automation system. Going in to the details I briefly present a real time designed and implemented software and hardware oriented house automation research project, capable of automating house's electricity and providing a security system to detect the presence of unexpected behavior.

  15. Automated valve condition classification of a reciprocating compressor with seeded faults: experimentation and validation of classification strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yih-Hwang; Liu, Huai-Sheng; Wu, Chung-Yung

    2009-09-01

    This paper deals with automatic valve condition classification of a reciprocating processor with seeded faults. The seeded faults are considered based on observation of valve faults in practice. They include the misplacement of valve and spring plates, incorrect tightness of the bolts for valve cover or valve seat, softening of the spring plate, and cracked or broken spring plate or valve plate. The seeded faults represent various stages of machine health condition and it is crucial to be able to correctly classify the conditions so that preventative maintenance can be performed before catastrophic breakdown of the compressor occurs. Considering the non-stationary characteristics of the system, time-frequency analysis techniques are applied to obtain the vibration spectrum as time develops. A data reduction algorithm is subsequently employed to extract the fault features from the formidable amount of time-frequency data and finally the probabilistic neural network is utilized to automate the classification process without the intervention of human experts. This study shows that the use of modification indices, as opposed to the original indices, greatly reduces the classification error, from about 80% down to about 20% misclassification for the 15 fault cases. Correct condition classification can be further enhanced if the use of similar fault cases is avoided. It is shown that 6.67% classification error is achievable when using the short-time Fourier transform and the mean variation method for the case of seven seeded faults with 10 training samples used. A stunning 100% correct classification can even be realized when the neural network is well trained with 30 training samples being used.

  16. High temperature experimental characterization of microscale thermoelectric effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favaloro, Tela

    Thermoelectric devices have been employed for many years as a reliable energy conversion technology for applications ranging from the cooling of sensors or charge coupled devices to the direct conversion of heat into electricity for remote power generation. However, its relatively low conversion efficiency has limited the implementation of thermoelectric materials for large scale cooling and waste heat recovery applications. Recent advances in semiconductor growth technology have enabled the precise and selective engineering of material properties to improve the thermoelectric figure of merit and thus the efficiency of thermoelectric devices. Accurate characterization at the intended operational temperature of novel thermoelectric materials is a crucial component of the optimization process in order to fundamentally understand material behavior and evaluate performance. The objective of this work is to provide the tools necessary to characterize high efficiency bulk and thin-film materials for thermoelectric energy conversion. The techniques developed here are not bound to specific material or devices, but can be generalized to any material system. Thermoreflectance imaging microscopy has proven to be invaluable for device thermometry owing to its high spatial and temporal resolutions. It has been utilized in this work to create two-dimensional temperature profiles of thermoelectric devices during operation used for performance analysis of novel materials, identification of defects, and visualization of high speed transients in a high-temperature imaging thermostat. We report the development of a high temperature imaging thermostat capable of high speed transient thermoelectric characterization. In addition, we present a noninvasive method for thermoreflectance coefficient calibration ideally suited for vacuum and thus high temperature employment. This is the first analysis of the thermoreflectance coefficient of commonly used metals at high-temperatures. High temperature vacuum thermostats are designed and fabricated with optical imaging capability and interchangeable measurement stages for various electrical and thermoelectric characterizations. We demonstrate the simultaneous measurement of in-plane electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient of thin-film or bulk thermoelectric materials. Furthermore, we utilize high-speed circuitry to implement the transient Harman technique and directly determine the cross-plane figure of merit of thin film thermoelectric materials at high temperatures. Transient measurements on thin film devices are subject to complications from the growth substrate, non-ideal contacts and other detrimental thermal and electrical effects. A strategy is presented for optimizing device geometry to mitigate the impact of these parasitics. This design enabled us to determine the cross-plane thermoelectric material properties in a single high temperature measurement of a 25mum InGaAs thin film with embedded ErAs (0.2%) nanoparticles using the bipolar transient Harman technique in conjunction with thermoreflectance thermal imaging. This approach eliminates discrepancies and potential device degradation from the multiple measurements necessary to obtain individual material parameters. Finite element method simulations are used to analyze non-uniform current and temperature distributions over the device area and determine the three dimensional current path for accurate extraction of material properties from the thermal images. Results match with independent measurements of thermoelectric material properties for the same material composition, validating this approach. We apply high magnification thermoreflectance imaging to create temperature maps of vanadium dioxide nanobeams and examine electro-thermal energy conversion along the nanobeam length. The metal to insulator transition of strongly correlated materials is subject to strong lattice coupling which brings about the unique one-dimensional alignment of metal-insulator domains along nanobeams. Many studies have investigated the effects of stress o

  17. Micro-Scale Regenerative Heat Exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Matthew E.; Stelter, Stephan; Stelter, Manfred

    2004-01-01

    A micro-scale regenerative heat exchanger has been designed, optimized and fabricated for use in a micro-Stirling device. Novel design and fabrication techniques enabled the minimization of axial heat conduction losses and pressure drop, while maximizing thermal regenerative performance. The fabricated prototype is comprised of ten separate assembled layers of alternating metal-dielectric composite. Each layer is offset to minimize conduction losses and maximize heat transfer by boundary layer disruption. A grating pattern of 100 micron square non-contiguous flow passages were formed with a nominal 20 micron wall thickness, and an overall assembled ten-layer thickness of 900 microns. Application of the micro heat exchanger is envisioned in the areas of micro-refrigerators/coolers, micropower devices, and micro-fluidic devices.

  18. Manufacturing of Superhydrophobic Surfaces with Nanoscale and Microscale Features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-06-01

    This factsheet describes a research project that will develop a technology that will enable nanoscale and microscale superhydrophobic (SHP) features to be imaged onto surfaces for the high-volume manufacturing of water-repellent components and coatings.

  19. An Efficient Procedure for Microscale Synthesis of Semicarbazones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandita, Sangeeta; Goyal, Samta; Passey, Sarita

    2004-01-01

    A successful microscale fusion of semicarbazones, or transformation of carbonyl compounds into semicarbazones is performed through an effective grinding system. The donning of protective attire is advised to avoid the hazardous effects of semicarbazide hydrochloride during the fusion process.

  20. Microscale luminescence imaging of defects, inhomogeneities, and secondary phases in halide scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, S., E-mail: lam@capesym.com; Swider, S.; Fiala, J.; Datta, A.; Motakef, S.

    2015-06-01

    A microscale luminescence system was custom-built to investigate crystallinity, crystal quality, and emission homogeneity in scintillator crystals. This system consists of a fluorescence microscope that has been integrated with a spectrometer and custom-software for both manual and automated collection of two-dimensional reflection and emission images and maps of scintillators under excitation. The system’s capabilities are demonstrated through imaging studies on samples of CsBa{sub 2}I{sub 5} (2%Eu) (CBI), CsI (5%Ba, 3%Eu), and SrI{sub 2} (5%Eu). Emission images obtained under 365 nm excitation reveal features that cannot be visualized using light microscopy alone. In the CBI samples, rod-like structures of 100–200 μm in diameter were observed. Using electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), these rods were found to be rich in barium and poor in cesium and europium. In CsI (Ba, Eu), oblong features were observed. Electron probe microanalysis confirmed that these regions varied in composition. Finally, an emission map of a one-inch diameter disk of SrI{sub 2} (Eu) indicated a uniform distribution of the dopant. This study demonstrates that the microscale luminescence system is a valuable complement to the current suite of scintillator characterization tools. Its capabilities for evaluating crystal quality and homogeneity will provide useful feedback for crystal growth optimization.

  1. Design and implementation of an Internet based effective controlling and monitoring system with wireless fieldbus communications technologies for process automation--an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetinceviz, Yucel; Bayindir, Ramazan

    2012-05-01

    The network requirements of control systems in industrial applications increase day by day. The Internet based control system and various fieldbus systems have been designed in order to meet these requirements. This paper describes an Internet based control system with wireless fieldbus communication designed for distributed processes. The system was implemented as an experimental setup in a laboratory. In industrial facilities, the process control layer and the distance connection of the distributed control devices in the lowest levels of the industrial production environment are provided with fieldbus networks. In this paper, the Internet based control system that will be able to meet the system requirements with a new-generation communication structure, which is called wired/wireless hybrid system, has been designed on field level and carried out to cover all sectors of distributed automation, from process control, to distributed input/output (I/O). The system has been accomplished by hardware structure with a programmable logic controller (PLC), a communication processor (CP) module, two industrial wireless modules and a distributed I/O module, Motor Protection Package (MPP) and software structure with WinCC flexible program used for the screen of Scada (Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition), SIMATIC MANAGER package program ("STEP7") used for the hardware and network configuration and also for downloading control program to PLC. PMID:22306882

  2. Microscale Imaging: Microbial Behavior Near NAPL Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, R.; Xu, M.; Olson, M. S.

    2006-12-01

    A comprehensive understanding of microbial transport mechanisms is needed for effective in situ bioremediation of ground water contaminants. Microscale imaging has great potential to provide insight into microbial transport and behavior in subsurface water near contaminated sites. In the present study we focus on the application of two novel microscale imaging techniques to observe microbial behavior surrounding dissolving NAPL in porous media: we use micro-CT to quantify bioenhancement of NAPL dissolution and we use two-color molecular probes to observe NAPL toxicity at the NAPL/water interface using fluorescence microscopy. Microcomputed Tomography (micro-CT) is a non-invasive imaging technique that allows visualization and quantification of the internal features of objects and porous media. The dissolution rate of TCE droplets dispersed in 1-mm-diameter glass beads was compared for water-saturated beads and beads containing an aqueous suspension of Pseudomonas putida F1. Changing volumes of NAPL ganglia were measured over time using micro-CT, and used to compute the mass transfer rate coefficient of TCE, with and without microbial degradation. Comparison of the mass transfer rate coefficients of TCE will be discussed. In addition, a novel method was developed to image both chemotaxis and the toxic effect of a dissolving NAPL droplet on the surrounding population of P. putida F1. Chemotaxis refers to the movement of bacteria under the influence of chemical gradient (either away or toward), which helps them to find an optimal concentration for their growth and survival. Agarose plug assays, in combination with a two-color fluorescence assay of bacterial viability, were used for investigation. Bacteria were stained with a mixture of SYTO 9 nucleic acid stain and propidium iodide. The stained bacterial solution was flooded into a chamber formed around an agarose plug containing TCE. Bacterial chemotactic response to TCE dissolution was measured by imaging the

  3. Microscale Methodology for Structure Elucidation of Natural Products

    OpenAIRE

    Molinski, Tadeusz F.

    2010-01-01

    Advances in microscale spectroscopic techniques, particularly microcryoprobe NMR, allow discovery and structure elucidation of new molecules down to only a few nanomole. Newer methods for utilizing circular dichroism (CD) have pushed the limits of detection to picomole levels. NMR and CD methods are complementary to the task of elucidation of complete stereostructures of complex natural products. Together, integrated microprobe NMR spectroscopy, microscale degradation and synthesis, are syner...

  4. Library Automation

    OpenAIRE

    Dhakne, B. N.; Giri, V. V; Waghmode, S. S.

    2010-01-01

    New technologies library provides several new materials, media and mode of storing and communicating the information. Library Automation reduces the drudgery of repeated manual efforts in library routine. By use of library automation collection, Storage, Administration, Processing, Preservation and communication etc.

  5. Quasi-experimental trial of diabetes Self-Management Automated and Real-Time Telephonic Support (SMARTSteps in a Medicaid managed care plan: study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratanawongsa Neda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health information technology can enhance self-management and quality of life for patients with chronic disease and overcome healthcare barriers for patients with limited English proficiency. After a randomized controlled trial of a multilingual automated telephone self-management support program (ATSM improved patient-centered dimensions of diabetes care in safety net clinics, we collaborated with a nonprofit Medicaid managed care plan to translate research into practice, offering ATSM as a covered benefit and augmenting ATSM to promote medication activation. This paper describes the protocol of the Self-Management Automated and Real-Time Telephonic Support Project (SMARTSteps. Methods/Design This controlled quasi-experimental trial used a wait-list variant of a stepped wedge design to enroll 362 adult health plan members with diabetes who speak English, Cantonese, or Spanish and receive care at 4 publicly-funded clinics. Through language-stratified randomization, participants were assigned to four intervention statuses: SMARTSteps-ONLY, SMARTSteps-PLUS, or wait-list for either intervention. In addition to usual primary care, intervention participants received 27 weekly calls in their preferred language with rotating queries and response-triggered education about self-care, medication adherence, safety concerns, psychological issues, and preventive services. Health coaches from the health plan called patients with out-of-range responses for collaborative goal setting and action planning. SMARTSteps-PLUS also included health coach calls to promote medication activation, adherence and intensification, if triggered by ATSM-reported non-adherence, refill non-adherence from pharmacy claims, or suboptimal cardiometabolic indicators. Wait-list patients crossed-over to SMARTSteps-ONLY or -PLUS at 6 months. For participants who agreed to structured telephone interviews at baseline and 6 months (n = 252, primary outcomes will be

  6. A MEMS sensor for microscale force measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majcherek, S.; Aman, A.; Fochtmann, J.

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes the development and testing of a new MEMS-based sensor device for microscale contact force measurements. A special MEMS cell was developed to reach higher lateral resolution than common steel-based load cells with foil-type strain gauges as mechanical-electrical converters. The design provided more than one normal force measurement point with spatial resolution in submillimeter range. Specific geometric adaption of the MEMS-device allowed adjustability of its measurement range between 0.5 and 5 N. The thin film nickel-chromium piezo resistors were used to achieve a mechanical-electrical conversion. The production process was realized by established silicon processing technologies such as deep reactive ion etching and vapor deposition (sputtering). The sensor was tested in two steps. Firstly, the sensor characteristics were carried out by application of defined loads at the measurement points by a push-pull tester. As a result, the sensor showed linear behavior. A measurement system analysis (MSA1) was performed to define the reliability of the measurement system. The measured force values had the maximal relative deviation of 1% to average value of 1.97 N. Secondly, the sensor was tested under near-industrial conditions. In this context, the thermal induced relaxation behavior of the electrical connector contact springs was investigated. The handling of emerging problems during the characterization process of the sensor is also described.

  7. A MEMS sensor for microscale force measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the development and testing of a new MEMS-based sensor device for microscale contact force measurements. A special MEMS cell was developed to reach higher lateral resolution than common steel-based load cells with foil-type strain gauges as mechanical-electrical converters. The design provided more than one normal force measurement point with spatial resolution in submillimeter range. Specific geometric adaption of the MEMS-device allowed adjustability of its measurement range between 0.5 and 5 N. The thin film nickel-chromium piezo resistors were used to achieve a mechanical-electrical conversion. The production process was realized by established silicon processing technologies such as deep reactive ion etching and vapor deposition (sputtering). The sensor was tested in two steps. Firstly, the sensor characteristics were carried out by application of defined loads at the measurement points by a push-pull tester. As a result, the sensor showed linear behavior. A measurement system analysis (MSA1) was performed to define the reliability of the measurement system. The measured force values had the maximal relative deviation of 1% to average value of 1.97 N. Secondly, the sensor was tested under near-industrial conditions. In this context, the thermal induced relaxation behavior of the electrical connector contact springs was investigated. The handling of emerging problems during the characterization process of the sensor is also described. (paper)

  8. Chladni Patterns in a Liquid at Microscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuillermet, Gaël; Gires, Pierre-Yves; Casset, Fabrice; Poulain, Cédric

    2016-05-01

    By means of ultrathin silicon membranes excited in the low ultrasound range, we show for the first time that it is possible to form two-dimensional Chladni patterns of microbeads in liquid. Unlike the well-known effect in a gaseous environment at the macroscale, where gravity effects are generally dominant, leading particles towards the nodal regions of displacement, we show that the combined effects of an ultrathin plate excited at low frequency (yielding to subsonic waves) together with reduced gravity (arising from buoyancy) will enhance the importance of microstreaming in the Chladni problem. Here, we report that for micrometric beads larger than the inner streaming layer, the microscale streaming in the vicinity of the plate tends to gather particles in antinodal regions of vibrations yielding to patterns in good agreement with the predicted modes for a liquid-loaded plate. Interestingly, a symmetry breaking phenomenon together with the streaming can trigger movements of beads departing from one cluster to another. We show that, for higher modes, this movement can appear as a collective rotation of the beads in the manner of a "farandole." PMID:27203325

  9. Dynamics of two microscale DPF devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dense plasma focus (DPF) devices are coaxial transient discharge devices capable of generating plasma densities greater than 1016 cm−3 with ion temperatures in excess of 1 keV by compression resulting from strong magnetic fields created by high pulsed current. They are predominately used for high energy particle generation, but they are also convenient for investigating pinch dynamics due to their relatively fast repetition rates. These devices have been extensively studied at length scales on the order of cm, and this work helps to bridge understanding of larger low pressure pinches and more recent moderate energy density sources with novel applications like portable sources for high energy particles. In this research, the dynamics of two significantly smaller DPF devices operating in 50–190 torr He at  <5 J/pulse with anode radii of 550 μm and 100 μm have been investigated using a 50 ns gated ICCD to image discharges throughout their lifetimes. Typical discharge stages of breakdown, rundown, pinch and expansion are observed for the microscale DPF. Images during the breakdown process are compared with respect to their symmetry, the velocity of their features, and their relative pinch intensities. Applicable scaling parameters are also compared to those of other DPF devices. In addition, the applicability of Knudsen scaling to DPF operation is introduced. The images show that as the anode radius decreases, breakdown and rundown features tend towards symmetry at higher pressure and near the Paschen minimum. (paper)

  10. Chladni Patterns in a Liquid at Microscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuillermet, Gaël; Gires, Pierre-Yves; Casset, Fabrice; Poulain, Cédric

    2016-05-01

    By means of ultrathin silicon membranes excited in the low ultrasound range, we show for the first time that it is possible to form two-dimensional Chladni patterns of microbeads in liquid. Unlike the well-known effect in a gaseous environment at the macroscale, where gravity effects are generally dominant, leading particles towards the nodal regions of displacement, we show that the combined effects of an ultrathin plate excited at low frequency (yielding to subsonic waves) together with reduced gravity (arising from buoyancy) will enhance the importance of microstreaming in the Chladni problem. Here, we report that for micrometric beads larger than the inner streaming layer, the microscale streaming in the vicinity of the plate tends to gather particles in antinodal regions of vibrations yielding to patterns in good agreement with the predicted modes for a liquid-loaded plate. Interestingly, a symmetry breaking phenomenon together with the streaming can trigger movements of beads departing from one cluster to another. We show that, for higher modes, this movement can appear as a collective rotation of the beads in the manner of a "farandole."

  11. Modeling of micro-scale thermoacoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offner, Avshalom; Ramon, Guy Z.

    2016-05-01

    Thermoacoustic phenomena, that is, onset of self-sustained oscillations or time-averaged fluxes in a sound wave, may be harnessed as efficient and robust heat transfer devices. Specifically, miniaturization of such devices holds great promise for cooling of electronics. At the required small dimensions, it is expected that non-negligible slip effects exist at the solid surface of the "stack"-a porous matrix, which is used for maintaining the correct temporal phasing of the heat transfer between the solid and oscillating gas. Here, we develop theoretical models for thermoacoustic engines and heat pumps that account for slip, within the standing-wave approximation. Stability curves for engines with both no-slip and slip boundary conditions were calculated; the slip boundary condition curve exhibits a lower temperature difference compared with the no slip curve for resonance frequencies that characterize micro-scale devices. Maximum achievable temperature differences across the stack of a heat pump were also calculated. For this case, slip conditions are detrimental and such a heat pump would maintain a lower temperature difference compared to larger devices, where slip effects are negligible.

  12. Process automation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Process automation technology has been pursued in the chemical processing industries and to a very limited extent in nuclear fuel reprocessing. Its effective use has been restricted in the past by the lack of diverse and reliable process instrumentation and the unavailability of sophisticated software designed for process control. The Integrated Equipment Test (IET) facility was developed by the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) in part to demonstrate new concepts for control of advanced nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. A demonstration of fuel reprocessing equipment automation using advanced instrumentation and a modern, microprocessor-based control system is nearing completion in the facility. This facility provides for the synergistic testing of all chemical process features of a prototypical fuel reprocessing plant that can be attained with unirradiated uranium-bearing feed materials. The unique equipment and mission of the IET facility make it an ideal test bed for automation studies. This effort will provide for the demonstration of the plant automation concept and for the development of techniques for similar applications in a full-scale plant. A set of preliminary recommendations for implementing process automation has been compiled. Some of these concepts are not generally recognized or accepted. The automation work now under way in the IET facility should be useful to others in helping avoid costly mistakes because of the underutilization or misapplication of process automation. 6 figs

  13. Mapping the Microscale Origins of MRI Contrast with Subcellular NV Diamond Magnetometry

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, Hunter C; Bhatnagar, Aadyot; Lee-Gosselin, Audrey; Barry, John F; Glenn, David R; Walsworth, Ronald L; Shapiro, Mikhail G

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a widely used biomedical imaging modality that derives much of its contrast from microscale magnetic field gradients in biological tissues. However, the connection between these sub-voxel field patterns and MRI contrast has not been studied experimentally. Here, we describe a new method to map subcellular magnetic fields in mammalian cells and tissues using nitrogen vacancy diamond magnetometry and connect these maps to voxel-scale MRI contrast, providing insights for in vivo imaging and contrast agent design.

  14. Numerical study of dynamic behavior of contact line approaching a micro-scale particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Yusuke; Tsukahara, Takahiro; Ueno, Ichiro

    2014-11-01

    The behavior of contact line (CL) the boundary line of solid-liquid-gas interface is one of the important topics regarding the dynamic wetting. Many experimental and theoretical approaches have been performed about static and axisymmetric systems: e.g., Ally et al. (Langmuir 2010 vol. 26, 11797) measured the capillary force on a micro-scale particle attached to a liquid surface and they compared with their physical model. However, there are few numerical simulations of the dynamic and asymmetric systems Focusing on the CL passing micro-scale solid particles, we simulated solid-liquid-gas flows. Gas-liquid interface is captured by a VOF method and the surface tension model is the CSF model. Solid-fluid interaction is treated by an immersed boundary method. We studied the broken-dam problem with a fixed sphere in either macro or micro scale. Our results of the macro scale agree reasonably with the experimental result. In the micro scale, where the domain is of 2.0 × 2.0 × 2.0 μm3 and the sphere diameter is 0.5 μm, we tested two types of sphere surface: hydrophobic and hydrophilic solids. We demonstrated that, as the liquid touches the hydrophilic sphere, the velocity of CL is higher than the hydrophobic case.

  15. CFD simulation of micro-scale pollutant dispersion in the built environment

    OpenAIRE

    Blocken, Bert; Tominaga, Y; Stathopoulos, T

    2013-01-01

    Outdoor air quality is one of the major environmental problems today. Micro-scale pollutant dispersion covers the building scale and the meteorological micro-scale. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is increasingly used for micro-scale dispersion studies. Virtual Special Issue groups papers published previously on this topic in Building & Environment. Some trends and directions for future research are outlined.

  16. Automating Finance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, John

    2007-01-01

    In past years, higher education's financial management side has been riddled with manual processes and aging mainframe applications. This article discusses schools which had taken advantage of an array of technologies that automate billing, payment processing, and refund processing in the case of overpayment. The investments are well worth it:…

  17. Microscale pH Titrations Using an Automatic Pipet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, Edward B.; Kortz, Carrie L.; Taylor, Max A.

    2002-01-01

    Presents a microscale pH titration technique that utilizes an automatic pipet. A small aliquot (1-5 mL) of the analyte solution is titrated with repeated additions of titrant, and the pH is determined after each delivery. The equivalence point is determined graphically by either the second derivative method or a Gran plot. The pipet can be…

  18. Microscale Fracture of Composite Materials for Wind Turbine Blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martyniuk, Karolina

    materials models can be developed if the understanding of the microscale damage- the first stage of material failure- is increased. Therefore it is important to characterize materials’ microstructures and micro-cracks initiation and propagation.The microstructure of fibre reinforced composite materials...

  19. Thermal Equilibrium in Plastic and Glass Microscale Containers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curbelo, Estela; Cerda, Maria F.; Mendez, Eduardo

    2007-01-01

    The study describes the various thermal equilibrium conditions, which should be taken care for while designing or selecting the plastic and glass microscale containers for physical chemistry experiments. The results show that the thermal equilibrium completely depends on the material of the container for the same volume and thickness.

  20. Direct measurement of the microscale conductivity of conjugated polymer monolayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøggild, Peter; Grey, Francois; Hassenkam, T.;

    2000-01-01

    The in-plane conductivity of conjugated polymer monolayers is mapped here for the first time on the microscale using a novel scanning micro four-point probe (see Figure). The probe allows the source, drain, and voltage electrodes to be positioned within the same domain and the mapping results...... demonstrate how microscopic ordering in the polymer domains controls the conductivity....

  1. Convenient Microscale Synthesis of a Coumarin Laser Dye Analog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktoudianakis, Evangelos; Dicks, Andrew P.

    2006-01-01

    Coumarin (2H-1-benzopyran-2-one) and its derivatives constitute a fascinating class of organic substances that are utilized industrially in areas such as cosmetics, food preservatives, insecticides and fluorescent laser dyes. The product can be synthesized, purified, and characterized within two hours with benefits of microscale reactivity being…

  2. Microscale packed bed reactor for controlled hydrogen peroxide decomposition as a fuel cell oxidant aboard unmanned undersea vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennon, E.; Burke, A. A.; Ocampo, M.; Besser, R. S.

    The multiphase catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide into water and oxygen is notoriously susceptible to thermal runaway (heat of reaction: -98 kJ mol -1). The high surface area to volume ratio (S/ V) in a microscale packed bed (MPB) reactor (radius 0.5 mm) was investigated for reducing the risk of thermal runaway during hydrogen peroxide decomposition to oxygen intended as a fuel cell oxidant aboard an unmanned undersea vehicle (UUV). A microscale reactor channel with a S/ V of ∼2 × 10 3 m 2 m -3 simulated under convective cooling generated a significant heat rise (T rise ∼ 100 K), whereas a microreactor with a higher S/ V (∼200 × 10 3 m 2 m -3) achieved thermal control (T rise < 10 K) over the simulated reaction zone. Although thermal management was successfully accomplished using the higher S/ V, experimental conversions of hydrogen peroxide to oxygen (5-18%) measured from the outlet were lower than simulated conversions (38-63%). Simulation assumptions, such as homogeneously dispersed flow and perfect catalyst interaction among other factors, contributed to the discrepancies between the simulated and experimental degrees of peroxide conversion to oxygen. Even though thermal control of the MPB was achieved, this work indicates that mass transfer limitations are a factor in the MPB reactor during a multiphase reaction, like decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to oxygen and water, and suggests means to overcome them even on the microscale level.

  3. Evaluation of a micro-scale wind model's performance over realistic building clusters using wind tunnel experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning; Du, Yunsong; Miao, Shiguang; Fang, Xiaoyi

    2016-08-01

    The simulation performance over complex building clusters of a wind simulation model (Wind Information Field Fast Analysis model, WIFFA) in a micro-scale air pollutant dispersion model system (Urban Microscale Air Pollution dispersion Simulation model, UMAPS) is evaluated using various wind tunnel experimental data including the CEDVAL (Compilation of Experimental Data for Validation of Micro-Scale Dispersion Models) wind tunnel experiment data and the NJU-FZ experiment data (Nanjing University-Fang Zhuang neighborhood wind tunnel experiment data). The results show that the wind model can reproduce the vortexes triggered by urban buildings well, and the flow patterns in urban street canyons and building clusters can also be represented. Due to the complex shapes of buildings and their distributions, the simulation deviations/discrepancies from the measurements are usually caused by the simplification of the building shapes and the determination of the key zone sizes. The computational efficiencies of different cases are also discussed in this paper. The model has a high computational efficiency compared to traditional numerical models that solve the Navier-Stokes equations, and can produce very high-resolution (1-5 m) wind fields of a complex neighborhood scale urban building canopy (~ 1 km ×1 km) in less than 3 min when run on a personal computer.

  4. Apparatus and method for determining microscale interactions based on compressive sensors such as crystal structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McAdams, Harley; AlQuraishi, Mohammed

    2015-04-21

    Techniques for determining values for a metric of microscale interactions include determining a mesoscale metric for a plurality of mesoscale interaction types, wherein a value of the mesoscale metric for each mesoscale interaction type is based on a corresponding function of values of the microscale metric for the plurality of the microscale interaction types. A plurality of observations that indicate the values of the mesoscale metric are determined for the plurality of mesoscale interaction types. Values of the microscale metric are determined for the plurality of microscale interaction types based on the plurality of observations and the corresponding functions and compressed sensing.

  5. Instalação Experimental para o Estudo do Controlo Automático e da Modernização de Canais de Distribuição de Água

    OpenAIRE

    Rijo, Manuel

    2005-01-01

    O artigo apresenta uma instalação experimental, basicamente constituída por dois canais de distribuição de água, um tradicional e o outro automático, dois reservatórios e um posto central de controlo. A instalação tem por objectivo principal o estudo, a experimentação e a demonstração dos diferentes modos de controlo em canais, quer os tradicionais quer os digitais, nomeadamente os do tipo PI. Faz-se uma apresentação sumária do sistema SCADA (Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition), instal...

  6. Use of automated real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to monitor experimental swine vesicular disease virus infection in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reid, S.M.; Paton, D.J.; Wilsden, G.;

    2004-01-01

    Automated real-time RT-PCR was evaluated as a diagnostic tool for swine vesicular disease virus (SVDV) infection on a range of samples (vesicular epithelium, serum, nasal swabs, faeces) from four inoculated and three in-contact pigs over a period of 28 days. Traditional diagnostic procedures (virus....... The RT-PCR and virus isolation were generally comparable in detecting SVDV in the serum and nasal swabs from inoculated and in-contact pigs up to day 6 after infection; it was possible, however, to isolate virus for a longer period from the faeces of a few pigs. This suggested that further optimization...... of the template extraction method was required to counteract the effects of RT-PCR inhibitors in faeces. It was concluded that the automated real-time RT-PCR is a useful diagnostic method for SVD in clinically or subclinically affected pigs and contributed to the study of the pathogenesis of SVD in the pigs....

  7. Automation Security

    OpenAIRE

    Mirzoev, Dr. Timur

    2014-01-01

    Web-based Automated Process Control systems are a new type of applications that use the Internet to control industrial processes with the access to the real-time data. Supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) networks contain computers and applications that perform key functions in providing essential services and commodities (e.g., electricity, natural gas, gasoline, water, waste treatment, transportation) to all Americans. As such, they are part of the nation s critical infrastructu...

  8. A tension-torsional fatigue testing apparatus for micro-scale components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Sichao; Wang, Lei; Chen, Gang; Yu, Dunji; Chen, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical characterization of micro-scale components under complex loading conditions is a great challenge. To meet such a challenge, a microtension-torsional fatigue testing apparatus is developed in this study that specializes in the evaluation of multiaxial fatigue behavior of thin stent wires. The actuation and measurement in two controlled directions are incorporated in the tensile and torsional load frames, respectively, and a thrust air bearing is applied for the coupling of the two frames. The axial deformation of specimens measured by a grating sensor built in the linear motor and by a non-contact displacement detect system is compared and corrected. The accuracy of the torque measurement is proved by torsion tests on thin wires of 316L stainless steel in nominal diameters of 100 μm. Multistep torsion test, multiaxial ratcheting test, and a fully strain controlled multiaxial cyclic test are performed on 100 μm and 200 μm-diameter 316L wires using this apparatus. The capability of the equipment in tension-torsional cyclic tests for micro-scale specimens is demonstrated by the experimental results.

  9. Assessing Microscale Environmental Changes: CORINE Vs. The Urban Atlas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrişor Alexandru-Ionuţ

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Applying geostatistical approaches to spatial data is a common method for assessing the transitional dynamics of land cover and use changes induced by human activities. However, the relevance of results depends largely on the quality of data. CORINE data have showed their utility in assessing long term changes at the macro-scale, but their use at the micro-scale is impeded by the spatial resolution and changes in the methodology of obtaining them. Recently, new data from the Urban Atlas were provided at a greater resolution for urban areas. In an attempt to assess their potential for analyzing transitional dynamics at the micro-scale, this paper compared the two data sets using the case study of Bucharest. The results indicate that the Urban Atlas does a better job in surprising the fragmentation of land in urban areas, and providing the real extent of specific features diminished by CORINE.

  10. Microscale and Nanoscale Process Systems Engineering: Challenge and Progress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨友麒

    2008-01-01

    This is an overview of the development of process systems engineering (PSE) in a smaller world. Two different spatio-temporal scopes are identified for microscale and nanoscale process systems. The features and challenges for each scale are reviewed, and different methodologies used by them discussed. Comparison of these two new areas with traditional process systems engineering is described. If microscale PSE could be considered as an extension of traditional PSE, nanoscale PSE should be accepted as a new discipline which has looser connection with the extant core of chemical engineering. Since "molecular factories" is the next frontier of processing scale, nanoscale PSE will be the new theory to handle the design, simulation and operation of those active processing systems.

  11. Influence of microscale in snow distributed modelling in semiarid regions

    OpenAIRE

    Pimentel Leiva, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    This work focuses on the importance of the microscale snow distribution in the modelling of the snow dynamics in semiarid regions. Snow over these areas has particular features that further complicate its measuring, monitoring and modelling (e.g. several snowmelt cycles throughout the year and a very heterogeneous distribution). Most extended GIS-based calculation of snowmelt/accumulation models must deal with non-negligible scales effects below the cell size, which may result ...

  12. On heat transfer at microscale with implications for microactuator design

    OpenAIRE

    Özsun, Özgür; Alaca, B. Erdem; Yalcinkaya, Arda D.; Yilmaz, Mehmet; Zervas, Michail; Leblebici, Yusuf

    2009-01-01

    The dominance of conduction and the negligible effect of gravity, and hence free convection, are verified in the case of microscale heat sources surrounded by air at atmospheric pressure. A list of temperature-dependent heat transfer coefficients is provided. In contrast to previous approaches based on free convection, supplied coefficients converge with increasing temperature. Instead of creating a new external function for the definition of boundary conditions via conductive heat transfer, ...

  13. A review of micro-scale abrasion testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micro-scale abrasion (commonly referred to as 'ball cratering') is a small-scale tribological test method which can be operated on a desktop. It offers the possibility of providing a quick, cheap, localized abrasion test that can be used with small samples. In principle its operation is simple, but in practice there are issues with wear scar measurement, wear mode and its applicability to a wide variety of monolithic materials and coatings. (topical review)

  14. Effects of microscale inertia on dynamic ductile crack growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, N.; Mercier, S.; Molinari, A.

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the role of microscale inertia in dynamic ductile crack growth. A constitutive model for porous solids that accounts for dynamic effects due to void growth is proposed. The model has been implemented in a finite element code and simulations of crack growth in a notched bar and in an edge cracked specimen have been performed. Results are compared to predictions obtained via the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN) model where micro-inertia effects are not accounted for. It is found that microscale inertia has a significant influence on the crack growth. In particular, it is shown that micro-inertia plays an important role during the strain localisation process by impeding void growth. Therefore, the resulting damage accumulation occurs in a more progressive manner. For this reason, simulations based on the proposed modelling exhibit much less mesh sensitivity than those based on the viscoplastic GTN model. Microscale inertia is also found to lead to lower crack speeds. Effects of micro-inertia on fracture toughness are evaluated.

  15. Highly sensitive microscale in vivo sensor enabled by electrophoretic assembly of nanoparticles for multiple biomarker detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malima, Asanterabi; Siavoshi, Salome; Musacchio, Tiziana; Upponi, Jaydev; Yilmaz, Cihan; Somu, Sivasubramanian; Hartner, William; Torchilin, Vladimir; Busnaina, Ahmed

    2012-11-21

    This paper describes a microscale in vivo sensor platform device for the simultaneous detection of multiple biomarkers. We designed the polymer-based biosensors incorporating multiple active isolated areas, as small as 70 μm × 70 μm, for antigen detection. The fabrication approach involved conventional micro- and nano-fabrication processes followed by site-specific electrophoretic directed assembly of antibody-functionalized nanoparticles. To ensure precise and large-scale manufacturing of these biosensors, we developed a semi-automated system for the attachment of the 250-μm biosensor to a 300-μm catheter probe. Our fabrication and post-processing procedures should enable large-scale production of such biosensor devices at lower manufacturing cost. The principle of detection with these biosensors involved a simple fluorescence-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. These biosensors exhibit high selectivity (ability to selectively detect multiple biomarkers of different diseases), specificity (ability to target generic to specific disease biomarkers), rapid antigen uptake, and low detection limits (for carcinoembryonic antigen, 31.25 pg mL(-1); for nucleosomes, 62.5 pg mL(-1)), laying the foundation for potential early detection of various diseases. PMID:22983480

  16. Ultrafast self-assembly of microscale particles by open-channel flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sun; Park, Inkyu; Hao, Zhao; Holman, Hoi-ying N; Pisano, Albert P; Zohdi, Tarek I

    2010-04-01

    We developed an ultrafast microfluidic approach to self-assemble microparticles in three dimensions by taking advantage of simple photolithography and capillary action of microparticle-dispersed suspensions. The theoretical principles of high-speed assembly have been explained, and the experimental verifications of the assembly of various sizes of silica microspheres and silica gel microspheres within thin and long open microchannels by using this approach have been demonstrated. We anticipate that the presented technique will be widely used in the semiconductor and Bio-MEMS (microelectromechanical systems) fields because it offers a fast way to control 3D microscale particle assemblies and also has superb compatibility with photolithography, which can lead to an easy integration of particle assembly with existing CMOS (complementary metal oxide-semiconductor) and MEMS fabrication processes.

  17. Multiperspective Analysis of Microscale Trigeneration Systems and Their Role in the Crowd Energy Concept

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Parantapa Sawant; Naim Meftah; Jens Pfafferott

    2015-01-01

    Abstract-The energy system of the future will transform from the current centralised fossil based to a decentralised, clean, highly efficient, and intelligent network. This transformation will require innovative technologies and ideas like trigeneration and the crowd energy concept to pave the way ahead. Even though trigeneration systems are extremely energy efficient and can play a vital role in the energy system, turning around their deployment is hindered by various barriers. These barriers are theoretically analysed in a multiperspective approach and the role decentralised trigeneration systems can play in the crowd energy concept is highlighted. It is derived from an initial literature research that a multiperspective (technological, energy-economic, and user) analysis is necessary for realising the potential of trigeneration systems in a decentralised grid. And to experimentally quantify these issues we are setting up a microscale trigeneration lab at our institute and the motivation for this lab is also briefly introduced.

  18. Flexible concentrator photovoltaics based on microscale silicon solar cells embedded in luminescent waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jongseung; Li, Lanfang; Semichaevsky, Andrey V; Ryu, Jae Ha; Johnson, Harley T; Nuzzo, Ralph G; Rogers, John A

    2011-06-14

    Unconventional methods to exploit monocrystalline silicon and other established materials in photovoltaic (PV) systems can create new engineering opportunities, device capabilities and cost structures. Here we show a type of composite luminescent concentrator PV system that embeds large scale, interconnected arrays of microscale silicon solar cells in thin matrix layers doped with luminophores. Photons that strike cells directly generate power in the usual manner; those incident on the matrix launch wavelength-downconverted photons that reflect and waveguide into the sides and bottom surfaces of the cells to increase further their power output, by more than 300% in examples reported here. Unlike conventional luminescent photovoltaics, this unusual design can be implemented in ultrathin, mechanically bendable formats. Detailed studies of design considerations and fabrication aspects for such devices, using both experimental and computational approaches, provide quantitative descriptions of the underlying materials science and optics.

  19. Effect of Microscale Contact State of Polyurethane Surface on Adhesion and Friction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Min; Ji Ai-hong; Dai Zhen-dong

    2006-01-01

    The effect of microscale contact of rough surfaces on the adhesion and friction under negative normal forces was experimentally investigated. The adhesive force of single point contact - sapphire ball to flat polyurethane did not vary with the normal force. With rough surface contact, which was assumed to be a great number of point contacts, the adhesive force increased logarithmically with the normal force. Under negative normal force adhesive state, the tangential force (more than hundred mN)were much larger than the negative normal force (several mN) and increased with the linear decrease of negative normal force.The results reveal why the gecko's toe must slide slightly on the target surface when it makes contact on a surface and suggest how a biomimetic gecko foot might be designed.

  20. Automated Budget System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The Automated Budget System (ABS) automates management and planning of the Mike Monroney Aeronautical Center (MMAC) budget by providing enhanced capability to plan,...

  1. Microscale heat transfer in a free jet against a plane surface

    OpenAIRE

    Shu, Jian-Jun

    2014-01-01

    A new two-layer model has been proposed to study microscale heat transfer associated with a developing flow boundary layer. As an example, a cold, microscale film of liquid impinging on an isothermal hot, horizontal surface has been investigated. The boundary layer is divided into two regions: a micro layer at microscale away from the surface and a macro layer at macroscale away from the surface. An approximate solution for the velocity and temperature distributions in the flow along the hori...

  2. Macro- to microscale heat transfer the lagging behavior

    CERN Document Server

    Tzou, D Y

    2014-01-01

    Physical processes taking place in micro/nanoscale strongly depend on the material types and can be very complicated. Known approaches include kinetic theory and quantum mechanics, non-equilibrium and irreversible thermodynamics, molecular dynamics, and/or fractal theory and fraction model. Due to innately different physical bases employed, different approaches may involve different physical properties in describing micro/nanoscale heat transport. In addition, the parameters involved in different approaches, may not be mutually inclusive. Macro- to Microscale Heat Transfer: The Lagging Behav

  3. Microscale technology and biocatalytic processes: Opportunities and challenges for synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wohlgemuth, Roland; Plazl, Igor; Žnidaršič-Plazl, Polona;

    2015-01-01

    Despite the expanding presence of microscale technology in chemical synthesis and energy production as well as in biomedical devices and analytical and diagnostic tools, its potential in biocatalytic processes for pharmaceutical and fine chemicals, as well as related industries, has not yet been...... fully exploited. The aim of this review is to shed light on the strategic advantages of this promising technology for the development and realization of biocatalytic processes and subsequent product recovery steps, demonstrated with examples from the literature. Constraints, opportunities......, and the future outlook for the implementation of these key green engineering methods and the role of supporting tools such as mathematical models to establish sustainable production processes are discussed....

  4. A microscale turbine driven by diffusive mass flux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mingcheng; Liu, Rui; Ripoll, Marisol; Chen, Ke

    2015-10-01

    An external diffusive mass flux is shown to be able to generate a mechanical torque on a microscale object based on anisotropic diffusiophoresis. In light of this finding, we propose a theoretical prototype micro-turbine driven purely by diffusive mass flux, which is in strong contrast to conventional turbines driven by convective mass flows. The rotational velocity of the proposed turbine is determined by the external concentration gradient, the geometry and the diffusiophoretic properties of the turbine. This scenario is validated by performing computer simulations. Our finding thus provides a new type of chemo-mechanical response which could be used to exploit existing chemical energies at small scales. PMID:26288078

  5. Micro-scale dynamic simulation of erythrocyte-platelet interaction in blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlMomani, T; Udaykumar, H S; Marshall, J S; Chandran, K B

    2008-06-01

    Platelet activation, adhesion, and aggregation on the blood vessel and implants result in the formation of mural thrombi. Platelet dynamics in blood flow is influenced by the far more numerous erythrocytes (RBCs). This is particularly the case in the smaller blood vessels (arterioles) and in constricted regions of blood flow (such as in valve leakage and hinge regions) where the dimensions of formed elements of blood become comparable with that of the flow geometry. In such regions, models to predict platelet motion, activation, aggregation and adhesion must account for platelet-RBC interactions. This paper studies platelet-RBC interactions in shear flows by performing simulations of micro-scale dynamics using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. A level-set sharp-interface immersed boundary method is employed in the computations in which RBC and platelet boundaries are tracked on a two-dimensional Cartesian grid. The RBCs are assumed to have an elliptical shape and to deform elastically under fluid forces while the platelets are assumed to behave as rigid particles of circular shape. Forces and torques between colliding blood cells are modeled using an extension of the soft-sphere model for elliptical particles. RBCs and platelets are transported under the forces and torques induced by fluid flow and cell-cell and cell-platelet collisions. The simulations show that platelet migration toward the wall is enhanced with increasing hematocrit, in agreement with past experimental observations. This margination is seen to occur due to hydrodynamic forces rather than collisional forces or volumetric exclusion effects. The effect of fluid shear forces on the platelets increases exponentially as a function of hematocrit for the range of parameters covered in this study. The micro-scale analysis can be potentially employed to obtain a deterministic relationship between fluid forces and platelet activation and aggregation in blood flow past cardiovascular implants

  6. Sample extraction and injection with a microscale preconcentrator.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Alex Lockwood (Advanced Sensor Technologies, Albuquerque, NM); Chan, Helena Kai Lun

    2007-09-01

    This report details the development of a microfabricated preconcentrator that functions as a fully integrated chemical extractor-injector for a microscale gas chromatograph (GC). The device enables parts-per-billion detection and quantitative analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in indoor air with size and power advantages over macro-scale systems. The 44 mm{sup 3} preconcentrator extracts VOCs using highly adsorptive, granular forms of graphitized carbon black and carbon molecular sieves. The micron-sized silicon cavities have integrated heating and temperature sensing allowing low power, yet rapid heating to thermally desorb the collected VOCs (GC injection). The keys to device construction are a new adsorbent-solvent filling technique and solvent-tolerant wafer-level silicon-gold eutectic bonding technology. The product is the first granular adsorbent preconcentrator integrated at the wafer level. Other advantages include exhaustive VOC extraction and injection peak widths an order of magnitude narrower than predecessor prototypes. A mass transfer model, the first for any microscale preconcentrator, is developed to describe both adsorption and desorption behaviors. The physically intuitive model uses implicit and explicit finite differences to numerically solve the required partial differential equations. The model is applied to the adsorption and desorption of decane at various concentrations to extract Langmuir adsorption isotherm parameters from effluent curve measurements where properties are unknown a priori.

  7. Spray-Formed Tooling with Micro-Scale Features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin McHugh

    2010-06-01

    Molds, dies, and related tooling are used to shape many of the plastic and metal components we use every day at home and work. Traditional mold-making practices are labor and capital equipment intensive, involving multiple machining, benching and heat treatment operations. Spray forming is an alternative method to manufacture molds and dies. The general concept is to atomize and deposit droplets of a tooling alloy onto a pattern to form a thick deposit while imaging the pattern’s shape, surface texture and details. Unlike conventional machining, this approach can be used to fabricate tooling with micro-scale surface features. This paper describes a research effort to spray form molds and dies that are used to image micro-scale surface textures into polymers. The goal of the study is to replicate textures that give rise to superhydrophobic behavior by mimicking the surface structure of highly water repellent biological materials such as the lotus leaf. Spray conditions leading to high transfer fidelity of features into the surface of molded polymers will be described. Improvements in water repellency of these materials was quantified by measuring the static contact angle of water droplets on flat and textured surfaces.

  8. Optical Levitation of Micro-Scale Particles in Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrbanek, Susan Y.; Weiland, Kenneth E.

    2004-01-01

    Success has been achieved using a radiation pressure gradient to levitate microscale particles in air for as long as four hours. This work is performed as a precursor to the development of a vacuum based optical tweezers interrogation tool for nanotechnology research. It was decided to first proceed with solving the problem of achieving optical levitation of a micro-scale particle in air before trying the same in a vacuum environment. This successful optical levitation in air confirms the work of Ashkin and Dziedzic. Levitation of 10 and 13.8 microns diameter polystyrene spheres was achieved, as well as the levitation of 10 and 100 microns diameter glass spheres. Particles were raised and lowered. A modicum of success was achieved translating particles horizontally. Trapping of multiple particles in one laser beam has been photographed. Also, it has been observed that particles, that may be conglomerates or irregular in shape, can also be trapped by a focused laser beam. Levitated glass beads were photographed using laser light scattered from the beads. The fact that there is evidence of optical traps in air containing irregular and conglomerate particles provides hope that future tool particles need not be perfect spheres.

  9. Reaction-diffusion processes at the nano- and microscales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Irving R.; Xu, Bing

    2016-04-01

    The bottom-up fabrication of nano- and microscale structures from primary building blocks (molecules, colloidal particles) has made remarkable progress over the past two decades, but most research has focused on structural aspects, leaving our understanding of the dynamic and spatiotemporal aspects at a relatively primitive stage. In this Review, we draw inspiration from living cells to argue that it is now time to move beyond the generation of structures and explore dynamic processes at the nanoscale. We first introduce nanoscale self-assembly, self-organization and reaction-diffusion processes as essential features of cells. Then, we highlight recent progress towards designing and controlling these fundamental features of life in abiological systems. Specifically, we discuss examples of reaction-diffusion processes that lead to such outcomes as self-assembly, self-organization, unique nanostructures, chemical waves and dynamic order to illustrate their ubiquity within a unifying context of dynamic oscillations and energy dissipation. Finally, we suggest future directions for research on reaction-diffusion processes at the nano- and microscales that we find hold particular promise for a new understanding of science at the nanoscale and the development of new kinds of nanotechnologies for chemical transport, chemical communication and integration with living systems.

  10. Use of Modern Chemical Protein Synthesis and Advanced Fluorescent Assay Techniques to Experimentally Validate the Functional Annotation of Microbial Genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kent, Stephen [University of Chicago

    2012-07-20

    The objective of this research program was to prototype methods for the chemical synthesis of predicted protein molecules in annotated microbial genomes. High throughput chemical methods were to be used to make large numbers of predicted proteins and protein domains, based on microbial genome sequences. Microscale chemical synthesis methods for the parallel preparation of peptide-thioester building blocks were developed; these peptide segments are used for the parallel chemical synthesis of proteins and protein domains. Ultimately, it is envisaged that these synthetic molecules would be ‘printed’ in spatially addressable arrays. The unique ability of total synthesis to precision label protein molecules with dyes and with chemical or biochemical ‘tags’ can be used to facilitate novel assay technologies adapted from state-of-the art single molecule fluorescence detection techniques. In the future, in conjunction with modern laboratory automation this integrated set of techniques will enable high throughput experimental validation of the functional annotation of microbial genomes.

  11. Microscale heat transfer in a free jet against a plane surface

    CERN Document Server

    Shu, Jian-Jun

    2014-01-01

    A new two-layer model has been proposed to study microscale heat transfer associated with a developing flow boundary layer. As an example, a cold, microscale film of liquid impinging on an isothermal hot, horizontal surface has been investigated. The boundary layer is divided into two regions: a micro layer at microscale away from the surface and a macro layer at macroscale away from the surface. An approximate solution for the velocity and temperature distributions in the flow along the horizontal surface is developed, which exploits the hydrodynamic similarity solution for microscale film flow. The approximate solution may provide a valuable basis for assessing microscale flow and heat transfer in more complex settings.

  12. Manufacturing and automation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Córdoba Nieto

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The article presents concepts and definitions from different sources concerning automation. The work approaches automation by virtue of the author’s experience in manufacturing production; why and how automation prolects are embarked upon is considered. Technological reflection regarding the progressive advances or stages of automation in the production area is stressed. Coriat and Freyssenet’s thoughts about and approaches to the problem of automation and its current state are taken and examined, especially that referring to the problem’s relationship with reconciling the level of automation with the flexibility and productivity demanded by competitive, worldwide manufacturing.

  13. Microscale extraction method for HPLC carotenoid analysis in vegetable matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidney Pacheco

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to generate simple, efficient analytical methods that are also fast, clean, and economical, and are capable of producing reliable results for a large number of samples, a micro scale extraction method for analysis of carotenoids in vegetable matrices was developed. The efficiency of this adapted method was checked by comparing the results obtained from vegetable matrices, based on extraction equivalence, time required and reagents. Six matrices were used: tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L., carrot (Daucus carota L., sweet potato with orange pulp (Ipomoea batatas (L. Lam., pumpkin (Cucurbita moschata Duch., watermelon (Citrullus lanatus (Thunb. Matsum. & Nakai and sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L. Lam. flour. Quantification of the total carotenoids was made by spectrophotometry. Quantification and determination of carotenoid profiles were formulated by High Performance Liquid Chromatography with photodiode array detection. Microscale extraction was faster, cheaper and cleaner than the commonly used one, and advantageous for analytical laboratories.

  14. Devices, systems, and methods for microscale isoelectric fractionation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommer, Gregory J.; Hatch, Anson V.; Wang, Ying-Chih; Singh, Anup K.

    2016-08-09

    Embodiments of the present invention provide devices, systems, and methods for microscale isoelectric fractionation. Analytes in a sample may be isolated according to their isoelectric point within a fractionation microchannel. A microfluidic device according to an embodiment of the invention includes a substrate at least partially defining a fractionation microchannel. The fractionation microchannel has at least one cross-sectional dimension equal to or less than 1 mm. A plurality of membranes of different pHs are disposed in the microchannel. Analytes having an isoelectric point between the pH of the membranes may be collected in a region of the fractionation channel between the first and second membranes through isoelectric fractionation.

  15. Complete linear optical isolation at the microscale with ultralow loss

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, JunHwan; Bahl, Gaurav

    2016-01-01

    Low-loss optical isolators and circulators are critical nonreciprocal components for signal routing and protection, but their chip-scale integration is not yet practical using standard photonics foundry processes. The significant challenges that confront integration of magneto-optic nonreciprocal systems on chip have made imperative the exploration of magnet free alternatives. However, none of these approaches have yet demonstrated linear optical isolation with ideal characteristics over a microscale footprint - simultaneously incorporating large contrast with ultralow forward loss - having fundamental compatibility with photonic integration in standard waveguide materials. Here we demonstrate that complete linear optical isolation can be obtained within any dielectric waveguide using only a whispering-gallery microresonator pumped by a single-frequency laser. The isolation originates from a nonreciprocal induced transparency based on a coherent light-sound interaction, with the coupling originating from the ...

  16. Devices, systems, and methods for microscale isoelectric fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Gregory J; Hatch, Anson V; Wang, Ying-Chih; Singh, Anup K

    2015-04-14

    Embodiments of the present invention provide devices, systems, and methods for microscale isoelectric fractionation. Analytes in a sample may be isolated according to their isoelectric point within a fractionation microchannel. A microfluidic device according to an embodiment of the invention includes a substrate at least partially defining a fractionation microchannel. The fractionation microchannel has at least one cross-sectional dimension equal to or less than 1 mm. A plurality of membranes of different pHs are disposed in the microchannel. Analytes having an isoelectric point between the pH of the membranes may be collected in a region of the fractionation channel between the first and second membranes through isoelectric fractionation.

  17. Configuration Management Automation (CMA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — Configuration Management Automation (CMA) will provide an automated, integrated enterprise solution to support CM of FAA NAS and Non-NAS assets and investments. CMA...

  18. Capillary Filling at the Microscale: Control of Fluid Front Using Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trejo-Soto, C.; Costa-Miracle, E.; Rodriguez-Villarreal, I.; Cid, J.; Alarcón, T.; Hernández-Machado, Aurora

    2016-01-01

    We propose an experimental and theoretical framework for the study of capillary filling at the micro-scale. Our methodology enables us to control the fluid flow regime so that we can characterise properties of Newtonian fluids such as their viscosity. In particular, we study a viscous, non-inertial, non-Washburn regime in which the position of the fluid front increases linearly with time for the whole duration of the experiment. The operating shear-rate range of our apparatus extends over nearly two orders of magnitude. Further, we analyse the advancement of a fluid front within a microcapillary in a system of two immiscible Newtonian liquids. We observe a non-Washburn regime in which the front can accelerate or decelerate depending on the viscosity contrast between the two liquids. We then propose a theoretical model which enables us to study and explain both non-Washburn regimes. Furthermore, our theoretical model allows us to put forward ways to control the emergence of these regimes by means of geometrical parameters of the experimental set-up. Our methodology allows us to design and calibrate a micro-viscosimetre which works at constant pressure. PMID:27104734

  19. Effects of electric field on micro-scale flame properties of biobutanol fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tao; Chen, Qinglin; Zhang, Bingjian; Lu, Shushen; Mo, Dongchuan; Zhang, Zhengguo; Gao, Xuenong

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing need of smaller power sources for satellites, energy systems and engine equipment, microcombustion pose a potential as alternative power source to conventional batteries. As the substitute fuel source for gasoline, biobutanol shows more promising characteristics than ethanol. In this study, the diffusion microflame of liquid biobutanol under electric field have been examined through in-lab experiment and numerical simulation. It is found that traditional gas jet diffusion flame theory shows significant inconsistency with the experimental results of micro scale flame in electric field. The results suggest that with the increase of electric field intensity, the quenching flow rate decrease first and increase after it reach its minimum, while the flame height and highest flame temperature increase first and drop after its peak value. In addition, it was also observed that the flame height and highest temperature for smaller tube can reach its maximum faster. Therefore, the interaction between microscale effect and electric field plays a significant role on understanding the microcombustion of liquid fuel. Therefore, FLUENT simulation was adopted to understand and measure the impacts of microflame characteristic parameters. The final numerical results are consistent with the experimental data and show a high reliability. PMID:27609428

  20. Effects of electric field on micro-scale flame properties of biobutanol fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tao; Chen, Qinglin; Zhang, Bingjian; Lu, Shushen; Mo, Dongchuan; Zhang, Zhengguo; Gao, Xuenong

    2016-09-01

    With the increasing need of smaller power sources for satellites, energy systems and engine equipment, microcombustion pose a potential as alternative power source to conventional batteries. As the substitute fuel source for gasoline, biobutanol shows more promising characteristics than ethanol. In this study, the diffusion microflame of liquid biobutanol under electric field have been examined through in-lab experiment and numerical simulation. It is found that traditional gas jet diffusion flame theory shows significant inconsistency with the experimental results of micro scale flame in electric field. The results suggest that with the increase of electric field intensity, the quenching flow rate decrease first and increase after it reach its minimum, while the flame height and highest flame temperature increase first and drop after its peak value. In addition, it was also observed that the flame height and highest temperature for smaller tube can reach its maximum faster. Therefore, the interaction between microscale effect and electric field plays a significant role on understanding the microcombustion of liquid fuel. Therefore, FLUENT simulation was adopted to understand and measure the impacts of microflame characteristic parameters. The final numerical results are consistent with the experimental data and show a high reliability.

  1. Effects of electric field on micro-scale flame properties of biobutanol fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tao; Chen, Qinglin; Zhang, Bingjian; Lu, Shushen; Mo, Dongchuan; Zhang, Zhengguo; Gao, Xuenong

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing need of smaller power sources for satellites, energy systems and engine equipment, microcombustion pose a potential as alternative power source to conventional batteries. As the substitute fuel source for gasoline, biobutanol shows more promising characteristics than ethanol. In this study, the diffusion microflame of liquid biobutanol under electric field have been examined through in-lab experiment and numerical simulation. It is found that traditional gas jet diffusion flame theory shows significant inconsistency with the experimental results of micro scale flame in electric field. The results suggest that with the increase of electric field intensity, the quenching flow rate decrease first and increase after it reach its minimum, while the flame height and highest flame temperature increase first and drop after its peak value. In addition, it was also observed that the flame height and highest temperature for smaller tube can reach its maximum faster. Therefore, the interaction between microscale effect and electric field plays a significant role on understanding the microcombustion of liquid fuel. Therefore, FLUENT simulation was adopted to understand and measure the impacts of microflame characteristic parameters. The final numerical results are consistent with the experimental data and show a high reliability. PMID:27609428

  2. Workflow automation architecture standard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moshofsky, R.P.; Rohen, W.T. [Boeing Computer Services Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-11-14

    This document presents an architectural standard for application of workflow automation technology. The standard includes a functional architecture, process for developing an automated workflow system for a work group, functional and collateral specifications for workflow automation, and results of a proof of concept prototype.

  3. Highly Localized Acoustic Streaming and Size-Selective Submicrometer Particle Concentration Using High Frequency Microscale Focused Acoustic Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, David J; Ma, Zhichao; Ai, Ye

    2016-05-17

    Concentration and separation of particles and biological specimens are fundamental functions of micro/nanofluidic systems. Acoustic streaming is an effective and biocompatible way to create rapid microscale fluid motion and induce particle capture, though the >100 MHz frequencies required to directly generate acoustic body forces on the microscale have traditionally been difficult to generate and localize in a way that is amenable to efficient generation of streaming. Moreover, acoustic, hydrodynamic, and electrical forces as typically applied have difficulty manipulating specimens in the submicrometer regime. In this work, we introduce highly focused traveling surface acoustic waves (SAW) at high frequencies between 193 and 636 MHz for efficient and highly localized production of acoustic streaming vortices on microfluidic length scales. Concentration occurs via a novel mechanism, whereby the combined acoustic radiation and streaming field results in size-selective aggregation in fluid streamlines in the vicinity of a high-amplitude acoustic beam, as opposed to previous acoustic radiation induced particle concentration where objects typically migrate toward minimum pressure locations. Though the acoustic streaming is induced by a traveling wave, we are able to manipulate particles an order of magnitude smaller than possible using the traveling wave force alone. We experimentally and theoretically examine the range of particle sizes that can be captured in fluid streamlines using this technique, with rapid particle concentration demonstrated down to 300 nm diameters. We also demonstrate that locations of trapping and concentration are size-dependent, which is attributed to the combined effects of the acoustic streaming and acoustic forces.

  4. Thermal chip fabrication with arrays of sensors and heaters for micro-scale impingement cooling heat transfer analysis and measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, C H; Gau, C

    2004-07-30

    The design and fabrication for a thermal chip with an array of temperature sensors and heaters for study of micro-jet impingement cooling heat transfer process are presented. This thermal chip can minimize the heat loss from the system to the ambient and provide a uniform heat flux along the wall, thus local heat transfer processes along the wall can be measured and obtained. The fabrication procedure presented can reach a chip yield of 100%, and every one of the sensors and heaters on the chip is in good condition. In addition, micro-jet impingement cooling experiments are performed to obtain the micro-scale local heat transfer Nusselt number along the wall. Flow visualization for the micro-impinging jet is also made. The experimental results indicate that both the micro-scale impinging jet flow structure and the heat transfer process along the wall is significantly different from the case of large-scale jet impingement cooling process. PMID:15142582

  5. Steady electrodiffusion in hydrogel-colloid composites: macroscale properties from microscale electrokinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reghan J. Hill

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available A rigorous microscale electrokinetic model for hydrogel-colloid composites is adopted to compute macroscale profiles of electrolyte concentration, electrostatic potential, and hydrostatic pressure across membranes that separate electrolytes with different concentrations. The membranes are uncharged polymeric hydrogels in which charged spherical colloidal particles are immobilized and randomly dispersed with a low solid volume fraction. Bulk membrane characteristics and performance are calculated from a continuum microscale electrokinetic model (Hill 2006b, c. The computations undertaken in this paper quantify the streaming and membrane potentials. For the membrane potential, increasing the volume fraction of negatively charged inclusions decreases the differential electrostatic potential across the membrane under conditions where there is zero convective flow and zero electrical current. With low electrolyte concentration and highly charged nanoparticles, the membrane potential is very sensitive to the particle volume fraction. Accordingly, the membrane potential - and changes brought about by the inclusion size, charge and concentration - could be a useful experimental diagnostic to complement more recent applications of the microscale electrokinetic model for electrical microrheology and electroacoustics (Hill and Ostoja-Starzewski 2008, Wang and Hill 2008.Um modelo eletrocinético rigoroso para compósitos formados por um hidrogel e um colóide é adotado para computar os perfis macroscópicos de concentração eletrolítica, potencial eletrostático e pressão hidrostática através de uma membrana que separa soluções com diferentes concentrações eletrolíticas. A membrana é composta por um hidrogel polimérico sem carga elétrica onde partículas esféricas são imobilizadas e dispersas aleatoriamente com baixa fração de volume do sólido. As características da membrana e a sua performance são calculadas a partir de um modelo

  6. Shoe-String Automation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncan, M.L.

    2001-07-30

    Faced with a downsizing organization, serious budget reductions and retirement of key metrology personnel, maintaining capabilities to provide necessary services to our customers was becoming increasingly difficult. It appeared that the only solution was to automate some of our more personnel-intensive processes; however, it was crucial that the most personnel-intensive candidate process be automated, at the lowest price possible and with the lowest risk of failure. This discussion relates factors in the selection of the Standard Leak Calibration System for automation, the methods of automation used to provide the lowest-cost solution and the benefits realized as a result of the automation.

  7. Collembola at three alpine subarctic sites resistant to twenty years of experimental warming

    OpenAIRE

    Alatalo, Juha M.; Annika K. Jägerbrand; Peter Čuchta

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the effects of micro-scale, site and 19 and 21 years of experimental warming on Collembola in three contrasting alpine subarctic plant communities (poor heath, rich meadow, wet meadow). Unexpectedly, experimental long-term warming had no significant effect on species richness, effective number of species, total abundance or abundance of any Collembola species. There were micro-scale effects on species richness, total abundance, and abundance of 10 of 35 species identified....

  8. Microscale spatial distributions of microbes and viruses in intertidal photosynthetic microbial mats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carreira, C; Piel, T; Staal, M.; Stuut, J.-B; Middelboe, M.; Brussaard, C.P.D.

    2015-01-01

    Intertidal photosynthetic microbial mats from the Wadden Sea island Schiermonnikoog were examined for microscale (millimetre) spatial distributions of viruses, prokaryotes and oxygenic photoautotrophs (filamentous cyanobacteria and benthic diatoms) at different times of the year. Abundances of virus

  9. Microscale Demonstration of the Paramagnetism of Liquid Oxygen with a Neodymium Magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattson, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    A microscale classroom demonstration of the paramagnetic behavior of various samples of liquid oxygen with neodymium magnet is being presented. The experiment should be done with extreme caution, as liquid oxygen reacts violently with organic matters.

  10. Using a Microscale Approach to Rapidly Separate and Characterize Three Photosynthetic Pigment Species from Fern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayudhya, Theppawut Israsena Na; Posey, Frederick T.; Tyus, Jessica C.; Dingra, Nin N.

    2015-01-01

    A rapid separation of three photosynthetic pigments (chlorophyll "a" and "b" and xanthophyll) from fern ("Polystichum acrostichoides") is described using microscale solvent extraction and traditional thin layer chromatography that minimizes use of harmful chemicals and lengthy procedures. The experiment introduces…

  11. Prediction of mechanical properties of cement paste at microscale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Breugel, K.

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Prediction of the mechanical properties of cement paste at microscale has been done in this contribution by making use of 3D lattice fracture model. The microstructure of cement paste is simulated by HYMOSTRUC3D first, which is represented in terms of sphere particles. Then the microstructure is converted into a voxel-based image, and a lattice system is constructed based on the image of the microstructure through ImgLat (Image to Lattice. A virtual uni-axial tensile test is configured and the fracture process is simulated by GLAK (Generalized Lattice Analysis Kernel. The outputs of fracture process simulation are the load-displacement diagram and micro-cracks propagation. The load-displacement diagram reveals the tensile behavior of cement paste at microscale, from which the elastic modulus and tensile strength can be obtained. A numerical experiment is carried out to show how the model works, and the final results also demonstrate the feasibility of the above modeling procedure.

    En el presente trabajo se ha realizado una predicción de las propiedades mecánicas del cemento en la micro-escala, empleando un modelo de fractura reticular 3D. En primer lugar se simula la micro-estructura del cemento mediante el código HYMOSTRUC3D, representando dicha micro-estructura mediante partículas esféricas. A continuación, la micro-estructura generada se convierte en una imagen basada en “vóxeles”, y se construye un sistema reticular basado en esa imagen mediante el código ImgLat (Image to Lattice. Se define un ensayo de tensión uniaxial virtual, y se simula el proceso de fractura usando el código GLAK (Generalized Lattice Análisis Kernel. Los resultados obtenidos de esta simulación del proceso de fractura son diagramas de carga-desplazamiento y propagación de micro-roturas. El diagrama de carga-desplazamiento caracteriza el comportamiento a fractura de la pasta de cemento en la micro-escala, y a partir de éste se puede

  12. Evidence of Ostwald ripening during evolution of micro-scale solid carbon spheres

    OpenAIRE

    Heon Ham; No-Hyung Park; Sang Sub Kim; Hyoun Woo Kim

    2014-01-01

    Ostwald ripening is an evolutionary mechanism that results in micro-scale carbon spheres from nano-scale spheres. Vapor-phase carbon elements from small carbon nanoparticles are transported to the surface of submicron-scale carbon spheres, eventually leading to their evolution to micro-scale spheres via well-known growth mechanisms, including the layer-by-layer, island, and mixed growth modes. The results obtained from this work will pave the way to the disclosure of the evolutionary mechanis...

  13. Fiber-optic fluorometer for microscale mapping of photosynthetic pigments in microbial communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thar, Roland Matthias; Kühl, Michael; Holst, Gerhard

    2001-01-01

    Microscale fluorescence measurements were performed in photosynthetic biofilms at a spatial resolution of 100 to 200 µm with a new fiber-optic fluorometer which allowed four different excitation and emission wavelengths and was configured for measuring phycobiliproteins, chlorophylls, and bacteri......Microscale fluorescence measurements were performed in photosynthetic biofilms at a spatial resolution of 100 to 200 µm with a new fiber-optic fluorometer which allowed four different excitation and emission wavelengths and was configured for measuring phycobiliproteins, chlorophylls...

  14. Engineering of microscale three-dimensional pancreatic islet models in vitro and their biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Bin; Wang, Lin; Han, Shuang; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda; Zhang, Xiaohui; Xu, Feng

    2016-08-01

    Diabetes now is the most common chronic disease in the world inducing heavy burden for the people's health. Based on this, diabetes research such as islet function has become a hot topic in medical institutes of the world. Today, in medical institutes, the conventional experiment platform in vitro is monolayer cell culture. However, with the development of micro- and nano-technologies, several microengineering methods have been developed to fabricate three-dimensional (3D) islet models in vitro which can better mimic the islet of pancreases in vivo. These in vitro islet models have shown better cell function than monolayer cells, indicating their great potential as better experimental platforms to elucidate islet behaviors under both physiological and pathological conditions, such as the molecular mechanisms of diabetes and clinical islet transplantation. In this review, we present the state-of-the-art advances in the microengineering methods for fabricating microscale islet models in vitro. We hope this will help researchers to better understand the progress in the engineering 3D islet models and their biomedical applications such as drug screening and islet transplantation.

  15. Thermodynamics at the microscale: from effective heating to the Brownian Carnot engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinis, L.; Martínez, I. A.; Roldán, É.; Parrondo, J. M. R.; Rica, R. A.

    2016-05-01

    We review a series of experimental studies of the thermodynamics of nonequilibrium processes at the microscale. In particular, in these experiments we studied the fluctuations of the thermodynamic properties of a single optically-trapped microparticle immersed in water and in the presence of external random forces. In equilibrium, the fluctuations of the position of the particle can be described by an effective temperature that can be tuned up to thousands of Kelvin. Isothermal and non-isothermal thermodynamic processes that also involve changes in a control parameter were implemented by controlling the effective temperature of the particle and the stiffness of the optical trap. Since truly adiabatic processes are unfeasible in colloidal systems, mean adiabatic protocols where no average heat is exchanged between the particle and the environment are discussed and implemented. By concatenating isothermal and adiabatic protocols, it is shown how a single-particle Carnot engine can be constructed. Finally, we provide an in-depth study of the fluctuations of the energetics and the efficiency of the cycle.

  16. Engineering of microscale three-dimensional pancreatic islet models in vitro and their biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Bin; Wang, Lin; Han, Shuang; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda; Zhang, Xiaohui; Xu, Feng

    2016-08-01

    Diabetes now is the most common chronic disease in the world inducing heavy burden for the people's health. Based on this, diabetes research such as islet function has become a hot topic in medical institutes of the world. Today, in medical institutes, the conventional experiment platform in vitro is monolayer cell culture. However, with the development of micro- and nano-technologies, several microengineering methods have been developed to fabricate three-dimensional (3D) islet models in vitro which can better mimic the islet of pancreases in vivo. These in vitro islet models have shown better cell function than monolayer cells, indicating their great potential as better experimental platforms to elucidate islet behaviors under both physiological and pathological conditions, such as the molecular mechanisms of diabetes and clinical islet transplantation. In this review, we present the state-of-the-art advances in the microengineering methods for fabricating microscale islet models in vitro. We hope this will help researchers to better understand the progress in the engineering 3D islet models and their biomedical applications such as drug screening and islet transplantation. PMID:25669871

  17. Microscale Distribution of Hydrogen Isotopes in Two Carbonaceous Chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, A. F.; Nittler, L. R.; Alexander, C. M. O'D

    2004-01-01

    Hydrogen isotopes are highly variable among primitive meteorites and interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) [1, 2]. In particular, many primitive objects exhibit D (and N-15) enrichments, relative to terrestrial values, thought to represent partial preservation of presolar material fractionated in molecular clouds. However, the diversity of D/H ratios among IDPs and chondrites indicates a complex history of processing in the solar nebula and on meteorite parent bodies. Deconvolving this record requires identification and characterization of the carriers of D enrichments in different objects. Isotopic imaging has proven to be a powerful method to quantitatively explore the distribution of D/H ratios on a one to several m scale in IDPs [2-4] and the CR chondrite Renazzo [5, 6]. In this study, we have used ion imaging to explore the microscale D/H distribution of two carbonaceous chondrites, Tagish Lake (unique) and Al Rais (CR2). Previous D/H measurements (on a tens of microns scale) of Tagish Lake matrix fragments by Messenger [7] and Engrand et al. [8] have found different results, most likely related to the analytical techniques used. Previous work has also shown a large range of D/H ratios in CR chondrites, including very large variations on a scale of a few microns [5, 6, 9].

  18. Studying epigenetic interactions using MicroScale Thermophoresis (MST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Schubert

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetic regulation is based on specific molecular interactions between epigenetic reader, writer and eraser molecules and chromatin. Binding parameters of these interactions such as binding affinities, stoichiometries and thermodynamics are essential for the understanding of the establishment and maintenance of epigenetic networks. The MicroScale Thermophoresis (MST is a rapid and precise method to characterize epigenetic interactions in solution at microliter scale, requiring low concentrations of the potential interactors. The technology is based on the movement of molecules through temperature gradients, a physical effect referred to as thermophoresis. The thermophoretic movement of a molecule depends on its size, charge and hydration shell. Upon the interaction of two molecules, at least one of these parameters is altered, leading to a change in the movement behavior, which can be used to quantify molecular interactions. MST offers free choice of buffers, also allowing measurements in serum and crude extracts, thereby ensuring optimal reaction conditions. Binding affinities from pM to mM can be measured, perfectly suited to analyze protein/protein, protein/modified peptide and protein/nucleic acid interactions in epigenetics. This review demonstrates the potential of this rapid and versatile technology in the characterization of epigenetic modifiers.

  19. Fabrication of microscale materials with programmable composition gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laval, Cédric; Bouchaudy, Anne; Salmon, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-04-01

    We present an original microfluidic technique coupling pervaporation and the use of Quake valves to fabricate microscale materials (∼10 × 100 μm(2) × 1 cm) with composition gradients along their longest dimension. Our device exploits pervaporation of water through a thin poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) membrane to continuously pump solutions (or dispersions) contained in different reservoirs connected to a microfluidic channel. This pervaporation-induced flow concentrates solutes (or particles) at the tip of the channel up to the formation of a dense material. The latter invades the channel as it is constantly enriched by an incoming flux of solutes/particles. Upstream Quake valves are used to select which reservoir is connected to the pervaporation channel and thus which solution (or dispersion) enriches the material during its growth. The microfluidic configuration of the pervaporation process is used to impose controlled growth along the channel thus enabling one to program spatial composition gradients using appropriate actuations of the valves. We demonstrate the possibilities offered by our technique through the fabrication of dense assemblies of nanoparticles and polymer composites with programmed gradients of fluorescent dyes. We also address the key issue of the spatial resolution of our gradients and we show that well-defined spatial modulations down to ≈50 μm can be obtained within colloidal materials, whereas gradients within polymer materials are resolved on length scales down to ≈1 mm due to molecular diffusion. PMID:26931112

  20. An artificial experimenter for automated response characterisation

    OpenAIRE

    Lovell, Christopher James

    2011-01-01

    Biology exhibits information processing capabilities, such as parallel processing and context sensitivity, which go far beyond the capabilities of modern conventional electronic computation. In particular the interactions of proteins suh as enzymes are interesting, as they appear to act as efficient biomolecular computers. Harnessing proteins as biomolecular computers is currently not possible, as little is understood about their interactions outside of a physiological context. Understanding ...

  1. Adhesiveless Transfer Printing of Ultrathin Microscale Semiconductor Materials by Controlling the Bending Radius of an Elastomeric Stamp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sungbum; Kim, Namyun; Song, Kwangsun; Lee, Jongho

    2016-08-01

    High-performance electronic devices integrated onto unconventional substrates provide opportunities for use in diverse applications, such as wearable or implantable forms of electronic devices. However, the interlayer adhesives between the electronic devices and substrates often limit processing temperature or cause electrical or thermal resistance at the interface. This paper introduces a very simple but effective transfer printing method that does not require an interlayer adhesive. Controlling the bending radius of a simple flat stamp enables picking up or printing of microscale semiconductor materials onto rigid, curvilinear, or flexible surfaces without the aid of a liquid adhesive. Theoretical and experimental studies reveal the underlying mechanism of the suggested approach. Adhesiveless printing of thin Si plates onto diverse substrates demonstrates the capability of this method. PMID:27458878

  2. Numerical Simulations of the Microscale Heterogeneities of Turbulence Observed on a Complex Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaïdi, Hanane; Dupont, Eric; Milliez, Maya; Musson-Genon, Luc; Carissimo, Bertrand

    2013-05-01

    We simulate the microscale heterogeneities of turbulent variables observed at a complex site for different wind directions. The atmospheric computational fluid dynamics (CFD) results are compared with an ensemble of 36 months of data collected at the experimental site SIRTA "Site Instrumental de Recherche par Télédétection Atmosphérique", located near Paris (France) in a semi-urban environment. The experimental data show that the normalized turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) k/ U 2 (where k is TKE and U is the wind speed) at 10-m height, for two different locations, is highly dependent on wind direction and strongly influenced by trees. These measurements show a strong increase of the normalized TKE downstream of the forest canopies with a large variability within the 36-month period in part due to the variation of the tree foliage. The numerical simulations are carried out using the CFD code Code_Saturne with the standard k-ɛ closure, in neutral stratification. The buildings are taken into account explicitly in the mesh and the forested areas are modelled with two approaches: the classical roughness wall law and a drag porosity. A comparison has been performed between the calculated values and the median of measured values of the normalized TKE and the normalized friction velocity, for each wind sector of 10°. A very good agreement is obtained with the drag porosity model, whereas the classical roughness law leads to a strong underestimation downstream of the forested areas. However, this large improvement of the results using the drag porosity model can only be obtained with a refinement of the grid, especially in forested areas, and an accurate land-use map.

  3. Microscale approaches to the rapid evaluation and specification of microfiltration processes

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, N. B.

    2011-01-01

    A high throughput method for the study of normal flow microfiltration operations has been established using a custom designed 8-24 well filter plate (0.8 cm2) and a commercial 96-well Multiscreen filter plate (0.3 cm2). Integration of this new approach with a typical robotic platform has enabled automation of the experimental procedure. Membrane resistance data can be quantified using either filter plate. The accuracy of these measurements has helped to determine that plate position does n...

  4. Optical tracking of nanoscale particles in microscale environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathai, P. P.; Liddle, J. A.; Stavis, S. M.

    2016-03-01

    The trajectories of nanoscale particles through microscale environments record useful information about both the particles and the environments. Optical microscopes provide efficient access to this information through measurements of light in the far field from nanoparticles. Such measurements necessarily involve trade-offs in tracking capabilities. This article presents a measurement framework, based on information theory, that facilitates a more systematic understanding of such trade-offs to rationally design tracking systems for diverse applications. This framework includes the degrees of freedom of optical microscopes, which determine the limitations of tracking measurements in theory. In the laboratory, tracking systems are assemblies of sources and sensors, optics and stages, and nanoparticle emitters. The combined characteristics of such systems determine the limitations of tracking measurements in practice. This article reviews this tracking hardware with a focus on the essential functions of nanoparticles as optical emitters and microenvironmental probes. Within these theoretical and practical limitations, experimentalists have implemented a variety of tracking systems with different capabilities. This article reviews a selection of apparatuses and techniques for tracking multiple and single particles by tuning illumination and detection, and by using feedback and confinement to improve the measurements. Prior information is also useful in many tracking systems and measurements, which apply across a broad spectrum of science and technology. In the context of the framework and review of apparatuses and techniques, this article reviews a selection of applications, with particle diffusion serving as a prelude to tracking measurements in biological, fluid, and material systems, fabrication and assembly processes, and engineered devices. In so doing, this review identifies trends and gaps in particle tracking that might influence future research.

  5. 3D printed components with ultrasonically arranged microscale structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llewellyn-Jones, Thomas M.; Drinkwater, Bruce W.; Trask, Richard S.

    2016-02-01

    This paper shows the first application of in situ manipulation of discontinuous fibrous structure mid-print, within a 3D printed polymeric composite architecture. Currently, rapid prototyping methods (fused filament fabrication, stereolithography) are gaining increasing popularity within the engineering commnity to build structural components. Unfortunately, the full potential of these components is limited by the mechanical properties of the materials used. The aim of this study is to create and demonstrate a novel method to instantaneously orient micro-scale glass fibres within a selectively cured photocurable resin system, using ultrasonic forces to align the fibres in the desired 3D architecture. To achieve this we have mounted a switchable, focused laser module on the carriage of a three-axis 3D printing stage, above an in-house ultrasonic alignment rig containing a mixture of photocurable resin and discontinuous 14 μm diameter glass fibre reinforcement(50 μm length). In our study, a suitable print speed of 20 mm s-1 was used, which is comparable to conventional additive layer techniques. We show the ability to construct in-plane orthogonally aligned sections printed side by side, where the precise orientation of the configurations is controlled by switching the ultrasonic standing wave profile mid-print. This approach permits the realisation of complex fibrous architectures within a 3D printed landscape. The versatile nature of the ultrasonic manipulation technique also permits a wide range of particle types (diameters, aspect ratios and functions) and architectures (in-plane, and out-plane) to be patterned, leading to the creation of a new generation of fibrous reinforced composites for 3D printing.

  6. Micro-scale mass-transfer variations during electrodeposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutija, D.P.

    1991-08-01

    Results of two studies on micro-scale mass-transfer enhancement are reported: (1) Profiled cross-sections of striated zinc surfaces deposited in laminar channel flow were analyzed with fast-fourier transforms (FFT) to determine preferred striation wavelengths. Striation frequency increases with current density until a minimum separation between striae of 150 {mu}m is reached. Beyond this point, independent of substrate used, striae meld together and form a relatively smooth, nodular deposit. Substrates equipped with artificial micron-sized protrusions result in significantly different macro-morphology in zinc deposits. Micro-patterned electrodes (MPE) with hemispherical protrusions 5 {mu}m in diameter yield thin zinc striae at current densities that ordinarily produce random nodular deposits. MPEs with artificial hemi-cylinders, 2.5 {mu}m in height and spaced 250 {mu}m apart, form striae with a period which matches the spacing of micron-sized ridges. (2) A novel, corrosion-resistant micromosaic electrode was fabricated on a silicon wafer. Measurements of mass-transport enhancement to a vertical micromosaic electrode caused by parallel bubble streams rising inside of the diffusion boundary-layer demonstrated the presence of two co-temporal enhancement mechanisms: surface-renewal increases the limiting current within five bubble diameters of the rising column, while bubble-induced laminar flows cause weaker enhancement over a much broader swath. The enhancement caused by bubble curtains is predicted accurately by linear superposition of single-column enhancements. Two columns of smaller H{sub 2} bubbles generated at the same volumetric rate as a single column of larger bubbles cause higher peak and far-field enhancements. 168 refs., 96 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Optical tracking of nanoscale particles in microscale environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathai, P. P.; Liddle, J. A.; Stavis, S. M.

    2016-01-01

    The trajectories of nanoscale particles through microscale environments record useful information about both the particles and the environments. Optical microscopes provide efficient access to this information through measurements of light in the far field from nanoparticles. Such measurements necessarily involve trade-offs in tracking capabilities. This article presents a measurement framework, based on information theory, that facilitates a more systematic understanding of such trade-offs to rationally design tracking systems for diverse applications. This framework includes the degrees of freedom of optical microscopes, which determine the limitations of tracking measurements in theory. In the laboratory, tracking systems are assemblies of sources and sensors, optics and stages, and nanoparticle emitters. The combined characteristics of such systems determine the limitations of tracking measurements in practice. This article reviews this tracking hardware with a focus on the essential functions of nanoparticles as optical emitters and microenvironmental probes. Within these theoretical and practical limitations, experimentalists have implemented a variety of tracking systems with different capabilities. This article reviews a selection of apparatuses and techniques for tracking multiple and single particles by tuning illumination and detection, and by using feedback and confinement to improve the measurements. Prior information is also useful in many tracking systems and measurements, which apply across a broad spectrum of science and technology. In the context of the framework and review of apparatuses and techniques, this article reviews a selection of applications, with particle diffusion serving as a prelude to tracking measurements in biological, fluid, and material systems, fabrication and assembly processes, and engineered devices. In so doing, this review identifies trends and gaps in particle tracking that might influence future research. PMID:27213022

  8. Automate functional testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Kalindri

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Currently, software engineers are increasingly turning to the option of automating functional tests, but not always have successful in this endeavor. Reasons range from low planning until over cost in the process. Some principles that can guide teams in automating these tests are described in this article.

  9. Automation in Warehouse Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamberg, R.; Verriet, J.

    2012-01-01

    The warehouses of the future will come in a variety of forms, but with a few common ingredients. Firstly, human operational handling of items in warehouses is increasingly being replaced by automated item handling. Extended warehouse automation counteracts the scarcity of human operators and support

  10. Work and Programmable Automation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVore, Paul W.

    A new industrial era based on electronics and the microprocessor has arrived, an era that is being called intelligent automation. Intelligent automation, in the form of robots, replaces workers, and the new products, using microelectronic devices, require significantly less labor to produce than the goods they replace. The microprocessor thus…

  11. Library Automation Style Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaylord Bros., Liverpool, NY.

    This library automation style guide lists specific terms and names often used in the library automation industry. The terms and/or acronyms are listed alphabetically and each is followed by a brief definition. The guide refers to the "Chicago Manual of Style" for general rules, and a notes section is included for the convenience of individual…

  12. Automation in immunohematology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajpai, Meenu; Kaur, Ravneet; Gupta, Ekta

    2012-07-01

    There have been rapid technological advances in blood banking in South Asian region over the past decade with an increasing emphasis on quality and safety of blood products. The conventional test tube technique has given way to newer techniques such as column agglutination technique, solid phase red cell adherence assay, and erythrocyte-magnetized technique. These new technologies are adaptable to automation and major manufacturers in this field have come up with semi and fully automated equipments for immunohematology tests in the blood bank. Automation improves the objectivity and reproducibility of tests. It reduces human errors in patient identification and transcription errors. Documentation and traceability of tests, reagents and processes and archiving of results is another major advantage of automation. Shifting from manual methods to automation is a major undertaking for any transfusion service to provide quality patient care with lesser turnaround time for their ever increasing workload. This article discusses the various issues involved in the process.

  13. Automation in Immunohematology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenu Bajpai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There have been rapid technological advances in blood banking in South Asian region over the past decade with an increasing emphasis on quality and safety of blood products. The conventional test tube technique has given way to newer techniques such as column agglutination technique, solid phase red cell adherence assay, and erythrocyte-magnetized technique. These new technologies are adaptable to automation and major manufacturers in this field have come up with semi and fully automated equipments for immunohematology tests in the blood bank. Automation improves the objectivity and reproducibility of tests. It reduces human errors in patient identification and transcription errors. Documentation and traceability of tests, reagents and processes and archiving of results is another major advantage of automation. Shifting from manual methods to automation is a major undertaking for any transfusion service to provide quality patient care with lesser turnaround time for their ever increasing workload. This article discusses the various issues involved in the process.

  14. Automation in immunohematology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajpai, Meenu; Kaur, Ravneet; Gupta, Ekta

    2012-07-01

    There have been rapid technological advances in blood banking in South Asian region over the past decade with an increasing emphasis on quality and safety of blood products. The conventional test tube technique has given way to newer techniques such as column agglutination technique, solid phase red cell adherence assay, and erythrocyte-magnetized technique. These new technologies are adaptable to automation and major manufacturers in this field have come up with semi and fully automated equipments for immunohematology tests in the blood bank. Automation improves the objectivity and reproducibility of tests. It reduces human errors in patient identification and transcription errors. Documentation and traceability of tests, reagents and processes and archiving of results is another major advantage of automation. Shifting from manual methods to automation is a major undertaking for any transfusion service to provide quality patient care with lesser turnaround time for their ever increasing workload. This article discusses the various issues involved in the process. PMID:22988378

  15. Automation in Warehouse Development

    CERN Document Server

    Verriet, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    The warehouses of the future will come in a variety of forms, but with a few common ingredients. Firstly, human operational handling of items in warehouses is increasingly being replaced by automated item handling. Extended warehouse automation counteracts the scarcity of human operators and supports the quality of picking processes. Secondly, the development of models to simulate and analyse warehouse designs and their components facilitates the challenging task of developing warehouses that take into account each customer’s individual requirements and logistic processes. Automation in Warehouse Development addresses both types of automation from the innovative perspective of applied science. In particular, it describes the outcomes of the Falcon project, a joint endeavour by a consortium of industrial and academic partners. The results include a model-based approach to automate warehouse control design, analysis models for warehouse design, concepts for robotic item handling and computer vision, and auton...

  16. Advances in inspection automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Walter H.; Mair, H. Douglas; Jansen, Dion; Lombardi, Luciano

    2013-01-01

    This new session at QNDE reflects the growing interest in inspection automation. Our paper describes a newly developed platform that makes the complex NDE automation possible without the need for software programmers. Inspection tasks that are tedious, error-prone or impossible for humans to perform can now be automated using a form of drag and drop visual scripting. Our work attempts to rectify the problem that NDE is not keeping pace with the rest of factory automation. Outside of NDE, robots routinely and autonomously machine parts, assemble components, weld structures and report progress to corporate databases. By contrast, components arriving in the NDT department typically require manual part handling, calibrations and analysis. The automation examples in this paper cover the development of robotic thickness gauging and the use of adaptive contour following on the NRU reactor inspection at Chalk River.

  17. Automated model building

    CERN Document Server

    Caferra, Ricardo; Peltier, Nicholas

    2004-01-01

    This is the first book on automated model building, a discipline of automated deduction that is of growing importance Although models and their construction are important per se, automated model building has appeared as a natural enrichment of automated deduction, especially in the attempt to capture the human way of reasoning The book provides an historical overview of the field of automated deduction, and presents the foundations of different existing approaches to model construction, in particular those developed by the authors Finite and infinite model building techniques are presented The main emphasis is on calculi-based methods, and relevant practical results are provided The book is of interest to researchers and graduate students in computer science, computational logic and artificial intelligence It can also be used as a textbook in advanced undergraduate courses

  18. Promoção automática nos anos 1950: a experiência pioneira do Grupo Experimental da Lapa (São Paulo Automatic promotion in the 1950s: the pioneering experiment of the Experimental School of Lapa (Sao Paulo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lygia S. Viégas

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available O presente artigo visa apresentar o projeto pioneiro de abolição da reprovação na rede estadual paulista, elaborado no final da década de 1950 e implantado no início de 1960, em caráter experimental, no Grupo Experimental da Lapa, escola que funcionava como unidade oficial de pesquisas da Secretaria da Educação. Apesar de inaugural, tal experiência raramente comparece em publicações sobre o tema, havendo poucos registros a seu respeito. Para tanto, o artigo esboça, a princípio, um breve contexto histórico do debate em torno da então chamada promoção automática, que se inicia no Brasil em 1918, no contexto da Primeira República, e ganha força, sobretudo, na década de 1950, no período desenvolvimentista. Em seguida, o texto aborda elementos constitutivos do projeto realizado no Grupo Experimental da Lapa, justificando a pertinência e a atualidade da promoção automática, bem como delineia sua formatação, em especial no que diz respeito à organização das classes, ao currículo, à avaliação e ao papel docente. Posto isso, são revelados trechos de depoimentos dados por educadores envolvidos na construção do referido projeto, os quais revelam suas potencialidades e contradições. Também são apresentados documentos raros sobre o tema publicados no contexto dessa experiência pioneira. Ao final, são tecidas considerações sobre a experiência em questão, a qual, apesar de pouco divulgada, possui enorme importância histórica. Espera-se, com este artigo, contribuir para a construção da escola pública de qualidade, principalmente considerando a crescente implantação da política de ciclos nas redes públicas educacionais brasileiras.This article presents the pioneering project of abolishing failure in the state public schools in São Paulo state, developed in the late 1950 and implemented at the beginning of 1960 on an experimental basis at the Experimental School of Lapa, a school that worked as the

  19. Multiscale modeling of microscale fiber reinforced composites with nano-engineered interphases

    CERN Document Server

    Kundalwalal, S I; Wardle, B L

    2015-01-01

    This study is focused on the mechanical properties and stress transfer behavior of multiscale composite containing nano- and micro-scale fillers. A novel concept has been proposed to exploit the remarkable mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to improve the stress transfer through the interphases, enabling their additional functionalities not available otherwise at the microscale. The distinctive feature of construction of this composite is such that CNTs are dispersed around the microscale fiber to modify fiber-matrix interfacial adhesion. Accordingly, models are developed for hybrid composites. First, molecular dynamics simulations in conjunction with the Mori-Tanaka method are used to determine the effective elastic properties of nano-engineered interphase layer comprised of CNT bundles and epoxy. Subsequently, a micromechanical pull-out model is developed for the resulting multiscale composite and its stress transfer behavior is studied for different orientations of CNT bundles. The current pu...

  20. Full in-plane strain tensor analysis using the microscale ring-core FIB milling and DIC approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunt, Alexander J. G.; Salvati, Enrico; Ma, Lifeng; Dolbyna, Igor P.; Neo, Tee K.; Korsunsky, Alexander M.

    2016-09-01

    Microscale Full In-plane Strain Tensor (FIST) analysis is crucial for improving understanding of residual stress and mechanical failure in many applications. This study outlines the first Focused Ion Beam (FIB) milling and Digital Image Correlation (DIC) based technique capable of performing precise, reliable and rapid quantification of this behaviour. The nature of semi-destructive FIB milling overcomes the main limitations of X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) strain tensor quantification: unstrained lattice parameter estimates are not required, analysis is performed in within a precisely defined 3D microscale volume, both amorphous and crystalline materials can be studied and access to X-ray/neutron facilities is not required. The FIST FIB milling and DIC experimental technique is based on extending the ring-core milling geometry to quantify the strain variation with angle and therefore benefits from the excellent precision and simple analytical approach associated with this method. In this study in-plane strain analysis was performed on sample of commercial interest: a porcelain veneered Yttria Partially Stabilised Zirconia (YPSZ) dental prosthesis, and was compared with the results of XRD. The two methods sample different gauge volumes and mechanical states: approximately plane stress for ring-core milling, and a through-thickness average for XRD. We demonstrate using complex analysis methods and Finite Element (FE) modelling that valid comparisons can be drawn between these two stress states. Excellent agreement was obtained between principal stress orientation and magnitudes, leading to realistic residual stress estimates that agree well with the literature (σAv ≈ 460 MPa) . As a measure of validity of the matching approach we report the upper and lower bounds on the (101) interplanar spacing of YPSZ that are found to correspond to the range 2.9586 - 2.9596 Å , closely matching published values.

  1. Effects of convection and solid wall on the diffusion in microscale convection flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Fan, Jing; Fei, Fei

    2010-12-01

    The diffusive transport properties in microscale convection flows are studied by using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method. The effective diffusion coefficient D∗ is computed from the mean square displacements of simulated molecules based on the Einstein diffusion equation D∗=⟨Δx2(t )⟩/2t. Two typical convection flows, namely, thermal creep convection and Rayleigh-Bénard convection, are investigated. The thermal creep convection in our simulation is in the noncontinuum regime, with the characteristic scale of the vortex varying from 1 to 100 molecular mean free paths. The diffusion is shown to be enhanced only when the vortex scale exceeds a certain critical value, while the diffusion is reduced when the vortex scale is less than the critical value. The reason for phenomenon of diffusion reduction in the noncontinuum regime is that the reduction effect due to solid wall is dominant while the enhancement effect due to convection is negligible. A molecule will lose its memory of macroscopic velocity when it collides with the walls, and thus molecules are hard to diffuse away if they are confined between very close walls. The Rayleigh-Bénard convection in our simulation is in the continuum regime, with the characteristic length of 1000 molecular mean free paths. Under such condition, the effect of solid wall on diffusion is negligible. The diffusion enhancement due to convection is shown to scale as the square root of the Péclet number in the steady convection regime, which is in agreement with previous theoretical and experimental results. In the oscillation convection regime, the diffusion is more strongly enhanced because the molecules can easily advect from one roll to its neighbor due to an oscillation mechanism.

  2. Chef infrastructure automation cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Marschall, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Chef Infrastructure Automation Cookbook contains practical recipes on everything you will need to automate your infrastructure using Chef. The book is packed with illustrated code examples to automate your server and cloud infrastructure.The book first shows you the simplest way to achieve a certain task. Then it explains every step in detail, so that you can build your knowledge about how things work. Eventually, the book shows you additional things to consider for each approach. That way, you can learn step-by-step and build profound knowledge on how to go about your configuration management

  3. Microscale validation of 4-aminoantipyrine test method for quantifying phenolic compounds in microbial culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Validation of test methods microscale is currently of great importance due to the economic and environmental advantages possessed, which constitutes a prerequisite for the performance of services and quality assurance of the results to provide customer. This paper addresses the microscale validation of 4-aminoantipyrine spectrophotometric method for the quantification of phenolic compounds in culture medium. Parameters linearity, precision, regression, accuracy, detection limits, quantification limits and robustness were evaluated, addition to the comparison test with no standardized method for determining polyphenols (Folin Ciocalteu). The results showed that both methods are feasible for determining phenols

  4. Generation of microscale current loops, atom rings, and cubic clusters using twisted optical molasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a scheme for a viable and highly flexible all-optical atomic cooling and trapping using twisted light. In particular, we explain how one-dimensional twisted optical molasses should lead to a microscale atomic ring or a picoampere ionic current. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional molasses lead, respectively, to the creation of atom or ion loops and discrete atom clusters positioned at the eight corners of a microcube. These features at the microscale should find applications in physics and in quantum information processing using optically trapped atoms and ions

  5. The influence of Phaeocystis globosa on microscale spatial patterns of chlorophyll a and bulk-phase seawater viscosity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seuront, L.; Lacheze, C.; Doubell, M. J.; Seymour, J. R.; Van Dongen-Vogels, V.; Newton, K.; Alderkamp, A. C.; Mitchell, J. G.

    2007-01-01

    A two-dimensional microscale (5 cm resolution) sampler was used over the course of a phytoplankton spring bloom dominated by Phaeocystis globosa to investigate the structural properties of chlorophyll a and seawater excess viscosity distributions. The microscale distribution patterns of chlorophyll

  6. Automated reactor records evaluation framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The only truly reliable method for core physics code validation is comparison against experimental data – and for power nuclear reactors, the only reasonably acquirable kind of experimental data are the reactor records. However, the amount of the data coming from the reactor operation is often so vast that it can be discouraging for the code developers to use it properly. Thus, the validation package is further reduced because the data is hard to use. This paper presents an elaborate, fully automated framework, which was designed and implemented in our institute, for reactor records processing and its use for core physics code validation. The workflow, implemented as a Web 2.0 application, provides a practical and painless solution for use of reactor records data for code development and validation. (author)

  7. I-94 Automation FAQs

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — In order to increase efficiency, reduce operating costs and streamline the admissions process, U.S. Customs and Border Protection has automated Form I-94 at air and...

  8. Hydrometeorological Automated Data System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Office of Hydrologic Development of the National Weather Service operates HADS, the Hydrometeorological Automated Data System. This data set contains the last...

  9. Automated Vehicles Symposium 2015

    CERN Document Server

    Beiker, Sven

    2016-01-01

    This edited book comprises papers about the impacts, benefits and challenges of connected and automated cars. It is the third volume of the LNMOB series dealing with Road Vehicle Automation. The book comprises contributions from researchers, industry practitioners and policy makers, covering perspectives from the U.S., Europe and Japan. It is based on the Automated Vehicles Symposium 2015 which was jointly organized by the Association of Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI) and the Transportation Research Board (TRB) in Ann Arbor, Michigan, in July 2015. The topical spectrum includes, but is not limited to, public sector activities, human factors, ethical and business aspects, energy and technological perspectives, vehicle systems and transportation infrastructure. This book is an indispensable source of information for academic researchers, industrial engineers and policy makers interested in the topic of road vehicle automation.

  10. Automated Vehicles Symposium 2014

    CERN Document Server

    Beiker, Sven; Road Vehicle Automation 2

    2015-01-01

    This paper collection is the second volume of the LNMOB series on Road Vehicle Automation. The book contains a comprehensive review of current technical, socio-economic, and legal perspectives written by experts coming from public authorities, companies and universities in the U.S., Europe and Japan. It originates from the Automated Vehicle Symposium 2014, which was jointly organized by the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI) and the Transportation Research Board (TRB) in Burlingame, CA, in July 2014. The contributions discuss the challenges arising from the integration of highly automated and self-driving vehicles into the transportation system, with a focus on human factors and different deployment scenarios. This book is an indispensable source of information for academic researchers, industrial engineers, and policy makers interested in the topic of road vehicle automation.

  11. Disassembly automation automated systems with cognitive abilities

    CERN Document Server

    Vongbunyong, Supachai

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a number of aspects to be considered in the development of disassembly automation, including the mechanical system, vision system and intelligent planner. The implementation of cognitive robotics increases the flexibility and degree of autonomy of the disassembly system. Disassembly, as a step in the treatment of end-of-life products, can allow the recovery of embodied value left within disposed products, as well as the appropriate separation of potentially-hazardous components. In the end-of-life treatment industry, disassembly has largely been limited to manual labor, which is expensive in developed countries. Automation is one possible solution for economic feasibility. The target audience primarily comprises researchers and experts in the field, but the book may also be beneficial for graduate students.

  12. Instant Sikuli test automation

    CERN Document Server

    Lau, Ben

    2013-01-01

    Get to grips with a new technology, understand what it is and what it can do for you, and then get to work with the most important features and tasks. A concise guide written in an easy-to follow style using the Starter guide approach.This book is aimed at automation and testing professionals who want to use Sikuli to automate GUI. Some Python programming experience is assumed.

  13. Automated security management

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Shaer, Ehab; Xie, Geoffrey

    2013-01-01

    In this contributed volume, leading international researchers explore configuration modeling and checking, vulnerability and risk assessment, configuration analysis, and diagnostics and discovery. The authors equip readers to understand automated security management systems and techniques that increase overall network assurability and usability. These constantly changing networks defend against cyber attacks by integrating hundreds of security devices such as firewalls, IPSec gateways, IDS/IPS, authentication servers, authorization/RBAC servers, and crypto systems. Automated Security Managemen

  14. Automated Lattice Perturbation Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monahan, Christopher

    2014-11-01

    I review recent developments in automated lattice perturbation theory. Starting with an overview of lattice perturbation theory, I focus on the three automation packages currently "on the market": HiPPy/HPsrc, Pastor and PhySyCAl. I highlight some recent applications of these methods, particularly in B physics. In the final section I briefly discuss the related, but distinct, approach of numerical stochastic perturbation theory.

  15. 环己酮制备实验的微型化论析%Study on the Microscale Experiment of the preparation of Cyclohexanone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柯杨

    2014-01-01

    文章介绍了制备环己酮的微型实验,对比了常量实验及微型实验的制备方法,探讨了重铬酸钾的用量、反应时间、反应温度对实验结果的影响。结果显示,制备环己酮微型实验的最佳条件是:投料比n (环己醇):n (重铬酸钾)=1∶1.8,反应时间30min ,反应温度50℃,产率达52.8%。在此条件下制备环己酮,具有实验效果好,污染小的特点。%The paper introduces the preparation of cyclohexanone by means of microscale experiment .The constant experiment and microscale experiment were compared .The effects of the dosage of bichrome ,the reaction time ,the reaction temperature were examined .The optimized conditions in the microscale experiment of preparation of cyclohexanone were found as follows:the mole ratio of bichrome to cyclohexanol was 1∶1.8 ,the reaction time was 30min ,the reaction temperature was 50℃ ,the yield reached o-ver 52.8% .Under this conditions ,the experimental phenomenon in the preparation of cyclohexanone is obvious and the experi-ment has less pollutions .

  16. Bacterial Societies: Cooperation, Colonization, and Competition in Micro-Scale Ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hol, F.J.H.

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis, I describe experiments aimed at understanding bacterial population dynamics in ecosystems that are spatially structured at the micro-scale. We combine microfabrication and microfluidics to create synthetic ecosystems that have a complex yet well-defined geometry and chemical composit

  17. Design of a holographic micro-scale spectrum-splitting photovoltaic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuechen; Vorndran, Shelby; Ayala Pelaez, Silvana; Russo, Juan M.; Kostuk, Raymond K.

    2015-09-01

    Micro-scale PV technology combines the high conversion efficiency of concentrated photovoltaics (CPV) with the low costs and the simple form of flat panel PV. Some of the benefits of micro-scale PV include: reduced semiconductor material usage; improved heat rejection capacity; and more versatile PV cell interconnect configurations. Spectrumsplitting is also a beneficial technique to increase the efficiency and reduce the cost of photovoltaic systems. It spatially separates the incident solar spectrum into spectral components and directs them to PV cells with matching bandgaps. This approach avoids the current and lattice matching problems that exist in tandem multi-junction systems. In this paper, we applied the ideas of spectrum-splitting in a micro-scale PV system, and demonstrated a holographic micro-scale spectrum-splitting photovoltaic system. This system consists of a volume transmission hologram in combination with a micro-lens array. An analysis methodology was developed to design the system and determine the performance of the resulting system. The spatial characteristics of the dispersed spectrum, the overall system conversion efficiency, and the improvement over best bandgap will be discussed.

  18. Evaluating Mechanisms of Dihydroxylation by Thin-Layer Chromatography: A Microscale Experiment for Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlingham, Benjamin T.; Rettig, Joseph C.

    2008-01-01

    A microscale experiment is presented in which cyclohexene is dihydroxylated under three sets of conditions: epoxidation-hydrolysis, permanganate oxidation, and the Woodward dihydroxylation. The products of the reactions are determined by the use of thin-layer chromatography. Teams of students are presented with proposed mechanisms for each…

  19. Organic Materials in the Undergraduate Laboratory: Microscale Synthesis and Investigation of a Donor-Acceptor Molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappenfus, Ted M.; Schliep, Karl B.; Dissanayake, Anudaththa; Ludden, Trevor; Nieto-Ortega, Belen; Lopez Navarrete, Juan T.; Ruiz Delgado, M. Carmen; Casado, Juan

    2012-01-01

    A series of experiments for undergraduate courses (e.g., organic, physical) have been developed in the area of small molecule organic materials. These experiments focus on understanding the electronic and redox properties of a donor-acceptor molecule that is prepared in a convenient one-step microscale reaction. The resulting intensely colored…

  20. Microscale Polymer Bottles Corked with a Phase-Change Material for Temperature-Controlled Release

    OpenAIRE

    Hyun, Dong Choon; Lu, Ping; Choi, Sang Il; Jeong, Unyong; Xia, Younan

    2013-01-01

    Keep your wine chilled! Microscale polymer bottles are loaded with dye molecules and then corked with a phase-change material (PCM). When temperature is raised beyond its melting point, the PCM quickly melt and trigger an instant release of the encapsulated dye. The release profiles can be manipulated by using a binary mixture of PCMs with different melting points.

  1. Visualization of microscale phase displacement proceses in retention and outflow experiments: nonuniquensess of unsaturated flow properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Annette Pia; Glass, R.J.; Hollenbeck, K.J.;

    2001-01-01

    we observe the drainage process to be composed of a mixture of fast air fingering and slower air back-filling. The influence of each of these microscale processes is controlled by a combination of the size and the speed of the applied boundary step, the initial saturation and its structure, and small...

  2. Microwave-Assisted Esterification: A Discovery-Based Microscale Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Maureen K.; King, Ryan P.; Wagner, Alexander J.; King, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    An undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory experiment has been developed that features a discovery-based microscale Fischer esterification utilizing a microwave reactor. Students individually synthesize a unique ester from known sets of alcohols and carboxylic acids. Each student identifies the best reaction conditions given their particular…

  3. A micro-scale hot-surface device based on non-radiative carrier recombination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kovalgin, A.Y.; Holleman, J.; Iordache, G.

    2004-01-01

    This work employs the idea of making micro-scale hot-surface devices (e.g. sensors, flow meters, micro reactors, etc) based on generation of heat due to nonradiative recombination of carriers in a thin (13 nm) poly silicon surface layer. An important part of the device is a nano-scale (10-100 nm) co

  4. Zebrafish Embryo Toxicity Microscale Model for Ichthyotoxicity Evaluation of Marine Natural Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Hong; Kong, Wen-Wen; Shao, Chang-Lun; Li, Yun; Liu, Yun-Zhang; Liu, Min; Guan, Fei-Fei; Wang, Chang-Yun

    2016-04-01

    Marine organisms often protect themselves against their predators by chemical defensive strategy. The second metabolites isolated from marine organisms and their symbiotic microbes have been proven to play a vital role in marine chemical ecology, such as ichthyotoxicity, allelopathy, and antifouling. It is well known that the microscale models for marine chemoecology assessment are urgently needed for trace quantity of marine natural products. Zebrafish model has been widely used as a microscale model in the fields of environment ecological evaluation and drug safety evaluation, but seldom reported for marine chemoecology assessment. In this work, zebrafish embryo toxicity microscale model was established for ichthyotoxicity evaluation of marine natural products by using 24-well microplate based on zebrafish embryo. Ichthyotoxicity was evaluated by observation of multiple toxicological endpoints, including coagulation egg, death, abnormal heartbeat, no spontaneous movement, delayed hatch, and malformation of the different organs during zebrafish embryogenesis periods at 24, 48, and 72 h post-fertilization (hpf). 3,4-Dichloroaniline was used as the positive control for method validation. Subsequently, the established model was applied to test the ichthyotoxic activity of the compounds isolated from corals and their symbiotic microbes and to isolate the bioactive secondary metabolites from the gorgonian Subergorgia mollis under bioassay guidance. It was suggested that zebrafish embryo toxicity microscale model is suitable for bioassay-guided isolation and preliminary bioactivity screening of marine natural products. PMID:26838966

  5. Heterogeneous distribution of prokaryotes and viruses at the microscale in a tidal sediment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Carreira; M. Larsen; R.N. Glud; C.P.D. Brussaard; M. Middelboe

    2013-01-01

    In this study we show for the first time the microscale (mm) 2- and 3-dimensional spatial distribution and abundance of prokaryotes, viruses, and oxygen in a tidal sediment. Prokaryotes and viruses were highly heterogeneously distributed with patches of elevated abundances surrounded by areas of ca.

  6. Heterogeneous distribution of prokaryotes and viruses at the microscale in a tidal sediment

    OpenAIRE

    Carreira, C.; Larsen, M.; Glud, RN; Brussaard, CPD; Middelboe, M.

    2013-01-01

    In this study we show for the first time the microscale (mm) 2- and 3-dimensional spatial distribution and abundance of prokaryotes, viruses, and oxygen in a tidal sediment. Prokaryotes and viruses were highly heterogeneously distributed with patches of elevated abundances surrounded by areas of ca. 3-fold lower abundance within distances of

  7. Laboratory Experiments on the Electrochemical Remediation of the Environment. Part 8. Microscale Simultaneous Photocatalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibanez, Jorge G.; Mena-Brito, Rodrigo; Fregoso-Infante, Arturo

    2005-01-01

    A microscale experiment in which the simultaneous oxidation of an organic compound and the reduction of a metal ion are photocatalytically performed in an aqueous slurry containing TiO[subscript 2] irradiated with UV light. This experiment can be performed in the laboratory session with simple chemicals and equipments.

  8. The Petasis Reaction: Microscale Synthesis of a Tertiary Amine Antifungal Analog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koroluk, Katherine J.; Jackson, Derek A.; Dicks, Andrew P.

    2012-01-01

    Students prepare a tertiary amine antifungal analog in an upper-level undergraduate organic laboratory. A microscale Petasis reaction is performed to generate a liquid compound readily characterized via IR and proton NMR spectroscopy. The biological relevance of the product is highlighted, with the tertiary amine scaffold being an important…

  9. Laser vaporization/ionization interface for coupling microscale separation techniques with mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Edward S.; Chang, Yu-chen

    1999-06-29

    The present invention provides a laser-induced vaporization and ionization interface for directly coupling microscale separation processes to a mass spectrometer. Vaporization and ionization of the separated analytes are facilitated by the addition of a light-absorbing component to the separation buffer or solvent.

  10. A 3-D microscale model for Co2 GasTransport in tomato leaves during photosynthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ho, Q.T.; Verboven, P.; Herremans, E.; Retta, M.A.; Defraeye, T.; Nicolaï, B.M.; Yin, X.; Thapa, R.K.; Struik, P.C.

    2012-01-01

    Exchange of CO2 in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) leaves was modelled using combined gas diffusion and photosynthesis kinetics in a real 3-D geometric representation of the cellular microstructure, obtained by synchrotron radiation X-ray microtomography. The microscale model for gas exchange accou

  11. Materials Testing and Automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Wayne D.; Zweigoron, Ronald B.

    1980-07-01

    The advent of automation in materials testing has been in large part responsible for recent radical changes in the materials testing field: Tests virtually impossible to perform without a computer have become more straightforward to conduct. In addition, standardized tests may be performed with enhanced efficiency and repeatability. A typical automated system is described in terms of its primary subsystems — an analog station, a digital computer, and a processor interface. The processor interface links the analog functions with the digital computer; it includes data acquisition, command function generation, and test control functions. Features of automated testing are described with emphasis on calculated variable control, control of a variable that is computed by the processor and cannot be read directly from a transducer. Three calculated variable tests are described: a yield surface probe test, a thermomechanical fatigue test, and a constant-stress-intensity range crack-growth test. Future developments are discussed.

  12. Automating the CMS DAQ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, G.; et al.

    2014-01-01

    We present the automation mechanisms that have been added to the Data Acquisition and Run Control systems of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment during Run 1 of the LHC, ranging from the automation of routine tasks to automatic error recovery and context-sensitive guidance to the operator. These mechanisms helped CMS to maintain a data taking efficiency above 90% and to even improve it to 95% towards the end of Run 1, despite an increase in the occurrence of single-event upsets in sub-detector electronics at high LHC luminosity.

  13. Automated phantom assay system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes an automated phantom assay system developed for assaying phantoms spiked with minute quantities of radionuclides. The system includes a computer-controlled linear-translation table that positions the phantom at exact distances from a spectrometer. A multichannel analyzer (MCA) interfaces with a computer to collect gamma spectral data. Signals transmitted between the controller and MCA synchronize data collection and phantom positioning. Measured data are then stored on disk for subsequent analysis. The automated system allows continuous unattended operation and ensures reproducible results

  14. Automated gas chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowry, Curtis D.; Blair, Dianna S.; Rodacy, Philip J.; Reber, Stephen D.

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus and process for the continuous, near real-time monitoring of low-level concentrations of organic compounds in a liquid, and, more particularly, a water stream. A small liquid volume of flow from a liquid process stream containing organic compounds is diverted by an automated process to a heated vaporization capillary where the liquid volume is vaporized to a gas that flows to an automated gas chromatograph separation column to chromatographically separate the organic compounds. Organic compounds are detected and the information transmitted to a control system for use in process control. Concentrations of organic compounds less than one part per million are detected in less than one minute.

  15. Advanced beamline automation for biological crystallography experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cork, Carl; O'Neill, James; Taylor, John; Earnest, Thomas

    2006-08-01

    An automated crystal-mounting/alignment system has been developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and has been installed on three of the protein-crystallography experimental stations at the Advanced Light Source (ALS); it is currently being implemented at synchrotron crystallography beamlines at CHESS, NSLS and the APS. The benefits to using an automounter system include (i) optimization of the use of synchrotron beam time, (ii) facilitation of advanced data-collection techniques, (iii) collection of higher quality data, (iv) reduction of the risk to crystals and (v) exploration of systematic studies of experimental protocols. Developments on the next-generation automounter with improvements in robustness, automated alignment and sample tracking are under way, with an end-to-end data-flow process being developed to allow remote data collection and monitoring. PMID:16855300

  16. The non-linear microscale flow solver 3DWind Developments and validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Undheim, Ove

    2005-05-01

    This PhD thesis describes the implementation of a Reynolds Stress Model in the RANS microscale solver 3DWind, which is developed to model wind flow in complex terrain. The solver is also calibrated and validated with the two-dimensional channel flow test case C18 from the ERCOFTAC Classic database and the full-scale atmospheric flow case of the Askervein hill. The implemented equations calculate both flow cases in good accordance with available experimental and numerical results. Still, the simulation experience and obtained results show that modelling of recirculation is a difficult task. The calculated flow field is very sensitive to the separation point, which is sensitive to several other factors. One important factor is the wall functions, which cause the separation zone to depend on the thickness of the first grid cell. Compared to the k-{epsilon} model, results from simulations with the Reynolds Stress Model gave improvements in the calculated turbulence upstream the C18 hill. There were also differences in the solutions in the wake of both the C18 and the Askervein hills; still, the differences are too small to make any conclusions about the quality of the models. The disadvantages of decreased stability, more wiggles in the solution and increased computational effort are considered larger than the advantages of accounting for anisotropy and historical effects in the Reynolds stresses. The solver is further used to quantify the effects of roughness and topography by generalized two-dimensional investigations of atmospheric flow. Hills and ridges are in this analysis found to increase wind velocities at 80m by up to 38%, and wind velocities above the ocean at 80m are 14% higher than corresponding open land velocities. Finally, a full wind resource assessment has been carried out at Eldsfjellet at the Norwegian island Hitra. Results were compared with measured data and simulation results from the linearized model WAsP. WAsP was found to estimate higher

  17. Automated solvent concentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, J. S.; Stuart, J. L.

    1976-01-01

    Designed for automated drug identification system (AUDRI), device increases concentration by 100. Sample is first filtered, removing particulate contaminants and reducing water content of sample. Sample is extracted from filtered residue by specific solvent. Concentrator provides input material to analysis subsystem.

  18. Protokoller til Home Automation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Kristian Ellebæk

    2008-01-01

    computer, der kan skifte mellem foruddefinerede indstillinger. Nogle gange kan computeren fjernstyres over internettet, så man kan se hjemmets status fra en computer eller måske endda fra en mobiltelefon. Mens nævnte anvendelser er klassiske indenfor home automation, er yderligere funktionalitet dukket op...

  19. ELECTROPNEUMATIC AUTOMATION EDUCATIONAL LABORATORY

    OpenAIRE

    Dolgorukov, S. O.; National Aviation University; Roman, B. V.; National Aviation University

    2013-01-01

    The article reflects current situation in education regarding mechatronics learning difficulties. Com-plex of laboratory test benches on electropneumatic automation are considered as a tool in advancing through technical science. Course of laboratory works developed to meet the requirement of efficient and reliable way of practical skills acquisition is regarded the simplest way for students to learn the ba-sics of mechatronics.

  20. Building Automation Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honeywell, Inc., Minneapolis, Minn.

    A number of different automation systems for use in monitoring and controlling building equipment are described in this brochure. The system functions include--(1) collection of information, (2) processing and display of data at a central panel, and (3) taking corrective action by sounding alarms, making adjustments, or automatically starting and…

  1. Test Construction: Automated

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldkamp, Bernard P.

    2014-01-01

    Optimal test construction deals with automated assembly of tests for educational and psychological measurement. Items are selected from an item bank to meet a predefined set of test specifications. Several models for optimal test construction are presented, and two algorithms for optimal test assemb

  2. Test Construction: Automated

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldkamp, Bernard P.

    2016-01-01

    Optimal test construction deals with automated assembly of tests for educational and psychological measurement. Items are selected from an item bank to meet a predefined set of test specifications. Several models for optimal test construction are presented, and two algorithms for optimal test assemb

  3. Automated Web Applications Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru Dan CĂPRIŢĂ

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Unit tests are a vital part of several software development practicesand processes such as Test-First Programming, Extreme Programming andTest-Driven Development. This article shortly presents the software quality andtesting concepts as well as an introduction to an automated unit testingframework for PHP web based applications.

  4. Automated Student Model Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koedinger, Kenneth R.; McLaughlin, Elizabeth A.; Stamper, John C.

    2012-01-01

    Student modeling plays a critical role in developing and improving instruction and instructional technologies. We present a technique for automated improvement of student models that leverages the DataShop repository, crowd sourcing, and a version of the Learning Factors Analysis algorithm. We demonstrate this method on eleven educational…

  5. Myths in test automation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jazmine Francis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Myths in automation of software testing is an issue of discussion that echoes about the areas of service in validation of software industry. Probably, the first though that appears in knowledgeable reader would be Why this old topic again? What's New to discuss the matter? But, for the first time everyone agrees that undoubtedly automation testing today is not today what it used to be ten or fifteen years ago, because it has evolved in scope and magnitude. What began as a simple linear scripts for web applications today has a complex architecture and a hybrid framework to facilitate the implementation of testing applications developed with various platforms and technologies. Undoubtedly automation has advanced, but so did the myths associated with it. The change in perspective and knowledge of people on automation has altered the terrain. This article reflects the points of views and experience of the author in what has to do with the transformation of the original myths in new versions, and how they are derived; also provides his thoughts on the new generation of myths.

  6. Micro-scale study of rupture in desiccating granular media

    OpenAIRE

    Hueckel, Tomasz; Mielniczuk, Boleslaw; El Youssoufi, Moulay Saïd

    2013-01-01

    Capillary bridges between two, three, and multiple fixed glass spheres are examined experimentally during their natural evaporation. The key variables of the process of evolution are measured using a calibrated balance recording and digital image processing with still and high-speed cameras. The calculations of Laplace pressure, as well as suction and surface tension resultant components of the interparticle force are made for two-grain systems. Evolution, properties and failure of evaporatin...

  7. Investigations of microscale fluid-thermal phenomena based on the deterministic Boltzmann-ESBGK model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaohui

    Fluid and thermal problems are widely encountered in micro/nano-scale devices, the characteristic lengths of which are from hundreds of microns down to tens of nanometers. A great number of such devices involve fundamental components like microchannels, capillaries, membranes and cantilever beams. Continuum assumptions that lead to classical governing equations such as Navier-Stokes equations and Fourier Laws break down when the characteristic size shrinks by an order of millions. In addition, conventional sensors, actuators and controllers turn to be insufficient to depict the flow, thermal, or electrical fields in micro-devices without impacting the original conditions greatly. Therefore, the development of numerical methods becomes indispensable in design and performance analysis of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS). The main goal of this PhD research is the development, implementation and application of comprehensive deterministic Boltzmann-ESBGK modeling framework to micro-scale fluid-thermal phenomena. Investigation of gas flows in short rectangular microchannels has been carried out to understand the rarefaction effects on the reduced mass-flow-rate as well as the non-equilibrium effects on the temperature components. At high Knudsen numbers, the reduced mass-flow-rate only depends on the pressure ratio and the temperature components deviate at the channel exit. For gas flows in long microchannels with and without constrictions, the Navier-Stokes equations with first-order slip boundary conditions are solved. Numerical results accurately predict the entrance pressure drop comparing to high-resolution experimental data using pressure-sensitive-paint (PSP). Simultions show clearly that the compressibility effects become less important than the rarefaction effects at low pressures. The coupled gas-phonon Boltzmann solver has been developed. The reduced distribution functions are used in the two-dimensional code to reduce the computational cost. The

  8. Automating spectral measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Fred T.

    2008-09-01

    This paper discusses the architecture of software utilized in spectroscopic measurements. As optical coatings become more sophisticated, there is mounting need to automate data acquisition (DAQ) from spectrophotometers. Such need is exacerbated when 100% inspection is required, ancillary devices are utilized, cost reduction is crucial, or security is vital. While instrument manufacturers normally provide point-and-click DAQ software, an application programming interface (API) may be missing. In such cases automation is impossible or expensive. An API is typically provided in libraries (*.dll, *.ocx) which may be embedded in user-developed applications. Users can thereby implement DAQ automation in several Windows languages. Another possibility, developed by FTG as an alternative to instrument manufacturers' software, is the ActiveX application (*.exe). ActiveX, a component of many Windows applications, provides means for programming and interoperability. This architecture permits a point-and-click program to act as automation client and server. Excel, for example, can control and be controlled by DAQ applications. Most importantly, ActiveX permits ancillary devices such as barcode readers and XY-stages to be easily and economically integrated into scanning procedures. Since an ActiveX application has its own user-interface, it can be independently tested. The ActiveX application then runs (visibly or invisibly) under DAQ software control. Automation capabilities are accessed via a built-in spectro-BASIC language with industry-standard (VBA-compatible) syntax. Supplementing ActiveX, spectro-BASIC also includes auxiliary serial port commands for interfacing programmable logic controllers (PLC). A typical application is automatic filter handling.

  9. Thermally-Targeted Adsorption And Enrichment In Micro-scale Hydrothermal Pore Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Priye, Aashish

    2016-01-01

    The unique ability of chaotic advection under micro-scale confinement to direct chemical processes along accelerated kinetic pathways has long been recognized. But practical applications have been slow to emerge because optimal results are often counter-intuitively achieved in flows that appear to possess undesirably high disorder. Here we demonstrate how thermally actuated chaotic phenomena within these microenvironments are capable of establishing a continuous conveyor transporting chemical compounds from the bulk to targeted locations on solid boundaries where they become greatly enriched. These findings intriguingly suggest that microscale chaotic advection may offer a new- mechanism to explain emergence of biomolecular complexity from dilute organic precursors in the prebiotic milieu-a key unanswered question in the origin of life. We further show how these flows can be rationally designed and harnessed to execute bulk biochemical processes with a level of robustness previously thought unattainable.

  10. Partitioned airs at microscale and nanoscale: thermal diffusivity in ultrahigh porosity solids of nanocellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Koh; Kobayashi, Yuri; Saito, Tsuguyuki; Isogai, Akira

    2016-02-01

    High porosity solids, such as plastic foams and aerogels, are thermally insulating. Their insulation performance strongly depends on their pore structure, which dictates the heat transfer process in the material. Understanding such a relationship is essential to realizing highly efficient thermal insulators. Herein, we compare the heat transfer properties of foams and aerogels that have very high porosities (97.3-99.7%) and an identical composition (nanocellulose). The foams feature rather closed, microscale pores formed with a thin film-like solid phase, whereas the aerogels feature nanoscale open pores formed with a nanofibrous network-like solid skeleton. Unlike the aerogel samples, the thermal diffusivity of the foam decreases considerably with a slight increase in the solid fraction. The results indicate that for suppressing the thermal diffusion of air within high porosity solids, creating microscale spaces with distinct partitions is more effective than directly blocking the free path of air molecules at the nanoscale.

  11. Effect of microscale shear stresses on the martensitic phase transformation of nanocrystalline tetragonal zirconia powders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Mette; Ahniyaz, Anwar; Sørensen, Bent F.;

    2010-01-01

    are extremely sensitive to both macroscopic uniaxial compressive strain and ball-milling induced shear stress and easily transform martensitically into the monoclinic phase. A linear relationship between applied compressive stress and the degree of tetragonal to monoclinic (t → m) phase transformation...... was observed. Ball-milling induced microscale stress has a similar effect on the t → m phase transformation. Furthermore, it was found that even very mild milling condition, such as 120 rpm, 1 h (0.5 mm balls) was enough to induce phase transformation. Surfactant assisted ball-milling was found to be very...... effective in de-agglomeration of our nanocrystalline porous ZrO2 particles into discrete nanocrystals. However, the t → m phase transformation could not be avoided totally even at very mild milling condition. This suggests that the metastable t-ZrO2 is extreme sensitive to microscale shear stress induced...

  12. Design and characterization of microscale heater structures for test die and sensor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, D.A.; Bowman, D.; Filter, W.; Mitchell, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Perry, J. [Philips Semiconductors, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1998-05-01

    The authors describe a class of microscale heaters fabricated with CMOS processes on silicon wafers. These heaters were designed to produce localized high temperatures above 400 C for test and sensor applications. The temperature levels produced for various input powers and the thermal profiles surrounding the heater for packaged and wafer-level heater structures were studied to guide the placement of microelectronics integrated with the heater structures on the same die. To show the performance of the design, they present resistance sensor measurements, IR temperature profiles, and results from a 3D thermal model of the die. This effort demonstrates that it is possible to successfully operate both a microscale heater and microcircuits on the same die.

  13. Partitioned airs at microscale and nanoscale: thermal diffusivity in ultrahigh porosity solids of nanocellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Koh; Kobayashi, Yuri; Saito, Tsuguyuki; Isogai, Akira

    2016-01-01

    High porosity solids, such as plastic foams and aerogels, are thermally insulating. Their insulation performance strongly depends on their pore structure, which dictates the heat transfer process in the material. Understanding such a relationship is essential to realizing highly efficient thermal insulators. Herein, we compare the heat transfer properties of foams and aerogels that have very high porosities (97.3-99.7%) and an identical composition (nanocellulose). The foams feature rather closed, microscale pores formed with a thin film-like solid phase, whereas the aerogels feature nanoscale open pores formed with a nanofibrous network-like solid skeleton. Unlike the aerogel samples, the thermal diffusivity of the foam decreases considerably with a slight increase in the solid fraction. The results indicate that for suppressing the thermal diffusion of air within high porosity solids, creating microscale spaces with distinct partitions is more effective than directly blocking the free path of air molecules at the nanoscale. PMID:26830144

  14. Active mixing of complex fluids at the microscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ober, Thomas J; Foresti, Daniele; Lewis, Jennifer A

    2015-10-01

    Mixing of complex fluids at low Reynolds number is fundamental for a broad range of applications, including materials assembly, microfluidics, and biomedical devices. Of these materials, yield stress fluids (and gels) pose the most significant challenges, especially when they must be mixed in low volumes over short timescales. New scaling relationships between mixer dimensions and operating conditions are derived and experimentally verified to create a framework for designing active microfluidic mixers that can efficiently homogenize a wide range of complex fluids. Active mixing printheads are then designed and implemented for multimaterial 3D printing of viscoelastic inks with programmable control of local composition. PMID:26396254

  15. Mesoscale to microscale wind farm flow modeling and evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanz Rodrigo, Javier; Chávez Arroyo, Roberto Aurelio; Moriarty, Patrick;

    2016-01-01

    structure with unique physics. This poses significant challenges to traditional wind engineering models that rely on surface-layer theories and engineering wind farm models to simulate the flow in and around wind farms. However, adopting an ABL approach offers the opportunity to better integrate wind farm...... design tools and meteorological models. The challenge is how to build the bridge between atmospheric and wind engineering model communities and how to establish a comprehensive evaluation process that identifies relevant physical phenomena for wind energy applications with modeling and experimental...

  16. Micro-Scale Thermal Imaging of Organic and Polymeric Materials with Cooled and Uncooled Infrared Cameras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Morikawa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The emissivity corrected thermal imaging combined with a real-time direct imposed-signal system on the freezing of biological cells is presented, which makes it possible to visualize the exothermic latent heat at a minus temperature. The applicability of the uncooled micro bolometer (thermal detector to the micro-scale thermal analysis on the phase transitions of organic and polymeric materials is discussed in comparison with the photon detector, equipped with the optics originally designed.

  17. Out-of-focus effects on microscale schlieren measurements of mass transport in a microfluidic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shao-Tuan; Sun, Chen-li

    2016-08-01

    The microscale schlieren technique provides a means for a non-invasive, full-field measurement for mixing microfluidics with excellent sensitivity and resolution. Nevertheless, an out-of-focus effect due to microscopic optics may lead to undesirable errors in quantifying the gradient information at high degrees of magnification. If the channel in the microfluidic device under study is too deep, light deflection caused by inhomogeneity located far from the focal plane may contributes little to the intensity change on the image plane. To address this issue, we propose the use of a weighting function that approximates a Gaussian profile with an optical-system-dependable width. We assume that the resultant intensity change is proportional to a weighted sum of the gradient across the channel depth and acquire micro-schlieren images of fluid mixing in a T-junction microchannel at various positions along the optical axis. For each objective, the width of the weighting function is then determined iteratively by curve fitting the ratio of changes in grayscale readouts for out-of-focus and focus micro-schlieren images. The standard deviation in the Gaussian distribution facilitates the quantification of the out-of-focus effect. In addition, we measure the sensitivities of a microscale schlieren system equipped with different objectives and compare the values to the model. Despite its better resolution, we find that an objective with higher magnification suffers from a more severe out-of-focus effect and a loss of sensitivity. Equations are proposed for estimations of the standard deviation and the sensitivity of microscale schlieren measurements. The outcome will facilitate the selection of proper microchannel depths for various microscale schlieren systems or vice versa, thus improving the precision of micro-schlieren measurements in microfluidic devices.

  18. Microscale Investigation of Arsenic Distribution and Species in Cement Product from Cement Kiln Coprocessing Wastes

    OpenAIRE

    Yufei Yang; Jingchuan Xue; Qifei Huang

    2013-01-01

    To improve the understanding of the immobilization mechanism and the leaching risk of Arsenic (As) in the cement product from coprocessing wastes using cement kiln, distribution and species of As in cement product were determined by microscale investigation methods, including electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. In this study, sodium arsenate crystals (Na3AsO412H2O) were mixed with cement production raw materials and calcined to produce cement clinker. Then, ...

  19. Superimpose signal processing method for micro-scale thermal imaging of solar salts at high temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikawa, Junko; Zamengo, Massimiliano; Kato, Yukitaka

    2016-05-01

    The global interest in energy applications activates the advanced study about the molten salts in the usage of fluids in the power cycle, such as for transport and heat storage in solar power facilities. However, the basic properties of molten salts show a general scattering in characterization especially in thermal properties. It is suggested that new studies are required on the measurement of thermal properties of solar salts using recent technologies. In this study, micro-scale heat transfer and phase change in molten salts are presented using our originally developed device: the micro-bolometer Infrared focal plane arrays (IR FPA) measuring system is a portable type instrument, which is re-designed to measure the thermal phenomena in high temperature up to 700 °C or higher. The superimpose system is newly setup adjusted to the signal processing in high temperature to realize the quantitative thermal imaging, simultaneously. The portable type apparatus for a quantitative micro-scale thermography using a micro-bolometer has been proposed based on an achromatic lens design to capture a micro-scale image in the long-wave infrared, a video signal superimposing for the real time emissivity correction, and a pseudo acceleration of a timeframe. Combined with the superimpose technique, the micro-scale thermal imaging in high temperature is achieved and the molten flows of the solar salts, sodium nitrate, and potassium nitrate are successfully observed. The solar salt, the mixture of sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate, shows a different shape of exothermic heat front morphology in the lower phase transition (solidification) temperature than the nitrates on cooling. The proposed measuring technique will be utilized to accelerate the screening step to determine the phase diagram and the eutectics of the multiple mixtures of candidate molten salts, which may be used as heat transport medium from the concentrated solar power to a processing plant for thermal energy

  20. Dynamic microscale temperature gradient in a gold nanorod solution measured by diffraction-limited nanothermometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Chengmingyue; Gan, Xiaosong; Li, Xiangping; Gu, Min, E-mail: mgu@swin.edu.au [Centre for Micro-Photonics, Faculty of Science, Engineering and Technology, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia)

    2015-09-21

    We quantify the dynamic microscale temperature gradient in a gold nanorod solution using quantum-dot-based microscopic fluorescence nanothermometry. By incorporating CdSe quantum dots into the solution as a nanothermometer, precise temperature mapping with diffraction-limited spatial resolution and sub-degree temperature resolution is achieved. The acquired data on heat generation and dissipation show an excellent agreement with theoretical simulations. This work reveals an effective approach for noninvasive temperature regulation with localized nanoheaters in microfluidic environment.

  1. Macroscale versus microscale methods for physiological analysis of biofilms formed in 96-well microtiter plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, L C; Moreira, J M R; Miranda, J M; Simões, M; Melo, L F; Mergulhão, F J

    2013-12-01

    Microtiter plates with 96 wells have become one of the preferred platforms for biofilm studies mainly because they enable high-throughput assays. In this work, macroscale and microscale methods were used to study the impact of hydrodynamic conditions on the physiology and location of Escherichia coli JM109(DE3) biofilms formed in microtiter plates. Biofilms were formed in shaking and static conditions, and two macroscale parameters were assayed: the total amount of biofilm was measured by the crystal violet assay and the metabolic activity was determined by the resazurin assay. From the macroscale point of view, there were no statistically significant differences between the biofilms formed in static and shaking conditions. However, at a microscale level, the differences between both conditions were revealed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was observed that biofilm morphology and spatial distribution along the wall were different in these conditions. Simulation of the hydrodynamic conditions inside the wells at a microscale was performed by computational fluid dynamics (CFD). These simulations showed that the shear strain rate was unevenly distributed on the walls during shaking conditions and that regions of higher shear strain rate were obtained closer to the air/liquid interface. Additionally, it was shown that wall regions subjected to higher shear strain rates were associated with the formation of biofilms containing cells of smaller size. Conversely, regions with lower shear strain rate were prone to have a more uniform spatial distribution of adhered cells of larger size. The results presented on this work highlight the wealth of information that may be gathered by complementing macroscale approaches with a microscale analysis of the experiments. PMID:24140575

  2. Oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis by microscale 'shot-gun' gene synthesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Grundström, T; Zenke, W M; Wintzerith, M; Matthes, H W; Staub, A; Chambon, P

    1985-01-01

    We describe a rapid and efficient microscale method for in vitro site-directed mutagenesis by gene synthesis. Mutants are constructed by "shot-gun ligation" of overlapping synthetic oligonucleotides yielding double stranded synthetic DNA of more than 120 nucleotides in length. The terminal oligonucleotides of the DNA segment to be synthesized are designed to create sticky ends complementary to unique restriction sites of a polylinker present in an M13 vector. The oligonucleotides are hybridiz...

  3. Martian mesoscale and microscale wind variability of relevance for dust lifting

    OpenAIRE

    Spiga, Aymeric; Lewis, Stephen R.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Mars si both a windy and dusty environment. Ariborne dust is a crucial climate component on Mars. It impacts atmospheric circulations at large-, meso- and micro-scales, which in turn control dust lifting from the surface and transport in the atmosphere. Dust lifting processes and feedbacks on atmospheric circulations are currently not well understood. Method: Our purpose is to show how mesoscale models and large-eddy simulations help to explore small-scale circulation patterns ...

  4. Dynamic microscale temperature gradient in a gold nanorod solution measured by diffraction-limited nanothermometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We quantify the dynamic microscale temperature gradient in a gold nanorod solution using quantum-dot-based microscopic fluorescence nanothermometry. By incorporating CdSe quantum dots into the solution as a nanothermometer, precise temperature mapping with diffraction-limited spatial resolution and sub-degree temperature resolution is achieved. The acquired data on heat generation and dissipation show an excellent agreement with theoretical simulations. This work reveals an effective approach for noninvasive temperature regulation with localized nanoheaters in microfluidic environment

  5. Dynamic microscale temperature gradient in a gold nanorod solution measured by diffraction-limited nanothermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chengmingyue; Gan, Xiaosong; Li, Xiangping; Gu, Min

    2015-09-01

    We quantify the dynamic microscale temperature gradient in a gold nanorod solution using quantum-dot-based microscopic fluorescence nanothermometry. By incorporating CdSe quantum dots into the solution as a nanothermometer, precise temperature mapping with diffraction-limited spatial resolution and sub-degree temperature resolution is achieved. The acquired data on heat generation and dissipation show an excellent agreement with theoretical simulations. This work reveals an effective approach for noninvasive temperature regulation with localized nanoheaters in microfluidic environment.

  6. Geographic accessibility around health care facilities for elderly residents in Hong Kong: a microscale walkability assessment

    OpenAIRE

    LOO, Becky P.Y.; Winnie Wing Yee Lam

    2012-01-01

    An ageing population poses various challenges to a society. Improvements in the medical system and the transportation network are both needed to maintain and to improve the quality of life of the elderly population. In this study we first analyze the travel patterns of elderly residents to health care facilities (HCFs) in Hong Kong. Then, we focus on elderly residents walking to and from major transit stops and on a major HCF for elderly residents as a case study. In particular, a microscale ...

  7. Enhanced current and power density of micro-scale microbial fuel cells with ultramicroelectrode anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hao; Rangaswami, Sriram; Lee, Hyung-Sool; Chae, Junseok

    2016-09-01

    We present a micro-scale microbial fuel cell (MFC) with an ultramicroelectrode (UME) anode, with the aim of creating a miniaturized high-current/power-density converter using carbon-neutral and renewable energy sources. Micro-scale MFCs have been studied for more than a decade, yet their current and power densities are still an order of magnitude lower than those of their macro-scale counterparts. In order to enhance the current/power densities, we engineer a concentric ring-shaped UME, with a width of 20 μm, to facilitate the diffusion of ions in the vicinity of the micro-organisms that form biofilm on the UME. The biofilm extends approximately 15 μm from the edge of the UME, suggesting the effective biofilm area increases. Measured current/power densities per the effective area and the original anode area are 7.08  ±  0.01 A m-2 & 3.09  ±  0.04 W m-2 and 17.7  ±  0.03 A m-2 & 7.72  ±  0.09 W m-2, respectively. This is substantially higher than any prior work in micro-scale MFCs, and very close, or even higher, to that of macro-scale MFCs. A Coulombic efficiency, a measure of how efficiently an MFC harvests electrons from donor substrate, of 70%, and an energy conversion efficiency of 17% are marked, highlighting the micro-scale MFC as an attractive alternative within the existing energy conversion portfolio.

  8. Microscale Enhancement of Heat and Mass Transfer for Hydrogen Energy Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drost, Kevin [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Jovanovic, Goran [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Paul, Brian [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States)

    2015-09-30

    The document summarized the technical progress associated with OSU’s involvement in the Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence. OSU focused on the development of microscale enhancement technologies for improving heat and mass transfer in automotive hydrogen storage systems. OSU’s key contributions included the development of an extremely compact microchannel combustion system for discharging hydrogen storage systems and a thermal management system for adsorption based hydrogen storage using microchannel cooling (the Modular Adsorption Tank Insert or MATI).

  9. Automated drawing system of quantum energy levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stampoultzis, M.; Sinatkas, J.; Tsakstara, V.; Kosmas, T. S.

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this work is to derive an automated system that provides advantageous drawings of energy spectra for quantum systems (nuclei, atoms, molecules, etc.) required in various physical sciences. The automation involves the development of appropriate computational code and graphical imaging system based on raw data insertion, theoretical calculations and experimental or bibliographic data insertion. The system determines the appropriate scale to depict graphically with the best possible way in the available space. The presently developed code operates locally and the results are displayed on the screen and can be exported to a PostScript file. We note its main features to arrange and visualize in the available space the energy levels with their identity, taking care the existence in the final diagram the least auxiliary deviations. Future improvements can be the use of Java and the availability on the Internet. The work involves the automated plotting of energy levels in molecules, atoms, nuclei and other types of quantized energy spectra. The automation involves the development of an appropriate computational code and graphical imaging system.

  10. Automated drawing system of quantum energy levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work is to derive an automated system that provides advantageous drawings of energy spectra for quantum systems (nuclei, atoms, molecules, etc.) required in various physical sciences. The automation involves the development of appropriate computational code and graphical imaging system based on raw data insertion, theoretical calculations and experimental or bibliographic data insertion. The system determines the appropriate scale to depict graphically with the best possible way in the available space. The presently developed code operates locally and the results are displayed on the screen and can be exported to a PostScript file. We note its main features to arrange and visualize in the available space the energy levels with their identity, taking care the existence in the final diagram the least auxiliary deviations. Future improvements can be the use of Java and the availability on the Internet. The work involves the automated plotting of energy levels in molecules, atoms, nuclei and other types of quantized energy spectra. The automation involves the development of an appropriate computational code and graphical imaging system

  11. Measurement of liquid film flow on nuclear rod bundle in micro-scale by using very high speed camera system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Son; Kawara, Zensaku; Yokomine, Takehiko; Kunugi, Tomoaki

    2012-11-01

    Playing important roles in the mass and heat transfer as well as the safety of boiling water reactor, the liquid film flow on nuclear fuel rods has been studied by different measurement techniques such as ultrasonic transmission, conductivity probe, etc. Obtained experimental data of this annular two-phase flow, however, are still not enough to construct the physical model for critical heat flux analysis especially at the micro-scale. Remain problems are mainly caused by complicated geometry of fuel rod bundles, high velocity and very unstable interface behavior of liquid and gas flow. To get over these difficulties, a new approach using a very high speed digital camera system has been introduced in this work. The test section simulating a 3×3 rectangular rod bundle was made of acrylic to allow a full optical observation of the camera. Image data were taken through Cassegrain optical system to maintain the spatiotemporal resolution up to 7 μm and 20 μs. The results included not only the real-time visual information of flow patterns, but also the quantitative data such as liquid film thickness, the droplets' size and speed distributions, and the tilt angle of wavy surfaces. These databases could contribute to the development of a new model for the annular two-phase flow. Partly supported by the Global Center of Excellence (G-COE) program (J-051) of MEXT, Japan.

  12. Electrochemical-thermal modeling and microscale phase change for passive internal thermal management of lithium ion batteries.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuller, Thomas F. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Bandhauer, Todd (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Garimella, Srinivas (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA)

    2012-01-01

    A fully coupled electrochemical and thermal model for lithium-ion batteries is developed to investigate the impact of different thermal management strategies on battery performance. In contrast to previous modeling efforts focused either exclusively on particle electrochemistry on the one hand or overall vehicle simulations on the other, the present work predicts local electrochemical reaction rates using temperature-dependent data on commercially available batteries designed for high rates (C/LiFePO{sub 4}) in a computationally efficient manner. Simulation results show that conventional external cooling systems for these batteries, which have a low composite thermal conductivity ({approx}1 W/m-K), cause either large temperature rises or internal temperature gradients. Thus, a novel, passive internal cooling system that uses heat removal through liquid-vapor phase change is developed. Although there have been prior investigations of phase change at the microscales, fluid flow at the conditions expected here is not well understood. A first-principles based cooling system performance model is developed and validated experimentally, and is integrated into the coupled electrochemical-thermal model for assessment of performance improvement relative to conventional thermal management strategies. The proposed cooling system passively removes heat almost isothermally with negligible thermal resistances between the heat source and cooling fluid. Thus, the minimization of peak temperatures and gradients within batteries allow increased power and energy densities unencumbered by thermal limitations.

  13. Validation of picogram- and femtogram-input DNA libraries for microscale metagenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Serene; Raina, Jean-Baptiste; Skarshewski, Adam; Le, Xuyen H.; Butler, Margaret K.; Stocker, Roman; Seymour, Justin; Tyson, Gene W.

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing libraries are typically limited by the requirement for nanograms to micrograms of input DNA. This bottleneck impedes the microscale analysis of ecosystems and the exploration of low biomass samples. Current methods for amplifying environmental DNA to bypass this bottleneck introduce considerable bias into metagenomic profiles. Here we describe and validate a simple modification of the Illumina Nextera XT DNA library preparation kit which allows creation of shotgun libraries from sub-nanogram amounts of input DNA. Community composition was reproducible down to 100 fg of input DNA based on analysis of a mock community comprising 54 phylogenetically diverse Bacteria and Archaea. The main technical issues with the low input libraries were a greater potential for contamination, limited DNA complexity which has a direct effect on assembly and binning, and an associated higher percentage of read duplicates. We recommend a lower limit of 1 pg (∼100–1,000 microbial cells) to ensure community composition fidelity, and the inclusion of negative controls to identify reagent-specific contaminants. Applying the approach to marine surface water, pronounced differences were observed between bacterial community profiles of microliter volume samples, which we attribute to biological variation. This result is consistent with expected microscale patchiness in marine communities. We thus envision that our benchmarked, slightly modified low input DNA protocol will be beneficial for microscale and low biomass metagenomics.

  14. Study of Gas Flow Characteristics in Tight Porous Media with a Microscale Lattice Boltzmann Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianlin; Yao, Jun; Zhang, Min; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Yongfei; Sun, Hai; An, Senyou; Li, Aifen

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the gas flow characteristics in tight porous media, a microscale lattice Boltzmann (LB) model with the regularization procedure is firstly adopted to simulate gas flow in three-dimensional (3D) digital rocks. A shale digital rock and a sandstone digital rock are reconstructed to study the effects of pressure, temperature and pore size on microscale gas flow. The simulation results show that because of the microscale effect in tight porous media, the apparent permeability is always higher than the intrinsic permeability, and with the decrease of pressure or pore size, or with the increase of temperature, the difference between apparent permeability and intrinsic permeability increases. In addition, the Knudsen numbers under different conditions are calculated and the results show that gas flow characteristics in the digital rocks under different Knudsen numbers are quite different. With the increase of Knudsen number, gas flow in the digital rocks becomes more uniform and the effect of heterogeneity of the porous media on gas flow decreases. Finally, two commonly used apparent permeability calculation models are evaluated by the simulation results and the Klinkenberg model shows better accuracy. In addition, a better proportionality factor in Klinkenberg model is proposed according to the simulation results. PMID:27587293

  15. Validation of picogram- and femtogram-input DNA libraries for microscale metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinke, Christian; Low, Serene; Woodcroft, Ben J; Raina, Jean-Baptiste; Skarshewski, Adam; Le, Xuyen H; Butler, Margaret K; Stocker, Roman; Seymour, Justin; Tyson, Gene W; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing libraries are typically limited by the requirement for nanograms to micrograms of input DNA. This bottleneck impedes the microscale analysis of ecosystems and the exploration of low biomass samples. Current methods for amplifying environmental DNA to bypass this bottleneck introduce considerable bias into metagenomic profiles. Here we describe and validate a simple modification of the Illumina Nextera XT DNA library preparation kit which allows creation of shotgun libraries from sub-nanogram amounts of input DNA. Community composition was reproducible down to 100 fg of input DNA based on analysis of a mock community comprising 54 phylogenetically diverse Bacteria and Archaea. The main technical issues with the low input libraries were a greater potential for contamination, limited DNA complexity which has a direct effect on assembly and binning, and an associated higher percentage of read duplicates. We recommend a lower limit of 1 pg (∼100-1,000 microbial cells) to ensure community composition fidelity, and the inclusion of negative controls to identify reagent-specific contaminants. Applying the approach to marine surface water, pronounced differences were observed between bacterial community profiles of microliter volume samples, which we attribute to biological variation. This result is consistent with expected microscale patchiness in marine communities. We thus envision that our benchmarked, slightly modified low input DNA protocol will be beneficial for microscale and low biomass metagenomics. PMID:27688978

  16. Development of melt electrohydrodynamic 3D printing for complex microscale poly (ε-caprolactone) scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiankang; Xia, Peng; Li, Dichen

    2016-01-01

    The replication of native hierarchical structures into synthetic scaffolds is important to direct cell growth and tissue regeneration. However, most of the existing scaffold strategies lack the capability to simultaneously realize the controlled fabrication of macroscopic geometries as well as microscale architectures with the scale similar to living cells. Here we developed a melt electrohydrodynamic printing platform and verified its feasibility to fabricate three-dimensional (3D) tissue-engineered scaffolds with complex curved geometries and microscale fibrous structures. Melting temperature was studied to stably print poly (ε-caprolactone) (PCL) filaments with the size of about 10 μm, which was precisely stacked into 3D straight walls with fine surface quality. By adjusting stage moving speed and directions, 3D PCL scaffolds with curved contours and predefined fiber orientations or spacing were successfully printed. Biological experiments showed that the printed microscale scaffolds had good biocompatibility and facilitated cellular proliferation and alignment in vitro. It is envisioned that the melt electrohydrodynamic printing can potentially provide an innovative tool to fabricate hierarchical scaffolds that mimic the native tissue architectures in a multiscale level. PMID:27490377

  17. Mechanism of fracture in macro- and micro-scales in hollow centre cracked disc specimen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.Eftekhari; A.Baghbanan; H.Hashemolhosseini; H.Amrollahi

    2015-01-01

    The hollow centre cracked disc(HCCD) specimen is one of the suggested alternative methods for determining the fracture toughness of rock. This work aims to investigate the fracture mechanism in HCCD in macro- and micro-scales using numerical methods, extended finite element method(X-FEM) and particle flow code(PFC) modeling, respectively. In the X-FEM, heaviside and near-tip enrichment functions are employed to consider the presence of the crack in the model. In PFC modeling the movement and interaction of stressed assemblies of rigid spherical particles are modeled using the distinct element method(DEM). A numerical code called MEX-FEM based on XFEM has been developed to simulate the problems involving crack. The models of pure modes I and Ⅱ in macro-scale are simulated in micro-scale. The results show that dimensionless stress intensity factors(YI, YⅡ) for pure modes I and Ⅱ increase by increasing the crack length ratio. The angle at which the pure mode Ⅱ occurs decreases by increasing the crack length ratio. In mixed mode I-Ⅱ, The value of YI decreases by increasing the crack angle, while the value of YⅡ increases to a given crack angle and then it decreases. Moreover, the fracture in micro-scale, unlike the macro-scale, includes a combination of different modes of fracturing.

  18. Mechanism of fracture in macro- and micro-scales in hollow centre cracked disc specimen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Eftekhari; A. Baghbanan; H. Hashemolhosseini; H. Amrollahi

    2015-01-01

    The hollow centre cracked disc (HCCD) specimen is one of the suggested alternative methods for determining the fracture toughness of rock. This work aims to investigate the fracture mechanism in HCCD in macro- and micro-scales using numerical methods, extended finite element method (X-FEM) and particle flow code (PFC) modeling, respectively. In the X-FEM, heaviside and near-tip enrichment functions are employed to consider the presence of the crack in the model. In PFC modeling the movement and interaction of stressed assemblies of rigid spherical particles are modeled using the distinct element method (DEM). A numerical code called MEX-FEM based on XFEM has been developed to simulate the problems involving crack. The models of pure modes I and II in macro-scale are simulated in micro-scale. The results show that dimensionless stress intensity factors (YI,YI) for pure modes I and II increase by increasing the crack length ratio. The angle at which the pure mode II occurs decreases by increasing the crack length ratio. In mixed mode I-II, The value ofYI decreases by increasing the crack angle, while the value ofYI increases to a given crack angle and then it decreases. Moreover, the fracture in micro-scale, unlike the macro-scale, includes a combination of different modes of fracturing.

  19. Validation of picogram- and femtogram-input DNA libraries for microscale metagenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Serene; Raina, Jean-Baptiste; Skarshewski, Adam; Le, Xuyen H.; Butler, Margaret K.; Stocker, Roman; Seymour, Justin; Tyson, Gene W.

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing libraries are typically limited by the requirement for nanograms to micrograms of input DNA. This bottleneck impedes the microscale analysis of ecosystems and the exploration of low biomass samples. Current methods for amplifying environmental DNA to bypass this bottleneck introduce considerable bias into metagenomic profiles. Here we describe and validate a simple modification of the Illumina Nextera XT DNA library preparation kit which allows creation of shotgun libraries from sub-nanogram amounts of input DNA. Community composition was reproducible down to 100 fg of input DNA based on analysis of a mock community comprising 54 phylogenetically diverse Bacteria and Archaea. The main technical issues with the low input libraries were a greater potential for contamination, limited DNA complexity which has a direct effect on assembly and binning, and an associated higher percentage of read duplicates. We recommend a lower limit of 1 pg (∼100–1,000 microbial cells) to ensure community composition fidelity, and the inclusion of negative controls to identify reagent-specific contaminants. Applying the approach to marine surface water, pronounced differences were observed between bacterial community profiles of microliter volume samples, which we attribute to biological variation. This result is consistent with expected microscale patchiness in marine communities. We thus envision that our benchmarked, slightly modified low input DNA protocol will be beneficial for microscale and low biomass metagenomics. PMID:27688978

  20. Biogeomorphological implications of microscale interactions between sediment geotechnics and marine benthos: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, John M. H.; Meadows, Azra; Meadows, Peter S.

    2002-09-01

    At the foundations of biogeomorphological processes in the sea lie interactions between the activities of marine benthic animals and the geotechnical properties of their sedimentary environments. The potential significance of these interactions, which take place at a microscale level of millimetres to metres, for the large-scale geomorphology of the seabed has rarely been appreciated. In the context of this review, large-scale is defined as greater than 50 m to hundreds of kilometres. The present review addresses this link, drawing examples from a wide range of marine environments, including estuaries, the intertidal zone, continental shelves and slopes, and the deep sea. It firstly considers sediment stabilisation, slope failure, sediment mixing, biodeposition, sediment compaction, and hydrodynamic effects. This is followed by a consideration of two extremes of the ecological pyramid—the effects of marine meiofauna and marine vertebrates. The final section draws attention to the central role of faunal mucus and extracellular polymeric material (ECPM) in many of the microscale interactions that we describe. The implications of these microscale biological processes and features are discussed in terms of their influence on and control of the large-scale geomorphology of the seabed.

  1. Development of melt electrohydrodynamic 3D printing for complex microscale poly (ε-caprolactone) scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiankang; Xia, Peng; Li, Dichen

    2016-01-01

    The replication of native hierarchical structures into synthetic scaffolds is important to direct cell growth and tissue regeneration. However, most of the existing scaffold strategies lack the capability to simultaneously realize the controlled fabrication of macroscopic geometries as well as microscale architectures with the scale similar to living cells. Here we developed a melt electrohydrodynamic printing platform and verified its feasibility to fabricate three-dimensional (3D) tissue-engineered scaffolds with complex curved geometries and microscale fibrous structures. Melting temperature was studied to stably print poly (ε-caprolactone) (PCL) filaments with the size of about 10 μm, which was precisely stacked into 3D straight walls with fine surface quality. By adjusting stage moving speed and directions, 3D PCL scaffolds with curved contours and predefined fiber orientations or spacing were successfully printed. Biological experiments showed that the printed microscale scaffolds had good biocompatibility and facilitated cellular proliferation and alignment in vitro. It is envisioned that the melt electrohydrodynamic printing can potentially provide an innovative tool to fabricate hierarchical scaffolds that mimic the native tissue architectures in a multiscale level.

  2. MICROSCALE METABOLIC, REDOX AND ABIOTIC REACTIONS IN HANFORD 300 AREA SUBSURFACE SEDIMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyenal, Haluk [WSU; McLEan, Jeff [JCVI; Majors, Paul [PNNL; Fredrickson, Jim [PNNL

    2013-11-14

    The Hanford 300 Area is a unique site due to periodic hydrologic influence of river water resulting in changes in groundwater elevation and flow direction. This area is also highly subject to uranium remobilization, the source of which is currently believed to be the region at the base of the vadose zone that is subject to period saturation due to the changes in the water levels in the Columbia River. We found that microbial processes and redox and abiotic reactions which operate at the microscale were critical to understanding factors controlling the macroscopic fate and transport of contaminants in the subsurface. The combined laboratory and field research showed how microscale conditions control uranium mobility and how biotic, abiotic and redox reactions relate to each other. Our findings extended the current knowledge to examine U(VI) reduction and immobilization using natural 300 Area communities as well as selected model organisms on redox-sensitive and redox-insensitive minerals. Using innovative techniques developed specifically to probe biogeochemical processes at the microscale, our research expanded our current understanding of the roles played by mineral surfaces, bacterial competition, and local biotic, abiotic and redox reaction rates on the reduction and immobilization of uranium.

  3. Rapid automated nuclear chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, R.A.

    1979-05-31

    Rapid Automated Nuclear Chemistry (RANC) can be thought of as the Z-separation of Neutron-rich Isotopes by Automated Methods. The range of RANC studies of fission and its products is large. In a sense, the studies can be categorized into various energy ranges from the highest where the fission process and particle emission are considered, to low energies where nuclear dynamics are being explored. This paper presents a table which gives examples of current research using RANC on fission and fission products. The remainder of this text is divided into three parts. The first contains a discussion of the chemical methods available for the fission product elements, the second describes the major techniques, and in the last section, examples of recent results are discussed as illustrations of the use of RANC.

  4. Automated theorem proving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaisted, David A

    2014-03-01

    Automated theorem proving is the use of computers to prove or disprove mathematical or logical statements. Such statements can express properties of hardware or software systems, or facts about the world that are relevant for applications such as natural language processing and planning. A brief introduction to propositional and first-order logic is given, along with some of the main methods of automated theorem proving in these logics. These methods of theorem proving include resolution, Davis and Putnam-style approaches, and others. Methods for handling the equality axioms are also presented. Methods of theorem proving in propositional logic are presented first, and then methods for first-order logic. WIREs Cogn Sci 2014, 5:115-128. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1269 CONFLICT OF INTEREST: The authors has declared no conflicts of interest for this article. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26304304

  5. ATLAS Distributed Computing Automation

    CERN Document Server

    Schovancova, J; The ATLAS collaboration; Borrego, C; Campana, S; Di Girolamo, A; Elmsheuser, J; Hejbal, J; Kouba, T; Legger, F; Magradze, E; Medrano Llamas, R; Negri, G; Rinaldi, L; Sciacca, G; Serfon, C; Van Der Ster, D C

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS Experiment benefits from computing resources distributed worldwide at more than 100 WLCG sites. The ATLAS Grid sites provide over 100k CPU job slots, over 100 PB of storage space on disk or tape. Monitoring of status of such a complex infrastructure is essential. The ATLAS Grid infrastructure is monitored 24/7 by two teams of shifters distributed world-wide, by the ATLAS Distributed Computing experts, and by site administrators. In this paper we summarize automation efforts performed within the ATLAS Distributed Computing team in order to reduce manpower costs and improve the reliability of the system. Different aspects of the automation process are described: from the ATLAS Grid site topology provided by the ATLAS Grid Information System, via automatic site testing by the HammerCloud, to automatic exclusion from production or analysis activities.

  6. Rapid automated nuclear chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapid Automated Nuclear Chemistry (RANC) can be thought of as the Z-separation of Neutron-rich Isotopes by Automated Methods. The range of RANC studies of fission and its products is large. In a sense, the studies can be categorized into various energy ranges from the highest where the fission process and particle emission are considered, to low energies where nuclear dynamics are being explored. This paper presents a table which gives examples of current research using RANC on fission and fission products. The remainder of this text is divided into three parts. The first contains a discussion of the chemical methods available for the fission product elements, the second describes the major techniques, and in the last section, examples of recent results are discussed as illustrations of the use of RANC

  7. The Automated Medical Office

    OpenAIRE

    Petreman, Mel

    1990-01-01

    With shock and surprise many physicians learned in the 1980s that they must change the way they do business. Competition for patients, increasing government regulation, and the rapidly escalating risk of litigation forces physicians to seek modern remedies in office management. The author describes a medical clinic that strives to be paperless using electronic innovation to solve the problems of medical practice management. A computer software program to automate information management in a c...

  8. Automation in biological crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Patrick Shaw; Mueller-Dieckmann, Jochen

    2014-06-01

    Crystallization remains the bottleneck in the crystallographic process leading from a gene to a three-dimensional model of the encoded protein or RNA. Automation of the individual steps of a crystallization experiment, from the preparation of crystallization cocktails for initial or optimization screens to the imaging of the experiments, has been the response to address this issue. Today, large high-throughput crystallization facilities, many of them open to the general user community, are capable of setting up thousands of crystallization trials per day. It is thus possible to test multiple constructs of each target for their ability to form crystals on a production-line basis. This has improved success rates and made crystallization much more convenient. High-throughput crystallization, however, cannot relieve users of the task of producing samples of high quality. Moreover, the time gained from eliminating manual preparations must now be invested in the careful evaluation of the increased number of experiments. The latter requires a sophisticated data and laboratory information-management system. A review of the current state of automation at the individual steps of crystallization with specific attention to the automation of optimization is given.

  9. Transition-state theory predicts clogging at the microscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laar, T. Van De; Klooster, S. Ten; Schroën, K.; Sprakel, J.

    2016-06-01

    Clogging is one of the main failure mechanisms encountered in industrial processes such as membrane filtration. Our understanding of the factors that govern the build-up of fouling layers and the emergence of clogs is largely incomplete, so that prevention of clogging remains an immense and costly challenge. In this paper we use a microfluidic model combined with quantitative real-time imaging to explore the influence of pore geometry and particle interactions on suspension clogging in constrictions, two crucial factors which remain relatively unexplored. We find a distinct dependence of the clogging rate on the entrance angle to a membrane pore which we explain quantitatively by deriving a model, based on transition-state theory, which describes the effect of viscous forces on the rate with which particles accumulate at the channel walls. With the same model we can also predict the effect of the particle interaction potential on the clogging rate. In both cases we find excellent agreement between our experimental data and theory. A better understanding of these clogging mechanisms and the influence of design parameters could form a stepping stone to delay or prevent clogging by rational membrane design.

  10. Shot Automation for the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagin, L J; Bettenhausen, R C; Beeler, R G; Bowers, G A; Carey, R; Casavant, D D; Cline, B D; Demaret, R D; Domyancic, D M; Elko, S D; Fisher, J M; Hermann, M R; Krammen, J E; Kohut, T R; Marshall, C D; Mathisen, D G; Ludwigsen, A P; Patterson, Jr., R W; Sanchez, R J; Stout, E A; Van Arsdall, P J; Van Wonterghem, B M

    2005-09-21

    performed for a shot. A graphical model editor facilitates the definition and viewing of an execution model. A change manager tool enables ''de-participation'' of individual devices, of entire laser segments (beams, quads, or bundles of beams) or individual diagnostics. This software has been deployed to the NIF facility and is currently being used to support NIF main laser commissioning shots and build-out of the NIF laser. This will be used to automate future target and experimental shot campaigns.

  11. Automation in organizations: Eternal conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieterly, D. L.

    1981-01-01

    Some ideas on and insights into the problems associated with automation in organizations are presented with emphasis on the concept of automation, its relationship to the individual, and its impact on system performance. An analogy is drawn, based on an American folk hero, to emphasize the extent of the problems encountered when dealing with automation within an organization. A model is proposed to focus attention on a set of appropriate dimensions. The function allocation process becomes a prominent aspect of the model. The current state of automation research is mentioned in relation to the ideas introduced. Proposed directions for an improved understanding of automation's effect on the individual's efficiency are discussed. The importance of understanding the individual's perception of the system in terms of the degree of automation is highlighted.

  12. Automated Assessment, Face to Face

    OpenAIRE

    Rizik M. H. Al-Sayyed; Amjad Hudaib; Muhannad AL-Shboul; Yousef Majdalawi; Mohammed Bataineh

    2010-01-01

    This research paper evaluates the usability of automated exams and compares them with the paper-and-pencil traditional ones. It presents the results of a detailed study conducted at The University of Jordan (UoJ) that comprised students from 15 faculties. A set of 613 students were asked about their opinions concerning automated exams; and their opinions were deeply analyzed. The results indicate that most students reported that they are satisfied with using automated exams but they have sugg...

  13. Automation System Products and Research

    OpenAIRE

    Rintala, Mikko; Sormunen, Jussi; Kuisma, Petri; Rahkala, Matti

    2014-01-01

    Automation systems are used in most buildings nowadays. In the past they were mainly used in industry to control and monitor critical systems. During the past few decades the automation systems have become more common and are used today from big industrial solutions to homes of private customers. With the growing need for ecologic and cost-efficient management systems, home and building automation systems are becoming a standard way of controlling lighting, ventilation, heating etc. Auto...

  14. Test Automation of Online Games

    OpenAIRE

    Schoenfeldt, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    State of the art browser games are increasingly complex pieces of software with extensive code basis. With increasing complexity, a software becomes harder to maintain. Automated regression testing can simplify these maintenance processes and thereby enable developers as well as testers to spend their workforce more efficiently. This thesis addresses the utilization of automated tests in web applications. As a use case test automation is applied to an online-based strategy game for the bro...

  15. Automated Quantification of Optic Nerve Axons in Primate Glaucomatous and Normal Eyes—Method and Comparison to Semi-Automated Manual Quantification

    OpenAIRE

    Reynaud, Juan; Cull, Grant; Lin WANG; Fortune, Brad; Gardiner, Stuart; Burgoyne, Claude F.; Cioffi, George A.

    2012-01-01

    An algorithm and software application for counting 100% of the axons in nonhuman primate optic nerve cross sections (normal through end-stage experimental glaucoma) is presented and validated against a semi-automated manual method.

  16. Mechatronic Design Automation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Zhun

    This book proposes a novel design method that combines both genetic programming (GP) to automatically explore the open-ended design space and bond graphs (BG) to unify design representations of multi-domain Mechatronic systems. Results show that the method, formally called GPBG method, can...... successfully design analogue filters, vibration absorbers, micro-electro-mechanical systems, and vehicle suspension systems, all in an automatic or semi-automatic way. It also investigates the very important issue of co-designing plant-structures and dynamic controllers in automated design of Mechatronic...

  17. The automated medical office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petreman, M

    1990-08-01

    With shock and surprise many physicians learned in the 1980s that they must change the way they do business. Competition for patients, increasing government regulation, and the rapidly escalating risk of litigation forces physicians to seek modern remedies in office management. The author describes a medical clinic that strives to be paperless using electronic innovation to solve the problems of medical practice management. A computer software program to automate information management in a clinic shows that practical thinking linked to advanced technology can greatly improve office efficiency.

  18. AUTOMATED API TESTING APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUNIL L. BANGARE

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Software testing is an investigation conducted to provide stakeholders with information about the quality of the product or service under test. With the help of software testing we can verify or validate the software product. Normally testing will be done after development of software but we can perform the software testing at the time of development process also. This paper will give you a brief introduction about Automated API Testing Tool. This tool of testing will reduce lots of headache after the whole development of software. It saves time as well as money. Such type of testing is helpful in the Industries & Colleges also.

  19. World-wide distribution automation systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devaney, T.M.

    1994-12-31

    A worldwide power distribution automation system is outlined. Distribution automation is defined and the status of utility automation is discussed. Other topics discussed include a distribution management system, substation feeder, and customer functions, potential benefits, automation costs, planning and engineering considerations, automation trends, databases, system operation, computer modeling of system, and distribution management systems.

  20. Design and Proto-Flight Test Strategy for a Microscale Solar Thermal Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, F. G.; Palmer, P.; Gibbon, D.

    2002-01-01

    The authors have previously shown that a micro-scale solar thermal engine, using storable monopropellants (e.g., water, ammonia, or hydrazine) and simplified subsystems, augments microsatellite capabilities by permitting velocity changes on the order of 1,500-3,000 m/s. Small satellites have long been seen as "confined" to limited roles in Low Earth Orbit (LEO). Adding significant propulsive capability opens up new roles and missions--among these, communications in geosynchronous earth orbit (GEO), as well as lunar orbit insertion and near-earth asteroid flybys. Transfer times range from as little as 30-40 days (for Geosynchronous Transfer Orbit to GEO) to 275 days for selected near-earth object encounters. This is accomplished by performing moderate thrust (~5 N) firings of the solar thermal engine at perigee and/or apogee. This paper will briefly review benchmark missions and preliminary design choices, concentrating on the selected detailed design and its ramifications for testing and spacecraft operational use. The solar thermal propulsion system is to be built as a proto-qualification/proto-flight unit (i.e., tested to qualification levels and subsequently used in on-orbit operations). This will minimize the number of experimental iterations prior to flight and reduce overall development cost. The testing program will include acoustic, sinusoidal, and random vibration tests, in line with Ariane 5's Ariane Structure for Auxiliary Payloads (ASAP) requirements. As several SSTL enhanced microsatellites have flown aboard Ariane, these figures represent excellent baseline values for the test campaign. Additionally, the solar thermal engine will be constructed so as to ensure compatibility with existing host spacecraft operational protocols. SSTL ground operations are "autonomous and self-checking," requiring the equivalent of only several operators per day to manage numerous small satellite passes. It is important that an advanced propulsion system not compromise

  1. Integration of Google Maps/Earth with microscale meteorology models and data visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yansen; Huynh, Giap; Williamson, Chatt

    2013-12-01

    The Google Maps/Earth GIS has been integrated with a microscale meteorological model to improve the system's functionality and ease of use. Almost all the components of the model system, including the terrain data processing, morphological data generation, meteorological data gathering and initialization, and displaying/visualizing the model results, have been improved by using this approach. Different from the traditional stand-along model system, this novel system takes advantages of enormous resources in map and image data retrieving/handling, four-dimensional (space and time) data visualization, overlaying, and many other advanced GIS features that the Google Maps/Earth platform has to offer. We have developed modular components for all of the model system controls and data processing programs which are glued together with the JavaScript language and KML/XML data. We have also developed small modular software using the Google application program interface to convert the model results and intermediate data for visualizations and animations. Capabilities such as high-resolution image, street view, and 3D buildings in the Google Earth/Map are also used to quickly generate small-scale vegetation and building morphology data that are required for the microscale meteorological models. This system has also been applied to visualize the data from other instruments such as Doppler wind lidars. Because of the tight integration of the internet based GIS and a microscale meteorology model, the model system is more versatile, intuitive, and user-friendly than a stand-along system we had developed before. This kind of system will enhance the user experience and also help researchers to explore new phenomena in fine-scale meteorology.

  2. Porous silver nanosheets: a novel sensing material for nanoscale and microscale airflow sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzbanrad, Ehsan; Zhao, Boxin; Zhou, Norman Y

    2015-11-01

    Fabrication of nanoscale and microscale machines and devices is one of the goals of nanotechnology. For this purpose, different materials, methods, and devices should be developed. Among them, various types of miniaturized sensors are required to build the nanoscale and microscale systems. In this research, we introduce a new nanoscale sensing material, silver nanosheets, for applications such as nanoscale and microscale gas flow sensors. The silver nanosheets were synthesized through the reduction of silver ions by ascorbic acid in the presence of poly(methacrylic acid) as a capping agent, followed by the growth of silver in the shape of hexagonal and triangular nanoplates, and self-assembly and nanojoining of these structural blocks. At the end of this process, the synthesized nanosheets were floated on the solution. Then, their electrical and thermal stability was demonstrated at 120 °C, and their atmospheric corrosion resistance was clarified at the same temperature range by thermogravimetric analysis. We employed the silver nanosheets in fabricating airflow sensors by scooping out the nanosheets by means of a sensor substrate, drying them at room temperature, and then annealing them at 300 °C for one hour. The fabricated sensors were tested for their ability to measure airflow in the range of 1 to 5 ml min(-1), which resulted in a linear response to the airflow with a response and recovery time around 2 s. Moreover, continuous dynamic testing demonstrated that the response of the sensors was stable and hence the sensors can be used for a long time without detectable drift in their response.

  3. Porous silver nanosheets: a novel sensing material for nanoscale and microscale airflow sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzbanrad, Ehsan; Zhao, Boxin; Zhou, Norman Y.

    2015-11-01

    Fabrication of nanoscale and microscale machines and devices is one of the goals of nanotechnology. For this purpose, different materials, methods, and devices should be developed. Among them, various types of miniaturized sensors are required to build the nanoscale and microscale systems. In this research, we introduce a new nanoscale sensing material, silver nanosheets, for applications such as nanoscale and microscale gas flow sensors. The silver nanosheets were synthesized through the reduction of silver ions by ascorbic acid in the presence of poly(methacrylic acid) as a capping agent, followed by the growth of silver in the shape of hexagonal and triangular nanoplates, and self-assembly and nanojoining of these structural blocks. At the end of this process, the synthesized nanosheets were floated on the solution. Then, their electrical and thermal stability was demonstrated at 120 °C, and their atmospheric corrosion resistance was clarified at the same temperature range by thermogravimetric analysis. We employed the silver nanosheets in fabricating airflow sensors by scooping out the nanosheets by means of a sensor substrate, drying them at room temperature, and then annealing them at 300 °C for one hour. The fabricated sensors were tested for their ability to measure airflow in the range of 1 to 5 ml min-1, which resulted in a linear response to the airflow with a response and recovery time around 2 s. Moreover, continuous dynamic testing demonstrated that the response of the sensors was stable and hence the sensors can be used for a long time without detectable drift in their response.

  4. Microscale vicariance and diversification of Western Balkan caddisflies linked to karstification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnitzler, Jan; Kučinić, Mladen; Graf, Wolfram; Ibrahimi, Halil; Kerovec, Mladen

    2016-01-01

    The karst areas in the Dinaric region of the Western Balkan Peninsula are a hotspot of freshwater biodiversity. Many investigators have examined diversification of the subterranean freshwater fauna in these karst systems. However, diversification of surface-water fauna remains largely unexplored. We assessed local and regional diversification of surface-water species in karst systems and asked whether patterns of population differentiation could be explained by dispersal–diversification processes or allopatric diversification following karst-related microscale vicariance. We analyzed mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (mtCOI) sequence data of 4 caddisfly species (genus Drusus) in a phylogeographic framework to assess local and regional population genetic structure and Pliocene/Pleistocene history. We used BEAST software to assess the timing of intraspecific diversification of the target species. We compared climate envelopes of the study species and projected climatically suitable areas during the last glacial maximum (LGM) to assess differences in the species climatic niches and infer potential LGM refugia. The haplotype distribution of the 4 species (324 individuals from 32 populations) was characterized by strong genetic differentiation with few haplotypes shared among populations (16%) and deep divergence among populations of the 3 endemic species, even at local scales. Divergence among local populations of endemics often exceeded divergence among regional and continental clades of the widespread D. discolor. Major divergences among regional populations dated to 2.0 to 0.5 Mya. Species distribution model projections and genetic structure suggest that the endemic species persisted in situ and diversified locally throughout multiple Pleistocene climate cycles. The pattern for D. discolor was different and consistent with multiple invasions into the region. Patterns of population genetic structure and diversification were similar for the 3 regional

  5. Microscale resolution fracture toughness profiling at the zirconia-porcelain interface in dental prostheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunt, Alexander J. G.; Mohanty, Gaurav; Neo, Tee K.; Michler, Johann; Korsunsky, Alexander M.

    2015-12-01

    The high failure rate of the Yttria Partially Stabilized Zirconia (YPSZ)-porcelain interface in dental prostheses is influenced by the micro-scale mechanical property variation in this region. To improve the understanding of this behavior, micro-scale fracture toughness profiling by nanoindentation micropillar splitting is reported for the first time. Sixty 5 μm diameter micropillars were machined within the first 100 μm of the interface. Berkovich nanoindentation provided estimates of the bulk fracture toughness of YPSZ and porcelain that matched the literature values closely. However, the large included tip angle prevented precise alignment of indenter with the pillar center. Cube corner indentation was performed on the remainder of the pillars and calibration between nanoindentation using different tip shapes was used to determine the associated conversion factors. YPSZ micropillars failed by gradual crack propagation and bulk values persisted to within 15 μm from the interface, beyond which scatter increased and a 10% increase in fracture toughness was observed that may be associated with grain size variation at this location. Micropillars straddling the interface displayed preferential fracture within porcelain parallel to the interface at a location where nano-voiding has previously been observed and reported. Pure porcelain micropillars exhibited highly brittle failure and a large reduction of fracture toughness (by up to ~90%) within the first 50 μm of the interface. These new insights constitute a major advance in understanding the structure-property relationship of this important bi-material interface at the micro-scale, and will improve micromechanical modelling needed to optimize current manufacturing routes and reduce failure.

  6. Automation from pictures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The state transition diagram (STD) model has been helpful in the design of real time software, especially with the emergence of graphical computer aided software engineering (CASE) tools. Nevertheless, the translation of the STD to real time code has in the past been primarily a manual task. At Los Alamos we have automated this process. The designer constructs the STD using a CASE tool (Cadre Teamwork) using a special notation for events and actions. A translator converts the STD into an intermediate state notation language (SNL), and this SNL is compiled directly into C code (a state program). Execution of the state program is driven by external events, allowing multiple state programs to effectively share the resources of the host processor. Since the design and the code are tightly integrated through the CASE tool, the design and code never diverge, and we avoid design obsolescence. Furthermore, the CASE tool automates the production of formal technical documents from the graphic description encapsulated by the CASE tool. (author)

  7. Automated Test Case Generation

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    I would like to present the concept of automated test case generation. I work on it as part of my PhD and I think it would be interesting also for other people. It is also the topic of a workshop paper that I am introducing in Paris. (abstract below) Please note that the talk itself would be more general and not about the specifics of my PhD, but about the broad field of Automated Test Case Generation. I would introduce the main approaches (combinatorial testing, symbolic execution, adaptive random testing) and their advantages and problems. (oracle problem, combinatorial explosion, ...) Abstract of the paper: Over the last decade code-based test case generation techniques such as combinatorial testing or dynamic symbolic execution have seen growing research popularity. Most algorithms and tool implementations are based on finding assignments for input parameter values in order to maximise the execution branch coverage. Only few of them consider dependencies from outside the Code Under Test’s scope such...

  8. Automated Postediting of Documents

    CERN Document Server

    Knight, K; Knight, Kevin; Chander, Ishwar

    1994-01-01

    Large amounts of low- to medium-quality English texts are now being produced by machine translation (MT) systems, optical character readers (OCR), and non-native speakers of English. Most of this text must be postedited by hand before it sees the light of day. Improving text quality is tedious work, but its automation has not received much research attention. Anyone who has postedited a technical report or thesis written by a non-native speaker of English knows the potential of an automated postediting system. For the case of MT-generated text, we argue for the construction of postediting modules that are portable across MT systems, as an alternative to hardcoding improvements inside any one system. As an example, we have built a complete self-contained postediting module for the task of article selection (a, an, the) for English noun phrases. This is a notoriously difficult problem for Japanese-English MT. Our system contains over 200,000 rules derived automatically from online text resources. We report on l...

  9. Maneuver Automation Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uffelman, Hal; Goodson, Troy; Pellegrin, Michael; Stavert, Lynn; Burk, Thomas; Beach, David; Signorelli, Joel; Jones, Jeremy; Hahn, Yungsun; Attiyah, Ahlam; Illsley, Jeannette

    2009-01-01

    The Maneuver Automation Software (MAS) automates the process of generating commands for maneuvers to keep the spacecraft of the Cassini-Huygens mission on a predetermined prime mission trajectory. Before MAS became available, a team of approximately 10 members had to work about two weeks to design, test, and implement each maneuver in a process that involved running many maneuver-related application programs and then serially handing off data products to other parts of the team. MAS enables a three-member team to design, test, and implement a maneuver in about one-half hour after Navigation has process-tracking data. MAS accepts more than 60 parameters and 22 files as input directly from users. MAS consists of Practical Extraction and Reporting Language (PERL) scripts that link, sequence, and execute the maneuver- related application programs: "Pushing a single button" on a graphical user interface causes MAS to run navigation programs that design a maneuver; programs that create sequences of commands to execute the maneuver on the spacecraft; and a program that generates predictions about maneuver performance and generates reports and other files that enable users to quickly review and verify the maneuver design. MAS can also generate presentation materials, initiate electronic command request forms, and archive all data products for future reference.

  10. Enhancing heat transfer at the micro-scale using elastic turbulence

    OpenAIRE

    R.D. Whalley; W.M. Abed; D.J.C. Dennis; Poole, R J

    2015-01-01

    Small concentrations of a high-molecular-weight polymer have been used to create so-called “elastic turbulence” in a micro-scale serpentine channel geometry. It is known that the interaction of large elastic stresses created by the shearing motion within the fluid flow with streamline curvature of the serpentine geometry leads initially to a purely-elastic instability and then the generation of elastic turbulence. We show that this elastic turbulence enhances the heat transfer at the micro-sc...

  11. Application of short pulsed laser systems for micro-scale processing.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jared, Bradley Howell

    2010-03-01

    The relatively recent development of short (nsec) and ultra-short (fsec) pulsed laser systems has introduced process capabilities which are particularly suited for micro-manufacturing applications. Micrometer feature resolutions and minimal heat affected zones are commonly cited benefits, although unique material interactions also prove attractive for many applications. A background of short and ultra-short pulsed laser system capabilities and material interactions will be presented for micro-scale processing. Processing strengths and limitations will be discussed and demonstrated within the framework of applications related to micro-machining, material surface modifications, and fundamental material science research.

  12. Scaling laws for gas breakdown for nanoscale to microscale gaps at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveless, Amanda M.; Garner, Allen L.

    2016-06-01

    Electronics miniaturization motivates gas breakdown predictions for microscale and smaller gaps, since traditional breakdown theory fails when gap size, d, is smaller than ˜15 μm at atmospheric pressure, patm. We perform a matched asymptotic analysis to derive analytic expressions for breakdown voltage, Vb, at patm for 1 nm ≤ d ≤ 35 μm. We obtain excellent agreement between numerical, analytic, and particle-in-cell simulations for argon, and show Vb decreasing as d → 0, instead of increasing as predicted by Paschen's law. This work provides an analytic framework for determining Vb at atmospheric pressure for various gap distances that may be extended to other gases.

  13. A review of recent advances in numerical simulations of microscale fuel processor for hydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holladay, J. D.; Wang, Y.

    2015-05-01

    Microscale (methanol as the fuel due to methanol's low reforming temperature and high conversion, although, there are several methane fueled systems. The increased computational power and more complex codes have led to improved accuracy of numerical simulations. Initial models focused on the reformer, while more recently, the simulations began including other unit operations such as vaporizers, inlet manifolds, and combustors. These codes are critical for developing the next generation systems. The systems reviewed included plate reactors, microchannel reactors, and annulus reactors for both wash-coated and packed bed systems.

  14. An agent strategy for automated stock market trading combining price and order book information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silaghi, G.; Robu, V.

    2005-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel automated agent strategy for stock market trading, developed in the context of the Penn-Lehman automated trading (PLAT) simulation platform by Kearns, M., and Ortiz, L., (2003). We provide a comprehensive experimental validation of our strategy using historic order book d

  15. Get smart! automate your house!

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Amstel, P.; Gorter, N.; De Rouw, J.

    2016-01-01

    This "designers' manual" is made during the TIDO-course AR0531 Innovation and Sustainability This manual will help you in reducing both energy usage and costs by automating your home. It gives an introduction to a number of home automation systems that every homeowner can install.

  16. Automated Methods Of Corrosion Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech-Nielsen, Gregers; Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Reeve, John Ch;

    1997-01-01

    The chapter describes the following automated measurements: Corrosion Measurements by Titration, Imaging Corrosion by Scanning Probe Microscopy, Critical Pitting Temperature and Application of the Electrochemical Hydrogen Permeation Cell.......The chapter describes the following automated measurements: Corrosion Measurements by Titration, Imaging Corrosion by Scanning Probe Microscopy, Critical Pitting Temperature and Application of the Electrochemical Hydrogen Permeation Cell....

  17. Automated separation for heterogeneous immunoassays

    OpenAIRE

    Truchaud, A.; Barclay, J; Yvert, J. P.; Capolaghi, B.

    1991-01-01

    Beside general requirements for modern automated systems, immunoassay automation involves specific requirements as a separation step for heterogeneous immunoassays. Systems are designed according to the solid phase selected: dedicated or open robots for coated tubes and wells, systems nearly similar to chemistry analysers in the case of magnetic particles, and a completely original design for those using porous and film materials.

  18. Automated Test-Form Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Linden, Wim J.; Diao, Qi

    2011-01-01

    In automated test assembly (ATA), the methodology of mixed-integer programming is used to select test items from an item bank to meet the specifications for a desired test form and optimize its measurement accuracy. The same methodology can be used to automate the formatting of the set of selected items into the actual test form. Three different…

  19. Translation: Aids, Robots, and Automation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreyewsky, Alexander

    1981-01-01

    Examines electronic aids to translation both as ways to automate it and as an approach to solve problems resulting from shortage of qualified translators. Describes the limitations of robotic MT (Machine Translation) systems, viewing MAT (Machine-Aided Translation) as the only practical solution and the best vehicle for further automation. (MES)

  20. Opening up Library Automation Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breeding, Marshall

    2009-01-01

    Throughout the history of library automation, the author has seen a steady advancement toward more open systems. In the early days of library automation, when proprietary systems dominated, the need for standards was paramount since other means of inter-operability and data exchange weren't possible. Today's focus on Application Programming…

  1. Assessment of microscale spatio-temporal variation of air pollution at an urban hotspot in Madrid (Spain) through an extensive field campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borge, Rafael; Narros, Adolfo; Artíñano, Begoña; Yagüe, Carlos; Gómez-Moreno, Francisco Javier; de la Paz, David; Román-Cascón, Carlos; Díaz, Elías; Maqueda, Gregorio; Sastre, Mariano; Quaassdorff, Christina; Dimitroulopoulou, Chrysanthi; Vardoulakis, Sotiris

    2016-09-01

    Poor urban air quality is one of the main environmental concerns worldwide due to its implications for population exposure and health-related issues. However, the development of effective abatement strategies in cities requires a consistent and holistic assessment of air pollution processes, taking into account all the relevant scales within a city. This contribution presents the methodology and main results of an intensive experimental campaign carried out in a complex pollution hotspot in Madrid (Spain) under the TECNAIRE-CM research project, which aimed at understanding the microscale spatio-temporal variation of ambient concentration levels in areas where high pollution values are recorded. A variety of instruments were deployed during a three-week field campaign to provide detailed information on meteorological and micrometeorological parameters and spatio-temporal variations of the most relevant pollutants (NO2 and PM) along with relevant information needed to simulate pedestrian fluxes. The results show the strong dependence of ambient concentrations on local emissions and meteorology that turns out in strong spatial and temporal variations, with gradients up to 2 μg m-3 m-1 for NO2 and 55 μg m-3 min-1 for PM10. Pedestrian exposure to these pollutants also presents strong variations temporally and spatially but it concentrates on pedestrian crossings and bus stops. The analysis of the results show that the high concentration levels found in urban hotspots depend on extremely complex dynamic processes that cannot be captured by routinely measurements made by air quality monitoring stations used for regulatory compliance assessment. The large influence from local traffic in the concentration fields highlights the need for a detailed description of specific variables that determine emissions and dispersion at microscale level. This also indicates that city-scale interventions may be complemented with local control measures and exposure management, to improve

  2. From macro-scale to micro-scale computational anatomy: a perspective on the next 20 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Kensaku

    2016-10-01

    This paper gives our perspective on the next two decades of computational anatomy, which has made great strides in the recognition and understanding of human anatomy from conventional clinical images. The results from this field are now used in a variety of medical applications, including quantitative analysis of organ shapes, interventional assistance, surgical navigation, and population analysis. Several anatomical models have also been used in computational anatomy, and these mainly target millimeter-scale shapes. For example, liver-shape models are almost completely modeled at the millimeter scale, and shape variations are described at such scales. Most clinical 3D scanning devices have had just under 1 or 0.5 mm per voxel resolution for over 25 years, and this resolution has not changed drastically in that time. Although Z-axis (head-to-tail direction) resolution has been drastically improved by the introduction of multi-detector CT scanning devices, in-plane resolutions have not changed very much either. When we look at human anatomy, we can see different anatomical structures at different scales. For example, pulmonary blood vessels and lung lobes can be observed in millimeter-scale images. If we take 10-µm-scale images of a lung specimen, the alveoli and bronchiole regions can be located in them. Most work in millimeter-scale computational anatomy has been done by the medical-image analysis community. In the next two decades, we encourage our community to focus on micro-scale computational anatomy. In this perspective paper, we briefly review the achievements of computational anatomy and its impacts on clinical applications; furthermore, we show several possibilities from the viewpoint of microscopic computational anatomy by discussing experimental results from our recent research activities.

  3. A Machine Learning Approach to Automated Negotiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Huaxiang(张化祥); Zhang Liang; Huang Shangteng; Ma Fanyuan

    2004-01-01

    Automated negotiation between two competitive agents is analyzed, and a multi-issue negotiation model based on machine learning, time belief, offer belief and state-action pair expected Q value is developed. Unlike the widely used approaches such as game theory approach, heuristic approach and argumentation approach, This paper uses a machine learning method to compute agents' average Q values in each negotiation stage. The delayed reward is used to generate agents' offer and counteroffer of every issue. The effect of time and discount rate on negotiation outcome is analyzed. Theory analysis and experimental data show this negotiation model is practical.

  4. Automated Motivic Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lartillot, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Motivic analysis provides very detailed understanding of musical composi- tions, but is also particularly difficult to formalize and systematize. A computational automation of the discovery of motivic patterns cannot be reduced to a mere extraction of all possible sequences of descriptions....... The systematic approach inexorably leads to a proliferation of redundant structures that needs to be addressed properly. Global filtering techniques cause a drastic elimination of interesting structures that damages the quality of the analysis. On the other hand, a selection of closed patterns allows...... for lossless compression. The structural complexity resulting from successive repetitions of patterns can be controlled through a simple modelling of cycles. Generally, motivic patterns cannot always be defined solely as sequences of descriptions in a fixed set of dimensions: throughout the descriptions...

  5. Robust automated knowledge capture.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens-Adams, Susan Marie; Abbott, Robert G.; Forsythe, James Chris; Trumbo, Michael Christopher Stefan; Haass, Michael Joseph; Hendrickson, Stacey M. Langfitt

    2011-10-01

    This report summarizes research conducted through the Sandia National Laboratories Robust Automated Knowledge Capture Laboratory Directed Research and Development project. The objective of this project was to advance scientific understanding of the influence of individual cognitive attributes on decision making. The project has developed a quantitative model known as RumRunner that has proven effective in predicting the propensity of an individual to shift strategies on the basis of task and experience related parameters. Three separate studies are described which have validated the basic RumRunner model. This work provides a basis for better understanding human decision making in high consequent national security applications, and in particular, the individual characteristics that underlie adaptive thinking.

  6. Automated Electrostatics Environmental Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Carlos; Lewis, Dean C.; Buchanan, Randy K.; Buchanan, Aubri

    2005-01-01

    The Mars Electrostatics Chamber (MEC) is an environmental chamber designed primarily to create atmospheric conditions like those at the surface of Mars to support experiments on electrostatic effects in the Martian environment. The chamber is equipped with a vacuum system, a cryogenic cooling system, an atmospheric-gas replenishing and analysis system, and a computerized control system that can be programmed by the user and that provides both automation and options for manual control. The control system can be set to maintain steady Mars-like conditions or to impose temperature and pressure variations of a Mars diurnal cycle at any given season and latitude. In addition, the MEC can be used in other areas of research because it can create steady or varying atmospheric conditions anywhere within the wide temperature, pressure, and composition ranges between the extremes of Mars-like and Earth-like conditions.

  7. Automated Standard Hazard Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebler, Shane

    2014-01-01

    The current system used to generate standard hazard reports is considered cumbersome and iterative. This study defines a structure for this system's process in a clear, algorithmic way so that standard hazard reports and basic hazard analysis may be completed using a centralized, web-based computer application. To accomplish this task, a test server is used to host a prototype of the tool during development. The prototype is configured to easily integrate into NASA's current server systems with minimal alteration. Additionally, the tool is easily updated and provides NASA with a system that may grow to accommodate future requirements and possibly, different applications. Results of this project's success are outlined in positive, subjective reviews complete by payload providers and NASA Safety and Mission Assurance personnel. Ideally, this prototype will increase interest in the concept of standard hazard automation and lead to the full-scale production of a user-ready application.

  8. Automated synthetic scene generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Givens, Ryan N.

    Physics-based simulations generate synthetic imagery to help organizations anticipate system performance of proposed remote sensing systems. However, manually constructing synthetic scenes which are sophisticated enough to capture the complexity of real-world sites can take days to months depending on the size of the site and desired fidelity of the scene. This research, sponsored by the Air Force Research Laboratory's Sensors Directorate, successfully developed an automated approach to fuse high-resolution RGB imagery, lidar data, and hyperspectral imagery and then extract the necessary scene components. The method greatly reduces the time and money required to generate realistic synthetic scenes and developed new approaches to improve material identification using information from all three of the input datasets.

  9. Hydrodynamics of a self-actuated bacterial carpet using microscale particle image velocimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hoyeon; Cheang, U Kei; Kim, Dalhyung; Ali, Jamel; Kim, Min Jun

    2015-03-01

    Microorganisms can effectively generate propulsive force at the microscale where viscous forces overwhelmingly dominate inertia forces; bacteria achieve this task through flagellar motion. When swarming bacteria, cultured on agar plates, are blotted onto the surface of a microfabricated structure, a monolayer of bacteria forms what is termed a "bacterial carpet," which generates strong flows due to the combined motion of their freely rotating flagella. Furthermore, when the bacterial carpet coated microstructure is released into a low Reynolds number fluidic environment, the propulsive force of the bacterial carpet is able to give the microstructure motility. In our previous investigations, we demonstrated motion control of these bacteria powered microbiorobots (MBRs). Without any external stimuli, MBRs display natural rotational and translational movements on their own; this MBR self-actuation is due to the coordination of flagella. Here, we investigate the flow fields generated by bacterial carpets, and compare this flow to the flow fields observed in the bulk fluid at a series of locations above the bacterial carpet. Using microscale particle image velocimetry, we characterize the flow fields generated from the bacterial carpets of MBRs in an effort to understand their propulsive flow, as well as the resulting pattern of flagella driven self-actuated motion. Comparing the velocities between the bacterial carpets on fixed and untethered MBRs, it was found that flow velocities near the surface of the microstructure were strongest, and at distances far above, the surface flow velocities were much smaller.

  10. Characterization of the mechanical behavior of SU-8 at microscale by viscoelastic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tingge; Yoo, Jun Hyeon; Babu, Sachin; Roy, Samit; Lee, Jeong-Bong; Lu, Hongbing

    2016-10-01

    The mechanical properties of SU-8 at microscale were measured under both micropillar compression and nanoindentation on a film on a substrate. To the best of our knowledge, this paper reports the first set of results for microcompression of SU-8 micropillars for measurement of mechanical properties using viscoelastic analysis. The effects of loading rate and micropillar size are examined. It was determined that the SU-8 exhibits viscoelastic properties at room temperature, the time-average Young’s modulus increases in general with the loading rate. The average Young’s modulus determined by compression of a micropillar was 4.1 GPa at a strain rate near 10-3 s-1. For nanoindentation on a SU-8 film supported by a silicon substrate, the default output from the nanoindenter for the Young’s modulus was approximately 6.0 GPa with the consideration of elastic-plastic behavior of the SU-8. When the viscoelastic effects were considered, the time-average Young’s modulus at a given strain rate was determined to be near 3.6 GPa, which agrees with the reported values in the literature obtained from tension and bending, and also correlates reasonably well with data from microcompression. This work indicates that viscoelastic analysis is necessary to extract the valid mechanical properties at nano/microscales for SU-8.

  11. Interim report:feasibility of microscale glucose reforming for renewable hydrogen.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norman, Kirsten (New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM)

    2007-03-01

    Micro-scale aqueous steam reforming of glucose is suggested as a novel method of H{sub 2} production for micro fuel cells. Compact fuel cell systems are a viable alternative to batteries as a portable electrical power source. Compared with conventional lithium polymer batteries, hydrocarbon powered fuel cells are smaller, weigh less, and have a much higher energy density. The goal of this project is to develop a hydrocarbon powered microfuel processor capable of driving an existing microfuel cell, and this interim report provides a summary of the engineering information for microscale reforming of carbohydrates and the summarizes the work completed as of September 2006. Work on this program will continue. Gas analysis of the gas evolved from glucose breakdown using a quadrupole mass spectrometer is now possible due do significant modifications to the vacuum chamber and to the mass spectrometer electronics. Effective adhesion of Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} to 316SS microstructured catalyst plates is still under investigation. Electrophoretic and dip coat methods of catalyst deposition have produced coatings with poor adhesion and limited available Pt surface area.

  12. Microscale geochemical gradients in Hanford 300 Area sediment biofilms and influence of uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Cao, Bin; Mishra, Bhoopesh; Boyanov, Maxim I.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2012-01-01

    The presence and importance of microenvironments in the subsurface at contaminated sites were suggested by previous geochemical studies. However, no direct quantitative characterization of the geochemical microenvironments had been reported. We quantitatively characterized microscale geochemical gradients (dissolved oxygen (DO), H(2), pH, and redox potential) in Hanford 300A subsurface sediment biofilms. Our results revealed significant differences in geochemical parameters across the sediment biofilm/water interface in the presence and absence of U(VI) under oxic and anoxic conditions. While the pH was relatively constant within the sediment biofilm, the redox potential and the DO and H(2) concentrations were heterogeneous at the microscale (<500-1000 μm). We found microenvironments with high DO levels (DO hotspots) when the sediment biofilm was exposed to U(VI). On the other hand, we found hotspots (high concentrations) of H(2) under anoxic conditions both in the presence and in the absence of U(VI). The presence of anoxic microenvironments inside the sediment biofilms suggests that U(VI) reduction proceeds under bulk oxic conditions. To test this, we operated our biofilm reactor under air-saturated conditions in the presence of U(VI) and characterized U speciation in the sediment biofilm. U L(III)-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES and EXAFS) showed that 80-85% of the U was in the U(IV) valence state.

  13. Micro-scale variability of urban particle number and mass concentrations in Leipzig, Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfram Birmili

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the micro-scale variability of particle number and mass concentrations in the urban atmosphere of Leipzig, Germany. Particles were sampled in May and June 2011 using portable instrumentation along a fixed measurement route, representing different degrees of outdoor particle exposure that can be experienced by a pedestrian. The instrumentation comprised a Grimm NanoCheck sensor for particle number (25-300 nm and a Grimm OPC for particle mass concentrations. The mobile measurements conducted at a time resolution of 10 s revealed rich details in the spatio-temporal distribution of urban particles that were not visible in fixed-site measurements. Motor traffic proved to be a major source of particle number and mass in the area, although the corresponding concentrations declined rapidly when moving away from the traffic sources. The experiments demonstrate that traffic-free zones and green park areas are useful measures to limit outdoor exposure to traffic-related particles even if they are rather modest in size. Unexpected findings include high fine particle concentrations (PM[0.25;1] near outdoor seating areas of restaurants, and the apparent dependence of coarse particle concentrations (PM[2.5;10] on the ability of surfaces to release particles by resuspension. The study illustrates the usefulness of the spatial sensing of airborne particles in the urban roughness layer and encourages the use of such data for the validation of micro-scale dispersion models.

  14. Self-Organization of Microscale Condensate for Delayed Flooding of Nanostructured Superhydrophobic Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ölçeroğlu, Emre; McCarthy, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces enhance condensation by inhibiting the formation of an insulating liquid layer. While this produces efficient heat transfer at low supersaturations, superhydrophobicity has been shown to break down at increased supersaturations. As heat transfer increases, the random distribution and high density of nucleation sites produces pinned droplets, which lead to uncontrollable flooding. In this work, engineered variations in wettability are used to promote the self-organization of microscale droplets, which is shown to effectively delay flooding. Virus-templated superhydrophobic surfaces are patterned with an array of superhydrophilic islands designed to minimize surface adhesion while promoting spatial order. By use of optical and electron microscopy, the surfaces are optimized and characterized during condensation. Mixed wettability imparts spatial order not only through preferential nucleation but more importantly through the self-organization of coalescing droplets at high supersaturations. The self-organization of microscale droplets (diameters of 1 mm) on the surface. As heat transfer increases, the surfaces transition from jumping-mode to shedding-mode removal with no flooding. This demonstrates the ability to engineer surfaces to resist flooding and can act as the basis for developing robust superhydrophobic surfaces for condensation applications. PMID:26855239

  15. Micro-scale energy valorization of grape marcs in winery production plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • BioMethane Potential of grape marcs was investigated. • Grape marcs were characterized to realize a micro-scale energy recovery. • Comparative BMP batch-tests utilizing lab-scale reactors were performed. • Biogas valorization by grape marcs anaerobic digestion at small scale is evaluated. - Abstract: The BiochemicalMethanePotential (BMP) of winery organic waste, with reference to two Italian red and white grapes (i.e. Nero Buono and Greco) by-products was investigated. The study was carried out to verify the possibility to reduce the production impact in a green-waste-management-chain-perspective. The possibility to efficiently utilize wine-related-by-products for energy production at a micro-scale (i.e. small-medium scale winery production plant) was also verified. Results showed as a good correlation can be established between the percentage of COD removal and the biogas production, as the winery can produce, from its waste methanization, about 7800 kW h year−1 electrical and 8900 kW h year−1 thermal. A critical evaluation was performed about the possibility to utilize the proposed approach to realize an optimal biomass waste management and an energetic valorization in a local-energy-production-perspective

  16. Micro-scale energy valorization of grape marcs in winery production plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabbri, Andrea; Bonifazi, Giuseppe; Serranti, Silvia, E-mail: silvia.serranti@uniroma1.it

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • BioMethane Potential of grape marcs was investigated. • Grape marcs were characterized to realize a micro-scale energy recovery. • Comparative BMP batch-tests utilizing lab-scale reactors were performed. • Biogas valorization by grape marcs anaerobic digestion at small scale is evaluated. - Abstract: The BiochemicalMethanePotential (BMP) of winery organic waste, with reference to two Italian red and white grapes (i.e. Nero Buono and Greco) by-products was investigated. The study was carried out to verify the possibility to reduce the production impact in a green-waste-management-chain-perspective. The possibility to efficiently utilize wine-related-by-products for energy production at a micro-scale (i.e. small-medium scale winery production plant) was also verified. Results showed as a good correlation can be established between the percentage of COD removal and the biogas production, as the winery can produce, from its waste methanization, about 7800 kW h year{sup −1} electrical and 8900 kW h year{sup −1} thermal. A critical evaluation was performed about the possibility to utilize the proposed approach to realize an optimal biomass waste management and an energetic valorization in a local-energy-production-perspective.

  17. Principles for microscale separations based on redox-active surfactants and electrochemical methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosslee, C A; Abbott, N L

    2001-10-15

    We report principles for microscale separations based on selective solubilization and deposition of sparingly water-soluble compounds by an aqueous solution of a redox-active surfactant. The surfactant, (11-ferrocenylundecyl)trimethylammonium bromide, undergoes a reversible change in micellization upon oxidation or reduction. This change in aggregation is exploited in a general scheme in which micelles of reduced surfactant are formed and then put in contact with a mixture of hydrophobic compounds leading to selective solubilization of the compounds. The micelles are then electrochemically disrupted, leading to the selective deposition of their contents. We measured the selectivity of the solubilization and deposition processes using mixtures of two model drug-like compounds, o-tolueneazo-beta-naphthol (I) and 1-phenylazo-2-naphthylamine (II). By repeatedly solubilizing and depositing a mixture that initially contained equal mole fractions of each compound, we demonstrate formation of a product that contains 98.4% of I after six cycles. Because the aggregation states of redox-active surfactants are easily controlled within simple microfabricated structures, including structures that define small stationary volumes (e.g., wells of a microtiter plate) or flowing volumes of liquids (e.g., microfabricated channels), we believe these principles may be useful for the purification or analysis of compounds in microscale chemical process systems. When used for purification, these principles provide separation of surfactant and product.

  18. Microscale electrochemical cell using plaster (CaSO4 as liquid junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuthapong Udnan

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available A microscale apparatus for electrochemical cell in which plaster (CaSO4 was used as liquid junction has been developed. A glass tube (0.5 cm ID x 5.0 cm was used to prepare each half-cell. The potentials of the resulting galvanic cells were measured by a multimetre and were compared to those of the galvanic cells in which agar was used as liquid junction. It was found that the potentials produced by the galvanic cells with plaster as liquid junction are not significantly different from those of the cells with agar as liquid junction and close to the theoretical values. In addition, when the developed apparatus was used for the study of electrolysis of potassium iodide solution, it was found that the electrolytic cell made from the microscale apparatus with plaster liquid junction can distinctly separate the reactions occurring at the anode and the cathode. Moreover, the lifetime of the plaster liquid junction is much greater than that of the agar liquid junction.

  19. Nonlinear microrheology and molecular imaging to map microscale deformations of entangled DNA networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tsai-Chin; Anderson, Rae

    We use active microrheology coupled to single-molecule fluorescence imaging to elucidate the microscale dynamics of entangled DNA. DNA naturally exists in a wide range of lengths and topologies, and is often confined in cell nucleui, forming highly concentrated and entangled biopolymer networks. Thus, DNA is the model polymer for understanding entangled polymer dynamics as well as the crowded environment of cells. These networks display complex viscoelastic properties that are not well understood, especially at the molecular-level and in response to nonlinear perturbations. Specifically, how microscopic stresses and strains propagate through entangled networks, and what molecular deformations lead to the network stress responses are unknown. To answer these important questions, we optically drive a microsphere through entangled DNA, perturbing the system far from equilibrium, while measuring the resistive force the DNA exerts on the bead during and after bead motion. We simultaneously image single fluorescent-labeled DNA molecules throughout the network to directly link the microscale stress response to molecular deformations. We characterize the deformation of the network from the molecular-level to the mesoscale, and map the stress propagation throughout the network. We further study the impact of DNA length (11 - 115 kbp) and topology (linear vs ring DNA) on deformation and propagation dynamics, exploring key nonlinear features such as tube dilation and power-law relaxation.

  20. Automated Essay Scoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semire DIKLI

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Automated Essay Scoring Semire DIKLI Florida State University Tallahassee, FL, USA ABSTRACT The impacts of computers on writing have been widely studied for three decades. Even basic computers functions, i.e. word processing, have been of great assistance to writers in modifying their essays. The research on Automated Essay Scoring (AES has revealed that computers have the capacity to function as a more effective cognitive tool (Attali, 2004. AES is defined as the computer technology that evaluates and scores the written prose (Shermis & Barrera, 2002; Shermis & Burstein, 2003; Shermis, Raymat, & Barrera, 2003. Revision and feedback are essential aspects of the writing process. Students need to receive feedback in order to increase their writing quality. However, responding to student papers can be a burden for teachers. Particularly if they have large number of students and if they assign frequent writing assignments, providing individual feedback to student essays might be quite time consuming. AES systems can be very useful because they can provide the student with a score as well as feedback within seconds (Page, 2003. Four types of AES systems, which are widely used by testing companies, universities, and public schools: Project Essay Grader (PEG, Intelligent Essay Assessor (IEA, E-rater, and IntelliMetric. AES is a developing technology. Many AES systems are used to overcome time, cost, and generalizability issues in writing assessment. The accuracy and reliability of these systems have been proven to be high. The search for excellence in machine scoring of essays is continuing and numerous studies are being conducted to improve the effectiveness of the AES systems.

  1. Compressive damage mechanism of GFRP composites under off-axis loading: Experimental and numerical investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, H.W.; Li, H.Y.; Gui, L.L.;

    2013-01-01

    Experimental and computational studies of the microscale mechanisms of damage formation and evolution in unidirectional glass fiber reinforced polymer composites (GFRP) under axial and off-axis compressive loading are carried out. A series of compressive testing of the composites with different a...

  2. Automating the radiographic NDT process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Automation, the removal of the human element in inspection, has not been generally applied to film radiographic NDT. The justication for automating is not only productivity but also reliability of results. Film remains in the automated system of the future because of its extremely high image content, approximately 8 x 109 bits per 14 x 17. The equivalent to 2200 computer floppy discs. Parts handling systems and robotics applied for manufacturing and some NDT modalities, should now be applied to film radiographic NDT systems. Automatic film handling can be achieved with the daylight NDT film handling system. Automatic film processing is becoming the standard in industry and can be coupled to the daylight system. Robots offer the opportunity to automate fully the exposure step. Finally, computer aided interpretation appears on the horizon. A unit which laser scans a 14 x 17 (inch) film in 6 - 8 seconds can digitize film information for further manipulation and possible automatic interrogations (computer aided interpretation). The system called FDRS (for Film Digital Radiography System) is moving toward 50 micron (*approx* 16 lines/mm) resolution. This is believed to meet the need of the majority of image content needs. We expect the automated system to appear first in parts (modules) as certain operations are automated. The future will see it all come together in an automated film radiographic NDT system (author)

  3. Automated Fluid Interface System (AFIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Automated remote fluid servicing will be necessary for future space missions, as future satellites will be designed for on-orbit consumable replenishment. In order to develop an on-orbit remote servicing capability, a standard interface between a tanker and the receiving satellite is needed. The objective of the Automated Fluid Interface System (AFIS) program is to design, fabricate, and functionally demonstrate compliance with all design requirements for an automated fluid interface system. A description and documentation of the Fairchild AFIS design is provided.

  4. Automated License Plate Recognition for Toll Booth Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketan S. Shevale

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the Smart Vehicle Screening System, which can be installed into a tollbooth for automated recognition of vehicle license plate information using a photograph of a vehicle. An automated system could then be implemented to control the payment of fees, parking areas, highways, bridges or tunnels, etc. There are considered an approach to identify vehicle through recognizing of it license plate using image fusion, neural networks and threshold techniques as well as some experimental results to recognize the license plate successfully.

  5. Intelligent Automated Diagnosis of Client Device Bottlenecks in Private Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Widanapathirana, C; Sekercioglu, Y A; Ivanovich, M; Fitzpatrick, P; 10.1109/UCC.2011.42

    2012-01-01

    We present an automated solution for rapid diagnosis of client device problems in private cloud environments: the Intelligent Automated Client Diagnostic (IACD) system. Clients are diagnosed with the aid of Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) packet traces, by (i) observation of anomalous artifacts occurring as a result of each fault and (ii) subsequent use of the inference capabilities of soft-margin Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifiers. The IACD system features a modular design and is extendible to new faults, with detection capability unaffected by the TCP variant used at the client. Experimental evaluation of the IACD system in a controlled environment demonstrated an overall diagnostic accuracy of 98%.

  6. Tracking and visualization of space-time activities for a micro-scale flu transmission study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Feng

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infectious diseases pose increasing threats to public health with increasing population density and more and more sophisticated social networks. While efforts continue in studying the large scale dissemination of contagious diseases, individual-based activity and behaviour study benefits not only disease transmission modelling but also the control, containment, and prevention decision making at the local scale. The potential for using tracking technologies to capture detailed space-time trajectories and model individual behaviour is increasing rapidly, as technological advances enable the manufacture of small, lightweight, highly sensitive, and affordable receivers and the routine use of location-aware devices has become widespread (e.g., smart cellular phones. The use of low-cost tracking devices in medical research has also been proved effective by more and more studies. This study describes the use of tracking devices to collect data of space-time trajectories and the spatiotemporal processing of such data to facilitate micro-scale flu transmission study. We also reports preliminary findings on activity patterns related to chances of influenza infection in a pilot study. Methods Specifically, this study employed A-GPS tracking devices to collect data on a university campus. Spatiotemporal processing was conducted for data cleaning and segmentation. Processed data was validated with traditional activity diaries. The A-GPS data set was then used for visual explorations including density surface visualization and connection analysis to examine space-time activity patterns in relation to chances of influenza infection. Results When compared to diary data, the segmented tracking data demonstrated to be an effective alternative and showed greater accuracies in time as well as the details of routes taken by participants. A comparison of space-time activity patterns between participants who caught seasonal influenza and those who

  7. High precision micro-scale Hall Effect characterization method using in-line micro four-point probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Dirch Hjorth; Hansen, Ole; Lin, Rong;

    2008-01-01

    Accurate characterization of ultra shallow junctions (USJ) is important in order to understand the principles of junction formation and to develop the appropriate implant and annealing technologies. We investigate the capabilities of a new micro-scale Hall effect measurement method where Hall...

  8. Evaluation of three flame retardant (FR) grey cotton blend nonwoven fabrics using micro-scale combustion calorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unbleached (grey or greige) cotton nonwoven (NW) fabrics (with 12.5% polypropylene scrim) were treated with three phosphate-nitrogen based FR formulations and evaluated with micro-scale combustion calorimetry (MCC). Heat release rate (HRR), Peak heat rate (PHRR), temperature at peak heat release ra...

  9. A Microscale Approach to Chemical Kinetics in the General Chemistry Laboratory: The Potassium Iodide Hydrogen Peroxide Iodine-Clock Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattsangi, Prem D.

    2011-01-01

    A microscale laboratory for teaching chemical kinetics utilizing the iodine clock reaction is described. Plastic pipets, 3 mL volume, are used to store and deliver precise drops of reagents and the reaction is run in a 24 well plastic tray using a total 60 drops of reagents. With this procedure, students determine the rate of reaction and the…

  10. National Automated Conformity Inspection Process

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The National Automated Conformity Inspection Process (NACIP) Application is intended to expedite the workflow process as it pertains to the FAA Form 81 0-10 Request...

  11. Evolution of Home Automation Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd. Rihan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In modern society home and office automation has becomeincreasingly important, providing ways to interconnectvarious home appliances. This interconnection results infaster transfer of information within home/offices leading tobetter home management and improved user experience.Home Automation, in essence, is a technology thatintegrates various electrical systems of a home to provideenhanced comfort and security. Users are grantedconvenient and complete control over all the electrical homeappliances and they are relieved from the tasks thatpreviously required manual control. This paper tracks thedevelopment of home automation technology over the lasttwo decades. Various home automation technologies havebeen explained briefly, giving a chronological account of theevolution of one of the most talked about technologies ofrecent times.

  12. Automation of antimicrobial activity screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forry, Samuel P; Madonna, Megan C; López-Pérez, Daneli; Lin, Nancy J; Pasco, Madeleine D

    2016-03-01

    Manual and automated methods were compared for routine screening of compounds for antimicrobial activity. Automation generally accelerated assays and required less user intervention while producing comparable results. Automated protocols were validated for planktonic, biofilm, and agar cultures of the oral microbe Streptococcus mutans that is commonly associated with tooth decay. Toxicity assays for the known antimicrobial compound cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) were validated against planktonic, biofilm forming, and 24 h biofilm culture conditions, and several commonly reported toxicity/antimicrobial activity measures were evaluated: the 50 % inhibitory concentration (IC50), the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), and the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC). Using automated methods, three halide salts of cetylpyridinium (CPC, CPB, CPI) were rapidly screened with no detectable effect of the counter ion on antimicrobial activity. PMID:26970766

  13. Automating the Purple Crow Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Shannon; Sica, R. J.; Argall, P. S.

    2016-06-01

    The Purple Crow LiDAR (PCL) was built to measure short and long term coupling between the lower, middle, and upper atmosphere. The initial component of my MSc. project is to automate two key elements of the PCL: the rotating liquid mercury mirror and the Zaber alignment mirror. In addition to the automation of the Zaber alignment mirror, it is also necessary to describe the mirror's movement and positioning errors. Its properties will then be added into the alignment software. Once the alignment software has been completed, we will compare the new alignment method with the previous manual procedure. This is the first among several projects that will culminate in a fully-automated lidar. Eventually, we will be able to work remotely, thereby increasing the amount of data we collect. This paper will describe the motivation for automation, the methods we propose, preliminary results for the Zaber alignment error analysis, and future work.

  14. Home automation with Intel Galileo

    CERN Document Server

    Dundar, Onur

    2015-01-01

    This book is for anyone who wants to learn Intel Galileo for home automation and cross-platform software development. No knowledge of programming with Intel Galileo is assumed, but knowledge of the C programming language is essential.

  15. Towards automated traceability maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäder, Patrick; Gotel, Orlena

    2012-10-01

    Traceability relations support stakeholders in understanding the dependencies between artifacts created during the development of a software system and thus enable many development-related tasks. To ensure that the anticipated benefits of these tasks can be realized, it is necessary to have an up-to-date set of traceability relations between the established artifacts. This goal requires the creation of traceability relations during the initial development process. Furthermore, the goal also requires the maintenance of traceability relations over time as the software system evolves in order to prevent their decay. In this paper, an approach is discussed that supports the (semi-) automated update of traceability relations between requirements, analysis and design models of software systems expressed in the UML. This is made possible by analyzing change events that have been captured while working within a third-party UML modeling tool. Within the captured flow of events, development activities comprised of several events are recognized. These are matched with predefined rules that direct the update of impacted traceability relations. The overall approach is supported by a prototype tool and empirical results on the effectiveness of tool-supported traceability maintenance are provided. PMID:23471308

  16. Automated Gas Distribution System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starke, Allen; Clark, Henry

    2012-10-01

    The cyclotron of Texas A&M University is one of the few and prized cyclotrons in the country. Behind the scenes of the cyclotron is a confusing, and dangerous setup of the ion sources that supplies the cyclotron with particles for acceleration. To use this machine there is a time consuming, and even wasteful step by step process of switching gases, purging, and other important features that must be done manually to keep the system functioning properly, while also trying to maintain the safety of the working environment. Developing a new gas distribution system to the ion source prevents many of the problems generated by the older manually setup process. This developed system can be controlled manually in an easier fashion than before, but like most of the technology and machines in the cyclotron now, is mainly operated based on software programming developed through graphical coding environment Labview. The automated gas distribution system provides multi-ports for a selection of different gases to decrease the amount of gas wasted through switching gases, and a port for the vacuum to decrease the amount of time spent purging the manifold. The Labview software makes the operation of the cyclotron and ion sources easier, and safer for anyone to use.

  17. Aprendizaje automático

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno, Antonio

    2006-01-01

    En este libro se introducen los conceptos básicos en una de las ramas más estudiadas actualmente dentro de la inteligencia artificial: el aprendizaje automático. Se estudian temas como el aprendizaje inductivo, el razonamiento analógico, el aprendizaje basado en explicaciones, las redes neuronales, los algoritmos genéticos, el razonamiento basado en casos o las aproximaciones teóricas al aprendizaje automático.

  18. 2015 Chinese Intelligent Automation Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Hongbo

    2015-01-01

    Proceedings of the 2015 Chinese Intelligent Automation Conference presents selected research papers from the CIAC’15, held in Fuzhou, China. The topics include adaptive control, fuzzy control, neural network based control, knowledge based control, hybrid intelligent control, learning control, evolutionary mechanism based control, multi-sensor integration, failure diagnosis, reconfigurable control, etc. Engineers and researchers from academia, industry and the government can gain valuable insights into interdisciplinary solutions in the field of intelligent automation.

  19. Technology modernization assessment flexible automation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, D.W.; Boyd, D.R.; Hansen, N.H.; Hansen, M.A.; Yount, J.A.

    1990-12-01

    The objectives of this report are: to present technology assessment guidelines to be considered in conjunction with defense regulations before an automation project is developed to give examples showing how assessment guidelines may be applied to a current project to present several potential areas where automation might be applied successfully in the depot system. Depots perform primarily repair and remanufacturing operations, with limited small batch manufacturing runs. While certain activities (such as Management Information Systems and warehousing) are directly applicable to either environment, the majority of applications will require combining existing and emerging technologies in different ways, with the special needs of depot remanufacturing environment. Industry generally enjoys the ability to make revisions to its product lines seasonally, followed by batch runs of thousands or more. Depot batch runs are in the tens, at best the hundreds, of parts with a potential for large variation in product mix; reconfiguration may be required on a week-to-week basis. This need for a higher degree of flexibility suggests a higher level of operator interaction, and, in turn, control systems that go beyond the state of the art for less flexible automation and industry in general. This report investigates the benefits and barriers to automation and concludes that, while significant benefits do exist for automation, depots must be prepared to carefully investigate the technical feasibility of each opportunity and the life-cycle costs associated with implementation. Implementation is suggested in two ways: (1) develop an implementation plan for automation technologies based on results of small demonstration automation projects; (2) use phased implementation for both these and later stage automation projects to allow major technical and administrative risk issues to be addressed. 10 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs. (JF)

  20. The High-Resolution Wave-Propagation Method Applied to Meso- and Micro-Scale Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Nashat N.; Proctor, Fred H.

    2012-01-01

    The high-resolution wave-propagation method for computing the nonhydrostatic atmospheric flows on meso- and micro-scales is described. The design and implementation of the Riemann solver used for computing the Godunov fluxes is discussed in detail. The method uses a flux-based wave decomposition in which the flux differences are written directly as the linear combination of the right eigenvectors of the hyperbolic system. The two advantages of the technique are: 1) the need for an explicit definition of the Roe matrix is eliminated and, 2) the inclusion of source term due to gravity does not result in discretization errors. The resulting flow solver is conservative and able to resolve regions of large gradients without introducing dispersion errors. The methodology is validated against exact analytical solutions and benchmark cases for non-hydrostatic atmospheric flows.

  1. Sub-millimeter arbitrary arrangements of monolithically micro-scale electrical double layer capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laszczyk, Karolina U.; Kazufumi, Kobashi; Sakurai, Shunsuke; Sekiguchi, Atsuko; Futaba, Don N.; Yamada, Takeo; Hata, Kenji

    2015-12-01

    We report the investigation on the reproducibility of micro-scale electric double layer capacitors (micro-EDLCs). The micro-EDLC components were fabricated parallel using photolithography, wet and dry processing. Electrodes of the micro-EDLCs are highly dense packed Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNTs) that form a mesh structure. The micro- EDLCs are connected 1-10 in series and in parallel being unified electrical circuits to tune the capacitance and the operational voltage. To confirm the reproducibility of the cells as well as the yield we performed electrochemical measurements in order to define the performance uniformity between cells strings and individual cells connected in a string. For 1-10 cells in series and in parallel the trends for the capacitance and operational voltage satisfied electrophysics rules governing cells addition. However, the measurements of the individual cells in a string revealed the significant performance discrepancy that might result in a shorten life cycling of a circuit.

  2. Modeling of particle interactions in DNA-laden flows at the microscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trebotichy, D; Millerz, G H; Bybee, M D

    2006-01-01

    We present a method for simulation of DNA-laden flows in complex microscale geometries. In this method an incompressible Newtonian fluid is discretized with a finite difference method in the interior of the domain and a Cartesian grid embedded boundary/volume-of-fluid method is used near the boundary. The DNA is represented by a bead-rod polymer model. The fluid and polymer are fully coupled through a body force representing hydrodynamic drag. The main objective in this work is to implement short range forces to properly model polymer-polymer and polymer-surface interactions. We will discuss two methods for these interactions: (1) a new rigid constraint algorithm whereby rods elastically bounce off one another, and (2) a classical (smooth) potential acting between rods. In addition, a smooth potential for the polymer-surface interactions is also implemented for comparison to the same interactions currently modeled by elastic collision. PMID:17959482

  3. From micro-scale 3D simulations to macro-scale model of periodic porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crevacore, Eleonora; Tosco, Tiziana; Marchisio, Daniele; Sethi, Rajandrea; Messina, Francesca

    2015-04-01

    In environmental engineering, the transport of colloidal suspensions in porous media is studied to understand the fate of potentially harmful nano-particles and to design new remediation technologies. In this perspective, averaging techniques applied to micro-scale numerical simulations are a powerful tool to extrapolate accurate macro-scale models. Choosing two simplified packing configurations of soil grains and starting from a single elementary cell (module), it is possible to take advantage of the periodicity of the structures to reduce the computation costs of full 3D simulations. Steady-state flow simulations for incompressible fluid in laminar regime are implemented. Transport simulations are based on the pore-scale advection-diffusion equation, that can be enriched introducing also the Stokes velocity (to consider the gravity effect) and the interception mechanism. Simulations are carried on a domain composed of several elementary modules, that serve as control volumes in a finite volume method for the macro-scale method. The periodicity of the medium involves the periodicity of the flow field and this will be of great importance during the up-scaling procedure, allowing relevant simplifications. Micro-scale numerical data are treated in order to compute the mean concentration (volume and area averages) and fluxes on each module. The simulation results are used to compare the micro-scale averaged equation to the integral form of the macroscopic one, making a distinction between those terms that could be computed exactly and those for which a closure in needed. Of particular interest it is the investigation of the origin of macro-scale terms such as the dispersion and tortuosity, trying to describe them with micro-scale known quantities. Traditionally, to study the colloidal transport many simplifications are introduced, such those concerning ultra-simplified geometry that usually account for a single collector. Gradual removal of such hypothesis leads to a

  4. Micro-scale fracture experiments on zirconium hydrides and phase boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, H.; Roberts, S. G.; Gong, J.

    2016-07-01

    Fracture properties of micro-scale zirconium hydrides and phase boundaries were studied using microcantilever testing methods. FIB-machined microcantilevers were milled on cross-sectional surfaces of hydrided samples, with the most highly-stressed regions within the δ-hydride film, within the α-Zr or along the Zr-hydride interface. Cantilevers were notched using the FIB and then tested in bending using a nanoindenter. Load-displacement results show that three types of cantilevers have distinct deformation properties. Zr cantilevers deformed plastically. Hydride cantilevers fractured after a small amount of plastic flow; the fracture toughness of the δ-hydride was found to be 3.3 ± 0.4 MPam1/2 and SEM examination showed transgranular cleavage on the fracture surfaces. Cantilevers notched at the Zr-hydride interface developed interfacial voids during loading, at loads considerably lower than that which initiate brittle fracture of hydrides.

  5. Implications of interacting microscale habitat heterogeneity and disturbance events on Folsomia candida (Collembola) population dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meli, Mattia; Palmqvist, Annemette; Forbes, Valery E

    2014-01-01

    , they are exposed to natural stressors, which might influence the effects of chemicals on populations. We designed simulation experiments that incorporate these 3 factors, and investigated their effects on populations of F. candida, in presence or absence of behavioural avoidance of contaminated habitat. Simulation...... events. The model suggests that a combination of heterogeneous contamination and multiple stressors can lead to unexpected effects of toxicants at the population level. Individual-based models can help to understand these effects and therefore add ecological realism to environmental risk assessment......The authors implemented a fractal algorithm in a spatially explicit individual-based model, in order to generate landscapes with different microscale patterns of habitat fragmentation and disturbance events, and studied their effects on population dynamics of the collembolan Folsomia candida. Among...

  6. Noninvasive analysis of thin turbid layers using microscale spatially offset Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Claudia; Realini, Marco; Colombo, Chiara; Sowoidnich, Kay; Afseth, Nils Kristian; Bertasa, Moira; Botteon, Alessandra; Matousek, Pavel

    2015-06-01

    Here, we demonstrate, for the first time, the extension of applicability of recently developed microscale spatially offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS), micro-SORS, from the area of cultural heritage to a wider range of analytical problems involving thin, tens of micrometers thick diffusely scattering turbid layers. The method can be applied in situations where a high turbidity of layers prevents the deployment of conventional confocal Raman microscopy with its depth resolving capability. The method was applied successfully to detect noninvasively the presence of thin, highly turbid layers within polymers, wheat seeds, and paper. An invasive, cross sectional analysis confirmed the micro-SORS findings. Micro-SORS represents a new Raman imaging modality expanding the portfolio of noninvasive, chemically specific analytical tools.

  7. Micro-scale heat-exchangers for Joule-Thomson cooling.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross, Andrew John

    2014-01-01

    This project focused on developing a micro-scale counter flow heat exchangers for Joule-Thomson cooling with the potential for both chip and wafer scale integration. This project is differentiated from previous work by focusing on planar, thin film micromachining instead of bulk materials. A process will be developed for fabricating all the devices mentioned above, allowing for highly integrated micro heat exchangers. The use of thin film dielectrics provides thermal isolation, increasing efficiency of the coolers compared to designs based on bulk materials, and it will allow for wafer-scale fabrication and integration. The process is intended to implement a CFHX as part of a Joule-Thomson cooling system for applications with heat loads less than 1mW. This report presents simulation results and investigation of a fabrication process for such devices.

  8. Vectorial detection of sub-microscale capillary curvature by laser beam profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Gopal; Singh, Kamal P.

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate a simple and non-invasive optical technique to detect direction and magnitude of long-range, sub-microscale capillary curvature of fluid interfaces in various situations. By analyzing magnitude and direction of the distorted spatial profile of the laser beam, following its weak Fresnel's reflection from the air-water interface, ultra-low curvature of 0.1 μm-1 caused by dipped slides, glass tubes, and microscopic twisted silk fibers was measured up to six capillary lengths away from the object. The flexibility of this technique allows us to measure curvature of remotely placed fluid-fluid interfaces and interaction between capillary curves of multiple objects. The high sensitivity of our technique is demonstrated in measuring magnetic susceptibility of water and the full spatial profile of deformation under weak magnetic field. This technique might find applications in precision measurements in optofluidics and interface physics.

  9. Micro-Scale Mechanical Testing of Non-Woven Carbon Nanotube Sheets and Yarns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magargee, J.; Morestin, F.; Cao, J.; Jones, J. S.

    2013-01-01

    Non-woven carbon nanotube (CNT) sheets and yarns were tested using a novel micro-scale mechanical testing system. CNT sheets were observed to delaminate during uniaxial testing using an adbesive gripping method, resulting from a higher proportion of load bearing in the outer sheets versus internal sheets and an apparently low interlaminar shear strength. In response to this, a new spool-grip method was used to alleviate non-uniform through-thickness stresses, circumvent premature delamination, and allow the sheet material to sustain a 72% increase in measured tensile strength. Furthermore, tension tests of CNT yarns showed that the yarn-structure was approximaiely 7 times stronger than the sheet structure, owing to a higher degree of CNT alignment in the test direction.

  10. Evaluation and analysis of novel micro-scale combined cooling, heating and power (MCCHP) system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huangfu, Y.; Wu, J.Y.; Wang, R.Z.; Kong, X.Q.; Wei, B.H. [Institute of Refrigeration and Cryogenics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2007-05-15

    This paper introduces a new micro-scale combined cooling, heating and power (MCCHP) system, which is especially suitable for domestic and light commercial applications. It mainly consists of a reciprocating internal combustion LPG and natural gas engine/generator, an adsorption chiller and heat recovery devices. Evaluation and analysis of the system are discussed in detail. Economic evaluation shows that this MCCHP system enjoys good economic efficiency with a pay back period of 2.97 years at the current natural gas price. Comprehensive analysis indicates that the electricity output condition is very important for determining the electricity efficiency, available regulation area, primary energy ratio and exergy efficiency. For high efficiency and good regulation performance, it is advisable for the system to operate with electricity output greater than half load. From the exergetic point of view, the electricity efficiency of the gas engine/generator should be enhanced for an improved MCCHP system. (author)

  11. Evaluation and analysis of novel micro-scale combined cooling, heating and power (MCCHP) system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper introduces a new micro-scale combined cooling, heating and power (MCCHP) system, which is especially suitable for domestic and light commercial applications. It mainly consists of a reciprocating internal combustion LPG and natural gas engine/generator, an adsorption chiller and heat recovery devices. Evaluation and analysis of the system are discussed in detail. Economic evaluation shows that this MCCHP system enjoys good economic efficiency with a pay back period of 2.97 years at the current natural gas price. Comprehensive analysis indicates that the electricity output condition is very important for determining the electricity efficiency, available regulation area, primary energy ratio and exergy efficiency. For high efficiency and good regulation performance, it is advisable for the system to operate with electricity output greater than half load. From the exergetic point of view, the electricity efficiency of the gas engine/generator should be enhanced for an improved MCCHP system

  12. All-semiconductor metamaterial-based optical circuit board at the microscale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Li; Huang, Lirong, E-mail: lrhuang@hust.edu.cn [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, School of Optical and Electronic Information, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China)

    2015-07-07

    The newly introduced metamaterial-based optical circuit, an analogue of electronic circuit, is becoming a forefront topic in the fields of electronics, optics, plasmonics, and metamaterials. However, metals, as the commonly used plasmonic elements in an optical circuit, suffer from large losses at the visible and infrared wavelengths. We propose here a low-loss, all-semiconductor metamaterial-based optical circuit board at the microscale by using interleaved intrinsic GaAs and doped GaAs, and present the detailed design process for various lumped optical circuit elements, including lumped optical inductors, optical capacitors, optical conductors, and optical insulators. By properly combining these optical circuit elements and arranging anisotropic optical connectors, we obtain a subwavelength optical filter, which can always hold band-stop filtering function for various polarization states of the incident electromagnetic wave. All-semiconductor optical circuits may provide a new opportunity in developing low-power and ultrafast components and devices for optical information processing.

  13. All-semiconductor metamaterial-based optical circuit board at the microscale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The newly introduced metamaterial-based optical circuit, an analogue of electronic circuit, is becoming a forefront topic in the fields of electronics, optics, plasmonics, and metamaterials. However, metals, as the commonly used plasmonic elements in an optical circuit, suffer from large losses at the visible and infrared wavelengths. We propose here a low-loss, all-semiconductor metamaterial-based optical circuit board at the microscale by using interleaved intrinsic GaAs and doped GaAs, and present the detailed design process for various lumped optical circuit elements, including lumped optical inductors, optical capacitors, optical conductors, and optical insulators. By properly combining these optical circuit elements and arranging anisotropic optical connectors, we obtain a subwavelength optical filter, which can always hold band-stop filtering function for various polarization states of the incident electromagnetic wave. All-semiconductor optical circuits may provide a new opportunity in developing low-power and ultrafast components and devices for optical information processing

  14. A review of recent advances of numerical simulations of microscale fuel processors for hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holladay, Jamelyn D.; Wang, Yong

    2015-05-01

    Microscale (<5W) reformers for hydrogen production have been investigated for over a decade. These devices are intended to provide hydrogen for small fuel cells. Due to the reformer’s small size, numerical simulations are critical to understand heat and mass transfer phenomena occurring in the systems. This paper reviews the development of the numerical codes and details the reaction equations used. The majority of the devices utilized methanol as the fuel due to methanol’s low reforming temperature and high conversion, although, there are several methane fueled systems. As computational power has decreased in cost and increased in availability, the codes increased in complexity and accuracy. Initial models focused on the reformer, while more recently, the simulations began including other unit operations such as vaporizers, inlet manifolds, and combustors. These codes are critical for developing the next generation systems. The systems reviewed included, plate reactors, microchannel reactors, annulus reactors, wash-coated, packed bed systems.

  15. 3D thermal analysis of rectangular microscale inorganic light-emitting diodes in a pulsed operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Y.; Bian, Z.; Li, Y.; Xing, Y.; Song, J.

    2016-10-01

    Microscale inorganic light-emitting diodes (µ-ILEDs) have attracted much attention due to their excellent performance in biointegrated applications such as optogenetics. The thermal behaviors of µ-ILEDs are critically important since a certain temperature increase may degrade the LED performance and cause tissue lesion. The µ-ILEDs in a pulsed operation offer an advantage in thermal management. In this paper, a 3D analytic model, as validated by finite element analysis, is developed to study the thermal response of rectangular µ-ILEDs in a pulsed operation. A scaling law for the maximum normalized temperature increase of rectangular µ-ILEDs in terms of non-dimensional parameters is established. The influences of geometric (i.e. shape factor) and loading parameters (e.g. duty cycle and period) on the temperature increase are systematically investigated. These results are very helpful in designing µ-ILEDs by providing guidelines to avoid adverse thermal effects.

  16. Micro-scale Abrasion and Medium Load Multiple Scratch Tests of PVD Coatings.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S. Poulat; H. Sun & D.G. Teer

    2004-01-01

    Micro-scale abrasion testing is widely used to determine the abrasion resistance of thin film coatings; it is a simple technique that can easily be used as part of a quality control procedure, but it has got the disadvantage of not allowing an easy study of the wear mechanisms involved: it is difficult to estimate the load applied on each abrasive particles in the contact between the loaded ball and the specimen. The possibility of using progressive loading scratch testing, a method widely used to assess the adhesion of thin film coatings, to model the abrasive wear of coatings has been studied in the past; the use of multiple scratch tests to study the wear mechanisms corresponding to a single abrasion scratch event has also been studied in the case of bulk materials (ceramics and hard metals). Two coatings, deposited by Closed Field Unbalanced Magnetron Sputter Ion Plating (CFUBMSIP) on ASP23 powder metallurgy steel substrate are chosen to be representative of the use of protective coatings in industry: titanium nitride, which is widely used to prevent tool wear, and TCL Graphit-iCTM, which is widely used as a wear resistant solid lubricant coating. The two coatings are first characterised by using a standard quality control procedure: their thickness is determined by the cap grinding method, their adhesion by progressive loading scratch. Then micro-scale abrasion tests performed with a slurry at a concentration which promotes grooving wear, and medium load multiple scratch tests performed with diamond indenters are completed; the results of these tests are analysed and compared to determine if there is any correlation between the two sets of results; the multiple scratch tests wear tracks are also observed to determine the wear mechanisms involved.

  17. Microprofiling of nitrogen patches in paddy soil: Analysis of spatiotemporal nutrient heterogeneity at the microscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yilin; Kronzucker, Herbert J.; Shi, Weiming

    2016-06-01

    Flooded paddy soil ecosystems in the tropics support the cultivation of the majority of the world’s leading crop, rice, and nitrogen (N) availability in the paddy-soil rooting zone limits rice production more than any other nutritional factor. Yet, little is known about the dynamic response of paddy soil to N-fertiliser application, in terms of horizontal and vertical patchiness in N distribution and transformation. Here, we present a microscale analysis of the profile of ammonium (NH4+) and nitrate (NO3‑), nitrification, oxygen (O2water and O2soil), and pH (pHwater and pHsoil) in paddy soils, collected from two representative rice-production areas in subtropical China. NH4+ and NO3‑ exhibited dramatic spatiotemporal profiles within N patches on the microscale. We show that pHsoil became constant at 1.0–3.5 mm depth, and O2soil became undetectable at 1.7–4.0 mm. Fertiliser application significantly increased pH, and decreased O2, within N patches. Path analysis showed that the factors governing nitrification scaled in the order: pHwater > pHsoil > NH4+ > O2water > NO3‑ > O2soil. We discuss the soil properties that decide the degree of nutrient patchiness within them and argue that such knowledge is critical to intelligent appraisals of nutrient-use efficiencies in the field.

  18. DTAF dye concentrations commonly used to measure microscale deformations in biological tissues alter tissue mechanics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spencer E Szczesny

    Full Text Available Identification of the deformation mechanisms and specific components underlying the mechanical function of biological tissues requires mechanical testing at multiple levels within the tissue hierarchical structure. Dichlorotriazinylaminofluorescein (DTAF is a fluorescent dye that is used to visualize microscale deformations of the extracellular matrix in soft collagenous tissues. However, the DTAF concentrations commonly employed in previous multiscale experiments (≥2000 µg/ml may alter tissue mechanics. The objective of this study was to determine whether DTAF affects tendon fascicle mechanics and if a concentration threshold exists below which any observed effects are negligible. This information is valuable for guiding the continued use of this fluorescent dye in future experiments and for interpreting the results of previous work. Incremental strain testing demonstrated that high DTAF concentrations (≥100 µg/ml increase the quasi-static modulus and yield strength of rat tail tendon fascicles while reducing their viscoelastic behavior. Subsequent multiscale testing and modeling suggests that these effects are due to a stiffening of the collagen fibrils and strengthening of the interfibrillar matrix. Despite these changes in tissue behavior, the fundamental deformation mechanisms underlying fascicle mechanics appear to remain intact, which suggests that conclusions from previous multiscale investigations of strain transfer are still valid. The effects of lower DTAF concentrations (≤10 µg/ml on tendon mechanics were substantially smaller and potentially negligible; nevertheless, no concentration was found that did not at least slightly alter the tissue behavior. Therefore, future studies should either reduce DTAF concentrations as much as possible or use other dyes/techniques for measuring microscale deformations.

  19. Automated Bone Age Assessment: Motivation, Taxonomies, and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjan Mansourvar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone age assessment (BAA of unknown people is one of the most important topics in clinical procedure for evaluation of biological maturity of children. BAA is performed usually by comparing an X-ray of left hand wrist with an atlas of known sample bones. Recently, BAA has gained remarkable ground from academia and medicine. Manual methods of BAA are time-consuming and prone to observer variability. This is a motivation for developing automated methods of BAA. However, there is considerable research on the automated assessment, much of which are still in the experimental stage. This survey provides taxonomy of automated BAA approaches and discusses the challenges. Finally, we present suggestions for future research.

  20. AUTOMATED ANALYSIS OF BREAKERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Farhadzade

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Breakers relate to Electric Power Systems’ equipment, the reliability of which influence, to a great extend, on reliability of Power Plants. In particular, the breakers determine structural reliability of switchgear circuit of Power Stations and network substations. Failure in short-circuit switching off by breaker with further failure of reservation unit or system of long-distance protection lead quite often to system emergency.The problem of breakers’ reliability improvement and the reduction of maintenance expenses is becoming ever more urgent in conditions of systematic increasing of maintenance cost and repair expenses of oil circuit and air-break circuit breakers. The main direction of this problem solution is the improvement of diagnostic control methods and organization of on-condition maintenance. But this demands to use a great amount of statistic information about nameplate data of breakers and their operating conditions, about their failures, testing and repairing, advanced developments (software of computer technologies and specific automated information system (AIS.The new AIS with AISV logo was developed at the department: “Reliability of power equipment” of AzRDSI of Energy. The main features of AISV are:· to provide the security and data base accuracy;· to carry out systematic control of breakers conformity with operating conditions;· to make the estimation of individual  reliability’s value and characteristics of its changing for given combination of characteristics variety;· to provide personnel, who is responsible for technical maintenance of breakers, not only with information but also with methodological support, including recommendations for the given problem solving  and advanced methods for its realization.

  1. The philosophy of scientific experimentation: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Radder, H.

    2009-01-01

    Practicing and studying automated experimentation may benefit from philosophical reflection on experimental science in general. This paper reviews the relevant literature and discusses central issues in the philosophy of scientific experimentation. The first two sections present brief accounts of the rise of experimental science and of its philosophical study. The next sections discuss three central issues of scientific experimentation: the scientific and philosophical significance of interve...

  2. Completely automated measurement facility (PAVICOM) for track-detector data processing

    CERN Document Server

    Aleksandrov, A B; Feinberg, E L; Goncharova, L A; Konovalova, N S; Martynov, A G; Polukhina, N G; Roussetski, A S; Starkov, NI; Tsarev, V A

    2004-01-01

    A review of technical capabilities and investigations performed using the completely automated measuring facility (PAVICOM) is presented. This very efficient facility for track-detector data processing in the field of nuclear and high-energy particle physics has been constructed in the Lebedev physical institute. PAVICOM is widely used in Russia for treatment of experimental data from track detectors (emulsion and solid-state trackers) in high- and low-energy physics, cosmic ray physics, etc. PAVICOM provides an essential improvement of the efficiency of experimental studies. In contrast to semi-automated microscopes widely used until now, PAVICOM is capable of performing completely automated measurements of charged particle tracks in nuclear emulsions and track detectors without employing hard visual work. In this case, track images are recorded by CCD cameras and then are digitized and converted into files. Thus, experimental data processing is accelerated by approximately a thousand times. Completely autom...

  3. An Extended Case Study Methoology for Investigating Influence of Cultural, Organizational, and Automation Factors on Human-Automation Trust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koltai, Kolina Sun; Ho, Nhut; Masequesmay, Gina; Niedober, David; Skoog, Mark; Johnson, Walter; Cacanindin, Artemio

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses a case study that examined the influence of cultural, organizational and automation capability upon human trust in, and reliance on, automation. In particular, this paper focuses on the design and application of an extended case study methodology, and on the foundational lessons revealed by it. Experimental test pilots involved in the research and development of the US Air Forces newly developed Automatic Ground Collision Avoidance System served as the context for this examination. An eclectic, multi-pronged approach was designed to conduct this case study, and proved effective in addressing the challenges associated with the cases politically sensitive and military environment. Key results indicate that the system design was in alignment with pilot culture and organizational mission, indicating the potential for appropriate trust development in operational pilots. These include the low-vulnerabilityhigh risk nature of the pilot profession, automation transparency and suspicion, system reputation, and the setup of and communications among organizations involved in the system development.

  4. 2012 Annual Conference on Experimental and Applied Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Crone, Wendy; Jin, Helena; Sciammarella, Cesar; Furlong, Cosme; Furlong, Cosme; Chalivendra, Vijay; Song, Bo; Casem, Daniel; Antoun, Bonnie; Qi, H; Hall, Richard; Tandon, GP; Lu, Hongbing; Lu, Charles; Yoshida, Sanichiro; Shaw, Gordon; Prorok, Barton; Barthelat, François; Korach, Chad; Grande-Allen, K; Lipke, Elizabeth; Lykofatitits, George; Zavattieri, Pablo; Starman, LaVern; Patterson, Eann; Backman, David; Cloud, Gary; Vol.1 Dynamic Behavior of Materials; Vol.2 Challenges in Mechanics of Time-Dependent Materials and Processes in Conventional and Multifunctional Materials; Vol.3 Imaging Methods for Novel Materials and Challenging Applications; Vol.4 Experimental and Applied Mechanics; Vol.5 Mechanics of Biological Systems and Materials; Vol.6 MEMS and Nanotechnology; Vol.7 Composite Materials and Joining Technologies for Composites

    2013-01-01

    Experimental and Applied Mechanics, Volume 4: Proceedings of the 2012 Annual Conference on Experimental and Applied Mechanics, the fourth volume of seven from the Conference, brings together 54 contributions to this important area of research and engineering. The collection presents early findings and case studies on fundamental and applied aspects of Experimental and Applied Mechanics, including papers on:  Fracture & Fatigue Microscale & Microstructural Effects in Fatigue & Fracture Material Applications Composite Characterization Using Digital Image Correlation Techniques Multi-Scale Simulation and Testing of Composites Residual Stress Inverse Problems/Hybrid Methods Nano-Composites Microstructure Material Characterization Modeling and Uncertainty Quantification Impact Behavior of Composites.

  5. Programmable automation systems in PSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Finnish safety authority (STUK) requires plant specific PSAs, and quantitative safety goals are set on different levels. The reliability analysis is more problematic when critical safety functions are realized by applying programmable automation systems. Conventional modeling techniques do not necessarily apply to the analysis of these systems, and the quantification seems to be impossible. However, it is important to analyze contribution of programmable automation systems to the plant safety and PSA is the only method with system analytical view over the safety. This report discusses the applicability of PSA methodology (fault tree analyses, failure modes and effects analyses) in the analysis of programmable automation systems. The problem of how to decompose programmable automation systems for reliability modeling purposes is discussed. In addition to the qualitative analysis and structural reliability modeling issues, the possibility to evaluate failure probabilities of programmable automation systems is considered. One solution to the quantification issue is the use of expert judgements, and the principles to apply expert judgements is discussed in the paper. A framework to apply expert judgements is outlined. Further, the impacts of subjective estimates on the interpretation of PSA results are discussed. (orig.) (13 refs.)

  6. International Conference Automation : Challenges in Automation, Robotics and Measurement Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Zieliński, Cezary; Kaliczyńska, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    This book presents the set of papers accepted for presentation at the International Conference Automation, held in Warsaw, 2-4 March of 2016. It presents the research results presented by top experts in the fields of industrial automation, control, robotics and measurement techniques. Each chapter presents a thorough analysis of a specific technical problem which is usually followed by numerical analysis, simulation, and description of results of implementation of the solution of a real world problem. The presented theoretical results, practical solutions and guidelines will be valuable for both researchers working in the area of engineering sciences and for practitioners solving industrial problems. .

  7. Energy conservation and management system using efficient building automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, S. Faiz; Hazry, D.; Tanveer, M. Hassan; Joyo, M. Kamran; Warsi, Faizan A.; Kamarudin, H.; Wan, Khairunizam; Razlan, Zuradzman M.; Shahriman A., B.; Hussain, A. T.

    2015-05-01

    In countries where the demand and supply gap of electricity is huge and the people are forced to endure increasing hours of load shedding, unnecessary consumption of electricity makes matters even worse. So the importance and need for electricity conservation increases exponentially. This paper outlines a step towards the conservation of energy in general and electricity in particular by employing efficient Building Automation technique. It should be noted that by careful designing and implementation of the Building Automation System, up to 30% to 40% of energy consumption can be reduced, which makes a huge difference for energy saving. In this study above mentioned concept is verified by performing experiment on a prototype experimental room and by implementing efficient building automation technique. For the sake of this efficient automation, Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) is employed as a main controller, monitoring various system parameters and controlling appliances as per required. The hardware test run and experimental findings further clarifies and proved the concept. The added advantage of this project is that it can be implemented to both small and medium level domestic homes thus greatly reducing the overall unnecessary load on the Utility provider.

  8. Transport and retention of xanthan gum-stabilized microscale zero-valent iron particles in saturated porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Jia; Tang, Fenglin; Zheng, Xilai; Shao, Haibing; Kolditz, Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Microscale zero valent iron (mZVI) is a promising material for in-situ contaminated groundwater remediation. However, its usefulness has been usually inhibited by mZVI particles' low mobility in saturated porous media for sedimentation and deposition. In our study, laboratory experiments, including sedimentation studies, rheological measurements and transport tests, were conducted to investigate the feasibility of xanthan gum (XG) being used as a coating agent for mZVI particle stabilization. In addition, the effects of XG concentration, flow rate, grain diameter and water chemistry on XG-coated mZVI (XG-mZVI) particle mobility were explored by analyzing its breakthrough curves and retention profiles. It was demonstrated that XG worked efficiently to enhance the suspension stability and mobility of mZVI particles through the porous media as a shear thinning fluid, especially at a higher concentration level (3 g/L). The results of the column study showed that the mobility of XG-mZVI particles increased with an increasing flow rate and larger grain diameter. At the highest flow rate (2.30 × 10(-3) m/s) within the coarsest porous media (0.8-1.2 mm), 86.52% of the XG-mZVI flowed through the column. At the lowest flow rate (0.97 × 10(-4) m/s) within the finest porous media (0.3-0.6 mm), the retention was dramatically strengthened, with only 48.22% of the particles flowing through the column. The XG-mZVI particles appeared to be easily trapped at the beginning of the column especially at a low flow rate. In terms of two representative water chemistry parameters (ion strength and pH value), no significant influence on XG-mZVI particle mobility was observed. The experimental results suggested that straining was the primary mechanism of XG-mZVI retention under saturated condition. Given the above results, the specific site-related conditions should be taken into consideration for the design of a successful delivery system to achieve a compromise between

  9. Automated microinjection system for adherent cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youoku, Sachihiro; Suto, Yoshinori; Ando, Moritoshi; Ito, Akio

    2007-07-01

    We have developed an automated microinjection system that can handle more than 500 cells an hour. Microinjection injects foreign agents directly into cells using a micro-capillary. It can randomly introduce agents such as DNA, proteins and drugs into various types of cells. However, conventional methods require a skilled operator and suffer from low throughput. The new automated microinjection techniques we have developed consist of a Petri dish height measuring method and a capillary apex position measuring method. The dish surface height is measured by analyzing the images of cells that adhere to the dish surface. The contrast between the cell images is minimized when the focus plane of an object lens coincides with the dish surface. We have developed an optimized focus searching method with a height accuracy of +/-0.2 um. The capillary apex position detection method consists of three steps: rough, middle, and precise. These steps are employed sequentially to cover capillary displacements of up to +/-2 mm, and to ultimately accomplish an alignment accuracy of less than one micron. Experimental results using this system we developed show that it can introduce fluorescent material (Alexa488) into adherent cells, HEK293, with a success rate of 88.5%.

  10. An automated procedure for evaluating song imitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yael Mandelblat-Cerf

    Full Text Available Songbirds have emerged as an excellent model system to understand the neural basis of vocal and motor learning. Like humans, songbirds learn to imitate the vocalizations of their parents or other conspecific "tutors." Young songbirds learn by comparing their own vocalizations to the memory of their tutor song, slowly improving until over the course of several weeks they can achieve an excellent imitation of the tutor. Because of the slow progression of vocal learning, and the large amounts of singing generated, automated algorithms for quantifying vocal imitation have become increasingly important for studying the mechanisms underlying this process. However, methodologies for quantifying song imitation are complicated by the highly variable songs of either juvenile birds or those that learn poorly because of experimental manipulations. Here we present a method for the evaluation of song imitation that incorporates two innovations: First, an automated procedure for selecting pupil song segments, and, second, a new algorithm, implemented in Matlab, for computing both song acoustic and sequence similarity. We tested our procedure using zebra finch song and determined a set of acoustic features for which the algorithm optimally differentiates between similar and non-similar songs.

  11. Automated power management and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolce, James L.

    1991-01-01

    A comprehensive automation design is being developed for Space Station Freedom's electric power system. A joint effort between NASA's Office of Aeronautics and Exploration Technology and NASA's Office of Space Station Freedom, it strives to increase station productivity by applying expert systems and conventional algorithms to automate power system operation. The initial station operation will use ground-based dispatches to perform the necessary command and control tasks. These tasks constitute planning and decision-making activities that strive to eliminate unplanned outages. We perceive an opportunity to help these dispatchers make fast and consistent on-line decisions by automating three key tasks: failure detection and diagnosis, resource scheduling, and security analysis. Expert systems will be used for the diagnostics and for the security analysis; conventional algorithms will be used for the resource scheduling.

  12. Computer automation and artificial intelligence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapid advances in computing, resulting from micro chip revolution has increased its application manifold particularly for computer automation. Yet the level of automation available, has limited its application to more complex and dynamic systems which require an intelligent computer control. In this paper a review of Artificial intelligence techniques used to augment automation is presented. The current sequential processing approach usually adopted in artificial intelligence has succeeded in emulating the symbolic processing part of intelligence, but the processing power required to get more elusive aspects of intelligence leads towards parallel processing. An overview of parallel processing with emphasis on transputer is also provided. A Fuzzy knowledge based controller for amination drug delivery in muscle relaxant anesthesia on transputer is described. 4 figs. (author)

  13. Unmet needs in automated cytogenetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Though some, at least, of the goals of automation systems for analysis of clinical cytogenetic material seem either at hand, like automatic metaphase finding, or at least likely to be met in the near future, like operator-assisted semi-automatic analysis of banded metaphase spreads, important areas of cytogenetic analsis, most importantly the determination of chromosomal aberration frequencies in populations of cells or in samples of cells from people exposed to environmental mutagens, await practical methods of automation. Important as are the clinical diagnostic applications, it is apparent that increasing concern over the clastogenic effects of the multitude of potentially clastogenic chemical and physical agents to which human populations are being increasingly exposed, and the resulting emergence of extensive cytogenetic testing protocols, makes the development of automation not only economically feasible but almost mandatory. The nature of the problems involved, and acutal of possible approaches to their solution, are discussed

  14. Manual versus automated blood sampling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teilmann, A C; Kalliokoski, Otto; Sørensen, Dorte B;

    2014-01-01

    corticosterone metabolites, and expressed more anxious behavior than did the mice of the other groups. Plasma corticosterone levels of mice subjected to tail blood sampling were also elevated, although less significantly. Mice subjected to automated blood sampling were less affected with regard to the parameters......Facial vein (cheek blood) and caudal vein (tail blood) phlebotomy are two commonly used techniques for obtaining blood samples from laboratory mice, while automated blood sampling through a permanent catheter is a relatively new technique in mice. The present study compared physiological parameters......, glucocorticoid dynamics as well as the behavior of mice sampled repeatedly for 24 h by cheek blood, tail blood or automated blood sampling from the carotid artery. Mice subjected to cheek blood sampling lost significantly more body weight, had elevated levels of plasma corticosterone, excreted more fecal...

  15. Network based automation for SMEs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shahabeddini Parizi, Mohammad; Radziwon, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    The implementation of appropriate automation concepts which increase productivity in Small and Medium Sized Enterprises (SMEs) requires a lot of effort, due to their limited resources. Therefore, it is strongly recommended for small firms to open up for the external sources of knowledge, which co......, this paper develops and discusses a set of guidelines for systematic productivity improvement within an innovative collaboration in regards to automation processes in SMEs.......The implementation of appropriate automation concepts which increase productivity in Small and Medium Sized Enterprises (SMEs) requires a lot of effort, due to their limited resources. Therefore, it is strongly recommended for small firms to open up for the external sources of knowledge, which...... could be obtained through network interaction. Based on two extreme cases of SMEs representing low-tech industry and an in-depth analysis of their manufacturing facilities this paper presents how collaboration between firms embedded in a regional ecosystem could result in implementation of new...

  16. Design automation for integrated circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, S. B.; de Geus, A. J.; Rohrer, R. A.

    1983-04-01

    Consideration is given to the development status of the use of computers in automated integrated circuit design methods, which promise the minimization of both design time and design error incidence. Integrated circuit design encompasses two major tasks: error specification, in which the goal is a logic diagram that accurately represents the desired electronic function, and physical specification, in which the goal is an exact description of the physical locations of all circuit elements and their interconnections on the chip. Design automation not only saves money by reducing design and fabrication time, but also helps the community of systems and logic designers to work more innovatively. Attention is given to established design automation methodologies, programmable logic arrays, and design shortcuts.

  17. Automated Podcasting System for Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ypatios Grigoriadis

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results achieved at Graz University of Technology (TU Graz in the field of automating the process of recording and publishing university lectures in a very new way. It outlines cornerstones of the development and integration of an automated recording system such as the lecture hall setup, the recording hardware and software architecture as well as the development of a text-based search for the final product by method of indexing video podcasts. Furthermore, the paper takes a look at didactical aspects, evaluations done in this context and future outlook.

  18. Agile Data: Automating database refactorings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Xavier

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses an automated approach to database change management throughout the companies’ development workflow. By using automated tools, companies can avoid common issues related to manual database deployments. This work was motivated by analyzing usual problems within organizations, mostly originated from manual interventions that may result in systems disruptions and production incidents. In addition to practices of continuous integration and continuous delivery, the current paper describes a case study in which a suggested pipeline is implemented in order to reduce the deployment times and decrease incidents due to ineffective data controlling.

  19. Design automation, languages, and simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Wai-Kai

    2003-01-01

    As the complexity of electronic systems continues to increase, the micro-electronic industry depends upon automation and simulations to adapt quickly to market changes and new technologies. Compiled from chapters contributed to CRC's best-selling VLSI Handbook, this volume covers a broad range of topics relevant to design automation, languages, and simulations. These include a collaborative framework that coordinates distributed design activities through the Internet, an overview of the Verilog hardware description language and its use in a design environment, hardware/software co-design, syst

  20. 2013 Chinese Intelligent Automation Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Deng, Zhidong

    2013-01-01

    Proceedings of the 2013 Chinese Intelligent Automation Conference presents selected research papers from the CIAC’13, held in Yangzhou, China. The topics include e.g. adaptive control, fuzzy control, neural network based control, knowledge based control, hybrid intelligent control, learning control, evolutionary mechanism based control, multi-sensor integration, failure diagnosis, and reconfigurable control. Engineers and researchers from academia, industry, and government can gain an inside view of new solutions combining ideas from multiple disciplines in the field of intelligent automation.   Zengqi Sun and Zhidong Deng are professors at the Department of Computer Science, Tsinghua University, China.

  1. 2013 Chinese Intelligent Automation Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Deng, Zhidong

    2013-01-01

    Proceedings of the 2013 Chinese Intelligent Automation Conference presents selected research papers from the CIAC’13, held in Yangzhou, China. The topics include e.g. adaptive control, fuzzy control, neural network based control, knowledge based control, hybrid intelligent control, learning control, evolutionary mechanism based control, multi-sensor integration, failure diagnosis, and reconfigurable control. Engineers and researchers from academia, industry, and government can gain an inside view of new solutions combining ideas from multiple disciplines in the field of intelligent automation. Zengqi Sun and Zhidong Deng are professors at the Department of Computer Science, Tsinghua University, China.

  2. Automated synthesis of sialylated oligosaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Esposito

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Sialic acid-containing glycans play a major role in cell-surface interactions with external partners such as cells and viruses. Straightforward access to sialosides is required in order to study their biological functions on a molecular level. Here, automated oligosaccharide synthesis was used to facilitate the preparation of this class of biomolecules. Our strategy relies on novel sialyl α-(2→3 and α-(2→6 galactosyl imidates, which, used in combination with the automated platform, provided rapid access to a small library of conjugation-ready sialosides of biological relevance.

  3. Toward designing for trust in database automation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appropriate reliance on system automation is imperative for safe and productive work, especially in safety-critical systems. It is unsafe to rely on automation beyond its designed use; conversely, it can be both unproductive and unsafe to manually perform tasks that are better relegated to automated tools. Operator trust in automated tools mediates reliance, and trust appears to affect how operators use technology. As automated agents become more complex, the question of trust in automation is increasingly important. In order to achieve proper use of automation, we must engender an appropriate degree of trust that is sensitive to changes in operating functions and context. In this paper, we present research concerning trust in automation in the domain of automated tools for relational databases. Lee and See have provided models of trust in automation. One model developed by Lee and See identifies three key categories of information about the automation that lie along a continuum of attributional abstraction. Purpose-, process-and performance-related information serve, both individually and through inferences between them, to describe automation in such a way as to engender r properly-calibrated trust. Thus, one can look at information from different levels of attributional abstraction as a general requirements analysis for information key to appropriate trust in automation. The model of information necessary to engender appropriate trust in automation [1] is a general one. Although it describes categories of information, it does not provide insight on how to determine the specific information elements required for a given automated tool. We have applied the Abstraction Hierarchy (AH) to this problem in the domain of relational databases. The AH serves as a formal description of the automation at several levels of abstraction, ranging from a very abstract purpose-oriented description to a more concrete description of the resources involved in the automated process

  4. Extraneous carbon assessment in ultra-microscale radiocarbon analysis using benzene polycarboxylic acids (BPCA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanke, Ulrich M.; McIntyre, Cameron P.; Schmidt, Michael W. I.; Wacker, Lukas; Eglinton, Timothy I.

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of the natural abundance of radiocarbon (14C) concentrations in inorganic and organic carbon-containing materials can be used to investigate their date of origin. Particularly, the biogeochemical cycling of specific compounds in the environment may be investigated applying molecular marker analyses. However, the isolation of specific molecules from environmental matrices requires a complex processing procedure resulting in small sample sizes that often contain less than 30 μg C. Such small samples are sensitive to extraneous carbon (Cex) that is introduced during the purification of the compounds (Shah and Pearson, 2007). We present a thorough radiocarbon blank assessment for benzene polycarboxylic acids (BPCA), a proxy for combustion products that are formed during the oxidative degradation of condensed polyaromatic structures (Wiedemeier et al, in press). The extraneous carbon assessment includes reference material for (1) chemical extraction, (2) preparative liquid chromatography (3) wet chemical oxidation which are subsequently measured with gas ion source AMS (Accelerator Mass Spectrometer, 5-100 μg C). We always use pairs of reference materials, radiocarbon depleted (14Cfossil) and modern (14Cmodern) to determine the fraction modern (F14C) of Cex.Our results include detailed information about the quantification of Cex in radiocarbon molecular marker analysis using BPCA. Error propagation calculations indicate that ultra-microscale samples (20-30 μg) are feasible with uncertainties of less than 10 %. Calculations of the constant contamination reveal important information about the source (F14C) and mass (μg) of Cex (Wacker and Christl, 2011) for each sub procedure. An external correction of compound specific radiocarbon data is essential for robust results that allow for a high degree of confidence in the 14C results. References Shah and Pearson, 2007. Ultra-microscale (5-25μg C) analysis of individual lipids by 14C AMS: Assessment and

  5. Microscopic particle image velocimetry measurements of transition to turbulence in microscale capillaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natrajan, V. K.; Christensen, K. T.

    2007-07-01

    The character of transitional capillary flow is investigated using pressure-drop measurements and instantaneous velocity fields acquired by microscopic PIV in the streamwise wall-normal plane of a 536 μm capillary over the Reynolds-number range 1,800 ≤ Re ≤ 3,400 in increments of 100. The pressure-drop measurements reveal a deviation from laminar behavior at Re = 1,900 with the differences between the measured and the predicted laminar-flow pressure drop increasing with increasing Re. These observations are consistent with the characteristics of the mean velocity profiles which begin to deviate from the parabolic laminar profile at Re = 1,900, interpreted as the onset of transition, by becoming increasingly flatter and fuller with increasing Re. A fully-turbulent state is attained at Re ≅ 3,400 where the mean velocity profile collapses onto the mean profile of fully-developed turbulent pipe flow from an existing direct numerical simulation at Re = 5,300. Examination of the instantaneous velocity fields acquired by micro-PIV in the range 1,900 ≤ Re flows at the microscale are composed of a subset of velocity fields illustrating a purely laminar behavior and a subset of fields that capture significant departure from laminar behavior. The fraction of velocity fields displaying non-laminar behavior increases with increasing Re, consistent with past observations of a growing number of intermittent turbulent spots bounded by nominally laminar flow in macroscale pipe flow with increasing Re. Instantaneous velocity fields that are non-laminar in character consistently contain multiple spanwise vortices that appear to streamwise-align to form larger-scale interfaces that incline slightly away from the wall. The characteristics of these “trains” of vortices are reminiscent of the spatial features of hairpin-like vortices and hairpin vortex packets often observed in fully-turbulent wall-bounded flow at both the macro- and micro-scales. Finally, single

  6. Visualization of micro-scale phase displacement processes in retention and outflow experiments: Non-uniqueness of unsaturated flow properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MORTENSEN,ANNETTE P.; GLASS JR.,ROBERT J.; HOLLENBECK,KARL; JENSEN,KARSTEN H.

    2000-03-09

    Methods to determine unsaturated hydraulic properties can exhibit random and non-unique behavior. The authors assess the causes for these behaviors by visualizing micro-scale phase displacement processes during equilibrium retention and transient outflow experiments. They observe that the drainage process is composed of a fast fingering followed by a slower backfilling. The influence of each these processes is controlled by the size and the speed of the applied boundary step, the initial saturation and its structure and by small-scale heterogeneities. Because the mixture of these micro-scale processes yields macro-scale effective behavior, measured unsaturated flow properties are also a function of these controls. These results suggest limitations on the current definitions and uniqueness of unsaturated hydraulic properties.

  7. Maintaining the pluripotency of mouse embryonic stem cells on gold nanoparticle layers with nanoscale but not microscale surface roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Zhonglin; Wang, Hongwei; Wang, Yanyun; Ding, Kaiguo; Liu, Huan; Yuan, Lin; Shi, Xiujuan; Wang, Mengmeng; Wang, Yanwei; Chen, Hong

    2014-05-01

    Efficient control of the self-renewal and pluripotency maintenance of embryonic stem cell (ESC) is a prerequisite for translating stem cell technologies to clinical applications. Surface topography is one of the most important factors that regulates cell behaviors. In the present study, micro/nano topographical structures composed of a gold nanoparticle layer (GNPL) with nano-, sub-micro-, and microscale surface roughnesses were used to study the roles of these structures in regulating the behaviors of mouse ESCs (mESCs) under feeder-free conditions. The distinctive results from Oct-4 immunofluorescence staining and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) demonstrate that nanoscale and low sub-microscale surface roughnesses (Rq less than 392 nm) are conducive to the long-term maintenance of mESC pluripotency, while high sub-microscale and microscale surface roughnesses (Rq greater than 573 nm) result in a significant loss of mESC pluripotency and a faster undirectional differentiation, particularly in long-term culture. Moreover, the likely signalling cascades engaged in the topological sensing of mESCs were investigated and their role in affecting the maintenance of the long-term cell pluripotency was discussed by analyzing the expression of proteins related to E-cadherin mediated cell-cell adhesions and integrin-mediated focal adhesions (FAs). Additionally, the conclusions from MTT, cell morphology staining and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity assays show that the surface roughness can provide a potent regulatory signal for various mESC behaviors, including cell attachment, proliferation and osteoinduction.Efficient control of the self-renewal and pluripotency maintenance of embryonic stem cell (ESC) is a prerequisite for translating stem cell technologies to clinical applications. Surface topography is one of the most important factors that regulates cell behaviors. In the present study, micro/nano topographical structures composed of a gold

  8. Impact of the microscale distribution of a Pseudomonas strain introduced into soil on potential contacts with indigenous bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dechesne, Arnaud; Pallud, C.; Bertolla, F.;

    2005-01-01

    Soil bioaugmentation is a promising approach in soil bioremediation and agriculture. Nevertheless, our knowledge of the fate and activity of introduced bacteria in soil and thus of their impact on the soil environment is still limited. The microscale spatial distribution of introduced bacteria has...... rarely been studied, although it determines the encounter probability between introduced cells and any components of the soil ecosystem and thus plays a role in the ecology of introduced bacteria. For example, conjugal gene transfer from introduced bacteria to indigenous bacteria requires cell......-to-cell contact, the probability of which depends on their spatial distribution. To quantitatively characterize the microscale distribution of an introduced bacterial population and its dynamics, a gfp-tagged derivative of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 was introduced by percolation in repacked soil columns. Initially...

  9. Macro-scale complexity of nano- to micro-scale architecture of olivine crystals through an iodine vapour transport mechanism

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Raymond L D Whitby; Takahiro Fukuda; Toru Maekawa

    2014-04-01

    The production of nano- to micro-scale olivine (magnesium and iron silicate) crystals has been achieved at relatively low temperatures through an iodine vapour transport of the metal onto amorphous silicon dioxide. The process occurs down a temperature gradient from 800 to 600°C yielding high quality crystals with long range crystallinity, highly complex interconnectivity and intricate macroscale architecture. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging of the substrate before and after the reaction reveals that the amorphous silicon oxide species is mobile, due to the lack of correlation between the silicon oxide layer and the final olivine particles, leading to a vapour–liquid–solid or vapour–solid growth mechanism. This technique demonstrates a facile, low temperature synthetic route towards olivine crystals with nano- to micro-scale dimensions.

  10. Extended -Regular Sequence for Automated Analysis of Microarray Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Hee-Jeong

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Microarray study enables us to obtain hundreds of thousands of expressions of genes or genotypes at once, and it is an indispensable technology for genome research. The first step is the analysis of scanned microarray images. This is the most important procedure for obtaining biologically reliable data. Currently most microarray image processing systems require burdensome manual block/spot indexing work. Since the amount of experimental data is increasing very quickly, automated microarray image analysis software becomes important. In this paper, we propose two automated methods for analyzing microarray images. First, we propose the extended -regular sequence to index blocks and spots, which enables a novel automatic gridding procedure. Second, we provide a methodology, hierarchical metagrid alignment, to allow reliable and efficient batch processing for a set of microarray images. Experimental results show that the proposed methods are more reliable and convenient than the commercial tools.

  11. Automated Ply Inspection (API) for AFP Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Automated Ply Inspection (API) system autonomously inspects layups created by high speed automated fiber placement (AFP) machines. API comprises a high accuracy...

  12. Use of an Oxygen-Insensitive Microscale Biosensor for Methane To Measure Methane Concentration Profiles in a Rice Paddy

    OpenAIRE

    Damgaard, Lars R.; Revsbech, Niels Peter; Reichardt, Wolfgang

    1998-01-01

    An oxygen-insensitive microscale biosensor for methane was constructed by furnishing a previously described biosensor with an oxygen guard. The guard consisted of a glass capillary containing heterotrophic bacteria, which consumed oxygen diffusing through the tip membrane, thus preventing it from diffusing into the methane-sensing unit. Oxygen microprofiles were measured through the oxygen guard capillary, demonstrating the principle and limitations of the method. When the tip of the guard ca...

  13. Biosensor Determination of the Microscale Distribution of Nitrate, Nitrate Assimilation, Nitrification, and Denitrification in a Diatom-Inhabited Freshwater Sediment

    OpenAIRE

    Lorenzen, Jan; Larsen, Lars Hauer; Kjær, Thomas; Revsbech, Niels-Peter

    1998-01-01

    High-resolution NO3− profiles in freshwater sediment covered with benthic diatoms were obtained with a new microscale NO3− biosensor characterized by absence of interference from chemical species other than NO2− and N2O. Analysis of the microprofiles obtained indicated no nitrification during darkness, high rates of nitrification and a tight coupling between nitrification and denitrification during illumination, and substantial rates of NO3− assimilation during illumination. Nitrification dur...

  14. Micro-scale wear characteristics of electroless Ni-P/SiC composite coating under two different sliding conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Franco, M.; Sha, W.; Malinov, S.; H. Liu

    2014-01-01

    The electroless nickel composite (ENC) with various silicon carbide contents was deposited onto aluminium alloy (LM24) substrate. The wear behaviour and the microhardness of the composite coating samples were investigated and compared with particles free and aluminium substrate samples using micro-scale abrasion tester and microhardness tester respectively. The wear scar marks and wear volume were analysed by optical microscope. The wear tracks were further studied using scanning electron mic...

  15. A micro-scale hot wire anemometer based on low stress (Ni/W) multi-layers deposited on nano-crystalline diamond for air flow sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbi, A.; Gimeno, L.; Gerbedoen, J.-C.; Viard, R.; Soltani, A.; Mortet, V.; Preobrazhensky, V.; Merlen, A.; Pernod, P.

    2015-12-01

    A linear array of microscale thermal anemometers has been designed, fabricated and characterized. The sensitive element consists of a self-compensated-stress multilayer (Ni/W) patterned to form a wire with length, width, and thickness close to 200 μm, 5 μm and 2 μm respectively. The wire is deposited and supported by prongs made of nano-crystalline diamond (NCD) of about 2 μm in thickness. Due to its high Young’s modulus, NCD allows a very high mechanical toughness without the need for thicker support for the hot wire. Also, depending on grain size, the NCD is able to present thermal conductivity smaller than 10 W mK-1, providing good thermal insulation from the substrate and less conductive end losses to the prongs. The sensor was characterized experimentally. Its electrical and thermal properties were obtained first in the absence of fluid flow. The results confirm the effectiveness of thermal insulation and the mechanical robustness of the structure. The fluidic characterizations were performed and analysed in the case of an airflow with velocities of up to 30 m s-1.

  16. Automated clustering procedure for TJ-II experimental signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Databases in fusion experiments are made up of thousands of signals. For this reason, data analysis must be simplified by developing automatic mechanisms for fast search and retrieval of specific data in the waveform database. In particular, a method for finding similar waveforms would be very helpful. The term 'similar' implies the use of proximity measurements in order to quantify how close two signals are. In this way, it would be possible to define several categories (clusters) and to classify the waveforms according to them, where this classification can be a starting point for exploratory data analysis in large databases. The clustering process is divided in two stages. The first one is feature extraction, i.e., to choose the set of properties that allow us to encode as much information as possible concerning a signal. The second one establishes the number of clusters according to a proximity measure

  17. Towards Automated System Synthesis Using SCIDUCTION

    OpenAIRE

    Jha, Susmit Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Automated synthesis of systems that are correct by construction has been a long-standing goal of computer science. Synthesis is a creative task and requires human intuition and skill. Its complete automation is currently beyond the capacity of programs that do automated reasoning. However, there is a pressing need for tools and techniques that can automate non-intuitive and error-prone synthesis tasks. This thesis proposes a novel synthesis approach to solve such tasks in the synthesis of pro...

  18. Simultaneous nano- and micro-scale control of nanofibrous microspheres self-assembled from star-shaped polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhanpeng; Marson, Ryan L.; Ge, Zhishen; Glotzer, Sharon C.; Ma, Peter X.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism underlying the multi-scale self-assembly of star-shaped polymers into non-hollow, hollow, and spongy nanofibrous microspheres is reported. Star-shaped poly(L-lactic acid) polymers with varying arm-numbers and arm-lengths are synthesized, dissolved in tetrahydrofuran, emulsified in glycerol, and thermally-induced to phase separate, resulting in microspheres that are either smooth or fibrous on the nano-scale, and either non-hollow, hollow, or spongy on the micro-scale. Molecular architecture and the hydroxyl density are shown to control assembly and morphology at both nano- and micro-scales. Nanofibers form only when the arm length is sufficiently long, while an increase in hydroxyl density causes the microspheres to change from non-hollow to hollow to spongy. We demonstrate via both experiments of capping or doubling the hydroxyl end groups and dissipative particle dynamics simulations that the affinity of hydroxyl to glycerol is critical to stabilizing the micro-scale structure. A “phase diagram” was constructed for the six types of microspheres in relation to the molecular structures of the star-shaped polymers. The proposed mechanism explains how star-shaped polymers self-assemble into various microspheres, and guides us to simultaneously control both nano- and micro-features of the microspheres. PMID:26009995

  19. A Godunov-type Finite Volume Scheme for Meso- and Micro-scale Flows in Three Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Nash'at; Lindeman, John

    2008-10-01

    This short note reports the extension of the f-waves approximate Riemann solver (A hmad and L indeman, 2007; L eV eque, 2002; B ale et al., 2002) for three-dimensional meso- and micro-scale atmospheric flows. The Riemann solver employs flux-based wave decomposition for the calculation of Godunov fluxes and does not require the explicit definition of the Roe matrix to enforce conservation. The other important feature of the Riemann solver is its ability to incorporate source term due to gravity without introducing discretization errors. The resulting finite volume scheme is second-order accurate in space and time. The finite-difference schemes currently used in atmospheric flow models are neither conservative nor able to resolve regions of sharp gradients. The finite volume scheme described in this paper is fully conservative and has the ability to resolve regions of sharp gradients without introducing spurious oscillations in the solution. The scheme shows promise in accurately resolving flows on the meso- and micro-scales and should be considered for implementation in the dynamical cores of next generation meso- and micro-scale atmospheric flow models.

  20. Automated activation-analysis system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An automated delayed neutron counting and instrumental neutron activation analysis system has been developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory's Omega West Reactor (OWR) to analyze samples for uranium and 31 additional elements with a maximum throughput of 400 samples per day. The system and its mode of operation for a large reconnaissance survey are described

  1. Automation, Performance and International Competition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kromann, Lene; Sørensen, Anders

    This paper presents new evidence on trade‐induced automation in manufacturing firms using unique data combining a retrospective survey that we have assembled with register data for 2005‐2010. In particular, we establish a causal effect where firms that have specialized in product types for which ...

  2. Feasibility Analysis of Crane Automation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Ming-xiao; MEI Xue-song; JIANG Ge-dong; ZHANG Gui-qing

    2006-01-01

    This paper summarizes the modeling methods, open-loop control and closed-loop control techniques of various forms of cranes, worldwide, and discusses their feasibilities and limitations in engineering. Then the dynamic behaviors of cranes are analyzed. Finally, we propose applied modeling methods and feasible control techniques and demonstrate the feasibilities of crane automation.

  3. Automation of Feynman diagram evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A C-program DIANA (DIagram ANAlyser) for the automation of Feynman diagram evaluations is presented. It consists of two parts: the analyzer of diagrams and the interpreter of a special text manipulating language. This language can be used to create a source code for analytical or numerical evaluations and to keep the control of the process in general

  4. Automated Clustering of Similar Amendments

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    The Italian Senate is clogged by computer-generated amendments. This talk will describe a simple strategy to cluster them in an automated fashion, so that the appropriate Senate procedures can be used to get rid of them in one sweep.

  5. Automated visual inspection of textile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rune Fisker; Carstensen, Jens Michael

    1997-01-01

    A method for automated inspection of two types of textile is presented. The goal of the inspection is to determine defects in the textile. A prototype is constructed for simulating the textile production line. At the prototype the images of the textile are acquired by a high speed line scan camera...

  6. Distribution system analysis and automation

    CERN Document Server

    Gers, Juan

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive guide to techniques that allow engineers to simulate, analyse and optimise power distribution systems which combined with automation, underpin the emerging concept of the "smart grid". This book is supported by theoretical concepts with real-world applications and MATLAB exercises.

  7. Teacherbot: Interventions in Automated Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayne, Sian

    2015-01-01

    Promises of "teacher-light" tuition and of enhanced "efficiency" via the automation of teaching have been with us since the early days of digital education, sometimes embraced by academics and institutions, and sometimes resisted as a set of moves which are damaging to teacher professionalism and to the humanistic values of…

  8. Automation, Labor Productivity and Employment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kromann, Lene; Rose Skaksen, Jan; Sørensen, Anders

    CEBR fremlægger nu den første rapport i AIM-projektet. Rapporten viser, at der er gode muligheder for yderligere automation i en stor del af de danske fremstillingsvirksomheder. For i dag er gennemsnitligt kun omkring 30 % af virksomhedernes produktionsprocesser automatiserede. Navnlig procesområ...

  9. Adaptation : A Partially Automated Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manjing, Tham; Bukhsh, F.A.; Weigand, H.

    2014-01-01

    This paper showcases the possibility of creating an adaptive auditing system. Adaptation in an audit environment need human intervention at some point. Based on a case study this paper focuses on automation of adaptation process. It is divided into solution design and validation parts. The artifact

  10. Automation of Space Inventory Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Patrick W.; Ngo, Phong; Wagner, Raymond; Barton, Richard; Gifford, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the utilization of automated space-based inventory management through handheld RFID readers and BioNet Middleware. The contents include: 1) Space-Based INventory Management; 2) Real-Time RFID Location and Tracking; 3) Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) RFID; and 4) BioNet Middleware.

  11. Automation; The New Industrial Revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnstein, George E.

    Automation is a word that describes the workings of computers and the innovations of automatic transfer machines in the factory. As the hallmark of the new industrial revolution, computers displace workers and create a need for new skills and retraining programs. With improved communication between industry and the educational community to…

  12. Computer automated movement detection for the analysis of behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Ramazani, Roseanna B.; Harish R Krishnan; BERGESON, SUSAN E.; Atkinson, Nigel S.

    2007-01-01

    Currently, measuring ethanol behaviors in flies depends on expensive image analysis software or time intensive experimenter observation. We have designed an automated system for the collection and analysis of locomotor behavior data, using the IEEE 1394 acquisition program dvgrab, the image toolkit ImageMagick and the programming language Perl. In the proposed method, flies are placed in a clear container and a computer-controlled camera takes pictures at regular intervals. Digital subtractio...

  13. Illinois: Library Automation and Connectivity Initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamont, Bridget L.; Bloomberg, Kathleen L.

    1996-01-01

    Discussion of library automation in Illinois focuses on ILLINET, the Illinois Library and Information Network. Topics include automated resource sharing; ILLINET's online catalog; regional library system automation; community networking and public library technology development; telecommunications initiatives; electronic access to state government…

  14. You're a What? Automation Technician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, John

    2010-01-01

    Many people think of automation as laborsaving technology, but it sure keeps Jim Duffell busy. Defined simply, automation is a technique for making a device run or a process occur with minimal direct human intervention. But the functions and technologies involved in automated manufacturing are complex. Nearly all functions, from orders coming in…

  15. Improved Performances of a Fluidized Bed Photo reactor by a Microscale Illumination System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The performances of a gas-solid two-dimensional fluidized bed reactor in photo catalytic selective oxidation reactions, irradiated with traditional UV lamps or with a microscale illumination system based on UV emitting diodes (UV A-LEDs), have been compared. In the photo catalytic oxidative dehydrogenation of cyclohexane to benzene on MoOx/TiO2-A12O3 catalyst the use of UV A-LEDs modules allowed to achieve a cyclohexane conversion and benzene yield higher than those obtained with traditional UV lamps. The better performances with UV A-LEDs are due to the UV A-LEDs small dimensions and small-angle emittance, which allow photons beam be directed towards the photo reactor windows, reducing the dispersion outside of photo reactor or the optical path length. As a consequence, the effectively illuminated mass of catalyst is greater. We have found that this illumination system is efficient for photo-oxidative dehydrogenation of cyclohexane to cyclohexene on sulphated MoOx-A12O3 and ethanol to acetaldehyde on VOx/TiO2.

  16. Micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS)-based micro-scale direct methanol fuel cell development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a high-power density, silicon-based micro-scale direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC), under development at Carnegie Mellon. Major issues in the DMFC design include the water management and energy-efficient micro fluidic sub-systems. The air flow and the methanol circulation are both at a natural draft, while a passive liquid-gas separator removes CO2 from the methanol chamber. An effective approach for maximizing the DMFC energy density, pumping the excess water back to the anode, is illustrated. The proposed DMFC contains several unique features: a silicon wafer with arrays of etched holes selectively coated with a non-wetting agent for collecting water at the cathode; a silicon membrane micro pump for pumping the collected water back to the anode; and a passive liquid-gas separator for CO2 removal. All of these silicon-based components are fabricated using micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS)-based processes on the same silicon wafer, so that interconnections are eliminated, and integration efforts as well as post-fabrication costs are both minimized. The resulting fuel cell has an overall size of one cubic inch, produces a net output of 10 mW, and has an energy density three to five times higher than that of current lithium-ion batteries

  17. Corrosion rate estimations of microscale zerovalent iron particles via direct hydrogen production measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velimirovic, Milica; Carniato, Luca; Simons, Queenie; Schoups, Gerrit; Seuntjens, Piet; Bastiaens, Leen

    2014-04-15

    In this study, the aging behavior of microscale zerovalent iron (mZVI) particles was investigated by quantifying the hydrogen gas generated by anaerobic mZVI corrosion in batch degradation experiments. Granular iron and nanoscale zerovalent iron (nZVI) particles were included in this study as controls. Firstly, experiments in liquid medium (without aquifer material) were performed and revealed that mZVI particles have approximately a 10-30 times lower corrosion rate than nZVI particles. A good correlation was found between surface area normalized corrosion rate (RSA) and reaction rate constants (kSA) of PCE, TCE, cDCE and 1,1,1-TCA. Generally, particles with higher degradation rates also have faster corrosion rates, but exceptions do exists. In a second phase, the hydrogen evolution was also monitored during batch tests in the presence of aquifer material and real groundwater. A 4-9 times higher corrosion rate of mZVI particles was observed under the natural environment in comparison with the aquifer free artificial condition, which can be attributed to the low pH of the aquifer and its buffer capacity. A corrosion model was calibrated on the batch experiments to take into account the inhibitory effects of the corrosion products (dissolved iron, hydrogen and OH(-)) on the iron corrosion rate.

  18. Prototyping of a highly performant and integrated piezoresistive force sensor for microscale applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the prototyping of a new piezoresistive microforce sensor is presented. An original design taking advantage of both the mechanical and bulk piezoresistive properties of silicon is presented, which enables the easy fabrication of a very small, large-range, high-sensitivity with high integration potential sensor. The sensor is made of two silicon strain gauges for which widespread and known microfabrication processes are used. The strain gauges present a high gauge factor which allows a good sensitivity of this force sensor. The dimensions of this sensor are 700 μm in length, 100 μm in width and 12 μm in thickness. These dimensions make its use convenient with many microscale applications, notably its integration in a microgripper. The fabricated sensor is calibrated using an industrial force sensor. The design, microfabrication process and performances of the fabricated piezoresistive force sensor are innovative thanks to its resolution of 100 nN and its measurement range of 2 mN. This force sensor also presents a high signal-to-noise ratio, typically 50 dB when a 2 mN force is applied at the tip of the force sensor. (paper)

  19. Microscale flow visualization of nucleate boiling in small channels: Mechanisms influencing heat transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasza, K.E.; Didascalou, T.; Wambsganss, M.W.

    1997-07-01

    This paper describes the use of a new test apparatus employing flow visualization via ultra-high-speed video and microscope optics to study microscale nucleate boiling in a small, rectangular, heated channel. The results presented are for water. Because of confinement effects produced by the channel cross section being of the same nominal size as the individual vapor bubbles nucleating at discrete wall sites, flow regimes and heat transfer mechanisms that occur in small channels are shown to be considerably different than those in large channels. Flow visualization data are presented depicting discrete bubble/bubble and bubble/wall interactions for moderate and high heat flux. Quantitative data are also presented on nucleate bubble growth behavior for a single nucleation site in the form of growth rates, bubble sizes, and frequency of generation in the presence and absence of a thin wall liquid layer. Mechanistic boiling behavior and trends are observed which support the use of this type of research as a powerful means to gain fundamental insights into why, under some conditions, nucleate boiling heat transfer coefficients are considerably larger in small channels than in large channels.

  20. On the estimation of wind comfort in a building environment by micro-scale simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Günter Gross

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A three-dimensional micro-scale model is used to study some aspects of wind comfort in a built-up area. The equations for calculating the mean wind have been extended by a Markov approach for short-term wind fluctuations. The model components have been successfully verified against wind tunnel measurements and observations of a field experiment. The simulated time series are used to estimate wind comfort measures. It turns out that the frequency of exceedance of prescribed thresholds depends strongly on the specification of the gust duration time. It was also possible to calculate the spatial distribution of a gust factor g$g$ depending on local wind characteristics. The simulated range is much broader than a value of g=3–3.5$g=3\\text{--}3.5$ commonly used for wind comfort assessments. Again, the order of magnitude and the bandwidth of g$g$ depends strongly on the definition of a gust.

  1. Interaction of a spherical particle with freestream turbulent flow: Effect of microscale Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagchi, Prosenjit

    2008-11-01

    The interaction of an isolated rigid sphere with an isotropic turbulent ambient flow is considered using a direct numerical simulation. The turbulence field is obtained from one realization of a separate DNS calculation (Donzis et al, JFM (2005), vol. 532; Yeung et al, JFM (2007) vol. 582), and used as the inflow condition for the flow around the sphere. This study is an extension of an earlier work (Bagchi and Balachandar, Phys. Fluids (2003), vol. 15; Bagchi and Balachandar, JFM (2004), vol. 518), where the Taylor microscale Reynolds number, Rλ, of the turbulence field was kept constant at 164. In the present study, we consider the effect of varying Rλ as 38, 90, 140 and 240. The sphere Reynolds number (based on the diameter and relative velocity) is in the range 63 to 400, and the sphere diameter varies from 1 to 8 times the Kolmogorov scale, and 0.18 to 0.0042 times the integral length scale, of the ambient turbulent flow. We present DNS results on the drag and lift forces, and added-mass and history forces on the sphere under varying Rλ, and compare them with the analytical results. Mean, RMS and PDF of these forces are analyzed. We also present transition in the sphere wake as Rλ is varied. Mean wake, and the modulation of the freestream turbulence in the wake are also presented under varying Rλ of the ambient flow.

  2. Trace elemental imaging of rare earth elements discriminates tissues at microscale in flat fossils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Gueriau

    Full Text Available The interpretation of flattened fossils remains a major challenge due to compression of their complex anatomies during fossilization, making critical anatomical features invisible or hardly discernible. Key features are often hidden under greatly preserved decay prone tissues, or an unpreparable sedimentary matrix. A method offering access to such anatomical features is of paramount interest to resolve taxonomic affinities and to study fossils after a least possible invasive preparation. Unfortunately, the widely-used X-ray micro-computed tomography, for visualizing hidden or internal structures of a broad range of fossils, is generally inapplicable to flattened specimens, due to the very high differential absorbance in distinct directions. Here we show that synchrotron X-ray fluorescence spectral raster-scanning coupled to spectral decomposition or a much faster Kullback-Leibler divergence based statistical analysis provides microscale visualization of tissues. We imaged exceptionally well-preserved fossils from the Late Cretaceous without needing any prior delicate preparation. The contrasting elemental distributions greatly improved the discrimination of skeletal elements material from both the sedimentary matrix and fossilized soft tissues. Aside content in alkaline earth elements and phosphorus, a critical parameter for tissue discrimination is the distinct amounts of rare earth elements. Local quantification of rare earths may open new avenues for fossil description but also in paleoenvironmental and taphonomical studies.

  3. Press-Printed Conductive Carbon Black Nanoparticle Films for Molecular Detection at the Microscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Pelle, Flavio; Vázquez, Luis; Del Carlo, Michele; Sergi, Manuel; Compagnone, Dario; Escarpa, Alberto

    2016-08-26

    Carbon black nanoparticle (CBNP) press-transferred film-based transducers for the molecular detection at the microscale level were proposed for the first time. Current-sensing atomic force microscopy (CS-AFM) revealed that the CBNP films were effectively press-transferred, retaining their good conductivity. A significant correlation between the morphology and the resistance was observed. The highest resistance was localized at the top of the press-transferred film protrusions, whereas low values are usually obtained at the deep crevices or grooves. The amount of press-transferred CBNPs is the key parameter to obtain films with improved conductivity, which is in good agreement with the electrochemical response. In addition, the conductivity of such optimum films was not only Ohmic; in fact, tunneling/hopping contributions were observed, as assessed by CS-AFM. The CBNP films acted as exclusive electrochemical transducers as evidenced by using two classes of molecules, that is, neurotransmitters and environmental organic contaminants. These results revealed the potential of these CBNP press-transferred films for providing new options in microfluidics and other related micro- and nanochemistry applications.

  4. Aerosol synthesis of nano and micro-scale zero valent metal particles from oxide precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Jonathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Luhrs, Claudia [UNM; Lesman, Zayd [UNM; Soliman, Haytham [UNM; Zea, Hugo [UNM

    2010-01-01

    In this work a novel aerosol method, derived form the batch Reduction/Expansion Synthesis (RES) method, for production of nano / micro-scale metal particles from oxides and hydroxides is presented. In the Aerosol-RES (A-RES) method, an aerosol, consisting of a physical mixture of urea and metal oxide or hydroxides, is passed through a heated oven (1000 C) with a residence time of the order of 1 second, producing pure (zero valent) metal particles. It appears that the process is flexible regarding metal or alloy identity, allows control of particle size and can be readily scaled to very large throughput. Current work is focused on creating nanoparticles of metal and metal alloy using this method. Although this is primarily a report on observations, some key elements of the chemistry are clear. In particular, the reducing species produced by urea decomposition are the primary agents responsible for reduction of oxides and hydroxides to metal. It is also likely that the rapid expansion that takes place when solid/liquid urea decomposes to form gas species influences the final morphology of the particles.

  5. Screen-Printed Electrodes: New Tools for Developing Microbial Electrochemistry at Microscale Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Estevez-Canales

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Microbial electrochemical technologies (METs have a number of potential technological applications. In this work, we report the use of screen-printed electrodes (SPEs as a tool to analyze the microbial electroactivity by using Geobacter sulfurreducens as a model microorganism. We took advantage of the small volume required for the assays (75 μL and the disposable nature of the manufactured strips to explore short-term responses of microbial extracellular electron transfer to conductive materials under different scenarios. The system proved to be robust for identifying the bioelectrochemical response, while avoiding complex electrochemical setups, not available in standard biotechnology laboratories. We successfully validated the system for characterizing the response of Geobacter sulfurreducens in different physiological states (exponential phase, stationary phase, and steady state under continuous culture conditions revealing different electron transfer responses. Moreover, a combination of SPE and G. sulfurreducens resulted to be a promising biosensor for quantifying the levels of acetate, as well as for performing studies in real wastewater. In addition, the potential of the technology for identifying electroactive consortia was tested, as an example, with a mixed population with nitrate-reducing capacity. We therefore present SPEs as a novel low-cost platform for assessing microbial electrochemical activity at the microscale level.

  6. Improved Performances of a Fluidized Bed Photoreactor by a Microscale Illumination System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Ciambelli

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The performances of a gas-solid two-dimensional fluidized bed reactor in photocatalytic selective oxidation reactions, irradiated with traditional UV lamps or with a microscale illumination system based on UV emitting diodes (UVA-LEDs, have been compared. In the photocatalytic oxidative dehydrogenation of cyclohexane to benzene on MoOx/TiO2-A12O3 catalyst the use of UVA-LEDs modules allowed to achieve a cyclohexane conversion and benzene yield higher than those obtained with traditional UV lamps. The better performances with UVA-LEDs are due to the UVA-LEDs small dimensions and small-angle emittance, which allow photons beam be directed towards the photoreactor windows, reducing the dispersion outside of photoreactor or the optical path length. As a consequence, the effectively illuminated mass of catalyst is greater. We have found that this illumination system is efficient for photo-oxidative dehydrogenation of cyclohexane to cyclohexene on sulphated MoOx/-A12O3 and ethanol to acetaldehyde on VOx/TiO2.

  7. Analysis of rotation-driven electrokinetic flow in microscale gap regions of rotating disk systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soong, C Y; Wang, S H

    2004-01-15

    In the present study, a novel theoretical model is developed for the analysis of rotating thermal-fluid flow characteristics in the presence of electrokinetic effects in the microscale gap region between two parallel disks under specified electrostatic, rotational, and thermal boundary conditions. The major flow configuration considered is a rotor-stator disk system. Axisymmetric Navier-Stokes equations with consideration of electric body force stemming from streaming potential are employed in the momentum balance. Variations of the fluid viscosity and permittivity with the local fluid temperature are considered. Between two disks, the axial distribution of the electric potential is determined by the Poisson equation with the concentration distributions of positive and negative ions obtained from Nernst-Planck equations for convection-diffusion of the ions in the flow field. Effects of disk rotation and electrostatic and thermal conditions on the electrokinetic flow and thermal characteristics are investigated. The electrohydrodynamic mechanisms are addressed with an interpretation of the coupling nature of the electric and flow fields. Finally, solutions with electric potential determined by employing nonlinear or linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation and/or invoking assumptions of constant properties are compared with the predictions of the present model for justification of various levels of approximation in solution of the electrothermal flow behaviors in rotating microfluidic systems. PMID:14654411

  8. Rapid formulation screening with a Multipart Microscale Fluid bed Powder processor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivikero, Niina; Murtomaa, Matti; Antikainen, Osmo; Hatara, Juha; Juppo, Anne-Mari; Sandler, Niklas

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate early formulation screening in small scale with a miniaturized fluid bed device. Altogether eight different batches were granulated in a Multipart Microscale Fluid bed Powder processor (MMFP) with constant process conditions using electrostatic atomization. Atomization voltage and granulation liquid flow rate were kept constant. Acid acetylsalicylic was used as model active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), lactose monohydrate, microcrystalline cellulose and polyvinylpyrrolidone were used as excipients. Granule size distributions were measured with spatial filtering technique. Friability test was performed by spinning granules in the mixer with glass beads. Compressibility of the granules was evaluated by tableting and the breaking force of the tablets was measured. Multivariate analysis, namely partial least squares regression and multilinear regression were applied to the data. It was possible to generate granules of different compositions rapidly employing MMFP with electrostatic atomization fast and acquire reliable and logical results with only small amount of material. However, a major challenge was to find suitable analytical methods for such small batches. PMID:20387990

  9. Crossover from shear-driven to thermally activated drainage of liquid-infused microscale capillaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colosqui, Carlos E.; Wexler, Jason S.; Liu, Ying; Stone, Howard A.

    2016-10-01

    The shear-driven drainage of capillary grooves filled with viscous liquid is a dynamic wetting phenomenon relevant to numerous industrial processes and lubricant-infused surfaces for drag reduction and antifouling. Prior work has reported that a finite length L∞ of the capillary groove can remain indefinitely filled with liquid even when large shear stresses are applied. The mechanism preventing full drainage is attributed to a balance between the shear-driven flow and a counterflow driven by capillary pressures caused by deformation of the free surface. In this work, we examine closely the approach to the final equilibrium length L∞ and report a crossover to a slow drainage regime that cannot be described by conventional dynamic models considering solely hydrodynamic and capillary forces. The slow drainage regime observed in experiments can be instead modeled by a kinetic equation describing a sequence of random thermally activated transitions between multiple metastable states caused by surface defects with nanoscale dimensions. Our findings provide insights on the critical role that natural or engineered surface roughness with nanoscale dimensions can play in the imbibition and drainage of capillaries and other dynamic wetting processes in microscale systems.

  10. In vivo micro-scale tomography of ciliary behavior in the mammalian oviduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shang; Burton, Jason C; Behringer, Richard R; Larina, Irina V

    2015-01-01

    Motile cilia in the mammalian oviduct play a key role in reproduction, such as transporting fertilized oocytes to the uterus for implantation. Due to their small size (~5-10 μm in length and ~300 nm in diameter), live visualization of cilia and their activity in the lumen of the oviduct through tissue layers represents a major challenge not yet overcome. Here, we report a functional low-coherence optical imaging technique that allows in vivo depth-resolved mapping of the cilia location and cilia beat frequency (CBF) in the intact mouse oviduct with micro-scale spatial resolution. We validate our approach with widely-used microscopic imaging methods, present the first in vivo mapping of the oviduct CBF in its native context, and demonstrate the ability of this approach to differentiate CBF in different locations of the oviduct at different post-conception stages. This technique opens a range of opportunities for live studies in reproductive medicine as well as other areas focused on cilia activity and related ciliopathies. PMID:26279472

  11. Trace elemental imaging of rare earth elements discriminates tissues at microscale in flat fossils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueriau, Pierre; Mocuta, Cristian; Dutheil, Didier B; Cohen, Serge X; Thiaudière, Dominique; Charbonnier, Sylvain; Clément, Gaël; Bertrand, Loïc

    2014-01-01

    The interpretation of flattened fossils remains a major challenge due to compression of their complex anatomies during fossilization, making critical anatomical features invisible or hardly discernible. Key features are often hidden under greatly preserved decay prone tissues, or an unpreparable sedimentary matrix. A method offering access to such anatomical features is of paramount interest to resolve taxonomic affinities and to study fossils after a least possible invasive preparation. Unfortunately, the widely-used X-ray micro-computed tomography, for visualizing hidden or internal structures of a broad range of fossils, is generally inapplicable to flattened specimens, due to the very high differential absorbance in distinct directions. Here we show that synchrotron X-ray fluorescence spectral raster-scanning coupled to spectral decomposition or a much faster Kullback-Leibler divergence based statistical analysis provides microscale visualization of tissues. We imaged exceptionally well-preserved fossils from the Late Cretaceous without needing any prior delicate preparation. The contrasting elemental distributions greatly improved the discrimination of skeletal elements material from both the sedimentary matrix and fossilized soft tissues. Aside content in alkaline earth elements and phosphorus, a critical parameter for tissue discrimination is the distinct amounts of rare earth elements. Local quantification of rare earths may open new avenues for fossil description but also in paleoenvironmental and taphonomical studies. PMID:24489809

  12. Are Plant Species’ Richness and Diversity Influenced by Fragmentation at a Microscale?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Aguirre-Gutiérrez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is argued that forest fragmentation has negative effects on biodiversity at the short and long term; however, these effects might be dependent on the specific vegetation of the study area and its intrinsic characteristics. The processes leading to fragmentation are very diverse and many of them have anthropogenic causes as logging actions and clearings for agricultural fields. Furthermore, it is thought that scale plays an important role in the expected effects of fragmentation on biodiversity. In this study the effect of forest fragmentation and its impact on the woody plants species, richness and diversity are analysed considering three vegetation types in a poorly studied and difficult access biodiversity hotspot in northern Mexico. The results show that the effects of fragmentation are dependent on the vegetation type and that these are not strongly related to the species richness, and diversity in a microscale (100 m2. Fragmentation effects on biodiversity must be analysed in a broad scale, considering the fragment as a whole. Furthermore, conservation priority should be given to the larger fragments, which could potentially maintain a higher portion of biodiversity. Management should also be focused on increasing the connectivity between these big and medium size forest patches.

  13. Autonomous control for mechanically stable navigation of microscale implants in brain tissue to record neural activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Sindhu; Kumar, Swathy Sampath; Muthuswamy, Jit

    2016-08-01

    Emerging neural prosthetics require precise positional tuning and stable interfaces with single neurons for optimal function over a lifetime. In this study, we report an autonomous control to precisely navigate microscale electrodes in soft, viscoelastic brain tissue without visual feedback. The autonomous control optimizes signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of single neuronal recordings in viscoelastic brain tissue while maintaining quasi-static mechanical stress conditions to improve stability of the implant-tissue interface. Force-displacement curves from microelectrodes in in vivo rodent experiments are used to estimate viscoelastic parameters of the brain. Using a combination of computational models and experiments, we determined an optimal movement for the microelectrodes with bidirectional displacements of 3:2 ratio between forward and backward displacements and a inter-movement interval of 40 s for minimizing mechanical stress in the surrounding brain tissue. A regulator with the above optimal bidirectional motion for the microelectrodes in in vivo experiments resulted in significant reduction in the number of microelectrode movements (0.23 movements/min) and longer periods of stable SNR (53 % of the time) compared to a regulator using a conventional linear, unidirectional microelectrode movement (with 1.48 movements/min and stable SNR 23 % of the time). PMID:27457752

  14. An investigation on platelet transport during thrombus formation at micro-scale stenosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Javier Tovar-Lopez

    Full Text Available This paper reports on an investigation of mass transport of blood cells at micro-scale stenosis where local strain-rate micro-gradients trigger platelet aggregation. Using a microfluidic flow focusing platform we investigate the blood flow streams that principally contribute to platelet aggregation under shear micro-gradient conditions. We demonstrate that relatively thin surface streams located at the channel wall are the primary contributor of platelets to the developing aggregate under shear gradient conditions. Furthermore we delineate a role for red blood cell hydrodynamic lift forces in driving enhanced advection of platelets to the stenosis wall and surface of developing aggregates. We show that this novel microfluidic platform can be effectively used to study the role of mass transport phenomena driving platelet recruitment and aggregate formation and believe that this approach will lead to a greater understanding of the mechanisms underlying shear-gradient dependent discoid platelet aggregation in the context of cardiovascular diseases such as acute coronary syndromes and ischemic stroke.

  15. Optimization of biomolecule separation by combining microscale filtration and design-of-experiment methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, Amir S; Kawka, Karina; Latulippe, David R

    2016-10-01

    There is considerable interest in developing microscale (i.e., high-throughput) methods that enable multiple filtration experiments to be run in parallel with smaller sample amounts and thus reduce the overall required time and associated cost to run the filtration tests. Previous studies to date have focused on simply evaluating the filtration capacity, not the separation performance. In this work, the stirred-well filtration (SWF) method was used in combination with design-of-experiment (DOE) methods to optimize the separation performance for three binary mixtures of bio-molecules: protein-protein, protein-polysaccharide, and protein-DNA. Using the parallel based format of the SWF method, eight constant-flux ultrafiltration experiments were conducted at once to study the effects of stirring conditions, permeate flux, and/or solution conditions (pH, ionic strength). Four separate filtration tests were conducted for each combination of process variables; in total, over 100 separate tests were conducted. The sieving coefficient and selectivity results are presented to match the DOE design format and enable a greater understanding of the effects of the different process variables that were studied. The method described herein can be used to rapidly determine the optimal combination of process factors that give the best separation performance for a range of membrane-based separations applications and thus obviate the need to run a large number of traditional lab-scale tests. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2131-2139. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27563852

  16. Heterogeneous distribution of prokaryotes and viruses at the microscale in a tidal sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carreira, Cátia; Larsen, Morten; Glud, Ronnie N.;

    2013-01-01

    . 3-fold lower abundance within distances of prokaryotes and viruses ranged from 1.3 × 109 to 4.2 × 109 cells cm−3 and 4.1 × 109 to 13.1 × 109 viruses cm−3, respectively. The results showed oxygen concentration and uptake rates to be heterogeneously distributed at the same spatial......In this study we show for the first time the microscale (mm) 2- and 3-dimensional spatial distribution and abundance of prokaryotes, viruses, and oxygen in a tidal sediment. Prokaryotes and viruses were highly heterogeneously distributed with patches of elevated abundances surrounded by areas of ca...... scale, with the oxygen penetration depth varying from 1.5 to 5.8 mm and with an average (±SD) diffusive oxygen uptake of 18.9 ± 6.4 mmol m−2 d−1. Locally, prokaryotes, viruses, and oxygen were found to be positively, negatively, or not correlated, but overall no significant relationship was detected...

  17. Vibration Analysis of a Postbuckled Microscale FG Beam Based on Modified Couple Stress Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ansari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of modified couple stress theory, the postbuckling behavior of the Euler-Bernoulli microscale FG beams is investigated by means of an exact solution method. The modified couple stress theory as a nonclassical continuum theory is capable of interpreting the size dependencies which become more significant at micro/nanoscales. The Von-Karman type nonlinear strain-displacement relationships are employed. The thermal effects are also incorporated into formulation. The governing equation of motion and the corresponding boundary conditions are derived using Hamilton’s principle. The material properties are assumed to be graded in the thickness direction according to the power-law distribution. A closed-form solution is obtained for the postbuckling deformation which is beyond the critical buckling load. To study the vibrations taking place in the vicinity of a buckled equilibrium position, the linear vibration problem is exactly solved around the first three buckled configurations. The natural frequencies of the lowest vibration modes around each of the first three buckled configurations are obtained. The influences of power-law exponent, boundary condition, length scale parameter, and thermal environment changes on the static deflection and free vibration frequencies are studied. A comparison is also made between the present results and those obtained via the classical beam theories.

  18. RANS solver for microscale pollution dispersion problems in areas with vegetation: Development and validation

    CERN Document Server

    Šíp, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    We present a description and validation of a finite volume solver aimed at solving the problems of microscale urban flows where vegetation is present. The solver is based on the five equation system of Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations for atmospheric boundary layer flows, which are complemented by the k-epsilon turbulence model. The vegetation is modelled as a porous zone, and the effects of the vegetation are included in the momentum and turbulence equations. A detailed dry deposition model is incorporated in the pollutant transport equation, allowing the investigation of the filtering properties of urban vegetation. The solver is validated on four test cases to assess the components of the model: the flow and pollutant dispersion around the 2D hill, the temporal evolution of the rising thermal bubble, the flow through and around the forest canopy, and a hedgerow filtering the particle-laden flow. Generally good agreement with the measured values or previously computed numerical solution is observed...

  19. Combination of ac electroosmosis and dielectrophoresis for particle manipulation on electrically-induced microscale wave structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work presents a simple method to fabricate controllable microscale wave structures on the top of regular interdigitated electrode (IDE) arrays using electrically-assisted lithography techniques. Smooth wave structures are extremely difficult, if not impossible, to fabricate using traditional multilayer photolithography technology. The fabricated wave structures were carefully measured using an optical profiler and the measured wave profiles were used in the numerical simulation of electrical field and for evaluating the parameters influencing the fabricated wave structure. It is demonstrated that the combined smooth wave structure and IDE array offer unique capability for particle manipulation including particle concentration, aggregation and separation. Particle motion manipulated via the combined wave structure and IDE array is governed by ac electroosmosis (ACEO), dielectrophoresis (DEP) or a combination of both depending on the applied frequency. At lower frequencies (∼30 kHz), ACEO dominates and particles are driven to move along the valleys of the wave structures; while at higher frequencies (∼200 kHz), DEP force dominates which concentrates particles at the peaks of the wave structures. In addition, varying the ac waveform from sine-wave to square-wave allows for dynamic control of particle motion. Size-dependent particle separation over the wave structure is also demonstrated for a mixture of 0.5 µm and 2 µm particles that are separated into two populations by the joint effects of drag and DEP forces when being pumped to flow via ACEO. (paper)

  20. Modelling of a CFD Microscale Model and Its Application in Wind Energy Resource Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Jie-shun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The prediction of a wind farm near the wind turbines has a significant effect on the safety as well as economy of wind power generation. To assess the wind resource distribution within a complex terrain, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD based wind farm forecast microscale model is developed. The model uses the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS model to characterize the turbulence. By using the results of Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF mesoscale weather forecast model as the input of the CFD model, a coupled model of CFD-WRF is established. A special method is used for the treatment of the information interchange on the lateral boundary between two models. This established coupled model is applied in predicting the wind farm near a wind turbine in Hong Gang-zi, Jilin, China. The results from this simulation are compared to real measured data. On this basis, the accuracy and efficiency of turbulence characterization schemes are discussed. It indicates that this coupling system is easy to implement and can make these two separate models work in parallel. The CFD model coupled with WRF has the advantage of high accuracy and fast speed, which makes it valid for the wind power generation.

  1. Microscale Mechanism of Age Dependent Wetting Properties of Prickly Pear Cacti (Opuntia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rykaczewski, Konrad; Jordan, Jacob S; Linder, Rubin; Woods, Erik T; Sun, Xiaoda; Kemme, Nicholas; Manning, Kenneth C; Cherry, Brian R; Yarger, Jeffery L; Majure, Lucas C

    2016-09-13

    Cacti thrive in xeric environments through specialized water storage and collection tactics such as a shallow, widespread root system that maximizes rainwater absorption and spines adapted for fog droplet collection. However, in many cacti, the epidermis, not the spines, dominates the exterior surface area. Yet, little attention has been dedicated to studying interactions of the cactus epidermis with water drops. Surprisingly, the epidermis of plants in the genus Opuntia, also known as prickly pear cacti, has water-repelling characteristics. In this work, we report that surface properties of cladodes of 25 taxa of Opuntia grown in an arid Sonoran climate switch from water-repelling to superwetting under water impact over the span of a single season. We show that the old cladode surfaces are not superhydrophilic, but have nearly vanishing receding contact angle. We study water drop interactions with, as well as nano/microscale topology and chemistry of, the new and old cladodes of two Opuntia species and use this information to uncover the microscopic mechanism underlying this phenomenon. We demonstrate that composition of extracted wax and its contact angle do not change significantly with time. Instead, we show that the reported age dependent wetting behavior primarily stems from pinning of the receding contact line along multilayer surface microcracks in the epicuticular wax that expose the underlying highly hydrophilic layers. PMID:27537082

  2. Remediation of trichloroethylene-contaminated groundwater by three modifier-coated microscale zero-valent iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jun; Xin, Jia; Zheng, Xilai; Kolditz, Olaf; Shao, Haibing

    2016-07-01

    Building a microscale zero-valent iron (mZVI) reaction zone is a promising in situ remediation technology for restoring groundwater contaminated by trichloroethylene (TCE). In order to determine a suitable modifier that could not only overcome gravity sedimentation of mZVI but also improve its remediation efficiency for TCE, the three biopolymers xanthan gum (XG), guargum (GG), and carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) were employed to coat mZVI for surface modification. The suspension stability of the modified mZVI and its TCE removal efficiency were systematically investigated. The result indicated that XG as a shear-thinning fluid showed the most remarkable efficiency of preventing mZVI from gravity sedimentation and enhancing the TCE removal efficiency by mZVI. In a 480-h experiment, the presence of XG (3 g L(-1)) increased the TCE removal efficiency by 31.85 %, whereas GG (3 g L(-1)) and CMC (3 g L(-1)) merely increased by 15.61 and 9.69 % respectively. The pH value, Eh value, and concentration of ferrous ion as functions of the reaction time were recorded in all the reaction systems, which indicated that XG worked best in buffering the pH value of the solution and inhibiting surface passivation of mZVI. PMID:27068901

  3. Analysis of the murine immune response to pulmonary delivery of precisely fabricated nano- and microscale particles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reid A Roberts

    Full Text Available Nanomedicine has the potential to transform clinical care in the 21(st century. However, a precise understanding of how nanomaterial design parameters such as size, shape and composition affect the mammalian immune system is a prerequisite for the realization of nanomedicine's translational promise. Herein, we make use of the recently developed Particle Replication in Non-wetting Template (PRINT fabrication process to precisely fabricate particles across and the nano- and micro-scale with defined shapes and compositions to address the role of particle design parameters on the murine innate immune response in both in vitro and in vivo settings. We find that particles composed of either the biodegradable polymer poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA or the biocompatible polymer polyethylene glycol (PEG do not cause release of pro-inflammatory cytokines nor inflammasome activation in bone marrow-derived macrophages. When instilled into the lungs of mice, particle composition and size can augment the number and type of innate immune cells recruited to the lungs without triggering inflammatory responses as assayed by cytokine release and histopathology. Smaller particles (80×320 nm are more readily taken up in vivo by monocytes and macrophages than larger particles (6 µm diameter, yet particles of all tested sizes remained in the lungs for up to 7 days without clearance or triggering of host immunity. These results suggest rational design of nanoparticle physical parameters can be used for sustained and localized delivery of therapeutics to the lungs.

  4. Use of Computer vision for Automation of a Roadheader in Selective Cutting Operation

    OpenAIRE

    Fuentes-Cantillana, J.L.; Catalina, J.C.; Rodriguez, A.; Orteu, Jean-José; Dumahu, Didier

    1991-01-01

    International audience; State-of-the art of automation in roadheaders Most of the experimental work for roadheaders automation has been centered in the operations which imply cutting a complete section which has a constant profile, or shows only slight changes, and with an arrangement of the cutting sequence subject basically only to the restrictions arising from the geometrical or geotechnical conditions. Nowadays, the market offers Systems able to control automatically the cutting of a fixe...

  5. Advanced microscale bioreactor system: a representative scale-down model for bench-top bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Wei-Ting; Aulakh, Rigzen P S; Traul, Donald L; Yuk, Inn H

    2012-12-01

    In recent years, several automated scale-down bioreactor systems have been developed to increase efficiency in cell culture process development. ambr™ is an automated workstation that provides individual monitoring and control of culture dissolved oxygen and pH in single-use, stirred-tank bioreactors at a working volume of 10-15 mL. To evaluate the ambr™ system, we compared the performance of four recombinant Chinese hamster ovary cell lines in a fed-batch process in parallel ambr™, 2-L bench-top bioreactors, and shake flasks. Cultures in ambr™ matched 2-L bioreactors in controlling the environment (temperature, dissolved oxygen, and pH) and in culture performance (growth, viability, glucose, lactate, Na(+), osmolality, titer, and product quality). However, cultures in shake flasks did not show comparable performance to the ambr™ and 2-L bioreactors.

  6. An Overview of Moonlight Applications Test Automation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Appasami Govindasamy

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Now-a-days web applications are developed by new technologies like Moonlight, Silverlight, JAVAFX, FLEX, etc. Silverlight is Microsoft's cross platform runtime and development technology for running Web-based multimedia applications in windows platform. Moonlight is an open-source implementation of the Silverlight development platform for Linux and other Unix/X11-based operating systems. It is a new technology in .Net 4.0 to develop rich interactive and attractive platform independent web applications. User Interface Test Automation is very essential for Software industries to reduce test time, cost and man power. Moonlight is new .NET technology to develop rich interactive Internet applications with the collaboration of Novel Corporation. Testing these kinds of applications are not so easy to test, especially the User interface test automation is very difficult. Software test automation has the capability to decrease the overall cost of testing and improve software quality, but most testing organizations have not been able to achieve the full potential of test automation. Many groups that implement test automation programs run into a number of common pitfalls. These problems can lead to test automation plans being completely scrapped, with the tools purchased for test automation becoming expensive. Often teams continue their automation effort, burdened with huge costs in maintaining large suites of automated test scripts. This paper will first discuss some of the key benefits of software test automation, and then examine the most common techniques used to implement software test automation of Moonlight Applications Test Automation. It will then discuss test automation and their potential. Finally, it will do test automation.

  7. Automated methods of corrosion measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Bech-Nielsen, Gregers; Reeve, John Ch;

    1997-01-01

    Measurements of corrosion rates and other parameters connected with corrosion processes are important, first as indicators of the corrosion resistance of metallic materials and second because such measurements are based on general and fundamental physical, chemical, and electrochemical relations....... Hence improvements and innovations in methods applied in corrosion research are likeliy to benefit basic disciplines as well. A method for corrosion measurements can only provide reliable data if the beckground of the method is fully understood. Failure of a method to give correct data indicates a need...... to revise assumptions regarding the basis of the method, which sometimes leads to the discovery of as-yet unnoticed phenomena. The present selection of automated methods for corrosion measurements is not motivated simply by the fact that a certain measurement can be performed automatically. Automation...

  8. CCD characterization and measurements automation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modern mosaic cameras have grown both in size and in number of sensors. The required volume of sensor testing and characterization has grown accordingly. For camera projects as large as the LSST, test automation becomes a necessity. A CCD testing and characterization laboratory was built and is in operation for the LSST project. Characterization of LSST study contract sensors has been performed. The characterization process and its automation are discussed, and results are presented. Our system automatically acquires images, populates a database with metadata information, and runs express analysis. This approach is illustrated on 55Fe data analysis. 55Fe data are used to measure gain, charge transfer efficiency and charge diffusion. Examples of express analysis results are presented and discussed.

  9. Automated nanomanipulation for nanodevice construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanowire field-effect transistors (nano-FETs) are nanodevices capable of highly sensitive, label-free sensing of molecules. However, significant variations in sensitivity across devices can result from poor control over device parameters, such as nanowire diameter and the number of electrode-bridging nanowires. This paper presents a fabrication approach that uses wafer-scale nanowire contact printing for throughput and uses automated nanomanipulation for precision control of nanowire number and diameter. The process requires only one photolithography mask. Using nanowire contact printing and post-processing (i.e. nanomanipulation inside a scanning electron microscope), we are able to produce devices all with a single-nanowire and similar diameters at a speed of ∼1 min/device with a success rate of 95% (n = 500). This technology represents a seamless integration of wafer-scale microfabrication and automated nanorobotic manipulation for producing nano-FET sensors with consistent response across devices. (paper)

  10. DOLFIN: Automated Finite Element Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Logg, Anders; 10.1145/1731022.1731030

    2011-01-01

    We describe here a library aimed at automating the solution of partial differential equations using the finite element method. By employing novel techniques for automated code generation, the library combines a high level of expressiveness with efficient computation. Finite element variational forms may be expressed in near mathematical notation, from which low-level code is automatically generated, compiled and seamlessly integrated with efficient implementations of computational meshes and high-performance linear algebra. Easy-to-use object-oriented interfaces to the library are provided in the form of a C++ library and a Python module. This paper discusses the mathematical abstractions and methods used in the design of the library and its implementation. A number of examples are presented to demonstrate the use of the library in application code.

  11. Automated illustration of patients instructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Duy; Nakamura, Carlos; Bray, Bruce E; Zeng-Treitler, Qing

    2012-01-01

    A picture can be a powerful communication tool. However, creating pictures to illustrate patient instructions can be a costly and time-consuming task. Building on our prior research in this area, we developed a computer application that automatically converts text to pictures using natural language processing and computer graphics techniques. After iterative testing, the automated illustration system was evaluated using 49 previously unseen cardiology discharge instructions. The completeness of the system-generated illustrations was assessed by three raters using a three-level scale. The average inter-rater agreement for text correctly represented in the pictograph was about 66 percent. Since illustration in this context is intended to enhance rather than replace text, these results support the feasibility of conducting automated illustration.

  12. Size and constraint effects on mechanical and fracture behavior of micro-scale Ni/Sn3.0Ag0.5Cu/Ni solder joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, H.B. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Zhang, X.P., E-mail: mexzhang@scut.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Zhou, M.B.; Zeng, J.B. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Mai, Y.-W. [Centre for Advanced Materials Technology (CAMT), School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering J07, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2014-11-03

    Solder joints are generally regarded as the weakest part in packaging systems and electronic assemblies in modern electronic products and devices. In this study, both experimental and finite element methods were used to characterize the mechanical behavior of micro-scale Ni/Sn3.0Ag0.5Cu/Ni sandwich-structured joints with different thickness-to-diameter ratios (R varying from 1/3 to 1/12) under quasi-static tension loading using a dynamic mechanical analyzer (DMA). Experimental results show that crack initiation and propagation in the solder matrix occur in a typical ductile manner. Compared with Cu/Sn3.0Ag0.5Cu/Cu sandwich-structured solder joints, Ni/Sn3.0Ag0.5Cu/Ni solder joints have much higher tensile strengths due to the dispersion strengthening effect through the fine Ag{sub 3}Sn particles. With decreasing R, both stiffness and tensile strength of solder joints increase obviously with decreasing coefficient of stress state and damage equivalent stress. Moreover, results of quantitative fractographic analysis by SEM and EDS display three fracture modes with decreasing R. Joints with R≥1/4 all fail by ductile fracture, those with R=1/6 fail by either ductile fracture or mixed ductile and brittle fractures, and for joints with R=1/12, brittle fracture is dominant. Furthermore, results obtained have also shown that the crack growth driving forces, K{sub I} and K{sub II}, as well as the strain energy release rate, G{sub I}, in the Ni{sub 3}Sn{sub 4} layer and at the Ni{sub 3}Sn{sub 4}/Ni interface, increase significantly with decreasing R. Hence, under tensile loading the fracture mode of solder joints changes from ductile to brittle as R is decreased.

  13. Automated medical image segmentation techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma Neeraj; Aggarwal Lalit

    2010-01-01

    Accurate segmentation of medical images is a key step in contouring during radiotherapy planning. Computed topography (CT) and Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging are the most widely used radiographic techniques in diagnosis, clinical studies and treatment planning. This review provides details of automated segmentation methods, specifically discussed in the context of CT and MR images. The motive is to discuss the problems encountered in segmentation of CT and MR images, and the relative merits ...

  14. Automated Periodontal Diseases Classification System

    OpenAIRE

    Aliaa A. A. Youssif; Abeer Saad Gawish,; Mohammed Elsaid Moussa

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an efficient and innovative system for automated classification of periodontal diseases, The strength of our technique lies in the fact that it incorporates knowledge from the patients' clinical data, along with the features automatically extracted from the Haematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) stained microscopic images. Our system uses image processing techniques based on color deconvolution, morphological operations, and watershed transforms for epithelium & connective tissue se...

  15. Home automation in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, J E; Tello, S F

    1994-01-01

    Environmental control units and home automation devices contribute to the independence and potential of individuals with disabilities, both at work and at home. Devices currently exist that can assist people with physical, cognitive, and sensory disabilities to control lighting, appliances, temperature, security, and telephone communications. This article highlights several possible applications for these technologies and discusses emerging technologies that will increase the benefits these devices offer people with disabilities. PMID:24440955

  16. Small Business Innovations (Automated Information)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Bruce G. Jackson & Associates Document Director is an automated tool that combines word processing and database management technologies to offer the flexibility and convenience of text processing with the linking capability of database management. Originally developed for NASA, it provides a means to collect and manage information associated with requirements development. The software system was used by NASA in the design of the Assured Crew Return Vehicle, as well as by other government and commercial organizations including the Southwest Research Institute.

  17. Automated Scheduling Via Artificial Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biefeld, Eric W.; Cooper, Lynne P.

    1991-01-01

    Artificial-intelligence software that automates scheduling developed in Operations Mission Planner (OMP) research project. Software used in both generation of new schedules and modification of existing schedules in view of changes in tasks and/or available resources. Approach based on iterative refinement. Although project focused upon scheduling of operations of scientific instruments and other equipment aboard spacecraft, also applicable to such terrestrial problems as scheduling production in factory.

  18. System of automated map design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preprint 'System of automated map design' contains information about the program shell for construction of territory map, performing level line drawing of arbitrary two-dimension field (in particular, the radionuclide concentration field). The work schedule and data structures are supplied, as well as data on system performance. The preprint can become useful for experts in radioecology and for all persons involved in territory pollution mapping or multi-purpose geochemical mapping. (author)

  19. Method development in automated mineralogy

    OpenAIRE

    Sandmann, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    The underlying research that resulted in this doctoral dissertation was performed at the Division of Economic Geology and Petrology of the Department of Mineralogy, TU Bergakademie Freiberg between 2011 and 2014. It was the primary aim of this thesis to develop and test novel applications for the technology of ‘Automated Mineralogy’ in the field of economic geology and geometallurgy. A “Mineral Liberation Analyser” (MLA) instrument of FEI Company was used to conduct most analytical studies. T...

  20. GUI test automation with SWTBot

    OpenAIRE

    Mazurkiewicz, Milosz

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis the author presents theoretical background of GUI test automation as well as technologies, tools and methodologies required to fully understand the test program written in SWTBot. Practical part of the thesis was to implement a program testing File Menu options of Pegasus RCP application developed in Nokia Siemens Networks. Concluding this dissertation, in the author’s opinion test programs written using SWTBot are relatively easy to read and intuitive for people familiar w...

  1. Automated minimax design of networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kaj; Schjær-Jacobsen, Hans; Voldby, J

    1975-01-01

    A new gradient algorithm for the solution of nonlinear minimax problems has been developed. The algorithm is well suited for automated minimax design of networks and it is very simple to use. It compares favorably with recent minimax and leastpth algorithms. General convergence problems related...... to minimax design of networks are discussed. Finally, minimax design of equalization networks for reflectiontype microwave amplifiers is carried out by means of the proposed algorithm....

  2. Adaptation: A Partially Automated Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Manjing, Tham; Bukhsh, F.A.; Weigand, H.

    2014-01-01

    This paper showcases the possibility of creating an adaptive auditing system. Adaptation in an audit environment need human intervention at some point. Based on a case study this paper focuses on automation of adaptation process. It is divided into solution design and validation parts. The artifact design is developed around import procedures of M-company. An overview of the artefact is discussed in detail to fully describes the adaptation mechanism with automatic adjustment for compliance re...

  3. Droplet-based microscale colorimetric biosensor for multiplexed DNA analysis via a graphene nanoprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: With a microvalve manipulate technique combined with droplet platform, a microscale fluorescence-based colorimetric sensor for multiplexed DNA analysis is developed via a graphene nanoprobe. Highlights: ► A quantitative detection for multiplexed DNA is first realized on droplet platform. ► The DNA detection is relied on a simple fluorescence-based colorimetric method. ► GO is served as a quencher for two different DNA fluorescent probes. ► This present work provides a rapid, sensitive, visual and convenient detection tool for droplet biosensor. - Abstract: The development of simple and inexpensive DNA detection strategy is very significant for droplet-based microfluidic system. Here, a droplet-based biosensor for multiplexed DNA analysis is developed with a common imaging device by using fluorescence-based colorimetric method and a graphene nanoprobe. With the aid of droplet manipulation technique, droplet size adjustment, droplet fusion and droplet trap are realized accurately and precisely. Due to the high quenching efficiency of graphene oxide (GO), in the absence of target DNAs, the droplet containing two single-stranded DNA probes and GO shows dark color, in which the DNA probes are labeled carboxy fluorescein (FAM) and 6-carboxy-X-rhodamine (ROX), respectively. The droplet changes from dark to bright color when the DNA probes form double helix with the specific target DNAs leading to the dyes far away from GO. This colorimetric droplet biosensor exhibits a quantitative capability for simultaneous detection of two different target DNAs with the detection limits of 9.46 and 9.67 × 10−8 M, respectively. It is also demonstrated that this biosensor platform can become a promising detection tool in high throughput applications with low consumption of reagents. Moreover, the incorporation of graphene nanoprobe and droplet technique can drive the biosensor field one more step to some extent.

  4. Modeling the Travel Behavior Impacts of Micro-Scale Land Use and Socio-Economic Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houshmand Ebrahimpour Masoumi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The effects of neighborhood-level land use characteristics on urban travel behavior of Iranian cities are under-researched. The present paper examines such influences in a microscopic scale. In this study the role of socio-economic factors is also studies and compared to that of urban form. Two case-study neighborhoods in west of Tehran are selected and considered, first of which is a centralized and compact neighborhood and the other is a sprawled and centerless one. A Multinomial Logit Regression model is developed to consider the effects of socio-economic and land use factors on urban travel pattern. In addition, to consider the effective factors, cross-sectional comparison between the influences of local accessibility and attractiveness of the neighborhood centers of the two case-study areas are undertaken. Also the causality relationships are considered according to the findings of the survey. The findings indicate significant effects of age and household income as socio-economic factors on transportation mode choice in neighborhoods with central structure. One the other hand, no meaningful association between socio-economic or land use variables are resulted by the model for the sprawled case. The most effective land use concept in micro-scale is considered to be satisfaction of entertainment facilities of the neighborhood. Also the descriptive findings show that the centralized neighborhood that gives more local accessibility to shops and retail generates less shopping trips. In considering the causal relations, the study shows that providing neighborhood infrastructures that increase or ease the accessibility to neighborhood amenities can lead to higher shares of sustainable transportation modes like walking, biking, or public transportation use.

  5. Microscale traffic simulation and emission estimation in a heavily trafficked roundabout in Madrid (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaassdorff, Christina; Borge, Rafael; Pérez, Javier; Lumbreras, Julio; de la Paz, David; de Andrés, Juan Manuel

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents the evaluation of emissions from vehicle operations in a domain of 300m×300m covering a complex urban roundabout with high traffic density in Madrid. Micro-level simulation was successfully applied to estimate the emissions on a scale of meters. Two programs were used: i) VISSIM to simulate the traffic on the square and to compute velocity-time profiles; and ii) VERSIT+micro through ENVIVER that uses VISSIM outputs to compute the related emissions at vehicle level. Data collection was achieved by a measurement campaign obtaining empirical data of vehicle flows and traffic intensities. Twelve simulations of different traffic situations (scenarios) were conducted, representing different hours from several days in a week and the corresponding NOX and PM10 emissions were estimated. The results show a general reduction on average speeds for higher intensities due to braking-acceleration patterns that contribute to increase the average emission factor and, therefore, the total emissions in the domain, especially on weekdays. The emissions are clearly related to traffic volume, although maximum emission scenario does not correspond to the highest traffic intensity due to congestion and variations in fleet composition throughout the day. These results evidence the potential that local measures aimed at alleviating congestion may have in urban areas to reduce emissions. In general, scenario-averaged emission factors estimated with the VISSIM-VERSIT+micro modelling system fitted well those from the average-speed model COPERT, used as a preliminary validation of the results. The largest deviations between these two models occur in those scenarios with more congestion. The design and resolution of the microscale modelling system allow to reflect the impact of actual traffic conditions on driving patterns and related emissions, making it useful for the design of mitigation measures for specific traffic hot-spots. PMID:27232968

  6. Computational optical palpation: micro-scale force mapping using finite-element methods (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijesinghe, Philip; Sampson, David D.; Kennedy, Brendan F.

    2016-03-01

    Accurate quantification of forces, applied to, or generated by, tissue, is key to understanding many biomechanical processes, fabricating engineered tissues, and diagnosing diseases. Many techniques have been employed to measure forces; in particular, tactile imaging - developed to spatially map palpation-mimicking forces - has shown potential in improving the diagnosis of cancer on the macro-scale. However, tactile imaging often involves the use of discrete force sensors, such as capacitive or piezoelectric sensors, whose spatial resolution is often limited to 1-2 mm. Our group has previously presented a type of tactile imaging, termed optical palpation, in which the change in thickness of a compliant layer in contact with tissue is measured using optical coherence tomography, and surface forces are extracted, with a micro-scale spatial resolution, using a one-dimensional spring model. We have also recently combined optical palpation with compression optical coherence elastography (OCE) to quantify stiffness. A main limitation of this work, however, is that a one-dimensional spring model is insufficient in describing the deformation of mechanically heterogeneous tissue with uneven boundaries, generating significant inaccuracies in measured forces. Here, we present a computational, finite-element method, which we term computational optical palpation. In this technique, by knowing the non-linear mechanical properties of the layer, and from only the axial component of displacement measured by phase-sensitive OCE, we can estimate, not only the axial forces, but the three-dimensional traction forces at the layer-tissue interface. We use a non-linear, three-dimensional model of deformation, which greatly increases the ability to accurately measure force and stiffness in complex tissues.

  7. Heterogeneity of inelastic strain during creep of Carrara marble: Microscale strain measurement technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintanilla-Terminel, Alejandra; Evans, Brian

    2016-08-01

    We combined the split cylinder technique with microfabrication technology to observe strain heterogeneities that were produced during high-pressure transient creep of Carrara marble. Samples were patterned with a custom-designed grid of markers spaced 10 µm apart and containing an embedded coordinate system. The microscale strain measurement (MSSM) technique described here allowed us to analyze the local strain distribution with unprecedented detail over large regions. The description of the strain field is a function of the area over which strain is being computed. The scale at which the strain field can be considered homogeneous can provide insight into the deformation processes taking place. At 400-500°C, when twinning production is prolific, we observe highly strained bands that span several grains. One possible cause for the multigrain bands is the need to relieve strain incompatibilities that result when twins impinge on neighboring grains. At 600-700°C, the strain fields are still quite heterogeneous, and local strain varies substantially within grains and near grain boundaries, but the multigrain slip bands are not present. Deformation is concentrated in much smaller areas within grains and along some grain boundaries. The disappearance of the multigrain slip bands occurs when the deformation conditions allow additional slip systems to be activated. At 600°C, when the total strain is varied from 0.11 to 0.36, the spatial scale of the heterogeneity does not vary, but there are increases in the standard deviation of the distribution of local strains normalized by the total strain; thus, we conclude that the microstructure does not achieve a steady state in this strain interval.

  8. Measurements of turbulence in a microscale multi-inlet vortex nanoprecipitation reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yanxiang; Chungyin Cheng, Janine; Fox, Rodney O.; Olsen, Michael G.

    2013-07-01

    The microscale multi-inlet vortex reactor (MIVR) is designed for use in Flash NanoPrecipitation (FNP), a promising technique for producing nanoparticles within small particle size distribution. Fluid mixing is crucial in the FNP process, and due to mixing’s strong dependence upon fluid kinematics, investigating velocity and turbulence within the reactor is crucial to optimizing reactor design. To this end, microscopic particle image velocimetry has been used to investigate flow within the MIVR. Three Reynolds numbers are studied, namely, Rej = 53, 93 and 240. At Rej = 53, the flow is laminar and steady. Due to the strong viscous effects at this Reynolds number, distinct flow patterns are observed at different distances from the reactor top and bottom walls. The viscous effects also retard the tangential motions within the reactor, resulting in a weaker vortex than appears at the higher Reynolds numbers. As the Reynolds number is increased to 93, the flow becomes more homogeneous over the depth of the reactor due to weaker viscous effects, yet the flow is still steady. The diminishing effects of viscosity also result in a stronger vortex. At the highest Reynolds number investigated, the flow is turbulent. Turbulent statistics including tangential and radial velocity fluctuations and Reynolds shear stresses are analyzed for this case in addition to the mean velocity field. The tangential motions of the flow are strongest at Rej = 240. Both the tangential and radial velocity fluctuations increase as the flow spirals toward the center of the reactor. The magnitudes of the tangential and radial velocity fluctuations are similar, suggesting that the turbulence is locally isotropic.

  9. Measurements of turbulence in a microscale multi-inlet vortex nanoprecipitation reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The microscale multi-inlet vortex reactor (MIVR) is designed for use in Flash NanoPrecipitation (FNP), a promising technique for producing nanoparticles within small particle size distribution. Fluid mixing is crucial in the FNP process, and due to mixing’s strong dependence upon fluid kinematics, investigating velocity and turbulence within the reactor is crucial to optimizing reactor design. To this end, microscopic particle image velocimetry has been used to investigate flow within the MIVR. Three Reynolds numbers are studied, namely, Rej = 53, 93 and 240. At Rej = 53, the flow is laminar and steady. Due to the strong viscous effects at this Reynolds number, distinct flow patterns are observed at different distances from the reactor top and bottom walls. The viscous effects also retard the tangential motions within the reactor, resulting in a weaker vortex than appears at the higher Reynolds numbers. As the Reynolds number is increased to 93, the flow becomes more homogeneous over the depth of the reactor due to weaker viscous effects, yet the flow is still steady. The diminishing effects of viscosity also result in a stronger vortex. At the highest Reynolds number investigated, the flow is turbulent. Turbulent statistics including tangential and radial velocity fluctuations and Reynolds shear stresses are analyzed for this case in addition to the mean velocity field. The tangential motions of the flow are strongest at Rej = 240. Both the tangential and radial velocity fluctuations increase as the flow spirals toward the center of the reactor. The magnitudes of the tangential and radial velocity fluctuations are similar, suggesting that the turbulence is locally isotropic. (paper)

  10. Mechanical Behavior of Al-SiC Nanolaminate Composites Using Micro-Scale Testing Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Carl Randolph

    Nanolaminate composite materials consist of alternating layers of materials at the nanoscale (≤100 nm). Due to the nanometer scale thickness of their layers, these materials display unique and tailorable properties. This enables us to alter both mechanical attributes such as strength and wear properties, as well as functional characteristics such as biocompatibility, optical, and electronic properties. This dissertation focuses on understanding the mechanical behavior of the Al-SiC system. From a practical perspective, these materials exhibit a combination of high toughness and strength which is attractive for many applications. Scientifically, these materials are interesting due to the large elastic modulus mismatch between the layers. This, paired with the small layer thickness, allows a unique opportunity for scientists to study the plastic deformation of metals under extreme amounts of constraint. Previous studies are limited in scope and a more diverse range of mechanical characterization is required to understand both the advantages and limitations of these materials. One of the major challenges with testing these materials is that they are only able to be made in thicknesses on the order of micrometers so the testing methods are limited to small volume techniques. This work makes use of both microscale testing techniques from the literature as well as novel methodologies. Using these techniques we are able to gain insight into aspects of the material's mechanical behavior such as the effects of layer orientation, flaw dependent fracture, tension-compression asymmetry, fracture toughness as a function of layer thickness, and shear behavior as a function of layer thickness.

  11. Discrete volumetric digital image correlation for the investigation of granular type media at microscale: accuracy assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bornert M.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The recent development of efficient 3D imaging tools such as X-Rays computed microtomography combined with the extension to volumetric images of Digital Image Correlation (DIC techniques provide new insights on the analysis of materials and structures. Among many other possible fields of application, geomaterials are good candidates for such investigations, owing to their relative transparency to X-rays and the presence in many samples of a natural contrast suitable for deformation mapping. However, these materials often deform discontinuously at microscale, for instance in the form of the development of a networks of microcracks. Discontinuity is even the dominant rule in granular-type materials such as sand in which the contribution to overall deformation of the microcontinuous phenomena -elastic strains inside grains- are negligible. To investigate deformation at the scale of these discontinuous mechanisms, specific DIC algorithms are required, which override the assumption of continuity of the transformation at the scale of the correlation windows. The recent so-called Discrete-DIC procedure (Hall et al, 2010 is a possible answer. We recall here its general principles and focus on its potential accuracy, from both theoretical and practical points of view. We show that the position and the rotation of individual grains with an average diameter of 500µm can be determined from images recorded with a laboratory microCT scanner, with a 15µm voxel size, with an accuracy of the order of 1µm and 0,1 degree, respectively.

  12. Nano- and microscale holes modulate cell-substrate adhesion, cytoskeletal organization, and -beta1 integrin localization in SV40 human corneal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karuri, Nancy W; Porri, Teresa J; Albrecht, Ralph M; Murphy, Christopher J; Nealey, Paul F

    2006-12-01

    Human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs) interface with a basement membrane in vivo that possesses complex nanoscale topographic features. We report that synthetic substrates patterned with nano- and microscale holes differentially modulate the proliferation, shape and adhesion of SV40 human corneal epithelial cells (SV40-HCECs) as a function of feature size: 1) Cell proliferation was inhibited on nanoscale features (features size less than 800 nm in pitch) compared to microscale features or planar substrates in identical culture conditions. 2) Cells on nanoscale holes had a stellate morphology compared to those on microscale features that were more evenly spread. 3) Cells adhered more to nanoscale features than to microscale features when exposed to shear stress in a laminar flow chamber. Transmission electron microscopy showed that cells cultured on the 400 nm pitch patterns had longer and more numerous filopodia and retraction fibers than cells cultured on the 1600 nm pitch patterns. Immunogold labeling of -beta1 integrins revealed that these receptors were localized at the cell periphery and in the aforementioned cytoskeletal elements. Our findings indicate that surface discontinuities and the activation of mechanochemical cell signaling mechanisms may contribute to the observed responses exhibited by SV40-HCECs cultured on nano- and microscale topography.

  13. Performance Evaluations on UAV-Aided Automated Meter Reading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurkan Tuna

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel approach of using unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs for automated meter reading (AMR applications in rural areas where there are a few consumers scattered across a wide area. Compared to traditional meter reading systems, the use of UAVs for AMR brings several advantages, such as low cost operation, flexibility and online system management. In this paper, the advantages of integrating an Inertial Navigation System (INS and a Global Positioning System (GPS receiver for a robust localization and navigation system for automated meter reading applications are investigated. In addition, the results of field tests related to the proposed navigation and localization system, and experimental studies on sensor node lifetime, are given to prove the effectiveness of the proposed system. The proposed system can be used by utility providers to extend or improve their services.

  14. Parmodel: a web server for automated comparative modeling of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchôa, Hugo Brandão; Jorge, Guilherme Eberhart; Freitas Da Silveira, Nelson José; Camera, João Carlos; Canduri, Fernanda; De Azevedo, Walter Filgueira

    2004-12-24

    Parmodel is a web server for automated comparative modeling and evaluation of protein structures. The aim of this tool is to help inexperienced users to perform modeling, assessment, visualization, and optimization of protein models as well as crystallographers to evaluate structures solved experimentally. It is subdivided in four modules: Parmodel Modeling, Parmodel Assessment, Parmodel Visualization, and Parmodel Optimization. The main module is the Parmodel Modeling that allows the building of several models for a same protein in a reduced time, through the distribution of modeling processes on a Beowulf cluster. Parmodel automates and integrates the main softwares used in comparative modeling as MODELLER, Whatcheck, Procheck, Raster3D, Molscript, and Gromacs. This web server is freely accessible at .

  15. Fully automated setup for high temperature Seebeck coefficient measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Patel, Ashutosh

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we report the fabrication of fully automated experimental setup for high temperature Seebeck coefficient ($\\alpha$) measurement. The K-type thermocouples are used to measure the average temperature of the sample and Seebeck voltage (SV) across it. The temperature dependence of the Seebeck coefficients of the thermocouple and its negative leg is taken care by using the integration method. Steady state based differential technique is used for $\\alpha$ measurement. Use of limited component and thin heater simplify the sample holder design and minimize the heat loss. The power supplied to the heater decides temperature difference across the sample and measurement is carried out by achieving the steady state. The LabVIEW based program is built to automize the whole measurement process. The complete setup is fabricated by using commonly available materials in the market. This instrument is standardized for materials with a wide range of $\\alpha$ and for the wide range of $\\Delta T$ across the specimen...

  16. Microscale fish bowls: a new class of latex particles with hollow interiors and engineered porous structures in their surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Unyong; Im, Sang Hyuk; Camargo, Pedro H C; Kim, Jung Hyun; Xia, Younan

    2007-10-23

    Microscale fish bowls, hollow particles with engineered holes in their surfaces, were prepared using two different methods. In the first method, commercial latex beads suspended in water were swollen with a good solvent of the polymer, followed by freezing with liquid nitrogen and evaporation of the solvent below 0 degrees C. While one big hole was generated when the amount of solvent used for the swelling was relatively low, small holes could be produced in the outer surface of each bowl by increasing the degree of swelling. The porosity and pore structure show a similar dependence on the degree of swelling for both amorphous and semicrystalline polymers even though they are supposed to exhibit different phase behaviors during the freezing and solvent evaporation processes. In the second method, a polymer emulsion in water was prepared and then frozen with liquid nitrogen, followed by solvent evaporation below 0 degrees C. The porosity and pore structure could be controlled by adjusting the concentration of the polymer solution used to prepare the emulsion. As for encapsulation, the bowl-shaped particles could be transformed back into solid beads via thermal annealing at a temperature near the glass transition temperature of the polymer or by adding a good solvent of the polymer to the colloidal suspension. In a proof-of-concept experiment, microscale fish bowls were fabricated from poly(caprolactone), quickly loaded with a fluorescent dye, and sealed through thermal annealing. The encapsulated dye could then be slowly released in a phosphate buffered saline, suggesting their potential use as a new class of microscale capsules for drug delivery.

  17. Design and Development of a Simple Low-cost Touchscreen to Control Home Automation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Muntasir Rahman

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Human and computer interaction has been developed into a wide and sophisticated field. Earlier automating electrical devices were absolutely mechanical. But with the invention of computer system, many computer researchers have tried to create computer based intelligent systems to accomplish many of their functionalities. Touchscreen controlled home automation system is one of them. These fascinating efforts to create intelligent systems are to provide human being a more convenient life. Moreover, it would accelerate the working speed of users. This paper concentrates primarily on experimental experiences on home automation system with a low-cost touchscreen technology. The proposed system provide an environment in which user can give commands by touching desired position on the touchscreen to automate the control of electrical devices. The interfacing circuit is designed using electronic components available in local market to keep the cost at low level.

  18. Relationship between surface velocity divergence and turbulence microscale in open-channel flows with submerged strip roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, T.; Sanjou, M.; Nezu, I.

    2016-05-01

    The present study investigates the effects of strip roughness on surface velocity divergence (SD) to develop physical modelling of gas transfer mechanisms in natural rivers. Particularly, turbulence measurements were conducted by PIV in a computer-controlled laboratory flume with varying water discharge and roughness spacing systematically, in order to obtain the space and time distributions of surface velocity divergence, turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation rate on the horizontal plane. Finally, a new empirical model for the surface velocity divergence was proposed considering turbulence microscales.

  19. Micro-Scale Motion Precision Simulation Method for a New-Type 6-DOF Micro-Manipulation Robot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Xin; ZHANG Zhi-jing; WANG Yu-shu

    2007-01-01

    A new 6-DOF micro-manipulation robot based on 3-PPTTRS parallel mechanisms in combination with flexure hinges is proposed. The design principle of the mechanism is introduced, and the kinematics analysis method based on differentiation is used to get the (inverse) kinematics equations. Then a micro-scale motion precision simulation method is proposed according to finite element analysis (FEA) , and the prediction of robot's motion precision in design phase is realized. The simulation result indicates that the 6-DOF micro-manipulation robot can meet the design specification.

  20. Laboratory automation and LIMS in forensics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stangegaard, Michael; Hansen, Anders Johannes; Morling, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Implementation of laboratory automation and LIMS in a forensic laboratory enables the laboratory, to standardize sample processing. Automated liquid handlers can increase throughput and eliminate manual repetitive pipetting operations, known to result in occupational injuries to the technical staff....... Furthermore, implementation of automated liquid handlers reduces the risk of sample misplacement. A LIMS can efficiently control the sample flow through the laboratory and manage the results of the conducted tests for each sample. Integration of automated liquid handlers with a LIMS provides the laboratory...... with the tools required for setting up automated production lines of complex laboratory processes and monitoring the whole process and the results. Combined, this enables processing of a large number of samples. Selection of the best automated solution for an individual laboratory should be based on user...

  1. Modern trends in automation of industrial complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Svjatnyj, Vladimir A.; Brovkina, Daniella Yu.

    2016-01-01

    This paper is dedicated to the study of the transition of manufacturing to a new stage of its development due to the introduction of the latest computer technologies, that have become common in the service sector, into the automation process. One of the characteristic features of the development of modern industry is the integration of the achievements of the theory and practice of automation, information technology, robotics and "human–automated object" systems. "Industry 4.0" was designed a...

  2. Automated Contingency Management for Propulsion Systems

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Increasing demand for improved reliability and survivability of mission-critical systems is driving the development of health monitoring and Automated Contingency...

  3. Rapid Automated Mission Planning System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation is an automated UAS mission planning system that will rapidly identify emergency (contingency) landing sites, manage contingency routing,...

  4. Urban micro-scale flood risk estimation with parsimonious hydraulic modelling and census data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Arrighi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The adoption of 2007/60/EC Directive requires European countries to implement flood hazard and flood risk maps by the end of 2013. Flood risk is the product of flood hazard, vulnerability and exposure, all three to be estimated with comparable level of accuracy. The route to flood risk assessment is consequently much more than hydraulic modelling of inundation, that is hazard mapping. While hazard maps have already been implemented in many countries, quantitative damage and risk maps are still at a preliminary level. A parsimonious quasi-2-D hydraulic model is here adopted, having many advantages in terms of easy set-up. It is here evaluated as being accurate in flood depth estimation in urban areas with a high-resolution and up-to-date Digital Surface Model (DSM. The accuracy, estimated by comparison with marble-plate records of a historic flood in the city of Florence, is characterized in the downtown's most flooded area by a bias of a very few centimetres and a determination coefficient of 0.73. The average risk is found to be about 14 € m−2 yr−1, corresponding to about 8.3% of residents' income. The spatial distribution of estimated risk highlights a complex interaction between the flood pattern and the building characteristics. As a final example application, the estimated risk values have been used to compare different retrofitting measures. Proceeding through the risk estimation steps, a new micro-scale potential damage assessment method is proposed. This is based on the georeferenced census system as the optimal compromise between spatial detail and open availability of socio-economic data. The results of flood risk assessment at the census section scale resolve most of the risk spatial variability, and they can be easily aggregated to whatever upper scale is needed given that they are geographically defined as contiguous polygons. Damage is calculated through stage–damage curves, starting from census data on building type and

  5. Micro-scale Spatial Clustering of Cholera Risk Factors in Urban Bangladesh.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qifang Bi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Close interpersonal contact likely drives spatial clustering of cases of cholera and diarrhea, but spatial clustering of risk factors may also drive this pattern. Few studies have focused specifically on how exposures for disease cluster at small spatial scales. Improving our understanding of the micro-scale clustering of risk factors for cholera may help to target interventions and power studies with cluster designs. We selected sets of spatially matched households (matched-sets near cholera case households between April and October 2013 in a cholera endemic urban neighborhood of Tongi Township in Bangladesh. We collected data on exposures to suspected cholera risk factors at the household and individual level. We used intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs to characterize clustering of exposures within matched-sets and households, and assessed if clustering depended on the geographical extent of the matched-sets. Clustering over larger spatial scales was explored by assessing the relationship between matched-sets. We also explored whether different exposures tended to appear together in individuals, households, and matched-sets. Household level exposures, including: drinking municipal supplied water (ICC = 0.97, 95%CI = 0.96, 0.98, type of latrine (ICC = 0.88, 95%CI = 0.71, 1.00, and intermittent access to drinking water (ICC = 0.96, 95%CI = 0.87, 1.00 exhibited strong clustering within matched-sets. As the geographic extent of matched-sets increased, the concordance of exposures within matched-sets decreased. Concordance between matched-sets of exposures related to water supply was elevated at distances of up to approximately 400 meters. Household level hygiene practices were correlated with infrastructure shown to increase cholera risk. Co-occurrence of different individual level exposures appeared to mostly reflect the differing domestic roles of study participants. Strong spatial clustering of exposures at a small spatial scale in a

  6. Smart Home Automation with Linux

    CERN Document Server

    Goodwin, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Linux users can now control their homes remotely! Are you a Linux user who has ever wanted to turn on the lights in your house, or open and close the curtains, while away on holiday? Want to be able to play the same music in every room, controlled from your laptop or mobile phone? Do you want to do these things without an expensive off-the-shelf kit? In Beginning Linux Home Automation, Steven Goodwin will show you how a house can be fully controlled by its occupants, all using open source software. From appliances to kettles to curtains, control your home remotely! What you'll learn* Control a

  7. Ball Bearing Stacking Automation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafeequerrahman S . Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This document is an effort to introduce the concept of automation in small scale industries and or small workshops that are involved in the manufacturing of small objects such as nuts, bolts and ball bearing in this case. This an electromechanical system which includes certain mechanical parts that involves one base stand on which one vertical metallic frame is mounted and hinged to this vertical stand is an in humanized effort seems inadequate in this era making necessary the use of Electronics, Computer in the manufacturing processes leading to the concept of Automated Manufacturing System (AMS.The ball bearing stack automation is an effort in this regard. In our project we go for stack automation for any object for example a ball bearing, be that is still a manual system there. It will be microcontroller based project control system equipped with microcontroller 89C51 from any manufacturer like Atmel or Philips. This could have been easily implemented if a PLC could be used for manufacturing the staking unit but I adopted the microcontroller based system so that some more modification in the system can be effected at will as to use the same hardware .Although a very small object i.e. ball bearig or small nut and fixture will be tried to be stacked, the system with more precision and more power handling capacity could be built for various requirements of the industry. For increasing more control capacity, we can use another module of this series. When the bearing is ready, it will be sent for packing. This is sensed by an inductive sensor. The output will be proceeds by PLC and microcontroller card which will be driving the assembly in order to put it into pads or flaps. This project will also count the total number of bearings to be packed and will display it on a LCD for real time reference and a provision is made using a higher level language using hyper terminal of the computer

  8. Robotium automated testing for Android

    CERN Document Server

    Zadgaonkar, Hrushikesh

    2013-01-01

    This is a step-by-step, example-oriented tutorial aimed at illustrating the various test scenarios and automation capabilities of Robotium.If you are an Android developer who is learning how to create test cases to test their application, and are looking to get a good grounding in different features in Robotium, this book is ideal for you. It's assumed that you have some experience in Android development, as well be familiar with the Android test framework, as Robotium is a wrapper to Android test framework.

  9. AUTOMATED TESTING OF OPC SERVERS

    CERN Document Server

    Farnham, B

    2011-01-01

    CERN relies on OPC Server implementations from 3rd party device vendors to provide a software interface to their respective hardware. Each time a vendor releases a new OPC Server version it is regression tested internally to verify that existing functionality has not been inadvertently broken during the process of adding new features. In addition bugs and problems must be communicated to the vendors in a reliable and portable way. This presentation covers the automated test approach used at CERN to cover both cases: Scripts are written in a domain specific language specifically created for describing OPC tests and executed by a custom software engine driving the OPC Server implementation.

  10. Automated Orientation of Aerial Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høhle, Joachim

    2002-01-01

    Methods for automated orientation of aerial images are presented. They are based on the use of templates, which are derived from existing databases, and area-based matching. The characteristics of available database information and the accuracy requirements for map compilation and orthoimage...... production are discussed on the example of Denmark. Details on the developed methods for interior and exterior orientation are described. Practical examples like the measurement of réseau images, updating of topographic databases and renewal of orthoimages are used to prove the feasibility of the developed...

  11. AN UNCONDITIONALLY STABLE HYBRID FE-FD SCHEME FOR SOLVING A 3-D HEAT TRANSPORT EQUATION IN A CYLINDRICAL THIN FILM WITH SUB-MICROSCALE THICKNESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-zhong Dai; Raja Nassar

    2003-01-01

    Heat transport at the microscale is of vital importance in microtechnology applications.The heat transport equation is different from the traditional heat transport equation sincea second order derivative of temperature with respect to time and a third-order mixedderivative of temperature with respect to space and time are introduced. In this study,we develop a hybrid finite element-finite difference (FE-FD) scheme with two levels intime for the three dimensional heat transport equation in a cylindrical thin film with sub-microscale thickness. It is shown that the scheme is unconditionally stable. The scheme isthen employed to obtain the temperature rise in a sub-microscale cylindrical gold film. Themethod can be applied to obtain the temperature rise in any thin films with sub-microscalethickness, where the geometry in the planar direction is arbitrary.

  12. 78 FR 44142 - Modification of Two National Customs Automation Program (NCAP) Tests Concerning Automated...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-23

    ... Automation Program (NCAP) test called the Document Image System (DIS) test. See 77 FR 20835. The DIS test... Automation Program Test of Automated Manifest Capabilities for Ocean and Rail Carriers: 76 FR 42721 (July 19... (SE test). See 76 FR 69755. The SE test established new entry capability to simplify the entry...

  13. Massachusetts Library Automation Survey: A Directory of Automated Operations in Massachusetts Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Eileen; Nijenberg, Caroline

    This directory is designed to provide information on automated systems and/or equipment used in libraries to provide a tool for planning future automation in the context of interlibrary cooperation considerations, and to inform the library and information community of the state of the art of automation in Massachusetts libraries. The main body is…

  14. Proposal of a Novel Approach to Developing Material Models for Micro-scale Composites Based on Testing and Modeling of Macro-scale Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siranosian, Antranik Antonio [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Schembri, Philip Edward [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Luscher, Darby Jon [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-04-20

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory's Weapon Systems Engineering division's Advanced Engineering Analysis group employs material constitutive models of composites for use in simulations of components and assemblies of interest. Experimental characterization, modeling and prediction of the macro-scale (i.e. continuum) behaviors of these composite materials is generally difficult because they exhibit nonlinear behaviors on the meso- (e.g. micro-) and macro-scales. Furthermore, it can be difficult to measure and model the mechanical responses of the individual constituents and constituent interactions in the composites of interest. Current efforts to model such composite materials rely on semi-empirical models in which meso-scale properties are inferred from continuum level testing and modeling. The proposed approach involves removing the difficulties of interrogating and characterizing micro-scale behaviors by scaling-up the problem to work with macro-scale composites, with the intention of developing testing and modeling capabilities that will be applicable to the mesoscale. This approach assumes that the physical mechanisms governing the responses of the composites on the meso-scale are reproducible on the macro-scale. Working on the macro-scale simplifies the quantification of composite constituents and constituent interactions so that efforts can be focused on developing material models and the testing techniques needed for calibration and validation. Other benefits to working with macro-scale composites include the ability to engineer and manufacture—potentially using additive manufacturing techniques—composites that will support the application of advanced measurement techniques such as digital volume correlation and three-dimensional computed tomography imaging, which would aid in observing and quantifying complex behaviors that are exhibited in the macro-scale composites of interest. Ultimately, the goal of this new approach is to develop a meso

  15. Automated pipelines for spectroscopic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allende Prieto, C.

    2016-09-01

    The Gaia mission will have a profound impact on our understanding of the structure and dynamics of the Milky Way. Gaia is providing an exhaustive census of stellar parallaxes, proper motions, positions, colors and radial velocities, but also leaves some glaring holes in an otherwise complete data set. The radial velocities measured with the on-board high-resolution spectrograph will only reach some 10 % of the full sample of stars with astrometry and photometry from the mission, and detailed chemical information will be obtained for less than 1 %. Teams all over the world are organizing large-scale projects to provide complementary radial velocities and chemistry, since this can now be done very efficiently from the ground thanks to large and mid-size telescopes with a wide field-of-view and multi-object spectrographs. As a result, automated data processing is taking an ever increasing relevance, and the concept is applying to many more areas, from targeting to analysis. In this paper, I provide a quick overview of recent, ongoing, and upcoming spectroscopic surveys, and the strategies adopted in their automated analysis pipelines.

  16. Cassini Tour Atlas Automated Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grazier, Kevin R.; Roumeliotis, Chris; Lange, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    During the Cassini spacecraft s cruise phase and nominal mission, the Cassini Science Planning Team developed and maintained an online database of geometric and timing information called the Cassini Tour Atlas. The Tour Atlas consisted of several hundreds of megabytes of EVENTS mission planning software outputs, tables, plots, and images used by mission scientists for observation planning. Each time the nominal mission trajectory was altered or tweaked, a new Tour Atlas had to be regenerated manually. In the early phases of Cassini s Equinox Mission planning, an a priori estimate suggested that mission tour designers would develop approximately 30 candidate tours within a short period of time. So that Cassini scientists could properly analyze the science opportunities in each candidate tour quickly and thoroughly so that the optimal series of orbits for science return could be selected, a separate Tour Atlas was required for each trajectory. The task of manually generating the number of trajectory analyses in the allotted time would have been impossible, so the entire task was automated using code written in five different programming languages. This software automates the generation of the Cassini Tour Atlas database. It performs with one UNIX command what previously took a day or two of human labor.

  17. Automated Car Park Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabros, J. P.; Tabañag, D.; Espra, A.; Gerasta, O. J.

    2015-06-01

    This study aims to develop a prototype for an Automated Car Park Management System that will increase the quality of service of parking lots through the integration of a smart system that assists motorist in finding vacant parking lot. The research was based on implementing an operating system and a monitoring system for parking system without the use of manpower. This will include Parking Guidance and Information System concept which will efficiently assist motorists and ensures the safety of the vehicles and the valuables inside the vehicle. For monitoring, Optical Character Recognition was employed to monitor and put into list all the cars entering the parking area. All parking events in this system are visible via MATLAB GUI which contain time-in, time-out, time consumed information and also the lot number where the car parks. To put into reality, this system has a payment method, and it comes via a coin slot operation to control the exit gate. The Automated Car Park Management System was successfully built by utilizing microcontrollers specifically one PIC18f4550 and two PIC16F84s and one PIC16F628A.

  18. The smooth transition from field emission to a self-sustained plasma in microscale electrode gaps at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilici, Mihai A.; Haase, John R.; Boyle, Calvin R.; Go, David B.; Sankaran, R. Mohan

    2016-06-01

    We report on the existence of a smooth transition from field emission to a self-sustained plasma in microscale electrode geometries at atmospheric pressure. This behavior, which is not found at macroscopic scales or low pressures, arises from the unique combination of large electric fields that are created in microscale dimensions to produce field-emitted electrons and the high pressures that lead to collisional ionization of the gas. Using a tip-to-plane electrode geometry, currents less than 10 μA are measured at onset voltages of ˜200 V for gaps less than 5 μm, and analysis of the current-voltage (I-V) relationship is found to follow Fowler-Nordheim behavior, confirming field emission. As the applied voltage is increased, gas breakdown occurs smoothly, initially resulting in the formation of a weak, partial-like glow and then a self-sustained glow discharge. Remarkably, this transition is essentially reversible, as no significant hysteresis is observed during forward and reverse voltage sweeps. In contrast, at larger electrode gaps, no field emission current is measured and gas breakdown occurs abruptly at higher voltages of ˜400 V, absent of any smooth transition from the pre-breakdown condition and is characterized only by glow discharge formation.

  19. Experimental research control software system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, I. A.; Kovalenko, A. G.; Vystavkin, A. N.

    2014-05-01

    A software system, intended for automation of a small scale research, has been developed. The software allows one to control equipment, acquire and process data by means of simple scripts. The main purpose of that development is to increase experiment automation easiness, thus significantly reducing experimental setup automation efforts. In particular, minimal programming skills are required and supervisors have no reviewing troubles. Interactions between scripts and equipment are managed automatically, thus allowing to run multiple scripts simultaneously. Unlike well-known data acquisition commercial software systems, the control is performed by an imperative scripting language. This approach eases complex control and data acquisition algorithms implementation. A modular interface library performs interaction with external interfaces. While most widely used interfaces are already implemented, a simple framework is developed for fast implementations of new software and hardware interfaces. While the software is in continuous development with new features being implemented, it is already used in our laboratory for automation of a helium-3 cryostat control and data acquisition. The software is open source and distributed under Gnu Public License.

  20. Automated Power Control for Virtualized Infrastructures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    文雨; 王伟平; 郭莉; 孟丹

    2014-01-01

    Power control for virtualized environments has gained much attention recently. One of the ma jor challenges is keeping underlying infrastructure in reasonably low power states and achieving service-level objectives (SLOs) of upper applications as well. Existing solutions, however, cannot effectively tackle this problem for virtualized environments. In this paper, we propose an automated power control solution for such scenarios in hope of making some progress. The major advantage of our solution is being able to precisely control the CPU frequency levels of a physical environment and the CPU power allocations among virtual machines with respect to the SLOs of multiple applications. Based on control theory and online model estimation, our solution can adapt to the variations of application power demands. Additionally, our solution can simultaneously manage the CPU power control for all virtual machines according to their dependencies at either the application-level or the infrastructure-level. The experimental evaluation demonstrates that our solution outperforms three state-of-the-art methods in terms of achieving the application SLOs with low infrastructure power consumption.