WorldWideScience

Sample records for automated mass action

  1. Automated mass maintenance of a software portfolio

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veerman, N.P.

    2006-01-01

    This is an experience report on automated mass maintenance of a large Cobol software portfolio. A company in the financial services and insurance industry upgraded their database system to a new version, affecting their entire software portfolio. The database system was accessed by the portfolio of

  2. Impact of automation on mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan Victoria; Rockwood, Alan

    2015-10-23

    Mass spectrometry coupled to liquid chromatography (LC-MS and LC-MS/MS) is an analytical technique that has rapidly grown in popularity in clinical practice. In contrast to traditional technology, mass spectrometry is superior in many respects including resolution, specificity, multiplex capability and has the ability to measure analytes in various matrices. Despite these advantages, LC-MS/MS remains high cost, labor intensive and has limited throughput. This specialized technology requires highly trained personnel and therefore has largely been limited to large institutions, academic organizations and reference laboratories. Advances in automation will be paramount to break through this bottleneck and increase its appeal for routine use. This article reviews these challenges, shares perspectives on essential features for LC-MS/MS total automation and proposes a step-wise and incremental approach to achieve total automation through reducing human intervention, increasing throughput and eventually integrating the LC-MS/MS system into the automated clinical laboratory operations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Mass Action and Conservation of Current

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eisenberg Robert S.

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The law of mass action does not force a series of chemical reactions to have the same current flow everywhere. Interruption of far-away current does not stop current everywhere in a series of chemical reactions (analyzed according to the law of mass action, and so does not obey Maxwell’s equations. An additional constraint and equation is needed to enforce global continuity of current. The additional constraint is introduced in this paper in the special case that the chemical reaction describes spatial movement through narrow channels. In that case, a fully consistent treatment is possible using different models of charge movement. The general case must be dealt with by variational methods that enforce consistency of all the physical laws involved. Violations of current continuity arise away from equilibrium, when current flows, and the law of mass action is applied to a non-equilibrium situation, different from the systems considered when the law was originally derived. Device design in the chemical world is difficult because simple laws are not obeyed in that way. Rate constants of the law of mass action are found experimentally to change from one set of conditions to another. The law of mass action is not robust in most cases and cannot serve the same role that circuit models do in our electrical technology. Robust models and device designs in the chemical world will not be possible until continuity of current is embedded in a generalization of the law of mass action using a consistent variational model of energy and dissipation.

  4. Hardware of automation systems of isotope mass spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manojlov, V.V.; Meleshkin, A.S.; Novikov, L.V.; Kornil'ev, S.O.; Voronin, B.M.

    1997-01-01

    The modernized hardware of isotope mass spectrometers is described. The modern control systems for the mass spectrometers are fulfilled on the basis of IBM/PC AT. Versions of subsystems mass spectrometer control through a standard bus and through a digital-to-analog converter are considered. The characteristics of an electrometric amplifier and interface cards developed for modernized automation systems of the isotope mass spectrometers are presented

  5. The mass action equation in pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenakin, Terry

    2016-01-01

    The mass action equation is the building block from which all models of drug-receptor interaction are built. In the simplest case, the equation predicts a sigmoidal relationship between the amount of drug-receptor complex and the logarithm of the concentration of drug. The form of this function is also the same as most dose-response relationships in pharmacology (such as enzyme inhibition and the protein binding of drugs) but the potency term in dose-response relationships very often differs in meaning from the similar term in the simple mass action relationship. This is because (i) most pharmacological systems are collections of mass action reactions in series and/or in parallel and (ii) the important assumptions in the mass action reaction are violated in complex pharmacological systems. In some systems, the affinity of the receptor R for some ligand A is modified by interaction of the receptor with the allosteric ligand B and concomitantly the affinity of the receptor for ligand B is modified to the same degree. When this occurs, the observed affinity of the ligand A for the receptor will depend on both the concentration of the co-binding allosteric ligand and its nature. The relationships between drug potency in pharmacological models and the equilibrium dissociation constants defined in single mass action reactions are discussed. More detailed knowledge of efficacy has led to new models of drug action that depend on the relative probabilities of different states, and these have taken knowledge of drug-receptor interactions beyond Guldberg and Waage. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  6. Automated mass spectrum generation for new physics

    CERN Document Server

    Alloul, Adam; De Causmaecker, Karen; Fuks, Benjamin; Rausch de Traubenberg, Michel

    2013-01-01

    We describe an extension of the FeynRules package dedicated to the automatic generation of the mass spectrum associated with any Lagrangian-based quantum field theory. After introducing a simplified way to implement particle mixings, we present a new class of FeynRules functions allowing both for the analytical computation of all the model mass matrices and for the generation of a C++ package, dubbed ASperGe. This program can then be further employed for a numerical evaluation of the rotation matrices necessary to diagonalize the field basis. We illustrate these features in the context of the Two-Higgs-Doublet Model, the Minimal Left-Right Symmetric Standard Model and the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model.

  7. HAMMER: automated operation of mass frontier to construct in silico mass spectral fragmentation libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jiarui; Weber, Ralf J M; Allwood, J William; Mistrik, Robert; Zhu, Zexuan; Ji, Zhen; Chen, Siping; Dunn, Warwick B; He, Shan; Viant, Mark R

    2014-02-15

    Experimental MS(n) mass spectral libraries currently do not adequately cover chemical space. This limits the robust annotation of metabolites in metabolomics studies of complex biological samples. In silico fragmentation libraries would improve the identification of compounds from experimental multistage fragmentation data when experimental reference data are unavailable. Here, we present a freely available software package to automatically control Mass Frontier software to construct in silico mass spectral libraries and to perform spectral matching. Based on two case studies, we have demonstrated that high-throughput automation of Mass Frontier allows researchers to generate in silico mass spectral libraries in an automated and high-throughput fashion with little or no human intervention required. Documentation, examples, results and source code are available at http://www.biosciences-labs.bham.ac.uk/viant/hammer/.

  8. Automated data processing of high-resolution mass spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Adsetts Edberg; Smedsgaard, Jørn

    infusion of crude extracts into the source taking advantage of the high sensitivity, high mass resolution and accuracy and the limited fragmentation. Unfortunately, there has not been a comparable development in the data processing techniques to fully exploit gain in high resolution and accuracy...... infusion analyses of crude extract to find the relationship between species from several species terverticillate Penicillium, and also that the ions responsible for the segregation can be identified. Furthermore the process can automate the process of detecting unique species and unique metabolites....

  9. Automated Determination of a Package's Center of Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayaz Hemani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to address the issue of increased efficiency and better planning for parcel shipments, an automated computer program was developed in Microsoft Excel that calculates center of mass and moments of mass with greater speed and reliability than currently implemented systems. This simple program requires only a variable density function and limits of integration for a given object as input within the spreadsheet system. Once the required input has been provided, a series of chain calculations, with the help of a Visual Basic for Applications (VBA script, is able to process the input, which is done through integration and a Riemann sum. Furthermore, the foundation of the program can also be used for calculating other physical quantities of interest such as the moment of inertia or surface area of an object.

  10. The development of a completely automated oxygen isotope mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahern, T.K.

    1980-01-01

    A completely automated mass spectrometer system has been developed to measure the oxygen isotope ratio of carbon dioxide samples. The system has an accuracy of 0.03 percent, and is capable of analyzing more than 100 samples a day. The system uses an Interdata minicomputer as the primary controller. The intelligence of the system is contained within hardware circuits, software within the minicomputer, and firmware written for a Motorola 6802 microprocessor. A microprocessor-based inlet system controller maximizes the throughput of carbon dioxide samples within the inlet system. The inlet system normally contains four different aliquots of carbon dioxide and introduces these samples to the mass spectrometer through a single admittance leak. The system has been used in the analysis of 111 samples of ice taken from the Steele glacier

  11. Automated spike preparation system for Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry (IDMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maxwell, S.L. III; Clark, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry (IDMS) is a method frequently employed to measure dissolved, irradiated nuclear materials. A known quantity of a unique isotope of the element to be measured (referred to as the ''spike'') is added to the solution containing the analyte. The resulting solution is chemically purified then analyzed by mass spectrometry. By measuring the magnitude of the response for each isotope and the response for the ''unique spike'' then relating this to the known quantity of the ''spike'', the quantity of the nuclear material can be determined. An automated spike preparation system was developed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to dispense spikes for use in IDMS analytical methods. Prior to this development, technicians weighed each individual spike manually to achieve the accuracy required. This procedure was time-consuming and subjected the master stock solution to evaporation. The new system employs a high precision SMI Model 300 Unipump dispenser interfaced with an electronic balance and a portable Epson HX-20 notebook computer to automate spike preparation

  12. Automating ActionScript Projects with Eclipse and Ant

    CERN Document Server

    Koning, Sidney

    2011-01-01

    Automating repetitive programming tasks is easier than many Flash/AS3 developers think. With the Ant build tool, the Eclipse IDE, and this concise guide, you can set up your own "ultimate development machine" to code, compile, debug, and deploy projects faster. You'll also get started with versioning systems, such as Subversion and Git. Create a consistent workflow for multiple machines, or even complete departments, with the help of extensive Ant code samples. If you want to work smarter and take your skills to a new level, this book will get you on the road to automation-with Ant. Set up y

  13. Hypervascular mediastinal masses: Action points for radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabral, Fernanda C.; Trotman-Dickenson, Beatrice; Madan, Rachna

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: •An algorithm combining clinical data and radiology features of hypervascular mediastinal masses is proposed to determine further evaluation and subsequently guide treatment. •Characteristic features and known association with syndromes and genetic mutations assists in achieving a diagnosis. •MRI and functional imaging can be very helpful in the evaluation of hypervascular mediastinal masses. •Identification of hypervascularity within mediastinal masses should alert the radiologist and clinician and an attempt should be made to preferably avoid percutaneous CT guided biopsies and attempt tissue sampling surgically with better control of post procedure hemorrhage. -- Abstract: Hypervascular mediastinal masses are a distinct group of rare diseases that include a subset of benign and malignant entities. Characteristic features and known association with syndromes and genetic mutations assist in achieving a diagnosis. Imaging allows an understanding of the vascularity of the lesion and should alert the radiologist and clinician to potential hemorrhagic complications and avoid percutaneous CT guided biopsies. In such cases, pre-procedure embolization and surgical biopsy maybe considered for better control of post procedure hemorrhage. The purpose of this article is to describe and illustrate the clinical features and radiologic spectrum of hypervascular mediastinal masses, and discuss the associated clinical and genetic syndromes. We will present an imaging algorithm to determine further evaluation and subsequently guide treatment

  14. Automated Reasoning over Deontic Action Logics with Finite Vocabularies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo F. Castro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we investigate further the tableaux system for a deontic action logic we presented in previous work. This tableaux system uses atoms (of a given boolean algebra of action terms as labels of formulae, this allows us to embrace parallel execution of actions and action complement, two action operators that may present difficulties in their treatment. One of the restrictions of this logic is that it uses vocabularies with a finite number of actions. In this article we prove that this restriction does not affect the coherence of the deduction system; in other words, we prove that the system is complete with respect to language extension. We also study the computational complexity of this extended deductive framework and we prove that the complexity of this system is in PSPACE, which is an improvement with respect to related systems.

  15. Joint driver-automation system design: Gradual action-oriented ambient stimuli

    OpenAIRE

    Kelsch, Johann; Dziennus, Marc

    2015-01-01

    At DLR we are researching toward concepts and HMI prototypes for joint driver-automation system design. One of the design ideas we are evaluating is to integrate feedback from certain amount of assistance and automation functions under the roof of ambient stimuli. As theoretical background we are using Lewin’s field theory with the ideas of gradual and directional valences and the congruency of internal and external factors (affordances [Gibson]) in motivational process as action determinant....

  16. Automated mass correction and data interpretation for protein open-access liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Craig D; Hall, John T; White, Wendy L; Miller, Luke A D; Williams, Jon D

    2007-02-01

    Characterization of recombinant protein purification fractions and final products by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS) are requested more frequently each year. A protein open-access (OA) LC/MS system was developed in our laboratory to meet this demand. This paper compares the system that we originally implemented in our facilities in 2003 to the one now in use, and discusses, in more detail, recent enhancements that have improved its robustness, reliability, and data reporting capabilities. The system utilizes instruments equipped with reversed-phase chromatography and an orthogonal accelerated time-of-flight mass spectrometer fitted with an electrospray source. Sample analysis requests are accomplished using a simple form on a web-enabled laboratory information management system (LIMS). This distributed form is accessible from any intranet-connected company desktop computer. Automated data acquisition and processing are performed using a combination of in-house (OA-Self Service, OA-Monitor, and OA-Analysis Engine) and vendor-supplied programs (AutoLynx, and OpenLynx) located on acquisition computers and off-line processing workstations. Analysis results are then reported via the same web-based LIMS. Also presented are solutions to problems not addressed on commercially available, small-molecule OA-LC/MS systems. These include automated transforming of mass-to-charge (m/z) spectra to mass spectra and automated data interpretation that considers minor variants to the protein sequence-such as common post-translational modifications (PTMs). Currently, our protein OA-LC/MS platform runs on five LC/MS instruments located in three separate GlaxoSmithKline R&D sites in the US and UK. To date, more than 8000 protein OA-LC/MS samples have been analyzed. With these user friendly and highly automated OA systems in place, mass spectrometry plays a key role in assessing the quality of recombinant proteins, either produced at our facilities or bought from external

  17. Automating the Detection of Reflection-on-Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saucerman, Jenny; Ruis, A. R.; Shaffer, David Williamson

    2017-01-01

    Learning to solve "complex problems"--problems whose solutions require the application of more than basic facts and skills--is critical to meaningful participation in the economic, social, and cultural life of the digital age. In this paper, we use a theoretical understanding of how professionals use reflection-in-action to solve complex…

  18. UV photodissociation action spectroscopy of haloanilinium ions in a linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Christopher S; Kirk, Benjamin B; Blanksby, Stephen J; O'Hair, Richard A J; Trevitt, Adam J

    2013-06-01

    UV-vis photodissociation action spectroscopy is becoming increasingly prevalent because of advances in, and commercial availability of, ion trapping technologies and tunable laser sources. This study outlines in detail an instrumental arrangement, combining a commercial ion-trap mass spectrometer and tunable nanosecond pulsed laser source, for performing fully automated photodissociation action spectroscopy on gas-phase ions. The components of the instrumentation are outlined, including the optical and electronic interfacing, in addition to the control software for automating the experiment and performing online analysis of the spectra. To demonstrate the utility of this ensemble, the photodissociation action spectra of 4-chloroanilinium, 4-bromoanilinium, and 4-iodoanilinium cations are presented and discussed. Multiple photoproducts are detected in each case and the photoproduct yields are followed as a function of laser wavelength. It is shown that the wavelength-dependent partitioning of the halide loss, H loss, and NH3 loss channels can be broadly rationalized in terms of the relative carbon-halide bond dissociation energies and processes of energy redistribution. The photodissociation action spectrum of (phenyl)Ag2 (+) is compared with a literature spectrum as a further benchmark.

  19. Open complex-balanced mass action chemical reaction networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rao, Shodhan; van der Schaft, Arjan; Jayawardhana, Bayu

    We consider open chemical reaction networks, i.e. ones with inflows and outflows. We assume that all the inflows to the network are constant and all outflows obey the mass action kinetics rate law. We define a complex-balanced open reaction network as one that admits a complex-balanced steady state.

  20. Automated de novo metabolite identification with mass spectrometry and cheminformatics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peironcely Miguel, Julio Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis new algorithms and methods that enable the de novo identification of metabolites have been developed. The aim was to find methods to propose candidate structures for unknown metabolites using MSn data as starting point. These methods have been integrated into a semi-automated pipeline

  1. Balance between automation and human actions in nuclear power plant operation. Results of international cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, B.; Olmstead, R.; Oudiz, A.; Jenkinson, J.; Kossilov, A.

    1990-01-01

    Automation has long been an established feature of power plants. In some applications, the use of automation has been the significant factor which has enabled plant technology to progress to its current state. Societal demands for increased levels of safety have led to greater use of redundancy and diversity and this, in turn, has increased levels of automation. However, possibly the greatest contributory factor in increased automation has resulted from improvements in information technology. Much recent attention has been focused on the concept of inherently safe reactors, which may simplify safety system requirements and information and control system complexity. The allocation of tasks between man and machine may be one of the most critical activity in the design of new nuclear plants and major retro-fits and it therefore warrants a design approach which is commensurate in quality with the high levels of safety and production performance sought from nuclear plants. Facing this climate, in 1989 the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) formed an advisory group from member countries with extensive experience in nuclear power plant automation. The task of this group was to advise on the appropriate balance between manual and automatic actions in plant operation

  2. Balance between automation and human actions in nuclear power plant operation. Results of international cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, B.; Olmstead, R.; Oudiz, A.; Jenkinson, J.; Kossilov, A.

    1990-01-01

    Automation has long been an established feature of power plants. In some applications, the use of automation has been the significant factor which has enabled plant technology to progress to its current state. Societal demands for increased levels of safety have led to greater use of redundancy and diversity and this, in turn, has increased levels of automation. However, possibly the greatest contributory factor in increased automation has resulted from improvements in information technology. Much recent attention has been focused on the concept of inherently safe reactors, which may simplify safety system requirements and information and control system complexity. The allocation of tasks between man and machine may be one of the most critical activity in the design of new nuclear plants and major retro-fits and it therefore warrants a design approach which is commensurate in quality with the high levels of safety and production performance sought from nuclear plants. Facing this climate, in 1989 the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) formed an advisory group from member countries with extensive experience in nuclear power plant automation. The task of this group was to advise on the appropriate balance between manual and automatic actions in plant operation. (author) [fr

  3. The mass-action-law theory of micellization revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusanov, Anatoly I

    2014-12-09

    Among numerous definitions of the critical micelle concentration (CMC), there is one related to the constant K of the mass action law as CMC = K(1-n) (n is the aggregation number). In this paper, the generalization of this definition for multicomponent micelles and the development of the mass-action-law theory of micellization based on this definition and the analysis of a multiple-equilibrium polydisperse micellar system have been presented. This variant of the theory of micellization looks more consistent than the earlier one. In addition, two thermodynamic findings are reported: the stability conditions for micellar systems and the dependence of aggregation numbers on the surfactant concentrations. The growth of the monomer concentration with the total surfactant concentration is shown to be a thermodynamic rule only in the case of a single sort of aggregative particles or at adding a single surfactant to a mixture. The stability condition takes more complex form when adding a mixture of aggregative particles. For the aggregation number of a micelle, it has been deduced a thermodynamic rule obeying it to increase with the total surfactant concentration. However, if the monomer concentration increases slowly, the aggregation number increases much more slowly and the more slowly the more pronounced is a maximum corresponding to a micelle on the distribution hypersurface (curve in the one-component case). This forms grounding for the quasi-chemical approximation in the mass-action-law theory (the constancy of aggregation numbers).

  4. ActionMap: A web-based software that automates loci assignments to framework maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albini, Guillaume; Falque, Matthieu; Joets, Johann

    2003-07-01

    Genetic linkage computation may be a repetitive and time consuming task, especially when numerous loci are assigned to a framework map. We thus developed ActionMap, a web-based software that automates genetic mapping on a fixed framework map without adding the new markers to the map. Using this tool, hundreds of loci may be automatically assigned to the framework in a single process. ActionMap was initially developed to map numerous ESTs with a small plant mapping population and is limited to inbred lines and backcrosses. ActionMap is highly configurable and consists of Perl and PHP scripts that automate command steps for the MapMaker program. A set of web forms were designed for data import and mapping settings. Results of automatic mapping can be displayed as tables or drawings of maps and may be exported. The user may create personal access-restricted projects to store raw data, settings and mapping results. All data may be edited, updated or deleted. ActionMap may be used either online or downloaded for free (http://moulon.inra.fr/~bioinfo/).

  5. Game-theory-based search engine to automate the mass assignment in complex native electrospray mass spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Yao-Hsin; Uetrecht, Charlotte; Yang, Shih-Chieh; Barendregt, Arjan; Heck, Albert J R; Peng, Wen-Ping

    2013-12-03

    Electrospray ionization coupled to native mass spectrometry (MS) has evolved into an important tool in structural biology to decipher the composition of protein complexes. However, the mass analysis of heterogeneous protein assemblies is hampered because of their overlapping charge state distributions, fine structure, and peak broadening. To facilitate the mass analysis, it is of importance to automate preprocessing raw mass spectra, assigning ion series to peaks and deciphering the subunit compositions. So far, the automation of preprocessing raw mass spectra has not been accomplished; Massign was introduced to simplify data analysis and decipher the subunit compositions. In this study, we develop a search engine, AutoMass, to automatically assign ion series to peaks without any additional user input, for example, limited ranges of charge states or ion mass. AutoMass includes an ion intensity-dependent method to check for Gaussian distributions of ion series and an ion intensity-independent method to address highly overlapping and non-Gaussian distributions. The minimax theorem from game theory is adopted to define the boundaries. With AutoMass, the boundaries of ion series in the well-resolved tandem mass spectra of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) capsids and those of the mass spectrum from CRISPR-related cascade protein complex are accurately assigned. Theoretical and experimental HBV ion masses are shown in agreement up to ~0.03%. The analysis is finished within a minute on a regular workstation. Moreover, less well-resolved mass spectra, for example, complicated multimer mass spectra and norovirus capsid mass spectra at different levels of desolvation, are analyzed. In sum, this first-ever fully automatic program reveals the boundaries of overlapping ion peak series and can further aid developing high-throughput native MS and top-down proteomics.

  6. Commissioning of an automated microphotometer used in spark-source mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearton, D.C.G.; Heron, C.

    1983-01-01

    A description of the automated microphotometer and its operation is given, which includes measurement under computer control. Speed and precision tests indicate that the system is superior in every respect to that in which an analyst reads photoplates in spark-source mass spectrometry

  7. Miniaturized Mass-Spectrometry-Based Analysis System for Fully Automated Examination of Conditioned Cell Culture Media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weber, E.; Pinkse, M.W.H.; Bener-Aksam, E.; Vellekoop, M.J.; Verhaert, P.D.E.M.

    2012-01-01

    We present a fully automated setup for performing in-line mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of conditioned media in cell cultures, in particular focusing on the peptides therein. The goal is to assess peptides secreted by cells in different culture conditions. The developed system is compatible with

  8. Automated cryogenic collection of carbon dioxide for stable isotope analysis and carbon-14 accelerator mass spectrometry dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenninkmeijer, C.A.M.

    1988-01-01

    A vacuum-powered high-vacuum glass valve has been used to develop gas sample bottles with automated taps. The automated, cryogenic systems have performed well for CO 2 collection to perform mass spectrometric analysis of 13 C and tandem accelerator mass spectrometry of 14 C

  9. Electrically evoked compound action potentials artefact rejection by independent component analysis: procedure automation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhoun, Idrick; McKay, Colette; El-Deredy, Wael

    2015-01-15

    Independent-components-analysis (ICA) successfully separated electrically-evoked compound action potentials (ECAPs) from the stimulation artefact and noise (ECAP-ICA, Akhoun et al., 2013). This paper shows how to automate the ECAP-ICA artefact cancellation process. Raw-ECAPs without artefact rejection were consecutively recorded for each stimulation condition from at least 8 intra-cochlear electrodes. Firstly, amplifier-saturated recordings were discarded, and the data from different stimulus conditions (different current-levels) were concatenated temporally. The key aspect of the automation procedure was the sequential deductive source categorisation after ICA was applied with a restriction to 4 sources. The stereotypical aspect of the 4 sources enables their automatic classification as two artefact components, a noise and the sought ECAP based on theoretical and empirical considerations. The automatic procedure was tested using 8 cochlear implant (CI) users and one to four stimulus electrodes. The artefact and noise sources were successively identified and discarded, leaving the ECAP as the remaining source. The automated ECAP-ICA procedure successfully extracted the correct ECAPs compared to standard clinical forward masking paradigm in 22 out of 26 cases. ECAP-ICA does not require extracting the ECAP from a combination of distinct buffers as it is the case with regular methods. It is an alternative that does not have the possible bias of traditional artefact rejections such as alternate-polarity or forward-masking paradigms. The ECAP-ICA procedure bears clinical relevance, for example as the artefact rejection sub-module of automated ECAP-threshold detection techniques, which are common features of CI clinical fitting software. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Fluctuations in Mass-Action Equilibrium of Protein Binding Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Koon-Kiu; Walker, Dylan; Maslov, Sergei

    2008-12-01

    We consider two types of fluctuations in the mass-action equilibrium in protein binding networks. The first type is driven by slow changes in total concentrations of interacting proteins. The second type (spontaneous) is caused by quickly decaying thermodynamic deviations away from equilibrium. We investigate the effects of network connectivity on fluctuations by comparing them to scenarios in which the interacting pair is isolated from the network and analytically derives bounds on fluctuations. Collective effects are shown to sometimes lead to large amplification of spontaneous fluctuations. The strength of both types of fluctuations is positively correlated with the complex connectivity and negatively correlated with complex concentration. Our general findings are illustrated using a curated network of protein interactions and multiprotein complexes in baker’s yeast, with empirical protein concentrations.

  11. Mass spectra-based framework for automated structural elucidation of metabolome data to explore phytochemical diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumio eMatsuda

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A novel framework for automated elucidation of metabolite structures in liquid chromatography-mass spectrometer (LC-MS metabolome data was constructed by integrating databases. High-resolution tandem mass spectra data automatically acquired from each metabolite signal were used for database searches. Three distinct databases, KNApSAcK, ReSpect, and the PRIMe standard compound database, were employed for the structural elucidation. The outputs were retrieved using the CAS metabolite identifier for identification and putative annotation. A simple metabolite ontology system was also introduced to attain putative characterization of the metabolite signals. The automated method was applied for the metabolome data sets obtained from the rosette leaves of 20 Arabidopsis accessions. Phenotypic variations in novel Arabidopsis metabolites among these accessions could be investigated using this method.

  12. Law of mass action for co-precipitation; Loi d'action de masse de la co-precipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitorge, P

    2008-07-01

    Coprecipitation is often understood as the incorporation of elements at trace concentrations into -initially pure- solid compounds. Coprecipitation has typically been used to identify radioactive isotopes. Coprecipitation can result in lowering solubility as compared to the solubility, when controlled by pure compounds. For this reason it is also important for geochemistry, waste management and de-pollution studies. The solid obtained with coprecipitation is a new homogeneous solid phase called solid solution. The 2 formula needed to calculate the aqueous solubility when controlled by the ideal AB{sub b(1-x)}C{sub cx} solid solutions are K{sub s,B}{sup 1-x}*K{sub s,C}{sup x} equals [A{sup z{sub A}}]*[B{sup z{sub B}}]{sup b(1-x)}*[C{sup z{sub C}}]{sup cx}/((1-x){sup b(1-x)}x{sup cx}) and K{sub s,C}/K{sub s,B} equals (1-x){sup b}*[C{sup z{sub C}}]{sup c}/[B{sup z{sub B}}]{sup b}*x{sup c}), where K{sub s,B} and K{sub s,C} are the classical constant solubility products of the AB{sub b} and AC{sub c} end-members, the b and c values are calculated from the (z{sub i}) charges of the ions and from charge balance. This report is essentially written to provide a thermodynamic demonstration of the law of mass action in attempts to confirm scientific bases for solubility calculations in geosciences (as typically retention of radio-nuclides by co-precipitation), and to facilitate such calculations. Note that the law of mass action is here a set of 2 equations (not only 1) for the ideal or near ideal systems. Since they are consistent with the phase rule, no extra formula (beside mass balance) is needed to calculate the concentrations of all the species in both phases, namely: [A{sup z{sub A}}], [B{sup z{sub B}}], [C{sup z{sub C}}] and specially x.

  13. The Analysis of Technical Condition of the Automated Systems of Protection and Actions for Their Maintenance in Readiness for Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marat Venerovich Arifullin

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In the article the analysis of technical condition of the existing the automated systems of protection (ASP and the analysis of actions for ASP maintenance in readiness for application is given during post-guarantee of operation on the example of real stationary object – storage of fuels and lubricants.

  14. Robust automated mass spectra interpretation and chemical formula calculation using mixed integer linear programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, Richard; Northen, Trent R

    2013-10-15

    Untargeted metabolite profiling using liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry coupled via electrospray ionization is a powerful tool for the discovery of novel natural products, metabolic capabilities, and biomarkers. However, the elucidation of the identities of uncharacterized metabolites from spectral features remains challenging. A critical step in the metabolite identification workflow is the assignment of redundant spectral features (adducts, fragments, multimers) and calculation of the underlying chemical formula. Inspection of the data by experts using computational tools solving partial problems (e.g., chemical formula calculation for individual ions) can be performed to disambiguate alternative solutions and provide reliable results. However, manual curation is tedious and not readily scalable or standardized. Here we describe an automated procedure for the robust automated mass spectra interpretation and chemical formula calculation using mixed integer linear programming optimization (RAMSI). Chemical rules among related ions are expressed as linear constraints and both the spectra interpretation and chemical formula calculation are performed in a single optimization step. This approach is unbiased in that it does not require predefined sets of neutral losses and positive and negative polarity spectra can be combined in a single optimization. The procedure was evaluated with 30 experimental mass spectra and was found to effectively identify the protonated or deprotonated molecule ([M + H](+) or [M - H](-)) while being robust to the presence of background ions. RAMSI provides a much-needed standardized tool for interpreting ions for subsequent identification in untargeted metabolomics workflows.

  15. Automated work-flow for processing high-resolution direct infusion electrospray ionization mass spectral fingerprints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Adsetts Edberg; Smedsgaard, Jørn

    2007-01-01

    an automated data processing pipeline to compare large numbers of fingerprint spectra from direct infusion experiments analyzed by high resolution MS. We describe some of the intriguing problems that have to be addressed. starting with the conversion and pre-processing of the raw data to the final data...... analysis. Illustrated on the direct infusion analysis (ESI-TOF-MS) of complex mixtures the method exploits the full quality of the high-resolution present in the mass spectra. Although the method is illustrated as a new library search method for high resolution MS, we demonstrate that the output...... of the preprocessing is applicable to cluster-, discriminant analysis, and related multivariate methods applied directly to mass spectra from direct infusion analysis of crude extracts. This is done to find the relationship between several terverticillate Penicillium species and identify the ions responsible...

  16. Improved protein hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry platform with fully automated data processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongqi; Zhang, Aming; Xiao, Gang

    2012-06-05

    Protein hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) followed by protease digestion and mass spectrometric (MS) analysis is accepted as a standard method for studying protein conformation and conformational dynamics. In this article, an improved HDX MS platform with fully automated data processing is described. The platform significantly reduces systematic and random errors in the measurement by introducing two types of corrections in HDX data analysis. First, a mixture of short peptides with fast HDX rates is introduced as internal standards to adjust the variations in the extent of back exchange from run to run. Second, a designed unique peptide (PPPI) with slow intrinsic HDX rate is employed as another internal standard to reflect the possible differences in protein intrinsic HDX rates when protein conformations at different solution conditions are compared. HDX data processing is achieved with a comprehensive HDX model to simulate the deuterium labeling and back exchange process. The HDX model is implemented into the in-house developed software MassAnalyzer and enables fully unattended analysis of the entire protein HDX MS data set starting from ion detection and peptide identification to final processed HDX output, typically within 1 day. The final output of the automated data processing is a set (or the average) of the most possible protection factors for each backbone amide hydrogen. The utility of the HDX MS platform is demonstrated by exploring the conformational transition of a monoclonal antibody by increasing concentrations of guanidine.

  17. An Automated Platform for High-Resolution Tissue Imaging Using Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanekoff, Ingela T.; Heath, Brandi S.; Liyu, Andrey V.; Thomas, Mathew; Carson, James P.; Laskin, Julia

    2012-10-02

    An automated platform has been developed for acquisition and visualization of mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) data using nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI). The new system enables robust operation of the nano-DESI imaging source over many hours. This is achieved by controlling the distance between the sample and the probe by mounting the sample holder onto an automated XYZ stage and defining the tilt of the sample plane. This approach is useful for imaging of relatively flat samples such as thin tissue sections. Custom software called MSI QuickView was developed for visualization of large data sets generated in imaging experiments. MSI QuickView enables fast visualization of the imaging data during data acquisition and detailed processing after the entire image is acquired. The performance of the system is demonstrated by imaging rat brain tissue sections. High resolution mass analysis combined with MS/MS experiments enabled identification of lipids and metabolites in the tissue section. In addition, high dynamic range and sensitivity of the technique allowed us to generate ion images of low-abundance isobaric lipids. High-spatial resolution image acquired over a small region of the tissue section revealed the spatial distribution of an abundant brain metabolite, creatine, in the white and gray matter that is consistent with the literature data obtained using magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

  18. Probing protein ligand interactions by automated hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, Michael J; Busby, Scott A; Pascal, Bruce D; He, Yuanjun; Hendrickson, Christopher L; Marshall, Alan G; Griffin, Patrick R

    2006-02-15

    Amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange is a powerful biophysical technique for probing changes in protein dynamics induced by ligand interaction. The inherent low throughput of the technology has limited its impact on drug screening and lead optimization. Automation increases the throughput of H/D exchange to make it compatible with drug discovery efforts. Here we describe the first fully automated H/D exchange system that provides highly reproducible H/D exchange kinetics from 130 ms to 24 h. Throughput is maximized by parallel sample processing, and the system can run H/D exchange assays in triplicate without user intervention. We demonstrate the utility of this system to differentiate structural perturbations in the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of the nuclear receptor PPARgamma induced upon binding a full agonist and a partial agonist. PPARgamma is the target of glitazones, drugs used for treatment of insulin resistance associated with type II diabetes. Recently it has been shown that partial agonists of PPARgamma have insulin sensitization properties while lacking several adverse effects associated with full agonist drugs. To further examine the mechanism of partial agonist activation of PPARgamma, we extended our studies to the analysis of ligand interactions with the heterodimeric complex of PPARgamma/RXRalpha LBDs. To facilitate analysis of H/D exchange of large protein complexes, we performed the experiment with a 14.5-T Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer capable of measuring mass with accuracy in the ppb range.

  19. Automated thermochemolysis reactor for detection of Bacillus anthracis endospores by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Dan [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Rands, Anthony D.; Losee, Scott C. [Torion Technologies, American Fork, UT 84003 (United States); Holt, Brian C. [Department of Statistics, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Williams, John R. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Lammert, Stephen A. [Torion Technologies, American Fork, UT 84003 (United States); Robison, Richard A. [Department of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Tolley, H. Dennis [Department of Statistics, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Lee, Milton L., E-mail: milton_lee@byu.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States)

    2013-05-02

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •An automated sample preparation system for Bacillus anthracis endospores was developed. •A thermochemolysis method was applied to produce and derivatize biomarkers for Bacillus anthracis detection. •The autoreactor controlled the precise delivery of reagents, and TCM reaction times and temperatures. •Solid phase microextraction was used to extract biomarkers, and GC–MS was used for final identification. •This autoreactor was successfully applied to the identification of Bacillus anthracis endospores. -- Abstract: An automated sample preparation system was developed and tested for the rapid detection of Bacillus anthracis endospores by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS) for eventual use in the field. This reactor is capable of automatically processing suspected bio-threat agents to release and derivatize unique chemical biomarkers by thermochemolysis (TCM). The system automatically controls the movement of sample vials from one position to another, crimping of septum caps onto the vials, precise delivery of reagents, and TCM reaction times and temperatures. The specific operations of introduction of sample vials, solid phase microextraction (SPME) sampling, injection into the GC–MS system, and ejection of used vials from the system were performed manually in this study, although they can be integrated into the automated system. Manual SPME sampling is performed by following visual and audible signal prompts for inserting the fiber into and retracting it from the sampling port. A rotating carousel design allows for simultaneous sample collection, reaction, biomarker extraction and analysis of sequential samples. Dipicolinic acid methyl ester (DPAME), 3-methyl-2-butenoic acid methyl ester (a fragment of anthrose) and two methylated sugars were used to compare the performance of the autoreactor with manual TCM. Statistical algorithms were used to construct reliable bacterial endospore signatures, and 24

  20. Automated thermochemolysis reactor for detection of Bacillus anthracis endospores by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Dan; Rands, Anthony D.; Losee, Scott C.; Holt, Brian C.; Williams, John R.; Lammert, Stephen A.; Robison, Richard A.; Tolley, H. Dennis; Lee, Milton L.

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •An automated sample preparation system for Bacillus anthracis endospores was developed. •A thermochemolysis method was applied to produce and derivatize biomarkers for Bacillus anthracis detection. •The autoreactor controlled the precise delivery of reagents, and TCM reaction times and temperatures. •Solid phase microextraction was used to extract biomarkers, and GC–MS was used for final identification. •This autoreactor was successfully applied to the identification of Bacillus anthracis endospores. -- Abstract: An automated sample preparation system was developed and tested for the rapid detection of Bacillus anthracis endospores by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS) for eventual use in the field. This reactor is capable of automatically processing suspected bio-threat agents to release and derivatize unique chemical biomarkers by thermochemolysis (TCM). The system automatically controls the movement of sample vials from one position to another, crimping of septum caps onto the vials, precise delivery of reagents, and TCM reaction times and temperatures. The specific operations of introduction of sample vials, solid phase microextraction (SPME) sampling, injection into the GC–MS system, and ejection of used vials from the system were performed manually in this study, although they can be integrated into the automated system. Manual SPME sampling is performed by following visual and audible signal prompts for inserting the fiber into and retracting it from the sampling port. A rotating carousel design allows for simultaneous sample collection, reaction, biomarker extraction and analysis of sequential samples. Dipicolinic acid methyl ester (DPAME), 3-methyl-2-butenoic acid methyl ester (a fragment of anthrose) and two methylated sugars were used to compare the performance of the autoreactor with manual TCM. Statistical algorithms were used to construct reliable bacterial endospore signatures, and 24

  1. Highly Reproducible Automated Proteomics Sample Preparation Workflow for Quantitative Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qin; Kowalski, Michael P; Mastali, Mitra; Parker, Sarah J; Sobhani, Kimia; van den Broek, Irene; Hunter, Christie L; Van Eyk, Jennifer E

    2018-01-05

    Sample preparation for protein quantification by mass spectrometry requires multiple processing steps including denaturation, reduction, alkylation, protease digestion, and peptide cleanup. Scaling these procedures for the analysis of numerous complex biological samples can be tedious and time-consuming, as there are many liquid transfer steps and timed reactions where technical variations can be introduced and propagated. We established an automated sample preparation workflow with a total processing time for 96 samples of 5 h, including a 2 h incubation with trypsin. Peptide cleanup is accomplished by online diversion during the LC/MS/MS analysis. In a selected reaction monitoring (SRM) assay targeting 6 plasma biomarkers and spiked β-galactosidase, mean intraday and interday cyclic voltammograms (CVs) for 5 serum and 5 plasma samples over 5 days were samples repeated on 3 separate days had total CVs below 20%. Similar results were obtained when the workflow was transferred to a second site: 93% of peptides had CVs below 20%. An automated trypsin digestion workflow yields uniformly processed samples in less than 5 h. Reproducible quantification of peptides was observed across replicates, days, instruments, and laboratory sites, demonstrating the broad applicability of this approach.

  2. Automated textual descriptions for a wide range of video events with 48 human actions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanckmann, P.; Schutte, K.; Burghouts, G.J.

    2012-01-01

    Presented is a hybrid method to generate textual descriptions of video based on actions. The method includes an action classifier and a description generator. The aim for the action classifier is to detect and classify the actions in the video, such that they can be used as verbs for the description

  3. Pep2Path: automated mass spectrometry-guided genome mining of peptidic natural products.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marnix H Medema

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Nonribosomally and ribosomally synthesized bioactive peptides constitute a source of molecules of great biomedical importance, including antibiotics such as penicillin, immunosuppressants such as cyclosporine, and cytostatics such as bleomycin. Recently, an innovative mass-spectrometry-based strategy, peptidogenomics, has been pioneered to effectively mine microbial strains for novel peptidic metabolites. Even though mass-spectrometric peptide detection can be performed quite fast, true high-throughput natural product discovery approaches have still been limited by the inability to rapidly match the identified tandem mass spectra to the gene clusters responsible for the biosynthesis of the corresponding compounds. With Pep2Path, we introduce a software package to fully automate the peptidogenomics approach through the rapid Bayesian probabilistic matching of mass spectra to their corresponding biosynthetic gene clusters. Detailed benchmarking of the method shows that the approach is powerful enough to correctly identify gene clusters even in data sets that consist of hundreds of genomes, which also makes it possible to match compounds from unsequenced organisms to closely related biosynthetic gene clusters in other genomes. Applying Pep2Path to a data set of compounds without known biosynthesis routes, we were able to identify candidate gene clusters for the biosynthesis of five important compounds. Notably, one of these clusters was detected in a genome from a different subphylum of Proteobacteria than that in which the molecule had first been identified. All in all, our approach paves the way towards high-throughput discovery of novel peptidic natural products. Pep2Path is freely available from http://pep2path.sourceforge.net/, implemented in Python, licensed under the GNU General Public License v3 and supported on MS Windows, Linux and Mac OS X.

  4. A completely automated CAD system for mass detection in a large mammographic database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellotti, R.; De Carlo, F.; Tangaro, S.

    2006-01-01

    Mass localization plays a crucial role in computer-aided detection (CAD) systems for the classification of suspicious regions in mammograms. In this article we present a completely automated classification system for the detection of masses in digitized mammographic images. The tool system we discuss consists in three processing levels: (a) Image segmentation for the localization of regions of interest (ROIs). This step relies on an iterative dynamical threshold algorithm able to select iso-intensity closed contours around gray level maxima of the mammogram. (b) ROI characterization by means of textural features computed from the gray tone spatial dependence matrix (GTSDM), containing second-order spatial statistics information on the pixel gray level intensity. As the images under study were recorded in different centers and with different machine settings, eight GTSDM features were selected so as to be invariant under monotonic transformation. In this way, the images do not need to be normalized, as the adopted features depend on the texture only, rather than on the gray tone levels, too. (c) ROI classification by means of a neural network, with supervision provided by the radiologist's diagnosis. The CAD system was evaluated on a large database of 3369 mammographic images [2307 negative, 1062 pathological (or positive), containing at least one confirmed mass, as diagnosed by an expert radiologist]. To assess the performance of the system, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) and free-response ROC analysis were employed. The area under the ROC curve was found to be A z =0.783±0.008 for the ROI-based classification. When evaluating the accuracy of the CAD against the radiologist-drawn boundaries, 4.23 false positives per image are found at 80% of mass sensitivity

  5. Measurement of Atmospheric Isoprene Concentrations using an Automated Cylindrical Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, G. D.; Shepson, P. B.; Grossenbacher, J. W.; Wells, J. M.; Patterson, G.; Barkett, D. J.

    2005-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released from the biosphere have been shown to substantially influence both ozone and aerosol chemistry. However, field instruments for the detection of these trace gases are often limited by instrument portability and the ability to distinguish compounds of interest from background or other interfering compounds. We have developed an automated sampling system that is coupled to a lightweight, low power cylindrical ion trap mass spectrometer. This instrument was used for high frequency isoprene measurements at a recent field campaign at the University of Michigan Biological Station PROPHET lab. The inlet uses a sample loop and 6-port valves to trap ambient air samples without the aid of cryogens. VOCs are preconcentrated by sampling directly into a pre-cooled capillary column that is then heated by moving the column to a pre-heated region to obtain rapid separation of isoprene from other species. Isoprene eluting from the end of the column is then introduced to the mass spectrometer. The commercially available cylindrical ion trap (Minotaur 400) interfaced with our preconcentrator yields limits of detection of <80 ppt. The data obtained during the PROPHET 2005 campaign suggest the new inlet system, when coupled with the Minotaur 400 detector provides a feasible field instrument for the fast and accurate evaluation of trace gases over a variety of atmospheric conditions.

  6. Automated combustion accelerator mass spectrometry for the analysis of biomedical samples in the low attomole range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Duijn, Esther; Sandman, Hugo; Grossouw, Dimitri; Mocking, Johannes A J; Coulier, Leon; Vaes, Wouter H J

    2014-08-05

    The increasing role of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) in biomedical research necessitates modernization of the traditional sample handling process. AMS was originally developed and used for carbon dating, therefore focusing on a very high precision but with a comparably low sample throughput. Here, we describe the combination of automated sample combustion with an elemental analyzer (EA) online coupled to an AMS via a dedicated interface. This setup allows direct radiocarbon measurements for over 70 samples daily by AMS. No sample processing is required apart from the pipetting of the sample into a tin foil cup, which is placed in the carousel of the EA. In our system, up to 200 AMS analyses are performed automatically without the need for manual interventions. We present results on the direct total (14)C count measurements in <2 μL human plasma samples. The method shows linearity over a range of 0.65-821 mBq/mL, with a lower limit of quantification of 0.65 mBq/mL (corresponding to 0.67 amol for acetaminophen). At these extremely low levels of activity, it becomes important to quantify plasma specific carbon percentages. This carbon percentage is automatically generated upon combustion of a sample on the EA. Apparent advantages of the present approach include complete omission of sample preparation (reduced hands-on time) and fully automated sample analysis. These improvements clearly stimulate the standard incorporation of microtracer research in the drug development process. In combination with the particularly low sample volumes required and extreme sensitivity, AMS strongly improves its position as a bioanalysis method.

  7. Geena 2, improved automated analysis of MALDI/TOF mass spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Paolo; Profumo, Aldo; Rocco, Mattia; Mangerini, Rosa; Ferri, Fabio; Facchiano, Angelo

    2016-03-02

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is producing high volumes of data supporting oncological sciences, especially for translational research. Most of related elaborations can be carried out by combining existing tools at different levels, but little is currently available for the automation of the fundamental steps. For the analysis of MALDI/TOF spectra, a number of pre-processing steps are required, including joining of isotopic abundances for a given molecular species, normalization of signals against an internal standard, background noise removal, averaging multiple spectra from the same sample, and aligning spectra from different samples. In this paper, we present Geena 2, a public software tool for the automated execution of these pre-processing steps for MALDI/TOF spectra. Geena 2 has been developed in a Linux-Apache-MySQL-PHP web development environment, with scripts in PHP and Perl. Input and output are managed as simple formats that can be consumed by any database system and spreadsheet software. Input data may also be stored in a MySQL database. Processing methods are based on original heuristic algorithms which are introduced in the paper. Three simple and intuitive web interfaces are available: the Standard Search Interface, which allows a complete control over all parameters, the Bright Search Interface, which leaves to the user the possibility to tune parameters for alignment of spectra, and the Quick Search Interface, which limits the number of parameters to a minimum by using default values for the majority of parameters. Geena 2 has been utilized, in conjunction with a statistical analysis tool, in three published experimental works: a proteomic study on the effects of long-term cryopreservation on the low molecular weight fraction of serum proteome, and two retrospective serum proteomic studies, one on the risk of developing breat cancer in patients affected by gross cystic disease of the breast (GCDB) and the other for the identification of a predictor of

  8. Automatic sampling and analysis of organics and biomolecules by capillary action-supported contactless atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Cheng-Huan; Meher, Anil Kumar; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2013-01-01

    Contactless atmospheric pressure ionization (C-API) method has been recently developed for mass spectrometric analysis. A tapered capillary is used as both the sampling tube and spray emitter in C-API. No electric contact is required on the capillary tip during C-API mass spectrometric analysis. The simple design of the ionization method enables the automation of the C-API sampling system. In this study, we propose an automatic C-API sampling system consisting of a capillary (∼1 cm), an aluminium sample holder, and a movable XY stage for the mass spectrometric analysis of organics and biomolecules. The aluminium sample holder is controlled by the movable XY stage. The outlet of the C-API capillary is placed in front of the orifice of a mass spectrometer, whereas the sample well on the sample holder is moved underneath the capillary inlet. The sample droplet on the well can be readily infused into the C-API capillary through capillary action. When the sample solution reaches the capillary outlet, the sample spray is readily formed in the proximity of the mass spectrometer applied with a high electric field. The gas phase ions generated from the spray can be readily monitored by the mass spectrometer. We demonstrate that six samples can be analyzed in sequence within 3.5 min using this automatic C-API MS setup. Furthermore, the well containing the rinsing solvent is alternately arranged between the sample wells. Therefore, the C-API capillary could be readily flushed between runs. No carryover problems are observed during the analyses. The sample volume required for the C-API MS analysis is minimal, with less than 1 nL of the sample solution being sufficient for analysis. The feasibility of using this setup for quantitative analysis is also demonstrated.

  9. Towards Automation 2.0: A Neurocognitive Model for Environment Recognition, Decision-Making, and Action Execution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zucker Gerhard

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The ongoing penetration of building automation by information technology is by far not saturated. Today's systems need not only be reliable and fault tolerant, they also have to regard energy efficiency and flexibility in the overall consumption. Meeting the quality and comfort goals in building automation while at the same time optimizing towards energy, carbon footprint and cost-efficiency requires systems that are able to handle large amounts of information and negotiate system behaviour that resolves conflicting demands—a decision-making process. In the last years, research has started to focus on bionic principles for designing new concepts in this area. The information processing principles of the human mind have turned out to be of particular interest as the mind is capable of processing huge amounts of sensory data and taking adequate decisions for (re-actions based on these analysed data. In this paper, we discuss how a bionic approach can solve the upcoming problems of energy optimal systems. A recently developed model for environment recognition and decision-making processes, which is based on research findings from different disciplines of brain research is introduced. This model is the foundation for applications in intelligent building automation that have to deal with information from home and office environments. All of these applications have in common that they consist of a combination of communicating nodes and have many, partly contradicting goals.

  10. Y-12 Plant remedial action Technology Logic Diagram: Volume 3, Technology evaluation data sheets: Part B, Characterization; robotics/automation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-09-01

    The Y-12 Plant Remedial Action Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision-support tool that relates environmental restoration (ER) problems at the Y-12 Plant to potential technologies that can remediate theses problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed for sufficient development of these technologies to allow for technology transfer and application to remedial action (RA) activities. The TLD consists of three volumes. Volume 1 contains an overview of the TLD, an explanation of the program-specific responsibilities, a review of identified technologies, and the rankings of remedial technologies. Volume 2 contains the logic linkages among environmental management goals, environmental problems, and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 3 contains the TLD data sheets. This report is Part B of Volume 3 and contains the Characterization and Robotics/Automation sections.

  11. Y-12 Plant remedial action Technology Logic Diagram: Volume 3, Technology evaluation data sheets: Part B, Characterization; robotics/automation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    The Y-12 Plant Remedial Action Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision-support tool that relates environmental restoration (ER) problems at the Y-12 Plant to potential technologies that can remediate theses problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed for sufficient development of these technologies to allow for technology transfer and application to remedial action (RA) activities. The TLD consists of three volumes. Volume 1 contains an overview of the TLD, an explanation of the program-specific responsibilities, a review of identified technologies, and the rankings of remedial technologies. Volume 2 contains the logic linkages among environmental management goals, environmental problems, and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 3 contains the TLD data sheets. This report is Part B of Volume 3 and contains the Characterization and Robotics/Automation sections

  12. FluTyper-an algorithm for automated typing and subtyping of the influenza virus from high resolution mass spectral data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwahn Alexander B

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High resolution mass spectrometry has been employed to rapidly and accurately type and subtype influenza viruses. The detection of signature peptides with unique theoretical masses enables the unequivocal assignment of the type and subtype of a given strain. This analysis has, to date, required the manual inspection of mass spectra of whole virus and antigen digests. Results A computer algorithm, FluTyper, has been designed and implemented to achieve the automated analysis of MALDI mass spectra recorded for proteolytic digests of the whole influenza virus and antigens. FluTyper incorporates the use of established signature peptides and newly developed naïve Bayes classifiers for four common influenza antigens, hemagglutinin, neuraminidase, nucleoprotein, and matrix protein 1, to type and subtype the influenza virus based on their detection within proteolytic peptide mass maps. Theoretical and experimental testing of the classifiers demonstrates their applicability at protein coverage rates normally achievable in mass mapping experiments. The application of FluTyper to whole virus and antigen digests of a range of different strains of the influenza virus is demonstrated. Conclusions FluTyper algorithm facilitates the rapid and automated typing and subtyping of the influenza virus from mass spectral data. The newly developed naïve Bayes classifiers increase the confidence of influenza virus subtyping, especially where signature peptides are not detected. FluTyper is expected to popularize the use of mass spectrometry to characterize influenza viruses.

  13. Possibilities of the common research-development action in the field of automated logistical engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pap Lajos

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper briefly presents the R&D cooperation of the Department of Materials Handling and Logistics and Departments of Automation. The main fields of cooperation are introduced. Different kind of Linear Motor (hereafter LM drives are being developed and tested for warehouse and rolling conveyor systems. Modern control strategies using AI methods are being investigated and tested for Automated guide vehicle. Wireless communication methods are being searched and developed for mobile material handling devices. Application possibilities of voice recognition and image processing are being tested for control of material handling robots and devices. Application of process visualization programs are being developed and investigated. Multi-level industrial communication system is being developed for the laboratories of the cooperating departments.

  14. Automated MALDI Matrix Coating System for Multiple Tissue Samples for Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mounfield, William P.; Garrett, Timothy J.

    2012-03-01

    Uniform matrix deposition on tissue samples for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) is key for reproducible analyte ion signals. Current methods often result in nonhomogenous matrix deposition, and take time and effort to produce acceptable ion signals. Here we describe a fully-automated method for matrix deposition using an enclosed spray chamber and spray nozzle for matrix solution delivery. A commercial air-atomizing spray nozzle was modified and combined with solenoid controlled valves and a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) to control and deliver the matrix solution. A spray chamber was employed to contain the nozzle, sample, and atomized matrix solution stream, and to prevent any interference from outside conditions as well as allow complete control of the sample environment. A gravity cup was filled with MALDI matrix solutions, including DHB in chloroform/methanol (50:50) at concentrations up to 60 mg/mL. Various samples (including rat brain tissue sections) were prepared using two deposition methods (spray chamber, inkjet). A linear ion trap equipped with an intermediate-pressure MALDI source was used for analyses. Optical microscopic examination showed a uniform coating of matrix crystals across the sample. Overall, the mass spectral images gathered from tissues coated using the spray chamber system were of better quality and more reproducible than from tissue specimens prepared by the inkjet deposition method.

  15. Automated locomotor activity monitoring as a quality control assay for mass-reared tephritid flies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominiak, Bernard C; Fanson, Benjamin G; Collins, Samuel R; Taylor, Phillip W

    2014-02-01

    The Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) requires vast numbers of consistently high quality insects to be produced over long periods. Quality control (QC) procedures are critical to effective SIT, both providing quality assurance and warning of operational deficiencies. We here present a potential new QC assay for mass rearing of Queensland fruit flies (Bactrocera tryoni Froggatt) for SIT; locomotor activity monitoring. We investigated whether automated locomotor activity monitors (LAMs) that simply detect how often a fly passes an infrared sensor in a glass tube might provide similar insights but with much greater economy. Activity levels were generally lower for females than for males, and declined over five days in the monitor for both sexes. Female activity levels were not affected by irradiation, but males irradiated at 60 or 70 Gy had reduced activity levels compared with unirradiated controls. We also found some evidence that mild heat shock of pupae results in adults with reduced activity. LAM offers a convenient, effective and economical assay to probe such changes. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. Overlap valence quarks on a twisted mass sea. A case study for mixed action lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cichy, Krzysztof [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Poznan Univ. (Poland). Faculty of Physics; Drach, Vincent; Jansen, Karl [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Garcia-Ramos, Elena [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany); Herdoiza, Gregorio [UAM/CSIC Univ. Autonoma de Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Teorica; UAM/CSIC Univ. Autonoma de Madrid (Spain). Inst. de Fisica Teorica; Collaboration: European Twisted Mass Collaboration

    2012-11-15

    We discuss a Lattice QCD mixed action investigation employing Wilson maximally twisted mass sea and overlap valence fermions. Using four values of the lattice spacing, we demonstrate that the overlap Dirac operator assumes a point-like locality in the continuum limit. We also show that by adopting suitable matching conditions for the sea and valence theories a consistent continuum limit for the pion decay constant and light baryon masses can be obtained. Finally, we confront results for sea-valence mixed meson masses and the valence scalar correlator with corresponding expressions of chiral perturbation theory. This allows us to extract low energy constants of mixed action chiral perturbation which characterize the strength of unitarity violations in our mixed action setup.

  17. Negative-Parity Baryon Masses Using O(a)-improved Fermion Action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Gockeler; R. Horsley; D. Pleiter; P.E.L. Rakow; G. Schierholz; C.M. Maynard; D.G. Richards

    2001-06-01

    We present a calculation of the mass of the lowest-lying negative-parity J=1/2{sup {minus}} state in quenched QCD. Results are obtained using a non-perturbatively {Omicron}(a)-improved clover fermion action, and a splitting found between the masses of the nucleon, and its parity partner. The calculation is performed on two lattice volumes, and at three lattice spacings, enabling a study of both finite-volume and finite lattice-spacing uncertainties. A comparison is made with results obtained using the unimproved Wilson fermion action.

  18. Imposed visual feedback delay of an action changes mass perception based on the sensory prediction error

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuya eHonda

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available While performing an action, the timing of when the sensory feedback is given can be used to establish the causal link between the action and its consequence. It has been shown that delaying the visual feedback while carrying an object makes people feel the mass of the object to be greater, suggesting that the feedback timing can also impact the perceived quality of an external object. In this study, we investigated the origin of the feedback timing information that influences the mass perception of the external object.Participants made a straight reaching movement while holding a manipulandum. The movement of the manipulandum was presented as a cursor movement on a monitor. In Experiment 1, various delays were imposed between the actual trajectory and the cursor movement. The participants’ perceived mass of the manipulandum significantly increased as the delay increased to 400 ms, but this gain did not reach significance when the delay was 800 ms. This suggests the existence of a temporal tuning mechanism for incorporating the visual feedback into the perception of mass. In Experiment 2, we examined whether the increased mass perception during the visual delay was due to the prediction error of the visual consequence of an action or to the actual delay of the feedback itself. After the participants adapted to the feedback delay, the perceived mass of the object became lighter than before, indicating that updating the temporal prediction model for the visual consequence diminishes the overestimation of the object’s mass. We propose that the misattribution of the visual delay into mass perception is induced by the sensorimotor prediction error, possibly when the amount of delay (error is within the range that can reasonably include the consequence of an action.

  19. Fully Automated Laser Ablation Liquid Capture Sample Analysis using NanoElectrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, Matthias [ORNL; Ovchinnikova, Olga S [ORNL; Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    RATIONALE: Laser ablation provides for the possibility of sampling a large variety of surfaces with high spatial resolution. This type of sampling when employed in conjunction with liquid capture followed by nanoelectrospray ionization provides the opportunity for sensitive and prolonged interrogation of samples by mass spectrometry as well as the ability to analyze surfaces not amenable to direct liquid extraction. METHODS: A fully automated, reflection geometry, laser ablation liquid capture spot sampling system was achieved by incorporating appropriate laser fiber optics and a focusing lens into a commercially available, liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA ) ready Advion TriVersa NanoMate system. RESULTS: Under optimized conditions about 10% of laser ablated material could be captured in a droplet positioned vertically over the ablation region using the NanoMate robot controlled pipette. The sampling spot size area with this laser ablation liquid capture surface analysis (LA/LCSA) mode of operation (typically about 120 m x 160 m) was approximately 50 times smaller than that achievable by direct liquid extraction using LESA (ca. 1 mm diameter liquid extraction spot). The set-up was successfully applied for the analysis of ink on glass and paper as well as the endogenous components in Alstroemeria Yellow King flower petals. In a second mode of operation with a comparable sampling spot size, termed laser ablation/LESA , the laser system was used to drill through, penetrate, or otherwise expose material beneath a solvent resistant surface. Once drilled, LESA was effective in sampling soluble material exposed at that location on the surface. CONCLUSIONS: Incorporating the capability for different laser ablation liquid capture spot sampling modes of operation into a LESA ready Advion TriVersa NanoMate enhanced the spot sampling spatial resolution of this device and broadened the surface types amenable to analysis to include absorbent and solvent resistant

  20. Investigating the kinematics of coronal mass ejections with the automated CORIMP catalog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byrne Jason P.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Studying coronal mass ejections (CMEs in coronagraph data can be challenging due to their diffuse structure and transient nature, compounded by the variations in their dynamics, morphology and frequency of occurrence. The large amounts of data available from missions like the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO make manual cataloging of CMEs tedious and prone to human error, and so a robust method of detection and analysis is required and often preferred. A new coronal image processing catalog called CORIMP has been developed in an effort to achieve this, through the implementation of a dynamic background separation technique and multiscale edge detection. These algorithms together isolate and characterise CME structure in the field-of-view of the Large Angle Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO onboard SOHO. CORIMP also applies a Savitzky-Golay filter, along with quadratic and linear fits, to the height-time measurements for better revealing the true CME speed and acceleration profiles across the plane-of-sky. Here we present a sample of new results from the CORIMP CME catalog, and directly compare them with the other automated catalogs of Computer Aided CME Tracking (CACTus and Solar Eruptive Events Detection System (SEEDS, as well as the manual CME catalog at the Coordinated Data Analysis Workshop (CDAW Data Center and a previously published study of the sample events. We further investigate a form of unsupervised machine learning by using a k-means clustering algorithm to distinguish detections of multiple CMEs that occur close together in space and time. While challenges still exist, this investigation and comparison of results demonstrate the reliability and robustness of the CORIMP catalog, proving its effectiveness at detecting and tracking CMEs throughout the LASCO dataset.

  1. Application of mass spectrometric techniques to delineate the modes-of-action of anticancer metallodrugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartinger, Christian G.; Groessl, Michael; Meier, Samuel M.; Casini, Angela; Dyson, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) has emerged as an important tool for studying anticancer metallodrugs in complex biological samples and for characterising their interactions with biomolecules and potential targets on a molecular level. The exact modes-of-action of these coordination compounds and especially

  2. Variable elimination in chemical reaction networks with mass-action kinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feliu, Elisenda; Wiuf, C.

    2012-01-01

    We consider chemical reaction networks taken with mass-action kinetics. The steady states of such a system are solutions to a system of polynomial equations. Even for small systems the task of finding the solutions is daunting. We develop an algebraic framework and procedure for linear elimination...

  3. Collective generative capacity: The seed of IT-induced collective action and mass innovation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Osch, W.; Avital, M.

    2009-01-01

    Analyzing how collective action leading to mass innovation emerges against the backdrop of an increasingly connected world, we introduce the concept of collective generativity as a new theoretical lens for understanding the ability of distributed communities to engage collectively in bottom-up

  4. On the graph and systems analysis of reversible chemical reaction networks with mass action kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rao, Shodhan; Jayawardhana, Bayu; Schaft, Arjan van der

    2012-01-01

    Motivated by the recent progresses on the interplay between the graph theory and systems theory, we revisit the analysis of reversible chemical reaction networks described by mass action kinetics by reformulating it using the graph knowledge of the underlying networks. Based on this formulation, we

  5. Game-Theory-Based Search Engine to Automate the Mass Assignment in Complex Native Electrospray Mass Spectra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tseng, Y.H.; Uetrecht, C.; Yang, S.C.; Barendregt, A.; Heck, A.J.R.; Peng, W.P.

    2013-01-01

    Electrospray ionization coupled to native mass spectrometry (MS) has evolved into an important tool in structural biology to decipher the composition of protein complexes. However, the mass analysis of heterogeneous protein assemblies is hampered because of their overlapping charge state

  6. Predicting Causal Relationships from Biological Data: Applying Automated Casual Discovery on Mass Cytometry Data of Human Immune Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Triantafillou, Sofia

    2017-03-31

    Learning the causal relationships that define a molecular system allows us to predict how the system will respond to different interventions. Distinguishing causality from mere association typically requires randomized experiments. Methods for automated causal discovery from limited experiments exist, but have so far rarely been tested in systems biology applications. In this work, we apply state-of-the art causal discovery methods on a large collection of public mass cytometry data sets, measuring intra-cellular signaling proteins of the human immune system and their response to several perturbations. We show how different experimental conditions can be used to facilitate causal discovery, and apply two fundamental methods that produce context-specific causal predictions. Causal predictions were reproducible across independent data sets from two different studies, but often disagree with the KEGG pathway databases. Within this context, we discuss the caveats we need to overcome for automated causal discovery to become a part of the routine data analysis in systems biology.

  7. Modeling the Mass Action Dynamics of Metabolism with Fluctuation Theorems and Maximum Entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, William; Thomas, Dennis; Baxter, Douglas; Zucker, Jeremy; Goh, Garrett

    The laws of thermodynamics dictate the behavior of biotic and abiotic systems. Simulation methods based on statistical thermodynamics can provide a fundamental understanding of how biological systems function and are coupled to their environment. While mass action kinetic simulations are based on solving ordinary differential equations using rate parameters, analogous thermodynamic simulations of mass action dynamics are based on modeling states using chemical potentials. The latter have the advantage that standard free energies of formation/reaction and metabolite levels are much easier to determine than rate parameters, allowing one to model across a large range of scales. Bridging theory and experiment, statistical thermodynamics simulations allow us to both predict activities of metabolites and enzymes and use experimental measurements of metabolites and proteins as input data. Even if metabolite levels are not available experimentally, it is shown that a maximum entropy assumption is quite reasonable and in many cases results in both the most energetically efficient process and the highest material flux.

  8. Action minimizers under topological constraints in the planar equal-mass four-body problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Duokui

    2018-04-01

    It is shown that in the planar equal-mass four-body problem, there exist two sets of action minimizers connecting two planar boundary configurations with fixed symmetry axes and specific order constraints: a double isosceles configuration and an isosceles trapezoid configuration, while order constraints are introduced on the boundary configurations. By applying the level estimate method, these minimizers are shown to be collision-free and they can be extended to two new sets of periodic or quasi-periodic orbits.

  9. Stepping Forward Action for Biped Robot Based on Acceleration Control of the Center of Mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kazuki; Tasaki, Go; Shibata, Masaaki

    In this paper, we propose a novel approach for stepping forward action of biped robot with minimum kicking force. In walking or starting to walk, the general biped robot kicks the ground with its own hind leg as well as human being does. The condition of the ground often restricts the gait because of stiffness, slipperiness and so on. In order to surmount the difficulty on stepping forward action, we introduce the redundant legged biped robot, which has 4 degree-of-freedoms on each leg. Our robot enables to move its tip position and its center of mass (COM) position independently. Controlling COM acceleration without moving its tip position realizes the stepping forward action with little kicking force. The physical experimental results show the significant validity of the proposed approach.

  10. E-FUSRAP: AUTOMATING THE CASE FILE FOR THE FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackenzie, D.; Marshall, K.

    2003-02-27

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Site Closure, EM-30, houses the document library pertaining to sites that are related to the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) and regularly addresses ongoing information demands, primarily from Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests, interested members of the public, the DOE, and other Federal Agencies. To address these demands more efficiently, DOE has begun to implement a new multi-phase, information management process known as e-FUSRAP. The first phase of e-FUSRAP, the development of the Considered Sites Database, summarizes and allows public access to complex information on over 600 sites considered as candidates for FUSRAP. The second phase of e-FUSRAP, the development of the Document Indexing Database, will create an internal index of more than 10,000 documents in the FUSRAP library's case file, allowing more effective management and retrieval of case file documents. Together, the phases of e-FUSRAP will allow EM-30 to become an innovative leader in enhancing public information sources.

  11. Fully-automated left ventricular mass and volume MRI analysis in the UK Biobank population cohort: evaluation of initial results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suinesiaputra, Avan; Sanghvi, Mihir M; Aung, Nay; Paiva, Jose Miguel; Zemrak, Filip; Fung, Kenneth; Lukaschuk, Elena; Lee, Aaron M; Carapella, Valentina; Kim, Young Jin; Francis, Jane; Piechnik, Stefan K; Neubauer, Stefan; Greiser, Andreas; Jolly, Marie-Pierre; Hayes, Carmel; Young, Alistair A; Petersen, Steffen E

    2018-02-01

    UK Biobank, a large cohort study, plans to acquire 100,000 cardiac MRI studies by 2020. Although fully-automated left ventricular (LV) analysis was performed in the original acquisition, this was not designed for unsupervised incorporation into epidemiological studies. We sought to evaluate automated LV mass and volume (Siemens syngo InlineVF versions D13A and E11C), against manual analysis in a substantial sub-cohort of UK Biobank participants. Eight readers from two centers, trained to give consistent results, manually analyzed 4874 UK Biobank cases for LV end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV), stroke volume (SV), ejection fraction (EF) and LV mass (LVM). Agreement between manual and InlineVF automated analyses were evaluated using Bland-Altman analysis and the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). Tenfold cross-validation was used to establish a linear regression calibration between manual and InlineVF results. InlineVF D13A returned results in 4423 cases, whereas InlineVF E11C returned results in 4775 cases and also reported LVM. Rapid visual assessment of the E11C results found 178 cases (3.7%) with grossly misplaced contours or landmarks. In the remaining 4597 cases, LV function showed good agreement: ESV -6.4 ± 9.0 ml, 0.853 (mean ± SD of the differences, ICC) EDV -3.0 ± 11.6 ml, 0.937; SV 3.4 ± 9.8 ml, 0.855; and EF 3.5 ± 5.1%, 0.586. Although LV mass was consistently overestimated (29.9 ± 17.0 g, 0.534) due to larger epicardial contours on all slices, linear regression could be used to correct the bias and improve accuracy. Automated InlineVF results can be used for case-control studies in UK Biobank, provided visual quality control and linear bias correction are performed. Improvements between InlineVF D13A and InlineVF E11C show the field is rapidly advancing, with further improvements expected in the near future.

  12. A semi-automated approach to derive elevation time-series and calculate glacier mass balance from historical aerial imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whorton, E.; Headman, A.; Shean, D. E.; McCann, E.

    2017-12-01

    Understanding the implications of glacier recession on water resources in the western U.S. requires quantifying glacier mass change across large regions over several decades. Very few glaciers in North America have long-term continuous field measurements of glacier mass balance. However, systematic aerial photography campaigns began in 1957 on many glaciers in the western U.S. and Alaska. These historical, vertical aerial stereo-photographs documenting glacier evolution have recently become publically available. Digital elevation models (DEM) of the transient glacier surface preserved in each imagery timestamp can be derived, then differenced to calculate glacier volume and mass change to improve regional geodetic solutions of glacier mass balance. In order to batch process these data, we use Python-based algorithms and Agisoft Photoscan structure from motion (SfM) photogrammetry software to semi-automate DEM creation, and orthorectify and co-register historical aerial imagery in a high-performance computing environment. Scanned photographs are rotated to reduce scaling issues, cropped to the same size to remove fiducials, and batch histogram equalization is applied to improve image quality and aid pixel-matching algorithms using the Python library OpenCV. Processed photographs are then passed to Photoscan through the Photoscan Python library to create DEMs and orthoimagery. To extend the period of record, the elevation products are co-registered to each other, airborne LiDAR data, and DEMs derived from sub-meter commercial satellite imagery. With the exception of the placement of ground control points, the process is entirely automated with Python. Current research is focused on: one, applying these algorithms to create geodetic mass balance time series for the 90 photographed glaciers in Washington State and two, evaluating the minimal amount of positional information required in Photoscan to prevent distortion effects that cannot be addressed during co

  13. An automated delayed neutron counting system for mass determinations of special nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sellers, M.T.; Kelly, D.G.; Corcoran, E.C.

    2012-01-01

    An automated delayed neutron counting (DNC) system has been developed at the Royal Military College of Canada (RMC) to enhance nuclear forensics capabilities pertaining to special nuclear material analysis. The system utilises the SLOWPOKE-2 Facility at RMC as a neutron source and 3 He detectors. System control and data acquisition occur through a LabVIEW platform. The time dependent count rate of the delayed neutron production has been examined for 235 U, using certified reference materials. Experimental validation according to ISO 17025 protocols suggests typical errors and precision of -3.6 and 3.1%, respectively, and a detection limit of 0.26 μg 235 U. (author)

  14. Automated SDS Depletion for Mass Spectrometry of Intact Membrane Proteins though Transmembrane Electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachuk, Carolyn; Faulkner, Melissa; Liu, Fang; Doucette, Alan A

    2016-08-05

    Membrane proteins are underrepresented in proteome analysis platforms because of their hydrophobic character, contributing to decreased solubility. Sodium dodecyl sulfate is a favored denaturant in proteomic workflows, facilitating cell lysis and protein dissolution; however, SDS impedes MS detection and therefore must be removed prior to analysis. Although strategies exist for SDS removal, they provide low recovery, purity, or reproducibility. Here we present a simple automated device, termed transmembrane electrophoresis (TME), incorporating the principles of membrane filtration, but with an applied electric current to ensure near-complete (99.9%) removal of the surfactant, including protein-bound SDS. Intact proteins are recovered in solution phase in high yield (90-100%) within 1 h of operation. The strategy is applied to protein standards and proteome mixtures, including an enriched membrane fraction from E. coli, resulting in quality MS spectra free of SDS adducts. The TME platform is applicable to both bottom-up MS/MS as well as LC-ESI-MS analysis of intact proteins. SDS-depleted fractions reveal a similar number of protein identifications (285) compared wit a non-SDS control (280), being highly correlated in terms of protein spectral counts. This fully automated approach to SDS removal presents a viable tool for proteome sample processing ahead of MS analysis. Data are available via ProteomeXchange, identifier PXD003941.

  15. Automated categorization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus clinical isolates into different clonal complexes by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camoez, M; Sierra, J M; Dominguez, M A; Ferrer-Navarro, M; Vila, J; Roca, I

    2016-02-01

    Early identification of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) dominant clones involved in infection and initiation of adequate infection control measures are essential to limit MRSA spread and understand MRSA population dynamics. In this study we evaluated the use of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS) for the automated discrimination of the major MRSA lineages (clonal complexes, CC) identified in our hospital during a 20-year period (1990-2009). A collection of 82 well-characterized MRSA isolates belonging to the four main CCs (CC5, CC8, CC22 and CC398) was split into a reference set (n = 36) and a validation set (n = 46) to generate pattern recognition models using the ClinProTools software for the identification of MALDI-TOF/MS biomarker peaks. The supervised neural network (SNN) model showed the best performance compared with two other models, with sensitivity and specificity values of 100% and 99.11%, respectively. Eleven peaks (m/z range: 3278-6592) with the highest separation power were identified and used to differentiate all four CCs. Validation of the SNN model using ClinProTools resulted in a positive predictive value (PPV) of 99.6%. The specific contribution of each peak to the model was used to generate subtyping reference signatures for automated subtyping using the BioTyper software, which successfully classified MRSA isolates into their corresponding CCs with a PPV of 98.9%. In conclusion, we find this novel automated MALDI-TOF/MS approach to be a promising, powerful and reliable tool for S. aureus typing. Copyright © 2015 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Predicting Causal Relationships from Biological Data: Applying Automated Causal Discovery on Mass Cytometry Data of Human Immune Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triantafillou, Sofia; Lagani, Vincenzo; Heinze-Deml, Christina; Schmidt, Angelika; Tegner, Jesper; Tsamardinos, Ioannis

    2017-10-05

    Learning the causal relationships that define a molecular system allows us to predict how the system will respond to different interventions. Distinguishing causality from mere association typically requires randomized experiments. Methods for automated  causal discovery from limited experiments exist, but have so far rarely been tested in systems biology applications. In this work, we apply state-of-the art causal discovery methods on a large collection of public mass cytometry data sets, measuring intra-cellular signaling proteins of the human immune system and their response to several perturbations. We show how different experimental conditions can be used to facilitate causal discovery, and apply two fundamental methods that produce context-specific causal predictions. Causal predictions were reproducible across independent data sets from two different studies, but often disagree with the KEGG pathway databases. Within this context, we discuss the caveats we need to overcome for automated causal discovery to become a part of the routine data analysis in systems biology.

  17. An improved, automated whole air sampler and gas chromatography mass spectrometry analysis system for volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Brian M.; Gilman, Jessica B.; Aikin, Kenneth C.; Atlas, Elliot L.; Goldan, Paul D.; Graus, Martin; Hendershot, Roger; Isaacman-VanWertz, Gabriel A.; Koss, Abigail; Kuster, William C.; Lueb, Richard A.; McLaughlin, Richard J.; Peischl, Jeff; Sueper, Donna; Ryerson, Thomas B.; Tokarek, Travis W.; Warneke, Carsten; Yuan, Bin; de Gouw, Joost A.

    2017-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds were quantified during two aircraft-based field campaigns using highly automated, whole air samplers with expedited post-flight analysis via a new custom-built, field-deployable gas chromatography-mass spectrometry instrument. During flight, air samples were pressurized with a stainless steel bellows compressor into electropolished stainless steel canisters. The air samples were analyzed using a novel gas chromatograph system designed specifically for field use which eliminates the need for liquid nitrogen. Instead, a Stirling cooler is used for cryogenic sample pre-concentration at temperatures as low as -165 °C. The analysis system was fully automated on a 20 min cycle to allow for unattended processing of an entire flight of 72 sample canisters within 30 h, thereby reducing typical sample residence times in the canisters to less than 3 days. The new analytical system is capable of quantifying a wide suite of C2 to C10 organic compounds at part-per-trillion sensitivity. This paper describes the sampling and analysis systems, along with the data analysis procedures which include a new peak-fitting software package for rapid chromatographic data reduction. Instrument sensitivities, uncertainties and system artifacts are presented for 35 trace gas species in canister samples. Comparisons of reported mixing ratios from each field campaign with measurements from other instruments are also presented.

  18. Gravity-Assist Trajectories to the Ice Giants: An Automated Method to Catalog Mass-or Time-Optimal Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Kyle M.; Knittel, Jeremy M.; Englander, Jacob A.

    2017-01-01

    This work presents an automated method of calculating mass (or time) optimal gravity-assist trajectories without a priori knowledge of the flyby-body combination. Since gravity assists are particularly crucial for reaching the outer Solar System, we use the Ice Giants, Uranus and Neptune, as example destinations for this work. Catalogs are also provided that list the most attractive trajectories found over launch dates ranging from 2024 to 2038. The tool developed to implement this method, called the Python EMTG Automated Trade Study Application (PEATSA), iteratively runs the Evolutionary Mission Trajectory Generator (EMTG), a NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in-house trajectory optimization tool. EMTG finds gravity-assist trajectories with impulsive maneuvers using a multiple-shooting structure along with stochastic methods (such as monotonic basin hopping) and may be run with or without an initial guess provided. PEATSA runs instances of EMTG in parallel over a grid of launch dates. After each set of runs completes, the best results within a neighborhood of launch dates are used to seed all other cases in that neighborhood---allowing the solutions across the range of launch dates to improve over each iteration. The results here are compared against trajectories found using a grid-search technique, and PEATSA is found to outperform the grid-search results for most launch years considered.

  19. Predicting Causal Relationships from Biological Data: Applying Automated Causal Discovery on Mass Cytometry Data of Human Immune Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Triantafillou, Sofia

    2017-09-29

    Learning the causal relationships that define a molecular system allows us to predict how the system will respond to different interventions. Distinguishing causality from mere association typically requires randomized experiments. Methods for automated  causal discovery from limited experiments exist, but have so far rarely been tested in systems biology applications. In this work, we apply state-of-the art causal discovery methods on a large collection of public mass cytometry data sets, measuring intra-cellular signaling proteins of the human immune system and their response to several perturbations. We show how different experimental conditions can be used to facilitate causal discovery, and apply two fundamental methods that produce context-specific causal predictions. Causal predictions were reproducible across independent data sets from two different studies, but often disagree with the KEGG pathway databases. Within this context, we discuss the caveats we need to overcome for automated causal discovery to become a part of the routine data analysis in systems biology.

  20. Hexicon 2: Automated Processing of Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry Data with Improved Deuteration Distribution Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Robert; Lou, Xinghua; Reinstein, Jochen; Shoeman, Robert L.; Hamprecht, Fred A.; Winkler, Andreas

    2014-06-01

    Hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX) experiments analyzed by mass spectrometry (MS) provide information about the dynamics and the solvent accessibility of protein backbone amide hydrogen atoms. Continuous improvement of MS instrumentation has contributed to the increasing popularity of this method; however, comprehensive automated data analysis is only beginning to mature. We present Hexicon 2, an automated pipeline for data analysis and visualization based on the previously published program Hexicon (Lou et al. 2010). Hexicon 2 employs the sensitive NITPICK peak detection algorithm of its predecessor in a divide-and-conquer strategy and adds new features, such as chromatogram alignment and improved peptide sequence assignment. The unique feature of deuteration distribution estimation was retained in Hexicon 2 and improved using an iterative deconvolution algorithm that is robust even to noisy data. In addition, Hexicon 2 provides a data browser that facilitates quality control and provides convenient access to common data visualization tasks. Analysis of a benchmark dataset demonstrates superior performance of Hexicon 2 compared with its predecessor in terms of deuteration centroid recovery and deuteration distribution estimation. Hexicon 2 greatly reduces data analysis time compared with manual analysis, whereas the increased number of peptides provides redundant coverage of the entire protein sequence. Hexicon 2 is a standalone application available free of charge under http://hx2.mpimf-heidelberg.mpg.de.

  1. Decon2LS: An open-source software package for automated processing and visualization of high resolution mass spectrometry data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Gordon A

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Data generated from liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry (LC-MS-based studies of a biological sample can contain large amounts of biologically significant information in the form of proteins, peptides, and metabolites. Interpreting this data involves inferring the masses and abundances of biomolecules injected into the instrument. Because of the inherent complexity of mass spectral patterns produced by these biomolecules, the analysis is significantly enhanced by using visualization capabilities to inspect and confirm results. In this paper we describe Decon2LS, an open-source software package for automated processing and visualization of high-resolution MS data. Drawing extensively on algorithms developed over the last ten years for ICR2LS, Decon2LS packages the algorithms as a rich set of modular, reusable processing classes for performing diverse functions such as reading raw data, routine peak finding, theoretical isotope distribution modelling, and deisotoping. Because the source code is openly available, these functionalities can now be used to build derivative applications in relatively fast manner. In addition, Decon2LS provides an extensive set of visualization tools, such as high performance chart controls. Results With a variety of options that include peak processing, deisotoping, isotope composition, etc, Decon2LS supports processing of multiple raw data formats. Deisotoping can be performed on an individual scan, an individual dataset, or on multiple datasets using batch processing. Other processing options include creating a two dimensional view of mass and liquid chromatography (LC elution time features, generating spectrum files for tandem MS data, creating total intensity chromatograms, and visualizing theoretical peptide profiles. Application of Decon2LS to deisotope different datasets obtained across different instruments yielded a high number of features that can be used to

  2. SAIDE: A Semi-Automated Interface for Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Villar, Maria T.; Miller, Danny E.; Fenton, Aron W.; Artigues, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Deuterium/hydrogen exchange in combination with mass spectrometry (DH MS) is a sensitive technique for detection of changes in protein conformation and dynamics. Since temperature, pH and timing control are the key elements for reliable and efficient measurement of hydrogen/deuterium content in proteins and peptides, we have developed a small, semiautomatic interface for deuterium exchange that interfaces the HPLC pumps with a mass spectrometer. This interface is relatively inexpensive to bui...

  3. RADARS, a bioinformatics solution that automates proteome mass spectral analysis, optimises protein identification, and archives data in a relational database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Helen I; Fenyö, David; Beavis, Ronald C

    2002-01-01

    RADARS, a rapid, automated, data archiving and retrieval software system for high-throughput proteomic mass spectral data processing and storage, is described. The majority of mass spectrometer data files are compatible with RADARS, for consistent processing. The system automatically takes unprocessed data files, identifies proteins via in silico database searching, then stores the processed data and search results in a relational database suitable for customized reporting. The system is robust, used in 24/7 operation, accessible to multiple users of an intranet through a web browser, may be monitored by Virtual Private Network, and is secure. RADARS is scalable for use on one or many computers, and is suited to multiple processor systems. It can incorporate any local database in FASTA format, and can search protein and DNA databases online. A key feature is a suite of visualisation tools (many available gratis), allowing facile manipulation of spectra, by hand annotation, reanalysis, and access to all procedures. We also described the use of Sonar MS/MS, a novel, rapid search engine requiring 40 MB RAM per process for searches against a genomic or EST database translated in all six reading frames. RADARS reduces the cost of analysis by its efficient algorithms: Sonar MS/MS can identifiy proteins without accurate knowledge of the parent ion mass and without protein tags. Statistical scoring methods provide close-to-expert accuracy and brings robust data analysis to the non-expert user.

  4. Approaches towards the automated interpretation and prediction of electrospray tandem mass spectra of non-peptidic combinatorial compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klagkou, Katerina; Pullen, Frank; Harrison, Mark; Organ, Andy; Firth, Alistair; Langley, G John

    2003-01-01

    Combinatorial chemistry is widely used within the pharmaceutical industry as a means of rapid identification of potential drugs. With the growth of combinatorial libraries, mass spectrometry (MS) became the key analytical technique because of its speed of analysis, sensitivity, accuracy and ability to be coupled with other analytical techniques. In the majority of cases, electrospray mass spectrometry (ES-MS) has become the default ionisation technique. However, due to the absence of fragment ions in the resulting spectra, tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) is required to provide structural information for the identification of an unknown analyte. This work discusses the first steps of an investigation into the fragmentation pathways taking place in electrospray tandem mass spectrometry. The ultimate goal for this project is to set general fragmentation rules for non-peptidic, pharmaceutical, combinatorial compounds. As an aid, an artificial intelligence (AI) software package is used to facilitate interpretation of the spectra. This initial study has focused on determining the fragmentation rules for some classes of compound types that fit the remit as outlined above. Based on studies carried out on several combinatorial libraries of these compounds, it was established that different classes of drug molecules follow unique fragmentation pathways. In addition to these general observations, the specific ionisation processes and the fragmentation pathways involved in the electrospray mass spectra of these systems were explored. The ultimate goal will be to incorporate our findings into the computer program and allow identification of an unknown, non-peptidic compound following insertion of its ES-MS/MS spectrum into the AI package. The work herein demonstrates the potential benefit of such an approach in addressing the issue of high-throughput, automated MS/MS data interpretation. Copyright 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Automated on-line liquid–liquid extraction system for temporal mass spectrometric analysis of dynamic samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, Kai-Ta; Liu, Pei-Han [Department of Applied Chemistry, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 University Rd, Hsinchu, 300, Taiwan (China); Urban, Pawel L. [Department of Applied Chemistry, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 University Rd, Hsinchu, 300, Taiwan (China); Institute of Molecular Science, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 University Rd, Hsinchu, 300, Taiwan (China)

    2015-09-24

    Most real samples cannot directly be infused to mass spectrometers because they could contaminate delicate parts of ion source and guides, or cause ion suppression. Conventional sample preparation procedures limit temporal resolution of analysis. We have developed an automated liquid–liquid extraction system that enables unsupervised repetitive treatment of dynamic samples and instantaneous analysis by mass spectrometry (MS). It incorporates inexpensive open-source microcontroller boards (Arduino and Netduino) to guide the extraction and analysis process. Duration of every extraction cycle is 17 min. The system enables monitoring of dynamic processes over many hours. The extracts are automatically transferred to the ion source incorporating a Venturi pump. Operation of the device has been characterized (repeatability, RSD = 15%, n = 20; concentration range for ibuprofen, 0.053–2.000 mM; LOD for ibuprofen, ∼0.005 mM; including extraction and detection). To exemplify its usefulness in real-world applications, we implemented this device in chemical profiling of pharmaceutical formulation dissolution process. Temporal dissolution profiles of commercial ibuprofen and acetaminophen tablets were recorded during 10 h. The extraction-MS datasets were fitted with exponential functions to characterize the rates of release of the main and auxiliary ingredients (e.g. ibuprofen, k = 0.43 ± 0.01 h{sup −1}). The electronic control unit of this system interacts with the operator via touch screen, internet, voice, and short text messages sent to the mobile phone, which is helpful when launching long-term (e.g. overnight) measurements. Due to these interactive features, the platform brings the concept of the Internet-of-Things (IoT) to the chemistry laboratory environment. - Highlights: • Mass spectrometric analysis normally requires sample preparation. • Liquid–liquid extraction can isolate analytes from complex matrices. • The proposed system automates

  6. Automated on-line liquid–liquid extraction system for temporal mass spectrometric analysis of dynamic samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, Kai-Ta; Liu, Pei-Han; Urban, Pawel L.

    2015-01-01

    Most real samples cannot directly be infused to mass spectrometers because they could contaminate delicate parts of ion source and guides, or cause ion suppression. Conventional sample preparation procedures limit temporal resolution of analysis. We have developed an automated liquid–liquid extraction system that enables unsupervised repetitive treatment of dynamic samples and instantaneous analysis by mass spectrometry (MS). It incorporates inexpensive open-source microcontroller boards (Arduino and Netduino) to guide the extraction and analysis process. Duration of every extraction cycle is 17 min. The system enables monitoring of dynamic processes over many hours. The extracts are automatically transferred to the ion source incorporating a Venturi pump. Operation of the device has been characterized (repeatability, RSD = 15%, n = 20; concentration range for ibuprofen, 0.053–2.000 mM; LOD for ibuprofen, ∼0.005 mM; including extraction and detection). To exemplify its usefulness in real-world applications, we implemented this device in chemical profiling of pharmaceutical formulation dissolution process. Temporal dissolution profiles of commercial ibuprofen and acetaminophen tablets were recorded during 10 h. The extraction-MS datasets were fitted with exponential functions to characterize the rates of release of the main and auxiliary ingredients (e.g. ibuprofen, k = 0.43 ± 0.01 h −1 ). The electronic control unit of this system interacts with the operator via touch screen, internet, voice, and short text messages sent to the mobile phone, which is helpful when launching long-term (e.g. overnight) measurements. Due to these interactive features, the platform brings the concept of the Internet-of-Things (IoT) to the chemistry laboratory environment. - Highlights: • Mass spectrometric analysis normally requires sample preparation. • Liquid–liquid extraction can isolate analytes from complex matrices. • The proposed system automates the

  7. Towards automated discrimination of lipids versus peptides from full scan mass spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Dittwald

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Although physicochemical fractionation techniques play a crucial role in the analysis of complex mixtures, they are not necessarily the best solution to separate specific molecular classes, such as lipids and peptides. Any physical fractionation step such as, for example, those based on liquid chromatography, will introduce its own variation and noise. In this paper we investigate to what extent the high sensitivity and resolution of contemporary mass spectrometers offers viable opportunities for computational separation of signals in full scan spectra. We introduce an automatic method that can discriminate peptide from lipid peaks in full scan mass spectra, based on their isotopic properties. We systematically evaluate which features maximally contribute to a peptide versus lipid classification. The selected features are subsequently used to build a random forest classifier that enables almost perfect separation between lipid and peptide signals without requiring ion fragmentation and classical tandem MS-based identification approaches. The classifier is trained on in silico data, but is also capable of discriminating signals in real world experiments. We evaluate the influence of typical data inaccuracies of common classes of mass spectrometry instruments on the optimal set of discriminant features. Finally, the method is successfully extended towards the classification of individual lipid classes from full scan mass spectral features, based on input data defined by the Lipid Maps Consortium.

  8. Automated Sample Preparation Platform for Mass Spectrometry-Based Plasma Proteomics and Biomarker Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilém Guryča

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The identification of novel biomarkers from human plasma remains a critical need in order to develop and monitor drug therapies for nearly all disease areas. The discovery of novel plasma biomarkers is, however, significantly hampered by the complexity and dynamic range of proteins within plasma, as well as the inherent variability in composition from patient to patient. In addition, it is widely accepted that most soluble plasma biomarkers for diseases such as cancer will be represented by tissue leakage products, circulating in plasma at low levels. It is therefore necessary to find approaches with the prerequisite level of sensitivity in such a complex biological matrix. Strategies for fractionating the plasma proteome have been suggested, but improvements in sensitivity are often negated by the resultant process variability. Here we describe an approach using multidimensional chromatography and on-line protein derivatization, which allows for higher sensitivity, whilst minimizing the process variability. In order to evaluate this automated process fully, we demonstrate three levels of processing and compare sensitivity, throughput and reproducibility. We demonstrate that high sensitivity analysis of the human plasma proteome is possible down to the low ng/mL or even high pg/mL level with a high degree of technical reproducibility.

  9. STERIC MASS ACTION MODEL FOR LACTOFERRIN ADSORPTION IN CRYOGEL WITH IMMOBILIZED COPPER IONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. M. A. Carvalho

    Full Text Available Abstract Parameters of equilibrium adsorption obtained from experiments using immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC were used to evaluate the applicability of the steric mass-action (SMA model to describe the adsorption of lactoferrin to cryogel resin under different conditions. The adsorption of lactoferrin on continuous supermacroporous cryogel with immobilized Cu2+ ions was evaluated in batch adsorption experiments at different pH (6-8 and temperature (293-313 K values. Estimated values of the equilibrium constant (K and characteristic number of binding sites (n showed that these parameters decreased with increasing ionic strength, pH and temperature, while the nonlinear parameter, the steric factor (σ, increased with increasing ionic strength and temperature. Expressions correlating these parameters with pH, ionic strength and temperature were then derived.

  10. Monte Carlo simulation of the transmission of measles: Beyond the mass action principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zekri, Nouredine; Clerc, Jean Pierre

    2002-04-01

    We present a Monte Carlo simulation of the transmission of measles within a population sample during its growing and equilibrium states by introducing two different vaccination schedules of one and two doses. We study the effects of the contact rate per unit time ξ as well as the initial conditions on the persistence of the disease. We found a weak effect of the initial conditions while the disease persists when ξ lies in the range 1/L-10/L (L being the latent period). Further comparison with existing data, prediction of future epidemics and other estimations of the vaccination efficiency are provided. Finally, we compare our approach to the models using the mass action principle in the first and another epidemic region and found the incidence independent of the number of susceptibles after the epidemic peak while it strongly fluctuates in its growing region. This method can be easily applied to other human, animal, and plant diseases and includes more complicated parameters.

  11. Monte Carlo simulation of the transmission of measles: Beyond the mass action principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zekri, Nouredine; Clerc, Jean Pierre

    2002-01-01

    We present a Monte Carlo simulation of the transmission of measles within a population sample during its growing and equilibrium states by introducing two different vaccination schedules of one and two doses. We study the effects of the contact rate per unit time ξ as well as the initial conditions on the persistence of the disease. We found a weak effect of the initial conditions while the disease persists when ξ lies in the range 1/L-10/L (L being the latent period). Further comparison with existing data, prediction of future epidemics and other estimations of the vaccination efficiency are provided. Finally, we compare our approach to the models using the mass action principle in the first and another epidemic region and found the incidence independent of the number of susceptibles after the epidemic peak while it strongly fluctuates in its growing region. This method can be easily applied to other human, animal, and plant diseases and includes more complicated parameters

  12. Preclusion of switch behavior in reaction networks with mass-action kinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feliu, Elisenda; Wiuf, C.

    2012-01-01

    consists of components of the species formation rate function and a maximal set of independent conservation laws. The determinant of the function is a polynomial in the species concentrations and the rate constants (linear in the latter) and its coefficients are fully determined. The criterion also......We study networks taken with mass-action kinetics and provide a Jacobian criterion that applies to an arbitrary network to preclude the existence of multiple positive steady states within any stoichiometric class for any choice of rate constants. We are concerned with the characterization...... of injective networks, that is, networks for which the species formation rate function is injective in the interior of the positive orthant within each stoichiometric class. We show that a network is injective if and only if the determinant of the Jacobian of a certain function does not vanish. The function...

  13. Enantioselective determination of methylphenidate and ritalinic acid in whole blood from forensic cases using automated solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Ragnar; B. Rasmussen, Henrik; Linnet, Kristian

    2012-01-01

    A chiral liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS-MS) method was developed and validated for quantifying methylphenidate and its major metabolite ritalinic acid in blood from forensic cases. Blood samples were prepared in a fully automated system by protein precipitation followed...

  14. HDXFinder: Automated Analysis and Data Reporting of Deuterium/Hydrogen Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Danny E.; Prasannan, Charulata B.; Villar, Maria T.; Fenton, Aron W.; Artigues, Antonio

    2012-02-01

    Hydrogen/deuterium exchange in combination with mass spectrometry (H/D MS) is a sensitive technique for detection of changes in protein conformation and dynamics. However, wide application of H/D MS has been hindered, in part, by the lack of computational tools necessary for efficient analysis of the large data sets associated with this technique. We report a novel web-based application for automatic analysis of H/D MS experimental data. This application relies on the high resolution of mass spectrometers to extract all isotopic envelopes before correlating these envelopes with individual peptides. Although a fully automatic analysis is possible, a variety of graphical tools are included to aid in the verification of correlations and rankings of the isotopic peptide envelopes. As a demonstration, the rate constants for H/D exchange of peptides from rabbit muscle pyruvate kinase are mapped onto the structure of this protein.

  15. Characterization of Disulfide-Linked Peptides Using Tandem Mass Spectrometry Coupled with Automated Data Analysis Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhidan; McGuinness, Kenneth N.; Crespo, Alejandro; Zhong, Wendy

    2018-01-01

    Disulfide bond formation is critical for maintaining structure stability and function of many peptides and proteins. Mass spectrometry has become an important tool for the elucidation of molecular connectivity. However, the interpretation of the tandem mass spectral data of disulfide-linked peptides has been a major challenge due to the lack of appropriate tools. Developing proper data analysis software is essential to quickly characterize disulfide-linked peptides. A thorough and in-depth understanding of how disulfide-linked peptides fragment in mass spectrometer is a key in developing software to interpret the tandem mass spectra of these peptides. Two model peptides with inter- and intra-chain disulfide linkages were used to study fragmentation behavior in both collisional-activated dissociation (CAD) and electron-based dissociation (ExD) experiments. Fragments generated from CAD and ExD can be categorized into three major types, which result from different S-S and C-S bond cleavage patterns. DiSulFinder is a computer algorithm that was newly developed based on the fragmentation observed in these peptides. The software is vendor neutral and capable of quickly and accurately identifying a variety of fragments generated from disulfide-linked peptides. DiSulFinder identifies peptide backbone fragments with S-S and C-S bond cleavages and, more importantly, can also identify fragments with the S-S bond still intact to aid disulfide linkage determination. With the assistance of this software, more comprehensive disulfide connectivity characterization can be achieved. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  16. Formularity: Software for Automated Formula Assignment of Natural and Other Organic Matter from Ultrahigh-Resolution Mass Spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tolic, Nikola; Liu, Yina; Liyu, Andrey V.; Shen, Yufeng; Tfaily, Malak M.; Kujawinski, Elizabeth B.; Longnecker, Krista; Kuo, Li-Jung; Robinson, Errol W.; Pasa Tolic, Ljiljana; Hess, Nancy J.

    2017-11-13

    Ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry, such as Fourier transform ion-cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS), can resolve thousands of molecular ions in complex organic matrices. A Compound Identification Algorithm (CIA) was previously developed for automated elemental formula assignment for natural organic matter (NOM). In this work we describe a user friendly interface for CIA, titled Formularity, which includes an additional functionality to perform search of formulas based on an Isotopic Pattern Algorithm (IPA). While CIA assigns elemental formulas for compounds containing C, H, O, N, S, and P, IPA is capable of assigning formulas for compounds containing other elements. We used halogenated organic compounds (HOC), a chemical class that is ubiquitous in nature as well as anthropogenic systems, as an example to demonstrate the capability of Formularity with IPA. A HOC standard mix was used to evaluate the identification confidence of IPA. The HOC spike in NOM and tap water were used to assess HOC identification in natural and anthropogenic matrices. Strategies for reconciliation of CIA and IPA assignments are discussed. Software and sample databases with documentation are freely available from the PNNL OMICS software repository https://omics.pnl.gov/software/formularity.

  17. Automated Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Electron Transfer Dissociation High Resolution Mass Spectrometry Measured at Single-Amide Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landgraf, Rachelle R.; Chalmers, Michael J.; Griffin, Patrick R.

    2012-02-01

    Hydrogen deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) is a well established method for the measurement of solution-phase deuterium incorporation into proteins, which can provide insight into protein conformational mobility. However, most HDX measurements are constrained to regions of the protein where pepsin proteolysis allows detection at peptide resolution. Recently, single-amide resolution deuterium incorporation has been achieved by limiting gas-phase scrambling in the mass spectrometer. This was accomplished by employing a combination of soft ionization and desolvation conditions coupled with the radical-driven fragmentation technique electron transfer dissociation (ETD). Here, a hybrid LTQ-Orbitrap XL is systematically evaluated for its utility in providing single-amide deuterium incorporation for differential HDX analysis of a nuclear receptor upon binding small molecule ligands. We are able to show that instrumental parameters can be optimized to minimize scrambling and can be incorporated into an established and fully automated HDX platform making differential single-amide HDX possible for bottom-up analysis of complex systems. We have applied this system to determine differential single amide resolution HDX data for the peroxizome proliferator activated receptor bound with two ligands of interest.

  18. Screening for inborn errors of metabolism using automated electrospray tandem mass spectrometry: study in high-risk Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraja, Dindagur; Mamatha, Sopanahalli Narasimhamurthy; De, Tanima; Christopher, Rita

    2010-04-01

    Tandem mass spectrometry is a major technological advance in the screening for inborn errors of metabolism. It has the advantage of sensitive and simultaneous multiple disease screening with minimal sample requirement. The diseases detected include aminoacidemias, fatty acid oxidation disorders, and organic acidemias. Using automated electrospray tandem mass spectrometry we screened 3550, clinically selected, symptomatic children for inborn errors of metabolism by analyzing amino acids and acylcarnitines in dried blood filter-paper samples. Among these, 113 (3.2%) children were identified with a metabolic disorder: 61 (54%) patients had amino acid disorders, 47 (41.6%) had organic acidemias, and 5 (4.4%) children had disorders of fatty acid oxidation. The diagnoses were further confirmed through clinical symptoms, and other biochemical studies. These results show that inherited metabolic disorders are not rare in India, a rapidly developing country with a high birth rate and relatively frequent occurrence of consanguineous marriages. Copyright 2009 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Mass asymmetry and tricyclic wobble motion assessment using automated launch video analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Decker

    2016-04-01

    Examination of the pitch and yaw histories clearly indicates that in addition to epicyclic motion's nutation and precession oscillations, an even faster wobble amplitude is present during each spin revolution, even though some of the amplitudes of the oscillation are smaller than 0.02 degree. The results are compared to a sequence of shots where little appreciable mass asymmetries were present, and only nutation and precession frequencies are predominantly apparent in the motion history results. Magnitudes of the wobble motion are estimated and compared to product of inertia measurements of the asymmetric projectiles.

  20. Automated Morphological and Morphometric Analysis of Mass Spectrometry Imaging Data: Application to Biomarker Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard de Muller, Gaël; Ait-Belkacem, Rima; Bonnel, David; Longuespée, Rémi; Stauber, Jonathan

    2017-12-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging datasets are mostly analyzed in terms of average intensity in regions of interest. However, biological tissues have different morphologies with several sizes, shapes, and structures. The important biological information, contained in this highly heterogeneous cellular organization, could be hidden by analyzing the average intensities. Finding an analytical process of morphology would help to find such information, describe tissue model, and support identification of biomarkers. This study describes an informatics approach for the extraction and identification of mass spectrometry image features and its application to sample analysis and modeling. For the proof of concept, two different tissue types (healthy kidney and CT-26 xenograft tumor tissues) were imaged and analyzed. A mouse kidney model and tumor model were generated using morphometric - number of objects and total surface - information. The morphometric information was used to identify m/z that have a heterogeneous distribution. It seems to be a worthwhile pursuit as clonal heterogeneity in a tumor is of clinical relevance. This study provides a new approach to find biomarker or support tissue classification with more information. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  1. Automated estimation of mass eruption rate of volcanic eruption on satellite imagery using a cloud pattern recognition algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouget, Solene; Jansons, Emile; Bursik, Marcus; Tupper, Andrew; Patra, Abani; Pitman, Bruce; Carn, Simon

    2014-05-01

    The need to detect and track the position of ash in the atmosphere has been highlighted in the past few years following the eruption Eyjafjallajokull. As a result, Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers (VAACs) are using Volcanic Ash Transport and Dispersion models (VATD) to estimate and predict the whereabouts of the ash in the atmosphere. However, these models require inputs of eruption source parameters, such as the mass eruption rate (MER), and wind fields, which are vital to properly model the ash movements. These inputs might change with time as the eruption enters different phases. This implies tracking the ash movement as conditions change, and new satellite imagery comes in. Thus, ultimately, the eruption must be detectable, regardless of changing eruption source and meteorological conditions. Volcanic cloud recognition can be particularly challenging, especially when meteorological clouds are present, which is typically the case in the tropics. Given the fact that a large fraction of the eruptions in the world happen in a tropical environment, we have based an automated volcanic cloud recognition algorithm on the fact that meteorological clouds and volcanic clouds behave differently. As a result, the pattern definition algorithm detects and defines volcanic clouds as different object types from meteorological clouds on satellite imagery. Following detection and definition, the algorithm then estimates the area covered by the ash. The area is then analyzed with respect to a plume growth rate methodology to get estimation of the volumetric and mass growth with time. This way, we were able to get an estimation of the MER with time, as plume growth is dependent on MER. To test our approach, we used the examples of two eruptions of different source strength, in two different climatic regimes, and for which therefore the weather during the eruption was quite different: Manam (Papua New Guinea) January 27 2005, which produced a stratospheric umbrella cloud and was

  2. Integration of biotechnology, visualisation technology and robot technology for automated mass propagation af elite trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Find, Jens

    Somatic embryogenesis (SE) is one of the promisisng methods for integration of biotechnology into breeding and propagation of conifers. Especially because SE has some particular advantages for the development of cost effective methods for clonal mass propagation of elite trees: It is a very...... effective and fast method for clonal propagation. The method is suitable for automatisation and robot technology. The method is, for several plant species, the preferred basis for development of additional biotechnological breeding technologies as e.g. genetic transformation. Elite clones can be stored over...... extended periods in liquid nitrogen at -196°C However, commercial application of the technology has until now been hampered by two essential problems: The production costs per plant must be reduced. Labour costs are low in the early steps of the process whereas they increase dramatically during the later...

  3. Automated approximation of center of mass position in X-ray sequences of animal locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, D; Andrada, E; Nyakatura, J A; Kilbourne, B M; Denzler, J

    2013-08-09

    A crucial aspect of comparative biomechanical research is the center of mass (CoM) estimation in animal locomotion scenarios. Important applications include the parameter estimation of locomotion models, the discrimination of gaits, or the calculation of mechanical work during locomotion. Several methods exist to approximate the CoM position, e.g. force-plate-based approaches, kinematic approaches, or the reaction board method. However, they all share the drawback of not being suitable for large scale studies, as detailed initial conditions from kinematics are required (force-plates), manual interaction is necessary (kinematic approach), or only static settings can be analyzed (reaction board). For the increasingly popular case of X-ray-based animal locomotion analysis, we present an alternative approach for CoM estimation which overcomes these shortcomings. The main idea is to only use the recorded X-ray images, and to map each pixel to the mass of matter it represents. As a consequence, our approach is surgically noninvasive, independent of animal species and locomotion characteristics, and neither requires prior knowledge nor any kind of user interaction. To assess the quality of our approach, we conducted a comparison to highly accurate reaction board experiments for lapwing and rat cadavers, and achieved an average accuracy of 2.6mm (less than 2% of the animal body length). We additionally verified the practical applicability of the algorithm by comparison to a previously published CoM study which is based on the kinematic method, yielding comparable results. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A Customizable Flow Injection System for Automated, High Throughput, and Time Sensitive Ion Mobility Spectrometry and Mass Spectrometry Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orton, Daniel J; Tfaily, Malak M; Moore, Ronald J; LaMarche, Brian L; Zheng, Xueyun; Fillmore, Thomas L; Chu, Rosalie K; Weitz, Karl K; Monroe, Matthew E; Kelly, Ryan T; Smith, Richard D; Baker, Erin S

    2018-01-02

    To better understand disease conditions and environmental perturbations, multiomic studies combining proteomic, lipidomic, and metabolomic analyses are vastly increasing in popularity. In a multiomic study, a single sample is typically extracted in multiple ways, and various analyses are performed using different instruments, most often based upon mass spectrometry (MS). Thus, one sample becomes many measurements, making high throughput and reproducible evaluations a necessity. One way to address the numerous samples and varying instrumental conditions is to utilize a flow injection analysis (FIA) system for rapid sample injections. While some FIA systems have been created to address these challenges, many have limitations such as costly consumables, low pressure capabilities, limited pressure monitoring, and fixed flow rates. To address these limitations, we created an automated, customizable FIA system capable of operating at a range of flow rates (∼50 nL/min to 500 μL/min) to accommodate both low- and high-flow MS ionization sources. This system also functions at varying analytical throughputs from 24 to 1200 samples per day to enable different MS analysis approaches. Applications ranging from native protein analyses to molecular library construction were performed using the FIA system, and results showed a highly robust and reproducible platform capable of providing consistent performance over many days without carryover, as long as washing buffers specific to each molecular analysis were utilized.

  5. Automated on-line liquid-liquid extraction system for temporal mass spectrometric analysis of dynamic samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Kai-Ta; Liu, Pei-Han; Urban, Pawel L

    2015-09-24

    Most real samples cannot directly be infused to mass spectrometers because they could contaminate delicate parts of ion source and guides, or cause ion suppression. Conventional sample preparation procedures limit temporal resolution of analysis. We have developed an automated liquid-liquid extraction system that enables unsupervised repetitive treatment of dynamic samples and instantaneous analysis by mass spectrometry (MS). It incorporates inexpensive open-source microcontroller boards (Arduino and Netduino) to guide the extraction and analysis process. Duration of every extraction cycle is 17 min. The system enables monitoring of dynamic processes over many hours. The extracts are automatically transferred to the ion source incorporating a Venturi pump. Operation of the device has been characterized (repeatability, RSD = 15%, n = 20; concentration range for ibuprofen, 0.053-2.000 mM; LOD for ibuprofen, ∼0.005 mM; including extraction and detection). To exemplify its usefulness in real-world applications, we implemented this device in chemical profiling of pharmaceutical formulation dissolution process. Temporal dissolution profiles of commercial ibuprofen and acetaminophen tablets were recorded during 10 h. The extraction-MS datasets were fitted with exponential functions to characterize the rates of release of the main and auxiliary ingredients (e.g. ibuprofen, k = 0.43 ± 0.01 h(-1)). The electronic control unit of this system interacts with the operator via touch screen, internet, voice, and short text messages sent to the mobile phone, which is helpful when launching long-term (e.g. overnight) measurements. Due to these interactive features, the platform brings the concept of the Internet-of-Things (IoT) to the chemistry laboratory environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Automated gravimetric sample pretreatment using an industrial robot for the high-precision determination of plutonium by isotope dilution mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surugaya, Naoki; Hiyama, Toshiaki; Watahiki, Masaru

    2008-06-01

    A robotized sample-preparation method for the determination of Pu, which is recovered by extraction reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel, by isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) is described. The automated system uses a six-axis industrial robot, whose motility is very fast, accurate, and flexible, installed in a glove box. The automation of the weighing and dilution steps enables operator-unattended sample pretreatment for the high-precision analysis of Pu in aqueous solutions. Using the developed system, the Pu concentration in a HNO(3) medium was successfully determined using a set of subsequent mass spectrometric measurements. The relative uncertainty in determining the Pu concentration by IDMS using this system was estimated to be less than 0.1% (k = 2), which is equal to that expected of a talented analyst. The operation time required was the same as that for a skilled operator.

  7. Automated gravimetric sample pretreatment using an industrial robot for the high-precision determination of plutonium by isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surugaya, Naoki; Hiyama, Toshiaki; Watahiki, Masaru

    2008-01-01

    A robotized sample-preparation method for the determination of Pu, which is recovered by extraction reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel, by isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) is described. The automated system uses a six-axis industrial robot, whose motility is very fast, accurate, and flexible, installed in a glove box. The automation of the weighing and dilution steps enables operator-unattended sample pretreatment for the high-precision analysis of Pu in aqueous solutions. Using the developed system, the Pu concentration in a HNO 3 medium was successfully determined using a set of subsequent mass spectrometric measurements. The relative uncertainty in determining the Pu concentration by IDMS using this system was estimated to be less than 0.1% (k=2), which is equal to that expected of a talented analysis. The operation time required was the same as that for a skilled operator. (author)

  8. Conditions for critical effects in the mass action kinetics equations for water radiolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittman, Richard S.; Buck, Edgar C.; Mausolf, Edward J.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Smith, Frances N.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.

    2014-12-26

    We report on a subtle global feature of the mass action kinetics equations for water radiolysis that results in predictions of a critical behavior in H2O2 and associated radical concentrations. While radiolysis kinetics has been studied extensively in the past, it is only in recent years that high speed computing has allowed the rapid exploration of the solution over widely varying dose and compositional conditions. We explore the radiolytic production of H2O2 under various externally fixed conditions of molecular H2 and O2 that have been regarded as problematic in the literature – specifically, “jumps” in predicted concentrations, and inconsistencies between predictions and experiments have been reported for alpha radiolysis. We computationally map-out a critical concentration behavior for alpha radiolysis kinetics using a comprehensive set of reactions. We then show that all features of interest are accurately reproduced with 15 reactions. An analytical solution for steady-state concentrations of the 15 reactions reveals regions in [H2] and [O2] where the H2O2 concentration is not unique – both stable and unstable concentrations exist. The boundary of this region can be characterized analytically as a function of G-values and rate constants independent of dose rate. Physically, the boundary can be understood as separating a region where a steady-state H2O2 concentration exists, from one where it does not exist without a direct decomposition reaction. We show that this behavior is consistent with reported alpha radiolysis data and that no such behavior should occur for gamma radiolysis. We suggest experiments that could verify or discredit a critical concentration behavior for alpha radiolysis and could place more restrictive ranges on G-values from derived relationships between them.

  9. Mass-action equilibrium and non-specific interactions in protein binding networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslov, Sergei

    2009-03-01

    Large-scale protein binding networks serve as a paradigm of complex properties of living cells. These networks are naturally weighted with edges characterized by binding strength and protein-nodes -- by their concentrations. However, the state-of-the-art high-throughput experimental techniques generate just a binary (yes or no) information about individual interactions. As a result, most of the previous research concentrated just on topology of these networks. In a series of recent publications [1-4] my collaborators and I went beyond purely topological studies and calculated the mass-action equilibrium of a genome-wide binding network using experimentally determined protein concentrations, localizations, and reliable binding interactions in baker's yeast. We then studied how this equilibrium responds to large perturbations [1-2] and noise [3] in concentrations of proteins. We demonstrated that the change in the equilibrium concentration of a protein exponentially decays (and sign-alternates) with its network distance away from the perturbed node. This explains why, despite a globally connected topology, individual functional modules in such networks are able to operate fairly independently. In a separate study [4] we quantified the interplay between specific and non-specific binding interactions under crowded conditions inside living cells. We show how the need to limit the waste of resources constrains the number of types and concentrations of proteins that are present at the same time and at the same place in yeast cells. [1] S Maslov, I. Ispolatov, PNAS 104:13655 (2007). [2] S. Maslov, K. Sneppen, I. Ispolatov, New J. of Phys. 9: 273 (2007). [3] K-K. Yan, D. Walker, S. Maslov, PRL accepted (2008). [4] J. Zhang, S. Maslov, and E. I. Shakhnovich, Mol Syst Biol 4, 210 (2008).

  10. Silica hydride based phases for small molecule separations using automated liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appulage, Dananjaya K; Schug, Kevin A

    2017-07-21

    Silica hydride, or Type C silica, has been developed as an alternative chromatographic support material for liquid chromatography. There are various bonded phases available with this new support. For four such phases (Cholesterol, Bidentate C18, Diamond Hydride, and Diol), retention and selectivity behavior were investigated using liquid chromatography coupled with triple quadrupole mass spectrometry. A set of small molecules from several chemical classes of interest, and varying in their physicochemical properties, were chromatographed under both reversed-phase and aqueous normal phase modes. To screen the columns, column switching was performed using an automated platform controlled by associated software and an additional valve. A typical scouting gradient was implemented. The separation conditions were not further optimized since the goal was simply to evaluate the variable retention behavior of the phases and selectivity under generic conditions. Further, retention of the analytes were evaluated under isocratic conditions with varying percentages of organic phase to visualize the potential for dual retention modes on the same column for certain analytes. Four analytes (fentanyl, hydrocodone, hydromorphone, and matrine) showed dual mode retention behavior with all four phases. Especially, fentanyl exhibited dramatic "U-shaped" retention profiles on Cholesterol and Bidentate C18 phases. Overall, changes in the retention order between reversed phase and aqueous normal phases emphasized the potential for altered selectivity. Results showed that the Cholesterol phase provided the highest retention for most analytes compared to the other phases. The more polar Diol phase still provided good retention in reversed phase mode. Retention and selectivity were all highly reproducible. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Automated multi-plug filtration cleanup for liquid chromatographic-tandem mass spectrometric pesticide multi-residue analysis in representative crop commodities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yuhong; Zhang, Jingru; Zhang, Yuan; Li, Fangbing; Han, Yongtao; Zou, Nan; Xu, Haowei; Qian, Meiyuan; Pan, Canping

    2016-09-02

    An automated multi-plug filtration cleanup (m-PFC) method on modified QuEChERS (quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe) extracts was developed. The automatic device was aimed to reduce labor-consuming manual operation workload in the cleanup steps. It could control the volume and the speed of pulling and pushing cycles accurately. In this work, m-PFC was based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) mixed with other sorbents and anhydrous magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) in a packed tip for analysis of pesticide multi-residues in crop commodities followed by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) detection. It was validated by analyzing 25 pesticides in six representative matrices spiked at two concentration levels of 10 and 100μg/kg. Salts, sorbents, m-PFC procedure, automated pulling and pushing volume, automated pulling speed, and pushing speed for each matrix were optimized. After optimization, two general automated m-PFC methods were introduced to relatively simple (apple, citrus fruit, peanut) and relatively complex (spinach, leek, green tea) matrices. Spike recoveries were within 83 and 108% and 1-14% RSD for most analytes in the tested matrices. Matrix-matched calibrations were performed with the coefficients of determination >0.997 between concentration levels of 10 and 1000μg/kg. The developed method was successfully applied to the determination of pesticide residues in market samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Automated high-capacity on-line extraction and bioanalysis of dried blood spot samples using liquid chromatography/high-resolution accurate mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Regina V; Henion, Jack; Wickremsinhe, Enaksha R

    2014-11-30

    Pharmacokinetic data to support clinical development of pharmaceuticals are routinely obtained from liquid plasma samples. The plasma samples require frozen shipment and storage and are extracted off-line from the liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) systems. In contrast, the use of dried blood spot (DBS) sampling is an attractive alternative in part due to its benefits in microsampling as well as simpler sample storage and transport. However, from a practical aspect, sample extraction from DBS cards can be challenging as currently performed. The goal of this report was to integrate automated serial extraction of large numbers of DBS cards with on-line liquid chromatography/high-resolution accurate mass spectrometry (LC/HRAMS) bioanalysis. An automated system for direct DBS extraction coupled to a LC/HRAMS was employed for the quantification of midazolam (MDZ) and α-hydroxymidazolam (α-OHMDZ) in human blood. The target analytes were directly extracted from the DBS cards onto an on-line chromatographic guard column followed by HRAMS detection. No additional sample treatment was required. The automated DBS LC/HRAMS method was developed and validated, based on the measurement at the accurate mass-to-charge ratio of the target analytes to ensure specificity for the assay. The automated DBS LC/HRAMS method analyzed a DBS sample within 2 min without the need for punching or additional off-line sample treatment. The fully automated analytical method was shown to be sensitive and selective over the concentration range of 5 to 2000 ng/mL. Intra- and inter-day precision and accuracy was less than 15% (less than 20% at the LLOQ). The validated method was successfully applied to measure MDZ and α-OHMDZ in an incurred human sample after a single 7.5 mg dose of MDZ. The direct DBS LC/HRAMS method demonstrated successful implementation of automated DBS extraction and bioanalysis for MDZ and α-OHMDZ. This approach has the potential to promote workload

  13. New Evidence for the Mechanism of Action of a Type-2 Diabetes Drug Using a Magnetic Bead-Based Automated Biosensing Platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uddin, Rokon; Nur-E-Habiba; Rena, Graham

    2017-01-01

    of adding a closely related but blood-glucose neutral drug propanediimidamide (PDI) showed completely different responses to the clusters. The entire assay was integrated in an automated microfluidics platform with an advanced optical imaging unit by which we investigated these aggregation...... platform for investigating the MOA of metformin using a magnetic microbead-based agglutination assay which has allowed us to demonstrate for the first time the interaction between Cu and metformin at clinically relevant low micromolar concentrations of the drug, thus suggesting a potential pathway...... of metformin's blood-glucose lowering action. In this assay, cysteine-functionalized magnetic beadswere agglutinated in the presence of Cu due to cysteine's Cu-chelation property. Addition of clinically relevant doses of metformin resulted in disaggregation of Cu-bridged bead-clusters, whereas the effect...

  14. Prediction of body mass index status from voice signals based on machine learning for automated medical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bum Ju; Kim, Keun Ho; Ku, Boncho; Jang, Jun-Su; Kim, Jong Yeol

    2013-05-01

    The body mass index (BMI) provides essential medical information related to body weight for the treatment and prognosis prediction of diseases such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and stroke. We propose a method for the prediction of normal, overweight, and obese classes based only on the combination of voice features that are associated with BMI status, independently of weight and height measurements. A total of 1568 subjects were divided into 4 groups according to age and gender differences. We performed statistical analyses by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Scheffe test to find significant features in each group. We predicted BMI status (normal, overweight, and obese) by a logistic regression algorithm and two ensemble classification algorithms (bagging and random forests) based on statistically significant features. In the Female-2030 group (females aged 20-40 years), classification experiments using an imbalanced (original) data set gave area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) values of 0.569-0.731 by logistic regression, whereas experiments using a balanced data set gave AUC values of 0.893-0.994 by random forests. AUC values in Female-4050 (females aged 41-60 years), Male-2030 (males aged 20-40 years), and Male-4050 (males aged 41-60 years) groups by logistic regression in imbalanced data were 0.585-0.654, 0.581-0.614, and 0.557-0.653, respectively. AUC values in Female-4050, Male-2030, and Male-4050 groups in balanced data were 0.629-0.893 by bagging, 0.707-0.916 by random forests, and 0.695-0.854 by bagging, respectively. In each group, we found discriminatory features showing statistical differences among normal, overweight, and obese classes. The results showed that the classification models built by logistic regression in imbalanced data were better than those built by the other two algorithms, and significant features differed according to age and gender groups. Our results could support the development of BMI diagnosis

  15. Automation of dimethylation after guanidination labeling chemistry and its compatibility with common buffers and surfactants for mass spectrometry-based shotgun quantitative proteome analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, Andy; Tang, Yanan; Chen, Lu; Li, Liang, E-mail: Liang.Li@ualberta.ca

    2013-07-25

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Dimethylation after guanidination (2MEGA) uses inexpensive reagents for isotopic labeling of peptides. •2MEGA can be optimized and automated for labeling peptides with high efficiency. •2MEGA is compatible with several commonly used cell lysis and protein solubilization reagents. •The automated 2MEGA labeling method can be used to handle a variety of protein samples for relative proteome quantification. -- Abstract: Isotope labeling liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC–MS) is a major analytical platform for quantitative proteome analysis. Incorporation of isotopes used to distinguish samples plays a critical role in the success of this strategy. In this work, we optimized and automated a chemical derivatization protocol (dimethylation after guanidination, 2MEGA) to increase the labeling reproducibility and reduce human intervention. We also evaluated the reagent compatibility of this protocol to handle biological samples in different types of buffers and surfactants. A commercially available liquid handler was used for reagent dispensation to minimize analyst intervention and at least twenty protein digest samples could be prepared in a single run. Different front-end sample preparation methods for protein solubilization (SDS, urea, Rapigest™, and ProteaseMAX™) and two commercially available cell lysis buffers were evaluated for compatibility with the automated protocol. It was found that better than 94% desired labeling could be obtained in all conditions studied except urea, where the rate was reduced to about 92% due to carbamylation on the peptide amines. This work illustrates the automated 2MEGA labeling process can be used to handle a wide range of protein samples containing various reagents that are often encountered in protein sample preparation for quantitative proteome analysis.

  16. Automated analysis of non-mass-enhancing lesions in breast MRI based on morphological, kinetic, and spatio-temporal moments and joint segmentation-motion compensation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Sebastian; Shutler, Jamie D.; Lobbes, Marc; Burgeth, Bernhard; Meyer-Bäse, Anke

    2013-12-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) represents an established method for the detection and diagnosis of breast lesions. While mass-like enhancing lesions can be easily categorized according to the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) MRI lexicon, a majority of diagnostically challenging lesions, the so called non-mass-like enhancing lesions, remain both qualitatively as well as quantitatively difficult to analyze. Thus, the evaluation of kinetic and/or morphological characteristics of non-masses represents a challenging task for an automated analysis and is of crucial importance for advancing current computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems. Compared to the well-characterized mass-enhancing lesions, non-masses have no well-defined and blurred tumor borders and a kinetic behavior that is not easily generalizable and thus discriminative for malignant and benign non-masses. To overcome these difficulties and pave the way for novel CAD systems for non-masses, we will evaluate several kinetic and morphological descriptors separately and a novel technique, the Zernike velocity moments, to capture the joint spatio-temporal behavior of these lesions, and additionally consider the impact of non-rigid motion compensation on a correct diagnosis.

  17. Supersymmetric Dirac-Born-Infeld action with self-dual mass term

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishino, Hitoshi; Rajpoot, Subhash; Reed, Kevin

    2005-01-01

    We introduce a Dirac-Born-Infeld action to a self-dual N = 1 supersymmetric vector multiplet in three dimensions. This action is based on the supersymmetric generalized self-duality in odd dimensions developed originally by Townsend, Pilch and van Nieuwenhuizen. Even though such a self-duality had been supposed to be very difficult to generalize to a supersymmetrically interacting system, we show that the Dirac-Born-Infeld action is actually compatible with supersymmetry and self-duality in three dimensions, even though the original self-duality receives corrections by the Dirac-Born-Infeld action. The interactions can be further generalized to arbitrary (non)polynomial interactions. As a by-product, we also show that a third-rank field strength leads to a more natural formulation of self-duality in 3D. We also show an interesting role played by the third-rank field strength leading to supersymmetry breaking, in addition to accommodating a Chern-Simons form

  18. Mass spectrometry-based monitoring of millisecond protein–ligand binding dynamics using an automated microfluidic platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cong, Yongzheng; Katipamula, Shanta; Trader, Cameron D.; Orton, Daniel J.; Geng, Tao; Baker, Erin S.; Kelly, Ryan T.

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing protein-ligand binding dynamics is crucial for understanding protein function and developing new therapeutic agents. We have developed a novel microfluidic platform that features rapid mixing of protein and ligand solutions, variable incubation times, and on-chip electrospray ionization to perform label-free, solution-based monitoring of protein-ligand binding dynamics. This platform offers many advantages including automated processing, rapid mixing, and low sample consumption.

  19. The antimicrobial action of low-molar-mass chitosan, chitosan derivates and chitooligosaccharides on bifidobacteria

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šimůnek, Jiří; Koppová, Ingrid; Lukáš, Filip; Tishchenko, Galina; Belzecki, G.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 4 (2010), s. 379-382 ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA525/08/0803 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515; CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : chitooligosaccharides * low-molar-mass chitosan Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 0.977, year: 2010

  20. A cloud pattern recognition algorithm to automate the estimation of mass eruption rates from an umbrella cloud or downwind plume observed via satellite imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansons, E.; Pouget, S.; Bursik, M. I.; Patra, A. K.; Pitman, E. B.; Tupper, A.

    2013-12-01

    The eruption of Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland in April and May, 2010, brought to light the importance of Volcanic Ash Transport and Dispersion models (VATD) to the estimation of the position and concentration of ash with time, and how vital it is for Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers (VAACs) to be able to detect and track ash clouds with both observations and models. The VATD needs to get Eruption Source Parameters (ESP), including mass eruption rate through time, as input, which ultimately relies on the detection of the eruption regardless of the meteorological conditions. Volcanic cloud recognition is especially difficult when meteorological clouds are also present, which is typically the case in the tropics. Given the fact that meteorological clouds and volcanic clouds behave differently, we developed an agent-based pattern definition algorithm to detect and define volcanic clouds on satellite imagery. We have combined this with a plume growth rate methodology to automate the estimation of volumetric and mass growth with time using plume geometry provided by satellite imagery. This allows an estimation of the mass eruption rate (MER) with time. To test our approach, we used the examples of two eruptions of different source strength, in two different climatic regimes and for which therefore the weather during eruption was quite different: Grímsvötn (Iceland) May 21, 2011, which produced an umbrella cloud readily seen above the cloud deck, and Manam (Papua New Guinea) October 24, 2004, which produced a stratospheric umbrella cloud that rapidly turned into a downwind plume, and was difficult to distinguish from meteorological clouds. The new methods may in the future allow for fast, easy and automated detection of volcanic clouds as well as a remote assessment of the mass eruption rate with time, even for inaccessible volcanoes. The methods may thus provide an additional path to estimation of the ESP and the forecasting of ash cloud propagation.

  1. Oak Ridge K-25 Site Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 3, Technology evaluation data sheets; Part B, Remedial action, robotics/automation, waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fellows, R.L. [ed.

    1993-02-26

    The Oak Ridge K-25 Technology Logic Diagram (TLD), a decision support tool for the K-25 Site, was developed to provide a planning document that relates environmental restoration (ER) and waste management (WN) problems at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site. The TLD technique identifies the research necessary to develop these technologies to a state that allows for technology transfer and application to waste management, remediation, decontamination, and decommissioning activities. The TLD consists of four separate volumes-Vol. 1, Vol. 2, Vol. 3A, and Vol. 3B. Volume 1 provides introductory and overview information about the TLD. Volume 2 contains logic diagrams. Volume 3 has been divided into two separate volumes to facilitate handling and use. This volume 3 B provides the Technology Evaluation Data Sheets (TEDS) for ER/WM activities (Remedial Action Robotics and Automation, Waste Management) that are referenced by a TEDS code number in Vol. 2 of the TLD. Each of these sheets represents a single logic trace across the TLD. These sheets contain more detail than each technology in Vol. 2. The TEDS are arranged alphanumerically by the TEDS code number in the upper right corner of each data sheet. Volume 3 can be used in two ways: (1) technologies that are identified from Vol. 2 can be referenced directly in Vol. 3 by using the TEDS codes, and (2) technologies and general technology areas (alternatives) can be located in the index in the front of this volume.

  2. Use of mass and toxicity balances in risk-based corrective action decisions at contaminated sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevigny, J.H.; Lintott, D.; Wrubleski, R.M.; Drury, C.R.

    1997-01-01

    The contaminated groundwater at a sour gas plant facility was studied to identify the chemicals of environmental concern. Simple mass balance principles were used to determine the proportion of organic carbon, organic nitrogen and Microtox R toxicity that can be attributed to two process chemicals that have contaminated several sour gas plants in western Canada. The two process chemicals are sulfolane and diisopropanolamine (DIPA). The organic carbon balance was calculated by determining the molar contribution of sulfolane and DIPA relative to the mass of carboxylic acid-corrected dissolved organic carbon. Organic carbon balances ranged from 44 to 96 per cent. The organic nitrogen balance was calculated by determining the molar contribution of DIPA relative to the mass of ammonium ion-corrected dissolved Kjeldahl nitrogen. The nitrogen balances were highly variable between 8 to 48 per cent for samples with organic nitrogen concentrations between 10 and 32 mg/L. The Microtox R toxicity balance was calculated by determining the proportions of toxicity that could be accounted for by pure phase sulfolane and DIPA. The Microtox R toxicity balance for samples that showed significant toxicity ranged from 71 to 122 per cent

  3. Mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quigg, Chris

    2007-01-01

    In the classical physics we inherited from Isaac Newton, mass does not arise, it simply is. The mass of a classical object is the sum of the masses of its parts. Albert Einstein showed that the mass of a body is a measure of its energy content, inviting us to consider the origins of mass. The protons we accelerate at Fermilab are prime examples of Einsteinian matter: nearly all of their mass arises from stored energy. Missing mass led to the discovery of the noble gases, and a new form of missing mass leads us to the notion of dark matter. Starting with a brief guided tour of the meanings of mass, the colloquium will explore the multiple origins of mass. We will see how far we have come toward understanding mass, and survey the issues that guide our research today.

  4. Creatine Supplementation and Skeletal Muscle Metabolism for Building Muscle Mass- Review of the Potential Mechanisms of Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farshidfar, Farnaz; Pinder, Mark A; Myrie, Semone B

    2017-01-01

    Creatine, a very popular supplement among athletic populations, is of growing interest for clinical applications. Since over 90% of creatine is stored in skeletal muscle, the effect of creatine supplementation on muscle metabolism is a widely studied area. While numerous studies over the past few decades have shown that creatine supplementation has many favorable effects on skeletal muscle physiology and metabolism, including enhancing muscle mass (growth/hypertrophy); the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. This report reviews studies addressing the mechanisms of action of creatine supplementation on skeletal muscle growth/hypertrophy. Early research proposed that the osmotic effect of creatine supplementation serves as a cellular stressor (osmosensing) that acts as an anabolic stimulus for protein synthesis signal pathways. Other reports indicated that creatine directly affects muscle protein synthesis via modulations of components in the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. Creatine may also directly affect the myogenic process (formation of muscle tissue), by altering secretions of myokines, such as myostatin and insulin-like growth factor-1, and expressions of myogenic regulatory factors, resulting in enhanced satellite cells mitotic activities and differentiation into myofiber. Overall, there is still no clear understanding of the mechanisms of action regarding how creatine affects muscle mass/growth, but current evidence suggests it may exert its effects through multiple approaches, with converging impacts on protein synthesis and myogenesis. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  5. Non-steady state mass action dynamics without rate constants: dynamics of coupled reactions using chemical potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, William R.; Baker, Scott E.

    2017-10-01

    Comprehensive and predictive simulation of coupled reaction networks has long been a goal of biology and other fields. Currently, metabolic network models that utilize enzyme mass action kinetics have predictive power but are limited in scope and application by the fact that the determination of enzyme rate constants is laborious and low throughput. We present a statistical thermodynamic formulation of the law of mass action for coupled reactions at both steady states and non-stationary states. The formulation uses chemical potentials instead of rate constants. When used to model deterministic systems, the method corresponds to a rescaling of the time dependent reactions in such a way that steady states can be reached on the same time scale but with significantly fewer computational steps. The relationships between reaction affinities, free energy changes and generalized detailed balance are central to the discussion. The significance for applications in systems biology are discussed as is the concept and assumption of maximum entropy production rate as a biological principle that links thermodynamics to natural selection.

  6. Detection and identification of drugs and toxicants in human body fluids by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry under data-dependent acquisition control and automated database search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberacher, Herbert; Schubert, Birthe; Libiseller, Kathrin; Schweissgut, Anna

    2013-04-03

    Systematic toxicological analysis (STA) is aimed at detecting and identifying all substances of toxicological relevance (i.e. drugs, drugs of abuse, poisons and/or their metabolites) in biological material. Particularly, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) represents a competent and commonly applied screening and confirmation tool. Herein, we present an untargeted liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) assay aimed to complement existing GC/MS screening for the detection and identification of drugs in blood, plasma and urine samples. Solid-phase extraction was accomplished on mixed-mode cartridges. LC was based on gradient elution in a miniaturized C18 column. High resolution electrospray ionization-MS/MS in positive ion mode with data-dependent acquisition control was used to generate tandem mass spectral information that enabled compound identification via automated library search in the "Wiley Registry of Tandem Mass Spectral Data, MSforID". Fitness of the developed LC/MS/MS method for application in STA in terms of selectivity, detection capability and reliability of identification (sensitivity/specificity) was demonstrated with blank samples, certified reference materials, proficiency test samples, and authentic casework samples. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. A simple automated solid-phase extraction procedure for measurement of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 and D2 by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, Susan; Harris, John; Calton, Lisa; Wallace, A Michael

    2009-05-01

    Measurement of 25-hydroxyvitamin D(3) (25OHD(3)) and D(2) (25OHD(2)) is challenging. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) methods have been described but they are often complex and difficult to automate. We have developed a simplified procedure involving an automated solid-phase extraction (SPE). Internal standard (hexadeuterated 25-hydroxyvitamin D(3)) was added to serum or plasma followed by protein precipitation with methanol. Following centrifugation, a robotic instrument (CTC PAL [Presearch] for ITSP SPE [MicroLiter Analytical Supplies, Inc]) performed a six-step SPE procedure and the purified samples were injected into the LC-MS/MS. Quantification of 25OHD(3) and 25OHD(2) was by electrospray ionization MS/MS in the multiple-reaction monitoring mode. The lower limit of quantitation was 4.0 nmol/L for 25OHD(3) and 7.5 nmol/L for 25OHD(2). Within- and between-assay precision was below 10% over the concentration range of 22.5-120 nmol/L for D(3) and 17.5-70 nmol/L for D(2) (n = 10). The calibration was linear up to 2500 nmol/L (r = 0.99). Recoveries ranged between 89% and 104% for both metabolites and no ion suppression was observed. The results obtained compared well (r = 0.96) with the IDS-OCTEIA 25-hydroxyvitamin D enzyme immunoassay for samples containing less than 125 nmol/L, at higher concentrations the immunodiagnostic system (IDS) method showed positive bias. Our simplified sample preparation and automated SPE method is suitable for the measurement of 25OHD(3) and D(2) in a routine laboratory environment. The system can process up to 300 samples per day with no cumbersome solvent evaporation step and minimal operator intervention.

  8. Fully automated dynamic in-syringe liquid-phase microextraction and on-column derivatization of carbamate pesticides with gas chromatography/mass spectrometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jingyi; Lee, Hian Kee

    2011-09-01

    A new fully automated dynamic in-syringe liquid-phase microextraction (LPME) and on-column derivatization approach, with gas chromatography/mass spectrometric (GC/MS) analysis, was developed to determine carbamate pesticides from water samples. With the use of a CTC CombiPal autosampler and its associated Cycle Composer software, a sample preparation-GC/MS method was enabled that allowed sample extraction, extract injection, and analyte derivatization to be carried out completely automatically. Optimization of extraction parameters was carried out by orthogonal array design which required a minimum of 16 experiments; the entire set of experiments was performed completely automatically and consecutively without any human intervention. Low limits of detection ranging from 0.05 to 0.1 μg/L were achieved for the carbamates. Effective enrichment of the analytes at a low concentration of 0.01 mg/L was also achieved (enrichment factors of between 57 and 138). The precision of the optimized method was satisfactory, with relative standard deviations of <6.0% (n = 6). High relative recoveries of between 81 and 125% were obtained when the method was applied to the analysis of real water samples, indicating that the sample matrix had little effect on the developed method. This automated dynamic in-syringe LPME approach demonstrated the feasibility of a complete analytical system comprising sample preparation and GC/MS that might be operated onsite, fully automatically without human intervention.

  9. Automated Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Electron Transfer Dissociation High Resolution Mass Spectrometry Measured at Single-Amide Resolution

    OpenAIRE

    Landgraf, Rachelle R.; Chalmers, Michael J.; Griffin, Patrick R.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) is a well established method for the measurement of solution-phase deuterium incorporation into proteins, which can provide insight into protein conformational mobility. However, most HDX measurements are constrained to regions of the protein where pepsin proteolysis allows detection at peptide resolution. Recently, single-amide resolution deuterium incorporation has been achieved by limiting gas-phase scrambling in the mass spectrometer....

  10. SU-C-218-06: Evaluation of a CT-Based, Semi-Automated Lung Mass Estimation Method Under Varying Acquisition Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busse, N; Erwin, W; Pan, T

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate a simple, semi-automated lung mass estimation method on CT scans from a variety of acquisition techniques for mass correction of MIRD dose estimates. CT scans from ten patients undergoing stereotactic body radiation therapy treatment planning on a GE DST PET/CT scanner were analyzed retrospectively. For each patient, free- breathing (FB) and respiratory gated 4D-CT scans were acquired. 4D-CT scans were reconstructed and sorted into ten phases representing one complete respiratory cycle. An average CT (ACT) was derived from the ten phase reconstructions. Half the patients also had breath-hold (BH) scans. Scans were analyzed using Osirix MD's V 1.3 (Pixmeo, Geneva Switzerland) Grow Region segmentation tool. Lung volume; average lung, tissue (∼lcm ROI in the descending aorta), and air (∼1 cm ROI in the trachea) HU's were recorded for each acquisition type. Lung mass was calculated by assuming each voxel is a linear combination of only air and tissue. The fraction of total lung volume consisting of lung tissue is assumed to be (lung HU - air HU) / (tissue HU - air HU), and mass = total volume X fraction X 1 g/cm 3 . 4D-CT mass estimates showed variability, with a minimum at end-expiration and a maximum just after end-inspiration. ACT generally produced the highest estimate. FB and BH estimates were near the median. Although calculated mass increased with increasing total lung volume, the difference between minimum and maximum population means in the 4D-CT data was 5.5%. FB and BH estimates fell within that 5.5%, while the ACT mean was 9.8% above the global mean. The range of estimated masses (524 g to 977 g) suggests the value of lung mass estimates for more patient-specific MIRD dose assessment. Excluding ACT, the results indicate that any of the acquisition techniques can provide a reasonable lung mass estimate. This work was supported in part by a residency grant from the AAPM. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  11. Metabolite profiling of Camellia sinensis by automated sequential, multidimensional gas chromatography/mass spectrometry reveals strong monsoon effects on tea constituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalsick, Amanda; Kfoury, Nicole; Robbat, Albert; Ahmed, Selena; Orians, Colin; Griffin, Timothy; Cash, Sean B; Stepp, John Richard

    2014-11-28

    Seasonal variation in tea (Camellia sinensis (L.) Kuntze; Theaceae) chemistry was investigated using automated sequential, multidimensional gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-GC/MS). Metabolite libraries were produced for teas harvested from the Bulang Mountains in Yunnan, China before and after the onset of the East Asian Monsoon. A total of 201 spring and 196 monsoon metabolites were identified, with 169 common and 59 seasonally unique compounds. An additional 163 metabolites were detected but their identity could not be confirmed. Spectral deconvolution of GC/MS data was used to measure the relative concentrations in the teas. Within each family individual metabolite concentrations increased, decreased and stayed the same. The major constituents in both teas were linalool (28%), geraniol (13%), α-terpineol (10%), hotrienol (4%) and nerol (3%). This work provides the foundation to monitor seasonal variations of tea chemistry. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Determination of Low Concentrations of Acetochlor in Water by Automated Solid-Phase Extraction and Gas Chromatography with Mass-Selective Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindley, C.E.; Stewart, J.T.; Sandstrom, M.W.

    1996-01-01

    A sensitive and reliable gas chromatographic/mass spectrometric (GC/MS) method for determining acetochlor in environmental water samples was developed. The method involves automated extraction of the herbicide from a filtered 1 L water sample through a C18 solid-phase extraction column, elution from the column with hexane-isopropyl alcohol (3 + 1), and concentration of the extract with nitrogen gas. The herbicide is quantitated by capillary/column GC/MS with selected-ion monitoring of 3 characteristic ions. The single-operator method detection limit for reagent water samples is 0.0015 ??g/L. Mean recoveries ranged from about 92 to 115% for 3 water matrixes fortified at 0.05 and 0.5 ??g/L. Average single-operator precision, over the course of 1 week, was better than 5%.

  13. Differential fragmentation patterns of pectin oligogalacturonides observed by nanoelectrospray quadrupole ion-trap mass spectrometry using automated spectra interpretation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mutenda, Kudzai E; Matthiesen, Rune; Roepstorff, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Oligogalacturonides of different degrees of polymerization (DP) and methyl esterification (DE) were structurally analyzed by nanoESI quadrupole ion-trap mass spectrometry. The fragmentation patterns of the oligogalacturonides were compared using the program 'Virtual Expert Mass Spectrometrist...... oligogalacturonides, cross-ring fragmentation gives more structural information than glycosidic bond cleavage. One implication of this is that more structural information is obtained when analyzing methyl-esterified oligogalacturonides than non-methyl-esterified ones in an ion-trap instrument. This is of particular...

  14. Effects of prey type on specific dynamic action, growth, and mass conversion efficiencies in the horned frog, Ceratophrys cranwelli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grayson, Kristine L; Cook, Leslie W; Todd, M Jason; Pierce, D; Hopkins, William A; Gatten, Robert E; Dorcas, Michael E

    2005-07-01

    To be most energetically profitable, predators should ingest prey with the maximal nutritional benefit while minimizing the cost of processing. Therefore, when determining the quality of prey items, both the cost of processing and nutritional content must be considered. Specific dynamic action (SDA), the increase in metabolic rate associated with feeding in animals, is a significant processing cost that represents the total cost of digestion and assimilation of nutrients from prey. We examined the effects of an invertebrate diet (earthworms) and a vertebrate diet (newborn mice) on mass conversion efficiencies, growth, and SDA in the Chacoan horned frog, Ceratophrys cranwelli. We found the earthworm diet to be significantly lower in lipid, protein, and energy content when compared to the diet of newborn mice. Growth and mass conversion efficiencies were significantly higher in frogs fed newborn mice. However, mean SDA did not differ between frogs fed the two diets, a finding that contradicts many studies that indicate SDA increases with the protein content of the meal. Together, our results indicate that future studies evaluating the effect of meal type on bioenergetics of herpetofauna are warranted and may provide significant insight into the underlying factors driving SDA.

  15. Automated Ambient Desorption-Ionization Platform for Surface Imaging Integrated with a Commercial Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pól, Jaroslav; Vidová, Veronika; Kruppa, G.; Kobliha, Václav; Novák, Petr; Lemr, Karel; Kotiaho, T.; Kostiainen, R.; Havlíček, Vladimír; Volný, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 81, č. 20 (2009), s. 8479-8487 ISSN 0003-2700 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC07017 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : ATMOSPHERIC-PRESSURE PHOTOIONIZATION * COMPREHENSIVE CLASSIFICATION-SYSTEM * mass spectrometry Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 5.214, year: 2009

  16. A Customizable Flow Injection System for Automated, High Throughput, and Time Sensitive Ion Mobility Spectrometry and Mass Spectrometry Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orton, Daniel J. [Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352, United States; Tfaily, Malak M. [Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352, United States; Moore, Ronald J. [Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352, United States; LaMarche, Brian L. [Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352, United States; Zheng, Xueyun [Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352, United States; Fillmore, Thomas L. [Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352, United States; Chu, Rosalie K. [Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352, United States; Weitz, Karl K. [Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352, United States; Monroe, Matthew E. [Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352, United States; Kelly, Ryan T. [Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352, United States; Smith, Richard D. [Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352, United States; Baker, Erin S. [Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352, United States

    2017-12-13

    To better understand disease conditions and environmental perturbations, multi-omic studies (i.e. proteomic, lipidomic, metabolomic, etc. analyses) are vastly increasing in popularity. In a multi-omic study, a single sample is typically extracted in multiple ways and numerous analyses are performed using different instruments. Thus, one sample becomes many analyses, making high throughput and reproducible evaluations a necessity. One way to address the numerous samples and varying instrumental conditions is to utilize a flow injection analysis (FIA) system for rapid sample injection. While some FIA systems have been created to address these challenges, many have limitations such as high consumable costs, low pressure capabilities, limited pressure monitoring and fixed flow rates. To address these limitations, we created an automated, customizable FIA system capable of operating at diverse flow rates (~50 nL/min to 500 µL/min) to accommodate low- and high-flow instrument sources. This system can also operate at varying analytical throughputs from 24 to 1200 samples per day to enable different MS analysis approaches. Applications ranging from native protein analyses to molecular library construction were performed using the FIA system. The results from these studies showed a highly robust platform, providing consistent performance over many days without carryover as long as washing buffers specific to each molecular analysis were utilized.

  17. A METHOD FOR AUTOMATED ANALYSIS OF 10 ML WATER SAMPLES CONTAINING ACIDIC, BASIC, AND NEUTRAL SEMIVOLATILE COMPOUNDS LISTED IN USEPA METHOD 8270 BY SOLID PHASE EXTRACTION COUPLED IN-LINE TO LARGE VOLUME INJECTION GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Data is presented showing the progress made towards the development of a new automated system combining solid phase extraction (SPE) with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry for the single run analysis of water samples containing a broad range of acid, base and neutral compounds...

  18. Quantification of 31 illicit and medicinal drugs and metabolites in whole blood by fully automated solid-phase extraction and ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørk, Marie Kjærgaard; Simonsen, Kirsten Wiese; Andersen, David Wederkinck

    2013-01-01

    An efficient method for analyzing illegal and medicinal drugs in whole blood using fully automated sample preparation and short ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) run time is presented. A selection of 31 drugs, including amphetamines, cocaine, opioids...

  19. Automated mini-column solid-phase extraction cleanup for high-throughput analysis of chemical contaminants in foods by low-pressure gas chromatography – tandem mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study demonstrated the application of an automated high-throughput mini-cartridge solid-phase extraction (mini-SPE) cleanup for the rapid low-pressure gas chromatography – tandem mass spectrometry (LPGC-MS/MS) analysis of pesticides and environmental contaminants in QuEChERS extracts of foods. ...

  20. Fully automated determination of 74 pharmaceuticals in environmental and waste waters by online solid phase extraction-liquid chromatography-electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Serna, Rebeca; Pérez, Sandra; Ginebreda, Antoni; Petrović, Mira; Barceló, Damià

    2010-12-15

    The present work describes the development of a fully automated method, based on on-line solid-phase extraction (SPE)-liquid chromatography-electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS), for the determination of 74 pharmaceuticals in environmental waters (superficial water and groundwater) as well as sewage waters. On-line SPE is performed by passing 2.5 mL of the water sample through a HySphere Resin GP cartridge. For unequivocal identification and confirmation two selected reaction monitoring (SRM) transitions are monitored per compound, thus four identification points are achieved. Quantification is performed by the internal standard approach, indispensable to correct the losses during the solid phase extraction, as well as the matrix effects. The main advantages of the method developed are high sensitivity (limits of detection in the low ng L(-1) range), selectivity due the use of tandem mass spectrometry and reliability due the use of 51 surrogates and minimum sample manipulation. As a part of the validation procedure, the method developed has been applied to the analysis of various environmental and sewage samples from a Spanish river and a sewage treatment plant. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Organotin speciation in environmental matrices by automated on-line hydride generation-programmed temperature vaporization-capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, H; Nogueira, J M F

    2005-11-11

    In the present contribution, a new automated on-line hydride generation methodology was developed for dibutyltin and tributyltin speciation at the trace level, using a programmable temperature-vaporizing inlet followed by capillary gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry in the selected ion-monitoring mode acquisition (PTV-GC/MS(SIM)). The methodology involves a sequence defined by two running methods, the first one configured for hydride generation with sodium tetrahydroborate as derivatising agent and the second configured for speciation purposes, using a conventional autosampler and data acquisition controlled by the instrument's software. From the method-development experiments, it had been established that injector configuration has a great effect on the speciation of the actual methodology, particularly, the initial inlet temperature (-20 degrees C; He: 150 ml/min), injection volume (2 microl) and solvent characteristics using the solvent venting mode. Under optimized conditions, a remarkable instrumental performance including very good precision (RSD CRM 462, Nr. 330 dibutyltin: 68+/-12 ng/g; tributyltin: 54+/-15 ng/g on dry mass basis), using liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) and solid-phase extraction (SPE) sample enrichment and multiple injections (2 x 5 microl) for sensitivity enhancement. The methodology evidenced high reproducibility, is easy to work-up, sensitive and showed to be a suitable alternative to replace the currently dedicated analytical systems for organotin speciation in environmental matrices at the trace level.

  2. Automated correlation and classification of secondary ion mass spectrometry images using a k-means cluster method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konicek, Andrew R; Lefman, Jonathan; Szakal, Christopher

    2012-08-07

    We present a novel method for correlating and classifying ion-specific time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) images within a multispectral dataset by grouping images with similar pixel intensity distributions. Binary centroid images are created by employing a k-means-based custom algorithm. Centroid images are compared to grayscale SIMS images using a newly developed correlation method that assigns the SIMS images to classes that have similar spatial (rather than spectral) patterns. Image features of both large and small spatial extent are identified without the need for image pre-processing, such as normalization or fixed-range mass-binning. A subsequent classification step tracks the class assignment of SIMS images over multiple iterations of increasing n classes per iteration, providing information about groups of images that have similar chemistry. Details are discussed while presenting data acquired with ToF-SIMS on a model sample of laser-printed inks. This approach can lead to the identification of distinct ion-specific chemistries for mass spectral imaging by ToF-SIMS, as well as matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI), and desorption electrospray ionization (DESI).

  3. High-resolution twin-ion metabolite extraction (HiTIME) mass spectrometry: nontargeted detection of unknown drug metabolites by isotope labeling, liquid chromatography mass spectrometry, and automated high-performance computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeming, Michael G; Isaac, Andrew P; Pope, Bernard J; Cranswick, Noel; Wright, Christine E; Ziogas, James; O'Hair, Richard A J; Donald, William A

    2015-04-21

    The metabolic fate of a compound can often determine the success of a new drug lead. Thus, significant effort is directed toward identifying the metabolites formed from a given molecule. Here, an automated and nontargeted procedure is introduced for detecting drug metabolites without authentic metabolite standards via the use of stable isotope labeling, liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC/MS), and high-performance computing. LC/MS of blood plasma extracts from rats that were administered a 1:1 mixture of acetaminophen (APAP) and (13)C6-APAP resulted in mass spectra that contained "twin" ions for drug metabolites that were not detected in control spectra (i.e., no APAP administered). Because of the development of a program (high-resolution twin-ion metabolite extraction; HiTIME) that can identify twin-ions in high-resolution mass spectra without centroiding (i.e., reduction of mass spectral peaks to single data points), 9 doublets corresponding to APAP metabolites were identified. This is nearly twice that obtained by use of existing programs that make use of centroiding to reduce computational cost under these conditions with a quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer. By a manual search for all reported APAP metabolite ions, no additional twin-ion signals were assigned. These data indicate that all the major metabolites of APAP and multiple low-abundance metabolites (e.g., acetaminophen hydroxy- and methoxysulfate) that are rarely reported were detected. This methodology can be used to detect drug metabolites without prior knowledge of their identity. HiTIME is freely available from https://github.com/bjpop/HiTIME .

  4. Automated determination of aliphatic primary amines in wastewater by simultaneous derivatization and headspace solid-phase microextraction followed by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llop, Anna; Pocurull, Eva; Borrull, Francesc

    2010-01-22

    This paper presents a fully automated method for determining ten primary amines in wastewater at ng/L levels. The method is based on simultaneous derivatization with pentafluorobenzaldehyde (PFBAY) and headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) followed by gas chromatography coupled to ion trap tandem mass spectrometry (GC-IT-MS-MS). The influence of main factors on the efficiency of derivatization and of HS-SPME is described in detail and optimized by a central composite design. For all species, the highest enrichment factors were achieved using a 85 microm polyacrylate (PA) fiber exposed in the headspace of stirred water samples (750 rpm) at pH 12, containing 360 g/L of NaCl, at 40 degrees C for 15 min. Under optimized conditions, the proposed method achieved detection limits ranging from 10 to 100 ng/L (except for cyclohexylamine). The optimized method was then used to determine the presence of primary amines in various types of wastewater samples, such as influent and effluent wastewater from municipal and industrial wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) and a potable water treatment plant. Although the analysis of these samples revealed the presence of up to 1500 microg/L of certain primary amines in influent industrial wastewater, the concentration of these compounds in the effluent and in municipal and potable water was substantially lower, at low microg/L levels. The new derivatization-HS-SPME-GC-IT-MS-MS method is suitable for the fast, reliable and inexpensive determination of primary amines in wastewater in an automated procedure. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Automating data analysis for two-dimensional gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry non-targeted analysis of comparative samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titaley, Ivan A; Ogba, O Maduka; Chibwe, Leah; Hoh, Eunha; Cheong, Paul H-Y; Simonich, Staci L Massey

    2018-03-16

    Non-targeted analysis of environmental samples, using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC × GC/ToF-MS), poses significant data analysis challenges due to the large number of possible analytes. Non-targeted data analysis of complex mixtures is prone to human bias and is laborious, particularly for comparative environmental samples such as contaminated soil pre- and post-bioremediation. To address this research bottleneck, we developed OCTpy, a Python™ script that acts as a data reduction filter to automate GC × GC/ToF-MS data analysis from LECO ® ChromaTOF ® software and facilitates selection of analytes of interest based on peak area comparison between comparative samples. We used data from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contaminated soil, pre- and post-bioremediation, to assess the effectiveness of OCTpy in facilitating the selection of analytes that have formed or degraded following treatment. Using datasets from the soil extracts pre- and post-bioremediation, OCTpy selected, on average, 18% of the initial suggested analytes generated by the LECO ® ChromaTOF ® software Statistical Compare feature. Based on this list, 63-100% of the candidate analytes identified by a highly trained individual were also selected by OCTpy. This process was accomplished in several minutes per sample, whereas manual data analysis took several hours per sample. OCTpy automates the analysis of complex mixtures of comparative samples, reduces the potential for human error during heavy data handling and decreases data analysis time by at least tenfold. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Full automation of solid-phase microextraction/on-fiber derivatization for simultaneous determination of endocrine-disrupting chemicals and steroid hormones by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lihua; Lan, Chongyu; Liu, Hongtao; Dong, Jun; Luan, Tiangang

    2006-09-01

    A fully automated method using direct immersion solid-phase microextraction (DI-SPME) and headspace on-fiber silylation for simultaneous determinations of exogenous endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) and endogenous steroid hormones in environmental aqueous and biological samples by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed and compared to a previously reported manual method. Three EDCs and five endocrine steroid hormones were selected to evaluate this method. The extraction and derivatization time, ion strength, pH, incubation temperature, sample volume, and extraction solvent were optimized. Satisfactory results in pure water were obtained in terms of linearity of calibration curve (R2=0.9932-1.0000), dynamic range (3 orders of magnitude), precision (4-9% RSD), as well as LOD (0.001-0.124 microg L(-1)) and LOQ (0.004-0.413 microg L(-1)), respectively. These results were similar to those obtained using a manual method, and moreover, the precision was improved. This new automated method has been applied to the determinations of target compounds in real samples used in our previous study on a manual SPME method. Exogenous octylphenol (OP), technical grade nonylphenol (t-NP), and diethylstilbestrol (DES) were at 0.13, 5.03, and 0.02 microg L(-1) in river water and 3.76, 13.25, and 0.10 microg L(-1) in fish serum, respectively. Natural steroid hormones estrone (E1), 17beta-estradiol (E2), and testosterone (T) were at 0.19, 0.11, and 6.22 microg L(-1) in river water; and in female fish serum E1, E2, and pregnenolone (PREG) were at 1.37, 1.95, and 6.25 microg L(-1), respectively. These results were confirmed by the manual method. The developed fully automated SPME and on-fiber silylation procedures showed satisfactory applications in environmental analysis and the performances show improved precision and a reduced analysis time compared to the manual method.

  7. Killing of targets by effector CD8 T cells in the mouse spleen follows the law of mass action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganusov, Vitaly V [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    In contrast with antibody-based vaccines, it has been difficult to measure the efficacy of T cell-based vaccines and to correlate the efficacy of CD8 T cell responses with protection again viral infections. In part, this difficulty is due to poor understanding of the in vivo efficacy of CD8 T cells produced by vaccination. Using a: recently developed experimental method of in vivo cytotoxicity we have investigated quantitative aspects of killing of peptide-pulsed targets by effector and memory CD8 T cells, specific to three epitopes of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), in the mouse spleen. By analyzing data on killing of targets with varying number of epitope-specific effector and memory CD8 T cells, we find that killing of targets by effectors follows the law of mass-action, that is the death rate of peptide-pulsed targets is proportional to the frequency of CTLs in the spleen. In contrast, killing of targets by memory CD8 T cells does not follow the mass action law because the death rate of targets saturates at high frequencies of memory CD8 T cells. For both effector and memory cells, we also find little support for the killing term that includes the decrease of the death rate of targets with target cell density. Interestingly, our analysis suggests that at low CD8 T cell frequencies, memory CD8 T cells on the per capita basis are more efficient at killing peptide-pulsed targets than effectors, but at high frequencies, effectors are more efficient killers than memory T cells. Comparison of the estimated killing efficacy of effector T cells with the value that is predicted from theoretical physics and based on motility of T cells in lymphoid tissues, suggests that limiting step in the killing of peptide-pulsed targets is delivering the lethal hit and not finding the target. Our results thus form a basis for quantitative understanding of the process of killing of virus-infected cells by T cell responses in tissues and can be used to correlate the

  8. Proteomic Analysis of Bacillus thuringiensis at Different Growth Phases by Using an Automated Online Two-Dimensional Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shaoya; Sun, Yunjun; Yang, Qi; Xiao, Xiuqing; Cao, Zhenping

    2012-01-01

    The proteome of a new Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki strain, 4.0718, from the middle vegetative (T1), early sporulation (T2), and late sporulation (T3) phases was analyzed using an integrated liquid chromatography (LC)-based protein identification system. The system comprised two-dimensional (2D) LC coupled with nanoscale electrospray ionization (ESI) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) on a high-resolution hybrid mass spectrometer with an automated data analysis system. After deletion of redundant proteins from the different batches and B. thuringiensis subspecies, 918, 703, and 778 proteins were identified in the respective three phases. Their molecular masses ranged from 4.6 Da to 477.4 Da, and their isoelectric points ranged from 4.01 to 11.84. Function clustering revealed that most of the proteins in the three phases were functional metabolic proteins, followed by proteins participating in cell processes. Small molecular and macromolecular metabolic proteins were further classified according to the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genome and BioCyc metabolic pathway database. Three protoxins (Cry2Aa, Cry1Aa, and Cry1Ac) as well as a series of potential intracellular active factors were detected. Many significant proteins related to spore and crystal formation, including sporulation proteins, help proteins, chaperones, and so on, were identified. The expression patterns of two identified proteins, CotJc and glutamine synthetase, were validated by Western blot analysis, which further confirmed the MS results. This study is the first to use shotgun technology to research the proteome of B. thuringiensis. Valuable experimental data are provided regarding the methodology of analyzing the B. thuringiensis proteome (which can be used to produce insecticidal crystal proteins) and have been added to the related protein database. PMID:22636013

  9. Integration of biotechnology, robot technology and visualisation technology for development of methods for automated mass production of elite trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Find, Jens

    Biotechnology has become an integrated part of plant breeding, and in recent years new methods have been developed for breeding and propagation of important plants in the agricultural-, ornamental- and forestry sector. One of the promising methods is somatic embryogenesis (SE), where plants...... are produced from single cells without sexual reproduction. SE has some particular advantages for the development of cost effective methods for clonal mass propagation of elite plants: It is a very effective and fast method for clonal propagation. The method is suitable for automatisation and robot technology....... The method is, for several plant species, the preferred basis for development of additional biotechnological breeding technologies as e.g. genetic transformation. Elite clones can be stored over extended periods in liquid nitrogen at -196°C However, commercial application of the technology has until now been...

  10. Killing of targets by CD8 T cells in the mouse spleen follows the law of mass action.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitaly V Ganusov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been difficult to correlate the quality of CD8 T cell responses with protection against viral infections. To investigate the relationship between efficacy and magnitude of T cell responses, we quantify the rate at which individual CD8 effector and memory T cells kill target cells in the mouse spleen. Using mathematical modeling, we analyze recent data on the loss of target cells pulsed with three different peptides from the mouse lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV in mouse spleens with varying numbers of epitope-specific CD8 T cells. We find that the killing of targets follows the law of mass-action, i.e., the death rate of individual target cells remains proportional to the frequency (or the total number of specific CD8 T cells in the spleen despite the fact that effector cell densities and effector to target ratios vary about a 1000-fold. The killing rate of LCMV-specific CD8 T cells is largely independent of T cell specificity and differentiation stage. Our results thus allow one to calculate the critical T cell concentration at which growth of a virus with a given replication rate can be prevented from the start of infection by memory CD8 T cell response.

  11. Killing of targets by CD8 T cells in the mouse spleen follows the law of mass action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganusov, Vitaly V; Barber, Daniel L; De Boer, Rob J

    2011-01-24

    It has been difficult to correlate the quality of CD8 T cell responses with protection against viral infections. To investigate the relationship between efficacy and magnitude of T cell responses, we quantify the rate at which individual CD8 effector and memory T cells kill target cells in the mouse spleen. Using mathematical modeling, we analyze recent data on the loss of target cells pulsed with three different peptides from the mouse lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) in mouse spleens with varying numbers of epitope-specific CD8 T cells. We find that the killing of targets follows the law of mass-action, i.e., the death rate of individual target cells remains proportional to the frequency (or the total number) of specific CD8 T cells in the spleen despite the fact that effector cell densities and effector to target ratios vary about a 1000-fold. The killing rate of LCMV-specific CD8 T cells is largely independent of T cell specificity and differentiation stage. Our results thus allow one to calculate the critical T cell concentration at which growth of a virus with a given replication rate can be prevented from the start of infection by memory CD8 T cell response.

  12. Automated detection of breast masses on digital mammograms using adaptive density-weighted contrast-enhancement filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrick, Nicholas; Chan, Heang-Ping; Sahiner, Berkman; Wei, Datong; Helvie, Mark A.; Goodsitt, Mitchell M.; Adler, Dorit D.

    1995-05-01

    This paper presents a novel approach for segmentation of suspicious mass regions in digitized mammograms using a new adaptive density-weighted contrast enhancement (DWCE) filter in conjunction with Laplacian-Gaussian (LG) edge detection. The new algorithm processes a mammogram in two stages. In the first stage the entire mammogram is filtered globally using a DWCE adaptive filter which enhances the local contrast of the image based on its local mean pixel values. The enhanced image is then segmented with an LG edge detector into isolated objects. In the second stage of processing, the DWCE adaptive filter and the edge detector are applied locally to each of the segmented object regions detected in the first stage. The number of objects is then reduced based on morphological features. ROIs are selected from the remaining object set based on the centroid locations of the individual objects. The selected ROIs are then input to either a linear discriminant analysis (LDA) classifier or a convolution neural network (CNN) to further differentiate true-positives and false-positives. In this study ROIs obtained from a set of 84 images were used to train the LDA and CNN classifiers. The DWCE algorithm was then,used to extract ROIs from a set of 84 test images. The trained LDA and CNN classifiers were subsequently applied to the extracted ROIs, and the dependence of the detection system's accuracy on the feature extraction and classification techniques was analyzed.

  13. Automated isotope dilution liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with on-line dilution and solid phase extraction for the measurement of cortisol in human serum sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Migaku; Eyama, Sakae; Takatsu, Akiko

    2014-08-05

    A candidate reference measurement procedure involving automated isotope dilution coupled with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (ID-LC-MS/MS) with on-line dilution and solid phase extraction (SPE) has been developed and critically evaluated. We constructed the LC-MS/MS with on-line dilution and SPE system. An isotopically labelled internal standard, cortisol-d4, was added to serum sample. After equilibration, the methanol was added to the sample, and deproteination was performed. Then, the sample was applied to the LC-MS/MS system. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) were 0.2 and 1ngg(-1), respectively. Excellent precision was obtained with within-day variation (RSD) of 1.9% for ID-LC-MS/MS analysis (n=6). This method, which demonstrates simple, easy, good accuracy, high precision, and is free from interferences from structural analogues, qualifies as a reference measurement procedure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A fully automated on-line preconcentration and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for the analysis of anti-infectives in wastewaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura, Pedro A; Gagnon, Christian; Sauvé, Sébastien

    2007-12-05

    We developed and validated a novel on-line preconcentration liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for the determination of anti-infectives in wastewaters. The presented method preconcentrates 1 mL of sample in a load column using a switching-valve technique. The method was optimized with respect to sample load flow rate, volume of the load column wash and organic solvent content of the load column wash. The sample is cleaned using a 30% organic solvent washing step and then gradually eluted to an analytical column for separation. To compensate for matrix effects, quantitation was performed using standard additions. Confirmation of the presence of the detected compounds was done using a second selective reaction monitoring transition. Method intra-day precision was less than 9% and inter-day precision %R.S.D. varied between 2.5 and 23%. Limits of detection for the selected anti-infective compounds ranged from 13 to 61 ng L(-1). All the target anti-infectives were found in the city of Montréal WWTP effluent in concentrations ranging from 71 to 289 ng L(-1). This automated method eases the rapid quantitation of those trace contaminants using small sample volumes.

  15. Fully automated determination of parabens, triclosan and methyl triclosan in wastewater by microextraction by packed sorbents and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Marino, Iria; Benito Quintana, Jose; Rodriguez, Isaac; Schrader, Steffi; Moeder, Monika

    2011-01-01

    A fully automated method for the determination of triclosan (TCS), its derivative methyl triclosan (MeTCS) and six parabens (esters of 4-hydroxybenzoic acid) including branched and linear isomers of propyl (i-PrP and n-PrP) and butyl paraben (i-BuP and n-BuP) in sewage water samples is presented. The procedure includes analytes enrichment by microextraction by packed sorbent (MEPS) coupled at-line to large volume injection-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (LVI-GC-MS). Under optimised conditions, compounds were extracted from 2 mL samples, adjusted at pH 3, using a C18 MEPS-sorbent. Adsorbed analytes were eluted directly into the Programmable Temperature Vaporizer (PTV) injector of the chromatograph with 2 x 25 μL of ethyl acetate. They were quantified using standard solutions in ultrapure water submitted to the same sample enrichment process as real sewage water samples. After signal normalisation using isotopic labelled species as internal surrogates, no differences were noticed among the extraction efficiency for sewage and ultrapure water; moreover, the proposed method reported lineal calibration curves from 0.1 to 10 ng mL -1 , relative standard deviations (%RSD) between 2 and 7.1% and limits of detection (LODs) varying from 0.001 to 0.015 ng mL -1 in ultrapure water and from 0.02 to 0.59 ng mL -1 in the most complex sample (raw wastewater).

  16. Automated polyvinylidene difluoride hollow fiber liquid-phase microextraction of flunitrazepam in plasma and urine samples for gas chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Shufen; Tan, Shuo; Ouyang, Gangfeng; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2009-03-20

    A new polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) hollow fiber (200 microm wall thickness, 1.2mm internal diameter, 0.2 microm pore size) was compared with two other polypropylene (PP) hollow fibers (200, 300 microm wall thickness, 1.2mm internal diameter, 0.2 microm pore size) in the automated hollow fiber liquid-phase microextraction (HF-LPME) of flunitrazepam (FLNZ) in biological samples. With higher porosity and better solvent compatibility, the PVDF hollow fiber showed advantages with faster extraction efficiency and operational accuracy. Parameters of the CTC autosampler program for HF-LPME in plasma and urine samples were carefully investigated to ensure accuracy and reproducibility. Several parameters influencing the efficiency of HF-LPME of FLNZ in plasma and urine samples were optimized, including type of porous hollow fiber, organic solvent, agitation rate, extraction time, salt concentration, organic modifier, and pH. Under optimal conditions, extraction recoveries of FLNZ in plasma and urine samples were 6.5% and 83.5%, respectively, corresponding to the enrichment factor of 13 in plasma matrix and 167 in urine matrix. Excellent sample clean-up was observed and good linearities (r(2)=0.9979 for plasma sample and 0.9995 for urine sample) were obtained in the range of 0.1-1000 ng/mL (plasma sample) and 0.01-1000 ng/mL (urine sample). The limits of detection (S/N=3) were 0.025 ng/mL in plasma matrix and 0.001 ng/mL in urine matrix by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry.

  17. Using the theory of reasoned action to determine physicians' intention to measure body mass index in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, Rahul; Kavookjian, Jan; Scott, Virginia Ginger; Kamal, Khalid M; Miller, Lesley-Ann N; Neal, William A

    2009-06-01

    Over the past few decades, childhood obesity has become a major public health issue in the United States. Numerous public and professional organizations recommend that physicians periodically screen for obesity in children and adolescents using the body mass index (BMI). However, studies have shown that physicians infrequently measure BMI in children and adolescents. The purpose of this study was to use the theory of reasoned action (TRA) to explain physicians' intentions to measure BMI in children and adolescents. The study objectives were to (1) determine if attitude and subjective norm predict physicians' intention to measure BMI in children and adolescents; (2) determine if family physicians and pediatricians differ in terms of theoretical factors; and (3) assess differences in behavioral beliefs, outcome evaluations, normative beliefs, and motivation to comply among physicians based on their level of intention to measure BMI. A cross-sectional mailed survey of 2590 physicians (family physicians and pediatricians) practicing in 4 states was conducted. A self-administered questionnaire was designed that included items related to the TRA constructs. The association between the theoretical constructs was examined using correlation and regression analyses. Student's t test was used to determine differences between family physicians and pediatricians on theoretical constructs and to compare the underlying beliefs of nonintenders with intenders. The usable response rate was 22.8%. Less than half (44%) of the physicians strongly intended to measure BMI in children and adolescents. Together, the TRA constructs attitude and subjective norm explained up to 49.9% of the variance in intention. Pediatricians had a significantly (P<.01) higher intention to measure BMI as compared to family physicians. There were significant (P<.01) behavioral and normative belief differences between physicians who intend and those who do not intend to measure BMI. The TRA is a useful model

  18. Characterizing the relationship between steady state and response using analytical expressions for the steady states of mass action models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loriaux, Paul Michael; Tesler, Glenn; Hoffmann, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    The steady states of cells affect their response to perturbation. Indeed, diagnostic markers for predicting the response to therapeutic perturbation are often based on steady state measurements. In spite of this, no method exists to systematically characterize the relationship between steady state and response. Mathematical models are established tools for studying cellular responses, but characterizing their relationship to the steady state requires that it have a parametric, or analytical, expression. For some models, this expression can be derived by the King-Altman method. However, King-Altman requires that no substrate act as an enzyme, and is therefore not applicable to most models of signal transduction. For this reason we developed py-substitution, a simple but general method for deriving analytical expressions for the steady states of mass action models. Where the King-Altman method is applicable, we show that py-substitution yields an equivalent expression, and at comparable efficiency. We use py-substitution to study the relationship between steady state and sensitivity to the anti-cancer drug candidate, dulanermin (recombinant human TRAIL). First, we use py-substitution to derive an analytical expression for the steady state of a published model of TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Next, we show that the amount of TRAIL required for cell death is sensitive to the steady state concentrations of procaspase 8 and its negative regulator, Bar, but not the other procaspase molecules. This suggests that activation of caspase 8 is a critical point in the death decision process. Finally, we show that changes in the threshold at which TRAIL results in cell death is not always equivalent to changes in the time of death, as is commonly assumed. Our work demonstrates that an analytical expression is a powerful tool for identifying steady state determinants of the cellular response to perturbation. All code is available at http://signalingsystems.ucsd.edu/models-and-code/ or

  19. Automated preconcentration of Fe, Zn, Cu, Ni, Cd, Pb, Co, and Mn in seawater with analysis using high-resolution sector field inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Insa; Schlosser, Christian; Rusiecka, Dagmara; Gledhill, Martha; Achterberg, Eric P

    2017-07-11

    A rapid, automated, high-throughput analytical method capable of simultaneous analysis of multiple elements at trace and ultratrace levels is required to investigate the biogeochemical cycle of trace metals in the ocean. Here we present an analytical approach which uses a commercially available automated preconcentration device (SeaFAST) with accurate volume loading and in-line pH buffering of the sample prior to loading onto a chelating resin (WAKO) and subsequent simultaneous analysis of iron (Fe), zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), nickel (Ni), cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), cobalt (Co) and manganese (Mn) by high-resolution inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HR-ICP-MS). Quantification of sample concentration was undertaken using isotope dilution for Fe, Zn, Cu, Ni, Cd and Pb, and standard addition for Co and Mn. The chelating resin is shown to have a high affinity for all analyzed elements, with recoveries between 83 and 100% for all elements, except Mn (60%) and Ni (48%), and showed higher recoveries for Ni, Cd, Pb, Co and Mn in direct comparison to an alternative resin (NOBIAS Chelate-PA1). The reduced recoveries for Ni and Mn using the WAKO resin did not affect the quantification accuracy. A relatively constant retention efficiency on the resin over a broad pH range (pH 5-8) was observed for the trace metals, except for Mn. Mn quantification using standard addition required accurate sample pH adjustment with optimal recoveries at pH 7.5 ± 0.3. UV digestion was necessary to increase recovery of Co and Cu in seawater by 15.6% and 11.4%, respectively, and achieved full break-down of spiked Co-containing vitamin B 12 complexes. Low blank levels and detection limits could be achieved (e.g., 0.029 nmol L -1 for Fe and 0.028 nmol L -1 for Zn) with the use of high purity reagents. Precision and accuracy were assessed using SAFe S, D1, and D2 reference seawaters, and results were in good agreement with available consensus values. The presented method is ideal for

  20. Automated Vehicle Monitoring System

    OpenAIRE

    Wibowo, Agustinus Deddy Arief; Heriansyah, Rudi

    2014-01-01

    An automated vehicle monitoring system is proposed in this paper. The surveillance system is based on image processing techniques such as background subtraction, colour balancing, chain code based shape detection, and blob. The proposed system will detect any human's head as appeared at the side mirrors. The detected head will be tracked and recorded for further action.

  1. Fully automated determination of parabens, triclosan and methyl triclosan in wastewater by microextraction by packed sorbents and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Marino, Iria, E-mail: iria.gonzalez@usc.es [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Nutrition and Food Sciences, Institute for Food Analysis and Research-IIAA, University of Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Benito Quintana, Jose; Rodriguez, Isaac [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Nutrition and Food Sciences, Institute for Food Analysis and Research-IIAA, University of Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Schrader, Steffi; Moeder, Monika [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research-UFZ, Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany)

    2011-01-17

    A fully automated method for the determination of triclosan (TCS), its derivative methyl triclosan (MeTCS) and six parabens (esters of 4-hydroxybenzoic acid) including branched and linear isomers of propyl (i-PrP and n-PrP) and butyl paraben (i-BuP and n-BuP) in sewage water samples is presented. The procedure includes analytes enrichment by microextraction by packed sorbent (MEPS) coupled at-line to large volume injection-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (LVI-GC-MS). Under optimised conditions, compounds were extracted from 2 mL samples, adjusted at pH 3, using a C18 MEPS-sorbent. Adsorbed analytes were eluted directly into the Programmable Temperature Vaporizer (PTV) injector of the chromatograph with 2 x 25 {mu}L of ethyl acetate. They were quantified using standard solutions in ultrapure water submitted to the same sample enrichment process as real sewage water samples. After signal normalisation using isotopic labelled species as internal surrogates, no differences were noticed among the extraction efficiency for sewage and ultrapure water; moreover, the proposed method reported lineal calibration curves from 0.1 to 10 ng mL{sup -1}, relative standard deviations (%RSD) between 2 and 7.1% and limits of detection (LODs) varying from 0.001 to 0.015 ng mL{sup -1} in ultrapure water and from 0.02 to 0.59 ng mL{sup -1} in the most complex sample (raw wastewater).

  2. An automated headspace solid-phasemicroextraction followed by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry method to determine macrocyclic musk fragrances in wastewater samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallecillos, Laura; Borrull, Francesc; Pocurull, Eva

    2013-11-01

    A fully automated method has been developed for determining eight macrocyclic musk fragrances in wastewater samples. The method is based on headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) followed by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Five different fibres (PDMS 7 μm, PDMS 30 μm, PDMS 100 μm, PDMS/DVB 65 μm and PA 85 μm) were tested. The best conditions were achieved when a PDMS/DVB 65 μm fibre was exposed for 45 min in the headspace of 10 mL water samples at 100 °C. Method detection limits were found in the low ng L−1 range between 0.75 and 5 ng L−1 depending on the target analytes. Moreover, under optimized conditions, the method gave good levels of intra-day and inter-day repeatabilities in wastewater samples with relative standard deviations (n =5, 1,000 ng L−1) less than 9 and 14 %, respectively. The applicability of the method was tested with influent and effluent urban wastewater samples from different wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). The analysis of influent urban wastewater revealed the presence of most of the target macrocyclic musks with, most notably, the maximum concentration of ambrettolide being obtained in WWTP A (4.36 μg L−1) and WWTP B (12.29 μg L−1), respectively. The analysis of effluent urban wastewater showed a decrease in target analyte concentrations, with exaltone and ambrettolide being the most abundant compounds with concentrations varying between below method quantification limit (MQL) and 2.46 μg L−1.

  3. Automation for tsetse mass rearing for use in sterile insect technique programmes. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1995-2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-05-01

    The rearing of tsetse flies for the sterile insect technique has been a laborious procedure in the past. The purpose of this co-ordinated research project (CRP) 'Automation for tsetse mass rearing for use in sterile insect technique programmes' was to develop appropriate semiautomated procedures to simplify the rearing, reduce the cost and standardize the product. Two main objectives were accomplished. The first was to simplify the handling of adults at emergence. This was achieved by allowing the adults to emerge directly into the production cages. Selection of the appropriate environmental conditions and timing allowed the manipulation of the emergence pattern to achieve the desired ratio of four females to one male with minimal un-emerged females remaining mixed with the male pupae. Tests demonstrated that putting the sexes together at emergence, leaving the males in the production cages, and using a ratio of 4:1 (3:1 for a few species) did not adversely affect pupal production. This has resulted in a standardized system for the self stocking of production cages. The second was to reduce the labour involved in feeding the flies. Three distinct systems were developed and tested in sequence. The first tsetse production unit (TPU 1) was a fully automated system, but the fly survival and fecundity were unacceptably low. From this a simpler TPU 2 was developed and tested, where 63 large cages were held on a frame that could be moved as a single unit to the feeding location. TPU 2 was tested in various locations, and found to satisfy the basic requirements, and the adoption of Plexiglas pupal collection slopes resolved much of the problem due to light distribution. However the cage holding frame was heavy and difficult to position on the feeding frame and the movement disturbed the flies. TPU 2 was superseded by TPU 3, in which the cages remain stationary at all times, and the blood is brought to the flies. The blood feeding system is mounted on rails to make it

  4. Planejamento de ações para automação inteligente da manufatura Action planning for intelligent manufacturing automation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavio Tonidandel

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo investiga o uso do sistema FAR-OFF na área da Automação da Manufatura. O sistema FAR-OFF possui característica similar aos sistemas de planejamento baseado em busca heurística, os quais têm apresentado excelentes resultados nos últimos anos na área de planejamento. Entretanto, em vez de ser um sistema generativo, o FAR-OFF é um sistema de planejamento baseado em casos que garante estabilidade para solucionar problemas em tempo aceitável. Os resultados apresentados pelo sistema no domínio de logística mostram que este é um sistema promissor para automação inteligente.This paper investigates the use of the FAR-OFF system in the Manufacturing Automation field. The FAR-OFF system has the feature of heuristic search based systems, which have been presenting excellent results over the last years in the planning area. However, instead of being a generative planning system, the FAR-OFF system is a case-based planner that can guarantee stability to solve problems in a reasonable amount of time. The results presented by its application in the logistic domain show that it is a promising system for intelligent automation.

  5. Determination of aflatoxins in food samples by automated on-line in-tube solid-phase microextraction coupled with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonaka, Y; Saito, K; Hanioka, N; Narimatsu, S; Kataoka, H

    2009-05-15

    A simple and sensitive automated method for determination of aflatoxins (B1, B2, G1, and G2) in nuts, cereals, dried fruits, and spices was developed consisting of in-tube solid-phase microextraction (SPME) coupled with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Aflatoxins were separated within 8 min by high-performance liquid chromatography using a Zorbax Eclipse XDB-C8 column with methanol/acetonitrile (60/40, v/v): 5mM ammonium formate (45:55) as the mobile phase. Electrospray ionization conditions in the positive ion mode were optimized for MS detection of aflatoxins. The pseudo-molecular ions [M+H](+) were used to detect aflatoxins in selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. The optimum in-tube SPME conditions were 25draw/eject cycles of 40 microL of sample using a Supel-Q PLOT capillary column as an extraction device. The extracted aflatoxins were readily desorbed from the capillary by passage of the mobile phase, and no carryover was observed. Using the in-tube SPME LC-MS with SIM method, good linearity of the calibration curve (r>0.9994) was obtained in the concentration range of 0.05-2.0 ng/mL using aflatoxin M1 as an internal standard, and the detection limits (S/N=3) of aflatoxins were 2.1-2.8 pg/mL. The in-tube SPME method showed >23-fold higher sensitivity than the direct injection method (10 microL injection volume). The within-day and between-day precision (relative standard deviations) at the concentration of 1 ng/mL aflatoxin mixture were below 3.3% and 7.7% (n=5), respectively. This method was applied successfully to analysis of food samples without interference peaks. The recoveries of aflatoxins spiked into nuts and cereals were >80%, and the relative standard deviations were Aflatoxins were detected at <10 ng/g in several commercial food samples.

  6. Determination of 74 new psychoactive substances in serum using automated in-line solid-phase extraction-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Sabrina; Kieliba, Tobias; Beike, Justus; Thevis, Mario; Mercer-Chalmers-Bender, Katja

    2017-10-01

    A detailed description is given of the development and validation of a fully automated in-line solid-phase extraction-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (SPE-LC-MS/MS) method capable of detecting 90 central-stimulating new psychoactive substances (NPS) and 5 conventional amphetamine-type stimulants (amphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxy-methamphetamine (MDMA), 3,4-methylenedioxy-amphetamine (MDA), 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-ethyl-amphetamine (MDEA), methamphetamine) in serum. The aim was to apply the validated method to forensic samples. The preparation of 150μL of serum was performed by an Instrument Top Sample Preparation (ITSP)-SPE with mixed mode cation exchanger cartridges. The extracts were directly injected into an LC-MS/MS system, using a biphenyl column and gradient elution with 2mM ammonium formate/0.1% formic acid and acetonitrile/0.1% formic acid as mobile phases. The chromatographic run time amounts to 9.3min (including re-equilibration). The total cycle time is 11min, due to the interlacing between sample preparation and analysis. The method was fully validated using 69 NPS and five conventional amphetamine-type stimulants, according to the guidelines of the Society of Toxicological and Forensic Chemistry (GTFCh). The guidelines were fully achieved for 62 analytes (with a limit of detection (LOD) between 0.2 and 4μg/L), whilst full validation was not feasible for the remaining 12 analytes. For the fully validated analytes, the method achieved linearity in the 5μg/L (lower limit of quantification, LLOQ) to 250μg/L range (coefficients of determination>0.99). Recoveries for 69 of these compounds were greater than 50%, with relative standard deviations≤15%. The validated method was then tested for its capability in detecting a further 21 NPS, thus totalling 95 tested substances. An LOD between 0.4 and 1.6μg/L was obtained for these 21 additional qualitatively-measured substances. The method was subsequently successfully applied to 28 specimens from

  7. Library Automation

    OpenAIRE

    Dhakne, B. N.; Giri, V. V; Waghmode, S. S.

    2010-01-01

    New technologies library provides several new materials, media and mode of storing and communicating the information. Library Automation reduces the drudgery of repeated manual efforts in library routine. By use of library automation collection, Storage, Administration, Processing, Preservation and communication etc.

  8. The attraction of sugar : An association between body mass index and impaired avoidance action tendencies of sweet snacks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, J.; Woud, M.L.; Keijsers, G.P.J.; Rinck, M.; Becker, E. S.; Wiers, R. W.

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigated implicit approach-avoidance action tendencies towards snack foods (pictorial Approach-Avoidance Task), and implicit approach-avoidance associations (verbal approach-avoidance Single-Target IAT) and affective associations (verbal positive-negative Single-Target IAT)

  9. A control system verifier using automated reasoning software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.E.; Seeman, S.E.

    1985-08-01

    An on-line, automated reasoning software system for verifying the actions of other software or human control systems has been developed. It was demonstrated by verifying the actions of an automated procedure generation system. The verifier uses an interactive theorem prover as its inference engine with the rules included as logical axioms. Operation of the verifier is generally transparent except when the verifier disagrees with the actions of the monitored software. Testing with an automated procedure generation system demonstrates the successful application of automated reasoning software for verification of logical actions in a diverse, redundant manner. A higher degree of confidence may be placed in the verified actions of the combined system

  10. Process automation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moser, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    Process automation technology has been pursued in the chemical processing industries and to a very limited extent in nuclear fuel reprocessing. Its effective use has been restricted in the past by the lack of diverse and reliable process instrumentation and the unavailability of sophisticated software designed for process control. The Integrated Equipment Test (IET) facility was developed by the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) in part to demonstrate new concepts for control of advanced nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. A demonstration of fuel reprocessing equipment automation using advanced instrumentation and a modern, microprocessor-based control system is nearing completion in the facility. This facility provides for the synergistic testing of all chemical process features of a prototypical fuel reprocessing plant that can be attained with unirradiated uranium-bearing feed materials. The unique equipment and mission of the IET facility make it an ideal test bed for automation studies. This effort will provide for the demonstration of the plant automation concept and for the development of techniques for similar applications in a full-scale plant. A set of preliminary recommendations for implementing process automation has been compiled. Some of these concepts are not generally recognized or accepted. The automation work now under way in the IET facility should be useful to others in helping avoid costly mistakes because of the underutilization or misapplication of process automation. 6 figs

  11. Analytical and clinical performance of the new Fujirebio 25-OH vitamin D assay, a comparison with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and three other automated assays

    OpenAIRE

    Saleh, Lanja; Mueller, Daniel; von Eckardstein, Arnold

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We evaluated the analytical and clinical performance of the new Lumipulse® G 25-OH vitamin D assay from Fujirebio, and compared it to a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method and three other commercial automated assays. METHODS: Total 25 hydroxy vitamin D (25(OH)D) levels were measured in 100 selected serum samples from our routine analysis with Fujirebio 25(OH)D assay. The results were compared with those obtained with LC-MS/MS and three other automat...

  12. 78 FR 17890 - Effective Date of Requirement for Premarket Approval for Automated External Defibrillator System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-25

    ... Approval for Automated External Defibrillator System. AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION... the following class III preamendments devices: Automated external defibrillators systems (AEDs), which... defibrillator based on new information. This action implements certain statutory requirements. DATES: Submit...

  13. Automated mass action model space generation and analysis methods for two-reactant combinatorially complex equilibriums: An analysis of ATP-induced ribonucleotide reductase R1 hexamerization data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radivoyevitch Tomas

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ribonucleotide reductase is the main control point of dNTP production. It has two subunits, R1, and R2 or p53R2. R1 has 5 possible catalytic site states (empty or filled with 1 of 4 NDPs, 5 possible s-site states (empty or filled with ATP, dATP, dTTP or dGTP, 3 possible a-site states (empty or filled with ATP or dATP, perhaps two possible h-site states (empty or filled with ATP, and all of this is folded into an R1 monomer-dimer-tetramer-hexamer equilibrium where R1 j-mers can be bound by variable numbers of R2 or p53R2 dimers. Trillions of RNR complexes are possible as a result. The problem is to determine which are needed in models to explain available data. This problem is intractable for 10 reactants, but it can be solved for 2 and is here for R1 and ATP. Results Thousands of ATP-induced R1 hexamerization models with up to three (s, a and h ATP binding sites per R1 subunit were automatically generated via hypotheses that complete dissociation constants are infinite and/or that binary dissociation constants are equal. To limit the model space size, it was assumed that s-sites are always filled in oligomers and never filled in monomers, and to interpret model terms it was assumed that a-sites fill before h-sites. The models were fitted to published dynamic light scattering data. As the lowest Akaike Information Criterion (AIC of the 3-parameter models was greater than the lowest of the 2-parameter models, only models with up to 3 parameters were fitted. Models with sums of squared errors less than twice the minimum were then partitioned into two groups: those that contained no occupied h-site terms (508 models and those that contained at least one (1580 models. Normalized AIC densities of these two groups of models differed significantly in favor of models that did not include an h-site term (Kolmogorov-Smirnov p -15; consistent with this, 28 of the top 30 models (ranked by AICs did not include an h-site term and 28/30 > 508/2088 with p -15. Finally, 99 of the 2088 models did not have any terms with ATP/R1 ratios >1.5, but of the top 30, there were 14 such models (14/30 > 99/2088 with p -16, i.e. the existence of R1 hexamers with >3 a-sites occupied by ATP is also not supported by this dataset. Conclusion The analysis presented suggests that three a-sites may not be occupied by ATP in R1 hexamers under the conditions of the data analyzed. If a-sites fill before h-sites, this implies that the dataset analyzed can be explained without the existence of an h-site. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Ossama Kashlan (nominated by Philip Hahnfeldt, Bin Hu (nominated by William Hlavacek and Rainer Sachs.

  14. Simulations of Magnetic Flux Emergence in Cool, Low-Mass Stars: Toward Linking Dynamo Action with Starspots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Maria Ann; Browning, Matthew; Nelson, Nicholas

    2018-01-01

    Starspots are windows into a star’s internal dynamo mechanism. However, the manner by which the dynamo-generated magnetic field traverses the stellar interior to emerge at the surface is not especially well understood. Establishing the details of magnetic flux emergence plays a key role in deciphering stellar dynamos and observed starspot properties. In the solar context, insight into this process has been obtained by assuming the magnetism giving rise to sunspots consists partly of idealized thin flux tubes (TFTs). Here, we present three sets of TFT simulations in rotating spherical shells of convection: one representative of the Sun, the second of a solar-like rapid rotator, and the third of a fully convective M dwarf. Our solar simulations reproduce sunspot observables such as low-latitude emergence, tilting action toward the equator following the Joy’s Law trend, and a phenomenon akin to active longitudes. Further, we compare the evolution of rising flux tubes in our (computationally inexpensive) TFT simulations to buoyant magnetic structures that arise naturally in a unique global simulation of a rapidly rotating Sun. We comment on the role of rapid rotation, the Coriolis force, and external torques imparted by the surrounding convection in establishing the trajectories of the flux tubes across the convection zone. In our fully convective M dwarf simulations, the expected starspot latitudes deviate from the solar trend, favoring significantly poleward latitudes unless the differential rotation is sufficiently prograde or the magnetic field is strongly super-equipartition. Together our work provides a link between dynamo-generated magnetic fields, turbulent convection, and observations of starspots along the lower main sequence.

  15. Automated External Defibrillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... To Health Topics / Automated External Defibrillator Automated External Defibrillator Also known as What Is An automated external ... in survival. Training To Use an Automated External Defibrillator Learning how to use an AED and taking ...

  16. Development and characterization of a novel plug and play liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) source that automates connections between the capillary trap, column, and emitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereman, Michael S; Hsieh, Edward J; Corso, Thomas N; Van Pelt, Colleen K; Maccoss, Michael J

    2013-06-01

    We report the development and characterization of a novel, vendor-neutral ultra-high pressure-compatible (~10,000 p.s.i.) LC-MS source. This device is the first to make automated connections with user-packed capillary traps, columns, and capillary emitters. The source uses plastic rectangular inserts (referred to here as cartridges) where individual components (i.e. trap, column, or emitter) can be exchanged independent of one another in a plug and play manner. Automated robotic connections are made between the three cartridges using linear translation powered by stepper motors to axially compress each cartridge by applying a well controlled constant compression force to each commercial LC fitting. The user has the versatility to tailor the separation (e.g. the length of the column, type of stationary phase, and mode of separation) to the experimental design of interest in a cost-effective manner. The source is described in detail, and several experiments are performed to evaluate the robustness of both the system and the exchange of the individual trap and emitter cartridges. The standard deviation in the retention time of four targeted peptides from a standard digest interlaced with a soluble Caenorhabditis elegans lysate ranged between 3.1 and 5.3 s over 3 days of analyses. Exchange of the emitter cartridge was found to have an insignificant effect on the abundance of various peptides. In addition, the trap cartridge can be replaced with minimal effects on retention time (<20 s).

  17. Non-perturbative renormalization in coordinate space for N{sub f}=2 maximally twisted mass fermions with tree-level Symanzik improved gauge action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cichy, Krzysztof, E-mail: krzysztof.cichy@desy.de [NIC, DESY, Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Adam Mickiewicz University, Faculty of Physics, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznan (Poland); Jansen, Karl, E-mail: karl.jansen@desy.de [NIC, DESY, Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Korcyl, Piotr, E-mail: piotr.korcyl@desy.de [NIC, DESY, Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); M. Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Reymonta 4, 30-059 Krakow (Poland)

    2012-12-11

    We present results of a Lattice QCD application of a coordinate space renormalization scheme for the extraction of renormalization constants for flavour non-singlet bilinear quark operators. The method consists in the analysis of the small-distance behaviour of correlation functions in Euclidean space and has several theoretical and practical advantages, in particular: it is gauge invariant, easy to implement and has relatively low computational cost. The values of renormalization constants in the X-space scheme can be converted to the MS{sup Macron} scheme via 4-loop continuum perturbative formulae. Our results for N{sub f}=2 maximally twisted mass fermions with tree-level Symanzik improved gauge action are compared to the ones from the RI-MOM scheme and show full agreement with this method.

  18. Library Automation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husby, Ole

    1990-01-01

    The challenges and potential benefits of automating university libraries are reviewed, with special attention given to cooperative systems. Aspects discussed include database size, the role of the university computer center, storage modes, multi-institutional systems, resource sharing, cooperative system management, networking, and intelligent…

  19. An automated delayed neutron counting system for mass determination of fissile isotopes in special nuclear materials at the Royal Military College of Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sellers, M.T.; Corcoran, E.C.; Kelly, D.G.

    2010-01-01

    A Delayed Neutron Counting System (DNCS) has been designed and installed to enhance the ability of Royal Military College of Canada (RMC) to analyze Special Nuclear Materials (SNM). By detecting and recording delayed neutron counts from SNM samples irradiated by the SLOWPOKE-2 Reactor Facility at RMC, the DNCS is able to determine the masses of multiple fissile nuclei in the samples efficiently and accurately. The system is controlled by LabVIEW software. A separate mathematical program has also been developed to determine the mass of fissile nuclei present in SNM. The DNCS and fissile mass determination program have been validated using powdered UO 2 samples. (author)

  20. Operating and Maintaining Energy Smart Schools Action Plan Template - All Action Plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2009-07-01

    EnergySmart Schools action plan templates for benchmarking, lighting, HVAC, water heating, building envelope, transformer, plug loads, kitchen equipment, swimming pool, building automation system, other.

  1. Analytical and clinical performance of the new Fujirebio 25-OH vitamin D assay, a comparison with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and three other automated assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Lanja; Mueller, Daniel; von Eckardstein, Arnold

    2016-04-01

    We evaluated the analytical and clinical performance of the new Lumipulse® G 25-OH vitamin D assay from Fujirebio, and compared it to a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method and three other commercial automated assays. Total 25 hydroxy vitamin D (25(OH)D) levels were measured in 100 selected serum samples from our routine analysis with Fujirebio 25(OH)D assay. The results were compared with those obtained with LC-MS/MS and three other automated 25(OH)D assays (Abbott, Beckman, and Roche). The accuracy of each assay tested was evaluated against a Labquality reference serum panel for 25(OH)D (Ref!25OHD; University of Ghent). Intra- and inter-day imprecision of the Fujirebio 25(OH)D assay was Lumipulse G 25-OH vitamin D assay from Fujirebio demonstrated a good correlation with LC-MS/MS and some immunoassays. The performance of the assay is well-suited for routine 25(OH)D measurement in clinical serum samples. A correction for the observed negative bias vs. LC-MS/MS could be considered.

  2. Determination of 1-chloro-4-[2,2,2-trichloro-1-(4-chlorophenyl)ethyl]benzene and related compounds in marine pore water by automated thermal desorption-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry using disposable optical fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eganhouse, Robert P.; DiFilippo, Erica L

    2015-01-01

    A method is described for determination of ten DDT-related compounds in marine pore water based on equilibrium solid-phase microextraction (SPME) using commercial polydimethylsiloxane-coated optical fiber with analysis by automated thermal desorption-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD-GC/MS). Thermally cleaned fiber was directly exposed to sediments and allowed to reach equilibrium under static conditions at the in situ field temperature. Following removal, fibers were rinsed, dried and cut into appropriate lengths for storage in leak-tight containers at -20°C. Analysis by TD-GC/MS under full scan (FS) and selected ion monitoring (SIM) modes was then performed. Pore-water method detection limits in FS and SIM modes were estimated at 0.05-2.4ng/L and 0.7-16pg/L, respectively. Precision of the method, including contributions from fiber handling, was less than 10%. Analysis of independently prepared solutions containing eight DDT compounds yielded concentrations that were within 6.9±5.5% and 0.1±14% of the actual concentrations in FS and SIM modes, respectively. The use of optical fiber with automated analysis allows for studies at high temporal and/or spatial resolution as well as for monitoring programs over large spatial and/or long temporal scales with adequate sample replication. This greatly enhances the flexibility of the technique and improves the ability to meet quality control objectives at significantly lower cost.

  3. An automated, open-source pipeline for mass production of digital elevation models (DEMs) from very-high-resolution commercial stereo satellite imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shean, David E.; Alexandrov, Oleg; Moratto, Zachary M.; Smith, Benjamin E.; Joughin, Ian R.; Porter, Claire; Morin, Paul

    2016-06-01

    We adapted the automated, open source NASA Ames Stereo Pipeline (ASP) to generate digital elevation models (DEMs) and orthoimages from very-high-resolution (VHR) commercial imagery of the Earth. These modifications include support for rigorous and rational polynomial coefficient (RPC) sensor models, sensor geometry correction, bundle adjustment, point cloud co-registration, and significant improvements to the ASP code base. We outline a processing workflow for ˜0.5 m ground sample distance (GSD) DigitalGlobe WorldView-1 and WorldView-2 along-track stereo image data, with an overview of ASP capabilities, an evaluation of ASP correlator options, benchmark test results, and two case studies of DEM accuracy. Output DEM products are posted at ˜2 m with direct geolocation accuracy of scale batch processing in a high-performance computing environment. We are leveraging these resources to produce dense time series and regional mosaics for the Earth's polar regions.

  4. A simple and automated method to determine macrocyclic musk fragrances in sewage sludge samples by headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallecillos, Laura; Pocurull, Eva; Borrull, Francesc

    2013-11-01

    For the first time, headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) has shown to be a powerful technique to extract macrocyclic musk fragrances directly from sewage sludge. It avoids the need to use additional extraction/preconcentration techniques or clean-up procedure and facilitates the automation of the method. Thus, a simple and fully automated method based on HS-SPME and GC-MS has been developed which allows the determination of eight macrocyclic musk fragrances at ngg(-1) (d.w.) levels. The optimal HS-SPME conditions were achieved when a PDMS/DVB 65μm fibre was exposed for 45min in the headspace of 0.25g sewage sludge samples mixed with 0.5mL of water stirred at 750rpm at 80°C. Optimal desorption conditions were found to be 250°C for 3min. Method detection limits were found in the low pgg(-1) range between 10pgg(-1) (d.w.) and 25pgg(-1) (d.w.) depending on the target analytes. In addition, under optimized conditions, the method gave good levels of intra-day and inter-day repeatabilities in sewage sludge with relative standard deviations varying between 1% to 9% and 6% to 15% respectively (n=5, 1000pgg(-1) d.w.). The applicability of the method was tested with sewage sludge from three urban sewage treatment plants (STPs). The analysis revealed the presence of the macrocyclic musks studied in several samples, with concentrations ranging between below MQL (method quantification limit) and 0.89ngg(-1) (d.w.). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Murine Automated Urine Sampler (MAUS), Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal outlines planned development for a low-power, low-mass automated urine sample collection and preservation system for small mammals, capable of...

  6. Murine Automated Urine Sampler (MAUS) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal outlines planned development for a low-power, low-mass automated urine sample collection and preservation system for small mammals, capable of...

  7. Development of an automated on-line pepsin digestion-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry configuration for the rapid analysis of protein adducts of chemical warfare agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carol-Visser, J.; van der Schans, M.; Fidder, A.; Huist, A.G.; van Baar, B.L.M.; Irth, H.; Noort, D.

    2008-01-01

    Rapid monitoring and retrospective verification are key issues in protection against and non-proliferation of chemical warfare agents (CWA). Such monitoring and verification are adequately accomplished by the analysis of persistent protein adducts of these agents. Liquid chromatography-mass

  8. Automated N-glycan profiling of a mutant Trypanosoma rangeli sialidase expressed in Pichia pastoris, using tandem mass spectrometry and bioinformatics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Haiying; Rasmussen, Morten I; Larsen, Martin R

    2015-01-01

    A mutant Trypanosoma rangeli sialidase, Tr7, expressed in Pichia pastoris, exhibits significant trans-sialidase activity, and has been used for analytical-scale production of sialylated human milk oligosaccharides. Mass spectrometry-based site-specific N-glycoprofiling of Tr7 showed that heteroge...

  9. Identification and characterization of the chemical constituents of Simiao Wan by ultra high performance liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry coupled to an automated multiple data processing method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Aihua; Zou, Di; Yan, Guangli; Tan, Yunlong; Sun, Hui; Wang, Xijun

    2014-07-01

    The chemical constituents of Simiao Wan (SW), a traditional Chinese medicine preparation, are difficult to determine and remain unclear. To more efficiently detect ions, a multiple data processing approach has been used in the characterization of the compounds. In this study, a rapid and sensitive method based on ultra high performance liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry and the multiple data processing approach was established to characterize the chemical constituents of SW. Ultra high performance liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry coupled with the multiple data processing approach could efficiently remove nonrelated ion signals from accurate mass data. We report the application of the multiple data processing approach for comprehensive detection and rapid identification of chemical constituents of SW. Of note, the total analysis time for separation was less than 20 min without losing any resolution. In the variable, importance in projection plot of orthogonal projection to latent structure-discriminant analysis, a total of 72 ions of interest (37 ions in positive mode, 38 ions in negative mode and three ions in both mode) were extracted or tentatively characterized based on their retention times, exact mass measurement for each molecular ion and subsequent fragment ions. In summary, the methodology proposed in this study could be valuable for the structural characterization and identification of the multiple constituents in the traditional Chinese medicine formula SW. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Autonomy, Automation, and Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Philip R.

    1987-02-01

    Aerospace industry interest in autonomy and automation, given fresh impetus by the national goal of establishing a Space Station, is becoming a major item of research and technology development. The promise of new technology arising from research in Artificial Intelligence (AI) has focused much attention on its potential in autonomy and automation. These technologies can improve performance in autonomous control functions that involve planning, scheduling, and fault diagnosis of complex systems. There are, however, many aspects of system and subsystem design in an autonomous system that impact AI applications, but do not directly involve AI technology. Development of a system control architecture, establishment of an operating system within the design, providing command and sensory data collection features appropriate to automated operation, and the use of design analysis tools to support system engineering are specific examples of major design issues. Aspects such as these must also receive attention and technology development support if we are to implement complex autonomous systems within the realistic limitations of mass, power, cost, and available flight-qualified technology that are all-important to a flight project.

  11. Marketing automation processes as a way to improve contemporary marketing of a company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witold Świeczak

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this article is to identify the possibilities which are given to contemporary companies thanks to the usage of processes included in marketing automation system. This publication deals with the key aspects of this issue. Its shows how the importance of the organization changes, how its value increases, as a result of using the tools which are provided by the processes included in the concept of marketing automation. This article defines the factors and processes which influence an effective course of actions taken as a part of marketing automation. Because the concept of marketing automation is a completely new reality; it is giving up the communication based on mass distribution of a uniform contents for really personalized individual and fully automated communication. This is a completely new idea, a kind of coexistence, in which both a sales department and a marketing department cooperate with each other closely to achieve the best result. It is also a situation in which marketing can definitely confirm its contribution to the income generated by the company. But marketing automation also means huge analytical possibilities and a real increase of a company’s value, its value added generated by the system – the source of information about clients, about all processes both marketing and sales, taking place in a company. The introduction of marketing automation system alters not only the current functioning of a marketing department, but also marketers themselves. In fact, everything that marketing automation system provides, including primarily accumulated unique knowledge of the client, is also a critical marketing value of every modern enterprise.

  12. Automated generation of lattice QCD Feynman rules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, A.; Mueller, E.H.; Horgan, R.R.

    2009-04-01

    The derivation of the Feynman rules for lattice perturbation theory from actions and operators is complicated, especially for highly improved actions such as HISQ. This task is, however, both important and particularly suitable for automation. We describe a suite of software to generate and evaluate Feynman rules for a wide range of lattice field theories with gluons and (relativistic and/or heavy) quarks. Our programs are capable of dealing with actions as complicated as (m)NRQCD and HISQ. Automated differentiation methods are used to calculate also the derivatives of Feynman diagrams. (orig.)

  13. Automated generation of lattice QCD Feynman rules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, A.; Mueller, E.H. [Edinburgh Univ. (United Kingdom). SUPA School of Physics and Astronomy; von Hippel, G.M. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Horgan, R.R. [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom). DAMTP, CMS

    2009-04-15

    The derivation of the Feynman rules for lattice perturbation theory from actions and operators is complicated, especially for highly improved actions such as HISQ. This task is, however, both important and particularly suitable for automation. We describe a suite of software to generate and evaluate Feynman rules for a wide range of lattice field theories with gluons and (relativistic and/or heavy) quarks. Our programs are capable of dealing with actions as complicated as (m)NRQCD and HISQ. Automated differentiation methods are used to calculate also the derivatives of Feynman diagrams. (orig.)

  14. An off-line automated preconcentration system with ethylenediaminetriacetate chelating resin for the determination of trace metals in seawater by high-resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Tomoharu; Konagaya, Wataru; Zheng, Linjie; Takano, Shotaro; Sasaki, Masanobu; Murata, Rena; Nakaguchi, Yuzuru; Sohrin, Yoshiki

    2015-01-07

    A novel automated off-line preconcentration system for trace metals (Al, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb) in seawater was developed by improving a commercially available solid-phase extraction system SPE-100 (Hiranuma Sangyo). The utilized chelating resin was NOBIAS Chelate-PA1 (Hitachi High-Technologies) with ethylenediaminetriacetic acid and iminodiacetic acid functional groups. Parts of the 8-way valve made of alumina and zirconia in the original SPE-100 system were replaced with parts made of polychlorotrifluoroethylene in order to reduce contamination of trace metals. The eluent pass was altered for the back flush elution of trace metals. We optimized the cleaning procedures for the chelating resin column and flow lines of the preconcentration system, and developed a preconcentration procedure, which required less labor and led to a superior performance compared to manual preconcentration (Sohrin et al.). The nine trace metals were simultaneously and quantitatively preconcentrated from ∼120 g of seawater, eluted with ∼15 g of 1M HNO3, and determined by HR-ICP-MS using the calibration curve method. The single-step preconcentration removed more than 99.998% of Na, K, Mg, Ca, and Sr from seawater. The procedural blanks and detection limits were lower than the lowest concentrations in seawater for Mn, Ni, Cu, and Pb, while they were as low as the lowest concentrations in seawater for Al, Fe, Co, Zn, and Cd. The accuracy and precision of this method were confirmed by the analysis of reference seawater samples (CASS-5, NASS-5, GEOTRACES GS, and GD) and seawater samples for vertical distribution in the western North Pacific Ocean. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Mass-action model analysis of the apparent molar volume and heat capacity of pluronics in water and liposome suspensions at 25 °C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirion, François; Meilleur, Luc; Lévesque, Isabelle

    2013-07-09

    Pluronics are block copolymers composed of a central block of polypropylene oxide and two side chains of polyethylene oxide. They are used in water to generate aggregates and gels or added to phospholipid suspensions to prepare microparticles for drug delivery applications. The structure of these systems has been widely investigated. However, little is known about the mechanisms leading to these structures. This investigation compares the apparent molar volumes and heat capacities of Pluronics F38, F108, F127, P85, P104, and P103 at 25 °C in water and in the presence of lecithin liposomes. The changes in molar volumes, heat capacities, and enthalpies generated by a mass-action model are in good agreement with the loss of hydrophobic hydration of the polypropylene oxide central block of the Pluronics. However, the molecularity of the endothermic transitions is much smaller than the aggregation numbers reported in the literature for the same systems. It is suggested that Pluronics go through dehydration of their central block to form unimolecular or small entities having a hydrophobic polypropylene oxide core. In water, these entities would assemble athermally to form larger aggregates. In the presence of liposomes, they would be transferred into the hydrophobic lecithin bilayers of the liposomes. Light transmission experiments suggest that the liposome suspensions are significantly altered only when the added Pluronics are in the dehydrated state.

  16. Autonomous Systems: Habitat Automation

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Habitat Automation Project Element within the Autonomous Systems Project is developing software to automate the automation of habitats and other spacecraft. This...

  17. An Automation Planning Primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paynter, Marion

    1988-01-01

    This brief planning guide for library automation incorporates needs assessment and evaluation of options to meet those needs. A bibliography of materials on automation planning and software reviews, library software directories, and library automation journals is included. (CLB)

  18. Study of the effect of positive ions impinging sensitive emulsions in mass spectrography; Etude de l'action des ions positifs sur les emulsions sensibles en spectrographie de masse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavard, A. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-08-01

    Experimental relationships have been established between the blackening of emulsions by impinging ions and the following parameters: number, mass and energy of impinging particles. Mean energy ions (about twenty keV) give rise to a latent image probably made of small specks of metallic silver located at the surface or in the bulk of the silver halide grain. A specific developer for ion sensitive emulsion was perfected. Sensitivity and detection threshold are increased by a factor of two or three, compared with values observed using a classical developer. Low energy particles sputtered from superficial layers of the emulsion by the impinging twenty keV ions, produce a latent image close to the surface of the silver halide grain. An oxidizing process bleaches superficial latent image and then reduces background fog. The improved signal over background ratio allows to observe lines undetectable when the plates are developed by usual process. (author) [French] On a etabli les relations experimentales entre le noircissement resultant de l'action des ions sur l'emulsion sensible et les parametres suivants: nombre de particules incidentes, masse et energie de ces particules. L'effet sur les grains d'halogenure d'argent a ete examine: les ions d'energie moyenne (de l'ordre de 20 keV) creent une image latente vraisemblablement constituee d'argent, situee a la fois a la surface et a l'interieur du grain. Un revelateur specifique pour le developpement des emulsions sensibles exposees aux ions a ete mis au point: il accroit la sensibilite d'un facteur deux a trois et le facteur de contraste par rapport a un revelateur usuel. Les particules de faible energie, emises par pulverisation des couches superficielles de l'emulsion au cours de l'enregistrement des spectres de masse des ions d'energie moyenne, creent essentiellement dans les grains d'halogenure d'argent, une image latente superficielle

  19. Automated Budget System -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The Automated Budget System (ABS) automates management and planning of the Mike Monroney Aeronautical Center (MMAC) budget by providing enhanced capability to plan,...

  20. LipidMatch: an automated workflow for rule-based lipid identification using untargeted high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelmel, Jeremy P; Kroeger, Nicholas M; Ulmer, Candice Z; Bowden, John A; Patterson, Rainey E; Cochran, Jason A; Beecher, Christopher W W; Garrett, Timothy J; Yost, Richard A

    2017-07-10

    Lipids are ubiquitous and serve numerous biological functions; thus lipids have been shown to have great potential as candidates for elucidating biomarkers and pathway perturbations associated with disease. Methods expanding coverage of the lipidome increase the likelihood of biomarker discovery and could lead to more comprehensive understanding of disease etiology. We introduce LipidMatch, an R-based tool for lipid identification for liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry workflows. LipidMatch currently has over 250,000 lipid species spanning 56 lipid types contained in in silico fragmentation libraries. Unique fragmentation libraries, compared to other open source software, include oxidized lipids, bile acids, sphingosines, and previously uncharacterized adducts, including ammoniated cardiolipins. LipidMatch uses rule-based identification. For each lipid type, the user can select which fragments must be observed for identification. Rule-based identification allows for correct annotation of lipids based on the fragments observed, unlike typical identification based solely on spectral similarity scores, where over-reporting structural details that are not conferred by fragmentation data is common. Another unique feature of LipidMatch is ranking lipid identifications for a given feature by the sum of fragment intensities. For each lipid candidate, the intensities of experimental fragments with exact mass matches to expected in silico fragments are summed. The lipid identifications with the greatest summed intensity using this ranking algorithm were comparable to other lipid identification software annotations, MS-DIAL and Greazy. For example, for features with identifications from all 3 software, 92% of LipidMatch identifications by fatty acyl constituents were corroborated by at least one other software in positive mode and 98% in negative ion mode. LipidMatch allows users to annotate lipids across a wide range of high resolution tandem mass spectrometry

  1. Third-generation electrokinetically pumped sheath-flow nanospray interface with improved stability and sensitivity for automated capillary zone electrophoresis-mass spectrometry analysis of complex proteome digests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Liangliang; Zhu, Guijie; Zhang, Zhenbin; Mou, Si; Dovichi, Norman J

    2015-05-01

    We have reported a set of electrokinetically pumped sheath flow nanoelectrospray interfaces to couple capillary zone electrophoresis with mass spectrometry. A separation capillary is threaded through a cross into a glass emitter. A side arm provides fluidic contact with a sheath buffer reservoir that is connected to a power supply. The potential applied to the sheath buffer drives electro-osmosis in the emitter to pump the sheath fluid at nanoliter per minute rates. Our first-generation interface placed a flat-tipped capillary in the emitter. Sensitivity was inversely related to orifice size and to the distance from the capillary tip to the emitter orifice. A second-generation interface used a capillary with an etched tip that allowed the capillary exit to approach within a few hundred micrometers of the emitter orifice, resulting in a significant increase in sensitivity. In both the first- and second-generation interfaces, the emitter diameter was typically 8 μm; these narrow orifices were susceptible to plugging and tended to have limited lifetime. We now report a third-generation interface that employs a larger diameter emitter orifice with very short distance between the capillary tip and the emitter orifice. This modified interface is much more robust and produces much longer lifetime than our previous designs with no loss in sensitivity. We evaluated the third-generation interface for a 5000 min (127 runs, 3.5 days) repetitive analysis of bovine serum albumin digest using an uncoated capillary. We observed a 10% relative standard deviation in peak area, an average of 160,000 theoretical plates, and very low carry-over (much less than 1%). We employed a linear-polyacrylamide (LPA)-coated capillary for single-shot, bottom-up proteomic analysis of 300 ng of Xenopus laevis fertilized egg proteome digest and identified 1249 protein groups and 4038 peptides in a 110 min separation using an LTQ-Orbitrap Velos mass spectrometer; peak capacity was ∼330. The

  2. Automation 2017

    CERN Document Server

    Zieliński, Cezary; Kaliczyńska, Małgorzata

    2017-01-01

    This book consists of papers presented at Automation 2017, an international conference held in Warsaw from March 15 to 17, 2017. It discusses research findings associated with the concepts behind INDUSTRY 4.0, with a focus on offering a better understanding of and promoting participation in the Fourth Industrial Revolution. Each chapter presents a detailed analysis of a specific technical problem, in most cases followed by a numerical analysis, simulation and description of the results of implementing the solution in a real-world context. The theoretical results, practical solutions and guidelines presented are valuable for both researchers working in the area of engineering sciences and practitioners looking for solutions to industrial problems. .

  3. Marketing automation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TODOR Raluca Dania

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The automation of the marketing process seems to be nowadays, the only solution to face the major changes brought by the fast evolution of technology and the continuous increase in supply and demand. In order to achieve the desired marketing results, businessis have to employ digital marketing and communication services. These services are efficient and measurable thanks to the marketing technology used to track, score and implement each campaign. Due to the technical progress, the marketing fragmentation, demand for customized products and services on one side and the need to achieve constructive dialogue with the customers, immediate and flexible response and the necessity to measure the investments and the results on the other side, the classical marketing approached had changed continue to improve substantially.

  4. Automated headspace solid-phase microextraction and on-fiber derivatization for the determination of clenbuterol in meat products by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yong; Ni, Yongnian

    2015-02-01

    A method was developed for the determination of clenbuterol in meat using stable-isotope-dilution gas chromatography with mass spectrometry coupled with solid-phase microextraction and on-fiber derivatization. The samples were first homogenized with hydrochloric acid followed by protein deposition. After headspace solid-phase microextraction and on-fiber derivatization, the content of clenbuterol was measured with the aid of stable-isotope dilution. The condition of solid-phase microextraction was optimized by central composite design. The relative standard deviations, limit of detection, and recoveries for clenbuterol were 4.2-9.2%, 0.48 μg/kg, and 96-104%, respectively. The proposed method was satisfactory for analysis of real samples as compared with the Chinese standard method. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. A semi-automated solid-phase extraction liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry method for the analysis of tetrahydrocannabinol and metabolites in whole blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagerdeo, Eshwar; Schaff, Jason E; Montgomery, Madeline A; LeBeau, Marc A

    2009-09-01

    Marijuana is one of the most commonly abused illicit substances in the USA, making cannabinoids important to detect in clinical and forensic toxicology laboratories. Historically, cannabinoids in biological fluids have been derivatized and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). There has been a gradual shift in many laboratories towards liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) for this analysis due to its improved sensitivity and reduced sample preparation compared with GC/MS procedures. This paper reports a validated method for the analysis of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and its two main metabolites, 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH) and 11-hydroxy-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-OH), in whole blood samples. The method has also been validated for cannabinol (CBD) and cannabidiol (CDN), two cannabinoids that were shown not to interfere with the method. This method has been successfully applied to samples both from living people and from deceased individuals obtained during autopsy. This method utilizes online solid-phase extraction (SPE) with LC/MS. Pretreatment of samples involves protein precipitation, sample concentration, ultracentrifugation, and reconstitution. The online SPE procedure was developed using Hysphere C8-EC sorbent. A chromatographic gradient with an Xterra MS C(18) column was used for the separation. Four multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) transitions were monitored for each analyte and internal standard. Linearity generally fell between 2 and 200 ng/mL. The limits of detection (LODs) ranged from 0.5 to 3 ng/mL and the limits of quantitation (LOQs) ranged from 2 to 8 ng/mL. The bias and imprecision were determined using a simple analysis of variance (ANOVA: single factor). The results demonstrate bias as <7%, and imprecision as <9%, for all components at each quantity control level. Published in 2009 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Non-uniqueness of the multi-temperature law of mass action. Application to 2T plasma composition calculation by means of a collisional-radiative model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annaloro, Julien; Teulet, Philippe; Bultel, Arnaud; Cressault, Yann; Gleizes, Alain

    2017-12-01

    This work is devoted to the calculation of the composition for a monoatomic plasma (argon in the case presented) for which the assumption of thermal equilibrium is not realized. The plasma composition is obtained from a CR model, taking into account free electrons and a great number of electronic levels of Ar atoms and Ar+ ions. This model is based on a large set of transition probabilities and reaction rate coefficients for radiative processes (spontaneous emission and radiative recombination) and on an extended database of direct and reverse reaction rate coefficients for collisional processes (excitation/de-excitation and ionization/recombination mechanisms). Assuming Maxwellian energy distribution functions for electrons and heavy chemical species, detailed balance equations are determined for all kind of reactions in the frame of the micro reversibility principle. From these balance equations, reverse rate coefficients are calculated as a function of direct reaction rates and of electrons and heavy particles translation temperatures (Te and Th respectively). Particular attention is paid to problematic chemical reactions with electrons involved on one side and only heavy species on the other side such as: Ar + Ar → Ar + Ar+ + e. The detailed balance relations obtained for ionization/recombination processes demonstrate the non-uniqueness of the multi-temperature Saha-Eggert law (i.e. non-uniqueness of the multi-temperature law of mass action). Multi-temperature argon plasma compositions obtained in the present work exhibit abrupt density variations. These sharp variations are characteristic of the transition between the domination of heavy particle reactions (at low temperature) and the predominance of electron collisions (at high temperature).

  7. The law of mass action and the pharmacological concentration-effect curve: resolving the paradox of apparently non-dose-related adverse drug reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronson, Jeffrey K; Ferner, Robin E

    2016-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions are sometimes described as being 'non-dose-related' because no relationship has been found between increasing doses and either the intensity of the response or the proportion of individuals in whom the response occurs; furthermore, hypersensitivity reactions are often regarded as being non-dose-related, even if different doses have not been studied. However, the law of mass action implies that all pharmacological effects are concentration related and should increase in intensity with increasing dose. We set out to explain this paradox. We searched for published adverse drug reactions that have been described as non-dose-related and analysed them. We identified four categories of explanations that resolve the paradox: (i) the reaction is not real; it may have occurred by chance or there may be methodological problems, such as bias or confounding factors; (ii) the dose-response curve for the adverse effect reaches a maximum at doses lower than were studied (i.e. a hypersusceptibility reaction); this underpins the use of test doses to predict the possibility of an adverse reaction at therapeutic doses; (iii) susceptibility to the adverse reaction differs widely among individuals; and (iv) imprecision or inaccuracy in the measurement of either dose or effect obscures dose responsiveness. This last explanation encompasses: (a) reactions related to cumulative dose; (b) dissociation between dose and concentration through saturable pharmacokinetics; and (c) variability in the measurement of the effect. If an adverse drug reaction appears to be non-dose-related, the reasons should be sought, having these mechanisms in mind. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  8. Insights into small heat shock protein and substrate structure during chaperone action derived from hydrogen/deuterium exchange and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Guilong; Basha, Eman; Wysocki, Vicki H; Vierling, Elizabeth

    2008-09-26

    Small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) and the related alpha-crystallins are ubiquitous chaperones linked to neurodegenerative diseases, myopathies, and cataract. To better define their mechanism of chaperone action, we used hydrogen/deuterium exchange and mass spectrometry (HXMS) to monitor conformational changes during complex formation between the structurally defined sHSPs, pea PsHsp18.1, and wheat TaHsp16.9, and the heat-denatured model substrates malate dehydrogenase (MDH) and firefly luciferase. Remarkably, we found that even when complexed with substrate, the highly dynamic local structure of the sHSPs, especially in the N-terminal arm (>70% exchange in 5 s), remains unchanged. These results, coupled with sHSP-substrate complex stability, indicate that sHSPs do not adopt new secondary structure when binding substrate and suggest sHSPs are tethered to substrate at multiple sites that are locally dynamic, a feature that likely facilitates recognition and refolding of sHSP-bound substrate by the Hsp70/DnaK chaperone system. Both substrates were found to be stabilized in a partially unfolded state that is observed only in the presence of sHSP. Furthermore, peptide-level HXMS showed MDH was substantially protected in two core regions (residues 95-156 and 228-252), which overlap with the MDH structure protected in the GroEL-bound MDH refolding intermediate. Significantly, despite differences in the size and structure of TaHsp16.9-MDH and PsHsp18.1-MDH complexes, peptide-level HXMS patterns for MDH in both complexes are virtually identical, indicating that stabilized MDH thermal unfolding intermediates are not determined by the identity of the sHSP.

  9. Automation from pictures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozubal, A.J.

    1992-01-01

    The state transition diagram (STD) model has been helpful in the design of real time software, especially with the emergence of graphical computer aided software engineering (CASE) tools. Nevertheless, the translation of the STD to real time code has in the past been primarily a manual task. At Los Alamos we have automated this process. The designer constructs the STD using a CASE tool (Cadre Teamwork) using a special notation for events and actions. A translator converts the STD into an intermediate state notation language (SNL), and this SNL is compiled directly into C code (a state program). Execution of the state program is driven by external events, allowing multiple state programs to effectively share the resources of the host processor. Since the design and the code are tightly integrated through the CASE tool, the design and code never diverge, and we avoid design obsolescence. Furthermore, the CASE tool automates the production of formal technical documents from the graphic description encapsulated by the CASE tool. (author)

  10. An automated, open-source (NASA Ames Stereo Pipeline) workflow for mass production of high-resolution DEMs from commercial stereo satellite imagery: Application to mountain glacies in the contiguous US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shean, D. E.; Arendt, A. A.; Whorton, E.; Riedel, J. L.; O'Neel, S.; Fountain, A. G.; Joughin, I. R.

    2016-12-01

    We adapted the open source NASA Ames Stereo Pipeline (ASP) to generate digital elevation models (DEMs) and orthoimages from very-high-resolution (VHR) commercial imagery of the Earth. These modifications include support for rigorous and rational polynomial coefficient (RPC) sensor models, sensor geometry correction, bundle adjustment, point cloud co-registration, and significant improvements to the ASP code base. We outline an automated processing workflow for 0.5 m GSD DigitalGlobe WorldView-1/2/3 and GeoEye-1 along-track and cross-track stereo image data. Output DEM products are posted at 2, 8, and 32 m with direct geolocation accuracy of scale batch processing in a high-performance computing environment. We have leveraged these resources to produce dense time series and regional mosaics for the Earth's ice sheets. We are now processing and analyzing all available 2008-2016 commercial stereo DEMs over glaciers and perennial snowfields in the contiguous US. We are using these records to study long-term, interannual, and seasonal volume change and glacier mass balance. This analysis will provide a new assessment of regional climate change, and will offer basin-scale analyses of snowpack evolution and snow/ice melt runoff for water resource applications.

  11. Automated and sensitive determination of four anabolic androgenic steroids in urine by online turbulent flow solid-phase extraction coupled with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry: a novel approach for clinical monitoring and doping control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Feng; Shao, Jing; Liu, Qian; Shi, Jian-Bo; Jiang, Gui-Bin

    2014-07-01

    A novel method for automated and sensitive analysis of testosterone, androstenedione, methyltestosterone and methenolone in urine samples by online turbulent flow solid-phase extraction coupled with high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was developed. The optimization and validation of the method were discussed in detail. The Turboflow C18-P SPE column showed the best extraction efficiency for all the analytes. Nanogram per liter (ng/L) level of AAS could be determined directly and the limits of quantification (LOQs) were 0.01 ng/mL, which were much lower than normally concerned concentrations for these typical anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) (0.1 ng/mL). The linearity range was from the LOQ to 100 ng/mL for each compound, with the coefficients of determination (r(2)) ranging from 0.9990 to 0.9999. The intraday and interday relative standard deviations (RSDs) ranged from 1.1% to 14.5% (n=5). The proposed method was successfully applied to the analysis of urine samples collected from 24 male athletes and 15 patients of prostate cancer. The proposed method provides an alternative practical way to rapidly determine AAS in urine samples, especially for clinical monitoring and doping control. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Quantification of five compounds with heterogeneous physicochemical properties (morphine, 6-monoacetylmorphine, cyamemazine, meprobamate and caffeine) in 11 fluids and tissues, using automated solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bévalot, Fabien; Bottinelli, Charline; Cartiser, Nathalie; Fanton, Laurent; Guitton, Jérôme

    2014-06-01

    An automated solid-phase extraction (SPE) protocol followed by gas chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry was developed for quantification of caffeine, cyamemazine, meprobamate, morphine and 6-monoacetylmorphine (6-MAM) in 11 biological matrices [blood, urine, bile, vitreous humor, liver, kidney, lung and skeletal muscle, brain, adipose tissue and bone marrow (BM)]. The assay was validated for linearity, within- and between-day precision and accuracy, limits of quantification, selectivity, extraction recovery (ER), sample dilution and autosampler stability on BM. For the other matrices, partial validation was performed (limits of quantification, linearity, within-day precision, accuracy, selectivity and ER). The lower limits of quantification were 12.5 ng/mL(ng/g) for 6-MAM, morphine and cyamemazine, 100 ng/mL(ng/g) for meprobamate and 50 ng/mL(ng/g) for caffeine. Analysis of real-case samples demonstrated the performance of the assay in forensic toxicology to investigate challenging cases in which, for example, blood is not available or in which analysis in alternative matrices could be relevant. The SPE protocol was also assessed as an extraction procedure that could target other relevant analytes of interest. The extraction procedure was applied to 12 molecules of forensic interest with various physicochemical properties (alimemazine, alprazolam, amitriptyline, citalopram, cocaine, diazepam, levomepromazine, nordazepam, tramadol, venlafaxine, pentobarbital and phenobarbital). All drugs were able to be detected at therapeutic concentrations in blood and in the alternate matrices.

  13. Screening of over 100 drugs in horse urine using automated on-line solid-phase extraction coupled to liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry for doping control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, W H; Choi, Timmy L S; Tsoi, Yeuki Y K; Leung, Gary N W; Wan, Terence S M

    2017-03-24

    A fast method for the direct analysis of enzyme-hydrolysed horse urine using an automated on-line solid-phase extraction (SPE) coupled to a liquid-chromatography/high resolution mass spectrometer was developed. Over 100 drugs of diverse drug classes could be simultaneously detected in horse urine at sub to low parts per billion levels. Urine sample was first hydrolysed by β-glucuronidase to release conjugated drugs, followed by centrifugal filtration. The filtrate (1mL) was directly injected into an on-line SPE system consisting of a pre-column filter and a SPE cartridge column for the separation of analytes from matrix components. Through valves-switching, the interfering matrix components were flushed to waste, and the analytes were eluted to a C 18 analytical column for refocusing and chromatographic separation. Detections were achieved by full-scan HRMS in alternating positive and negative electrospray ionisation modes within a turn-around time of 16min, inclusive of on-line sample clean-up and post-run mobile phase equilibration. No significant matrix interference was observed at the expected retention times of the targeted masses. Over 90% of the drugs studied gave estimated limits of detection (LoDs) at or below 5ng/mL, with some LoDs reaching down to 0.05ng/mL. Data-dependent acquisition (DDA) was included to provide additional product-ion scan data to substantiate the presence of detected analytes. The resulting product-ion spectra can be searched against an in-house MS/MS library for identity verification. The applicability of the method has been demonstrated by the detection of drugs in doping control samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Analysis of urinary 8-isoprostane as an oxidative stress biomarker by stable isotope dilution using automated online in-tube solid-phase microextraction coupled with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Keisuke; Kataoka, Hiroyuki

    2015-08-10

    We have developed a simple and sensitive method for the determination of the oxidative stress biomarker 8-isoprostane (8-IP) in human urine by automated online in-tube solid-phase microextraction (SPME) coupled with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) using a Zorbax Eclipse XDB-8 column and 0.1% formic acid/methanol (25/75, v/v) as a mobile phase. Electrospray MS/MS for 8-IP was performed on an API 4000 triple quadruple mass spectrometer in negative ion mode. The optimum in-tube SPME conditions were 20 draw/eject cycles with a sample size of 40 μL using a Carboxen 1006 PLOT capillary column for the extraction. The extracted compounds were easily desorbed from the capillary by passage of the mobile phase, and no carryover was observed. Total analysis time of this method including online extraction and analysis was about 30 min for each sample. The in-tube SPME LC-MS/MS method showed good linearity in the concentration range of 20-1000 pg/mL with a correlation coefficient r = 0.9999 for 8-IP using a stable isotope-labeled internal standard, 8-IP-d4. The detection limit of 8-IP was 3.3 pg/mL and the proposed method showed 42-fold higher sensitivity than the direct injection method. The intra-day and inter-day precisions (relative standard deviations) were below 5.0% and 8.5% (n = 5), respectively. This method was applied successfully to the analysis of urine samples without pretreatment or interference peaks. The recovery rates of 8-IP spiked into urine samples were above 92%. This method is useful for assessing the effects of oxidative stress and antioxidant intake. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Both Automation and Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Royal

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the concept of a paperless society and the current situation in library automation. Various applications of automation and telecommunications are addressed, and future library automation is considered. Automation at the Monroe County Public Library in Bloomington, Indiana, is described as an example. (MES)

  16. Process development for automated solar cell and module production. Task 4: automated array assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagerty, J.J.

    1980-06-30

    The scope of work under this contract involves specifying a process sequence which can be used in conjunction with automated equipment for the mass production of solar cell modules for terrestrial use. This process sequence is then critically analyzed from a technical and economic standpoint to determine the technological readiness of each process step for implementation. The process steps are ranked according to the degree of development effort required and according to their significance to the overall process. Under this contract the steps receiving analysis were: back contact metallization, automated cell array layup/interconnect, and module edge sealing. For automated layup/interconnect both hard automation and programmable automation (using an industrial robot) were studied. The programmable automation system was then selected for actual hardware development. Economic analysis using the SAMICS system has been performed during these studies to assure that development efforts have been directed towards the ultimate goal of price reduction. Details are given. (WHK)

  17. Determination of anabolic steroids in human urine by automated in-tube solid-phase microextraction coupled with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Keita; Yagi, Katsuharu; Ishizaki, Atsushi; Kataoka, Hiroyuki

    2010-09-05

    A simple, rapid and sensitive method was developed for determining the presence of seven anabolic steroids (boldenone, nandrolone, testosterone, methyltestosterone, epiandrosterone, androsterone, and atnozolol) in human urine. Glucuronide-conjugates of these compounds were hydrolyzed with beta-glucuronidase. The anabolic steroids were analyzed by on-line in-tube solid-phase microextraction (SPME) coupled with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). The steroids were separated within 14 min by high performance liquid chromatography using a Chromolith RP-18e column and 5 mM ammonium formate/methanol (35/65, v/v) as a mobile phase at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. Electrospray ionization conditions in the positive ion mode were optimized for the MS detection of these compounds. The optimum in-tube SPME conditions were 20 draw/eject cycles with a sample size of 40 microL using a Supel-Q PLOT capillary column for the extraction. The extracted compounds could be desorbed readily from the capillary column by flow of the mobile phase, and no carryover was observed. Using the in-tube SPME LC-MS with SIM mode detection, good linearity of the calibration curve (r>0.995) was obtained in the concentration range of 0.5-20 ng/mL, except for stanozolol. The detection limits (S/N=3) of anabolic steroids were in the range 9-182 pg/mL and the proposed method showed 20-33-fold higher sensitivity than the direct injection method. The within-day and between-day precisions were below 4.0% and 7.3% (n=5), respectively. This method was applied successfully to the analysis of urine samples without the interference peaks. The recovery rates of anabolic steroids spiked into urine samples were above 85%. This method is useful to analyze the urinary levels of these compounds in anti-doping tests. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Universal protocol for the rapid automated detection of carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative bacilli directly from blood cultures by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oviaño, Marina; Sparbier, Katrin; Barba, Maria José; Kostrzewa, Markus; Bou, Germán

    2016-12-01

    Detection of carbapenemase-producing bacteria directly from blood cultures is a major challenge, as patients with bacteraemia are critically ill. Early detection can be helpful for selection of the most appropriate antibiotic therapy as well as adequate control of outbreaks. In the current study, a novel matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF)-based method was developed for the rapid, automated detection of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii directly from blood cultures. Carbapenemase activity was determined in 30 min by measuring hydrolysis of imipenem (0.31 mg/mL) in blood cultures spiked with a series of 119 previously characterised isolates, 81 of which carried a carbapenemase enzyme (10 bla KPC , 10 bla VIM , 10 bla NDM , 10 bla IMP , 26 bla OXA-48-type , 9 bla OXA-23 , 1 bla OXA-237 , 3 bla OXA-24 and 2 bla OXA-58 ) . Twenty blood cultures obtained from bacteraemic patients carrying bla OXA-48 -producing isolates were also analysed using the same protocol. Analysis was performed using MALDI-TOF Biotyper ® Compass software, which automatically provides a result of sensitivity or resistance, calculated as the logRQ or ratio of hydrolysis of the antibiotic. This assay is simple to perform, inexpensive, time saving, universal for Gram-negative bacilli, and highly reliable (overall sensitivity and specificity of 98% and 100%, respectively). Moreover, the protocol could be established as a standardised method in clinical laboratories as it does not require specialised training in mass spectrometry. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  19. Rapid and automated analysis of aflatoxin M1 in milk and dairy products by online solid phase extraction coupled to ultra-high-pressure-liquid-chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campone, Luca; Piccinelli, Anna Lisa; Celano, Rita; Pagano, Imma; Russo, Mariateresa; Rastrelli, Luca

    2016-01-08

    This study reports a fast and automated analytical procedure for the analysis of aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) in milk and dairy products. The method is based on the simultaneous protein precipitation and AFM1 extraction, by salt-induced liquid-liquid extraction (SI-LLE), followed by an online solid-phase extraction (online SPE) coupled to ultra-high-pressure-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) analysis to the automatic pre-concentration, clean up and sensitive and selective determination of AFM1. The main parameters affecting the extraction efficiency and accuracy of the analytical method were studied in detail. In the optimal conditions, acetonitrile and NaCl were used as extraction/denaturant solvent and salting-out agent in SI-LLE, respectively. After centrifugation, the organic phase (acetonitrile) was diluted with water (1:9 v/v) and purified (1mL) by online C18 cartridge coupled with an UHPLC column. Finally, selected reaction monitoring (SRM) acquisition mode was applied to the detection of AFM1. Validation studies were carried out on different dairy products (whole and skimmed cow milk, yogurt, goat milk, and powder infant formula), providing method quantification limits about 25 times lower than AFM1 maximum levels permitted by EU regulation 1881/2006 in milk and dairy products for direct human consumption. Recoveries (86-102%) and repeatability (RSDmilk and dairy products studied. The proposed method improves the performance of AFM1 analysis in milk samples as AFM1 determination is performed with a degree of accuracy higher than the conventional methods. Other advantages are the reduction of sample preparation procedure, time and cost of the analysis, enabling high sample throughput that meet the current concerns of food safety and the public health protection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A high-throughput, fully automated liquid/liquid extraction liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry method for the quantitation of a new investigational drug ABT-869 and its metabolite A-849529 in human plasma samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodila, Ramona C; Kim, Joseph C; Ji, Qin C; El-Shourbagy, Tawakol A

    2006-01-01

    ABT-869 is a novel ATP-competitive inhibitor for all the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). It is one of the oncology drugs in development at Abbott Laboratories and has great potential for enhanced anti-tumor efficacy as well as activity in a broad range of human cancers. We report here an accurate, precise and rugged liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) assay for the quantitative measurement of ABT-869 and its acid metabolite A-849529. A fully automated 96-well liquid/liquid extraction method was achieved utilizing a Hamilton liquid handler. The only manual intervention required prior to LC/MS/MS injection is to transfer the 96-well plate to a drying rack to dry the extracts then transfer the plate back to the Hamilton for robotic reconstitution. The linear dynamic ranges were from 1.1 to 598.8 ng/mL for ABT-869 and from 1.1 to 605.8 ng/mL for A-849529. The coefficient of determination (r2) for all analytes was greater than 0.9995. For the drug ABT-869, the intra-assay coefficient of variance (CV) was between 0.4% and 3.7% and the inter-assay CV was between 0.9% and 2.8%. The inter-assay mean accuracy, expressed as percent of theoretical, was between 96.8% and 102.2%. For the metabolite A-849529, the intra-assay CV was between 0.5% and 5.1% and the inter-assay CV was between 0.8% and 4.9%. The inter-assay mean accuracy, expressed as percent of theoretical, was between 96.9% and 100.6%. Copyright 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Automated solid-phase extraction-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis of 6-acetylmorphine in human urine specimens: application for a high-throughput urine analysis laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robandt, P V; Bui, H M; Scancella, J M; Klette, K L

    2010-10-01

    An automated solid-phase extraction-liquid chromatography- tandem mass spectrometry (SPE-LC-MS-MS) method using the Spark Holland Symbiosis Pharma SPE-LC coupled to a Waters Quattro Micro MS-MS was developed for the analysis of 6-acetylmorphine (6-AM) in human urine specimens. The method was linear (R² = 0.9983) to 100 ng/mL, with no carryover at 200 ng/mL. Limits of quantification and detection were found to be 2 ng/mL. Interrun precision calculated as percent coefficient of variation (%CV) and evaluated by analyzing five specimens at 10 ng/mL over nine batches (n = 45) was 3.6%. Intrarun precision evaluated from 0 to 100 ng/mL ranged from 1.0 to 4.4%CV. Other opioids (codeine, morphine, oxycodone, oxymorphone, hydromorphone, hydrocodone, and norcodeine) did not interfere in the detection, quantification, or chromatography of 6-AM or the deuterated internal standard. The quantified values for 41 authentic human urine specimens previously found to contain 6-AM by a validated gas chromatography (GC)-MS method were compared to those obtained by the SPE-LC-MS-MS method. The SPE-LC-MS-MS procedure eliminates the human factors of specimen handling, extraction, and derivatization, thereby reducing labor costs and rework resulting from human error or technique issues. The time required for extraction and analysis was reduced by approximately 50% when compared to a validated 6-AM procedure using manual SPE and GC-MS analysis.

  2. Quantification of the anti-leukemia drug STI571 (Gleevec) and its metabolite (CGP 74588) in monkey plasma using a semi-automated solid phase extraction procedure and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtiar, R; Khemani, L; Hayes, M; Bedman, T; Tse, F

    2002-06-15

    Signal Transduction Inhibitor 571 (STI571, formerly known as CGP 57148B) or Gleevec received fast track approval by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). STI571 (Gleevec) is a revolutionary and promising new oral therapy for CML, which functions at the molecular level with high specificity. The dramatic improvement in efficacy compared with existing treatments prompted an equally profound increase in the pace of development of Gleevec. The duration from first dose in man to completion of the New Drug Application (NDA) filing was less than 3 years. In addition, recently, FDA approved Gleevec for the treatment of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). In order to support all toxicokinetic (TK) studies with sufficient speed to meet various target dates, a semi-automated procedure using solid phase extraction (SPE) was developed and validated. A Packard Multi-Probe I and a SPE step in a 96-well plate format were utilized. A 3M Empore octyl (C(8))-standard density 96-well plate was used for plasma sample extraction. A Sciex API 3000 triple quadrupole mass spectrometer with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) interface operated in positive ion mode was used for detection. Lower limits of quantification of 1.00 and 2.00 ng/ml were attained for STI571 and its metabolite, CGP 74588, respectively. The method proved to be rugged and allowed the simultaneous quantification of STI571 and CGP 74588 in monkey plasma. Herein, assay development, validation, and representative concentration-time profiles obtained from TK studies are presented.

  3. [Use of time-of-flight mass spectrometry with ionization division fragments of californium-252 for studying the mechanisms of action of drugs on DNA and its components].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhodub, L F; Grebenik, L I; Chivanov, V D

    1994-01-01

    Using soft-ionization mass spectrometry (252-Cf particle desorption mass spectrometry, PDMS) a minor adduct of anticancer drug prospidine and deoxyguanosine-5-phosphate (pdG) has been found. It has been shown experimentally that PDMS is very useful for study of biological mixtures as well as mechanisms of interactions between drugs and biomolecules.

  4. Determination of the oxidative stress biomarker urinary 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine by automated on-line in-tube solid-phase microextraction coupled with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Hiroyuki; Mizuno, Keisuke; Oda, Eri; Saito, Akihiro

    2016-04-15

    A simple and sensitive method for the determination of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), a marker of oxidative DNA damage in human urine, was developed using automated on-line in-tube solid-phase microextraction (SPME) coupled with stable isotope-dilution liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Creatinine was also analyzed simultaneously to normalize urine volume by the in-tube SPME LC-MS/MS method, and 8-OHdG and creatinine were separated within 3 min using a Zorbax Eclipse XDB-C8 column. Electrospray MS/MS for these compounds was performed on an API 4000 triple quadruple mass spectrometer in the positive ion mode by multiple reaction monitoring. The optimum in-tube SPME conditions were 20 draw/eject cycles of 40 μL of sample at a flow rate of 200 μL/min using a Carboxen 1006 PLOT capillary column as an extraction device. The extracted compounds were easily desorbed from the capillary by passage of the mobile phase, and no carryover was observed. The calibration curve for 8-OHdG using its stable isotope-labeled internal standard was linear in the range of 0.05-10 ng/mL, and the detection limit was 8.3 pg/mL. The intra-day and inter-day precision (relative standard deviations) were below 3.1% and 9.6% (n=5), respectively. This method was applied successfully to the analysis of urine samples without any other pretreatment and interference peaks, with good recovery rates above 91% in spiked urine samples. The limits of quantification of 8-OHdG and creatinine in 0.1 mL urine samples were about 0.32 and 0.69 ng/mL (S/N=10), respectively. This method was utilized to assess the effects of smoking, green tea drinking and alcohol drinking on the urinary excretion of 8-OHdG. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Autonomy and Automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shively, Jay

    2017-01-01

    A significant level of debate and confusion has surrounded the meaning of the terms autonomy and automation. Automation is a multi-dimensional concept, and we propose that Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (RPAS) automation should be described with reference to the specific system and task that has been automated, the context in which the automation functions, and other relevant dimensions. In this paper, we present definitions of automation, pilot in the loop, pilot on the loop and pilot out of the loop. We further propose that in future, the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) RPAS Panel avoids the use of the terms autonomy and autonomous when referring to automated systems on board RPA. Work Group 7 proposes to develop, in consultation with other workgroups, a taxonomy of Levels of Automation for RPAS.

  6. An automated swimming respirometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    STEFFENSEN, JF; JOHANSEN, K; BUSHNELL, PG

    1984-01-01

    An automated respirometer is described that can be used for computerized respirometry of trout and sharks.......An automated respirometer is described that can be used for computerized respirometry of trout and sharks....

  7. Configuration Management Automation (CMA) -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — Configuration Management Automation (CMA) will provide an automated, integrated enterprise solution to support CM of FAA NAS and Non-NAS assets and investments. CMA...

  8. Automated technological equipment-robot complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhitomirskii, S.V.; Samorodskikh, B.L.

    1984-01-01

    This paper surveys the types of automated technological equipment robot complexes. The principal elements of such complexes are described. Complexes are divided into two principal groups: those using simultaneously acting robots, and those using successively acting robots. The great variety of types of robots using successive action is then described

  9. EOS Terra: EOS DAM Automation Constellation MOWG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantziaras, Dimitrios C.

    2017-01-01

    Brief summary of the decision factors considered and process improvement steps made, to evolve the ESMO debris avoidance maneuver process to a more automated process. Presentation is in response to an action item/question received at a prior MOWG meeting.

  10. Automation in College Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werking, Richard Hume

    1991-01-01

    Reports the results of a survey of the "Bowdoin List" group of liberal arts colleges. The survey obtained information about (1) automation modules in place and when they had been installed; (2) financing of automation and its impacts on the library budgets; and (3) library director's views on library automation and the nature of the…

  11. Parameters Investigation of Mathematical Model of Productivity for Automated Line with Availability by DMAIC Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Chan Sin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Automated line is widely applied in industry especially for mass production with less variety product. Productivity is one of the important criteria in automated line as well as industry which directly present the outputs and profits. Forecast of productivity in industry accurately in order to achieve the customer demand and the forecast result is calculated by using mathematical model. Mathematical model of productivity with availability for automated line has been introduced to express the productivity in terms of single level of reliability for stations and mechanisms. Since this mathematical model of productivity with availability cannot achieve close enough productivity compared to actual one due to lack of parameters consideration, the enhancement of mathematical model is required to consider and add the loss parameters that is not considered in current model. This paper presents the investigation parameters of productivity losses investigated by using DMAIC (Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, and Control concept and PACE Prioritization Matrix (Priority, Action, Consider, and Eliminate. The investigated parameters are important for further improvement of mathematical model of productivity with availability to develop robust mathematical model of productivity in automated line.

  12. Automation in Clinical Microbiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledeboer, Nathan A.

    2013-01-01

    Historically, the trend toward automation in clinical pathology laboratories has largely bypassed the clinical microbiology laboratory. In this article, we review the historical impediments to automation in the microbiology laboratory and offer insight into the reasons why we believe that we are on the cusp of a dramatic change that will sweep a wave of automation into clinical microbiology laboratories. We review the currently available specimen-processing instruments as well as the total laboratory automation solutions. Lastly, we outline the types of studies that will need to be performed to fully assess the benefits of automation in microbiology laboratories. PMID:23515547

  13. Automation of industrial bioprocesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyeler, W; DaPra, E; Schneider, K

    2000-01-01

    The dramatic development of new electronic devices within the last 25 years has had a substantial influence on the control and automation of industrial bioprocesses. Within this short period of time the method of controlling industrial bioprocesses has changed completely. In this paper, the authors will use a practical approach focusing on the industrial applications of automation systems. From the early attempts to use computers for the automation of biotechnological processes up to the modern process automation systems some milestones are highlighted. Special attention is given to the influence of Standards and Guidelines on the development of automation systems.

  14. Minima de L'intégrale D'action du Problème Newtoniende 4 Corps de Masses Égales Dans R3: Orbites `Hip-Hop'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenciner, Alain; Venturelli, Andrea

    2000-09-01

    We consider the problem of 4 bodies of equal masses in R 3 for the Newtonian r-1 potential. We address the question of the absolute minima of the action integral among (anti)symmetric loops of class H 1 whose period is fixed. It is the simplest case for which the results of [4] (corrected in [5]) do not apply: the minima cannot be the relative equilibria whose configuration is an absolute minimum of the potential among the configurations having a given moment of inertia with respect to their center of mass. This is because the regular tetrahedron cannot have a relative equilibrium motion in R 3 (see [2]). We show that the absolute minima of the action are not homographic motions. We also show that if we force the configuration to admit a certain type of symmetry of order 4, the absolute minimum is a collisionless orbit whose configuration ‘hesitates’ between the central configuration of the square and the one of the tetrahedron. We call these orbits ‘hip-hop’. A similar result holds in case of a symmetry of order 3 where the central configuration of the equilateral triangle with a body at the center of mass replaces the square.

  15. Reduced bone mass in obese young rats through PPAR omega suppression of wnt/beta-catenin signaling and direct action of free fatty acids (NEFA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The relationship of obesity to skeletal development is unclear. We utilized total enteral nutrition to feed high and low fat diets (HFD and LFD) to rats for 4 wks to produce obesity. Weight gain was matched but fat mass, serum leptin and NEFA were increased by HFD (P < 0.05). HFD lowered total bone ...

  16. Differential employment rates in the journalism and mass communication labor force based on gender, race and ethnicity: Exploring the impact of affirmative action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becker, L.B.; Lauf, E.; Lowrey, W.

    1999-01-01

    This paper examines whether gender, race, and ethnicity are associated with employment in the journalism and mass communication labor market and—if discrepancies in employment exist—what explanations might he offered for them. The data show strong evidence that race and ethnicity are associated with

  17. Bioprocessing automation in cell therapy manufacturing: Outcomes of special interest group automation workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Oliver; Robinson, Sarah; Bure, Kim; Brindley, David A; Mccall, David

    2018-02-13

    Phacilitate held a Special Interest Group workshop event in Edinburgh, UK, in May 2017. The event brought together leading stakeholders in the cell therapy bioprocessing field to identify present and future challenges and propose potential solutions to automation in cell therapy bioprocessing. Here, we review and summarize discussions from the event. Deep biological understanding of a product, its mechanism of action and indication pathogenesis underpin many factors relating to bioprocessing and automation. To fully exploit the opportunities of bioprocess automation, therapeutics developers must closely consider whether an automation strategy is applicable, how to design an 'automatable' bioprocess and how to implement process modifications with minimal disruption. Major decisions around bioprocess automation strategy should involve all relevant stakeholders; communication between technical and business strategy decision-makers is of particular importance. Developers should leverage automation to implement in-process testing, in turn applicable to process optimization, quality assurance (QA)/ quality control (QC), batch failure control, adaptive manufacturing and regulatory demands, but a lack of precedent and technical opportunities can complicate such efforts. Sparse standardization across product characterization, hardware components and software platforms is perceived to complicate efforts to implement automation. The use of advanced algorithmic approaches such as machine learning may have application to bioprocess and supply chain optimization. Automation can substantially de-risk the wider supply chain, including tracking and traceability, cryopreservation and thawing and logistics. The regulatory implications of automation are currently unclear because few hardware options exist and novel solutions require case-by-case validation, but automation can present attractive regulatory incentives. Copyright © 2018 International Society for Cellular Therapy

  18. Power, speed & automation with Adobe Photoshop

    CERN Document Server

    Scott, Geoff

    2012-01-01

    This is a must for the serious Photoshop user! Power, Speed & Automation explores how to customize and automate Photoshop to increase your speed and productivity.  With numerous step-by-step instructions, the authors-two of Adobe's own software developers!- walk you through the steps to best tailor Photoshop's interface to your personal workflow; write and apply Actions; and use batching and scripts to process large numbers of images quickly and automatically.  You will learn how to build your own dialogs and panels to improve your production workflows in Photoshop, the secrets of changing

  19. Automation warning system against driver falling asleep in-traffic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dymov I. S.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to the development of a new automation recognition and warning system against driver falling asleep in-traffic. The issue of the physical condition control of professional drivers on the voyage has been considered both on the part of efficiency and quality of its determination, and in terms of improving overall road safety. The existing and widely used devices for determining the transition to the stage of sleep of drivers being in-traffic have been analyzed. Their advantages and disadvantages have been detected. It has been established that the main negative factor preventing the mass introduction of pre-existing warning systems is the need to wear one or another monitoring device before starting the movement. Carried out project research work has proposed a complex monitoring of the physical and physiological condition of driving person as a new warning method against falling asleep in-traffic. The proposed variations of algorithmic implementations can be used in long-distance trucks and passenger vehicles. Two different versions of the automatic control status of the driver physical condition have been considered. The first approach has proposed the use of sensors of the biometric parameters of body, pulsus, body temperature, and hands on wheel pressure sensors. The second one has proposed using the tracking cameras. Both for the first and second versions of the automation system a toolset of control devices is being installed inside the vehicle and have no physical, so irritating action on the driver. Software approach for the false operation rejection of the devices has been developed. The paper considers the flow diagrams of the automatic systems and logical structure of analysis and decision-making. The set of impacts intended for driver's awakening has been proposed. The conclusion about the engineering perspectives of the proposed approach of projected automation systems has been made.

  20. Automation systems for radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamasaki, Paul

    1974-01-01

    The application of automation systems for radioimmunoassay (RIA) was discussed. Automated systems could be useful in the second step, of the four basic processes in the course of RIA, i.e., preparation of sample for reaction. There were two types of instrumentation, a semi-automatic pipete, and a fully automated pipete station, both providing for fast and accurate dispensing of the reagent or for the diluting of sample with reagent. Illustrations of the instruments were shown. (Mukohata, S.)

  1. Automated stopcock actuator

    OpenAIRE

    Vandehey, N. T.; O\\'Neil, J. P.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction We have developed a low-cost stopcock valve actuator for radiochemistry automation built using a stepper motor and an Arduino, an open-source single-board microcontroller. The con-troller hardware can be programmed to run by serial communication or via two 5–24 V digital lines for simple integration into any automation control system. This valve actuator allows for automated use of a single, disposable stopcock, providing a number of advantages over stopcock manifold systems ...

  2. Automated Analysis of Accountability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruni, Alessandro; Giustolisi, Rosario; Schürmann, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    that are amenable to automated verification. Our definitions are general enough to be applied to different classes of protocols and different automated security verification tools. Furthermore, we point out formally the relation between verifiability and accountability. We validate our definitions...... with the automatic verification of three protocols: a secure exam protocol, Google’s Certificate Transparency, and an improved version of Bingo Voting. We find through automated verification that all three protocols satisfy verifiability while only the first two protocols meet accountability....

  3. Management Planning for Workplace Automation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDole, Thomas L.

    Several factors must be considered when implementing office automation. Included among these are whether or not to automate at all, the effects of automation on employees, requirements imposed by automation on the physical environment, effects of automation on the total organization, and effects on clientele. The reasons behind the success or…

  4. Laboratory Automation and Middleware.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riben, Michael

    2015-06-01

    The practice of surgical pathology is under constant pressure to deliver the highest quality of service, reduce errors, increase throughput, and decrease turnaround time while at the same time dealing with an aging workforce, increasing financial constraints, and economic uncertainty. Although not able to implement total laboratory automation, great progress continues to be made in workstation automation in all areas of the pathology laboratory. This report highlights the benefits and challenges of pathology automation, reviews middleware and its use to facilitate automation, and reviews the progress so far in the anatomic pathology laboratory. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Automated cloning methods.; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collart, F.

    2001-01-01

    Argonne has developed a series of automated protocols to generate bacterial expression clones by using a robotic system designed to be used in procedures associated with molecular biology. The system provides plate storage, temperature control from 4 to 37 C at various locations, and Biomek and Multimek pipetting stations. The automated system consists of a robot that transports sources from the active station on the automation system. Protocols for the automated generation of bacterial expression clones can be grouped into three categories (Figure 1). Fragment generation protocols are initiated on day one of the expression cloning procedure and encompass those protocols involved in generating purified coding region (PCR)

  6. Complacency and Automation Bias in the Use of Imperfect Automation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickens, Christopher D; Clegg, Benjamin A; Vieane, Alex Z; Sebok, Angelia L

    2015-08-01

    We examine the effects of two different kinds of decision-aiding automation errors on human-automation interaction (HAI), occurring at the first failure following repeated exposure to correctly functioning automation. The two errors are incorrect advice, triggering the automation bias, and missing advice, reflecting complacency. Contrasts between analogous automation errors in alerting systems, rather than decision aiding, have revealed that alerting false alarms are more problematic to HAI than alerting misses are. Prior research in decision aiding, although contrasting the two aiding errors (incorrect vs. missing), has confounded error expectancy. Participants performed an environmental process control simulation with and without decision aiding. For those with the aid, automation dependence was created through several trials of perfect aiding performance, and an unexpected automation error was then imposed in which automation was either gone (one group) or wrong (a second group). A control group received no automation support. The correct aid supported faster and more accurate diagnosis and lower workload. The aid failure degraded all three variables, but "automation wrong" had a much greater effect on accuracy, reflecting the automation bias, than did "automation gone," reflecting the impact of complacency. Some complacency was manifested for automation gone, by a longer latency and more modest reduction in accuracy. Automation wrong, creating the automation bias, appears to be a more problematic form of automation error than automation gone, reflecting complacency. Decision-aiding automation should indicate its lower degree of confidence in uncertain environments to avoid the automation bias. © 2015, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

  7. Digital computers in action

    CERN Document Server

    Booth, A D

    1965-01-01

    Digital Computers in Action is an introduction to the basics of digital computers as well as their programming and various applications in fields such as mathematics, science, engineering, economics, medicine, and law. Other topics include engineering automation, process control, special purpose games-playing devices, machine translation and mechanized linguistics, and information retrieval. This book consists of 14 chapters and begins by discussing the history of computers, from the idea of performing complex arithmetical calculations to the emergence of a modern view of the structure of a ge

  8. 77 FR 20835 - National Customs Automation Program (NCAP) Test Concerning Automated Commercial Environment (ACE...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection National Customs Automation...: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: General notice. SUMMARY: This document announces U.S. Customs and Border Protection's (CBP's) plan to conduct a National Customs...

  9. Application of ultraperformance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry-based metabonomic techniques to analyze the joint toxic action of long-term low-level exposure to a mixture of organophosphate pesticides on rat urine profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Longfei; Wang, Hong; Xu, Wei; Zeng, Yan; Hou, Yurong; Zhang, Yuqiu; Zhao, Xiujuan; Sun, Changhao

    2013-07-01

    In previously published articles, we evaluated the toxicity of four organophosphate (OP) pesticides (dichlorvos, dimethoate, acephate, and phorate) to rats using metabonomic technology at their corresponding no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL). Results show that a single pesticide elicits no toxic response. This study aimed to determine whether chronic exposure to a mixture of the above four pesticides (at their corresponding NOAEL) can lead to joint toxic action in rats using the same technology. Pesticides were administered daily to rats through drinking water for 24 weeks. The above mixture of the four pesticides showed joint toxic action at the NOAEL of each pesticide. The metabonomic profiles of rats urine were analyzed by ultraperformance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. The 16 metabolites statistically significantly changed in all treated groups compared with the control group. Dimethylphosphate and dimethyldithiophosphate exclusively detected in all treated groups can be used as early, sensitive biomarkers for exposure to a mixture of the OP pesticides. Moreover, exposure to the OP pesticides resulted in increased 7-methylguanine, ribothymidine, cholic acid, 4-pyridoxic acid, kynurenine, and indoxyl sulfate levels, as well as decreased hippuric acid, creatinine, uric acid, gentisic acid, C18-dihydrosphingosine, phytosphingosine, suberic acid, and citric acid. The results indicated that a mixture of OP pesticides induced DNA damage and oxidative stress, disturbed the metabolism of lipids, and interfered with the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Ensuring food safety requires not only the toxicology test data of each pesticide for the calculation of the acceptable daily intake but also the joint toxic action.

  10. Automated System Marketplace 1994.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Jose-Marie; Kertis, Kimberly

    1994-01-01

    Reports results of the 1994 Automated System Marketplace survey based on responses from 60 vendors. Highlights include changes in the library automation marketplace; estimated library systems revenues; minicomputer and microcomputer-based systems; marketplace trends; global markets and mergers; research needs; new purchase processes; and profiles…

  11. Automation benefits BWR customers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    A description is given of the increasing use of automation at General Electric's Wilmington fuel fabrication plant. Computerised systems and automated equipment perform a large number of inspections, inventory and process operations, and new advanced systems are being continuously introduced to reduce operator errors and expand product reliability margins. (U.K.)

  12. Automate functional testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Kalindri

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Currently, software engineers are increasingly turning to the option of automating functional tests, but not always have successful in this endeavor. Reasons range from low planning until over cost in the process. Some principles that can guide teams in automating these tests are described in this article.

  13. Automation in Warehouse Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamberg, R.; Verriet, J.

    2012-01-01

    The warehouses of the future will come in a variety of forms, but with a few common ingredients. Firstly, human operational handling of items in warehouses is increasingly being replaced by automated item handling. Extended warehouse automation counteracts the scarcity of human operators and

  14. Identity Management Processes Automation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Y. Lavrukhin

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Implementation of identity management systems consists of two main parts, consulting and automation. The consulting part includes development of a role model and identity management processes description. The automation part is based on the results of consulting part. This article describes the most important aspects of IdM implementation.

  15. Work and Programmable Automation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVore, Paul W.

    A new industrial era based on electronics and the microprocessor has arrived, an era that is being called intelligent automation. Intelligent automation, in the form of robots, replaces workers, and the new products, using microelectronic devices, require significantly less labor to produce than the goods they replace. The microprocessor thus…

  16. Library Automation in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Syed Jalaluddin

    1998-01-01

    Examines the state of library automation in Pakistan. Discusses early developments; financial support by the Netherlands Library Development Project (Pakistan); lack of automated systems in college/university and public libraries; usage by specialist libraries; efforts by private-sector libraries and the National Library in Pakistan; commonly used…

  17. Library Automation Style Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaylord Bros., Liverpool, NY.

    This library automation style guide lists specific terms and names often used in the library automation industry. The terms and/or acronyms are listed alphabetically and each is followed by a brief definition. The guide refers to the "Chicago Manual of Style" for general rules, and a notes section is included for the convenience of individual…

  18. Planning for Office Automation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherron, Gene T.

    1982-01-01

    The steps taken toward office automation by the University of Maryland are described. Office automation is defined and some types of word processing systems are described. Policies developed in the writing of a campus plan are listed, followed by a section on procedures adopted to implement the plan. (Author/MLW)

  19. The Automated Office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naclerio, Nick

    1979-01-01

    Clerical personnel may be able to climb career ladders as a result of office automation and expanded job opportunities in the word processing area. Suggests opportunities in an automated office system and lists books and periodicals on word processing for counselors and teachers. (MF)

  20. Automating the Small Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skapura, Robert

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the use of microcomputers for automating school libraries, both for entire systems and for specific library tasks. Highlights include available library management software, newsletters that evaluate software, constructing an evaluation matrix, steps to consider in library automation, and a brief discussion of computerized card catalogs.…

  1. Automation in the clinical microbiology laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Susan M; Marlowe, Elizabeth M

    2013-09-01

    Imagine a clinical microbiology laboratory where a patient's specimens are placed on a conveyor belt and sent on an automation line for processing and plating. Technologists need only log onto a computer to visualize the images of a culture and send to a mass spectrometer for identification. Once a pathogen is identified, the system knows to send the colony for susceptibility testing. This is the future of the clinical microbiology laboratory. This article outlines the operational and staffing challenges facing clinical microbiology laboratories and the evolution of automation that is shaping the way laboratory medicine will be practiced in the future. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Automated remedial assessment methodology software system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whiting, M.; Wilkins, M.; Stiles, D.

    1994-11-01

    The Automated Remedial Analysis Methodology (ARAM) software system has been developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory to assist the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in evaluating cleanup options for over 10,000 contaminated sites across the DOE complex. The automated methodology comprises modules for decision logic diagrams, technology applicability and effectiveness rules, mass balance equations, cost and labor estimating factors and equations, and contaminant stream routing. ARAM is used to select technologies for meeting cleanup targets; determine the effectiveness of the technologies in destroying, removing, or immobilizing contaminants; decide the nature and amount of secondary waste requiring further treatment; and estimate the cost and labor involved when applying technologies

  3. Inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase as anti-inflammatory mode of action of Plectranthus zeylanicus Benth and chemical characterization of ingredients by a mass spectrometric approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napagoda, Mayuri; Gerstmeier, Jana; Wesely, Sandra; Popella, Sven; Lorenz, Sybille; Scheubert, Kerstin; Svatoš, Aleš; Werz, Oliver

    2014-02-03

    The perennial herb Plectranthus zeylanicus Benth is extensively used in traditional medicine in Sri Lanka and South India for treating inflammatory conditions, but pharmacological features of Plectranthus zeylanicus are hardly explored in order to understand and rationalize its use in ethnomedicine. As 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) is a key enzyme in inflammatory disorders such as asthma or atherosclerosis, we investigated 5-LO inhibition by Plectranthus zeylanicus extracts and analyzed relevant constituents. We applied cell-free and cell-based assays to investigate suppression of 5-LO activity. Cell viability, radical scavenger activities, and inhibition of reactive oxygen species formation (ROS) in neutrophils were analysed to exclude unspecific cytotoxic or antioxidant effects. Constituents of the extracts were characterized by bioassay-guided fractionation and by analysis using gas or liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometric (Orbitrap) analysis. Extracts of Plectranthus zeylanicus prepared with n-hexane or dichloromethane potently suppressed 5-LO activity in stimulated human neutrophils (IC50=6.6 and 12µg/ml, respectively) and inhibited isolated human recombinant 5-LO (IC50=0.7 and 1.2µg/ml, respectively). In contrast, no significant radical scavenging activity or suppression of ROS formation was observed, and neutrophil viability was unaffected. Besides ubiquitously occurring ingredients, coleone P, cinncassiol A and C, and callistric acid were identified as constituents in the most active fraction. Together, potent inhibition of 5-LO activity, without concomitant anti-oxidant activity and cytotoxic effects, rationalizes the ethnopharmacological use of Plectranthus zeylanicus as anti-inflammatory remedy. Modern chromatographic/mass spectrometric analysis reveals discrete chemical structures of relevant constituents. © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Advances in inspection automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Walter H.; Mair, H. Douglas; Jansen, Dion; Lombardi, Luciano

    2013-01-01

    This new session at QNDE reflects the growing interest in inspection automation. Our paper describes a newly developed platform that makes the complex NDE automation possible without the need for software programmers. Inspection tasks that are tedious, error-prone or impossible for humans to perform can now be automated using a form of drag and drop visual scripting. Our work attempts to rectify the problem that NDE is not keeping pace with the rest of factory automation. Outside of NDE, robots routinely and autonomously machine parts, assemble components, weld structures and report progress to corporate databases. By contrast, components arriving in the NDT department typically require manual part handling, calibrations and analysis. The automation examples in this paper cover the development of robotic thickness gauging and the use of adaptive contour following on the NRU reactor inspection at Chalk River.

  5. Automated model building

    CERN Document Server

    Caferra, Ricardo; Peltier, Nicholas

    2004-01-01

    This is the first book on automated model building, a discipline of automated deduction that is of growing importance Although models and their construction are important per se, automated model building has appeared as a natural enrichment of automated deduction, especially in the attempt to capture the human way of reasoning The book provides an historical overview of the field of automated deduction, and presents the foundations of different existing approaches to model construction, in particular those developed by the authors Finite and infinite model building techniques are presented The main emphasis is on calculi-based methods, and relevant practical results are provided The book is of interest to researchers and graduate students in computer science, computational logic and artificial intelligence It can also be used as a textbook in advanced undergraduate courses

  6. Automation in Warehouse Development

    CERN Document Server

    Verriet, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    The warehouses of the future will come in a variety of forms, but with a few common ingredients. Firstly, human operational handling of items in warehouses is increasingly being replaced by automated item handling. Extended warehouse automation counteracts the scarcity of human operators and supports the quality of picking processes. Secondly, the development of models to simulate and analyse warehouse designs and their components facilitates the challenging task of developing warehouses that take into account each customer’s individual requirements and logistic processes. Automation in Warehouse Development addresses both types of automation from the innovative perspective of applied science. In particular, it describes the outcomes of the Falcon project, a joint endeavour by a consortium of industrial and academic partners. The results include a model-based approach to automate warehouse control design, analysis models for warehouse design, concepts for robotic item handling and computer vision, and auton...

  7. Automation in Immunohematology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenu Bajpai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There have been rapid technological advances in blood banking in South Asian region over the past decade with an increasing emphasis on quality and safety of blood products. The conventional test tube technique has given way to newer techniques such as column agglutination technique, solid phase red cell adherence assay, and erythrocyte-magnetized technique. These new technologies are adaptable to automation and major manufacturers in this field have come up with semi and fully automated equipments for immunohematology tests in the blood bank. Automation improves the objectivity and reproducibility of tests. It reduces human errors in patient identification and transcription errors. Documentation and traceability of tests, reagents and processes and archiving of results is another major advantage of automation. Shifting from manual methods to automation is a major undertaking for any transfusion service to provide quality patient care with lesser turnaround time for their ever increasing workload. This article discusses the various issues involved in the process.

  8. Determination and confirmation of parent and total ractopamine in bovine, swine, and turkey tissues by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry: First Action 2011.23.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Thomas J; Rodewald, John M; Brunelle, Sharon L; Neeley, Mark; Wallace, Michael; Connolly, Paul; Coleman, Mark R

    2012-01-01

    A candidate method selected by the AOAC Expert Review Panel (ERP) for Ractopamine for determination and confirmation of parent and total ractopamine by LC/MS/MS was validated in a single laboratory for bovine, swine, and turkey tissues. The candidate method utilizes methanol extraction of the tissues, followed by an optional enzymatic hydrolysis for determination of total (parent plus conjugate) ractopamine. A mixed-mode cation exchange SPE cartridge is used to purify the initial extract before LC/MS/MS. Matrix-matched standards and a ractopamine-d6 internal standard are used for quantification of parent and total ractopamine in unknown samples. Validation data demonstrated that mean intertrial recoveries for ractopamine across all concentrations tested ranged from 79.7 to 102.2% for parent ractopamine and from 79.0 to 100.0% when a hydrolysis step was included. Intertrial repeatability precision ranged from 2.44 to 11.1% for parent ractopamine and 4.97 to 15.0% with hydrolysis. Estimated LOD values were below 0.1 ng/g and LOQ values were validated at 0.25x the maximum residue limits. The data satisfy the requirements of the AOAC Stakeholder Panel for Veterinary Drug Residue Methods for single laboratory validation studies. The method was awarded Official Methods of Analysis First Action 2011.23 by the AOAC ERP on Veterinary Drug Residues.

  9. If this then that: an introduction to automated task services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoy, Matthew B

    2015-01-01

    This article explores automated task services, a type of website that allows users to create rules that are triggered by activity on one website and perform a task on another site. The most well-known automated task service is If This Then That (IFTTT), but recently a large number of these services have sprung up. These services can be used to connect websites, apps, business services, and even devices such as phones and home automation equipment. This allows for millions of possible combinations of rules, triggers, and actions. Librarians can put these services to use in many ways, from automating social media postings to remembering to bring their umbrella when rain is in the forecast. A list of popular automated task services is included, as well as a number of ideas for using these services in libraries.

  10. Action physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinness, Lachlan P.; Savage, C. M.

    2016-09-01

    More than a decade ago, Edwin Taylor issued a "call to action" that presented the case for basing introductory university mechanics teaching around the principle of stationary action [E. F. Taylor, Am. J. Phys. 71, 423-425 (2003)]. We report on our response to that call in the form of an investigation of the teaching and learning of the stationary action formulation of physics in a first-year university course. Our action physics instruction proceeded from the many-paths approach to quantum physics to ray optics, classical mechanics, and relativity. Despite the challenges presented by action physics, students reported it to be accessible, interesting, motivational, and valuable.

  11. Developments towards a fully automated AMS system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steier, P.; Puchegger, S.; Golser, R.; Kutschera, W.; Priller, A.; Rom, W.; Wallner, A.; Wild, E.

    2000-01-01

    The possibilities of computer-assisted and automated accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) measurements were explored. The goal of these efforts is to develop fully automated procedures for 'routine' measurements at the Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator (VERA), a dedicated 3-MV Pelletron tandem AMS facility. As a new tool for automatic tuning of the ion optics we developed a multi-dimensional optimization algorithm robust to noise, which was applied for 14 C and 10 Be. The actual isotope ratio measurements are performed in a fully automated fashion and do not require the presence of an operator. Incoming data are evaluated online and the results can be accessed via Internet. The system was used for 14 C, 10 Be, 26 Al and 129 I measurements

  12. Systematic review automation technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Systematic reviews, a cornerstone of evidence-based medicine, are not produced quickly enough to support clinical practice. The cost of production, availability of the requisite expertise and timeliness are often quoted as major contributors for the delay. This detailed survey of the state of the art of information systems designed to support or automate individual tasks in the systematic review, and in particular systematic reviews of randomized controlled clinical trials, reveals trends that see the convergence of several parallel research projects. We surveyed literature describing informatics systems that support or automate the processes of systematic review or each of the tasks of the systematic review. Several projects focus on automating, simplifying and/or streamlining specific tasks of the systematic review. Some tasks are already fully automated while others are still largely manual. In this review, we describe each task and the effect that its automation would have on the entire systematic review process, summarize the existing information system support for each task, and highlight where further research is needed for realizing automation for the task. Integration of the systems that automate systematic review tasks may lead to a revised systematic review workflow. We envisage the optimized workflow will lead to system in which each systematic review is described as a computer program that automatically retrieves relevant trials, appraises them, extracts and synthesizes data, evaluates the risk of bias, performs meta-analysis calculations, and produces a report in real time. PMID:25005128

  13. Determination and confirmation of nicarbazin, measured as 4,4-dinitrocarbanilide (DNC), in chicken tissues by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry: First Action 2013.07.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Mark R; Rodewald, John M; Brunelle, Sharon L; Nelson, Maria; Bailey, Lauryn; Burnett, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    A single-laboratory validation (SLV) study was conducted on an LC/MS/MS method for the determination and confirmation of nicarbazin, expressed as 4,4-dinitrocarbanilide (DNC), in chicken tissues, including liver, kidney, muscle, skin with adhering fat, and eggs. Linearity was demonstrated with DNC standard curve solutions using a weighted (1/x) regression and confirmed with matrix-matched standards. Intertrial repeatability precision (relative standard deviation of repeatability; RSD(r) was from 2.5 to 11.3%, as determined in fortified tissues. The precision was verified with incurred tissue, and varied from 0.53 to 2.5%. Average recoveries ranged from 82% in egg to 98% in kidney. Although the average recoveries across all concentrations were within the acceptable range, the method was improved with the inclusion of an internal standard and the use of matrix-matched standards. Accuracy for the improved method in chicken liver varied from 93 to 99% across all concentrations (100-8000 ng/g) compared to recoveries below 80% at concentrations, between 100-400 ng/g in chicken liver for the original method. The limit of detection was estimated to be less than 3.0 ng/g in all tissue types, and the limit of quantitation was validated at 20 ng/g. Based on confirmatory ion ratios and peak retention times, the false-negative rate was estimated as 0.00% (95% confidence limits 0.00, 0.74%) from 484 fortified samples and 12 incurred residue samples analyzed using the U.S. and EU confirmation criteria. Small variations to the method parameters, with the exception of injection volume, did not have a significant effect on recoveries. Stability was determined for fortified tissues, extracts, and standard curve solutions. The data collected in this study satisfy the requirements of SLV studies established by the AOAC Stakeholder Panel for Veterinary Drug Residue and the method was awarded First Action Official Method status by the Expert Review Panel for Veterinary Drug Residues on

  14. On-Site School Library Automation: Automation Anywhere with Laptops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Holly; Oxner, June

    2000-01-01

    Four years after the Halifax Regional School Board was formed through amalgamation, over 75% of its school libraries were automated. On-site automation with laptops was a quicker, more efficient way of automating than sending a shelf list to the Technical Services Department. The Eastern Shore School Library Automation Project was a successful…

  15. Multi-state steric mass action model and case study on complex high loading behavior of mAb on ion exchange tentacle resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diedrich, Juliane; Heymann, William; Leweke, Samuel; Hunt, Stephen; Todd, Robert; Kunert, Christian; Johnson, Will; von Lieres, Eric

    2017-11-24

    Tentacle resins for IEX are increasingly applied in preparative chromatography for their higher selectivity and higher capacities in comparison to IEX resins without tentacles. However, tentacle resins are often observed to cause unusual elution behavior of monoclonal antibodies under high loading conditions. Understanding this elution behavior is important for a quality by design approach, as it is now mandated by regulatory agencies. A model-based analysis of load, wash and gradient elution is performed for a monoclonal antibody (mAb) on Fractogel SO 3 - . Four experiments with increasing loaded mass show complex peak shapes and formation of a shoulder under overloaded conditions. We hypothesize that the observed peak shapes are caused by mAbs binding in multiple states on the tentacle ion-exchange resin. A new multi-state SMA binding model is used for testing this hypothesis. A two-state binding model is found to quantitatively reproduce all four experiments. An in-depth analysis reveals that the shoulder formation under overloaded conditions can be explained by multi-state binding that particularly manifests in rapid but weak re-adsorption of eluting molecules near the column end. The introduced multi-state SMA model combines features of the so-called spreading model (multiple bound states) and of the standard SMA model (salt dependency). It is by no means limited to ion-exchange chromatography on tentacle resins, but the same concept can be applied for studying systems that are based on other physical mechanisms. The new model can potentially improve mechanistic understanding and facilitate quantitative simulation of various phenomena, such as caused by reorientation, reconformation or unfolding of bound species. Similar concepts can be applied for studying surface-induced aggregation and denaturation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Automated electron microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, K.A.; Walker, L.R.

    1986-01-01

    The Plant Laboratory at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant has recently obtained a Cameca MBX electron microprobe with a Tracor Northern TN5500 automation system. This allows full stage and spectrometer automation and digital beam control. The capabilities of the system include qualitative and quantitative elemental microanalysis for all elements above and including boron in atomic number, high- and low-magnification imaging and processing, elemental mapping and enhancement, and particle size, shape, and composition analyses. Very low magnification, quantitative elemental mapping using stage control (which is of particular interest) has been accomplished along with automated size, shape, and composition analysis over a large relative area

  17. Operational proof of automation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaerschky, R.; Reifenhaeuser, R.; Schlicht, K.

    1976-01-01

    Automation of the power plant process may imply quite a number of problems. The automation of dynamic operations requires complicated programmes often interfering in several branched areas. This reduces clarity for the operating and maintenance staff, whilst increasing the possibilities of errors. The synthesis and the organization of standardized equipment have proved very successful. The possibilities offered by this kind of automation for improving the operation of power plants will only sufficiently and correctly be turned to profit, however, if the application of these technics of equipment is further improved and if its volume is tallied with a definite etc. (orig.) [de

  18. Chef infrastructure automation cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Marschall, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Chef Infrastructure Automation Cookbook contains practical recipes on everything you will need to automate your infrastructure using Chef. The book is packed with illustrated code examples to automate your server and cloud infrastructure.The book first shows you the simplest way to achieve a certain task. Then it explains every step in detail, so that you can build your knowledge about how things work. Eventually, the book shows you additional things to consider for each approach. That way, you can learn step-by-step and build profound knowledge on how to go about your configuration management

  19. Pantothenic Acid (Vitamin B5) in Infant Formula and Adult/ Pediatric Nutritional Formula by Ultra-High Pressure Liquid Chromatography/Tandem Mass Spectrometry Method: Collaborative Study, Final Action 2012.16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Frederic; Campos-Giménez, Esther

    2015-01-01

    In order to determine repeatability and reproducibility of AOAC First Action Method 2012.16 [Pantothenic Acid (Vitamin B5) in Infant Formula and Adult/Pediatric Nutritional Formula by Ultra-High Pressure Liquid Chromatography/Tandem Mass Spectrometry], a collaborative study was organized. The study was divided in two parts: method setup and qualification of participants (part 1) and collaborative study participation (part 2). For part 1, each participating laboratory was asked to analyze two practice samples using the aforementioned method. Laboratories that provided results within a range of expected levels were qualified for part 2, during which each laboratory received 10 samples in blind duplicates. Results have been compared to the Standard Method Performance Requirement (SMPR®) 2012.009 established for pantothenic acid. Precision results (repeatability and reproducibility) were within the limits stated in the SMPR. Repeatability ranged from 1.3 to 3.3%, and reproducibility ranged from 4.1 to 7.0%. Horwitz ratio (HorRat) values were all <1, ranging from 0.33 to 0.69. The AOAC Expert Review Panel on Stakeholder Panel on Infant Formula and Adult Nutritionals Nutrient Methods determined that the data presented met the SMPR and recommended the method for Final Action status, which was then granted by the AOAC Official Methods Board.

  20. AUTOMATING THE DATA SECURITY PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florin Ogigau-Neamtiu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary organizations face big data security challenges in the cyber environment due to modern threats and actual business working model which relies heavily on collaboration, data sharing, tool integration, increased mobility, etc. The nowadays data classification and data obfuscation selection processes (encryption, masking or tokenization suffer because of the human implication in the process. Organizations need to shirk data security domain by classifying information based on its importance, conduct risk assessment plans and use the most cost effective data obfuscation technique. The paper proposes a new model for data protection by using automated machine decision making procedures to classify data and to select the appropriate data obfuscation technique. The proposed system uses natural language processing capabilities to analyze input data and to select the best course of action. The system has capabilities to learn from previous experiences thus improving itself and reducing the risk of wrong data classification.

  1. Automation Interface Design Development

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Our research makes its contributions at two levels. At one level, we addressed the problems of interaction between humans and computers/automation in a particular...

  2. Automated Vehicles Symposium 2014

    CERN Document Server

    Beiker, Sven; Road Vehicle Automation 2

    2015-01-01

    This paper collection is the second volume of the LNMOB series on Road Vehicle Automation. The book contains a comprehensive review of current technical, socio-economic, and legal perspectives written by experts coming from public authorities, companies and universities in the U.S., Europe and Japan. It originates from the Automated Vehicle Symposium 2014, which was jointly organized by the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI) and the Transportation Research Board (TRB) in Burlingame, CA, in July 2014. The contributions discuss the challenges arising from the integration of highly automated and self-driving vehicles into the transportation system, with a focus on human factors and different deployment scenarios. This book is an indispensable source of information for academic researchers, industrial engineers, and policy makers interested in the topic of road vehicle automation.

  3. Fixed automated spray technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-19

    This research project evaluated the construction and performance of Boschungs Fixed Automated : Spray Technology (FAST) system. The FAST system automatically sprays de-icing material on : the bridge when icing conditions are about to occur. The FA...

  4. Automated Vehicles Symposium 2015

    CERN Document Server

    Beiker, Sven

    2016-01-01

    This edited book comprises papers about the impacts, benefits and challenges of connected and automated cars. It is the third volume of the LNMOB series dealing with Road Vehicle Automation. The book comprises contributions from researchers, industry practitioners and policy makers, covering perspectives from the U.S., Europe and Japan. It is based on the Automated Vehicles Symposium 2015 which was jointly organized by the Association of Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI) and the Transportation Research Board (TRB) in Ann Arbor, Michigan, in July 2015. The topical spectrum includes, but is not limited to, public sector activities, human factors, ethical and business aspects, energy and technological perspectives, vehicle systems and transportation infrastructure. This book is an indispensable source of information for academic researchers, industrial engineers and policy makers interested in the topic of road vehicle automation.

  5. Automation synthesis modules review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boschi, S.; Lodi, F.; Malizia, C.; Cicoria, G.; Marengo, M.

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of 68 Ga labelled tracers has changed the diagnostic approach to neuroendocrine tumours and the availability of a reliable, long-lived 68 Ge/ 68 Ga generator has been at the bases of the development of 68 Ga radiopharmacy. The huge increase in clinical demand, the impact of regulatory issues and a careful radioprotection of the operators have boosted for extensive automation of the production process. The development of automated systems for 68 Ga radiochemistry, different engineering and software strategies and post-processing of the eluate were discussed along with impact of automation with regulations. - Highlights: ► Generators availability and robust chemistry boosted for the huge diffusion of 68Ga radiopharmaceuticals. ► Different technological approaches for 68Ga radiopharmaceuticals will be discussed. ► Generator eluate post processing and evolution to cassette based systems were the major issues in automation. ► Impact of regulations on the technological development will be also considered

  6. Disassembly automation automated systems with cognitive abilities

    CERN Document Server

    Vongbunyong, Supachai

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a number of aspects to be considered in the development of disassembly automation, including the mechanical system, vision system and intelligent planner. The implementation of cognitive robotics increases the flexibility and degree of autonomy of the disassembly system. Disassembly, as a step in the treatment of end-of-life products, can allow the recovery of embodied value left within disposed products, as well as the appropriate separation of potentially-hazardous components. In the end-of-life treatment industry, disassembly has largely been limited to manual labor, which is expensive in developed countries. Automation is one possible solution for economic feasibility. The target audience primarily comprises researchers and experts in the field, but the book may also be beneficial for graduate students.

  7. Automated Lattice Perturbation Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monahan, Christopher

    2014-11-01

    I review recent developments in automated lattice perturbation theory. Starting with an overview of lattice perturbation theory, I focus on the three automation packages currently "on the market": HiPPy/HPsrc, Pastor and PhySyCAl. I highlight some recent applications of these methods, particularly in B physics. In the final section I briefly discuss the related, but distinct, approach of numerical stochastic perturbation theory.

  8. Automated ISMS control auditability

    OpenAIRE

    Suomu, Mikko

    2015-01-01

    This thesis focuses on researching a possible reference model for automated ISMS’s (Information Security Management System) technical control auditability. The main objective was to develop a generic framework for automated compliance status monitoring of the ISO27001:2013 standard which could be re‐used in any ISMS system. The framework was tested with Proof of Concept (PoC) empirical research in a test infrastructure which simulates the framework target deployment environment. To fulfi...

  9. Marketing automation supporting sales

    OpenAIRE

    Sandell, Niko

    2016-01-01

    The past couple of decades has been a time of major changes in marketing. Digitalization has become a permanent part of marketing and at the same time enabled efficient collection of data. Personalization and customization of content are playing a crucial role in marketing when new customers are acquired. This has also created a need for automation to facilitate the distribution of targeted content. As a result of successful marketing automation more information of the customers is gathered ...

  10. Automated security management

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Shaer, Ehab; Xie, Geoffrey

    2013-01-01

    In this contributed volume, leading international researchers explore configuration modeling and checking, vulnerability and risk assessment, configuration analysis, and diagnostics and discovery. The authors equip readers to understand automated security management systems and techniques that increase overall network assurability and usability. These constantly changing networks defend against cyber attacks by integrating hundreds of security devices such as firewalls, IPSec gateways, IDS/IPS, authentication servers, authorization/RBAC servers, and crypto systems. Automated Security Managemen

  11. Automated lattice data generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayyar Venkitesh

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The process of generating ensembles of gauge configurations (and measuring various observables over them can be tedious and error-prone when done “by hand”. In practice, most of this procedure can be automated with the use of a workflow manager. We discuss how this automation can be accomplished using Taxi, a minimal Python-based workflow manager built for generating lattice data. We present a case study demonstrating this technology.

  12. Effects of Automation Types on Air Traffic Controller Situation Awareness and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethumadhavan, A.

    2009-01-01

    The Joint Planning and Development Office has proposed the introduction of automated systems to help air traffic controllers handle the increasing volume of air traffic in the next two decades (JPDO, 2007). Because fully automated systems leave operators out of the decision-making loop (e.g., Billings, 1991), it is important to determine the right level and type of automation that will keep air traffic controllers in the loop. This study examined the differences in the situation awareness (SA) and collision detection performance of individuals when they worked with information acquisition, information analysis, decision and action selection and action implementation automation to control air traffic (Parasuraman, Sheridan, & Wickens, 2000). When the automation was unreliable, the time taken to detect an upcoming collision was significantly longer for all the automation types compared with the information acquisition automation. This poor performance following automation failure was mediated by SA, with lower SA yielding poor performance. Thus, the costs associated with automation failure are greater when automation is applied to higher order stages of information processing. Results have practical implications for automation design and development of SA training programs.

  13. Critical Mass

    CERN Multimedia

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2070299

    2017-01-01

    Critical Mass is a cycling event typically held on the last Friday of every month; its purpose is not usually formalized beyond the direct action of meeting at a set location and time and traveling as a group through city or town streets on bikes. The event originated in 1992 in San Francisco; by the end of 2003, the event was being held in over 300 cities around the world. At CERN it is held once a year in conjunction with the national Swiss campaing "Bike to work".

  14. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-03-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (October - December 1993) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  15. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-11-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (July - September 1992) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  16. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-06-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (January--March 1989) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. Also included are a number of enforcement actions that had been previously resolved but not published in this NUREG. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  17. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-05-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (January--March 1990) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. Also included are a number of enforcement actions that had been previously resolved but not published in this NUREG. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  18. Automation of a thermogravimetric equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mussio, L.; Castiglioni, J.; Diano, W.

    1987-01-01

    A low cost automation of some instruments by means of simple electronic circuits and a microcomputer Apple IIe. type is discussed. The electronic circuits described are: a) a position detector including phototransistors connected as differential amplifier; b) a current source that, using the error signal of the position detector, changes the current through the coil of an electromagnetic balance to restore its zero position; c) a proportional temperature controller, zero volt switching to drive a furnace to a desired temperature; d) an interface temperature regulator-microcomputer to control the temperature regulator by software; e) a multiplexer for an analog input of a commercial interface. Those circuits are applied in a thermogravimetric equipment used also for vapours adsorption. A program in block diagram form is included and is able to record change of mass, time, furnace temperature and to drive the temperature regulator in order to have the heating rates or the temperature plateaux needed for the experiment. (author) [pt

  19. Mass culture of photobacteria to obtain luciferase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Picciolo, G. L.; Rich, E., Jr.

    1969-01-01

    Inoculating preheated trays containing nutrient agar with photobacteria provides a means for mass culture of aerobic microorganisms in order to obtain large quantities of luciferase. To determine optimum harvest time, growth can be monitored by automated light-detection instrumentation.

  20. Validation of a fully automated solid‐phase extraction and ultra‐high‐performance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry method for quantification of 30 pharmaceuticals and metabolites in post‐mortem blood and brain samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Marie Katrine Klose; Nedahl, Michael; Johansen, Sys Stybe

    2018-01-01

    In this study, we present the validation of an analytical method capable of quantifying 30 commonly encountered pharmaceuticals and metabolites in whole blood and brain tissue from forensic cases. Solid‐phase extraction was performed by a fully automated robotic system, thereby minimising manual...... labour and human error while increasing sample throughput, robustness, and traceability. The method was validated in blood in terms of selectivity, linear range, matrix effect, extraction recovery, process efficiency, carry‐over, stability, precision, and accuracy. Deuterated analogues of each analyte....../kg. Thus, the linear range covered both therapeutic and toxic levels. The method showed acceptable accuracy and precision, with accuracies ranging from 80 to 118% and precision below 19% for the majority of the analytes. Linear range, matrix effect, extraction recovery, process efficiency, precision...

  1. Methodical Approaches to Creation of Dividing Automation at Industrial Enterprises with Generating Power Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Kalentionok

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers a problem pertaining to creation of dividing automation at industrial enterprises which have their own generating plants. Algorithms for action of dividing automation that permit to ensure minimum possible power non-balance while using generating plants for autonomous operation and possible parameters for its response are proposed in the paper.

  2. 75 FR 71735 - In the Matter of: Certain Automated Media Library Devices; Notice of Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-24

    ... Library Devices; Notice of Investigation AGENCY: U.S. International Trade Commission. ACTION: Institution... sale within the United States after importation of certain automated media library devices by reason of... after importation of certain automated media library devices that infringe one or more of claims 1-11 of...

  3. 76 FR 28801 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Automated Commercial Environment Trade Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-18

    ... Environment Trade Survey AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security. ACTION... approval in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act: Automated Commercial Environment Trade Survey... the use of appropriate automated, electronic, mechanical, or other technological techniques or other...

  4. Single-run determination of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) di- to deca-brominated in fish meal, fish oil and fish feed by isotope dilution: Application of automated sample purification and gas chromatography/ion trap tandem mass spectrometry (GC/ITMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco, Sonia Lucia; Vieites, Juan M.

    2010-01-01

    The present paper describes the application of automated cleanup and fractionation procedures of the Power Prep system (Fluid Management Systems) for the determination of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in feeding stuffs and fish meal and oil. Gas chromatography (GC) separation followed by ion trap tandem mass spectrometry detection in EI mode (ITMS) allowed the analysis of di- to deca-BDEs in the samples matrices used in fish aquaculture. The method developed enabled the determination of 26 native PBDE congeners and 11 13 C 12 -labelled congeners, including deca-BDE 209, in a single-run analysis, using isotope dilution. The automated cleanup, consisting of a succession of multilayer silica and basic alumina columns previously applied by Wyrzykowska et al. (2009) in combustion flue gas, was succesfully applied in our complex matrices. The method allowed an increase in productivity, i.e. lower time was required to process samples, and simultaneous purification of several samples was achieved at a time, reducing analyst dedication and human error input. Average recoveries of 43-96% were obtained. GC/ITMS can overcome the complexity originating from the sample matrix, eliminating matrix effects by tandem MS, to enable the detection of congeners penta- to nona-BDEs where interferent masses were present. The provisional detection limits, estimated in the samples, were 5-30 pg for di-, tri-, tetra-, and penta-BDEs, 20-65 pg for hexa-, hepta-, octa- and nona-BDEs, and 105 pg for deca-BDE. Reduction of deca-BDE 209 blank values is of concern to ongoing research. Good accuracy was obtained by application of the whole procedure, representing an efficient, low-cost and fast alternative for routine analyses.

  5. Working together on automated vehicle guidance AVG : preliminary business plan, abridged version.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Awareness (ed.)

    1998-01-01

    This plan describes the questions which will have to be answered in the short term, and the action which need to be taken in a phased and structured manner to gain insight into the potential of automated vehicle guidance (AVG).

  6. Lattice QCD with mixed actions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowler, Ken C.; Joo, Balint; Kenway, Richard D.; Maynard, Chris M.; Tweedie, Robert J.

    2005-01-01

    We discuss some of the implications of simulating QCD when the action used for the sea quarks is different from that used for the valence quarks. We present exploratory results for the hadron mass spectrum and pseudoscalar meson decay constants using improved staggered sea quarks and HYP-smeared overlap valence quarks. We propose a method for matching the valence quark mass to the sea quark mass and demonstrate it on UKQCD clover data in the simpler case where the sea and valence actions are the same

  7. Automating the CMS DAQ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, G.; et al.

    2014-01-01

    We present the automation mechanisms that have been added to the Data Acquisition and Run Control systems of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment during Run 1 of the LHC, ranging from the automation of routine tasks to automatic error recovery and context-sensitive guidance to the operator. These mechanisms helped CMS to maintain a data taking efficiency above 90% and to even improve it to 95% towards the end of Run 1, despite an increase in the occurrence of single-event upsets in sub-detector electronics at high LHC luminosity.

  8. Control and automation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, R.; Zillich, H.

    1986-01-01

    A survey is given of the development of control and automation systems for energy uses. General remarks about control and automation schemes are followed by a description of modern process control systems along with process control processes as such. After discussing the particular process control requirements of nuclear power plants the paper deals with the reliability and availability of process control systems and refers to computerized simulation processes. The subsequent paragraphs are dedicated to descriptions of the operating floor, ergonomic conditions, existing systems, flue gas desulfurization systems, the electromagnetic influences on digital circuits as well as of light wave uses. (HAG) [de

  9. Automated nuclear materials accounting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacak, P.; Moravec, J.

    1982-01-01

    An automated state system of accounting for nuclear materials data was established in Czechoslovakia in 1979. A file was compiled of 12 programs in the PL/1 language. The file is divided into four groups according to logical associations, namely programs for data input and checking, programs for handling the basic data file, programs for report outputs in the form of worksheets and magnetic tape records, and programs for book inventory listing, document inventory handling and materials balance listing. A similar automated system of nuclear fuel inventory for a light water reactor was introduced for internal purposes in the Institute of Nuclear Research (UJV). (H.S.)

  10. Altering user' acceptance of automation through prior automation exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekier, Marek; Molesworth, Brett R C

    2017-06-01

    Air navigation service providers worldwide see increased use of automation as one solution to overcome the capacity constraints imbedded in the present air traffic management (ATM) system. However, increased use of automation within any system is dependent on user acceptance. The present research sought to determine if the point at which an individual is no longer willing to accept or cooperate with automation can be manipulated. Forty participants underwent training on a computer-based air traffic control programme, followed by two ATM exercises (order counterbalanced), one with and one without the aid of automation. Results revealed after exposure to a task with automation assistance, user acceptance of high(er) levels of automation ('tipping point') decreased; suggesting it is indeed possible to alter automation acceptance. Practitioner Summary: This paper investigates whether the point at which a user of automation rejects automation (i.e. 'tipping point') is constant or can be manipulated. The results revealed after exposure to a task with automation assistance, user acceptance of high(er) levels of automation decreased; suggesting it is possible to alter automation acceptance.

  11. Action Plan for Florida's Public Libraries. Addendum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida Library Study Commission, Tallahassee.

    The introduction to this addendum (the Action Plan is LI 004 521) discusses the present use by libraries of information-handling technology and identifies some of the trends taking place in performing essential library services. While some limited inroads have been made in automating certain public library functions, the bulk of services is still…

  12. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-03-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (October--December 1992) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  13. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-02-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (October--December 1990) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  14. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-08-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (April--June 1992) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  15. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-03-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (October--December 1991) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  16. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (April-June 1991) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  17. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-12-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (July--September 1993) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  18. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-06-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (January--March 1993) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  19. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-05-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (January--March 1992) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  20. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-11-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (July--September 1990) and includes copies of letters, notices, and orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  1. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-11-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (July--September 1991) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  2. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (October--December 1989) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  3. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-12-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (July--September 1989) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  4. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-05-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (January--March 1991) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  5. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (April--June 1993) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  6. Automated toxicological screening reports of modified Agilent MSD Chemstation combined with Microsoft Visual Basic application programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Sanggil; Kim, Suncheun; Choi, Hyeyoung; Choi, Hwakyoung; Chung, Heesun; Hwang, Bangyeon

    2010-06-15

    Agilent GC-MS MSD Chemstation offers automated library search report for toxicological screening using total ion chromatogram (TIC) and mass spectroscopy in normal mode. Numerous peaks appear in the chromatogram of biological specimen such as blood or urine and often large migrating peaks obscure small target peaks, in addition, any target peaks of low abundance regularly give wrong library search result or low matching score. As a result, retention time and mass spectrum of all the peaks in the chromatogram have to be checked to see if they are relevant. These repeated actions are very tedious and time-consuming to toxicologists. MSD Chemstation software operates using a number of macro files which give commands and instructions on how to work on and extract data from the chromatogram and spectroscopy. These macro files are developed by the own compiler of the software. All the original macro files can be modified and new macro files can be added to the original software by users. To get more accurate results with more convenient method and to save time for data analysis, we developed new macro files for reports generation and inserted new menus in the Enhanced Data Analysis program. Toxicological screening reports generated by these new macro files are in text mode or graphic mode and these reports can be generated with three different automated subtraction options. Text reports have Brief mode and Full mode and graphic reports have the option with or without mass spectrum mode. Matched mass spectrum and matching score for detected compounds are printed in reports by modified library searching modules. We have also developed an independent application program named DrugMan. This program manages drug groups, lists and parameters that are in use in MSD Chemstation. The incorporation of DrugMan with modified macro modules provides a powerful tool for toxicological screening and save a lot of valuable time on toxicological work. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All

  7. Idaho: Library Automation and Connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolles, Charles

    1996-01-01

    Provides an overview of the development of cooperative library automation and connectivity in Idaho, including telecommunications capacity, library networks, the Internet, and the role of the state library. Information on six shared automation systems in Idaho is included. (LRW)

  8. A comprehensive library-based, automated screening procedure for 46 synthetic cannabinoids in serum employing liquid chromatography-quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry with high-temperature electrospray ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huppertz, Laura M; Kneisel, Stefan; Auwärter, Volker; Kempf, Jürgen

    2014-02-01

    Considering the vast variety of synthetic cannabinoids and herbal mixtures - commonly known as 'Spice' or 'K2' - on the market and the resulting increase of severe intoxications related to their consumption, there is a need in clinical and forensic toxicology for comprehensive up-to-date screening methods. The focus of this project aimed at developing and implementing an automated screening procedure for the detection of synthetic cannabinoids in serum using a liquid chromatography-ion trap-MS (LC-MS(n)) system and a spectra library-based approach, currently including 46 synthetic cannabinoids and 8 isotope labelled analogues. In the process of method development, a high-temperature ESI source (IonBooster(TM), Bruker Daltonik) and its effects on the ionization efficiency of the investigated synthetic cannabinoids were evaluated and compared to a conventional ESI source. Despite their structural diversity, all investigated synthetic cannabinoids benefitted from high-temperature ionization by showing remarkably higher MS intensities compared to conventional ESI. The employed search algorithm matches retention time, MS and MS(2)/MS(3) spectra. With the utilization of the ionBooster source, limits for the automated detection comparable to cut-off values of routine MRM methods were achieved for the majority of analytes. Even compounds not identified when using a conventional ESI source were detected using the ionBooster-source. LODs in serum range from 0.1 ng/ml to 0.5 ng/ml. The use of parent compounds as analytical targets offers the possibility of instantly adding new emerging compounds to the library and immediately applying the updated method to serum samples, allowing the rapid adaptation of the screening method to ongoing forensic or clinical requirements. The presented approach can also be applied to other specimens, such as oral fluid or hair, and herbal mixtures and was successfully applied to authentic serum samples. Quantitative MRM results of samples with

  9. Automated HAZOP revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taylor, J. R.

    2017-01-01

    Hazard and operability analysis (HAZOP) has developed from a tentative approach to hazard identification for process plants in the early 1970s to an almost universally accepted approach today, and a central technique of safety engineering. Techniques for automated HAZOP analysis were developed...

  10. Automated data model evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazi, Zoltan; Kazi, Ljubica; Radulovic, Biljana

    2012-01-01

    Modeling process is essential phase within information systems development and implementation. This paper presents methods and techniques for analysis and evaluation of data model correctness. Recent methodologies and development results regarding automation of the process of model correctness analysis and relations with ontology tools has been presented. Key words: Database modeling, Data model correctness, Evaluation

  11. Automated Accounting. Instructor Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Duane R.

    This curriculum guide was developed to assist business instructors using Dac Easy Accounting College Edition Version 2.0 software in their accounting programs. The module consists of four units containing assignment sheets and job sheets designed to enable students to master competencies identified in the area of automated accounting. The first…

  12. Mechatronic Design Automation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Zhun

    successfully design analogue filters, vibration absorbers, micro-electro-mechanical systems, and vehicle suspension systems, all in an automatic or semi-automatic way. It also investigates the very important issue of co-designing plant-structures and dynamic controllers in automated design of Mechatronic...

  13. Protokoller til Home Automation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Kristian Ellebæk

    2008-01-01

    computer, der kan skifte mellem foruddefinerede indstillinger. Nogle gange kan computeren fjernstyres over internettet, så man kan se hjemmets status fra en computer eller måske endda fra en mobiltelefon. Mens nævnte anvendelser er klassiske indenfor home automation, er yderligere funktionalitet dukket op...

  14. Automated Water Extraction Index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feyisa, Gudina Legese; Meilby, Henrik; Fensholt, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    of various sorts of environmental noise and at the same time offers a stable threshold value. Thus we introduced a new Automated Water Extraction Index (AWEI) improving classification accuracy in areas that include shadow and dark surfaces that other classification methods often fail to classify correctly...

  15. Myths in test automation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jazmine Francis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Myths in automation of software testing is an issue of discussion that echoes about the areas of service in validation of software industry. Probably, the first though that appears in knowledgeable reader would be Why this old topic again? What's New to discuss the matter? But, for the first time everyone agrees that undoubtedly automation testing today is not today what it used to be ten or fifteen years ago, because it has evolved in scope and magnitude. What began as a simple linear scripts for web applications today has a complex architecture and a hybrid framework to facilitate the implementation of testing applications developed with various platforms and technologies. Undoubtedly automation has advanced, but so did the myths associated with it. The change in perspective and knowledge of people on automation has altered the terrain. This article reflects the points of views and experience of the author in what has to do with the transformation of the original myths in new versions, and how they are derived; also provides his thoughts on the new generation of myths.

  16. Driver Psychology during Automated Platooning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heikoop, D.D.

    2017-01-01

    With the rapid increase in vehicle automation technology, the call for understanding how humans behave while driving in an automated vehicle becomes more urgent. Vehicles that have automated systems such as Lane Keeping Assist (LKA) or Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC) not only support drivers in their

  17. Automated detection of solar eruptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hurlburt N.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Observation of the solar atmosphere reveals a wide range of motions, from small scale jets and spicules to global-scale coronal mass ejections (CMEs. Identifying and characterizing these motions are essential to advancing our understanding of the drivers of space weather. Both automated and visual identifications are currently used in identifying Coronal Mass Ejections. To date, eruptions near the solar surface, which may be precursors to CMEs, have been identified primarily by visual inspection. Here we report on Eruption Patrol (EP: a software module that is designed to automatically identify eruptions from data collected by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO/AIA. We describe the method underlying the module and compare its results to previous identifications found in the Heliophysics Event Knowledgebase. EP identifies eruptions events that are consistent with those found by human annotations, but in a significantly more consistent and quantitative manner. Eruptions are found to be distributed within 15 Mm of the solar surface. They possess peak speeds ranging from 4 to 100 km/s and display a power-law probability distribution over that range. These characteristics are consistent with previous observations of prominences.

  18. Levels of automation and user control - evaluation of a turbine automation interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Jonas (Chalmers Univ. of Technology (Sweden))

    2008-10-15

    The study was performed during the annual operator training at the Studsvik nuclear power plant simulator facility in Nykoeping, Sweden. The participating operators came from the Oskarshamn 3 nuclear power plant. In the study, seven nuclear power plant turbine operators were interviewed concerning their use of the automatic turbine system. A field study approach together with a heuristic usability evaluation was made to assess how the operators are affected by use of automation in the control room setting. The purpose of the study was to examine how operator performance is affected by varying levels of automation in nuclear power plant turbine operation. The Automatic Turbine System (ATS) was evaluated to clarify how the ATS interface design supports the operators work. The results show that during manual control the operators experience loss of speed and accuracy in performing actions together with difficulty of dividing attention between performing a task and overall monitoring, as the major problems. The positive aspects of manual operations lie in increased feeling of being in control when performing actions by hand. With higher levels of automation the problems shift to issues concerning difficulty of following the automatic sequences and loosing track in procedures. As the level of automation gets higher, the need of feedback increases which means that information presentation also becomes more important. The use of the semiautomatic, step-mode is often preferred by the operators since it combines the speed and accuracy of the automation with the ability of maintaining the feeling of being in control. Further, a number of usability related concerns was found in the ATS interface. The operators especially experience the presentation of the conditions that manage the automatic sequences as difficult to perceive. (author)

  19. Levels of automation and user control - evaluation of a turbine automation interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Jonas

    2008-10-01

    The study was performed during the annual operator training at the Studsvik nuclear power plant simulator facility in Nykoeping, Sweden. The participating operators came from the Oskarshamn 3 nuclear power plant. In the study, seven nuclear power plant turbine operators were interviewed concerning their use of the automatic turbine system. A field study approach together with a heuristic usability evaluation was made to assess how the operators are affected by use of automation in the control room setting. The purpose of the study was to examine how operator performance is affected by varying levels of automation in nuclear power plant turbine operation. The Automatic Turbine System (ATS) was evaluated to clarify how the ATS interface design supports the operators work. The results show that during manual control the operators experience loss of speed and accuracy in performing actions together with difficulty of dividing attention between performing a task and overall monitoring, as the major problems. The positive aspects of manual operations lie in increased feeling of being in control when performing actions by hand. With higher levels of automation the problems shift to issues concerning difficulty of following the automatic sequences and loosing track in procedures. As the level of automation gets higher, the need of feedback increases which means that information presentation also becomes more important. The use of the semiautomatic, step-mode is often preferred by the operators since it combines the speed and accuracy of the automation with the ability of maintaining the feeling of being in control. Further, a number of usability related concerns was found in the ATS interface. The operators especially experience the presentation of the conditions that manage the automatic sequences as difficult to perceive. (au)

  20. The surveillance state of behavioral automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Andreas T; Claridge-Chang, Adam

    2012-01-01

    Genetics’ demand for increased throughput is driving automatization of behavior analysis far beyond experimental workhorses like circadian monitors and the operant conditioning box. However, the new automation is not just faster: it is also allowing new kinds of experiments, many of which erase the boundaries of the traditional neuroscience disciplines (psychology, ethology and physiology) while producing insight into problems that were otherwise opaque. Ironically, a central theme of current automatization is to improve observation of animals in increasingly naturalistic environments. This is not just a return to 19th century priorities: the new observational methods provide unprecedented quantitation of actions and ever-closer integration with experimentation. PMID:22119142

  1. Automated Segmentation of Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegmann, Mikkel Bille; Nilsson, Jens Chr.; Grønning, Bjørn A.

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to be an accurate and precise technique to assess cardiac volumes and function in a non-invasive manner and is generally considered to be the current gold-standard for cardiac imaging [1]. Measurement of ventricular volumes, muscle mass and function...... is based on determination of the left-ventricular endocardial and epicardial borders. Since manual border detection is laborious, automated segmentation is highly desirable as a fast, objective and reproducible alternative. Automated segmentation will thus enhance comparability between and within cardiac...... studies and increase accuracy by allowing acquisition of thinner MRI-slices. This abstract demonstrates that statistical models of shape and appearance, namely the deformable models: Active Appearance Models, can successfully segment cardiac MRIs....

  2. Automation at NRCN Dosimetry Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abraham, A.; Arad, I.; Mesing, M.; Levinson, S.; Weinstein, M.; Pelled, O.; Broida, A.; German, U.

    2014-01-01

    Running a dosimetric service based on TLD technology such as at the Nuclear Research Centre Negev (NRCN) requires a large group of workers to carry out simple mechanical actions such as opening and closing TLD badges, placing and removal of TLD cards from the badges and operating the TLD reader. These actions can be automated to free human resources for other assignments and to improve the quality assurance. At NRCN a project was undertaken to design and build a robotic system based on a manipulator arm. The design was based on the experience achieved with an earlier prototype (1,2). The system stores the TLD badges in special designed boxes, which are transported and stored in computer defined bins. The robotic arm loads and unloads TLD cards to the badges, and loads/unloads the cards to a magazine for the TLD reader. At the Nuclear Research Center Negev (NRCN) each badge is assigned to a specific worker and bears a sticker containing the worker's personal details, also in a machine readable form (barcode). In order to establish a proper QA check, a barcode reader records the information on the badge and on the TLD card placed in this badge and checks their compatibility with the information contained in the main database. Besides the TLD cards loading/unloading station, there is a contamination check station, a cards cleaning station and a UV irradiation box used to reduce the history dependent residual dose. The system was installed at the NRCN dosimetry laboratory It was successfully tested for several hundreds of cycles and will become operational in the first quarter of 2014. As far as we know, there is no similar product available for automatic handling in a TLD laboratory

  3. Automated campaign system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vondran, Gary; Chao, Hui; Lin, Xiaofan; Beyer, Dirk; Joshi, Parag; Atkins, Brian; Obrador, Pere

    2006-02-01

    To run a targeted campaign involves coordination and management across numerous organizations and complex process flows. Everything from market analytics on customer databases, acquiring content and images, composing the materials, meeting the sponsoring enterprise brand standards, driving through production and fulfillment, and evaluating results; all processes are currently performed by experienced highly trained staff. Presented is a developed solution that not only brings together technologies that automate each process, but also automates the entire flow so that a novice user could easily run a successful campaign from their desktop. This paper presents the technologies, structure, and process flows used to bring this system together. Highlighted will be how the complexity of running a targeted campaign is hidden from the user through technologies, all while providing the benefits of a professionally managed campaign.

  4. Rapid automated nuclear chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, R.A.

    1979-01-01

    Rapid Automated Nuclear Chemistry (RANC) can be thought of as the Z-separation of Neutron-rich Isotopes by Automated Methods. The range of RANC studies of fission and its products is large. In a sense, the studies can be categorized into various energy ranges from the highest where the fission process and particle emission are considered, to low energies where nuclear dynamics are being explored. This paper presents a table which gives examples of current research using RANC on fission and fission products. The remainder of this text is divided into three parts. The first contains a discussion of the chemical methods available for the fission product elements, the second describes the major techniques, and in the last section, examples of recent results are discussed as illustrations of the use of RANC

  5. ATLAS Distributed Computing Automation

    CERN Document Server

    Schovancova, J; The ATLAS collaboration; Borrego, C; Campana, S; Di Girolamo, A; Elmsheuser, J; Hejbal, J; Kouba, T; Legger, F; Magradze, E; Medrano Llamas, R; Negri, G; Rinaldi, L; Sciacca, G; Serfon, C; Van Der Ster, D C

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS Experiment benefits from computing resources distributed worldwide at more than 100 WLCG sites. The ATLAS Grid sites provide over 100k CPU job slots, over 100 PB of storage space on disk or tape. Monitoring of status of such a complex infrastructure is essential. The ATLAS Grid infrastructure is monitored 24/7 by two teams of shifters distributed world-wide, by the ATLAS Distributed Computing experts, and by site administrators. In this paper we summarize automation efforts performed within the ATLAS Distributed Computing team in order to reduce manpower costs and improve the reliability of the system. Different aspects of the automation process are described: from the ATLAS Grid site topology provided by the ATLAS Grid Information System, via automatic site testing by the HammerCloud, to automatic exclusion from production or analysis activities.

  6. Automated Assembly Center (AAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauffer, Robert J.

    1993-01-01

    The objectives of this project are as follows: to integrate advanced assembly and assembly support technology under a comprehensive architecture; to implement automated assembly technologies in the production of high-visibility DOD weapon systems; and to document the improved cost, quality, and lead time. This will enhance the production of DOD weapon systems by utilizing the latest commercially available technologies combined into a flexible system that will be able to readily incorporate new technologies as they emerge. Automated assembly encompasses the following areas: product data, process planning, information management policies and framework, three schema architecture, open systems communications, intelligent robots, flexible multi-ability end effectors, knowledge-based/expert systems, intelligent workstations, intelligent sensor systems, and PDES/PDDI data standards.

  7. Automated drawing generation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshinaga, Toshiaki; Kawahata, Junichi; Yoshida, Naoto; Ono, Satoru

    1991-01-01

    Since automated CAD drawing generation systems still require human intervention, improvements were focussed on an interactive processing section (data input and correcting operation) which necessitates a vast amount of work. As a result, human intervention was eliminated, the original objective of a computerized system. This is the first step taken towards complete automation. The effects of development and commercialization of the system are as described below. (1) The interactive processing time required for generating drawings was improved. It was determined that introduction of the CAD system has reduced the time required for generating drawings. (2) The difference in skills between workers preparing drawings has been eliminated and the quality of drawings has been made uniform. (3) The extent of knowledge and experience demanded of workers has been reduced. (author)

  8. Automated fingerprint identification system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bukhari, U.A.; Sheikh, N.M.; Khan, U.I.; Mahmood, N.; Aslam, M.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we present selected stages of an automated fingerprint identification system. The software for the system is developed employing algorithm for two-tone conversion, thinning, feature extraction and matching. Keeping FBI standards into account, it has been assured that no details of the image are lost in the comparison process. We have deployed a general parallel thinning algorithm for specialized images like fingerprints and modified the original algorithm after a series of experimentation selecting the one giving the best results. We also proposed an application-based approach for designing automated fingerprint identification systems keeping in view systems requirements. We will show that by using our system, the precision and efficiency of current fingerprint matching techniques are increased. (author)

  9. Automated breeder fuel fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldmann, L.H.; Frederickson, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    The objective of the Secure Automated Fabrication (SAF) Project is to develop remotely operated equipment for the processing and manufacturing of breeder reactor fuel pins. The SAF line will be installed in the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF). The FMEF is presently under construction at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford site near Richland, Washington, and is operated by the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The fabrication and support systems of the SAF line are designed for computer-controlled operation from a centralized control room. Remote and automated fuel fabriction operations will result in: reduced radiation exposure to workers; enhanced safeguards; improved product quality; near real-time accountability, and increased productivity. The present schedule calls for installation of SAF line equipment in the FMEF beginning in 1984, with qualifying runs starting in 1986 and production commencing in 1987. 5 figures

  10. Automated Instrumentation System Verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-04-01

    fUig JDma Entered) i. _-_J I ___________ UNCLASSI FI ED SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF TIHIS PAGE(II7,m Daca Entod) 20. ABSTRACT (Continued). ) contain...automatic measurement should arise. 15 I "_......_______.....____,_.........____ _ ’ " AFWL-TR-82-137 11. TRADITIONAL PROCEDURES The necessity to measure data...measurement (Ref. 8). Finally, when the necessity for automation was recognized and funds were provided, the effort described in this report was started

  11. Cavendish Balance Automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Bryan

    2000-01-01

    This is the final report for a project carried out to modify a manual commercial Cavendish Balance for automated use in cryostat. The scope of this project was to modify an off-the-shelf manually operated Cavendish Balance to allow for automated operation for periods of hours or days in cryostat. The purpose of this modification was to allow the balance to be used in the study of effects of superconducting materials on the local gravitational field strength to determine if the strength of gravitational fields can be reduced. A Cavendish Balance was chosen because it is a fairly simple piece of equipment for measuring gravity, one the least accurately known and least understood physical constants. The principle activities that occurred under this purchase order were: (1) All the components necessary to hold and automate the Cavendish Balance in a cryostat were designed. Engineering drawings were made of custom parts to be fabricated, other off-the-shelf parts were procured; (2) Software was written in LabView to control the automation process via a stepper motor controller and stepper motor, and to collect data from the balance during testing; (3)Software was written to take the data collected from the Cavendish Balance and reduce it to give a value for the gravitational constant; (4) The components of the system were assembled and fitted to a cryostat. Also the LabView hardware including the control computer, stepper motor driver, data collection boards, and necessary cabling were assembled; and (5) The system was operated for a number of periods, data collected, and reduced to give an average value for the gravitational constant.

  12. Automation in biological crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Patrick Shaw; Mueller-Dieckmann, Jochen

    2014-06-01

    Crystallization remains the bottleneck in the crystallographic process leading from a gene to a three-dimensional model of the encoded protein or RNA. Automation of the individual steps of a crystallization experiment, from the preparation of crystallization cocktails for initial or optimization screens to the imaging of the experiments, has been the response to address this issue. Today, large high-throughput crystallization facilities, many of them open to the general user community, are capable of setting up thousands of crystallization trials per day. It is thus possible to test multiple constructs of each target for their ability to form crystals on a production-line basis. This has improved success rates and made crystallization much more convenient. High-throughput crystallization, however, cannot relieve users of the task of producing samples of high quality. Moreover, the time gained from eliminating manual preparations must now be invested in the careful evaluation of the increased number of experiments. The latter requires a sophisticated data and laboratory information-management system. A review of the current state of automation at the individual steps of crystallization with specific attention to the automation of optimization is given.

  13. Automated planning through abstractions in dynamic and stochastic environments

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez Muñoz, Moisés

    2016-01-01

    Mención Internacional en el título de doctor Generating sequences of actions - plans - for an automatic system, like a robot, using Automated Planning is particularly diflicult in stochastic and/or dynamic environments. These plans are composed of actions whose execution, in certain scenarios, might fail, which in tum prevents the execution of the rest of the actions in the plan. Also, in some environments, plans must he generated fast, hoth at the start of the execution and after every ex...

  14. Efficient Temporal Action Localization in Videos

    KAUST Repository

    Alwassel, Humam

    2018-04-17

    State-of-the-art temporal action detectors inefficiently search the entire video for specific actions. Despite the encouraging progress these methods achieve, it is crucial to design automated approaches that only explore parts of the video which are the most relevant to the actions being searched. To address this need, we propose the new problem of action spotting in videos, which we define as finding a specific action in a video while observing a small portion of that video. Inspired by the observation that humans are extremely efficient and accurate in spotting and finding action instances in a video, we propose Action Search, a novel Recurrent Neural Network approach that mimics the way humans spot actions. Moreover, to address the absence of data recording the behavior of human annotators, we put forward the Human Searches dataset, which compiles the search sequences employed by human annotators spotting actions in the AVA and THUMOS14 datasets. We consider temporal action localization as an application of the action spotting problem. Experiments on the THUMOS14 dataset reveal that our model is not only able to explore the video efficiently (observing on average 17.3% of the video) but it also accurately finds human activities with 30.8% mAP (0.5 tIoU), outperforming state-of-the-art methods

  15. Application Filters for TCP/IP Industrial Automation Protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Aguinaldo B.; Kobayashi, Tiago H.; Medeiros, João Paulo S.; Brito, Agostinho M.; Motta Pires, Paulo S.

    The use of firewalls is a common approach usually meant to secure Automation Technology (AT) from Information Technology (TI) networks. This work proposes a filtering system for TCP/IP-based automation networks in which only certain kind of industrial traffic is permitted. All network traffic which does not conform with a proper industrial protocol pattern or with specific rules for its actions is supposed to be abnormal and must be blocked. As a case study, we developed a seventh layer firewall application with the ability of blocking spurious traffic, using an IP packet queueing engine and a regular expression library.

  16. Fully automated on-line solid phase extraction coupled to liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for the simultaneous analysis of alkylphenol polyethoxylates and their carboxylic and phenolic metabolites in wastewater samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciofi, Lorenzo; Ancillotti, Claudia; Chiuminatto, Ugo; Fibbi, Donatella; Pasquini, Benedetta; Bruzzoniti, Maria Concetta; Rivoira, Luca; Del Bubba, Massimo

    2016-05-01

    Three different sorbents (i.e. endcapped octadecylsilane, octasilane and styrene-N-vinylpiperidinone co-polymer) were investigated in order to develop an on-line solid phase extraction-liquid chromatographic tandem mass spectrometric method (on-line SPE-LC-MS/MS) for the simultaneous analysis of alkylphenols polyethoxylate (AP(n)EOs, n = 1-8) and corresponding monocarboxylate (AP1ECs) and phenolic (APs) metabolites. The endcapped octadecylsilane was selected due to its full compatibility with a chromatographic approach, which allowed the elution of positively and negatively ionisable compounds in two distinct retention time windows, using a water-acetonitrile-tetrahydrofuran ternary gradient and a pellicular pentafluorophenyl column. On this SPE sorbent, the composition of the loading/clean-up solution was then optimized in order to achieve the best recoveries of target analytes. Under the best experimental conditions, the total analysis time per sample was 25 min and method detection limits (MDLs) were in the sub-nanograms per litre to nanograms per litre range (0.0081-1.0 ng L(-1)) for AP(n)EOs with n = 2-8, AP1ECs and APs, whereas for AP1EOs, an MDL of about 50 ng L(-1) was found. Using the mass-labelled compound spiking technique, the method performance was tested on inlet and outlet wastewater samples from three activated sludge treatment plants managing domestic and industrial sewages of the urban areas and the textile district of Prato and Bisenzio valley (Tuscany, Italy); in most cases, apparent recovery percentages approximately in the ranges of 50-110% and 80-120% were found for inlet and outlet samples, respectively. The on-line SPE-LC-MS/MS analysis of wastewater samples highlighted the presence of target analytes at concentrations ranging from few nanograms per litre to thousands nanograms per litre, depending on the compound and matrix analysed. AP2ECs were also tentatively identified in outlet samples.

  17. Comparison of the accuracy of US-guided biopsy of breast masses performed with 14-gauge, 16-gauge and 18-gauge automated cutting needle biopsy devices, and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Monica L; Hess, Kenneth; Candelaria, Rosalind P; Eghtedari, Mohammad; Adrada, Beatriz E; Sneige, Nour; Fornage, Bruno D

    2017-07-01

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound (US)-guided core needle biopsy (CNB) of breast masses performed with 14-gauge, 16-gauge and 18-gauge needles. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 1,112 patients who underwent US-guided breast CNB with 14-gauge, 16-gauge and 18-gauge needles. Cases with surgical excision or a minimum of 2 years of imaging follow-up were included. Rates of sample inadequacy, discordance with surgical or imaging findings and upgrade of DCIS to invasive cancer or high-risk lesion to in situ or invasive cancer were computed for each needle size. The study included 703 CNBs: 203 performed with 14-gauge, 235 with 16-gauge and 265 with 18-gauge needles. There were no significant differences between 14-gauge, 16-gauge and 18-gauge needles in rates of specimen inadequacy (0 %, 0.4 % and 1.9 %, respectively) (p = 0.084); surgical discordance (2.6 %, 2.9 % and 3.8 %) (p = 0.76); imaging discordance (0 %, 0 % and 2 %) (p = 1.0); DCIS upgrade (43 %, 43 % and 36 %) (p = 1.00) or high-risk lesion upgrade (38 %, 25 % and 55 %) (p = 0.49). There was no statistically significant difference in diagnostic accuracy of US-guided CNB of breast masses performed with 14-gauge, 16-gauge and 18-gauge needles. • Percutaneous image-guided breast core needle biopsy (CNB) is the standard of care. • Breast CNB with 14-gauge, 16-gauge and 18-gauge needles has similar diagnostic accuracy. • Smaller gauge needles can be confidently used for ultrasound-guided breast CNB.

  18. Design and fabrication of an automated temperature programmed ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A completely automated temperature-programmed reaction (TPR) system for carrying out gas-solid catalytic reactions under atmospheric flow conditions is fabricated to study CO and hydrocarbon oxidation, and NO reduction. The system consists of an all-stainless steel UHV system, quadrupole mass spectrometer SX200 ...

  19. Design and fabrication of an automated temperature programmed ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. A completely automated temperature-programmed reaction (TPR) system for carrying out gas–solid catalytic reactions under atmospheric flow conditions is fabricated to study CO and hydrocarbon oxidation, and NO reduction. The system consists of an all-stainless steel UHV system, quadrupole mass.

  20. MODELING OF AUTOMATION PROCESSES CONCERNING CROP CULTIVATION BY AVIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Ryabkov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers modeling of automation processes concerning crop cultivation by aviation. Processes that take place in three interconnected environments: human, technical and movable air objects are described by a model which is based on a set theory. Stochastic network theory of mass service systems for description of human-machine system of real time is proposed in the paper.

  1. Technology assessment of automation trends in the modular home industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phil Mitchell; Robert Russell Hurst

    2009-01-01

    This report provides an assessment of technology used in manufacturing modular homes in the United States, and that used in the German prefabricated wooden home industry. It is the first step toward identifying the research needs in automation and manufacturing methods that will facilitate mass customization in the home manufacturing industry. Within the United States...

  2. Automation, Performance and International Competition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kromann, Lene; Sørensen, Anders

    This paper presents new evidence on trade‐induced automation in manufacturing firms using unique data combining a retrospective survey that we have assembled with register data for 2005‐2010. In particular, we establish a causal effect where firms that have specialized in product types for which...... the Chinese exports to the world market has risen sharply invest more in automated capital compared to firms that have specialized in other product types. We also study the relationship between automation and firm performance and find that firms with high increases in scale and scope of automation have faster...... productivity growth than other firms. Moreover, automation improves the efficiency of all stages of the production process by reducing setup time, run time, and inspection time and increasing uptime and quantity produced per worker. The efficiency improvement varies by type of automation....

  3. Fast automated scanning of OPERA emulsion films

    CERN Document Server

    Sirri, G.

    2007-01-01

    The use of nuclear emulsions to record tracks of charged particles with an accuracy of better than 1 micron is possible in large physics experiments thanks to the recent improvements in the industrial production of emulsions and to the development of fast automated microscopes. The European Scanning System (ESS) is a fast automatic system developed for the mass scanning of the emulsions of the OPERA experiment, which requires microscopes with scanning speeds of about 20 cm$^2$/h. Recent improvements in the technique and measurements with ESS are reported.

  4. A computational framework for the automated construction of glycosylation reaction networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Liu

    Full Text Available Glycosylation is among the most common and complex post-translational modifications identified to date. It proceeds through the catalytic action of multiple enzyme families that include the glycosyltransferases that add monosaccharides to growing glycans, and glycosidases which remove sugar residues to trim glycans. The expression level and specificity of these enzymes, in part, regulate the glycan distribution or glycome of specific cell/tissue systems. Currently, there is no systematic method to describe the enzymes and cellular reaction networks that catalyze glycosylation. To address this limitation, we present a streamlined machine-readable definition for the glycosylating enzymes and additional methodologies to construct and analyze glycosylation reaction networks. In this computational framework, the enzyme class is systematically designed to store detailed specificity data such as enzymatic functional group, linkage and substrate specificity. The new classes and their associated functions enable both single-reaction inference and automated full network reconstruction, when given a list of reactants and/or products along with the enzymes present in the system. In addition, graph theory is used to support functions that map the connectivity between two or more species in a network, and that generate subset models to identify rate-limiting steps regulating glycan biosynthesis. Finally, this framework allows the synthesis of biochemical reaction networks using mass spectrometry (MS data. The features described above are illustrated using three case studies that examine: i O-linked glycan biosynthesis during the construction of functional selectin-ligands; ii automated N-linked glycosylation pathway construction; and iii the handling and analysis of glycomics based MS data. Overall, the new computational framework enables automated glycosylation network model construction and analysis by integrating knowledge of glycan structure and enzyme

  5. A computational framework for the automated construction of glycosylation reaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Neelamegham, Sriram

    2014-01-01

    Glycosylation is among the most common and complex post-translational modifications identified to date. It proceeds through the catalytic action of multiple enzyme families that include the glycosyltransferases that add monosaccharides to growing glycans, and glycosidases which remove sugar residues to trim glycans. The expression level and specificity of these enzymes, in part, regulate the glycan distribution or glycome of specific cell/tissue systems. Currently, there is no systematic method to describe the enzymes and cellular reaction networks that catalyze glycosylation. To address this limitation, we present a streamlined machine-readable definition for the glycosylating enzymes and additional methodologies to construct and analyze glycosylation reaction networks. In this computational framework, the enzyme class is systematically designed to store detailed specificity data such as enzymatic functional group, linkage and substrate specificity. The new classes and their associated functions enable both single-reaction inference and automated full network reconstruction, when given a list of reactants and/or products along with the enzymes present in the system. In addition, graph theory is used to support functions that map the connectivity between two or more species in a network, and that generate subset models to identify rate-limiting steps regulating glycan biosynthesis. Finally, this framework allows the synthesis of biochemical reaction networks using mass spectrometry (MS) data. The features described above are illustrated using three case studies that examine: i) O-linked glycan biosynthesis during the construction of functional selectin-ligands; ii) automated N-linked glycosylation pathway construction; and iii) the handling and analysis of glycomics based MS data. Overall, the new computational framework enables automated glycosylation network model construction and analysis by integrating knowledge of glycan structure and enzyme biochemistry. All

  6. An Approach to Office Automation

    OpenAIRE

    Ischenko, A.N.; Tumeo, M.A.

    1983-01-01

    In recent years, the increasing scale of production and degree of specialization within firms has led to a significant growth in the amount of information needed for their successful management. As a result, the use of computer systems (office automation) has become increasingly common. However, no manuals or set automation procedures exist to help organizations design and implement an efficient and effective office automation system. The goals of this paper are to outline some important...

  7. Embedded system for building automation

    OpenAIRE

    Rolih, Andrej

    2014-01-01

    Home automation is a fast developing field of computer science and electronics. Companies are offering many different products for home automation. Ranging anywhere from complete systems for building management and control, to simple smart lights that can be connected to the internet. These products offer the user greater living comfort and lower their expenses by reducing the energy usage. This thesis shows the development of a simple home automation system that focuses mainly on the enhance...

  8. World-wide distribution automation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devaney, T.M.

    1994-01-01

    A worldwide power distribution automation system is outlined. Distribution automation is defined and the status of utility automation is discussed. Other topics discussed include a distribution management system, substation feeder, and customer functions, potential benefits, automation costs, planning and engineering considerations, automation trends, databases, system operation, computer modeling of system, and distribution management systems

  9. Contaminant analysis automation, an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollen, R.; Ramos, O. Jr.

    1996-01-01

    To meet the environmental restoration and waste minimization goals of government and industry, several government laboratories, universities, and private companies have formed the Contaminant Analysis Automation (CAA) team. The goal of this consortium is to design and fabricate robotics systems that standardize and automate the hardware and software of the most common environmental chemical methods. In essence, the CAA team takes conventional, regulatory- approved (EPA Methods) chemical analysis processes and automates them. The automation consists of standard laboratory modules (SLMs) that perform the work in a much more efficient, accurate, and cost- effective manner

  10. Current advances and strategies towards fully automated sample preparation for regulated LC-MS/MS bioanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Naiyu; Jiang, Hao; Zeng, Jianing

    2014-09-01

    Robotic liquid handlers (RLHs) have been widely used in automated sample preparation for liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) bioanalysis. Automated sample preparation for regulated bioanalysis offers significantly higher assay efficiency, better data quality and potential bioanalytical cost-savings. For RLHs that are used for regulated bioanalysis, there are additional requirements, including 21 CFR Part 11 compliance, software validation, system qualification, calibration verification and proper maintenance. This article reviews recent advances in automated sample preparation for regulated bioanalysis in the last 5 years. Specifically, it covers the following aspects: regulated bioanalysis requirements, recent advances in automation hardware and software development, sample extraction workflow simplification, strategies towards fully automated sample extraction, and best practices in automated sample preparation for regulated bioanalysis.

  11. Fossil power plant automation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Divakaruni, S.M.; Touchton, G.

    1991-01-01

    This paper elaborates on issues facing the utilities industry and seeks to address how new computer-based control and automation technologies resulting from recent microprocessor evolution, can improve fossil plant operations and maintenance. This in turn can assist utilities to emerge stronger from the challenges ahead. Many presentations at the first ISA/EPRI co-sponsored conference are targeted towards improving the use of computer and control systems in the fossil and nuclear power plants and we believe this to be the right forum to share our ideas

  12. Action Learning: Avoiding Conflict or Enabling Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corley, Aileen; Thorne, Ann

    2006-01-01

    Action learning is based on the premise that action and learning are inextricably entwined and it is this potential, to enable action, which has contributed to the growth of action learning within education and management development programmes. However has this growth in action learning lead to an evolution or a dilution of Revan's classical…

  13. A high-throughput liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry method for simultaneous quantification of a hydrophobic drug candidate and its hydrophilic metabolite in human urine with a fully automated liquid/liquid extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Perry G; Zhang, Jun; Gage, Eric M; Schmidt, Jeffrey M; Rodila, Ramona C; Ji, Qin C; El-Shourbagy, Tawakol A

    2006-01-01

    ABT-869 (A-741439) is an investigational new drug candidate under development by Abbott Laboratories. ABT-869 is hydrophobic, but is oxidized in the body to A-849529, a hydrophilic metabolite that includes both carboxyl and amino groups. Poor solubility of ABT-869 in aqueous matrix causes simultaneous analysis of both ABT-869 and its metabolite within the same extraction and injection to be extremely difficult in human urine. In this paper, a high-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS/MS) method has been developed and validated for high-speed simultaneous quantitation of the hydrophobic ABT-869 and its hydrophilic metabolite, A-849529, in human urine. The deuterated internal standards, A-741439D(4) and A-849529D(4), were used in this method. The disparate properties of the two analytes were mediated by treating samples with acetonitrile, adjusting pH with an extraction buffer, and optimizing the extraction solvent and mobile phase composition. For a 100 microL urine sample volume, the lower limit of quantitation was approximately 1 ng/mL for both ABT-869 and A-849529. The calibration curve was linear from 1.09 to 595.13 ng/mL for ABT-869, and 1.10 to 600.48 ng/mL for A-849529 (r2 > 0.9975 for both ABT-869 and A-849529). Because the method employs simultaneous quantification, high throughput is achieved despite the presence of both a hydrophobic analyte and its hydrophilic metabolite in human urine. Copyright 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Automated Test Case Generation

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    I would like to present the concept of automated test case generation. I work on it as part of my PhD and I think it would be interesting also for other people. It is also the topic of a workshop paper that I am introducing in Paris. (abstract below) Please note that the talk itself would be more general and not about the specifics of my PhD, but about the broad field of Automated Test Case Generation. I would introduce the main approaches (combinatorial testing, symbolic execution, adaptive random testing) and their advantages and problems. (oracle problem, combinatorial explosion, ...) Abstract of the paper: Over the last decade code-based test case generation techniques such as combinatorial testing or dynamic symbolic execution have seen growing research popularity. Most algorithms and tool implementations are based on finding assignments for input parameter values in order to maximise the execution branch coverage. Only few of them consider dependencies from outside the Code Under Test’s scope such...

  15. AUTOMATED GEOSPATIAL WATERSHED ASSESSMENT ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Automated Geospatial Watershed Assessment tool (AGWA) is a GIS interface jointly developed by the USDA Agricultural Research Service, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the University of Arizona, and the University of Wyoming to automate the parameterization and execution of the Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) and KINEmatic Runoff and EROSion (KINEROS2) hydrologic models. The application of these two models allows AGWA to conduct hydrologic modeling and watershed assessments at multiple temporal and spatial scales. AGWA’s current outputs are runoff (volumes and peaks) and sediment yield, plus nitrogen and phosphorus with the SWAT model. AGWA uses commonly available GIS data layers to fully parameterize, execute, and visualize results from both models. Through an intuitive interface the user selects an outlet from which AGWA delineates and discretizes the watershed using a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) based on the individual model requirements. The watershed model elements are then intersected with soils and land cover data layers to derive the requisite model input parameters. The chosen model is then executed, and the results are imported back into AGWA for visualization. This allows managers to identify potential problem areas where additional monitoring can be undertaken or mitigation activities can be focused. AGWA also has tools to apply an array of best management practices. There are currently two versions of AGWA available; AGWA 1.5 for

  16. Maneuver Automation Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uffelman, Hal; Goodson, Troy; Pellegrin, Michael; Stavert, Lynn; Burk, Thomas; Beach, David; Signorelli, Joel; Jones, Jeremy; Hahn, Yungsun; Attiyah, Ahlam; hide

    2009-01-01

    The Maneuver Automation Software (MAS) automates the process of generating commands for maneuvers to keep the spacecraft of the Cassini-Huygens mission on a predetermined prime mission trajectory. Before MAS became available, a team of approximately 10 members had to work about two weeks to design, test, and implement each maneuver in a process that involved running many maneuver-related application programs and then serially handing off data products to other parts of the team. MAS enables a three-member team to design, test, and implement a maneuver in about one-half hour after Navigation has process-tracking data. MAS accepts more than 60 parameters and 22 files as input directly from users. MAS consists of Practical Extraction and Reporting Language (PERL) scripts that link, sequence, and execute the maneuver- related application programs: "Pushing a single button" on a graphical user interface causes MAS to run navigation programs that design a maneuver; programs that create sequences of commands to execute the maneuver on the spacecraft; and a program that generates predictions about maneuver performance and generates reports and other files that enable users to quickly review and verify the maneuver design. MAS can also generate presentation materials, initiate electronic command request forms, and archive all data products for future reference.

  17. A Demonstration of Automated DNA Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latourelle, Sandra; Seidel-Rogol, Bonnie

    1998-01-01

    Details a simulation that employs a paper-and-pencil model to demonstrate the principles behind automated DNA sequencing. Discusses the advantages of automated sequencing as well as the chemistry of automated DNA sequencing. (DDR)

  18. Automating usability of ATLAS Distributed Computing resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tupputi, S. A.; Di Girolamo, A.; Kouba, T.; Schovancová, J.; Atlas Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    The automation of ATLAS Distributed Computing (ADC) operations is essential to reduce manpower costs and allow performance-enhancing actions, which improve the reliability of the system. In this perspective a crucial case is the automatic handling of outages of ATLAS computing sites storage resources, which are continuously exploited at the edge of their capabilities. It is challenging to adopt unambiguous decision criteria for storage resources of non-homogeneous types, sizes and roles. The recently developed Storage Area Automatic Blacklisting (SAAB) tool has provided a suitable solution, by employing an inference algorithm which processes history of storage monitoring tests outcome. SAAB accomplishes both the tasks of providing global monitoring as well as automatic operations on single sites. The implementation of the SAAB tool has been the first step in a comprehensive review of the storage areas monitoring and central management at all levels. Such review has involved the reordering and optimization of SAM tests deployment and the inclusion of SAAB results in the ATLAS Site Status Board with both dedicated metrics and views. The resulting structure allows monitoring the storage resources status with fine time-granularity and automatic actions to be taken in foreseen cases, like automatic outage handling and notifications to sites. Hence, the human actions are restricted to reporting and following up problems, where and when needed. In this work we show SAAB working principles and features. We present also the decrease of human interactions achieved within the ATLAS Computing Operation team. The automation results in a prompt reaction to failures, which leads to the optimization of resource exploitation.

  19. Automating usability of ATLAS distributed computing resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tupputi, S A; Girolamo, A Di; Kouba, T; Schovancová, J

    2014-01-01

    The automation of ATLAS Distributed Computing (ADC) operations is essential to reduce manpower costs and allow performance-enhancing actions, which improve the reliability of the system. In this perspective a crucial case is the automatic handling of outages of ATLAS computing sites storage resources, which are continuously exploited at the edge of their capabilities. It is challenging to adopt unambiguous decision criteria for storage resources of non-homogeneous types, sizes and roles. The recently developed Storage Area Automatic Blacklisting (SAAB) tool has provided a suitable solution, by employing an inference algorithm which processes history of storage monitoring tests outcome. SAAB accomplishes both the tasks of providing global monitoring as well as automatic operations on single sites. The implementation of the SAAB tool has been the first step in a comprehensive review of the storage areas monitoring and central management at all levels. Such review has involved the reordering and optimization of SAM tests deployment and the inclusion of SAAB results in the ATLAS Site Status Board with both dedicated metrics and views. The resulting structure allows monitoring the storage resources status with fine time-granularity and automatic actions to be taken in foreseen cases, like automatic outage handling and notifications to sites. Hence, the human actions are restricted to reporting and following up problems, where and when needed. In this work we show SAAB working principles and features. We present also the decrease of human interactions achieved within the ATLAS Computing Operation team. The automation results in a prompt reaction to failures, which leads to the optimization of resource exploitation.

  20. Opening up Library Automation Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breeding, Marshall

    2009-01-01

    Throughout the history of library automation, the author has seen a steady advancement toward more open systems. In the early days of library automation, when proprietary systems dominated, the need for standards was paramount since other means of inter-operability and data exchange weren't possible. Today's focus on Application Programming…

  1. Automated Power-Distribution System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashworth, Barry; Riedesel, Joel; Myers, Chris; Miller, William; Jones, Ellen F.; Freeman, Kenneth; Walsh, Richard; Walls, Bryan K.; Weeks, David J.; Bechtel, Robert T.

    1992-01-01

    Autonomous power-distribution system includes power-control equipment and automation equipment. System automatically schedules connection of power to loads and reconfigures itself when it detects fault. Potential terrestrial applications include optimization of consumption of power in homes, power supplies for autonomous land vehicles and vessels, and power supplies for automated industrial processes.

  2. Automation in Catholic College Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stussy, Susan A.

    1981-01-01

    Reports on a 1980 survey of library automation in 105 Catholic colleges with collections containing less than 300,000 bibliographic items. The report indicates that network membership and grant funding were a vital part of library automation in the schools surveyed. (Author/LLS)

  3. Library Automation: A Year on.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Electronic Library, 1997

    1997-01-01

    A follow-up interview with librarians from Hong Kong, Mexico, Australia, Canada, and New Zealand about library automation systems in their libraries and their plans for the future. Discusses system performance, upgrades, services, resources, intranets, trends in automation, Web interfaces, full-text image/document systems, document delivery, OPACs…

  4. Library Automation: A Balanced View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avram, Henriette

    1972-01-01

    Ellsworth Mason's two recently published papers, severely criticizing library automation, are refuted. While admitting to the failures and problems, this paper also presents the positive accomplishments in a brief evaluation of the status of library automation in 1971. (16 references) (Author/SJ)

  5. Library Automation: A Critical Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overmyer, LaVahn

    This report has two main purposes: (1) To give an account of the use of automation in selected libraries throughout the country and in the development of networks; and (2) To discuss some of the fundamental considerations relevant to automation and the implications for library education, library research and the library profession. The first part…

  6. Automated methods of corrosion measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Bech-Nielsen, Gregers; Reeve, John Ch

    1997-01-01

    to revise assumptions regarding the basis of the method, which sometimes leads to the discovery of as-yet unnoticed phenomena. The present selection of automated methods for corrosion measurements is not motivated simply by the fact that a certain measurement can be performed automatically. Automation...

  7. Automated Methods Of Corrosion Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech-Nielsen, Gregers; Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Reeve, John Ch

    1997-01-01

    The chapter describes the following automated measurements: Corrosion Measurements by Titration, Imaging Corrosion by Scanning Probe Microscopy, Critical Pitting Temperature and Application of the Electrochemical Hydrogen Permeation Cell.......The chapter describes the following automated measurements: Corrosion Measurements by Titration, Imaging Corrosion by Scanning Probe Microscopy, Critical Pitting Temperature and Application of the Electrochemical Hydrogen Permeation Cell....

  8. Automated Test-Form Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Linden, Wim J.; Diao, Qi

    2011-01-01

    In automated test assembly (ATA), the methodology of mixed-integer programming is used to select test items from an item bank to meet the specifications for a desired test form and optimize its measurement accuracy. The same methodology can be used to automate the formatting of the set of selected items into the actual test form. Three different…

  9. A Survey of Automated Deduction

    OpenAIRE

    Bundy, Alan

    1999-01-01

    We survey research in the automation of deductive inference, from its beginnings in the early history of computing to the present day. We identify and describe the major areas of research interest and their applications. The area is characterised by its wide variety of proof methods, forms of automated deduction and applications.

  10. Automated cell type discovery and classification through knowledge transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hao-Chih; Kosoy, Roman; Becker, Christine E.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Motivation: Recent advances in mass cytometry allow simultaneous measurements of up to 50 markers at single-cell resolution. However, the high dimensionality of mass cytometry data introduces computational challenges for automated data analysis and hinders translation of new biological understanding into clinical applications. Previous studies have applied machine learning to facilitate processing of mass cytometry data. However, manual inspection is still inevitable and becoming the barrier to reliable large-scale analysis. Results: We present a new algorithm called Automated Cell-type Discovery and Classification (ACDC) that fully automates the classification of canonical cell populations and highlights novel cell types in mass cytometry data. Evaluations on real-world data show ACDC provides accurate and reliable estimations compared to manual gating results. Additionally, ACDC automatically classifies previously ambiguous cell types to facilitate discovery. Our findings suggest that ACDC substantially improves both reliability and interpretability of results obtained from high-dimensional mass cytometry profiling data. Availability and Implementation: A Python package (Python 3) and analysis scripts for reproducing the results are availability on https://bitbucket.org/dudleylab/acdc. Contact: brian.kidd@mssm.edu or joel.dudley@mssm.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:28158442

  11. ORIGAMI Automator Primer. Automated ORIGEN Source Terms and Spent Fuel Storage Pool Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wieselquist, William A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Thompson, Adam B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bowman, Stephen M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Peterson, Joshua L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Source terms and spent nuclear fuel (SNF) storage pool decay heat load analyses for operating nuclear power plants require a large number of Oak Ridge Isotope Generation and Depletion (ORIGEN) calculations. SNF source term calculations also require a significant amount of bookkeeping to track quantities such as core and assembly operating histories, spent fuel pool (SFP) residence times, heavy metal masses, and enrichments. The ORIGEN Assembly Isotopics (ORIGAMI) module in the SCALE code system provides a simple scheme for entering these data. However, given the large scope of the analysis, extensive scripting is necessary to convert formats and process data to create thousands of ORIGAMI input files (one per assembly) and to process the results into formats readily usable by follow-on analysis tools. This primer describes a project within the SCALE Fulcrum graphical user interface (GUI) called ORIGAMI Automator that was developed to automate the scripting and bookkeeping in large-scale source term analyses. The ORIGAMI Automator enables the analyst to (1) easily create, view, and edit the reactor site and assembly information, (2) automatically create and run ORIGAMI inputs, and (3) analyze the results from ORIGAMI. ORIGAMI Automator uses the standard ORIGEN binary concentrations files produced by ORIGAMI, with concentrations available at all time points in each assembly’s life. The GUI plots results such as mass, concentration, activity, and decay heat using a powerful new ORIGEN Post-Processing Utility for SCALE (OPUS) GUI component. This document includes a description and user guide for the GUI, a step-by-step tutorial for a simplified scenario, and appendices that document the file structures used.

  12. The Science of Home Automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Brian Louis

    Smart home technologies and the concept of home automation have become more popular in recent years. This popularity has been accompanied by social acceptance of passive sensors installed throughout the home. The subsequent increase in smart homes facilitates the creation of home automation strategies. We believe that home automation strategies can be generated intelligently by utilizing smart home sensors and activity learning. In this dissertation, we hypothesize that home automation can benefit from activity awareness. To test this, we develop our activity-aware smart automation system, CARL (CASAS Activity-aware Resource Learning). CARL learns the associations between activities and device usage from historical data and utilizes the activity-aware capabilities to control the devices. To help validate CARL we deploy and test three different versions of the automation system in a real-world smart environment. To provide a foundation of activity learning, we integrate existing activity recognition and activity forecasting into CARL home automation. We also explore two alternatives to using human-labeled data to train the activity learning models. The first unsupervised method is Activity Detection, and the second is a modified DBSCAN algorithm that utilizes Dynamic Time Warping (DTW) as a distance metric. We compare the performance of activity learning with human-defined labels and with automatically-discovered activity categories. To provide evidence in support of our hypothesis, we evaluate CARL automation in a smart home testbed. Our results indicate that home automation can be boosted through activity awareness. We also find that the resulting automation has a high degree of usability and comfort for the smart home resident.

  13. Open Automated Demand Response Communications Specification (Version 1.0)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piette, Mary Ann; Ghatikar, Girish; Kiliccote, Sila; Koch, Ed; Hennage, Dan; Palensky, Peter; McParland, Charles

    2009-02-28

    The development of the Open Automated Demand Response Communications Specification, also known as OpenADR or Open Auto-DR, began in 2002 following the California electricity crisis. The work has been carried out by the Demand Response Research Center (DRRC), which is managed by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. This specification describes an open standards-based communications data model designed to facilitate sending and receiving demand response price and reliability signals from a utility or Independent System Operator to electric customers. OpenADR is one element of the Smart Grid information and communications technologies that are being developed to improve optimization between electric supply and demand. The intention of the open automated demand response communications data model is to provide interoperable signals to building and industrial control systems that are preprogrammed to take action based on a demand response signal, enabling a demand response event to be fully automated, with no manual intervention. The OpenADR specification is a flexible infrastructure to facilitate common information exchange between the utility or Independent System Operator and end-use participants. The concept of an open specification is intended to allow anyone to implement the signaling systems, the automation server or the automation clients.

  14. Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometric telescope automation and observing software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eric H. Neilsen, Jr.; email = neilsen@fnal.gov

    2002-01-01

    The photometric telescope (PT) provides observations necessary for the photometric calibration of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Because the attention of the observing staff is occupied by the operation of the 2.5 meter telescope which takes the survey data proper, the PT must reliably take data with little supervision. In this paper we describe the PT's observing program, MOP, which automates most tasks necessary for observing. MOP's automated target selection is closely modeled on the actions a human observer might take, and is built upon a user interface that can be (and has been) used for manual operation. This results in an interface that makes it easy for an observer to track the activities of the automating procedures and intervene with minimum disturbance when necessary. MOP selects targets from the same list of standard star and calibration fields presented to the user, and chooses standard star fields covering ranges of airmass, color, and time necessary to monitor atmospheric extinction and produce a photometric solution. The software determines when additional standard star fields are unnecessary, and selects survey calibration fields according to availability and priority. Other automated features of MOP, such as maintaining the focus and keeping a night log, are also built around still functional manual interfaces, allowing the observer to be as active in observing as desired; MOP's automated features may be used as tools for manual observing, ignored entirely, or allowed to run the telescope with minimal supervision when taking routine data

  15. Berkeley automated supernova search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kare, J.T.; Pennypacker, C.R.; Muller, R.A.; Mast, T.S.; Crawford, F.S.; Burns, M.S.

    1981-01-01

    The Berkeley automated supernova search employs a computer controlled 36-inch telescope and charge coupled device (CCD) detector to image 2500 galaxies per night. A dedicated minicomputer compares each galaxy image with stored reference data to identify supernovae in real time. The threshold for detection is m/sub v/ = 18.8. We plan to monitor roughly 500 galaxies in Virgo and closer every night, and an additional 6000 galaxies out to 70 Mpc on a three night cycle. This should yield very early detection of several supernovae per year for detailed study, and reliable premaximum detection of roughly 100 supernovae per year for statistical studies. The search should be operational in mid-1982.

  16. Berkeley automated supernova search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kare, J.T.; Pennypacker, C.R.; Muller, R.A.; Mast, T.S.

    1981-01-01

    The Berkeley automated supernova search employs a computer controlled 36-inch telescope and charge coupled device (CCD) detector to image 2500 galaxies per night. A dedicated minicomputer compares each galaxy image with stored reference data to identify supernovae in real time. The threshold for detection is m/sub v/ = 18.8. We plan to monitor roughly 500 galaxies in Virgo and closer every night, and an additional 6000 galaxies out to 70 Mpc on a three night cycle. This should yield very early detection of several supernovae per year for detailed study, and reliable premaximum detection of roughly 100 supernovae per year for statistical studies. The search should be operational in mid-1982

  17. Automated attendance accounting system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, C. P. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An automated accounting system useful for applying data to a computer from any or all of a multiplicity of data terminals is disclosed. The system essentially includes a preselected number of data terminals which are each adapted to convert data words of decimal form to another form, i.e., binary, usable with the computer. Each data terminal may take the form of a keyboard unit having a number of depressable buttons or switches corresponding to selected data digits and/or function digits. A bank of data buffers, one of which is associated with each data terminal, is provided as a temporary storage. Data from the terminals is applied to the data buffers on a digit by digit basis for transfer via a multiplexer to the computer.

  18. Robust automated knowledge capture.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens-Adams, Susan Marie; Abbott, Robert G.; Forsythe, James Chris; Trumbo, Michael Christopher Stefan; Haass, Michael Joseph; Hendrickson, Stacey M. Langfitt

    2011-10-01

    This report summarizes research conducted through the Sandia National Laboratories Robust Automated Knowledge Capture Laboratory Directed Research and Development project. The objective of this project was to advance scientific understanding of the influence of individual cognitive attributes on decision making. The project has developed a quantitative model known as RumRunner that has proven effective in predicting the propensity of an individual to shift strategies on the basis of task and experience related parameters. Three separate studies are described which have validated the basic RumRunner model. This work provides a basis for better understanding human decision making in high consequent national security applications, and in particular, the individual characteristics that underlie adaptive thinking.

  19. (No) Security in Automation!?

    CERN Document Server

    Lüders, S

    2008-01-01

    Modern Information Technologies like Ethernet, TCP/IP, web server or FTP are nowadays increas-ingly used in distributed control and automation systems. Thus, information from the factory floor is now directly available at the management level (From Shop-Floor to Top-Floor) and can be ma-nipulated from there. Despite the benefits coming with this (r)evolution, new vulnerabilities are in-herited, too: worms and viruses spread within seconds via Ethernet and attackers are becoming interested in control systems. Unfortunately, control systems lack the standard security features that usual office PCs have. This contribution will elaborate on these problems, discuss the vulnerabilities of modern control systems and present international initiatives for mitigation.

  20. Automated Motivic Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lartillot, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Motivic analysis provides very detailed understanding of musical composi- tions, but is also particularly difficult to formalize and systematize. A computational automation of the discovery of motivic patterns cannot be reduced to a mere extraction of all possible sequences of descriptions....... The systematic approach inexorably leads to a proliferation of redundant structures that needs to be addressed properly. Global filtering techniques cause a drastic elimination of interesting structures that damages the quality of the analysis. On the other hand, a selection of closed patterns allows...... for lossless compression. The structural complexity resulting from successive repetitions of patterns can be controlled through a simple modelling of cycles. Generally, motivic patterns cannot always be defined solely as sequences of descriptions in a fixed set of dimensions: throughout the descriptions...

  1. Printing quality control automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapeznikova, O. V.

    2018-04-01

    One of the most important problems in the concept of standardizing the process of offset printing is the control the quality rating of printing and its automation. To solve the problem, a software has been developed taking into account the specifics of printing system components and the behavior in printing process. In order to characterize the distribution of ink layer on the printed substrate the so-called deviation of the ink layer thickness on the sheet from nominal surface is suggested. The geometric data construction the surface projections of the color gamut bodies allows to visualize the color reproduction gamut of printing systems in brightness ranges and specific color sectors, that provides a qualitative comparison of the system by the reproduction of individual colors in a varying ranges of brightness.

  2. Automated electronic filter design

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Amal

    2017-01-01

    This book describes a novel, efficient and powerful scheme for designing and evaluating the performance characteristics of any electronic filter designed with predefined specifications. The author explains techniques that enable readers to eliminate complicated manual, and thus error-prone and time-consuming, steps of traditional design techniques. The presentation includes demonstration of efficient automation, using an ANSI C language program, which accepts any filter design specification (e.g. Chebyschev low-pass filter, cut-off frequency, pass-band ripple etc.) as input and generates as output a SPICE(Simulation Program with Integrated Circuit Emphasis) format netlist. Readers then can use this netlist to run simulations with any version of the popular SPICE simulator, increasing accuracy of the final results, without violating any of the key principles of the traditional design scheme.

  3. Automated Essay Scoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semire DIKLI

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Automated Essay Scoring Semire DIKLI Florida State University Tallahassee, FL, USA ABSTRACT The impacts of computers on writing have been widely studied for three decades. Even basic computers functions, i.e. word processing, have been of great assistance to writers in modifying their essays. The research on Automated Essay Scoring (AES has revealed that computers have the capacity to function as a more effective cognitive tool (Attali, 2004. AES is defined as the computer technology that evaluates and scores the written prose (Shermis & Barrera, 2002; Shermis & Burstein, 2003; Shermis, Raymat, & Barrera, 2003. Revision and feedback are essential aspects of the writing process. Students need to receive feedback in order to increase their writing quality. However, responding to student papers can be a burden for teachers. Particularly if they have large number of students and if they assign frequent writing assignments, providing individual feedback to student essays might be quite time consuming. AES systems can be very useful because they can provide the student with a score as well as feedback within seconds (Page, 2003. Four types of AES systems, which are widely used by testing companies, universities, and public schools: Project Essay Grader (PEG, Intelligent Essay Assessor (IEA, E-rater, and IntelliMetric. AES is a developing technology. Many AES systems are used to overcome time, cost, and generalizability issues in writing assessment. The accuracy and reliability of these systems have been proven to be high. The search for excellence in machine scoring of essays is continuing and numerous studies are being conducted to improve the effectiveness of the AES systems.

  4. Automated endoscope reprocessors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desilets, David; Kaul, Vivek; Tierney, William M; Banerjee, Subhas; Diehl, David L; Farraye, Francis A; Kethu, Sripathi R; Kwon, Richard S; Mamula, Petar; Pedrosa, Marcos C; Rodriguez, Sarah A; Wong Kee Song, Louis-Michel

    2010-10-01

    The ASGE Technology Committee provides reviews of existing, new, or emerging endoscopic technologies that have an impact on the practice of GI endoscopy. Evidence-based methodology is used, with a MEDLINE literature search to identify pertinent clinical studies on the topic and a MAUDE (U.S. Food and Drug Administration Center for Devices and Radiological Health) database search to identify the reported complications of a given technology. Both are supplemented by accessing the "related articles" feature of PubMed and by scrutinizing pertinent references cited by the identified studies. Controlled clinical trials are emphasized, but in many cases data from randomized, controlled trials are lacking. In such cases, large case series, preliminary clinical studies, and expert opinions are used. Technical data are gathered from traditional and Web-based publications, proprietary publications, and informal communications with pertinent vendors. Technology Status Evaluation Reports are drafted by 1 or 2 members of the ASGE Technology Committee, reviewed and edited by the committee as a whole, and approved by the Governing Board of the ASGE. When financial guidance is indicated, the most recent coding data and list prices at the time of publication are provided. For this review, the MEDLINE database was searched through February 2010 for articles related to automated endoscope reprocessors, using the words endoscope reprocessing, endoscope cleaning, automated endoscope reprocessors, and high-level disinfection. Technology Status Evaluation Reports are scientific reviews provided solely for educational and informational purposes. Technology Status Evaluation Reports are not rules and should not be construed as establishing a legal standard of care or as encouraging, advocating, requiring, or discouraging any particular treatment or payment for such treatment. Copyright © 2010 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Automation of the dicentric chromosome assay and related assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balajee, Adayabalam S.; Dainiak, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Dicentric Chromosome Assay (DCA) is considered to be the 'gold standard' for personalized dose assessment in humans after accidental or incidental radiation exposure. Although this technique is superior to other cytogenetic assays in terms of specificity and sensitivity, its potential application to radiation mass casualty scenarios is highly restricted because DCA is time consuming and labor intensive when performed manually. Therefore, it is imperative to develop high throughput automation techniques to make DCA suitable for radiological triage scenarios. At the Cytogenetic Biodosimetry Laboratory in Oak Ridge, efforts are underway to develop high throughput automation of DCA. Current status on development of various automated cytogenetic techniques in meeting the biodosimetry needs of radiological/nuclear incident(s) will be discussed

  6. Knowledge based support for real time application of multiagent control and automation in electric power systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saleem, Arshad; Nordstrom, Lars; Lind, Morten

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a mechanism for developing knowledge based support for real time application of multiagent systems (MAS) in control, automation and diagnosis of electric power systems. In particular it presents a way for autonomous agents to utilize a qualitative means-ends based model...... and choose an appropriate control action. The paper also elaborates on real time interfacing between multi-agent systems and industry standard distribution automation and control system....

  7. Automating the radiographic NDT process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aman, J.K.

    1986-01-01

    Automation, the removal of the human element in inspection, has not been generally applied to film radiographic NDT. The justication for automating is not only productivity but also reliability of results. Film remains in the automated system of the future because of its extremely high image content, approximately 8 x 10 9 bits per 14 x 17. The equivalent to 2200 computer floppy discs. Parts handling systems and robotics applied for manufacturing and some NDT modalities, should now be applied to film radiographic NDT systems. Automatic film handling can be achieved with the daylight NDT film handling system. Automatic film processing is becoming the standard in industry and can be coupled to the daylight system. Robots offer the opportunity to automate fully the exposure step. Finally, computer aided interpretation appears on the horizon. A unit which laser scans a 14 x 17 (inch) film in 6 - 8 seconds can digitize film information for further manipulation and possible automatic interrogations (computer aided interpretation). The system called FDRS (for Film Digital Radiography System) is moving toward 50 micron (*approx* 16 lines/mm) resolution. This is believed to meet the need of the majority of image content needs. We expect the automated system to appear first in parts (modules) as certain operations are automated. The future will see it all come together in an automated film radiographic NDT system (author) [pt

  8. Spatial and temporal analysis of mass movement using dendrochronology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braam, R.R.; Weiss, E.E.J.; Burrough, P.A.

    1987-01-01

    Tree growth and inclination on sloping land is affected by mass movement. Suitable analysis of tree growth and tree form can therefore provide considerable information on mass movement activity. This paper reports a new, automated method for studying the temporal and spatial aspects of mass

  9. On the least action principle in cosmology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nusser, A; Branchini, E

    2000-01-01

    Given the present distribution of mass tracing objects in an expanding universe, we develop and test a fast method for recovering their past orbits using the least action principle. In this method, termed FAM for fast action minimization, the orbits are expanded in a set of orthogonal time basis

  10. Automating usability of ATLAS Distributed Computing resources

    CERN Document Server

    "Tupputi, S A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The automation of ATLAS Distributed Computing (ADC) operations is essential to reduce manpower costs and allow performance-enhancing actions, which improve the reliability of the system. In this perspective a crucial case is the automatic exclusion/recovery of ATLAS computing sites storage resources, which are continuously exploited at the edge of their capabilities. It is challenging to adopt unambiguous decision criteria for storage resources who feature non-homogeneous types, sizes and roles. The recently developed Storage Area Automatic Blacklisting (SAAB) tool has provided a suitable solution, by employing an inference algorithm which processes SAM (Site Availability Test) site-by-site SRM tests outcome. SAAB accomplishes both the tasks of providing global monitoring as well as automatic operations on single sites.\

  11. Default mode contributions to automated information processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatansever, Deniz; Menon, David K; Stamatakis, Emmanuel A

    2017-11-28

    Concurrent with mental processes that require rigorous computation and control, a series of automated decisions and actions govern our daily lives, providing efficient and adaptive responses to environmental demands. Using a cognitive flexibility task, we show that a set of brain regions collectively known as the default mode network plays a crucial role in such "autopilot" behavior, i.e., when rapidly selecting appropriate responses under predictable behavioral contexts. While applying learned rules, the default mode network shows both greater activity and connectivity. Furthermore, functional interactions between this network and hippocampal and parahippocampal areas as well as primary visual cortex correlate with the speed of accurate responses. These findings indicate a memory-based "autopilot role" for the default mode network, which may have important implications for our current understanding of healthy and adaptive brain processing.

  12. WIRELESS HOME AUTOMATION SYSTEM BASED ON MICROCONTROLLER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUNA H. SALEH

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the development of Global System Mobile (GSM-based control home air-conditioner for home automation system. The main aim of the prototype development is to reduce electricity wastage. GSM module was used for receiving Short Message Service (SMS from the user’s mobile phone that automatically enable the controller to take any further action such as to switch ON and OFF the home air-conditioner. The system controls the air-conditioner based on the temperature reading through the sensor. Every period temperature sensor sends the degree to Micro Controller Unit (MCU through ZigBee. Based on temperature degree MCU send ON or OFF signal to switch. Additionally, system allows user to operate or shut down the airconditioner remotely through SMS.

  13. An Automation Survival Guide for Media Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whaley, Roger E.

    1989-01-01

    Reviews factors that should affect the decision to automate a school media center and offers suggestions for the automation process. Topics discussed include getting the library collection ready for automation, deciding what automated functions are needed, evaluating software vendors, selecting software, and budgeting. (CLB)

  14. Toward Automated N-Glycopeptide Identification in Glycoproteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ling Y; Moh, Edward S X; Parker, Benjamin L; Bern, Marshall; Packer, Nicolle H; Thaysen-Andersen, Morten

    2016-10-07

    Advances in software-driven glycopeptide identification have facilitated N-glycoproteomics studies reporting thousands of intact N-glycopeptides, i.e., N-glycan-conjugated peptides, but the automated identification process remains to be scrutinized. Herein, we compare the site-specific glycoprofiling efficiency of the PTM-centric search engine Byonic relative to manual expert annotation utilizing typical glycoproteomics acquisition and data analysis strategies but with a single glycoprotein, the uncharacterized multiple N-glycosylated human basigin. Detailed site-specific reference glycoprofiles of purified basigin were manually established using ion-trap CID-MS/MS and high-resolution Q-Exactive Orbitrap HCD-MS/MS of tryptic N-glycopeptides and released N-glycans. The micro- and macroheterogeneous basigin N-glycosylation was site-specifically glycoprofiled using Byonic with or without a background of complex peptides using Q-Exactive Orbitrap HCD-MS/MS. The automated glycoprofiling efficiencies were assessed against the site-specific reference glycoprofiles and target/decoy proteome databases. Within the limits of this single glycoprotein analysis, the search criteria and confidence thresholds (Byonic scores) recommended by the vendor provided high glycoprofiling accuracy and coverage (both >80%) and low peptide FDRs (<1%). The data complexity, search parameters including search space (proteome/glycome size), mass tolerance and peptide modifications, and confidence thresholds affected the automated glycoprofiling efficiency and analysis time. Correct identification of ambiguous peptide modifications (methionine oxidation/carbamidomethylation) whose mass differences coincide with several monosaccharide mass differences (Fuc/Hex/HexNAc) and of ambiguous isobaric (Hex 1 NeuAc 1 -R/Fuc 1 NeuGc 1 -R) or near-isobaric (NeuAc 1 -R/Fuc 2 -R) monosaccharide subcompositions remains challenging in automated glycoprofiling, arguing particular attention paid to N

  15. National Automated Conformity Inspection Process -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The National Automated Conformity Inspection Process (NACIP) Application is intended to expedite the workflow process as it pertains to the FAA Form 81 0-10 Request...

  16. Home automation with Intel Galileo

    CERN Document Server

    Dundar, Onur

    2015-01-01

    This book is for anyone who wants to learn Intel Galileo for home automation and cross-platform software development. No knowledge of programming with Intel Galileo is assumed, but knowledge of the C programming language is essential.

  17. Fully automated parallel oligonucleotide synthesizer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lebl, M.; Burger, Ch.; Ellman, B.; Heiner, D.; Ibrahim, G.; Jones, A.; Nibbe, M.; Thompson, J.; Mudra, Petr; Pokorný, Vít; Poncar, Pavel; Ženíšek, Karel

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 8 (2001), s. 1299-1314 ISSN 0010-0765 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : automated oligonucleotide synthesizer Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.778, year: 2001

  18. Office Automation Boosts University's Productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Business Affairs, 1986

    1986-01-01

    The University of Pittsburgh has a 2-year agreement designating the Xerox Corporation as the primary supplier of word processing and related office automation equipment in order to increase productivity and more efficient use of campus resources. (MLF)

  19. Office Automation at Memphis State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R. Eugene; And Others

    1986-01-01

    The development of a university-wide office automation plan, beginning with a short-range pilot project and a five-year plan for the entire organization with the potential for modular implementation, is described. (MSE)

  20. The Evaluation of Automated Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McDougall, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    .... The Army has recognized this change and is adapting to operate in this new environment. It has developed a number of automated tools to assist leaders in the command and control of their organizations...

  1. Automation and Human Resource Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taft, Michael

    1988-01-01

    Discussion of the automation of personnel administration in libraries covers (1) new developments in human resource management systems; (2) system requirements; (3) software evaluation; (4) vendor evaluation; (5) selection of a system; (6) training and support; and (7) benefits. (MES)

  2. The Automator: Intelligent control system monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M. Bickley; D.A. Bryan; K.S. White

    1999-01-01

    A large-scale control system may contain several hundred thousand control points which must be monitored to ensure smooth operation. Knowledge of the current state of such a system is often implicit in the values of these points and operators must be cognizant of the state while making decisions. Repetitive operators requiring human intervention lead to fatigue, which can in turn lead to mistakes. The authors propose a tool called the Automator based on a middleware software server. This tool would provide a user-configurable engine for monitoring control points. Based on the status of these control points, a specified action could be taken. The action could range from setting another control point, to triggering an alarm, to running an executable. Often the data presented by a system is meaningless without context information from other channels. Such a tool could be configured to present interpreted information based on values of other channels. Additionally, this tool could translate numerous values in a non-friendly form (such as numbers, bits, or return codes) into meaningful strings of information. Multiple instances of this server could be run, allowing individuals or groups to configure their own Automators. The configuration of the tool will be file-based. In the future, these files could be generated by graphical design tools, allowing for rapid development of new configurations. In addition, the server will be able to explicitly maintain information about the state of the control system. This state information can be used in decision-making processes and shared with other applications. A conceptual framework and software design for the tool are presented

  3. Decision Making In A High-Tech World: Automation Bias and Countermeasures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosier, Kathleen L.; Skitka, Linda J.; Burdick, Mark R.; Heers, Susan T.; Rosekind, Mark R. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Automated decision aids and decision support systems have become essential tools in many high-tech environments. In aviation, for example, flight management systems computers not only fly the aircraft, but also calculate fuel efficient paths, detect and diagnose system malfunctions and abnormalities, and recommend or carry out decisions. Air Traffic Controllers will soon be utilizing decision support tools to help them predict and detect potential conflicts and to generate clearances. Other fields as disparate as nuclear power plants and medical diagnostics are similarly becoming more and more automated. Ideally, the combination of human decision maker and automated decision aid should result in a high-performing team, maximizing the advantages of additional cognitive and observational power in the decision-making process. In reality, however, the presence of these aids often short-circuits the way that even very experienced decision makers have traditionally handled tasks and made decisions, and introduces opportunities for new decision heuristics and biases. Results of recent research investigating the use of automated aids have indicated the presence of automation bias, that is, errors made when decision makers rely on automated cues as a heuristic replacement for vigilant information seeking and processing. Automation commission errors, i.e., errors made when decision makers inappropriately follow an automated directive, or automation omission errors, i.e., errors made when humans fail to take action or notice a problem because an automated aid fails to inform them, can result from this tendency. Evidence of the tendency to make automation-related omission and commission errors has been found in pilot self reports, in studies using pilots in flight simulations, and in non-flight decision making contexts with student samples. Considerable research has found that increasing social accountability can successfully ameliorate a broad array of cognitive biases and

  4. Anesthesiology, automation, and artificial intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, John C; Joshi, Girish P

    2018-01-01

    There have been many attempts to incorporate automation into the practice of anesthesiology, though none have been successful. Fundamentally, these failures are due to the underlying complexity of anesthesia practice and the inability of rule-based feedback loops to fully master it. Recent innovations in artificial intelligence, especially machine learning, may usher in a new era of automation across many industries, including anesthesiology. It would be wise to consider the implications of such potential changes before they have been fully realized.

  5. Aprendizaje automático

    OpenAIRE

    Suárez Cueto, Armando

    2006-01-01

    En este libro se introducen los conceptos básicos en una de las ramas más estudiadas actualmente dentro de la inteligencia artificial: el aprendizaje automático. Se estudian temas como el aprendizaje inductivo, el razonamiento analógico, el aprendizaje basado en explicaciones, las redes neuronales, los algoritmos genéticos, el razonamiento basado en casos o las aproximaciones teóricas al aprendizaje automático.

  6. 2015 Chinese Intelligent Automation Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Hongbo

    2015-01-01

    Proceedings of the 2015 Chinese Intelligent Automation Conference presents selected research papers from the CIAC’15, held in Fuzhou, China. The topics include adaptive control, fuzzy control, neural network based control, knowledge based control, hybrid intelligent control, learning control, evolutionary mechanism based control, multi-sensor integration, failure diagnosis, reconfigurable control, etc. Engineers and researchers from academia, industry and the government can gain valuable insights into interdisciplinary solutions in the field of intelligent automation.

  7. Technology modernization assessment flexible automation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, D.W.; Boyd, D.R.; Hansen, N.H.; Hansen, M.A.; Yount, J.A.

    1990-12-01

    The objectives of this report are: to present technology assessment guidelines to be considered in conjunction with defense regulations before an automation project is developed to give examples showing how assessment guidelines may be applied to a current project to present several potential areas where automation might be applied successfully in the depot system. Depots perform primarily repair and remanufacturing operations, with limited small batch manufacturing runs. While certain activities (such as Management Information Systems and warehousing) are directly applicable to either environment, the majority of applications will require combining existing and emerging technologies in different ways, with the special needs of depot remanufacturing environment. Industry generally enjoys the ability to make revisions to its product lines seasonally, followed by batch runs of thousands or more. Depot batch runs are in the tens, at best the hundreds, of parts with a potential for large variation in product mix; reconfiguration may be required on a week-to-week basis. This need for a higher degree of flexibility suggests a higher level of operator interaction, and, in turn, control systems that go beyond the state of the art for less flexible automation and industry in general. This report investigates the benefits and barriers to automation and concludes that, while significant benefits do exist for automation, depots must be prepared to carefully investigate the technical feasibility of each opportunity and the life-cycle costs associated with implementation. Implementation is suggested in two ways: (1) develop an implementation plan for automation technologies based on results of small demonstration automation projects; (2) use phased implementation for both these and later stage automation projects to allow major technical and administrative risk issues to be addressed. 10 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs. (JF)

  8. Virtual Machine in Automation Projects

    OpenAIRE

    Xing, Xiaoyuan

    2010-01-01

    Virtual machine, as an engineering tool, has recently been introduced into automation projects in Tetra Pak Processing System AB. The goal of this paper is to examine how to better utilize virtual machine for the automation projects. This paper designs different project scenarios using virtual machine. It analyzes installability, performance and stability of virtual machine from the test results. Technical solutions concerning virtual machine are discussed such as the conversion with physical...

  9. Towards automated identification of metabolites using mass spectral trees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rojas-Chertó, Miquel

    2014-01-01

    The detailed description of the chemical compounds present in organisms, organs/tissues, biofluids and cells is the key to understand the complexity of biological systems. The small molecules (metabolites) are known to be very diverse in structure and function. However, the identification of the

  10. Automated mass spectrometric analysis of urinary and plasma serotonin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Wilhelmina H. A.; Wilkens, Marianne H. L. I.; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; Kema, Ido P.

    Serotonin emerges as crucial neurotransmitter and hormone in a growing number of different physiologic processes. Besides extensive serotonin production previously noted in patients with metastatic carcinoid tumors, serotonin now is implicated in liver cell regeneration and bone formation. The aim

  11. Towards automated traceability maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäder, Patrick; Gotel, Orlena

    2012-10-01

    Traceability relations support stakeholders in understanding the dependencies between artifacts created during the development of a software system and thus enable many development-related tasks. To ensure that the anticipated benefits of these tasks can be realized, it is necessary to have an up-to-date set of traceability relations between the established artifacts. This goal requires the creation of traceability relations during the initial development process. Furthermore, the goal also requires the maintenance of traceability relations over time as the software system evolves in order to prevent their decay. In this paper, an approach is discussed that supports the (semi-) automated update of traceability relations between requirements, analysis and design models of software systems expressed in the UML. This is made possible by analyzing change events that have been captured while working within a third-party UML modeling tool. Within the captured flow of events, development activities comprised of several events are recognized. These are matched with predefined rules that direct the update of impacted traceability relations. The overall approach is supported by a prototype tool and empirical results on the effectiveness of tool-supported traceability maintenance are provided.

  12. Automated personnel radiation monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sterling, S.G.

    1981-01-01

    An automated Personnel Low-Level Radiation Portal Monitor has been developed by UNC Nuclear Industries, Inc. It is micro-computer controlled and uses nineteen large gas flow radiation detectors. By employing a micro-computer, sophisticated mathematical analysis is used on the detector informational data base to determine the statistical probability of contamination. This system provides for: (1) Increased sensitivity to point source contamination; (2) Real time background level compensation before and during Portal occupancy; (3) Variable counting periods as necessary to provide a significant statistical probability of contamination; (4) Continuous self-testing of system components, detector operability and sensitivity; and (5) Multiple modes of operation allowing the operator/owner control from continuous walk-through (for SNM detection at gates) to complete whole body counts (at step-off points from radiation zones). Sr-90 sources of .005 uCi can be detected from the hands and feet with a 90% confidence level, less than .1% false alarm rate with background levels up to 0.1 mR/hr. For the occupants periphery adjacent to the detectors, a sensitivity of .01 uCi is readily attainable. Alpha particle detection is legitimately available on hands, due to close proximity detection and thin Mylar detector cover techniques

  13. Automated personnel radiation monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterling, S.G.

    1981-06-01

    An automated Personnel Low-Level Radiation Portal Monitor has been developed by UNC Nuclear Industries, Inc. It is micro-computer controlled and uses nineteen large gas flow radiation detectors. By employing a micro-computer, sophisticated mathematical analysis is used on the detector informational data base to determine the statistical probability of contamination. This system provides for: (1) Increased sensitivity to point source contamination; (2) Real time background level compensation before and during Portal occupancy; (3) Variable counting periods as necessary to provide a significant statistical probability of contamination; (4) Continuous self-testing of system components, detector operability and sensitivity; and (5) Multiple modes of operation allowing the operator/owner control from continuous walk-through (for SNM detection at gates) to complete whole body counts (at step-off points from radiation zones). Sr-90 sources of .005 uCi can be detected from the hands and feet with a 90% confidence level, less than .1% false alarm rate with background levels up to 0.1 mR/hr. For the occupants periphery adjacent to the detectors, a sensitivity of .01 uCi is readily attainable. Alpha particle detection is legitimately available on hands, due to close proximity detection and thin Mylar detector cover techniques.

  14. Particle Accelerator Focus Automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, José; Rocha, Jorge; Redondo, Luís; Cruz, João

    2017-08-01

    The Laboratório de Aceleradores e Tecnologias de Radiação (LATR) at the Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, of Instituto Superior Técnico (IST) has a horizontal electrostatic particle accelerator based on the Van de Graaff machine which is used for research in the area of material characterization. This machine produces alfa (He+) and proton (H+) beams of some μA currents up to 2 MeV/q energies. Beam focusing is obtained using a cylindrical lens of the Einzel type, assembled near the high voltage terminal. This paper describes the developed system that automatically focuses the ion beam, using a personal computer running the LabVIEW software, a multifunction input/output board and signal conditioning circuits. The focusing procedure consists of a scanning method to find the lens bias voltage which maximizes the beam current measured on a beam stopper target, which is used as feedback for the scanning cycle. This system, as part of a wider start up and shut down automation system built for this particle accelerator, brings great advantages to the operation of the accelerator by turning it faster and easier to operate, requiring less human presence, and adding the possibility of total remote control in safe conditions.

  15. Automated propellant leak detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makel, D. B.; Jansa, E. D.; Bickmore, T. W.; Powers, W. T.

    1993-01-01

    An automated hydrogen leak detection system is being developed for earth-to-orbit rocket engine applications. The system consists of three elements, a sensor array, a signal processing unit, and a diagnostic processor. The sensor array consists of discrete solid state sensors which are located at specific potential leak sites and in potential leak zones. The signal processing unit provides excitations power for the sensors and provides analog to digital data conversion of the sensor signals. The diagnostic computer analyzes the sensor outputs to determine leak sources and magnitude. Leak data from the sensor network is interpreted using knowledge based software and displayed on-line through a graphical user interface including 3-D leak visualization. The system requirements have been developed assuming eventual application to the Space Shuttle Main Engine which requires approximately 72 measurement locations. A prototype system has been constructed to demonstrate the operational features of the system. This system includes both prototype electronics and data processing software algorithms. Experiments are in progress to evaluate system operation at conditions which simulate prelaunch and flight. The prototype system consists of a network using 16 sensors within a testbed which simulates engine components. Sensor response, orientation, and data analysis algorithms are being evaluated using calibrated leaks produced within the testbed. A prototype flight system is also under development consisting of 8 sensors and flight capable electronics with autonomous control and data recording.

  16. Particle Accelerator Focus Automation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopes José

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The Laboratório de Aceleradores e Tecnologias de Radiação (LATR at the Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, of Instituto Superior Técnico (IST has a horizontal electrostatic particle accelerator based on the Van de Graaff machine which is used for research in the area of material characterization. This machine produces alfa (He+ and proton (H+ beams of some μA currents up to 2 MeV/q energies. Beam focusing is obtained using a cylindrical lens of the Einzel type, assembled near the high voltage terminal. This paper describes the developed system that automatically focuses the ion beam, using a personal computer running the LabVIEW software, a multifunction input/output board and signal conditioning circuits. The focusing procedure consists of a scanning method to find the lens bias voltage which maximizes the beam current measured on a beam stopper target, which is used as feedback for the scanning cycle. This system, as part of a wider start up and shut down automation system built for this particle accelerator, brings great advantages to the operation of the accelerator by turning it faster and easier to operate, requiring less human presence, and adding the possibility of total remote control in safe conditions.

  17. Automated uranium titration system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, M.; Kato, Y.

    1983-01-01

    An automated titration system based on the Davies-Gray method has been developed for accurate determination of uranium. The system consists of a potentiometric titrator with precise burettes, a sample changer, an electronic balance and a desk-top computer with a printer. Fifty-five titration vessels are loaded in the sample changer. The first three contain the standard solution for standardizing potassium dichromate titrant, and the next two and the last two contain the control samples for data quality assurance. The other forty-eight measurements are carried out for sixteen unknown samples. Sample solution containing about 100 mg uranium is taken in a titration vessel. At the pretreatment position, uranium (VI) is reduced to uranium (IV) by iron (II). After the valency adjustment, the vessel is transferred to the titration position. The rate of titrant addition is automatically controlled to be slower near the end-point. The last figure (0.01 mL) of the equivalent titrant volume for uranium is calculated from the potential change. The results obtained with this system on 100 mg uranium gave a precision of 0.2% (RSD,n=3) and an accuracy of better than 0.1%. Fifty-five titrations are accomplished in 10 hours. (author)

  18. Automated asteroseismic peak detections

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Saravia Ortiz de Montellano, Andrés; Hekker, S.; Themeßl, N.

    2018-05-01

    Space observatories such as Kepler have provided data that can potentially revolutionize our understanding of stars. Through detailed asteroseismic analyses we are capable of determining fundamental stellar parameters and reveal the stellar internal structure with unprecedented accuracy. However, such detailed analyses, known as peak bagging, have so far been obtained for only a small percentage of the observed stars while most of the scientific potential of the available data remains unexplored. One of the major challenges in peak bagging is identifying how many solar-like oscillation modes are visible in a power density spectrum. Identification of oscillation modes is usually done by visual inspection that is time-consuming and has a degree of subjectivity. Here, we present a peak-detection algorithm especially suited for the detection of solar-like oscillations. It reliably characterizes the solar-like oscillations in a power density spectrum and estimates their parameters without human intervention. Furthermore, we provide a metric to characterize the false positive and false negative rates to provide further information about the reliability of a detected oscillation mode or the significance of a lack of detected oscillation modes. The algorithm presented here opens the possibility for detailed and automated peak bagging of the thousands of solar-like oscillators observed by Kepler.

  19. Automated ISS Flight Utilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offermann, Jan Tuzlic

    2016-01-01

    During my internship at NASA Johnson Space Center, I worked in the Space Radiation Analysis Group (SRAG), where I was tasked with a number of projects focused on the automation of tasks and activities related to the operation of the International Space Station (ISS). As I worked on a number of projects, I have written short sections below to give a description for each, followed by more general remarks on the internship experience. My first project is titled "General Exposure Representation EVADOSE", also known as "GEnEVADOSE". This project involved the design and development of a C++/ ROOT framework focused on radiation exposure for extravehicular activity (EVA) planning for the ISS. The utility helps mission managers plan EVAs by displaying information on the cumulative radiation doses that crew will receive during an EVA as a function of the egress time and duration of the activity. SRAG uses a utility called EVADOSE, employing a model of the space radiation environment in low Earth orbit to predict these doses, as while outside the ISS the astronauts will have less shielding from charged particles such as electrons and protons. However, EVADOSE output is cumbersome to work with, and prior to GEnEVADOSE, querying data and producing graphs of ISS trajectories and cumulative doses versus egress time required manual work in Microsoft Excel. GEnEVADOSE automates all this work, reading in EVADOSE output file(s) along with a plaintext file input by the user providing input parameters. GEnEVADOSE will output a text file containing all the necessary dosimetry for each proposed EVA egress time, for each specified EVADOSE file. It also plots cumulative dose versus egress time and the ISS trajectory, and displays all of this information in an auto-generated presentation made in LaTeX. New features have also been added, such as best-case scenarios (egress times corresponding to the least dose), interpolated curves for trajectories, and the ability to query any time in the

  20. Automated Supernova Discovery (Abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, R. S.

    2015-12-01

    (Abstract only) We are developing a system of robotic telescopes for automatic recognition of Supernovas as well as other transient events in collaboration with the Puckett Supernova Search Team. At the SAS2014 meeting, the discovery program, SNARE, was first described. Since then, it has been continuously improved to handle searches under a wide variety of atmospheric conditions. Currently, two telescopes are used to build a reference library while searching for PSN with a partial library. Since data is taken every night without clouds, we must deal with varying atmospheric and high background illumination from the moon. Software is configured to identify a PSN, reshoot for verification with options to change the run plan to acquire photometric or spectrographic data. The telescopes are 24-inch CDK24, with Alta U230 cameras, one in CA and one in NM. Images and run plans are sent between sites so the CA telescope can search while photometry is done in NM. Our goal is to find bright PSNs with magnitude 17.5 or less which is the limit of our planned spectroscopy. We present results from our first automated PSN discoveries and plans for PSN data acquisition.

  1. A LARGE LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY AUTOMATES. WORKFORCE IMPLICATIONS OF COMPUTER CONVERSION. AUTOMATION PROGRAM REPORT, NUMBER 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    CIBARICH, AUGUST L.; AND OTHERS

    THIS WAS ONE OF 20 DEMONSTRATION PROJECTS INITIATED IN 11 STATES IN 1961-63 TO GAIN EXPERIENCE WITH LABOR MARKET PROBLEMS ARISING FROM CHANGING TECHNOLOGY AND MASS LAYOFFS. THE FUNDAMENTAL AIM WAS TO COMBINE ACTION AND RESEARCH TO DEMONSTRATE WHAT THE STATE EMPLOYMENT SERVICE COULD DO IN AREAS WHERE THE LABOR MARKET WAS RAPIDLY CHANGING.…

  2. An Office Automation Needs Assessment Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-08-01

    office automation needs of a Army Hospital. Based on a literature review and interviews with industry experts, a model was developed to assess office automation needs. The model was applied against the needs of the Clinical Support Division. The author identified a need for a strategic plan for Office Automation prior to analysis of a specific service for automaton. He recommended establishment of a Hospital Automation Advisory Council to centralize establish policy recommendations for Office automation

  3. An automation model of Effluent Treatment Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Alberto Oliveira Lima Roque

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Population growth and intensification of industrial activities have increased the deterioration of natural resources. Industrial, hospital and residential wastes are dumped directly into landfills without processing, polluting soils. This action will have consequences later, because the liquid substance resulting from the putrefaction of organic material plows into the soil to reach water bodies. Cities arise without planning, industrial and household wastes are discharged into rivers, lakes and oceans without proper treatment, affecting water resources. It is well known that in the next century there will be fierce competition for fresh water on the planet, probably due to the scarcity of it. Demographic expansion has occurred without proper health planning, degrading oceans, lakes and rivers. Thus, a large percentage of world population suffers from diseases related to water pollution. Accordingly, it can be concluded that sewage treatment is essential to human survival, to preserve rivers, lakes and oceans. An Effluent Treatment Plant (ETP treats wastewater to reduce its pollution to acceptable levels before sending them to the oceans or rivers. To automate the operation of an ETP, motors, sensors and logic blocks, timers and counters are needed. These functions are achieved with programmable logic controllers (PLC and Supervisory Systems. The Ladder language is used to program controllers and is a pillar of the Automation and Control Engineering. The supervisory systems allow process information to be monitored, while the PLC are responsible for control and data acquisition. In the age we live in, process automation is used in an increasing scale in order to provide higher quality, raise productivity and improve the proposed activities. Therefore, an automatic ETP will improve performance and efficiency to handle large volumes of sewage. Considering the growing importance of environmental awareness with special emphasis

  4. Taking action against violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, K

    1996-05-01

    Significant increase in violent crimes in recent years forced Icelandic men to take action against violence. Television was seen as a major contributory factor in increasing violence. Surveys indicate that 10-15 years after television broadcasting commences in a particular society, the incidence of crime can be expected to double. While the majority of the individuals arrested for violent crimes are men, being male does not necessarily mean being violent. The Men's Committee of the Icelandic Equal Rights Council initiated a week-long information and education campaign under the theme "Men Against Violence". This campaign involved several events including an art exhibit, speeches on violence in families, treatment sought by those who are likely to resort to violence, booklet distribution among students in secondary schools, and a mass media campaign to raise public awareness on this pressing problem.

  5. Clinical Chemistry Laboratory Automation in the 21st Century - Amat Victoria curam (Victory loves careful preparation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armbruster, David A; Overcash, David R; Reyes, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    The era of automation arrived with the introduction of the AutoAnalyzer using continuous flow analysis and the Robot Chemist that automated the traditional manual analytical steps. Successive generations of stand-alone analysers increased analytical speed, offered the ability to test high volumes of patient specimens, and provided large assay menus. A dichotomy developed, with a group of analysers devoted to performing routine clinical chemistry tests and another group dedicated to performing immunoassays using a variety of methodologies. Development of integrated systems greatly improved the analytical phase of clinical laboratory testing and further automation was developed for pre-analytical procedures, such as sample identification, sorting, and centrifugation, and post-analytical procedures, such as specimen storage and archiving. All phases of testing were ultimately combined in total laboratory automation (TLA) through which all modules involved are physically linked by some kind of track system, moving samples through the process from beginning-to-end. A newer and very powerful, analytical methodology is liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). LC-MS/MS has been automated but a future automation challenge will be to incorporate LC-MS/MS into TLA configurations. Another important facet of automation is informatics, including middleware, which interfaces the analyser software to a laboratory information systems (LIS) and/or hospital information systems (HIS). This software includes control of the overall operation of a TLA configuration and combines analytical results with patient demographic information to provide additional clinically useful information. This review describes automation relevant to clinical chemistry, but it must be recognised that automation applies to other specialties in the laboratory, e.g. haematology, urinalysis, microbiology. It is a given that automation will continue to evolve in the clinical laboratory

  6. Clinical Chemistry Laboratory Automation in the 21st Century - Amat Victoria curam (Victory loves careful preparation).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armbruster, David A; Overcash, David R; Reyes, Jaime

    2014-08-01

    The era of automation arrived with the introduction of the AutoAnalyzer using continuous flow analysis and the Robot Chemist that automated the traditional manual analytical steps. Successive generations of stand-alone analysers increased analytical speed, offered the ability to test high volumes of patient specimens, and provided large assay menus. A dichotomy developed, with a group of analysers devoted to performing routine clinical chemistry tests and another group dedicated to performing immunoassays using a variety of methodologies. Development of integrated systems greatly improved the analytical phase of clinical laboratory testing and further automation was developed for pre-analytical procedures, such as sample identification, sorting, and centrifugation, and post-analytical procedures, such as specimen storage and archiving. All phases of testing were ultimately combined in total laboratory automation (TLA) through which all modules involved are physically linked by some kind of track system, moving samples through the process from beginning-to-end. A newer and very powerful, analytical methodology is liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). LC-MS/MS has been automated but a future automation challenge will be to incorporate LC-MS/MS into TLA configurations. Another important facet of automation is informatics, including middleware, which interfaces the analyser software to a laboratory information systems (LIS) and/or hospital information systems (HIS). This software includes control of the overall operation of a TLA configuration and combines analytical results with patient demographic information to provide additional clinically useful information. This review describes automation relevant to clinical chemistry, but it must be recognised that automation applies to other specialties in the laboratory, e.g. haematology, urinalysis, microbiology. It is a given that automation will continue to evolve in the clinical laboratory

  7. 77 FR 48527 - National Customs Automation Program (NCAP) Test Concerning Automated Commercial Environment (ACE...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection National Customs Automation... National Customs Automation Program (NCAP) test concerning the simplified entry functionality in the... INFORMATION: Background In General Customs and Border Protection's (CBP's) National Customs Automation Program...

  8. AUTOMATED ANALYSIS OF BREAKERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Farhadzade

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Breakers relate to Electric Power Systems’ equipment, the reliability of which influence, to a great extend, on reliability of Power Plants. In particular, the breakers determine structural reliability of switchgear circuit of Power Stations and network substations. Failure in short-circuit switching off by breaker with further failure of reservation unit or system of long-distance protection lead quite often to system emergency.The problem of breakers’ reliability improvement and the reduction of maintenance expenses is becoming ever more urgent in conditions of systematic increasing of maintenance cost and repair expenses of oil circuit and air-break circuit breakers. The main direction of this problem solution is the improvement of diagnostic control methods and organization of on-condition maintenance. But this demands to use a great amount of statistic information about nameplate data of breakers and their operating conditions, about their failures, testing and repairing, advanced developments (software of computer technologies and specific automated information system (AIS.The new AIS with AISV logo was developed at the department: “Reliability of power equipment” of AzRDSI of Energy. The main features of AISV are:· to provide the security and data base accuracy;· to carry out systematic control of breakers conformity with operating conditions;· to make the estimation of individual  reliability’s value and characteristics of its changing for given combination of characteristics variety;· to provide personnel, who is responsible for technical maintenance of breakers, not only with information but also with methodological support, including recommendations for the given problem solving  and advanced methods for its realization.

  9. Automated ship image acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, T. R.

    2008-04-01

    The experimental Automated Ship Image Acquisition System (ASIA) collects high-resolution ship photographs at a shore-based laboratory, with minimal human intervention. The system uses Automatic Identification System (AIS) data to direct a high-resolution SLR digital camera to ship targets and to identify the ships in the resulting photographs. The photo database is then searchable using the rich data fields from AIS, which include the name, type, call sign and various vessel identification numbers. The high-resolution images from ASIA are intended to provide information that can corroborate AIS reports (e.g., extract identification from the name on the hull) or provide information that has been omitted from the AIS reports (e.g., missing or incorrect hull dimensions, cargo, etc). Once assembled into a searchable image database, the images can be used for a wide variety of marine safety and security applications. This paper documents the author's experience with the practicality of composing photographs based on AIS reports alone, describing a number of ways in which this can go wrong, from errors in the AIS reports, to fixed and mobile obstructions and multiple ships in the shot. The frequency with which various errors occurred in automatically-composed photographs collected in Halifax harbour in winter time were determined by manual examination of the images. 45% of the images examined were considered of a quality sufficient to read identification markings, numbers and text off the entire ship. One of the main technical challenges for ASIA lies in automatically differentiating good and bad photographs, so that few bad ones would be shown to human users. Initial attempts at automatic photo rating showed 75% agreement with manual assessments.

  10. Automated sizing of large structures by mixed optimization methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobieszczanski, J.; Loendorf, D.

    1973-01-01

    A procedure for automating the sizing of wing-fuselage airframes was developed and implemented in the form of an operational program. The program combines fully stressed design to determine an overall material distribution with mass-strength and mathematical programming methods to design structural details accounting for realistic design constraints. The practicality and efficiency of the procedure is demonstrated for transport aircraft configurations. The methodology is sufficiently general to be applicable to other large and complex structures.

  11. Mass screening in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strax, P.

    1977-01-01

    Some questions about mass screening in breast cancer are answered it being concluded that: 1. mass screening for the detection of early breast cancer is the only means with proven potential for lowering the death rate of the disease; 2. mammography is an importante - if not the most important modality in mass screening; 3. new film - screen combinations generally available are capable of producing mammograms of excelent quality with radiation doses down to .1 rad into the body of breast. The risk of malignant changes from such dosage - even when given periodically is negligeable. New equipment, to be available, shortly, will use the new film - screen combinations in an automated manner with must reduce cost in time, filme, personnel and processing - of more than 50%. This would make mass screening more practical. (M.A.) [pt

  12. Nominal Mass?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attygalle, Athula B; Pavlov, Julius

    2017-08-01

    The current IUPAC-recommended definition of the term "nominal mass," based on the most abundant naturally occurring stable isotope of an element, is flawed. We propose that Nominal mass should be defined as the sum of integer masses of protons and neutrons in any chemical species. In this way, all isotopes and isotopologues can be assigned a definitive identifier. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  13. Automated clustering-based workload characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentakalos, Odysseas I.; Menasce, Daniel A.; Yesha, Yelena

    1996-01-01

    The demands placed on the mass storage systems at various federal agencies and national laboratories are continuously increasing in intensity. This forces system managers to constantly monitor the system, evaluate the demand placed on it, and tune it appropriately using either heuristics based on experience or analytic models. Performance models require an accurate workload characterization. This can be a laborious and time consuming process. It became evident from our experience that a tool is necessary to automate the workload characterization process. This paper presents the design and discusses the implementation of a tool for workload characterization of mass storage systems. The main features of the tool discussed here are: (1)Automatic support for peak-period determination. Histograms of system activity are generated and presented to the user for peak-period determination; (2) Automatic clustering analysis. The data collected from the mass storage system logs is clustered using clustering algorithms and tightness measures to limit the number of generated clusters; (3) Reporting of varied file statistics. The tool computes several statistics on file sizes such as average, standard deviation, minimum, maximum, frequency, as well as average transfer time. These statistics are given on a per cluster basis; (4) Portability. The tool can easily be used to characterize the workload in mass storage systems of different vendors. The user needs to specify through a simple log description language how the a specific log should be interpreted. The rest of this paper is organized as follows. Section two presents basic concepts in workload characterization as they apply to mass storage systems. Section three describes clustering algorithms and tightness measures. The following section presents the architecture of the tool. Section five presents some results of workload characterization using the tool.Finally, section six presents some concluding remarks.

  14. Programmable automation systems in PSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulkkinen, U.

    1997-06-01

    The Finnish safety authority (STUK) requires plant specific PSAs, and quantitative safety goals are set on different levels. The reliability analysis is more problematic when critical safety functions are realized by applying programmable automation systems. Conventional modeling techniques do not necessarily apply to the analysis of these systems, and the quantification seems to be impossible. However, it is important to analyze contribution of programmable automation systems to the plant safety and PSA is the only method with system analytical view over the safety. This report discusses the applicability of PSA methodology (fault tree analyses, failure modes and effects analyses) in the analysis of programmable automation systems. The problem of how to decompose programmable automation systems for reliability modeling purposes is discussed. In addition to the qualitative analysis and structural reliability modeling issues, the possibility to evaluate failure probabilities of programmable automation systems is considered. One solution to the quantification issue is the use of expert judgements, and the principles to apply expert judgements is discussed in the paper. A framework to apply expert judgements is outlined. Further, the impacts of subjective estimates on the interpretation of PSA results are discussed. (orig.) (13 refs.)

  15. International Conference Automation : Challenges in Automation, Robotics and Measurement Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Zieliński, Cezary; Kaliczyńska, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    This book presents the set of papers accepted for presentation at the International Conference Automation, held in Warsaw, 2-4 March of 2016. It presents the research results presented by top experts in the fields of industrial automation, control, robotics and measurement techniques. Each chapter presents a thorough analysis of a specific technical problem which is usually followed by numerical analysis, simulation, and description of results of implementation of the solution of a real world problem. The presented theoretical results, practical solutions and guidelines will be valuable for both researchers working in the area of engineering sciences and for practitioners solving industrial problems. .

  16. Mass spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manojlov, V.E.; Nedelin, P.N.; Lukichev, A.N.; Sapozhkov, L.K.; Turubarov, V.I.

    1980-01-01

    Mass spectrometers of different types are suggested to use for qualitative and quantitative analyses of gas. The operation principles of static and dynamic mass spectrometer are studied. In static mass spectrometers mass separation of ions is performed by changing the value of accelerating voltage in the ion source when retaining the magnetic field intensity. Such devices are stationary. The device mass is conditioned by the magnet mass. Mass separation in dynamic mass spectrometers is dependent on the degree of energy increment of ions in HF-electric fields. Radio frequency mass spectrometers are used with advantage for studying upper layers of an atmosphere and are installed on radiosondes and satellites. The main technical characteristics of the MX-1330 mass spectrometer, the basis of which is the analyzer with 180 deg deviation of an ion beam in the field of permanent magnet, are presented. The device is intended for controlling the environment and permits to analyze gases with a molecular mass up to 450 using various systems of gas filling. The error of determination of molecular substance is not greater than +-3 %; the magnetic field intensity constitutes 4.8x10 5 A/m; the supply voltage is 380/220 V; the total power is 5.0 kVA [ru

  17. Significant NRC Enforcement Actions

    Data.gov (United States)

    Nuclear Regulatory Commission — This dataset provides a list of Nuclear Regulartory Commission (NRC) issued significant enforcement actions. These actions, referred to as "escalated", are issued by...

  18. Manual versus automated blood sampling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teilmann, A C; Kalliokoski, Otto; Sørensen, Dorte B

    2014-01-01

    corticosterone metabolites, and expressed more anxious behavior than did the mice of the other groups. Plasma corticosterone levels of mice subjected to tail blood sampling were also elevated, although less significantly. Mice subjected to automated blood sampling were less affected with regard to the parameters......Facial vein (cheek blood) and caudal vein (tail blood) phlebotomy are two commonly used techniques for obtaining blood samples from laboratory mice, while automated blood sampling through a permanent catheter is a relatively new technique in mice. The present study compared physiological parameters......, glucocorticoid dynamics as well as the behavior of mice sampled repeatedly for 24 h by cheek blood, tail blood or automated blood sampling from the carotid artery. Mice subjected to cheek blood sampling lost significantly more body weight, had elevated levels of plasma corticosterone, excreted more fecal...

  19. Computer automation and artificial intelligence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasnain, S.B.

    1992-01-01

    Rapid advances in computing, resulting from micro chip revolution has increased its application manifold particularly for computer automation. Yet the level of automation available, has limited its application to more complex and dynamic systems which require an intelligent computer control. In this paper a review of Artificial intelligence techniques used to augment automation is presented. The current sequential processing approach usually adopted in artificial intelligence has succeeded in emulating the symbolic processing part of intelligence, but the processing power required to get more elusive aspects of intelligence leads towards parallel processing. An overview of parallel processing with emphasis on transputer is also provided. A Fuzzy knowledge based controller for amination drug delivery in muscle relaxant anesthesia on transputer is described. 4 figs. (author)

  20. Visual automated macromolecular model building.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Gerrit G; Hazledine, Saul; Wiegels, Tim; Carolan, Ciaran; Lamzin, Victor S

    2013-04-01

    Automated model-building software aims at the objective interpretation of crystallographic diffraction data by means of the construction or completion of macromolecular models. Automated methods have rapidly gained in popularity as they are easy to use and generate reproducible and consistent results. However, the process of model building has become increasingly hidden and the user is often left to decide on how to proceed further with little feedback on what has preceded the output of the built model. Here, ArpNavigator, a molecular viewer tightly integrated into the ARP/wARP automated model-building package, is presented that directly controls model building and displays the evolving output in real time in order to make the procedure transparent to the user.

  1. Unmet needs in automated cytogenetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, M.A.

    1976-01-01

    Though some, at least, of the goals of automation systems for analysis of clinical cytogenetic material seem either at hand, like automatic metaphase finding, or at least likely to be met in the near future, like operator-assisted semi-automatic analysis of banded metaphase spreads, important areas of cytogenetic analsis, most importantly the determination of chromosomal aberration frequencies in populations of cells or in samples of cells from people exposed to environmental mutagens, await practical methods of automation. Important as are the clinical diagnostic applications, it is apparent that increasing concern over the clastogenic effects of the multitude of potentially clastogenic chemical and physical agents to which human populations are being increasingly exposed, and the resulting emergence of extensive cytogenetic testing protocols, makes the development of automation not only economically feasible but almost mandatory. The nature of the problems involved, and acutal of possible approaches to their solution, are discussed

  2. Automated cell type discovery and classification through knowledge transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hao-Chih; Kosoy, Roman; Becker, Christine E; Dudley, Joel T; Kidd, Brian A

    2017-06-01

    Recent advances in mass cytometry allow simultaneous measurements of up to 50 markers at single-cell resolution. However, the high dimensionality of mass cytometry data introduces computational challenges for automated data analysis and hinders translation of new biological understanding into clinical applications. Previous studies have applied machine learning to facilitate processing of mass cytometry data. However, manual inspection is still inevitable and becoming the barrier to reliable large-scale analysis. We present a new algorithm called utomated ell-type iscovery and lassification (ACDC) that fully automates the classification of canonical cell populations and highlights novel cell types in mass cytometry data. Evaluations on real-world data show ACDC provides accurate and reliable estimations compared to manual gating results. Additionally, ACDC automatically classifies previously ambiguous cell types to facilitate discovery. Our findings suggest that ACDC substantially improves both reliability and interpretability of results obtained from high-dimensional mass cytometry profiling data. A Python package (Python 3) and analysis scripts for reproducing the results are availability on https://bitbucket.org/dudleylab/acdc . brian.kidd@mssm.edu or joel.dudley@mssm.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  3. Toward designing for trust in database automation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duez, P. P.; Jamieson, G. A.

    2006-01-01

    Appropriate reliance on system automation is imperative for safe and productive work, especially in safety-critical systems. It is unsafe to rely on automation beyond its designed use; conversely, it can be both unproductive and unsafe to manually perform tasks that are better relegated to automated tools. Operator trust in automated tools mediates reliance, and trust appears to affect how operators use technology. As automated agents become more complex, the question of trust in automation is increasingly important. In order to achieve proper use of automation, we must engender an appropriate degree of trust that is sensitive to changes in operating functions and context. In this paper, we present research concerning trust in automation in the domain of automated tools for relational databases. Lee and See have provided models of trust in automation. One model developed by Lee and See identifies three key categories of information about the automation that lie along a continuum of attributional abstraction. Purpose-, process-and performance-related information serve, both individually and through inferences between them, to describe automation in such a way as to engender r properly-calibrated trust. Thus, one can look at information from different levels of attributional abstraction as a general requirements analysis for information key to appropriate trust in automation. The model of information necessary to engender appropriate trust in automation [1] is a general one. Although it describes categories of information, it does not provide insight on how to determine the specific information elements required for a given automated tool. We have applied the Abstraction Hierarchy (AH) to this problem in the domain of relational databases. The AH serves as a formal description of the automation at several levels of abstraction, ranging from a very abstract purpose-oriented description to a more concrete description of the resources involved in the automated process

  4. Design automation, languages, and simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Wai-Kai

    2003-01-01

    As the complexity of electronic systems continues to increase, the micro-electronic industry depends upon automation and simulations to adapt quickly to market changes and new technologies. Compiled from chapters contributed to CRC's best-selling VLSI Handbook, this volume covers a broad range of topics relevant to design automation, languages, and simulations. These include a collaborative framework that coordinates distributed design activities through the Internet, an overview of the Verilog hardware description language and its use in a design environment, hardware/software co-design, syst

  5. Status of automated tensile machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satou, M.; Hamilton, M.L.; Sato, S.; Kohyama, A.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this work is to develop the Monbusho Automated Tensile machine (MATRON) and install and operate it at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The machine is designed to provide rapid, automated testing of irradiated miniature tensile specimen in a vacuum at elevated temperatures. The MATRON was successfully developed and shipped to PNL for installation in a hot facility. The original installation plan was modified to simplify the current and subsequent installations, and the installation was completed. Detailed procedures governing the operation of the system were written. Testing on irradiated miniature tensile specimen should begin in the near future

  6. Computer automation in veterinary hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, H

    1996-05-01

    Computers have been used to automate complex and repetitive tasks in veterinary hospitals since the 1960s. Early systems were expensive, but their use was justified because they performed jobs which would have been impossible or which would have required greater resources in terms of time and personnel had they been performed by other methods. Systems found in most veterinary hospitals today are less costly, magnitudes more capable, and often underused. Modern multitasking operating systems and graphical interfaces bring many opportunities for automation. Commercial and custom programs developed and used in a typical multidoctor mixed species veterinary practice are described.

  7. Automated fabrication of reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyman, D.H.; McLemore, D.R.; Bennett, D.W.; Yatabe, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    The development of Secure Automated Fabrication (SAF) methods is the goal of the United States breeder reactor program and will form the technological basis for the future breeder reactor fuel supply. A major factor in achieving this goal is the development of remotely operated fuel fabrication equipment. The unit operations are being designed for microprocessor control connected to a central control center. The program schedule is to demonstrate the feasibility of automated pellet fuel fabrication and remote maintenance techniques by the mid-1980's. Development of major ceramic unit operations and the required computer control system is currently in the engineering testing stage

  8. 2013 Chinese Intelligent Automation Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Deng, Zhidong

    2013-01-01

    Proceedings of the 2013 Chinese Intelligent Automation Conference presents selected research papers from the CIAC’13, held in Yangzhou, China. The topics include e.g. adaptive control, fuzzy control, neural network based control, knowledge based control, hybrid intelligent control, learning control, evolutionary mechanism based control, multi-sensor integration, failure diagnosis, and reconfigurable control. Engineers and researchers from academia, industry, and government can gain an inside view of new solutions combining ideas from multiple disciplines in the field of intelligent automation.   Zengqi Sun and Zhidong Deng are professors at the Department of Computer Science, Tsinghua University, China.

  9. 2013 Chinese Intelligent Automation Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Deng, Zhidong

    2013-01-01

    Proceedings of the 2013 Chinese Intelligent Automation Conference presents selected research papers from the CIAC’13, held in Yangzhou, China. The topics include e.g. adaptive control, fuzzy control, neural network based control, knowledge based control, hybrid intelligent control, learning control, evolutionary mechanism based control, multi-sensor integration, failure diagnosis, and reconfigurable control. Engineers and researchers from academia, industry, and government can gain an inside view of new solutions combining ideas from multiple disciplines in the field of intelligent automation. Zengqi Sun and Zhidong Deng are professors at the Department of Computer Science, Tsinghua University, China.

  10. Automated Podcasting System for Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ypatios Grigoriadis

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results achieved at Graz University of Technology (TU Graz in the field of automating the process of recording and publishing university lectures in a very new way. It outlines cornerstones of the development and integration of an automated recording system such as the lecture hall setup, the recording hardware and software architecture as well as the development of a text-based search for the final product by method of indexing video podcasts. Furthermore, the paper takes a look at didactical aspects, evaluations done in this context and future outlook.

  11. Automated emergency operating procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Ramirez, G.; Nelson, P.F.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a training tool for the symptom oriented emergency operating procedures used at the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant. EOPs and operator training are intended to assist the operator for managing accident situations. A prototype expert system based on the EOPs has been developed for operator training. The demonstration expert system was developed using a commercial shell. The knowledge base consists of two parts. The specific operator actions to be executed for 5 selected accident sequences and the EOPs steps for the reactor pressure vessel control of the water level, pressure, and power. The knowledge is expressed in the form of IF-THEN production rules. A typical training session will display a set of conditions and will prompt the trainee to indicate the appropriate step to perform. This mode will guide the trainee through selected accident sequences. A second mode of the expert system will prompt the trainee for the current plant conditions and the expert system will respond with the EOPs which are required to be performed under these conditions. This allows the trainee to study What if situations

  12. Wireless Home Automation System using IoT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra MIHALACHE

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the chance of having an automated home is no longer a fancy luxury, but a reality accessible to a wide range of consumers, because smart home systems have replaced those that only automated the home in the past. More and more solutions based on IoT are being devel-oped to transform homes into smart ones, but the problem is that the benefits of home automa-tion are still not clear to everyone as they are not promoted enough, so we cannot talk about a broad mass of consumers already using integrated or DIY solutions to improve their lives. In this paper, I will present a home automation system using Arduino Uno integrated with rele-vant modules which are used to allow remote control of lights or fans, changes being made on the basis of different sensors data. The system is designed to be low cost and expandable, bring-ing accessibility, convenience and energy efficiency.

  13. Automated NFC enabled rural healthcare for reliable patient record maintainance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethia, Divyashikha; Jain, Shantanu; Kakkar, Himadri

    2012-01-01

    Body sensor networks can be used for health monitoring of patients by expert medical doctors, in remote locations like rural areas in developing countries, and can also be used to provide medical aid to areas affected by natural disasters in any part of the world. An important issue to be addressed, when the number of patients is large, is to reliably maintain the patient records and have simple automated mobile applications for healthcare helpers to use. We propose an automated healthcare architecture using NFC-enabled mobile phones and patients having their patient ID on RFID tags. It utilizes NFC-enabled mobile phones to read the patient ID, followed by automated gathering of healthcare vital parameters from body sensors using Bluetooth, analyses the information and transmits it to a medical server for expert feedback. With limited hospital resources and less training requirement for healthcare helpers through simpler applications, this automation of healthcare processing can provide time effective and reliable mass health consultation from medical experts in remote locations.

  14. Automated structural classification of lipids by machine learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Ryan; Miller, Ryan H; Miller, Ryan D; Porter, Michael; Dalgleish, James; Prince, John T

    2015-03-01

    Modern lipidomics is largely dependent upon structural ontologies because of the great diversity exhibited in the lipidome, but no automated lipid classification exists to facilitate this partitioning. The size of the putative lipidome far exceeds the number currently classified, despite a decade of work. Automated classification would benefit ongoing classification efforts by decreasing the time needed and increasing the accuracy of classification while providing classifications for mass spectral identification algorithms. We introduce a tool that automates classification into the LIPID MAPS ontology of known lipids with >95% accuracy and novel lipids with 63% accuracy. The classification is based upon simple chemical characteristics and modern machine learning algorithms. The decision trees produced are intelligible and can be used to clarify implicit assumptions about the current LIPID MAPS classification scheme. These characteristics and decision trees are made available to facilitate alternative implementations. We also discovered many hundreds of lipids that are currently misclassified in the LIPID MAPS database, strongly underscoring the need for automated classification. Source code and chemical characteristic lists as SMARTS search strings are available under an open-source license at https://www.github.com/princelab/lipid_classifier. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Neutrino mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, R.G.H.

    1992-01-01

    Despite intensive experimental work since the neutrino's existence was proposed by Pauli 60 years ago, and its first observation by Reines and Cowan almost 40 years ago, the neutrino's fundamental properties remain elusive. Among those properties are the masses of the three known flavors, properties under charge conjugation, parity and time-reversal, and static and dynamic electromagnetic moments. Mass is perhaps the most fundamental, as it constrains the other properties. The present status of the search for neutrino mass is briefly reviewed

  16. Automated Ply Inspection (API) for AFP Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Automated Ply Inspection (API) system autonomously inspects layups created by high speed automated fiber placement (AFP) machines. API comprises a high accuracy...

  17. Understanding human management of automation errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Sara E.; Rogers, Wendy A.; Fisk, Arthur D.

    2013-01-01

    Automation has the potential to aid humans with a diverse set of tasks and support overall system performance. Automated systems are not always reliable, and when automation errs, humans must engage in error management, which is the process of detecting, understanding, and correcting errors. However, this process of error management in the context of human-automation interaction is not well understood. Therefore, we conducted a systematic review of the variables that contribute to error management. We examined relevant research in human-automation interaction and human error to identify critical automation, person, task, and emergent variables. We propose a framework for management of automation errors to incorporate and build upon previous models. Further, our analysis highlights variables that may be addressed through design and training to positively influence error management. Additional efforts to understand the error management process will contribute to automation designed and implemented to support safe and effective system performance. PMID:25383042

  18. Selected Information Resources on Library Automation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Library of Congress, Washington, DC. National Referral Center for Science and Technology.

    Organizations which provide information on library automation are listed with a brief annotation of the type of information or service available from each organization. This is followed by a short bibliography of selected publications on library automation. (NH)

  19. Logistic control in automated transportation networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ebben, Mark

    2001-01-01

    Increasing congestion problems lead to a search for alternative transportation systems. Automated transportation networks, possibly underground, are an option. Logistic control systems are essential for future implementations of such automated transportation networks. This book contributes to the

  20. Future Autonomous and Automated Systems Testbed

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Trust is the greatest obstacle to implementing greater autonomy and automation (A&A) in the human spaceflight program. The Future Autonomous and Automated...

  1. MASS SPECTROMETER

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, F.A.

    1960-08-23

    A mass spectrometer is designed with a first adjustable magnetic field for resolving an ion beam into beams of selected masses, a second adjustable magnetic field for further resolving the ion beam from the first field into beams of selected masses, a thin foil disposed in the path of the beam between the first and second magnets to dissociate molecular ions incident thereon, an electrostatic field for further resolving the ion beam from the second field into beams of selected masses, and a detector disposed adjacent to the electrostatic field to receive the ion beam.

  2. Team play with a powerful and independent agent: operational experiences and automation surprises on the Airbus A-320

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarter, N. B.; Woods, D. D.

    1997-01-01

    Research and operational experience have shown that one of the major problems with pilot-automation interaction is a lack of mode awareness (i.e., the current and future status and behavior of the automation). As a result, pilots sometimes experience so-called automation surprises when the automation takes an unexpected action or fails to behave as anticipated. A lack of mode awareness and automation surprises can he viewed as symptoms of a mismatch between human and machine properties and capabilities. Changes in automation design can therefore he expected to affect the likelihood and nature of problems encountered by pilots. Previous studies have focused exclusively on early generation "glass cockpit" aircraft that were designed based on a similar automation philosophy. To find out whether similar difficulties with maintaining mode awareness are encountered on more advanced aircraft, a corpus of automation surprises was gathered from pilots of the Airbus A-320, an aircraft characterized by high levels of autonomy, authority, and complexity. To understand the underlying reasons for reported breakdowns in human-automation coordination, we also asked pilots about their monitoring strategies and their experiences with and attitude toward the unique design of flight controls on this aircraft.

  3. Hybrid Action Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rönnkö, M.; Ravn, Anders Peter; Sere, K.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the use of action systems with differential actions in the specifcation of hybrid systems. As the main contribution we generalize the definition of a differential action, allowing the use of arbitrary relations over model variables and their time-derivatives in modell......In this paper we investigate the use of action systems with differential actions in the specifcation of hybrid systems. As the main contribution we generalize the definition of a differential action, allowing the use of arbitrary relations over model variables and their time...... to the differential action, thus, allowing stepwise development of hybrid systems Udgivelsesdato: JAN 1...

  4. Ask the experts: automation: part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allinson, John L; Blick, Kenneth E; Cohen, Lucinda; Higton, David; Li, Ming

    2013-08-01

    Bioanalysis invited a selection of leading researchers to express their views on automation in the bioanalytical laboratory. The topics discussed include the challenges that the modern bioanalyst faces when integrating automation into existing drug-development processes, the impact of automation and how they envision the modern bioanalytical laboratory changing in the near future. Their enlightening responses provide a valuable insight into the impact of automation and the future of the constantly evolving bioanalytical laboratory.

  5. 76 FR 34246 - Automated Commercial Environment (ACE); Announcement of National Customs Automation Program Test...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-13

    ... Environment (ACE); Announcement of National Customs Automation Program Test of Automated Procedures for In... Customs Automation Program (NCAP) test relating to highway movements of commercial goods that are... Automation Program (NCAP) was established in Subtitle B of Title VI--Customs Modernization, in the North...

  6. 75 FR 64737 - Automated Commercial Environment (ACE): Announcement of a National Customs Automation Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-20

    ... Environment (ACE): Announcement of a National Customs Automation Program Test of Automated Manifest... Automation Program test concerning the transmission of required advance ocean and rail data through the... Automation Program (NCAP) was established in Subtitle B of Title VI--Customs Modernization, in the North...

  7. Cognitive Approaches to Automated Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regian, J. Wesley, Ed.; Shute, Valerie J., Ed.

    This book contains a snapshot of state-of-the-art research on the design of automated instructional systems. Selected cognitive psychologists were asked to describe their approach to instruction and cognitive diagnosis, the theoretical basis of the approach, its utility and applicability, and the knowledge engineering or task analysis methods…

  8. An automated activation analysis system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minor, M.M.; Hensley, W.K.; Denton, M.M.; Garcia, S.R.

    1982-01-01

    An automated delayed neutron counting and instrumental neutron activation analysis system has been developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory's Omega West Reactor (OWR) to analyze samples for uranium and 31 additional elements with a maximum throughput of 400 samples per day. The system and its mode of operation for a large reconnaissance survey will be described. (author)

  9. Automated ultrasonic inspection using PULSDAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naybour, P.J.

    1992-01-01

    PULSDAT (Portable Ultrasonic Data Acquisition Tool) is a system for recording the data from single probe automated ultrasonic inspections. It is one of a range of instruments and software developed by Nuclear Electric to carry out a wide variety of high quality ultrasonic inspections. These vary from simple semi-automated inspections through to multi-probe, highly automated ones. PULSDAT runs under the control of MIPS software, and collects data which is compatible with the GUIDE data display system. PULSDAT is therefore fully compatible with Nuclear Electric's multi-probe inspection systems and utilises all the reliability and quality assurance of the software. It is a rugged, portable system that can be used in areas of difficult access. The paper discusses the benefits of automated inspection and gives an outline of the main features of PULSDAT. Since April 1990 PULSDAT has been used in several applications within Nuclear Electric and this paper presents two examples: the first is a ferritic set-through nozzle and the second is an austenitic fillet weld. (Author)

  10. Automation of Space Inventory Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Patrick W.; Ngo, Phong; Wagner, Raymond; Barton, Richard; Gifford, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the utilization of automated space-based inventory management through handheld RFID readers and BioNet Middleware. The contents include: 1) Space-Based INventory Management; 2) Real-Time RFID Location and Tracking; 3) Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) RFID; and 4) BioNet Middleware.

  11. AUTOMATING ASSET KNOWLEDGE WITH MTCONNECT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh, Sid; Ly, Sidney; Manning, Martin; Michaloski, John; Proctor, Fred

    2016-01-01

    In order to maximize assets, manufacturers should use real-time knowledge garnered from ongoing and continuous collection and evaluation of factory-floor machine status data. In discrete parts manufacturing, factory machine monitoring has been difficult, due primarily to closed, proprietary automation equipment that make integration difficult. Recently, there has been a push in applying the data acquisition concepts of MTConnect to the real-time acquisition of machine status data. MTConnect is an open, free specification aimed at overcoming the "Islands of Automation" dilemma on the shop floor. With automated asset analysis, manufacturers can improve production to become lean, efficient, and effective. The focus of this paper will be on the deployment of MTConnect to collect real-time machine status to automate asset management. In addition, we will leverage the ISO 22400 standard, which defines an asset and quantifies asset performance metrics. In conjunction with these goals, the deployment of MTConnect in a large aerospace manufacturing facility will be studied with emphasis on asset management and understanding the impact of machine Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE) on manufacturing.

  12. Automated Behavior Property Verification Tool

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Leo, John K

    2008-01-01

    .... A type of CGF in which the entities have limited autonomy is semi-automated forces (SAF). The SAF system for this thesis research is OneSAF, a near real-time SAF that offers raw data collection of the entities in a particular simulation scenario...

  13. Automation, Labor Productivity and Employment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kromann, Lene; Rose Skaksen, Jan; Sørensen, Anders

    CEBR fremlægger nu den første rapport i AIM-projektet. Rapporten viser, at der er gode muligheder for yderligere automation i en stor del af de danske fremstillingsvirksomheder. For i dag er gennemsnitligt kun omkring 30 % af virksomhedernes produktionsprocesser automatiserede. Navnlig procesområ...

  14. Adaptation : A Partially Automated Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manjing, Tham; Bukhsh, F.A.; Weigand, H.

    2014-01-01

    This paper showcases the possibility of creating an adaptive auditing system. Adaptation in an audit environment need human intervention at some point. Based on a case study this paper focuses on automation of adaptation process. It is divided into solution design and validation parts. The artifact

  15. Automation; The New Industrial Revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnstein, George E.

    Automation is a word that describes the workings of computers and the innovations of automatic transfer machines in the factory. As the hallmark of the new industrial revolution, computers displace workers and create a need for new skills and retraining programs. With improved communication between industry and the educational community to…

  16. Designing automated handheld navigation support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uluca, D.; Streefkerk, J.W.; Sciacchitano, B.; McCrickard, D.S.

    2008-01-01

    Map usage on handheld devices suffers from limited screen size and the minimal attention that users can dedicate to them in mobile situations. This work examines effects of automating navigation features like zooming and panning as well as other features such as rotation, path finding and artifact

  17. Automated activation-analysis system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minor, M.M.; Hensley, W.K.; Denton, M.M.; Garcia, S.R.

    1981-01-01

    An automated delayed neutron counting and instrumental neutron activation analysis system has been developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory's Omega West Reactor (OWR) to analyze samples for uranium and 31 additional elements with a maximum throughput of 400 samples per day. The system and its mode of operation for a large reconnaissance survey are described

  18. CCD characterization and measurements automation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kotov, I.V.; Frank, J.; Kotov, A.I.; Kubánek, Petr; O´Connor, P.; Prouza, Michael; Radeka, V.; Takacs, P.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 695, Dec (2012), 188-192 ISSN 0168-9002 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME09052 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : CCD * characterization * test automation Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 1.142, year: 2012

  19. Algorithms for VLSI Design Automation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerez, Sabih H.

    1998-01-01

    Modern microprocessors such as Intel's Pentium chip typically contain many millions of transistors. They are known generically as Very Large-Scale Integrated (VLSI) systems, and their sheer scale and complexity has necessitated the development of CAD tools to automate their design. This book focuses

  20. Automated activation-analysis system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minor, M.M.; Garcia, S.R.; Denton, M.M.

    1982-01-01

    An automated delayed neutron counting and instrumental neutron activation analysis system has been developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory's Omega West Reactor (OWR) to analyze samples for uranium and 31 additional elements with a maximum throughput of 400 samples per day