WorldWideScience

Sample records for automated image analysis1woa

  1. Automated ship image acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, T. R.

    2008-04-01

    The experimental Automated Ship Image Acquisition System (ASIA) collects high-resolution ship photographs at a shore-based laboratory, with minimal human intervention. The system uses Automatic Identification System (AIS) data to direct a high-resolution SLR digital camera to ship targets and to identify the ships in the resulting photographs. The photo database is then searchable using the rich data fields from AIS, which include the name, type, call sign and various vessel identification numbers. The high-resolution images from ASIA are intended to provide information that can corroborate AIS reports (e.g., extract identification from the name on the hull) or provide information that has been omitted from the AIS reports (e.g., missing or incorrect hull dimensions, cargo, etc). Once assembled into a searchable image database, the images can be used for a wide variety of marine safety and security applications. This paper documents the author's experience with the practicality of composing photographs based on AIS reports alone, describing a number of ways in which this can go wrong, from errors in the AIS reports, to fixed and mobile obstructions and multiple ships in the shot. The frequency with which various errors occurred in automatically-composed photographs collected in Halifax harbour in winter time were determined by manual examination of the images. 45% of the images examined were considered of a quality sufficient to read identification markings, numbers and text off the entire ship. One of the main technical challenges for ASIA lies in automatically differentiating good and bad photographs, so that few bad ones would be shown to human users. Initial attempts at automatic photo rating showed 75% agreement with manual assessments.

  2. Automating Shallow Seismic Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steeples, Don W.

    2004-12-09

    This seven-year, shallow-seismic reflection research project had the aim of improving geophysical imaging of possible contaminant flow paths. Thousands of chemically contaminated sites exist in the United States, including at least 3,700 at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Imaging technologies such as shallow seismic reflection (SSR) and ground-penetrating radar (GPR) sometimes are capable of identifying geologic conditions that might indicate preferential contaminant-flow paths. Historically, SSR has been used very little at depths shallower than 30 m, and even more rarely at depths of 10 m or less. Conversely, GPR is rarely useful at depths greater than 10 m, especially in areas where clay or other electrically conductive materials are present near the surface. Efforts to image the cone of depression around a pumping well using seismic methods were only partially successful (for complete references of all research results, see the full Final Technical Report, DOE/ER/14826-F), but peripheral results included development of SSR methods for depths shallower than one meter, a depth range that had not been achieved before. Imaging at such shallow depths, however, requires geophone intervals of the order of 10 cm or less, which makes such surveys very expensive in terms of human time and effort. We also showed that SSR and GPR could be used in a complementary fashion to image the same volume of earth at very shallow depths. The primary research focus of the second three-year period of funding was to develop and demonstrate an automated method of conducting two-dimensional (2D) shallow-seismic surveys with the goal of saving time, effort, and money. Tests involving the second generation of the hydraulic geophone-planting device dubbed the ''Autojuggie'' showed that large numbers of geophones can be placed quickly and automatically and can acquire high-quality data, although not under rough topographic conditions. In some easy

  3. Automated Orientation of Aerial Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høhle, Joachim

    2002-01-01

    Methods for automated orientation of aerial images are presented. They are based on the use of templates, which are derived from existing databases, and area-based matching. The characteristics of available database information and the accuracy requirements for map compilation and orthoimage...... production are discussed on the example of Denmark. Details on the developed methods for interior and exterior orientation are described. Practical examples like the measurement of réseau images, updating of topographic databases and renewal of orthoimages are used to prove the feasibility of the developed...

  4. An automated imaging system for radiation biodosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garty, Guy; Bigelow, Alan W; Repin, Mikhail; Turner, Helen C; Bian, Dakai; Balajee, Adayabalam S; Lyulko, Oleksandra V; Taveras, Maria; Yao, Y Lawrence; Brenner, David J

    2015-07-01

    We describe here an automated imaging system developed at the Center for High Throughput Minimally Invasive Radiation Biodosimetry. The imaging system is built around a fast, sensitive sCMOS camera and rapid switchable LED light source. It features complete automation of all the steps of the imaging process and contains built-in feedback loops to ensure proper operation. The imaging system is intended as a back end to the RABiT-a robotic platform for radiation biodosimetry. It is intended to automate image acquisition and analysis for four biodosimetry assays for which we have developed automated protocols: The Cytokinesis Blocked Micronucleus assay, the γ-H2AX assay, the Dicentric assay (using PNA or FISH probes) and the RABiT-BAND assay. PMID:25939519

  5. Automated image enhancement using power law transformations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S P Vimal; P K Thiruvikraman

    2012-12-01

    We propose a scheme for automating power law transformations which are used for image enhancement. The scheme we propose does not require the user to choose the exponent in the power law transformation. This method works well for images having poor contrast, especially to those images in which the peaks corresponding to the background and the foreground are not widely separated.

  6. Close Clustering Based Automated Color Image Annotation

    CERN Document Server

    Garg, Ankit; Asawa, Krishna

    2010-01-01

    Most image-search approaches today are based on the text based tags associated with the images which are mostly human generated and are subject to various kinds of errors. The results of a query to the image database thus can often be misleading and may not satisfy the requirements of the user. In this work we propose our approach to automate this tagging process of images, where image results generated can be fine filtered based on a probabilistic tagging mechanism. We implement a tool which helps to automate the tagging process by maintaining a training database, wherein the system is trained to identify certain set of input images, the results generated from which are used to create a probabilistic tagging mechanism. Given a certain set of segments in an image it calculates the probability of presence of particular keywords. This probability table is further used to generate the candidate tags for input images.

  7. Radiographic examination takes on an automated image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Automation can be effectively applied to nondestructive testing (NDT). Until recently, film radiography used in NDT was largely a manual process, involving the shooting of a series of x-rays, manually positioned and manually processed. In other words, much radiographic work is being done the way it was over 50 years ago. Significant advances in automation have changed the face of manufacturing, and industry has shared in the benefits brought by such progress. The handling of parts, which was once responsible for a large measure of labor costs, is now assigned to robotic equipment. In nondestructive testing processes, some progress has been achieved in automation - for example, in real-time imaging systems. However, only recently have truly automated NDT begun to emerge. There are two major reasons to introduce automation into NDT - reliability and productivity. Any process or technique that can improve the reliability of parts testing could easily justify the capital investments required

  8. Close Clustering Based Automated Color Image Annotation

    OpenAIRE

    Garg, Ankit; Dwivedi, Rahul; Asawa, Krishna

    2010-01-01

    Most image-search approaches today are based on the text based tags associated with the images which are mostly human generated and are subject to various kinds of errors. The results of a query to the image database thus can often be misleading and may not satisfy the requirements of the user. In this work we propose our approach to automate this tagging process of images, where image results generated can be fine filtered based on a probabilistic tagging mechanism. We implement a tool which...

  9. Automated Functional Analysis in Dynamic Medical Imaging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tichý, Ondřej

    Praha : Katedra matematiky, FSv ČVUT v Praze, 2012, s. 19-20. [Aplikovaná matematika – Rektorysova soutěž. Praha (CZ), 07.12.2012] Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Factor Analysis * Dynamic Sequence * Scintigraphy Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2012/AS/tichy-automated functional analysis in dynamic medical imaging.pdf

  10. Automated image analysis of uterine cervical images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenjing; Gu, Jia; Ferris, Daron; Poirson, Allen

    2007-03-01

    Cervical Cancer is the second most common cancer among women worldwide and the leading cause of cancer mortality of women in developing countries. If detected early and treated adequately, cervical cancer can be virtually prevented. Cervical precursor lesions and invasive cancer exhibit certain morphologic features that can be identified during a visual inspection exam. Digital imaging technologies allow us to assist the physician with a Computer-Aided Diagnosis (CAD) system. In colposcopy, epithelium that turns white after application of acetic acid is called acetowhite epithelium. Acetowhite epithelium is one of the major diagnostic features observed in detecting cancer and pre-cancerous regions. Automatic extraction of acetowhite regions from cervical images has been a challenging task due to specular reflection, various illumination conditions, and most importantly, large intra-patient variation. This paper presents a multi-step acetowhite region detection system to analyze the acetowhite lesions in cervical images automatically. First, the system calibrates the color of the cervical images to be independent of screening devices. Second, the anatomy of the uterine cervix is analyzed in terms of cervix region, external os region, columnar region, and squamous region. Third, the squamous region is further analyzed and subregions based on three levels of acetowhite are identified. The extracted acetowhite regions are accompanied by color scores to indicate the different levels of acetowhite. The system has been evaluated by 40 human subjects' data and demonstrates high correlation with experts' annotations.

  11. Automated image segmentation using information theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Our development of automated contouring of CT images for RT planning is based on maximum a posteriori (MAP) analyses of region textures, edges, and prior shapes, and assumes stationary Gaussian distributions for voxel textures and contour shapes. Since models may not accurately represent image data, it would be advantageous to compute inferences without relying on models. The relative entropy (RE) from information theory can generate inferences based solely on the similarity of probability distributions. The entropy of a distribution of a random variable X is defined as -Σx p(x)log2p(x) for all the values x which X may assume. The RE (Kullback-Liebler divergence) of two distributions p(X), q(X), over X is Σx p(x)log2{p(x)/q(x)}. The RE is a kind of 'distance' between p,q, equaling zero when p=q and increasing as p,q are more different. Minimum-error MAP and likelihood ratio decision rules have RE equivalents: minimum error decisions obtain with functions of the differences between REs of compared distributions. One applied result is the contour ideally separating two regions is that which maximizes the relative entropy of the two regions' intensities. A program was developed that automatically contours the outlines of patients in stereotactic headframes, a situation most often requiring manual drawing. The relative entropy of intensities inside the contour (patient) versus outside (background) was maximized by conjugate gradient descent over the space of parameters of a deformable contour. shows the computed segmentation of a patient from headframe backgrounds. This program is particularly useful for preparing images for multimodal image fusion. Relative entropy and allied measures of distribution similarity provide automated contouring criteria that do not depend on statistical models of image data. This approach should have wide utility in medical image segmentation applications. Copyright (2001) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and

  12. Automated Quality Assurance Applied to Mammographic Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Davis

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Quality control in mammography is based upon subjective interpretation of the image quality of a test phantom. In order to suppress subjectivity due to the human observer, automated computer analysis of the Leeds TOR(MAM test phantom is investigated. Texture analysis via grey-level co-occurrence matrices is used to detect structures in the test object. Scoring of the substructures in the phantom is based on grey-level differences between regions and information from grey-level co-occurrence matrices. The results from scoring groups of particles within the phantom are presented.

  13. Computerized Station For Semi-Automated Testing Image Intensifier Tubes

    OpenAIRE

    Chrzanowski Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Testing of image intensifier tubes is still done using mostly manual methods due to a series of both technical and legal problems with test automation. Computerized stations for semi-automated testing of IITs are considered as novelty and are under continuous improvements. This paper presents a novel test station that enables semi-automated measurement of image intensifier tubes. Wide test capabilities and advanced design solutions rise the developed test station significantly above the curre...

  14. Automated quantitative image analysis of nanoparticle assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Chaitanya R.; Gao, Bo; Tao, Andrea R.; Arya, Gaurav

    2015-05-01

    The ability to characterize higher-order structures formed by nanoparticle (NP) assembly is critical for predicting and engineering the properties of advanced nanocomposite materials. Here we develop a quantitative image analysis software to characterize key structural properties of NP clusters from experimental images of nanocomposites. This analysis can be carried out on images captured at intermittent times during assembly to monitor the time evolution of NP clusters in a highly automated manner. The software outputs averages and distributions in the size, radius of gyration, fractal dimension, backbone length, end-to-end distance, anisotropic ratio, and aspect ratio of NP clusters as a function of time along with bootstrapped error bounds for all calculated properties. The polydispersity in the NP building blocks and biases in the sampling of NP clusters are accounted for through the use of probabilistic weights. This software, named Particle Image Characterization Tool (PICT), has been made publicly available and could be an invaluable resource for researchers studying NP assembly. To demonstrate its practical utility, we used PICT to analyze scanning electron microscopy images taken during the assembly of surface-functionalized metal NPs of differing shapes and sizes within a polymer matrix. PICT is used to characterize and analyze the morphology of NP clusters, providing quantitative information that can be used to elucidate the physical mechanisms governing NP assembly.The ability to characterize higher-order structures formed by nanoparticle (NP) assembly is critical for predicting and engineering the properties of advanced nanocomposite materials. Here we develop a quantitative image analysis software to characterize key structural properties of NP clusters from experimental images of nanocomposites. This analysis can be carried out on images captured at intermittent times during assembly to monitor the time evolution of NP clusters in a highly automated

  15. Automated object detection for astronomical images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orellana, Sonny; Zhao, Lei; Boussalis, Helen; Liu, Charles; Rad, Khosrow; Dong, Jane

    2005-10-01

    Sponsored by the National Aeronautical Space Association (NASA), the Synergetic Education and Research in Enabling NASA-centered Academic Development of Engineers and Space Scientists (SERENADES) Laboratory was established at California State University, Los Angeles (CSULA). An important on-going research activity in this lab is to develop an easy-to-use image analysis software with the capability of automated object detection to facilitate astronomical research. This paper presented a fast object detection algorithm based on the characteristics of astronomical images. This algorithm consists of three steps. First, the foreground and background are separated using histogram-based approach. Second, connectivity analysis is conducted to extract individual object. The final step is post processing which refines the detection results. To improve the detection accuracy when some objects are blocked by clouds, top-hat transform is employed to split the sky into cloudy region and non-cloudy region. A multi-level thresholding algorithm is developed to select the optimal threshold for different regions. Experimental results show that our proposed approach can successfully detect the blocked objects by clouds.

  16. An automated digital imaging system for environmental monitoring applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogle, Rian; Velasco, Miguel; Vogel, John

    2013-01-01

    Recent improvements in the affordability and availability of high-resolution digital cameras, data loggers, embedded computers, and radio/cellular modems have advanced the development of sophisticated automated systems for remote imaging. Researchers have successfully placed and operated automated digital cameras in remote locations and in extremes of temperature and humidity, ranging from the islands of the South Pacific to the Mojave Desert and the Grand Canyon. With the integration of environmental sensors, these automated systems are able to respond to local conditions and modify their imaging regimes as needed. In this report we describe in detail the design of one type of automated imaging system developed by our group. It is easily replicated, low-cost, highly robust, and is a stand-alone automated camera designed to be placed in remote locations, without wireless connectivity.

  17. Image analysis and platform development for automated phenotyping in cytomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, Kuan

    2013-01-01

    This thesis is dedicated to the empirical study of image analysis in HT/HC screen study. Often a HT/HC screening produces extensive amounts that cannot be manually analyzed. Thus, an automated image analysis solution is prior to an objective understanding of the raw image data. Compared to general a

  18. Computerized Station For Semi-Automated Testing Image Intensifier Tubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrzanowski Krzysztof

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Testing of image intensifier tubes is still done using mostly manual methods due to a series of both technical and legal problems with test automation. Computerized stations for semi-automated testing of IITs are considered as novelty and are under continuous improvements. This paper presents a novel test station that enables semi-automated measurement of image intensifier tubes. Wide test capabilities and advanced design solutions rise the developed test station significantly above the current level of night vision metrology.

  19. Automated feature extraction and classification from image sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and Unisys Corporation have completed a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) to explore automated feature extraction and classification from image sources. The CRADA helped the USGS define the spectral and spatial resolution characteristics of airborne and satellite imaging sensors necessary to meet base cartographic and land use and land cover feature classification requirements and help develop future automated geographic and cartographic data production capabilities. The USGS is seeking a new commercial partner to continue automated feature extraction and classification research and development.

  20. Image segmentation for automated dental identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haj Said, Eyad; Nassar, Diaa Eldin M.; Ammar, Hany H.

    2006-02-01

    Dental features are one of few biometric identifiers that qualify for postmortem identification; therefore, creation of an Automated Dental Identification System (ADIS) with goals and objectives similar to the Automated Fingerprint Identification System (AFIS) has received increased attention. As a part of ADIS, teeth segmentation from dental radiographs films is an essential step in the identification process. In this paper, we introduce a fully automated approach for teeth segmentation with goal to extract at least one tooth from the dental radiograph film. We evaluate our approach based on theoretical and empirical basis, and we compare its performance with the performance of other approaches introduced in the literature. The results show that our approach exhibits the lowest failure rate and the highest optimality among all full automated approaches introduced in the literature.

  1. Towards Automated Annotation of Benthic Survey Images: Variability of Human Experts and Operational Modes of Automation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beijbom, Oscar; Edmunds, Peter J; Roelfsema, Chris; Smith, Jennifer; Kline, David I; Neal, Benjamin P; Dunlap, Matthew J; Moriarty, Vincent; Fan, Tung-Yung; Tan, Chih-Jui; Chan, Stephen; Treibitz, Tali; Gamst, Anthony; Mitchell, B Greg; Kriegman, David

    2015-01-01

    Global climate change and other anthropogenic stressors have heightened the need to rapidly characterize ecological changes in marine benthic communities across large scales. Digital photography enables rapid collection of survey images to meet this need, but the subsequent image annotation is typically a time consuming, manual task. We investigated the feasibility of using automated point-annotation to expedite cover estimation of the 17 dominant benthic categories from survey-images captured at four Pacific coral reefs. Inter- and intra- annotator variability among six human experts was quantified and compared to semi- and fully- automated annotation methods, which are made available at coralnet.ucsd.edu. Our results indicate high expert agreement for identification of coral genera, but lower agreement for algal functional groups, in particular between turf algae and crustose coralline algae. This indicates the need for unequivocal definitions of algal groups, careful training of multiple annotators, and enhanced imaging technology. Semi-automated annotation, where 50% of the annotation decisions were performed automatically, yielded cover estimate errors comparable to those of the human experts. Furthermore, fully-automated annotation yielded rapid, unbiased cover estimates but with increased variance. These results show that automated annotation can increase spatial coverage and decrease time and financial outlay for image-based reef surveys. PMID:26154157

  2. Towards Automated Annotation of Benthic Survey Images: Variability of Human Experts and Operational Modes of Automation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Beijbom

    Full Text Available Global climate change and other anthropogenic stressors have heightened the need to rapidly characterize ecological changes in marine benthic communities across large scales. Digital photography enables rapid collection of survey images to meet this need, but the subsequent image annotation is typically a time consuming, manual task. We investigated the feasibility of using automated point-annotation to expedite cover estimation of the 17 dominant benthic categories from survey-images captured at four Pacific coral reefs. Inter- and intra- annotator variability among six human experts was quantified and compared to semi- and fully- automated annotation methods, which are made available at coralnet.ucsd.edu. Our results indicate high expert agreement for identification of coral genera, but lower agreement for algal functional groups, in particular between turf algae and crustose coralline algae. This indicates the need for unequivocal definitions of algal groups, careful training of multiple annotators, and enhanced imaging technology. Semi-automated annotation, where 50% of the annotation decisions were performed automatically, yielded cover estimate errors comparable to those of the human experts. Furthermore, fully-automated annotation yielded rapid, unbiased cover estimates but with increased variance. These results show that automated annotation can increase spatial coverage and decrease time and financial outlay for image-based reef surveys.

  3. Towards Automated Annotation of Benthic Survey Images: Variability of Human Experts and Operational Modes of Automation

    OpenAIRE

    Oscar Beijbom; Edmunds, Peter J.; Chris Roelfsema; Jennifer Smith; Kline, David I.; Neal, Benjamin P.; Matthew J Dunlap; Vincent Moriarty; Tung-Yung Fan; Chih-Jui Tan; Stephen Chan; Tali Treibitz; Anthony Gamst; B. Greg Mitchell; David Kriegman

    2015-01-01

    Global climate change and other anthropogenic stressors have heightened the need to rapidly characterize ecological changes in marine benthic communities across large scales. Digital photography enables rapid collection of survey images to meet this need, but the subsequent image annotation is typically a time consuming, manual task. We investigated the feasibility of using automated point-annotation to expedite cover estimation of the 17 dominant benthic categories from survey-images capture...

  4. Automated identification of animal species in camera trap images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, X.; Wang, J.; Kays, R.; Jansen, P.A.; Wang, T.; Huang, T.

    2013-01-01

    Image sensors are increasingly being used in biodiversity monitoring, with each study generating many thousands or millions of pictures. Efficiently identifying the species captured by each image is a critical challenge for the advancement of this field. Here, we present an automated species identif

  5. Automated diabetic retinopathy imaging in Indian eyes: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupak Roy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the efficacy of an automated retinal image grading system in diabetic retinopathy (DR screening. Materials and Methods: Color fundus images of patients of a DR screening project were analyzed for the purpose of the study. For each eye two set of images were acquired, one centerd on the disk and the other centerd on the macula. All images were processed by automated DR screening software (Retmarker. The results were compared to ophthalmologist grading of the same set of photographs. Results: 5780 images of 1445 patients were analyzed. Patients were screened into two categories DR or no DR. Image quality was high, medium and low in 71 (4.91%, 1117 (77.30% and 257 (17.78% patients respectively. Specificity and sensitivity for detecting DR in the high, medium and low group were (0.59, 0.91; (0.11, 0.95 and (0.93, 0.14. Conclusion: Automated retinal image screening system for DR had a high sensitivity in high and medium quality images. Automated DR grading software′s hold promise in future screening programs.

  6. Automating proliferation rate estimation from Ki-67 histology images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Lahham, Heba Z.; Alomari, Raja S.; Hiary, Hazem; Chaudhary, Vipin

    2012-03-01

    Breast cancer is the second cause of women death and the most diagnosed female cancer in the US. Proliferation rate estimation (PRE) is one of the prognostic indicators that guide the treatment protocols and it is clinically performed from Ki-67 histopathology images. Automating PRE substantially increases the efficiency of the pathologists. Moreover, presenting a deterministic and reproducible proliferation rate value is crucial to reduce inter-observer variability. To that end, we propose a fully automated CAD system for PRE from the Ki-67 histopathology images. This CAD system is based on a model of three steps: image pre-processing, image clustering, and nuclei segmentation and counting that are finally followed by PRE. The first step is based on customized color modification and color-space transformation. Then, image pixels are clustered by K-Means depending on the features extracted from the images derived from the first step. Finally, nuclei are segmented and counted using global thresholding, mathematical morphology and connected component analysis. Our experimental results on fifty Ki-67-stained histopathology images show a significant agreement between our CAD's automated PRE and the gold standard's one, where the latter is an average between two observers' estimates. The Paired T-Test, for the automated and manual estimates, shows ρ = 0.86, 0.45, 0.8 for the brown nuclei count, blue nuclei count, and proliferation rate, respectively. Thus, our proposed CAD system is as reliable as the pathologist estimating the proliferation rate. Yet, its estimate is reproducible.

  7. Automation of Cassini Support Imaging Uplink Command Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly-Hollins, Lisa; Breneman, Herbert H.; Brooks, Robert

    2010-01-01

    "Support imaging" is imagery requested by other Cassini science teams to aid in the interpretation of their data. The generation of the spacecraft command sequences for these images is performed by the Cassini Instrument Operations Team. The process initially established for doing this was very labor-intensive, tedious and prone to human error. Team management recognized this process as one that could easily benefit from automation. Team members were tasked to document the existing manual process, develop a plan and strategy to automate the process, implement the plan and strategy, test and validate the new automated process, and deliver the new software tools and documentation to Flight Operations for use during the Cassini extended mission. In addition to the goals of higher efficiency and lower risk in the processing of support imaging requests, an effort was made to maximize adaptability of the process to accommodate uplink procedure changes and the potential addition of new capabilities outside the scope of the initial effort.

  8. Extended -Regular Sequence for Automated Analysis of Microarray Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Hee-Jeong

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Microarray study enables us to obtain hundreds of thousands of expressions of genes or genotypes at once, and it is an indispensable technology for genome research. The first step is the analysis of scanned microarray images. This is the most important procedure for obtaining biologically reliable data. Currently most microarray image processing systems require burdensome manual block/spot indexing work. Since the amount of experimental data is increasing very quickly, automated microarray image analysis software becomes important. In this paper, we propose two automated methods for analyzing microarray images. First, we propose the extended -regular sequence to index blocks and spots, which enables a novel automatic gridding procedure. Second, we provide a methodology, hierarchical metagrid alignment, to allow reliable and efficient batch processing for a set of microarray images. Experimental results show that the proposed methods are more reliable and convenient than the commercial tools.

  9. Fuzzy Emotional Semantic Analysis and Automated Annotation of Scene Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianfang Cao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the advances in electronic and imaging techniques, the production of digital images has rapidly increased, and the extraction and automated annotation of emotional semantics implied by images have become issues that must be urgently addressed. To better simulate human subjectivity and ambiguity for understanding scene images, the current study proposes an emotional semantic annotation method for scene images based on fuzzy set theory. A fuzzy membership degree was calculated to describe the emotional degree of a scene image and was implemented using the Adaboost algorithm and a back-propagation (BP neural network. The automated annotation method was trained and tested using scene images from the SUN Database. The annotation results were then compared with those based on artificial annotation. Our method showed an annotation accuracy rate of 91.2% for basic emotional values and 82.4% after extended emotional values were added, which correspond to increases of 5.5% and 8.9%, respectively, compared with the results from using a single BP neural network algorithm. Furthermore, the retrieval accuracy rate based on our method reached approximately 89%. This study attempts to lay a solid foundation for the automated emotional semantic annotation of more types of images and therefore is of practical significance.

  10. Fuzzy emotional semantic analysis and automated annotation of scene images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jianfang; Chen, Lichao

    2015-01-01

    With the advances in electronic and imaging techniques, the production of digital images has rapidly increased, and the extraction and automated annotation of emotional semantics implied by images have become issues that must be urgently addressed. To better simulate human subjectivity and ambiguity for understanding scene images, the current study proposes an emotional semantic annotation method for scene images based on fuzzy set theory. A fuzzy membership degree was calculated to describe the emotional degree of a scene image and was implemented using the Adaboost algorithm and a back-propagation (BP) neural network. The automated annotation method was trained and tested using scene images from the SUN Database. The annotation results were then compared with those based on artificial annotation. Our method showed an annotation accuracy rate of 91.2% for basic emotional values and 82.4% after extended emotional values were added, which correspond to increases of 5.5% and 8.9%, respectively, compared with the results from using a single BP neural network algorithm. Furthermore, the retrieval accuracy rate based on our method reached approximately 89%. This study attempts to lay a solid foundation for the automated emotional semantic annotation of more types of images and therefore is of practical significance. PMID:25838818

  11. Automated Localization of Optic Disc in Retinal Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepali A.Godse

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available An efficient detection of optic disc (OD in colour retinal images is a significant task in an automated retinal image analysis system. Most of the algorithms developed for OD detection are especially applicable to normal and healthy retinal images. It is a challenging task to detect OD in all types of retinal images, that is, normal, healthy images as well as abnormal, that is, images affected due to disease. This paper presents an automated system to locate an OD and its centre in all types of retinal images. The ensemble of steps based on different criteria produces more accurate results. The proposed algorithm gives excellent results and avoids false OD detection. The technique is developed and tested on standard databases provided for researchers on internet, Diaretdb0 (130 images, Diaretdb1 (89 images, Drive (40 images and local database (194 images. The local database images are collected from ophthalmic clinics. It is able to locate OD and its centre in 98.45% of all tested cases. The results achieved by different algorithms can be compared when algorithms are applied on same standard databases. This comparison is also discussed in this paper which shows that the proposed algorithm is more efficient.

  12. Automated image capture and defects detection by cavity inspection camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The defects as pit and scar make electric/magnetic field enhance and it cause field emission and quench in superconducting cavities. We used inspection camera to find these defects, but the current system which operated by human often mistake file naming and require long acquisition time. This study aims to solve these problems with introduction of cavity driving automation and defect inspection. We used rs232c of serial communication to drive of motor and camera for the automation of the inspection camera, and we used defect inspection software with defects reference images and pattern match software with the OpenCV lib. By the automation, we cut down the acquisition time from 8 hours to 2 hours, however defect inspection software is under preparation. The defect inspection software has a problem of complexity of image back ground. (author)

  13. Automated Segmentation of Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegmann, Mikkel Bille; Nilsson, Jens Chr.; Grønning, Bjørn A.

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to be an accurate and precise technique to assess cardiac volumes and function in a non-invasive manner and is generally considered to be the current gold-standard for cardiac imaging [1]. Measurement of ventricular volumes, muscle mass and function...

  14. Automated morphometry of transgenic mouse brains in MR images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheenstra, Alize Elske Hiltje

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative and local morphometry of mouse brain MRI is a relatively new field of research, where automated methods can be exploited to rapidly provide accurate and repeatable results. In this thesis we reviewed several existing methods and applications of quantitative morphometry to brain MR image

  15. Automated radiopharmaceutical production systems for positron imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study provides information that will lead towards the widespread availability of systems for routine production of positron emitting isotopes and radiopharmaceuticals in a medical setting. The first part describes the collection, evaluation, and preparation in convenient form of the pertinent physical, engineering, and chemical data related to reaction yields and isotope production. The emphasis is on the production of the four short-lived isotopes C-11, N-13, O-15 and F-18. The second part is an assessment of radiation sources including cyclotrons, linear accelerators, and other more exotic devices. Various aspects of instrumentation including ease of installation, cost, and shielding are included. The third part of the study reviews the preparation of precursors and radiopharmaceuticals by automated chemical systems. 182 refs., 3 figs., 15 tabs

  16. An automated and simple method for brain MR image extraction

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu Zixin; Liu Jiafeng; Zhang Haiyan; Li Haiyun

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The extraction of brain tissue from magnetic resonance head images, is an important image processing step for the analyses of neuroimage data. The authors have developed an automated and simple brain extraction method using an improved geometric active contour model. Methods The method uses an improved geometric active contour model which can not only solve the boundary leakage problem but also is less sensitive to intensity inhomogeneity. The method defines the initial fu...

  17. An automated vessel segmentation of retinal images using multiscale vesselness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ocular fundus image can provide information on pathological changes caused by local ocular diseases and early signs of certain systemic diseases, such as diabetes and hypertension. Automated analysis and interpretation of fundus images has become a necessary and important diagnostic procedure in ophthalmology. The extraction of blood vessels from retinal images is an important and challenging task in medical analysis and diagnosis. In this paper, we introduce an implementation of the anisotropic diffusion which allows reducing the noise and better preserving small structures like vessels in 2D images. A vessel detection filter, based on a multi-scale vesselness function, is then applied to enhance vascular structures.

  18. Automated Archiving of Archaeological Aerial Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Doneus

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of any aerial photo archive is to allow quick access to images based on content and location. Therefore, next to a description of technical parameters and depicted content, georeferencing of every image is of vital importance. This can be done either by identifying the main photographed object (georeferencing of the image content or by mapping the center point and/or the outline of the image footprint. The paper proposes a new image archiving workflow. The new pipeline is based on the parameters that are logged by a commercial, but cost-effective GNSS/IMU solution and processed with in-house-developed software. Together, these components allow one to automatically geolocate and rectify the (oblique aerial images (by a simple planar rectification using the exterior orientation parameters and to retrieve their footprints with reasonable accuracy, which is automatically stored as a vector file. The data of three test flights were used to determine the accuracy of the device, which turned out to be better than 1° for roll and pitch (mean between 0.0 and 0.21 with a standard deviation of 0.17–0.46 and better than 2.5° for yaw angles (mean between 0.0 and −0.14 with a standard deviation of 0.58–0.94. This turned out to be sufficient to enable a fast and almost automatic GIS-based archiving of all of the imagery.

  19. Automated planning of breast radiotherapy using cone beam CT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amit, Guy [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario M5G2M9 (Canada); Purdie, Thomas G., E-mail: tom.purdie@rmp.uhn.ca [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario M5G2M9 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E2 (Canada); Techna Institute, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1P5 (Canada)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Develop and clinically validate a methodology for using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging in an automated treatment planning framework for breast IMRT. Methods: A technique for intensity correction of CBCT images was developed and evaluated. The technique is based on histogram matching of CBCT image sets, using information from “similar” planning CT image sets from a database of paired CBCT and CT image sets (n = 38). Automated treatment plans were generated for a testing subset (n = 15) on the planning CT and the corrected CBCT. The plans generated on the corrected CBCT were compared to the CT-based plans in terms of beam parameters, dosimetric indices, and dose distributions. Results: The corrected CBCT images showed considerable similarity to their corresponding planning CTs (average mutual information 1.0±0.1, average sum of absolute differences 185 ± 38). The automated CBCT-based plans were clinically acceptable, as well as equivalent to the CT-based plans with average gantry angle difference of 0.99°±1.1°, target volume overlap index (Dice) of 0.89±0.04 although with slightly higher maximum target doses (4482±90 vs 4560±84, P < 0.05). Gamma index analysis (3%, 3 mm) showed that the CBCT-based plans had the same dose distribution as plans calculated with the same beams on the registered planning CTs (average gamma index 0.12±0.04, gamma <1 in 99.4%±0.3%). Conclusions: The proposed method demonstrates the potential for a clinically feasible and efficient online adaptive breast IMRT planning method based on CBCT imaging, integrating automation.

  20. An Automated Image Processing System for Concrete Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumgart, C.W.; Cave, S.P.; Linder, K.E.

    1998-11-23

    AlliedSignal Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T) was asked to perform a proof-of-concept study for the Missouri Highway and Transportation Department (MHTD), Research Division, in June 1997. The goal of this proof-of-concept study was to ascertain if automated scanning and imaging techniques might be applied effectively to the problem of concrete evaluation. In the current evaluation process, a concrete sample core is manually scanned under a microscope. Voids (or air spaces) within the concrete are then detected visually by a human operator by incrementing the sample under the cross-hairs of a microscope and by counting the number of "pixels" which fall within a void. Automation of the scanning and image analysis processes is desired to improve the speed of the scanning process, to improve evaluation consistency, and to reduce operator fatigue. An initial, proof-of-concept image analysis approach was successfully developed and demonstrated using acquired black and white imagery of concrete samples. In this paper, the automated scanning and image capture system currently under development will be described and the image processing approach developed for the proof-of-concept study will be demonstrated. A development update and plans for future enhancements are also presented.

  1. An Automated, Image Processing System for Concrete Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allied Signal Federal Manufacturing ampersand Technologies (FM ampersand T) was asked to perform a proof-of-concept study for the Missouri Highway and Transportation Department (MHTD), Research Division, in June 1997. The goal of this proof-of-concept study was to ascertain if automated scanning and imaging techniques might be applied effectively to the problem of concrete evaluation. In the current evaluation process, a concrete sample core is manually scanned under a microscope. Voids (or air spaces) within the concrete are then detected visually by a human operator by incrementing the sample under the cross-hairs of a microscope and by counting the number of ''pixels'' which fall within a void. Automation of the scanning and image analysis processes is desired to improve the speed of the scanning process, to improve evaluation consistency, and to reduce operator fatigue. An initial, proof-of-concept image analysis approach was successfully developed and demonstrated using acquired black and white imagery of concrete samples. In this paper, the automated scanning and image capture system currently under development will be described and the image processing approach developed for the proof-of-concept study will be demonstrated. A development update and plans for future enhancements are also presented

  2. Automated vasculature extraction from placenta images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almoussa, Nizar; Dutra, Brittany; Lampe, Bryce; Getreuer, Pascal; Wittman, Todd; Salafia, Carolyn; Vese, Luminita

    2011-03-01

    Recent research in perinatal pathology argues that analyzing properties of the placenta may reveal important information on how certain diseases progress. One important property is the structure of the placental blood vessels, which supply a fetus with all of its oxygen and nutrition. An essential step in the analysis of the vascular network pattern is the extraction of the blood vessels, which has only been done manually through a costly and time-consuming process. There is no existing method to automatically detect placental blood vessels; in addition, the large variation in the shape, color, and texture of the placenta makes it difficult to apply standard edge-detection algorithms. We describe a method to automatically detect and extract blood vessels from a given image by using image processing techniques and neural networks. We evaluate several local features for every pixel, in addition to a novel modification to an existing road detector. Pixels belonging to blood vessel regions have recognizable responses; hence, we use an artificial neural network to identify the pattern of blood vessels. A set of images where blood vessels are manually highlighted is used to train the network. We then apply the neural network to recognize blood vessels in new images. The network is effective in capturing the most prominent vascular structures of the placenta.

  3. Automated Image Registration Using Morphological Region of Interest Feature Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaza, Antonio; LeMoigne, Jacqueline; Netanyahu, Nathan S.

    2005-01-01

    With the recent explosion in the amount of remotely sensed imagery and the corresponding interest in temporal change detection and modeling, image registration has become increasingly important as a necessary first step in the integration of multi-temporal and multi-sensor data for applications such as the analysis of seasonal and annual global climate changes, as well as land use/cover changes. The task of image registration can be divided into two major components: (1) the extraction of control points or features from images; and (2) the search among the extracted features for the matching pairs that represent the same feature in the images to be matched. Manual control feature extraction can be subjective and extremely time consuming, and often results in few usable points. Automated feature extraction is a solution to this problem, where desired target features are invariant, and represent evenly distributed landmarks such as edges, corners and line intersections. In this paper, we develop a novel automated registration approach based on the following steps. First, a mathematical morphology (MM)-based method is used to obtain a scale-orientation morphological profile at each image pixel. Next, a spectral dissimilarity metric such as the spectral information divergence is applied for automated extraction of landmark chips, followed by an initial approximate matching. This initial condition is then refined using a hierarchical robust feature matching (RFM) procedure. Experimental results reveal that the proposed registration technique offers a robust solution in the presence of seasonal changes and other interfering factors. Keywords-Automated image registration, multi-temporal imagery, mathematical morphology, robust feature matching.

  4. SAND: Automated VLBI imaging and analyzing pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming

    2016-05-01

    The Search And Non-Destroy (SAND) is a VLBI data reduction pipeline composed of a set of Python programs based on the AIPS interface provided by ObitTalk. It is designed for the massive data reduction of multi-epoch VLBI monitoring research. It can automatically investigate calibrated visibility data, search all the radio emissions above a given noise floor and do the model fitting either on the CLEANed image or directly on the uv data. It then digests the model-fitting results, intelligently identifies the multi-epoch jet component correspondence, and recognizes the linear or non-linear proper motion patterns. The outputs including CLEANed image catalogue with polarization maps, animation cube, proper motion fitting and core light curves. For uncalibrated data, a user can easily add inline modules to do the calibration and self-calibration in a batch for a specific array.

  5. Automated delineation of stroke lesions using brain CT images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline R. Gillebert

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Computed tomographic (CT images are widely used for the identification of abnormal brain tissue following infarct and hemorrhage in stroke. Manual lesion delineation is currently the standard approach, but is both time-consuming and operator-dependent. To address these issues, we present a method that can automatically delineate infarct and hemorrhage in stroke CT images. The key elements of this method are the accurate normalization of CT images from stroke patients into template space and the subsequent voxelwise comparison with a group of control CT images for defining areas with hypo- or hyper-intense signals. Our validation, using simulated and actual lesions, shows that our approach is effective in reconstructing lesions resulting from both infarct and hemorrhage and yields lesion maps spatially consistent with those produced manually by expert operators. A limitation is that, relative to manual delineation, there is reduced sensitivity of the automated method in regions close to the ventricles and the brain contours. However, the automated method presents a number of benefits in terms of offering significant time savings and the elimination of the inter-operator differences inherent to manual tracing approaches. These factors are relevant for the creation of large-scale lesion databases for neuropsychological research. The automated delineation of stroke lesions from CT scans may also enable longitudinal studies to quantify changes in damaged tissue in an objective and reproducible manner.

  6. Quantifying biodiversity using digital cameras and automated image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roadknight, C. M.; Rose, R. J.; Barber, M. L.; Price, M. C.; Marshall, I. W.

    2009-04-01

    Monitoring the effects on biodiversity of extensive grazing in complex semi-natural habitats is labour intensive. There are also concerns about the standardization of semi-quantitative data collection. We have chosen to focus initially on automating the most time consuming aspect - the image analysis. The advent of cheaper and more sophisticated digital camera technology has lead to a sudden increase in the number of habitat monitoring images and information that is being collected. We report on the use of automated trail cameras (designed for the game hunting market) to continuously capture images of grazer activity in a variety of habitats at Moor House National Nature Reserve, which is situated in the North of England at an average altitude of over 600m. Rainfall is high, and in most areas the soil consists of deep peat (1m to 3m), populated by a mix of heather, mosses and sedges. The cameras have been continuously in operation over a 6 month period, daylight images are in full colour and night images (IR flash) are black and white. We have developed artificial intelligence based methods to assist in the analysis of the large number of images collected, generating alert states for new or unusual image conditions. This paper describes the data collection techniques, outlines the quantitative and qualitative data collected and proposes online and offline systems that can reduce the manpower overheads and increase focus on important subsets in the collected data. By converting digital image data into statistical composite data it can be handled in a similar way to other biodiversity statistics thus improving the scalability of monitoring experiments. Unsupervised feature detection methods and supervised neural methods were tested and offered solutions to simplifying the process. Accurate (85 to 95%) categorization of faunal content can be obtained, requiring human intervention for only those images containing rare animals or unusual (undecidable) conditions, and

  7. Automated techniques for quality assurance of radiological image modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodenough, David J.; Atkins, Frank B.; Dyer, Stephen M.

    1991-05-01

    This paper will attempt to identify many of the important issues for quality assurance (QA) of radiological modalities. It is of course to be realized that QA can span many aspects of the diagnostic decision making process. These issues range from physical image performance levels to and through the diagnostic decision of the radiologist. We will use as a model for automated approaches a program we have developed to work with computed tomography (CT) images. In an attempt to unburden the user, and in an effort to facilitate the performance of QA, we have been studying automated approaches. The ultimate utility of the system is its ability to render in a safe and efficacious manner, decisions that are accurate, sensitive, specific and which are possible within the economic constraints of modern health care delivery.

  8. Usefulness of automated biopsy guns in image-guided biopsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the usefulness of automated biopsy guns in image-guided biopsy of lung, liver, pancreas and other organs. Using automated biopsy devices, 160 biopsies of variable anatomic sites were performed: Biopsies were performed under ultrasonographic(US) guidance in 95 and computed tomographic (CT) guidance in 65. We retrospectively analyzed histologic results and complications. Specimens were adequate for histopathologic diagnosis in 143 of the 160 patients(89.4%)-Diagnostic tissue was obtained in 130 (81.3%), suggestive tissue obtained in 13(8.1%), and non-diagnostic tissue was obtained in 14(8.7%). Inadequate tissue was obtained in only 3(1.9%). There was no statistically significant difference between US-guided and CT-guided percutaneous biopsy. There was no occurrence of significant complication. We have experienced mild complications in only 5 patients-2 hematuria and 2 hematochezia in transrectal prostatic biopsy, and 1 minimal pneumothorax in CT-guided percutaneous lung biopsy. All of them were resolved spontaneously. The image-guided biopsy using the automated biopsy gun was a simple, safe and accurate method of obtaining adequate specimen for the histopathologic diagnosis

  9. AUTOMATED DATA ANALYSIS FOR CONSECUTIVE IMAGES FROM DROPLET COMBUSTION EXPERIMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Lee Dembia

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A simple automated image analysis algorithm has been developed that processes consecutive images from high speed, high resolution digital images of burning fuel droplets. The droplets burn under conditions that promote spherical symmetry. The algorithm performs the tasks of edge detection of the droplet’s boundary using a grayscale intensity threshold, and shape fitting either a circle or ellipse to the droplet’s boundary. The results are compared to manual measurements of droplet diameters done with commercial software. Results show that it is possible to automate data analysis for consecutive droplet burning images even in the presence of a significant amount of noise from soot formation. An adaptive grayscale intensity threshold provides the ability to extract droplet diameters for the wide range of noise encountered. In instances where soot blocks portions of the droplet, the algorithm manages to provide accurate measurements if a circle fit is used instead of an ellipse fit, as an ellipse can be too accommodating to the disturbance.

  10. Automated retinal image analysis for diabetic retinopathy in telemedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Dawn A; Keane, Pearse A; Tufail, Adnan; Egan, Catherine A; Aiello, Lloyd Paul; Silva, Paolo S

    2015-03-01

    There will be an estimated 552 million persons with diabetes globally by the year 2030. Over half of these individuals will develop diabetic retinopathy, representing a nearly insurmountable burden for providing diabetes eye care. Telemedicine programmes have the capability to distribute quality eye care to virtually any location and address the lack of access to ophthalmic services. In most programmes, there is currently a heavy reliance on specially trained retinal image graders, a resource in short supply worldwide. These factors necessitate an image grading automation process to increase the speed of retinal image evaluation while maintaining accuracy and cost effectiveness. Several automatic retinal image analysis systems designed for use in telemedicine have recently become commercially available. Such systems have the potential to substantially improve the manner by which diabetes eye care is delivered by providing automated real-time evaluation to expedite diagnosis and referral if required. Furthermore, integration with electronic medical records may allow a more accurate prognostication for individual patients and may provide predictive modelling of medical risk factors based on broad population data. PMID:25697773

  11. Automated curved planar reformation of 3D spine images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traditional techniques for visualizing anatomical structures are based on planar cross-sections from volume images, such as images obtained by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, planar cross-sections taken in the coordinate system of the 3D image often do not provide sufficient or qualitative enough diagnostic information, because planar cross-sections cannot follow curved anatomical structures (e.g. arteries, colon, spine, etc). Therefore, not all of the important details can be shown simultaneously in any planar cross-section. To overcome this problem, reformatted images in the coordinate system of the inspected structure must be created. This operation is usually referred to as curved planar reformation (CPR). In this paper we propose an automated method for CPR of 3D spine images, which is based on the image transformation from the standard image-based to a novel spine-based coordinate system. The axes of the proposed spine-based coordinate system are determined on the curve that represents the vertebral column, and the rotation of the vertebrae around the spine curve, both of which are described by polynomial models. The optimal polynomial parameters are obtained in an image analysis based optimization framework. The proposed method was qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated on five CT spine images. The method performed well on both normal and pathological cases and was consistent with manually obtained ground truth data. The proposed spine-based CPR benefits from reduced structural complexity in favour of improved feature perception of the spine. The reformatted images are diagnostically valuable and enable easier navigation, manipulation and orientation in 3D space. Moreover, reformatted images may prove useful for segmentation and other image analysis tasks

  12. Automated Dsm Extraction from Uav Images and Performance Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, S.; Kim, T.

    2015-08-01

    As technology evolves, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) imagery is being used from simple applications such as image acquisition to complicated applications such as 3D spatial information extraction. Spatial information is usually provided in the form of a DSM or point cloud. It is important to generate very dense tie points automatically from stereo images. In this paper, we tried to apply stereo image-based matching technique developed for satellite/aerial images to UAV images, propose processing steps for automated DSM generation and to analyse the possibility of DSM generation. For DSM generation from UAV images, firstly, exterior orientation parameters (EOPs) for each dataset were adjusted. Secondly, optimum matching pairs were determined. Thirdly, stereo image matching was performed with each pair. Developed matching algorithm is based on grey-level correlation on pixels applied along epipolar lines. Finally, the extracted match results were united with one result and the final DSM was made. Generated DSM was compared with a reference DSM from Lidar. Overall accuracy was 1.5 m in NMAD. However, several problems have to be solved in future, including obtaining precise EOPs, handling occlusion and image blurring problems. More effective interpolation technique needs to be developed in the future.

  13. Automating the Photogrammetric Bridging Based on MMS Image Sequence Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, J. F. C.; Lemes Neto, M. C.; Blasechi, V.

    2014-11-01

    The photogrammetric bridging or traverse is a special bundle block adjustment (BBA) for connecting a sequence of stereo-pairs and of determining the exterior orientation parameters (EOP). An object point must be imaged in more than one stereo-pair. In each stereo-pair the distance ratio between an object and its corresponding image point varies significantly. We propose to automate the photogrammetric bridging based on a fully automatic extraction of homologous points in stereo-pairs and on an arbitrary Cartesian datum to refer the EOP and tie points. The technique uses SIFT algorithm and the keypoint matching is given by similarity descriptors of each keypoint based on the smallest distance. All the matched points are used as tie points. The technique was applied initially to two pairs. The block formed by four images was treated by BBA. The process follows up to the end of the sequence and it is semiautomatic because each block is processed independently and the transition from one block to the next depends on the operator. Besides four image blocks (two pairs), we experimented other arrangements with block sizes of six, eight, and up to twenty images (respectively, three, four, five and up to ten bases). After the whole image pairs sequence had sequentially been adjusted in each experiment, a simultaneous BBA was run so to estimate the EOP set of each image. The results for classical ("normal case") pairs were analyzed based on standard statistics regularly applied to phototriangulation, and they show figures to validate the process.

  14. Automated image analysis in the study of collagenous colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiehn, Anne-Marie Kanstrup; Kristensson, Martin; Engel, Ulla;

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to develop an automated image analysis software to measure the thickness of the subepithelial collagenous band in colon biopsies with collagenous colitis (CC) and incomplete CC (CCi). The software measures the thickness of the collagenous band on microscopic...... agreement between the four pathologists and the VG app was κ=0.71. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, the Visiopharm VG app is able to measure the thickness of a sub-epithelial collagenous band in colon biopsies with an accuracy comparable to the performance of a pathologist and thereby provides a promising...

  15. An automated 3D reconstruction method of UAV images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Wang, He; Liu, Xiaoyang; Li, Feng; Sun, Guangtong; Song, Ping

    2015-10-01

    In this paper a novel fully automated 3D reconstruction approach based on low-altitude unmanned aerial vehicle system (UAVs) images will be presented, which does not require previous camera calibration or any other external prior knowledge. Dense 3D point clouds are generated by integrating orderly feature extraction, image matching, structure from motion (SfM) and multi-view stereo (MVS) algorithms, overcoming many of the cost, time limitations of rigorous photogrammetry techniques. An image topology analysis strategy is introduced to speed up large scene reconstruction by taking advantage of the flight-control data acquired by UAV. Image topology map can significantly reduce the running time of feature matching by limiting the combination of images. A high-resolution digital surface model of the study area is produced base on UAV point clouds by constructing the triangular irregular network. Experimental results show that the proposed approach is robust and feasible for automatic 3D reconstruction of low-altitude UAV images, and has great potential for the acquisition of spatial information at large scales mapping, especially suitable for rapid response and precise modelling in disaster emergency.

  16. Granulometric profiling of aeolian dust deposits by automated image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, György; Újvári, Gábor; Kovács, János; Jakab, Gergely; Kiss, Klaudia; Szalai, Zoltán

    2016-04-01

    Determination of granulometric parameters is of growing interest in the Earth sciences. Particle size data of sedimentary deposits provide insights into the physicochemical environment of transport, accumulation and post-depositional alterations of sedimentary particles, and are important proxies applied in paleoclimatic reconstructions. It is especially true for aeolian dust deposits with a fairly narrow grain size range as a consequence of the extremely selective nature of wind sediment transport. Therefore, various aspects of aeolian sedimentation (wind strength, distance to source(s), possible secondary source regions and modes of sedimentation and transport) can be reconstructed only from precise grain size data. As terrestrial wind-blown deposits are among the most important archives of past environmental changes, proper explanation of the proxy data is a mandatory issue. Automated imaging provides a unique technique to gather direct information on granulometric characteristics of sedimentary particles. Granulometric data obtained from automatic image analysis of Malvern Morphologi G3-ID is a rarely applied new technique for particle size and shape analyses in sedimentary geology. Size and shape data of several hundred thousand (or even million) individual particles were automatically recorded in this study from 15 loess and paleosoil samples from the captured high-resolution images. Several size (e.g. circle-equivalent diameter, major axis, length, width, area) and shape parameters (e.g. elongation, circularity, convexity) were calculated by the instrument software. At the same time, the mean light intensity after transmission through each particle is automatically collected by the system as a proxy of optical properties of the material. Intensity values are dependent on chemical composition and/or thickness of the particles. The results of the automated imaging were compared to particle size data determined by three different laser diffraction instruments

  17. Automated angiogenesis quantification through advanced image processing techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doukas, Charlampos N; Maglogiannis, Ilias; Chatziioannou, Aristotle; Papapetropoulos, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    Angiogenesis, the formation of blood vessels in tumors, is an interactive process between tumor, endothelial and stromal cells in order to create a network for oxygen and nutrients supply, necessary for tumor growth. According to this, angiogenic activity is considered a suitable method for both tumor growth or inhibition detection. The angiogenic potential is usually estimated by counting the number of blood vessels in particular sections. One of the most popular assay tissues to study the angiogenesis phenomenon is the developing chick embryo and its chorioallantoic membrane (CAM), which is a highly vascular structure lining the inner surface of the egg shell. The aim of this study was to develop and validate an automated image analysis method that would give an unbiased quantification of the micro-vessel density and growth in angiogenic CAM images. The presented method has been validated by comparing automated results to manual counts over a series of digital chick embryo photos. The results indicate the high accuracy of the tool, which has been thus extensively used for tumor growth detection at different stages of embryonic development. PMID:17946107

  18. Pancreas++ : Automated Quantification of Pancreatic Islet Cells in Microscopy Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    StuartMaudsley

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The microscopic image analysis of pancreatic Islet of Langerhans morphology is crucial for the investigation of diabetes and metabolic diseases. Besides the general size of the islet, the percentage and relative position of glucagon-containing alpha-, and insulin-containing beta-cells is also important for pathophysiological analyses, especially in rodents. Hence, the ability to identify, quantify and spatially locate peripheral and ‘involuted’ alpha-cells in the islet core is an important analytical goal. There is a dearth of software available for the automated and sophisticated positional-quantification of multiple cell types in the islet core. Manual analytical methods for these analyses, while relatively accurate, can suffer from a slow throughput rate as well as user-based biases. Here we describe a newly developed pancreatic islet analytical software program, Pancreas++, which facilitates the fully-automated, non-biased, and highly reproducible investigation of islet area and alpha- and beta-cell quantity as well as position within the islet for either single or large batches of fluorescent images. We demonstrate the utility and accuracy of Pancreas++ by comparing its performance to other pancreatic islet size and cell type (alpha, beta quantification methods. Our Pancreas++ analysis was significantly faster than other methods, while still retaining low error rates and a high degree of result correlation with the manually generated reference standard.

  19. Automated Image Processing for the Analysis of DNA Repair Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Riess, Thorsten; Tomas, Martin; Ferrando-May, Elisa; Merhof, Dorit

    2011-01-01

    The efficient repair of cellular DNA is essential for the maintenance and inheritance of genomic information. In order to cope with the high frequency of spontaneous and induced DNA damage, a multitude of repair mechanisms have evolved. These are enabled by a wide range of protein factors specifically recognizing different types of lesions and finally restoring the normal DNA sequence. This work focuses on the repair factor XPC (xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C), which identifies bulky DNA lesions and initiates their removal via the nucleotide excision repair pathway. The binding of XPC to damaged DNA can be visualized in living cells by following the accumulation of a fluorescent XPC fusion at lesions induced by laser microirradiation in a fluorescence microscope. In this work, an automated image processing pipeline is presented which allows to identify and quantify the accumulation reaction without any user interaction. The image processing pipeline comprises a preprocessing stage where the ima...

  20. An automated deformable image registration evaluation of confidence tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Neil; Chen, Josephine; Kim, Hojin; Morin, Olivier; Nie, Ke; Pouliot, Jean

    2016-04-01

    Deformable image registration (DIR) is a powerful tool for radiation oncology, but it can produce errors. Beyond this, DIR accuracy is not a fixed quantity and varies on a case-by-case basis. The purpose of this study is to explore the possibility of an automated program to create a patient- and voxel-specific evaluation of DIR accuracy. AUTODIRECT is a software tool that was developed to perform this evaluation for the application of a clinical DIR algorithm to a set of patient images. In brief, AUTODIRECT uses algorithms to generate deformations and applies them to these images (along with processing) to generate sets of test images, with known deformations that are similar to the actual ones and with realistic noise properties. The clinical DIR algorithm is applied to these test image sets (currently 4). From these tests, AUTODIRECT generates spatial and dose uncertainty estimates for each image voxel based on a Student’s t distribution. In this study, four commercially available DIR algorithms were used to deform a dose distribution associated with a virtual pelvic phantom image set, and AUTODIRECT was used to generate dose uncertainty estimates for each deformation. The virtual phantom image set has a known ground-truth deformation, so the true dose-warping errors of the DIR algorithms were also known. AUTODIRECT predicted error patterns that closely matched the actual error spatial distribution. On average AUTODIRECT overestimated the magnitude of the dose errors, but tuning the AUTODIRECT algorithms should improve agreement. This proof-of-principle test demonstrates the potential for the AUTODIRECT algorithm as an empirical method to predict DIR errors.

  1. Scanning probe image wizard: A toolbox for automated scanning probe microscopy data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirling, Julian; Woolley, Richard A. J.; Moriarty, Philip

    2013-11-01

    We describe SPIW (scanning probe image wizard), a new image processing toolbox for SPM (scanning probe microscope) images. SPIW can be used to automate many aspects of SPM data analysis, even for images with surface contamination and step edges present. Specialised routines are available for images with atomic or molecular resolution to improve image visualisation and generate statistical data on surface structure.

  2. Automated extraction of chemical structure information from digital raster images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shedden Kerby A

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To search for chemical structures in research articles, diagrams or text representing molecules need to be translated to a standard chemical file format compatible with cheminformatic search engines. Nevertheless, chemical information contained in research articles is often referenced as analog diagrams of chemical structures embedded in digital raster images. To automate analog-to-digital conversion of chemical structure diagrams in scientific research articles, several software systems have been developed. But their algorithmic performance and utility in cheminformatic research have not been investigated. Results This paper aims to provide critical reviews for these systems and also report our recent development of ChemReader – a fully automated tool for extracting chemical structure diagrams in research articles and converting them into standard, searchable chemical file formats. Basic algorithms for recognizing lines and letters representing bonds and atoms in chemical structure diagrams can be independently run in sequence from a graphical user interface-and the algorithm parameters can be readily changed-to facilitate additional development specifically tailored to a chemical database annotation scheme. Compared with existing software programs such as OSRA, Kekule, and CLiDE, our results indicate that ChemReader outperforms other software systems on several sets of sample images from diverse sources in terms of the rate of correct outputs and the accuracy on extracting molecular substructure patterns. Conclusion The availability of ChemReader as a cheminformatic tool for extracting chemical structure information from digital raster images allows research and development groups to enrich their chemical structure databases by annotating the entries with published research articles. Based on its stable performance and high accuracy, ChemReader may be sufficiently accurate for annotating the chemical database with links

  3. Image Processing for Automated Analysis of the Fluorescence In-Situ Hybridization (FISH) Microscopic Images

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schier, Jan; Kovář, Bohumil; Kočárek, E.; Kuneš, Michal

    Berlin Heidelberg: Springer-Verlag, 2011, s. 622-633. (Lecture Notes in Computer Science ). ISBN 978-3-642-24081-2. [5th International Conference, ICHIT 2011. Daejeon (KR), 22.09.2011-24.09.2011] R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA01010931 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : fluorescence in-situ hybridization * image processing * image segmentation Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2011/ZS/shier-image processing for automated analysis of the fluorescence in-situ hybridization (fish) microscopic images.pdf

  4. Image-based path planning for automated virtual colonoscopy navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Wei

    2008-03-01

    Virtual colonoscopy (VC) is a noninvasive method for colonic polyp screening, by reconstructing three-dimensional models of the colon using computerized tomography (CT). In virtual colonoscopy fly-through navigation, it is crucial to generate an optimal camera path for efficient clinical examination. In conventional methods, the centerline of the colon lumen is usually used as the camera path. In order to extract colon centerline, some time consuming pre-processing algorithms must be performed before the fly-through navigation, such as colon segmentation, distance transformation, or topological thinning. In this paper, we present an efficient image-based path planning algorithm for automated virtual colonoscopy fly-through navigation without the requirement of any pre-processing. Our algorithm only needs the physician to provide a seed point as the starting camera position using 2D axial CT images. A wide angle fisheye camera model is used to generate a depth image from the current camera position. Two types of navigational landmarks, safe regions and target regions are extracted from the depth images. Camera position and its corresponding view direction are then determined using these landmarks. The experimental results show that the generated paths are accurate and increase the user comfort during the fly-through navigation. Moreover, because of the efficiency of our path planning algorithm and rendering algorithm, our VC fly-through navigation system can still guarantee 30 FPS.

  5. Texture-Based Automated Lithological Classification Using Aeromagenetic Anomaly Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Vivek

    2009-01-01

    This report consists of a thesis submitted to the faculty of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science, Graduate College, The University of Arizona, 2004 Aeromagnetic anomaly images are geophysical prospecting tools frequently used in the exploration of metalliferous minerals and hydrocarbons. The amplitude and texture content of these images provide a wealth of information to geophysicists who attempt to delineate the nature of the Earth's upper crust. These images prove to be extremely useful in remote areas and locations where the minerals of interest are concealed by basin fill. Typically, geophysicists compile a suite of aeromagnetic anomaly images, derived from amplitude and texture measurement operations, in order to obtain a qualitative interpretation of the lithological (rock) structure. Texture measures have proven to be especially capable of capturing the magnetic anomaly signature of unique lithological units. We performed a quantitative study to explore the possibility of using texture measures as input to a machine vision system in order to achieve automated classification of lithological units. This work demonstrated a significant improvement in classification accuracy over random guessing based on a priori probabilities. Additionally, a quantitative comparison between the performances of five classes of texture measures in their ability to discriminate lithological units was achieved.

  6. Automated target recognition technique for image segmentation and scene analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgart, Chris W.; Ciarcia, Christopher A.

    1994-03-01

    Automated target recognition (ATR) software has been designed to perform image segmentation and scene analysis. Specifically, this software was developed as a package for the Army's Minefield and Reconnaissance and Detector (MIRADOR) program. MIRADOR is an on/off road, remote control, multisensor system designed to detect buried and surface- emplaced metallic and nonmetallic antitank mines. The basic requirements for this ATR software were the following: (1) an ability to separate target objects from the background in low signal-noise conditions; (2) an ability to handle a relatively high dynamic range in imaging light levels; (3) the ability to compensate for or remove light source effects such as shadows; and (4) the ability to identify target objects as mines. The image segmentation and target evaluation was performed using an integrated and parallel processing approach. Three basic techniques (texture analysis, edge enhancement, and contrast enhancement) were used collectively to extract all potential mine target shapes from the basic image. Target evaluation was then performed using a combination of size, geometrical, and fractal characteristics, which resulted in a calculated probability for each target shape. Overall results with this algorithm were quite good, though there is a tradeoff between detection confidence and the number of false alarms. This technology also has applications in the areas of hazardous waste site remediation, archaeology, and law enforcement.

  7. Automated Recognition of 3D Features in GPIR Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Han; Stough, Timothy; Fijany, Amir

    2007-01-01

    A method of automated recognition of three-dimensional (3D) features in images generated by ground-penetrating imaging radar (GPIR) is undergoing development. GPIR 3D images can be analyzed to detect and identify such subsurface features as pipes and other utility conduits. Until now, much of the analysis of GPIR images has been performed manually by expert operators who must visually identify and track each feature. The present method is intended to satisfy a need for more efficient and accurate analysis by means of algorithms that can automatically identify and track subsurface features, with minimal supervision by human operators. In this method, data from multiple sources (for example, data on different features extracted by different algorithms) are fused together for identifying subsurface objects. The algorithms of this method can be classified in several different ways. In one classification, the algorithms fall into three classes: (1) image-processing algorithms, (2) feature- extraction algorithms, and (3) a multiaxis data-fusion/pattern-recognition algorithm that includes a combination of machine-learning, pattern-recognition, and object-linking algorithms. The image-processing class includes preprocessing algorithms for reducing noise and enhancing target features for pattern recognition. The feature-extraction algorithms operate on preprocessed data to extract such specific features in images as two-dimensional (2D) slices of a pipe. Then the multiaxis data-fusion/ pattern-recognition algorithm identifies, classifies, and reconstructs 3D objects from the extracted features. In this process, multiple 2D features extracted by use of different algorithms and representing views along different directions are used to identify and reconstruct 3D objects. In object linking, which is an essential part of this process, features identified in successive 2D slices and located within a threshold radius of identical features in adjacent slices are linked in a

  8. Automated detection of open magnetic field regions in EUV images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krista, Larisza Diana; Reinard, Alysha

    2016-05-01

    Open magnetic regions on the Sun are either long-lived (coronal holes) or transient (dimmings) in nature, but both appear as dark regions in EUV images. For this reason their detection can be done in a similar way. As coronal holes are often large and long-lived in comparison to dimmings, their detection is more straightforward. The Coronal Hole Automated Recognition and Monitoring (CHARM) algorithm detects coronal holes using EUV images and a magnetogram. The EUV images are used to identify dark regions, and the magnetogam allows us to determine if the dark region is unipolar – a characteristic of coronal holes. There is no temporal sensitivity in this process, since coronal hole lifetimes span days to months. Dimming regions, however, emerge and disappear within hours. Hence, the time and location of a dimming emergence need to be known to successfully identify them and distinguish them from regular coronal holes. Currently, the Coronal Dimming Tracker (CoDiT) algorithm is semi-automated – it requires the dimming emergence time and location as an input. With those inputs we can identify the dimming and track it through its lifetime. CoDIT has also been developed to allow the tracking of dimmings that split or merge – a typical feature of dimmings.The advantage of these particular algorithms is their ability to adapt to detecting different types of open field regions. For coronal hole detection, each full-disk solar image is processed individually to determine a threshold for the image, hence, we are not limited to a single pre-determined threshold. For dimming regions we also allow individual thresholds for each dimming, as they can differ substantially. This flexibility is necessary for a subjective analysis of the studied regions. These algorithms were developed with the goal to allow us better understand the processes that give rise to eruptive and non-eruptive open field regions. We aim to study how these regions evolve over time and what environmental

  9. Automated microaneurysm detection algorithms applied to diabetic retinopathy retinal images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akara Sopharak

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy is the commonest cause of blindness in working age people. It is characterised and graded by the development of retinal microaneurysms, haemorrhages and exudates. The damage caused by diabetic retinopathy can be prevented if it is treated in its early stages. Therefore, automated early detection can limit the severity of the disease, improve the follow-up management of diabetic patients and assist ophthalmologists in investigating and treating the disease more efficiently. This review focuses on microaneurysm detection as the earliest clinically localised characteristic of diabetic retinopathy, a frequently observed complication in both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Algorithms used for microaneurysm detection from retinal images are reviewed. A number of features used to extract microaneurysm are summarised. Furthermore, a comparative analysis of reported methods used to automatically detect microaneurysms is presented and discussed. The performance of methods and their complexity are also discussed.

  10. Automated Imaging and Analysis of the Hemagglutination Inhibition Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Michael; Fries, Katherine; Khoury, Rawia; Zheng, Lingyi; Hu, Branda; Hildreth, Stephen W; Parkhill, Robert; Warren, William

    2016-04-01

    The hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) assay quantifies the level of strain-specific influenza virus antibody present in serum and is the standard by which influenza vaccine immunogenicity is measured. The HAI assay endpoint requires real-time monitoring of rapidly evolving red blood cell (RBC) patterns for signs of agglutination at a rate of potentially thousands of patterns per day to meet the throughput needs for clinical testing. This analysis is typically performed manually through visual inspection by highly trained individuals. However, concordant HAI results across different labs are challenging to demonstrate due to analyst bias and variability in analysis methods. To address these issues, we have developed a bench-top, standalone, high-throughput imaging solution that automatically determines the agglutination states of up to 9600 HAI assay wells per hour and assigns HAI titers to 400 samples in a single unattended 30-min run. Images of the tilted plates are acquired as a function of time and analyzed using algorithms that were developed through comprehensive examination of manual classifications. Concordance testing of the imaging system with eight different influenza antigens demonstrates 100% agreement between automated and manual titer determination with a percent difference of ≤3.4% for all cases. PMID:26464422

  11. Automated transient detection in the STEREO Heliospheric Imagers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Luke; Scott, Chris; Owens, Mat; Lockwood, Mike; Tucker-Hood, Kim; Davies, Jackie

    2014-05-01

    Since the launch of the twin STEREO satellites, the heliospheric imagers (HI) have been used, with good results, in tracking transients of solar origin, such as Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs), out far into the heliosphere. A frequently used approach is to build a "J-map", in which multiple elongation profiles along a constant position angle are stacked in time, building an image in which radially propagating transients form curved tracks in the J-map. From this the time-elongation profile of a solar transient can be manually identified. This is a time consuming and laborious process, and the results are subjective, depending on the skill and expertise of the investigator. Therefore, it is desirable to develop an automated algorithm for the detection and tracking of the transient features observed in HI data. This is to some extent previously covered ground, as similar problems have been encountered in the analysis of coronagraph data and have led to the development of products such as CACtus etc. We present the results of our investigation into the automated detection of solar transients observed in J-maps formed from HI data. We use edge and line detection methods to identify transients in the J-maps, and then use kinematic models of the solar transient propagation (such as the fixed-phi and harmonic mean geometric models) to estimate the solar transients properties, such as transient speed and propagation direction, from the time-elongation profile. The effectiveness of this process is assessed by comparison of our results with a set of manually identified CMEs, extracted and analysed by the Solar Storm Watch Project. Solar Storm Watch is a citizen science project in which solar transients are identified in J-maps formed from HI data and tracked multiple times by different users. This allows the calculation of a consensus time-elongation profile for each event, and therefore does not suffer from the potential subjectivity of an individual researcher tracking an

  12. Automated CT marker segmentation for image registration in radionuclide therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper a novel, automated CT marker segmentation technique for image registration is described. The technique, which is based on analysing each CT slice contour individually, treats the cross sections of the external markers as protrusions of the slice contour. Knowledge-based criteria, using the shape and dimensions of the markers, are defined to enable marker identification and segmentation. Following segmentation, the three-dimensional (3D) markers' centroids are localized using an intensity-weighted algorithm. Finally, image registration is performed using a least-squares fit algorithm. The technique was applied to both simulated and patient studies. The patients were undergoing 131I-mIBG radionuclide therapy with each study comprising several 99mTc single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scans and one CT marker scan. The mean residual 3D registration errors (±1 SD) computed for the simulated and patient studies were 1.8±0.3 mm and 4.3±0.5 mm respectively. (author)

  13. Automated interpretation of PET/CT images in patients with lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutte, Henrik; Jakobsson, David; Olofsson, Fredrik; Ohlsson, Mattias; Valind, Sven; Loft, Annika; Edenbrandt, Lars; Kjaer, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    localization of lesions in the PET images in the feature extraction process. Eight features from each examination were used as inputs to artificial neural networks trained to classify the images. Thereafter, the performance of the network was evaluated in the test set. RESULTS: The performance of the automated......PURPOSE: To develop a completely automated method based on image processing techniques and artificial neural networks for the interpretation of combined [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) images for the diagnosis and staging of lung...... standard' image interpretation. The training group was used in the development of the automated method. The image processing techniques included algorithms for segmentation of the lungs based on the CT images and detection of lesions in the PET images. Lung boundaries from the CT images were used for...

  14. Automated movement correction for dynamic PET/CT images: Evaluation with phantom and patient data

    OpenAIRE

    Ye, H.; Wong, KP; Wardak, M; Dahlbom, M.; Kepe, V; Barrio, JR; Nelson, LD; Small, GW; Huang, SC

    2014-01-01

    Head movement during a dynamic brain PET/CT imaging results in mismatch between CT and dynamic PET images. It can cause artifacts in CT-based attenuation corrected PET images, thus affecting both the qualitative and quantitative aspects of the dynamic PET images and the derived parametric images. In this study, we developed an automated retrospective image-based movement correction (MC) procedure. The MC method first registered the CT image to each dynamic PET frames, then re-reconstructed th...

  15. Automated Micro-Object Detection for Mobile Diagnostics Using Lens-Free Imaging Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Mohendra Roy; Dongmin Seo; Sangwoo Oh; Yeonghun Chae; Myung-Hyun Nam; Sungkyu Seo

    2016-01-01

    Lens-free imaging technology has been extensively used recently for microparticle and biological cell analysis because of its high throughput, low cost, and simple and compact arrangement. However, this technology still lacks a dedicated and automated detection system. In this paper, we describe a custom-developed automated micro-object detection method for a lens-free imaging system. In our previous work (Roy et al.), we developed a lens-free imaging system using low-cost components. This sy...

  16. Automated Image Retrieval of Chest CT Images Based on Local Grey Scale Invariant Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrais Porto, Marcelo; Cordeiro d'Ornellas, Marcos

    2015-01-01

    Textual-based tools are regularly employed to retrieve medical images for reading and interpretation using current retrieval Picture Archiving and Communication Systems (PACS) but pose some drawbacks. All-purpose content-based image retrieval (CBIR) systems are limited when dealing with medical images and do not fit well into PACS workflow and clinical practice. This paper presents an automated image retrieval approach for chest CT images based local grey scale invariant features from a local database. Performance was measured in terms of precision and recall, average retrieval precision (ARP), and average retrieval rate (ARR). Preliminary results have shown the effectiveness of the proposed approach. The prototype is also a useful tool for radiology research and education, providing valuable information to the medical and broader healthcare community. PMID:26262345

  17. Automated Nanofiber Diameter Measurement in SEM Images Using a Robust Image Analysis Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ertan Öznergiz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the high surface area, porosity, and rigidity, applications of nanofibers and nanosurfaces have developed in recent years. Nanofibers and nanosurfaces are typically produced by electrospinning method. In the production process, determination of average fiber diameter is crucial for quality assessment. Average fiber diameter is determined by manually measuring the diameters of randomly selected fibers on scanning electron microscopy (SEM images. However, as the number of the images increases, manual fiber diameter determination becomes a tedious and time consuming task as well as being sensitive to human errors. Therefore, an automated fiber diameter measurement system is desired. In the literature, this task is achieved by using image analysis algorithms. Typically, these methods first isolate each fiber in the image and measure the diameter of each isolated fiber. Fiber isolation is an error-prone process. In this study, automated calculation of nanofiber diameter is achieved without fiber isolation using image processing and analysis algorithms. Performance of the proposed method was tested on real data. The effectiveness of the proposed method is shown by comparing automatically and manually measured nanofiber diameter values.

  18. Automated Detection of Firearms and Knives in a CCTV Image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Grega

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Closed circuit television systems (CCTV are becoming more and more popular and are being deployed in many offices, housing estates and in most public spaces. Monitoring systems have been implemented in many European and American cities. This makes for an enormous load for the CCTV operators, as the number of camera views a single operator can monitor is limited by human factors. In this paper, we focus on the task of automated detection and recognition of dangerous situations for CCTV systems. We propose algorithms that are able to alert the human operator when a firearm or knife is visible in the image. We have focused on limiting the number of false alarms in order to allow for a real-life application of the system. The specificity and sensitivity of the knife detection are significantly better than others published recently. We have also managed to propose a version of a firearm detection algorithm that offers a near-zero rate of false alarms. We have shown that it is possible to create a system that is capable of an early warning in a dangerous situation, which may lead to faster and more effective response times and a reduction in the number of potential victims.

  19. Automated Detection of Firearms and Knives in a CCTV Image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grega, Michał; Matiolański, Andrzej; Guzik, Piotr; Leszczuk, Mikołaj

    2016-01-01

    Closed circuit television systems (CCTV) are becoming more and more popular and are being deployed in many offices, housing estates and in most public spaces. Monitoring systems have been implemented in many European and American cities. This makes for an enormous load for the CCTV operators, as the number of camera views a single operator can monitor is limited by human factors. In this paper, we focus on the task of automated detection and recognition of dangerous situations for CCTV systems. We propose algorithms that are able to alert the human operator when a firearm or knife is visible in the image. We have focused on limiting the number of false alarms in order to allow for a real-life application of the system. The specificity and sensitivity of the knife detection are significantly better than others published recently. We have also managed to propose a version of a firearm detection algorithm that offers a near-zero rate of false alarms. We have shown that it is possible to create a system that is capable of an early warning in a dangerous situation, which may lead to faster and more effective response times and a reduction in the number of potential victims. PMID:26729128

  20. Exploiting image registration for automated resonance assignment in NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analysis of protein NMR data involves the assignment of resonance peaks in a number of multidimensional data sets. To establish resonance assignment a three-dimensional search is used to match a pair of common variables, such as chemical shifts of the same spin system, in different NMR spectra. We show that by displaying the variables to be compared in two-dimensional plots the process can be simplified. Moreover, by utilizing a fast Fourier transform cross-correlation algorithm, more common to the field of image registration or pattern matching, we can automate this process. Here, we use sequential NMR backbone assignment as an example to show that the combination of correlation plots and segmented pattern matching establishes fast backbone assignment in fifteen proteins of varying sizes. For example, the 265-residue RalBP1 protein was 95.4 % correctly assigned in 10 s. The same concept can be applied to any multidimensional NMR data set where analysis comprises the comparison of two variables. This modular and robust approach offers high efficiency with excellent computational scalability and could be easily incorporated into existing assignment software

  1. Automated image analysis of atomic force microscopy images of rotavirus particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A variety of biological samples can be imaged by the atomic force microscope (AFM) under environments that range from vacuum to ambient to liquid. Generally imaging is pursued to evaluate structural features of the sample or perhaps identify some structural changes in the sample that are induced by the investigator. In many cases, AFM images of sample features and induced structural changes are interpreted in general qualitative terms such as markedly smaller or larger, rougher, highly irregular, or smooth. Various manual tools can be used to analyze images and extract more quantitative data, but this is usually a cumbersome process. To facilitate quantitative AFM imaging, automated image analysis routines are being developed. Viral particles imaged in water were used as a test case to develop an algorithm that automatically extracts average dimensional information from a large set of individual particles. The extracted information allows statistical analyses of the dimensional characteristics of the particles and facilitates interpretation related to the binding of the particles to the surface. This algorithm is being extended for analysis of other biological samples and physical objects that are imaged by AFM

  2. Automated image analysis of atomic force microscopy images of rotavirus particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkataraman, S. [Life Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Allison, D.P. [Life Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Department of Biochemistry, Cellular, and Molecular Biology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Molecular Imaging Inc. Tempe, AZ, 85282 (United States); Qi, H. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Morrell-Falvey, J.L. [Life Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Kallewaard, N.L. [Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232-2905 (United States); Crowe, J.E. [Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232-2905 (United States); Doktycz, M.J. [Life Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)]. E-mail: doktyczmj@ornl.gov

    2006-06-15

    A variety of biological samples can be imaged by the atomic force microscope (AFM) under environments that range from vacuum to ambient to liquid. Generally imaging is pursued to evaluate structural features of the sample or perhaps identify some structural changes in the sample that are induced by the investigator. In many cases, AFM images of sample features and induced structural changes are interpreted in general qualitative terms such as markedly smaller or larger, rougher, highly irregular, or smooth. Various manual tools can be used to analyze images and extract more quantitative data, but this is usually a cumbersome process. To facilitate quantitative AFM imaging, automated image analysis routines are being developed. Viral particles imaged in water were used as a test case to develop an algorithm that automatically extracts average dimensional information from a large set of individual particles. The extracted information allows statistical analyses of the dimensional characteristics of the particles and facilitates interpretation related to the binding of the particles to the surface. This algorithm is being extended for analysis of other biological samples and physical objects that are imaged by AFM.

  3. Performance and Analysis of the Automated Semantic Object and Spatial Relationships Extraction in Traffic Images

    OpenAIRE

    Wang Hui Hui

    2013-01-01

    Extraction and representation of spatial relations semantics among objects are important as it can convey important information about the image and to further increase the confidence in image understanding which contributes to richer querying and retrieval facilities. This paper discusses the performance of the automated object spatial relationships semantic information extraction as proposed. Experiments have been conducted to demonstrate that the proposed automated object spatial relations...

  4. Use of automated image registration to generate mean brain SPECT image of Alzheimer's patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to compute and compare the group mean HMPAO brain SPECT images of patients with senile dementia of Alzheimer's type (SDAT) and age matched control subjects after transformation of the individual images to a standard size and shape. Ten patients with Alzheimer's disease (age 71.6±5.0 yr) and ten age matched normal subjects (age 71.0±6.1 yr) participated in this study. Tc-99m HMPAO brain SPECT and X-ray CT scans were acquired for each subject. SPECT images were normalized to an average activity of 100 counts/pixel. Individual brain images were transformed to a standard size and shape with the help of Automated Image Registration (AIR). Realigned brain SPECT images of both groups were used to generate mean and standard deviation images by arithmetic operations on voxel based numerical values. Mean images of both groups were compared by applying the unpaired t-test on a voxel by voxel basis to generate three dimensional T-maps. X-ray CT images of individual subjects were evaluated by means of a computer program for brain atrophy. A significant decrease in relative radioisotope (RI) uptake was present in the bilateral superior and inferior parietal lobules (p<0.05), bilateral inferior temporal gyri, and the bilateral superior and middle frontal gyri (p<0.001). The mean brain atrophy indices for patients and normal subjects were 0.853±0.042 and 0.933±0.017 respectively, the difference being statistically significant (p<0.001). The use of a brain image standardization procedure increases the accuracy of voxel based group comparisons. Thus, intersubject averaging enhances the capacity for detection of abnormalities in functional brain images by minimizing the influence of individual variation. (author)

  5. Imaging Automation and Volume Tomographic Visualization at Texas Neutron Imaging Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A thermal neutron imaging facility for real-time neutron radiography and computed tomography has been developed at the University of Texas reactor. The facility produced good-quality radiographs and two-dimensional tomograms. Further developments have been recently accomplished. A computer software has been developed to automate and expedite the data acquisition and reconstruction processes. Volume tomographic visualization using Interactive Data Language (IDL) software has been demonstrated and will be further developed. Volume tomography provides the additional flexibility of producing slices of the object using software and thus avoids redoing the measurements

  6. Imaging automation and volume tomographic visualization at Texas Neutron Imaging Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A thermal neutron imaging facility for real-time neutron radiography and computed tomography has been developed at the University of Texas reactor. The facility produced a good-quality radiographs and two-dimensional tomograms. Further developments have been recently accomplished. Further developments have been recently accomplished. A computer software has been developed to automate and expedite the data acquisition and reconstruction processes. Volume tomographic visualization using Interactive Data Language (IDL) software has been demonstrated and will be further developed. Volume tomography provides the additional flexibility of producing slices of the object using software and thus avoids redoing the measurements

  7. Twelve automated thresholding methods for segmentation of PET images: a phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Elena; Lecumberri, Pablo; Pagola, Miguel; Gómez, Marisol; Bilbao, Izaskun; Ecay, Margarita; Peñuelas, Iván; Martí-Climent, Josep M.

    2012-06-01

    Tumor volume delineation over positron emission tomography (PET) images is of great interest for proper diagnosis and therapy planning. However, standard segmentation techniques (manual or semi-automated) are operator dependent and time consuming while fully automated procedures are cumbersome or require complex mathematical development. The aim of this study was to segment PET images in a fully automated way by implementing a set of 12 automated thresholding algorithms, classical in the fields of optical character recognition, tissue engineering or non-destructive testing images in high-tech structures. Automated thresholding algorithms select a specific threshold for each image without any a priori spatial information of the segmented object or any special calibration of the tomograph, as opposed to usual thresholding methods for PET. Spherical 18F-filled objects of different volumes were acquired on clinical PET/CT and on a small animal PET scanner, with three different signal-to-background ratios. Images were segmented with 12 automatic thresholding algorithms and results were compared with the standard segmentation reference, a threshold at 42% of the maximum uptake. Ridler and Ramesh thresholding algorithms based on clustering and histogram-shape information, respectively, provided better results that the classical 42%-based threshold (p < 0.05). We have herein demonstrated that fully automated thresholding algorithms can provide better results than classical PET segmentation tools.

  8. Twelve automated thresholding methods for segmentation of PET images: a phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumor volume delineation over positron emission tomography (PET) images is of great interest for proper diagnosis and therapy planning. However, standard segmentation techniques (manual or semi-automated) are operator dependent and time consuming while fully automated procedures are cumbersome or require complex mathematical development. The aim of this study was to segment PET images in a fully automated way by implementing a set of 12 automated thresholding algorithms, classical in the fields of optical character recognition, tissue engineering or non-destructive testing images in high-tech structures. Automated thresholding algorithms select a specific threshold for each image without any a priori spatial information of the segmented object or any special calibration of the tomograph, as opposed to usual thresholding methods for PET. Spherical 18F-filled objects of different volumes were acquired on clinical PET/CT and on a small animal PET scanner, with three different signal-to-background ratios. Images were segmented with 12 automatic thresholding algorithms and results were compared with the standard segmentation reference, a threshold at 42% of the maximum uptake. Ridler and Ramesh thresholding algorithms based on clustering and histogram-shape information, respectively, provided better results that the classical 42%-based threshold (p < 0.05). We have herein demonstrated that fully automated thresholding algorithms can provide better results than classical PET segmentation tools. (paper)

  9. Automated Algorithm for Carotid Lumen Segmentation and 3D Reconstruction in B-mode images

    OpenAIRE

    Jorge M. S. Pereira; João Manuel R. S. Tavares

    2011-01-01

    The B-mode image system is one of the most popular systems used in the medical area; however it imposes several difficulties in the image segmentation process due to low contrast and noise. Although these difficulties, this image mode is often used in the study and diagnosis of the carotid artery diseases.In this paper, it is described the a novel automated algorithm for carotid lumen segmentation and 3-D reconstruction in B- mode images.

  10. Neuron Image Analyzer: Automated and Accurate Extraction of Neuronal Data from Low Quality Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwang-Min; Son, Kilho; Palmore, G Tayhas R

    2015-01-01

    Image analysis software is an essential tool used in neuroscience and neural engineering to evaluate changes in neuronal structure following extracellular stimuli. Both manual and automated methods in current use are severely inadequate at detecting and quantifying changes in neuronal morphology when the images analyzed have a low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This inadequacy derives from the fact that these methods often include data from non-neuronal structures or artifacts by simply tracing pixels with high intensity. In this paper, we describe Neuron Image Analyzer (NIA), a novel algorithm that overcomes these inadequacies by employing Laplacian of Gaussian filter and graphical models (i.e., Hidden Markov Model, Fully Connected Chain Model) to specifically extract relational pixel information corresponding to neuronal structures (i.e., soma, neurite). As such, NIA that is based on vector representation is less likely to detect false signals (i.e., non-neuronal structures) or generate artifact signals (i.e., deformation of original structures) than current image analysis algorithms that are based on raster representation. We demonstrate that NIA enables precise quantification of neuronal processes (e.g., length and orientation of neurites) in low quality images with a significant increase in the accuracy of detecting neuronal changes post-stimulation. PMID:26593337

  11. AMIsurvey, chimenea and other tools: Automated imaging for transient surveys with existing radio-observatories

    CERN Document Server

    Staley, Tim D

    2015-01-01

    In preparing the way for the Square Kilometre Array and its pathfinders, there is a pressing need to begin probing the transient sky in a fully robotic fashion using the current generation of radio telescopes. Effective exploitation of such surveys requires a largely automated data-reduction process. This paper introduces an end-to-end automated reduction pipeline, AMIsurvey, used for calibrating and imaging data from the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager Large Array. AMIsurvey makes use of several component libraries which have been packaged separately for open-source release. The most scientifically significant of these is chimenea, which implements a telescope agnostic algorithm for automated imaging of pre-calibrated multi-epoch radio-synthesis data, making use of CASA subroutines for the underlying image-synthesis operations. At a lower level, AMIsurvey relies upon two libraries, drive-ami and drive-casa, built to allow use of mature radio-astronomy software packages from within Python scripts. These packages...

  12. Automated defect recognition method based on neighbor layer slice images of ICT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current automated defect recognition of industrial computerized tomography(ICT) slice images is mostly carried out in individual image. Certain false detections would exist for some isolated noises can not be wiped off without considering the information of neighbor layer images. To solve this problem,a new automated defect recognition method is presented based on a two-step analysis of consecutive slice images. First, all potential defects are segmented using a classic method in each image. Second, real defects and false defects are recognized by all potential defect matching of neighbor layer images in two steps based on the continuity of real defects characteristic and the non-continuity of false defects between the neighbor images. The method is verified by experiments and results prove that the real defects can be detected with high probability and false detections can be reduced effectively. (authors)

  13. Knowledge Acquisition, Validation, and Maintenance in a Planning System for Automated Image Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Steve A.

    1996-01-01

    A key obstacle hampering fielding of AI planning applications is the considerable expense of developing, verifying, updating, and maintainting the planning knowledge base (KB). Planning systems must be able to compare favorably in terms of software lifecycle costs to other means of automation such as scripts or rule-based expert systems. This paper describes a planning application of automated imaging processing and our overall approach to knowledge acquisition for this application.

  14. Automated recognition of cell phenotypes in histology images based on membrane- and nuclei-targeting biomarkers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three-dimensional in vitro culture of cancer cells are used to predict the effects of prospective anti-cancer drugs in vivo. In this study, we present an automated image analysis protocol for detailed morphological protein marker profiling of tumoroid cross section images. Histologic cross sections of breast tumoroids developed in co-culture suspensions of breast cancer cell lines, stained for E-cadherin and progesterone receptor, were digitized and pixels in these images were classified into five categories using k-means clustering. Automated segmentation was used to identify image regions composed of cells expressing a given biomarker. Synthesized images were created to check the accuracy of the image processing system. Accuracy of automated segmentation was over 95% in identifying regions of interest in synthesized images. Image analysis of adjacent histology slides stained, respectively, for Ecad and PR, accurately predicted regions of different cell phenotypes. Image analysis of tumoroid cross sections from different tumoroids obtained under the same co-culture conditions indicated the variation of cellular composition from one tumoroid to another. Variations in the compositions of cross sections obtained from the same tumoroid were established by parallel analysis of Ecad and PR-stained cross section images. Proposed image analysis methods offer standardized high throughput profiling of molecular anatomy of tumoroids based on both membrane and nuclei markers that is suitable to rapid large scale investigations of anti-cancer compounds for drug development

  15. Automated striatal uptake analysis of 18F-FDOPA PET images applied to Parkinson's disease patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    6-[18F]Fluoro-L-DOPA (FDOPA) is a radiopharmaceutical valuable for assessing the presynaptic dopaminergic function when used with positron emission tomography (PET). More specifically, the striatal-to-occipital ratio (SOR) of FDOPA uptake images has been extensively used as a quantitative parameter in these PET studies. Our aim was to develop an easy, automated method capable of performing objective analysis of SOR in FDOPA PET images of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. Brain images from FDOPA PET studies of 21 patients with PD and 6 healthy subjects were included in our automated striatal analyses. Images of each individual were spatially normalized into an FDOPA template. Subsequently, the image slice with the highest level of basal ganglia activity was chosen among the series of normalized images. Also, the immediate preceding and following slices of the chosen image were then selected. Finally, the summation of these three images was used to quantify and calculate the SOR values. The results obtained by automated analysis were compared with manual analysis by a trained and experienced image processing technologist. The SOR values obtained from the automated analysis had a good agreement and high correlation with manual analysis. The differences in caudate, putamen, and striatum were -0.023, -0.029, and -0.025, respectively; correlation coefficients 0.961, 0.957, and 0.972, respectively. We have successfully developed a method for automated striatal uptake analysis of FDOPA PET images. There was no significant difference between the SOR values obtained from this method and using manual analysis. Yet it is an unbiased time-saving and cost-effective program and easy to implement on a personal computer. (author)

  16. Automated Micro-Object Detection for Mobile Diagnostics Using Lens-Free Imaging Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Mohendra; Seo, Dongmin; Oh, Sangwoo; Chae, Yeonghun; Nam, Myung-Hyun; Seo, Sungkyu

    2016-01-01

    Lens-free imaging technology has been extensively used recently for microparticle and biological cell analysis because of its high throughput, low cost, and simple and compact arrangement. However, this technology still lacks a dedicated and automated detection system. In this paper, we describe a custom-developed automated micro-object detection method for a lens-free imaging system. In our previous work (Roy et al.), we developed a lens-free imaging system using low-cost components. This system was used to generate and capture the diffraction patterns of micro-objects and a global threshold was used to locate the diffraction patterns. In this work we used the same setup to develop an improved automated detection and analysis algorithm based on adaptive threshold and clustering of signals. For this purpose images from the lens-free system were then used to understand the features and characteristics of the diffraction patterns of several types of samples. On the basis of this information, we custom-developed an automated algorithm for the lens-free imaging system. Next, all the lens-free images were processed using this custom-developed automated algorithm. The performance of this approach was evaluated by comparing the counting results with standard optical microscope results. We evaluated the counting results for polystyrene microbeads, red blood cells, and HepG2, HeLa, and MCF7 cells. The comparison shows good agreement between the systems, with a correlation coefficient of 0.91 and linearity slope of 0.877. We also evaluated the automated size profiles of the microparticle samples. This Wi-Fi-enabled lens-free imaging system, along with the dedicated software, possesses great potential for telemedicine applications in resource-limited settings. PMID:27164146

  17. A novel automated image analysis method for accurate adipocyte quantification

    OpenAIRE

    Osman, Osman S.; Selway, Joanne L; Kępczyńska, Małgorzata A; Stocker, Claire J.; O’Dowd, Jacqueline F; Cawthorne, Michael A.; Arch, Jonathan RS; Jassim, Sabah; Langlands, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Increased adipocyte size and number are associated with many of the adverse effects observed in metabolic disease states. While methods to quantify such changes in the adipocyte are of scientific and clinical interest, manual methods to determine adipocyte size are both laborious and intractable to large scale investigations. Moreover, existing computational methods are not fully automated. We, therefore, developed a novel automatic method to provide accurate measurements of the cross-section...

  18. Automated synthesis of image processing procedures using AI planning techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Steve; Mortensen, Helen

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the Multimission VICAR (Video Image Communication and Retrieval) Planner (MVP) (Chien 1994) system, which uses artificial intelligence planning techniques (Iwasaki & Friedland, 1985, Pemberthy & Weld, 1992, Stefik, 1981) to automatically construct executable complex image processing procedures (using models of the smaller constituent image processing subprograms) in response to image processing requests made to the JPL Multimission Image Processing Laboratory (MIPL). The MVP system allows the user to specify the image processing requirements in terms of the various types of correction required. Given this information, MVP derives unspecified required processing steps and determines appropriate image processing programs and parameters to achieve the specified image processing goals. This information is output as an executable image processing program which can then be executed to fill the processing request.

  19. Automated examination notification of Emergency Department images in a picture archiving and communication system

    OpenAIRE

    Andriole, Katherine P.; Avrin, David E.; Weber, Ellen; Luth, David M.; Bazzill, Todd M.

    2001-01-01

    This study compares the timeliness of radiology interpretation of Emergency Department (ED) imaging examinations in a picture archiving and communication system (PACS) before and after implementation of an automated paging system for notification of image availability. An alphanumeric pager for each radiology subspecialty (chest, pediatrics, bone, neuroradiology, and body) was used to alert the responsible radiologist that an ED imaging examination is available to be viewed on the PACS. The p...

  20. Automated Analysis of Fluorescence Microscopy Images to Identify Protein-Protein Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Morrell-Falvey, J. L.; Qi, H.; Doktycz, M. J.; Venkatraman, S.

    2006-01-01

    The identification of protein interactions is important for elucidating biological networks. One obstacle in comprehensive interaction studies is the analyses of large datasets, particularly those containing images. Development of an automated system to analyze an image-based protein interaction dataset is needed. Such an analysis system is described here, to automatically extract features from fluorescence microscopy images obtained from a bacterial protein interaction assay. These features ...

  1. NeuronMetrics: Software for Semi-Automated Processing of Cultured-Neuron Images

    OpenAIRE

    Narro, Martha L.; Yang, Fan; Kraft, Robert; Wenk, Carola; Efrat, Alon; Restifo, Linda L.

    2007-01-01

    Using primary cell culture to screen for changes in neuronal morphology requires specialized analysis software. We developed NeuronMetrics™ for semi-automated, quantitative analysis of two-dimensional (2D) images of fluorescently labeled cultured neurons. It skeletonizes the neuron image using two complementary image-processing techniques, capturing fine terminal neurites with high fidelity. An algorithm was devised to span wide gaps in the skeleton. NeuronMetrics uses a novel strategy based ...

  2. Chimenea and other tools: Automated imaging of multi-epoch radio-synthesis data with CASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staley, T. D.; Anderson, G. E.

    2015-11-01

    In preparing the way for the Square Kilometre Array and its pathfinders, there is a pressing need to begin probing the transient sky in a fully robotic fashion using the current generation of radio telescopes. Effective exploitation of such surveys requires a largely automated data-reduction process. This paper introduces an end-to-end automated reduction pipeline, AMIsurvey, used for calibrating and imaging data from the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager Large Array. AMIsurvey makes use of several component libraries which have been packaged separately for open-source release. The most scientifically significant of these is chimenea, which implements a telescope-agnostic algorithm for automated imaging of pre-calibrated multi-epoch radio-synthesis data, of the sort typically acquired for transient surveys or follow-up. The algorithm aims to improve upon standard imaging pipelines by utilizing iterative RMS-estimation and automated source-detection to avoid so called 'Clean-bias', and makes use of CASA subroutines for the underlying image-synthesis operations. At a lower level, AMIsurvey relies upon two libraries, drive-ami and drive-casa, built to allow use of mature radio-astronomy software packages from within Python scripts. While targeted at automated imaging, the drive-casa interface can also be used to automate interaction with any of the CASA subroutines from a generic Python process. Additionally, these packages may be of wider technical interest beyond radio-astronomy, since they demonstrate use of the Python library pexpect to emulate terminal interaction with an external process. This approach allows for rapid development of a Python interface to any legacy or externally-maintained pipeline which accepts command-line input, without requiring alterations to the original code.

  3. A method for fast automated microscope image stitching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Deng, Zhen-Sheng; Fan, Qiu-Hong

    2013-05-01

    Image stitching is an important technology to produce a panorama or larger image by combining several images with overlapped areas. In many biomedical researches, image stitching is highly desirable to acquire a panoramic image which represents large areas of certain structures or whole sections, while retaining microscopic resolution. In this study, we develop a fast normal light microscope image stitching algorithm based on feature extraction. At first, an algorithm of scale-space reconstruction of speeded-up robust features (SURF) was proposed to extract features from the images to be stitched with a short time and higher repeatability. Then, the histogram equalization (HE) method was employed to preprocess the images to enhance their contrast for extracting more features. Thirdly, the rough overlapping zones of the images preprocessed were calculated by phase correlation, and the improved SURF was used to extract the image features in the rough overlapping areas. Fourthly, the features were corresponded by matching algorithm and the transformation parameters were estimated, then the images were blended seamlessly. Finally, this procedure was applied to stitch normal light microscope images to verify its validity. Our experimental results demonstrate that the improved SURF algorithm is very robust to viewpoint, illumination, blur, rotation and zoom of the images and our method is able to stitch microscope images automatically with high precision and high speed. Also, the method proposed in this paper is applicable to registration and stitching of common images as well as stitching the microscope images in the field of virtual microscope for the purpose of observing, exchanging, saving, and establishing a database of microscope images. PMID:23465523

  4. Automative Multi Classifier Framework for Medical Image Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Edbert Rajan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Medical image processing is the technique used to create images of the human body for medical purposes. Nowadays, medical image processing plays a major role and a challenging solution for the critical stage in the medical line. Several researches have done in this area to enhance the techniques for medical image processing. However, due to some demerits met by some advanced technologies, there are still many aspects that need further development. Existing study evaluate the efficacy of the medical image analysis with the level-set shape along with fractal texture and intensity features to discriminate PF (Posterior Fossa tumor from other tissues in the brain image. To develop the medical image analysis and disease diagnosis, to devise an automotive subjective optimality model for segmentation of images based on different sets of selected features from the unsupervised learning model of extracted features. After segmentation, classification of images is done. The classification is processed by adapting the multiple classifier frameworks in the previous work based on the mutual information coefficient of the selected features underwent for image segmentation procedures. In this study, to enhance the classification strategy, we plan to implement enhanced multi classifier framework for the analysis of medical images and disease diagnosis. The performance parameter used for the analysis of the proposed enhanced multi classifier framework for medical image analysis is Multiple Class intensity, image quality, time consumption.

  5. Automated retinal image quality assessment on the UK Biobank dataset for epidemiological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welikala, R A; Fraz, M M; Foster, P J; Whincup, P H; Rudnicka, A R; Owen, C G; Strachan, D P; Barman, S A

    2016-04-01

    Morphological changes in the retinal vascular network are associated with future risk of many systemic and vascular diseases. However, uncertainty over the presence and nature of some of these associations exists. Analysis of data from large population based studies will help to resolve these uncertainties. The QUARTZ (QUantitative Analysis of Retinal vessel Topology and siZe) retinal image analysis system allows automated processing of large numbers of retinal images. However, an image quality assessment module is needed to achieve full automation. In this paper, we propose such an algorithm, which uses the segmented vessel map to determine the suitability of retinal images for use in the creation of vessel morphometric data suitable for epidemiological studies. This includes an effective 3-dimensional feature set and support vector machine classification. A random subset of 800 retinal images from UK Biobank (a large prospective study of 500,000 middle aged adults; where 68,151 underwent retinal imaging) was used to examine the performance of the image quality algorithm. The algorithm achieved a sensitivity of 95.33% and a specificity of 91.13% for the detection of inadequate images. The strong performance of this image quality algorithm will make rapid automated analysis of vascular morphometry feasible on the entire UK Biobank dataset (and other large retinal datasets), with minimal operator involvement, and at low cost. PMID:26894596

  6. Automated image analysis of lateral lumber X-rays by a form model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development of a software for fully automated image analysis of lateral lumbar spine X-rays. Material and method: Using the concept of active shape models, we developed a software that produces a form model of the lumbar spine from lateral lumbar spine radiographs and runs an automated image segmentation. This model is able to detect lumbar vertebrae automatically after the filtering of digitized X-ray images. The model was trained with 20 lateral lumbar spine radiographs with no pathological findings before we evaluated the software with 30 further X-ray images which were sorted by image quality ranging from one (best) to three (worst). There were 10 images for each quality. Results: Image recognition strongly depended on image quality. In group one 52 and in group two 51 out of 60 vertebral bodies including the sacrum were recognized, but in group three only 18 vertebral bodies were properly identified. Conclusion: Fully automated and reliable recognition of vertebral bodies from lateral spine radiographs using the concept of active shape models is possible. The precision of this technique is limited by the superposition of different structures. Further improvements are necessary. Therefore standardized image quality and enlargement of the training data set are required. (orig.)

  7. Evaluation of an improved technique for automated center lumen line definition in cardiovascular image data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the study was to evaluate a new method for automated definition of a center lumen line in vessels in cardiovascular image data. This method, called VAMPIRE, is based on improved detection of vessel-like structures. A multiobserver evaluation study was conducted involving 40 tracings in clinical CTA data of carotid arteries to compare VAMPIRE with an established technique. This comparison showed that VAMPIRE yields considerably more successful tracings and improved handling of stenosis, calcifications, multiple vessels, and nearby bone structures. We conclude that VAMPIRE is highly suitable for automated definition of center lumen lines in vessels in cardiovascular image data. (orig.)

  8. Evaluation of an improved technique for automated center lumen line definition in cardiovascular image data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gratama van Andel, Hugo A.F. [Erasmus MC-University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of Medical Informatics, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus MC-University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Academic Medical Centre-University of Amsterdam, Department of Medical Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Meijering, Erik; Vrooman, Henri A.; Stokking, Rik [Erasmus MC-University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of Medical Informatics, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus MC-University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Lugt, Aad van der; Monye, Cecile de [Erasmus MC-University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2006-02-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate a new method for automated definition of a center lumen line in vessels in cardiovascular image data. This method, called VAMPIRE, is based on improved detection of vessel-like structures. A multiobserver evaluation study was conducted involving 40 tracings in clinical CTA data of carotid arteries to compare VAMPIRE with an established technique. This comparison showed that VAMPIRE yields considerably more successful tracings and improved handling of stenosis, calcifications, multiple vessels, and nearby bone structures. We conclude that VAMPIRE is highly suitable for automated definition of center lumen lines in vessels in cardiovascular image data. (orig.)

  9. Histogram analysis with automated extraction of brain-tissue region from whole-brain CT images

    OpenAIRE

    Kondo, Masatoshi; Yamashita, Koji; Yoshiura, Takashi; Hiwatash, Akio; Shirasaka, Takashi; Arimura, Hisao; Nakamura, Yasuhiko; Honda, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether an automated extraction of the brain-tissue region from CT images is useful for the histogram analysis of the brain-tissue region was studied. We used the CT images of 11 patients. We developed an automatic brain-tissue extraction algorithm. We evaluated the similarity index of this automated extraction method relative to manual extraction, and we compared the mean CT number of all extracted pixels and the kurtosis and skewness of the distribution of CT numbers of all ext...

  10. Automated analysis of protein subcellular location in time series images

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Yanhua; Osuna-Highley, Elvira; Hua, Juchang; Nowicki, Theodore Scott; Stolz, Robert; McKayle, Camille; Murphy, Robert F.

    2010-01-01

    Motivation: Image analysis, machine learning and statistical modeling have become well established for the automatic recognition and comparison of the subcellular locations of proteins in microscope images. By using a comprehensive set of features describing static images, major subcellular patterns can be distinguished with near perfect accuracy. We now extend this work to time series images, which contain both spatial and temporal information. The goal is to use temporal features to improve...

  11. Automated quadrilateral mesh generation for digital image structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    With the development of advanced imaging technology, digital images are widely used. This paper proposes an automatic quadrilateral mesh generation algorithm for multi-colour imaged structures. It takes an original arbitrary digital image as an input for automatic quadrilateral mesh generation, this includes removing the noise, extracting and smoothing the boundary geometries between different colours, and automatic all-quad mesh generation with the above boundaries as constraints. An application example is...

  12. Improved automated synthesis and preliminary animal PET/CT imaging of 11C-acetate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study a simple and rapid automated synthetic technology of 11C-acetate (11C- AC), automated synthesis of 11C-AC was performed by carboxylation of MeMgBr/tetrahydrofuran (THF) on a polyethylene loop with 11C-CO2, followed by hydrolysis and purification on solid-phase extraction cartridges using a 11C-Choline/Methionine synthesizer made in China. A high and reproducible radiochemical yield of above 40% (decay corrected) was obtained within the whole synthesis time about 8 min from 11C-CO2. The radiochemical purity of 11C-AC was over 95%. The novel, simple and rapid on-column hydrolysis-purification procedure should adaptable to the fully automated synthesis of 11C-AC at several commercial synthesis module. 11C-AC injection produced by the automated procedure is safe and effective, and can be used for PET imaging of animals and humans. (authors)

  13. Automated method and system for the alignment and correlation of images from two different modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giger, Maryellen L.; Chen, Chin-Tu; Armato, Samuel; Doi, Kunio

    1999-10-26

    A method and system for the computerized registration of radionuclide images with radiographic images, including generating image data from radiographic and radionuclide images of the thorax. Techniques include contouring the lung regions in each type of chest image, scaling and registration of the contours based on location of lung apices, and superimposition after appropriate shifting of the images. Specific applications are given for the automated registration of radionuclide lungs scans with chest radiographs. The method in the example given yields a system that spatially registers and correlates digitized chest radiographs with V/Q scans in order to correlate V/Q functional information with the greater structural detail of chest radiographs. Final output could be the computer-determined contours from each type of image superimposed on any of the original images, or superimposition of the radionuclide image data, which contains high activity, onto the radiographic chest image.

  14. Comparison of semi-automated image analysis and manual methods for tissue quantification in pancreatic carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sims, A.J. [Regional Medical Physics Department, Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: a.j.sims@newcastle.ac.uk; Murray, A. [Regional Medical Physics Department, Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom); Bennett, M.K. [Department of Histopathology, Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Trust, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom)

    2002-04-21

    Objective measurements of tissue area during histological examination of carcinoma can yield valuable prognostic information. However, such measurements are not made routinely because the current manual approach is time consuming and subject to large statistical sampling error. In this paper, a semi-automated image analysis method for measuring tissue area in histological samples is applied to the measurement of stromal tissue, cell cytoplasm and lumen in samples of pancreatic carcinoma and compared with the standard manual point counting method. Histological samples from 26 cases of pancreatic carcinoma were stained using the sirius red, light-green method. Images from each sample were captured using two magnifications. Image segmentation based on colour cluster analysis was used to subdivide each image into representative colours which were classified manually into one of three tissue components. Area measurements made using this technique were compared to corresponding manual measurements and used to establish the comparative accuracy of the semi-automated image analysis technique, with a quality assurance study to measure the repeatability of the new technique. For both magnifications and for each tissue component, the quality assurance study showed that the semi-automated image analysis algorithm had better repeatability than its manual equivalent. No significant bias was detected between the measurement techniques for any of the comparisons made using the 26 cases of pancreatic carcinoma. The ratio of manual to semi-automatic repeatability errors varied from 2.0 to 3.6. Point counting would need to be increased to be between 400 and 1400 points to achieve the same repeatability as for the semi-automated technique. The results demonstrate that semi-automated image analysis is suitable for measuring tissue fractions in histological samples prepared with coloured stains and is a practical alternative to manual point counting. (author)

  15. Comparison of semi-automated image analysis and manual methods for tissue quantification in pancreatic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective measurements of tissue area during histological examination of carcinoma can yield valuable prognostic information. However, such measurements are not made routinely because the current manual approach is time consuming and subject to large statistical sampling error. In this paper, a semi-automated image analysis method for measuring tissue area in histological samples is applied to the measurement of stromal tissue, cell cytoplasm and lumen in samples of pancreatic carcinoma and compared with the standard manual point counting method. Histological samples from 26 cases of pancreatic carcinoma were stained using the sirius red, light-green method. Images from each sample were captured using two magnifications. Image segmentation based on colour cluster analysis was used to subdivide each image into representative colours which were classified manually into one of three tissue components. Area measurements made using this technique were compared to corresponding manual measurements and used to establish the comparative accuracy of the semi-automated image analysis technique, with a quality assurance study to measure the repeatability of the new technique. For both magnifications and for each tissue component, the quality assurance study showed that the semi-automated image analysis algorithm had better repeatability than its manual equivalent. No significant bias was detected between the measurement techniques for any of the comparisons made using the 26 cases of pancreatic carcinoma. The ratio of manual to semi-automatic repeatability errors varied from 2.0 to 3.6. Point counting would need to be increased to be between 400 and 1400 points to achieve the same repeatability as for the semi-automated technique. The results demonstrate that semi-automated image analysis is suitable for measuring tissue fractions in histological samples prepared with coloured stains and is a practical alternative to manual point counting. (author)

  16. A feasibility assessment of automated FISH image and signal analysis to assist cervical cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingwei; Li, Yuhua; Liu, Hong; Li, Shibo; Zhang, Roy R.; Zheng, Bin

    2012-02-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technology provides a promising molecular imaging tool to detect cervical cancer. Since manual FISH analysis is difficult, time-consuming, and inconsistent, the automated FISH image scanning systems have been developed. Due to limited focal depth of scanned microscopic image, a FISH-probed specimen needs to be scanned in multiple layers that generate huge image data. To improve diagnostic efficiency of using automated FISH image analysis, we developed a computer-aided detection (CAD) scheme. In this experiment, four pap-smear specimen slides were scanned by a dual-detector fluorescence image scanning system that acquired two spectrum images simultaneously, which represent images of interphase cells and FISH-probed chromosome X. During image scanning, once detecting a cell signal, system captured nine image slides by automatically adjusting optical focus. Based on the sharpness index and maximum intensity measurement, cells and FISH signals distributed in 3-D space were projected into a 2-D con-focal image. CAD scheme was applied to each con-focal image to detect analyzable interphase cells using an adaptive multiple-threshold algorithm and detect FISH-probed signals using a top-hat transform. The ratio of abnormal cells was calculated to detect positive cases. In four scanned specimen slides, CAD generated 1676 con-focal images that depicted analyzable cells. FISH-probed signals were independently detected by our CAD algorithm and an observer. The Kappa coefficients for agreement between CAD and observer ranged from 0.69 to 1.0 in detecting/counting FISH signal spots. The study demonstrated the feasibility of applying automated FISH image and signal analysis to assist cyto-geneticists in detecting cervical cancers.

  17. Automated, non-linear registration between 3-dimensional brain map and medical head image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we propose an automated, non-linear registration method between 3-dimensional medical head image and brain map in order to efficiently extract the regions of interest. In our method, input 3-dimensional image is registered into a reference image extracted from a brain map. The problems to be solved are automated, non-linear image matching procedure, and cost function which represents the similarity between two images. Non-linear matching is carried out by dividing the input image into connected partial regions, transforming the partial regions preserving connectivity among the adjacent images, evaluating the image similarity between the transformed regions of the input image and the correspondent regions of the reference image, and iteratively searching the optimal transformation of the partial regions. In order to measure the voxelwise similarity of multi-modal images, a cost function is introduced, which is based on the mutual information. Some experiments using MR images presented the effectiveness of the proposed method. (author)

  18. Automated detection of cardiac phase from intracoronary ultrasound image sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zheng; Dong, Yi; Li, Mengchan

    2015-01-01

    Intracoronary ultrasound (ICUS) is a widely used interventional imaging modality in clinical diagnosis and treatment of cardiac vessel diseases. Due to cyclic cardiac motion and pulsatile blood flow within the lumen, there exist changes of coronary arterial dimensions and relative motion between the imaging catheter and the lumen during continuous pullback of the catheter. The action subsequently causes cyclic changes to the image intensity of the acquired image sequence. Information on cardiac phases is implied in a non-gated ICUS image sequence. A 1-D phase signal reflecting cardiac cycles was extracted according to cyclical changes in local gray-levels in ICUS images. The local extrema of the signal were then detected to retrieve cardiac phases and to retrospectively gate the image sequence. Results of clinically acquired in vivo image data showed that the average inter-frame dissimilarity of lower than 0.1 was achievable with our technique. In terms of computational efficiency and complexity, the proposed method was shown to be competitive when compared with the current methods. The average frame processing time was lower than 30 ms. We effectively reduced the effect of image noises, useless textures, and non-vessel region on the phase signal detection by discarding signal components caused by non-cardiac factors. PMID:26406038

  19. SU-E-I-94: Automated Image Quality Assessment of Radiographic Systems Using An Anthropomorphic Phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In a large, academic medical center, consistent radiographic imaging performance is difficult to routinely monitor and maintain, especially for a fleet consisting of multiple vendors, models, software versions, and numerous imaging protocols. Thus, an automated image quality control methodology has been implemented using routine image quality assessment with a physical, stylized anthropomorphic chest phantom. Methods: The “Duke” Phantom (Digital Phantom 07-646, Supertech, Elkhart, IN) was imaged twice on each of 13 radiographic units from a variety of vendors at 13 primary care clinics. The first acquisition used the clinical PA chest protocol to acquire the post-processed “FOR PRESENTATION” image. The second image was acquired without an antiscatter grid followed by collection of the “FOR PROCESSING” image. Manual CNR measurements were made from the largest and thickest contrast-detail inserts in the lung, heart, and abdominal regions of the phantom in each image. An automated image registration algorithm was used to estimate the CNR of the same insert using similar ROIs. Automated measurements were then compared to the manual measurements. Results: Automatic and manual CNR measurements obtained from “FOR PRESENTATION” images had average percent differences of 0.42%±5.18%, −3.44%±4.85%, and 1.04%±3.15% in the lung, heart, and abdominal regions, respectively; measurements obtained from “FOR PROCESSING” images had average percent differences of -0.63%±6.66%, −0.97%±3.92%, and −0.53%±4.18%, respectively. The maximum absolute difference in CNR was 15.78%, 10.89%, and 8.73% in the respective regions. In addition to CNR assessment of the largest and thickest contrast-detail inserts, the automated method also provided CNR estimates for all 75 contrast-detail inserts in each phantom image. Conclusion: Automated analysis of a radiographic phantom has been shown to be a fast, robust, and objective means for assessing radiographic

  20. SU-E-I-94: Automated Image Quality Assessment of Radiographic Systems Using An Anthropomorphic Phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wells, J; Wilson, J; Zhang, Y; Samei, E; Ravin, Carl E. [Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In a large, academic medical center, consistent radiographic imaging performance is difficult to routinely monitor and maintain, especially for a fleet consisting of multiple vendors, models, software versions, and numerous imaging protocols. Thus, an automated image quality control methodology has been implemented using routine image quality assessment with a physical, stylized anthropomorphic chest phantom. Methods: The “Duke” Phantom (Digital Phantom 07-646, Supertech, Elkhart, IN) was imaged twice on each of 13 radiographic units from a variety of vendors at 13 primary care clinics. The first acquisition used the clinical PA chest protocol to acquire the post-processed “FOR PRESENTATION” image. The second image was acquired without an antiscatter grid followed by collection of the “FOR PROCESSING” image. Manual CNR measurements were made from the largest and thickest contrast-detail inserts in the lung, heart, and abdominal regions of the phantom in each image. An automated image registration algorithm was used to estimate the CNR of the same insert using similar ROIs. Automated measurements were then compared to the manual measurements. Results: Automatic and manual CNR measurements obtained from “FOR PRESENTATION” images had average percent differences of 0.42%±5.18%, −3.44%±4.85%, and 1.04%±3.15% in the lung, heart, and abdominal regions, respectively; measurements obtained from “FOR PROCESSING” images had average percent differences of -0.63%±6.66%, −0.97%±3.92%, and −0.53%±4.18%, respectively. The maximum absolute difference in CNR was 15.78%, 10.89%, and 8.73% in the respective regions. In addition to CNR assessment of the largest and thickest contrast-detail inserts, the automated method also provided CNR estimates for all 75 contrast-detail inserts in each phantom image. Conclusion: Automated analysis of a radiographic phantom has been shown to be a fast, robust, and objective means for assessing radiographic

  1. Semi-automated discrimination of retinal pigmented epithelial cells in two-photon fluorescence images of mouse retinas

    OpenAIRE

    Nathan S. Alexander; Palczewska, Grazyna; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Automated image segmentation is a critical step toward achieving a quantitative evaluation of disease states with imaging techniques. Two-photon fluorescence microscopy (TPM) has been employed to visualize the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) and provide images indicating the health of the retina. However, segmentation of RPE cells within TPM images is difficult due to small differences in fluorescence intensity between cell borders and cell bodies. Here we present a semi-automated method f...

  2. Infrared thermal imaging for automated detection of diabetic foot complications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Netten, van Jaap J.; Baal, van Jeff G.; Liu, Chanjuan; Heijden, van der Ferdi; Bus, Sicco A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Although thermal imaging can be a valuable technology in the prevention and management of diabetic foot disease, it is not yet widely used in clinical practice. Technological advancement in infrared imaging increases its application range. The aim was to explore the first steps in the ap

  3. Automated Selection of Uniform Regions for CT Image Quality Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Naeemi, Maitham D; Roychodhury, Sohini

    2016-01-01

    CT images are widely used in pathology detection and follow-up treatment procedures. Accurate identification of pathological features requires diagnostic quality CT images with minimal noise and artifact variation. In this work, a novel Fourier-transform based metric for image quality (IQ) estimation is presented that correlates to additive CT image noise. In the proposed method, two windowed CT image subset regions are analyzed together to identify the extent of variation in the corresponding Fourier-domain spectrum. The two square windows are chosen such that their center pixels coincide and one window is a subset of the other. The Fourier-domain spectral difference between these two sub-sampled windows is then used to isolate spatial regions-of-interest (ROI) with low signal variation (ROI-LV) and high signal variation (ROI-HV), respectively. Finally, the spatial variance ($var$), standard deviation ($std$), coefficient of variance ($cov$) and the fraction of abdominal ROI pixels in ROI-LV ($\

  4. Automated and unbiased image analyses as tools in phenotypic classification of small-spored Alternaria species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Birgitte; Hansen, Michael Edberg; Smedsgaard, Jørn

    2005-01-01

    often has been broadly applied to various morphologically and chemically distinct groups of isolates from different hosts. The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate automated and unbiased image analysis systems that will analyze different phenotypic characters and facilitate testing...

  5. Extraction of Prostatic Lumina and Automated Recognition for Prostatic Calculus Image Using PCA-SVM

    OpenAIRE

    D. Joshua Liao; Yusheng Huang; Xiaofen Xing; Hua Wang; Jian Liu; Hui Xiao; Zhuocai Wang; Xiaojun Ding; Xiangmin Xu

    2011-01-01

    Identification of prostatic calculi is an important basis for determining the tissue origin. Computation-assistant diagnosis of prostatic calculi may have promising potential but is currently still less studied. We studied the extraction of prostatic lumina and automated recognition for calculus images. Extraction of lumina from prostate histology images was based on local entropy and Otsu threshold recognition using PCA-SVM and based on the texture features of prostatic calculus. The SVM cla...

  6. Automated registration of multispectral MR vessel wall images of the carotid artery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klooster, R. van ' t; Staring, M.; Reiber, J. H. C.; Lelieveldt, B. P. F.; Geest, R. J. van der, E-mail: rvdgeest@lumc.nl [Department of Radiology, Division of Image Processing, Leiden University Medical Center, 2300 RC Leiden (Netherlands); Klein, S. [Department of Radiology and Department of Medical Informatics, Biomedical Imaging Group Rotterdam, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam 3015 GE (Netherlands); Kwee, R. M.; Kooi, M. E. [Department of Radiology, Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6202 AZ (Netherlands)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Atherosclerosis is the primary cause of heart disease and stroke. The detailed assessment of atherosclerosis of the carotid artery requires high resolution imaging of the vessel wall using multiple MR sequences with different contrast weightings. These images allow manual or automated classification of plaque components inside the vessel wall. Automated classification requires all sequences to be in alignment, which is hampered by patient motion. In clinical practice, correction of this motion is performed manually. Previous studies applied automated image registration to correct for motion using only nondeformable transformation models and did not perform a detailed quantitative validation. The purpose of this study is to develop an automated accurate 3D registration method, and to extensively validate this method on a large set of patient data. In addition, the authors quantified patient motion during scanning to investigate the need for correction. Methods: MR imaging studies (1.5T, dedicated carotid surface coil, Philips) from 55 TIA/stroke patients with ipsilateral <70% carotid artery stenosis were randomly selected from a larger cohort. Five MR pulse sequences were acquired around the carotid bifurcation, each containing nine transverse slices: T1-weighted turbo field echo, time of flight, T2-weighted turbo spin-echo, and pre- and postcontrast T1-weighted turbo spin-echo images (T1W TSE). The images were manually segmented by delineating the lumen contour in each vessel wall sequence and were manually aligned by applying throughplane and inplane translations to the images. To find the optimal automatic image registration method, different masks, choice of the fixed image, different types of the mutual information image similarity metric, and transformation models including 3D deformable transformation models, were evaluated. Evaluation of the automatic registration results was performed by comparing the lumen segmentations of the fixed image and

  7. Automated registration of multispectral MR vessel wall images of the carotid artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Atherosclerosis is the primary cause of heart disease and stroke. The detailed assessment of atherosclerosis of the carotid artery requires high resolution imaging of the vessel wall using multiple MR sequences with different contrast weightings. These images allow manual or automated classification of plaque components inside the vessel wall. Automated classification requires all sequences to be in alignment, which is hampered by patient motion. In clinical practice, correction of this motion is performed manually. Previous studies applied automated image registration to correct for motion using only nondeformable transformation models and did not perform a detailed quantitative validation. The purpose of this study is to develop an automated accurate 3D registration method, and to extensively validate this method on a large set of patient data. In addition, the authors quantified patient motion during scanning to investigate the need for correction. Methods: MR imaging studies (1.5T, dedicated carotid surface coil, Philips) from 55 TIA/stroke patients with ipsilateral <70% carotid artery stenosis were randomly selected from a larger cohort. Five MR pulse sequences were acquired around the carotid bifurcation, each containing nine transverse slices: T1-weighted turbo field echo, time of flight, T2-weighted turbo spin-echo, and pre- and postcontrast T1-weighted turbo spin-echo images (T1W TSE). The images were manually segmented by delineating the lumen contour in each vessel wall sequence and were manually aligned by applying throughplane and inplane translations to the images. To find the optimal automatic image registration method, different masks, choice of the fixed image, different types of the mutual information image similarity metric, and transformation models including 3D deformable transformation models, were evaluated. Evaluation of the automatic registration results was performed by comparing the lumen segmentations of the fixed image and

  8. An image-processing program for automated counting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, D.J.; Anderson, W.H.; Anthony, R.M.

    1996-01-01

    An image-processing program developed by the National Institute of Health, IMAGE, was modified in a cooperative project between remote sensing specialists at the Ohio State University Center for Mapping and scientists at the Alaska Science Center to facilitate estimating numbers of black brant (Branta bernicla nigricans) in flocks at Izembek National Wildlife Refuge. The modified program, DUCK HUNT, runs on Apple computers. Modifications provide users with a pull down menu that optimizes image quality; identifies objects of interest (e.g., brant) by spectral, morphometric, and spatial parameters defined interactively by users; counts and labels objects of interest; and produces summary tables. Images from digitized photography, videography, and high- resolution digital photography have been used with this program to count various species of waterfowl.

  9. Progress in the robust automated segmentation of real cell images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamford, P.; Jackway, P.; Lovell, Brian

    1999-07-01

    We propose a collection of robust algorithms for the segmentation of cell images from Papanicolaou stained cervical smears (`Pap' smears). This problem is deceptively difficult and often results on laboratory datasets do not carry over to real world data. Our approach is in 3 parts. First, we segment the cytoplasm from the background using a novel method based on the Wilson and Spann multi-resolution framework. Second, we segment the nucleus from the cytoplasm using an active contour method, where the best contour is found by a global minimization method. Third, we implement a method to determine a confidence measure for the segmentation of each object. This uses a stability criterion over the regularization parameter (lambda) in the active contour. We present the results of thorough testing of the algorithms on large numbers of cell images. A database of 20,120 images is used for the segmentation tests and 18,718 images for the robustness tests.

  10. Automated Drusen Segmentation and Quantification in SD-OCT Images

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Qiang; Leng, Theodore; Zheng, Luoluo; Kutzscher, Lauren; Ma, Jeffrey; de Sisternes, Luis; Rubin, Daniel L.

    2013-01-01

    Spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) is a useful tool for the visualization of drusen, a retinal abnormality seen in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD); however, objective assessment of drusen is thwarted by the lack of a method to robustly quantify these lesions on serial OCT images. Here, we describe an automatic drusen segmentation method for SD-OCT retinal images, which leverages a priori knowledge of normal retinal morphology and anatomical features. Th...

  11. Automated detection of BB pixel clusters in digital fluoroscopic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small ball bearings (BBs) are often used to characterize and correct for geometric distortion of x-ray image intensifiers. For quantitative applications the number of BBs required for accurate distortion correction is prohibitively large for manual detection. A method to automatically determine the BB coordinates is described. The technique consists of image segmentation, pixel coalescing and centroid calculation. The dependence of calculated BB coordinates on segmentation threshold was also evaluated and found to be within the uncertainty of measurement. (author)

  12. Validation of Supervised Automated Algorithm for Fast Quantitative Evaluation of Organ Motion on Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To validate a correlation coefficient template-matching algorithm applied to the supervised automated quantification of abdominal-pelvic organ motion captured on time-resolved magnetic resonance imaging. Methods and Materials: Magnetic resonance images of 21 patients across four anatomic sites were analyzed. Representative anatomic points of interest were chosen as surrogates for organ motion. The point of interest displacements across each image frame relative to baseline were quantified manually and through the use of a template-matching software tool, termed 'Motiontrack.' Automated and manually acquired displacement measures, as well as the standard deviation of intrafraction motion, were compared for each image frame and for each patient. Results: Discrepancies between the automated and manual displacements of ≥2 mm were uncommon, ranging in frequency of 0-9.7% (liver and prostate, respectively). The standard deviations of intrafraction motion measured with each method correlated highly (r = 0.99). Considerable interpatient variability in organ motion was demonstrated by a wide range of standard deviations in the liver (1.4-7.5 mm), uterus (1.1-8.4 mm), and prostate gland (0.8-2.7 mm). The automated algorithm performed successfully in all patients but 1 and substantially improved efficiency compared with manual quantification techniques (5 min vs. 60-90 min). Conclusion: Supervised automated quantification of organ motion captured on magnetic resonance imaging using a correlation coefficient template-matching algorithm was efficient, accurate, and may play an important role in off-line adaptive approaches to intrafraction motion management

  13. The accuracy of a designed software for automated localization of craniofacial landmarks on CBCT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two-dimensional projection radiographs have been traditionally considered the modality of choice for cephalometric analysis. To overcome the shortcomings of two-dimensional images, three-dimensional computed tomography (CT) has been used to evaluate craniofacial structures. However, manual landmark detection depends on medical expertise, and the process is time-consuming. The present study was designed to produce software capable of automated localization of craniofacial landmarks on cone beam (CB) CT images based on image registration and to evaluate its accuracy. The software was designed using MATLAB programming language. The technique was a combination of feature-based (principal axes registration) and voxel similarity-based methods for image registration. A total of 8 CBCT images were selected as our reference images for creating a head atlas. Then, 20 CBCT images were randomly selected as the test images for evaluating the method. Three experts twice located 14 landmarks in all 28 CBCT images during two examinations set 6 weeks apart. The differences in the distances of coordinates of each landmark on each image between manual and automated detection methods were calculated and reported as mean errors. The combined intraclass correlation coefficient for intraobserver reliability was 0.89 and for interobserver reliability 0.87 (95% confidence interval, 0.82 to 0.93). The mean errors of all 14 landmarks were <4 mm. Additionally, 63.57% of landmarks had a mean error of <3 mm compared with manual detection (gold standard method). The accuracy of our approach for automated localization of craniofacial landmarks, which was based on combining feature-based and voxel similarity-based methods for image registration, was acceptable. Nevertheless we recommend repetition of this study using other techniques, such as intensity-based methods

  14. Multispectral Image Road Extraction Based Upon Automated Map Conflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin

    Road network extraction from remotely sensed imagery enables many important and diverse applications such as vehicle tracking, drone navigation, and intelligent transportation studies. There are, however, a number of challenges to road detection from an image. Road pavement material, width, direction, and topology vary across a scene. Complete or partial occlusions caused by nearby buildings, trees, and the shadows cast by them, make maintaining road connectivity difficult. The problems posed by occlusions are exacerbated with the increasing use of oblique imagery from aerial and satellite platforms. Further, common objects such as rooftops and parking lots are made of materials similar or identical to road pavements. This problem of common materials is a classic case of a single land cover material existing for different land use scenarios. This work addresses these problems in road extraction from geo-referenced imagery by leveraging the OpenStreetMap digital road map to guide image-based road extraction. The crowd-sourced cartography has the advantages of worldwide coverage that is constantly updated. The derived road vectors follow only roads and so can serve to guide image-based road extraction with minimal confusion from occlusions and changes in road material. On the other hand, the vector road map has no information on road widths and misalignments between the vector map and the geo-referenced image are small but nonsystematic. Properly correcting misalignment between two geospatial datasets, also known as map conflation, is an essential step. A generic framework requiring minimal human intervention is described for multispectral image road extraction and automatic road map conflation. The approach relies on the road feature generation of a binary mask and a corresponding curvilinear image. A method for generating the binary road mask from the image by applying a spectral measure is presented. The spectral measure, called anisotropy-tunable distance (ATD

  15. Automated analysis of image mammogram for breast cancer diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurhasanah, Sampurno, Joko; Faryuni, Irfana Diah; Ivansyah, Okto

    2016-03-01

    Medical imaging help doctors in diagnosing and detecting diseases that attack the inside of the body without surgery. Mammogram image is a medical image of the inner breast imaging. Diagnosis of breast cancer needs to be done in detail and as soon as possible for determination of next medical treatment. The aim of this work is to increase the objectivity of clinical diagnostic by using fractal analysis. This study applies fractal method based on 2D Fourier analysis to determine the density of normal and abnormal and applying the segmentation technique based on K-Means clustering algorithm to image abnormal for determine the boundary of the organ and calculate the area of organ segmentation results. The results show fractal method based on 2D Fourier analysis can be used to distinguish between the normal and abnormal breast and segmentation techniques with K-Means Clustering algorithm is able to generate the boundaries of normal and abnormal tissue organs, so area of the abnormal tissue can be determined.

  16. An Automated Platform for High-Resolution Tissue Imaging Using Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanekoff, Ingela T.; Heath, Brandi S.; Liyu, Andrey V.; Thomas, Mathew; Carson, James P.; Laskin, Julia

    2012-10-02

    An automated platform has been developed for acquisition and visualization of mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) data using nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI). The new system enables robust operation of the nano-DESI imaging source over many hours. This is achieved by controlling the distance between the sample and the probe by mounting the sample holder onto an automated XYZ stage and defining the tilt of the sample plane. This approach is useful for imaging of relatively flat samples such as thin tissue sections. Custom software called MSI QuickView was developed for visualization of large data sets generated in imaging experiments. MSI QuickView enables fast visualization of the imaging data during data acquisition and detailed processing after the entire image is acquired. The performance of the system is demonstrated by imaging rat brain tissue sections. High resolution mass analysis combined with MS/MS experiments enabled identification of lipids and metabolites in the tissue section. In addition, high dynamic range and sensitivity of the technique allowed us to generate ion images of low-abundance isobaric lipids. High-spatial resolution image acquired over a small region of the tissue section revealed the spatial distribution of an abundant brain metabolite, creatine, in the white and gray matter that is consistent with the literature data obtained using magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

  17. Automated Classification of Glaucoma Images by Wavelet Energy Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.Annu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Glaucoma is the second leading cause of blindness worldwide. As glaucoma progresses, more optic nerve tissue is lost and the optic cup grows which leads to vision loss. This paper compiles a systemthat could be used by non-experts to filtrate cases of patients not affected by the disease. This work proposes glaucomatous image classification using texture features within images and efficient glaucoma classification based on Probabilistic Neural Network (PNN. Energy distribution over wavelet sub bands is applied to compute these texture features. Wavelet features were obtained from the daubechies (db3, symlets (sym3, and biorthogonal (bio3.3, bio3.5, and bio3.7 wavelet filters. It uses a technique to extract energy signatures obtained using 2-D discrete wavelet transform and the energy obtained from the detailed coefficients can be used to distinguish between normal and glaucomatous images. We observedan accuracy of around 95%, this demonstrates the effectiveness of these methods.

  18. System and method for automated object detection in an image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Garrett T.; Brumby, Steven P.; George, John S.; Paiton, Dylan M.; Schultz, Peter F.

    2015-10-06

    A contour/shape detection model may use relatively simple and efficient kernels to detect target edges in an object within an image or video. A co-occurrence probability may be calculated for two or more edge features in an image or video using an object definition. Edge features may be differentiated between in response to measured contextual support, and prominent edge features may be extracted based on the measured contextual support. The object may then be identified based on the extracted prominent edge features.

  19. Automated detection of meteors in observed image sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šimberová, Stanislava; Suk, Tomáš

    2015-12-01

    We propose a new detection technique based on statistical characteristics of images in the video sequence. These characteristics displayed in time enable to catch any bright track during the whole sequence. We applied our method to the image datacubes that are created from camera pictures of the night sky. Meteor flying through the Earth's atmosphere leaves a light trail lasting a few seconds on the sky background. We developed a special technique to recognize this event automatically in the complete observed video sequence. For further analysis leading to the precise recognition of object we suggest to apply Fourier and Hough transformations.

  20. Automation of the method gamma of comparison dosimetry images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this work was the development of JJGAMMA application analysis software, which enables this task systematically, minimizing intervention specialist and therefore the variability due to the observer. Both benefits, allow comparison of images is done in practice with the required frequency and objectivity. (Author)

  1. Semi-automated recognition of protozoa by image analysis

    OpenAIRE

    A.L. Amaral; Baptiste, C; Pons, M. N.; Nicolau, Ana; Lima, Nelson; Ferreira, E. C.; Mota, M.; H. Vivier

    1999-01-01

    A programme was created to semi-automatically analyse protozoal digitised images. Principal Component Analysis technique was used for species identification. After data collection and mathematical treatment, a threedimensional representation was generated and several protozoa (Opercularia, Colpidium, Tetrahymena, Prorodon, Glaucoma and Trachelophyllum) species could be positively identified.

  2. Automated Coronal Loop Identification Using Digital Image Processing Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong K.; Gary, G. Allen; Newman, Timothy S.

    2003-01-01

    The results of a master thesis project on a study of computer algorithms for automatic identification of optical-thin, 3-dimensional solar coronal loop centers from extreme ultraviolet and X-ray 2-dimensional images will be presented. These center splines are proxies of associated magnetic field lines. The project is pattern recognition problems in which there are no unique shapes or edges and in which photon and detector noise heavily influence the images. The study explores extraction techniques using: (1) linear feature recognition of local patterns (related to the inertia-tensor concept), (2) parametric space via the Hough transform, and (3) topological adaptive contours (snakes) that constrains curvature and continuity as possible candidates for digital loop detection schemes. We have developed synthesized images for the coronal loops to test the various loop identification algorithms. Since the topology of these solar features is dominated by the magnetic field structure, a first-order magnetic field approximation using multiple dipoles provides a priori information in the identification process. Results from both synthesized and solar images will be presented.

  3. Automated Detection of Contaminated Radar Image Pixels in Mountain Areas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Liping; Qin XU; Pengfei ZHANG; Shun LIU

    2008-01-01

    In mountain areas,radar observations are often contaminated(1)by echoes from high-speed moving vehicles and(2)by point-wise ground clutter under either normal propagation(NP)or anomalous propa-gation(AP)conditions.Level II data are collected from KMTX(Salt Lake City,Utah)radar to analyze these two types of contamination in the mountain area around the Great Salt Lake.Human experts provide the"ground truth"for possible contamination of either type on each individual pixel.Common features are then extracted for contaminated pixels of each type.For example,pixels contaminated by echoes from high-speed moving vehicles are characterized by large radial velocity and spectrum width.Echoes from a moving train tend to have larger velocity and reflectivity but smaller spectrum width than those from moving vehicles on highways.These contaminated pixels are only seen in areas of large terrain gradient(in the radial direction along the radar beam).The same is true for the second type of contamination-point-wise ground clutters.Six quality control(QC)parameters are selected to quantify the extracted features.Histograms are computed for each QC parameter and grouped for contaminated pixels of each type and also for non-contaminated pixels.Based on the computed histograms,a fuzzy logical algorithm is developed for automated detection of contaminated pixels.The algorithm is tested with KMTX radar data under different(clear and rainy)weather conditions.

  4. Automated and Accurate Detection of Soma Location and Surface Morphology in Large-Scale 3D Neuron Images

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng Yan; Anan Li; Bin Zhang,; Wenxiang Ding; Qingming Luo; Hui Gong

    2013-01-01

    Automated and accurate localization and morphometry of somas in 3D neuron images is essential for quantitative studies of neural networks in the brain. However, previous methods are limited in obtaining the location and surface morphology of somas with variable size and uneven staining in large-scale 3D neuron images. In this work, we proposed a method for automated soma locating in large-scale 3D neuron images that contain relatively sparse soma distributions. This method involves three step...

  5. Automated marker tracking using noisy X-ray images degraded by the treatment beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wisotzky, E. [Fraunhofer Institute for Production Systems and Design Technology (IPK), Berlin (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Fast, M.F.; Nill, S. [The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom). Joint Dept. of Physics; Oelfke, U. [The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom). Joint Dept. of Physics; German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-09-01

    This study demonstrates the feasibility of automated marker tracking for the real-time detection of intrafractional target motion using noisy kilovoltage (kV) X-ray images degraded by the megavoltage (MV) treatment beam. The authors previously introduced the in-line imaging geometry, in which the flat-panel detector (FPD) is mounted directly underneath the treatment head of the linear accelerator. They found that the 121 kVp image quality was severely compromised by the 6 MV beam passing through the FPD at the same time. Specific MV-induced artefacts present a considerable challenge for automated marker detection algorithms. For this study, the authors developed a new imaging geometry by re-positioning the FPD and the X-ray tube. This improved the contrast-to-noise-ratio between 40% and 72% at the 1.2 mAs/image exposure setting. The increase in image quality clearly facilitates the quick and stable detection of motion with the aid of a template matching algorithm. The setup was tested with an anthropomorphic lung phantom (including an artificial lung tumour). In the tumour one or three Calypso {sup registered} beacons were embedded to achieve better contrast during MV radiation. For a single beacon, image acquisition and automated marker detection typically took around 76±6 ms. The success rate was found to be highly dependent on imaging dose and gantry angle. To eliminate possible false detections, the authors implemented a training phase prior to treatment beam irradiation and also introduced speed limits for motion between subsequent images.

  6. Automated 3D ultrasound image segmentation for assistant diagnosis of breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuxin; Gu, Peng; Lee, Won-Mean; Roubidoux, Marilyn A.; Du, Sidan; Yuan, Jie; Wang, Xueding; Carson, Paul L.

    2016-04-01

    Segmentation of an ultrasound image into functional tissues is of great importance to clinical diagnosis of breast cancer. However, many studies are found to segment only the mass of interest and not all major tissues. Differences and inconsistencies in ultrasound interpretation call for an automated segmentation method to make results operator-independent. Furthermore, manual segmentation of entire three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound volumes is time-consuming, resource-intensive, and clinically impractical. Here, we propose an automated algorithm to segment 3D ultrasound volumes into three major tissue types: cyst/mass, fatty tissue, and fibro-glandular tissue. To test its efficacy and consistency, the proposed automated method was employed on a database of 21 cases of whole breast ultrasound. Experimental results show that our proposed method not only distinguishes fat and non-fat tissues correctly, but performs well in classifying cyst/mass. Comparison of density assessment between the automated method and manual segmentation demonstrates good consistency with an accuracy of 85.7%. Quantitative comparison of corresponding tissue volumes, which uses overlap ratio, gives an average similarity of 74.54%, consistent with values seen in MRI brain segmentations. Thus, our proposed method exhibits great potential as an automated approach to segment 3D whole breast ultrasound volumes into functionally distinct tissues that may help to correct ultrasound speed of sound aberrations and assist in density based prognosis of breast cancer.

  7. Semi-automated segmentation of carotid artery total plaque volume from three dimensional ultrasound carotid imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, D.; Gyacskov, I.; Ukwatta, E.; Lindenmaier, T.; Fenster, A.; Parraga, G.

    2012-03-01

    Carotid artery total plaque volume (TPV) is a three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound (US) imaging measurement of carotid atherosclerosis, providing a direct non-invasive and regional estimation of atherosclerotic plaque volume - the direct determinant of carotid stenosis and ischemic stroke. While 3DUS measurements of TPV provide the potential to monitor plaque in individual patients and in populations enrolled in clinical trials, until now, such measurements have been performed manually which is laborious, time-consuming and prone to intra-observer and inter-observer variability. To address this critical translational limitation, here we describe the development and application of a semi-automated 3DUS plaque volume measurement. This semi-automated TPV measurement incorporates three user-selected boundaries in two views of the 3DUS volume to generate a geometric approximation of TPV for each plaque measured. We compared semi-automated repeated measurements to manual segmentation of 22 individual plaques ranging in volume from 2mm3 to 151mm3. Mean plaque volume was 43+/-40mm3 for semi-automated and 48+/-46mm3 for manual measurements and these were not significantly different (p=0.60). Mean coefficient of variation (CV) was 12.0+/-5.1% for the semi-automated measurements.

  8. Automated Dermoscopy Image Analysis of Pigmented Skin Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Baldi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Dermoscopy (dermatoscopy, epiluminescence microscopy is a non-invasive diagnostic technique for the in vivo observation of pigmented skin lesions (PSLs, allowing a better visualization of surface and subsurface structures (from the epidermis to the papillary dermis. This diagnostic tool permits the recognition of morphologic structures not visible by the naked eye, thus opening a new dimension in the analysis of the clinical morphologic features of PSLs. In order to reduce the learning-curve of non-expert clinicians and to mitigate problems inherent in the reliability and reproducibility of the diagnostic criteria used in pattern analysis, several indicative methods based on diagnostic algorithms have been introduced in the last few years. Recently, numerous systems designed to provide computer-aided analysis of digital images obtained by dermoscopy have been reported in the literature. The goal of this article is to review these systems, focusing on the most recent approaches based on content-based image retrieval systems (CBIR.

  9. Automated segmentation of pigmented skin lesions in multispectral imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to develop an algorithm for the automatic segmentation of multispectral images of pigmented skin lesions. The study involved 1700 patients with 1856 cutaneous pigmented lesions, which were analysed in vivo by a novel spectrophotometric system, before excision. The system is able to acquire a set of 15 different multispectral images at equally spaced wavelengths between 483 and 951 nm. An original segmentation algorithm was developed and applied to the whole set of lesions and was able to automatically contour them all. The obtained lesion boundaries were shown to two expert clinicians, who, independently, rejected 54 of them. The 97.1% contour accuracy indicates that the developed algorithm could be a helpful and effective instrument for the automatic segmentation of skin pigmented lesions. (note)

  10. Automated Structure Detection in HRTEM Images: An Example with Graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kling, Jens; Vestergaard, Jacob Schack; Dahl, Anders Bjorholm; Hansen, Thomas Willum; Larsen, Rasmus; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    structure in the image. The centers of the C-hexagons are displayed as nodes. To segment the image into “pure” and “impure” regions, like areas with residual amorphous contamination or defects e.g. holes, a sliding window approach is used. The magnitude of the Fourier transformation within a window is...... tensor B-splines is employed, which is deformed by matching model grid points with the C-hexagon centers. Dependent on the Cs and defocus-settings during microscopy these centers appear either dark or bright. One ends up with a deformed hexagonal tessellation, which can easily be transformed into a...... length scale, and at the same time lattice deformations can be visualized. The method will be refined to facilitate the detection of larger defects like holes and the determination of the edge terminations....

  11. Extending and applying active appearance models for automated, high precision segmentation in different image modalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegmann, Mikkel Bille; Fisker, Rune; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær

    initialization scheme is designed thus making the usage of AAMs fully automated. Using these extensions it is demonstrated that AAMs can segment bone structures in radiographs, pork chops in perspective images and the left ventricle in cardiovascular magnetic resonance images in a robust, fast and accurate...... object class description, which can be employed to rapidly search images for new object instances. The proposed extensions concern enhanced shape representation, handling of homogeneous and heterogeneous textures, refinement optimization using Simulated Annealing and robust statistics. Finally, an...

  12. Pancreas++: Automated Quantification of Pancreatic Islet Cells in Microscopy Images

    OpenAIRE

    StuartMaudsley; BronwenMartin; JenniferLFiori

    2013-01-01

    The microscopic image analysis of pancreatic Islet of Langerhans morphology is crucial for the investigation of diabetes and metabolic diseases. Besides the general size of the islet, the percentage and relative position of glucagon-containing alpha-, and insulin-containing beta-cells is also important for pathophysiological analyses, especially in rodents. Hence, the ability to identify, quantify and spatially locate peripheral, and “involuted” alpha-cells in the islet core is an important a...

  13. Automation of disbond detection in aircraft fuselage through thermal image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, D. R.; Winfree, W. P.

    1992-01-01

    A procedure for interpreting thermal images obtained during the nondestructive evaluation of aircraft bonded joints is presented. The procedure operates on time-derivative thermal images and resulted in a disbond image with disbonds highlighted. The size of the 'black clusters' in the output disbond image is a quantitative measure of disbond size. The procedure is illustrated using simulation data as well as data obtained through experimental testing of fabricated samples and aircraft panels. Good results are obtained, and, except in pathological cases, 'false calls' in the cases studied appeared only as noise in the output disbond image which was easily filtered out. The thermal detection technique coupled with an automated image interpretation capability will be a very fast and effective method for inspecting bonded joints in an aircraft structure.

  14. Imaging System for the Automated Determination of Microscopical Properties in Hardened Portland Concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumgart, C.W.; Cave, S.P.; Linder, K.E.

    2000-03-08

    During this CRADA, Honeywell FM and T and MoDOT personnel designed a unique scanning system (including both hardware and software) that can be used to perform an automated scan and evaluation of a concrete sample. The specific goals of the CRADA were: (1) Develop a combined system integration, image acquisition, and image analysis approach to mimic the manual scanning and evaluation process. Produce a prototype system which can: (a) automate the scanning process to improve its speed and efficiency; (b) reduce operator fatigue; and (c) improve the consistency of the evaluation process. (2) Capture and preserve the baseline knowledge used by the MoDOT experts in performing the evaluation process. At the present time, the evaluation expertise resides in two MoDOT personnel. Automation of the evaluation process will allow that knowledge to be captured, preserved, and used for training purposes. (3) Develop an approach for the image analysis which is flexible and extensible in order to accommodate the inevitable pathologies that arise in the evaluation process. Such pathologies include features such as cracks and fissures, voids filled with paste or debris, and multiple, overlapping voids. FM and T personnel used image processing, pattern recognition, and system integration skills developed for other Department of Energy applications to develop and test a prototype of an automated scanning system for concrete evaluation. MoDOT personnel provided all the basic hardware (microscope, camera, computer-controlled stage, etc.) for the prototype, supported FM and T in the acquisition of image data for software development, and provided their critical expert knowledge of the process of concrete evaluation. This combination of expertise was vital to the successful development of the prototype system.

  15. Advanced automated gain adjustments for in-vivo ultrasound imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moshavegh, Ramin; Hemmsen, Martin Christian; Martins, Bo;

    2015-01-01

    each containing 50 frames. The scans are acquired using a recently commercialized BK3000 ultrasound scanner (BK Ultrasound, Denmark). Matching pairs of in-vivo sequences, unprocessed and processed with the proposed method were visualized side by side and evaluated by 4 radiologists for image quality....... Wilcoxon signed-rank test was then applied to the ratings provided by radiologists. The average VAS score was highly positive 12.16 (p-value: 2.09 x 10-23) favoring the gain-adjusted scans with the proposed algorithm....

  16. Automated Hierarchical Time Gain Compensation for In Vivo Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moshavegh, Ramin; Hemmsen, Martin Christian; Martins, Bo;

    2015-01-01

    tissue and the ultrasound signal strength. The proposed algorithm was applied to a set of 44 in vivo abdominal movie sequences each containing 15 frames. Matching pairs of in vivo sequences, unprocessed and processed with the proposed AHTGC were visualized side by side and evaluated by two radiologists...... in terms of image quality. Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to evaluate whether radiologists preferred the processed sequences or the unprocessed data. The results indicate that the average visual analogue scale (VAS) is positive ( p-value: 2.34 × 10−13) and estimated to be 1.01 (95% CI: 0.85; 1...

  17. Automation of image data processing. (Polish Title: Automatyzacja proces u przetwarzania danych obrazowych)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preuss, R.

    2014-12-01

    This article discusses the current capabilities of automate processing of the image data on the example of using PhotoScan software by Agisoft. At present, image data obtained by various registration systems (metric and non - metric cameras) placed on airplanes, satellites, or more often on UAVs is used to create photogrammetric products. Multiple registrations of object or land area (large groups of photos are captured) are usually performed in order to eliminate obscured area as well as to raise the final accuracy of the photogrammetric product. Because of such a situation t he geometry of the resulting image blocks is far from the typical configuration of images. For fast images georeferencing automatic image matching algorithms are currently applied. They can create a model of a block in the local coordinate system or using initial exterior orientation and measured control points can provide image georeference in an external reference frame. In the case of non - metric image application, it is also possible to carry out self - calibration process at this stage. Image matching algorithm is also used in generation of dense point clouds reconstructing spatial shape of the object (area). In subsequent processing steps it is possible to obtain typical photogrammetric products such as orthomosaic, DSM or DTM and a photorealistic solid model of an object . All aforementioned processing steps are implemented in a single program in contrary to standard commercial software dividing all steps into dedicated modules. Image processing leading to final geo referenced products can be fully automated including sequential implementation of the processing steps at predetermined control parameters. The paper presents the practical results of the application fully automatic generation of othomosaic for both images obtained by a metric Vexell camera and a block of images acquired by a non - metric UAV system

  18. Extended Field Laser Confocal Microscopy (EFLCM): Combining automated Gigapixel image capture with in silico virtual microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy has revolutionized cell biology. However, the technique has major limitations in speed and sensitivity due to the fact that a single laser beam scans the sample, allowing only a few microseconds signal collection for each pixel. This limitation has been overcome by the introduction of parallel beam illumination techniques in combination with cold CCD camera based image capture. Using the combination of microlens enhanced Nipkow spinning disc confocal illumination together with fully automated image capture and large scale in silico image processing we have developed a system allowing the acquisition, presentation and analysis of maximum resolution confocal panorama images of several Gigapixel size. We call the method Extended Field Laser Confocal Microscopy (EFLCM). We show using the EFLCM technique that it is possible to create a continuous confocal multi-colour mosaic from thousands of individually captured images. EFLCM can digitize and analyze histological slides, sections of entire rodent organ and full size embryos. It can also record hundreds of thousands cultured cells at multiple wavelength in single event or time-lapse fashion on fixed slides, in live cell imaging chambers or microtiter plates. The observer independent image capture of EFLCM allows quantitative measurements of fluorescence intensities and morphological parameters on a large number of cells. EFLCM therefore bridges the gap between the mainly illustrative fluorescence microscopy and purely quantitative flow cytometry. EFLCM can also be used as high content analysis (HCA) instrument for automated screening processes

  19. Automated Peripheral Neuropathy Assessment Using Optical Imaging and Foot Anthropometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Hafeez-U R; Spruce, Michelle; Alty, Stephen R; Dudley, Sandra

    2015-08-01

    A large proportion of individuals who live with type-2 diabetes suffer from plantar sensory neuropathy. Regular testing and assessment for the condition is required to avoid ulceration or other damage to patient's feet. Currently accepted practice involves a trained clinician testing a patient's feet manually with a hand-held nylon monofilament probe. The procedure is time consuming, labor intensive, requires special training, is prone to error, and repeatability is difficult. With the vast increase in type-2 diabetes, the number of plantar sensory neuropathy sufferers has already grown to such an extent as to make a traditional manual test problematic. This paper presents the first investigation of a novel approach to automatically identify the pressure points on a given patient's foot for the examination of sensory neuropathy via optical image processing incorporating plantar anthropometry. The method automatically selects suitable test points on the plantar surface that correspond to those repeatedly chosen by a trained podiatrist. The proposed system automatically identifies the specific pressure points at different locations, namely the toe (hallux), metatarsal heads and heel (Calcaneum) areas. The approach is generic and has shown 100% reliability on the available database used. The database consists of Chinese, Asian, African, and Caucasian foot images. PMID:26186748

  20. Automated detection of diabetic retinopathy in retinal images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Valverde

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy (DR is a disease with an increasing prevalence and the main cause of blindness among working-age population. The risk of severe vision loss can be significantly reduced by timely diagnosis and treatment. Systematic screening for DR has been identified as a cost-effective way to save health services resources. Automatic retinal image analysis is emerging as an important screening tool for early DR detection, which can reduce the workload associated to manual grading as well as save diagnosis costs and time. Many research efforts in the last years have been devoted to developing automatic tools to help in the detection and evaluation of DR lesions. However, there is a large variability in the databases and evaluation criteria used in the literature, which hampers a direct comparison of the different studies. This work is aimed at summarizing the results of the available algorithms for the detection and classification of DR pathology. A detailed literature search was conducted using PubMed. Selected relevant studies in the last 10 years were scrutinized and included in the review. Furthermore, we will try to give an overview of the available commercial software for automatic retinal image analysis.

  1. Automated extraction of metastatic liver cancer regions from abdominal contrast CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, automated extraction of metastatic liver cancer regions from abdominal contrast X-ray CT images is investigated. Because even in Japan, cases of metastatic liver cancers are increased due to recent Europeanization and/or Americanization of Japanese eating habits, development of a system for computer aided diagnosis of them is strongly expected. Our automated extraction procedure consists of following four steps; liver region extraction, density transformation for enhancement of cancer regions, segmentation for obtaining candidate cancer regions, and reduction of false positives by shape feature. Parameter values used in each step of the procedure are decided based on density and shape features of typical metastatic liver cancers. In experiments using practical 20 cases of metastatic liver tumors, it is shown that 56% of true cancers can be detected successfully from CT images by the proposed procedure. (author)

  2. Automated grading of renal cell carcinoma using whole slide imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang-Cheng Yeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Recent technology developments have demonstrated the benefit of using whole slide imaging (WSI in computer-aided diagnosis. In this paper, we explore the feasibility of using automatic WSI analysis to assist grading of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC, which is a manual task traditionally performed by pathologists. Materials and Methods: Automatic WSI analysis was applied to 39 hematoxylin and eosin-stained digitized slides of clear cell RCC with varying grades. Kernel regression was used to estimate the spatial distribution of nuclear size across the entire slides. The analysis results were correlated with Fuhrman nuclear grades determined by pathologists. Results: The spatial distribution of nuclear size provided a panoramic view of the tissue sections. The distribution images facilitated locating regions of interest, such as high-grade regions and areas with necrosis. The statistical analysis showed that the maximum nuclear size was significantly different (P < 0.001 between low-grade (Grades I and II and high-grade tumors (Grades III and IV. The receiver operating characteristics analysis showed that the maximum nuclear size distinguished high-grade and low-grade tumors with a false positive rate of 0.2 and a true positive rate of 1.0. The area under the curve is 0.97. Conclusion: The automatic WSI analysis allows pathologists to see the spatial distribution of nuclei size inside the tumors. The maximum nuclear size can also be used to differentiate low-grade and high-grade clear cell RCC with good sensitivity and specificity. These data suggest that automatic WSI analysis may facilitate pathologic grading of renal tumors and reduce variability encountered with manual grading.

  3. Automated detection of regions of interest for tissue microarray experiments: an image texture analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent research with tissue microarrays led to a rapid progress toward quantifying the expressions of large sets of biomarkers in normal and diseased tissue. However, standard procedures for sampling tissue for molecular profiling have not yet been established. This study presents a high throughput analysis of texture heterogeneity on breast tissue images for the purpose of identifying regions of interest in the tissue for molecular profiling via tissue microarray technology. Image texture of breast histology slides was described in terms of three parameters: the percentage of area occupied in an image block by chromatin (B), percentage occupied by stroma-like regions (P), and a statistical heterogeneity index H commonly used in image analysis. Texture parameters were defined and computed for each of the thousands of image blocks in our dataset using both the gray scale and color segmentation. The image blocks were then classified into three categories using the texture feature parameters in a novel statistical learning algorithm. These categories are as follows: image blocks specific to normal breast tissue, blocks specific to cancerous tissue, and those image blocks that are non-specific to normal and disease states. Gray scale and color segmentation techniques led to identification of same regions in histology slides as cancer-specific. Moreover the image blocks identified as cancer-specific belonged to those cell crowded regions in whole section image slides that were marked by two pathologists as regions of interest for further histological studies. These results indicate the high efficiency of our automated method for identifying pathologic regions of interest on histology slides. Automation of critical region identification will help minimize the inter-rater variability among different raters (pathologists) as hundreds of tumors that are used to develop an array have typically been evaluated (graded) by different pathologists. The region of interest

  4. Simple Tool for Semi-automated Evaluation of Yeast Colony Images

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schier, Jan; Kovář, Bohumil

    Berlin: Springer, 2013 - (Fred, A.; Filipe, J.; Gamboa, H.), s. 110-125. (Communications in Computer and Information Science. 273). ISBN 978-3-642-29751-9 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA01010931 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Colony counting * Petri dish evaluation * software tool Subject RIV: JC - Computer Hardware ; Software http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2012/ZS/schier-simple tool for semi-automated evaluation of yeast colony image s.pdf

  5. Characterization of the microstructure of dairy systems using automated image analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Juliana V.C.; Legland, David; Cauty, Chantal; Kolotuev, Irina; Floury, Juliane

    2015-01-01

    A sound understanding of the microstructure of dairy products is of great importance in order to predict and control their properties and final quality. The aim of this study was to develop an automated image analysis procedure to characterize the microstructure of different dairy systems. A high pressure freezing coupled with freeze-substitution (HPF-FS) protocol was applied prior to transmission electron microscopy(TEM) in order to minimize any modification of the microstructure of the dair...

  6. The impact of air pollution on the level of micronuclei measured by automated image analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rössnerová, Andrea; Špátová, Milada; Rossner, P.; Solanský, I.; Šrám, Radim

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 669, 1-2 (2009), s. 42-47. ISSN 0027-5107 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1QS500390506; GA MŠk 2B06088; GA MŠk 2B08005 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : micronuclei * binucleated cells * automated image analysis Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality Impact factor: 3.556, year: 2009

  7. Automated semantic indexing of imaging reports to support retrieval of medical images in the multimedia electronic medical record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, H J; Antipov, I; Hersh, W; Smith, C A; Mailhot, M

    1999-12-01

    This paper describes preliminary work evaluating automated semantic indexing of radiology imaging reports to represent images stored in the Image Engine multimedia medical record system at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. The authors used the SAPHIRE indexing system to automatically identify important biomedical concepts within radiology reports and represent these concepts with terms from the 1998 edition of the U.S. National Library of Medicine's Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) Metathesaurus. This automated UMLS indexing was then compared with manual UMLS indexing of the same reports. Human indexing identified appropriate UMLS Metathesaurus descriptors for 81% of the important biomedical concepts contained in the report set. SAPHIRE automatically identified UMLS Metathesaurus descriptors for 64% of the important biomedical concepts contained in the report set. The overall conclusions of this pilot study were that the UMLS metathesaurus provided adequate coverage of the majority of the important concepts contained within the radiology report test set and that SAPHIRE could automatically identify and translate almost two thirds of these concepts into appropriate UMLS descriptors. Further work is required to improve both the recall and precision of this automated concept extraction process. PMID:10805018

  8. Development of a methodology for automated assessment of the quality of digitized images in mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process of evaluating the quality of radiographic images in general, and mammography in particular, can be much more accurate, practical and fast with the help of computer analysis tools. The purpose of this study is to develop a computational methodology to automate the process of assessing the quality of mammography images through techniques of digital imaging processing (PDI), using an existing image processing environment (ImageJ). With the application of PDI techniques was possible to extract geometric and radiometric characteristics of the images evaluated. The evaluated parameters include spatial resolution, high-contrast detail, low contrast threshold, linear detail of low contrast, tumor masses, contrast ratio and background optical density. The results obtained by this method were compared with the results presented in the visual evaluations performed by the Health Surveillance of Minas Gerais. Through this comparison was possible to demonstrate that the automated methodology is presented as a promising alternative for the reduction or elimination of existing subjectivity in the visual assessment methodology currently in use. (author)

  9. OpenComet: An automated tool for comet assay image analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin M. Gyori

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive species such as free radicals are constantly generated in vivo and DNA is the most important target of oxidative stress. Oxidative DNA damage is used as a predictive biomarker to monitor the risk of development of many diseases. The comet assay is widely used for measuring oxidative DNA damage at a single cell level. The analysis of comet assay output images, however, poses considerable challenges. Commercial software is costly and restrictive, while free software generally requires laborious manual tagging of cells. This paper presents OpenComet, an open-source software tool providing automated analysis of comet assay images. It uses a novel and robust method for finding comets based on geometric shape attributes and segmenting the comet heads through image intensity profile analysis. Due to automation, OpenComet is more accurate, less prone to human bias, and faster than manual analysis. A live analysis functionality also allows users to analyze images captured directly from a microscope. We have validated OpenComet on both alkaline and neutral comet assay images as well as sample images from existing software packages. Our results show that OpenComet achieves high accuracy with significantly reduced analysis time.

  10. Automated Formosat Image Processing System for Rapid Response to International Disasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, M. C.; Chou, S. C.; Chen, Y. C.; Chen, B.; Liu, C.; Yu, S. J.

    2016-06-01

    FORMOSAT-2, Taiwan's first remote sensing satellite, was successfully launched in May of 2004 into the Sun-synchronous orbit at 891 kilometers of altitude. With the daily revisit feature, the 2-m panchromatic, 8-m multi-spectral resolution images captured have been used for researches and operations in various societal benefit areas. This paper details the orchestration of various tasks conducted in different institutions in Taiwan in the efforts responding to international disasters. The institutes involved including its space agency-National Space Organization (NSPO), Center for Satellite Remote Sensing Research of National Central University, GIS Center of Feng-Chia University, and the National Center for High-performance Computing. Since each institution has its own mandate, the coordinated tasks ranged from receiving emergency observation requests, scheduling and tasking of satellite operation, downlink to ground stations, images processing including data injection, ortho-rectification, to delivery of image products. With the lessons learned from working with international partners, the FORMOSAT Image Processing System has been extensively automated and streamlined with a goal to shorten the time between request and delivery in an efficient manner. The integrated team has developed an Application Interface to its system platform that provides functions of search in archive catalogue, request of data services, mission planning, inquiry of services status, and image download. This automated system enables timely image acquisition and substantially increases the value of data product. Example outcome of these efforts in recent response to support Sentinel Asia in Nepal Earthquake is demonstrated herein.

  11. Automating PACS quality control with the Vanderbilt image processing enterprise resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esparza, Michael L.; Welch, E. Brian; Landman, Bennett A.

    2012-02-01

    Precise image acquisition is an integral part of modern patient care and medical imaging research. Periodic quality control using standardized protocols and phantoms ensures that scanners are operating according to specifications, yet such procedures do not ensure that individual datasets are free from corruption; for example due to patient motion, transient interference, or physiological variability. If unacceptable artifacts are noticed during scanning, a technologist can repeat a procedure. Yet, substantial delays may be incurred if a problematic scan is not noticed until a radiologist reads the scans or an automated algorithm fails. Given scores of slices in typical three-dimensional scans and widevariety of potential use cases, a technologist cannot practically be expected inspect all images. In large-scale research, automated pipeline systems have had great success in achieving high throughput. However, clinical and institutional workflows are largely based on DICOM and PACS technologies; these systems are not readily compatible with research systems due to security and privacy restrictions. Hence, quantitative quality control has been relegated to individual investigators and too often neglected. Herein, we propose a scalable system, the Vanderbilt Image Processing Enterprise Resource (VIPER) to integrate modular quality control and image analysis routines with a standard PACS configuration. This server unifies image processing routines across an institutional level and provides a simple interface so that investigators can collaborate to deploy new analysis technologies. VIPER integrates with high performance computing environments has successfully analyzed all standard scans from our institutional research center over the course of the last 18 months.

  12. An Automated System for the Detection of Stratified Squamous Epithelial Cancer Cell Using Image Processing Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram Krishna Kumar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Early detection of cancer disease is a difficult problem and if it is not detected in starting phase the cancer can be fatal. Current medical procedures which are used to diagnose the cancer in body partsare time taking and more laboratory work is required for them. This work is an endeavor to possible recognition of cancer cells in the body part. The process consists of image taken of the affected area and digital image processing of the images to get a morphological pattern which differentiate normal cell to cancer cell. The technique is different than visual inspection and biopsy process. Image processing enables the visualization of cellular structure with substantial resolution. The aim of the work is to exploit differences in cellular organization between cancerous and normal tissue using image processing technique, thus allowing for automated, fast and accurate diagnosis.

  13. Development of Raman microspectroscopy for automated detection and imaging of basal cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larraona-Puy, Marta; Ghita, Adrian; Zoladek, Alina; Perkins, William; Varma, Sandeep; Leach, Iain H.; Koloydenko, Alexey A.; Williams, Hywel; Notingher, Ioan

    2009-09-01

    We investigate the potential of Raman microspectroscopy (RMS) for automated evaluation of excised skin tissue during Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS). The main aim is to develop an automated method for imaging and diagnosis of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) regions. Selected Raman bands responsible for the largest spectral differences between BCC and normal skin regions and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) are used to build a multivariate supervised classification model. The model is based on 329 Raman spectra measured on skin tissue obtained from 20 patients. BCC is discriminated from healthy tissue with 90+/-9% sensitivity and 85+/-9% specificity in a 70% to 30% split cross-validation algorithm. This multivariate model is then applied on tissue sections from new patients to image tumor regions. The RMS images show excellent correlation with the gold standard of histopathology sections, BCC being detected in all positive sections. We demonstrate the potential of RMS as an automated objective method for tumor evaluation during MMS. The replacement of current histopathology during MMS by a ``generalization'' of the proposed technique may improve the feasibility and efficacy of MMS, leading to a wider use according to clinical need.

  14. Automated construction of arterial and venous trees in retinal images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qiao; Abràmoff, Michael D; Garvin, Mona K

    2015-10-01

    While many approaches exist to segment retinal vessels in fundus photographs, only a limited number focus on the construction and disambiguation of arterial and venous trees. Previous approaches are local and/or greedy in nature, making them susceptible to errors or limiting their applicability to large vessels. We propose a more global framework to generate arteriovenous trees in retinal images, given a vessel segmentation. In particular, our approach consists of three stages. The first stage is to generate an overconnected vessel network, named the vessel potential connectivity map (VPCM), consisting of vessel segments and the potential connectivity between them. The second stage is to disambiguate the VPCM into multiple anatomical trees, using a graph-based metaheuristic algorithm. The third stage is to classify these trees into arterial or venous (A/V) trees. We evaluated our approach with a ground truth built based on a public database, showing a pixel-wise classification accuracy of 88.15% using a manual vessel segmentation as input, and 86.11% using an automatic vessel segmentation as input. PMID:26636114

  15. Automated Functional Morphology Measurement Using Cardiac SPECT Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Seok Yoon; Ko, Seong Jin; Kang, Se Sik; Kim, Chang Soo; Kim, Jung Hoon [Dept. of Radiological Science, College of Health Sciences, Catholic University of Pusan, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    For the examination of nuclear medicine, myocardial scan is a good method to evaluate a hemodynamic importance of coronary heart disease. but, the automatized qualitative measurement is additionally necessary to improve the decoding efficiency. we suggests the creation of cardiac three-dimensional model and model of three-dimensional cardiac thickness as a new measurement. For the experiment, cardiac reduced cross section was obtained from SPECT. Next, the pre-process was performed and image segmentation was fulfilled by level set. for the modeling of left cardiac thickness, it was realized by applying difference equation of two-dimensional laplace equation. As the result of experiment, it was successful to measure internal wall and external wall and three-dimensional modeling was realized by coordinate. and, with laplace formula, it was successful to develop the thickness of cardiac wall. through the three-dimensional model, defects were observed easily and position of lesion was grasped rapidly by the revolution of model. The model which was developed as the support index of decoding will provide decoding information to doctor additionally and reduce the rate of false diagnosis as well as play a great role for diagnosing IHD early.

  16. Automated 3D-Objectdocumentation on the Base of an Image Set

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Vetter

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Digital stereo-photogrammetry allows users an automatic evaluation of the spatial dimension and the surface texture of objects. The integration of image analysis techniques simplifies the automation of evaluation of large image sets and offers a high accuracy [1]. Due to the substantial similarities of stereoscopic image pairs, correlation techniques provide measurements of subpixel precision for corresponding image points. With the help of an automated point search algorithm in image sets identical points are used to associate pairs of images to stereo models and group them. The found identical points in all images are basis for calculation of the relative orientation of each stereo model as well as defining the relation of neighboured stereo models. By using proper filter strategies incorrect points are removed and the relative orientation of the stereo model can be made automatically. With the help of 3D-reference points or distances at the object or a defined distance of camera basis the stereo model is orientated absolute. An adapted expansion- and matching algorithm offers the possibility to scan the object surface automatically. The result is a three dimensional point cloud; the scan resolution depends on image quality. With the integration of the iterative closest point- algorithm (ICP these partial point clouds are fitted to a total point cloud. In this way, 3D-reference points are not necessary. With the help of the implemented triangulation algorithm a digital surface models (DSM can be created. The texturing can be made automatically by the usage of the images that were used for scanning the object surface. It is possible to texture the surface model directly or to generate orthophotos automatically. By using of calibrated digital SLR cameras with full frame sensor a high accuracy can be reached. A big advantage is the possibility to control the accuracy and quality of the 3d-objectdocumentation with the resolution of the images. The

  17. Automation Aspects for the Georeferencing of Photogrammetric Aerial Image Archives in Forested Scenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimmo Nurminen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Photogrammetric aerial film image archives are scanned into digital form in many countries. These data sets offer an interesting source of information for scientists from different disciplines. The objective of this investigation was to contribute to the automation of a generation of 3D environmental model time series when using small-scale airborne image archives, especially in forested scenes. Furthermore, we investigated the usability of dense digital surface models (DSMs generated using these data sets as well as the uncertainty propagation of the DSMs. A key element in the automation is georeferencing. It is obvious that for images captured years apart, it is essential to find ground reference locations that have changed as little as possible. We studied a 68-year-long aerial image time series in a Finnish Karelian forestland. The quality of candidate ground locations was evaluated by comparing digital DSMs created from the images to an airborne laser scanning (ALS-originated reference DSM. The quality statistics of DSMs were consistent with the expectations; the estimated median root mean squared error for height varied between 0.3 and 2 m, indicating a photogrammetric modelling error of 0.1‰ with respect to flying height for data sets collected since the 1980s, and 0.2‰ for older data sets. The results show that of the studied land cover classes, “peatland without trees” changed the least over time and is one of the most promising candidates to serve as a location for automatic ground control measurement. Our results also highlight some potential challenges in the process as well as possible solutions. Our results indicate that using modern photogrammetric techniques, it is possible to reconstruct 3D environmental model time series using photogrammetric image archives in a highly automated way.

  18. Automated volume of interest delineation and rendering of cone beam CT images in interventional cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Cristian; Schäfer, Dirk; Eshuis, Peter; Carroll, John; Grass, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Interventional C-arm systems allow the efficient acquisition of 3D cone beam CT images. They can be used for intervention planning, navigation, and outcome assessment. We present a fast and completely automated volume of interest (VOI) delineation for cardiac interventions, covering the whole visceral cavity including mediastinum and lungs but leaving out rib-cage and spine. The problem is addressed in a model based approach. The procedure has been evaluated on 22 patient cases and achieves an average surface error below 2mm. The method is able to cope with varying image intensities, varying truncations due to the limited reconstruction volume, and partially with heavy metal and motion artifacts.

  19. Quality Control in Automated Manufacturing Processes – Combined Features for Image Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Kuhlenkötter

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In production processes the use of image processing systems is widespread. Hardware solutions and cameras respectively are available for nearly every application. One important challenge of image processing systems is the development and selection of appropriate algorithms and software solutions in order to realise ambitious quality control for production processes. This article characterises the development of innovative software by combining features for an automatic defect classification on product surfaces. The artificial intelligent method Support Vector Machine (SVM is used to execute the classification task according to the combined features. This software is one crucial element for the automation of a manually operated production process. 

  20. An algorithm for automated analysis of ultrasound images to measure tendon excursion in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sabrina S M; Lewis, Gregory S; Piazza, Stephen J

    2008-02-01

    The accuracy of an algorithm for the automated tracking of tendon excursion from ultrasound images was tested in three experiments. Because the automated method could not be tested against direct measurements of tendon excursion in vivo, an indirect validation procedure was employed. In one experiment, a wire "phantom" was moved a known distance across the ultrasound probe and the automated tracking results were compared with the known distance. The excursion of the musculotendinous junction of the gastrocnemius during frontal and sagittal plane movement of the ankle was assessed in a single cadaver specimen both by manual tracking and with a cable extensometer sutured to the gastrocnemius muscle. A third experiment involved estimation of Achilles tendon excursion in vivo with both manual and automated tracking. Root mean squared (RMS) error was calculated between pairs of measurements after each test. Mean RMS errors of less than 1 mm were observed for the phantom experiments. For the in vitro experiment, mean RMS errors of 8-9% of the total tendon excursion were observed. Mean RMS errors of 6-8% of the total tendon excursion were found in vivo. The results indicate that the proposed algorithm accurately tracks Achilles tendon excursion, but further testing is necessary to determine its general applicability. PMID:18309186

  1. Automated collection of medical images for research from heterogeneous systems: trials and tribulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, M. N.; Looney, P.; Young, K.; Halling-Brown, M. D.

    2014-03-01

    Radiological imaging is fundamental within the healthcare industry and has become routinely adopted for diagnosis, disease monitoring and treatment planning. Over the past two decades both diagnostic and therapeutic imaging have undergone a rapid growth, the ability to be able to harness this large influx of medical images can provide an essential resource for research and training. Traditionally, the systematic collection of medical images for research from heterogeneous sites has not been commonplace within the NHS and is fraught with challenges including; data acquisition, storage, secure transfer and correct anonymisation. Here, we describe a semi-automated system, which comprehensively oversees the collection of both unprocessed and processed medical images from acquisition to a centralised database. The provision of unprocessed images within our repository enables a multitude of potential research possibilities that utilise the images. Furthermore, we have developed systems and software to integrate these data with their associated clinical data and annotations providing a centralised dataset for research. Currently we regularly collect digital mammography images from two sites and partially collect from a further three, with efforts to expand into other modalities and sites currently ongoing. At present we have collected 34,014 2D images from 2623 individuals. In this paper we describe our medical image collection system for research and discuss the wide spectrum of challenges faced during the design and implementation of such systems.

  2. Sfm_georef: Automating image measurement of ground control points for SfM-based projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Mike R.

    2016-04-01

    Deriving accurate DEM and orthomosaic image products from UAV surveys generally involves the use of multiple ground control points (GCPs). Here, we demonstrate the automated collection of GCP image measurements for SfM-MVS processed projects, using sfm_georef software (James & Robson, 2012; http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/staff/jamesm/software/sfm_georef.htm). Sfm_georef was originally written to provide geo-referencing procedures for SfM-MVS projects. It has now been upgraded with a 3-D patch-based matching routine suitable for automating GCP image measurement in both aerial and ground-based (oblique) projects, with the aim of reducing the time required for accurate geo-referencing. Sfm_georef is compatible with a range of SfM-MVS software and imports the relevant files that describe the image network, including camera models and tie points. 3-D survey measurements of ground control are then provided, either for natural features or artificial targets distributed over the project area. Automated GCP image measurement is manually initiated through identifying a GCP position in an image by mouse click; the GCP is then represented by a square planar patch in 3-D, textured from the image and oriented parallel to the local topographic surface (as defined by the 3-D positions of nearby tie points). Other images are then automatically examined by projecting the patch into the images (to account for differences in viewing geometry) and carrying out a sub-pixel normalised cross-correlation search in the local area. With two or more observations of a GCP, its 3-D co-ordinates are then derived by ray intersection. With the 3-D positions of three or more GCPs identified, an initial geo-referencing transform can be derived to relate the SfM-MVS co-ordinate system to that of the GCPs. Then, if GCPs are symmetric and identical, image texture from one representative GCP can be used to search automatically for all others throughout the image set. Finally, the GCP observations can be

  3. Towards Automated Three-Dimensional Tracking of Nephrons through Stacked Histological Image Sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charita Bhikha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An automated approach for tracking individual nephrons through three-dimensional histological image sets of mouse and rat kidneys is presented. In a previous study, the available images were tracked manually through the image sets in order to explore renal microarchitecture. The purpose of the current research is to reduce the time and effort required to manually trace nephrons by creating an automated, intelligent system as a standard tool for such datasets. The algorithm is robust enough to isolate closely packed nephrons and track their convoluted paths despite a number of nonideal, interfering conditions such as local image distortions, artefacts, and interstitial tissue interference. The system comprises image preprocessing, feature extraction, and a custom graph-based tracking algorithm, which is validated by a rule base and a machine learning algorithm. A study of a selection of automatically tracked nephrons, when compared with manual tracking, yields a 95% tracking accuracy for structures in the cortex, while those in the medulla have lower accuracy due to narrower diameter and higher density. Limited manual intervention is introduced to improve tracking, enabling full nephron paths to be obtained with an average of 17 manual corrections per mouse nephron and 58 manual corrections per rat nephron.

  4. ATOM - an OMERO add-on for automated import of image data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lipp Peter

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Modern microscope platforms are able to generate multiple gigabytes of image data in a single experimental session. In a routine research laboratory workflow, these data are initially stored on the local acquisition computer from which files need to be transferred to the experimenter's (remote image repository (e.g., DVDs, portable hard discs or server-based storage because of limited local data storage. Although manual solutions for this migration, such as OMERO - a client-server software for visualising and managing large amounts of image data - exist, this import process may be a time-consuming and tedious task. Findings We have developed ATOM, a Java-based and thus platform-independent add-on for OMERO enabling automated transfer of image data from a wide variety of acquisition software packages into OMERO. ATOM provides a graphical user interface and allows pre-organisation of experimental data for the transfer. Conclusions ATOM is a convenient extension of the OMERO software system. An automated interface to OMERO will be a useful tool for scientists working with file formats supported by the Bio-Formats file format library, a platform-independent library for reading the most common file formats of microscope images.

  5. Automated quantification technology for cerebrospinal fluid dynamics based on magnetic resonance image analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Time-spatial labeling inversion pulse (Time-SLIP) technology, which is a non-contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology for the visualization of blood flow and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics, is used for diagnosis of neurological diseases related to CSF including idiopathic normal-pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH), one of the causes of dementia. However, physicians must subjectively evaluate the velocity of CSF dynamics through observation of Time-SLIP images because no quantification technology exists that can express the values numerically. To address this issue, Toshiba, in cooperation with Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation and Toshiba Rinkan Hospital, has developed an automated quantification technology for CSF dynamics utilizing MR image analysis. We have confirmed the effectiveness of this technology through verification tests using a water phantom and quantification experiments using images of healthy volunteers. (author)

  6. Can Automated Imaging for Optic Disc and Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Analysis Aid Glaucoma Detection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banister, Katie; Boachie, Charles; Bourne, Rupert; Cook, Jonathan; Burr, Jennifer M.; Ramsay, Craig; Garway-Heath, David; Gray, Joanne; McMeekin, Peter; Hernández, Rodolfo; Azuara-Blanco, Augusto

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare the diagnostic performance of automated imaging for glaucoma. Design Prospective, direct comparison study. Participants Adults with suspected glaucoma or ocular hypertension referred to hospital eye services in the United Kingdom. Methods We evaluated 4 automated imaging test algorithms: the Heidelberg Retinal Tomography (HRT; Heidelberg Engineering, Heidelberg, Germany) glaucoma probability score (GPS), the HRT Moorfields regression analysis (MRA), scanning laser polarimetry (GDx enhanced corneal compensation; Glaucoma Diagnostics (GDx), Carl Zeiss Meditec, Dublin, CA) nerve fiber indicator (NFI), and Spectralis optical coherence tomography (OCT; Heidelberg Engineering) retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) classification. We defined abnormal tests as an automated classification of outside normal limits for HRT and OCT or NFI ≥ 56 (GDx). We conducted a sensitivity analysis, using borderline abnormal image classifications. The reference standard was clinical diagnosis by a masked glaucoma expert including standardized clinical assessment and automated perimetry. We analyzed 1 eye per patient (the one with more advanced disease). We also evaluated the performance according to severity and using a combination of 2 technologies. Main Outcome Measures Sensitivity and specificity, likelihood ratios, diagnostic, odds ratio, and proportion of indeterminate tests. Results We recruited 955 participants, and 943 were included in the analysis. The average age was 60.5 years (standard deviation, 13.8 years); 51.1% were women. Glaucoma was diagnosed in at least 1 eye in 16.8%; 32% of participants had no glaucoma-related findings. The HRT MRA had the highest sensitivity (87.0%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 80.2%–92.1%), but lowest specificity (63.9%; 95% CI, 60.2%–67.4%); GDx had the lowest sensitivity (35.1%; 95% CI, 27.0%–43.8%), but the highest specificity (97.2%; 95% CI, 95.6%–98.3%). The HRT GPS sensitivity was 81.5% (95% CI, 73.9%–87.6%), and

  7. Automated detection of galaxy-scale gravitational lenses in high resolution imaging data

    CERN Document Server

    Marshall, Philip J; Moustakas, Leonidas A; Fassnacht, Christopher D; Bradac, Marusa; Schrabback, Tim; Blandford, Roger D

    2008-01-01

    Lens modeling is the key to successful and meaningful automated strong galaxy-scale gravitational lens detection. We have implemented a lens-modeling "robot" that treats every bright red galaxy (BRG) in a large imaging survey as a potential gravitational lens system. Using a simple model optimized for "typical" galaxy-scale lenses, we generate four assessments of model quality that are used in an automated classification. The robot infers the lens classification parameter H that a human would have assigned; the inference is performed using a probability distribution generated from a human-classified training set, including realistic simulated lenses and known false positives drawn from the HST/EGS survey. We compute the expected purity, completeness and rejection rate, and find that these can be optimized for a particular application by changing the prior probability distribution for H, equivalent to defining the robot's "character." Adopting a realistic prior based on the known abundance of lenses, we find t...

  8. Automated Line Tracking of lambda-DNA for Single-Molecule Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Guan, Juan; Granick, Steve

    2011-01-01

    We describe a straightforward, automated line tracking method to visualize within optical resolution the contour of linear macromolecules as they rearrange shape as a function of time by Brownian diffusion and under external fields such as electrophoresis. Three sequential stages of analysis underpin this method: first, "feature finding" to discriminate signal from noise; second, "line tracking" to approximate those shapes as lines; third, "temporal consistency check" to discriminate reasonable from unreasonable fitted conformations in the time domain. The automated nature of this data analysis makes it straightforward to accumulate vast quantities of data while excluding the unreliable parts of it. We implement the analysis on fluorescence images of lambda-DNA molecules in agarose gel to demonstrate its capability to produce large datasets for subsequent statistical analysis.

  9. Estimation of urinary stone composition by automated processing of CT images

    CERN Document Server

    Chevreau, Grégoire; Conort, Pierre; Renard-Penna, Raphaëlle; Mallet, Alain; Daudon, Michel; Mozer, Pierre; 10.1007/s00240-009-0195-3

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this article was developing an automated tool for routine clinical practice to estimate urinary stone composition from CT images based on the density of all constituent voxels. A total of 118 stones for which the composition had been determined by infrared spectroscopy were placed in a helical CT scanner. A standard acquisition, low-dose and high-dose acquisitions were performed. All voxels constituting each stone were automatically selected. A dissimilarity index evaluating variations of density around each voxel was created in order to minimize partial volume effects: stone composition was established on the basis of voxel density of homogeneous zones. Stone composition was determined in 52% of cases. Sensitivities for each compound were: uric acid: 65%, struvite: 19%, cystine: 78%, carbapatite: 33.5%, calcium oxalate dihydrate: 57%, calcium oxalate monohydrate: 66.5%, brushite: 75%. Low-dose acquisition did not lower the performances (P < 0.05). This entirely automated approach eliminat...

  10. Automated classification of optical coherence tomography images of human atrial tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Yu; Tsay, David; Amir, Syed B; Marboe, Charles C; Hendon, Christine P

    2016-10-01

    Tissue composition of the atria plays a critical role in the pathology of cardiovascular disease, tissue remodeling, and arrhythmogenic substrates. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has the ability to capture the tissue composition information of the human atria. In this study, we developed a region-based automated method to classify tissue compositions within human atria samples within OCT images. We segmented regional information without prior information about the tissue architecture and subsequently extracted features within each segmented region. A relevance vector machine model was used to perform automated classification. Segmentation of human atrial ex vivo datasets was correlated with trichrome histology and our classification algorithm had an average accuracy of 80.41% for identifying adipose, myocardium, fibrotic myocardium, and collagen tissue compositions. PMID:26926869

  11. AUTOMATED DETECTION OF OIL DEPOTS FROM HIGH RESOLUTION IMAGES: A NEW PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. O. Ok

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an original approach to identify oil depots from single high resolution aerial/satellite images in an automated manner. The new approach considers the symmetric nature of circular oil depots, and it computes the radial symmetry in a unique way. An automated thresholding method to focus on circular regions and a new measure to verify circles are proposed. Experiments are performed on six GeoEye-1 test images. Besides, we perform tests on 16 Google Earth images of an industrial test site acquired in a time series manner (between the years 1995 and 2012. The results reveal that our approach is capable of detecting circle objects in very different/difficult images. We computed an overall performance of 95.8% for the GeoEye-1 dataset. The time series investigation reveals that our approach is robust enough to locate oil depots in industrial environments under varying illumination and environmental conditions. The overall performance is computed as 89.4% for the Google Earth dataset, and this result secures the success of our approach compared to a state-of-the-art approach.

  12. Fully automated muscle quality assessment by Gabor filtering of second harmonic generation images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paesen, Rik; Smolders, Sophie; Vega, José Manolo de Hoyos; Eijnde, Bert O.; Hansen, Dominique; Ameloot, Marcel

    2016-02-01

    Although structural changes on the sarcomere level of skeletal muscle are known to occur due to various pathologies, rigorous studies of the reduced sarcomere quality remain scarce. This can possibly be explained by the lack of an objective tool for analyzing and comparing sarcomere images across biological conditions. Recent developments in second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy and increasing insight into the interpretation of sarcomere SHG intensity profiles have made SHG microscopy a valuable tool to study microstructural properties of sarcomeres. Typically, sarcomere integrity is analyzed by fitting a set of manually selected, one-dimensional SHG intensity profiles with a supramolecular SHG model. To circumvent this tedious manual selection step, we developed a fully automated image analysis procedure to map the sarcomere disorder for the entire image at once. The algorithm relies on a single-frequency wavelet-based Gabor approach and includes a newly developed normalization procedure allowing for unambiguous data interpretation. The method was validated by showing the correlation between the sarcomere disorder, quantified by the M-band size obtained from manually selected profiles, and the normalized Gabor value ranging from 0 to 1 for decreasing disorder. Finally, to elucidate the applicability of our newly developed protocol, Gabor analysis was used to study the effect of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis on the sarcomere regularity. We believe that the technique developed in this work holds great promise for high-throughput, unbiased, and automated image analysis to study sarcomere integrity by SHG microscopy.

  13. MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING COMPATIBLE ROBOTIC SYSTEM FOR FULLY AUTOMATED BRACHYTHERAPY SEED PLACEMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muntener, Michael; Patriciu, Alexandru; Petrisor, Doru; Mazilu, Dumitru; Bagga, Herman; Kavoussi, Louis; Cleary, Kevin; Stoianovici, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To introduce the development of the first magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-compatible robotic system capable of automated brachytherapy seed placement. Methods An MRI-compatible robotic system was conceptualized and manufactured. The entire robot was built of nonmagnetic and dielectric materials. The key technology of the system is a unique pneumatic motor that was specifically developed for this application. Various preclinical experiments were performed to test the robot for precision and imager compatibility. Results The robot was fully operational within all closed-bore MRI scanners. Compatibility tests in scanners of up to 7 Tesla field intensity showed no interference of the robot with the imager. Precision tests in tissue mockups yielded a mean seed placement error of 0.72 ± 0.36 mm. Conclusions The robotic system is fully MRI compatible. The new technology allows for automated and highly accurate operation within MRI scanners and does not deteriorate the MRI quality. We believe that this robot may become a useful instrument for image-guided prostate interventions. PMID:17169653

  14. An Automated Images-to-Graphs Framework for High Resolution Connectomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William R Gray Roncal

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Reconstructing a map of neuronal connectivity is a critical challenge in contemporary neuroscience. Recent advances in high-throughput serial section electron microscopy (EM have produced massive 3D image volumes of nanoscale brain tissue for the first time. The resolution of EM allows for individual neurons and their synaptic connections to be directly observed. Recovering neuronal networks by manually tracing each neuronal process at this scale is unmanageable, and therefore researchers are developing automated image processing modules. Thus far, state-of-the-art algorithms focus only on the solution to a particular task (e.g., neuron segmentation or synapse identification. In this manuscript we present the first fully automated images-to-graphs pipeline (i.e., a pipeline that begins with an imaged volume of neural tissue and produces a brain graph without any human interaction. To evaluate overall performance and select the best parameters and methods, we also develop a metric to assess the quality of the output graphs. We evaluate a set of algorithms and parameters, searching possible operating points to identify the best available brain graph for our assessment metric. Finally, we deploy a reference end-to-end version of the pipeline on a large, publicly available data set. This provides a baseline result and framework for community analysis and future algorithm development and testing. All code and data derivatives have been made publicly available toward eventually unlocking new biofidelic computational primitives and understanding of neuropathologies.

  15. Automated Adaptive Brightness in Wireless Capsule Endoscopy Using Image Segmentation and Sigmoid Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Ravi; Mohammed, Shahed K; Hasan, Md Mehedi; Zhang, Xuechao; Wahid, Khan A

    2016-08-01

    Wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) plays an important role in the diagnosis of gastrointestinal (GI) diseases by capturing images of human small intestine. Accurate diagnosis of endoscopic images depends heavily on the quality of captured images. Along with image and frame rate, brightness of the image is an important parameter that influences the image quality which leads to the design of an efficient illumination system. Such design involves the choice and placement of proper light source and its ability to illuminate GI surface with proper brightness. Light emitting diodes (LEDs) are normally used as sources where modulated pulses are used to control LED's brightness. In practice, instances like under- and over-illumination are very common in WCE, where the former provides dark images and the later provides bright images with high power consumption. In this paper, we propose a low-power and efficient illumination system that is based on an automated brightness algorithm. The scheme is adaptive in nature, i.e., the brightness level is controlled automatically in real-time while the images are being captured. The captured images are segmented into four equal regions and the brightness level of each region is calculated. Then an adaptive sigmoid function is used to find the optimized brightness level and accordingly a new value of duty cycle of the modulated pulse is generated to capture future images. The algorithm is fully implemented in a capsule prototype and tested with endoscopic images. Commercial capsules like Pillcam and Mirocam were also used in the experiment. The results show that the proposed algorithm works well in controlling the brightness level accordingly to the environmental condition, and as a result, good quality images are captured with an average of 40% brightness level that saves power consumption of the capsule. PMID:27333609

  16. Automated segmentation and classification of multispectral magnetic resonance images of brain using artificial neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddick, W E; Glass, J O; Cook, E N; Elkin, T D; Deaton, R J

    1997-12-01

    We present a fully automated process for segmentation and classification of multispectral magnetic resonance (MR) images. This hybrid neural network method uses a Kohonen self-organizing neural network for segmentation and a multilayer backpropagation neural network for classification. To separate different tissue types, this process uses the standard T1-, T2-, and PD-weighted MR images acquired in clinical examinations. Volumetric measurements of brain structures, relative to intracranial volume, were calculated for an index transverse section in 14 normal subjects (median age 25 years; seven male, seven female). This index slice was at the level of the basal ganglia, included both genu and splenium of the corpus callosum, and generally, showed the putamen and lateral ventricle. An intraclass correlation of this automated segmentation and classification of tissues with the accepted standard of radiologist identification for the index slice in the 14 volunteers demonstrated coefficients (ri) of 0.91, 0.95, and 0.98 for white matter, gray matter, and ventricular cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), respectively. An analysis of variance for estimates of brain parenchyma volumes in five volunteers imaged five times each demonstrated high intrasubject reproducibility with a significance of at least p < 0.05 for white matter, gray matter, and white/gray partial volumes. The population variation, across 14 volunteers, demonstrated little deviation from the averages for gray and white matter, while partial volume classes exhibited a slightly higher degree of variability. This fully automated technique produces reliable and reproducible MR image segmentation and classification while eliminating intra- and interobserver variability. PMID:9533591

  17. Detailed interrogation of trypanosome cell biology via differential organelle staining and automated image analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wheeler Richard J

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many trypanosomatid protozoa are important human or animal pathogens. The well defined morphology and precisely choreographed division of trypanosomatid cells makes morphological analysis a powerful tool for analyzing the effect of mutations, chemical insults and changes between lifecycle stages. High-throughput image analysis of micrographs has the potential to accelerate collection of quantitative morphological data. Trypanosomatid cells have two large DNA-containing organelles, the kinetoplast (mitochondrial DNA and nucleus, which provide useful markers for morphometric analysis; however they need to be accurately identified and often lie in close proximity. This presents a technical challenge. Accurate identification and quantitation of the DNA content of these organelles is a central requirement of any automated analysis method. Results We have developed a technique based on double staining of the DNA with a minor groove binding (4'', 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI and a base pair intercalating (propidium iodide (PI or SYBR green fluorescent stain and color deconvolution. This allows the identification of kinetoplast and nuclear DNA in the micrograph based on whether the organelle has DNA with a more A-T or G-C rich composition. Following unambiguous identification of the kinetoplasts and nuclei the resulting images are amenable to quantitative automated analysis of kinetoplast and nucleus number and DNA content. On this foundation we have developed a demonstrative analysis tool capable of measuring kinetoplast and nucleus DNA content, size and position and cell body shape, length and width automatically. Conclusions Our approach to DNA staining and automated quantitative analysis of trypanosomatid morphology accelerated analysis of trypanosomatid protozoa. We have validated this approach using Leishmania mexicana, Crithidia fasciculata and wild-type and mutant Trypanosoma brucei. Automated analysis of T. brucei

  18. Automated diagnoses of attention deficit hyperactive disorder using magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ani eEloyan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Successful automated diagnoses of attention deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD using imaging and functional biomarkers would have fundamental consequences on the public health impact of the disease. In this work, we show results on the predictability of ADHD using imaging biomarkers and discuss the scientific and diagnostic impacts of the research. We created a prediction model using the landmark ADHD 200 data set focusing on resting state functional connectivity (rs-fc and structural brain imaging. We predicted ADHD status and subtype, obtained by behavioral examination, using imaging data, intelligence quotients and other covariates. The novel contributions of this manuscript include a thorough exploration of prediction and image feature extraction methodology on this form of data, including the use of singular value decompositions, CUR decompositions, random forest, gradient boosting, bagging, voxel-based morphometry and support vector machines as well as important insights into the value, and potentially lack thereof, of imaging biomarkers of disease. The key results include the CUR-based decomposition of the rs-fc-fMRI along with gradient boosting and the prediction algorithm based on a motor network parcellation and random forest algorithm. We conjecture that the CUR decomposition is largely diagnosing common population directions of head motion. Of note, a byproduct of this research is a potential automated method for detecting subtle in-scanner motion. The final prediction algorithm, a weighted combination of several algorithms, had an external test set specificity of 94% with sensitivity of 21%. The most promising imaging biomarker was a correlation graph from a motor network parcellation. In summary, we have undertaken a large-scale statistical exploratory prediction exercise on the unique ADHD 200 data set. The exercise produced several potential leads for future scientific exploration of the neurological basis of ADHD.

  19. Benchmarking, Research, Development, and Support for ORNL Automated Image and Signature Retrieval (AIR/ASR) Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobin, K.W.

    2004-06-01

    This report describes the results of a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with Applied Materials, Inc. (AMAT) of Santa Clara, California. This project encompassed the continued development and integration of the ORNL Automated Image Retrieval (AIR) technology, and an extension of the technology denoted Automated Signature Retrieval (ASR), and other related technologies with the Defect Source Identification (DSI) software system that was under development by AMAT at the time this work was performed. In the semiconductor manufacturing environment, defect imagery is used to diagnose problems in the manufacturing line, train yield management engineers, and examine historical data for trends. Image management in semiconductor data systems is a growing cause of concern in the industry as fabricators are now collecting up to 20,000 images each week. In response to this concern, researchers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) developed a semiconductor-specific content-based image retrieval method and system, also known as AIR. The system uses an image-based query-by-example method to locate and retrieve similar imagery from a database of digital imagery using visual image characteristics. The query method is based on a unique architecture that takes advantage of the statistical, morphological, and structural characteristics of image data, generated by inspection equipment in industrial applications. The system improves the manufacturing process by allowing rapid access to historical records of similar events so that errant process equipment can be isolated and corrective actions can be quickly taken to improve yield. The combined ORNL and AMAT technology is referred to hereafter as DSI-AIR and DSI-ASR.

  20. Experiences and achievements in automated image sequence orientation for close-range photogrammetric projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barazzetti, Luigi; Forlani, Gianfranco; Remondino, Fabio; Roncella, Riccardo; Scaioni, Marco

    2011-07-01

    Automatic image orientation of close-range image blocks is becoming a task of increasing importance in the practice of photogrammetry. Although image orientation procedures based on interactive tie point measurements do not require any preferential block structure, the use of structured sequences can help to accomplish this task in an automated way. Automatic orientation of image sequences has been widely investigated in the Computer Vision community. Here the method is generally named "Structure from Motion" (SfM), or "Structure and Motion". These refer to the simultaneous estimation of the image orientation parameters and 3D object points of a scene from a set of image correspondences. Such approaches, that generally disregard camera calibration data, do not ensure an accurate 3D reconstruction, which is a requirement for photogrammetric projects. The major contribution of SfM is therefore viewed in the photogrammetric community as a powerful tool to automatically provide a dense set of tie points as well as initial parameters for a final rigorous bundle adjustment. The paper, after a brief overview of automatic procedures for close-range image sequence orientation, will show some characteristic examples. Although powerful and reliable image orientation solutions are nowadays available at research level, there are certain questions that are still open. Thus the paper will also report some open issues, like the geometric characteristics of the sequences, scene's texture and shape, ground constraints (control points and/or free-network adjustment), feature matching techniques, outlier rejection and bundle adjustment models.

  1. Effect of image compression and scaling on automated scoring of immunohistochemical stainings and segmentation of tumor epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konsti Juho

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Digital whole-slide scanning of tissue specimens produces large images demanding increasing storing capacity. To reduce the need of extensive data storage systems image files can be compressed and scaled down. The aim of this article is to study the effect of different levels of image compression and scaling on automated image analysis of immunohistochemical (IHC stainings and automated tumor segmentation. Methods Two tissue microarray (TMA slides containing 800 samples of breast cancer tissue immunostained against Ki-67 protein and two TMA slides containing 144 samples of colorectal cancer immunostained against EGFR were digitized with a whole-slide scanner. The TMA images were JPEG2000 wavelet compressed with four compression ratios: lossless, and 1:12, 1:25 and 1:50 lossy compression. Each of the compressed breast cancer images was furthermore scaled down either to 1:1, 1:2, 1:4, 1:8, 1:16, 1:32, 1:64 or 1:128. Breast cancer images were analyzed using an algorithm that quantitates the extent of staining in Ki-67 immunostained images, and EGFR immunostained colorectal cancer images were analyzed with an automated tumor segmentation algorithm. The automated tools were validated by comparing the results from losslessly compressed and non-scaled images with results from conventional visual assessments. Percentage agreement and kappa statistics were calculated between results from compressed and scaled images and results from lossless and non-scaled images. Results Both of the studied image analysis methods showed good agreement between visual and automated results. In the automated IHC quantification, an agreement of over 98% and a kappa value of over 0.96 was observed between losslessly compressed and non-scaled images and combined compression ratios up to 1:50 and scaling down to 1:8. In automated tumor segmentation, an agreement of over 97% and a kappa value of over 0.93 was observed between losslessly compressed images and

  2. Automated system for acquisition and image processing for the control and monitoring boned nopal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luevano, E.; de Posada, E.; Arronte, M.; Ponce, L.; Flores, T.

    2013-11-01

    This paper describes the design and fabrication of a system for acquisition and image processing to control the removal of thorns nopal vegetable (Opuntia ficus indica) in an automated machine that uses pulses of a laser of Nd: YAG. The areolas, areas where thorns grow on the bark of the Nopal, are located applying segmentation algorithms to the images obtained by a CCD. Once the position of the areolas is known, coordinates are sent to a motors system that controls the laser to interact with all areolas and remove the thorns of the nopal. The electronic system comprises a video decoder, memory for image and software storage, and digital signal processor for system control. The firmware programmed tasks on acquisition, preprocessing, segmentation, recognition and interpretation of the areolas. This system achievement identifying areolas and generating table of coordinates of them, which will be send the motor galvo system that controls the laser for removal

  3. Newly found pulmonary pathophysiology from automated breath-hold perfusion-SPECT-CT fusion image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulmonary perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)-CT fusion image largely contributes to objective and detailed correlation between lung morphologic and perfusion impairment in various lung diseases. However, traditional perfusion SPECT obtained during rest breathing usually shows a significant mis-registration on fusion image with conventional CT obtained during deep-inspiratory phase. There are also other adverse effects caused by respiratory lung motion such as blurring or smearing of small perfusion defects. To resolve these disadvantages of traditional perfusion SPECT, an innovative method of deep-inspiratory breath-hold (DIBrH) SPECT scan is developed in the Nuclear Medicine Institute of Yamaguchi University Hospital. This review article briefly describes the new findings of pulmonary pathophysiology which has been reveled by detailed lung morphologic-perfusion correlation on automated reliable DIBrH perfusion SPECT-CT fusion image. (author)

  4. PAPNET TM: an automated cytology screener using image processing and neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luck, Randall L.; Tjon-Fo-Sang, Robert; Mango, Laurie; Recht, Joel R.; Lin, Eunice; Knapp, James

    1992-04-01

    The Pap smear is the universally accepted test used for cervical cancer screening. In the United States alone, about 50 to 70 million of these test are done annually. Every one of the tests is done manually be a cytotechnologist looking at cells on a glass slide under a microscope. This paper describes PAPNET, an automated microscope system that combines a high speed image processor and a neural network processor. The image processor performs an algorithmic primary screen of each image. The neural network performs a non-algorithmic secondary classification of candidate cells. The final output of the system is not a diagnosis. Rather it is a display screen of suspicious cells from which a decision about the status of the case can be made.

  5. Results of Automated Retinal Image Analysis for Detection of Diabetic Retinopathy from the Nakuru Study, Kenya

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul Bøgelund Hansen, Morten; Abramoff, M. D.; Folk, J. C.;

    2015-01-01

    Objective Digital retinal imaging is an established method of screening for diabetic retinopathy (DR). It has been established that currently about 1% of the world's blind or visually impaired is due to DR. However, the increasing prevalence of diabetes mellitus and DR is creating an increased...... workload on those with expertise in grading retinal images. Safe and reliable automated analysis of retinal images may support screening services worldwide. This study aimed to compare the Iowa Detection Program (IDP) ability to detect diabetic eye diseases (DED) to human grading carried out at Moorfields...... gave an AUC of 0.878 (95% CI 0.850-0.905). It showed a negative predictive value of 98%. The IDP missed no vision threatening retinopathy in any patients and none of the false negative cases met criteria for treatment. Conclusions In this epidemiological sample, the IDP's grading was comparable to that...

  6. The use of the Kalman filter in the automated segmentation of EIT lung images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we present a new pipeline for the fast and accurate segmentation of impedance images of the lungs using electrical impedance tomography (EIT). EIT is an emerging, promising, non-invasive imaging modality that produces real-time, low spatial but high temporal resolution images of impedance inside a body. Recovering impedance itself constitutes a nonlinear ill-posed inverse problem, therefore the problem is usually linearized, which produces impedance-change images, rather than static impedance ones. Such images are highly blurry and fuzzy along object boundaries. We provide a mathematical reasoning behind the high suitability of the Kalman filter when it comes to segmenting and tracking conductivity changes in EIT lung images. Next, we use a two-fold approach to tackle the segmentation problem. First, we construct a global lung shape to restrict the search region of the Kalman filter. Next, we proceed with augmenting the Kalman filter by incorporating an adaptive foreground detection system to provide the boundary contours for the Kalman filter to carry out the tracking of the conductivity changes as the lungs undergo deformation in a respiratory cycle. The proposed method has been validated by using performance statistics such as misclassified area, and false positive rate, and compared to previous approaches. The results show that the proposed automated method can be a fast and reliable segmentation tool for EIT imaging. (paper)

  7. An integrated and interactive decision support system for automated melanoma recognition of dermoscopic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M M; Bhattacharya, P

    2010-09-01

    This paper presents an integrated and interactive decision support system for the automated melanoma recognition of the dermoscopic images based on image retrieval by content and multiple expert fusion. In this context, the ultimate aim is to support the decision making by retrieving and displaying the relevant past cases as well as predicting the image categories (e.g., melanoma, benign and dysplastic nevi) by combining outputs from different classifiers. However, the most challenging aspect in this domain is to detect the lesion from the healthy background skin and extract the lesion-specific local image features. A thresholding-based segmentation method is applied on the intensity images generated from two different schemes to detect the lesion. For the fusion-based image retrieval and classification, the lesion-specific local color and texture features are extracted and represented in the form of the mean and variance-covariance of color channels and in a combined feature space. The performance is evaluated by using both the precision-recall and classification accuracies. Experimental results on a dermoscopic image collection demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed system and show the viability of a real-time clinical application. PMID:19942406

  8. Automating quality assurance of digital linear accelerators using a radioluminescent phosphor coated phantom and optical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Cesare H.; Naczynski, Dominik J.; Yu, Shu-Jung S.; Yang, Yong; Xing, Lei

    2016-09-01

    Performing mechanical and geometric quality assurance (QA) tests for medical linear accelerators (LINAC) is a predominantly manual process that consumes significant time and resources. In order to alleviate this burden this study proposes a novel strategy to automate the process of performing these tests. The autonomous QA system consists of three parts: (1) a customized phantom coated with radioluminescent material; (2) an optical imaging system capable of visualizing the incidence of the radiation beam, light field or lasers on the phantom; and (3) software to process the captured signals. The radioluminescent phantom, which enables visualization of the radiation beam on the same surface as the light field and lasers, is placed on the couch and imaged while a predefined treatment plan is delivered from the LINAC. The captured images are then processed to self-calibrate the system and perform measurements for evaluating light field/radiation coincidence, jaw position indicators, cross-hair centering, treatment couch position indicators and localizing laser alignment. System accuracy is probed by intentionally introducing errors and by comparing with current clinical methods. The accuracy of self-calibration is evaluated by examining measurement repeatability under fixed and variable phantom setups. The integrated system was able to automatically collect, analyze and report the results for the mechanical alignment tests specified by TG-142. The average difference between introduced and measured errors was 0.13 mm. The system was shown to be consistent with current techniques. Measurement variability increased slightly from 0.1 mm to 0.2 mm when the phantom setup was varied, but no significant difference in the mean measurement value was detected. Total measurement time was less than 10 minutes for all tests as a result of automation. The system’s unique features of a phosphor-coated phantom and fully automated, operator independent self-calibration offer the

  9. Automating quality assurance of digital linear accelerators using a radioluminescent phosphor coated phantom and optical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Cesare H; Naczynski, Dominik J; Yu, Shu-Jung S; Yang, Yong; Xing, Lei

    2016-09-01

    Performing mechanical and geometric quality assurance (QA) tests for medical linear accelerators (LINAC) is a predominantly manual process that consumes significant time and resources. In order to alleviate this burden this study proposes a novel strategy to automate the process of performing these tests. The autonomous QA system consists of three parts: (1) a customized phantom coated with radioluminescent material; (2) an optical imaging system capable of visualizing the incidence of the radiation beam, light field or lasers on the phantom; and (3) software to process the captured signals. The radioluminescent phantom, which enables visualization of the radiation beam on the same surface as the light field and lasers, is placed on the couch and imaged while a predefined treatment plan is delivered from the LINAC. The captured images are then processed to self-calibrate the system and perform measurements for evaluating light field/radiation coincidence, jaw position indicators, cross-hair centering, treatment couch position indicators and localizing laser alignment. System accuracy is probed by intentionally introducing errors and by comparing with current clinical methods. The accuracy of self-calibration is evaluated by examining measurement repeatability under fixed and variable phantom setups. The integrated system was able to automatically collect, analyze and report the results for the mechanical alignment tests specified by TG-142. The average difference between introduced and measured errors was 0.13 mm. The system was shown to be consistent with current techniques. Measurement variability increased slightly from 0.1 mm to 0.2 mm when the phantom setup was varied, but no significant difference in the mean measurement value was detected. Total measurement time was less than 10 minutes for all tests as a result of automation. The system's unique features of a phosphor-coated phantom and fully automated, operator independent self-calibration offer the

  10. Advances in hardware, software, and automation for 193nm aerial image measurement systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zibold, Axel M.; Schmid, R.; Seyfarth, A.; Waechter, M.; Harnisch, W.; Doornmalen, H. v.

    2005-05-01

    A new, second generation AIMS fab 193 system has been developed which is capable of emulating lithographic imaging of any type of reticles such as binary and phase shift masks (PSM) including resolution enhancement technologies (RET) such as optical proximity correction (OPC) or scatter bars. The system emulates the imaging process by adjustment of the lithography equivalent illumination and imaging conditions of 193nm wafer steppers including circular, annular, dipole and quadrupole type illumination modes. The AIMS fab 193 allows a rapid prediction of wafer printability of critical mask features, including dense patterns and contacts, defects or repairs by acquiring through-focus image stacks by means of a CCD camera followed by quantitative image analysis. Moreover the technology can be readily applied to directly determine the process window of a given mask under stepper imaging conditions. Since data acquisition is performed electronically, AIMS in many applications replaces the need for costly and time consuming wafer prints using a wafer stepper/ scanner followed by CD SEM resist or wafer analysis. The AIMS fab 193 second generation system is designed for 193nm lithography mask printing predictability down to the 65nm node. In addition to hardware improvements a new modular AIMS software is introduced allowing for a fully automated operation mode. Multiple pre-defined points can be visited and through-focus AIMS measurements can be executed automatically in a recipe based mode. To increase the effectiveness of the automated operation mode, the throughput of the system to locate the area of interest, and to acquire the through-focus images is increased by almost a factor of two in comparison with the first generation AIMS systems. In addition a new software plug-in concept is realised for the tools. One new feature has been successfully introduced as "Global CD Map", enabling automated investigation of global mask quality based on the local determination of

  11. Automated measurement of CT noise in patient images with a novel structure coherence feature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Minsoo; Choi, Young Hun; Kim, Jong Hyo

    2015-12-01

    While the assessment of CT noise constitutes an important task for the optimization of scan protocols in clinical routine, the majority of noise measurements in practice still rely on manual operation, hence limiting their efficiency and reliability. This study presents an algorithm for the automated measurement of CT noise in patient images with a novel structure coherence feature. The proposed algorithm consists of a four-step procedure including subcutaneous fat tissue selection, the calculation of structure coherence feature, the determination of homogeneous ROIs, and the estimation of the average noise level. In an evaluation with 94 CT scans (16 517 images) of pediatric and adult patients along with the participation of two radiologists, ROIs were placed on a homogeneous fat region at 99.46% accuracy, and the agreement of the automated noise measurements with the radiologists' reference noise measurements (PCC  =  0.86) was substantially higher than the within and between-rater agreements of noise measurements (PCCwithin  =  0.75, PCCbetween  =  0.70). In addition, the absolute noise level measurements matched closely the theoretical noise levels generated by a reduced-dose simulation technique. Our proposed algorithm has the potential to be used for examining the appropriateness of radiation dose and the image quality of CT protocols for research purposes as well as clinical routine. PMID:26561914

  12. Comparison of manually produced and automated cross country movement maps using digital image processing techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, L. K.

    1985-01-01

    The Image-Based Information System (IBIS) was used to automate the cross country movement (CCM) mapping model developed by the Defense Mapping Agency (DMA). Existing terrain factor overlays and a CCM map, produced by DMA for the Fort Lewis, Washington area, were digitized and reformatted into geometrically registered images. Terrain factor data from Slope, Soils, and Vegetation overlays were entered into IBIS, and were then combined utilizing IBIS-programmed equations to implement the DMA CCM model. The resulting IBIS-generated CCM map was then compared with the digitized manually produced map to test similarity. The numbers of pixels comprising each CCM region were compared between the two map images, and percent agreement between each two regional counts was computed. The mean percent agreement equalled 86.21%, with an areally weighted standard deviation of 11.11%. Calculation of Pearson's correlation coefficient yielded +9.997. In some cases, the IBIS-calculated map code differed from the DMA codes: analysis revealed that IBIS had calculated the codes correctly. These highly positive results demonstrate the power and accuracy of IBIS in automating models which synthesize a variety of thematic geographic data.

  13. Automated segmentation of oral mucosa from wide-field OCT images (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldan, Ryan N.; Lee, Anthony M. D.; Cahill, Lucas; Liu, Kelly; MacAulay, Calum; Poh, Catherine F.; Lane, Pierre

    2016-03-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) can discriminate morphological tissue features important for oral cancer detection such as the presence or absence of basement membrane and epithelial thickness. We previously reported an OCT system employing a rotary-pullback catheter capable of in vivo, rapid, wide-field (up to 90 x 2.5mm2) imaging in the oral cavity. Due to the size and complexity of these OCT data sets, rapid automated image processing software that immediately displays important tissue features is required to facilitate prompt bed-side clinical decisions. We present an automated segmentation algorithm capable of detecting the epithelial surface and basement membrane in 3D OCT images of the oral cavity. The algorithm was trained using volumetric OCT data acquired in vivo from a variety of tissue types and histology-confirmed pathologies spanning normal through cancer (8 sites, 21 patients). The algorithm was validated using a second dataset of similar size and tissue diversity. We demonstrate application of the algorithm to an entire OCT volume to map epithelial thickness, and detection of the basement membrane, over the tissue surface. These maps may be clinically useful for delineating pre-surgical tumor margins, or for biopsy site guidance.

  14. Automated measurement of CT noise in patient images with a novel structure coherence feature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While the assessment of CT noise constitutes an important task for the optimization of scan protocols in clinical routine, the majority of noise measurements in practice still rely on manual operation, hence limiting their efficiency and reliability. This study presents an algorithm for the automated measurement of CT noise in patient images with a novel structure coherence feature. The proposed algorithm consists of a four-step procedure including subcutaneous fat tissue selection, the calculation of structure coherence feature, the determination of homogeneous ROIs, and the estimation of the average noise level. In an evaluation with 94 CT scans (16 517 images) of pediatric and adult patients along with the participation of two radiologists, ROIs were placed on a homogeneous fat region at 99.46% accuracy, and the agreement of the automated noise measurements with the radiologists’ reference noise measurements (PCC  =  0.86) was substantially higher than the within and between-rater agreements of noise measurements (PCCwithin  =  0.75, PCCbetween  =  0.70). In addition, the absolute noise level measurements matched closely the theoretical noise levels generated by a reduced-dose simulation technique. Our proposed algorithm has the potential to be used for examining the appropriateness of radiation dose and the image quality of CT protocols for research purposes as well as clinical routine. (paper)

  15. Automated measurement of CT noise in patient images with a novel structure coherence feature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Minsoo; Choi, Young Hun; Hyo Kim, Jong

    2015-12-01

    While the assessment of CT noise constitutes an important task for the optimization of scan protocols in clinical routine, the majority of noise measurements in practice still rely on manual operation, hence limiting their efficiency and reliability. This study presents an algorithm for the automated measurement of CT noise in patient images with a novel structure coherence feature. The proposed algorithm consists of a four-step procedure including subcutaneous fat tissue selection, the calculation of structure coherence feature, the determination of homogeneous ROIs, and the estimation of the average noise level. In an evaluation with 94 CT scans (16 517 images) of pediatric and adult patients along with the participation of two radiologists, ROIs were placed on a homogeneous fat region at 99.46% accuracy, and the agreement of the automated noise measurements with the radiologists’ reference noise measurements (PCC  =  0.86) was substantially higher than the within and between-rater agreements of noise measurements (PCCwithin  =  0.75, PCCbetween  =  0.70). In addition, the absolute noise level measurements matched closely the theoretical noise levels generated by a reduced-dose simulation technique. Our proposed algorithm has the potential to be used for examining the appropriateness of radiation dose and the image quality of CT protocols for research purposes as well as clinical routine.

  16. A molecular scanner to automate proteomic research and to display proteome images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binz, P A; Müller, M; Walther, D; Bienvenut, W V; Gras, R; Hoogland, C; Bouchet, G; Gasteiger, E; Fabbretti, R; Gay, S; Palagi, P; Wilkins, M R; Rouge, V; Tonella, L; Paesano, S; Rossellat, G; Karmime, A; Bairoch, A; Sanchez, J C; Appel, R D; Hochstrasser, D F

    1999-11-01

    Identification and characterization of all proteins expressed by a genome in biological samples represent major challenges in proteomics. Today's commonly used high-throughput approaches combine two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) with peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF) analysis. Although automation is often possible, a number of limitations still adversely affect the rate of protein identification and annotation in 2-DE databases: the sequential excision process of pieces of gel containing protein; the enzymatic digestion step; the interpretation of mass spectra (reliability of identifications); and the manual updating of 2-DE databases. We present a highly automated method that generates a fully annoated 2-DE map. Using a parallel process, all proteins of a 2-DE are first simultaneously digested proteolytically and electro-transferred onto a poly(vinylidene difluoride) membrane. The membrane is then directly scanned by MALDI-TOF MS. After automated protein identification from the obtained peptide mass fingerprints using PeptIdent software (http://www.expasy.ch/tools/peptident.html + ++), a fully annotated 2-D map is created on-line. It is a multidimensional representation of a proteome that contains interpreted PMF data in addition to protein identification results. This "MS-imaging" method represents a major step toward the development of a clinical molecular scanner. PMID:10565287

  17. Automated Image Segmentation And Characterization Technique For Effective Isolation And Representation Of Human Face

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Reddy N

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In areas such as defense and forensics, it is necessary to identify the face of the criminals from the already available database. Automated face recognition system involves face isolation, feature extraction and classification technique. Challenges in face recognition system are isolating the face effectively as it may be affected by illumination, posture and variation in skin color. Hence it is necessary to develop an effective algorithm that isolates face from the image. In this paper, advanced face isolation technique and feature extraction technique has been proposed.

  18. Automated aortic calcification detection in low-dose chest CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yiting; Htwe, Yu Maw; Padgett, Jennifer; Henschke, Claudia; Yankelevitz, David; Reeves, Anthony P.

    2014-03-01

    The extent of aortic calcification has been shown to be a risk indicator for vascular events including cardiac events. We have developed a fully automated computer algorithm to segment and measure aortic calcification in low-dose noncontrast, non-ECG gated, chest CT scans. The algorithm first segments the aorta using a pre-computed Anatomy Label Map (ALM). Then based on the segmented aorta, aortic calcification is detected and measured in terms of the Agatston score, mass score, and volume score. The automated scores are compared with reference scores obtained from manual markings. For aorta segmentation, the aorta is modeled as a series of discrete overlapping cylinders and the aortic centerline is determined using a cylinder-tracking algorithm. Then the aortic surface location is detected using the centerline and a triangular mesh model. The segmented aorta is used as a mask for the detection of aortic calcification. For calcification detection, the image is first filtered, then an elevated threshold of 160 Hounsfield units (HU) is used within the aorta mask region to reduce the effect of noise in low-dose scans, and finally non-aortic calcification voxels (bony structures, calcification in other organs) are eliminated. The remaining candidates are considered as true aortic calcification. The computer algorithm was evaluated on 45 low-dose non-contrast CT scans. Using linear regression, the automated Agatston score is 98.42% correlated with the reference Agatston score. The automated mass and volume score is respectively 98.46% and 98.28% correlated with the reference mass and volume score.

  19. Automated radial basis function neural network based image classification system for diabetic retinopathy detection in retinal images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anitha, J.; Vijila, C. Kezi Selva; Hemanth, D. Jude

    2010-02-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a chronic eye disease for which early detection is highly essential to avoid any fatal results. Image processing of retinal images emerge as a feasible tool for this early diagnosis. Digital image processing techniques involve image classification which is a significant technique to detect the abnormality in the eye. Various automated classification systems have been developed in the recent years but most of them lack high classification accuracy. Artificial neural networks are the widely preferred artificial intelligence technique since it yields superior results in terms of classification accuracy. In this work, Radial Basis function (RBF) neural network based bi-level classification system is proposed to differentiate abnormal DR Images and normal retinal images. The results are analyzed in terms of classification accuracy, sensitivity and specificity. A comparative analysis is performed with the results of the probabilistic classifier namely Bayesian classifier to show the superior nature of neural classifier. Experimental results show promising results for the neural classifier in terms of the performance measures.

  20. Automating the Analysis of Spatial Grids A Practical Guide to Data Mining Geospatial Images for Human & Environmental Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Lakshmanan, Valliappa

    2012-01-01

    The ability to create automated algorithms to process gridded spatial data is increasingly important as remotely sensed datasets increase in volume and frequency. Whether in business, social science, ecology, meteorology or urban planning, the ability to create automated applications to analyze and detect patterns in geospatial data is increasingly important. This book provides students with a foundation in topics of digital image processing and data mining as applied to geospatial datasets. The aim is for readers to be able to devise and implement automated techniques to extract information from spatial grids such as radar, satellite or high-resolution survey imagery.

  1. AI (artificial intelligence) in histopathology--from image analysis to automated diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayser, Klaus; Görtler, Jürgen; Bogovac, Milica; Bogovac, Aleksandar; Goldmann, Torsten; Vollmer, Ekkehard; Kayser, Gian

    2009-01-01

    The technological progress in digitalization of complete histological glass slides has opened a new door in tissue--based diagnosis. The presentation of microscopic images as a whole in a digital matrix is called virtual slide. A virtual slide allows calculation and related presentation of image information that otherwise can only be seen by individual human performance. The digital world permits attachments of several (if not all) fields of view and the contemporary visualization on a screen. The presentation of all microscopic magnifications is possible if the basic pixel resolution is less than 0.25 microns. To introduce digital tissue--based diagnosis into the daily routine work of a surgical pathologist requires a new setup of workflow arrangement and procedures. The quality of digitized images is sufficient for diagnostic purposes; however, the time needed for viewing virtual slides exceeds that of viewing original glass slides by far. The reason lies in a slower and more difficult sampling procedure, which is the selection of information containing fields of view. By application of artificial intelligence, tissue--based diagnosis in routine work can be managed automatically in steps as follows: 1. The individual image quality has to be measured, and corrected, if necessary. 2. A diagnostic algorithm has to be applied. An algorithm has be developed, that includes both object based (object features, structures) and pixel based (texture) measures. 3. These measures serve for diagnosis classification and feedback to order additional information, for example in virtual immunohistochemical slides. 4. The measures can serve for automated image classification and detection of relevant image information by themselves without any labeling. 5. The pathologists' duty will not be released by such a system; to the contrary, it will manage and supervise the system, i.e., just working at a "higher level". Virtual slides are already in use for teaching and continuous

  2. Semi-automated discrimination of retinal pigmented epithelial cells in two-photon fluorescence images of mouse retinas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Nathan S; Palczewska, Grazyna; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2015-08-01

    Automated image segmentation is a critical step toward achieving a quantitative evaluation of disease states with imaging techniques. Two-photon fluorescence microscopy (TPM) has been employed to visualize the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) and provide images indicating the health of the retina. However, segmentation of RPE cells within TPM images is difficult due to small differences in fluorescence intensity between cell borders and cell bodies. Here we present a semi-automated method for segmenting RPE cells that relies upon multiple weak features that differentiate cell borders from the remaining image. These features were scored by a search optimization procedure that built up the cell border in segments around a nucleus of interest. With six images used as a test, our method correctly identified cell borders for 69% of nuclei on average. Performance was strongly dependent upon increasing retinosome content in the RPE. TPM image analysis has the potential of providing improved early quantitative assessments of diseases affecting the RPE. PMID:26309765

  3. Automation of PCXMC and ImPACT for NASA Astronaut Medical Imaging Dose and Risk Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadori, Amir; Picco, Charles; Flores-McLaughlin, John; Shavers, Mark; Semones, Edward

    2011-01-01

    To automate astronaut organ and effective dose calculations from occupational X-ray and computed tomography (CT) examinations incorporating PCXMC and ImPACT tools and to estimate the associated lifetime cancer risk per the National Council on Radiation Protection & Measurements (NCRP) using MATLAB(R). Methods: NASA follows guidance from the NCRP on its operational radiation safety program for astronauts. NCRP Report 142 recommends that astronauts be informed of the cancer risks from reported exposures to ionizing radiation from medical imaging. MATLAB(R) code was written to retrieve exam parameters for medical imaging procedures from a NASA database, calculate associated dose and risk, and return results to the database, using the Microsoft .NET Framework. This code interfaces with the PCXMC executable and emulates the ImPACT Excel spreadsheet to calculate organ doses from X-rays and CTs, respectively, eliminating the need to utilize the PCXMC graphical user interface (except for a few special cases) and the ImPACT spreadsheet. Results: Using MATLAB(R) code to interface with PCXMC and replicate ImPACT dose calculation allowed for rapid evaluation of multiple medical imaging exams. The user inputs the exam parameter data into the database and runs the code. Based on the imaging modality and input parameters, the organ doses are calculated. Output files are created for record, and organ doses, effective dose, and cancer risks associated with each exam are written to the database. Annual and post-flight exposure reports, which are used by the flight surgeon to brief the astronaut, are generated from the database. Conclusions: Automating PCXMC and ImPACT for evaluation of NASA astronaut medical imaging radiation procedures allowed for a traceable and rapid method for tracking projected cancer risks associated with over 12,000 exposures. This code will be used to evaluate future medical radiation exposures, and can easily be modified to accommodate changes to the risk

  4. Automated image-based assay for evaluation of HIV neutralization and cell-to-cell fusion inhibition

    OpenAIRE

    Sheik-Khalil, Enas; Bray, Mark-Anthony; Özkaya Sahin, Gülsen; Scarlatti, Gabriella; Jansson, Marianne; Carpenter, Anne E.; Fenyö, Eva Maria

    2014-01-01

    Background Standardized techniques to detect HIV-neutralizing antibody responses are of great importance in the search for an HIV vaccine. Methods Here, we present a high-throughput, high-content automated plaque reduction (APR) assay based on automated microscopy and image analysis that allows evaluation of neutralization and inhibition of cell-cell fusion within the same assay. Neutralization of virus particles is measured as a reduction in the number of fluorescent plaques, and inhibition ...

  5. Knee x-ray image analysis method for automated detection of osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamir, Lior; Ling, Shari M; Scott, William W; Bos, Angelo; Orlov, Nikita; Macura, Tomasz J; Eckley, D Mark; Ferrucci, Luigi; Goldberg, Ilya G

    2009-02-01

    We describe a method for automated detection of radiographic osteoarthritis (OA) in knee X-ray images. The detection is based on the Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) classification grades, which correspond to the different stages of OA severity. The classifier was built using manually classified X-rays, representing the first four KL grades (normal, doubtful, minimal, and moderate). Image analysis is performed by first identifying a set of image content descriptors and image transforms that are informative for the detection of OA in the X-rays and assigning weights to these image features using Fisher scores. Then, a simple weighted nearest neighbor rule is used in order to predict the KL grade to which a given test X-ray sample belongs. The dataset used in the experiment contained 350 X-ray images classified manually by their KL grades. Experimental results show that moderate OA (KL grade 3) and minimal OA (KL grade 2) can be differentiated from normal cases with accuracy of 91.5% and 80.4%, respectively. Doubtful OA (KL grade 1) was detected automatically with a much lower accuracy of 57%. The source code developed and used in this study is available for free download at www.openmicroscopy.org. PMID:19342330

  6. Evaluation of a content-based retrieval system for blood cell images with automated methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seng, Woo Chaw; Mirisaee, Seyed Hadi

    2011-08-01

    Content-based image retrieval techniques have been extensively studied for the past few years. With the growth of digital medical image databases, the demand for content-based analysis and retrieval tools has been increasing remarkably. Blood cell image is a key diagnostic tool for hematologists. An automated system that can retrieved relevant blood cell images correctly and efficiently would save the effort and time of hematologists. The purpose of this work is to develop such a content-based image retrieval system. Global color histogram and wavelet-based methods are used in the prototype. The system allows users to search by providing a query image and select one of four implemented methods. The obtained results demonstrate the proposed extended query refinement has the potential to capture a user's high level query and perception subjectivity by dynamically giving better query combinations. Color-based methods performed better than wavelet-based methods with regard to precision, recall rate and retrieval time. Shape and density of blood cells are suggested as measurements for future improvement. The system developed is useful for undergraduate education. PMID:20703533

  7. Automated segmentation of murine lung tumors in x-ray micro-CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swee, Joshua K. Y.; Sheridan, Clare; de Bruin, Elza; Downward, Julian; Lassailly, Francois; Pizarro, Luis

    2014-03-01

    Recent years have seen micro-CT emerge as a means of providing imaging analysis in pre-clinical study, with in-vivo micro-CT having been shown to be particularly applicable to the examination of murine lung tumors. Despite this, existing studies have involved substantial human intervention during the image analysis process, with the use of fully-automated aids found to be almost non-existent. We present a new approach to automate the segmentation of murine lung tumors designed specifically for in-vivo micro-CT-based pre-clinical lung cancer studies that addresses the specific requirements of such study, as well as the limitations human-centric segmentation approaches experience when applied to such micro-CT data. Our approach consists of three distinct stages, and begins by utilizing edge enhancing and vessel enhancing non-linear anisotropic diffusion filters to extract anatomy masks (lung/vessel structure) in a pre-processing stage. Initial candidate detection is then performed through ROI reduction utilizing obtained masks and a two-step automated segmentation approach that aims to extract all disconnected objects within the ROI, and consists of Otsu thresholding, mathematical morphology and marker-driven watershed. False positive reduction is finally performed on initial candidates through random-forest-driven classification using the shape, intensity, and spatial features of candidates. We provide validation of our approach using data from an associated lung cancer study, showing favorable results both in terms of detection (sensitivity=86%, specificity=89%) and structural recovery (Dice Similarity=0.88) when compared against manual specialist annotation.

  8. Automated bone segmentation from large field of view 3D MR images of the hip joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accurate bone segmentation in the hip joint region from magnetic resonance (MR) images can provide quantitative data for examining pathoanatomical conditions such as femoroacetabular impingement through to varying stages of osteoarthritis to monitor bone and associated cartilage morphometry. We evaluate two state-of-the-art methods (multi-atlas and active shape model (ASM) approaches) on bilateral MR images for automatic 3D bone segmentation in the hip region (proximal femur and innominate bone). Bilateral MR images of the hip joints were acquired at 3T from 30 volunteers. Image sequences included water-excitation dual echo stead state (FOV 38.6 × 24.1 cm, matrix 576 × 360, thickness 0.61 mm) in all subjects and multi-echo data image combination (FOV 37.6 × 23.5 cm, matrix 576 × 360, thickness 0.70 mm) for a subset of eight subjects. Following manual segmentation of femoral (head–neck, proximal-shaft) and innominate (ilium+ischium+pubis) bone, automated bone segmentation proceeded via two approaches: (1) multi-atlas segmentation incorporating non-rigid registration and (2) an advanced ASM-based scheme. Mean inter- and intra-rater reliability Dice's similarity coefficients (DSC) for manual segmentation of femoral and innominate bone were (0.970, 0.963) and (0.971, 0.965). Compared with manual data, mean DSC values for femoral and innominate bone volumes using automated multi-atlas and ASM-based methods were (0.950, 0.922) and (0.946, 0.917), respectively. Both approaches delivered accurate (high DSC values) segmentation results; notably, ASM data were generated in substantially less computational time (12 min versus 10 h). Both automated algorithms provided accurate 3D bone volumetric descriptions for MR-based measures in the hip region. The highly computational efficient ASM-based approach is more likely suitable for future clinical applications such as extracting bone–cartilage interfaces for potential cartilage segmentation. (paper)

  9. An automated segmentation method for three-dimensional carotid ultrasound images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahalka, Abir; Fenster, Aaron

    2001-04-01

    We have developed an automated segmentation method for three-dimensional vascular ultrasound images. The method consists of two steps: an automated initial contour identification, followed by application of a geometrically deformable model (GDM). The formation of the initial contours requires the input of a single seed point by the user, and was shown to be insensitive to the placement of the seed within a structure. The GDM minimizes contour energy, providing a smoothed final result. It requires only three simple parameters, all with easily selectable values. The algorithm is fast, performing segmentation on a 336×352×200 volume in 25 s when running on a 100 MHz 9500 Power Macintosh prototype. The segmentation algorithm was tested on stenosed vessel phantoms with known geometry, and the segmentation of the cross-sectional areas was found to be within 3% of the true area. The algorithm was also applied to two sets of patient carotid images, one acquired with a mechanical scanner and the other with a freehand scanning system, with good results on both.

  10. The objective evaluation of the phase image: a comparison of different automated methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patients with suspected or proven coronary artery disease were investigated using both X-ray ventriculography and equilibrium gated radionuclide angiography. In order to diagnose regional wall motion abnormalities, the parametric images obtained by Fourier analysis of the radionuclide images were analysed by different automated methods based on the measurement of the homogeneity of the phase values within the LV ROI. The effect of a diastolic frames exclusion, smoothing the original data, weighting the phase histogram, using Bacharach's error corrected phase distribution functions, using different descriptors of the spread of the phase histograms or distribution functions were tested. (Receiver operating characteristic ROC) curves were plotted for each method. The results show that the diagnostic value of the automated methods depends mainly on the way the histograms or distribution functions are described and to a lesser extent on the type of histograms or distribution functions used. The best result is obtained after smoothing, diastolic frames exclusion, weighting the phase histogram by the amplitude and describing it by its standard deviation. Nevertheless, this result is not significantly better than the visual method. (author)

  11. Automated model-based bias field correction of MR images of the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Leemput, K; Maes, F; Vandermeulen, D; Suetens, P

    1999-10-01

    We propose a model-based method for fully automated bias field correction of MR brain images. The MR signal is modeled as a realization of a random process with a parametric probability distribution that is corrupted by a smooth polynomial inhomogeneity or bias field. The method we propose applies an iterative expectation-maximization (EM) strategy that interleaves pixel classification with estimation of class distribution and bias field parameters, improving the likelihood of the model parameters at each iteration. The algorithm, which can handle multichannel data and slice-by-slice constant intensity offsets, is initialized with information from a digital brain atlas about the a priori expected location of tissue classes. This allows full automation of the method without need for user interaction, yielding more objective and reproducible results. We have validated the bias correction algorithm on simulated data and we illustrate its performance on various MR images with important field inhomogeneities. We also relate the proposed algorithm to other bias correction algorithms. PMID:10628948

  12. Automated static image analysis as a novel tool in describing the physical properties of dietary fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Andrzej KUREK

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The growing interest in the usage of dietary fiber in food has caused the need to provide precise tools for describing its physical properties. This research examined two dietary fibers from oats and beets, respectively, in variable particle sizes. The application of automated static image analysis for describing the hydration properties and particle size distribution of dietary fiber was analyzed. Conventional tests for water holding capacity (WHC were conducted. The particles were measured at two points: dry and after water soaking. The most significant water holding capacity (7.00 g water/g solid was achieved by the smaller sized oat fiber. Conversely, the water holding capacity was highest (4.20 g water/g solid in larger sized beet fiber. There was evidence for water absorption increasing with a decrease in particle size in regards to the same fiber source. Very strong correlations were drawn between particle shape parameters, such as fiber length, straightness, width and hydration properties measured conventionally. The regression analysis provided the opportunity to estimate whether the automated static image analysis method could be an efficient tool in describing the hydration properties of dietary fiber. The application of the method was validated using mathematical model which was verified in comparison to conventional WHC measurement results.

  13. Quantitative Assessment of Mouse Mammary Gland Morphology Using Automated Digital Image Processing and TEB Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blacher, Silvia; Gérard, Céline; Gallez, Anne; Foidart, Jean-Michel; Noël, Agnès; Péqueux, Christel

    2016-04-01

    The assessment of rodent mammary gland morphology is largely used to study the molecular mechanisms driving breast development and to analyze the impact of various endocrine disruptors with putative pathological implications. In this work, we propose a methodology relying on fully automated digital image analysis methods including image processing and quantification of the whole ductal tree and of the terminal end buds as well. It allows to accurately and objectively measure both growth parameters and fine morphological glandular structures. Mammary gland elongation was characterized by 2 parameters: the length and the epithelial area of the ductal tree. Ductal tree fine structures were characterized by: 1) branch end-point density, 2) branching density, and 3) branch length distribution. The proposed methodology was compared with quantification methods classically used in the literature. This procedure can be transposed to several software and thus largely used by scientists studying rodent mammary gland morphology. PMID:26910307

  14. Automated image analyzer for batch processing of CR-39 foils for fast neutron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An automated image analysis system has been developed for counting of tracks generated in CR-39 detectors after processing by Electro-chemical etching (ECE). The tracks are caused by exposure to fast neutron, and is used for measuring the neutron dose received by the radiation workers. The system is capable of batch processing a group of 20 foils in a single cycle, rendering the measurement process elegant and efficient. Thus, the system provides a marked improvement over the earlier one, which has provision of handling one foil at a time. The image analysis software of this system is empowered with the capability to resolve the overlapping tracks, which are commonly found in foils exposed to higher levels of neutron dose. The algorithm employed to resolve the tracks is an enhancement over that utilized in the earlier system. This results in improved accuracy of dosimetry. (author)

  15. Automated segmentation of wood fibres in micro-CT images of paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Y; Phillion, A B; Martinez, D M

    2015-12-01

    A novel algorithm has been developed and validated to isolate individual papermaking fibres in micro-computed tomographic images of paper handsheets as a first step to characterize the structure of the paper. The three-step fibre segmentation algorithm segments the papermaking fibres by (i) tracking the hollow inside the fibres via a modified connected component methodology, (ii) extracting the fibre walls using a distance transform and (iii) labelling the fibres through collapsed sections by a final refinement step. Furthermore, postprocessing algorithms have been developed to calculate the length and coarseness of the segmented fibres. The fibre segmentation algorithm is the first ever reported method for the automated segmentation of the tortuous three-dimensional morphology of papermaking fibres within microstructural images of paper handsheets. The method is not limited to papermaking fibres, but can be applied to any material consisting of tortuous and hollow fibres. PMID:26301453

  16. Modelling and representation issues in automated feature extraction from aerial and satellite images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowmya, Arcot; Trinder, John

    New digital systems for the processing of photogrammetric and remote sensing images have led to new approaches to information extraction for mapping and Geographic Information System (GIS) applications, with the expectation that data can become more readily available at a lower cost and with greater currency. Demands for mapping and GIS data are increasing as well for environmental assessment and monitoring. Hence, researchers from the fields of photogrammetry and remote sensing, as well as computer vision and artificial intelligence, are bringing together their particular skills for automating these tasks of information extraction. The paper will review some of the approaches used in knowledge representation and modelling for machine vision, and give examples of their applications in research for image understanding of aerial and satellite imagery.

  17. Semi-automated characterization of the γ' phase in Ni-based superalloys via high-resolution backscatter imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The size distribution and volume fraction of the γ' phase in Ni-based superalloys plays a critical role in microstructural evolution and mechanical properties. Automated analysis of images is often desired for rapid quantitative characterization of these microstructures. Backscatter electron imaging of specimens in which the γ' phase has been selectively etched yields images that can be more readily segmented with image processing algorithms than other imaging techniques. Utilization of this combination of sample preparation and imaging technique allows for the rapid collection of microstructural data.

  18. Automated materials discrimination using 3D dual energy X ray images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ability of a human observer to identify an explosive device concealed in complex arrangements of objects routinely encountered in the 2D x-ray screening of passenger baggage at airports is often problematic. Standard dual-energy x-ray techniques enable colour encoding of the resultant images in terms of organic, inorganic and metal substances. This transmission imaging technique produces colour information computed from a high-energy x-ray signal and a low energy x-ray signal (80keVeff ≤ 13) to be automatically discriminated from many layers of overlapping substances. This is achieved by applying a basis materials subtraction technique to the data provided by a wavelet image segmentation algorithm. This imaging technique is reliant upon the image data for the masking substances to be discriminated independently of the target material. Further work investigated the extraction of depth data from stereoscopic images to estimate the mass density of the target material. A binocular stereoscopic dual-energy x-ray machine previously developed by the Vision Systems Group at The Nottingham Trent University in collaboration with The Home Office Science and Technology Group provided the image data for the empirical investigation. This machine utilises a novel linear castellated dual-energy x-ray detector recently developed by the Vision Systems Group. This detector array employs half the number of scintillator-photodiode sensors in comparison to a conventional linear dual-energy sensor. The castellated sensor required the development of an image enhancement algorithm to remove the spatial interlace effect in the resultant images prior to the calibration of the system for materials discrimination. To automate the basis materials subtraction technique a wavelet image segmentation and classification algorithm was developed. This enabled overlapping image structures in the x-rayed baggage to be partitioned. A series of experiments was conducted to investigate the

  19. Semi-automated segmentation of a glioblastoma multiforme on brain MR images for radiotherapy planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a computerized method for semi-automated segmentation of the gross tumor volume (GTV) of a glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) on brain MR images for radiotherapy planning (RTP). Three-dimensional (3D) MR images of 28 cases with a GBM were used in this study. First, a sphere volume of interest (VOI) including the GBM was selected by clicking a part of the GBM region in the 3D image. Then, the sphere VOI was transformed to a two-dimensional (2D) image by use of a spiral-scanning technique. We employed active contour models (ACM) to delineate an optimal outline of the GBM in the transformed 2D image. After inverse transform of the optimal outline to the 3D space, a morphological filter was applied to smooth the shape of the 3D segmented region. For evaluation of our computerized method, we compared the computer output with manually segmented regions, which were obtained by a therapeutic radiologist using a manual tracking method. In evaluating our segmentation method, we employed the Jaccard similarity coefficient (JSC) and the true segmentation coefficient (TSC) in volumes between the computer output and the manually segmented region. The mean and standard deviation of JSC and TSC were 74.2±9.8% and 84.1±7.1%, respectively. Our segmentation method provided a relatively accurate outline for GBM and would be useful for radiotherapy planning. (author)

  20. An automated voxelized dosimetry tool for radionuclide therapy based on serial quantitative SPECT/CT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, Price A.; Kron, Tomas [Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne 3002 (Australia); Beauregard, Jean-Mathieu [Department of Radiology, Université Laval, Quebec City G1V 0A6 (Canada); Hofman, Michael S.; Hogg, Annette; Hicks, Rodney J. [Department of Molecular Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne 3002 (Australia)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To create an accurate map of the distribution of radiation dose deposition in healthy and target tissues during radionuclide therapy.Methods: Serial quantitative SPECT/CT images were acquired at 4, 24, and 72 h for 28 {sup 177}Lu-octreotate peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) administrations in 17 patients with advanced neuroendocrine tumors. Deformable image registration was combined with an in-house programming algorithm to interpolate pharmacokinetic uptake and clearance at a voxel level. The resultant cumulated activity image series are comprised of values representing the total number of decays within each voxel's volume. For PRRT, cumulated activity was translated to absorbed dose based on Monte Carlo-determined voxel S-values at a combination of long and short ranges. These dosimetric image sets were compared for mean radiation absorbed dose to at-risk organs using a conventional MIRD protocol (OLINDA 1.1).Results: Absorbed dose values to solid organs (liver, kidneys, and spleen) were within 10% using both techniques. Dose estimates to marrow were greater using the voxelized protocol, attributed to the software incorporating crossfire effect from nearby tumor volumes.Conclusions: The technique presented offers an efficient, automated tool for PRRT dosimetry based on serial post-therapy imaging. Following retrospective analysis, this method of high-resolution dosimetry may allow physicians to prescribe activity based on required dose to tumor volume or radiation limits to healthy tissue in individual patients.

  1. Long-term live cell imaging and automated 4D analysis of drosophila neuroblast lineages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina C F Homem

    Full Text Available The developing Drosophila brain is a well-studied model system for neurogenesis and stem cell biology. In the Drosophila central brain, around 200 neural stem cells called neuroblasts undergo repeated rounds of asymmetric cell division. These divisions typically generate a larger self-renewing neuroblast and a smaller ganglion mother cell that undergoes one terminal division to create two differentiating neurons. Although single mitotic divisions of neuroblasts can easily be imaged in real time, the lack of long term imaging procedures has limited the use of neuroblast live imaging for lineage analysis. Here we describe a method that allows live imaging of cultured Drosophila neuroblasts over multiple cell cycles for up to 24 hours. We describe a 4D image analysis protocol that can be used to extract cell cycle times and growth rates from the resulting movies in an automated manner. We use it to perform lineage analysis in type II neuroblasts where clonal analysis has indicated the presence of a transit-amplifying population that potentiates the number of neurons. Indeed, our experiments verify type II lineages and provide quantitative parameters for all cell types in those lineages. As defects in type II neuroblast lineages can result in brain tumor formation, our lineage analysis method will allow more detailed and quantitative analysis of tumorigenesis and asymmetric cell division in the Drosophila brain.

  2. Automated diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma using fundus and OCT images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pachiyappan Arulmozhivarman

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We describe a system for the automated diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma using fundus and optical coherence tomography (OCT images. Automatic screening will help the doctors to quickly identify the condition of the patient in a more accurate way. The macular abnormalities caused due to diabetic retinopathy can be detected by applying morphological operations, filters and thresholds on the fundus images of the patient. Early detection of glaucoma is done by estimating the Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer (RNFL thickness from the OCT images of the patient. The RNFL thickness estimation involves the use of active contours based deformable snake algorithm for segmentation of the anterior and posterior boundaries of the retinal nerve fiber layer. The algorithm was tested on a set of 89 fundus images of which 85 were found to have at least mild retinopathy and OCT images of 31 patients out of which 13 were found to be glaucomatous. The accuracy for optical disk detection is found to be 97.75%. The proposed system therefore is accurate, reliable and robust and can be realized.

  3. Prospective Image Registration for Automated Scan Prescription of Follow-up Knee Images in Quantitative Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Goldenstein, Janet; Schooler, Joseph; Crane, Jason C; Ozhinsky, Eugene; Pialat, Jean-Baptiste; Carballido-Gamio, Julio; Majumdar, Sharmila

    2011-01-01

    Consistent scan prescription for MRI of the knee is very important for accurate comparison of images in a longitudinal study. However, consistent scan region selection is difficult due the complexity of the knee joint. We propose a novel method for registering knee images using a mutual information registration algorithm to align images in a baseline and follow-up exam. The output of the registration algorithm, three translations and three Euler angles, is then used to redefine the region to ...

  4. An objective method to optimize the MR sequence set for plaque classification in carotid vessel wall images using automated image segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van 't Klooster, Ronald; Patterson, Andrew J; Young, Victoria E; Gillard, Jonathan H; Reiber, Johan H C; van der Geest, Rob J

    2013-01-01

    A typical MR imaging protocol to study the status of atherosclerosis in the carotid artery consists of the application of multiple MR sequences. Since scanner time is limited, a balance has to be reached between the duration of the applied MR protocol and the quantity and quality of the resulting images which are needed to assess the disease. In this study an objective method to optimize the MR sequence set for classification of soft plaque in vessel wall images of the carotid artery using automated image segmentation was developed. The automated method employs statistical pattern recognition techniques and was developed based on an extensive set of MR contrast weightings and corresponding manual segmentations of the vessel wall and soft plaque components, which were validated by histological sections. Evaluation of the results from nine contrast weightings showed the tradeoff between scan duration and automated image segmentation performance. For our dataset the best segmentation performance was achieved by selecting five contrast weightings. Similar performance was achieved with a set of three contrast weightings, which resulted in a reduction of scan time by more than 60%. The presented approach can help others to optimize MR imaging protocols by investigating the tradeoff between scan duration and automated image segmentation performance possibly leading to shorter scanning times and better image interpretation. This approach can potentially also be applied to other research fields focusing on different diseases and anatomical regions. PMID:24194941

  5. RootAnalyzer: A Cross-Section Image Analysis Tool for Automated Characterization of Root Cells and Tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Joshua Chopin; Hamid Laga; Chun Yuan Huang; Sigrid Heuer; Miklavcic, Stanley J.

    2015-01-01

    The morphology of plant root anatomical features is a key factor in effective water and nutrient uptake. Existing techniques for phenotyping root anatomical traits are often based on manual or semi-automatic segmentation and annotation of microscopic images of root cross sections. In this article, we propose a fully automated tool, hereinafter referred to as RootAnalyzer, for efficiently extracting and analyzing anatomical traits from root-cross section images. Using a range of image processi...

  6. Automated bone segmentation from dental CBCT images using patch-based sparse representation and convex optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Li; Gao, Yaozong; Shi, Feng; Liao, Shu; Li, Gang [Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Chen, Ken Chung [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Houston Methodist Hospital Research Institute, Houston, Texas 77030 and Department of Stomatology, National Cheng Kung University Medical College and Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan 70403 (China); Shen, Steve G. F.; Yan, Jin [Department of Oral and Craniomaxillofacial Surgery and Science, Shanghai Ninth People' s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University College of Medicine, Shanghai, China 200011 (China); Lee, Philip K. M.; Chow, Ben [Hong Kong Dental Implant and Maxillofacial Centre, Hong Kong, China 999077 (China); Liu, Nancy X. [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Houston Methodist Hospital Research Institute, Houston, Texas 77030 and Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, Beijing, China 100050 (China); Xia, James J. [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Houston Methodist Hospital Research Institute, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department of Surgery (Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery), Weill Medical College, Cornell University, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Department of Oral and Craniomaxillofacial Surgery and Science, Shanghai Ninth People' s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University College of Medicine, Shanghai, China 200011 (China); Shen, Dinggang, E-mail: dgshen@med.unc.edu [Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 and Department of Brain and Cognitive Engineering, Korea University, Seoul, 136701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an increasingly utilized imaging modality for the diagnosis and treatment planning of the patients with craniomaxillofacial (CMF) deformities. Accurate segmentation of CBCT image is an essential step to generate three-dimensional (3D) models for the diagnosis and treatment planning of the patients with CMF deformities. However, due to the poor image quality, including very low signal-to-noise ratio and the widespread image artifacts such as noise, beam hardening, and inhomogeneity, it is challenging to segment the CBCT images. In this paper, the authors present a new automatic segmentation method to address these problems. Methods: To segment CBCT images, the authors propose a new method for fully automated CBCT segmentation by using patch-based sparse representation to (1) segment bony structures from the soft tissues and (2) further separate the mandible from the maxilla. Specifically, a region-specific registration strategy is first proposed to warp all the atlases to the current testing subject and then a sparse-based label propagation strategy is employed to estimate a patient-specific atlas from all aligned atlases. Finally, the patient-specific atlas is integrated into amaximum a posteriori probability-based convex segmentation framework for accurate segmentation. Results: The proposed method has been evaluated on a dataset with 15 CBCT images. The effectiveness of the proposed region-specific registration strategy and patient-specific atlas has been validated by comparing with the traditional registration strategy and population-based atlas. The experimental results show that the proposed method achieves the best segmentation accuracy by comparison with other state-of-the-art segmentation methods. Conclusions: The authors have proposed a new CBCT segmentation method by using patch-based sparse representation and convex optimization, which can achieve considerably accurate segmentation results in CBCT

  7. Automated Analysis of {sup 123}I-beta-CIT SPECT Images with Statistical Probabilistic Anatomical Mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eo, Jae Seon; Lee, Hoyoung; Lee, Jae Sung; Kim, Yu Kyung; Jeon, Bumseok; Lee, Dong Soo [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    Population-based statistical probabilistic anatomical maps have been used to generate probabilistic volumes of interest for analyzing perfusion and metabolic brain imaging. We investigated the feasibility of automated analysis for dopamine transporter images using this technique and evaluated striatal binding potentials in Parkinson's disease and Wilson's disease. We analyzed 2β-Carbomethoxy-3β-(4-{sup 123}I-iodophenyl)tropane ({sup 123}I-beta-CIT) SPECT images acquired from 26 people with Parkinson's disease (M:F=11:15,mean age=49±12 years), 9 people with Wilson's disease (M: F=6:3, mean age=26±11 years) and 17 normal controls (M:F=5:12, mean age=39±16 years). A SPECT template was created using striatal statistical probabilistic map images. All images were spatially normalized onto the template, and probability-weighted regional counts in striatal structures were estimated. The binding potential was calculated using the ratio of specific and nonspecific binding activities at equilibrium. Voxel-based comparisons between groups were also performed using statistical parametric mapping. Qualitative assessment showed that spatial normalizations of the SPECT images were successful for all images. The striatal binding potentials of participants with Parkinson's disease and Wilson's disease were significantly lower than those of normal controls. Statistical parametric mapping analysis found statistically significant differences only in striatal regions in both disease groups compared to controls. We successfully evaluated the regional {sup 123}I-beta-CIT distribution using the SPECT template and probabilistic map data automatically. This procedure allows an objective and quantitative comparison of the binding potential, which in this case showed a significantly decreased binding potential in the striata of patients with Parkinson's disease or Wilson's disease.

  8. Automated bone segmentation from dental CBCT images using patch-based sparse representation and convex optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an increasingly utilized imaging modality for the diagnosis and treatment planning of the patients with craniomaxillofacial (CMF) deformities. Accurate segmentation of CBCT image is an essential step to generate three-dimensional (3D) models for the diagnosis and treatment planning of the patients with CMF deformities. However, due to the poor image quality, including very low signal-to-noise ratio and the widespread image artifacts such as noise, beam hardening, and inhomogeneity, it is challenging to segment the CBCT images. In this paper, the authors present a new automatic segmentation method to address these problems. Methods: To segment CBCT images, the authors propose a new method for fully automated CBCT segmentation by using patch-based sparse representation to (1) segment bony structures from the soft tissues and (2) further separate the mandible from the maxilla. Specifically, a region-specific registration strategy is first proposed to warp all the atlases to the current testing subject and then a sparse-based label propagation strategy is employed to estimate a patient-specific atlas from all aligned atlases. Finally, the patient-specific atlas is integrated into amaximum a posteriori probability-based convex segmentation framework for accurate segmentation. Results: The proposed method has been evaluated on a dataset with 15 CBCT images. The effectiveness of the proposed region-specific registration strategy and patient-specific atlas has been validated by comparing with the traditional registration strategy and population-based atlas. The experimental results show that the proposed method achieves the best segmentation accuracy by comparison with other state-of-the-art segmentation methods. Conclusions: The authors have proposed a new CBCT segmentation method by using patch-based sparse representation and convex optimization, which can achieve considerably accurate segmentation results in CBCT

  9. Semi-automated scar detection in delayed enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morisi, Rita; Donini, Bruno; Lanconelli, Nico; Rosengarden, James; Morgan, John; Harden, Stephen; Curzen, Nick

    2015-06-01

    Late enhancement cardiac magnetic resonance images (MRI) has the ability to precisely delineate myocardial scars. We present a semi-automated method for detecting scars in cardiac MRI. This model has the potential to improve routine clinical practice since quantification is not currently offered due to time constraints. A first segmentation step was developed for extracting the target regions for potential scar and determining pre-candidate objects. Pattern recognition methods are then applied to the segmented images in order to detect the position of the myocardial scar. The database of late gadolinium enhancement (LE) cardiac MR images consists of 111 blocks of images acquired from 63 patients at the University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust (UK). At least one scar was present for each patient, and all the scars were manually annotated by an expert. A group of images (around one third of the entire set) was used for training the system which was subsequently tested on all the remaining images. Four different classifiers were trained (Support Vector Machine (SVM), k-nearest neighbor (KNN), Bayesian and feed-forward neural network) and their performance was evaluated by using Free response Receiver Operating Characteristic (FROC) analysis. Feature selection was implemented for analyzing the importance of the various features. The segmentation method proposed allowed the region affected by the scar to be extracted correctly in 96% of the blocks of images. The SVM was shown to be the best classifier for our task, and our system reached an overall sensitivity of 80% with less than 7 false positives per patient. The method we present provides an effective tool for detection of scars on cardiac MRI. This may be of value in clinical practice by permitting routine reporting of scar quantification.

  10. Automated Analysis of 123I-beta-CIT SPECT Images with Statistical Probabilistic Anatomical Mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Population-based statistical probabilistic anatomical maps have been used to generate probabilistic volumes of interest for analyzing perfusion and metabolic brain imaging. We investigated the feasibility of automated analysis for dopamine transporter images using this technique and evaluated striatal binding potentials in Parkinson's disease and Wilson's disease. We analyzed 2β-Carbomethoxy-3β-(4-123I-iodophenyl)tropane (123I-beta-CIT) SPECT images acquired from 26 people with Parkinson's disease (M:F=11:15,mean age=49±12 years), 9 people with Wilson's disease (M: F=6:3, mean age=26±11 years) and 17 normal controls (M:F=5:12, mean age=39±16 years). A SPECT template was created using striatal statistical probabilistic map images. All images were spatially normalized onto the template, and probability-weighted regional counts in striatal structures were estimated. The binding potential was calculated using the ratio of specific and nonspecific binding activities at equilibrium. Voxel-based comparisons between groups were also performed using statistical parametric mapping. Qualitative assessment showed that spatial normalizations of the SPECT images were successful for all images. The striatal binding potentials of participants with Parkinson's disease and Wilson's disease were significantly lower than those of normal controls. Statistical parametric mapping analysis found statistically significant differences only in striatal regions in both disease groups compared to controls. We successfully evaluated the regional 123I-beta-CIT distribution using the SPECT template and probabilistic map data automatically. This procedure allows an objective and quantitative comparison of the binding potential, which in this case showed a significantly decreased binding potential in the striata of patients with Parkinson's disease or Wilson's disease

  11. Computerized detection of breast cancer on automated breast ultrasound imaging of women with dense breasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drukker, Karen, E-mail: kdrukker@uchicago.edu; Sennett, Charlene A.; Giger, Maryellen L. [Department of Radiology, MC2026, The University of Chicago, 5841 South Maryland Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: Develop a computer-aided detection method and investigate its feasibility for detection of breast cancer in automated 3D ultrasound images of women with dense breasts. Methods: The HIPAA compliant study involved a dataset of volumetric ultrasound image data, “views,” acquired with an automated U-Systems Somo•V{sup ®} ABUS system for 185 asymptomatic women with dense breasts (BI-RADS Composition/Density 3 or 4). For each patient, three whole-breast views (3D image volumes) per breast were acquired. A total of 52 patients had breast cancer (61 cancers), diagnosed through any follow-up at most 365 days after the original screening mammogram. Thirty-one of these patients (32 cancers) had a screening-mammogram with a clinically assigned BI-RADS Assessment Category 1 or 2, i.e., were mammographically negative. All software used for analysis was developed in-house and involved 3 steps: (1) detection of initial tumor candidates, (2) characterization of candidates, and (3) elimination of false-positive candidates. Performance was assessed by calculating the cancer detection sensitivity as a function of the number of “marks” (detections) per view. Results: At a single mark per view, i.e., six marks per patient, the median detection sensitivity by cancer was 50.0% (16/32) ± 6% for patients with a screening mammogram-assigned BI-RADS category 1 or 2—similar to radiologists’ performance sensitivity (49.9%) for this dataset from a prior reader study—and 45.9% (28/61) ± 4% for all patients. Conclusions: Promising detection sensitivity was obtained for the computer on a 3D ultrasound dataset of women with dense breasts at a rate of false-positive detections that may be acceptable for clinical implementation.

  12. A portable fluorescence spectroscopy imaging system for automated root phenotyping in soil cores in the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasson, Anton; Bischof, Leanne; Zwart, Alec; Watt, Michelle

    2016-02-01

    Root architecture traits are a target for pre-breeders. Incorporation of root architecture traits into new cultivars requires phenotyping. It is attractive to rapidly and directly phenotype root architecture in the field, avoiding laboratory studies that may not translate to the field. A combination of soil coring with a hydraulic push press and manual core-break counting can directly phenotype root architecture traits of depth and distribution in the field through to grain development, but large teams of people are required and labour costs are high with this method. We developed a portable fluorescence imaging system (BlueBox) to automate root counting in soil cores with image analysis software directly in the field. The lighting system was optimized to produce high-contrast images of roots emerging from soil cores. The correlation of the measurements with the root length density of the soil cores exceeded the correlation achieved by human operator measurements (R (2)=0.68 versus 0.57, respectively). A BlueBox-equipped team processed 4.3 cores/hour/person, compared with 3.7 cores/hour/person for the manual method. The portable, automated in-field root architecture phenotyping system was 16% more labour efficient, 19% more accurate, and 12% cheaper than manual conventional coring, and presents an opportunity to directly phenotype root architecture in the field as part of pre-breeding programs. The platform has wide possibilities to capture more information about root health and other root traits in the field. PMID:26826219

  13. A portable fluorescence spectroscopy imaging system for automated root phenotyping in soil cores in the field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasson, Anton; Bischof, Leanne; Zwart, Alec; Watt, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Root architecture traits are a target for pre-breeders. Incorporation of root architecture traits into new cultivars requires phenotyping. It is attractive to rapidly and directly phenotype root architecture in the field, avoiding laboratory studies that may not translate to the field. A combination of soil coring with a hydraulic push press and manual core-break counting can directly phenotype root architecture traits of depth and distribution in the field through to grain development, but large teams of people are required and labour costs are high with this method. We developed a portable fluorescence imaging system (BlueBox) to automate root counting in soil cores with image analysis software directly in the field. The lighting system was optimized to produce high-contrast images of roots emerging from soil cores. The correlation of the measurements with the root length density of the soil cores exceeded the correlation achieved by human operator measurements (R 2=0.68 versus 0.57, respectively). A BlueBox-equipped team processed 4.3 cores/hour/person, compared with 3.7 cores/hour/person for the manual method. The portable, automated in-field root architecture phenotyping system was 16% more labour efficient, 19% more accurate, and 12% cheaper than manual conventional coring, and presents an opportunity to directly phenotype root architecture in the field as part of pre-breeding programs. The platform has wide possibilities to capture more information about root health and other root traits in the field. PMID:26826219

  14. Development of an automated imaging pipeline for the analysis of the zebrafish larval kidney.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens H Westhoff

    Full Text Available The analysis of kidney malformation caused by environmental influences during nephrogenesis or by hereditary nephropathies requires animal models allowing the in vivo observation of developmental processes. The zebrafish has emerged as a useful model system for the analysis of vertebrate organ development and function, and it is suitable for the identification of organotoxic or disease-modulating compounds on a larger scale. However, to fully exploit its potential in high content screening applications, dedicated protocols are required allowing the consistent visualization of inner organs such as the embryonic kidney. To this end, we developed a high content screening compatible pipeline for the automated imaging of standardized views of the developing pronephros in zebrafish larvae. Using a custom designed tool, cavities were generated in agarose coated microtiter plates allowing for accurate positioning and orientation of zebrafish larvae. This enabled the subsequent automated acquisition of stable and consistent dorsal views of pronephric kidneys. The established pipeline was applied in a pilot screen for the analysis of the impact of potentially nephrotoxic drugs on zebrafish pronephros development in the Tg(wt1b:EGFP transgenic line in which the developing pronephros is highlighted by GFP expression. The consistent image data that was acquired allowed for quantification of gross morphological pronephric phenotypes, revealing concentration dependent effects of several compounds on nephrogenesis. In addition, applicability of the imaging pipeline was further confirmed in a morpholino based model for cilia-associated human genetic disorders associated with different intraflagellar transport genes. The developed tools and pipeline can be used to study various aspects in zebrafish kidney research, and can be readily adapted for the analysis of other organ systems.

  15. Automated Detection of Galaxy-Scale Gravitational Lenses in High-Resolution Imaging Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Philip J.; Hogg, David W.; Moustakas, Leonidas A.; Fassnacht, Christopher D.; Bradač, Maruša; Schrabback, Tim; Blandford, Roger D.

    2009-04-01

    We expect direct lens modeling to be the key to successful and meaningful automated strong galaxy-scale gravitational lens detection. We have implemented a lens-modeling "robot" that treats every bright red galaxy (BRG) in a large imaging survey as a potential gravitational lens system. Having optimized a simple model for "typical" galaxy-scale gravitational lenses, we generate four assessments of model quality that are then used in an automated classification. The robot infers from these four data the lens classification parameter H that a human would have assigned; the inference is performed using a probability distribution generated from a human-classified training set of candidates, including realistic simulated lenses and known false positives drawn from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Extended Groth Strip (EGS) survey. We compute the expected purity, completeness, and rejection rate, and find that these statistics can be optimized for a particular application by changing the prior probability distribution for H; this is equivalent to defining the robot's "character." Adopting a realistic prior based on expectations for the abundance of lenses, we find that a lens sample may be generated that is ~100% pure, but only ~20% complete. This shortfall is due primarily to the oversimplicity of the model of both the lens light and mass. With a more optimistic robot, ~90% completeness can be achieved while rejecting ~90% of the candidate objects. The remaining candidates must be classified by human inspectors. Displaying the images used and produced by the robot on a custom "one-click" web interface, we are able to inspect and classify lens candidates at a rate of a few seconds per system, suggesting that a future 1000 deg2 imaging survey containing 107 BRGs, and some 104 lenses, could be successfully, and reproducibly, searched in a modest amount of time. We have verified our projected survey statistics, albeit at low significance, using the HST EGS data, discovering

  16. High-throughput automated home-cage mesoscopic functional imaging of mouse cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Timothy H.; Boyd, Jamie D.; Bolaños, Federico; Vanni, Matthieu P.; Silasi, Gergely; Haupt, Dirk; LeDue, Jeff M.

    2016-01-01

    Mouse head-fixed behaviour coupled with functional imaging has become a powerful technique in rodent systems neuroscience. However, training mice can be time consuming and is potentially stressful for animals. Here we report a fully automated, open source, self-initiated head-fixation system for mesoscopic functional imaging in mice. The system supports five mice at a time and requires minimal investigator intervention. Using genetically encoded calcium indicator transgenic mice, we longitudinally monitor cortical functional connectivity up to 24 h per day in >7,000 self-initiated and unsupervised imaging sessions up to 90 days. The procedure provides robust assessment of functional cortical maps on the basis of both spontaneous activity and brief sensory stimuli such as light flashes. The approach is scalable to a number of remotely controlled cages that can be assessed within the controlled conditions of dedicated animal facilities. We anticipate that home-cage brain imaging will permit flexible and chronic assessment of mesoscale cortical function. PMID:27291514

  17. Automated classification of patients with coronary artery disease using grayscale features from left ventricle echocardiographic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, U Rajendra; Sree, S Vinitha; Muthu Rama Krishnan, M; Krishnananda, N; Ranjan, Shetty; Umesh, Pai; Suri, Jasjit S

    2013-12-01

    Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), caused by the buildup of plaque on the inside of the coronary arteries, has a high mortality rate. To efficiently detect this condition from echocardiography images, with lesser inter-observer variability and visual interpretation errors, computer based data mining techniques may be exploited. We have developed and presented one such technique in this paper for the classification of normal and CAD affected cases. A multitude of grayscale features (fractal dimension, entropies based on the higher order spectra, features based on image texture and local binary patterns, and wavelet based features) were extracted from echocardiography images belonging to a huge database of 400 normal cases and 400 CAD patients. Only the features that had good discriminating capability were selected using t-test. Several combinations of the resultant significant features were used to evaluate many supervised classifiers to find the combination that presents a good accuracy. We observed that the Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) classifier trained with a feature subset made up of nine significant features presented the highest accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value of 100%. We have also developed a novel, highly discriminative HeartIndex, which is a single number that is calculated from the combination of the features, in order to objectively classify the images from either of the two classes. Such an index allows for an easier implementation of the technique for automated CAD detection in the computers in hospitals and clinics. PMID:23958645

  18. Portable automated imaging in complex ceramics with a microwave interference scanning system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goitia, Ryan M.; Schmidt, Karl F.; Little, Jack R.; Ellingson, William A.; Green, William; Franks, Lisa P.

    2013-01-01

    An improved portable microwave interferometry system has been automated to permit rapid examination of components with minimal operator attendance. Functionalities include stereo and multiplexed, frequency-modulated at multiple frequencies, producing layered volumetric images of complex ceramic structures. The technique has been used to image composite ceramic armor and ceramic matrix composite components, as well as other complex dielectric materials. The system utilizes Evisive Scan microwave interference scanning technique. Validation tests include artificial and in-service damage of ceramic armor, surrogates and ceramic matrix composite samples. Validation techniques include micro-focus x-ray and computed tomography imaging. The microwave interference scanning technique has demonstrated detection of cracks, interior laminar features and variations in material properties such as density. The image yields depth information through phase angle manipulation, and shows extent of feature and relative dielectric property information. It requires access to only one surface, and no coupling medium. Data are not affected by separation of layers of dielectric material, such as outer over-wrap. Test panels were provided by the US Army Research Laboratory, and the US Army Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC), who with the US Air Force Research Laboratory have supported this work.

  19. An automated target recognition technique for image segmentation and scene analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumgart, C.W.; Ciarcia, C.A.

    1994-02-01

    Automated target recognition software has been designed to perform image segmentation and scene analysis. Specifically, this software was developed as a package for the Army`s Minefield and Reconnaissance and Detector (MIRADOR) program. MIRADOR is an on/off road, remote control, multi-sensor system designed to detect buried and surface-emplaced metallic and non-metallic anti-tank mines. The basic requirements for this ATR software were: (1) an ability to separate target objects from the background in low S/N conditions; (2) an ability to handle a relatively high dynamic range in imaging light levels; (3) the ability to compensate for or remove light source effects such as shadows; and (4) the ability to identify target objects as mines. The image segmentation and target evaluation was performed utilizing an integrated and parallel processing approach. Three basic techniques (texture analysis, edge enhancement, and contrast enhancement) were used collectively to extract all potential mine target shapes from the basic image. Target evaluation was then performed using a combination of size, geometrical, and fractal characteristics which resulted in a calculated probability for each target shape. Overall results with this algorithm were quite good, though there is a trade-off between detection confidence and the number of false alarms. This technology also has applications in the areas of hazardous waste site remediation, archaeology, and law enforcement.

  20. Vision 20/20: Perspectives on automated image segmentation for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to rapid advances in radiation therapy (RT), especially image guidance and treatment adaptation, a fast and accurate segmentation of medical images is a very important part of the treatment. Manual delineation of target volumes and organs at risk is still the standard routine for most clinics, even though it is time consuming and prone to intra- and interobserver variations. Automated segmentation methods seek to reduce delineation workload and unify the organ boundary definition. In this paper, the authors review the current autosegmentation methods particularly relevant for applications in RT. The authors outline the methods’ strengths and limitations and propose strategies that could lead to wider acceptance of autosegmentation in routine clinical practice. The authors conclude that currently, autosegmentation technology in RT planning is an efficient tool for the clinicians to provide them with a good starting point for review and adjustment. Modern hardware platforms including GPUs allow most of the autosegmentation tasks to be done in a range of a few minutes. In the nearest future, improvements in CT-based autosegmentation tools will be achieved through standardization of imaging and contouring protocols. In the longer term, the authors expect a wider use of multimodality approaches and better understanding of correlation of imaging with biology and pathology

  1. High-throughput automated home-cage mesoscopic functional imaging of mouse cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Timothy H; Boyd, Jamie D; Bolaños, Federico; Vanni, Matthieu P; Silasi, Gergely; Haupt, Dirk; LeDue, Jeff M

    2016-01-01

    Mouse head-fixed behaviour coupled with functional imaging has become a powerful technique in rodent systems neuroscience. However, training mice can be time consuming and is potentially stressful for animals. Here we report a fully automated, open source, self-initiated head-fixation system for mesoscopic functional imaging in mice. The system supports five mice at a time and requires minimal investigator intervention. Using genetically encoded calcium indicator transgenic mice, we longitudinally monitor cortical functional connectivity up to 24 h per day in >7,000 self-initiated and unsupervised imaging sessions up to 90 days. The procedure provides robust assessment of functional cortical maps on the basis of both spontaneous activity and brief sensory stimuli such as light flashes. The approach is scalable to a number of remotely controlled cages that can be assessed within the controlled conditions of dedicated animal facilities. We anticipate that home-cage brain imaging will permit flexible and chronic assessment of mesoscale cortical function. PMID:27291514

  2. Automated tracking of lava lake level using thermal images at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai’i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Matthew R.; Swanson, Don; Orr, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Tracking the level of the lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u Crater, at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai’i, is an essential part of monitoring the ongoing eruption and forecasting potentially hazardous changes in activity. We describe a simple automated image processing routine that analyzes continuously-acquired thermal images of the lava lake and measures lava level. The method uses three image segmentation approaches, based on edge detection, short-term change analysis, and composite temperature thresholding, to identify and track the lake margin in the images. These relative measurements from the images are periodically calibrated with laser rangefinder measurements to produce real-time estimates of lake elevation. Continuous, automated tracking of the lava level has been an important tool used by the U.S. Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory since 2012 in real-time operational monitoring of the volcano and its hazard potential.

  3. Automated Nanofiber Diameter Measurement in SEM Images Using a Robust Image Analysis Method

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Due to the high surface area, porosity, and rigidity, applications of nanofibers and nanosurfaces have developed in recent years. Nanofibers and nanosurfaces are typically produced by electrospinning method. In the production process, determination of average fiber diameter is crucial for quality assessment. Average fiber diameter is determined by manually measuring the diameters of randomly selected fibers on scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images. However, as the number of the images inc...

  4. Automated parameterisation for multi-scale image segmentation on multiple layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drăguţ, L.; Csillik, O.; Eisank, C.; Tiede, D.

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a new automated approach to parameterising multi-scale image segmentation of multiple layers, and we implemented it as a generic tool for the eCognition® software. This approach relies on the potential of the local variance (LV) to detect scale transitions in geospatial data. The tool detects the number of layers added to a project and segments them iteratively with a multiresolution segmentation algorithm in a bottom-up approach, where the scale factor in the segmentation, namely, the scale parameter (SP), increases with a constant increment. The average LV value of the objects in all of the layers is computed and serves as a condition for stopping the iterations: when a scale level records an LV value that is equal to or lower than the previous value, the iteration ends, and the objects segmented in the previous level are retained. Three orders of magnitude of SP lags produce a corresponding number of scale levels. Tests on very high resolution imagery provided satisfactory results for generic applicability. The tool has a significant potential for enabling objectivity and automation of GEOBIA analysis. PMID:24748723

  5. NeuronMetrics: Software for Semi-Automated Processing of Cultured-Neuron Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narro, Martha L.; Yang, Fan; Kraft, Robert; Wenk, Carola; Efrat, Alon; Restifo, Linda L.

    2007-01-01

    Using primary cell culture to screen for changes in neuronal morphology requires specialized analysis software. We developed NeuronMetrics™ for semi-automated, quantitative analysis of two-dimensional (2D) images of fluorescently labeled cultured neurons. It skeletonizes the neuron image using two complementary image-processing techniques, capturing fine terminal neurites with high fidelity. An algorithm was devised to span wide gaps in the skeleton. NeuronMetrics uses a novel strategy based on geometric features called faces to extract a branch-number estimate from complex arbors with numerous neurite-to-neurite contacts, without creating a precise, contact-free representation of the neurite arbor. It estimates total neurite length, branch number, primary neurite number, territory (the area of the convex polygon bounding the skeleton and cell body), and Polarity Index (a measure of neuronal polarity). These parameters provide fundamental information about the size and shape of neurite arbors, which are critical factors for neuronal function. NeuronMetrics streamlines optional manual tasks such as removing noise, isolating the largest primary neurite, and correcting length for self-fasciculating neurites. Numeric data are output in a single text file, readily imported into other applications for further analysis. Written as modules for ImageJ, NeuronMetrics provides practical analysis tools that are easy to use and support batch processing. Depending on the need for manual intervention, processing time for a batch of ~60 2D images is 1.0–2.5 hours, from a folder of images to a table of numeric data. NeuronMetrics’ output accelerates the quantitative detection of mutations and chemical compounds that alter neurite morphology in vitro, and will contribute to the use of cultured neurons for drug discovery. PMID:17270152

  6. Semi-automated procedures for shoreline extraction using single RADARSAT-1 SAR image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Fugura, A.'kif; Billa, Lawal; Pradhan, Biswajeet

    2011-12-01

    Coastline identification is important for surveying and mapping reasons. Coastline serves as the basic point of reference and is used on nautical charts for navigation purposes. Its delineation has become crucial and more important in the wake of the many recent earthquakes and tsunamis resulting in complete change and redraw of some shorelines. In a tropical country like Malaysia, presence of cloud cover hinders the application of optical remote sensing data. In this study a semi-automated technique and procedures are presented for shoreline delineation from RADARSAT-1 image. A scene of RADARSAT-1 satellite image was processed using enhanced filtering technique to identify and extract the shoreline coast of Kuala Terengganu, Malaysia. RADSARSAT image has many advantages over the optical data because of its ability to penetrate cloud cover and its night sensing capabilities. At first, speckles were removed from the image by using Lee sigma filter which was used to reduce random noise and to enhance the image and discriminate the boundary between land and water. The results showed an accurate and improved extraction and delineation of the entire coastline of Kuala Terrenganu. The study demonstrated the reliability of the image averaging filter in reducing random noise over the sea surface especially near the shoreline. It enhanced land-water boundary differentiation, enabling better delineation of the shoreline. Overall, the developed techniques showed the potential of radar imagery for accurate shoreline mapping and will be useful for monitoring shoreline changes during high and low tides as well as shoreline erosion in a tropical country like Malaysia.

  7. Prospective image registration for automated scan prescription of follow-up knee images in quantitative studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenstein, Janet; Schooler, Joseph; Crane, Jason C; Ozhinsky, Eugene; Pialat, Jean-Baptiste; Carballido-Gamio, Julio; Majumdar, Sharmila

    2011-06-01

    Consistent scan prescription for MRI of the knee is very important for accurate comparison of images in a longitudinal study. However, consistent scan region selection is difficult due to the complexity of the knee joint. We propose a novel method for registering knee images using a mutual information registration algorithm to align images in a baseline and follow-up exam. The output of the registration algorithm, three translations and three Euler angles, is then used to redefine the region to be imaged and acquire an identical oblique imaging volume in the follow-up exam as in the baseline. This algorithm is robust to articulation of the knee and anatomical abnormalities due to disease (e.g., osteophytes). The registration method is performed only on the distal femur and is not affected by the proximal tibia or soft tissues. We have incorporated this approach in a clinical MR system and have demonstrated its utility in automatically obtaining consistent scan regions between baseline and follow-up examinations, thus improving the precision of quantitative evaluation of cartilage. Results show an improvement with prospective registration in the coefficient of variation for cartilage thickness, cartilage volume and T2 relaxation measurements. PMID:21546186

  8. Analysis of irradiated U-7wt%Mo dispersion fuel microstructures using automated image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collette, R.; King, J.; Buesch, C.; Keiser, D. D.; Williams, W.; Miller, B. D.; Schulthess, J.

    2016-07-01

    The High Performance Research Reactor Fuel Development (HPPRFD) program is responsible for developing low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel substitutes for high performance reactors fueled with highly enriched uranium (HEU) that have not yet been converted to LEU. The uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) fuel system was selected for this effort. In this study, fission gas pore segmentation was performed on U-7wt%Mo dispersion fuel samples at three separate fission densities using an automated image processing interface developed in MATLAB. Pore size distributions were attained that showed both expected and unexpected fission gas behavior. In general, it proved challenging to identify any dominant trends when comparing fission bubble data across samples from different fuel plates due to varying compositions and fabrication techniques. The results exhibited fair agreement with the fission density vs. porosity correlation developed by the Russian reactor conversion program.

  9. Feasibility of fully automated detection of fiducial markers implanted into the prostate using electronic portal imaging: A comparison of methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of fully automated detection of fiducial markers implanted into the prostate using portal images acquired with an electronic portal imaging device. Methods and Materials: We have made a direct comparison of 4 different methods (2 template matching-based methods, a method incorporating attenuation and constellation analyses and a cross correlation method) that have been published in the literature for the automatic detection of fiducial markers. The cross-correlation technique requires a-priory information from the portal images, therefore the technique is not fully automated for the first treatment fraction. Images of 7 patients implanted with gold fiducial markers (8 mm in length and 1 mm in diameter) were acquired before treatment (set-up images) and during treatment (movie images) using 1MU and 15MU per image respectively. Images included: 75 anterior (AP) and 69 lateral (LAT) set-up images and 51 AP and 83 LAT movie images. Using the different methods described in the literature, marker positions were automatically identified. Results: The method based upon cross correlation techniques gave the highest percentage detection success rate of 99% (AP) and 83% (LAT) set-up (1MU) images. The methods gave detection success rates of less than 91% (AP) and 42% (LAT) set-up images. The amount of a-priory information used and how it affects the way the techniques are implemented, is discussed. Conclusions: Fully automated marker detection in set-up images for the first treatment fraction is unachievable using these methods and that using cross-correlation is the best technique for automatic detection on subsequent radiotherapy treatment fractions

  10. Three-dimensional semi-automated segmentation of carotid atherosclerosis from three-dimensional ultrasound images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukwatta, E.; Awad, J.; Buchanan, D.; Parraga, G.; Fenster, A.

    2012-03-01

    Three-dimensional ultrasound (3DUS) provides non-invasive and precise measurements of carotid atherosclerosis that directly reflects arterial wall abnormalities that are thought to be related to stroke risk. Here we describe a threedimensional segmentation method based on the sparse field level set method to automate the segmentation of the mediaadventitia (MAB) and lumen-intima (LIB) boundaries of the common carotid artery from 3DUS images. To initiate the process, an expert chooses four anchor points on each boundary on a subset of transverse slices that are orthogonal to the axis of the artery. An initial surface is generated using the anchor points as initial guess for the segmentation. The MAB is segmented first using five energies: length minimization energy, local region-based energy, edge-based energy, anchor point-based energy, and local smoothness energy. Five energies are also used for the LIB segmentation: length minimization energy, local region-based energy, global region-based energy, anchor point-based energy, and boundary separation-based energy. The algorithm was evaluated with respect to manual segmentations on a slice-by-slice basis using 15 3DUS images. To generate results in this paper, inter-slice distance of 2 mm is used for the initialization. For the MAB and LIB segmentations, our method yielded Dice coefficients of more than 92% and sub-millimeter values for mean and maximum absolute distance errors. Our method also yielded a vessel wall volume error of 7.1% +/- 3.4%. The realization of a semi-automated algorithm will aid in the translation of 3DUS measurements to clinical research for the rapid, non-invasive, and economical monitoring of atherosclerotic disease.

  11. New automated image analysis method for the assessment of Ki-67 labeling index in meningiomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wielisław Papierz

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Many studies have emphasised the importance of Ki-67 labeling index (LI as the proliferation marker in meningiomas. Several authors confirmed, that Ki-67 LI has prognostic significance and correlates with likelihood of tumour recurrences. These observations were widely accepted by pathologists, but up till now no standard method for Ki-67 LI assessment was developed and introduced for the diagnostic pathology. In this paper we present a new computerised system for automated Ki-67 LI estimation in meningiomas as an aid for histological grading of meningiomas and potential standard method of Ki-67 LI assessment. We also discuss the concordance of Ki-67 LI results obtained by presented computerized system and expert pathologist, as well as possible pitfalls and mistakes in automated counting of immunopositive or negative cells. For the quantitative evaluation of digital images of meningiomas the designed software uses an algorithm based on mathematical description of cell morphology. This solution acts together with the Support Vector Machine (SVM used in the classification mode for the recognition of immunoreactivity of cells. The applied sequential thresholding simulated well the human process of cell recognition. The same digital images of randomly selected tumour areas were parallelly analysed by computer and blindly by two expert pathologists. Ki-67 labeling indices were estimated and the results compared. The mean relative discrepancy between the levels of Ki-67 LI by our system and by the human expert did not exceed 14% in all investigated cases. These preliminary results suggest that the designed software could be an useful tool supporting the diagnostic digital pathology. However, more extended studies are needed for approval of this suggestion.

  12. Improving cervical region of interest by eliminating vaginal walls and cotton-swabs for automated image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkataraman, Sankar; Li, Wenjing

    2008-03-01

    Image analysis for automated diagnosis of cervical cancer has attained high prominence in the last decade. Automated image analysis at all levels requires a basic segmentation of the region of interest (ROI) within a given image. The precision of the diagnosis is often reflected by the precision in detecting the initial region of interest, especially when some features outside the ROI mimic the ones within the same. Work described here discusses algorithms that are used to improve the cervical region of interest as a part of automated cervical image diagnosis. A vital visual aid in diagnosing cervical cancer is the aceto-whitening of the cervix after the application of acetic acid. Color and texture are used to segment acetowhite regions within the cervical ROI. Vaginal walls along with cottonswabs sometimes mimic these essential features leading to several false positives. Work presented here is focused towards detecting in-focus vaginal wall boundaries and then extrapolating them to exclude vaginal walls from the cervical ROI. In addition, discussed here is a marker-controlled watershed segmentation that is used to detect cottonswabs from the cervical ROI. A dataset comprising 50 high resolution images of the cervix acquired after 60 seconds of acetic acid application were used to test the algorithm. Out of the 50 images, 27 benefited from a new cervical ROI. Significant improvement in overall diagnosis was observed in these images as false positives caused by features outside the actual ROI mimicking acetowhite region were eliminated.

  13. Comparison of manual and semi-automated delineation of regions of interest for radioligand PET imaging analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As imaging centers produce higher resolution research scans, the number of man-hours required to process regional data has become a major concern. Comparison of automated vs. manual methodology has not been reported for functional imaging. We explored validation of using automation to delineate regions of interest on positron emission tomography (PET) scans. The purpose of this study was to ascertain improvements in image processing time and reproducibility of a semi-automated brain region extraction (SABRE) method over manual delineation of regions of interest (ROIs). We compared 2 sets of partial volume corrected serotonin 1a receptor binding potentials (BPs) resulting from manual vs. semi-automated methods. BPs were obtained from subjects meeting consensus criteria for frontotemporal degeneration and from age- and gender-matched healthy controls. Two trained raters provided each set of data to conduct comparisons of inter-rater mean image processing time, rank order of BPs for 9 PET scans, intra- and inter-rater intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC), repeatability coefficients (RC), percentages of the average parameter value (RM%), and effect sizes of either method. SABRE saved approximately 3 hours of processing time per PET subject over manual delineation (p < .001). Quality of the SABRE BP results was preserved relative to the rank order of subjects by manual methods. Intra- and inter-rater ICC were high (>0.8) for both methods. RC and RM% were lower for the manual method across all ROIs, indicating less intra-rater variance across PET subjects' BPs. SABRE demonstrated significant time savings and no significant difference in reproducibility over manual methods, justifying the use of SABRE in serotonin 1a receptor radioligand PET imaging analysis. This implies that semi-automated ROI delineation is a valid methodology for future PET imaging analysis

  14. Automated Image Analysis for Determination of Antibody Titers Against Occupational Bacterial Antigens Using Indirect Immunofluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauner, Paul; Jäckel, Udo

    2016-06-01

    Employees who are exposed to high concentrations of microorganisms in bioaerosols frequently suffer from respiratory disorders. However, etiology and in particular potential roles of microorganisms in pathogenesis still need to be elucidated. Thus, determination of employees' antibody titers against specific occupational microbial antigens may lead to identification of potentially harmful species. Since indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) is easy to implement, we used this technique to analyze immunoreactions in human sera. In order to address disadvantageous inter-observer variations as well as the absence of quantifiable fluorescence data in conventional titer determination by eye, we specifically developed a software tool for automated image analysis. The 'Fluorolyzer' software is able to reliably quantify fluorescence intensities of antibody-bound bacterial cells on digital images. Subsequently, fluorescence values of single cells have been used to calculate non-discrete IgG titers. We tested this approach on multiple bacterial workplace isolates and determined titers in sera from 20 volunteers. Furthermore, we compared image-based results with the conventional manual readout and found significant correlation as well as statistically confirmed reproducibility. In conclusion, we successfully employed 'Fluorolyzer' for determination of titers against various bacterial species and demonstrated its applicability as a useful tool for reliable and efficient analysis of immune response toward occupational exposure to bioaerosols. PMID:27026659

  15. Combined multiphoton imaging and automated functional enucleation of porcine oocytes using femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuetemeyer, Kai; Lucas-Hahn, Andrea; Petersen, Bjoern; Lemme, Erika; Hassel, Petra; Niemann, Heiner; Heisterkamp, Alexander

    2010-07-01

    Since the birth of ``Dolly'' as the first mammal cloned from a differentiated cell, somatic cell cloning has been successful in several mammalian species, albeit at low success rates. The highly invasive mechanical enucleation step of a cloning protocol requires sophisticated, expensive equipment and considerable micromanipulation skill. We present a novel noninvasive method for combined oocyte imaging and automated functional enucleation using femtosecond (fs) laser pulses. After three-dimensional imaging of Hoechst-labeled porcine oocytes by multiphoton microscopy, our self-developed software automatically identified the metaphase plate. Subsequent irradiation of the metaphase chromosomes with the very same laser at higher pulse energies in the low-density-plasma regime was used for metaphase plate ablation (functional enucleation). We show that fs laser-based functional enucleation of porcine oocytes completely inhibited the parthenogenetic development without affecting the oocyte morphology. In contrast, nonirradiated oocytes were able to develop parthenogenetically to the blastocyst stage without significant differences to controls. Our results indicate that fs laser systems have great potential for oocyte imaging and functional enucleation and may improve the efficiency of somatic cell cloning.

  16. CT and MRI derived source localization error in a custom prostate phantom using automated image coregistration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dosimetric evaluation of completed brachytherapy implant procedures is crucial in developing proper technique. Additionally, accurate dosimetry may be useful in predicting the success of an implant. Accurate definition of the prostate gland and localization of the implanted radioactive sources are critical to attain meaningful dosimetric data. MRI is recognized as a superior imaging modality in delineating the prostate gland. More importantly, MRI can be used for source localization in postimplant prostates. However, the MRI derived source localization error bears further investigation. We present a useful tool in determining the source localization error as well as permitting the fusion, or coregistration, of selected data from multiple imaging modalities. We constructed a custom prostate phantom of hydrocolloid material precisely implanted with I-125 seeds. We obtained CT, the accepted modality, and MRI scans of the phantom. Subsequently, we developed an automated algorithm that employs a sequential translation of data sets to initially maximize coregistration and minimize error between data sets. This was followed by a noniterative solution for the necessary rotation transformation matrix using the Orthogonal Procrustes Solution. We applied this algorithm to CT and MRI scans of the custom phantom. CT derived source locations had source localization errors of 1.59 mm±0.64. MRI derived source locations produced similar results (1.67 mm±0.76). These errors may be attributed to the image digitization process

  17. New technologies for automated cell counting based on optical image analysis ;The Cellscreen'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkmann, Marlies; Lütkemeyer, Dirk; Gudermann, Frank; Lehmann, Jürgen

    2002-01-01

    A prototype of a newly developed apparatus for measuring cell growth characteristics of suspension cells in micro titre plates over a period of time was examined. Fully automated non-invasive cell counts in small volume cultivation vessels, e.g. 96 well plates, were performed with the Cellscreen system by Innovatis AG, Germany. The system automatically generates microscopic images of suspension cells which had sedimented on the base of the well plate. The total cell number and cell geometry was analysed without staining or sampling using the Cedex image recognition technology. Thus, time course studies of cell growth with the identical culture became possible. Basic parameters like the measurement range, the minimum number of images which were required for statistically reliable results, as well as the influence of the measurement itself and the effect of evaporation in 96 well plates on cell proliferation were determined. A comparison with standard methods including the influence of the cultured volume per well (25 mul to 200 mul) on cell growth was performed. Furthermore, the toxic substances ammonia, lactate and butyrate were used to show that the Cellscreen system is able to detect even the slightest changes in the specific growth rate. PMID:19003093

  18. Software feature enhancements for automated scanning of multiple surface geometry objects using ultrasonic imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electronics Division, BARC in association with Metallic Fuels Division has developed an Ultrasonic Imaging System suitable for automated inspection of metallic objects with multiple surface geometry. The electronics hardware and application software for this system has been developed by Electronics Division and the design and development of the mechanical scanner was done by Metallic Fuels Division, BARC. The scanner has been successfully interfaced with the high-resolution ultrasonic imaging system (ULTIMA-200SP). A very significant feature of the ULTIMA-200SP system is the application software which performs various tasks of controlling various motors of scanner in addition to data acquisition, processing, analysis and information display. All these tasks must be carried out in a well synchronized manner for generating high resolution B Scan and C Scan images of test objects. In order to meet stringent requirements of the user, ULTIMA software has been extensively upgraded with new advanced features viz. Fast (coarse) and Slow (fine) scan for the speed optimization, Scanning of Cuboids and Cylindrical objects in the user defined region of interest, 3D view of the C-Scan, gray level, dual or multiple color plot in B-Scan, C-Scan and 3D views. This paper describes the advanced Windows based application software package developed at ED, BARC and highlights its salient features along with a brief description of the system hardware and relevant information. (author)

  19. Semi-automated porosity identification from thin section images using image analysis and intelligent discriminant classifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiasi-Freez, Javad; Soleimanpour, Iman; Kadkhodaie-Ilkhchi, Ali; Ziaii, Mansur; Sedighi, Mahdi; Hatampour, Amir

    2012-08-01

    Identification of different types of porosity within a reservoir rock is a functional parameter for reservoir characterization since various pore types play different roles in fluid transport and also, the pore spaces determine the fluid storage capacity of the reservoir. The present paper introduces a model for semi-automatic identification of porosity types within thin section images. To get this goal, a pattern recognition algorithm is followed. Firstly, six geometrical shape parameters of sixteen largest pores of each image are extracted using image analysis techniques. The extracted parameters and their corresponding pore types of 294 pores are used for training two intelligent discriminant classifiers, namely linear and quadratic discriminant analysis. The trained classifiers take the geometrical features of the pores to identify the type and percentage of five types of porosity, including interparticle, intraparticle, oomoldic, biomoldic, and vuggy in each image. The accuracy of classifiers is determined from two standpoints. Firstly, the predicted and measured percentages of each type of porosity are compared with each other. The results indicate reliable performance for predicting percentage of each type of porosity. In the second step, the precisions of classifiers for categorizing the pore spaces are analyzed. The classifiers also took a high acceptance score when used for individual recognition of pore spaces. The proposed methodology is a further promising application for petroleum geologists allowing statistical study of pore types in a rapid and accurate way.

  20. Automated optical image correlation to constrain dynamics of slow-moving landslides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, B. H.; Roering, J. J.; Lamb, M. P.

    2011-12-01

    Large, slow-moving landslides can dominate sediment flux from mountainous terrain, yet their long-term spatio-temporal behavior at the landscape scale is not well understood. Movement can be inconspicuous, episodic, persist for decades, and is challenging and time consuming to quantify using traditional methods such as stereo photogrammetry or field surveying. In the absence of large datasets documenting the movement of slow-moving landslides, we are challenged to isolate the key variables that control their movement and evolution. This knowledge gap hampers our understanding of landslide processes, landslide hazard, sediment budgets, and landscape evolution. Here we document the movement of numerous slow-moving landslides along the Eel River, northern California. These glacier-like landslides (earthflows) move seasonally (typically 1-2 m/yr), with minimal surface deformation, such that scattered shrubs can grow on the landslide surface for decades. Previous work focused on manually tracking the position of individual features (trees, rocks) on photos and LiDAR-derived digital topography to identify the extent of landslide activity. Here, we employ sub-pixel change detection software (COSI-Corr) to generate automated maps of landslide displacement by correlating successive orthorectified photos. Through creation of a detailed multi-temporal deformation field across the entire landslide surface, COSI-Corr is able to delineate zones of movement, quantify displacement, and identify domains of flow convergence and divergence. The vegetation and fine-scale landslide morphology provide excellent texture for automated comparison between successive orthorectified images, although decorrelation can occur in areas where translation between images is greater than the specified search window, or where intense ground deformation or vegetation change occurs. We automatically detected movement on dozens of active landslides (with landslide extent and displacement confirmed by

  1. Myocardial Perfusion: Near-automated Evaluation from Contrast-enhanced MR Images Obtained at Rest and during Vasodilator Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Tarroni, Giacomo; Corsi, Cristiana; Antkowiak, Patrick F; Veronesi, Federico; Kramer, Christopher M.; Epstein, Frederick H; Walter, James; Lamberti, Claudio; Lang, Roberto M.; Mor-Avi, Victor; Patel, Amit R

    2012-01-01

    This study demonstrated that despite the extreme dynamic nature of contrast-enhanced cardiac MR image sequences and respiratory motion, near-automated frame-by-frame detection of myocardial segments and high-quality quantification of myocardial contrast is feasible both at rest and during vasodilator stress.

  2. Quantification of diffusion tensor imaging in normal white matter maturation of early childhood using an automated processing pipeline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loh, K.B.; Ramli, N.; Tan, L.K.; Roziah, M. [University of Malaya, Department of Biomedical Imaging, University Malaya Research Imaging Centre (UMRIC), Faculty of Medicine, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Rahmat, K. [University of Malaya, Department of Biomedical Imaging, University Malaya Research Imaging Centre (UMRIC), Faculty of Medicine, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); University Malaya, Biomedical Imaging Department, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Ariffin, H. [University of Malaya, Department of Paediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2012-07-15

    The degree and status of white matter myelination can be sensitively monitored using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). This study looks at the measurement of fractional anistropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) using an automated ROI with an existing DTI atlas. Anatomical MRI and structural DTI were performed cross-sectionally on 26 normal children (newborn to 48 months old), using 1.5-T MRI. The automated processing pipeline was implemented to convert diffusion-weighted images into the NIfTI format. DTI-TK software was used to register the processed images to the ICBM DTI-81 atlas, while AFNI software was used for automated atlas-based volumes of interest (VOIs) and statistical value extraction. DTI exhibited consistent grey-white matter contrast. Triphasic temporal variation of the FA and MD values was noted, with FA increasing and MD decreasing rapidly early in the first 12 months. The second phase lasted 12-24 months during which the rate of FA and MD changes was reduced. After 24 months, the FA and MD values plateaued. DTI is a superior technique to conventional MR imaging in depicting WM maturation. The use of the automated processing pipeline provides a reliable environment for quantitative analysis of high-throughput DTI data. (orig.)

  3. Quantification of diffusion tensor imaging in normal white matter maturation of early childhood using an automated processing pipeline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The degree and status of white matter myelination can be sensitively monitored using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). This study looks at the measurement of fractional anistropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) using an automated ROI with an existing DTI atlas. Anatomical MRI and structural DTI were performed cross-sectionally on 26 normal children (newborn to 48 months old), using 1.5-T MRI. The automated processing pipeline was implemented to convert diffusion-weighted images into the NIfTI format. DTI-TK software was used to register the processed images to the ICBM DTI-81 atlas, while AFNI software was used for automated atlas-based volumes of interest (VOIs) and statistical value extraction. DTI exhibited consistent grey-white matter contrast. Triphasic temporal variation of the FA and MD values was noted, with FA increasing and MD decreasing rapidly early in the first 12 months. The second phase lasted 12-24 months during which the rate of FA and MD changes was reduced. After 24 months, the FA and MD values plateaued. DTI is a superior technique to conventional MR imaging in depicting WM maturation. The use of the automated processing pipeline provides a reliable environment for quantitative analysis of high-throughput DTI data. (orig.)

  4. Automated high-throughput assessment of prostate biopsy tissue using infrared spectroscopic chemical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassan, Paul; Sachdeva, Ashwin; Shanks, Jonathan H.; Brown, Mick D.; Clarke, Noel W.; Gardner, Peter

    2014-03-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) chemical imaging has been demonstrated as a promising technique to complement histopathological assessment of biomedical tissue samples. Current histopathology practice involves preparing thin tissue sections and staining them using hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) after which a histopathologist manually assess the tissue architecture under a visible microscope. Studies have shown that there is disagreement between operators viewing the same tissue suggesting that a complementary technique for verification could improve the robustness of the evaluation, and improve patient care. FT-IR chemical imaging allows the spatial distribution of chemistry to be rapidly imaged at a high (diffraction-limited) spatial resolution where each pixel represents an area of 5.5 × 5.5 μm2 and contains a full infrared spectrum providing a chemical fingerprint which studies have shown contains the diagnostic potential to discriminate between different cell-types, and even the benign or malignant state of prostatic epithelial cells. We report a label-free (i.e. no chemical de-waxing, or staining) method of imaging large pieces of prostate tissue (typically 1 cm × 2 cm) in tens of minutes (at a rate of 0.704 × 0.704 mm2 every 14.5 s) yielding images containing millions of spectra. Due to refractive index matching between sample and surrounding paraffin, minimal signal processing is required to recover spectra with their natural profile as opposed to harsh baseline correction methods, paving the way for future quantitative analysis of biochemical signatures. The quality of the spectral information is demonstrated by building and testing an automated cell-type classifier based upon spectral features.

  5. Hyper-Cam automated calibration method for continuous hyperspectral imaging measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Jean-Philippe; Habte, Zewdu; George, Jacks; Farley, Vincent; Tremblay, Pierre; Chamberland, Martin; Romano, Joao; Rosario, Dalton

    2010-04-01

    The midwave and longwave infrared regions of the electromagnetic spectrum contain rich information which can be captured by hyperspectral sensors thus enabling enhanced detection of targets of interest. A continuous hyperspectral imaging measurement capability operated 24/7 over varying seasons and weather conditions permits the evaluation of hyperspectral imaging for detection of different types of targets in real world environments. Such a measurement site was built at Picatinny Arsenal under the Spectral and Polarimetric Imagery Collection Experiment (SPICE), where two Hyper-Cam hyperspectral imagers are installed at the Precision Armament Laboratory (PAL) and are operated autonomously since Fall of 2009. The Hyper-Cam are currently collecting a complete hyperspectral database that contains the MWIR and LWIR hyperspectral measurements of several targets under day, night, sunny, cloudy, foggy, rainy and snowy conditions. The Telops Hyper-Cam sensor is an imaging spectrometer that enables the spatial and spectral analysis capabilities using a single sensor. It is based on the Fourier-transform technology yielding high spectral resolution and enabling high accuracy radiometric calibration. It provides datacubes of up to 320x256 pixels at spectral resolutions of up to 0.25 cm-1. The MWIR version covers the 3 to 5 μm spectral range and the LWIR version covers the 8 to 12 μm spectral range. This paper describes the automated operation of the two Hyper-Cam sensors being used in the SPICE data collection. The Reveal Automation Control Software (RACS) developed collaboratively between Telops, ARDEC, and ARL enables flexible operating parameters and autonomous calibration. Under the RACS software, the Hyper-Cam sensors can autonomously calibrate itself using their internal blackbody targets, and the calibration events are initiated by user defined time intervals and on internal beamsplitter temperature monitoring. The RACS software is the first software developed for

  6. Automated melanoma detection with a novel multispectral imaging system: results of a prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the performance of a new spectroscopic system in the diagnosis of melanoma. This study involves a consecutive series of 1278 patients with 1391 cutaneous pigmented lesions including 184 melanomas. In an attempt to approach the 'real world' of lesion population, a further set of 1022 not excised clinically reassuring lesions was also considered for analysis. Each lesion was imaged in vivo by a multispectral imaging system. The system operates at wavelengths between 483 and 950 nm by acquiring 15 images at equally spaced wavelength intervals. From the images, different lesion descriptors were extracted related to the colour distribution and morphology of the lesions. Data reduction techniques were applied before setting up a neural network classifier designed to perform automated diagnosis. The data set was randomly divided into three sets: train (696 lesions, including 90 melanomas) and verify (348 lesions, including 53 melanomas) for the instruction of a proper neural network, and an independent test set (347 lesions, including 41 melanomas). The neural network was able to discriminate between melanomas and non-melanoma lesions with a sensitivity of 80.4% and a specificity of 75.6% in the 1391 histologized cases data set. No major variations were found in classification scores when train, verify and test subsets were separately evaluated. Following receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, the resulting area under the curve was 0.85. No significant differences were found among areas under train, verify and test set curves, supporting the good network ability to generalize for new cases. In addition, specificity and area under ROC curve increased up to 90% and 0.90, respectively, when the additional set of 1022 lesions without histology was added to the test set. Our data show that performance of an automated system is greatly population dependent, suggesting caution in the comparison with results reported in the

  7. An automated image cytometry system for monitoring DNA ploidy and other cell features of radiotherapy and chemotherapy patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DNA content and distribution in cell nuclei were studied in samples of fine-needle aspiration (FNA) from 27 locally advanced breast and head and neck cancers in two going randomized trials that compared accelerated fractionation to standard fractionation radiation in locally advanced breast cancer and head and neck cancer. Two image cytometry methods were compared: a new, fully automated DNA image cytometry system (AIC) and a conventional image cytometry (CIC) system with manual selection, focusing, and segmentation of cells. The results of both techniques were compared on the basis of DNA histogram parameters including DNA index (DI), mean DNA values (MDV), and Auer's DNA histogram patterns. An excellent correlation was achieved between the two imaging techniques in terms of DI (r=0.985, p<0.001) and MDV (r=0.951, p<0.001) as well as between Auer's histogram patterns, where both methods agreed completely. It was concluded in these analyses that the two image cytometry methods were equivalent. However, the AIC offered an advantage by scanning samples in a fully automated way, which represented significant time saving for cytopathologists working with the system, as well as a larger number of cells used in the automated analysis. With the automated image cytometer, 500 relevant cells were collected and analyzed in about 10 minutes, where with the interactive (manual) method, it took typically an hour to collect and analyze only about 250 cells. Seventeen samples were sufficient for flow analysis. Image cytometry and flow cytometry showed good agreement in DI determination; however, three cases reported as diploid by flow cytometry were found to be aneuploid by image cytometry techniques. (author)

  8. Boosting accuracy of automated classification of fluorescence microscope images for location proteomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Kai

    2004-06-01

    accuracy for single 2D images being higher than 90% for the first time. In particular, the classification accuracy for the easily confused endomembrane compartments (endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi, endosomes, lysosomes was improved by 5–15%. We achieved further improvements when classification was conducted on image sets rather than on individual cell images. Conclusions The availability of accurate, fast, automated classification systems for protein location patterns in conjunction with high throughput fluorescence microscope imaging techniques enables a new subfield of proteomics, location proteomics. The accuracy and sensitivity of this approach represents an important alternative to low-resolution assignments by curation or sequence-based prediction.

  9. Development of Automated Image Analysis Tools for Verification of Radiotherapy Field Accuracy with AN Electronic Portal Imaging Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Lei

    1995-01-01

    The successful management of cancer with radiation relies on the accurate deposition of a prescribed dose to a prescribed anatomical volume within the patient. Treatment set-up errors are inevitable because the alignment of field shaping devices with the patient must be repeated daily up to eighty times during the course of a fractionated radiotherapy treatment. With the invention of electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs), patient's portal images can be visualized daily in real-time after only a small fraction of the radiation dose has been delivered to each treatment field. However, the accuracy of human visual evaluation of low-contrast portal images has been found to be inadequate. The goal of this research is to develop automated image analysis tools to detect both treatment field shape errors and patient anatomy placement errors with an EPID. A moments method has been developed to align treatment field images to compensate for lack of repositioning precision of the image detector. A figure of merit has also been established to verify the shape and rotation of the treatment fields. Following proper alignment of treatment field boundaries, a cross-correlation method has been developed to detect shifts of the patient's anatomy relative to the treatment field boundary. Phantom studies showed that the moments method aligned the radiation fields to within 0.5mm of translation and 0.5^ circ of rotation and that the cross-correlation method aligned anatomical structures inside the radiation field to within 1 mm of translation and 1^ circ of rotation. A new procedure of generating and using digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) at megavoltage energies as reference images was also investigated. The procedure allowed a direct comparison between a designed treatment portal and the actual patient setup positions detected by an EPID. Phantom studies confirmed the feasibility of the methodology. Both the moments method and the cross -correlation technique were

  10. Automated local bright feature image analysis of nuclear protein distribution identifies changes in tissue phenotype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The organization of nuclear proteins is linked to cell and tissue phenotypes. When cells arrest proliferation, undergo apoptosis, or differentiate, the distribution of nuclear proteins changes. Conversely, forced alteration of the distribution of nuclear proteins modifies cell phenotype. Immunostaining and fluorescence microscopy have been critical for such findings. However, there is an increasing need for quantitative analysis of nuclear protein distribution to decipher epigenetic relationships between nuclear structure and cell phenotype, and to unravel the mechanisms linking nuclear structure and function. We have developed imaging methods to quantify the distribution of fluorescently-stained nuclear protein NuMA in different mammary phenotypes obtained using three-dimensional cell culture. Automated image segmentation of DAPI-stained nuclei was generated to isolate thousands of nuclei from three-dimensional confocal images. Prominent features of fluorescently-stained NuMA were detected using a novel local bright feature analysis technique, and their normalized spatial density calculated as a function of the distance from the nuclear perimeter to its center. The results revealed marked changes in the distribution of the density of NuMA bright features as non-neoplastic cells underwent phenotypically normal acinar morphogenesis. In contrast, we did not detect any reorganization of NuMA during the formation of tumor nodules by malignant cells. Importantly, the analysis also discriminated proliferating non-neoplastic cells from proliferating malignant cells, suggesting that these imaging methods are capable of identifying alterations linked not only to the proliferation status but also to the malignant character of cells. We believe that this quantitative analysis will have additional applications for classifying normal and pathological tissues

  11. Automated local bright feature image analysis of nuclear proteindistribution identifies changes in tissue phenotype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knowles, David; Sudar, Damir; Bator, Carol; Bissell, Mina

    2006-02-01

    The organization of nuclear proteins is linked to cell and tissue phenotypes. When cells arrest proliferation, undergo apoptosis, or differentiate, the distribution of nuclear proteins changes. Conversely, forced alteration of the distribution of nuclear proteins modifies cell phenotype. Immunostaining and fluorescence microscopy have been critical for such findings. However, there is an increasing need for quantitative analysis of nuclear protein distribution to decipher epigenetic relationships between nuclear structure and cell phenotype, and to unravel the mechanisms linking nuclear structure and function. We have developed imaging methods to quantify the distribution of fluorescently-stained nuclear protein NuMA in different mammary phenotypes obtained using three-dimensional cell culture. Automated image segmentation of DAPI-stained nuclei was generated to isolate thousands of nuclei from three-dimensional confocal images. Prominent features of fluorescently-stained NuMA were detected using a novel local bright feature analysis technique, and their normalized spatial density calculated as a function of the distance from the nuclear perimeter to its center. The results revealed marked changes in the distribution of the density of NuMA bright features as non-neoplastic cells underwent phenotypically normal acinar morphogenesis. In contrast, we did not detect any reorganization of NuMA during the formation of tumor nodules by malignant cells. Importantly, the analysis also discriminated proliferating non-neoplastic cells from proliferating malignant cells, suggesting that these imaging methods are capable of identifying alterations linked not only to the proliferation status but also to the malignant character of cells. We believe that this quantitative analysis will have additional applications for classifying normal and pathological tissues.

  12. Evaluation of automated image registration algorithm for image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The performance of an image registration (IR) software was evaluated for automatically detecting known errors simulated through the movement of ExactCouch using an onboard imager. Twenty-seven set-up errors (11 translations, 10 rotations, 6 translation and rotation) were simulated by introducing offset up to ±15 mm in three principal axes and 0° to ±1° in yaw. For every simulated error, orthogonal kV radiograph and cone beam CT were acquired in half-fan (CBCTHF) and full-fan (CBCTFF) mode. The orthogonal radiographs and CBCTs were automatically co-registered to reference digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) and planning CT using 2D–2D and 3D–3D matching software based on mutual information transformation. A total of 79 image sets (ten pairs of kV X-rays and 69 session of CBCT) were analyzed to determine the (a) reproducibility of IR outcome and (b) residual error, defined as the deviation between the known and IR software detected displacement in translation and rotation. The reproducibility of automatic IR of planning CT and repeat CBCTs taken with and without kilovoltage detector and kilovoltage X-ray source arm movement was excellent with mean SD of 0.1 mm in the translation and 0.0° in rotation. The average residual errors in translation and rotation were within ±0.5 mm and ±0.2°, ±0.9 mm and ±0.3°, and ±0.4 mm and ±0.2° for setup simulated only in translation, rotation, and both translation and rotation. The mean (SD) 3D vector was largest when only translational error was simulated and was 1.7 (1.1) mm for 2D–2D match of reference DRR with radiograph, 1.4 (0.6) and 1.3 (0.5) mm for 3D–3D match of reference CT and CBCT with full fan and half fan, respectively. In conclusion, the image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) system is accurate within 1.8 mm and 0.4° and reproducible under control condition. Inherent error from any IGRT process should be taken into account while setting clinical IGRT protocol.

  13. Primary histologic diagnosis using automated whole slide imaging: a validation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jukic Drazen M

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Only prototypes 5 years ago, high-speed, automated whole slide imaging (WSI systems (also called digital slide systems, virtual microscopes or wide field imagers are becoming increasingly capable and robust. Modern devices can capture a slide in 5 minutes at spatial sampling periods of less than 0.5 micron/pixel. The capacity to rapidly digitize large numbers of slides should eventually have a profound, positive impact on pathology. It is important, however, that pathologists validate these systems during development, not only to identify their limitations but to guide their evolution. Methods Three pathologists fully signed out 25 cases representing 31 parts. The laboratory information system was used to simulate real-world sign-out conditions including entering a full diagnostic field and comment (when appropriate and ordering special stains and recuts. For each case, discrepancies between diagnoses were documented by committee and a "consensus" report was formed and then compared with the microscope-based, sign-out report from the clinical archive. Results In 17 of 25 cases there were no discrepancies between the individual study pathologist reports. In 8 of the remaining cases, there were 12 discrepancies, including 3 in which image quality could be at least partially implicated. When the WSI consensus diagnoses were compared with the original sign-out diagnoses, no significant discrepancies were found. Full text of the pathologist reports, the WSI consensus diagnoses, and the original sign-out diagnoses are available as an attachment to this publication. Conclusion The results indicated that the image information contained in current whole slide images is sufficient for pathologists to make reliable diagnostic decisions and compose complex diagnostic reports. This is a very positive result; however, this does not mean that WSI is as good as a microscope. Virtually every slide had focal areas in which image quality (focus

  14. Automated parasite faecal egg counting using fluorescence labelling, smartphone image capture and computational image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slusarewicz, Paul; Pagano, Stefanie; Mills, Christopher; Popa, Gabriel; Chow, K Martin; Mendenhall, Michael; Rodgers, David W; Nielsen, Martin K

    2016-07-01

    Intestinal parasites are a concern in veterinary medicine worldwide and for human health in the developing world. Infections are identified by microscopic visualisation of parasite eggs in faeces, which is time-consuming, requires technical expertise and is impractical for use on-site. For these reasons, recommendations for parasite surveillance are not widely adopted and parasite control is based on administration of rote prophylactic treatments with anthelmintic drugs. This approach is known to promote anthelmintic resistance, so there is a pronounced need for a convenient egg counting assay to promote good clinical practice. Using a fluorescent chitin-binding protein, we show that this structural carbohydrate is present and accessible in shells of ova of strongyle, ascarid, trichurid and coccidian parasites. Furthermore, we show that a cellular smartphone can be used as an inexpensive device to image fluorescent eggs and, by harnessing the computational power of the phone, to perform image analysis to count the eggs. Strongyle egg counts generated by the smartphone system had a significant linear correlation with manual McMaster counts (R(2)=0.98), but with a significantly lower coefficient of variation (P=0.0177). Furthermore, the system was capable of differentiating equine strongyle and ascarid eggs similar to the McMaster method, but with significantly lower coefficients of variation (Psmartphones as relatively sophisticated, inexpensive and portable medical diagnostic devices. PMID:27025771

  15. Automated Data Production for a Novel Airborne Multiangle Spectropolarimetric Imager (airmspi)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanovic, V. M.; Bull, M.; Diner, D. J.; Geier, S.; Rheingans, B.

    2012-07-01

    A novel polarimetric imaging technique making use of rapid retardance modulation has been developed by JPL as a part of NASA's Instrument Incubator Program. It has been built into the Airborne Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (AirMSPI) under NASA's Airborne Instrument Technology Transition Program, and is aimed primarily at remote sensing of the amounts and microphysical properties of aerosols and clouds. AirMSPI includes an 8-band (355, 380, 445, 470, 555, 660, 865, 935 nm) pushbroom camera that measures polarization in a subset of the bands (470, 660, and 865 nm). The camera is mounted on a gimbal and acquires imagery in a configurable set of along-track viewing angles ranging between +67° and -67° relative to nadir. As a result, near simultaneous multi-angle, multi-spectral, and polarimetric measurements of the targeted areas at a spatial resolution ranging from 7 m to 20 m (depending on the viewing angle) can be derived. An automated data production system is being built to support high data acquisition rate in concert with co-registration and orthorectified mapping requirements. To date, a number of successful engineering checkout flights were conducted in October 2010, August-September 2011, and January 2012. Data products resulting from these flights will be presented.

  16. A fully automated tortuosity quantification system with application to corneal nerve fibres in confocal microscopy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annunziata, Roberto; Kheirkhah, Ahmad; Aggarwal, Shruti; Hamrah, Pedram; Trucco, Emanuele

    2016-08-01

    Recent clinical research has highlighted important links between a number of diseases and the tortuosity of curvilinear anatomical structures like corneal nerve fibres, suggesting that tortuosity changes might detect early stages of specific conditions. Currently, clinical studies are mainly based on subjective, visual assessment, with limited repeatability and inter-observer agreement. To address these problems, we propose a fully automated framework for image-level tortuosity estimation, consisting of a hybrid segmentation method and a highly adaptable, definition-free tortuosity estimation algorithm. The former combines an appearance model, based on a Scale and Curvature-Invariant Ridge Detector (SCIRD), with a context model, including multi-range learned context filters. The latter is based on a novel tortuosity estimation paradigm in which discriminative, multi-scale features can be automatically learned for specific anatomical objects and diseases. Experimental results on 140 in vivo confocal microscopy images of corneal nerve fibres from healthy and unhealthy subjects demonstrate the excellent performance of our method compared to state-of-the-art approaches and ground truth annotations from 3 expert observers. PMID:27136674

  17. Continuing Development of GOES-R SUVI Automated Solar Image Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, S. M.; Darnel, J.; Vickroy, J.; Steenburgh, R. A.; Rigler, E. J.

    2013-12-01

    NOAA's Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC) is the Nation's official source of space weather alerts, watches and warnings. In that role, the Center will be ingesting GOES-R Solar Ultraviolet Imager (SUVI) data beginning in the 2015-16 timeframe. Along with other NOAA and non-NOAA sources of solar imagery these observations are used by SWPC forecasters to inform their analysis (nowcast) and forecasts and also as sources of data to run empirical and numerical models. A supervised, multispectral, Bayesian pixel classifier has been developed and produces what are referred to as thematic maps to assist forecasters in their analysis. These maps represent classes of pixels including: space, coronal holes, quiet corona, filaments, active regions, and flares. The thematic maps product underwent initial operational test and evaluation at SWPC in 2012-13. The test used synoptic data from the Atmospheric Imaging Array (AIA) on NASA's SDO mission in near real time as a proxy for SUVI data. The thematic maps product has been upgraded and retrained to incorporate H-alpha imagery to better discriminate between filament channels and coronal holes. We present ongoing results of the operational test and evaluation for thematic maps. Also, we include initial results for automated flare location and coronal hole boundary location that depend on thematic maps as inputs.

  18. Automated segmentation of muscle and adipose tissue on CT images for human body composition analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Howard; Cobzas, Dana; Birdsell, Laura; Lieffers, Jessica; Baracos, Vickie

    2009-02-01

    The ability to compute body composition in cancer patients lends itself to determining the specific clinical outcomes associated with fat and lean tissue stores. For example, a wasting syndrome of advanced disease associates with shortened survival. Moreover, certain tissue compartments represent sites for drug distribution and are likely determinants of chemotherapy efficacy and toxicity. CT images are abundant, but these cannot be fully exploited unless there exist practical and fast approaches for tissue quantification. Here we propose a fully automated method for segmenting muscle, visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissues, taking the approach of shape modeling for the analysis of skeletal muscle. Muscle shape is represented using PCA encoded Free Form Deformations with respect to a mean shape. The shape model is learned from manually segmented images and used in conjunction with a tissue appearance prior. VAT and SAT are segmented based on the final deformed muscle shape. In comparing the automatic and manual methods, coefficients of variation (COV) (1 - 2%), were similar to or smaller than inter- and intra-observer COVs reported for manual segmentation.

  19. Automated image analysis reveals the dynamic 3-dimensional organization of multi-ciliary arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico F. Galati

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Multi-ciliated cells (MCCs use polarized fields of undulating cilia (ciliary array to produce fluid flow that is essential for many biological processes. Cilia are positioned by microtubule scaffolds called basal bodies (BBs that are arranged within a spatially complex 3-dimensional geometry (3D. Here, we develop a robust and automated computational image analysis routine to quantify 3D BB organization in the ciliate, Tetrahymena thermophila. Using this routine, we generate the first morphologically constrained 3D reconstructions of Tetrahymena cells and elucidate rules that govern the kinetics of MCC organization. We demonstrate the interplay between BB duplication and cell size expansion through the cell cycle. In mutant cells, we identify a potential BB surveillance mechanism that balances large gaps in BB spacing by increasing the frequency of closely spaced BBs in other regions of the cell. Finally, by taking advantage of a mutant predisposed to BB disorganization, we locate the spatial domains that are most prone to disorganization by environmental stimuli. Collectively, our analyses reveal the importance of quantitative image analysis to understand the principles that guide the 3D organization of MCCs.

  20. Machine Learning Approach to Automated Quality Identification of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Colony Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haponen, Markus; Rasku, Jyrki

    2016-01-01

    The focus of this research is on automated identification of the quality of human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) colony images. iPS cell technology is a contemporary method by which the patient's cells are reprogrammed back to stem cells and are differentiated to any cell type wanted. iPS cell technology will be used in future to patient specific drug screening, disease modeling, and tissue repairing, for instance. However, there are technical challenges before iPS cell technology can be used in practice and one of them is quality control of growing iPSC colonies which is currently done manually but is unfeasible solution in large-scale cultures. The monitoring problem returns to image analysis and classification problem. In this paper, we tackle this problem using machine learning methods such as multiclass Support Vector Machines and several baseline methods together with Scaled Invariant Feature Transformation based features. We perform over 80 test arrangements and do a thorough parameter value search. The best accuracy (62.4%) for classification was obtained by using a k-NN classifier showing improved accuracy compared to earlier studies. PMID:27493680

  1. Automated Waterline Detection in the Wadden Sea Using High-Resolution TerraSAR-X Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Wiehle

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an algorithm for automatic detection of the land-water-line from TerraSAR-X images acquired over the Wadden Sea. In this coastal region of the southeastern North Sea, a strip of up to 20 km of seabed falls dry during low tide, revealing mudflats and tidal creeks. The tidal currents transport sediments and can change the coastal shape with erosion rates of several meters per month. This rate can be strongly increased by storm surges which also cause flooding of usually dry areas. Due to the high number of ships traveling through the Wadden Sea to the largest ports of Germany, frequent monitoring of the bathymetry is also an important task for maritime security. For such an extended area and the required short intervals of a few months, only remote sensing methods can perform this task efficiently. Automating the waterline detection in weather-independent radar images provides a fast and reliable way to spot changes in the coastal topography. The presented algorithm first performs smoothing, brightness thresholding, and edge detection. In the second step, edge drawing and flood filling are iteratively performed to determine optimal thresholds for the edge drawing. In the last step, small misdetections are removed.

  2. Automated Processing of Imaging Data through Multi-tiered Classification of Biological Structures Illustrated Using Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Mei; Crane, Matthew M; Entchev, Eugeni V; Caballero, Antonio; Fernandes de Abreu, Diana Andrea; Ch'ng, QueeLim; Lu, Hang

    2015-04-01

    Quantitative imaging has become a vital technique in biological discovery and clinical diagnostics; a plethora of tools have recently been developed to enable new and accelerated forms of biological investigation. Increasingly, the capacity for high-throughput experimentation provided by new imaging modalities, contrast techniques, microscopy tools, microfluidics and computer controlled systems shifts the experimental bottleneck from the level of physical manipulation and raw data collection to automated recognition and data processing. Yet, despite their broad importance, image analysis solutions to address these needs have been narrowly tailored. Here, we present a generalizable formulation for autonomous identification of specific biological structures that is applicable for many problems. The process flow architecture we present here utilizes standard image processing techniques and the multi-tiered application of classification models such as support vector machines (SVM). These low-level functions are readily available in a large array of image processing software packages and programming languages. Our framework is thus both easy to implement at the modular level and provides specific high-level architecture to guide the solution of more complicated image-processing problems. We demonstrate the utility of the classification routine by developing two specific classifiers as a toolset for automation and cell identification in the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans. To serve a common need for automated high-resolution imaging and behavior applications in the C. elegans research community, we contribute a ready-to-use classifier for the identification of the head of the animal under bright field imaging. Furthermore, we extend our framework to address the pervasive problem of cell-specific identification under fluorescent imaging, which is critical for biological investigation in multicellular organisms or tissues. Using these examples as a guide, we envision

  3. Automated Processing of Imaging Data through Multi-tiered Classification of Biological Structures Illustrated Using Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Zhan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative imaging has become a vital technique in biological discovery and clinical diagnostics; a plethora of tools have recently been developed to enable new and accelerated forms of biological investigation. Increasingly, the capacity for high-throughput experimentation provided by new imaging modalities, contrast techniques, microscopy tools, microfluidics and computer controlled systems shifts the experimental bottleneck from the level of physical manipulation and raw data collection to automated recognition and data processing. Yet, despite their broad importance, image analysis solutions to address these needs have been narrowly tailored. Here, we present a generalizable formulation for autonomous identification of specific biological structures that is applicable for many problems. The process flow architecture we present here utilizes standard image processing techniques and the multi-tiered application of classification models such as support vector machines (SVM. These low-level functions are readily available in a large array of image processing software packages and programming languages. Our framework is thus both easy to implement at the modular level and provides specific high-level architecture to guide the solution of more complicated image-processing problems. We demonstrate the utility of the classification routine by developing two specific classifiers as a toolset for automation and cell identification in the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans. To serve a common need for automated high-resolution imaging and behavior applications in the C. elegans research community, we contribute a ready-to-use classifier for the identification of the head of the animal under bright field imaging. Furthermore, we extend our framework to address the pervasive problem of cell-specific identification under fluorescent imaging, which is critical for biological investigation in multicellular organisms or tissues. Using these examples as a

  4. Automated coronary artery calcification detection on low-dose chest CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yiting; Cham, Matthew D.; Henschke, Claudia; Yankelevitz, David; Reeves, Anthony P.

    2014-03-01

    Coronary artery calcification (CAC) measurement from low-dose CT images can be used to assess the risk of coronary artery disease. A fully automatic algorithm to detect and measure CAC from low-dose non-contrast, non-ECG-gated chest CT scans is presented. Based on the automatically detected CAC, the Agatston score (AS), mass score and volume score were computed. These were compared with scores obtained manually from standard-dose ECG-gated scans and low-dose un-gated scans of the same patient. The automatic algorithm segments the heart region based on other pre-segmented organs to provide a coronary region mask. The mitral valve and aortic valve calcification is identified and excluded. All remaining voxels greater than 180HU within the mask region are considered as CAC candidates. The heart segmentation algorithm was evaluated on 400 non-contrast cases with both low-dose and regular dose CT scans. By visual inspection, 371 (92.8%) of the segmentations were acceptable. The automated CAC detection algorithm was evaluated on 41 low-dose non-contrast CT scans. Manual markings were performed on both low-dose and standard-dose scans for these cases. Using linear regression, the correlation of the automatic AS with the standard-dose manual scores was 0.86; with the low-dose manual scores the correlation was 0.91. Standard risk categories were also computed. The automated method risk category agreed with manual markings of gated scans for 24 cases while 15 cases were 1 category off. For low-dose scans, the automatic method agreed with 33 cases while 7 cases were 1 category off.

  5. Comparison of manual direct and automated indirect measurement of hippocampus using magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giesel, Frederik L. [Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (Germany); MRI Unit, Department of Radiology, Sheffield (United Kingdom)], E-mail: f.giesel@dkfz.de; Thomann, Philipp A. [Section of Geriatric Psychiatry, University of Heidelberg (Germany); Hahn, Horst K. [MeVis, Bremen (Germany); Politi, Maria [Neuroradiology, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Stieltjes, Bram; Weber, Marc-Andre [Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (Germany); Pantel, Johannes [Department of Psychiatry, University of Frankfurt (Germany); Wilkinson, I.D.; Griffiths, Paul D. [MRI Unit, Department of Radiology, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Schroeder, Johannes [Section of Geriatric Psychiatry, University of Heidelberg (Germany); Essig, Marco [Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (Germany)

    2008-05-15

    Purpose: Objective quantification of brain structure can aid diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring in several neuropsychiatric disorders. In this study, we aimed to compare direct and indirect quantification approaches for hippocampal formation changes in patients with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Methods and materials: Twenty-one healthy volunteers (mean age: 66.2), 21 patients with mild cognitive impairment (mean age: 66.6), and 10 patients with AD (mean age: 65.1) were enrolled. All subjects underwent extensive neuropsychological testing and were imaged at 1.5 T (Vision, Siemens, Germany; T1w coronal TR = 4 ms, Flip = 13 deg., FOV = 250 mm, Matrix = 256 x 256, 128 contiguous slices, 1.8 mm). Direct measurement of the hippocampal formation was performed on coronal slices using a standardized protocol, while indirect temporal horn volume (THV) was calculated using a watershed algorithm-based software package (MeVis, Germany). Manual tracing took about 30 min, semi-automated measurement less than 3 min time. Results: Successful direct and indirect quantification was performed in all subjects. A significant volume difference was found between controls and AD patients (p < 0.001) with both the manual and the semi-automated approach. Group analysis showed a slight but not significant decrease of hippocampal volume and increase in temporal horn volume (THV) for subjects with mild cognitive impairment compared to volunteers (p < 0.07). A significant correlation (p < 0.001) of direct and indirect measurement was found. Conclusion: The presented indirect approach for hippocampus volumetry is equivalent to the direct approach and offers the advantages of observer independency, time reduction and thus usefulness for clinical routine.

  6. Comparison of manual direct and automated indirect measurement of hippocampus using magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Objective quantification of brain structure can aid diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring in several neuropsychiatric disorders. In this study, we aimed to compare direct and indirect quantification approaches for hippocampal formation changes in patients with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Methods and materials: Twenty-one healthy volunteers (mean age: 66.2), 21 patients with mild cognitive impairment (mean age: 66.6), and 10 patients with AD (mean age: 65.1) were enrolled. All subjects underwent extensive neuropsychological testing and were imaged at 1.5 T (Vision, Siemens, Germany; T1w coronal TR = 4 ms, Flip = 13 deg., FOV = 250 mm, Matrix = 256 x 256, 128 contiguous slices, 1.8 mm). Direct measurement of the hippocampal formation was performed on coronal slices using a standardized protocol, while indirect temporal horn volume (THV) was calculated using a watershed algorithm-based software package (MeVis, Germany). Manual tracing took about 30 min, semi-automated measurement less than 3 min time. Results: Successful direct and indirect quantification was performed in all subjects. A significant volume difference was found between controls and AD patients (p < 0.001) with both the manual and the semi-automated approach. Group analysis showed a slight but not significant decrease of hippocampal volume and increase in temporal horn volume (THV) for subjects with mild cognitive impairment compared to volunteers (p < 0.07). A significant correlation (p < 0.001) of direct and indirect measurement was found. Conclusion: The presented indirect approach for hippocampus volumetry is equivalent to the direct approach and offers the advantages of observer independency, time reduction and thus usefulness for clinical routine

  7. Automated tissue classification of intracardiac optical coherence tomography images (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Yu; Tsay, David; Amir, Syed B.; Marboe, Charles C.; Hendon, Christine P.

    2016-03-01

    Remodeling of the myocardium is associated with increased risk of arrhythmia and heart failure. Our objective is to automatically identify regions of fibrotic myocardium, dense collagen, and adipose tissue, which can serve as a way to guide radiofrequency ablation therapy or endomyocardial biopsies. Using computer vision and machine learning, we present an automated algorithm to classify tissue compositions from cardiac optical coherence tomography (OCT) images. Three dimensional OCT volumes were obtained from 15 human hearts ex vivo within 48 hours of donor death (source, NDRI). We first segmented B-scans using a graph searching method. We estimated the boundary of each region by minimizing a cost function, which consisted of intensity, gradient, and contour smoothness. Then, features, including texture analysis, optical properties, and statistics of high moments, were extracted. We used a statistical model, relevance vector machine, and trained this model with abovementioned features to classify tissue compositions. To validate our method, we applied our algorithm to 77 volumes. The datasets for validation were manually segmented and classified by two investigators who were blind to our algorithm results and identified the tissues based on trichrome histology and pathology. The difference between automated and manual segmentation was 51.78 +/- 50.96 μm. Experiments showed that the attenuation coefficients of dense collagen were significantly different from other tissue types (P < 0.05, ANOVA). Importantly, myocardial fibrosis tissues were different from normal myocardium in entropy and kurtosis. The tissue types were classified with an accuracy of 84%. The results show good agreements with histology.

  8. An automated image-registration technique based on multiple structure matching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new image-registration technique that matches multiple structures on complementary imaging data sets (e.g., CT and MRI) has been developed and tested with both phantom and patient data. The algorithm assumes a rigid-body transformation and is suitable for correlating structures within the cranium or at the skull base. The basic premise of the new technique is that an optimum transformation is achieved when the relative volume lying outside of the intersection between a structure and its transformed counterpart is a minimum. This relative volume is calculated numerically using a random sampling approach, and a binary searching algorithm was used to step through the nine-dimensional parameter space consisting of three rotation angles, three scaling factors and three components of a translation vector. For the nine tests using phantom data, the automated structure-matching technique was able to predict the correct rotation angles to within ±1 degree. The expected clinical performance of the new technique was assessed by comparing results obtained with the new method to those obtained using other techniques for 12 patients who were treated with charged particles at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) and who had image-registration studies performed as part of their treatment plan. For 9 of the 12 patients considered, the new structure-matching technique produced a significantly better registration than the older methods, as measured by the resultant average relative volume lying outside of the intersection between any structure and its transformed counterpart. For the other three patients, results were not significantly different for the new structure-matching method and the older techniques

  9. Investigation into Cloud Computing for More Robust Automated Bulk Image Geoprocessing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Richard B.; Smoot, James C.; Underwood, Lauren; Armstrong, C. Duane

    2012-01-01

    Geospatial resource assessments frequently require timely geospatial data processing that involves large multivariate remote sensing data sets. In particular, for disasters, response requires rapid access to large data volumes, substantial storage space and high performance processing capability. The processing and distribution of this data into usable information products requires a processing pipeline that can efficiently manage the required storage, computing utilities, and data handling requirements. In recent years, with the availability of cloud computing technology, cloud processing platforms have made available a powerful new computing infrastructure resource that can meet this need. To assess the utility of this resource, this project investigates cloud computing platforms for bulk, automated geoprocessing capabilities with respect to data handling and application development requirements. This presentation is of work being conducted by Applied Sciences Program Office at NASA-Stennis Space Center. A prototypical set of image manipulation and transformation processes that incorporate sample Unmanned Airborne System data were developed to create value-added products and tested for implementation on the "cloud". This project outlines the steps involved in creating and testing of open source software developed process code on a local prototype platform, and then transitioning this code with associated environment requirements into an analogous, but memory and processor enhanced cloud platform. A data processing cloud was used to store both standard digital camera panchromatic and multi-band image data, which were subsequently subjected to standard image processing functions such as NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index), NDMI (Normalized Difference Moisture Index), band stacking, reprojection, and other similar type data processes. Cloud infrastructure service providers were evaluated by taking these locally tested processing functions, and then

  10. Evaluation of a software package for automated quality assessment of contrast detail images-comparison with subjective visual assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pascoal, A [Medical Engineering and Physics, King' s College London, Faraday Building Denmark Hill, London SE5 8RX (Denmark); Lawinski, C P [KCARE - King' s Centre for Assessment of Radiological Equipment, King' s College Hospital, Faraday Building Denmark Hill, London SE5 8RX (Denmark); Honey, I [KCARE - King' s Centre for Assessment of Radiological Equipment, King' s College Hospital, Faraday Building Denmark Hill, London SE5 8RX (Denmark); Blake, P [KCARE - King' s Centre for Assessment of Radiological Equipment, King' s College Hospital, Faraday Building Denmark Hill, London SE5 8RX (Denmark)

    2005-12-07

    Contrast detail analysis is commonly used to assess image quality (IQ) associated with diagnostic imaging systems. Applications include routine assessment of equipment performance and optimization studies. Most frequently, the evaluation of contrast detail images involves human observers visually detecting the threshold contrast detail combinations in the image. However, the subjective nature of human perception and the variations in the decision threshold pose limits to the minimum image quality variations detectable with reliability. Objective methods of assessment of image quality such as automated scoring have the potential to overcome the above limitations. A software package (CDRAD analyser) developed for automated scoring of images produced with the CDRAD test object was evaluated. Its performance to assess absolute and relative IQ was compared with that of an average observer. Results show that the software does not mimic the absolute performance of the average observer. The software proved more sensitive and was able to detect smaller low-contrast variations. The observer's performance was superior to the software's in the detection of smaller details. Both scoring methods showed frequent agreement in the detection of image quality variations resulting from changes in kVp and KERMA{sub detector}, which indicates the potential to use the software CDRAD analyser for assessment of relative IQ.

  11. Optic disc boundary segmentation from diffeomorphic demons registration of monocular fundus image sequences versus 3D visualization of stereo fundus image pairs for automated early stage glaucoma assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatti, Vijay; Hill, Jason; Mitra, Sunanda; Nutter, Brian

    2014-03-01

    Despite the current availability in resource-rich regions of advanced technologies in scanning and 3-D imaging in current ophthalmology practice, world-wide screening tests for early detection and progression of glaucoma still consist of a variety of simple tools, including fundus image-based parameters such as CDR (cup to disc diameter ratio) and CAR (cup to disc area ratio), especially in resource -poor regions. Reliable automated computation of the relevant parameters from fundus image sequences requires robust non-rigid registration and segmentation techniques. Recent research work demonstrated that proper non-rigid registration of multi-view monocular fundus image sequences could result in acceptable segmentation of cup boundaries for automated computation of CAR and CDR. This research work introduces a composite diffeomorphic demons registration algorithm for segmentation of cup boundaries from a sequence of monocular images and compares the resulting CAR and CDR values with those computed manually by experts and from 3-D visualization of stereo pairs. Our preliminary results show that the automated computation of CDR and CAR from composite diffeomorphic segmentation of monocular image sequences yield values comparable with those from the other two techniques and thus may provide global healthcare with a cost-effective yet accurate tool for management of glaucoma in its early stage.

  12. Automated recognition of body cavities in torso X-ray CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, it has become even more important to understand the normal anatomical structures of the human body in the field of radiological image anatomy. The recognition of body cavities is useful when organ extraction is performed. However, it is difficult to perform organ extraction and to obtain a clear understanding of anatomical structures based on CT values. For example, the distributions of the CT numbers of muscle and organs overlap each other. Therefore, the recognition of the body cavity domain can reduce the range of internal organ extraction and simplify organ segmentation. The purpose of the present study was to develop an automated method for recognizing the body cavities in torso X-ray CT images. Our body cavity recognition method is based on skeletal positions and is performed by extracting the borders of the thoracic cavity, abdominal cavity, and pelvic cavity. This method detects the initial and final points of such borders and searches for the shortest path on the surfaces of the skeletal structures. It then generates the boundary surfaces of the thoracic, abdominal, and pelvic cavities by drawing straight lines between the shortest paths and the centers of the paths. The body cavities located between the superior thoracic aperture and the diaphragm, the diaphragm and the pelvic inlet, and the pelvic inlet and the pelvic outlet are regarded as the thoracic cavity, the abdominal cavity, and the pelvic cavity, respectively. The method was applied to 20 cases in which torso X-ray CT images were obtained. The results showed that the body cavities were extracted correctly in most cases: the thoracic cavity in 17 cases, the abdominal cavity in 19 cases, and the pelvic cavity in 18 cases. We confirmed that our proposed method is effective for recognizing these body cavities. As one of the applications of our study, segmentation of muscle, fat, and the rectum in CT images was performed using the information obtained for body cavity structures. The results

  13. Precision automation of cell type classification and sub-cellular fluorescence quantification from laser scanning confocal images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardy Craig Hall

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available While novel whole-plant phenotyping technologies have been successfully implemented into functional genomics and breeding programs, the potential of automated phenotyping with cellular resolution is largely unexploited. Laser scanning confocal microscopy has the potential to close this gap by providing spatially highly resolved images containing anatomic as well as chemical information on a subcellular basis. However, in the absence of automated methods, the assessment of the spatial patterns and abundance of fluorescent markers with subcellular resolution is still largely qualitative and time-consuming. Recent advances in image acquisition and analysis, coupled with improvements in microprocessor performance, have brought such automated methods within reach, so that information from thousands of cells per image for hundreds of images may be derived in an experimentally convenient time-frame. Here, we present a MATLAB-based analytical pipeline to 1 segment radial plant organs into individual cells, 2 classify cells into cell type categories based upon random forest classification, 3 divide each cell into sub-regions, and 4 quantify fluorescence intensity to a subcellular degree of precision for a separate fluorescence channel. In this research advance, we demonstrate the precision of this analytical process for the relatively complex tissues of Arabidopsis hypocotyls at various stages of development. High speed and robustness make our approach suitable for phenotyping of large collections of stem-like material and other tissue types.

  14. Automated gas bubble imaging at sea floor – a new method of in situ gas flux quantification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Thomanek

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Photo-optical systems are common in marine sciences and have been extensively used in coastal and deep-sea research. However, due to technical limitations in the past photo images had to be processed manually or semi-automatically. Recent advances in technology have rapidly improved image recording, storage and processing capabilities which are used in a new concept of automated in situ gas quantification by photo-optical detection. The design for an in situ high-speed image acquisition and automated data processing system is reported ("Bubblemeter". New strategies have been followed with regards to back-light illumination, bubble extraction, automated image processing and data management. This paper presents the design of the novel method, its validation procedures and calibration experiments. The system will be positioned and recovered from the sea floor using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV. It is able to measure bubble flux rates up to 10 L/min with a maximum error of 33% for worst case conditions. The Bubblemeter has been successfully deployed at a water depth of 1023 m at the Makran accretionary prism offshore Pakistan during a research expedition with R/V Meteor in November 2007.

  15. Automated parcellation of the brain surface generated from magnetic resonance images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Li

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a fast and reliable pipeline to automatically parcellate the cortical surface into sub-regions. The pipeline can be used to study brain changes associated with psychiatric and neurological disorders. First, a genus zero cortical surface for one hemisphere is generated from the magnetic resonance images at the parametric boundary of the white matter and the gray matter. Second, a hemisphere-specific surface atlas is registered to the cortical surface using geometry features mapped in the spherical domain. The deformation field is used to warp statistic labels from the atlas to the subject surface. The Dice index of the labeled surface area is used to evaluate the similarity between the automated labels with the manual labels on the subject. The average Dice across twenty-four regions on fourteen testing subjects is 0.86. Alternative evaluations have also chosen to show the accuracy and flexibility of the present method. The point-wise accuracy of fourteen testing subjects is above 86% in average. The experiment shows that the present method is highly consistent with FreeSurfer (>99% of the surface area, using the same set of labels.

  16. An automated framework for 3D serous pigment epithelium detachment segmentation in SD-OCT images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhuli; Chen, Haoyu; Shi, Fei; Wang, Lirong; Zhu, Weifang; Xiang, Dehui; Yan, Chenglin; Li, Liang; Chen, Xinjian

    2016-01-01

    Pigment epithelium detachment (PED) is an important clinical manifestation of multiple chorioretinal diseases, which can cause loss of central vision. In this paper, an automated framework is proposed to segment serous PED in SD-OCT images. The proposed framework consists of four main steps: first, a multi-scale graph search method is applied to segment abnormal retinal layers; second, an effective AdaBoost method is applied to refine the initial segmented regions based on 62 extracted features; third, a shape-constrained graph cut method is applied to segment serous PED, in which the foreground and background seeds are obtained automatically; finally, an adaptive structure elements based morphology method is applied to remove false positive segmented regions. The proposed framework was tested on 25 SD-OCT volumes from 25 patients diagnosed with serous PED. The average true positive volume fraction (TPVF), false positive volume fraction (FPVF), dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and positive predictive value (PPV) are 90.08%, 0.22%, 91.20% and 92.62%, respectively. The proposed framework can provide clinicians with accurate quantitative information, including shape, size and position of the PED region, which can assist clinical diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26899236

  17. Experimental saltwater intrusion in coastal aquifers using automated image analysis: Applications to homogeneous aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, G.; Ahmed, Ashraf A.; Hamill, G. A.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents the applications of a novel methodology to quantify saltwater intrusion parameters in laboratory-scale experiments. The methodology uses an automated image analysis procedure, minimising manual inputs and the subsequent systematic errors that can be introduced. This allowed the quantification of the width of the mixing zone which is difficult to measure in experimental methods that are based on visual observations. Glass beads of different grain sizes were tested for both steady-state and transient conditions. The transient results showed good correlation between experimental and numerical intrusion rates. The experimental intrusion rates revealed that the saltwater wedge reached a steady state condition sooner while receding than advancing. The hydrodynamics of the experimental mixing zone exhibited similar traits; a greater increase in the width of the mixing zone was observed in the receding saltwater wedge, which indicates faster fluid velocities and higher dispersion. The angle of intrusion analysis revealed the formation of a volume of diluted saltwater at the toe position when the saltwater wedge is prompted to recede. In addition, results of different physical repeats of the experiment produced an average coefficient of variation less than 0.18 of the measured toe length and width of the mixing zone.

  18. Automated MALDI Matrix Coating System for Multiple Tissue Samples for Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mounfield, William P.; Garrett, Timothy J.

    2012-03-01

    Uniform matrix deposition on tissue samples for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) is key for reproducible analyte ion signals. Current methods often result in nonhomogenous matrix deposition, and take time and effort to produce acceptable ion signals. Here we describe a fully-automated method for matrix deposition using an enclosed spray chamber and spray nozzle for matrix solution delivery. A commercial air-atomizing spray nozzle was modified and combined with solenoid controlled valves and a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) to control and deliver the matrix solution. A spray chamber was employed to contain the nozzle, sample, and atomized matrix solution stream, and to prevent any interference from outside conditions as well as allow complete control of the sample environment. A gravity cup was filled with MALDI matrix solutions, including DHB in chloroform/methanol (50:50) at concentrations up to 60 mg/mL. Various samples (including rat brain tissue sections) were prepared using two deposition methods (spray chamber, inkjet). A linear ion trap equipped with an intermediate-pressure MALDI source was used for analyses. Optical microscopic examination showed a uniform coating of matrix crystals across the sample. Overall, the mass spectral images gathered from tissues coated using the spray chamber system were of better quality and more reproducible than from tissue specimens prepared by the inkjet deposition method.

  19. Automated discrimination of dicentric and monocentric chromosomes by machine learning-based image processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanxin; Knoll, Joan H; Wilkins, Ruth C; Flegal, Farrah N; Rogan, Peter K

    2016-05-01

    Dose from radiation exposure can be estimated from dicentric chromosome (DC) frequencies in metaphase cells of peripheral blood lymphocytes. We automated DC detection by extracting features in Giemsa-stained metaphase chromosome images and classifying objects by machine learning (ML). DC detection involves (i) intensity thresholded segmentation of metaphase objects, (ii) chromosome separation by watershed transformation and elimination of inseparable chromosome clusters, fragments and staining debris using a morphological decision tree filter, (iii) determination of chromosome width and centreline, (iv) derivation of centromere candidates, and (v) distinction of DCs from monocentric chromosomes (MC) by ML. Centromere candidates are inferred from 14 image features input to a Support Vector Machine (SVM). Sixteen features derived from these candidates are then supplied to a Boosting classifier and a second SVM which determines whether a chromosome is either a DC or MC. The SVM was trained with 292 DCs and 3135 MCs, and then tested with cells exposed to either low (1 Gy) or high (2-4 Gy) radiation dose. Results were then compared with those of 3 experts. True positive rates (TPR) and positive predictive values (PPV) were determined for the tuning parameter, σ. At larger σ, PPV decreases and TPR increases. At high dose, for σ = 1.3, TPR = 0.52 and PPV = 0.83, while at σ = 1.6, the TPR = 0.65 and PPV = 0.72. At low dose and σ = 1.3, TPR = 0.67 and PPV = 0.26. The algorithm differentiates DCs from MCs, overlapped chromosomes and other objects with acceptable accuracy over a wide range of radiation exposures. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:393-402, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26929213

  20. Automated Synthesis of 18F-Fluoropropoxytryptophan for Amino Acid Transporter System Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Hong Shih

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study was to develop a cGMP grade of [18F]fluoropropoxytryptophan (18F-FTP to assess tryptophan transporters using an automated synthesizer. Methods. Tosylpropoxytryptophan (Ts-TP was reacted with K18F/kryptofix complex. After column purification, solvent evaporation, and hydrolysis, the identity and purity of the product were validated by radio-TLC (1M-ammonium acetate : methanol = 4 : 1 and HPLC (C-18 column, methanol : water = 7 : 3 analyses. In vitro cellular uptake of 18F-FTP and 18F-FDG was performed in human prostate cancer cells. PET imaging studies were performed with 18F-FTP and 18F-FDG in prostate and small cell lung tumor-bearing mice (3.7 MBq/mouse, iv. Results. Radio-TLC and HPLC analyses of 18F-FTP showed that the Rf and Rt values were 0.9 and 9 min, respectively. Radiochemical purity was >99%. The radiochemical yield was 37.7% (EOS 90 min, decay corrected. Cellular uptake of 18F-FTP and 18F-FDG showed enhanced uptake as a function of incubation time. PET imaging studies showed that 18F-FTP had less tumor uptake than 18F-FDG in prostate cancer model. However, 18F-FTP had more uptake than 18F-FDG in small cell lung cancer model. Conclusion. 18F-FTP could be synthesized with high radiochemical yield. Assessment of upregulated transporters activity by 18F-FTP may provide potential applications in differential diagnosis and prediction of early treatment response.

  1. Automated collection of imaging and phenotypic data to centralized and distributed data repositories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret D King

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Accurate data collection at the ground level is vital to the integrity of neuroimaging research. Similarly important is the ability to connect and curate data in order to make it meaningful and sharable with other investigators. Collecting data, especially with several different modalities, can be time consuming and expensive. These issues have driven the development of automated collection of neuroimaging and clinical assessment data within COINS (Collaborative Informatics and Neuroimaging Suite. COINS is an end-to-end data management system. It provides a comprehensive platform for data collection, management, secure storage, and flexible data retrieval (Bockholt et al., 2010, Scott et al., 2011. Self Assessment (SAis an application embedded in the Assessment Manager tool in the COINS. It is an innovative tool that allows participants to fill out assessments via the web-based Participant Portal. It eliminates the need for paper collection and data entry by allowing participants to submit their assessments directly to COINS. After a queue has been created for the participant, they can access the Participant Portal via the internet to fill out their assessments. This allows them the flexibility to participate from home, a library, on site, etc. The collected data is stored in a PostgresSQL database at the Mind Research Network behind a firewall to protect sensitive data. An added benefit to using COINS is the ability to collect, store and share imaging data and assessment data with no interaction with outside tools or programs. All study data collected (imaging and assessment are stored and exported with a participant's unique subject identifier so there is no need to keep extra spreadsheets or databases to link and keep track of the data. There is a great need for data collection tools that limit human intervention and error. COINS aims to be a leader in database solutions for research studies collecting data from several different modalities

  2. Automated synthesis of novel cell death imaging tracer 18F-FPDuramycin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: The noninvasive imaging of cell death plays an important role in the evaluation of degenerative diseases and detection of tumor treatments. Duramycin, a peptide with 19-amino acid, is produced by Streptoverticillium cinnamoneus. It binds specifically to phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), a novel molecular target for cell death. Purpose: The aim is to develop a synthetic method to label duramycin using 18F ion. The automated synthesis was carried out by multi-step procedure on the modified PET-MF-2V-IT-I synthesizer. Methods: Firstly, the prosthetic group of 4-nitrophenyl 2-[18F]fluoropropionate (18F-NFP) was automatically synthesized by a convenient three-step procedure. Secondly, 18F-FPDuramycin was synthesized by conjunction of 18F-NFP with duramycin, which was purified by a solid-phase extraction cartridge. Orthogonal test was performed to confirm the suitable reaction conditions (solvent, base and temperature). Results: The radiochemical yields of 18F-NFP were (25±5)% (n=10, decay-uncorrected) based on[18F]fluoride in 80 min. 18F-FPDuramycin was obtained with yield of (70±3)% (n=8, decay-uncorrected) based on 18F-NFP within 20 min. The radiochemical purity of 18F-FPDuramycin was greater than 99% and the specific activity was greater than (23.7±13.7) GBq·μmol-1 (n=10). Conclusion: 18F-FPDuramycin injection is easy to be prepared with 'two-pot reaction' and is a promising radiotracer used for the clinical and scientific study on positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. (authors)

  3. Computer-aided method for automated selection of optimal imaging plane for measurement of total cerebral blood flow by MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Pang-yu; Bagci, Ahmet Murat; Alperin, Noam

    2009-02-01

    A computer-aided method for finding an optimal imaging plane for simultaneous measurement of the arterial blood inflow through the 4 vessels leading blood to the brain by phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging is presented. The method performance is compared with manual selection by two observers. The skeletons of the 4 vessels for which centerlines are generated are first extracted. Then, a global direction of the relatively less curved internal carotid arteries is calculated to determine the main flow direction. This is then used as a reference direction to identify segments of the vertebral arteries that strongly deviates from the main flow direction. These segments are then used to identify anatomical landmarks for improved consistency of the imaging plane selection. An optimal imaging plane is then identified by finding a plane with the smallest error value, which is defined as the sum of the angles between the plane's normal and the vessel centerline's direction at the location of the intersections. Error values obtained using the automated and the manual methods were then compared using 9 magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) data sets. The automated method considerably outperformed the manual selection. The mean error value with the automated method was significantly lower than the manual method, 0.09+/-0.07 vs. 0.53+/-0.45, respectively (p<.0001, Student's t-test). Reproducibility of repeated measurements was analyzed using Bland and Altman's test, the mean 95% limits of agreements for the automated and manual method were 0.01~0.02 and 0.43~0.55 respectively.

  4. Automated image analysis of alveolar expansion patterns in immature newborn rabbits treated with natural or artificial surfactant.

    OpenAIRE

    Halliday, H; Robertson, B.; Nilsson, R.; Rigaut, J. P.; Grossmann, G.

    1987-01-01

    Automated image analysis of histological lung sections was used to compare the efficacy of an artificial surfactant (dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine + high-density lipoprotein, 10:1) and a natural surfactant (the phospholipid fraction of porcine surfactant, isolated by liquid-gel chromatography in ventilated immature newborn rabbits delivered after 27 days' gestation. Tidal volumes were significantly improved in each group treated with surfactant when compared with controls, but natural surfac...

  5. Development and application of an automated analysis method for individual cerebral perfusion single photon emission tomography images

    CERN Document Server

    Cluckie, A J

    2001-01-01

    Neurological images may be analysed by performing voxel by voxel comparisons with a group of control subject images. An automated, 3D, voxel-based method has been developed for the analysis of individual single photon emission tomography (SPET) scans. Clusters of voxels are identified that represent regions of abnormal radiopharmaceutical uptake. Morphological operators are applied to reduce noise in the clusters, then quantitative estimates of the size and degree of the radiopharmaceutical uptake abnormalities are derived. Statistical inference has been performed using a Monte Carlo method that has not previously been applied to SPET scans, or for the analysis of individual images. This has been validated for group comparisons of SPET scans and for the analysis of an individual image using comparison with a group. Accurate statistical inference was obtained independent of experimental factors such as degrees of freedom, image smoothing and voxel significance level threshold. The analysis method has been eval...

  6. LOCALIZATION OF PALM DORSAL VEIN PATTERN USING IMAGE PROCESSING FOR AUTOMATED INTRA-VENOUS DRUG NEEDLE INSERTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrs. Kavitha. R,

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Vein pattern in palms is a random mesh of interconnected and inter- wining blood vessels. This project is the application of vein detection concept to automate the drug delivery process. It dealswith extracting palm dorsal vein structures, which is a key procedure for selecting the optimal drug needle insertion point. Gray scale images obtained from a low cost IR-webcam are poor in contrast, and usually noisy which make an effective vein segmentation a great challenge. Here a new vein image segmentation method is introduced, based on enhancement techniques resolves the conflict between poor contrast vein image and good quality image segmentation. Gaussian filter is used to remove the high frequency noise in the image. The ultimate goal is to identify venous bifurcations and determine the insertion point for the needle in between their branches.

  7. Development of a semi-automated superimposing image verification system using a template matching algorithm in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To analyze shifts in the isocenter of images, we developed a semi-automated superimposing image-verification system that is capable of automatically quantifying shifts in the isocenter through image analysis with a personal computer (PC). The accuracy and usefulness of this software were examined through a comparison of nine portal images with a simulation image and by comparing nine portal images with a DRR image, using a human pelvic phantom. The difference between the known magnitude of shift and the magnitude of shift detected with this method was analyzed as detection error. When the portal images were compared with the simulation image, the 95% confidence interval (95% CI) of detection errors (mean±SD) was 0.57±0.36 mm (95% CI: 0.49-0.65 mm). When the portal images were compared with the DRR image, the respective figures were 0.68±0.38 mm (95% CI: 0.59-0.77 mm). No significant difference was noted between these two categories of comparison (N.S). The absolute detection error (mean±SD) in all directions was 0.34±0.34 mm for the comparison of portal images with the simulation image and 0.41±0.36 mm for the comparison of portal images with the DRR image. This system seems to be appropriate for verification of the treatment field by improving the accuracy of radiotherapy as a method of computer-assisted landmark recognition during image comparison. (author)

  8. Using dual-energy x-ray imaging to enhance automated lung tumor tracking during real-time adaptive radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menten, Martin J., E-mail: martin.menten@icr.ac.uk; Fast, Martin F.; Nill, Simeon; Oelfke, Uwe, E-mail: uwe.oelfke@icr.ac.uk [Joint Department of Physics at The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London SM2 5NG (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: Real-time, markerless localization of lung tumors with kV imaging is often inhibited by ribs obscuring the tumor and poor soft-tissue contrast. This study investigates the use of dual-energy imaging, which can generate radiographs with reduced bone visibility, to enhance automated lung tumor tracking for real-time adaptive radiotherapy. Methods: kV images of an anthropomorphic breathing chest phantom were experimentally acquired and radiographs of actual lung cancer patients were Monte-Carlo-simulated at three imaging settings: low-energy (70 kVp, 1.5 mAs), high-energy (140 kVp, 2.5 mAs, 1 mm additional tin filtration), and clinical (120 kVp, 0.25 mAs). Regular dual-energy images were calculated by weighted logarithmic subtraction of high- and low-energy images and filter-free dual-energy images were generated from clinical and low-energy radiographs. The weighting factor to calculate the dual-energy images was determined by means of a novel objective score. The usefulness of dual-energy imaging for real-time tracking with an automated template matching algorithm was investigated. Results: Regular dual-energy imaging was able to increase tracking accuracy in left–right images of the anthropomorphic phantom as well as in 7 out of 24 investigated patient cases. Tracking accuracy remained comparable in three cases and decreased in five cases. Filter-free dual-energy imaging was only able to increase accuracy in 2 out of 24 cases. In four cases no change in accuracy was observed and tracking accuracy worsened in nine cases. In 9 out of 24 cases, it was not possible to define a tracking template due to poor soft-tissue contrast regardless of input images. The mean localization errors using clinical, regular dual-energy, and filter-free dual-energy radiographs were 3.85, 3.32, and 5.24 mm, respectively. Tracking success was dependent on tumor position, tumor size, imaging beam angle, and patient size. Conclusions: This study has highlighted the influence of

  9. Using dual-energy x-ray imaging to enhance automated lung tumor tracking during real-time adaptive radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Real-time, markerless localization of lung tumors with kV imaging is often inhibited by ribs obscuring the tumor and poor soft-tissue contrast. This study investigates the use of dual-energy imaging, which can generate radiographs with reduced bone visibility, to enhance automated lung tumor tracking for real-time adaptive radiotherapy. Methods: kV images of an anthropomorphic breathing chest phantom were experimentally acquired and radiographs of actual lung cancer patients were Monte-Carlo-simulated at three imaging settings: low-energy (70 kVp, 1.5 mAs), high-energy (140 kVp, 2.5 mAs, 1 mm additional tin filtration), and clinical (120 kVp, 0.25 mAs). Regular dual-energy images were calculated by weighted logarithmic subtraction of high- and low-energy images and filter-free dual-energy images were generated from clinical and low-energy radiographs. The weighting factor to calculate the dual-energy images was determined by means of a novel objective score. The usefulness of dual-energy imaging for real-time tracking with an automated template matching algorithm was investigated. Results: Regular dual-energy imaging was able to increase tracking accuracy in left–right images of the anthropomorphic phantom as well as in 7 out of 24 investigated patient cases. Tracking accuracy remained comparable in three cases and decreased in five cases. Filter-free dual-energy imaging was only able to increase accuracy in 2 out of 24 cases. In four cases no change in accuracy was observed and tracking accuracy worsened in nine cases. In 9 out of 24 cases, it was not possible to define a tracking template due to poor soft-tissue contrast regardless of input images. The mean localization errors using clinical, regular dual-energy, and filter-free dual-energy radiographs were 3.85, 3.32, and 5.24 mm, respectively. Tracking success was dependent on tumor position, tumor size, imaging beam angle, and patient size. Conclusions: This study has highlighted the influence of

  10. Note: An automated image analysis method for high-throughput classification of surface-bound bacterial cell motions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Simon; Syal, Karan; Tao, Nongjian; Wang, Shaopeng

    2015-12-01

    We present a Single-Cell Motion Characterization System (SiCMoCS) to automatically extract bacterial cell morphological features from microscope images and use those features to automatically classify cell motion for rod shaped motile bacterial cells. In some imaging based studies, bacteria cells need to be attached to the surface for time-lapse observation of cellular processes such as cell membrane-protein interactions and membrane elasticity. These studies often generate large volumes of images. Extracting accurate bacterial cell morphology features from these images is critical for quantitative assessment. Using SiCMoCS, we demonstrated simultaneous and automated motion tracking and classification of hundreds of individual cells in an image sequence of several hundred frames. This is a significant improvement from traditional manual and semi-automated approaches to segmenting bacterial cells based on empirical thresholds, and a first attempt to automatically classify bacterial motion types for motile rod shaped bacterial cells, which enables rapid and quantitative analysis of various types of bacterial motion. PMID:26724085

  11. Note: An automated image analysis method for high-throughput classification of surface-bound bacterial cell motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Simon; Syal, Karan; Tao, Nongjian; Wang, Shaopeng

    2015-12-01

    We present a Single-Cell Motion Characterization System (SiCMoCS) to automatically extract bacterial cell morphological features from microscope images and use those features to automatically classify cell motion for rod shaped motile bacterial cells. In some imaging based studies, bacteria cells need to be attached to the surface for time-lapse observation of cellular processes such as cell membrane-protein interactions and membrane elasticity. These studies often generate large volumes of images. Extracting accurate bacterial cell morphology features from these images is critical for quantitative assessment. Using SiCMoCS, we demonstrated simultaneous and automated motion tracking and classification of hundreds of individual cells in an image sequence of several hundred frames. This is a significant improvement from traditional manual and semi-automated approaches to segmenting bacterial cells based on empirical thresholds, and a first attempt to automatically classify bacterial motion types for motile rod shaped bacterial cells, which enables rapid and quantitative analysis of various types of bacterial motion.

  12. Application of Reflectance Transformation Imaging Technique to Improve Automated Edge Detection in a Fossilized Oyster Reef

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djuricic, Ana; Puttonen, Eetu; Harzhauser, Mathias; Dorninger, Peter; Székely, Balázs; Mandic, Oleg; Nothegger, Clemens; Molnár, Gábor; Pfeifer, Norbert

    2016-04-01

    The world's largest fossilized oyster reef is located in Stetten, Lower Austria excavated during field campaigns of the Natural History Museum Vienna between 2005 and 2008. It is studied in paleontology to learn about change in climate from past events. In order to support this study, a laser scanning and photogrammetric campaign was organized in 2014 for 3D documentation of the large and complex site. The 3D point clouds and high resolution images from this field campaign are visualized by photogrammetric methods in form of digital surface models (DSM, 1 mm resolution) and orthophoto (0.5 mm resolution) to help paleontological interpretation of data. Due to size of the reef, automated analysis techniques are needed to interpret all digital data obtained from the field. One of the key components in successful automation is detection of oyster shell edges. We have tested Reflectance Transformation Imaging (RTI) to visualize the reef data sets for end-users through a cultural heritage viewing interface (RTIViewer). The implementation includes a Lambert shading method to visualize DSMs derived from terrestrial laser scanning using scientific software OPALS. In contrast to shaded RTI no devices consisting of a hardware system with LED lights, or a body to rotate the light source around the object are needed. The gray value for a given shaded pixel is related to the angle between light source and the normal at that position. Brighter values correspond to the slope surfaces facing the light source. Increasing of zenith angle results in internal shading all over the reef surface. In total, oyster reef surface contains 81 DSMs with 3 m x 2 m each. Their surface was illuminated by moving the virtual sun every 30 degrees (12 azimuth angles from 20-350) and every 20 degrees (4 zenith angles from 20-80). This technique provides paleontologists an interactive approach to virtually inspect the oyster reef, and to interpret the shell surface by changing the light source direction

  13. Towards an automated analysis of video-microscopy images of fungal morphogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diéguez-Uribeondo, Javier

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Fungal morphogenesis is an exciting field of cell biology and several mathematical models have been developed to describe it. These models require experimental evidences to be corroborated and, therefore, there is a continuous search for new microscopy and image analysis techniques. In this work, we have used a Canny-edge-detector based technique to automate the generation of hyphal profiles and calculation of morphogenetic parameters such as diameter, elongation rates and hyphoid fitness. The results show that the data obtained with this technique are similar to published data generated with manualbased tracing techniques and that have been carried out on the same species or genus. Thus, we show that application of edge detector-based technique to hyphal growth represents an efficient and accurate method to study hyphal morphogenesis. This represents the first step towards an automated analysis of videomicroscopy images of fungal morphogenesis.La morfogénesis de los hongos es un área de estudio de gran relevancia en la biología celular y en la que se han desarrollado varios modelos matemáticos. Los modelos matemáticos de procesos biológicos precisan de pruebas experimentales que apoyen y corroboren las predicciones teóricas y, por este motivo, existe una búsqueda continua de nuevas técnicas de microscopía y análisis de imágenes para su aplicación en el estudio del crecimiento celular. En este trabajo hemos utilizado una técnica basada en un detector de contornos llamado “Canny-edge-detectorâ€� con el objetivo de automatizar la generación de perfiles de hifas y el cálculo de parámetros morfogenéticos, tales como: el diámetro, la velocidad de elongación y el ajuste con el perfil hifoide, es decir, el perfil teórico de las hifas de los hongos. Los resultados obtenidos son similares a los datos publicados a partir de técnicas manuales de trazado de contornos, generados en la misma especie y género. De esta manera

  14. LeafJ: an ImageJ plugin for semi-automated leaf shape measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloof, Julin N; Nozue, Kazunari; Mumbach, Maxwell R; Palmer, Christine M

    2013-01-01

    High throughput phenotyping (phenomics) is a powerful tool for linking genes to their functions (see review and recent examples). Leaves are the primary photosynthetic organ, and their size and shape vary developmentally and environmentally within a plant. For these reasons studies on leaf morphology require measurement of multiple parameters from numerous leaves, which is best done by semi-automated phenomics tools. Canopy shade is an important environmental cue that affects plant architecture and life history; the suite of responses is collectively called the shade avoidance syndrome (SAS). Among SAS responses, shade induced leaf petiole elongation and changes in blade area are particularly useful as indices. To date, leaf shape programs (e.g. SHAPE, LAMINA, LeafAnalyzer, LEAFPROCESSOR) can measure leaf outlines and categorize leaf shapes, but can not output petiole length. Lack of large-scale measurement systems of leaf petioles has inhibited phenomics approaches to SAS research. In this paper, we describe a newly developed ImageJ plugin, called LeafJ, which can rapidly measure petiole length and leaf blade parameters of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. For the occasional leaf that required manual correction of the petiole/leaf blade boundary we used a touch-screen tablet. Further, leaf cell shape and leaf cell numbers are important determinants of leaf size. Separate from LeafJ we also present a protocol for using a touch-screen tablet for measuring cell shape, area, and size. Our leaf trait measurement system is not limited to shade-avoidance research and will accelerate leaf phenotyping of many mutants and screening plants by leaf phenotyping. PMID:23380664

  15. Automated Thermal Image Processing for Detection and Classification of Birds and Bats - FY2012 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duberstein, Corey A.; Matzner, Shari; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Virden, Daniel J.; Myers, Joshua R.; Maxwell, Adam R.

    2012-09-01

    Surveying wildlife at risk from offshore wind energy development is difficult and expensive. Infrared video can be used to record birds and bats that pass through the camera view, but it is also time consuming and expensive to review video and determine what was recorded. We proposed to conduct algorithm and software development to identify and to differentiate thermally detected targets of interest that would allow automated processing of thermal image data to enumerate birds, bats, and insects. During FY2012 we developed computer code within MATLAB to identify objects recorded in video and extract attribute information that describes the objects recorded. We tested the efficiency of track identification using observer-based counts of tracks within segments of sample video. We examined object attributes, modeled the effects of random variability on attributes, and produced data smoothing techniques to limit random variation within attribute data. We also began drafting and testing methodology to identify objects recorded on video. We also recorded approximately 10 hours of infrared video of various marine birds, passerine birds, and bats near the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) at Sequim, Washington. A total of 6 hours of bird video was captured overlooking Sequim Bay over a series of weeks. An additional 2 hours of video of birds was also captured during two weeks overlooking Dungeness Bay within the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Bats and passerine birds (swallows) were also recorded at dusk on the MSL campus during nine evenings. An observer noted the identity of objects viewed through the camera concurrently with recording. These video files will provide the information necessary to produce and test software developed during FY2013. The annotation will also form the basis for creation of a method to reliably identify recorded objects.

  16. Automated 3D quantitative assessment and measurement of alpha angles from the femoral head-neck junction using MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To develop an automated approach for 3D quantitative assessment and measurement of alpha angles from the femoral head-neck (FHN) junction using bone models derived from magnetic resonance (MR) images of the hip joint.Bilateral MR images of the hip joints were acquired from 30 male volunteers (healthy active individuals and high-performance athletes, aged 18–49 years) using a water-excited 3D dual echo steady state (DESS) sequence. In a subset of these subjects (18 water-polo players), additional True Fast Imaging with Steady-state Precession (TrueFISP) images were acquired from the right hip joint. For both MR image sets, an active shape model based algorithm was used to generate automated 3D bone reconstructions of the proximal femur. Subsequently, a local coordinate system of the femur was constructed to compute a 2D shape map to project femoral head sphericity for calculation of alpha angles around the FHN junction. To evaluate automated alpha angle measures, manual analyses were performed on anterosuperior and anterior radial MR slices from the FHN junction that were automatically reformatted using the constructed coordinate system.High intra- and inter-rater reliability (intra-class correlation coefficients  >  0.95) was found for manual alpha angle measurements from the auto-extracted anterosuperior and anterior radial slices. Strong correlations were observed between manual and automatic measures of alpha angles for anterosuperior (r  =  0.84) and anterior (r  =  0.92) FHN positions. For matched DESS and TrueFISP images, there were no significant differences between automated alpha angle measures obtained from the upper anterior quadrant of the FHN junction (two-way repeated measures ANOVA, F  <  0.01, p  =  0.98).Our automatic 3D method analysed MR images of the hip joints to generate alpha angle measures around the FHN junction circumference with very good reliability and reproducibility. This work has the

  17. Automation of a high-speed imaging setup for differential viscosity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the automation of a setup previously used to assess the viscosity of pleural effusion samples and discriminate between transudates and exudates, an important first step in clinical diagnostics. The presented automation includes the design, testing, and characterization of a vacuum-actuated loading station that handles the 2 mm glass spheres used as sensors, as well as the engineering of electronic Printed Circuit Board (PCB) incorporating a microcontroller and their synchronization with a commercial high-speed camera operating at 10 000 fps. The hereby work therefore focuses on the instrumentation-related automation efforts as the general method and clinical application have been reported earlier [Hurth et al., J. Appl. Phys. 110, 034701 (2011)]. In addition, we validate the performance of the automated setup with the calibration for viscosity measurements using water/glycerol standard solutions and the determination of the viscosity of an “unknown” solution of hydroxyethyl cellulose

  18. SU-C-304-04: A Compact Modular Computational Platform for Automated On-Board Imager Quality Assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Traditionally, the assessment of X-ray tube output and detector positioning accuracy of on-board imagers (OBI) has been performed manually and subjectively with rulers and dosimeters, and typically takes hours to complete. In this study, we have designed a compact modular computational platform to automatically analyze OBI images acquired with in-house designed phantoms as an efficient and robust surrogate. Methods: The platform was developed as an integrated and automated image analysis-based platform using MATLAB for easy modification and maintenance. Given a set of images acquired with the in-house designed phantoms, the X-ray output accuracy was examined via cross-validation of the uniqueness and integration minimization of important image quality assessment metrics, while machine geometric and positioning accuracy were validated by utilizing pattern-recognition based image analysis techniques. Results: The platform input was a set of images of an in-house designed phantom. The total processing time is about 1–2 minutes. Based on the data acquired from three Varian Truebeam machines over the course of 3 months, the designed test validation strategy achieved higher accuracy than traditional methods. The kVp output accuracy can be verified within +/−2 kVp, the exposure accuracy within 2%, and exposure linearity with a coefficient of variation (CV) of 0.1. Sub-millimeter position accuracy was achieved for the lateral and longitudinal positioning tests, while vertical positioning accuracy within +/−2 mm was achieved. Conclusion: This new platform delivers to the radiotherapy field an automated, efficient, and stable image analysis-based procedure, for the first time, acting as a surrogate for traditional tests for LINAC OBI systems. It has great potential to facilitate OBI quality assurance (QA) with the assistance of advanced image processing techniques. In addition, it provides flexible integration of additional tests for expediting other OBI

  19. SU-C-304-04: A Compact Modular Computational Platform for Automated On-Board Imager Quality Assurance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolly, S [Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO (United States); University of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Cai, B; Chen, H; Anastasio, M; Sun, B; Yaddanapudi, S; Noel, C; Goddu, S; Mutic, S; Li, H [Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO (United States); Tan, J [UTSouthwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Traditionally, the assessment of X-ray tube output and detector positioning accuracy of on-board imagers (OBI) has been performed manually and subjectively with rulers and dosimeters, and typically takes hours to complete. In this study, we have designed a compact modular computational platform to automatically analyze OBI images acquired with in-house designed phantoms as an efficient and robust surrogate. Methods: The platform was developed as an integrated and automated image analysis-based platform using MATLAB for easy modification and maintenance. Given a set of images acquired with the in-house designed phantoms, the X-ray output accuracy was examined via cross-validation of the uniqueness and integration minimization of important image quality assessment metrics, while machine geometric and positioning accuracy were validated by utilizing pattern-recognition based image analysis techniques. Results: The platform input was a set of images of an in-house designed phantom. The total processing time is about 1–2 minutes. Based on the data acquired from three Varian Truebeam machines over the course of 3 months, the designed test validation strategy achieved higher accuracy than traditional methods. The kVp output accuracy can be verified within +/−2 kVp, the exposure accuracy within 2%, and exposure linearity with a coefficient of variation (CV) of 0.1. Sub-millimeter position accuracy was achieved for the lateral and longitudinal positioning tests, while vertical positioning accuracy within +/−2 mm was achieved. Conclusion: This new platform delivers to the radiotherapy field an automated, efficient, and stable image analysis-based procedure, for the first time, acting as a surrogate for traditional tests for LINAC OBI systems. It has great potential to facilitate OBI quality assurance (QA) with the assistance of advanced image processing techniques. In addition, it provides flexible integration of additional tests for expediting other OBI

  20. Experimental Assessment of Mouse Sociability Using an Automated Image Processing Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varghese, Frency; Burket, Jessica A; Benson, Andrew D; Deutsch, Stephen I; Zemlin, Christian W

    2016-01-01

    Mouse is the preferred model organism for testing drugs designed to increase sociability. We present a method to quantify mouse sociability in which the test mouse is placed in a standardized apparatus and relevant behaviors are assessed in three different sessions (called session I, II, and III). The apparatus has three compartments (see Figure 1), the left and right compartments contain an inverted cup which can house a mouse (called "stimulus mouse"). In session I, the test mouse is placed in the cage and its mobility is characterized by the number of transitions made between compartments. In session II, a stimulus mouse is placed under one of the inverted cups and the sociability of the test mouse is quantified by the amounts of time it spends near the cup containing the enclosed stimulus mouse vs. the empty inverted cup. In session III, the inverted cups are removed and both mice interact freely. The sociability of the test mouse in session III is quantified by the number of social approaches it makes toward the stimulus mouse and by the number of times it avoids a social approach by the stimulus mouse. The automated evaluation of the movie detects the nose of the test mouse, which allows the determination of all described sociability measures in session I and II (in session III, approaches are identified automatically but classified manually). To find the nose, the image of an empty cage is digitally subtracted from each frame of the movie and the resulting image is binarized to identify the mouse pixels. The mouse tail is automatically removed and the two most distant points of the remaining mouse are determined; these are close to nose and base of tail. By analyzing the motion of the mouse and using continuity arguments, the nose is identified. Figure 1. Assessment of Sociability During 3 sessions. Session I (top): Acclimation of test mouse to the cage. Session II (middle): Test mouse moving freely in the cage while the stimulus mouse is enclosed in an

  1. Automated 3D quantitative assessment and measurement of alpha angles from the femoral head-neck junction using MR imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ying; Fripp, Jurgen; Chandra, Shekhar S.; Walker, Duncan; Crozier, Stuart; Engstrom, Craig

    2015-10-01

    To develop an automated approach for 3D quantitative assessment and measurement of alpha angles from the femoral head-neck (FHN) junction using bone models derived from magnetic resonance (MR) images of the hip joint. Bilateral MR images of the hip joints were acquired from 30 male volunteers (healthy active individuals and high-performance athletes, aged 18-49 years) using a water-excited 3D dual echo steady state (DESS) sequence. In a subset of these subjects (18 water-polo players), additional True Fast Imaging with Steady-state Precession (TrueFISP) images were acquired from the right hip joint. For both MR image sets, an active shape model based algorithm was used to generate automated 3D bone reconstructions of the proximal femur. Subsequently, a local coordinate system of the femur was constructed to compute a 2D shape map to project femoral head sphericity for calculation of alpha angles around the FHN junction. To evaluate automated alpha angle measures, manual analyses were performed on anterosuperior and anterior radial MR slices from the FHN junction that were automatically reformatted using the constructed coordinate system. High intra- and inter-rater reliability (intra-class correlation coefficients  >  0.95) was found for manual alpha angle measurements from the auto-extracted anterosuperior and anterior radial slices. Strong correlations were observed between manual and automatic measures of alpha angles for anterosuperior (r  =  0.84) and anterior (r  =  0.92) FHN positions. For matched DESS and TrueFISP images, there were no significant differences between automated alpha angle measures obtained from the upper anterior quadrant of the FHN junction (two-way repeated measures ANOVA, F  angle measures around the FHN junction circumference with very good reliability and reproducibility. This work has the potential to improve analyses of cam-type lesions of the FHN junction for large-scale morphometric and clinical MR

  2. Optimization of automated radiosynthesis of [18F]AV-45: a new PET imaging agent for Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ) aggregates in the brain is linked to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Imaging probes targeting these Aβ aggregates in the brain may provide a useful tool to facilitate the diagnosis of AD. Recently, [18F]AV-45 ([18F]5) demonstrated high binding to the Aβ aggregates in AD patients. To improve the availability of this agent for widespread clinical application, a rapid, fully automated, high-yield, cGMP-compliant radiosynthesis was necessary for production of this probe. We report herein an optimal [18F]fluorination, de-protection condition and fully automated radiosynthesis of [18F]AV-45 ([18F]5) on a radiosynthesis module (BNU F-A2). Methods: The preparation of [18F]AV-45 ([18F]5) was evaluated under different conditions, specifically by employing different precursors (-OTs and -Br as the leaving group), reagents (K222/K2CO3 vs. tributylammonium bicarbonate) and deprotection in different acids. With optimized conditions from these experiments, the automated synthesis of [18F]AV-45 ([18F]5) was accomplished by using a computer-programmed, standard operating procedure, and was purified on an on-line solid-phase cartridge (Oasis HLB). Results: The optimized reaction conditions were successfully implemented to an automated nucleophilic fluorination module. The radiochemical purity of [18F]AV-45 ([18F]5) was >95%, and the automated synthesis yield was 33.6±5.2% (no decay corrected, n=4), 50.1±7.9% (decay corrected) in 50 min at a quantity level of 10-100 mCi (370-3700 MBq). Autoradiography studies of [18F]AV-45 ([18F]5) using postmortem AD brain and Tg mouse brain sections in the presence of different concentration of 'cold' AV-136 showed a relatively low inhibition of in vitro binding of [18F]AV-45 ([18F]5) to the Aβ plaques (IC50=1-4 μM, a concentration several order of magnitude higher than the expected pseudo carrier concentration in the brain). Conclusions: Solid-phase extraction purification and

  3. An automated four-point scale scoring of segmental wall motion in echocardiography using quantified parametric images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this paper is to develop an automated method which operates on echocardiographic dynamic loops for classifying the left ventricular regional wall motion (RWM) in a four-point scale. A non-selected group of 37 patients (2 and 4 chamber views) was studied. Each view was segmented according to the standardized segmentation using three manually positioned anatomical landmarks (the apex and the angles of the mitral annulus). The segmented data were analyzed by two independent experienced echocardiographists and the consensual RWM scores were used as a reference for comparisons. A fast and automatic parametric imaging method was used to compute and display as static color-coded parametric images both temporal and motion information contained in left ventricular dynamic echocardiograms. The amplitude and time parametric images were provided to a cardiologist for visual analysis of RWM and used for RWM quantification. A cross-validation method was applied to the segmental quantitative indices for classifying RWM in a four-point scale. A total of 518 segments were analyzed. Comparison between visual interpretation of parametric images and the reference reading resulted in an absolute agreement (Aa) of 66% and a relative agreement (Ra) of 96% and kappa (κ) coefficient of 0.61. Comparison of the automated RWM scoring against the same reference provided Aa = 64%, Ra = 96% and κ = 0.64 on the validation subset. Finally, linear regression analysis between the global quantitative index and global reference scores as well as ejection fraction resulted in correlations of 0.85 and 0.79. A new automated four-point scale scoring of RWM was developed and tested in a non-selected database. Its comparison against a consensual visual reading of dynamic echocardiograms showed its ability to classify RWM abnormalities.

  4. Automated image-based colon cleansing for laxative-free CT colonography computer-aided polyp detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance of a computer-aided detection (CAD) system for detecting colonic polyps at noncathartic computed tomography colonography (CTC) in conjunction with an automated image-based colon cleansing algorithm. Methods: An automated colon cleansing algorithm was designed to detect and subtract tagged-stool, accounting for heterogeneity and poor tagging, to be used in conjunction with a colon CAD system. The method is locally adaptive and combines intensity, shape, and texture analysis with probabilistic optimization. CTC data from cathartic-free bowel preparation were acquired for testing and training the parameters. Patients underwent various colonic preparations with barium or Gastroview in divided doses over 48 h before scanning. No laxatives were administered and no dietary modifications were required. Cases were selected from a polyp-enriched cohort and included scans in which at least 90% of the solid stool was visually estimated to be tagged and each colonic segment was distended in either the prone or supine view. The CAD system was run comparatively with and without the stool subtraction algorithm. Results: The dataset comprised 38 CTC scans from prone and/or supine scans of 19 patients containing 44 polyps larger than 10 mm (22 unique polyps, if matched between prone and supine scans). The results are robust on fine details around folds, thin-stool linings on the colonic wall, near polyps and in large fluid/stool pools. The sensitivity of the CAD system is 70.5% per polyp at a rate of 5.75 false positives/scan without using the stool subtraction module. This detection improved significantly (p = 0.009) after automated colon cleansing on cathartic-free data to 86.4% true positive rate at 5.75 false positives/scan. Conclusions: An automated image-based colon cleansing algorithm designed to overcome the challenges of the noncathartic colon significantly improves the sensitivity of colon CAD by approximately 15%.

  5. Development of automated segmentation method for the posterior portion of the temporal lobe on coronal MR images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brain MRI is an important method for examining the diseases caused by various cerebral pathologies, and the measurement of temporal lobe volume is useful for identifying dementia and temporal lobe abnormalities. However, no segmentation algorithm for the temporal lobe on coronal MR images has been established. Such an algorithm is needed because the shape of the temporal lobe on coronal images varies from area to area. The purpose of this research was to develop a segmentation method for the posterior portion of the temporal lobe on coronal MR images. The subjects were 11 normal patients, whose coronal T1-weighted images were selected for this study. The preprocessing algorithm for segmentation consists of smoothing, binarization, and thinning. The first step of the segmentation process consists of recognition techniques for the temporal lobe region on thinning images. The next step is distance transformation on identified thinning images. Finally, the temporal lobe was segmented by using the original images and distance transformation images and employing the newly developed algorithm. The rate of accuracy of automated recognition was over 74% for all cases, while the average rate of accuracy was 83.2±4.0%. These results suggest that this segmentation method can clearly segment the temporal lobe and has potential for clinical use. Based on this study, although it included only 11 normal patients, we have started applying this segmentation method to many patients, with or without temporal lobe disease. (author)

  6. A quality assurance framework for the fully automated and objective evaluation of image quality in cone-beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Thousands of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanners for vascular, maxillofacial, neurological, and body imaging are in clinical use today, but there is no consensus on uniform acceptance and constancy testing for image quality (IQ) and dose yet. The authors developed a quality assurance (QA) framework for fully automated and time-efficient performance evaluation of these systems. In addition, the dependence of objective Fourier-based IQ metrics on direction and position in 3D volumes was investigated for CBCT. Methods: The authors designed a dedicated QA phantom 10 cm in length consisting of five compartments, each with a diameter of 10 cm, and an optional extension ring 16 cm in diameter. A homogeneous section of water-equivalent material allows measuring CT value accuracy, image noise and uniformity, and multidimensional global and local noise power spectra (NPS). For the quantitative determination of 3D high-contrast spatial resolution, the modulation transfer function (MTF) of centrally and peripherally positioned aluminum spheres was computed from edge profiles. Additional in-plane and axial resolution patterns were used to assess resolution qualitatively. The characterization of low-contrast detectability as well as CT value linearity and artifact behavior was tested by utilizing sections with soft-tissue-equivalent and metallic inserts. For an automated QA procedure, a phantom detection algorithm was implemented. All tests used in the dedicated QA program were initially verified in simulation studies and experimentally confirmed on a clinical dental CBCT system. Results: The automated IQ evaluation of volume data sets of the dental CBCT system was achieved with the proposed phantom requiring only one scan for the determination of all desired parameters. Typically, less than 5 min were needed for phantom set-up, scanning, and data analysis. Quantitative evaluation of system performance over time by comparison to previous examinations was also

  7. Improving the image quality of contrast-enhanced MR angiography by automated image registration: A prospective study in peripheral arterial disease of the lower extremities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: If a patient has moved during digital subtraction angiography (DSA), manual pixel shift can improve the image quality. This study investigated whether such image registration can also improve the quality of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in patients with peripheral arterial disease of the lower extremities. Materials and methods: 404 leg MRAs of patients likely to have peripheral artery disease were included in this prospective study. The standard non-registered MRAs were compared to automatically linear, affine and warp registered MRAs by four image quality parameters, including the vessel detection probability (VDP) in maximum intensity projection (MIP) images and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR). The different registration types were compared by analysis of variance. Results: All studied image quality parameters showed similar trends. Generally, registration improved the leg MRA quality significantly (P < 0.05). The 12% of lower legs with a body shift of 1 mm or more showed the highest gain in image quality when using linear registration instead of no registration, with an average VDP gain of 20-49%. Warp registration improved the image quality slightly further. Conclusion: Automated image registration can improve the MRA image quality especially in the lower legs, which is comparable to the effect of pixel shift in DSA.

  8. Different approaches to synovial membrane volume determination by magnetic resonance imaging: manual versus automated segmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel

    1997-01-01

    methodology for volume determinations (maximal error 6.3%). Preceded by the determination of reproducibility and the optimal threshold at the available MR unit, automated 'threshold' segmentation appears to be acceptable when changes rather than absolute values of synovial membrane volumes are most important......, osteoarthritis (OA) 16] and 17 RA wrists were examined. At enhancement thresholds between 30 and 60%, the automated volumes (Syn(x%)) were highly significantly correlated to manual volumes (SynMan) (knees: rho = 0.78-0.91, P < 10(-5) to < 10(-9); wrists: rho = 0.87-0.95, P < 10(-4) to < 10(-6)). The absolute...... values of the automated estimates were extremely dependent on the threshold chosen. At the optimal threshold of 45%, the median numerical difference from SynMan was 7 ml (17%) in knees and 2 ml (25%) in wrists. At this threshold, the difference was not related to diagnosis, clinical inflammation or...

  9. Automated grading of left ventricular segmental wall motion by an artificial neural network using color kinesis images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.O. Murta Jr.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study describes an auxiliary tool in the diagnosis of left ventricular (LV segmental wall motion (WM abnormalities based on color-coded echocardiographic WM images. An artificial neural network (ANN was developed and validated for grading LV segmental WM using data from color kinesis (CK images, a technique developed to display the timing and magnitude of global and regional WM in real time. We evaluated 21 normal subjects and 20 patients with LVWM abnormalities revealed by two-dimensional echocardiography. CK images were obtained in two sets of viewing planes. A method was developed to analyze CK images, providing quantitation of fractional area change in each of the 16 LV segments. Two experienced observers analyzed LVWM from two-dimensional images and scored them as: 1 normal, 2 mild hypokinesia, 3 moderate hypokinesia, 4 severe hypokinesia, 5 akinesia, and 6 dyskinesia. Based on expert analysis of 10 normal subjects and 10 patients, we trained a multilayer perceptron ANN using a back-propagation algorithm to provide automated grading of LVWM, and this ANN was then tested in the remaining subjects. Excellent concordance between expert and ANN analysis was shown by ROC curve analysis, with measured area under the curve of 0.975. An excellent correlation was also obtained for global LV segmental WM index by expert and ANN analysis (R² = 0.99. In conclusion, ANN showed high accuracy for automated semi-quantitative grading of WM based on CK images. This technique can be an important aid, improving diagnostic accuracy and reducing inter-observer variability in scoring segmental LVWM.

  10. Development of an automated method for the detection of chronic lacunar infarct regions in brain MR images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of our study is to develop an algorithm that would enable the automated detection of lacunar infarct on T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images. Automated identification of the lacunar infarct regions is not only useful in assisting radiologists to detect lacunar infarcts as a computer-aided detection (CAD) system but is also beneficial in preventing the occurrence of cerebral apoplexy in high-risk patients. The lacunar infarct regions are classified into the following two types for detection: ''isolated lacunar infarct regions'' and ''lacunar infarct regions adjacent to hyperintensive structures.'' The detection of isolated lacunar infarct regions was based on the multiple-phase binarization (MPB) method. Moreover, to detect lacunar infarct regions adjacent to hyperintensive structures, we used a morphological opening processing and a subtraction technique between images produced using two types of circular structuring elements. Thereafter, candidate regions were selected based on three features -area, circularity, and gravity center. Two methods were applied to the detected candidates for eliminating false positives (FPs). The first method involved eliminating FPs that occurred along the periphery of the brain using the region-growing technique. The second method, the multi-circular regions difference method (MCRDM), was based on the comparison between the mean pixel values in a series of double circles on a T1-weighted image. A training dataset comprising 20 lacunar infarct cases was used to adjust the parameters. In addition, 673 MR images from 80 cases were used for testing the performance of our method; the sensitivity and specificity were 90.1% and 30.0% with 1.7 FPs per image, respectively. The results indicated that our CAD system for the automatic detection of lacunar infarct on MR images was effective. (author)

  11. Accuracy of patient specific organ-dose estimates obtained using an automated image segmentation algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilat-Schmidt, Taly; Wang, Adam; Coradi, Thomas; Haas, Benjamin; Star-Lack, Josh

    2016-03-01

    The overall goal of this work is to develop a rapid, accurate and fully automated software tool to estimate patient-specific organ doses from computed tomography (CT) scans using a deterministic Boltzmann Transport Equation solver and automated CT segmentation algorithms. This work quantified the accuracy of organ dose estimates obtained by an automated segmentation algorithm. The investigated algorithm uses a combination of feature-based and atlas-based methods. A multiatlas approach was also investigated. We hypothesize that the auto-segmentation algorithm is sufficiently accurate to provide organ dose estimates since random errors at the organ boundaries will average out when computing the total organ dose. To test this hypothesis, twenty head-neck CT scans were expertly segmented into nine regions. A leave-one-out validation study was performed, where every case was automatically segmented with each of the remaining cases used as the expert atlas, resulting in nineteen automated segmentations for each of the twenty datasets. The segmented regions were applied to gold-standard Monte Carlo dose maps to estimate mean and peak organ doses. The results demonstrated that the fully automated segmentation algorithm estimated the mean organ dose to within 10% of the expert segmentation for regions other than the spinal canal, with median error for each organ region below 2%. In the spinal canal region, the median error was 7% across all data sets and atlases, with a maximum error of 20%. The error in peak organ dose was below 10% for all regions, with a median error below 4% for all organ regions. The multiple-case atlas reduced the variation in the dose estimates and additional improvements may be possible with more robust multi-atlas approaches. Overall, the results support potential feasibility of an automated segmentation algorithm to provide accurate organ dose estimates.

  12. An expert diagnostic system based on neural networks and image analysis techniques in the field of automated cytogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beksaç, M S; Eskiizmirliler, S; Cakar, A N; Erkmen, A M; Dağdeviren, A; Lundsteen, C

    1996-03-01

    In this study, we introduce an expert system for intelligent chromosome recognition and classification based on artificial neural networks (ANN) and features obtained by automated image analysis techniques. A microscope equipped with a CCTV camera, integrated with an IBM-PC compatible computer environment including a frame grabber, is used for image data acquisition. Features of the chromosomes are obtained directly from the digital chromosome images. Two new algorithms for automated object detection and object skeletonizing constitute the basis of the feature extraction phase which constructs the components of the input vector to the ANN part of the system. This first version of our intelligent diagnostic system uses a trained unsupervised neural network structure and an original rule-based classification algorithm to find a karyotyped form of randomly distributed chromosomes over a complete metaphase. We investigate the effects of network parameters on the classification performance and discuss the adaptability and flexibility of the neural system in order to reach a structure giving an output including information about both structural and numerical abnormalities. Moreover, the classification performances of neural and rule-based system are compared for each class of chromosome. PMID:8705397

  13. Large-scale automated image analysis for computational profiling of brain tissue surrounding implanted neuroprosthetic devices using Python

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Rey-Villamizar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we describe use of Python for large-scale automated server-based bio-image analysis in FARSIGHT, a free and open-source toolkit of image analysis methods for quantitative studies of complex and dynamic tissue microenvironments imaged by modern optical microscopes including confocal, multi-spectral, multi-photon, and time-lapse systems. The core FARSIGHT modules for image segmentation, feature extraction, tracking, and machine learning are written in C++, leveraging widely used libraries including ITK, VTK, Boost, and Qt. For solving complex image analysis task, these modules must be combined into scripts using Python. As a concrete example, we consider the problem of analyzing 3-D multi-spectral brain tissue images surrounding implanted neuroprosthetic devices, acquired using high-throughput multi-spectral spinning disk step-and-repeat confocal microscopy. The resulting images typically contain 5 fluorescent channels, 6,000$\\times$10,000$\\times$500 voxels with 16 bits/voxel, implying image sizes exceeding 250GB. These images must be mosaicked, pre-processed to overcome imaging artifacts, and segmented to enable cellular-scale feature extraction. The features are used to identify cell types, and perform large-scale analytics for identifying spatial distributions of specific cell types relative to the device. Python was used to build a server-based script (Dell 910 PowerEdge servers with 4 sockets/server with 10 cores each, 2 threads per core and 1TB of RAM running on Red Hat Enterprise Linux linked to a RAID 5 SAN capable of routinely handling image datasets at this scale and performing all these processing steps in a collaborative multi-user multi-platform environment consisting. Our Python script enables efficient data storage and movement between compute and storage servers, logging all processing steps, and performs full multi-threaded execution of all codes, including open and closed-source third party libraries.

  14. Automated collection of imaging and phenotypic data to centralized and distributed data repositories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Margaret D; Wood, Dylan; Miller, Brittny; Kelly, Ross; Landis, Drew; Courtney, William; Wang, Runtang; Turner, Jessica A; Calhoun, Vince D

    2014-01-01

    Accurate data collection at the ground level is vital to the integrity of neuroimaging research. Similarly important is the ability to connect and curate data in order to make it meaningful and sharable with other investigators. Collecting data, especially with several different modalities, can be time consuming and expensive. These issues have driven the development of automated collection of neuroimaging and clinical assessment data within COINS (Collaborative Informatics and Neuroimaging Suite). COINS is an end-to-end data management system. It provides a comprehensive platform for data collection, management, secure storage, and flexible data retrieval (Bockholt et al., 2010; Scott et al., 2011). It was initially developed for the investigators at the Mind Research Network (MRN), but is now available to neuroimaging institutions worldwide. Self Assessment (SA) is an application embedded in the Assessment Manager (ASMT) tool in COINS. It is an innovative tool that allows participants to fill out assessments via the web-based Participant Portal. It eliminates the need for paper collection and data entry by allowing participants to submit their assessments directly to COINS. Instruments (surveys) are created through ASMT and include many unique question types and associated SA features that can be implemented to help the flow of assessment administration. SA provides an instrument queuing system with an easy-to-use drag and drop interface for research staff to set up participants' queues. After a queue has been created for the participant, they can access the Participant Portal via the internet to fill out their assessments. This allows them the flexibility to participate from home, a library, on site, etc. The collected data is stored in a PostgresSQL database at MRN. This data is only accessible by users that have explicit permission to access the data through their COINS user accounts and access to MRN network. This allows for high volume data collection and

  15. Automated extraction of skeletal muscles from torso X-ray CT images based on anatomical positional information between skeleton and skeletal muscles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose an automated approach to extract skeletal muscles in torso X-ray CT images. It transforms 3-D anatomy into 2-D stretched images for simplifying anatomical relationships to getting pathognomonical points. The experimental results show that the proposed method was effective to extract skeletal muscles. (author)

  16. Time efficiency and diagnostic accuracy of new automated myocardial perfusion analysis software in 320-row CT cardiac imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We aimed to evaluate the time efficiency and diagnostic accuracy of automated myocardial computed tomography perfusion (CTP) image analysis software. 320-row CTP was performed in 30 patients, and analyses were conducted independently by three different blinded readers by the use of two recent software releases (version 4.6 and novel version 4.71GR001, Toshiba, Tokyo, Japan). Analysis times were compared, and automated epi- and endocardial contour detection was subjectively rated in five categories (excellent, good, fair, poor and very poor). As semi-quantitative perfusion parameters, myocardial attenuation and transmural perfusion ratio (TPR) were calculated for each myocardial segment and agreement was tested by using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Conventional coronary angiography served as reference standard. The analysis time was significantly reduced with the novel automated software version as compared with the former release (Reader 1: 43:08 ± 11:39 min vs. 09:47 ± 04:51 min, Reader 2: 42:07 ± 06:44 min vs. 09:42 ± 02:50 min and Reader 3: 21:38 ± 3:44 min vs. 07:34 ± 02:12 min; p < 0.001 for all). Epi- and endocardial contour detection for the novel software was rated to be significantly better (p < 0.001) than with the former software. ICCs demonstrated strong agreement (≥ 0.75) for myocardial attenuation in 93% and for TPR in 82%. Diagnostic accuracy for the two software versions was not significantly different (p 0.169) as compared with conventional coronary angiography. The novel automated CTP analysis software offers enhanced time efficiency with an improvement by a factor of about four, while maintaining diagnostic accuracy.

  17. SU-E-T-497: Semi-Automated in Vivo Radiochromic Film Dosimetry Using a Novel Image Processing Algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To validate an automated image processing algorithm designed to detect the center of radiochromic film used for in vivo film dosimetry against the current gold standard of manual selection. Methods: An image processing algorithm was developed to automatically select the region of interest (ROI) in *.tiff images that contain multiple pieces of radiochromic film (0.5x1.3cm2). After a user has linked a calibration file to the processing algorithm and selected a *.tiff file for processing, an ROI is automatically detected for all films by a combination of thresholding and erosion, which removes edges and any additional markings for orientation. Calibration is applied to the mean pixel values from the ROIs and a *.tiff image is output displaying the original image with an overlay of the ROIs and the measured doses. Validation of the algorithm was determined by comparing in vivo dose determined using the current gold standard (manually drawn ROIs) versus automated ROIs for n=420 scanned films. Bland-Altman analysis, paired t-test, and linear regression were performed to demonstrate agreement between the processes. Results: The measured doses ranged from 0.2-886.6cGy. Bland-Altman analysis of the two techniques (automatic minus manual) revealed a bias of -0.28cGy and a 95% confidence interval of (5.5cGy,-6.1cGy). These values demonstrate excellent agreement between the two techniques. Paired t-test results showed no statistical differences between the two techniques, p=0.98. Linear regression with a forced zero intercept demonstrated that Automatic=0.997*Manual, with a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.999. The minimal differences between the two techniques may be explained by the fact that the hand drawn ROIs were not identical to the automatically selected ones. The average processing time was 6.7seconds in Matlab on an IntelCore2Duo processor. Conclusion: An automated image processing algorithm has been developed and validated, which will help minimize user

  18. Automated Scoring of Chromogenic Media for Detection of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus by Use of WASPLab Image Analysis Software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faron, Matthew L; Buchan, Blake W; Vismara, Chiara; Lacchini, Carla; Bielli, Alessandra; Gesu, Giovanni; Liebregts, Theo; van Bree, Anita; Jansz, Arjan; Soucy, Genevieve; Korver, John; Ledeboer, Nathan A

    2016-03-01

    Recently, systems have been developed to create total laboratory automation for clinical microbiology. These systems allow for the automation of specimen processing, specimen incubation, and imaging of bacterial growth. In this study, we used the WASPLab to validate software that discriminates and segregates positive and negative chromogenic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) plates by recognition of pigmented colonies. A total of 57,690 swabs submitted for MRSA screening were enrolled in the study. Four sites enrolled specimens following their standard of care. Chromogenic agar used at these sites included MRSASelect (Bio-Rad Laboratories, Redmond, WA), chromID MRSA (bioMérieux, Marcy l'Etoile, France), and CHROMagar MRSA (BD Diagnostics, Sparks, MD). Specimens were plated and incubated using the WASPLab. The digital camera took images at 0 and 16 to 24 h and the WASPLab software determined the presence of positive colonies based on a hue, saturation, and value (HSV) score. If the HSV score fell within a defined threshold, the plate was called positive. The performance of the digital analysis was compared to manual reading. Overall, the digital software had a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 90.7% with the specificity ranging between 90.0 and 96.0 across all sites. The results were similar using the three different agars with a sensitivity of 100% and specificity ranging between 90.7 and 92.4%. These data demonstrate that automated digital analysis can be used to accurately sort positive from negative chromogenic agar cultures regardless of the pigmentation produced. PMID:26719443

  19. Automated brain tumor segmentation in magnetic resonance imaging based on sliding-window technique and symmetry analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lian Yanyun; Song Zhijian

    2014-01-01

    Background Brain tumor segmentation from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an important step toward surgical planning,treatment planning,monitoring of therapy.However,manual tumor segmentation commonly used in clinic is time-consuming and challenging,and none of the existed automated methods are highly robust,reliable and efficient in clinic application.An accurate and automated tumor segmentation method has been developed for brain tumor segmentation that will provide reproducible and objective results close to manual segmentation results.Methods Based on the symmetry of human brain,we employed sliding-window technique and correlation coefficient to locate the tumor position.At first,the image to be segmented was normalized,rotated,denoised,and bisected.Subsequently,through vertical and horizontal sliding-windows technique in turn,that is,two windows in the left and the right part of brain image moving simultaneously pixel by pixel in two parts of brain image,along with calculating of correlation coefficient of two windows,two windows with minimal correlation coefficient were obtained,and the window with bigger average gray value is the location of tumor and the pixel with biggest gray value is the locating point of tumor.At last,the segmentation threshold was decided by the average gray value of the pixels in the square with center at the locating point and 10 pixels of side length,and threshold segmentation and morphological operations were used to acquire the final tumor region.Results The method was evaluated on 3D FSPGR brain MR images of 10 patients.As a result,the average ratio of correct location was 93.4% for 575 slices containing tumor,the average Dice similarity coefficient was 0.77 for one scan,and the average time spent on one scan was 40 seconds.Conclusions An fully automated,simple and efficient segmentation method for brain tumor is proposed and promising for future clinic use.Correlation coefficient is a new and effective feature for tumor

  20. A simple viability analysis for unicellular cyanobacteria using a new autofluorescence assay, automated microscopy, and ImageJ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schulze Katja

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Currently established methods to identify viable and non-viable cells of cyanobacteria are either time-consuming (eg. plating or preparation-intensive (eg. fluorescent staining. In this paper we present a new and fast viability assay for unicellular cyanobacteria, which uses red chlorophyll fluorescence and an unspecific green autofluorescence for the differentiation of viable and non-viable cells without the need of sample preparation. Results The viability assay for unicellular cyanobacteria using red and green autofluorescence was established and validated for the model organism Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Both autofluorescence signals could be observed simultaneously allowing a direct classification of viable and non-viable cells. The results were confirmed by plating/colony count, absorption spectra and chlorophyll measurements. The use of an automated fluorescence microscope and a novel ImageJ based image analysis plugin allow a semi-automated analysis. Conclusions The new method simplifies the process of viability analysis and allows a quick and accurate analysis. Furthermore results indicate that a combination of the new assay with absorption spectra or chlorophyll concentration measurements allows the estimation of the vitality of cells.

  1. Improved automated production of 18F-FMISO and its tumor hypoxia imaging by Micro-PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: 1-H-1-(3-[18F]fluoro-2-hydroxypropyl)-2-nitroimidazole (18F-FMISO) is a specific molecular imaging probe for tumor hypoxia imaging, and its PET/CT imaging has an important clinical value for planning cancer radiotherapy target volume. Purpose: This study aimed to develop an improved, automated production of 18F-FMISO and to perform Micro-PET/CT imaging of tumor hypoxia. Methods: Based on the labeling precursor NITTP and a simple 'one-pot' method, an upgraded Explora GN module together with Explora LC was adopted to run radiofluorination (NITTP (10 mg), MeCN (1.0 mL), 120℃, 5.0 min), hydrolysis (HCI (1.0 mol/L, 1.0 mL), 130℃, 8.0 min) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) purification to produce 18F-FMISO automatically. Moreover, Radio-HPLC and Radio-TLC were applied for the quality control, and Micro-PET/CT scanner for hypoxia imaging of SW1990 pancreatic tumor-bearing mice. Results: As results, 18F-FMISO was obtained with the synthesis time for about 65 min, the radiochemical yield of (30±5.0)% (no decay corrected, n=20), the radiochemical purity of above 99%, the specific activity of (2.04±0.17)x1011 Bq·μmol-1, plus with the enhanced chemical purity. Moreover, MicroPET/CT imaging showed that 18F-FMISO presented whole-body distribution in SW1990 tumor-bearing mice, and the optimized time point for tumor hypoxia imaging was 3 h post injection with the uptake ratios of tumor-to-muscle of 3.00±0.08. Conclusion: In sum, we developed an improved, automated production of 18F-FMISO with high performance liquid chromatography purification, high radiochemical yield, high specific activity and high reliability , and also verified its MicroPET/CT imaging of tumor hypoxia for providing experimental reference data. (authors)

  2. Comparison of the automated evaluation of phantom mama in digital and digitalized images; Comparacao da avaliacao automatizada do phantom mama em imagens digitais e digitalizadas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santana, Priscila do Carmo, E-mail: pcs@cdtn.b [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear. Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias e Tecnicas Nucleares; Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina. Dept. de Propedeutica Complementar; Gomes, Danielle Soares; Oliveira, Marcio Alves; Nogueira, Maria do Socorro, E-mail: mnogue@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Mammography is an essential tool for diagnosis and early detection of breast cancer if it is provided as a very good quality service. The process of evaluating the quality of radiographic images in general, and mammography in particular, can be much more accurate, practical and fast with the help of computer analysis tools. This work compare the automated methodology for the evaluation of scanned digital images the phantom mama. By applied the DIP method techniques was possible determine geometrical and radiometric images evaluated. The evaluated parameters include circular details of low contrast, contrast ratio, spatial resolution, tumor masses, optical density and background in Phantom Mama scanned and digitized images. The both results of images were evaluated. Through this comparison was possible to demonstrate that this automated methodology is presented as a promising alternative for the reduction or elimination of subjectivity in both types of images, but the Phantom Mama present insufficient parameters for spatial resolution evaluation. (author)

  3. Different approaches to synovial membrane volume determination by magnetic resonance imaging: manual versus automated segmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel

    1997-01-01

    synovial membrane volume, e.g. no systematic errors were found. The inter-MRI variation, evaluated in three knees and three wrists, was higher than by manual segmentation, particularly due to sensitivity to malalignment artefacts. Examination of test objects proved the high accuracy of the general......Automated fast (5-20 min) synovial membrane volume determination by MRI, based on pre-set post-gadolinium-DTPA enhancement thresholds, was evaluated as a substitute for a time-consuming (45-120 min), previously validated, manual segmentation method. Twenty-nine knees [rheumatoid arthritis (RA) 13......, osteoarthritis (OA) 16] and 17 RA wrists were examined. At enhancement thresholds between 30 and 60%, the automated volumes (Syn(x%)) were highly significantly correlated to manual volumes (SynMan) (knees: rho = 0.78-0.91, P < 10(-5) to < 10(-9); wrists: rho = 0.87-0.95, P < 10(-4) to < 10(-6)). The absolute...

  4. A Marker-Based Approach for the Automated Selection of a Single Segmentation from a Hierarchical Set of Image Segmentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarabalka, Y.; Tilton, J. C.; Benediktsson, J. A.; Chanussot, J.

    2012-01-01

    The Hierarchical SEGmentation (HSEG) algorithm, which combines region object finding with region object clustering, has given good performances for multi- and hyperspectral image analysis. This technique produces at its output a hierarchical set of image segmentations. The automated selection of a single segmentation level is often necessary. We propose and investigate the use of automatically selected markers for this purpose. In this paper, a novel Marker-based HSEG (M-HSEG) method for spectral-spatial classification of hyperspectral images is proposed. Two classification-based approaches for automatic marker selection are adapted and compared for this purpose. Then, a novel constrained marker-based HSEG algorithm is applied, resulting in a spectral-spatial classification map. Three different implementations of the M-HSEG method are proposed and their performances in terms of classification accuracies are compared. The experimental results, presented for three hyperspectral airborne images, demonstrate that the proposed approach yields accurate segmentation and classification maps, and thus is attractive for remote sensing image analysis.

  5. Automated detection of spinal centrelines, vertebral bodies and intervertebral discs in CT and MR images of lumbar spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štern, Darko; Likar, Boštjan; Pernuš, Franjo; Vrtovec, Tomaž

    2010-01-01

    We propose a completely automated algorithm for the detection of the spinal centreline and the centres of vertebral bodies and intervertebral discs in images acquired by computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The developed methods are based on the analysis of the geometry of spinal structures and the characteristics of CT and MR images and were evaluated on 29 CT and 13 MR images of lumbar spine. The overall mean distance between the obtained and the ground truth spinal centrelines and centres of vertebral bodies and intervertebral discs were 1.8 ± 1.1 mm and 2.8 ± 1.9 mm, respectively, and no considerable differences were detected among the results for CT, T1-weighted MR and T2-weighted MR images. The knowledge of the location of the spinal centreline and the centres of vertebral bodies and intervertebral discs is valuable for the analysis of the spine. The proposed method may therefore be used to initialize the techniques for labelling and segmentation of vertebrae.

  6. LeafJ: An ImageJ Plugin for Semi-automated Leaf Shape Measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Maloof, Julin N.; Nozue, Kazunari; Mumbach, Maxwell R.; Palmer, Christine M.

    2013-01-01

    High throughput phenotyping (phenomics) is a powerful tool for linking genes to their functions (see review1 and recent examples2-4). Leaves are the primary photosynthetic organ, and their size and shape vary developmentally and environmentally within a plant. For these reasons studies on leaf morphology require measurement of multiple parameters from numerous leaves, which is best done by semi-automated phenomics tools5,6. Canopy shade is an important environmental cue that affects plant arc...

  7. Colour image in 2D and 3D microscopy for the automation of pollen rate measurement:

    OpenAIRE

    Belmonte, Jordina; Bonton, Pierre; Boucher, Alain; Galan, Carmen; Hidalgo, Pablo J.; Thonnat, Monique; Tomczak, Regis

    2002-01-01

    Pollen monitoring is of great importance for the prevention of allergy. As this activity is still largely carried out by humans, there is an increasing interest in the automation of pollen monitoring. The goal is to reduce monitoring time in order to plan more efficient treatments. In this context, an original device based on computer vision is developed. The goal of such a system is to provide accurate measurement of pollen concentration. This information can be used as well by palynologists...

  8. COLOUR IMAGE IN 2D AND 3D MICROSCOPY FOR THE AUTOMATION OF POLLEN RATE MEASUREMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Pierre Bonton; Alain Boucher; Monique Thonnat; Regis Tomczak; Hidalgo, Pablo J.; Jordina Belmonte; Carmen Galan

    2011-01-01

    Pollen monitoring is of great importance for the prevention of allergy. As this activity is still largely carried out by humans, there is an increasing interest in the automation of pollen monitoring. The goal is to reduce monitoring time in order to plan more efficient treatments. In this context, an original device based on computer vision is developed. The goal of such a system is to provide accurate measurement of pollen concentration. This information can be used as well by palynologists...

  9. Fast automated yeast cell counting algorithm using bright-field and fluorescence microscopic images

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Dongpyo; Lee, Gwanghee; Jung, Neon Cheol; Jeon, Moongu

    2013-01-01

    Background The faithful determination of the concentration and viability of yeast cells is important for biological research as well as industry. To this end, it is important to develop an automated cell counting algorithm that can provide not only fast but also accurate and precise measurement of yeast cells. Results With the proposed method, we measured the precision of yeast cell measurements by using 0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% viability samples. As a result, the actual viability measured ...

  10. Evaluation of an Automated Information Extraction Tool for Imaging Data Elements to Populate a Breast Cancer Screening Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacson, Ronilda; Harris, Kimberly; Brawarsky, Phyllis; Tosteson, Tor D; Onega, Tracy; Tosteson, Anna N A; Kaye, Abby; Gonzalez, Irina; Birdwell, Robyn; Haas, Jennifer S

    2015-10-01

    Breast cancer screening is central to early breast cancer detection. Identifying and monitoring process measures for screening is a focus of the National Cancer Institute's Population-based Research Optimizing Screening through Personalized Regimens (PROSPR) initiative, which requires participating centers to report structured data across the cancer screening continuum. We evaluate the accuracy of automated information extraction of imaging findings from radiology reports, which are available as unstructured text. We present prevalence estimates of imaging findings for breast imaging received by women who obtained care in a primary care network participating in PROSPR (n = 139,953 radiology reports) and compared automatically extracted data elements to a "gold standard" based on manual review for a validation sample of 941 randomly selected radiology reports, including mammograms, digital breast tomosynthesis, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The prevalence of imaging findings vary by data element and modality (e.g., suspicious calcification noted in 2.6% of screening mammograms, 12.1% of diagnostic mammograms, and 9.4% of tomosynthesis exams). In the validation sample, the accuracy of identifying imaging findings, including suspicious calcifications, masses, and architectural distortion (on mammogram and tomosynthesis); masses, cysts, non-mass enhancement, and enhancing foci (on MRI); and masses and cysts (on ultrasound), range from 0.8 to1.0 for recall, precision, and F-measure. Information extraction tools can be used for accurate documentation of imaging findings as structured data elements from text reports for a variety of breast imaging modalities. These data can be used to populate screening registries to help elucidate more effective breast cancer screening processes. PMID:25561069

  11. Automated determination of the centers of vertebral bodies and intervertebral discs in CT and MR lumbar spine images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štern, Darko; Vrtovec, Tomaž; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan

    2010-03-01

    The knowledge of the location of the centers of vertebral bodies and intervertebral discs is valuable for the analysis of the spine. Existing methods for the detection and segmentation of vertebrae in images acquired by computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging are usually applicable only to a specific image modality and require prior knowledge of the location of vertebrae, usually obtained by manual identification or statistical modeling. We propose a completely automated framework for the detection of the centers of vertebral bodies and intervertebral discs in CT and MR images. The image intensity and gradient magnitude profiles are first extracted in each image along the already obtained spinal centerline and therefore contain a repeating pattern representing the vertebral bodies and intervertebral discs. Based on the period of the repeating pattern and by using a function that approximates the shape of the vertebral body, a model of the vertebral body is generated. The centers of vertebral bodies and intervertebral discs are detected by measuring the similarity between the generated model and the extracted profiles. The method was evaluated on 29 CT and 13 MR images of lumbar spine with varying number of vertebrae. The overall mean distance between the obtained and the ground truth centers was 2.8 +/- 1.9 mm, and no considerable differences were detected between the results for CT, T1-weighted MR or T2-weighted MR images, or among different vertebrae. The proposed method may therefore be valuable for initializing the techniques for the detection and segmentation of vertebrae.

  12. Automated kidney morphology measurements from ultrasound images using texture and edge analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravishankar, Hariharan; Annangi, Pavan; Washburn, Michael; Lanning, Justin

    2016-04-01

    In a typical ultrasound scan, a sonographer measures Kidney morphology to assess renal abnormalities. Kidney morphology can also help to discriminate between chronic and acute kidney failure. The caliper placements and volume measurements are often time consuming and an automated solution will help to improve accuracy, repeatability and throughput. In this work, we developed an automated Kidney morphology measurement solution from long axis Ultrasound scans. Automated kidney segmentation is challenging due to wide variability in kidney shape, size, weak contrast of the kidney boundaries and presence of strong edges like diaphragm, fat layers. To address the challenges and be able to accurately localize and detect kidney regions, we present a two-step algorithm that makes use of edge and texture information in combination with anatomical cues. First, we use an edge analysis technique to localize kidney region by matching the edge map with predefined templates. To accurately estimate the kidney morphology, we use textural information in a machine learning algorithm framework using Haar features and Gradient boosting classifier. We have tested the algorithm on 45 unseen cases and the performance against ground truth is measured by computing Dice overlap, % error in major and minor axis of kidney. The algorithm shows successful performance on 80% cases.

  13. Automated systemic-cognitive analysis of images pixels (generalization, abstraction, classification and identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutsenko Y. V.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the article the application of systemic-cognitive analysis and its mathematical model i.e. the system theory of the information and its program toolkit which is "Eidos" system for loading images from graphics files, synthesis of the generalized images of classes, their abstraction, classification of the generalized images (clusters and constructs comparisons of concrete images with the generalized images (identification are examined. We suggest using the theory of information for processing the data and its size for every pixel which indicates that the image is of a certain class. A numerical example is given in which on the basis of a number of specific examples of images belonging to different classes, forming generalized images of these classes, independent of their specific implementations, i.e., the "Eidoses" of these images (in the definition of Plato – the prototypes or archetypes of images (in the definition of Jung. But the "Eidos" system provides not only the formation of prototype images, which quantitatively reflects the amount of information in the elements of specific images on their belonging to a particular proto-types, but a comparison of specific images with generic (identification and the generalization of pictures images with each other (classification

  14. Accurate, precise modeling of cell proliferation kinetics from time-lapse imaging and automated image analysis of agar yeast culture arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Lue

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome-wide mutant strain collections have increased demand for high throughput cellular phenotyping (HTCP. For example, investigators use HTCP to investigate interactions between gene deletion mutations and additional chemical or genetic perturbations by assessing differences in cell proliferation among the collection of 5000 S. cerevisiae gene deletion strains. Such studies have thus far been predominantly qualitative, using agar cell arrays to subjectively score growth differences. Quantitative systems level analysis of gene interactions would be enabled by more precise HTCP methods, such as kinetic analysis of cell proliferation in liquid culture by optical density. However, requirements for processing liquid cultures make them relatively cumbersome and low throughput compared to agar. To improve HTCP performance and advance capabilities for quantifying interactions, YeastXtract software was developed for automated analysis of cell array images. Results YeastXtract software was developed for kinetic growth curve analysis of spotted agar cultures. The accuracy and precision for image analysis of agar culture arrays was comparable to OD measurements of liquid cultures. Using YeastXtract, image intensity vs. biomass of spot cultures was linearly correlated over two orders of magnitude. Thus cell proliferation could be measured over about seven generations, including four to five generations of relatively constant exponential phase growth. Spot area normalization reduced the variation in measurements of total growth efficiency. A growth model, based on the logistic function, increased precision and accuracy of maximum specific rate measurements, compared to empirical methods. The logistic function model was also more robust against data sparseness, meaning that less data was required to obtain accurate, precise, quantitative growth phenotypes. Conclusion Microbial cultures spotted onto agar media are widely used for genotype

  15. A robust computational solution for automated quantification of a specific binding ratio based on [123I]FP-CIT SPECT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the current paper is to present a computational solution to accurately quantify a specific to a non-specific uptake ratio in [123I]fP-CIT single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images and simultaneously measure the spatial dimensions of the basal ganglia, also known as basal nuclei. A statistical analysis based on a reference dataset selected by the user is also automatically performed. The quantification of the specific to non-specific uptake ratio here is based on regions of interest defined after the registration of the image under study with a template image. The computational solution was tested on a dataset of 38 [123I]FP-CIT SPECT images: 28 images were from patients with Parkinson’s disease and the remainder from normal patients, and the results of the automated quantification were compared to the ones obtained by three well-known semi-automated quantification methods. The results revealed a high correlation coefficient between the developed automated method and the three semi-automated methods used for comparison (r ≥0.975). The solution also showed good robustness against different positions of the patient, as an almost perfect agreement between the specific to non-specific uptake ratio was found (ICC=1.000). The mean processing time was around 6 seconds per study using a common notebook PC. The solution developed can be useful for clinicians to evaluate [123I]FP-CIT SPECT images due to its accuracy, robustness and speed. Also, the comparison between case studies and the follow-up of patients can be done more accurately and proficiently since the intra- and inter-observer variability of the semi-automated calculation does not exist in automated solutions. The dimensions of the basal ganglia and their automatic comparison with the values of the population selected as reference are also important for professionals in this area.

  16. Automated CAD for Nodule Detection for Magnetic Resonance Image Contrast Enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.R.Ananth

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Contrast is a measure of the variation in intensity or gray value in a specified region of an image. In all applications concerning image acquisition, followed by processing of images, successful pre-processing is of the essence. Every sensor has its own characteristics, but in general the quality of the acquired MR image is fairly poor. Overall grayscale intensity variations, poor contrast and noisy background are the frequently encountered issues. The Rational Unsharp Masking method is the one introduced here to improve the quality of the MR image. It is demonstrated, that the proposed method has much reduced noise sensitivity than another polynomial operator, Cubic Unsharp masking and number of approaches devised to improve the perceived quality of an image. This algorithm has been tested for various slices of axial, sagittal and coronal sections of MR image. The results confirm the ability of the algorithm to produce better quality images, helpful to have effective diagnosis.

  17. The image quality and lesion characterization of breast using automated whole-breast ultrasound: A comparison with handheld ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The image quality of AWUS was comparable to that of HHUS for lesion characterization. • In only 0.5%, the poor quality of AWUSimages inhibited precise interpretations. • The HHUS was superior to AWUS in the analysis of peripherally located, irregular, non-circumscribed, or BI-RADS category 4 or 5 lesions. - Abstract: Objective: To prospectively evaluate the image quality of automated whole breast ultrasonography (AWUS) in the characterization of breast lesions compared with handheld breast ultrasonography (HHUS). Materials and methods: This prospective study included a total of 411 lesions in 209 women. All patients underwent both HHUS and AWUS prior to biopsy. An evaluation of identical image pairs of 411 lesions obtained from both modalities was performed, and the image quality of AWUS was compared with that of HHUS as a reference standard. The overall image quality was evaluated for lesion coverage, lesion conspicuity, and artifact effect using a graded score. Additionally, the factors that correlated with differences in image quality between the two modalities were analyzed. Results: In 97.1%, the image quality of AWUS was identical or superior to that of HHUS, whereas AWUS was inferior in 2.9%. In only 0.5%, the poor quality of AWUS images caused by incomplete lesion coverage and shadowing due to a contact artifact inhibited precise interpretations. The two main causes resulting in degraded AWUS image quality were blurring of the margin (83.3%) and acoustic shadowing by Cooper's ligament or improper compression pressure of the transducer (66.7%). Among various factors, peripheral location from the nipple (p = 0.01), lesion size (p = 0.02), shape descriptor (p = 0.02), and final American College of Radiology Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) category (p = 0.001) were correlated with differences in image quality between AWUS and HHUS. Conclusion: Although the image quality of AWUS was comparable to that of HHUS for

  18. The image quality and lesion characterization of breast using automated whole-breast ultrasound: A comparison with handheld ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Yeong Yi [Department of Radiology, St. Vincent' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Hun, E-mail: rad-ksh@catholic.ac.kr [Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Bong Joo [Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • The image quality of AWUS was comparable to that of HHUS for lesion characterization. • In only 0.5%, the poor quality of AWUSimages inhibited precise interpretations. • The HHUS was superior to AWUS in the analysis of peripherally located, irregular, non-circumscribed, or BI-RADS category 4 or 5 lesions. - Abstract: Objective: To prospectively evaluate the image quality of automated whole breast ultrasonography (AWUS) in the characterization of breast lesions compared with handheld breast ultrasonography (HHUS). Materials and methods: This prospective study included a total of 411 lesions in 209 women. All patients underwent both HHUS and AWUS prior to biopsy. An evaluation of identical image pairs of 411 lesions obtained from both modalities was performed, and the image quality of AWUS was compared with that of HHUS as a reference standard. The overall image quality was evaluated for lesion coverage, lesion conspicuity, and artifact effect using a graded score. Additionally, the factors that correlated with differences in image quality between the two modalities were analyzed. Results: In 97.1%, the image quality of AWUS was identical or superior to that of HHUS, whereas AWUS was inferior in 2.9%. In only 0.5%, the poor quality of AWUS images caused by incomplete lesion coverage and shadowing due to a contact artifact inhibited precise interpretations. The two main causes resulting in degraded AWUS image quality were blurring of the margin (83.3%) and acoustic shadowing by Cooper's ligament or improper compression pressure of the transducer (66.7%). Among various factors, peripheral location from the nipple (p = 0.01), lesion size (p = 0.02), shape descriptor (p = 0.02), and final American College of Radiology Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) category (p = 0.001) were correlated with differences in image quality between AWUS and HHUS. Conclusion: Although the image quality of AWUS was comparable to that of HHUS for

  19. SU-E-J-252: Reproducibility of Radiogenomic Image Features: Comparison of Two Semi-Automated Segmentation Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Objective and reliable quantification of imaging phenotype is an essential part of radiogenomic studies. We compared the reproducibility of two semi-automatic segmentation methods for quantitative image phenotyping in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Methods: MRI examinations with T1 post-gadolinium and FLAIR sequences of 10 GBM patients were downloaded from the Cancer Image Archive site. Two semi-automatic segmentation tools with different algorithms (deformable model and grow cut method) were used to segment contrast enhancement, necrosis and edema regions by two independent observers. A total of 21 imaging features consisting of area and edge groups were extracted automatically from the segmented tumor. The inter-observer variability and coefficient of variation (COV) were calculated to evaluate the reproducibility. Results: Inter-observer correlations and coefficient of variation of imaging features with the deformable model ranged from 0.953 to 0.999 and 2.1% to 9.2%, respectively, and the grow cut method ranged from 0.799 to 0.976 and 3.5% to 26.6%, respectively. Coefficient of variation for especially important features which were previously reported as predictive of patient survival were: 3.4% with deformable model and 7.4% with grow cut method for the proportion of contrast enhanced tumor region; 5.5% with deformable model and 25.7% with grow cut method for the proportion of necrosis; and 2.1% with deformable model and 4.4% with grow cut method for edge sharpness of tumor on CE-T1W1. Conclusion: Comparison of two semi-automated tumor segmentation techniques shows reliable image feature extraction for radiogenomic analysis of GBM patients with multiparametric Brain MRI

  20. Automated classification of brain tumor type in whole-slide digital pathology images using local representative tiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Jocelyn; Hoogi, Assaf; Depeursinge, Adrien; Rubin, Daniel L

    2016-05-01

    Computerized analysis of digital pathology images offers the potential of improving clinical care (e.g. automated diagnosis) and catalyzing research (e.g. discovering disease subtypes). There are two key challenges thwarting computerized analysis of digital pathology images: first, whole slide pathology images are massive, making computerized analysis inefficient, and second, diverse tissue regions in whole slide images that are not directly relevant to the disease may mislead computerized diagnosis algorithms. We propose a method to overcome both of these challenges that utilizes a coarse-to-fine analysis of the localized characteristics in pathology images. An initial surveying stage analyzes the diversity of coarse regions in the whole slide image. This includes extraction of spatially localized features of shape, color and texture from tiled regions covering the slide. Dimensionality reduction of the features assesses the image diversity in the tiled regions and clustering creates representative groups. A second stage provides a detailed analysis of a single representative tile from each group. An Elastic Net classifier produces a diagnostic decision value for each representative tile. A weighted voting scheme aggregates the decision values from these tiles to obtain a diagnosis at the whole slide level. We evaluated our method by automatically classifying 302 brain cancer cases into two possible diagnoses (glioblastoma multiforme (N = 182) versus lower grade glioma (N = 120)) with an accuracy of 93.1 % (p < 0.001). We also evaluated our method in the dataset provided for the 2014 MICCAI Pathology Classification Challenge, in which our method, trained and tested using 5-fold cross validation, produced a classification accuracy of 100% (p < 0.001). Our method showed high stability and robustness to parameter variation, with accuracy varying between 95.5% and 100% when evaluated for a wide range of parameters. Our approach may be useful to automatically

  1. SU-E-J-252: Reproducibility of Radiogenomic Image Features: Comparison of Two Semi-Automated Segmentation Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, M; Woo, B; Kim, J [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jamshidi, N; Kuo, M [UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Objective and reliable quantification of imaging phenotype is an essential part of radiogenomic studies. We compared the reproducibility of two semi-automatic segmentation methods for quantitative image phenotyping in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Methods: MRI examinations with T1 post-gadolinium and FLAIR sequences of 10 GBM patients were downloaded from the Cancer Image Archive site. Two semi-automatic segmentation tools with different algorithms (deformable model and grow cut method) were used to segment contrast enhancement, necrosis and edema regions by two independent observers. A total of 21 imaging features consisting of area and edge groups were extracted automatically from the segmented tumor. The inter-observer variability and coefficient of variation (COV) were calculated to evaluate the reproducibility. Results: Inter-observer correlations and coefficient of variation of imaging features with the deformable model ranged from 0.953 to 0.999 and 2.1% to 9.2%, respectively, and the grow cut method ranged from 0.799 to 0.976 and 3.5% to 26.6%, respectively. Coefficient of variation for especially important features which were previously reported as predictive of patient survival were: 3.4% with deformable model and 7.4% with grow cut method for the proportion of contrast enhanced tumor region; 5.5% with deformable model and 25.7% with grow cut method for the proportion of necrosis; and 2.1% with deformable model and 4.4% with grow cut method for edge sharpness of tumor on CE-T1W1. Conclusion: Comparison of two semi-automated tumor segmentation techniques shows reliable image feature extraction for radiogenomic analysis of GBM patients with multiparametric Brain MRI.

  2. Development and application of an automated analysis method for individual cerebral perfusion single photon emission tomography images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neurological images may be analysed by performing voxel by voxel comparisons with a group of control subject images. An automated, 3D, voxel-based method has been developed for the analysis of individual single photon emission tomography (SPET) scans. Clusters of voxels are identified that represent regions of abnormal radiopharmaceutical uptake. Morphological operators are applied to reduce noise in the clusters, then quantitative estimates of the size and degree of the radiopharmaceutical uptake abnormalities are derived. Statistical inference has been performed using a Monte Carlo method that has not previously been applied to SPET scans, or for the analysis of individual images. This has been validated for group comparisons of SPET scans and for the analysis of an individual image using comparison with a group. Accurate statistical inference was obtained independent of experimental factors such as degrees of freedom, image smoothing and voxel significance level threshold. The analysis method has been evaluated for application to cerebral perfusion SPET imaging in ischaemic stroke. It has been shown that useful quantitative estimates, high sensitivity and high specificity may be obtained. Sensitivity and the accuracy of signal quantification were found to be dependent on the operator defined analysis parameters. Recommendations for the values of these parameters have been made. The analysis method developed has been compared with an established method and shown to result in higher specificity for the data and analysis parameter sets tested. In addition, application to a group of ischaemic stroke patient SPET scans has demonstrated its clinical utility. The influence of imaging conditions has been assessed using phantom data acquired with different gamma camera SPET acquisition parameters. A lower limit of five million counts and standardisation of all acquisition parameters has been recommended for the analysis of individual SPET scans. (author)

  3. Structure tensor based automated detection of macular edema and central serous retinopathy using optical coherence tomography images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Bilal; Raja, Gulistan; Hassan, Taimur; Usman Akram, M

    2016-04-01

    Macular edema (ME) and central serous retinopathy (CSR) are two macular diseases that affect the central vision of a person if they are left untreated. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging is the latest eye examination technique that shows a cross-sectional region of the retinal layers and that can be used to detect many retinal disorders in an early stage. Many researchers have done clinical studies on ME and CSR and reported significant findings in macular OCT scans. However, this paper proposes an automated method for the classification of ME and CSR from OCT images using a support vector machine (SVM) classifier. Five distinct features (three based on the thickness profiles of the sub-retinal layers and two based on cyst fluids within the sub-retinal layers) are extracted from 30 labeled images (10 ME, 10 CSR, and 10 healthy), and SVM is trained on these. We applied our proposed algorithm on 90 time-domain OCT (TD-OCT) images (30 ME, 30 CSR, 30 healthy) of 73 patients. Our algorithm correctly classified 88 out of 90 subjects with accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of 97.77%, 100%, and 93.33%, respectively. PMID:27140751

  4. Fully Automated On-Chip Imaging Flow Cytometry System with Disposable Contamination-Free Plastic Re-Cultivation Chip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoyuki Kaneko

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a novel imaging cytometry system using a poly(methyl methacrylate (PMMA based microfluidic chip. The system was contamination-free, because sample suspensions contacted only with a flammable PMMA chip and no other component of the system. The transparency and low-fluorescence of PMMA was suitable for microscopic imaging of cells flowing through microchannels on the chip. Sample particles flowing through microchannels on the chip were discriminated by an image-recognition unit with a high-speed camera in real time at the rate of 200 event/s, e.g., microparticles 2.5 μm and 3.0 μm in diameter were differentiated with an error rate of less than 2%. Desired cells were separated automatically from other cells by electrophoretic or dielectrophoretic force one by one with a separation efficiency of 90%. Cells in suspension with fluorescent dye were separated using the same kind of microfluidic chip. Sample of 5 μL with 1 × 106 particle/mL was processed within 40 min. Separated cells could be cultured on the microfluidic chip without contamination. The whole operation of sample handling was automated using 3D micropipetting system. These results showed that the novel imaging flow cytometry system is practically applicable for biological research and clinical diagnostics.

  5. Automated extraction of absorption features from Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and Geophysical and Environmental Research Imaging Spectrometer (GERIS) data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Fred A.; Calvin, Wendy M.; Seznec, Olivier

    1988-01-01

    Automated techniques were developed for the extraction and characterization of absorption features from reflectance spectra. The absorption feature extraction algorithms were successfully tested on laboratory, field, and aircraft imaging spectrometer data. A suite of laboratory spectra of the most common minerals was analyzed and absorption band characteristics tabulated. A prototype expert system was designed, implemented, and successfully tested to allow identification of minerals based on the extracted absorption band characteristics. AVIRIS spectra for a site in the northern Grapevine Mountains, Nevada, have been characterized and the minerals sericite (fine grained muscovite) and dolomite were identified. The minerals kaolinite, alunite, and buddingtonite were identified and mapped for a site at Cuprite, Nevada, using the feature extraction algorithms on the new Geophysical and Environmental Research 64 channel imaging spectrometer (GERIS) data. The feature extraction routines (written in FORTRAN and C) were interfaced to the expert system (written in PROLOG) to allow both efficient processing of numerical data and logical spectrum analysis.

  6. Automated extraction of pressure ridges from SAR images of sea ice - Comparison with surface truth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesecky, J. F.; Smith, M. P.; Samadani, R.; Daida, J. M.; Comiso, J. C.

    1991-01-01

    The authors estimate the characteristics of ridges and leads in sea ice from SAR (synthetic aperture radar) images. Such estimates are based on the hypothesis that bright filamentary features in SAR sea ice images correspond with pressure ridges. A data set collected in the Greenland Sea in 1987 allows this hypothesis to be evaluated for X-band SAR images. A preliminary analysis of data collected from SAR images and ice elevation (from a laser altimeter) is presented. It is found that SAR image brightness and ice elevation are clearly related. However, the correlation, using the data and techniques applied, is not strong.

  7. Multimedia input in automated image annotation and content-based retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srihari, Rohini K.

    1995-03-01

    This research explores the interaction of linguistic and photographic information in an integrated text/image database. By utilizing linguistic descriptions of a picture (speech and text input) coordinated with pointing references to the picture, we extract information useful in two aspects: image interpretation and image retrieval. In the image interpretation phase, objects and regions mentioned in the text are identified; the annotated image is stored in a database for future use. We incorporate techniques from our previous research on photo understanding using accompanying text: a system, PICTION, which identifies human faces in a newspaper photograph based on the caption. In the image retrieval phase, images matching natural language queries are presented to a user in a ranked order. This phase combines the output of (1) the image interpretation/annotation phase, (2) statistical text retrieval methods, and (3) image retrieval methods (e.g., color indexing). The system allows both point and click querying on a given image as well as intelligent querying across the entire text/image database.

  8. HEIDI: An Automated Process for the Identification and Extraction of Photometric Light Curves from Astronomical Images

    CERN Document Server

    Todd, M; Tanga, P; Coward, D M; Zadnik, M G

    2014-01-01

    The production of photometric light curves from astronomical images is a very time-consuming task. Larger data sets improve the resolution of the light curve, however, the time requirement scales with data volume. The data analysis is often made more difficult by factors such as a lack of suitable calibration sources and the need to correct for variations in observing conditions from one image to another. Often these variations are unpredictable and corrections are based on experience and intuition. The High Efficiency Image Detection & Identification (HEIDI) pipeline software rapidly processes sets of astronomical images. HEIDI automatically selects multiple sources for calibrating the images using an algorithm that provides a reliable means of correcting for variations between images in a time series. The algorithm takes into account that some sources may intrinsically vary on short time scales and excludes these from being used as calibration sources. HEIDI processes a set of images from an entire nigh...

  9. Using Automated Image Analysis Algorithms to Distinguish Normal, Aberrant, and Degenerate Mitotic Figures Induced by Eg5 Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigley, Alison L; Klein, Stephanie K; Davies, Barry; Williams, Leigh; Rudmann, Daniel G

    2016-07-01

    Modulation of the cell cycle may underlie the toxicologic or pharmacologic responses of a potential therapeutic agent and contributes to decisions on its preclinical and clinical safety and efficacy. The descriptive and quantitative assessment of normal, aberrant, and degenerate mitotic figures in tissue sections is an important end point characterizing the effect of xenobiotics on the cell cycle. Historically, pathologists used manual counting and special staining visualization techniques such as immunohistochemistry for quantification of normal, aberrant, and degenerate mitotic figures. We designed an automated image analysis algorithm for measuring these mitotic figures in hematoxylin and eosin (H&E)-stained sections. Algorithm validation methods used data generated from a subcutaneous human transitional cell carcinoma xenograft model in nude rats treated with the cell cycle inhibitor Eg5. In these studies, we scanned and digitized H&E-stained xenografts and applied a complex ruleset of sequential mathematical filters and shape discriminators for classification of cell populations demonstrating normal, aberrant, or degenerate mitotic figures. The resultant classification system enabled the representations of three identifiable degrees of morphological change associated with tumor differentiation and compound effects. The numbers of mitotic figure variants and mitotic indices data generated corresponded to a manual assessment by a pathologist and supported automated algorithm verification and application for both efficacy and toxicity studies. PMID:26936079

  10. Automated removal of stripe interference in full-disk solar images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Sheng; He, Shuan; Huang, Yao; He, Hui-Ling; Lin, Gang-Hua

    2016-06-01

    The quality of full-disk solar Hα images is significantly degraded by stripe interference. In this paper, to improve the analysis of morphological evolution, a robust solution for stripe interference removal in a partial full-disk solar Hα image is proposed. The full-disk solar image is decomposed into a set of support value images on different scales by convolving the image with a sequence of multiscale support value filters, which are calculated from the mapped least-squares support vector machines (LS-SVMs). To match the resolution of the support value images, a scale-adaptive LS-SVM regression model is used to remove stripe interference from the support value images. We have demonstrated the advantages of our method on solar Hα images taken in 2001–2002 at the Huairou Solar Observing Station. Our experimental results show that our method can remove the stripe interference well in solar Hα images and the restored image can be used in morphology researches.

  11. Fully automated rodent brain MR image processing pipeline on a Midas server: from acquired images to region-based statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budin, Francois; Hoogstoel, Marion; Reynolds, Patrick; Grauer, Michael; O'Leary-Moore, Shonagh K; Oguz, Ipek

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of rodent brains enables study of the development and the integrity of the brain under certain conditions (alcohol, drugs etc.). However, these images are difficult to analyze for biomedical researchers with limited image processing experience. In this paper we present an image processing pipeline running on a Midas server, a web-based data storage system. It is composed of the following steps: rigid registration, skull-stripping, average computation, average parcellation, parcellation propagation to individual subjects, and computation of region-based statistics on each image. The pipeline is easy to configure and requires very little image processing knowledge. We present results obtained by processing a data set using this pipeline and demonstrate how this pipeline can be used to find differences between populations. PMID:23964234

  12. Fully automated rodent brain MR image processing pipeline on a Midas server: from acquired images to region-based statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francois Budin

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI of rodent brains enables study of the development and the integrity of the brain under certain conditions (alcohol, drugs etc.. However, these images are difficult to analyze for biomedical researchers with limited image processing experience. In this paper we present an image processing pipeline running on a Midas server, a web-based data storage system. It is composed of the following steps: rigid registration, skull-stripping, average computation, average segmentation, segmentation propagation to individual subjects and computation of region-based statistics on each image. The pipeline is easy to configure and requires very little image processing knowledge. We present results obtained by processing a data set using this pipeline and demonstrate how this pipeline can be used to find differences between populations.

  13. Scaling up Ecological Measurements of Coral Reefs Using Semi-Automated Field Image Collection and Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel González-Rivero

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ecological measurements in marine settings are often constrained in space and time, with spatial heterogeneity obscuring broader generalisations. While advances in remote sensing, integrative modelling and meta-analysis enable generalisations from field observations, there is an underlying need for high-resolution, standardised and geo-referenced field data. Here, we evaluate a new approach aimed at optimising data collection and analysis to assess broad-scale patterns of coral reef community composition using automatically annotated underwater imagery, captured along 2 km transects. We validate this approach by investigating its ability to detect spatial (e.g., across regions and temporal (e.g., over years change, and by comparing automated annotation errors to those of multiple human annotators. Our results indicate that change of coral reef benthos can be captured at high resolution both spatially and temporally, with an average error below 5%, among key benthic groups. Cover estimation errors using automated annotation varied between 2% and 12%, slightly larger than human errors (which varied between 1% and 7%, but small enough to detect significant changes among dominant groups. Overall, this approach allows a rapid collection of in-situ observations at larger spatial scales (km than previously possible, and provides a pathway to link, calibrate, and validate broader analyses across even larger spatial scales (10–10,000 km2.

  14. Development of an automated extraction method for liver tumors in three dimensional multiphase multislice CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper proposes a tumor detection method using four phase three dimensional (3D) CT images of livers, i.e. non-contrast, early, portal, and late phase images. The method extracts liver regions from the four phase images and enhances tumors in the livers using a 3D adaptive convergence index filter. Then it detects local maximum points and extracts tumor candidates by a region growing method. Subsequently several features of the candidates are measured and each candidate is classified into true tumor or normal tissue based on Mahalanobis distances. Above processes except liver region extraction are applied to four phase images, independently and four resultant images are integrated into one. We applied the proposed method to 3D abdominal CT images of ten patients obtained with multi-detector row CT scanner and confirmed that tumor detection rate was 100% without false positives, which was quite promising results. (author)

  15. Screening of subfertile men for testicular carcinoma in situ by an automated image analysis-based cytological test of the ejaculate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almstrup, K; Lippert, Marianne; Mogensen, Hanne O; Nielsen, J E; Hansen, J D; Daugaard, G; Jørgensen, N; Foged, Niels; Skakkebæk, N E; Rajpert-De Meyts, E

    slightly lower sensitivity (0.51), possibly because of obstruction. We conclude that this novel non-invasive test combining automated immunocytochemistry and advanced image analysis allows identification of TC at the CIS stage with a high specificity, but a negative test does not completely exclude CIS. On...... detected in ejaculates with specific CIS markers. We have built a high throughput framework involving automated immunocytochemical staining, scanning microscopy and in silico image analysis allowing automated detection and grading of CIS-like stained objects in semen samples. In this study, 1175 ejaculates...... from 765 subfertile men were tested using this framework. In 5/765 (0.65%) cases, CIS-like cells were identified in the ejaculate. Three of these had bilateral testicular biopsies performed and CIS was histologically confirmed in two. In total, 63 bilateral testicular biopsy were performed in...

  16. Correction of oral contrast artifacts in CT-based attenuation correction of PET images using an automated segmentation algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmadian, Alireza; Ay, Mohammad R.; Sarkar, Saeed [Medical Sciences/University of Tehran, Research Center for Science and Technology in Medicine, Tehran (Iran); Medical Sciences/University of Tehran, Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, Tehran (Iran); Bidgoli, Javad H. [Medical Sciences/University of Tehran, Research Center for Science and Technology in Medicine, Tehran (Iran); East Tehran Azad University, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Tehran (Iran); Zaidi, Habib [Geneva University Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2008-10-15

    Oral contrast is usually administered in most X-ray computed tomography (CT) examinations of the abdomen and the pelvis as it allows more accurate identification of the bowel and facilitates the interpretation of abdominal and pelvic CT studies. However, the misclassification of contrast medium with high-density bone in CT-based attenuation correction (CTAC) is known to generate artifacts in the attenuation map ({mu}map), thus resulting in overcorrection for attenuation of positron emission tomography (PET) images. In this study, we developed an automated algorithm for segmentation and classification of regions containing oral contrast medium to correct for artifacts in CT-attenuation-corrected PET images using the segmented contrast correction (SCC) algorithm. The proposed algorithm consists of two steps: first, high CT number object segmentation using combined region- and boundary-based segmentation and second, object classification to bone and contrast agent using a knowledge-based nonlinear fuzzy classifier. Thereafter, the CT numbers of pixels belonging to the region classified as contrast medium are substituted with their equivalent effective bone CT numbers using the SCC algorithm. The generated CT images are then down-sampled followed by Gaussian smoothing to match the resolution of PET images. A piecewise calibration curve was then used to convert CT pixel values to linear attenuation coefficients at 511 keV. The visual assessment of segmented regions performed by an experienced radiologist confirmed the accuracy of the segmentation and classification algorithms for delineation of contrast-enhanced regions in clinical CT images. The quantitative analysis of generated {mu}maps of 21 clinical CT colonoscopy datasets showed an overestimation ranging between 24.4% and 37.3% in the 3D-classified regions depending on their volume and the concentration of contrast medium. Two PET/CT studies known to be problematic demonstrated the applicability of the technique

  17. A new automated method for analysis of gated-SPECT images based on a three-dimensional heart shaped model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomsky, Milan; Richter, Jens; Johansson, Lena; El-Ali, Henrik; Aström, Karl; Ljungberg, Michael; Edenbrandt, Lars; El Ali, Henrik H.

    2005-01-01

    A new automated method for quantification of left ventricular function from gated-single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images has been developed. The method for quantification of cardiac function (CAFU) is based on a heart shaped model and the active shape algorithm. The model....... The maximal differences between the CAFU estimations and the true left ventricular volumes of the digital phantoms were 11 ml for the end-diastolic volume (EDV), 3 ml for the end-systolic volume (ESV) and 3% for the ejection fraction (EF). The largest differences were seen in the smallest heart. In...... the patient group the EDV calculated using QGS and CAFU showed good agreement for large hearts and higher CAFU values compared with QGS for the smaller hearts. In the larger hearts, ESV was much larger for QGS than for CAFU both in the phantom and patient studies. In the smallest hearts there was good...

  18. A fully automated multi-modal computer aided diagnosis approach to coronary calcium scoring of MSCT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing; Ferns, Gordon; Giles, John; Lewis, Emma

    2012-03-01

    Inter- and intra- observer variability is a problem often faced when an expert or observer is tasked with assessing the severity of a disease. This issue is keenly felt in coronary calcium scoring of patients suffering from atherosclerosis where in clinical practice, the observer must identify firstly the presence, followed by the location of candidate calcified plaques found within the coronary arteries that may prevent oxygenated blood flow to the heart muscle. However, it can be difficult for a human observer to differentiate calcified plaques that are located in the coronary arteries from those found in surrounding anatomy such as the mitral valve or pericardium. In addition to the benefits to scoring accuracy, the use of fast, low dose multi-slice CT imaging to perform the cardiac scan is capable of acquiring the entire heart within a single breath hold. Thus exposing the patient to lower radiation dose, which for a progressive disease such as atherosclerosis where multiple scans may be required, is beneficial to their health. Presented here is a fully automated method for calcium scoring using both the traditional Agatston method, as well as the volume scoring method. Elimination of the unwanted regions of the cardiac image slices such as lungs, ribs, and vertebrae is carried out using adaptive heart isolation. Such regions cannot contain calcified plaques but can be of a similar intensity and their removal will aid detection. Removal of both the ascending and descending aortas, as they contain clinical insignificant plaques, is necessary before the final calcium scores are calculated and examined against ground truth scores of three averaged expert observer results. The results presented here are intended to show the feasibility and requirement for an automated scoring method to reduce the subjectivity and reproducibility error inherent with manual clinical calcium scoring.

  19. An automated multi-modal object analysis approach to coronary calcium scoring of adaptive heart isolated MSCT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing; Ferns, Gordon; Giles, John; Lewis, Emma

    2012-02-01

    Inter- and intra- observer variability is a problem often faced when an expert or observer is tasked with assessing the severity of a disease. This issue is keenly felt in coronary calcium scoring of patients suffering from atherosclerosis where in clinical practice, the observer must identify firstly the presence, followed by the location of candidate calcified plaques found within the coronary arteries that may prevent oxygenated blood flow to the heart muscle. This can be challenging for a human observer as it is difficult to differentiate calcified plaques that are located in the coronary arteries from those found in surrounding anatomy such as the mitral valve or pericardium. The inclusion or exclusion of false positive or true positive calcified plaques respectively will alter the patient calcium score incorrectly, thus leading to the possibility of incorrect treatment prescription. In addition to the benefits to scoring accuracy, the use of fast, low dose multi-slice CT imaging to perform the cardiac scan is capable of acquiring the entire heart within a single breath hold. Thus exposing the patient to lower radiation dose, which for a progressive disease such as atherosclerosis where multiple scans may be required, is beneficial to their health. Presented here is a fully automated method for calcium scoring using both the traditional Agatston method, as well as the Volume scoring method. Elimination of the unwanted regions of the cardiac image slices such as lungs, ribs, and vertebrae is carried out using adaptive heart isolation. Such regions cannot contain calcified plaques but can be of a similar intensity and their removal will aid detection. Removal of both the ascending and descending aortas, as they contain clinical insignificant plaques, is necessary before the final calcium scores are calculated and examined against ground truth scores of three averaged expert observer results. The results presented here are intended to show the requirement and

  20. Automated GMP Synthesis of [18F]ICMT-11 for In Vivo Imaging of Caspase-3 Activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Isatin-5-sulfonamide ([18F]ICMT-11) is a sub-nanomolar inhibitor of caspase-3 previously evaluated as an apoptosis imaging agent. Herein, an alternative radiosynthesis of [18F]ICMT-11 with increased purity and specific activity is presented. Finally, a GMP-applicable automated radiosynthesis of [18F]ICMT-11 is described. Methods: The preparation of [18F]ICMT-11 was evaluated under a variety of reaction conditions, including reaction solvent, by employing alternative phase transfer catalysts and under different deprotection conditions. Following initial investigations, the process was transferred onto a fully automated GE FASTlab synthesis platform for further development and optimisation. Results: The synthesis of [18F]ICMT-11 was successfully validated under GMP conditions, resulting in a yield of 4.6 ± 0.4 GBq with a radiochemical purity of > 98% at EOS and a specific activity of 685 ± 237 GBq/μmol within 90 min. Quality control was carried out in accordance with the European Pharmacopoeia and demonstrated that [18F]ICMT-11 can be consistently manufactured on the FASTlab to meet specifications. Conclusions: A simplified methodology for the synthesis of the apoptosis imaging agent, [18F]ICMT-11, has been achieved by the SN2 displacement of a tosylate leaving group with [18F]fluoride ion. This results in an increased purity and specific activity over the original copper catalysed “Click” synthetic stratagem reaction involving 2-[18F]fluoroethylazide with an alkyne precursor and is now suitable for routine clinical application.

  1. A computer-aided automated methodology for the detection and classification of occlusal caries from photographic color images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdouses, Elias D; Koutsouri, Georgia D; Tripoliti, Evanthia E; Matsopoulos, George K; Oulis, Constantine J; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this work is to present a computer-aided automated methodology for the assessment of carious lesions, according to the International Caries Detection and Assessment System (ICDAS II), which are located on the occlusal surfaces of posterior permanent teeth from photographic color tooth images. The proposed methodology consists of two stages: (a) the detection of regions of interest and (b) the classification of the detected regions according to ICDAS ΙΙ. In the first stage, pre-processing, segmentation and post-processing mechanisms were employed. For each pixel of the detected regions, a 15×15 neighborhood is used and a set of intensity-based and texture-based features were extracted. A correlation based technique was applied to select a subset of 36 features which were given as input into the classification stage, where five classifiers (J48, Random Tree, Random Forests, Support Vector Machines and Naïve Bayes) were compared to conclude to the best one, in our case, to Random Forests. The methodology was evaluated on a set of 103 digital color images where 425 regions of interest from occlusal surfaces of extracted permanent teeth were manually segmented and classified, based on visual assessments by two experts. The methodology correctly detected 337 out of 340 regions in the detection stage with accuracy of detection 80%. For the classification stage an overall accuracy 83% is achieved. The proposed methodology provides an objective and fully automated caries diagnostic system for occlusal carious lesions with similar or better performance of a trained dentist taking into consideration the available medical knowledge. PMID:25932969

  2. Automated detection and analysis of fluorescent in situ hybridization spots depicted in digital microscopic images of Pap-smear specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingwei; Zheng, Bin; Li, Shibo; Zhang, Roy; Mulvihill, John J.; Chen, Wei R.; Liu, Hong

    2009-03-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technology has been widely recognized as a promising molecular and biomedical optical imaging tool to screen and diagnose cervical cancer. However, manual FISH analysis is time-consuming and may introduce large inter-reader variability. In this study, a computerized scheme is developed and tested. It automatically detects and analyzes FISH spots depicted on microscopic fluorescence images. The scheme includes two stages: (1) a feature-based classification rule to detect useful interphase cells, and (2) a knowledge-based expert classifier to identify splitting FISH spots and improve the accuracy of counting independent FISH spots. The scheme then classifies detected analyzable cells as normal or abnormal. In this study, 150 FISH images were acquired from Pap-smear specimens and examined by both an experienced cytogeneticist and the scheme. The results showed that (1) the agreement between the cytogeneticist and the scheme was 96.9% in classifying between analyzable and unanalyzable cells (Kappa=0.917), and (2) agreements in detecting normal and abnormal cells based on FISH spots were 90.5% and 95.8% with Kappa=0.867. This study demonstrated the feasibility of automated FISH analysis, which may potentially improve detection efficiency and produce more accurate and consistent results than manual FISH analysis.

  3. High Res at High Speed: Automated Delivery of High-Resolution Images from Digital Library Collections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbrook, R. Niccole; Watkins, Sean

    2012-01-01

    As primary source materials in the library are digitized and made available online, the focus of related library services is shifting to include new and innovative methods of digital delivery via social media, digital storytelling, and community-based and consortial image repositories. Most images on the Web are not of sufficient quality for most…

  4. SoFAST: Automated Flare Detection with the PROBA2/SWAP EUV Imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonte, K.; Berghmans, D.; De Groof, A.; Steed, K.; Poedts, S.

    2013-08-01

    The Sun Watcher with Active Pixels and Image Processing (SWAP) EUV imager onboard PROBA2 provides a non-stop stream of coronal extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) images at a cadence of typically 130 seconds. These images show the solar drivers of space-weather, such as flares and erupting filaments. We have developed a software tool that automatically processes the images and localises and identifies flares. On one hand, the output of this software tool is intended as a service to the Space Weather Segment of ESA's Space Situational Awareness (SSA) program. On the other hand, we consider the PROBA2/SWAP images as a model for the data from the Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUI) instrument prepared for the future Solar Orbiter mission, where onboard intelligence is required for prioritising data within the challenging telemetry quota. In this article we present the concept of the software, the first statistics on its effectiveness and the online display in real time of its results. Our results indicate that it is not only possible to detect EUV flares automatically in an acquired dataset, but that quantifying a range of EUV dynamics is also possible. The method is based on thresholding of macropixelled image sequences. The robustness and simplicity of the algorithm is a clear advantage for future onboard use.

  5. Detection of DNA Aneuploidy in Exfoliated Airway Epithelia Cells of Sputum Specimens by the Automated Image Cytometry and Its Clinical Value in the Identification of Lung Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨健; 周宜开

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate the value of detecton of DNA aneuploidy in exfoliated airway epithelia cells of sputum specimens by the automated image cytometry for the identification of lung cancer, 100patients were divided into patient group (50 patients with lung cancer)and control group (30 patients with tuberculosis and 20 healthy people). Sputum was obtained for the quantitative analysis of DNA content of exfoliated airway epithelial cells with the automated image cytometry, together with the examinations of brush cytology and conventional sputum cytology. Our results showed that DNA aneuploidy (DI>2.5 or 5c) was found in 20 out of 50 sputum samples of lung cancer, 1 out of 30 sputum samples from tuberculosis patients, and none of 20 sputum samples from healthy people. The positive rates of conventional sputum cytology and brush cytology were 16 % and 32 %,which was lower than that of DNA aneuploidy detection by the automated image cytometry (P<0.01 ,P>0.05). Our study showed that automated image cytometry, which uses DNA aneuploidy as a marker for tumor, can detect the malignant cells in sputum samples of lung cancer and it is a sensitive and specific method serving as a complement for the diagnosis of lung cancer.

  6. Automated image segmentation and registration of vessel wall MRI for quantitative assessment of carotid artery vessel wall dimensions and plaque composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klooster, Ronald van 't

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of this thesis was to develop methods for automated segmentation, registration and classification of the carotid artery vessel wall and plaque components using multi-sequence MR vessel wall images to assess atherosclerosis. First, a general introduction into atherosclerosis and differe

  7. Automated contouring of tumor regions in treatment planning CT images using PET/CT images based on a localized level set method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to develop an automated method for contouring lung tumor regions in treatment planning computed tomography (CT) images using positron emission tomography (PET)/CT images. The initial regions of lung tumors were identified by thresholding the PET images at a certain percentage of maximum standardized uptake value (SUV). A localized level set method (LLSM), which we proposed in this study, was applied for the initial tumor region, and the proposed method determines an optimum contour of the gross tumor volume (GTV) region by searching a minimum point of average speed function on the contours of the LSM function with changing evolution time. For performance evaluation were employed the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), which denotes the degree of a region similarity between the gold standard of the GTV determined by radiation oncologists and the GTV region obtained by our proposed method. We applied our proposed method to data sets of planning CT and PET/CT image sets for six lung cancer patients. The average DSC was 0.77, which seems to be feasible for segmentation of lung tumors. Preliminary results show that the proposed method may be useful for assisting treatment planners in delineation of the tumor region. (author)

  8. A System for Automated Acquisition of 3D Biomedical Images Using Confocal Microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čapek, Martin; Tomori, Z.; Michálek, Jan; Janáček, Jiří; Kubínová, Lucie; Hozman, J.

    Vol.2. Graz: Verlag der Technischen Universität, 2009 - (Pabst, M.; Zellnig, G.), s. 415-416 ISBN 978-3-85125-062-6. [MC 2009 - Joint Meeting of Dreiländertagung and Multinational Congress on Microscopy /9./. Graz (AT), 30.08.2009-04.09.2009] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06063; GA ČR(CZ) GA102/08/0691; GA ČR(CZ) GA304/09/0733; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA100110502; GA MŠk(CZ) MEB080831 Grant ostatní: VEGA(SK) 2-0164-07 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : confocal laser scanning microscope * illumination inhomogeneity * automated acquisition system Subject RIV: JD - Computer Applications, Robotics

  9. A Review of Fully Automated Techniques for Brain Tumor Detection From MR Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjum Hayat Gondal

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Radiologists use medical images to diagnose diseases precisely. However, identification of brain tumor from medical images is still a critical and complicated job for a radiologist. Brain tumor identification form magnetic resonance imaging (MRI consists of several stages. Segmentation is known to be an essential step in medical imaging classification and analysis. Performing the brain MR images segmentation manually is a difficult task as there are several challenges associated with it. Radiologist and medical experts spend plenty of time for manually segmenting brain MR images, and this is a non-repeatable task. In view of this, an automatic segmentation of brain MR images is needed to correctly segment White Matter (WM, Gray Matter (GM and Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF tissues of brain in a shorter span of time. The accurate segmentation is crucial as otherwise the wrong identification of disease can lead to severe consequences. Taking into account the aforesaid challenges, this research is focused towards highlighting the strengths and limitations of the earlier proposed segmentation techniques discussed in the contemporary literature. Besides summarizing the literature, the paper also provides a critical evaluation of the surveyed literature which reveals new facets of research. However, articulating a new technique is beyond the scope of this paper.

  10. An automated image-based tool for pupil plane characterization of EUVL tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levinson, Zac; Smith, Jack S.; Fenger, Germain; Smith, Bruce W.

    2016-03-01

    Pupil plane characterization will play a critical role in image process optimization for EUV lithography (EUVL), as it has for several lithography generations. In EUVL systems there is additional importance placed on understanding the ways that thermally-induced system drift affect pupil variation during operation. In-situ full pupil characterization is therefore essential for these tools. To this end we have developed Quick Inverse Pupil (QUIP)—a software suite developed for rapid characterization of pupil plane behavior based on images formed by that system. The software consists of three main components: 1) an image viewer, 2) the model builder, and 3) the wavefront analyzer. The image viewer analyzes CDSEM micrographs or actinic mask micrographs to measure either CDs or through-focus intensity volumes. The software is capable of rotation correction and image registration with subpixel accuracy. The second component pre-builds a model for a particular imaging system to enable rapid pupil characterization. Finally, the third component analyzes the results from the image viewer and uses the optional pre-built model for inverse solutions of pupil plane behavior. Both pupil amplitude and phase variation can be extracted using this software. Inverse solutions are obtained through a model based algorithm which is built on top of commercial rigorous full-vector simulation software.

  11. AUTOMATED DETECTION OF HARD EXUDATES IN FUNDUS IMAGES USING IMPROVED OTSU THRESHOLDING AND SVM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Gao

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available One common cause of visual impairment among people of working age in the industrialized countries is Diabetic Retinopathy (DR. Automatic recognition of hard exudates (EXs which is one of DR lesions in fundus images can contribute to the diagnosis and screening of DR.The aim of this paper was to automatically detect those lesions from fundus images. At first,green channel of each original fundus image was segmented by improved Otsu thresholding based on minimum inner-cluster variance, and candidate regions of EXs were obtained. Then, we extracted features of candidate regions and selected a subset which best discriminates EXs from the retinal background by means of logistic regression (LR. The selected features were subsequently used as inputs to a SVM to get a final segmentation result of EXs in the image. Our database was composed of 120 images with variable color, brightness, and quality. 70 of them were used to train the SVM and the remaining 50 to assess the performance of the method. Using a lesion based criterion, we achieved a mean sensitivity of 95.05% and a mean positive predictive value of 95.37%. With an image-based criterion, our approach reached a 100% mean sensitivity, 90.9% mean specificity and 96.0% mean accuracy. Furthermore, the average time cost in processing an image is 8.31 seconds. These results suggest that the proposed method could be a diagnostic aid for ophthalmologists in the screening for DR.

  12. MO-G-BRE-03: Automated Continuous Monitoring of Patient Setup with Second-Check Independent Image Registration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To create a non-supervised quality assurance program to monitor image-based patient setup. The system acts a secondary check by independently computing shifts and rotations and interfaces with Varian's database to verify therapist's work and warn against sub-optimal setups. Methods: Temporary digitally-reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) and OBI radiographic image files created by Varian's treatment console during patient setup are intercepted and used as input in an independent registration module customized for accuracy that determines the optimal rotations and shifts. To deal with the poor quality of OBI images, a histogram equalization of the live images to the DDR counterparts is performed as a pre-processing step. A search for the most sensitive metric was performed by plotting search spaces subject to various translations and convergence analysis was applied to ensure the optimizer finds the global minima. Final system configuration uses the NCC metric with 150 histogram bins and a one plus one optimizer running for 2000 iterations with customized scales for translations and rotations in a multi-stage optimization setup that first corrects and translations and subsequently rotations. Results: The system was installed clinically to monitor and provide almost real-time feedback on patient positioning. On a 2 month-basis uncorrected pitch values were of a mean 0.016° with standard deviation of 1.692°, and couch rotations of − 0.090°± 1.547°. The couch shifts were −0.157°±0.466° cm for the vertical, 0.045°±0.286 laterally and 0.084°± 0.501° longitudinally. Uncorrected pitch angles were the most common source of discrepancies. Large variations in the pitch angles were correlated with patient motion inside the mask. Conclusion: A system for automated quality assurance of therapist's registration was designed and tested in clinical practice. The approach complements the clinical software's automated registration in

  13. Automated image segmentation and registration of vessel wall MRI for quantitative assessment of carotid artery vessel wall dimensions and plaque composition

    OpenAIRE

    Klooster, Ronald van 't

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of this thesis was to develop methods for automated segmentation, registration and classification of the carotid artery vessel wall and plaque components using multi-sequence MR vessel wall images to assess atherosclerosis. First, a general introduction into atherosclerosis and different stages of the disease were described including the importance to differentiate between stable and vulnerable plaques. Several non-invasive imaging techniques were discussed and the advantages of...

  14. Automated identification of diploid reference cells in cervical smears using image analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laak, J.A.W.M. van der; Siebers, A.G.; Cuijpers, V.M.J.I.; Pahlplatz, M.M.M.; Wilde, P.C.M. de; Hanselaar, A.G.J.M.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acquisition of DNA ploidy histograms by image analysis may yield important information regarding the behavior of premalignant cervical lesions. Accurate selection of nuclei for DNA measurement is an important prerequisite for obtaining reliable data. Traditionally, manual selection of nu

  15. Use of laser range finders and range image analysis in automated assembly tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvertos, Nicolas; Dcunha, Ivan

    1990-01-01

    A proposition to study the effect of filtering processes on range images and to evaluate the performance of two different laser range mappers is made. Median filtering was utilized to remove noise from the range images. First and second order derivatives are then utilized to locate the similarities and dissimilarities between the processed and the original images. Range depth information is converted into spatial coordinates, and a set of coefficients which describe 3-D objects is generated using the algorithm developed in the second phase of this research. Range images of spheres and cylinders are used for experimental purposes. An algorithm was developed to compare the performance of two different laser range mappers based upon the range depth information of surfaces generated by each of the mappers. Furthermore, an approach based on 2-D analytic geometry is also proposed which serves as a basis for the recognition of regular 3-D geometric objects.

  16. Automated Detection of Healthy and Diseased Aortae from Images Obtained by Contrast-Enhanced CT Scan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Gayhart

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We developed the next stage of our computer assisted diagnosis (CAD system to aid radiologists in evaluating CT images for aortic disease by removing innocuous images and highlighting signs of aortic disease. Materials and Methods. Segmented data of patient’s contrast-enhanced CT scan was analyzed for aortic dissection and penetrating aortic ulcer (PAU. Aortic dissection was detected by checking for an abnormal shape of the aorta using edge oriented methods. PAU was recognized through abnormally high intensities with interest point operators. Results. The aortic dissection detection process had a sensitivity of 0.8218 and a specificity of 0.9907. The PAU detection process scored a sensitivity of 0.7587 and a specificity of 0.9700. Conclusion. The aortic dissection detection process and the PAU detection process were successful in removing innocuous images, but additional methods are necessary for improving recognition of images with aortic disease.

  17. Automated liver lesion characterization using fast kVp switching dual energy computed tomography imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaria-Pang, Alberto; Dutta, Sandeep; Makrogiannis, Sokratis; Hara, Amy; Pavlicek, William; Silva, Alvin; Thomsen, Brian; Robertson, Scott; Okerlund, Darin; Langan, David A.; Bhotika, Rahul

    2010-03-01

    Hypodense metastases are not always completely distinguishable from benign cysts in the liver using conventional Computed Tomography (CT) imaging, since the two lesion types present with overlapping intensity distributions due to similar composition as well as other factors including beam hardening and patient motion. This problem is extremely challenging for small lesions with diameter less than 1 cm. To accurately characterize such lesions, multiple follow-up CT scans or additional Positron Emission Tomography or Magnetic Resonance Imaging exam are often conducted, and in some cases a biopsy may be required after the initial CT finding. Gemstone Spectral Imaging (GSI) with fast kVp switching enables projection-based material decomposition, offering the opportunity to discriminate tissue types based on their energy-sensitive material attenuation and density. GSI can be used to obtain monochromatic images where beam hardening is reduced or eliminated and the images come inherently pre-registered due to the fast kVp switching acquisition. We present a supervised learning method for discriminating between cysts and hypodense liver metastases using these monochromatic images. Intensity-based statistical features extracted from voxels inside the lesion are used to train optimal linear and nonlinear classifiers. Our algorithm only requires a region of interest within the lesion in order to compute relevant features and perform classification, thus eliminating the need for an accurate segmentation of the lesion. We report classifier performance using M-fold cross-validation on a large lesion database with radiologist-provided lesion location and labels as the reference standard. Our results demonstrate that (a) classification using a single projection-based spectral CT image, i.e., a monochromatic image at a specified keV, outperforms classification using an image-based dual energy CT pair, i.e., low and high kVp images derived from the same fast kVp acquisition and (b

  18. Statistical colour models: an automated digital image analysis method for quantification of histological biomarkers

    OpenAIRE

    Shu, Jie; Dolman, G. E.; Duan, Jiang; Qiu, Guoping; Ilyas, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background Colour is the most important feature used in quantitative immunohistochemistry (IHC) image analysis; IHC is used to provide information relating to aetiology and to confirm malignancy. Methods Statistical modelling is a technique widely used for colour detection in computer vision. We have developed a statistical model of colour detection applicable to detection of stain colour in digital IHC images. Model was first trained by massive colour pixels collected semi-automatically. To ...

  19. Automated method for small-animal PET image registration with intrinsic validation

    OpenAIRE

    Pascau, Javier; Gispert, Juan Domingo; Michaelides, Michael; Thanos, Panayotis K.; Volkow, Nora D.; Vaquero, Juan José; Soto-Montenegro, Maria Luisa; Desco, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    We propose and compare different registration approaches to align small-animal PET studies and a procedure to validate the results by means of objective registration consistency measurements. Procedures: We have applied a registration algorithm based on information theory, using different approaches to mask the reference image. The registration consistency allows for the detection of incorrect registrations. This methodology has been evaluated on a test dataset(FDG-PET rat brain images)...

  20. Automating PACS Quality Control with the Vanderbilt Image Processing Enterprise Resource

    OpenAIRE

    Esparza, Michael L.; Welch, E. Brian; Landman, Bennett A.

    2012-01-01

    Precise image acquisition is an integral part of modern patient care and medical imaging research. Periodic quality control using standardized protocols and phantoms ensures that scanners are operating according to specifications, yet such procedures do not ensure that individual datasets are free from corruption–for example due to patient motion, transient interference, or physiological variability. If unacceptable artifacts are noticed during scanning, a technologist can repeat a procedure....

  1. Automated measurement of epidermal thickness from optical coherence tomography images using line region growing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delacruz, Jomer; Weissman, Jesse; Gossage, Kirk

    2010-02-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive imaging modality that acquires cross sectional images of tissue in-vivo. It accelerates skin diagnosis by eliminating invasive biopsy and laborious histology in the process. Dermatologists have widely used it for looking at morphology of skin diseases such as psoriasis, dermatitis, basal cell carcinoma etc. Skin scientists have also successfully used it for looking at differences in epidermal thickness and its underlying structure with respect to age, body sites, ethnicity, gender, and other related factors. Similar to other in-vivo imaging systems, OCT images suffer from a high degree of speckle and noise content, which hinders examination of tissue structures. Most of the previous work in OCT segmentation of skin was done manually. This compromised the quality of the results by limiting the analyses to a few frames per area. In this paper, we discuss a region growing method for automatic identification of the upper and lower boundaries of the epidermis in living human skin tissue. This image analysis method utilizes images obtained from a frequency-domain OCT. This system is high-resolution and high-speed, and thus capable of capturing volumetric images of the skin in short time. The three-dimensional (3D) data provides additional information that is used in the segmentation process to help compensate for the inherent noise in the images. This method not only provides a better estimation of the epidermal thickness, but also generates a 3D surface map of the epidermal-dermal junction, from which underlying topography can be visualized and further quantified.

  2. Automated analysis of phantom images for the evaluation of long-term reproducibility in digital mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gennaro, G [Department of Oncological and Surgical Sciences, University of Padova, via Gattamelata 64, 35128 Padova (Italy); Ferro, F [Department of Oncological and Surgical Sciences, University of Padova, via Gattamelata 64, 35128 Padova (Italy); Contento, G [Cyberqual S.r.l., Gorizia (Italy); Fornasin, F [Cyberqual S.r.l., Gorizia (Italy); Di Maggio, C [Department of Oncological and Surgical Sciences, University of Padova, via Gattamelata 64, 35128 Padova (Italy)

    2007-03-07

    The performance of an automatic software package was evaluated with phantom images acquired by a full-field digital mammography unit. After the validation, the software was used, together with a Leeds TORMAS test object, to model the image acquisition process. Process modelling results were used to evaluate the sensitivity of the method in detecting changes of exposure parameters from routine image quality measurements in digital mammography, which is the ultimate purpose of long-term reproducibility tests. Image quality indices measured by the software included the mean pixel value and standard deviation of circular details and surrounding background, contrast-to-noise ratio and relative contrast; detail counts were also collected. The validation procedure demonstrated that the software localizes the phantom details correctly and the difference between automatic and manual measurements was within few grey levels. Quantitative analysis showed sufficient sensitivity to relate fluctuations in exposure parameters (kV{sub p} or mAs) to variations in image quality indices. In comparison, detail counts were found less sensitive in detecting image quality changes, even when limitations due to observer subjectivity were overcome by automatic analysis. In conclusion, long-term reproducibility tests provided by the Leeds TORMAS phantom with quantitative analysis of multiple IQ indices have been demonstrated to be effective in predicting causes of deviation from standard operating conditions and can be used to monitor stability in full-field digital mammography.

  3. Automated Pulmonary Nodule Detection System in Computed Tomography Images: A Hierarchical Block Classification Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wook-Jin Choi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A computer-aided detection (CAD system is helpful for radiologists to detect pulmonary nodules at an early stage. In this paper, we propose a novel pulmonary nodule detection method based on hierarchical block classification. The proposed CAD system consists of three steps. In the first step, input computed tomography images are split into three-dimensional block images, and we apply entropy analysis on the block images to select informative blocks. In the second step, the selected block images are segmented and adjusted for detecting nodule candidates. In the last step, we classify the nodule candidate images into nodules and non-nodules. We extract feature vectors of the objects in the selected blocks. Lastly, the support vector machine is applied to classify the extracted feature vectors. Performance of the proposed system is evaluated on the Lung Image Database Consortium database. The proposed method has reduced the false positives in the nodule candidates significantly. It achieved 95.28% sensitivity with only 2.27 false positives per scan.

  4. A learning-based approach for automated quality assessment of computer-rendered images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xi; Agam, Gady

    2012-01-01

    Computer generated images are common in numerous computer graphics applications such as games, modeling, and simulation. There is normally a tradeoff between the time allocated to the generation of each image frame and and the quality of the image, where better quality images require more processing time. Specifically, in the rendering of 3D objects, the surfaces of objects may be manipulated by subdividing them into smaller triangular patches and/or smoothing them so as to produce better looking renderings. Since unnecessary subdivision results in increased rendering time and unnecessary smoothing results in reduced details, there is a need to automatically determine the amount of necessary processing for producing good quality rendered images. In this paper we propose a novel supervised learning based methodology for automatically predicting the quality of rendered images of 3D objects. To perform the prediction we train on a data set which is labeled by human observers for quality. We are then able to predict the quality of renderings (not used in the training) with an average prediction error of roughly 20%. The proposed approach is compared to known techniques and is shown to produce better results.

  5. A novel approach for automated shoreline extraction from remote sensing images using low level programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigos, Anastasios; Vaiopoulos, Aristidis; Skianis, George; Tsekouras, George; Drakopoulos, Panos

    2015-04-01

    Tracking coastline changes is a crucial task in the context of coastal management and synoptic remotely sensed data has become an essential tool for this purpose. In this work, and within the framework of BeachTour project, we introduce a new method for shoreline extraction from high resolution satellite images. It was applied on two images taken by the WorldView-2 satellite (7 channels, 2m resolution) during July 2011 and August 2014. The location is the well-known tourist destination of Laganas beach spanning 5 km along the southern part of Zakynthos Island, Greece. The atmospheric correction was performed with the ENVI FLAASH procedure and the final images were validated against hyperspectral field measurements. Using three channels (CH2=blue, CH3=green and CH7=near infrared) the Modified Redness Index image was calculated according to: MRI=(CH7)2/[CH2x(CH3)3]. MRI has the property that its value keeps increasing as the water becomes shallower. This is followed by an abrupt reduction trend at the location of the wet sand up to the point where the dry shore face begins. After that it remains low-valued throughout the beach zone. Images based on this index were used for the shoreline extraction process that included the following steps: a) On the MRI based image, only an area near the shoreline was kept (this process is known as image masking). b) On the masked image the Canny edge detector operator was applied. c) Of all edges discovered on step (b) only the biggest was kept. d) If the line revealed on step (c) was unacceptable, i.e. not defining the shoreline or defining only part of it, then either more than one areas on step (c) were kept or on the MRI image the pixel values were bound in a particular interval [Blow, Bhigh] and only the ones belonging in this interval were kept. Then, steps (a)-(d) were repeated. Using this method, which is still under development, we were able to extract the shoreline position and reveal its changes during the 3-year period

  6. Investigation into diagnostic agreement using automated computer-assisted histopathology pattern recognition image analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua D Webster

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The extent to which histopathology pattern recognition image analysis (PRIA agrees with microscopic assessment has not been established. Thus, a commercial PRIA platform was evaluated in two applications using whole-slide images. Substantial agreement, lacking significant constant or proportional errors, between PRIA and manual morphometric image segmentation was obtained for pulmonary metastatic cancer areas (Passing/Bablok regression. Bland-Altman analysis indicated heteroscedastic measurements and tendency toward increasing variance with increasing tumor burden, but no significant trend in mean bias. The average between-methods percent tumor content difference was -0.64. Analysis of between-methods measurement differences relative to the percent tumor magnitude revealed that method disagreement had an impact primarily in the smallest measurements (tumor burden 0.988, indicating high reproducibility for both methods, yet PRIA reproducibility was superior (C.V.: PRIA = 7.4, manual = 17.1. Evaluation of PRIA on morphologically complex teratomas led to diagnostic agreement with pathologist assessments of pluripotency on subsets of teratomas. Accommodation of the diversity of teratoma histologic features frequently resulted in detrimental trade-offs, increasing PRIA error elsewhere in images. PRIA error was nonrandom and influenced by variations in histomorphology. File-size limitations encountered while training algorithms and consequences of spectral image processing dominance contributed to diagnostic inaccuracies experienced for some teratomas. PRIA appeared better suited for tissues with limited phenotypic diversity. Technical improvements may enhance diagnostic agreement, and consistent pathologist input will benefit further development and application of PRIA.

  7. Predicting non-small cell lung cancer prognosis by fully automated microscopic pathology image features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kun-Hsing; Zhang, Ce; Berry, Gerald J.; Altman, Russ B.; Ré, Christopher; Rubin, Daniel L.; Snyder, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most prevalent cancer worldwide, and histopathological assessment is indispensable for its diagnosis. However, human evaluation of pathology slides cannot accurately predict patients' prognoses. In this study, we obtain 2,186 haematoxylin and eosin stained histopathology whole-slide images of lung adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma patients from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), and 294 additional images from Stanford Tissue Microarray (TMA) Database. We extract 9,879 quantitative image features and use regularized machine-learning methods to select the top features and to distinguish shorter-term survivors from longer-term survivors with stage I adenocarcinoma (P<0.003) or squamous cell carcinoma (P=0.023) in the TCGA data set. We validate the survival prediction framework with the TMA cohort (P<0.036 for both tumour types). Our results suggest that automatically derived image features can predict the prognosis of lung cancer patients and thereby contribute to precision oncology. Our methods are extensible to histopathology images of other organs. PMID:27527408

  8. Automated extraction method for the center line of spinal canal and its application to the spinal curvature quantification in torso X-ray CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Tatsuro; Zhou, Xiangrong; Chen, Huayue; Hara, Takeshi; Miyamoto, Kei; Kobayashi, Tatsunori; Yokoyama, Ryujiro; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Hoshi, Hiroaki; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2010-03-01

    X-ray CT images have been widely used in clinical routine in recent years. CT images scanned by a modern CT scanner can show the details of various organs and tissues. This means various organs and tissues can be simultaneously interpreted on CT images. However, CT image interpretation requires a lot of time and energy. Therefore, support for interpreting CT images based on image-processing techniques is expected. The interpretation of the spinal curvature is important for clinicians because spinal curvature is associated with various spinal disorders. We propose a quantification scheme of the spinal curvature based on the center line of spinal canal on CT images. The proposed scheme consists of four steps: (1) Automated extraction of the skeletal region based on CT number thresholding. (2) Automated extraction of the center line of spinal canal. (3) Generation of the median plane image of spine, which is reformatted based on the spinal canal. (4) Quantification of the spinal curvature. The proposed scheme was applied to 10 cases, and compared with the Cobb angle that is commonly used by clinicians. We found that a high-correlation (for the 95% confidence interval, lumbar lordosis: 0.81-0.99) between values obtained by the proposed (vector) method and Cobb angle. Also, the proposed method can provide the reproducible result (inter- and intra-observer variability: within 2°). These experimental results suggested a possibility that the proposed method was efficient for quantifying the spinal curvature on CT images.

  9. Automated Feature Extraction In Cotton Leaf Images By Graph Cut Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant R. Rothe

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Feature extraction and representation is a decisive step for pattern recognition system. How to extract ideal features that can reflect the inherent content of the images as complete as possible is still a challenging problem in computer vision. Therefore goal of feature extraction is to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of analysis and classification.In this work we present a graph cut based approach for the segmentation of images of diseased cotton leaves.We extract color layout descriptors which can be used for classification. The diseases that have been considered are Bacterial Blight, Myrothecium and Alternaria. The testing samples of the images are gathered from CICR Nagpur, cotton fields in Buldhana and Nagpur district.

  10. Automated microaneurysm detection method based on double ring filter in retinal fundus images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, Atsushi; Muramatsu, Chisako; Hatanaka, Yuji; Suemori, Shinsuke; Hara, Takeshi; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2009-02-01

    The presence of microaneurysms in the eye is one of the early signs of diabetic retinopathy, which is one of the leading causes of vision loss. We have been investigating a computerized method for the detection of microaneurysms on retinal fundus images, which were obtained from the Retinopathy Online Challenge (ROC) database. The ROC provides 50 training cases, in which "gold standard" locations of microaneurysms are provided, and 50 test cases without the gold standard locations. In this study, the computerized scheme was developed by using the training cases. Although the results for the test cases are also included, this paper mainly discusses the results for the training cases because the "gold standard" for the test cases is not known. After image preprocessing, candidate regions for microaneurysms were detected using a double-ring filter. Any potential false positives located in the regions corresponding to blood vessels were removed by automatic extraction of blood vessels from the images. Twelve image features were determined, and the candidate lesions were classified into microaneurysms or false positives using the rule-based method and an artificial neural network. The true positive fraction of the proposed method was 0.45 at 27 false positives per image. Forty-two percent of microaneurysms in the 50 training cases were considered invisible by the consensus of two co-investigators. When the method was evaluated for visible microaneurysms, the sensitivity for detecting microaneurysms was 65% at 27 false positives per image. Our computerized detection scheme could be improved for helping ophthalmologists in the early diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy.

  11. Automated Classification Of Scanning Electron Microscope Particle Images Using Morphological Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamarche, B. L.; Lewis, R. R.; Girvin, D. C.; McKinley, J. P.

    2008-12-01

    We are developing a software tool that can automatically classify anthropogenic and natural aerosol particulates using morphological analysis. Our method was developed using SEM (background and secondary electron) images of single particles. Particle silhouettes are detected and converted into polygons using Intel's OpenCV image processing library. Our analysis then proceeds independently for the two kinds of images. Analysis of secondary images concerns itself solely with the silhouette and seeks to quantify its shape and roughness. Traversing the polygon with spline interpolation, we uniformly sample k(s), the signed curvature of the silhouette's path as a function of distance along the perimeter s. k(s) is invariant under rotation and translation. The power spectrum of k(s) qualitatively shows both shape and roughness: more power at low frequencies indicates variation in shape; more power at higher frequencies indicates a rougher silhouette. We present a series of filters (low-, band-, and high-pass) which we convolve with k(s) to yield a set of parameters that characterize the shape and roughness numerically. Analysis of backscatter images focuses on the (visual) texture, which is the result of both composition and geometry. Using the silhouette as a boundary, we compute the variogram, a statistical measure of inter-pixel covariance as a function of distance. Variograms take on characteristic curves, which we fit with a heuristic, asymptotic function that uses a small set of parameters. The combination of silhouette and variogram fit parameters forms the basis of a multidimensional classification space whose dimensionality we may reduce by principal component analysis and whose region boundaries allow us to classify new particles. This analysis is performed without a priori knowledge of other physical, chemical, or climatic properties. The method will be adapted to multi-particulate images.

  12. Automated Detection of Interphase and Metaphase Nuclei in the FISH Images

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schier, Jan; Kovář, Bohumil; Kočárek, E.

    Algarve : SciTePress - Science and Technology Publications, 2012 - (Schier, J.; Correia, C.; Fred, A.; Gamboa, H.), s. 347-350 ISBN 978-989-8425-90-4. [BIOINFORMATICS 2012, International Conference on Bioinformatics Models, Methods and Algorithms. Vilamoura, Algarve (PT), 01.02.2012-04.02.2012] R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA01010931 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : FISH analysis * Fluorescence microscopy * Image analysis * Image segmentation Subject RIV: JC - Computer Hardware ; Software

  13. Automated segmentations of skin, soft-tissue, and skeleton, from torso CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiangrong; Hara, Takeshi; Fujita, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Ryujiro; Kiryu, Takuji; Hoshi, Hiroaki

    2004-05-01

    We have been developing a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) scheme for automatically recognizing human tissue and organ regions from high-resolution torso CT images. We show some initial results for extracting skin, soft-tissue and skeleton regions. 139 patient cases of torso CT images (male 92, female 47; age: 12-88) were used in this study. Each case was imaged with a common protocol (120kV/320mA) and covered the whole torso with isotopic spatial resolution of about 0.63 mm and density resolution of 12 bits. A gray-level thresholding based procedure was applied to separate the human body from background. The density and distance features to body surface were used to determine the skin, and separate soft-tissue from the others. A 3-D region growing based method was used to extract the skeleton. We applied this system to the 139 cases and found that the skin, soft-tissue and skeleton regions were recognized correctly for 93% of the patient cases. The accuracy of segmentation results was acceptable by evaluating the results slice by slice. This scheme will be included in CAD systems for detecting and diagnosing the abnormal lesions in multi-slice torso CT images.

  14. An automated cloud detection method based on green channel of total sky visible images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Yang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Getting an accurate cloud cover state is a challenging task. In the past, traditional two-dimensional red-to-blue band methods have been widely used for cloud detection in total sky images. By analyzing the imaging principle of cameras, green channel has been selected to replace the 2-D red-to-blue band for total sky cloud detection. The brightness distribution in a total sky image is usually non-uniform, because of forward scattering and Mie scattering of aerosols, which results in increased detection errors in the circumsolar and near-horizon regions. This paper proposes an automatic cloud detection algorithm, "green channel background subtraction adaptive threshold" (GBSAT, which incorporates channel selection, background simulation, computation of solar mask and cloud mask, subtraction, adaptive threshold, and binarization. Several experimental cases show that the GBSAT algorithm is robust for all types of test total sky images and has more complete and accurate retrievals of visual effects than those found through traditional methods.

  15. Enabling automated magnetic resonance imaging-based targeting assessment during dipole field navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latulippe, Maxime; Felfoul, Ouajdi; Dupont, Pierre E.; Martel, Sylvain

    2016-02-01

    The magnetic navigation of drugs in the vascular network promises to increase the efficacy and reduce the secondary toxicity of cancer treatments by targeting tumors directly. Recently, dipole field navigation (DFN) was proposed as the first method achieving both high field and high navigation gradient strengths for whole-body interventions in deep tissues. This is achieved by introducing large ferromagnetic cores around the patient inside a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. However, doing so distorts the static field inside the scanner, which prevents imaging during the intervention. This limitation constrains DFN to open-loop navigation, thus exposing the risk of a harmful toxicity in case of a navigation failure. Here, we are interested in periodically assessing drug targeting efficiency using MRI even in the presence of a core. We demonstrate, using a clinical scanner, that it is in fact possible to acquire, in specific regions around a core, images of sufficient quality to perform this task. We show that the core can be moved inside the scanner to a position minimizing the distortion effect in the region of interest for imaging. Moving the core can be done automatically using the gradient coils of the scanner, which then also enables the core to be repositioned to perform navigation to additional targets. The feasibility and potential of the approach are validated in an in vitro experiment demonstrating navigation and assessment at two targets.

  16. DetectTLC: Automated Reaction Mixture Screening Utilizing Quantitative Mass Spectrometry Image Feature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaddi, Chanchala D.; Bennett, Rachel V.; Paine, Martin R. L.; Banks, Mitchel D.; Weber, Arthur L.; Fernández, Facundo M.; Wang, May D.

    2016-01-01

    Full characterization of complex reaction mixtures is necessary to understand mechanisms, optimize yields, and elucidate secondary reaction pathways. Molecular-level information for species in such mixtures can be readily obtained by coupling mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) with thin layer chromatography (TLC) separations. User-guided investigation of imaging data for mixture components with known m/z values is generally straightforward; however, spot detection for unknowns is highly tedious, and limits the applicability of MSI in conjunction with TLC. To accelerate imaging data mining, we developed DetectTLC, an approach that automatically identifies m/z values exhibiting TLC spot-like regions in MS molecular images. Furthermore, DetectTLC can also spatially match m/z values for spots acquired during alternating high and low collision-energy scans, pairing product ions with precursors to enhance structural identification. As an example, DetectTLC is applied to the identification and structural confirmation of unknown, yet significant, products of abiotic pyrazinone and aminopyrazine nucleoside analog synthesis. PMID:26508443

  17. Automated method for measuring alveolar bone resorption by three-dimensional image processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes a method for estimating regions of alveolar bone resorption and automatically measuring resorption depth using dental 3-D CT images by applying 3-D image processing techniques. The depth of alveolar bone resorption is an important index of the severity of periodontitis. Conventional methods for evaluating alveolar bone resorption have suffered from the limitations of not permitting inspection on the interproximal sides and not providing a 3-D description of resorption. In our proposed method, dental 3-D X-ray CT images are used to estimate the region of resorption and to automatically measure the resorption depth around the tooth of interest. Detailed information concerning the distribution of resorption can be obtained using this method. Regions of resorption are estimated using morphological operations and labeling. Limits are established by fitting convex hulls to the region of the target tooth before searching for the lowest points of resorption. The resorption depth is calculated as the distance between the cement-enamel junction and the lowest point of resorption. The experimental results and comparison of these results against measurements obtained by experts using cross-sectional CT images and the findings of clinical examination showed that the proposed method can be used to measure the resorption depth around the entire tooth automatically. (author)

  18. An Automated System for the Detection and Diagnosis of Kidney Lesions in Children from Scintigraphy Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landgren, Matilda; Sjöstrand, Karl; Ohlsson, Mattias; Ståhl, Daniel; Overgaard, Niels Christian; Åström, Kalle; Sixt, Rune; Edenbrandt, Lars

    lesions in children and adolescents from 99mTc- DMSA scintigraphy images. We present the chain of analysis and provide a discussion of its performance. On a per-lesion basis, the classification reached an ROC-curve area of 0.96 (sensitivity/specificity e.g. 97%/85%) measured using an independent test...

  19. Automated image segmentation of haematoxylin and eosin stained skeletal muscle cross-sections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, F; Mackey, AL; Srikuea, R;

    2013-01-01

    . This procedure is labour-intensive and time-consuming. In this paper, we have developed and validated an automatic image segmentation algorithm that is not only efficient but also accurate. Our proposed automatic segmentation algorithm for haematoxylin and eosin stained skeletal muscle cross-sections consists...

  20. DetectTLC: Automated Reaction Mixture Screening Utilizing Quantitative Mass Spectrometry Image Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaddi, Chanchala D.; Bennett, Rachel V.; Paine, Martin R. L.; Banks, Mitchel D.; Weber, Arthur L.; Fernández, Facundo M.; Wang, May D.

    2016-02-01

    Full characterization of complex reaction mixtures is necessary to understand mechanisms, optimize yields, and elucidate secondary reaction pathways. Molecular-level information for species in such mixtures can be readily obtained by coupling mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) with thin layer chromatography (TLC) separations. User-guided investigation of imaging data for mixture components with known m/z values is generally straightforward; however, spot detection for unknowns is highly tedious, and limits the applicability of MSI in conjunction with TLC. To accelerate imaging data mining, we developed DetectTLC, an approach that automatically identifies m/z values exhibiting TLC spot-like regions in MS molecular images. Furthermore, DetectTLC can also spatially match m/z values for spots acquired during alternating high and low collision-energy scans, pairing product ions with precursors to enhance structural identification. As an example, DetectTLC is applied to the identification and structural confirmation of unknown, yet significant, products of abiotic pyrazinone and aminopyrazine nucleoside analog synthesis.

  1. Automated detection of kinks from blood vessels for optic cup segmentation in retinal images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, D. W. K.; Liu, J.; Lim, J. H.; Li, H.; Wong, T. Y.

    2009-02-01

    The accurate localization of the optic cup in retinal images is important to assess the cup to disc ratio (CDR) for glaucoma screening and management. Glaucoma is physiologically assessed by the increased excavation of the optic cup within the optic nerve head, also known as the optic disc. The CDR is thus an important indicator of risk and severity of glaucoma. In this paper, we propose a method of determining the cup boundary using non-stereographic retinal images by the automatic detection of a morphological feature within the optic disc known as kinks. Kinks are defined as the bendings of small vessels as they traverse from the disc to the cup, providing physiological validation for the cup boundary. To detect kinks, localized patches are first generated from a preliminary cup boundary obtained via level set. Features obtained using edge detection and wavelet transform are combined using a statistical approach rule to identify likely vessel edges. The kinks are then obtained automatically by analyzing the detected vessel edges for angular changes, and these kinks are subsequently used to obtain the cup boundary. A set of retinal images from the Singapore Eye Research Institute was obtained to assess the performance of the method, with each image being clinically graded for the CDR. From experiments, when kinks were used, the error on the CDR was reduced to less than 0.1 CDR units relative to the clinical CDR, which is within the intra-observer variability of 0.2 CDR units.

  2. SU-C-BRD-06: Sensitivity Study of An Automated System to Acquire and Analyze EPID Exit Dose Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olch, A; Zhuang, A [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The dosimetric consequences of errors in patient setup or beam delivery and anatomical changes are not readily known. A new product, PerFRACTION (Sun Nuclear Corporation), is designed to detect these errors by comparing the EPID exit dose image from each field of each fraction to those from baseline fraction images. This work investigates the sensitivity of PerFRACTION to detect the deviation of induced errors in a variety of realistic scenarios. Methods: Eight plans were created mimicking potential delivery or setup errors. The plans consisted of a nominal field and the field with an induced error. These were used to irradiate the EPID simulating multiple fractions with and without the error. Integrated EPID images were acquired in clinical mode and saved in ARIA. PerFRACTION automatically pulls the images into its database and performs the user defined comparison. In some cases, images were manually pushed to PerFRACTION. We varied the distance-to-agreement or dose tolerance until PerFRACTION showed failing pixels in the affected region and recorded the values. We induced errors of 1mm and greater in jaw, MLC, and couch position, 2 degree collimation rotation (patient yaw), and 0.5% to 1.5% in machine output. Both static and arc fields with the rails in or out were also acquired and compared. Results: PerFRACTION detected position errors of the jaws, MLC, and couch with an accuracy of better than 0.5 mm, and 0.2 degrees for collimator and gantry error. PerFRACTION detected a machine output error within 0.2% and detected the change in rail position. Conclusion: A new automated system for monitoring daily treatments for machine or patient variations from the first fraction using integrated EPID images was found to be sensitive enough to detect small positional, angular, and dosimetric errors within 0.5mm, 0.2 degrees, and 0.2%, respectively. Sun Nuclear Corporation has provided a software license for the product described.

  3. Automated detection of semagram-laden images using adaptive neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerkez, Paul S.; Cannady, James D.

    2012-04-01

    Digital steganography is gaining wide acceptance in the world of electronic copyright stamping. Digital media that are easy to steal, such as graphics, photos and audio files, are being tagged with both visible and invisible copyright stamps (known as digital watermarking). However, these same techniques can also be used to hide communications between actors in criminal or covert activities. An inherent difficulty in detecting steganography is overcoming the variety of methods for hiding a message and the multitude of choices of available media. Another problem in steganography defense is the issue of detection speed since the encoded data is frequently time-sensitive. When a message is visually transmitted in a non-textual format (i.e., in an image) it is referred to as a semagram. Semagrams are relatively easy to create, but very difficult to detect. While steganography can often be identified by detecting digital modifications to an image's structure, an image-based semagram is more difficult because the message is the image itself. The work presented describes the creation of a novel, computer-based application, which uses hybrid hierarchical neural network architecture to detect the likely presence of a semagram message in an image. The prototype system was used to detect semagrams containing Morse Code messages. Based on the results of these experiments our approach provides a significant advance in the detection of complex semagram patterns. Specific results of the experiments and the potential practical applications of the neural network-based technology are discussed. This presentation provides the final results of our research experiments.

  4. Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) breast composition descriptors: Automated measurement development for full field digital mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, E. E.; Sellers, T. A.; Lu, B. [Department of Cancer Epidemiology, Division of Population Sciences, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States); Heine, J. J. [Department of Cancer Imaging and Metabolism, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: The Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) breast composition descriptors are used for standardized mammographic reporting and are assessed visually. This reporting is clinically relevant because breast composition can impact mammographic sensitivity and is a breast cancer risk factor. New techniques are presented and evaluated for generating automated BI-RADS breast composition descriptors using both raw and calibrated full field digital mammography (FFDM) image data.Methods: A matched case-control dataset with FFDM images was used to develop three automated measures for the BI-RADS breast composition descriptors. Histograms of each calibrated mammogram in the percent glandular (pg) representation were processed to create the new BR{sub pg} measure. Two previously validated measures of breast density derived from calibrated and raw mammograms were converted to the new BR{sub vc} and BR{sub vr} measures, respectively. These three measures were compared with the radiologist-reported BI-RADS compositions assessments from the patient records. The authors used two optimization strategies with differential evolution to create these measures: method-1 used breast cancer status; and method-2 matched the reported BI-RADS descriptors. Weighted kappa (κ) analysis was used to assess the agreement between the new measures and the reported measures. Each measure's association with breast cancer was evaluated with odds ratios (ORs) adjusted for body mass index, breast area, and menopausal status. ORs were estimated as per unit increase with 95% confidence intervals.Results: The three BI-RADS measures generated by method-1 had κ between 0.25–0.34. These measures were significantly associated with breast cancer status in the adjusted models: (a) OR = 1.87 (1.34, 2.59) for BR{sub pg}; (b) OR = 1.93 (1.36, 2.74) for BR{sub vc}; and (c) OR = 1.37 (1.05, 1.80) for BR{sub vr}. The measures generated by method-2 had κ between 0.42–0.45. Two of these

  5. Automated classification of LV regional wall motion based on spatio-temporal profiles from cardiac cine magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantilla, Juan; Garreau, Mireille; Bellanger, Jean-Jacques; Paredes, José Luis

    2013-11-01

    Assessment of the cardiac Left Ventricle (LV) wall motion is generally based on visual inspection or quantitative analysis of 2D+t sequences acquired in short-axis cardiac cine-Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Most often, cardiac dynamic is globally analized from two particular phases of the cardiac cycle. In this paper, we propose an automated method to classify regional wall motion in LV function based on spatio-temporal pro les and Support Vector Machines (SVM). This approach allows to obtain a binary classi cation between normal and abnormal motion, without the need of pre-processing and by exploiting all the images of the cardiac cycle. In each short- axis MRI slice level (basal, median, and apical), the spatio-temporal pro les are extracted from the selection of a subset of diametrical lines crossing opposites LV segments. Initialized at end-diastole phase, the pro les are concatenated with their corresponding projections into the succesive temporal phases of the cardiac cycle. These pro les are associated to di erent types of information that derive from the image (gray levels), Fourier, Wavelet or Curvelet domains. The approach has been tested on a set of 14 abnormal and 6 healthy patients by using a leave-one-out cross validation and two kernel functions for SVM classi er. The best classi cation performance is yielded by using four-level db4 wavelet transform and SVM with a linear kernel. At each slice level the results provided a classi cation rate of 87.14% in apical level, 95.48% in median level and 93.65% in basal level.

  6. Automated prostate cancer detection via comprehensive multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging texture feature models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prostate cancer is the most common form of cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death in North America. Auto-detection of prostate cancer can play a major role in early detection of prostate cancer, which has a significant impact on patient survival rates. While multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging (MP-MRI) has shown promise in diagnosis of prostate cancer, the existing auto-detection algorithms do not take advantage of abundance of data available in MP-MRI to improve detection accuracy. The goal of this research was to design a radiomics-based auto-detection method for prostate cancer via utilizing MP-MRI data. In this work, we present new MP-MRI texture feature models for radiomics-driven detection of prostate cancer. In addition to commonly used non-invasive imaging sequences in conventional MP-MRI, namely T2-weighted MRI (T2w) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), our proposed MP-MRI texture feature models incorporate computed high-b DWI (CHB-DWI) and a new diffusion imaging modality called correlated diffusion imaging (CDI). Moreover, the proposed texture feature models incorporate features from individual b-value images. A comprehensive set of texture features was calculated for both the conventional MP-MRI and new MP-MRI texture feature models. We performed feature selection analysis for each individual modality and then combined best features from each modality to construct the optimized texture feature models. The performance of the proposed MP-MRI texture feature models was evaluated via leave-one-patient-out cross-validation using a support vector machine (SVM) classifier trained on 40,975 cancerous and healthy tissue samples obtained from real clinical MP-MRI datasets. The proposed MP-MRI texture feature models outperformed the conventional model (i.e., T2w+DWI) with regard to cancer detection accuracy. Comprehensive texture feature models were developed for improved radiomics-driven detection of prostate cancer using MP-MRI. Using a

  7. Automated Alignment and On-Sky Performance of the Gemini Planet Imager Coronagraph

    CERN Document Server

    Savransky, Dmitry; Poyneer, Lisa A; Dunn, Jennifer; Macintosh, Bruce A; Sadakuni, Naru; Dillon, Daren; Goodsell, Stephen J; Hartung, Markus; Hibon, Pascale; Rantakyrö, Fredrik; Cardwell, Andrew; Serio, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) is a next-generation, facility instrument currently being commissioned at the Gemini South observatory. GPI combines an extreme adaptive optics system and integral field spectrograph (IFS) with an apodized-pupil Lyot coronagraph (APLC) producing an unprecedented capability for directly imaging and spectroscopically characterizing extrasolar planets. GPI's operating goal of $10^{-7}$ contrast requires very precise alignments between the various elements of the coronagraph (two pupil masks and one focal plane mask) and active control of the beam path throughout the instrument. Here, we describe the techniques used to automatically align GPI and maintain the alignment throughout the course of science observations. We discuss the particular challenges of maintaining precision alignments on a Cassegrain mounted instrument and strategies that we have developed that allow GPI to achieve high contrast even in poor seeing conditions.

  8. Automated prediction of tissue outcome after acute ischemic stroke in computed tomography perfusion images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, Pieter C.; Bennink, Edwin; de Jong, Hugo; Velthuis, Birgitta K.; Viergever, Max A.; Dankbaar, Jan Willem

    2015-03-01

    Assessment of the extent of cerebral damage on admission in patients with acute ischemic stroke could play an important role in treatment decision making. Computed tomography perfusion (CTP) imaging can be used to determine the extent of damage. However, clinical application is hindered by differences among vendors and used methodology. As a result, threshold based methods and visual assessment of CTP images has not yet shown to be useful in treatment decision making and predicting clinical outcome. Preliminary results in MR studies have shown the benefit of using supervised classifiers for predicting tissue outcome, but this has not been demonstrated for CTP. We present a novel method for the automatic prediction of tissue outcome by combining multi-parametric CTP images into a tissue outcome probability map. A supervised classification scheme was developed to extract absolute and relative perfusion values from processed CTP images that are summarized by a trained classifier into a likelihood of infarction. Training was performed using follow-up CT scans of 20 acute stroke patients with complete recanalization of the vessel that was occluded on admission. Infarcted regions were annotated by expert neuroradiologists. Multiple classifiers were evaluated in a leave-one-patient-out strategy for their discriminating performance using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) statistics. Results showed that a RandomForest classifier performed optimally with an area under the ROC of 0.90 for discriminating infarct tissue. The obtained results are an improvement over existing thresholding methods and are in line with results found in literature where MR perfusion was used.

  9. OpenComet: An automated tool for comet assay image analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Gyori, Benjamin M.; Gireedhar Venkatachalam; Thiagarajan, P. S.; David Hsu; Marie-Veronique Clement

    2014-01-01

    Reactive species such as free radicals are constantly generated in vivo and DNA is the most important target of oxidative stress. Oxidative DNA damage is used as a predictive biomarker to monitor the risk of development of many diseases. The comet assay is widely used for measuring oxidative DNA damage at a single cell level. The analysis of comet assay output images, however, poses considerable challenges. Commercial software is costly and restrictive, while free software generally requires ...

  10. Metro Maps of Plant Disease Dynamics—Automated Mining of Differences Using Hyperspectral Images

    OpenAIRE

    Wahabzada, Mirwaes; Mahlein, Anne-Katrin; Bauckhage, Christian; Steiner, Ulrike; Oerke, Erich-Christian; Kersting, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the response dynamics of plants to biotic stress is essential to improve management practices and breeding strategies of crops and thus to proceed towards a more sustainable agriculture in the coming decades. In this context, hyperspectral imaging offers a particularly promising approach since it provides non-destructive measurements of plants correlated with internal structure and biochemical compounds. In this paper, we present a cascade of data mining techniques for fast and ...

  11. Automated iterative neutrosophic lung segmentation for image analysis in thoracic computed tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Yanhui; Zhou, Chuan; Chan, Heang-Ping; Chughtai, Aamer; Wei, Jun; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Kazerooni, Ella A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Lung segmentation is a fundamental step in many image analysis applications for lung diseases and abnormalities in thoracic computed tomography (CT). The authors have previously developed a lung segmentation method based on expectation-maximization (EM) analysis and morphological operations (EMM) for our computer-aided detection (CAD) system for pulmonary embolism (PE) in CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA). However, due to the large variations in pathology that may be present in thoraci...

  12. Development and evaluation of automated image analysis techniques in thoracic CT

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, K.

    2011-01-01

    This work concerns the development and analysis of two automatic image processing techniques in thoracic CT: Nodule detection and Intra-patient non-rigid registration. A method of nodule detection is described and thoroughly evaluated, and the organisation of a public challenge in nodule detection (ANODE09) is described with detailed discussion of the challenge results. Non-rigid registration is applied to a database of COPD patients in order to demonstrate a method of measuring pulmonary fun...

  13. CT-guided automated detection of lung tumors on PET images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yunfeng; Zhao, Binsheng; Akhurst, Timothy J.; Yan, Jiayong; Schwartz, Lawrence H.

    2008-03-01

    The calculation of standardized uptake values (SUVs) in tumors on serial [ 18F]2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ( 18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) images is often used for the assessment of therapy response. We present a computerized method that automatically detects lung tumors on 18F-FDG PET/Computed Tomography (CT) images using both anatomic and metabolic information. First, on CT images, relevant organs, including lung, bone, liver and spleen, are automatically identified and segmented based on their locations and intensity distributions. Hot spots (SUV >= 1.5) on 18F-FDG PET images are then labeled using the connected component analysis. The resultant "hot objects" (geometrically connected hot spots in three dimensions) that fall into, reside at the edges or are in the vicinity of the lungs are considered as tumor candidates. To determine true lesions, further analyses are conducted, including reduction of tumor candidates by the masking out of hot objects within CT-determined normal organs, and analysis of candidate tumors' locations, intensity distributions and shapes on both CT and PET. The method was applied to 18F-FDG-PET/CT scans from 9 patients, on which 31 target lesions had been identified by a nuclear medicine radiologist during a Phase II lung cancer clinical trial. Out of 31 target lesions, 30 (97%) were detected by the computer method. However, sensitivity and specificity were not estimated because not all lesions had been marked up in the clinical trial. The method effectively excluded the hot spots caused by mediastinum, liver, spleen, skeletal muscle and bone metastasis.

  14. Easy Leaf Area: Automated Digital Image Analysis for Rapid and Accurate Measurement of Leaf Area

    OpenAIRE

    Hsien Ming Easlon; Bloom, Arnold J.

    2014-01-01

    Premise of the study: Measurement of leaf areas from digital photographs has traditionally required significant user input unless backgrounds are carefully masked. Easy Leaf Area was developed to batch process hundreds of Arabidopsis rosette images in minutes, removing background artifacts and saving results to a spreadsheet-ready CSV file. Methods and Results: Easy Leaf Area uses the color ratios of each pixel to distinguish leaves and calibration areas from their background and compares ...

  15. Automated Image Analysis in Undetermined Sections of Human Permanent Third Molars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørndal, Lars; Darvann, Tron Andre; Bro-Nielsen, Morten; Larsen, Rasmus; Thylstrup, A.

    1997-01-01

    A computerized histomorphometric analysis was made of Karnovsky-fixed, hydroxethylmethacrylate embedded and toluidine blue/pyronin-stained sections to determine: (1) the two-dimensional size of the coronal odontoblasts given by their cytoplasm:nucleus ratio; (2) the ratio between the number of co...... sectioning profiles should be analysed. The use of advanced image processing on undemineralized tooth sections provides a rational foundation for further work on the reactions of the odontoblasts to external injuries including dental caries....

  16. Digital Rocks Portal: a sustainable platform for imaged dataset sharing, translation and automated analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prodanovic, M.; Esteva, M.; Hanlon, M.; Nanda, G.; Agarwal, P.

    2015-12-01

    Recent advances in imaging have provided a wealth of 3D datasets that reveal pore space microstructure (nm to cm length scale) and allow investigation of nonlinear flow and mechanical phenomena from first principles using numerical approaches. This framework has popularly been called "digital rock physics". Researchers, however, have trouble storing and sharing the datasets both due to their size and the lack of standardized image types and associated metadata for volumetric datasets. This impedes scientific cross-validation of the numerical approaches that characterize large scale porous media properties, as well as development of multiscale approaches required for correct upscaling. A single research group typically specializes in an imaging modality and/or related modeling on a single length scale, and lack of data-sharing infrastructure makes it difficult to integrate different length scales. We developed a sustainable, open and easy-to-use repository called the Digital Rocks Portal, that (1) organizes images and related experimental measurements of different porous materials, (2) improves access to them for a wider community of geosciences or engineering researchers not necessarily trained in computer science or data analysis. Once widely accepter, the repository will jumpstart productivity and enable scientific inquiry and engineering decisions founded on a data-driven basis. This is the first repository of its kind. We show initial results on incorporating essential software tools and pipelines that make it easier for researchers to store and reuse data, and for educators to quickly visualize and illustrate concepts to a wide audience. For data sustainability and continuous access, the portal is implemented within the reliable, 24/7 maintained High Performance Computing Infrastructure supported by the Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC) at the University of Texas at Austin. Long-term storage is provided through the University of Texas System Research

  17. Automated Counting of Rice Planthoppers in Paddy Fields Based on Image Processing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Qing; XIAN Ding-xiang; LIU Qing-jie; YANG Bao-jun; DIAO Guang-qiang; TANG Jian

    2014-01-01

    A quantitative survey of rice planthoppers in paddy ifelds is important to assess the population density and make forecasting decisions. Manual rice planthopper survey methods in paddy ifelds are time-consuming, fatiguing and tedious. This paper describes a handheld device for easily capturing planthopper images on rice stems and an automatic method for counting rice planthoppers based on image processing. The handheld device consists of a digital camera with WiFi, a smartphone and an extrendable pole. The surveyor can use the smartphone to control the camera, which is ifxed on the front of the pole by WiFi, and to photograph planthoppers on rice stems. For the counting of planthoppers on rice stems, we adopt three layers of detection that involve the following:(a) the ifrst layer of detection is an AdaBoost classiifer based on Haar features;(b) the second layer of detection is a support vector machine (SVM) classiifer based on histogram of oriented gradient (HOG) features;(c) the third layer of detection is the threshold judgment of the three features. We use this method to detect and count whiteback planthoppers (Sogatella furcifera) on rice plant images and achieve an 85.2%detection rate and a 9.6%false detection rate. The method is easy, rapid and accurate for the assessment of the population density of rice planthoppers in paddy ifelds.

  18. Automated materials discrimination using 3D dual energy X ray images

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, T W

    2002-01-01

    The ability of a human observer to identify an explosive device concealed in complex arrangements of objects routinely encountered in the 2D x-ray screening of passenger baggage at airports is often problematic. Standard dual-energy x-ray techniques enable colour encoding of the resultant images in terms of organic, inorganic and metal substances. This transmission imaging technique produces colour information computed from a high-energy x-ray signal and a low energy x-ray signal (80keVimages of a threat substance which has been masked by other materials will result in colour encoding which is proportional to the effective atomic number of the threat material and the masking material. The work presented in this thesis enables the effective atomic number of the target material within a specified window (6.6 <= Z sub e sub f sub f <= 13) to be auto...

  19. An Optimized Clustering Approach for Automated Detection of White Matter Lesions in MRI Brain Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Anitha

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Settings White Matter lesions (WMLs are small areas of dead cells found in parts of the brain. In general, it is difficult for medical experts to accurately quantify the WMLs due to decreased contrast between White Matter (WM and Grey Matter (GM. The aim of this paper is to
    automatically detect the White Matter Lesions which is present in the brains of elderly people. WML detection process includes the following stages: 1. Image preprocessing, 2. Clustering (Fuzzy c-means clustering, Geostatistical Possibilistic clustering and Geostatistical Fuzzy clustering and 3.Optimization using Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO. The proposed system is tested on a database of 208 MRI images. GFCM yields high sensitivity of 89%, specificity of 94% and overall accuracy of 93% over FCM and GPC. The clustered brain images are then subjected to Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO. The optimized result obtained from GFCM-PSO provides sensitivity of 90%, specificity of 94% and accuracy of 95%. The detection results reveals that GFCM and GFCMPSO better localizes the large regions of lesions and gives less false positive rate when compared to GPC and GPC-PSO which captures the largest loads of WMLs only in the upper ventral horns of the brain.

  20. Segmentation and automated measurement of chronic wound images: probability map approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad Fauzi, Mohammad Faizal; Khansa, Ibrahim; Catignani, Karen; Gordillo, Gayle; Sen, Chandan K.; Gurcan, Metin N.

    2014-03-01

    estimated 6.5 million patients in the United States are affected by chronic wounds, with more than 25 billion US dollars and countless hours spent annually for all aspects of chronic wound care. There is need to develop software tools to analyze wound images that characterize wound tissue composition, measure their size, and monitor changes over time. This process, when done manually, is time-consuming and subject to intra- and inter-reader variability. In this paper, we propose a method that can characterize chronic wounds containing granulation, slough and eschar tissues. First, we generate a Red-Yellow-Black-White (RYKW) probability map, which then guides the region growing segmentation process. The red, yellow and black probability maps are designed to handle the granulation, slough and eschar tissues, respectively found in wound tissues, while the white probability map is designed to detect the white label card for measurement calibration purpose. The innovative aspects of this work include: 1) Definition of a wound characteristics specific probability map for segmentation, 2) Computationally efficient regions growing on 4D map; 3) Auto-calibration of measurements with the content of the image. The method was applied on 30 wound images provided by the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, with the ground truth independently generated by the consensus of two clinicians. While the inter-reader agreement between the readers is 85.5%, the computer achieves an accuracy of 80%.

  1. Application of automated image analysis to the identification and extraction of recyclable plastic bottles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Edgar SCAVINO; Dzuraidah Abdul WAHAB; Aini HUSSAIN; Hassan BASRI; Mohd Marzuki MUSTAFA

    2009-01-01

    An experimental machine vision apparatus was used to identify and extract recyclable plastic bottles out of a conveyor belt. Color images were taken with a commercially available Webcam, and the recognition was performed by our homemade software, based on the shape and dimensions of object images. The software was able to manage multiple bottles in a single image and was additionally extended to cases involving touching bottles. The identification was fulfilled by comparing the set of measured features with an existing database and meanwhile integrating various recognition techniques such as minimum distance in the feature space, self-organized maps, and neural networks. The recognition system was tested on a set of 50 different bottles and provided so far an accuracy of about 97% on bottle identification. The extraction of the bottles was performed by means of a pneumatic arm, which was activated according to the plastic type; polyethylene-terephthalate (PET) bottles were left on the conveyor belt, while non-PET boules were extracted. The software was designed to provide the best compromise between reliability and speed for real-time applications in view of the commercialization of the system at existing recycling plants.

  2. Pedestrian detection in thermal images: An automated scale based region extraction with curvelet space validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmi, A.; Faheema, A. G. J.; Deodhare, Dipti

    2016-05-01

    Pedestrian detection is a key problem in night vision processing with a dozen of applications that will positively impact the performance of autonomous systems. Despite significant progress, our study shows that performance of state-of-the-art thermal image pedestrian detectors still has much room for improvement. The purpose of this paper is to overcome the challenge faced by the thermal image pedestrian detectors, which employ intensity based Region Of Interest (ROI) extraction followed by feature based validation. The most striking disadvantage faced by the first module, ROI extraction, is the failed detection of cloth insulted parts. To overcome this setback, this paper employs an algorithm and a principle of region growing pursuit tuned to the scale of the pedestrian. The statistics subtended by the pedestrian drastically vary with the scale and deviation from normality approach facilitates scale detection. Further, the paper offers an adaptive mathematical threshold to resolve the problem of subtracting the background while extracting cloth insulated parts as well. The inherent false positives of the ROI extraction module are limited by the choice of good features in pedestrian validation step. One such feature is curvelet feature, which has found its use extensively in optical images, but has as yet no reported results in thermal images. This has been used to arrive at a pedestrian detector with a reduced false positive rate. This work is the first venture made to scrutinize the utility of curvelet for characterizing pedestrians in thermal images. Attempt has also been made to improve the speed of curvelet transform computation. The classification task is realized through the use of the well known methodology of Support Vector Machines (SVMs). The proposed method is substantiated with qualified evaluation methodologies that permits us to carry out probing and informative comparisons across state-of-the-art features, including deep learning methods, with six

  3. A comprehensive and precise quantification of the calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa (Dana) for intensive live feed cultures using an automated ZooImage system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vu, Minh Thi Thuy; Jepsen, Per Meyer; Hansen, Benni Winding

    2014-01-01

    ignored. In this study, we propose a novel method for highly precise classification of development stages and biomass of A. tonsa, in intensive live feed cultures, using an automated ZooImage system, a freeware image analysis. We successfully created a training set of 13 categories, including 7 copepod...... and 6 non-copepod (debris) groups. ZooImage used this training set for automatic discrimination through a random forest algorithm with the general accuracy of 92.8%. The ZooImage showed no significant difference in classifying solitary eggs, or mixed nauplii stages and copepodites compared to personal...... microscope observation. Furthermore, ZooImage was also adapted for automatic estimation of A. tonsa biomass. This is the first study that has successfully applied ZooImage software which enables fast and reliable quantification of the development stages and the biomass of A. tonsa. As a result, relevant...

  4. Reduced radiation dose and improved image quality at cardiovascular CT angiography by automated attenuation-based tube voltage selection: intra-individual comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the effect of automated tube voltage selection on radiation dose and image quality at cardiovascular CT angiography (CTA). We retrospectively analysed paired studies in 72 patients (41 male, 60.5 ± 16.5 years), who had undergone CTA acquisitions of the heart or aorta both before and after the implementation of an automated x-ray tube voltage selection algorithm (ATVS). All other parameters were kept identical between the two acquisitions. Subjective image quality (IQ) was rated and objective IQ was measured by image noise, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and figure of merit (FOM). Image quality parameters and effective dose were compared between acquisitions. Overall subjective image quality improved with the percentage of cases scored as adequate or higher increasing from 79 % to 92 % after implementation of ATVS (P = 0.03). SNR (14.1 ± 5.9, 15.7 ± 6.1, P = 0.009), CNR (11.6 ± 5.3, 13.2 ± 5.6, P = 0.011), and FOM (19.9 ± 23.3, 43.8 ± 51.1, P < 0.001) were significantly higher after implementation of ATVS. Mean image noise (24.1 ± 8.4 HU, 22.7 ± 7.1 HU, P = 0.048) and mean effective dose (10.6 ± 5.9 mSv, 8.8 ± 5.0 mSv, P = 0.003) were significantly lower after implementation of ATVS. Automated tube voltage selection can operator-independently optimize cardiovascular CTA image acquisition parameters with improved image quality at reduced dose. (orig.)

  5. Automated Digital Image Analysis (TrichoScan®) for Human Hair Growth Analysis: Ease versus Errors

    OpenAIRE

    Saraogi, Punit P; Rachita S Dhurat

    2010-01-01

    Background: TrichoScan® is considered to be time-saving, easy to perform and consistent for quantifying hair loss/growth. Conflicting results of our study lead us to closely observe the image analysis, and certain repeated errors in the detection of hair were highlighted. Aims: To assess the utility of TrichoScan in quantification of diffuse hair loss in males with androgenetic alopecia (AGA) and females with diffuse telogen hair loss, with regard to total hair density (THD), telogen and vell...

  6. Automated detection system for pulmonary emphysema on 3D chest CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Akira; Zhou, Xiangrong; Iwano, Shingo; Itoh, Shigeki; Fujita, Hiroshi; Ishigaki, Takeo

    2004-05-01

    An automatic extraction of pulmonary emphysema area on 3-D chest CT images was performed using an adaptive thresholding technique. We proposed a method to estimate the ratio of the emphysema area to the whole lung volume. We employed 32 cases (15 normal and 17 abnormal) which had been already diagnosed by radiologists prior to the study. The ratio in all the normal cases was less than 0.02, and in abnormal cases, it ranged from 0.01 to 0.26. The effectiveness of our approach was confirmed through the results of the present study.

  7. Automated synthesis of [11C]choline, a positron-emitting tracer for tumor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    (β-Hydroxyethyl)tri([11C]methyl)ammonium ([11C]choline) is a tracer very effective in imaging various human tumors using positron emission tomography (PET). We have constructed a computer-controlled [11C]choline synthetic apparatus which carries out the whole process of synthesis and product purification automatically. The setup is simple and the process quick. In 20 min, 11 GBq of [11C]choline (chloride) is obtainable from 26 GBq of [11C]CO2. The final product is a sterile and pyrogen-free [11C]choline 'injection'

  8. Automated Waterline Detection in the Wadden Sea Using High-Resolution TerraSAR-X Images

    OpenAIRE

    Stefan Wiehle; Susanne Lehner

    2015-01-01

    We present an algorithm for automatic detection of the land-water-line from TerraSAR-X images acquired over the Wadden Sea. In this coastal region of the southeastern North Sea, a strip of up to 20 km of seabed falls dry during low tide, revealing mudflats and tidal creeks. The tidal currents transport sediments and can change the coastal shape with erosion rates of several meters per month. This rate can be strongly increased by storm surges which also cause flooding of usually dry areas. Du...

  9. Automated segmentation of serous pigment epithelium detachment in SD-OCT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhuli; Shi, Fei; Xiang, Dehui; Chen, Haoyu; Chen, Xinjian

    2015-03-01

    Pigment epithelium detachment (PED) is an important clinical manifestation of multiple chorio-retinal disease processes, which can cause the loss of central vision. A 3-D method is proposed to automatically segment serous PED in SD-OCT images. The proposed method consists of five steps: first, a curvature anisotropic diffusion filter is applied to remove speckle noise. Second, the graph search method is applied for abnormal retinal layer segmentation associated with retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) deformation. During this process, Bruch's membrane, which doesn't show in the SD-OCT images, is estimated with the convex hull algorithm. Third, the foreground and background seeds are automatically obtained from retinal layer segmentation result. Fourth, the serous PED is segmented based on the graph cut method. Finally, a post-processing step is applied to remove false positive regions based on mathematical morphology. The proposed method was tested on 20 SD-OCT volumes from 20 patients diagnosed with serous PED. The average true positive volume fraction (TPVF), false positive volume fraction (FPVF), dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and positive predictive value (PPV) are 97.19%, 0.03%, 96.34% and 95.59%, respectively. Linear regression analysis shows a strong correlation (r = 0.975) comparing the segmented PED volumes with the ground truth labeled by an ophthalmology expert. The proposed method can provide clinicians with accurate quantitative information, including shape, size and position of the PED regions, which can assist diagnose and treatment.

  10. CT-diskography, diskomanometry and MR imaging as predictors of the outcome of lumbar percutaneous automated nucleotomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This prospective study was performed to assess whether CT-diskography (CT-D), diskomanometry (DMM) including recording of the pain response, or the MR signal intensity of the disks are reliable predictors of the outcome of nucleotomy. Ninety-one patients, 44 females and 47 males aged 18-68 years (mean 37.4) treated at 99 disk levels were included. All had plain CT, MR imaging, CT-D and DMM performed prior to automated percutaneous nucleotomy with the Nucleotome R system. Sixity-nine (76%) of the patients responded well to treatment within 3 months. Due to recurrences, the success rate at 1 year was reduced to 65%. Except for better results following nucleotomy in patients with similar and identical pain as the presenting complaint provoked at diskography, no association was demonstrated between diskographic parameters, or loss of signal on MR, and the outcome. Better results were also seen in patients with a short history of disk disease, but not in patients with predominantly sciatica and focal hernias compared to those with predominantly low-back pain and diffuse posterior buldges. The results do not justify routine use of diskography prior to nucleotomy in patients with pathologic disks demonstrated by noninvasive methods and localizing sciatic pain. (orig./UG)

  11. Automated synthesis of hypoxia imaging agent [18F]FMISO based upon a modified Explora FDG4 module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new automated synthesis procedure of -H-1-(3-[18F]fluoro-2-hydroxypropyl)-2-nitroimidazole ([18F]FMISO), a specific hypoxia imaging agent with great significances for the noninvasive, dynamic hypoxia evaluation of cancer, was developed by modifying Explora DG4 module, a commercial [18F]FDG production system, in this study. Its radiochemical synthesis was carried out via two sequent reaction steps, i.e. he nucleophilic displacement of labeling precursor -(2'-nitro-1'-imidazolyl)-2-O-tetrahydropyranyl-3-O-tosyl-propanediol NITTP) with activated 18F- ion at 100 deg C for 8 minutes, and the following hydrolysis with 1M HCl at 100 deg C for 5 minutes and neutralization with 1M NaOH. Two-pot reaction with two independent separations was adopted to assure the good separation of final product via solid phase extraction (SPE) based upon combined Sep-pak cartridges instead f high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). This fast, reliable reparation route of 18F-FMISO could complete within 50 minutes with about 5% of high radiochemical yield (with decay correction) and more than 98% of good radiochemical purity. The modified module could perform multiple runs of production of [18F]FMISO. (author)

  12. Automated Grading of Gliomas using Deep Learning in Digital Pathology Images: A modular approach with ensemble of convolutional neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertosun, Mehmet Günhan; Rubin, Daniel L

    2015-01-01

    Brain glioma is the most common primary malignant brain tumors in adults with different pathologic subtypes: Lower Grade Glioma (LGG) Grade II, Lower Grade Glioma (LGG) Grade III, and Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) Grade IV. The survival and treatment options are highly dependent of this glioma grade. We propose a deep learning-based, modular classification pipeline for automated grading of gliomas using digital pathology images. Whole tissue digitized images of pathology slides obtained from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) were used to train our deep learning modules. Our modular pipeline provides diagnostic quality statistics, such as precision, sensitivity and specificity, of the individual deep learning modules, and (1) facilitates training given the limited data in this domain, (2) enables exploration of different deep learning structures for each module, (3) leads to developing less complex modules that are simpler to analyze, and (4) provides flexibility, permitting use of single modules within the framework or use of other modeling or machine learning applications, such as probabilistic graphical models or support vector machines. Our modular approach helps us meet the requirements of minimum accuracy levels that are demanded by the context of different decision points within a multi-class classification scheme. Convolutional Neural Networks are trained for each module for each sub-task with more than 90% classification accuracies on validation data set, and achieved classification accuracy of 96% for the task of GBM vs LGG classification, 71% for further identifying the grade of LGG into Grade II or Grade III on independent data set coming from new patients from the multi-institutional repository. PMID:26958289

  13. Automated segmentation of MS lesions in FLAIR, DIR and T2-w MR images via an information theoretic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Jason E.; Matlock, Kevin; Pal, Ranadip; Nutter, Brian; Mitra, Sunanda

    2016-03-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a vital tool in the diagnosis and characterization of multiple sclerosis (MS). MS lesions can be imaged with relatively high contrast using either Fluid Attenuated Inversion Recovery (FLAIR) or Double Inversion Recovery (DIR). Automated segmentation and accurate tracking of MS lesions from MRI remains a challenging problem. Here, an information theoretic approach to cluster the voxels in pseudo-colorized multispectral MR data (FLAIR, DIR, T2-weighted) is utilized to automatically segment MS lesions of various sizes and noise levels. The Improved Jump Method (IJM) clustering, assisted by edge suppression, is applied to the segmentation of white matter (WM), gray matter (GM), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and MS lesions, if present, into a subset of slices determined to be the best MS lesion candidates via Otsu's method. From this preliminary clustering, the modal data values for the tissues can be determined. A Euclidean distance is then used to estimate the fuzzy memberships of each brain voxel for all tissue types and their 50/50 partial volumes. From these estimates, binary discrete and fuzzy MS lesion masks are constructed. Validation is provided by using three synthetic MS lesions brains (mild, moderate and severe) with labeled ground truths. The MS lesions of mild, moderate and severe designations were detected with a sensitivity of 83.2%, and 88.5%, and 94.5%, and with the corresponding Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) of 0.7098, 0.8739, and 0.8266, respectively. The effect of MRI noise is also examined by simulated noise and the application of a bilateral filter in preprocessing.

  14. Automated Image-Based Procedures for Accurate Artifacts 3D Modeling and Orthoimage Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Pierrot-Deseilligny

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The accurate 3D documentation of architectures and heritages is getting very common and required in different application contexts. The potentialities of the image-based approach are nowadays very well-known but there is a lack of reliable, precise and flexible solutions, possibly open-source, which could be used for metric and accurate documentation or digital conservation and not only for simple visualization or web-based applications. The article presents a set of photogrammetric tools developed in order to derive accurate 3D point clouds and orthoimages for the digitization of archaeological and architectural objects. The aim is also to distribute free solutions (software, methodologies, guidelines, best practices, etc. based on 3D surveying and modeling experiences, useful in different application contexts (architecture, excavations, museum collections, heritage documentation, etc. and according to several representations needs (2D technical documentation, 3D reconstruction, web visualization, etc..

  15. Integration of XNAT/PACS, DICOM, and research software for automated multi-modal image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yurui; Burns, Scott S.; Lauzon, Carolyn B.; Fong, Andrew E.; James, Terry A.; Lubar, Joel F.; Thatcher, Robert W.; Twillie, David A.; Wirt, Michael D.; Zola, Marc A.; Logan, Bret W.; Anderson, Adam W.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2013-03-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an increasingly important public health concern. While there are several promising avenues of intervention, clinical assessments are relatively coarse and comparative quantitative analysis is an emerging field. Imaging data provide potentially useful information for evaluating TBI across functional, structural, and microstructural phenotypes. Integration and management of disparate data types are major obstacles. In a multi-institution collaboration, we are collecting electroencephalogy (EEG), structural MRI, diffusion tensor MRI (DTI), and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) from a large cohort of US Army service members exposed to mild or moderate TBI who are undergoing experimental treatment. We have constructed a robust informatics backbone for this project centered on the DICOM standard and eXtensible Neuroimaging Archive Toolkit (XNAT) server. Herein, we discuss (1) optimization of data transmission, validation and storage, (2) quality assurance and workflow