WorldWideScience

Sample records for automated guided vehicles

  1. A Review Of Design And Control Of Automated Guided Vehicle Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Le-Anh, Tuan; Koster, René

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThis paper presents a review on design and control of automated guided vehicle systems. We address most key related issues including guide-path design, estimating the number of vehicles, vehicle scheduling, idle-vehicle positioning, battery management, vehicle routing, and conflict resolution. We discuss and classify important models and results from key publications in literature on automated guided vehicle systems, including often-neglected areas, such as idle-vehicle positionin...

  2. A Review Of Design And Control Of Automated Guided Vehicle Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Le-Anh (Tuan); M.B.M. de Koster (René)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThis paper presents a review on design and control of automated guided vehicle systems. We address most key related issues including guide-path design, estimating the number of vehicles, vehicle scheduling, idle-vehicle positioning, battery management, vehicle routing, and conflict

  3. Robust localisation of automated guided vehicles for computer-integrated manufacturing environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dixon, R. C.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available As industry moves toward an era of complete automation and mass customisation, automated guided vehicles (AGVs are used as material handling systems. However, the current techniques that provide navigation, control, and manoeuvrability of automated guided vehicles threaten to create bottlenecks and inefficiencies in manufacturing environments that strive towards the optimisation of part production. This paper proposes a decentralised localisation technique for an automated guided vehicle without any non-holonomic constraints. Incorporation of these vehicles into the material handling system of a computer-integrated manufacturing environment would increase the characteristics of robustness, efficiency, flexibility, and advanced manoeuvrability.

  4. Virtual Diagnostic Sensors Design for an Automated Guided Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf Stetter

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, Automated Guided Vehicles (AGVs have been playing an increasingly important role in producing industry and infrastructure and will soon arrive to other areas of human life such as the transportation of goods and people. However, several challenges still aggravate the operation of AGVs, which limit the amount of implementation. One major challenge is the realization of reliable sensors that can capture the different aspects of the state of an AGV as well as its surroundings. One promising approach towards more reliable sensors is the supplementary application of virtual sensors, which are able to generate virtual measurements by using other sources of information such as actuator states and already existing sensors together with appropriate mathematical models. The focus of the research described in this paper is the design of virtual sensors determining forces and torques acting on an AGV. The proposed novel approach is using a quadratic boundedness approach, which makes it possible to include bounded disturbances acting on the AGV. One major advantage of the presented approach is that the use of complex tire models can be avoided. Information from acceleration and yaw rate sensors is processed in order to realize reliable virtual force and torque sensors. The resulting force and torque information can be used for several diagnostic purposes such as fault detection or fault prevention. The presented approach is explained and verified on the basis of an innovative design of an AGV. This innovative design addresses another major challenge for AGVs, which is the limited maneuvering possibilities of many AGV designs. The innovative design allows nearly unlimited maneuvering possibilities but requires reliable sensor data. The application of the approach in the AGV resulted in the insight that the generated estimates are consistent with the longitudinal forces and torques obtained by a proven reference model.

  5. Design and control of automated guided vehicle systems: A case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Q.; Adriaansen, A.C.; Udding, J.T.; Pogromski, A.Y.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we study the design and control of automated guided vehicle (AGV) systems, with the focus on the quayside container transport in an automated container terminal. We first set up an event-driven model for an AGV system in the zone control framework. Then a number of layouts of the road

  6. Automated guided vehicle systems a primer with practical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Ullrich, Günter

    2015-01-01

    This primer is directed at experts and practitioners in intralogistics who are concerned with optimizing material flows. The presentation is comprehensive covering both, practical and theoretical aspects with a moderate degree of specialization, using clear and concise language. Areas of operation as well as technical standards of all relevant components and functions are described. Recent developments in technology and in the markets are taken into account. The goal of this book is to further stronger use of automated guided transport systems and the enhancement of their future performance.

  7. Automated Guided Vehicle For Phsically Handicapped People - A Cost Effective Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, G. Arun, Dr.; Sivasubramaniam, Mr. A.

    2017-12-01

    Automated Guided vehicle (AGV) is like a robot that can deliver the materials from the supply area to the technician automatically. This is faster and more efficient. The robot can be accessed wirelessly. A technician can directly control the robot to deliver the components rather than control it via a human operator (over phone, computer etc. who has to program the robot or ask a delivery person to make the delivery). The vehicle is automatically guided through its ways. To avoid collisions a proximity sensor is attached to the system. The sensor senses the signals of the obstacles and can stop the vehicle in the presence of obstacles. Thus vehicle can avoid accidents that can be very useful to the present industrial trend and material handling and equipment handling will be automated and easy time saving methodology.

  8. Development of an omnidirectional Automated Guided Vehicle with MY3 wheels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suyang Yu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an omnidirectional Automated Guided Vehicle (AGV with a novel omnidirectional wheel named MY3 wheel. Due to the special structure and material of the MY3 wheel, the AGV has full three DOFs in the motion plane and good capabilities of load carrying and slip resisting. In addition, the kinematic model of the AGV is derived, and the guiding method that can make the AGV to follow a specified path is established. Finally, experiments are performed to verify the kinematic model and guiding method.

  9. Integrated Markov-neural reliability computation method: A case for multiple automated guided vehicle system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazlollahtabar, Hamed; Saidi-Mehrabad, Mohammad; Balakrishnan, Jaydeep

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes an integrated Markovian and back propagation neural network approaches to compute reliability of a system. While states of failure occurrences are significant elements for accurate reliability computation, Markovian based reliability assessment method is designed. Due to drawbacks shown by Markovian model for steady state reliability computations and neural network for initial training pattern, integration being called Markov-neural is developed and evaluated. To show efficiency of the proposed approach comparative analyses are performed. Also, for managerial implication purpose an application case for multiple automated guided vehicles (AGVs) in manufacturing networks is conducted. - Highlights: • Integrated Markovian and back propagation neural network approach to compute reliability. • Markovian based reliability assessment method. • Managerial implication is shown in an application case for multiple automated guided vehicles (AGVs) in manufacturing networks

  10. Utilising scripting language for unmanned and automated guided vehicles operating within row crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, R. N.; Nørremark, M.; Sørensen, C.G.

    2008-01-01

    A flexible high-level control language is an important element in the ongoing task of introducing automated guided vehicles (AGV) to new application domains. A new application domain is row crops, where small AGV's will perform weed control around individual crop plants. This paper defines...... is described here as the ‘supervisory field coverage monitor’ (SFCM), which acts to coordinate the behaviours. The applicability of this modified SMR-CL has been successfully demonstrated using a vehicle test in a specially designed artificial row crop field. The analysis of the operational performance...

  11. A vision-based automated guided vehicle system with marker recognition for indoor use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeisung; Hyun, Chang-Ho; Park, Mignon

    2013-08-07

    We propose an intelligent vision-based Automated Guided Vehicle (AGV) system using fiduciary markers. In this paper, we explore a low-cost, efficient vehicle guiding method using a consumer grade web camera and fiduciary markers. In the proposed method, the system uses fiduciary markers with a capital letter or triangle indicating direction in it. The markers are very easy to produce, manipulate, and maintain. The marker information is used to guide a vehicle. We use hue and saturation values in the image to extract marker candidates. When the known size fiduciary marker is detected by using a bird's eye view and Hough transform, the positional relation between the marker and the vehicle can be calculated. To recognize the character in the marker, a distance transform is used. The probability of feature matching was calculated by using a distance transform, and a feature having high probability is selected as a captured marker. Four directional signals and 10 alphabet features are defined and used as markers. A 98.87% recognition rate was achieved in the testing phase. The experimental results with the fiduciary marker show that the proposed method is a solution for an indoor AGV system.

  12. Simulation of a Production Line with Automated Guided Vehicle: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Felipe Verpa Leite

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Currently, companies have increasingly needed to improve and develop their processes to flexible the production in order to reduce waiting times and increase productivity through smaller time intervals. To achieve these objectives, efficient and automated transport and handling material systems are required. Therefore, the AGV systems (Automated Guided Vehicle are often used to optimize the flow of materials within the production systems. In this paper, the author evaluates the usage of an AGV system in an industrial environment and analyzes the advantages, disadvantages of the project. Furthermore, the author uses the systems simulation software Promodel® 7.0 to develop a model, based on data collected from real production system, in order to analyze and optimize the use of AGVs. Throughout this paper, problems are identified as well as solution adopted by the author and the results obtained from the simulations.

  13. Selection of Filtration Methods in the Analysis of Motion of Automated Guided Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobrzańska Magdalena

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this article the issues related to mapping the route and error correction in automated guided vehicle (AGV movement have been discussed. The nature and size of disruption have been determined using the registered runs in experimental studies. On the basis of the analysis a number of numerical runs have been generated, which mapped possible to obtain runs in a real movement of the vehicle. The obtained data set has been used for further research. The aim of this paper was to test the selected methods of digital filtering on the same data set and determine their effectiveness. The results of simulation studies have been presented in the article. The effectiveness of various methods has been determined and on this basis the conclusions have been drawn.

  14. Development of an automated guided vehicle controller using a systems engineering approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferreira, Tremaine

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Automated guided vehicles (AGVs are widely used for transporting materials in industry and commerce. In this research, an intelligent AGV-based material-handling system was developed using a model- based systems engineering (MBSE approach. The core of the AGV, the controller, was designed in the system modelling language environment using Visual Paradigm software, and then implemented in the hardware. As the result, the AGV’s complex tasks of material handling, navigation, and communication were successfully accomplished and tested in the real industrial environment. The developed AGV is capable of towing trolleys with a weight of up to 200kg at walking speed. The AGV can be incorporated into an intelligent material-handling system with multiple autonomous vehicles and work stations, thus providing flexibility and reconfigurability for the whole manufacturing system. Ergonomic and safety aspects were also considered in the design of the AGV. A comprehensive safety system that is compliant with industrial standards was implemented.

  15. An optimization design proposal of automated guided vehicles for mixed type transportation in hospital environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Domingo; Romero, Luis; Espinosa, María Del Mar; Domínguez, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present an optimization proposal in the automated guided vehicles design used in hospital logistics, as well as to analyze the impact of its implementation in a real environment. This proposal is based on the design of those elements that would allow the vehicles to deliver an extra cart by the towing method. So, the proposal intention is to improve the productivity and the performance of the current vehicles by using a transportation method of combined carts. The study has been developed following concurrent engineering premises from three different viewpoints. First, the sequence of operations has been described, and second, a proposal of design of the equipment has been undertaken. Finally, the impact of the proposal has been analyzed according to real data from the Hospital Universitario Rio Hortega in Valladolid (Spain). In this particular case, by the implementation of the analyzed proposal in the hospital a reduction of over 35% of the current time of use can be achieved. This result may allow adding new tasks to the vehicles, and according to this, both a new kind of vehicle and a specific module can be developed in order to get a better performance.

  16. An optimization design proposal of automated guided vehicles for mixed type transportation in hospital environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domingo González

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present an optimization proposal in the automated guided vehicles design used in hospital logistics, as well as to analyze the impact of its implementation in a real environment.This proposal is based on the design of those elements that would allow the vehicles to deliver an extra cart by the towing method. So, the proposal intention is to improve the productivity and the performance of the current vehicles by using a transportation method of combined carts.The study has been developed following concurrent engineering premises from three different viewpoints. First, the sequence of operations has been described, and second, a proposal of design of the equipment has been undertaken. Finally, the impact of the proposal has been analyzed according to real data from the Hospital Universitario Rio Hortega in Valladolid (Spain. In this particular case, by the implementation of the analyzed proposal in the hospital a reduction of over 35% of the current time of use can be achieved. This result may allow adding new tasks to the vehicles, and according to this, both a new kind of vehicle and a specific module can be developed in order to get a better performance.

  17. A new memetic algorithm for mitigating tandem automated guided vehicle system partitioning problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourrahimian, Parinaz

    2017-11-01

    Automated Guided Vehicle System (AGVS) provides the flexibility and automation demanded by Flexible Manufacturing System (FMS). However, with the growing concern on responsible management of resource use, it is crucial to manage these vehicles in an efficient way in order reduces travel time and controls conflicts and congestions. This paper presents the development process of a new Memetic Algorithm (MA) for optimizing partitioning problem of tandem AGVS. MAs employ a Genetic Algorithm (GA), as a global search, and apply a local search to bring the solutions to a local optimum point. A new Tabu Search (TS) has been developed and combined with a GA to refine the newly generated individuals by GA. The aim of the proposed algorithm is to minimize the maximum workload of the system. After all, the performance of the proposed algorithm is evaluated using Matlab. This study also compared the objective function of the proposed MA with GA. The results showed that the TS, as a local search, significantly improves the objective function of the GA for different system sizes with large and small numbers of zone by 1.26 in average.

  18. Evolutionary approaches for scheduling a flexible manufacturing system with automated guided vehicles and robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramaraj Natarajan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the scheduling of machines, an Automated Guided Vehicle (AGV and two robots in a Flexible Manufacturing System (FMS formed in three loop layouts, with objectives to minimize the makespan, mean flow time and mean tardiness. The scheduling optimization is carried out using Sheep Flock Heredity Algorithm (SFHA and Artificial Immune System (AIS algorithm. AGV is used for carrying jobs between the Load/Unload station and the machines. The robots are used for loading and unloading the jobs in the machines, and also used for transferring jobs between the machines. The algorithms are applied for test problems taken from the literature and the results obtained using the two algorithms are compared. The results indicate that SFHA performs better than AIS for this problem.

  19. Application Of Kalman Filter In Navigation Process Of Automated Guided Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Śmieszek Mirosław

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the paper an example of application of the Kalman filtering in the navigation process of automatically guided vehicles was presented. The basis for determining the position of automatically guided vehicles is odometry – the navigation calculation. This method of determining the position of a vehicle is affected by many errors. In order to eliminate these errors, in modern vehicles additional systems to increase accuracy in determining the position of a vehicle are used. In the latest navigation systems during route and position adjustments the probabilistic methods are used. The most frequently applied are Kalman filters.

  20. Kalman Filter Sensor Fusion for Mecanum Wheeled Automated Guided Vehicle Localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Won Yoon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Mecanum automated guided vehicle (AGV, which can move in any direction by using a special wheel structure with a LIM-wheel and a diagonally positioned roller, holds considerable promise for the field of industrial electronics. A conventional method for Mecanum AGV localization has certain limitations, such as slip phenomena, because there are variations in the surface of the road and ground friction. Therefore, precise localization is a very important issue for the inevitable slip phenomenon situation. So a sensor fusion technique is developed to cope with this drawback by using the Kalman filter. ENCODER and StarGazer were used for sensor fusion. StarGazer is a position sensor for an image recognition device and always generates some errors due to the limitations of the image recognition device. ENCODER has also errors accumulating over time. On the other hand, there are no moving errors. In this study, we developed a Mecanum AGV prototype system and showed by simulation that we can eliminate the disadvantages of each sensor. We obtained the precise localization of the Mecanum AGV in a slip phenomenon situation via sensor fusion using a Kalman filter.

  1. Small Imaging Depth LIDAR and DCNN-Based Localization for Automated Guided Vehicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Seigo; Hiratsuka, Shigeyoshi; Ohta, Mitsuhiko; Matsubara, Hiroyuki; Ogawa, Masaru

    2018-01-10

    We present our third prototype sensor and a localization method for Automated Guided Vehicles (AGVs), for which small imaging LIght Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) and fusion-based localization are fundamentally important. Our small imaging LIDAR, named the Single-Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) LIDAR, uses a time-of-flight method and SPAD arrays. A SPAD is a highly sensitive photodetector capable of detecting at the single-photon level, and the SPAD LIDAR has two SPAD arrays on the same chip for detection of laser light and environmental light. Therefore, the SPAD LIDAR simultaneously outputs range image data and monocular image data with the same coordinate system and does not require external calibration among outputs. As AGVs travel both indoors and outdoors with vibration, this calibration-less structure is particularly useful for AGV applications. We also introduce a fusion-based localization method, named SPAD DCNN, which uses the SPAD LIDAR and employs a Deep Convolutional Neural Network (DCNN). SPAD DCNN can fuse the outputs of the SPAD LIDAR: range image data, monocular image data and peak intensity image data. The SPAD DCNN has two outputs: the regression result of the position of the SPAD LIDAR and the classification result of the existence of a target to be approached. Our third prototype sensor and the localization method are evaluated in an indoor environment by assuming various AGV trajectories. The results show that the sensor and localization method improve the localization accuracy.

  2. A Control of Collision and Deadlock Avoidance for Automated Guided Vehicles with a Fault-Tolerance Capability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Li

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Based on a novel discrete-event zone-control model, in our previous papers [1, 2], we presented a time-efficient traffic control for automated guided vehicle (AGV systems to exclude inter-vehicle collisions and system deadlocks, together with a case study on container terminals. The traffic control allows each vehicle in an AGV system to freely choose its routes for any finite sequence of zone-to-zone transportation tasks and the routes can be constructed in an online fashion. In this paper, we extended our previous results with two practical goals: (1 to increase the utilization of the workspace area by reducing the minimally allowed area of each zone; (2 to avoid vehicle collisions and deadlocks with the occurrence of vehicle breakdowns. To achieve the first goal, we include one extra vehicle event that allows each vehicle to probe further ahead while it is moving on the guide-path. This leads to an extension of our previous discrete-event model and traffic control rules, which are presented in the first part of the paper. The second part of the paper concerns the second goal, for which an emergency traffic control scheme is designed as supplementary to the normal traffic control rules. As in our previous papers, the improved model and traffic control are applied to a simulation of quayside container transshipment at container terminals; our simulation results are compared with those from two interesting works in the literature.

  3. Automated Vehicles Symposium 2015

    CERN Document Server

    Beiker, Sven

    2016-01-01

    This edited book comprises papers about the impacts, benefits and challenges of connected and automated cars. It is the third volume of the LNMOB series dealing with Road Vehicle Automation. The book comprises contributions from researchers, industry practitioners and policy makers, covering perspectives from the U.S., Europe and Japan. It is based on the Automated Vehicles Symposium 2015 which was jointly organized by the Association of Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI) and the Transportation Research Board (TRB) in Ann Arbor, Michigan, in July 2015. The topical spectrum includes, but is not limited to, public sector activities, human factors, ethical and business aspects, energy and technological perspectives, vehicle systems and transportation infrastructure. This book is an indispensable source of information for academic researchers, industrial engineers and policy makers interested in the topic of road vehicle automation.

  4. Automated Vehicles Symposium 2014

    CERN Document Server

    Beiker, Sven; Road Vehicle Automation 2

    2015-01-01

    This paper collection is the second volume of the LNMOB series on Road Vehicle Automation. The book contains a comprehensive review of current technical, socio-economic, and legal perspectives written by experts coming from public authorities, companies and universities in the U.S., Europe and Japan. It originates from the Automated Vehicle Symposium 2014, which was jointly organized by the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI) and the Transportation Research Board (TRB) in Burlingame, CA, in July 2014. The contributions discuss the challenges arising from the integration of highly automated and self-driving vehicles into the transportation system, with a focus on human factors and different deployment scenarios. This book is an indispensable source of information for academic researchers, industrial engineers, and policy makers interested in the topic of road vehicle automation.

  5. Automated Vehicle Monitoring System

    OpenAIRE

    Wibowo, Agustinus Deddy Arief; Heriansyah, Rudi

    2014-01-01

    An automated vehicle monitoring system is proposed in this paper. The surveillance system is based on image processing techniques such as background subtraction, colour balancing, chain code based shape detection, and blob. The proposed system will detect any human's head as appeared at the side mirrors. The detected head will be tracked and recorded for further action.

  6. Automated container transportation using self-guided vehicles: Fernald site requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazen, F.B.

    1993-09-01

    A new opportunity to improve the safety and efficiency of environmental restoration operations, using robotics has emerged from advances in industry, academia, and government labs. Self-Guided Vehicles (SGV's) have recently been developed in industry and early systems have already demonstrated much, though not all, of the functionality necessary to support driverless transportation of waste within and between processing facilities. Improved materials databases are being developed by at least two DOE remediation sites, the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEME) in the State of Ohio and the Hanford Complex in the State of Washington. SGV's can be developed that take advantage of the information in these databases and yield improved dispatch, waste tracking, report and shipment documentation. In addition, they will reduce the radiation hazard to workers and the risk of damaging containers through accidental collision. In this document, features of remediation sites that dictate the design of both the individual SGV's and the collective system of SGV's are presented, through the example of the site requirements at Fernald. Some concepts borrowed from the world of manufacturing are explained and then used to develop an integrated, holistic view of the remediation site as a pseudo-factory. Transportation methods at Fernald and anticipated growth in transport demand are analyzed. The new site-wide database under development at Fernald is presented so that advantageous and synergistic links between SGV's and information systems can be analyzed. Details of the SGV development proposed are submitted, and some results of a recently completed state of the art survey for SGV use in this application are also presented

  7. Agent-Oriented Embedded Control System Design and Development of a Vision-Based Automated Guided Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Xing

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a control system design and development approach for a vision-based automated guided vehicle (AGV based on the multi-agent system (MAS methodology and embedded system resources. A three-phase agent-oriented design methodology Prometheus is used to analyse system functions, construct operation scenarios, define agent types and design the MAS coordination mechanism. The control system is then developed in an embedded implementation containing a digital signal processor (DSP and an advanced RISC machine (ARM by using the multitasking processing capacity of multiple microprocessors and system services of a real-time operating system (RTOS. As a paradigm, an onboard embedded controller is designed and developed for the AGV with a camera detecting guiding landmarks, and the entire procedure has a high efficiency and a clear hierarchy. A vision guidance experiment for our AGV is carried out in a space-limited laboratory environment to verify the perception capacity and the onboard intelligence of the agent-oriented embedded control system.

  8. Modeling Automated Guided Vehicle Systems in Material Handling = Otomatikleştirilmiş Rehberli Araç Sistemlerinin Transport Tekniğinde Modellemesi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bülent SEZEN

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The study objectives are to 1 provide information regarding the use and benefits of Automated Guided Vehicle (AGV systems in manufacturing environments, and 2 review the literature related to design, modeling and simulation of AGV systems. We classify the tools utilized in design problems of AGV systems as analytical and simulation-based tools. Then, give examples of both categories from related literature.

  9. Automated Accounting. Instructor Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Duane R.

    This curriculum guide was developed to assist business instructors using Dac Easy Accounting College Edition Version 2.0 software in their accounting programs. The module consists of four units containing assignment sheets and job sheets designed to enable students to master competencies identified in the area of automated accounting. The first…

  10. Synthesis of Automated Vehicle Legislation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    This report provides a synthesis of issues addressed by state legislation regarding automated vehicles (AV); AV technologies are rapidly evolving and many states have developed legislation to govern AV testing and deployment and to assure safety on p...

  11. Automated and connected vehicle implications and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Automated and connected vehicles (ACV) and, in particular, autonomous vehicles have captured : the interest of the public, industry and transportation authorities. ACVs can significantly reduce : accidents, fuel consumption, pollution and the costs o...

  12. Green Vehicle Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... label Buy green. Save green. Learn about MPG math Discover fuel-saving tips Promote green ... U.S. consumers who have already purchased new vehicles under the fuel economy & greenhouse gas standard! More about the standards » Check ...

  13. Benefits estimation framework for automated vehicle operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Automated vehicles have the potential to bring about transformative safety, mobility, energy, and environmental benefits to the surface transportation : system. They are also being introduced into a complex transportation system, where second-order i...

  14. Comparison of vehicle types at an automated container terminal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vis, I.F.A.; Harika, I.

    2004-01-01

    At automated container terminals, containers are transshipped from one mode of transportation to another. Automated vehicles transport containers from the stack to the ship and vice versa. Two different types of automated vehicles are studied in this paper, namely automated lifting vehicles and

  15. Automated mixed traffic vehicle design AMTV 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, A. R.; Marks, R. A.; Cassell, P. L.

    1982-01-01

    The design of an improved and enclosed Automated Mixed Traffic Transit (AMTT) vehicle is described. AMTT is an innovative concept for low-speed tram-type transit in which suitable vehicles are equipped with sensors and controls to permit them to operate in an automated mode on existing road or walkway surfaces. The vehicle chassis and body design are presented in terms of sketches and photographs. The functional design of the sensing and control system is presented, and modifications which could be made to the baseline design for improved performance, in particular to incorporate a 20-mph capability, are also discussed. The vehicle system is described at the block-diagram-level of detail. Specifications and parameter values are given where available.

  16. Evaluation of automated vehicle technology for transit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide an overview of the state of automated vehicle (AV) technology : in transit. The Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) wishes to know what AV technology is : currently available that could be used in tran...

  17. Will Automated Vehicles Negatively Impact Traffic Flow?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. C. Calvert

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With low-level vehicle automation already available, there is a necessity to estimate its effects on traffic flow, especially if these could be negative. A long gradual transition will occur from manual driving to automated driving, in which many yet unknown traffic flow dynamics will be present. These effects have the potential to increasingly aid or cripple current road networks. In this contribution, we investigate these effects using an empirically calibrated and validated simulation experiment, backed up with findings from literature. We found that low-level automated vehicles in mixed traffic will initially have a small negative effect on traffic flow and road capacities. The experiment further showed that any improvement in traffic flow will only be seen at penetration rates above 70%. Also, the capacity drop appeared to be slightly higher with the presence of low-level automated vehicles. The experiment further investigated the effect of bottleneck severity and truck shares on traffic flow. Improvements to current traffic models are recommended and should include a greater detail and understanding of driver-vehicle interaction, both in conventional and in mixed traffic flow. Further research into behavioural shifts in driving is also recommended due to limited data and knowledge of these dynamics.

  18. Automated Vehicle Regulation: An Energy and Emissions Perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levine, Aaron

    2016-05-18

    This presentation provides a summary of the current automated vehicles polices in the United States and how they related to reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The presentation then looks at future automated vehicle trends that will increase and reduce GHG emissions and what current policies utilized in other areas of law could be adapted for automated vehicle GHG emissions.

  19. Preface to the special section on human factors and automation in vehicles: designing highly automated vehicles with the driver in mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merat, Natasha; Lee, John D

    2012-10-01

    This special section brings together diverse research regarding driver interaction with advanced automotive technology to guide design of increasingly automated vehicles. Rapidly evolving vehicle automation will likely change cars and trucks more in the next 5 years than the preceding 50, radically redefining what it means to drive. This special section includes 10 articles from European and North American researchers reporting simulator and naturalistic driving studies. Little research has considered the consequences of fully automated driving, with most focusing on lane-keeping and speed control systems individually. The studies reveal two underlying design philosophies: automate driving versus support driving. Results of several studies, consistent with previous research in other domains, suggest that the automate philosophy can delay driver responses to incidents in which the driver has to intervene and take control from the automation. Understanding how to orchestrate the transfer or sharing of control between the system and the driver, particularly in critical incidents, emerges as a central challenge. Designers should not assume that automation can substitute seamlessly for a human driver, nor can they assume that the driver can safely accommodate the limitations of automation. Designers, policy makers, and researchers must give careful consideration to what role the person should have in highly automated vehicles and how to support the driver if the driver is to be responsible for vehicle control. As in other domains, driving safety increasingly depends on the combined performance of the human and automation, and successful designs will depend on recognizing and supporting the new roles of the driver.

  20. Automated Announcements of Approaching Emergency Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachelder, Aaron; Foster, Conrad

    2006-01-01

    Street intersections that are equipped with traffic lights would also be equipped with means for generating audible announcements of approaching emergency vehicles, according to a proposal. The means to generate the announcements would be implemented in the intersection- based subsystems of emergency traffic-light-preemption systems like those described in the two immediately preceding articles and in "Systems Would Preempt Traffic Lights for Emergency Vehicles" (NPO-30573), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 28, No. 10 (October 2004), page 36. Preempting traffic lights is not, by itself, sufficient to warn pedestrians at affected intersections that emergency vehicles are approaching. Automated visual displays that warn of approaching emergency vehicles can be helpful as a supplement to preemption of traffic lights, but experience teaches that for a variety of reasons, pedestrians often do not see such displays. Moreover, in noisy and crowded urban settings, the lights and sirens on emergency vehicles are often not noticed until a few seconds before the vehicles arrive. According to the proposal, the traffic-light preemption subsystem at each intersection would generate an audible announcement for example, emergency vehicle approaching, please clear intersection whenever a preemption was triggered. The subsystem would estimate the time of arrival of an approaching emergency vehicle by use of vehicle identity, position, and time data from one or more sources that could include units connected to traffic loops and/or transponders connected to diagnostic and navigation systems in participating emergency vehicles. The intersection-based subsystem would then start the announcement far enough in advance to enable pedestrians to leave the roadway before any emergency vehicles arrive.

  1. 2nd Road Vehicle Automation Workshop

    CERN Document Server

    Beiker, Sven; Road Vehicle Automation

    2014-01-01

    This contributed volume covers all relevant aspects of road vehicle automation including societal impacts, legal matters, and technology innovation from the perspectives of a multitude of public and private actors. It is based on an expert workshop organized by the Transportation Research Board at Stanford University in July 2013. The target audience primarily comprises academic researchers, but the book may also be of interest to practitioners and professionals. Higher levels of road vehicle automation are considered beneficial for road safety, energy efficiency, productivity, convenience, and social inclusion. The necessary key technologies in the fields of object-recognition systems, data processing, and infrastructure communication have been consistently developed over the recent years and are mostly available on the market today. However, there is still a need for substantial research and development, e.g. with interactive maps, data processing, functional safety, and the fusion of different data sources...

  2. An applications guide to vehicle SNM monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fehlau, P.E.

    1987-03-01

    The applications guide introduces its readers to the vehicle special nuclear material (SNM) monitors that are becoming part of safeguards and security measures for nuclear material control at DOE facilities. Building on the foundation provided by an applications guide to pedestrian SNM monitors published in 1986 and a technical report on vehicle monitoring published in 1982, the guide provides an overview of vehicle monitoring in Part 1, a discussion of technical aspects of vehicle monitoring in Part 2, and a catalog of vehicle SNM monitors available to DOE facilities in Part 3. Vehicle monitor upkeep, calibration, testing, and performance are important topics in Part 1. The short technical discussion in Part 2 is devoted to new developments and unique features of vehicle monitors

  3. Vision-based guidance for an automated roving vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, M. D.; Cunningham, R. T.; Eskenazi, R.

    1978-01-01

    A controller designed to guide an automated vehicle to a specified target without external intervention is described. The intended application is to the requirements of planetary exploration, where substantial autonomy is required because of the prohibitive time lags associated with closed-loop ground control. The guidance algorithm consists of a set of piecewise-linear control laws for velocity and steering commands, and is executable in real time with fixed-point arithmetic. The use of a previously-reported object tracking algorithm for the vision system to provide position feedback data is described. Test results of the control system on a breadboard rover at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory are included.

  4. Evaluation of automated vehicle technology for transit : [summary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Automated transportation has been portrayed in : futuristic literature since the 19th century, but : making vehicles truly autonomous has only been : possible in recent decades with advanced control : and computer technologies. Automating cars is a :...

  5. Enhanced mobility for aging populations using automated vehicles : [summary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Studies show that aging adults have travel needs that can be inadequately addressed by todays : transportation system. Automated vehicles (AVs), ranging from assistive technologies to full : automation, may offer a safe and efficient transportatio...

  6. Automated mixed traffic transit vehicle microprocessor controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, R. A.; Cassell, P.; Johnston, A. R.

    1981-01-01

    An improved Automated Mixed Traffic Vehicle (AMTV) speed control system employing a microprocessor and transistor chopper motor current controller is described and its performance is presented in terms of velocity versus time curves. The on board computer hardware and software systems are described as is the software development system. All of the programming used in this controller was implemented using FORTRAN. This microprocessor controller made possible a number of safety features and improved the comfort associated with starting and shopping. In addition, most of the vehicle's performance characteristics can be altered by simple program parameter changes. A failure analysis of the microprocessor controller was generated and the results are included. Flow diagrams for the speed control algorithms and complete FORTRAN code listings are also included.

  7. Vehicle safety telemetry for automated highways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, G. R.

    1977-01-01

    The emphasis in current, automatic vehicle testing and diagnosis is primarily centered on the proper operation of the engine. Lateral and longitudinal guidance technologies, including speed control and headway sensing for collision avoidance, are reviewed. The principal guidance technique remains the buried wire. Speed control and headway sensing, even though they show the same basic elements in braking and fuel systems, are proceeding independently. The applications of on-board electronic and microprocessor techniques were investigated; each application (emission control, spark advance, or anti-slip braking) is being treated as an independent problem is proposed. A unified bus system of distributed processors for accomplishing the various functions and testing required for vehicles equipped to use automated highways.

  8. Potential Energy and Emission Benefits of Vehicle Automation and Connectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Driving behavior greatly impacts vehicle tailpipe emissions. Connected and automated vehicle (CAV) technologies are designed to smooth driving and relieve traffic congestion and are therefore expected to reduce fuel consumption and tailpipe emissions...

  9. Autonomous guided vehicles methods and models for optimal path planning

    CERN Document Server

    Fazlollahtabar, Hamed

    2015-01-01

      This book provides readers with extensive information on path planning optimization for both single and multiple Autonomous Guided Vehicles (AGVs), and discusses practical issues involved in advanced industrial applications of AGVs. After discussing previously published research in the field and highlighting the current gaps, it introduces new models developed by the authors with the goal of reducing costs and increasing productivity and effectiveness in the manufacturing industry. The new models address the increasing complexity of manufacturing networks, due for example to the adoption of flexible manufacturing systems that involve automated material handling systems, robots, numerically controlled machine tools, and automated inspection stations, while also considering the uncertainty and stochastic nature of automated equipment such as AGVs. The book discusses and provides solutions to important issues concerning the use of AGVs in the manufacturing industry, including material flow optimization with A...

  10. Records Management Handbook; Source Data Automation Equipment Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Archives and Records Service (GSA), Washington, DC. Office of Records Management.

    A detailed guide to selecting appropriate source data automation equipment is presented. Source data automation equipment is used to prepare data for electronic data processing or computerized recordkeeping. The guide contains specifications, performance data cost, and pictures of the major types of machines used in source data automation.…

  11. Accelerated Lane-Changing Trajectory Planning of Automated Vehicles with Vehicle-to-Vehicle Collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haijian Bai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering the complexity of lane changing using automated vehicles and the frequency of turning lanes in city settings, this paper aims to generate an accelerated lane-changing trajectory using vehicle-to-vehicle collaboration (V2VC. Based on the characteristics of accelerated lane changing, we used a polynomial method and cooperative strategies for trajectory planning to establish a lane-changing model under different degrees of collaboration with the following vehicle in the target lane by considering vehicle kinematics and comfort requirements. Furthermore, considering the shortcomings of the traditional elliptical vehicle and round vehicle models, we established a rectangular vehicle model with collision boundary conditions by analysing the relationships between the possible collision points and the outline of the vehicle. Then, we established a simulation model for the accelerated lane-changing process in different environments under different degrees of collaboration. The results show that, by using V2VC, we can achieve safe accelerated lane-changing trajectories and simultaneously satisfy the requirements of vehicle kinematics and comfort control.

  12. Automated Mixed Traffic Vehicle (AMTV) technology and safety study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, A. R.; Peng, T. K. C.; Vivian, H. C.; Wang, P. K.

    1978-01-01

    Technology and safety related to the implementation of an Automated Mixed Traffic Vehicle (AMTV) system are discussed. System concepts and technology status were reviewed and areas where further development is needed are identified. Failure and hazard modes were also analyzed and methods for prevention were suggested. The results presented are intended as a guide for further efforts in AMTV system design and technology development for both near term and long term applications. The AMTV systems discussed include a low speed system, and a hybrid system consisting of low speed sections and high speed sections operating in a semi-guideway. The safety analysis identified hazards that may arise in a properly functioning AMTV system, as well as hardware failure modes. Safety related failure modes were emphasized. A risk assessment was performed in order to create a priority order and significant hazards and failure modes were summarized. Corrective measures were proposed for each hazard.

  13. Review of Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS) for Automated Vehicles : Identifying Potential Barriers and Challenges for the Certification of Automated Vehicles Using Existing FMVSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-11

    The purpose of this work is to identify instances where the existing Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards may pose challenges to the introduction of automated vehicles. It identifies standards requiring further review - both to ensure that existing...

  14. Review of automated vehicle technology : policy and implementation implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-14

    The goals of this project were to undergo a systematic review of automated vehicle technologies with a focus on policy : implications, methods of implementation, regulation by states, and developments occurring on legal fronts, ultimately creating a ...

  15. Shuttle Repair Tools Automate Vehicle Maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Successfully building, flying, and maintaining the space shuttles was an immensely complex job that required a high level of detailed, precise engineering. After each shuttle landed, it entered a maintenance, repair, and overhaul (MRO) phase. Each system was thoroughly checked and tested, and worn or damaged parts replaced, before the shuttle was rolled out for its next mission. During the MRO period, workers needed to record exactly what needed replacing and why, as well as follow precise guidelines and procedures in making their repairs. That meant traceability, and with it lots of paperwork. In 2007, the number of reports generated during electrical system repairs was getting out of hand-placing among the top three systems in terms of paperwork volume. Repair specialists at Kennedy Space Center were unhappy spending so much time at a desk and so little time actually working on the shuttle. "Engineers weren't spending their time doing technical work," says Joseph Schuh, an electrical engineer at Kennedy. "Instead, they were busy with repetitive, time-consuming processes that, while important in their own right, provided a low return on time invested." The strain of such inefficiency was bad enough that slow electrical repairs jeopardized rollout on several occasions. Knowing there had to be a way to streamline operations, Kennedy asked Martin Belson, a project manager with 30 years experience as an aerospace contractor, to co-lead a team in developing software that would reduce the effort required to document shuttle repairs. The result was System Maintenance Automated Repair Tasks (SMART) software. SMART is a tool for aggregating and applying information on every aspect of repairs, from procedures and instructions to a vehicle s troubleshooting history. Drawing on that data, SMART largely automates the processes of generating repair instructions and post-repair paperwork. In the case of the space shuttle, this meant that SMART had 30 years worth of operations

  16. Automated mixed traffic vehicle control and scheduling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, T. K. C.; Chon, K.

    1976-01-01

    The operation and the expected performance of a proposed automatic guideway transit system which uses low speed automated mixed traffic vehicles (AMTVs) were analyzed. Vehicle scheduling and headway control policies were evaluated with a transit system simulation model. The effect of mixed traffic interference on the average vehicle speed was examined with a vehicle pedestrian interface model. Control parameters regulating vehicle speed were evaluated for safe stopping and passenger comfort. Some preliminary data on the cost and operation of an experimental AMTV system are included. These data were the result of a separate task conducted at JPL, and were included as background information.

  17. User choices regarding vehicle-driving automation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marchau, V.A.W.J.; Molin, E.J.E.; Heijden, R.E.C.M. van der; Breddia, C.A.; Wadhwa, L.C.

    2004-01-01

    The introduction of Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) in motor vehicles is expected to improve traffic efficiency and safety significantly. These systems support the driver in controlling his vehicle applying advanced sensing, computing and controlling devices. Successful implementation of

  18. Automated procedures for sizing aerospace vehicle structures /SAVES/

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, G. L.; Blackburn, C. L.; Dixon, S. C.

    1972-01-01

    Results from a continuing effort to develop automated methods for structural design are described. A system of computer programs presently under development called SAVES is intended to automate the preliminary structural design of a complete aerospace vehicle. Each step in the automated design process of the SAVES system of programs is discussed, with emphasis placed on use of automated routines for generation of finite-element models. The versatility of these routines is demonstrated by structural models generated for a space shuttle orbiter, an advanced technology transport,n hydrogen fueled Mach 3 transport. Illustrative numerical results are presented for the Mach 3 transport wing.

  19. Operational Based Vision Assessment Automated Vision Test Collection User Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-15

    AFRL-SA-WP-SR-2017-0012 Operational Based Vision Assessment Automated Vision Test Collection User Guide Elizabeth Shoda, Alex...June 2015 – May 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Operational Based Vision Assessment Automated Vision Test Collection User Guide 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER... automated vision tests , or AVT. Development of the AVT was required to support threshold-level vision testing capability needed to investigate the

  20. Clean Cities 2014 Vehicle Buyer's Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-12-01

    The Clean Cities 2014 Vehicle Buyer's Guide is an annual guide which features a comprehensive list of 2014 light-duty alternative fuel and advanced vehicles, grouped by fuel and technology. The guide provides model-specific information on vehicle specifications, manufacturer suggested retail price, fuel economy, energy impact, and emissions. The information can be used to identify options, compare vehicles, and help inform purchase decisions.

  1. Automated landmark-guided deformable image registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, Vasant; Chen, Susie; Gu, Xuejun; Chiu, Tsuicheng; Liu, Honghuan; Jiang, Lan; Wang, Jing; Yordy, John; Nedzi, Lucien; Mao, Weihua

    2015-01-07

    The purpose of this work is to develop an automated landmark-guided deformable image registration (LDIR) algorithm between the planning CT and daily cone-beam CT (CBCT) with low image quality. This method uses an automated landmark generation algorithm in conjunction with a local small volume gradient matching search engine to map corresponding landmarks between the CBCT and the planning CT. The landmarks act as stabilizing control points in the following Demons deformable image registration. LDIR is implemented on graphics processing units (GPUs) for parallel computation to achieve ultra fast calculation. The accuracy of the LDIR algorithm has been evaluated on a synthetic case in the presence of different noise levels and data of six head and neck cancer patients. The results indicate that LDIR performed better than rigid registration, Demons, and intensity corrected Demons for all similarity metrics used. In conclusion, LDIR achieves high accuracy in the presence of multimodality intensity mismatch and CBCT noise contamination, while simultaneously preserving high computational efficiency.

  2. Automated landmark-guided deformable image registration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kearney, Vasant; Chen, Susie; Gu, Xuejun; Chiu, Tsuicheng; Liu, Honghuan; Jiang, Lan; Wang, Jing; Yordy, John; Nedzi, Lucien; Mao, Weihua

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop an automated landmark-guided deformable image registration (LDIR) algorithm between the planning CT and daily cone-beam CT (CBCT) with low image quality. This method uses an automated landmark generation algorithm in conjunction with a local small volume gradient matching search engine to map corresponding landmarks between the CBCT and the planning CT. The landmarks act as stabilizing control points in the following Demons deformable image registration. LDIR is implemented on graphics processing units (GPUs) for parallel computation to achieve ultra fast calculation. The accuracy of the LDIR algorithm has been evaluated on a synthetic case in the presence of different noise levels and data of six head and neck cancer patients. The results indicate that LDIR performed better than rigid registration, Demons, and intensity corrected Demons for all similarity metrics used. In conclusion, LDIR achieves high accuracy in the presence of multimodality intensity mismatch and CBCT noise contamination, while simultaneously preserving high computational efficiency. (paper)

  3. Dangerous intersections? A review of studies of fatigue and distraction in the automated vehicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Gerald; Neubauer, Catherine; Saxby, Dyani J; Wohleber, Ryan W; Lin, Jinchao

    2018-04-10

    The impacts of fatigue on the vehicle driver may change with technological advancements including automation and the increasing prevalence of potentially distracting in-car systems. This article reviews the authors' simulation studies of how fatigue, automation, and distraction may intersect as threats to safety. Distinguishing between states of active and passive fatigue supports understanding of fatigue and the development of countermeasures. Active fatigue is a stress-like state driven by overload of cognitive capabilities. Passive fatigue is produced by underload and monotony, and is associated with loss of task engagement and alertness. Our studies show that automated driving reliably elicits subjective symptoms of passive fatigue and also loss of alertness that persists following manual takeover. Passive fatigue also impairs attention and automation use in operators of Remotely Piloted Vehicles (RPVs). Use of in-vehicle media has been proposed as a countermeasure to fatigue, but such media may also be distracting. Studies tested whether various forms of phone-based media interacted with automation-induced fatigue, but effects were complex and dependent on task configuration. Selection of fatigue countermeasures should be guided by an understanding of the form of fatigue confronting the operator. System design, regulation of level of automation, managing distraction, and selection of fatigue-resilient personnel are all possible interventions for passive fatigue, but careful evaluation of interventions is necessary prior to deployment. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Technical note: CT-guided biopsy of lung masses using an automated guiding apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chellathurai, Amarnath; Kanhirat, Saneej; Chokkappan, Kabilan; Swaminathan, Thiruchendur S; Kulasekaran, Nadhamuni

    2009-01-01

    Automated guiding apparatuses for CT-guided biopsies are now available. We report our experience with an indigenous system to guide lung biopsies. This system gave results similar to those with the manual technique. Automated planning also appears to be technically easier, it requires fewer number of needle passes, consumes less time, and requires fewer number of check scans

  5. AUTOMATED COMPUTER SYSTEM OF VEHICLE VOICE CONTROL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kravchenko

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Domestic cars and foreign analogues are considered. Failings are marked related to absence of the auxiliary electronic system which serves for the increase of safety and comfort of vehicle management. Innovative development of the complex system of vocal management which provides reliability, comfort and simplicity of movement in a vehicle is offered.

  6. An Automation Survival Guide for Media Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whaley, Roger E.

    1989-01-01

    Reviews factors that should affect the decision to automate a school media center and offers suggestions for the automation process. Topics discussed include getting the library collection ready for automation, deciding what automated functions are needed, evaluating software vendors, selecting software, and budgeting. (CLB)

  7. Clean Cities 2011 Vehicle Buyer's Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-01-01

    The 2011 Clean Cities Light-Duty Vehicle Buyer's Guide is a consumer publication that provides a comprehensive list of commercially available alternative fuel and advanced vehicles in model year 2011. The guide allows for side-by-side comparisons of fuel economy, price, emissions, and vehicle specifications.

  8. Clean Cities 2014 Vehicle Buyer's Guide (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2013-12-01

    This annual guide features a comprehensive list of 2014 light-duty alternative fuel and advanced vehicles, grouped by fuel and technology. The guide provides model-specific information on vehicle specifications, manufacturer suggested retail price, fuel economy, energy impact, and emissions. The information can be used to identify options, compare vehicles, and help inform purchase decisions.

  9. The Legal Status of Low Speed, Electric, Automated Vehicles in Texas : Policy Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    This report explores whether vehicles that are both Neighborhood Electric Vehicles (NEVs) and Automated Vehicles (AVs) may operate legally on public roads in Texas. First is an examination of Neighborhood Electric Vehicles and how they are governed i...

  10. 1997 update for the applications guide to vehicle SNM monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    York, R.L.; Fehlau, P.E.

    1997-04-01

    Ten years have elapsed since the publication of the original applications guide to vehicle special nuclear material (SNM) monitors. During that interval, use of automatic vehicle monitors has become more commonplace, and formal procedures for monitor upkeep and evaluation have become available. New concepts for vehicle monitoring are being explored, as well. This update report reviews the basics of vehicle SNM monitoring, discusses what is new in vehicle SNM monitoring, and catalogs the vehicle SNM monitors that are commercial available

  11. Vehicle automation and weather : challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-25

    Adverse weather has major impacts on the safety and operations of all roads, from signalized arterials to Interstate highways. Weather affects driver behavior, vehicle performance, pavement friction, and roadway infrastructure, thereby increasing the...

  12. Automated vehicle for railway track fault detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhushan, M.; Sujay, S.; Tushar, B.; Chitra, P.

    2017-11-01

    For the safety reasons, railroad tracks need to be inspected on a regular basis for detecting physical defects or design non compliances. Such track defects and non compliances, if not detected in a certain interval of time, may eventually lead to severe consequences such as train derailments. Inspection must happen twice weekly by a human inspector to maintain safety standards as there are hundreds and thousands of miles of railroad track. But in such type of manual inspection, there are many drawbacks that may result in the poor inspection of the track, due to which accidents may cause in future. So to avoid such errors and severe accidents, this automated system is designed.Such a concept would surely introduce automation in the field of inspection process of railway track and can help to avoid mishaps and severe accidents due to faults in the track.

  13. Travel Effects and Associated Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Automated Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-01

    In much the same way that the automobile disrupted horse and cart transportation in the 20th century, automated vehicles hold the potential to disrupt our current system of transportation and the fabric of our built environment in the 21st century. E...

  14. Automation and traction control of articulated vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Andersson, Ulf

    2013-01-01

    Articulated machines such as load-haul-dump machines, wheel loaders and haulers operate in many different environments and driving conditions. In particular they need to be able to perform well with road conditions and loads that can change drastically, setting hard requirements on performances and robustness. The control challenges for off-road vehicles are hence quite different from standard cars or trucks, which mostly drive on regular roads. An important aspect characterising this is the ...

  15. Automated driving and autonomous functions on road vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, T. J.; Lidberg, M.

    2015-07-01

    In recent years, road vehicle automation has become an important and popular topic for research and development in both academic and industrial spheres. New developments have received extensive coverage in the popular press, and it may be said that the topic has captured the public imagination. Indeed, the topic has generated interest across a wide range of academic, industry and governmental communities, well beyond vehicle engineering; these include computer science, transportation, urban planning, legal, social science and psychology. While this follows a similar surge of interest - and subsequent hiatus - of Automated Highway Systems in the 1990s, the current level of interest is substantially greater, and current expectations are high. It is common to frame the new technologies under the banner of 'self-driving cars' - robotic systems potentially taking over the entire role of the human driver, a capability that does not fully exist at present. However, this single vision leads one to ignore the existing range of automated systems that are both feasible and useful. Recent developments are underpinned by substantial and long-term trends in 'computerisation' of the automobile, with developments in sensors, actuators and control technologies to spur the new developments in both industry and academia. In this paper, we review the evolution of the intelligent vehicle and the supporting technologies with a focus on the progress and key challenges for vehicle system dynamics. A number of relevant themes around driving automation are explored in this article, with special focus on those most relevant to the underlying vehicle system dynamics. One conclusion is that increased precision is needed in sensing and controlling vehicle motions, a trend that can mimic that of the aerospace industry, and similarly benefit from increased use of redundant by-wire actuators.

  16. Safe interaction between cyclists, pedestrians and automated vehicles : what do we know and what do we need to know?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, L. Kint, S. van der Schagen, I.N.L.G. van & Hagenzieker, M.P.

    2017-01-01

    Automated vehicles are gradually entering our roadway system. Before our roads will be solely used by fully automated vehicles, a long transition period is to be expected in which fully automated vehicles, partly automated vehicles and manually-driven vehicles have to share our roads. The current

  17. Advanced automation for in-space vehicle processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sklar, Michael; Wegerif, D.

    1990-01-01

    The primary objective of this 3-year planned study is to assure that the fully evolved Space Station Freedom (SSF) can support automated processing of exploratory mission vehicles. Current study assessments show that required extravehicular activity (EVA) and to some extent intravehicular activity (IVA) manpower requirements for required processing tasks far exceeds the available manpower. Furthermore, many processing tasks are either hazardous operations or they exceed EVA capability. Thus, automation is essential for SSF transportation node functionality. Here, advanced automation represents the replacement of human performed tasks beyond the planned baseline automated tasks. Both physical tasks such as manipulation, assembly and actuation, and cognitive tasks such as visual inspection, monitoring and diagnosis, and task planning are considered. During this first year of activity both the Phobos/Gateway Mars Expedition and Lunar Evolution missions proposed by the Office of Exploration have been evaluated. A methodology for choosing optimal tasks to be automated has been developed. Processing tasks for both missions have been ranked on the basis of automation potential. The underlying concept in evaluating and describing processing tasks has been the use of a common set of 'Primitive' task descriptions. Primitive or standard tasks have been developed both for manual or crew processing and automated machine processing.

  18. Optimal Control of Connected and Automated Vehicles at Roundabouts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Liuhui [University of Delaware; Malikopoulos, Andreas [ORNL; Rios-Torres, Jackeline [ORNL

    2018-01-01

    Connectivity and automation in vehicles provide the most intriguing opportunity for enabling users to better monitor transportation network conditions and make better operating decisions to improve safety and reduce pollution, energy consumption, and travel delays. This study investigates the implications of optimally coordinating vehicles that are wirelessly connected to each other and to an infrastructure in roundabouts to achieve a smooth traffic flow without stop-and-go driving. We apply an optimization framework and an analytical solution that allows optimal coordination of vehicles for merging in such traffic scenario. The effectiveness of the efficiency of the proposed approach is validated through simulation and it is shown that coordination of vehicles can reduce total travel time by 3~49% and fuel consumption by 2~27% with respect to different traffic levels. In addition, network throughput is improved by up to 25% due to elimination of stop-and-go driving behavior.

  19. An automated miniature robotic vehicle inspection system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobie, Gordon; Summan, Rahul; MacLeod, Charles; Pierce, Gareth; Galbraith, Walter [Centre for Ultrasonic Engineering, University of Strathclyde, 204 George Street, Glasgow, G1 1XW (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-18

    A novel, autonomous reconfigurable robotic inspection system for quantitative NDE mapping is presented. The system consists of a fleet of wireless (802.11g) miniature robotic vehicles, each approximately 175 × 125 × 85 mm with magnetic wheels that enable them to inspect industrial structures such as storage tanks, chimneys and large diameter pipe work. The robots carry one of a number of payloads including a two channel MFL sensor, a 5 MHz dry coupled UT thickness wheel probe and a machine vision camera that images the surface. The system creates an NDE map of the structure overlaying results onto a 3D model in real time. The authors provide an overview of the robot design, data fusion algorithms (positioning and NDE) and visualization software.

  20. An automated miniature robotic vehicle inspection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobie, Gordon; Summan, Rahul; MacLeod, Charles; Pierce, Gareth; Galbraith, Walter

    2014-01-01

    A novel, autonomous reconfigurable robotic inspection system for quantitative NDE mapping is presented. The system consists of a fleet of wireless (802.11g) miniature robotic vehicles, each approximately 175 × 125 × 85 mm with magnetic wheels that enable them to inspect industrial structures such as storage tanks, chimneys and large diameter pipe work. The robots carry one of a number of payloads including a two channel MFL sensor, a 5 MHz dry coupled UT thickness wheel probe and a machine vision camera that images the surface. The system creates an NDE map of the structure overlaying results onto a 3D model in real time. The authors provide an overview of the robot design, data fusion algorithms (positioning and NDE) and visualization software

  1. Smart Automation, Customer Experience and Customer Engagement in Electric Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asad Ullah

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A major challenge to cleaner and more sustainable transportation is the lack of adoptability of electric vehicles (EVs by customers. Therefore, most of the vehicles we see on the road use fossil fuel instead of sustainable green energy sources. One way to improve customer acceptance is to market EVs as a socially desirable product, rather than only environmentally friendly. The silver lining to promote is the potential of information and communications technology (ICT features in EVs, which can lead to a deeper connection between the EVs and their users. These engaging technologies can bring customers closer to the company, resulting in generating big data, which can lead to even deeper insights into customer preferences. Because the technology of vehicle connectivity and automation is just taking off, it is important to understand how these technologies in EVs can enhance customer experiences and result in sustainable customer engagement. Unfortunately, this important research area remains neglected. This research, therefore, is focused on building a conceptual framework for understanding the influence of electric vehicle (EV automation and connectivity on customer experience, and ultimately, customer engagement.

  2. Life Cycle Assessment of Connected and Automated Vehicles: Sensing and Computing Subsystem and Vehicle Level Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawron, James H; Keoleian, Gregory A; De Kleine, Robert D; Wallington, Timothy J; Kim, Hyung Chul

    2018-03-06

    Although recent studies of connected and automated vehicles (CAVs) have begun to explore the potential energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission impacts from an operational perspective, little is known about how the full life cycle of the vehicle will be impacted. We report the results of a life cycle assessment (LCA) of Level 4 CAV sensing and computing subsystems integrated into internal combustion engine vehicle (ICEV) and battery electric vehicle (BEV) platforms. The results indicate that CAV subsystems could increase vehicle primary energy use and GHG emissions by 3-20% due to increases in power consumption, weight, drag, and data transmission. However, when potential operational effects of CAVs are included (e.g., eco-driving, platooning, and intersection connectivity), the net result is up to a 9% reduction in energy and GHG emissions in the base case. Overall, this study highlights opportunities where CAVs can improve net energy and environmental performance.

  3. Analysis of an Automated Vehicle Routing Problem in Logistics considering Path Interruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of automated vehicles in logistics can efficiently reduce the cost of logistics and reduce the potential risks in the last mile. Considering the path restriction in the initial stage of the application of automated vehicles in logistics, the conventional model for a vehicle routing problem (VRP is modified. Thus, the automated vehicle routing problem with time windows (AVRPTW model considering path interruption is established. Additionally, an improved particle swarm optimisation (PSO algorithm is designed to solve this problem. Finally, a case study is undertaken to test the validity of the model and the algorithm. Four automated vehicles are designated to execute all delivery tasks required by 25 stores. Capacities of all of the automated vehicles are almost fully utilised. It is of considerable significance for the promotion of automated vehicles in last-mile situations to develop such research into real problems arising in the initial period.

  4. Obstacle detectors for automated transit vehicles: A technoeconomic and market analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockerby, C. E.

    1979-01-01

    A search was conducted to identify the technical and economic characteristics of both NASA and nonNASA obstacle detectors. The findings, along with market information were compiled and analyzed for consideration by DOT and NASA in decisions about any future automated transit vehicle obstacle detector research, development, or applications project. Currently available obstacle detectors and systems under development are identified by type (sonic, capacitance, infrared/optical, guided radar, and probe contact) and compared with the three NASA devices selected as possible improvements or solutions to the problems in existing obstacle detection systems. Cost analyses and market forecasts individually for the AGT and AMTV markets are included.

  5. 36 CFR 1192.173 - Automated guideway transit vehicles and systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    .... Vertical alignment may be accomplished by vehicle air suspension or other suitable means of meeting the... vehicles and systems. 1192.173 Section 1192.173 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND... TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES Other Vehicles and Systems § 1192.173 Automated guideway transit vehicles and systems. (a...

  6. 1st workshop on situational awareness in semi-Automated vehicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McCall, R.; Baumann, M.; Politis, I.; Borojeni, S.S.; Alvarez, I.; Mirnig, A.; Meschtscherjakov, A.; Tscheligi, M.; Chuang, L.; Terken, J.M.B.

    2016-01-01

    This workshop will focus on the problem of occupant and vehicle situational awareness with respect to automated vehicles when the driver must take over control. It will explore the future of fully automated and mixed traffic situations where vehicles are assumed to be operating at level 3 or above.

  7. Terminal Sliding Mode Tracking Controller Design for Automatic Guided Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongbin

    2018-03-01

    Based on sliding mode variable structure control theory, the path tracking problem of automatic guided vehicle is studied, proposed a controller design method based on the terminal sliding mode. First of all, through analyzing the characteristics of the automatic guided vehicle movement, the kinematics model is presented. Then to improve the traditional expression of terminal sliding mode, design a nonlinear sliding mode which the convergence speed is faster than the former, verified by theoretical analysis, the design of sliding mode is steady and fast convergence in the limited time. Finally combining Lyapunov method to design the tracking control law of automatic guided vehicle, the controller can make the automatic guided vehicle track the desired trajectory in the global sense as well as in finite time. The simulation results verify the correctness and effectiveness of the control law.

  8. Development of an automated vehicle stop system for cardiac emergencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tung T. Nguyen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the concept and configuration of a novel automated safety vehicle stop system, and a future prospect of the study. Intrinsic sudden death may cause traffic accident since such accidents sometimes involve not only the driver but also other traffic users such as passengers and pedestrians. Cardiovascular disease (CVD is considered as a serious driving risk factor. The pain and others effects of cardiac events degrade driver’s performance, and CVD causes ischemia brought by the CVD induces incapacity of driving. In the automated safety vehicle stop system, which our research group has developed, steer-sensors collects bio-signals and a camera captures the driver’s posture to monitor driver’s incapability. When the driver loses his or her driving capability, the system takes over the maneuver of the vehicle and automatically drives to a safety spot by observing the traffic environment. An emergency scenario was used to demonstrate the system verifying its potential.

  9. Automation of the guiding center expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burby, J. W.; Squire, J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Qin, H. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2013-07-15

    We report on the use of the recently developed Mathematica package VEST (Vector Einstein Summation Tools) to automatically derive the guiding center transformation. Our Mathematica code employs a recursive procedure to derive the transformation order-by-order. This procedure has several novel features. (1) It is designed to allow the user to easily explore the guiding center transformation's numerous non-unique forms or representations. (2) The procedure proceeds entirely in cartesian position and velocity coordinates, thereby producing manifestly gyrogauge invariant results; the commonly used perpendicular unit vector fields e{sub 1},e{sub 2} are never even introduced. (3) It is easy to apply in the derivation of higher-order contributions to the guiding center transformation without fear of human error. Our code therefore stands as a useful tool for exploring subtle issues related to the physics of toroidal momentum conservation in tokamaks.

  10. Automated particulate sampler field test model operations guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowyer, S.M.; Miley, H.S.

    1996-10-01

    The Automated Particulate Sampler Field Test Model Operations Guide is a collection of documents which provides a complete picture of the Automated Particulate Sampler (APS) and the Field Test in which it was evaluated. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Automated Particulate Sampler was developed for the purpose of radionuclide particulate monitoring for use under the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). Its design was directed by anticipated requirements of small size, low power consumption, low noise level, fully automatic operation, and most predominantly the sensitivity requirements of the Conference on Disarmament Working Paper 224 (CDWP224). This guide is intended to serve as both a reference document for the APS and to provide detailed instructions on how to operate the sampler. This document provides a complete description of the APS Field Test Model and all the activity related to its evaluation and progression.

  11. A guide to automation techniques in calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renz, D.P.; Wetzel, J.R.; Breakall, K.L.; James, S.J.; Kasperski, P.W.

    1992-01-01

    Many improvements occurring in calorimetry measurement technology in the past few years will help current users of calorimeters to achieve better use of their existing systems. These include a more user friendly operator computer interface, a more detailed printout at the end of each run, improved data processing to eliminate operator error, and improved system monitoring to detect system or environmental problems. In addition, an electrical calibration heater has been developed to replace plutonium-238 heat standards for calibrating calorimeters, and several automation systems allow for easier and safer system operation

  12. Changes in motivational and higher level cognitive processes when interacting with in-vehicle automation

    OpenAIRE

    Beggiato, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Many functions that at one time could only be performed by humans can nowadays be carried out by machines. Automation impacts many areas of life including work, home, communication and mobility. In the driving context, in-vehicle automation is considered to provide solutions for environmental, economic, safety and societal challenges. However, automation changes the driving task and the human-machine interaction. Thus, the expected benefit of in-vehicle automation can be undermined by changes...

  13. Changes in motivational and higher level cognitive processes when interacting with in-vehicle automation

    OpenAIRE

    Beggiato, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Many functions that at one time could only be performed by humans can nowadays be carried out by machines. Automation impacts many areas of life including work, home, communication and mobility. In the driving context, in-vehicle automation is considered to provide solutions for environmental, economic, safety and societal challenges. However, automation changes the driving task and the human-machine interaction. Thus, the expected benefit of in-vehicle automation can be undermined by changes...

  14. Control techniques for an automated mixed traffic vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisenholder, G. W.; Johnston, A. R.

    1977-01-01

    The paper describes an automated mixed traffic vehicle (AMTV), a driverless low-speed tram designed to operate in mixed pedestrian and vehicular traffic. The vehicle is a six-passenger electric tram equipped with sensing and control which permit it to function on existing streets in an automatic mode. The design includes established wire-following techniques for steering and near-IR headway sensors. A 7-mph cruise speed is reduced to 2 mph or a complete stop in response to sensor (or passenger) inputs. The AMTV performance is evaluated by operation on a loop route and by simulation. Some necessary improvements involving sensors, sensor pattern, use of an audible signal, and control lag are discussed. It is suggested that appropriate modifications will eliminate collision incidents.

  15. Usefulness of automated biopsy guns in image-guided biopsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jung Hyung; Rhee, Chang Soo; Lee, Sung Moon; Kim, Hong; Woo, Sung Ku; Suh, Soo Jhi

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of automated biopsy guns in image-guided biopsy of lung, liver, pancreas and other organs. Using automated biopsy devices, 160 biopsies of variable anatomic sites were performed: Biopsies were performed under ultrasonographic(US) guidance in 95 and computed tomographic (CT) guidance in 65. We retrospectively analyzed histologic results and complications. Specimens were adequate for histopathologic diagnosis in 143 of the 160 patients(89.4%)-Diagnostic tissue was obtained in 130 (81.3%), suggestive tissue obtained in 13(8.1%), and non-diagnostic tissue was obtained in 14(8.7%). Inadequate tissue was obtained in only 3(1.9%). There was no statistically significant difference between US-guided and CT-guided percutaneous biopsy. There was no occurrence of significant complication. We have experienced mild complications in only 5 patients-2 hematuria and 2 hematochezia in transrectal prostatic biopsy, and 1 minimal pneumothorax in CT-guided percutaneous lung biopsy. All of them were resolved spontaneously. The image-guided biopsy using the automated biopsy gun was a simple, safe and accurate method of obtaining adequate specimen for the histopathologic diagnosis

  16. Usefulness of automated biopsy guns in image-guided biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jung Hyung; Rhee, Chang Soo; Lee, Sung Moon; Kim, Hong; Woo, Sung Ku; Suh, Soo Jhi [School of Medicine, Keimyung University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-12-15

    To evaluate the usefulness of automated biopsy guns in image-guided biopsy of lung, liver, pancreas and other organs. Using automated biopsy devices, 160 biopsies of variable anatomic sites were performed: Biopsies were performed under ultrasonographic(US) guidance in 95 and computed tomographic (CT) guidance in 65. We retrospectively analyzed histologic results and complications. Specimens were adequate for histopathologic diagnosis in 143 of the 160 patients(89.4%)-Diagnostic tissue was obtained in 130 (81.3%), suggestive tissue obtained in 13(8.1%), and non-diagnostic tissue was obtained in 14(8.7%). Inadequate tissue was obtained in only 3(1.9%). There was no statistically significant difference between US-guided and CT-guided percutaneous biopsy. There was no occurrence of significant complication. We have experienced mild complications in only 5 patients-2 hematuria and 2 hematochezia in transrectal prostatic biopsy, and 1 minimal pneumothorax in CT-guided percutaneous lung biopsy. All of them were resolved spontaneously. The image-guided biopsy using the automated biopsy gun was a simple, safe and accurate method of obtaining adequate specimen for the histopathologic diagnosis.

  17. Fully automated MRI-guided robotics for prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoianovici, D.; Vigaru, B.; Petrisor, D.; Muntener, M.; Patriciu, A.; Song, D.

    2008-01-01

    The uncertainties encountered in the deployment of brachytherapy seeds are related to the commonly used ultrasound imager and the basic instrumentation used for the implant. An alternative solution is under development in which a fully automated robot is used to place the seeds according to the dosimetry plan under direct MRI-guidance. Incorporation of MRI-guidance creates potential for physiological and molecular image-guided therapies. Moreover, MRI-guided brachytherapy is also enabling for re-estimating dosimetry during the procedure, because with the MRI the seeds already implanted can be localised. An MRI compatible robot (MrBot) was developed. The robot is designed for transperineal percutaneous prostate interventions, and customised for fully automated MRI-guided brachytherapy. With different end-effectors, the robot applies to other image-guided interventions of the prostate. The robot is constructed of non-magnetic and dielectric materials and is electricity free using pneumatic actuation and optic sensing. A new motor (PneuStep) was purposely developed to set this robot in motion. The robot fits alongside the patient in closed-bore MRI scanners. It is able to stay fully operational during MR imaging without deteriorating the quality of the scan. In vitro, cadaver, and animal tests showed millimetre needle targeting accuracy, and very precise seed placement. The robot tested without any interference up to 7T. The robot is the first fully automated robot to function in MRI scanners. Its first application is MRI-guided seed brachytherapy. It is capable of automated, highly accurate needle placement. Extensive testing is in progress prior to clinical trials. Preliminary results show that the robot may become a useful image-guided intervention instrument. (author)

  18. Subjective and objective assessment of manual, supported, and automated vehicle control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, A.P. de; Godthelp, J.; Käppler, W.D.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper subjective and objective assessments of vehicle control are illustrated by means of ex-periments concerning manipulation of vehicle dynamics, driver support, and automated driving. Subjective ratings are discussed in relation to objective performance measures.

  19. Literature review on recent international activity in cooperative vehicle-highway automation systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    This literature review supports the report, Recent International Activity in Cooperative VehicleHighway Automation Systems. It : reviews the published literature in English dating from 2007 or later about non-U.S.-based work on cooperative vehicle...

  20. Revolutionizing our roadways : the challenges and benefits of making automated vehicles a reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Automated vehicles (AVs)a combination of technologies and sensors that : enable vehicles to operate with limited or no driver inputare rapidly moving : from science fiction to real-world application. Low-level, limited function AV : technologie...

  1. 49 CFR 38.173 - Automated guideway transit vehicles and systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... accomplished by vehicle air suspension or other suitable means of meeting the requirement. (c) In stations... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Automated guideway transit vehicles and systems... DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) ACCESSIBILITY SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES Other Vehicles and Systems § 38...

  2. Clean Cities 2012 Vehicle Buyer's Guide (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-03-01

    The expanding availability of alternative fuels and advanced vehicles makes it easier than ever to reduce petroleum use, cut emissions, and save on fuel costs. The Clean Cities 2012 Vehicle Buyer's Guide features a comprehensive list of model year 2012 vehicles that can run on ethanol, biodiesel, electricity, propane or natural gas. Drivers and fleet managers across the country are looking for ways to reduce petroleum use, fuel costs, and vehicle emissions. As you'll find in this guide, these goals are easier to achieve than ever before, with an expanding selection of vehicles that use gasoline or diesel more efficiently, or forego them altogether. Plug-in electric vehicles made a grand entrance onto U.S. roadways in model year (MY) 2011, and their momentum in the market is poised for continued growth in 2012. Sales of the all-electric Nissan Leaf surpassed 8,000 in the fall of 2011, and the plug-in hybrid Chevy Volt is now available nationwide. Several new models from major automakers will become available throughout MY 2012, and drivers are benefiting from a rapidly growing network of charging stations, thanks to infrastructure development initiatives in many states. Hybrid electric vehicles, which first entered the market just a decade ago, are ubiquitous today. Hybrid technology now allows drivers of all vehicle classes, from SUVs to luxury sedans to subcompacts, to slash fuel use and emissions. Alternative fueling infrastructure is expanding in many regions, making natural gas, propane, ethanol, and biodiesel attractive and convenient choices for many consumers and fleets. And because fuel availability is the most important factor in choosing an alternative fuel vehicle, this growth opens up new possibilities for vehicle ownership. This guide features model-specific information about vehicle specs, manufacturer suggested retail price (MSRP), fuel economy, and emissions. You can use this information to compare vehicles and help inform your buying

  3. Loft: An Automated Mesh Generator for Stiffened Shell Aerospace Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldred, Lloyd B.

    2011-01-01

    Loft is an automated mesh generation code that is designed for aerospace vehicle structures. From user input, Loft generates meshes for wings, noses, tanks, fuselage sections, thrust structures, and so on. As a mesh is generated, each element is assigned properties to mark the part of the vehicle with which it is associated. This property assignment is an extremely powerful feature that enables detailed analysis tasks, such as load application and structural sizing. This report is presented in two parts. The first part is an overview of the code and its applications. The modeling approach that was used to create the finite element meshes is described. Several applications of the code are demonstrated, including a Next Generation Launch Technology (NGLT) wing-sizing study, a lunar lander stage study, a launch vehicle shroud shape study, and a two-stage-to-orbit (TSTO) orbiter. Part two of the report is the program user manual. The manual includes in-depth tutorials and a complete command reference.

  4. Policy Brief: What is the Legal Framework for Automated Vehicles in Texas?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-01

    During the 85th Texas Legislature in 2017, Texas enacted a law related to automated vehicles. The bill, SB 2205, creates the legal framework for automated vehicle operation and testing in Texas. Although this law addresses a number of issues that can...

  5. The future of fully automated vehicles : opportunities for vehicle- and ride-sharing, with cost and emissions savings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Fully automated or autonomous vehicles (AVs) hold great promise for the future of transportation. By 2020 : Google, auto manufacturers and other technology providers intend to introduce self-driving cars to the public with : either limited or fully a...

  6. Automated space vehicle control for rendezvous proximity operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lea, Robert N.

    1988-01-01

    Rendezvous during the unmanned space exploration missions, such as a Mars Rover/Sample Return will require a completely automatic system from liftoff to docking. A conceptual design of an automated rendezvous, proximity operations, and docking system is being implemented and validated at the Johnson Space Center (JSC). The emphasis is on the progress of the development and testing of a prototype system for control of the rendezvous vehicle during proximity operations that is currently being developed at JSC. Fuzzy sets are used to model the human capability of common sense reasoning in decision making tasks and such models are integrated with the expert systems and engineering control system technology to create a system that performs comparably to a manned system.

  7. Guide to alternative fuel vehicle incentives and laws: September 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, C.; O' Connor, K.

    1998-12-22

    This guide provides information in support of the National Clean Cities Program, which will assist one in becoming better informed about the choices and options surrounding the use of alternative fuels and the purchase of alternative fuel vehicles. The information printed in this guide is current as of September 15, 1998. For recent additions or more up-to-date information, check the Alternative Fuels Data Center Web site at http://www.afdc.doe.gov

  8. Performance of an Automated-Mixed-Traffic-Vehicle /AMTV/ System. [urban people mover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, T. K. C.; Chon, K.

    1978-01-01

    This study analyzes the operation and evaluates the expected performance of a proposed automatic guideway transit system which uses low-speed Automated Mixed Traffic Vehicles (AMTV's). Vehicle scheduling and headway control policies are evaluated with a transit system simulation model. The effect of mixed-traffic interference on the average vehicle speed is examined with a vehicle-pedestrian interface model. Control parameters regulating vehicle speed are evaluated for safe stopping and passenger comfort.

  9. The GNC Measurement System for the Automated Transfer Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, Y.; da Cunha, P.

    The Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV) is a European Space Agency (ESA) funded spacecraft developed by EADS Space Transportation as prime contractor for the space segment together with major European industrial partners, in the frame of the International Space Station (ISS). Its mission objective is threefold : to supply the station with fret and propellant, to reboost ISS to a higher orbit and to dispose of waste from the station. The ATV first flight, called Jules Verne and planned on 2005, will be the first European Vehicle to perform an orbital rendezvous. The GNC Measurement System (GMS) is the ATV on board function in charge of the measurement data collection and preconditioning for the navigation, guidance and control (GNC) algorithms. The GMS is made up of hardware which are the navigation sensors (with a certain level of hardware redundancy for each of them), and of an on-board software that manages, monitors and performs consistency checks to detect and isolate potential sensor failures. The GMS relies on six kinds of navigation sensors, used during various phases of the mission : the gyrometers assembly (GYRA), the accelerometers assembly (ACCA), the star trackers (STR), the GPS receivers, the telegoniometers (TGM) and the videometers (VDM), the last two being used for the final rendezvous phase. The GMS function is developed by EADS Space Transportation together with other industrial partners: EADS Astrium, EADS Sodern, Laben and Dasa Jena Optronik.

  10. Clean Cities 2015 Vehicle Buyer's Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-02-11

    Drivers and fleets are increasingly turning to the hundreds of light-duty, alternative fuel, and advanced technology vehicle models that reduce petroleum use, save on fuel costs, and cut emissions. This guide provides a comprehensive list of the 2015 light-duty models that use alternative fuels or advanced fuel-saving technologies.

  11. 2015 Vehicle Buyer's Guide (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2015-02-01

    Drivers and fleets are increasingly turning to the hundreds of light-duty, alternative fuel, and advanced technology vehicle models that reduce petroleum use, save on fuel costs, and cut emissions. This guide provides a comprehensive list of the 2015 light-duty models that use alternative fuels or advanced fuel-saving technologies.

  12. Clean Cities 2016 Vehicle Buyer's Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-02-01

    Drivers and fleets are increasingly turning to the hundreds of light-duty, alternative fuel, and advanced technology vehicle models that reduce petroleum use, save on fuel costs, and cut emissions. This guide provides a comprehensive list of the 2016 light-duty models that use alternative fuels or advanced fuel-saving technologies.

  13. Driver Vigilance in Automated Vehicles: Hazard Detection Failures Are a Matter of Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenlee, Eric T; DeLucia, Patricia R; Newton, David C

    2018-03-01

    The primary aim of the current study was to determine whether monitoring the roadway for hazards during automated driving results in a vigilance decrement. Although automated vehicles are relatively novel, the nature of human-automation interaction within them has the classic hallmarks of a vigilance task. Drivers must maintain attention for prolonged periods of time to detect and respond to rare and unpredictable events, for example, roadway hazards that automation may be ill equipped to detect. Given the similarity with traditional vigilance tasks, we predicted that drivers of a simulated automated vehicle would demonstrate a vigilance decrement in hazard detection performance. Participants "drove" a simulated automated vehicle for 40 minutes. During that time, their task was to monitor the roadway for roadway hazards. As predicted, hazard detection rate declined precipitously, and reaction times slowed as the drive progressed. Further, subjective ratings of workload and task-related stress indicated that sustained monitoring is demanding and distressing and it is a challenge to maintain task engagement. Monitoring the roadway for potential hazards during automated driving results in workload, stress, and performance decrements similar to those observed in traditional vigilance tasks. To the degree that vigilance is required of automated vehicle drivers, performance errors and associated safety risks are likely to occur as a function of time on task. Vigilance should be a focal safety concern in the development of vehicle automation.

  14. Estimated Bounds and Important Factors for Fuel Use and Consumer Costs of Connected and Automated Vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephens, T. S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gonder, Jeff [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Chen, Yuche [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Lin, Z. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Liu, C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gohlke, D. [US Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

    2016-11-01

    This report details a study of the potential effects of connected and automated vehicle (CAV) technologies on vehicle miles traveled (VMT), vehicle fuel efficiency, and consumer costs. Related analyses focused on a range of light-duty CAV technologies in conventional powertrain vehicles -- from partial automation to full automation, with and without ridesharing -- compared to today's base-case scenario. Analysis results revealed widely disparate upper- and lower-bound estimates for fuel use and VMT, ranging from a tripling of fuel use to decreasing light-duty fuel use to below 40% of today's level. This wide range reflects uncertainties in the ways that CAV technologies can influence vehicle efficiency and use through changes in vehicle designs, driving habits, and travel behavior. The report further identifies the most significant potential impacting factors, the largest areas of uncertainty, and where further research is particularly needed.

  15. Artificial guide stars for adaptive optics using unmanned aerial vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basden, A. G.; Brown, Anthony M.; Chadwick, P. M.; Clark, P.; Massey, R.

    2018-06-01

    Astronomical adaptive optics (AO) systems are used to increase effective telescope resolution. However, they cannot be used to observe the whole sky since one or more natural guide stars of sufficient brightness must be found within the telescope field of view for the AO system to work. Even when laser guide stars are used, natural guide stars are still required to provide a constant position reference. Here, we introduce a technique to overcome this problem by using rotary unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) as a platform from which to produce artificial guide stars. We describe the concept that relies on the UAV being able to measure its precise relative position. We investigate the AO performance improvements that can be achieved, which in the cases presented here can improve the Strehl ratio by a factor of at least 2 for a 8 m class telescope. We also discuss improvements to this technique, which is relevant to both astronomical and solar AO systems.

  16. Working together on automated vehicle guidance AVG : preliminary business plan, abridged version.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Awareness (ed.)

    1998-01-01

    This plan describes the questions which will have to be answered in the short term, and the action which need to be taken in a phased and structured manner to gain insight into the potential of automated vehicle guidance (AVG).

  17. Transportation planning implications of automated/connected vehicles on Texas highways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    This research project was focused on the transportation planning implications of automated/connected : vehicles (AV/CVs) on Texas highways. The research assessed how these potentially transformative : technologies can be included in transportation pl...

  18. Benefits Estimation Model for Automated Vehicle Operations: Phase 2 Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Automated vehicles have the potential to bring about transformative safety, mobility, energy, and environmental benefits to the surface transportation system. They are also being introduced into a complex transportation system, where second-order imp...

  19. A Framework for Evaluating Energy and Emissions of Connected and Automated Vehicles through Traffic Microsimulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-07

    Connected and automated vehicles (CAV) are poised to transform surface transportation systems in the United States. Near-term CAV technologies like cooperative adaptive cruise control (CACC) have the potential to deliver energy efficiency and air qua...

  20. An Accelerated Testing Approach for Automated Vehicles with Background Traffic Described by Joint Distributions

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Zhiyuan; Lam, Henry; Zhao, Ding

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a new framework based on joint statistical models for evaluating risks of automated vehicles in a naturalistic driving environment. The previous studies on the Accelerated Evaluation for automated vehicles are extended from multi-independent-variate models to joint statistics. The proposed toolkit includes exploration of the rare event (e.g. crash) sets and construction of accelerated distributions for Gaussian Mixture models using Importance Sampling techniques. Furthermo...

  1. Safety assessment of automated vehicle functions by simulation-based fault injection

    OpenAIRE

    Juez, Garazi; Amparan, Estibaliz; Lattarulo, Ray; Rastelli, Joshue Perez; Ruiz, Alejandra; Espinoza, Huascar

    2017-01-01

    As automated driving vehicles become more sophisticated and pervasive, it is increasingly important to assure its safety even in the presence of faults. This paper presents a simulation-based fault injection approach (Sabotage) aimed at assessing the safety of automated vehicle functions. In particular, we focus on a case study to forecast fault effects during the model-based design of a lateral control function. The goal is to determine the acceptable fault detection interval for pe...

  2. Automated dental implantation using image-guided robotics: registration results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoyan; McKenzie, Frederic D; Bawab, Sebastian; Li, Jiang; Yoon, Yongki; Huang, Jen-K

    2011-09-01

    One of the most important factors affecting the outcome of dental implantation is the accurate insertion of the implant into the patient's jaw bone, which requires a high degree of anatomical accuracy. With the accuracy and stability of robots, image-guided robotics is expected to provide more reliable and successful outcomes for dental implantation. Here, we proposed the use of a robot for drilling the implant site in preparation for the insertion of the implant. An image-guided robotic system for automated dental implantation is described in this paper. Patient-specific 3D models are reconstructed from preoperative Cone-beam CT images, and implantation planning is performed with these virtual models. A two-step registration procedure is applied to transform the preoperative plan of the implant insertion into intra-operative operations of the robot with the help of a Coordinate Measurement Machine (CMM). Experiments are carried out with a phantom that is generated from the patient-specific 3D model. Fiducial Registration Error (FRE) and Target Registration Error (TRE) values are calculated to evaluate the accuracy of the registration procedure. FRE values are less than 0.30 mm. Final TRE values after the two-step registration are 1.42 ± 0.70 mm (N = 5). The registration results of an automated dental implantation system using image-guided robotics are reported in this paper. Phantom experiments show that the practice of robot in the dental implantation is feasible and the system accuracy is comparable to other similar systems for dental implantation.

  3. Is vehicle automation enough to prevent crashes? Role of traffic operations in automated driving environments for traffic safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Eunbi; Oh, Cheol; Lee, Seolyoung

    2017-07-01

    Automated driving systems (ADSs) are expected to prevent traffic accidents caused by driver carelessness on freeways. There is no doubt regarding this safety benefit if all vehicles in the transportation system were equipped with ADSs; however, it is implausible to expect that ADSs will reach 100% market penetration rate (MPR) in the near future. Therefore, the following question arises: 'Can ADSs, which consider only situations in the vicinity of an equipped vehicle, really contribute to a significant reduction in traffic accidents?' To address this issue, the interactions between equipped and unequipped vehicles must be investigated, which is the purpose of this study. This study evaluated traffic safety at different MPRs based on a proposed index to represent the overall rear-end crash risk of the traffic stream. Two approaches were evaluated for adjusting longitudinal vehicle maneuvers: vehicle safety-based maneuvering (VSM), which considers the crash risk of an equipped vehicle and its neighboring vehicles, and traffic safety-based maneuvering (TSM), which considers the overall crash risk in the traffic stream. TSM assumes that traffic operational agencies are able to monitor all the vehicles and to intervene in vehicle maneuvering. An optimization process, which attempts to obtain vehicle maneuvering control parameters to minimize the overall crash risk, is integrated into the proposed evaluation framework. The main purpose of employing the optimization process for vehicle maneuvering in this study is to identify opportunities to improve traffic safety through effective traffic management rather than developing a vehicle control algorithm that can be implemented in practice. The microscopic traffic simulator VISSIM was used to simulate the freeway traffic stream and to conduct systematic evaluations based on the proposed methodology. Both TSM and VSM achieved significant reductions in the potential for rear-end crashes. However, TSM obtained much greater

  4. The modeling of transfer of steering between automated vehicle and human driver using hybrid control framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaustubh, M.; Willemsen, DMC; Mazo Espinosa, M.; Sjöberg, J.; Morris, B.

    2016-01-01

    Proponents of autonomous driving pursue driverless technologies, whereas others foresee a gradual transition where there will be automated driving systems that share the control of the vehicle with the driver. With such advances it becomes pertinent that the developed automated systems need to be

  5. The modeling of transfer of steering between automated vehicle and human driver using hybrid control framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaustubh, M.; Willemsen, D.M.C.; Mazo, M.

    2016-01-01

    Proponents of autonomous driving pursue driverless technologies, whereas others foresee a gradual transition where there will be automated driving systems that share the control of the vehicle with the driver. With such advances it becomes pertinent that the developed automated systems need to be

  6. Automation of a T-intersection using virtual platoons of cooperative autonomous vehicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morales Medina, Alejandro; van de Wouw, N.; Nijmeijer, H.

    2015-01-01

    Both traffic throughput and the vehicle passenger safety can be increased by automating road intersections. We propose the virtual platooning concept to ensure a smooth, efficient and safe traffic flow through an automated intersection. The virtual platoon is formed by defining a virtual

  7. Scenarios about development and implications of automated vehicles in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milakis, D.; Snelder, M.; Van Arem, B.; Van Wee, G.P.; Homem De Almeida Rodriguez Correia, G.

    2016-01-01

    Automated driving technology is emerging. Yet, less is known about when automated vehicles will hit the market, how penetration rates will evolve and to what extent this new transportation technology will affect transportation demand and planning. This study identified through scenario analysis

  8. Development and transport implications of automated vehicles in the Netherlands : Scenarios for 2030 and 2050

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milakis, D.; Snelder, M.; van Arem, B.; van Wee, G.P.; Homem de Almeida Correia, G.

    2017-01-01

    Automated driving technology is emerging. Yet, little is known in the literature about when automated vehicles will reach the market, how penetration rates will evolve and to what extent this new transport technology will affect transport demand and planning. This study uses scenario analysis to

  9. Development and transport implications of automated vehicles in the Netherlands: Scenarios for 2030 and 2050

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milakis, D.; Snelder, M.; Arem, B. van; Wee, B. van; Almeida Correia, G.H. de

    2017-01-01

    Automated driving technology is emerging. Yet, little is known in the literature about when automated vehicles will reach the market, how penetration rates will evolve and to what extent this new transport technology will affect transport demand and planning. This study uses scenario analysis to

  10. A time-use model for the automated vehicle-era

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pudāne, Baiba; Molin, Eric J.E.; Arentze, Theo A.; Maknoon, Yousef; Chorus, Caspar G.

    2018-01-01

    Automated Vehicles (AVs) offer their users a possibility to perform new non-driving activities while being on the way. The effects of this opportunity on travel choices and travel demand have mostly been conceptualised and modelled via a reduced penalty associated with (in-vehicle) travel time. This

  11. A Time-use Model for the Automated Vehicle-era

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pudane, B.; Molin, E.J.E.; Arentze, TA; Maknoon, M.Y.; Chorus, C.G.

    2018-01-01

    Automated Vehicles (AVs) offer their users a possibility to perform new non-driving activities while being on the way. The effects of this opportunity on travel choices and travel demand have mostly been conceptualised and modelled via a reduced penalty associated with (in-vehicle) travel time. This

  12. Safely towards self-driving vehicles : new opportunities new risks and new challenges during the automation of the traffic system.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nes, C.N. van & Duivenvoorden, C.W.A.E.

    2017-01-01

    There are more and more systems on the market to support the driver in his vehicle. Step by step the automation of our vehicles increases, the traffic system is in a transition towards self-driving vehicles. The automation offers opportunities to make our traffic safer, cleaner and more efficient.

  13. Automated processing of data on the use of motor vehicles in the Serbian Armed Forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikola S. Osmokrović

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of introducing information technology into the armed forces is the automation of the management process. The management in movement and transport (M&T in our armed forces has been included in the process of automation from the beginning. For that reason, today we can speak about the automated processing of data on road traffic safety and on the use of motor vehicles. With regard to the overall development of the information system of the movement and transport service, the paper presents an information system of the M&T service for the processing of data on the use of motor vehicles. The main features, components and functions of the 'Vozila' application, which was specially developed for the automated processing of data on motor vehicle use, are explained in particular.

  14. Pioneering driverless electric vehicles in Europe: the City Automated Transport System (CATS)

    OpenAIRE

    Christie , Derek; Koymans , Anne; Chanard , Thierry; Lasgouttes , Jean-Marc; Kaufmann , Vincent

    2016-01-01

    International audience; The City Automated Transport System (CATS) was a collaborative FP7 European project that lasted from 2010 to 2014. Its objective was to evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of driverless electric vehicles in European cities. This contribution explains how the project was implemented by 11 teams in five countries, culminating with practical trials of driverless vehicles in Strasbourg, France; Ploiesti, Romania; and Lausanne, Switzerland. The Navya vehicles used we...

  15. Application of the H-Mode, a Design and Interaction Concept for Highly Automated Vehicles, to Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, Kenneth H.; Flemisch, Frank O.; Schutte, Paul C.; Williams, Ralph A.

    2006-01-01

    Driven by increased safety, efficiency, and airspace capacity, automation is playing an increasing role in aircraft operations. As aircraft become increasingly able to autonomously respond to a range of situations with performance surpassing human operators, we are compelled to look for new methods that help us understand their use and guide their design using new forms of automation and interaction. We propose a novel design metaphor to aid the conceptualization, design, and operation of highly-automated aircraft. Design metaphors transfer meaning from common experiences to less familiar applications or functions. A notable example is the "Desktop metaphor" for manipulating files on a computer. This paper describes a metaphor for highly automated vehicles known as the H-metaphor and a specific embodiment of the metaphor known as the H-mode as applied to aircraft. The fundamentals of the H-metaphor are reviewed followed by an overview of an exploratory usability study investigating human-automation interaction issues for a simple H-mode implementation. The envisioned application of the H-mode concept to aircraft is then described as are two planned evaluations.

  16. System and Method for Automated Rendezvous, Docking and Capture of Autonomous Underwater Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, William C. (Inventor); Clark, Evan (Inventor); Richmond, Kristof (Inventor); Paulus, Jeremy (Inventor); Kapit, Jason (Inventor); Scully, Mark (Inventor); Kimball, Peter (Inventor)

    2018-01-01

    A system for automated rendezvous, docking, and capture of autonomous underwater vehicles at the conclusion of a mission comprising of comprised of a docking rod having lighted, pulsating (in both frequency and light intensity) series of LED light strips thereon, with the LEDs at a known spacing, and the autonomous underwater vehicle specially designed to detect and capture the docking rod and then be lifted structurally by a spherical end strop about which the vehicle can be pivoted and hoisted up (e.g., onto a ship). The method of recovery allows for very routine and reliable automated recovery of an unmanned underwater asset.

  17. The effect of varying levels of vehicle automation on drivers' lane changing behaviour.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Madigan

    Full Text Available Much of the Human Factors research into vehicle automation has focused on driver responses to critical scenarios where a crash might occur. However, there is less knowledge about the effects of vehicle automation on drivers' behaviour during non-critical take-over situations, such as driver-initiated lane-changing or overtaking. The current driving simulator study, conducted as part of the EC-funded AdaptIVe project, addresses this issue. It uses a within-subjects design to compare drivers' lane-changing behaviour in conventional manual driving, partially automated driving (PAD and conditionally automated driving (CAD. In PAD, drivers were required to re-take control from an automated driving system in order to overtake a slow moving vehicle, while in CAD, the driver used the indicator lever to initiate a system-performed overtaking manoeuvre. Results showed that while drivers' acceptance of both the PAD and CAD systems was high, they generally preferred CAD. A comparison of overtaking positions showed that drivers initiated overtaking manoeuvres slightly later in PAD than in manual driving or CAD. In addition, when compared to conventional driving, drivers had higher deviations in lane positioning and speed, along with higher lateral accelerations during lane changes following PAD. These results indicate that even in situations which are not time-critical, drivers' vehicle control after automation is degraded compared to conventional driving.

  18. The effect of varying levels of vehicle automation on drivers' lane changing behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madigan, Ruth; Louw, Tyron; Merat, Natasha

    2018-01-01

    Much of the Human Factors research into vehicle automation has focused on driver responses to critical scenarios where a crash might occur. However, there is less knowledge about the effects of vehicle automation on drivers' behaviour during non-critical take-over situations, such as driver-initiated lane-changing or overtaking. The current driving simulator study, conducted as part of the EC-funded AdaptIVe project, addresses this issue. It uses a within-subjects design to compare drivers' lane-changing behaviour in conventional manual driving, partially automated driving (PAD) and conditionally automated driving (CAD). In PAD, drivers were required to re-take control from an automated driving system in order to overtake a slow moving vehicle, while in CAD, the driver used the indicator lever to initiate a system-performed overtaking manoeuvre. Results showed that while drivers' acceptance of both the PAD and CAD systems was high, they generally preferred CAD. A comparison of overtaking positions showed that drivers initiated overtaking manoeuvres slightly later in PAD than in manual driving or CAD. In addition, when compared to conventional driving, drivers had higher deviations in lane positioning and speed, along with higher lateral accelerations during lane changes following PAD. These results indicate that even in situations which are not time-critical, drivers' vehicle control after automation is degraded compared to conventional driving.

  19. Impact of Automation on Drivers' Performance in Agricultural Semi-Autonomous Vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashiri, B; Mann, D D

    2015-04-01

    Drivers' inadequate mental workload has been reported as one of the negative effects of driving assistant systems and in-vehicle automation. The increasing trend of automation in agricultural vehicles raises some concerns about drivers' mental workload in such vehicles. Thus, a human factors perspective is needed to identify the consequences of such automated systems. In this simulator study, the effects of vehicle steering task automation (VSTA) and implement control and monitoring task automation (ICMTA) were investigated using a tractor-air seeder system as a case study. Two performance parameters (reaction time and accuracy of actions) were measured to assess drivers' perceived mental workload. Experiments were conducted using the tractor driving simulator (TDS) located in the Agricultural Ergonomics Laboratory at the University of Manitoba. Study participants were university students with tractor driving experience. According to the results, reaction time and number of errors made by drivers both decreased as the automation level increased. Correlations were found among performance parameters and subjective mental workload reported by the drivers.

  20. The effect of varying levels of vehicle automation on drivers’ lane changing behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louw, Tyron; Merat, Natasha

    2018-01-01

    Much of the Human Factors research into vehicle automation has focused on driver responses to critical scenarios where a crash might occur. However, there is less knowledge about the effects of vehicle automation on drivers’ behaviour during non-critical take-over situations, such as driver-initiated lane-changing or overtaking. The current driving simulator study, conducted as part of the EC-funded AdaptIVe project, addresses this issue. It uses a within-subjects design to compare drivers’ lane-changing behaviour in conventional manual driving, partially automated driving (PAD) and conditionally automated driving (CAD). In PAD, drivers were required to re-take control from an automated driving system in order to overtake a slow moving vehicle, while in CAD, the driver used the indicator lever to initiate a system-performed overtaking manoeuvre. Results showed that while drivers’ acceptance of both the PAD and CAD systems was high, they generally preferred CAD. A comparison of overtaking positions showed that drivers initiated overtaking manoeuvres slightly later in PAD than in manual driving or CAD. In addition, when compared to conventional driving, drivers had higher deviations in lane positioning and speed, along with higher lateral accelerations during lane changes following PAD. These results indicate that even in situations which are not time-critical, drivers’ vehicle control after automation is degraded compared to conventional driving. PMID:29466402

  1. Taking Over Control From Highly Automated Vehicles in Complex Traffic Situations: The Role of Traffic Density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Christian; Körber, Moritz; Lechner, David; Bengler, Klaus

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the impact of traffic density and verbal tasks on takeover performance in highly automated driving. In highly automated vehicles, the driver has to occasionally take over vehicle control when approaching system limits. To ensure safety, the ability of the driver to regain control of the driving task under various driving situations and different driver states needs to be quantified. Seventy-two participants experienced takeover situations requiring an evasive maneuver on a three-lane highway with varying traffic density (zero, 10, and 20 vehicles per kilometer). In a between-subjects design, half of the participants were engaged in a verbal 20-Questions Task, representing speaking on the phone while driving in a highly automated vehicle. The presence of traffic in takeover situations led to longer takeover times and worse takeover quality in the form of shorter time to collision and more collisions. The 20-Questions Task did not influence takeover time but seemed to have minor effects on the takeover quality. For the design and evaluation of human-machine interaction in takeover situations of highly automated vehicles, the traffic state seems to play a major role, compared to the driver state, manipulated by the 20-Questions Task. The present results can be used by developers of highly automated systems to appropriately design human-machine interfaces and to assess the driver's time budget for regaining control. © 2016, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

  2. A data driven approach for automating vehicle activated signs

    OpenAIRE

    Jomaa, Diala

    2016-01-01

    Vehicle activated signs (VAS) display a warning message when drivers exceed a particular threshold. VAS are often installed on local roads to display a warning message depending on the speed of the approaching vehicles. VAS are usually powered by electricity; however, battery and solar powered VAS are also commonplace. This thesis investigated devel-opment of an automatic trigger speed of vehicle activated signs in order to influence driver behaviour, the effect of which has been measured in ...

  3. Automated and connected vehicle (AV/CV) test bed to improve transit, bicycle, and pedestrian safety : technical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Crashes involving transit vehicles, bicyclists, and pedestrians are a concern in Texas, especially in urban areas. This research explored the potential of automated and connected vehicle (AV/CV) technology to reduce or eliminate these crashes. The pr...

  4. The H-Metaphor as a Guideline for Vehicle Automation and Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flemisch, Frank O.; Adams, Catherine A.; Conway, Sheila R.; Goodrich, Ken H.; Palmer, Michael T.; Schutte, Paul C.

    2003-01-01

    Good design is not free of form. It does not necessarily happen through a mere sampling of technologies packaged together, through pure analysis, or just by following procedures. Good design begins with inspiration and a vision, a mental image of the end product, which can sometimes be described with a design metaphor. A successful example from the 20th century is the desktop metaphor, which took a real desktop as an orientation for the manipulation of electronic documents on a computer. Initially defined by Xerox, then refined by Apple and others, it could be found on almost every computer by the turn of the 20th century. This paper sketches a specific metaphor for the emerging field of highly automated vehicles, their interactions with human users and with other vehicles. In the introduction, general questions on vehicle automation are raised and related to the physical control of conventional vehicles and to the automation of some late 20th century vehicles. After some words on design metaphors, the H-Metaphor is introduced. More details of the metaphor's source are described and their application to human-machine interaction, automation and management of intelligent vehicles sketched. Finally, risks and opportunities to apply the metaphor to technical applications are discussed.

  5. Changing technology in transportation : automated vehicles in freight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-27

    The world of transportation is on the verge of undergoing an impactful transformation. Over the past decade, automotive computing technology has progressed far more rapidly than anticipated. Most major auto manufacturers integrated automated features...

  6. Recent international activity in cooperative vehicle-highway automation systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    This report summarizes the current state of the art in cooperative vehiclehighway automation systems in Europe and Asia : based on a series of meetings, demonstrations, and site visits, combined with the results of literature review. This review c...

  7. Advanced paratransit system : an application of digital map, automated vehicle scheduling and vehicle location systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-05-01

    This report documents and evaluates an advanced Paratransit system demonstration project. The Santa Clara Valley Transportation Agency (SCVTA), via OUTREACH, implemented such a system, comprised of an automated trip scheduling system (ATSS) and autom...

  8. Harnessing Vehicle Automation for Public Mobility -- An Overview of Ongoing Efforts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Stanley E.

    2015-11-05

    This presentation takes a look at the efforts to harness automated vehicle technology for public transport. The European CityMobil2 is the leading demonstration project in which automated shuttles were, or are planned to be, demonstrated in several cities and regions. The presentation provides a brief overview of the demonstrations at Oristano, Italy (July 2014), LaRochelle, France (Dec 2014), Lausanne, Switzerland (Apr 2015), Vantaa, Finland (July 2015), and Trikala, Greece (Sept 2015). In addition to technology exposition, the objectives included generating a legal framework for operation in each location and gaging the reaction of the public to unmanned shuttles, both of which were successfully achieved. Several such demonstrations are planned throughout the world, including efforts in North America in conjunction with the GoMentum Station in California. These early demonstration with low-speed automated shuttles provide a glimpse of the possible with a fully automated fleet of driverless vehicle providing a public transit service.

  9. A simple approach to a vision-guided unmanned vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archibald, Christopher; Millar, Evan; Anderson, Jon D.; Archibald, James K.; Lee, Dah-Jye

    2005-10-01

    This paper describes the design and implementation of a vision-guided autonomous vehicle that represented BYU in the 2005 Intelligent Ground Vehicle Competition (IGVC), in which autonomous vehicles navigate a course marked with white lines while avoiding obstacles consisting of orange construction barrels, white buckets and potholes. Our project began in the context of a senior capstone course in which multi-disciplinary teams of five students were responsible for the design, construction, and programming of their own robots. Each team received a computer motherboard, a camera, and a small budget for the purchase of additional hardware, including a chassis and motors. The resource constraints resulted in a simple vision-based design that processes the sequence of images from the single camera to determine motor controls. Color segmentation separates white and orange from each image, and then the segmented image is examined using a 10x10 grid system, effectively creating a low resolution picture for each of the two colors. Depending on its position, each filled grid square influences the selection of an appropriate turn magnitude. Motor commands determined from the white and orange images are then combined to yield the final motion command for video frame. We describe the complete algorithm and the robot hardware and we present results that show the overall effectiveness of our control approach.

  10. Parameter tuning and cooperative control for automated guided vehicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stouten, B.

    2005-01-01

    For several practical control engineering applications it is desirable that multiple systems can operate independently as well as in cooperation with each other. Especially when the transition between individual and cooperative behavior and vice versa can be carried out easily, this results in

  11. Driving Performance After Self-Regulated Control Transitions in Highly Automated Vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Alexander; Stanton, Neville A

    2017-12-01

    This study aims to explore whether driver-paced, noncritical transitions of control may counteract some of the aftereffects observed in the contemporary literature, resulting in higher levels of vehicle control. Research into control transitions in highly automated driving has focused on urgent scenarios where drivers are given a relatively short time span to respond to a request to resume manual control, resulting in seemingly scrambled control when manual control is resumed. Twenty-six drivers drove two scenarios with an automated driving feature activated. Drivers were asked to read a newspaper or monitor the system and relinquish or resume control from the automation when prompted by vehicle systems. Driving performance in terms of lane positioning and steering behavior was assessed for 20 seconds post resuming control to capture the resulting level of control. It was found that lane positioning was virtually unaffected for the duration of the 20-second time span in both automated conditions compared to the manual baseline when drivers resumed manual control; however, significant increases in the standard deviation of steering input were found for both automated conditions compared to baseline. No significant differences were found between the two automated conditions. The results indicate that when drivers self-paced the transfer back to manual control they exhibit less of the detrimental effects observed in system-paced conditions. It was shown that self-paced transitions could reduce the risk of accidents near the edge of the operational design domain. Vehicle manufacturers must consider these benefits when designing contemporary systems.

  12. Low Speed Longitudinal Control Algorithms for Automated Vehicles in Simulation and Real Platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Marcano

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS acting over throttle and brake are already available in level 2 automated vehicles. In order to increase the level of automation new systems need to be tested in an extensive set of complex scenarios, ensuring safety under all circumstances. Validation of these systems using real vehicles presents important drawbacks: the time needed to drive millions of kilometers, the risk associated with some situations, and the high cost involved. Simulation platforms emerge as a feasible solution. Therefore, robust and reliable virtual environments to test automated driving maneuvers and control techniques are needed. In that sense, this paper presents a use case where three longitudinal low speed control techniques are designed, tuned, and validated using an in-house simulation framework and later applied in a real vehicle. Control algorithms include a classical PID, an adaptive network fuzzy inference system (ANFIS, and a Model Predictive Control (MPC. The simulated dynamics are calculated using a multibody vehicle model. In addition, longitudinal actuators of a Renault Twizy are characterized through empirical tests. A comparative analysis of results between simulated and real platform shows the effectiveness of the proposed framework for designing and validating longitudinal controllers for real automated vehicles.

  13. Incorporating driver behaviors into connected and automated vehicle simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-24

    The adoption of connected vehicle (CV) technology is anticipated at various levels of development and deployment over the next decade. One primary challenge with these new technologies is the lack of platform to enable a robust and reliable evaluatio...

  14. Automation for Vehicle and Crew Operations, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Modern space systems such as the International Space Station (ISS) and the proposed Constellation vehicles and habitats are complex entities with hundreds of...

  15. Automated vehicle counting using image processing and machine learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meany, Sean; Eskew, Edward; Martinez-Castro, Rosana; Jang, Shinae

    2017-04-01

    Vehicle counting is used by the government to improve roadways and the flow of traffic, and by private businesses for purposes such as determining the value of locating a new store in an area. A vehicle count can be performed manually or automatically. Manual counting requires an individual to be on-site and tally the traffic electronically or by hand. However, this can lead to miscounts due to factors such as human error A common form of automatic counting involves pneumatic tubes, but pneumatic tubes disrupt traffic during installation and removal, and can be damaged by passing vehicles. Vehicle counting can also be performed via the use of a camera at the count site recording video of the traffic, with counting being performed manually post-recording or using automatic algorithms. This paper presents a low-cost procedure to perform automatic vehicle counting using remote video cameras with an automatic counting algorithm. The procedure would utilize a Raspberry Pi micro-computer to detect when a car is in a lane, and generate an accurate count of vehicle movements. The method utilized in this paper would use background subtraction to process the images and a machine learning algorithm to provide the count. This method avoids fatigue issues that are encountered in manual video counting and prevents the disruption of roadways that occurs when installing pneumatic tubes

  16. Automated Circulation Systems in Libraries Serving the Blind and Physically Handicapped: A Reference Guide for Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanger, Judith; And Others

    Designed to facilitate communications in future automation projects between library and data processing personnel, especially those projects involving the use of automated systems in the service of disabled patrons, this guide identifies and describes a master set of major circulation system requirements and design considerations, and illustrates…

  17. Automated Vehicle Policy and Regulation: A State Perspective Workshop: Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Stanley E. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Levine, Aaron [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-06-01

    A workshop held on May 18, 2016, at the University of Maryland focused on key principles that should govern state policy decisions intended to ensure the safe operation of autonomous vehicles (AVs). The patchwork approach taken by early state adopters had primarily addressed only testing of these vehicles. As uncertainties in technology and business models play out, and in the absence of more suitable policies and regulations, states are relying on laws created for conventional vehicles to govern AV operations. The workshop addressed these challenges with three panel discussions that examined the underpinnings of policy development, factors affecting policy decisions, and the ultimate impact of AVs in a number of areas, including economic competitiveness; quality of mobility, particularly for disabled community; and energy use and emissions.

  18. Takeover Time in Highly Automated Vehicles: Noncritical Transitions to and From Manual Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Alexander; Stanton, Neville A

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to review existing research into driver control transitions and to determine the time it takes drivers to resume control from a highly automated vehicle in noncritical scenarios. Contemporary research has moved from an inclusive design approach to adhering only to mean/median values when designing control transitions in automated driving. Research into control transitions in highly automated driving has focused on urgent scenarios where drivers are given a relatively short time span to respond to a request to resume manual control. We found a paucity in research into more frequent scenarios for control transitions, such as planned exits from highway systems. Twenty-six drivers drove two scenarios with an automated driving feature activated. Drivers were asked to read a newspaper, or to monitor the system, and to relinquish, or resume, control from the automation when prompted by vehicle systems. Significantly longer control transition times were found between driving with and without secondary tasks. Control transition times were substantially longer than those reported in the peer-reviewed literature. We found that drivers take longer to resume control when under no time pressure compared with that reported in the literature. Moreover, we found that drivers occupied by a secondary task exhibit larger variance and slower responses to requests to resume control. Workload scores implied optimal workload. Intra- and interindividual differences need to be accommodated by vehicle manufacturers and policy makers alike to ensure inclusive design of contemporary systems and safety during control transitions.

  19. Automated procedure execution for space vehicle autonomous control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broten, Thomas A.; Brown, David A.

    1990-01-01

    Increased operational autonomy and reduced operating costs have become critical design objectives in next-generation NASA and DoD space programs. The objective is to develop a semi-automated system for intelligent spacecraft operations support. The Spacecraft Operations and Anomaly Resolution System (SOARS) is presented as a standardized, model-based architecture for performing High-Level Tasking, Status Monitoring and automated Procedure Execution Control for a variety of spacecraft. The particular focus is on the Procedure Execution Control module. A hierarchical procedure network is proposed as the fundamental means for specifying and representing arbitrary operational procedures. A separate procedure interpreter controls automatic execution of the procedure, taking into account the current status of the spacecraft as maintained in an object-oriented spacecraft model.

  20. String Stability of Heterogeneous Platoons with Non-connected Automated Vehicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, M.; Li, Honghai; GAO, Jian; Huang, Zichao; li, Bin; van Arem, B.

    2017-01-01

    It is expected that automated vehicles will gradually penetrate on public roads, resulting in mixed traffic in the next decades. This can impact traffic flow operations, especially the roadway capacity and flow stability. It is of paramount
    importance to understand and predict the implications

  1. NREL Research and Thoughts on Connected and Automated Vehicle Energy Impacts; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonder, Jeff; Wood, Eric; Lammert, Michael

    2014-12-09

    Jeff was invited to brief the EPA Mobile Sources Technical Review Subcommittee on considerations regarding potential energy and environmental considerations for connected and automated vehicles. For more information about the MSTRS see http://www2.epa.gov/caaac/mobile-sources-technical-review-subcommittee-mstrs-caaac.

  2. Automation of Sensor Control in Uninhabited Aerial Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    were otherwise performed manually reduces workload and mitigates high workload situations. On the other hand, it has been suggested that the...that automation may help mitigate high workload (Lee, 2008) it would have been interesting if both sets of authors additionally assessed when...frames would result in the sensor view flickering between two views. In support of this, VBS2 initialisation parameters were adjusted to prevent

  3. Safety and Cost Assessment of Connected and Automated Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-29

    Many light-duty vehicle crashes occur due to human error and distracted driving. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) reports that ten percent of all fatal crashes and seventeen percent of injury crashes in 2011 were a result of...

  4. Driving the Phileas, a new automated public transport vehicle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Waard, Dick; Brookhuis, Karel; Fabriek, Eva; Van Wolffelaar, Peter C.

    2004-01-01

    Phileas is a high quality public transport vehicle combining characteristics of bus, tram, and the underground. Phileas is equipped with pneumatic tyres and complies with the statutory regulations for buses. Accordingly Phileas may drive everywhere on public roads where buses are allowed to drive.

  5. Mining Repair Actions for Guiding Automated Program Fixing

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez , Matias; Monperrus , Martin

    2012-01-01

    Automated program fixing consists of generating source code in order to fix bugs in an automated manner. Our intuition is that automated program fixing can imitate human-based program fixing. Hence, we present a method to mine repair actions from software repositories. A repair action is a small semantic modification on code such as adding a method call. We then decorate repair actions with a probability distribution also learnt from software repositories. Our probabilistic repair models enab...

  6. Drivability Improvement Control for Vehicle Start-Up Applied to an Automated Manual Transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danna Jiang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Drivability is the key factor for the automated manual transmission. It includes fast response to the driver’s demand and the driving comfort. This paper deals with a control methodology applied to an automated manual transmission vehicle for drivability enhancement during vehicle start-up phase. Based on a piecewise model of powertrain, a multiple-model predictive controller (mMPC is designed with the engine speed, clutch disc speed, and wheel speed as the measurable input variables and the engine torque reference and clutch friction torque reference as the controller’s output variables. The model not only includes the clutch dynamic, the flexible shaft dynamic, but also includes the actuators’ delay character. Considering the driver’s intention, a slipping speed trajectory is generated based on the acceleration pedal dynamically. The designed control strategy is verified on a complete powertrain and longitudinal vehicle dynamic model with different driver’s torque demands.

  7. Automated low-thrust guidance for the orbital maneuvering vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Richard E.; Schmeichel, Harry; Shortwell, Charles P.; Werner, Ronald A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the highly autonomous OMV Guidance Navigation and Control system. Emphasis is placed on a key feature of the design, the low thrust guidance algorithm. The two guidance modes, orbit change guidance and rendezvous guidance, are discussed in detail. It is shown how OMV will automatically transfer from its initial orbit to an arbitrary target orbit and reach a specified rendezvous position relative to the target vehicle.

  8. Trasmar: automated vehicle for transport of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segovia R, J.A.; Martinez J, L.

    2001-01-01

    Traditionally robots have been used for industrial applications, even though area in which these devices had a deep impact is in the nuclear industry. The ININ is an Institute that must to manage and to work with radioactive substances. The ININ is also responsible of the storage and supervision of radioactive wastes in the country, therefore the applications of the automated systems in the Institute have as the main objective to reduce the exposure and the contact of personnel with the radioactive material. Here to, it has been proposed the project called Assisted Transportation of Radioactive Material (TRASMAR). (Author)

  9. Expert system isssues in automated, autonomous space vehicle rendezvous

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Mary Ann; Bochsler, Daniel C.

    1987-01-01

    The problems involved in automated autonomous rendezvous are briefly reviewed, and the Rendezvous Expert (RENEX) expert system is discussed with reference to its goals, approach used, and knowledge structure and contents. RENEX has been developed to support streamlining operations for the Space Shuttle and Space Station program and to aid definition of mission requirements for the autonomous portions of rendezvous for the Mars Surface Sample Return and Comet Nucleus Sample return unmanned missions. The experience with REMEX to date and recommendations for further development are presented.

  10. Automated Search-Based Robustness Testing for Autonomous Vehicle Software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin M. Betts

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Autonomous systems must successfully operate in complex time-varying spatial environments even when dealing with system faults that may occur during a mission. Consequently, evaluating the robustness, or ability to operate correctly under unexpected conditions, of autonomous vehicle control software is an increasingly important issue in software testing. New methods to automatically generate test cases for robustness testing of autonomous vehicle control software in closed-loop simulation are needed. Search-based testing techniques were used to automatically generate test cases, consisting of initial conditions and fault sequences, intended to challenge the control software more than test cases generated using current methods. Two different search-based testing methods, genetic algorithms and surrogate-based optimization, were used to generate test cases for a simulated unmanned aerial vehicle attempting to fly through an entryway. The effectiveness of the search-based methods in generating challenging test cases was compared to both a truth reference (full combinatorial testing and the method most commonly used today (Monte Carlo testing. The search-based testing techniques demonstrated better performance than Monte Carlo testing for both of the test case generation performance metrics: (1 finding the single most challenging test case and (2 finding the set of fifty test cases with the highest mean degree of challenge.

  11. Towards cooperative guidance and control of highly automated vehicles: H-Mode and Conduct-by-Wire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flemisch, Frank Ole; Bengler, Klaus; Bubb, Heiner; Winner, Hermann; Bruder, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    This article provides a general ergonomic framework of cooperative guidance and control for vehicles with an emphasis on the cooperation between a human and a highly automated vehicle. In the twenty-first century, mobility and automation technologies are increasingly fused. In the sky, highly automated aircraft are flying with a high safety record. On the ground, a variety of driver assistance systems are being developed, and highly automated vehicles with increasingly autonomous capabilities are becoming possible. Human-centred automation has paved the way for a better cooperation between automation and humans. How can these highly automated systems be structured so that they can be easily understood, how will they cooperate with the human? The presented research was conducted using the methods of iterative build-up and refinement of framework by triangulation, i.e. by instantiating and testing the framework with at least two derived concepts and prototypes. This article sketches a general, conceptual ergonomic framework of cooperative guidance and control of highly automated vehicles, two concepts derived from the framework, prototypes and pilot data. Cooperation is exemplified in a list of aspects and related to levels of the driving task. With the concept 'Conduct-by-Wire', cooperation happens mainly on the guidance level, where the driver can delegate manoeuvres to the automation with a specialised manoeuvre interface. With H-Mode, a haptic-multimodal interaction with highly automated vehicles based on the H(orse)-Metaphor, cooperation is mainly done on guidance and control with a haptically active interface. Cooperativeness should be a key aspect for future human-automation systems. Especially for highly automated vehicles, cooperative guidance and control is a research direction with already promising concepts and prototypes that should be further explored. The application of the presented approach is every human-machine system that moves and includes high

  12. A guide to the automation body of knowledge

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    Edited by Vernon L. Trevathan, with contributions from more than 35 leading experts from all aspects of automation, this book is a key resource for anyone who is studying for the ISA Certified Automation Professional® (CAP®), ISA Certified Control Systems Technician® (CCST®), and/or Control Systems Engineer (CSE) exams. The book defines the most important automation concepts and processes, while also describing the technical skills required to implement them in today's industrial environment. This edition provides comprehensive information about all major topics in the broad field of automation including: Process and analytical instrumentation ; Continuous and batch control ; Control valves and final control elements ; Basic discrete, sequencing, and manufacturing control ; Advanced control ; Digital and analog communications ; Data management and system software ; Networking and security ; Safety and reliability ; System checkout, testing, startup, and troubleshooting ; Project management. Whether you ar...

  13. Hardware-in-loop simulation of electric vehicles automated mechanical transmission system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, C.; Wu, Y.; Wang, L. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Inst. of Electrical Engineering

    2009-03-11

    Automated mechanical transmission (AMT) can be used to enhance the performance of hybrid electric vehicles. In this study, hardware-in-loop (HIL) simulations were used to develop an AMT control system. HIL was used to simulate the running and fault status of the system as well as to optimize its performance. HIL was combined with a commercial simulation tool and an automatic code generation technology in a real time environment tool to develop the AMT control system. A hybrid vehicle system dynamics model was generated and then simulated in various real time operating vehicle environments. Virtual instrument technology was used to develop real time monitoring, parameter matching calibration, data acquisition and offline analyses for the optimization of the control system. Results of the analyses demonstrated that the AMT control system can be used to optimize the performance of hybrid electric vehicles. 5 refs., 9 figs.

  14. Automated Escape Guidance Algorithms for An Escape Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanary, Ronald; Hammen, David; Ito, Daigoro; Rabalais, Bruce; Rishikof, Brian; Siebold, Karl

    2002-01-01

    An escape vehicle was designed to provide an emergency evacuation for crew members living on a space station. For maximum escape capability, the escape vehicle needs to have the ability to safely evacuate a station in a contingency scenario such as an uncontrolled (e.g., tumbling) station. This emergency escape sequence will typically be divided into three events: The fust separation event (SEP1), the navigation reconstruction event, and the second separation event (SEP2). SEP1 is responsible for taking the spacecraft from its docking port to a distance greater than the maximum radius of the rotating station. The navigation reconstruction event takes place prior to the SEP2 event and establishes the orbital state to within the tolerance limits necessary for SEP2. The SEP2 event calculates and performs an avoidance burn to prevent station recontact during the next several orbits. This paper presents the tools and results for the whole separation sequence with an emphasis on the two separation events. The fust challenge includes collision avoidance during the escape sequence while the station is in an uncontrolled rotational state, with rotation rates of up to 2 degrees per second. The task of avoiding a collision may require the use of the Vehicle's de-orbit propulsion system for maximum thrust and minimum dwell time within the vicinity of the station vicinity. The thrust of the propulsion system is in a single direction, and can be controlled only by the attitude of the spacecraft. Escape algorithms based on a look-up table or analytical guidance can be implemented since the rotation rate and the angular momentum vector can be sensed onboard and a-priori knowledge of the position and relative orientation are available. In addition, crew intervention has been provided for in the event of unforeseen obstacles in the escape path. The purpose of the SEP2 burn is to avoid re-contact with the station over an extended period of time. Performing this maneuver properly

  15. Automated vehicle detection in forward-looking infrared imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Der, Sandor; Chan, Alex; Nasrabadi, Nasser; Kwon, Heesung

    2004-01-10

    We describe an algorithm for the detection and clutter rejection of military vehicles in forward-looking infrared (FLIR) imagery. The detection algorithm is designed to be a prescreener that selects regions for further analysis and uses a spatial anomaly approach that looks for target-sized regions of the image that differ in texture, brightness, edge strength, or other spatial characteristics. The features are linearly combined to form a confidence image that is thresholded to find likely target locations. The clutter rejection portion uses target-specific information extracted from training samples to reduce the false alarms of the detector. The outputs of the clutter rejecter and detector are combined by a higher-level evidence integrator to improve performance over simple concatenation of the detector and clutter rejecter. The algorithm has been applied to a large number of FLIR imagery sets, and some of these results are presented here.

  16. Routing Optimization of Intelligent Vehicle in Automated Warehouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-cong Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Routing optimization is a key technology in the intelligent warehouse logistics. In order to get an optimal route for warehouse intelligent vehicle, routing optimization in complex global dynamic environment is studied. A new evolutionary ant colony algorithm based on RFID and knowledge-refinement is proposed. The new algorithm gets environmental information timely through the RFID technology and updates the environment map at the same time. It adopts elite ant kept, fallback, and pheromones limitation adjustment strategy. The current optimal route in population space is optimized based on experiential knowledge. The experimental results show that the new algorithm has higher convergence speed and can jump out the U-type or V-type obstacle traps easily. It can also find the global optimal route or approximate optimal one with higher probability in the complex dynamic environment. The new algorithm is proved feasible and effective by simulation results.

  17. Partial camera automation in an unmanned air vehicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korteling, J E; van der Borg, W

    1997-03-01

    The present study focused on an intelligent, semiautonomous, interface for a camera operator of a simulated unmanned air vehicle (UAV). This interface used system "knowledge" concerning UAV motion in order to assist a camera operator in tracking an object moving through the landscape below. The semiautomated system compensated for the translations of the UAV relative to the earth. This compensation was accompanied by the appropriate joystick movements ensuring tactile (haptic) feedback of these system interventions. The operator had to superimpose self-initiated joystick manipulations over these system-initiated joystick motions in order to track the motion of a target (a driving truck) relative to the terrain. Tracking data showed that subjects performed substantially better with the active system. Apparently, the subjects had no difficulty in maintaining control, i.e., "following" the active stick while superimposing self-initiated control movements over the system-interventions. Furthermore, tracking performance with an active interface was clearly superior relative to the passive system. The magnitude of this effect was equal to the effect of update-frequency (2-5 Hz) of the monitor image. The benefits of update frequency enhancement and semiautomated tracking were the greatest under difficult steering conditions. Mental workload scores indicated that, for the difficult tracking-dynamics condition, both semiautomation and update frequency increase resulted in less experienced mental effort. For the easier dynamics this effect was only seen for update frequency.

  18. Fuel Economy and Emission Testing for Connected and Automated Vehicles Using Real-world Driving Datasets

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Yan; Yang, Weiqing; Zhao, Ding

    2018-01-01

    By using the onboard sensing and external connectivity technology, connected and automated vehicles (CAV) could lead to improved energy efficiency, better routing, and lower traffic congestion. With the rapid development of the technology and adaptation of CAV, it is more critical to develop the new evaluation method and standard which could evaluate the impacts on energy consumption and environmental pollution of CAV fairly, especially under the various traffic conditions. In this paper, we ...

  19. Learn AppleScript The Comprehensive Guide to Scripting and Automation on MAC OS X

    CERN Document Server

    Rosenthal, Hanaan

    2009-01-01

    AppleScript is an English-like, easy-to-understand scripting language built into every Mac. AppleScript can automate hundreds of AppleScriptable applications, performing tasks both large and small, complex and simple. Learn AppleScript: The Comprehensive Guide to Scripting and Automation on Mac OS X, Third Edition has been completely updated for Mac OS X Snow Leopard. It's all here, with an emphasis on practical information that will help you solve any automation problem-from the most mundane repetitive tasks to highly integrated workflows of complex systems. * Friendly enough for beginners, d

  20. A Crowd-Based Intelligence Approach for Measurable Security, Privacy, and Dependability in Internet of Automated Vehicles with Vehicular Fog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Rauniyar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of Internet of things (IoT and cloud computing technologies, we are in the era of automation, device-to-device (D2D and machine-to-machine (M2M communications. Automated vehicles have recently gained a huge attention worldwide, and it has created a new wave of revolution in automobile industries. However, in order to fully establish automated vehicles and their connectivity to the surroundings, security, privacy, and dependability always remain a crucial issue. One cannot deny the fact that such automatic vehicles are highly vulnerable to different kinds of security attacks. Also, today’s such systems are built from generic components. Prior analysis of different attack trends and vulnerabilities enables us to deploy security solutions effectively. Moreover, scientific research has shown that a “group” can perform better than individuals in making decisions and predictions. Therefore, this paper deals with the measurable security, privacy, and dependability of automated vehicles through the crowd-based intelligence approach that is inspired from swarm intelligence. We have studied three use case scenarios of automated vehicles and systems with vehicular fog and have analyzed the security, privacy, and dependability metrics of such systems. Our systematic approaches to measuring efficient system configuration, security, privacy, and dependability of automated vehicles are essential for getting the overall picture of the system such as design patterns, best practices for configuration of system, metrics, and measurements.

  1. User Guide for Automated Wetland Determination Data Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-25

    are not visible to the user . As a result, it is important that users open a fresh copy of the Excel® file for every use and ensure that macros are...input on the ADS and this user guide. REFERENCES Berkowitz, J. F. 2011a. Regionalizing the Corps of Engineers wetland delineation manual : Process...Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program ERDC/TN WRAP-17-1 July 2017 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. User Guide for

  2. Influencing Trust for Human-Automation Collaborative Scheduling of Multiple Unmanned Vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clare, Andrew S; Cummings, Mary L; Repenning, Nelson P

    2015-11-01

    We examined the impact of priming on operator trust and system performance when supervising a decentralized network of heterogeneous unmanned vehicles (UVs). Advances in autonomy have enabled a future vision of single-operator control of multiple heterogeneous UVs. Real-time scheduling for multiple UVs in uncertain environments requires the computational ability of optimization algorithms combined with the judgment and adaptability of human supervisors. Because of system and environmental uncertainty, appropriate operator trust will be instrumental to maintain high system performance and prevent cognitive overload. Three groups of operators experienced different levels of trust priming prior to conducting simulated missions in an existing, multiple-UV simulation environment. Participants who play computer and video games frequently were found to have a higher propensity to overtrust automation. By priming gamers to lower their initial trust to a more appropriate level, system performance was improved by 10% as compared to gamers who were primed to have higher trust in the automation. Priming was successful at adjusting the operator's initial and dynamic trust in the automated scheduling algorithm, which had a substantial impact on system performance. These results have important implications for personnel selection and training for futuristic multi-UV systems under human supervision. Although gamers may bring valuable skills, they may also be potentially prone to automation bias. Priming during training and regular priming throughout missions may be one potential method for overcoming this propensity to overtrust automation. © 2015, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

  3. Automated gun biopsy of the prostate under ultrasound guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Ik; Lim, Jae Hoon; Ko, Young Tae; Lee, Dong Ho; Lim, Joo Won

    1994-01-01

    To assess the effectiveness and clinical usefulness of prostate biopsy by automated gun biopsy device under the transrectal ultrasonographic guidance, authors analysed the result of biopsy and the patients status after biopsy procedure. The subjects consisted of 24 patients with prostatic disease. Biopsy instrument was an automated gun biopsy device loaded with an 18 gauze biopsy needle. All the patients were admitted to the hospital. No analgesics was given. All the procedure was performed with the patient in left lateral decubitus. Biopsy was performed at 2-4 different points of the prostate in 22 cases, but recently, six different points were targeted in two patients. Biopsy specimens were sufficient in 21 cases but insufficient in three cases. Histologic examination of biopsy specimens showed that 13 cases were nodular hyperplasia, eight cases were cancerous and three cases were inflammation. There was no clinically significant complication. There was mild to moderate degree of pain in all patients. Tansrectal biopsy of the prostate with an automated gun biopsy device under ultrasonographic guidance is considered relatively easy, handy and useful procedure in patients with prostatic disease. The procedure may be performed on the out patient basis

  4. Cost and benefit estimates of partially-automated vehicle collision avoidance technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Corey D; Hendrickson, Chris T; Samaras, Constantine

    2016-10-01

    Many light-duty vehicle crashes occur due to human error and distracted driving. Partially-automated crash avoidance features offer the potential to reduce the frequency and severity of vehicle crashes that occur due to distracted driving and/or human error by assisting in maintaining control of the vehicle or issuing alerts if a potentially dangerous situation is detected. This paper evaluates the benefits and costs of fleet-wide deployment of blind spot monitoring, lane departure warning, and forward collision warning crash avoidance systems within the US light-duty vehicle fleet. The three crash avoidance technologies could collectively prevent or reduce the severity of as many as 1.3 million U.S. crashes a year including 133,000 injury crashes and 10,100 fatal crashes. For this paper we made two estimates of potential benefits in the United States: (1) the upper bound fleet-wide technology diffusion benefits by assuming all relevant crashes are avoided and (2) the lower bound fleet-wide benefits of the three technologies based on observed insurance data. The latter represents a lower bound as technology is improved over time and cost reduced with scale economies and technology improvement. All three technologies could collectively provide a lower bound annual benefit of about $18 billion if equipped on all light-duty vehicles. With 2015 pricing of safety options, the total annual costs to equip all light-duty vehicles with the three technologies would be about $13 billion, resulting in an annual net benefit of about $4 billion or a $20 per vehicle net benefit. By assuming all relevant crashes are avoided, the total upper bound annual net benefit from all three technologies combined is about $202 billion or an $861 per vehicle net benefit, at current technology costs. The technologies we are exploring in this paper represent an early form of vehicle automation and a positive net benefit suggests the fleet-wide adoption of these technologies would be beneficial

  5. Analysis of the Effects of Connected–Automated Vehicle Technologies on Travel Demand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auld, Joshua [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Lemont, IL 60439; Sokolov, Vadim [Department of Systems Engineering and Operations Research, Volgenau School of Engineering, George Mason University, MS 4A6, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030; Stephens, Thomas S. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Lemont, IL 60439

    2017-01-01

    Connected–automated vehicle (CAV) technologies are likely to have significant effects not only on how vehicles operate in the transportation system, but also on how individuals behave and use their vehicles. While many CAV technologies—such as connected adaptive cruise control and ecosignals—have the potential to increase network throughput and efficiency, many of these same technologies have a secondary effect of reducing driver burden, which can drive changes in travel behavior. Such changes in travel behavior—in effect, lowering the cost of driving—have the potential to increase greatly the utilization of the transportation system with concurrent negative externalities, such as congestion, energy use, and emissions, working against the positive effects on the transportation system resulting from increased capacity. To date, few studies have analyzed the potential effects on CAV technologies from a systems perspective; studies often focus on gains and losses to an individual vehicle, at a single intersection, or along a corridor. However, travel demand and traffic flow constitute a complex, adaptive, nonlinear system. Therefore, in this study, an advanced transportation systems simulation model—POLARIS—was used. POLARIS includes cosimulation of travel behavior and traffic flow to study the potential effects of several CAV technologies at the regional level. Various technology penetration levels and changes in travel time sensitivity have been analyzed to determine a potential range of effects on vehicle miles traveled from various CAV technologies.

  6. Modeling take-over performance in level 3 conditionally automated vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Christian; Happee, Riender; Bengler, Klaus

    2017-11-28

    Taking over vehicle control from a Level 3 conditionally automated vehicle can be a demanding task for a driver. The take-over determines the controllability of automated vehicle functions and thereby also traffic safety. This paper presents models predicting the main take-over performance variables take-over time, minimum time-to-collision, brake application and crash probability. These variables are considered in relation to the situational and driver-related factors time-budget, traffic density, non-driving-related task, repetition, the current lane and driver's age. Regression models were developed using 753 take-over situations recorded in a series of driving simulator experiments. The models were validated with data from five other driving simulator experiments of mostly unrelated authors with another 729 take-over situations. The models accurately captured take-over time, time-to-collision and crash probability, and moderately predicted the brake application. Especially the time-budget, traffic density and the repetition strongly influenced the take-over performance, while the non-driving-related tasks, the lane and drivers' age explained a minor portion of the variance in the take-over performances. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Shockwave-Based Automated Vehicle Longitudinal Control Algorithm for Nonrecurrent Congestion Mitigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liuhui Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A shockwave-based speed harmonization algorithm for the longitudinal movement of automated vehicles is presented in this paper. In the advent of Connected/Automated Vehicle (C/AV environment, the proposed algorithm can be applied to capture instantaneous shockwaves constructed from vehicular speed profiles shared by individual equipped vehicles. With a continuous wavelet transform (CWT method, the algorithm detects abnormal speed drops in real-time and optimizes speed to prevent the shockwave propagating to the upstream traffic. A traffic simulation model is calibrated to evaluate the applicability and efficiency of the proposed algorithm. Based on 100% C/AV market penetration, the simulation results show that the CWT-based algorithm accurately detects abnormal speed drops. With the improved accuracy of abnormal speed drop detection, the simulation results also demonstrate that the congestion can be mitigated by reducing travel time and delay up to approximately 9% and 18%, respectively. It is also found that the shockwave caused by nonrecurrent congestion is quickly dissipated even with low market penetration.

  8. Unified Brake Service by a Hierarchical Controller for Active Deceleration Control in an Electric and Automated Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliang Nie

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Unified brake service is a universal service for generating certain brake force to meet the demand deceleration and is essential for an automated driving system. However, it is rather difficult to control the pressure in the wheel cylinders to reach the target deceleration of the automated vehicle, which is the key issue of the active deceleration control system (ADC. This paper proposes a hierarchical control method to actively control vehicle deceleration with active-brake actuators. In the upper hierarchical, the target pressure of wheel cylinders is obtained by dynamic equations of a pure electric vehicle. In the lower hierarchical, the solenoid valve instructions and the pump speed of hydraulic control unit (HCU are determined to satisfy the desired pressure with the feedback of measured wheel cylinder pressure by pressure sensors. Results of road experiments of a pure electric and automated vehicle indicate that the proposed method realizes the target deceleration accurately and efficiently.

  9. The Use of Intelligent Relays for the Sewer Cleaning Vehicle Control and Automation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Chiver

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the way in which the electrical control and automation system of the 5 mc combined sewer and gully cleaning vehicle equipped by a local company was designed, using the intelligent relay of the easy 700 type of Moeller (Eaton company. The control of all the equipments is performed locally from the control panel and some of them can also by remote controlled by means of the radio waves. The program required by the intelligent relay was created, tested and implemented with the help of the dedicated software easy-soft 6, developed by the manufacturing company.

  10. Functional safety for road vehicles new challenges and solutions for e-mobility and automated driving

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, Hans-Leo

    2016-01-01

    This book highlights the current challenges for engineers involved in product development and the associated changes in procedure they make necessary. Methods for systematically analyzing the requirements for safety and security mechanisms are described using examples of how they are implemented in software and hardware, and how their effectiveness can be demonstrated in terms of functional and design safety are discussed. Given today’s new E-mobility and automated driving approaches, new challenges are arising and further issues concerning “Road Vehicle Safety” and “Road Traffic Safety” have to be resolved. To address the growing complexity of vehicle functions, as well as the increasing need to accommodate interdisciplinary project teams, previous development approaches now have to be reconsidered, and system engineering approaches and proven management systems need to be supplemented or wholly redefined. The book presents a continuous system development process, starting with the basic requiremen...

  11. ADDJUST - An automated system for steering Centaur launch vehicles in measured winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, D. C.

    1977-01-01

    ADDJUST (Automatic Determination and Dissemination of Just-Updated Steering Terms) is an automated computer and communication system designed to provide Atlas/Centaur and Titan/Centaur launch vehicles with booster-phase steering data on launch day. Wind soundings are first obtained, from which a smoothed wind velocity vs altitude relationship is established. Design for conditions at the end of the boost phase with initial pitch and yaw maneuvers, followed by zero total angle of attack through the filtered wind establishes the required vehicle attitude as a function of altitude. Polynomial coefficients for pitch and yaw attitude vs altitude are determined and are transmitted for validation and loading into the Centaur airborne computer. The system has enabled 14 consecutive launches without a flight wind delay.

  12. Normative legal regulating of vehicles with a high degree of automation of control: strategy and tactics for implementation in Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisulenko, B. V.; Bocharov, A. V.; Pugachev, V. V.

    2018-02-01

    The article discusses the risks specific to vehicles with a high level of automation of control, and conditions the limits on the operating conditions of such vehicles. The article determines existing legal barriers to the implementation of autonomous vehicles. The article contains an analysis of foreign practice of regulating in the European Union, Japan and the United States and information about the UNECE activities aimed at enabling operation of vehicles with a high degree of automation control. Basing on the results of the analysis, the authors made proposals for removal of legal barriers. The article also contains proposals for the development of specific requirements for autonomous vehicles associated with their specific features of design.

  13. Automated vehicle guidance using discrete reference markers. [road surface steering techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, A. R.; Assefi, T.; Lai, J. Y.

    1979-01-01

    Techniques for providing steering control for an automated vehicle using discrete reference markers fixed to the road surface are investigated analytically. Either optical or magnetic approaches can be used for the sensor, which generates a measurement of the lateral offset of the vehicle path at each marker to form the basic data for steering control. Possible mechanizations of sensor and controller are outlined. Techniques for handling certain anomalous conditions, such as a missing marker, or loss of acquisition, and special maneuvers, such as u-turns and switching, are briefly discussed. A general analysis of the vehicle dynamics and the discrete control system is presented using the state variable formulation. Noise in both the sensor measurement and in the steering servo are accounted for. An optimal controller is simulated on a general purpose computer, and the resulting plots of vehicle path are presented. Parameters representing a small multipassenger tram were selected, and the simulation runs show response to an erroneous sensor measurement and acquisition following large initial path errors.

  14. Anatomy guided automated SPECT renal seed point estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Shekhar; Kumar, Sailendra

    2010-04-01

    Quantification of SPECT(Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography) images can be more accurate if correct segmentation of region of interest (ROI) is achieved. Segmenting ROI from SPECT images is challenging due to poor image resolution. SPECT is utilized to study the kidney function, though the challenge involved is to accurately locate the kidneys and bladder for analysis. This paper presents an automated method for generating seed point location of both kidneys using anatomical location of kidneys and bladder. The motivation for this work is based on the premise that the anatomical location of the bladder relative to the kidneys will not differ much. A model is generated based on manual segmentation of the bladder and both the kidneys on 10 patient datasets (including sum and max images). Centroid is estimated for manually segmented bladder and kidneys. Relatively easier bladder segmentation is followed by feeding bladder centroid coordinates into the model to generate seed point for kidneys. Percentage error observed in centroid coordinates of organs from ground truth to estimated values from our approach are acceptable. Percentage error of approximately 1%, 6% and 2% is observed in X coordinates and approximately 2%, 5% and 8% is observed in Y coordinates of bladder, left kidney and right kidney respectively. Using a regression model and the location of the bladder, the ROI generation for kidneys is facilitated. The model based seed point estimation will enhance the robustness of kidney ROI estimation for noisy cases.

  15. Clean Cities Guide to Alternative Fuel and Advanced Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-08-01

    Today's fleets are increasingly interested in medium-duty and heavy-duty vehicles that use alternative fuels or advanced technologies that can help reduce operating costs, meet emissions requirements, improve fleet sustainability, and support U.S. energy independence. Vehicle and engine manufacturers are responding to this interest with a wide range of options across a steadily growing number of vehicle applications. This guide provides an overview of alternative fuel power systems--including engines, microturbines, electric motors, and fuel cells--and hybrid propulsion systems. The guide also offers a list of individual medium- and heavy-duty vehicle models listed by application, along with associated manufacturer contact information, fuel type(s), power source(s), and related information.

  16. Clean Cities Guide to Alternative Fuel and Advanced Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles (Book)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2013-08-01

    Today's fleets are increasingly interested in medium-duty and heavy-duty vehicles that use alternative fuels or advanced technologies that can help reduce operating costs, meet emissions requirements, improve fleet sustainability, and support U.S. energy independence. Vehicle and engine manufacturers are responding to this interest with a wide range of options across a steadily growing number of vehicle applications. This guide provides an overview of alternative fuel power systems?including engines, microturbines, electric motors, and fuel cells?and hybrid propulsion systems. The guide also offers a list of individual medium- and heavy-duty vehicle models listed by application, along with associated manufacturer contact information, fuel type(s), power source(s), and related information.

  17. Usefulness of US-guided automated gun biopsy of nonpalpable breast lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwak, Min Sook; Kim, Hak Soo; Lee, Han Kyung; Koh, Sung Hye; O, Eun Young; Yoon, Myung Hwan; Yang, Dal Mo; Kim, Hyung Sik

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical usefulness of ultrasonography(US)-guided automated gun biopsy of nonpalpable breast lesions. In 30 nonpalpable breast lesions over 0.6cm and detected on US, we performed US-guided biopsy using an 18-gauge automated biopsy gun. Two to four specimens were obtained from each lesion. We analyzed the site, size and depth of the lesions, and the length and histopathologic results of the specimens. In four lesions, surgical biopsy and gun biopsy results were compared. In 29 of 30 lesions(96.7%), specimens were adequate for histopathologic diagnosis, and this was as follows : one case of infiltrating ductal carcinoma, 13 of fibrocystic disease, 10 of fibrocystic disease versus fibroadenoma and one of fibrodenoma. There was also one reactive hyperplasia of LN, and one fatty one and two normal tissues, and in these four lesions, agreement between gun and surgical biopsy results was 100%. The only complication was minor bleeding, which was controlled by compression. US-guided automated gun biopsy is a clinically useful and safe procedure for evaluating nonpalpable breast lesions detected on US

  18. Usefulness of US-guided automated gun biopsy of nonpalpable breast lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, Min Sook; Kim, Hak Soo; Lee, Han Kyung; Koh, Sung Hye; O, Eun Young; Yoon, Myung Hwan; Yang, Dal Mo; Kim, Hyung Sik [Chungang Gil Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-11-01

    To evaluate the clinical usefulness of ultrasonography(US)-guided automated gun biopsy of nonpalpable breast lesions. In 30 nonpalpable breast lesions over 0.6cm and detected on US, we performed US-guided biopsy using an 18-gauge automated biopsy gun. Two to four specimens were obtained from each lesion. We analyzed the site, size and depth of the lesions, and the length and histopathologic results of the specimens. In four lesions, surgical biopsy and gun biopsy results were compared. In 29 of 30 lesions(96.7%), specimens were adequate for histopathologic diagnosis, and this was as follows : one case of infiltrating ductal carcinoma, 13 of fibrocystic disease, 10 of fibrocystic disease versus fibroadenoma and one of fibrodenoma. There was also one reactive hyperplasia of LN, and one fatty one and two normal tissues, and in these four lesions, agreement between gun and surgical biopsy results was 100%. The only complication was minor bleeding, which was controlled by compression. US-guided automated gun biopsy is a clinically useful and safe procedure for evaluating nonpalpable breast lesions detected on US.

  19. Machine-Vision Systems Selection for Agricultural Vehicles: A Guide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Pajares

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Machine vision systems are becoming increasingly common onboard agricultural vehicles (autonomous and non-autonomous for different tasks. This paper provides guidelines for selecting machine-vision systems for optimum performance, considering the adverse conditions on these outdoor environments with high variability on the illumination, irregular terrain conditions or different plant growth states, among others. In this regard, three main topics have been conveniently addressed for the best selection: (a spectral bands (visible and infrared; (b imaging sensors and optical systems (including intrinsic parameters and (c geometric visual system arrangement (considering extrinsic parameters and stereovision systems. A general overview, with detailed description and technical support, is provided for each topic with illustrative examples focused on specific applications in agriculture, although they could be applied in different contexts other than agricultural. A case study is provided as a result of research in the RHEA (Robot Fleets for Highly Effective Agriculture and Forestry Management project for effective weed control in maize fields (wide-rows crops, funded by the European Union, where the machine vision system onboard the autonomous vehicles was the most important part of the full perception system, where machine vision was the most relevant. Details and results about crop row detection, weed patches identification, autonomous vehicle guidance and obstacle detection are provided together with a review of methods and approaches on these topics.

  20. Accelerated Evaluation of Automated Vehicles Safety in Lane-Change Scenarios Based on Importance Sampling Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ding; Lam, Henry; Peng, Huei; Bao, Shan; LeBlanc, David J; Nobukawa, Kazutoshi; Pan, Christopher S

    2017-03-01

    Automated vehicles (AVs) must be thoroughly evaluated before their release and deployment. A widely used evaluation approach is the Naturalistic-Field Operational Test (N-FOT), which tests prototype vehicles directly on the public roads. Due to the low exposure to safety-critical scenarios, N-FOTs are time consuming and expensive to conduct. In this paper, we propose an accelerated evaluation approach for AVs. The results can be used to generate motions of the other primary vehicles to accelerate the verification of AVs in simulations and controlled experiments. Frontal collision due to unsafe cut-ins is the target crash type of this paper. Human-controlled vehicles making unsafe lane changes are modeled as the primary disturbance to AVs based on data collected by the University of Michigan Safety Pilot Model Deployment Program. The cut-in scenarios are generated based on skewed statistics of collected human driver behaviors, which generate risky testing scenarios while preserving the statistical information so that the safety benefits of AVs in nonaccelerated cases can be accurately estimated. The cross-entropy method is used to recursively search for the optimal skewing parameters. The frequencies of the occurrences of conflicts, crashes, and injuries are estimated for a modeled AV, and the achieved accelerated rate is around 2000 to 20 000. In other words, in the accelerated simulations, driving for 1000 miles will expose the AV with challenging scenarios that will take about 2 to 20 million miles of real-world driving to encounter. This technique thus has the potential to greatly reduce the development and validation time for AVs.

  1. Location Estimation for an Autonomously Guided Vehicle using an Augmented Kalman Filter to Autocalibrate the Odometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Thomas Dall; Bak, Martin; Andersen, Nils Axel

    1998-01-01

    A Kalman filter using encoder readings as inputs and vision measurements as observations is designed as a location estimator for an autonomously guided vehicle (AGV). To reduce the effect of modelling errors an augmented filter that estimates the true system parameters is designed. The traditional...

  2. Detection of Orbital Debris Collision Risks for the Automated Transfer Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peret, L.; Legendre, P.; Delavault, S.; Martin, T.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we present a general collision risk assessment method, which has been applied through numerical simulations to the Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV) case. During ATV ascent towards the International Space Station, close approaches between the ATV and objects of the USSTRACOM catalog will be monitored through collision rosk assessment. Usually, collision risk assessment relies on an exclusion volume or a probability threshold method. Probability methods are more effective than exclusion volumes but require accurate covariance data. In this work, we propose to use a criterion defined by an adaptive exclusion area. This criterion does not require any probability calculation but is more effective than exclusion volume methods as demonstrated by our numerical experiments. The results of these studies, when confirmed and finalized, will be used for the ATV operations.

  3. Samen werken aan Automatische VoertuigGeleiding: aanzet tot een businessplan [Working together on Automated Vehicle Guidance; Preliminary business plan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coemet, M.J.; Vos, A.P. de; Arem, B. van; Brookhuis, K.A.; Heijer, T.; Marchau, V.A.W.J.

    1998-01-01

    Automated Vehicle Guidance (AVG) systems are expected to have a major impact on traffic and transport. In order to reap the benefits and offset or avoid the disadvantages of AVG, correct and timely choices will have to be made. The Ministry of Transport, Public Works and Water Manage-ment, the

  4. Automated and connected vehicle (AV/CV) test bed to improve transit, bicycle, and pedestrian safety : concept of operations plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    This document presents the Concept of Operations (ConOps) Plan for the Automated and Connected Vehicle (AV/CV) Test Bed to Improve Transit, Bicycle, and Pedestrian Safety. As illustrated in Figure 1, the plan presents the overarching vision and goals...

  5. Human-Automation Interaction Design for Adaptive Cruise Control Systems of Ground Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwisoo Eom

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A majority of recently developed advanced vehicles have been equipped with various automated driver assistance systems, such as adaptive cruise control (ACC and lane keeping assistance systems. ACC systems have several operational modes, and drivers can be unaware of the mode in which they are operating. Because mode confusion is a significant human error factor that contributes to traffic accidents, it is necessary to develop user interfaces for ACC systems that can reduce mode confusion. To meet this requirement, this paper presents a new human-automation interaction design methodology in which the compatibility of the machine and interface models is determined using the proposed criteria, and if the models are incompatible, one or both of the models is/are modified to make them compatible. To investigate the effectiveness of our methodology, we designed two new interfaces by separately modifying the machine model and the interface model and then performed driver-in-the-loop experiments. The results showed that modifying the machine model provides a more compact, acceptable, effective, and safe interface than modifying the interface model.

  6. Human-Automation Interaction Design for Adaptive Cruise Control Systems of Ground Vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Hwisoo; Lee, Sang Hun

    2015-06-12

    A majority of recently developed advanced vehicles have been equipped with various automated driver assistance systems, such as adaptive cruise control (ACC) and lane keeping assistance systems. ACC systems have several operational modes, and drivers can be unaware of the mode in which they are operating. Because mode confusion is a significant human error factor that contributes to traffic accidents, it is necessary to develop user interfaces for ACC systems that can reduce mode confusion. To meet this requirement, this paper presents a new human-automation interaction design methodology in which the compatibility of the machine and interface models is determined using the proposed criteria, and if the models are incompatible, one or both of the models is/are modified to make them compatible. To investigate the effectiveness of our methodology, we designed two new interfaces by separately modifying the machine model and the interface model and then performed driver-in-the-loop experiments. The results showed that modifying the machine model provides a more compact, acceptable, effective, and safe interface than modifying the interface model.

  7. Sono-Guided Percutaneous Automated Gun Biopsy in Pediatric Renal Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Chul

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate whether sono-guided percutaneous automated gun biopsy is also useful in pediatricpatients with renal diseases. In the prone position of twenty pediatric patients with renal parenchymal diseases, percutaneous biopsy was done through lateral aspect of the lower pole of left kidney with automated biopsy gun under the guidance of ultrasonography. The biopsy needle was either of 18 or 20 gauge. The obtained core of renal tissue was examined with light, immunofluorescent or electron microscope by the renal pathologist. In 18 among 20 patients, adequate renal tissue core sufficient to be pathologically diagnosed was obtained. The histologic findings were as follows : IG A nephropathy (n = 2), lupus nephritis (n =2), minimal change glomerulonephritis (n = 5), membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (n = 3), mesangialproliferative glomeru-lonephritis (n = 1), diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis (n = 3), focalglomerulo-sclerosis (n = 1), membranous glomerulopathy (n = 1). No significant complications occurred during or after the biopsy. Sono-guided percutaneous renal biopsy using automated biopsy gun is also useful todiagnose renal parenchymal diseases without significant complications in pediatric patients

  8. Guiding automated NMR structure determination using a global optimization metric, the NMR DP score

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Yuanpeng Janet, E-mail: yphuang@cabm.rutgers.edu; Mao, Binchen; Xu, Fei; Montelione, Gaetano T., E-mail: gtm@rutgers.edu [Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine, and Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium (United States)

    2015-08-15

    ASDP is an automated NMR NOE assignment program. It uses a distinct bottom-up topology-constrained network anchoring approach for NOE interpretation, with 2D, 3D and/or 4D NOESY peak lists and resonance assignments as input, and generates unambiguous NOE constraints for iterative structure calculations. ASDP is designed to function interactively with various structure determination programs that use distance restraints to generate molecular models. In the CASD–NMR project, ASDP was tested and further developed using blinded NMR data, including resonance assignments, either raw or manually-curated (refined) NOESY peak list data, and in some cases {sup 15}N–{sup 1}H residual dipolar coupling data. In these blinded tests, in which the reference structure was not available until after structures were generated, the fully-automated ASDP program performed very well on all targets using both the raw and refined NOESY peak list data. Improvements of ASDP relative to its predecessor program for automated NOESY peak assignments, AutoStructure, were driven by challenges provided by these CASD–NMR data. These algorithmic improvements include (1) using a global metric of structural accuracy, the discriminating power score, for guiding model selection during the iterative NOE interpretation process, and (2) identifying incorrect NOESY cross peak assignments caused by errors in the NMR resonance assignment list. These improvements provide a more robust automated NOESY analysis program, ASDP, with the unique capability of being utilized with alternative structure generation and refinement programs including CYANA, CNS, and/or Rosetta.

  9. Guiding automated left ventricular chamber segmentation in cardiac imaging using the concept of conserved myocardial volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garson, Christopher D; Li, Bing; Acton, Scott T; Hossack, John A

    2008-06-01

    The active surface technique using gradient vector flow allows semi-automated segmentation of ventricular borders. The accuracy of the algorithm depends on the optimal selection of several key parameters. We investigated the use of conservation of myocardial volume for quantitative assessment of each of these parameters using synthetic and in vivo data. We predicted that for a given set of model parameters, strong conservation of volume would correlate with accurate segmentation. The metric was most useful when applied to the gradient vector field weighting and temporal step-size parameters, but less effective in guiding an optimal choice of the active surface tension and rigidity parameters.

  10. Steerability Analysis of Tracked Vehicles: Theory and User’s Guide for Computer Program TVSTEER

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-08-01

    Baladi , Donald E. Barnes, Rebecca P. BergerC oStructures Laboratory NDEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY ___ Waterways Experiment Station, Corps of Engineers . U P0 Box...Analysis of Tracked Vehicles: Theory and User’s Guide for Computer Program TVSTEER - 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Baladi , George Y., Barnes, Donald E...mathematical model was formulated by Drs. George Y. Baladi and Behzad Rohani. The logic and computer programming were accomplished by Dr. Baladi and

  11. Coherent Doppler lidar for automated space vehicle rendezvous, stationkeeping and capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilbro, James A.

    1991-01-01

    The inherent spatial resolution of laser radar makes ladar or lidar an attractive candidate for Automated Rendezvous and Capture application. Previous applications were based on incoherent lidar techniques, requiring retro-reflectors on the target vehicle. Technology improvements (reduced size, no cryogenic cooling requirement) have greatly enhanced the construction of coherent lidar systems. Coherent lidar permits the acquisition of non-cooperative targets at ranges that are limited by the detection capability rather than by the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) requirements. The sensor can provide translational state information (range, velocity, and angle) by direct measurement and, when used with any array detector, also can provide attitude information by Doppler imaging techniques. Identification of the target is accomplished by scanning with a high pulse repetition frequency (dependent on the SNR). The system performance is independent of range and should not be constrained by sun angle. An initial effort to characterize a multi-element detection system has resulted in a system that is expected to work to a minimum range of 1 meter. The system size, weight and power requirements are dependent on the operating range; 10 km range requires a diameter of 3 centimeters with overall size at 3 x 3 x 15 to 30 cm, while 100 km range requires a 30 cm diameter.

  12. Protected Turning Movements of Noncooperative Automated Vehicles: Geometrics, Trajectories, and Saturation Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaobo Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is the first to quantify throughput (saturation flow of noncooperative automated vehicles when performing turning maneuvers, which are critical bottlenecks in arterial road networks. We first develop a constrained optimization problem based on AVs’ kinematic behavior during a protected signal phase which considers both ABS-enabled and wheels-locked braking, as well as avoiding encroaching into oncoming traffic or past the edge-of-receiving-lane. We analyze noncooperative (“defensive” behavior, in keeping with the Assured Clear Distance Ahead legal standard to which human drivers are held and AVs will likely also be for the foreseeable future. We demonstrate that, under plausible behavioral parameters, AVs appear likely to have positive impacts on throughput of turning traffic streams at intersections, in the range of +0.2% (under the most conservative circumstances to +43% for a typical turning maneuver. We demonstrate that the primary mechanism of impact of turning radius is its effect on speed, which is likely to be constrained by passenger comfort. We show heterogeneous per-lane throughput in the case of “double turn lanes.” Finally, we demonstrate limited sensitivity to crash-risk criterion, with a 4% difference arising from a change from 1 in 10,000 to 1 in 100,000,000. The paper concludes with a brief discussion of policy implications and future research needs.

  13. Review of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations for Automated Commercial Vehicles: Preliminary Assessment of Interpretation and Enforcement Challenges, Questions, and Gaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-01

    The Volpe National Transportation Systems Center (Volpe) reviewed the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (FMCSRs) to identify compliance and enforcement challenges related to the operation of automated commercial vehicles (CMVs) in interstate c...

  14. Quality of closed chest compression on a manikin in ambulance vehicles and flying helicopters with a real time automated feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havel, Christof; Schreiber, Wolfgang; Trimmel, Helmut; Malzer, Reinhard; Haugk, Moritz; Richling, Nina; Riedmüller, Eva; Sterz, Fritz; Herkner, Harald

    2010-01-01

    Automated verbal and visual feedback improves quality of resuscitation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and was proven to increase short-term survival. Quality of resuscitation may be hampered in more difficult situations like emergency transportation. Currently there is no evidence if feedback devices can improve resuscitation quality during different modes of transportation. To assess the effect of real time automated feedback on the quality of resuscitation in an emergency transportation setting. Randomised cross-over trial. Medical University of Vienna, Vienna Municipal Ambulance Service and Helicopter Emergency Medical Service Unit (Christophorus Flugrettungsverein) in September 2007. European Resuscitation Council (ERC) certified health care professionals performing CPR in a flying helicopter and in a moving ambulance vehicle on a manikin with human-like chest properties. CPR sessions, with real time automated feedback as the intervention and standard CPR without feedback as control. Quality of chest compression during resuscitation. Feedback resulted in less deviation from ideal compression rate 100 min(-1) (9+/-9 min(-1), ptime. Applied work was less in the feedback group compared to controls (373+/-448 cm x compression; ptime automated feedback improves certain aspects of CPR quality in flying helicopters and moving ambulance vehicles. The effect of feedback guidance was most pronounced for chest compression rate. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of automated speed enforcement in Montgomery County, Maryland, on vehicle speeds, public opinion, and crashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wen; McCartt, Anne T

    2016-09-01

    In May 2007, Montgomery County, Maryland, implemented an automated speed enforcement program, with cameras allowed on residential streets with speed limits of 35 mph or lower and in school zones. In 2009, the state speed camera law increased the enforcement threshold from 11 to 12 mph over the speed limit and restricted school zone enforcement hours. In 2012, the county began using a corridor approach, in which cameras were periodically moved along the length of a roadway segment. The long-term effects of the speed camera program on travel speeds, public attitudes, and crashes were evaluated. Changes in travel speeds at camera sites from 6 months before the program began to 7½ years after were compared with changes in speeds at control sites in the nearby Virginia counties of Fairfax and Arlington. A telephone survey of Montgomery County drivers was conducted in Fall 2014 to examine attitudes and experiences related to automated speed enforcement. Using data on crashes during 2004-2013, logistic regression models examined the program's effects on the likelihood that a crash involved an incapacitating or fatal injury on camera-eligible roads and on potential spillover roads in Montgomery County, using crashes in Fairfax County on similar roads as controls. About 7½ years after the program began, speed cameras were associated with a 10% reduction in mean speeds and a 62% reduction in the likelihood that a vehicle was traveling more than 10 mph above the speed limit at camera sites. When interviewed in Fall 2014, 95% of drivers were aware of the camera program, 62% favored it, and most had received a camera ticket or knew someone else who had. The overall effect of the camera program in its modified form, including both the law change and the corridor approach, was a 39% reduction in the likelihood that a crash resulted in an incapacitating or fatal injury. Speed cameras alone were associated with a 19% reduction in the likelihood that a crash resulted in an

  16. Dynamic Coordinated Shifting Control of Automated Mechanical Transmissions without a Clutch in a Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinlei Liu

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of the shifting process of automated mechanical transmissions (AMTs for traditional hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs, and by combining the features of electric machines with fast response speed, the dynamic model of the hybrid electric AMT vehicle powertrain is built up, the dynamic characteristics of each phase of shifting process are analyzed, and a control strategy in which torque and speed of the engine and electric machine are coordinatively controlled to achieve AMT shifting control for a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV without clutch is proposed. In the shifting process, the engine and electric machine are well controlled, and the shift jerk and power interruption and restoration time are reduced. Simulation and real car test results show that the proposed control strategy can more efficiently improve the shift quality for PHEVs equipped with AMTs.

  17. Team performance in networked supervisory control of unmanned air vehicles: effects of automation, working memory, and communication content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKendrick, Ryan; Shaw, Tyler; de Visser, Ewart; Saqer, Haneen; Kidwell, Brian; Parasuraman, Raja

    2014-05-01

    Assess team performance within a net-worked supervisory control setting while manipulating automated decision aids and monitoring team communication and working memory ability. Networked systems such as multi-unmanned air vehicle (UAV) supervision have complex properties that make prediction of human-system performance difficult. Automated decision aid can provide valuable information to operators, individual abilities can limit or facilitate team performance, and team communication patterns can alter how effectively individuals work together. We hypothesized that reliable automation, higher working memory capacity, and increased communication rates of task-relevant information would offset performance decrements attributed to high task load. Two-person teams performed a simulated air defense task with two levels of task load and three levels of automated aid reliability. Teams communicated and received decision aid messages via chat window text messages. Task Load x Automation effects were significant across all performance measures. Reliable automation limited the decline in team performance with increasing task load. Average team spatial working memory was a stronger predictor than other measures of team working memory. Frequency of team rapport and enemy location communications positively related to team performance, and word count was negatively related to team performance. Reliable decision aiding mitigated team performance decline during increased task load during multi-UAV supervisory control. Team spatial working memory, communication of spatial information, and team rapport predicted team success. An automated decision aid can improve team performance under high task load. Assessment of spatial working memory and the communication of task-relevant information can help in operator and team selection in supervisory control systems.

  18. Ultrasound-guided renal biopsy: experience using an automated core biopsy system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, R; Common, A A; Marcuzzi, D

    2000-04-01

    To assess the safety and efficacy of ultrasound-guided percutaneous renal biopsy using an automated core biopsy system, and to determine radiologists' accuracy in predicting sample adequacy. Ninety-five biopsies were performed on 25 native kidneys and 70 renal allografts using a 16-gauge automated, spring-loaded core biopsy device under real-time sonographic guidance. Radiologists performing the biopsy estimated the number of core samples needed to obtain an adequate specimen, based on visual inspection of each core. The final determination of the number of samples was made by a pathology technologist who attended each biopsy, based on preliminary microscopic examination of tissue cores. After each biopsy, an ultrasonographic examination was performed to search for biopsy-related hemorrhage, and a questionnaire was given to the patient to determine biopsy-related complications, which were categorized as either minor or major. The main indication for biopsy was acute renal failure (in 43.2% of biopsies). An average of 3 tissue cores per biopsy were obtained. Of the 94 patients in whom a biopsy was conducted to exclude diffuse renal disease, a mean of 12.5 glomeruli were present in each specimen. Overall, adequate tissue for diagnosis was obtained in 98.9% of cases. The radiologists' estimate of the number of core samples needed concurred with the pathology technologists' determination of sample adequacy in 88.4% of cases. A total of 26 complications occurred (in 27.4% of biopsies), consisting of 23 minor (24.2%) and 3 major (3.2%) complications. Real-time sonographic guidance in conjunction with an automated core biopsy system is a safe and accurate method of performing percutaneous renal biopsy. Routine use of sonographic examinations to search for biopsy-related complications is not indicated. Radiologists are accurate in estimating sample adequacy in most cases; however, the presence of a pathology technologist at the biopsy procedure virtually eliminates the

  19. Automated Snow Extent Mapping Based on Orthophoto Images from Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedzielski, Tomasz; Spallek, Waldemar; Witek-Kasprzak, Matylda

    2018-04-01

    The paper presents the application of the k-means clustering in the process of automated snow extent mapping using orthophoto images generated using the Structure-from-Motion (SfM) algorithm from oblique aerial photographs taken by unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). A simple classification approach has been implemented to discriminate between snow-free and snow-covered terrain. The procedure uses the k-means clustering and classifies orthophoto images based on the three-dimensional space of red-green-blue (RGB) or near-infrared-red-green (NIRRG) or near-infrared-green-blue (NIRGB) bands. To test the method, several field experiments have been carried out, both in situations when snow cover was continuous and when it was patchy. The experiments have been conducted using three fixed-wing UAVs (swinglet CAM by senseFly, eBee by senseFly, and Birdie by FlyTech UAV) on 10/04/2015, 23/03/2016, and 16/03/2017 within three test sites in the Izerskie Mountains in southwestern Poland. The resulting snow extent maps, produced automatically using the classification method, have been validated against real snow extents delineated through a visual analysis and interpretation offered by human analysts. For the simplest classification setup, which assumes two classes in the k-means clustering, the extent of snow patches was estimated accurately, with areal underestimation of 4.6% (RGB) and overestimation of 5.5% (NIRGB). For continuous snow cover with sparse discontinuities at places where trees or bushes protruded from snow, the agreement between automatically produced snow extent maps and observations was better, i.e. 1.5% (underestimation with RGB) and 0.7-0.9% (overestimation, either with RGB or with NIRRG). Shadows on snow were found to be mainly responsible for the misclassification.

  20. Omnidirectional configuration and control approach on mini heavy loaded forklift autonomous guided vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Norsharimie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the omnidirectional configuration and control approach on Mini Heavy Loaded Forklift Autonomous Guided Vehicle (MHeLFAGV for flexibility maneuverability in confine and narrow area. The issue in turning motion for nonholonomic vehicle in confine area becoming a motivation in MHeLFAGV design to provide holonomic vehicle with flexible movement. Therefore an omni-wheeled named Mecanum wheel has been configured in this vehicle design as well as omnidirectional control algorithm. MHeLFAGV system is developed with collaboration and inspired from Vacuumshmelze (M Sdn. Bhd. Pekan, Pahang in order to have a customized mini forklift that able to work in a very confined warehouse (170cm × 270cm square with heavy payload in a range of 20-200kg. In electronics control design, two stages of controller boards are developed namely as Board 1 and 2 that specifically for movement controller board and monitoring controller board respectively. In addition separate module of left, right, forward, backward, diagonal and zigzagging movement is developed as embedded modules for MHeLFAGV system’s control architecture. A few experiments are done to verify the algorithm for each omnidirectional movement of MHeLFAGV system in the wide area. The waypoint of MHeLFAGV movement is plotted using Global Positioning System (GPS as well as a digital compass by mapping the longitude and latitude of the vehicle. There are slightly different between the targeted movements with recorded data since Mecanum wheeled affected by the uneven surface of the landscape. The experiment is also further on moving in confine are on the actual targeted warehouse.

  1. Optimal Stack Layout in a Sea Container Terminal with Automated Lifting Vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, D.; Gupta, A.; Parhi, S.; de Koster, M.B.M.

    2014-01-01

    textabstractContainer terminal performance is largely determined by its design decisions, which include the number and type of quay cranes (QCs), stack cranes (SCs), transport vehicles, vehicle travel path, and stack layout. The terminal design process is complex because it is affected by factors such as topological constraints, stochastic interactions among the quayside, vehicle transport and stackside operations. Further, the orientation of the stack layout (parallel or perpendicular to the...

  2. Knowledge-Based Aircraft Automation: Managers Guide on the use of Artificial Intelligence for Aircraft Automation and Verification and Validation Approach for a Neural-Based Flight Controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broderick, Ron

    1997-01-01

    The ultimate goal of this report was to integrate the powerful tools of artificial intelligence into the traditional process of software development. To maintain the US aerospace competitive advantage, traditional aerospace and software engineers need to more easily incorporate the technology of artificial intelligence into the advanced aerospace systems being designed today. The future goal was to transition artificial intelligence from an emerging technology to a standard technology that is considered early in the life cycle process to develop state-of-the-art aircraft automation systems. This report addressed the future goal in two ways. First, it provided a matrix that identified typical aircraft automation applications conducive to various artificial intelligence methods. The purpose of this matrix was to provide top-level guidance to managers contemplating the possible use of artificial intelligence in the development of aircraft automation. Second, the report provided a methodology to formally evaluate neural networks as part of the traditional process of software development. The matrix was developed by organizing the discipline of artificial intelligence into the following six methods: logical, object representation-based, distributed, uncertainty management, temporal and neurocomputing. Next, a study of existing aircraft automation applications that have been conducive to artificial intelligence implementation resulted in the following five categories: pilot-vehicle interface, system status and diagnosis, situation assessment, automatic flight planning, and aircraft flight control. The resulting matrix provided management guidance to understand artificial intelligence as it applied to aircraft automation. The approach taken to develop a methodology to formally evaluate neural networks as part of the software engineering life cycle was to start with the existing software quality assurance standards and to change these standards to include neural network

  3. Guide to Federal Funding, Financing, and Technical Assistance for Plug-in Electric Vehicles and Charging Stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2016-07-29

    The U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Department of Transportation have published a guide to highlight examples of federal support and technical assistance for plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) and charging stations. The guide provides a description of each opportunity and a point of contact to assist those interested in advancing PEV technology. The Department of Energy’s Alternative Fuels Data Center provides a comprehensive database of federal and state programs that support plug-in electric vehicles and infrastructure.

  4. Orbital transfer vehicle launch operations study: Automated technology knowledge base, volume 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    A simplified retrieval strategy for compiling automation-related bibliographies from NASA/RECON is presented. Two subsets of NASA Thesaurus subject terms were extracted: a primary list, which is used to obtain an initial set of citations; and a secondary list, which is used to limit or further specify a large initial set of citations. These subject term lists are presented in Appendix A as the Automated Technology Knowledge Base (ATKB) Thesaurus.

  5. Optimal Stack Layout in a Sea Container Terminal with Automated Lifting Vehicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Roy (Debjit); A. Gupta (Akash); S. Parhi (Sampanna); M.B.M. de Koster (René)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractContainer terminal performance is largely determined by its design decisions, which include the number and type of quay cranes (QCs), stack cranes (SCs), transport vehicles, vehicle travel path, and stack layout. The terminal design process is complex because it is affected by factors

  6. Advancing eco-driving strategies for drivers and automated vehicles traveling within intersection vicinities : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Vehicle emissions occupy a considerable share of emission inventories in the United States. One of the approaches taken to minimize vehicle emissions is eco-driving. Supported by advanced ITS technologies, it is available to provide the real-time eco...

  7. Nonlinear model predictive control of a passenger vehicle for automated lane changes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Acosta, A.F.; Marquez-Ruiz, A.; Espinosa, J.J.

    2017-01-01

    This article presents a nonlinear Model Predictive Control (MPC) for lane changes, based on a simplified Single Track Model (STM) of the vehicle. The STM includes the position of the vehicle in global coordinates as a state so that the position of the target lane can be specified to the MPC for

  8. SIG: Multiple Views on Safety-Critical Automation: Aircraft, Autonomous Vehicles, Air Traffic Management and Satellite Ground Segments Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feary, Michael; Palanque, Philippe; Martinie, Célia; Tscheligi, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    This SIG focuses on the engineering of automation in interactive critical systems. Automation has already been studied in a number of (sub-) disciplines and application fields: design, human factors, psychology, (software) engineering, aviation, health care, games. One distinguishing feature of the area we are focusing on is that in the field of interactive critical systems properties such as reliability, dependability, fault tolerance are as important as usability, user experience or overall acceptance issues. The SIG targets at two problem areas: first the engineering of the user interaction with (partly-) autonomous systems: how to design, build and assess autonomous behavior, especially in cases where there is a need to represent on the user interface both autonomous and interactive objects. An example of such integration is the representation of an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) (where no direct interaction is possible), together with aircrafts (that have to be instructed by an air traffic controller to avoid the UAV). Second the design and engineering of user interaction in general for autonomous objects/systems (for example a cruise control in a car or an autopilot in an aircraft). The goal of the SIG is to raise interest in the CHI community on the general aspects of automation and to identify a community of researchers and practitioners interested in those increasingly prominent issues of interfaces towards (semi)-autonomous systems. The expected audience should be interested in addressing the issues of integration of mainly unconnected research domains to formulate a new joint research agenda.

  9. Multiple Views on Safety-Critical Automation: Aircraft, Autonomous Vehicles, Air Traffic Management and Satellite Ground Segments Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feary, Michael S.; Palanque, Philippe Andre Rolan; Martinie, De Almeida; Tscheligi, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    This SIG focuses on the engineering of automation in interactive critical systems. Automation has already been studied in a number of (sub-) disciplines and application fields: design, human factors, psychology, (software) engineering, aviation, health care, games. One distinguishing feature of the area we are focusing on is that in the field of interactive critical systems properties such as reliability, dependability, fault-tolerance are as important as usability, user experience or overall acceptance issues. The SIG targets at two problem areas: first the engineering of the user interaction with (partly-) autonomous systems: how to design, build and assess autonomous behavior, especially in cases where there is a need to represent on the user interface both autonomous and interactive objects. An example of such integration is the representation of an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) (where no direct interaction is possible), together with aircrafts (that have to be instructed by an air traffic controller to avoid the UAV). Second the design and engineering of user interaction in general for autonomous objects systems (for example a cruise control in a car or an autopilot in an aircraft). The goal of the SIG is to raise interest in the CHI community on the general aspects of automation and to identify a community of researchers and practitioners interested in those increasingly prominent issues of interfaces towards (semi)-autonomous systems. The expected audience should be interested in addressing the issues of integration of mainly unconnected research domains to formulate a new joint research agenda.

  10. Neural Network Control-Based Drive Design of Servomotor and Its Application to Automatic Guided Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Shyan Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An automatic guided vehicle (AGV is extensively used for productions in a flexible manufacture system with high efficiency and high flexibility. A servomotor-based AGV is designed and implemented in this paper. In order to steer the AGV to go along a predefined path with corner or arc, the conventional proportional-integral-derivative (PID control is used in the system. However, it is difficult to tune PID gains at various conditions. As a result, the neural network (NN control is considered to assist the PID control for gain tuning. The experimental results are first provided to verify the correctness of the neural network plus PID control for 400 W-motor control system. Secondly, the AGV includes two sets of the designed motor systems and CAN BUS transmission so that it can move along the straight line and curve paths shown in the taped videos.

  11. Greenhouse Emission Reductions and Natural Gas Vehicles: A Resource Guide on Technology Options and Project Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orestes Anastasia; NAncy Checklick; Vivianne Couts; Julie Doherty; Jette Findsen; Laura Gehlin; Josh Radoff

    2002-09-01

    Accurate and verifiable emission reductions are a function of the degree of transparency and stringency of the protocols employed in documenting project- or program-associated emissions reductions. The purpose of this guide is to provide a background for law and policy makers, urban planners, and project developers working with the many Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emission reduction programs throughout the world to quantify and/or evaluate the GHG impacts of Natural Gas Vehicle (NGVs). In order to evaluate the GHG benefits and/or penalties of NGV projects, it is necessary to first gain a fundamental understanding of the technology employed and the operating characteristics of these vehicles, especially with regard to the manner in which they compare to similar conventional gasoline or diesel vehicles. Therefore, the first two sections of this paper explain the basic technology and functionality of NGVs, but focus on evaluating the models that are currently on the market with their similar conventional counterparts, including characteristics such as cost, performance, efficiency, environmental attributes, and range. Since the increased use of NGVs, along with Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFVs) in general, represents a public good with many social benefits at the local, national, and global levels, NGVs often receive significant attention in the form of legislative and programmatic support. Some states mandate the use of NGVs, while others provide financial incentives to promote their procurement and use. Furthermore, Federal legislation in the form of tax incentives or procurement requirements can have a significant impact on the NGV market. In order to implement effective legislation or programs, it is vital to have an understanding of the different programs and activities that already exist so that a new project focusing on GHG emission reduction can successfully interact with and build on the experience and lessons learned of those that preceded it. Finally, most programs

  12. Crash safety concerns for out-of-position occupant postures: A look toward safety in highly automated vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurry, Timothy L; Poplin, Gerald S; Shaw, Greg; Panzer, Matthew B

    2018-04-09

    Highly automated vehicle occupants will all be passengers and may be free to ride while in postures for which existing occupant safety systems such as seat belts and airbags were not originally designed. These occupants could therefore face increased risk of injury when a crash occurs. Given that current vehicles are capable of supporting a variety of occupant postures outside of the normal design position, such as reclined or turned passengers, an evaluation of current field data was performed to better understand the risks of being out of position. We investigated the frequency, demographics, and injury outcomes for out-of-position occupants using NASS-CDS. A matched analysis was performed to compare injury outcomes for out-of-position passengers with in-position drivers involved in similar crashes. Finally, case studies for out-of-position occupants were examined in the Crash Injury Research (CIREN) database. Only 0.5% of occupants in NASS-CDS with a coded posture were out of position at the time of crash. Of the out-of-position occupants, being turned or seated sideways was almost as likely as being reclined. Out-of-position occupants were younger and less likely to be belted than their in-position counterparts. Analysis of the injury data indicated a trend that being out of position was associated with an elevated risk for serious injury. However, the number of out-of-position occupants was too small to provide a definitive or statistically significant conclusion on injury outcome. Though highly automated vehicles may eventually reduce the number of crashes and traffic fatalities in the future, there will be a transition period when these vehicles remain at risk from collisions with human-driven vehicles. These crashes could cause higher than anticipated rates of injury if occupants are less likely to be belted or tend to be in positions for which restraints are not optimized. This study highlights the need for future research on occupant response and

  13. Automated scheme to determine design parameters for a recoverable reentry vehicle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, W.E.

    1976-01-01

    The NRV (Nosetip Recovery Vehicle) program at Sandia Laboratories is designed to recover the nose section from a sphere cone reentry vehicle after it has flown a near ICBM reentry trajectory. Both mass jettison and parachutes are used to reduce the velocity of the RV near the end of the trajectory to a sufficiently low level that the vehicle may land intact. The design problem of determining mass jettison time and parachute deployment time in order to ensure that the vehicle does land intact is considered. The problem is formulated as a min-max optimization problem where the design parameters are to be selected to minimize the maximum possible deviation in the design criteria due to uncertainties in the system. The results of the study indicate that the optimal choice of the design parameters ensures that the maximum deviation in the design criteria is within acceptable bounds. This analytically ensures the feasibility of recovery for NRV

  14. Development of a Fully Automated Guided Wave System for In-Process Cure Monitoring of CFRP Composite Laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Tyler B.; Hou, Tan-Hung; Grimsley, Brian W.; Yaun, Fuh-Gwo

    2016-01-01

    A guided wave-based in-process cure monitoring technique for carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites was investigated at NASA Langley Research Center. A key cure transition point (vitrification) was identified and the degree of cure was monitored using metrics such as amplitude and time of arrival (TOA) of guided waves. Using an automated system preliminarily developed in this work, high-temperature piezoelectric transducers were utilized to interrogate a twenty-four ply unidirectional composite panel fabricated from Hexcel (Registered Trademark) IM7/8552 prepreg during cure. It was shown that the amplitude of the guided wave increased sharply around vitrification and the TOA curve possessed an inverse relationship with degree of cure. The work is a first step in demonstrating the feasibility of transitioning the technique to perform in-process cure monitoring in an autoclave, defect detection during cure, and ultimately a closed-loop process control to maximize composite part quality and consistency.

  15. Stochastic Modeling of Unloading and Loading Operations at a Container Terminal using Automated Lifting Vehicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Roy (Debjit); M.B.M. de Koster (René)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractWith growing worldwide trade, container terminals have grown in number and size. Many new terminals are now automated to increase operational efficiency. The key focus is on improving seaside processes, where a distinction can be made between single quay crane operations (all quay

  16. Driver behavior and workload in an on-road automated vehicle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stapel, J.C.J.; Mullakkal Babu, F.A.; Happee, R.

    2017-01-01

    Driver mental underload is an important concern in the operational safety of automated driving. In this study, workload was evaluated subjectively (NASA RTLX) and objectively (auditory detection-response task) on Dutch public highways (~150km) in a Tesla Model S comparing manual and supervised

  17. Workshop report : joint workshop on liability issues in advanced vehicle control and automated highway systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-02-05

    The National Automated Highway System Consortium (NAHSC), ITS America and the American Association of State Highway & Transportation Officials (AASHTO) co-sponsored a two-day workshop in Washington, DC on February 5-6, 1997 to examine the liability i...

  18. CityMobil : Human factor issues regarding highly automated vehicles on eLane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toffetti, A.; Wilschut, E.S.; Martens, M.H.; Schieben, A.; Rambaldini, A.; Merat, N.; Flemisch, F.

    2009-01-01

    There are several human factor concerns with highly autonomous or semiautonomous driving, such as transition of control, loss of skill, and dealing with automated system errors. Four CityMobil experiments studied the eLane concept for dual-mode cars, and the results of one are described. The open

  19. Assessment of the safety benefits of vehicles' advanced driver assistance, connectivity and low level automation systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Lishengsa; Abdel-Aty, Mohamed; Wu, Yina; Wang, Ling

    2018-04-11

    The Connected Vehicle (CV) technologies together with other Driving Assistance (DA) technologies are believed to have great effects on traffic operation and safety, and they are expected to impact the future of our cities. However, few research has estimated the exact safety benefits when all vehicles are equipped with these technologies. This paper seeks to fill the gap by using a general crash avoidance effectiveness framework for major CV&DA technologies to make a comprehensive crash reduction estimation. Twenty technologies that were tested in recent studies are summarized and sensitivity analysis is used for estimating their total crash avoidance effectiveness. The results show that crash avoidance effectiveness of CV&DA technology is significantly affected by the vehicle type and the safety estimation methodology. A 70% crash avoidance rate seems to be the highest effectiveness for the CV&DA technologies operating in the real-world environment. Based on the 2005-2008 U.S. GES Crash Records, this research found that the CV&DA technologies could lead to the reduction of light vehicles' crashes and heavy trucks' crashes by at least 32.99% and 40.88%, respectively. The rear-end crashes for both light vehicles and heavy trucks have the most expected crash benefits from the technologies. The paper also studies the effectiveness of Forward Collision Warning technology (FCW) under fog conditions, and the results show that FCW could reduce 35% of the near-crash events under fog conditions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Automated replication of cone beam CT-guided treatments in the Pinnacle(3) treatment planning system for adaptive radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargrave, Catriona; Mason, Nicole; Guidi, Robyn; Miller, Julie-Anne; Becker, Jillian; Moores, Matthew; Mengersen, Kerrie; Poulsen, Michael; Harden, Fiona

    2016-03-01

    Time-consuming manual methods have been required to register cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images with plans in the Pinnacle(3) treatment planning system in order to replicate delivered treatments for adaptive radiotherapy. These methods rely on fiducial marker (FM) placement during CBCT acquisition or the image mid-point to localise the image isocentre. A quality assurance study was conducted to validate an automated CBCT-plan registration method utilising the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) Structure Set (RS) and Spatial Registration (RE) files created during online image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). CBCTs of a phantom were acquired with FMs and predetermined setup errors using various online IGRT workflows. The CBCTs, DICOM RS and RE files were imported into Pinnacle(3) plans of the phantom and the resulting automated CBCT-plan registrations were compared to existing manual methods. A clinical protocol for the automated method was subsequently developed and tested retrospectively using CBCTs and plans for six bladder patients. The automated CBCT-plan registration method was successfully applied to thirty-four phantom CBCT images acquired with an online 0 mm action level workflow. Ten CBCTs acquired with other IGRT workflows required manual workarounds. This was addressed during the development and testing of the clinical protocol using twenty-eight patient CBCTs. The automated CBCT-plan registrations were instantaneous, replicating delivered treatments in Pinnacle(3) with errors of ±0.5 mm. These errors were comparable to mid-point-dependant manual registrations but superior to FM-dependant manual registrations. The automated CBCT-plan registration method quickly and reliably replicates delivered treatments in Pinnacle(3) for adaptive radiotherapy.

  1. Natural Environment Modeling and Fault-Diagnosis for Automated Agricultural Vehicle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blas, Morten Rufus; Blanke, Mogens

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents results for an automatic navigation system for agricultural vehicles. The system uses stereo-vision, inertial sensors and GPS. Special emphasis has been placed on modeling the natural environment in conjunction with a fault-tolerant navigation system. The results are exemplified...... by an agricultural vehicle following cut grass (swath). It is demonstrated how faults in the system can be detected and diagnosed using state of the art techniques from fault-tolerant literature. Results in performing fault-diagnosis and fault accomodation are presented using real data....

  2. Fuzzylot: a novel self-organising fuzzy-neural rule-based pilot system for automated vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquier, M; Quek, C; Toh, M

    2001-10-01

    This paper presents part of our research work concerned with the realisation of an Intelligent Vehicle and the technologies required for its routing, navigation, and control. An automated driver prototype has been developed using a self-organising fuzzy rule-based system (POPFNN-CRI(S)) to model and subsequently emulate human driving expertise. The ability of fuzzy logic to represent vague information using linguistic variables makes it a powerful tool to develop rule-based control systems when an exact working model is not available, as is the case of any vehicle-driving task. Designing a fuzzy system, however, is a complex endeavour, due to the need to define the variables and their associated fuzzy sets, and determine a suitable rule base. Many efforts have thus been devoted to automating this process, yielding the development of learning and optimisation techniques. One of them is the family of POP-FNNs, or Pseudo-Outer Product Fuzzy Neural Networks (TVR, AARS(S), AARS(NS), CRI, Yager). These generic self-organising neural networks developed at the Intelligent Systems Laboratory (ISL/NTU) are based on formal fuzzy mathematical theory and are able to objectively extract a fuzzy rule base from training data. In this application, a driving simulator has been developed, that integrates a detailed model of the car dynamics, complete with engine characteristics and environmental parameters, and an OpenGL-based 3D-simulation interface coupled with driving wheel and accelerator/ brake pedals. The simulator has been used on various road scenarios to record from a human pilot driving data consisting of steering and speed control actions associated to road features. Specifically, the POPFNN-CRI(S) system is used to cluster the data and extract a fuzzy rule base modelling the human driving behaviour. Finally, the effectiveness of the generated rule base has been validated using the simulator in autopilot mode.

  3. Exploring the use of automated vehicles as last mile connection of train trips through an agent-based simulation model : An application to Delft, Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Homem de Almeida Correia, G.

    2017-01-01

    The last mile in a public transport trip is known to bring a large disutility for passengers, because the conventional transport modes for this stage of the trip can, in many cases, be rather slow, inflexible and not provide a seamless experience to passengers. Fully automated vehicles (AVs), that

  4. Modeling Real-Time Human-Automation Collaborative Scheduling of Unmanned Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Bundle Algorithm (CBBA), a decentralized, polynomial-time, market based protocol (Choi, et al., 2009). More details on the AS can be found in (Whitten...infonned consent to panicipate in this research study. Signature oflnvesligator Date Approved on 31-0CT-2012 - MIT JRB Protocol #: 1110005179- Expires on...presented at the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, Karlsruhe, Germany. Miller, C. (2004). Human-Computer Etiquette : Managing

  5. Human factors implications of vehicle automation: Current understanding and future directions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merat, N.; de Waard, Dick

    2014-01-01

    Advances in vehicle-based technology are currently progressing at an ever- increasing rate and innovations in this area are no longer restricted to Original Equipment Manufacturers or the automotive industry, with service providers such as Google and a number of research institutes in Europe and

  6. Parallel autonomy in automated vehicles : Safe motion generation with minimal intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwarting, Wilko; Alonso Mora, J.; Pauli, Liam; Karaman, Sertac; Rus, Daniela; Chen, I-Ming; Nakamura, Yoshihiko

    2017-01-01

    Current state-of-the-art vehicle safety systems, such as assistive braking or automatic lane following, are still only able to help in relatively simple driving situations. We introduce a Parallel Autonomy shared-control framework that produces safe trajectories based on human inputs even in much

  7. Consumer acceptance and travel behavior : impacts of automated vehicles : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    This study provides a glimpse into the not-too-distant future by asking people in the general population how they would respond to the availability of self-driving vehicles, which might be on Texas roadways within a few years. Some elements of the te...

  8. A Graphical User Interface (GUI) for Automated Classification of Bradley Fighting Vehicle Shock Absorbers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sincebaugh, Patrick

    1998-01-01

    .... We then explain the design and capabilities of the SSATS graphical user interface (GUI), which includes the integration of a neural network classification scheme. We finish by discussing recent results of utilizing the system to test and evaluate Bradley armored vehicle shock absorbers.

  9. VEDS-Automated system for inspection of vehicles and containers for explosives and other threats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gozani, T.; Liu, F.; Sivakumar, M.

    2004-01-01

    Many parts of national infrastructures around the world are very vulnerable to terrorist threats in the form of large vehicle bombs. The larger bomb, the larger is the damage and its extent. The number of containers and vehicles crossing land or sea ports of entry is huge. Tough the probability is low, any vehicle may contain a threat. Any system addressing these enormous security tasks should obviously be based on excellent human intelligence to focus the attention on a much smaller number of high-risk containers and vehicles. These containers must then be subjected to a thorough and reliable inspection for the threats.Viable security system must incorporate a credible and effective inspection to achieve its purposes. It should have high performance and be operationally acceptable. This means the system must possess high detection capabilities, low false positive rate, fast response and provide automatic decision eliminating the need for human interpretation. Ancore has developed a range of new inspection devices, which are highly suitable for the above tasks. All the systems are automatic, material specific, high performance for a wide range and type of threats. Some of them are also highly modular, and compact. Some of the systems are fixed, other are relocatable, or fully mobile. The presentation will discuss Ancore's VEDS (Vehicle Explosive Detection System) which detects bulk explosives (expandable also to radiological and nuclear threats)) in marine containers, trucks and cars. The compact and rugged nature of the VEDS sensor makes it suitable for many forms of conveyance: mobile (van mounted), portal, forklift mounted, or mounted on container unloading rig. The physics principles of the system and some recent applications and results will be presented

  10. Developing an automated database for monitoring ultrasound- and computed tomography-guided procedure complications and diagnostic yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itri, Jason N; Jones, Lisa P; Kim, Woojin; Boonn, William W; Kolansky, Ana S; Hilton, Susan; Zafar, Hanna M

    2014-04-01

    Monitoring complications and diagnostic yield for image-guided procedures is an important component of maintaining high quality patient care promoted by professional societies in radiology and accreditation organizations such as the American College of Radiology (ACR) and Joint Commission. These outcome metrics can be used as part of a comprehensive quality assurance/quality improvement program to reduce variation in clinical practice, provide opportunities to engage in practice quality improvement, and contribute to developing national benchmarks and standards. The purpose of this article is to describe the development and successful implementation of an automated web-based software application to monitor procedural outcomes for US- and CT-guided procedures in an academic radiology department. The open source tools PHP: Hypertext Preprocessor (PHP) and MySQL were used to extract relevant procedural information from the Radiology Information System (RIS), auto-populate the procedure log database, and develop a user interface that generates real-time reports of complication rates and diagnostic yield by site and by operator. Utilizing structured radiology report templates resulted in significantly improved accuracy of information auto-populated from radiology reports, as well as greater compliance with manual data entry. An automated web-based procedure log database is an effective tool to reliably track complication rates and diagnostic yield for US- and CT-guided procedures performed in a radiology department.

  11. Automating Vehicles by Deep Reinforcement Learning using Task Separation with Hill Climbing

    OpenAIRE

    Plessen, Mogens Graf

    2017-01-01

    Within the context of autonomous vehicles, classical model-based control methods suffer from the trade-off between model complexity and computational burden required for the online solution of expensive optimization or search problems at every short sampling time. These methods include sampling-based algorithms, lattice-based algorithms and algorithms based on model predictive control (MPC). Recently, end-to-end trained deep neural networks were proposed to map camera images directly to steer...

  12. DISTRIBUTED CONTROL ARCHITECTURE OF AN OMNI-DIRECTIONAL AUTONOMOUS GUIDED VEHICLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.S. Tlale

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    ENGLISH ABSTRACT: Omni-directionality is the ability of a mobile robot to move instantaneously in any direction. This paper describes the wheel and controller designs of a Mecanumwheeled, autonomous guided vehicle (AGV for reconfigurable manufacturing systems. Mecanum wheels use slip developed between rollers and surface, surface and ground, to achieve omni-directionality. An advantage of omni-directional robotic platforms is that they are capable of performing tasks in congested environments such as those found in factory workshops, narrow aisles, warehouses, etc. Controller Area Network (CAN is implemented as a distributed controller to control motion and navigation tasks of the developed robot. The design of the distributed controller is described and its performance analyzed. This increases the reliability and functionality of the mobile robot.

    AFRIKAANSE OPSOMMING: Die artikel beskryf wiel - en beheerontwerpe van ‘n veelrigting mobiele robot. Die robot is ‘n selfstandigbeheerde voertuig vir gebruik by vervaardigingstelsels met veranderbare konfigurasie. Die ontwerp van die robot en bypassende beheerstelsel word beskryf en ontleed teen die agterground van bewegings – en navigeertake. Die betroubaarheid en funksionering van die sisteem word beoordeel.

  13. Reference Tools for Data Processing, Office Automation, and Data Communications: An Introductory Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cupoli, Patricia Dymkar

    1981-01-01

    Provides an introduction to various reference sources which are useful in dealing with the areas of data processing, office automation, and communications technologies. A bibliography with vendor listings is included. (FM)

  14. An Automation Planning Primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paynter, Marion

    1988-01-01

    This brief planning guide for library automation incorporates needs assessment and evaluation of options to meet those needs. A bibliography of materials on automation planning and software reviews, library software directories, and library automation journals is included. (CLB)

  15. Electromagnetic support and/or guide system for levitating vehicles. Elektromagnetisches Trag- und/oder Fuehrungssystem fuer Schwebefahrzeuge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breitling, U; Simon, K

    1978-01-26

    The invention refers to an electromagnetic support and/or guide system for levitating vehicles (MAGLEV system). These levitating vehicles can move along tracks with at least one fixed branch-off. The parts of the system on the vehicle are arranged symmetrically to the vehicle's longitudinal axis above or below the vehicle body. There are 2 parallel rows of magnets provided for each longitudinal side of the vehicle, where only one magnet can act on the track outside the branch-off, and both magnets can act alternately on the track within the branch-off. The purpose of the invention is to develop such a system so that interference forces on the core parts are avoided. According to the invention this is achieved by the first row of each parallel longitudinal row of electromagnets and the armature rails allocated to the first row having a different pole spacing from the second row of electromagnets of the parallel row concerned and the armature rails of the associated second row.

  16. Real-time Accurate Surface Reconstruction Pipeline for Vision Guided Planetary Exploration Using Unmanned Ground and Aerial Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Eduardo DeBrito

    2012-01-01

    This report discusses work completed over the summer at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), California Institute of Technology. A system is presented to guide ground or aerial unmanned robots using computer vision. The system performs accurate camera calibration, camera pose refinement and surface extraction from images collected by a camera mounted on the vehicle. The application motivating the research is planetary exploration and the vehicles are typically rovers or unmanned aerial vehicles. The information extracted from imagery is used primarily for navigation, as robot location is the same as the camera location and the surfaces represent the terrain that rovers traverse. The processed information must be very accurate and acquired very fast in order to be useful in practice. The main challenge being addressed by this project is to achieve high estimation accuracy and high computation speed simultaneously, a difficult task due to many technical reasons.

  17. Technology updates from the OEMs (tires, rims, automation inflation systems, and alternative fuels for heavy vehicles)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, N. [Charonic Canada Inc., Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2001-07-01

    This power point presentation outlined a project at Charonic Canada Inc., which demonstrated and evaluated innovations in the areas of vehicle safety, operating economy and diesel fuel substitution. It also presented a range of results that demonstrate some of the trends that may be used on vehicles, particularly trucks, in the near future. The demonstration involved a 2 year observation of a five truck fleet hauling refuse from Toronto to Michigan. The trucks completed 2,500 round trips of 540 miles and used 115 tonnes of natural gas fuel replacing diesel fuel. Safety innovations included tire pressure monitoring, hazard locator radar system, anti-spray system, wheel nut and bearing temperature indicators and brake safe indicators. These features were reported as being worthwhile investments. Economy innovations included a dual-fuel engine system, wide base tires, light weight CNG tanks, centrifugal oil cleaner and an oil and lubrication system. Although the technology continues to improve, the dual-engine system requires further work. Difficulties were encountered when trying to meet performance, fuel economy and emission targets at the same time. 18 figs.

  18. Automated guidance algorithms for a space station-based crew escape vehicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanary, R; Hammen, D G; Ito, D; Rabalais, B W; Rishikof, B H; Siebold, K H

    2003-04-01

    An escape vehicle was designed to provide an emergency evacuation for crew members living on a space station. For maximum escape capability, the escape vehicle needs to have the ability to safely evacuate a station in a contingency scenario such as an uncontrolled (e.g., tumbling) station. This emergency escape sequence will typically be divided into three events: The first separation event (SEP1), the navigation reconstruction event, and the second separation event (SEP2). SEP1 is responsible for taking the spacecraft from its docking port to a distance greater than the maximum radius of the rotating station. The navigation reconstruction event takes place prior to the SEP2 event and establishes the orbital state to within the tolerance limits necessary for SEP2. The SEP2 event calculates and performs an avoidance burn to prevent station recontact during the next several orbits. This paper presents the tools and results for the whole separation sequence with an emphasis on the two separation events. The first challenge includes collision avoidance during the escape sequence while the station is in an uncontrolled rotational state, with rotation rates of up to 2 degrees per second. The task of avoiding a collision may require the use of the Vehicle's de-orbit propulsion system for maximum thrust and minimum dwell time within the vicinity of the station vicinity. The thrust of the propulsion system is in a single direction, and can be controlled only by the attitude of the spacecraft. Escape algorithms based on a look-up table or analytical guidance can be implemented since the rotation rate and the angular momentum vector can be sensed onboard and a-priori knowledge of the position and relative orientation are available. In addition, crew intervention has been provided for in the event of unforeseen obstacles in the escape path. The purpose of the SEP2 burn is to avoid re-contact with the station over an extended period of time. Performing this maneuver requires

  19. A fascinating country in the world of computing your guide to automated reasoning

    CERN Document Server

    Wos, Larry

    1999-01-01

    This book shows you - through examples and puzzles and intriguing questions - how to make your computer reason logically. To help you, the book includes a CD-ROM with OTTER, the world's most powerful general-purpose reasoning program. The automation of reasoning has advanced markedly in the past few decades, and this book discusses some of the remarkable successes that automated reasoning programs have had in tackling challenging problems in mathematics, logic, program verification, and circuit design. Because the intended audience includes students and teachers, the book provides many exercis

  20. Exploring the use of automated vehicles as last mile connection of train trips through an agent-based simulation model: An application to Delft, Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur Scheltes

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The last mile in a public transport trip is known to bring a large disutility for passengers, because the conventional transport modes for this stage of the trip can, in many cases, be rather slow, inflexible and not provide a seamless experience to passengers. Fully automated vehicles (AVs, that is, those which do not need a driver, could act as a first mile/last mile connection to mass public transport modes. In this paper, we study a system that we call Automated Last-Mile Transport (ALMT, which consists of a fleet of small, fully automated, electric vehicles to improve the last mile performance of a trip done in a train. An agent-based simulation model was proposed for the ALMT whereby a dispatching algorithm distributes travel requests amongst the available vehicles using a FIFO sequence and selects a vehicle based on a set of specified control conditions (e.g. travel time to reach a requesting passenger. The model was applied to the case-study of the connection between the train station Delft Zuid and the Technological Innovation Campus (Delft, The Netherlands in order to test the methodology and understand the performance of the system in function of several operational parameters and demand scenarios. The most important conclusion from the baseline scenario was that the ALMT system was only able to compete with the walking mode and that additional measures were needed to increase the performance of the ALMT system in order to be competitive with cycling. Relocating empty vehicles or allowing pre-booking of vehicles led to a significant reduction in average waiting time, whilst allowing passengers to drive at a higher speed led to a large reduction in average travel time, whilst simultaneously reducing system capacity as energy use is increased.

  1. Comparing the Effects of Vehicle Automation, Policy-Making and Changed User Preferences on the Uptake of Electric Cars and Emissions from Transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Mazur

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Switching energy demand for transport from liquid fuels to electricity is the most promising way to significantly improve air quality and reduce transport emissions. Previous studies have shown this is possible, that by 2035 the economics of alternative powertrain and energy vectors will have converged. However, they do not address whether the transition is likely or plausible. Using the UK as a case study, we present a systems dynamics model based study informed by transition theory and explore the effects of technology progress, policy-making, user preferences and; for the first time, automated vehicles on this transition. We are not trying to predict the future but to highlight what is necessary in order for different scenarios to become more or less likely. Worryingly we show that current policies with the expected technology progress and expectations of vehicle buyers are insufficient to reach global targets. Faster technology progress, strong financial incentives or a change in vehicle buyer expectations are crucial but still insufficient. In contrast, the biggest switch to alternatively fuelled vehicles could be achieved by the introduction of automated vehicles. The implications will affect policy makers, automotive manufactures, technology developers and broader society.

  2. Fluoroscopically guided automated gun biopsy of chest lesions: diagnostic accuracy and complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Hee Sul; Han, Young Min; Choi, Ki Chul and others

    1998-01-01

    To determine the diagnostic accuracy and frequency of complications of fluoroscopyguided transthoracic needle biopsy, using an automated gun biopsy system. We retrospectively reviewed 86 patients who underwent automated gun biopsy between October 1995 and October 1996. An 18-gauge cutting needle was used in all cases. All biopsies were performed under fluoroscopic guidance by one interventional radiologist. Tissue sufficient for histologic diagnosis was obtained in 73 of 86 biopsies(84.9%). Fifty-six lesions were malignent and 30 were benign. Sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy for malignant lesions were 87.5% and 87.5%, respectively while cell type specificity in malignant diagnosis was 91.7%(11/12). Sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy for benign lesions were 80.0% and 73.3%, respectively. Postbioptic pneumothorax occurred in three of 86 biopsies(3.5%), one of which required placement of a chest tube. Automated gun biopsy is a simple, safe method for the diagnosis of focal chest lesions. An automated biopsy device offers high diagnostic accuracy in casis involving malignant and benign lesions of the chest, and is particularly useful for determining malignant cell type and specific diagnosis of benign lesions.=20

  3. Automation of vibroacoustic data bank for random vibration criteria development. [for the space shuttle and launch vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferebee, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    A computerized data bank system was developed for utilization of large amounts of vibration and acoustic data to formulate component random vibration design and test criteria. This system consists of a computer, graphics tablet, and a dry-silver hard copier which are all desk-top type hardware and occupy minimal space. The data bank contains data from the Saturn V and Titan III flight and static test programs. The vibration and acoustic data are stored in the form of power spectral density and one-third octave band plots over the frequency range from 20 to 2000 Hz. The data was stored by digitizing each spectral plot by tracing with the graphics tablet. The digitized data was statistically analyzed and the resulting 97.5% probability levels were stored on tape along with the appropriate structural parameters. Standard extrapolation procedures were programmed for prediction of component random vibration test criteria for new launch vehicle and payload configurations. This automated vibroacoustic data bank system greatly enhances the speed and accuracy of formulating vibration test criteria. In the future, the data bank will be expanded to include all data acquired from the space shuttle flight test program.

  4. Performance of an automated external defibrillator in a moving ambulance vehicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Jong Geun; Jeung, Kyung Woon; Lee, Byung Kook; Ryu, Hyun Ho; Lee, Hyoung Youn; Kim, Mu Jin; Heo, Tag; Min, Yong Il; You, Yeonho

    2010-04-01

    The available data suggest that automated external defibrillators (AED) can be safely used in vibration-like moving conditions such as rigid inflatable boats and aircraft environments. However, little literature exists examining their performance in a moving ambulance. The present study was undertaken to determine whether an AED is able to analyse the heart rhythm correctly during ambulance transport. An ambulance was driven on paved (20-100 km/h) and unpaved (10 km/h) roads. The performance of two AED devices (CU ER 2, CU Medical Systems Inc., Korea, and Heartstart MRx, Phillips, USA) was determined in a moving ambulance using manikins. Vibration intensity was measured simultaneously with a digital vibrometer. AED performance was then evaluated again on manikins and on a swine model under simulated vibration intensities (0.5-5m/s(2)) measured by the vibrometer in the previous phase of the investigation. The vibration intensity increased with increasing speeds on paved roads (1.98+/-0.44 m/s(2) at 100 km/h). While driving on unpaved roads, it increased to 6.40+/-1.06 m/s(2). Both AED algorithms analysed the heart rhythm correctly under resting state. When tested on pigs, both algorithms showed substantially degraded performances, even at low vibration intensities of 0.5-1m/s(2), which corresponded to vibration intensities while driving on paved roads at 20-60 km/h. This study also showed that electrocardiograms generated on manikins were more resistant to motion artifacts than were the pig electrocardiograms. Ambulance personnel should consider the possibility of misinterpretation by an AED when this device is used while transporting a patient. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Automated System Checkout to Support Predictive Maintenance for the Reusable Launch Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson-Hine, Ann; Deb, Somnath; Kulkarni, Deepak; Wang, Yao; Lau, Sonie (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The Propulsion Checkout and Control System (PCCS) is a predictive maintenance software system. The real-time checkout procedures and diagnostics are designed to detect components that need maintenance based on their condition, rather than using more conventional approaches such as scheduled or reliability centered maintenance. Predictive maintenance can reduce turn-around time and cost and increase safety as compared to conventional maintenance approaches. Real-time sensor validation, limit checking, statistical anomaly detection, and failure prediction based on simulation models are employed. Multi-signal models, useful for testability analysis during system design, are used during the operational phase to detect and isolate degraded or failed components. The TEAMS-RT real-time diagnostic engine was developed to utilize the multi-signal models by Qualtech Systems, Inc. Capability of predicting the maintenance condition was successfully demonstrated with a variety of data, from simulation to actual operation on the Integrated Propulsion Technology Demonstrator (IPTD) at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Playback of IPTD valve actuations for feature recognition updates identified an otherwise undetectable Main Propulsion System 12 inch prevalve degradation. The algorithms were loaded into the Propulsion Checkout and Control System for further development and are the first known application of predictive Integrated Vehicle Health Management to an operational cryogenic testbed. The software performed successfully in real-time, meeting the required performance goal of 1 second cycle time.

  6. Performance measurement evaluation framework and co-benefit / tradeoff analysis for connected and automated vehicles (CAV) applications : a survey : a research report from the National Center for Sustainable Transportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    A number of Connected and/or Automated Vehicle (CAV) applications have recently been designed to improve the performance of our transportation system. Safety, mobility and environmental sustainability are three cornerstone performance metrics when ev...

  7. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous renal biopsy with an automated biopsy gun in diffuse renal disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ji Yang; Moon, Jeoung Mi; Park, Ji Hyun; Kwon, Jae Soo; Song, Ik Hoon; Kim, Sung Rok

    1994-01-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness and clinical usefulness of percutaneous renal biopsy by using automated biopsy gun under the real-time ultrasonographic guidance that was performed in 17 patients with diffuse renal disease. We retrospectively analysed the histopathological diagnosis and the patients' status after percutaneous renal biopsy.Adequate amount of tissue for the histologic diagnosis could be obtained in al patients. Histopathologic diagnosis included the minimal change nephrotic syndrome in 6 patients, the membrano proliferative glomerulonephritis in 4,the membranous glomerulonephritis in 2, the glomerulosclerosis in 2, Ig A nephropathy in 2, and the normal finding in 1. Significant complication occurred in only one patient who developed a transient loss of sensation at and around the biopsy site. In conclusion, automated biopsy gun was a very useful device in performing percutaneous biopsy for diffuse renal disease with a high success rate and a low complication rate

  8. Investigation of Matlab® as Platform in Navigation and Control of an Automatic Guided Vehicle Utilising an Omnivision Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Kotze

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Automatic Guided Vehicles (AGVs are navigated utilising multiple types of sensors for detecting the environment. In this investigation such sensors are replaced and/or minimized by the use of a single omnidirectional camera picture stream. An area of interest is extracted, and by using image processing the vehicle is navigated on a set path. Reconfigurability is added to the route layout by signs incorporated in the navigation process. The result is the possible manipulation of a number of AGVs, each on its own designated colour-signed path. This route is reconfigurable by the operator with no programming alteration or intervention. A low resolution camera and a Matlab® software development platform are utilised. The use of Matlab® lends itself to speedy evaluation and implementation of image processing options on the AGV, but its functioning in such an environment needs to be assessed.

  9. Investigation of Matlab® as platform in navigation and control of an Automatic Guided Vehicle utilising an omnivision sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotze, Ben; Jordaan, Gerrit

    2014-08-25

    Automatic Guided Vehicles (AGVs) are navigated utilising multiple types of sensors for detecting the environment. In this investigation such sensors are replaced and/or minimized by the use of a single omnidirectional camera picture stream. An area of interest is extracted, and by using image processing the vehicle is navigated on a set path. Reconfigurability is added to the route layout by signs incorporated in the navigation process. The result is the possible manipulation of a number of AGVs, each on its own designated colour-signed path. This route is reconfigurable by the operator with no programming alteration or intervention. A low resolution camera and a Matlab® software development platform are utilised. The use of Matlab® lends itself to speedy evaluation and implementation of image processing options on the AGV, but its functioning in such an environment needs to be assessed.

  10. Task Analysis and Descriptions of Required Job Competencies for Robotics/Automated Systems Technicians. Final Report. Volume 2. Curriculum Planning Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Daniel M.; Lovett, James E.

    This volume of the final report for the Robotics/Automated Systems Technician (RAST) curriculum project is a curriculum planning guide intended for school administrators, faculty, and student counselors/advisors. It includes step-by-step procedures to help institutions evaluate their community's needs and their capabilities to meet these needs in…

  11. Automated tru-cut imaging-guided core needle biopsy of canine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of imaging-guided core needle biopsy for canine orbital mass diagnosis. A second excisional biopsy obtained during surgery or necropsy was used as the reference standard. A prospective feasibility study was conducted in 23 canine orbital masses at a single ...

  12. An engineer's guide to automated testing of high-speed interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Moreira, Jose

    2010-01-01

    Providing a complete introduction to the state-of-the-art in high-speed digital testing with automated test equipment (ATE), this practical resource is the first book focus exclusively on this increasingly important topic. Featuring clear examples, this one-stop reference covers all critical aspects of the subject, from high-speed digital basics, ATE instrumentation for digital applications, and test and measurements, to production testing, support instrumentation and text fixture design. This in-depth volume also discusses at advanced ATE topics, such as multiplexing of ATE pin channels and t

  13. Driver Psychology during Automated Platooning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heikoop, D.D.

    2017-01-01

    With the rapid increase in vehicle automation technology, the call for understanding how humans behave while driving in an automated vehicle becomes more urgent. Vehicles that have automated systems such as Lane Keeping Assist (LKA) or Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC) not only support drivers in their

  14. Commercial vehicle fleet management and information systems. Technical memorandum 3 : ITS fleet management technology resource guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-05-01

    In todays increasingly competitive economic environment, effective management of commercial vehicle fleets is important for all types of carriers and for the trucking industry as a whole. To meet fleet management needs, carriers increasingly are t...

  15. Comparison of needles size in pediatric renal biopsy with sono-guided percutaneous-automated gun technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Chul; Park, Jin Yong

    1997-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of a 20-gauge and an 18-gauge needle in sono-guided percutaneous automated gun biopsy for establishing the specific diagnosis of renal parenchymal disease in pediatric kidneys. In 60 pediatric patients with renal parenchymal diseases, percutaneous sono-guided gun biopsy was performed by an experienced radiologist. In two groups of 30 patients, regardless of their age, two needle passes were performed, using alternately an 18-gauge or a 20-gauge biopsy needle. The core of renal tissue thus obtained was examined with light, immunofluorescent or electron microscopy by the renal pathologist. The mean number of intact glomeruli of whole tissue core per biopsy, as seen on the light microscopy, and post-bioptic complications were compared between the two different needle size groups. The number (mean±1 standard deviation) of glomeruli obtained per biopsy was 17±8 in the 18-gauge needle group, and 14±5 in the 20-gauge group. Between two groups, there was no major post-bioptic complication requiring specific treatment, nor a statistically significant difference in the frequency of minor complications. Even though more glomeruli were obtained with an 18-gauge needle, the number obtained with a 20-gauge needle also permitted adequate pathologic examination. Both an 18-gauge and a 20-gauge needle may thus be suitable for renal biopsy in pediatric patients

  16. Driver-centred vehicle automation: using network analysis for agent-based modelling of the driver in highly automated driving systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Victoria A; Stanton, Neville A

    2016-11-01

    To the average driver, the concept of automation in driving infers that they can become completely 'hands and feet free'. This is a common misconception, however, one that has been shown through the application of Network Analysis to new Cruise Assist technologies that may feature on our roads by 2020. Through the adoption of a Systems Theoretic approach, this paper introduces the concept of driver-initiated automation which reflects the role of the driver in highly automated driving systems. Using a combination of traditional task analysis and the application of quantitative network metrics, this agent-based modelling paper shows how the role of the driver remains an integral part of the driving system implicating the need for designers to ensure they are provided with the tools necessary to remain actively in-the-loop despite giving increasing opportunities to delegate their control to the automated subsystems. Practitioner Summary: This paper describes and analyses a driver-initiated command and control system of automation using representations afforded by task and social networks to understand how drivers remain actively involved in the task. A network analysis of different driver commands suggests that such a strategy does maintain the driver in the control loop.

  17. Planetary Mission Entry Vehicles Quick Reference Guide. Version 3.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Carol; Arcadi, Marla

    2006-01-01

    This is Version 3.0 of the planetary mission entry vehicle document. Three new missions, Re-entry F, Hayabusa, and ARD have been added to t he previously published edition (Version 2.1). In addition, the Huyge ns mission has been significantly updated and some Apollo data correc ted. Due to the changing nature of planetary vehicles during the desi gn, manufacture and mission phases, and to the variables involved in measurement and computation, please be aware that the data provided h erein cannot be guaranteed. Contact Carol Davies at cdavies@mail.arc. nasa.gov to correct or update the current data, or to suggest other missions.

  18. Sonographically guided core biopsy of the breast: comparison of 14-gauge automated gun and 11-gauge directional vacuum-assisted biopsy methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Nariya; Moon, Woo Kyung; Cha, Joo Hee

    2005-01-01

    To compare the outcomes of 14-gauge automated biopsy and 11-gauge vacuum-assisted biopsy for the sonographically guided core biopsies of breast lesions. We retrospectively reviewed all sonographically guided core biopsies performed from January 2002 to February 2004. The sonographically guided core biopsies were performed with using a 14-gauge automated gun on 562 breast lesions or with using an 11-gauge vacuum-assisted device on 417 lesions. The histologic findings were compared with the surgical, imaging and follow-up findings. The histologic underestimation rate, the repeat biopsy rate and the false negative rates were compared between the two groups. A repeat biopsy was performed on 49 benign lesions because of the core biopsy results of the high-risk lesions (n=24), the imaging-histologic discordance (n=5), and the imaging findings showing disease progression (n=20). The total underestimation rates, according to the biopsy device, were 55% (12/22) for the 14-gauge automated gun biopsies and 36% (8/22) for the 11-gauge vacuum-assisted device (ρ = 0.226). The atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) underestimation (i.e., atypical ductal hyperplasia at core biopsy and carcinoma at surgery) was 58% (7/12) for the 14-gauge automated gun biopsies and 20% (1/5) for the 11-gauge vacuum-assisted biopsies. The ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) underestimation rate (i.e., ductal carcinoma in situ upon core biopsy and invasive carcinoma found at surgery) was 50% (5/10) for the 14-gauge automated gun biopsies and 41% (7/17) for the 11-gauge vacuum-assisted biopsies. The repeat biopsy rates were 6% (33/562) for the 14-gauge automated gun biopsies and 3.5% (16/417) for the 11-gauge vacuum-assisted biopsies. Only 5 (0.5%) of the 979 core biopsies were believed to have missed the malignant lesions. The false-negative rate was 3% (4 of 128 cancers) for the 14-gauge automated gun biopsies and 1% (1 of 69 cancers) for the 11-gauge vacuum-assisted biopsies. The outcomes of the

  19. Cost minimisation analysis: kilovoltage imaging with automated repositioning versus electronic portal imaging in image-guided radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, S; Younie, S; Rolfo, A; Thomas, J; Siva, S; Fox, C; Kron, T; Phillips, D; Tai, K H; Foroudi, F

    2012-10-01

    To compare the treatment time and cost of prostate cancer fiducial marker image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) using orthogonal kilovoltage imaging (KVI) and automated couch shifts and orthogonal electronic portal imaging (EPI) and manual couch shifts. IGRT treatment delivery times were recorded automatically on either unit. Costing was calculated from real costs derived from the implementation of a new radiotherapy centre. To derive cost per minute for EPI and KVI units the total annual setting up and running costs were divided by the total annual working time. The cost per IGRT fraction was calculated by multiplying the cost per minute by the duration of treatment. A sensitivity analysis was conducted to test the robustness of our analysis. Treatment times without couch shift were compared. Time data were analysed for 8648 fractions, 6057 from KVI treatment and 2591 from EPI treatment from a total of 294 patients. The median time for KVI treatment was 6.0 min (interquartile range 5.1-7.4 min) and for EPI treatment it was 10.0 min (interquartile range 8.3-11.8 min) (P value time for EPI was 8.8 min and for KVI was 5.1 min. Treatment time is less on KVI units compared with EPI units. This is probably due to automation of couch shift and faster evaluation of imaging on KVI units. Annual running costs greatly outweigh initial setting up costs and therefore the cost per fraction was less with KVI, despite higher initial costs. The selection of appropriate IGRT equipment can make IGRT practical within radiotherapy departments. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Topographic attributes as a guide for automated detection or highlighting of geological features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viseur, Sophie; Le Men, Thibaud; Guglielmi, Yves

    2015-04-01

    Photogrammetry or LIDAR technology combined with photography allow geoscientists to obtain 3D high-resolution numerical representations of outcrops, generally termed as Digital Outcrop Models (DOM). For over a decade, these 3D numerical outcrops serve as support for precise and accurate interpretations of geological features such as fracture traces or plans, strata, facies mapping, etc. These interpretations have the benefit to be directly georeferenced and embedded into the 3D space. They are then easily integrated into GIS or geomodeler softwares for modelling in 3D the subsurface geological structures. However, numerical outcrops generally represent huge data sets that are heavy to manipulate and hence to interpret. This may be particularly tedious as soon as several scales of geological features must be investigated or as geological features are very dense and imbricated. Automated tools for interpreting geological features from DOMs would be then a significant help to process these kinds of data. Such technologies are commonly used for interpreting seismic or medical data. However, it may be noticed that even if many efforts have been devoted to easily and accurately acquire 3D topographic point clouds and photos and to visualize accurate 3D textured DOMs, few attentions have been paid to the development of algorithms for automated detection of the geological structures from DOMs. The automatic detection of objects on numerical data generally assumes that signals or attributes computed from this data allows the recognition of the targeted object boundaries. The first step consists then in defining attributes that highlight the objects or their boundaries. For DOM interpretations, some authors proposed to use differential operators computed on the surface such as normal or curvatures. These methods generally extract polylines corresponding to fracture traces or bed limits. Other approaches rely on the PCA technology to segregate different topographic plans

  1. Commercial-vehicle enforcement: a guide for law-enforcement managers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of the document is to provide a resource for law enforcement agencies to evaluate their programs, and to promote the uniform application of concepts already shown to be effective in other jurisdictions, which identify and address commercial-vehicle traffic safety needs

  2. 75 FR 13809 - Reclassification of Motorcycles (Two and Three Wheeled Vehicles) in the Guide to Reporting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-23

    ... Taxation, page 3-2. Item I.E.2. Motorcycles: This item includes two-wheeled and three-wheeled motorcycles... FHWA from their motor vehicle registration systems. As a result, such data is based on the definitions... bicycles. \\4\\ American National Standards Institute, http://webstore.ansi.org/?source=google&adgroup=ansi...

  3. TH-AB-BRA-02: Automated Triplet Beam Orientation Optimization for MRI-Guided Co-60 Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, D; Thomas, D; Cao, M; O’Connor, D; Lamb, J; Sheng, K

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: MRI guided Co-60 provides daily and intrafractional MRI soft tissue imaging for improved target tracking and adaptive radiotherapy. To remedy the low output limitation, the system uses three Co-60 sources at 120° apart, but using all three sources in planning is considerably unintuitive. We automate the beam orientation optimization using column generation, and then solve a novel fluence map optimization (FMO) problem while regularizing the number of MLC segments. Methods: Three patients—1 prostate (PRT), 1 lung (LNG), and 1 head-and-neck boost plan (H&NBoost)—were evaluated. The beamlet dose for 180 equally spaced coplanar beams under 0.35 T magnetic field was calculated using Monte Carlo. The 60 triplets were selected utilizing the column generation algorithm. The FMO problem was formulated using an L2-norm minimization with anisotropic total variation (TV) regularization term, which allows for control over the number of MLC segments. Our Fluence Regularized and Optimized Selection of Triplets (FROST) plans were compared against the clinical treatment plans (CLN) produced by an experienced dosimetrist. Results: The mean PTV D95, D98, and D99 differ by −0.02%, +0.12%, and +0.44% of the prescription dose between planning methods, showing same PTV dose coverage. The mean PTV homogeneity (D95/D5) was at 0.9360 (FROST) and 0.9356 (CLN). R50 decreased by 0.07 with FROST. On average, FROST reduced Dmax and Dmean of OARs by 6.56% and 5.86% of the prescription dose. The manual CLN planning required iterative trial and error runs which is very time consuming, while FROST required minimal human intervention. Conclusions: MRI guided Co-60 therapy needs the output of all sources yet suffers from unintuitive and laborious manual beam selection processes. Automated triplet orientation optimization is shown essential to overcome the difficulty and improves the dosimetry. A novel FMO with regularization provides additional controls over the number of MLC segments

  4. TH-AB-BRA-02: Automated Triplet Beam Orientation Optimization for MRI-Guided Co-60 Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, D; Thomas, D; Cao, M; O’Connor, D; Lamb, J; Sheng, K [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: MRI guided Co-60 provides daily and intrafractional MRI soft tissue imaging for improved target tracking and adaptive radiotherapy. To remedy the low output limitation, the system uses three Co-60 sources at 120° apart, but using all three sources in planning is considerably unintuitive. We automate the beam orientation optimization using column generation, and then solve a novel fluence map optimization (FMO) problem while regularizing the number of MLC segments. Methods: Three patients—1 prostate (PRT), 1 lung (LNG), and 1 head-and-neck boost plan (H&NBoost)—were evaluated. The beamlet dose for 180 equally spaced coplanar beams under 0.35 T magnetic field was calculated using Monte Carlo. The 60 triplets were selected utilizing the column generation algorithm. The FMO problem was formulated using an L2-norm minimization with anisotropic total variation (TV) regularization term, which allows for control over the number of MLC segments. Our Fluence Regularized and Optimized Selection of Triplets (FROST) plans were compared against the clinical treatment plans (CLN) produced by an experienced dosimetrist. Results: The mean PTV D95, D98, and D99 differ by −0.02%, +0.12%, and +0.44% of the prescription dose between planning methods, showing same PTV dose coverage. The mean PTV homogeneity (D95/D5) was at 0.9360 (FROST) and 0.9356 (CLN). R50 decreased by 0.07 with FROST. On average, FROST reduced Dmax and Dmean of OARs by 6.56% and 5.86% of the prescription dose. The manual CLN planning required iterative trial and error runs which is very time consuming, while FROST required minimal human intervention. Conclusions: MRI guided Co-60 therapy needs the output of all sources yet suffers from unintuitive and laborious manual beam selection processes. Automated triplet orientation optimization is shown essential to overcome the difficulty and improves the dosimetry. A novel FMO with regularization provides additional controls over the number of MLC segments

  5. CT-guided biopsy of pulmonary lesions : a comparison of diagnostic accuracy and complication rate between automated gun biopsy and fine needle aspiration biopsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Keon Woo; Kang, Duk Sik

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the efficacy and safety of CT-guided automated gun biopsy with those of fine needle aspiration biopsy of pulmonary lesions. Under CT guidance, we performed automated gu biopsies in 115 cases of 109 patients and fine needle aspiration biopsies in 119 cases of 108 patients with pulmonary lesions. Between the two methods, we compared the diagnostic rate, diagnostic accuracy and frequency of compilations according to the depth and diameter of pulmonary lesions. The overall diagnostic rates of automated gun biopsy and fine needle aspiration biopsy were 76.5 % (88/115) and 64.7 % (77/119) respectively. There was a significant statistical difference (p=0.048), especially in the case of malignant lesions less than 3 cm (p=0.027) and more than 6 cm in maximal diameter (p=0.008), and in the lesions located from 1 cm to less than 3 cm from the pleural (p=0.030), as seen on CT. There was no significant statistical difference in the frequency of complications. Automated gun biopsy of pulmonary lesions under CT guidance is safe, with complications rate comparable to those of fine needle aspiration biopsy. A higher overall diagnostic rate can be achieved by automated gun biopsy than by fine needle aspiration biopsy. For the diagnosis of pulmonary lesions under CT guidance, automated gun biopsy is therefore a more useful procedure than fine needle aspiration biopsy. (author). 24 refs., 3 tabs

  6. Automated segmentation of dental CBCT image with prior-guided sequential random forests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Li; Gao, Yaozong; Shi, Feng; Li, Gang [Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-7513 (United States); Chen, Ken-Chung; Tang, Zhen [Surgical Planning Laboratory, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Xia, James J., E-mail: dgshen@med.unc.edu, E-mail: JXia@HoustonMethodist.org [Surgical Planning Laboratory, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department of Surgery (Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery), Weill Medical College, Cornell University, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Department of Oral and Craniomaxillofacial Surgery, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai Ninth People’s Hospital, Shanghai 200011 (China); Shen, Dinggang, E-mail: dgshen@med.unc.edu, E-mail: JXia@HoustonMethodist.org [Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-7513 and Department of Brain and Cognitive Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 02841 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an increasingly utilized imaging modality for the diagnosis and treatment planning of the patients with craniomaxillofacial (CMF) deformities. Accurate segmentation of CBCT image is an essential step to generate 3D models for the diagnosis and treatment planning of the patients with CMF deformities. However, due to the image artifacts caused by beam hardening, imaging noise, inhomogeneity, truncation, and maximal intercuspation, it is difficult to segment the CBCT. Methods: In this paper, the authors present a new automatic segmentation method to address these problems. Specifically, the authors first employ a majority voting method to estimate the initial segmentation probability maps of both mandible and maxilla based on multiple aligned expert-segmented CBCT images. These probability maps provide an important prior guidance for CBCT segmentation. The authors then extract both the appearance features from CBCTs and the context features from the initial probability maps to train the first-layer of random forest classifier that can select discriminative features for segmentation. Based on the first-layer of trained classifier, the probability maps are updated, which will be employed to further train the next layer of random forest classifier. By iteratively training the subsequent random forest classifier using both the original CBCT features and the updated segmentation probability maps, a sequence of classifiers can be derived for accurate segmentation of CBCT images. Results: Segmentation results on CBCTs of 30 subjects were both quantitatively and qualitatively validated based on manually labeled ground truth. The average Dice ratios of mandible and maxilla by the authors’ method were 0.94 and 0.91, respectively, which are significantly better than the state-of-the-art method based on sparse representation (p-value < 0.001). Conclusions: The authors have developed and validated a novel fully automated method

  7. Pep2Path: automated mass spectrometry-guided genome mining of peptidic natural products.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marnix H Medema

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Nonribosomally and ribosomally synthesized bioactive peptides constitute a source of molecules of great biomedical importance, including antibiotics such as penicillin, immunosuppressants such as cyclosporine, and cytostatics such as bleomycin. Recently, an innovative mass-spectrometry-based strategy, peptidogenomics, has been pioneered to effectively mine microbial strains for novel peptidic metabolites. Even though mass-spectrometric peptide detection can be performed quite fast, true high-throughput natural product discovery approaches have still been limited by the inability to rapidly match the identified tandem mass spectra to the gene clusters responsible for the biosynthesis of the corresponding compounds. With Pep2Path, we introduce a software package to fully automate the peptidogenomics approach through the rapid Bayesian probabilistic matching of mass spectra to their corresponding biosynthetic gene clusters. Detailed benchmarking of the method shows that the approach is powerful enough to correctly identify gene clusters even in data sets that consist of hundreds of genomes, which also makes it possible to match compounds from unsequenced organisms to closely related biosynthetic gene clusters in other genomes. Applying Pep2Path to a data set of compounds without known biosynthesis routes, we were able to identify candidate gene clusters for the biosynthesis of five important compounds. Notably, one of these clusters was detected in a genome from a different subphylum of Proteobacteria than that in which the molecule had first been identified. All in all, our approach paves the way towards high-throughput discovery of novel peptidic natural products. Pep2Path is freely available from http://pep2path.sourceforge.net/, implemented in Python, licensed under the GNU General Public License v3 and supported on MS Windows, Linux and Mac OS X.

  8. Automated segmentation of dental CBCT image with prior-guided sequential random forests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Li; Gao, Yaozong; Shi, Feng; Li, Gang; Chen, Ken-Chung; Tang, Zhen; Xia, James J.; Shen, Dinggang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an increasingly utilized imaging modality for the diagnosis and treatment planning of the patients with craniomaxillofacial (CMF) deformities. Accurate segmentation of CBCT image is an essential step to generate 3D models for the diagnosis and treatment planning of the patients with CMF deformities. However, due to the image artifacts caused by beam hardening, imaging noise, inhomogeneity, truncation, and maximal intercuspation, it is difficult to segment the CBCT. Methods: In this paper, the authors present a new automatic segmentation method to address these problems. Specifically, the authors first employ a majority voting method to estimate the initial segmentation probability maps of both mandible and maxilla based on multiple aligned expert-segmented CBCT images. These probability maps provide an important prior guidance for CBCT segmentation. The authors then extract both the appearance features from CBCTs and the context features from the initial probability maps to train the first-layer of random forest classifier that can select discriminative features for segmentation. Based on the first-layer of trained classifier, the probability maps are updated, which will be employed to further train the next layer of random forest classifier. By iteratively training the subsequent random forest classifier using both the original CBCT features and the updated segmentation probability maps, a sequence of classifiers can be derived for accurate segmentation of CBCT images. Results: Segmentation results on CBCTs of 30 subjects were both quantitatively and qualitatively validated based on manually labeled ground truth. The average Dice ratios of mandible and maxilla by the authors’ method were 0.94 and 0.91, respectively, which are significantly better than the state-of-the-art method based on sparse representation (p-value < 0.001). Conclusions: The authors have developed and validated a novel fully automated method

  9. Different Control Algorithms for a Platoon of Autonomous Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoran Gacovski

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a concept of platoon movement of autonomous vehicles (smart cars. These vehicles have Adaptive or Advanced cruise control (ACC system also called Intelligent cruise control (ICC or Adaptive Intelligent cruise control (AICC system. The vehicles are suitable to follow other vehicles on desired distance and to be organized in platoons. To perform a research on the control and stability of an AGV (Automated Guided Vehicles string, we have developed a car-following model. To do this, first a single vehicle is modeled and since all cars in the platoon have the same dynamics, the single vehicle model is copied ten times to form model of platoon (string with ten vehicles. To control this string, we have applied equal PID controllers to all vehicles, except the leading vehicle. These controllers try to keep the headway distance as constant as possible and the velocity error between subsequent vehicles - small. For control of vehicle with nonlinear dynamics combi­nation of feedforward control and feedback control approach is used. Feedforward control is based on the inverse model of nominal dynamics of the vehicle, and feedback PID control is designed based on the linearized model of the vehicle. For simulation and analysis of vehicle and platoon of vehicles – we have developed Matlab/Simulink models. Simulation results, discussions and conclusions are given at the end of the paper.

  10. Control of a self guided tracked vehicle for hazardous waste removal using GPS positioning and ultrasonic collision avoidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, B.; Lokhorst, D.; Fung, P.; Rice, P.

    1996-01-01

    In 1994 a large hydraulic telerobotic tracked transport vehicle (TTV) was built for Lockheed Idaho Technologies by a team of companies consisting of RAHCO International of Spokane, Spar Aerospace of Toronto and RSI Research of Victoria. The TTV was developed as a part of the Department of Energy's Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Program to transport low level transuranic waste in a safe, dust-free manner minimizing the potential spread of airborne contaminants. The TTV was controlled from a remote control station by an operator relying on video and sensor feedback. This paper describes the control system of SGTV, a self guided version of the TTV developed in 1995 to travel autonomously between loading and off-loading points while automatically avoiding obstacles in its path. Self-guidance is divided between a supervisory Mission Planning and Control computer (WC) and an on-board system of five networked computers

  11. A Clonal Selection Algorithm for Minimizing Distance Travel and Back Tracking of Automatic Guided Vehicles in Flexible Manufacturing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Viveak Kumar; Chanda, Arindam Kumar; Angra, Surjit

    2018-03-01

    The flexible manufacturing system (FMS) constitute of several programmable production work centers, material handling systems (MHSs), assembly stations and automatic storage and retrieval systems. In FMS, the automatic guided vehicles (AGVs) play a vital role in material handling operations and enhance the performance of the FMS in its overall operations. To achieve low makespan and high throughput yield in the FMS operations, it is highly imperative to integrate the production work centers schedules with the AGVs schedules. The Production schedule for work centers is generated by application of the Giffler and Thompson algorithm under four kind of priority hybrid dispatching rules. Then the clonal selection algorithm (CSA) is applied for the simultaneous scheduling to reduce backtracking as well as distance travel of AGVs within the FMS facility. The proposed procedure is computationally tested on the benchmark FMS configuration from the literature and findings from the investigations clearly indicates that the CSA yields best results in comparison of other applied methods from the literature.

  12. Papillary lesions of the breast: comparison of the US-guided 14-gauge automated gun method and the 11-gauge directional vacuum-assisted biopsy method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Eun Sook; Cho, Nariya; Yang, Sang Kyu; Kim, Do Youn; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2006-01-01

    The compare the outcomes of US-guided 14-gauge automated biopsy and 11-gauge vacuum-assisted biopsy for the papillary lesions of the breast. We retrospectively reviewed the US-guided core biopsies of 1,723 consecutive breast lesions that were treated from January 2003 to April 2005. Ninety-eight lesions (5.7%) were pathologically reported as papillary lesions. The biopsies were performed with using a 14-gauge automated gun on 65 lesions or with using an 11-gauge vacuum-assisted device on 33 lesions. Thirty-five lesions (54%, 35/65) of 14-gauge automated gun biopsies and 5 lesions (15%, 5/33) of 11-gauge vacuum-assisted biopsies underwent surgery. The histologic findings were compared with the surgical, imaging and follow-up findings. The histologic underestimation rate, the repeat biopsy rate and the false negative rate were compared between the two groups. The repeat biopsy rate was determined by dividing the total number of core biopsies into the number of repeat biopsies. 'ADH underestimation' was defined as a lesion yielding atypical ductal hyperplasia on percutaneous biopsy and carcinoma at surgery, and 'DCIS underestimation' was defined as a lesion yielding ductal carcinoma in situ on percutaneous biopsy and invasive carcinoma at surgery. The repeat biopsy rate was 42% (27/65) for the 14-gauge automated gun biopsies and 9.1% (3/33) for the 11-gauge vacuum-assisted biopsies. The ADH underestimation rate was 50% (7/14) for the 14-gauge automated gun biopsies and 0% (0/4) for the 11-gauge vacuum-assisted biopsies. The DCIS underestimation was 14% (1/7) for the 14-gauge automated gun biopsies and 0% (0/2) for the 11-gauge vacuum-assisted biopsies. The false negative rate was 0% for these two groups. For the papillary lesions of the breast, the outcomes of the US-guided core biopsies performed with the 11-gauge vacuum-assisted device were better than those of the biopsies performed with the 14-gauge automated gun, in terms of underestimation and repeat biopsy

  13. Drivers anticipate lead-vehicle conflicts during automated longitudinal control: Sensory cues capture driver attention and promote appropriate and timely responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morando, Alberto; Victor, Trent; Dozza, Marco

    2016-12-01

    Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC) has been shown to reduce the exposure to critical situations by maintaining a safe speed and headway. It has also been shown that drivers adapt their visual behavior in response to the driving task demand with ACC, anticipating an impending lead vehicle conflict by directing their eyes to the forward path before a situation becomes critical. The purpose of this paper is to identify the causes related to this anticipatory mechanism, by investigating drivers' visual behavior while driving with ACC when a potential critical situation is encountered, identified as a forward collision warning (FCW) onset (including false positive warnings). This paper discusses how sensory cues capture attention to the forward path in anticipation of the FCW onset. The analysis used the naturalistic database EuroFOT to examine visual behavior with respect to two manually-coded metrics, glance location and glance eccentricity, and then related the findings to vehicle data (such as speed, acceleration, and radar information). Three sensory cues (longitudinal deceleration, looming, and brake lights) were found to be relevant for capturing driver attention and increase glances to the forward path in anticipation of the threat; the deceleration cue seems to be dominant. The results also show that the FCW acts as an effective attention-orienting mechanism when no threat anticipation is present. These findings, relevant to the study of automation, provide additional information about drivers' response to potential lead-vehicle conflicts when longitudinal control is automated. Moreover, these results suggest that sensory cues are important for alerting drivers to an impending critical situation, allowing for a prompt reaction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Automated Patent Categorization and Guided Patent Search using IPC as Inspired by MeSH and PubMed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisinger, Daniel; Tsatsaronis, George; Bundschus, Markus; Wieneke, Ulrich; Schroeder, Michael

    2013-04-15

    Document search on PubMed, the pre-eminent database for biomedical literature, relies on the annotation of its documents with relevant terms from the Medical Subject Headings ontology (MeSH) for improving recall through query expansion. Patent documents are another important information source, though they are considerably less accessible. One option to expand patent search beyond pure keywords is the inclusion of classification information: Since every patent is assigned at least one class code, it should be possible for these assignments to be automatically used in a similar way as the MeSH annotations in PubMed. In order to develop a system for this task, it is necessary to have a good understanding of the properties of both classification systems. This report describes our comparative analysis of MeSH and the main patent classification system, the International Patent Classification (IPC). We investigate the hierarchical structures as well as the properties of the terms/classes respectively, and we compare the assignment of IPC codes to patents with the annotation of PubMed documents with MeSH terms.Our analysis shows a strong structural similarity of the hierarchies, but significant differences of terms and annotations. The low number of IPC class assignments and the lack of occurrences of class labels in patent texts imply that current patent search is severely limited. To overcome these limits, we evaluate a method for the automated assignment of additional classes to patent documents, and we propose a system for guided patent search based on the use of class co-occurrence information and external resources.

  15. Precision-guided vehicle for transport and installation of LHC cryomagnets

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    LHC quadrupoles and dipoles are heavier, longer and more fragile than the magnets used in CERN s former LEP collider. Therefore, an innovative solution for their transport and installation in the tunnel has been developed. It consists of convoys of two tractors, a trailer and unloading equipment. The convoys feature infrared optical guidance, which offsets the minimal clearance inside the tunnel, and are designed to minimize vibration of the magnets during transport. Operations will be monitored by a technician, who will take over the controls to unload and install the magnets. The first such convoy is now undergoing testing in the tunnel. The people who have contributed to the new transport system are pictured here at Point 4 in the LHC tunnel where tests on the first convoy are being conducted. The optical guidance system uses the white lines on the floor (Photos 01 and 03) to steer the vehicle in the tunnel. The prototype quadrupole magnet used in the tests is visible in Photos 02 and 04.

  16. Simulating the impacts of on-street vehicle parking on traffic operations on urban streets using cellular automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jingxu; Li, Zhibin; Jiang, Hang; Zhu, Senlai; Wang, Wei

    2017-02-01

    In recent years, many bicycle lanes on urban streets are replaced with vehicle parking places. Spaces for bicycle riding are reduced, resulting in changes in bicycle and vehicle operational features. The objective of this study is to estimate the impacts of on-street parking on heterogeneous traffic operation on urban streets. A cellular automaton (CA) model is developed and calibrated to simulate bicycle lane-changing on streets with on-street parking. Two types of street segments with different bicycle lane width are considered. From the simulation, two types of conflicts between bicycles and vehicles are identified which are frictional conflicts and blocking conflicts. Factors affecting the frequency of conflicts are also identified. Based on the results, vehicle delay is estimated for various traffic situations considering the range of occupancy levels for on-street parking. Later, a numerical network example is analyzed to estimate the network impact of on-street parking on traffic assignment and operation. Findings of the study are helpful to policies and design regarding on-street vehicle parking to improve the efficiency of traffic operations.

  17. Challenges and Opportunities for Transactive Control of Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment. A Reference Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Xin [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Meintz, Andrew [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-07-29

    This report seeks to characterize the opportunities and challenges that arise in developing a transactive control strategy for grid-EVSE integration in various use-case scenarios in a way that provides end-user, energy market, grid, and societal benefits. A detailed review provides information about EVSE integration market trends and stakeholder activities. This is followed by an exploration of value proposition for transactive control of EVSE at both the home scale and the building/campus scale. This report will serve as a reference guide for stakeholders in the grid-EVSE integration area, illustrate potential implementations, and identify a high-value research project for overcoming the barriers and unlocking the benefits of transactive controls of EVSE. While it is not intended to specify the technical details of the transactive control solution, the report contains a list of use cases describing potential applications of transactive control of EVSE, barriers to implementing these applications, and research and development (R&D) opportunities to overcome the barriers. The use cases of transactive control of EVSE are listed in Table ES1.

  18. Operation and evaluation of the Terminal Configured Vehicle Mission Simulator in an automated terminal area metering and spacing ATC environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houck, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes the work being done at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Langley Research Center on the development of a mission simulator for use in the Terminal Configured Vehicle Program. A brief description of the goals and objectives of the Terminal Configured Vehicle Program is presented. A more detailed description of the Mission Simulator, in its present configuration, and its components is provided. Finally, a description of the first research study conducted in the Mission Simulator is presented along with a discussion of some preliminary results from this study.

  19. Towards an Improved Pilot-Vehicle Interface for Highly Automated Aircraft: Evaluation of the Haptic Flight Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutte, Paul; Goodrich, Kenneth; Williams, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    The control automation and interaction paradigm (e.g., manual, autopilot, flight management system) used on virtually all large highly automated aircraft has long been an exemplar of breakdowns in human factors and human-centered design. An alternative paradigm is the Haptic Flight Control System (HFCS) that is part of NASA Langley Research Center s Naturalistic Flight Deck Concept. The HFCS uses only stick and throttle for easily and intuitively controlling the actual flight of the aircraft without losing any of the efficiency and operational benefits of the current paradigm. Initial prototypes of the HFCS are being evaluated and this paper describes one such evaluation. In this evaluation we examined claims regarding improved situation awareness, appropriate workload, graceful degradation, and improved pilot acceptance. Twenty-four instrument-rated pilots were instructed to plan and fly four different flights in a fictitious airspace using a moderate fidelity desktop simulation. Three different flight control paradigms were tested: Manual control, Full Automation control, and a simplified version of the HFCS. Dependent variables included both subjective (questionnaire) and objective (SAGAT) measures of situation awareness, workload (NASA-TLX), secondary task performance, time to recognize automation failures, and pilot preference (questionnaire). The results showed a statistically significant advantage for the HFCS in a number of measures. Results that were not statistically significant still favored the HFCS. The results suggest that the HFCS does offer an attractive and viable alternative to the tactical components of today s FMS/autopilot control system. The paper describes further studies that are planned to continue to evaluate the HFCS.

  20. An automated rendezvous and capture system design concept for the cargo transfer vehicle and Space Station Freedom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Ron; Marsh, Steven

    1991-01-01

    A rendezvous sensor system concept was developed for the cargo transfer vehicle (CTV) to autonomously rendezvous with and be captured by Space Station Freedom (SSF). The development of requirements, the design of a unique Lockheed developed sensor concept to meet these requirements, and the system design to place this sensor on the CTV and rendezvous with the SSF are described .

  1. Evaluation of a self-guided transport vehicle for remote transportation of transuranic and other hazardous waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rice, P.M.; Moody, S.J.; Peterson, R. [and others

    1997-04-01

    Between 1952 and 1970, over two million cubic ft of transuranic mixed waste was buried in shallow pits and trenches in the Subsurface Disposal Area at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory`s Radioactive Waste Management Complex. Commingled with this two million cubic ft of waste is up to 10 million cubic ft of fill soil. The pits and trenches were constructed similarly to municipal landfills with both stacked and random dump waste forms such as barrels and boxes. The main contaminants are micron-sized particles of plutonium and americium oxides, chlorides, and hydroxides. Retrieval, treatment, and disposal is one of the options being considered for the waste. This report describes the results of a field demonstration conducted to evaluate a technology for transporting exhumed transuranic wastes at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and at other hazardous or radioactive waste sites through the U.S. Department of Energy complex. The full-scale demonstration, conducted at the INEEL Robotics Center in the summer of 1995, evaluated equipment performance and techniques for remote transport of exhumed buried waste. The technology consisted of a Self-Guided Transport Vehicle designed to remotely convey retrieved waste from the retrieval digface and transport it to a receiving/processing area with minimal human intervention. Data were gathered and analyzed to evaluate performance parameters such as precision and accuracy of navigation and transportation rates.

  2. Evaluation of a self-guided transport vehicle for remote transportation of transuranic and other hazardous waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rice, P.M.; Moody, S.J.; Peterson, R.

    1997-04-01

    Between 1952 and 1970, over two million cubic ft of transuranic mixed waste was buried in shallow pits and trenches in the Subsurface Disposal Area at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory's Radioactive Waste Management Complex. Commingled with this two million cubic ft of waste is up to 10 million cubic ft of fill soil. The pits and trenches were constructed similarly to municipal landfills with both stacked and random dump waste forms such as barrels and boxes. The main contaminants are micron-sized particles of plutonium and americium oxides, chlorides, and hydroxides. Retrieval, treatment, and disposal is one of the options being considered for the waste. This report describes the results of a field demonstration conducted to evaluate a technology for transporting exhumed transuranic wastes at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and at other hazardous or radioactive waste sites through the U.S. Department of Energy complex. The full-scale demonstration, conducted at the INEEL Robotics Center in the summer of 1995, evaluated equipment performance and techniques for remote transport of exhumed buried waste. The technology consisted of a Self-Guided Transport Vehicle designed to remotely convey retrieved waste from the retrieval digface and transport it to a receiving/processing area with minimal human intervention. Data were gathered and analyzed to evaluate performance parameters such as precision and accuracy of navigation and transportation rates

  3. Using simulation to design an automated underground system for transporting freight around Schiphol Airport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, Matthijs C.; van Harten, Aart; Ebben, Mark; Saanen, Y.A.; Valentin, E.C.; Verbraeck, A.

    2002-01-01

    To avoid road congestion, we are developing a highly automated underground transport system using automatic guided vehicles (AGVs) around Schiphol Airport. It is unique in its scale, incorporating 16 to 25 km tubes connecting five to 20 terminals, and it includes 200 to 400 AGVs to transport an

  4. Automating the Analysis of Spatial Grids A Practical Guide to Data Mining Geospatial Images for Human & Environmental Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Lakshmanan, Valliappa

    2012-01-01

    The ability to create automated algorithms to process gridded spatial data is increasingly important as remotely sensed datasets increase in volume and frequency. Whether in business, social science, ecology, meteorology or urban planning, the ability to create automated applications to analyze and detect patterns in geospatial data is increasingly important. This book provides students with a foundation in topics of digital image processing and data mining as applied to geospatial datasets. The aim is for readers to be able to devise and implement automated techniques to extract information from spatial grids such as radar, satellite or high-resolution survey imagery.

  5. Automated Real-Time Needle-Guide Tracking for Fast 3-T MR-guided Transrectal Prostate Biopsy: A Feasibility Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zamecnik, P.; Schouten, M.G.; Krafft, A.J.; Maier, F.; Schlemmer, H.-P.; Barentsz, J.O.; Bock, M. de; Futterer, J.J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess the feasibility of automatic needle-guide tracking by using a real-time phase-only cross correlation (POCC) algorithm-based sequence for transrectal 3-T in-bore magnetic resonance (MR)-guided prostate biopsies. Materials and Methods This study was approved by the ethics review

  6. Age differences in the takeover of vehicle control and engagement in non-driving-related activities in simulated driving with conditional automation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Hallie; Feng, Jing

    2017-09-01

    High-level vehicle automation has been proposed as a valuable means to enhance the mobility of older drivers, as older drivers experience age-related declines in many cognitive functions that are vital for safe driving. Recent research attempted to examine age differences in how engagement in non-driving-related activities impact driving performance, by instructing drivers to engage in mandatory pre-designed activities. While the mandatory engagement method allows a precise control of the timing and mental workload of the non-driving-related activities, it is different from how a driver would naturally engage in these activities. This study allowed younger (age 18-35, mean age=19.9years) and older drivers (age 62-81, mean age=70.4years) to freely decide when and how to engage in voluntarily chosen non-driving-related activities during simulated driving with conditional automation. We coded video recordings of participants' engagement in non-driving-related activities. We examined the effect of age, level of activity-engagement and takeover notification interval on vehicle control performance during the takeover, by comparing between the high and low engagement groups in younger and older drivers, across two takeover notification interval conditions. We found that both younger and older drivers engaged in various non-driving-related activities during the automated driving portion, with distinct preferences on the type of activity for each age group (i.e., while younger drivers mostly used an electronic device, older drivers tended to converse). There were also significant differences between the two age groups and between the two notification intervals on various driving performance measures. Older drivers benefited more than younger drivers from the longer interval in terms of response time to notifications. Voluntary engagement in non-driving-related activities did not impair takeover performance in general, although there was a trend of older drivers who were

  7. Accuracy of automated software-guided detection of significant coronary artery stenosis by CT angiography: comparison with invasive catheterisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anders, Katharina; Uder, Michael; Achenbach, Stephan; Petit, Isabel; Daniel, Werner G.; Pflederer, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    True automated detection of coronary artery stenoses might be useful whenever expert evaluation is not available, or as a ''second reader'' to enhance diagnostic confidence. We evaluated the accuracy of a PC-based stenosis detection tool alone and combined with expert interpretation. One hundred coronary CT angiography datasets were evaluated with the automated software alone, by manual interpretation (axial images, multiplanar reformations and maximum intensity projections in free double-oblique planes), and by expert interpretation aware of the automated findings. Stenoses ≥ 50 % were noted per-vessel and per-patient, and compared with invasive angiography. Automated post-processing was successful in 90 % of patients (88 % of vessels). When excluding uninterpretable datasets, per-patient sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were 89 %, 79 %, 74 % and 92 % (per-vessel: 82 %, 85 %, 48 % and 96 %). All 100 datasets were evaluable by expert interpretation. Per-patient sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV were 95 %, 95 %, 93 % and 97 % (per-vessel: 89 %,98 %, 88 % and 98 %). Knowing the results of automated interpretation did not improve the performance of expert readers. Automated off-line post-processing of coronary CT angiography shows adequate sensitivity, but relatively low specificity in coronary stenosis detection. It does not increase accuracy of expert interpretation. Failure of post-processing in 10 % of all patients necessitates additional manual image work-up. (orig.)

  8. A Human-Automation Interface Model to Guide Automation Design of System Functions: A Way to Achieve Manning Goals in New Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-12-01

    Manual (Army) FoS Family of Systems FRMV FCS Recovery and Maintenance Vehicle GDLS General Dynamics Land Systems HFE Human Factors Engineering...Thanks goes to our CRADA partners at BAE Systems (formerly UDLP) in Santa Clara, CA. Jeff Powers, Doug Neil, Gene Brennan, and Ron Natividad were eager...above in the HFE implications, MWL can be modeled during system design to assess if it is reasonable throughout system functional flow. Besides

  9. National Space Science Data Center data archive and distribution service (NDADS) automated retrieval mail system user's guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Charleen M.; Vansteenberg, Michael E.

    1992-01-01

    The National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) has developed an automated data retrieval request service utilizing our Data Archive and Distribution Service (NDADS) computer system. NDADS currently has selected project data written to optical disk platters with the disks residing in a robotic 'jukebox' near-line environment. This allows for rapid and automated access to the data with no staff intervention required. There are also automated help information and user services available that can be accessed. The request system permits an average-size data request to be completed within minutes of the request being sent to NSSDC. A mail message, in the format described in this document, retrieves the data and can send it to a remote site. Also listed in this document are the data currently available.

  10. Automated Generation of Geo-Referenced Mosaics From Video Data Collected by Deep-Submergence Vehicles: Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhzanov, Y.; Beaulieu, S.; Soule, S. A.; Shank, T.; Fornari, D.; Mayer, L. A.

    2005-12-01

    Many advances in understanding geologic, tectonic, biologic, and sedimentologic processes in the deep ocean are facilitated by direct observation of the seafloor. However, making such observations is both difficult and expensive. Optical systems (e.g., video, still camera, or direct observation) will always be constrained by the severe attenuation of light in the deep ocean, limiting the field of view to distances that are typically less than 10 meters. Acoustic systems can 'see' much larger areas, but at the cost of spatial resolution. Ultimately, scientists want to study and observe deep-sea processes in the same way we do land-based phenomena so that the spatial distribution and juxtaposition of processes and features can be resolved. We have begun development of algorithms that will, in near real-time, generate mosaics from video collected by deep-submergence vehicles. Mosaics consist of >>10 video frames and can cover 100's of square-meters. This work builds on a publicly available still and video mosaicking software package developed by Rzhanov and Mayer. Here we present the results of initial tests of data collection methodologies (e.g., transects across the seafloor and panoramas across features of interest), algorithm application, and GIS integration conducted during a recent cruise to the Eastern Galapagos Spreading Center (0 deg N, 86 deg W). We have developed a GIS database for the region that will act as a means to access and display mosaics within a geospatially-referenced framework. We have constructed numerous mosaics using both video and still imagery and assessed the quality of the mosaics (including registration errors) under different lighting conditions and with different navigation procedures. We have begun to develop algorithms for efficient and timely mosaicking of collected video as well as integration with navigation data for georeferencing the mosaics. Initial results indicate that operators must be properly versed in the control of the

  11. An Automated Technique for Generating Georectified Mosaics from Ultra-High Resolution Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV Imagery, Based on Structure from Motion (SfM Point Clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Watson

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs are an exciting new remote sensing tool capable of acquiring high resolution spatial data. Remote sensing with UAVs has the potential to provide imagery at an unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. The small footprint of UAV imagery, however, makes it necessary to develop automated techniques to geometrically rectify and mosaic the imagery such that larger areas can be monitored. In this paper, we present a technique for geometric correction and mosaicking of UAV photography using feature matching and Structure from Motion (SfM photogrammetric techniques. Images are processed to create three dimensional point clouds, initially in an arbitrary model space. The point clouds are transformed into a real-world coordinate system using either a direct georeferencing technique that uses estimated camera positions or via a Ground Control Point (GCP technique that uses automatically identified GCPs within the point cloud. The point cloud is then used to generate a Digital Terrain Model (DTM required for rectification of the images. Subsequent georeferenced images are then joined together to form a mosaic of the study area. The absolute spatial accuracy of the direct technique was found to be 65–120 cm whilst the GCP technique achieves an accuracy of approximately 10–15 cm.

  12. Organizing a Collaborative Development of Technological Design Requirements Using a Constructive Dialogue on Value Profiles: A Case in Automated Vehicle Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flipse, Steven M; Puylaert, Steven

    2018-02-01

    Following societal and policy pressures for responsible innovation, innovators are more and more expected to consider the broader socio-ethical context of their work, and more importantly, to integrate such considerations into their daily practices. This may require the involvement of 'outsiders' in innovation trajectories, including e.g. societal and governmental actors. However, methods on how to functionally organize such integration in light of responsible innovation have only recently started to emerge. We present an approach to do just that, in which we first develop value profiles of the involved actors, and second, design a workshop setting that allows innovators to develop design requirements in collaboration with representatives of parties that are not usually involved in such innovation design practices. Using a case study in automated vehicle development, we positively demonstrate the possibility and utility of our approach. We stress that in this study we wish to demonstrate the functionality of our developed method, and did not search for scientifically valid outcomes regarding this technical field.

  13. Effects of advanced carbohydrate counting guided by an automated bolus calculator in Type 1 diabetes mellitus (StenoABC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hommel, E; Schmidt, S; Vistisen, D

    2017-01-01

    -centre, investigator-initiated clinical study. We enrolled advanced carbohydrate counting-naïve adults with Type 1 diabetes and HbA1c levels 64-100 mmol/mol (8.0-11.3%), who were receiving multiple daily insulin injection therapy. In a 1:1-ratio, participants were randomized to receive training in either advanced......AIMS: To test whether concomitant use of an automated bolus calculator for people with Type 1 diabetes carrying out advanced carbohydrate counting would induce further improvements in metabolic control. METHODS: We conducted a 12-month, randomized, parallel-group, open-label, single...... carbohydrate counting using mental calculations (MC group) or advanced carbohydrate counting using an automated bolus calculator (ABC group) during a 3.5-h group training course. For 12 months after training, participants attended a specialized diabetes centre quarterly. The primary outcome was change in HbA1c...

  14. PSYCHOLOGICAL AND PEDAGOGICAL BASES FOR THE CREATION OF AN AUTOMATED SYSTEM FOR THE DIAGNOSIS OF LEVELS OF PERCEPTION CHANNELS DEVELOPMENT (PERCEPTION.GUIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petro P. Vorobiyenko

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the results of research on the process of human perception of information, the definitions of the main channels of perception of the external world, and the diagnoses of the prevailing channel. The experience and practical achievements of scientists are analyzed in the context of psychology, pedagogy, socionics, neurolinguistic programming. Certain methods for diagnosing the dominant channel of human perception of information using electronic resources and software complexes are considered. An extended model of the process of human information perception is presented based on the three-element classification of personality types: visual, audial, kinesthetic. The main stages of the creation of an automated "perception.guide" system for diagnosing the leading channel of information perception with the purpose of choosing the most effective teaching methods using information and communication technologies are revealed. The advantages of using the system for educational purposes are determined.

  15. Feedback control for a train-like vehicle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micaelli, A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a feedback nonlinear control law for a train-like vehicle (TLV) used in nuclear power-station maintenance. The front cart is either manual or automated guided. The rear carts are feedback controlled. The control objective is to ensure that the rear carts track the path produced (on-line) by the front cart. This controller was experimentally tested on the TLV-prototype. (authors). 4 figs., 4 refs

  16. Digital-flight-control-system software written in automated-engineering-design language: A user's guide of verification and validation tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Jim

    1987-01-01

    The user guide of verification and validation (V&V) tools for the Automated Engineering Design (AED) language is specifically written to update the information found in several documents pertaining to the automated verification of flight software tools. The intent is to provide, in one document, all the information necessary to adequately prepare a run to use the AED V&V tools. No attempt is made to discuss the FORTRAN V&V tools since they were not updated and are not currently active. Additionally, the current descriptions of the AED V&V tools are contained and provides information to augment the NASA TM 84276. The AED V&V tools are accessed from the digital flight control systems verification laboratory (DFCSVL) via a PDP-11/60 digital computer. The AED V&V tool interface handlers on the PDP-11/60 generate a Univac run stream which is transmitted to the Univac via a Remote Job Entry (RJE) link. Job execution takes place on the Univac 1100 and the job output is transmitted back to the DFCSVL and stored as a PDP-11/60 printfile.

  17. Instant Sikuli test automation

    CERN Document Server

    Lau, Ben

    2013-01-01

    Get to grips with a new technology, understand what it is and what it can do for you, and then get to work with the most important features and tasks. A concise guide written in an easy-to follow style using the Starter guide approach.This book is aimed at automation and testing professionals who want to use Sikuli to automate GUI. Some Python programming experience is assumed.

  18. Automate functional testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Kalindri

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Currently, software engineers are increasingly turning to the option of automating functional tests, but not always have successful in this endeavor. Reasons range from low planning until over cost in the process. Some principles that can guide teams in automating these tests are described in this article.

  19. Breast lesions with imaging-histologic discordance during US-guided 14G automated core biopsy: can the directional vacuum-assisted removal replace the surgical excision? Initial findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Min Jung; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Lee, Ji Young; Youk, Ji Hyun; Oh, Ki Keun; Park, Byeong-Woo; Kim, Seung-Il; Kim, Haeryoung

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of carcinoma at percutaneous directional vacuum-assisted removal (DVAR) in women with imaging-histologic discordance during ultrasound (US)-guided automated core needle biopsy, and to determine the role of DVAR in breast lesions with imaging-histologic discordance. A US-guided 14-gauge automated core needle biopsy was performed on 837 consecutive lesions. Imaging-histologic discordance was prospectively considered in 33 of 634 benign biopsies. DVAR was recommended in those lesions. Among the 33 lesions, 26 lesions that underwent subsequent DVAR or surgical excision made up our study population. Medical records, imaging studies, and histologic findings were reviewed. Among the 26 lesions, 18 lesions underwent subsequent US-guided DVAR, with 8-gauge probes for 15 of the lesions, and 11-gauge for three of the lesions. Two lesions were diagnosed as having carcinoma (2/18, 11.1% of upgrade rate; 3.1-32.8% CI). The remaining eight lesions underwent subsequent surgical excision, and carcinoma was diagnosed in one case (12.5% of upgrade rate; 2.2-47.1% CI). A US-guided DVAR of the breast mass with imaging-histologic discordance during US-guided 14-gauge automated core needle biopsy is a valuable alternative to surgery as a means of obtaining a definitive histological diagnosis. (orig.)

  20. Image-guided automated needle biopsy of 106 thoracic lesions: a retrospective review of diagnostic accuracy and complication rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, S.; Dyer, J.; Guest, P.

    2000-01-01

    We reviewed the diagnostic accuracy and complication rates of transthoracic needle biopsy (TNB) with an automated 18-gauge core biopsy needle and gun, using either fluoroscopic or CT guidance. One hundred six lesions were biopsied in 103 patients between 1992 and 1998. Hard-copy images, imaging reports, pathology reports and clinical notes were reviewed. In 3 patients it was not possible to establish the lesion as either malignant or benign from the available follow-up, so these were removed from the analysis of diagnostic accuracy. Adequate samples for histological diagnosis were obtained in 104 of 106 (98 %) biopsies. There were 75 of 85 (88 %) true-positive core biopsies for malignant lesions and a specific cell type was identified in 70 of 85 (82 %) cases. A specific histological diagnosis was obtained in 12 of 18 (66 %) biopsies. There was a 19 % rate of pneumothorax with only 2.4 % requiring drainage. Minor haemoptysis occurred in 3.8 % of procedures. The TNB technique with an automated core biopsy needle provides a high level of diagnostic accuracy, effectively distinguishes cell type in malignancy and provides a definite diagnosis in benign disease more frequently than fine needle aspiration (FNA). There is no increased complication rate compared with FNA. (orig.)

  1. Utilization of Connected Vehicle Data to Support Traffic Management Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-01

    Automated vehicle technology is advancing rapidly, from concept to test vehicles on the streets of American cities. Some of the underlying technologies that enable automation, such as Bluetooth communications and GPS, are already available in many ca...

  2. Automated ultrafast kilovoltage-megavoltage cone-beam CT for image guided radiotherapy of lung cancer: System description and real-time results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blessing, Manuel; Arns, Anna; Wertz, Hansjoerg; Stsepankou, Dzmitry; Boda-Heggemann, Judit; Hesser, Juergen; Wenz, Frederik; Lohr, Frank

    2018-04-01

    To establish a fully automated kV-MV CBCT imaging method on a clinical linear accelerator that allows image acquisition of thoracic targets for patient positioning within one breath-hold (∼15s) under realistic clinical conditions. Our previously developed FPGA-based hardware unit which allows synchronized kV-MV CBCT projection acquisition is connected to a clinical linear accelerator system via a multi-pin switch; i.e. either kV-MV imaging or conventional clinical mode can be selected. An application program was developed to control the relevant linac parameters automatically and to manage the MV detector readout as well as the gantry angle capture for each MV projection. The kV projections are acquired with the conventional CBCT system. GPU-accelerated filtered backprojection is performed separately for both data sets. After appropriate grayscale normalization both modalities are combined and the final kV-MV volume is re-imported in the CBCT system to enable image matching. To demonstrate adequate geometrical accuracy of the novel imaging system the Penta-Guide phantom QA procedure is performed. Furthermore, a human plastinate and different tumor shapes in a thorax phantom are scanned. Diameters of the known tumor shapes are measured in the kV-MV reconstruction. An automated kV-MV CBCT workflow was successfully established in a clinical environment. The overall procedure, from starting the data acquisition until the reconstructed volume is available for registration, requires ∼90s including 17s acquisition time for 100° rotation. It is very simple and allows target positioning in the same way as for conventional CBCT. Registration accuracy of the QA phantom is within ±1mm. The average deviation from the known tumor dimensions measured in the thorax phantom was 0.7mm which corresponds to an improvement of 36% compared to our previous kV-MV imaging system. Due to automation the kV-MV CBCT workflow is speeded up by a factor of >10 compared to the manual

  3. Multisensor simultaneous vehicle tracking and shape estimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elfring, J.; Appeldoorn, R.P.W.; Kwakkernaat, M.R.J.A.E.

    2016-01-01

    This work focuses on vehicle automation applications that require both the estimation of kinematic and geometric information of surrounding vehicles, e.g., automated overtaking or merging. Rather then using one sensor that is able to estimate a vehicle's geometry from each sensor frame, e.g., a

  4. Integrated vehicle control and guidance systems in unmanned ground vehicles for commercial applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Chase H.

    1995-01-01

    While there is a lot of recent development in the entire IVHS field, very few have had the opportunity to combine the many areas of development into a single integrated `intelligent' unmanned vehicle. One of our systems was developed specifically to serve a major automobile manufacturer's need for an automated vehicle chassis durability test facility. Due to the severity of the road surface human drivers could not be used. A totally automated robotic vehicle driver and guidance system was necessary. In order to deliver fixed price commercial projects now, it was apparent system and component costs were of paramount importance. Cyplex has developed a robust, cost effective single wire guidance system. This system has inherent advantages in system simplicity. Multi-signal (per vehicle lane) systems complicate path planning and layout when multiple lanes and lane changes are required, as on actual highways. The system has demonstrated high enough immunity to rain and light snow cover that normal safety reductions in speed are adequate to stay within the required system performance envelope. This system and it's antenna interface have shown the ability to guide the vehicle at slow speeds (10 MPH) with a tracking repeatability of plus or minus 1/8 of an inch. The basic guide and antenna system has been tested at speeds up to 80 mph. The system has inherently superior abilities for lane changes and precision vehicle placement. The operation of this system will be described and the impact of a system that is commercially viable now for highway and off road use will be discussed.

  5. Sci-Thur AM: YIS – 08: Automated Imaging Quality Assurance for Image-Guided Small Animal Irradiators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnstone, Chris; Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena [University of Victoria (Australia)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: To develop quality assurance (QA) standards and tolerance levels for image quality of small animal irradiators. Methods: A fully automated in-house QA software for image analysis of a commercial microCT phantom was created. Quantitative analyses of CT linearity, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), uniformity and noise, geometric accuracy, modulation transfer function (MTF), and CT number evaluation was performed. Phantom microCT scans from seven institutions acquired with varying parameters (kVp, mA, time, voxel size, and frame rate) and five irradiator units (Xstrahl SARRP, PXI X-RAD 225Cx, PXI X-RAD SmART, GE explore CT/RT 140, and GE Explore CT 120) were analyzed. Multi-institutional data sets were compared using our in-house software to establish pass/fail criteria for each QA test. Results: CT linearity (R2>0.996) was excellent at all but Institution 2. Acceptable SNR (>35) and noise levels (<55HU) were obtained at four of the seven institutions, where failing scans were acquired with less than 120mAs. Acceptable MTF (>1.5 lp/mm for MTF=0.2) was obtained at all but Institution 6 due to the largest scan voxel size (0.35mm). The geometric accuracy passed (<1.5%) at five of the seven institutions. Conclusion: Our QA software can be used to rapidly perform quantitative imaging QA for small animal irradiators, accumulate results over time, and display possible changes in imaging functionality from its original performance and/or from the recommended tolerance levels. This tool will aid researchers in maintaining high image quality, enabling precise conformal dose delivery to small animals.

  6. Sci-Thur AM: YIS – 08: Automated Imaging Quality Assurance for Image-Guided Small Animal Irradiators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnstone, Chris; Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop quality assurance (QA) standards and tolerance levels for image quality of small animal irradiators. Methods: A fully automated in-house QA software for image analysis of a commercial microCT phantom was created. Quantitative analyses of CT linearity, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), uniformity and noise, geometric accuracy, modulation transfer function (MTF), and CT number evaluation was performed. Phantom microCT scans from seven institutions acquired with varying parameters (kVp, mA, time, voxel size, and frame rate) and five irradiator units (Xstrahl SARRP, PXI X-RAD 225Cx, PXI X-RAD SmART, GE explore CT/RT 140, and GE Explore CT 120) were analyzed. Multi-institutional data sets were compared using our in-house software to establish pass/fail criteria for each QA test. Results: CT linearity (R2>0.996) was excellent at all but Institution 2. Acceptable SNR (>35) and noise levels (<55HU) were obtained at four of the seven institutions, where failing scans were acquired with less than 120mAs. Acceptable MTF (>1.5 lp/mm for MTF=0.2) was obtained at all but Institution 6 due to the largest scan voxel size (0.35mm). The geometric accuracy passed (<1.5%) at five of the seven institutions. Conclusion: Our QA software can be used to rapidly perform quantitative imaging QA for small animal irradiators, accumulate results over time, and display possible changes in imaging functionality from its original performance and/or from the recommended tolerance levels. This tool will aid researchers in maintaining high image quality, enabling precise conformal dose delivery to small animals.

  7. HiRel: Hybrid Automated Reliability Predictor (HARP) integrated reliability tool system, (version 7.0). Volume 3: HARP Graphics Oriented (GO) input user's guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavuso, Salvatore J.; Rothmann, Elizabeth; Mittal, Nitin; Koppen, Sandra Howell

    1994-01-01

    The Hybrid Automated Reliability Predictor (HARP) integrated Reliability (HiRel) tool system for reliability/availability prediction offers a toolbox of integrated reliability/availability programs that can be used to customize the user's application in a workstation or nonworkstation environment. HiRel consists of interactive graphical input/output programs and four reliability/availability modeling engines that provide analytical and simulative solutions to a wide host of highly reliable fault-tolerant system architectures and is also applicable to electronic systems in general. The tool system was designed at the outset to be compatible with most computing platforms and operating systems, and some programs have been beta tested within the aerospace community for over 8 years. This document is a user's guide for the HiRel graphical preprocessor Graphics Oriented (GO) program. GO is a graphical user interface for the HARP engine that enables the drawing of reliability/availability models on a monitor. A mouse is used to select fault tree gates or Markov graphical symbols from a menu for drawing.

  8. HiRel: Hybrid Automated Reliability Predictor (HARP) integrated reliability tool system, (version 7.0). Volume 4: HARP Output (HARPO) graphics display user's guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sproles, Darrell W.; Bavuso, Salvatore J.

    1994-01-01

    The Hybrid Automated Reliability Predictor (HARP) integrated Reliability (HiRel) tool system for reliability/availability prediction offers a toolbox of integrated reliability/availability programs that can be used to customize the user's application in a workstation or nonworkstation environment. HiRel consists of interactive graphical input/output programs and four reliability/availability modeling engines that provide analytical and simulative solutions to a wide host of highly reliable fault-tolerant system architectures and is also applicable to electronic systems in general. The tool system was designed at the outset to be compatible with most computing platforms and operating systems and some programs have been beta tested within the aerospace community for over 8 years. This document is a user's guide for the HiRel graphical postprocessor program HARPO (HARP Output). HARPO reads ASCII files generated by HARP. It provides an interactive plotting capability that can be used to display alternate model data for trade-off analyses. File data can also be imported to other commercial software programs.

  9. Automation in a material processing/storage facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, K.; Gordon, J.

    1997-01-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is currently developing a new facility, the Actinide Packaging and Storage Facility (APSF), to process and store legacy materials from the United States nuclear stockpile. A variety of materials, with a variety of properties, packaging and handling/storage requirements, will be processed and stored at the facility. Since these materials are hazardous and radioactive, automation will be used to minimize worker exposure. Other benefits derived from automation of the facility include increased throughput capacity and enhanced security. The diversity of materials and packaging geometries to be handled poses challenges to the automation of facility processes. In addition, the nature of the materials to be processed underscores the need for safety, reliability and serviceability. The application of automation in this facility must, therefore, be accomplished in a rational and disciplined manner to satisfy the strict operational requirements of the facility. Among the functions to be automated are the transport of containers between process and storage areas via an Automatic Guided Vehicle (AGV), and various processes in the Shipping Package Unpackaging (SPU) area, the Accountability Measurements (AM) area, the Special Isotope Storage (SIS) vault and the Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) vault. Other areas of the facility are also being automated, but are outside the scope of this paper

  10. Translation: Aids, Robots, and Automation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreyewsky, Alexander

    1981-01-01

    Examines electronic aids to translation both as ways to automate it and as an approach to solve problems resulting from shortage of qualified translators. Describes the limitations of robotic MT (Machine Translation) systems, viewing MAT (Machine-Aided Translation) as the only practical solution and the best vehicle for further automation. (MES)

  11. Automated vehicle identification tags in San Antonio : lessons learned from the metropolitan model deployment initiative : unique method for collecting arterial travel speed information

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-10-01

    This report demonstrates a unique solution to the challenge of providing accurate, timely estimates of arterial travel times to the motoring public. In particular, it discusses the lessons learned in deploying the Vehicle Tag Project in San Antonio, ...

  12. Mechatronic Design Automation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Zhun

    successfully design analogue filters, vibration absorbers, micro-electro-mechanical systems, and vehicle suspension systems, all in an automatic or semi-automatic way. It also investigates the very important issue of co-designing plant-structures and dynamic controllers in automated design of Mechatronic...

  13. The road to automated driving: Dual mode and human factors considerations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, M.H.; Beukel, A.P. van den

    2013-01-01

    Recent technological developments have shown a transition from informative driving support systems to more automated vehicles. Although automated vehicles are designed to overcome limitations in human perception, decision making and response, there may be a downside to introducing these

  14. The road to automated driving: dual mode and human factors considerations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, Marieke Hendrikje; van den Beukel, Arie Paul

    2013-01-01

    Recent technological developments have shown a transition from informative driving support systems to more automated vehicles. Although automated vehicles are designed to overcome limitations in human perception, decision making and response, there may be a downside to introducing these

  15. Vehicle Dynamics and Control

    CERN Document Server

    Rajamani, Rajesh

    2012-01-01

    Vehicle Dynamics and Control provides a comprehensive coverage of vehicle control systems and the dynamic models used in the development of these control systems. The control system applications covered in the book include cruise control, adaptive cruise control, ABS, automated lane keeping, automated highway systems, yaw stability control, engine control, passive, active and semi-active suspensions, tire-road friction coefficient estimation, rollover prevention, and hybrid electric vehicle. In developing the dynamic model for each application, an effort is made to both keep the model simple enough for control system design but at the same time rich enough to capture the essential features of the dynamics. A special effort has been made to explain the several different tire models commonly used in literature and to interpret them physically. In the second edition of the book, chapters on roll dynamics, rollover prevention and hybrid electric vehicles have been added, and the chapter on electronic stability co...

  16. Strategies for dispatching AGVs at automated seaport container terminals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunow, Martin; Günther, H.O.; Lehmann, M.

    2006-01-01

    Control of logistics operations at container terminals is an extremely complex task, especially if automated guided vehicles (AGVs) are employed. In AGV dispatching, the stochastic nature of the handling systems must be taken into account. For instance, handling times of quay and stacking cranes...... as well as release times of transportation orders are not exactly known in advance. We present a simulation study of AGV dispatching strategies in a seaport container terminal, where AGVs can be used in single or dual-carrier mode. The latter allows transporting two small-sized (20 ft) or one large......-line heuristic. The performance of the dispatching strategies is evaluated using a scalable simulation model. The design of the experimental study reflects conditions which are typical of a real automated terminal environment. Major experimental factors are the size of the terminal and the degree of stochastic...

  17. Strategies for dispatching AGV's at automated seaport container terminals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunow, Martin; Günther, H.O.; Lehmann, M.

    2007-01-01

    Control of logistics operations at container terminals is an extremely complex task, especially if automated guided vehicles (AGVs) are employed. In AGV dispatching, the stochastic nature of the handling systems must be taken into account. For instance, handling times of quay and stacking cranes...... as well as release times of transportation orders are not exactly known in advance. We present a simulation study of AGV dispatching strategies in a seaport container terminal, where AGVs can be used in single or dual-carrier mode. The latter allows transporting two small-sized (20 ft) or one large......-line heuristic. The performance of the dispatching strategies is evaluated using a scalable simulation model. The design of the experimental study reflects conditions which are typical of a real automated terminal environment. Major experimental factors are the size of the terminal and the degree of stochastic...

  18. From cooperative to autonomous vehicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sande, T.P.J.; Nijmeijer, H.; Fossen, T.I.; Pettersen, K.Y.; Nijmeijer, H.

    2017-01-01

    What defines an autonomous vehicle? In this chapter the authors will try to answer this question and formulate the limitations of driver assistance systems as well as for—conditionally—autonomous vehicles . First a short summary of the levels of automation as provided by the society of automotive

  19. Home Automation

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Zeeshan

    2010-01-01

    In this paper I briefly discuss the importance of home automation system. Going in to the details I briefly present a real time designed and implemented software and hardware oriented house automation research project, capable of automating house's electricity and providing a security system to detect the presence of unexpected behavior.

  20. AN AUTOMATED RAILWAY STATION TRAFFIC CONTROL SYSTEM

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AN AUTOMATED RAILWAY STATION TRAFFIC CONTROL SYSTEM. ... involve collision with automobiles or other vehicles and collision with other trains. ... the processed signals to control electromagnetic devices through motor drivers.

  1. Automation of unit for leakage test

    OpenAIRE

    LYCHKOVSKAYA V.S.; TSYGANKOV A.S.; GRINBERG G.M.; STANOVOVA O.A.

    2015-01-01

    Federal state educational standard requirements for training of university students have been considered. Leakage test procedures for components of aerospace vehicles have been described. Automation procedures of existing laboratory leakage test units have been outlined.

  2. Step-by-step guide to building an inexpensive 3D printed motorized positioning stage for automated high-content screening microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneidereit, Dominik; Kraus, Larissa; Meier, Jochen C; Friedrich, Oliver; Gilbert, Daniel F

    2017-06-15

    High-content screening microscopy relies on automation infrastructure that is typically proprietary, non-customizable, costly and requires a high level of skill to use and maintain. The increasing availability of rapid prototyping technology makes it possible to quickly engineer alternatives to conventional automation infrastructure that are low-cost and user-friendly. Here, we describe a 3D printed inexpensive open source and scalable motorized positioning stage for automated high-content screening microscopy and provide detailed step-by-step instructions to re-building the device, including a comprehensive parts list, 3D design files in STEP (Standard for the Exchange of Product model data) and STL (Standard Tessellation Language) format, electronic circuits and wiring diagrams as well as software code. System assembly including 3D printing requires approx. 30h. The fully assembled device is light-weight (1.1kg), small (33×20×8cm) and extremely low-cost (approx. EUR 250). We describe positioning characteristics of the stage, including spatial resolution, accuracy and repeatability, compare imaging data generated with our device to data obtained using a commercially available microplate reader, demonstrate its suitability to high-content microscopy in 96-well high-throughput screening format and validate its applicability to automated functional Cl - - and Ca 2+ -imaging with recombinant HEK293 cells as a model system. A time-lapse video of the stage during operation and as part of a custom assembled screening robot can be found at https://vimeo.com/158813199. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Low Speed Automation, a French Initiative

    OpenAIRE

    Sébastien, Glaser; Maurice, Cour; Lydie, Nouveliere; Alain, Lambert; Fawzi, Nashashibi; Jean-Christophe, Popieul; Benjamin, Mourllion

    2012-01-01

    International audience; Nowadays, vehicle safety is constantly increasing thanks to the improvement of vehicle passive and active safety. However, on a daily usage of the car, traffic jams remains a problem. With limited space for road infrastructure, automation of the driving task on specific situation seems to be a possible solution. The French project ABV, which stands for low speed automation, tries to demonstrate the feasibility of the concept and to prove the benefits. In this article, ...

  4. Development of an Autonomous Navigation Technology Test Vehicle

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tobler, Chad K

    2004-01-01

    .... In order to continue these research activities at CIMAR, a new Kawasaki Mule All-Terrain Vehicle was chosen to be automated as a test-bed for the purpose of developing and testing autonomous vehicle technologies...

  5. Partial Automated Alignment and Integration System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Gary Wayne (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention is a Partial Automated Alignment and Integration System (PAAIS) used to automate the alignment and integration of space vehicle components. A PAAIS includes ground support apparatuses, a track assembly with a plurality of energy-emitting components and an energy-receiving component containing a plurality of energy-receiving surfaces. Communication components and processors allow communication and feedback through PAAIS.

  6. WEpods project : Finding the potential for automated road public transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Homem De Almeida Rodriguez Correia, G.

    2016-01-01

    Vehicle automation is developing rapidly, nevertheless a lot of wor k is still lacking, as we are not yet at a point where vehicles are able to drive themselves on a road without a human behind the wheel. One of the possibilities of automation is its use as public transport. In theWEpods project,

  7. Autonomous Vehicles: A Policy Roadmap for Law Enforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    autonomous vehicle , vehicles , self - driving car , automated...the fault of the autonomous vehicle .6 In other words, human error was the fault in all of the collisions and the self - driving car has NEVER caused a...32 David Shamah, “As Google Dreams of Driverless Cars , IDF Deploys Them: Self Driving Vehicles Are not New for the Israeli Army, and a

  8. Optimization-based Method for Automated Road Network Extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong, D

    2001-01-01

    Automated road information extraction has significant applicability in transportation. It provides a means for creating, maintaining, and updating transportation network databases that are needed for purposes ranging from traffic management to automated vehicle navigation and guidance. This paper is to review literature on the subject of road extraction and to describe a study of an optimization-based method for automated road network extraction

  9. Tool-driven Design and Automated Parameterization for Real-time Generic Drivetrain Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwarz Christina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Real-time dynamic drivetrain modeling approaches have a great potential for development cost reduction in the automotive industry. Even though real-time drivetrain models are available, these solutions are specific to single transmission topologies. In this paper an environment for parameterization of a solution is proposed based on a generic method applicable to all types of gear transmission topologies. This enables tool-guided modeling by non- experts in the fields of mechanic engineering and control theory leading to reduced development and testing efforts. The approach is demonstrated for an exemplary automatic transmission using the environment for automated parameterization. Finally, the parameterization is validated via vehicle measurement data.

  10. Overarching Tactical Wheeled Vehicle Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-08-31

    trailer. The PM, Transportation, provided existing LCCEs for the various systems in the Automated Cost Estimating Integrated Tool ( ACEIT ) format. The...Advanced Assault Amphibious Vehicle AAO Approved Acquisition Objective ACE Aviation Combat Element ACEIT Automated Cost Estimating Integrated Tool ALMC... ACEIT , SVLCCM, and CASA) using two different CESs, and estimated in three different constant budget dollar years (i.e., FY95, FY96, and FY01). A

  11. Human factors evaluation of level 2 and level 3 automated driving concepts : past research, state of automation technology, and emerging system concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Within the context of automation Levels 2 and 3, this report documents the proceedings from a literature review of key : human factors studies that was performed related to automated vehicle operations. This document expands and updates : the results...

  12. Auditing and GRC automation in SAP

    CERN Document Server

    Chuprunov, Maxim

    2013-01-01

    Going beyond current literature, this book extends internal controls to efficiency and profitability. Offers an audit guide for an SAP ERP system, covers risks and control descriptions, and shows how to automate compliance management based on SAP GRC.

  13. Intelligent behaviors through vehicle-to-vehicle and vehicle-to-infrastructure communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Richard D.; Sturgeon, Purser; Brown, Mike

    2012-06-01

    The last decade has seen a significant increase in intelligent safety devices on private automobiles. These devices have both increased and augmented the situational awareness of the driver and in some cases provided automated vehicle responses. To date almost all intelligent safety devices have relied on data directly perceived by the vehicle. This constraint has a direct impact on the types of solutions available to the vehicle. In an effort to improve the safety options available to a vehicle, numerous research laboratories and government agencies are investing time and resources into connecting vehicles to each other and to infrastructure-based devices. This work details several efforts in both the commercial vehicle and the private auto industries to increase vehicle safety and driver situational awareness through vehicle-to-vehicle and vehicle-to-infrastructure communication. It will specifically discuss intelligent behaviors being designed to automatically disable non-compliant vehicles, warn tractor trailer vehicles of unsafe lane maneuvers such as lane changes, passing, and merging, and alert drivers to non-line-of-sight emergencies.

  14. Fatigue and voluntary utilization of automation in simulated driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, Catherine; Matthews, Gerald; Langheim, Lisa; Saxby, Dyani

    2012-10-01

    A driving simulator was used to assess the impact on fatigue, stress, and workload of full vehicle automation that was initiated by the driver. Previous studies have shown that mandatory use of full automation induces a state of "passive fatigue" associated with loss of alertness. By contrast, voluntary use of automation may enhance the driver's perceptions of control and ability to manage fatigue. Participants were assigned to one of two experimental conditions, automation optional (AO) and nonautomation (NA), and then performed a 35 min, monotonous simulated drive. In the last 5 min, automation was unavailable and drivers were required to respond to an emergency event. Subjective state and workload were evaluated before and after the drive. Making automation available to the driver failed to alleviate fatigue and stress states induced by driving in monotonous conditions. Drivers who were fatigued prior to the drive were more likely to choose to use automation, but automation use increased distress, especially in fatigue-prone drivers. Drivers in the AO condition were slower to initiate steering responses to the emergency event, suggesting optional automation may be distracting. Optional, driver-controlled automation appears to pose the same dangers to task engagement and alertness as externally initiated automation. Drivers of automated vehicles may be vulnerable to fatigue that persists when normal vehicle control is restored. It is important to evaluate automated systems' impact on driver fatigue, to seek design solutions to the issue of maintaining driver engagement, and to address the vulnerabilities of fatigue-prone drivers.

  15. HiRel: Hybrid Automated Reliability Predictor (HARP) integrated reliability tool system, (version 7.0). Volume 1: HARP introduction and user's guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavuso, Salvatore J.; Rothmann, Elizabeth; Dugan, Joanne Bechta; Trivedi, Kishor S.; Mittal, Nitin; Boyd, Mark A.; Geist, Robert M.; Smotherman, Mark D.

    1994-01-01

    The Hybrid Automated Reliability Predictor (HARP) integrated Reliability (HiRel) tool system for reliability/availability prediction offers a toolbox of integrated reliability/availability programs that can be used to customize the user's application in a workstation or nonworkstation environment. HiRel consists of interactive graphical input/output programs and four reliability/availability modeling engines that provide analytical and simulative solutions to a wide host of reliable fault-tolerant system architectures and is also applicable to electronic systems in general. The tool system was designed to be compatible with most computing platforms and operating systems, and some programs have been beta tested, within the aerospace community for over 8 years. Volume 1 provides an introduction to the HARP program. Comprehensive information on HARP mathematical models can be found in the references.

  16. Non-cable vehicle guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daugela, G.C.; Willott, A.M.; Chopiuk, R.G.; Thornton, S.E.

    1988-06-01

    The purpose is to determine the most promising driverless mine vehicle guidance systems that are not dependent on buried cables, and to plan their development. The project is presented in two phases: a preliminary study and literature review to determine whether suitable technologies exist to justify further work; and an in-depth assessment and selection of technologies for vehicle guidance. A large number of guidance elements are involved in a completely automated vehicle. The technologies that hold the best potential for development of guidance systems for mine vehicles are ultrasonics, radar, lasers, dead reckoning, and guidance algorithms. The best approach to adaptation of these technologies is on a step by step basis. Guidance modules that are complete in themselves and are designed to be integrated with other modules can provide short term benefits. Two modules are selected for development: the dragline operations monitor and automated machine control for optimized mining (AMCOM). 99 refs., 20 figs., 40 tabs.

  17. 77 FR 40921 - Communication With Transport Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-11

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2012-0163] Communication With Transport Vehicles AGENCY... Commission (NRC or the Commission), is withdrawing Regulatory Guide 5.32, Revision 1, ``Communication with... withdrawing Regulatory Guide 5.32, revision 1, ``Communication with Transport Vehicles,'' published in May...

  18. Vehicle to Vehicle Services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønsted, Jeppe Rørbæk

    2008-01-01

    location aware infotainment, increase safety, and lessen environmental strain. This dissertation is about service oriented architecture for pervasive computing with an emphasis on vehicle to vehicle applications. If devices are exposed as services, applications can be created by composing a set of services...... be evaluated. Service composition mechanisms for pervasive computing are categorized and we discuss how the characteristics of pervasive computing can be supported by service composition mechanisms. Finally, we investigate how to make pervasive computing systems capable of being noticed and understood...

  19. Intelligent Vehicle Health Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Deidre E.; Trevino, Luis; Watson, Michael D.

    2005-01-01

    objectives: Guidance and Navigation; Communications and Tracking; Vehicle Monitoring; Information Transport and Integration; Vehicle Diagnostics; Vehicle Prognostics; Vehicle mission Planning; Automated Repair and Replacement; Vehicle Control; Human Computer Interface; and Onboard Verification and Validation. Furthermore, the presented framework provides complete vehicle management which not only allows for increased crew safety and mission success through new intelligence capabilities, but also yields a mechanism for more efficient vehicle operations. The representative IVHM technologies for computer platform using heterogeneous communication, 3) coupled electromagnetic oscillators for enhanced communications, 4) Linux-based real-time systems, 5) genetic algorithms, 6) Bayesian Networks, 7) evolutionary algorithms, 8) dynamic systems control modeling, and 9) advanced sensing capabilities. This paper presents IVHM technologies developed under NASA's NFFP pilot project and the integration of these technologies forms the framework for IIVM.

  20. Driver support and automated driving systems : Acceptance and effects on behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Waard, D.; Brookhuis, K.A.; Scerbo, MW; Mouloua, M

    1999-01-01

    Automation in driving ranges from simple in-vehicle information systems to completely automated driving in the Automated Highway System (AHS). An increased level of automation and increased restriction in behavioural freedom, as well as decreased control over tasks, have serious consequences for

  1. Process automation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moser, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    Process automation technology has been pursued in the chemical processing industries and to a very limited extent in nuclear fuel reprocessing. Its effective use has been restricted in the past by the lack of diverse and reliable process instrumentation and the unavailability of sophisticated software designed for process control. The Integrated Equipment Test (IET) facility was developed by the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) in part to demonstrate new concepts for control of advanced nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. A demonstration of fuel reprocessing equipment automation using advanced instrumentation and a modern, microprocessor-based control system is nearing completion in the facility. This facility provides for the synergistic testing of all chemical process features of a prototypical fuel reprocessing plant that can be attained with unirradiated uranium-bearing feed materials. The unique equipment and mission of the IET facility make it an ideal test bed for automation studies. This effort will provide for the demonstration of the plant automation concept and for the development of techniques for similar applications in a full-scale plant. A set of preliminary recommendations for implementing process automation has been compiled. Some of these concepts are not generally recognized or accepted. The automation work now under way in the IET facility should be useful to others in helping avoid costly mistakes because of the underutilization or misapplication of process automation. 6 figs

  2. Distribution system analysis and automation

    CERN Document Server

    Gers, Juan

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive guide to techniques that allow engineers to simulate, analyse and optimise power distribution systems which combined with automation, underpin the emerging concept of the "smart grid". This book is supported by theoretical concepts with real-world applications and MATLAB exercises.

  3. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Vehicle Assembly Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galitsky, Christina; Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst

    2008-01-01

    The motor vehicle industry in the U.S. spends about $3.6 billion on energy annually. In this report, we focus on auto assembly plants. In the U.S., over 70 assembly plants currently produce 13 million cars and trucks each year. In assembly plants, energy expenditures is a relatively small cost factor in the total production process. Still, as manufacturers face an increasingly competitive environment, energy efficiency improvements can provide a means to reduce costs without negatively affecting the yield or the quality of the product. In addition, reducing energy costs reduces the unpredictability associated with variable energy prices in today?s marketplace, which could negatively affect predictable earnings, an important element for publicly-traded companies such as those in the motor vehicle industry. In this report, we first present a summary of the motor vehicle assembly process and energy use. This is followed by a discussion of energy efficiency opportunities available for assembly plants. Where available, we provide specific primary energy savings for each energy efficiency measure based on case studies, as well as references to technical literature. If available, we have listed costs and typical payback periods. We include experiences of assembly plants worldwide with energy efficiency measures reviewed in the report. Our findings suggest that although most motor vehicle companies in the U.S. have energy management teams or programs, there are still opportunities available at individual plants to reduce energy consumption cost effectively. Further research on the economics of the measures for individual assembly plants, as part of an energy management program, is needed to assess the potential impact of selected technologies at these plants.

  4. Performance Analysis on Transfer Platforms in Frame Bridge Based Automated Container Terminals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongtao Hu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies a new automated container terminal (ACT system which utilizes multistory frame bridges and rail-mounted trolleys to transport containers between the quay and the yard. Beside typical ACT systems use trucks or automated guided vehicles for transporting containers between quay cranes and yard cranes, the new design uses three types of handling machines, namely, ground trolleys (GTs, transfer platforms (TPs, and frame trolleys (FTs. These three types of handling machines collaborate with one another to transport containers. This study decomposes the system into several subsystems. Each subsystem has one TP and several FTs and GTs dedicated to this TP. Then, a Markov chain model is developed to analyze the throughput of TPs. At last, the performance of the new ACT system is estimated. Sensitivity analyzes the numbers, and the processing rates of trolleys are conducted through the numeric experiments.

  5. Possibilities of the common research-development action in the field of automated logistical engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pap Lajos

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper briefly presents the R&D cooperation of the Department of Materials Handling and Logistics and Departments of Automation. The main fields of cooperation are introduced. Different kind of Linear Motor (hereafter LM drives are being developed and tested for warehouse and rolling conveyor systems. Modern control strategies using AI methods are being investigated and tested for Automated guide vehicle. Wireless communication methods are being searched and developed for mobile material handling devices. Application possibilities of voice recognition and image processing are being tested for control of material handling robots and devices. Application of process visualization programs are being developed and investigated. Multi-level industrial communication system is being developed for the laboratories of the cooperating departments.

  6. Human Factors of Automated Driving : Predicting the Effects of Authority Transitions on Traffic Flow Efficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Varotto, S.F.; Hoogendoorn, R.G.; Van Arem, B.; Hoogendoorn, S.P.

    2014-01-01

    Automated driving potentially has a significant impact on traffic flow efficiency. Automated vehicles, which possess cooperative capabilities, are expected to reduce congestion levels for instance by increasing road capacity, by anticipating traffic conditions further downstream and also by

  7. Automating the design of resection guides specific to patient anatomy in knee replacement surgery by enhanced 3D curvature and surface modeling of distal femur shape models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerveri, Pietro; Manzotti, Alfonso; Confalonieri, Norberto; Baroni, Guido

    2014-12-01

    Personalized resection guides (PRG) have been recently proposed in the domain of knee replacement, demonstrating clinical outcome similar or even superior to both manual and navigated interventions. Among the mandatory pre-surgical steps for PRG prototyping, the measurement of clinical landmarks (CL) on the bony surfaces is recognized as a key issue due to lack of standardized methodologies, operator-dependent variability and time expenditure. In this paper, we focus on the reliability and repeatability of an anterior-posterior axis, also known as Whiteside line (WL), of the distal femur proposing automatic surface processing and modeling methods aimed at overcoming some of the major concerns related to the manual identification of such CL on 2D images and 3D models. We show that the measurement of WL, exploiting the principle of mean-shifting surface curvature, is highly repeatable and coherent with clinical knowledge. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Motion planning for autonomous vehicle based on radial basis function neural network in unstructured environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiajia; Zhao, Pan; Liang, Huawei; Mei, Tao

    2014-09-18

    The autonomous vehicle is an automated system equipped with features like environment perception, decision-making, motion planning, and control and execution technology. Navigating in an unstructured and complex environment is a huge challenge for autonomous vehicles, due to the irregular shape of road, the requirement of real-time planning, and the nonholonomic constraints of vehicle. This paper presents a motion planning method, based on the Radial Basis Function (RBF) neural network, to guide the autonomous vehicle in unstructured environments. The proposed algorithm extracts the drivable region from the perception grid map based on the global path, which is available in the road network. The sample points are randomly selected in the drivable region, and a gradient descent method is used to train the RBF network. The parameters of the motion-planning algorithm are verified through the simulation and experiment. It is observed that the proposed approach produces a flexible, smooth, and safe path that can fit any road shape. The method is implemented on autonomous vehicle and verified against many outdoor scenes; furthermore, a comparison of proposed method with the existing well-known Rapidly-exploring Random Tree (RRT) method is presented. The experimental results show that the proposed method is highly effective in planning the vehicle path and offers better motion quality.

  9. Successes and Challenges in the Resale of Alternative Fuel Vehicles: July 2001 - March 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2002-05-01

    This report provides the outcome of Dorfman & O'Neal's effort to examine the resale market for automobiles as it relates to the resale of late-model, original equipment manufacture (OEM), alternative fuel vehicles. Auctions provide an exceptionally rapid, effective, and efficient market for the transfer of property between buyers and sellers at reasonable prices. The first automobile auction in the United States was successful because used cars were in reasonably constant supply, were uniformly packaged, and were easily graded for quality. Also, the auction had sufficient volume to significantly lower the handling and transaction costs for wholesalers and dealers. To this day, the automobile auction industry conducts business primarily with registered wholesalers and dealers. Except for the U.S. General Services Administration (GSA) auctions and some consignment auctions, nearly all automobile auctions are closed to the public. The auction system represents a near-perfect market, validated by the lack of statistical price differences in value of specific model cars between various regions of the country. However, specialty cars may be subject to arbitrage. The buyer purchases the vehicle believing that it can be sold immediately at a profit in another region. A variety of vehicle pricing services are available to serve the consumer and the wholesale automobile industry. Each has a different philosophy for collecting, analyzing, and reporting data. ''The Automobile Lease Guide'' (ALG) is clearly the authority on vehicle residual values. Auction companies continue to apply automated technologies to lower transaction costs. Automated technologies are the only way to track the increasing number of transactions in the growing industry. Nevertheless, people-to-people relationships remain critical to the success of all auction companies. Our assessment is that everyone in the secondary automobile market is aware of alternative fuel vehicles

  10. Distribution automation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruenemeyer, D.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on a Distribution Automation (DA) System enhances the efficiency and productivity of a utility. It also provides intangible benefits such as improved public image and market advantages. A utility should evaluate the benefits and costs of such a system before committing funds. The expenditure for distribution automation is economical when justified by the deferral of a capacity increase, a decrease in peak power demand, or a reduction in O and M requirements

  11. Automation for On-road Vehicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerardino, Guillermo Andrés Pocovi; Lauridsen, Mads; Alvarez, Beatriz Soret

    2015-01-01

    insights into the expected evolution towards autonomous driving. The many challenges introduced by V2X use cases are emphasized and compared to today’s wireless system capabilities. Finally, we give our vision on the design of future radio technologies for the support of this kind of communications....

  12. Simulation of Automated Vehicles' Drive Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-28

    This research has two objectives: 1) To develop algorithms for plausible and legally-justifiable freeway car-following and arterial-street gap acceptance driving behavior for AVs 2) To implement these algorithms on a representative road network, in o...

  13. Acoustic guide for noise-transmission testing of aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaicaitis, Rimas (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Selective testing of aircraft or other vehicular components without requiring disassembly of the vehicle or components was accomplished by using a portable guide apparatus. The device consists of a broadband noise source, a guide to direct the acoustic energy, soft sealing insulation to seal the guide to the noise source and to the vehicle component, and noise measurement microphones, both outside the vehicle at the acoustic guide output and inside the vehicle to receive attenuated sound. By directing acoustic energy only to selected components of a vehicle via the acoustic guide, it is possible to test a specific component, such as a door or window, without picking up extraneous noise which may be transmitted to the vehicle interior through other components or structure. This effect is achieved because no acoustic energy strikes the vehicle exterior except at the selected component. Also, since the test component remains attached to the vehicle, component dynamics with vehicle frame are not altered.

  14. Who is driving my car? Development and analysis of a control transition strategy for collaborative automated congestion driving

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Urhahne, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    The role of the driver is changing now that vehicles with driving automation technologies appear on the road. It evolves from being an active controller of the vehicle to being a supervisor of the automated ride. The driver has to collaborate with the driving automation and remains responsible for

  15. The evaluation, design and implementation of an automated storage and retrieval system for uranium trioxide powder (UO3) at Sellafield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitt, C.R.; Mather, K.

    1993-01-01

    The paper initially sets out the methods used to evaluate the requirements for an automated system to store and retrieve drums of radioactive Uranium Trioxide (UO3) power arising from the Thermal Oxide Reprocessing Plant (THORP) at Sellafield Cumbria. This is followed by a description of the configuration of storage vaults used and of the development of a Self Guided Vehicle (SGV) to operate remotely within these vaults. The system evolved is based on a combination of well proven mechanical equipment and control techniques and the implementation of the design together with testing and control procedures are described. (author)

  16. Virtual automation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casis, E; Garrido, A; Uranga, B; Vives, A; Zufiaurre, C

    2001-01-01

    Total laboratory automation (TLA) can be substituted in mid-size laboratories by a computer sample workflow control (virtual automation). Such a solution has been implemented in our laboratory using PSM, software developed in cooperation with Roche Diagnostics (Barcelona, Spain), to this purpose. This software is connected to the online analyzers and to the laboratory information system and is able to control and direct the samples working as an intermediate station. The only difference with TLA is the replacement of transport belts by personnel of the laboratory. The implementation of this virtual automation system has allowed us the achievement of the main advantages of TLA: workload increase (64%) with reduction in the cost per test (43%), significant reduction in the number of biochemistry primary tubes (from 8 to 2), less aliquoting (from 600 to 100 samples/day), automation of functional testing, drastic reduction of preanalytical errors (from 11.7 to 0.4% of the tubes) and better total response time for both inpatients (from up to 48 hours to up to 4 hours) and outpatients (from up to 10 days to up to 48 hours). As an additional advantage, virtual automation could be implemented without hardware investment and significant headcount reduction (15% in our lab).

  17. Automated road marking recognition system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziyatdinov, R. R.; Shigabiev, R. R.; Talipov, D. N.

    2017-09-01

    Development of the automated road marking recognition systems in existing and future vehicles control systems is an urgent task. One way to implement such systems is the use of neural networks. To test the possibility of using neural network software has been developed with the use of a single-layer perceptron. The resulting system based on neural network has successfully coped with the task both when driving in the daytime and at night.

  18. Inspection vehicle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Masaki; Omote, Tatsuyuki; Yoneya, Yutaka; Tanaka, Keiji; Waki, Tetsuro; Yoshida, Tomiji; Kido, Tsuyoshi.

    1993-01-01

    An inspection vehicle comprises a small-sized battery directly connected with a power motor or a direct power source from trolly lines and a switching circuit operated by external signals. The switch judges advance or retreat by two kinds of signals and the inspection vehicle is recovered by self-running. In order to recover the abnormally stopped inspection vehicle to the targeted place, the inspection vehicle is made in a free-running state by using a clutch mechanism and is pushed by an other vehicle. (T.M.)

  19. Remote-controlled vision-guided mobile robot system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ande, Raymond; Samu, Tayib; Hall, Ernest L.

    1997-09-01

    Automated guided vehicles (AGVs) have many potential applications in manufacturing, medicine, space and defense. The purpose of this paper is to describe exploratory research on the design of the remote controlled emergency stop and vision systems for an autonomous mobile robot. The remote control provides human supervision and emergency stop capabilities for the autonomous vehicle. The vision guidance provides automatic operation. A mobile robot test-bed has been constructed using a golf cart base. The mobile robot (Bearcat) was built for the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems (AUVS) 1997 competition. The mobile robot has full speed control with guidance provided by a vision system and an obstacle avoidance system using ultrasonic sensors systems. Vision guidance is accomplished using two CCD cameras with zoom lenses. The vision data is processed by a high speed tracking device, communicating with the computer the X, Y coordinates of blobs along the lane markers. The system also has three emergency stop switches and a remote controlled emergency stop switch that can disable the traction motor and set the brake. Testing of these systems has been done in the lab as well as on an outside test track with positive results that show that at five mph the vehicle can follow a line and at the same time avoid obstacles.

  20. Automating Finance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, John

    2007-01-01

    In past years, higher education's financial management side has been riddled with manual processes and aging mainframe applications. This article discusses schools which had taken advantage of an array of technologies that automate billing, payment processing, and refund processing in the case of overpayment. The investments are well worth it:…

  1. Library Automation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husby, Ole

    1990-01-01

    The challenges and potential benefits of automating university libraries are reviewed, with special attention given to cooperative systems. Aspects discussed include database size, the role of the university computer center, storage modes, multi-institutional systems, resource sharing, cooperative system management, networking, and intelligent…

  2. Development and Testing of Optimized Autonomous and Connected Vehicle Trajectories at Signalized Intersections [summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    Visions of self-driving vehicles abound in popular science and entertainment. Many programs are at work to make a reality catch of this imagination. Vehicle automation has progressed rapidly in recent years, from simple driver assistance technologies...

  3. Vehicle systems and payload requirements evaluation. [computer programs for identifying launch vehicle system requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rea, F. G.; Pittenger, J. L.; Conlon, R. J.; Allen, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    Techniques developed for identifying launch vehicle system requirements for NASA automated space missions are discussed. Emphasis is placed on development of computer programs and investigation of astrionics for OSS missions and Scout. The Earth Orbit Mission Program - 1 which performs linear error analysis of launch vehicle dispersions for both vehicle and navigation system factors is described along with the Interactive Graphic Orbit Selection program which allows the user to select orbits which satisfy mission requirements and to evaluate the necessary injection accuracy.

  4. Electric vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-03-01

    Quiet, clean, and efficient, electric vehicles (EVs) may someday become a practical mode of transportation for the general public. Electric vehicles can provide many advantages for the nation's environment and energy supply because they run on electricity, which can be produced from many sources of energy such as coal, natural gas, uranium, and hydropower. These vehicles offer fuel versatility to the transportation sector, which depends almost solely on oil for its energy needs. Electric vehicles are any mode of transportation operated by a motor that receives electricity from a battery or fuel cell. EVs come in all shapes and sizes and may be used for different tasks. Some EVs are small and simple, such as golf carts and electric wheel chairs. Others are larger and more complex, such as automobile and vans. Some EVs, such as fork lifts, are used in industries. In this fact sheet, we will discuss mostly automobiles and vans. There are also variations on electric vehicles, such as hybrid vehicles and solar-powered vehicles. Hybrid vehicles use electricity as their primary source of energy, however, they also use a backup source of energy, such as gasoline, methanol or ethanol. Solar-powered vehicles are electric vehicles that use photovoltaic cells (cells that convert solar energy to electricity) rather than utility-supplied electricity to recharge the batteries. These concepts are discussed.

  5. Policy and society related implications of automated driving : A review of literature and directions for future research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milakis, D.; Van Arem, B.; Van Wee, G.P.

    2015-01-01

    Automated driving has been receiving enormous attention by industry, government and academia. Although high expectations rest on this evolving transportation technology, little is known about its impacts. Most papers published so far have explored technological aspects of vehicle automation and

  6. Fault Tolerant Autonomous Lateral Control for Heavy Vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Talbot, Craig Matthew; Papadimitriou, Iakovos; Tomizuka, Masayoshi

    2004-01-01

    This report summarizes the research results of TO4233, "Fault Tolerant Autonomous Lateral Control for Heavy Vehicles". This project represents a continuing effort of PATH's research on Automated Highway Systems (AHS) and more specifically in the area of heavy vehicles. Research on the lateral control of heavy vehicles for AHS has been going on at PATH since 1993. MOU129, "Steering and Braking Control of Heavy Duty Vehicles" was the first project and it was followed by MOU242, "Lateral Control...

  7. Towards life-long mobility: accessible transportation with automation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeon, M.; Politis, I.; Shladover, S.E.; Sutter, C.; Terken, J.M.B.; Poppinga, B.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the prevalent discussions on automated vehicles, little research has been conducted with a focus on inclusiveness of traditionally excluded populations from driving. Even though we may envision a future where everyone can drive with perfect automation, the problem will not be that simple. As

  8. Missouri commercial vehicle operations : state business plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-05-15

    This business plan is intended to assist this state in improving its commercial vehicle operation regulation, guide the deployment and installation of intelligent transportation systems and to implement these systems in an efficient and cost effectiv...

  9. Intro to Valve Guide Reconditioning. Automotive Mechanics. Valves. Instructor's Guide [and] Student Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, W.

    This instructional package, one in a series of individualized instructional units on tools and techniques for repairing worn valve guides in motor vehicles, provides practical experience for students in working on cylinder heads. Covered in the module are reaming valve guides that are oversized to match a new oversized valve, reaming valve guides…

  10. Vehicle recovery and towing guideline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-01-15

    This guideline was developed to provide light and medium duty vehicles operators in the oil and gas industry with a set of best practices for avoiding injury and damage during the recovery of stuck vehicles. The aim of the guideline was to increase awareness of safety issues and promote the safe usage of the vehicles by personnel throughout the petroleum industry and to establish minimum standards of practice for vehicle recovery. The guideline included a step-by-step guide for pulling out a vehicle with a recovery strap as well as vehicle-mounted winch procedures. Pre-job checklists for both procedures were provided. Issues related to the strength rating of vehicle tow hooks and hitch receivers were discussed, as well as some of the hazards associated with steep terrains and heavy mud. The guideline also included recommendations for a vehicle recovery kit with instructions on vehicle recovery, a recovery strap, a recovery hitch and shackle, a collapsible shovel, traffic cones and reflector flares, and a heavy blanket and gloves. 7 refs., 2 tabs., 13 figs.

  11. Integrated robust controller for vehicle path following

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mashadi, Behrooz; Ahmadizadeh, Pouyan, E-mail: p-ahmadizadeh@iust.ac.ir; Majidi, Majid, E-mail: m-majidi@iust.ac.ir [Iran University of Science and Technology, School of Automotive Engineering (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahmoodi-Kaleybar, Mehdi, E-mail: m-mahmoodi-k@iust.ac.ir [Iran University of Science and Technology, School of Mechanical Engineering (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    The design of an integrated 4WS+DYC control system to guide a vehicle on a desired path is presented. The lateral dynamics of the path follower vehicle is formulated by considering important parameters. To reduce the effect of uncertainties in vehicle parameters, a robust controller is designed based on a μ-synthesis approach. Numerical simulations are performed using a nonlinear vehicle model in MATLAB environment in order to investigate the effectiveness of the designed controller. Results of simulations show that the controller has a profound ability to making the vehicle track the desired path in the presence of uncertainties.

  12. Integrated robust controller for vehicle path following

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mashadi, Behrooz; Ahmadizadeh, Pouyan; Majidi, Majid; Mahmoodi-Kaleybar, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    The design of an integrated 4WS+DYC control system to guide a vehicle on a desired path is presented. The lateral dynamics of the path follower vehicle is formulated by considering important parameters. To reduce the effect of uncertainties in vehicle parameters, a robust controller is designed based on a μ-synthesis approach. Numerical simulations are performed using a nonlinear vehicle model in MATLAB environment in order to investigate the effectiveness of the designed controller. Results of simulations show that the controller has a profound ability to making the vehicle track the desired path in the presence of uncertainties

  13. Role of automation in the ACRV operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepahban, S. F.

    1992-01-01

    The Assured Crew Return Vehicle (ACRV) will provide the Space Station Freedom with contingency means of return to earth (1) of one disabled crew member during medical emergencies, (2) of all crew members in case of accidents or failures of SSF systems, and (3) in case of interruption of the Space Shuttle flights. A wide range of vehicle configurations and system approaches are currently under study. The Program requirements focus on minimizing life cycle costs by ensuring simple operations, built-in reliability and maintainability. The ACRV philosophy of embedded operations is based on maximum use of existing facilities, resources and processes, while minimizing the interfaces and impacts to the Space Shuttle and Freedom programs. A preliminary integrated operations concept based on this philosophy and covering the ground, flight, mission support, and landing and recovery operations has been produced. To implement the ACRV operations concept, the underlying approach has been to rely on vehicle autonomy and automation, to the extent possible. Candidate functions and processes which may benefit from current or near-term automation and robotics technologies are identified. These include, but are not limited to, built-in automated ground tests and checkouts; use of the Freedom and the Orbiter remote manipulator systems, for ACRV berthing; automated passive monitoring and performance trend analysis, and periodic active checkouts during dormant periods. The major ACRV operations concept issues as they relate to the use of automation are discussed.

  14. Vehicle regulations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2006-01-01

    In the Netherlands, all vehicles using public roads must meet so-called permanent requirements. This is enforced by the police and, for some categories, also during the MOT. In the Netherlands, most types of motor vehicle1 can only be introduced to the market if they meet the entry requirements. For

  15. Jenkins The Definitive Guide

    CERN Document Server

    Smart, John

    2011-01-01

    Streamline software development with Jenkins, the popular Java-based open source tool that has revolutionized the way teams think about Continuous Integration (CI). This complete guide shows you how to automate your build, integration, release, and deployment processes with Jenkins-and demonstrates how CI can save you time, money, and many headaches. Ideal for developers, software architects, and project managers, Jenkins: The Definitive Guide is both a CI tutorial and a comprehensive Jenkins reference. Through its wealth of best practices and real-world tips, you'll discover how easy it is

  16. Plant automation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, L.J.; Sackett, J.I.; Dayal, Y.; Wagner, W.K.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes work at EBR-II in the development and demonstration of new control equipment and methods and associated schemes for plant prognosis, diagnosis, and automation. The development work has attracted the interest of other national laboratories, universities, and commercial companies. New initiatives include use of new control strategies, expert systems, advanced diagnostics, and operator displays. The unique opportunity offered by EBR-II is as a test bed where a total integrated approach to automatic reactor control can be directly tested under real power plant conditions

  17. Connected vehicle impacts on transportation planning technical memorandum #6: skills and expertise required to incorporate connected vehicles into transportation planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-08

    Professional development and training are essential to the incorporation of connected/automated vehicles (C/AV) into the : transportation planning process. In order to guarantee a successful deployment, transportation planning agencies and their : st...

  18. Policy challenges of increasing automation in driving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ata M. Khan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The convergence of information and communication technologies (ICT with automotive technologies has already resulted in automation features in road vehicles and this trend is expected to continue in the future owing to consumer demand, dropping costs of components, and improved reliability. While the automation features that have taken place so far are mainly in the form of information and driver warning technologies (classified as level I pre-2010, future developments in the medium term (level II 2010–2025 are expected to exhibit connected cognitive vehicle features and encompass increasing degree of automation in the form of advanced driver assistance systems. Although autonomous vehicles have been developed for research purposes and are being tested in controlled driving missions, the autonomous driving case is only a long term (level III 2025+ scenario. This paper contributes knowledge on technological forecasts regarding automation, policy challenges for each level of technology development and application context, and the essential instrument of cost-effectiveness for policy analysis which enables policy decisions on the automation systems to be assessed in a consistent and balanced manner. The cost of a system per vehicle is viewed against its effectiveness in meeting policy objectives of improving safety, efficiency, mobility, convenience and reducing environmental effects. Example applications are provided that illustrate the contribution of the methodology in providing information for supporting policy decisions. Given the uncertainties in system costs as well as effectiveness, the tool for assessing policies for future generation features probabilistic and utility-theoretic analysis capability. The policy issues defined and the assessment framework enable the resolution of policy challenges while allowing worthy innovative automation in driving to enhance future road transportation.

  19. Air Force construction automation/robotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nease, AL; Dusseault, Christopher

    1994-01-01

    The Air Force has several unique requirements that are being met through the development of construction robotic technology. The missions associated with these requirements place construction/repair equipment operators in potentially harmful situations. Additionally, force reductions require that human resources be leveraged to the maximum extent possible and that more stringent construction repair requirements push for increased automation. To solve these problems, the U.S. Air Force is undertaking a research and development effort at Tyndall AFB, FL to develop robotic teleoperation, telerobotics, robotic vehicle communications, automated damage assessment, vehicle navigation, mission/vehicle task control architecture, and associated computing environment. The ultimate goal is the fielding of robotic repair capability operating at the level of supervised autonomy. The authors of this paper will discuss current and planned efforts in construction/repair, explosive ordnance disposal, hazardous waste cleanup, fire fighting, and space construction.

  20. WIDAFELS flexible automation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shende, P.S.; Chander, K.P.; Ramadas, P.

    1990-01-01

    After discussing the various aspects of automation, some typical examples of various levels of automation are given. One of the examples is of automated production line for ceramic fuel pellets. (M.G.B.)

  1. Recommendations for Autonomous Industrial Vehicle Performance Standards

    OpenAIRE

    Bostelman , Roger

    2016-01-01

    International audience; A workshop was held at the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, called: “Autonomous Industrial Vehicles: From the Laboratory to the Factory Floor”. Nine research papers were presented followed by a discussion session summarized in this paper. The workshop findings are intended to be useful for developing standards within the ASTM F45 Committee for Driverless Automatic Industrial Vehicles. This paper provides feedback from the discussion listing the...

  2. Contribution to intelligent vehicle platoon control

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao , Jin

    2010-01-01

    This PhD thesis is dedicated to the control strategies for intelligent vehicle platoon in highway with the main aims of alleviating traffic congestion and improving traffic safety. After a review of the different existing automated driving systems, the vehicle longitudinal and lateral dynamic models are derived. Then, the longitudinal control and lateral control strategies are studied respectively. At first, the longitudinal control system is designed to be hierarchical with an upper level co...

  3. Low cost automation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-03-01

    This book indicates method of building of automation plan, design of automation facilities, automation and CHIP process like basics of cutting, NC processing machine and CHIP handling, automation unit, such as drilling unit, tapping unit, boring unit, milling unit and slide unit, application of oil pressure on characteristics and basic oil pressure circuit, application of pneumatic, automation kinds and application of process, assembly, transportation, automatic machine and factory automation.

  4. Automated Budget System -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The Automated Budget System (ABS) automates management and planning of the Mike Monroney Aeronautical Center (MMAC) budget by providing enhanced capability to plan,...

  5. Model Year 2017 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-11-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles.

  6. Model Year 2012 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2011-11-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles.

  7. Model Year 2013 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2012-12-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles.

  8. Model Year 2011 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2010-11-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles.

  9. Model Year 2018 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2017-12-07

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles.

  10. Abandoned vehicles

    CERN Multimedia

    Relations with the Host States Service

    2004-01-01

    The services in charge of managing the CERN site have recently noted an increase in the number of abandoned vehicles. This poses a risk from the point of view of safety and security and, on the eve of several important events in honour of CERN's fiftieth anniversary, is detrimental to the Organization's image. Owners of vehicles that have been left immobile for some time on the CERN site, including on the external car park by the flags, are therefore invited to contact the Reception and Access Control Service (service-parking-longterm@cern.ch) before 1st October 2004 and, where appropriate, move their vehicle to a designated long-term parking area. After this date, any vehicle whose owner has failed to respond to this request and which is without a number plate, has been stationary for several weeks or is out of service, may be impounded at the owner's risk and expense. Relations with the Host States Service Tel. 72848

  11. Sustainable transportation : technology, engineering, and science - summer camp instructor's guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    This document reproduces the instructors guide for a ten day transportation engineering summer camp that was held at the University of Idaho in July 2013. The instructors guide is split into three units: Unit 1: Vehicle Technology, Unit 2: Traf...

  12. Automation 2017

    CERN Document Server

    Zieliński, Cezary; Kaliczyńska, Małgorzata

    2017-01-01

    This book consists of papers presented at Automation 2017, an international conference held in Warsaw from March 15 to 17, 2017. It discusses research findings associated with the concepts behind INDUSTRY 4.0, with a focus on offering a better understanding of and promoting participation in the Fourth Industrial Revolution. Each chapter presents a detailed analysis of a specific technical problem, in most cases followed by a numerical analysis, simulation and description of the results of implementing the solution in a real-world context. The theoretical results, practical solutions and guidelines presented are valuable for both researchers working in the area of engineering sciences and practitioners looking for solutions to industrial problems. .

  13. Marketing automation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TODOR Raluca Dania

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The automation of the marketing process seems to be nowadays, the only solution to face the major changes brought by the fast evolution of technology and the continuous increase in supply and demand. In order to achieve the desired marketing results, businessis have to employ digital marketing and communication services. These services are efficient and measurable thanks to the marketing technology used to track, score and implement each campaign. Due to the technical progress, the marketing fragmentation, demand for customized products and services on one side and the need to achieve constructive dialogue with the customers, immediate and flexible response and the necessity to measure the investments and the results on the other side, the classical marketing approached had changed continue to improve substantially.

  14. Connected vehicle applications : safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Connected vehicle safety applications are designed to increase situational awareness : and reduce or eliminate crashes through vehicle-to-infrastructure, vehicle-to-vehicle, : and vehicle-to-pedestrian data transmissions. Applications support advisor...

  15. Design and Implementation of Company Tailored Automated Material Handling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langer, Gilad; Bilberg, Arne

    1996-01-01

    This article focuses on the problems of analysing automation of material handling systems in order to develop an efficient automated solution that is specifically tailored to the company. The research has resulted in development of new methods for evaluating factory automation from design...... to implementation. The goals of the research were to analyse and evaluate automation in order to obtain an advantageous combination of human and automated resources. The idea is to asses different solutions in a virtual environment, where experiments and analyses can be performed so that the company can justify...... for their application with computer aided information processing tools. The framework is named the "Automated Material Handling (AMH) Preference GuideLine". The research has been carried out in close co-operation with Danish and European industry, where implementations of automation can be referred to. It is our...

  16. Looking forward : In-vehicle auxiliary display positioning affects carsickness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, O.X.; Bos, J.E.; Diels, C.

    2018-01-01

    Carsickness is associated with a mismatch between actual and anticipated sensory signals. Occupants of automated vehicles, especially when using a display, are at higher risk of becoming carsick than drivers of conventional vehicles. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of positioning of

  17. Obstacle Avoidance Control Design: An Experimental Evaluation in Vehicle Platooning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goos, J.; Alirezaei, M.; Semsar-Kazerooni, E.; Ploeg, J.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, an obstacle avoidance controller (OA) based on the impedance control method is developed. The main goal of the OA controller is to guarantee robust gap making for a merging vehicle within a platoon of vehicles which are longitudinally automated. The proposed OA controller is developed

  18. A Fuzzy Rule-based Controller For Automotive Vehicle Guidance

    OpenAIRE

    Hessburg, Thomas; Tomizuka, Masayoshi

    1991-01-01

    A fuzzy rule-based controller is applied to lateral guidance of a vehicle for an automated highway system. The fuzzy rules, based on human drivers' experiences, are developed to track the center of a lane in the presence of external disturbances and over a range of vehicle operating conditions.

  19. Automated ultrasonic inspection using PULSDAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naybour, P.J.

    1992-01-01

    PULSDAT (Portable Ultrasonic Data Acquisition Tool) is a system for recording the data from single probe automated ultrasonic inspections. It is one of a range of instruments and software developed by Nuclear Electric to carry out a wide variety of high quality ultrasonic inspections. These vary from simple semi-automated inspections through to multi-probe, highly automated ones. PULSDAT runs under the control of MIPS software, and collects data which is compatible with the GUIDE data display system. PULSDAT is therefore fully compatible with Nuclear Electric's multi-probe inspection systems and utilises all the reliability and quality assurance of the software. It is a rugged, portable system that can be used in areas of difficult access. The paper discusses the benefits of automated inspection and gives an outline of the main features of PULSDAT. Since April 1990 PULSDAT has been used in several applications within Nuclear Electric and this paper presents two examples: the first is a ferritic set-through nozzle and the second is an austenitic fillet weld. (Author)

  20. Development of sensor guided precision sprayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuizen, A.T.; Zande, van de J.C.

    2013-01-01

    Sensor guided precision sprayers were developed to automate the spray process with a focus on emission reduction and identical or increased efficacy, with the precision agriculture concept in mind. Within the project “Innovations2” sensor guided precision sprayers were introduced to leek,

  1. Physics of automated driving in framework of three-phase traffic theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerner, Boris S

    2018-04-01

    We have revealed physical features of automated driving in the framework of the three-phase traffic theory for which there is no fixed time headway to the preceding vehicle. A comparison with the classical model approach to automated driving for which an automated driving vehicle tries to reach a fixed (desired or "optimal") time headway to the preceding vehicle has been made. It turns out that automated driving in the framework of the three-phase traffic theory can exhibit the following advantages in comparison with the classical model of automated driving: (i) The absence of string instability. (ii) Considerably smaller speed disturbances at road bottlenecks. (iii) Automated driving vehicles based on the three-phase theory can decrease the probability of traffic breakdown at the bottleneck in mixed traffic flow consisting of human driving and automated driving vehicles; on the contrary, even a single automated driving vehicle based on the classical approach can provoke traffic breakdown at the bottleneck in mixed traffic flow.

  2. Physics of automated driving in framework of three-phase traffic theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerner, Boris S.

    2018-04-01

    We have revealed physical features of automated driving in the framework of the three-phase traffic theory for which there is no fixed time headway to the preceding vehicle. A comparison with the classical model approach to automated driving for which an automated driving vehicle tries to reach a fixed (desired or "optimal") time headway to the preceding vehicle has been made. It turns out that automated driving in the framework of the three-phase traffic theory can exhibit the following advantages in comparison with the classical model of automated driving: (i) The absence of string instability. (ii) Considerably smaller speed disturbances at road bottlenecks. (iii) Automated driving vehicles based on the three-phase theory can decrease the probability of traffic breakdown at the bottleneck in mixed traffic flow consisting of human driving and automated driving vehicles; on the contrary, even a single automated driving vehicle based on the classical approach can provoke traffic breakdown at the bottleneck in mixed traffic flow.

  3. Vehicle-to-Vehicle crash avoidance technology : public acceptance final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The Vehicle-to-Vehicle (V2V) Crash Avoidance Public Acceptance report summarizes data from a survey of the current level of awareness and acceptance of V2V technology. The survey was guided by findings from prior studies and 12 focus groups. A total ...

  4. Both Automation and Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Royal

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the concept of a paperless society and the current situation in library automation. Various applications of automation and telecommunications are addressed, and future library automation is considered. Automation at the Monroe County Public Library in Bloomington, Indiana, is described as an example. (MES)

  5. The Solutions to the Problem of Temporary Vehicle Parking in the City. The Analysis of Vehicle Parking Time and Costs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ričardas Mockus

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Methods of solving the problems of temporary parking of vehicles in the city by using the automatic parking systems are considered. The investigation of vehicle parking is described and the comparison of the ramp-type and automated parking lots is presented.Article in Lithuanian

  6. Driverless vehicles; Automatisches Fahren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goetting, H.H. [MSEE, Goetting KG, Lehrte (Germany)

    2000-07-01

    New sensor systems, radiocommunication and computer technology have speeded up progress in automation. Driverless vehicles are now feasible. They offer maximum mobility and driving comfort, arrival on time and with minimum environmental effects. Germany should make use of its technological advantage and start trial projects on public roads now. [German] Mit der neuen Sensor-, Funk- und Rechnertechnik ist Bewegung in die Automatisierung gekommen. Automatisches Fahren hat grosse Vorteile fuer unser Wirtschafts- und Sozialleben. Es bietet fuer uns alle ein hoechstes Mass an Mobilitaet, entspannter Bewegung, puenktlicher Ankunft, geringster Belastung fuer die Umwelt (weniger Kraftstoff, weniger Laerm, weniger Platzbedarf). Es ist jetzt entscheidend, dass wir unseren technologischen Vorsprung in Deutschland nutzen, und die ersten Erprobungsprojekte auf oeffentlichen Strassen starten. (orig.)

  7. Automated nutrient analyses in seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitledge, T.E.; Malloy, S.C.; Patton, C.J.; Wirick, C.D.

    1981-02-01

    This manual was assembled for use as a guide for analyzing the nutrient content of seawater samples collected in the marine coastal zone of the Northeast United States and the Bering Sea. Some modifications (changes in dilution or sample pump tube sizes) may be necessary to achieve optimum measurements in very pronounced oligotrophic, eutrophic or brackish areas. Information is presented under the following section headings: theory and mechanics of automated analysis; continuous flow system description; operation of autoanalyzer system; cookbook of current nutrient methods; automated analyzer and data analysis software; computer interfacing and hardware modifications; and trouble shooting. The three appendixes are entitled: references and additional reading; manifold components and chemicals; and software listings. (JGB)

  8. Survey and comparison of automated UT systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neeley, V.I.; Avioli, M.J.

    1988-01-01

    In the past decade, the limitations of manual UT inspections have become more severe and adverse. Perhaps the best evidence of this has been the problem of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in boiling water reactors (BWR). The onset of this problem clearly showed that better and more sophisticated UT inspection methods must be developed to assure the industry that an appropriate level of inspection integrity could be maintained. While automated UT inspection systems have been under development for some time, this event certainly spurred this activity and has resulted in a variety of commercial systems. The intent of this project, sponsored by EPRI, is to develop a utility engineer's 'Buyer guide' to automated UT systems. Comparison of different automated UT systems along with results of questionnaires on manual UT versus automated UT costs and effectiveness are reviewed. (author)

  9. electric vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. R. Lee

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A major problem facing battery-powered electric vehicles is in their batteries: weight and charge capacity. Thus, a battery-powered electric vehicle only has a short driving range. To travel for a longer distance, the batteries are required to be recharged frequently. In this paper, we construct a model for a battery-powered electric vehicle, in which driving strategy is to be obtained such that the total travelling time between two locations is minimized. The problem is formulated as an optimization problem with switching times and speed as decision variables. This is an unconventional optimization problem. However, by using the control parametrization enhancing technique (CPET, it is shown that this unconventional optimization is equivalent to a conventional optimal parameter selection problem. Numerical examples are solved using the proposed method.

  10. The role of automation and artificial intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schappell, R. T.

    1983-07-01

    Consideration is given to emerging technologies that are not currently in common use, yet will be mature enough for implementation in a space station. Artificial intelligence (AI) will permit more autonomous operation and improve the man-machine interfaces. Technology goals include the development of expert systems, a natural language query system, automated planning systems, and AI image understanding systems. Intelligent robots and teleoperators will be needed, together with improved sensory systems for the robotics, housekeeping, vehicle control, and spacecraft housekeeping systems. Finally, NASA is developing the ROBSIM computer program to evaluate level of automation, perform parametric studies and error analyses, optimize trajectories and control systems, and assess AI technology.

  11. Automated Transportation Management System (ATMS) user's manual. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, P.D.

    1994-01-01

    The Automated Transportation Management System (ATMS) Software User Guide (SUG) constitutes the user procedures for the ATMS System. Information in this document will be used by the user to operate the automated system. It is intended to be used as a reference manual to guide and direct the user(s) through the ATMS software product and its environment. The objectives of ATMS are as follows: to better support the Procurement function with freight rate information; to free Transportation Logistics personnel from routine activities such as the auditing and input of freight billing information; to comply with Headquarters Department of Energy-Inspector General (DOE-IG) audit findings to automate transportation management functions; to reduce the keying of data into the Shipment Mobility Accountability Collection (SMAC) database; and to provide automation for the preparing of Bill of Lading, Declaration of Dangerous Goods, Emergency Response Guide and shipping Labels using HM181 Retrieval of hazardous material table text information

  12. Electric-Drive Vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Septon, Kendall K [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-09-11

    Electric-drive vehicles use electricity as their primary fuel or to improve the efficiency of conventional vehicle designs. These vehicles can be divided into three categories: Hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), All-electric vehicles (EVs). Together, PHEVs and EVs can also be referred to as plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs).

  13. Electric-Drive Vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2017-09-01

    Electric-drive vehicles use electricity as their primary fuel or to improve the efficiency of conventional vehicle designs. These vehicles can be divided into three categories: Hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), All-electric vehicles (EVs). Together, PHEVs and EVs can also be referred to as plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs).

  14. Customer loads of two-wheeled vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorges, C.; Öztürk, K.; Liebich, R.

    2017-12-01

    Customer usage profiles are the most unknown influences in vehicle design targets and they play an important role in durability analysis. This publication presents a customer load acquisition system for two-wheeled vehicles that utilises the vehicle's onboard signals. A road slope estimator was developed to reveal the unknown slope resistance force with the help of a linear Kalman filter. Furthermore, an automated mass estimator was developed to consider the correct vehicle loading. The mass estimation is performed by an extended Kalman filter. Finally, a model-based wheel force calculation was derived, which is based on the superposition of forces calculated from measured onboard signals. The calculated wheel forces were validated by measurements with wheel-load transducers through the comparison of rainflow matrices. The calculated wheel forces correspond with the measured wheel forces in terms of both quality and quantity. The proposed methods can be used to gather field data for improved vehicle design loads.

  15. Autonomous Vehicles: Disengagements, Accidents and Reaction Times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Vinayak V; Chand, Sai; Nair, Divya J

    2016-01-01

    Autonomous vehicles are being viewed with scepticism in their ability to improve safety and the driving experience. A critical issue with automated driving at this stage of its development is that it is not yet reliable and safe. When automated driving fails, or is limited, the autonomous mode disengages and the drivers are expected to resume manual driving. For this transition to occur safely, it is imperative that drivers react in an appropriate and timely manner. Recent data released from the California trials provide compelling insights into the current factors influencing disengagements of autonomous mode. Here we show that the number of accidents observed has a significantly high correlation with the autonomous miles travelled. The reaction times to take control of the vehicle in the event of a disengagement was found to have a stable distribution across different companies at 0.83 seconds on average. However, there were differences observed in reaction times based on the type of disengagements, type of roadway and autonomous miles travelled. Lack of trust caused by the exposure to automated disengagements was found to increase the likelihood to take control of the vehicle manually. Further, with increased vehicle miles travelled the reaction times were found to increase, which suggests an increased level of trust with more vehicle miles travelled. We believe that this research would provide insurers, planners, traffic management officials and engineers fundamental insights into trust and reaction times that would help them design and engineer their systems.

  16. Autonomous Vehicles: Disengagements, Accidents and Reaction Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Vinayak V.; Chand, Sai; Nair, Divya J.

    2016-01-01

    Autonomous vehicles are being viewed with scepticism in their ability to improve safety and the driving experience. A critical issue with automated driving at this stage of its development is that it is not yet reliable and safe. When automated driving fails, or is limited, the autonomous mode disengages and the drivers are expected to resume manual driving. For this transition to occur safely, it is imperative that drivers react in an appropriate and timely manner. Recent data released from the California trials provide compelling insights into the current factors influencing disengagements of autonomous mode. Here we show that the number of accidents observed has a significantly high correlation with the autonomous miles travelled. The reaction times to take control of the vehicle in the event of a disengagement was found to have a stable distribution across different companies at 0.83 seconds on average. However, there were differences observed in reaction times based on the type of disengagements, type of roadway and autonomous miles travelled. Lack of trust caused by the exposure to automated disengagements was found to increase the likelihood to take control of the vehicle manually. Further, with increased vehicle miles travelled the reaction times were found to increase, which suggests an increased level of trust with more vehicle miles travelled. We believe that this research would provide insurers, planners, traffic management officials and engineers fundamental insights into trust and reaction times that would help them design and engineer their systems. PMID:27997566

  17. Autonomous Vehicles: Disengagements, Accidents and Reaction Times.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinayak V Dixit

    Full Text Available Autonomous vehicles are being viewed with scepticism in their ability to improve safety and the driving experience. A critical issue with automated driving at this stage of its development is that it is not yet reliable and safe. When automated driving fails, or is limited, the autonomous mode disengages and the drivers are expected to resume manual driving. For this transition to occur safely, it is imperative that drivers react in an appropriate and timely manner. Recent data released from the California trials provide compelling insights into the current factors influencing disengagements of autonomous mode. Here we show that the number of accidents observed has a significantly high correlation with the autonomous miles travelled. The reaction times to take control of the vehicle in the event of a disengagement was found to have a stable distribution across different companies at 0.83 seconds on average. However, there were differences observed in reaction times based on the type of disengagements, type of roadway and autonomous miles travelled. Lack of trust caused by the exposure to automated disengagements was found to increase the likelihood to take control of the vehicle manually. Further, with increased vehicle miles travelled the reaction times were found to increase, which suggests an increased level of trust with more vehicle miles travelled. We believe that this research would provide insurers, planners, traffic management officials and engineers fundamental insights into trust and reaction times that would help them design and engineer their systems.

  18. Programmable automated transistor test system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truong, L.V.; Sundberg, G.R.

    1986-01-01

    The paper describes a programmable automated transistor test system (PATTS) and its utilization to evaluate bipolar transistors and Darlingtons, and such MOSFET and special types as can be accommodated with the PATTS base-drive. An application of a pulsed power technique at low duty cycles in a non-destructive test is used to examine the dynamic switching characteristic curves of power transistors. Data collection, manipulation, storage, and output are operator interactive but are guided and controlled by the system software. In addition a library of test data is established on disks, tapes, and hard copies for future reference

  19. Programmable, automated transistor test system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, L. V.; Sundburg, G. R.

    1986-01-01

    A programmable, automated transistor test system was built to supply experimental data on new and advanced power semiconductors. The data will be used for analytical models and by engineers in designing space and aircraft electric power systems. A pulsed power technique was used at low duty cycles in a nondestructive test to examine the dynamic switching characteristic curves of power transistors in the 500 to 1000 V, 10 to 100 A range. Data collection, manipulation, storage, and output are operator interactive but are guided and controlled by the system software.

  20. Automated Car Park Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabros, J. P.; Tabañag, D.; Espra, A.; Gerasta, O. J.

    2015-06-01

    This study aims to develop a prototype for an Automated Car Park Management System that will increase the quality of service of parking lots through the integration of a smart system that assists motorist in finding vacant parking lot. The research was based on implementing an operating system and a monitoring system for parking system without the use of manpower. This will include Parking Guidance and Information System concept which will efficiently assist motorists and ensures the safety of the vehicles and the valuables inside the vehicle. For monitoring, Optical Character Recognition was employed to monitor and put into list all the cars entering the parking area. All parking events in this system are visible via MATLAB GUI which contain time-in, time-out, time consumed information and also the lot number where the car parks. To put into reality, this system has a payment method, and it comes via a coin slot operation to control the exit gate. The Automated Car Park Management System was successfully built by utilizing microcontrollers specifically one PIC18f4550 and two PIC16F84s and one PIC16F628A.

  1. Automated driving and its effects on the safety ecosystem: How do compatibility issues affect the transition period?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Loon, R.J.; Martens, Marieke Hendrikje

    2015-01-01

    Different components of automated vehicles are being made available commercially as we speak. Much research has been conducted into these components and many of these have been studied with respect to their effects on safety, but the transition period from non-automated driving to fully automated

  2. Automated driving and its effect on the safety ecosystem: how do compatibility issues affect the transition period?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loon, R.J. van; Martens, M.H.

    2015-01-01

    Different components of automated vehicles are being made available commercially as we speak. Much research has been conducted into these components and many of these have been studied with respect to their effects on safety, but the transition period from non-automated driving to fully automated

  3. Control of Multiple Robotic Sentry Vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feddema, J.; Klarer, P.; Lewis, C.

    1999-04-01

    As part of a project for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, Sandia National Laboratories is developing and testing the feasibility of using of a cooperative team of robotic sentry vehicles to guard a perimeter and to perform surround and diversion tasks. This paper describes on-going activities in the development of these robotic sentry vehicles. To date, we have developed a robotic perimeter detection system which consists of eight ''Roving All Terrain Lunar Explorer Rover'' (RATLER{trademark}) vehicles, a laptop-based base-station, and several Miniature Intrusion Detection Sensors (MIDS). A radio frequency receiver on each of the RATLER vehicles alerts the sentry vehicles of alarms from the hidden MIDS. When an alarm is received, each vehicle decides whether it should investigate the alarm based on the proximity of itself and the other vehicles to the alarm. As one vehicle attends an alarm, the other vehicles adjust their position around the perimeter to better prepare for another alarm. We have also demonstrated the ability to drive multiple vehicles in formation via tele-operation or by waypoint GPS navigation. This is currently being extended to include mission planning capabilities. At the base-station, the operator can draw on an aerial map the goal regions to be surrounded and the repulsive regions to be avoided. A potential field path planner automatically generates a path from the vehicles' current position to the goal regions while avoiding the repulsive regions and the other vehicles. This path is previewed to the operator before the regions are downloaded to the vehicles. The same potential field path planner resides on the vehicle, except additional repulsive forces from on-board proximity sensors guide the vehicle away from unplanned obstacles.

  4. Development of nuclear power plant automated remote patrol system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, R.; Kubo, K.; Sato, K.; Taguchi, J.

    1984-01-01

    An Automated Remote Patrol System was developed for a remote inspection, observation and monitoring of nuclear power plant's components. This automated remote patrol system consists of; a vehicle moving along a monorail; three rails mounted in a monorail for data transmission and for power supply; an image fiber connected to a TV camera; an arm type mechanism (manipulator) for moving image fiber; a computer for control and data processing and operator's console. Special features of this Automated Remote Patrol System are as follows: The inspection vehicle runs along horizontal and vertical (up/down) monorails. The arm type mechanism (manipulator) on the vehicle is used to move image fiber. Slide type electric collectors are used for data transmission and power supply. Time-division multiplexing is adapted for data transmission. Voice communication is used for controlling mechanisms. Pattern recognition is used for data processing. The experience that has been obtained from a series of various tests is summarized. (author)

  5. Model Year 2015 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2014-12-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles. The vehicles listed have been divided into three classes of cars, three classes of light duty trucks, and three classes of special purpose vehicles.

  6. Model Year 2009 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2008-10-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles. The vehicles listed have been divided into three classes of cars, three classes of light duty trucks, and three classes of special purpose vehicles.

  7. Model Year 2005 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2004-11-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles. The vehicles listed have been divided into three classes of cars, three classes of light duty trucks, and three classes of special purpose vehicles.

  8. Model Year 2016 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-11-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles. The vehicles listed have been divided into three classes of cars, three classes of light duty trucks, and three classes of special purpose vehicles.

  9. Model Year 2010 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-10-14

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles. The vehicles listed have been divided into three classes of cars, three classes of light duty trucks, and three classes of special purpose vehicles.

  10. Model Year 2014 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-12-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles. The vehicles listed have been divided into three classes of cars, three classes of light duty trucks, and three classes of special purpose vehicles.

  11. Automated Intelligent Assistant for mass spectrometry operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filby, E.E.; Rankin, R.A.; Yoshida, D.E.

    1991-01-01

    The Automated Intelligent Assistant is designed to insure that our mass spectrometers produce timely, high-quality measurement data. The design combines instrument interfacing and expert system technology to automate an adaptable set-point damage prevention strategy. When shutdowns occur, the Assistant can help guide troubleshooting efforts. Stored real-time data will help our development program upgrade and improve the system, and also make it possible to re-run previously-observed instrument problems as ''live'' training exercises for the instrument operators. Initial work has focused on implementing the Assistant for the instrument ultra-high vacuum components. 14 refs., 5 figs

  12. Vehicle Controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    UNISTICK is an airplane-like joystick being developed by Johnson Engineering under NASA and VA sponsorship. It allows a driver to control a vehicle with one hand, and is based upon technology developed for the Apollo Lunar Landings of the 1970's. It allows severely handicapped drivers to operate an automobile or van easily. The system is expected to be in production by March 1986.

  13. Towards life-long mobility: Accessible transportation with automation

    OpenAIRE

    Jeon, M; Politis, Ioannis; Shladover, SE; Sutter, C; Terken, JMB; Poppinga, B

    2016-01-01

    Despite the prevalent discussions on automated vehicles, little research has been conducted with a focus on inclusiveness of traditionally excluded populations from driving. Even though we may envision a future where everyone can drive with perfect automation, the problem will not be that simple. As with any other problem domains, we need to scrutinize all the design considerations - not only each population's characteristics (capabilities and limitations), but also the entire system, technol...

  14. Preliminary design for spent fuel canister handling systems in a canister transfer and installation vehicle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wendelin, T.; Suikki, M.

    2008-12-01

    The report presents a spent fuel canister transfer and installation vehicle. The vehicle is used for carrying the fuel canister into a disposal tunnel and installing it into a deposition hole. The report outlines basic requirements and a design for canister handling equipment used in a canister transfer and installation vehicle, a description regarding the operation and maintenance of the equipment, as well as a cost estimate. Specific vehicles will be manufactured for all canister types in order to minimize the height of the disposal tunnels. This report is only focused on a transfer and installation vehicle for OL1-2 fuel canisters. Detailed designing and selection of final components have not yet been carried out. The report also describes the vehicle's requirements for the structures of a repository system, as well as actions in possible malfunction or fault situations. The spent fuel canister is brought from an encapsulation plant by a canister lift down to the repository level. The fuel canister is driven from the canister lift by an automated guided vehicle onto a canister hoist at a canister loading station. The canister transfer and installation vehicle is waiting for the canister with its radiation shield in an upright position above the canister hoist. The hoist carries the canister upward until the vehicle's own lifting means grab hold of the canister and raise it up into the vehicle's radiation shield. This is followed by turning the radiation shield to a transport position and by closing it in a radiation-proof manner against a rear radiation shield. The vehicle is driven along the central tunnel into the disposal tunnel and parked on top of the deposition hole. The vehicle's radiation shield is turned to the upright position and the canister is lowered with the vehicle's hydraulic winches into a bentonite-lined deposition hole. The radiation shield is turned back to the transport position and the vehicle can be driven out of the disposal tunnel

  15. Automated Coal-Mine Shuttle Car

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, E. R., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Cable-guided car increases efficiency in underground coal mines. Unmanned vehicle contains storage batteries in side panels for driving traction motors located in wheels. Batteries recharged during inactive periods or slid out as unit and replaced by fresh battery bank. Onboard generator charges batteries as car operates.

  16. Energy Assessment of Automated Mobility Districts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yuche [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-08-03

    Automated vehicles (AVs) are increasingly being discussed as the basis for on-demand mobility services, introducing a new paradigm in which a fleet of AVs displace private automobiles for day-to-day travel in dense activity districts. This project examines such a concept to displace privately owned automobiles within a region containing dense activity generators (jobs, retail, entertainment, etc.), referred to as an automated mobility district (AMDs). The project reviews several such districts including airport, college campuses, business parks, downtown urban cores, and military bases, with examples of previous attempts to meet the mobility needs apart from private automobiles, some with automated technology and others with more traditional transit based solutions. The issues and benefits of AMDs are framed within the perspective of intra-district, inter-district, and border issues, and the requirements for a modeling framework are identified to adequately reflect the breadth of mobility, energy, and emissions impact anticipated with AMDs.

  17. Squid-inspired vehicle design using coupled fluid-solid analytical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgio-Serchi, Francesco; Weymouth, Gabriel

    2017-11-01

    The need for enhanced automation in the marine and maritime fields is fostering research into robust and highly maneuverable autonomous underwater vehicles. To address these needs we develop design principles for a new generation of soft-bodied aquatic vehicles similar to octopi and squids. In particular, we consider the capability of pulsed-jetting bodies to boost thrust by actively modifying their external body-shape and in this way benefit of the contribution from added-mass variation. We present an analytical formulation of the coupled fluid-structure interaction between the elastic body and the ambient fluid. The model incorporates a number of new salient contributions to the soft-body dynamics. We highlight the role of added-mass variation effects of the external fluid in enhancing thrust and assess how the shape-changing actuation is impeded by a confinement-related unsteady inertial term and by an external shape-dependent fluid stiffness contribution. We show how the analysis of these combined terms has guided us to the design of a new prototype of a squid-inspired vehicle tuning of the natural frequency of the coupled fluid-solid system with the purpose of optimizing its actuation routine.

  18. An automated swimming respirometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    STEFFENSEN, JF; JOHANSEN, K; BUSHNELL, PG

    1984-01-01

    An automated respirometer is described that can be used for computerized respirometry of trout and sharks.......An automated respirometer is described that can be used for computerized respirometry of trout and sharks....

  19. Autonomy and Automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shively, Jay

    2017-01-01

    A significant level of debate and confusion has surrounded the meaning of the terms autonomy and automation. Automation is a multi-dimensional concept, and we propose that Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (RPAS) automation should be described with reference to the specific system and task that has been automated, the context in which the automation functions, and other relevant dimensions. In this paper, we present definitions of automation, pilot in the loop, pilot on the loop and pilot out of the loop. We further propose that in future, the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) RPAS Panel avoids the use of the terms autonomy and autonomous when referring to automated systems on board RPA. Work Group 7 proposes to develop, in consultation with other workgroups, a taxonomy of Levels of Automation for RPAS.

  20. Configuration Management Automation (CMA) -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — Configuration Management Automation (CMA) will provide an automated, integrated enterprise solution to support CM of FAA NAS and Non-NAS assets and investments. CMA...

  1. Automated Mobility Transitions: Governing Processes in the UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debbie Hopkins

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary systems of mobility are undergoing a transition towards automation. In the UK, this transition is being led by (often new partnerships between incumbent manufacturers and new entrants, in collaboration with national governments, local/regional councils, and research institutions. This paper first offers a framework for analyzing the governance of the transition, adapting ideas from the Transition Management (TM perspective, and then applies the framework to ongoing automated vehicle transition dynamics in the UK. The empirical analysis suggests that the UK has adopted a reasonably comprehensive approach to the governing of automated vehicle innovation but that this approach cannot be characterized as sufficiently inclusive, democratic, diverse and open. The lack of inclusivity, democracy, diversity and openness is symptomatic of the post-political character of how the UK’s automated mobility transition is being governed. The paper ends with a call for a reconfiguration of the automated vehicle transition in the UK and beyond, so that much more space is created for dissent and for reflexive and comprehensive big picture thinking on (automated mobility futures.

  2. Pilot Dependence on Imperfect Diagnostic Automation in Simulated UAV Flights: An Attentional Visual Scanning Analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wickens, Christopher; Dixon, Stephen; Goh, Juliana; Hammer, Ben

    2005-01-01

    An unmanned air vehicle (UAV) simulation was designed to reveal the effects of imperfectly reliable diagnostic automation a monitor of system health parameters on pilot attention, as the latter was assessed via visual scanning...

  3. ALGORITHM OF WORK OF SYSTEM OF MANAGEMENT BY AUTOMATED GEAR-BOXES CARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Smirnov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of algorithms of management system’s work by the automated gear-boxes vehicles is considered and the results of their practical use on the example of the KamAZ truck are considered.

  4. Automated delay estimation at signalized intersections : phase I concept and algorithm development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Currently there are several methods to measure the performance of surface streets, but their capabilities in dynamically estimating vehicle delay are limited. The objective of this research is to develop a method to automate traffic delay estimation ...

  5. Automated Model Generation for Hybrid Vehicles Optimization and Control Création automatique de modèles de composants pour l’optimisation et le contrôle de véhicules hybrides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verdonck N.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Systematic optimization of modern powertrains, and hybrids in particular, requires the representation of the system by means of Backward Quasistatic Models (BQM. In contrast, the models used in realistic powertrain simulators are often of the Forward Dynamic Model (FDM type. The paper presents a methodology to derive BQM’s of modern powertrain components, as parametric, steady-state limits of their FDM counterparts. The parametric nature of this procedure implies that changing the system modeled does not imply relaunching a simulation campaign, but only adjusting the corresponding parameters in the BQM. The approach is illustrated with examples concerning turbocharged engines, electric motors, and electrochemical batteries, and the influence of a change in parameters on the supervisory control of an hybrid vehicle is then studied offline, in co-simulation and on an HiL test bench adapted to hybrid vehicles (HyHiL. L’optimisation de l’utilisation des groupes moto-propulseurs (GMP modernes nécessite de modéliser le système de manière quasi-statique avec une logique inverse (“Backward Quasistatic Model” – BQM, en particulier dans le cas des GMP hybrides. Cependant, les modèles utilisés pour la simulation réaliste de ces GMP sont souvent dynamiques à logique directe (“Forward Dynamic Model” – FDM. Cet article présente une méthodologie pour obtenir les BQM des composants de GMP actuels directement issus de la limite quasi-statique des FDM correspondants de manière analytique. Grâce à l’aspect paramétrique de cette procédure, il n’est pas nécessaire de relancer une campagne de simulations après chaque changement du système modélisé: il suffit de modifier les paramètres correspondants dans le BQM. Cette approche est illustrée par trois cas d’étude (moteur turbo, moteur électrique et batterie, et l’effet d’un changement de paramètre sur le contrôle de supervision d’un véhicule hybride est

  6. Developing Policy for Urban Autonomous Vehicles: Impact on Congestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Metz

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available An important problem for surface transport is road traffic congestion, which is ubiquitous and difficult to mitigate. Accordingly, a question for policymakers is the possible impact on congestion of autonomous vehicles. It seems likely that the main impact of vehicle automation will not be seen until driverless vehicles are sufficiently safe for use amid general traffic on urban streets. Shared use driverless vehicles could reduce the cost of taxis and a wider range of public transport vehicles could be economic. Individually owned autonomous vehicles would have the ability to travel unoccupied and may need to be regulated where this might add to congestion. It is possible that autonomous vehicles could provide mobility services at lower cost and wider scope, such that private car use in urban areas could decline and congestion reduce. City authorities should be alert to these possibilities in developing transport policy.

  7. Automation in Clinical Microbiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledeboer, Nathan A.

    2013-01-01

    Historically, the trend toward automation in clinical pathology laboratories has largely bypassed the clinical microbiology laboratory. In this article, we review the historical impediments to automation in the microbiology laboratory and offer insight into the reasons why we believe that we are on the cusp of a dramatic change that will sweep a wave of automation into clinical microbiology laboratories. We review the currently available specimen-processing instruments as well as the total laboratory automation solutions. Lastly, we outline the types of studies that will need to be performed to fully assess the benefits of automation in microbiology laboratories. PMID:23515547

  8. Integrated trajectory control and collision avoidance for automated driving

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaegh, J.; Ploeg, J.; Nunen, E. van; Teerhuis, A.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a method for trajectory control, based on feedback linearization to guide an Automatic Guided Vehicle (AGV). The novelty of this work, is the adaptation of a reference trajectory with respect to a desired velocity in real-time to avoid collisions using a time-scaling mechanism.

  9. Understanding reliance on automation: effects of error type, error distribution, age and experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Julian; Rogers, Wendy A.; Fisk, Arthur D.; Rovira, Ericka

    2015-01-01

    An obstacle detection task supported by “imperfect” automation was used with the goal of understanding the effects of automation error types and age on automation reliance. Sixty younger and sixty older adults interacted with a multi-task simulation of an agricultural vehicle (i.e. a virtual harvesting combine). The simulator included an obstacle detection task and a fully manual tracking task. A micro-level analysis provided insight into the way reliance patterns change over time. The results indicated that there are distinct patterns of reliance that develop as a function of error type. A prevalence of automation false alarms led participants to under-rely on the automation during alarm states while over relying on it during non-alarms states. Conversely, a prevalence of automation misses led participants to over-rely on automated alarms and under-rely on the automation during non-alarm states. Older adults adjusted their behavior according to the characteristics of the automation similarly to younger adults, although it took them longer to do so. The results of this study suggest the relationship between automation reliability and reliance depends on the prevalence of specific errors and on the state of the system. Understanding the effects of automation detection criterion settings on human-automation interaction can help designers of automated systems make predictions about human behavior and system performance as a function of the characteristics of the automation. PMID:25642142

  10. Intention to use a fully automated car: attitudes and a priori acceptability

    OpenAIRE

    PAYRE, William; CESTAC, Julien; DELHOMME, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    If previous research studied acceptability of partially or highly automated driving, few of them focused on fully automated driving (FAD), including the ability to master longitudinal control, lateral control and maneuvers. The present study analyzes a priori acceptability, attitudes, personality traits and intention to use a fully automated vehicle. 421 French drivers (153 males, M= 40.2 years, age range 19-73) answered an online questionnaire. 68.1% of the sample a priori accepted FAD. P...

  11. Developments and challenges for autonomous unmanned vehicles

    CERN Document Server

    Finn, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    It is widely anticipated that autonomous vehicles will have a transformational impact on military forces and will play a key role in many future force structures. As a result, many tasks have already been identified that unmanned systems could undertake more readily than humans. However, for this to occur, such systems will need to be agile, versatile, persistent, reliable, survivable and lethal. This will require many of the vehicles 'cognitive' or higher order functions to be more fully developed, whereas to date only the 'component' or physical functions have been successfully automated and

  12. Connected vehicle application : safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Connected vehicle safety applications are designed to increase situational awareness : and reduce or eliminate crashes through vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2I), vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V), and vehicle-to-pedestrian (V2P) data transmissions. Applications...

  13. New York State Thruway Authority automatic vehicle classification (AVC) : research report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-31

    In December 2007, the N.Y.S. Thruway Authority (Thruway) concluded a Federal : funded research effort to study technology and develop a design for retrofitting : devices required in implementing a fully automated vehicle classification system i...

  14. Methods of monitoring the technical condition of the braking system of an autonomous vehicle during operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revin, A.; Dygalo, V.; Boyko, G.; Lyaschenko, M.; Dygalo, L.

    2018-02-01

    Possibilities of diagnosing of a technical condition of braking system of the autonomous vehicles with automated modules while in service are considered. The concept of sharing of onboard means and stands for diagnosing is presented.

  15. An assessment of autonomous vehicles : traffic impacts and infrastructure needs : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    The project began by understanding the current state of practice and trends. NHTSAs four-level taxonomy for automated vehicles was used to classify smart driving technologies and infrastructure needs. The project used surveys to analyze and gain a...

  16. Plug-In Electric Vehicle Handbook for Consumers (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-09-01

    Plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) are entering the automobile market and are viable alternatives to conventional vehicles. This guide for consumers describes the basics of PEV technology, PEV benefits, how to select the right PEV, charging a PEV, and PEV maintenance.

  17. Plug-In Electric Vehicle Handbook for Fleet Managers (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-04-01

    Plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) are entering the automobile market and are viable alternatives to conventional vehicles. This guide for fleet managers describes the basics of PEV technology, PEV benefits for fleets, how to select the right PEV, charging a PEV, and PEV maintenance.

  18. Automation and robotics human performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mah, Robert W.

    1990-01-01

    The scope of this report is limited to the following: (1) assessing the feasibility of the assumptions for crew productivity during the intra-vehicular activities and extra-vehicular activities; (2) estimating the appropriate level of automation and robotics to accomplish balanced man-machine, cost-effective operations in space; (3) identifying areas where conceptually different approaches to the use of people and machines can leverage the benefits of the scenarios; and (4) recommending modifications to scenarios or developing new scenarios that will improve the expected benefits. The FY89 special assessments are grouped into the five categories shown in the report. The high level system analyses for Automation & Robotics (A&R) and Human Performance (HP) were performed under the Case Studies Technology Assessment category, whereas the detailed analyses for the critical systems and high leverage development areas were performed under the appropriate operations categories (In-Space Vehicle Operations or Planetary Surface Operations). The analysis activities planned for the Science Operations technology areas were deferred to FY90 studies. The remaining activities such as analytic tool development, graphics/video demonstrations and intelligent communicating systems software architecture were performed under the Simulation & Validations category.

  19. Armored Combat Vehicles Science and Technology Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-11-01

    APPLICATION OF SENSORS Investigate the seismic, acoustic, and electromagnetic signatures of military and intruder -type targets and the theoretical aspects...a prototype sampling system which has the capability to monitor ambieut air both outside and inside vehicles and provide an early warning to the crew...and through various processing modules provide automated functions for simultaneous tracking of targets and automitic recognition, 74 f’," SENSING

  20. Pre-Alignment Checks. Automotive Mechanics. Steering & Suspension. Instructor's Guide [and] Student Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spignesi, B.

    This instructional package, one in a series of individualized instructional units on automotive steering and suspension, consists of a student guide and an instructor guide dealing with prealignment checks. Covered in the module are the following steps in a prealignment check: checking the ride height of a vehicle, checking the ball joints and the…

  1. A Survey of Missions for Unmanned Undersea Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    commands (much like wire-guided tor- pedoes ) have become possible. We regard this vehicle variety as a type of ROV. This study treats both AUVs and...energy offered by new technologies, power and energy are still an issue for tor- pedo -like AUVs. A survey of AUV developers conducted in the spring of...neutral buoyancy is also needed for vehicle recovery. For AUVs launched from tor- pedo tubes in particular, vehicle recovery can occur only when the

  2. Connected vehicles and cybersecurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Connected vehicles are a next-generation technology in vehicles and in infrastructure that will make travel safer, cleaner, and more efficient. The advanced wireless technology enables vehicles to share and communicate information with each other and...

  3. Electric Vehicles. LC Science Tracer Bullet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buydos, John E., Comp.

    This document reviews the literature in the collections of the Library of Congress on electric vehicles. Not intended as a comprehensive bibliography, this guide is designed as the title implies, to put the reader "on target." This is of greatest utility to the beginning student of the topic. (AA)

  4. Automation systems for radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamasaki, Paul

    1974-01-01

    The application of automation systems for radioimmunoassay (RIA) was discussed. Automated systems could be useful in the second step, of the four basic processes in the course of RIA, i.e., preparation of sample for reaction. There were two types of instrumentation, a semi-automatic pipete, and a fully automated pipete station, both providing for fast and accurate dispensing of the reagent or for the diluting of sample with reagent. Illustrations of the instruments were shown. (Mukohata, S.)

  5. Towards a generic lateral control concept for cooperative automated driving : theoretical and experimental evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmeitz, A.J.C.; Zegers, J.; Ploeg, J.; Alirezaei, M.

    2017-01-01

    Lateral vehicle control is an essential part for many automated and cooperative driving applications. Lane keeping and vehicle following are typical modes of such control system. The aim of this paper is to develop a generic lateral controller that can handle these different modes. Based on the

  6. Laboratory Automation and Middleware.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riben, Michael

    2015-06-01

    The practice of surgical pathology is under constant pressure to deliver the highest quality of service, reduce errors, increase throughput, and decrease turnaround time while at the same time dealing with an aging workforce, increasing financial constraints, and economic uncertainty. Although not able to implement total laboratory automation, great progress continues to be made in workstation automation in all areas of the pathology laboratory. This report highlights the benefits and challenges of pathology automation, reviews middleware and its use to facilitate automation, and reviews the progress so far in the anatomic pathology laboratory. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Automated cloning methods.; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collart, F.

    2001-01-01

    Argonne has developed a series of automated protocols to generate bacterial expression clones by using a robotic system designed to be used in procedures associated with molecular biology. The system provides plate storage, temperature control from 4 to 37 C at various locations, and Biomek and Multimek pipetting stations. The automated system consists of a robot that transports sources from the active station on the automation system. Protocols for the automated generation of bacterial expression clones can be grouped into three categories (Figure 1). Fragment generation protocols are initiated on day one of the expression cloning procedure and encompass those protocols involved in generating purified coding region (PCR)

  8. Complacency and Automation Bias in the Use of Imperfect Automation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickens, Christopher D; Clegg, Benjamin A; Vieane, Alex Z; Sebok, Angelia L

    2015-08-01

    We examine the effects of two different kinds of decision-aiding automation errors on human-automation interaction (HAI), occurring at the first failure following repeated exposure to correctly functioning automation. The two errors are incorrect advice, triggering the automation bias, and missing advice, reflecting complacency. Contrasts between analogous automation errors in alerting systems, rather than decision aiding, have revealed that alerting false alarms are more problematic to HAI than alerting misses are. Prior research in decision aiding, although contrasting the two aiding errors (incorrect vs. missing), has confounded error expectancy. Participants performed an environmental process control simulation with and without decision aiding. For those with the aid, automation dependence was created through several trials of perfect aiding performance, and an unexpected automation error was then imposed in which automation was either gone (one group) or wrong (a second group). A control group received no automation support. The correct aid supported faster and more accurate diagnosis and lower workload. The aid failure degraded all three variables, but "automation wrong" had a much greater effect on accuracy, reflecting the automation bias, than did "automation gone," reflecting the impact of complacency. Some complacency was manifested for automation gone, by a longer latency and more modest reduction in accuracy. Automation wrong, creating the automation bias, appears to be a more problematic form of automation error than automation gone, reflecting complacency. Decision-aiding automation should indicate its lower degree of confidence in uncertain environments to avoid the automation bias. © 2015, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

  9. Introduction matters: Manipulating trust in automation and reliance in automated driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körber, Moritz; Baseler, Eva; Bengler, Klaus

    2018-01-01

    Trust in automation is a key determinant for the adoption of automated systems and their appropriate use. Therefore, it constitutes an essential research area for the introduction of automated vehicles to road traffic. In this study, we investigated the influence of trust promoting (Trust promoted group) and trust lowering (Trust lowered group) introductory information on reported trust, reliance behavior and take-over performance. Forty participants encountered three situations in a 17-min highway drive in a conditionally automated vehicle (SAE Level 3). Situation 1 and Situation 3 were non-critical situations where a take-over was optional. Situation 2 represented a critical situation where a take-over was necessary to avoid a collision. A non-driving-related task (NDRT) was presented between the situations to record the allocation of visual attention. Participants reporting a higher trust level spent less time looking at the road or instrument cluster and more time looking at the NDRT. The manipulation of introductory information resulted in medium differences in reported trust and influenced participants' reliance behavior. Participants of the Trust promoted group looked less at the road or instrument cluster and more at the NDRT. The odds of participants of the Trust promoted group to overrule the automated driving system in the non-critical situations were 3.65 times (Situation 1) to 5 times (Situation 3) higher. In Situation 2, the Trust promoted group's mean take-over time was extended by 1154 ms and the mean minimum time-to-collision was 933 ms shorter. Six participants from the Trust promoted group compared to no participant of the Trust lowered group collided with the obstacle. The results demonstrate that the individual trust level influences how much drivers monitor the environment while performing an NDRT. Introductory information influences this trust level, reliance on an automated driving system, and if a critical take-over situation can be

  10. Highly automated driving, secondary task performance, and driver state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merat, Natasha; Jamson, A Hamish; Lai, Frank C H; Carsten, Oliver

    2012-10-01

    A driving simulator study compared the effect of changes in workload on performance in manual and highly automated driving. Changes in driver state were also observed by examining variations in blink patterns. With the addition of a greater number of advanced driver assistance systems in vehicles, the driver's role is likely to alter in the future from an operator in manual driving to a supervisor of highly automated cars. Understanding the implications of such advancements on drivers and road safety is important. A total of 50 participants were recruited for this study and drove the simulator in both manual and highly automated mode. As well as comparing the effect of adjustments in driving-related workload on performance, the effect of a secondary Twenty Questions Task was also investigated. In the absence of the secondary task, drivers' response to critical incidents was similar in manual and highly automated driving conditions. The worst performance was observed when drivers were required to regain control of driving in the automated mode while distracted by the secondary task. Blink frequency patterns were more consistent for manual than automated driving but were generally suppressed during conditions of high workload. Highly automated driving did not have a deleterious effect on driver performance, when attention was not diverted to the distracting secondary task. As the number of systems implemented in cars increases, an understanding of the implications of such automation on drivers' situation awareness, workload, and ability to remain engaged with the driving task is important.

  11. Vehicle Development Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Supports the development of prototype deployment platform vehicles for offboard countermeasure systems.DESCRIPTION: The Vehicle Development Laboratory is...

  12. Trajectories and Maneuvers of Surrounding Vehicles with Panoramic Camera Arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dueholm, Jacob Velling; Kristoffersen, Miklas Strøm; Satzoda, Ravi K.

    2016-01-01

    Vision-based research for intelligent vehicles have traditionally focused on specific regions around a vehicle, such as a front looking camera for, e.g., lane estimation. Traffic scenes are complex and vital information could be lost in unobserved regions. This paper proposes a framework that uses...... four visual sensors for a full surround view of a vehicle in order to achieve an understanding of surrounding vehicle behaviors. The framework will assist the analysis of naturalistic driving studies by automating the task of data reduction of the observed trajectories. To this end, trajectories...... are estimated using a vehicle detector together with a multiperspective optimized tracker in each view. The trajectories are transformed to a common ground plane, where they are associated between perspectives and analyzed to reveal tendencies around the ego-vehicle. The system is tested on sequences from 2.5 h...

  13. Intersection Management Using In-Vehicle Speed Advisory/Adaptation

    OpenAIRE

    Rakha, Hesham; Bichiou, Youssef; Hassan, Abdallah; Zohdy, Ismail

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, connected vehicles (CVs) and automated vehicles (AVs) have emerged as a realistic and viable transportation option. Research centers and companies have dedicated substantial efforts to the technology, motivated largely by the potential safety benefits that can be realized through the elimination of human error, the enhancement of mobility via reduction of congestion and optimization of trips, and the associated positive environmental impacts. Both sensors and control mechanis...

  14. Sustainable transportation : technology, engineering, and science : summer camp instructor’s guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    This document reproduces the instructors guide for a ten day transportation engineering summer camp that was held at the University of Idaho in July 2013. The instructors guide is split into three units: Unit 1: Vehicle Technology, Unit 2: Traf...

  15. Audit: Automated Disk Investigation Toolkit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umit Karabiyik

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Software tools designed for disk analysis play a critical role today in forensics investigations. However, these digital forensics tools are often difficult to use, usually task specific, and generally require professionally trained users with IT backgrounds. The relevant tools are also often open source requiring additional technical knowledge and proper configuration. This makes it difficult for investigators without some computer science background to easily conduct the needed disk analysis. In this paper, we present AUDIT, a novel automated disk investigation toolkit that supports investigations conducted by non-expert (in IT and disk technology and expert investigators. Our proof of concept design and implementation of AUDIT intelligently integrates open source tools and guides non-IT professionals while requiring minimal technical knowledge about the disk structures and file systems of the target disk image.

  16. Editorial for special issue on Perception and Navigation for Autonomous Vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Laugier , Christian; Philippe , Martinet; Urbano , Nunes

    2014-01-01

    International audience; This Special Issue of the IEEE Robotics and Automation Magazine has been prepared in the scope of the activities of the Technical Committee on "Autonomous Ground Vehicle and Intelligent Transportation System" (AGV-ITS) (http://www.ieee-ras.org/autonomous-groundvehicles- and-intelligent-transportation-systems) of the IEEE Robotics and Automation Society (IEEE RAS).

  17. Guided labworks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Lærke Bang

    For the last 40 years physics education research has shown poor learning outcomes of guided labs. Still this is found to be a very used teaching method in the upper secodary schools. This study explains the teacher's choice of guided labs throught the concept of redesign as obstacle dislodgement...

  18. AUTOMATED INFORMATION CONTROL SYSTEM OF MAGNETO LEVITATING CREW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. O. Dzenzerskyi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available It is suggested the concept of construction of automated information-control system (ICS for Maglev on the basis of usage of highway mark-connecting communication wave guide line with groups of input connecting holes placed along active way structure. The excitation of wave guide line is carried out by the modulated microwave signals with the information about spatial position of Maglev, its speed, and also about parameters of propulsion system.

  19. Quantitative DMS mapping for automated RNA secondary structure inference

    OpenAIRE

    Cordero, Pablo; Kladwang, Wipapat; VanLang, Christopher C.; Das, Rhiju

    2012-01-01

    For decades, dimethyl sulfate (DMS) mapping has informed manual modeling of RNA structure in vitro and in vivo. Here, we incorporate DMS data into automated secondary structure inference using a pseudo-energy framework developed for 2'-OH acylation (SHAPE) mapping. On six non-coding RNAs with crystallographic models, DMS- guided modeling achieves overall false negative and false discovery rates of 9.5% and 11.6%, comparable or better than SHAPE-guided modeling; and non-parametric bootstrappin...

  20. Asleep at the automated wheel-Sleepiness and fatigue during highly automated driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelpohl, Tobias; Kühn, Matthias; Hummel, Thomas; Vollrath, Mark

    2018-03-20

    Due to the lack of active involvement in the driving situation and due to monotonous driving environments drivers with automation may be prone to become fatigued faster than manual drivers (e.g. Schömig et al., 2015). However, little is known about the progression of fatigue during automated driving and its effects on the ability to take back manual control after a take-over request. In this driving simulator study with Nö=ö60 drivers we used a three factorial 2ö×ö2ö×ö12 mixed design to analyze the progression (12ö×ö5ömin; within subjects) of driver fatigue in drivers with automation compared to manual drivers (between subjects). Driver fatigue was induced as either mainly sleep related or mainly task related fatigue (between subjects). Additionally, we investigated the drivers' reactions to a take-over request in a critical driving scenario to gain insights into the ability of fatigued drivers to regain manual control and situation awareness after automated driving. Drivers in the automated driving condition exhibited facial indicators of fatigue after 15 to 35ömin of driving. Manual drivers only showed similar indicators of fatigue if they suffered from a lack of sleep and then only after a longer period of driving (approx. 40ömin). Several drivers in the automated condition closed their eyes for extended periods of time. In the driving with automation condition mean automation deactivation times after a take-over request were slower for a certain percentage (about 30%) of the drivers with a lack of sleep (Mö=ö3.2; SDö=ö2.1ös) compared to the reaction times after a long drive (Mö=ö2.4; SDö=ö0.9ös). Drivers with automation also took longer than manual drivers to first glance at the speed display after a take-over request and were more likely to stay behind a braking lead vehicle instead of overtaking it. Drivers are unable to stay alert during extended periods of automated driving without non-driving related tasks. Fatigued drivers could