WorldWideScience

Sample records for automated medical records

  1. Medical record automation at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogle, G.O.; Grier, R.S.

    1979-01-01

    With the increase in population at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory and the growing concern over employee health, especially concerning the effects of the work environment, the Occupational Medicine Group decided to automate its medical record keeping system to meet these growing demands. With this computer system came not only the ability for long-term study of the work environment verses employee health, but other benefits such as more comprehensive records, increased legibility, reduced physician time, and better records management

  2. Automated Medical Record Tracking System for the Ridge Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper employs the systems analysis and design approach (also known as systems development lifecycle) to design and develop an automated medical records tracking system. This proposed system is a case study at the Ridge Hospital, Ghana. The system is limited to the tracking and management of in patients\\' ...

  3. Automated de-identification of free-text medical records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long William J

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Text-based patient medical records are a vital resource in medical research. In order to preserve patient confidentiality, however, the U.S. Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA requires that protected health information (PHI be removed from medical records before they can be disseminated. Manual de-identification of large medical record databases is prohibitively expensive, time-consuming and prone to error, necessitating automatic methods for large-scale, automated de-identification. Methods We describe an automated Perl-based de-identification software package that is generally usable on most free-text medical records, e.g., nursing notes, discharge summaries, X-ray reports, etc. The software uses lexical look-up tables, regular expressions, and simple heuristics to locate both HIPAA PHI, and an extended PHI set that includes doctors' names and years of dates. To develop the de-identification approach, we assembled a gold standard corpus of re-identified nursing notes with real PHI replaced by realistic surrogate information. This corpus consists of 2,434 nursing notes containing 334,000 words and a total of 1,779 instances of PHI taken from 163 randomly selected patient records. This gold standard corpus was used to refine the algorithm and measure its sensitivity. To test the algorithm on data not used in its development, we constructed a second test corpus of 1,836 nursing notes containing 296,400 words. The algorithm's false negative rate was evaluated using this test corpus. Results Performance evaluation of the de-identification software on the development corpus yielded an overall recall of 0.967, precision value of 0.749, and fallout value of approximately 0.002. On the test corpus, a total of 90 instances of false negatives were found, or 27 per 100,000 word count, with an estimated recall of 0.943. Only one full date and one age over 89 were missed. No patient names were missed in either

  4. Achieving automated narrative text interpretation using phrases in the electronic medical record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, S. N.; Barnett, G. O.

    1996-01-01

    Stereotypic phrases are used by clinicians throughout the medical record, as seen in an analysis of our COSTAR medical record database. These phrases are often associated with an underling semantic concept; for example the phrase CLEAR LUNGS may be linked with the concept "normal lung exam" for a particular physician. Formalizing these associations with concepts from the UMLS using the MEDPhrase application allowed us to automate interpretation of narrative text within our electronic medical record. PMID:8947723

  5. Using the electronic medical record to identify community-acquired pneumonia: toward a replicable automated strategy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvain DeLisle

    Full Text Available Timely information about disease severity can be central to the detection and management of outbreaks of acute respiratory infections (ARI, including influenza. We asked if two resources: 1 free text, and 2 structured data from an electronic medical record (EMR could complement each other to identify patients with pneumonia, an ARI severity landmark.A manual EMR review of 2747 outpatient ARI visits with associated chest imaging identified x-ray reports that could support the diagnosis of pneumonia (kappa score  = 0.88 (95% CI 0.82∶0.93, along with attendant cases with Possible Pneumonia (adds either cough, sputum, fever/chills/night sweats, dyspnea or pleuritic chest pain or with Pneumonia-in-Plan (adds pneumonia stated as a likely diagnosis by the provider. The x-ray reports served as a reference to develop a text classifier using machine-learning software that did not require custom coding. To identify pneumonia cases, the classifier was combined with EMR-based structured data and with text analyses aimed at ARI symptoms in clinical notes.370 reference cases with Possible Pneumonia and 250 with Pneumonia-in-Plan were identified. The x-ray report text classifier increased the positive predictive value of otherwise identical EMR-based case-detection algorithms by 20-70%, while retaining sensitivities of 58-75%. These performance gains were independent of the case definitions and of whether patients were admitted to the hospital or sent home. Text analyses seeking ARI symptoms in clinical notes did not add further value.Specialized software development is not required for automated text analyses to help identify pneumonia patients. These results begin to map an efficient, replicable strategy through which EMR data can be used to stratify ARI severity.

  6. Automated anesthesia carts reduce drug recording errors in medication administrations - A single center study in the largest tertiary referral hospital in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Du, Yingying; Zhao, Yingying; Ren, Yang; Zhang, Wei

    2017-08-01

    To clinically evaluate a type of patented automated anesthesia cart in medication administrations in anesthesia. This was a prospectively randomized open label clinical trial. In 10 designated operating suits in the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, in China. 1066 cases originated from 10,812 medication administrations in anesthesia were randomized. 78 registered anesthesiologists managed the medication. The patients received medication administrations in anesthesia with either an automated or a conventional manual cart. American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score, sex, duration of anesthesia and surgical specialty, errors in administration of medications (incorrect medication given (substitution), medication not given (omission) and drug recordings errors"), compliance and satisfaction were recorded. The total error rate was 7.3% with the automated anesthesia carts (1 in 14 administrations) and 11.9% with conventional manual carts (1 in 8 administrations). Automated anesthesia carts significantly reduced the drug recording error rate compared to conventional manual carts (Perrors omission errors was found between groups of automated anesthesia carts and conventional manual carts. The anesthesiologists' compliance with the automated anesthesia carts was unsatisfactory, and all the errors in medication recordings with the automated anesthesia carts were due to the incorrect use of the carts. Most of the participating anesthesiologists preferred the automated anesthesia carts (Perrors in medication administrations of anesthesia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Automated extraction of clinical traits of multiple sclerosis in electronic medical records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Mary F; Sriram, Subramaniam; Bush, William S; Denny, Joshua C; Haines, Jonathan L

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The clinical course of multiple sclerosis (MS) is highly variable, and research data collection is costly and time consuming. We evaluated natural language processing techniques applied to electronic medical records (EMR) to identify MS patients and the key clinical traits of their disease course. Materials and methods We used four algorithms based on ICD-9 codes, text keywords, and medications to identify individuals with MS from a de-identified, research version of the EMR at Vanderbilt University. Using a training dataset of the records of 899 individuals, algorithms were constructed to identify and extract detailed information regarding the clinical course of MS from the text of the medical records, including clinical subtype, presence of oligoclonal bands, year of diagnosis, year and origin of first symptom, Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) scores, timed 25-foot walk scores, and MS medications. Algorithms were evaluated on a test set validated by two independent reviewers. Results We identified 5789 individuals with MS. For all clinical traits extracted, precision was at least 87% and specificity was greater than 80%. Recall values for clinical subtype, EDSS scores, and timed 25-foot walk scores were greater than 80%. Discussion and conclusion This collection of clinical data represents one of the largest databases of detailed, clinical traits available for research on MS. This work demonstrates that detailed clinical information is recorded in the EMR and can be extracted for research purposes with high reliability. PMID:24148554

  8. Automating occupational protection records systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, M.; Martin, J.B.

    1991-10-01

    Occupational protection records have traditionally been generated by field and laboratory personnel, assembled into files in the safety office, and eventually stored in a warehouse or other facility. Until recently, these records have been primarily paper copies, often handwritten. Sometimes, the paper is microfilmed for storage. However, electronic records are beginning to replace these traditional methods. The purpose of this paper is to provide guidance for making the transition to automated record keeping and retrieval using modern computer equipment. This paper describes the types of records most readily converted to electronic record keeping and a methodology for implementing an automated record system. The process of conversion is based on a requirements analysis to assess program needs and a high level of user involvement during the development. The importance of indexing the hard copy records for easy retrieval is also discussed. The concept of linkage between related records and its importance relative to reporting, research, and litigation will be addressed. 2 figs

  9. Improving sensitivity of machine learning methods for automated case identification from free-text electronic medical records

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Z. Afzal (Zubair); M.J. Schuemie (Martijn); J.C. van Blijderveen (Nico); E.F. Sen (Fatma); M.C.J.M. Sturkenboom (Miriam); J.A. Kors (Jan)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Distinguishing cases from non-cases in free-text electronic medical records is an important initial step in observational epidemiological studies, but manual record validation is time-consuming and cumbersome. We compared different approaches to develop an automatic case

  10. Medical Archive Recording System (MARS)

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Reza Tajvidi

    2007-01-01

    In this talk, one of the most efficient, and reliable integrated tools for CD/DVD production workflow, called Medical Archive Recording System (MARS) by ETIAM Company, France, which is a leader in multimedia connectivity for healthcare in Europe, is going to be introduced. "nThis tool is used to record all patient studies, route the studies to printers and PACS automatically, print key images and associated reports and log all study production for automated post processing/archiving. Its...

  11. Automated Medical Literature Retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Hawking

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background The constantly growing publication rate of medical research articles puts increasing pressure on medical specialists who need to be aware of the recent developments in their field. The currently used literature retrieval systems allow researchers to find specific papers; however the search task is still repetitive and time-consuming. Aims In this paper we describe a system that retrieves medical publications by automatically generating queries based on data from an electronic patient record. This allows the doctor to focus on medical issues and provide an improved service to the patient, with higher confidence that it is underpinned by current research. Method Our research prototype automatically generates query terms based on the patient record and adds weight factors for each term. Currently the patient’s age is taken into account with a fuzzy logic derived weight, and terms describing blood-related anomalies are derived from recent blood test results. Conditionally selected homonyms are used for query expansion. The query retrieves matching records from a local index of PubMed publications and displays results in descending relevance for the given patient. Recent publications are clearly highlighted for instant recognition by the researcher. Results Nine medical specialists from the Royal Adelaide Hospital evaluated the system and submitted pre-trial and post-trial questionnaires. Throughout the study we received positive feedback as doctors felt the support provided by the prototype was useful, and which they would like to use in their daily routine. Conclusion By supporting the time-consuming task of query formulation and iterative modification as well as by presenting the search results in order of relevance for the specific patient, literature retrieval becomes part of the daily workflow of busy professionals.

  12. Your Medical Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Your Medical Records KidsHealth / For Teens / Your Medical Records What's ... Print en español Tus historias clínicas What Are Medical Records? Each time you climb up on a ...

  13. Surgical medical record

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bulow, S.

    2008-01-01

    A medical record is presented on the basis of selected linguistic pearls collected over the years from surgical case records Udgivelsesdato: 2008/12/15......A medical record is presented on the basis of selected linguistic pearls collected over the years from surgical case records Udgivelsesdato: 2008/12/15...

  14. SU-D-BRD-06: Creating a Safety Net for a Fully Automated, Script Driven Electronic Medical Record

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheu, R; Ghafar, R; Powers, A; Green, S; Lo, Y

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Demonstrate the effectiveness of in-house software in ensuring EMR workflow efficiency and safety. Methods: A web-based dashboard system (WBDS) was developed to monitor clinical workflow in real time using web technology (WAMP) through ODBC (Open Database Connectivity). Within Mosaiq (Elekta Inc), operational workflow is driven and indicated by Quality Check Lists (QCLs), which is triggered by automation software IQ Scripts (Elekta Inc); QCLs rely on user completion to propagate. The WBDS retrieves data directly from the Mosaig SQL database and tracks clinical events in real time. For example, the necessity of a physics initial chart check can be determined by screening all patients on treatment who have received their first fraction and who have not yet had their first chart check. Monitoring similar “real” events with our in-house software creates a safety net as its propagation does not rely on individual users input. Results: The WBDS monitors the following: patient care workflow (initial consult to end of treatment), daily treatment consistency (scheduling, technique, charges), physics chart checks (initial, EOT, weekly), new starts, missing treatments (>3 warning/>5 fractions, action required), and machine overrides. The WBDS can be launched from any web browser which allows the end user complete transparency and timely information. Since the creation of the dashboards, workflow interruptions due to accidental deletion or completion of QCLs were eliminated. Additionally, all physics chart checks were completed timely. Prompt notifications of treatment record inconsistency and machine overrides have decreased the amount of time between occurrence and execution of corrective action. Conclusion: Our clinical workflow relies primarily on QCLs and IQ Scripts; however, this functionality is not the panacea of safety and efficiency. The WBDS creates a more thorough system of checks to provide a safer and near error-less working environment

  15. SU-D-BRD-06: Creating a Safety Net for a Fully Automated, Script Driven Electronic Medical Record

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheu, R; Ghafar, R; Powers, A; Green, S; Lo, Y [Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Demonstrate the effectiveness of in-house software in ensuring EMR workflow efficiency and safety. Methods: A web-based dashboard system (WBDS) was developed to monitor clinical workflow in real time using web technology (WAMP) through ODBC (Open Database Connectivity). Within Mosaiq (Elekta Inc), operational workflow is driven and indicated by Quality Check Lists (QCLs), which is triggered by automation software IQ Scripts (Elekta Inc); QCLs rely on user completion to propagate. The WBDS retrieves data directly from the Mosaig SQL database and tracks clinical events in real time. For example, the necessity of a physics initial chart check can be determined by screening all patients on treatment who have received their first fraction and who have not yet had their first chart check. Monitoring similar “real” events with our in-house software creates a safety net as its propagation does not rely on individual users input. Results: The WBDS monitors the following: patient care workflow (initial consult to end of treatment), daily treatment consistency (scheduling, technique, charges), physics chart checks (initial, EOT, weekly), new starts, missing treatments (>3 warning/>5 fractions, action required), and machine overrides. The WBDS can be launched from any web browser which allows the end user complete transparency and timely information. Since the creation of the dashboards, workflow interruptions due to accidental deletion or completion of QCLs were eliminated. Additionally, all physics chart checks were completed timely. Prompt notifications of treatment record inconsistency and machine overrides have decreased the amount of time between occurrence and execution of corrective action. Conclusion: Our clinical workflow relies primarily on QCLs and IQ Scripts; however, this functionality is not the panacea of safety and efficiency. The WBDS creates a more thorough system of checks to provide a safer and near error-less working environment.

  16. Automated medical image segmentation techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Neeraj

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate segmentation of medical images is a key step in contouring during radiotherapy planning. Computed topography (CT and Magnetic resonance (MR imaging are the most widely used radiographic techniques in diagnosis, clinical studies and treatment planning. This review provides details of automated segmentation methods, specifically discussed in the context of CT and MR images. The motive is to discuss the problems encountered in segmentation of CT and MR images, and the relative merits and limitations of methods currently available for segmentation of medical images.

  17. Automated NFC enabled rural healthcare for reliable patient record maintainance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethia, Divyashikha; Jain, Shantanu; Kakkar, Himadri

    2012-01-01

    Body sensor networks can be used for health monitoring of patients by expert medical doctors, in remote locations like rural areas in developing countries, and can also be used to provide medical aid to areas affected by natural disasters in any part of the world. An important issue to be addressed, when the number of patients is large, is to reliably maintain the patient records and have simple automated mobile applications for healthcare helpers to use. We propose an automated healthcare architecture using NFC-enabled mobile phones and patients having their patient ID on RFID tags. It utilizes NFC-enabled mobile phones to read the patient ID, followed by automated gathering of healthcare vital parameters from body sensors using Bluetooth, analyses the information and transmits it to a medical server for expert feedback. With limited hospital resources and less training requirement for healthcare helpers through simpler applications, this automation of healthcare processing can provide time effective and reliable mass health consultation from medical experts in remote locations.

  18. Pervasive Electronic Medical Record

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nafiisah

    doctors, nurses, physician's assistants, emergency medical technicians and other caregivers. PEMR, a platform-independent solution, integrates RFID and other wireless networks to provide the required infrastructure for transmitting critical medical information anywhere and anytime using either existing network or ad hoc.

  19. Automated Processing Workflow for Ambient Seismic Recordings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, A. J.; Shragge, J.

    2017-12-01

    Structural imaging using body-wave energy present in ambient seismic data remains a challenging task, largely because these wave modes are commonly much weaker than surface wave energy. In a number of situations body-wave energy has been extracted successfully; however, (nearly) all successful body-wave extraction and imaging approaches have focused on cross-correlation processing. While this is useful for interferometric purposes, it can also lead to the inclusion of unwanted noise events that dominate the resulting stack, leaving body-wave energy overpowered by the coherent noise. Conversely, wave-equation imaging can be applied directly on non-correlated ambient data that has been preprocessed to mitigate unwanted energy (i.e., surface waves, burst-like and electromechanical noise) to enhance body-wave arrivals. Following this approach, though, requires a significant preprocessing effort on often Terabytes of ambient seismic data, which is expensive and requires automation to be a feasible approach. In this work we outline an automated processing workflow designed to optimize body wave energy from an ambient seismic data set acquired on a large-N array at a mine site near Lalor Lake, Manitoba, Canada. We show that processing ambient seismic data in the recording domain, rather than the cross-correlation domain, allows us to mitigate energy that is inappropriate for body-wave imaging. We first develop a method for window selection that automatically identifies and removes data contaminated by coherent high-energy bursts. We then apply time- and frequency-domain debursting techniques to mitigate the effects of remaining strong amplitude and/or monochromatic energy without severely degrading the overall waveforms. After each processing step we implement a QC check to investigate improvements in the convergence rates - and the emergence of reflection events - in the cross-correlation plus stack waveforms over hour-long windows. Overall, the QC analyses suggest that

  20. Medical Secretaries’ Care of Records

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bossen, Claus; Jensen, Lotte Groth; Witt, Flemming

    2012-01-01

    We describe the cooperative work of medical secretaries at two hospital departments, during the implementation of an electronic health record system. Medical secretaries' core task is to take care of patient records by ensuring that also do information gatekeeping and articulation work. The EHR...... implementation stressed their importance to the departments' work arrangements, coupled their work more tightly to that of other staff, and led to task drift among professions. information is complete, up to date, and correctly coded. Medical secretaries While medical secretaries have been relatively invisible...

  1. Automation in Records Management in University Libraries in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... State university libraries and less archival record were automated in both Federal and State university libraries, it was recommended that State university libraries should follow the lead of Federal university libraries by automating their records, this will go a long way to make information retrieval and accessibility easier.

  2. Automated detection of medication administration errors in neonatal intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi; Kirkendall, Eric S; Hall, Eric S; Ni, Yizhao; Lingren, Todd; Kaiser, Megan; Lingren, Nataline; Zhai, Haijun; Solti, Imre; Melton, Kristin

    2015-10-01

    To improve neonatal patient safety through automated detection of medication administration errors (MAEs) in high alert medications including narcotics, vasoactive medication, intravenous fluids, parenteral nutrition, and insulin using the electronic health record (EHR); to evaluate rates of MAEs in neonatal care; and to compare the performance of computerized algorithms to traditional incident reporting for error detection. We developed novel computerized algorithms to identify MAEs within the EHR of all neonatal patients treated in a level four neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) in 2011 and 2012. We evaluated the rates and types of MAEs identified by the automated algorithms and compared their performance to incident reporting. Performance was evaluated by physician chart review. In the combined 2011 and 2012 NICU data sets, the automated algorithms identified MAEs at the following rates: fentanyl, 0.4% (4 errors/1005 fentanyl administration records); morphine, 0.3% (11/4009); dobutamine, 0 (0/10); and milrinone, 0.3% (5/1925). We found higher MAE rates for other vasoactive medications including: dopamine, 11.6% (5/43); epinephrine, 10.0% (289/2890); and vasopressin, 12.8% (54/421). Fluid administration error rates were similar: intravenous fluids, 3.2% (273/8567); parenteral nutrition, 3.2% (649/20124); and lipid administration, 1.3% (203/15227). We also found 13 insulin administration errors with a resulting rate of 2.9% (13/456). MAE rates were higher for medications that were adjusted frequently and fluids administered concurrently. The algorithms identified many previously unidentified errors, demonstrating significantly better sensitivity (82% vs. 5%) and precision (70% vs. 50%) than incident reporting for error recognition. Automated detection of medication administration errors through the EHR is feasible and performs better than currently used incident reporting systems. Automated algorithms may be useful for real-time error identification and

  3. Automated methods for the summarization of electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivovarov, Rimma; Elhadad, Noémie

    2015-09-01

    This review examines work on automated summarization of electronic health record (EHR) data and in particular, individual patient record summarization. We organize the published research and highlight methodological challenges in the area of EHR summarization implementation. The target audience for this review includes researchers, designers, and informaticians who are concerned about the problem of information overload in the clinical setting as well as both users and developers of clinical summarization systems. Automated summarization has been a long-studied subject in the fields of natural language processing and human-computer interaction, but the translation of summarization and visualization methods to the complexity of the clinical workflow is slow moving. We assess work in aggregating and visualizing patient information with a particular focus on methods for detecting and removing redundancy, describing temporality, determining salience, accounting for missing data, and taking advantage of encoded clinical knowledge. We identify and discuss open challenges critical to the implementation and use of robust EHR summarization systems. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved.

  4. SMART Plan. Statewide Management of Automated Record Transfer: A Plan To Automate and Transfer Student Records Statewide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevada State Dept. of Education, Carson City. Planning, Research and Evaluation Branch.

    As of 1993, Nevada had no systems for statewide automation and transfer of student records. This guide book presents findings of a collaborative study, conducted by the Nevada Department of Education and local school districts, that explored the need for and feasibility of developing a statewide system for automating and transferring student…

  5. Enhanced Adherence in Patients Using an Automated Home Medication Dispenser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Charles; Schweighardt, Anne; Conn, Kelly M; Nelson, Dallas; Barbano, Richard; Marshall, Frederick; Brown, Jack

    2017-07-24

    Many factors contribute to medication nonadherence including psychological and memory disorders, aging, and pill burden. The Automated Home Medication Dispenser (AHMD) is a medication management system intended to help solve unintentional medication nonadherence. The purpose of this study was to determine if use of the AHMD improved medication adherence. We conducted a 6-month prospective, feasibility study assessing use of the AHMD in 21 patient-caregiver dyads. Patients were referred by their physician because of poor medication adherence and included if they resided in Rochester, NY and on at least two medications in pill form. Pill counts were performed at baseline to assess previous adherence. Prospective medication adherence was assessed using AHMD recorded dosing information. A paired t-test was used to compare previous and prospective adherence. The mean age of patients was 75.1 years. Fifteen patients (71.4%) and eight caregivers (38.1%) were women; half (47.6%) of caregivers lived with the patient. The most common patient comorbidities were hypertension (76.2%) and memory disorder (61.9%). Mean adherence increased from 49.0% at baseline to 96.8% after 6 months of AHMD use (p < .001). In a cohort of unintentionally nonadherent patients, use of the AHMD for 6 months significantly improved medication adherence.

  6. Copying and pasting of examinations within the electronic medical record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thielke, Stephen; Hammond, Kenric; Helbig, Susan

    2007-06-01

    Electronic patient records often include text that has been copied and pasted from other records. A type of copying that involves the highest risk for confusion, medical error, and medico-legal harm is the copying of the clinical examination. We studied this phenomenon using an automated text categorization algorithm to detect copied exams in a set of 167,076 VA records. Exam copying occurred frequently, in about 3% of all exams, or in 25% of patient charts. Thirteen percent of all authors had copied at least one exam, and 3% of authors had copied an exam from another author. There were significant differences between service types and levels of training of the authors. We speculate that copying and pasting of exams degrades the quality of the medical record, and that studying this behavior is integral to our understanding of phenomenology of the electronic medical record.

  7. Automated medical follow-up and delayed industrial risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, M.E.

    In response to increasing demand for human data to identify social, environmental, and occupational influences upon health, Statistics Canada has been organizing existing files of vital and health records to facilitate such studies on a national scale. In particular, the development of a Canadian Mortality Data Base file, the initiation of the National Cancer Incidence system, and the development of new computer techniques have helped reduce the cost and increase the scale and efficiency of automated medical follow-up to produce statistics of sickness or death attributable to environmental factors. Specific occupational studies now in progress serve to illustrate the methods, practical difficulties, potential size, and products from such investigations

  8. Automated parallel recordings of topologically identified single ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Ryuji; Tsuji, Yutaro; Sato, Koji; Osaki, Toshihisa; Kamiya, Koki; Hirano, Minako; Ide, Toru; Miki, Norihisa; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2013-01-01

    Although ion channels are attractive targets for drug discovery, the systematic screening of ion channel-targeted drugs remains challenging. To facilitate automated single ion-channel recordings for the analysis of drug interactions with the intra- and extracellular domain, we have developed a parallel recording methodology using artificial cell membranes. The use of stable lipid bilayer formation in droplet chamber arrays facilitated automated, parallel, single-channel recording from reconstituted native and mutated ion channels. Using this system, several types of ion channels, including mutated forms, were characterised by determining the protein orientation. In addition, we provide evidence that both intra- and extracellular amyloid-beta fragments directly inhibit the channel open probability of the hBK channel. This automated methodology provides a high-throughput drug screening system for the targeting of ion channels and a data-intensive analysis technique for studying ion channel gating mechanisms.

  9. Orthopedic office medical records using COSTAR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, J G

    1986-10-01

    Computer stored ambulatory record (COSTAR) is a public domain medical data management system designed to replace traditional, paper-based office medical and financial records. COSTAR is an integrated, modular system that can be implemented incrementally for medical records, accounts receivable, scheduling, and report generation. Combined with medical query language (MQL), COSTAR provides a valuable tool to implement protocols for clinical practice, research, quality assurance, and economic cost performance without redundant data entry.

  10. 5 CFR 293.107 - Special safeguards for automated records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    .... 293.107 Section 293.107 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE... part, managers of automated personnel records shall establish administrative, technical, physical, and..., reports, punched cards, magnetic tapes, disks, and on-line computer storage. The safeguards must be in...

  11. Medical Office Automation Using Multifunction Distributed Intelligence Computer Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radcliffe, Robert A.

    1983-01-01

    Medical industry focus will soon dramatically shift away from towards and -oriented . computers are presently available at microcomputer prices, with a performance level, flexibility, and sophistication which far outstrips that of and computer systems being touted today for automating medical office activities. Continued investment in and computer systems for medical office automation appears shortsighted in light of clear trends in both the medical and computer industries toward systems which must accommodate advanced communications, graphics, and integrated diagnostic equipment capabilities.

  12. [The study of medical supplies automation replenishment algorithm in hospital on medical supplies supplying chain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Xi

    2012-07-01

    The thesis aims to study the automation replenishment algorithm in hospital on medical supplies supplying chain. The mathematical model and algorithm of medical supplies automation replenishment are designed through referring to practical data form hospital on the basis of applying inventory theory, greedy algorithm and partition algorithm. The automation replenishment algorithm is proved to realize automatic calculation of the medical supplies distribution amount and optimize medical supplies distribution scheme. A conclusion could be arrived that the model and algorithm of inventory theory, if applied in medical supplies circulation field, could provide theoretical and technological support for realizing medical supplies automation replenishment of hospital on medical supplies supplying chain.

  13. Medical Practitioners Act 2007: the increased medical record burden.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Byrne, D

    2010-03-01

    New medical record keeping obligations are implemented by the Medical Practitioners Act (2007), effective July 2009. This audit, comprising review of 347 medical entries in 257 charts on one day, investigated compliance with the Act together with the general standard of medical record keeping. The Medical Council requirement was absent all but 3 (0.9%) of entries; there was no unique identifier or signature in 28 (8%) and 135 (39%) of entries respectively. The case for change is discussed.

  14. Complex automated medication systems reduce medication administration errors in a Danish acute medical unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risør, Bettina Wulff; Lisby, Marianne; Sørensen, Jan

    2018-03-24

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of two automated medication systems in reducing medication administration errors. The study was a controlled before-and-after study and included three observation periods with collection of data during a 3-week period as initial baseline and two subsequent follow-up periods at 10 and 20 months. The study was conducted in two Danish acute medical units. Two automated medication systems were implemented: (i) a complex automated medication system (cAMS) consisting of an automated dispensing cabinet, automated unit-dose dispensing and barcode medication administration (BCMA) and (ii) a non-patient-specific automated medication system (npsAMS) consisting of automated unit-dose dispensing and BCMA. The occurrence of administration errors and sub-types; procedural and clinical errors were observed. The proportion of errors was calculated by dividing the number of doses with one or more errors with the number of opportunities for errors. Difference-in-difference analysis using logistic regression was used to assess changes in proportion of errors. Compared with control, the cAMS reduced the overall risk of administration errors in the intervention unit, (odds ratio (OR) 0.53; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.27-0.90) and procedural errors were significantly reduced as well (OR 0.44; 95% CI 0.126-0.94). The npsAMS effectively reduced the clinical errors in the intervention ward (OR 0.38; 95% CI 0.15-0.96). In line with previous research, this study found that technological interventions in the medication administration process could reduce the occurrence of medication errors.

  15. Defining medical record and finance department relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, J T; Quinn, M J

    1985-07-01

    The role of the medical record department has become more crucial under DRGs. Timeliness and accuracy of clinical data has become critical to the hospital's financial success. As a result, a new relationship is forming between the finance and medical record departments. It is therefore important that the financial manager understand the operation of this department to make that new relationship a strong one.

  16. Medical records and radiation exposure cards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vigan, C.

    1975-01-01

    Some ideas concerning medical records at the Ispra Centre are exposed. The approved medical practitioner has two main tasks: he must gather enough relevant information to decide on the worker's suitability and also to determine his physical condition, normal or otherwise, and he must record it with enough detail to permit comparison with findings at later examinations. for the purposes of medical records, clinical examinations and complementary investigations, a large proportion of the measurements are of course made on the critical organs. The problems of the container or physical medium receiving the information to be recorded is considered. The possibilities offered by computer techniques are discussed

  17. Medical records and issues in negligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available It is very important for the treating doctor to properly document the management of a patient under his care. Medical record keeping has evolved into a science of itself. This will be the only way for the doctor to prove that the treatment was carried out properly. Moreover, it will also be of immense help in the scientific evaluation and review of patient management issues. Medical records form an important part of the management of a patient. It is important for the doctors and medical establishments to properly maintain the records of patients for two important reasons. The first one is that it will help them in the scientific evaluation of their patient profile, helping in analyzing the treatment results, and to plan treatment protocols. It also helps in planning governmental strategies for future medical care. But of equal importance in the present setting is in the issue of alleged medical negligence. The legal system relies mainly on documentary evidence in a situation where medical negligence is alleged by the patient or the relatives. In an accusation of negligence, this is very often the most important evidence deciding on the sentencing or acquittal of the doctor. With the increasing use of medical insurance for treatment, the insurance companies also require proper record keeping to prove the patient′s demand for medical expenses. Improper record keeping can result in declining medical claims. It is disheartening to note that inspite of knowing the importance of proper record keeping it is still in a nascent stage in India. It is wise to remember that "Poor records mean poor defense, no records mean no defense". Medical records include a variety of documentation of patient′s history, clinical findings, diagnostic test results, preoperative care, operation notes, post operative care, and daily notes of a patient′s progress and medications. A properly obtained consent will go a long way in proving that the procedures were

  18. Medical records and issues in negligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Joseph

    2009-07-01

    It is very important for the treating doctor to properly document the management of a patient under his care. Medical record keeping has evolved into a science of itself. This will be the only way for the doctor to prove that the treatment was carried out properly. Moreover, it will also be of immense help in the scientific evaluation and review of patient management issues. Medical records form an important part of the management of a patient. It is important for the doctors and medical establishments to properly maintain the records of patients for two important reasons. The first one is that it will help them in the scientific evaluation of their patient profile, helping in analyzing the treatment results, and to plan treatment protocols. It also helps in planning governmental strategies for future medical care. But of equal importance in the present setting is in the issue of alleged medical negligence. The legal system relies mainly on documentary evidence in a situation where medical negligence is alleged by the patient or the relatives. In an accusation of negligence, this is very often the most important evidence deciding on the sentencing or acquittal of the doctor. With the increasing use of medical insurance for treatment, the insurance companies also require proper record keeping to prove the patient's demand for medical expenses. Improper record keeping can result in declining medical claims. It is disheartening to note that inspite of knowing the importance of proper record keeping it is still in a nascent stage in India. It is wise to remember that "Poor records mean poor defense, no records mean no defense". Medical records include a variety of documentation of patient's history, clinical findings, diagnostic test results, preoperative care, operation notes, post operative care, and daily notes of a patient's progress and medications. A properly obtained consent will go a long way in proving that the procedures were conducted with the concurrence of

  19. Collaborative Affordances of Medical Records

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jakob Eyvind; Houben, Steven

    2017-01-01

    This article proposes the concept of Collaborative Affordances to describe physical and digital properties (i.e., affordances) of an artifact, which affords coordination and collaboration in work. Collaborative Affordances build directly on Gibson (1977)’s affordance concept and extends the work...... by Sellen and Harper (2003) on the affordances of physical paper. Sellen and Harper describe how the physical properties of paper affords easy reading, navigation, mark-up, and writing, but focuses, we argue, mainly on individual use of paper and digital technology. As an extension to this, Collaborative...... Affordances focusses on the properties of physical and digital artifacts that affords collaborative activities. We apply the concept of Collaborative Affordances to the study of paper-based and electronic patient records in hospitals and detail how they afford collaboration through four types of Collaborative...

  20. The NRPB automated thermoluminescent dosemeter and dose record keeping system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dennis, J.A.; Marshall, T.O.; Shaw, K.B.

    1975-03-01

    This report describes the thermoluminescent personal radiation dosemeter and its associated automated processing equipment, which are being developed by the National Radiological Protection Board, together with the operation of a computerised dosemeter issue and record keeping system. The main justifications for introducing these systems are improvements in the organizational efficiency of the maintenance of individual dose records, a more flexible and accurate dosimetry system, and economics in operational costs. The dosemeter is based on a numbered aluminium plate containing two lithium fluoride in polytetrafluorethylene disks for the measurement of surface and body dose. This dosemeter is wrapped in thin plastic and labelled with the wearer's name and address. On return, the dosemeter is checked automatically for radioactive contamination; it is unwrapped and evaluated; the dose readings are included in the wearer's stored dose record; the dosemeter is annealed and is then available for re-issue to another wearer. Dose reports and warnings are automatically issued to the wearer or his employer. (author)

  1. Prevalence of medication administration errors in two medical units with automated prescription and dispensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Gonzalez, Carmen Guadalupe; Herranz-Alonso, Ana; Martin-Barbero, Maria Luisa; Duran-Garcia, Esther; Durango-Limarquez, Maria Isabel; Hernández-Sampelayo, Paloma; Sanjurjo-Saez, Maria

    2012-01-01

    To identify the frequency of medication administration errors and their potential risk factors in units using a computerized prescription order entry program and profiled automated dispensing cabinets. Prospective observational study conducted within two clinical units of the Gastroenterology Department in a 1537-bed tertiary teaching hospital in Madrid (Spain). Medication errors were measured using the disguised observation technique. Types of medication errors and their potential severity were described. The correlation between potential risk factors and medication errors was studied to identify potential causes. In total, 2314 medication administrations to 73 patients were observed: 509 errors were recorded (22.0%)-68 (13.4%) in preparation and 441 (86.6%) in administration. The most frequent errors were use of wrong administration techniques (especially concerning food intake (13.9%)), wrong reconstitution/dilution (1.7%), omission (1.4%), and wrong infusion speed (1.2%). Errors were classified as no damage (95.7%), no damage but monitoring required (2.3%), and temporary damage (0.4%). Potential clinical severity could not be assessed in 1.6% of cases. The potential risk factors morning shift, evening shift, Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical medication class antacids, prokinetics, antibiotics and immunosuppressants, oral administration, and intravenous administration were associated with a higher risk of administration errors. No association was found with variables related to understaffing or nurse's experience. Medication administration errors persist in units with automated prescription and dispensing. We identified a need to improve nurses' working procedures and to implement a Clinical Decision Support tool that generates recommendations about scheduling according to dietary restrictions, preparation of medication before parenteral administration, and adequate infusion rates.

  2. PS-022 Complex automated medication systems reduce medication administration error rates in an acute medical ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risør, Bettina Wulff; Lisby, Marianne; Sørensen, Jan

    2017-01-01

    the medication administration error rate in comparison with current practice. Material and methods This was a controlled before and after study with follow-up after 7 and 14 months. The study was conducted in two acute medical hospital wards. Two automated medication systems were tested: (1) automated dispensing...... cabinet, automated dispensing and barcode medication administration; (2) non-patient specific automated dispensing and barcode medication administration. The occurrence of administration errors was observed in three 3 week periods. The error rates were calculated by dividing the number of doses with one....... The complex automated medication system effectively reduced the overall risk of administration errors in the intervention ward (OR 0.53, 95% CI 0.27–0.90), and the procedural error rate was also significantly reduced (OR 0.44, 95% CI 0.126–0.94). The non-patient specific automated medication system...

  3. 32 CFR 701.122 - Medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... located may afford special protection to certain medical records (e.g., drug and alcohol abuse treatment... have an adverse effect on the mental or physical health of the individual. Normally, this determination... practitioner. If it is medically indicated that access could have an adverse mental or physical effect on the...

  4. Automated signal quality assessment of mobile phone-recorded heart sound signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, David B; Brennan, Thomas; Ntusi, Ntobeko; Abdelrahman, Hassan Y; Zühlke, Liesl J; Mayosi, Bongani M; Tarassenko, Lionel; Clifford, Gari D

    Mobile phones, due to their audio processing capabilities, have the potential to facilitate the diagnosis of heart disease through automated auscultation. However, such a platform is likely to be used by non-experts, and hence, it is essential that such a device is able to automatically differentiate poor quality from diagnostically useful recordings since non-experts are more likely to make poor-quality recordings. This paper investigates the automated signal quality assessment of heart sound recordings performed using both mobile phone-based and commercial medical-grade electronic stethoscopes. The recordings, each 60 s long, were taken from 151 random adult individuals with varying diagnoses referred to a cardiac clinic and were professionally annotated by five experts. A mean voting procedure was used to compute a final quality label for each recording. Nine signal quality indices were defined and calculated for each recording. A logistic regression model for classifying binary quality was then trained and tested. The inter-rater agreement level for the stethoscope and mobile phone recordings was measured using Conger's kappa for multiclass sets and found to be 0.24 and 0.54, respectively. One-third of all the mobile phone-recorded phonocardiogram (PCG) signals were found to be of sufficient quality for analysis. The classifier was able to distinguish good- and poor-quality mobile phone recordings with 82.2% accuracy, and those made with the electronic stethoscope with an accuracy of 86.5%. We conclude that our classification approach provides a mechanism for substantially improving auscultation recordings by non-experts. This work is the first systematic evaluation of a PCG signal quality classification algorithm (using a separate test dataset) and assessment of the quality of PCG recordings captured by non-experts, using both a medical-grade digital stethoscope and a mobile phone.

  5. Identifying phenotypic signatures of neuropsychiatric disorders from electronic medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyalina, Svetlana; Percha, Bethany; LePendu, Paea; Iyer, Srinivasan V; Altman, Russ B; Shah, Nigam H

    2013-12-01

    Mental illness is the leading cause of disability in the USA, but boundaries between different mental illnesses are notoriously difficult to define. Electronic medical records (EMRs) have recently emerged as a powerful new source of information for defining the phenotypic signatures of specific diseases. We investigated how EMR-based text mining and statistical analysis could elucidate the phenotypic boundaries of three important neuropsychiatric illnesses-autism, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia. We analyzed the medical records of over 7000 patients at two facilities using an automated text-processing pipeline to annotate the clinical notes with Unified Medical Language System codes and then searching for enriched codes, and associations among codes, that were representative of the three disorders. We used dimensionality-reduction techniques on individual patient records to understand individual-level phenotypic variation within each disorder, as well as the degree of overlap among disorders. We demonstrate that automated EMR mining can be used to extract relevant drugs and phenotypes associated with neuropsychiatric disorders and characteristic patterns of associations among them. Patient-level analyses suggest a clear separation between autism and the other disorders, while revealing significant overlap between schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. They also enable localization of individual patients within the phenotypic 'landscape' of each disorder. Because EMRs reflect the realities of patient care rather than idealized conceptualizations of disease states, we argue that automated EMR mining can help define the boundaries between different mental illnesses, facilitate cohort building for clinical and genomic studies, and reveal how clear expert-defined disease boundaries are in practice.

  6. The future of the perfusion record: automated data collection vs. manual recording.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottens, Jane; Baker, Robert A; Newland, Richard F; Mazzone, Annette

    2005-12-01

    The perfusion record, whether manually recorded or computer generated, is a legal representation of the procedure. The handwritten perfusion record has been the most common method of recording events that occur during cardiopulmonary bypass. This record is of significant contrast to the integrated data management systems available that provide continuous collection of data automatically or by means of a few keystrokes. Additionally, an increasing number of monitoring devices are available to assist in the management of patients on bypass. These devices are becoming more complex and provide more data for the perfusionist to monitor and record. Most of the data from these can be downloaded automatically into online data management systems, allowing more time for the perfusionist to concentrate on the patient while simultaneously producing a more accurate record. In this prospective report, we compared 17 cases that were recorded using both manual and electronic data collection techniques. The perfusionist in charge of the case recorded the perfusion using the manual technique while a second perfusionist entered relevant events on the electronic record generated by the Stockert S3 Data Management System/Data Bahn (Munich, Germany). Analysis of the two types of perfusion records showed significant variations in the recorded information. Areas that showed the most inconsistency included measurement of the perfusion pressures, flow, blood temperatures, cardioplegia delivery details, and the recording of events, with the electronic record superior in the integrity of the data. In addition, the limitations of the electronic system were also shown by the lack of electronic gas flow data in our hardware. Our results confirm the importance of accurate methods of recording of perfusion events. The use of an automated system provides the opportunity to minimize transcription error and bias. This study highlights the limitation of spot recording of perfusion events in the

  7. Electronic Medical Record Tobacco Use Vital Sign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norris John W

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Determination of the prevalence of tobacco use and impact of tobacco prevention/treatment efforts in an electronic medical record enabled practice utilizing a defined tobacco vital sign variable. Design and Measurements Retrospective cohort study utilizing patient data recorded in an electronic medical record database between July 15, 2001, and May 31, 2003. Patient-reported tobacco use status was obtained for each of 6,771 patients during the pre-provider period of their 24,824 visits during the study period with the recorder blinded to past tobacco use status entries. Results An overall current tobacco use prevalence of 27.1% was found during the study period. Tobacco use status was recorded in 96% of visits. Comparison of initial to final visit tobacco use status demonstrates a consistency rate of 75.0% declaring no change in tobacco status in the 4,522 patients with two or more visits. An 8.6% net tobacco use decline was seen for the practice (p value Conclusion Self reported tobacco use status as a vital sign embedded within the workflow of an electronic medical record enabled practice was a quantitative tool for determination of tobacco use prevalence and a measuring stick of risk prevention/intervention impact.

  8. [Reliability of Primary Care computerised medication records].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Molina Sáez, Celia; Urbieta Sanz, Elena; Madrigal de Torres, Manuel; Piñera Salmerón, Pascual; Pérez Cárceles, María D

    2016-03-01

    To quantify and to evaluate the reliability of Primary Care (PC) computerised medication records of as an information source of patient chronic medications, and to identify associated factors with the presence of discrepancies. A descriptive cross-sectional study. General Referral Hospital in Murcia. Patients admitted to the cardiology-chest diseases unit, during the months of February to April 2013, on home treatment, who agreed to participate in the study. Evaluation of the reliability of Primary Care computerised medication records by analysing the concordance, by identifying discrepancies, between the active medication in these records and that recorded in pharmacist interview with the patient/caregiver. Identification of associated factors with the presence of discrepancies was analysed using a multivariate logistic regression. The study included a total of 308 patients with a mean of 70.9 years (13.0 SD). The concordance of active ingredients was 83.7%, and this decreased to 34.7% when taking the dosage into account. Discrepancies were found in 97.1% of patients. The most frequent discrepancy was omission of frequency (35.6%), commission (drug added unjustifiably) (14.6%), and drug omission (12.7%). Age older than 65 years (1.98 [1.08 to 3.64]), multiple chronic diseases (1.89 [1.04 to 3.42]), and have a narcotic or psychotropic drug prescribed (2.22 [1.16 to 4.24]), were the factors associated with the presence of discrepancies. Primary Care computerised medication records, although of undoubted interest, are not be reliable enough to be used as the sole source of information on patient chronic medications when admitted to hospital. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. [Nurse's coworking to electronic medical record].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maresca, M; Gavaciuto, D; Cappelli, G

    2007-01-01

    Nephrologists need to register and look at a great number of clinical data. The use of electronic medical records may improve efficiency and reduce errors. Aim of our work is to report the experience of Villa Scassi Hospital in Genoa, where a "patient file" has been performed to improve nephrology practice management. The file contains all clinical records, laboratory and radiology data, therapy, dialysis clinics, in addition to reports of out-patients department. This system allowed a better efficiency in diagnosis and treatment of the patient. Moreover experience of nurses in employing electronic medical records is reported. A reduced number of errors was found in therapy administering, because of a only one data source for physicians and nurses.

  10. Automated integration of continuous glucose monitor data in the electronic health record using consumer technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajiv B; Goren, Nira D; Stark, David E; Wall, Dennis P; Longhurst, Christopher A

    2016-05-01

    The diabetes healthcare provider plays a key role in interpreting blood glucose trends, but few institutions have successfully integrated patient home glucose data in the electronic health record (EHR). Published implementations to date have required custom interfaces, which limit wide-scale replication. We piloted automated integration of continuous glucose monitor data in the EHR using widely available consumer technology for 10 pediatric patients with insulin-dependent diabetes. Establishment of a passive data communication bridge via a patient's/parent's smartphone enabled automated integration and analytics of patient device data within the EHR between scheduled clinic visits. It is feasible to utilize available consumer technology to assess and triage home diabetes device data within the EHR, and to engage patients/parents and improve healthcare provider workflow. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association.

  11. Identifying collaborative care teams through electronic medical record utilization patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, You; Lorenzi, Nancy M; Sandberg, Warren S; Wolgast, Kelly; Malin, Bradley A

    2017-04-01

    The goal of this investigation was to determine whether automated approaches can learn patient-oriented care teams via utilization of an electronic medical record (EMR) system. To perform this investigation, we designed a data-mining framework that relies on a combination of latent topic modeling and network analysis to infer patterns of collaborative teams. We applied the framework to the EMR utilization records of over 10 000 employees and 17 000 inpatients at a large academic medical center during a 4-month window in 2010. Next, we conducted an extrinsic evaluation of the patterns to determine the plausibility of the inferred care teams via surveys with knowledgeable experts. Finally, we conducted an intrinsic evaluation to contextualize each team in terms of collaboration strength (via a cluster coefficient) and clinical credibility (via associations between teams and patient comorbidities). The framework discovered 34 collaborative care teams, 27 (79.4%) of which were confirmed as administratively plausible. Of those, 26 teams depicted strong collaborations, with a cluster coefficient > 0.5. There were 119 diagnostic conditions associated with 34 care teams. Additionally, to provide clarity on how the survey respondents arrived at their determinations, we worked with several oncologists to develop an illustrative example of how a certain team functions in cancer care. Inferred collaborative teams are plausible; translating such patterns into optimized collaborative care will require administrative review and integration with management practices. EMR utilization records can be mined for collaborative care patterns in large complex medical centers.

  12. A Primer on Endoscopic Electronic Medical Records

    OpenAIRE

    Atreja, Ashish; Rizk, Maged; Gurland, Brooke

    2010-01-01

    Endoscopic electronic medical record systems (EEMRs) are now increasingly utilized in many endoscopy centers. Modern EEMRs not only support endoscopy report generation, but often include features such as practice management tools, image and video clip management, inventory management, e-faxes to referring physicians, and database support to measure quality and patient outcomes. There are many existing software vendors offering EEMRs, and choosing a software vendor can be time consuming and co...

  13. Automated UMLS-based comparison of medical forms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Dugas

    Full Text Available Medical forms are very heterogeneous: on a European scale there are thousands of data items in several hundred different systems. To enable data exchange for clinical care and research purposes there is a need to develop interoperable documentation systems with harmonized forms for data capture. A prerequisite in this harmonization process is comparison of forms. So far--to our knowledge--an automated method for comparison of medical forms is not available. A form contains a list of data items with corresponding medical concepts. An automatic comparison needs data types, item names and especially item with these unique concept codes from medical terminologies. The scope of the proposed method is a comparison of these items by comparing their concept codes (coded in UMLS. Each data item is represented by item name, concept code and value domain. Two items are called identical, if item name, concept code and value domain are the same. Two items are called matching, if only concept code and value domain are the same. Two items are called similar, if their concept codes are the same, but the value domains are different. Based on these definitions an open-source implementation for automated comparison of medical forms in ODM format with UMLS-based semantic annotations was developed. It is available as package compareODM from http://cran.r-project.org. To evaluate this method, it was applied to a set of 7 real medical forms with 285 data items from a large public ODM repository with forms for different medical purposes (research, quality management, routine care. Comparison results were visualized with grid images and dendrograms. Automated comparison of semantically annotated medical forms is feasible. Dendrograms allow a view on clustered similar forms. The approach is scalable for a large set of real medical forms.

  14. Automated UMLS-based comparison of medical forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugas, Martin; Fritz, Fleur; Krumm, Rainer; Breil, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Medical forms are very heterogeneous: on a European scale there are thousands of data items in several hundred different systems. To enable data exchange for clinical care and research purposes there is a need to develop interoperable documentation systems with harmonized forms for data capture. A prerequisite in this harmonization process is comparison of forms. So far--to our knowledge--an automated method for comparison of medical forms is not available. A form contains a list of data items with corresponding medical concepts. An automatic comparison needs data types, item names and especially item with these unique concept codes from medical terminologies. The scope of the proposed method is a comparison of these items by comparing their concept codes (coded in UMLS). Each data item is represented by item name, concept code and value domain. Two items are called identical, if item name, concept code and value domain are the same. Two items are called matching, if only concept code and value domain are the same. Two items are called similar, if their concept codes are the same, but the value domains are different. Based on these definitions an open-source implementation for automated comparison of medical forms in ODM format with UMLS-based semantic annotations was developed. It is available as package compareODM from http://cran.r-project.org. To evaluate this method, it was applied to a set of 7 real medical forms with 285 data items from a large public ODM repository with forms for different medical purposes (research, quality management, routine care). Comparison results were visualized with grid images and dendrograms. Automated comparison of semantically annotated medical forms is feasible. Dendrograms allow a view on clustered similar forms. The approach is scalable for a large set of real medical forms.

  15. Improving outpatient primary medication adherence with physician guided, automated dispensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moroshek JG

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Jacob G Moroshek1,2 1Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, 2Carlson School of Management, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA Background: Physician dispensing, different from pharmacist dispensing, is a way for practitioners to supply their patients with medications, at the point of care. The InstyMeds dispenser and logistics system can automate much of the dispensing, insurance adjudication, inventory management, and regulatory reporting that is required of physician dispensing. Objective: To understand the percentage of patients that exhibit primary adherence to medication in the outpatient setting when choosing InstyMeds. Method: The InstyMeds dispensing database was de-identified and analyzed for primary adherence. This is the ratio of patients who dispensed their medication to those who received an eligible prescription. Results: The average InstyMeds emergency department installation has a primary adherence rate of 91.7%. The maximum rate for an installed device was 98.5%. Conclusion: Although national rates of primary adherence have been found to be in the range of 70%, automated physician dispensing vastly improves the rate of adherence. Improved adherence should lead to better patient outcomes, fewer return visits, and lower healthcare costs. Keywords: automated dispensing, adherence, compliance, medication, physician dispensing, InstyMeds

  16. Automated telecommunication-based reminders and adherence with once-daily glaucoma medication dosing: the automated dosing reminder study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Michael V; Chang, Dolly S; Frazier, Travis; Plyler, Ryan; Jefferys, Joan L; Friedman, David S

    2014-07-01

    Topical glaucoma medications lower intraocular pressure and alter the course of the disease. Because adherence with glaucoma medications is a known problem, interventions are needed to help those patients who do not take their medications as prescribed. To assess the ability of an automated telecommunication-based intervention to improve adherence with glaucoma medications. We performed a prospective cohort study of medication adherence, followed by a randomized intervention for those found to be nonadherent, of individuals recruited from a university-based glaucoma subspecialty clinic. A total of 491 participants were enrolled in the initial assessment of adherence. Of those, 70 were nonadherent with their medications after 3 months of electronic monitoring and randomized to intervention and control groups. A personal health record was used to store the list of patient medications and reminder preferences. On the basis of those data, participants randomized to the intervention received daily messages, either text or voice, reminding them to take their medication. Participants randomized to the control group received usual care. Difference in adherence before and after initiation of the intervention. Using an intent-to-treat analysis, we found that the median adherence rate in the 38 participants randomized to the intervention increased from 53% to 64% (P telecommunication-based reminders linked to data in a personal health record improved adherence with once-daily glaucoma medications. This is an effective method to improve adherence that could realistically be implemented in ophthalmology practices with a minimum amount of effort on the part of the practice or the patient.

  17. A primer on endoscopic electronic medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atreja, Ashish; Rizk, Maged; Gurland, Brooke

    2010-02-01

    Endoscopic electronic medical record systems (EEMRs) are now increasingly utilized in many endoscopy centers. Modern EEMRs not only support endoscopy report generation, but often include features such as practice management tools, image and video clip management, inventory management, e-faxes to referring physicians, and database support to measure quality and patient outcomes. There are many existing software vendors offering EEMRs, and choosing a software vendor can be time consuming and confusing. The goal of this article is inform the readers about current functionalities available in modern EEMR and provide them with a framework necessary to find an EEMR that is best fit for their practice.

  18. Automated Medical Supply Chain Management: A Remedy for Logistical Shortcomings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    AU/ACSC/2016 AIR COMMAND AND STAFF COLLEGE DISTANCE LEARNING AIR UNIVERSITY AUTOMATED MEDICAL SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT: A REMEDY FOR...Technology Workflow,” 18 November 2011, accessed 10 July 2016, http://www.mobileaspects.com/ blog /2011/11/18/evaluating-tissue-tracking- technology-solutions...Technology Workflow. November 18, 2011. http://www.mobileaspects.com/ blog /2011/11/18/evaluating-tissue-tracking-technology- solutions-part-2

  19. Automated touch screen device for recording complex rodent behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabrouk, O.S.; Dripps, I.J.; Ramani, S.; Chang, C.; Han, J.L.; Rice, KC; Jutkiewicz, E.M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Monitoring mouse behavior is a critical step in the development of modern pharmacotherapies. New Method Here we describe the application of a novel method that utilizes a touch display computer (tablet) and software to detect, record, and report fine motor behaviors. A consumer-grade tablet device is placed in the bottom of a specially made acrylic cage allowing the animal to walk on the device (MouseTrapp). We describe its application in open field (for general locomotor studies) which measures step lengths and velocity. The device can perform light-dark (anxiety) tests by illuminating half of the screen and keeping the other half darkened. A divider is built into the lid of the device allowing the animal free access to either side. Results Treating mice with amphetamine and the delta opioid peptide receptor agonist SNC80 stimulated locomotor activity on the device. Amphetamine increased step velocity but not step length during its peak effect (40–70 min after treatment), thus indicating detection of subtle amphetamine-induced effects. Animals showed a preference (74% of time spent) for the darkened half compared to the illuminated side. Comparison with Existing Method Animals were videotaped within the chamber to compare quadrant crosses to detected motion on the device. The slope, duration and magnitude of quadrant crosses tightly correlated with overall locomotor activity as detected by Mousetrapp. Conclusions We suggest that modern touch display devices such as MouseTrapp will be an important step toward automation of behavioral analyses for characterizing phenotypes and drug effects. PMID:24952323

  20. Improving medical stores management through automation and effective communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ashok; Cariappa, M P; Marwaha, Vishal; Sharma, Mukti; Arora, Manu

    2016-01-01

    Medical stores management in hospitals is a tedious and time consuming chore with limited resources tasked for the purpose and poor penetration of Information Technology. The process of automation is slow paced due to various inherent factors and is being challenged by the increasing inventory loads and escalating budgets for procurement of drugs. We carried out an indepth case study at the Medical Stores of a tertiary care health care facility. An iterative six step Quality Improvement (QI) process was implemented based on the Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) cycle. The QI process was modified as per requirement to fit the medical stores management model. The results were evaluated after six months. After the implementation of QI process, 55 drugs of the medical store inventory which had expired since 2009 onwards were replaced with fresh stock by the suppliers as a result of effective communication through upgraded database management. Various pending audit objections were dropped due to the streamlined documentation and processes. Inventory management improved drastically due to automation, with disposal orders being initiated four months prior to the expiry of drugs and correct demands being generated two months prior to depletion of stocks. The monthly expense summary of drugs was now being done within ten days of the closing month. Improving communication systems within the hospital with vendor database management and reaching out to clinicians is important. Automation of inventory management requires to be simple and user-friendly, utilizing existing hardware. Physical stores monitoring is indispensable, especially due to the scattered nature of stores. Staff training and standardized documentation protocols are the other keystones for optimal medical store management.

  1. Collaborative Affordances of Hybrid Patient Record Technologies in Medical Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houben, Steven; Frost, Mads; Bardram, Jakob E

    2015-01-01

    The medical record is a central artifact used to organize, communicate and coordinate information related to patient care. Despite recent deployments of electronic health records (EHR), paper medical records are still widely used because of the affordances of paper. Although a number of approache......PR in a medical simulation. Based on these empirical studies, this paper introduces and discusses the concept of collaborative affordances, which describes a set of properties of the medical record that foster collaborative collocated work....

  2. Medical record search engines, using pseudonymised patient identity: an alternative to centralised medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quantin, Catherine; Jaquet-Chiffelle, David-Olivier; Coatrieux, Gouenou; Benzenine, Eric; Allaert, François-André

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of our multidisciplinary study was to define a pragmatic and secure alternative to the creation of a national centralised medical record which could gather together the different parts of the medical record of a patient scattered in the different hospitals where he was hospitalised without any risk of breaching confidentiality. We first analyse the reasons for the failure and the dangers of centralisation (i.e. difficulty to define a European patients' identifier, to reach a common standard for the contents of the medical record, for data protection) and then propose an alternative that uses the existing available data on the basis that setting up a safe though imperfect system could be better than continuing a quest for a mythical perfect information system that we have still not found after a search that has lasted two decades. We describe the functioning of Medical Record Search Engines (MRSEs), using pseudonymisation of patients' identity. The MRSE will be able to retrieve and to provide upon an MD's request all the available information concerning a patient who has been hospitalised in different hospitals without ever having access to the patient's identity. The drawback of this system is that the medical practitioner then has to read all of the information and to create his own synthesis and eventually to reject extra data. Faced with the difficulties and the risks of setting up a centralised medical record system, a system that gathers all of the available information concerning a patient could be of great interest. This low-cost pragmatic alternative which could be developed quickly should be taken into consideration by health authorities. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Electronic medical records and the gastroenterologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosinski, Lawrence R

    2012-01-01

    This is an age of disruptive innovation in health care in which the business model is changing. Fee-for-service, volume-based systems are being replaced by fixed-fee, value-based systems. One of the major facilitating forces behind this change has been the development of the electronic health record, which is providing the medical community with the ability to have real-time quality metrics that will drive the development of web-based clinical decision support tools that will transform the current peer-review-based rules of practice with an eclectic fluid environment of continuous quality measurement and improvement. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. 21 CFR 870.2800 - Medical magnetic tape recorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... magnetic tape recorder. (a) Identification. A medical magnetic tape recorder is a device used to record and... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical magnetic tape recorder. 870.2800 Section 870.2800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

  5. 10 CFR 712.38 - Maintenance of medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...). (b) The psychological record of HRP candidates and HRP-certified individuals is a component of the medical record. The psychological record must: (1) Contain any clinical reports, test protocols and data...

  6. Recorded interviews with human and medical geneticists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Peter S

    2017-02-01

    A series of 100 recorded interviews with human and medical geneticists has been carried out and some general results are reported here. Twenty countries across the world are represented, mostly European, with a particular emphasis on the United Kingdom. A priority was given to older workers, many of whom were key founders of human genetics in their own countries and areas of work, and over 20 of whom are now no longer living. The interviews also give valuable information on the previous generation of workers, as teachers and mentors of the interviewees, thus extending the coverage of human genetics back to the 1930s or even earlier. A number of prominent themes emerge from the interview series; notably the beginnings of human cytogenetics from the late 1950s, the development of medical genetics research and its clinical applications in the 1960s and 1970s, and more recently the beginnings and rapid growth of human molecular genetics. The interviews provide vivid personal portraits of those involved, and also show the effects of social and political issues, notably those arising from World War 2 and its aftermath, which affected not only the individuals involved but also broader developments in human genetics, such as research related to risks of irradiation. While this series has made a start in the oral history of this important field, extension and further development of the work is urgently needed to give a fuller picture of how human genetics has developed.

  7. Perspectives on electronic medical records adoption: electronic medical records (EMR in outcomes research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Belletti

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Dan Belletti1, Christopher Zacker1, C Daniel Mullins21Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, East Hanover, NJ, USA; 2University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, Baltimore, MD, USAAbstract: Health information technology (HIT is engineered to promote improved quality and efficiency of care, and reduce medical errors. Healthcare organizations have made significant investments in HIT tools and the electronic medical record (EMR is a major technological advance. The Department of Veterans Affairs was one of the first large healthcare systems to fully implement EMR. The Veterans Health Information System and Technology Architecture (VistA began by providing an interface to review and update a patient’s medical record with its computerized patient record system. However, since the implementation of the VistA system there has not been an overall substantial adoption of EMR in the ambulatory or inpatient setting. In fact, only 23.9% of physicians were using EMRs in their office-based practices in 2005. A sample from the American Medical Association revealed that EMRs were available in an office setting to 17% of physicians in late 2007 and early 2008. Of these, 17% of physicians with EMR, only 4% were considered to be fully functional EMR systems. With the exception of some large aggregate EMR databases the slow adoption of EMR has limited its use in outcomes research. This paper reviews the literature and presents the current status of and forces influencing the adoption of EMR in the office-based practice, and identifies the benefits, limitations, and overall value of EMR in the conduct of outcomes research in the US.Keywords: electronic medical records, health information technology, medical errors

  8. Medical Records and Correspondence Demand Respect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Benamer

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available To The Editor: I was amazed recently to see a patient from Libya who came to the UK for treatment based on the advice of his Libyan physicians. The patient carried with him no referral letter whatsoever. Not one physician familiar with his case bothered to write a few lines for the poor patient, although each of those doctors saw the patient at least twice and prescribed one or more treatment. The patient carried with him different medications that had been prescribed, and a few empty containers of other medicines he had used. I mention the above short tale to bring to light what I feel is a major ethical problem with the way medicine is practiced in Libya [1]. The keeping of good medical records together with clear and concise correspondence between physicians is imperative for several reasons. Not only does it avoid duplication of services and unnecessary costs, it decreases the time invested by both the patient and physician, and it fosters a collegial relationship among healthcare providers. Many times, referring physicians may not know each other. It provides a channel for them to learn from each other as well as a method for them to form professional relationships. It occurred to me that colleagues in Libya may be shy of writing referral letters or may even be phobic about disclosing their practice habits. Patient information can best be written as referral letters which summaries the patient presentation, testing, response to treatment, possible consultation, and reason for referral. The referral may be because the physician(s initially treating the patient simply have tried all treatments known to them, or they may need to refer if they lack certain diagnostic equipment necessary to continue the care. To refer the patient to colleagues simply says “we think more can be done for this patient but we may not be able to do it here; please evaluate.” It shows respect for the patient and for the colleague. No physician knows everything

  9. Do general practitioners record alcohol abuse in the electronic medical records? : A comparison of survey and medical record data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abidi, L.; Oenema, A.; van den Akker, M.; van de Mheen, D.

    2018-01-01

    Objective: Primary care professionals are encouraged to screen patients for alcohol abuse. However, patients with alcohol abuse are often under-diagnosed as well as under-registered in medical records in general practices. This study aims to report on the registration rates of alcohol abuse

  10. Medical records department and balanced scorecard approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajami, Sima; Ebadsichani, Afsaneh; Tofighi, Shahram; Tavakoli, Nahid

    2013-01-01

    The Medical Records Department (MRD) is an important source for evaluating and planning of healthcare services; therefore, hospital managers should improve their performance not only in the short-term but also in the long-term plans. The Balanced Scorecard (BSC) is a tool in the management system that enables organizations to correct operational functions and provides feedback around both the internal processes and the external outcomes, in order to improve strategic performance and outcomes continuously. The main goal of this study was to assess the MRD performance with BSC approach in a hospital. This research was an analytical cross-sectional study in which data was collected by questionnaires, forms and observation. The population was the staff of the MRD in a hospital in Najafabad, Isfahan, Iran. To analyze data, first, objectives of the MRD, according to the mission and perspectives of the hospital, were redefined and, second, indicators were measured. Subsequently, findings from the performance were compared with the expected score. In order to achieve the final target, the programs, activities, and plans were reformed. The MRD was successful in absorbing customer satisfaction. From a customer perspective, score in customer satisfaction of admission and statistics sections were 82% and 83%, respectively. The comprehensive nature of the strategy map makes the MRD especially useful as a consensus building and communication tool in the hospital.

  11. 19 CFR 201.27 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... his or her medical or psychological records in the absence of a doctor's discussion and advice, the... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Special procedures: Medical records. 201.27... APPLICATION Safeguarding Individual Privacy Pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 552a § 201.27 Special procedures: Medical...

  12. The potential of electronic medical records for health service management.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, J. van der; Fleming, D.M.

    2006-01-01

    The medical record held in primary care provides the most comprehensive summary of all medical events. Diagnostic, laboratory, and prescribing data are all linked in individual patient records. Networks of GPs in some European countries are routinely recording data electronically in a way which

  13. Automated Records Management Systems in the ESARBICA Region

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research stream has seen archives and records management becoming an important theoretical issue receiving considerable attention from researchers within the fields of information management and systems. Many researchers in their contributions have found that archives and records which form a part of a wide ...

  14. Accurate, Automated Detection of Atrial Fibrillation in Ambulatory Recordings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linker, David T.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose A highly accurate, automated algorithm would facilitate cost-effective screening for asymptomatic atrial fibrillation. This study analyzed a new algorithm and compared to existing techniques. Methods The incremental benefit of each step in refinement of the algorithm was measured, and the algorithm was compared to other methods using the Physionet atrial fibrillation and normal sinus rhythm databases. Results When analyzing segments of 21 RR intervals or less, the algorithm had a significantly higher area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) than the other algorithms tested. At analysis segment sizes of up to 101 RR intervals, the algorithm continued to have a higher AUC than any of the other methods tested, although the difference from the second best other algorithm was no longer significant, with an AUC of 0.9992 with a 95% confidence interval (CI) of 0.9986–0.9998, versus 0.9986 (CI 0.9978–0.9994). With identical per-subject sensitivity, per-subject specificity of the current algorithm was superior to the other tested algorithms even at 101 RR intervals, with no false positives (CI 0.0%–0.8%) versus 5.3% false positives for the second best algorithm (CI 3.4–7.9%). Conclusions The described algorithm shows great promise for automated screening for atrial fibrillation by reducing false positives requiring manual review, while maintaining high sensitivity. PMID:26850411

  15. Market factors and electronic medical record adoption in medical practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menachemi, Nir; Mazurenko, Olena; Kazley, Abby Swanson; Diana, Mark L; Ford, Eric W

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies identified individual or practice factors that influence practice-based physicians' electronic medical record (EMR) adoption. Less is known about the market factors that influence physicians' EMR adoption. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between environmental market characteristics and physicians' EMR adoption. The Health Tracking Physician Survey 2008 and Area Resource File (2008) were combined and analyzed. Binary logistic regression was used to examine the relationship between three dimensions of the market environment (munificence, dynamism, and complexity) and EMR adoption controlling for several physician and practice characteristics. In a nationally representative sample of 4,720 physicians, measures of market dynamism including increases in unemployment, odds ratio (OR) = 0.95, 95% confidence interval (CI) [0.91, 0.99], or poverty rates, OR = 0.93, 95% CI [0.89, 0.96], were negatively associated with EMR adoption. Health maintenance organization penetration, OR = 3.01, 95% CI [1.49, 6.05], another measure of dynamism, was positively associated with EMR adoption. Physicians practicing in areas with a malpractice crisis, OR = 0.82, 95% CI [0.71, 0.94], representing environmental complexity, had lower EMR adoption rates. Understanding how market factors relate to practice-based physicians' EMR adoption can assist policymakers to better target limited resources as they work to realize the national goal of universal EMR adoption and meaningful use.

  16. Privacy Impact Assessment for the Wellness Program Medical Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Wellness Program Medical Records System collects contact information and other Personally Identifiable Information (PII). Learn how this data is collected, used, accessed, the purpose of data collection, and record retention policies.

  17. Factors affecting the utilisation of electronic medical records system ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    knowledge and skills needed for electronic record-keeping. Paper-based record systems can ... In Malawi, paper-based medical record-keeping has been observed to exacerbate challenges related to accessing patient records and ..... Med. 2010;7(8). 7. WHO. Management of Patient Information Trends and Challenges in.

  18. Patients' thoughts on patient- retained medical records

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    was also thought to motivate the patients to act on the advice given, and the records also served as a reminder to take their ... to use it and to standardise the information that is recorded; and health planners should be motivated to implement .... Table I: Combined list of themes identified and quotations supporting them.

  19. Recording and automated analysis of naturalistic bioptic driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Gang; Peli, Eli

    2011-05-01

    People with moderate central vision loss are legally permitted to drive with a bioptic telescope in 39 US states and the Netherlands, but the safety of bioptic driving remains highly controversial. There is no scientific evidence about bioptic use and its impact on safety. We propose searching for evidence by recording naturalistic driving activities in patients' cars. In a pilot study we used an analogue video system to record two bioptic drivers' daily driving activities for 10 and 5 days, respectively. In this technical report, we also describe our novel digital system that collects vehicle manoeuvre information and enables recording over more extended periods, and discuss our approach to analyzing the vast amount of data. Our observations of telescope use by the pilot subjects were quite different from their reports in a previous survey. One subject used the telescope only seven times in nearly 6 h of driving. For the other subject, the average interval between telescope use was about 2 min, and Mobile (cell) phone use in one trip extended the interval to almost 5 min. We demonstrate that computerized analysis of lengthy recordings based on video, GPS, acceleration, and black box data can be used to select informative segments for efficient off-line review of naturalistic driving behaviours. The inconsistency between self reports and objective data as well as infrequent telescope use underscores the importance of recording bioptic driving behaviours in naturalistic conditions over extended periods. We argue that the new recording system is important for understanding bioptic use behaviours and bioptic driving safety. © 2011 The College of Optometrists.

  20. Health care consumer's perception of the Electronic Medical Record ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Worldwide Electronic Medical Records (EMR) when compared to a paper-based system has been proven to improve service delivering numerous health care facilities. However, no research has been described in the literature regarding the user's perception of the clinical electronic medical record (EMR) ...

  1. Retention of Medical Records in Ghanaian Teaching Hospitals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Retention of Medical Records in Ghanaian Teaching Hospitals: Some International Perspectives. ... The study revealed that the problems inherent in the retention of management of non-current medical records are due to the absence of formal guidelines and procedures, and to the fact that those that exist are not properly ...

  2. 10 CFR 35.2080 - Records of mobile medical services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Records of mobile medical services. 35.2080 Section 35... of mobile medical services. (a) A licensee shall retain a copy of each letter that permits the use of... the last provision of service. (b) A licensee shall retain the record of each survey required by § 35...

  3. Technology Acceptance of Electronic Medical Records by Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocker, Gary

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the Technology Acceptance Model's (TAM) relevance of the intention of nurses to use electronic medical records in acute health care settings. The basic technology acceptance research of Davis (1989) was applied to the specific technology tool of electronic medical records (EMR) in a specific setting…

  4. The use of automated bioacoustic recorders to replace human wildlife surveys: an example using nightjars.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mieke C Zwart

    Full Text Available To be able to monitor and protect endangered species, we need accurate information on their numbers and where they live. Survey methods using automated bioacoustic recorders offer significant promise, especially for species whose behaviour or ecology reduces their detectability during traditional surveys, such as the European nightjar. In this study we examined the utility of automated bioacoustic recorders and the associated classification software as a way to survey for wildlife, using the nightjar as an example. We compared traditional human surveys with results obtained from bioacoustic recorders. When we compared these two methods using the recordings made at the same time as the human surveys, we found that recorders were better at detecting nightjars. However, in practice fieldworkers are likely to deploy recorders for extended periods to make best use of them. Our comparison of this practical approach with human surveys revealed that recorders were significantly better at detecting nightjars than human surveyors: recorders detected nightjars during 19 of 22 survey periods, while surveyors detected nightjars on only six of these occasions. In addition, there was no correlation between the amount of vocalisation captured by the acoustic recorders and the abundance of nightjars as recorded by human surveyors. The data obtained from the recorders revealed that nightjars were most active just before dawn and just after dusk, and least active during the middle of the night. As a result, we found that recording at both dusk and dawn or only at dawn would give reasonably high levels of detection while significantly reducing recording time, preserving battery life. Our analyses suggest that automated bioacoustic recorders could increase the detection of other species, particularly those that are known to be difficult to detect using traditional survey methods. The accuracy of detection is especially important when the data are used to inform

  5. The design and implementation of online medical record system ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Access to appropriate and credible medical information is essential. It is however saddening that many developing countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa, have low or no access to information on personal health status. The Online Medical Record System (OMRS) is a departure from the traditional paper-based medical ...

  6. Electronic health records and online medical records: an asset or a liability under current conditions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen-Graham, Judith; Mitchell, Lauren; Heriot, Natalie; Armani, Roksana; Langton, David; Levinson, Michele; Young, Alan; Smith, Julian A; Kotsimbos, Tom; Wilson, John W

    2018-02-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to audit the current use of medical records to determine completeness and concordance with other sources of medical information. Methods Medical records for 40 patients from each of five Melbourne major metropolitan hospitals were randomly selected (n=200). A quantitative audit was performed for detailed patient information and medical record keeping, as well as data collection, storage and utilisation. Using each hospital's current online clinical database, scanned files and paperwork available for each patient audited, the reviewers sourced as much relevant information as possible within a 30-min time allocation from both the record and the discharge summary. Results Of all medical records audited, 82% contained medical and surgical history, allergy information and patient demographics. All audited discharge summaries lacked at least one of the following: demographics, medication allergies, medical and surgical history, medications and adverse drug event information. Only 49% of records audited showed evidence the discharge summary was sent outside the institution. Conclusions The quality of medical data captured and information management is variable across hospitals. It is recommended that medical history documentation guidelines and standardised discharge summaries be implemented in Australian healthcare services. What is known about this topic? Australia has a complex health system, the government has approved funding to develop a universal online electronic medical record system and is currently trialling this in an opt-out style in the Napean Blue Mountains (NSW) and in Northern Queensland. The system was originally named the personally controlled electronic health record but has since been changed to MyHealth Record (2016). In Victoria, there exists a wide range of electronic health records used to varying degrees, with some hospitals still relying on paper-based records and many using scanned medical records

  7. Assessment of Automating Safety Surveillance From Electronic Health Records: Analysis for the Quality and Safety Review System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Allan; Adams, Katharine; Samarth, Anita; McQueen, Laura; Trivedi, Manan; Chappel, Tahleah; Grace, Erin; Terrillion, Susan; Ratwani, Raj M

    2017-06-30

    In an effort to improve and standardize the collection of adverse event data, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality is developing and testing a patient safety surveillance system called the Quality and Safety Review System (QSRS). Its current abstraction from medical records is through manual human coders, taking an average of 75 minutes to complete the review and abstraction tasks for one patient record. With many healthcare systems across the country adopting electronic health record (EHR) technology, there is tremendous potential for more efficient abstraction by automatically populating QSRS. In the absence of real-world testing data and models, which require a substantial investment, we provide a heuristic assessment of the feasibility of automatically populating QSRS questions from EHR data. To provide an assessment of the automation feasibility for QSRS, we first developed a heuristic framework, the Relative Abstraction Complexity Framework, to assess relative complexity of data abstraction questions. This framework assesses the relative complexity of characteristics or features of abstraction questions that should be considered when determining the feasibility of automating QSRS. Questions are assigned a final relative complexity score (RCS) of low, medium, or high by a team of clinicians, human factors, and natural language processing researchers. One hundred thirty-four QSRS questions were coded using this framework by a team of natural language processing and clinical experts. Fifty-five questions (41%) had high RCS and would be more difficult to automate, such as "Was use of a device associated with an adverse outcome(s)?" Forty-two questions (31%) had medium RCS, such as "Were there any injuries as a result of the fall(s)?' and 37 questions (28%) had low RCS, such as "Did the patient deliver during this stay?' These results suggest that Blood and Hospital Acquired Infections-Clostridium Difficile Infection (HAI-CDI) modules would be relatively

  8. Do general practitioners record alcohol abuse in the electronic medical records? A comparison of survey and medical record data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidi, L; Oenema, A; van den Akker, M; van de Mheen, D

    2018-03-01

    Primary care professionals are encouraged to screen patients for alcohol abuse. However, patients with alcohol abuse are often under-diagnosed as well as under-registered in medical records in general practices. This study aims to report on the registration rates of alcohol abuse diagnoses in general practices in comparison to patients' self-reported rates of alcohol use disorder. Data of a total number of 2,349 patients were analyzed from the SMILE study, a large prospective cohort study conducted in The Netherlands. Two data collection strategies were combined: (1) Patient self-report data on alcohol consumption as well as other sociodemographic characteristics; (2) Medical record (ICPC codes) data of diagnoses of chronic and acute alcohol abuse of the same patients. GPs' registrations of diagnoses were compared with the self-report data using descriptive statistics. Based on the results of the patient reported data, 179 (14.8%) male participants had an alcohol use disorder. Of the total number of female patients, 82 (7.2%) had an alcohol use disorder. One of the male and none of the female patients with an alcohol use disorder were registered as such by the GP. This study found that 11.1% of the total patient sample reported an alcohol use disorder, of which a strikingly low number of patients were recorded as such by their GP. It is likely that low recognition due to barriers related to alcohol screening as well as registration avoidance due to the stigma around alcohol abuse play a role in low registration.

  9. 78 FR 2363 - Notification of Deletion of a System of Records; Automated Trust Funds Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-11

    ... Database AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of deletion of a system... establishing the Automated Trust Funds (ATF) database system of records. The Federal Information Security... Integrity Act of 1982, Public Law 97-255, provided authority for the system. The ATF database has been...

  10. Automation of PCXMC and ImPACT for NASA Astronaut Medical Imaging Dose and Risk Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadori, Amir; Picco, Charles; Flores-McLaughlin, John; Shavers, Mark; Semones, Edward

    2011-01-01

    To automate astronaut organ and effective dose calculations from occupational X-ray and computed tomography (CT) examinations incorporating PCXMC and ImPACT tools and to estimate the associated lifetime cancer risk per the National Council on Radiation Protection & Measurements (NCRP) using MATLAB(R). Methods: NASA follows guidance from the NCRP on its operational radiation safety program for astronauts. NCRP Report 142 recommends that astronauts be informed of the cancer risks from reported exposures to ionizing radiation from medical imaging. MATLAB(R) code was written to retrieve exam parameters for medical imaging procedures from a NASA database, calculate associated dose and risk, and return results to the database, using the Microsoft .NET Framework. This code interfaces with the PCXMC executable and emulates the ImPACT Excel spreadsheet to calculate organ doses from X-rays and CTs, respectively, eliminating the need to utilize the PCXMC graphical user interface (except for a few special cases) and the ImPACT spreadsheet. Results: Using MATLAB(R) code to interface with PCXMC and replicate ImPACT dose calculation allowed for rapid evaluation of multiple medical imaging exams. The user inputs the exam parameter data into the database and runs the code. Based on the imaging modality and input parameters, the organ doses are calculated. Output files are created for record, and organ doses, effective dose, and cancer risks associated with each exam are written to the database. Annual and post-flight exposure reports, which are used by the flight surgeon to brief the astronaut, are generated from the database. Conclusions: Automating PCXMC and ImPACT for evaluation of NASA astronaut medical imaging radiation procedures allowed for a traceable and rapid method for tracking projected cancer risks associated with over 12,000 exposures. This code will be used to evaluate future medical radiation exposures, and can easily be modified to accommodate changes to the risk

  11. Automated anaesthesia record systems, observations on future trends of development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrichs, W

    1995-02-01

    The introduction of electronic anaesthesia documentation systems was attempted as early as in 1979, although their efficient application has become reality only in the past few years. Today, documentation technology is offered by most of the monitor manufacturers and new systems are being developed by various working groups. The advantages of the electronic protocol are apparent: Continuous high quality documentation, comparability of data due to the availability of a anaesthesia data bank, reduction of the workload of the anaesthesia staff and availability of new additional information. Disadvantages of the electronic protocol have also been discussed. Typically, by going through the process of entering data on the course of the anaesthetic procedure on the protocol sheet, the information is mentally absorbed and evaluated by the anaesthetist. This mental processing of information may, however, be missing when the data are recorded fully automatically--without active involvement on the part of the anaesthetist. It seems that electronic anaesthesia protocols will be required in the near future. The advantages of accurate documentation and quality control in the presence of careful planning will outweight cost considerations. However, at this time, almost none of the commercially available systems have matured to a point where their purchase can be recommended without reservation. There is still a lack of standards for the subsequent exchange of data and a solution to a number of ergonomic problems still remains to be found.

  12. Implications of WWW technologies for exchanging medical records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurice Dixon

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses some of the implications for medical record exchange of very recent developments in technology and tools that support the World Wide Web. It argues that XML (Extensible Mark-up Language is a very good enabling technology for medical record exchange. XML provides a much cheaper way of executing the exchange of medical information that circumvents the need for proprietary software. Use of XML can also simplify solutions to the problems associated with coping with the evolution of medical systems in time. However XML on its own does not resolve all the semantic heterogeneities.

  13. [Audit: medical record documentation among advanced cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perceau, Elise; Chirac, Anne; Rhondali, Wadih; Ruer, Murielle; Chabloz, Claire; Filbet, Marilène

    2014-02-01

    Medical record documentation of cancer inpatients is a core component of continuity of care. The main goal of the study was an assessment of medical record documentation in a palliative care unit (PCU) using a targeted clinical audit based on deceased inpatients' charts. Stage 1 (2010): a clinical audit of medical record documentation assessed by a list of items (diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, power of attorney directive, advance directives). Stage 2 (2011): corrective measures. Stage 3 (2012): re-assessment with the same items' list after six month. Forty cases were investigated during stage 1 and 3. After the corrective measures, inpatient's medical record documentation was significantly improved, including for diagnosis (P = 0.01), diseases extension and treatment (P advanced directives (P = 0.145).

  14. Towards Semantic Search and Inference in Electronic Medical Records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bevan Koopman

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background This paper presents a novel approach to searching electronic medical records that is based on concept matching rather than keyword matching. Aims The concept-based approach is intended to overcome specific challenges we identified in searching medical records. Method Queries and documents were transformed from their term-based originals into medical concepts as defined by the SNOMED-CT ontology. Results Evaluation on a real-world collection of medical records showed our concept-based approach outperformed a keyword baseline by 25% in Mean Average Precision. Conclusion The concept-based approach provides a framework for further development of inference based search systems for dealing with medical data.

  15. [Information extraction methodology used in electronic medical records].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yingying; Ye, Feng

    2011-01-01

    We try to use information extraction technology in some parts of the medical records and extract disease information to accumulate experience for extracting complete information from medical records. This paper attempts to use dictionary and rules to achieve the named entity recognition. Information extraction is based on shallow parsing and use pattern sentence matching method with the help of a 3 levels finite state automaton.

  16. Practical fulltext search in medical records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vít Volšička

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Performing a search through previously existing documents, including medical reports, is an integral part of acquiring new information and educational processes. Unfortunately, finding relevant information is not always easy, since many documents are saved in free text formats, thereby making it difficult to search through them. A full-text search is a viable solution for searching through documents. The full-text search makes it possible to efficiently search through large numbers of documents and to find those that contain specific search phrases in a short time. All leading database systems currently offer full-text search, but some do not support the complex morphology of the Czech language. Apache Solr provides full support options and some full-text libraries. This programme provides the good support of the Czech language in the basic installation, and a wide range of settings and options for its deployment over any platform. The library had been satisfactorily tested using real data from the hospitals. Solr provided useful, fast, and accurate searches. However, there is still a need to make adjustments in order to receive effective search results, particularly by correcting typographical errors made not only in the text, but also when entering words in the search box and creating a list of frequently used abbreviations and synonyms for more accurate results.

  17. Medical impacts of anthropometric records. | Adebisi | Annals of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anthropology is now one of the inter-disciplinary scientific fields that is gaining much attention in forensic, socio-cultural, industrial and bio-medical applications. There is a need for a better awareness of some of the impacts - past and present, in the medical practice, of the records that were obtained by workers in this field in ...

  18. Retention of Medical Records in Ghanaian Teaching Hospitals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper investigates medical records retention and storage practices in selected Ghanaian hospitals. The state- of- the- art in the use and final disposition of non-current patient records is reviewed with a view to recommending remedial measures that could contribute to the improvement of the existing system. The study ...

  19. 12 CFR 1102.104 - Special procedure: Medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... or a mental health professional indicating that, in his or her opinion, disclosure of the requested... mental health professional to whom the individual would like the records to be disclosed, and disclosure... Subcommittee § 1102.104 Special procedure: Medical records. (a) Statement of physician or mental health...

  20. Medical Services: Medical Record Administration and Health Care Documentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-05-03

    formerly prescribed by AR 40-400 (para 6-4b(1)). o Converts DA Form 8006 ( Pediatric Dentistry Diagnostic Form) into a reproducible form, DA 8006-R (para 6-7e...will be used when needed and will be filed on top of the original SF 603. See paragraph 5-18. e. DA Form 8006-R ( Pediatric Dentistry Diagnostic Form...DA 40 AR 40–66 • 3 May 1999 Form 8006-R will be used for recording the examination, diagnosis, and treatment planning of pediatric dentistry patients

  1. Medication Administration Errors in Nursing Homes Using an Automated Medication Dispensing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bemt, Patricia M.L.A.; Idzinga, Jetske C.; Robertz, Hans; Kormelink, Dennis Groot; Pels, Neske

    2009-01-01

    Objective To identify the frequency of medication administration errors as well as their potential risk factors in nursing homes using a distribution robot. Design The study was a prospective, observational study conducted within three nursing homes in the Netherlands caring for 180 individuals. Measurements Medication errors were measured using the disguised observation technique. Types of medication errors were described. The correlation between several potential risk factors and the occurrence of medication errors was studied to identify potential causes for the errors. Results In total 2,025 medication administrations to 127 clients were observed. In these administrations 428 errors were observed (21.2%). The most frequently occurring types of errors were use of wrong administration techniques (especially incorrect crushing of medication and not supervising the intake of medication) and wrong time errors (administering the medication at least 1 h early or late).The potential risk factors female gender (odds ratio (OR) 1.39; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.05–1.83), ATC medication class antibiotics (OR 11.11; 95% CI 2.66–46.50), medication crushed (OR 7.83; 95% CI 5.40–11.36), number of dosages/day/client (OR 1.03; 95% CI 1.01–1.05), nursing home 2 (OR 3.97; 95% CI 2.86–5.50), medication not supplied by distribution robot (OR 2.92; 95% CI 2.04–4.18), time classes “7–10 am” (OR 2.28; 95% CI 1.50–3.47) and “10 am-2 pm” (OR 1.96; 1.18–3.27) and day of the week “Wednesday” (OR 1.46; 95% CI 1.03–2.07) are associated with a higher risk of administration errors. Conclusions Medication administration in nursing homes is prone to many errors. This study indicates that the handling of the medication after removing it from the robot packaging may contribute to this high error frequency, which may be reduced by training of nurse attendants, by automated clinical decision support and by measures to reduce workload. PMID:19390109

  2. Are the medical records of high quality in teaching hospitals?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somi MH

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Documentation of medical data in patient records is needed to improve the quality of healthcare and medical knowledge progress. Documentation of patient history, clinical problems, treatment, and follow-up care are needed to improve practice and research. Objective: To determine documentation of patient records at the internal medicine ward of Imam Khomeini Hospital, Tabriz, Iran. Method: The study was descriptive and 100 patient records were selected through random sampling. Records were related to the patients who had been discharged from the general internal ward during April to June 2000. Data was collected using the questionnaire including 30 closed questions, and 5 open ones. The results were reported in ratios (% averages and standard deviation. T-test was used to examine the association of length of stay and records data adequacy scores. Data was analysed by the SPSS software. Results: Completeness of the patient records was moderately acceptable (68.7%. The difference between performance of residents, interns and students in documentation of primary diagnoses and differential diagnoses was significant (P<0.001 and performance of residents was more efficient (59.6%, (69.7%. Of the records, 22.2% were without summary sheet. Conclusion: Patient records had many deficiencies. Instructions for documentation are necessary. Regular monitoring and evaluation by the attending physicians and writing skills education could be effective in accurate documentation. Key words: DOCUMENTATION, MEDICAL RECORDS, REVIEW, TEACHING HOSPITALS, TABRIZ

  3. From documents on paper to electronic medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrajo, Lino; Penas, Angel; Melcón, Rubén; González, Fco Javier; Couto, Eduardo

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the creation process of an electronic medical records (EMR) application in the Juan Canalejo University Hospital Complex (CHUJC). From the knowledge acquired through the observation of the traditional processes of managing the Patients medical records on paper a tool was developed which in principle was thought of to classify electronic documents associated to a patient and to which different functions of medical work have been subsequently added: visualizing clinical documents of patients, creation of new documents and following the development of patients.

  4. A comparison of patient recall of smoking cessation advice with advice recorded in electronic medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szatkowski, Lisa; McNeill, Ann; Lewis, Sarah; Coleman, Tim

    2011-05-10

    Brief cessation advice delivered to smokers during routine primary care consultations increases smoking cessation rates. However, in previous studies investigating recall of smoking cessation advice, smokers have reported more advice being received than is actually documented in their medical records. Recording of smoking cessation advice in UK primary care medical records has increased since the introduction of the Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF) in 2004, and so we compare recall and recording of cessation advice since this time to assess whether or not agreement between these two data sources has improved. For each year from 2000 to 2009, the proportion of patients in The Health Improvement Network Database (THIN) with a recording of cessation advice in their notes in the last 12 months was calculated. In 2004, 2005 and 2008, these figures were compared to rates of patients recalling having received cessation advice in the last 12 months in the Primary Care Trust (PCT) Patient Surveys, with adjustment for age, sex and regional differences between the populations. In 2004 there was good agreement between the proportion of THIN patients who had cessation advice recorded in their medical records and the proportion recalling advice in the Patient Survey. However, in both 2005 and 2008, more patients had cessation advice recorded in their medical records than recalled receiving advice. Since the introduction of the QOF, the rate of recording of cessation advice in primary care medical records has exceeded that of patient recall. Whilst both data sources have limitations, our study suggests that, in recent years, the proportion of smokers being advised to quit by primary care health professionals may not have improved as much as the improved recording rates imply.

  5. Automated patient and medication payment method for clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yawn BP

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Barbara P Yawn,1 Suzanne Madison,1 Susan Bertram,1 Wilson D Pace,2 Anne Fuhlbrigge,3 Elliot Israel,3 Dawn Littlefield,1 Margary Kurland,1 Michael E Wechsler41Olmsted Medical Center, Department of Research, Rochester, MN, 2UCDHSC, Department of Family Medicine, University of Colorado Health Science Centre, Aurora, CO, 3Brigham and Women's Hospital, Pulmonary and Critical Care Division, Boston, MA, 4National Jewish Medical Center, Division of Pulmonology, Denver, CO, USABackground: Published reports and studies related to patient compensation for clinical trials focus primarily on the ethical issues related to appropriate amounts to reimburse for patient's time and risk burden. Little has been published regarding the method of payment for patient participation. As clinical trials move into widely dispersed community practices and more complex designs, the method of payment also becomes more complex. Here we review the decision process and payment method selected for a primary care-based randomized clinical trial of asthma management in Black Americans.Methods: The method selected is a credit card system designed specifically for clinical trials that allows both fixed and variable real-time payments. We operationalized the study design by providing each patient with two cards, one for reimbursement for study visits and one for payment of medication costs directly to the pharmacies.Results: Of the 1015 patients enrolled, only two refused use of the ClinCard, requesting cash payments for visits and only rarely a weekend or fill-in pharmacist refused to use the card system for payment directly to the pharmacy. Overall, the system has been well accepted by patients and local study teams. The ClinCard administrative system facilitates the fiscal accounting and medication adherence record-keeping by the central teams. Monthly fees are modest, and all 12 study institutional review boards approved use of the system without concern for patient

  6. Smart Pharmacy Cards to automate patient records for prospective drug utilization review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ognibene, P J

    1991-01-01

    The Smart Pharmacy Card automates the patient's medical and prescription history so that every new prescription can be analyzed by a pharmacist to determine if it conflicts with disease states, allergies, prescription and non-prescription drugs documented in the card. The prototype that will be demonstrated at SCAMC 1991 will use an integrated-circuit card ("smart card") that holds 16,000 bits of electronically-erasable data.

  7. Automated integration of continuous glucose monitor data in the electronic health record using consumer technology

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Rajiv B; Goren, Nira D; Stark, David E; Wall, Dennis P; Longhurst, Christopher A

    2016-01-01

    The diabetes healthcare provider plays a key role in interpreting blood glucose trends, but few institutions have successfully integrated patient home glucose data in the electronic health record (EHR). Published implementations to date have required custom interfaces, which limit wide-scale replication. We piloted automated integration of continuous glucose monitor data in the EHR using widely available consumer technology for 10 pediatric patients with insulin-dependent diabetes. Establishm...

  8. Assessment of the impact on time to complete medical record using an electronic medical record versus a paper record on emergency department patients: a study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Jeffrey J; Sutherland, Jane; Symington, Cheryl; Dorland, Katie; Mansour, Marlene; Stiell, Ian G

    2014-12-01

    Electronic medical records are becoming an integral part of healthcare delivery. The goal of this study was to compare paper documentation versus electronic medical record for non-traumatic chest pain to determine differences in time for physicians to complete medical records using paper versus electronic mediums. We also assessed physician satisfaction with the electronic format. We conducted this before-after study in a single large tertiary care academic emergency department. In the 'Before Period', stopwatches determined the time for paper medical recording. In the 'After Period', a template-based electronic medical record was introduced and the time for electronic recording was measured. The time to record in the before and after periods were compared using a two-sided t test. We surveyed physicians to assess satisfaction. We enrolled 100 non-traumatic patients with chest pain in the before period and 73 in the after period. The documentation time was longer using electronic charting, (9.6±5.9 min vs 6.1±2.5 min; pelectronic patient recording for non-traumatic chest pain. This is the first study that we are aware of which compared paper versus electronic medical records in the emergency department. Electronic recording took longer than paper records. Physicians were not satisfied using this electronic record. Given the time pressures on emergency physicians, a solution to minimise the charting time using electronic medical records must be found before widespread uptake of electronic charting will be possible. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  9. 77 FR 15026 - Privacy Act of 1974; Farm Records File (Automated) System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-14

    ..., protect the environment, and enhance the marketing of agricultural products. The system of records covers... marketing data; Lease and transfer of allotments and quotas; Appeals; New grower applications; Conservation... boundaries and is recommended as the common location identifier for reporting acreage. Digital renditions of...

  10. Medical education in an electronic health record-mediated world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellaway, Rachel H; Graves, Lisa; Greene, Peter S

    2013-04-01

    This paper reflects on the extent to which we are preparing learners for practice in an electronic health record (EHR)-mediated world. We are currently training the last generation to remember a world without the Internet and the first who will practice in a largely EHR-mediated practice environment. We undertook a thematic review of the literature connecting medical education with e-health using the concepts of 'electronic health record' or 'electronic medical record' as a proxy for the broader notion of e-health. Our findings are more equivocal and cautious than earlier commentators might have expected and while there are examples of good practice and successful integration, the majority of articles we reviewed raised issues and problems with the current links between EHRs and medical education. Medical professionals in particular are quite ambivalent about many of the changes brought about by EHRs, and in the absence of changes in perception and practice it is likely that the connections between medical education and e-health will continue to be problematic. We hope that this paper will lead to an improved understanding of these problems and will serve to advance the discourse on how medical education should engage with the world of e-health and the world of e-health with medical education.

  11. The medical record entrepreneur: a future of opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, M S; Nath, D D

    1989-06-01

    In summary, medical record practitioners can become successful entrepreneurs with the right motivation. It will be important to overcome the fear and inertia inherent in any bold new venture, to find our "niche," to assume the roles of explorer, artist, judge, and champion, as well as to encourage and promote our development within an organization or in a business of our own. Medical record entrepreneurs need to evaluate and understand current and potential consumers, their current needs, perceptions, and future needs. Entrepreneurs should capitalize on strengths, develop innovative marketing approaches, and apply them. In the current climate of the health care industry, there is a myriad of entrepreneurial opportunities available to the medical record profession. It all begins with the individual.

  12. Medical record management systems: criticisms and new perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frénot, S; Laforest, F

    1999-06-01

    The first generation of computerized medical records stored the data as text, but these records did not bring any improvement in information manipulation. The use of a relational database management system (DBMS) has largely solved this problem as it allows for data requests by using SQL. However, this requires data structuring which is not very appropriate to medicine. Moreover, the use of templates and icon user interfaces has introduced a deviation from the paper-based record (still existing). The arrival of hypertext user interfaces has proven to be of interest to fill the gap between the paper-based medical record and its electronic version. We think that further improvement can be accomplished by using a fully document-based system. We present the architecture, advantages and disadvantages of classical DBMS-based and Web/DBMS-based solutions. We also present a document-based solution and explain its advantages, which include communication, security, flexibility and genericity.

  13. Automating Clinical Score Calculation within the Electronic Health Record. A Feasibility Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aakre, Christopher; Dziadzko, Mikhail; Keegan, Mark T; Herasevich, Vitaly

    2017-04-12

    Evidence-based clinical scores are used frequently in clinical practice, but data collection and data entry can be time consuming and hinder their use. We investigated the programmability of 168 common clinical calculators for automation within electronic health records. We manually reviewed and categorized variables from 168 clinical calculators as being extractable from structured data, unstructured data, or both. Advanced data retrieval methods from unstructured data sources were tabulated for diagnoses, non-laboratory test results, clinical history, and examination findings. We identified 534 unique variables, of which 203/534 (37.8%) were extractable from structured data and 269/534 (50.4.7%) were potentially extractable using advanced techniques. Nearly half (265/534, 49.6%) of all variables were not retrievable. Only 26/168 (15.5%) of scores were completely programmable using only structured data and 43/168 (25.6%) could potentially be programmable using widely available advanced information retrieval techniques. Scores relying on clinical examination findings or clinical judgments were most often not completely programmable. Complete automation is not possible for most clinical scores because of the high prevalence of clinical examination findings or clinical judgments - partial automation is the most that can be achieved. The effect of fully or partially automated score calculation on clinical efficiency and clinical guideline adherence requires further study.

  14. Beyond the medical record: other modes of error acknowledgment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Marilynn M; Cornett, Patricia L; Sutcliffe, Kathleen M; Lewton, Elizabeth

    2005-05-01

    Studies before and since the 1999 Institute of Medicine report have noted the limitations of using medical record reporting for reliably quantifying and understanding medical error. Quantitative macro analyses of large datasets should be supplemented by small-scale qualitative studies to provide insight into micro-level daily events in clinical and hospital practice that contribute to errors and adverse events and how they are reported. The study design involved semistructured face-to-face interviews with residents about the medical errors in which they recently had been involved and included questions regarding how those errors were acknowledged. This paper reports the ways in which medical error is or is not reported and residents' responses to a perceived medical error. Twenty-six residents were randomly sampled from a total population of 85 residents working in a 600-bed teaching hospital. Outcome measures were based on analysis of cases residents described. Using Ethnograph and traditional methods of content analysis, cases were categorized as Documented, Discussed, and Uncertain. Of 73 cases, 30 (41.1%) were formally acknowledged and Documented in the medical record; 24 (32.9%) were addressed through Discussions but not documented; 19 cases (26%) cases were classified as Uncertain. Twelve cases involved medication errors, which were acknowledged in different categories. The supervisory discussion, the informal discussion, and near-miss contain important information for improving clinical care. Our study also shows the need to improve residents' education to prepare them to recognize and address medical errors.

  15. Identification of Units and Other Terms in Czech Medical Records

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zvára Jr., Karel; Kašpar, Václav

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 1 (2010), s. 78-82 ISSN 1801-5603 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06014 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : natural language processing * healthcare documentation * medical reports * EHR * finite-state machine * regular expression Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science http://www.ejbi.org/en/ejbi/article/61-en-identification-of-units- and -other-terms-in-czech-medical-records.html

  16. Automated drug dispensing system reduces medication errors in an intensive care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapuis, Claire; Roustit, Matthieu; Bal, Gaëlle; Schwebel, Carole; Pansu, Pascal; David-Tchouda, Sandra; Foroni, Luc; Calop, Jean; Timsit, Jean-François; Allenet, Benoît; Bosson, Jean-Luc; Bedouch, Pierrick

    2010-12-01

    We aimed to assess the impact of an automated dispensing system on the incidence of medication errors related to picking, preparation, and administration of drugs in a medical intensive care unit. We also evaluated the clinical significance of such errors and user satisfaction. Preintervention and postintervention study involving a control and an intervention medical intensive care unit. Two medical intensive care units in the same department of a 2,000-bed university hospital. Adult medical intensive care patients. After a 2-month observation period, we implemented an automated dispensing system in one of the units (study unit) chosen randomly, with the other unit being the control. The overall error rate was expressed as a percentage of total opportunities for error. The severity of errors was classified according to National Coordinating Council for Medication Error Reporting and Prevention categories by an expert committee. User satisfaction was assessed through self-administered questionnaires completed by nurses. A total of 1,476 medications for 115 patients were observed. After automated dispensing system implementation, we observed a reduced percentage of total opportunities for error in the study compared to the control unit (13.5% and 18.6%, respectively; perror (20.4% and 13.5%; perror showed a significant impact of the automated dispensing system in reducing preparation errors (perrors caused no harm (National Coordinating Council for Medication Error Reporting and Prevention category C). The automated dispensing system did not reduce errors causing harm. Finally, the mean for working conditions improved from 1.0±0.8 to 2.5±0.8 on the four-point Likert scale. The implementation of an automated dispensing system reduced overall medication errors related to picking, preparation, and administration of drugs in the intensive care unit. Furthermore, most nurses favored the new drug dispensation organization.

  17. The use of shared medication record as part of medication reconciliation at hospital admission is feasible

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munck, Lars K; Hansen, Karina R; Mølbak, Anne Grethe

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Medication reconciliation improves congruence in cross sectional patient courses. Our regional electronic medical record (EMR) integrates the shared medication record (SMR) which provides full access to current medication and medication prescriptions for all citizens in Denmark. We...... studied whether our SMR integration could facilitate medication reconciliation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patients admitted to the emergency department for hospitalization were randomised to consultation using EMR with or without the integrated SMR access. Observed time used for medication reconciliation...... was the primary efficacy parameter. RESULTS: A total of 62 consecutive patient consultations were randomised including 39 with more than five prescriptions. EMR had data from previous consultations for 46 patients, 59 patients provided information on medication. In all, 18 junior physicians in early postgraduate...

  18. Medication incidents related to automated dose dispensing in community pharmacies and hospitals - A reporting system study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.C. Cheung (Ka Chun); P.M.L.A. van den Bemt (Patricia); M.L. Bouvy (Marcel); M.E. Wensing (Michel); P.A. de Smet (Peter)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Automated dose dispensing (ADD) is being introduced in several countries and the use of this technology is expected to increase as a growing number of elderly people need to manage their medication at home. ADD aims to improve medication safety and treatment adherence, but

  19. Medication incidents related to automated dose dispensing in community pharmacies and hospitals - A reporting system study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheung, Ka Chun; Van Den Bemt, Patricia M L A; Bouvy, Marcel L.; Wensing, Michel; De Smet, Peter A G M

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Automated dose dispensing (ADD) is being introduced in several countries and the use of this technology is expected to increase as a growing number of elderly people need to manage their medication at home. ADD aims to improve medication safety and treatment adherence, but it may

  20. Medication incidents related to automated dose dispensing in community pharmacies and hospitals - a reporting system study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheung, K.C.; Bemt, P.M. van den; Bouvy, M.L.; Wensing, M.J.; Smet, P.A. de

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Automated dose dispensing (ADD) is being introduced in several countries and the use of this technology is expected to increase as a growing number of elderly people need to manage their medication at home. ADD aims to improve medication safety and treatment adherence, but it may

  1. Anonymization of Electronic Medical Records to Support Clinical Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Gkoulalas-Divanis, Aris

    2013-01-01

    Anonymization of Electronic Medical Records to Support Clinical Analysis closely examines the privacy threats that may arise from medical data sharing, and surveys the state-of-the-art methods developed to safeguard data against these threats. To motivate the need for computational methods, the book first explores the main challenges facing the privacy-protection of medical data using the existing policies, practices and regulations. Then, it takes an in-depth look at the popular computational privacy-preserving methods that have been developed for demographic, clinical and genomic data sharing, and closely analyzes the privacy principles behind these methods, as well as the optimization and algorithmic strategies that they employ. Finally, through a series of in-depth case studies that highlight data from the US Census as well as the Vanderbilt University Medical Center, the book outlines a new, innovative class of privacy-preserving methods designed to ensure the integrity of transferred medical data for su...

  2. Automated integration of continuous glucose monitor data in the electronic health record using consumer technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajiv B; Goren, Nira D; Stark, David E; Wall, Dennis P; Longhurst, Christopher A

    2016-01-01

    The diabetes healthcare provider plays a key role in interpreting blood glucose trends, but few institutions have successfully integrated patient home glucose data in the electronic health record (EHR). Published implementations to date have required custom interfaces, which limit wide-scale replication. We piloted automated integration of continuous glucose monitor data in the EHR using widely available consumer technology for 10 pediatric patients with insulin-dependent diabetes. Establishment of a passive data communication bridge via a patient’s/parent’s smartphone enabled automated integration and analytics of patient device data within the EHR between scheduled clinic visits. It is feasible to utilize available consumer technology to assess and triage home diabetes device data within the EHR, and to engage patients/parents and improve healthcare provider workflow. PMID:27018263

  3. Digital Sport Medical Record: Sigh or a blessing?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stege, J.P.; Fleuren, M.A.H.; van der Knaap, E.T.W.; Stubbe, J.H.

    2013-01-01

    Since 2004, there have been several initiatives regarding the development of a digital Sport Medical Record (SMD). Interviews with the Netherlands Association of Sports Medicine (VSG) show that there are particular problems with commissioning of the digital SMD. During spring 2012, two focus group

  4. Electronic medical records: a developing and developed country analysis

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sikhondze, NC

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available on the accuracy and availability of the data and since most of the data is on paper format; this limits access to the data by healthcare providers and acts as a hindrance to healthcare delivery. The implementation of Electronic Medical Records (EMR), which...

  5. York University at TREC 2012: Medical Records Track

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    York University at TREC 2012: Medical Records Track Jun Miao, Zheng Ye, Jimmy Huang Information Retrieval and Knowledge Managment Lab York University...Information Retrieval and Knowledge Managment Lab,Toronto, Canada, 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND

  6. Health Care Consumer's Perception of the Electronic Medical Record

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Method: A structured questionnaire was developed, validated and utilized in this quantitative research project. Quantitative data were collected ... Electronic Medical Records (EMR), as a health information technology innovation, has ... EMR will provide a highly effective, reliable, secure, and innovative information system.

  7. Medical Guidelines Presentation and Comparing with Electronic Health Record

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Veselý, Arnošt; Zvárová, Jana; Peleška, Jan; Buchtela, David; Anger, Z.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 75, č. 3-4 (2006), s. 240-245 ISSN 1386-5056 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1ET200300413 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : medical guidelines * electronic health record * GLIF model * reminder facility Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science Impact factor: 1.726, year: 2006

  8. Flexible Method for the Automated Offline-Detection of Artifacts in Multi-Channel Electroencephalogram Recordings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waser, Markus; Garn, Heinrich; Benke, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    . However, these preprocessing steps do not allow for complete artifact correction. We propose a method for the automated offline-detection of remaining artifacts after preprocessing in multi-channel EEG recordings. In contrast to existing methods it requires neither adaptive parameters varying between...... recordings nor a topography template. It is suited for short EEG segments and is flexible with regard to target applications. The algorithm was developed and tested on 60 clinical EEG samples of 20 seconds each that were recorded both in resting state and during cognitive activation to gain a realistic...... in conjunction with receiver operating characteristics (ROC curves). We observed high sensitivity of 95.5%±4.8 and specificity of 88.8%±2.1. The method has thus shown great potential and is promising as a possible tool for both EEG-based clinical applications and EEG-related research....

  9. Secure scalable disaster electronic medical record and tracking system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demers, Gerard; Kahn, Christopher; Johansson, Per; Buono, Colleen; Chipara, Octav; Griswold, William; Chan, Theodore

    2013-10-01

    Electronic medical records (EMRs) are considered superior in documentation of care for medical practice. Current disaster medical response involves paper tracking systems and radio communication for mass-casualty incidents (MCIs). These systems are prone to errors, may be compromised by local conditions, and are labor intensive. Communication infrastructure may be impacted, overwhelmed by call volume, or destroyed by the disaster, making self-contained and secure EMR response a critical capability. Report As the prehospital disaster EMR allows for more robust content including protected health information (PHI), security measures must be instituted to safeguard these data. The Wireless Internet Information System for medicAl Response in Disasters (WIISARD) Research Group developed a handheld, linked, wireless EMR system utilizing current technology platforms. Smart phones connected to radio frequency identification (RFID) readers may be utilized to efficiently track casualties resulting from the incident. Medical information may be transmitted on an encrypted network to fellow prehospital team members, medical dispatch, and receiving medical centers. This system has been field tested in a number of exercises with excellent results, and future iterations will incorporate robust security measures. A secure prehospital triage EMR improves documentation quality during disaster drills.

  10. Call broadcasting and automated recorders as tools for anuran surveys in a subarctic tundra landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannan, R. Nicholas; Perry, Gad; Andersen, David; Boal, Clint W.

    2014-01-01

    Relatively little is known about population ecology of anurans in arctic and subarctic tundra regions, in part because it is difficult to survey anurans in these landscapes. Anuran survey protocols developed for temperate regions have limited applicability in arctic and subarctic tundra landscapes, which may lack roads and vehicle access, and experience variable and inclement weather during short anuran breeding seasons. To evaluate approaches to address some of the limitations of surveying anurans in tundra landscapes, we assessed the effectiveness of using breeding call broadcasts to increase detection of Boreal Chorus Frogs (Pseudacris maculata) and Wood Frogs (Lithobates sylvaticus) near Cape Churchill, Manitoba, Canada. We also evaluated how counts of anurans derived from automated audio recorders compared with those obtained simultaneously by observers. We detected on average 0.4 additional Wood Frogs per survey when we broadcasted calls (x̄ = 0.82, SD = 1.38), an increase of > 40% compared to surveys without broadcasts (x̄ = 1.24, SD = 1.51; Wilcoxon test; Z = 2.73, P = 0.006). In contrast, broadcasting Boreal Chorus Frog calls did not increase the number of chorus frog detections (Wilcoxon test; Z 0.90). Detections of Wood Frogs in a 100-m radius were lower via automated recorders (x̄ = 0.60, SD = 0.87 SD) than by observers during simultaneous surveys (x̄ = 0.96, SD = 1.27 Z = 2.07, P = 0.038), but those of Boreal Chorus Frogs were not different (x = 1.72, SD = 1.31;x̄ = 1.44, SD = 1.5; Z = 1.55, P > 0.121). Our results suggest that broadcasting calls can increase detection of Wood Frogs, and that automated recorders are useful in detecting both Wood Frogs and Boreal Chorus Fogs in arctic and subarctic tundra landscapes.

  11. Reduction of incorrect record accessing and charting patient electronic medical records in the perioperative environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebello, Elizabeth; Kee, Spencer; Kowalski, Alicia; Harun, Nusrat; Guindani, Michele; Goravanchi, Farzin

    2016-12-01

    Opening and charting in the incorrect patient electronic record presents a patient safety issue. The authors investigated the prevalence of reported errors and whether efforts utilizing the anesthesia time-out and barcoding have decreased the incidence of errors in opening and charting in the patient electronic medical record in the perioperative environment. The authors queried the database for all surgeries and procedures requiring anesthesia from January 2009 to September 2012. Of the 115,760 records of anesthesia procedures identified, there were 57 instances of incorrect record opening and charting during the study period. A decreasing trend was observed for all sites combined (p patient record opening in the perioperative environment. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Medical record: systematic centralization versus secure on demand aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quantin, Catherine; Jaquet-Chiffelle, David-Olivier; Coatrieux, Gouenou; Benzenine, Eric; Auverlot, Bertrand; Allaert, François-André

    2011-03-22

    As patients often see the data of their medical histories scattered among various medical records hosted in several health-care establishments, the purpose of our multidisciplinary study was to define a pragmatic and secure on-demand based system able to gather this information, with no risk of breaching confidentiality, and to relay it to a medical professional who asked for the information via a specific search engine. Scattered data are often heterogeneous, which makes the task of gathering information very hard. Two methods can be compared: trying to solve the problem by standardizing and centralizing all the information about every patient in a single Medical Record system or trying to use the data "as is" and find a way to obtain the most complete and the most accurate information. Given the failure of the first approach, due to the lack of standardization or privacy and security problems, for example, we propose an alternative that relies on the current state of affairs: an on-demand system, using a specific search engine that is able to retrieve information from the different medical records of a single patient. We describe the function of Medical Record Search Engines (MRSE), which are able to retrieve all the available information regarding a patient who has been hospitalized in different hospitals and to provide this information to health professionals upon request. MRSEs use pseudonymized patient identities and thus never have access to the patient's identity. However, though the system would be easy to implement as it by-passes many of the difficulties associated with a centralized architecture, the health professional would have to validate the information, i.e. read all of the information and create his own synthesis and possibly reject extra data, which could be a drawback. We thus propose various feasible improvements, based on the implementation of several tools in our on-demand based system. A system that gathers all of the currently available

  13. Medical record: systematic centralization versus secure on demand aggregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benzenine Eric

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As patients often see the data of their medical histories scattered among various medical records hosted in several health-care establishments, the purpose of our multidisciplinary study was to define a pragmatic and secure on-demand based system able to gather this information, with no risk of breaching confidentiality, and to relay it to a medical professional who asked for the information via a specific search engine. Methods Scattered data are often heterogeneous, which makes the task of gathering information very hard. Two methods can be compared: trying to solve the problem by standardizing and centralizing all the information about every patient in a single Medical Record system or trying to use the data "as is" and find a way to obtain the most complete and the most accurate information. Given the failure of the first approach, due to the lack of standardization or privacy and security problems, for example, we propose an alternative that relies on the current state of affairs: an on-demand system, using a specific search engine that is able to retrieve information from the different medical records of a single patient. Results We describe the function of Medical Record Search Engines (MRSE, which are able to retrieve all the available information regarding a patient who has been hospitalized in different hospitals and to provide this information to health professionals upon request. MRSEs use pseudonymized patient identities and thus never have access to the patient's identity. However, though the system would be easy to implement as it by-passes many of the difficulties associated with a centralized architecture, the health professional would have to validate the information, i.e. read all of the information and create his own synthesis and possibly reject extra data, which could be a drawback. We thus propose various feasible improvements, based on the implementation of several tools in our on-demand based system

  14. Proposed Electronic Medical Record with Emphasis on Hepatitis Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Skapetis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Medical domain is characterized, like many other domains, by an exponential evolution of the knowledge. There are a lot of tools which try to reduce the risk of error apparition in medical life. Medical decision becomes a very hard activity because the human experts, who have to make decisions, can hardly process the huge amounts of data. Diagnosis has a very important role here. It is the first step from a set of therapeutic actions, an error at this level can have dramatic consequences.The aim of this paper is to present a new electronic medical system for using it on patients with hepatitis virusinfection.Results: Hepatitis is a very complicated disease with numerous different types many of them can lead to serious diseases like cirrhosis and liver cancer. An early correct diagnosis and an adequate treatment could reduce the risks of liver cancer apparition or other severe diseases. The main goal of the system is to use artificial intelligence in order to offer predictions about patients infected with hepatitis virus and also to follow the healthcondition of the patient reevaluating at every time the initial diagnosis and suggesting tests and treatment. Our effort is to present a new electronic medical record that will “borrow” data from the standard health record of the patient and other resources where information is saved and will process it and give suggestions for the diagnosis and treatment of the patient and at the same time will use a simple operating environment, such as the internet, thus making it easy to use.Conclusions The medical record is a big step in improving health services in public hospitals. The proposed EMR with the use of artificial intelligence is the next logical step that will help in the diagnosis and early treatment of disease.

  15. Prevalence of Sharing Access Credentials in Electronic Medical Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korach, Tzfania; Shreberk-Hassidim, Rony; Thomaidou, Elena; Uzefovsky, Florina; Ayal, Shahar; Ariely, Dan

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Confidentiality of health information is an important aspect of the physician patient relationship. The use of digital medical records has made data much more accessible. To prevent data leakage, many countries have created regulations regarding medical data accessibility. These regulations require a unique user ID for each medical staff member, and this must be protected by a password, which should be kept undisclosed by all means. Methods We performed a four-question Google Forms-based survey of medical staff. In the survey, each participant was asked if he/she ever obtained the password of another medical staff member. Then, we asked how many times such an episode occurred and the reason for it. Results A total of 299 surveys were gathered. The responses showed that 220 (73.6%) participants reported that they had obtained the password of another medical staff member. Only 171 (57.2%) estimated how many time it happened, with an average estimation of 4.75 episodes. All the residents that took part in the study (45, 15%) had obtained the password of another medical staff member, while only 57.5% (38/66) of the nurses reported this. Conclusions The use of unique user IDs and passwords to defend the privacy of medical data is a common requirement in medical organizations. Unfortunately, the use of passwords is doomed because medical staff members share their passwords with one another. Strict regulations requiring each staff member to have it's a unique user ID might lead to password sharing and to a decrease in data safety. PMID:28875052

  16. The period of time in which medical records are kept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sephora Luyza Marchesini Stival

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Regarding medical record keeping, legislation in Portugal is sparse in relation to conservation of several legal instruments. Furthermore, it contributes to the knowledge of most health professionals and health institution managers who are obliged to keep the information of their patients. In Brazil, despite the absence of legislation, the Federal Medical Council has been consolidating the theme through resolutions. Both countries are heading to rule in favors of permanent guard, which can only be achieved by switching paper support for electronic support.

  17. National electronic medical records integration on cloud computing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Hebah; El-Masri, Samir

    2013-01-01

    Few Healthcare providers have an advanced level of Electronic Medical Record (EMR) adoption. Others have a low level and most have no EMR at all. Cloud computing technology is a new emerging technology that has been used in other industry and showed a great success. Despite the great features of Cloud computing, they haven't been utilized fairly yet in healthcare industry. This study presents an innovative Healthcare Cloud Computing system for Integrating Electronic Health Record (EHR). The proposed Cloud system applies the Cloud Computing technology on EHR system, to present a comprehensive EHR integrated environment.

  18. Clinicians’ Evaluation of Computer-Assisted Medication Summarization of Electronic Medical Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xinxin; Cimin, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Each year thousands of patients die of avoidable medication errors. When a patient is admitted to, transferred within, or discharged from a clinical facility, clinicians should review previous medication orders, current orders and future plans for care, and reconcile differences if there are any. If medication reconciliation is not accurate and systematic, medication errors such as omissions, duplications, dosing errors, or drug interactions may occur and cause harm. Computer-assisted medication applications showed promise as an intervention to reduce medication summarization inaccuracies and thus avoidable medication errors. In this study, a computer-assisted medication summarization application, designed to abstract and represent multi-source time-oriented medication data, was introduced to assist clinicians with their medication reconciliation processes. An evaluation study was carried out to assess clinical usefulness and analyze potential impact of such application. Both quantitative and qualitative methods were applied to measure clinicians' performance efficiency and inaccuracy in medication summarization process with and without the intervention of computer-assisted medication application. Clinicians' feedback indicated the feasibility of integrating such a medication summarization tool into clinical practice workflow as a complementary addition to existing electronic health record systems. The result of the study showed potential to improve efficiency and reduce inaccuracy in clinician performance of medication summarization, which could in turn improve care efficiency, quality of care, and patient safety. PMID:24393492

  19. Clinicians' evaluation of computer-assisted medication summarization of electronic medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xinxin; Cimino, James J

    2015-04-01

    Each year thousands of patients die of avoidable medication errors. When a patient is admitted to, transferred within, or discharged from a clinical facility, clinicians should review previous medication orders, current orders and future plans for care, and reconcile differences if there are any. If medication reconciliation is not accurate and systematic, medication errors such as omissions, duplications, dosing errors, or drug interactions may occur and cause harm. Computer-assisted medication applications showed promise as an intervention to reduce medication summarization inaccuracies and thus avoidable medication errors. In this study, a computer-assisted medication summarization application, designed to abstract and represent multi-source time-oriented medication data, was introduced to assist clinicians with their medication reconciliation processes. An evaluation study was carried out to assess clinical usefulness and analyze potential impact of such application. Both quantitative and qualitative methods were applied to measure clinicians' performance efficiency and inaccuracy in medication summarization process with and without the intervention of computer-assisted medication application. Clinicians' feedback indicated the feasibility of integrating such a medication summarization tool into clinical practice workflow as a complementary addition to existing electronic health record systems. The result of the study showed potential to improve efficiency and reduce inaccuracy in clinician performance of medication summarization, which could in turn improve care efficiency, quality of care, and patient safety. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Data-Driven Information Extraction from Chinese Electronic Medical Records.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Xu

    Full Text Available This study aims to propose a data-driven framework that takes unstructured free text narratives in Chinese Electronic Medical Records (EMRs as input and converts them into structured time-event-description triples, where the description is either an elaboration or an outcome of the medical event.Our framework uses a hybrid approach. It consists of constructing cross-domain core medical lexica, an unsupervised, iterative algorithm to accrue more accurate terms into the lexica, rules to address Chinese writing conventions and temporal descriptors, and a Support Vector Machine (SVM algorithm that innovatively utilizes Normalized Google Distance (NGD to estimate the correlation between medical events and their descriptions.The effectiveness of the framework was demonstrated with a dataset of 24,817 de-identified Chinese EMRs. The cross-domain medical lexica were capable of recognizing terms with an F1-score of 0.896. 98.5% of recorded medical events were linked to temporal descriptors. The NGD SVM description-event matching achieved an F1-score of 0.874. The end-to-end time-event-description extraction of our framework achieved an F1-score of 0.846.In terms of named entity recognition, the proposed framework outperforms state-of-the-art supervised learning algorithms (F1-score: 0.896 vs. 0.886. In event-description association, the NGD SVM is superior to SVM using only local context and semantic features (F1-score: 0.874 vs. 0.838.The framework is data-driven, weakly supervised, and robust against the variations and noises that tend to occur in a large corpus. It addresses Chinese medical writing conventions and variations in writing styles through patterns used for discovering new terms and rules for updating the lexica.

  1. A method for automating calibration and records management for instrumentation and dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, J.M. Jr.; Rushton, R.O.; Burns, R.E. Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Current industry requirements are becoming more stringent on quality assurance records and documentation for calibration of instruments and dosimetry. A novel method is presented here that will allow a progressive automation scheme to be used in pursuit of that goal. This concept is based on computer-controlled irradiators that can act as stand-alone devices or be interfaced to other components via a computer local area network. In this way, complete systems can be built with modules to create a records management system to meet the needs of small laboratories or large multi-building calibration groups. Different database engines or formats can be used simply by replacing a module. Modules for temperature and pressure monitoring or shipping and receiving can be added, as well as equipment modules for direct IEEE-488 interface to electrometers and other instrumentation

  2. Formalized Medical Guidelines and a Structured Electronic Health Record.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Peleška, Jan; Anger, Z.; Buchtela, David; Šebesta, K.; Tomečková, Marie; Veselý, Arnošt; Zvára, K.; Zvárová, Jana

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 11, - (2005), s. 4652-4656 ISSN 1727-1983. [EMBEC'05. European Medical and Biomedical Conference /3./. Prague, 20.11.2005-25.11.2005] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1ET200300413 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : formalization of guidelines in cardilogy * GLIF model * structure electronic health record * algorithm in cardiovascular diagnostics and treatment Subject RIV: BD - Theory of Information

  3. The Dependence of Machine Learning on Electronic Medical Record Quality

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, Long; Ledbetter, David; Aczon, Melissa; Wetzel, Randall

    2017-01-01

    There is growing interest in applying machine learning methods to Electronic Medical Records (EMR). Across different institutions, however, EMR quality can vary widely. This work investigated the impact of this disparity on the performance of three advanced machine learning algorithms: logistic regression, multilayer perceptron, and recurrent neural network. The EMR disparity was emulated using different permutations of the EMR collected at Children's Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA) Pediatric Int...

  4. Brief review: dangers of the electronic medical record

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available EMRs represent a potential boon to patient care and providers, but to date that potential has been unfulfilled. Data suggest that in some instances EMRs may even produce adverse outcomes. This result probably has occurred because lack of provider input and familiarity with EMRs resulting in the medical records becoming less a tool for patient care and more of a tool for documentation and reimbursement.

  5. Implementing hospital library automation: the GaIN project. Georgia Interactive Network for Medical Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, J A; McInnis, K A; Rosner, A L

    1995-01-01

    The GaIN (Georgia Interactive Network for Medical Information) Hospital Libraries' Local Automation Project was a one-year, grant-funded initiative to implement an integrated library system in three Georgia hospitals. The purpose of the project was to install the library systems, describe the steps in hospital library automation, and identify issues and barriers related to automation in small libraries. The participating hospitals included a small, a medium, and a large institution. The steps and time required for project implementation were documented in order to develop a decision checklist. Although library automation proved a desirable approach for improving collection accessibility, simplifying daily routines, and improving the library's image in the hospital, planners must be sure to consider equipment as well as software support, staffing for the conversion, and training of the library staff and end users. PMID:7581184

  6. Admission medical records made at night time have the same quality as day and evening time records

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amirian, Ilda; Mortensen, Jacob F; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: A thorough and accurate admission medical record is an important tool in ensuring patient safety during the hospital stay. Surgeons' performance might be affected during night shifts due to sleep deprivation. The aim of the study was to assess the quality of admission medical records....... CONCLUSION: Night time deterioration was not seen in the quality of the medical records. FUNDING: The study was supported financially by the Tryg Foundation Denmark and The Danish Medical Association. TRIAL REGISTRATION: not relevant....

  7. The utility of the records medical: factors associated with the medication errors in chronic disease 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cruz, Hellen Lilliane; Mota, Flávia Karla da Cruz; Araújo, Lorena Ulhôa; Bodevan, Emerson Cotta; Seixas, Sérgio Ricardo Stuckert; Santos, Delba Fonseca

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: This study describes the development of the medication history of the medical records to measure factors associated with medication errors among chronic diseases patients in Diamantina, Minas Gerais. Methods: retrospective, descriptive observational study of secondary data, through the review of medical records of hypertensive and diabetic patients, from March to October 2016. Results: The patients the mean age of patient was 62.1 ± 14.3 years. The number of basic nursing care (95.5%) prevailed and physician consultations were 82.6%. Polypharmacy was recorded in 54% of sample, and review of the medication lists by a pharmacist revealed that 67.0% drug included at least one risk. The most common risks were: drug-drug interaction (57.8%), renal risk (29.8%), risk of falling (12.9%) and duplicate therapies (11.9%). Factors associated with medications errors history were chronic diseases and polypharmacy, that persisted in multivariate analysis, with adjusted RP chronic diseases, diabetes RP 1.55 (95%IC 1.04-1.94), diabetes/hypertension RP 1.6 (95%CI 1.09-1.23) and polypharmacy RP 1.61 (95%IC 1.41-1.85), respectively. Conclusion: Medication errors are known to compromise patient safety. This has led to the suggestion that medication reconciliation an entry point into the systems health, ongoing care coordination and a person focused approach for people and their families. PMID:29236841

  8. Evaluation and comparison of medical records department of Iran university of medical sciences teaching hospitals and medical records department of Kermanshah university of medical sciences teaching hospitals according to the international standards ISO 9001-2000 in 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    maryam ahmadi

    2010-04-01

    Conclusion: The rate of final conformity of medical records system by the criteria of the ISO 9001-2000 standards in hospitals related to Iran university of medical sciences was greater than in hospitals related to Kermanshah university of medical sciences. And total conformity rate of medical records system in Kermanshah hospitals was low. So the regulation of medical records department with ISO quality management standards can help to elevate its quality.

  9. Comparison of birth weight between school health records and medical birth records in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Camilla Bjørn; Gamborg, Michael; Heitmann, Berit

    2015-01-01

    -1991. PARTICIPANTS: The study was based on BW recorded in the Copenhagen School Health Records Register (CSHRR) and in The Medical Birth Register (MBR). The registers were linked via the Danish personal identification number. PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOME MEASURES: Statistical comparisons of BW in the registers were...... performed using t tests, Pearson's correlation coefficients, Bland-Altman plots and κ coefficients. Odds of BW discrepancies >100 g were examined by logistic regressions. RESULTS: The study population included 47 534 children. From 1973 to 1979 when BW was grouped in 500 g intervals in the MBR, mean BW...

  10. Evaluation of Electronic Medical Record Administrative data Linked Database (EMRALD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Karen; Mitiku, Tezeta F; Ivers, Noah M; Guo, Helen; Lu, Hong; Jaakkimainen, Liisa; Kavanagh, Doug G; Lee, Douglas S; Tu, Jack V

    2014-01-01

    Primary care electronic medical records (EMRs) represent a potentially rich source of information for research and evaluation. To assess the completeness of primary care EMR data compared with administrative data. Retrospective comparison of provincial health-related administrative databases and patient records for more than 50,000 patients of 54 physicians in 15 geographically distinct clinics in Ontario, Canada, contained in the Electronic Medical Record Administrative data Linked Database (EMRALD). Physician billings, laboratory tests, medications, specialist consultation letters, and hospital discharges captured in EMRALD were compared with health-related administrative data in a universal access healthcare system. The mean (standard deviation [SD]) percentage of clinic primary care outpatient visits captured in EMRALD compared with administrative data was 94.4% (4.88%). Consultation letters from specialists for first consultations and for hospital discharges were captured at a mean (SD) rate of 72.7% (7.98%) and 58.5% (15.24%), respectively, within 30 days of the occurrence. The mean (SD) capture within EMRALD of the most common laboratory tests billed and the most common drugs dispensed was 67.3% (21.46%) and 68.2% (8.32%), respectively, for all clinics. We found reasonable capture of information within the EMR compared with administrative data, with the advantage in the EMR of having actual laboratory results, prescriptions for patients of all ages, and detailed clinical information. However, the combination of complete EMR records and administrative data is needed to provide a full comprehensive picture of patient health histories and processes, and outcomes of care.

  11. Report on Medical Activities for the Automated AFEES Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-03-10

    review of check-list and protocol of the test and actual examinations under direct observation by the physician. In the third phase, the para - medics... Psoriasis 40.18 Tinea cruris 40. 30 Abnormal color or texture 40. 31 Brownish-yellow spots 40. 33 Yellow 40.35 Pallor 40. 37

  12. Minimal impact of an electronic medical records system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tall, Jill M; Hurd, Marie; Gifford, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    Electronic medical records (EMRs) implementation in hospitals and emergency departments (EDs) is becoming increasingly more common. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of an EMR system on patient-related factors that correlate to ED workflow efficiency. A retrospective chart review assessed monthly census reports of all patients who registered and were treated to disposition during conversion from paper charts to an EMR system. The primary outcome measurement was an analysis of the time of registration to discharge or total ED length of stay as well as rate of those who left without being seen, eloped, or left against medical advice. These data were recorded from 3 periods, for 18 months: before installation of the EMR system (pre-EMR), during acclimation to the EMR, and post acclimation (post-EMR). A total of 61626 individual patient records were collected and analyzed. The total ED length of stay across all patient subtypes was not significantly affected by the installation of the hospital-wide EMR system (P = .481); however, a significant decrease was found for patients who were admitted to the hospital from the ED (P .25). Installation of a hospital-wide EMR system had minimal impact on workflow efficiency parameters in an ED. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Reflecting on the ethical administration of computerized medical records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collmann, Jeff R.

    1995-05-01

    This presentation examines the ethical issues raised by computerized image management and communication systems (IMAC), the ethical principals that should guide development of policies, procedures and practices for IMACS systems, and who should be involved in developing a hospital's approach to these issues. The ready access of computerized records creates special hazards of which hospitals must beware. Hospitals must maintain confidentiality of patient's records while making records available to authorized users as efficiently as possible. The general conditions of contemporary health care undermine protecting the confidentiality of patient record. Patients may not provide health care institutions with information about themselves under conditions of informed consent. The field of information science must design sophisticated systems of computer security that stratify access, create audit trails on data changes and system use, safeguard patient data from corruption, and protect the databases from outside invasion. Radiology professionals must both work with information science experts in their own hospitals to create institutional safeguards and include the adequacy of security measures as a criterion for evaluating PACS systems. New policies and procedures on maintaining computerized patient records must be developed that obligate all members of the health care staff, not just care givers. Patients must be informed about the existence of computerized medical records, the rules and practices that govern their dissemination and given the opportunity to give or withhold consent for their use. Departmental and hospital policies on confidentiality should be reviewed to determine if revisions are necessary to manage computer-based records. Well developed discussions of the ethical principles and administrative policies on confidentiality and informed consent and of the risks posed by computer-based patient records systems should be included in initial and continuing

  14. A method for the automated, reliable retrieval of publication-citation records.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek Ruths

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Publication records and citation indices often are used to evaluate academic performance. For this reason, obtaining or computing them accurately is important. This can be difficult, largely due to a lack of complete knowledge of an individual's publication list and/or lack of time available to manually obtain or construct the publication-citation record. While online publication search engines have somewhat addressed these problems, using raw search results can yield inaccurate estimates of publication-citation records and citation indices. METHODOLOGY: In this paper, we present a new, automated method that produces estimates of an individual's publication-citation record from an individual's name and a set of domain-specific vocabulary that may occur in the individual's publication titles. Because this vocabulary can be harvested directly from a research web page or online (partial publication list, our method delivers an easy way to obtain estimates of a publication-citation record and the relevant citation indices. Our method works by applying a series of stringent name and content filters to the raw publication search results returned by an online publication search engine. In this paper, our method is run using Google Scholar, but the underlying filters can be easily applied to any existing publication search engine. When compared against a manually constructed data set of individuals and their publication-citation records, our method provides significant improvements over raw search results. The estimated publication-citation records returned by our method have an average sensitivity of 98% and specificity of 72% (in contrast to raw search result specificity of less than 10%. When citation indices are computed using these records, the estimated indices are within of the true value 10%, compared to raw search results which have overestimates of, on average, 75%. CONCLUSIONS: These results confirm that our method provides

  15. The University of Washington electronic medical record experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welton, Nanette J

    2010-07-01

    The Health Sciences Library at the University of Washington initiated and continues to develop a role in the electronic medical record, starting with the development of the first integrated web-based interface, called MINDscape. An Integrated Academic Information Management System (IAIMS) grant in 1992 began the process, which also led to the development of a clinical medical librarian position. Over the years, the librarian's role in the clinical environment became more established, and with the advent of clinical online resources, it offered further opportunities for librarians to provide the expertise needed to incorporate the appropriate resources. The collaborative journey continues as librarians, now able to directly access the EMRs, provide information about what resources to use and where best to place them and design how best to provide notes or feedback to clinicians.

  16. A medical record linkage analysis of abortion underreporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udry, J R; Gaughan, M; Schwingl, P J; van den Berg, B J

    1996-01-01

    Inaccuracy in women's reports of their abortion histories affects many areas of interest to reproductive health professionals and researchers. The identification of characteristics that affect the accuracy of reporting is essential for the improvement of data collection methods. A comparison of the medical records of 104 American women aged 27-30 in 1990-1991 with their self-reported abortion histories revealed that 19% of these women failed to report one or more abortions. Results of logistic regression analysis indicate that nonwhite women were 3.3 times as likely as whites to underreport. With each additional year that had elapsed since the first recorded abortion, women became somewhat more likely to underreport (odds ratio of 1.3), while each additional year of a woman's education slightly decreased the likelihood of underreporting (odds ratio of 0.7).

  17. Applying XDS for sharing CDA-based medical records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joong Il; Jang, Bong Mun; Han, Dong Hoon; Yang, Keon Ho; Kang, Won-Suk; Jung, Haijo; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2006-03-01

    Many countries have set long-term objectives for establishing an Electronic Healthcare Records system(EHRs). Various IT Strategies note that integration of EHR systems has a high priority. Because the EHR systems are based on different information models and different technology platforms, one of the key integration problems in the realization of the EHRs for the continuity of patient care, is the inability to share patient records between various institutions. Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) committee has defined the detailed implementations of existing standards such as DICOM, HL7, in a publicly available document called the IHE technical framework (IHE-TF). Cross-enterprise document sharing (XDS), one of IHE technical frameworks, is describing how to apply the standards into the information systems for the sharing of medical documents among hospitals. This study aims to design Clinical Document Architecture (CDA) schema based on HL7, and to apply implementation strategies of XDS using this CDA schema.

  18. Evaluation of a lecture recording system in a medical curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacro, Thierry R H; Gebregziabher, Mulugeta; Fitzharris, Timothy P

    2010-01-01

    Recently, the Medical University of South Carolina adopted a lecture recording system (LRS). A retrospective study of LRS was implemented to document the students' perceptions, pattern of usage, and impact on the students' grades in three basic sciences courses (Cell Biology/Histology, Physiology, and Neurosciences). The number of accesses and length of viewings of the recordings were recorded per week for each student and correlated with the grades in each of the three courses. Attendance records were not available. The results showed considerable variability in the use of the LRS by both faculty and students during the entire semester and across all three courses, including week to week variations. Data indicated that 30% of the students did not use the LRS at all with 41% of the students using it very little (less than 10 times for a total of 131 recordings). Specific patterns of usage were identified for each of the three courses throughout the semester, with an increase in access prior or during examination weeks. However, the statistical analysis showed that there was no correlation between the final grades and the usage of LRS. Finally, a survey of the students' perception showed that 74% agreed/strongly agreed that the recordings were useful with 6% disagreeing/strongly disagreeing and 11% undecided. This study showed that the use of LRS might be a viable alternative for students unable to attend lecture due to circumstances such as illness but that more research is needed to truly understand the best pedagogical use of LRS. Copyright © 2010 American Association of Anatomists.

  19. A prototype for automation of land-cover products from Landsat Surface Reflectance Data Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rover, J.; Goldhaber, M. B.; Steinwand, D.; Nelson, K.; Coan, M.; Wylie, B. K.; Dahal, D.; Wika, S.; Quenzer, R.

    2014-12-01

    Landsat data records of surface reflectance provide a three-decade history of land surface processes. Due to the vast number of these archived records, development of innovative approaches for automated data mining and information retrieval were necessary. Recently, we created a prototype utilizing open source software libraries for automatically generating annual Anderson Level 1 land cover maps and information products from data acquired by the Landsat Mission for the years 1984 to 2013. The automated prototype was applied to two target areas in northwestern and east-central North Dakota, USA. The approach required the National Land Cover Database (NLCD) and two user-input target acquisition year-days. The Landsat archive was mined for scenes acquired within a 100-day window surrounding these target dates, and then cloud-free pixels where chosen closest to the specified target acquisition dates. The selected pixels were then composited before completing an unsupervised classification using the NLCD. Pixels unchanged in pairs of the NLCD were used for training decision tree models in an iterative process refined with model confidence measures. The decision tree models were applied to the Landsat composites to generate a yearly land cover map and related information products. Results for the target areas captured changes associated with the recent expansion of oil shale production and agriculture driven by economics and policy, such as the increase in biofuel production and reduction in Conservation Reserve Program. Changes in agriculture, grasslands, and surface water reflect the local hydrological conditions that occurred during the 29-year span. Future enhancements considered for this prototype include a web-based client, ancillary spatial datasets, trends and clustering algorithms, and the forecasting of future land cover.

  20. A Semi-automated Approach to Improve the Efficiency of Medical Imaging Segmentation for Haptic Rendering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Pat; Hu, Mengqi; Kannan, Rahul; Krishnaswamy, Srinivasan

    2017-08-01

    The Sensimmer platform represents our ongoing research on simultaneous haptics and graphics rendering of 3D models. For simulation of medical and surgical procedures using Sensimmer, 3D models must be obtained from medical imaging data, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT). Image segmentation techniques are used to determine the anatomies of interest from the images. 3D models are obtained from segmentation and their triangle reduction is required for graphics and haptics rendering. This paper focuses on creating 3D models by automating the segmentation of CT images based on the pixel contrast for integrating the interface between Sensimmer and medical imaging devices, using the volumetric approach, Hough transform method, and manual centering method. Hence, automating the process has reduced the segmentation time by 56.35% while maintaining the same accuracy of the output at ±2 voxels.

  1. One year of ICTP diploma courses on-line using the automated EyA recording system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canessa, Enrique; Fonda, Carlo; Zennaro, Marco

    2009-03-01

    The 12-month pre-Ph.D ICTP Diploma Courses in the fields of Condensed Matter Physics, High Energy Physics, Mathematics, Earth System Physics and Basics Physics have been recorded using the automated, low cost recording system called EyA developed in-house. We discuss the technical details on how these recordings were implemented, together with some web usage statistics and students feedback. As yet, no similar endeavor has been made to put on-line a complete high-level Diploma Programme, due to the high costs involved when using alternative recording solutions. These recordings are freely available on the website www.ictp.tv. (author)

  2. Active learning: a step towards automating medical concept extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kholghi, Mahnoosh; Sitbon, Laurianne; Zuccon, Guido; Nguyen, Anthony

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents an automatic, active learning-based system for the extraction of medical concepts from clinical free-text reports. Specifically, (1) the contribution of active learning in reducing the annotation effort and (2) the robustness of incremental active learning framework across different selection criteria and data sets are determined. The comparative performance of an active learning framework and a fully supervised approach were investigated to study how active learning reduces the annotation effort while achieving the same effectiveness as a supervised approach. Conditional random fields as the supervised method, and least confidence and information density as 2 selection criteria for active learning framework were used. The effect of incremental learning vs standard learning on the robustness of the models within the active learning framework with different selection criteria was also investigated. The following 2 clinical data sets were used for evaluation: the Informatics for Integrating Biology and the Bedside/Veteran Affairs (i2b2/VA) 2010 natural language processing challenge and the Shared Annotated Resources/Conference and Labs of the Evaluation Forum (ShARe/CLEF) 2013 eHealth Evaluation Lab. The annotation effort saved by active learning to achieve the same effectiveness as supervised learning is up to 77%, 57%, and 46% of the total number of sequences, tokens, and concepts, respectively. Compared with the random sampling baseline, the saving is at least doubled. Incremental active learning is a promising approach for building effective and robust medical concept extraction models while significantly reducing the burden of manual annotation. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. The impact of an automated dose-dispensing scheme on user compliance, medication understanding, and medication stockpiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anna Bira; Haugbølle, Lotte Stig

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been assumed that a new health technology, automated dose-dispensing (ADD), would result in benefits for medication users, including increased compliance, enhanced medication understanding, and improved safety. However, it was legislators and health professionals who pinpointed...... the assumed user benefits. Neither Danish nor international studies dealt with users' perspective on ADD in general or with respect to the pinpointed benefits, and thus exploration was needed. OBJECTIVES: The objective of this article is to respond to the following research question: How does ADD affect users...

  4. Automated endoscopic navigation and advisory system from medical image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwoh, Chee K.; Khan, Gul N.; Gillies, Duncan F.

    1999-05-01

    , which is developed to obtain the relative depth of the colon surface in the image by assuming a point light source very close to the camera. If we assume the colon has a shape similar to a tube, then a reasonable approximation of the position of the center of the colon (lumen) will be a function of the direction in which the majority of the normal vectors of shape are pointing. The second layer is the control layer and at this level, a decision model must be built for endoscope navigation and advisory system. The system that we built is the models of probabilistic networks that create a basic, artificial intelligence system for navigation in the colon. We have constructed the probabilistic networks from correlated objective data using the maximum weighted spanning tree algorithm. In the construction of a probabilistic network, it is always assumed that the variables starting from the same parent are conditionally independent. However, this may not hold and will give rise to incorrect inferences. In these cases, we proposed the creation of a hidden node to modify the network topology, which in effect models the dependency of correlated variables, to solve the problem. The conditional probability matrices linking the hidden node to its neighbors are determined using a gradient descent method which minimizing the objective cost function. The error gradients can be treated as updating messages and ca be propagated in any direction throughout any singly connected network to adjust the network parameters. With the above two- level approach, we have been able to build an automated endoscope navigation and advisory system successfully.

  5. [Impact of an automated dispensing system for medical devices in cardiac surgery department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clou, E; Dompnier, M; Kably, B; Leplay, C; Poupon, E; Archer, V; Paul, M

    2018-01-01

    To secure medical devices' management, the implementation of automated dispensing system in surgical service has been realized. The objective of this study was to evaluate security, organizational and economic impact of installing automated dispensing system for medical devices (ASDM). The implementation took place in a cardiac surgery department. Security impact was assessed by comparing traceability rate of implantable medical devices one year before and one year after installation. Questionnaire on nurses' perception and satisfaction completed this survey. Resupplying costs, stocks' evolution and investments for the implementation of ASDM were the subject of cost-benefit study. After one year, traceability rate is excellent (100%). Nursing staffs were satisfied with 87.5% by this new system. The introduction of ASDM allowed a qualitative and quantitative decrease in stocks, with a reduction of 30% for purchased medical devices and 15% for implantable medical devices in deposit-consignment. Cost-benefit analysis shows a rapid return on investment. Real stock decrease (purchased medical devices) is equivalent to 46.6% of investment. Implementation of ASDM allows to secure storage and dispensing of medical devices. This system has also an important economic impact and appreciated by users. Copyright © 2017 Académie Nationale de Pharmacie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Penetrógrafo eletrônico automático Automatic electronic recording penetrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aloísio Bianchini

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho relata o desenvolvimento de um penetrógrafo, construído para operar de forma automática, executando um ensaio de penetração com um simples toque no botão de partida. Ele possui incorporado, um sistema dedicado de aquisição de dados, que pode armazenar até 187 ensaios e uma interface de comunicação, dispensando a conexão ao microcomputador ou "datalogger". As condições do ensaio como, por exemplo, data, localização (latitude e longitude e profundidade, podem ser atualizadas, assim como a aferição da célula de carga, via teclado com mostrador de duas linhas. Verificou-se variação de velocidade This paper presents the development of an automatic recording penetrometer, which operates at the touch of a button. It incorporates a data acquisition system, which can store data of 187 tests and has a serial PC interface. The test characterization such as dates, location (latitude and longitude can be recorded as well. The maximum working depth may be set and the load cell calibration can be verified through a keyboard with 2 lines display. A speed variation error of < 5% compared to ASAE standard was verified for cone indices between 500 and 5,684 kPa. The equipment is compact, easy to handle and can realize one test every minute.

  7. The role of automated feedback in training and retaining biological recorders for citizen science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wal, René; Sharma, Nirwan; Mellish, Chris; Robinson, Annie; Siddharthan, Advaith

    2016-06-01

    The rapid rise of citizen science, with lay people forming often extensive biodiversity sensor networks, is seen as a solution to the mismatch between data demand and supply while simultaneously engaging citizens with environmental topics. However, citizen science recording schemes require careful consideration of how to motivate, train, and retain volunteers. We evaluated a novel computing science framework that allowed for the automated generation of feedback to citizen scientists using natural language generation (NLG) technology. We worked with a photo-based citizen science program in which users also volunteer species identification aided by an online key. Feedback is provided after photo (and identification) submission and is aimed to improve volunteer species identification skills and to enhance volunteer experience and retention. To assess the utility of NLG feedback, we conducted two experiments with novices to assess short-term (single session) and longer-term (5 sessions in 2 months) learning, respectively. Participants identified a specimen in a series of photos. One group received only the correct answer after each identification, and the other group received the correct answer and NLG feedback explaining reasons for misidentification and highlighting key features that facilitate correct identification. We then developed an identification training tool with NLG feedback as part of the citizen science program BeeWatch and analyzed learning by users. Finally, we implemented NLG feedback in the live program and evaluated this by randomly allocating all BeeWatch users to treatment groups that received different types of feedback upon identification submission. After 6 months separate surveys were sent out to assess whether views on the citizen science program and its feedback differed among the groups. Identification accuracy and retention of novices were higher for those who received automated feedback than for those who received only confirmation of the

  8. Electronic medical records and efficiency and productivity during office visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Michael F

    2011-04-01

    To estimate the relationship between electronic medical record (EMR) use and efficiency of utilization and provider productivity during visits to US office-based physicians. Cross-sectional analysis of the 2006-2007 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey. The sample included 62,710 patient visits to 2625 physicians. EMR systems included demographics, clinical notes, prescription orders, and laboratory and imaging results. Efficiency was measured as utilization of examinations, laboratory tests, radiology procedures, health education, nonmedication treatments, and medications. Productivity was measured as total services provided per 20-minute period. Survey-weighted regressions estimated association of EMR use with services provided, visit intensity/duration, and productivity. Marginal effects were estimated by averaging across all visits and by major reason for visit. EMR use was associated with higher probability of any examination (7.7%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.4%, 13.1%); any laboratory test (5.7%, 95% CI = 2.6%, 8.8%); any health education (4.9%, 95% CI = 0.2%, 9.6%); and fewer laboratory tests (-7.1%, 95% CI = -14.2%, -0.1%). During pre/post surgery visits, EMR use was associated with 7.3% (95% CI= -12.9%, -1.8%) fewer radiology procedures. EMR use was not associated with utilization of nonmedication treatments and medications, or visit duration. During routine visits for a chronic problem, EMR use was associated with 11.2% (95% CI = 5.7%, 16.8%) more diagnostic/screening services provided per 20-minute period. EMR use had a mixed association with efficiency and productivity during office visits. EMRs may improve provider productivity, especially during visits for a new problem and routine chronic care.

  9. Admission medical records made at night time have the same quality as day and evening time records

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amirian, Ilda; Mortensen, Jacob F; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: A thorough and accurate admission medical record is an important tool in ensuring patient safety during the hospital stay. Surgeons' performance might be affected during night shifts due to sleep deprivation. The aim of the study was to assess the quality of admission medical records...

  10. Admission medical records made at night time have the same quality as day and evening time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amirian, Ilda; Mortensen, Jacob F; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: A thorough and accurate admission medical record is an important tool in ensuring patient safety during the hospital stay. Surgeons' performance might be affected during night shifts due to sleep deprivation. The aim of the study was to assess the quality of admission medical records...... deterioration was not seen in the quality of the medical records....

  11. Implementing electronic medical record systems in developing countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamish Fraser

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The developing world faces a series of health crises including HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis that threaten the lives of millions of people. Lack of infrastructure and trained, experienced staff are considered important barriers to scaling up treatment for these diseases. In this paper we explain why information systems are important in many healthcare projects in the developing world. We discuss pilot projects demonstrating that such systems are possible and can expand to manage hundreds of thousands of patients. We also pass on the most important practical lessons in design and implementation from our experience in doing this work. Finally, we discuss the importance of collaboration between projects in the development of electronic medical record systems rather than reinventing systems in isolation, and the use of open standards and open source software.

  12. Designing a medical records review tool: an instructional guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell-Henry, Tracy; Cooper, Simon; Endacott, Ruth; Porter, Joanne; Missen, Karen; Sparks, Louise

    2015-01-01

    Medical Records Reviews (MRR) are commonly used in research and quality activities in health care, however, there is a paucity of literature offering a step by step guide to devising a reliable, user-friendly tool. This instructional paper focuses on the stages used to design and implement successful MRR using examples from two reviews in Australian rural hospitals investigating the responses of Registered Nurses to patient deterioration, and guided by time series principals. The MRR were conducted in two rural hospitals in conjunction with a simulation learning intervention where nurses rehearsed clinical management of a deteriorating patient. A six-step template is presented to guide practitioners on how to design and use a MRR tool. When well-planned and appropriately used, MRR provides an excellent means for examining patient outcomes in addition to safety and quality of care.

  13. Medical Record Keeping in the Summer Camp Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Jaycelyn; Weinberg, Stuart; Rosenbloom, S. Trent

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Approximately one fifth of school-aged children spend a significant portion of their year at residential summer camp, and a growing number have chronic medical conditions. Camp health records are essential for safe, efficient care and for transitions between camp and home providers, yet little research exists regarding these systems. Objective To survey residential summer camps for children to determine how camps create, store, and use camper health records. To raise awareness in the informatics community of the issues experienced by health providers working in a special pediatric care setting. Methods We designed a web-based electronic survey concerning medical recordkeeping and healthcare practices at summer camps. 953 camps accredited by the American Camp Association received the survey. Responses were consolidated and evaluated for trends and conclusions. Results Of 953 camps contacted, 298 (31%) responded to the survey. Among respondents, 49.3% stated that there was no computer available at the health center, and 14.8% of camps stated that there was not any computer available to health staff at all. 41.1% of camps stated that internet access was not available. The most common complaints concerning recordkeeping practices were time burden, adequate completion, and consistency. Conclusions Summer camps in the United States make efforts to appropriately document health-care given to campers, but inconsistency and inefficiency may be barriers to staff productivity, staff satisfaction, and quality of care. Survey responses suggest that the current methods used by camps to document healthcare cause limitations in consistency, efficiency, and communications between providers, camp staff, and parents. As of 2012, survey respondents articulated need for a standard software to document summer camp healthcare practices that accounts for camp-specific needs. Improvement may be achieved if documentation software offers the networking capability

  14. Medical Record Keeping in the Summer Camp Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Laura; Holland, Jaycelyn; Weinberg, Stuart; Rosenbloom, S Trent

    2016-12-14

    Approximately one fifth of school-aged children spend a significant portion of their year at residential summer camp, and a growing number have chronic medical conditions. Camp health records are essential for safe, efficient care and for transitions between camp and home providers, yet little research exists regarding these systems. To survey residential summer camps for children to determine how camps create, store, and use camper health records. To raise awareness in the informatics community of the issues experienced by health providers working in a special pediatric care setting. We designed a web-based electronic survey concerning medical recordkeeping and healthcare practices at summer camps. 953 camps accredited by the American Camp Association received the survey. Responses were consolidated and evaluated for trends and conclusions. Of 953 camps contacted, 298 (31%) responded to the survey. Among respondents, 49.3% stated that there was no computer available at the health center, and 14.8% of camps stated that there was not any computer available to health staff at all. 41.1% of camps stated that internet access was not available. The most common complaints concerning recordkeeping practices were time burden, adequate completion, and consistency. Summer camps in the United States make efforts to appropriately document healthcare given to campers, but inconsistency and inefficiency may be barriers to staff productivity, staff satisfaction, and quality of care. Survey responses suggest that the current methods used by camps to document healthcare cause limitations in consistency, efficiency, and communications between providers, camp staff, and parents. As of 2012, survey respondents articulated need for a standard software to document summer camp healthcare practices that accounts for camp-specific needs. Improvement may be achieved if documentation software offers the networking capability, simplicity, pediatrics-specific features, and avoidance of

  15. Factors Affecting Accuracy of Data Abstracted from Medical Records.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith N Zozus

    Full Text Available Medical record abstraction (MRA is often cited as a significant source of error in research data, yet MRA methodology has rarely been the subject of investigation. Lack of a common framework has hindered application of the extant literature in practice, and, until now, there were no evidence-based guidelines for ensuring data quality in MRA. We aimed to identify the factors affecting the accuracy of data abstracted from medical records and to generate a framework for data quality assurance and control in MRA.Candidate factors were identified from published reports of MRA. Content validity of the top candidate factors was assessed via a four-round two-group Delphi process with expert abstractors with experience in clinical research, registries, and quality improvement. The resulting coded factors were categorized into a control theory-based framework of MRA. Coverage of the framework was evaluated using the recent published literature.Analysis of the identified articles yielded 292 unique factors that affect the accuracy of abstracted data. Delphi processes overall refuted three of the top factors identified from the literature based on importance and five based on reliability (six total factors refuted. Four new factors were identified by the Delphi. The generated framework demonstrated comprehensive coverage. Significant underreporting of MRA methodology in recent studies was discovered.The framework generated from this research provides a guide for planning data quality assurance and control for studies using MRA. The large number and variability of factors indicate that while prospective quality assurance likely increases the accuracy of abstracted data, monitoring the accuracy during the abstraction process is also required. Recent studies reporting research results based on MRA rarely reported data quality assurance or control measures, and even less frequently reported data quality metrics with research results. Given the demonstrated

  16. 32 CFR 326.11 - Special procedures for disclosure of medical and psychological records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Special procedures for disclosure of medical and... Special procedures for disclosure of medical and psychological records. When requested medical and psychological records are not exempt from disclosure, the PA Coordinator may determine which non-exempt medical...

  17. Perspectives for medical informatics. Reusing the electronic medical record for clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokosch, H U; Ganslandt, T

    2009-01-01

    Even though today most university hospitals have already implemented commercial hospital information systems and started to build up comprehensive electronic medical records, reuse of such data for data warehousing and research purposes is still very rare. Given this situation, the focus of this paper is to present an overview on exemplary projects, which have already tackled this challenge, reflect on current initiatives within the United States of America and the European Union to establish IT infrastructures for clinical and translational research, and draw attention to new challenges in this area. This paper does not intend to provide a fully comprehensive review on all the issues of clinical routine data reuse. It is based, however, on a presentation of a large variety of historical, but also most recent activities in data warehousing, data retrieval and linking medical informatics with translational research. The article presents an overview of the various international approaches to this issue and illustrates concepts and solutions which have been published, thus giving an impression of activities pursued in this field of medical informatics. Further, problems and open questions, which have also been named in the literature, are presented and three challenges (to establish comprehensive clinical data warehouses, to establish professional IT infrastructure applications supporting clinical trial data capture and to integrate medical record systems and clinical trial databases) related to this area of medical informatics are identified and presented. Translational biomedical research with the aim "to integrate bedside and biology" and to bridge the gap between clinical care and medical research today and in the years to come, provides a large and interesting field for medical informatics researchers. Especially the need for integrating clinical research projects with data repositories built up during documentation of routine clinical care, today still leaves

  18. Automated Detection of Postoperative Surgical Site Infections Using Supervised Methods with Electronic Health Record Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhen; Simon, Gyorgy J; Arsoniadis, Elliot G; Wang, Yan; Kwaan, Mary R; Melton, Genevieve B

    2015-01-01

    The National Surgical Quality Improvement Project (NSQIP) is widely recognized as "the best in the nation" surgical quality improvement resource in the United States. In particular, it rigorously defines postoperative morbidity outcomes, including surgical adverse events occurring within 30 days of surgery. Due to its manual yet expensive construction process, the NSQIP registry is of exceptionally high quality, but its high cost remains a significant bottleneck to NSQIP's wider dissemination. In this work, we propose an automated surgical adverse events detection tool, aimed at accelerating the process of extracting postoperative outcomes from medical charts. As a prototype system, we combined local EHR data with the NSQIP gold standard outcomes and developed machine learned models to retrospectively detect Surgical Site Infections (SSI), a particular family of adverse events that NSQIP extracts. The built models have high specificity (from 0.788 to 0.988) as well as very high negative predictive values (>0.98), reliably eliminating the vast majority of patients without SSI, thereby significantly reducing the NSQIP extractors' burden.

  19. Automation of Presentation Record Production Based on Rich-Media Technology Using SNT Petri Nets Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Martiník

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rich-media describes a broad range of digital interactive media that is increasingly used in the Internet and also in the support of education. Last year, a special pilot audiovisual lecture room was built as a part of the MERLINGO (MEdia-rich Repository of LearnING Objects project solution. It contains all the elements of the modern lecture room determined for the implementation of presentation recordings based on the rich-media technologies and their publication online or on-demand featuring the access of all its elements in the automated mode including automatic editing. Property-preserving Petri net process algebras (PPPA were designed for the specification and verification of the Petri net processes. PPPA does not need to verify the composition of the Petri net processes because all their algebraic operators preserve the specified set of the properties. These original PPPA are significantly generalized for the newly introduced class of the SNT Petri process and agent nets in this paper. The PLACE-SUBST and ASYNC-PROC algebraic operators are defined for this class of Petri nets and their chosen properties are proved. The SNT Petri process and agent nets theory were significantly applied at the design, verification, and implementation of the programming system ensuring the pilot audiovisual lecture room functionality.

  20. Automation of Presentation Record Production Based on Rich-Media Technology Using SNT Petri Nets Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martiník, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    Rich-media describes a broad range of digital interactive media that is increasingly used in the Internet and also in the support of education. Last year, a special pilot audiovisual lecture room was built as a part of the MERLINGO (MEdia-rich Repository of LearnING Objects) project solution. It contains all the elements of the modern lecture room determined for the implementation of presentation recordings based on the rich-media technologies and their publication online or on-demand featuring the access of all its elements in the automated mode including automatic editing. Property-preserving Petri net process algebras (PPPA) were designed for the specification and verification of the Petri net processes. PPPA does not need to verify the composition of the Petri net processes because all their algebraic operators preserve the specified set of the properties. These original PPPA are significantly generalized for the newly introduced class of the SNT Petri process and agent nets in this paper. The PLACE-SUBST and ASYNC-PROC algebraic operators are defined for this class of Petri nets and their chosen properties are proved. The SNT Petri process and agent nets theory were significantly applied at the design, verification, and implementation of the programming system ensuring the pilot audiovisual lecture room functionality.

  1. The Effect of Medical Recording Training on Quantity and Quality of Recording in Gynecology Residents of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayyah-Melli, Manizheh; Nikravan Mofrad, Malahat; Amini, Abolghasem; Piri, Zakieh; Ghojazadeh, Morteza; Rahmani, Vahideh

    2017-09-01

    Introduction: Medical records contain valuable information about a patient's medical history and treatment. Patient safety is one of the most important dimensions of health care quality assurance and performance improvement. Completing the process of documentation is necessary to continue patient care and continuous quality improvement of basic services. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of medical recording education on the quantity and quality of recording in gynecology residents of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. Methods: This study is a quasi-experimental study and was conducted at Al-Zahra Teaching Hospital, Tabriz, Iran, in 2016. Thirty-two second through fourth year gynecologic residents of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences who were willing to participate in the study were included by census sampling and participated in training workshop. Three evaluators reviewed the residents' records before and after training course by a checklist. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS 13 software. P-values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: The results showed that before the intervention, there were significant differences in the quantity of information status among the evaluators and no significant difference was observed in the recording of qualitative status. After the workshop, among the 3 evaluators, there were also significant differences in the quantity of data recording status; however, no significant change was observed in recording of qualitative status. Conclusion: The study findings revealed that a sectional training course of correct and standardized medical records has no effect on reforming the process of recording.

  2. Impact of patients' access to medical records in occupational medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krakov, A; Kabaha, N; Azuri, J; Moshe, S

    2018-04-14

    Information technologies offer new ways to engage with patients regarding their health, but no studies have been done in occupational health services (OHS). To examine the advantages and disadvantages of providing written and oral medical information to patients in OHS. In this cross-sectional study, data were retrieved from patients visiting four different OHS during 2014-15 for a fitness for work evaluation. We built a semi-quantitative satisfaction questionnaire, with responses ranging on a Likert scale of 1-5 from very dissatisfied (1) to very satisfied (5). There were 287 questionnaires available for analysis. The number of patients who received detailed oral and written information, which included an explanation of their health condition and of the occupational physician's (OP's) decision, was higher in clinics 1 and 3 compared to clinics 2 and 4 (48 and 38% compared to 21 and 31% respectively, P < 0.05). When patients were provided with detailed oral and written information, they declared having a better understanding (4.3 and 4.4 compared to 3.8 respectively, P < 0.001), a higher level of confidence in their OP (4.4 and 4.3 compared to 3.7 and 4 respectively, P < 0.001), a higher level of satisfaction (4.3 and 4.4 compared to 3.8 respectively, P < 0.001) and a higher sense of control and ability to correct the record (1.8 compared to 1.4 respectively, P < 0.01), compared to patients who received partial information. We recommend sharing detailed oral and written medical information with patients in OHS.

  3. Detecting unapproved abbreviations in the electronic medical record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capraro, Andrew; Stack, Anne; Harper, Marvin B; Kimia, Amir

    2012-04-01

    At an emergency department (ED) in a tertiary care children's hospital with a level 1 pediatric trauma designation, unapproved abbreviations (UAAs) within electronic medical records (EMRs) were identified, and feedback was provided to providers regarding their types and use rates. Existing EMRs, including the ED physicians' patient notes were used as templates to develop a UAA list and an abbreviation detector. The detector was validated against human-screened samples of electronic ED notes from 2003 and then applied to all existing data to generate baseline rates of UAA, before intervention/implementation. Next, the validated abbreviation detector was applied prospectively in screening all EMRs monthly during a six-month period. In validation, the abbreviation detector had a sensitivity of 89%, a specificity of 99.9%, and a positive predictive value of 89%. Some 475,613 EMRs were screened, with UAAs identified at a rate of 26.4 +/- 4 per 1,000 EMRs. The most common nonmedication UAA was "qd" [11.8/1,000 EMRs], and the most common medication UAA was "PCN" [4.2/1,000 EMRs]. A total of 27,282 patient notes from 74 physicians were screened between January 1, 2007, and June 30, 2007, and 392 monthly reports were generated. Aggregate UAA use decreased by 8% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 6%-14%) per month-from 19.3 to > 12.1/100 charts, for a 37.3% decrease in UAA use in the six-month period. The estimated monthly decrease per physician was 0.9/100 (95% CI: 0.86-0.94, p abbreviation detector for surveillance of newly created EMRs, followed by consistent education and feedback, led to a significant decrease in UAA use in the study period.

  4. Progress in electronic medical record adoption in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    To determine the rate of adoption of electronic medical records (EMRs) by physicians across Canada, provincial incentives, and perceived benefits of and barriers to EMR adoption. Data on EMR adoption in Canada were collected from CINAHL, MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, the Health Council of Canada, Canada Health Infoway, government websites, regional EMR associations, and health professional association websites. After removal of duplicate articles, 236 documents were found matching the original search. After using the filter Canada, 12 documents remained. Additional documents were obtained from each province's EMR website and from the Canada Health Infoway website. Since 2006, Canadian EMR adoption rates have increased from about 20% of practitioners to an estimated 62% of practitioners in 2013, with substantial regional disparities ranging from roughly 40% of physicians in New Brunswick and Quebec to more than 75% of physicians in Alberta. Provincial incentives vary widely but appear to have only a weak relationship with the rate of adoption. Many adopters use only a fraction of their software's available functions. User-cited benefits to adoption include time savings, improved record keeping, heightened patient safety, and confidence in retrieved data when EMRs are used efficiently. Barriers to adoption include financial and time constraints, lack of knowledgeable support personnel, and lack of interoperability with hospital and pharmacy systems. Canadian physicians remain at the stage of EMR adoption. Progression in EMR use requires experienced, knowledgeable technical support during implementation, and financial support for the transcription of patient data from paper to electronic media. The interoperability of EMR offerings for hospitals, pharmacies, and clinics is the rate-limiting factor in achieving a unified EMR solution for Canada.

  5. Effects of a direct refill program for automated dispensing cabinets on medication-refill errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmons, Pieter J; Dalton, Ashley J; Daniels, Charles E

    2012-10-01

    The effects of a direct refill program for automated dispensing cabinets (ADCs) on medication-refill errors were studied. This study was conducted in designated acute care areas of a 386-bed academic medical center. A wholesaler-to-ADC direct refill program, consisting of prepackaged delivery of medications and bar-code-assisted ADC refilling, was implemented in the inpatient pharmacy of the medical center in September 2009. Medication-refill errors in 26 ADCs from the general medicine units, the infant special care unit, the surgical and burn intensive care units, and intermediate units were assessed before and after the implementation of this program. Medication-refill errors were defined as an ADC pocket containing the wrong drug, wrong strength, or wrong dosage form. ADC refill errors decreased by 77%, from 62 errors per 6829 refilled pockets (0.91%) to 8 errors per 3855 refilled pockets (0.21%) (p error type detected before the intervention was the incorrect medication (wrong drug, wrong strength, or wrong dosage form) in the ADC pocket. Of the 54 incorrect medications found before the intervention, 38 (70%) were loaded in a multiple-drug drawer. After the implementation of the new refill process, 3 of the 5 incorrect medications were loaded in a multiple-drug drawer. There were 3 instances of expired medications before and only 1 expired medication after implementation of the program. A redesign of the ADC refill process using a wholesaler-to-ADC direct refill program that included delivery of prepackaged medication and bar-code-assisted refill significantly decreased the occurrence of ADC refill errors.

  6. Electronic Medical Records, Medical Students, and Ambulatory Family Physicians: A Multi-Institution Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Jordan; Anthony, David; WinklerPrins, Vince; Roskos, Steven

    2017-10-01

    Medical students commonly encounter electronic medical records (EMRs) in their ambulatory family medicine clerkships, but how students interact with this technology varies tremendously and presents challenges to students and preceptors. Little research to date has evaluated the impact of EMRs on medical student education in the ambulatory setting; this three-institution study aimed to identify behaviors of ambulatory family medicine preceptors as they relate to EMRs and medical students. In 2015, the authors sent e-mails to ambulatory preceptors who in the preceding year had hosted medical students during family medicine clerkships, inviting them to participate in the survey, which asked questions about each preceptor's methods of using the EMR with medical students. Of 801 ambulatory preceptors, 265 (33%) responded. The vast majority of respondents used an EMR and provided students with access to it in some way, but only 62.2% (147/236) allowed students to write electronic notes. Of those who allowed students electronic access, one-third did so by logging students in under their own (the preceptor's) credentials, either by telling the students their log-in information (22/202; 10.9%) or by logging in the student without revealing their passwords (43/202; 21.3%). Ambulatory medical student training in the use of EMRs not only varies but also requires many preceptors to break rules for students to learn important documentation skills. Without changes to the policies surrounding student access to and use of EMRs, future physicians will enter residency without the training they need to appropriately document patient care.

  7. Improving the medical records department processes by lean management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajami, Sima; Ketabi, Saeedeh; Sadeghian, Akram; Saghaeinnejad-Isfahani, Sakine

    2015-01-01

    Lean management is a process improvement technique to identify waste actions and processes to eliminate them. The benefits of Lean for healthcare organizations are that first, the quality of the outcomes in terms of mistakes and errors improves. The second is that the amount of time taken through the whole process significantly improves. The purpose of this paper is to improve the Medical Records Department (MRD) processes at Ayatolah-Kashani Hospital in Isfahan, Iran by utilizing Lean management. This research was applied and an interventional study. The data have been collected by brainstorming, observation, interview, and workflow review. The study population included MRD staff and other expert staff within the hospital who were stakeholders and users of the MRD. The MRD were initially taught the concepts of Lean management and then formed into the MRD Lean team. The team then identified and reviewed the current processes subsequently; they identified wastes and values, and proposed solutions. The findings showed that the MRD units (Archive, Coding, Statistics, and Admission) had 17 current processes, 28 wastes, and 11 values were identified. In addition, they offered 27 comments for eliminating the wastes. The MRD is the critical department for the hospital information system and, therefore, the continuous improvement of its services and processes, through scientific methods such as Lean management, are essential. The study represents one of the few attempts trying to eliminate wastes in the MRD.

  8. 32 CFR 806b.48 - Disclosing the medical records of minors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION PRIVACY ACT PROGRAM Disclosing Records to Third Parties § 806b.48 Disclosing the medical records... guardians in conjunction with applicable Federal laws and guidelines. The laws of each state define the age... abuse treatment, abortion, and birth control. If you manage medical records, learn the local laws and...

  9. Identifying Risk of Future Asthma Attacks Using UK Medical Record Data: A Respiratory Effectiveness Group Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakey, John D; Price, David B; Pizzichini, Emilio; Popov, Todor A; Dimitrov, Borislav D; Postma, Dirkje S; Josephs, Lynn K; Kaplan, Alan; Papi, Alberto; Kerkhof, Marjan; Hillyer, Elizabeth V; Chisholm, Alison; Thomas, Mike

    Asthma attacks are common, serious, and costly. Individual factors associated with attacks, such as poor symptom control, are not robust predictors. We investigated whether the rich data available in UK electronic medical records could identify patients at risk of recurrent attacks. We analyzed anonymized, longitudinal medical records of 118,981 patients with actively treated asthma (ages 12-80 years) and 3 or more years of data. Potential risk factors during 1 baseline year were evaluated using univariable (simple) logistic regression for outcomes of 2 or more and 4 or more attacks during the following 2-year period. Predictors with significant univariable association (P attacks included baseline-year markers of attacks (acute oral corticosteroid courses, emergency visits), more frequent reliever use and health care utilization, worse lung function, current smoking, blood eosinophilia, rhinitis, nasal polyps, eczema, gastroesophageal reflux disease, obesity, older age, and being female. The number of oral corticosteroid courses had the strongest association. The final cross-validated models incorporated 19 and 16 risk factors for 2 or more and 4 or more attacks over 2 years, respectively, with areas under the curve of 0.785 (95% CI, 0.780-0.789) and 0.867 (95% CI, 0.860-0.873), respectively. Routinely collected data could be used proactively via automated searches to identify individuals at risk of recurrent asthma attacks. Further research is needed to assess the impact of such knowledge on clinical prognosis. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Use of automated medication adherence monitoring in bipolar disorder research: pitfalls, pragmatics, and possibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Jennifer B; Sams, Johnny; Tatsuoka, Curtis; Cassidy, Kristin A; Sajatovic, Martha

    2015-04-01

    Medication nonadherence occurs in 20-60% of persons with bipolar disorder (BD) and is associated with serious negative outcomes, including relapse, hospitalization, incarceration, suicide and high healthcare costs. Various strategies have been developed to measure adherence in BD. This descriptive paper summarizes challenges and workable strategies using electronic medication monitoring in a randomized clinical trial (RCT) in patients with BD. Descriptive data from 57 nonadherent individuals with BD enrolled in a prospective RCT evaluating a novel customized adherence intervention versus control were analyzed. Analyses focused on whole group data and did not assess intervention effects. Adherence was assessed with the self-reported Tablets Routine Questionnaire and the Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS). The majority of participants were women (74%), African American (69%), with type I BD (77%). Practical limitations of MEMS included misuse in conjunction with pill minders, polypharmacy, cost, failure to bring to research visits, losing the device, and the device impacting baseline measurement. The advantages were more precise measurement, less biased recall, and collecting data from past time periods for missed interim visits. Automated devices such as MEMS can assist investigators in evaluating adherence in patients with BD. Knowing the anticipated pitfalls allows study teams to implement preemptive procedures for successful implementation in BD adherence studies and can help pave the way for future refinements as automated adherence assessment technologies become more sophisticated and readily available.

  11. A Review of Published Guidance for Video Recording in Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Dennis J

    2018-01-25

    Medical educators have used resident-patient video recording to verify trainee competence in interpersonal and technical skills for 50 years. Although numerous authors acknowledge that video recording can compromise patient privacy and confidentiality, no summary of potential risks is available. A scoping review of the literature on resident-patient video recording in medical education from the 1960s to the present was conducted. The review examined publications that addressed ethical, policy, procedural, or legal issues affecting patients' rights when video recording. Potential risks to the rights of video recorded patients were organized into 6 categories: informed consent policies, informed consent procedures, recorded medical errors, secondary use of recordings, collateral patient information, and public trust issues. The review revealed contradictory opinions on informed consent policies, inadequate guidance for responding when medical errors are recorded, and conflicting opinions about when recordings become part of the medical record. Many reviewed publications are opinion-based, precede current confidentiality guidelines, or rely on survey results. This review organizes potential threats to patients' rights for those medical educators who use video recording technology. The review reveals a need for broader consensus about video recording guidelines and for research on video recording practices, especially given technological advances in video equipment and the expansion of video technology in health care settings. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Automating and estimating glomerular filtration rate for dosing medications and staging chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trinkley KE

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Katy E Trinkley,1 S Michelle Nikels,2 Robert L Page II,1 Melanie S Joy11Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2School of Medicine, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO, USA Objective: The purpose of this paper is to serve as a review for primary care providers on the bedside methods for estimating glomerular filtration rate (GFR for dosing and chronic kidney disease (CKD staging and to discuss how automated health information technologies (HIT can enhance clinical documentation of staging and reduce medication errors in patients with CKD.Methods: A nonsystematic search of PubMed (through March 2013 was conducted to determine the optimal approach to estimate GFR for dosing and CKD staging and to identify examples of how automated HITs can improve health outcomes in patients with CKD. Papers known to the authors were included, as were scientific statements. Articles were chosen based on the judgment of the authors.Results: Drug-dosing decisions should be based on the method used in the published studies and package labeling that have been determined to be safe, which is most often the Cockcroft–Gault formula unadjusted for body weight. Although Modification of Diet in Renal Disease is more commonly used in practice for staging, the CKD–Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD–EPI equation is the most accurate formula for estimating the CKD staging, especially at higher GFR values. Automated HITs offer a solution to the complexity of determining which equation to use for a given clinical scenario. HITs can educate providers on which formula to use and how to apply the formula in a given clinical situation, ultimately improving appropriate medication and medical management in CKD patients.Conclusion: Appropriate estimation of GFR is key to optimal health outcomes. HITs assist clinicians in both choosing the most appropriate GFR estimation formula and in applying the results of the GFR estimation in practice. Key limitations of the

  13. [A Research on the origin and development of standardization of Chinese medical case records].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei

    2014-11-01

    The origin of Chinese medical case history is rather early. Chunyu Yi's medical cases (zhen ji) of the Western Han Dynasty were the earliest actual extant medical case with the practical contents. In the Ming Dynasty, Han Mao put forward firstly the principles of "six aspects must be recorded" for writing the pulse record, as the beginning of the standardization of medical case record. Later, Wu Kun, Yu Yan, Li Yanzhen, He Lianchen et al. supplemented, adjusted and changed the format of medical case record. After 1949, the format of medical case record was revised several times to form the national standard. In fact, the clinical medical case record is different from the case history. The modern medical case record could not reflect fully the thinking process of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and the essence of the treatment based on syndrome differentiation. Exploring the origin and development of the standardization of medical case record will benefit for the improvement of modern format of medical case record.

  14. Use of an electronic medical record reminder improves HIV screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kershaw, Colleen; Taylor, Jessica L; Horowitz, Gary; Brockmeyer, Diane; Libman, Howard; Kriegel, Gila; Ngo, Long

    2018-01-10

    More than 1 in 7 patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in the United States are unaware of their serostatus despite recommendations of US agencies that all adults through age 65 be screened for HIV at least once. To facilitate universal screening, an electronic medical record (EMR) reminder was created for our primary care practice. Screening rates before and after implementation were assessed to determine the impact of the reminder on screening rates. A retrospective cohort analysis was performed for patients age 18-65 with visits between January 1, 2012-October 30, 2014. EMR databases were examined for HIV testing and selected patient characteristics. We evaluated the probability of HIV screening in unscreened patients before and after the reminder and used a multivariable generalized linear model to test the association between likelihood of HIV testing and specific patient characteristics. Prior to the reminder, the probability of receiving an HIV test for previously unscreened patients was 15.3%. This increased to 30.7% after the reminder (RR 2.02, CI 1.95-2.09, p < 0.0001). The impact was most significant in patients age 45-65. White race, English as primary language, and higher median household income were associated with lower likelihoods of screening both before and after implementation (RR 0.68, CI 0.65-0.72; RR 0.74, CI 0.67-0.82; RR 0.84, CI 0.80-0.88, respectively). The EMR reminder increased rates of HIV screening twofold in our practice. It was most effective in increasing screening rates in older patients. Patients who were white, English-speaking, and had higher incomes were less likely to be screened for HIV both before and after the reminder.

  15. Electronic Health Record-Related Events in Medical Malpractice Claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graber, Mark L; Siegal, Dana; Riah, Heather; Johnston, Doug; Kenyon, Kathy

    2015-11-06

    There is widespread agreement that the full potential of health information technology (health IT) has not yet been realized and of particular concern are the examples of unintended consequences of health IT that detract from the safety of health care or from the use of health IT itself. The goal of this project was to obtain additional information on these health IT-related problems, using a mixed methods (qualitative and quantitative) analysis of electronic health record-related harm in cases submitted to a large database of malpractice suits and claims. Cases submitted to the CRICO claims database and coded during 2012 and 2013 were analyzed. A total of 248 cases (<1%) involving health IT were identified and coded using a proprietary taxonomy that identifies user- and system-related sociotechnical factors. Ambulatory care accounted for most of the cases (146 cases). Cases were most typically filed as a result of an error involving medications (31%), diagnosis (28%), or a complication of treatment (31%). More than 80% of cases involved moderate or severe harm, although lethal cases were less likely in cases from ambulatory settings. Etiologic factors spanned all of the sociotechnical dimensions, and many recurring patterns of error were identified. Adverse events associated with health IT vulnerabilities can cause extensive harm and are encountered across the continuum of health care settings and sociotechnical factors. The recurring patterns provide valuable lessons that both practicing clinicians and health IT developers could use to reduce the risk of harm in the future. The likelihood of harm seems to relate more to a patient's particular situation than to any one class of error.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share thework provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used

  16. Electronic Medical Record Keeping: Eleven Years Experience at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To rep ort the su ccess of a p ap erless med ical record system in a small clinic in a d evelop ing economy and to highlight the ad vantages and challenges of electronic med ical record keep ing, even with a small bu d get. Method: The concept of electronic med ical record (EMR) as a record keep ing method at Life Sup ...

  17. A new framework for analysing automated acoustic species-detection data: occupancy estimation and optimization of recordings post-processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambert, Thierry A.; Waddle, J. Hardin; Miller, David A.W.; Walls, Susan; Nichols, James D.

    2018-01-01

    The development and use of automated species-detection technologies, such as acoustic recorders, for monitoring wildlife are rapidly expanding. Automated classification algorithms provide a cost- and time-effective means to process information-rich data, but often at the cost of additional detection errors. Appropriate methods are necessary to analyse such data while dealing with the different types of detection errors.We developed a hierarchical modelling framework for estimating species occupancy from automated species-detection data. We explore design and optimization of data post-processing procedures to account for detection errors and generate accurate estimates. Our proposed method accounts for both imperfect detection and false positive errors and utilizes information about both occurrence and abundance of detections to improve estimation.Using simulations, we show that our method provides much more accurate estimates than models ignoring the abundance of detections. The same findings are reached when we apply the methods to two real datasets on North American frogs surveyed with acoustic recorders.When false positives occur, estimator accuracy can be improved when a subset of detections produced by the classification algorithm is post-validated by a human observer. We use simulations to investigate the relationship between accuracy and effort spent on post-validation, and found that very accurate occupancy estimates can be obtained with as little as 1% of data being validated.Automated monitoring of wildlife provides opportunity and challenges. Our methods for analysing automated species-detection data help to meet key challenges unique to these data and will prove useful for many wildlife monitoring programs.

  18. Privacy Impact Assessment for the Medical and Research Study Records of Human Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Medical & Research Study Records of Human Volunteers System collects demographic and medical information on subjects who participate in research. Learn how this data is collected, used, access to the data, and the purpose of data collection.

  19. Integration of SNOMED CT into the OpenMRS electronic medical record system framework

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gerber, A

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Integrating a mechanism to store, retrieve and use clinical data with a system to manage medical records enables better utilisation of medical data and improved healthcare. This poster introduces a research project that aims to extend Open...

  20. 42 CFR 482.24 - Condition of participation: Medical record services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... anesthesia services. (B) An updated examination of the patient, including any changes in the patient's... practitioners' orders, nursing notes, reports of treatment, medication records, radiology, and laboratory...

  1. Sharing Annotated Audio Recordings of Clinic Visits With Patients-Development of the Open Recording Automated Logging System (ORALS): Study Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Paul J; Dannenberg, Michelle D; Ganoe, Craig H; Haslett, William; Faill, Rebecca; Hassanpour, Saeed; Das, Amar; Arend, Roger; Masel, Meredith C; Piper, Sheryl; Reicher, Haley; Ryan, James; Elwyn, Glyn

    2017-07-06

    Providing patients with recordings of their clinic visits enhances patient and family engagement, yet few organizations routinely offer recordings. Challenges exist for organizations and patients, including data safety and navigating lengthy recordings. A secure system that allows patients to easily navigate recordings may be a solution. The aim of this project is to develop and test an interoperable system to facilitate routine recording, the Open Recording Automated Logging System (ORALS), with the aim of increasing patient and family engagement. ORALS will consist of (1) technically proficient software using automated machine learning technology to enable accurate and automatic tagging of in-clinic audio recordings (tagging involves identifying elements of the clinic visit most important to patients [eg, treatment plan] on the recording) and (2) a secure, easy-to-use Web interface enabling the upload and accurate linkage of recordings to patients, which can be accessed at home. We will use a mixed methods approach to develop and formatively test ORALS in 4 iterative stages: case study of pioneer clinics where recordings are currently offered to patients, ORALS design and user experience testing, ORALS software and user interface development, and rapid cycle testing of ORALS in a primary care clinic, assessing impact on patient and family engagement. Dartmouth's Informatics Collaboratory for Design, Development and Dissemination team, patients, patient partners, caregivers, and clinicians will assist in developing ORALS. We will implement a publication plan that includes a final project report and articles for peer-reviewed journals. In addition to this work, we will regularly report on our progress using popular relevant Tweet chats and online using our website, www.openrecordings.org. We will disseminate our work at relevant conferences (eg, Academy Health, Health Datapalooza, and the Institute for Healthcare Improvement Quality Forums). Finally, Iora Health, a

  2. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of an Automated Medication System Implemented in a Danish Hospital Setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risoer, Bettina Wulff; Lisby, Marianne; Soerensen, Jan

    2017-01-01

    outcome measure was the number of errors in the medication administration process observed prospectively before and after implementation. To determine the difference in proportion of errors after implementation of the AMS, logistic regression was applied with the presence of error(s) as the dependent......Objectives To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of an automated medication system (AMS) implemented in a Danish hospital setting. Methods An economic evaluation was performed alongside a controlled before-and-after effectiveness study with one control ward and one intervention ward. The primary...... of avoided administration errors was related to the incremental costs to obtain the cost-effectiveness ratio expressed as the cost per avoided administration error. Results The AMS resulted in a statistically significant reduction in the proportion of errors in the intervention ward compared with the control...

  3. Gemvid, an open source, modular, automated activity recording system for rats using digital video

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leprince Pierre

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Measurement of locomotor activity is a valuable tool for analysing factors influencing behaviour and for investigating brain function. Several methods have been described in the literature for measuring the amount of animal movement but most are flawed or expensive. Here, we describe an open source, modular, low-cost, user-friendly, highly sensitive, non-invasive system that records all the movements of a rat in its cage. Methods Our activity monitoring system quantifies overall free movements of rodents without any markers, using a commercially available CCTV and a newly designed motion detection software developed on a GNU/Linux-operating computer. The operating principle is that the amount of overall movement of an object can be expressed by the difference in total area occupied by the object in two consecutive picture frames. The application is based on software modules that allow the system to be used in a high-throughput workflow. Documentation, example files, source code and binary files can be freely downloaded from the project website at http://bioinformatics.org/gemvid/. Results In a series of experiments with objects of pre-defined oscillation frequencies and movements, we documented the sensitivity, reproducibility and stability of our system. We also compared data obtained with our system and data obtained with an Actiwatch device. Finally, to validate the system, results obtained from the automated observation of 6 rats during 7 days in a regular light cycle are presented and are accompanied by a stability test. The validity of this system is further demonstrated through the observation of 2 rats in constant dark conditions that displayed the expected free running of their circadian rhythm. Conclusion The present study describes a system that relies on video frame differences to automatically quantify overall free movements of a rodent without any markers. It allows the monitoring of rats in their own

  4. Determining Multiple Sclerosis Phenotype from Electronic Medical Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Richard E; Butler, Jorie; LaFleur, Joanne; Knippenberg, Kristin; C Kamauu, Aaron W; DuVall, Scott L

    2016-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS), a central nervous system disease in which nerve signals are disrupted by scarring and demyelination, is classified into phenotypes depending on the patterns of cognitive or physical impairment progression: relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS), primary-progressive MS (PPMS), secondary-progressive MS (SPMS), or progressive-relapsing MS (PRMS). The phenotype is important in managing the disease and determining appropriate treatment. The ICD-9-CM code 340.0 is uninformative about MS phenotype, which increases the difficulty of studying the effects of phenotype on disease. To identify MS phenotype using natural language processing (NLP) techniques on progress notes and other clinical text in the electronic medical record (EMR). Patients with at least 2 ICD-9-CM codes for MS (340.0) from 1999 through 2010 were identified from nationwide EMR data in the Department of Veterans Affairs. Clinical experts were interviewed for possible keywords and phrases denoting MS phenotype in order to develop a data dictionary for NLP. For each patient, NLP was used to search EMR clinical notes, since the first MS diagnosis date for these keywords and phrases. Presence of phenotype-related keywords and phrases were analyzed in context to remove mentions that were negated (e.g., "not relapsing-remitting") or unrelated to MS (e.g., "RR" meaning "respiratory rate"). One thousand mentions of MS phenotype were validated, and all records of 150 patients were reviewed for missed mentions. There were 7,756 MS patients identified by ICD-9-CM code 340.0. MS phenotype was identified for 2,854 (36.8%) patients, with 1,836 (64.3%) of those having just 1 phenotype mentioned in their EMR clinical notes: 1,118 (39.2%) RRMS, 325 (11.4%) PPMS, 374 (13.1%) SPMS, and 19 (0.7%) PRMS. A total of 747 patients (26.2%) had 2 phenotypes, the most common being 459 patients (16.1%) with RRMS and SPMS. A total of 213 patients (7.5%) had 3 phenotypes, and 58 patients (2.0%) had 4 phenotypes mentioned

  5. A review of electronic medical record keeping on mobile medical service trips in austere settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dainton, Christopher; Chu, Charlene H

    2017-02-01

    Electronic medical records (EMRs) may address the need for decision and language support for Western clinicians on mobile medical service trips (MSTs) in low resource settings abroad, while providing improved access to records and data management. However, there has yet to be a review of this emerging technology used by MSTs in low-resource settings. The aim of this study is to describe EMR systems designed specifically for use by mobile MSTs in remote settings, and accordingly, determine new opportunities for this technology to improve quality of healthcare provided by MSTs. A MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Scopus/IEEE search and supplementary Google search were performed for EMR systems specific to mobile MSTs. Information was extracted regarding EMR name, organization, scope of use, platform, open source coding, commercial availability, data integration, and capacity for linguistic and decision support. Missing information was requested by email. After screening of 122 abstracts, two articles remained that discussed deployment of EMR systems in MST settings (iChart, SmartList To Go), and thirteen additional EMR systems were found through the Google search. Of these, three systems (Project Buendia, TEBOW, and University of Central Florida's internally developed EMR) are based on modified versions of Open MRS software, while three are smartphone apps (QuickChart EMR, iChart, NotesFirst). Most of the systems use a local network to manage data, while the remaining systems use opportunistic cloud synchronization. Three (TimmyCare, Basil, and Backpack EMR) contain multilingual user interfaces, and only one (QuickChart EMR) contained MST-specific clinical decision support. There have been limited attempts to tailor EMRs to mobile MSTs. Only Open MRS has a broad user base, and other EMR systems should consider interoperability and data sharing with larger systems as a priority. Several systems include tablet compatibility, or are specifically designed for smartphone, which may be

  6. A Study on FIDO Authentication System for Reinforcing the Security of Electronic Medical Records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Sujin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The target of compulsory certification in Information Security Management System has extended to medical institutions. This caused us to recognize the importance of information security in modern hospital information system that has changed from the medical record management that was recorded and managed largely in paper chart in the past to the Electronic Medical Record that medical personnel enter patient information into a computer directly for building a database. As medical institutions manage sensitive information like personal information basically, personal medical data infringement accident, if occurred can become a big social issue. Currently, the medical information in medical institutions are stored in electronic medical records and to access, user authentication is required by means of accredited certificate as security measure. Accredited certification has technical problems such as certificate storage method and security level of password and managerial problems such as certificate copy/leak/share. In this respect, this study proposes and presents how to build the FIDO-based authentication system that applies UAF or U2F authentication mechanism depending on the authority and work scope of medical personnel and medical support assistant like staffs, officers, licensed practical nurse and so on, within large medical institutions that use medical information system. The aim is to solve problems in accredited certificate authentication method in the existing medical institutions with the FIDO-based authentication system proposed in this study.

  7. Data collection in a live mass casualty incident simulation: automated RFID technology versus manually recorded system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingrassia, Pier Luigi; Carenzo, Luca; Barra, Federico Lorenzo; Colombo, Davide; Ragazzoni, Luca; Tengattini, Marco; Prato, Federico; Geddo, Alessandro; Della Corte, Francesco

    2012-02-01

    To demonstrate the applicability and the reliability of a radio frequency identification (RFID) system to collect data during a live exercise. A rooftop collapse of a crowded building was simulated. Fifty-three volunteers were trained to perform as smart victims, simulating clinical conditions, using dynamic data cards, and capturing delay times and triage codes. Every victim was also equipped with a RFID tag. RFID antenna was placed at the entrance of the advanced medical post (AMP) and emergency department (ED) and recorded casualties entering the hospital. A total of 12 victims entered AMP and 31 victims were directly transferred to the ED. 100% (12 of 12 and 31 of 31) of the time cards reported a manually written hospital admission time. No failures occurred in tag reading or data transfers. A correlation analysis was performed between the two methods plotting the paired RFID and manual times and resulted in a r=0.977 for the AMP and r=0.986 for the ED with a P value of less than 0.001. We confirmed the applicability of RFID system to the collection of time delays. Its use should be investigated in every aspect of data collection (triage, treatments) during a disaster exercise.

  8. In-hospital prescription changes and documentation in the medical records of the primary care provider: results from a medical record review study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poldervaart, Judith M; van Melle, Marije A; Willemse, Sanne; de Wit, Niek J; Zwart, Dorien L M

    2017-11-29

    An increasing number of transitions due to substitution of care of more complex patients urges insight in and improvement of transitional medication safety. While lack of documentation of prescription changes and/or lack of information exchange between settings likely cause adverse drug events, frequency of occurrence of these causes is not clear. Therefore, we aimed at determining the frequency of in-hospital patients’ prescription changes that are not or incorrectly documented in their primary care provider’s (PCP) medical record. A medical record review study was performed in a database linking patients’ medical records of hospital and PCP. A random sample (n = 600) was drawn from all 1399 patients who were registered at a participating primary care practice as well as the gastroenterology or cardiology department in 2013 of the University Medical Center Utrecht, the Netherlands. Outcomes were the number of in-hospital prescription changes that was not or incorrectly documented in the medical record of the PCP, and timeliness of documentation. Records of 390 patients included one or more primary-secondary care transitions; in total we identified 1511 transitions. During these transitions, 408 in-hospital prescription changes were made, of which 31% was not or incorrectly documented in the medical record of the PCP within the next 3 months. In case changes were documented, the median number of days between hospital visit and documentation was 3 (IQR 0–18). One third of in-hospital prescription changes was not or incorrectly documented in the PCP’s record, which likely puts patients at risk of adverse drug events after hospital visits. Such flawed reliability of a routine care process is unacceptable and warrants improvement and close monitoring.

  9. Medical office automation integrated into the distributed architecture of a hospital information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherrer, J R; Revillard, C; Borst, F; Berthoud, M; Lovis, C

    1994-05-01

    Patient histories, discharge summaries, and medical consultant reports are made up of written texts. Therefore, the gathering and archiving of these texts in machine-readable form has many characteristics of computer-based medical records. In Geneva, approximately 1,540 PCs are connected to the Hospital Information System DIOGENE 2, with the possibility of accessing all the functions offered by the system without losing any of their MS-DOS word processing capabilities. The UNIDOC system, presented in this paper, takes all these features into account, a real marriage of technologies between the MS-DOS environment and the distributed client-server architecture. The INGRES database management system supports the entire archiving process of the medical patient texts, structured by prelabelled paragraphs and automatically indexed. Both the quality and accessibility of the records are enhanced, while the archiving capacity is neither too limited nor too expensive.

  10. Design and implementation of an affordable, public sector electronic medical record in rural Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anant Raut

    2017-06-01

    Over the course of 18 months, we were able to develop, deploy and iterate upon the electronic medical record, and then deploy the refined product at an additional facility within only four weeks. Our experience suggests the feasibility of an integrated electronic medical record for public sector care delivery even in settings of rural poverty.

  11. 36 CFR 1202.42 - How are requests for access to medical records handled?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... writing a physician or mental health professional to whom you would like the records to be disclosed, and disclosure that otherwise would be made to you will instead be made to the designated physician or mental... receives a request for access to medical records, if NARA believes that disclosure of medical and/or...

  12. Congruence of Self-Reported Medications with Pharmacy Prescription Records in Low-Income Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caskie, Grace I. L.; Willis, Sherry L.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the congruence of self-reported medications with computerized pharmacy records. Design and Methods: Pharmacy records and self-reported medications were obtained for 294 members of a state pharmaceutical assistance program who also participated in ACTIVE, a clinical trial on cognitive training in nondemented elderly…

  13. 77 FR 55221 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Report of Medical Examination and Vaccination Record...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-07

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services [OMB Control Number 1615-0033] Agency Information Collection Activities: Report of Medical Examination and Vaccination Record... Approved Collection. (2) Title of the Form/Collection: Report of Medical Examination and Vaccination Record...

  14. Urban Alabama Physicians and the Electronic Medical Record: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiggle, Michele

    2012-01-01

    The electronic medical record (EMR) is an information technology tool supporting the examination, treatment, and care of a patient. The EMR allows physicians to view a patient's record showing current medications, a history of visits from health care providers with notes from those visits, a problem list, a functional status assessment, a schedule…

  15. 32 CFR 319.7 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... unless the disclosure of such records directly to the requester could, in the judgment of a physician, have an adverse effect on the physical or mental health or safety and welfare of the requester or other...

  16. A computerised out-patient medical records programme based on the Summary Time-Oriented Record (STOR) System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, P Y; Goh, L G; Ong, R; Wong, P K

    1992-12-01

    Advances in microcomputer hardware and software technology have made computerised outpatient medical records practical. We have developed a programme based on the Summary Time-Oriented Record (STOR) system which complements existing paper-based record keeping. The elements of the Problem Oriented Medical Record (POMR) System are displayed in two windows within one screen, namely, the SOAP (Subjective information, Objective information, Assessments and Plans) elements in the Reason For Encounter (RFE) window and the problem list with outcomes in the Problem List (PL) window. Context sensitive child windows display details of plans of management in the RFE window and clinical notes in the PL window. The benefits of such innovations to clinical decision making and practice based research and its medico-legal implications are discussed.

  17. An object-oriented approach for structuring the electronic medical record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banhart, F; Lohmann, R

    2000-01-01

    We implemented a framework for modelling the electronic medical record on top of an object-oriented model. Clinical patient data are structured in a uniform way through the use of a comprehensive data model. The meaning of the information elements is explicitly determined by a medical data dictionary. The data structures of both, medical record and data dictionary are implemented, using a semantically rich, object-oriented data model. We examined several possibilities for the graphical preparation of the inherently recursive data structures. Again, we use object-oriented frameworks for the implementation of flexible user interfaces to the electronic medical record with a consistent look-and-feel.

  18. Automated, non-linear registration between 3-dimensional brain map and medical head image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuta, Shinobu; Urayama, Shin-ichi; Zoroofi, R.A.; Uyama, Chikao

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an automated, non-linear registration method between 3-dimensional medical head image and brain map in order to efficiently extract the regions of interest. In our method, input 3-dimensional image is registered into a reference image extracted from a brain map. The problems to be solved are automated, non-linear image matching procedure, and cost function which represents the similarity between two images. Non-linear matching is carried out by dividing the input image into connected partial regions, transforming the partial regions preserving connectivity among the adjacent images, evaluating the image similarity between the transformed regions of the input image and the correspondent regions of the reference image, and iteratively searching the optimal transformation of the partial regions. In order to measure the voxelwise similarity of multi-modal images, a cost function is introduced, which is based on the mutual information. Some experiments using MR images presented the effectiveness of the proposed method. (author)

  19. Natural Language Processing Based Instrument for Classification of Free Text Medical Records

    OpenAIRE

    Khachidze, Manana; Tsintsadze, Magda; Archuadze, Maia

    2016-01-01

    According to the Ministry of Labor, Health and Social Affairs of Georgia a new health management system has to be introduced in the nearest future. In this context arises the problem of structuring and classifying documents containing all the history of medical services provided. The present work introduces the instrument for classification of medical records based on the Georgian language. It is the first attempt of such classification of the Georgian language based medical records. On the w...

  20. Evaluation of natural language processing from emergency department computerized medical records for intra-hospital syndromic surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pagliaroli Véronique

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of patients who pose an epidemic hazard when they are admitted to a health facility plays a role in preventing the risk of hospital acquired infection. An automated clinical decision support system to detect suspected cases, based on the principle of syndromic surveillance, is being developed at the University of Lyon's Hôpital de la Croix-Rousse. This tool will analyse structured data and narrative reports from computerized emergency department (ED medical records. The first step consists of developing an application (UrgIndex which automatically extracts and encodes information found in narrative reports. The purpose of the present article is to describe and evaluate this natural language processing system. Methods Narrative reports have to be pre-processed before utilizing the French-language medical multi-terminology indexer (ECMT for standardized encoding. UrgIndex identifies and excludes syntagmas containing a negation and replaces non-standard terms (abbreviations, acronyms, spelling errors.... Then, the phrases are sent to the ECMT through an Internet connection. The indexer's reply, based on Extensible Markup Language, returns codes and literals corresponding to the concepts found in phrases. UrgIndex filters codes corresponding to suspected infections. Recall is defined as the number of relevant processed medical concepts divided by the number of concepts evaluated (coded manually by the medical epidemiologist. Precision is defined as the number of relevant processed concepts divided by the number of concepts proposed by UrgIndex. Recall and precision were assessed for respiratory and cutaneous syndromes. Results Evaluation of 1,674 processed medical concepts contained in 100 ED medical records (50 for respiratory syndromes and 50 for cutaneous syndromes showed an overall recall of 85.8% (95% CI: 84.1-87.3. Recall varied from 84.5% for respiratory syndromes to 87.0% for cutaneous syndromes. The

  1. The realization of the storage of XML and middleware-based data of electronic medical records

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Shuzhen; Gu Peidi; Luo Yanlin

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, using the technology of XML and middleware to design and implement a unified electronic medical records storage archive management system and giving a common storage management model. Using XML to describe the structure of electronic medical records, transform the medical data from traditional 'business-centered' medical information into a unified 'patient-centered' XML document and using middleware technology to shield the types of the databases at different departments of the hospital and to complete the information integration of the medical data which scattered in different databases, conducive to information sharing between different hospitals. (authors)

  2. Feasibility Study for Establishing Three Medical Record Related Programs. Research Report Series Volume XIV, No. 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    William Rainey Harper Coll., Palatine, IL. Office of Planning and Research.

    In November 1985, a survey was conducted at William Rainey Harper College (WRHC), in Illinois, to test the feasibility of establishing programs for medical record technicians, medical coders, and utilization analysts. The survey instrument was mailed to 1,232 hospitals, medical care facilities, nursing homes, physicians' and dentists' offices, and…

  3. Automated video analysis of non-verbal communication in a medical setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuval Hart

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Non-verbal communication plays a significant role in establishing good rapport between physicians and patients and influences patient’s health outcomes. Therefore, it is important to measure and analyze non-verbal communication in medical settings. Current approaches to measure non-verbal interactions in medicine employ coding by human raters. Such tools are labor intensive and hence limit the scale of possible studies. Here, we present an automated video analysis tool of non-verbal interactions in a medical setting. We test the tool using videos of subjects that interact with an actor portraying a doctor performing one of two scripted scenarios of interviewing the subjects: in one scenario the actor was focused on his computer and briefly engaged with the subject. The second scenario included active listening by the doctor and heavy focus on the subject. We analyze the cross correlation in total kinetic energy of the two people in the dyad, and also characterize the frequency spectrum of their motion. We find large differences in interpersonal motion synchrony and entrainment between the two performance scenarios. The active listening scenario shows more synchrony and more symmetric followership than the other scenario. Moreover, the active listening scenario shows more high frequency motion termed jitter that has been recently suggested to be a marker of followership. The present approach may be useful for analyzing physician-patient interactions in terms of synchrony and dominance in a wide range of medical settings.

  4. Automated Video Analysis of Non-verbal Communication in a Medical Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Yuval; Czerniak, Efrat; Karnieli-Miller, Orit; Mayo, Avraham E; Ziv, Amitai; Biegon, Anat; Citron, Atay; Alon, Uri

    2016-01-01

    Non-verbal communication plays a significant role in establishing good rapport between physicians and patients and may influence aspects of patient health outcomes. It is therefore important to analyze non-verbal communication in medical settings. Current approaches to measure non-verbal interactions in medicine employ coding by human raters. Such tools are labor intensive and hence limit the scale of possible studies. Here, we present an automated video analysis tool for non-verbal interactions in a medical setting. We test the tool using videos of subjects that interact with an actor portraying a doctor. The actor interviews the subjects performing one of two scripted scenarios of interviewing the subjects: in one scenario the actor showed minimal engagement with the subject. The second scenario included active listening by the doctor and attentiveness to the subject. We analyze the cross correlation in total kinetic energy of the two people in the dyad, and also characterize the frequency spectrum of their motion. We find large differences in interpersonal motion synchrony and entrainment between the two performance scenarios. The active listening scenario shows more synchrony and more symmetric followership than the other scenario. Moreover, the active listening scenario shows more high-frequency motion termed jitter that has been recently suggested to be a marker of followership. The present approach may be useful for analyzing physician-patient interactions in terms of synchrony and dominance in a range of medical settings.

  5. Evaluation of Randomly Selected Completed Medical Records Sheets in Teaching Hospitals of Jahrom University of Medical Sciences, 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Parsa Mahjob

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: Medical record documentation, often use to protect the patients legal rights, also providing information for medical researchers, general studies, education of health care staff and qualitative surveys is used. There is a need to control the amount of data entered in the medical record sheets of patients, considering the completion of these sheets is often carried out after completion of service delivery to the patients. Therefore, in this study the prevalence of completeness of medical history, operation reports, and physician order sheets by different documentaries in Jahrom teaching hospitals during year 2009 was analyzed. Methods and Materials: In this descriptive / retrospective study, the 400 medical record sheets of the patients from two teaching hospitals affiliated to Jahrom medical university was randomly selected. The tool of data collection was a checklist based on the content of medical history sheet, operation report and physician order sheets. The data were analyzed by SPSS (Version10 software and Microsoft Office Excel 2003. Results: Average of personal (Demography data entered in medical history, physician order and operation report sheets which is done by department's secretaries were 32.9, 35.8 and 40.18 percent. Average of clinical data entered by physician in medical history sheet is 38 percent. Surgical data entered by the surgeon in operation report sheet was 94.77 percent. Average of data entered by operation room's nurse in operation report sheet was 36.78 percent; Average of physician order data in physician order sheet entered by physician was 99.3 percent. Conclusion: According to this study, the rate of completed record papers reviewed by documentary in Jahrom teaching hospitals were not desirable and in some cases were very weak and incomplete. This deficiency was due to different reason such as medical record documentaries negligence, lack of adequate education for documentaries, High work

  6. Quality and correlates of medical record documentation in the ambulatory care setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Steven R

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Documentation in the medical record facilitates the diagnosis and treatment of patients. Few studies have assessed the quality of outpatient medical record documentation, and to the authors' knowledge, none has conclusively determined the correlates of chart documentation. We therefore undertook the present study to measure the rates of documentation of quality of care measures in an outpatient primary care practice setting that utilizes an electronic medical record. Methods We reviewed electronic medical records from 834 patients receiving care from 167 physicians (117 internists and 50 pediatricians at 14 sites of a multi-specialty medical group in Massachusetts. We abstracted information for five measures of medical record documentation quality: smoking history, medications, drug allergies, compliance with screening guidelines, and immunizations. From other sources we determined physicians' specialty, gender, year of medical school graduation, and self-reported time spent teaching and in patient care. Results Among internists, unadjusted rates of documentation were 96.2% for immunizations, 91.6% for medications, 88% for compliance with screening guidelines, 61.6% for drug allergies, 37.8% for smoking history. Among pediatricians, rates were 100% for immunizations, 84.8% for medications, 90.8% for compliance with screening guidelines, 50.4% for drug allergies, and 20.4% for smoking history. While certain physician and patient characteristics correlated with some measures of documentation quality, documentation varied depending on the measure. For example, female internists were more likely than male internists to document smoking history (odds ratio [OR], 1.90; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.27 – 2.83 but were less likely to document drug allergies (OR, 0.51; 95% CI, 0.35 – 0.75. Conclusions Medical record documentation varied depending on the measure, with room for improvement in most domains. A variety of

  7. Using System Inflammatory Response Syndrome as an Easy-to-Implement, Sustainable, and Automated Tool for All-Cause Deterioration Among Medical Inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogerty, Robert L; Sussman, L Scott; Kenyon, Kathleen; Li, Fangyong; Sukumar, Nitin; Kliger, Alan S; Acker, Kurt; Sankey, Christopher

    2018-01-23

    Clinical deterioration detection among adult inpatients is known to be suboptimal, and many electronic health record tools have been developed to help identify these patients. Many of these tools are focused on sepsis spectrum disorders, but the evolution of the definition of sepsis is moving toward increased specificity, which may make automated detection of clinical deterioration from nonsepsis-related conditions less likely. The objectives of this study were to develop and to examine the use of a low-cost, highly sustainable deterioration detection tool based on systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) criteria. Using existing resources, a SIRS-based electronic health record monitoring and intervention tool was developed with a focus on ease of implementation and high sustainability. This tool was used to monitor 15,739 adult inpatients in real time during their admission. The SIRS-based tool, created with focus on ease of implementation and high sustainability, identified patients with higher risk of clinical deterioration. The project was rapidly deployed for a 4-month period at a 900-bed campus of an academic medical center with minimal additional resources required. Whereas the definition of sepsis moves away from SIRS, SIRS-based criteria may still have clinical benefit as an easy-to-automate detection tool for all-cause clinical deterioration among medical inpatients.

  8. Med-records: an ADD database of AAEC medical records since 1966

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barry, J.M.; Pollard, J.P.; Tucker, A.D.

    1986-08-01

    Since its inception in 1958 most of the staff of the AAEC Research Establishment at Lucas Heights have had annual medical examinations. Medical information accrued since 1966 has been collected as an ADD database to allow ad hoc enquiries to be made against the data. Details are given of the database schema and numerous support routines ranging from the integrity checking of input data to analysis and plotting of the summary results

  9. Automated extraction of temporal motor activity signals from video recordings of neonatal seizures based on adaptive block matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karayiannis, Nicolaos B; Sami, Abdul; Frost, James D; Wise, Merrill S; Mizrahi, Eli M

    2005-04-01

    This paper presents an automated procedure developed to extract quantitative information from video recordings of neonatal seizures in the form of motor activity signals. This procedure relies on optical flow computation to select anatomical sites located on the infants' body parts. Motor activity signals are extracted by tracking selected anatomical sites during the seizure using adaptive block matching. A block of pixels is tracked throughout a sequence of frames by searching for the most similar block of pixels in subsequent frames; this search is facilitated by employing various update strategies to account for the changing appearance of the block. The proposed procedure is used to extract temporal motor activity signals from video recordings of neonatal seizures and other events not associated with seizures.

  10. Technology and Health Care: Efficiency, Frustration, and Disconnect in the Transition to Electronic Medical Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magsamen-Conrad, Kate; Checton, Maria

    2014-02-01

    This study investigates one medical facility's transition to electronic medical records (becoming "paperless"). We utilized face-to-face interviews to investigate the transition process with one implementer (the vice president of the medical facility) and three stakeholders from one of the four offices (an assistant office manager, a nurse, and a medical technician). We discuss the dominant themes of efficiency, frustration, and disconnect as well as conclusions and implications.

  11. An Automated Recording Method in Clinical Consultation to Rate the Limp in Lower Limb Osteoarthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Barrois

    Full Text Available For diagnosis and follow up, it is important to be able to quantify limp in an objective, and precise way adapted to daily clinical consultation. The purpose of this exploratory study was to determine if an inertial sensor-based method could provide simple features that correlate with the severity of lower limb osteoarthritis evaluated by the WOMAC index without the use of step detection in the signal processing. Forty-eight patients with lower limb osteoarthritis formed two severity groups separated by the median of the WOMAC index (G1, G2. Twelve asymptomatic age-matched control subjects formed the control group (G0. Subjects were asked to walk straight 10 meters forward and 10 meters back at self-selected walking speeds with inertial measurement units (IMU (3-D accelerometers, 3-D gyroscopes and 3-D magnetometers attached on the head, the lower back (L3-L4 and both feet. Sixty parameters corresponding to the mean and the root mean square (RMS of the recorded signals on the various sensors (head, lower back and feet, in the various axes, in the various frames were computed. Parameters were defined as discriminating when they showed statistical differences between the three groups. In total, four parameters were found discriminating: mean and RMS of the norm of the acceleration in the horizontal plane for contralateral and ipsilateral foot in the doctor's office frame. No discriminating parameter was found on the head or the lower back. No discriminating parameter was found in the sensor linked frames. This study showed that two IMUs placed on both feet and a step detection free signal processing method could be an objective and quantitative complement to the clinical examination of the physician in everyday practice. Our method provides new automatically computed parameters that could be used for the comprehension of lower limb osteoarthritis. It may not only be used in medical consultation to score patients but also to monitor the evolution

  12. Comparative Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Three Different Automated Medication Systems Implemented in a Danish Hospital Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risør, Bettina Wulff; Lisby, Marianne; Sørensen, Jan

    2018-02-01

    Automated medication systems have been found to reduce errors in the medication process, but little is known about the cost-effectiveness of such systems. The objective of this study was to perform a model-based indirect cost-effectiveness comparison of three different, real-world automated medication systems compared with current standard practice. The considered automated medication systems were a patient-specific automated medication system (psAMS), a non-patient-specific automated medication system (npsAMS), and a complex automated medication system (cAMS). The economic evaluation used original effect and cost data from prospective, controlled, before-and-after studies of medication systems implemented at a Danish hematological ward and an acute medical unit. Effectiveness was described as the proportion of clinical and procedural error opportunities that were associated with one or more errors. An error was defined as a deviation from the electronic prescription, from standard hospital policy, or from written procedures. The cost assessment was based on 6-month standardization of observed cost data. The model-based comparative cost-effectiveness analyses were conducted with system-specific assumptions of the effect size and costs in scenarios with consumptions of 15,000, 30,000, and 45,000 doses per 6-month period. With 30,000 doses the cost-effectiveness model showed that the cost-effectiveness ratio expressed as the cost per avoided clinical error was €24 for the psAMS, €26 for the npsAMS, and €386 for the cAMS. Comparison of the cost-effectiveness of the three systems in relation to different valuations of an avoided error showed that the psAMS was the most cost-effective system regardless of error type or valuation. The model-based indirect comparison against the conventional practice showed that psAMS and npsAMS were more cost-effective than the cAMS alternative, and that psAMS was more cost-effective than npsAMS.

  13. Automated medical resident rotation and shift scheduling to ensure quality resident education and patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalley, Hannah K; Keskinocak, Pinar

    2016-03-01

    At academic teaching hospitals around the country, the majority of clinical care is provided by resident physicians. During their training, medical residents often rotate through various hospitals and/or medical services to maximize their education. Depending on the size of the training program, manually constructing such a rotation schedule can be cumbersome and time consuming. Further, rules governing allowable duty hours for residents have grown more restrictive in recent years (ACGME 2011), making day-to-day shift scheduling of residents more difficult (Connors et al., J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 137:710-713, 2009; McCoy et al., May Clin Proc 86(3):192, 2011; Willis et al., J Surg Edu 66(4):216-221, 2009). These rules limit lengths of duty periods, allowable duty hours in a week, and rest periods, to name a few. In this paper, we present two integer programming models (IPs) with the goals of (1) creating feasible assignments of residents to rotations over a one-year period, and (2) constructing night and weekend call-shift schedules for the individual rotations. These models capture various duty-hour rules and constraints, provide the ability to test multiple what-if scenarios, and largely automate the process of schedule generation, solving these scheduling problems more effectively and efficiently compared to manual methods. Applying our models on data from a surgical residency program, we highlight the infeasibilities created by increased duty-hour restrictions placed on residents in conjunction with current scheduling paradigms.

  14. [Informations on oncologic epicrises contained in medical records].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainz, J; Olesen, F

    1989-10-30

    The informative content of summaries concerning 96 patients in whom the diagnosis of cancer of the breast was established in 1986 in local and regional hospitals in Denmark was investigated. The informative content of the summaries were illustrated by investigation of the extent to which the summaries contained information about the diagnosis, treatment, laboratory investigations, information to the patient and her relatives and information about contact with the general practitioner. In addition, summaries from the regional hospitals were investigated as regards information about the prognosis and the medical and sociomedical therapeutic plan. Information about the diagnosis, treatment, laboratory investigations and the medical therapeutic plans was, as a rule, provided in the summaries. Information about information to the relatives, prognosis and the sociomedical therapeutic plan for follow-up control by the general practitioner was scarcely ever provided in the summaries. Information to the patient was mentioned in less than half of the summaries from local hospitals and in less than 20% of the summaries from regional hospitals. This investigation reveals that the summaries lack valuable information.

  15. Performance evaluation of medical records departments by analytical hierarchy process (AHP) approach in the selected hospitals in Isfahan : medical records dep. & AHP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajami, Sima; Ketabi, Saeedeh

    2012-06-01

    Medical Records Department (MRD) is an important unit for evaluating and planning of care services. The goal of this study is evaluating the performance of the Medical Records Departments (MRDs) of the selected hospitals in Isfahan, Iran by using Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP). This was an analytic of cross-sectional study that was done in spring 2008 in Isfahan, Iran. The statistical population consisted of MRDs of Alzahra, Kashani and Khorshid Hospitals in Isfahan. Data were collected by forms and through brainstorm technique. To analyze and perform AHP, Expert Choice software was used by researchers. Results were showed archiving unit has received the largest importance weight with respect to information management. However, on customer aspect admission unit has received the largest weight. Ordering weights of Medical Records Departments' Alzahra, Kashani and Khorshid Hospitals in Isfahan were with 0.394, 0.342 and 0.264 respectively. It is useful for managers to allocate and prioritize resources according to AHP technique for ranking at the Medical Records Departments.

  16. Can multilingual machine translation help make medical record content more comprehensible to patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng-Treitler, Qing; Kim, Hyeoneui; Rosemblat, Graciela; Keselman, Alla

    2010-01-01

    With the development of electronic personal health records, more patients are gaining access to their own medical records. However, comprehension of medical record content remains difficult for many patients. Because each record is unique, it is also prohibitively costly to employ human translators to solve this problem. In this study, we investigated whether multilingual machine translation could help make medical record content more comprehensible to patients who lack proficiency in the language of the records. We used a popular general-purpose machine translation tool called Babel Fish to translate 213 medical record sentences from English into Spanish, Chinese, Russian and Korean. We evaluated the comprehensibility and accuracy of the translation. The text characteristics of the incorrectly translated sentences were also analyzed. In each language, the majority of the translations were incomprehensible (76% to 92%) and/or incorrect (77% to 89%). The main causes of the translation are vocabulary difficulty and syntactical complexity. A general-purpose machine translation tool like the Babel Fish is not adequate for the translation of medical records; however, a machine translation tool can potentially be improved significantly, if it is trained to target certain narrow domains in medicine.

  17. Automated statistical matching of multiple tephra records exemplified using five long maar sequences younger than 75 ka, Auckland, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Rebecca M.; Bebbington, Mark S.; Cronin, Shane J.; Jones, Geoff

    2014-09-01

    Detailed tephrochronologies are built to underpin probabilistic volcanic hazard forecasting, and to understand the dynamics and history of diverse geomorphic, climatic, soil-forming and environmental processes. Complicating factors include highly variable tephra distribution over time; difficulty in correlating tephras from site to site based on physical and chemical properties; and uncertain age determinations. Multiple sites permit construction of more accurate composite tephra records, but correctly merging individual site records by recognizing common events and site-specific gaps is complex. We present an automated procedure for matching tephra sequences between multiple deposition sites using stochastic local optimization techniques. If individual tephra age determinations are not significantly different between sites, they are matched and a more precise age is assigned. Known stratigraphy and mineralogical or geochemical compositions are used to constrain tephra matches. We apply this method to match tephra records from five long sediment cores (≤ 75 cal ka BP) in Auckland, New Zealand. Sediments at these sites preserve basaltic tephras from local eruptions of the Auckland Volcanic Field as well as distal rhyolitic and andesitic tephras from Okataina, Taupo, Egmont, Tongariro, and Tuhua (Mayor Island) volcanic centers. The new correlated record compiled is statistically more likely than previously published arrangements from this area.

  18. Using a scripted data entry process to transfer legacy immunization data while transitioning between electronic medical record systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, J; Hsiao, A; Fenick, A

    2014-01-01

    Transitioning between Electronic Medical Records (EMR) can result in patient data being stranded in legacy systems with subsequent failure to provide appropriate patient care. Manual chart abstraction is labor intensive, error-prone, and difficult to institute for immunizations on a systems level in a timely fashion. We sought to transfer immunization data from two of our health system's soon to be replaced EMRs to the future EMR using a single process instead of separate interfaces for each facility. We used scripted data entry, a process where a computer automates manual data entry, to insert data into the future EMR. Using the Center for Disease Control's CVX immunization codes we developed a bridge between immunization identifiers within our system's EMRs. We performed a two-step process evaluation of the data transfer using automated data comparison and manual chart review. We completed the data migration from two facilities in 16.8 hours with no data loss or corruption. We successfully populated the future EMR with 99.16% of our legacy immunization data - 500,906 records - just prior to our EMR transition date. A subset of immunizations, first recognized during clinical care, had not originally been extracted from the legacy systems. Once identified, this data - 1,695 records - was migrated using the same process with minimal additional effort. Scripted data entry for immunizations is more accurate than published estimates for manual data entry and we completed our data transfer in 1.2% of the total time we predicted for manual data entry. Performing this process before EMR conversion helped identify obstacles to data migration. Drawing upon this work, we will reuse this process for other healthcare facilities in our health system as they transition to the future EMR.

  19. Auditing Medical Records Accesses via Healthcare Interaction Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, You; Nyemba, Steve; Malin, Bradley

    2012-01-01

    Healthcare organizations are deploying increasingly complex clinical information systems to support patient care. Traditional information security practices (e.g., role-based access control) are embedded in enterprise-level systems, but are insufficient to ensure patient privacy. This is due, in part, to the dynamic nature of healthcare, which makes it difficult to predict which care providers need access to what and when. In this paper, we show that modeling operations at a higher level of granularity (e.g., the departmental level) are stable in the context of a relational network, which may enable more effective auditing strategies. We study three months of access logs from a large academic medical center to illustrate that departmental interaction networks exhibit certain invariants, such as the number, strength, and reciprocity of relationships. We further show that the relations extracted from the network can be leveraged to assess the extent to which a patient’s care satisfies expected organizational behavior. PMID:23304277

  20. Paper versus computer: Feasibility of an electronic medical record in general pediatrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Roukema (Jolt); R.K. Los (Renske); S.E. Bleeker (Sacha); A.M. van Ginneken (Astrid); J. van der Lei (Johan); H.A. Moll (Henriëtte)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND. Implementation of electronic medical record systems promises significant advances in patient care, because such systems enhance readability, availability, and data quality. Structured data entry (SDE) applications can prompt for completeness, provide greater accuracy and

  1. A comparison of long-term parallel measurements of sunshine duration obtained with a Campbell-Stokes sunshine recorder and two automated sunshine sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, D. J.; Pötzi, W.; Freislich, H.; Strutzmann, H.; Veronig, A. M.; Foelsche, U.; Rieder, H. E.

    2017-06-01

    In recent decades, automated sensors for sunshine duration (SD) measurements have been introduced in meteorological networks, thereby replacing traditional instruments, most prominently the Campbell-Stokes (CS) sunshine recorder. Parallel records of automated and traditional SD recording systems are rare. Nevertheless, such records are important to understand the differences/similarities in SD totals obtained with different instruments and how changes in monitoring device type affect the homogeneity of SD records. This study investigates the differences/similarities in parallel SD records obtained with a CS and two automated SD sensors between 2007 and 2016 at the Kanzelhöhe Observatory, Austria. Comparing individual records of daily SD totals, we find differences of both positive and negative sign, with smallest differences between the automated sensors. The larger differences between CS-derived SD totals and those from automated sensors can be attributed (largely) to the higher sensitivity threshold of the CS instrument. Correspondingly, the closest agreement among all sensors is found during summer, the time of year when sensitivity thresholds are least critical. Furthermore, we investigate the performance of various models to create the so-called sensor-type-equivalent (STE) SD records. Our analysis shows that regression models including all available data on daily (or monthly) time scale perform better than simple three- (or four-) point regression models. Despite general good performance, none of the considered regression models (of linear or quadratic form) emerges as the "optimal" model. Although STEs prove useful for relating SD records of individual sensors on daily/monthly time scales, this does not ensure that STE (or joint) records can be used for trend analysis.

  2. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of an Automated Medication System Implemented in a Danish Hospital Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risør, Bettina Wulff; Lisby, Marianne; Sørensen, Jan

    To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of an automated medication system (AMS) implemented in a Danish hospital setting. An economic evaluation was performed alongside a controlled before-and-after effectiveness study with one control ward and one intervention ward. The primary outcome measure was the number of errors in the medication administration process observed prospectively before and after implementation. To determine the difference in proportion of errors after implementation of the AMS, logistic regression was applied with the presence of error(s) as the dependent variable. Time, group, and interaction between time and group were the independent variables. The cost analysis used the hospital perspective with a short-term incremental costing approach. The total 6-month costs with and without the AMS were calculated as well as the incremental costs. The number of avoided administration errors was related to the incremental costs to obtain the cost-effectiveness ratio expressed as the cost per avoided administration error. The AMS resulted in a statistically significant reduction in the proportion of errors in the intervention ward compared with the control ward. The cost analysis showed that the AMS increased the ward's 6-month cost by €16,843. The cost-effectiveness ratio was estimated at €2.01 per avoided administration error, €2.91 per avoided procedural error, and €19.38 per avoided clinical error. The AMS was effective in reducing errors in the medication administration process at a higher overall cost. The cost-effectiveness analysis showed that the AMS was associated with affordable cost-effectiveness rates. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Automated management of C.E.A. libraries: description and format of bibliographic records

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iung, J.

    1984-04-01

    Data element definitions and record structure are given for various types of bibliographic entities, corresponding to the following documents: books, periodicals, conference proceedings, reports, theses, conference papers, preprints, patents [fr

  4. Perception of electronic medical records (EMRs by nursing staff in a teaching hospital in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Kumar Pera

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Currently, in India, many healthcare organizations and their managements appreciate the advantages of electronic medical records, but they often use them. The current push for universal health coverage in India with National Rural Health Mission (NRHM and National Urban Health Mission (NUHM helping toward healthcare reforms highlights the importance of implementing information technology as a means of cutting costs and improving efficiency in healthcare field. The quality of documentation of patient care rendered at healthcare destinations is very important to showcase the growing stature of healthcare in India. Aims: As maintaining the medical records is very important, storage and retrieval of the information is also important for future patient care. In this regard, implementation of electronic medical records in hospitals is essential. Through this study, we wanted to highlight the perceptions of healthcare personnel, who are in the core team of delivering healthcare, toward implementation of electronic medical records. Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out among doctors (post-graduates and staff nurses. The sample size for post-graduate students and nurses was 164 and 296, respectively, in this study. The study was carried out during the period from January to June 2013, and a survey was conducted with the help of a validated, pre-tested questionnaire in a tertiary care medical college hospital in India. Results: The results showed that 75% of the study population are comfortable working with electronic medical records. They mentioned that display of diagnosis, medications, and allergies of patients on the records was most important. Their perception was that electronic medical records improve timely decision-making and patient care due to immediate access to the patient′s disease history. Conclusion: The major problems faced by nurses, as per our study, are delay in services due to dispersion of records

  5. Development of Markup Language for Medical Record Charting: A Charting Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Won-Mo; Chae, Younbyoung; Jang, Bo-Hyoung

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays a lot of trials for collecting electronic medical records (EMRs) exist. However, structuring data format for EMR is an especially labour-intensive task for practitioners. Here we propose a new mark-up language for medical record charting (called Charting Language), which borrows useful properties from programming languages. Thus, with Charting Language, the text data described in dynamic situation can be easily used to extract information.

  6. Building a national electronic medical record exchange system - experiences in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu-Chuan Jack; Yen, Ju-Chuan; Chiu, Wen-Ta; Jian, Wen-Shan; Syed-Abdul, Shabbir; Hsu, Min-Huei

    2015-08-01

    There are currently 501 hospitals and about 20,000 clinics in Taiwan. The National Health Insurance (NHI) system, which is operated by the NHI Administration, uses a single-payer system and covers 99.9% of the nation's total population of 23,000,000. Taiwan's NHI provides people with a high degree of freedom in choosing their medical care options. However, there is the potential concern that the available medical resources will be overused. The number of doctor consultations per person per year is about 15. Duplication of laboratory tests and prescriptions are not rare either. Building an electronic medical record exchange system is a good method of solving these problems and of improving continuity in health care. In November 2009, Taiwan's Executive Yuan passed the 'Plan for accelerating the implementation of electronic medical record systems in medical institutions' (2010-2012; a 3-year plan). According to this plan, a patient can, at any hospital in Taiwan, by using his/her health insurance IC card and physician's medical professional IC card, upon signing a written agreement, retrieve all important medical records for the past 6 months from other participating hospitals. The focus of this plan is to establish the National Electronic Medical Record Exchange Centre (EEC). A hospital's information system will be connected to the EEC through an electronic medical record (EMR) gateway. The hospital will convert the medical records for the past 6 months in its EMR system into standardized files and save them on the EMR gateway. The most important functions of the EEC are to generate an index of all the XML files on the EMR gateways of all hospitals, and to provide search and retrieval services for hospitals and clinics. The EEC provides four standard inter-institution EMR retrieval services covering medical imaging reports, laboratory test reports, discharge summaries, and outpatient records. In this system, we adopted the Health Level 7 (HL7) Clinical Document

  7. A model for improving medical records by creating electronic health records: review article

    OpenAIRE

    Hamidreza Salmani Mojaveri; Mahboubeh Kordmostfapour; Kokab Mansour Kiaiy; Fatemeh Amouzad Khalili; Negin Qavi Kutenai

    2017-01-01

    Today, the use of information and communication technology (ICT) is an important and key factor in the progress of all organizations, including health-centered and health systems. Given the importance of the subject matter above, these organizations have created a particular transformation and change in order to upgrade their systems in use, one of which is the creation of Electronic Health Records (EHR). This evolving system, by increasing productivity, both by increasing staffing efficiency...

  8. A cloud-based framework for large-scale traditional Chinese medical record retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lijun; Liu, Li; Fu, Xiaodong; Huang, Qingsong; Zhang, Xianwen; Zhang, Yin

    2018-01-01

    Electronic medical records are increasingly common in medical practice. The secondary use of medical records has become increasingly important. It relies on the ability to retrieve the complete information about desired patient populations. How to effectively and accurately retrieve relevant medical records from large- scale medical big data is becoming a big challenge. Therefore, we propose an efficient and robust framework based on cloud for large-scale Traditional Chinese Medical Records (TCMRs) retrieval. We propose a parallel index building method and build a distributed search cluster, the former is used to improve the performance of index building, and the latter is used to provide high concurrent online TCMRs retrieval. Then, a real-time multi-indexing model is proposed to ensure the latest relevant TCMRs are indexed and retrieved in real-time, and a semantics-based query expansion method and a multi- factor ranking model are proposed to improve retrieval quality. Third, we implement a template-based visualization method for displaying medical reports. The proposed parallel indexing method and distributed search cluster can improve the performance of index building and provide high concurrent online TCMRs retrieval. The multi-indexing model can ensure the latest relevant TCMRs are indexed and retrieved in real-time. The semantics expansion method and the multi-factor ranking model can enhance retrieval quality. The template-based visualization method can enhance the availability and universality, where the medical reports are displayed via friendly web interface. In conclusion, compared with the current medical record retrieval systems, our system provides some advantages that are useful in improving the secondary use of large-scale traditional Chinese medical records in cloud environment. The proposed system is more easily integrated with existing clinical systems and be used in various scenarios. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Assessment of diabetes care by medical record review. The Indian Health Service model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayfield, J A; Rith-Najarian, S J; Acton, K J; Schraer, C D; Stahn, R M; Johnson, M H; Gohdes, D

    1994-08-01

    To evaluate the adherence to minimum standards for diabetes care in multiple primary-care facilities using a uniform system of medical record review. In 1986, the Indian Health Service (IHS) developed diabetes care standards and an assessment process to evaluate adherence to those standards using medical record review. We review our assessment method and results for 1992. Charts were selected in a systematic random fashion from 138 participating facilities. Trained professional staff reviewed patient charts, using a uniform set of definitions. A weighted rate of adherence was constructed for each item. Medical record reviews were conducted on 6,959 charts selected from 40,118 diabetic patients. High rates of adherence (> 70%) were noted for blood pressure and weight measurements at each visit, blood sugar determinations at each visit, annual laboratory screening tests, electrocardiogram at baseline, and adult immunizations. Lower rates of adherence (dental examinations. IHS rates of adherence are similar to rates obtained from medical record reviews and computerized billing data, but are less than rates obtained by provider self-report. Medical record review, using uniform definitions and inexpensive software for data entry and reports, can easily be implemented in multiple primary-care settings. Uniformity of data definition and collection facilitates the aggregation of the data and comparison over time and among facilities. This medical record review system, although labor intensive, can be easily adopted in a variety of primary-care settings for quality improvement activities, program planning, and evaluation.

  10. Reducing and Sustaining Duplicate Medical Record Creation by Usability Testing and System Redesign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khunlertkit, Adjhaporn; Dorissaint, Leonard; Chen, Allen; Paine, Lori; Pronovost, Peter J

    2017-10-25

    Duplicate medical record creation is a common and consequential health care systems error often caused by poor search system usability and inappropriate user training. We conducted two phases of scenario-based usability testing with patient registrars working in areas at risk of generating duplicate medical records. Phase 1 evaluated the existing search system, which led to system redesigns. Phase 2 tested the redesigned system to mitigate potential errors before health system-wide implementation. To evaluate system effectiveness, we compared the monthly potential duplicate medical record rates for preimplementation and postimplementation months. The existing system could not effectively handle a misspelling, which led to failed search and duplicate medical record creation. Using the existing system, 96% of registrars found commonly spelled patient names whereas only 69% successfully found complicated names. Registrars lacked knowledge and usage of a phonetic matching function to assist in misspelling. The new system consistently captured the correct patient regardless of misspelling, but search returned more potential matches, resulting in, on average, 4 seconds longer to select common names. Potential monthly duplicate medical record rate reduced by 38%, from 4% to 2.3% after implementation of the new system, and has sustained at an average of 2.5% for 2 years. Usability testing was an effective method to reveal problems and aid system redesign to deliver a more user friendly system, hence reducing the potential for medical record duplication. Greater standards for usability would ensure that these improvements can be realized before rather than after exposing patients to risks.

  11. A retrospective cohort study on lifestyle habits of cardiovascular patients: how informative are medical records?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fouwels, A.J.; Bredie, S.J.H.; Wollersheim, H.C.H.; Schippers, G.M.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To evaluate the vigilance of medical specialists as to the lifestyle of their cardiovascular outpatients by comparing lifestyle screening as registered in medical records versus a lifestyle questionnaire (LSQ), a study was carried out at the cardiovascular outpatient clinic of the

  12. A retrospective cohort study on lifestyle habits of cardiovascular patients: how informative are medical records?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fouwels, Annemarie J.; Bredie, Sebastiaan J. H.; Wollersheim, Hub; Schippers, Gerard M.

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: To evaluate the vigilance of medical specialists as to the lifestyle of their cardiovascular outpatients by comparing lifestyle screening as registered in medical records versus a lifestyle questionnaire (LSQ), a study was carried out at the cardiovascular outpatient clinic of

  13. Chang Gung Research Database: A multi-institutional database consisting of original medical records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Shao Tsai

    2017-10-01

    Conclusions: The CGRD is a multi-institutional, original medical record-based research database with high overall and disease-specific coverage of Taiwan. The population of the CGRD has significantly higher severity of comorbidities, and prevalence of specific diseases than those of Taiwan NHIRD and medical centers in Taiwan.

  14. 29 CFR 1904.9 - Recording criteria for cases involving medical removal under OSHA standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... under OSHA standards. 1904.9 Section 1904.9 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL... removal under OSHA standards. (a) Basic requirement. If an employee is medically removed under the medical surveillance requirements of an OSHA standard, you must record the case on the OSHA 300 Log. (b) Implementation...

  15. The use of open source electronic medical records in an urban ED in Kumasi-Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.K. Forson*

    2013-12-01

    Conclusion: Open source medical records may be the most appropriate and cost-effective software to adapt for keeping patient records electronically in a low resource setting. Further studies need to be conducted to demonstrate how EMR may affect the pace of work in the ED.

  16. The EMR-scan: assessing the quality of Electronic Medical Records in general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheij, R.; Jabaaij, L.; Njoo, K.; Hoogen, H. van den; Bakker, D. de

    2008-01-01

    Background: The use of electronic medical records (EMR) in general practice has spread rapidly in the last decade (more than 90% today). Traditionally, these records are primarily used for direct patient care and for administrative purposes by the practice involved. In recent years, further

  17. Quantitative Analysis of Uncertainty in Medical Reporting: Part 3: Customizable Education, Decision Support, and Automated Alerts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiner, Bruce I

    2017-12-18

    In order to better elucidate and understand the causative factors and clinical implications of uncertainty in medical reporting, one must first create a referenceable database which records a number of standardized metrics related to uncertainty language, clinical context, technology, and provider and patient data. The resulting analytics can in turn be used to create context and user-specific reporting guidelines, real-time decision support, educational resources, and quality assurance measures. If this technology can be directly integrated into reporting technology and workflow, the goal is to proactively improve clinical outcomes at the point of care.

  18. 22 CFR 308.10 - Security of records systems-manual and automated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... destruction of manual and automatic record systems. These security safeguards shall apply to all systems in... dial-type combination lock, and/or be equipped with a steel lock bar secured by a GSA approved... in steel cabinets without the necessity of combination locks. (3) Access to and use of systems of...

  19. Measuring a Pig's Preference for Suspended Toys by Using an Automated Recording Technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zonderland, J.J.; Vermeer, H.M.; Vereijken, P.F.G.; Spoolder, H.A.M.

    2003-01-01

    Not all suspended materials for finishing pigs are equally suited to meet the natural behavior of the animal, but the required physical properties of the toys have yet to be identified. The present study aimed to develop a labor saving electronic recording device for animal-material interactions.

  20. Automated vehicle location, data recording, friction measurement and applicator control for winter road maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    The first part of this project conducted a detailed evaluation of the ability of a new friction measurement system to : provide an accurate measure of road conditions. A system that records friction coefficient as a function of road : location was de...

  1. Automated Methods to Extract Patient New Information from Clinical Notes in Electronic Health Record Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui

    2013-01-01

    The widespread adoption of Electronic Health Record (EHR) has resulted in rapid text proliferation within clinical care. Clinicians' use of copying and pasting functions in EHR systems further compounds this by creating a large amount of redundant clinical information in clinical documents. A mixture of redundant information (especially outdated…

  2. The impact of online video lecture recordings and automated feedback on student performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieling, M. B.; Hofman, W. H. A.

    To what extent a blended learning configuration of face-to-face lectures, online on-demand video recordings of the face-to-face lectures and the offering of online quizzes with appropriate feedback has an additional positive impact on the performance of these students compared to the traditional

  3. Health information technology: medical record documentation issues in the electronic era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacey, Bill; Bholat, Michelle Anne

    2012-12-01

    This article outlines the regulatory movement propelling physicians into the electronic health record environment and the subsequent emergence of quality issues in the medical record. There are benefits and downside risks for implementing electronic health records as part of the desire of a practice or institution to build patient-centered medical homes. The intersection of how a practice or institution collects and reports quality metrics using health information technology and subsequently submits claims for services rendered has created unforeseen challenges for which leadership must be aware and address proactively. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Sudden cardiac arrests, automated external defibrillators, and medical emergency response plans in Tennessee high schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Mark L; Watson, Andrew M; Gregory, Andrew; Givens, Timothy G; Abramo, Thomas J; Kannankeril, Prince J

    2013-03-01

    Schools are important public locations of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA), and the American Heart Association (AHA) recommends medical emergency response plans (MERPs), which may include an automated external defibrillator (AED) in schools. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of SCA and the prevalence of AEDs and MERPs in Tennessee high schools. Tennessee Secondary School Athletic Association member schools were surveyed regarding SCA on campus within 5 years, AED presence, and MERP characteristics. Of 378 schools, 257 (68%) completed the survey. There were 21 (5 student and 16 adult) SCAs on school grounds, yielding a 5-year incidence of 1 SCA per 12 high schools. An AED was present at 11 of 21 schools with SCA, and 6 SCA victims were treated with an AED shock. A linear increase in SCA frequency was noted with increasing school size (schools, 71% had an MERP, 48% had an AED, and only 4% were fully compliant with AHA recommendations. Schools with a history of SCA were more likely to be compliant (19% vs. 3%, P = 0.011). The 5-year incidence of SCA in Tennessee high schools is 1 in 12, but increases to 1 in 7 for schools with more than 1000 students. Compliance with AHA guidelines for MERPs is poor, but improved in schools with recent SCA. Future recommendations should encourage the inclusion of AED placement in schools with more than 1000 students.

  5. Characteristics of registration of medical records in a hospital in southern Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cender Udai Quispe-Juli

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the characteristics of registration of medical records of hospitalization in the Hospital III Yanahuara in Arequipa, Peru. Material and methods: The study was observational, cross-sectional and retrospective. 225 medical records of hospitalization were evaluated in November 2015. A tab consisting of 15 items was used; each item was assessed using a scale: "very bad", "bad", "acceptable", "good" and "very good". Adescriptive analysis was done by calculating frequency. Results: Items with a higher proportion of acceptable registration data were: clear therapeutic indication (84%, clinical evolution (74.7%, diagnosis (70.7%, complete and orderly therapeutic indication (54.2%, medical history taking (50.2% and physical examination (43.1%. The very well recorded items were: indication of tests and procedures (97.3%, medical identification (91.1% and allergies (67.1%. Very bad recorded items were: reason for admission (91.1%, life habits (72.9% and prior treatment (38.2%. Conclusions: Most medical records of hospitalization are characterized by an acceptable record of most evaluated items; however they have notable deficiencies in some items.

  6. Correlation of venous thromboembolism prophylaxis and electronic medical record alerts with incidence among surgical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, Rajesh; Lee, Nathaniel; Duane, Therese M; Gu, Zirui; Nguyen, Natalie; Potter, Teresa; Rensing, Edna; Sampson, Renata; Burrows, Mandy; Banas, Colin; Hartigan, Sarah; Grover, Amelia

    2016-11-01

    Venous thromboembolism events are potentially preventable adverse events. We investigated the effect of interruptions and delays in pharmacologic prophylaxis on venous thromboembolism incidence. Additionally, we evaluated the utility of electronic medical record alerts for venous thromboembolism prophylaxis. Venous thromboembolisms were identified in surgical patients retrospectively through Core Measure Venous ThromboEmbolism-6-6 and Patient Safety Indicator 12 between November 2013 and March 2015. Venous thromboembolism pharmacologic prophylaxis and prescriber response to electronic medical record alerts were recorded prospectively. Prophylaxis was categorized as continuous, delayed, interrupted, other, and none. Among 10,318 surgical admissions, there were 131 venous thromboembolisms; 23.7% of the venous thromboembolisms occurred with optimal continuous prophylaxis. Prophylaxis, length of stay, age, and transfer from another hospital were associated with increased venous thromboembolism incidence. Compared with continuous prophylaxis, interruptions were associated with 3 times greater odds of venous thromboembolism. Delays were associated with 2 times greater odds of venous thromboembolism. Electronic medical record alerts occurred in 45.7% of the encounters and were associated with a 2-fold increased venous thromboembolism incidence. Focus groups revealed procedures as the main contributor to interruptions, and workflow disruption as the main limitation of the electronic medical record alerts. Multidisciplinary strategies to decrease delays and interruptions in venous thromboembolism prophylaxis and optimization of electronic medical record tools for prophylaxis may help decrease rates of preventable venous thromboembolism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Method and system for determining precursors of health abnormalities from processing medical records

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2013-06-25

    Medical reports are converted to document vectors in computing apparatus and sampled by applying a maximum variation sampling function including a fitness function to the document vectors to reduce a number of medical records being processed and to increase the diversity of the medical records being processed. Linguistic phrases are extracted from the medical records and converted to s-grams. A Haar wavelet function is applied to the s-grams over the preselected time interval; and the coefficient results of the Haar wavelet function are examined for patterns representing the likelihood of health abnormalities. This confirms certain s-grams as precursors of the health abnormality and a parameter can be calculated in relation to the occurrence of such a health abnormality.

  8. Architecture of portable electronic medical records system integrated with streaming media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Shih, Chien-Chou

    2012-02-01

    Due to increasing occurrence of accidents and illness during business trips, travel, or overseas studies, the requirement for portable EMR (Electronic Medical Records) has increased. This study proposes integrating streaming media technology into the EMR system to facilitate referrals, contracted laboratories, and disease notification among hospitals. The current study encoded static and dynamic medical images of patients into a streaming video format and stored them in a Flash Media Server (FMS). Based on the Taiwan Electronic Medical Record Template (TMT) standard, EMR records can be converted into XML documents and used to integrate description fields with embedded streaming videos. This investigation implemented a web-based portable EMR interchanging system using streaming media techniques to expedite exchanging medical image information among hospitals. The proposed architecture of the portable EMR retrieval system not only provides local hospital users the ability to acquire EMR text files from a previous hospital, but also helps access static and dynamic medical images as reference for clinical diagnosis and treatment. The proposed method protects property rights of medical images through information security mechanisms of the Medical Record Interchange Service Center and Health Certificate Authorization to facilitate proper, efficient, and continuous treatment of patients.

  9. Corridor consultations and the medical microbiological record: is patient safety at risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heard, S R; Roberts, C; Furrows, S J; Kelsey, M; Southgate, L

    2003-01-01

    The performance procedures of the General Medical Council are aimed at identifying seriously deficient performance in a doctor. The performance procedures require the medical record to be of a standard that enables the next doctor seeing the patient to give adequate care based on the available information. Setting standards for microbiological record keeping has proved difficult. Over one fifth of practising medical microbiologists (including virologists) in the UK (139 of 676) responded to a survey undertaken by the working group developing the performance procedures for microbiology, to identify current practice and to develop recommendations for agreement within the profession about the standards of the microbiological record. The cumulative frequency for the surveyed recording methods used indicated that at various times 65% (90 of 139) of respondents used a daybook, 62% (86 of 139) used the back of the clinical request card, 57% (79 of 139) used a computer record, and 22% (30 of 139) used an index card system to record microbiological advice, suggesting wide variability in relation to how medical microbiologists maintain clinical records. PMID:12499432

  10. Design and implementation of an affordable, public sector electronic medical record in rural Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raut, Anant; Yarbrough, Chase; Singh, Vivek; Gauchan, Bikash; Citrin, David; Verma, Varun; Hawley, Jessica; Schwarz, Dan; Harsha Bangura, Alex; Shrestha, Biplav; Schwarz, Ryan; Adhikari, Mukesh; Maru, Duncan

    2017-06-23

    Globally, electronic medical records are central to the infrastructure of modern healthcare systems. Yet the vast majority of electronic medical records have been designed for resource-rich environments and are not feasible in settings of poverty. Here we describe the design and implementation of an electronic medical record at a public sector district hospital in rural Nepal, and its subsequent expansion to an additional public sector facility.DevelopmentThe electronic medical record was designed to solve for the following elements of public sector healthcare delivery: 1) integration of the systems across inpatient, surgical, outpatient, emergency, laboratory, radiology, and pharmacy sites of care; 2) effective data extraction for impact evaluation and government regulation; 3) optimization for longitudinal care provision and patient tracking; and 4) effectiveness for quality improvement initiatives. For these purposes, we adapted Bahmni, a product built with open-source components for patient tracking, clinical protocols, pharmacy, laboratory, imaging, financial management, and supply logistics. In close partnership with government officials, we deployed the system in February of 2015, added on additional functionality, and iteratively improved the system over the following year. This experience enabled us then to deploy the system at an additional district-level hospital in a different part of the country in under four weeks. We discuss the implementation challenges and the strategies we pursued to build an electronic medical record for the public sector in rural Nepal.DiscussionOver the course of 18 months, we were able to develop, deploy and iterate upon the electronic medical record, and then deploy the refined product at an additional facility within only four weeks. Our experience suggests the feasibility of an integrated electronic medical record for public sector care delivery even in settings of rural poverty.

  11. Towards improvement of the accuracy and completeness of medication registration with the use of an electronic medical record (EMR)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiddema-van de Wal, A; Smith, RJA; van der Werf, GT; Meyboom-de Jong, B

    Background. Approximately 80% of GPs use a GP information system (GIS) and an electronic medical record (EMR) in their daily practice. To reap the full benefits of an EMR for patient care, post-graduate education and research, the data input must be well structured and accurately coded. Objectives.

  12. On standardization of basic datasets of electronic medical records in traditional Chinese medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Ni, Wandong; Li, Jing; Jiang, Youlin; Liu, Kunjing; Ma, Zhaohui

    2017-12-24

    Standardization of electronic medical record, so as to enable resource-sharing and information exchange among medical institutions has become inevitable in view of the ever increasing medical information. The current research is an effort towards the standardization of basic dataset of electronic medical records in traditional Chinese medicine. In this work, an outpatient clinical information model and an inpatient clinical information model are created to adequately depict the diagnosis processes and treatment procedures of traditional Chinese medicine. To be backward compatible with the existing dataset standard created for western medicine, the new standard shall be a superset of the existing standard. Thus, the two models are checked against the existing standard in conjunction with 170,000 medical record cases. If a case cannot be covered by the existing standard due to the particularity of Chinese medicine, then either an existing data element is expanded with some Chinese medicine contents or a new data element is created. Some dataset subsets are also created to group and record Chinese medicine special diagnoses and treatments such as acupuncture. The outcome of this research is a proposal of standardized traditional Chinese medicine medical records datasets. The proposal has been verified successfully in three medical institutions with hundreds of thousands of medical records. A new dataset standard for traditional Chinese medicine is proposed in this paper. The proposed standard, covering traditional Chinese medicine as well as western medicine, is expected to be soon approved by the authority. A widespread adoption of this proposal will enable traditional Chinese medicine hospitals and institutions to easily exchange information and share resources. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. An Analysis of the Records Management Process to Determine the Impact of Automation on Productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-12-01

    dressers , domestic workers, cleaners, and medical staff (14:267). 10 In macroeconomics, productivity is an important economic parameter. It is an indication...organizations. According to Christopher , API methods are similar to plant productivity measurement methods and can be used in cases where a single...output can be defined as the measure of successful performance of the organization (3:3.3). To develop an API, Christopher says that an organization

  14. Automated detection of follow-up appointments using text mining of discharge records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruud, Kari L; Johnson, Matthew G; Liesinger, Juliette T; Grafft, Carrie A; Naessens, James M

    2010-06-01

    To determine whether text mining can accurately detect specific follow-up appointment criteria in free-text hospital discharge records. Cross-sectional study. Mayo Clinic Rochester hospitals. Inpatients discharged from general medicine services in 2006 (n = 6481). Textual hospital dismissal summaries were manually reviewed to determine whether the records contained specific follow-up appointment arrangement elements: date, time and either physician or location for an appointment. The data set was evaluated for the same criteria using SAS Text Miner software. The two assessments were compared to determine the accuracy of text mining for detecting records containing follow-up appointment arrangements. Agreement of text-mined appointment findings with gold standard (manual abstraction) including sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV). About 55.2% (3576) of discharge records contained all criteria for follow-up appointment arrangements according to the manual review, 3.2% (113) of which were missed through text mining. Text mining incorrectly identified 3.7% (107) follow-up appointments that were not considered valid through manual review. Therefore, the text mining analysis concurred with the manual review in 96.6% of the appointment findings. Overall sensitivity and specificity were 96.8 and 96.3%, respectively; and PPV and NPV were 97.0 and 96.1%, respectively. of individual appointment criteria resulted in accuracy rates of 93.5% for date, 97.4% for time, 97.5% for physician and 82.9% for location. Text mining of unstructured hospital dismissal summaries can accurately detect documentation of follow-up appointment arrangement elements, thus saving considerable resources for performance assessment and quality-related research.

  15. Medical records for animals used in research, teaching, and testing: public statement from the American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Karl; Bailey, Michele; Foresman, Larry L; Harris, Robert L; Motzel, Sherri L; Rockar, Richard A; Ruble, Gaye; Suckow, Mark A

    2007-01-01

    Medical records are considered to be a key element of a program of adequate veterinary care for animals used in research, teaching, and testing. However, prior to the release of the public statement on medical records by the American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine (ACLAM), the guidance that was available on the form and content of medical records used for the research setting was not consistent and, in some cases, was considered to be too rigid. To address this concern, ACLAM convened an ad hoc Medical Records Committee and charged the Committee with the task of developing a medical record guideline that was based on both professional judgment and performance standards. The Committee provided ACLAM with a guidance document titled Public Statements: Medical Records for Animals Used in Research, Teaching, and Testing, which was approved by ACLAM in late 2004. The ACLAM public statement on medical records provides guidance on the definition and content of medical records, and clearly identifies the Attending Veterinarian as the individual who is charged with authority and responsibility for oversight of the institution's medical records program. The document offers latitude to institutions in the precise form and process used for medical records but identifies typical information to be included in such records. As a result, the ACLAM public statement on medical records provides practical yet flexible guidelines to assure that documentation of animal health is performed in research, teaching, and testing situations.

  16. A SWOT Analysis of the Various Backup Scenarios Used in Electronic Medical Record Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Hwa Jeong; Kim, Hye Hyeon; Kim, Ju Han

    2011-09-01

    Electronic medical records (EMRs) are increasingly being used by health care services. Currently, if an EMR shutdown occurs, even for a moment, patient safety and care can be seriously impacted. Our goal was to determine the methodology needed to develop an effective and reliable EMR backup system. Our "independent backup system by medical organizations" paradigm implies that individual medical organizations develop their own EMR backup systems within their organizations. A "personal independent backup system" is defined as an individual privately managing his/her own medical records, whereas in a "central backup system by the government" the government controls all the data. A "central backup system by private enterprises" implies that individual companies retain control over their own data. A "cooperative backup system among medical organizations" refers to a networked system established through mutual agreement. The "backup system based on mutual trust between an individual and an organization" means that the medical information backup system at the organizational level is established through mutual trust. Through the use of SWOT analysis it can be shown that cooperative backup among medical organizations is possible to be established through a network composed of various medical agencies and that it can be managed systematically. An owner of medical information only grants data access to the specific person who gave the authorization for backup based on the mutual trust between an individual and an organization. By employing SWOT analysis, we concluded that a linkage among medical organizations or between an individual and an organization can provide an efficient backup system.

  17. Non-redundant association rules between diseases and medications: an automated method for knowledge base construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Séverac, François; Sauleau, Erik A; Meyer, Nicolas; Lefèvre, Hassina; Nisand, Gabriel; Jay, Nicolas

    2015-04-15

    The widespread use of electronic health records (EHRs) has generated massive clinical data storage. Association rules mining is a feasible technique to convert this large amount of data into usable knowledge for clinical decision making, research or billing. We present a data driven method to create a knowledge base linking medications to pathological conditions through their therapeutic indications from elements within the EHRs. Association rules were created from the data of patients hospitalised between May 2012 and May 2013 in the department of Cardiology at the University Hospital of Strasbourg. Medications were extracted from the medication list, and the pathological conditions were extracted from the discharge summaries using a natural language processing tool. Association rules were generated along with different interestingness measures: chi square, lift, conviction, dependency, novelty and satisfaction. All medication-disease pairs were compared to the Summary of Product Characteristics, which is the gold standard. A score based on the other interestingness measures was created to filter the best rules, and the indices were calculated for the different interestingness measures. After the evaluation against the gold standard, a list of accurate association rules was successfully retrieved. Dependency represents the best recall (0.76). Our score exhibited higher exactness (0.84) and precision (0.27) than all of the others interestingness measures. Further reductions in noise produced by this method must be performed to improve the classification precision. Association rules mining using the unstructured elements of the EHR is a feasible technique to identify clinically accurate associations between medications and pathological conditions.

  18. Effects and Satisfaction of Medical Device Safety Information Reporting System Using Electronic Medical Record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hye Jung; Choi, Young Deuk; Kim, Nam Hyun

    2017-04-01

    This paper describes an evaluation study on the effectiveness of developing an in-hospital medical device safety information reporting system for managing safety information, including adverse incident data related to medical devices, following the enactment of the Medical Device Act in Korea. Medical device safety information reports were analyzed for 190 cases that took place prior to the application of a medical device safety information reporting system and during a period when the reporting system was used. Also, questionnaires were used to measure the effectiveness of the medical device safety information reporting system. The analysis was based on the questionnaire responses of 15 reporters who submitted reports in both the pre- and post-reporting system periods. Sixty-two reports were submitted in paper form, but after the system was set up, this number more than doubled to 128 reports in electronic form. In terms of itemized reporting, a total of 45 items were reported. Before the system was used, 23 items had been reported, but this increased to 32 items after the system was put to use. All survey variables of satisfaction received a mean of over 3 points, while positive attitude , potential benefits , and positive benefits all exceeded 4 points, each receiving 4.20, 4.20, and 4.13, respectively. Among the variables, time-consuming and decision-making had the lowest mean values, each receiving 3.53. Satisfaction was found to be high for system quality and user satisfaction , but relatively low for time-consuming and decision-making . We were able to verify that effective reporting and monitoring of adverse incidents and the safety of medical devices can be implemented through the establishment of an in-hospital medical device safety information reporting system that can enhance patient safety and medical device risk management.

  19. Attitudes toward inter-hospital electronic patient record exchange: discrepancies among physicians, medical record staff, and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jong-Yi; Ho, Hsiao-Yun; Chen, Jen-De; Chai, Sinkuo; Tai, Chih-Jaan; Chen, Yung-Fu

    2015-07-12

    In this era of ubiquitous information, patient record exchange among hospitals still has technological and individual barriers including resistance to information sharing. Most research on user attitudes has been limited to one type of user or aspect. Because few analyses of attitudes toward electronic patient records (EPRs) have been conducted, understanding the attitudes among different users in multiple aspects is crucial to user acceptance. This proof-of-concept study investigated the attitudes of users toward the inter-hospital EPR exchange system implemented nationwide and focused on discrepant behavioral intentions among three user groups. The system was designed by combining a Health Level 7-based protocol, object-relational mapping, and other medical informatics techniques to ensure interoperability in realizing patient-centered practices. After implementation, three user-specific questionnaires for physicians, medical record staff, and patients were administered, with a 70 % response rate. The instrument showed favorable convergent construct validity and internal consistency reliability. Two dependent variables were applied: the attitudes toward privacy and support. Independent variables comprised personal characteristics, work characteristics, human aspects, and technology aspects. Major statistical methods included exploratory factor analysis and general linear model. The results from 379 respondents indicated that the patients highly agreed with privacy protection by their consent and support for EPRs, whereas the physicians remained conservative toward both. Medical record staff was ranked in the middle among the three groups. The three user groups demonstrated discrepant intentions toward privacy protection and support. Experience of computer use, level of concerns, usefulness of functions, and specifically, reason to use electronic medical records and number of outpatient visits were significantly associated with the perceptions. Overall, four

  20. Barriers to retrieving patient information from electronic health record data: failure analysis from the TREC Medical Records Track.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edinger, Tracy; Cohen, Aaron M; Bedrick, Steven; Ambert, Kyle; Hersh, William

    2012-01-01

    Secondary use of electronic health record (EHR) data relies on the ability to retrieve accurate and complete information about desired patient populations. The Text Retrieval Conference (TREC) 2011 Medical Records Track was a challenge evaluation allowing comparison of systems and algorithms to retrieve patients eligible for clinical studies from a corpus of de-identified medical records, grouped by patient visit. Participants retrieved cohorts of patients relevant to 35 different clinical topics, and visits were judged for relevance to each topic. This study identified the most common barriers to identifying specific clinic populations in the test collection. Using the runs from track participants and judged visits, we analyzed the five non-relevant visits most often retrieved and the five relevant visits most often overlooked. Categories were developed iteratively to group the reasons for incorrect retrieval for each of the 35 topics. Reasons fell into nine categories for non-relevant visits and five categories for relevant visits. Non-relevant visits were most often retrieved because they contained a non-relevant reference to the topic terms. Relevant visits were most often infrequently retrieved because they used a synonym for a topic term. This failure analysis provides insight into areas for future improvement in EHR-based retrieval with techniques such as more widespread and complete use of standardized terminology in retrieval and data entry systems.

  1. Medical device integration: CIOs must bridge the digital divide between devices and electronic medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raths, David

    2009-02-01

    To get funding approved for medical device integration, ClOs suggest focusing on specific patient safety or staff efficiency pain points. Organizations that make clinical engineering part of their IT team report fewer chain-of-command issues. It also helps IT people understand the clinical goals because the engineering people have been working closely with clinicians for years. A new organization has formed to work on collaboration between clinical engineers and IT professionals. For more information, go to www.ceitcollaboration.org. ECRI Institute has written a guide to handling the convergence of medical technology and hospital networks. Its "Medical Technology for the IT Professional: An Essential Guide for Working in Today's Healthcare Setting" also details how IT professionals can assist hospital technology planning and acquisition, and provide ongoing support for IT-based medical technologies. For more information, visit www.ecri.org/ITresource.

  2. Patient-centric medical notes: Identifying areas for improvement in the age of open medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eric Hweegeun; Patel, Jay Pravin; Fortin, Auguste Hector

    2017-08-01

    Patients are increasingly provided facilitated access to their medical notes. Physicians have reported concerns that patients will find notes confusing and offensive, and that typographical errors will appear unprofessional. This exploratory study quantifies the prevalence of potentially confusing or offensive medical language and typographic errors within notes. The authors performed a retrospective, cross-sectional review of 400 inpatient History and Physical notes from a tertiary care center. All notes were from admissions to general internal medicine services. Words and phrases of interest were codified into five pre-established categories and subdivisions. Of 400 notes, 337 notes written by residents and hospitalists were analyzed. The most prevalent characteristics identified per note were General Medical Acronyms (99.1%), Medical Jargon (96.7%), and Typographical Errors (49%). Residents used a greater number of acronyms and abbreviations (planguage may prove beneficial to the patient-physician relationship in the digital era. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Automated filtering of common-mode artifacts in multichannel physiological recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, John W; Siewiorek, Daniel P; Smailagic, Asim; Wang, Wei

    2013-10-01

    The removal of spatially correlated noise is an important step in processing multichannel recordings. Here, a technique termed the adaptive common average reference (ACAR) is presented as an effective and simple method for removing this noise. The ACAR is based on a combination of the well-known common average reference (CAR) and an adaptive noise canceling (ANC) filter. In a convergent process, the CAR provides a reference to an ANC filter, which in turn provides feedback to enhance the CAR. This method was effective on both simulated and real data, outperforming the standard CAR when the amplitude or polarity of the noise changes across channels. In many cases, the ACAR even outperformed independent component analysis. On 16 channels of simulated data, the ACAR was able to attenuate up to approximately 290 dB of noise and could improve signal quality if the original SNR was as high as 5 dB. With an original SNR of 0 dB, the ACAR improved signal quality with only two data channels and performance improved as the number of channels increased. It also performed well under many different conditions for the structure of the noise and signals. Analysis of contaminated electrocorticographic recordings further showed the effectiveness of the ACAR.

  4. Records of medical malpractice litigation: a potential indicator of health-care quality in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhan; Li, Niying; Jiang, Mengsi; Dear, Keith; Hsieh, Chee-Ruey

    2017-06-01

    To assess the characteristics and incidence of medical litigation in China and the potential usefulness of the records of such litigation as an indicator of health-care quality. We investigated 13 620 cases of medical malpractice litigation that ended between 2010 and 2015 and were reported to China's Supreme Court. We categorized each case according to location of the court, the year the litigation ended, the medical specialization involved, the severity of the reported injury, the type of allegation raised by the plaintiff - including any alleged shortcomings in the health care received - and the outcome of the litigation. The annual incidence of medical malpractice litigation increased from 75 in 2010 to 6947 in 2014. Most cases related to general surgery (1350 litigations), internal medicine (3500 litigations), obstetrics and gynaecology (1251 litigations) and orthopaedics (1283 litigations). Most of the reported injuries were either minor (1358 injuries) or fatal (4111 deaths). The most frequent allegation was of lack of consent or notification (1356 litigations), followed by misdiagnosis (1172 litigations), delay in treatment (1145 litigations) and alteration or forgery of medical records (975 litigations). Of the 11 014 plaintiffs with known litigation outcomes, 7482 (67.9%) received monetary compensation. Over our study period, the incidence of litigation over potential medical malpractice increased in China. As many of the cases related to alleged inadequacies in the quality of health care, records of medical malpractice litigation in China may be worth exploring as an indicator of health-care quality.

  5. On-the-job training of health professionals for electronic health record and electronic medical record use: A scoping review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina L. Younge

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of electronic health records (EHRs or electronic medical records (EMRs is well documented in health informatics literature yet, very few studies focus primarily on how health professionals in direct clinical care are trained for EHR or EMR use. Purpose: To investigate how health professionals in direct clinical care are trained to prepare them for EHR or EMR use. Methods: Systematic searches were conducted in CINAHL, EMBASE, Ovid MEDLINE, PsycINFO, PubMed and ISI WoS and, the Arksey and O’Malley scoping methodological framework was used to collect the data and analyze the results. Results: Training was done at implementation, orientation and post-implementation. Implementation and orientation training had a broader scope while post-implementation training focused on proficiency, efficiency and improvement. The multiplicity of training methods, types and levels of training identified appear to suggest that training is more effective when a combination of training methods are used.

  6. Designing an algorithm to preserve privacy for medical record linkage with error-prone data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Doyel; Chen, Tingting; Zhong, Sheng; Khethavath, Praveen

    2014-01-20

    Linking medical records across different medical service providers is important to the enhancement of health care quality and public health surveillance. In records linkage, protecting the patients' privacy is a primary requirement. In real-world health care databases, records may well contain errors due to various reasons such as typos. Linking the error-prone data and preserving data privacy at the same time are very difficult. Existing privacy preserving solutions for this problem are only restricted to textual data. To enable different medical service providers to link their error-prone data in a private way, our aim was to provide a holistic solution by designing and developing a medical record linkage system for medical service providers. To initiate a record linkage, one provider selects one of its collaborators in the Connection Management Module, chooses some attributes of the database to be matched, and establishes the connection with the collaborator after the negotiation. In the Data Matching Module, for error-free data, our solution offered two different choices for cryptographic schemes. For error-prone numerical data, we proposed a newly designed privacy preserving linking algorithm named the Error-Tolerant Linking Algorithm, that allows the error-prone data to be correctly matched if the distance between the two records is below a threshold. We designed and developed a comprehensive and user-friendly software system that provides privacy preserving record linkage functions for medical service providers, which meets the regulation of Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. It does not require a third party and it is secure in that neither entity can learn the records in the other's database. Moreover, our novel Error-Tolerant Linking Algorithm implemented in this software can work well with error-prone numerical data. We theoretically proved the correctness and security of our Error-Tolerant Linking Algorithm. We have also fully

  7. Text Mining of the Electronic Health Record: An Information Extraction Approach for Automated Identification and Subphenotyping of HFpEF Patients for Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonnalagadda, Siddhartha R; Adupa, Abhishek K; Garg, Ravi P; Corona-Cox, Jessica; Shah, Sanjiv J

    2017-06-01

    Precision medicine requires clinical trials that are able to efficiently enroll subtypes of patients in whom targeted therapies can be tested. To reduce the large amount of time spent screening, identifying, and recruiting patients with specific subtypes of heterogeneous clinical syndromes (such as heart failure with preserved ejection fraction [HFpEF]), we need prescreening systems that are able to automate data extraction and decision-making tasks. However, a major obstacle is the vast amount of unstructured free-form text in medical records. Here we describe an information extraction-based approach that automatically converts unstructured text into structured data, which is cross-referenced against eligibility criteria using a rule-based system to determine which patients qualify for a major HFpEF clinical trial (PARAGON). We show that we can achieve a sensitivity and positive predictive value of 0.95 and 0.86, respectively. Our open-source algorithm could be used to efficiently identify and subphenotype patients with HFpEF and other disorders.

  8. The role of frontline RNs in the selection of an electronic medical record business partner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhoit, Kathryn; Mustain, Jane; King, Marjorie

    2006-01-01

    Frontline RNs knowledgeable in the strategic objectives of their organization made a difference in the selection of an electronic medical record business partner for a large, complex healthcare system. Their impact was significant because of the chief nurse executive's personal articulation of the organization's strategic goals and of her investment in their education. These factors provided the frontline RNs with a foundational base of knowledge about a variety of electronic medical record systems. The preparation and exposure enabled the frontline RNs to make a valuable contribution to the selection of an electronic medical record business partner. The RNs were a major force in affecting philosophical change from the organization's original pursuit of "best-of-breed" interfaced systems to a fully integrated, "best-of-class" vendor business partner. The learning experiences of the frontline RNs are explored to answer the following question: Why must frontline RNs play a key role in this process?

  9. Evaluation of medication errors with implementation of electronic health record technology in the medical intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liao TV

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available T Vivian Liao,1 Marina Rabinovich,2 Prasad Abraham,2 Sebastian Perez,3 Christiana DiPlotti,4 Jenny E Han,5 Greg S Martin,5 Eric Honig5 1Department of Pharmacy Practice, College of Pharmacy, Mercer Health Sciences Center, 2Department of Pharmacy and Clinical Nutrition, Grady Health System, 3Department of Surgery, Emory University, 4Pharmacy, Ingles Markets, 5Department of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA Purpose: Patients in the intensive care unit (ICU are at an increased risk for medication errors (MEs and adverse drug events from multifactorial causes. ME rate ranges from 1.2 to 947 per 1,000 patient days in the medical ICU (MICU. Studies with the implementation of electronic health records (EHR have concluded that it significantly reduced overall prescribing errors and the number of errors that caused patient harm decreased. However, other types of errors, such as wrong dose and omission of required medications increased after EHR implementation. We sought to compare the number of MEs before and after EHR implementation in the MICU, with additional evaluation of error severity.Patients and methods: Prospective, observational, quality improvement study of all patients admitted to a single MICU service at an academic medical center. Patients were evaluated during four periods over 2 years: August–September 2010 (preimplementation; period I, January–February 2011 (2 months postimplementation; period II, August–September 2012 (21 months postimplementation; period III, and January–February 2013 (25 months postimplementation; period IV. All medication orders and administration records were reviewed by an ICU clinical pharmacist and ME was defined as a deviation from established standards for prescribing, dispensing, administering, or documenting medication. The frequency and classification of MEs were compared between groups by chi square; p<0.05 was considered significant.Results: There was a statistically significant increase

  10. Adaptations of Personal Health Record Platform for Medical Research on Chronic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Krukowski

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The article reports on experiences in e-Health platforms and services for supporting medical research into the causes and relationships among physiological parameters and health problems concerning different chronic diseases. The Personal Health Record (PHR is a way of standardizing electronic management of medical information between patients and their physicians, including medical bodies collaborating in providing integrated medical care services. We describe roles and aims behind electronic health records, follow with applicable legal and standardizations frameworks and relevant European activities, leading to the presentation of common commercial and open-source implementations of such systems, concluding with the indication of specific adaptations enabling a use of stored personal health data for scientific research into causes and evaluation of chronic illnesses. We describe ethical and privacy concerns that are relevant to using and exchanging electronic health information.

  11. Mining association rules between abnormal health examination results and outpatient medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao Huang, Yi

    Currently, interpretation of health examination reports relies primarily on the physician's own experience. If health screening data could be integrated with outpatient medical records to uncover correlations between disease and abnormal test results, the physician could benefit from having additional reference resources for medical examination report interpretation and clinic diagnosis. This study used the medical database of a regional hospital in Taiwan to illustrate how association rules can be found between abnormal health examination results and outpatient illnesses. The rules can help to build up a disease-prevention knowledge database that assists healthcare providers in follow-up treatment and prevention. Furthermore, this study proposes a new algorithm, the data cutting and sorting method, or DCSM, in place of the traditional Apriori algorithm. DCSM significantly improves the mining performance of Apriori by reducing the time to scan health examination and outpatient medical records, both of which are databases of immense sizes.

  12. [Design and Implementation of a Mobile Operating Room Information Management System Based on Electronic Medical Record].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Baozhen; Liu, Zhiguo; Wang, Xianwen

    2015-06-01

    A mobile operating room information management system with electronic medical record (EMR) is designed to improve work efficiency and to enhance the patient information sharing. In the operating room, this system acquires the information from various medical devices through the Client/Server (C/S) pattern, and automatically generates XML-based EMR. Outside the operating room, this system provides information access service by using the Browser/Server (B/S) pattern. Software test shows that this system can correctly collect medical information from equipment and clearly display the real-time waveform. By achieving surgery records with higher quality and sharing the information among mobile medical units, this system can effectively reduce doctors' workload and promote the information construction of the field hospital.

  13. Perspectives of healthcare practitioners: An exploration of interprofessional communication using electronic medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardach, Shoshana H; Real, Kevin; Bardach, David R

    2017-05-01

    Contemporary state-of-the-art healthcare facilities are incorporating technology into their building design to improve communication and patient care. However, technological innovations may also have unintended consequences. This study seeks to better understand how technology influences interprofessional communication within a hospital setting based in the United States. Nine focus groups were conducted including a range of healthcare professions. The focus groups explored practitioners' experiences working on two floors of a newly designed hospital and included questions about the ways in which technology shaped communication with other healthcare professionals. All focus groups were recorded, transcribed, and coded to identify themes. Participant responses focused on the electronic medical record, and while some benefits of the electronic medical record were discussed, participants indicated use of the electronic medical record has resulted in a reduction of in-person communication. Different charting approaches resulted in barriers to communication between specialties and reduced confidence that other practitioners had received one's notes. Limitations in technology-including limited computer availability, documentation complexity, and sluggish sign-in processes-also were identified as barriers to effective and timely communication between practitioners. Given the ways in which technology shapes interprofessional communication, future research should explore how to create standardised electronic medical record use across professions at the optimal level to support communication and patient care.

  14. Identification of a potential fibromyalgia diagnosis using random forest modeling applied to electronic medical records

    OpenAIRE

    Masters, Elizabeth T.; Emir,Birol; Mardekian,Jack; Clair,Andrew; Kuhn,Max; Silverman,Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Birol Emir,1 Elizabeth T Masters,1 Jack Mardekian,1 Andrew Clair,1 Max Kuhn,2 Stuart L Silverman,3 1Pfizer Inc., New York, NY, 2Pfizer Inc., Groton, CT, 3Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA Background: Diagnosis of fibromyalgia (FM), a chronic musculoskeletal condition characterized by widespread pain and a constellation of symptoms, remains challenging and is often delayed. Methods: Random forest modeling of electronic medical records was used to identify variables that may fa...

  15. An electronic health record driven algorithm to identify incident antidepressant medication users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobo, William V; Pathak, Jyotishman; Kremers, Hilal Maradit; Yawn, Barbara P; Brue, Scott M; Stoppel, Cynthia J; Croarkin, Paul E; St Sauver, Jennifer; Frye, Mark A; Rocca, Walter A

    2014-01-01

    We validated an algorithm designed to identify new or prevalent users of antidepressant medications via population-based drug prescription records. We obtained population-based drug prescription records for the entire Olmsted County, Minnesota, population from 2011 to 2012 (N=149,629) using the existing electronic medical records linkage infrastructure of the Rochester Epidemiology Project (REP). We selected electronically a random sample of 200 new antidepressant users stratified by age and sex. The algorithm required the exclusion of antidepressant use in the 6 months preceding the date of the first qualifying antidepressant prescription (index date). Medical records were manually reviewed and adjudicated to calculate the positive predictive value (PPV). We also manually reviewed the records of a random sample of 200 antihistamine users who did not meet the case definition of new antidepressant user to estimate the negative predictive value (NPV). 161 of the 198 subjects electronically identified as new antidepressant users were confirmed by manual record review (PPV 81.3%). Restricting the definition of new users to subjects who were prescribed typical starting doses of each agent for treating major depression in non-geriatric adults resulted in an increase in the PPV (90.9%). Extending the time windows with no antidepressant use preceding the index date resulted in only modest increases in PPV. The manual abstraction of medical records of 200 antihistamine users yielded an NPV of 98.5%. Our study confirms that REP prescription records can be used to identify prevalent and incident users of antidepressants in the Olmsted County, Minnesota, population. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  16. The PHARMS (Patient Held Active Record of Medication Status) feasibility study: a research proposal.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, Elaine

    2018-01-08

    Medication errors are a major source of preventable morbidity, mortality and cost and many occur at the times of hospital admission and discharge. Novel interventions (such as new methods of recording medication information and conducting medication reconciliation) are required to facilitate accurate transfer of medication information. With existing evidence supporting the use of information technology and the patient representing the one constant in the care process, an electronic patient held medication record may provide a solution. This study will assess the feasibility of introducing a patient held electronic medication record in primary and secondary care using the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR).This feasibility study is a mixed method study of community dwelling older adult patients admitted to an urban secondary care facility comprising a non-randomised intervention and qualitative interviews with key stakeholders. Outcomes of interest include clinical outcomes and process evaluation.This study will yield insights pertaining to feasibility, acceptability and participation for a more definitive evaluation of the intervention. The study also has the potential to contribute to knowledge of implementation of technology in a healthcare context and to the broader area of implementation science.

  17. Microchip amplifier for in vitro, in vivo, and automated whole cell patch-clamp recording.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Reid R; Kolb, Ilya; Kodandaramaiah, Suhasa B; Chubykin, Alexander A; Yang, Aimei; Bear, Mark F; Boyden, Edward S; Forest, Craig R

    2015-02-15

    Patch clamping is a gold-standard electrophysiology technique that has the temporal resolution and signal-to-noise ratio capable of reporting single ion channel currents, as well as electrical activity of excitable single cells. Despite its usefulness and decades of development, the amplifiers required for patch clamping are expensive and bulky. This has limited the scalability and throughput of patch clamping for single-ion channel and single-cell analyses. In this work, we have developed a custom patch-clamp amplifier microchip that can be fabricated using standard commercial silicon processes capable of performing both voltage- and current-clamp measurements. A key innovation is the use of nonlinear feedback elements in the voltage-clamp amplifier circuit to convert measured currents into logarithmically encoded voltages, thereby eliminating the need for large high-valued resistors, a factor that has limited previous attempts at integration. Benchtop characterization of the chip shows low levels of current noise [1.1 pA root mean square (rms) over 5 kHz] during voltage-clamp measurements and low levels of voltage noise (8.2 μV rms over 10 kHz) during current-clamp measurements. We demonstrate the ability of the chip to perform both current- and voltage-clamp measurement in vitro in HEK293FT cells and cultured neurons. We also demonstrate its ability to perform in vivo recordings as part of a robotic patch-clamping system. The performance of the patch-clamp amplifier microchip compares favorably with much larger commercial instrumentation, enabling benchtop commoditization, miniaturization, and scalable patch-clamp instrumentation. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Towards improvement of the accuracy and completeness of medication registration with the use of an electronic medical record (EMR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiddema-van de Wal, A; Smith, R J; van der Werf, G T; Meyboom-de Jong, B

    2001-06-01

    Approximately 80% of GPs use a GP information system (GIS) and an electronic medical record (EMR) in their daily practice. To reap the full benefits of an EMR for patient care, post-graduate education and research, the data input must be well structured and accurately coded. The quality and user-friendliness of the software positively influence the completeness and reliability of the data recorded in the GIS. To assess this in actual practice, this study examined whether or not an increase occurred in the accuracy and completeness of indication-related medication registration after the GIS's software package was upgraded. GPs recorded data for the Registration Network Groningen (RNG) concerning four medication groups: insulin, trimethoprim, the contraceptive pill and beta-blocking agents. The completeness and accuracy of the registered data were assessed both before and after the change to the new software package. The completeness is evaluated on the basis of the indications missing for the prescribed medications. To assess accuracy, a check was made to determine whether the indications corresponded to those deemed relevant for that particular medication according to National Pharmaceutical Guidelines. The percentage of missing indications decreased notably, especially in the chronically prescribed medication groups. For insulin, the percentage decreased from 40.5 to 3% and for the contraceptive pill from 34.5 to 1%. For trimethoprim, the percentage decreased from 10 to 1%, and for beta-blocking agents from 22 to 1.5%. Of the indications present, the percentage of relevant indications showed a slight increase, with the largest increase observed for the contraceptive pill where the percentage rose from 86 to 96%. The completeness of recorded indications improved considerably after the change of software. This is due mostly to the efforts of the GPs, their practice assistants and the support of the RNG organization involved in the conversion procedure. Accuracy

  19. The study of inpatient medical records on hospital deductions: An interventional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Nahid; Jahanbakhsh, Maryam; Akbari, Mojtaba; Baktashian, Mojtba; Hasanzadeh, Akbar; Sadeghpour, Samaneh

    2015-01-01

    Background: The rate of hospital deductions is a commonly cited concern among teaching hospitals in Iran. The objective of the present study is to access the effect of the quantitative and qualitative analysis of inpatient medical records on deductions and identifying the major resources of deductions. There are currently no published interventional studies that have investigated this issue quantitatively. Materials and Methods: In an interventional study, we reviewed all the 192 patient's medical records (PMRs) for any documentation errors, to determine the rate of deductions. We conducted a pilot of 30 cases prior to the actual survey. Nonprobability-based consecutive sampling was used. The main study was conducted in three phases: 1. Primary evaluation; 2. Training, performance of intervention and corrective actions; and 3. Final assessment. Comprehensive assessments of medical records and follow-upof error correction were carried out systematically and according to the pre-set schedule. Pre- and post-intervention assessments were compared in order to evaluate the effect of the intervention. Data were analyzed using the SPSS-20 statistical software. Paired-sample t-test was used to compare changes in deduction scores before and after the intervention. Differences at a P value less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: In the initial survey of 800 PMRs, nearly one quarter (24%) (Or 192 cases) had at least one type of deduction. The three top types of deductions were Laboratory (47.9%), Medical radiation (45.3%), and Physician visit (35.9%). The results showed a 2.7- to about 36-fold lower rate of hospital deductions (average: 6.4-fold; reduction from21131 to 3285 US dollars). Conclusion: All in all, the results of the present study indicated that educational interventions and quantitative and qualitative analysis of inpatient medical records are very beneficial and effective in the reduction of medical record deductions. PMID:26097852

  20. Validation of an Improved Computer-Assisted Technique for Mining Free-Text Electronic Medical Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duz, Marco; Marshall, John F; Parkin, Tim

    2017-06-29

    The use of electronic medical records (EMRs) offers opportunity for clinical epidemiological research. With large EMR databases, automated analysis processes are necessary but require thorough validation before they can be routinely used. The aim of this study was to validate a computer-assisted technique using commercially available content analysis software (SimStat-WordStat v.6 (SS/WS), Provalis Research) for mining free-text EMRs. The dataset used for the validation process included life-long EMRs from 335 patients (17,563 rows of data), selected at random from a larger dataset (141,543 patients, ~2.6 million rows of data) and obtained from 10 equine veterinary practices in the United Kingdom. The ability of the computer-assisted technique to detect rows of data (cases) of colic, renal failure, right dorsal colitis, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use in the population was compared with manual classification. The first step of the computer-assisted analysis process was the definition of inclusion dictionaries to identify cases, including terms identifying a condition of interest. Words in inclusion dictionaries were selected from the list of all words in the dataset obtained in SS/WS. The second step consisted of defining an exclusion dictionary, including combinations of words to remove cases erroneously classified by the inclusion dictionary alone. The third step was the definition of a reinclusion dictionary to reinclude cases that had been erroneously classified by the exclusion dictionary. Finally, cases obtained by the exclusion dictionary were removed from cases obtained by the inclusion dictionary, and cases from the reinclusion dictionary were subsequently reincluded using Rv3.0.2 (R Foundation for Statistical Computing, Vienna, Austria). Manual analysis was performed as a separate process by a single experienced clinician reading through the dataset once and classifying each row of data based on the interpretation of the free

  1. Development, implementation, and evaluation of a hybrid electronic medical record system specifically designed for a developing world surgical service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laing, G L; Bruce, J L; Skinner, D L; Allorto, N L; Clarke, D L; Aldous, C

    2014-06-01

    The Pietermaritzburg Metropolitan Trauma Service previously successfully constructed and implemented an electronic surgical registry (ESR). This study reports on our attempts to expand and develop this concept into a multi-functional hybrid electronic medical record (HEMR) system for use in a tertiary level surgical service. This HEMR system was designed to incorporate the function and benefits of an ESR, an electronic medical record (EMR) system, and a clinical decision support system (CDSS). Formal ethical approval to maintain the HEMR system was obtained. Appropriate software was sourced to develop the project. The data model was designed as a relational database. Following the design and construction process, the HEMR file was launched on a secure server. This provided the benefits of access security and automated backups. A systematic training program was implemented for client training. The exercise of data capture was integrated into the process of clinical workflow, taking place at multiple points in time. Data were captured at the times of admission, operative intervention, endoscopic intervention, adverse events (morbidity), and the end of patient care (discharge, transfer, or death). A quarterly audit was performed 3 months after implementation of the HEMR system. The data were extracted and audited to assess their quality. A total of 1,114 patient entries were captured in the system. Compliance rates were in the order of 87-100 %, and client satisfaction rates were high. It is possible to construct and implement a unique, simple, cost-effective HEMR system in a developing world surgical service. This information system is unique in that it combines the discrete functions of an EMR system with an ESR and a CDSS. We identified a number of potential limitations and developed interventions to ameliorate them. This HEMR system provides the necessary platform for ongoing quality improvement programs and clinical research.

  2. Towards more reliable automated multi-dose dispensing: retrospective follow-up study on medication dose errors and product defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palttala, Iida; Heinämäki, Jyrki; Honkanen, Outi; Suominen, Risto; Antikainen, Osmo; Hirvonen, Jouni; Yliruusi, Jouko

    2013-03-01

    To date, little is known on applicability of different types of pharmaceutical dosage forms in an automated high-speed multi-dose dispensing process. The purpose of the present study was to identify and further investigate various process-induced and/or product-related limitations associated with multi-dose dispensing process. The rates of product defects and dose dispensing errors in automated multi-dose dispensing were retrospectively investigated during a 6-months follow-up period. The study was based on the analysis of process data of totally nine automated high-speed multi-dose dispensing systems. Special attention was paid to the dependence of multi-dose dispensing errors/product defects and pharmaceutical tablet properties (such as shape, dimensions, weight, scored lines, coatings, etc.) to profile the most suitable forms of tablets for automated dose dispensing systems. The relationship between the risk of errors in dose dispensing and tablet characteristics were visualized by creating a principal component analysis (PCA) model for the outcome of dispensed tablets. The two most common process-induced failures identified in the multi-dose dispensing are predisposal of tablet defects and unexpected product transitions in the medication cassette (dose dispensing error). The tablet defects are product-dependent failures, while the tablet transitions are dependent on automated multi-dose dispensing systems used. The occurrence of tablet defects is approximately twice as common as tablet transitions. Optimal tablet preparation for the high-speed multi-dose dispensing would be a round-shaped, relatively small/middle-sized, film-coated tablet without any scored line. Commercial tablet products can be profiled and classified based on their suitability to a high-speed multi-dose dispensing process.

  3. A SWOT Analysis of the Various Backup Scenarios Used in Electronic Medical Record Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Hwa Jeong; Kim, Hye Hyeon

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Electronic medical records (EMRs) are increasingly being used by health care services. Currently, if an EMR shutdown occurs, even for a moment, patient safety and care can be seriously impacted. Our goal was to determine the methodology needed to develop an effective and reliable EMR backup system. Methods Our "independent backup system by medical organizations" paradigm implies that individual medical organizations develop their own EMR backup systems within their organizations. A "personal independent backup system" is defined as an individual privately managing his/her own medical records, whereas in a "central backup system by the government" the government controls all the data. A "central backup system by private enterprises" implies that individual companies retain control over their own data. A "cooperative backup system among medical organizations" refers to a networked system established through mutual agreement. The "backup system based on mutual trust between an individual and an organization" means that the medical information backup system at the organizational level is established through mutual trust. Results Through the use of SWOT analysis it can be shown that cooperative backup among medical organizations is possible to be established through a network composed of various medical agencies and that it can be managed systematically. An owner of medical information only grants data access to the specific person who gave the authorization for backup based on the mutual trust between an individual and an organization. Conclusions By employing SWOT analysis, we concluded that a linkage among medical organizations or between an individual and an organization can provide an efficient backup system. PMID:22084811

  4. Developing a Systematic Architecture Approach for Designing an Enhanced Electronic Medical Record (EEMR) System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldukheil, Maher A.

    2013-01-01

    The Healthcare industry is characterized by its complexity in delivering care to the patients. Accordingly, healthcare organizations adopt and implement Information Technology (IT) solutions to manage complexity, improve quality of care, and transform to a fully integrated and digitized environment. Electronic Medical Records (EMR), which is…

  5. Health Care Professionals' Perceptions of the Use of Electronic Medical Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeyeye, Adebisi

    2015-01-01

    Electronic medical record (EMR) use has improved significantly in health care organizations. However, many barriers and factors influence the success of EMR implementation and adoption. The purpose of the descriptive qualitative single-case study was to explore health care professionals' perceptions of the use of EMRs at a hospital division of a…

  6. Accessing Your Health Information: How can I access my health information and medical records?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About ONC Main navigation Health IT Feedback Form Health IT Strategic Planning Leadership Bios ONC Speaker Request Form Contact Us ONC Budget and Performance Breadcrumb Home How Do I? For Individuals How can I access my health information/medical record? For Individuals How can I ...

  7. Pre-Post Evaluation of Physicians' Satisfaction with a Redesigned Electronic Medical Record System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaspers, Monique W. M.; Peute, Linda W. P.; Lauteslager, Arnaud; Bakker, Piet J. M.

    2008-01-01

    Physicians' acceptance of Electronic Medical Record Systems (EMRs) is closely related to their usability. Knowledge about end-users' opinions on usability of an EMR system may contribute to planning for the next phase of the usability cycle of the system. A demand for integration of new

  8. Evolution of Medication Administration Workflow in Implementing Electronic Health Record System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuan-Han

    2013-01-01

    This study focused on the clinical workflow evolutions when implementing the health information technology (HIT). The study especially emphasized on administrating medication when the electronic health record (EHR) systems were adopted at rural healthcare facilities. Mixed-mode research methods, such as survey, observation, and focus group, were…

  9. Enhanced identification of eligibility for depression research using an electronic medical record search engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyfried, Lisa; Hanauer, David A; Nease, Donald; Albeiruti, Rashad; Kavanagh, Janet; Kales, Helen C

    2009-12-01

    Electronic medical records (EMRs) have become part of daily practice for many physicians. Attempts have been made to apply electronic search engine technology to speed EMR review. This was a prospective, observational study to compare the speed and clinical accuracy of a medical record search engine vs. manual review of the EMR. Three raters reviewed 49 cases in the EMR to screen for eligibility in a depression study using the electronic medical record search engine (EMERSE). One week later raters received a scrambled set of the same patients including 9 distractor cases, and used manual EMR review to determine eligibility. For both methods, accuracy was assessed for the original 49 cases by comparison with a gold standard rater. Use of EMERSE resulted in considerable time savings; chart reviews using EMERSE were significantly faster than traditional manual review (p=0.03). The percent agreement of raters with the gold standard (e.g. concurrent validity) using either EMERSE or manual review was not significantly different. Using a search engine optimized for finding clinical information in the free-text sections of the EMR can provide significant time savings while preserving clinical accuracy. The major power of this search engine is not from a more advanced and sophisticated search algorithm, but rather from a user interface designed explicitly to help users search the entire medical record in a way that protects health information.

  10. Identifying Risk of Future Asthma Attacks Using UK Medical Record Data : A Respiratory Effectiveness Group Initiative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blakey, John D.; Price, David B.; Pizzichini, Emilio; Popov, Todor A.; Dimitrov, Borislav D.; Postma, Dirkje S.; Josephs, Lynn K.; Kaplan, Alan; Papi, Alberto; Kerkhof, Marjan; Hillyer, Elizabeth V.; Chisholm, Alison; Thomas, Mike

    BACKGROUND: Asthma attacks are common, serious, and costly. Individual factors associated with attacks, such as poor symptom control, are not robust predictors. OBJECTIVE: We investigated whether the rich data available in UK electronic medical records could identify patients at risk of recurrent

  11. Company project: "Evaluation of the quality of medical records as a tool of clinical risk management"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Santa Guzzo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The medical record was defined by the Italian Ministry of Health in 1992 as "the information tool designed to record all relevant demographic and clinical information on a patient during a single hospitalization episode". Retrospective analysis of medical records is a tool for selecting direct and indirect indicators of critical issues (organizational, management, technical and professional issues. The project’s purpose being the promotion of an evaluation and self-evaluation process of the medical records as a clinical risk management tool, in order to improve the quality of care within the company. Methods/design: The Authors have retrospectively analyzed a total of n. 1184 medical charts of patients admitted to Teaching Hospital “Umberto I” in Rome during in 2013 ( n. 518 and 2015 (n. 666 . Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS for Windows © 19:00. all duly filled out criteria (92 were examined. Strengths” and " Weaknesses " have been identified from data analysis and on the basis of the established criteria to identify Best Practices and Bad Practice. Results and Conclusion: The data analysis showed marked improvements (statistically significant of the quality of evaluated clinical documentation and indirectly of behavior. However, when taking into account some sub-criteria, critical issues emerge; these issues taking into account company priorities, could be subject in the future to further corrective actions.

  12. Estimating morbidity rates from electronic medical records in general practice. Evaluation of a grouping system.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biermans, M.C.J.; Verheij, R.A.; Bakker, D.H. de; Zielhuis, G.A.; Robbe, P.F.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In this study, we evaluated the internal validity of EPICON, an application for grouping ICPC-coded diagnoses from electronic medical records into episodes of care. These episodes are used to estimate morbidity rates in general practice. METHODS: Morbidity rates based on EPICON were

  13. A Real Application of a Concept-based Electronic Medical Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purin, Barbara; Eccher, Claudio; Forti, Stefano

    2003-01-01

    We present a real implementation of a concept-based Electronic Medical Record for the management of heart failure disease. Our approach is based on GEHR archetypes represented in XML format for modelling clinical information. By using this technique it could be possible to build a interoperable future-proof clinical information system. PMID:14728481

  14. Utilizing uncoded consultation notes from electronic medical records for predictive modeling of colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogendoorn, Mark; Szolovits, Peter; Moons, Leon M G; Numans, ME

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Machine learning techniques can be used to extract predictive models for diseases from electronic medical records (EMRs). However, the nature of EMRs makes it difficult to apply off-the-shelf machine learning techniques while still exploiting the rich content of the EMRs. In this paper,

  15. OSHA Final Rule Gives Employees the Right to See Their Exposure and Medical Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Mary

    1982-01-01

    Provides details pertaining to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) ruling that gives employees, their designated representatives, and OSHA the right to examine their on-the-job medical records. Discusses the effects the ruling may have on organizations. (Author/MLF)

  16. Agreement between questionnaire and medical records on some health and socioeconomic problems among poisoning cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fathelrahman Ahmed I

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The main objective of the present study was to evaluate the agreement between questionnaire and medical records on some health and socioeconomic problems among poisoning cases. Methods Cross-sectional sample of 100 poisoning cases consecutively admitted to the Hospital Pulau Pinang, Malaysia during the period from September 2003 to February 2004 were studied. Data on health and socioeconomic problems were collected both by self-administered questionnaire and from medical records. Agreement between the two sets of data was assessed by calculating the concordance rate, Kappa (k and PABAK. McNemar statistic was used to test differences between categories. Results Data collected by questionnaire and medical records showed excellent agreement on the "marital status"; good agreements on "chronic illness", "psychiatric illness", and "previous history of poisoning"; and fair agreements on "at least one health problem", and "boy-girl friends problem". PABAK values suggest better agreements' measures. Conclusion There were excellent to good agreements between questionnaire and medical records on the marital status and most of the health problems and fair to poor agreements on the majority of socioeconomic problems. The implications of those findings were discussed.

  17. The use of GP electronic medical records for international comparisons on prescription.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheij, R.; Dijk, L. van; Pringle, M.; Elliott, C.; Fleming, D.M.

    2007-01-01

    Aims: Much international research on prescription does not take into account the associated diagnoses. Subsequently, large scale international comparisons on what is prescribed for which disease are relatively rare. Routinely collected GP electronic medical records, whose use is well established in

  18. MO-FG-303-04: A Smartphone Application for Automated Mechanical Quality Assurance of Medical Accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H; Lee, H; Choi, K; Ye, S

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The mechanical quality assurance (QA) of medical accelerators consists of a time consuming series of procedures. Since most of the procedures are done manually – e.g., checking gantry rotation angle with the naked eye using a level attached to the gantry –, it is considered to be a process with high potential for human errors. To remove the possibilities of human errors and reduce the procedure duration, we developed a smartphone application for automated mechanical QA. Methods: The preparation for the automated process was done by attaching a smartphone to the gantry facing upward. For the assessments of gantry and collimator angle indications, motion sensors (gyroscope, accelerator, and magnetic field sensor) embedded in the smartphone were used. For the assessments of jaw position indicator, cross-hair centering, and optical distance indicator (ODI), an optical-image processing module using a picture taken by the high-resolution camera embedded in the smartphone was implemented. The application was developed with the Android software development kit (SDK) and OpenCV library. Results: The system accuracies in terms of angle detection error and length detection error were < 0.1° and < 1 mm, respectively. The mean absolute error for gantry and collimator rotation angles were 0.03° and 0.041°, respectively. The mean absolute error for the measured light field size was 0.067 cm. Conclusion: The automated system we developed can be used for the mechanical QA of medical accelerators with proven accuracy. For more convenient use of this application, the wireless communication module is under development. This system has a strong potential for the automation of the other QA procedures such as light/radiation field coincidence and couch translation/rotations

  19. Implementation of a Big Data Accessing and Processing Platform for Medical Records in Cloud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao-Tung; Liu, Jung-Chun; Chen, Shuo-Tsung; Lu, Hsin-Wen

    2017-08-18

    Big Data analysis has become a key factor of being innovative and competitive. Along with population growth worldwide and the trend aging of population in developed countries, the rate of the national medical care usage has been increasing. Due to the fact that individual medical data are usually scattered in different institutions and their data formats are varied, to integrate those data that continue increasing is challenging. In order to have scalable load capacity for these data platforms, we must build them in good platform architecture. Some issues must be considered in order to use the cloud computing to quickly integrate big medical data into database for easy analyzing, searching, and filtering big data to obtain valuable information.This work builds a cloud storage system with HBase of Hadoop for storing and analyzing big data of medical records and improves the performance of importing data into database. The data of medical records are stored in HBase database platform for big data analysis. This system performs distributed computing on medical records data processing through Hadoop MapReduce programming, and to provide functions, including keyword search, data filtering, and basic statistics for HBase database. This system uses the Put with the single-threaded method and the CompleteBulkload mechanism to import medical data. From the experimental results, we find that when the file size is less than 300MB, the Put with single-threaded method is used and when the file size is larger than 300MB, the CompleteBulkload mechanism is used to improve the performance of data import into database. This system provides a web interface that allows users to search data, filter out meaningful information through the web, and analyze and convert data in suitable forms that will be helpful for medical staff and institutions.

  20. Design of Electronic Medical Record User Interfaces: A Matrix-Based Method for Improving Usability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kushtrim Kuqi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines a new approach of using the Design Structure Matrix (DSM modeling technique to improve the design of Electronic Medical Record (EMR user interfaces. The usability of an EMR medication dosage calculator used for placing orders in an academic hospital setting was investigated. The proposed method captures and analyzes the interactions between user interface elements of the EMR system and groups elements based on information exchange, spatial adjacency, and similarity to improve screen density and time-on-task. Medication dose adjustment task time was recorded for the existing and new designs using a cognitive simulation model that predicts user performance. We estimate that the design improvement could reduce time-on-task by saving an average of 21 hours of hospital physicians’ time over the course of a month. The study suggests that the application of DSM can improve the usability of an EMR user interface.

  1. Frequency, comprehension and attitudes of physicians towards abbreviations in the medical record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamiel, Uri; Hecht, Idan; Nemet, Achia; Pe'er, Liron; Man, Vitaly; Hilely, Assaf; Achiron, Asaf

    2018-03-14

    Abbreviations are common in the medical record. Their inappropriate use may ultimately lead to patient harm, yet little is known regarding the extent of their use and their comprehension. Our aim was to assess the extent of their use, their comprehension and physicians' attitudes towards them, using ophthalmology consults in a tertiary hospital as a model. We first mapped the frequency with which English abbreviations were used in the departments' computerised databases. We then used the most frequently used abbreviations as part of a cross-sectional survey designed to assess the attitudes of non-ophthalmologist physicians towards the abbreviations and their comprehension of them. Finally, we tested whether an online lecture would improve comprehension. 4375 records were screened, and 235 physicians responded to the survey. Only 42.5% knew at least 10% of the abbreviations, and no one knew them all. Ninety-two per cent of respondents admitted to searching online for the meanings of abbreviations, and 59.1% believe abbreviations should be prohibited in medical records. A short online lecture improved the number of respondents answering correctly at least 50% of the time from 1.2% to 42% (PAbbreviations are common in medical records and are frequently misinterpreted. Online teaching is a valuable tool for physician education. The majority of respondents believed that misinterpreting abbreviations could negatively impact patient care, and that the use of abbreviations should be prohibited in medical records. Due to low rates of comprehension and negative attitudes towards abbreviations in medical communications, we believe their use should be discouraged. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  2. Understanding Factors Contributing to Inappropriate Critical Care: A Mixed-Methods Analysis of Medical Record Documentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Thanh H; Tarn, Derjung M; Yamamoto, Myrtle; Garber, Bryan J; Wenger, Neil S

    2017-11-01

    Factors leading to inappropriate critical care, that is treatment that should not be provided because it does not offer the patient meaningful benefit, have not been rigorously characterized. We explored medical record documentation about patients who received inappropriate critical care and those who received appropriate critical care to examine factors associated with the provision of inappropriate treatment. Medical records were abstracted from 123 patients who were assessed as receiving inappropriate treatment and 66 patients who were assessed as receiving appropriate treatment but died within six months of intensive care unit (ICU) admission. We used mixed methods combining qualitative analysis of medical record documentation with multivariable analysis to examine the relationship between patient and communication factors and the receipt of inappropriate treatment, and present these within a conceptual model. One academic health system. Medical records revealed 21 themes pertaining to prognosis and factors influencing treatment aggressiveness. Four themes were independently associated with patients receiving inappropriate treatment according to physicians. When decision making was not guided by physicians (odds ratio [OR] 3.76, confidence interval [95% CI] 1.21-11.70) or was delayed by patient/family (OR 4.52, 95% CI 1.69-12.04), patients were more likely to receive inappropriate treatment. Documented communication about goals of care (OR 0.29, 95% CI 0.10-0.84) and patient's preferences driving decision making (OR 0.02, 95% CI 0.00-0.27) were associated with lower odds of receiving inappropriate treatment. Medical record documentation suggests that inappropriate treatment occurs in the setting of communication and decision-making patterns that may be amenable to intervention.

  3. Documentation of clinical care in hospital patients' medical records: A qualitative study of medical students' perspectives on clinical documentation education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowlands, Stella; Coverdale, Steven; Callen, Joanne

    2016-12-01

    Clinical documentation is essential for communication between health professionals and the provision of quality care to patients. To examine medical students' perspectives of their education in documentation of clinical care in hospital patients' medical records. A qualitative design using semi-structured interviews with fourth-year medical students was undertaken at a hospital-based clinical school in an Australian university. Several themes reflecting medical students' clinical documentation education emerged from the data: formal clinical documentation education using lectures and tutorials was minimal; most education occurred on the job by junior doctors and student's expressed concerns regarding variation in education between teams and receiving limited feedback on performance. Respondents reported on the importance of feedback for their learning of disease processes and treatments. They suggested that improvements could be made in the timing of clinical documentation education and they stressed the importance of training on the job. On-the-job education with feedback in clinical documentation provides a learning opportunity for medical students and is essential in order to ensure accurate, safe, succinct and timely clinical notes. © The Author(s) 2016.

  4. Distribution of Problems, Medications and Lab Results in Electronic Health Records: The Pareto Principle at Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Adam; Bates, David W

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many natural phenomena demonstrate power-law distributions, where very common items predominate. Problems, medications and lab results represent some of the most important data elements in medicine, but their overall distribution has not been reported. OBJECTIVE: Our objective is to determine whether problems, medications and lab results demonstrate a power law distribution. METHODS: Retrospective review of electronic medical record data for 100,000 randomly selected patients seen at least twice in 2006 and 2007 at the Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston and its affiliated medical practices. RESULTS: All three data types exhibited a power law distribution. The 12.5% most frequently used problems account for 80% of all patient problems, the top 11.8% of medications account for 80% of all medication orders and the top 4.5% of lab result types account for all lab results. CONCLUSION: These three data elements exhibited power law distributions with a small number of common items representing a substantial proportion of all orders and observations, which has implications for electronic health record design.

  5. Knowledge and attitudes of nurses in community health centres about electronic medical records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Don O'Mahony

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nurses in primary healthcare record data for the monitoring and evaluation of diseases and services. Information and communications technology (ICT can improve quality in healthcare by providing quality medical records. However, worldwide, the majority of health ICT projects have failed. Individual user acceptance is a crucial factor in successful ICT implementation. Objectives: The aim of this study is to explore nurses’ knowledge, attitudes and perceptions regarding ICT so as to inform the future implementation of electronic medical record (EMR systems. Methods: A qualitative design was used. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken with nurses at three community health centres (CHCs in the King Sabata Dalyindyebo Local Municipality. The interview guide was informed by the literature on user acceptance of ICT. Interviews were recorded and analysed using content analysis. Results: Many nurses knew about health ICT and articulated clearly the potential benefits of an EMR such as fewer errors, more complete records, easier reporting and access to information. They thought that an EMR system would solve the challenges they identified with the current paper-based record system, including duplication of data, misfiling, lack of a chronological patient record, excessive time in recording and reduced time for patient care. For personal ICT needs, approximately half used cellphone Internet-based services and computers. Conclusions: In this study, nurses identified many challenges with the current recording methods. They thought that an EMR should be installed at CHCs. Their knowledge about EMR, positive attitudes to ICT and personal use of ICT devices increase the likelihood of successful EMR implementation at CHCs.

  6. Development and application of two semi-automated tools for targeted medical product surveillance in a distributed data network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, John G; Wang, Shirley V; Fuller, Candace C; Toh, Sengwee; Panozzo, Catherine A; Cocoros, Noelle; Zhou, Meijia; Gagne, Joshua J; Maro, Judith C

    2017-12-01

    An important component of the Food and Drug Administration's Sentinel Initiative is the active post-market risk identification and analysis (ARIA) system, which utilizes semi-automated, parameterized computer programs to implement propensity-score adjusted and self-controlled risk interval designs to conduct targeted surveillance of medical products in the Sentinel Distributed Database. In this manuscript, we review literature relevant to the development of these programs and describe their application within the Sentinel Initiative. These quality-checked and publicly available tools have been successfully used to conduct rapid, replicable, and targeted safety analyses of several medical products. In addition to speed and reproducibility, use of semi-automated tools allows investigators to focus on decisions regarding key methodological parameters. We also identified challenges associated with the use of these methods in distributed and prospective datasets like the Sentinel Distributed Database, namely uncertainty regarding the optimal approach to estimating propensity scores in dynamic data among data partners of heterogeneous size. Future research should focus on the methodological challenges raised by these applications as well as developing new modular programs for targeted surveillance of medical products.

  7. An algorithm to improve diagnostic accuracy in diabetes in computerised problem orientated medical records (POMR compared with an established algorithm developed in episode orientated records (EOMR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon de Lusignan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available An algorithm that detects errors in diagnosis, classification or coding of diabetes in primary care computerised medial record (CMR systems is currently available.  However, this was developed on CMR systems that are “Episode orientated” medical records (EOMR; and don’t force the user to always code a problem or link data to an existing one.  More strictly problem orientated medical record (POMR systems mandate recording a problem and linking consultation data to them.  

  8. Evaluating the benefit of introducing medical clerks as transcriptionists to assist physicians in outpatient clinics: a quantitative analysis of medical records by counting characters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasahara, Satoko; Yoshizaki, Kayoko; Yamashita, Teppei; Takeda, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluates the effects of the medical clerks introduced to reduce physicians' workloads in outpatient clinics by assisting with their documentation processes (e.g., the production of electronic medical records (EMRs)). The volume of information written in narrative text in EMRs from 2007 (pre-introduction of medical clerks) to 2012 (post-introduction) was measured by counting Japanese characters. The total number of medical records for analysis was 1,577. The average number of characters in EMRs increased from before the introduction of medical clerks to afterwards regardless of the types of documents (subjective or objective data) or visits (first or second visits). We conclude that introducing medical clerks improves the quantity of outpatients' medical records and that such a character-counting method is useful for evaluating the benefit of the introduction of medical clerks to assist physicians.

  9. Using the Electronic Medical Record to Enhance Physician-Nurse Communication Regarding Patients' Discharge Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Molly; Gurka, David

    2015-01-01

    The fast-paced environment of hospitals contributes to communication failures between health care providers while impacting patient care and patient flow. An effective mechanism for sharing patients' discharge information with health care team members is required to improve patient throughput. The communication of a patient's discharge plan was identified as crucial in alleviating patient flow delays at a tertiary care, academic medical center. By identifying the patients who were expected to be discharged the following day, the health care team could initiate discharge preparations in advance to improve patient care and patient flow. The patients' electronic medical record served to convey dynamic information regarding the patients' discharge status to the health care team via conditional discharge orders. Two neurosciences units piloted a conditional discharge order initiative. Conditional discharge orders were designed in the electronic medical record so that the conditions for discharge were listed in a dropdown menu. The health care team was trained on the conditional discharge order protocol, including when to write them, how to find them in the patients' electronic medical record, and what actions should be prompted by these orders. On average, 24% of the patients discharged had conditional discharge orders written the day before discharge. The average discharge time for patients with conditional discharge orders decreased by 83 minutes (0.06 day) from baseline. Qualitatively, the health care team reported improved workflows with conditional orders. The conditional discharge orders allowed physicians to communicate pending discharges electronically to the multidisciplinary team. The initiative positively impacted patient discharge times and workflows.

  10. Contribution of Electronic Medical Records to the Management of Rare Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Bremond-Gignac

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Electronic health record systems provide great opportunity to study most diseases. Objective of this study was to determine whether electronic medical records (EMR in ophthalmology contribute to management of rare eye diseases, isolated or in syndromes. Study was designed to identify and collect patients’ data with ophthalmology-specific EMR. Methods. Ophthalmology-specific EMR software (Softalmo software Corilus was used to acquire ophthalmological ocular consultation data from patients with five rare eye diseases. The rare eye diseases and data were selected and collected regarding expertise of eye center. Results. A total of 135,206 outpatient consultations were performed between 2011 and 2014 in our medical center specialized in rare eye diseases. The search software identified 29 congenital aniridia, 6 Axenfeld/Rieger syndrome, 11 BEPS, 3 Nanophthalmos, and 3 Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome. Discussion. EMR provides advantages for medical care. The use of ophthalmology-specific EMR is reliable and can contribute to a comprehensive ocular visual phenotype useful for clinical research. Conclusion. Routinely EMR acquired with specific software dedicated to ophthalmology provides sufficient detail for rare diseases. These software-collected data appear useful for creating patient cohorts and recording ocular examination, avoiding the time-consuming analysis of paper records and investigation, in a University Hospital linked to a National Reference Rare Center Disease.

  11. Contribution of Electronic Medical Records to the Management of Rare Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremond-Gignac, Dominique; Lewandowski, Elisabeth; Copin, Henri

    2015-01-01

    Electronic health record systems provide great opportunity to study most diseases. Objective of this study was to determine whether electronic medical records (EMR) in ophthalmology contribute to management of rare eye diseases, isolated or in syndromes. Study was designed to identify and collect patients' data with ophthalmology-specific EMR. Ophthalmology-specific EMR software (Softalmo software Corilus) was used to acquire ophthalmological ocular consultation data from patients with five rare eye diseases. The rare eye diseases and data were selected and collected regarding expertise of eye center. A total of 135,206 outpatient consultations were performed between 2011 and 2014 in our medical center specialized in rare eye diseases. The search software identified 29 congenital aniridia, 6 Axenfeld/Rieger syndrome, 11 BEPS, 3 Nanophthalmos, and 3 Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome. EMR provides advantages for medical care. The use of ophthalmology-specific EMR is reliable and can contribute to a comprehensive ocular visual phenotype useful for clinical research. Routinely EMR acquired with specific software dedicated to ophthalmology provides sufficient detail for rare diseases. These software-collected data appear useful for creating patient cohorts and recording ocular examination, avoiding the time-consuming analysis of paper records and investigation, in a University Hospital linked to a National Reference Rare Center Disease.

  12. Improving quality in an internal medicine residency program through a peer medical record audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asao, Keiko; Mansi, Ishak A; Banks, Daniel

    2009-12-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a quality improvement project of a limited didactic session, a medical record audit by peers, and casual feedback within a residency program. Residents audited their peers' medical records from the clinic of a university hospital in March, April, August, and September 2007. A 24-item quality-of-care score was developed for five common diagnoses, expressed from 0 to 100, with 100 as complete compliance. Audit scores were compared by month and experience of the resident as an auditor. A total of 469 medical records, audited by 12 residents, for 80 clinic residents, were included. The mean quality-of-care score was 89 (95% CI = 88-91); the scores in March, April, August, and September were 88 (95% CI = 85-91), 94 (95% CI = 90-96), 87 (95% CI = 85-89), and 91 (95% CI = 89-93), respectively. The mean score of 58 records of residents who had experience as auditors was 94 (95% CI = 89-96) compared with 89 (95% CI = 87-90) for those who did not. The score significantly varied (P = .0009) from March to April and from April to August, but it was not significantly associated with experience as an auditor with multivariate analysis. Residents' compliance with the standards of care was generally high. Residents responded to the project well, but their performance dropped after a break in the intervention. Continuation of the audit process may be necessary for a sustained effect on quality.

  13. A Model of Process-Based Automation: Cost and Quality Implications in the Medication Management Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaulding, Trent Joseph

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this research is to understand how a set of systems, as defined by the business process, creates value. The three studies contained in this work develop the model of process-based automation. The model states that complementarities among systems are specified by handoffs in the business process. The model also provides theory to…

  14. Impact of an electronic medical record system on emergency department discharge instructions for patients with hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cienki, John J; Guerrera, Angela D; Rose Steed, Nell; Kubo, Elizabeth N; Baumann, Brigitte M

    2013-09-01

    Uncontrolled hypertension is associated with significant patient morbidity and health care costs. Many patients evaluated in the emergency department (ED) do not regularly consult health care providers and have socioeconomic barriers to receiving primary care. Hypertension screening and counseling has been advocated as a routine part of ED care. Previous work has shown poor referral rates and education for ED patients presenting with elevated blood pressure (BP). We sought to determine whether implementation of an electronic medical record (EMR) would improve these rates. We performed a retrospective study conducted in 2 urban academic EDs, comparing pre-EMR (handwritten discharge) to post-EMR discharge instructions for patient referral for BP management and education on lifestyle modification. Medical records of patients aged ≥ 18 years with a systolic BP rate ≥ 140 or diastolic BP rate ≥ 90 mm Hg were included. Patient data included demographics, BP rate, presenting symptoms, and administration of antihypertensive medication while in the ED. Discharge instructions were reviewed for a directed referral for outpatient BP management, prescriptions for antihypertensive medication, and lifestyle modifications. Of the 1000 medical records reviewed, 500 were pre- and 500 were post-EMR, including a total of 389 patients who had persistently elevated BP on reassessment. At discharge, acknowledgment of elevated BP occurred in 45% of patients in the pre-EMR phase and only 26% in the post-EMR phase (P patients and in 15% of the post-EMR patients (P patient included increasing BP rate, pharmacologic treatment of hypertension in the ED, or provision of a prescription for an antihypertensive medication at discharge. The post-EMR phase was negatively associated with a directed referral for outpatient BP management. Overall, the initiation of EMR led to a decrease in outpatient referrals and acknowledgment of elevated BP rates in discharge instructions. The provision of

  15. Clinical Holistic Medicine: the “New Medicine”, the Multiparadigmatic Physician, and the Medical Record

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The modern physician is often multiparadigmatic as he serves many different types of people in many different existential circumstances. The physician basically often has three, very different sets of technologies or “toolboxes” at his disposal, derived from three different medical paradigms: classical, manual medicine; biomedicine; and holistic or consciousness-oriented medicine. For lack of a better term, we have called the extended medical science — integrating these three different paradigms and their three strands of tools and methods — the “new medicine”. The excellent physician, mastering the “new medicine”, uses the most efficient way to help every patient, giving him or her exactly what is needed under the circumstances. The excellent physician will choose the right paradigm(s for the person, the illness, or the situation, and will use the case record to keep track of all the subjective and objective factors and events involved in the process of healing through time. The case or medical record has the following purposes: A. Reflection: To keep track of facts, to provide an overview, to encourage causal analysis, to support research and learning, and to reveal mistakes easily. B. Communication: To communicate with the patient with a printout of the case record to create trust and help the patient to remember all assignments and exercises. C. Evidence and safety: To provide evidence and safety for the patient or to be used in case of legal questions. D. Self-discipline: To encourage discipline, as a good case record is basically honest, sober, brief, and sticks to the point. It forces the physician to make an effort to be more diligent and careful than a busy day usually allows.The intention of the case or medical record is ethical: to be sure that you, as a physician, give the best possible treatment to your patient. It helps you to reflect deeply, communicate efficiently, provide evidence and safety, and back your self

  16. Clinical holistic medicine: the "new medicine", the multiparadigmatic physician, and the medical record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventegodt, Søren; Morad, Mohammed; Merrick, Joav

    2004-05-11

    The modern physician is often multiparadigmatic as he serves many different types of people in many different existential circumstances. The physician basically often has three, very different sets of technologies or "toolboxes" at his disposal, derived from three different medical paradigms: classical, manual medicine; biomedicine; and holistic or consciousness-oriented medicine. For lack of a better term, we have called the extended medical science--integrating these three different paradigms and their three strands of tools and methods--the "new medicine". The excellent physician, mastering the "new medicine", uses the most efficient way to help every patient, giving him or her exactly what is needed under the circumstances. The excellent physician will choose the right paradigm(s) for the person, the illness, or the situation, and will use the case record to keep track of all the subjective and objective factors and events involved in the process of healing through time. The case or medical record has the following purposes: A. REFLECTION: To keep track of facts, to provide an overview, to encourage causal analysis, to support research and learning, and to reveal mistakes easily. B. To communicate with the patient with a printout of the case record to create trust and help the patient to remember all assignments and exercises. C. EVIDENCE AND SAFETY: To provide evidence and safety for the patient or to be used in case of legal questions. D. SELF-DISCIPLINE: To encourage discipline, as a good case record is basically honest, sober, brief, and sticks to the point. It forces the physician to make an effort to be more diligent and careful than a busy day usually allows. The intention of the case or medical record is ethical: to be sure that you, as a physician, give the best possible treatment to your patient. It helps you to reflect deeply, communicate efficiently, provide evidence and safety, and back your self-discipline, never to be carried away by the high

  17. Exploring medical student decisions regarding attending live lectures and using recorded lectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Anmol; Saks, Norma Susswein

    2013-09-01

    Student decisions about lecture attendance are based on anticipated effect on learning. Factors involved in decision-making, the use of recorded lectures and their effect on lecture attendance, all warrant investigation. This study was designed to identify factors in student decisions to attend live lectures, ways in which students use recorded lectures, and if their use affects live lecture attendance. A total of 213 first (M1) and second year (M2) medical students completed a survey about lecture attendance, and rated factors related to decisions to attend live lectures and to utilize recorded lectures. Responses were analyzed overall and by class year and gender. M1 attended a higher percentage of live lectures than M2, while both classes used the same percentage of recorded lectures. Females attended more live lectures, and used a smaller percentage of recorded lectures. The lecturer was a key in attendance decisions. Also considered were the subject and availability of other learning materials. Students use recorded lectures as replacement for live lectures and as supplement to them. Lectures, both live and recorded, are important for student learning. Decisions about lecture placement in the curriculum need to be based on course content and lecturer quality.

  18. Preserving medical correctness, readability and consistency in de-identified health records

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pantazos, Kostas; Lauesen, Søren; Lippert, Søren

    2016-01-01

    A health record database contains structured data fields that identify the patient, such as patient ID, patient name, e-mail and phone number. These data are fairly easy to de-identify, that is, replace with other identifiers. However, these data also occur in fields with doctors’ free-text notes...... written in an abbreviated style that cannot be analyzed grammatically. If we replace a word that looks like a name, but isn’t, we degrade readability and medical correctness. If we fail to replace it when we should, we degrade confidentiality. We de-identified an existing Danish electronic health record...

  19. Development and validation of an automated delirium risk assessment system (Auto-DelRAS) implemented in the electronic health record system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Kyoung-Ja; Jin, Yinji; Jin, Taixian; Lee, Sun-Mi

    2018-01-01

    A key component of the delirium management is prevention and early detection. To develop an automated delirium risk assessment system (Auto-DelRAS) that automatically alerts health care providers of an intensive care unit (ICU) patient's delirium risk based only on data collected in an electronic health record (EHR) system, and to evaluate the clinical validity of this system. Cohort and system development designs were used. Medical and surgical ICUs in two university hospitals in Seoul, Korea. A total of 3284 patients for the development of Auto-DelRAS, 325 for external validation, 694 for validation after clinical applications. The 4211 data items were extracted from the EHR system and delirium was measured using CAM-ICU (Confusion Assessment Method for Intensive Care Unit). The potential predictors were selected and a logistic regression model was established to create a delirium risk scoring algorithm to construct the Auto-DelRAS. The Auto-DelRAS was evaluated at three months and one year after its application to clinical practice to establish the predictive validity of the system. Eleven predictors were finally included in the logistic regression model. The results of the Auto-DelRAS risk assessment were shown as high/moderate/low risk on a Kardex screen. The predictive validity, analyzed after the clinical application of Auto-DelRAS after one year, showed a sensitivity of 0.88, specificity of 0.72, positive predictive value of 0.53, negative predictive value of 0.94, and a Youden index of 0.59. A relatively high level of predictive validity was maintained with the Auto-DelRAS system, even one year after it was applied to clinical practice. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Automatic identification of methotrexate-induced liver toxicity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis from the electronic medical record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chen; Karlson, Elizabeth W; Dligach, Dmitriy; Ramirez, Monica P; Miller, Timothy A; Mo, Huan; Braggs, Natalie S; Cagan, Andrew; Gainer, Vivian; Denny, Joshua C; Savova, Guergana K

    2015-04-01

    To improve the accuracy of mining structured and unstructured components of the electronic medical record (EMR) by adding temporal features to automatically identify patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with methotrexate-induced liver transaminase abnormalities. Codified information and a string-matching algorithm were applied to a RA cohort of 5903 patients from Partners HealthCare to select 1130 patients with potential liver toxicity. Supervised machine learning was applied as our key method. For features, Apache clinical Text Analysis and Knowledge Extraction System (cTAKES) was used to extract standard vocabulary from relevant sections of the unstructured clinical narrative. Temporal features were further extracted to assess the temporal relevance of event mentions with regard to the date of transaminase abnormality. All features were encapsulated in a 3-month-long episode for classification. Results were summarized at patient level in a training set (N=480 patients) and evaluated against a test set (N=120 patients). The system achieved positive predictive value (PPV) 0.756, sensitivity 0.919, F1 score 0.829 on the test set, which was significantly better than the best baseline system (PPV 0.590, sensitivity 0.703, F1 score 0.642). Our innovations, which included framing the phenotype problem as an episode-level classification task, and adding temporal information, all proved highly effective. Automated methotrexate-induced liver toxicity phenotype discovery for patients with RA based on structured and unstructured information in the EMR shows accurate results. Our work demonstrates that adding temporal features significantly improved classification results. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. A Way to Understand Inpatients Based on the Electronic Medical Records in the Big Data Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyi Mao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, information technology in healthcare, such as Electronic Medical Record (EMR system, is potential to improve service quality and cost efficiency of the hospital. The continuous use of EMR systems has generated a great amount of data. However, hospitals tend to use these data to report their operational efficiency rather than to understand their patients. Base on a dataset of inpatients’ medical records from a Chinese general public hospital, this study applies a configuration analysis from a managerial perspective and explains inpatients management in a different way. Four inpatient configurations (valued patients, managed patients, normal patients, and potential patients are identified by the measure of the length of stay and the total hospital cost. The implications of the finding are discussed.

  2. A Way to Understand Inpatients Based on the Electronic Medical Records in the Big Data Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    In recent decades, information technology in healthcare, such as Electronic Medical Record (EMR) system, is potential to improve service quality and cost efficiency of the hospital. The continuous use of EMR systems has generated a great amount of data. However, hospitals tend to use these data to report their operational efficiency rather than to understand their patients. Base on a dataset of inpatients' medical records from a Chinese general public hospital, this study applies a configuration analysis from a managerial perspective and explains inpatients management in a different way. Four inpatient configurations (valued patients, managed patients, normal patients, and potential patients) are identified by the measure of the length of stay and the total hospital cost. The implications of the finding are discussed. PMID:28280506

  3. Development of a clinical information tool for the electronic medical record: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Barbara A; Tannery, Nancy H; Wessel, Charles B; Yarger, Frances; LaDue, John; Fiorillo, Anthony B

    2010-07-01

    What is the process of developing a clinical information tool to be embedded in the electronic health record of a very large and diverse academic medical center? The development took place at the University of Pittsburgh Health Sciences Library System. The clinical information tool developed is a search box with subject tabs to provide quick access to designated full-text information resources. Each subject tab offers a federated search of a different pool of resources. Search results are organized "on the fly" into meaningful categories using clustering technology and are directly accessible from the results page. After more than a year of discussion and planning, a clinical information tool was embedded in the academic medical center's electronic health record. The library successfully developed a clinical information tool, called Clinical-e, for use at the point of care. Future development will refine the tool and evaluate its impact and effectiveness.

  4. Incorporating client-server database architecture and graphical user interface into outpatient medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiacco, P A; Rice, W H

    1991-01-01

    Computerized medical record systems require structured database architectures for information processing. However, the data must be able to be transferred across heterogeneous platform and software systems. Client-Server architecture allows for distributive processing of information among networked computers and provides the flexibility needed to link diverse systems together effectively. We have incorporated this client-server model with a graphical user interface into an outpatient medical record system, known as SuperChart, for the Department of Family Medicine at SUNY Health Science Center at Syracuse. SuperChart was developed using SuperCard and Oracle SuperCard uses modern object-oriented programming to support a hypermedia environment. Oracle is a powerful relational database management system that incorporates a client-server architecture. This provides both a distributed database and distributed processing which improves performance.

  5. Association of arrhythmia-related genetic variants with phenotypes documented in electronic medical records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Driest, Sara L.; Wells, Quinn S.; Stallings, Sarah; Bush, William S.; Gordon, Adam; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Kim, Jerry H.; Crosslin, David R.; Jarvik, Gail P.; Carrell, David S.; Ralston, James; Larson, Eric B.; Bielinski, Suzette J.; Olson, Janet E.; Ye, Zi; Kullo, Iftikhar J.; Abul-Husn, Noura S.; Scott, Stuart A.; Bottinger, Erwin; Almoguera, Berta; Connolly, John; Chiavacci, Rosetta; Hakonarson, Hakon; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J.; Pan, Vivian; Persell, Stephen D.; Smith, Maureen; Chisholm, Rex L.; Kitchner, Terrie E.; He, Max M.; Brilliant, Murray H.; Wallace, John R.; Doheny, Kimberly F.; Shoemaker, M. Benjamin; Li, Rongling; Manolio, Teri A.; Callis, Thomas E.; Macaya, Daniela; Williams, Marc S.; Carey, David; Kapplinger, Jamie D.; Ackerman, Michael J.; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Denny, Joshua C.; Roden, Dan M.

    2016-01-01

    Importance Large-scale DNA sequencing identifies incidental rare variants in established Mendelian disease genes, but the frequency of related clinical phenotypes in unselected patient populations is not well established. Phenotype data from electronic medical records may provide a resource to assess the clinical relevance of rare variants. Objective To determine the clinical phenotypes from electronic medical records in individuals with variants designated as pathogenic by expert review in arrhythmia susceptibility genes. Design, Setting and Participants This prospective cohort study included 2022 individuals recruited for non-antiarrhythmic drug exposure phenotypes from 10/5/2012 to 9/30/2013 for the Electronic Medical Records and Genomics Network Pharmacogenomics project from seven US academic medical centers. Variants in SCN5A and KCNH2, disease genes for long QT and Brugada Syndromes, were assessed for potential pathogenicity by three laboratories with ion channel expertise and the ClinVar database. Relevant phenotypes were determined from electronic medical records, with data available through 9/10/2014. Exposure One or more variants designated as pathogenic in SCN5A or KCNH2. Main Outcome Measures Arrhythmia or electrocardiographic (ECG) phenotypes defined by ICD9 codes, ECG data, and manual electronic medical record review. Results Among 2022 study participants (median age, 61 years [interquartile range, 56–65 years]; 1118 [55%] female; 1491 [74%] white), a total of 122 rare (minor allele frequency <0.5%) nonsynonymous and splice-site variants in 2 arrhythmia susceptibility genes were identified in 223 individuals (11% of the study cohort). Forty-two variants in 63 participants were designated potentially pathogenic by at least 1 laboratory or ClinVar, with low concordance across laboratories (Cohen κ = 0.26). An ICD-9 code for arrhythmia was found in 11 of 63 (17%) variant carriers vs 264 of 1959 (13%) of those without variants (difference, +4%; 95% CI

  6. An analytical approach to characterize morbidity profile dissimilarity between distinct cohorts using electronic medical records

    OpenAIRE

    Schildcrout, Jonathan S.; Basford, Melissa A.; Pulley, Jill M.; Masys, Daniel R.; Roden, Dan M.; Wang, Deede; Chute, Christopher G.; Kullo, Iftikhar J.; Carrell, David; Peissig, Peggy; Kho, Abel; Denny, Joshua C.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a two-stage analytical approach for characterizing morbidity profile dissimilarity among patient cohorts using electronic medical records. We capture morbidities using the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD-9) codes. In the first stage of the approach separate logistic regression analyses for ICD-9 sections (e.g., “hypertensive disease” or “appendicitis”) are conducted, and the odds ratios that describe adjusted differences in pre...

  7. A study of general practitioners' perspectives on electronic medical records systems in NHSScotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouamrane, Matt-Mouley; Mair, Frances S

    2013-05-21

    Primary care doctors in NHSScotland have been using electronic medical records within their practices routinely for many years. The Scottish Health Executive eHealth strategy (2008-2011) has recently brought radical changes to the primary care computing landscape in Scotland: an information system (GPASS) which was provided free-of-charge by NHSScotland to a majority of GP practices has now been replaced by systems provided by two approved commercial providers. The transition to new electronic medical records had to be completed nationally across all health-boards by March 2012. We carried out 25 in-depth semi-structured interviews with primary care doctors to elucidate GPs' perspectives on their practice information systems and collect more general information on management processes in the patient surgical pathway in NHSScotland. We undertook a thematic analysis of interviewees' responses, using Normalisation Process Theory as the underpinning conceptual framework. The majority of GPs' interviewed considered that electronic medical records are an integral and essential element of their work during the consultation, playing a key role in facilitating integrated and continuity of care for patients and making clinical information more accessible. However, GPs expressed a number of reservations about various system functionalities - for example: in relation to usability, system navigation and information visualisation. Our study highlights that while electronic information systems are perceived as having important benefits, there remains substantial scope to improve GPs' interaction and overall satisfaction with these systems. Iterative user-centred improvements combined with additional training in the use of technology would promote an increased understanding, familiarity and command of the range of functionalities of electronic medical records among primary care doctors.

  8. Low correlation between self-report and medical record documentation of urinary tract infection symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echaiz, Jose F; Cass, Candice; Henderson, Jeffrey P; Babcock, Hilary M; Marschall, Jonas

    2015-09-01

    Correlations between symptom documentation in medical records and patient self-report (SR) vary depending on the condition studied. Patient symptoms are particularly important in urinary tract infection (UTI) diagnosis, and this correlation for UTI symptoms is currently unknown. This is a cross-sectional survey study in hospitalized patients with Escherichia coli bacteriuria. Patients were interviewed within 24 hours of diagnosis for the SR of UTI symptoms. We reviewed medical records for UTI symptoms documented by admitting or treating inpatient physicians (IPs), nurses (RNs), and emergency physicians (EPs). The level of agreement between groups was assessed using Cohen κ coefficient. Out of 43 patients, 34 (79%) self-reported at least 1 of 6 primary symptoms. The most common self-reported symptoms were urinary frequency (53.5%); retention (41.9%); flank pain, suprapubic pain, and fatigue (37.2% each); and dysuria (30.2%). Correlation between SR and medical record documentation was slight to fair (κ, 0.06-0.4 between SR and IPs and 0.09-0.5 between SR and EDs). Positive agreement was highest for dysuria and frequency. Correlation between self-reported UTI symptoms and health care providers' documentation was low to fair. Because medical records are a vital source of information for clinicians and researchers and symptom assessment and documentation are vital in distinguishing UTI from asymptomatic bacteriuria, efforts must be made to improve documentation. Copyright © 2015 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Preparing for Electronic Medical Record Implementation: Carolina Care Communication in an Electronic Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Tracy; Tonges, Mary; Ray, Joel

    2017-11-01

    This article describes 1 organization's successful approach to mitigating the potential negative effects of a new electronic medical record on patient experience. The Carolina Care model, developed at the University of North Carolina Hospitals to actualize caring theory in practice, helped to structure and greatly facilitate this work. Seven focus areas were integrated to create the "Communication in an Electronic Environment" program with a strong emphasis on nurse-patient communication.

  10. The Adoption of Electronic Medical Records and Decision Support Systems in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Chae, Young Moon; Yoo, Ki Bong; Kim, Eun Sook; Chae, Hogene

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To examine the current status of hospital information systems (HIS), analyze the effects of Electronic Medical Records (EMR) and Clinical Decision Support Systems (CDSS) have upon hospital performance, and examine how management issues change over time according to various growth stages. Methods Data taken from the 2010 survey on the HIS status and management issues for 44 tertiary hospitals and 2009 survey on hospital performance appraisal were used. A chi-square test was used to ...

  11. Electronic Medical Records Optimize Clinical Data Management in the Outpatient Cardiological Clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Dalmiani, Stefano; Morales, Maria Aurora; Carpeggiani, Clara; Macerata, Alberto; Marcheschi, Paolo

    2003-01-01

    A system based on a relational database with administrative and clinical information and integrated with an Information System, where the system covers the role of a Functional Island, is routinely used in our Institution. To analyze how Electronic Medical Records (EMR) may help physicians in organizing and reducing time waste in a busy outpatient clinic, a sample of 1000 reports were evaluated for system performance. The time needed for building new clinical histories or modifying the alread...

  12. Rewriting abortion: deploying medical records in jurisdictional negotiation over a forbidden practice in Senegal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Siri

    2014-01-01

    Boundary work refers to the strategies deployed by professionals in the arenas of the public, the law and the workplace to define and defend jurisdictional authority. Little attention has been directed to the role of documents in negotiating professional claims. While boundary work over induced abortion has been extensively documented, few studies have examined jurisdictional disputes over the treatment of abortion complications, or post-abortion care (PAC). This study explores how medical providers deploy medical records in boundary work over the treatment of complications of spontaneous and induced abortion in Senegal, where induced abortion is prohibited under any circumstance. Findings are based on an institutional ethnography of Senegal’s national PAC program over a period of 13 months between 2010 and 2011. Data collection methods included in-depth interviews with 36 health care professionals, observation of PAC services at three hospitals, a review of abortion records at each hospital, and a case review of illegal abortions prosecuted by the state. Findings show that health providers produce a particular account of the type of abortion treated through a series of practices such as the patient interview and the clinical exam. Providers obscure induced abortion in medical documents in three ways: the use of terminology that does not differentiate between induced and spontaneous abortion in PAC registers, the omission of data on the type of abortion altogether in PAC registers, and reporting the total number but not the type of abortions treated in hospital data transmitted to state health authorities. The obscuration of suspected induced abortion in the record permits providers to circumvent police inquiry at the hospital. PAC has been implemented in nearly 50 countries worldwide. This study demonstrates the need for additional research on how medical professionals negotiate conflicting medical and legal obligations in the daily practice of treating abortion

  13. Rewriting abortion: deploying medical records in jurisdictional negotiation over a forbidden practice in Senegal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Siri

    2014-05-01

    Boundary work refers to the strategies deployed by professionals in the arenas of the public, the law and the workplace to define and defend jurisdictional authority. Little attention has been directed to the role of documents in negotiating professional claims. While boundary work over induced abortion has been extensively documented, few studies have examined jurisdictional disputes over the treatment of abortion complications, or post-abortion care (PAC). This study explores how medical providers deploy medical records in boundary work over the treatment of complications of spontaneous and induced abortion in Senegal, where induced abortion is prohibited under any circumstance. Findings are based on an institutional ethnography of Senegal's national PAC program over a period of 13 months between 2010 and 2011. Data collection methods included in-depth interviews with 36 health care professionals, observation of PAC services at three hospitals, a review of abortion records at each hospital, and a case review of illegal abortions prosecuted by the state. Findings show that health providers produce a particular account of the type of abortion treated through a series of practices such as the patient interview and the clinical exam. Providers obscure induced abortion in medical documents in three ways: the use of terminology that does not differentiate between induced and spontaneous abortion in PAC registers, the omission of data on the type of abortion altogether in PAC registers, and reporting the total number but not the type of abortions treated in hospital data transmitted to state health authorities. The obscuration of suspected induced abortion in the record permits providers to circumvent police inquiry at the hospital. PAC has been implemented in approximately 50 countries worldwide. This study demonstrates the need for additional research on how medical professionals negotiate conflicting medical and legal obligations in the daily practice of treating

  14. Job characteristic perception and intrinsic motivation in medical record department staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isfahani, Sakineh Saghaeiannejad; Bahrami, Soosan; Torki, Sedighe

    2013-01-01

    Human resources are key factors in service organizations like hospitals. Therefore, motivating human recourses to achieve the objectives of an organization is important. Job enrichment is a strategy used to increase job motivation in staffs. The goal of the current study is to determine the relationship between job characteristics and intrinsic motivation in medical record staff in hospitals related to Medical Science University in Isfahan in 2011-2012 academic year. The type of the study is descriptive and corelational of multi variables. The population of the study includes all the medical record staffs of medical record department working in Medical Science hospitals of Isfahan. One hundred twentyseven subjects were selected by conducting a census. In the present study, data collected by using two questionnaires of job characteristics devised by Hackman and Oldeham, and of intrinsic motivation. Content validity was confirmed by experts and its reliability was calculated through coefficient of Cronbach's alpha (r1 = 0.84- r2 = 0.94). The questionnaires completed were entered into SPSS(18) software; furthermore, statistical analysis done descriptively (frequency percent, mean, standard deviation, Pierson correlation coefficient,...) and inferentially (multiple regression, MANOVA, LSD). A significant relationship between job characteristics as well as its elements (skill variety, task identity, task significance, autonomy and feedback) and intrinsic motivation was noticed. (p motivation was significant and job feedback had the most impact upon the intrinsic motivation. No significant difference was noticed among the mean amounts of job characteristic perception according to age, gender, level of education, and the kind of educational degree in hospitals. However, there was a significant difference among the mean amounts of job characteristic perception according to the unit of service and the years of servicein hospitals. The findings show that all job

  15. Data resource profile: the Rochester Epidemiology Project (REP) medical records-linkage system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Sauver, Jennifer L; Grossardt, Brandon R; Yawn, Barbara P; Melton, L Joseph; Pankratz, Joshua J; Brue, Scott M; Rocca, Walter A

    2012-12-01

    The Rochester Epidemiology Project (REP) medical records-linkage system was established in 1966 to capture health care information for the entire population of Olmsted County, MN, USA. The REP includes a dynamic cohort of 502 820 unique individuals who resided in Olmsted County at some point between 1966 and 2010, and received health care for any reason at a health care provider within the system. The data available electronically (electronic REP indexes) include demographic characteristics, medical diagnostic codes, surgical procedure codes and death information (including causes of death). In addition, for each resident, the system keeps a complete list of all paper records, electronic records and scanned documents that are available in full text for in-depth review and abstraction. The REP serves as the research infrastructure for studies of virtually all diseases that come to medical attention, and has supported over 2000 peer-reviewed publications since 1966. The system covers residents of all ages and both sexes, regardless of socio-economic status, ethnicity or insurance status. For further information regarding the use of the REP for a specific study, please visit our website at www.rochesterproject.org or contact us at info@rochesterproject.org. Our website also provides access to an introductory video in English and Spanish.

  16. Natural Language Processing Based Instrument for Classification of Free Text Medical Records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manana Khachidze

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the Ministry of Labor, Health and Social Affairs of Georgia a new health management system has to be introduced in the nearest future. In this context arises the problem of structuring and classifying documents containing all the history of medical services provided. The present work introduces the instrument for classification of medical records based on the Georgian language. It is the first attempt of such classification of the Georgian language based medical records. On the whole 24.855 examination records have been studied. The documents were classified into three main groups (ultrasonography, endoscopy, and X-ray and 13 subgroups using two well-known methods: Support Vector Machine (SVM and K-Nearest Neighbor (KNN. The results obtained demonstrated that both machine learning methods performed successfully, with a little supremacy of SVM. In the process of classification a “shrink” method, based on features selection, was introduced and applied. At the first stage of classification the results of the “shrink” case were better; however, on the second stage of classification into subclasses 23% of all documents could not be linked to only one definite individual subclass (liver or binary system due to common features characterizing these subclasses. The overall results of the study were successful.

  17. 29 CFR 1913.10 - Rules of agency practice and procedure concerning OSHA access to employee medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rules of agency practice and procedure concerning OSHA... PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE CONCERNING OSHA ACCESS TO EMPLOYEE MEDICAL RECORDS § 1913.10 Rules of agency practice and procedure concerning OSHA access to employee medical records. (a) General policy. OSHA access...

  18. Jaundice in primary care: a cohort study of adults aged >45 years using electronic medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Anna; Stapley, Sally; Hamilton, William

    2012-08-01

    Jaundice is a rare but important symptom of malignant and benign conditions. When patients present in primary care, understanding the relative likelihood of different disease processes can help GPs to investigate and refer patients appropriately. To identify and quantify the various causes of jaundice in adults presenting in primary care. Historical cohort study using electronic primary care records. UK General Practice Research Database. Participants (186 814 men and women) aged >45 years with clinical events recorded in primary care records between 1 January 2005 and 31 December 2007. Data were searched for episodes of jaundice and explanatory diagnoses identified within the subsequent 12 months. If no diagnosis was found, the patient's preceding medical record was searched for relevant chronic diseases. From the full cohort, 277 patients had at least one record of jaundice between 1 January 2005 and 31 December 2006. Ninety-two (33%) were found to have bile duct stones; 74 (27%) had an explanatory cancer [pancreatic cancer 34 (12%), cholangiocarcinoma 13 (5%) and other diagnosed primary malignancy 27 (10%)]. Liver disease attributed to excess alcohol explained 26 (9%) and other diagnoses were identified in 24 (9%). Sixty-one (22%) had no diagnosis related to jaundice recorded. Although the most common cause of jaundice is bile duct stones, cancers are present in over a quarter of patients with jaundice in this study, demonstrating the importance of urgent investigation into the underlying cause.

  19. Computer-aided recording of automatic endoscope washing and disinfection processes as an integral part of medical documentation for quality assurance purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klein Stefanie

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The reprocessing of medical endoscopes is carried out using automatic cleaning and disinfection machines. The documentation and archiving of records of properly conducted reprocessing procedures is the last and increasingly important part of the reprocessing cycle for flexible endoscopes. Methods This report describes a new computer program designed to monitor and document the automatic reprocessing of flexible endoscopes and accessories in fully automatic washer-disinfectors; it does not contain nor compensate the manual cleaning step. The program implements national standards for the monitoring of hygiene in flexible endoscopes and the guidelines for the reprocessing of medical products. No FDA approval has been obtained up to now. The advantages of this newly developed computer program are firstly that it simplifies the documentation procedures of medical endoscopes and that it could be used universally with any washer-disinfector and that it is independent of the various interfaces and software products provided by the individual suppliers of washer-disinfectors. Results The computer program presented here has been tested on a total of four washer-disinfectors in more than 6000 medical examinations within 9 months. Conclusions We present for the first time an electronic documentation system for automated washer-disinfectors for medical devices e.g. flexible endoscopes which can be used on any washer-disinfectors that documents the procedures involved in the automatic cleaning process and can be easily connected to most hospital documentation systems.

  20. What information is provided in transcripts and Medical Student Performance Records from Canadian Medical Schools? A retrospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason A. Robins

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Resident selection committees must rely on information provided by medical schools in order to evaluate candidates. However, this information varies between institutions, limiting its value in comparing individuals and fairly assessing their quality. This study investigates what is included in candidates’ documentation, the heterogeneity therein, as well as its objective data. Methods: Samples of recent transcripts and Medical Student Performance Records were anonymised prior to evaluation. Data were then extracted by two independent reviewers blinded to the submitting university, assessing for the presence of pre-selected criteria; disagreement was resolved through consensus. The data were subsequently analysed in multiple subgroups. Results: Inter-rater agreement equalled 92%. Inclusion of important criteria varied by school, ranging from 22.2% inclusion to 70.4%; the mean equalled 47.4%. The frequency of specific criteria was highly variable as well. Only 17.7% of schools provided any basis for comparison of academic performance; the majority detailed only status regarding pass or fail, without any further qualification. Conclusions: Considerable heterogeneity exists in the information provided in official medical school documentation, as well as markedly little objective data. Standardization may be necessary in order to facilitate fair comparison of graduates from different institutions. Implementation of objective data may allow more effective intra- and inter-scholastic comparison.

  1. What information is provided in transcripts and Medical Student Performance Records from Canadian Medical Schools? A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robins, Jason A; McInnes, Matthew D F; Esmail, Kaisra

    2014-01-01

    Resident selection committees must rely on information provided by medical schools in order to evaluate candidates. However, this information varies between institutions, limiting its value in comparing individuals and fairly assessing their quality. This study investigates what is included in candidates' documentation, the heterogeneity therein, as well as its objective data. Samples of recent transcripts and Medical Student Performance Records were anonymised prior to evaluation. Data were then extracted by two independent reviewers blinded to the submitting university, assessing for the presence of pre-selected criteria; disagreement was resolved through consensus. The data were subsequently analysed in multiple subgroups. Inter-rater agreement equalled 92%. Inclusion of important criteria varied by school, ranging from 22.2% inclusion to 70.4%; the mean equalled 47.4%. The frequency of specific criteria was highly variable as well. Only 17.7% of schools provided any basis for comparison of academic performance; the majority detailed only status regarding pass or fail, without any further qualification. Considerable heterogeneity exists in the information provided in official medical school documentation, as well as markedly little objective data. Standardization may be necessary in order to facilitate fair comparison of graduates from different institutions. Implementation of objective data may allow more effective intra- and inter-scholastic comparison.

  2. Toward better public health reporting using existing off the shelf approaches: The value of medical dictionaries in automated cancer detection using plaintext medical data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasthurirathne, Suranga N; Dixon, Brian E; Gichoya, Judy; Xu, Huiping; Xia, Yuni; Mamlin, Burke; Grannis, Shaun J

    2017-05-01

    Existing approaches to derive decision models from plaintext clinical data frequently depend on medical dictionaries as the sources of potential features. Prior research suggests that decision models developed using non-dictionary based feature sourcing approaches and "off the shelf" tools could predict cancer with performance metrics between 80% and 90%. We sought to compare non-dictionary based models to models built using features derived from medical dictionaries. We evaluated the detection of cancer cases from free text pathology reports using decision models built with combinations of dictionary or non-dictionary based feature sourcing approaches, 4 feature subset sizes, and 5 classification algorithms. Each decision model was evaluated using the following performance metrics: sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value, and area under the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve. Decision models parameterized using dictionary and non-dictionary feature sourcing approaches produced performance metrics between 70 and 90%. The source of features and feature subset size had no impact on the performance of a decision model. Our study suggests there is little value in leveraging medical dictionaries for extracting features for decision model building. Decision models built using features extracted from the plaintext reports themselves achieve comparable results to those built using medical dictionaries. Overall, this suggests that existing "off the shelf" approaches can be leveraged to perform accurate cancer detection using less complex Named Entity Recognition (NER) based feature extraction, automated feature selection and modeling approaches. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Strategies for Medical Data Extraction and Presentation Part 3: Automated Context- and User-Specific Data Extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiner, Bruce

    2015-08-01

    In current medical practice, data extraction is limited by a number of factors including lack of information system integration, manual workflow, excessive workloads, and lack of standardized databases. The combined limitations result in clinically important data often being overlooked, which can adversely affect clinical outcomes through the introduction of medical error, diminished diagnostic confidence, excessive utilization of medical services, and delays in diagnosis and treatment planning. Current technology development is largely inflexible and static in nature, which adversely affects functionality and usage among the diverse and heterogeneous population of end users. In order to address existing limitations in medical data extraction, alternative technology development strategies need to be considered which incorporate the creation of end user profile groups (to account for occupational differences among end users), customization options (accounting for individual end user needs and preferences), and context specificity of data (taking into account both the task being performed and data subject matter). Creation of the proposed context- and user-specific data extraction and presentation templates offers a number of theoretical benefits including automation and improved workflow, completeness in data search, ability to track and verify data sources, creation of computerized decision support and learning tools, and establishment of data-driven best practice guidelines.

  4. Automatic prediction of rheumatoid arthritis disease activity from the electronic medical records.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Lin

    Full Text Available We aimed to mine the data in the Electronic Medical Record to automatically discover patients' Rheumatoid Arthritis disease activity at discrete rheumatology clinic visits. We cast the problem as a document classification task where the feature space includes concepts from the clinical narrative and lab values as stored in the Electronic Medical Record.The Training Set consisted of 2792 clinical notes and associated lab values. Test Set 1 included 1749 clinical notes and associated lab values. Test Set 2 included 344 clinical notes for which there were no associated lab values. The Apache clinical Text Analysis and Knowledge Extraction System was used to analyze the text and transform it into informative features to be combined with relevant lab values.Experiments over a range of machine learning algorithms and features were conducted. The best performing combination was linear kernel Support Vector Machines with Unified Medical Language System Concept Unique Identifier features with feature selection and lab values. The Area Under the Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve (AUC is 0.831 (σ = 0.0317, statistically significant as compared to two baselines (AUC = 0.758, σ = 0.0291. Algorithms demonstrated superior performance on cases clinically defined as extreme categories of disease activity (Remission and High compared to those defined as intermediate categories (Moderate and Low and included laboratory data on inflammatory markers.Automatic Rheumatoid Arthritis disease activity discovery from Electronic Medical Record data is a learnable task approximating human performance. As a result, this approach might have several research applications, such as the identification of patients for genome-wide pharmacogenetic studies that require large sample sizes with precise definitions of disease activity and response to therapies.

  5. 76 FR 53921 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security ALL-034 Emergency Care Medical Records...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-30

    .... Treatment provided and/or procedures. Transfer of care, refusal of care, and/or transportation mode and... 1974; Department of Homeland Security ALL--034 Emergency Care Medical Records System of Records Notice... Homeland Security system of records titled, ``Department of Homeland Security/ ALL--034 Emergency Care...

  6. Three-Dimensional Visual Patient Based on Electronic Medical Diagnostic Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Liehang; Sun, Jianyong; Yang, Yuanyuan; Ling, Tonghui; Wang, Mingqing; Gu, Yiping; Yang, Zhiming; Hua, Yanqing; Zhang, Jianguo

    2018-01-01

    an innovative concept and method is introduced to use a 3-D anatomical graphic pattern called visual patient (VP) visually to index, represent, and render the medical diagnostic records (MDRs) of a patient, so that a doctor can quickly learn the current and historical medical status of the patient by manipulating VP. The MDRs can be imaging diagnostic reports and DICOM images, laboratory reports and clinical summaries which can have clinical information relating to medical status of human organs or body parts. the concept and method included three steps. First, a VP data model called visual index object (VIO) and a VP graphic model called visual anatomic object (VAO) were introduced. Second, a series of processing methods of parsing and extracting key information from MDRs were used to fill the attributes of the VIO model of a patient. Third, a VP system (VPS) was designed to map VIO to VAO, to create a VP instance for each patient. a prototype VPS has been implemented in a simulated hospital PACS/RIS integrated environment. Two evaluation results showed that more than 70% participating radiologists would like to use the VPS in their radiological imaging tasks, and the efficiency of using VPS to review the tested patients' MDRs was 2.24 times higher than that of using PACS/RIS, while the average accuracy by using PACS/RIS was better than that by using VPS; however, this difference was only about 4%. the developed VPS can show the medical status of patient organs/sub-organs with 3-D anatomical graphic pattern and will be welcomed by radiologists with better efficiency in reviewing the patients' MDRs and with acceptable accuracy. the VP introduces a new way for medical professionals to access and interact with a huge amount of patient records with better efficiency in the big data era.

  7. Medication incidents related to automated dose dispensing in community pharmacies and hospitals--a reporting system study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ka-Chun Cheung

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Automated dose dispensing (ADD is being introduced in several countries and the use of this technology is expected to increase as a growing number of elderly people need to manage their medication at home. ADD aims to improve medication safety and treatment adherence, but it may introduce new safety issues. This descriptive study provides insight into the nature and consequences of medication incidents related to ADD, as reported by healthcare professionals in community pharmacies and hospitals. METHODS: The medication incidents that were submitted to the Dutch Central Medication incidents Registration (CMR reporting system were selected and characterized independently by two researchers. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Person discovering the incident, phase of the medication process in which the incident occurred, immediate cause of the incident, nature of incident from the healthcare provider's perspective, nature of incident from the patient's perspective, and consequent harm to the patient caused by the incident. RESULTS: From January 2012 to February 2013 the CMR received 15,113 incidents: 3,685 (24.4% incidents from community pharmacies and 11,428 (75.6% incidents from hospitals. Eventually 1 of 50 reported incidents (268/15,113 = 1.8% were related to ADD; in community pharmacies more incidents (227/3,685 = 6.2% were related to ADD than in hospitals (41/11,428 = 0.4%. The immediate cause of an incident was often a change in the patient's medicine regimen or relocation. Most reported incidents occurred in two phases: entering the prescription into the pharmacy information system and filling the ADD bag. CONCLUSION: A proportion of incidents was related to ADD and is reported regularly, especially by community pharmacies. In two phases, entering the prescription into the pharmacy information system and filling the ADD bag, most incidents occurred. A change in the patient's medicine regimen or relocation was the immediate causes of an

  8. Evaluation of Electronic Medical Record (EMR at large urban primary care sexual health centre.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher K Fairley

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Despite substantial investment in Electronic Medical Record (EMR systems there has been little research to evaluate them. Our aim was to evaluate changes in efficiency and quality of services after the introduction of a purpose built EMR system, and to assess its acceptability by the doctors, nurses and patients using it. METHODS: We compared a nine month period before and after the introduction of an EMR system in a large sexual health service, audited a sample of records in both periods and undertook anonymous surveys of both staff and patients. RESULTS: There were 9,752 doctor consultations (in 5,512 consulting hours in the Paper Medical Record (PMR period and 9,145 doctor consultations (in 5,176 consulting hours in the EMR period eligible for inclusion in the analysis. There were 5% more consultations per hour seen by doctors in the EMR period compared to the PMR period (rate ratio = 1.05; 95% confidence interval, 1.02, 1.08 after adjusting for type of consultation. The qualitative evaluation of 300 records for each period showed no difference in quality (P>0.17. A survey of clinicians demonstrated that doctors and nurses preferred the EMR system (P<0.01 and a patient survey in each period showed no difference in satisfaction of their care (97% for PMR, 95% for EMR, P = 0.61. CONCLUSION: The introduction of an integrated EMR improved efficiency while maintaining the quality of the patient record. The EMR was popular with staff and was not associated with a decline in patient satisfaction in the clinical care provided.

  9. Towards iconic language for patient records, drug monographs, guidelines and medical search engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamy, Jean-Baptiste; Duclos, Catherine; Hamek, Saliha; Beuscart-Zéphir, Marie-Catherine; Kerdelhué, Gaetan; Darmoni, Stefan; Favre, Madeleine; Falcoff, Hector; Simon, Christian; Pereira, Suzanne; Serrot, Elisabeth; Mitouard, Thierry; Hardouin, Etienne; Kergosien, Yannick; Venot, Alain

    2010-01-01

    Practicing physicians have limited time for consulting medical knowledge and records. We have previously shown that using icons instead of text to present drug monographs may allow contraindications and adverse effects to be identified more rapidly and more accurately. These findings were based on the use of an iconic language designed for drug knowledge, providing icons for many medical concepts, including diseases, antecedents, drug classes and tests. In this paper, we describe a new project aimed at extending this iconic language, and exploring the possible applications of these icons in medicine. Based on evaluators' comments, focus groups of physicians and opinions of academic, industrial and associative partners, we propose iconic applications related to patient records, for example summarizing patient conditions, searching for specific clinical documents and helping to code structured data. Other applications involve the presentation of clinical practice guidelines and improving the interface of medical search engines. These new applications could use the same iconic language that was designed for drug knowledge, with a few additional items that respect the logic of the language.

  10. Mining free-text medical records for companion animal enteric syndrome surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anholt, R M; Berezowski, J; Jamal, I; Ribble, C; Stephen, C

    2014-03-01

    Large amounts of animal health care data are present in veterinary electronic medical records (EMR) and they present an opportunity for companion animal disease surveillance. Veterinary patient records are largely in free-text without clinical coding or fixed vocabulary. Text-mining, a computer and information technology application, is needed to identify cases of interest and to add structure to the otherwise unstructured data. In this study EMR's were extracted from veterinary management programs of 12 participating veterinary practices and stored in a data warehouse. Using commercially available text-mining software (WordStat™), we developed a categorization dictionary that could be used to automatically classify and extract enteric syndrome cases from the warehoused electronic medical records. The diagnostic accuracy of the text-miner for retrieving cases of enteric syndrome was measured against human reviewers who independently categorized a random sample of 2500 cases as enteric syndrome positive or negative. Compared to the reviewers, the text-miner retrieved cases with enteric signs with a sensitivity of 87.6% (95%CI, 80.4-92.9%) and a specificity of 99.3% (95%CI, 98.9-99.6%). Automatic and accurate detection of enteric syndrome cases provides an opportunity for community surveillance of enteric pathogens in companion animals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A retrospective analysis of medical record use in e-consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecina, Jennifer L; North, Frederick

    2017-06-01

    Introduction Under certain circumstances, e-consultations can substitute for a face-to-face consultation. A basic requirement for a successful e-consultation is that the e-consultant has access to important medical history and exam findings along with laboratory and imaging results. Knowing just what information the specialist needs to complete an e-consultation is a major challenge. This paper examines differences between specialties in their need for past information from laboratory, imaging and clinical notes. Methods This is a retrospective study of patients who had an internal e-consultation performed at an academic medical centre. We reviewed a random sample of e-consultations that occurred in the first half of 2013 for the indication for the e-consultation and whether the e-consultant reviewed data in the medical record that was older than one year to perform the e-consultation. Results Out of 3008 total e-consultations we reviewed 360 (12%) randomly selected e-consultations from 12 specialties. Questions on management (35.8%), image results (27.2%) and laboratory results (25%) were the three most common indications for e-consultation. E-consultants reviewed medical records in existence more than one year prior to the e-consultation 146 (40.6%) of the time with e-consultants in the specialties of endocrinology, haematology and rheumatology, reviewing records older than one year more than half the time. Labs (20.3%), office notes (20%) and imaging (17.8%) were the types of medical data older than one year that were reviewed the most frequently overall. Discussion Management questions appear to be the most common reason for e-consultation. E-consultants frequently reviewed historical medical data that is older than one year at the time of the e-consultation, especially in endocrinology, haematology and rheumatology specialties. Practices engaging in e-consultations that require transfer of data may want to include longer time frames of historical information

  12. Implementing and Integrating a Clinically-Driven Electronic Medical Record (EMR for Radiation Oncology in a Large Medical Enterprise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Paxton Kirkpatrick

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose/Objective: While our department is heavily invested in computer-based treatment planning, we historically relied on paper-based charts for management of Radiation Oncology patients. In early 2009, we initiated the process of conversion to an electronic medical record (EMR eliminating the need for paper charts. Key goals included the ability to readily access information wherever and whenever needed, without compromising safety, treatment quality, confidentiality or productivity.Methodology: In February, 2009, we formed a multi-disciplinary team of Radiation Oncology physicians, nurses, therapists, administrators, physicists/dosimetrists, and information technology (IT specialists, along with staff from the Duke Health System IT department. The team identified all existing processes and associated information/reports, established the framework for the EMR system and generated, tested and implemented specific EMR processes.Results: Two broad classes of information were identified: information which must be readily accessed by anyone in the health system versus that used solely within the Radiation Oncology department. Examples of the former are consultation reports, weekly treatment check notes and treatment summaries; the latter includes treatment plans, daily therapy records and quality assurance reports. To manage the former, we utilized the enterprise-wide system , which required an intensive effort to design and implement procedures to export information from Radiation Oncology into that system. To manage "Radiation Oncology" data, we used our existing system (ARIA, Varian Medical Systems. The ability to access both systems simultaneously from a single workstation (WS was essential, requiring new WS and modified software. As of January, 2010, all new treatments were managed solely with an EMR. We find that an EMR makes information more widely accessible and does not compromise patient safety, treatment quality or confidentiality

  13. Automated personnel-assets-consumables-drug tracking in ambulance services for more effective and efficient medical emergency interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utku, Semih; Özcanhan, Mehmet Hilal; Unluturk, Mehmet Suleyman

    2016-04-01

    Patient delivery time is no longer considered as the only critical factor, in ambulatory services. Presently, five clinical performance indicators are used to decide patient satisfaction. Unfortunately, the emergency ambulance services in rapidly growing metropolitan areas do not meet current satisfaction expectations; because of human errors in the management of the objects onboard the ambulances. But, human involvement in the information management of emergency interventions can be reduced by electronic tracking of personnel, assets, consumables and drugs (PACD) carried in the ambulances. Electronic tracking needs the support of automation software, which should be integrated to the overall hospital information system. Our work presents a complete solution based on a centralized database supported by radio frequency identification (RFID) and bluetooth low energy (BLE) identification and tracking technologies. Each object in an ambulance is identified and tracked by the best suited technology. The automated identification and tracking reduces manual paper documentation and frees the personnel to better focus on medical activities. The presence and amounts of the PACD are automatically monitored, warning about their depletion, non-presence or maintenance dates. The computerized two way hospital-ambulance communication link provides information sharing and instantaneous feedback for better and faster diagnosis decisions. A fully implemented system is presented, with detailed hardware and software descriptions. The benefits and the clinical outcomes of the proposed system are discussed, which lead to improved personnel efficiency and more effective interventions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A pilot study of a heuristic algorithm for novel template identification from VA electronic medical record text.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redd, Andrew M; Gundlapalli, Adi V; Divita, Guy; Carter, Marjorie E; Tran, Le-Thuy; Samore, Matthew H

    2017-07-01

    Templates in text notes pose challenges for automated information extraction algorithms. We propose a method that identifies novel templates in plain text medical notes. The identification can then be used to either include or exclude templates when processing notes for information extraction. The two-module method is based on the framework of information foraging and addresses the hypothesis that documents containing templates and the templates within those documents can be identified by common features. The first module takes documents from the corpus and groups those with common templates. This is accomplished through a binned word count hierarchical clustering algorithm. The second module extracts the templates. It uses the groupings and performs a longest common subsequence (LCS) algorithm to obtain the constituent parts of the templates. The method was developed and tested on a random document corpus of 750 notes derived from a large database of US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) electronic medical notes. The grouping module, using hierarchical clustering, identified 23 groups with 3 documents or more, consisting of 120 documents from the 750 documents in our test corpus. Of these, 18 groups had at least one common template that was present in all documents in the group for a positive predictive value of 78%. The LCS extraction module performed with 100% positive predictive value, 94% sensitivity, and 83% negative predictive value. The human review determined that in 4 groups the template covered the entire document, with the remaining 14 groups containing a common section template. Among documents with templates, the number of templates per document ranged from 1 to 14. The mean and median number of templates per group was 5.9 and 5, respectively. The grouping method was successful in finding like documents containing templates. Of the groups of documents containing templates, the LCS module was successful in deciphering text belonging to the template

  15. Automating the segmentation of medical images for the production of voxel tomographic computational models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caon, M.

    2001-01-01

    Radiation dosimetry for the diagnostic medical imaging procedures performed on humans requires anatomically accurate, computational models. These may be constructed from medical images as voxel-based tomographic models. However, they are time consuming to produce and as a consequence, there are few available. This paper discusses the emergence of semi-automatic segmentation techniques and describes an application (iRAD) written in Microsoft Visual Basic that allows the bitmap of a medical image to be segmented interactively and semi-automatically while displayed in Microsoft Excel. iRAD will decrease the time required to construct voxel models. Copyright (2001) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  16. An efficacy trial of an electronic health record-based strategy to inform patients on safe medication use: The role of written and spoken communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Laura M; Mullen, Rebecca J; Russell, Allison; Fata, Aimee; Bailey, Stacy C; Makoul, Gregory; Wolf, Michael S

    2016-09-01

    We tested the feasibility and efficacy of an electronic health record (EHR) strategy that automated the delivery of print medication information at the time of prescribing. Patients (N=141) receiving a new prescription at one internal medicine clinic were recruited into a 2-arm physician-randomized study. We leveraged an EHR platform to automatically deliver 1-page educational 'MedSheets' to patients after medical encounters. We also assessed if physicians counseled patients via patient self-report immediately following visits. Patients' understanding was objectively measured via phone interview. 122 patients completed the trial. Most intervention patients (70%) reported receiving MedSheets. Patients reported physicians frequently counseled on indication and directions for use, but less often for risks. In multivariable analysis, written information (OR 2.78, 95% CI 1.10-7.04) and physician counseling (OR 2.95, 95% CI 1.26-6.91) were independently associated with patient understanding of risk information. Receiving both was most beneficial; 87% of those receiving counseling and MedSheets correctly recalled medication risks compared to 40% receiving neither. An EHR can be a reliable means to deliver tangible, print medication education to patients, but cannot replace the salience of physician-patient communication. Offering both written and spoken modalities produced a synergistic effect for informing patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Assessing the feasibility of large-scale natural language processing in a corpus of ordinary medical records: a lexical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersh, W R; Campbell, E M; Malveau, S E

    1997-01-01

    Identify the lexical content of a large corpus of ordinary medical records to assess the feasibility of large-scale natural language processing. A corpus of 560 megabytes of medical record text from an academic medical center was broken into individual words and compared with the words in six medical vocabularies, a common word list, and a database of patient names. Unrecognized words were assessed for algorithmic and contextual approaches to identifying more words, while the remainder were analyzed for spelling correctness. About 60% of the words occurred in the medical vocabularies, common word list, or names database. Of the remainder, one-third were recognizable by other means. Of the remaining unrecognizable words, over three-fourths represented correctly spelled real words and the rest were misspellings. Large-scale generalized natural language processing methods for the medical record will require expansion of existing vocabularies, spelling error correction, and other algorithmic approaches to map words into those from clinical vocabularies.

  18. Medical records documentation of constipation preceding Parkinson disease: A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savica, R; Carlin, J M; Grossardt, B R; Bower, J H; Ahlskog, J E; Maraganore, D M; Bharucha, A E; Rocca, W A

    2009-11-24

    Parkinson disease (PD) may affect the autonomic nervous system and may cause constipation; however, few studies have explored constipation preceding the motor onset of PD. We investigated constipation preceding PD using a case-control study design in a population-based sample. Using the medical records-linkage system of the Rochester Epidemiology Project, we identified 196 subjects who developed PD in Olmsted County, MN, from 1976 through 1995. Each incident case was matched by age (+/-1 year) and sex to a general population control. We reviewed the complete medical records of cases and controls in the medical records-linkage system to ascertain the occurrence of constipation preceding the onset of PD (or index year). Constipation preceding PD or the index year was more common in cases than in controls (odds ratio [OR] 2.48; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.49 to 4.11; p = 0.0005). This association remained significant after adjusting for smoking and coffee consumption (ever vs never), and after excluding constipation possibly induced by drugs. In addition, the association remained significant in analyses restricted to constipation documented 20 or more years before the onset of motor symptoms of PD. Although the association was stronger in women than in men and in patients with PD with rest tremor compared with patients with PD without rest tremor, these differences were not significant. Our findings suggest that constipation occurring as early as 20 or more years before the onset of motor symptoms is associated with an increased risk of Parkinson disease.

  19. Use of electronic medical record-enhanced checklist and electronic dashboard to decrease CLABSIs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pageler, Natalie M; Longhurst, Christopher A; Wood, Matthew; Cornfield, David N; Suermondt, Jaap; Sharek, Paul J; Franzon, Deborah

    2014-03-01

    We hypothesized that a checklist enhanced by the electronic medical record and a unit-wide dashboard would improve compliance with an evidence-based, pediatric-specific catheter care bundle and decrease central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI). We performed a cohort study with historical controls that included all patients with a central venous catheter in a 24-bed PICU in an academic children's hospital. Postintervention CLABSI rates, compliance with bundle elements, and staff perceptions of communication were evaluated and compared with preintervention data. CLABSI rates decreased from 2.6 CLABSIs per 1000 line-days before intervention to 0.7 CLABSIs per 1000 line-days after intervention. Analysis of specific bundle elements demonstrated increased daily documentation of line necessity from 30% to 73% (P < .001), increased compliance with dressing changes from 87% to 90% (P = .003), increased compliance with cap changes from 87% to 93% (P < .001), increased compliance with port needle changes from 69% to 95% (P < .001), but decreased compliance with insertion bundle documentation from 67% to 62% (P = .001). Changes in the care plan were made during review of the electronic medical record checklist on 39% of patient rounds episodes. Use of an electronic medical record-enhanced CLABSI prevention checklist coupled with a unit-wide real-time display of adherence was associated with increased compliance with evidence-based catheter care and sustained decrease in CLABSI rates. These data underscore the potential for computerized interventions to promote compliance with proven best practices and prevent patient harm.

  20. Error-correction learning for artificial neural networks using the Bayesian paradigm. Application to automated medical diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belciug, Smaranda; Gorunescu, Florin

    2014-12-01

    Automated medical diagnosis models are now ubiquitous, and research for developing new ones is constantly growing. They play an important role in medical decision-making, helping physicians to provide a fast and accurate diagnosis. Due to their adaptive learning and nonlinear mapping properties, the artificial neural networks are widely used to support the human decision capabilities, avoiding variability in practice and errors based on lack of experience. Among the most common learning approaches, one can mention either the classical back-propagation algorithm based on the partial derivatives of the error function with respect to the weights, or the Bayesian learning method based on posterior probability distribution of weights, given training data. This paper proposes a novel training technique gathering together the error-correction learning, the posterior probability distribution of weights given the error function, and the Goodman-Kruskal Gamma rank correlation to assembly them in a Bayesian learning strategy. This study had two main purposes; firstly, to develop anovel learning technique based on both the Bayesian paradigm and the error back-propagation, and secondly,to assess its effectiveness. The proposed model performance is compared with those obtained by traditional machine learning algorithms using real-life breast and lung cancer, diabetes, and heart attack medical databases. Overall, the statistical comparison results indicate that thenovellearning approach outperforms the conventional techniques in almost all respects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Towards Standardized Patient Data Exchange: Integrating a FHIR Based API for the Open Medical Record System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasthurirathne, Suranga N; Mamlin, Burke; Grieve, Grahame; Biondich, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Interoperability is essential to address limitations caused by the ad hoc implementation of clinical information systems and the distributed nature of modern medical care. The HL7 V2 and V3 standards have played a significant role in ensuring interoperability for healthcare. FHIR is a next generation standard created to address fundamental limitations in HL7 V2 and V3. FHIR is particularly relevant to OpenMRS, an Open Source Medical Record System widely used across emerging economies. FHIR has the potential to allow OpenMRS to move away from a bespoke, application specific API to a standards based API. We describe efforts to design and implement a FHIR based API for the OpenMRS platform. Lessons learned from this effort were used to define long term plans to transition from the legacy OpenMRS API to a FHIR based API that greatly reduces the learning curve for developers and helps enhance adhernce to standards.

  2. A Patient-Held Medical Record Integrating Depression Care into Diabetes Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriko Satoh-Asahara

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose Depression is frequently observed in people with diabetes. The purpose of this study is to develop a tool for individuals with diabetes and depression to communicate their comorbid conditions to health-care providers. Method We searched the Internet to review patient-held medical records (PHRs of patients with diabetes and examine current levels of integration of diabetes and depression care in Japan. Results Eight sets of PHRs were found for people with diabetes. All PHRs included clinical follow-up of diabetes and multidisciplinary clinical pathways for diabetes care. No PHRs included depression monitoring and/or treatment. In terms of an integrated PHR for a patient comorbid with diabetes and depression, necessary components include hopes/preferences, educational information on diabetes complications and treatment, medical history, stress and coping, resources, and monitoring diabetes and depression. Conclusion A new PHR may be suitable for comorbid patients with diabetes and depression.

  3. Detecting earlier indicators of homelessness in the free text of medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redd, Andrew; Carter, Marjorie; Divita, Guy; Shen, Shuying; Palmer, Miland; Samore, Matthew; Gundlapalli, Adi V

    2014-01-01

    Early warning indicators to identify US Veterans at risk of homelessness are currently only inferred from administrative data. References to indicators of risk or instances of homelessness in the free text of medical notes written by Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) providers may precede formal identification of Veterans as being homeless. This represents a potentially untapped resource for early identification. Using natural language processing (NLP), we investigated the idea that concepts related to homelessness written in the free text of the medical record precede the identification of homelessness by administrative data. We found that homeless Veterans were much higher utilizers of VA resources producing approximately 12 times as many documents as non-homeless Veterans. NLP detected mentions of either direct or indirect evidence of homelessness in a significant portion of Veterans earlier than structured data.

  4. The impact of structured laboratory routines in computerized medical records in a primary care service setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardy, Daniel A; Simon, Tzachit; Limoni, Yehuda; Kuperman, Oded; Rabzon, Ira; Cohen, Arnon; Cohen, Leah; Shvartzman, Pesach

    2005-12-01

    Inappropriate laboratory ordering is a problem affecting medical systems worldwide. An intervention was called for as a result of increasing laboratory costs. Thus, we aimed to assess the impact of introducing computerized laboratory routines to a computerized primary care setting. The study included 380 primary care physician practices of Clalit Health Service (HMO) southern district (CHS-SD) in Israel, caring for 470,000 members. Consensus laboratory routines order sets were electronically introduced into all physicians' computerized medical record (CMR) software, after consensus and internal marketing process. The primary findings were that a previously observed annual increase in laboratory test utilization was stopped, a 2% reduction in total number of tests and a 4 % reduction in the total number of tests per age adjusted person was observed. In conclusion the wide use of CMRs and communication technology combined with an appropriate organizational process can be used to increase appropriate utilization of laboratory tests.

  5. Electronic Medical Records (EMRs), Epidemiology, and Epistemology: Reflections on EMRs and Future Pediatric Clinical Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, Richard C.

    2011-01-01

    Electronic medical records (EMRs) are increasingly common in pediatric patient care. EMR data represent a relatively novel and rich resource for clinical research. The fact, however, that pediatric EMR data are collected for the purposes of clinical documentation and billing rather than research creates obstacles to their use in scientific investigation. Particular issues include accuracy, completeness, comparability between settings, ease of extraction, and context of recording. Although these problems can be addressed through standard strategies for dealing with partially accurate and incomplete data, a longer term solution will involve work with pediatric clinicians to improve data quality. As research becomes one of the explicit purposes for which pediatricians collect EMR data, the pediatric clinician will play a central role in future pediatric clinical research. PMID:21622040

  6. Electronic medical records (EMRs), epidemiology, and epistemology: reflections on EMRs and future pediatric clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, Richard C

    2011-01-01

    Electronic medical records (EMRs) are increasingly common in pediatric patient care. EMR data represent a relatively novel and rich resource for clinical research. The fact, however, that pediatric EMR data are collected for the purposes of clinical documentation and billing rather than research creates obstacles to their use in scientific investigation. Particular issues include accuracy, completeness, comparability between settings, ease of extraction, and context of recording. Although these problems can be addressed through standard strategies for dealing with partially accurate and incomplete data, a longer-term solution will involve work with pediatric clinicians to improve data quality. As research becomes one of the explicit purposes for which pediatricians collect EMR data, the pediatric clinician will play a central role in future pediatric clinical research. Copyright © 2011 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Tables or bar graphs? Presenting test results in electronic medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Noel T; Gilkey, Melissa B; Lillie, Sarah E; Hesse, Bradford W; Sheridan, Stacey L

    2012-01-01

    Electronic personal health records offer a promising way to communicate medical test results to patients. We compared the usability of tables and horizontal bar graphs for presenting medical test results electronically. We conducted experiments with a convenience sample of 106 community-dwelling adults. In the first experiment, participants viewed either table or bar graph formats (between subjects) that presented medical test results with normal and abnormal findings. In a second experiment, participants viewed table and bar graph formats (within subjects) that presented test results with normal, borderline, and abnormal findings. Participants required less viewing time when using bar graphs rather than tables. This overall difference was due to superior performance of bar graphs in vignettes with many test results. Bar graphs and tables performed equally well with regard to recall accuracy and understanding. In terms of ease of use, participants did not prefer bar graphs to tables when they viewed only one format. When participants viewed both formats, those with experience with bar graphs preferred bar graphs, and those with experience with tables found bar graphs equally easy to use. Preference for bar graphs was strongest when viewing tests with borderline results. Compared to horizontal bar graphs, tables required more time and experience to achieve the same results, suggesting that tables can be a more burdensome format to use. The current practice of presenting medical test results in a tabular format merits reconsideration.

  8. Usability Evaluation of An Electronic Medication Administration Record (eMAR) Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, J.; Iribarren, S.; Kapsandoy, S.; Perri, S.; Staggers, N.

    2011-01-01

    Background Electronic medication administration records (eMARs) have been widely used in recent years. However, formal usability evaluations are not yet available for these vendor applications, especially from the perspective of nurses, the largest group of eMAR users. Objective To conduct a formal usability evaluation of an implemented eMAR. Methods Four evaluators examined a commercial vendor eMAR using heuristic evaluation techniques. The evaluators defined seven tasks typical of eMAR use and independently evaluated the application. Consensus techniques were used to obtain 100% agreement of identified usability problems and severity ratings. Findings were reviewed with 5 clinical staff nurses and the Director of Clinical Informatics who verified findings with a small group of clinical nurses. Results Evaluators found 60 usability problems categorized into 233 heuristic violations. Match, Error, and Visibility heuristics were the most frequently violated. Administer Medication and Order and Modify Medications tasks had the highest number of heuristic violations and usability problems rated as major or catastrophic. Conclusion The high number of usability problems could impact the effectiveness, efficiency and satisfaction of nurses’ medication administration activities and may include concerns about patient safety. Usability is a joint responsibility between sites and vendors. We offer a call to action for usability evaluations at all sites and eMAR application redesign as necessary to improve the user experience and promote patient safety. PMID:23616871

  9. Task and error analysis balancing benefits over business of electronic medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstens, Deborah Sater; Rodriguez, Walter; Wood, Michael B

    2014-01-01

    Task and error analysis research was performed to identify: a) the process for healthcare organisations in managing healthcare for patients with mental illness or substance abuse; b) how the process can be enhanced and; c) if electronic medical records (EMRs) have a role in this process from a business and safety perspective. The research question is if EMRs have a role in enhancing the healthcare for patients with mental illness or substance abuse. A discussion on the business of EMRs is addressed to understand the balancing act between the safety and business aspects of an EMR.

  10. A color display device recording X ray spectra, especially intended for medical radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulch, J.-M.

    1975-01-01

    Said invention relates to a color display recording device for X ray spectra intended for medical radiography. The video signal of the X ray camera receiving the radiation having passed through the patient is amplified and transformed into a color coding according to the energy spectrum received by the camera. In a first version, the energy spectrum from the camera gives directly an image on the color tube. In a second version the energy spectrum, after having been transformed into digital signals, is first sent into a memory, then into a computer used as a spectrum analyzer, and finally into the color display device [fr

  11. Barriers to the Adoption and Use of an Electronic Medication Record

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granlien, Maren Sander; Hertzum, Morten

    2012-01-01

    obtained. Eleven categories of barrier are identified with uncertainty about what the barriers concretely are as the prime barrier. This prime barrier is particularly noteworthy because the respondents are formally responsible for the adoption of the EMR. It is apparent that time alone has not led......Clinicians’ adoption of the information systems deployed at hospitals is crucial to achieving the intended effects of the systems, yet many systems face substantial adoption barriers. In this study we analyse the adoption and use of an electronic medication record (EMR) 2-4 years after its...

  12. Stepwise approach to establishing multiple outreach laboratory information system-electronic medical record interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantanowitz, Liron; Labranche, Wayne; Lareau, William

    2010-05-26

    Clinical laboratory outreach business is changing as more physician practices adopt an electronic medical record (EMR). Physician connectivity with the laboratory information system (LIS) is consequently becoming more important. However, there are no reports available to assist the informatician with establishing and maintaining outreach LIS-EMR connectivity. A four-stage scheme is presented that was successfully employed to establish unidirectional and bidirectional interfaces with multiple physician EMRs. This approach involves planning (step 1), followed by interface building (step 2) with subsequent testing (step 3), and finally ongoing maintenance (step 4). The role of organized project management, software as a service (SAAS), and alternate solutions for outreach connectivity are discussed.

  13. The Gap between Actual and Mandated Use of an Electronic Medication Record Three Years after Deployment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granlien, Maren Fich; Hertzum, Morten; Gudmundsen, Jette

    2008-01-01

    Three years after the hospitals in one of Denmark's five healthcare regions deployed an electronic medication record (EMR) four of eight main system facilities are used consistently by only 3%-37% of the hospital wards. Furthermore, four of eight mandated work procedures involving the EMR......, such as lack of knowledge, information, and training among clinicians. However, the prime barrier appears to be uncertainty about what the barriers concretely are and about the extent to which system facilities and work procedures are actually adopted. Three years after deployment it is apparent that time...

  14. A Mainframe Medical Records and Decision Support System for Application in Hand Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Melissa S.; Wyllie, F.J.; Dent, J.A.; Lister, G.D.

    1987-01-01

    This document provides a discussion of the development of a mainframe medical record keeping and decision support system for use in a busy hand surgery practice. Navigation through the system is accomplished via a light pen and a series of menu screens which place little reliance on fluent English usage or typing ability. This system is designed to provide multiple paths of data entry which accommodate the individual user, as well as guard against omission of important clinical details. Initial efforts have been directed in the areas of office and emergency room examination, operative procedures, nursing procedures and vascular laboratory investigations.

  15. Using the NASA Task Load Index to Assess Workload in Electronic Medical Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Darren; Kushniruk, Andre W; Borycki, Elizabeth M

    2015-01-01

    Electronic medical records (EMRs) has been expected to decrease health professional workload. The NASA Task Load Index has become an important tool for assessing workload in many domains. However, its application in assessing the impact of an EMR on nurse's workload has remained to be explored. In this paper we report the results of a study of workload and we explore the utility of applying the NASA Task Load Index to assess impact of an EMR at the end of its lifecycle on nurses' workload. It was found that mental and temporal demands were the most responsible for the workload. Further work along these lines is recommended.

  16. Phenotype analysis of early risk factors from electronic medical records improves image-derived diagnostic classifiers for optic nerve pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaganti, Shikha; Nabar, Kunal P.; Nelson, Katrina M.; Mawn, Louise A.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2017-03-01

    We examine imaging and electronic medical records (EMR) of 588 subjects over five major disease groups that affect optic nerve function. An objective evaluation of the role of imaging and EMR data in diagnosis of these conditions would improve understanding of these diseases and help in early intervention. We developed an automated image processing pipeline that identifies the orbital structures within the human eyes from computed tomography (CT) scans, calculates structural size, and performs volume measurements. We customized the EMR-based phenome-wide association study (PheWAS) to derive diagnostic EMR phenotypes that occur at least two years prior to the onset of the conditions of interest from a separate cohort of 28,411 ophthalmology patients. We used random forest classifiers to evaluate the predictive power of image-derived markers, EMR phenotypes, and clinical visual assessments in identifying disease cohorts from a control group of 763 patients without optic nerve disease. Image-derived markers showed more predictive power than clinical visual assessments or EMR phenotypes. However, the addition of EMR phenotypes to the imaging markers improves the classification accuracy against controls: the AUC improved from 0.67 to 0.88 for glaucoma, 0.73 to 0.78 for intrinsic optic nerve disease, 0.72 to 0.76 for optic nerve edema, 0.72 to 0.77 for orbital inflammation, and 0.81 to 0.85 for thyroid eye disease. This study illustrates the importance of diagnostic context for interpretation of image-derived markers and the proposed PheWAS technique provides a flexible approach for learning salient features of patient history and incorporating these data into traditional machine learning analyses.

  17. Multimedia system for creation, transmission and consultation of medical examination records

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Rest, C.; Fortineau, J.; Bernier, M.; Guillo, P.; Cavarec, M.

    1997-01-01

    Achieving an urgency examination requires a rapid transmission of the results to the examiner. An efficient method of their communication could be achieved by producing a multimedia record consisting of images, comments and voiced utterances. We have retained for illustration the case of pulmonary scintigraphy in the diagnosis of pulmonary emboli. Following the acquisition the images are transferred to a PC (under Interfile format). These are displayed on the screen in association with anatomic schemes. In order to present all the elements important for interpretation, a series of tools was developed. Thus, to single out the anomalies the editor is provided with arrows to which verbal comments can be associated. Subsequently, he enters up its record. The interpreted examination is transferred to the examiner's PC via an ATM network. The consultant may then investigate the multimedia record by displaying images and comments and listening to the comments and conclusion of the isotope investigator. A prototype is already operational and its evaluation phase is to start. This stage refers to the quality of transmitted information. A quest among examiners will then allow to evaluate whether the examination reading out and the comprehension of the isotope investigators' conclusions are easier. The speed of transmission will be compared with the current routine (based on manuscript records) and its practical impact in case of urgency circumstances will be assessed. The technical facilities utilized by us allow an easy generalization of the approach to other image-based medical examinations performed in case of urgency

  18. Electronic patient record use during ward rounds: a qualitative study of interaction between medical staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Cecily; Jones, Matthew; Blackwell, Alan; Vuylsteke, Alain

    2008-01-01

    Electronic patient records are becoming more common in critical care. As their design and implementation are optimized for single users rather than for groups, we aimed to understand the differences in interaction between members of a multidisciplinary team during ward rounds using an electronic, as opposed to paper, patient medical record. A qualitative study of morning ward rounds of an intensive care unit that triangulates data from video-based interaction analysis, observation, and interviews. Our analysis demonstrates several difficulties the ward round team faced when interacting with each other using the electronic record compared with the paper one. The physical setup of the technology may impede the consultant's ability to lead the ward round and may prevent other clinical staff from contributing to discussions. We discuss technical and social solutions for minimizing the impact of introducing an electronic patient record, emphasizing the need to balance both. We note that awareness of the effects of technology can enable ward-round teams to adapt their formations and information sources to facilitate multidisciplinary communication during the ward round.

  19. Application of the STOPP/START criteria to a medical record database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauta, Katinka J; Groenhof, Feikje; Schuling, Jan; Hugtenburg, Jacqueline G; van Hout, Hein P J; Haaijer-Ruskamp, Flora M; Denig, Petra

    2017-10-01

    The STOPP/START criteria are increasingly used to assess prescribing quality in elderly patients at practice level. Our aim was to test computerized algorithms for applying these criteria to a medical record database. STOPP/START criteria-based computerized algorithms were defined using Anatomical-Therapeutic-Chemical (ATC) codes for medication and International Classification of Primary Care (ICPC) codes for diagnoses. The algorithms were applied to a Dutch primary care database, including patients aged ≥65 years using ≥5 chronic drugs. We tested for associations with patient characteristics that have previously shown a relationship with the original STOPP/START criteria, using multivariate logistic regression models. Included were 1187 patients with a median age of 75 years. In total, 39 of the 62 STOPP and 18 of the 26 START criteria could be converted to a computerized algorithm. The main reasons for inapplicability were lack of information on the severity of a condition and insufficient covering of ICPC-codes. We confirmed a positive association between the occurrence of both the STOPP and the START criteria and the number of chronic drugs (adjusted OR ranging from 1.37, 95% CI 1.04-1.82 to 3.19, 95% CI 2.33-4.36) as well as the patient's age (adjusted OR for STOPP 1.30, 95% CI 1.01-1.67; for START 1.73, 95% CI 1.35-2.21), and also between female gender and the occurrence of STOPP criteria (adjusted OR 1.41, 95% CI 1.09-1.82). Sixty-five percent of the STOPP/START criteria could be applied with computerized algorithms to a medical record database with ATC-coded medication and ICPC-coded diagnoses. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Automated identification of dementia using medical imaging: a survey from a pattern classification perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chuanchuan; Xia, Yong; Pan, Yongsheng; Chen, Jinhu

    2016-03-01

    In this review paper, we summarized the automated dementia identification algorithms in the literature from a pattern classification perspective. Since most of those algorithms consist of both feature extraction and classification, we provide a survey on three categories of feature extraction methods, including the voxel-, vertex- and ROI-based ones, and four categories of classifiers, including the linear discriminant analysis, Bayes classifiers, support vector machines, and artificial neural networks. We also compare the reported performance of many recently published dementia identification algorithms. Our comparison shows that many algorithms can differentiate the Alzheimer's disease (AD) from elderly normal with a largely satisfying accuracy, whereas distinguishing the mild cognitive impairment from AD or elderly normal still remains a major challenge.

  1. Virtual 3D bladder reconstruction for augmented medical records from white light cystoscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurie, Kristen L.; Zlatev, Dimitar V.; Angst, Roland; Liao, Joseph C.; Ellerbee, Audrey K.

    2016-02-01

    Bladder cancer has a high recurrence rate that necessitates lifelong surveillance to detect mucosal lesions. Examination with white light cystoscopy (WLC), the standard of care, is inherently subjective and data storage limited to clinical notes, diagrams, and still images. A visual history of the bladder wall can enhance clinical and surgical management. To address this clinical need, we developed a tool to transform in vivo WLC videos into virtual 3-dimensional (3D) bladder models using advanced computer vision techniques. WLC videos from rigid cystoscopies (1280 x 720 pixels) were recorded at 30 Hz followed by immediate camera calibration to control for image distortions. Video data were fed into an automated structure-from-motion algorithm that generated a 3D point cloud followed by a 3D mesh to approximate the bladder surface. The highest quality cystoscopic images were projected onto the approximated bladder surface to generate a virtual 3D bladder reconstruction. In intraoperative WLC videos from 36 patients undergoing transurethral resection of suspected bladder tumors, optimal reconstruction was achieved from frames depicting well-focused vasculature, when the bladder was maintained at constant volume with minimal debris, and when regions of the bladder wall were imaged multiple times. A significant innovation of this work is the ability to perform the reconstruction using video from a clinical procedure collected with standard equipment, thereby facilitating rapid clinical translation, application to other forms of endoscopy and new opportunities for longitudinal studies of cancer recurrence.

  2. Identification of a potential fibromyalgia diagnosis using random forest modeling applied to electronic medical records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emir B

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Birol Emir,1 Elizabeth T Masters,1 Jack Mardekian,1 Andrew Clair,1 Max Kuhn,2 Stuart L Silverman,3 1Pfizer Inc., New York, NY, 2Pfizer Inc., Groton, CT, 3Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA Background: Diagnosis of fibromyalgia (FM, a chronic musculoskeletal condition characterized by widespread pain and a constellation of symptoms, remains challenging and is often delayed. Methods: Random forest modeling of electronic medical records was used to identify variables that may facilitate earlier FM identification and diagnosis. Subjects aged ≥18 years with two or more listings of the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, (ICD-9 code for FM (ICD-9 729.1 ≥30 days apart during the 2012 calendar year were defined as cases among subjects associated with an integrated delivery network and who had one or more health care provider encounter in the Humedica database in calendar years 2011 and 2012. Controls were without the FM ICD-9 codes. Seventy-two demographic, clinical, and health care resource utilization variables were entered into a random forest model with downsampling to account for cohort imbalances (<1% subjects had FM. Importance of the top ten variables was ranked based on normalization to 100% for the variable with the largest loss in predicting performance by its omission from the model. Since random forest is a complex prediction method, a set of simple rules was derived to help understand what factors drive individual predictions. Results: The ten variables identified by the model were: number of visits where laboratory/non-imaging diagnostic tests were ordered; number of outpatient visits excluding office visits; age; number of office visits; number of opioid prescriptions; number of medications prescribed; number of pain medications excluding opioids; number of medications administered/ordered; number of emergency room visits; and number of musculoskeletal conditions. A receiver operating

  3. Letter to Editor: Electronic Medical Record, Step toward Improving the Quality of Healthcare Services and Treatment Provided to Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elahe Gozali

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Information technology can increase the quality of medical care and is a target for many of the pioneers in the development of clinical or medical information. Electronic medical record (EMR, one of such technologies, is a well-known and valuable system to access patient information in hospitals. Electronic medical records which are used for the purpose of providing basic health care are available through a network of computers. All units of the hospital such as examination room, conference room, emergency, patient care units, nursing stations, operating rooms, recovery units, laboratory, radiology, pharmacy and medical records should have access to it. Among its advantages are improved quality of care provided to patients, better organized information, improvement in the timeliness of the process, accuracy and completeness of documentation, patient access to electronic copies of records, prevention of medication errors and allergies, reduced medical errors, immediate access to information in different places, decision support technology and improvement in the process of doing . S urely the use of electronic medical records has created a new dimension to patient care and clinical practice and will provide a comprehensive system to support people in the community and enhance the quality of services provided to them.

  4. Use of and attitudes to a hospital information system by medical secretaries, nurses and physicians deprived of the paper-based medical record: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlsen Tom H

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most hospitals keep and update their paper-based medical records after introducing an electronic medical record or a hospital information system (HIS. This case report describes a HIS in a hospital where the paper-based medical records are scanned and eliminated. To evaluate the HIS comprehensively, the perspectives of medical secretaries and nurses are described as well as that of physicians. Methods We have used questionnaires and interviews to assess and compare frequency of use of the HIS for essential tasks, task performance and user satisfaction among medical secretaries, nurses and physicians. Results The medical secretaries use the HIS much more than the nurses and the physicians, and they consider that the electronic HIS greatly has simplified their work. The work of nurses and physicians has also become simplified, but they find less satisfaction with the system, particularly with the use of scanned document images. Conclusions Although the basis for reference is limited, the results support the assertion that replacing the paper-based medical record primarily benefits the medical secretaries, and to a lesser degree the nurses and the physicians. The varying results in the different employee groups emphasize the need for a multidisciplinary approach when evaluating a HIS.

  5. Integrating spatial fuzzy clustering with level set methods for automated medical image segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bing Nan; Chui, Chee Kong; Chang, Stephen; Ong, S H

    2011-01-01

    The performance of the level set segmentation is subject to appropriate initialization and optimal configuration of controlling parameters, which require substantial manual intervention. A new fuzzy level set algorithm is proposed in this paper to facilitate medical image segmentation. It is able to directly evolve from the initial segmentation by spatial fuzzy clustering. The controlling parameters of level set evolution are also estimated from the results of fuzzy clustering. Moreover the fuzzy level set algorithm is enhanced with locally regularized evolution. Such improvements facilitate level set manipulation and lead to more robust segmentation. Performance evaluation of the proposed algorithm was carried on medical images from different modalities. The results confirm its effectiveness for medical image segmentation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. An analytical approach to characterize morbidity profile dissimilarity between distinct cohorts using electronic medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schildcrout, Jonathan S; Basford, Melissa A; Pulley, Jill M; Masys, Daniel R; Roden, Dan M; Wang, Deede; Chute, Christopher G; Kullo, Iftikhar J; Carrell, David; Peissig, Peggy; Kho, Abel; Denny, Joshua C

    2010-12-01

    We describe a two-stage analytical approach for characterizing morbidity profile dissimilarity among patient cohorts using electronic medical records. We capture morbidities using the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD-9) codes. In the first stage of the approach separate logistic regression analyses for ICD-9 sections (e.g., "hypertensive disease" or "appendicitis") are conducted, and the odds ratios that describe adjusted differences in prevalence between two cohorts are displayed graphically. In the second stage, the results from ICD-9 section analyses are combined into a general morbidity dissimilarity index (MDI). For illustration, we examine nine cohorts of patients representing six phenotypes (or controls) derived from five institutions, each a participant in the electronic MEdical REcords and GEnomics (eMERGE) network. The phenotypes studied include type II diabetes and type II diabetes controls, peripheral arterial disease and peripheral arterial disease controls, normal cardiac conduction as measured by electrocardiography, and senile cataracts. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Efficient Queries of Stand-off Annotations for Natural Language Processing on Electronic Medical Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yuan; Szolovits, Peter

    2016-01-01

    In natural language processing, stand-off annotation uses the starting and ending positions of an annotation to anchor it to the text and stores the annotation content separately from the text. We address the fundamental problem of efficiently storing stand-off annotations when applying natural language processing on narrative clinical notes in electronic medical records (EMRs) and efficiently retrieving such annotations that satisfy position constraints. Efficient storage and retrieval of stand-off annotations can facilitate tasks such as mapping unstructured text to electronic medical record ontologies. We first formulate this problem into the interval query problem, for which optimal query/update time is in general logarithm. We next perform a tight time complexity analysis on the basic interval tree query algorithm and show its nonoptimality when being applied to a collection of 13 query types from Allen's interval algebra. We then study two closely related state-of-the-art interval query algorithms, proposed query reformulations, and augmentations to the second algorithm. Our proposed algorithm achieves logarithmic time stabbing-max query time complexity and solves the stabbing-interval query tasks on all of Allen's relations in logarithmic time, attaining the theoretic lower bound. Updating time is kept logarithmic and the space requirement is kept linear at the same time. We also discuss interval management in external memory models and higher dimensions.

  8. Effect of educational and electronic medical record interventions on food allergy management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelig, Ari; Harwayne-Gidansky, Ilana; Gault, Allison; Wang, Julie

    2016-09-01

    The growing prevalence of food allergies indicates a responsibility among primary care providers to ensure that their patients receive accurate diagnosis and management. To improve physician knowledge and management of food allergies by implementing educational and electronic medical record interventions. Pre- and posttest scores of pediatric residents and faculty were analyzed to assess the effectiveness of an educational session designed to improve knowledge of food allergy management. One year later, a best practice advisory was implemented in the electronic medical record to alert providers to consider allergy referral whenever a diagnosis code for food allergy or epinephrine autoinjector prescription was entered. A review of charts 6 months before and 6 months after each intervention was completed to determine the impact of both interventions. Outcome measurements included referrals to an allergy clinic, prescription of self-injectable epinephrine, and documentation that written emergency action plans were provided. There was a significant increase in test scores immediately after the educational intervention (mean, 56.2 versus 84.3%; p management of children with food allergies at our pediatrics clinic. Further studies are needed to identify effective strategies to improve management of food allergies by primary care physicians.

  9. [Study on medical records of acupuncture-moxibustion in The Twenty-four Histories].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kai-Wen

    2012-03-01

    Through the combination of manual retrieval and computerized retrieval, medical records of acupuncture-moxibustion in The Twenty-Four Histories were collected. Acupuncture cases from the Spring and Autumn Period (770-476 B.C.) to the end of the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644)were retrieved. From the medical records of acupuncture-moxibustion in Chinese official history books, it can be found that systematic diseases or emergent and severe diseases were already treated by physicians with the combination of acupuncture and medicine as early as in the Spring and Autumn Period as well as the Warring States Period(475-221 B.C.). CANG Gong, a famous physician of the Western Han Dynasty (206 B. C.-A. D. 24), cured diseases by selecting points along the running courses of meridians where the illness inhabited, which indicates that the theory of meridians and collaterals was served as a guide for clinical practice as early as in the Western Han Dynasty. Blood letting therapy, which has surprising effect, was often adopted by physicians of various historical periods to treat diseases. And treatment of diseases with single point was approved to be easy and effective.

  10. Beyond information retrieval and electronic health record use: competencies in clinical informatics for medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hersh WR

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available William R Hersh,1 Paul N Gorman,1 Frances E Biagioli,2 Vishnu Mohan,1 Jeffrey A Gold,3 George C Mejicano4 1Department of Medical Informatics and Clinical Epidemiology, 2Department of Family Medicine, 3Department of Medicine, 4School of Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR, USA Abstract: Physicians in the 21st century will increasingly interact in diverse ways with information systems, requiring competence in many aspects of clinical informatics. In recent years, many medical school curricula have added content in information retrieval (search and basic use of the electronic health record. However, this omits the growing number of other ways that physicians are interacting with information that includes activities such as clinical decision support, quality measurement and improvement, personal health records, telemedicine, and personalized medicine. We describe a process whereby six faculty members representing different perspectives came together to define competencies in clinical informatics for a curriculum transformation process occurring at Oregon Health & Science University. From the broad competencies, we also developed specific learning objectives and milestones, an implementation schedule, and mapping to general competency domains. We present our work to encourage debate and refinement as well as facilitate evaluation in this area. Keywords: curriculum transformation, clinical decision support, patient safety, health care quality, patient engagement

  11. Electronic medical records and communication with patients and other clinicians: are we talking less?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Ann S; Cohen, Genna R; Grossman, Joy M

    2010-04-01

    Commercial electronic medical records (EMRs) both help and hinder physician interpersonal communication--real-time, face-to-face or phone conversations--with patients and other clinicians, according to a new Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC) study based on in-depth interviews with clinicians in 26 physician practices. EMRs assist real-time communication with patients during office visits, primarily through immediate access to patient information, allowing clinicians to talk with patients rather than search for information from paper records. For some clinicians, however, aspects of EMRs pose a distraction during visits. Moreover, some indicated that clinicians may rely on EMRs for information gathering and transfer at the expense of real-time communication with patients and other clinicians. Given time pressures already present in many physician practices, EMR and office-work flow modifications could help ensure that EMRs advance care without compromising interpersonal communication. In particular, policies promoting EMR adoption should consider incorporating communication-skills training for medical trainees and clinicians using EMRs.

  12. [Electronic medical records: Evolution of physician-patient relationship in the Primary Care clinic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Santonja, T; Gómez-Paredes, L; Álvarez-Montero, S; Cabello-Ballesteros, L; Mombiela-Muruzabal, M T

    2017-04-01

    The introduction of electronic medical records and computer media in clinics, has influenced the physician-patient relationship. These modifications have many advantages, but there is concern that the computer has become too important, going from a working tool to the centre of our attention during the clinical interview, decreasing doctor interaction with the patient. The objective of the study was to estimate the percentage of time that family physicians spend on computer media compared to interpersonal communication with the patient, and whether this time is modified depending on different variables such as, doctor's age or reason for the consultation. An observational and descriptive study was conducted for 10 weeks, with 2 healthcare centres involved. The researchers attended all doctor- patient interviews, recording the patient time in and out of the consultation. Each time the doctor fixed his gaze on computer media the time was clocked. A total of 436 consultations were collected. The doctors looked at the computer support a median 38.33% of the total duration of an interview. Doctors of 45 years and older spent more time fixing their eyes on computer media (P<.05). Family physicians used almost 40% of the consultation time looking at computer media, and depends on age of physician, number of queries, and number of medical appointments. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Brief review: Adoption of electronic medical records to enhance acute pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, David H; Phelan, Rachel; Wilson, Rosemary; Ross-White, Amanda; VanDenKerkhof, Elizabeth G; Penning, John P; Jaeger, Melanie

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine physician barriers to adopting electronic medical records (EMRs) as well as anesthesiologists' experiences with the EMRs used by the acute pain management service at two tertiary care centres in Canada. We first review the recent literature to determine if physician barriers to adoption are changing given the exponential growth of information technology and the evolving healthcare environment. We next report on institutional experience from two academic health sciences centres regarding the challenges they encountered over the past ten years in developing and implementing an electronic medical record system for acute pain management. The key identified barriers to adoption of EMRs are financial, technological, and time constraints. These barriers are identical to those reported in a systematic review performed prior to 2009 and remain significant factors challenging implementation. These challenges were encountered during our institution's process of adopting EMRs specific to acute pain management. In addition, our findings emphasize the importance of physician participation in the development and implementation stages of EMRs in order to incorporate their feedback and ensure the EMR system is in keeping with their workflow. Use of EMRs will inevitably become the standard of care; however, many barriers persist to impede their implementation and adoption. These challenges to implementation can be facilitated by a corporate strategy for change that acknowledges the barriers and provides the resources for implementation. Adoption will facilitate benefits in communication, patient management, research, and improved patient safety.

  14. The use of electronic patient records for medical research: conflicts and contradictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Fiona

    2015-03-29

    The use of electronic patient records for medical research is extremely topical. The Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CRPD), the English NHS observational data and interventional research service, was launched in April 2012. The CPRD has access to, and facilities to link, many healthcare related datasets. The CPRD is partially based on learning from the Health Research Support Service (HRSS), which was used to test the technical and practical aspects of downloading and linking electronic patient records for research. Questions around the feasibility and acceptability of implementing and integrating the processes necessary to enable electronic patient records to be used for the purposes of research remain. Focus groups and interviews were conducted with a total of 50 patients and 7 staff from the two English GP practices involved in piloting the HRSS, supplemented with 11 interviews with key stakeholders. Emergent themes were mapped on to the constructs of normalization process theory (NPT) to consider the ways in which sense was made of the work of implementing and integrating the HRSS. The NPT analysis demonstrated a lack of commitment to, and engagement with, the HRSS on the part of patients, whilst the commitment of doctors and practice staff was to some extent mitigated by concerns about issues of governance and consent, particularly in relation to downloading electronic patient records with associated identifiers. Although the CPRD is presented as a benign, bureaucratic process, perceptions by patients and staff of inherent contradictions with centrally held values of information governance and consent in downloading and linking electronic patient records for research remains a barrier to implementation. It is likely that conclusions reached about the problems of balancing the contradictions inherent in sharing what can be perceived as a private resource for the public good are globally transferrable.

  15. Evaluating the quality of medical multiple-choice items created with automated processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gierl, Mark J; Lai, Hollis

    2013-07-01

    Computerised assessment raises formidable challenges because it requires large numbers of test items. Automatic item generation (AIG) can help address this test development problem because it yields large numbers of new items both quickly and efficiently. To date, however, the quality of the items produced using a generative approach has not been evaluated. The purpose of this study was to determine whether automatic processes yield items that meet standards of quality that are appropriate for medical testing. Quality was evaluated firstly by subjecting items created using both AIG and traditional processes to rating by a four-member expert medical panel using indicators of multiple-choice item quality, and secondly by asking the panellists to identify which items were developed using AIG in a blind review. Fifteen items from the domain of therapeutics were created in three different experimental test development conditions. The first 15 items were created by content specialists using traditional test development methods (Group 1 Traditional). The second 15 items were created by the same content specialists using AIG methods (Group 1 AIG). The third 15 items were created by a new group of content specialists using traditional methods (Group 2 Traditional). These 45 items were then evaluated for quality by a four-member panel of medical experts and were subsequently categorised as either Traditional or AIG items. Three outcomes were reported: (i) the items produced using traditional and AIG processes were comparable on seven of eight indicators of multiple-choice item quality; (ii) AIG items can be differentiated from Traditional items by the quality of their distractors, and (iii) the overall predictive accuracy of the four expert medical panellists was 42%. Items generated by AIG methods are, for the most part, equivalent to traditionally developed items from the perspective of expert medical reviewers. While the AIG method produced comparatively fewer plausible

  16. The Role of the Electronic Medical Record in the Intensive Care Unit Nurse's Detection of Patient Deterioration: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despins, Laurel A; Wakefield, Bonnie J

    2018-03-30

    Failure to detect patient deterioration signals leads to longer stays in the hospital, worse functional outcomes, and higher hospital mortality rates. Surveillance, including ongoing acquisition, interpretation, and synthesis of patient data by the nurse, is essential for early risk detection. Electronic medical records promote accessibility and retrievability of patient data and can support patient surveillance. A secondary analysis was performed on interview data from 24 intensive care unit nurses, collected in a study that examined factors influencing nurse responses to alarms. Six themes describing nurses' use of electronic medical record information to understand the patients' norm and seven themes describing electronic medical record design issues were identified. Further work is needed on electronic medical record design to integrate documentation and information presentation with the nursing workflow. Organizations should involve bedside nurses in the design of handoff formats that provide key information common to all intensive care unit patient populations, as well as population-specific information.

  17. An Electronic Medical Record Alert Intervention to Improve HPV Vaccination Among Eligible Male College Students at a University Student Health Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Suzanne; Warner, Echo L; Kirchhoff, Anne C; Mooney, Ryan; Martel, Laura; Kepka, Deanna

    2018-02-16

    This pilot study aims to improve HPV vaccination for college aged males at a student health center. The first part of the study consisted of a focus group that assessed the barriers and facilitators of HPV vaccination among healthcare providers and clinic staff (N = 16). Providers reported missed opportunities for HPV vaccination. For the second part of the study, providers and staff reviewed medical records of patients ages 18-26 with student health insurance and with HPV vaccine at baseline (12/1/2014 to 7/31/2015) and follow-up (12/1/2015 to 7/31/2016). A computer-automated EMR alert was generated in the medical record of eligible male patients (N = 386). Z-scores were estimated for two-sample proportions to measure change in HPV vaccine rates at baseline and follow-up for males and females. HPV vaccine initiation rates increased among males (baseline: 5.2% follow-up: 25.1%, p HPV vaccine initiation rates among insured college-aged males.

  18. A novel method for estimating transgender status using electronic medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roblin, Douglas; Barzilay, Joshua; Tolsma, Dennis; Robinson, Brandi; Schild, Laura; Cromwell, Lee; Braun, Hayley; Nash, Rebecca; Gerth, Joseph; Hunkeler, Enid; Quinn, Virginia P; Tangpricha, Vin; Goodman, Michael

    2016-03-01

    We describe a novel algorithm for identifying transgender people and determining their male-to-female (MTF) or female-to-male (FTM) identity in electronic medical records of an integrated health system. A computer program scanned Kaiser Permanente Georgia electronic medical records from January 2006 through December 2014 for relevant diagnostic codes, and presence of specific keywords (e.g., "transgender" or "transsexual") in clinical notes. Eligibility was verified by review of de-identified text strings containing targeted keywords, and if needed, by an additional in-depth review of records. Once transgender status was confirmed, FTM or MTF identity was assessed using a second program and another round of text string reviews. Of 813,737 members, 271 were identified as possibly transgender: 137 through keywords only, 25 through diagnostic codes only, and 109 through both codes and keywords. Of these individuals, 185 (68%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 62%-74%) were confirmed as definitely transgender. The proportions (95% CIs) of definite transgender status among persons identified via keywords, diagnostic codes, and both were 45% (37%-54%), 56% (35%-75%), and 100% (96%-100%). Of the 185 definitely transgender people, 99 (54%, 95% CI: 46%-61%) were MTF, 84 (45%, 95% CI: 38%-53%) were FTM. For two persons, gender identity remained unknown. Prevalence of transgender people (per 100,000 members) was 4.4 (95% CI: 2.6-7.4) in 2006 and 38.7 (95% CI: 32.4-46.2) in 2014. The proposed method of identifying candidates for transgender health studies is low cost and relatively efficient. It can be applied in other similar health care systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Semi-Automated Annotation of Biobank Data Using Standard Medical Terminologies in a Graph Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Philipp; Neururer, Sabrina; Goebel, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Data describing biobank resources frequently contains unstructured free-text information or insufficient coding standards. (Bio-) medical ontologies like Orphanet Rare Diseases Ontology (ORDO) or the Human Disease Ontology (DOID) provide a high number of concepts, synonyms and entity relationship properties. Such standard terminologies increase quality and granularity of input data by adding comprehensive semantic background knowledge from validated entity relationships. Moreover, cross-references between terminology concepts facilitate data integration across databases using different coding standards. In order to encourage the use of standard terminologies, our aim is to identify and link relevant concepts with free-text diagnosis inputs within a biobank registry. Relevant concepts are selected automatically by lexical matching and SPARQL queries against a RDF triplestore. To ensure correctness of annotations, proposed concepts have to be confirmed by medical data administration experts before they are entered into the registry database. Relevant (bio-) medical terminologies describing diseases and phenotypes were identified and stored in a graph database which was tied to a local biobank registry. Concept recommendations during data input trigger a structured description of medical data and facilitate data linkage between heterogeneous systems.

  20. Potential application of item-response theory to interpretation of medical codes in electronic patient records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dregan Alex

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electronic patient records are generally coded using extensive sets of codes but the significance of the utilisation of individual codes may be unclear. Item response theory (IRT models are used to characterise the psychometric properties of items included in tests and questionnaires. This study asked whether the properties of medical codes in electronic patient records may be characterised through the application of item response theory models. Methods Data were provided by a cohort of 47,845 participants from 414 family practices in the UK General Practice Research Database (GPRD with a first stroke between 1997 and 2006. Each eligible stroke code, out of a set of 202 OXMIS and Read codes, was coded as either recorded or not recorded for each participant. A two parameter IRT model was fitted using marginal maximum likelihood estimation. Estimated parameters from the model were considered to characterise each code with respect to the latent trait of stroke diagnosis. The location parameter is referred to as a calibration parameter, while the slope parameter is referred to as a discrimination parameter. Results There were 79,874 stroke code occurrences available for analysis. Utilisation of codes varied between family practices with intraclass correlation coefficients of up to 0.25 for the most frequently used codes. IRT analyses were restricted to 110 Read codes. Calibration and discrimination parameters were estimated for 77 (70% codes that were endorsed for 1,942 stroke patients. Parameters were not estimated for the remaining more frequently used codes. Discrimination parameter values ranged from 0.67 to 2.78, while calibration parameters values ranged from 4.47 to 11.58. The two parameter model gave a better fit to the data than either the one- or three-parameter models. However, high chi-square values for about a fifth of the stroke codes were suggestive of poor item fit. Conclusion The application of item response

  1. Working with an Electronic Medical Record in Ambulatory Care: A Study of Patient Perceptions of Intrusiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizer, Milisa K; Sieck, Cynthia; Lehman, Jennifer S; Hefner, Jennifer L; Huerta, Timothy R; McAlearney, Ann Scheck

    2017-01-01

    To assess patient perceptions of electronic medical record (EMR) intrusiveness during ambulatory visits to clinics associated with a large academic medical center. We conducted a survey of patients seen at any of 98 academic medical center clinics. The survey assessed demographics, visit satisfaction, computer use, and perceived intrusiveness of the computer. Of 7,058 patients, slightly more than 80 percent reported that the physician had used the computer while in the room, but only 24 percent were shown results in the EMR. Most patients were very satisfied or satisfied with their visit and did not find the computer intrusive (83 percent). Younger respondents, those shown results, and those who reported that the physician used the computer were more likely to perceive the computer as intrusive. Qualitative comments suggest different perceptions related to computer intrusiveness than to EMR use more generally. Patients were generally accepting of EMRs and therefore use of computers in the exam room. However, subgroups of patients may require greater study to better understand patient perceptions related to EMR use and intrusiveness. Results suggest the need for greater focus on how physicians use computers in the exam room in a manner that facilitates maintaining good rapport with patients.

  2. Meeting the security requirements of electronic medical records in the ERA of high-speed computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alanazi, H O; Zaidan, A A; Zaidan, B B; Kiah, M L Mat; Al-Bakri, S H

    2015-01-01

    This study has two objectives. First, it aims to develop a system with a highly secured approach to transmitting electronic medical records (EMRs), and second, it aims to identify entities that transmit private patient information without permission. The NTRU and the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) cryptosystems are secured encryption methods. The AES is a tested technology that has already been utilized in several systems to secure sensitive data. The United States government has been using AES since June 2003 to protect sensitive and essential information. Meanwhile, NTRU protects sensitive data against attacks through the use of quantum computers, which can break the RSA cryptosystem and elliptic curve cryptography algorithms. A hybrid of AES and NTRU is developed in this work to improve EMR security. The proposed hybrid cryptography technique is implemented to secure the data transmission process of EMRs. The proposed security solution can provide protection for over 40 years and is resistant to quantum computers. Moreover, the technique provides the necessary evidence required by law to identify disclosure or misuse of patient records. The proposed solution can effectively secure EMR transmission and protect patient rights. It also identifies the source responsible for disclosing confidential patient records. The proposed hybrid technique for securing data managed by institutional websites must be improved in the future.

  3. Methods of defining hypertension in electronic medical records: validation against national survey data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Mingkai; Chen, Guanmin; Kaplan, Gilaad G; Lix, Lisa M; Drummond, Neil; Lucyk, Kelsey; Garies, Stephanie; Lowerison, Mark; Weibe, Samuel; Quan, Hude

    2016-09-01

    Electronic medical records (EMR) can be a cost-effective source for hypertension surveillance. However, diagnosis of hypertension in EMR is commonly under-coded and warrants the needs to review blood pressure and antihypertensive drugs for hypertension case identification. We included all the patients actively registered in The Health Improvement Network (THIN) database, UK, on 31 December 2011. Three case definitions using diagnosis code, antihypertensive drug prescriptions and abnormal blood pressure, respectively, were used to identify hypertension patients. We compared the prevalence and treatment rate of hypertension in THIN with results from Health Survey for England (HSE) in 2011. Compared with prevalence reported by HSE (29.7%), the use of diagnosis code alone (14.0%) underestimated hypertension prevalence. The use of any of the definitions (38.4%) or combination of antihypertensive drug prescriptions and abnormal blood pressure (38.4%) had higher prevalence than HSE. The use of diagnosis code or two abnormal blood pressure records with a 2-year period (31.1%) had similar prevalence and treatment rate of hypertension with HSE. Different definitions should be used for different study purposes. The definition of 'diagnosis code or two abnormal blood pressure records with a 2-year period' could be used for hypertension surveillance in THIN. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Realization of a universal patient identifier for electronic medical records through biometric technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, D C; Pons, Alexander P; Asfour, Shihab S

    2009-07-01

    The technology exists for the migration of healthcare data from its archaic paper-based system to an electronic one, and, once in digital form, to be transported anywhere in the world in a matter of seconds. The advent of universally accessible healthcare data has benefited all participants, but one of the outstanding problems that must be addressed is how the creation of a standardized nationwide electronic healthcare record system in the United States would uniquely identify and match a composite of an individual's recorded healthcare information to an identified individual patients out of approximately 300 million people to a 1:1 match. To date, a few solutions to this problem have been proposed that are limited in their effectiveness. We propose the use of biometric technology within our fingerprint, iris, retina scan, and DNA (FIRD) framework, which is a multiphase system whose primary phase is a multilayer consisting of these four types of biometric identifiers: 1) fingerprint; 2) iris; 3) retina scan; and 4) DNA. In addition, it also consists of additional phases of integration, consolidation, and data discrepancy functions to solve the unique association of a patient to their medical data distinctively. This would allow a patient to have real-time access to all of their recorded healthcare information electronically whenever it is necessary, securely with minimal effort, greater effectiveness, and ease.

  5. Predictive modeling of colorectal cancer using a dedicated pre-processing pipeline on routine electronic medical records

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kop, Reinier; Hoogendoorn, Mark; Teije, Annette Ten; Büchner, Frederike L; Slottje, Pauline; Moons, Leon M G; Numans, Mattijs E

    2016-01-01

    Over the past years, research utilizing routine care data extracted from Electronic Medical Records (EMRs) has increased tremendously. Yet there are no straightforward, standardized strategies for pre-processing these data. We propose a dedicated medical pre-processing pipeline aimed at taking on

  6. Paper-Based Medical Records: the Challenges and Lessons Learned from Studying Obstetrics and Gynaecological Post-Operation Records in a Nigerian Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adekunle Yisau Abdulkadir

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available AIM: With the background knowledge that auditing of Medical Records (MR for adequacy and completeness is necessary if it is to be useful and reliable in continuing patient care; protection of the legal interest of the patient, physicians, and the Hospital; and meeting requirements for researches, we scrutinized theatre records of our hospital to identify routine omissions or deficiencies, and correctable errors in our MR system. METHOD: Obstetrics and Gynaecological post operation theatre records between January 2006 and December 2008 were quantitatively and qualitatively analyzed for details that included: hospital number; Patients age; diagnosis; surgery performed; types and modes of anesthesia; date of surgery; patients’ ward; Anesthetists names; surgeons and attending nurses names, and abbreviations used with SPSS 15.0 for Windows. RESULTS: Hardly were any of the 1270 surgeries during the study period documented without an omission or an abbreviation. Hospital numbers and patients’ age were not documented in 21.8% (n=277 and 59.1% (n=750 respectively. Diagnoses and surgeries were recorded with varying abbreviations in about 96% of instances. Surgical team names were mostly abbreviated or initials only given. CONCLUSION: To improve the quality of Paper-based Medical Record, regular auditing, training and good orientation of medical personnel for good record practices, and discouraging large volume record book to reduce paper damages and sheet loss from handling are necessary else what we record toady may neither be useful nor available tomorrow. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2010; 9(5.000: 427-432

  7. A novel level set model with automated initialization and controlling parameters for medical image segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qingyi; Jiang, Mingyan; Bai, Peirui; Yang, Guang

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a level set model without the need of generating initial contour and setting controlling parameters manually is proposed for medical image segmentation. The contribution of this paper is mainly manifested in three points. First, we propose a novel adaptive mean shift clustering method based on global image information to guide the evolution of level set. By simple threshold processing, the results of mean shift clustering can automatically and speedily generate an initial contour of level set evolution. Second, we devise several new functions to estimate the controlling parameters of the level set evolution based on the clustering results and image characteristics. Third, the reaction diffusion method is adopted to supersede the distance regularization term of RSF-level set model, which can improve the accuracy and speed of segmentation effectively with less manual intervention. Experimental results demonstrate the performance and efficiency of the proposed model for medical image segmentation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Pharmacy Automation in Navy Medicine: A Study of Naval Medical Center San Diego

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    performing all steps, including transportation, up to pharmacist verification via the conveyer belt . Manual fills are located along the conveyor system ... system installed at NMCSD. 7 Figure 2. Conveyer Belt Installed at Naval Medical Center San Diego. Once the customer places an order, the conveyor ...places an order, the conveyor system directs each prescription through the different steps of the fill process. Manual fill stations are located to

  9. Implementing change in primary care practices using electronic medical records: a conceptual framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart Gail W

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Implementing change in primary care is difficult, and little practical guidance is available to assist small primary care practices. Methods to structure care and develop new roles are often needed to implement an evidence-based practice that improves care. This study explored the process of change used to implement clinical guidelines for primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease in primary care practices that used a common electronic medical record (EMR. Methods Multiple conceptual frameworks informed the design of this study designed to explain the complex phenomena of implementing change in primary care practice. Qualitative methods were used to examine the processes of change that practice members used to implement the guidelines. Purposive sampling in eight primary care practices within the Practice Partner Research Network-Translating Researching into Practice (PPRNet-TRIP II clinical trial yielded 28 staff members and clinicians who were interviewed regarding how change in practice occurred while implementing clinical guidelines for primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease and strokes. Results A conceptual framework for implementing clinical guidelines into primary care practice was developed through this research. Seven concepts and their relationships were modelled within this framework: leaders setting a vision with clear goals for staff to embrace; involving the team to enable the goals and vision for the practice to be achieved; enhancing communication systems to reinforce goals for patient care; developing the team to enable the staff to contribute toward practice improvement; taking small steps, encouraging practices' tests of small changes in practice; assimilating the electronic medical record to maximize clinical effectiveness, enhancing practices' use of the electronic tool they have invested in for patient care improvement; and providing feedback within a culture of

  10. Effects of two types of medical contrast media on routine chemistry results by three automated chemistry analyzers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yu Jin; Rim, John Hoon; Yim, Jisook; Lee, Sang-Guk; Kim, Jeong-Ho

    2017-08-01

    The use of iodinated contrast media has grown in popularity in the past two decades, but relatively little attention has been paid to the possible interferential effects of contrast media on laboratory test results. Herein, we investigate medical contrast media interference with routine chemistry results obtained by three automated chemistry analyzers. Ten levels of pooled serum were used in the study. Two types of medical contrast media [Iopamiro (iopamidol) and Omnipaque (iohexol)] were evaluated. To evaluate the dose-dependent effects of the contrast media, iopamidol and iohexol were spiked separately into aliquots of serum for final concentrations of 1.8%, 3.6%, 5.5%, 7.3%, and 9.1%. The 28 analytes included in the routine chemistry panel were measured by using Hitachi 7600, AU5800, and Cobas c702 analyzers. We calculated the delta percentage difference (DPD) between the samples and the control, and examined dose-dependent trends. When the mean DPD values were compared with the reference cut-off criteria, the only uniformly interferential effect observed for all analyzers was in total protein with iopamidol. Two additional analytes that showed trends toward interferential effects only in few analyzers and exceeded the limits of the allowable error were the serum iron and the total CO 2 . The other combinations of analyzer and contrast showed no consistent dose-dependent propensity for change in any analyte level. Our study suggests that many of the analytes included in routine chemistry results, except total protein and serum iron, are not significantly affected by iopamidol and iohexol. These results suggest that it would be beneficial to apply a flexible medical evaluation process for patients requiring both laboratory tests and imaging studies, minimizing the need for strict regulations for sequential tests. Copyright © 2017 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Detecting inpatient falls by using natural language processing of electronic medical records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toyabe Shin-ichi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Incident reporting is the most common method for detecting adverse events in a hospital. However, under-reporting or non-reporting and delay in submission of reports are problems that prevent early detection of serious adverse events. The aim of this study was to determine whether it is possible to promptly detect serious injuries after inpatient falls by using a natural language processing method and to determine which data source is the most suitable for this purpose. Methods We tried to detect adverse events from narrative text data of electronic medical records by using a natural language processing method. We made syntactic category decision rules to detect inpatient falls from text data in electronic medical records. We compared how often the true fall events were recorded in various sources of data including progress notes, discharge summaries, image order entries and incident reports. We applied the rules to these data sources and compared F-measures to detect falls between these data sources with reference to the results of a manual chart review. The lag time between event occurrence and data submission and the degree of injury were compared. Results We made 170 syntactic rules to detect inpatient falls by using a natural language processing method. Information on true fall events was most frequently recorded in progress notes (100%, incident reports (65.0% and image order entries (12.5%. However, F-measure to detect falls using the rules was poor when using progress notes (0.12 and discharge summaries (0.24 compared with that when using incident reports (1.00 and image order entries (0.91. Since the results suggested that incident reports and image order entries were possible data sources for prompt detection of serious falls, we focused on a comparison of falls found by incident reports and image order entries. Injury caused by falls found by image order entries was significantly more severe than falls detected by

  12. Copy Number Variation Analysis in the Context of Electronic Medical Records & Large-Scale Genomics Consortium Efforts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J Connolly

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this paper is to review recent research on copy number variations (CNVs and their association with complex and rare diseases. In the latter part of this paper, we focus on how large biorepositories such as the electronic medical record and genomics (eMERGE consortium may be best leveraged to systematically mine for potentially pathogenic CNVs, and we end with a discussion of how such variants might be reported back for inclusion in electronic medical records as part of medical history.

  13. 3D deeply supervised network for automated segmentation of volumetric medical images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Qi; Yu, Lequan; Chen, Hao; Jin, Yueming; Yang, Xin; Qin, Jing; Heng, Pheng-Ann

    2017-10-01

    While deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs) have achieved remarkable success in 2D medical image segmentation, it is still a difficult task for CNNs to segment important organs or structures from 3D medical images owing to several mutually affected challenges, including the complicated anatomical environments in volumetric images, optimization difficulties of 3D networks and inadequacy of training samples. In this paper, we present a novel and efficient 3D fully convolutional network equipped with a 3D deep supervision mechanism to comprehensively address these challenges; we call it 3D DSN. Our proposed 3D DSN is capable of conducting volume-to-volume learning and inference, which can eliminate redundant computations and alleviate the risk of over-fitting on limited training data. More importantly, the 3D deep supervision mechanism can effectively cope with the optimization problem of gradients vanishing or exploding when training a 3D deep model, accelerating the convergence speed and simultaneously improving the discrimination capability. Such a mechanism is developed by deriving an objective function that directly guides the training of both lower and upper layers in the network, so that the adverse effects of unstable gradient changes can be counteracted during the training procedure. We also employ a fully connected conditional random field model as a post-processing step to refine the segmentation results. We have extensively validated the proposed 3D DSN on two typical yet challenging volumetric medical image segmentation tasks: (i) liver segmentation from 3D CT scans and (ii) whole heart and great vessels segmentation from 3D MR images, by participating two grand challenges held in conjunction with MICCAI. We have achieved competitive segmentation results to state-of-the-art approaches in both challenges with a much faster speed, corroborating the effectiveness of our proposed 3D DSN. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Stepwise approach to establishing multiple outreach laboratory information system-electronic medical record interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liron Pantanowitz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical laboratory outreach business is changing as more physician practices adopt an electronic medical record (EMR. Physician connectivity with the laboratory information system (LIS is consequently becoming more important. However, there are no reports available to assist the informatician with establishing and maintaining outreach LIS-EMR connectivity. A four-stage scheme is presented that was successfully employed to establish unidirectional and bidirectional interfaces with multiple physician EMRs. This approach involves planning (step 1, followed by interface building (step 2 with subsequent testing (step 3, and finally ongoing maintenance (step 4. The role of organized project management, software as a service (SAAS, and alternate solutions for outreach connectivity are discussed.

  15. EMRlog Method for Computer Security for Electronic Medical Records with Logic and Data Mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Mauricio Martínez Monterrubio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The proper functioning of a hospital computer system is an arduous work for managers and staff. However, inconsistent policies are frequent and can produce enormous problems, such as stolen information, frequent failures, and loss of the entire or part of the hospital data. This paper presents a new method named EMRlog for computer security systems in hospitals. EMRlog is focused on two kinds of security policies: directive and implemented policies. Security policies are applied to computer systems that handle huge amounts of information such as databases, applications, and medical records. Firstly, a syntactic verification step is applied by using predicate logic. Then data mining techniques are used to detect which security policies have really been implemented by the computer systems staff. Subsequently, consistency is verified in both kinds of policies; in addition these subsets are contrasted and validated. This is performed by an automatic theorem prover. Thus, many kinds of vulnerabilities can be removed for achieving a safer computer system.

  16. A genome-wide association study of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia using an electronic medical record

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karnes, Jason H; Cronin, Robert M; Rollin, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    . Here, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) and candidate gene study using HIT cases and controls identified using electronic medical records (EMRs) coupled to a DNA biobank and attempted to replicate GWAS associations in an independent cohort. We subsequently investigated influences......-heparin treated patients (OR 3.09; 1.14-8.13; p=0.02). In the candidate gene study, SNPs at HLA-DRA were nominally associated with HIT (OR 0.25; 0.15-0.44; p=2.06×10(-6)). Further study of TDAG8 and HLA-DRA SNPs is warranted to assess their influence on the risk of developing HIT....

  17. Development and implementation of a 'Mental Health Finder' software tool within an electronic medical record system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, D; Hannigan, A; Higgins, S; McDonnell, R; Meagher, D; Cullen, W

    2017-02-01

    In Ireland, as in many other healthcare systems, mental health service provision is being reconfigured with a move toward more care in the community, and particularly primary care. Recording and surveillance systems for mental health information and activities in primary care are needed for service planning and quality improvement. We describe the development and initial implementation of a software tool ('mental health finder') within a widely used primary care electronic medical record system (EMR) in Ireland to enable large-scale data collection on the epidemiology and management of mental health and substance use problems among patients attending general practice. In collaboration with the Irish Primary Care Research Network (IPCRN), we developed the 'Mental Health Finder' as a software plug-in to a commonly used primary care EMR system to facilitate data collection on mental health diagnoses and pharmacological treatments among patients. The finder searches for and identifies patients based on diagnostic coding and/or prescribed medicines. It was initially implemented among a convenience sample of six GP practices. Prevalence of mental health and substance use problems across the six practices, as identified by the finder, was 9.4% (range 6.9-12.7%). 61.9% of identified patients were female; 25.8% were private patients. One-third (33.4%) of identified patients were prescribed more than one class of psychotropic medication. Of the patients identified by the finder, 89.9% were identifiable via prescribing data, 23.7% via diagnostic coding. The finder is a feasible and promising methodology for large-scale data collection on mental health problems in primary care.

  18. Determining rates of overweight and obese status in children using electronic medical records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birken, Catherine S.; Tu, Karen; Oud, William; Carsley, Sarah; Hanna, Miranda; Lebovic, Gerald; Guttmann, Astrid

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine the prevalence of overweight and obese status in children by age, sex, and visit type, using data from EMRALD® (Electronic Medical Record Administrative data Linked Database). Design Heights and weights were abstracted for children 0 to 19 years of age who had at least one well-child visit from January 2010 to December 2011. Using the most recent visit, the proportions and 95% CIs of patients defined as overweight and obese were compared by age group, sex, and visit type using the World Health Organization growth reference standards. Setting Ontario. Participants Children 0 to 19 years of age who were rostered to a primary care physician participating in EMRALD and had at least one well-child visit from January 2010 to December 2011. Main outcome measures Proportion and 95% CI of children with overweight and obese status by age group; proportion of children with overweight and obese status by sex (with male sex as the referent) within each age group; and proportion of children with overweight and obese status at the most recent well-child visit type compared with other visit types by age group. Results There were 28 083 well-child visits during this period. For children who attended well-child visits, 84.7% of visits had both a height and weight documented. Obesity rates were significantly higher in 1- to 4-year-olds compared with children younger than 1 (6.1% vs 2.3%; P overweight and obese status were lower using data from well-child visits compared with other visits. Conclusion Electronic medical records might be useful to conduct population-based surveillance of overweight or obese status in children. Methodologic standards, however, should be developed. PMID:28209703

  19. Modulators of normal electrocardiographic intervals identified in a large electronic medical record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Andrea H; Schildcrout, Jonathan S; Blakemore, Dana L; Masys, Dan R; Pulley, Jill M; Basford, Melissa A; Roden, Dan M; Denny, Joshua C

    2011-02-01

    Traditional electrocardiographic (ECG) reference ranges were derived from studies in communities or clinical trial populations. The distribution of ECG parameters in a large population presenting to a healthcare system has not been studied. The purpose of this study was to define the contribution of age, race, gender, height, body mass index, and type 2 diabetes mellitus to normal ECG parameters in a population presenting to a healthcare system. Study subjects were obtained from the Vanderbilt Synthetic Derivative, a de-identified image of the electronic medical record (EMR), containing more than 20 years of records on 1.7 million subjects. We identified 63,177 unique subjects with an ECG that was read as "normal" by the reviewing cardiologist. Using combinations of natural language processing and laboratory and billing code queries, we identified a subset of 32,949 subjects without cardiovascular disease, interfering medications, or abnormal electrolytes. The ethnic makeup was 77% Caucasian, 13% African American, 1% Hispanic, 1% Asian, and 8% unknown. The range that included 95% of normal PR intervals was 125-196 ms, QRS 69-103 ms, QT interval corrected with Bazett formula 365-458 ms, and heart rate 54-96 bpm. Linear regression modeling of patient characteristic effects reproduced known age and gender effects and identified novel associations with race, body mass index, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. A web-based application for patient-specific normal ranges is available online at http://biostat.mc.vanderbilt.edu/ECGPredictionInterval. Analysis of a large set of EMR-derived normal ECGs reproduced known associations, found new relationships, and established patient-specific normal ranges. Such knowledge informs clinical and genetic research and may improve understanding of normal cardiac physiology. Copyright © 2011 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Modulators of normal ECG intervals identified in a large electronic medical record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Andrea H; Schildcrout, Jonathan S; Blakemore, Dana L; Masys, Dan R; Pulley, Jill M; Basford, Melissa A; Roden, Dan M; Denny, Joshua C

    2010-01-01

    Background Traditional electrocardiographic reference ranges were derived from studies in communities or clinical trial populations. The distribution of ECG parameters in a large population presenting to a healthcare system has not been studied. Objective The objective of this study is to define the contribution of age, race, gender, height, body mass index (BMI), and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) to normal electrocardiographic parameters in a population presenting to a healthcare system. Methods Study subjects were obtained from the Vanderbilt Synthetic Derivative, a de-identified image of the electronic medical record (EMR), containing more than 20 years of records on 1.7 million subjects. We identified 63,177 unique subjects with an ECG read as ‘normal’ by the reviewing cardiologist. Using combinations of natural language processing, laboratory and billing code queries, we identified a subset of 32,949 subjects without cardiovascular disease, interfering medications, or abnormal electrolytes. The ethnic makeup was 77% Caucasian, 13% African American, 1% Hispanic, 1% Asian, and 8% unknown. Results The range that included 95% of normal PR intervals was 125–196 msec; QRS 69–103 msec; QTcB 365–458 msec; and HR 54–96 bpm. Linear regression modeling of patient characteristic effects reproduced known age and gender effects and identified novel associations with race, BMI, and T2D. A web-based application for patient-specific normal ranges has been made available online at http://biostat.mc.vanderbilt.edu/ECGPredictionInterval. Conclusion Analysis of a large set of EMR-derived normal ECGs reproduced known associations, found new relationships, and established patient-specific normal ranges. Such knowledge informs clinical and genetic research and may improve understanding of normal cardiac physiology. PMID:21044898

  1. Use of attribute association error probability estimates to evaluate quality of medical record geocodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaus, Christian A; Carrasco, Luis E; Goldberg, Daniel W; Henry, Kevin A; Sherman, Recinda L

    2015-09-15

    The utility of patient attributes associated with the spatiotemporal analysis of medical records lies not just in their values but also the strength of association between them. Estimating the extent to which a hierarchy of conditional probability exists between patient attribute associations such as patient identifying fields, patient and date of diagnosis, and patient and address at diagnosis is fundamental to estimating the strength of association between patient and geocode, and patient and enumeration area. We propose a hierarchy for the attribute associations within medical records that enable spatiotemporal relationships. We also present a set of metrics that store attribute association error probability (AAEP), to estimate error probability for all attribute associations upon which certainty in a patient geocode depends. A series of experiments were undertaken to understand how error estimation could be operationalized within health data and what levels of AAEP in real data reveal themselves using these methods. Specifically, the goals of this evaluation were to (1) assess if the concept of our error assessment techniques could be implemented by a population-based cancer registry; (2) apply the techniques to real data from a large health data agency and characterize the observed levels of AAEP; and (3) demonstrate how detected AAEP might impact spatiotemporal health research. We present an evaluation of AAEP metrics generated for cancer cases in a North Carolina county. We show examples of how we estimated AAEP for selected attribute associations and circumstances. We demonstrate the distribution of AAEP in our case sample across attribute associations, and demonstrate ways in which disease registry specific operations influence the prevalence of AAEP estimates for specific attribute associations. The effort to detect and store estimates of AAEP is worthwhile because of the increase in confidence fostered by the attribute association level approach to the

  2. Syndromic surveillance in companion animals utilizing electronic medical records data: development and proof of concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip H. Kass

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In an effort to recognize and address communicable and point-source epidemics in dog and cat populations, this project created a near real-time syndromic surveillance system devoted to companion animal health in the United States. With over 150 million owned pets in the US, the development of such a system is timely in light of previous epidemics due to various causes that were only recognized in retrospect. The goal of this study was to develop epidemiologic and statistical methods for veterinary hospital-based surveillance, and to demonstrate its efficacy by detection of simulated foodborne outbreaks using a database of over 700 hospitals. Data transfer protocols were established via a secure file transfer protocol site, and a data repository was constructed predominantly utilizing open-source software. The daily proportion of patients with a given clinical or laboratory finding was contrasted with an equivalent average proportion from a historical comparison period, allowing construction of the proportionate diagnostic outcome ratio and its confidence interval for recognizing aberrant heath events. A five-tiered alert system was used to facilitate daily assessment of almost 2,000 statistical analyses. Two simulated outbreak scenarios were created by independent experts, blinded to study investigators, and embedded in the 2010 medical records. Both outbreaks were detected almost immediately by the alert system, accurately detecting species affected using relevant clinical and laboratory findings, and ages involved. Besides demonstrating proof-in-concept of using veterinary hospital databases to detect aberrant events in space and time, this research can be extended to conducting post-detection etiologic investigations utilizing exposure information in the medical record.

  3. Combining free text and structured electronic medical record entries to detect acute respiratory infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvain DeLisle

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The electronic medical record (EMR contains a rich source of information that could be harnessed for epidemic surveillance. We asked if structured EMR data could be coupled with computerized processing of free-text clinical entries to enhance detection of acute respiratory infections (ARI.A manual review of EMR records related to 15,377 outpatient visits uncovered 280 reference cases of ARI. We used logistic regression with backward elimination to determine which among candidate structured EMR parameters (diagnostic codes, vital signs and orders for tests, imaging and medications contributed to the detection of those reference cases. We also developed a computerized free-text search to identify clinical notes documenting at least two non-negated ARI symptoms. We then used heuristics to build case-detection algorithms that best combined the retained structured EMR parameters with the results of the text analysis.An adjusted grouping of diagnostic codes identified reference ARI patients with a sensitivity of 79%, a specificity of 96% and a positive predictive value (PPV of 32%. Of the 21 additional structured clinical parameters considered, two contributed significantly to ARI detection: new prescriptions for cough remedies and elevations in body temperature to at least 38°C. Together with the diagnostic codes, these parameters increased detection sensitivity to 87%, but specificity and PPV declined to 95% and 25%, respectively. Adding text analysis increased sensitivity to 99%, but PPV dropped further to 14%. Algorithms that required satisfying both a query of structured EMR parameters as well as text analysis disclosed PPVs of 52-68% and retained sensitivities of 69-73%.Structured EMR parameters and free-text analyses can be combined into algorithms that can detect ARI cases with new levels of sensitivity or precision. These results highlight potential paths by which repurposed EMR information could facilitate the discovery of epidemics before

  4. Use of an Electronic Medical Record to Assess Patient-Reported Morbidity Following Ureteroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Monica S C; Antonelli, Jodi A; Lotan, Yair; Shakir, Nabeel; Kavoussi, Nicholas; Cohen, Adam; Pearle, Margaret S

    2016-05-01

    With the extensive documentation afforded by our electronic medical record (EMR), we observed an unusually high number of patient-initiated encounters following ureteroscopy (URS). We sought to quantify and categorize patient encounters following URS to determine if we could identify avoidable common problems. Following IRB approval, we reviewed the records of 298 consecutive patients with stones who underwent 314 URS procedures between July 2013 and November 2014. Patient demographics, stone characteristics and operative details, as well as telephone encounters, secure online patient-initiated (MyChart) messages, and emergency department (ED) visits following URS were extracted from our EMR (Epic, Verona, WI). We performed univariate (UVA) and multivariate (MVA) analysis to identify factors predictive of postoperative patient encounters and compared URS patients to a group of 56 patients undergoing transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT) for number and type of encounters. We identified 443 encounters generated by 201 URS patients, including 334 telephone calls, 71 MyChart messages, and 38 ED visits. Among these encounters, 352 (79%) were medically related (pain comprised 45%) and the remainder involved scheduling issues. By UVA age, bilateral versus unilateral URS, stone location (both kidney and ureter), ureteral access sheath size, and total number of stones predicted a postoperative encounter. By MVA, only younger age and larger UAS size were independent predictors. When compared with TURBT patients, URS patients had a 2.5-fold higher risk of having a pain-related postoperative encounter (OR 2.54, 95% CI 1.08-7.04, P=0.03). Among patients undergoing URS for stones, two-thirds made unprompted contact with a healthcare provider and 80% of contacts involved postoperative pain, a finding that is distinct from another endoscopic procedure that does not involve upper tract manipulation. Patients do not perceive URS as the benign procedure doctors do.

  5. Developing a cardiovascular disease risk factor annotated corpus of Chinese electronic medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jia; He, Bin; Guan, Yi; Jiang, Jingchi; Yang, Jinfeng

    2017-08-08

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) has become the leading cause of death in China, and most of the cases can be prevented by controlling risk factors. The goal of this study was to build a corpus of CVD risk factor annotations based on Chinese electronic medical records (CEMRs). This corpus is intended to be used to develop a risk factor information extraction system that, in turn, can be applied as a foundation for the further study of the progress of risk factors and CVD. We designed a light annotation task to capture CVD risk factors with indicators, temporal attributes and assertions that were explicitly or implicitly displayed in the records. The task included: 1) preparing data; 2) creating guidelines for capturing annotations (these were created with the help of clinicians); 3) proposing an annotation method including building the guidelines draft, training the annotators and updating the guidelines, and corpus construction. Meanwhile, we proposed some creative annotation guidelines: (1) the under-threshold medical examination values were annotated for our purpose of studying the progress of risk factors and CVD; (2) possible and negative risk factors were concerned for the same reason, and we created assertions for annotations; (3) we added four temporal attributes to CVD risk factors in CEMRs for constructing long term variations. Then, a risk factor annotated corpus based on de-identified discharge summaries and progress notes from 600 patients was developed. Built with the help of clinicians, this corpus has an inter-annotator agreement (IAA) F 1 -measure of 0.968, indicating a high reliability. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first annotated corpus concerning CVD risk factors in CEMRs and the guidelines for capturing CVD risk factor annotations from CEMRs were proposed. The obtained document-level annotations can be applied in future studies to monitor risk factors and CVD over the long term.

  6. History of the Rochester Epidemiology Project: Half a Century of Medical Records Linkage in a US Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocca, Walter A.; Yawn, Barbara P.; St. Sauver, Jennifer L.; Grossardt, Brandon R.; Melton, L. Joseph

    2012-01-01

    The Rochester Epidemiology Project (REP) has maintained a comprehensive medical records linkage system for nearly half a century for almost all persons residing in Olmsted County, Minnesota. Herein, we provide a brief history of the REP before and after 1966, the year in which the REP was officially established. The key protagonists before 1966 were Henry Plummer, Mabel Root, and Joseph Berkson, who developed a medical records linkage system at Mayo Clinic. In 1966, Leonard Kurland established collaborative agreements with other local health care providers (hospitals, physician groups, and clinics [primarily Olmsted Medical Center]) to develop a medical records linkage system that covered the entire population of Olmsted County, and he obtained funding from the National Institutes of Health to support the new system. In 1997, L. Joseph Melton III addressed emerging concerns about the confidentiality of medical record information by introducing a broad patient research authorization as per Minnesota state law. We describe how the key protagonists of the REP have responded to challenges posed by evolving medical knowledge, information technology, and public expectation and policy. In addition, we provide a general description of the system; discuss issues of data quality, reliability, and validity; describe the research team structure; provide information about funding; and compare the REP with other medical information systems. The REP can serve as a model for the development of similar research infrastructures in the United States and worldwide. PMID:23199802

  7. Formalization and computation of quality measures based on electronic medical records

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dentler, K.; Numans, M.E.; ten Teije, A.C.M.; Cornet, R.; de Keizer, N.F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Ambiguous definitions of quality measures in natural language impede their automated computability and also the reproducibility, validity, timeliness, traceability, comparability, and interpretability of computed results. Therefore, quality measures should be formalized before their

  8. Formalization and computation of quality measures based on electronic medical records

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dentler, K.; Numans, M.; ten Teije, A.; Cornet, R.; De Keizer, N.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Ambiguous definitions of quality measures in natural language impede their automated computability and also the reproducibility, validity, timeliness, traceability, comparability, and interpretability of computed results. Therefore, quality measures should be formalized before their

  9. Increased adolescent overweight and obesity documentation through a simple electronic medical record intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode, David V; Roberts, Timothy A; Johnson, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to improve provider documentation of adolescent overweight and obesity through body mass index percentile (BMI%) documentation in the military's electronic medical record (EMR). Using the FOCUS-PDCA (Find-Organize-Clarify-Understand-Select-Plan-Do-Check-Act) model, we developed an intervention to improve rates of diagnosis of overweight/obesity in our adolescent medicine clinic. Medical technicians documented the patient's BMI% and growth chart in the EMR. Pre- and postintervention chart reviews of approximately 300 consecutive patient encounters compared the rates of overweight/obesity with provider-documented diagnosis. A total of 333 pre- and 328 postintervention clinic encounters were reviewed. The rate of overweight and obesity calculated was similar between pre- and postintervention groups (30% vs. 31%). Correct diagnosis increased from 40% to 64% after the intervention. Females and patients seen by resident physicians were less likely to receive a correct diagnosis at baseline, but these differences were mitigated in the postintervention group. In multivariate analyses, only the intervention and provider type were predictive of an improvement in correct diagnosis. BMI% documentation in our EMR was an effective way to improve documentation of overweight/obese adolescent patients and may be particularly helpful for resident physicians.

  10. Interconnection of electronic medical record with clinical data management system by CDISC ODM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Yasushi; Hattori, Atsushi; Manabe, Shiro; Takeda, Toshihiro; Takahashi, Daiyo; Yamamoto, Yuichiro; Murata, Taizo; Mihara, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    EDC system has been used in the field of clinical research. The current EDC system does not connect with electronic medical record system (EMR), thus a medical staff has to transcribe the data in EMR to EDC system manually. This redundant process causes not only inefficiency but also human error. We developed an EDC system cooperating with EMR, in which the data required for a clinical research form (CRF) is transcribed automatically from EMR to electronic CRF (eCRF) and is sent via network. We call this system as "eCRF reporter". The interface module of eCRF reporter can retrieves the data in EMR database including patient biography data, laboratory test data, prescription data and data entered by template in progress notes. The eCRF reporter also enables users to enter data directly to eCRF. The eCRF reporter generates CDISC ODM file and PDF which is a translated form of Clinical data in ODM. After storing eCRF in EMR, it is transferred via VPN to a clinical data management system (CDMS) which can receive the eCRF files and parse ODM. We started some clinical research by using this system. This system is expected to promote clinical research efficiency and strictness.

  11. The journey from precontemplation to action: Transitioning between electronic medical record systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Thomas; Rizer, Milisa; McAlearney, Ann Scheck; Mekhjian, Hagop; Siedler, Monica; Sharp, Karen; Teater, Phyllis; Huerta, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Health care organizations, in response to federal programs, have sought to identify electronic medical record (EMR) strategies that align well with their visions for success. Little exists in the literature discussing the transition from one EMR strategy to another. The analysis and planning process used by a major academic medical center in its journey to adopt a new strategy was described in this study. We use the transtheoretical model of change to frame the five phases through which the organization transitioned from a best-of-breed system to an enterprise system. We explore the five phases of change from the perspective of a maturing approach to new technology adoption. Data collection included archival retrieval and review as well as interviews with key stakeholders. Although there was always a focus on some enterprise capabilities such as computerized physician order entry, the emphasis on EMR selection tended to be driven by specialty requirements. Focusing on the patient across the continuum of care, as opposed to focusing on excessive requirements by clinical specialties, was essential in forming and deploying a vision for the new EMR. This research outlines a successful pathway used by an organization that had invested heavily in EMR technology and was faced with evaluating whether to continue that investment or start with a new platform. Rather than focusing on the technology alone, efforts to reframe the discussion to one that focused on the patient resulted in less resistance to change.

  12. A Technology Acceptance Model for Inter-Organisational Electronic Medical Records Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jocelyn Handy

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available This article reports the findings of the first stage of an ongoing, longitudinal study into the implementation of an interorganisational electronic medical records (EMR system. The study adapted and expanded Davis' (1993 technology acceptance model (TAM to investigate the attitudes of primary care practitioners towards a proposed system for maternity patients. All doctors and midwives holding maternity care contracts with a large urban hospital in New Zealand were sent a questionnaire soliciting their views on a planned EMR system linking the hospital and the primary care sectors. The results showed that whilst Davis' two key factors of perceived ease of use and perceived usefulness were important to medical professionals, another key factor, perceived system acceptability, which concerns control and management of information is vitally important to the acceptance of the system. The study also showed that the two groups of professionals had differing requirements due to different levels of experience and practice computerisation. Finally, the research highlights a number of wider organisational issues particularly relevant to the use of inter organisational systems in general and healthcare systems in particular.

  13. The effect of electronic medical record adoption on outcomes in US hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Jinhyung

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The electronic medical record (EMR is one of the most promising components of health information technology. However, the overall impact of EMR adoption on outcomes at US hospitals remains unknown. This study examined the relationship between basic EMR adoption and 30-day rehospitalization, 30-day mortality, inpatient mortality and length of stay. Methods Our overall approach was to compare outcomes for the two years before and two years after the year of EMR adoption, at 708 acute-care hospitals in the US from 2000 to 2007. We looked at the effect of EMR on outcomes using two methods. First, we compared the outcomes by quarter for the period before and after EMR adoption among hospitals that adopted EMR. Second, we compared hospitals that adopted EMR to those that did not, before and after EMR adoption, using a generalized linear model. Results Hospitals adopting EMR experienced 0.11 (95% CI: -0.218 to −0.002 days’ shorter length of stay and 0.182 percent lower 30-day mortality, but a 0.19 (95% CI: 0.0006 to 0.0033 percent increase in 30-day rehospitalization in the two years after EMR adoption. The association of EMR adoption with outcomes also varied by type of admission (medical vs. surgical. Conclusions Previous studies using observational data from large samples of hospitals have produced conflicting results. However, using different methods, we found a small but statistically significant association of EMR adoption with outcomes of hospitalization.

  14. Wound emergencies: the importance of assessment, documentation, and early treatment using a wound electronic medical record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golinko, Michael S; Clark, Sunday; Rennert, Robert; Flattau, Anna; Boulton, Andrew J M; Brem, Harold

    2009-05-01

    Chronic wounds such as diabetic foot ulcers, venous ulcers, and pressure ulcers are a major source of morbidity and mortality. To describe wound characteristics associated with a wound emergency, the Wound Electronic Medical Records (WEMR) of 200 consecutive admissions (139 patients, average number of admissions 1.4) to a dedicated inpatient wound healing unit over a period of 5 months were retrospectively reviewed. Patient mean age was 62 +/- 16 years, 59% were men, 27% had a foot ulcer and diabetes mellitus, and 29% had venous ulcers. Presenting signs and symptoms included wound pain, cellulitis, nonpurulent drainage, and undermining, but few presented with classic local clinical signs of infection. Treatment consisted of sharp debridement with deep tissue culture and pathology from the wound base and/or systemic antibiotics. Twenty-percent (20%) of patients had pathology-confirmed and 38% had pathology- or radiology-confirmed osteomyelitis on admission, supporting that new or increasing wound pain, cellulitis, and/or nonpurulent drainage or presence of significant undermining may be indicative of an invasive infection and that patients presenting with these signs and symptoms require an immediate treatment plan and consideration of hospital admission. Use of an objective documentation system such as the WEMR may help alert clinicians to subtle wound changes that require aggressive treatment; thereby, avoiding emergency room visits and hospital admissions. Future research is needed utilizing the WEMR across multiple medical centers to further define criteria for a chronic wound emergency.

  15. Impact of immediate access to the electronic medical record on anatomic pathology performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renshaw, Andrew A; Gould, Edwin W

    2013-07-01

    To assess the overall impact of access to the electronic medical record (EMR) on anatomic pathology performance. We reviewed the results of all use of the EMR by 1 pathologist over an 18-month period. Of the 10,107 cases (913 cytology and 9,194 surgical pathology) reviewed, the EMR (excluding anatomic pathology records) was accessed in 222 (2.2% of all cases, 6.5% of all cytology cases, and 1.8% of all surgical pathology cases). The EMR was used to evaluate a critical value in 20 (9.0%) cases and make a more specific diagnosis in 77 (34.7%) cases, a less specific diagnosis in 4 (1.8%) cases, and a systemic rather than localized diagnosis in 4 (1.8%) cases. The percentage of cases in which the physician was contacted decreased from 7.3% for the prior 18 months to 6.7%, but this change was not significant (P = .13). Twelve cases were subsequently sent for interinstitutional consultation, and no disagreements were identified. The EMR was accessed in 2.2% of all surgical pathology and cytology cases and affected the diagnosis in 48% of these cases.

  16. Tissue Banking, Bioinformatics, and Electronic Medical Records: The Front-End Requirements for Personalized Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, K. Stephen; Sarojini, Sreeja; Youssif, Maher; Nalley, Kip; Milinovikj, Natasha; Elloumi, Fathi; Russell, Steven; Pecora, Andrew; Schecter, Elyssa; Goy, Andre

    2013-01-01

    Personalized medicine promises patient-tailored treatments that enhance patient care and decrease overall treatment costs by focusing on genetics and “-omics” data obtained from patient biospecimens and records to guide therapy choices that generate good clinical outcomes. The approach relies on diagnostic and prognostic use of novel biomarkers discovered through combinations of tissue banking, bioinformatics, and electronic medical records (EMRs). The analytical power of bioinformatic platforms combined with patient clinical data from EMRs can reveal potential biomarkers and clinical phenotypes that allow researchers to develop experimental strategies using selected patient biospecimens stored in tissue banks. For cancer, high-quality biospecimens collected at diagnosis, first relapse, and various treatment stages provide crucial resources for study designs. To enlarge biospecimen collections, patient education regarding the value of specimen donation is vital. One approach for increasing consent is to offer publically available illustrations and game-like engagements demonstrating how wider sample availability facilitates development of novel therapies. The critical value of tissue bank samples, bioinformatics, and EMR in the early stages of the biomarker discovery process for personalized medicine is often overlooked. The data obtained also require cross-disciplinary collaborations to translate experimental results into clinical practice and diagnostic and prognostic use in personalized medicine. PMID:23818899

  17. Interfacing the Microcomputer and the Mainframe to Support Visit-Revisit Comparisons of Medical Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltsman, Tom; Truax, Terry

    1982-01-01

    The microcomputer is finding an increasing role on the hospital patient floor to aid the collection, management and display of the patient's medical data. The data collected by the nursing staff on the microcomputer is stored locally on floppy disks and forms the initial basis for a computerized nursing assessment. The data, however, is permanently maintained at a central site using a mainframe database management system. This paper reports the development of methods which allow the nursing staff (using the same microcomputer used for local data collection) to interface with the mainframe database and send or retrieve components of the patient's record. The microcomputer interface allows the nursing staff to retrieve and view the patient's previous visit records using the same screen format used to input and display the current assessment. As data from the current visit is entered, the current data is compared with the relevant data from the previous visits. Significant deviations are detected and the nurse is alerted. The data can then be displayed for comparisons.

  18. Cost-benefit analysis of electronic medical record system at a tertiary care hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jong Soo; Lee, Woo Baik; Rhee, Poong-Lyul

    2013-09-01

    Although Electronic Medical Record (EMR) systems provide various benefits, there are both advantages and disadvantages regarding its cost-effectiveness. This study analyzed the economic effects of EMR systems using a cost-benefit analysis based on the differential costs of managerial accounting. Samsung Medical Center (SMC) is a general hospital in Korea that developed an EMR system for outpatients from 2006 to 2008. This study measured the total costs and benefits during an 8-year period after EMR adoption. The costs include the system costs of building the EMR and the costs incurred in smoothing its adoption. The benefits included cost reductions after its adoption and additional revenues from both remodeling of paper-chart storage areas and medical transcriptionists' contribution. The measured amounts were discounted by SMC's expected interest rate to calculate the net present value (NPV), benefit-cost ratio (BCR), and discounted payback period (DPP). During the analysis period, the cumulative NPV and the BCR were US$3,617 thousand and 1.23, respectively. The DPP was about 6.18 years. Although the adoption of an EMR resulted in overall growth in administrative costs, it is cost-effective since the cumulative NPV was positive. The positive NPV was attributed to both cost reductions and additional revenues. EMR adoption is not so attractive to management in that the DPP is longer than 5 years at 6.18 and the BCR is near 1 at 1.23. However, an EMR is a worthwhile investment, seeing that this study did not include any qualitative benefits and that the paper-chart system was cost-centric.

  19. Impact of implementing alerts about medication black-box warnings in electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Donghui Tony; Seger, Diane L; Lasser, Karen E; Karson, Andrew S; Fiskio, Julie M; Seger, Andrew C; Bates, David W

    2011-02-01

    The Food and Drug Administration issues black-box warnings (BBWs) regarding medications with serious risks, yet physician adherence to the warnings is low. We evaluated the impact of delivering BBW-based alerts about drug-drug, drug-disease, and drug-laboratory interactions for prescription medications in outpatients in an electronic health record with clinical decision support. We compared the frequency of non-adherence to all BBWs about drug-drug, drug-disease, and drug-laboratory interactions for 30 drugs/drug classes, and by individual drugs/drug groups with BBWs between the pre- and post-intervention periods. We used multivariate analysis to identify independent risk factors for non-adherence to BBWs. There was a slightly higher frequency of non-adherence to BBWs after the intervention (4.8% vs. 5.1%, p=0.045). In multivariate analyses, after adjustment for patient and provider characteristics and site of care, medications prescribed during the pre-intervention period were less likely to violate BBWs compared to those prescribed during the post-intervention period (OR 0.67, 95% CI, 0.47-0.96). However, black-box warning violations did decrease after the intervention for BBWs about drug-drug interactions (6.1% vs. 1.8%, p<0.0001) and drug-pregnancy interactions (5.1% vs. 3.6%, p=0.01). Ambulatory care computerized order entry with prescribing alerts about BBWs did not improve clinicians' overall adherence to BBWs, though it did improve adherence for specific clinically important subcategories. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Validation of fragility fractures in primary care electronic medical records: A population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Laguna, Daniel; Soria-Castro, Alberto; Carbonell-Abella, Cristina; Orozco-López, Pilar; Estrada-Laza, Pilar; Nogues, Xavier; Díez-Perez, Adolfo; Prieto-Alhambra, Daniel

    2017-11-28

    Electronic medical records databases use pre-specified lists of diagnostic codes to identify fractures. These codes, however, are not specific enough to disentangle traumatic from fragility-related fractures. We report on the proportion of fragility fractures identified in a random sample of coded fractures in SIDIAP. Patients≥50 years old with any fracture recorded in 2012 (as per pre-specified ICD-10 codes) and alive at the time of recruitment were eligible for this retrospective observational study in 6 primary care centres contributing to the SIDIAP database (www.sidiap.org). Those with previous fracture/s, non-responders, and those with dementia or a serious psychiatric disease were excluded. Data on fracture type (traumatic vs fragility), skeletal site, and basic patient characteristics were collected. Of 491/616 (79.7%) patients with a registered fracture in 2012 who were contacted, 331 (349 fractures) were included. The most common fractures were forearm (82), ribs (38), and humerus (32), and 225/349 (64.5%) were fragility fractures, with higher proportions for classic osteoporotic sites: hip, 91.7%; spine, 87.7%; and major fractures, 80.5%. This proportion was higher in women, the elderly, and patients with a previously coded diagnosis of osteoporosis. More than 4 in 5 major fractures recorded in SIDIAP are due to fragility (non-traumatic), with higher proportions for hip (92%) and vertebral (88%) fracture, and a lower proportion for fractures other than major ones. Our data support the validity of SIDIAP for the study of the epidemiology of osteoporotic fractures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  1. Association of Arrhythmia-Related Genetic Variants With Phenotypes Documented in Electronic Medical Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Driest, Sara L; Wells, Quinn S; Stallings, Sarah; Bush, William S; Gordon, Adam; Nickerson, Deborah A; Kim, Jerry H; Crosslin, David R; Jarvik, Gail P; Carrell, David S; Ralston, James D; Larson, Eric B; Bielinski, Suzette J; Olson, Janet E; Ye, Zi; Kullo, Iftikhar J; Abul-Husn, Noura S; Scott, Stuart A; Bottinger, Erwin; Almoguera, Berta; Connolly, John; Chiavacci, Rosetta; Hakonarson, Hakon; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Pan, Vivian; Persell, Stephen D; Smith, Maureen; Chisholm, Rex L; Kitchner, Terrie E; He, Max M; Brilliant, Murray H; Wallace, John R; Doheny, Kimberly F; Shoemaker, M Benjamin; Li, Rongling; Manolio, Teri A; Callis, Thomas E; Macaya, Daniela; Williams, Marc S; Carey, David; Kapplinger, Jamie D; Ackerman, Michael J; Ritchie, Marylyn D; Denny, Joshua C; Roden, Dan M

    2016-01-05

    Large-scale DNA sequencing identifies incidental rare variants in established Mendelian disease genes, but the frequency of related clinical phenotypes in unselected patient populations is not well established. Phenotype data from electronic medical records (EMRs) may provide a resource to assess the clinical relevance of rare variants. To determine the clinical phenotypes from EMRs for individuals with variants designated as pathogenic by expert review in arrhythmia susceptibility genes. This prospective cohort study included 2022 individuals recruited for nonantiarrhythmic drug exposure phenotypes from October 5, 2012, to September 30, 2013, for the Electronic Medical Records and Genomics Network Pharmacogenomics project from 7 US academic medical centers. Variants in SCN5A and KCNH2, disease genes for long QT and Brugada syndromes, were assessed for potential pathogenicity by 3 laboratories with ion channel expertise and by comparison with the ClinVar database. Relevant phenotypes were determined from EMRs, with data available from 2002 (or earlier for some sites) through September 10, 2014. One or more variants designated as pathogenic in SCN5A or KCNH2. Arrhythmia or electrocardiographic (ECG) phenotypes defined by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) codes, ECG data, and manual EMR review. Among 2022 study participants (median age, 61 years [interquartile range, 56-65 years]; 1118 [55%] female; 1491 [74%] white), a total of 122 rare (minor allele frequency <0.5%) nonsynonymous and splice-site variants in 2 arrhythmia susceptibility genes were identified in 223 individuals (11% of the study cohort). Forty-two variants in 63 participants were designated potentially pathogenic by at least 1 laboratory or ClinVar, with low concordance across laboratories (Cohen κ = 0.26). An ICD-9 code for arrhythmia was found in 11 of 63 (17%) variant carriers vs 264 of 1959 (13%) of those without variants (difference, +4%; 95% CI, -5% to +13

  2. Automation of Field Operations and Services (AFOS) National Weather Service (NWS) Service Records and Retention System (SRRS) Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Service Records and Retention System (SRRS) is historical digital data set DSI-9949, a collection of products created by the U.S. National Weather Service (NWS) and...

  3. Development and validation of a continuous measure of patient condition using the Electronic Medical Record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, Michael J; Rothman, Steven I; Beals, Joseph

    2013-10-01

    Patient condition is a key element in communication between clinicians. However, there is no generally accepted definition of patient condition that is independent of diagnosis and that spans acuity levels. We report the development and validation of a continuous measure of general patient condition that is independent of diagnosis, and that can be used for medical-surgical as well as critical care patients. A survey of Electronic Medical Record data identified common, frequently collected non-static candidate variables as the basis for a general, continuously updated patient condition score. We used a new methodology to estimate in-hospital risk associated with each of these variables. A risk function for each candidate input was computed by comparing the final pre-discharge measurements with 1-year post-discharge mortality. Step-wise logistic regression of the variables against 1-year mortality was used to determine the importance of each variable. The final set of selected variables consisted of 26 clinical measurements from four categories: nursing assessments, vital signs, laboratory results and cardiac rhythms. We then constructed a heuristic model quantifying patient condition (overall risk) by summing the single-variable risks. The model's validity was assessed against outcomes from 170,000 medical-surgical and critical care patients, using data from three US hospitals. Outcome validation across hospitals yields an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve(AUC) of ≥0.92 when separating hospice/deceased from all other discharge categories, an AUC of ≥0.93 when predicting 24-h mortality and an AUC of 0.62 when predicting 30-day readmissions. Correspondence with outcomes reflective of patient condition across the acuity spectrum indicates utility in both medical-surgical units and critical care units. The model output, which we call the Rothman Index, may provide clinicians with a longitudinal view of patient condition to help address known

  4. Case Study: The Transformation of the Health Record; The Impact of Electronic Medical Records in a Military Treatment Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    safety was achieved from many safeguards including reducing transcription errors and prescribing errors (Charles, Harmon, and Jordan). One major...receive continuing education as needed for reporting errors . Each coder spent up to two hours per week correcting administrative errors (BPR CHCS II...Management of these records is the responsibility of the Head of the Clinic. Section VI Medico -Legal Issues 16-35. General. (1) Purpose - include

  5. Impact of automated dispensing cabinets on medication selection and preparation error rates in an emergency department: a prospective and direct observational before-and-after study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanning, Laura; Jones, Nick; Manias, Elizabeth

    2016-04-01

    The implementation of automated dispensing cabinets (ADCs) in healthcare facilities appears to be increasing, in particular within Australian hospital emergency departments (EDs). While the investment in ADCs is on the increase, no studies have specifically investigated the impacts of ADCs on medication selection and preparation error rates in EDs. Our aim was to assess the impact of ADCs on medication selection and preparation error rates in an ED of a tertiary teaching hospital. Pre intervention and post intervention study involving direct observations of nurses completing medication selection and preparation activities before and after the implementation of ADCs in the original and new emergency departments within a 377-bed tertiary teaching hospital in Australia. Medication selection and preparation error rates were calculated and compared between these two periods. Secondary end points included the impact on medication error type and severity. A total of 2087 medication selection and preparations were observed among 808 patients pre and post intervention. Implementation of ADCs in the new ED resulted in a 64.7% (1.96% versus 0.69%, respectively, P = 0.017) reduction in medication selection and preparation errors. All medication error types were reduced in the post intervention study period. There was an insignificant impact on medication error severity as all errors detected were categorised as minor. The implementation of ADCs could reduce medication selection and preparation errors and improve medication safety in an ED setting. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Statement on access to relevant medical and other health records and relevant legal records for forensic medical evaluations of alleged torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alempijevic, D; Beriashvili, R; Beynon, J; Duque, M; Duterte, P; Fernando, R; Fincanci, S; Hansen, S; Hardi, L; Hougen, H; Iacopino, V; Mendonça, M; Modvig, J; Mendez, M; Özkalipci, Ö; Payne-James, J; Peel, M; Rasmussen, O; Reyes, H; Rogde, S; Sajantila, A; Treue, F; Vanezis, P; Vieira, D

    2013-04-01

    In some jurisdictions attempts have been made to limit or deny access to medical records for victims of torture seeking remedy or reparations or for individuals who have been accused of crimes based on confessions allegedly extracted under torture. The following article describes the importance of full disclosure of all medical and other health records, as well as legal documents, in any case in which an individual alleges that they have been subjected to torture or other forms of cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment of punishment. A broad definition of what must be included in the terms medical and health records is put forward, and an overview of why their full disclosure is an integral part of international standards for the investigation and documentation of torture (the Istanbul Protocol). The fact that medical records may reveal the complicity or direct participation of healthcare professionals in acts of torture and other ill-treatment is discussed. A summary of international law and medical ethics surrounding the right of access to personal information, especially health information in connection with allegations of torture is also given. Copyright © 2012 IRCT. Published by Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. 21 CFR 866.2170 - Automated colony counter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2170 Automated colony counter. (a) Identification. An automated colony counter is a mechanical device intended for medical...

  8. Mother knows best: medical record management for patients with spina bifida during the transition from pediatric to adult care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Østerlund, Carsten S; Dosa, Nienke P; Arnott Smith, Catherine

    2005-01-01

    The personal health record has potential to improve health care transition for an emerging population of pediatric patients with complex chronic conditions who survive to adulthood. In this study qualitative techniques were used to assess how young adults with spina bifida and their parents interact with their medical records. Condensation and categorization strategies for inductive research based on Grounded Theory were used to analyze 1) Who is involved in record keeping 2) How the information is stored 3) What information is kept and shared among the different constituencies and 4) When patients and parents need the information. Theme analysis revealed that mothers play a central role in the medical record management of adolescents with spina bifida. The parent-maintained home based records served as a linking pin in a heterogeneous healthcare information environment. These records tended to be organized as time-lines. Parent and patients were concerned about how best to transition their health information management from parent to adult children. Patients and parents uniformly supported the idea of having access to the medical record on-line.

  9. Closed-Loop Real-Time Imaging Enables Fully Automated Cell-Targeted Patch-Clamp Neural Recording In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suk, Ho-Jun; van Welie, Ingrid; Kodandaramaiah, Suhasa B; Allen, Brian; Forest, Craig R; Boyden, Edward S

    2017-08-30

    Targeted patch-clamp recording is a powerful method for characterizing visually identified cells in intact neural circuits, but it requires skill to perform. We previously developed an algorithm that automates "blind" patching in vivo, but full automation of visually guided, targeted in vivo patching has not been demonstrated, with currently available approaches requiring human intervention to compensate for cell movement as a patch pipette approaches a targeted neuron. Here we present a closed-loop real-time imaging strategy that automatically compensates for cell movement by tracking cell position and adjusting pipette motion while approaching a target. We demonstrate our system's ability to adaptively patch, under continuous two-photon imaging and real-time analysis, fluorophore-expressing neurons of multiple types in the living mouse cortex, without human intervention, with yields comparable to skilled human experimenters. Our "imagepatching" robot is easy to implement and will help enable scalable characterization of identified cell types in intact neural circuits. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Validation of metabolic syndrome using medical records in the SUN cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barrio-Lopez Maria

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this study was to evaluate the validity of self reported criteria of Metabolic Syndrome (MS in the SUN (Seguimiento Universidad de Navarra cohort using their medical records as the gold standard. Methods We selected 336 participants and we obtained MS related data according to Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III and International Diabetes Federation (IDF. Then we compared information on the self reported diagnosis of MS and MS diagnosed in their medical records. We calculated the proportion of confirmed MS, the proportion of confirmed non-MS and the intraclass correlation coefficients for each component of the MS. Results From those 336 selected participants, we obtained sufficient data in 172 participants to confirm or reject MS using ATP III criteria. The proportion of confirmed MS was 91.2% (95% CI: 80.7- 97.1 and the proportion of confirmed non-MS was 92.2% (95% CI: 85.7-96.4 using ATP III criteria. The proportion of confirmed MS using IDF criteria was 100% (95% CI: 87.2-100 and the proportion of confirmed non-MS was 97.1% (95% CI: 85.1-99.9. Kappa Index was 0.82 in the group diagnosed by ATP III criteria and 0.97 in the group diagnosed by IDF criteria. Intraclass correlation coefficients for the different component of MS were: 0.93 (IC 95%:0.91- 0.95 for BMI; 0.96 (IC 95%: 0.93-0.98 for waist circumference; 0.75 (IC 95%: 0.66-0.82 for fasting glucose; 0.50 (IC 95%:0.35-0.639 for HDL cholesterol; 0.78 (IC 95%: 0.70-0.84 for triglycerides; 0.49 (IC 95%:0.34-0.61 for systolic blood pressure and 0.55 (IC 95%: 0.41-0.65 for diastolic blood pressure. Conclusions Self-reported MS based on self reported components of the SM in a Spanish cohort of university graduates was sufficiently valid as to be used in epidemiological studies.

  11. Gastrointestinal disease outbreak detection using multiple data streams from electronic medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Sharon K; Huang, Jie; Abrams, Allyson M; Gilliss, Debra; Reed, Mary; Platt, Richard; Huang, Susan S; Kulldorff, Martin

    2012-05-01

    Passive reporting and laboratory testing delays may limit gastrointestinal (GI) disease outbreak detection. Healthcare systems routinely collect clinical data in electronic medical records (EMRs) that could be used for surveillance. This study's primary objective was to identify data streams from EMRs that may perform well for GI outbreak detection. Zip code-specific daily episode counts in 2009 were generated for 22 syndromic and laboratory-based data streams from Kaiser Permanente Northern California EMRs, covering 3.3 million members. Data streams included outpatient and inpatient diagnosis codes, antidiarrheal medication dispensings, stool culture orders, and positive microbiology tests for six GI pathogens. Prospective daily surveillance was mimicked using the space-time permutation scan statistic in single and multi-stream analyses, and space-time clusters were identified. Serotype relatedness was assessed for isolates in two Salmonella clusters. Potential outbreaks included a cluster of 18 stool cultures ordered over 5 days in one zip code and a Salmonella cluster in three zip codes over 9 days, in which at least five of six cases had the same rare serotype. In all, 28 potential outbreaks were identified using single stream analyses, with signals in outpatient diagnosis codes most common. Multi-stream analyses identified additional potential outbreaks and in one example, improved the timeliness of detection. GI disease-related data streams can be used to identify potential outbreaks when generated from EMRs with extensive regional coverage. This process can supplement traditional GI outbreak reports to health departments, which frequently consist of outbreaks in well-defined settings (e.g., day care centers and restaurants) with no laboratory-confirmed pathogen. Data streams most promising for surveillance included microbiology test results, stool culture orders, and outpatient diagnoses. In particular, clusters of microbiology tests positive for specific

  12. Pediatric patients on ketogenic diet undergoing general anesthesia-a medical record review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soysal, Elif; Gries, Heike; Wray, Carter

    2016-12-01

    To identify guidelines for anesthesia management and determine whether general anesthesia is safe for pediatric patients on ketogenic diet (KD). Retrospective medical record review. Postoperative recovery area. All pediatric patients who underwent general anesthesia while on KD between 2009 and 2014 were reviewed. We identified 24 patients who underwent a total of 33 procedures. All children were on KD due to intractable epilepsy. The age of patients ranged from 1 to 15 years. General anesthesia for the scheduled procedures. Patients' demographics, seizure history, type of procedure; perioperative blood chemistry, medications including the anesthesia administered, and postoperative complications. Twenty-four patients underwent a total of 33 procedures. The duration of KD treatment at the time of general anesthesia ranged from 4 days to 8 years. Among the 33 procedures, 3 patients had complications that could be attributable to KD and general anesthesia. A 9-year-old patient experienced increased seizures on postoperative day 0. An 8-year-old patient with hydropcephalus developed metabolic acidosis on postoperative day 1, and a 7-year-old patient's procedure was complicated by respiratory distress and increased seizure activity in the postanesthesia care unit. This study showed that it is relatively safe for children on KD to undergo general anesthesia. The 3 complications attributable to general anesthesia were mild, and the increased seizure frequencies in 2 patients returned back to baseline in 24 hours. Although normal saline is considered more beneficial than lactated Ringer's solution in patients on KD, normal saline should also be administered carefully because of the risk of exacerbating patients' metabolic acidosis. One should be aware of the potential change of the ketogenic status due to drugs given intraoperatively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Using Electronic Health Record Data to Measure Care Quality for Individuals with Multiple Chronic Medical Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayliss, Elizabeth A; McQuillan, Deanna B; Ellis, Jennifer L; Maciejewski, Matthew L; Zeng, Chan; Barton, Mary B; Boyd, Cynthia M; Fortin, Martin; Ling, Shari M; Tai-Seale, Ming; Ralston, James D; Ritchie, Christine S; Zulman, Donna M

    2016-09-01

    To inform the development of a data-driven measure of quality care for individuals with multiple chronic conditions (MCCs) derived from an electronic health record (EHR). Qualitative study using focus groups, interactive webinars, and a modified Delphi process. Research department within an integrated delivery system. The webinars and Delphi process included 17 experts in clinical geriatrics and primary care, health policy, quality assessment, health technology, and health system operations. The focus group included 10 individuals aged 70-87 with three to six chronic conditions selected from a random sample of individuals aged 65 and older with three or more chronic medical conditions. Through webinars and the focus group, input was solicited on constructs representing high-quality care for individuals with MCCs. A working list was created of potential measures representing these constructs. Using a modified Delphi process, experts rated the importance of each possible measure and the feasibility of implementing each measure using EHR data. High-priority constructs reflected processes rather than outcomes of care. High-priority constructs that were potentially feasible to measure included assessing physical function, depression screening, medication reconciliation, annual influenza vaccination, outreach after hospital admission, and documented advance directives. High-priority constructs that were less feasible to measure included goal setting and shared decision-making, identifying drug-drug interactions, assessing social support, timely communication with patients, and other aspects of good customer service. Lower-priority domains included pain assessment, continuity of care, and overuse of screening or laboratory testing. High-quality MCC care should be measured using meaningful process measures rather than outcomes. Although some care processes are currently extractable from electronic data, capturing others will require adapting and applying technology to

  14. A Strategy for Reusing the Data of Electronic Medical Record Systems for Clinical Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Yasushi; Hattori, Atsushi; Manabe, Shiro; Tsuda, Tsutomu; Takeda, Toshihiro; Okada, Katsuki; Murata, Taizo; Mihara, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    There is a great need to reuse data stored in electronic medical records (EMR) databases for clinical research. We previously reported the development of a system in which progress notes and case report forms (CRFs) were simultaneously recorded using a template in the EMR in order to exclude redundant data entry. To make the data collection process more efficient, we are developing a system in which the data originally stored in the EMR database can be populated within a frame in a template. We developed interface plugin modules that retrieve data from the databases of other EMR applications. A universal keyword written in a template master is converted to a local code using a data conversion table, then the objective data is retrieved from the corresponding database. The template element data, which are entered by a template, are stored in the template element database. To retrieve the data entered by other templates, the objective data is designated by the template element code with the template code, or by the concept code if it is written for the element. When the application systems in the EMR generate documents, they also generate a PDF file and a corresponding document profile XML, which includes important data, and send them to the document archive server and the data sharing saver, respectively. In the data sharing server, the data are represented by an item with an item code with a document class code and its value. By linking a concept code to an item identifier, an objective data can be retrieved by designating a concept code. We employed a flexible strategy in which a unique identifier for a hospital is initially attached to all of the data that the hospital generates. The identifier is secondarily linked with concept codes. The data that are not linked with a concept code can also be retrieved using the unique identifier of the hospital. This strategy makes it possible to reuse any of a hospital's data.

  15. Comparison of the prevalence and characteristics of inpatient adverse events using medical records review and incident reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macharia, W M; Muteshi, C M; Wanyonyi, S Z; Mukaindo, A M; Ismail, A; Ekea, H; Abdallah, A; Tole, J M; Ngugi, A K

    2016-09-08

    Information on adverse events (AEs) in hospitalised patients in developing countries is scanty. To compare the magnitude and characteristics of inpatient AEs in a tertiary, not-for-profit healthcare facility in Kenya, using medical records review and incident reporting. Estimation of prevalence was done using incidents reported in 2010 from a random sample of medical records for hospital admissions. Nurse reviewers used 18 screening criteria, followed by physician reviewers to confirm occurrence. An AE was defined as an unexpected clinical event (UE) associated with death, disability or prolonged hospitalisation not explained by the disease condition. The kappa statistic was used to estimate inter-rater agreement, and analysis was done using logistic regression. The study identified 53 UEs from 2 000 randomly selected medical records and 33 reported UEs from 23 026 admissions in the index year. The prevalences of AEs from medical records review and incident reports were 1.4% (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.9 - 2.0) and 0.03% (95% CI 0.012 - 0.063), respectively. Compared with incident reporting, review of medical records identified more disability (13.2% v. 0%; p=0.03) and prolonged hospital stays (43.4% v. 18.2%; p=0.02). Review of medical records is preferable to incident reporting in determining the prevalence of AEs in health facilities with limited inpatient quality improvement experience. Further research is needed to determine whether staff education and a positive culture change through promotion of non-punitive UE reporting or a combination of approaches would improve the comprehensiveness of AE reporting.

  16. 75 FR 34754 - Privacy Act; Notification of a New Privacy Act System of Records, Title Eight Automated Paperless...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-18

    ... address, telephone number, race, ethnicity, gender type, income and financial data. Medical and health... MAINTAINED IN THE SYSTEM, INCLUDING CATEGORIES OF USERS AND THE PURPOSES OF SUCH USES: FHEO uses TEAPOTS to... data is stored on the production TEAPOTS server, and the reporting server. The data is backed up every...

  17. Microcomputer-based system for 24-hour recording of oesophageal motility and pH profile with automated analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breedijk, M.; Smout, A. J.; van der Zouw, C.; Verwey, H.; Akkermans, L. M.

    1989-01-01

    A system developed for long-term simultaneous recording of oesophageal motility and pH in the ambulant patient is described. The system consists of a microprocessor based data-acquisition and preprocessing device, a personal computer for postprocessing, report generation and data storage, a

  18. Adding Live-Streaming to Recorded Lectures in a Non-Distributed Pre-Clerkship Medical Education Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, Amanjot; Fliker, Aviva; Leitao, Darren; Jones, Jodi; Gooi, Adrian

    2017-01-01

    Live-streaming video has had increasing uses in medical education, especially in distributed education models. The literature on the impact of live-streaming in non-distributed education models, however, is scarce. To determine the attitudes towards live-streaming and recorded lectures as a resource to pre-clerkship medical students in a non-distributed medical education model. First and second year medical students were sent a voluntary cross-sectional survey by email, and were asked questions on live-streaming, recorded lectures and in person lectures using a 5-point Likert and open answers. Of the 118 responses (54% response rate), the data suggested that both watching recorded lectures (Likert 4.55) and live-streaming lectures (4.09) were perceived to be more educationally valuable than face-to-face attendance of lectures (3.60). While responses indicated a statistically significant increase in anticipated classroom attendance if both live-streaming and recorded lectures were removed (from 63% attendance to 76%, p =0.002), there was no significant difference in attendance if live-streaming lectures were removed but recorded lectures were maintained (from 63% to 66%, p=0.76). The addition of live-streaming lectures in the pre-clerkship setting was perceived to be value added to the students. The data also suggests that the removal of live-streaming lectures would not lead to a statistically significant increase in classroom attendance by pre-clerkship students.

  19. Epidemic surveillance using an electronic medical record: an empiric approach to performance improvement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongzhang Zheng

    Full Text Available Electronic medical records (EMR form a rich repository of information that could benefit public health. We asked how structured and free-text narrative EMR data should be combined to improve epidemic surveillance for acute respiratory infections (ARI.Eight previously characterized ARI case detection algorithms (CDA were applied to historical EMR entries to create authentic time series of daily ARI case counts (background. An epidemic model simulated influenza cases (injection. From the time of the injection, cluster-detection statistics were applied daily on paired background+injection (combined and background-only time series. This cycle was then repeated with the injection shifted to each week of the evaluation year. We computed: a the time from injection to the first statistical alarm uniquely found in the combined dataset (Detection Delay; b how often alarms originated in the background-only dataset (false-alarm rate, or FAR; and c the number of cases found within these false alarms (Caseload. For each CDA, we plotted the Detection Delay as a function of FAR or Caseload, over a broad range of alarm thresholds.CDAs that combined text analyses seeking ARI symptoms in clinical notes with provider-assigned diagnostic codes in order to maximize the precision rather than the sensitivity of case-detection lowered Detection Delay at any given FAR or Caseload.An empiric approach can guide the integration of EMR data into case-detection methods that improve both the timeliness and efficiency of epidemic detection.

  20. The medical ethics of Dr J Marion Sims: a fresh look at the historical record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, L L

    2006-06-01

    Vesicovaginal fistula was a catastrophic complication of childbirth among 19th century American women. The first consistently successful operation for this condition was developed by Dr J Marion Sims, an Alabama surgeon who carried out a series of experimental operations on black slave women between 1845 and 1849. Numerous modern authors have attacked Sims's medical ethics, arguing that he manipulated the institution of slavery to perform ethically unacceptable human experiments on powerless, unconsenting women. This article reviews these allegations using primary historical source material and concludes that the charges that have been made against Sims are largely without merit. Sims's modern critics have discounted the enormous suffering experienced by fistula victims, have ignored the controversies that surrounded the introduction of anaesthesia into surgical practice in the middle of the 19th century, and have consistently misrepresented the historical record in their attacks on Sims. Although enslaved African American women certainly represented a "vulnerable population" in the 19th century American South, the evidence suggests that Sims's original patients were willing participants in his surgical attempts to cure their affliction-a condition for which no other viable therapy existed at that time.

  1. Factors affecting electronic medical record system adoption in small korean hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young-Taek; Lee, Jinhyung

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate the factors affecting adoption of an Electronic Medical Record (EMR) system in small Korean hospitals. This study used survey data on adoption of EMR systems; data included that from various hospital organizational structures. The survey was conducted from April 10 to August 3, 2009. The response rate was 33.5% and the total number of small general hospitals was 144. Data were analyzed using the generalized estimating equation method to adjust for environmental clustering effects. The adoption rate of EMR systems was 40.2% for all responding small hospitals. The study results indicate that IT infrastructure (OR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.23 to 1.80) and organic hospital structure (OR, 1.86; 95% CI, 1.07 to 3.23) rather than mechanistic hospital structure or the number of hospitals within a county (OR, 1.08; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.17) were critical factors for EMR adoption after controlling for various hospital covariates. This study found that several managerial features of hospitals and one environmental factor were related to the adoption of EMR systems in small Korean hospitals. Considering that health information technology produces many positive health outcomes and that an 'adoption gap' regarding information technology exists in small clinical settings, healthcare policy makers should understand which organizational and environmental factors affect adoption of EMR systems and take action to financially support small hospitals during this transition.

  2. Overview of laboratory data tools available in a single electronic medical record

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil R Kudler

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Laboratory data account for the bulk of data stored in any given electronic medical record (EMR. To best serve the user, electronic laboratory data needs to be flexible and customizable. Our aim was to determine the various ways in which laboratory data get utilized by clinicians in our health system′s EMR. Method: All electronic menus, tabs, flowsheets, notes and subsections within the EMR (Millennium v2007.13, Cerner Corporation, Kansas City, MO, US were explored to determine how clinicians utilize discrete laboratory data. Results: Laboratory data in the EMR were utilized by clinicians in five distinct ways: within flowsheets, their personal inbox (EMR messaging, with decision support tools, in the health maintenance tool, and when incorporating laboratory data into their clinical notes and letters. Conclusions : Flexible electronic laboratory data in the EMR hava many advantages. Users can view, sort, pool, and appropriately route laboratory information to better support trend analyses, clinical decision making, and clinical charting. Laboratory data in the EMR can also be utilized to develop clinical decision support tools. Pathologists need to participate in the creation of these EMR tools in order to better support the appropriate utilization of laboratory information in the EMR.

  3. Using clinician text notes in electronic medical record data to validate transgender-related diagnosis codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blosnich, John R; Cashy, John; Gordon, Adam J; Shipherd, Jillian C; Kauth, Michael R; Brown, George R; Fine, Michael J

    2018-04-04

    Transgender individuals are vulnerable to negative health risks and outcomes, but research remains limited because data sources, such as electronic medical records (EMRs), lack standardized collection of gender identity information. Most EMR do not include the gold standard of self-identified gender identity, but International Classification of Diseases (ICDs) includes diagnostic codes indicating transgender-related clinical services. However, it is unclear if these codes can indicate transgender status. The objective of this study was to determine the extent to which patients' clinician notes in EMR contained transgender-related terms that could corroborate ICD-coded transgender identity. Data are from the US Department of Veterans Affairs Corporate Data Warehouse. Transgender patients were defined by the presence of ICD9 and ICD10 codes associated with transgender-related clinical services, and a 3:1 comparison group of nontransgender patients was drawn. Patients' clinician text notes were extracted and searched for transgender-related words and phrases. Among 7560 patients defined as transgender based on ICD codes, the search algorithm identified 6753 (89.3%) with transgender-related terms. Among 22 072 patients defined as nontransgender without ICD codes, 246 (1.1%) had transgender-related terms; after review, 11 patients were identified as transgender, suggesting a 0.05% false negative rate. Using ICD-defined transgender status can facilitate health services research when self-identified gender identity data are not available in EMR.

  4. The differing privacy concerns regarding exchanging electronic medical records of internet users in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hsin-Ginn; Han, Hwai-En; Kuo, Kuang-Ming; Liu, Chung-Feng

    2012-12-01

    This study explores whether Internet users have different privacy concerns regarding the information contained in electronic medical records (EMRs) according to gender, age, occupation, education, and EMR awareness. Based on the Concern for Information Privacy (CFIP) scale developed by Smith and colleagues in 1996, we conducted an online survey using 15 items in four dimensions, namely, collection, unauthorized access, secondary use, and errors, to investigate Internet users' concerns regarding the privacy of EMRs under health information exchanges (HIE). We retrieved 213 valid questionnaires. The results indicate that the respondents had substantial privacy concerns regarding EMRs and their educational level and EMR awareness significantly influenced their privacy concerns regarding unauthorized access and secondary use of EMRs. This study recommends that the Taiwanese government organizes a comprehensive EMR awareness campaign, emphasizing unauthorized access and secondary use of EMRs. Additionally, to cultivate the public's understanding of EMRs, the government should employ various media, especially Internet channels, to promote EMR awareness, thereby enabling the public to accept the concept and use of EMRs. People who are highly educated and have superior EMR awareness should be given a comprehensive explanation of how hospitals protect patients' EMRs from unauthorized access and secondary use to address their concerns. Thus, the public can comprehend, trust, and accept the use of EMRs, reducing their privacy concerns, which should facilitate the future implementation of HIE.

  5. Electronic medical records in a sub-specialty practice: one asthma center's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolomeo, Concettina; Shiffman, Richard; Bazzy-Asaad, Alia

    2008-11-01

    There are numerous known benefits associated with the use of an electronic medical record (EMR). In October of 2004, a pediatric respiratory medicine practice at a major academic institution began the process of implementing an EMR system. Through this process, another benefit was realized, improved coordination between out-patient and in-patient care in relation to asthma education. The process began with the formation of an implementation team. The team consisted of technical as well as clinical experts from various disciplines. Together the team developed templates, decision support tools and standardized patient care letters. The team also determined workflow and provided training on the EMR system. A major benefit associated with EMR implementation was the increase in the number of children who were hospitalized with an asthma exacerbation and received an asthma action plan upon discharge. Prior to the EMR system, 4% received an asthma action plan upon discharge. After implementation of the EMR system, 58% received an asthma action plan upon discharge.

  6. Knowledge retrieval from PubMed abstracts and electronic medical records with the Multiple Sclerosis Ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Ashutosh; Gündel, Michaela; Rajput, Abdul Mateen; Mevissen, Heinz-Theodor; Saiz, Albert; Pastor, Xavier; Lozano-Rubi, Raimundo; Martinez-Lapiscina, Elena H; Martinez-Lapsicina, Elena H; Zubizarreta, Irati; Mueller, Bernd; Kotelnikova, Ekaterina; Toldo, Luca; Hofmann-Apitius, Martin; Villoslada, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    In order to retrieve useful information from scientific literature and electronic medical records (EMR) we developed an ontology specific for Multiple Sclerosis (MS). The MS Ontology was created using scientific literature and expert review under the Protégé OWL environment. We developed a dictionary with semantic synonyms and translations to different languages for mining EMR. The MS Ontology was integrated with other ontologies and dictionaries (diseases/comorbidities, gene/protein, pathways, drug) into the text-mining tool SCAIView. We analyzed the EMRs from 624 patients with MS using the MS ontology dictionary in order to identify drug usage and comorbidities in MS. Testing competency questions and functional evaluation using F statistics further validated the usefulness of MS ontology. Validation of the lexicalized ontology by means of named entity recognition-based methods showed an adequate performance (F score = 0.73). The MS Ontology retrieved 80% of the genes associated with MS from scientific abstracts and identified additional pathways targeted by approved disease-modifying drugs (e.g. apoptosis pathways associated with mitoxantrone, rituximab and fingolimod). The analysis of the EMR from patients with MS identified current usage of disease modifying drugs and symptomatic therapy as well as comorbidities, which are in agreement with recent reports. The MS Ontology provides a semantic framework that is able to automatically extract information from both scientific literature and EMR from patients with MS, revealing new pathogenesis insights as well as new clinical information.

  7. Electronic medical record systems in critical access hospitals: leadership perspectives on anticipated and realized benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Troy R; Vavroch, Jared; Bahensky, James A; Ward, Marcia M

    2010-04-01

    The growth of electronic medical records (EMRs) is driven by the belief that EMRs will significantly improve healthcare providers' performance and reduce healthcare costs. Evidence supporting these beliefs is limited, especially for small rural hospitals. A survey that focused on health information technology (HIT) capacity was administered to all hospitals in Iowa. Structured interviews were conducted with the leadership at 15 critical access hospitals (CAHs) that had implemented EMRs in order to assess the perceived benefits of operational EMRs. The results indicate that most of the hospitals implemented EMRs to improve efficiency, timely access, and quality. Many CAH leaders also viewed EMR implementation as a necessary business strategy to remain viable and improve financial performance. While some reasons reflect external influences, such as perceived future federal mandates, other reasons suggest that the decision was driven by internal forces, including the hospital's culture and the desires of key leaders to embrace HIT. Anticipated benefits were consistent with goals; however, realized benefits were rarely obvious in terms of quantifiable results. These findings expand the limited research on the rationale for implementing EMRs in critical access hospitals.

  8. Knowledge retrieval from PubMed abstracts and electronic medical records with the Multiple Sclerosis Ontology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashutosh Malhotra

    Full Text Available In order to retrieve useful information from scientific literature and electronic medical records (EMR we developed an ontology specific for Multiple Sclerosis (MS.The MS Ontology was created using scientific literature and expert review under the Protégé OWL environment. We developed a dictionary with semantic synonyms and translations to different languages for mining EMR. The MS Ontology was integrated with other ontologies and dictionaries (diseases/comorbidities, gene/protein, pathways, drug into the text-mining tool SCAIView. We analyzed the EMRs from 624 patients with MS using the MS ontology dictionary in order to identify drug usage and comorbidities in MS. Testing competency questions and functional evaluation using F statistics further validated the usefulness of MS ontology.Validation of the lexicalized ontology by means of named entity recognition-based methods showed an adequate performance (F score = 0.73. The MS Ontology retrieved 80% of the genes associated with MS from scientific abstracts and identified additional pathways targeted by approved disease-modifying drugs (e.g. apoptosis pathways associated with mitoxantrone, rituximab and fingolimod. The analysis of the EMR from patients with MS identified current usage of disease modifying drugs and symptomatic therapy as well as comorbidities, which are in agreement with recent reports.The MS Ontology provides a semantic framework that is able to automatically extract information from both scientific literature and EMR from patients with MS, revealing new pathogenesis insights as well as new clinical information.

  9. Population prevalence and control of cardiovascular risk factors: what electronic medical records tell us.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalán-Ramos, Arantxa; Verdú, Jose M; Grau, María; Iglesias-Rodal, Manuel; del Val García, José L; Consola, Alicia; Comin, Eva

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the prevalence, control, and management of hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2). Cross-sectional analysis of all individuals attended in the Catalan primary care centers between 2006 and 2009. History of cardiovascular diseases, diagnosis and treatment of hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, DM2, lipid profile, glycemia and blood pressure data were extracted from electronic medical records. Age-standardized prevalence and levels of management and control were estimated. Individuals aged 35-74 years using primary care databases. A total of 2,174,515 individuals were included (mean age 52 years [SD 11], 47% men). Hypertension was the most prevalent cardiovascular risk factor (39% in women, 41% in men) followed by hypercholesterolemia (38% and 40%) and DM2 (12% and 16%), respectively. Diuretics and angiotensin-converting enzyme in