WorldWideScience

Sample records for automated fall detection

  1. User-based motion sensing and fuzzy logic for automated fall detection in older adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boissy, Patrice; Choquette, Stéphane; Hamel, Mathieu

    2007-01-01

    More than one third of community-dwelling older adults and up to 60% of nursing home residents fall each year, with 10-15% of fallers sustaining a serious injury. Reliable automated fall detection can increase confidence in people with fear of falling, promote active safe living for older adults......, and reduce complications from falls. The performance of a 2-stage fall detection algorithm using impact magnitudes and changes in trunk angles derived from user-based motion sensors was evaluated under laboratory conditions. Ten healthy participants were instrumented on the front and side of the trunk with 3......D accelerometers. Participants simulated 9 fall conditions and 6 common activities of daily living. Fall conditions were simulated on a protective mattress. The experimental data set comprised 750 events (45 fall events and 30 nonfall events per participant) that were classified by the fall...

  2. Automated Technology for In-home Fall Risk Assessment and Detection Sensor System

    OpenAIRE

    Rantz, Marilyn J.; Skubic, Marjorie; Abbott, Carmen; Galambos, Colleen; Pak, Youngju; Ho, Dominic K.C.; Stone, Erik E.; Rui, Liyang; Back, Jessica; Miller, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    Falls are a major problem for older adults. A continuous, unobtrusive, environmentally mounted in-home monitoring system that automatically detects when falls have occurred or when the risk of falling is increasing could alert health care providers and family members so they could intervene to improve physical function or mange illnesses that are precipitating falls. Researchers at the University of Missouri (MU)Center for Eldercare and Rehabilitation Technology are testing such sensor system...

  3. Automated In-Home Fall Risk Assessment and Detection Sensor System for Elders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantz, Marilyn; Skubic, Marjorie; Abbott, Carmen; Galambos, Colleen; Popescu, Mihail; Keller, James; Stone, Erik; Back, Jessie; Miller, Steven J; Petroski, Gregory F

    2015-06-01

    Falls are a major problem for the elderly people leading to injury, disability, and even death. An unobtrusive, in-home sensor system that continuously monitors older adults for fall risk and detects falls could revolutionize fall prevention and care. A fall risk and detection system was developed and installed in the apartments of 19 older adults at a senior living facility. The system includes pulse-Doppler radar, a Microsoft Kinect, and 2 web cameras. To collect data for comparison with sensor data and for algorithm development, stunt actors performed falls in participants' apartments each month for 2 years and participants completed fall risk assessments (FRAs) using clinically valid, standardized instruments. The FRAs were scored by clinicians and recorded by the sensing modalities. Participants' gait parameters were measured as they walked on a GAITRite mat. These data were used as ground truth, objective data to use in algorithm development and to compare with radar and Kinect generated variables. All FRAs are highly correlated (p falls are being sent to clinicians providing faster responses to urgent situations. The in-home FRA and detection system has the potential to help older adults remain independent, maintain functional ability, and live at home longer. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Evaluation of the falls telephone: an automated system for enduring assessment of falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Marck, Marjolein A; Overeem, Sebastiaan; Klok, Philomène C M; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Munneke, Marten

    2011-02-01

    To evaluate the reliability and user experiences of an automated telephone system to monitor falls during a prolonged period of time. Prospective cohort study. Four neurological outpatient clinics in the Netherlands. One hundred nineteen community-dwelling people with Parkinson's disease without dementia, because falls are common in this population. Clinical and demographic data were obtained. The Falls Telephone is a computerized telephone system through which participants can enter the number of falls during a particular period. During a follow-up of 1 to 40 weekly calls, 2,465 calls were made. In total, 173 no-fall entries and 115 fall entries were verified using personal telephone interviews. User experiences were evaluated in 90 of the 119 participants using structured telephone interviews. All no-fall entries and 78% of fall entries were confirmed to be correct. Sensitivity to detect falls was 100%, and specificity was 87%. Users regarded the Falls Telephone as a convenient tool to monitor falls. The Falls Telephone is a convenient and reliable instrument to monitor falls. The automated system has high specificity, obviating the need for time-consuming personal follow-up calls in the majority of nonfallers. As such, the Falls Telephone lends itself well to data collection in large trials with prolonged follow-up in participants with Parkinson's disease. © 2011, Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2011, The American Geriatrics Society.

  5. Older Adults' Perceptions of Fall Detection Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, Shomir; Kneale, Laura; Le, Thai; Phelan, Elizabeth; Rosenberg, Dori; Thompson, Hilaire; Demiris, George

    2017-08-01

    A third of adults over the age of 65 are estimated to fall at least once a year. Perhaps as dangerous as the fall itself is the time spent after a fall if the person is unable to move. Although there are many devices available to detect when a person has fallen, little is known about the opinions of older adults regarding these fall detection devices (FDDs). We conducted five focus groups with 27 older adults. Transcripts from sessions were coded to generate themes that captured participants' perceptions. Themes were identified that related to two topics of interest: (a) personal influences on the participants' desire to have a FDD, including perceived need, participant values, and cost, and (b) participant recommendations regarding specific features and functionalities of these devices such as automation, wearable versus non-wearable devices, and device customization. Together, these themes suggest ways in which FDDs may be improved so that they are suitable for their intended population.

  6. A simple strategy for fall events detection

    KAUST Repository

    Harrou, Fouzi

    2017-01-20

    The paper concerns the detection of fall events based on human silhouette shape variations. The detection of fall events is addressed from the statistical point of view as an anomaly detection problem. Specifically, the paper investigates the multivariate exponentially weighted moving average (MEWMA) control chart to detect fall events. Towards this end, a set of ratios for five partial occupancy areas of the human body for each frame are collected and used as the input data to MEWMA chart. The MEWMA fall detection scheme has been successfully applied to two publicly available fall detection databases, the UR fall detection dataset (URFD) and the fall detection dataset (FDD). The monitoring strategy developed was able to provide early alert mechanisms in the event of fall situations.

  7. Automation warning system against driver falling asleep in-traffic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dymov I. S.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to the development of a new automation recognition and warning system against driver falling asleep in-traffic. The issue of the physical condition control of professional drivers on the voyage has been considered both on the part of efficiency and quality of its determination, and in terms of improving overall road safety. The existing and widely used devices for determining the transition to the stage of sleep of drivers being in-traffic have been analyzed. Their advantages and disadvantages have been detected. It has been established that the main negative factor preventing the mass introduction of pre-existing warning systems is the need to wear one or another monitoring device before starting the movement. Carried out project research work has proposed a complex monitoring of the physical and physiological condition of driving person as a new warning method against falling asleep in-traffic. The proposed variations of algorithmic implementations can be used in long-distance trucks and passenger vehicles. Two different versions of the automatic control status of the driver physical condition have been considered. The first approach has proposed the use of sensors of the biometric parameters of body, pulsus, body temperature, and hands on wheel pressure sensors. The second one has proposed using the tracking cameras. Both for the first and second versions of the automation system a toolset of control devices is being installed inside the vehicle and have no physical, so irritating action on the driver. Software approach for the false operation rejection of the devices has been developed. The paper considers the flow diagrams of the automatic systems and logical structure of analysis and decision-making. The set of impacts intended for driver's awakening has been proposed. The conclusion about the engineering perspectives of the proposed approach of projected automation systems has been made.

  8. Automated asteroseismic peak detections

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Saravia Ortiz de Montellano, Andrés; Hekker, S.; Themeßl, N.

    2018-05-01

    Space observatories such as Kepler have provided data that can potentially revolutionize our understanding of stars. Through detailed asteroseismic analyses we are capable of determining fundamental stellar parameters and reveal the stellar internal structure with unprecedented accuracy. However, such detailed analyses, known as peak bagging, have so far been obtained for only a small percentage of the observed stars while most of the scientific potential of the available data remains unexplored. One of the major challenges in peak bagging is identifying how many solar-like oscillation modes are visible in a power density spectrum. Identification of oscillation modes is usually done by visual inspection that is time-consuming and has a degree of subjectivity. Here, we present a peak-detection algorithm especially suited for the detection of solar-like oscillations. It reliably characterizes the solar-like oscillations in a power density spectrum and estimates their parameters without human intervention. Furthermore, we provide a metric to characterize the false positive and false negative rates to provide further information about the reliability of a detected oscillation mode or the significance of a lack of detected oscillation modes. The algorithm presented here opens the possibility for detailed and automated peak bagging of the thousands of solar-like oscillators observed by Kepler.

  9. Automated propellant leak detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makel, D. B.; Jansa, E. D.; Bickmore, T. W.; Powers, W. T.

    1993-01-01

    An automated hydrogen leak detection system is being developed for earth-to-orbit rocket engine applications. The system consists of three elements, a sensor array, a signal processing unit, and a diagnostic processor. The sensor array consists of discrete solid state sensors which are located at specific potential leak sites and in potential leak zones. The signal processing unit provides excitations power for the sensors and provides analog to digital data conversion of the sensor signals. The diagnostic computer analyzes the sensor outputs to determine leak sources and magnitude. Leak data from the sensor network is interpreted using knowledge based software and displayed on-line through a graphical user interface including 3-D leak visualization. The system requirements have been developed assuming eventual application to the Space Shuttle Main Engine which requires approximately 72 measurement locations. A prototype system has been constructed to demonstrate the operational features of the system. This system includes both prototype electronics and data processing software algorithms. Experiments are in progress to evaluate system operation at conditions which simulate prelaunch and flight. The prototype system consists of a network using 16 sensors within a testbed which simulates engine components. Sensor response, orientation, and data analysis algorithms are being evaluated using calibrated leaks produced within the testbed. A prototype flight system is also under development consisting of 8 sensors and flight capable electronics with autonomous control and data recording.

  10. Development and evaluation of an automated fall risk assessment system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju Young; Jin, Yinji; Piao, Jinshi; Lee, Sun-Mi

    2016-04-01

    Fall risk assessment is the first step toward prevention, and a risk assessment tool with high validity should be used. This study aimed to develop and validate an automated fall risk assessment system (Auto-FallRAS) to assess fall risks based on electronic medical records (EMRs) without additional data collected or entered by nurses. This study was conducted in a 1335-bed university hospital in Seoul, South Korea. The Auto-FallRAS was developed using 4211 fall-related clinical data extracted from EMRs. Participants included fall patients and non-fall patients (868 and 3472 for the development study; 752 and 3008 for the validation study; and 58 and 232 for validation after clinical application, respectively). The system was evaluated for predictive validity and concurrent validity. The final 10 predictors were included in the logistic regression model for the risk-scoring algorithm. The results of the Auto-FallRAS were shown as high/moderate/low risk on the EMR screen. The predictive validity analyzed after clinical application of the Auto-FallRAS was as follows: sensitivity = 0.95, NPV = 0.97 and Youden index = 0.44. The validity of the Morse Fall Scale assessed by nurses was as follows: sensitivity = 0.68, NPV = 0.88 and Youden index = 0.28. This study found that the Auto-FallRAS results were better than were the nurses' predictions. The advantage of the Auto-FallRAS is that it automatically analyzes information and shows patients' fall risk assessment results without requiring additional time from nurses. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care; all rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of the falls telephone: an automated system for enduring assessment of falls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marck, M.A. van der; Overeem, S.; Klok, P.C.; Bloem, B.R.; Munneke, M.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the reliability and user experiences of an automated telephone system to monitor falls during a prolonged period of time. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: Four neurological outpatient clinics in the Netherlands. PARTICIPANTS: One hundred nineteen community-dwelling

  12. Elderly fall detection using SIFT hybrid features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoxiao; Gao, Chao; Guo, Yongcai

    2015-10-01

    With the tendency of aging society, countries all over the world are dealing with the demographic change. Fall had been proven to be of the highest fatality rate among the elderly. To realize the elderly fall detection, the proposed algorithm used the hybrid feature. Based on the rate of centroid change, the algorithm adopted VEI to offer the posture feature, this combined motion feature with posture feature. The algorithm also took advantage of SIFT descriptor of VEI(V-SIFT) to show more details of behaviors with occlusion. An improved motion detection method was proposed to improve the accuracy of front-view motion detection. The experimental results on CASIA database and self-built database showed that the proposed approach has high efficiency and strong robustness which effectively improved the accuracy of fall detection.

  13. Detection and Prevention of Seniors Falls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubomír MACKŮ

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the issue of seniors’ security and safety, namely the security problems related to falls of independently living elderly citizens. The number of elderly people is growing very fast worldwide and very often they live unattended in their house or flat. In case of accidently falling down, they are often unable help themselves and stay on the floor for hours or even longer. This may lead even to the death if no help comes. Various possibilities of their fall detection are studied. We analyze the historical development, current capabilities and efficiency of different approaches and methods. We address the willingness and ability of seniors to actively use technology, detection limits, privacy, personal data security and other important factors. In addition, we discuss the challenges, current shortcomings, issues and trends in fall detection or operation reliability in real-life conditions. The main future goal would be to maintain the personal privacy and security of irrelevant information in modern fall detection systems.

  14. Automated radiometric detection of bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waters, J.R.

    1974-01-01

    A new radiometric method called BACTEC, used for the detection of bacteria in cultures or in supposedly sterile samples, was discussed from the standpoint of methodology, both automated and semi-automated. Some of the results obtained so far were reported and some future applications and development possibilities were described. In this new method, the test sample is incubated in a sealed vial with a liquid culture medium containing a 14 C-labeled substrate. If bacteria are present, they break down the substrate, producing 14 CO 2 which is periodically extracted from the vial as a gas and is tested for radioactivity. If this gaseous radioactivity exceeds a threshold level, it is evidence of bacterial presence and growth in the test vial. The first application was for the detection of bacteria in the blood cultures of hospital patients. Data were presented showing typical results. Also discussed were future applications, such as rapid screening for bacteria in urine industrial sterility testing and the disposal of used 14 C substrates. (Mukohata, S.)

  15. Sensorbased fall detection and fall prediction of senior citizens in their domestic environment

    OpenAIRE

    Feldwieser, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Falls in old age are associated with a reduction of autonomy and mobility and are one the main threads to the health of older adults. Physical and mental consequences of falls are a large financial burden to the healthcare system. Automatic fall detection devices could call of medical help in case of a fall and fall prevention programmers could specifically address the deficits of persons at risk of falling. Currently it is difficult and expensive to correctly identify perso...

  16. A dynamic evidential network for fall detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Paulo Armando Cavalcante; Boudy, Jerome; Istrate, Dan; Dorizzi, Bernadette; Mota, Joao Cesar Moura

    2014-07-01

    This study is part of the development of a remote home healthcare monitoring application designed to detect distress situations through several types of sensors. The multisensor fusion can provide more accurate and reliable information compared to information provided by each sensor separately. Furthermore, data from multiple heterogeneous sensors present in the remote home healthcare monitoring systems have different degrees of imperfection and trust. Among the multisensor fusion methods, Dempster-Shafer theory (DST) is currently considered the most appropriate for representing and processing the imperfect information. Based on a graphical representation of the DST called evidential networks, a structure of heterogeneous data fusion from multiple sensors for fall detection has been proposed. The evidential networks, implemented on our remote medical monitoring platform, are also proposed in this paper to maximize the performance of automatic fall detection and thus make the system more reliable. However, the presence of noise, the variability of recorded signals by the sensors, and the failing or unreliable sensors may thwart the evidential networks performance. In addition, the sensors signals nonstationary nature may degrade the experimental conditions. To compensate the nonstationary effect, the time evolution is considered by introducing the dynamic evidential network which was evaluated by the simulated fall scenarios corresponding to various use cases.

  17. Fall Down Detection Under Smart Home System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juang, Li-Hong; Wu, Ming-Ni

    2015-10-01

    Medical technology makes an inevitable trend for the elderly population, therefore the intelligent home care is an important direction for science and technology development, in particular, elderly in-home safety management issues become more and more important. In this research, a low of operation algorithm and using the triangular pattern rule are proposed, then can quickly detect fall-down movements of humanoid by the installation of a robot with camera vision at home that will be able to judge the fall-down movements of in-home elderly people in real time. In this paper, it will present a preliminary design and experimental results of fall-down movements from body posture that utilizes image pre-processing and three triangular-mass-central points to extract the characteristics. The result shows that the proposed method would adopt some characteristic value and the accuracy can reach up to 90 % for a single character posture. Furthermore the accuracy can be up to 100 % when a continuous-time sampling criterion and support vector machine (SVM) classifier are used.

  18. A wavelet-based approach to fall detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmerini, Luca; Bagalà, Fabio; Zanetti, Andrea; Klenk, Jochen; Becker, Clemens; Cappello, Angelo

    2015-05-20

    Falls among older people are a widely documented public health problem. Automatic fall detection has recently gained huge importance because it could allow for the immediate communication of falls to medical assistance. The aim of this work is to present a novel wavelet-based approach to fall detection, focusing on the impact phase and using a dataset of real-world falls. Since recorded falls result in a non-stationary signal, a wavelet transform was chosen to examine fall patterns. The idea is to consider the average fall pattern as the "prototype fall".In order to detect falls, every acceleration signal can be compared to this prototype through wavelet analysis. The similarity of the recorded signal with the prototype fall is a feature that can be used in order to determine the difference between falls and daily activities. The discriminative ability of this feature is evaluated on real-world data. It outperforms other features that are commonly used in fall detection studies, with an Area Under the Curve of 0.918. This result suggests that the proposed wavelet-based feature is promising and future studies could use this feature (in combination with others considering different fall phases) in order to improve the performance of fall detection algorithms.

  19. A Wavelet-Based Approach to Fall Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Palmerini

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Falls among older people are a widely documented public health problem. Automatic fall detection has recently gained huge importance because it could allow for the immediate communication of falls to medical assistance. The aim of this work is to present a novel wavelet-based approach to fall detection, focusing on the impact phase and using a dataset of real-world falls. Since recorded falls result in a non-stationary signal, a wavelet transform was chosen to examine fall patterns. The idea is to consider the average fall pattern as the “prototype fall”.In order to detect falls, every acceleration signal can be compared to this prototype through wavelet analysis. The similarity of the recorded signal with the prototype fall is a feature that can be used in order to determine the difference between falls and daily activities. The discriminative ability of this feature is evaluated on real-world data. It outperforms other features that are commonly used in fall detection studies, with an Area Under the Curve of 0.918. This result suggests that the proposed wavelet-based feature is promising and future studies could use this feature (in combination with others considering different fall phases in order to improve the performance of fall detection algorithms.

  20. Skin-contact sensor for automatic fall detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narasimhan, Ravi

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes an adhesive sensor system worn on the skin that automatically detects human falls. The sensor, which consists of a tri-axial accelerometer, a microcon-troller and a Bluetooth Low Energy transceiver, can be worn anywhere on a subject's torso and in any orientation. In order to distinguish easily between falls and activities of daily living (ADL), a possible fall is detected only if an impact is detected and if the subject is horizontal shortly afterwards. As an additional criterion to reduce false positives, a fall is confirmed if the user activity level several seconds after a possible fall is below a threshold. Intentional falls onto a gymnastics mat were performed by 10 volunteers (total of 297 falls); ADL were performed by 15 elderly volunteers (total of 315 ADL). The fall detection algorithm provided a sensitivity of 99% and a specificity of 100%.

  1. Home Camera-Based Fall Detection System for the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koldo de Miguel

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Falls are the leading cause of injury and death in elderly individuals. Unfortunately, fall detectors are typically based on wearable devices, and the elderly often forget to wear them. In addition, fall detectors based on artificial vision are not yet available on the market. In this paper, we present a new low-cost fall detector for smart homes based on artificial vision algorithms. Our detector combines several algorithms (background subtraction, Kalman filtering and optical flow as input to a machine learning algorithm with high detection accuracy. Tests conducted on over 50 different fall videos have shown a detection ratio of greater than 96%.

  2. Home Camera-Based Fall Detection System for the Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Miguel, Koldo; Brunete, Alberto; Hernando, Miguel; Gambao, Ernesto

    2017-12-09

    Falls are the leading cause of injury and death in elderly individuals. Unfortunately, fall detectors are typically based on wearable devices, and the elderly often forget to wear them. In addition, fall detectors based on artificial vision are not yet available on the market. In this paper, we present a new low-cost fall detector for smart homes based on artificial vision algorithms. Our detector combines several algorithms (background subtraction, Kalman filtering and optical flow) as input to a machine learning algorithm with high detection accuracy. Tests conducted on over 50 different fall videos have shown a detection ratio of greater than 96%.

  3. Automated Change Detection for Synthetic Aperture Sonar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    2014 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Automated Change Detection for Synthetic Aperture Sonar...R. Azimi-Sadjadi and S. Srinivasan, “Coherent Change Detection and Classification in Synthetic Aper - ture Radar Imagery Using Canonical Correlation

  4. A novel wearable smart button system for fall detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Wei; Sun, Xiang; Zhi, Yueyan; Han, Yue; Mao, Hande

    2017-05-01

    Fall has been the second most cause of accidental injury to death in the world. It has been a serious threat to the physical and mental health of the elders. Therefore, developing wearable node system with fall detecting ability has become increasingly pressing at present. A novel smart button for long-term fall detection is proposed in this paper, which is able to accurately monitor the falling behavior, and sending warning message online as well. The smart button is based on the tri-axis acceleration sensor which is used to collect the body motion signals. By using the statistical metrics of acceleration characteristics, a new SVM classification algorithm with high positive accuracy and stability is proposed so as to classify the falls and activities of daily living, and the results can be real-time displayed on Android based mobile phone. The experiments show that our wearable node system can continuously monitor the falling behavior with positive rate 94.8%.

  5. Automated detection of solar eruptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hurlburt N.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Observation of the solar atmosphere reveals a wide range of motions, from small scale jets and spicules to global-scale coronal mass ejections (CMEs. Identifying and characterizing these motions are essential to advancing our understanding of the drivers of space weather. Both automated and visual identifications are currently used in identifying Coronal Mass Ejections. To date, eruptions near the solar surface, which may be precursors to CMEs, have been identified primarily by visual inspection. Here we report on Eruption Patrol (EP: a software module that is designed to automatically identify eruptions from data collected by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO/AIA. We describe the method underlying the module and compare its results to previous identifications found in the Heliophysics Event Knowledgebase. EP identifies eruptions events that are consistent with those found by human annotations, but in a significantly more consistent and quantitative manner. Eruptions are found to be distributed within 15 Mm of the solar surface. They possess peak speeds ranging from 4 to 100 km/s and display a power-law probability distribution over that range. These characteristics are consistent with previous observations of prominences.

  6. Detect and Avoid (DAA) Automation Maneuver Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    controlled a UAS through airspace including several proximal aircraft. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Drones ; Detect and Avoid; Remotely Piloted Aircraft...maneuver guidance presentation but the transparency “threshold” needed to result in appropriate automation usage , which is defined as both high rates of

  7. Fall detection for multiple pedestrians using depth image processing technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shih-Wei; Lin, Shir-Kuan

    2014-04-01

    A fall detection method based on depth image analysis is proposed in this paper. As different from the conventional methods, if the pedestrians are partially overlapped or partially occluded, the proposed method is still able to detect fall events and has the following advantages: (1) single or multiple pedestrian detection; (2) recognition of human and non-human objects; (3) compensation for illumination, which is applicable in scenarios using indoor light sources of different colors; (4) using the central line of a human silhouette to obtain the pedestrian tilt angle; and (5) avoiding misrecognition of a squat or stoop as a fall. According to the experimental results, the precision of the proposed fall detection method is 94.31% and the recall is 85.57%. The proposed method is verified to be robust and specifically suitable for applying in family homes, corridors and other public places. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Analysis of Android Device-Based Solutions for Fall Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casilari, Eduardo; Luque, Rafael; Morón, María-José

    2015-07-23

    Falls are a major cause of health and psychological problems as well as hospitalization costs among older adults. Thus, the investigation on automatic Fall Detection Systems (FDSs) has received special attention from the research community during the last decade. In this area, the widespread popularity, decreasing price, computing capabilities, built-in sensors and multiplicity of wireless interfaces of Android-based devices (especially smartphones) have fostered the adoption of this technology to deploy wearable and inexpensive architectures for fall detection. This paper presents a critical and thorough analysis of those existing fall detection systems that are based on Android devices. The review systematically classifies and compares the proposals of the literature taking into account different criteria such as the system architecture, the employed sensors, the detection algorithm or the response in case of a fall alarms. The study emphasizes the analysis of the evaluation methods that are employed to assess the effectiveness of the detection process. The review reveals the complete lack of a reference framework to validate and compare the proposals. In addition, the study also shows that most research works do not evaluate the actual applicability of the Android devices (with limited battery and computing resources) to fall detection solutions.

  9. Detecting falls as novelties in acceleration patterns acquired with smartphones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Medrano

    Full Text Available Despite being a major public health problem, falls in the elderly cannot be detected efficiently yet. Many studies have used acceleration as the main input to discriminate between falls and activities of daily living (ADL. In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in using smartphones for fall detection. The most promising results have been obtained by supervised Machine Learning algorithms. However, a drawback of these approaches is that they rely on falls simulated by young or mature people, which might not represent every possible fall situation and might be different from older people's falls. Thus, we propose to tackle the problem of fall detection by applying a kind of novelty detection methods which rely only on true ADL. In this way, a fall is any abnormal movement with respect to ADL. A system based on these methods could easily adapt itself to new situations since new ADL could be recorded continuously and the system could be re-trained on the fly. The goal of this work is to explore the use of such novelty detectors by selecting one of them and by comparing it with a state-of-the-art traditional supervised method under different conditions. The data sets we have collected were recorded with smartphones. Ten volunteers simulated eight type of falls, whereas ADL were recorded while they carried the phone in their real life. Even though we have not collected data from the elderly, the data sets were suitable to check the adaptability of novelty detectors. They have been made publicly available to improve the reproducibility of our results. We have studied several novelty detection methods, selecting the nearest neighbour-based technique (NN as the most suitable. Then, we have compared NN with the Support Vector Machine (SVM. In most situations a generic SVM outperformed an adapted NN.

  10. Fall detection using supervised machine learning algorithms: A comparative study

    KAUST Repository

    Zerrouki, Nabil

    2017-01-05

    Fall incidents are considered as the leading cause of disability and even mortality among older adults. To address this problem, fall detection and prevention fields receive a lot of intention over the past years and attracted many researcher efforts. We present in the current study an overall performance comparison between fall detection systems using the most popular machine learning approaches which are: Naïve Bayes, K nearest neighbor, neural network, and support vector machine. The analysis of the classification power associated to these most widely utilized algorithms is conducted on two fall detection databases namely FDD and URFD. Since the performance of the classification algorithm is inherently dependent on the features, we extracted and used the same features for all classifiers. The classification evaluation is conducted using different state of the art statistical measures such as the overall accuracy, the F-measure coefficient, and the area under ROC curve (AUC) value.

  11. Falls

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... falling off furniture or down the stairs. Older children may fall off playground equipment. For elderly people, falls can be especially serious. They are at higher risk of falling. They are also more likely to ...

  12. Automated vehicle for railway track fault detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhushan, M.; Sujay, S.; Tushar, B.; Chitra, P.

    2017-11-01

    For the safety reasons, railroad tracks need to be inspected on a regular basis for detecting physical defects or design non compliances. Such track defects and non compliances, if not detected in a certain interval of time, may eventually lead to severe consequences such as train derailments. Inspection must happen twice weekly by a human inspector to maintain safety standards as there are hundreds and thousands of miles of railroad track. But in such type of manual inspection, there are many drawbacks that may result in the poor inspection of the track, due to which accidents may cause in future. So to avoid such errors and severe accidents, this automated system is designed.Such a concept would surely introduce automation in the field of inspection process of railway track and can help to avoid mishaps and severe accidents due to faults in the track.

  13. Automated assistance for detecting malicious code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, R.; Kerchen, P.; Levitt, K.; Olsson, R.; Archer, M.; Casillas, M. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (US). Dept. of Computer Science

    1993-06-18

    This paper gives an update on the continuing work on the Malicious Code Testbed (MCT). The MCT is a semi-automated tool, operating in a simulated, cleanroom environment, that is capable of detecting many types of malicious code, such as viruses, Trojan horses, and time/logic bombs. The MCT allows security analysts to check a program before installation, thereby avoiding any damage a malicious program might inflict.

  14. Analysis of Public Datasets for Wearable Fall Detection Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casilari, Eduardo; Santoyo-Ramón, José-Antonio; Cano-García, José-Manuel

    2017-06-27

    Due to the boom of wireless handheld devices such as smartwatches and smartphones, wearable Fall Detection Systems (FDSs) have become a major focus of attention among the research community during the last years. The effectiveness of a wearable FDS must be contrasted against a wide variety of measurements obtained from inertial sensors during the occurrence of falls and Activities of Daily Living (ADLs). In this regard, the access to public databases constitutes the basis for an open and systematic assessment of fall detection techniques. This paper reviews and appraises twelve existing available data repositories containing measurements of ADLs and emulated falls envisaged for the evaluation of fall detection algorithms in wearable FDSs. The analysis of the found datasets is performed in a comprehensive way, taking into account the multiple factors involved in the definition of the testbeds deployed for the generation of the mobility samples. The study of the traces brings to light the lack of a common experimental benchmarking procedure and, consequently, the large heterogeneity of the datasets from a number of perspectives (length and number of samples, typology of the emulated falls and ADLs, characteristics of the test subjects, features and positions of the sensors, etc.). Concerning this, the statistical analysis of the samples reveals the impact of the sensor range on the reliability of the traces. In addition, the study evidences the importance of the selection of the ADLs and the need of categorizing the ADLs depending on the intensity of the movements in order to evaluate the capability of a certain detection algorithm to discriminate falls from ADLs.

  15. Analysis of Public Datasets for Wearable Fall Detection Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Casilari

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to the boom of wireless handheld devices such as smartwatches and smartphones, wearable Fall Detection Systems (FDSs have become a major focus of attention among the research community during the last years. The effectiveness of a wearable FDS must be contrasted against a wide variety of measurements obtained from inertial sensors during the occurrence of falls and Activities of Daily Living (ADLs. In this regard, the access to public databases constitutes the basis for an open and systematic assessment of fall detection techniques. This paper reviews and appraises twelve existing available data repositories containing measurements of ADLs and emulated falls envisaged for the evaluation of fall detection algorithms in wearable FDSs. The analysis of the found datasets is performed in a comprehensive way, taking into account the multiple factors involved in the definition of the testbeds deployed for the generation of the mobility samples. The study of the traces brings to light the lack of a common experimental benchmarking procedure and, consequently, the large heterogeneity of the datasets from a number of perspectives (length and number of samples, typology of the emulated falls and ADLs, characteristics of the test subjects, features and positions of the sensors, etc.. Concerning this, the statistical analysis of the samples reveals the impact of the sensor range on the reliability of the traces. In addition, the study evidences the importance of the selection of the ADLs and the need of categorizing the ADLs depending on the intensity of the movements in order to evaluate the capability of a certain detection algorithm to discriminate falls from ADLs.

  16. An automated process for deceit detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwogu, Ifeoma; Frank, Mark; Govindaraju, Venu

    2010-04-01

    In this paper we present a prototype for an automated deception detection system. Similar to polygraph examinations, we attempt to take advantage of the theory that false answers will produce distinctive measurements in certain physiological manifestations. We investigate the role of dynamic eye-based features such as eye closure/blinking and lateral movements of the iris in detecting deceit. The features are recorded both when the test subjects are having non-threatening conversations as well as when they are being interrogated about a crime they might have committed. The rates of the behavioral changes are blindly clustered into two groups. Examining the clusters and their characteristics, we observe that the dynamic features selected for deception detection show promising results with an overall deceptive/non-deceptive prediction rate of 71.43% from a study consisting of 28 subjects.

  17. Automated detection of microcalcification clusters in mammograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karale, Vikrant A.; Mukhopadhyay, Sudipta; Singh, Tulika; Khandelwal, Niranjan; Sadhu, Anup

    2017-03-01

    Mammography is the most efficient modality for detection of breast cancer at early stage. Microcalcifications are tiny bright spots in mammograms and can often get missed by the radiologist during diagnosis. The presence of microcalcification clusters in mammograms can act as an early sign of breast cancer. This paper presents a completely automated computer-aided detection (CAD) system for detection of microcalcification clusters in mammograms. Unsharp masking is used as a preprocessing step which enhances the contrast between microcalcifications and the background. The preprocessed image is thresholded and various shape and intensity based features are extracted. Support vector machine (SVM) classifier is used to reduce the false positives while preserving the true microcalcification clusters. The proposed technique is applied on two different databases i.e DDSM and private database. The proposed technique shows good sensitivity with moderate false positives (FPs) per image on both databases.

  18. New Advances and Challenges of Fall Detection Systems: A Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Xu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Falling, as one of the main harm threats to the elderly, has drawn researchers’ attentions and has always been one of the most valuable research topics in the daily health-care for the elderly in last two decades. Before 2014, several researchers reviewed the development of fall detection, presented issues and challenges, and navigated the direction for the study in the future. With smart sensors and Internet of Things (IoT developing rapidly, this field has made great progress. However, there is a lack of a review and discussion on novel sensors, technologies and algorithms introduced and employed from 2014, as well as the emerging challenges and new issues. To bridge this gap, we present an overview of fall detection research and discuss the core research questions on this topic. A total of 6830 related documents were collected and analyzed based on the key words. Among these documents, the twenty most influential and highly cited articles are selected and discussed profoundly from three perspectives: sensors, algorithms and performance. The findings would assist researchers in understanding current developments and barriers in the systems of fall detection. Although researchers achieve fruitful work and progress, this research domain still confronts challenges on theories and practice. In the near future, the new solutions based on advanced IoT will sustainably urge the development to prevent falling injuries.

  19. Automated Sunspot Detection and Classification Using SOHO/MDI Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    AUTOMATED SUNSPOT DETECTION AND CLASSIFICATION USING SOHO/MDI IMAGERY THESIS Samantha R. Howard, 1st Lieutenant, USAF AFIT-ENP-MS-15-M-078 DEPARTMENT...Government and is not subject to copyright protection in the United States. AFIT-ENP-MS-15-M-078 AUTOMATED SUNSPOT DETECTION AND CLASSIFICATION USING SOHO...MS-15-M-078 AUTOMATED SUNSPOT DETECTION AND CLASSIFICATION USING SOHO/MDI IMAGERY Samantha R. Howard, B.S. 1st Lieutenant, USAF Committee Membership

  20. Automated Hydrogen Gas Leak Detection System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    The Gencorp Aerojet Automated Hydrogen Gas Leak Detection System was developed through the cooperation of industry, academia, and the Government. Although the original purpose of the system was to detect leaks in the main engine of the space shuttle while on the launch pad, it also has significant commercial potential in applications for which there are no existing commercial systems. With high sensitivity, the system can detect hydrogen leaks at low concentrations in inert environments. The sensors are integrated with hardware and software to form a complete system. Several of these systems have already been purchased for use on the Ford Motor Company assembly line for natural gas vehicles. This system to detect trace hydrogen gas leaks from pressurized systems consists of a microprocessor-based control unit that operates a network of sensors. The sensors can be deployed around pipes, connectors, flanges, and tanks of pressurized systems where leaks may occur. The control unit monitors the sensors and provides the operator with a visual representation of the magnitude and locations of the leak as a function of time. The system can be customized to fit the user's needs; for example, it can monitor and display the condition of the flanges and fittings associated with the tank of a natural gas vehicle.

  1. Automating Vendor Fraud Detection in Enterprise Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishore Singh

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Fraud is a multi-billion dollar industry that continues to grow annually. Many organisations are poorly prepared to prevent and detect fraud. Fraud detection strategies are intended to quickly and efficiently identify fraudulent activities that circumvent preventative measures. In this paper we adopt a Design-Science methodological framework to develop a model for detection of vendor fraud based on analysis of patterns or signatures identified in enterprise system audit trails. The concept is demonstrated be developing prototype software. Verification of the prototype is achieved by performing a series of experiments. Validation is achieved by independent reviews from auditing practitioners. Key findings of this study are: i automating routine data analytics improves auditor productivity and reduces time taken to identify potential fraud, and ii visualisations assist in promptly identifying potentially fraudulent user activities. The study makes the following contributions: i a model for proactive fraud detection, ii methods for visualising user activities in transaction data, iii a stand-alone MCL-based prototype.

  2. Fall detection in walking robots by multi-way principal component analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karssen, J.G.; Wisse, M.

    2008-01-01

    Large disturbances can cause a biped to fall. If an upcoming fall can be detected, damage can be minimized or the fall can be prevented. We introduce the multi-way principal component analysis (MPCA) method for the detection of upcoming falls. We study the detection capability of the MPCA method in

  3. Meteorite Fall Detection and Analysis via Weather Radar: Worldwide Potential for Citizen Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, M.; Bresky, C.; Laird, C.; Reddy, V.; Hankey, M.

    2017-12-01

    Meteorite falls can be detected using weather radars, facilitating rapid recovery of meteorites to minimize terrestrial alteration. Imagery from the US NEXRAD radar network reveals over two dozen meteorite falls where meteorites have been recovered, and about another dozen that remain unrecovered. Discovery of new meteorite falls is well suited to "citizen science" and similar outreach activities, as well as automation of computational components into internet-based search tools. Also, there are many more weather radars employed worldwide than those in the US NEXRAD system. Utilization of weather radars worldwide for meteorite recovery can not only expand citizen science opportunities but can also lead to significant improvement in the number of freshly-fallen meteorites available for research. We will discuss the methodologies behind locating and analyzing meteorite falls using weather radar, and how to make them available for citizen science efforts. An important example is the Aquarius Project, a Chicago-area consortium recently formed with the goal of recovering meteorites from Lake Michigan. This project has extensive student involvement geared toward development of actual hardware for recovering meteorites from the lake floor. Those meteorites were identified in weather radar imagery as they fell into the lake from a large meteor on 06 Feb 2017. Another example of public interaction is the meteor detection systems operated by the American Meteor Society (AMS). The AMS website has been developed to allow public reporting of meteors, effectively enabling citizen science to locate and describe significant meteor events worldwide.

  4. Detection of falls using accelerometers and mobile phone technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Raymond Y W; Carlisle, Alison J

    2011-11-01

    to study the sensitivity and specificity of fall detection using mobile phone technology. an experimental investigation using motion signals detected by the mobile phone. the research was conducted in a laboratory setting, and 18 healthy adults (12 males and 6 females; age = 29 ± 8.7 years) were recruited. each participant was requested to perform three trials of four different types of simulated falls (forwards, backwards, lateral left and lateral right) and eight other everyday activities (sit-to-stand, stand-to-sit, level walking, walking up- and downstairs, answering the phone, picking up an object and getting up from supine). Acceleration was measured using two devices, a mobile phone and an independent accelerometer attached to the waist of the participants. Bland-Altman analysis shows a higher degree of agreement between the data recorded by the two devices. Using individual upper and lower detection thresholds, the specificity and sensitivity for mobile phone were 0.81 and 0.77, respectively, and for external accelerometer they were 0.82 and 0.96, respectively. fall detection using a mobile phone is a feasible and highly attractive technology for older adults, especially those living alone. It may be best achieved with an accelerometer attached to the waist, which transmits signals wirelessly to a phone.

  5. Automated detection of Karnal bunt teliospores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, Kim D.; Baumgart, Chris W.; Creager, Jim; Heinen, Bob; Troupe, Tim; Meyer, Dick; Carr, Janie; Quint, Jack

    1998-02-01

    Karnal bunt is a fungal disease which infects wheat and, when present in wheat crops, yields it unsatisfactory for human consumption. Due to the fact that Karnal bunt (KB) is difficult to detect in the field, samples are taken to laboratories where technicians use microscopes and methodically search for KB teliospores. AlliedSignal Federal Manufacturing & Technologies, working with the Kansas Department of Agriculture, created a system which utilizes pattern recognition, feature extraction, and neural networks to prototype an automated detection system for identifying KB teliospores. System hardware consists of a biological compound microscope, motorized stage, CCD camera, frame grabber, and a PC. Integration of the system hardware with custom software comprises the machine vision system. Fundamental processing steps involve capturing an image from the slide, while concurrently processing the previous image. Features extracted from the acquired imagery are then processed by a neural network classifier which has been trained to recognize `spore-like' objects. Images with `spore-like' objects are reviewed by trained technicians. Benefits of this system include: (1) reduction of the overall cycle-time; (2) utilization of technicians for intelligent decision making (vs. manual searching); (3) a regulatory standard which is quantifiable and repeatable; (4) guaranteed 100% coverage of the cover slip; and (5) significantly enhanced detection accuracy.

  6. An Automated Energy Detection Algorithm Based on Consecutive Mean Excision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    ARL-TR-8268 ● JAN 2018 US Army Research Laboratory An Automated Energy Detection Algorithm Based on Consecutive Mean Excision...not return it to the originator. ARL-TR-8268 ● JAN 2018 US Army Research Laboratory An Automated Energy Detection Algorithm...2018 2. REPORT TYPE Technical Report 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 1 October 2016–30 September 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE An Automated Energy

  7. An Automated Flying-Insect Detection System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vann, Timi; Andrews, Jane C.; Howell, Dane; Ryan, Robert

    2007-01-01

    An automated flying-insect detection system (AFIDS) was developed as a proof-of-concept instrument for real-time detection and identification of flying insects. This type of system has use in public health and homeland-security decision support, agriculture and military pest management, and/or entomological research. Insects are first lured into the AFIDS integrated sphere by insect attractants. Once inside the sphere, the insect s wing beats cause alterations in light intensity that is detected by a photoelectric sensor. Following detection, the insects are encouraged (with the use of a small fan) to move out of the sphere and into a designated insect trap where they are held for taxonomic identification or serological testing. The acquired electronic wing-beat signatures are preprocessed (Fourier transformed) in real time to display a periodic signal. These signals are sent to the end user where they are graphically. All AFIDS data are preprocessed in the field with the use of a laptop computer equipped with LabVIEW. The AFIDS software can be programmed to run continuously or at specific time intervals when insects are prevalent. A special DC-restored transimpedance amplifier reduces the contributions of low-frequency background light signals, and affords approximately two orders of magnitude greater AC gain than conventional amplifiers. This greatly increases the signal-to-noise ratio and enables the detection of small changes in light intensity. The AFIDS light source consists of high-intensity Al-GaInP light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The AFIDS circuitry minimizes brightness fluctuations in the LEDs and when integrated with an integrating sphere, creates a diffuse uniform light field. The insect wing beats isotropically scatter the diffuse light in the sphere and create wing-beat signatures that are detected by the sensor. This configuration minimizes variations in signal associated with insect flight orientation. Preliminary data indicate that AFIDS has

  8. AMSNEXRAD-Automated detection of meteorite strewnfields in doppler weather radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankey, Michael; Fries, Marc; Matson, Rob; Fries, Jeff

    2017-09-01

    For several years meteorite recovery in the United States has been greatly enhanced by using Doppler weather radar images to determine possible fall zones for meteorites produced by witnessed fireballs. While most fireball events leave no record on the Doppler radar, some large fireballs do. Based on the successful recovery of 10 meteorite falls 'under the radar', and the discovery of radar on more than 10 historic falls, it is believed that meteoritic dust and or actual meteorites falling to the ground have been recorded on Doppler weather radar (Fries et al., 2014). Up until this point, the process of detecting the radar signatures associated with meteorite falls has been a manual one and dependent on prior accurate knowledge of the fall time and estimated ground track. This manual detection process is labor intensive and can take several hours per event. Recent technological developments by NOAA now help enable the automation of these tasks. This in combination with advancements by the American Meteor Society (Hankey et al., 2014) in the tracking and plotting of witnessed fireballs has opened the possibility for automatic detection of meteorites in NEXRAD Radar Archives. Here in the processes for fireball triangulation, search area determination, radar interfacing, data extraction, storage, search, detection and plotting are explained.

  9. Retrieval-travel-time model for free-fall-flow-rack automated storage and retrieval system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metahri, Dhiyaeddine; Hachemi, Khalid

    2018-03-01

    Automated storage and retrieval systems (AS/RSs) are material handling systems that are frequently used in manufacturing and distribution centers. The modelling of the retrieval-travel time of an AS/RS (expected product delivery time) is practically important, because it allows us to evaluate and improve the system throughput. The free-fall-flow-rack AS/RS has emerged as a new technology for drug distribution. This system is a new variation of flow-rack AS/RS that uses an operator or a single machine for storage operations, and uses a combination between the free-fall movement and a transport conveyor for retrieval operations. The main contribution of this paper is to develop an analytical model of the expected retrieval-travel time for the free-fall flow-rack under a dedicated storage assignment policy. The proposed model, which is based on a continuous approach, is compared for accuracy, via simulation, with discrete model. The obtained results show that the maximum deviation between the continuous model and the simulation is less than 5%, which shows the accuracy of our model to estimate the retrieval time. The analytical model is useful to optimise the dimensions of the rack, assess the system throughput, and evaluate different storage policies.

  10. Accelerometer and Camera-Based Strategy for Improved Human Fall Detection

    KAUST Repository

    Zerrouki, Nabil

    2016-10-29

    In this paper, we address the problem of detecting human falls using anomaly detection. Detection and classification of falls are based on accelerometric data and variations in human silhouette shape. First, we use the exponentially weighted moving average (EWMA) monitoring scheme to detect a potential fall in the accelerometric data. We used an EWMA to identify features that correspond with a particular type of fall allowing us to classify falls. Only features corresponding with detected falls were used in the classification phase. A benefit of using a subset of the original data to design classification models minimizes training time and simplifies models. Based on features corresponding to detected falls, we used the support vector machine (SVM) algorithm to distinguish between true falls and fall-like events. We apply this strategy to the publicly available fall detection databases from the university of Rzeszow’s. Results indicated that our strategy accurately detected and classified fall events, suggesting its potential application to early alert mechanisms in the event of fall situations and its capability for classification of detected falls. Comparison of the classification results using the EWMA-based SVM classifier method with those achieved using three commonly used machine learning classifiers, neural network, K-nearest neighbor and naïve Bayes, proved our model superior.

  11. Defining the user requirements for wearable and optical fall prediction and fall detection devices for home use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gövercin, Mehmet; Költzsch, Y; Meis, M; Wegel, S; Gietzelt, M; Spehr, J; Winkelbach, S; Marschollek, M; Steinhagen-Thiessen, E

    2010-01-01

    One of the major problems in the development of information and communication technologies for older adults is user acceptance. Here we describe the results of focus group discussions that were conducted with older adults and their relatives to guide the development of assistive devices for fall detection and fall prevention. The aim was to determine the ergonomic and functional requirements of such devices and to include these requirements in a user-centered development process. A semi-structured interview format based on an interview guide was used to conduct three focus group discussions with 22 participants. The average age was 75 years in the first group, 68 years in the second group and 50 years in the third group (relatives). Overall, participants considered a fall prediction system to be as important as a fall detection system. Although the ambient, unobtrusive character of the optical sensor system was appreciated, wearable inertial sensors were preferred because of their wide range of use, which provides higher levels of security. Security and mobility were two major reasons for people at risk of falling to buy a wearable and/or optical fall prediction and fall detection device. Design specifications should include a wearable, non-stigmatising sensor at the user's wrist, with an emergency option in case of falling.

  12. Automated System for Early Breast Cancer Detection in Mammograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankman, Isaac N.; Kim, Dong W.; Christens-Barry, William A.; Weinberg, Irving N.; Gatewood, Olga B.; Brody, William R.

    1993-01-01

    The increasing demand on mammographic screening for early breast cancer detection, and the subtlety of early breast cancer signs on mammograms, suggest an automated image processing system that can serve as a diagnostic aid in radiology clinics. We present a fully automated algorithm for detecting clusters of microcalcifications that are the most common signs of early, potentially curable breast cancer. By using the contour map of the mammogram, the algorithm circumvents some of the difficulties encountered with standard image processing methods. The clinical implementation of an automated instrument based on this algorithm is also discussed.

  13. Automated detection and recognition of diagnostically significant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... points and the use of automated means of searching for ECG lines. The system increases the reliability of decoding ECG by a doctor-cardiologist for the purpose of diagnosis and significantly reduces the time to perform this procedure. Keywords: ECG; ECG annotation; the state machine; state diagram; UML; LabVIEW ...

  14. Mobile Phone Based Falling Detection Sensor and Computer-Aided Algorithm for Elderly People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Jong-Ha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Falls are dangerous for the elderly population; therefore many fall detection systems have been developed. However, previous methods are bulky for elderly people or only use a single sensor to isolate falls from daily living activities, which makes a fall difficult to distinguish. In this paper, we present a cost-effective and easy-to-use portable fall-detection sensor and algorithm. Specifically, to detect human falls, we used a three-axis accelerator and a three-axis gyroscope in a mobile phone. We used the Fourier descriptor-based frequency analysis method to classify both normal and falling status. From the experimental results, the proposed method detects falling status with 96.14% accuracy.

  15. Automated lung nodule classification following automated nodule detection on CT: A serial approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armato, Samuel G. III; Altman, Michael B.; Wilkie, Joel; Sone, Shusuke; Li, Feng; Doi, Kunio; Roy, Arunabha S.

    2003-01-01

    We have evaluated the performance of an automated classifier applied to the task of differentiating malignant and benign lung nodules in low-dose helical computed tomography (CT) scans acquired as part of a lung cancer screening program. The nodules classified in this manner were initially identified by our automated lung nodule detection method, so that the output of automated lung nodule detection was used as input to automated lung nodule classification. This study begins to narrow the distinction between the 'detection task' and the 'classification task'. Automated lung nodule detection is based on two- and three-dimensional analyses of the CT image data. Gray-level-thresholding techniques are used to identify initial lung nodule candidates, for which morphological and gray-level features are computed. A rule-based approach is applied to reduce the number of nodule candidates that correspond to non-nodules, and the features of remaining candidates are merged through linear discriminant analysis to obtain final detection results. Automated lung nodule classification merges the features of the lung nodule candidates identified by the detection algorithm that correspond to actual nodules through another linear discriminant classifier to distinguish between malignant and benign nodules. The automated classification method was applied to the computerized detection results obtained from a database of 393 low-dose thoracic CT scans containing 470 confirmed lung nodules (69 malignant and 401 benign nodules). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to evaluate the ability of the classifier to differentiate between nodule candidates that correspond to malignant nodules and nodule candidates that correspond to benign lesions. The area under the ROC curve for this classification task attained a value of 0.79 during a leave-one-out evaluation

  16. Occlusion, optimization, emergency response and partial falls in a senior collapse detection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grewe, Lynne; Magaña-Zook, Steven

    2015-05-01

    Vision based fall detection systems must often contend with more issues than the need to simply identify true fall cases. All vision systems have areas of the frame they cannot see, occlusion, and this becomes of critical importance for systems monitoring for falls. Even with full scene visibility, human falls have an incredible variety requiring special detectors for edge cases like partial falls. Each detection algorithm is only as good as the parameters it is provided and so optimum values for each detector are found using Particle Swarm Optimization. We then discuss the use of email and short message service (SMS) in alerting caregivers that a fall has occurred.

  17. Automated detection of selective logging using SmallSat imagery

    OpenAIRE

    DESCALS FERRANDO ADRIA; SZANTOI ZOLTAN; BECK PIETER; BRINK ANDREAS; STROBL PETER

    2016-01-01

    We propose an automated processing workflow to detect and classify changes in bi-temporal very high resolution (VHR) SmallSat imagery. The workflow consists of two pre-processing steps, which are an image registration method with a cross-correlation approach, and a radiometric normalization based on regression of automatically detected invariant pixels. The detection of selective logging is performed using the Iteratively Reweighted Multivariate Alteration Detection (IR-MAD), which calculates...

  18. A review on automated pavement distress detection methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coenen, Tom B.J.; Golroo, Amir

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, extensive research has been conducted on pavement distress detection. A large part of these studies applied automated methods to capture different distresses. In this paper, a literature review on the distresses and related detection methods are presented. This review also includes

  19. Vision-based fall detection system for improving safety of elderly people

    KAUST Repository

    Harrou, Fouzi

    2017-12-06

    Recognition of human movements is very useful for several applications, such as smart rooms, interactive virtual reality systems, human detection and environment modeling. The objective of this work focuses on the detection and classification of falls based on variations in human silhouette shape, a key challenge in computer vision. Falls are a major health concern, specifically for the elderly. In this study, the detection is achieved with a multivariate exponentially weighted moving average (MEWMA) monitoring scheme, which is effective in detecting falls because it is sensitive to small changes. Unfortunately, an MEWMA statistic fails to differentiate real falls from some fall-like gestures. To remedy this limitation, a classification stage based on a support vector machine (SVM) is applied on detected sequences. To validate this methodology, two fall detection datasets have been tested: the University of Rzeszow fall detection dataset (URFD) and the fall detection dataset (FDD). The results of the MEWMA-based SVM are compared with three other classifiers: neural network (NN), naïve Bayes and K-nearest neighbor (KNN). These results show the capability of the developed strategy to distinguish fall events, suggesting that it can raise an early alert in the fall incidents.

  20. Statistical control chart and neural network classification for improving human fall detection

    KAUST Repository

    Harrou, Fouzi

    2017-01-05

    This paper proposes a statistical approach to detect and classify human falls based on both visual data from camera and accelerometric data captured by accelerometer. Specifically, we first use a Shewhart control chart to detect the presence of potential falls by using accelerometric data. Unfortunately, this chart cannot distinguish real falls from fall-like actions, such as lying down. To bypass this difficulty, a neural network classifier is then applied only on the detected cases through visual data. To assess the performance of the proposed method, experiments are conducted on the publicly available fall detection databases: the University of Rzeszow\\'s fall detection (URFD) dataset. Results demonstrate that the detection phase play a key role in reducing the number of sequences used as input into the neural network classifier for classification, significantly reducing computational burden and achieving better accuracy.

  1. Automated Windowing Processing for Pupil Detection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ebisawa, Y

    2001-01-01

    .... The pupil center in the video image is a focal point to determine the eye gaze. Recently, to improve the disadvantages of traditional pupil detection methods, a pupil detection technique using two light sources (LEDs...

  2. Effective detection method for falls according to the distance between two tri-axial accelerometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Hyung; Park, Geun-Chul; Kim, Soo-Hong; Kim, Soo-Sung; Lee, Hae-Rim; Jeon, Gye-Rok

    2016-04-01

    Falls and fall-related injuries are a significant problem in the elderly population. A number of different approaches for detecting falls and activities of daily living (ADLs) have been conducted in recent years. However, distinguishing between real falls and certain fall-like ADL is often difficult. The aim of this study is to discriminate falls from fall-like ADLs such as jogging, jumping, and jumping down. The distance between two tri-axial accelerometers attached to the abdomen and the sternum was increased from 10 to 30 cm in 10-cm intervals. Experiments for falls and ADLs were performed to investigate the feasibility of the detection system for falls developed in this study. When the distances between the two tri-axial electrometers were 20 and 30 cm, fall-like ADLs were effectively distinguished from falls. The thresholds for three parameters — SVM, Diff Z, and Sum_diff_Z — were set; falls could be distinguished from ADL action sequences when the SVM value was larger than 4 g (TH1), the Diff_Z parameter was larger than 1.25 g (TH2), and the Sum_diff_Z parameter was larger than 15 m/s (TH3). In particular, when the SVM, Diff_Z, and Sum_diff_Z parameter were sequentially applied to thresholds (TH1, TH2, and TH3), fall-like ADL action sequences were accurately discriminated from falls.

  3. Automated detection of exudates for diabetic retinopathy screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleming, Alan D [Biomedical Physics, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, AB25 2ZD (United Kingdom); Philip, Sam [Diabetes Retinal Screening Service, David Anderson Building, Foresterhill Road, Aberdeen, AB25 2ZP (United Kingdom); Goatman, Keith A [Biomedical Physics, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, AB25 2ZD (United Kingdom); Williams, Graeme J [Diabetes Retinal Screening Service, David Anderson Building, Foresterhill Road, Aberdeen, AB25 2ZP (United Kingdom); Olson, John A [Diabetes Retinal Screening Service, David Anderson Building, Foresterhill Road, Aberdeen, AB25 2ZP (United Kingdom); Sharp, Peter F [Biomedical Physics, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, AB25 2ZD (United Kingdom)

    2007-12-21

    Automated image analysis is being widely sought to reduce the workload required for grading images resulting from diabetic retinopathy screening programmes. The recognition of exudates in retinal images is an important goal for automated analysis since these are one of the indicators that the disease has progressed to a stage requiring referral to an ophthalmologist. Candidate exudates were detected using a multi-scale morphological process. Based on local properties, the likelihoods of a candidate being a member of classes exudate, drusen or background were determined. This leads to a likelihood of the image containing exudates which can be thresholded to create a binary decision. Compared to a clinical reference standard, images containing exudates were detected with sensitivity 95.0% and specificity 84.6% in a test set of 13 219 images of which 300 contained exudates. Depending on requirements, this method could form part of an automated system to detect images showing either any diabetic retinopathy or referable diabetic retinopathy.

  4. Automated detection of exudates for diabetic retinopathy screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Alan D.; Philip, Sam; Goatman, Keith A.; Williams, Graeme J.; Olson, John A.; Sharp, Peter F.

    2007-12-01

    Automated image analysis is being widely sought to reduce the workload required for grading images resulting from diabetic retinopathy screening programmes. The recognition of exudates in retinal images is an important goal for automated analysis since these are one of the indicators that the disease has progressed to a stage requiring referral to an ophthalmologist. Candidate exudates were detected using a multi-scale morphological process. Based on local properties, the likelihoods of a candidate being a member of classes exudate, drusen or background were determined. This leads to a likelihood of the image containing exudates which can be thresholded to create a binary decision. Compared to a clinical reference standard, images containing exudates were detected with sensitivity 95.0% and specificity 84.6% in a test set of 13 219 images of which 300 contained exudates. Depending on requirements, this method could form part of an automated system to detect images showing either any diabetic retinopathy or referable diabetic retinopathy.

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF WEARABLE HUMAN FALL DETECTION SYSTEM USING MULTILAYER PERCEPTRON NEURAL NETWORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamideh Kerdegari

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an accurate wearable fall detection system which can identify the occurrence of falls among elderly population. A waist worn tri-axial accelerometer was used to capture the movement signals of human body. A set of laboratory-based falls and activities of daily living (ADL were performed by volunteers with different physical characteristics. The collected acceleration patterns were classified precisely to fall and ADL using multilayer perceptron (MLP neural network. This work was resulted to a high accuracy wearable fall-detection system with the accuracy of 91.6%.

  6. Approaches to automated detection of cyberbullying:A Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Salawu, Semiu; He, Yulan; Lumsden, Joanna

    2017-01-01

    Research into cyberbullying detection has increased in recent years, due in part to the proliferation of cyberbullying across social media and its detrimental effect on young people. A growing body of work is emerging on automated approaches to cyberbullying detection. These approaches utilise machine learning and natural language processing techniques to identify the characteristics of a cyberbullying exchange and automatically detect cyberbullying by matching textual data to the identified ...

  7. Systems and Methods for Automated Water Detection Using Visible Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, Arturo L. (Inventor); Matthies, Larry H. (Inventor); Bellutta, Paolo (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Systems and methods are disclosed that include automated machine vision that can utilize images of scenes captured by a 3D imaging system configured to image light within the visible light spectrum to detect water. One embodiment includes autonomously detecting water bodies within a scene including capturing at least one 3D image of a scene using a sensor system configured to detect visible light and to measure distance from points within the scene to the sensor system, and detecting water within the scene using a processor configured to detect regions within each of the at least one 3D images that possess at least one characteristic indicative of the presence of water.

  8. A Data-Driven Monitoring Technique for Enhanced Fall Events Detection

    KAUST Repository

    Zerrouki, Nabil

    2016-07-26

    Fall detection is a crucial issue in the health care of seniors. In this work, we propose an innovative method for detecting falls via a simple human body descriptors. The extracted features are discriminative enough to describe human postures and not too computationally complex to allow a fast processing. The fall detection is addressed as a statistical anomaly detection problem. The proposed approach combines modeling using principal component analysis modeling with the exponentially weighted moving average (EWMA) monitoring chart. The EWMA scheme is applied on the ignored principal components to detect the presence of falls. Using two different fall detection datasets, URFD and FDD, we have demonstrated the greater sensitivity and effectiveness of the developed method over the conventional PCA-based methods.

  9. Automated detection and categorization of genital injuries using digital colposcopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandes, Kelwin; Cardoso, Jaime S.; Astrup, Birgitte Schmidt

    2017-01-01

    handcrafted features and deep learning techniques in the automated processing of colposcopic images for genital injury detection. Positive results where achieved by both paradigms in segmentation and classification subtasks, being traditional and deep models the best strategy for each subtask type...

  10. Automated system for crack detection using infrared thermograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starman, Stanislav

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was the development of the automated system for crack detection on square steel bars used in the automotive industry for axle and shaft construction. The automated system for thermographic crack detection uses brief pulsed eddy currents to heat steel components under inspection. Cracks, if present, will disturb the current flow and so generate changes in the temperature profile in the crack area. These changes of temperature are visualized using an infrared camera. The image acquired by the infrared camera is evaluated through an image processing system. The advantages afforded by the system are its inspection time, its excellent flaw detection sensitivity and its ability to detect hidden, subsurface cracks. The automated system consists of four IR cameras (each side of steel bar is evaluated at a time), coil, high frequency generator and control place with computers. The system is a part of the inspection line where the subsurface and surface cracks are searched. If the crack is present, the cracked place is automatically marked. The components without cracks are then deposited apart from defective blocks. The system is fully automated and its ability is to evaluate four meter blocks within 20 seconds. This is the real reason for using this system in real industrial applications. (author)

  11. Enhanced detection levels in a semi-automated sandwich ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A peptide nucleic acid (PNA) signal probe was tested as a replacement for a typical DNA oligonucleotidebased signal probe in a semi-automated sandwich hybridisation assay designed to detect the harmful phytoplankton species Alexandrium tamarense. The PNA probe yielded consistently higher fluorescent signal ...

  12. Automated detection and association of surface waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. D. Woodgold

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available An algorithm for the automatic detection and association of surface waves has been developed and tested over an 18 month interval on broad band data from the Yellowknife array (YKA. The detection algorithm uses a conventional STA/LTA scheme on data that have been narrow band filtered at 20 s periods and a test is then applied to identify dispersion. An average of 9 surface waves are detected daily using this technique. Beamforming is applied to determine the arrival azimuth; at a nonarray station this could be provided by poIarization analysis. The detected surface waves are associated daily with the events located by the short period array at Yellowknife, and later with the events listed in the USGS NEIC Monthly Summaries. Association requires matching both arrival time and azimuth of the Rayleigh waves. Regional calibration of group velocity and azimuth is required. . Large variations in both group velocity and azimuth corrections were found, as an example, signals from events in Fiji Tonga arrive with apparent group velocities of 2.9 3.5 krn/s and azimuths from 5 to + 40 degrees clockwise from true (great circle azimuth, whereas signals from Kuriles Kamchatka have velocities of 2.4 2.9 km/s and azimuths off by 35 to 0 degrees. After applying the regional corrections, surface waves are considered associated if the arrival time matches to within 0.25 km/s in apparent group velocity and the azimuth is within 30 degrees of the median expected. Over the 18 month period studied, 32% of the automatically detected surface waves were associated with events located by the Yellowknife short period array, and 34% (1591 with NEIC events; there is about 70% overlap between the two sets of events. Had the automatic detections been reported to the USGS, YKA would have ranked second (after LZH in terms of numbers of associated surface waves for the study period of April 1991 to September 1992.

  13. An Unobtrusive Fall Detection and Alerting System Based on Kalman Filter and Bayes Network Classifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jian; Bai, Shuang; Wang, Xiaoyi

    2017-06-16

    Falls are one of the main health risks among the elderly. A fall detection system based on inertial sensors can automatically detect fall event and alert a caregiver for immediate assistance, so as to reduce injuries causing by falls. Nevertheless, most inertial sensor-based fall detection technologies have focused on the accuracy of detection while neglecting quantization noise caused by inertial sensor. In this paper, an activity model based on tri-axial acceleration and gyroscope is proposed, and the difference between activities of daily living (ADLs) and falls is analyzed. Meanwhile, a Kalman filter is proposed to preprocess the raw data so as to reduce noise. A sliding window and Bayes network classifier are introduced to develop a wearable fall detection system, which is composed of a wearable motion sensor and a smart phone. The experiment shows that the proposed system distinguishes simulated falls from ADLs with a high accuracy of 95.67%, while sensitivity and specificity are 99.0% and 95.0%, respectively. Furthermore, the smart phone can issue an alarm to caregivers so as to provide timely and accurate help for the elderly, as soon as the system detects a fall.

  14. Automated Human Screening for Detecting Concealed Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twyman, Nathan W.

    2012-01-01

    Screening individuals for concealed knowledge has traditionally been the purview of professional interrogators investigating a crime. But the ability to detect when a person is hiding important information would be of high value to many other fields and functions. This dissertation proposes design principles for and reports on an implementation…

  15. Automated detection of microaneurysms using robust blob descriptors

    OpenAIRE

    Adal, Kedir; Ali, Sharib; Sidibé, Désiré; Karnowski, T.P.; Chaum, Edward; Mériaudeau, Fabrice

    2013-01-01

    International audience; Microaneurysms (MAs) are among the first signs of diabetic retinopathy (DR) that can be seen as round dark-red structures in digital color fundus photographs of retina. In recent years, automated computer-aided detection and diagnosis (CAD) of MAs has attracted many researchers due to its low-cost and versatile nature. In this paper, the MA detection problem is modeled as finding interest points from a given image and several interest point descriptors are introduced a...

  16. Automated baseline change detection phase I. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-12-01

    The Automated Baseline Change Detection (ABCD) project is supported by the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) as part of its ER ampersand WM cross-cutting technology program in robotics. Phase 1 of the Automated Baseline Change Detection project is summarized in this topical report. The primary objective of this project is to apply robotic and optical sensor technology to the operational inspection of mixed toxic and radioactive waste stored in barrels, using Automated Baseline Change Detection (ABCD), based on image subtraction. Absolute change detection is based on detecting any visible physical changes, regardless of cause, between a current inspection image of a barrel and an archived baseline image of the same barrel. Thus, in addition to rust, the ABCD system can also detect corrosion, leaks, dents, and bulges. The ABCD approach and method rely on precise camera positioning and repositioning relative to the barrel and on feature recognition in images. In support of this primary objective, there are secondary objectives to determine DOE operational inspection requirements and DOE system fielding requirements

  17. (Automated) software modularization using community detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Klaus Marius; Manikas, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    The modularity of a software system is known to have an effect on, among other, development effort, change impact, and technical debt. Modularizing a specific system and evaluating this modularization is, however, challenging. In this paper, we apply community detection methods to the graph...... of class dependencies in software systems to find optimal modularizations through communities. We evaluate this approach through a study of 111 Java systems contained in the Qualitas Corpus. We found that using the modularity function of Newman with an Erdős-Rényi null-model and using the community...... detection algorithm of Reichardt and Bornholdt improved community quality for all systems, that coupling decreased for 99 of the systems, and that coherence increased for 102 of the systems. Furthermore, the modularity function correlates with existing metrics for coupling and coherence....

  18. Automated Sargassum Detection for Landsat Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, S.; Gallegos, S. C.; Armstrong, D.

    2016-02-01

    We implemented a system to automatically detect Sargassum, a floating seaweed, in 30-meter LANDSAT-8 Operational Land Imager (OLI) imagery. Our algorithm for Sargassum detection is an extended form of Hu's approach to derive a floating algae index (FAI) [1]. Hu's algorithm was developed for Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data, but we extended it for use with the OLI bands centered at 655, 865, and 1609 nm, which are comparable to the MODIS bands located at 645, 859, and 1640 nm. We also developed a high resolution true color product to mask cloud pixels in the OLI scene by applying a threshold to top of the atmosphere (TOA) radiances in the red (655 nm), green (561 nm), and blue (443 nm) wavelengths, as well as a method for removing false positive identifications of Sargassum in the imagery. Hu's algorithm derives a FAI for each Sargassum identified pixel. Our algorithm is currently set to only flag the presence of Sargassum in an OLI pixel by classifying any pixel with a FAI > 0.0 as Sargassum. Additionally, our system geo-locates the flagged Sargassum pixels identified in the OLI imagery into the U.S. Navy Global HYCOM model grid. One element of the model grid covers an area 0.125 degrees of latitude by 0.125 degrees of longitude. To resolve the differences in spatial coverage between Landsat and HYCOM, a scheme was developed to calculate the percentage of pixels flagged within the grid element and if above a threshold, it will be flagged as Sargassum. This work is a part of a larger system, sponsored by NASA/Applied Science and Technology Project at J.C. Stennis Space Center, to forecast when and where Sargassum will land on shore. The focus area of this work is currently the Texas coast. Plans call for extending our efforts into the Caribbean. References: [1] Hu, Chuanmin. A novel ocean color index to detect floating algae in the global oceans. Remote Sensing of Environment 113 (2009) 2118-2129.

  19. Automated detection of medication administration errors in neonatal intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi; Kirkendall, Eric S; Hall, Eric S; Ni, Yizhao; Lingren, Todd; Kaiser, Megan; Lingren, Nataline; Zhai, Haijun; Solti, Imre; Melton, Kristin

    2015-10-01

    To improve neonatal patient safety through automated detection of medication administration errors (MAEs) in high alert medications including narcotics, vasoactive medication, intravenous fluids, parenteral nutrition, and insulin using the electronic health record (EHR); to evaluate rates of MAEs in neonatal care; and to compare the performance of computerized algorithms to traditional incident reporting for error detection. We developed novel computerized algorithms to identify MAEs within the EHR of all neonatal patients treated in a level four neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) in 2011 and 2012. We evaluated the rates and types of MAEs identified by the automated algorithms and compared their performance to incident reporting. Performance was evaluated by physician chart review. In the combined 2011 and 2012 NICU data sets, the automated algorithms identified MAEs at the following rates: fentanyl, 0.4% (4 errors/1005 fentanyl administration records); morphine, 0.3% (11/4009); dobutamine, 0 (0/10); and milrinone, 0.3% (5/1925). We found higher MAE rates for other vasoactive medications including: dopamine, 11.6% (5/43); epinephrine, 10.0% (289/2890); and vasopressin, 12.8% (54/421). Fluid administration error rates were similar: intravenous fluids, 3.2% (273/8567); parenteral nutrition, 3.2% (649/20124); and lipid administration, 1.3% (203/15227). We also found 13 insulin administration errors with a resulting rate of 2.9% (13/456). MAE rates were higher for medications that were adjusted frequently and fluids administered concurrently. The algorithms identified many previously unidentified errors, demonstrating significantly better sensitivity (82% vs. 5%) and precision (70% vs. 50%) than incident reporting for error recognition. Automated detection of medication administration errors through the EHR is feasible and performs better than currently used incident reporting systems. Automated algorithms may be useful for real-time error identification and

  20. Automated Detection of Optic Disc in Fundus Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burman, R.; Almazroa, A.; Raahemifar, K.; Lakshminarayanan, V.

    Optic disc (OD) localization is an important preprocessing step in the automated image detection of fundus image infected with glaucoma. An Interval Type-II fuzzy entropy based thresholding scheme along with Differential Evolution (DE) is applied to determine the location of the OD in the right of left eye retinal fundus image. The algorithm, when applied to 460 fundus images from the MESSIDOR dataset, shows a success rate of 99.07 % for 217 normal images and 95.47 % for 243 pathological images. The mean computational time is 1.709 s for normal images and 1.753 s for pathological images. These results are important for automated detection of glaucoma and for telemedicine purposes.

  1. Automated Fault Detection for DIII-D Tokamak Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, M.L.; Scoville, J.T.; Johnson, R.D.; Hyatt, A.W.; Lee, J.

    1999-11-01

    An automated fault detection software system has been developed and was used during 1999 DIII-D plasma operations. The Fault Identification and Communication System (FICS) executes automatically after every plasma discharge to check dozens of subsystems for proper operation and communicates the test results to the tokamak operator. This system is now used routinely during DIII-D operations and has led to an increase in tokamak productivity.

  2. One step automated unpatterned wafer defect detection and classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dou Lie; Kesler, Daniel; Bruno, William; Monjak, Charles; Hunt, Jim

    1998-01-01

    Automated detection and classification of crystalline defects on micro-grade silicon wafers is extremely important for integrated circuit (IC) device yield. High training cost, limited capability of classifying defects, increasing possibility of contamination, and unexpected human mistakes necessitate the need to replace the human visual inspection with automated defect inspection. The Laser Scanning Surface Inspection Systems (SSISs) equipped with the Reconvergent Specular Detection (RSD) apparatus are widely used for final wafer inspection. RSD, more commonly known as light channel detection (LC), is capable of detecting and classifying material defects by analyzing information from two independent phenomena, light scattering and reflecting. This paper presents a new technique including a new type of light channel detector to detect and classify wafer surface defects such as slipline dislocation, Epi spikes, Pits, and dimples. The optical system to study this technique consists of a particle scanner to detect and quantify light scattering events from contaminants on the wafer surface and a RSD apparatus (silicon photo detector). Compared with the light channel detector presently used in the wafer fabs, this new light channel technique provides higher sensitivity for small defect detection and more defect scattering signatures for defect classification. Epi protrusions (mounds and spikes), slip dislocations, voids, dimples, and some other common defect features and contamination on silicon wafers are studied using this equipment. The results are compared quantitatively with that of human visual inspection and confirmed by microscope or AFM. This new light channel technology could provide the real future solution to the wafer manufacturing industry for fully automated wafer inspection and defect characterization

  3. Detecting inpatient falls by using natural language processing of electronic medical records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toyabe Shin-ichi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Incident reporting is the most common method for detecting adverse events in a hospital. However, under-reporting or non-reporting and delay in submission of reports are problems that prevent early detection of serious adverse events. The aim of this study was to determine whether it is possible to promptly detect serious injuries after inpatient falls by using a natural language processing method and to determine which data source is the most suitable for this purpose. Methods We tried to detect adverse events from narrative text data of electronic medical records by using a natural language processing method. We made syntactic category decision rules to detect inpatient falls from text data in electronic medical records. We compared how often the true fall events were recorded in various sources of data including progress notes, discharge summaries, image order entries and incident reports. We applied the rules to these data sources and compared F-measures to detect falls between these data sources with reference to the results of a manual chart review. The lag time between event occurrence and data submission and the degree of injury were compared. Results We made 170 syntactic rules to detect inpatient falls by using a natural language processing method. Information on true fall events was most frequently recorded in progress notes (100%, incident reports (65.0% and image order entries (12.5%. However, F-measure to detect falls using the rules was poor when using progress notes (0.12 and discharge summaries (0.24 compared with that when using incident reports (1.00 and image order entries (0.91. Since the results suggested that incident reports and image order entries were possible data sources for prompt detection of serious falls, we focused on a comparison of falls found by incident reports and image order entries. Injury caused by falls found by image order entries was significantly more severe than falls detected by

  4. Food intake monitoring: automated chew event detection in chewing sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Päßler, Sebastian; Fischer, Wolf-Joachim

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of the food intake behavior has the potential to provide insights into the development of obesity and eating disorders. As an elementary part of this analysis, chewing strokes have to be detected and counted. Our approach for food intake analysis is the evaluation of chewing sounds generated during the process of eating. These sounds were recorded by microphones applied to the outer ear canal of the user. Eight different algorithms for automated chew event detection were presented and evaluated on two datasets. The first dataset contained food intake sounds from the consumption of six types of food. The second dataset consisted of recordings of different environmental sounds. These datasets contained 68,094 chew events in around 18 h recording data. The results of the automated chew event detection were compared to manual annotations. Precision and recall over 80% were achieved by most of the algorithms. A simple noise reduction algorithm using spectral subtraction was implemented for signal enhancement. Its benefit on the chew event detection performance was evaluated. A reduction of the number of false detections by 28% on average was achieved by maintaining the detection performance. The system is able to be used for calculation of the chewing frequency in laboratory settings.

  5. Automated detection and classification for craters based on geometric matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian-qing; Cui, Ping-yuan; Cui, Hui-tao

    2011-08-01

    Crater detection and classification are critical elements for planetary mission preparations and landing site selection. This paper presents a methodology for the automated detection and matching of craters on images of planetary surface such as Moon, Mars and asteroids. For craters usually are bowl shaped depression, craters can be figured as circles or circular arc during landing phase. Based on the hypothesis that detected crater edges is related to craters in a template by translation, rotation and scaling, the proposed matching method use circles to fitting craters edge, and align circular arc edges from the image of the target body with circular features contained in a model. The approach includes edge detection, edge grouping, reference point detection and geometric circle model matching. Finally we simulate planetary surface to test the reasonableness and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  6. Evaluation of the android-based fall detection system with physiological data monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshmak, Gregory A; Linden, Maria; Loutfi, Amy

    2013-01-01

    Aging population is considered to be major problem in modern healthcare. At the same time, fall incidents often occur among elderly and cause serious injuries affecting their independent living. This paper proposes a framework which uses mobile phone technology together with physiological data monitoring in order to detect falls. The system carries out collecting, storing and processing of acceleration data with further alarm generating and transferring all the measurements to remote caregiver. To perform evaluation, an experimental setup involving novice ice-skaters were carried out to obtain realistic fall data and examine the effects of falling on physiological parameters. A fall detection algorithm has been designed therefore to cope with large variations of movement in the torso. The online algorithm operating showed performance results of 90% specificity, 100% sensitivity and 94% accuracy.

  7. Cholangiocarcinoma--an automated preliminary detection system using MLP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logeswaran, Rajasvaran

    2009-12-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma, cancer of the bile ducts, is often diagnosed via magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP). Due to low resolution, noise and difficulty is actually seeing the tumor in the images, especially by examining only a single image, there has been very little development of automated systems for cholangiocarcinoma diagnosis. This paper presents a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system for the automated preliminary detection of the tumor using a single MRCP image. The multi-stage system employs algorithms and techniques that correspond to the radiological diagnosis characteristics employed by doctors. A popular artificial neural network, the multi-layer perceptron (MLP), is used for decision making to differentiate images with cholangiocarcinoma from those without. The test results achieved was 94% when differentiating only healthy and tumor images, and 88% in a robust multi-disease test where the system had to identify the tumor images from a large set of images containing common biliary diseases.

  8. MEMS-based sensing and algorithm development for fall detection and gait analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Piyush; Ramirez, Gabriel; Lie, Donald Y. C.; Dallas, Tim; Banister, Ron E.; Dentino, Andrew

    2010-02-01

    Falls by the elderly are highly detrimental to health, frequently resulting in injury, high medical costs, and even death. Using a MEMS-based sensing system, algorithms are being developed for detecting falls and monitoring the gait of elderly and disabled persons. In this study, wireless sensors utilize Zigbee protocols were incorporated into planar shoe insoles and a waist mounted device. The insole contains four sensors to measure pressure applied by the foot. A MEMS based tri-axial accelerometer is embedded in the insert and a second one is utilized by the waist mounted device. The primary fall detection algorithm is derived from the waist accelerometer. The differential acceleration is calculated from samples received in 1.5s time intervals. This differential acceleration provides the quantification via an energy index. From this index one may ascertain different gait and identify fall events. Once a pre-determined index threshold is exceeded, the algorithm will classify an event as a fall or a stumble. The secondary algorithm is derived from frequency analysis techniques. The analysis consists of wavelet transforms conducted on the waist accelerometer data. The insole pressure data is then used to underline discrepancies in the transforms, providing more accurate data for classifying gait and/or detecting falls. The range of the transform amplitude in the fourth iteration of a Daubechies-6 transform was found sufficient to detect and classify fall events.

  9. Towards a social and context-aware multi-sensor fall detection and risk assessment platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Backere, F; Ongenae, F; Van den Abeele, F; Nelis, J; Bonte, P; Clement, E; Philpott, M; Hoebeke, J; Verstichel, S; Ackaert, A; De Turck, F

    2015-09-01

    For elderly people fall incidents are life-changing events that lead to degradation or even loss of autonomy. Current fall detection systems are not integrated and often associated with undetected falls and/or false alarms. In this paper, a social- and context-aware multi-sensor platform is presented, which integrates information gathered by a plethora of fall detection systems and sensors at the home of the elderly, by using a cloud-based solution, making use of an ontology. Within the ontology, both static and dynamic information is captured to model the situation of a specific patient and his/her (in)formal caregivers. This integrated contextual information allows to automatically and continuously assess the fall risk of the elderly, to more accurately detect falls and identify false alarms and to automatically notify the appropriate caregiver, e.g., based on location or their current task. The main advantage of the proposed platform is that multiple fall detection systems and sensors can be integrated, as they can be easily plugged in, this can be done based on the specific needs of the patient. The combination of several systems and sensors leads to a more reliable system, with better accuracy. The proof of concept was tested with the use of the visualizer, which enables a better way to analyze the data flow within the back-end and with the use of the portable testbed, which is equipped with several different sensors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. An Automated Directed Spectral Search Methodology for Small Target Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Stanley I.

    Much of the current efforts in remote sensing tackle macro-level problems such as determining the extent of wheat in a field, the general health of vegetation or the extent of mineral deposits in an area. However, for many of the remaining remote sensing challenges being studied currently, such as border protection, drug smuggling, treaty verification, and the war on terror, most targets are very small in nature - a vehicle or even a person. While in typical macro-level problems the objective vegetation is in the scene, for small target detection problems it is not usually known if the desired small target even exists in the scene, never mind finding it in abundance. The ability to find specific small targets, such as vehicles, typifies this problem. Complicating the analyst's life, the growing number of available sensors is generating mountains of imagery outstripping the analysts' ability to visually peruse them. This work presents the important factors influencing spectral exploitation using multispectral data and suggests a different approach to small target detection. The methodology of directed search is presented, including the use of scene-modeled spectral libraries, various search algorithms, and traditional statistical and ROC curve analysis. The work suggests a new metric to calibrate analysis labeled the analytic sweet spot as well as an estimation method for identifying the sweet spot threshold for an image. It also suggests a new visualization aid for highlighting the target in its entirety called nearest neighbor inflation (NNI). It brings these all together to propose that these additions to the target detection arena allow for the construction of a fully automated target detection scheme. This dissertation next details experiments to support the hypothesis that the optimum detection threshold is the analytic sweet spot and that the estimation method adequately predicts it. Experimental results and analysis are presented for the proposed directed

  11. Automated dicentric chromosome detection system for radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Jiang; Luo Yisheng; Cheng Xin; Jiang Li; He Xiaohai

    2000-01-01

    Scoring of dicentric chromosome in human lymphocyte metaphase is the routine method for evaluation of individual dose after radiation accident. Manual microscope scoring methods is tedious and time consuming. The purpose of this subject is to describe a digital image process software of an automated dicentric chromosome detection system the authors developed. Metaphase images are obtained by conventional light microscope equipped with a video camera and converted to digital images. The automatic analysis procedure which developed by C++ computer language including pretreatment of the image, individual chromosome separation and dicentrics scoring. The program was tested using the sample of human blood irradiated with 3.5 Gy γ-rays in vitro. 197 metaphases were analyzed, each of them carries dicentric, about 83% of all dicentrics can be detected correctly, while the value is about 97% for well spread metaphases. An automated dicentric chromosome detection system can give a reliable dose estimation if 80% of all dicentrics are detected correctly. The results show that authors' system can reach this level. As many factors influence the accuracy, such as the quality of cell slide, image capture and pretreatment, much work has to be done before it can be put into practice

  12. Automated detection of multiple sclerosis lesions in serial brain MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llado, Xavier; Ganiler, Onur; Oliver, Arnau; Marti, Robert; Freixenet, Jordi [University of Girona, Computer Vision and Robotics Group, Girona (Spain); Valls, Laia [Dr. Josep Trueta University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Girona (Spain); Vilanova, Joan C. [Girona Magnetic Resonance Center, Girona (Spain); Ramio-Torrenta, Lluis [Dr. Josep Trueta University Hospital, Institut d' Investigacio Biomedica de Girona, Multiple Sclerosis and Neuroimmunology Unit, Girona (Spain); Rovira, Alex [Vall d' Hebron University Hospital, Magnetic Resonance Unit, Department of Radiology, Barcelona (Spain)

    2012-08-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a serious disease typically occurring in the brain whose diagnosis and efficacy of treatment monitoring are vital. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is frequently used in serial brain imaging due to the rich and detailed information provided. Time-series analysis of images is widely used for MS diagnosis and patient follow-up. However, conventional manual methods are time-consuming, subjective, and error-prone. Thus, the development of automated techniques for the detection and quantification of MS lesions is a major challenge. This paper presents an up-to-date review of the approaches which deal with the time-series analysis of brain MRI for detecting active MS lesions and quantifying lesion load change. We provide a comprehensive reference source for researchers in which several approaches to change detection and quantification of MS lesions are investigated and classified. We also analyze the results provided by the approaches, discuss open problems, and point out possible future trends. Lesion detection approaches are required for the detection of static lesions and for diagnostic purposes, while either quantification of detected lesions or change detection algorithms are needed to follow up MS patients. However, there is not yet a single approach that can emerge as a standard for the clinical practice, automatically providing an accurate MS lesion evolution quantification. Future trends will focus on combining the lesion detection in single studies with the analysis of the change detection in serial MRI. (orig.)

  13. Automated Change Detection for Validation and Update of Geodata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Brian Pilemann; Knudsen, Thomas

    Traditionally, different manual, labour intensive and hence costly methods have been used for change detection. Conducting field inspections, comparing the map contents with the real world "on location" is onemethod. In another method two neighbouring images from a flight campaign are used...... to newer (raster based) remote sensing images in order to detect changes in objects. In this paper an automatic change detection method considering changes in the building theme and based on colourinfrared (CIR) aerial photographs in combination with height information (LIDAR, digital photogrammetry...... and a stereo model generated. The digital map database is superimposed (in3D) on the stereo model, and a stereo-operator locates the differences. Automating the update process for a topographic map database is, however, non-trivial, as itinvolves the comparison of the existing (vector based) map database...

  14. Automated Detection of Oscillating Regions in the Solar Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireland, J.; Marsh, M. S.; Kucera, T. A.; Young, C. A.

    2010-01-01

    Recently observed oscillations in the solar atmosphere have been interpreted and modeled as magnetohydrodynamic wave modes. This has allowed for the estimation of parameters that are otherwise hard to derive, such as the coronal magnetic-field strength. This work crucially relies on the initial detection of the oscillations, which is commonly done manually. The volume of Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) data will make manual detection inefficient for detecting all of the oscillating regions. An algorithm is presented that automates the detection of areas of the solar atmosphere that support spatially extended oscillations. The algorithm identifies areas in the solar atmosphere whose oscillation content is described by a single, dominant oscillation within a user-defined frequency range. The method is based on Bayesian spectral analysis of time series and image filtering. A Bayesian approach sidesteps the need for an a-priori noise estimate to calculate rejection criteria for the observed signal, and it also provides estimates of oscillation frequency, amplitude, and noise, and the error in all of these quantities, in a self-consistent way. The algorithm also introduces the notion of quality measures to those regions for which a positive detection is claimed, allowing for simple post-detection discrimination by the user. The algorithm is demonstrated on two Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) datasets, and comments regarding its suitability for oscillation detection in SDO are made.

  15. The Automated Assessment of Postural Stability: Balance Detection Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napoli, Alessandro; Glass, Stephen M; Tucker, Carole; Obeid, Iyad

    2017-12-01

    Impaired balance is a common indicator of mild traumatic brain injury, concussion and musculoskeletal injury. Given the clinical relevance of such injuries, especially in military settings, it is paramount to develop more accurate and reliable on-field evaluation tools. This work presents the design and implementation of the automated assessment of postural stability (AAPS) system, for on-field evaluations following concussion. The AAPS is a computer system, based on inexpensive off-the-shelf components and custom software, that aims to automatically and reliably evaluate balance deficits, by replicating a known on-field clinical test, namely, the Balance Error Scoring System (BESS). The AAPS main innovation is its balance error detection algorithm that has been designed to acquire data from a Microsoft Kinect ® sensor and convert them into clinically-relevant BESS scores, using the same detection criteria defined by the original BESS test. In order to assess the AAPS balance evaluation capability, a total of 15 healthy subjects (7 male, 8 female) were required to perform the BESS test, while simultaneously being tracked by a Kinect 2.0 sensor and a professional-grade motion capture system (Qualisys AB, Gothenburg, Sweden). High definition videos with BESS trials were scored off-line by three experienced observers for reference scores. AAPS performance was assessed by comparing the AAPS automated scores to those derived by three experienced observers. Our results show that the AAPS error detection algorithm presented here can accurately and precisely detect balance deficits with performance levels that are comparable to those of experienced medical personnel. Specifically, agreement levels between the AAPS algorithm and the human average BESS scores ranging between 87.9% (single-leg on foam) and 99.8% (double-leg on firm ground) were detected. Moreover, statistically significant differences in balance scores were not detected by an ANOVA test with alpha equal to 0

  16. Fall detection and classifications based on time-scale radar signal characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadde, Ajay; Amin, Moeness G.; Zhang, Yimin D.; Ahmad, Fauzia

    2014-05-01

    Unattended catastrophic falls result in risk to the lives of elderly. There are growing efforts and rising interest in detecting falls of the aging population, especially those living alone. Radar serves as an effective non-intrusive sensor for detecting human activities. For radar to be effective, it is important to achieve low false alarms, i.e., the system can reliably differentiate between a fall and other human activities. In this paper, we discuss the time-scale based signal analysis of the radar returns from a human target. Reliable features are extracted from the scalogram and are used for fall classifications. The classification results and the advantages of using a wavelet transform are discussed.

  17. Estimating fall risk with inertial sensors using gait stability measures that do not require step detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, F; Toebes, M J P; Pijnappels, M; Stagni, R; van Dieën, J H

    2013-06-01

    Falls have major consequences both at societal (health-care and economy) and individual (physical and psychological) levels. Questionnaires to assess fall risk are commonly used in the clinic, but their predictive value is limited. Objective methods, suitable for clinical application, are hence needed to obtain a quantitative assessment of individual fall risk. Falls in older adults often occur during walking and trunk position is known to play a critical role in balance control. Therefore, analysis of trunk kinematics during gait could present a viable approach to the development of such methods. In this study, nonlinear measures such as harmonic ratio (HR), index of harmonicity (IH), multiscale entropy (MSE) and recurrence quantification analysis (RQA) of trunk accelerations were calculated. These measures are not dependent on step detection, a potentially critical source of error. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between the aforementioned measures and fall history in a large sample of subjects (42 fallers and 89 non - fallers) aged 50 or older. Univariate associations with fall history were found for MSE and RQA parameters in the AP direction; the best classification results were obtained for MSE with scale factor τ = 2 and for maximum length of diagonals in RQA (72.5% and 71% correct classifications, respectively). MSE and RQA were found to be positively associated with fall history and could hence represent useful tools in the identification of subjects for fall prevention programs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Real-time monitoring system for elderly people in detecting falling movement using accelerometer and gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siregar, B.; Andayani, U.; Bahri, R. P.; Seniman; Fahmi, F.

    2018-03-01

    Most of the elderly people is experiencing a decrease in physical quality, especially the weakness in the legs. This will cause elderly easy to fall and can have a serious impact on their health if not getting help very quickly. It is, therefore, necessary to take immediate action against the falling cases experienced by the elderly. One such action is by developing supervision and detecting of falling movements in real-time, which is then the connection to a member of the family. In this research, we used Arduino Uno as a microcontroller, sensor accelerometer, and gyroscope that serves to measure falling movement of the elderly person and supported by GPS technology Ublox Neo 6M to provide information about coordinates. The result was the high accuracy of delivering notification data to server and accuracy of data delivery to family notification equal to 93,75%. The system successfully detects the direction of falling: forward, backward, left or right and able to distinguish between unintentional falling and conscious falling like a bow or prostrate position.

  19. Automated Terrestrial EMI Emitter Detection, Classification, and Localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stottler, R.; Ong, J.; Gioia, C.; Bowman, C.; Bhopale, A.

    Clear operating spectrum at ground station antenna locations is critically important for communicating with, commanding, controlling, and maintaining the health of satellites. Electro Magnetic Interference (EMI) can interfere with these communications, so it is extremely important to track down and eliminate sources of EMI. The Terrestrial RFI-locating Automation with CasE based Reasoning (TRACER) system is being implemented to automate terrestrial EMI emitter localization and identification to improve space situational awareness, reduce manpower requirements, dramatically shorten EMI response time, enable the system to evolve without programmer involvement, and support adversarial scenarios such as jamming. The operational version of TRACER is being implemented and applied with real data (power versus frequency over time) for both satellite communication antennas and sweeping Direction Finding (DF) antennas located near them. This paper presents the design and initial implementation of TRACER’s investigation data management, automation, and data visualization capabilities. TRACER monitors DF antenna signals and detects and classifies EMI using neural network technology, trained on past cases of both normal communications and EMI events. When EMI events are detected, an Investigation Object is created automatically. The user interface facilitates the management of multiple investigations simultaneously. Using a variant of the Friis transmission equation, emissions data is used to estimate and plot the emitter’s locations over time for comparison with current flights. The data is also displayed on a set of five linked graphs to aid in the perception of patterns spanning power, time, frequency, and bearing. Based on details of the signal (its classification, direction, and strength, etc.), TRACER retrieves one or more cases of EMI investigation methodologies which are represented as graphical behavior transition networks (BTNs). These BTNs can be edited easily

  20. Automated Incident Detection Using Real-Time Floating Car Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten Houbraken

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the feasibility of a live Automated Incident Detection (AID system using only Floating Car Data (FCD in one of the first large-scale FCD AID field trials. AID systems detect traffic events and alert upcoming drivers to improve traffic safety without human monitoring. These automated systems traditionally rely on traffic monitoring sensors embedded in the road. FCD allows for finer spatial granularity of traffic monitoring. However, low penetration rates of FCD probe vehicles and the data latency have historically hindered FCD AID deployment. We use a live country-wide FCD system monitoring an estimated 5.93% of all vehicles. An FCD AID system is presented and compared to the installed AID system (using loop sensor data on 2 different highways in Netherlands. Our results show the FCD AID can adequately monitor changing traffic conditions and follow the AID benchmark. The presented FCD AID is integrated with the road operator systems as part of an innovation project, making this, to the best of our knowledge, the first full chain technical feasibility trial of an FCD-only AID system. Additionally, FCD allows for AID on roads without installed sensors, allowing road safety improvements at low cost.

  1. Enhancing time-series detection algorithms for automated biosurveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokars, Jerome I; Burkom, Howard; Xing, Jian; English, Roseanne; Bloom, Steven; Cox, Kenneth; Pavlin, Julie A

    2009-04-01

    BioSense is a US national system that uses data from health information systems for automated disease surveillance. We studied 4 time-series algorithm modifications designed to improve sensitivity for detecting artificially added data. To test these modified algorithms, we used reports of daily syndrome visits from 308 Department of Defense (DoD) facilities and 340 hospital emergency departments (EDs). At a constant alert rate of 1%, sensitivity was improved for both datasets by using a minimum standard deviation (SD) of 1.0, a 14-28 day baseline duration for calculating mean and SD, and an adjustment for total clinic visits as a surrogate denominator. Stratifying baseline days into weekdays versus weekends to account for day-of-week effects increased sensitivity for the DoD data but not for the ED data. These enhanced methods may increase sensitivity without increasing the alert rate and may improve the ability to detect outbreaks by using automated surveillance system data.

  2. A Novel Short-Time Fourier Transform-Based Fall Detection Algorithm Using 3-Axis Accelerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isu Shin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The short-time Fourier transform- (STFT- based algorithm was suggested to distinguish falls from various activities of daily living (ADLs. Forty male subjects volunteered in the experiments including three types of falls and four types of ADLs. An inertia sensor unit attached to the middle of two anterior superior iliac spines was used to measure the 3-axis accelerations at 100 Hz. The measured accelerations were transformed to signal vector magnitude values to be analyzed using STFT. The powers of low frequency components were extracted, and the fall detection was defined as whether the normalized power was less than the threshold (50% of the normal power. Most power was observed at the frequency band lower than 5 Hz in all activities, but the dramatic changes in the power were found only in falls. The specificity of 1–3 Hz frequency components was the best (100%, but the sensitivity was much smaller compared with 4 Hz component. The 4 Hz component showed the best fall detection with 96.9% sensitivity and 97.1% specificity. We believe that the suggested algorithm based on STFT would be useful in the fall detection and the classification from ADLs as well.

  3. Improved cancer detection in automated breast ultrasound by radiologists using Computer Aided Detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zelst, J.C. van; Tan, T.; Platel, B.; Jong, M de; Steenbakkers, A.; Mourits, M.; Grivegnee, A.; Borelli, C.; Karssemeijer, N.; Mann, R.M.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of dedicated Computer Aided Detection (CAD) software for automated breast ultrasound (ABUS) on the performance of radiologists screening for breast cancer. METHODS: 90 ABUS views of 90 patients were randomly selected from a multi-institutional archive of cases

  4. An Automated Algorithm for Fast Pulse Wave Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bistra Nenova

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This study presents an automated algorithm for fast pulse wave detection, directed to establishing the presence of cardiac activity in an emergency. The method relies on real-time estimation of similarity of closely positioned rising edges of the waveform and decision logic. The algorithm was tested on a set of pressure pulse waves from the MGH/MF waveform database from PhysioNet. Our approach to assessing the algorithm performance was based on location and classification of suspicious 10 s signal epochs by means of detection of dissimilar peak-to-peak intervals. The detected epochs were visually inspected and compared to the corresponding ECG-based expert beat annotations. The main epoch and error types were summarized. The performance of the algorithm and the visual interpretation of the results were illustrated by means of examples. The review of the recordings showed that the proposed algorithm correctly identifies cardiac pulsations even under considerable artefacts. Our conclusion is that the algorithm reliably detects critical periods in cardiac activity and is applicable to fast pulse wave detection in real-time applications and ambulatory measurement setups.

  5. Sunglass detection method for automation of video surveillance system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikandar, Tasriva; Samsudin, Wan Nur Azhani W.; Hawari Ghazali, Kamarul; Mohd, Izzeldin I.; Fazle Rabbi, Mohammad

    2018-04-01

    Wearing sunglass to hide face from surveillance camera is a common activity in criminal incidences. Therefore, sunglass detection from surveillance video has become a demanding issue in automation of security systems. In this paper we propose an image processing method to detect sunglass from surveillance images. Specifically, a unique feature using facial height and width has been employed to identify the covered region of the face. The presence of covered area by sunglass is evaluated using facial height-width ratio. Threshold value of covered area percentage is used to classify the glass wearing face. Two different types of glasses have been considered i.e. eye glass and sunglass. The results of this study demonstrate that the proposed method is able to detect sunglasses in two different illumination conditions such as, room illumination as well as in the presence of sunlight. In addition, due to the multi-level checking in facial region, this method has 100% accuracy of detecting sunglass. However, in an exceptional case where fabric surrounding the face has similar color as skin, the correct detection rate was found 93.33% for eye glass.

  6. An Automated Energy Detection Algorithm Based on Morphological Filter Processing with a Modified Watershed Transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    ARL-TR-8270 ● JAN 2018 US Army Research Laboratory An Automated Energy Detection Algorithm Based on Morphological Filter...Automated Energy Detection Algorithm Based on Morphological Filter Processing with a Modified Watershed Transform by Kwok F Tom Sensors and Electron...1 October 2016–30 September 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE An Automated Energy Detection Algorithm Based on Morphological Filter Processing with a

  7. An Automated Energy Detection Algorithm Based on Kurtosis-Histogram Excision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    ARL-TR-8269 ● JAN 2018 US Army Research Laboratory An Automated Energy Detection Algorithm Based on Kurtosis-Histogram Excision...needed. Do not return it to the originator. ARL-TR-8269 ● JAN 2018 US Army Research Laboratory An Automated Energy Detection...Automated Energy Detection Algorithm Based on Kurtosis-Histogram Excision 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6

  8. Fully Automated Sunspot Detection and Classification Using SDO HMI Imagery in MATLAB

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    FULLY AUTOMATED SUNSPOT DETECTION AND CLASSIFICATION USING SDO HMI IMAGERY IN MATLAB THESIS Gordon M. Spahr, Second Lieutenant, USAF AFIT-ENP-14-M-34...the U.S. Government and is not subject to copyright protection in the United States. AFIT-ENP-14-M-34 FULLY AUTOMATED SUNSPOT DETECTION AND...DISTRIUBUTION UNLIMITED. AFIT-ENP-14-M-34 FULLY AUTOMATED SUNSPOT DETECTION AND CLASSIFICATION USING SDO HMI IMAGERY IN MATLAB Gordon M. Spahr, BS Second

  9. Mobile Robot Aided Silhouette Imaging and Robust Body Pose Recognition for Elderly-Fall Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Liu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This article introduces a mobile infrared silhouette imaging and sparse representation-based pose recognition for building an elderly-fall detection system. The proposed imaging paradigm exploits the novel use of the pyroelectric infrared (PIR sensor in pursuit of body silhouette imaging. A mobile robot carrying a vertical column of multi-PIR detectors is organized for the silhouette acquisition. Then we express the fall detection problem in silhouette image-based pose recognition. For the pose recognition, we use a robust sparse representation-based method for fall detection. The normal and fall poses are sparsely represented in the basis space spanned by the combinations of a pose training template and an error template. The ℓ1 norm minimizations with linear programming (LP and orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP are used for finding the sparsest solution, and the entity with the largest amplitude encodes the class of the testing sample. The application of the proposed sensing paradigm to fall detection is addressed in the context of three scenarios, including: ideal non-obstruction, simulated random pixel obstruction and simulated random block obstruction. Experimental studies are conducted to validate the effectiveness of the proposed method for nursing and homeland healthcare.

  10. An automatic fall detection framework using data fusion of Doppler radar and motion sensor network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liang; Popescu, Mihail; Skubic, Marjorie; Rantz, Marilyn

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the ongoing work of detecting falls in independent living senior apartments. We have developed a fall detection system with Doppler radar sensor and implemented ceiling radar in real senior apartments. However, the detection accuracy on real world data is affected by false alarms inherent in the real living environment, such as motions from visitors. To solve this issue, this paper proposes an improved framework by fusing the Doppler radar sensor result with a motion sensor network. As a result, performance is significantly improved after the data fusion by discarding the false alarms generated by visitors. The improvement of this new method is tested on one week of continuous data from an actual elderly person who frequently falls while living in her senior home.

  11. Evaluation of a New Digital Automated Glycemic Pattern Detection Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comellas, María José; Albiñana, Emma; Artes, Maite; Corcoy, Rosa; Fernández-García, Diego; García-Alemán, Jorge; García-Cuartero, Beatriz; González, Cintia; Rivero, María Teresa; Casamira, Núria; Weissmann, Jörg

    2017-11-01

    Blood glucose meters are reliable devices for data collection, providing electronic logs of historical data easier to interpret than handwritten logbooks. Automated tools to analyze these data are necessary to facilitate glucose pattern detection and support treatment adjustment. These tools emerge in a broad variety in a more or less nonevaluated manner. The aim of this study was to compare eDetecta, a new automated pattern detection tool, to nonautomated pattern analysis in terms of time investment, data interpretation, and clinical utility, with the overarching goal to identify early in development and implementation of tool areas of improvement and potential safety risks. Multicenter web-based evaluation in which 37 endocrinologists were asked to assess glycemic patterns of 4 real reports (2 continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion [CSII] and 2 multiple daily injection [MDI]). Endocrinologist and eDetecta analyses were compared on time spent to analyze each report and agreement on the presence or absence of defined patterns. eDetecta module markedly reduced the time taken to analyze each case on the basis of the emminens eConecta reports (CSII: 18 min; MDI: 12.5), compared to the automatic eDetecta analysis. Agreement between endocrinologists and eDetecta varied depending on the patterns, with high level of agreement in patterns of glycemic variability. Further analysis of low level of agreement led to identifying areas where algorithms used could be improved to optimize trend pattern identification. eDetecta was a useful tool for glycemic pattern detection, helping clinicians to reduce time required to review emminens eConecta glycemic reports. No safety risks were identified during the study.

  12. An Automated Road Roughness Detection from Mobile Laser Scanning Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, P.; Angelats, E.

    2017-05-01

    Rough roads influence the safety of the road users as accident rate increases with increasing unevenness of the road surface. Road roughness regions are required to be efficiently detected and located in order to ensure their maintenance. Mobile Laser Scanning (MLS) systems provide a rapid and cost-effective alternative by providing accurate and dense point cloud data along route corridor. In this paper, an automated algorithm is presented for detecting road roughness from MLS data. The presented algorithm is based on interpolating smooth intensity raster surface from LiDAR point cloud data using point thinning process. The interpolated surface is further processed using morphological and multi-level Otsu thresholding operations to identify candidate road roughness regions. The candidate regions are finally filtered based on spatial density and standard deviation of elevation criteria to detect the roughness along the road surface. The test results of road roughness detection algorithm on two road sections are presented. The developed approach can be used to provide comprehensive information to road authorities in order to schedule maintenance and ensure maximum safety conditions for road users.

  13. A vision-based fall detection algorithm of human in indoor environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hao; Guo, Yongcai

    2017-02-01

    Elderly care becomes more and more prominent in China as the population is aging fast and the number of aging population is large. Falls, as one of the biggest challenges in elderly guardianship system, have a serious impact on both physical health and mental health of the aged. Based on feature descriptors, such as aspect ratio of human silhouette, velocity of mass center, moving distance of head and angle of the ultimate posture, a novel vision-based fall detection method was proposed in this paper. A fast median method of background modeling with three frames was also suggested. Compared with the conventional bounding box and ellipse method, the novel fall detection technique is not only applicable for recognizing the fall behaviors end of lying down but also suitable for detecting the fall behaviors end of kneeling down and sitting down. In addition, numerous experiment results showed that the method had a good performance in recognition accuracy on the premise of not adding the cost of time.

  14. Automated rice leaf disease detection using color image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugoy, Reinald Adrian D. L.; Mariano, Vladimir Y.

    2011-06-01

    In rice-related institutions such as the International Rice Research Institute, assessing the health condition of a rice plant through its leaves, which is usually done as a manual eyeball exercise, is important to come up with good nutrient and disease management strategies. In this paper, an automated system that can detect diseases present in a rice leaf using color image analysis is presented. In the system, the outlier region is first obtained from a rice leaf image to be tested using histogram intersection between the test and healthy rice leaf images. Upon obtaining the outlier, it is then subjected to a threshold-based K-means clustering algorithm to group related regions into clusters. Then, these clusters are subjected to further analysis to finally determine the suspected diseases of the rice leaf.

  15. Geostationary Fire Detection with the Wildfire Automated Biomass Burning Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, J.; Schmidt, C. C.; Brunner, J. C.; Prins, E. M.

    2010-12-01

    The Wild Fire Automated Biomass Burning Algorithm (WF_ABBA), developed at the Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies (CIMSS), has a long legacy of operational wildfire detection and characterization. In recent years, applications of geostationary fire detection and characterization data have been expanding. Fires are detected with a contextual algorithm and when the fires meet certain conditions the instantaneous fire size, temperature, and radiative power are calculated and provided in user products. The WF_ABBA has been applied to data from Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES)-8 through 15, Meteosat-8/-9, and Multifunction Transport Satellite (MTSAT)-1R/-2. WF_ABBA is also being developed for the upcoming platforms like GOES-R Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) and other geostationary satellites. Development of the WF_ABBA for GOES-R ABI has focused on adapting the legacy algorithm to the new satellite system, enhancing its capabilities to take advantage of the improvements available from ABI, and addressing user needs. By its nature as a subpixel feature, observation of fire is extraordinarily sensitive to the characteristics of the sensor and this has been a fundamental part of the GOES-R WF_ABBA development work.

  16. Anomaly detection in an automated safeguards system using neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whiteson, R.; Howell, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    An automated safeguards system must be able to detect an anomalous event, identify the nature of the event, and recommend a corrective action. Neural networks represent a new way of thinking about basic computational mechanisms for intelligent information processing. In this paper, we discuss the issues involved in applying a neural network model to the first step of this process: anomaly detection in materials accounting systems. We extend our previous model to a 3-tank problem and compare different neural network architectures and algorithms. We evaluate the computational difficulties in training neural networks and explore how certain design principles affect the problems. The issues involved in building a neural network architecture include how the information flows, how the network is trained, how the neurons in a network are connected, how the neurons process information, and how the connections between neurons are modified. Our approach is based on the demonstrated ability of neural networks to model complex, nonlinear, real-time processes. By modeling the normal behavior of the processes, we can predict how a system should be behaving and, therefore, detect when an abnormality occurs

  17. Automated Detection of Firearms and Knives in a CCTV Image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Grega

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Closed circuit television systems (CCTV are becoming more and more popular and are being deployed in many offices, housing estates and in most public spaces. Monitoring systems have been implemented in many European and American cities. This makes for an enormous load for the CCTV operators, as the number of camera views a single operator can monitor is limited by human factors. In this paper, we focus on the task of automated detection and recognition of dangerous situations for CCTV systems. We propose algorithms that are able to alert the human operator when a firearm or knife is visible in the image. We have focused on limiting the number of false alarms in order to allow for a real-life application of the system. The specificity and sensitivity of the knife detection are significantly better than others published recently. We have also managed to propose a version of a firearm detection algorithm that offers a near-zero rate of false alarms. We have shown that it is possible to create a system that is capable of an early warning in a dangerous situation, which may lead to faster and more effective response times and a reduction in the number of potential victims.

  18. Automated Detection of Firearms and Knives in a CCTV Image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grega, Michał; Matiolański, Andrzej; Guzik, Piotr; Leszczuk, Mikołaj

    2016-01-01

    Closed circuit television systems (CCTV) are becoming more and more popular and are being deployed in many offices, housing estates and in most public spaces. Monitoring systems have been implemented in many European and American cities. This makes for an enormous load for the CCTV operators, as the number of camera views a single operator can monitor is limited by human factors. In this paper, we focus on the task of automated detection and recognition of dangerous situations for CCTV systems. We propose algorithms that are able to alert the human operator when a firearm or knife is visible in the image. We have focused on limiting the number of false alarms in order to allow for a real-life application of the system. The specificity and sensitivity of the knife detection are significantly better than others published recently. We have also managed to propose a version of a firearm detection algorithm that offers a near-zero rate of false alarms. We have shown that it is possible to create a system that is capable of an early warning in a dangerous situation, which may lead to faster and more effective response times and a reduction in the number of potential victims.

  19. Automated analysis for detecting beams in laser wakefield simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ushizima, Daniela M.; Rubel, Oliver; Prabhat, Mr.; Weber, Gunther H.; Bethel, E. Wes; Aragon, Cecilia R.; Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Hamann, Bernd; Messmer, Peter; Hagen, Hans

    2008-01-01

    Laser wakefield particle accelerators have shown the potential to generate electric fields thousands of times higher than those of conventional accelerators. The resulting extremely short particle acceleration distance could yield a potential new compact source of energetic electrons and radiation, with wide applications from medicine to physics. Physicists investigate laser-plasma internal dynamics by running particle-in-cell simulations; however, this generates a large dataset that requires time-consuming, manual inspection by experts in order to detect key features such as beam formation. This paper describes a framework to automate the data analysis and classification of simulation data. First, we propose a new method to identify locations with high density of particles in the space-time domain, based on maximum extremum point detection on the particle distribution. We analyze high density electron regions using a lifetime diagram by organizing and pruning the maximum extrema as nodes in a minimum spanning tree. Second, we partition the multivariate data using fuzzy clustering to detect time steps in a experiment that may contain a high quality electron beam. Finally, we combine results from fuzzy clustering and bunch lifetime analysis to estimate spatially confined beams. We demonstrate our algorithms successfully on four different simulation datasets

  20. Fall detection devices and their use with older adults: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, Shomir; Thompson, Hilaire; Demiris, George

    2014-01-01

    Falls represent a significant threat to the health and independence of adults aged 65 years and older. As a wide variety and large number of passive monitoring systems are currently and increasingly available to detect when individuals have fallen, there is a need to analyze and synthesize the evidence regarding their ability to accurately detect falls to determine which systems are most effective. The purpose of this literature review is to systematically assess the current state of design and implementation of fall-detection devices. This review also examines to what extent these devices have been tested in the real world as well as the acceptability of these devices to older adults. A systematic literature review was conducted in PubMed, CINAHL, EMBASE, and PsycINFO from their respective inception dates to June 25, 2013. Articles were included if they discussed a project or multiple projects involving a system with the purpose of detecting a fall in adults. It was not a requirement for inclusion in this review that the system targets persons older than 65 years. Articles were excluded if they were not written in English or if they looked at fall risk, fall detection in children, fall prevention, or a personal emergency response device. Studies were initially divided into those using sensitivity, specificity, or accuracy in their evaluation methods and those using other methods to evaluate their devices. Studies were further classified into wearable devices and nonwearable devices. Studies were appraised for inclusion of older adults in sample and if evaluation included real-world settings. This review identified 57 projects that used wearable systems and 35 projects using nonwearable systems, regardless of evaluation technique. Nonwearable systems included cameras, motion sensors, microphones, and floor sensors. Of the projects examining wearable systems, only 7.1% reported monitoring older adults in a real-world setting. There were no studies of nonwearable

  1. An Automated Energy Detection Algorithm Based on Morphological and Statistical Processing Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-09

    ARL-TR-8272 ● JAN 2018 US Army Research Laboratory An Automated Energy Detection Algorithm Based on Morphological and...is no longer needed. Do not return it to the originator. ARL-TR-8272 ● JAN 2018 US Army Research Laboratory An Automated Energy ...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE An Automated Energy Detection Algorithm Based on Morphological and Statistical Processing Techniques 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER

  2. Freezing of gait and fall detection in Parkinson's disease using wearable sensors: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva de Lima, A.L.; Evers, L.J.W.; Hahn, T.; Bataille, L.; Hamilton, J.L.; Little, M.A.; Okuma, Y.; Bloem, B.R.; Faber, M.J.

    2017-01-01

    Despite the large number of studies that have investigated the use of wearable sensors to detect gait disturbances such as Freezing of gait (FOG) and falls, there is little consensus regarding appropriate methodologies for how to optimally apply such devices. Here, an overview of the use of wearable

  3. An Energy-Efficient Multi-Tier Architecture for Fall Detection Using Smartphones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guvensan, M Amac; Kansiz, A Oguz; Camgoz, N Cihan; Turkmen, H Irem; Yavuz, A Gokhan; Karsligil, M Elif

    2017-06-23

    Automatic detection of fall events is vital to providing fast medical assistance to the causality, particularly when the injury causes loss of consciousness. Optimization of the energy consumption of mobile applications, especially those which run 24/7 in the background, is essential for longer use of smartphones. In order to improve energy-efficiency without compromising on the fall detection performance, we propose a novel 3-tier architecture that combines simple thresholding methods with machine learning algorithms. The proposed method is implemented on a mobile application, called uSurvive, for Android smartphones. It runs as a background service and monitors the activities of a person in daily life and automatically sends a notification to the appropriate authorities and/or user defined contacts when it detects a fall. The performance of the proposed method was evaluated in terms of fall detection performance and energy consumption. Real life performance tests conducted on two different models of smartphone demonstrate that our 3-tier architecture with feature reduction could save up to 62% of energy compared to machine learning only solutions. In addition to this energy saving, the hybrid method has a 93% of accuracy, which is superior to thresholding methods and better than machine learning only solutions.

  4. Unsupervised machine-learning method for improving the performance of ambulatory fall-detection systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuwono Mitchell

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Falls can cause trauma, disability and death among older people. Ambulatory accelerometer devices are currently capable of detecting falls in a controlled environment. However, research suggests that most current approaches can tend to have insufficient sensitivity and specificity in non-laboratory environments, in part because impacts can be experienced as part of ordinary daily living activities. Method We used a waist-worn wireless tri-axial accelerometer combined with digital signal processing, clustering and neural network classifiers. The method includes the application of Discrete Wavelet Transform, Regrouping Particle Swarm Optimization, Gaussian Distribution of Clustered Knowledge and an ensemble of classifiers including a multilayer perceptron and Augmented Radial Basis Function (ARBF neural networks. Results Preliminary testing with 8 healthy individuals in a home environment yields 98.6% sensitivity to falls and 99.6% specificity for routine Activities of Daily Living (ADL data. Single ARB and MLP classifiers were compared with a combined classifier. The combined classifier offers the greatest sensitivity, with a slight reduction in specificity for routine ADL and an increased specificity for exercise activities. In preliminary tests, the approach achieves 100% sensitivity on in-group falls, 97.65% on out-group falls, 99.33% specificity on routine ADL, and 96.59% specificity on exercise ADL. Conclusion The pre-processing and feature-extraction steps appear to simplify the signal while successfully extracting the essential features that are required to characterize a fall. The results suggest this combination of classifiers can perform better than MLP alone. Preliminary testing suggests these methods may be useful for researchers who are attempting to improve the performance of ambulatory fall-detection systems.

  5. Automated Waterline Detection in the Wadden Sea Using High-Resolution TerraSAR-X Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Wiehle

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an algorithm for automatic detection of the land-water-line from TerraSAR-X images acquired over the Wadden Sea. In this coastal region of the southeastern North Sea, a strip of up to 20 km of seabed falls dry during low tide, revealing mudflats and tidal creeks. The tidal currents transport sediments and can change the coastal shape with erosion rates of several meters per month. This rate can be strongly increased by storm surges which also cause flooding of usually dry areas. Due to the high number of ships traveling through the Wadden Sea to the largest ports of Germany, frequent monitoring of the bathymetry is also an important task for maritime security. For such an extended area and the required short intervals of a few months, only remote sensing methods can perform this task efficiently. Automating the waterline detection in weather-independent radar images provides a fast and reliable way to spot changes in the coastal topography. The presented algorithm first performs smoothing, brightness thresholding, and edge detection. In the second step, edge drawing and flood filling are iteratively performed to determine optimal thresholds for the edge drawing. In the last step, small misdetections are removed.

  6. Older adults' perceptions of technologies aimed at falls prevention, detection or monitoring: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley-Hague, Helen; Boulton, Elisabeth; Hall, Alex; Pfeiffer, Klaus; Todd, Chris

    2014-06-01

    Over recent years a number of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) have emerged aiming at falls prevention, falls detection and alarms for use in case of fall. There are also a range of ICT interventions, which have been created or adapted to be pro-active in preventing falls, such as those which provide strength and balance training to older adults in the prevention of falls. However, there are issues related to the adoption and continued use of these technologies by older adults. This review provides an overview of older adults' perceptions of falls technologies. We undertook systematic searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and PsychINFO, COMPENDEX and the Cochrane database. Key search terms included 'older adults', 'seniors', 'preference', 'attitudes' and a wide range of technologies, they also included the key word 'fall*'. We considered all studies that included older adults aged 50 and above. Studies had to include technologies related specifically to falls prevention, detection or monitoring. The Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) tool and the Quality Assessment Tool for Quantitative Studies by the Effective Public Health Practice Project (EPHPP) were used. We identified 76 potentially relevant papers. Some 21 studies were considered for quality review. Twelve qualitative studies, three quantitative studies and 6 mixed methods studies were included. The literature related to technologies aimed at predicting, monitoring and preventing falls suggest that intrinsic factors related to older adults' attitudes around control, independence and perceived need/requirements for safety are important for their motivation to use and continue using technologies. Extrinsic factors such as usability, feedback gained and costs are important elements which support these attitudes and perceptions. Positive messages about the benefits of falls technologies for promoting healthy active ageing and independence are critical, as is ensuring that the technologies are simple

  7. Accuracy of a wavelet-based fall detection approach using an accelerometer and a barometric pressure sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejupi, Andreas; Galang, Chantel; Aziz, Omar; Park, Edward J; Robinovitch, Stephen

    2017-07-01

    Falls are a major source of morbidity in older adults, and 50% of older adults who fall cannot rise independently after falling. Wearable sensor-based fall detection devices may assist in preventing long lies after falls. The goal of this study was to determine the accuracy of a novel wavelet-based approach to automatically detect falls based on accelerometer and barometric pressure sensor data. Participants (n=15) mimicked a range of falls, near falls, and activities of daily living (ADLs) while wearing accelerometer and barometric pressure sensors on the lower back, chest, wrists and thighs. The wavelet transform using pattern adapted wavelets was applied to detect falls from the sensor data. In total, 525 trials (194 falls, 105 near-falls and 226 ADLs) were included in our analysis. When we applied the wavelet-based method on only accelerometer data, classification accuracies ranged from 82% to 96%, with the chest sensor providing the highest accuracy. Accuracy improved by 3.4% on average (p=0.041; SD=3.0%) when we also included the barometric pressure sensor data. The highest classification accuracies (of 98%) were achieved when we combined wavelet-based features and traditional statistical features in a multiphase fall detection model using machine learning. We show that the wavelet-based approach accurately distinguishes falls from near-falls and ADLs, and that it can be applied on wearable sensor data generated from various body locations. Additionally, we show that the accuracy of a wavelet-based fall detection system can be further improved by combining accelerometer and barometric pressure sensor data, and by incorporating wavelet and statistical features in a machine learning classification algorithm.

  8. Automated Detection of Small Bodies by Space Based Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidstrup, P. R.; Grillmayer, G.; Andersen, A. C.; Haack, H.; Jorgensen, J. L.

    The number of known comets and asteroids is increasing every year. Up till now this number is including approximately 250,000 of the largest minor planets, as they are usually referred. These discoveries are due to the Earth-based observation which has intensified over the previous decades. Additionally larger telescopes and arrays of telescopes are being used for exploring our Solar System. It is believed that all near- Earth and Main-Belt asteroids of diameters above 10 to 30 km have been discovered, leaving these groups of objects as observationally complete. However, the cataloguing of smaller bodies is incomplete as only a very small fraction of the expected number has been discovered. It is estimated that approximately 1010 main belt asteroids in the size range 1 m to 1 km are too faint to be observed using Earth-based telescopes. In order to observe these small bodies, space-based search must be initiated to remove atmospheric disturbances and to minimize the distance to the asteroids and thereby minimising the requirement for long camera integration times. A new method of space-based detection of moving non-stellar objects is currently being developed utilising the Advanced Stellar Compass (ASC) built for spacecraft attitude determination by Ørsted, Danish Technical University. The ASC serves as a backbone technology in the project as it is capable of fully automated distinction of known and unknown celestial objects. By only processing objects of particular interest, i.e. moving objects, it will be possible to discover small bodies with a minimum of ground control, with the ultimate ambition of a fully automated space search probe. Currently, the ASC is being mounted on the Flying Laptop satellite of the Institute of Space Systems, Universität Stuttgart. It will, after a launch into a low Earth polar orbit in 2008, test the detection method with the ASC equipment that already had significant in-flight experience. A future use of the ASC based automated

  9. Automated baseline change detection -- Phases 1 and 2. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byler, E.

    1997-10-31

    The primary objective of this project is to apply robotic and optical sensor technology to the operational inspection of mixed toxic and radioactive waste stored in barrels, using Automated Baseline Change Detection (ABCD), based on image subtraction. Absolute change detection is based on detecting any visible physical changes, regardless of cause, between a current inspection image of a barrel and an archived baseline image of the same barrel. Thus, in addition to rust, the ABCD system can also detect corrosion, leaks, dents, and bulges. The ABCD approach and method rely on precise camera positioning and repositioning relative to the barrel and on feature recognition in images. The ABCD image processing software was installed on a robotic vehicle developed under a related DOE/FETC contract DE-AC21-92MC29112 Intelligent Mobile Sensor System (IMSS) and integrated with the electronics and software. This vehicle was designed especially to navigate in DOE Waste Storage Facilities. Initial system testing was performed at Fernald in June 1996. After some further development and more extensive integration the prototype integrated system was installed and tested at the Radioactive Waste Management Facility (RWMC) at INEEL beginning in April 1997 through the present (November 1997). The integrated system, composed of ABCD imaging software and IMSS mobility base, is called MISS EVE (Mobile Intelligent Sensor System--Environmental Validation Expert). Evaluation of the integrated system in RWMC Building 628, containing approximately 10,000 drums, demonstrated an easy to use system with the ability to properly navigate through the facility, image all the defined drums, and process the results into a report delivered to the operator on a GUI interface and on hard copy. Further work is needed to make the brassboard system more operationally robust.

  10. Automated baseline change detection - Phases 1 and 2. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byler, E.

    1997-01-01

    The primary objective of this project is to apply robotic and optical sensor technology to the operational inspection of mixed toxic and radioactive waste stored in barrels, using Automated Baseline Change Detection (ABCD), based on image subtraction. Absolute change detection is based on detecting any visible physical changes, regardless of cause, between a current inspection image of a barrel and an archived baseline image of the same barrel. Thus, in addition to rust, the ABCD system can also detect corrosion, leaks, dents, and bulges. The ABCD approach and method rely on precise camera positioning and repositioning relative to the barrel and on feature recognition in images. The ABCD image processing software was installed on a robotic vehicle developed under a related DOE/FETC contract DE-AC21-92MC29112 Intelligent Mobile Sensor System (IMSS) and integrated with the electronics and software. This vehicle was designed especially to navigate in DOE Waste Storage Facilities. Initial system testing was performed at Fernald in June 1996. After some further development and more extensive integration the prototype integrated system was installed and tested at the Radioactive Waste Management Facility (RWMC) at INEEL beginning in April 1997 through the present (November 1997). The integrated system, composed of ABCD imaging software and IMSS mobility base, is called MISS EVE (Mobile Intelligent Sensor System--Environmental Validation Expert). Evaluation of the integrated system in RWMC Building 628, containing approximately 10,000 drums, demonstrated an easy to use system with the ability to properly navigate through the facility, image all the defined drums, and process the results into a report delivered to the operator on a GUI interface and on hard copy. Further work is needed to make the brassboard system more operationally robust

  11. Automated approach to detecting behavioral states using EEG-DABS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary B. Loris

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Electrocorticographic (ECoG signals represent cortical electrical dipoles generated by synchronous local field potentials that result from simultaneous firing of neurons at distinct frequencies (brain waves. Since different brain waves correlate to different behavioral states, ECoG signals presents a novel strategy to detect complex behaviors. We developed a program, EEG Detection Analysis for Behavioral States (EEG-DABS that advances Fast Fourier Transforms through ECoG signals time series, separating it into (user defined frequency bands and normalizes them to reduce variability. EEG-DABS determines events if segments of an experimental ECoG record have significantly different power bands than a selected control pattern of EEG. Events are identified at every epoch and frequency band and then are displayed as output graphs by the program. Certain patterns of events correspond to specific behaviors. Once a predetermined pattern was selected for a behavioral state, EEG-DABS correctly identified the desired behavioral event. The selection of frequency band combinations for detection of the behavior affects accuracy of the method. All instances of certain behaviors, such as freezing, were correctly identified from the event patterns generated with EEG-DABS. Detecting behaviors is typically achieved by visually discerning unique animal phenotypes, a process that is time consuming, unreliable, and subjective. EEG-DABS removes variability by using defined parameters of EEG/ECoG for a desired behavior over chronic recordings. EEG-DABS presents a simple and automated approach to quantify different behavioral states from ECoG signals.

  12. On developing automated control systems for radiometric flaw detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncharov, V.I.; Gorbunov, V.I.; Epifantsev, B.N.

    1976-01-01

    The block diagram of the automated control system (ACS) in the radiation defectoscopy has been substantiated. Particular data for designing such systems are presented. The algorithms of operation of the systems are proposed to base on the known theory of statistical solutions with the input signals normalized to eliminate the transient mode of description of the information fields. The structure of the computing block of the radiation defectoscopy ACS should be chosen to be two-staged and comprising the detection and recognition units connected in series. The nearest practical results (2-3 years) should be expected from the semiautomatic subsystems of the radiation defectoscopy ACS. Such subsystems are meant to be the ''man-information processing unit'' system. Development of automatic subsystems of the radiation defectoscopy ACS is predicted for the next five years. In case of the moderate required contrast sensitivity (approximately 4%) and dimensions of the detected defects (0.2 x 0.2 mm), such systems may be developed within two years

  13. Detection of Operator Performance Breakdown as an Automation Triggering Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Hyo-Sang; Lee, Paul U.; Landry, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    Performance breakdown (PB) has been anecdotally described as a state where the human operator "loses control of context" and "cannot maintain required task performance." Preventing such a decline in performance is critical to assure the safety and reliability of human-integrated systems, and therefore PB could be useful as a point at which automation can be applied to support human performance. However, PB has never been scientifically defined or empirically demonstrated. Moreover, there is no validated objective way of detecting such a state or the transition to that state. The purpose of this work is: 1) to empirically demonstrate a PB state, and 2) to develop an objective way of detecting such a state. This paper defines PB and proposes an objective method for its detection. A human-in-the-loop study was conducted: 1) to demonstrate PB by increasing workload until the subject reported being in a state of PB, and 2) to identify possible parameters of a detection method for objectively identifying the subjectively-reported PB point, and 3) to determine if the parameters are idiosyncratic to an individual/context or are more generally applicable. In the experiment, fifteen participants were asked to manage three concurrent tasks (one primary and two secondary) for 18 minutes. The difficulty of the primary task was manipulated over time to induce PB while the difficulty of the secondary tasks remained static. The participants' task performance data was collected. Three hypotheses were constructed: 1) increasing workload will induce subjectively-identified PB, 2) there exists criteria that identifies the threshold parameters that best matches the subjectively-identified PB point, and 3) the criteria for choosing the threshold parameters is consistent across individuals. The results show that increasing workload can induce subjectively-identified PB, although it might not be generalizable-only 12 out of 15 participants declared PB. The PB detection method based on

  14. Embedded DSP-based telehealth radar system for remote in-door fall detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garripoli, Carmine; Mercuri, Marco; Karsmakers, Peter; Jack Soh, Ping; Crupi, Giovanni; Vandenbosch, Guy A E; Pace, Calogero; Leroux, Paul; Schreurs, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Telehealth systems and applications are extensively investigated nowadays to enhance the quality-of-care and, in particular, to detect emergency situations and to monitor the well-being of elderly people, allowing them to stay at home independently as long as possible. In this paper, an embedded telehealth system for continuous, automatic, and remote monitoring of real-time fall emergencies is presented and discussed. The system, consisting of a radar sensor and base station, represents a cost-effective and efficient healthcare solution. The implementation of the fall detection data processing technique, based on the least-square support vector machines, through a digital signal processor and the management of the communication between radar sensor and base station are detailed. Experimental tests, for a total of 65 mimicked fall incidents, recorded with 16 human subjects (14 men and two women) that have been monitored for 320 min, have been used to validate the proposed system under real circumstances. The subjects' weight is between 55 and 90 kg with heights between 1.65 and 1.82 m, while their age is between 25 and 39 years. The experimental results have shown a sensitivity to detect the fall events in real time of 100% without reporting false positives. The tests have been performed in an area where the radar's operation was not limited by practical situations, namely, signal power, coverage of the antennas, and presence of obstacles between the subject and the antennas.

  15. 3D depth image analysis for indoor fall detection of elderly people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Yang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new fall detection method of elderly people in a room environment based on shape analysis of 3D depth images captured by a Kinect sensor. Depth images are pre-processed by a median filter both for background and target. The silhouette of moving individual in depth images is achieved by a subtraction method for background frames. The depth images are converted to disparity map, which is obtained by the horizontal and vertical projection histogram statistics. The initial floor plane information is obtained by V disparity map, and the floor plane equation is estimated by the least square method. Shape information of human subject in depth images is analyzed by a set of moment functions. Coefficients of ellipses are calculated to determine the direction of individual. The centroids of the human body are calculated and the angle between the human body and the floor plane is calculated. When both the distance from the centroids of the human body to the floor plane and the angle between the human body and the floor plane are lower than some thresholds, fall incident will be detected. Experiments with different falling direction are performed. Experimental results show that the proposed method can detect fall incidents effectively.

  16. Detecting Falls at Home: User-Centered Design of a Pervasive Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc-Eric Bobillier Chaumon

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Falling is the main cause of domestic accidents and fatal injuries to seniors at home. In this paper, we describe the design process for a new pervasive technology (CIRDO. The aim of this technology is to detect falls (via audio and video sensors and to alert the elderly's family or caregivers. Two complementary studies were performed. Firstly, the actual risk situations of older adults were analyzed. Secondly, social acceptance was investigated for the different homecare field stakeholders. Our results highlight the tensions among social actors towards the tool and their impacts on technology acceptance by the elderly. Also, we show a significant change in the fall process due to the device. In actuality, the social functions associated with CIRDO implementation and the necessity of iterative design processes suggest that the CIRDO system should be more flexible and versatile to better fit the risk behaviors of seniors that evolve using this device.

  17. Fall Detection on Ambient Assisted Living using a Wireless Sensor Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel FELGUEIRAS

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a distributed system for fall detection is presented. The proposed system was designed to monitor activities of the daily living of elderly people and to inform the caregivers when a falls event occurs. This system uses a scalable wireless sensor networks to collect the data and transmit it to a control center. Also, an intelligent algorithm is used to process the data collected by the sensor networks and calculate if an event is, or not, a fall. A statistical method is used to improve this algorithm and to reduce false positives. The system presented has the capability to learn with past events and to adapt is behavior with new information collected from the monitored elders. The results obtained show that the system has an accuracy above 98%. 

  18. Clinical feasibility trial of a motion detection system for fall prevention in hospitalized older adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Marisa; Harrison, Barbara; Rawashdeh, Osamah; Hammond, Robert; Avery, Yvonne; Rawashdeh, Muawea; Sa'deh, Waseem; Maddens, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to test the feasibility of a wireless 5-sensor, motion detection system (5S-MDS) with hospitalized older adults. Interventions to prevent hospital-based falls in older adults are important to reduce morbidity, mortality, and health care costs. Wearable motion sensors, which track and wirelessly transmit body movements, may identify human movement patterns that immediately precede falls, thus allowing early prevention. Descriptive feasibility study in which 5 hospitalized older adults were recruited to wear the 5S-MDS for 4 hours. Measurement included assessment of participant acceptance, skin integrity, and sensor accuracy. All 5 participants (mean age, 90.2 years) agreed that sensors were acceptable and skin integrity was maintained. The sensor data accurately reflected the patient movements. The 5S-MDS was feasible for 4 hours' use with hospitalized older adults. It has potential as an early warning system for falls. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Automated Detection of Salt Marsh Platforms : a Topographic Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, G.; Mudd, S. M.; Clubb, F. J.

    2017-12-01

    Monitoring the topographic evolution of coastal marshes is a crucial step toward improving the management of these valuable landscapes under the pressure of relative sea level rise and anthropogenic modification. However, determining their geometrically complex boundaries currently relies on spectral vegetation detection methods or requires labour-intensive field surveys and digitisation.We propose a novel method to reproducibly isolate saltmarsh scarps and platforms from a DEM. Field observations and numerical models show that saltmarshes mature into sub-horizontal platforms delineated by sub-vertical scarps: based on this premise, we identify scarps as lines of local maxima on a slope*relief raster, then fill landmasses from the scarps upward, thus isolating mature marsh platforms. Non-dimensional search parameters allow batch-processing of data without recalibration. We test our method using lidar-derived DEMs of six saltmarshes in England with varying tidal ranges and geometries, for which topographic platforms were manually isolated from tidal flats. Agreement between manual and automatic segregation exceeds 90% for resolutions of 1m, with all but one sites maintaining this performance for resolutions up to 3.5m. For resolutions of 1m, automatically detected platforms are comparable in surface area and elevation distribution to digitised platforms. We also find that our method allows the accurate detection of local bloc failures 3 times larger than the DEM resolution.Detailed inspection reveals that although tidal creeks were digitised as part of the marsh platform, automatic detection classifies them as part of the tidal flat, causing an increase in false negatives and overall platform perimeter. This suggests our method would benefit from a combination with existing creek detection algorithms. Fallen blocs and pioneer zones are inconsistently identified, particularly in macro-tidal marshes, leading to differences between digitisation and the automated method

  20. Driver Vigilance in Automated Vehicles: Hazard Detection Failures Are a Matter of Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenlee, Eric T; DeLucia, Patricia R; Newton, David C

    2018-03-01

    The primary aim of the current study was to determine whether monitoring the roadway for hazards during automated driving results in a vigilance decrement. Although automated vehicles are relatively novel, the nature of human-automation interaction within them has the classic hallmarks of a vigilance task. Drivers must maintain attention for prolonged periods of time to detect and respond to rare and unpredictable events, for example, roadway hazards that automation may be ill equipped to detect. Given the similarity with traditional vigilance tasks, we predicted that drivers of a simulated automated vehicle would demonstrate a vigilance decrement in hazard detection performance. Participants "drove" a simulated automated vehicle for 40 minutes. During that time, their task was to monitor the roadway for roadway hazards. As predicted, hazard detection rate declined precipitously, and reaction times slowed as the drive progressed. Further, subjective ratings of workload and task-related stress indicated that sustained monitoring is demanding and distressing and it is a challenge to maintain task engagement. Monitoring the roadway for potential hazards during automated driving results in workload, stress, and performance decrements similar to those observed in traditional vigilance tasks. To the degree that vigilance is required of automated vehicle drivers, performance errors and associated safety risks are likely to occur as a function of time on task. Vigilance should be a focal safety concern in the development of vehicle automation.

  1. Automated single particle detection and tracking for large microscopy datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Rhodri S; Yang, Lei; Dun, Alison; Smyth, Annya M; Duncan, Rory R; Rickman, Colin; Lu, Weiping

    2016-05-01

    Recent advances in optical microscopy have enabled the acquisition of very large datasets from living cells with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolutions. Our ability to process these datasets now plays an essential role in order to understand many biological processes. In this paper, we present an automated particle detection algorithm capable of operating in low signal-to-noise fluorescence microscopy environments and handling large datasets. When combined with our particle linking framework, it can provide hitherto intractable quantitative measurements describing the dynamics of large cohorts of cellular components from organelles to single molecules. We begin with validating the performance of our method on synthetic image data, and then extend the validation to include experiment images with ground truth. Finally, we apply the algorithm to two single-particle-tracking photo-activated localization microscopy biological datasets, acquired from living primary cells with very high temporal rates. Our analysis of the dynamics of very large cohorts of 10 000 s of membrane-associated protein molecules show that they behave as if caged in nanodomains. We show that the robustness and efficiency of our method provides a tool for the examination of single-molecule behaviour with unprecedented spatial detail and high acquisition rates.

  2. Assessment of an automated surveillance system for detection of initial ventilator-associated events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuckchady, Dooshanveer; Heckman, Michael G; Diehl, Nancy N; Creech, Tara; Carey, Darlene; Domnick, Robert; Hellinger, Walter C

    2015-10-01

    Surveillance for initial ventilator-associated events (VAEs) was automated and compared with nonautomated review of episodes of mechanical ventilation. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of automated surveillance were very high (>93%), and automated surveillance reduced the time spent on detection of VAEs by >90%. Copyright © 2015 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. An Automated Energy Detection Algorithm Based on Morphological Filter Processing with a Semi-Disk Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    ARL-TR-8271 ● JAN 2018 US Army Research Laboratory An Automated Energy Detection Algorithm Based on Morphological Filter... Energy Detection Algorithm Based on Morphological Filter Processing with a Semi-Disk Structure by Kwok F Tom Sensors and Electron Devices...September 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE An Automated Energy Detection Algorithm Based on Morphological Filter Processing with a Semi-Disk Structure 5a

  4. Rock Falls Impacting Railway Tracks: Detection Analysis through an Artificial Intelligence Camera Prototype

    OpenAIRE

    Fantini, Andrea; Fiorucci, Matteo; Martino, Salvatore

    2017-01-01

    During the last few years, several approaches have been proposed to improve early warning systems for managing geological risk due to landslides, where important infrastructures (such as railways, highways, pipelines, and aqueducts) are exposed elements. In this regard, an Artificial intelligence Camera Prototype (AiCP) for real-time monitoring has been integrated in a multisensor monitoring system devoted to rock fall detection. An abandoned limestone quarry was chosen at Acuto (central Ital...

  5. Local Geometrically Enriched Mixtures for Stable and Robust Human Tracking in Detecting Falls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michalis Kokkinos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Detecting a fall through visual cues is emerging as a hot research agenda for improving the independence of the elderly. However, the traditional motion-based algorithms are very sensitive to noise, reducing fall detection accuracy. Another approach is to efficiently localize and then track the foreground object followed by measurements that aid the identification of a fall. However, to perform robust and stable tracking over a long time is a challenging research aspect in computer vision society. In this paper, we introduce a stable human tracker able to efficiently cope with the trade-off between model stability (accurate tracking performance and adaptability (model evolution to visual changes. In particular, we introduce local geometrically enriched mixture models for background modelling. Then, we incorporate iterative motion information methods, constrained by shape and time properties, to estimate high confidence image regions for background model updating. This way, we are able to detect and track the foreground objects even when visual conditions are dynamically changed over time (luminosity or background/foreground changes or active cameras.

  6. Automated Detection of Thermo-Erosion in High Latitude Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, M. J.; Chipman, M. L.; Hu, F.

    2017-12-01

    Detecting permafrost disturbance is of critical importance as the severity of climate change and associated increase in wildfire frequency and magnitude impacts regional to global carbon dynamics. However, it has not been possible to evaluate spatiotemporal patterns of permafrost degradation over large regions of the Arctic, due to limited spatial and temporal coverage of high resolution optical, radar, lidar, or hyperspectral remote sensing products. Here we present the first automated multi-temporal analysis for detecting disturbance in response to permafrost thaw, using meso-scale high-frequency remote sensing products (i.e. entire Landsat image archive). This approach was developed, tested, and applied in the Noatak National Preserve (26,500km2) in northwestern Alaska. We identified thermo-erosion (TE), by capturing the indirect spectral signal associated with episodic sediment plumes in adjacent waterbodies following TE disturbance. We isolated this turbidity signal within lakes during summer (mid-summer & late-summer) and annual time-period image composites (1986-2016), using the cloud-based geospatial parallel processing platform, Google Earth Engine™API. We validated the TE detection algorithm using seven consecutive years of sub-meter high resolution imagery (2009-2015) covering 798 ( 33%) of the 2456 total lakes in the Noatak lowlands. Our approach had "good agreement" with sediment pulses and landscape deformation in response to permafrost thaw (overall accuracy and kappa coefficient of 85% and 0.61). We identify active TE to impact 10.4% of all lakes, but was inter-annually variable, with the highest and lowest TE years represented by 1986 ( 41.1%) and 2002 ( 0.7%), respectively. We estimate thaw slumps, lake erosion, lake drainage, and gully formation to account for 23.3, 61.8, 12.5, and 1.3%, of all active TE across the Noatak National Preserve. Preliminary analysis, suggests TE may be subject to a hysteresis effect following extreme climatic

  7. Performance evaluation of automated approaches to building detection in multi-source aerial data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khoshelham, K.; Nardinocchi, C.; Frontoni, C.; Mancini, A.; Zingaretti, P.

    2009-01-01

    Automated approaches to building detection in multi-source aerial data are important in many applications, including map updating, city modeling, urban growth analysis and monitoring of informal settlements. This paper presents a comparative analysis of different methods for automated building

  8. Automated weed detection in the field - possibilities and limits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pflanz, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV have become omnipresent and adequate tools to generate high-resolution spatial data of agricultural cropland. Their implementation into remote sensing approaches of weeds provides suitable applications for a site-specific herbicide management. In general, an increasingly use of innovative technologies gradually leads from agricultural research into the practical application. This requires an evaluation of possibilities and limits of UAV-based remote sensing procedures. While spectrals from UAVs are being used already for mapping needs of nutrient or water, the image supported weed detection is much more complex and at the moment not relevant in practice. In this regard, there is a lack of weed and crop differentiation through spectral analyses and object-based approaches separate different plants not species-specific or are not adapted to morphologic changes of the growth. Moreover, there is a need for alternative positioning techniques without GPS, as it is required for a precise optical imaging analysis at low altitudes. To evaluate the possibilities and limitations of automated weed identification regarding the optical and sampling requirements, flights were carried out with a hexacopter at an altitude of 5 m over agricultural crop land with variable weed patches. The altitude was controlled by the GPS-autopilot. Images were captured at geo-referenced points and the number of different weed species was simultaneously determined by manually counting. The required optical resolution on the ground was estimated by comparing the number of weeds between image analysis on the PC and with the field rating data.

  9. Image-based fall detection and classification of a user with a walking support system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghvaei, Sajjad; Kosuge, Kazuhiro

    2017-10-01

    The classification of visual human action is important in the development of systems that interact with humans. This study investigates an image-based classification of the human state while using a walking support system to improve the safety and dependability of these systems.We categorize the possible human behavior while utilizing a walker robot into eight states (i.e., sitting, standing, walking, and five falling types), and propose two different methods, namely, normal distribution and hidden Markov models (HMMs), to detect and recognize these states. The visual feature for the state classification is the centroid position of the upper body, which is extracted from the user's depth images. The first method shows that the centroid position follows a normal distribution while walking, which can be adopted to detect any non-walking state. The second method implements HMMs to detect and recognize these states. We then measure and compare the performance of both methods. The classification results are employed to control the motion of a passive-type walker (called "RT Walker") by activating its brakes in non-walking states. Thus, the system can be used for sit/stand support and fall prevention. The experiments are performed with four subjects, including an experienced physiotherapist. Results show that the algorithm can be adapted to the new user's motion pattern within 40 s, with a fall detection rate of 96.25% and state classification rate of 81.0%. The proposed method can be implemented to other abnormality detection/classification applications that employ depth image-sensing devices.

  10. Comparison of Machine Learning Methods for the Purpose Of Human Fall Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strémy Maximilián

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available According to several studies, the European population is rapidly aging far over last years. It is therefore important to ensure that aging population is able to live independently without the support of working-age population. In accordance with the studies, fall is the most dangerous and frequent accident in the everyday life of aging population. In our paper, we present a system to track the human fall by a visual detection, i.e. using no wearable equipment. For this purpose, we used a Kinect sensor, which provides the human body position in the Cartesian coordinates. It is possible to directly capture a human body because the Kinect sensor has a depth and also an infrared camera. The first step in our research was to detect postures and classify the fall accident. We experimented and compared the selected machine learning methods including Naive Bayes, decision trees and SVM method to compare the performance in recognizing the human postures (standing, sitting and lying. The highest classification accuracy of over 93.3% was achieved by the decision tree method.

  11. Automated land cover change detection: the quest for meaningful high temporal time series extraction

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Salmon, BP

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available An automated land cover change detection method is proposed that uses coarse resolution hyper-temporal satellite time series data. The study compared two different unsupervised clustering approaches that operate on the short term Fourier transform...

  12. Sludge settleability detection using automated SV30 measurement and its application to a field WWTP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y J; Choi, S J; Bae, H; Kim, C W

    2011-01-01

    The need for automation & measurement technologies to detect the process state has been a driving force in the development of various measurements at wastewater treatment plants. While the number of applications of automation & measurement technologies to the field is increasing, there have only been a few cases where they have been applied to the area of sludge settling. This is because it is not easy to develop an automated operation support system for the detection of sludge settleability due to its site-specific characteristics. To automate the human operator's daily test and diagnosis works on sludge settling, an on-line SV30 measurement was developed and an automated detection algorithm on settleability was developed that imitated heuristics to detect settleability faults. The automated SV30 measurement is based on automatic pumping with a predefined schedule, the image capture of the settling test with a digital camera, and an analysis of the images to detect the settled sludge height. A sludge settleability detection method was developed and its applicability was investigated by field application.

  13. The effect of JPEG compression on automated detection of microaneurysms in retinal images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cree, M. J.; Jelinek, H. F.

    2008-02-01

    As JPEG compression at source is ubiquitous in retinal imaging, and the block artefacts introduced are known to be of similar size to microaneurysms (an important indicator of diabetic retinopathy) it is prudent to evaluate the effect of JPEG compression on automated detection of retinal pathology. Retinal images were acquired at high quality and then compressed to various lower qualities. An automated microaneurysm detector was run on the retinal images of various qualities of JPEG compression and the ability to predict the presence of diabetic retinopathy based on the detected presence of microaneurysms was evaluated with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) methodology. The negative effect of JPEG compression on automated detection was observed even at levels of compression sometimes used in retinal eye-screening programmes and these may have important clinical implications for deciding on acceptable levels of compression for a fully automated eye-screening programme.

  14. Automated detection of test fixture strategies and smells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greiler, M.S.; Van Deursen, A.; Storey, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Paper accepted for publication in the Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Software Testing, Verification and Validation, IEEE Computer Society, 18-22 March 2013, ISBN 978-1-4673-5961-0, doi: 10.1109/ICST.2013.45 Designing automated tests is a challenging task. One important concern

  15. Quantitative Indicators for Behaviour Drift Detection from Home Automation Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronese, Fabio; Masciadri, Andrea; Comai, Sara; Matteucci, Matteo; Salice, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    Smart Homes diffusion provides an opportunity to implement elderly monitoring, extending seniors' independence and avoiding unnecessary assistance costs. Information concerning the inhabitant behaviour is contained in home automation data, and can be extracted by means of quantitative indicators. The application of such approach proves it can evidence behaviour changes.

  16. Privacy-Preserved Behavior Analysis and Fall Detection by an Infrared Ceiling Sensor Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mineichi Kudo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available An infrared ceiling sensor network system is reported in this study to realize behavior analysis and fall detection of a single person in the home environment. The sensors output multiple binary sequences from which we know the existence/non-existence of persons under the sensors. The short duration averages of the binary responses are shown to be able to be regarded as pixel values of a top-view camera, but more advantageous in the sense of preserving privacy. Using the “pixel values” as features, support vector machine classifiers succeeded in recognizing eight activities (walking, reading, etc. performed by five subjects at an average recognition rate of 80.65%. In addition, we proposed a martingale framework for detecting falls in this system. The experimental results showed that we attained the best performance of 95.14% (F1 value, the FAR of 7.5% and the FRR of 2.0%. This accuracy is not sufficient in general but surprisingly high with such low-level information. In summary, it is shown that this system has the potential to be used in the home environment to provide personalized services and to detect abnormalities of elders who live alone.

  17. Assessment of automated disease detection in diabetic retinopathy screening using two-field photography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith Goatman

    Full Text Available To assess the performance of automated disease detection in diabetic retinopathy screening using two field mydriatic photography.Images from 8,271 sequential patient screening episodes from a South London diabetic retinopathy screening service were processed by the Medalytix iGrading™ automated grading system. For each screening episode macular-centred and disc-centred images of both eyes were acquired and independently graded according to the English national grading scheme. Where discrepancies were found between the automated result and original manual grade, internal and external arbitration was used to determine the final study grades. Two versions of the software were used: one that detected microaneurysms alone, and one that detected blot haemorrhages and exudates in addition to microaneurysms. Results for each version were calculated once using both fields and once using the macula-centred field alone.Of the 8,271 episodes, 346 (4.2% were considered unassessable. Referable disease was detected in 587 episodes (7.1%. The sensitivity of the automated system for detecting unassessable images ranged from 97.4% to 99.1% depending on configuration. The sensitivity of the automated system for referable episodes ranged from 98.3% to 99.3%. All the episodes that included proliferative or pre-proliferative retinopathy were detected by the automated system regardless of configuration (192/192, 95% confidence interval 98.0% to 100%. If implemented as the first step in grading, the automated system would have reduced the manual grading effort by between 2,183 and 3,147 patient episodes (26.4% to 38.1%.Automated grading can safely reduce the workload of manual grading using two field, mydriatic photography in a routine screening service.

  18. An exploration study to detect different factors influencing on inefficiency of office automation systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azam Roostaee

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Office automation systems play important role on increasing productivity and efficiency of organizations. An automated system is capable of improving required communications, speed up the process of tasks and removes unnecessary activities. This paper presents an empirical investigation to detect important factors influencing on inefficiency of office automation systems in ministry of science, research and technology of Iran. The proposed study of this paper designs a questionnaire and distributes it among management team who work for this organization. The results of our investigation indicate that two factors, lack of necessary infrastructure for participating in office automation activities as well as lack of management support, play important role on reaching desirable results. In addition, educational background and work experience also influence office automation systems’ applicability.

  19. A comparison of automatic fall detection by the cross-product and magnitude of tri-axial acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, Pei-Kuang; Chan, Hsiao-Lung; Chen, Yu-Chuan; Tang, Fuk-Tan; Wong, May-Kuen

    2009-01-01

    Falling is an important problem in the health maintenance of people above middle age. Portable accelerometer systems have been designed to detect falls. However, false alarms induced by some dynamic motions, such as walking and jumping, are difficult to avoid. Acceleration cross-product (AC)-related methods are proposed and examined by this study to seek solutions for detecting falls with less motion-evoked false alarms. A set of tri-axial acceleration data is collected during simulated falls, posture transfers and dynamic activities by wireless sensors for making methodological comparisons. The performance of fall detection is evaluated in aspects of parameter comparison, threshold selection, sensor placement and post-fall posture (PP) recruitment. By parameter comparison, AC leads to a larger area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve than acceleration magnitude (AM). Three strategies of threshold selection, for 100% sensitivity (Sen100), for 100% specificity (Spe100) and for the best sum (BS) of sensitivity and specificity, are evaluated. Selecting a threshold based on Sen100 and BS leads to more practicable results. Simultaneous data recording from sensors in the chest and waist is performed. Fall detection based on the data from the chest shows better global accuracy. PP recruitment leads to lower false alarm ratios (FR) for both AC- and AM-based methods

  20. Automated detection of structural alerts (chemical fragments in (ecotoxicology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronan Bureau

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This mini-review describes the evolution of different algorithms dedicated to the automated discovery of chemical fragments associated to (ecotoxicological endpoints. These structural alerts correspond to one of the most interesting approach of in silico toxicology due to their direct link with specific toxicological mechanisms. A number of expert systems are already available but, since the first work in this field which considered a binomial distribution of chemical fragments between two datasets, new data miners were developed and applied with success in chemoinformatics. The frequency of a chemical fragment in a dataset is often at the core of the process for the definition of its toxicological relevance. However, recent progresses in data mining provide new insights into the automated discovery of new rules. Particularly, this review highlights the notion of Emerging Patterns that can capture contrasts between classes of data.

  1. AUTOMATED DETECTION OF STRUCTURAL ALERTS (CHEMICAL FRAGMENTS IN (ECOTOXICOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alban Lepailleur

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This mini-review describes the evolution of different algorithms dedicated to the automated discovery of chemical fragments associated to (ecotoxicological endpoints. These structural alerts correspond to one of the most interesting approach of in silico toxicology due to their direct link with specific toxicological mechanisms. A number of expert systems are already available but, since the first work in this field which considered a binomial distribution of chemical fragments between two datasets, new data miners were developed and applied with success in chemoinformatics. The frequency of a chemical fragment in a dataset is often at the core of the process for the definition of its toxicological relevance. However, recent progresses in data mining provide new insights into the automated discovery of new rules. Particularly, this review highlights the notion of Emerging Patterns that can capture contrasts between classes of data.

  2. Fully Autonomous Multiplet Event Detection: Application to Local-Distance Monitoring of Blood Falls Seismicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmichael, Joshua Daniel [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Carr, Christina [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States); Pettit, Erin C. [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States)

    2015-06-18

    We apply a fully autonomous icequake detection methodology to a single day of high-sample rate (200 Hz) seismic network data recorded from the terminus of Taylor Glacier, ANT that temporally coincided with a brine release episode near Blood Falls (May 13, 2014). We demonstrate a statistically validated procedure to assemble waveforms triggered by icequakes into populations of clusters linked by intra-event waveform similarity. Our processing methodology implements a noise-adaptive power detector coupled with a complete-linkage clustering algorithm and noise-adaptive correlation detector. This detector-chain reveals a population of 20 multiplet sequences that includes ~150 icequakes and produces zero false alarms on the concurrent, diurnally variable noise. Our results are very promising for identifying changes in background seismicity associated with the presence or absence of brine release episodes. We thereby suggest that our methodology could be applied to longer time periods to establish a brine-release monitoring program for Blood Falls that is based on icequake detections.

  3. Automated seismic detection of landslides at regional scales: a Random Forest based detection algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibert, C.; Michéa, D.; Provost, F.; Malet, J. P.; Geertsema, M.

    2017-12-01

    of continuous seismic record by the Alaskan permanent seismic network and Hi-Climb trans-Himalayan seismic network. The processing chain we developed also opens the possibility for a near-real time seismic detection of landslides, in association with remote-sensing automated detection from Sentinel 2 images for example.

  4. Operations management system advanced automation: Fault detection isolation and recovery prototyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Matt

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to address the global fault detection, isolation and recovery (FDIR) requirements for Operation's Management System (OMS) automation within the Space Station Freedom program. This shall be accomplished by developing a selected FDIR prototype for the Space Station Freedom distributed processing systems. The prototype shall be based on advanced automation methodologies in addition to traditional software methods to meet the requirements for automation. A secondary objective is to expand the scope of the prototyping to encompass multiple aspects of station-wide fault management (SWFM) as discussed in OMS requirements documentation.

  5. Development of a fully automated software system for rapid analysis/processing of the falling weight deflectometer data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    The Office of Special Investigations at Iowa Department of Transportation (DOT) collects FWD data on regular basis to evaluate pavement structural conditions. The primary objective of this study was to develop a fully-automated software system for ra...

  6. Automated Detection of Repetitive Motor Behaviors as an Outcome Measurement in Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilchrist, Kristin H; Hegarty-Craver, Meghan; Christian, Robert B; Grego, Sonia; Kies, Ashley C; Wheeler, Anne C

    2017-11-21

    Repetitive sensory motor behaviors are a direct target for clinical treatment and a potential treatment endpoint for individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities. By removing the burden associated with video annotation or direct observation, automated detection of stereotypy would allow for longer term monitoring in ecologic settings. We report automated detection of common stereotypical motor movements using commercially available accelerometers affixed to the body and a generalizable detection algorithm. The method achieved a sensitivity of 80% for body rocking and 93% for hand flapping without individualized algorithm training or foreknowledge of subject's specific movements. This approach is well-suited for implementation in a continuous monitoring system outside of a clinical setting.

  7. Automated real-time detection of tonic-clonic seizures using a wearable EMG device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beniczky, Sándor; Conradsen, Isa; Henning, Oliver

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the accuracy of automated detection of generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS) using a wearable surface EMG device. METHODS: We prospectively tested the technical performance and diagnostic accuracy of real-time seizure detection using a wearable surface EMG device. The s...

  8. Cell-Detection Technique for Automated Patch Clamping

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Mark; Gray, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    A unique and customizable machinevision and image-data-processing technique has been developed for use in automated identification of cells that are optimal for patch clamping. [Patch clamping (in which patch electrodes are pressed against cell membranes) is an electrophysiological technique widely applied for the study of ion channels, and of membrane proteins that regulate the flow of ions across the membranes. Patch clamping is used in many biological research fields such as neurobiology, pharmacology, and molecular biology.] While there exist several hardware techniques for automated patch clamping of cells, very few of those techniques incorporate machine vision for locating cells that are ideal subjects for patch clamping. In contrast, the present technique is embodied in a machine-vision algorithm that, in practical application, enables the user to identify good and bad cells for patch clamping in an image captured by a charge-coupled-device (CCD) camera attached to a microscope, within a processing time of one second. Hence, the present technique can save time, thereby increasing efficiency and reducing cost. The present technique involves the utilization of cell-feature metrics to accurately make decisions on the degree to which individual cells are "good" or "bad" candidates for patch clamping. These metrics include position coordinates (x,y) in the image plane, major-axis length, minor-axis length, area, elongation, roundness, smoothness, angle of orientation, and degree of inclusion in the field of view. The present technique does not require any special hardware beyond commercially available, off-the-shelf patch-clamping hardware: A standard patchclamping microscope system with an attached CCD camera, a personal computer with an imagedata- processing board, and some experience in utilizing imagedata- processing software are all that are needed. A cell image is first captured by the microscope CCD camera and image-data-processing board, then the image

  9. Automated Change Detection for Validation and Update of Geodata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Brian Pilemann; Knudsen, Thomas

    and a stereo model generated. The digital map database is superimposed (in 3D) on the stereo model, and a stereo-operator locates the differences. Automating the update process for a topographic map database is, however, non-trivial, as it involves the comparison of the existing (vector based) map database...... to be of great importance. Also the co-registration of the different data types shows to be a problem in practice. The artefacts resulting from this can be partially dealt with using mathematical morphology, but misregistration still accounts for a general degradation of the accuracy....

  10. Accurate, Automated Detection of Atrial Fibrillation in Ambulatory Recordings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linker, David T.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose A highly accurate, automated algorithm would facilitate cost-effective screening for asymptomatic atrial fibrillation. This study analyzed a new algorithm and compared to existing techniques. Methods The incremental benefit of each step in refinement of the algorithm was measured, and the algorithm was compared to other methods using the Physionet atrial fibrillation and normal sinus rhythm databases. Results When analyzing segments of 21 RR intervals or less, the algorithm had a significantly higher area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) than the other algorithms tested. At analysis segment sizes of up to 101 RR intervals, the algorithm continued to have a higher AUC than any of the other methods tested, although the difference from the second best other algorithm was no longer significant, with an AUC of 0.9992 with a 95% confidence interval (CI) of 0.9986–0.9998, versus 0.9986 (CI 0.9978–0.9994). With identical per-subject sensitivity, per-subject specificity of the current algorithm was superior to the other tested algorithms even at 101 RR intervals, with no false positives (CI 0.0%–0.8%) versus 5.3% false positives for the second best algorithm (CI 3.4–7.9%). Conclusions The described algorithm shows great promise for automated screening for atrial fibrillation by reducing false positives requiring manual review, while maintaining high sensitivity. PMID:26850411

  11. Improved cancer detection in automated breast ultrasound by radiologists using Computer Aided Detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelst, J.C.M. van; Tan, T.; Platel, B.; Jong, M. de; Steenbakkers, A.; Mourits, M.; Grivegnee, A.; Borelli, C.; Karssemeijer, N.; Mann, R.M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of dedicated Computer Aided Detection (CAD) software for automated breast ultrasound (ABUS) on the performance of radiologists screening for breast cancer. Methods: 90 ABUS views of 90 patients were randomly selected from a multi-institutional archive of cases collected between 2010 and 2013. This dataset included normal cases (n = 40) with >1 year of follow up, benign (n = 30) lesions that were either biopsied or remained stable, and malignant lesions (n = 20). Six readers evaluated all cases with and without CAD in two sessions. CAD-software included conventional CAD-marks and an intelligent minimum intensity projection of the breast tissue. Readers reported using a likelihood-of-malignancy scale from 0 to 100. Alternative free-response ROC analysis was used to measure the performance. Results: Without CAD, the average area-under-the-curve (AUC) of the readers was 0.77 and significantly improved with CAD to 0.84 (p = 0.001). Sensitivity of all readers improved (range 5.2–10.6%) by using CAD but specificity decreased in four out of six readers (range 1.4–5.7%). No significant difference was observed in the AUC between experienced radiologists and residents both with and without CAD. Conclusions: Dedicated CAD-software for ABUS has the potential to improve the cancer detection rates of radiologists screening for breast cancer.

  12. Improved cancer detection in automated breast ultrasound by radiologists using Computer Aided Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zelst, J.C.M. van, E-mail: Jan.vanZelst@radboudumc.nl [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Tan, T.; Platel, B. [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Jong, M. de [Jeroen Bosch Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, ‘s-Hertogenbosch (Netherlands); Steenbakkers, A. [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Mourits, M. [Jeroen Bosch Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, ‘s-Hertogenbosch (Netherlands); Grivegnee, A. [Jules Bordet Institute, Department of Radiology, Brussels (Belgium); Borelli, C. [Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Department of Radiological Sciences, Rome (Italy); Karssemeijer, N.; Mann, R.M. [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2017-04-15

    Objective: To investigate the effect of dedicated Computer Aided Detection (CAD) software for automated breast ultrasound (ABUS) on the performance of radiologists screening for breast cancer. Methods: 90 ABUS views of 90 patients were randomly selected from a multi-institutional archive of cases collected between 2010 and 2013. This dataset included normal cases (n = 40) with >1 year of follow up, benign (n = 30) lesions that were either biopsied or remained stable, and malignant lesions (n = 20). Six readers evaluated all cases with and without CAD in two sessions. CAD-software included conventional CAD-marks and an intelligent minimum intensity projection of the breast tissue. Readers reported using a likelihood-of-malignancy scale from 0 to 100. Alternative free-response ROC analysis was used to measure the performance. Results: Without CAD, the average area-under-the-curve (AUC) of the readers was 0.77 and significantly improved with CAD to 0.84 (p = 0.001). Sensitivity of all readers improved (range 5.2–10.6%) by using CAD but specificity decreased in four out of six readers (range 1.4–5.7%). No significant difference was observed in the AUC between experienced radiologists and residents both with and without CAD. Conclusions: Dedicated CAD-software for ABUS has the potential to improve the cancer detection rates of radiologists screening for breast cancer.

  13. Detection of a meteorite 'stream' - Observations of a second meteorite fall from the orbit of the Innisfree chondrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliday, I.

    1987-03-01

    The first observational evidence of multiple meteorite falls from the same orbit is adduced from the February 6, 1980 fall of a meteorite precisely 3 yr after the fall of the Innisfree meteorite. Due consideration of the detection probability for two related objects with the meteorite camera network in western Canada suggests that the Innisfree brecciated LL chondrite was a near-surface fragment from a parent object whose radius was of the order of several tens of meters. A meteorite mass of 1.8 kg is predicted for the new object, whose recovery in the vicinity of Ridgedale, Saskatchewan, is now sought for the sake of comparison with the Innisfree chondrite.

  14. Fall Detection in Individuals With Lower Limb Amputations Using Mobile Phones: Machine Learning Enhances Robustness for Real-World Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawen, Nicholas; Lonini, Luca; Mummidisetty, Chaithanya Krishna; Shparii, Ilona; Albert, Mark V; Kording, Konrad; Jayaraman, Arun

    2017-10-11

    Automatically detecting falls with mobile phones provides an opportunity for rapid response to injuries and better knowledge of what precipitated the fall and its consequences. This is beneficial for populations that are prone to falling, such as people with lower limb amputations. Prior studies have focused on fall detection in able-bodied individuals using data from a laboratory setting. Such approaches may provide a limited ability to detect falls in amputees and in real-world scenarios. The aim was to develop a classifier that uses data from able-bodied individuals to detect falls in individuals with a lower limb amputation, while they freely carry the mobile phone in different locations and during free-living. We obtained 861 simulated indoor and outdoor falls from 10 young control (non-amputee) individuals and 6 individuals with a lower limb amputation. In addition, we recorded a broad database of activities of daily living, including data from three participants' free-living routines. Sensor readings (accelerometer and gyroscope) from a mobile phone were recorded as participants freely carried it in three common locations-on the waist, in a pocket, and in the hand. A set of 40 features were computed from the sensors data and four classifiers were trained and combined through stacking to detect falls. We compared the performance of two population-specific models, trained and tested on either able-bodied or amputee participants, with that of a model trained on able-bodied participants and tested on amputees. A simple threshold-based classifier was used to benchmark our machine-learning classifier. The accuracy of fall detection in amputees for a model trained on control individuals (sensitivity: mean 0.989, 1.96*standard error of the mean [SEM] 0.017; specificity: mean 0.968, SEM 0.025) was not statistically different (P=.69) from that of a model trained on the amputee population (sensitivity: mean 0.984, SEM 0.016; specificity: mean 0.965, SEM 0

  15. Unified framework for triaxial accelerometer-based fall event detection and classification using cumulants and hierarchical decision tree classifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambhampati, Satya Samyukta; Singh, Vishal; Manikandan, M Sabarimalai; Ramkumar, Barathram

    2015-08-01

    In this Letter, the authors present a unified framework for fall event detection and classification using the cumulants extracted from the acceleration (ACC) signals acquired using a single waist-mounted triaxial accelerometer. The main objective of this Letter is to find suitable representative cumulants and classifiers in effectively detecting and classifying different types of fall and non-fall events. It was discovered that the first level of the proposed hierarchical decision tree algorithm implements fall detection using fifth-order cumulants and support vector machine (SVM) classifier. In the second level, the fall event classification algorithm uses the fifth-order cumulants and SVM. Finally, human activity classification is performed using the second-order cumulants and SVM. The detection and classification results are compared with those of the decision tree, naive Bayes, multilayer perceptron and SVM classifiers with different types of time-domain features including the second-, third-, fourth- and fifth-order cumulants and the signal magnitude vector and signal magnitude area. The experimental results demonstrate that the second- and fifth-order cumulant features and SVM classifier can achieve optimal detection and classification rates of above 95%, as well as the lowest false alarm rate of 1.03%.

  16. Data for automated, high-throughput microscopy analysis of intracellular bacterial colonies using spot detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernstsen, Christina L; Login, Frédéric H; Jensen, Helene H

    2017-01-01

    Quantification of intracellular bacterial colonies is useful in strategies directed against bacterial attachment, subsequent cellular invasion and intracellular proliferation. An automated, high-throughput microscopy-method was established to quantify the number and size of intracellular bacterial...... of cell nuclei were automatically quantified using a spot detection-tool. The spot detection-output was exported to Excel, where data analysis was performed. In this article, micrographs and spot detection data are made available to facilitate implementation of the method....

  17. High inter-reviewer variability of spike detection on intracranial EEG addressed by an automated multi-channel algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkmeier, Daniel T; Shah, Aashit K; Flanagan, Danny; Atkinson, Marie D; Agarwal, Rajeev; Fuerst, Darren R; Jafari-Khouzani, Kourosh; Loeb, Jeffrey A

    2012-06-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the consistency of human reviewer spike detection and then develop a computer algorithm to make the intracranial spike detection process more objective and reliable. Three human reviewers marked interictal spikes on samples of intracranial EEGs from 10 patients. The sensitivity, precision and agreement in channel ranking by activity were calculated between reviewers. A computer algorithm was developed to parallel the way human reviewers detect spikes by first identifying all potential spikes on each channel using frequency filtering and then block scaling all channels at the same time in order to exclude potential spikes that fall below an amplitude and slope threshold. Its performance was compared to the human reviewers on the same set of patients. Human reviewers showed surprisingly poor inter-reviewer agreement, but did broadly agree on the ranking of channels for spike activity. The computer algorithm performed as well as the human reviewers and did especially well at ranking channels from highest to lowest spike frequency. Our algorithm showed good agreement with the different human reviewers, even though they demonstrated different criteria for what constitutes a 'spike' and performed especially well at the clinically important task of ranking channels by spike activity. An automated, objective method to detect interictal spikes on intracranial recordings will improve both research and the surgical management of epilepsy patients. Copyright © 2011 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Reliability and Fall Risk Detection for the BESTest and Mini-BESTest in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anson, Eric; Thompson, Elizabeth; Ma, Lei; Jeka, John

    2017-04-26

    Test stability and test-retest reliability have not previously been reported for either the Balance Evaluation Systems Test (BESTest) or mini-BESTest (mBEST) in a population of older adults with nonspecific balance limitations. Furthermore, no criterion for identifying change greater than chance has been reported in older adults with nonspecific balance problems using either BESTest or mBEST scores. The purposes of this study were to determine test stability over time, test-retest reliability, to identify minimum detectable change for the BESTest and mBEST in a population of older adults with nonspecific balance problems. In addition, the ability of the BESTest and mBEST to identify past fallers was characterized. This was an observational study with 58 adults 65 years or older with a history of falls or self-reported balance problem. The BESTest and mBEST were administered to all participants at the beginning and end of 4 weeks. Test-retest reliability was calculated with intraclass correlations, and minimum detectable change was calculated at the 95% confidence level (MDC95). Receiver operating characteristics were used to characterize the sensitivity and specificity of the BESTest and mBEST to identify older adults who had previously fallen. Balance scores did not significantly change over a 4-week period. Test-retest reliability for the BESTest (0.86) and mBEST (0.84) was good to excellent. MDC95 scores were identified for the BESTest (8.9) and mBEST (4). The BESTest and mBEST scores were stable and reliable over a period of 4 weeks for a population of older adults with self-reported balance problems or a history of falling. MDC95 scores allow interpretation of change in BESTest and mBEST scores following rehabilitation.

  19. Rock Falls Impacting Railway Tracks: Detection Analysis through an Artificial Intelligence Camera Prototype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Fantini

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last few years, several approaches have been proposed to improve early warning systems for managing geological risk due to landslides, where important infrastructures (such as railways, highways, pipelines, and aqueducts are exposed elements. In this regard, an Artificial intelligence Camera Prototype (AiCP for real-time monitoring has been integrated in a multisensor monitoring system devoted to rock fall detection. An abandoned limestone quarry was chosen at Acuto (central Italy as test-site for verifying the reliability of the integrated monitoring system. A portion of jointed rock mass, with dimensions suitable for optical monitoring, was instrumented by extensometers. One meter of railway track was used as a target for fallen blocks and a weather station was installed nearby. Main goals of the test were (i evaluating the reliability of the AiCP and (ii detecting rock blocks that reach the railway track by the AiCP. At this aim, several experiments were carried out by throwing rock blocks over the railway track. During these experiments, the AiCP detected the blocks and automatically transmitted an alarm signal.

  20. Object level HSI-LIDAR data fusion for automated detection of difficult targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaev, A V; Daniel, B J; Neumann, J G; Kim, A M; Lee, K R

    2011-10-10

    Data fusion from disparate sensors significantly improves automated man-made target detection performance compared to that of just an individual sensor. In particular, it can solve hyperspectral imagery (HSI) detection problems pertaining to low-radiance man-made objects and objects in shadows. We present an algorithm that fuses HSI and LIDAR data for automated detection of man-made objects. LIDAR is used to define a set of potential targets based on physical dimensions, and HSI is then used to discriminate between man-made and natural objects. The discrimination technique is a novel HSI detection concept that uses an HSI detection score localization metric capable of distinguishing between wide-area score distributions inherent to natural objects and highly localized score distributions indicative of man-made targets. A typical man-made localization score was found to be around 0.5 compared to natural background typical localization scores being less than 0.1.

  1. Automated spoof-detection for fingerprints using optical coherence tomography

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Darlow, LN

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Fingerprint recognition systems are prevalent in high-security applications. As a result, the act of spoofing these systems with artificial fingerprints is of increasing concern. This research presents an automatic means for spoof-detection using...

  2. Automated syndrome detection in a set of clinical facial photographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehringer, Stefan; Guenther, Manuel; Sinigerova, Stella; Wurtz, Rolf P; Horsthemke, Bernhard; Wieczorek, Dagmar

    2011-09-01

    Computer systems play an important role in clinical genetics and are a routine part of finding clinical diagnoses but make it difficult to fully exploit information derived from facial appearance. So far, automated syndrome diagnosis based on digital, facial photographs has been demonstrated under study conditions but has not been applied in clinical practice. We have therefore investigated how well statistical classifiers trained on study data comprising 202 individuals affected by one of 14 syndromes could classify a set of 91 patients for whom pictures were taken under regular, less controlled conditions in clinical practice. We found a classification accuracy of 21% percent in the clinical sample representing a ratio of 3.0 over a random choice. This contrasts with a 60% accuracy or 8.5 ratio in the training data. Producing average images in both groups from sets of pictures for each syndrome demonstrates that the groups exhibit large phenotypic differences explaining discrepancies in accuracy. A broadening of the data set is suggested in order to improve accuracy in clinical practice. In order to further this goal, a software package is made available that allows application of the procedures and contributions toward an improved data set. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Automated detection of Lupus white matter lesions in MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eloy Roura Perez

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Brain magnetic resonance imaging provides detailed information which can be used to detect and segment white matter lesions (WML. In this work we propose an approach to automatically segment WML in Lupus patients by using T1w and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR images. Lupus WML appear as small focal abnormal tissue observed as hyperintensities in the FLAIR images. The quantification of these WML is a key factor for the stratification of lupus patients and therefore both lesion detection and segmentation play an important role. In our approach, the T1w image is first used to classify the three main tissues of the brain, white matter (WM, gray matter (GM and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, while the FLAIR image is then used to detect focal WML as outliers of its GM intensity distribution. A set of post-processing steps based on lesion size, tissue neighborhood, and location are used to refine the lesion candidates. The proposal is evaluated on 20 patients, presenting qualitative and quantitative results in terms of precision and sensitivity of lesion detection (True Positive Rate (62% and Positive Prediction Value (80% respectively as well as segmentation accuracy (Dice Similarity Coefficient (72%. Obtained results illustrate the validity of the approach to automatically detect and segment lupus lesions. Besides, our approach is publicly available as a SPM8/12 toolbox extension with a simple parameter configuration.

  4. Automated electrochemical detection of iron ions in erythrocytes from melim minipigs suffering from melanoma

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kremplová, M.; Krejcová, l.; Hynek, D.; Barath, P.; Majzlík, P.; Horák, Vratislav; Adam, V.; Sochor, J.; Cernei, N.; Hubálek, J.; Vrba, R.; Kižek, R.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 7 (2012), s. 5893-5909 ISSN 1452-3981 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : Automation * Biological sample * Electrochemical detection Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 3.729, year: 2011

  5. Automated detection of unfilled pauses in speech of healthy and brain-damaged individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ossewaarde, Roelant; Jonkers, Roel; Jalvingh, Fedor; Bastiaanse, Yvonne

    Automated detection of un lled pauses in speech of healthy and brain-damaged individuals Roelant Ossewaardea,b, Roel Jonkersa, Fedor Jalvingha,c, Roelien Bastiaansea aCenter for Language and Cognition, University of Groningen; bInstitute for ICT, HU University of Applied Science, Utrecht; cSt.

  6. Automated Detection of Heuristics and Biases among Pathologists in a Computer-Based System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Rebecca S.; Legowski, Elizabeth; Medvedeva, Olga; Reitmeyer, Kayse; Tseytlin, Eugene; Castine, Melissa; Jukic, Drazen; Mello-Thoms, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is threefold: (1) to develop an automated, computer-based method to detect heuristics and biases as pathologists examine virtual slide cases, (2) to measure the frequency and distribution of heuristics and errors across three levels of training, and (3) to examine relationships of heuristics to biases, and biases to…

  7. Sensitivity of hemozoin detection by automated flow cytometry in non- and semi-immune malaria patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grobusch, Martin P.; Hänscheid, Thomas; Krämer, Benedikt; Neukammer, Jörg; May, Jürgen; Seybold, Joachim; Kun, Jürgen F. J.; Suttorp, Norbert

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cell-Dyn automated blood cell analyzers use laser flow cytometry technology, allowing detection of malaria pigment (hemozoin) in monocytes. We evaluated the value of such an instrument to diagnose malaria in febrile travelers returning to Berlin, Germany, the relation between the

  8. PCA method for automated detection of mispronounced words

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Zhenhao; Sharma, Sudhendu R.; Smith, Mark J. T.

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents a method for detecting mispronunciations with the aim of improving Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL) tools used by foreign language learners. The algorithm is based on Principle Component Analysis (PCA). It is hierarchical with each successive step refining the estimate to classify the test word as being either mispronounced or correct. Preprocessing before detection, like normalization and time-scale modification, is implemented to guarantee uniformity of the feature vectors input to the detection system. The performance using various features including spectrograms and Mel-Frequency Cepstral Coefficients (MFCCs) are compared and evaluated. Best results were obtained using MFCCs, achieving up to 99% accuracy in word verification and 93% in native/non-native classification. Compared with Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) which are used pervasively in recognition application, this particular approach is computational efficient and effective when training data is limited.

  9. Automated and unsupervised detection of malarial parasites in microscopic images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purwar Yashasvi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria is a serious infectious disease. According to the World Health Organization, it is responsible for nearly one million deaths each year. There are various techniques to diagnose malaria of which manual microscopy is considered to be the gold standard. However due to the number of steps required in manual assessment, this diagnostic method is time consuming (leading to late diagnosis and prone to human error (leading to erroneous diagnosis, even in experienced hands. The focus of this study is to develop a robust, unsupervised and sensitive malaria screening technique with low material cost and one that has an advantage over other techniques in that it minimizes human reliance and is, therefore, more consistent in applying diagnostic criteria. Method A method based on digital image processing of Giemsa-stained thin smear image is developed to facilitate the diagnostic process. The diagnosis procedure is divided into two parts; enumeration and identification. The image-based method presented here is designed to automate the process of enumeration and identification; with the main advantage being its ability to carry out the diagnosis in an unsupervised manner and yet have high sensitivity and thus reducing cases of false negatives. Results The image based method is tested over more than 500 images from two independent laboratories. The aim is to distinguish between positive and negative cases of malaria using thin smear blood slide images. Due to the unsupervised nature of method it requires minimal human intervention thus speeding up the whole process of diagnosis. Overall sensitivity to capture cases of malaria is 100% and specificity ranges from 50-88% for all species of malaria parasites. Conclusion Image based screening method will speed up the whole process of diagnosis and is more advantageous over laboratory procedures that are prone to errors and where pathological expertise is minimal. Further this method

  10. Automated Detection of Anomalous Shipping Manifests to Identify Illicit Trade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Chikkagoudar, Satish

    2013-11-12

    We describe an approach to analyzing trade data which uses clustering to detect similarities across shipping manifest records, classification to evaluate clustering results and categorize new unseen shipping data records, and visual analytics to provide to support situation awareness in dynamic decision making to monitor and warn against the movement of radiological threat materials through search, analysis and forecasting capabilities. The evaluation of clustering results through classification and systematic inspection of the clusters show the clusters have strong semantic cohesion and offer novel ways to detect transactions related to nuclear smuggling.

  11. Automated Detection of Ocular Alignment with Binocular Retinal Birefringence Scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, David G.; Shah, Ankoor S.; Sau, Soma; Nassif, Deborah; Guyton, David L.

    2003-06-01

    We previously developed a retinal birefringence scanning (RBS) device to detect eye fixation. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a new binocular RBS (BRBS) instrument can detect simultaneous fixation of both eyes. Control (nonmyopic and myopic) and strabismic subjects were studied by use of BRBS at a fixation distance of 45 cm. Binocularity (the percentage of measurements with bilateral fixation) was determined from the BRBS output. All nonstrabismic subjects with good quality signals had binocularity >75%. Binocularity averaged 5% in four subjects with strabismus (range of 0 -20%). BRBS may potentially be used to screen individuals for abnormal eye alignment.

  12. System and method for automated object detection in an image

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenyon, Garrett T.; Brumby, Steven P.; George, John S.; Paiton, Dylan M.; Schultz, Peter F.

    2015-10-06

    A contour/shape detection model may use relatively simple and efficient kernels to detect target edges in an object within an image or video. A co-occurrence probability may be calculated for two or more edge features in an image or video using an object definition. Edge features may be differentiated between in response to measured contextual support, and prominent edge features may be extracted based on the measured contextual support. The object may then be identified based on the extracted prominent edge features.

  13. Evaluation of Feature Extraction and Recognition for Activity Monitoring and Fall Detection Based on Wearable sEMG Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Xugang; Tang, Minyan; Miran, Seyed M; Luo, Zhizeng

    2017-05-27

    As an essential subfield of context awareness, activity awareness, especially daily activity monitoring and fall detection, plays a significant role for elderly or frail people who need assistance in their daily activities. This study investigates the feature extraction and pattern recognition of surface electromyography (sEMG), with the purpose of determining the best features and classifiers of sEMG for daily living activities monitoring and fall detection. This is done by a serial of experiments. In the experiments, four channels of sEMG signal from wireless, wearable sensors located on lower limbs are recorded from three subjects while they perform seven activities of daily living (ADL). A simulated trip fall scenario is also considered with a custom-made device attached to the ankle. With this experimental setting, 15 feature extraction methods of sEMG, including time, frequency, time/frequency domain and entropy, are analyzed based on class separability and calculation complexity, and five classification methods, each with 15 features, are estimated with respect to the accuracy rate of recognition and calculation complexity for activity monitoring and fall detection. It is shown that a high accuracy rate of recognition and a minimal calculation time for daily activity monitoring and fall detection can be achieved in the current experimental setting. Specifically, the Wilson Amplitude (WAMP) feature performs the best, and the classifier Gaussian Kernel Support Vector Machine (GK-SVM) with Permutation Entropy (PE) or WAMP results in the highest accuracy for activity monitoring with recognition rates of 97.35% and 96.43%. For fall detection, the classifier Fuzzy Min-Max Neural Network (FMMNN) has the best sensitivity and specificity at the cost of the longest calculation time, while the classifier Gaussian Kernel Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis (GK-FDA) with the feature WAMP guarantees a high sensitivity (98.70%) and specificity (98.59%) with a short

  14. Evaluation of Feature Extraction and Recognition for Activity Monitoring and Fall Detection Based on Wearable sEMG Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xugang Xi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available As an essential subfield of context awareness, activity awareness, especially daily activity monitoring and fall detection, plays a significant role for elderly or frail people who need assistance in their daily activities. This study investigates the feature extraction and pattern recognition of surface electromyography (sEMG, with the purpose of determining the best features and classifiers of sEMG for daily living activities monitoring and fall detection. This is done by a serial of experiments. In the experiments, four channels of sEMG signal from wireless, wearable sensors located on lower limbs are recorded from three subjects while they perform seven activities of daily living (ADL. A simulated trip fall scenario is also considered with a custom-made device attached to the ankle. With this experimental setting, 15 feature extraction methods of sEMG, including time, frequency, time/frequency domain and entropy, are analyzed based on class separability and calculation complexity, and five classification methods, each with 15 features, are estimated with respect to the accuracy rate of recognition and calculation complexity for activity monitoring and fall detection. It is shown that a high accuracy rate of recognition and a minimal calculation time for daily activity monitoring and fall detection can be achieved in the current experimental setting. Specifically, the Wilson Amplitude (WAMP feature performs the best, and the classifier Gaussian Kernel Support Vector Machine (GK-SVM with Permutation Entropy (PE or WAMP results in the highest accuracy for activity monitoring with recognition rates of 97.35% and 96.43%. For fall detection, the classifier Fuzzy Min-Max Neural Network (FMMNN has the best sensitivity and specificity at the cost of the longest calculation time, while the classifier Gaussian Kernel Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis (GK-FDA with the feature WAMP guarantees a high sensitivity (98.70% and specificity (98.59% with a

  15. Assessing bat detectability and occupancy with multiple automated echolocation detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorresen, P.M.; Miles, A.C.; Todd, C.M.; Bonaccorso, F.J.; Weller, T.J.

    2008-01-01

    Occupancy analysis and its ability to account for differential detection probabilities is important for studies in which detecting echolocation calls is used as a measure of bat occurrence and activity. We examined the feasibility of remotely acquiring bat encounter histories to estimate detection probability and occupancy. We used echolocation detectors coupled to digital recorders operating at a series of proximate sites on consecutive nights in 2 trial surveys for the Hawaiian hoary bat (Lasiurus cinereus semotus). Our results confirmed that the technique is readily amenable for use in occupancy analysis. We also conducted a simulation exercise to assess the effects of sampling effort on parameter estimation. The results indicated that the precision and bias of parameter estimation were often more influenced by the number of sites sampled than number of visits. Acceptable accuracy often was not attained until at least 15 sites or 15 visits were used to estimate detection probability and occupancy. The method has significant potential for use in monitoring trends in bat activity and in comparative studies of habitat use. ?? 2008 American Society of Mammalogists.

  16. Automated Micro-Object Detection for Mobile Diagnostics Using Lens-Free Imaging Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohendra Roy

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Lens-free imaging technology has been extensively used recently for microparticle and biological cell analysis because of its high throughput, low cost, and simple and compact arrangement. However, this technology still lacks a dedicated and automated detection system. In this paper, we describe a custom-developed automated micro-object detection method for a lens-free imaging system. In our previous work (Roy et al., we developed a lens-free imaging system using low-cost components. This system was used to generate and capture the diffraction patterns of micro-objects and a global threshold was used to locate the diffraction patterns. In this work we used the same setup to develop an improved automated detection and analysis algorithm based on adaptive threshold and clustering of signals. For this purpose images from the lens-free system were then used to understand the features and characteristics of the diffraction patterns of several types of samples. On the basis of this information, we custom-developed an automated algorithm for the lens-free imaging system. Next, all the lens-free images were processed using this custom-developed automated algorithm. The performance of this approach was evaluated by comparing the counting results with standard optical microscope results. We evaluated the counting results for polystyrene microbeads, red blood cells, and HepG2, HeLa, and MCF7 cells. The comparison shows good agreement between the systems, with a correlation coefficient of 0.91 and linearity slope of 0.877. We also evaluated the automated size profiles of the microparticle samples. This Wi-Fi-enabled lens-free imaging system, along with the dedicated software, possesses great potential for telemedicine applications in resource-limited settings.

  17. Automated Detection of Conformational Epitopes Using Phage Display Peptide Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surendra S Negi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Precise determination of conformational epitopes of neutralizing antibodies represents a key step in the rational design of novel vaccines. A powerful experimental method to gain insights on the physical chemical nature of conformational epitopes is the selection of linear peptides that bind with high affinities to a monoclonal antibody of interest by phage display technology. However, the structural characterization of conformational epitopes from these mimotopes is not straightforward, and in the past the interpretation of peptide sequences from phage display experiments focused on linear sequence analysis to find a consensus sequence or common sequence motifs.Results: We present a fully automated search method, EpiSearch that predicts the possible location of conformational epitopes on the surface of an antigen. The algorithm uses peptide sequences from phage display experiments as input, and ranks all surface exposed patches according to the frequency distribution of similar residues in the peptides and in the patch. We have tested the performance of the EpiSearch algorithm for six experimental data sets of phage display experiments, the human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2/neu, the antibody mAb Bo2C11 targeting the C2 domain of FVIII, antibodies mAb 17b and mAb b12 of the HIV envelope protein gp120, mAb 13b5 targeting HIV-1 capsid protein and 80R of the SARS coronavirus spike protein. In all these examples the conformational epitopes as determined by the X-ray crystal structures of the antibody-antigen complexes, were found within the highest scoring patches of EpiSearch, covering in most cases more than 50% residues of experimental observed conformational epitopes. Input options of the program include mapping of a single peptide or a set of peptides on the antigen structure, and the results of the calculation can be visualized on our interactive web server.Availability: Users can access the EpiSearch from our web

  18. Proof of Concept of Automated Collision Detection Technology in Rugby Sevens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Anthea C; Anson, Judith M; Pyne, David B

    2017-04-01

    Clarke, AC, Anson, JM, and Pyne, DB. Proof of concept of automated collision detection technology in rugby sevens. J Strength Cond Res 31(4): 1116-1120, 2017-Developments in microsensor technology allow for automated detection of collisions in various codes of football, removing the need for time-consuming postprocessing of video footage. However, little research is available on the ability of microsensor technology to be used across various sports or genders. Game video footage was matched with microsensor-detected collisions (GPSports) in one men's (n = 12 players) and one women's (n = 12) rugby sevens match. True-positive, false-positive, and false-negative events between video and microsensor-detected collisions were used to calculate recall (ability to detect a collision) and precision (accurately identify a collision). The precision was similar between the men's and women's rugby sevens game (∼0.72; scale 0.00-1.00); however, the recall in the women's game (0.45) was less than that for the men's game (0.69). This resulted in 45% of collisions for men and 62% of collisions for women being incorrectly labeled. Currently, the automated collision detection system in GPSports microtechnology units has only modest utility in rugby sevens, and it seems that a rugby sevens-specific algorithm is needed. Differences in measures between the men's and women's game may be a result of physical size, and strength, and physicality, as well as technical and tactical factors.

  19. An Automated Cloud-edge Detection Algorithm Using Cloud Physics and Radar Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Jennifer G.; Merceret, Francis J.; Grainger, Cedric A.

    2003-01-01

    An automated cloud edge detection algorithm was developed and extensively tested. The algorithm uses in-situ cloud physics data measured by a research aircraft coupled with ground-based weather radar measurements to determine whether the aircraft is in or out of cloud. Cloud edges are determined when the in/out state changes, subject to a hysteresis constraint. The hysteresis constraint prevents isolated transient cloud puffs or data dropouts from being identified as cloud boundaries. The algorithm was verified by detailed manual examination of the data set in comparison to the results from application of the automated algorithm.

  20. Automated detection of new impact sites on Martian surface from HiRISE images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Xin; Di, Kaichang; Wang, Yexin; Wan, Wenhui; Yue, Zongyu

    2017-10-01

    In this study, an automated method for Martian new impact site detection from single images is presented. It first extracts dark areas in full high resolution image, then detects new impact craters within dark areas using a cascade classifier which combines local binary pattern features and Haar-like features trained by an AdaBoost machine learning algorithm. Experimental results using 100 HiRISE images show that the overall detection rate of proposed method is 84.5%, with a true positive rate of 86.9%. The detection rate and true positive rate in the flat regions are 93.0% and 91.5%, respectively.

  1. Toward automated detection and segmentation of aortic calcifications from radiographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauze, François; de Bruijne, Marleen

    2007-03-01

    This paper aims at automatically measuring the extent of calcified plaques in the lumbar aorta from standard radiographs. Calcifications in the abdominal aorta are an important predictor for future cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Accurate and reproducible measurement of the amount of calcified deposit in the aorta is therefore of great value in disease diagnosis and prognosis, treatment planning, and the study of drug effects. We propose a two-step approach in which first the calcifications are detected by an iterative statistical pixel classification scheme combined with aorta shape model optimization. Subsequently, the detected calcified pixels are used as the initialization for an inpainting based segmentation. We present results on synthetic images from the inpainting based segmentation as well as results on several X-ray images based on the two-steps approach.

  2. Automated vehicle detection in forward-looking infrared imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Der, Sandor; Chan, Alex; Nasrabadi, Nasser; Kwon, Heesung

    2004-01-10

    We describe an algorithm for the detection and clutter rejection of military vehicles in forward-looking infrared (FLIR) imagery. The detection algorithm is designed to be a prescreener that selects regions for further analysis and uses a spatial anomaly approach that looks for target-sized regions of the image that differ in texture, brightness, edge strength, or other spatial characteristics. The features are linearly combined to form a confidence image that is thresholded to find likely target locations. The clutter rejection portion uses target-specific information extracted from training samples to reduce the false alarms of the detector. The outputs of the clutter rejecter and detector are combined by a higher-level evidence integrator to improve performance over simple concatenation of the detector and clutter rejecter. The algorithm has been applied to a large number of FLIR imagery sets, and some of these results are presented here.

  3. Preprocessing for Automating Early Detection of Cervical Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Abhishek; Kar, Avijit; Bhattacharyya, Debasis

    2011-01-01

    Uterine Cervical Cancer is one of the most common forms of cancer in women worldwide. Most cases of cervical cancer can be prevented through screening programs aimed at detecting precancerous lesions. During Digital Colposcopy, colposcopic images or cervigrams are acquired in raw form. They contain specular reflections which appear as bright spots heavily saturated with white light and occur due to the presence of moisture on the uneven cervix surface and. The cervix region occupies about hal...

  4. Weighted Polynomial Approximation for Automated Detection of Inspiratory Flow Limitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Cheng Huang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Inspiratory flow limitation (IFL is a critical symptom of sleep breathing disorders. A characteristic flattened flow-time curve indicates the presence of highest resistance flow limitation. This study involved investigating a real-time algorithm for detecting IFL during sleep. Three categories of inspiratory flow shape were collected from previous studies for use as a development set. Of these, 16 cases were labeled as non-IFL and 78 as IFL which were further categorized into minor level (20 cases and severe level (58 cases of obstruction. In this study, algorithms using polynomial functions were proposed for extracting the features of IFL. Methods using first- to third-order polynomial approximations were applied to calculate the fitting curve to obtain the mean absolute error. The proposed algorithm is described by the weighted third-order (w.3rd-order polynomial function. For validation, a total of 1,093 inspiratory breaths were acquired as a test set. The accuracy levels of the classifications produced by the presented feature detection methods were analyzed, and the performance levels were compared using a misclassification cobweb. According to the results, the algorithm using the w.3rd-order polynomial approximation achieved an accuracy of 94.14% for IFL classification. We concluded that this algorithm achieved effective automatic IFL detection during sleep.

  5. Automated detection of diabetic retinopathy in retinal images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Valverde

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy (DR is a disease with an increasing prevalence and the main cause of blindness among working-age population. The risk of severe vision loss can be significantly reduced by timely diagnosis and treatment. Systematic screening for DR has been identified as a cost-effective way to save health services resources. Automatic retinal image analysis is emerging as an important screening tool for early DR detection, which can reduce the workload associated to manual grading as well as save diagnosis costs and time. Many research efforts in the last years have been devoted to developing automatic tools to help in the detection and evaluation of DR lesions. However, there is a large variability in the databases and evaluation criteria used in the literature, which hampers a direct comparison of the different studies. This work is aimed at summarizing the results of the available algorithms for the detection and classification of DR pathology. A detailed literature search was conducted using PubMed. Selected relevant studies in the last 10 years were scrutinized and included in the review. Furthermore, we will try to give an overview of the available commercial software for automatic retinal image analysis.

  6. Automated Structure Detection in HRTEM Images: An Example with Graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kling, Jens; Vestergaard, Jacob Schack; Dahl, Anders Bjorholm

    Graphene, as the forefather of 2D-materials, attracts much attention due to its extraordinary properties like transparency, flexibility and outstanding high conductivity, together with a thickness of only one atom. The properties seem to be dependent on the atomic structure of graphene...... of time making it difficult to resolve dynamic processes or unstable structures. Tools that assist to get the maximum of information out of recorded images are therefore greatly appreciated. In order to get the most accurate results out of the structure detection, we have optimized the imaging conditions...

  7. Automated Meteor Detection by All-Sky Digital Camera Systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Suk, Tomáš; Šimberová, Stanislava

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 120, č. 3 (2017), s. 189-215 ISSN 0167-9295 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-16928S Institutional support: RVO:67985815 ; RVO:67985556 Keywords : meteor detection * autonomous fireball observatories * fish- eye camera * Hough transformation Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science; BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics (ASU-R) OBOR OECD: Computer sciences, information science, bioinformathics (hardware development to be 2.2, social aspect to be 5.8); Astronomy (including astrophysics,space science) (ASU-R) Impact factor: 0.875, year: 2016

  8. Colorimetric sensor for bad odor detection using automated color correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, K.; Tarantik, K.; Pannek, C.; Benito-Altamirano, I.; Casals, O.; Fàbrega, C.; Romano-Rodríguez, A.; Wöllenstein, J.; Prades, J. D.

    2017-06-01

    Colorimetric sensors based on color-changing dyes offer a convenient approach for the quantitative measurement of gases. An integrated, mobile colorimetric sensor can be particularly helpful for occasional gas measurements, such as informal air quality checks for bad odors. In these situations, the main requirement is high availability, easy usage, and high specificity towards one single chemical compound, combined with cost-efficient production. In this contribution, we show how a well stablished colorimetric method can be adapted for easy operation and readout, making it suitable for the untrained end user. As an example, we present the use of pH indicators for the selective and reversible detection of NH3 in air (one relevant gas contributing to bad odors) using gas-sensitive layers dip coated on glass substrates. Our results show that the method can be adapted to detect NH3 concentrations lower than 1 ppm, with measure-to-result times in the range of a few minutes. We demonstrate that the color measurements can be carried out with the optical signals of RGB sensors, without losing quantitative performance.

  9. Using Akka Platform in Unidentified Falling Object Detection on the LHC.

    CERN Document Server

    Motesnitsalis, Evangelos

    2013-01-01

    During my participation in the CERN Summer Student Program 2013, I worked under the Technology Department of CERN and, more specifically, in the Machine Protection and Electrical Integrity (MPE) Group. The MPE Group supports LHC operation and maintains state‐of‐the art technology for magnet circuit protection and interlock systems for the present and future accelerators, magnet test facilities and CERN hosted experiments. Within this context, we developed an application that parallelizes the Unidentified Falling Object Detection Algorithm on the LHC Operational Data Analysis Software. For this reason, we used a JVM-based toolkit, named Akka, which parallelizes the execution by creating a number of actors that run simultaneously. The results of the new approach are presented on the last part of this report. They tend to be quite interesting and promising as we managed to reduce the execution time of the analysis by a factor of 10 on a local machine and the first attempts to execute the program on a cluster...

  10. A Fully Automated Method to Detect and Segment a Manufactured Object in an Underwater Color Image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phlypo Ronald

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a fully automated active contours-based method for the detection and the segmentation of a moored manufactured object in an underwater image. Detection of objects in underwater images is difficult due to the variable lighting conditions and shadows on the object. The proposed technique is based on the information contained in the color maps and uses the visual attention method, combined with a statistical approach for the detection and an active contour for the segmentation of the object to overcome the above problems. In the classical active contour method the region descriptor is fixed and the convergence of the method depends on the initialization. With our approach, this dependence is overcome with an initialization using the visual attention results and a criterion to select the best region descriptor. This approach improves the convergence and the processing time while providing the advantages of a fully automated method.

  11. Early detection of pharmacovigilance signals with automated methods based on false discovery rates: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Ismaïl; Thiessard, Frantz; Miremont-Salamé, Ghada; Haramburu, Françoise; Kreft-Jais, Carmen; Bégaud, Bernard; Tubert-Bitter, Pascale

    2012-06-01

    Improving the detection of drug safety signals has led several pharmacovigilance regulatory agencies to incorporate automated quantitative methods into their spontaneous reporting management systems. The three largest worldwide pharmacovigilance databases are routinely screened by the lower bound of the 95% confidence interval of proportional reporting ratio (PRR₀₂.₅), the 2.5% quantile of the Information Component (IC₀₂.₅) or the 5% quantile of the Gamma Poisson Shrinker (GPS₀₅). More recently, Bayesian and non-Bayesian False Discovery Rate (FDR)-based methods were proposed that address the arbitrariness of thresholds and allow for a built-in estimate of the FDR. These methods were also shown through simulation studies to be interesting alternatives to the currently used methods. The objective of this work was twofold. Based on an extensive retrospective study, we compared PRR₀₂.₅, GPS₀₅ and IC₀₂.₅ with two FDR-based methods derived from the Fisher's exact test and the GPS model (GPS(pH0) [posterior probability of the null hypothesis H₀ calculated from the Gamma Poisson Shrinker model]). Secondly, restricting the analysis to GPS(pH0), we aimed to evaluate the added value of using automated signal detection tools compared with 'traditional' methods, i.e. non-automated surveillance operated by pharmacovigilance experts. The analysis was performed sequentially, i.e. every month, and retrospectively on the whole French pharmacovigilance database over the period 1 January 1996-1 July 2002. Evaluation was based on a list of 243 reference signals (RSs) corresponding to investigations launched by the French Pharmacovigilance Technical Committee (PhVTC) during the same period. The comparison of detection methods was made on the basis of the number of RSs detected as well as the time to detection. Results comparing the five automated quantitative methods were in favour of GPS(pH0) in terms of both number of detections of true signals and

  12. Automated crack detection in conductive smart-concrete structures using a resistor mesh model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, Austin; D'Alessandro, Antonella; Ubertini, Filippo; Laflamme, Simon

    2018-03-01

    Various nondestructive evaluation techniques are currently used to automatically detect and monitor cracks in concrete infrastructure. However, these methods often lack the scalability and cost-effectiveness over large geometries. A solution is the use of self-sensing carbon-doped cementitious materials. These self-sensing materials are capable of providing a measurable change in electrical output that can be related to their damage state. Previous work by the authors showed that a resistor mesh model could be used to track damage in structural components fabricated from electrically conductive concrete, where damage was located through the identification of high resistance value resistors in a resistor mesh model. In this work, an automated damage detection strategy that works through placing high value resistors into the previously developed resistor mesh model using a sequential Monte Carlo method is introduced. Here, high value resistors are used to mimic the internal condition of damaged cementitious specimens. The proposed automated damage detection method is experimentally validated using a 500 × 500 × 50 mm3 reinforced cement paste plate doped with multi-walled carbon nanotubes exposed to 100 identical impact tests. Results demonstrate that the proposed Monte Carlo method is capable of detecting and localizing the most prominent damage in a structure, demonstrating that automated damage detection in smart-concrete structures is a promising strategy for real-time structural health monitoring of civil infrastructure.

  13. Integrating Online and Offline Three-Dimensional Deep Learning for Automated Polyp Detection in Colonoscopy Videos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lequan Yu; Hao Chen; Qi Dou; Jing Qin; Pheng Ann Heng

    2017-01-01

    Automated polyp detection in colonoscopy videos has been demonstrated to be a promising way for colorectal cancer prevention and diagnosis. Traditional manual screening is time consuming, operator dependent, and error prone; hence, automated detection approach is highly demanded in clinical practice. However, automated polyp detection is very challenging due to high intraclass variations in polyp size, color, shape, and texture, and low interclass variations between polyps and hard mimics. In this paper, we propose a novel offline and online three-dimensional (3-D) deep learning integration framework by leveraging the 3-D fully convolutional network (3D-FCN) to tackle this challenging problem. Compared with the previous methods employing hand-crafted features or 2-D convolutional neural network, the 3D-FCN is capable of learning more representative spatio-temporal features from colonoscopy videos, and hence has more powerful discrimination capability. More importantly, we propose a novel online learning scheme to deal with the problem of limited training data by harnessing the specific information of an input video in the learning process. We integrate offline and online learning to effectively reduce the number of false positives generated by the offline network and further improve the detection performance. Extensive experiments on the dataset of MICCAI 2015 Challenge on Polyp Detection demonstrated the better performance of our method when compared with other competitors.

  14. Estimating fall risk with inertial sensors using gait stability measures that do not require step detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riva, F.; Toebes, M.J.P.; Pijnappels, M.A.G.M.; Stagni, R.; van Dieen, J.H.

    2013-01-01

    Falls have major consequences both at societal (health-care and economy) and individual (physical and psychological) levels. Questionnaires to assess fall risk are commonly used in the clinic, but their predictive value is limited. Objective methods, suitable for clinical application, are hence

  15. Automated Meteor Detection by All-Sky Digital Camera Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suk, Tomáš; Šimberová, Stanislava

    2017-12-01

    We have developed a set of methods to detect meteor light traces captured by all-sky CCD cameras. Operating at small automatic observatories (stations), these cameras create a network spread over a large territory. Image data coming from these stations are merged in one central node. Since a vast amount of data is collected by the stations in a single night, robotic storage and analysis are essential to processing. The proposed methodology is adapted to data from a network of automatic stations equipped with digital fish-eye cameras and includes data capturing, preparation, pre-processing, analysis, and finally recognition of objects in time sequences. In our experiments we utilized real observed data from two stations.

  16. Automated Detection of Knickpoints and Knickzones Across Transient Landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gailleton, B.; Mudd, S. M.; Clubb, F. J.

    2017-12-01

    Mountainous regions are ubiquitously dissected by river channels, which transmit climate and tectonic signals to the rest of the landscape by adjusting their long profiles. Fluvial response to allogenic forcing is often expressed through the upstream propagation of steepened reaches, referred to as knickpoints or knickzones. The identification and analysis of these steepened reaches has numerous applications in geomorphology, such as modelling long-term landscape evolution, understanding controls on fluvial incision, and constraining tectonic uplift histories. Traditionally, the identification of knickpoints or knickzones from fluvial profiles requires manual selection or calibration. This process is both time-consuming and subjective, as different workers may select different steepened reaches within the profile. We propose an objective, statistically-based method to systematically pick knickpoints/knickzones on a landscape scale using an outlier-detection algorithm. Our method integrates river profiles normalised by drainage area (Chi, using the approach of Perron and Royden, 2013), then separates the chi-elevation plots into a series of transient segments using the method of Mudd et al. (2014). This method allows the systematic detection of knickpoints across a DEM, regardless of size, using a high-performance algorithm implemented in the open-source Edinburgh Land Surface Dynamics Topographic Tools (LSDTopoTools) software package. After initial knickpoint identification, outliers are selected using several sorting and binning methods based on the Median Absolute Deviation, to avoid the influence sample size. We test our method on a series of DEMs and grid resolutions, and show that our method consistently identifies accurate knickpoint locations across each landscape tested.

  17. Fall Detection for Elderly from Partially Observed Depth-Map Video Sequences Based on View-Invariant Human Activity Representation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rami Alazrai

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new approach for fall detection from partially-observed depth-map video sequences. The proposed approach utilizes the 3D skeletal joint positions obtained from the Microsoft Kinect sensor to build a view-invariant descriptor for human activity representation, called the motion-pose geometric descriptor (MPGD. Furthermore, we have developed a histogram-based representation (HBR based on the MPGD to construct a length-independent representation of the observed video subsequences. Using the constructed HBR, we formulate the fall detection problem as a posterior-maximization problem in which the posteriori probability for each observed video subsequence is estimated using a multi-class SVM (support vector machine classifier. Then, we combine the computed posteriori probabilities from all of the observed subsequences to obtain an overall class posteriori probability of the entire partially-observed depth-map video sequence. To evaluate the performance of the proposed approach, we have utilized the Kinect sensor to record a dataset of depth-map video sequences that simulates four fall-related activities of elderly people, including: walking, sitting, falling form standing and falling from sitting. Then, using the collected dataset, we have developed three evaluation scenarios based on the number of unobserved video subsequences in the testing videos, including: fully-observed video sequence scenario, single unobserved video subsequence of random lengths scenarios and two unobserved video subsequences of random lengths scenarios. Experimental results show that the proposed approach achieved an average recognition accuracy of 93 . 6 % , 77 . 6 % and 65 . 1 % , in recognizing the activities during the first, second and third evaluation scenario, respectively. These results demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach to detect falls from partially-observed videos.

  18. A feasibility assessment of automated FISH image and signal analysis to assist cervical cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingwei; Li, Yuhua; Liu, Hong; Li, Shibo; Zhang, Roy R.; Zheng, Bin

    2012-02-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technology provides a promising molecular imaging tool to detect cervical cancer. Since manual FISH analysis is difficult, time-consuming, and inconsistent, the automated FISH image scanning systems have been developed. Due to limited focal depth of scanned microscopic image, a FISH-probed specimen needs to be scanned in multiple layers that generate huge image data. To improve diagnostic efficiency of using automated FISH image analysis, we developed a computer-aided detection (CAD) scheme. In this experiment, four pap-smear specimen slides were scanned by a dual-detector fluorescence image scanning system that acquired two spectrum images simultaneously, which represent images of interphase cells and FISH-probed chromosome X. During image scanning, once detecting a cell signal, system captured nine image slides by automatically adjusting optical focus. Based on the sharpness index and maximum intensity measurement, cells and FISH signals distributed in 3-D space were projected into a 2-D con-focal image. CAD scheme was applied to each con-focal image to detect analyzable interphase cells using an adaptive multiple-threshold algorithm and detect FISH-probed signals using a top-hat transform. The ratio of abnormal cells was calculated to detect positive cases. In four scanned specimen slides, CAD generated 1676 con-focal images that depicted analyzable cells. FISH-probed signals were independently detected by our CAD algorithm and an observer. The Kappa coefficients for agreement between CAD and observer ranged from 0.69 to 1.0 in detecting/counting FISH signal spots. The study demonstrated the feasibility of applying automated FISH image and signal analysis to assist cyto-geneticists in detecting cervical cancers.

  19. Automated detection of satellite contamination in incoherent scatter radar spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Porteous

    Full Text Available Anomalous ion line spectra have been identified in many experiments. Such spectra are defined as deviations from the standard symmetric "double-humped" spectra derived from incoherent scatter radar echoes from the upper atmosphere. Some anomalous spectra – where there are sharp enhancements of power over restricted height ranges – have been attributed to satellite contamination in the beam path. Here we outline a method for detecting such contamination, and review in detail a few cases where the method enables the identification of anomalous spectra as satellite echoes, subsequently ascribed to specific orbital objects. The methods used here to identify such satellites provide a useful way of distinguishing anomalous spectra due to satellites from those of geophysical origin. Analysis of EISCAT Svalbard Radar data reveals that an average of 8 satellites per hour are found to cross the beam. Based on a relatively small sample of the data set, it appears that at least half of the occurrences of anomalous spectra are caused by satellite contamination rather than being of geophysical origin.

    Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere, instruments and techniques – Radio Science (signal processing

  20. Automated detection of satellite contamination in incoherent scatter radar spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Porteous

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Anomalous ion line spectra have been identified in many experiments. Such spectra are defined as deviations from the standard symmetric "double-humped" spectra derived from incoherent scatter radar echoes from the upper atmosphere. Some anomalous spectra – where there are sharp enhancements of power over restricted height ranges – have been attributed to satellite contamination in the beam path. Here we outline a method for detecting such contamination, and review in detail a few cases where the method enables the identification of anomalous spectra as satellite echoes, subsequently ascribed to specific orbital objects. The methods used here to identify such satellites provide a useful way of distinguishing anomalous spectra due to satellites from those of geophysical origin. Analysis of EISCAT Svalbard Radar data reveals that an average of 8 satellites per hour are found to cross the beam. Based on a relatively small sample of the data set, it appears that at least half of the occurrences of anomalous spectra are caused by satellite contamination rather than being of geophysical origin.Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere, instruments and techniques – Radio Science (signal processing

  1. Automated Detection of Classical Novae with Neural Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Feeney, S; Evans, N W; An, J; Hewett, P C; Bode, M; Darnley, M; Kerins, E; Baillon, Paul; Carr, B J; Paulin-Henriksson, S; Gould, A

    2005-01-01

    The POINT-AGAPE collaboration surveyed M31 with the primary goal of optical detection of microlensing events, yet its data catalogue is also a prime source of lightcurves of variable and transient objects, including classical novae (CNe). A reliable means of identification, combined with a thorough survey of the variable objects in M31, provides an excellent opportunity to locate and study an entire galactic population of CNe. This paper presents a set of 440 neural networks, working in 44 committees, designed specifically to identify fast CNe. The networks are developed using training sets consisting of simulated novae and POINT-AGAPE lightcurves, in a novel variation on K-fold cross-validation. They use the binned, normalised power spectra of the lightcurves as input units. The networks successfully identify 9 of the 13 previously identified M31 CNe within their optimal working range (and 11 out of 13 if the network error bars are taken into account). They provide a catalogue of 19 new candidate fast CNe, o...

  2. Automated 3-D Detection of Dendritic Spines from In Vivo Two-Photon Image Stacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, P K; Hernandez-Herrera, P; Labate, D; Papadakis, M

    2017-10-01

    Despite the significant advances in the development of automated image analysis algorithms for the detection and extraction of neuronal structures, current software tools still have numerous limitations when it comes to the detection and analysis of dendritic spines. The problem is especially challenging in in vivo imaging, where the difficulty of extracting morphometric properties of spines is compounded by lower image resolution and contrast levels native to two-photon laser microscopy. To address this challenge, we introduce a new computational framework for the automated detection and quantitative analysis of dendritic spines in vivo multi-photon imaging. This framework includes: (i) a novel preprocessing algorithm enhancing spines in a way that they are included in the binarized volume produced during the segmentation of foreground from background; (ii) the mathematical foundation of this algorithm, and (iii) an algorithm for the detection of spine locations in reference to centerline trace and separating them from the branches to whom spines are attached to. This framework enables the computation of a wide range of geometric features such as spine length, spatial distribution and spine volume in a high-throughput fashion. We illustrate our approach for the automated extraction of dendritic spine features in time-series multi-photon images of layer 5 cortical excitatory neurons from the mouse visual cortex.

  3. An automated procedure for covariation-based detection of RNA structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winker, S.; Overbeek, R.; Woese, C.R.; Olsen, G.J.; Pfluger, N.

    1989-12-01

    This paper summarizes our investigations into the computational detection of secondary and tertiary structure of ribosomal RNA. We have developed a new automated procedure that not only identifies potential bondings of secondary and tertiary structure, but also provides the covariation evidence that supports the proposed bondings, and any counter-evidence that can be detected in the known sequences. A small number of previously unknown bondings have been detected in individual RNA molecules (16S rRNA and 7S RNA) through the use of our automated procedure. Currently, we are systematically studying mitochondrial rRNA. Our goal is to detect tertiary structure within 16S rRNA and quaternary structure between 16S and 23S rRNA. Our ultimate hope is that automated covariation analysis will contribute significantly to a refined picture of ribosome structure. Our colleagues in biology have begun experiments to test certain hypotheses suggested by an examination of our program's output. These experiments involve sequencing key portions of the 23S ribosomal RNA for species in which the known 16S ribosomal RNA exhibits variation (from the dominant pattern) at the site of a proposed bonding. The hope is that the 23S ribosomal RNA of these species will exhibit corresponding complementary variation or generalized covariation. 24 refs.

  4. An automated procedure for covariation-based detection of RNA structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winker, S.; Overbeek, R.; Woese, C.R.; Olsen, G.J.; Pfluger, N.

    1989-12-01

    This paper summarizes our investigations into the computational detection of secondary and tertiary structure of ribosomal RNA. We have developed a new automated procedure that not only identifies potential bondings of secondary and tertiary structure, but also provides the covariation evidence that supports the proposed bondings, and any counter-evidence that can be detected in the known sequences. A small number of previously unknown bondings have been detected in individual RNA molecules (16S rRNA and 7S RNA) through the use of our automated procedure. Currently, we are systematically studying mitochondrial rRNA. Our goal is to detect tertiary structure within 16S rRNA and quaternary structure between 16S and 23S rRNA. Our ultimate hope is that automated covariation analysis will contribute significantly to a refined picture of ribosome structure. Our colleagues in biology have begun experiments to test certain hypotheses suggested by an examination of our program's output. These experiments involve sequencing key portions of the 23S ribosomal RNA for species in which the known 16S ribosomal RNA exhibits variation (from the dominant pattern) at the site of a proposed bonding. The hope is that the 23S ribosomal RNA of these species will exhibit corresponding complementary variation or generalized covariation. 24 refs

  5. Development of a platform to combine sensor networks and home robots to improve fall detection in the home environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Toffola, Luca; Patel, Shyamal; Chen, Bor-rong; Ozsecen, Yalgin M; Puiatti, Alessandro; Bonato, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Over the last decade, significant progress has been made in the development of wearable sensor systems for continuous health monitoring in the home and community settings. One of the main areas of application for these wearable sensor systems is in detecting emergency events such as falls. Wearable sensors like accelerometers are increasingly being used to monitor daily activities of individuals at a risk of falls, detect emergency events and send alerts to caregivers. However, such systems tend to have a high rate of false alarms, which leads to low compliance levels. Home robots can enable caregivers with the ability to quickly make an assessment and intervene if an emergency event is detected. This can provide an additional layer for detecting false positives, which can lead to improve compliance. In this paper, we present preliminary work on the development of a fall detection system based on a combination sensor networks and home robots. The sensor network architecture comprises of body worn sensors and ambient sensors distributed in the environment. We present the software architecture and conceptual design home robotic platform. We also perform preliminary characterization of the sensor network in terms of latencies and battery lifetime.

  6. Development and Evaluation of an Automated, Home-Based, Electronic Questionnaire for Detecting COPD Exacerbations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco de B. Velazquez-Peña

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Collaboration between patients and their medical and technical experts enabled the development of an automated questionnaire for the early detection of COPD exacerbations (AQCE. The questionnaire consisted of fourteen questions and was implemented on a computer system for use by patients at home in an un-supervised environment. Psychometric evaluation was conducted after a 6-month field trial. Fifty-two patients were involved in the development of the questionnaire. Reproducibility was studied using 19 patients (ICC = 0.94. Sixteen out of the 19 subjects started the 6 month-field trial with the computer application. Cronbach’s alpha of 0.81 was achieved. In the concurrent validity analysis, a correlation of 0.80 (p = 0.002 with the CCQ was reported. The results suggest that AQCE is a valid and reliable questionnaire, showing that an automated home-based electronic questionnaire may enable early detection of exacerbations of COPD.

  7. Fully Automated Detection and Quantification of Macular Fluid in OCT Using Deep Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegl, Thomas; Waldstein, Sebastian M; Bogunovic, Hrvoje; Endstraßer, Franz; Sadeghipour, Amir; Philip, Ana-Maria; Podkowinski, Dominika; Gerendas, Bianca S; Langs, Georg; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula

    2018-04-01

    Development and validation of a fully automated method to detect and quantify macular fluid in conventional OCT images. Development of a diagnostic modality. The clinical dataset for fluid detection consisted of 1200 OCT volumes of patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD, n = 400), diabetic macular edema (DME, n = 400), or retinal vein occlusion (RVO, n = 400) acquired with Zeiss Cirrus (Carl Zeiss Meditec, Dublin, CA) (n = 600) or Heidelberg Spectralis (Heidelberg Engineering, Heidelberg, Germany) (n = 600) OCT devices. A method based on deep learning to automatically detect and quantify intraretinal cystoid fluid (IRC) and subretinal fluid (SRF) was developed. The performance of the algorithm in accurately identifying fluid localization and extent was evaluated against a manual consensus reading of 2 masked reading center graders. Performance of a fully automated method to accurately detect, differentiate, and quantify intraretinal and SRF using area under the receiver operating characteristics curves, precision, and recall. The newly designed, fully automated diagnostic method based on deep learning achieved optimal accuracy for the detection and quantification of IRC for all 3 macular pathologies with a mean accuracy (AUC) of 0.94 (range, 0.91-0.97), a mean precision of 0.91, and a mean recall of 0.84. The detection and measurement of SRF were also highly accurate with an AUC of 0.92 (range, 0.86-0.98), a mean precision of 0.61, and a mean recall of 0.81, with superior performance in neovascular AMD and RVO compared with DME, which was represented rarely in the population studied. High linear correlation was confirmed between automated and manual fluid localization and quantification, yielding an average Pearson's correlation coefficient of 0.90 for IRC and of 0.96 for SRF. Deep learning in retinal image analysis achieves excellent accuracy for the differential detection of retinal fluid types across the most prevalent exudative

  8. Automated eddy-current installation AVD-01 for detecting flaws in fuel element cans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varvaritsa, V.P.; Martishchenko, L.G.; Popov, V.K.; Romanov, M.L.; Shlepnev, I.O.; Shmatok, V.P.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes an automated installation for eddy-current flaw detection in thin-walled pipes with small diameter; its unified transport system makes it possible to use the installation in inspection lines and production lines of fuel elements. The article describes the structural diagrams of the installation and presents the results of investigations connected with the selection for establishing the optimum regimes and sensitivity of feedthrough transducers with focusing screens

  9. Automated Detection of Radiology Reports that Document Non-routine Communication of Critical or Significant Results

    OpenAIRE

    Lakhani, Paras; Langlotz, Curtis P.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to develop an automated method to accurately detect radiology reports that indicate non-routine communication of critical or significant results. Such a classification system would be valuable for performance monitoring and accreditation. Using a database of 2.3 million free-text radiology reports, a rule-based query algorithm was developed after analyzing hundreds of radiology reports that indicated communication of critical or significant results to a he...

  10. Shape based automated detection of pulmonary nodules with surface feature based false positive reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Y.; Itoh, H.; Masutani, Y.; Ohtomo, K.; Maeda, E.; Yoshikawa, T.; Hayashi, N.

    2007-01-01

    We proposed a shape based automated detection of pulmonary nodules with surface feature based false positive (FP) reduction. In the proposed system, the FP existing in internal of vessel bifurcation is removed using extracted surface of vessels and nodules. From the validation with 16 chest CT scans, we find that the proposed CAD system achieves 18.7 FPs/scan at 90% sensitivity, and 7.8 FPs/scan at 80% sensitivity. (orig.)

  11. A self-adapting system for the automated detection of inter-ictal epileptiform discharges.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaun S Lodder

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Scalp EEG remains the standard clinical procedure for the diagnosis of epilepsy. Manual detection of inter-ictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs is slow and cumbersome, and few automated methods are used to assist in practice. This is mostly due to low sensitivities, high false positive rates, or a lack of trust in the automated method. In this study we aim to find a solution that will make computer assisted detection more efficient than conventional methods, while preserving the detection certainty of a manual search. METHODS: Our solution consists of two phases. First, a detection phase finds all events similar to epileptiform activity by using a large database of template waveforms. Individual template detections are combined to form "IED nominations", each with a corresponding certainty value based on the reliability of their contributing templates. The second phase uses the ten nominations with highest certainty and presents them to the reviewer one by one for confirmation. Confirmations are used to update certainty values of the remaining nominations, and another iteration is performed where ten nominations with the highest certainty are presented. This continues until the reviewer is satisfied with what has been seen. Reviewer feedback is also used to update template accuracies globally and improve future detections. KEY FINDINGS: Using the described method and fifteen evaluation EEGs (241 IEDs, one third of all inter-ictal events were shown after one iteration, half after two iterations, and 74%, 90%, and 95% after 5, 10 and 15 iterations respectively. Reviewing fifteen iterations for the 20-30 min recordings 1 took approximately 5 min. SIGNIFICANCE: The proposed method shows a practical approach for combining automated detection with visual searching for inter-ictal epileptiform activity. Further evaluation is needed to verify its clinical feasibility and measure the added value it presents.

  12. Detection of virus-specific intrathecally synthesised immunoglobulin G with a fully automated enzyme immunoassay system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weissbrich Benedikt

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The determination of virus-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG antibodies in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF is useful for the diagnosis of virus associated diseases of the central nervous system (CNS and for the detection of a polyspecific intrathecal immune response in patients with multiple sclerosis. Quantification of virus-specific IgG in the CSF is frequently performed by calculation of a virus-specific antibody index (AI. Determination of the AI is a demanding and labour-intensive technique and therefore automation is desirable. We evaluated the precision and the diagnostic value of a fully automated enzyme immunoassay for the detection of virus-specific IgG in serum and CSF using the analyser BEP2000 (Dade Behring. Methods The AI for measles, rubella, varicella-zoster, and herpes simplex virus IgG was determined from pairs of serum and CSF samples of patients with viral CNS infections, multiple sclerosis and of control patients. CSF and serum samples were tested simultaneously with reference to a standard curve. Starting dilutions were 1:6 and 1:36 for CSF and 1:1386 and 1:8316 for serum samples. Results The interassay coefficient of variation was below 10% for all parameters tested. There was good agreement between AIs obtained with the BEP2000 and AIs derived from the semi-automated reference method. Conclusion Determination of virus-specific IgG in serum-CSF-pairs for calculation of AI has been successfully automated on the BEP2000. Current limitations of the assay layout imposed by the analyser software should be solved in future versions to offer more convenience in comparison to manual or semi-automated methods.

  13. Objective fall risk detection in stroke survivors using wearable sensor technology: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor-Piliae, Ruth E; Mohler, M Jane; Najafi, Bijan; Coull, Bruce M

    2016-12-01

    Stroke survivors often have persistent neural deficits related to motor function and sensation, which increase their risk of falling, most of which occurs at home or in community settings. The use of wearable technology to monitor fall risk and gait in stroke survivors may prove useful in enhancing recovery and/or preventing injuries. Determine the feasibility of using wearable technology (PAMSys™) to objectively monitor fall risk and gait in home and community settings in stroke survivors. In this feasibility study, we used the PAMSys to identify fall risk indicators (postural transitions: duration in seconds, and number of unsuccessful attempts), and gait (steps, speed, duration) for 48 hours during usual daily activities in stroke survivors (n = 10) compared to age-matched controls (n = 10). A questionnaire assessed device acceptability. Stroke survivors mean age was 70 ± 8 years old, were mainly Caucasian (60%) women (70%), and not significantly different than the age-matched controls (all P-values >0.20). Stroke survivors (100%) reported that the device was comfortable to wear, didn't interfere with everyday activities, and were willing to wear it for another 48 hours. None reported any difficulty with the device while sleeping, removing/putting back on for showering or changing clothes. When compared to controls, stroke survivors had significantly worse fall risk indicators and walked less (P technology may prove useful in monitoring fall risk and gait in stroke survivors, potentially enhancing recovery.

  14. Molecular Detection of Bladder Cancer by Fluorescence Microsatellite Analysis and an Automated Genetic Analyzing System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarel Halachmi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the ability of an automated fluorescent analyzing system to detect microsatellite alterations, in patients with bladder cancer. We investigated 11 with pathology proven bladder Transitional Cell Carcinoma (TCC for microsatellite alterations in blood, urine, and tumor biopsies. DNA was prepared by standard methods from blood, urine and resected tumor specimens, and was used for microsatellite analysis. After the primers were fluorescent labeled, amplification of the DNA was performed with PCR. The PCR products were placed into the automated genetic analyser (ABI Prism 310, Perkin Elmer, USA and were subjected to fluorescent scanning with argon ion laser beams. The fluorescent signal intensity measured by the genetic analyzer measured the product size in terms of base pairs. We found loss of heterozygocity (LOH or microsatellite alterations (a loss or gain of nucleotides, which alter the original normal locus size in all the patients by using fluorescent microsatellite analysis and an automated analyzing system. In each case the genetic changes found in urine samples were identical to those found in the resected tumor sample. The studies demonstrated the ability to detect bladder tumor non-invasively by fluorescent microsatellite analysis of urine samples. Our study supports the worldwide trend for the search of non-invasive methods to detect bladder cancer. We have overcome major obstacles that prevented the clinical use of an experimental system. With our new tested system microsatellite analysis can be done cheaper, faster, easier and with higher scientific accuracy.

  15. A nationwide web-based automated system for early outbreak detection and rapid response in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yilan Liao

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Timely reporting, effective analyses and rapid distribution of surveillance data can assist in detecting the aberration of disease occurrence and further facilitate a timely response. In China, a new nationwide web-based automated system for outbreak detection and rapid response was developed in 2008. The China Infectious Disease Automated-alert and Response System (CIDARS was developed by the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention based on the surveillance data from the existing electronic National Notifiable Infectious Diseases Reporting Information System (NIDRIS started in 2004. NIDRIS greatly improved the timeliness and completeness of data reporting with real time reporting information via the Internet. CIDARS further facilitates the data analysis, aberration detection, signal dissemination, signal response and information communication needed by public health departments across the country. In CIDARS, three aberration detection methods are used to detect the unusual occurrence of 28 notifiable infectious diseases at the county level and to transmit that information either in real-time or on a daily basis. The Internet, computers and mobile phones are used to accomplish rapid signal generation and dissemination, timely reporting and reviewing of the signal response results. CIDARS has been used nationwide since 2008; all Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC in China at the county, prefecture, provincial and national levels are involved in the system. It assists with early outbreak detection at the local level and prompts reporting of unusual disease occurrences or potential outbreaks to CDCs throughout the country.

  16. Automated multi-lesion detection for referable diabetic retinopathy in indigenous health care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon Pires

    Full Text Available Diabetic Retinopathy (DR is a complication of diabetes mellitus that affects more than one-quarter of the population with diabetes, and can lead to blindness if not discovered in time. An automated screening enables the identification of patients who need further medical attention. This study aimed to classify retinal images of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples utilizing an automated computer-based multi-lesion eye screening program for diabetic retinopathy. The multi-lesion classifier was trained on 1,014 images from the São Paulo Eye Hospital and tested on retinal images containing no DR-related lesion, single lesions, or multiple types of lesions from the Inala Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health care centre. The automated multi-lesion classifier has the potential to enhance the efficiency of clinical practice delivering diabetic retinopathy screening. Our program does not necessitate image samples for training from any specific ethnic group or population being assessed and is independent of image pre- or post-processing to identify retinal lesions. In this Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population, the program achieved 100% sensitivity and 88.9% specificity in identifying bright lesions, while detection of red lesions achieved a sensitivity of 67% and specificity of 95%. When both bright and red lesions were present, 100% sensitivity with 88.9% specificity was obtained. All results obtained with this automated screening program meet WHO standards for diabetic retinopathy screening.

  17. Automated diabetic retinopathy detection in smartphone-based fundus photography using artificial intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajalakshmi, Ramachandran; Subashini, Radhakrishnan; Anjana, Ranjit Mohan; Mohan, Viswanathan

    2018-03-09

    To assess the role of artificial intelligence (AI)-based automated software for detection of diabetic retinopathy (DR) and sight-threatening DR (STDR) by fundus photography taken using a smartphone-based device and validate it against ophthalmologist's grading. Three hundred and one patients with type 2 diabetes underwent retinal photography with Remidio 'Fundus on phone' (FOP), a smartphone-based device, at a tertiary care diabetes centre in India. Grading of DR was performed by the ophthalmologists using International Clinical DR (ICDR) classification scale. STDR was defined by the presence of severe non-proliferative DR, proliferative DR or diabetic macular oedema (DME). The retinal photographs were graded using a validated AI DR screening software (EyeArt TM ) designed to identify DR, referable DR (moderate non-proliferative DR or worse and/or DME) or STDR. The sensitivity and specificity of automated grading were assessed and validated against the ophthalmologists' grading. Retinal images of 296 patients were graded. DR was detected by the ophthalmologists in 191 (64.5%) and by the AI software in 203 (68.6%) patients while STDR was detected in 112 (37.8%) and 146 (49.3%) patients, respectively. The AI software showed 95.8% (95% CI 92.9-98.7) sensitivity and 80.2% (95% CI 72.6-87.8) specificity for detecting any DR and 99.1% (95% CI 95.1-99.9) sensitivity and 80.4% (95% CI 73.9-85.9) specificity in detecting STDR with a kappa agreement of k = 0.78 (p < 0.001) and k = 0.75 (p < 0.001), respectively. Automated AI analysis of FOP smartphone retinal imaging has very high sensitivity for detecting DR and STDR and thus can be an initial tool for mass retinal screening in people with diabetes.

  18. An Automated Quiet Sleep Detection Approach in Preterm Infants as a Gateway to Assess Brain Maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dereymaeker, Anneleen; Pillay, Kirubin; Vervisch, Jan; Van Huffel, Sabine; Naulaers, Gunnar; Jansen, Katrien; De Vos, Maarten

    2017-09-01

    Sleep state development in preterm neonates can provide crucial information regarding functional brain maturation and give insight into neurological well being. However, visual labeling of sleep stages from EEG requires expertise and is very time consuming, prompting the need for an automated procedure. We present a robust method for automated detection of preterm sleep from EEG, over a wide postmenstrual age ([Formula: see text] age) range, focusing first on Quiet Sleep (QS) as an initial marker for sleep assessment. Our algorithm, CLuster-based Adaptive Sleep Staging (CLASS), detects QS if it remains relatively more discontinuous than non-QS over PMA. CLASS was optimized on a training set of 34 recordings aged 27-42 weeks PMA, and performance then assessed on a distinct test set of 55 recordings of the same age range. Results were compared to visual QS labeling from two independent raters (with inter-rater agreement [Formula: see text]), using Sensitivity, Specificity, Detection Factor ([Formula: see text] of visual QS periods correctly detected by CLASS) and Misclassification Factor ([Formula: see text] of CLASS-detected QS periods that are misclassified). CLASS performance proved optimal across recordings at 31-38 weeks (median [Formula: see text], median MF 0-0.25, median Sensitivity 0.93-1.0, and median Specificity 0.80-0.91 across this age range), with minimal misclassifications at 35-36 weeks (median [Formula: see text]). To illustrate the potential of CLASS in facilitating clinical research, normal maturational trends over PMA were derived from CLASS-estimated QS periods, visual QS estimates, and nonstate specific periods (containing QS and non-QS) in the EEG recording. CLASS QS trends agreed with those from visual QS, with both showing stronger correlations than nonstate specific trends. This highlights the benefit of automated QS detection for exploring brain maturation.

  19. Automated and miniaturized detection of biological threats with a centrifugal microfluidic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, D.; van Oordt, T.; Strohmeier, O.; Roth, G.; Drexler, J.; Eberhard, M.; Niedrig, M.; Patel, P.; Zgaga-Griesz, A.; Bessler, W.; Weidmann, M.; Hufert, F.; Zengerle, R.; von Stetten, F.

    2012-06-01

    The world's growing mobility, mass tourism, and the threat of terrorism increase the risk of the fast spread of infectious microorganisms and toxins. Today's procedures for pathogen detection involve complex stationary devices, and are often too time consuming for a rapid and effective response. Therefore a robust and mobile diagnostic system is required. We present a microstructured LabDisk which performs complex biochemical analyses together with a mobile centrifugal microfluidic device which processes the LabDisk. This portable system will allow fully automated and rapid detection of biological threats at the point-of-need.

  20. Sleep-spindle detection: crowdsourcing and evaluating performance of experts, non-experts and automated methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warby, Simon C.; Wendt, Sabrina Lyngbye; Welinder, Peter

    2014-01-01

    to crowdsource spindle identification by human experts and non-experts, and we compared their performance with that of automated detection algorithms in data from middle- to older-aged subjects from the general population. We also refined methods for forming group consensus and evaluating the performance...... that crowdsourcing the scoring of sleep data is an efficient method to collect large data sets, even for difficult tasks such as spindle identification. Further refinements to spindle detection algorithms are needed for middle- to older-aged subjects....

  1. Assessment of a scalp EEG-based automated seizure detection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, K M; Shiau, D S; Kern, R T; Chien, J H; Yang, M C K; Yandora, K A; Valeriano, J P; Halford, J J; Sackellares, J C

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and validate an offline, automated scalp EEG-based seizure detection system and to compare its performance to commercially available seizure detection software. The test seizure detection system, IdentEvent™, was developed to enhance the efficiency of post-hoc long-term EEG review in epilepsy monitoring units. It translates multi-channel scalp EEG signals into multiple EEG descriptors and recognizes ictal EEG patterns. Detection criteria and thresholds were optimized in 47 long-term scalp EEG recordings selected for training (47 subjects, ∼3653h with 141 seizures). The detection performance of IdentEvent was evaluated using a separate test dataset consisting of 436 EEG segments obtained from 55 subjects (∼1200h with 146 seizures). Each of the test EEG segments was reviewed by three independent epileptologists and the presence or absence of seizures in each epoch was determined by majority rule. Seizure detection sensitivity and false detection rate were calculated for IdentEvent as well as for the comparable detection software (Persyst's Reveal®, version 2008.03.13, with three parameter settings). Bootstrap re-sampling was applied to establish the 95% confidence intervals of the estimates and for the performance comparison between two detection algorithms. The overall detection sensitivity of IdentEvent was 79.5% with a false detection rate (FDR) of 2 per 24h, whereas the comparison system had 80.8%, 76%, and 74% sensitivity using its three detection thresholds (perception score) with FDRs of 13, 8, and 6 per 24h, respectively. Bootstrap 95% confidence intervals of the performance difference revealed that the two detection systems had comparable detection sensitivity, but IdentEvent generated a significantly (p<0.05) smaller FDR. The study validates the performance of the IdentEvent™ seizure detection system. With comparable detection sensitivity, an improved false detection rate makes the automated seizure

  2. Automated extraction of avian influenza virus for rapid detection using real-time RT-PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewari, Deepanker; Zellers, Corey; Acland, Helen; Pedersen, Janice C

    2007-10-01

    Highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza (AI) poses a grave risk to human health. An important aspect of influenza control is rapid diagnosis. This study describes the efficiency of AI-RNA extraction utilizing silica-based magnetic beads with robotics and its detection with an influenza A matrix gene real-time RT-PCR from tracheal swabs, and compares it to virus isolation and manual spin column extractions. Analytical sensitivity was assessed by performing dilution analysis and detection of H2N2 AI viral RNA. Diagnostic sensitivity and specificity was assessed by analyzing tracheal swabs collected from H7N2 infected and uninfected chickens. Both manual and robotic extractions detected AI virus at 1log(10)EID(50)/ml. Diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of matrix gene detection with the automated extraction method for chicken tracheal swab specimens was similar to that of virus isolation and the manual extraction method. There were only three discordant results among 212 tested specimens. The main advantages of automated robotic viral nucleic acid extraction are high throughput processing; hands-free operation; and reduction in human and technical error. This study demonstrates successful detection of influenza A virus with magnetic beads utilizing the Qiagen MagAttract cell kit on a BioRobot M48 platform.

  3. Multiplex RT-PCR and Automated Microarray for Detection of Eight Bovine Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lung, O; Furukawa-Stoffer, T; Burton Hughes, K; Pasick, J; King, D P; Hodko, D

    2017-12-01

    Microarrays can be a useful tool for pathogen detection as it allow for simultaneous interrogation of the presence of a large number of genetic sequences in a sample. However, conventional microarrays require extensive manual handling and multiple pieces of equipment for printing probes, hybridization, washing and signal detection. In this study, a reverse transcription (RT)-PCR with an accompanying novel automated microarray for simultaneous detection of eight viruses that affect cattle [vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), bovine viral diarrhoea virus type 1 and type 2, bovine herpesvirus 1, bluetongue virus, malignant catarrhal fever virus, rinderpest virus (RPV) and parapox viruses] is described. The assay accurately identified a panel of 37 strains of the target viruses and identified a mixed infection. No non-specific reactions were observed with a panel of 23 non-target viruses associated with livestock. Vesicular stomatitis virus was detected as early as 2 days post-inoculation in oral swabs from experimentally infected animals. The limit of detection of the microarray assay was as low as 1 TCID 50 /ml for RPV. The novel microarray platform automates the entire post-PCR steps of the assay and integrates electrophoretic-driven capture probe printing in a single user-friendly instrument that allows array layout and assay configuration to be user-customized on-site. © 2016 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada.

  4. Hand, foot and mouth disease in China: evaluating an automated system for the detection of outbreaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhongjie; Lai, Shengjie; Zhang, Honglong; Wang, Liping; Zhou, Dinglun; Liu, Jizeng; Lan, Yajia; Ma, Jiaqi; Yu, Hongjie; Buckeridge, David L; Pittayawonganan, Chakrarat; Clements, Archie CA; Hu, Wenbiao

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To evaluate the performance of China’s infectious disease automated alert and response system in the detection of outbreaks of hand, foot and mouth (HFM) disease. Methods We estimated size, duration and delay in reporting HFM disease outbreaks from cases notified between 1 May 2008 and 30 April 2010 and between 1 May 2010 and 30 April 2012, before and after automatic alert and response included HFM disease. Sensitivity, specificity and timeliness of detection of aberrations in the incidence of HFM disease outbreaks were estimated by comparing automated detections to observations of public health staff. Findings The alert and response system recorded 106 005 aberrations in the incidence of HFM disease between 1 May 2010 and 30 April 2012 – a mean of 5.6 aberrations per 100 days in each county that reported HFM disease. The response system had a sensitivity of 92.7% and a specificity of 95.0%. The mean delay between the reporting of the first case of an outbreak and detection of that outbreak by the response system was 2.1 days. Between the first and second study periods, the mean size of an HFM disease outbreak decreased from 19.4 to 15.8 cases and the mean interval between the onset and initial reporting of such an outbreak to the public health emergency reporting system decreased from 10.0 to 9.1 days. Conclusion The automated alert and response system shows good sensitivity in the detection of HFM disease outbreaks and appears to be relatively rapid. Continued use of this system should allow more effective prevention and limitation of such outbreaks in China. PMID:25378756

  5. Comparing a Perceptual and an Automated Vision-Based Method for Lie Detection in Younger Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serras Pereira, Mariana; Cozijn, Reinier; Postma, Eric; Shahid, Suleman; Swerts, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigates how easily it can be detected whether a child is being truthful or not in a game situation, and it explores the cue validity of bodily movements for such type of classification. To achieve this, we introduce an innovative methodology - the combination of perception studies (in which eye-tracking technology is being used) and automated movement analysis. Film fragments from truthful and deceptive children were shown to human judges who were given the task to decide whether the recorded child was being truthful or not. Results reveal that judges are able to accurately distinguish truthful clips from lying clips in both perception studies. Even though the automated movement analysis for overall and specific body regions did not yield significant results between the experimental conditions, we did find a positive correlation between the amount of movement in a child and the perception of lies, i.e., the more movement the children exhibited during a clip, the higher the chance that the clip was perceived as a lie. The eye-tracking study revealed that, even when there is movement happening in different body regions, judges tend to focus their attention mainly on the face region. This is the first study that compares a perceptual and an automated method for the detection of deceptive behavior in children whose data have been elicited through an ecologically valid paradigm.

  6. Automated acoustic analysis in detection of spontaneous swallows in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golabbakhsh, Marzieh; Rajaei, Ali; Derakhshan, Mahmoud; Sadri, Saeed; Taheri, Masoud; Adibi, Peyman

    2014-10-01

    Acoustic monitoring of swallow frequency has become important as the frequency of spontaneous swallowing can be an index for dysphagia and related complications. In addition, it can be employed as an objective quantification of ingestive behavior. Commonly, swallowing complications are manually detected using videofluoroscopy recordings, which require expensive equipment and exposure to radiation. In this study, a noninvasive automated technique is proposed that uses breath and swallowing recordings obtained via a microphone located over the laryngopharynx. Nonlinear diffusion filters were used in which a scale-space decomposition of recorded sound at different levels extract swallows from breath sounds and artifacts. This technique was compared to manual detection of swallows using acoustic signals on a sample of 34 subjects with Parkinson's disease. A speech language pathologist identified five subjects who showed aspiration during the videofluoroscopic swallowing study. The proposed automated method identified swallows with a sensitivity of 86.67 %, a specificity of 77.50 %, and an accuracy of 82.35 %. These results indicate the validity of automated acoustic recognition of swallowing as a fast and efficient approach to objectively estimate spontaneous swallow frequency.

  7. Automated detection and characterization of harmonic tremor in continuous seismic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Diana C.

    2017-06-01

    Harmonic tremor is a common feature of volcanic, hydrothermal, and ice sheet seismicity and is thus an important proxy for monitoring changes in these systems. However, no automated methods for detecting harmonic tremor currently exist. Because harmonic tremor shares characteristics with speech and music, digital signal processing techniques for analyzing these signals can be adapted. I develop a novel pitch-detection-based algorithm to automatically identify occurrences of harmonic tremor and characterize their frequency content. The algorithm is applied to seismic data from Popocatepetl Volcano, Mexico, and benchmarked against a monthlong manually detected catalog of harmonic tremor events. During a period of heightened eruptive activity from December 2014 to May 2015, the algorithm detects 1465 min of harmonic tremor, which generally precede periods of heightened explosive activity. These results demonstrate the algorithm's ability to accurately characterize harmonic tremor while highlighting the need for additional work to understand its causes and implications at restless volcanoes.

  8. Automated detection of acute haemorrhagic stroke in non-contrasted CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meetz, K.; Buelow, T.

    2007-01-01

    An efficient treatment of stroke patients implies a profound differential diagnosis that includes the detection of acute haematoma. The proposed approach provides an automated detection of acute haematoma, assisting the non-stroke expert in interpreting non-contrasted CT images. It consists of two steps: First, haematoma candidates are detected applying multilevel region growing approach based on a typical grey value characteristic. Second, true haematomas are differentiated from partial volume artefacts, relying on spatial features derived from distance-based histograms. This approach achieves a specificity of 77% and a sensitivity of 89.7% in detecting acute haematoma in non-contrasted CT images when applied to a set of 25 non-contrasted CT images. (orig.)

  9. Automated sinkhole detection using a DEM subsetting technique and fill tools at Mammoth Cave National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, J.; Bohnenstiehl, D. R.; Levine, N. S.

    2013-12-01

    An automated workflow for sinkhole detection is developed using Light Detection and Ranging (Lidar) data from Mammoth Cave National Park (MACA). While the park is known to sit within a karst formation, the generally dense canopy cover and the size of the park (~53,000 acres) creates issues for sinkhole inventorying. Lidar provides a useful remote sensing technology for peering beneath the canopy in hard to reach areas of the park. In order to detect sinkholes, a subsetting technique is used to interpolate a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) thereby reducing edge effects. For each subset, standard GIS fill tools are used to fill depressions within the DEM. The initial DEM is then subtracted from the filled DEM resulting in detected depressions or sinkholes. Resulting depressions are then described in terms of size and geospatial trend.

  10. Mechanism and DNA-based detection of field-evolved resistance to transgenic Bt corn in fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Rahul; Hasler, James; Meagher, Robert; Nagoshi, Rodney; Hietala, Lucas; Huang, Fangneng; Narva, Kenneth; Jurat-Fuentes, Juan Luis

    2017-09-07

    Evolution of resistance threatens sustainability of transgenic crops producing insecticidal proteins from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt). The fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) is a devastating pest of corn in the Western Hemisphere initially controlled by transgenic Bt corn producing the Cry1Fa insecticidal protein (event TC1507). However field-evolved resistance to TC1507 was observed in Puerto Rico in 2007 and has subsequently been reported in a number of locations in North and South America. Early studies on Puerto Rico fall armyworm populations found that the resistance phenotype was associated with reduced expression of alkaline phosphatase. However, in this work we show that field-evolved resistance to Cry1Fa Bt corn in Puerto Rico is closely linked to a mutation in an ATP Binding Cassette subfamily C2 (ABCC2) gene that functions as a Cry1Fa receptor in susceptible insects. Furthermore, we report a DNA-based genotyping test used to demonstrate the presence of the resistant (SfABCC2mut) allele in Puerto Rico populations in 2007, coincident with the first reports of damage to TC1507 corn. These DNA-based field screening data provide strong evidence that resistance to TC1507 in fall armyworm maps to the SfABCC2 gene and provides a useful molecular marker for detecting the SfABCC2mut allele in resistant fall armyworm.

  11. Clinical Evaluation of the First Automated Assay for the Detection of Stimulating TSH Receptor Autoantibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allelein, S; Ehlers, M; Goretzki, S; Hermsen, D; Feldkamp, J; Haase, M; Dringenberg, T; Schmid, C; Hautzel, H; Schott, M

    2016-12-01

    Until recently, stimulating TSH receptor autoantibodies (sTRAbs) could only be measured by bioassays. A new assay system, which directly detects sTRAb in sera by applying bridge technology, has been established and is now available as automated chemiluminescence (bridge) immunoassay. We evaluated the automated bridge assay in clinical routine and compared it with a conventional automated TRAb assay (competition assay). Altogether, 226 Graves' disease (GD), 57 autoimmune thyroiditis, 74 non-autoimmune nodular goiter and 49 thyroid cancer patients, as well as 41 healthy controls were retrospectively evaluated. ROC plot analysis based on sera of newly diagnosed GD patients revealed an area under curve of 0.99 (95% CI: 0.99-1.0) indicating a high assay sensitivity and specificity. The highest sensitivity (100%) and specificity (99%) were seen at a cut-off level of 0.55 IU/l. The calculated positive predictive value was 94%, whereas the negative was 100%. Applying a ROC plot-derived cut-off of≥0.30 IU/l, derived from sera of GD patients already receiving antithyroid drug therapy for≤6 months, the sensitivity was 99% whereas the specificity was 98%. Detailed comparison of both assay systems used revealed a slightly different distribution of sTRAb and TRAb. Measurement of sTRAb during follow-up revealed a steady decline over one year of follow-up. In summary, our results demonstrate that the new automated bridge assay system for detecting sTRAb has a high sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing GD and to discriminate from other thyroid diseases, respectively. Our study, however, does not provide full evidence that the bridge assay is specific for sTRAb only. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Normalized gradient fields cross-correlation for automated detection of prostate in magnetic resonance images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotin, Sergei V.; Yin, Yin; Periaswamy, Senthil; Kunz, Justin; Haldankar, Hrishikesh; Muradyan, Naira; Cornud, François; Turkbey, Baris; Choyke, Peter L.

    2012-02-01

    Fully automated prostate segmentation helps to address several problems in prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment: it can assist in objective evaluation of multiparametric MR imagery, provides a prostate contour for MR-ultrasound (or CT) image fusion for computer-assisted image-guided biopsy or therapy planning, may facilitate reporting and enables direct prostate volume calculation. Among the challenges in automated analysis of MR images of the prostate are the variations of overall image intensities across scanners, the presence of nonuniform multiplicative bias field within scans and differences in acquisition setup. Furthermore, images acquired with the presence of an endorectal coil suffer from localized high-intensity artifacts at the posterior part of the prostate. In this work, a three-dimensional method for fast automated prostate detection based on normalized gradient fields cross-correlation, insensitive to intensity variations and coil-induced artifacts, is presented and evaluated. The components of the method, offline template learning and the localization algorithm, are described in detail. The method was validated on a dataset of 522 T2-weighted MR images acquired at the National Cancer Institute, USA that was split in two halves for development and testing. In addition, second dataset of 29 MR exams from Centre d'Imagerie Médicale Tourville, France were used to test the algorithm. The 95% confidence intervals for the mean Euclidean distance between automatically and manually identified prostate centroids were 4.06 +/- 0.33 mm and 3.10 +/- 0.43 mm for the first and second test datasets respectively. Moreover, the algorithm provided the centroid within the true prostate volume in 100% of images from both datasets. Obtained results demonstrate high utility of the detection method for a fully automated prostate segmentation.

  13. Computerized detection of breast cancer on automated breast ultrasound imaging of women with dense breasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drukker, Karen, E-mail: kdrukker@uchicago.edu; Sennett, Charlene A.; Giger, Maryellen L. [Department of Radiology, MC2026, The University of Chicago, 5841 South Maryland Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: Develop a computer-aided detection method and investigate its feasibility for detection of breast cancer in automated 3D ultrasound images of women with dense breasts. Methods: The HIPAA compliant study involved a dataset of volumetric ultrasound image data, “views,” acquired with an automated U-Systems Somo•V{sup ®} ABUS system for 185 asymptomatic women with dense breasts (BI-RADS Composition/Density 3 or 4). For each patient, three whole-breast views (3D image volumes) per breast were acquired. A total of 52 patients had breast cancer (61 cancers), diagnosed through any follow-up at most 365 days after the original screening mammogram. Thirty-one of these patients (32 cancers) had a screening-mammogram with a clinically assigned BI-RADS Assessment Category 1 or 2, i.e., were mammographically negative. All software used for analysis was developed in-house and involved 3 steps: (1) detection of initial tumor candidates, (2) characterization of candidates, and (3) elimination of false-positive candidates. Performance was assessed by calculating the cancer detection sensitivity as a function of the number of “marks” (detections) per view. Results: At a single mark per view, i.e., six marks per patient, the median detection sensitivity by cancer was 50.0% (16/32) ± 6% for patients with a screening mammogram-assigned BI-RADS category 1 or 2—similar to radiologists’ performance sensitivity (49.9%) for this dataset from a prior reader study—and 45.9% (28/61) ± 4% for all patients. Conclusions: Promising detection sensitivity was obtained for the computer on a 3D ultrasound dataset of women with dense breasts at a rate of false-positive detections that may be acceptable for clinical implementation.

  14. Developing an Automated Machine Learning Marine Oil Spill Detection System with Synthetic Aperture Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinales, J. C.; Graber, H. C.; Hargrove, J. T.; Caruso, M. J.

    2016-02-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the ability to detect and classify marine hydrocarbon films with spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery. The dampening effects of hydrocarbon discharges on small surface capillary-gravity waves renders the ocean surface "radar dark" compared with the standard wind-borne ocean surfaces. Given the scope and impact of events like the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, the need for improved, automated and expedient monitoring of hydrocarbon-related marine anomalies has become a pressing and complex issue for governments and the extraction industry. The research presented here describes the development, training, and utilization of an algorithm that detects marine oil spills in an automated, semi-supervised manner, utilizing X-, C-, or L-band SAR data as the primary input. Ancillary datasets include related radar-borne variables (incidence angle, etc.), environmental data (wind speed, etc.) and textural descriptors. Shapefiles produced by an experienced human-analyst served as targets (validation) during the training portion of the investigation. Training and testing datasets were chosen for development and assessment of algorithm effectiveness as well as optimal conditions for oil detection in SAR data. The algorithm detects oil spills by following a 3-step methodology: object detection, feature extraction, and classification. Previous oil spill detection and classification methodologies such as machine learning algorithms, artificial neural networks (ANN), and multivariate classification methods like partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) are evaluated and compared. Statistical, transform, and model-based image texture techniques, commonly used for object mapping directly or as inputs for more complex methodologies, are explored to determine optimal textures for an oil spill detection system. The influence of the ancillary variables is explored, with a particular focus on the role of strong vs. weak wind forcing.

  15. Automated Detection and Quantification of Circadian Eye Blinks Using a Contact Lens Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gisler, Christophe; Ridi, Antonio; Hennebert, Jean; Weinreb, Robert N; Mansouri, Kaweh

    2015-01-01

    To detect and quantify eye blinks during 24-hour intraocular pressure (IOP) monitoring with a contact lens sensor (CLS). A total of 249 recordings of 24-hour IOP patterns from 202 participants using a CLS were included. Software was developed to automatically detect eye blinks, and wake and sleep periods. The blink detection method was based on detection of CLS signal peaks greater than a threshold proportional to the signal amplitude. Three methods for automated detection of the sleep and wake periods were evaluated. These relied on blink detection and subsequent comparison of the local signal amplitude with a threshold proportional to the mean signal amplitude. These methods were compared to manual sleep/wake verification. In a pilot, simultaneous video recording of 10 subjects was performed to compare the software to observer-measured blink rates. Mean (SD) age of participants was 57.4 ± 16.5 years (males, 49.5%). There was excellent agreement between software-detected number of blinks and visually measured blinks for both observers (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC], 0.97 for observer 1; ICC, 0.98 for observer 2). The CLS measured a mean blink frequency of 29.8 ± 15.4 blinks/min, a blink duration of 0.26 ± 0.21 seconds and an interblink interval of 1.91 ± 2.03 seconds. The best method for identifying sleep periods had an accuracy of 95.2 ± 0.5%. Automated analysis of CLS 24-hour IOP recordings can accurately quantify eye blinks, and identify sleep and wake periods. This study sheds new light on the potential importance of eye blinks in glaucoma and may contribute to improved understanding of circadian IOP characteristics.

  16. CEST ANALYSIS: AUTOMATED CHANGE DETECTION FROM VERY-HIGH-RESOLUTION REMOTE SENSING IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ehlers

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A fast detection, visualization and assessment of change in areas of crisis or catastrophes are important requirements for coordination and planning of help. Through the availability of new satellites and/or airborne sensors with very high spatial resolutions (e.g., WorldView, GeoEye new remote sensing data are available for a better detection, delineation and visualization of change. For automated change detection, a large number of algorithms has been proposed and developed. From previous studies, however, it is evident that to-date no single algorithm has the potential for being a reliable change detector for all possible scenarios. This paper introduces the Combined Edge Segment Texture (CEST analysis, a decision-tree based cooperative suite of algorithms for automated change detection that is especially designed for the generation of new satellites with very high spatial resolution. The method incorporates frequency based filtering, texture analysis, and image segmentation techniques. For the frequency analysis, different band pass filters can be applied to identify the relevant frequency information for change detection. After transforming the multitemporal images via a fast Fourier transform (FFT and applying the most suitable band pass filter, different methods are available to extract changed structures: differencing and correlation in the frequency domain and correlation and edge detection in the spatial domain. Best results are obtained using edge extraction. For the texture analysis, different 'Haralick' parameters can be calculated (e.g., energy, correlation, contrast, inverse distance moment with 'energy' so far providing the most accurate results. These algorithms are combined with a prior segmentation of the image data as well as with morphological operations for a final binary change result. A rule-based combination (CEST of the change algorithms is applied to calculate the probability of change for a particular location. CEST

  17. Detection of tuberculosis using digital chest radiography: automated reading vs. interpretation by clinical officers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maduskar, P; Muyoyeta, M; Ayles, H; Hogeweg, L; Peters-Bax, L; van Ginneken, B

    2013-12-01

    A busy urban health centre in Lusaka, Zambia. To compare the accuracy of automated reading (CAD4TB) with the interpretation of digital chest radiograph (CXR) by clinical officers for the detection of tuberculosis (TB). A retrospective analysis was performed on 161 subjects enrolled in a TB specimen bank study. CXRs were analysed using CAD4TB, which computed an image abnormality score (0-100). Four clinical officers scored the CXRs for abnormalities consistent with TB. We compared the automated readings and the readings by clinical officers against the bacteriological and radiological results used as reference. We report here the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) and kappa (κ) statistics. Of 161 enrolled subjects, 97 had bacteriologically confirmed TB and 120 had abnormal CXR. The AUCs for CAD4TB and the clinical officers were respectively 0.73 and 0.65-0.75 in comparison with the bacteriological reference, and 0.91 and 0.89-0.94 in comparison with the radiological reference. P values indicated no significant differences, except for one clinical officer who performed significantly worse than CAD4TB (P < 0.05) using the bacteriological reference. κ values for CAD4TB and clinical officers with radiological reference were respectively 0.61 and 0.49-0.67. CXR assessment using CAD4TB and by clinical officers is comparable. CAD4TB has potential as a point-of-care test and for the automated identification of subjects who require further examinations.

  18. Development of Raman microspectroscopy for automated detection and imaging of basal cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larraona-Puy, Marta; Ghita, Adrian; Zoladek, Alina; Perkins, William; Varma, Sandeep; Leach, Iain H.; Koloydenko, Alexey A.; Williams, Hywel; Notingher, Ioan

    2009-09-01

    We investigate the potential of Raman microspectroscopy (RMS) for automated evaluation of excised skin tissue during Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS). The main aim is to develop an automated method for imaging and diagnosis of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) regions. Selected Raman bands responsible for the largest spectral differences between BCC and normal skin regions and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) are used to build a multivariate supervised classification model. The model is based on 329 Raman spectra measured on skin tissue obtained from 20 patients. BCC is discriminated from healthy tissue with 90+/-9% sensitivity and 85+/-9% specificity in a 70% to 30% split cross-validation algorithm. This multivariate model is then applied on tissue sections from new patients to image tumor regions. The RMS images show excellent correlation with the gold standard of histopathology sections, BCC being detected in all positive sections. We demonstrate the potential of RMS as an automated objective method for tumor evaluation during MMS. The replacement of current histopathology during MMS by a ``generalization'' of the proposed technique may improve the feasibility and efficacy of MMS, leading to a wider use according to clinical need.

  19. Automated seed detection and three-dimensional reconstruction. I. Seed localization from fluoroscopic images or radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tubic, Dragan; Zaccarin, Andre; Pouliot, Jean; Beaulieu, Luc

    2001-01-01

    An automated procedure for the detection of the position and the orientation of radioactive seeds on fluoroscopic images or scanned radiographs is presented. The extracted positions of seed centers and the orientations are used for three-dimensional reconstruction of permanent prostate implants. The extraction procedure requires several steps: correction of image intensifier distortions, normalization, background removal, automatic threshold selection, thresholding, and finally, moment analysis and classification of the connected components. The algorithm was tested on 75 fluoroscopic images. The results show that, on average, 92% of the seeds are detected automatically. The orientation is found with an error smaller than 5 deg. for 75% of the seeds. The orientation of overlapping seeds (10%) should be considered as an estimate at best. The image processing procedure can also be used for seed or catheter detection in CT images, with minor modifications

  20. Automated feature detection and identification in digital point-ordered signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppenlander, Jane E.; Loomis, Kent C.; Brudnoy, David M.; Levy, Arthur J.

    1998-01-01

    A computer-based automated method to detect and identify features in digital point-ordered signals. The method is used for processing of non-destructive test signals, such as eddy current signals obtained from calibration standards. The signals are first automatically processed to remove noise and to determine a baseline. Next, features are detected in the signals using mathematical morphology filters. Finally, verification of the features is made using an expert system of pattern recognition methods and geometric criteria. The method has the advantage that standard features can be, located without prior knowledge of the number or sequence of the features. Further advantages are that standard features can be differentiated from irrelevant signal features such as noise, and detected features are automatically verified by parameters extracted from the signals. The method proceeds fully automatically without initial operator set-up and without subjective operator feature judgement.

  1. Primer effect in the detection of mitochondrial DNA point heteroplasmy by automated sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calatayud, Marta; Ramos, Amanda; Santos, Cristina; Aluja, Maria Pilar

    2013-06-01

    The correct detection of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) heteroplasmy by automated sequencing presents methodological constraints. The main goals of this study are to investigate the effect of sense and distance of primers in heteroplasmy detection and to test if there are differences in the accurate determination of heteroplasmy involving transitions or transversions. A gradient of the heteroplasmy levels was generated for mtDNA positions 9477 (transition G/A) and 15,452 (transversion C/A). Amplification and subsequent sequencing with forward and reverse primers, situated at 550 and 150 bp from the heteroplasmic positions, were performed. Our data provide evidence that there is a significant difference between the use of forward and reverse primers. The forward primer is the primer that seems to give a better approximation to the real proportion of the variants. No significant differences were found concerning the distance at which the sequencing primers were placed neither between the analysis of transitions and transversions. The data collected in this study are a starting point that allows to glimpse the importance of the sequencing primers in the accurate detection of point heteroplasmy, providing additional insight into the overall automated sequencing strategy.

  2. Detection of diarrhoeal pathogens in human faeces using an automated, robotic platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jex, Aaron R; Stanley, Keith K; Lo, William; Littman, Rachael; Verweij, Jaco J; Campbell, Bronwyn E; Nolan, Matthew J; Pangasa, Aradhana; Stevens, Melita A; Haydon, Shane; Gasser, Robin B

    2012-02-01

    Infectious diarrhoeal diseases represent a major socio-economic burden to humans, and are linked to a range of pathogens, including viruses, bacteria and protists. The accurate detection of such pathogens is central to control. However, detection often relies on methods that have limited diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. Here, we assessed an automated, robotic platform for the simultaneous detection of eight major pathogens associated with infectious diarrhoea. Genomic DNA samples (n = 167) from faeces from humans with diarrhoea and diagnosed as cryptosporidiosis, and 100 uninfected control subjects, were tested for adenovirus 40/41, norovirus, Clostridium difficile, Campylobacter, Salmonella, Shigella, Cryptosporidium and Giardia by multiplexed-tandem PCR, and also characterized by single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis (SSCP) and selective sequencing. All 167 samples tested positive for Cryptosporidium, five for adenovirus 40/41, four for Campylobacter, three for C. difficile and seven for Shigella spp., with no false positive results for any assay. The automated PCR exhibited a high sensitivity, with humans. This platform requires little molecular biological expertise and is well suited to various diagnostic facilities and settings. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of automated nucleic acid extraction methods for virus detection in a multicenter comparative trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Uttenthal, Åse; Hakhverdyan, M.

    2009-01-01

    between the results obtained for the different automated extraction platforms. In particular, the limit of detection was identical for 9/12 and 8/12 best performing robots (using dilutions of BVDV infected-serum and cell culture material, respectively), which was similar to a manual extraction method used...... for comparison. The remaining equipment and protocols used were less sensitive, in an extreme case for serum, by a factor of 1000. There was no evidence for cross-contamination of RNA template in any of the negative samples included in these panels. These results are not intended to replace local optimisation...

  4. Procedure for Automated Eddy Current Crack Detection in Thin Titanium Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wincheski, Russell A.

    2012-01-01

    This procedure provides the detailed instructions for conducting Eddy Current (EC) inspections of thin (5-30 mils) titanium membranes with thickness and material properties typical of the development of Ultra-Lightweight diaphragm Tanks Technology (ULTT). The inspection focuses on the detection of part-through, surface breaking fatigue cracks with depths between approximately 0.002" and 0.007" and aspect ratios (a/c) of 0.2-1.0 using an automated eddy current scanning and image processing technique.

  5. Automated location detection of injection site for preclinical stereotactic neurosurgery procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbaszadeh, Shiva; Wu, Hemmings C. H.

    2017-03-01

    Currently, during stereotactic neurosurgery procedures, the manual task of locating the proper area for needle insertion or implantation of electrode/cannula/optic fiber can be time consuming. The requirement of the task is to quickly and accurately find the location for insertion. In this study we investigate an automated method to locate the entry point of region of interest. This method leverages a digital image capture system, pattern recognition, and motorized stages. Template matching of known anatomical identifiable regions is used to find regions of interest (e.g. Bregma) in rodents. For our initial study, we tackle the problem of automatically detecting the entry point.

  6. COBAS AMPLICOR: fully automated RNA and DNA amplification and detection system for routine diagnostic PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiDomenico, N; Link, H; Knobel, R; Caratsch, T; Weschler, W; Loewy, Z G; Rosenstraus, M

    1996-12-01

    The COBAS AMPLICOR system automates amplification and detection of target nucleic acids, making diagnostic PCR routine for a variety of infectious diseases. The system contains a single thermal cycler with two independently regulated heating/cooling blocks, an incubator, a magnetic particle washer, a pipettor, and a photometer. Amplified products are captured on oligonucleotide-coated paramagnetic microparticles and detected with use of an avidin-horseradish peroxidase (HRP) conjugate. Concentrated solutions of amplicon or HRP were pipetted without detectable carryover. Amplified DNA was detected with an intraassay CV of < 4.5%; the combined intraassay CV for amplification and detection was < 15%. No cross-reactivity was observed when three different target nucleic acids were amplified in a single reaction and detected with three target-specific capture probes. The initial COBAS AMPLICOR menu includes qualitative tests for diagnosing infections with Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and hepatitis C virus. All tests include an optional Internal Control to provide assurance that specimens are successfully amplified and detected.

  7. Automated object detection and tracking with a flash LiDAR system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Marcus; Hebel, Marcus; Arens, Michael

    2016-10-01

    The detection of objects, or persons, is a common task in the fields of environment surveillance, object observation or danger defense. There are several approaches for automated detection with conventional imaging sensors as well as with LiDAR sensors, but for the latter the real-time detection is hampered by the scanning character and therefore by the data distortion of most LiDAR systems. The paper presents a solution for real-time data acquisition of a flash LiDAR sensor with synchronous raw data analysis, point cloud calculation, object detection, calculation of the next best view and steering of the pan-tilt head of the sensor. As a result the attention is always focused on the object, independent of the behavior of the object. Even for highly volatile and rapid changes in the direction of motion the object is kept in the field of view. The experimental setup used in this paper is realized with an elementary person detection algorithm in medium distances (20 m to 60 m) to show the efficiency of the system for objects with a high angular speed. It is easy to replace the detection part by any other object detection algorithm and thus it is easy to track nearly any object, for example a car or a boat or an UAV in various distances.

  8. Development of an Automated Microfluidic System for DNA Collection, Amplification, and Detection of Pathogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagan, Bethany S.; Bruckner-Lea, Cynthia J.

    2002-12-01

    This project was focused on developing and testing automated routines for a microfluidic Pathogen Detection System. The basic pathogen detection routine has three primary components; cell concentration, DNA amplification, and detection. In cell concentration, magnetic beads are held in a flow cell by an electromagnet. Sample liquid is passed through the flow cell and bacterial cells attach to the beads. These beads are then released into a small volume of fluid and delivered to the peltier device for cell lysis and DNA amplification. The cells are lysed during initial heating in the peltier device, and the released DNA is amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or strand displacement amplification (SDA). Once amplified, the DNA is then delivered to a laser induced fluorescence detection unit in which the sample is detected. These three components create a flexible platform that can be used for pathogen detection in liquid and sediment samples. Future developments of the system will include on-line DNA detection during DNA amplification and improved capture and release methods for the magnetic beads during cell concentration.

  9. Microscope image based fully automated stomata detection and pore measurement method for grapevines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiranya Jayakody

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stomatal behavior in grapevines has been identified as a good indicator of the water stress level and overall health of the plant. Microscope images are often used to analyze stomatal behavior in plants. However, most of the current approaches involve manual measurement of stomatal features. The main aim of this research is to develop a fully automated stomata detection and pore measurement method for grapevines, taking microscope images as the input. The proposed approach, which employs machine learning and image processing techniques, can outperform available manual and semi-automatic methods used to identify and estimate stomatal morphological features. Results First, a cascade object detection learning algorithm is developed to correctly identify multiple stomata in a large microscopic image. Once the regions of interest which contain stomata are identified and extracted, a combination of image processing techniques are applied to estimate the pore dimensions of the stomata. The stomata detection approach was compared with an existing fully automated template matching technique and a semi-automatic maximum stable extremal regions approach, with the proposed method clearly surpassing the performance of the existing techniques with a precision of 91.68% and an F1-score of 0.85. Next, the morphological features of the detected stomata were measured. Contrary to existing approaches, the proposed image segmentation and skeletonization method allows us to estimate the pore dimensions even in cases where the stomatal pore boundary is only partially visible in the microscope image. A test conducted using 1267 images of stomata showed that the segmentation and skeletonization approach was able to correctly identify the stoma opening 86.27% of the time. Further comparisons made with manually traced stoma openings indicated that the proposed method is able to estimate stomata morphological features with accuracies of 89.03% for area

  10. Microscope image based fully automated stomata detection and pore measurement method for grapevines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakody, Hiranya; Liu, Scarlett; Whitty, Mark; Petrie, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Stomatal behavior in grapevines has been identified as a good indicator of the water stress level and overall health of the plant. Microscope images are often used to analyze stomatal behavior in plants. However, most of the current approaches involve manual measurement of stomatal features. The main aim of this research is to develop a fully automated stomata detection and pore measurement method for grapevines, taking microscope images as the input. The proposed approach, which employs machine learning and image processing techniques, can outperform available manual and semi-automatic methods used to identify and estimate stomatal morphological features. First, a cascade object detection learning algorithm is developed to correctly identify multiple stomata in a large microscopic image. Once the regions of interest which contain stomata are identified and extracted, a combination of image processing techniques are applied to estimate the pore dimensions of the stomata. The stomata detection approach was compared with an existing fully automated template matching technique and a semi-automatic maximum stable extremal regions approach, with the proposed method clearly surpassing the performance of the existing techniques with a precision of 91.68% and an F1-score of 0.85. Next, the morphological features of the detected stomata were measured. Contrary to existing approaches, the proposed image segmentation and skeletonization method allows us to estimate the pore dimensions even in cases where the stomatal pore boundary is only partially visible in the microscope image. A test conducted using 1267 images of stomata showed that the segmentation and skeletonization approach was able to correctly identify the stoma opening 86.27% of the time. Further comparisons made with manually traced stoma openings indicated that the proposed method is able to estimate stomata morphological features with accuracies of 89.03% for area, 94.06% for major axis length, 93.31% for minor

  11. Automated thermochemolysis reactor for detection of Bacillus anthracis endospores by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Dan [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Rands, Anthony D.; Losee, Scott C. [Torion Technologies, American Fork, UT 84003 (United States); Holt, Brian C. [Department of Statistics, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Williams, John R. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Lammert, Stephen A. [Torion Technologies, American Fork, UT 84003 (United States); Robison, Richard A. [Department of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Tolley, H. Dennis [Department of Statistics, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Lee, Milton L., E-mail: milton_lee@byu.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States)

    2013-05-02

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •An automated sample preparation system for Bacillus anthracis endospores was developed. •A thermochemolysis method was applied to produce and derivatize biomarkers for Bacillus anthracis detection. •The autoreactor controlled the precise delivery of reagents, and TCM reaction times and temperatures. •Solid phase microextraction was used to extract biomarkers, and GC–MS was used for final identification. •This autoreactor was successfully applied to the identification of Bacillus anthracis endospores. -- Abstract: An automated sample preparation system was developed and tested for the rapid detection of Bacillus anthracis endospores by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS) for eventual use in the field. This reactor is capable of automatically processing suspected bio-threat agents to release and derivatize unique chemical biomarkers by thermochemolysis (TCM). The system automatically controls the movement of sample vials from one position to another, crimping of septum caps onto the vials, precise delivery of reagents, and TCM reaction times and temperatures. The specific operations of introduction of sample vials, solid phase microextraction (SPME) sampling, injection into the GC–MS system, and ejection of used vials from the system were performed manually in this study, although they can be integrated into the automated system. Manual SPME sampling is performed by following visual and audible signal prompts for inserting the fiber into and retracting it from the sampling port. A rotating carousel design allows for simultaneous sample collection, reaction, biomarker extraction and analysis of sequential samples. Dipicolinic acid methyl ester (DPAME), 3-methyl-2-butenoic acid methyl ester (a fragment of anthrose) and two methylated sugars were used to compare the performance of the autoreactor with manual TCM. Statistical algorithms were used to construct reliable bacterial endospore signatures, and 24

  12. Automated thermochemolysis reactor for detection of Bacillus anthracis endospores by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Dan; Rands, Anthony D.; Losee, Scott C.; Holt, Brian C.; Williams, John R.; Lammert, Stephen A.; Robison, Richard A.; Tolley, H. Dennis; Lee, Milton L.

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •An automated sample preparation system for Bacillus anthracis endospores was developed. •A thermochemolysis method was applied to produce and derivatize biomarkers for Bacillus anthracis detection. •The autoreactor controlled the precise delivery of reagents, and TCM reaction times and temperatures. •Solid phase microextraction was used to extract biomarkers, and GC–MS was used for final identification. •This autoreactor was successfully applied to the identification of Bacillus anthracis endospores. -- Abstract: An automated sample preparation system was developed and tested for the rapid detection of Bacillus anthracis endospores by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS) for eventual use in the field. This reactor is capable of automatically processing suspected bio-threat agents to release and derivatize unique chemical biomarkers by thermochemolysis (TCM). The system automatically controls the movement of sample vials from one position to another, crimping of septum caps onto the vials, precise delivery of reagents, and TCM reaction times and temperatures. The specific operations of introduction of sample vials, solid phase microextraction (SPME) sampling, injection into the GC–MS system, and ejection of used vials from the system were performed manually in this study, although they can be integrated into the automated system. Manual SPME sampling is performed by following visual and audible signal prompts for inserting the fiber into and retracting it from the sampling port. A rotating carousel design allows for simultaneous sample collection, reaction, biomarker extraction and analysis of sequential samples. Dipicolinic acid methyl ester (DPAME), 3-methyl-2-butenoic acid methyl ester (a fragment of anthrose) and two methylated sugars were used to compare the performance of the autoreactor with manual TCM. Statistical algorithms were used to construct reliable bacterial endospore signatures, and 24

  13. Automated structural imaging analysis detects premanifest Huntington's disease neurodegeneration within 1 year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majid, D S Adnan; Stoffers, Diederick; Sheldon, Sarah; Hamza, Samar; Thompson, Wesley K; Goldstein, Jody; Corey-Bloom, Jody; Aron, Adam R

    2011-07-01

    Intense efforts are underway to evaluate neuroimaging measures as biomarkers for neurodegeneration in premanifest Huntington's disease (preHD). We used a completely automated longitudinal analysis method to compare structural scans in preHD individuals and controls. Using a 1-year longitudinal design, we analyzed T(1) -weighted structural scans in 35 preHD individuals and 22 age-matched controls. We used the SIENA (Structural Image Evaluation, using Normalization, of Atrophy) software tool to yield overall percentage brain volume change (PBVC) and voxel-level changes in atrophy. We calculated sample sizes for a hypothetical disease-modifying (neuroprotection) study. We found significantly greater yearly atrophy in preHD individuals versus controls (mean PBVC controls, -0.149%; preHD, -0.388%; P = .031, Cohen's d = .617). For a preHD subgroup closest to disease onset, yearly atrophy was more than 3 times that of controls (mean PBVC close-to-onset preHD, -0.510%; P = .019, Cohen's d = .920). This atrophy was evident at the voxel level in periventricular regions, consistent with well-established preHD basal ganglia atrophy. We estimated that a neuroprotection study using SIENA would only need 74 close-to-onset individuals in each arm (treatment vs placebo) to detect a 50% slowing in yearly atrophy with 80% power. Automated whole-brain analysis of structural MRI can reliably detect preHD disease progression in 1 year. These results were attained with a readily available imaging analysis tool, SIENA, which is observer independent, automated, and robust with respect to image quality, slice thickness, and different pulse sequences. This MRI biomarker approach could be used to evaluate neuroprotection in preHD. Copyright © 2011 Movement Disorder Society.

  14. A Validation of Automated and Quality Controlled Satellite Based Fire Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruminski, M. G.; Hanna, J.

    2010-12-01

    The Satellite Analysis Branch (SAB) of NOAA/NESDIS performs a daily fire analysis for North America utilizing GOES, NOAA POES and MODIS satellite data. Automated fire detection algorithms are employed for each of the sensors. The automated detections are evaluated against the underlying satellite imagery by analysts, with detections that are believed to be false positives removed and missed fires added to the analysis. Previous validation of automated detections has typically utilized very high resolution satellite data, such as ASTER (30m), coincident in space and time with the sensor being validated. While this approach is useful for evaluating algorithm detection capability at a specific time for fires that are not obscured there is a high likelihood that it does not provide a comprehensive evaluation based on all fire occurrences for the day. Fires that occur before or after the satellite overpass would not be included and those that are obscured by clouds would also not be accounted for. These are important considerations in assessing climatology and for emission estimates. This study utilizes ground based reports from Florida, Montana, Idaho and South Carolina which have well established reporting and permitting procedures. These ground reports are primarily agricultural and prescribe burns for which permits are required. While it is possible that permits are obtained but the burn is not performed it is felt that this represents a small fraction of the number reported based on communication with permitting officials. Only the Probability Of Detection (POD) is computed. A positive detection occurs for satellite detections within 8km of a reported fire. This buffer is employed to allow for known satellite navigation errors. Determining false positive detects would not be reliable since there is no way of knowing with certainty that a detected fire did not actually occur at a location. It could easily be an unreported fire. Results for Florida based on daily

  15. A case of ventricular fibrillation not detected by an automated external defibrillator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigetoshi Sakabe, MD

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of ventricular fibrillation (VF which an automated external defibrillator (AED could not detect. A 13-year-old girl collapsed just after playing basketball. Cardio pulmonary resuscitation (CPR was started immediately and 5 minutes later an AED was applied by a rescue team. The monitor of the AED displayed typical VF, but the AED did not detect it as VF. The VF was not detected during 2 more attempts. Detection occurred on the fourth attempt, and counter-shock was successfully delivered, but the process took an extra 9 minutes. After the event, the girl was diagnosed with a latent type of prolonged QT syndrome. We analyzed the reason why the VF was not detected by the AED and found that the ECG detected by the AED fell outside the device’s parameters for ventricular tachycardia (VT or VF. We emphasize that the AED is an excellent device, but we should also be aware of its limitations.

  16. Reconstruction of the Magnetkoepfl rockfall event - Detecting rock fall release zones using terrestrial laser scanning, Hohe Tauern, Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmeyer, I.; Keuschnig, M.; Delleske, R.; Schrott, L.

    2012-04-01

    Instability of rock faces in high mountain areas is an important risk factor for man and infrastructure, particularly within the context of climate change. Numerous rock fall events in the European Alps suggest an increasing occurrence of mass movements due to rising temperatures in recent years. Within the MOREXPERT project ('Monitoring Expert System for Hazardous Rock Walls') a new long-term monitoring site for mass movement and permafrost interaction has been initiated in the Austrian Alps. The study area is located at the Kitzsteinhorn (Hohe Tauern), a particularly interesting site for the investigation of glacier retreat and potential permafrost degradation and their respective consequences for the stability of alpine rock faces. To detect and quantify changes occurring at the terrain surface an extensive terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) monitoring campaign was started in 2011. TLS creates three-dimensional high-resolution images of the scanned area allowing precise quantification of changes in geometry and volume in steep rock faces over distances of up to several hundreds of meters. Within the TLS monitoring campaign at the Kitzsteinhorn a large number of differently dimensioned rock faces is examined (varying size, slope inclination etc.). Scanned areas include the Kitzsteinhorn northwest and south face, the Magnetkoepfl east face as well as a couple of small rock faces in the vicinity of the summit station. During the night from August 27th to August 28th 2011 a rock fall event was documented by employees of the cable car company. The release zone could not immediately be detected. The east face of the Magnetkoepfl covers approximately 70 meters in height and about 200 meters in width. It is made up of calcareous mica-schist and displays an abundance of well-developed joint sets with large joint apertures. Meteorological data from a weather station located at the same altitude (2.950m) and just 500m away from the release zone show that the rock fall event

  17. Automated Aflatoxin Analysis Using Inline Reusable Immunoaffinity Column Cleanup and LC-Fluorescence Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhemrev, Ria; Pazdanska, Monika; Marley, Elaine; Biselli, Scarlett; Staiger, Simone

    2015-01-01

    A novel reusable immunoaffinity cartridge containing monoclonal antibodies to aflatoxins coupled to a pressure resistant polymer has been developed. The cartridge is used in conjunction with a handling system inline to LC with fluorescence detection to provide fully automated aflatoxin analysis for routine monitoring of a variety of food matrixes. The handling system selects an immunoaffinity cartridge from a tray and automatically applies the sample extract. The cartridge is washed, then aflatoxins B1, B2, G1, and G2 are eluted and transferred inline to the LC system for quantitative analysis using fluorescence detection with postcolumn derivatization using a KOBRA® cell. Each immunoaffinity cartridge can be used up to 15 times without loss in performance, offering increased sample throughput and reduced costs compared to conventional manual sample preparation and cleanup. The system was validated in two independent laboratories using samples of peanuts and maize spiked at 2, 8, and 40 μg/kg total aflatoxins, and paprika, nutmeg, and dried figs spiked at 5, 20, and 100 μg/kg total aflatoxins. Recoveries exceeded 80% for both aflatoxin B1 and total aflatoxins. The between-day repeatability ranged from 2.1 to 9.6% for aflatoxin B1 for the six levels and five matrixes. Satisfactory Z-scores were obtained with this automated system when used for participation in proficiency testing (FAPAS®) for samples of chilli powder and hazelnut paste containing aflatoxins.

  18. Automated detection of extended sources in radio maps: progress from the SCORPIO survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggi, S.; Ingallinera, A.; Leto, P.; Cavallaro, F.; Bufano, F.; Schillirò, F.; Trigilio, C.; Umana, G.; Buemi, C. S.; Norris, R. P.

    2016-08-01

    Automated source extraction and parametrization represents a crucial challenge for the next-generation radio interferometer surveys, such as those performed with the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) and its precursors. In this paper, we present a new algorithm, called CAESAR (Compact And Extended Source Automated Recognition), to detect and parametrize extended sources in radio interferometric maps. It is based on a pre-filtering stage, allowing image denoising, compact source suppression and enhancement of diffuse emission, followed by an adaptive superpixel clustering stage for final source segmentation. A parametrization stage provides source flux information and a wide range of morphology estimators for post-processing analysis. We developed CAESAR in a modular software library, also including different methods for local background estimation and image filtering, along with alternative algorithms for both compact and diffuse source extraction. The method was applied to real radio continuum data collected at the Australian Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) within the SCORPIO project, a pathfinder of the Evolutionary Map of the Universe (EMU) survey at the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP). The source reconstruction capabilities were studied over different test fields in the presence of compact sources, imaging artefacts and diffuse emission from the Galactic plane and compared with existing algorithms. When compared to a human-driven analysis, the designed algorithm was found capable of detecting known target sources and regions of diffuse emission, outperforming alternative approaches over the considered fields.

  19. An automated and integrated framework for dust storm detection based on ogc web processing services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, F.; Shea, G. Y. K.; Wong, M. S.; Campbell, J.

    2014-11-01

    Dust storms are known to have adverse effects on public health. Atmospheric dust loading is also one of the major uncertainties in global climatic modelling as it is known to have a significant impact on the radiation budget and atmospheric stability. The complexity of building scientific dust storm models is coupled with the scientific computation advancement, ongoing computing platform development, and the development of heterogeneous Earth Observation (EO) networks. It is a challenging task to develop an integrated and automated scheme for dust storm detection that combines Geo-Processing frameworks, scientific models and EO data together to enable the dust storm detection and tracking processes in a dynamic and timely manner. This study develops an automated and integrated framework for dust storm detection and tracking based on the Web Processing Services (WPS) initiated by Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC). The presented WPS framework consists of EO data retrieval components, dust storm detecting and tracking component, and service chain orchestration engine. The EO data processing component is implemented based on OPeNDAP standard. The dust storm detecting and tracking component combines three earth scientific models, which are SBDART model (for computing aerosol optical depth (AOT) of dust particles), WRF model (for simulating meteorological parameters) and HYSPLIT model (for simulating the dust storm transport processes). The service chain orchestration engine is implemented based on Business Process Execution Language for Web Service (BPEL4WS) using open-source software. The output results, including horizontal and vertical AOT distribution of dust particles as well as their transport paths, were represented using KML/XML and displayed in Google Earth. A serious dust storm, which occurred over East Asia from 26 to 28 Apr 2012, is used to test the applicability of the proposed WPS framework. Our aim here is to solve a specific instance of a complex EO data

  20. Statistical techniques for automating the detection of anomalous performance in rotating machinery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piety, K.R.; Magette, T.E.

    1979-01-01

    The level of technology utilized in automated systems that monitor industrial rotating equipment and the potential of alternative surveillance methods are assessed. It is concluded that changes in surveillance methodology would upgrade ongoing programs and yet still be practical for implementation. An improved anomaly recognition methodology is formulated and implemented on a minicomputer system. The effectiveness of the monitoring system was evaluated in laboratory tests on a small rotor assembly, using vibrational signals from both displacement probes and accelerometers. Time and frequency domain descriptors are selected to compose an overall signature that characterizes the monitored equipment. Limits for normal operation of the rotor assembly are established automatically during an initial learning period. Thereafter, anomaly detection is accomplished by applying an approximate statistical test to each signature descriptor. As demonstrated over months of testing, this monitoring system is capable of detecting anomalous conditions while exhibiting a false alarm rate below 0.5%

  1. Development of a Computer Based Problem-Oriented Automated Remote Leakage Detection Control System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosach Alisa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We explore the architecture and the concept of building an automation remote leakage detection system, in particular ’ a system for collection and processing of information. As practice shows, the development of those systems is a lengthy and time-consuming process involving management of heterogeneous hardware and analysis of large amounts of data. To implement the task, it is proposed to use the SCADA industry standard, universal communication protocols, and for data processing – open source database management systems and cluster analysis algorithms. A universal approach makes it possible to develop a scalable problem-oriented system. This approach takes into account the information received and processed during the leakage detection process.

  2. Results of Automated Retinal Image Analysis for Detection of Diabetic Retinopathy from the Nakuru Study, Kenya

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul Bøgelund Hansen, Morten; Abramoff, M. D.; Folk, J. C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Digital retinal imaging is an established method of screening for diabetic retinopathy (DR). It has been established that currently about 1% of the world's blind or visually impaired is due to DR. However, the increasing prevalence of diabetes mellitus and DR is creating an increased...... gave an AUC of 0.878 (95% CI 0.850-0.905). It showed a negative predictive value of 98%. The IDP missed no vision threatening retinopathy in any patients and none of the false negative cases met criteria for treatment. Conclusions In this epidemiological sample, the IDP's grading was comparable...... workload on those with expertise in grading retinal images. Safe and reliable automated analysis of retinal images may support screening services worldwide. This study aimed to compare the Iowa Detection Program (IDP) ability to detect diabetic eye diseases (DED) to human grading carried out at Moorfields...

  3. Automated detection of sperm whale sounds as a function of abrupt changes in sound intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Christopher D.; Rayborn, Grayson H.; Brack, Benjamin A.; Kuczaj, Stan A.; Paulos, Robin L.

    2003-04-01

    An algorithm designed to detect abrupt changes in sound intensity was developed and used to identify and count sperm whale vocalizations and to measure boat noise. The algorithm is a MATLAB routine that counts the number of occurrences for which the change in intensity level exceeds a threshold. The algorithm also permits the setting of a ``dead time'' interval to prevent the counting of multiple pulses within a single sperm whale click. This algorithm was used to analyze digitally sampled recordings of ambient noise obtained from the Gulf of Mexico using near bottom mounted EARS buoys deployed as part of the Littoral Acoustic Demonstration Center experiment. Because the background in these data varied slowly, the result of the application of the algorithm was automated detection of sperm whale clicks and creaks with results that agreed well with those obtained by trained human listeners. [Research supported by ONR.

  4. Accuracy of automated software-guided detection of significant coronary artery stenosis by CT angiography: comparison with invasive catheterisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anders, Katharina; Uder, Michael; Achenbach, Stephan; Petit, Isabel; Daniel, Werner G.; Pflederer, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    True automated detection of coronary artery stenoses might be useful whenever expert evaluation is not available, or as a ''second reader'' to enhance diagnostic confidence. We evaluated the accuracy of a PC-based stenosis detection tool alone and combined with expert interpretation. One hundred coronary CT angiography datasets were evaluated with the automated software alone, by manual interpretation (axial images, multiplanar reformations and maximum intensity projections in free double-oblique planes), and by expert interpretation aware of the automated findings. Stenoses ≥ 50 % were noted per-vessel and per-patient, and compared with invasive angiography. Automated post-processing was successful in 90 % of patients (88 % of vessels). When excluding uninterpretable datasets, per-patient sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were 89 %, 79 %, 74 % and 92 % (per-vessel: 82 %, 85 %, 48 % and 96 %). All 100 datasets were evaluable by expert interpretation. Per-patient sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV were 95 %, 95 %, 93 % and 97 % (per-vessel: 89 %,98 %, 88 % and 98 %). Knowing the results of automated interpretation did not improve the performance of expert readers. Automated off-line post-processing of coronary CT angiography shows adequate sensitivity, but relatively low specificity in coronary stenosis detection. It does not increase accuracy of expert interpretation. Failure of post-processing in 10 % of all patients necessitates additional manual image work-up. (orig.)

  5. Results of Automated Retinal Image Analysis for Detection of Diabetic Retinopathy from the Nakuru Study, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Morten B; Abràmoff, Michael D; Folk, James C; Mathenge, Wanjiku; Bastawrous, Andrew; Peto, Tunde

    2015-01-01

    Digital retinal imaging is an established method of screening for diabetic retinopathy (DR). It has been established that currently about 1% of the world's blind or visually impaired is due to DR. However, the increasing prevalence of diabetes mellitus and DR is creating an increased workload on those with expertise in grading retinal images. Safe and reliable automated analysis of retinal images may support screening services worldwide. This study aimed to compare the Iowa Detection Program (IDP) ability to detect diabetic eye diseases (DED) to human grading carried out at Moorfields Reading Centre on the population of Nakuru Study from Kenya. Retinal images were taken from participants of the Nakuru Eye Disease Study in Kenya in 2007/08 (n = 4,381 participants [NW6 Topcon Digital Retinal Camera]). First, human grading was performed for the presence or absence of DR, and for those with DR this was sub-divided in to referable or non-referable DR. The automated IDP software was deployed to identify those with DR and also to categorize the severity of DR. The primary outcomes were sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive value of IDP versus the human grader as reference standard. Altogether 3,460 participants were included. 113 had DED, giving a prevalence of 3.3% (95% CI, 2.7-3.9%). Sensitivity of the IDP to detect DED as by the human grading was 91.0% (95% CI, 88.0-93.4%). The IDP ability to detect DED gave an AUC of 0.878 (95% CI 0.850-0.905). It showed a negative predictive value of 98%. The IDP missed no vision threatening retinopathy in any patients and none of the false negative cases met criteria for treatment. In this epidemiological sample, the IDP's grading was comparable to that of human graders'. It therefore might be feasible to consider inclusion into usual epidemiological grading.

  6. Automated lung module detection at low-dose CT: preliminary experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goo, Jin-Mo; Lee, Jeong-Won; Lee, Hyun-Ju; Kim, Seung-Wan; Kim, Jong-Hyo; Im, Jung-Gi

    2003-01-01

    To determine the usefulness of a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system for the automated detection of lung nodules at low-dose CT. A CAD system developed for detecting lung nodules was used to process the data provided by 50 consecutive low-dose CT scans. The results of an initial report, a second look review by two chest radiologists, and those obtained by the CAD system were compared, and by reviewing all of these, a gold standard was established. By applying the gold standard, a total of 52 nodules were identified (26 with a diameter ≤ 5 mm; 26 with a diameter > 5 mm). Compared to an initial report, four additional nodules were detected by the CAD system. Three of these, identified only at CAD, formed part of the data used to derive the gold standard. For the detection of nodules > 5 mm in diameter, sensitivity was 77% for the initial report, for the second look review, and 88% for the second look review,and 65% for the CAD system. There were 8.0 ± 5.2 false-positive CAD results per CT study. These preliminary results indicate that a CAD system may improve the detection of pulmonary nodules at low-dose CT

  7. FahamecV1:A Low Cost Automated Metaphase Detection System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Yilmaz

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, FahamecV1 is introduced and investigated as a low cost and high accuracy solution for metaphase detection. Chromosome analysis is performed at the metaphase stage and high accuracy and automated detection of the metaphase stage plays an active role in decreasing analysis time. FahamecV1 includes an optic microscope, a motorized microscope stage, an electronic control unit, a camera, a computer and a software application. Printing components of the motorized microscope stage (using a 3D printer is of the main reasons for cost reduction. Operations such as stepper motor calibration, are detection, focusing, scanning, metaphase detection and saving of coordinates into a database are automatically performed. To detect metaphases, a filter named Metafilter is developed and applied. Average scanning time per preparate is 77 sec/cm2. True positive rate is calculated as 95.1%, true negative rate is calculated as 99.0% and accuracy is calculated as 98.8%.

  8. A fully automated microfluidic-based electrochemical sensor for real-time bacteria detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altintas, Zeynep; Akgun, Mete; Kokturk, Guzin; Uludag, Yildiz

    2018-02-15

    A fully automated microfluidic-based electrochemical biosensor was designed and manufactured for pathogen detection. The quantification of Escherichia coli was investigated with standard and nanomaterial amplified immunoassays in the concentration ranges of 0.99 × 10 4 3.98 × 10 9 cfu mL -1 and 103.97 × 10 7 cfu mL -1 which resulted in detection limits of 1.99 × 10 4 cfu mL -1 and 50 cfu mL -1 , respectively. The developed methodology was then applied for E. coli quantification in water samples using nanomaterial modified assay. Same detection limit for E. coli was achieved for real sample analysis with a little decrease on the sensor signal. Cross-reactivity studies were conducted by testing Shigella, Salmonella spp., Salmonella typhimurium and Staphylococcus aureus on E. coli specific antibody surface that confirmed the high specificity of the developed immunoassays. The sensor surface could be regenerated multiple times which significantly reduces the cost of the system. Our custom-designed biosensor is capable of detecting bacteria with high sensitivity and specificity, and can serve as a promising tool for pathogen detection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Radiologists' Performance for Detecting Lesions and the Interobserver Variability of Automated Whole Breast Ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Hun; Kang, Bong Joo; Choi, Byung Gil; Choi, Jae Jung; Lee, Ji Hye [Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Byung Joo; Choe, Byung Joo [Department of General Surgery, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sarah [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyunbin [CMC Clinical Research Coordinating Center, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    To compare the detection performance of the automated whole breast ultrasound (AWUS) with that of the hand-held breast ultrasound (HHUS) and to evaluate the interobserver variability in the interpretation of the AWUS. AWUS was performed in 38 breast cancer patients. A total of 66 lesions were included: 38 breast cancers, 12 additional malignancies and 16 benign lesions. Three breast radiologists independently reviewed the AWUS data and analyzed the breast lesions according to the BI-RADS classification. The detection rate of malignancies was 98.0% for HHUS and 90.0%, 88.0% and 96.0% for the three readers of the AWUS. The sensitivity and the specificity were 98.0% and 62.5% in HHUS, 90.0% and 87.5% for reader 1, 88.0% and 81.3% for reader 2, and 96.0% and 93.8% for reader 3, in AWUS. There was no significant difference in the radiologists' detection performance, sensitivity and specificity (p > 0.05) between the two modalities. The interobserver agreement was fair to good for the ultrasonographic features, categorization, size, and the location of breast masses. AWUS is thought to be useful for detecting breast lesions. In comparison with HHUS, AWUS shows no significant difference in the detection rate, sensitivity and the specificity, with high degrees of interobserver agreement.

  10. Automated valve fault detection based on acoustic emission parameters and support vector machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salah M. Ali

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Reciprocating compressors are one of the most used types of compressors with wide applications in industry. The most common failure in reciprocating compressors is always related to the valves. Therefore, a reliable condition monitoring method is required to avoid the unplanned shutdown in this category of machines. Acoustic emission (AE technique is one of the effective recent methods in the field of valve condition monitoring. However, a major challenge is related to the analysis of AE signal which perhaps only depends on the experience and knowledge of technicians. This paper proposes automated fault detection method using support vector machine (SVM and AE parameters in an attempt to reduce human intervention in the process. Experiments were conducted on a single stage reciprocating air compressor by combining healthy and faulty valve conditions to acquire the AE signals. Valve functioning was identified through AE waveform analysis. SVM faults detection model was subsequently devised and validated based on training and testing samples respectively. The results demonstrated automatic valve fault detection model with accuracy exceeding 98%. It is believed that valve faults can be detected efficiently without human intervention by employing the proposed model for a single stage reciprocating compressor. Keywords: Condition monitoring, Faults detection, Signal analysis, Acoustic emission, Support vector machine

  11. A new framework for analysing automated acoustic species-detection data: occupancy estimation and optimization of recordings post-processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambert, Thierry A.; Waddle, J. Hardin; Miller, David A.W.; Walls, Susan; Nichols, James D.

    2018-01-01

    The development and use of automated species-detection technologies, such as acoustic recorders, for monitoring wildlife are rapidly expanding. Automated classification algorithms provide a cost- and time-effective means to process information-rich data, but often at the cost of additional detection errors. Appropriate methods are necessary to analyse such data while dealing with the different types of detection errors.We developed a hierarchical modelling framework for estimating species occupancy from automated species-detection data. We explore design and optimization of data post-processing procedures to account for detection errors and generate accurate estimates. Our proposed method accounts for both imperfect detection and false positive errors and utilizes information about both occurrence and abundance of detections to improve estimation.Using simulations, we show that our method provides much more accurate estimates than models ignoring the abundance of detections. The same findings are reached when we apply the methods to two real datasets on North American frogs surveyed with acoustic recorders.When false positives occur, estimator accuracy can be improved when a subset of detections produced by the classification algorithm is post-validated by a human observer. We use simulations to investigate the relationship between accuracy and effort spent on post-validation, and found that very accurate occupancy estimates can be obtained with as little as 1% of data being validated.Automated monitoring of wildlife provides opportunity and challenges. Our methods for analysing automated species-detection data help to meet key challenges unique to these data and will prove useful for many wildlife monitoring programs.

  12. An Analysis on Sensor Locations of the Human Body for Wearable Fall Detection Devices: Principles and Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Turan Özdemir

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Wearable devices for fall detection have received attention in academia and industry, because falls are very dangerous, especially for elderly people, and if immediate aid is not provided, it may result in death. However, some predictive devices are not easily worn by elderly people. In this work, a huge dataset, including 2520 tests, is employed to determine the best sensor placement location on the body and to reduce the number of sensor nodes for device ergonomics. During the tests, the volunteer’s movements are recorded with six groups of sensors each with a triaxial (accelerometer, gyroscope and magnetometer sensor, which is placed tightly on different parts of the body with special straps: head, chest, waist, right-wrist, right-thigh and right-ankle. The accuracy of individual sensor groups with their location is investigated with six machine learning techniques, namely the k-nearest neighbor (k-NN classifier, Bayesian decision making (BDM, support vector machines (SVM, least squares method (LSM, dynamic time warping (DTW and artificial neural networks (ANNs. Each technique is applied to single, double, triple, quadruple, quintuple and sextuple sensor configurations. These configurations create 63 different combinations, and for six machine learning techniques, a total of 63 × 6 = 378 combinations is investigated. As a result, the waist region is found to be the most suitable location for sensor placement on the body with 99.96% fall detection sensitivity by using the k-NN classifier, whereas the best sensitivity achieved by the wrist sensor is 97.37%, despite this location being highly preferred for today’s wearable applications.

  13. An Analysis on Sensor Locations of the Human Body for Wearable Fall Detection Devices: Principles and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdemir, Ahmet Turan

    2016-07-25

    Wearable devices for fall detection have received attention in academia and industry, because falls are very dangerous, especially for elderly people, and if immediate aid is not provided, it may result in death. However, some predictive devices are not easily worn by elderly people. In this work, a huge dataset, including 2520 tests, is employed to determine the best sensor placement location on the body and to reduce the number of sensor nodes for device ergonomics. During the tests, the volunteer's movements are recorded with six groups of sensors each with a triaxial (accelerometer, gyroscope and magnetometer) sensor, which is placed tightly on different parts of the body with special straps: head, chest, waist, right-wrist, right-thigh and right-ankle. The accuracy of individual sensor groups with their location is investigated with six machine learning techniques, namely the k-nearest neighbor (k-NN) classifier, Bayesian decision making (BDM), support vector machines (SVM), least squares method (LSM), dynamic time warping (DTW) and artificial neural networks (ANNs). Each technique is applied to single, double, triple, quadruple, quintuple and sextuple sensor configurations. These configurations create 63 different combinations, and for six machine learning techniques, a total of 63 × 6 = 378 combinations is investigated. As a result, the waist region is found to be the most suitable location for sensor placement on the body with 99.96% fall detection sensitivity by using the k-NN classifier, whereas the best sensitivity achieved by the wrist sensor is 97.37%, despite this location being highly preferred for today's wearable applications.

  14. Detection and quantification of intracellular bacterial colonies by automated, high-throughput microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernstsen, Christina L; Login, Frédéric H; Jensen, Helene H; Nørregaard, Rikke; Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Nejsum, Lene N

    2017-08-01

    To target bacterial pathogens that invade and proliferate inside host cells, it is necessary to design intervention strategies directed against bacterial attachment, cellular invasion and intracellular proliferation. We present an automated microscopy-based, fast, high-throughput method for analyzing size and number of intracellular bacterial colonies in infected tissue culture cells. Cells are seeded in 48-well plates and infected with a GFP-expressing bacterial pathogen. Following gentamicin treatment to remove extracellular pathogens, cells are fixed and cell nuclei stained. This is followed by automated microscopy and subsequent semi-automated spot detection to determine the number of intracellular bacterial colonies, their size distribution, and the average number per host cell. Multiple 48-well plates can be processed sequentially and the procedure can be completed in one working day. As a model we quantified intracellular bacterial colonies formed by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) during infection of human kidney cells (HKC-8). Urinary tract infections caused by UPEC are among the most common bacterial infectious diseases in humans. UPEC can colonize tissues of the urinary tract and is responsible for acute, chronic, and recurrent infections. In the bladder, UPEC can form intracellular quiescent reservoirs, thought to be responsible for recurrent infections. In the kidney, UPEC can colonize renal epithelial cells and pass to the blood stream, either via epithelial cell disruption or transcellular passage, to cause sepsis. Intracellular colonies are known to be clonal, originating from single invading UPEC. In our experimental setup, we found UPEC CFT073 intracellular bacterial colonies to be heterogeneous in size and present in nearly one third of the HKC-8 cells. This high-throughput experimental format substantially reduces experimental time and enables fast screening of the intracellular bacterial load and cellular distribution of multiple

  15. Early detection of radioactive fall-out by gamma-spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aage, Helle Karina; Korsbech, Uffe C C; Bargholz, K.

    2003-01-01

    Radioactive fallout should be detected as early as possible. A new and efficient method for detection of low-level irradiation from manmade radioactivity is developed. Radiation abnormalities are detectable down to air kerma rate, of 0.5 to 1.0 nGy h(-1) for Cs-137 and even lower for I-131...... For multi-gamma energy radioactivity the detection level is 2.6-3.5 nGy h(-1). A standard NaI detector and a 512-channel analyser are used together with noise adjusted singular value decomposition (NASVD). Statistical noise is removed and the measured spectra are reproduced using spectral components...... radioactive sources need to be detected....

  16. AN ARCHITECTURE FOR AUTOMATED FIRE DETECTION EARLY WARNING SYSTEM BASED ON GEOPROCESSING SERVICE COMPOSITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Samadzadegan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Rapidly discovering, sharing, integrating and applying geospatial information are key issues in the domain of emergency response and disaster management. Due to the distributed nature of data and processing resources in disaster management, utilizing a Service Oriented Architecture (SOA to take advantages of workflow of services provides an efficient, flexible and reliable implementations to encounter different hazardous situation. The implementation specification of the Web Processing Service (WPS has guided geospatial data processing in a Service Oriented Architecture (SOA platform to become a widely accepted solution for processing remotely sensed data on the web. This paper presents an architecture design based on OGC web services for automated workflow for acquisition, processing remotely sensed data, detecting fire and sending notifications to the authorities. A basic architecture and its building blocks for an automated fire detection early warning system are represented using web-based processing of remote sensing imageries utilizing MODIS data. A composition of WPS processes is proposed as a WPS service to extract fire events from MODIS data. Subsequently, the paper highlights the role of WPS as a middleware interface in the domain of geospatial web service technology that can be used to invoke a large variety of geoprocessing operations and chaining of other web services as an engine of composition. The applicability of proposed architecture by a real world fire event detection and notification use case is evaluated. A GeoPortal client with open-source software was developed to manage data, metadata, processes, and authorities. Investigating feasibility and benefits of proposed framework shows that this framework can be used for wide area of geospatial applications specially disaster management and environmental monitoring.

  17. An Architecture for Automated Fire Detection Early Warning System Based on Geoprocessing Service Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samadzadegan, F.; Saber, M.; Zahmatkesh, H.; Joze Ghazi Khanlou, H.

    2013-09-01

    Rapidly discovering, sharing, integrating and applying geospatial information are key issues in the domain of emergency response and disaster management. Due to the distributed nature of data and processing resources in disaster management, utilizing a Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) to take advantages of workflow of services provides an efficient, flexible and reliable implementations to encounter different hazardous situation. The implementation specification of the Web Processing Service (WPS) has guided geospatial data processing in a Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) platform to become a widely accepted solution for processing remotely sensed data on the web. This paper presents an architecture design based on OGC web services for automated workflow for acquisition, processing remotely sensed data, detecting fire and sending notifications to the authorities. A basic architecture and its building blocks for an automated fire detection early warning system are represented using web-based processing of remote sensing imageries utilizing MODIS data. A composition of WPS processes is proposed as a WPS service to extract fire events from MODIS data. Subsequently, the paper highlights the role of WPS as a middleware interface in the domain of geospatial web service technology that can be used to invoke a large variety of geoprocessing operations and chaining of other web services as an engine of composition. The applicability of proposed architecture by a real world fire event detection and notification use case is evaluated. A GeoPortal client with open-source software was developed to manage data, metadata, processes, and authorities. Investigating feasibility and benefits of proposed framework shows that this framework can be used for wide area of geospatial applications specially disaster management and environmental monitoring.

  18. Automated DNA mutation detection using universal conditions direct sequencing: application to ten muscular dystrophy genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Bai-Lin

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the most common and efficient methods for detecting mutations in genes is PCR amplification followed by direct sequencing. Until recently, the process of designing PCR assays has been to focus on individual assay parameters rather than concentrating on matching conditions for a set of assays. Primers for each individual assay were selected based on location and sequence concerns. The two primer sequences were then iteratively adjusted to make the individual assays work properly. This generally resulted in groups of assays with different annealing temperatures that required the use of multiple thermal cyclers or multiple passes in a single thermal cycler making diagnostic testing time-consuming, laborious and expensive. These factors have severely hampered diagnostic testing services, leaving many families without an answer for the exact cause of a familial genetic disease. A search of GeneTests for sequencing analysis of the entire coding sequence for genes that are known to cause muscular dystrophies returns only a small list of laboratories that perform comprehensive gene panels. The hypothesis for the study was that a complete set of universal assays can be designed to amplify and sequence any gene or family of genes using computer aided design tools. If true, this would allow automation and optimization of the mutation detection process resulting in reduced cost and increased throughput. Results An automated process has been developed for the detection of deletions, duplications/insertions and point mutations in any gene or family of genes and has been applied to ten genes known to bear mutations that cause muscular dystrophy: DMD; CAV3; CAPN3; FKRP; TRIM32; LMNA; SGCA; SGCB; SGCG; SGCD. Using this process, mutations have been found in five DMD patients and four LGMD patients (one in the FKRP gene, one in the CAV3 gene, and two likely causative heterozygous pairs of variations in the CAPN3 gene of two other

  19. Automated DNA mutation detection using universal conditions direct sequencing: application to ten muscular dystrophy genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Richard R; Schneider, Hal E; Estrella, Elicia; Burgess, Stephanie; Cheng, Andrew S; Barrett, Caitlin; Lip, Va; Lai, Poh San; Shen, Yiping; Wu, Bai-Lin; Darras, Basil T; Beggs, Alan H; Kunkel, Louis M

    2009-10-18

    One of the most common and efficient methods for detecting mutations in genes is PCR amplification followed by direct sequencing. Until recently, the process of designing PCR assays has been to focus on individual assay parameters rather than concentrating on matching conditions for a set of assays. Primers for each individual assay were selected based on location and sequence concerns. The two primer sequences were then iteratively adjusted to make the individual assays work properly. This generally resulted in groups of assays with different annealing temperatures that required the use of multiple thermal cyclers or multiple passes in a single thermal cycler making diagnostic testing time-consuming, laborious and expensive.These factors have severely hampered diagnostic testing services, leaving many families without an answer for the exact cause of a familial genetic disease. A search of GeneTests for sequencing analysis of the entire coding sequence for genes that are known to cause muscular dystrophies returns only a small list of laboratories that perform comprehensive gene panels.The hypothesis for the study was that a complete set of universal assays can be designed to amplify and sequence any gene or family of genes using computer aided design tools. If true, this would allow automation and optimization of the mutation detection process resulting in reduced cost and increased throughput. An automated process has been developed for the detection of deletions, duplications/insertions and point mutations in any gene or family of genes and has been applied to ten genes known to bear mutations that cause muscular dystrophy: DMD; CAV3; CAPN3; FKRP; TRIM32; LMNA; SGCA; SGCB; SGCG; SGCD. Using this process, mutations have been found in five DMD patients and four LGMD patients (one in the FKRP gene, one in the CAV3 gene, and two likely causative heterozygous pairs of variations in the CAPN3 gene of two other patients). Methods and assay sequences are reported in

  20. Automated analysis of retinal images for detection of referable diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abràmoff, Michael D; Folk, James C; Han, Dennis P; Walker, Jonathan D; Williams, David F; Russell, Stephen R; Massin, Pascale; Cochener, Beatrice; Gain, Philippe; Tang, Li; Lamard, Mathieu; Moga, Daniela C; Quellec, Gwénolé; Niemeijer, Meindert

    2013-03-01

    The diagnostic accuracy of computer detection programs has been reported to be comparable to that of specialists and expert readers, but no computer detection programs have been validated in an independent cohort using an internationally recognized diabetic retinopathy (DR) standard. To determine the sensitivity and specificity of the Iowa Detection Program (IDP) to detect referable diabetic retinopathy (RDR). In primary care DR clinics in France, from January 1, 2005, through December 31, 2010, patients were photographed consecutively, and retinal color images were graded for retinopathy severity according to the International Clinical Diabetic Retinopathy scale and macular edema by 3 masked independent retinal specialists and regraded with adjudication until consensus. The IDP analyzed the same images at a predetermined and fixed set point. We defined RDR as more than mild nonproliferative retinopathy and/or macular edema. A total of 874 people with diabetes at risk for DR. Sensitivity and specificity of the IDP to detect RDR, area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, sensitivity and specificity of the retinal specialists' readings, and mean interobserver difference (κ). The RDR prevalence was 21.7% (95% CI, 19.0%-24.5%). The IDP sensitivity was 96.8% (95% CI, 94.4%-99.3%) and specificity was 59.4% (95% CI, 55.7%-63.0%), corresponding to 6 of 874 false-negative results (none met treatment criteria). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.937 (95% CI, 0.916-0.959). Before adjudication and consensus, the sensitivity/specificity of the retinal specialists were 0.80/0.98, 0.71/1.00, and 0.91/0.95, and the mean intergrader κ was 0.822. The IDP has high sensitivity and specificity to detect RDR. Computer analysis of retinal photographs for DR and automated detection of RDR can be implemented safely into the DR screening pipeline, potentially improving access to screening and health care productivity and reducing visual loss

  1. Automated Landslides Detection for Mountain Cities Using Multi-Temporal Remote Sensing Imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhong; Zhang, Yifei; Ouyang, Chao; Zhang, Feng; Ma, Jie

    2018-03-09

    Landslides that take place in mountain cities tend to cause huge casualties and economic losses, and a precise survey of landslide areas is a critical task for disaster emergency. However, because of the complicated appearance of the nature, it is difficult to find a spatial regularity that only relates to landslides, thus landslides detection based on only spatial information or artificial features usually performs poorly. In this paper, an automated landslides detection approach that is aiming at mountain cities has been proposed based on pre- and post-event remote sensing images, it mainly utilizes the knowledge of landslide-related surface covering changes, and makes full use of the temporal and spatial information. A change detection method using Deep Convolution Neural Network (DCNN) was introduced to extract the areas where drastic alterations have taken place; then, focusing on the changed areas, the Spatial Temporal Context Learning (STCL) was conducted to identify the landslides areas; finally, we use slope degree which is derived from digital elevation model (DEM) to make the result more reliable, and the change of DEM is used for making the detected areas more complete. The approach was applied to detecting the landslides in Shenzhen, Zhouqu County and Beichuan County in China, and a quantitative accuracy assessment has been taken. The assessment indicates that this approach can guarantee less commission error of landslide areal extent which is below 17.6% and achieves a quality percentage above 61.1%, and for landslide areas, the detection percentage is also competitive, the experimental results proves the feasibility and accuracy of the proposed approach for the detection landslides in mountain cities.

  2. Comparing a perceptual and an automated vision-based method for lie detection in younger children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Serras Pereira

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates how easily it can be detected whether a child is being truthful or not in a game situation, and it explores the cue validity of bodily movements for such type of classification. To achieve this, we introduce an innovative methodology – the combination of perception studies (in which one uses eye-tracking technology and automated movement analysis. Film fragments from truthful and deceptive children were shown to human judges who were given the task to decide whether the recorded child was being truthful or not. Results reveal that judges are able to accurately distinguish truthful clips from lying clips in both perception studies. Even though the automated movement analysis for overall and specific body regions did not yield significant results between the experimental conditions, we did find a positive correlation between the amount of movement in a child and the perception of lies, i.e., the more movement the children exhibited during a clip, the higher the chance that the clip was perceived as a lie. The eye-tracking study revealed that, even when there is movement happening on different body regions, judges tend to focus their attention mainly on the face region.

  3. Detection of cut-off point for rapid automized naming test in good readers and dyslexics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Soleymani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Rapid automized naming test is an appropriate tool to diagnose learning disability even before teaching reading. This study aimed to detect the cut-off point of this test for good readers and dyslexics.Methods: The test has 4 parts including: objects, colors, numbers and letters. 5 items are repeated on cards randomly for 10 times. Children were asked to name items rapidly. We studied 18 dyslexic students and 18 age-matched good readers between 7 and 8 years of age at second and third grades of elementary school; they were recruited by non-randomize sampling into 2 groups: children with developmental dyslexia from learning disabilities centers with mean age of 100 months, and normal children with mean age of 107 months from general schools in Tehran. Good readers selected from the same class of dyslexics.Results: The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.849 for letter naming, 0.892 for color naming, 0.971 for number naming, 0.887 for picture naming, and 0.965 totally. The overall sensitivity and specificity was 1 and was 0.79, respectively. The highest sensitivity and specificity were related to number naming (1 and 0.90, respectively.Conclusion: Findings showed that the rapid automized naming test could diagnose good readers from dyslexics appropriately.

  4. Automated image classification applied to reconstituted human corneal epithelium for the early detection of toxic damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosta, Giovanni Franco; Urani, Chiara; De Servi, Barbara; Meloni, Marisa

    2010-02-01

    For a long time acute eye irritation has been assessed by means of the DRAIZE rabbit test, the limitations of which are known. Alternative tests based on in vitro models have been proposed. This work focuses on the "reconstituted human corneal epithelium" (R-HCE), which resembles the corneal epithelium of the human eye by thickness, morphology and marker expression. Testing a substance on R-HCE involves a variety of methods. Herewith quantitative morphological analysis is applied to optical microscope images of R-HCE cross sections resulting from exposure to benzalkonium chloride (BAK). The short term objectives and the first results are the analysis and classification of said images. Automated analysis relies on feature extraction by the spectrum-enhancement algorithm, which is made sensitive to anisotropic morphology, and classification based on principal components analysis. The winning strategy has been the separate analysis of the apical and basal layers, which carry morphological information of different types. R-HCE specimens have been ranked by gross damage. The onset of early damage has been detected and an R-HCE specimen exposed to a low BAK dose has been singled out from the negative and positive control. These results provide a proof of principle for the automated classification of the specimens of interest on a purely morphological basis by means of the spectrum enhancement algorithm.

  5. A method for the automated detection phishing websites through both site characteristics and image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Joshua S.; Matthews, Jeanna N.; Stacy, John L.

    2012-06-01

    Phishing website analysis is largely still a time-consuming manual process of discovering potential phishing sites, verifying if suspicious sites truly are malicious spoofs and if so, distributing their URLs to the appropriate blacklisting services. Attackers increasingly use sophisticated systems for bringing phishing sites up and down rapidly at new locations, making automated response essential. In this paper, we present a method for rapid, automated detection and analysis of phishing websites. Our method relies on near real-time gathering and analysis of URLs posted on social media sites. We fetch the pages pointed to by each URL and characterize each page with a set of easily computed values such as number of images and links. We also capture a screen-shot of the rendered page image, compute a hash of the image and use the Hamming distance between these image hashes as a form of visual comparison. We provide initial results demonstrate the feasibility of our techniques by comparing legitimate sites to known fraudulent versions from Phishtank.com, by actively introducing a series of minor changes to a phishing toolkit captured in a local honeypot and by performing some initial analysis on a set of over 2.8 million URLs posted to Twitter over a 4 days in August 2011. We discuss the issues encountered during our testing such as resolvability and legitimacy of URL's posted on Twitter, the data sets used, the characteristics of the phishing sites we discovered, and our plans for future work.

  6. AUTOMATED DETECTION OF OIL DEPOTS FROM HIGH RESOLUTION IMAGES: A NEW PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. O. Ok

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an original approach to identify oil depots from single high resolution aerial/satellite images in an automated manner. The new approach considers the symmetric nature of circular oil depots, and it computes the radial symmetry in a unique way. An automated thresholding method to focus on circular regions and a new measure to verify circles are proposed. Experiments are performed on six GeoEye-1 test images. Besides, we perform tests on 16 Google Earth images of an industrial test site acquired in a time series manner (between the years 1995 and 2012. The results reveal that our approach is capable of detecting circle objects in very different/difficult images. We computed an overall performance of 95.8% for the GeoEye-1 dataset. The time series investigation reveals that our approach is robust enough to locate oil depots in industrial environments under varying illumination and environmental conditions. The overall performance is computed as 89.4% for the Google Earth dataset, and this result secures the success of our approach compared to a state-of-the-art approach.

  7. UAS imaging for automated crop lodging detection: a case study over an experimental maize field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Tianxing; Starek, Michael J.; Brewer, Michael J.; Masiane, Tiisetso; Murray, Seth C.

    2017-05-01

    Lodging has been recognized as one of the major destructive factors for crop quality and yield, particularly in corn. A variety of contributing causes, e.g. disease and/or pest, weather conditions, excessive nitrogen, and high plant density, may lead to lodging before harvesting season. Traditional lodging detection strategies mainly rely on ground data collection, which is insufficient in efficiency and accuracy. To address this problem, this research focuses on the use of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) for automated detection of crop lodging. The study was conducted over an experimental corn field at the Texas A and M AgriLife Research and Extension Center at Corpus Christi, Texas, during the growing season of 2016. Nadir-view images of the corn field were taken by small UAS platforms equipped with consumer grade RGB and NIR cameras on a per week basis, enabling a timely observation of the plant growth. 3D structural information of the plants was reconstructed using structure-from-motion photogrammetry. The structural information was then applied to calculate crop height, and rates of growth. A lodging index for detecting corn lodging was proposed afterwards. Ground truth data of lodging was collected on a per row basis and used for fair assessment and tuning of the detection algorithm. Results show the UAS-measured height correlates well with the ground-measured height. More importantly, the lodging index can effectively reflect severity of corn lodging and yield after harvesting.

  8. Automated detection of exudates and macula for grading of diabetic macular edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, M Usman; Tariq, Anam; Khan, Shoab A; Javed, M Younus

    2014-04-01

    Medical systems based on state of the art image processing and pattern recognition techniques are very common now a day. These systems are of prime interest to provide basic health care facilities to patients and support to doctors. Diabetic macular edema is one of the retinal abnormalities in which diabetic patient suffers from severe vision loss due to affected macula. It affects the central vision of the person and causes total blindness in severe cases. In this article, we propose an intelligent system for detection and grading of macular edema to assist the ophthalmologists in early and automated detection of the disease. The proposed system consists of a novel method for accurate detection of macula using a detailed feature set and Gaussian mixtures model based classifier. We also present a new hybrid classifier as an ensemble of Gaussian mixture model and support vector machine for improved exudate detection even in the presence of other bright lesions which eventually leads to reliable classification of input retinal image in different stages of macular edema. The statistical analysis and comparative evaluation of proposed system with existing methods are performed on publicly available standard retinal image databases. The proposed system has achieved average value of 97.3%, 95.9% and 96.8% for sensitivity, specificity and accuracy respectively on both databases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. GPR Signal Characterization for Automated Landmine and UXO Detection Based on Machine Learning Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Núñez-Nieto

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Landmine clearance is an ongoing problem that currently affects millions of people around the world. This study evaluates the effectiveness of ground penetrating radar (GPR in demining and unexploded ordnance detection using 2.3-GHz and 1-GHz high-frequency antennas. An automated detection tool based on machine learning techniques is also presented with the aim of automatically detecting underground explosive artifacts. A GPR survey was conducted on a designed scenario that included the most commonly buried items in historic battle fields, such as mines, projectiles and mortar grenades. The buried targets were identified using both frequencies, although the higher vertical resolution provided by the 2.3-GHz antenna allowed for better recognition of the reflection patterns. The targets were also detected automatically using machine learning techniques. Neural networks and logistic regression algorithms were shown to be able to discriminate between potential targets and clutter. The neural network had the most success, with accuracies ranging from 89% to 92% for the 1-GHz and 2.3-GHz antennas, respectively.

  10. A novel fully automated molecular diagnostic system (AMDS for colorectal cancer mutation detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiro Kitano

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: KRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA mutations are frequently observed in colorectal cancer (CRC. In particular, KRAS mutations are strong predictors for clinical outcomes of EGFR-targeted treatments such as cetuximab and panitumumab in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC. For mutation analysis, the current methods are time-consuming, and not readily available to all oncologists and pathologists. We have developed a novel, simple, sensitive and fully automated molecular diagnostic system (AMDS for point of care testing (POCT. Here we report the results of a comparison study between AMDS and direct sequencing (DS in the detection of KRAS, BRAF and PI3KCA somatic mutations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: DNA was extracted from a slice of either frozen (n = 89 or formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE CRC tissue (n = 70, and then used for mutation analysis by AMDS and DS. All mutations (n = 41 among frozen and 27 among FFPE samples detected by DS were also successfully (100% detected by the AMDS. However, 8 frozen and 6 FFPE samples detected as wild-type in the DS analysis were shown as mutants in the AMDS analysis. By cloning-sequencing assays, these discordant samples were confirmed as true mutants. One sample had simultaneous "hot spot" mutations of KRAS and PIK3CA, and cloning assay comfirmed that E542K and E545K were not on the same allele. Genotyping call rates for DS were 100.0% (89/89 and 74.3% (52/70 in frozen and FFPE samples, respectively, for the first attempt; whereas that of AMDS was 100.0% for both sample sets. For automated DNA extraction and mutation detection by AMDS, frozen tissues (n = 41 were successfully detected all mutations within 70 minutes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: AMDS has superior sensitivity and accuracy over DS, and is much easier to execute than conventional labor intensive manual mutation analysis. AMDS has great potential for POCT equipment for mutation analysis.

  11. Phase II: Automated System for Aneuploidy Detection in Sperm Final Report CRADA No. TC-1554-98

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyrobek, W. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dunlay, R. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-28

    This was a collaborative effort between the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Cellomics, Inc. (formerly BioDx and Biological Detection, Inc.) to develop an automated system for detecting human sperm aneuploidy. Aneuploidy (an abnormal number of chromosomes) is one of the major categories of chromosomally abnormal sperm, which results in chromosomally defective pregnancies and babies. An automated system would be used for testing the effects of toxic agents and for other research and clinical applications. This collaborated effort was funded by a National Institutes of Environmental Health Services, Phase II, Small Business Innovation Research Program (SBIR) grant to Cellornics (Contract No. N44-ES-82004).

  12. Assessment of the quality of fall detection and management in primary care in the Netherlands based on the ACOVE quality indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askari, M; Eslami, S; van Rijn, M; Medlock, S; Moll van Charante, E P; van der Velde, N; de Rooij, S E; Abu-Hanna, A

    2016-02-01

    We determined adherence to nine fall-related ACOVE quality indicators to investigate the quality of management of falls in the elderly population by general practitioners in the Netherlands. Our findings demonstrate overall low adherence to these indicators, possibly indicating insufficiency in the quality of fall management. Most indicators showed a positive association between increased risk for functional decline and adherence, four of which with statistical significance. This study aims to investigate the quality of detection and management of falls in the elderly population by general practitioners in the Netherlands, using the Assessing Care of Vulnerable Elders (ACOVE) quality indicators. Community-dwelling persons aged 70 years or above, registered in participating general practices, were asked to fill in a questionnaire designed to determine general practitioner (GP) adherence to fall-related indicators. We used logistic regression to estimate the association between increased risk for functional decline-quantified by the Identification of Seniors At Risk for Primary Care score-and adherence. We then cross-validated the self-reported falls with medical records. Of the 950 elders responding to our questionnaire, only 10.6 % reported that their GP proactively asked them about falls. Of the 160 patients who reported two or more falls, or one fall for which they visited the GP, only 23.1 % had fall documentation in their records. Adherence ranged between 13.6 and 48.6 %. There was a significant positive association between the ISAR-PC scores and adherence in four QIs. Documentation of falls was highest (36.7 %) in patients whom the GP had proactively asked about falls. Based on patient self-reports, adherence to the ACOVE fall-related indicators was poor, suggesting that the quality of evaluation and management of falls in community-dwelling older persons in the Netherlands is poor. The documentation of falls and fall-related risk factors was also poor

  13. Flexible Method for the Automated Offline-Detection of Artifacts in Multi-Channel Electroencephalogram Recordings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waser, Markus; Garn, Heinrich; Benke, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    . However, these preprocessing steps do not allow for complete artifact correction. We propose a method for the automated offline-detection of remaining artifacts after preprocessing in multi-channel EEG recordings. In contrast to existing methods it requires neither adaptive parameters varying between...... recordings nor a topography template. It is suited for short EEG segments and is flexible with regard to target applications. The algorithm was developed and tested on 60 clinical EEG samples of 20 seconds each that were recorded both in resting state and during cognitive activation to gain a realistic...... in conjunction with receiver operating characteristics (ROC curves). We observed high sensitivity of 95.5%±4.8 and specificity of 88.8%±2.1. The method has thus shown great potential and is promising as a possible tool for both EEG-based clinical applications and EEG-related research....

  14. Transferring x-ray based automated threat detection between scanners with different energies and resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, M.; Ransley, M.; Rogers, T. W.; Griffin, L. D.

    2017-10-01

    A significant obstacle to developing high performance Deep Learning algorithms for Automated Threat Detection (ATD) in security X-ray imagery, is the difficulty of obtaining large training datasets. In our previous work, we circumvented this problem for ATD in cargo containers, using Threat Image Projection and data augmentation. In this work, we investigate whether data scarcity for other modalities, such as parcels and baggage, can be ameliorated by transforming data from one domain so that it approximates the appearance of another. We present an ontology of ATD datasets to assess where transfer learning may be applied. We define frameworks for transfer at the training and testing stages, and compare the results for both methods against ATD where a common data source is used for training and testing. Our results show very poor transfer, which we attribute to the difficulty of accurately matching the blur and contrast characteristics of different scanners.

  15. PLAT: An Automated Fault and Behavioural Anomaly Detection Tool for PLC Controlled Manufacturing Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arup Ghosh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Operational faults and behavioural anomalies associated with PLC control processes take place often in a manufacturing system. Real time identification of these operational faults and behavioural anomalies is necessary in the manufacturing industry. In this paper, we present an automated tool, called PLC Log-Data Analysis Tool (PLAT that can detect them by using log-data records of the PLC signals. PLAT automatically creates a nominal model of the PLC control process and employs a novel hash table based indexing and searching scheme to satisfy those purposes. Our experiments show that PLAT is significantly fast, provides real time identification of operational faults and behavioural anomalies, and can execute within a small memory footprint. In addition, PLAT can easily handle a large manufacturing system with a reasonable computing configuration and can be installed in parallel to the data logging system to identify operational faults and behavioural anomalies effectively.

  16. Automation of disbond detection in aircraft fuselage through thermal image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, D. R.; Winfree, W. P.

    1992-01-01

    A procedure for interpreting thermal images obtained during the nondestructive evaluation of aircraft bonded joints is presented. The procedure operates on time-derivative thermal images and resulted in a disbond image with disbonds highlighted. The size of the 'black clusters' in the output disbond image is a quantitative measure of disbond size. The procedure is illustrated using simulation data as well as data obtained through experimental testing of fabricated samples and aircraft panels. Good results are obtained, and, except in pathological cases, 'false calls' in the cases studied appeared only as noise in the output disbond image which was easily filtered out. The thermal detection technique coupled with an automated image interpretation capability will be a very fast and effective method for inspecting bonded joints in an aircraft structure.

  17. Fully automated left ventricular contour detection for gated radionuclide angiography, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoba, Minoru; Wani, Hidenobu; Hiroe, Michiaki; Kusakabe, Kiyoko.

    1984-01-01

    A fully automated practical method has been developed to detect the left ventricular (LV) contour from gated pool images. Ejection fraction and volume curve can be computed accurately without operater variance. The characteristics of the method are summarized as follows: 1. Optimal design of the filter that works on Fourier domain, can be achieved to improve the signal to noise ratio. 2. New algorithm which use the cosine and sine transform images has been developed for the separating ventricle from atrium and defining center of LV. 3. Contrast enhancement by optimized square filter. 4. Radial profiles are generated from the center of LV and smoothed by fourth order Fourier series approximation. The crossing point with local threshold value searched from the center of the LV is defined as edge. 5. LV contour is obtained by conecting all the edge points defined on radial profiles by fitting them to Fourier function. (author)

  18. Automated EEG detection algorithms and clinical semiology in epilepsy: importance of correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, R Edward

    2011-12-01

    With advances in technological innovation, electroencephalography has remained the gold standard for classification and localization of epileptic seizures. Like other diagnostic modalities, technological advances have opened new avenues for assessment of data, and hold great promise to improve interpretive capabilities. However, proper overall interpretation and application of electroencephalographic findings relies on valid correlations of associated clinical semiology. This article addresses interpretation of clinical signs and symptoms in the context of the diagnostic predictive value of electroencephalographic, clinical, and electrographic definitions of seizures, and upcoming challenges of interpreting intracranial high-frequency electroencephalographic data. This article is part of a Supplemental Special Issue entitled The Future of Automated Seizure Detection and Prediction. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A thesis on the Development of an Automated SWIFT Edge Detection Algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trujillo, Christopher J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-07-28

    Throughout the world, scientists and engineers such as those at Los Alamos National Laboratory, perform research and testing unique only to applications aimed towards advancing technology, and understanding the nature of materials. With this testing, comes a need for advanced methods of data acquisition and most importantly, a means of analyzing and extracting the necessary information from such acquired data. In this thesis, I aim to produce an automated method implementing advanced image processing techniques and tools to analyze SWIFT image datasets for Detonator Technology at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Such an effective method for edge detection and point extraction can prove to be advantageous in analyzing such unique datasets and provide for consistency in producing results.

  20. Automated mitosis detection using texture, SIFT features and HMAX biologically inspired approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irshad, Humayun; Jalali, Sepehr; Roux, Ludovic; Racoceanu, Daniel; Hwee, Lim Joo; Naour, Gilles Le; Capron, Frédérique

    2013-01-01

    According to Nottingham grading system, mitosis count in breast cancer histopathology is one of three components required for cancer grading and prognosis. Manual counting of mitosis is tedious and subject to considerable inter- and intra-reader variations. The aim is to investigate the various texture features and Hierarchical Model and X (HMAX) biologically inspired approach for mitosis detection using machine-learning techniques. We propose an approach that assists pathologists in automated mitosis detection and counting. The proposed method, which is based on the most favorable texture features combination, examines the separability between different channels of color space. Blue-ratio channel provides more discriminative information for mitosis detection in histopathological images. Co-occurrence features, run-length features, and Scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT) features were extracted and used in the classification of mitosis. Finally, a classification is performed to put the candidate patch either in the mitosis class or in the non-mitosis class. Three different classifiers have been evaluated: Decision tree, linear kernel Support Vector Machine (SVM), and non-linear kernel SVM. We also evaluate the performance of the proposed framework using the modified biologically inspired model of HMAX and compare the results with other feature extraction methods such as dense SIFT. The proposed method has been tested on Mitosis detection in breast cancer histological images (MITOS) dataset provided for an International Conference on Pattern Recognition (ICPR) 2012 contest. The proposed framework achieved 76% recall, 75% precision and 76% F-measure. Different frameworks for classification have been evaluated for mitosis detection. In future work, instead of regions, we intend to compute features on the results of mitosis contour segmentation and use them to improve detection and classification rate.

  1. Automated mitosis detection using texture, SIFT features and HMAX biologically inspired approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humayun Irshad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: According to Nottingham grading system, mitosis count in breast cancer histopathology is one of three components required for cancer grading and prognosis. Manual counting of mitosis is tedious and subject to considerable inter- and intra-reader variations. Aims: The aim is to investigate the various texture features and Hierarchical Model and X (HMAX biologically inspired approach for mitosis detection using machine-learning techniques. Materials and Methods: We propose an approach that assists pathologists in automated mitosis detection and counting. The proposed method, which is based on the most favorable texture features combination, examines the separability between different channels of color space. Blue-ratio channel provides more discriminative information for mitosis detection in histopathological images. Co-occurrence features, run-length features, and Scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT features were extracted and used in the classification of mitosis. Finally, a classification is performed to put the candidate patch either in the mitosis class or in the non-mitosis class. Three different classifiers have been evaluated: Decision tree, linear kernel Support Vector Machine (SVM, and non-linear kernel SVM. We also evaluate the performance of the proposed framework using the modified biologically inspired model of HMAX and compare the results with other feature extraction methods such as dense SIFT. Results: The proposed method has been tested on Mitosis detection in breast cancer histological images (MITOS dataset provided for an International Conference on Pattern Recognition (ICPR 2012 contest. The proposed framework achieved 76% recall, 75% precision and 76% F-measure. Conclusions: Different frameworks for classification have been evaluated for mitosis detection. In future work, instead of regions, we intend to compute features on the results of mitosis contour segmentation and use them to improve detection and

  2. Automated detection and volumetric segmentation of the spleen in CT scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammon, M.; Dankerl, P.; Janka, R.; Uder, M.; Cavallaro, A.; Kramer, M.; Seifert, S.; Tsymbal, A.; Costa, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    To introduce automated detection and volumetric segmentation of the spleen in spiral CT scans with the THESEUS-MEDICO software. The consistency between automated volumetry (aV), estimated volume determination (eV) and manual volume segmentation (mV) was evaluated. Retrospective evaluation of the CAD system based on methods like ''marginal space learning'' and ''boosting algorithms''. 3 consecutive spiral CT scans (thoraco-abdominal; portal-venous contrast agent phase; 1 or 5 mm slice thickness) of 15 consecutive lymphoma patients were included. The eV: 30 cm 3 + 0.58 (width x length x thickness of the spleen) and the mV as the reference standard were determined by an experienced radiologist. The aV could be performed in all CT scans within 15.2 (± 2.4) seconds. The average splenic volume measured by aV was 268.21 ± 114.67 cm 3 compared to 281.58 ± 130.21 cm 3 in mV and 268.93 ± 104.60 cm 3 in eV. The correlation coefficient was 0.99 (coefficient of determination (R 2 ) = 0.98) for aV and mV, 0.91 (R 2 = 0.83) for mV and eV and 0.91 (R 2 = 0.82) for aV and eV. There was an almost perfect correlation of the changes in splenic volume measured with the new aV and mV (0.92; R 2 = 0.84), mV and eV (0.95; R 2 = 0.91) and aV and eV (0.83; R 2 = 0.69) between two time points. The automated detection and volumetric segmentation software rapidly provides an accurate measurement of the splenic volume in CT scans. Knowledge about splenic volume and its change between two examinations provides valuable clinical information without effort for the radiologist. (orig.)

  3. Breast cancer detection: Radiologists' performance using mammography with and without automated whole-breast ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, Kevin M.; Lee, Sung-Jae; Comulada, W.S.; Dean, Judy

    2010-01-01

    Radiologist reader performance for breast cancer detection using mammography plus automated whole-breast ultrasound (AWBU) was compared with mammography alone. Screenings for non-palpable breast malignancies in women with radiographically dense breasts with contemporaneous mammograms and AWBU were reviewed by 12 radiologists blinded to the diagnoses; half the studies were abnormal. Readers first reviewed the 102 mammograms. The American College of Radiology (ACR) Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BIRADS) and Digital Mammographic Imaging Screening Trial (DMIST) likelihood ratings were recorded with location information for identified abnormalities. Readers then reviewed the mammograms and AWBU with knowledge of previous mammogram-only evaluation. We compared reader performance across screening techniques using absolute callback, areas under the curve (AUC), and figure of merit (FOM). True positivity of cancer detection increased 63%, with only a 4% decrease in true negativity. Reader-averaged AUC was higher for mammography plus AWBU compared with mammography alone by BIRADS (0.808 versus 0.701) and likelihood scores (0.810 versus 0.703). Similarly, FOM was higher for mammography plus AWBU compared with mammography alone by BIRADS (0.786 versus 0.613) and likelihood scores (0.791 versus 0.614). Adding AWBU to mammography improved callback rates, accuracy of breast cancer detection, and confidence in callbacks for dense-breasted women. (orig.)

  4. Communication Behaviour-Based Big Data Application to Classify and Detect HTTP Automated Software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manh Cong Tran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available HTTP is recognized as the most widely used protocol on the Internet when applications are being transferred more and more by developers onto the web. Due to increasingly complex computer systems, diversity HTTP automated software (autoware thrives. Unfortunately, besides normal autoware, HTTP malware and greyware are also spreading rapidly in web environment. Consequently, network communication is not just rigorously controlled by users intention. This raises the demand for analyzing HTTP autoware communication behaviour to detect and classify malicious and normal activities via HTTP traffic. Hence, in this paper, based on many studies and analysis of the autoware communication behaviour through access graph, a new method to detect and classify HTTP autoware communication at network level is presented. The proposal system includes combination of MapReduce of Hadoop and MarkLogic NoSQL database along with xQuery to deal with huge HTTP traffic generated each day in a large network. The method is examined with real outbound HTTP traffic data collected through a proxy server of a private network. Experimental results obtained for proposed method showed that promised outcomes are achieved since 95.1% of suspicious autoware are classified and detected. This finding may assist network and system administrator in inspecting early the internal threats caused by HTTP autoware.

  5. Automated detection of breast cancer in resected specimens with fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Jennifer E.; Gorpas, Dimitris; Unger, Jakob; Darrow, Morgan; Bold, Richard J.; Marcu, Laura

    2018-01-01

    Re-excision rates for breast cancer lumpectomy procedures are currently nearly 25% due to surgeons relying on inaccurate or incomplete methods of evaluating specimen margins. The objective of this study was to determine if cancer could be automatically detected in breast specimens from mastectomy and lumpectomy procedures by a classification algorithm that incorporated parameters derived from fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIm). This study generated a database of co-registered histologic sections and FLIm data from breast cancer specimens (N  =  20) and a support vector machine (SVM) classification algorithm able to automatically detect cancerous, fibrous, and adipose breast tissue. Classification accuracies were greater than 97% for automated detection of cancerous, fibrous, and adipose tissue from breast cancer specimens. The classification worked equally well for specimens scanned by hand or with a mechanical stage, demonstrating that the system could be used during surgery or on excised specimens. The ability of this technique to simply discriminate between cancerous and normal breast tissue, in particular to distinguish fibrous breast tissue from tumor, which is notoriously challenging for optical techniques, leads to the conclusion that FLIm has great potential to assess breast cancer margins. Identification of positive margins before waiting for complete histologic analysis could significantly reduce breast cancer re-excision rates.

  6. Automated detection of synapses in serial section transmission electron microscopy image stacks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kreshuk

    Full Text Available We describe a method for fully automated detection of chemical synapses in serial electron microscopy images with highly anisotropic axial and lateral resolution, such as images taken on transmission electron microscopes. Our pipeline starts from classification of the pixels based on 3D pixel features, which is followed by segmentation with an Ising model MRF and another classification step, based on object-level features. Classifiers are learned on sparse user labels; a fully annotated data subvolume is not required for training. The algorithm was validated on a set of 238 synapses in 20 serial 7197×7351 pixel images (4.5×4.5×45 nm resolution of mouse visual cortex, manually labeled by three independent human annotators and additionally re-verified by an expert neuroscientist. The error rate of the algorithm (12% false negative, 7% false positive detections is better than state-of-the-art, even though, unlike the state-of-the-art method, our algorithm does not require a prior segmentation of the image volume into cells. The software is based on the ilastik learning and segmentation toolkit and the vigra image processing library and is freely available on our website, along with the test data and gold standard annotations (http://www.ilastik.org/synapse-detection/sstem.

  7. Breast cancer detection: radiologists' performance using mammography with and without automated whole-breast ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Kevin M; Dean, Judy; Lee, Sung-Jae; Comulada, W Scott

    2010-11-01

    Radiologist reader performance for breast cancer detection using mammography plus automated whole-breast ultrasound (AWBU) was compared with mammography alone. Screenings for non-palpable breast malignancies in women with radiographically dense breasts with contemporaneous mammograms and AWBU were reviewed by 12 radiologists blinded to the diagnoses; half the studies were abnormal. Readers first reviewed the 102 mammograms. The American College of Radiology (ACR) Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BIRADS) and Digital Mammographic Imaging Screening Trial (DMIST) likelihood ratings were recorded with location information for identified abnormalities. Readers then reviewed the mammograms and AWBU with knowledge of previous mammogram-only evaluation. We compared reader performance across screening techniques using absolute callback, areas under the curve (AUC), and figure of merit (FOM). True positivity of cancer detection increased 63%, with only a 4% decrease in true negativity. Reader-averaged AUC was higher for mammography plus AWBU compared with mammography alone by BIRADS (0.808 versus 0.701) and likelihood scores (0.810 versus 0.703). Similarly, FOM was higher for mammography plus AWBU compared with mammography alone by BIRADS (0.786 versus 0.613) and likelihood scores (0.791 versus 0.614). Adding AWBU to mammography improved callback rates, accuracy of breast cancer detection, and confidence in callbacks for dense-breasted women.

  8. Automated detection of microaneurysms using scale-adapted blob analysis and semi-supervised learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adal, Kedir M; Sidibé, Désiré; Ali, Sharib; Chaum, Edward; Karnowski, Thomas P; Mériaudeau, Fabrice

    2014-04-01

    Despite several attempts, automated detection of microaneurysm (MA) from digital fundus images still remains to be an open issue. This is due to the subtle nature of MAs against the surrounding tissues. In this paper, the microaneurysm detection problem is modeled as finding interest regions or blobs from an image and an automatic local-scale selection technique is presented. Several scale-adapted region descriptors are introduced to characterize these blob regions. A semi-supervised based learning approach, which requires few manually annotated learning examples, is also proposed to train a classifier which can detect true MAs. The developed system is built using only few manually labeled and a large number of unlabeled retinal color fundus images. The performance of the overall system is evaluated on Retinopathy Online Challenge (ROC) competition database. A competition performance measure (CPM) of 0.364 shows the competitiveness of the proposed system against state-of-the art techniques as well as the applicability of the proposed features to analyze fundus images. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Performance evaluation of an automated single-channel sleep–wake detection algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Richard F; Wang, Ying; Loparo, Kenneth A; Kelly, Monica R; Bootzin, Richard R

    2014-01-01

    Background A need exists, from both a clinical and a research standpoint, for objective sleep measurement systems that are both easy to use and can accurately assess sleep and wake. This study evaluates the output of an automated sleep–wake detection algorithm (Z-ALG) used in the Zmachine (a portable, single-channel, electroencephalographic [EEG] acquisition and analysis system) against laboratory polysomnography (PSG) using a consensus of expert visual scorers. Methods Overnight laboratory PSG studies from 99 subjects (52 females/47 males, 18–60 years, median age 32.7 years), including both normal sleepers and those with a variety of sleep disorders, were assessed. PSG data obtained from the differential mastoids (A1–A2) were assessed by Z-ALG, which determines sleep versus wake every 30 seconds using low-frequency, intermediate-frequency, and high-frequency and time domain EEG features. PSG data were independently scored by two to four certified PSG technologists, using standard Rechtschaffen and Kales guidelines, and these score files were combined on an epoch-by-epoch basis, using a majority voting rule, to generate a single score file per subject to compare against the Z-ALG output. Both epoch-by-epoch and standard sleep indices (eg, total sleep time, sleep efficiency, latency to persistent sleep, and wake after sleep onset) were compared between the Z-ALG output and the technologist consensus score files. Results Overall, the sensitivity and specificity for detecting sleep using the Z-ALG as compared to the technologist consensus are 95.5% and 92.5%, respectively, across all subjects, and the positive predictive value and the negative predictive value for detecting sleep are 98.0% and 84.2%, respectively. Overall κ agreement is 0.85 (approaching the level of agreement observed among sleep technologists). These results persist when the sleep disorder subgroups are analyzed separately. Conclusion This study demonstrates that the Z-ALG automated sleep

  10. Determination of Proton dose distal fall-off location by detecting right-angled prompt gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Kyu Seok

    2006-02-01

    The proton beam has a unique advantage over the electron and photon beams in that it can give very high radiation dose to the tumor volume while effectively sparing the neighboring healthy tissue and organs. The number of proton therapy facility is very rapidly increasing in the world. And now the 230 MeV cyclotron facility for proton therapy is constructing at National Cancer Center, this facility until 2006. The distal fall-off location of proton beam is simply calculated by analytical method, but this method has many uncertain when anatomical structure is very complicated. It is very important to know the exact position of the proton beam distal fall-off, or beam range, in the patient's body for both the safety of the patient and the effectiveness of the treatment itself. In 2003, Stichelbaut and Jongen reported the possibility of using the right-angled prompt gamma rays, which are emitted at 90 .deg. from the incident proton beam direction, to determine the position of the proton beam distal fall-off. They studied the interactions of the protons and other secondary particles in a water phantom and concluded that there is a correlation between the position of the distal fall-off and the distribution of the right-angled prompt gamma rays. We have recently designed a prompt gamma scanning system to measure the proton range in situ by using Monte Carlo technique employing MCNPX, FLUKA, and Sabrina TM . The prompt gamma scanning system was designed to measure only the right-angled prompt gamma rays passing through a narrow collimation hole in order to correlate the position with the dose distribution. The collimation part of the scanning system, which has been constructed to measure the gamma rays at 70 MeV of proton energy, is made of a set of paraffin, boron carbide, and lead layers to shield the high-energy neutrons and secondary photons. After the different proton energies and SOBP beam widths are irradiated at the water phantom. we detected prompt gamma at 5 cm

  11. Development of childhood fall motion database and browser based on behavior measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakara, Hiroyuki; Nishida, Yoshifumi; Yoon, Sang Min; Miyazaki, Yusuke; Koizumi, Yoshinori; Mizoguchi, Hiroshi; Yamanaka, Tatsuhiro

    2013-10-01

    This paper describes the development of a fall motion database and a browser designed to facilitate investigations into fall-related injury risk. First, child-related daily activities were collected at a "sensor home", which is a model of a normal living environment equipped with an embedded video-surveillance system and within which child test subjects were equipped with wearable acceleration-gyro sensors. As of this report, measurements have been conducted for 19 children (months age: mean=23.8, standard deviation=10.5), and data has been obtained on 105 fall incidents. During our research, falls were detected from the accumulated sensor data using a detection algorithm developed by the authors, and then video clips of detected falls were extracted from the recorded video streams automatically. The extracted video clips were then used for fall motion analysis. A computer vision (CV) algorithm, which was developed to automate fall motion analysis, facilitates accumulation of fall motion data into the abovementioned database, and the associated database browser allows users to perform conditional searches of fall data by inputting search conditions, such as child attributes and specific fall situations. Before this study, there was no database which contains child's actual fall motion data, and it has the potential to facilitate injury risk reduction related to falls in daily living environments. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Automated detection of haemozoin-containing monocytes for the diagnosis of malaria in microscopically negative cases during pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hänscheid, Thomas; Längin, Matthias; Codices, Vera; Luty, Adrian J. F.; Adegnika, Ayola A.; Kremsner, Peter G.; Grobusch, Martin P.

    2009-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum sequesters in the placenta. Cell-Dyn automated flow cytometric haematology analysers have the capacity to detect haemozoin-containing circulating leukocytes during routine FBC analysis. In Lambaréné, Gabon, 685 FBCs of pregnant women were analysed, yielding 86.8% sensitivity

  13. Glaucoma progression detection with frequency doubling technology (FDT) compared to standard automated perimetry (SAP) in the Groningen Longitudinal Glaucoma Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wesselink, Christiaan; Jansonius, Nomdo M.

    Purpose: To determine the usefulness of frequency doubling perimetry (FDT) for progression detection in glaucoma, compared to standard automated perimetry (SAP). Methods: Data were used from 150 eyes of 150 glaucoma patients from the Groningen Longitudinal Glaucoma Study. After baseline, SAP was

  14. Automated detection of malaria pigment: feasibility for malaria diagnosing in an area with seasonal malaria in northern Namibia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Langen, Adrianus J.; van Dillen, Jeroen; de Witte, Piet; Mucheto, Samson; Nagelkerke, Nico; Kager, Piet

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the feasibility of automated malaria detection with the Cell-Dyn 3700 (Abbott Diagnostics, Santa Clara, CA, USA) haematology analyser for diagnosing malaria in northern Namibia. METHODS: From April to June 2003, all patients with a positive blood smear result and a subset of

  15. Mechanism and DNA-based detection of field-evolved resistance to transgenic Bt corn in fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evolution of resistance threatens sustainability of transgenic crops producing insecticidal proteins from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt). The fall armyworm is a devastating pest controlled by transgenic Bt corn producing the Cry1Fa insecticidal protein. However, fall armyworm populations ...

  16. Support vector machines for automated snoring detection: proof-of-concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelsson, Laura B; Rangarajan, Anusha A; Shimada, Kenji; Krafty, Robert T; Buysse, Daniel J; Strollo, Patrick J; Kravitz, Howard M; Zheng, Huiyong; Hall, Martica H

    2017-03-01

    Snoring has been shown to be associated with adverse physical and mental health, independent of the effects of sleep disordered breathing. Despite increasing evidence for the risks of snoring, few studies on sleep and health include objective measures of snoring. One reason for this methodological limitation is the difficulty of quantifying snoring. Conventional methods may rely on manual scoring of snore events by trained human scorers, but this process is both time- and labor-intensive, making the measurement of objective snoring impractical for large or multi-night studies. The current study is a proof-of-concept to validate the use of support vector machines (SVM), a form of machine learning, for the automated scoring of an objective snoring signal. An SVM algorithm was trained and tested on a set of approximately 150,000 snoring and non-snoring data segments, and F-scores for SVM performance compared to visual scoring performance were calculated using the Wilcoxon signed rank test for paired data. The ability of the SVM algorithm to discriminate snore from non-snore segments of data did not differ statistically from visual scorer performance (SVM F-score = 82.46 ± 7.93 versus average visual F-score = 88.35 ± 4.61, p = 0.2786), supporting SVM snore classification ability comparable to visual scorers. In this proof-of-concept, we established that the SVM algorithm performs comparably to trained visual scorers, supporting the use of SVM for automated snoring detection in future studies.

  17. AUTOMATED DETECTION OF GALAXY-SCALE GRAVITATIONAL LENSES IN HIGH-RESOLUTION IMAGING DATA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, Philip J.; Bradac, Marusa; Hogg, David W.; Moustakas, Leonidas A.; Fassnacht, Christopher D.; Schrabback, Tim; Blandford, Roger D.

    2009-01-01

    We expect direct lens modeling to be the key to successful and meaningful automated strong galaxy-scale gravitational lens detection. We have implemented a lens-modeling 'robot' that treats every bright red galaxy (BRG) in a large imaging survey as a potential gravitational lens system. Having optimized a simple model for 'typical' galaxy-scale gravitational lenses, we generate four assessments of model quality that are then used in an automated classification. The robot infers from these four data the lens classification parameter H that a human would have assigned; the inference is performed using a probability distribution generated from a human-classified training set of candidates, including realistic simulated lenses and known false positives drawn from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Extended Groth Strip (EGS) survey. We compute the expected purity, completeness, and rejection rate, and find that these statistics can be optimized for a particular application by changing the prior probability distribution for H; this is equivalent to defining the robot's 'character'. Adopting a realistic prior based on expectations for the abundance of lenses, we find that a lens sample may be generated that is ∼100% pure, but only ∼20% complete. This shortfall is due primarily to the oversimplicity of the model of both the lens light and mass. With a more optimistic robot, ∼90% completeness can be achieved while rejecting ∼90% of the candidate objects. The remaining candidates must be classified by human inspectors. Displaying the images used and produced by the robot on a custom 'one-click' web interface, we are able to inspect and classify lens candidates at a rate of a few seconds per system, suggesting that a future 1000 deg. 2 imaging survey containing 10 7 BRGs, and some 10 4 lenses, could be successfully, and reproducibly, searched in a modest amount of time. We have verified our projected survey statistics, albeit at low significance, using the HST EGS data

  18. Automated Detection of Postoperative Surgical Site Infections Using Supervised Methods with Electronic Health Record Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhen; Simon, Gyorgy J; Arsoniadis, Elliot G; Wang, Yan; Kwaan, Mary R; Melton, Genevieve B

    2015-01-01

    The National Surgical Quality Improvement Project (NSQIP) is widely recognized as "the best in the nation" surgical quality improvement resource in the United States. In particular, it rigorously defines postoperative morbidity outcomes, including surgical adverse events occurring within 30 days of surgery. Due to its manual yet expensive construction process, the NSQIP registry is of exceptionally high quality, but its high cost remains a significant bottleneck to NSQIP's wider dissemination. In this work, we propose an automated surgical adverse events detection tool, aimed at accelerating the process of extracting postoperative outcomes from medical charts. As a prototype system, we combined local EHR data with the NSQIP gold standard outcomes and developed machine learned models to retrospectively detect Surgical Site Infections (SSI), a particular family of adverse events that NSQIP extracts. The built models have high specificity (from 0.788 to 0.988) as well as very high negative predictive values (>0.98), reliably eliminating the vast majority of patients without SSI, thereby significantly reducing the NSQIP extractors' burden.

  19. Construction and evaluation of an automated light directed protein-detecting microarray synthesizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marthandan, N; Klyza, S; Li, S; Kwon, Y U; Kodadek, T; Garner, H R

    2008-03-01

    We have designed, constructed, and evaluated an automated instrument that has produced high-density arrays with more than 30 000 peptide features within a 1.5 cm(2) area of a glass slide surface. These arrays can be used for high throughput library screening for protein binding ligands, for potential drug candidate molecules, or for discovering biomarkers. The device consists of a novel fluidics system, a relay control electrical system, an optics system that implements Texas Instruments' digital micromirror device (DMD), and a microwave source for accelerated synthesis of peptide arrays. The instrument implements two novel solid phase chemical synthesis strategies for producing peptide and peptoid arrays. Biotin-streptavidin and DNP anti-DNP (dinitrophenol) models of antibody small molecule interactions were used to demonstrate and evaluate the instrument's capability to produce high-density protein detecting arrays. Several screening assay and detection schemes were explored with various levels of efficiency and assays with sensitivity of 10 nM were also possible.

  20. Automated multi-radionuclide separation and analysis with combined detection capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plionis, Alexander Asterios

    The radiological dispersal device (RDD) is a weapon of great concern to those agencies responsible for protecting the public from the modern age of terrorism. In order to effectively respond to an RDD event, these agencies need to possess the capability to rapidly identify the radiological agents involved in the incident and assess the uptake of each individual victim. Since medical treatment for internal radiation poisoning is radionuclide-specific, it is critical to identify and quantify the radiological uptake of each individual victim. This dissertation describes the development of automated analytical components that could be used to determine and quantify multiple radionuclides in human urine bioassays. This is accomplished through the use of extraction chromatography that is plumbed in-line with one of a variety of detection instruments. Flow scintillation analysis is used for 90Sr and 210Po determination, flow gamma analysis is used assess 60 Co and 137Cs, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry is used to determine actinides. Detection limits for these analytes were determined for the appropriate technique and related to their implications for health physics.

  1. Automated detection of lung nodules in low-dose computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cascio, D.; Cheran, S.C.; Chincarini, A.; De Nunzio, G.; Delogu, P.; Fantacci, M.E.; Gargano, G.; Gori, I.; Retico, A.; Masala, G.L.; Preite Martinez, A.; Santoro, M.; Spinelli, C.; Tarantino, T.

    2007-01-01

    A computer-aided detection (CAD) system for the identification of pulmonary nodules in low-dose multi-detector computed-tomography (CT) images has been developed in the framework of the MAGIC-5 Italian project. One of the main goals of this project is to build a distributed database of lung CT scans in order to enable automated image analysis through a data and cpu GRID infrastructure. The basic modules of our lung-CAD system, consisting in a 3D dot-enhancement filter for nodule detection and a neural classifier for false-positive finding reduction, are described. The system was designed and tested for both internal and sub-pleural nodules. The database used in this study consists of 17 low-dose CT scans reconstructed with thin slice thickness (∝300 slices/scan). The preliminary results are shown in terms of the FROC analysis reporting a good sensitivity (85% range) for both internal and sub-pleural nodules at an acceptable level of false positive findings (1-9 FP/scan); the sensitivity value remains very high (75% range) even at 1-6 FP/scan. (orig.)

  2. Automated alarm to detect antigen excess in serum free immunoglobulin light chain kappa and lambda assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urdal, Petter; Amundsen, Erik K; Toska, Karin; Klingenberg, Olav

    2014-10-01

    Antigen excess causing a falsely low concentration result may occur when measuring serum free immunoglobulin light chains (SFLC). Automated antigen excess detection methods are available only with some analyzers. We have now developed and verified such a method. Residuals of sera with known SFLC-κ and -λ concentrations were analyzed using Binding Site reagents and methods adapted to the Roche Cobas® c.501 analyzer. We analyzed 117 sera for SFLC-κ and -λ and examined how the absorbance increased with time during the 7 minutes of reaction (absorbance reading points 12-70). From this an antigen excess alarm factor (ratio of absorbance increases between reading points 68-60 and 20-12, multiplied by 100) was defined. Upon our request, Roche added to our two SFLC assays a program which calculated this antigen excess alarm factor and triggered an alarm when the factor was below a defined value. We verified this antigen excess alarm function by analyzing serum from 325 persons of whom 143 were multiple myeloma patients. All samples with a known concentration above 30 mg/L triggered either an antigen excess alarm, an 'above test' alarm or both. Also, all samples above 200 mg/L (SFLC-λ) and 300 mg/L (SFLC-κ) triggered the antigen excess alarm and all but one triggered the above test alarm. The antigen excess alarm function presented here detected all known antigen excess samples at no increased time of analysis, a reduced workload and reduced reagent cost.

  3. Speech activity detection for the automated speaker recognition system of critical use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Bykov

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In the article, the authors developed a method for detecting speech activity for an automated system for recognizing critical use of speeches with wavelet parameterization of speech signal and classification at intervals of “language”/“pause” using a curvilinear neural network. The method of wavelet-parametrization proposed by the authors allows choosing the optimal parameters of wavelet transformation in accordance with the user-specified error of presentation of speech signal. Also, the method allows estimating the loss of information depending on the selected parameters of continuous wavelet transformation (NPP, which allowed to reduce the number of scalable coefficients of the LVP of the speech signal in order of magnitude with the allowable degree of distortion of the local spectrum of the LVP. An algorithm for detecting speech activity with a curvilinear neural network classifier is also proposed, which shows the high quality of segmentation of speech signals at intervals "language" / "pause" and is resistant to the presence in the speech signal of narrowband noise and technogenic noise due to the inherent properties of the curvilinear neural network.

  4. Automated large-volume sample stacking procedure to detect labeled peptides at picomolar concentration using capillary electrophoresis and laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siri, Nathalie; Riolet, Pierre; Bayle, Christophe; Couderc, François

    2003-08-05

    We have developed an automated large-volume sample stacking (LVSS) procedure to detect fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled peptides in the picomolar range. The injection duration is 10 min at 50 mbar to fill 62% of the capillary volume to the detection cell. The calculated limit of detection (S/N=3), filling 1% of the capillary volume, is 74 pM for bradykinin and 45 pM for L-enkephalin with samples diluted in water and analyzed in a 50 mM borate buffer, pH 9.2. With the automated LVSS system, the limits of detection are 7 pM for bradykinin, 3 pM for L-enkephalin and 2 pM for substance P. LVSS is shown to be quantitative from 500 to 10 pM.

  5. Detection - NIR, Luminescence and Other Rapid Methods-Pit Falls and Opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trudil, D.

    2007-01-01

    The proliferation of rapid, on-site biological detectors over the last 15 years has caused confusion within the user community and in some cases a diversion of resources. There remains no panacea; all systems have issues and no system provides the total answer. In 1995, with much enthusiasm, members of a US National Lab presented a mock-up of a hand held Biological Detector. This system, compared to a 'Tricorder' from science fiction, was envisioned to be available within 5 years. It would be able to scan a substance and within minutes provide an answer. Clearly that remains the goal of detector programs, but unfortunately science is the limiting factor. There are technologies, such as fluorescence and luminescence that provide minimally acceptable results when utilizing a defined bio-air sample. Many of these systems are also expensive, limiting their utility. But when these FLAPS, BARTS, BAWS, BioLerts and other are challenged with dirty or non-aerosol samples, they begin to have problems. With the relatively high cost of test kits, the significant number of potential hoax or negative samples; the issue of usefulness versus performance versus cost has further complicated the environment. Consequently, the utilization of cost effective, simple screening systems is needed for on site use. The current trend is to determine cost effective approaches to triage samples prior to in depth analysis. Therefore, a pH test, protein strip and Bioluminescence screen can indicate threat/non-threat prior to in-depth analysis. Experiences from 2001/2002 indicate over 90% of the first responder events are hoax related. Adapting the paradigm, screening out negatives become a priority. Near Infra Red (NIR) has been utilized in chemical agent detection and has been recently utilized to identify powders, salts, sugars and numerous potential hoax samples. The system is a non-destructive screening method that can be integrated with other technologies as a front end triage system

  6. Automated surveillance of 911 call data for detection of possible water contamination incidents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dangel Chrissy

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drinking water contamination, with the capability to affect large populations, poses a significant risk to public health. In recent water contamination events, the impact of contamination on public health appeared in data streams monitoring health-seeking behavior. While public health surveillance has traditionally focused on the detection of pathogens, developing methods for detection of illness from fast-acting chemicals has not been an emphasis. Methods An automated surveillance system was implemented for Cincinnati's drinking water contamination warning system to monitor health-related 911 calls in the city of Cincinnati. Incident codes indicative of possible water contamination were filtered from all 911 calls for analysis. The 911 surveillance system uses a space-time scan statistic to detect potential water contamination incidents. The frequency and characteristics of the 911 alarms over a 2.5 year period were studied. Results During the evaluation, 85 alarms occurred, although most occurred prior to the implementation of an additional alerting constraint in May 2009. Data were available for analysis approximately 48 minutes after calls indicating alarms may be generated 1-2 hours after a rapid increase in call volume. Most alerts occurred in areas of high population density. The average alarm area was 9.22 square kilometers. The average number of cases in an alarm was nine calls. Conclusions The 911 surveillance system provides timely notification of possible public health events, but did have limitations. While the alarms contained incident codes and location of the caller, additional information such as medical status was not available to assist validating the cause of the alarm. Furthermore, users indicated that a better understanding of 911 system functionality is necessary to understand how it would behave in an actual water contamination event.

  7. Automated detection and tracking of many cells by using 4D live-cell imaging data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, Terumasa; Hirose, Osamu; Kawaguchi, Shotaro; Toyoshima, Yu; Teramoto, Takayuki; Ikebata, Hisaki; Kuge, Sayuri; Ishihara, Takeshi; Iino, Yuichi; Yoshida, Ryo

    2014-06-15

    Automated fluorescence microscopes produce massive amounts of images observing cells, often in four dimensions of space and time. This study addresses two tasks of time-lapse imaging analyses; detection and tracking of the many imaged cells, and it is especially intended for 4D live-cell imaging of neuronal nuclei of Caenorhabditis elegans. The cells of interest appear as slightly deformed ellipsoidal forms. They are densely distributed, and move rapidly in a series of 3D images. Thus, existing tracking methods often fail because more than one tracker will follow the same target or a tracker transits from one to other of different targets during rapid moves. The present method begins by performing the kernel density estimation in order to convert each 3D image into a smooth, continuous function. The cell bodies in the image are assumed to lie in the regions near the multiple local maxima of the density function. The tasks of detecting and tracking the cells are then addressed with two hill-climbing algorithms. The positions of the trackers are initialized by applying the cell-detection method to an image in the first frame. The tracking method keeps attacking them to near the local maxima in each subsequent image. To prevent the tracker from following multiple cells, we use a Markov random field (MRF) to model the spatial and temporal covariation of the cells and to maximize the image forces and the MRF-induced constraint on the trackers. The tracking procedure is demonstrated with dynamic 3D images that each contain >100 neurons of C.elegans. http://daweb.ism.ac.jp/yoshidalab/crest/ismb2014 SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Supplementary data are available at http://daweb.ism.ac.jp/yoshidalab/crest/ismb2014 © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  8. Network-Based Real-time Integrated Fire Detection and Alarm (FDA) System with Building Automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, F.; Boby, R. I.; Rashid, M. M.; Alam, M. M.; Shaikh, Z.

    2017-11-01

    Fire alarm systems have become increasingly an important lifesaving technology in many aspects, such as applications to detect, monitor and control any fire hazard. A large sum of money is being spent annually to install and maintain the fire alarm systems in buildings to protect property and lives from the unexpected spread of fire. Several methods are already developed and it is improving on a daily basis to reduce the cost as well as increase quality. An integrated Fire Detection and Alarm (FDA) systems with building automation was studied, to reduce cost and improve their reliability by preventing false alarm. This work proposes an improved framework for FDA system to ensure a robust intelligent network of FDA control panels in real-time. A shortest path algorithmic was chosen for series of buildings connected by fiber optic network. The framework shares information and communicates with each fire alarm panels connected in peer to peer configuration and declare the network state using network address declaration from any building connected in network. The fiber-optic connection was proposed to reduce signal noises, thus increasing large area coverage, real-time communication and long-term safety. Based on this proposed method an experimental setup was designed and a prototype system was developed to validate the performance in practice. Also, the distributed network system was proposed to connect with an optional remote monitoring terminal panel to validate proposed network performance and ensure fire survivability where the information is sequentially transmitted. The proposed FDA system is different from traditional fire alarm and detection system in terms of topology as it manages group of buildings in an optimal and efficient manner.Introduction

  9. Sink detection on tilted terrain for automated identification of glacial cirques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasicek, Günther; Robl, Jörg; Lang, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Glacial cirques are morphologically distinct but complex landforms and represent a vital part of high mountain topography. Their distribution, elevation and relief are expected to hold information on (1) the extent of glacial occupation, (2) the mechanism of glacial cirque erosion, and (3) how glacial in concert with periglacial processes can limit peak altitude and mountain range height. While easily detectably for the expert's eye both in nature and on various representations of topography, their complicated nature makes them a nemesis for computer algorithms. Consequently, manual mapping of glacial cirques is commonplace in many mountain landscapes worldwide, but consistent datasets of cirque distribution and objectively mapped cirques and their morphometrical attributes are lacking. Among the biggest problems for algorithm development are the complexity in shape and the great variability of cirque size. For example, glacial cirques can be rather circular or longitudinal in extent, exist as individual and composite landforms, show prominent topographic depressions or can entirely be filled with water or sediment. For these reasons, attributes like circularity, size, drainage area and topology of landform elements (e.g. a flat floor surrounded by steep walls) have only a limited potential for automated cirque detection. Here we present a novel, geomorphometric method for automated identification of glacial cirques on digital elevation models that exploits their genetic bowl-like shape. First, we differentiate between glacial and fluvial terrain employing an algorithm based on a moving window approach and multi-scale curvature, which is also capable of fitting the analysis window to valley width. We then fit a plane to the valley stretch clipped by the analysis window and rotate the terrain around the center cell until the plane is level. Doing so, we produce sinks of considerable size if the clipped terrain represents a cirque, while no or only very small sinks

  10. 28-day extended-duration orbiter automated fault detection, isolation, and recovery concept definition and proof-of-concept development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rejai, B.; Zeilingold, D.; Rehagen, S.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes concept definition and proof-of-concept development of an automated on-board fault detection, isolation, and reconfiguration (FDIR) system for the extended-duration orbiter (EDO). The EDO is a modified Shuttle orbiter that can perform 16- to 28-day missions. The design of EDO FDIR requires automating existing orbiter FDIR procedures while minimizing changes to existing hardware and software. Automation will be achieved by extensive use of expert system technology. Two software architectures, a fully distributed one and a hierarchical failure-driven one, were identified. The hierarchical failure-driven approach was selected for proof-of-concept development. Prototypes were developed for the power reactant storage and distribution and fuel cells subsystems to recognize, isolate, and provide reconfiguration instructions for a limited number of malfunctions.

  11. Automated detection of infectious disease outbreaks in hospitals: a retrospective cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan S Huang

    2010-02-01

    clusters. Compared to rule-based thresholds, WHONET-SaTScan considered only one of 73 previously designated MRSA clusters and 0 of 87 VRE clusters as episodes statistically unlikely to have occurred by chance. WHONET-SaTScan identified six MRSA and four VRE clusters that were previously unknown. Epidemiologists considered more than 95% of the 59 detected clusters to merit consideration, with 27% warranting active investigation or intervention.Automated statistical software identified hospital clusters that had escaped routine detection. It also classified many previously identified clusters as events likely to occur because of normal random fluctuations. This automated method has the potential to provide valuable real-time guidance both by identifying otherwise unrecognized outbreaks and by preventing the unnecessary implementation of resource-intensive infection control measures that interfere with regular patient care. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.

  12. SU-G-201-03: Automation of High Dose Rate Brachytherapy Quality Assurance: Development of a Radioluminescent Detection System for Simultaneous Detection of Activity, Timing, and Positioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins, C; Xing, L; Fahimian, B [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Accuracy of positioning, timing and activity is of critical importance for High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy delivery. Respective measurements via film autoradiography, stop-watches and well chambers can be cumbersome, crude or lack dynamic source evaluation capabilities. To address such limitations, a single device radioluminescent detection system enabling automated real-time quantification of activity, position and timing accuracy is presented and experimentally evaluated. Methods: A radioluminescent sheet was fabricated by mixing Gd?O?S:Tb with PDMS and incorporated into a 3D printed device where it was fixated below a CMOS digital camera. An Ir-192 HDR source (VS2000, VariSource iX) with an effective active length of 5 mm was introduced using a 17-gauge stainless steel needle below the sheet. Pixel intensity values for determining activity were taken from an ROI centered on the source location. A calibration curve relating intensity values to activity was generated and used to evaluate automated activity determination with data gathered over 6 weeks. Positioning measurements were performed by integrating images for an entire delivery and fitting peaks to the resulting profile. Timing measurements were performed by evaluating source location and timestamps from individual images. Results: Average predicted activity error over 6 weeks was .35 ± .5%. The distance between four dwell positions was determined by the automated system to be 1.99 ± .02 cm. The result from autoradiography was 2.00 ± .03 cm. The system achieved a time resolution of 10 msec and determined the dwell time to be 1.01 sec ± .02 sec. Conclusion: The system was able to successfully perform automated detection of activity, positioning and timing concurrently under a single setup. Relative to radiochromic and radiographic film-based autoradiography, which can only provide a static evaluation positioning, optical detection of temporary radiation induced luminescence enables dynamic

  13. Fully Automated Detection of Corticospinal Tract Damage in Chronic Stroke Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural integrity of the corticospinal tract (CST after stroke is closely linked to the degree of motor impairment. However, current methods for measurement of fractional atrophy (FA of CST based on region of interest (ROI are time-consuming and open to bias. Here, we used tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS together with a CST template with healthy volunteers to quantify structural integrity of CST automatically. Two groups of patients after ischemic stroke were enrolled, group 1 (10 patients, 7 men, and Fugl-Meyer assessment (FMA scores ⩽ 50 and group 2 (12 patients, 12 men, and FMA scores = 100. CST of FAipsi, FAcontra, and FAratio was compared between the two groups. Relative to group 2, FA was decreased in group 1 in the ipsilesional CST (P<0.01, as well as the FAratio (P<0.01. There was no significant difference between the two subgroups in the contralesional CST (P=0.23. Compared with contralesional CST, FA of ipsilesional CST decreased in group 1 (P<0.01. These results suggest that the automated method used in our study could detect a surrogate biomarker to quantify the CST after stroke, which would facilitate implementation of clinical practice.

  14. Statistical techniques for automating the detection of anomalous performance in rotating machinery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piety, K.R.; Magette, T.E.

    1978-01-01

    Surveillance techniques which extend the sophistication existing in automated systems monitoring in industrial rotating equipment are described. The monitoring system automatically established limiting criteria during an initial learning period of a few days; and subsequently, while monitoring the test rotor during an extended period of normal operation, experienced a false alarm rate of 0.5%. At the same time, the monitoring system successfully detected all fault types that introduced into the test setup. Tests on real equipment are needed to provide final verification of the monitoring techniques. There are areas that would profit from additional investigation in the laboratory environment. A comparison of the relative value of alternate descriptors under given fault conditions would be worthwhile. This should be pursued in conjunction with extending the set of fault types available, e.g., lecaring problems. Other tests should examine the effects of using fewer (more coarse) intervals to define the lumped operational states. finally, techniques to diagnose the most probable fault should be developed by drawing upon the extensive data automatically logged by the monitoring system

  15. Automated detection of midsagittal plane in MR images of the head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Deming; Chalk, Jonathan B.; Doddrell, David M.; Semple, James

    2001-07-01

    A fully automated and robust method is presented for dividing MR 3D images of the human brain into two hemispheres. The method is developed specifically to deal with pathologically affected brains or brains in which the longitudinal fissure (LF) is significantly widened due to ageing or atrophy associated with neuro-degenerative processes. To provide a definitive estimate of the mid- sagittal plane, the method combines longitudinal fissure lines detected in both axial and corona slices of T1- weighted MR images and then fit these lines to a 3D plane. The method was applied to 36 brain MR image data sets (15 of them arising from subjects with probable Alzheimer's disease) all exhibiting some degrees of widened fissures and/or significant asymmetry due to pathology. Visual inspection of the results revealed that the separation was highly accurate and satisfactory. In some cases (5 in total), there were minor degrees of asymmetry in the posterior fossa structures despite successful splitting of cerebral cortex.

  16. Automated Topographic Change Detection via Dem Differencing at Large Scales Using The Arcticdem Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela, S. G.; Howat, I.; Noh, M. J.; Porter, C. C.; Morin, P. J.

    2016-12-01

    In the last decade, high resolution satellite imagery has become an increasingly accessible tool for geoscientists to quantify changes in the Arctic land surface due to geophysical, ecological and anthropomorphic processes. However, the trade off between spatial coverage and spatial-temporal resolution has limited detailed, process-level change detection over large (i.e. continental) scales. The ArcticDEM project utilized over 300,000 Worldview image pairs to produce a nearly 100% coverage elevation model (above 60°N) offering the first polar, high spatial - high resolution (2-8m by region) dataset, often with multiple repeats in areas of particular interest to geo-scientists. A dataset of this size (nearly 250 TB) offers endless new avenues of scientific inquiry, but quickly becomes unmanageable computationally and logistically for the computing resources available to the average scientist. Here we present TopoDiff, a framework for a generalized. automated workflow that requires minimal input from the end user about a study site, and utilizes cloud computing resources to provide a temporally sorted and differenced dataset, ready for geostatistical analysis. This hands-off approach allows the end user to focus on the science, without having to manage thousands of files, or petabytes of data. At the same time, TopoDiff provides a consistent and accurate workflow for image sorting, selection, and co-registration enabling cross-comparisons between research projects.

  17. Automated Detection and Closing of Holes in Aerial Point Clouds Using AN Uas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiolka, T.; Rouatbi, F.; Bender, D.

    2017-08-01

    3D terrain models are an important instrument in areas like geology, agriculture and reconnaissance. Using an automated UAS with a line-based LiDAR can create terrain models fast and easily even from large areas. But the resulting point cloud may contain holes and therefore be incomplete. This might happen due to occlusions, a missed flight route due to wind or simply as a result of changes in the ground height which would alter the swath of the LiDAR system. This paper proposes a method to detect holes in 3D point clouds generated during the flight and adjust the course in order to close them. First, a grid-based search for holes in the horizontal ground plane is performed. Then a check for vertical holes mainly created by buildings walls is done. Due to occlusions and steep LiDAR angles, closing the vertical gaps may be difficult or even impossible. Therefore, the current approach deals with holes in the ground plane and only marks the vertical holes in such a way that the operator can decide on further actions regarding them. The aim is to efficiently create point clouds which can be used for the generation of complete 3D terrain models.

  18. A Deep-Learning System for Fully-Automated Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter (PICC) Tip Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunkwang; Mansouri, Mohammad; Tajmir, Shahein; Lev, Michael H; Do, Synho

    2017-10-05

    A peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) is a thin catheter that is inserted via arm veins and threaded near the heart, providing intravenous access. The final catheter tip position is always confirmed on a chest radiograph (CXR) immediately after insertion since malpositioned PICCs can cause potentially life-threatening complications. Although radiologists interpret PICC tip location with high accuracy, delays in interpretation can be significant. In this study, we proposed a fully-automated, deep-learning system with a cascading segmentation AI system containing two fully convolutional neural networks for detecting a PICC line and its tip location. A preprocessing module performed image quality and dimension normalization, and a post-processing module found the PICC tip accurately by pruning false positives. Our best model, trained on 400 training cases and selectively tuned on 50 validation cases, obtained absolute distances from ground truth with a mean of 3.10 mm, a standard deviation of 2.03 mm, and a root mean squares error (RMSE) of 3.71 mm on 150 held-out test cases. This system could help speed confirmation of PICC position and further be generalized to include other types of vascular access and therapeutic support devices.

  19. Application of Reflectance Transformation Imaging Technique to Improve Automated Edge Detection in a Fossilized Oyster Reef

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djuricic, Ana; Puttonen, Eetu; Harzhauser, Mathias; Dorninger, Peter; Székely, Balázs; Mandic, Oleg; Nothegger, Clemens; Molnár, Gábor; Pfeifer, Norbert

    2016-04-01

    The world's largest fossilized oyster reef is located in Stetten, Lower Austria excavated during field campaigns of the Natural History Museum Vienna between 2005 and 2008. It is studied in paleontology to learn about change in climate from past events. In order to support this study, a laser scanning and photogrammetric campaign was organized in 2014 for 3D documentation of the large and complex site. The 3D point clouds and high resolution images from this field campaign are visualized by photogrammetric methods in form of digital surface models (DSM, 1 mm resolution) and orthophoto (0.5 mm resolution) to help paleontological interpretation of data. Due to size of the reef, automated analysis techniques are needed to interpret all digital data obtained from the field. One of the key components in successful automation is detection of oyster shell edges. We have tested Reflectance Transformation Imaging (RTI) to visualize the reef data sets for end-users through a cultural heritage viewing interface (RTIViewer). The implementation includes a Lambert shading method to visualize DSMs derived from terrestrial laser scanning using scientific software OPALS. In contrast to shaded RTI no devices consisting of a hardware system with LED lights, or a body to rotate the light source around the object are needed. The gray value for a given shaded pixel is related to the angle between light source and the normal at that position. Brighter values correspond to the slope surfaces facing the light source. Increasing of zenith angle results in internal shading all over the reef surface. In total, oyster reef surface contains 81 DSMs with 3 m x 2 m each. Their surface was illuminated by moving the virtual sun every 30 degrees (12 azimuth angles from 20-350) and every 20 degrees (4 zenith angles from 20-80). This technique provides paleontologists an interactive approach to virtually inspect the oyster reef, and to interpret the shell surface by changing the light source direction

  20. A machine learning system for automated whole-brain seizure detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Fergus

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a chronic neurological condition that affects approximately 70 million people worldwide. Characterised by sudden bursts of excess electricity in the brain, manifesting as seizures, epilepsy is still not well understood when compared with other neurological disorders. Seizures often happen unexpectedly and attempting to predict them has been a research topic for the last 30 years. Electroencephalograms have been integral to these studies, as the recordings that they produce can capture the brain’s electrical signals. The diagnosis of epilepsy is usually made by a neurologist, but can be difficult to make in the early stages. Supporting para-clinical evidence obtained from magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalography may enable clinicians to make a diagnosis of epilepsy and instigate treatment earlier. However, electroencephalogram capture and interpretation is time consuming and can be expensive due to the need for trained specialists to perform the interpretation. Automated detection of correlates of seizure activity generalised across different regions of the brain and across multiple subjects may be a solution. This paper explores this idea further and presents a supervised machine learning approach that classifies seizure and non-seizure records using an open dataset containing 342 records (171 seizures and 171 non-seizures. Our approach posits a new method for generalising seizure detection across different subjects without prior knowledge about the focal point of seizures. Our results show an improvement on existing studies with 88% for sensitivity, 88% for specificity and 93% for the area under the curve, with a 12% global error, using the k-NN classifier.

  1. An automated method for dynamic red blood cell aggregate detection in microfluidic flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehri, R; Niazi, E; Mavriplis, C; Fenech, M

    2018-01-31

    Red blood cell (RBC) aggregation is a unique phenomenon that occurs when red blood cells are subjected to low shear rates. Little is known about the sizes, shapes and behaviour of aggregates flowing in healthy humans. However, excessive aggregation has been shown to be an indication of pathological conditions. Therefore, characterizing RBC aggregates is important to medical research. The objective of this study was to develop a reliable technique based on image processing to assess and characterize human RBC aggregation subjected to controlled and measurable shear rates in a two-fluid flow microfluidic shearing system. Images of RBC suspensions at [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] entrained by a phosphate buffered saline solution in a PDMS microchannel were captured with a high speed camera. An algorithm for processing the RBC aggregate images is presented and validated (1) on a sample of known diameter hollow glass microspheres and (2) by comparing RBC aggregate size results with those of an ImageJ image processing technique and those obtained by manual detection by two independent researchers. The proposed image processing algorithm provides a very good agreement with the manufacturer data for the glass microspheres. It also performs well on the RBC suspension images, with errors of 2-4 [Formula: see text] with respect to the manual results. The proposed automated method for RBC aggregate detection is found to be reliable and fairly accurate and will serve researchers and, perhaps in the future, clinicians to assess healthy and pathological RBC aggregation under flowing conditions.

  2. An Automated Measurement of Ciliary Beating Frequency using a Combined Optical Flow and Peak Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Woojae; Han, Tae Hwa; Kim, Hyun Jun; Park, Man Young; Kim, Ku Sang

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The mucociliary transport system is a major defense mechanism of the respiratory tract. The performance of mucous transportation in the nasal cavity can be represented by a ciliary beating frequency (CBF). This study proposes a novel method to measure CBF by using optical flow. Methods To obtain objective estimates of CBF from video images, an automated computer-based image processing technique is developed. This study proposes a new method based on optical flow for image processing and peak detection for signal processing. We compare the measuring accuracy of the method in various combinations of image processing (optical flow versus difference image) and signal processing (fast Fourier transform [FFT] vs. peak detection [PD]). The digital high-speed video method with a manual count of CBF in slow motion video play, is the gold-standard in CBF measurement. We obtained a total of fifty recorded ciliated sinonasal epithelium images to measure CBF from the Department of Otolaryngology. The ciliated sinonasal epithelium images were recorded at 50-100 frames per second using a charge coupled device camera with an inverted microscope at a magnification of ×1,000. Results The mean square errors and variance for each method were 1.24, 0.84 Hz; 11.8, 2.63 Hz; 3.22, 1.46 Hz; and 3.82, 1.53 Hz for optical flow (OF) + PD, OF + FFT, difference image [DI] + PD, and DI + FFT, respectively. Of the four methods, PD using optical flow showed the best performance for measuring the CBF of nasal mucosa. Conclusions The proposed method was able to measure CBF more objectively and efficiently than what is currently possible. PMID:21886872

  3. A completely automated CAD system for mass detection in a large mammographic database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellotti, R.; De Carlo, F.; Tangaro, S.

    2006-01-01

    Mass localization plays a crucial role in computer-aided detection (CAD) systems for the classification of suspicious regions in mammograms. In this article we present a completely automated classification system for the detection of masses in digitized mammographic images. The tool system we discuss consists in three processing levels: (a) Image segmentation for the localization of regions of interest (ROIs). This step relies on an iterative dynamical threshold algorithm able to select iso-intensity closed contours around gray level maxima of the mammogram. (b) ROI characterization by means of textural features computed from the gray tone spatial dependence matrix (GTSDM), containing second-order spatial statistics information on the pixel gray level intensity. As the images under study were recorded in different centers and with different machine settings, eight GTSDM features were selected so as to be invariant under monotonic transformation. In this way, the images do not need to be normalized, as the adopted features depend on the texture only, rather than on the gray tone levels, too. (c) ROI classification by means of a neural network, with supervision provided by the radiologist's diagnosis. The CAD system was evaluated on a large database of 3369 mammographic images [2307 negative, 1062 pathological (or positive), containing at least one confirmed mass, as diagnosed by an expert radiologist]. To assess the performance of the system, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) and free-response ROC analysis were employed. The area under the ROC curve was found to be A z =0.783±0.008 for the ROI-based classification. When evaluating the accuracy of the CAD against the radiologist-drawn boundaries, 4.23 false positives per image are found at 80% of mass sensitivity

  4. Automated determinations of selenium in thermal power plant wastewater by sequential hydride generation and chemiluminescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezoe, Kentaro; Ohyama, Seiichi; Hashem, Md Abul; Ohira, Shin-Ichi; Toda, Kei

    2016-02-01

    After the Fukushima disaster, power generation from nuclear power plants in Japan was completely stopped and old coal-based power plants were re-commissioned to compensate for the decrease in power generation capacity. Although coal is a relatively inexpensive fuel for power generation, it contains high levels (mgkg(-1)) of selenium, which could contaminate the wastewater from thermal power plants. In this work, an automated selenium monitoring system was developed based on sequential hydride generation and chemiluminescence detection. This method could be applied to control of wastewater contamination. In this method, selenium is vaporized as H2Se, which reacts with ozone to produce chemiluminescence. However, interference from arsenic is of concern because the ozone-induced chemiluminescence intensity of H2Se is much lower than that of AsH3. This problem was successfully addressed by vaporizing arsenic and selenium individually in a sequential procedure using a syringe pump equipped with an eight-port selection valve and hot and cold reactors. Oxidative decomposition of organoselenium compounds and pre-reduction of the selenium were performed in the hot reactor, and vapor generation of arsenic and selenium were performed separately in the cold reactor. Sample transfers between the reactors were carried out by a pneumatic air operation by switching with three-way solenoid valves. The detection limit for selenium was 0.008 mg L(-1) and calibration curve was linear up to 1.0 mg L(-1), which provided suitable performance for controlling selenium in wastewater to around the allowable limit (0.1 mg L(-1)). This system consumes few chemicals and is stable for more than a month without any maintenance. Wastewater samples from thermal power plants were collected, and data obtained by the proposed method were compared with those from batchwise water treatment followed by hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  5. Automated lesion detection on MRI scans using combined unsupervised and supervised methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Dazhou; Fridriksson, Julius; Fillmore, Paul; Rorden, Christopher; Yu, Hongkai; Zheng, Kang; Wang, Song

    2015-01-01

    Accurate and precise detection of brain lesions on MR images (MRI) is paramount for accurately relating lesion location to impaired behavior. In this paper, we present a novel method to automatically detect brain lesions from a T1-weighted 3D MRI. The proposed method combines the advantages of both unsupervised and supervised methods. First, unsupervised methods perform a unified segmentation normalization to warp images from the native space into a standard space and to generate probability maps for different tissue types, e.g., gray matter, white matter and fluid. This allows us to construct an initial lesion probability map by comparing the normalized MRI to healthy control subjects. Then, we perform non-rigid and reversible atlas-based registration to refine the probability maps of gray matter, white matter, external CSF, ventricle, and lesions. These probability maps are combined with the normalized MRI to construct three types of features, with which we use supervised methods to train three support vector machine (SVM) classifiers for a combined classifier. Finally, the combined classifier is used to accomplish lesion detection. We tested this method using T1-weighted MRIs from 60 in-house stroke patients. Using leave-one-out cross validation, the proposed method can achieve an average Dice coefficient of 73.1 % when compared to lesion maps hand-delineated by trained neurologists. Furthermore, we tested the proposed method on the T1-weighted MRIs in the MICCAI BRATS 2012 dataset. The proposed method can achieve an average Dice coefficient of 66.5 % in comparison to the expert annotated tumor maps provided in MICCAI BRATS 2012 dataset. In addition, on these two test datasets, the proposed method shows competitive performance to three state-of-the-art methods, including Stamatakis et al., Seghier et al., and Sanjuan et al. In this paper, we introduced a novel automated procedure for lesion detection from T1-weighted MRIs by combining both an unsupervised and a

  6. Eosinophilia detected by automated blood cell counting in ambulatory North American outpatients. Incidence and clinical significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigden, M; Graydon, C

    1997-09-01

    To audit a cohort of ambulatory outpatients with eosinophilia detected on automated blood cell counting. Specific objectives included the determination of whether the eosinophilia had been anticipated, the etiology of the eosinophilia, the clinical follow-up and investigations performed on patients with eosinophilia, and the effect of the detection of eosinophilia on patient management and ultimate clinical outcome. A year-long retrospective review of all patients with an absolute eosinophil count of greater than 0.7 x 10(9)/L. A large outpatient laboratory system. The patient population was managed by family physicians and specialists. Data collection included the results of the hematology profile, the absolute eosinophil count, the clinical situation responsible for the hematologic profile determination, and the probable cause of eosinophilia. Individual physicians were surveyed to determine if discovery of the eosinophilia had changed patient management plan or clinical outcome. Out of 195,300 patients who had a hematology profile performed, 225 were found to have an absolute eosinophilia count higher than 0.7 x 10(9)/L. The overall incidence of eosinophilia in the study population was 0.1%. The eosinophilia was not anticipated in 85% of patients. No obvious cause was detected for the eosinophilia in 36% of patients. Various allergic diseases were responsible for the eosinophilia in the majority of the remaining patients. Fewer than 9% of individuals manifested a serious systemic illness or parasitemia. Further clinical follow-up had been performed in 69% of patients. Additional laboratory tests had been ordered in 59% of patients. The laboratory tests most frequently ordered were a repeat hematology profile or stool examinations for ova and parasites. In only two instances did the discovery of the eosinophilia appear to result in a significant change in patient management or ultimate clinical income. The vast majority of eosinophilias detected in ambulatory

  7. Towards automated detection, semi-quantification and identification of microbial growth in clinical bacteriology: A proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croxatto, Antony; Marcelpoil, Raphaël; Orny, Cédrick; Morel, Didier; Prod'hom, Guy; Greub, Gilbert

    2017-12-01

    Automation in microbiology laboratories impacts management, workflow, productivity and quality. Further improvements will be driven by the development of intelligent image analysis allowing automated detection of microbial growth, release of sterile samples, identification and quantification of bacterial colonies and reading of AST disk diffusion assays. We investigated the potential benefit of intelligent imaging analysis by developing algorithms allowing automated detection, semi-quantification and identification of bacterial colonies. Defined monomicrobial and clinical urine samples were inoculated by the BD Kiestra™ InoqulA™ BT module. Image acquisition of plates was performed with the BD Kiestra™ ImagA BT digital imaging module using the BD Kiestra™ Optis™ imaging software. The algorithms were developed and trained using defined data sets and their performance evaluated on both defined and clinical samples. The detection algorithms exhibited 97.1% sensitivity and 93.6% specificity for microbial growth detection. Moreover, quantification accuracy of 80.2% and of 98.6% when accepting a 1 log tolerance was obtained with both defined monomicrobial and clinical urine samples, despite the presence of multiple species in the clinical samples. Automated identification accuracy of microbial colonies growing on chromogenic agar from defined isolates or clinical urine samples ranged from 98.3% to 99.7%, depending on the bacterial species tested. The development of intelligent algorithm represents a major innovation that has the potential to significantly increase laboratory quality and productivity while reducing turn-around-times. Further development and validation with larger numbers of defined and clinical samples should be performed before transferring intelligent imaging analysis into diagnostic laboratories. Copyright © 2017 Chang Gung University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Development of an automated method of detecting stereotyped feeding events in multisensor data from tagged rorqual whales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Ann N; Goldbogen, Jeremy A; Friedlaender, Ari S; Calambokidis, John

    2016-10-01

    The introduction of animal-borne, multisensor tags has opened up many opportunities for ecological research, making previously inaccessible species and behaviors observable. The advancement of tag technology and the increasingly widespread use of bio-logging tags are leading to large volumes of sometimes extremely detailed data. With the increasing quantity and duration of tag deployments, a set of tools needs to be developed to aid in facilitating and standardizing the analysis of movement sensor data. Here, we developed an observation-based decision tree method to detect feeding events in data from multisensor movement tags attached to fin whales (Balaenoptera physalus ). Fin whales exhibit an energetically costly and kinematically complex foraging behavior called lunge feeding, an intermittent ram filtration mechanism. Using this automated system, we identified feeding lunges in 19 fin whales tagged with multisensor tags, during a total of over 100 h of continuously sampled data. Using movement sensor and hydrophone data, the automated lunge detector correctly identified an average of 92.8% of all lunges, with a false-positive rate of 9.5%. The strong performance of our automated feeding detector demonstrates an effective, straightforward method of activity identification in animal-borne movement tag data. Our method employs a detection algorithm that utilizes a hierarchy of simple thresholds based on knowledge of observed features of feeding behavior, a technique that is readily modifiable to fit a variety of species and behaviors. Using automated methods to detect behavioral events in tag records will significantly decrease data analysis time and aid in standardizing analysis methods, crucial objectives with the rapidly increasing quantity and variety of on-animal tag data. Furthermore, our results have implications for next-generation tag design, especially long-term tags that can be outfitted with on-board processing algorithms that automatically detect

  9. Automated image-based colon cleansing for laxative-free CT colonography computer-aided polyp detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linguraru, Marius George; Panjwani, Neil; Fletcher, Joel G.; Summer, Ronald M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance of a computer-aided detection (CAD) system for detecting colonic polyps at noncathartic computed tomography colonography (CTC) in conjunction with an automated image-based colon cleansing algorithm. Methods: An automated colon cleansing algorithm was designed to detect and subtract tagged-stool, accounting for heterogeneity and poor tagging, to be used in conjunction with a colon CAD system. The method is locally adaptive and combines intensity, shape, and texture analysis with probabilistic optimization. CTC data from cathartic-free bowel preparation were acquired for testing and training the parameters. Patients underwent various colonic preparations with barium or Gastroview in divided doses over 48 h before scanning. No laxatives were administered and no dietary modifications were required. Cases were selected from a polyp-enriched cohort and included scans in which at least 90% of the solid stool was visually estimated to be tagged and each colonic segment was distended in either the prone or supine view. The CAD system was run comparatively with and without the stool subtraction algorithm. Results: The dataset comprised 38 CTC scans from prone and/or supine scans of 19 patients containing 44 polyps larger than 10 mm (22 unique polyps, if matched between prone and supine scans). The results are robust on fine details around folds, thin-stool linings on the colonic wall, near polyps and in large fluid/stool pools. The sensitivity of the CAD system is 70.5% per polyp at a rate of 5.75 false positives/scan without using the stool subtraction module. This detection improved significantly (p = 0.009) after automated colon cleansing on cathartic-free data to 86.4% true positive rate at 5.75 false positives/scan. Conclusions: An automated image-based colon cleansing algorithm designed to overcome the challenges of the noncathartic colon significantly improves the sensitivity of colon CAD by approximately 15%.

  10. Genetic algorithm based feature selection combined with dual classification for the automated detection of proliferative diabetic retinopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Welikala, R; Fraz, M; Dehmeshki, J; Hoppe, A; Tah, V; Mann, S; Williamson, T H; Barman, S A

    2015-01-01

    Proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) is a condition that carries a high risk of severe visual impairment. The hallmark of PDR is the growth of abnormal new vessels. In this paper, an automated method for the detection of new vessels from retinal images is presented. This method is based on a dual classification approach. Two vessel segmentation approaches are applied to create two separate binary vessel map which each hold vital information. Local morphology features are measured from eac...

  11. Vertebral Body Compression Fractures and Bone Density: Automated Detection and Classification on CT Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Joseph E; Yao, Jianhua; Summers, Ronald M

    2017-09-01

    Purpose To create and validate a computer system with which to detect, localize, and classify compression fractures and measure bone density of thoracic and lumbar vertebral bodies on computed tomographic (CT) images. Materials and Methods Institutional review board approval was obtained, and informed consent was waived in this HIPAA-compliant retrospective study. A CT study set of 150 patients (mean age, 73 years; age range, 55-96 years; 92 women, 58 men) with (n = 75) and without (n = 75) compression fractures was assembled. All case patients were age and sex matched with control subjects. A total of 210 thoracic and lumbar vertebrae showed compression fractures and were electronically marked and classified by a radiologist. Prototype fully automated spinal segmentation and fracture detection software were then used to analyze the study set. System performance was evaluated with free-response receiver operating characteristic analysis. Results Sensitivity for detection or localization of compression fractures was 95.7% (201 of 210; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 87.0%, 98.9%), with a false-positive rate of 0.29 per patient. Additionally, sensitivity was 98.7% and specificity was 77.3% at case-based receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Accuracy for classification by Genant type (anterior, middle, or posterior height loss) was 0.95 (107 of 113; 95% CI: 0.89, 0.98), with weighted κ of 0.90 (95% CI: 0.81, 0.99). Accuracy for categorization by Genant height loss grade was 0.68 (77 of 113; 95% CI: 0.59, 0.76), with a weighted κ of 0.59 (95% CI: 0.47, 0.71). The average bone attenuation for T12-L4 vertebrae was 146 HU ± 29 (standard deviation) in case patients and 173 HU ± 42 in control patients; this difference was statistically significant (P high sensitivity and with a low false-positive rate, as well as to calculate vertebral bone density, on CT images. © RSNA, 2017 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  12. Flow cytometric-membrane potential detection of sodium channel active marine toxins: application to ciguatoxins in fish muscle and feasibility of automating saxitoxin detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manger, Ronald; Woodle, Doug; Berger, Andrew; Dickey, Robert W; Jester, Edward; Yasumoto, Takeshi; Lewis, Richard; Hawryluk, Timothy; Hungerford, James

    2014-01-01

    Ciguatoxins are potent neurotoxins with a significant public health impact. Cytotoxicity assays have allowed the most sensitive means of detection of ciguatoxin-like activity without reliance on mouse bioassays and have been invaluable in studying outbreaks. An improvement of these cell-based assays is presented here in which rapid flow cytometric detection of ciguatoxins and saxitoxins is demonstrated using fluorescent voltage sensitive dyes. A depolarization response can be detected directly due to ciguatoxin alone; however, an approximate 1000-fold increase in sensitivity is observed in the presence of veratridine. These results demonstrate that flow cytometric assessment of ciguatoxins is possible at levels approaching the trace detection limits of our earlier cytotoxicity assays, however, with a significant reduction in analysis time. Preliminary results are also presented for detection of brevetoxins and for automation and throughput improvements to a previously described method for detecting saxitoxins in shellfish extracts.

  13. Evaluation of a CLEIA automated assay system for the detection of a panel of tumor markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falzarano, Renato; Viggiani, Valentina; Michienzi, Simona; Longo, Flavia; Tudini, Silvestra; Frati, Luigi; Anastasi, Emanuela

    2013-10-01

    Tumor markers are commonly used to detect a relapse of disease in oncologic patients during follow-up. It is important to evaluate new assay systems for a better and more precise assessment, as a standardized method is currently lacking. The aim of this study was to assess the concordance between an automated chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay system (LUMIPULSE® G1200) and our reference methods using seven tumor markers. Serum samples from 787 subjects representing a variety of diagnoses, including oncologic, were analyzed using LUMIPULSE® G1200 and our reference methods. Serum values were measured for the following analytes: prostate-specific antigen (PSA), alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), cancer antigen 125 (CA125), carbohydrate antigen 15-3 (CA15-3), carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9), and cytokeratin 19 fragment (CYFRA 21-1). For the determination of CEA, AFP, and PSA, an automatic analyzer based on chemiluminescence was applied as reference method. To assess CYFRA 21-1, CA125, CA19-9, and CA15-3, an immunoradiometric manual system was employed. Method comparison by Passing-Bablok analysis resulted in slopes ranging from 0.9728 to 1.9089 and correlation coefficients from 0.9977 to 0.9335. The precision of each assay was assessed by testing six serum samples. Each sample was analyzed for all tumor biomarkers in duplicate and in three different runs. The coefficients of variation were less than 6.3 and 6.2 % for within-run and between-run variation, respectively. Our data suggest an overall good interassay agreement for all markers. The comparison with our reference methods showed good precision and reliability, highlighting its usefulness in clinical laboratory's routine.

  14. Automated Detection and Predictive Modeling of Flux Transfer Events using CLUSTER Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipes, T. B.; Karimabadi, H.; Driscoll, J.; Wang, Y.; Lavraud, B.; Slavin, J. A.

    2006-12-01

    Almost all statistical studies of flux ropes (FTEs) and traveling compression regions (TCRs) have been based on (i) visual inspection of data to compile a list of events and (ii) use of histograms and simple linear correlation analysis to study their properties and potential causes and dependencies. This approach has several major drawbacks including being highly subjective and inefficient. The traditional use of histograms and simple linear correlation analysis is also only useful for analysis of systems that show dominant dependencies on one or two variables at the most. However, if the system has complex dependencies, more sophisticated statistical techniques are required. For example, Wang et al. [2006] showed evidence that FTE occurrence rate are affected by IMF Bygsm, Bzgsm, and magnitude, and the IMF clock, tilt, spiral, and cone angles. If the initial findings were correct that FTEs occur only during periods of southward IMF, one could use the direction of IMF as a predictor of occurrence of FTEs. But in light of Wang et al. result, one cannot draw quantitative conclusions about conditions under which FTEs occur. It may be that a certain combination of these parameters is the true controlling parameter. To uncover this, one needs to deploy more sophisticated techniques. We have developed a new, sophisticated data mining tool called MineTool. MineTool is highly accurate, flexible and capable of handling difficult and even noisy datasets extremely well. It has the ability to outperform standard data mining tools such as artificial neural networks, decision/regression trees and support vector machines. Here we present preliminary results of the application of this tool to the CLUSTER data to perform two tasks: (i) automated detection of FTEs, and (ii) predictive modeling of occurrences of FTEs based on IMF and magnetospheric conditions.

  15. Automated detection of arterial input function in DSC perfusion MRI in a stroke rat model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, M-Y; Liu, H-L [Graduate Institute of Medical Physics and Imaging Science, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Lee, T-H; Yang, S-T; Kuo, H-H [Stroke Section, Department of Neurology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Chyi, T-K [Molecular Imaging Center Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: hlaliu@mail.cgu.edu.tw

    2009-05-15

    Quantitative cerebral blood flow (CBF) estimation requires deconvolution of the tissue concentration time curves with an arterial input function (AIF). However, image-based determination of AIF in rodent is challenged due to limited spatial resolution. We evaluated the feasibility of quantitative analysis using automated AIF detection and compared the results with commonly applied semi-quantitative analysis. Permanent occlusion of bilateral or unilateral common carotid artery was used to induce cerebral ischemia in rats. The image using dynamic susceptibility contrast method was performed on a 3-T magnetic resonance scanner with a spin-echo echo-planar-image sequence (TR/TE = 700/80 ms, FOV = 41 mm, matrix = 64, 3 slices, SW = 2 mm), starting from 7 s prior to contrast injection (1.2 ml/kg) at four different time points. For quantitative analysis, CBF was calculated by the AIF which was obtained from 10 voxels with greatest contrast enhancement after deconvolution. For semi-quantitative analysis, relative CBF was estimated by the integral divided by the first moment of the relaxivity time curves. We observed if the AIFs obtained in the three different ROIs (whole brain, hemisphere without lesion and hemisphere with lesion) were similar, the CBF ratios (lesion/normal) between quantitative and semi-quantitative analyses might have a similar trend at different operative time points. If the AIFs were different, the CBF ratios might be different. We concluded that using local maximum one can define proper AIF without knowing the anatomical location of arteries in a stroke rat model.

  16. Automated Thermal Image Processing for Detection and Classification of Birds and Bats - FY2012 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duberstein, Corey A.; Matzner, Shari; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Virden, Daniel J.; Myers, Joshua R.; Maxwell, Adam R.

    2012-09-01

    Surveying wildlife at risk from offshore wind energy development is difficult and expensive. Infrared video can be used to record birds and bats that pass through the camera view, but it is also time consuming and expensive to review video and determine what was recorded. We proposed to conduct algorithm and software development to identify and to differentiate thermally detected targets of interest that would allow automated processing of thermal image data to enumerate birds, bats, and insects. During FY2012 we developed computer code within MATLAB to identify objects recorded in video and extract attribute information that describes the objects recorded. We tested the efficiency of track identification using observer-based counts of tracks within segments of sample video. We examined object attributes, modeled the effects of random variability on attributes, and produced data smoothing techniques to limit random variation within attribute data. We also began drafting and testing methodology to identify objects recorded on video. We also recorded approximately 10 hours of infrared video of various marine birds, passerine birds, and bats near the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) at Sequim, Washington. A total of 6 hours of bird video was captured overlooking Sequim Bay over a series of weeks. An additional 2 hours of video of birds was also captured during two weeks overlooking Dungeness Bay within the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Bats and passerine birds (swallows) were also recorded at dusk on the MSL campus during nine evenings. An observer noted the identity of objects viewed through the camera concurrently with recording. These video files will provide the information necessary to produce and test software developed during FY2013. The annotation will also form the basis for creation of a method to reliably identify recorded objects.

  17. Comparing automated classification and digitization approaches to detect change in eelgrass bed extent during restoration of a large river delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, Anna Elizabeth; Davis, Jerry D.; Woo, Isa; Grossman, Eric; Barham, Jesse B.; Ellings, Christopher S.; Takekawa, John Y.

    2017-01-01

    Native eelgrass (Zostera marina) is an important contributor to ecosystem services that supplies cover for juvenile fish, supports a variety of invertebrate prey resources for fish and waterbirds, provides substrate for herring roe consumed by numerous fish and birds, helps stabilize sediment, and sequesters organic carbon. Seagrasses are in decline globally, and monitoring changes in their growth and extent is increasingly valuable to determine impacts from large-scale estuarine restoration and inform blue carbon mapping initiatives. Thus, we examined the efficacy of two remote sensing mapping methods with high-resolution (0.5 m pixel size) color near infrared imagery with ground validation to assess change following major tidal marsh restoration. Automated classification of false color aerial imagery and digitized polygons documented a slight decline in eelgrass area directly after restoration followed by an increase two years later. Classification of sparse and low to medium density eelgrass was confounded in areas with algal cover, however large dense patches of eelgrass were well delineated. Automated classification of aerial imagery from unsupervised and supervised methods provided reasonable accuracies of 73% and hand-digitizing polygons from the same imagery yielded similar results. Visual clues for hand digitizing from the high-resolution imagery provided as reliable a map of dense eelgrass extent as automated image classification. We found that automated classification had no advantages over manual digitization particularly because of the limitations of detecting eelgrass with only three bands of imagery and near infrared.

  18. Fall prevention walker during rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, Kian Sek; E, Chun Zhi; Saim, Hashim; Zakaria, Wan Nurshazwani Wan; Khialdin, Safinaz Binti Mohd; Isa, Hazlita; Awad, M. I.; Soon, Chin Fhong

    2017-09-01

    This paper proposes on the design of a walker for the prevention of falling among elderlies or patients during rehabilitation whenever they use a walker to assist them. Fall happens due to impaired balance or gait problem. The assistive device is designed by applying stability concept and an accelerometric fall detection system is included. The accelerometric fall detection system acts as an alerting device that acquires body accelerometric data and detect fall. Recorded accelerometric data could be useful for further assessment. Structural strength of the walker was verified via iterations of simulation using finite element analysis, before being fabricated. Experiments were conducted to identify the fall patterns using accelerometric data. The design process and detection of fall pattern demonstrates the design of a walker that could support the user without fail and alerts the helper, thus salvaging the users from injuries due to fall and unattended situation.

  19. Automated detection of haemozoin-containing monocytes for the diagnosis of malaria in microscopically negative cases during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hänscheid, Thomas; Längin, Matthias; Codices, Vera; Luty, Adrian J F; Adegnika, Ayola A; Kremsner, Peter G; Grobusch, Martin P

    2009-03-01

    Plasmodium falciparum sequesters in the placenta. Cell-Dyn automated flow cytometric haematology analysers have the capacity to detect haemozoin-containing circulating leukocytes during routine FBC analysis. In Lambaréné, Gabon, 685 FBCs of pregnant women were analysed, yielding 86.8% sensitivity and 78.5% specificity compared to microscopy. In a subset of 37 Cell-Dyn positive but microscopy negative samples, PCR detected five positive cases. This methodology may serve as an adjunct rapid diagnostic tool for malaria during pregnancy, even in microscopically negative cases.

  20. Automated detection and analysis of particle beams in laser-plasma accelerator simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ushizima, Daniela Mayumi; Geddes, C.G.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Bethel, E. Wes; Jacobsen, J.; Prabhat, ,; R.ubel, O.; Weber, G,; Hamann, B.

    2010-05-21

    scientific data mining is increasingly considered. In plasma simulations, Bagherjeiran et al. presented a comprehensive report on applying graph-based techniques for orbit classification. They used the KAM classifier to label points and components in single and multiple orbits. Love et al. conducted an image space analysis of coherent structures in plasma simulations. They used a number of segmentation and region-growing techniques to isolate regions of interest in orbit plots. Both approaches analyzed particle accelerator data, targeting the system dynamics in terms of particle orbits. However, they did not address particle dynamics as a function of time or inspected the behavior of bunches of particles. Ruebel et al. addressed the visual analysis of massive laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) simulation data using interactive procedures to query the data. Sophisticated visualization tools were provided to inspect the data manually. Ruebel et al. have integrated these tools to the visualization and analysis system VisIt, in addition to utilizing efficient data management based on HDF5, H5Part, and the index/query tool FastBit. In Ruebel et al. proposed automatic beam path analysis using a suite of methods to classify particles in simulation data and to analyze their temporal evolution. To enable researchers to accurately define particle beams, the method computes a set of measures based on the path of particles relative to the distance of the particles to a beam. To achieve good performance, this framework uses an analysis pipeline designed to quickly reduce the amount of data that needs to be considered in the actual path distance computation. As part of this process, region-growing methods are utilized to detect particle bunches at single time steps. Efficient data reduction is essential to enable automated analysis of large data sets as described in the next section, where data reduction methods are steered to the particular requirements of our clustering analysis

  1. Point Cloud Based Change Detection - an Automated Approach for Cloud-based Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Patrick; Bahr, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The fusion of stereo photogrammetric point clouds with LiDAR data or terrain information derived from SAR interferometry has a significant potential for 3D topographic change detection. In the present case study latest point cloud generation and analysis capabilities are used to examine a landslide that occurred in the village of Malin in Maharashtra, India, on 30 July 2014, and affected an area of ca. 44.000 m2. It focuses on Pléiades high resolution satellite imagery and the Airbus DS WorldDEMTM as a product of the TanDEM-X mission. This case study was performed using the COTS software package ENVI 5.3. Integration of custom processes and automation is supported by IDL (Interactive Data Language). Thus, ENVI analytics is running via the object-oriented and IDL-based ENVITask API. The pre-event topography is represented by the WorldDEMTM product, delivered with a raster of 12 m x 12 m and based on the EGM2008 geoid (called pre-DEM). For the post-event situation a Pléiades 1B stereo image pair of the AOI affected was obtained. The ENVITask "GeneratePointCloudsByDenseImageMatching" was implemented to extract passive point clouds in LAS format from the panchromatic stereo datasets: • A dense image-matching algorithm is used to identify corresponding points in the two images. • A block adjustment is applied to refine the 3D coordinates that describe the scene geometry. • Additionally, the WorldDEMTM was input to constrain the range of heights in the matching area, and subsequently the length of the epipolar line. The "PointCloudFeatureExtraction" task was executed to generate the post-event digital surface model from the photogrammetric point clouds (called post-DEM). Post-processing consisted of the following steps: • Adding the geoid component (EGM 2008) to the post-DEM. • Pre-DEM reprojection to the UTM Zone 43N (WGS-84) coordinate system and resizing. • Subtraction of the pre-DEM from the post-DEM. • Filtering and threshold based classification of

  2. Automated Microfluidic Droplet-Based Sample Chopper for Detection of Small Fluorescence Differences Using Lock-In Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negou, Jean T; Avila, L Adriana; Li, Xiangpeng; Hagos, Tesfagebriel M; Easley, Christopher J

    2017-06-06

    Fluorescence is widely used for small-volume analysis and is a primary tool for on-chip detection in microfluidic devices, yet additional expertise, more elaborate optics, and phase-locked detectors are needed for ultrasensitive measurements. Recently, we designed a microfluidic analog to an optical beam chopper (μChopper) that alternated formation of picoliter volume sample and reference droplets. Without complex optics, the device negated large signal drifts (1/f noise), allowing absorbance detection in a mere 27 μm optical path. Here, we extend the μChopper concept to fluorescence detection with standard wide-field microscope optics. Precision of droplet control in the μChopper was improved by automation with pneumatic valves, allowing fluorescence measurements to be strictly phase locked at 0.04 Hz bandwidth to droplets generated at 3.50 Hz. A detection limit of 12 pM fluorescein was achieved when sampling 20 droplets, and as few as 310 zeptomoles (3.1 × 10 -19 mol) were detectable in single droplets (8.8 nL). When applied to free fatty acid (FFA) uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, this μChopper permitted single-cell FFA uptake rates to be quantified at 3.5 ± 0.2 × 10 -15 mol cell -1 for the first time. Additionally, homogeneous immunoassays in droplets exhibited insulin detection limits of 9.3 nM or 190 amol (1.9 × 10 -16 mol). The combination of this novel, automated μChopper with lock-in detection provides a high-performance platform for detecting small differences with standard fluorescence optics, particularly in situations where sample volume is limited. The technique should be simple to implement into a variety of other droplet fluidics devices.

  3. Automated Bayesian model development for frequency detection in biological time series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oldroyd Giles ED

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A first step in building a mathematical model of a biological system is often the analysis of the temporal behaviour of key quantities. Mathematical relationships between the time and frequency domain, such as Fourier Transforms and wavelets, are commonly used to extract information about the underlying signal from a given time series. This one-to-one mapping from time points to frequencies inherently assumes that both domains contain the complete knowledge of the system. However, for truncated, noisy time series with background trends this unique mapping breaks down and the question reduces to an inference problem of identifying the most probable frequencies. Results In this paper we build on the method of Bayesian Spectrum Analysis and demonstrate its advantages over conventional methods by applying it to a number of test cases, including two types of biological time series. Firstly, oscillations of calcium in plant root cells in response to microbial symbionts are non-stationary and noisy, posing challenges to data analysis. Secondly, circadian rhythms in gene expression measured over only two cycles highlights the problem of time series with limited length. The results show that the Bayesian frequency detection approach can provide useful results in specific areas where Fourier analysis can be uninformative or misleading. We demonstrate further benefits of the Bayesian approach for time series analysis, such as direct comparison of different hypotheses, inherent estimation of noise levels and parameter precision, and a flexible framework for modelling the data without pre-processing. Conclusions Modelling in systems biology often builds on the study of time-dependent phenomena. Fourier Transforms are a convenient tool for analysing the frequency domain of time series. However, there are well-known limitations of this method, such as the introduction of spurious frequencies when handling short and noisy time series, and

  4. Dual tasking with the timed "up & go" test improves detection of risk of falls in people with Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vance, Roisin C; Healy, Dan G; Galvin, Rose; French, Helen P

    2015-01-01

    Falls are a common and disabling feature of Parkinson disease (PD). Early identification of patients at greatest risk of falling is a key goal of physical therapy assessment. The Timed "Up & Go" Test (TUG), a frequently used mobility assessment tool, has moderate sensitivity and specificity for identifying fall risk. The study objective was to investigate whether adding a task (cognitive or manual) to the TUG (TUG-cognitive or TUG-manual, respectively) increases the utility of the test for identifying fall risk in people with PD. This was a retrospective cohort study of people with PD (N=36). Participants were compared on the basis of self-reported fall exposure in the preceding 6 months (those who had experienced falls ["fallers"] versus those who had not ["nonfallers"]). The time taken to complete the TUG, TUG-cognitive, and TUG-manual was measured for both groups. Between-group differences were calculated with the Mann-Whitney U test. The discriminative performance of the test at various cutoff values was examined, and estimates of sensitivity and specificity were based on receiver operating characteristic curve plots. Fallers took significantly longer than nonfallers (n=19) to complete the TUG under all 3 conditions. The TUG-cognitive showed optimal discriminative performance (receiver operating characteristic area under the curve=0.82; 95% confidence interval [CI]=0.64, 0.92) at a cutoff of 14.7 seconds. The TUG-cognitive was more likely to correctly classify participants with a low risk of falling (positive likelihood ratio=2.9) (Physical Therapy Association.

  5. Estimating the joint disease outbreak-detection time when an automated biosurveillance system is augmenting traditional clinical case finding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yanna; Adamou, Christina; Dowling, John N; Cooper, Gregory F

    2008-04-01

    The goals of automated biosurveillance systems are to detect disease outbreaks early, while exhibiting few false positives. Evaluation measures currently exist to estimate the expected detection time of biosurveillance systems. Researchers also have developed models that estimate clinician detection of cases of outbreak diseases, which is a process known as clinical case finding. However, little research has been done on estimating how well biosurveillance systems augment traditional outbreak detection that is carried out by clinicians. In this paper, we introduce a general approach for doing so for non-endemic disease outbreaks, which are characteristic of bioterrorist induced diseases, such as respiratory anthrax. We first layout the basic framework, which makes minimal assumptions, and then we specialize it in several ways. We illustrate the method using a Bayesian outbreak detection algorithm called PANDA, a model of clinician outbreak detection, and simulated cases of a windborne anthrax release. This analysis derives a bound on how well we would expect PANDA to augment clinician detection of an anthrax outbreak. The results support that such analyses are useful in assessing the extent to which computer-based outbreak detection systems are expected to augment traditional clinician outbreak detection.

  6. Automated Detection of Geomorphic Features in LiDAR Point Clouds of Various Spatial Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorninger, Peter; Székely, Balázs; Zámolyi, András.; Nothegger, Clemens

    2010-05-01

    LiDAR, also referred to as laser scanning, has proved to be an important tool for topographic data acquisition. Terrestrial laser scanning allows for accurate (several millimeter) and high resolution (several centimeter) data acquisition at distances of up to some hundred meters. By contrast, airborne laser scanning allows for acquiring homogeneous data for large areas, albeit with lower accuracy (decimeter) and resolution (some ten points per square meter) compared to terrestrial laser scanning. Hence, terrestrial laser scanning is preferably used for precise data acquisition of limited areas such as landslides or steep structures, while airborne laser scanning is well suited for the acquisition of topographic data of huge areas or even country wide. Laser scanners acquire more or less homogeneously distributed point clouds. These points represent natural objects like terrain and vegetation and artificial objects like buildings, streets or power lines. Typical products derived from such data are geometric models such as digital surface models representing all natural and artificial objects and digital terrain models representing the geomorphic topography only. As the LiDAR technology evolves, the amount of data produced increases almost exponentially even in smaller projects. This means a considerable challenge for the end user of the data: the experimenter has to have enough knowledge, experience and computer capacity in order to manage the acquired dataset and to derive geomorphologically relevant information from the raw or intermediate data products. Additionally, all this information might need to be integrated with other data like orthophotos. In all theses cases, in general, interactive interpretation is necessary to determine geomorphic structures from such models to achieve effective data reduction. There is little support for the automatic determination of characteristic features and their statistical evaluation. From the lessons learnt from automated

  7. Results of a multivariate approach to automated oestrus and mastitis detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, de R.M.; Kroeze, G.H.; Achten, J.M.F.H.; Maatje, K.; Rossing, W.

    1997-01-01

    In modern dairy farming sensors can be used to measure on-line milk yield, milk temperature, electrical conductivity of quarter milk, concentrate intake and the cow's activity. Together with information from the management information system (MIS), the sensor data can be used for the automated

  8. Computer-aided Detection of Cancer in Automated 3D Breast Ultrasound

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, T.; Platel, B.; Mus, R.; Tabar, L.; Mann, R.; Karssemeijer, N.

    2013-01-01

    Automated 3D breast ultrasound (ABUS) has gained a lot of interest and may become widely used in screening of dense breasts, where sensitivity of mammography is poor. However, reading ABUS images is time consuming, and subtle abnormalities may be missed. Therefore, we are developing a computer aided

  9. Automated cerebellar segmentation: Validation and application to detect smaller volumes in children prenatally exposed to alcohol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie A. Cardenas

    2014-01-01

    Discussion: These results demonstrate excellent reliability and validity of automated cerebellar volume and mid-sagittal area measurements, compared to manual measurements. These data also illustrate that this new technology for automatically delineating the cerebellum leads to conclusions regarding the effects of prenatal alcohol exposure on the cerebellum consistent with prior studies that used labor intensive manual delineation, even with a very small sample.

  10. Simplified automated image analysis for detection and phenotyping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis on porous supports by monitoring growing microcolonies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice L den Hertog

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Even with the advent of nucleic acid (NA amplification technologies the culture of mycobacteria for diagnostic and other applications remains of critical importance. Notably microscopic observed drug susceptibility testing (MODS, as opposed to traditional culture on solid media or automated liquid culture, has shown potential to both speed up and increase the provision of mycobacterial culture in high burden settings. METHODS: Here we explore the growth of Mycobacterial tuberculosis microcolonies, imaged by automated digital microscopy, cultured on a porous aluminium oxide (PAO supports. Repeated imaging during colony growth greatly simplifies "computer vision" and presumptive identification of microcolonies was achieved here using existing publically available algorithms. Our system thus allows the growth of individual microcolonies to be monitored and critically, also to change the media during the growth phase without disrupting the microcolonies. Transfer of identified microcolonies onto selective media allowed us, within 1-2 bacterial generations, to rapidly detect the drug susceptibility of individual microcolonies, eliminating the need for time consuming subculturing or the inoculation of multiple parallel cultures. SIGNIFICANCE: Monitoring the phenotype of individual microcolonies as they grow has immense potential for research, screening, and ultimately M. tuberculosis diagnostic applications. The method described is particularly appealing with respect to speed and automation.

  11. Automated Feature Set Selection and Its Application to MCC Identification in Digital Mammograms for Breast Cancer Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu-Chung Shen

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We propose a fully automated algorithm that is able to select a discriminative feature set from a training database via sequential forward selection (SFS, sequential backward selection (SBS, and F-score methods. We applied this scheme to microcalcifications cluster (MCC detection in digital mammograms for early breast cancer detection. The system was able to select features fully automatically, regardless of the input training mammograms used. We tested the proposed scheme using a database of 111 clinical mammograms containing 1,050 microcalcifications (MCs. The accuracy of the system was examined via a free response receiver operating characteristic (fROC curve of the test dataset. The system performance for MC identifications was Az = 0.9897, the sensitivity was 92%, and 0.65 false positives (FPs were generated per image for MCC detection.

  12. Ice crystal characterization in cirrus clouds: a sun-tracking camera system and automated detection algorithm for halo displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, Linda; Seefeldner, Meinhard; Wiegner, Matthias; Mayer, Bernhard

    2017-07-01

    Halo displays in the sky contain valuable information about ice crystal shape and orientation: e.g., the 22° halo is produced by randomly oriented hexagonal prisms while parhelia (sundogs) indicate oriented plates. HaloCam, a novel sun-tracking camera system for the automated observation of halo displays is presented. An initial visual evaluation of the frequency of halo displays for the ACCEPT (Analysis of the Composition of Clouds with Extended Polarization Techniques) field campaign from October to mid-November 2014 showed that sundogs were observed more often than 22° halos. Thus, the majority of halo displays was produced by oriented ice crystals. During the campaign about 27 % of the cirrus clouds produced 22° halos, sundogs or upper tangent arcs. To evaluate the HaloCam observations collected from regular measurements in Munich between January 2014 and June 2016, an automated detection algorithm for 22° halos was developed, which can be extended to other halo types as well. This algorithm detected 22° halos about 2 % of the time for this dataset. The frequency of cirrus clouds during this time period was estimated by co-located ceilometer measurements using temperature thresholds of the cloud base. About 25 % of the detected cirrus clouds occurred together with a 22° halo, which implies that these clouds contained a certain fraction of smooth, hexagonal ice crystals. HaloCam observations complemented by radiative transfer simulations and measurements of aerosol and cirrus cloud optical thickness (AOT and COT) provide a possibility to retrieve more detailed information about ice crystal roughness. This paper demonstrates the feasibility of a completely automated method to collect and evaluate a long-term database of halo observations and shows the potential to characterize ice crystal properties.

  13. High throughput detection of Coxiella burnetii by real-time PCR with internal control system and automated DNA preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kramme Stefanie

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coxiella burnetii is the causative agent of Q-fever, a widespread zoonosis. Due to its high environmental stability and infectivity it is regarded as a category B biological weapon agent. In domestic animals infection remains either asymptomatic or presents as infertility or abortion. Clinical presentation in humans can range from mild flu-like illness to acute pneumonia and hepatitis. Endocarditis represents the most common form of chronic Q-fever. In humans serology is the gold standard for diagnosis but is inadequate for early case detection. In order to serve as a diagnostic tool in an eventual biological weapon attack or in local epidemics we developed a real-time 5'nuclease based PCR assay with an internal control system. To facilitate high-throughput an automated extraction procedure was evaluated. Results To determine the minimum number of copies that are detectable at 95% chance probit analysis was used. Limit of detection in blood was 2,881 copies/ml [95%CI, 2,188–4,745 copies/ml] with a manual extraction procedure and 4,235 copies/ml [95%CI, 3,143–7,428 copies/ml] with a fully automated extraction procedure, respectively. To demonstrate clinical application a total of 72 specimens of animal origin were compared with respect to manual and automated extraction. A strong correlation between both methods was observed rendering both methods suitable. Testing of 247 follow up specimens of animal origin from a local Q-fever epidemic rendered real-time PCR more sensitive than conventional PCR. Conclusion A sensitive and thoroughly evaluated real-time PCR was established. Its high-throughput mode may show a useful approach to rapidly screen samples in local outbreaks for other organisms relevant for humans or animals. Compared to a conventional PCR assay sensitivity of real-time PCR was higher after testing samples from a local Q-fever outbreak.

  14. Assessment of hearing threshold in adults with hearing loss using an automated system of cortical auditory evoked potential detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durante, Alessandra Spada; Wieselberg, Margarita Bernal; Roque, Nayara; Carvalho, Sheila; Pucci, Beatriz; Gudayol, Nicolly; de Almeida, Kátia

    The use of hearing aids by individuals with hearing loss brings a better quality of life. Access to and benefit from these devices may be compromised in patients who present difficulties or limitations in traditional behavioral audiological evaluation, such as newborns and small children, individuals with auditory neuropathy spectrum, autism, and intellectual deficits, and in adults and the elderly with dementia. These populations (or individuals) are unable to undergo a behavioral assessment, and generate a growing demand for objective methods to assess hearing. Cortical auditory evoked potentials have been used for decades to estimate hearing thresholds. Current technological advances have lead to the development of equipment that allows their clinical use, with features that enable greater accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity, and the possibility of automated detection, analysis, and recording of cortical responses. To determine and correlate behavioral auditory thresholds with cortical auditory thresholds obtained from an automated response analysis technique. The study included 52 adults, divided into two groups: 21 adults with moderate to severe hearing loss (study group); and 31 adults with normal hearing (control group). An automated system of detection, analysis, and recording of cortical responses (HEARLab ® ) was used to record the behavioral and cortical thresholds. The subjects remained awake in an acoustically treated environment. Altogether, 150 tone bursts at 500, 1000, 2000, and 4000Hz were presented through insert earphones in descending-ascending intensity. The lowest level at which the subject detected the sound stimulus was defined as the behavioral (hearing) threshold (BT). The lowest level at which a cortical response was observed was defined as the cortical electrophysiological threshold. These two responses were correlated using linear regression. The cortical electrophysiological threshold was, on average, 7.8dB higher than the

  15. Glaucoma progression detection with frequency doubling technology (FDT) compared to standard automated perimetry (SAP) in the Groningen Longitudinal Glaucoma Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesselink, Christiaan; Jansonius, Nomdo M

    2017-09-01

    To determine the usefulness of frequency doubling perimetry (FDT) for progression detection in glaucoma, compared to standard automated perimetry (SAP). Data were used from 150 eyes of 150 glaucoma patients from the Groningen Longitudinal Glaucoma Study. After baseline, SAP was performed approximately yearly; FDT every other year. First and last visit had to contain both tests. Using linear regression, progression velocities were calculated for SAP (Humphrey Field Analyzer) mean deviation (MD) and FDT MD and the number of test locations with a total deviation probability below p glaucoma progression in patients who cannot perform SAP reliably. © 2017 The Authors Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics © 2017 The College of Optometrists.

  16. A new automated quantification algorithm for the detection and evaluation of focal liver lesions with contrast-enhanced ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatos, Ilias; Tsantis, Stavros; Spiliopoulos, Stavros; Skouroliakou, Aikaterini; Theotokas, Ioannis; Zoumpoulis, Pavlos; Hazle, John D; Kagadis, George C

    2015-07-01

    Detect and classify focal liver lesions (FLLs) from contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) imaging by means of an automated quantification algorithm. The proposed algorithm employs a sophisticated segmentation method to detect and contour focal lesions from 52 CEUS video sequences (30 benign and 22 malignant). Lesion detection involves wavelet transform zero crossings utilization as an initialization step to the Markov random field model toward the lesion contour extraction. After FLL detection across frames, time intensity curve (TIC) is computed which provides the contrast agents' behavior at all vascular phases with respect to adjacent parenchyma for each patient. From each TIC, eight features were automatically calculated and employed into the support vector machines (SVMs) classification algorithm in the design of the image analysis model. With regard to FLLs detection accuracy, all lesions detected had an average overlap value of 0.89 ± 0.16 with manual segmentations for all CEUS frame-subsets included in the study. Highest classification accuracy from the SVM model was 90.3%, misdiagnosing three benign and two malignant FLLs with sensitivity and specificity values of 93.1% and 86.9%, respectively. The proposed quantification system that employs FLLs detection and classification algorithms may be of value to physicians as a second opinion tool for avoiding unnecessary invasive procedures.

  17. Carrier detection in X-linked ocular albinism of the Nettleship-Falls type by DNA analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergen, A. A.; Schuurman, E. J.; van den Born, L. I.; Samanns, C.; van Dorp, D. B.; Pinckers, A. J.; Bakker, E.; van Ommen, G. J.; Gal, A.; Bleeker-Wagemakers, E. M.

    1992-01-01

    X-linked ocular albinism (XOA) is characterized by anomalies of the eyes and hypopigmentation or absence of pigment in skin, hair and eyes due to a hereditary inborn error of metabolism affecting the pigment cells. The gene of XOA of the Nettleship-Falls type (OA1) has been mapped to Xp22.3, and

  18. Iterative User Interface Design for Automated Sequential Organ Failure Assessment Score Calculator in Sepsis Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aakre, Christopher Ansel; Kitson, Jaben E; Li, Man; Herasevich, Vitaly

    2017-05-18

    The new sepsis definition has increased the need for frequent sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score recalculation and the clerical burden of information retrieval makes this score ideal for automated calculation. The aim of this study was to (1) estimate the clerical workload of manual SOFA score calculation through a time-motion analysis and (2) describe a user-centered design process for an electronic medical record (EMR) integrated, automated SOFA score calculator with subsequent usability evaluation study. First, we performed a time-motion analysis by recording time-to-task-completion for the manual calculation of 35 baseline and 35 current SOFA scores by 14 internal medicine residents over a 2-month period. Next, we used an agile development process to create a user interface for a previously developed automated SOFA score calculator. The final user interface usability was evaluated by clinician end users with the Computer Systems Usability Questionnaire. The overall mean (standard deviation, SD) time-to-complete manual SOFA score calculation time was 61.6 s (33). Among the 24% (12/50) usability survey respondents, our user-centered user interface design process resulted in >75% favorability of survey items in the domains of system usability, information quality, and interface quality. Early stakeholder engagement in our agile design process resulted in a user interface for an automated SOFA score calculator that reduced clinician workload and met clinicians' needs at the point of care. Emerging interoperable platforms may facilitate dissemination of similarly useful clinical score calculators and decision support algorithms as "apps." A user-centered design process and usability evaluation should be considered during creation of these tools. ©Christopher Ansel Aakre, Jaben E Kitson, Man Li, Vitaly Herasevich. Originally published in JMIR Human Factors (http://humanfactors.jmir.org), 18.05.2017.

  19. Automated detection of focal cortical dysplasia type II with surface-based magnetic resonance imaging postprocessing and machine learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Bo; Krishnan, Balu; Adler, Sophie; Wagstyl, Konrad; Hu, Wenhan; Jones, Stephen; Najm, Imad; Alexopoulos, Andreas; Zhang, Kai; Zhang, Jianguo; Ding, Meiping; Wang, Shuang; Wang, Zhong Irene

    2018-04-10

    Focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) is a major pathology in patients undergoing surgical resection to treat pharmacoresistant epilepsy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) postprocessing methods may provide essential help for detection of FCD. In this study, we utilized surface-based MRI morphometry and machine learning for automated lesion detection in a mixed cohort of patients with FCD type II from 3 different epilepsy centers. Sixty-one patients with pharmacoresistant epilepsy and histologically proven FCD type II were included in the study. The patients had been evaluated at 3 different epilepsy centers using 3 different MRI scanners. T1-volumetric sequence was used for postprocessing. A normal database was constructed with 120 healthy controls. We also included 35 healthy test controls and 15 disease test controls with histologically confirmed hippocampal sclerosis to assess specificity. Features were calculated and incorporated into a nonlinear neural network classifier, which was trained to identify lesional cluster. We optimized the threshold of the output probability map from the classifier by performing receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses. Success of detection was defined by overlap between the final cluster and the manual labeling. Performance was evaluated using k-fold cross-validation. The threshold of 0.9 showed optimal sensitivity of 73.7% and specificity of 90.0%. The area under the curve for the ROC analysis was 0.75, which suggests a discriminative classifier. Sensitivity and specificity were not significantly different for patients from different centers, suggesting robustness of performance. Correct detection rate was significantly lower in patients with initially normal MRI than patients with unequivocally positive MRI. Subgroup analysis showed the size of the training group and normal control database impacted classifier performance. Automated surface-based MRI morphometry equipped with machine learning showed robust performance across

  20. Preventing falls

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... more difficult to stand up or keep your balance are a common cause of falls. Balance problems can also cause falls. When you walk, ... 2018, A.D.A.M., Inc. Duplication for commercial use must be authorized in writing by ADAM ...

  1. An ex ante analysis on the use of activity meters for automated estrus detection: to invest or not to invest?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutten, C J; Steeneveld, W; Inchaisri, C; Hogeveen, H

    2014-11-01

    The technical performance of activity meters for automated detection of estrus in dairy farming has been studied, and such meters are already used in practice. However, information on the economic consequences of using activity meters is lacking. The current study analyzes the economic benefits of a sensor system for detection of estrus and appraises the feasibility of an investment in such a system. A stochastic dynamic simulation model was used to simulate reproductive performance of a dairy herd. The number of cow places in this herd was fixed at 130. The model started with 130 randomly drawn cows (in a Monte Carlo process) and simulated calvings and replacement of these cows in subsequent years. Default herd characteristics were a conception rate of 50%, an 8-wk dry-off period, and an average milk production level of 8,310 kg per cow per 305 d. Model inputs were derived from real farm data and expertise. For the analysis, visual detection by the farmer ("without" situation) was compared with automated detection with activity meters ("with" situation). For visual estrus detection, an estrus detection rate of 50% and a specificity of 100% were assumed. For automated estrus detection, an estrus detection rate of 80% and a specificity of 95% were assumed. The results of the cow simulation model were used to estimate the difference between the annual net cash flows in the "with" and "without" situations (marginal financial effect) and the internal rate of return (IRR) as profitability indicators. The use of activity meters led to improved estrus detection and, therefore, to a decrease in the average calving interval and subsequent increase in annual milk production. For visual estrus detection, the average calving interval was 419 d and average annual milk production was 1,032,278 kg. For activity meters, the average calving interval was 403 d and the average annual milk production was 1,043,398 kg. It was estimated that the initial investment in activity meters

  2. Computer-aided detection of breast cancers using Haar-like features in automated 3D breast ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Tao; Mordang, Jan-Jurre; van Zelst, Jan; Grivegnée, André; Gubern-Mérida, Albert; Melendez, Jaime; Mann, Ritse M; Zhang, Wei; Platel, Bram; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2015-04-01

    Automated 3D breast ultrasound (ABUS) has gained interest in breast imaging. Especially for screening women with dense breasts, ABUS appears to be beneficial. However, since the amount of data generated is large, the risk of oversight errors is substantial. Computer aided detection (CADe) may be used as a second reader to prevent oversight errors. When CADe is used in this fashion, it is essential that small cancers are detected, while the number of false positive findings should remain acceptable. In this work, the authors improve their previously developed CADe system in the initial candidate detection stage. The authors use a large number of 2D Haar-like features to differentiate lesion structures from false positives. Using a cascade of GentleBoost classifiers that combines these features, a likelihood score, highly specific for small cancers, can be efficiently computed. The likelihood scores are added to the previously developed voxel features to improve detection. The method was tested in a dataset of 414 ABUS volumes with 211 cancers. Cancers had a mean size of 14.72 mm. Free-response receiver operating characteristic analysis was performed to evaluate the performance of the algorithm with and without using the aforementioned Haar-like feature likelihood scores. After the initial detection stage, the number of missed cancer was reduced by 18.8% after adding Haar-like feature likelihood scores. The proposed technique significantly improves our previously developed CADe system in the initial candidate detection stage.

  3. Changes in ecosystem resilience detected in automated measures of ecosystem metabolism during a whole-lake manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batt, Ryan D; Carpenter, Stephen R; Cole, Jonathan J; Pace, Michael L; Johnson, Robert A

    2013-10-22

    Environmental sensor networks are developing rapidly to assess changes in ecosystems and their services. Some ecosystem changes involve thresholds, and theory suggests that statistical indicators of changing resilience can be detected near thresholds. We examined the capacity of environmental sensors to assess resilience during an experimentally induced transition in a whole-lake manipulation. A trophic cascade was induced in a planktivore-dominated lake by slowly adding piscivorous bass, whereas a nearby bass-dominated lake remained unmanipulated and served as a reference ecosystem during the 4-y experiment. In both the manipulated and reference lakes, automated sensors were used to measure variables related to ecosystem metabolism (dissolved oxygen, pH, and chlorophyll-a concentration) and to estimate gross primary production, respiration, and net ecosystem production. Thresholds were detected in some automated measurements more than a year before the completion of the transition to piscivore dominance. Directly measured variables (dissolved oxygen, pH, and chlorophyll-a concentration) related to ecosystem metabolism were better indicators of the approaching threshold than were the estimates of rates (gross primary production, respiration, and net ecosystem production); this difference was likely a result of the larger uncertainties in the derived rate estimates. Thus, relatively simple characteristics of ecosystems that were observed directly by the sensors were superior indicators of changing resilience. Models linked to thresholds in variables that are directly observed by sensor networks may provide unique opportunities for evaluating resilience in complex ecosystems.

  4. Automated identification of abnormal metaphase chromosome cells for the detection of chronic myeloid leukemia using microscopic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingwei; Zheng, Bin; Li, Shibo; Mulvihill, John J.; Chen, Xiaodong; Liu, Hong

    2010-07-01

    Karyotyping is an important process to classify chromosomes into standard classes and the results are routinely used by the clinicians to diagnose cancers and genetic diseases. However, visual karyotyping using microscopic images is time-consuming and tedious, which reduces the diagnostic efficiency and accuracy. Although many efforts have been made to develop computerized schemes for automated karyotyping, no schemes can get be performed without substantial human intervention. Instead of developing a method to classify all chromosome classes, we develop an automatic scheme to detect abnormal metaphase cells by identifying a specific class of chromosomes (class 22) and prescreen for suspicious chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). The scheme includes three steps: (1) iteratively segment randomly distributed individual chromosomes, (2) process segmented chromosomes and compute image features to identify the candidates, and (3) apply an adaptive matching template to identify chromosomes of class 22. An image data set of 451 metaphase cells extracted from bone marrow specimens of 30 positive and 30 negative cases for CML is selected to test the scheme's performance. The overall case-based classification accuracy is 93.3% (100% sensitivity and 86.7% specificity). The results demonstrate the feasibility of applying an automated scheme to detect or prescreen the suspicious cancer cases.

  5. Automated Detection, Localization, and Classification of Traumatic Vertebral Body Fractures in the Thoracic and Lumbar Spine at CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Joseph E; Yao, Jianhua; Muñoz, Hector; Summers, Ronald M

    2016-01-01

    To design and validate a fully automated computer system for the detection and anatomic localization of traumatic thoracic and lumbar vertebral body fractures at computed tomography (CT). This retrospective study was HIPAA compliant. Institutional review board approval was obtained, and informed consent was waived. CT examinations in 104 patients (mean age, 34.4 years; range, 14-88 years; 32 women, 72 men), consisting of 94 examinations with positive findings for fractures (59 with vertebral body fractures) and 10 control examinations (without vertebral fractures), were performed. There were 141 thoracic and lumbar vertebral body fractures in the case set. The locations of fractures were marked and classified by a radiologist according to Denis column involvement. The CT data set was divided into training and testing subsets (37 and 67 subsets, respectively) for analysis by means of prototype software for fully automated spinal segmentation and fracture detection. Free-response receiver operating characteristic analysis was performed. Training set sensitivity for detection and localization of fractures within each vertebra was 0.82 (28 of 34 findings; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.68, 0.90), with a false-positive rate of 2.5 findings per patient. The sensitivity for fracture localization to the correct vertebra was 0.88 (23 of 26 findings; 95% CI: 0.72, 0.96), with a false-positive rate of 1.3. Testing set sensitivity for the detection and localization of fractures within each vertebra was 0.81 (87 of 107 findings; 95% CI: 0.75, 0.87), with a false-positive rate of 2.7. The sensitivity for fracture localization to the correct vertebra was 0.92 (55 of 60 findings; 95% CI: 0.79, 0.94), with a false-positive rate of 1.6. The most common cause of false-positive findings was nutrient foramina (106 of 272 findings [39%]). The fully automated computer system detects and anatomically localizes vertebral body fractures in the thoracic and lumbar spine on CT images with a

  6. A multiplex reverse transcription PCR and automated electronic microarray assay for detection and differentiation of seven viruses affecting swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, A; Fisher, M; Furukawa-Stoffer, T; Ambagala, A; Hodko, D; Pasick, J; King, D P; Nfon, C; Ortega Polo, R; Lung, O

    2018-04-01

    Microarray technology can be useful for pathogen detection as it allows simultaneous interrogation of the presence or absence of a large number of genetic signatures. However, most microarray assays are labour-intensive and time-consuming to perform. This study describes the development and initial evaluation of a multiplex reverse transcription (RT)-PCR and novel accompanying automated electronic microarray assay for simultaneous detection and differentiation of seven important viruses that affect swine (foot-and-mouth disease virus [FMDV], swine vesicular disease virus [SVDV], vesicular exanthema of swine virus [VESV], African swine fever virus [ASFV], classical swine fever virus [CSFV], porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus [PRRSV] and porcine circovirus type 2 [PCV2]). The novel electronic microarray assay utilizes a single, user-friendly instrument that integrates and automates capture probe printing, hybridization, washing and reporting on a disposable electronic microarray cartridge with 400 features. This assay accurately detected and identified a total of 68 isolates of the seven targeted virus species including 23 samples of FMDV, representing all seven serotypes, and 10 CSFV strains, representing all three genotypes. The assay successfully detected viruses in clinical samples from the field, experimentally infected animals (as early as 1 day post-infection (dpi) for FMDV and SVDV, 4 dpi for ASFV, 5 dpi for CSFV), as well as in biological material that were spiked with target viruses. The limit of detection was 10 copies/μl for ASFV, PCV2 and PRRSV, 100 copies/μl for SVDV, CSFV, VESV and 1,000 copies/μl for FMDV. The electronic microarray component had reduced analytical sensitivity for several of the target viruses when compared with the multiplex RT-PCR. The integration of capture probe printing allows custom onsite array printing as needed, while electrophoretically driven hybridization generates results faster than conventional

  7. A fully automated chromatographic peak detection and treatment software for multi-user multi-task computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardot, P J; Trolliard, P; Tembely, S

    1990-01-01

    A fully automated method is presented for the detection and integration of chromatographic peak software in which the only parameter to define is the data acquisition frequency; this has to be chosen high enough to minimize some Nyquist frequency problems. Programmed in C language, the software is used on a Unix like system (Xenix) to emphasize its automaticity. The performance of the system in liquid chromatography has been studied in respect of noise frequency and intensity. It is shown that the classical signal-to-noise ratio is obsolete for definition of the detection limit since frequency analysis allows some signal filtration; these limitations are described. An example is given of simulation with Gaussian peaks convoluted with noise characterized by its intensity and frequency distribution. The validity of the software is demonstrated for some HPLC separations.

  8. Detection of early behavioral markers of Huntington's disease in R6/2 mice employing an automated social home cage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudenko, Olga; Tkach, Vadim; Berezin, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    developed behavior screening system, the IntelliCage, allows automated testing of mouse behavior in the home cage employing individual recognition of animals living in social groups. The present study validates the ability of the IntelliCage system to detect behavioral and cognitive dysfunction in R6/2 mice....../2 mice, such as decrease in exploratory activity, sleep disturbances, increased drinking, and repetitive behavior. Additionally, the use of various learning tasks, such as spatial avoidance and spatial patrolling, revealed early cognitive changes in R6/2 mice. The simple learning tasks may be used......, an established transgenic model of HD. The results indicate that the IntelliCage is a reliable system for recording exploratory activity, drinking behavior, circadian rhythm, spatial preference, and cognition in mice during prolonged periods of assessment. The system detected early dysfunctional behaviors in R6...

  9. Automated quality control of forced oscillation measurements: respiratory artifact detection with advanced feature extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Thuy T; Leong, Philip H W; Robinson, Paul D; Gutzler, Thomas; Jee, Adelle S; King, Gregory G; Thamrin, Cindy

    2017-10-01

    The forced oscillation technique (FOT) can provide unique and clinically relevant lung function information with little cooperation with subjects. However, FOT has higher variability than spirometry, possibly because strategies for quality control and reducing artifacts in FOT measurements have yet to be standardized or validated. Many quality control procedures rely on either simple statistical filters or subjective evaluation by a human operator. In this study, we propose an automated artifact removal approach based on the resistance against flow profile, applied to complete breaths. We report results obtained from data recorded from children and adults, with and without asthma. Our proposed method has 76% agreement with a human operator for the adult data set and 79% for the pediatric data set. Furthermore, we assessed the variability of respiratory resistance measured by FOT using within-session variation (wCV) and between-session variation (bCV). In the asthmatic adults test data set, our method was again similar to that of the manual operator for wCV (6.5 vs. 6.9%) and significantly improved bCV (8.2 vs. 8.9%). Our combined automated breath removal approach based on advanced feature extraction offers better or equivalent quality control of FOT measurements compared with an expert operator and computationally more intensive methods in terms of accuracy and reducing intrasubject variability. NEW & NOTEWORTHY The forced oscillation technique (FOT) is gaining wider acceptance for clinical testing; however, strategies for quality control are still highly variable and require a high level of subjectivity. We propose an automated, complete breath approach for removal of respiratory artifacts from FOT measurements, using feature extraction and an interquartile range filter. Our approach offers better or equivalent performance compared with an expert operator, in terms of accuracy and reducing intrasubject variability. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological

  10. An automated sawtooth detection algorithm for strongly varying plasma conditions and crash characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gude, A.; Maraschek, M.; Kardaun, O.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2017-09-01

    A sawtooth crash algorithm that can automatically detect irregular sawteeth with strongly varying crash characteristics, including inverted crashes with central signal increase, has been developed. Such sawtooth behaviour is observed in ASDEX Upgrade with its tungsten wall, especially in phases with central ECRH. This application of ECRH for preventing impurity accumulation is envisaged also for ITER. The detection consists of three steps: a sensitive edge detection, a multichannel combination to increase detection performance, and a profile analysis that tests generic sawtooth crash features. The effect of detection parameters on the edge detection results has been investigated using synthetic signals and tested in an application to ASDEX Upgrade soft x-ray data.

  11. Automated lanes detection and comparison of bacterial electrophoretic protein fingerprints using fast Fourier transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millership, S; Ragoonaden, K

    1992-08-01

    A method of computer-automated analysis of bacterial fingerprints produced by electrophoresis of proteins in a one-dimensional slab gel system is described. Proteins were visualized by silver staining. Western blotting, or autoradiography. Gels were recorded with a CCD camera, and after initial manual removal of the unwanted image margins, track margins were identified and extracted and a normalized trace was produced automatically using Fourier routines to smooth plots required for this process. Normalized traces were then compared by Fourier correlation after application of a high-pass step filter.

  12. Automated detection and analysis of fluorescent in situ hybridization spots depicted in digital microscopic images of Pap-smear specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingwei; Zheng, Bin; Li, Shibo; Zhang, Roy; Mulvihill, John J.; Chen, Wei R.; Liu, Hong

    2009-03-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technology has been widely recognized as a promising molecular and biomedical optical imaging tool to screen and diagnose cervical cancer. However, manual FISH analysis is time-consuming and may introduce large inter-reader variability. In this study, a computerized scheme is developed and tested. It automatically detects and analyzes FISH spots depicted on microscopic fluorescence images. The scheme includes two stages: (1) a feature-based classification rule to detect useful interphase cells, and (2) a knowledge-based expert classifier to identify splitting FISH spots and improve the accuracy of counting independent FISH spots. The scheme then classifies detected analyzable cells as normal or abnormal. In this study, 150 FISH images were acquired from Pap-smear specimens and examined by both an experienced cytogeneticist and the scheme. The results showed that (1) the agreement between the cytogeneticist and the scheme was 96.9% in classifying between analyzable and unanalyzable cells (Kappa=0.917), and (2) agreements in detecting normal and abnormal cells based on FISH spots were 90.5% and 95.8% with Kappa=0.867. This study demonstrated the feasibility of automated FISH analysis, which may potentially improve detection efficiency and produce more accurate and consistent results than manual FISH analysis.

  13. Towards Sensor-Actuator Coupling in an Automated Order Picking System by Detecting Sealed Seams on Pouch Packed Goods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Weichert

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel concept of coupling the actuators of an automated order picking system for pouch packed goods with an embedded CCD camera sensor by means of image processing and machine learning is presented. The picking system mechanically combines the conveyance and singularization of a still-connected chain of pouch packed goods in a single machinery. The proposed algorithms perform a per-frame processing of the captured images in real-time to detect the sealed seams of the ongoing pouches. The detections are used to deduce cutting decisions in order to control the system’s actuators, namely the drive pulley for conveyance and the cutting device for the separation. Within this context, two controlling strategies are presented as well which specify the interaction of the sensor and the actuators. The detection is carried out by two different marker detection strategies: enhanced Template Matching as a heuristic and Support Vector Machines as a supervised classification based concept. Depending on the employed marker, detection rates of almost 100% with a calculation time of less than 40 ms are possible. From a logistic point of view, sealed seam widths of 20 mm prove feasible.

  14. A Novel Method for the Separation of Overlapping Pollen Species for Automated Detection and Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tello-Mijares, Santiago; Flores, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    The identification of pollen in an automated way will accelerate different tasks and applications of palynology to aid in, among others, climate change studies, medical allergies calendar, and forensic science. The aim of this paper is to develop a system that automatically captures a hundred microscopic images of pollen and classifies them into the 12 different species from Lagunera Region, Mexico. Many times, the pollen is overlapping on the microscopic images, which increases the difficulty for its automated identification and classification. This paper focuses on a method to segment the overlapping pollen. First, the proposed method segments the overlapping pollen. Second, the method separates the pollen based on the mean shift process (100% segmentation) and erosion by H-minima based on the Fibonacci series. Thus, pollen is characterized by its shape, color, and texture for training and evaluating the performance of three classification techniques: random tree forest, multilayer perceptron, and Bayes net. Using the newly developed system, we obtained segmentation results of 100% and classification on top of 96.2% and 96.1% in recall and precision using multilayer perceptron in twofold cross validation.

  15. Crowdsourcing image annotation for nucleus detection and segmentation in computational pathology: evaluating experts, automated methods, and the crowd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irshad, H; Montaser-Kouhsari, L; Waltz, G; Bucur, O; Nowak, J A; Dong, F; Knoblauch, N W; Beck, A H

    2015-01-01

    The development of tools in computational pathology to assist physicians and biomedical scientists in the diagnosis of disease requires access to high-quality annotated images for algorithm learning and evaluation. Generating high-quality expert-derived annotations is time-consuming and expensive. We explore the use of crowdsourcing for rapidly obtaining annotations for two core tasks in com- putational pathology: nucleus detection and nucleus segmentation. We designed and implemented crowdsourcing experiments using the CrowdFlower platform, which provides access to a large set of labor channel partners that accesses and manages millions of contributors worldwide. We obtained annotations from four types of annotators and compared concordance across these groups. We obtained: crowdsourced annotations for nucleus detection and segmentation on a total of 810 images; annotations using automated methods on 810 images; annotations from research fellows for detection and segmentation on 477 and 455 images, respectively; and expert pathologist-derived annotations for detection and segmentation on 80 and 63 images, respectively. For the crowdsourced annotations, we evaluated performance across a range of contributor skill levels (1, 2, or 3). The crowdsourced annotations (4,860 images in total) were completed in only a fraction of the time and cost required for obtaining annotations using traditional methods. For the nucleus detection task, the research fellow-derived annotations showed the strongest concordance with the expert pathologist- derived annotations (F-M =93.68%), followed by the crowd-sourced contributor levels 1,2, and 3 and the automated method, which showed relatively similar performance (F-M = 87.84%, 88.49%, 87.26%, and 86.99%, respectively). For the nucleus segmentation task, the crowdsourced contributor level 3-derived annotations, research fellow-derived annotations, and automated method showed the strongest concordance with the expert pathologist

  16. Detection and Automated Scoring of Dicentric Chromosomes in Nonstimulated Lymphocyte Prematurely Condensed Chromosomes After Telomere and Centromere Staining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M'kacher, Radhia; El Maalouf, Elie; Terzoudi, Georgia; Ricoul, Michelle; Heidingsfelder, Leonhard; Karachristou, Ionna; Laplagne, Eric; Hempel, William M.; Colicchio, Bruno; Dieterlen, Alain; Pantelias, Gabriel; Sabatier, Laure

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To combine telomere and centromere (TC) staining of premature chromosome condensation (PCC) fusions to identify dicentrics, centric rings, and acentric chromosomes, making possible the realization of a dose–response curve and automation of the process. Methods and Materials: Blood samples from healthy donors were exposed to 60 Co irradiation at varying doses up to 8 Gy, followed by a repair period of 8 hours. Premature chromosome condensation fusions were carried out, and TC staining using peptide nucleic acid probes was performed. Chromosomal aberration (CA) scoring was carried out manually and automatically using PCC-TCScore software, developed in our laboratory. Results: We successfully optimized the hybridization conditions and image capture parameters, to increase the sensitivity and effectiveness of CA scoring. Dicentrics, centric rings, and acentric chromosomes were rapidly and accurately detected, leading to a linear-quadratic dose–response curve by manual scoring at up to 8 Gy. Using PCC-TCScore software for automatic scoring, we were able to detect 95% of dicentrics and centric rings. Conclusion: The introduction of TC staining to the PCC fusion technique has made possible the rapid scoring of unstable CAs, including dicentrics, with a level of accuracy and ease not previously possible. This new approach can be used for biological dosimetry in radiation emergency medicine, where the rapid and accurate detection of dicentrics is a high priority using automated scoring. Because there is no culture time, this new approach can also be used for the follow-up of patients treated by genotoxic therapy, creating the possibility to perform the estimation of induced chromosomal aberrations immediately after the blood draw

  17. Detection and Automated Scoring of Dicentric Chromosomes in Nonstimulated Lymphocyte Prematurely Condensed Chromosomes After Telomere and Centromere Staining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M' kacher, Radhia [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie, Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); El Maalouf, Elie [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie, Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Laboratoire Modélisation Intelligence Processus Systèmes (MIPS)–Groupe TIIM3D, Université de Haute-Alsace, Mulhouse (France); Terzoudi, Georgia [Laboratory of Radiobiology & Biodosimetry, National Center for Scientific Research Demokritos, Athens (Greece); Ricoul, Michelle [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie, Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Heidingsfelder, Leonhard [MetaSystems, Altlussheim (Germany); Karachristou, Ionna [Laboratory of Radiobiology & Biodosimetry, National Center for Scientific Research Demokritos, Athens (Greece); Laplagne, Eric [Pole Concept, Paris (France); Hempel, William M. [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie, Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Colicchio, Bruno; Dieterlen, Alain [Laboratoire Modélisation Intelligence Processus Systèmes (MIPS)–Groupe TIIM3D, Université de Haute-Alsace, Mulhouse (France); Pantelias, Gabriel [Laboratory of Radiobiology & Biodosimetry, National Center for Scientific Research Demokritos, Athens (Greece); Sabatier, Laure, E-mail: laure.sabatier@cea.fr [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie, Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To combine telomere and centromere (TC) staining of premature chromosome condensation (PCC) fusions to identify dicentrics, centric rings, and acentric chromosomes, making possible the realization of a dose–response curve and automation of the process. Methods and Materials: Blood samples from healthy donors were exposed to {sup 60}Co irradiation at varying doses up to 8 Gy, followed by a repair period of 8 hours. Premature chromosome condensation fusions were carried out, and TC staining using peptide nucleic acid probes was performed. Chromosomal aberration (CA) scoring was carried out manually and automatically using PCC-TCScore software, developed in our laboratory. Results: We successfully optimized the hybridization conditions and image capture parameters, to increase the sensitivity and effectiveness of CA scoring. Dicentrics, centric rings, and acentric chromosomes were rapidly and accurately detected, leading to a linear-quadratic dose–response curve by manual scoring at up to 8 Gy. Using PCC-TCScore software for automatic scoring, we were able to detect 95% of dicentrics and centric rings. Conclusion: The introduction of TC staining to the PCC fusion technique has made possible the rapid scoring of unstable CAs, including dicentrics, with a level of accuracy and ease not previously possible. This new approach can be used for biological dosimetry in radiation emergency medicine, where the rapid and accurate detection of dicentrics is a high priority using automated scoring. Because there is no culture time, this new approach can also be used for the follow-up of patients treated by genotoxic therapy, creating the possibility to perform the estimation of induced chromosomal aberrations immediately after the blood draw.

  18. Involvement of the end user: exploration of older people's needs and preferences for a wearable fall detection device – a qualitative descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thilo FJS

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Friederike JS Thilo,1,2 Selina Bilger,1 Ruud JG Halfens,2 Jos MGA Schols,2,3 Sabine Hahn1 1Applied Research and Development in Nursing, Health Division, Bern University of Applied Sciences, Bern, Switzerland; 2Department of Health Services Research, 3Department of Family Medicine, School CAPHRI, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands Purpose: To explore the needs and preferences of community-dwelling older people, by involving them in the device design and mock-up development stage of a fall detection device, consisting of a body-worn sensor linked to a smartphone application. Patients and methods: A total of 22 community-dwelling persons 75 years of age and older were involved in the development of a fall detection device. Three semistructured focus group interviews were conducted. The interview data were analyzed using qualitative descriptive analysis with deductive coding. Results: The mock-up of a waterproof, body-worn, automatic and manual alerting device, which served both as a day-time wearable sensor and a night-time wearable sensor, was welcomed. Changes should be considered regarding shape, color and size along with alternate ways of integrating the sensor with items already in use in daily life, such as jewelry and personal watches. The reliability of the sensor is key for the participants. Issues important to the alerting process were discussed, for instance, who should be contacted and why. Several participants were concerned with the mandatory use of the smartphone and assumed that it would be difficult to use. They criticized the limited distance between the sensor and the smartphone for reliable fall detection, as it might restrict activity and negatively influence their degree of independence in daily life. Conclusion: This study supports that involving end users in the design and mock-up development stage is welcomed by older people and allows their needs and preferences concerning the fall detection device to be

  19. Studies of criticality Monte Carlo method convergence: use of a deterministic calculation and automated detection of the transient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jinaphanh, A.

    2012-01-01

    Monte Carlo criticality calculation allows to estimate the effective multiplication factor as well as local quantities such as local reaction rates. Some configurations presenting weak neutronic coupling (high burn up profile, complete reactor core,...) may induce biased estimations for k eff or reaction rates. In order to improve robustness of the iterative Monte Carlo methods, a coupling with a deterministic code was studied. An adjoint flux is obtained by a deterministic calculation and then used in the Monte Carlo. The initial guess is then automated, the sampling of fission sites is modified and the random walk of neutrons is modified using splitting and russian roulette strategies. An automated convergence detection method has been developed. It locates and suppresses the transient due to the initialization in an output series, applied here to k eff and Shannon entropy. It relies on modeling stationary series by an order 1 auto regressive process and applying statistical tests based on a Student Bridge statistics. This method can easily be extended to every output of an iterative Monte Carlo. Methods developed in this thesis are tested on different test cases. (author)

  20. Wide-Open: Accelerating public data release by automating detection of overdue datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grechkin, Maxim; Poon, Hoifung; Howe, Bill

    2017-06-01

    Open data is a vital pillar of open science and a key enabler for reproducibility, data reuse, and novel discoveries. Enforcement of open-data policies, however, largely relies on manual efforts, which invariably lag behind the increasingly automated generation of biological data. To address this problem, we developed a general approach to automatically identify datasets overdue for public release by applying text mining to identify dataset references in published articles and parse query results from repositories to determine if the datasets remain private. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach on 2 popular National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) repositories: Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) and Sequence Read Archive (SRA). Our Wide-Open system identified a large number of overdue datasets, which spurred administrators to respond directly by releasing 400 datasets in one week.

  1. Evaluation of automated serum des-gamma-carboxyprothrombin (DCP) assays for detecting hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jonghyeon; Park, Yongjung; Kim, Jeong-Ho; Kim, Hyon-Suk

    2011-12-01

    We evaluated two new autoanalyzers, μTAS and Lumipulse for des-γ-carboxyprothrombin (DCP) assay. Analytical performance was evaluated, and the upper reference limit of the 97.5th percentile for DCP was re-established using sera from 140 healthy individuals. DCP levels were determined by the two autoanalyzers and EIA in a total of 239 sera from HCC patients (n=120) and those without HCC (n=119). Total imprecision of the two automated assays was Lumipulse. There were proportional and constant biases between the results from the autoanalyzers and those from EIA. The two newly developed DCP assays showed high analytical performance, but re-establishment of reference limits would be necessary. The new analyzers could be useful for clinical laboratories because of convenience of operation and wide AMRs. Copyright © 2011 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Quantitative Assessment of Mouse Mammary Gland Morphology Using Automated Digital Image Processing and TEB Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blacher, Silvia; Gérard, Céline; Gallez, Anne; Foidart, Jean-Michel; Noël, Agnès; Péqueux, Christel

    2016-04-01

    The assessment of rodent mammary gland morphology is largely used to study the molecular mechanisms driving breast development and to analyze the impact of various endocrine disruptors with putative pathological implications. In this work, we propose a methodology relying on fully automated digital image analysis methods including image processing and quantification of the whole ductal tree and of the terminal end buds as well. It allows to accurately and objectively measure both growth parameters and fine morphological glandular structures. Mammary gland elongation was characterized by 2 parameters: the length and the epithelial area of the ductal tree. Ductal tree fine structures were characterized by: 1) branch end-point density, 2) branching density, and 3) branch length distribution. The proposed methodology was compared with quantification methods classically used in the literature. This procedure can be transposed to several software and thus largely used by scientists studying rodent mammary gland morphology.

  3. Detection of Orbital Debris Collision Risks for the Automated Transfer Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peret, L.; Legendre, P.; Delavault, S.; Martin, T.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we present a general collision risk assessment method, which has been applied through numerical simulations to the Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV) case. During ATV ascent towards the International Space Station, close approaches between the ATV and objects of the USSTRACOM catalog will be monitored through collision rosk assessment. Usually, collision risk assessment relies on an exclusion volume or a probability threshold method. Probability methods are more effective than exclusion volumes but require accurate covariance data. In this work, we propose to use a criterion defined by an adaptive exclusion area. This criterion does not require any probability calculation but is more effective than exclusion volume methods as demonstrated by our numerical experiments. The results of these studies, when confirmed and finalized, will be used for the ATV operations.

  4. Automated Detection of Alkali-silica Reaction in Concrete using Linear Array Ultrasound Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos-Villalobos, Hector J [ORNL; Clayton, Dwight A [ORNL; Ezell, N Dianne Bull [ORNL; Clayton, Joseph A [ORNL; Baba, Justin S [ORNL

    2017-01-01

    Alkali-silica reaction (ASR) is a chemical reaction in either concrete or mortar between hydroxyl ions of the alkalis (sodium and potassium) from hydraulic cement (or other sources), and certain siliceous minerals present in some aggregates. The reaction product, an alkali-silica gel, is hygroscopic having a tendency to absorb water and swell, which under certain circumstances, leads to abnormal expansion and cracking of the concrete. This phenomenon affects the durability and performance of concrete structures severely since it can cause significant loss of mechanical properties. Developing reliable methods and tools that can evaluate the degree of the ASR damage in existing structures, so that informed decisions can be made toward mitigating ASR progression and damage, is important to the long term operation of nuclear power plants especially if licenses are extended beyond 60 years. This paper examines an automated method of determining the extent of ASR damage in fabricated concrete specimens.

  5. Semi-automated detection of fractional shortening in zebrafish embryo heart videos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrat Sara

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Quantifying cardiac functions in model organisms like embryonic zebrafish is of high importance in small molecule screens for new therapeutic compounds. One relevant cardiac parameter is the fractional shortening (FS. A method for semi-automatic quantification of FS in video recordings of zebrafish embryo hearts is presented. The software provides automated visual information about the end-systolic and end-diastolic stages of the heart by displaying corresponding colored lines into a Motion-mode display. After manually marking the ventricle diameters in frames of end-systolic and end-diastolic stages, the FS is calculated. The software was evaluated by comparing the results of the determination of FS with results obtained from another established method. Correlations of 0.96 < r < 0.99 between the two methods were found indicating that the new software provides comparable results for the determination of the FS.

  6. Visual compression of workflow visualizations with automated detection of macro motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Eamonn; Rocca-Serra, Philippe; Sansone, Susanna-Assunta; Davies, Jim; Chen, Min

    2013-12-01

    This paper is concerned with the creation of 'macros' in workflow visualization as a support tool to increase the efficiency of data curation tasks. We propose computation of candidate macros based on their usage in large collections of workflows in data repositories. We describe an efficient algorithm for extracting macro motifs from workflow graphs. We discovered that the state transition information, used to identify macro candidates, characterizes the structural pattern of the macro and can be harnessed as part of the visual design of the corresponding macro glyph. This facilitates partial automation and consistency in glyph design applicable to a large set of macro glyphs. We tested this approach against a repository of biological data holding some 9,670 workflows and found that the algorithmically generated candidate macros are in keeping with domain expert expectations.

  7. Detection of anti-dsDNA antibodies by computer-aided automated immunofluorescence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakos, Gabriella; Gonzalez, Marlene; Flaherty, David; Bentow, Chelsea; Ibarra, Claudia; Stimson, Deborah; Nacario, Lori; Hiemann, Rico; Dervieux, Thierry

    2016-06-01

    NOVA View is a computer aided fluorescence microscope that is used for the automated reading and interpretation of indirect immunofluorescent tests in diagnostic immunology. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the performance of the NOVA View® system for the measurement of anti-dsDNA antibodies using the Crithidia luciliae indirect immunofluorescence test (CLIFT) technology. Analytical performance of NOVA View CLIFT was assessed in repeatability (within run) and reproducibility (between runs and instruments) studies. Two hundred-fifty patient samples (N=200 consecutive samples and N=50 samples from systemic lupus erythematosus patients) were tested to evaluate the agreement between results generated with NOVA View CLIFT, and those obtained with manual microscopic reading of the same slides. Positivity rate in SLE was assessed on the 50 SLE samples. The NOVA View system showed high level of repeatability and reproducibility within runs, between runs, and between instruments. Agreement of NOVA View software interpretation and digital image reading results with manual microscopic reading results was 96.0%, and the same positivity rate was obtained on SLE samples by NOVA View digital image reading as that of manual microscopic reading (36.0% vs. 38.0%, respectively). Results generated by NOVA View CLIFT were equivalent to those obtained by manual microscopic reading on a large routine sample set. NOVA View demonstrated consistency within and between runs, and between instruments. Automation of CLIFT provides reliability and is a suitable alternative for routine clinical laboratories. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Automated detection of discourse segment and experimental types from the text of cancer pathway results sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Gully A P C; Dasigi, Pradeep; de Waard, Anita; Hovy, Eduard H

    2016-01-01

    Automated machine-reading biocuration systems typically use sentence-by-sentence information extraction to construct meaning representations for use by curators. This does not directly reflect the typical discourse structure used by scientists to construct an argument from the experimental data available within a article, and is therefore less likely to correspond to representations typically used in biomedical informatics systems (let alone to the mental models that scientists have). In this study, we develop Natural Language Processing methods to locate, extract, and classify the individual passages of text from articles' Results sections that refer to experimental data. In our domain of interest (molecular biology studies of cancer signal transduction pathways), individual articles may contain as many as 30 small-scale individual experiments describing a variety of findings, upon which authors base their overall research conclusions. Our system automatically classifies discourse segments in these texts into seven categories (fact, hypothesis, problem, goal, method, result, implication) with an F-score of 0.68. These segments describe the essential building blocks of scientific discourse to (i) provide context for each experiment, (ii) report experimental details and (iii) explain the data's meaning in context. We evaluate our system on text passages from articles that were curated in molecular biology databases (the Pathway Logic Datum repository, the Molecular Interaction MINT and INTACT databases) linking individual experiments in articles to the type of assay used (coprecipitation, phosphorylation, translocation etc.). We use supervised machine learning techniques on text passages containing unambiguous references to experiments to obtain baseline F1 scores of 0.59 for MINT, 0.71 for INTACT and 0.63 for Pathway Logic. Although preliminary, these results support the notion that targeting information extraction methods to experimental results could provide

  9. Detection of a spontaneous pulse in photoplethysmograms during automated cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a porcine model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijshoff, R.W.; Sar, T. van der; Peeters, W.H.; Bezemer, R.; Aelen, P.; Paulussen, I.W.; Ordelman, S.C.; Venema, A.; Berkom, P.F. van; Aarts, R.M.; Woerlee, P.H.; Scheffer, G.J.; Noordergraaf, G.J.

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Reliable, non-invasive detection of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) with minimal interruptions to chest compressions would be valuable for high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). We investigated the potential of photoplethysmography (PPG) to detect the presence of a

  10. Panacea: Automating Attack Classification for Anomaly-based Network Intrusion Detection Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolzoni, D.; Etalle, Sandro; Hartel, Pieter H.; Kirda, E.; Jha, S.; Balzarotti, D.

    Anomaly-based intrusion detection systems are usually criticized because they lack a classication of attack, thus security teams have to manually inspect any raised alert to classify it. We present a new approach, Panacea, to automatically and systematically classify attacks detected by an

  11. Panacea: Automating Attack Classification for Anomaly-based Network Intrusion Detection Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolzoni, D.; Etalle, Sandro; Hartel, Pieter H.

    2009-01-01

    Anomaly-based intrusion detection systems are usually criticized because they lack a classication of attack, thus security teams have to manually inspect any raised alert to classify it. We present a new approach, Panacea, to automatically and systematically classify attacks detected by an

  12. X-ray based stem detection in an automated tomato weeding system

    Science.gov (United States)

    A stem detection system was developed for automatic weed control in transplanted tomato fields. A portable x-ray source projected an x-ray beam perpendicular to the crop row and parallel to the soil surface. The plant’s main stem absorbs x-ray energy, decreasing the detected signal and allowing stem...

  13. Automated Detection of Healthy and Diseased Aortae from Images Obtained by Contrast-Enhanced CT Scan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Gayhart

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We developed the next stage of our computer assisted diagnosis (CAD system to aid radiologists in evaluating CT images for aortic disease by removing innocuous images and highlighting signs of aortic disease. Materials and Methods. Segmented data of patient’s contrast-enhanced CT scan was analyzed for aortic dissection and penetrating aortic ulcer (PAU. Aortic dissection was detected by checking for an abnormal shape of the aorta using edge oriented methods. PAU was recognized through abnormally high intensities with interest point operators. Results. The aortic dissection detection process had a sensitivity of 0.8218 and a specificity of 0.9907. The PAU detection process scored a sensitivity of 0.7587 and a specificity of 0.9700. Conclusion. The aortic dissection detection process and the PAU detection process were successful in removing innocuous images, but additional methods are necessary for improving recognition of images with aortic disease.

  14. A semi-automated method for rapid detection of ripple events on interictal voltage discharges in the scalp electroencephalogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Catherine J; Chan, Arthur; Song, Dan; Staley, Kevin J; Stufflebeam, Steven M; Kramer, Mark A

    2017-02-01

    High frequency oscillations are emerging as a clinically important indicator of epileptic networks. However, manual detection of these high frequency oscillations is difficult, time consuming, and subjective, especially in the scalp EEG, thus hindering further clinical exploration and application. Semi-automated detection methods augment manual detection by reducing inspection to a subset of time intervals. We propose a new method to detect high frequency oscillations that co-occur with interictal epileptiform discharges. The new method proceeds in two steps. The first step identifies candidate time intervals during which high frequency activity is increased. The second step computes a set of seven features for each candidate interval. These features require that the candidate event contain a high frequency oscillation approximately sinusoidal in shape, with at least three cycles, that co-occurs with a large amplitude discharge. Candidate events that satisfy these features are stored for validation through visual analysis. We evaluate the detector performance in simulation and on ten examples of scalp EEG data, and show that the proposed method successfully detects spike-ripple events, with high positive predictive value, low false positive rate, and high intra-rater reliability. The proposed method is less sensitive than the existing method of visual inspection, but much faster and much more reliable. Accurate and rapid detection of high frequency activity increases the clinical viability of this rhythmic biomarker of epilepsy. The proposed spike-ripple detector rapidly identifies candidate spike-ripple events, thus making clinical analysis of prolonged, multielectrode scalp EEG recordings tractable. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Automated brightfield dual-color in situ hybridization for detection of mouse double minute 2 gene amplification in sarcomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenjun; McElhinny, Abigail; Nielsen, Alma; Wang, Maria; Miller, Melanie; Singh, Shalini; Rueger, Ruediger; Rubin, Brian P; Wang, Zhen; Tubbs, Raymond R; Nagle, Raymond B; Roche, Pat; Wu, Ping; Pestic-Dragovich, Lidija

    2011-01-01

    The human homolog of the mouse double minute 2 (MDM2) oncogene is amplified in about 20% of sarcomas. The measurement of the MDM2 amplification can aid in classification and may provide a predictive value for recently formulated therapies targeting MDM2. We have developed and validated an automated bright field dual-color in situ hybridization application to detect MDM2 gene amplification. A repeat-depleted MDM2 probe was constructed to target the MDM2 gene region at 12q15. A chromosome 12-specific probe (CHR12) was generated from a pα12H8 plasmid. The in situ hybridization assay was developed by using a dinitrophenyl-labeled MDM2 probe and a digoxigenin-labeled CHR12 probe on the Ventana Medical Systems' automated slide-staining platforms. The specificity of the MDM2 and CHR12 probes was shown on metaphase spreads and further validated against controls, including normal human tonsil and known MDM2-amplified samples. The assay performance was evaluated on a cohort of 100 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded specimens by using a conventional bright field microscope. Simultaneous hybridization and signal detection for MDM2 and CHR12 showed that both DNA targets were present in the same cells. One hundred soft tissue specimens were stained for MDM2 and CHR12. Although 26 of 29 lipomas were nonamplified and eusomic, MDM2 amplification was noted in 78% of atypical lipomatous tumors or well-differentiated liposarcomas. Five of 6 dedifferentiated liposarcoma cases were amplified for MDM2. MDM2 amplification was observed in 1 of 8 osteosarcomas; 3 showed CHR12 aneusomy. MDM2 amplification was present in 1 of 4 chondrosarcomas. Nine of 10 synovial sarcomas displayed no evidence of MDM2 amplification in most tumor cells. In pleomorphic sarcoma, not otherwise specified (pleomorphic malignant fibrous histiocytoma), MDM2 was amplified in 38% of cases, whereas 92% were aneusomic for CHR12. One alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma and 2 embryonal rhabdomyosarcomas displayed low-level aneusomy

  16. Automated mediastinal lymph node detection from CT volumes based on intensity targeted radial structure tensor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Hirohisa; Bhatia, Kanwal K; Oda, Masahiro; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Iwano, Shingo; Homma, Hirotoshi; Takabatake, Hirotsugu; Mori, Masaki; Natori, Hiroshi; Schnabel, Julia A; Mori, Kensaku

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents a local intensity structure analysis based on an intensity targeted radial structure tensor (ITRST) and the blob-like structure enhancement filter based on it (ITRST filter) for the mediastinal lymph node detection algorithm from chest computed tomography (CT) volumes. Although the filter based on radial structure tensor analysis (RST filter) based on conventional RST analysis can be utilized to detect lymph nodes, some lymph nodes adjacent to regions with extremely high or low intensities cannot be detected. Therefore, we propose the ITRST filter, which integrates the prior knowledge on detection target intensity range into the RST filter. Our lymph node detection algorithm consists of two steps: (1) obtaining candidate regions using the ITRST filter and (2) removing false positives (FPs) using the support vector machine classifier. We evaluated lymph node detection performance of the ITRST filter on 47 contrast-enhanced chest CT volumes and compared it with the RST and Hessian filters. The detection rate of the ITRST filter was 84.2% with 9.1 FPs/volume for lymph nodes whose short axis was at least 10 mm, which outperformed the RST and Hessian filters.

  17. Automated melanoma detection with a novel multispectral imaging system: results of a prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomatis, Stefano; Carrara, Mauro; Bono, Aldo; Bartoli, Cesare; Lualdi, Manuela; Tragni, Gabrina; Colombo, Ambrogio; Marchesini, Renato

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the performance of a new spectroscopic system in the diagnosis of melanoma. This study involves a consecutive series of 1278 patients with 1391 cutaneous pigmented lesions including 184 melanomas. In an attempt to approach the 'real world' of lesion population, a further set of 1022 not excised clinically reassuring lesions was also considered for analysis. Each lesion was imaged in vivo by a multispectral imaging system. The system operates at wavelengths between 483 and 950 nm by acquiring 15 images at equally spaced wavelength intervals. From the images, different lesion descriptors were extracted related to the colour distribution and morphology of the lesions. Data reduction techniques were applied before setting up a neural network classifier designed to perform automated diagnosis. The data set was randomly divided into three sets: train (696 lesions, including 90 melanomas) and verify (348 lesions, including 53 melanomas) for the instruction of a proper neural network, and an independent test set (347 lesions, including 41 melanomas). The neural network was able to discriminate between melanomas and non-melanoma lesions with a sensitivity of 80.4% and a specificity of 75.6% in the 1391 histologized cases data set. No major variations were found in classification scores when train, verify and test subsets were separately evaluated. Following receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, the resulting area under the curve was 0.85. No significant differences were found among areas under train, verify and test set curves, supporting the good network ability to generalize for new cases. In addition, specificity and area under ROC curve increased up to 90% and 0.90, respectively, when the additional set of 1022 lesions without histology was added to the test set. Our data show that performance of an automated system is greatly population dependent, suggesting caution in the comparison with results reported in the

  18. Multicenter Evaluation of a Novel Automated Rapid Detection System of BRAF Status in Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiefer, Ana-Iris; Parlow, Laura; Gabler, Lisa; Mesteri, Ildiko; Koperek, Oskar; von Deimling, Andreas; Streubel, Berthold; Preusser, Matthias; Lehmann, Annika; Kellner, Udo; Pauwels, Patrick; Lambin, Suzan; Dietel, Manfred; Hummel, Michael; Klauschen, Frederick; Birner, Peter; Möbs, Markus

    2016-05-01

    The mutated BRAF oncogene represents a therapeutic target in malignant melanoma. Because BRAF mutations are also involved in the pathogenesis of other human malignancies, the use of specific BRAF inhibitors might also be extended to other diseases in the future. A prerequisite for the clinical application of BRAF inhibitors is the reliable detection of activating BRAF mutations in routine histopathological samples. In a multicenter approach, we evaluated a novel and fully automated PCR-based system (Idylla) capable of detecting BRAF V600 mutations in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue within 90 minutes with high sensitivity. We analyzed a total of 436 samples with the Idylla system. Valid results were obtained in 421 cases (96.56%). Its performance was compared with conventional methods (pyrosequencing or Sanger sequencing). Concordant results were obtained in 406 cases (96.90%). Reanalysis of eight discordant samples by next-generation sequencing and/or pyrosequencing with newly extracted DNA and the BRAF RGQ Kit confirmed the Idylla result in seven cases, resulting in an overall agreement of 98.57%. In conclusion, the Idylla system is a highly reliable and sensitive platform for detection of BRAF V600 mutations in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded material, providing an efficient alternative to conventional diagnostic methods, particularly for routine diagnostics laboratories with limited experience in molecular pathology. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Breast cancer detection: Radiologists' performance using mammography with and without automated whole-breast ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, Kevin M. [Hall Center, Santa Monica, CA (United States); Lee, Sung-Jae; Comulada, W.S. [University of California, Semel Institute Center for Community Health, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Dean, Judy

    2010-11-15

    Radiologist reader performance for breast cancer detection using mammography plus automated whole-breast ultrasound (AWBU) was compared with mammography alone. Screenings for non-palpable breast malignancies in women with radiographically dense breasts with contemporaneous mammograms and AWBU were reviewed by 12 radiologists blinded to the diagnoses; half the studies were abnormal. Readers first reviewed the 102 mammograms. The American College of Radiology (ACR) Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BIRADS) and Digital Mammographic Imaging Screening Trial (DMIST) likelihood ratings were recorded with location information for identified abnormalities. Readers then reviewed the mammograms and AWBU with knowledge of previous mammogram-only evaluation. We compared reader performance across screening techniques using absolute callback, areas under the curve (AUC), and figure of merit (FOM). True positivity of cancer detection increased 63%, with only a 4% decrease in true negativity. Reader-averaged AUC was higher for mammography plus AWBU compared with mammography alone by BIRADS (0.808 versus 0.701) and likelihood scores (0.810 versus 0.703). Similarly, FOM was higher for mammography plus AWBU compared with mammography alone by BIRADS (0.786 versus 0.613) and likelihood scores (0.791 versus 0.614). Adding AWBU to mammography improved callback rates, accuracy of breast cancer detection, and confidence in callbacks for dense-breasted women. (orig.)

  20. Automated Manufacture of Damage Detecting, Self-Healing Composite Cryogenic Pressure Vessels, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — After successfully demonstrating the basic functionality of a damage-detecting, self-healing 'smart' material system in Phase I, Aurora and UMass Lowell aim to...

  1. Quest for automated land cover change detection using satellite time series data

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Salmon, BP

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows that a feedforward Multilayer Perceptron (MLP) operating over a temporal sliding window of multispectral time series MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite data is able to detect land cover change...

  2. An Automated Energy Detection Algorithm Based on Morphological Filter Processing with a Modified Watershed Transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    obtained works well for signals present or noise-only RF spectrum data files. The red curve is the threshold when added to the morphological processed...TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) US Army Research Laboratory Sensors and Electron Devices...morphological image techniques to the energy detection scenario of signals in the RF spectrum domain. The algorithm automatically establishes a detection

  3. Automated microcalcification detection in mammograms using statistical variable-box-threshold filter method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Mark; Mitra, Sunanda; Roberson, Glenn H.; Shieh, Yao-Yang

    1997-10-01

    Currently early detection of breast cancer is primarily accomplished by mammography and suspicious findings may lead to a decision for performing a biopsy. Digital enhancement and pattern recognition techniques may aid in early detection of some patterns such as microcalcification clusters indicating onset of DCIS (ductal carcinoma in situ) that accounts for 20% of all mammographically detected breast cancers and could be treated when detected early. These individual calcifications are hard to detect due to size and shape variability and inhomogeneous background texture. Our study addresses only early detection of microcalcifications that allows the radiologist to interpret the x-ray findings in computer-aided enhanced form easier than evaluating the x-ray film directly. We present an algorithm which locates microcalcifications based on local grayscale variability and of tissue structures and image statistics. Threshold filters with lower and upper bounds computed from the image statistics of the entire image and selected subimages were designed to enhance the entire image. This enhanced image was used as the initial image for identifying the micro-calcifications based on the variable box threshold filters at different resolutions. The test images came from the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center and the MIAS mammographic database, which are classified into various categories including microcalcifications. Classification of other types of abnormalities in mammograms based on their characteristic features is addressed in later studies.

  4. Semi-automated camera trap image processing for the detection of ungulate fence crossing events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janzen, Michael; Visser, Kaitlyn; Visscher, Darcy; MacLeod, Ian; Vujnovic, Dragomir; Vujnovic, Ksenija

    2017-09-27

    Remote cameras are an increasingly important tool for ecological research. While remote camera traps collect field data with minimal human attention, the images they collect require post-processing and characterization before it can be ecologically and statistically analyzed, requiring the input of substantial time and money from researchers. The need for post-processing is due, in part, to a high incidence of non-target images. We developed a stand-alone semi-automated computer program to aid in image processing, categorization, and data reduction by employing background subtraction and histogram rules. Unlike previous work that uses video as input, our program uses still camera trap images. The program was developed for an ungulate fence crossing project and tested against an image dataset which had been previously processed by a human operator. Our program placed images into categories representing the confidence of a particular sequence of images containing a fence crossing event. This resulted in a reduction of 54.8% of images that required further human operator characterization while retaining 72.6% of the known fence crossing events. This program can provide researchers using remote camera data the ability to reduce the time and cost required for image post-processing and characterization. Further, we discuss how this procedure might be generalized to situations not specifically related to animal use of linear features.

  5. System automation for a bacterial colony detection and identification instrument via forward scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Euiwon; Hirleman, E Daniel; Aroonnual, Amornrat; Bhunia, Arun K; Robinson, J Paul

    2009-01-01

    A system design and automation of a microbiological instrument that locates bacterial colonies and captures the forward-scattering signatures are presented. The proposed instrument integrates three major components: a colony locator, a forward scatterometer and a motion controller. The colony locator utilizes an off-axis light source to illuminate a Petri dish and an IEEE1394 camera to capture the diffusively scattered light to provide the number of bacterial colonies and two-dimensional coordinate information of the bacterial colonies with the help of a segmentation algorithm with region-growing. Then the Petri dish is automatically aligned with the respective centroid coordinate with a trajectory optimization method, such as the Traveling Salesman Algorithm. The forward scatterometer automatically computes the scattered laser beam from a monochromatic image sensor via quadrant intensity balancing and quantitatively determines the centeredness of the forward-scattering pattern. The final scattering signatures are stored to be analyzed to provide rapid identification and classification of the bacterial samples

  6. Novel flowcytometry-based approach of malignant cell detection in body fluids using an automated hematology analyzer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiko Ai

    Full Text Available Morphological microscopic examinations of nucleated cells in body fluid (BF samples are performed to screen malignancy. However, the morphological differentiation is time-consuming and labor-intensive. This study aimed to develop a new flowcytometry-based gating analysis mode "XN-BF gating algorithm" to detect malignant cells using an automated hematology analyzer, Sysmex XN-1000. XN-BF mode was equipped with WDF white blood cell (WBC differential channel. We added two algorithms to the WDF channel: Rule 1 detects larger and clumped cell signals compared to the leukocytes, targeting the clustered malignant cells; Rule 2 detects middle sized mononuclear cells containing less granules than neutrophils with similar fluorescence signal to monocytes, targeting hematological malignant cells and solid tumor cells. BF samples that meet, at least, one rule were detected as malignant. To evaluate this novel gating algorithm, 92 various BF samples were collected. Manual microscopic differentiation with the May-Grunwald Giemsa stain and WBC count with hemocytometer were also performed. The performance of these three methods were evaluated by comparing with the cytological diagnosis. The XN-BF gating algorithm achieved sensitivity of 63.0% and specificity of 87.8% with 68.0% for positive predictive value and 85.1% for negative predictive value in detecting malignant-cell positive samples. Manual microscopic WBC differentiation and WBC count demonstrated 70.4% and 66.7% of sensitivities, and 96.9% and 92.3% of specificities, respectively. The XN-BF gating algorithm can be a feasible tool in hematology laboratories for prompt screening of malignant cells in various BF samples.

  7. Brain-Wide Mapping of Axonal Connections: Workflow for Automated Detection and Spatial Analysis of Labeling in Microscopic Sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, Eszter A; Leergaard, Trygve B; Csucs, Gergely; Bjaalie, Jan G

    2016-01-01

    Axonal tracing techniques are powerful tools for exploring the structural organization of neuronal connections. Tracers such as biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) and Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin (Pha-L) allow brain-wide mapping of connections through analysis of large series of histological section images. We present a workflow for efficient collection and analysis of tract-tracing datasets with a focus on newly developed modules for image processing and assignment of anatomical location to tracing data. New functionality includes automatic detection of neuronal labeling in large image series, alignment of images to a volumetric brain atlas, and analytical tools for measuring the position and extent of labeling. To evaluate the workflow, we used high-resolution microscopic images from axonal tracing experiments in which different parts of the rat primary somatosensory cortex had been injected with BDA or Pha-L. Parameters from a set of representative images were used to automate detection of labeling in image series covering the entire brain, resulting in binary maps of the distribution of labeling. For high to medium labeling densities, automatic detection was found to provide reliable results when compared to manual analysis, whereas weak labeling required manual curation for optimal detection. To identify brain regions corresponding to labeled areas, section images were aligned to the Waxholm Space (WHS) atlas of the Sprague Dawley rat brain (v2) by custom-angle slicing of the MRI template to match individual sections. Based on the alignment, WHS coordinates were obtained for labeled elements and transformed to stereotaxic coordinates. The new workflow modules increase the efficiency and reliability of labeling detection in large series of images from histological sections, and enable anchoring to anatomical atlases for further spatial analysis and comparison with other data.

  8. Brain-wide mapping of axonal connections: workflow for automated detection and spatial analysis of labeling in microscopic sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eszter Agnes ePapp

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Axonal tracing techniques are powerful tools for exploring the structural organization of neuronal connections. Tracers such as biotinylated dextran amine (BDA and Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin (Pha-L allow brain-wide mapping of connections through analysis of large series of histological section images. We present a workflow for efficient collection and analysis of tract-tracing datasets with a focus on newly developed modules for image processing and assignment of anatomical location to tracing data. New functionality includes automatic detection of neuronal labeling in large image series, alignment of images to a volumetric brain atlas, and analytical tools for measuring the position and extent of labeling. To evaluate the workflow, we used high-resolution microscopic images from axonal tracing experiments in which different parts of the rat primary somatosensory cortex had been injected with BDA or Pha-L. Parameters from a set of representative images were used to automate detection of labeling in image series covering the entire brain, resulting in binary maps of the distribution of labeling. For high to medium labeling densities, automatic detection was found to provide reliable results when compared to manual analysis, whereas weak labeling required manual curation for optimal detection. To identify brain regions corresponding to labeled areas, section images were aligned to the Waxholm Space (WHS atlas of the Sprague Dawley rat brain (v2 by custom-angle slicing of the MRI template to match individual sections. Based on the alignment, WHS coordinates were obtained for labeled elements and transformed to stereotaxic coordinates. The new workflow modules increase the efficiency and reliability of labeling detection in large series of images from histological sections, and enable anchoring to anatomical atlases for further spatial analysis and comparison with other data.

  9. Automated prostate cancer detection via comprehensive multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging texture feature models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalvati, Farzad; Wong, Alexander; Haider, Masoom A.

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common form of cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death in North America. Auto-detection of prostate cancer can play a major role in early detection of prostate cancer, which has a significant impact on patient survival rates. While multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging (MP-MRI) has shown promise in diagnosis of prostate cancer, the existing auto-detection algorithms do not take advantage of abundance of data available in MP-MRI to improve detection accuracy. The goal of this research was to design a radiomics-based auto-detection method for prostate cancer via utilizing MP-MRI data. In this work, we present new MP-MRI texture feature models for radiomics-driven detection of prostate cancer. In addition to commonly used non-invasive imaging sequences in conventional MP-MRI, namely T2-weighted MRI (T2w) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), our proposed MP-MRI texture feature models incorporate computed high-b DWI (CHB-DWI) and a new diffusion imaging modality called correlated diffusion imaging (CDI). Moreover, the proposed texture feature models incorporate features from individual b-value images. A comprehensive set of texture features was calculated for both the conventional MP-MRI and new MP-MRI texture feature models. We performed feature selection analysis for each individual modality and then combined best features from each modality to construct the optimized texture feature models. The performance of the proposed MP-MRI texture feature models was evaluated via leave-one-patient-out cross-validation using a support vector machine (SVM) classifier trained on 40,975 cancerous and healthy tissue samples obtained from real clinical MP-MRI datasets. The proposed MP-MRI texture feature models outperformed the conventional model (i.e., T2w+DWI) with regard to cancer detection accuracy. Comprehensive texture feature models were developed for improved radiomics-driven detection of prostate cancer using MP-MRI. Using a

  10. Toward Real-Time Automated Detection of Turns during Gait Using Wearable Inertial Measurement Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domen Novak

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have presented algorithms for detection of turns during gait using wearable sensors, but those algorithms were not built for real-time use. This paper therefore investigates the optimal approach for real-time detection of planned turns during gait using wearable inertial measurement units. Several different sensor positions (head, back and legs and three different detection criteria (orientation, angular velocity and both are compared with regard to their ability to correctly detect turn onset. Furthermore, the different sensor positions are compared with regard to their ability to predict the turn direction and amplitude. The evaluation was performed on ten healthy subjects who performed left/right turns at three amplitudes (22, 45 and 90 degrees. Results showed that turn onset can be most accurately detected with sensors on the back and using a combination of orientation and angular velocity. The same setup also gives the best prediction of turn direction and amplitude. Preliminary measurements with a single amputee were also performed and highlighted important differences such as slower turning that need to be taken into account.

  11. On the accuracy of automated shoreline detection derived from satellite imagery : A case study of the Sand Motor mega-scale nourishment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagenaars, Gerben; de Vries, S.; Luijendijk, A.P.; de Boer, W.P.; Reniers, A.J.H.M.

    2018-01-01

    Measured trends and variability in shoreline position are used by coastal managers, scientists and engineers to understand and monitor coastal systems. This paper presents a new and generic method for automated shoreline detection from the largely unexplored collection of publicly available

  12. A graphical automated detection system to locate hardwood log surface defects using high-resolution three-dimensional laser scan data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liya Thomas; R. Edward. Thomas

    2011-01-01

    We have developed an automated defect detection system and a state-of-the-art Graphic User Interface (GUI) for hardwood logs. The algorithm identifies defects at least 0.5 inch high and at least 3 inches in diameter on barked hardwood log and stem surfaces. To summarize defect features and to build a knowledge base, hundreds of defects were measured, photographed, and...

  13. Automated detection of microcalcification clusters in digital mammograms based on wavelet domain hidden Markov tree modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regentova, E.; Zhang, L.; Veni, G.; Zheng, J.

    2007-01-01

    A system is designed for detecting microcalcification clusters (MCC) in digital mammograms. The system is intended for computer-aided diagnostic prompting. Further discrimination of MCC as benign or malignant is assumed to be performed by radiologists. Processing of mammograms is based on the statistical modeling by means of wavelet domain hidden markov trees (WHMT). Segmentation is performed by the weighted likelihood evaluation followed by the classification based on spatial filters for a single microcalcification (MC) and a cluster of MC detection. The analysis is carried out on FROC curves for 40 mammograms from the mini-MIAS database and for 100 mammograms with 50 cancerous and 50 benign cases from DDSM database. The designed system is capable to detect 100% of true positive cases in these sets. The rate of false positives is 2.9 per case for mini-MIAS dataset; and 0.01 for the DDSM images. (orig.)

  14. Viral RNA testing and automation on the bead-based CBNE detection microsystem.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galambos, Paul C.; Bourdon, Christopher Jay; Farrell, Cara M.; Rossito, Paul (University of California at Davis); McClain, Jaime L.; Derzon, Mark Steven; Cullor, James Sterling (University of California at Davis); Rahimian, Kamayar

    2008-09-01

    We developed prototype chemistry for nucleic acid hybridization on our bead-based diagnostics platform and we established an automatable bead handling protocol capable of 50 part-per-billion (ppb) sensitivity. We are working towards a platform capable of parallel, rapid (10 minute), raw sample testing for orthogonal (in this case nucleic acid and immunoassays) identification of biological (and other) threats in a single sensor microsystem. In this LDRD we developed the nucleic acid chemistry required for nucleic acid hybridization. Our goal is to place a non-cell associated RNA virus (Bovine Viral Diarrhea, BVD) on the beads for raw sample testing. This key pre-requisite to showing orthogonality (nucleic acid measurements can be performed in parallel with immunoassay measurements). Orthogonal detection dramatically reduces false positives. We chose BVD because our collaborators (UC-Davis) can supply samples from persistently infected animals; and because proof-of-concept field testing can be performed with modification of the current technology platform at the UC Davis research station. Since BVD is a cattle-prone disease this research dovetails with earlier immunoassay work on Botulinum toxin simulant testing in raw milk samples. Demonstration of BVD RNA detection expands the repertoire of biological macromolecules that can be adapted to our bead-based detection. The resources of this late start LDRD were adequate to partially demonstrate the conjugation of the beads to the nucleic acids. It was never expected to be adequate for a full live virus test but to motivate that additional investment. In addition, we were able to reduce the LOD (Limit of Detection) for the botulinum toxin stimulant to 50 ppb from the earlier LOD of 1 ppm. A low LOD combined with orthogonal detection provides both low false negatives and low false positives. The logical follow-on steps to this LDRD research are to perform live virus identification as well as concurrent nucleic acid and

  15. Detecting Pilot's Engagement Using fNIRS Connectivity Features in an Automated vs. Manual Landing Scenario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin J. Verdière

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring pilot's mental states is a relevant approach to mitigate human error and enhance human machine interaction. A promising brain imaging technique to perform such a continuous measure of human mental state under ecological settings is Functional Near-InfraRed Spectroscopy (fNIRS. However, to our knowledge no study has yet assessed the potential of fNIRS connectivity metrics as long as passive Brain Computer Interfaces (BCI are concerned. Therefore, we designed an experimental scenario in a realistic simulator in which 12 pilots had to perform landings under two contrasted levels of engagement (manual vs. automated. The collected data were used to benchmark the performance of classical oxygenation features (i.e., Average, Peak, Variance, Skewness, Kurtosis, Area Under the Curve, and Slope and connectivity features (i.e., Covariance, Pearson's, and Spearman's Correlation, Spectral Coherence, and Wavelet Coherence to discriminate these two landing conditions. Classification performance was obtained by using a shrinkage Linear Discriminant Analysis (sLDA and a stratified cross validation using each feature alone or by combining them. Our findings disclosed that the connectivity features performed significantly better than the classical concentration metrics with a higher accuracy for the wavelet coherence (average: 65.3/59.9 %, min: 45.3/45.0, max: 80.5/74.7 computed for HbO/HbR signals respectively. A maximum classification performance was obtained by combining the area under the curve with the wavelet coherence (average: 66.9/61.6 %, min: 57.3/44.8, max: 80.0/81.3 computed for HbO/HbR signals respectively. In a general manner all connectivity measures allowed an efficient classification when computed over HbO signals. Those promising results provide methodological cues for further implementation of fNIRS-based passive BCIs.

  16. M-Track: A New Software for Automated Detection of Grooming Trajectories in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheldon L Reeves

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Grooming is a complex and robust innate behavior, commonly performed by most vertebrate species. In mice, grooming consists of a series of stereotyped patterned strokes, performed along the rostro-caudal axis of the body. The frequency and duration of each grooming episode is sensitive to changes in stress levels, social interactions and pharmacological manipulations, and is therefore used in behavioral studies to gain insights into the function of brain regions that control movement execution and anxiety. Traditional approaches to analyze grooming rely on manually scoring the time of onset and duration of each grooming episode, and are often performed on grooming episodes triggered by stress exposure, which may not be entirely representative of spontaneous grooming in freely-behaving mice. This type of analysis is time-consuming and provides limited information about finer aspects of grooming behaviors, which are important to understand movement stereotypy and bilateral coordination in mice. Currently available commercial and freeware video-tracking software allow automated tracking of the whole body of a mouse or of its head and tail, not of individual forepaws. Here we describe a simple experimental set-up and a novel open-source code, named M-Track, for simultaneously tracking the movement of individual forepaws during spontaneous grooming in multiple freely-behaving mice. This toolbox provides a simple platform to perform trajectory analysis of forepaw movement during distinct grooming episodes. By using M-track we show that, in C57BL/6 wild type mice, the speed and bilateral coordination of the left and right forepaws remain unaltered during the execution of distinct grooming episodes. Stress exposure induces a profound increase in the length of the forepaw grooming trajectories. M-Track provides a valuable and user-friendly interface to streamline the analysis of spontaneous grooming in biomedical research studies.

  17. M-Track: A New Software for Automated Detection of Grooming Trajectories in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Sheldon L; Fleming, Kelsey E; Zhang, Lin; Scimemi, Annalisa

    2016-09-01

    Grooming is a complex and robust innate behavior, commonly performed by most vertebrate species. In mice, grooming consists of a series of stereotyped patterned strokes, performed along the rostro-caudal axis of the body. The frequency and duration of each grooming episode is sensitive to changes in stress levels, social interactions and pharmacological manipulations, and is therefore used in behavioral studies to gain insights into the function of brain regions that control movement execution and anxiety. Traditional approaches to analyze grooming rely on manually scoring the time of onset and duration of each grooming episode, and are often performed on grooming episodes triggered by stress exposure, which may not be entirely representative of spontaneous grooming in freely-behaving mice. This type of analysis is time-consuming and provides limited information about finer aspects of grooming behaviors, which are important to understand movement stereotypy and bilateral coordination in mice. Currently available commercial and freeware video-tracking software allow automated tracking of the whole body of a mouse or of its head and tail, not of individual forepaws. Here we describe a simple experimental set-up and a novel open-source code, named M-Track, for simultaneously tracking the movement of individual forepaws during spontaneous grooming in multiple freely-behaving mice. This toolbox provides a simple platform to perform trajectory analysis of forepaw movement during distinct grooming episodes. By using M-track we show that, in C57BL/6 wild type mice, the speed and bilateral coordination of the left and right forepaws remain unaltered during the execution of distinct grooming episodes. Stress exposure induces a profound increase in the length of the forepaw grooming trajectories. M-Track provides a valuable and user-friendly interface to streamline the analysis of spontaneous grooming in biomedical research studies.

  18. Integrating Electrochemical Detection with Centrifugal Microfluidics for Real-Time and Fully Automated Sample Testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Sune Zoëga; Kwasny, Dorota; Amato, Letizia

    2015-01-01

    Here we present a robust, stable and low-noise experimental set-up for performing electrochemical detection on a centrifugal microfluidic platform. By using a low-noise electronic component (electrical slip-ring) it is possible to achieve continuous, on-line monitoring of electrochemical experime......Here we present a robust, stable and low-noise experimental set-up for performing electrochemical detection on a centrifugal microfluidic platform. By using a low-noise electronic component (electrical slip-ring) it is possible to achieve continuous, on-line monitoring of electrochemical...

  19. Detection and characterization of verocytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli by automated 5 ' nuclease PCR assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Eva Møller; Andersen, Marianne Thorup

    2003-01-01

    In recent years increased attention has been focused on infections caused by isolates of verocytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli (VTEC) serotypes other than O157. These non-O157 VTEC isolates are commonly present in food and food production animals. Easy detection, isolation, and characterization...... of hydrophobic-grid membrane filters and DNA probe hybridization. Furthermore, we have developed 5' nuclease PCR assays for the detection of virulence factors typically present in VTEC isolates, including subtypes of three genes of the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) pathogenicity island. The 22 assays...

  20. Automated Detection of Short Optical Transients of Astrophysical Origin in Real Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Sokołowski

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The detection of short optical transients of astrophysical origin in real time is an important task for existing robotic telescopes. The faster a new optical transient is detected, the earlier follow-up observations can be started. The sooner the object is identified, the more data can be collected before the source fades away, particularly in the most interesting early period of the transient. In this the real-time pipeline designed for identification of optical flashes with the “Pi of the Sky” project will be presented in detail together with solutions used by other experiments.

  1. Students fall for Fall Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smedley, Kara

    2012-02-01

    From Boston to Beijing, thousands of students traveled to San Francisco for the 2011 AGU Fall Meeting. Of those who participated, 183 students were able to attend thanks to AGU's student travel grant program, which assists students with travel costs and seeks to enrich the meeting through ethnic and gender diversity. Students at Fall Meeting enjoyed a variety of programs and activities designed to help them better network with their peers, learn about new fields, and disseminate their research to the interested public. More than 800 students attended AGU's first annual student mixer, sharing drinks and ideas with fellow student members and future colleagues as well as forging new friendships and intellectual relationships.

  2. Low-Cost 3D Printers Enable High-Quality and Automated Sample Preparation and Molecular Detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamfai Chan

    Full Text Available Most molecular diagnostic assays require upfront sample preparation steps to isolate the target's nucleic acids, followed by its amplification and detection using various nucleic acid amplification techniques. Because molecular diagnostic methods are generally rather difficult to perform manually without highly trained users, automated and integrated systems are highly desirable but too costly for use at point-of-care or low-resource settings. Here, we showcase the development of a low-cost and rapid nucleic acid isolation and amplification platform by modifying entry-level 3D printers that cost between $400 and $750. Our modifications consisted of replacing the extruder with a tip-comb attachment that houses magnets to conduct magnetic particle-based nucleic acid extraction. We then programmed the 3D printer to conduct motions that can perform high-quality extraction protocols. Up to 12 samples can be processed simultaneously in under 13 minutes and the efficiency of nucleic acid isolation matches well against gold-standard spin-column-based extraction technology. Additionally, we used the 3D printer's heated bed to supply heat to perform water bath-based polymerase chain reactions (PCRs. Using another attachment to hold PCR tubes, the 3D printer was programmed to automate the process of shuttling PCR tubes between water baths. By eliminating the temperature ramping needed in most commercial thermal cyclers, the run time of a 35-cycle PCR protocol was shortened by 33%. This article demonstrates that for applications in resource-limited settings, expensive nucleic acid extraction devices and thermal cyclers that are used in many central laboratories can be potentially replaced by a device modified from inexpensive entry-level 3D printers.

  3. Low-Cost 3D Printers Enable High-Quality and Automated Sample Preparation and Molecular Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kamfai; Coen, Mauricio; Hardick, Justin; Gaydos, Charlotte A; Wong, Kah-Yat; Smith, Clayton; Wilson, Scott A; Vayugundla, Siva Praneeth; Wong, Season

    2016-01-01

    Most molecular diagnostic assays require upfront sample preparation steps to isolate the target's nucleic acids, followed by its amplification and detection using various nucleic acid amplification techniques. Because molecular diagnostic methods are generally rather difficult to perform manually without highly trained users, automated and integrated systems are highly desirable but too costly for use at point-of-care or low-resource settings. Here, we showcase the development of a low-cost and rapid nucleic acid isolation and amplification platform by modifying entry-level 3D printers that cost between $400 and $750. Our modifications consisted of replacing the extruder with a tip-comb attachment that houses magnets to conduct magnetic particle-based nucleic acid extraction. We then programmed the 3D printer to conduct motions that can perform high-quality extraction protocols. Up to 12 samples can be processed simultaneously in under 13 minutes and the efficiency of nucleic acid isolation matches well against gold-standard spin-column-based extraction technology. Additionally, we used the 3D printer's heated bed to supply heat to perform water bath-based polymerase chain reactions (PCRs). Using another attachment to hold PCR tubes, the 3D printer was programmed to automate the process of shuttling PCR tubes between water baths. By eliminating the temperature ramping needed in most commercial thermal cyclers, the run time of a 35-cycle PCR protocol was shortened by 33%. This article demonstrates that for applications in resource-limited settings, expensive nucleic acid extraction devices and thermal cyclers that are used in many central laboratories can be potentially replaced by a device modified from inexpensive entry-level 3D printers.

  4. Trajectory-based change detection for automated characterization of forest disturbance dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert E. Kennedy; Warren B. Cohen; Todd A. Schroeder

    2007-01-01

    Satellite sensors are well suited to monitoring changes on the Earth's surface through provision of consistent and repeatable measurements at a spatial scale appropriate for many processes causing change on the land surface. Here, we describe and test a new conceptual approach to change detection of forests using a dense temporal stack of Landsat Thematic Mapper (...

  5. Comparing a Perceptual and an Automated Vision-Based Method for Lie Detection in Younger Children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vieira Da Fonseca Serras Pereira, Mariana; Cozijn, Rein; Postma, Eric; Shahid, Suleman; Swerts, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigates how easily it can be detected whether a child is being truthful or not in a game situation, and it explores the cue validity of bodily movements for such type of classification. To achieve this, we introduce an innovative methodology – the combination of perception

  6. Automated spine and vertebrae detection in CT images using object-based image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwier, M; Chitiboi, T; Hülnhagen, T; Hahn, H K

    2013-09-01

    Although computer assistance has become common in medical practice, some of the most challenging tasks that remain unsolved are in the area of automatic detection and recognition. The human visual perception is in general far superior to computer vision algorithms. Object-based image analysis is a relatively new approach that aims to lift image analysis from a pixel-based processing to a semantic region-based processing of images. It allows effective integration of reasoning processes and contextual concepts into the recognition method. In this paper, we present an approach that applies object-based image analysis to the task of detecting the spine in computed tomography images. A spine detection would be of great benefit in several contexts, from the automatic labeling of vertebrae to the assessment of spinal pathologies. We show with our approach how region-based features, contextual information and domain knowledge, especially concerning the typical shape and structure of the spine and its components, can be used effectively in the analysis process. The results of our approach are promising with a detection rate for vertebral bodies of 96% and a precision of 99%. We also gain a good two-dimensional segmentation of the spine along the more central slices and a coarse three-dimensional segmentation. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Visual surveying platform for the automated detection of road surface distresses

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Naidoo, T

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available is vital to preventing pothole formation and growth. To improve the efficiency of maintenance and reduce the cost thereof, the Visual Surveying Platform (VSP) is being developed that will automatically detect and analyse road distresses. The VSP consists...

  8. Automated detection method for architectural distortion areas on mammograms based on morphological processing and surface analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Tetsuko; Matsubara, Tomoko; Hara, Takeshi; Fujita, Hiroshi; Endo, Tokiko; Iwase, Takuji

    2004-05-01

    As well as mass and microcalcification, architectural distortion is a very important finding for the early detection of breast cancer via mammograms, and such distortions can be classified into three typical types: spiculation, retraction, and distortion. The purpose of this work is to develop an automatic method for detecting areas of architectural distortion with spiculation. The suspect areas are detected by concentration indexes of line-structures extracted by using mean curvature. After that, discrimination analysis of nine features is employed for the classifications of true and false positives. The employed features are the size, the mean pixel value, the mean concentration index, the mean isotropic index, the contrast, and four other features based on the power spectrum. As a result of this work, the accuracy of the classification was 76% and the sensitivity was 80% with 0.9 false positives per image in our database in regard to spiculation. It was concluded that our method was effective in detectiong the area of architectural distortion; however, some architectural distortions were not detected accurately because of the size, the density, or the different appearance of the distorted areas.

  9. Automated retrieval of cloud and aerosol properties from the ARM Raman lidar, part 1: feature detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thorsen, Tyler J.; Fu, Qiang; Newsom, Rob K.; Turner, David D.; Comstock, Jennifer M.

    2015-11-01

    A Feature detection and EXtinction retrieval (FEX) algorithm for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program’s Raman lidar (RL) has been developed. Presented here is part 1 of the FEX algorithm: the detection of features including both clouds and aerosols. The approach of FEX is to use multiple quantities— scattering ratios derived using elastic and nitro-gen channel signals from two fields of view, the scattering ratio derived using only the elastic channel, and the total volume depolarization ratio— to identify features using range-dependent detection thresholds. FEX is designed to be context-sensitive with thresholds determined for each profile by calculating the expected clear-sky signal and noise. The use of multiple quantities pro-vides complementary depictions of cloud and aerosol locations and allows for consistency checks to improve the accuracy of the feature mask. The depolarization ratio is shown to be particularly effective at detecting optically-thin features containing non-spherical particles such as cirrus clouds. Improve-ments over the existing ARM RL cloud mask are shown. The performance of FEX is validated against a collocated micropulse lidar and observations from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) satellite over the ARM Darwin, Australia site. While we focus on a specific lidar system, the FEX framework presented here is suitable for other Raman or high spectral resolution lidars.

  10. Automated solar radio burst detection on radio spectrum: a review of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Recently, the success of various techniques in image processing to identify solar radio burst automatically was presented. This paper reviews previous technique in image processing. This discussion will help the solar astronomer to find the best technique in pre-processing before moving into the next stage for detection of ...

  11. Automated detection of very Low Surface Brightness galaxies in the Virgo Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prole, D. J.; Davies, J. I.; Keenan, O. C.; Davies, L. J. M.

    2018-04-01

    We report the automatic detection of a new sample of very low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies, likely members of the Virgo cluster. We introduce our new software, DeepScan, that has been designed specifically to detect extended LSB features automatically using the DBSCAN algorithm. We demonstrate the technique by applying it over a 5 degree2 portion of the Next-Generation Virgo Survey (NGVS) data to reveal 53 low surface brightness galaxies that are candidate cluster members based on their sizes and colours. 30 of these sources are new detections despite the region being searched specifically for LSB galaxies previously. Our final sample contains galaxies with 26.0 ≤ ⟨μe⟩ ≤ 28.5 and 19 ≤ mg ≤ 21, making them some of the faintest known in Virgo. The majority of them have colours consistent with the red sequence, and have a mean stellar mass of 106.3 ± 0.5M⊙ assuming cluster membership. After using ProFit to fit Sérsic profiles to our detections, none of the new sources have effective radii larger than 1.5 Kpc and do not meet the criteria for ultra-diffuse galaxy (UDG) classification, so we classify them as ultra-faint dwarfs.

  12. VirusDetect: An automated pipeline for efficient virus discovery using deep sequencing of small RNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accurate detection of viruses in plants and animals is critical for agriculture production and human health. Deep sequencing and assembly of virus-derived siRNAs has proven to be a highly efficient approach for virus discovery. However, to date no computational tools specifically designed for both k...

  13. Syndromic Surveillance and Outbreak Detection Using Automated Microbiologic Laboratory Test Order Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-15

    Adenovirus (40/41)/Rotavirus Adenovirus (40/41), Direct EIA Norovirus, RT-PCR Rotavirus Detection by EIA Cryptosporidium Smear, Stool...IgM, Qn HTLV-I/II Antibodies, Qual Ureaplasma/Mycoplasma hominis Severe Illness or Death potentially due to infectious disease ACUTE onset of... CRYPTOSPORIDIUM CRYPTOSPORIDIUM CSF CULT CSF CULTURE CULTURE CSF; SPINAL FLUID CULTURE CYANOBACTERIUM ID CYANOBTERIUM ID CYCLOSPORA

  14. Automated retinal nerve fiber layer defect detection using fundus imaging in glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Rashmi; Puhan, N B; Rao, Aparna; Padhy, Debananda; Panda, Ganapati

    2018-06-01

    Retinal nerve fiber layer defect (RNFLD) provides an early objective evidence of structural changes in glaucoma. RNFLD detection is currently carried out using imaging modalities like OCT and GDx which are expensive for routine practice. In this regard, we propose a novel automatic method for RNFLD detection and angular width quantification using cost effective redfree fundus images to be practically useful for computer-assisted glaucoma risk assessment. After blood vessel inpainting and CLAHE based contrast enhancement, the initial boundary pixels are identified by local minima analysis of the 1-D intensity profiles on concentric circles. The true boundary pixels are classified using random forest trained by newly proposed cumulative zero count local binary pattern (CZC-LBP) and directional differential energy (DDE) along with Shannon, Tsallis entropy and intensity features. Finally, the RNFLD angular width is obtained by random sample consensus (RANSAC) line fitting on the detected set of boundary pixels. The proposed method is found to achieve high RNFLD detection performance on a newly created dataset with sensitivity (SN) of 0.7821 at 0.2727 false positives per image (FPI) and the area under curve (AUC) value is obtained as 0.8733. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A Semi-Automated Object-Based Approach for Landslide Detection Validated by Persistent Scatterer Interferometry Measures and Landslide Inventories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Lang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Geoinformation derived from Earth observation (EO plays a key role for detecting, analyzing and monitoring landslides to assist hazard and risk analysis. Within the framework of the EC-GMES-FP7 project SAFER (Services and Applications For Emergency Response a semi-automated object-based approach for landslide detection and classification has been developed. The method was applied to a case study in North-Western Italy using SPOT-5 imagery and a digital elevation model (DEM, including its derivatives slope, aspect, curvature and plan curvature. For the classification in the object-based environment spectral, spatial and morphological properties as well as context information were used. In a first step, landslides were classified on a coarse segmentation level to separate them from other features with similar spectral characteristics. Thereafter, the classification was refined on a finer segmentation level, where two categories of mass movements were differentiated: flow-like landslides and other landslide types. In total, an area of 3.77 km² was detected as landslide-affected area, 1.68 km² were classified as flow-like landslides and 2.09 km² as other landslide types. The outcomes were compared to and validated by pre-existing landslide inventory data (IFFI and PAI and an interpretation of PSI (Persistent Scatterer Interferometry measures derived from ERS1/2, ENVISAT ASAR and RADARSAT-1 data. The spatial overlap of the detected landslides and existing landslide inventories revealed 44.8% (IFFI and 50.4% (PAI, respectively. About 32% of the polygons identified through OBIA are covered by persistent scatterers data.

  16. Automated detection of external ventricular and lumbar drain-related meningitis using laboratory and microbiology results and medication data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maaike S M van Mourik

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Monitoring of healthcare-associated infection rates is important for infection control and hospital benchmarking. However, manual surveillance is time-consuming and susceptible to error. The aim was, therefore, to develop a prediction model to retrospectively detect drain-related meningitis (DRM, a frequently occurring nosocomial infection, using routinely collected data from a clinical data warehouse. METHODS: As part of the hospital infection control program, all patients receiving an external ventricular (EVD or lumbar drain (ELD (2004 to 2009; n = 742 had been evaluated for the development of DRM through chart review and standardized diagnostic criteria by infection control staff; this was the reference standard. Children, patients dying <24 hours after drain insertion or with <1 day follow-up and patients with infection at the time of insertion or multiple simultaneous drains were excluded. Logistic regression was used to develop a model predicting the occurrence of DRM. Missing data were imputed using multiple imputation. Bootstrapping was applied to increase generalizability. RESULTS: 537 patients remained after application of exclusion criteria, of which 82 developed DRM (13.5/1000 days at risk. The automated model to detect DRM included the number of drains placed, drain type, blood leukocyte count, C-reactive protein, cerebrospinal fluid leukocyte count and culture result, number of antibiotics started during admission, and empiric antibiotic therapy. Discriminatory power of this model was excellent (area under the ROC curve 0.97. The model achieved 98.8% sensitivity (95% CI 88.0% to 99.9% and specificity of 87.9% (84.6% to 90.8%. Positive and negative predictive values were 56.9% (50.8% to 67.9% and 99.9% (98.6% to 99.9%, respectively. Predicted yearly infection rates concurred with observed infection rates. CONCLUSION: A prediction model based on multi-source data stored in a clinical data warehouse could accurately

  17. An automated multi-scale network-based scheme for detection and location of seismic sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poiata, N.; Aden-Antoniow, F.; Satriano, C.; Bernard, P.; Vilotte, J. P.; Obara, K.

    2017-12-01

    We present a recently developed method - BackTrackBB (Poiata et al. 2016) - allowing to image energy radiation from different seismic sources (e.g., earthquakes, LFEs, tremors) in different tectonic environments using continuous seismic records. The method exploits multi-scale frequency-selective coherence in the wave field, recorded by regional seismic networks or local arrays. The detection and location scheme is based on space-time reconstruction of the seismic sources through an imaging function built from the sum of station-pair time-delay likelihood functions, projected onto theoretical 3D time-delay grids. This imaging function is interpreted as the location likelihood of the seismic source. A signal pre-processing step constructs a multi-band statistical representation of the non stationary signal, i.e. time series, by means of higher-order statistics or energy envelope characteristic functions. Such signal-processing is designed to detect in time signal transients - of different scales and a priori unknown predominant frequency - potentially associated with a variety of sources (e.g., earthquakes, LFE, tremors), and to improve the performance and the robustness of the detection-and-location location step. The initial detection-location, based on a single phase analysis with the P- or S-phase only, can then be improved recursively in a station selection scheme. This scheme - exploiting the 3-component records - makes use of P- and S-phase characteristic functions, extracted after a polarization analysis of the event waveforms, and combines the single phase imaging functions with the S-P differential imaging functions. The performance of the method is demonstrated here in different tectonic environments: (1) analysis of the one year long precursory phase of 2014 Iquique earthquake in Chile; (2) detection and location of tectonic tremor sources and low-frequency earthquakes during the multiple episodes of tectonic tremor activity in southwestern Japan.

  18. OGLE‐2008‐BLG‐510: first automated real‐time detection of a weak microlensing anomaly – brown dwarf or stellar binary?★

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozza, V.; Dominik, M.; Rattenbury, N. J.

    2012-01-01

    ‐lens and binary‐source models, including the possibility that the lens system consists of an M dwarf orbited by a brown dwarf. The detection of this microlensing anomaly and our analysis demonstrate that: (1) automated real‐time detection of weak microlensing anomalies with immediate feedback is feasible...... of both brown‐dwarf companions and binary‐source microlensing events might hide here....

  19. Automated chromatographic system with polarimetric detection laser applied in the control of fermentation processes and seaweed extracts characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fajer, V.; Naranjo, S.; Mora, W.; Patinno, R.; Coba, E.; Michelena, G.

    2012-01-01

    There are presented applications and innovations of chromatographic and polarimetric systems in which develop methodologies for measuring the input molasses and the resulting product of a fermentation process of alcohol from a rich honey and evaluation of the fermentation process honey servery in obtaining a drink native to the Yucatan region. Composition was assessed optically active substances in seaweed, of interest to the pharmaceutical industry. The findings provide measurements alternative raw materials and products of the sugar industry, beekeeping and pharmaceutical liquid chromatography with automated polarimetric detection reduces measurement times up to 15 min, making it comparable to the times of high chromatography resolution, significantly reducing operating costs. By chromatography system with polarimetric detection (SCDP) is new columns have included standard size designed by the authors, which allow process samples with volumes up to 1 ml and reduce measurement time to 15 min, decreasing to 5 times the volume sample and halving the time of measurement. Was evaluated determining the concentration of substances using the peaks of the chromatograms obtained for the different columns and calculate the uncertainty of measurements. The results relating to the improvement of a data acquisition program (ADQUIPOL v.2.0) and new programs for the preparation of chromatograms (CROMAPOL CROMAPOL V.1.0 and V.1.2) provide important benefits, which allow a considerable saving of time the processing of the results and can be applied in other chromatography systems with the appropriate adjustments. (Author)

  20. An automated microfluidic chip system for detection of piscine nodavirus and characterization of its potential carrier in grouper farms.