WorldWideScience

Sample records for automated dna assembly

  1. Algorithms for Automated DNA Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    known results. The total number of possible assembly graphs for a single goal part is (2n 1)!/(n 1)!n! [also known as the Catalan number (20...correct theoretical construction scheme is de- veloped manually, it is likely to be suboptimal by any number of cost metrics. Modular, robust and...collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number . 1. REPORT DATE 23 MAR 2010 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED

  2. Scar-less multi-part DNA assembly design automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillson, Nathan J.

    2016-06-07

    The present invention provides a method of a method of designing an implementation of a DNA assembly. In an exemplary embodiment, the method includes (1) receiving a list of DNA sequence fragments to be assembled together and an order in which to assemble the DNA sequence fragments, (2) designing DNA oligonucleotides (oligos) for each of the DNA sequence fragments, and (3) creating a plan for adding flanking homology sequences to each of the DNA oligos. In an exemplary embodiment, the method includes (1) receiving a list of DNA sequence fragments to be assembled together and an order in which to assemble the DNA sequence fragments, (2) designing DNA oligonucleotides (oligos) for each of the DNA sequence fragments, and (3) creating a plan for adding optimized overhang sequences to each of the DNA oligos.

  3. Automated optical assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bala, John L.

    1995-08-01

    Automation and polymer science represent fundamental new technologies which can be directed toward realizing the goal of establishing a domestic, world-class, commercial optics business. Use of innovative optical designs using precision polymer optics will enable the US to play a vital role in the next generation of commercial optical products. The increased cost savings inherent in the utilization of optical-grade polymers outweighs almost every advantage of using glass for high volume situations. Optical designers must gain experience with combined refractive/diffractive designs and broaden their knowledge base regarding polymer technology beyond a cursory intellectual exercise. Implementation of a fully automated assembly system, combined with utilization of polymer optics, constitutes the type of integrated manufacturing process which will enable the US to successfully compete with the low-cost labor employed in the Far East, as well as to produce an equivalent product.

  4. DNA controlled assembly of liposomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Stefan; Jakobsen, Ulla; Simonsen, Adam Cohen

    2009-01-01

    DNA-encoding of solid nanoparticles requires surfacechemistry, which is often tedious and not generally applicable. In the present study non-covalently attached DNA are used to assemble soft nanoparticles (liposomes) in solution. This process displays remarkably sharp thermal transitions from...... assembled to disassembled state for which reason this method allows easy and fast detection of polynucleotides (e.g. DNA or RNA), including single nucleotide polymorphisms as well as insertions and deletions....

  5. Thermal battery automated assembly station conceptual design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, D

    1988-08-01

    Thermal battery assembly involves many operations which are labor- intense. In August 1986, a project team was formed at GE Neutron Devices to investigate and evaluate more efficient and productive battery assembly techniques through the use of automation. The result of this study was the acceptance of a plan to automate the piece part pellet fabrication and battery stacking operations by using computerized pellet presses and robots which would be integrated by a main computer. This report details the conceptual design and development plan to be followed in the fabrication, development, and implementation of a thermal battery automated assembly station. 4 figs., 8 tabs.

  6. Automated ensemble assembly and validation of microbial genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The continued democratization of DNA sequencing has sparked a new wave of development of genome assembly and assembly validation methods. As individual research labs, rather than centralized centers, begin to sequence the majority of new genomes, it is important to establish best practices for genome assembly. However, recent evaluations such as GAGE and the Assemblathon have concluded that there is no single best approach to genome assembly. Instead, it is preferable to generate multiple assemblies and validate them to determine which is most useful for the desired analysis; this is a labor-intensive process that is often impossible or unfeasible. Results To encourage best practices supported by the community, we present iMetAMOS, an automated ensemble assembly pipeline; iMetAMOS encapsulates the process of running, validating, and selecting a single assembly from multiple assemblies. iMetAMOS packages several leading open-source tools into a single binary that automates parameter selection and execution of multiple assemblers, scores the resulting assemblies based on multiple validation metrics, and annotates the assemblies for genes and contaminants. We demonstrate the utility of the ensemble process on 225 previously unassembled Mycobacterium tuberculosis genomes as well as a Rhodobacter sphaeroides benchmark dataset. On these real data, iMetAMOS reliably produces validated assemblies and identifies potential contamination without user intervention. In addition, intelligent parameter selection produces assemblies of R. sphaeroides comparable to or exceeding the quality of those from the GAGE-B evaluation, affecting the relative ranking of some assemblers. Conclusions Ensemble assembly with iMetAMOS provides users with multiple, validated assemblies for each genome. Although computationally limited to small or mid-sized genomes, this approach is the most effective and reproducible means for generating high-quality assemblies and enables users to

  7. DNA-guided nanoparticle assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gang, Oleg; Nykypanchuk, Dmytro; Maye, Mathew; van der Lelie, Daniel

    2013-07-16

    In some embodiments, DNA-capped nanoparticles are used to define a degree of crystalline order in assemblies thereof. In some embodiments, thermodynamically reversible and stable body-centered cubic (bcc) structures, with particles occupying <.about.10% of the unit cell, are formed. Designs and pathways amenable to the crystallization of particle assemblies are identified. In some embodiments, a plasmonic crystal is provided. In some aspects, a method for controlling the properties of particle assemblages is provided. In some embodiments a catalyst is formed from nanoparticles linked by nucleic acid sequences and forming an open crystal structure with catalytically active agents attached to the crystal on its surface or in interstices.

  8. ReseqChip: Automated integration of multiple local context probe data from the MitoChip array in mitochondrial DNA sequence assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spang Rainer

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Affymetrix MitoChip v2.0 is an oligonucleotide tiling array for the resequencing of the human mitochondrial (mt genome. For each of 16,569 nucleotide positions of the mt genome it holds two sets of four 25-mer probes each that match the heavy and the light strand of a reference mt genome and vary only at their central position to interrogate all four possible alleles. In addition, the MitoChip v2.0 carries alternative local context probes to account for known mtDNA variants. These probes have been neglected in most studies due to the lack of software for their automated analysis. Results We provide ReseqChip, a free software that automates the process of resequencing mtDNA using multiple local context probes on the MitoChip v2.0. ReseqChip significantly improves base call rate and sequence accuracy. ReseqChip is available at http://code.open-bio.org/svnweb/index.cgi/bioperl/browse/bioperl-live/trunk/Bio/Microarray/Tools/. Conclusions ReseqChip allows for the automated consolidation of base calls from alternative local mt genome context probes. It thereby improves the accuracy of resequencing, while reducing the number of non-called bases.

  9. Regulating DNA Self-assembly by DNA-Surface Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Longfei; Li, Yulin; Wang, Yong; Zheng, Jianwei; Mao, Chengde

    2017-12-14

    DNA self-assembly provides a powerful approach for preparation of nanostructures. It is often studied in bulk solution and involves only DNA-DNA interactions. When confined to surfaces, DNA-surface interactions become an additional, important factor to DNA self-assembly. However, the way in which DNA-surface interactions influence DNA self-assembly is not well studied. In this study, we showed that weak DNA-DNA interactions could be stabilized by DNA-surface interactions to allow large DNA nanostructures to form. In addition, the assembly can be conducted isothermally at room temperature in as little as 5 seconds. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. The simulation of automated leading edge assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Qingming

    2015-01-01

    Aircraft manufacturers are experiencing a fierce competition worldwide. Improving productivity, increasing throughput and reducing costs are influencing aircraft manufacturer’s future development. In order to improve competitiveness and provide sufficient and high quality products, it should reduce operations of aircraft assembly,majority of which are still in manual process, which limit production output. In contrast, these processes can be automated to replace manual opera...

  11. DNA Assembly in 3D Printed Fluidics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William G Patrick

    Full Text Available The process of connecting genetic parts-DNA assembly-is a foundational technology for synthetic biology. Microfluidics present an attractive solution for minimizing use of costly reagents, enabling multiplexed reactions, and automating protocols by integrating multiple protocol steps. However, microfluidics fabrication and operation can be expensive and requires expertise, limiting access to the technology. With advances in commodity digital fabrication tools, it is now possible to directly print fluidic devices and supporting hardware. 3D printed micro- and millifluidic devices are inexpensive, easy to make and quick to produce. We demonstrate Golden Gate DNA assembly in 3D-printed fluidics with reaction volumes as small as 490 nL, channel widths as fine as 220 microns, and per unit part costs ranging from $0.61 to $5.71. A 3D-printed syringe pump with an accompanying programmable software interface was designed and fabricated to operate the devices. Quick turnaround and inexpensive materials allowed for rapid exploration of device parameters, demonstrating a manufacturing paradigm for designing and fabricating hardware for synthetic biology.

  12. "First generation" automated DNA sequencing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slatko, Barton E; Kieleczawa, Jan; Ju, Jingyue; Gardner, Andrew F; Hendrickson, Cynthia L; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2011-10-01

    Beginning in the 1980s, automation of DNA sequencing has greatly increased throughput, reduced costs, and enabled large projects to be completed more easily. The development of automation technology paralleled the development of other aspects of DNA sequencing: better enzymes and chemistry, separation and imaging technology, sequencing protocols, robotics, and computational advancements (including base-calling algorithms with quality scores, database developments, and sequence analysis programs). Despite the emergence of high-throughput sequencing platforms, automated Sanger sequencing technology remains useful for many applications. This unit provides background and a description of the "First-Generation" automated DNA sequencing technology. It also includes protocols for using the current Applied Biosystems (ABI) automated DNA sequencing machines. © 2011 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  13. Self-assembled DNA Structures for Nanoconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hao; Yin, Peng; Park, Sung Ha; Li, Hanying; Feng, Liping; Guan, Xiaoju; Liu, Dage; Reif, John H.; LaBean, Thomas H.

    2004-09-01

    In recent years, a number of research groups have begun developing nanofabrication methods based on DNA self-assembly. Here we review our recent experimental progress to utilize novel DNA nanostructures for self-assembly as well as for templates in the fabrication of functional nano-patterned materials. We have prototyped a new DNA nanostructure known as a cross structure. This nanostructure has a 4-fold symmetry which promotes its self-assembly into tetragonal 2D lattices. We have utilized the tetragonal 2D lattices as templates for highly conductive metallic nanowires and periodic 2D protein nano-arrays. We have constructed and characterized a DNA nanotube, a new self-assembling superstructure composed of DNA tiles. We have also demonstrated an aperiodic DNA lattice composed of DNA tiles assembled around a long scaffold strand; the system translates information encoded in the scaffold strand into a specific and reprogrammable barcode pattern. We have achieved metallic nanoparticle linear arrays templated on self-assembled 1D DNA arrays. We have designed and demonstrated a 2-state DNA lattice, which displays expand/contract motion switched by DNA nanoactuators. We have also achieved an autonomous DNA motor executing unidirectional motion along a linear DNA track.

  14. Automated extraction of DNA from clothing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stangegaard, Michael; Hjort, Benjamin Benn; Nøhr Hansen, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Presence of PCR inhibitors in extracted DNA may interfere with the subsequent quantification and short tandem repeat (STR) reactions used in forensic genetic DNA typing. We have compared three automated DNA extraction methods based on magnetic beads with a manual method with the aim of reducing...

  15. Mobius Assembly: A versatile Golden-Gate framework towards universal DNA assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas I Andreou

    Full Text Available Synthetic biology builds upon the foundation of engineering principles, prompting innovation and improvement in biotechnology via a design-build-test-learn cycle. A community-wide standard in DNA assembly would enable bio-molecular engineering at the levels of predictivity and universality in design and construction that are comparable to other engineering fields. Golden Gate Assembly technology, with its robust capability to unidirectionally assemble numerous DNA fragments in a one-tube reaction, has the potential to deliver a universal standard framework for DNA assembly. While current Golden Gate Assembly frameworks (e.g. MoClo and Golden Braid render either high cloning capacity or vector toolkit simplicity, the technology can be made more versatile-simple, streamlined, and cost/labor-efficient, without compromising capacity. Here we report the development of a new Golden Gate Assembly framework named Mobius Assembly, which combines vector toolkit simplicity with high cloning capacity. It is based on a two-level, hierarchical approach and utilizes a low-frequency cutter to reduce domestication requirements. Mobius Assembly embraces the standard overhang designs designated by MoClo, Golden Braid, and Phytobricks and is largely compatible with already available Golden Gate part libraries. In addition, dropout cassettes encoding chromogenic proteins were implemented for cost-free visible cloning screening that color-code different cloning levels. As proofs of concept, we have successfully assembled up to 16 transcriptional units of various pigmentation genes in both operon and multigene arrangements. Taken together, Mobius Assembly delivers enhanced versatility and efficiency in DNA assembly, facilitating improved standardization and automation.

  16. Quantifying quality in DNA self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenbauer, Klaus F.; Wachauf, Christian H.; Dietz, Hendrik

    2014-01-01

    Molecular self-assembly with DNA is an attractive route for building nanoscale devices. The development of sophisticated and precise objects with this technique requires detailed experimental feedback on the structure and composition of assembled objects. Here we report a sensitive assay for the quality of assembly. The method relies on measuring the content of unpaired DNA bases in self-assembled DNA objects using a fluorescent de-Bruijn probe for three-base ‘codons’, which enables a comparison with the designed content of unpaired DNA. We use the assay to measure the quality of assembly of several multilayer DNA origami objects and illustrate the use of the assay for the rational refinement of assembly protocols. Our data suggests that large and complex objects like multilayer DNA origami can be made with high strand integration quality up to 99%. Beyond DNA nanotechnology, we speculate that the ability to discriminate unpaired from paired nucleic acids in the same macromolecule may also be useful for analysing cellular nucleic acids. PMID:24751596

  17. Large branched self-assembled DNA complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosch, Paul; Waelti, Christoph; Middelberg, Anton P J; Davies, A Giles

    2007-01-01

    Many biological molecules have been demonstrated to self-assemble into complex structures and networks by using their very efficient and selective molecular recognition processes. The use of biological molecules as scaffolds for the construction of functional devices by self-assembling nanoscale complexes onto the scaffolds has recently attracted significant attention and many different applications in this field have emerged. In particular DNA, owing to its inherent sophisticated self-organization and molecular recognition properties, has served widely as a scaffold for various nanotechnological self-assembly applications, with metallic and semiconducting nanoparticles, proteins, macromolecular complexes, inter alia, being assembled onto designed DNA scaffolds. Such scaffolds may typically contain multiple branch-points and comprise a number of DNA molecules selfassembled into the desired configuration. Previously, several studies have used synthetic methods to produce the constituent DNA of the scaffolds, but this typically constrains the size of the complexes. For applications that require larger self-assembling DNA complexes, several tens of nanometers or more, other techniques need to be employed. In this article, we discuss a generic technique to generate large branched DNA macromolecular complexes

  18. Automated assembly of micro mechanical parts in a Microfactory setup

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Torbjörn Gerhard; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Gegeckaite, Asta

    2006-01-01

    Many micro products in use today are manufactured using semi-automatic assembly. Handling, assembly and transport of the parts are especially labour intense processes. Automation of these processes holds a large potential, especially if flexible, modular microfactories can be developed. This paper...... focuses on the issues that have to be taken into consideration in order to go from a semi-automatic production into an automated microfactory. The application in this study is a switch consisting of 7 parts. The development of a microfactory setup to take care of the automated assembly of the switch...

  19. Terminating DNA Tile Assembly with Nanostructured Caps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Deepak K; Jiang, Ruoyu; Reinhart, Seth; Mohammed, Abdul M; Jorgenson, Tyler D; Schulman, Rebecca

    2017-10-24

    Precise control over the nucleation, growth, and termination of self-assembly processes is a fundamental tool for controlling product yield and assembly dynamics. Mechanisms for altering these processes programmatically could allow the use of simple components to self-assemble complex final products or to design processes allowing for dynamic assembly or reconfiguration. Here we use DNA tile self-assembly to develop general design principles for building complexes that can bind to a growing biomolecular assembly and terminate its growth by systematically characterizing how different DNA origami nanostructures interact with the growing ends of DNA tile nanotubes. We find that nanostructures that present binding interfaces for all of the binding sites on a growing facet can bind selectively to growing ends and stop growth when these interfaces are presented on either a rigid or floppy scaffold. In contrast, nucleation of nanotubes requires the presentation of binding sites in an arrangement that matches the shape of the structure's facet. As a result, it is possible to build nanostructures that can terminate the growth of existing nanotubes but cannot nucleate a new structure. The resulting design principles for constructing structures that direct nucleation and termination of the growth of one-dimensional nanostructures can also serve as a starting point for programmatically directing two- and three-dimensional crystallization processes using nanostructure design.

  20. Integrating Test-Form Formatting into Automated Test Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Qi; van der Linden, Wim J.

    2013-01-01

    Automated test assembly uses the methodology of mixed integer programming to select an optimal set of items from an item bank. Automated test-form generation uses the same methodology to optimally order the items and format the test form. From an optimization point of view, production of fully formatted test forms directly from the item pool using…

  1. 3D Assembly Group Analysis for Cognitive Automation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Brecher

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A concept that allows the cognitive automation of robotic assembly processes is introduced. An assembly cell comprised of two robots was designed to verify the concept. For the purpose of validation a customer-defined part group consisting of Hubelino bricks is assembled. One of the key aspects for this process is the verification of the assembly group. Hence a software component was designed that utilizes the Microsoft Kinect to perceive both depth and color data in the assembly area. This information is used to determine the current state of the assembly group and is compared to a CAD model for validation purposes. In order to efficiently resolve erroneous situations, the results are interactively accessible to a human expert. The implications for an industrial application are demonstrated by transferring the developed concepts to an assembly scenario for switch-cabinet systems.

  2. Automated DNA electrophoresis, hybridization and detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zapolski, E.J.; Gersten, D.M.; Golab, T.J.; Ledley, R.S.

    1986-01-01

    A fully automated, computer controlled system for nucleic acid hybridization analysis has been devised and constructed. In practice, DNA is digested with restriction endonuclease enzyme(s) and loaded into the system by pipette; 32 P-labelled nucleic acid probe(s) is loaded into the nine hybridization chambers. Instructions for all the steps in the automated process are specified by answering questions that appear on the computer screen at the start of the experiment. Subsequent steps are performed automatically. The system performs horizontal electrophoresis in agarose gel, fixed the fragments to a solid phase matrix, denatures, neutralizes, prehybridizes, hybridizes, washes, dries and detects the radioactivity according to the specifications given by the operator. The results, printed out at the end, give the positions on the matrix to which radioactivity remains hybridized following stringent washing

  3. Equipment development for automated assembly of solar modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagerty, J. J.

    1982-01-01

    Prototype equipment was developed which allows for totally automated assembly in the three major areas of module manufacture: cell stringing, encapsulant layup and cure and edge sealing. The equipment is designed to be used in conjunction with a standard Unimate 2000B industrial robot although the design is adaptable to other transport systems.

  4. DNA origami as a nanoscale template for protein assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzyk, Anton; Laitinen, Kimmo T [Nanoscience Center, Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, PO Box 35, FIN-40014 (Finland); Toermae, Paeivi [Department of Applied Physics, Helsinki University of Technology, PO Box 5100, FIN-02015 (Finland)], E-mail: paivi.torma@hut.fi

    2009-06-10

    We describe two general approaches to the utilization of DNA origami structures for the assembly of materials. In one approach, DNA origami is used as a prefabricated template for subsequent assembly of materials. In the other, materials are assembled simultaneously with the DNA origami, i.e. the DNA origami technique is used to drive the assembly of materials. Fabrication of complex protein structures is demonstrated by these two approaches. The latter approach has the potential to be extended to the assembly of multiple materials with single attachment chemistry.

  5. DNA origami as a nanoscale template for protein assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzyk, Anton; Laitinen, Kimmo T; Toermae, Paeivi

    2009-01-01

    We describe two general approaches to the utilization of DNA origami structures for the assembly of materials. In one approach, DNA origami is used as a prefabricated template for subsequent assembly of materials. In the other, materials are assembled simultaneously with the DNA origami, i.e. the DNA origami technique is used to drive the assembly of materials. Fabrication of complex protein structures is demonstrated by these two approaches. The latter approach has the potential to be extended to the assembly of multiple materials with single attachment chemistry.

  6. Herpesvirus capsid assembly and DNA packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heming, Jason D.; Conway, James F.; Homa, Fred L.

    2017-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type I (HSV-1) is the causative agent of several pathologies ranging in severity from the common cold sore to life-threatening encephalitic infection. During productive lytic infection, over 80 viral proteins are expressed in a highly regulated manner, resulting in the replication of viral genomes and assembly of progeny virions. The virion of all herpesviruses consists of an external membrane envelope, a proteinaceous layer called the tegument, and an icosahedral capsid containing the double-stranded linear DNA genome. The capsid shell of HSV-1 is built from four structural proteins: a major capsid protein, VP5, which forms the capsomers (hexons and pentons), the triplex consisting of VP19C and VP23 found between the capsomers, and VP26 which binds to VP5 on hexons but not pentons. In addition, the dodecameric pUL6 portal complex occupies one of the 12 capsid vertices, and the capsid vertex specific component (CVSC), a heterotrimer complex of pUL17, pUL25 and pUL36 binds specifically to the triplexes adjacent to each penton. The capsid is assembled in the nucleus where the viral genome is packaged into newly assembled closed capsid shells. Cleavage and packaging of replicated, concatemeric viral DNA requires the seven viral proteins encoded by the UL6, UL15, UL17, UL25, UL28, UL32, and UL33 genes. Considerable advances have been made in understanding the structure of the herpesvirus capsid and the function of several of the DNA packaging proteins by applying biochemical, genetic, and structural techniques. This review is a summary of recent advances with respect to the structure of the HSV-1 virion capsid and what is known about the function of the seven packaging proteins and their interactions with each other and with the capsid shell. PMID:28528442

  7. Virtual commissioning of automated micro-optical assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlette, Christian; Losch, Daniel; Haag, Sebastian; Zontar, Daniel; Roßmann, Jürgen; Brecher, Christian

    2015-02-01

    In this contribution, we present a novel approach to enable virtual commissioning for process developers in micro-optical assembly. Our approach aims at supporting micro-optics experts to effectively develop assisted or fully automated assembly solutions without detailed prior experience in programming while at the same time enabling them to easily implement their own libraries of expert schemes and algorithms for handling optical components. Virtual commissioning is enabled by a 3D simulation and visualization system in which the functionalities and properties of automated systems are modeled, simulated and controlled based on multi-agent systems. For process development, our approach supports event-, state- and time-based visual programming techniques for the agents and allows for their kinematic motion simulation in combination with looped-in simulation results for the optical components. First results have been achieved for simply switching the agents to command the real hardware setup after successful process implementation and validation in the virtual environment. We evaluated and adapted our system to meet the requirements set by industrial partners-- laser manufacturers as well as hardware suppliers of assembly platforms. The concept is applied to the automated assembly of optical components for optically pumped semiconductor lasers and positioning of optical components for beam-shaping

  8. Verification Test of Automated Robotic Assembly of Space Truss Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Marvin D.; Will, Ralph W.; Quach, Cuong C.

    1995-01-01

    A multidisciplinary program has been conducted at the Langley Research Center to develop operational procedures for supervised autonomous assembly of truss structures suitable for large-aperture antennas. The hardware and operations required to assemble a 102-member tetrahedral truss and attach 12 hexagonal panels were developed and evaluated. A brute-force automation approach was used to develop baseline assembly hardware and software techniques. However, as the system matured and operations were proven, upgrades were incorporated and assessed against the baseline test results. These upgrades included the use of distributed microprocessors to control dedicated end-effector operations, machine vision guidance for strut installation, and the use of an expert system-based executive-control program. This paper summarizes the developmental phases of the program, the results of several assembly tests, and a series of proposed enhancements. No problems that would preclude automated in-space assembly or truss structures have been encountered. The test system was developed at a breadboard level and continued development at an enhanced level is warranted.

  9. Enhanced throughput for infrared automated DNA sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middendorf, Lyle R.; Gartside, Bill O.; Humphrey, Pat G.; Roemer, Stephen C.; Sorensen, David R.; Steffens, David L.; Sutter, Scott L.

    1995-04-01

    Several enhancements have been developed and applied to infrared automated DNA sequencing resulting in significantly higher throughput. A 41 cm sequencing gel (31 cm well- to-read distance) combines high resolution of DNA sequencing fragments with optimized run times yielding two runs per day of 500 bases per sample. A 66 cm sequencing gel (56 cm well-to-read distance) produces sequence read lengths of up to 1000 bases for ds and ss templates using either T7 polymerase or cycle-sequencing protocols. Using a multichannel syringe to load 64 lanes allows 16 samples (compatible with 96-well format) to be visualized for each run. The 41 cm gel configuration allows 16,000 bases per day (16 samples X 500 bases/sample X 2 ten hour runs/day) to be sequenced with the advantages of infrared technology. Enhancements to internal labeling techniques using an infrared-labeled dATP molecule (Boehringer Mannheim GmbH, Penzberg, Germany; Sequenase (U.S. Biochemical) have also been made. The inclusion of glycerol in the sequencing reactions yields greatly improved results for some primer and template combinations. The inclusion of (alpha) -Thio-dNTP's in the labeling reaction increases signal intensity two- to three-fold.

  10. DNA Self-Assembly: From Chirality to Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youri Timsit

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Transient or long-term DNA self-assembly participates in essential genetic functions. The present review focuses on tight DNA-DNA interactions that have recently been found to play important roles in both controlling DNA higher-order structures and their topology. Due to their chirality, double helices are tightly packed into stable right-handed crossovers. Simple packing rules that are imposed by DNA geometry and sequence dictate the overall architecture of higher order DNA structures. Close DNA-DNA interactions also provide the missing link between local interactions and DNA topology, thus explaining how type II DNA topoisomerases may sense locally the global topology. Finally this paper proposes that through its influence on DNA self-assembled structures, DNA chirality played a critical role during the early steps of evolution.

  11. Software-Supported USER Cloning Strategies for Site-Directed Mutagenesis and DNA Assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Genee, Hans Jasper; Bonde, Mads Tvillinggaard; Bagger, Frederik Otzen

    2015-01-01

    USER cloning is a fast and versatile method for engineering of plasmid DNA. We have developed a user friendly Web server tool that automates the design of optimal PCR primers for several distinct USER cloning-based applications. Our Web server, named AMUSER (Automated DNA Modifications with USER...... cloning), facilitates DNA assembly and introduction of virtually any type of site-directed mutagenesis by designing optimal PCR primers for the desired genetic changes. To demonstrate the utility, we designed primers for a simultaneous two-position site-directed mutagenesis of green fluorescent protein...... (GFP) to yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), which in a single step reaction resulted in a 94% cloning efficiency. AMUSER also supports degenerate nucleotide primers, single insert combinatorial assembly, and flexible parameters for PCR amplification. AMUSER is freely available online at ....

  12. Engineering of automated assembly of beam-shaping optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haag, Sebastian; Sinhoff, Volker; Müller, Tobias; Brecher, Christian

    2014-03-01

    Beam-shaping is essential for any kind of laser application. Assembly technologies for beam-shaping subassemblies are subject to intense research and development activities and their technical feasibility has been proven in recent years while economic viability requires more efficient engineering tools for process planning and production ramp up of complex assembly tasks for micro-optical systems. The work presented in this paper aims for significant reduction of process development and production ramp up times for the automated assembly of micro-optical subassemblies for beam-collimation and beam-tilting. The approach proposed bridges the gap between the product development phase and the realization of automation control through integration of established software tools such as optics simulation and CAD modeling as well as through introduction of novel software tools and methods to efficiently describe active alignment strategies. The focus of the paper is put on the methodological approach regarding the engineering of assembly processes for beam-shaping micro-optics and the formal representation of assembly objectives similar to representation in mechanical assemblies. Main topic of the paper is the engineering methodology for active alignment processes based on the classification of optical functions for beam-shaping optics and corresponding standardized measurement setups including adaptable alignment algorithms. The concepts are applied to industrial use-cases: (1) integrated collimation module for fast- and slow-axis and (2) beam-tilting subassembly consisting of a fast-axis collimator and micro-lens array. The paper concludes with an overview of current limitations as well as an outlook on the next development steps considering adhesive bonding processes.

  13. Automated and model-based assembly of an anamorphic telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holters, Martin; Dirks, Sebastian; Stollenwerk, Jochen; Loosen, Peter

    2018-02-01

    Since the first usage of optical glasses there has been an increasing demand for optical systems which are highly customized for a wide field of applications. To meet the challenge of the production of so many unique systems, the development of new techniques and approaches has risen in importance. However, the assembly of precision optical systems with lot sizes of one up to a few tens of systems is still dominated by manual labor. In contrast, highly adaptive and model-based approaches may offer a solution for manufacturing with a high degree of automation and high throughput while maintaining high precision. In this work a model-based automated assembly approach based on ray-tracing is presented. This process runs autonomously, and accounts for a wide range of functionality. It firstly identifies the sequence for an optimized assembly and secondly, generates and matches intermediate figures of merit to predict the overall optical functionality of the optical system. This process also takes into account the generation of a digital twin of the optical system, by mapping key-performance-indicators like the first and the second momentum of intensity into the optical model. This approach is verified by the automatic assembly of an anamorphic telescope within an assembly cell. By continuous measuring and mapping the key-performance-indicators into the optical model, the quality of the digital twin is determined. Moreover, by measuring the optical quality and geometrical parameters of the telescope, the precision of this approach is determined. Finally, the productivity of the process is evaluated by monitoring the speed of the different steps of the process.

  14. DNA-Controlled Assembly of Soft Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    This book covers the emerging topic of DNA nanotechnology and DNA supramolecular chemistry in its broader sense. By taking DNA out of its biological role, this biomolecule has become a very versatile building block in materials chemistry, supramolecular chemistry and bio-nanotechnology. Many nove......-covalent systems, DNA origami, DNA based switches, DNA machines, and alternative structures and templates. This broad coverage is very appealing since it combines both the synthesis of modified DNA as well as designer concepts to successfully plan and make DNA nanostructures....

  15. Automated Array Assembly, Phase 2. Final technical progress report, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carbajal, B.G.

    1979-11-01

    The 1979 phase of this Automated Array Assembly, Phase 2 contract was devoted solely to the tasks of scaling up the Tandem Junction Cell (TJC) from 2 cm x 2 cm to 6.2 cm x 6.2 cm and the assembly of several modules using these large-area TJCs. The scale-up of the TJC was based on using the existing process and doing the necessary design activities to increase the cell area to an acceptably large area. The design was carried out using available device models. The design was verified and sample large-area TJCs were fabricated. Mechanical and process problems occurred causing a schedule slippage that resulted in contract expiration before enough large-area TCs were fabricated to populate the sample Tandem Junction Modules (TJMs). A TJM design was carried out in which the module interconnects served to augment the current collecting buses on the cell. The module was made up of a 5 x 6 TJC matrix mounted on a porcelainized steel substrate with a glass cover. The TJC matrix was series-parallel connected using copper clad Invar interconnects soldered to the TJC metallization. Sample cell matrices were assembled using dummy cells. No sample TJMs were assembled due to a shortage of large-area TJCs and contract expiration.

  16. Automation of a single-DNA molecule stretching device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kristian Tølbøl; Lopacinska, Joanna M.; Tommerup, Niels

    2015-01-01

    We automate the manipulation of genomic-length DNA in a nanofluidic device based on real-time analysis of fluorescence images. In our protocol, individual molecules are picked from a microchannel and stretched with pN forces using pressure driven flows. The millimeter-long DNA fragments free...

  17. DNA assisted self-assembly of PAMAM dendrimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Taraknath; Kumar, Mattaparthi Venkata Satish; Maiti, Prabal K

    2014-10-09

    We report DNA assisted self-assembly of polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers using all atom Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations and present a molecular level picture of a DNA-linked PAMAM dendrimer nanocluster, which was first experimentally reported by Choi et al. (Nano Lett., 2004, 4, 391-397). We have used single stranded DNA (ssDNA) to direct the self-assembly process. To explore the effect of pH on this mechanism, we have used both the protonated (low pH) and nonprotonated (high pH) dendrimers. In all cases studied here, we observe that the DNA strand on one dendrimer unit drives self-assembly as it binds to the complementary DNA strand present on the other dendrimer unit, leading to the formation of a DNA-linked dendrimer dimeric complex. However, this binding process strongly depends on the charge of the dendrimer and length of the ssDNA. We observe that the complex with a nonprotonated dendrimer can maintain a DNA length dependent inter-dendrimer distance. In contrast, for complexes with a protonated dendrimer, the inter-dendrimer distance is independent of the DNA length. We attribute this observation to the electrostatic complexation of a negatively charged DNA strand with the positively charged protonated dendrimer.

  18. One-Dimensional Multichromophor Arrays Based on DNA: From Self-Assembly to Light-Harvesting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensslen, Philipp; Wagenknecht, Hans-Achim

    2015-10-20

    Light-harvesting complexes collect light energy and deliver it by a cascade of energy and electron transfer processes to the reaction center where charge separation leads to storage as chemical energy. The design of artificial light-harvesting assemblies faces enormous challenges because several antenna chromophores need to be kept in close proximity but self-quenching needs to be avoided. Double stranded DNA as a supramolecular scaffold plays a promising role due to its characteristic structural properties. Automated DNA synthesis allows incorporation of artificial chromophore-modified building blocks, and sequence design allows precise control of the distances and orientations between the chromophores. The helical twist between the chromophores, which is induced by the DNA framework, controls energy and electron transfer and thereby reduces the self-quenching that is typically observed in chromophore aggregates. This Account summarizes covalently multichromophore-modified DNA and describes how such multichromophore arrays were achieved by Watson-Crick-specific and DNA-templated self-assembly. The covalent DNA systems were prepared by incorporation of chromophores as DNA base substitutions (either as C-nucleosides or with acyclic linkers as substitutes for the 2'-deoxyribofuranoside) and as DNA base modifications. Studies with DNA base substitutions revealed that distances but more importantly relative orientations of the chromophores govern the energy transfer efficiencies and thereby the light-harvesting properties. With DNA base substitutions, duplex stabilization was faced and could be overcome, for instance, by zipper-like placement of the chromophores in both strands. For both principal structural approaches, DNA-based light-harvesting antenna could be realized. The major disadvantages, however, for covalent multichromophore DNA conjugates are the poor yields of synthesis and the solubility issues for oligonucleotides with more than 5-10 chromophore

  19. Physical principles for DNA tile self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Constantine G; Winfree, Erik

    2017-06-19

    DNA tiles provide a promising technique for assembling structures with nanoscale resolution through self-assembly by basic interactions rather than top-down assembly of individual structures. Tile systems can be programmed to grow based on logical rules, allowing for a small number of tile types to assemble large, complex assemblies that can retain nanoscale resolution. Such algorithmic systems can even assemble different structures using the same tiles, based on inputs that seed the growth. While programming and theoretical analysis of tile self-assembly often makes use of abstract logical models of growth, experimentally implemented systems are governed by nanoscale physical processes that can lead to very different behavior, more accurately modeled by taking into account the thermodynamics and kinetics of tile attachment and detachment in solution. This review discusses the relationships between more abstract and more physically realistic tile assembly models. A central concern is how consideration of model differences enables the design of tile systems that robustly exhibit the desired abstract behavior in realistic physical models and in experimental implementations. Conversely, we identify situations where self-assembly in abstract models can not be well-approximated by physically realistic models, putting constraints on physical relevance of the abstract models. To facilitate the discussion, we introduce a unified model of tile self-assembly that clarifies the relationships between several well-studied models in the literature. Throughout, we highlight open questions regarding the physical principles for DNA tile self-assembly.

  20. MIDAS: A Modular DNA Assembly System for Synthetic Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dolleweerd, Craig J; Kessans, Sarah A; Van de Bittner, Kyle C; Bustamante, Leyla Y; Bundela, Rudranuj; Scott, Barry; Nicholson, Matthew J; Parker, Emily J

    2018-04-20

    A modular and hierarchical DNA assembly platform for synthetic biology based on Golden Gate (Type IIS restriction enzyme) cloning is described. This enabling technology, termed MIDAS (for Modular Idempotent DNA Assembly System), can be used to precisely assemble multiple DNA fragments in a single reaction using a standardized assembly design. It can be used to build genes from libraries of sequence-verified, reusable parts and to assemble multiple genes in a single vector, with full user control over gene order and orientation, as well as control of the direction of growth (polarity) of the multigene assembly, a feature that allows genes to be nested between other genes or genetic elements. We describe the detailed design and use of MIDAS, exemplified by the reconstruction, in the filamentous fungus Penicillium paxilli, of the metabolic pathway for production of paspaline and paxilline, key intermediates in the biosynthesis of a range of indole diterpenes-a class of secondary metabolites produced by several species of filamentous fungi. MIDAS was used to efficiently assemble a 25.2 kb plasmid from 21 different modules (seven genes, each composed of three basic parts). By using a parts library-based system for construction of complex assemblies, and a unique set of vectors, MIDAS can provide a flexible route to assembling tailored combinations of genes and other genetic elements, thereby supporting synthetic biology applications in a wide range of expression hosts.

  1. A Theoretical and Experimental Study of DNA Self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Harish

    The control of matter and phenomena at the nanoscale is fast becoming one of the most important challenges of the 21st century with wide-ranging applications from energy and health care to computing and material science. Conventional top-down approaches to nanotechnology, having served us well for long, are reaching their inherent limitations. Meanwhile, bottom-up methods such as self-assembly are emerging as viable alternatives for nanoscale fabrication and manipulation. A particularly successful bottom up technique is DNA self-assembly where a set of carefully designed DNA strands form a nanoscale object as a consequence of specific, local interactions among the different components, without external direction. The final product of the self-assembly process might be a static nanostructure or a dynamic nanodevice that performs a specific function. Over the past two decades, DNA self-assembly has produced stunning nanoscale objects such as 2D and 3D lattices, polyhedra and addressable arbitrary shaped substrates, and a myriad of nanoscale devices such as molecular tweezers, computational circuits, biosensors and molecular assembly lines. In this dissertation we study multiple problems in the theory, simulations and experiments of DNA self-assembly. We extend the Turing-universal mathematical framework of self-assembly known as the Tile Assembly Model by incorporating randomization during the assembly process. This allows us to reduce the tile complexity of linear assemblies. We develop multiple techniques to build linear assemblies of expected length N using far fewer tile types than previously possible. We abstract the fundamental properties of DNA and develop a biochemical system, which we call meta-DNA, based entirely on strands of DNA as the only component molecule. We further develop various enzyme-free protocols to manipulate meta-DNA systems and provide strand level details along with abstract notations for these mechanisms. We simulate DNA circuits by

  2. PNA Directed Sequence Addressed Self-Assembly of DNA Nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter E.

    2008-01-01

    sequence specifically recognize another PNA oligomer. We describe how such three domain PNAs have utility for assembling dsDNA grid and clover leaf structures, and in combination with SNAP-tag technol. of protein dsDNA structures. (c) 2008 American Institute of Physics. [on SciFinder (R)] Udgivelsesdato...

  3. Glycan arrays and other tools produced by automated glycan assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter H. Seeberger

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbohydrates are the dominant biopolymer on earth and play important roles ranging from building material for plants to function in many biological systems. Glycans remain poorly studied due to a lack of synthetic tools. The goal of my laboratory has been to develop a general method for the automated assembly of glycans. The general protocols we developed resulted in the commercialisation of the Glyconeer 2.1™ synthesizer as well as the building blocks and all reagents. Oligosaccharides as long as 50-mers are now accessible within days. Rapid access to defined oligosaccharides has been the foundation to many applications including synthetic tools such as glycan microarrays, glycan nanoparticles and anti-glycan antibodies. The platform technology is helping to address real-life problems by the creation of new vaccines and diagnostics. After addressing mainly mammalian glycobiology earlier, material science and plant biology are benefitting increasingly from synthetic glycans.

  4. Directed Formation of DNA Nanoarrays through Orthogonal Self-Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugen Stulz

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We describe the synthesis of terpyridine modified DNA strands which selectively form DNA nanotubes through orthogonal hydrogen bonding and metal complexation interactions. The short DNA strands are designed to self-assemble into long duplexes through a sticky-end approach. Addition of weakly binding metals such as Zn(II and Ni(II induces the formation of tubular arrays consisting of DNA bundles which are 50-200 nm wide and 2-50 nm high. TEM shows additional long distance ordering of the terpy-DNA complexes into fibers.

  5. DNA-Based Self-Assembly of Fluorescent Nanodiamonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Neumann, Andre; Lindlau, Jessica; Wu, Yuzhou; Pramanik, Goutam; Naydenov, Boris; Jelezko, Fedor; Schüder, Florian; Huber, Sebastian; Huber, Marinus; Stehr, Florian; Högele, Alexander; Weil, Tanja; Liedl, Tim

    2015-08-12

    As a step toward deterministic and scalable assembly of ordered spin arrays we here demonstrate a bottom-up approach to position fluorescent nanodiamonds (NDs) with nanometer precision on DNA origami structures. We have realized a reliable and broadly applicable surface modification strategy that results in DNA-functionalized and perfectly dispersed NDs that were then self-assembled in predefined geometries. With optical studies we show that the fluorescence properties of the nitrogen-vacancy color centers in NDs are preserved during surface modification and DNA assembly. As this method allows the nanoscale arrangement of fluorescent NDs together with other optically active components in complex geometries, applications based on self-assembled spin lattices or plasmon-enhanced spin sensors as well as improved fluorescent labeling for bioimaging could be envisioned.

  6. Integrating DNA strand-displacement circuitry with DNA tile self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, David Yu; Hariadi, Rizal F.; Choi, Harry M.T.; Winfree, Erik

    2013-01-01

    DNA nanotechnology has emerged as a reliable and programmable way of controlling matter at the nanoscale through the specificity of Watson–Crick base pairing, allowing both complex self-assembled structures with nanometer precision and complex reaction networks implementing digital and analog behaviors. Here we show how two well-developed frameworks, DNA tile self-assembly and DNA strand-displacement circuits, can be systematically integrated to provide programmable kinetic control of self-assembly. We demonstrate the triggered and catalytic isothermal self-assembly of DNA nanotubes over 10 μm long from precursor DNA double-crossover tiles activated by an upstream DNA catalyst network. Integrating more sophisticated control circuits and tile systems could enable precise spatial and temporal organization of dynamic molecular structures. PMID:23756381

  7. Gigadalton-scale shape-programmable DNA assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenbauer, Klaus F.; Sigl, Christian; Dietz, Hendrik

    2017-12-01

    Natural biomolecular assemblies such as molecular motors, enzymes, viruses and subcellular structures often form by self-limiting hierarchical oligomerization of multiple subunits. Large structures can also assemble efficiently from a few components by combining hierarchical assembly and symmetry, a strategy exemplified by viral capsids. De novo protein design and RNA and DNA nanotechnology aim to mimic these capabilities, but the bottom-up construction of artificial structures with the dimensions and complexity of viruses and other subcellular components remains challenging. Here we show that natural assembly principles can be combined with the methods of DNA origami to produce gigadalton-scale structures with controlled sizes. DNA sequence information is used to encode the shapes of individual DNA origami building blocks, and the geometry and details of the interactions between these building blocks then control their copy numbers, positions and orientations within higher-order assemblies. We illustrate this strategy by creating planar rings of up to 350 nanometres in diameter and with atomic masses of up to 330 megadaltons, micrometre-long, thick tubes commensurate in size to some bacilli, and three-dimensional polyhedral assemblies with sizes of up to 1.2 gigadaltons and 450 nanometres in diameter. We achieve efficient assembly, with yields of up to 90 per cent, by using building blocks with validated structure and sufficient rigidity, and an accurate design with interaction motifs that ensure that hierarchical assembly is self-limiting and able to proceed in equilibrium to allow for error correction. We expect that our method, which enables the self-assembly of structures with sizes approaching that of viruses and cellular organelles, can readily be used to create a range of other complex structures with well defined sizes, by exploiting the modularity and high degree of addressability of the DNA origami building blocks used.

  8. Assembly of DNA Architectures in a Non-Aqueous Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J. Proctor

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, the procedures for the creation of self-assembled DNA nanostructures in aqueous and non-aqueous media are described. DNA-Surfactant complex formation renders the DNA soluble in organic solvents offering an exciting way to bridge the transition of DNA origami materials electronics applications. The DNA retains its structural features, and these unique geometries provide an interesting candidate for future electronics and nanofabrication applications with potential for new properties. The DNA architectures were first assembled under aqueous conditions, and then characterized in solution (using circular dichroism (CD spectroscopy and on the surface (using atomic force microscopy (AFM. Following aqueous assembly, the DNA nanostructures were transitioned to a non-aqueous environment, where butanol was chosen for optical compatibility and thermal properties. The retention of DNA hierarchical structure and thermal stability in non-aqueous conditions were confirmed via CD spectroscopy. The formation and characterization of these higher order DNA-surfactant complexes is described in this paper.

  9. DNA fragments assembly based on nicking enzyme system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui-Yan Wang

    Full Text Available A couple of DNA ligation-independent cloning (LIC methods have been reported to meet various requirements in metabolic engineering and synthetic biology. The principle of LIC is the assembly of multiple overlapping DNA fragments by single-stranded (ss DNA overlaps annealing. Here we present a method to generate single-stranded DNA overlaps based on Nicking Endonucleases (NEases for LIC, the method was termed NE-LIC. Factors related to cloning efficiency were optimized in this study. This NE-LIC allows generating 3'-end or 5'-end ss DNA overlaps of various lengths for fragments assembly. We demonstrated that the 10 bp/15 bp overlaps had the highest DNA fragments assembling efficiency, while 5 bp/10 bp overlaps showed the highest efficiency when T4 DNA ligase was added. Its advantage over Sequence and Ligation Independent Cloning (SLIC and Uracil-Specific Excision Reagent (USER was obvious. The mechanism can be applied to many other LIC strategies. Finally, the NEases based LIC (NE-LIC was successfully applied to assemble a pathway of six gene fragments responsible for synthesizing microbial poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB.

  10. An automated annotation tool for genomic DNA sequences using

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Genomic sequence data are often available well before the annotated sequence is published. We present a method for analysis of genomic DNA to identify coding sequences using the GeneScan algorithm and characterize these resultant sequences by BLAST. The routines are used to develop a system for automated ...

  11. Hierarchically assembled DNA origami tubules with reconfigurable chirality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Haorong; Cha, Tae-Gon; Pan, Jing; Choi, Jong Hyun

    2013-01-01

    The dynamic reconfiguration of a hierarchically assembled tubular structure is demonstrated using the DNA origami technique. Short cylindrical DNA origami monomers are synthesized and linked into elongated tubules, which can then be disassembled via toehold-mediated strand displacement. The disassembled subunits are subsequently linked into tubules of a different chirality. The reconfiguration is performed with the subunits carrying dumbbell hairpin DNA oligonucleotides or gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). The reconfiguration of higher order origami structures presented here is useful for constructing dynamic nanostructures that exceed the size limit of single DNA origami and may facilitate the study of molecular or particle interactions by tuning their relative distance and organization. (paper)

  12. Autonomous assembly of synthetic oligonucleotides built from an expanded DNA alphabet. Total synthesis of a gene encoding kanamycin resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen K. Merritt

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Many synthetic biologists seek to increase the degree of autonomy in the assembly of long DNA (L-DNA constructs from short synthetic DNA fragments, which are today quite inexpensive because of automated solid-phase synthesis. However, the low information density of DNA built from just four nucleotide “letters”, the presence of strong (G:C and weak (A:T nucleobase pairs, the non-canonical folded structures that compete with Watson–Crick pairing, and other features intrinsic to natural DNA, generally prevent the autonomous assembly of short single-stranded oligonucleotides greater than a dozen or so.Results: We describe a new strategy to autonomously assemble L-DNA constructs from fragments of synthetic single-stranded DNA. This strategy uses an artificially expanded genetic information system (AEGIS that adds nucleotides to the four (G, A, C, and T found in standard DNA by shuffling hydrogen-bonding units on the nucleobases, all while retaining the overall Watson–Crick base-pairing geometry. The added information density allows larger numbers of synthetic fragments to self-assemble without off-target hybridization, hairpin formation, and non-canonical folding interactions. The AEGIS pairs are then converted into standard pairs to produce a fully natural L-DNA product. Here, we report the autonomous assembly of a gene encoding kanamycin resistance using this strategy. Synthetic fragments were built from a six-letter alphabet having two AEGIS components, 5-methyl-2’-deoxyisocytidine and 2’-deoxyisoguanosine (respectively S and B, at their overlapping ends. Gaps in the overlapped assembly were then filled in using DNA polymerases, and the nicks were sealed by ligase. The S:B pairs in the ligated construct were then converted to T:A pairs during PCR amplification. When cloned into a plasmid, the product was shown to make Escherichia coli resistant to kanamycin. A parallel study that attempted to assemble similarly sized genes

  13. Automated Processing of 2-D Gel Electrophoretograms of Genomic DNA for Hunting Pathogenic DNA Molecular Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi; Nakazawa; Watanabe; Konagaya

    1999-01-01

    We have developed the automated processing algorithms for 2-dimensional (2-D) electrophoretograms of genomic DNA based on RLGS (Restriction Landmark Genomic Scanning) method, which scans the restriction enzyme recognition sites as the landmark and maps them onto a 2-D electrophoresis gel. Our powerful processing algorithms realize the automated spot recognition from RLGS electrophoretograms and the automated comparison of a huge number of such images. In the final stage of the automated processing, a master spot pattern, on which all the spots in the RLGS images are mapped at once, can be obtained. The spot pattern variations which seemed to be specific to the pathogenic DNA molecular changes can be easily detected by simply looking over the master spot pattern. When we applied our algorithms to the analysis of 33 RLGS images derived from human colon tissues, we successfully detected several colon tumor specific spot pattern changes.

  14. The Automated Assembly Team contributions to the APRIMED Agile Manufacturing Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.E.; Ames, A.L.; Calton, T.L.

    1995-06-01

    The Automated Assembly Team of the APRIMED Project (abbreviated as A') consists of two parts: the Archimedes Project, which is an ongoing project developing automated assembly technology, and the A' Robot Team. Archimedes is a second generation assembly planning system that both provides a general high-level assembly sequencing capability and, for a smaller class of products, facilitates automatic programming of a robotic workcell to assemble them. The A' robot team designed, developed, and implemented a flexible robot workcell which served as the automated factory of the A' project. In this document we briefly describe the role of automated assembly planning in agile manufacturing, and specifically describe the contributions of the Archimedes project and the A' robot team to the A' project. We introduce the concepts of the Archimedes automated assembly planning project, and discuss the enhancements to Archimedes which were developed in response to the needs of the A' project. We also present the work of the A' robot team in designing and developing the A' robot workcell, including all tooling and programming to support assembly of the A' discriminator devices. Finally, we discuss the process changes which these technologies have enabled in the A' project

  15. Process development for automated solar-cell and module production. Task 4. Automated array assembly. Quarterly report No. 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagerty, J. J.; Gifford, M.

    1981-04-15

    The Automated Lamination Station is mechanically complete and is currently undergoing final wiring. The high current driver and isolator boards have been completed and installed, and the main interface board is under construction. The automated vacuum chamber has had a minor redesign to increase stiffness and improve the cover open/close mechanism. Design of the Final Assembly Station has been completed and construction is underway.

  16. Solving Vertex Cover Problem Using DNA Tile Assembly Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihua Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA tile assembly models are a class of mathematically distributed and parallel biocomputing models in DNA tiles. In previous works, tile assembly models have been proved be Turing-universal; that is, the system can do what Turing machine can do. In this paper, we use tile systems to solve computational hard problem. Mathematically, we construct three tile subsystems, which can be combined together to solve vertex cover problem. As a result, each of the proposed tile subsystems consists of Θ(1 types of tiles, and the assembly process is executed in a parallel way (like DNA’s biological function in cells; thus the systems can generate the solution of the problem in linear time with respect to the size of the graph.

  17. DNA nanostructure-directed assembly of metal nanoparticle superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julin, Sofia; Nummelin, Sami; Kostiainen, Mauri A.; Linko, Veikko

    2018-05-01

    Structural DNA nanotechnology provides unique, well-controlled, versatile, and highly addressable motifs and templates for assembling materials at the nanoscale. These methods to build from the bottom-up using DNA as a construction material are based on programmable and fully predictable Watson-Crick base pairing. Researchers have adopted these techniques to an increasing extent for creating numerous DNA nanostructures for a variety of uses ranging from nanoelectronics to drug-delivery applications. Recently, an increasing effort has been put into attaching nanoparticles (the size range of 1-20 nm) to the accurate DNA motifs and into creating metallic nanostructures (typically 20-100 nm) using designer DNA nanoshapes as molds or stencils. By combining nanoparticles with the superior addressability of DNA-based scaffolds, it is possible to form well-ordered materials with intriguing and completely new optical, plasmonic, electronic, and magnetic properties. This focused review discusses the DNA structure-directed nanoparticle assemblies covering the wide range of different one-, two-, and three-dimensional systems.

  18. Electron Microscopic Visualization of Protein Assemblies on Flattened DNA Origami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallik, Leena; Dhakal, Soma; Nichols, Joseph; Mahoney, Jacob; Dosey, Anne M; Jiang, Shuoxing; Sunahara, Roger K; Skiniotis, Georgios; Walter, Nils G

    2015-07-28

    DNA provides an ideal substrate for the engineering of versatile nanostructures due to its reliable Watson-Crick base pairing and well-characterized conformation. One of the most promising applications of DNA nanostructures arises from the site-directed spatial arrangement with nanometer precision of guest components such as proteins, metal nanoparticles, and small molecules. Two-dimensional DNA origami architectures, in particular, offer a simple design, high yield of assembly, and large surface area for use as a nanoplatform. However, such single-layer DNA origami were recently found to be structurally polymorphous due to their high flexibility, leading to the development of conformationally restrained multilayered origami that lack some of the advantages of the single-layer designs. Here we monitored single-layer DNA origami by transmission electron microscopy (EM) and discovered that their conformational heterogeneity is dramatically reduced in the presence of a low concentration of dimethyl sulfoxide, allowing for an efficient flattening onto the carbon support of an EM grid. We further demonstrated that streptavidin and a biotinylated target protein (cocaine esterase, CocE) can be captured at predesignated sites on these flattened origami while maintaining their functional integrity. Our demonstration that protein assemblies can be constructed with high spatial precision (within ∼2 nm of their predicted position on the platforms) by using strategically flattened single-layer origami paves the way for exploiting well-defined guest molecule assemblies for biochemistry and nanotechnology applications.

  19. Automation of cDNA Synthesis and Labelling Improves Reproducibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Klevebring

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Several technologies, such as in-depth sequencing and microarrays, enable large-scale interrogation of genomes and transcriptomes. In this study, we asses reproducibility and throughput by moving all laboratory procedures to a robotic workstation, capable of handling superparamagnetic beads. Here, we describe a fully automated procedure for cDNA synthesis and labelling for microarrays, where the purification steps prior to and after labelling are based on precipitation of DNA on carboxylic acid-coated paramagnetic beads. Results. The fully automated procedure allows for samples arrayed on a microtiter plate to be processed in parallel without manual intervention and ensuring high reproducibility. We compare our results to a manual sample preparation procedure and, in addition, use a comprehensive reference dataset to show that the protocol described performs better than similar manual procedures. Conclusions. We demonstrate, in an automated gene expression microarray experiment, a reduced variance between replicates, resulting in an increase in the statistical power to detect differentially expressed genes, thus allowing smaller differences between samples to be identified. This protocol can with minor modifications be used to create cDNA libraries for other applications such as in-depth analysis using next-generation sequencing technologies.

  20. Development and verification testing of automation and robotics for assembly of space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Marvin D.; Will, Ralph W.; Quach, Cuong C.

    1993-01-01

    A program was initiated within the past several years to develop operational procedures for automated assembly of truss structures suitable for large-aperture antennas. The assembly operations require the use of a robotic manipulator and are based on the principle of supervised autonomy to minimize crew resources. A hardware testbed was established to support development and evaluation testing. A brute-force automation approach was used to develop the baseline assembly hardware and software techniques. As the system matured and an operation was proven, upgrades were incorprated and assessed against the baseline test results. This paper summarizes the developmental phases of the program, the results of several assembly tests, the current status, and a series of proposed developments for additional hardware and software control capability. No problems that would preclude automated in-space assembly of truss structures have been encountered. The current system was developed at a breadboard level and continued development at an enhanced level is warranted.

  1. DNA biosensor by self-assembly of carbon nanotubes and DNA to detect riboflavin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Jing [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering. Chongqing University, ChongQing, 400044 (China); Zhang Yunhuai, E-mail: xp2031@163.com [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering. Chongqing University, ChongQing, 400044 (China); Yang Tongyi [School of Life Science. NanJing University, Nanjing, 210093 (China); Zhang Huai [Liming Research Institute of Chemical Industry, LuoYang, 471001 (China); Yang Yixuan [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering. Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Xiao Peng [College of Mathematics and Physics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2009-10-15

    The fabrication of biosensors via self-assembly of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and DNA on a platinum electrode was presented in this paper. The carboxylic SWNTs were assembled on an amine-modified platinum electrode surface and followed by the assembly of NH{sub 2}-DNA with the carboxyl-amine coupling. The decorated surface was characterized by Field Emission Electron Microscopy (FEG-SEM) and electrochemical experiments, which showed that the reaction of DNA-SWNTs biosensor was quasi-reversible. The mechanism of DNA and riboflavin (VB{sub 2}) was studied by cyclic voltammetry and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The fabricated SWNTs-reinforced biosensor exhibits high sensitivity and low detection limit for the tested VB{sub 2} compared to the reported methods.

  2. Uncertainties in the Item Parameter Estimates and Robust Automated Test Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldkamp, Bernard P.; Matteucci, Mariagiulia; de Jong, Martijn G.

    2013-01-01

    Item response theory parameters have to be estimated, and because of the estimation process, they do have uncertainty in them. In most large-scale testing programs, the parameters are stored in item banks, and automated test assembly algorithms are applied to assemble operational test forms. These algorithms treat item parameters as fixed values,…

  3. Assembly and microscopic characterization of DNA origami structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheible, Max; Jungmann, Ralf; Simmel, Friedrich C

    2012-01-01

    DNA origami is a revolutionary method for the assembly of molecular nanostructures from DNA with precisely defined dimensions and with an unprecedented yield. This can be utilized to arrange nanoscale components such as proteins or nanoparticles into pre-defined patterns. For applications it will now be of interest to arrange such components into functional complexes and study their geometry-dependent interactions. While commonly DNA nanostructures are characterized by atomic force microscopy or electron microscopy, these techniques often lack the time-resolution to study dynamic processes. It is therefore of considerable interest to also apply fluorescence microscopic techniques to DNA nanostructures. Of particular importance here is the utilization of novel super-resolved microscopy methods that enable imaging beyond the classical diffraction limit.

  4. Cellular Uptake of Tile-Assembled DNA Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocabey, Samet; Meinl, Hanna; MacPherson, Iain S; Cassinelli, Valentina; Manetto, Antonio; Rothenfusser, Simon; Liedl, Tim; Lichtenegger, Felix S

    2014-12-30

    DNA-based nanostructures have received great attention as molecular vehicles for cellular delivery of biomolecules and cancer drugs. Here, we report on the cellular uptake of tubule-like DNA tile-assembled nanostructures 27 nm in length and 8 nm in diameter that carry siRNA molecules, folic acid and fluorescent dyes. In our observations, the DNA structures are delivered to the endosome and do not reach the cytosol of the GFP -expressing HeLa cells that were used in the experiments. Consistent with this observation, no elevated silencing of the GFP gene could be detected. Furthermore, the presence of up to six molecules of folic acid on the carrier surface did not alter the uptake behavior and gene silencing. We further observed several challenges that have to be considered when performing in vitro and in vivo experiments with DNA structures: (i) DNA tile tubes consisting of 42 nt-long oligonucleotides and carrying single- or double-stranded extensions degrade within one hour in cell medium at 37 °C, while the same tubes without extensions are stable for up to eight hours. The degradation is caused mainly by the low concentration of divalent ions in the media. The lifetime in cell medium can be increased drastically by employing DNA tiles that are 84 nt long. (ii) Dyes may get cleaved from the oligonucleotides and then accumulate inside the cell close to the mitochondria, which can lead to misinterpretation of data generated by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. (iii) Single-stranded DNA carrying fluorescent dyes are internalized at similar levels as the DNA tile-assembled tubes used here.

  5. Electrostatic assembly of Cu2O nanoparticles on DNA templates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Li; Wei Gang; Qi Bin; Zhou Hualan; Liu Zhiguo; Song Yonghai; Yang Xiurong; Li Zhuang

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, a method for highly ordered assembly of cuprous oxide (Cu 2 O) nanoparticles (NPs) by DNA templates was reported. Cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB)-capped Cu 2 O NPs were adsorbed onto well-aligned λ-DNA chains to form necklace-like one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures. UV-vis, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize the nanostructure. The Cu 2 O nanostructures fabricated with the method are both highly ordered and quite straight

  6. DNA Assembly with De Bruijn Graphs Using an FPGA Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, Carl; Gosselin, Benoit; Fortier, Paul

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents an FPGA implementation of a DNA assembly algorithm, called Ray, initially developed to run on parallel CPUs. The OpenCL language is used and the focus is placed on modifying and optimizing the original algorithm to better suit the new parallelization tool and the radically different hardware architecture. The results show that the execution time is roughly one fourth that of the CPU and factoring energy consumption yields a tenfold savings.

  7. Arduino-based automation of a DNA extraction system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung-Won; Lee, Mi-So; Ryu, Mun-Ho; Kim, Jong-Won

    2015-01-01

    There have been many studies to detect infectious diseases with the molecular genetic method. This study presents an automation process for a DNA extraction system based on microfluidics and magnetic bead, which is part of a portable molecular genetic test system. This DNA extraction system consists of a cartridge with chambers, syringes, four linear stepper actuators, and a rotary stepper actuator. The actuators provide a sequence of steps in the DNA extraction process, such as transporting, mixing, and washing for the gene specimen, magnetic bead, and reagent solutions. The proposed automation system consists of a PC-based host application and an Arduino-based controller. The host application compiles a G code sequence file and interfaces with the controller to execute the compiled sequence. The controller executes stepper motor axis motion, time delay, and input-output manipulation. It drives the stepper motor with an open library, which provides a smooth linear acceleration profile. The controller also provides a homing sequence to establish the motor's reference position, and hard limit checking to prevent any over-travelling. The proposed system was implemented and its functionality was investigated, especially regarding positioning accuracy and velocity profile.

  8. Design and Assembly of DNA Nano-Objects and 2D DNA Origami Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenyan

    DNA, which plays a central role in biology as the carrier of genetic information, is also an excellent candidate for structural nanotechnology. Researches have proven that a variety of complicated DNA assemblies, such as objects, 2D & 3D crystals, and nanomechanical devices, can be fabricated through the combination of robust branched DNA motifs and sticky ends. This dissertation focuses on the design and construction of DNA nano--objects and 2D DNA origami arrays. In this dissertation, we first describe the formation of a triangular species that has four strands per edge, held together by PX interactions. We demonstrate by nondenaturing gel electrophoresis and by atomic force microscopy (AFM) that we can combine a partial triangle with other strands to form a robust four--stranded molecule. By combining them with a novel three--domain molecule, we also demonstrate by AFM that these triangles can be self--assembled into a linear array. Second, we demonstrate our attempts to design and self--assemble 2D DNA origami arrays using several different strategies. Specifically, we introduce the self--assembly of 2D DNA origami lattices using a symmetric cross--like design. This design strategy resulted in a well--ordered woven latticework array with edge dimensions of 2--3 mum. This size is likely to be large enough to connect bottom-up methods of patterning with top--down approaches. Third, we illustrate the design and construction of DNA nano--objects for exploring the substrate preferences of topoisomerase (topo) II. We designed and fabricated four double rhombus--like DNA molecules, each of which contains a different conformation of crossover in the middle, as possible substrates to establish the structural preferences for topo II. We characterized the formation of each substrate molecule by gel electrophoresis. Finally, we study the effect of M13 DNA knotting on the formation of the DNA origami tiles. We demonstrate by atomic force microscopy (AFM) that knotted M13

  9. Engineering Mathematical Analysis Method for Productivity Rate in Linear Arrangement Serial Structure Automated Flow Assembly Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Chan Sin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Productivity rate (Q or production rate is one of the important indicator criteria for industrial engineer to improve the system and finish good output in production or assembly line. Mathematical and statistical analysis method is required to be applied for productivity rate in industry visual overviews of the failure factors and further improvement within the production line especially for automated flow line since it is complicated. Mathematical model of productivity rate in linear arrangement serial structure automated flow line with different failure rate and bottleneck machining time parameters becomes the basic model for this productivity analysis. This paper presents the engineering mathematical analysis method which is applied in an automotive company which possesses automated flow assembly line in final assembly line to produce motorcycle in Malaysia. DCAS engineering and mathematical analysis method that consists of four stages known as data collection, calculation and comparison, analysis, and sustainable improvement is used to analyze productivity in automated flow assembly line based on particular mathematical model. Variety of failure rate that causes loss of productivity and bottleneck machining time is shown specifically in mathematic figure and presents the sustainable solution for productivity improvement for this final assembly automated flow line.

  10. DNA origami-based nanoribbons: assembly, length distribution, and twist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jungmann, Ralf; Scheible, Max; Kuzyk, Anton; Pardatscher, Guenther; Simmel, Friedrich C [Lehrstuhl fuer Bioelektronik, Physik-Department and ZNN/WSI, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Coulombwall 4a, 85748 Garching (Germany); Castro, Carlos E, E-mail: simmel@ph.tum.de [Labor fuer Biomolekulare Nanotechnologie, Physik-Department and ZNN/WSI, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Coulombwall 4a, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2011-07-08

    A variety of polymerization methods for the assembly of elongated nanoribbons from rectangular DNA origami structures are investigated. The most efficient method utilizes single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides to bridge an intermolecular scaffold seam between origami monomers. This approach allows the fabrication of origami ribbons with lengths of several micrometers, which can be used for long-range ordered arrangement of proteins. It is quantitatively shown that the length distribution of origami ribbons obtained with this technique follows the theoretical prediction for a simple linear polymerization reaction. The design of flat single layer origami structures with constant crossover spacing inevitably results in local underwinding of the DNA helix, which leads to a global twist of the origami structures that also translates to the nanoribbons.

  11. DNA origami-based nanoribbons: assembly, length distribution, and twist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jungmann, Ralf; Scheible, Max; Kuzyk, Anton; Pardatscher, Guenther; Simmel, Friedrich C; Castro, Carlos E

    2011-01-01

    A variety of polymerization methods for the assembly of elongated nanoribbons from rectangular DNA origami structures are investigated. The most efficient method utilizes single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides to bridge an intermolecular scaffold seam between origami monomers. This approach allows the fabrication of origami ribbons with lengths of several micrometers, which can be used for long-range ordered arrangement of proteins. It is quantitatively shown that the length distribution of origami ribbons obtained with this technique follows the theoretical prediction for a simple linear polymerization reaction. The design of flat single layer origami structures with constant crossover spacing inevitably results in local underwinding of the DNA helix, which leads to a global twist of the origami structures that also translates to the nanoribbons.

  12. Surface-assisted DNA self-assembly: An enzyme-free strategy towards formation of branched DNA lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhanjadeo, Madhabi M.; Nayak, Ashok K.; Subudhi, Umakanta

    2017-01-01

    DNA based self-assembled nanostructures and DNA origami has proven useful for organizing nanomaterials with firm precision. However, for advanced applications like nanoelectronics and photonics, large-scale organization of self-assembled branched DNA (bDNA) into periodic lattices is desired. In this communication for the first time we report a facile method of self-assembly of Y-shaped bDNA nanostructures on the cationic surface of Aluminum (Al) foil to prepare periodic two dimensional (2D) bDNA lattice. Particularly those Y-shaped bDNA structures having smaller overhangs and unable to self-assemble in solution, they are easily assembled on the surface of Al foil in the absence of ligase. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) analysis shows homogenous distribution of two-dimensional bDNA lattices across the Al foil. When the assembled bDNA structures were recovered from the Al foil and electrophoresed in nPAGE only higher order polymeric bDNA structures were observed without a trace of monomeric structures which confirms the stability and high yield of the bDNA lattices. Therefore, this enzyme-free economic and efficient strategy for developing bDNA lattices can be utilized in assembling various nanomaterials for functional molecular components towards development of DNA based self-assembled nanodevices. - Highlights: • Al foil surface-assisted self-assembly of monomeric structures into larger branched DNA lattice. • FESEM study confirms the uniform distribution of two-dimensional bDNA lattice structures across the surface of Al foil. • Enzyme-free and economic strategy to prepare higher order structures from simpler DNA nanostructures have been confirmed by recovery assay. • Use of well proven sequences for the preparation of pure Y-shaped monomeric DNA nanostructure with high yield.

  13. Assembly of a biocompatible triazole-linked gene by one-pot click-DNA ligation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukwikila, Mikiembo; Gale, Nittaya; El-Sagheer, Afaf H.; Brown, Tom; Tavassoli, Ali

    2017-11-01

    The chemical synthesis of oligonucleotides and their enzyme-mediated assembly into genes and genomes has significantly advanced multiple scientific disciplines. However, these approaches are not without their shortcomings; enzymatic amplification and ligation of oligonucleotides into genes and genomes makes automation challenging, and site-specific incorporation of epigenetic information and/or modified bases into large constructs is not feasible. Here we present a fully chemical one-pot method for the assembly of oligonucleotides into a gene by click-DNA ligation. We synthesize the 335 base-pair gene that encodes the green fluorescent protein iLOV from ten functionalized oligonucleotides that contain 5ʹ-azide and 3ʹ-alkyne units. The resulting click-linked iLOV gene contains eight triazoles at the sites of chemical ligation, and yet is fully biocompatible; it is replicated by DNA polymerases in vitro and encodes a functional iLOV protein in Escherichia coli. We demonstrate the power and potential of our one-pot gene-assembly method by preparing an epigenetically modified variant of the iLOV gene.

  14. DNA Trojan Horses: Self-Assembled Floxuridine-Containing DNA Polyhedra for Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Quanbing; Ma, Yuan; Pan, Gaifang; Xue, Bai; Yan, Deyue; Zhang, Chuan; Zhu, Xinyuan

    2017-10-02

    Based on their structural similarity to natural nucleobases, nucleoside analogue therapeutics were integrated into DNA strands through conventional solid-phase synthesis. By elaborately designing their sequences, floxuridine-integrated DNA strands were synthesized and self-assembled into well-defined DNA polyhedra with definite drug-loading ratios as well as tunable size and morphology. As a novel drug delivery system, these drug-containing DNA polyhedra could ideally mimic the Trojan Horse to deliver chemotherapeutics into tumor cells and fight against cancer. Both in vitro and in vivo results demonstrate that the DNA Trojan horse with buckyball architecture exhibits superior anticancer capability over the free drug and other formulations. With precise control over the drug-loading ratio and structure of the nanocarriers, the DNA Trojan horse may play an important role in anticancer treatment and exhibit great potential in translational nanomedicine. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. DNA-PK dependent targeting of DNA-ends to a protein complex assembled on matrix attachment region DNA sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauldin, S.K.; Getts, R.C.; Perez, M.L.; DiRienzo, S.; Stamato, T.D.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: We find that nuclear protein extracts from mammalian cells contain an activity that allows DNA ends to associate with circular pUC18 plasmid DNA. This activity requires the catalytic subunit of DNA-PK (DNA-PKcs) and Ku since it was not observed in mutants lacking Ku or DNA-PKcs but was observed when purified Ku/DNA-PKcs was added to these mutant extracts. Competition experiments between pUC18 and pUC18 plasmids containing various nuclear matrix attachment region (MAR) sequences suggest that DNA ends preferentially associate with plasmids containing MAR DNA sequences. At a 1:5 mass ratio of MAR to pUC18, approximately equal amounts of DNA end binding to the two plasmids were observed, while at a 1:1 ratio no pUC18 end-binding was observed. Calculation of relative binding activities indicates that DNA-end binding activities to MAR sequences was 7 to 21 fold higher than pUC18. Western analysis of proteins bound to pUC18 and MAR plasmids indicates that XRCC4, DNA ligase IV, scaffold attachment factor A, topoisomerase II, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase preferentially associate with the MAR plasmid in the absence or presence of DNA ends. In contrast, Ku and DNA-PKcs were found on the MAR plasmid only in the presence of DNA ends. After electroporation of a 32P-labeled DNA probe into human cells and cell fractionation, 87% of the total intercellular radioactivity remained in nuclei after a 0.5M NaCl extraction suggesting the probe was strongly bound in the nucleus. The above observations raise the possibility that DNA-PK targets DNA-ends to a repair and/or DNA damage signaling complex which is assembled on MAR sites in the nucleus

  16. Automated Eukaryotic Gene Structure Annotation Using EVidenceModeler and the Program to Assemble Spliced Alignments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haas, B J; Salzberg, S L; Zhu, W; Pertea, M; Allen, J E; Orvis, J; White, O; Buell, C R; Wortman, J R

    2007-12-10

    EVidenceModeler (EVM) is presented as an automated eukaryotic gene structure annotation tool that reports eukaryotic gene structures as a weighted consensus of all available evidence. EVM, when combined with the Program to Assemble Spliced Alignments (PASA), yields a comprehensive, configurable annotation system that predicts protein-coding genes and alternatively spliced isoforms. Our experiments on both rice and human genome sequences demonstrate that EVM produces automated gene structure annotation approaching the quality of manual curation.

  17. Critical factors for assembling a high volume of DNA barcodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajibabaei, Mehrdad; deWaard, Jeremy R; Ivanova, Natalia V; Ratnasingham, Sujeevan; Dooh, Robert T; Kirk, Stephanie L; Mackie, Paula M; Hebert, Paul D.N

    2005-01-01

    Large-scale DNA barcoding projects are now moving toward activation while the creation of a comprehensive barcode library for eukaryotes will ultimately require the acquisition of some 100 million barcodes. To satisfy this need, analytical facilities must adopt protocols that can support the rapid, cost-effective assembly of barcodes. In this paper we discuss the prospects for establishing high volume DNA barcoding facilities by evaluating key steps in the analytical chain from specimens to barcodes. Alliances with members of the taxonomic community represent the most effective strategy for provisioning the analytical chain with specimens. The optimal protocols for DNA extraction and subsequent PCR amplification of the barcode region depend strongly on their condition, but production targets of 100K barcode records per year are now feasible for facilities working with compliant specimens. The analysis of museum collections is currently challenging, but PCR cocktails that combine polymerases with repair enzyme(s) promise future success. Barcode analysis is already a cost-effective option for species identification in some situations and this will increasingly be the case as reference libraries are assembled and analytical protocols are simplified. PMID:16214753

  18. Evaluation of Four Automated Protocols for Extraction of DNA from FTA Cards

    OpenAIRE

    Stangegaard, Michael; Børsting, Claus; Ferrero-Miliani, Laura; Frank-Hansen, Rune; Poulsen, Lena; Hansen, Anders J; Morling, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Extraction of DNA using magnetic bead-based techniques on automated DNA extraction instruments provides a fast, reliable, and reproducible method for DNA extraction from various matrices. Here, we have compared the yield and quality of DNA extracted from FTA cards using four automated extraction protocols on three different instruments. The extraction processes were repeated up to six times with the same pieces of FTA cards. The sample material on the FTA cards was either blood or buccal cell...

  19. Protein Self-Assembly and Protein-Induced DNA Morphologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawhinney, Matthew T.

    The ability of biomolecules to associate into various structural configurations has a substantial impact on human physiology. The synthesis of protein polypeptide chains using the information encoded by DNA is mediated through the use of regulatory proteins, known as transcription factors. Some transcription factors perform function by inducing local curvature in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) strands, the mechanisms of which are not entirely known. An important architectural protein, eleven zinc finger CTCF (11 ZF CTCF) is involved in genome organization and hypothesized to mediate DNA loop formation. Direct evidence for these CTCF-induced DNA loops has yet to be observed. In this thesis, the effect of 11 ZF CTCF on DNA morphology is examined using atomic force microscopy, a powerful technique for visualizing biomolecules with nanometer resolution. The presence of CTCF is revealed to induce a variety of morphologies deviating from the relaxed state of control DNA samples, including compact circular complexes, meshes, and networks. Images reveal quasi-circular DNA/CTCF complexes consistent with a single DNA molecule twice wrapped around the protein. The structures of DNA and proteins are highly important for operations in the cell. Structural irregularities may lead to a variety of issues, including more than twenty human pathologies resulting from aberrant protein misfolding into amyloid aggregates of elongated fibrils. Insulin deficiency and resistance characterizing type 2 diabetes often requires administration of insulin. Injectable and inhalable delivery methods have been documented to result in the deposition of amyloid fibrils. Oligomers, soluble multiprotein assemblies, are believed to play an important role in this process. Insulin aggregation under physiological conditions is not well understood and oligomers have not yet been fully characterized. In this thesis, in vitro insulin aggregation at acidic and neutral pH is explored using a variety of techniques

  20. High molecular weight DNA assembly in vivo for synthetic biology applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhas, Mario; Ajioka, James W

    2017-05-01

    DNA assembly is the key technology of the emerging interdisciplinary field of synthetic biology. While the assembly of smaller DNA fragments is usually performed in vitro, high molecular weight DNA molecules are assembled in vivo via homologous recombination in the host cell. Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae are the main hosts used for DNA assembly in vivo. Progress in DNA assembly over the last few years has paved the way for the construction of whole genomes. This review provides an update on recent synthetic biology advances with particular emphasis on high molecular weight DNA assembly in vivo in E. coli, B. subtilis and S. cerevisiae. Special attention is paid to the assembly of whole genomes, such as those of the first synthetic cell, synthetic yeast and minimal genomes.

  1. JPLEX: Java Simplex Implementation with Branch-and-Bound Search for Automated Test Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ryoungsun; Kim, Jiseon; Dodd, Barbara G.; Chung, Hyewon

    2011-01-01

    JPLEX, short for Java simPLEX, is an automated test assembly (ATA) program. It is a mixed integer linear programming (MILP) solver written in Java. It reads in a configuration file, solves the minimization problem, and produces an output file for postprocessing. It implements the simplex algorithm to create a fully relaxed solution and…

  2. Framework to Implement Collaborative Robots in Manual Assembly: A Lean Automation Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malik, Ali Ahmad; Bilberg, Arne

    The recent proliferation of smart manufacturing technologies has emerged the concept of hybrid automation for assembly systems utilizing the best of humans and robots in a combination. Based on the ability to work alongside human-workers the next generation of industrial robots (or robotics 2...... of virtual simulations is discussed for validation and optimization of human-robot work environment....

  3. Automated Test Assembly for Cognitive Diagnosis Models Using a Genetic Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelman, Matthew; Kim, Wonsuk; Roussos, Louis A.

    2009-01-01

    Much recent psychometric literature has focused on cognitive diagnosis models (CDMs), a promising class of instruments used to measure the strengths and weaknesses of examinees. This article introduces a genetic algorithm to perform automated test assembly alongside CDMs. The algorithm is flexible in that it can be applied whether the goal is to…

  4. RPA binds histone H3-H4 and functions in DNA replication-coupled nucleosome assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shaofeng; Xu, Zhiyun; Leng, He; Zheng, Pu; Yang, Jiayi; Chen, Kaifu; Feng, Jianxun; Li, Qing

    2017-01-27

    DNA replication-coupled nucleosome assembly is essential to maintain genome integrity and retain epigenetic information. Multiple involved histone chaperones have been identified, but how nucleosome assembly is coupled to DNA replication remains elusive. Here we show that replication protein A (RPA), an essential replisome component that binds single-stranded DNA, has a role in replication-coupled nucleosome assembly. RPA directly binds free H3-H4. Assays using a synthetic sequence that mimics freshly unwound single-stranded DNA at replication fork showed that RPA promotes DNA-(H3-H4) complex formation immediately adjacent to double-stranded DNA. Further, an RPA mutant defective in H3-H4 binding exhibited attenuated nucleosome assembly on nascent chromatin. Thus, we propose that RPA functions as a platform for targeting histone deposition to replication fork, through which RPA couples nucleosome assembly with ongoing DNA replication. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  5. Automated methods for single-stranded DNA isolation and dideoxynucleotide DNA sequencing reactions on a robotic workstation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mardis, E.R.; Roe, B.A.

    1989-01-01

    Automated procedures have been developed for both the simultaneous isolation of 96 single-stranded M13 chimeric template DNAs in less than two hours, and for simultaneously pipetting 24 dideoxynucleotide sequencing reactions on a commercially available laboratory workstation. The DNA sequencing results obtained by either radiolabeled or fluorescent methods are consistent with the premise that automation of these portions of DNA sequencing projects will improve the reproducibility of the DNA isolation and the procedures for these normally labor-intensive steps provides an approach for rapid acquisition of large amounts of high quality, reproducible DNA sequence data

  6. DNA-directed self-assembly of gold nanoparticles into binary and ternary nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Hui; Yi Changqing; Tzang Chihung; Zhu Junjie; Yang Mengsu

    2007-01-01

    The assembly and characterization of gold nanoparticle-based binary and ternary structures are reported. Two strategies were used to assemble gold nanoparticles into ordered nanoscale architectures: in strategy 1, gold nanoparticles were functionalized with single-strand DNA (ssDNA) first, and then hybridized with complementary ssDNA-labelled nanoparticles to assemble designed architectures. In strategy 2, the designed architectures were constructed through hybridization between complementary ssDNA first, then by assembling gold nanoparticles to the scaffolding through gold-sulfur bonds. Both TEM measurements and agarose gel electrophoresis confirmed that the latter strategy is more efficient in generating the designed nanostructures

  7. Automation and integration of multiplexed on-line sample preparation with capillary electrophoresis for DNA sequencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, H.

    1999-03-31

    The purpose of this research is to develop a multiplexed sample processing system in conjunction with multiplexed capillary electrophoresis for high-throughput DNA sequencing. The concept from DNA template to called bases was first demonstrated with a manually operated single capillary system. Later, an automated microfluidic system with 8 channels based on the same principle was successfully constructed. The instrument automatically processes 8 templates through reaction, purification, denaturation, pre-concentration, injection, separation and detection in a parallel fashion. A multiplexed freeze/thaw switching principle and a distribution network were implemented to manage flow direction and sample transportation. Dye-labeled terminator cycle-sequencing reactions are performed in an 8-capillary array in a hot air thermal cycler. Subsequently, the sequencing ladders are directly loaded into a corresponding size-exclusion chromatographic column operated at {approximately} 60 C for purification. On-line denaturation and stacking injection for capillary electrophoresis is simultaneously accomplished at a cross assembly set at {approximately} 70 C. Not only the separation capillary array but also the reaction capillary array and purification columns can be regenerated after every run. DNA sequencing data from this system allow base calling up to 460 bases with accuracy of 98%.

  8. DNA Self-Assembly and Computation Studied with a Coarse-grained Dynamic Bonded Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svaneborg, Carsten; Fellermann, Harold; Rasmussen, Steen

    2012-01-01

    We utilize a coarse-grained directional dynamic bonding DNA model [C. Svaneborg, Comp. Phys. Comm. (In Press DOI:10.1016/j.cpc.2012.03.005)] to study DNA self-assembly and DNA computation. In our DNA model, a single nucleotide is represented by a single interaction site, and complementary sites can...

  9. DNAzyme-Based Logic Gate-Mediated DNA Self-Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cheng; Yang, Jing; Jiang, Shuoxing; Liu, Yan; Yan, Hao

    2016-01-13

    Controlling DNA self-assembly processes using rationally designed logic gates is a major goal of DNA-based nanotechnology and programming. Such controls could facilitate the hierarchical engineering of complex nanopatterns responding to various molecular triggers or inputs. Here, we demonstrate the use of a series of DNAzyme-based logic gates to control DNA tile self-assembly onto a prescribed DNA origami frame. Logic systems such as "YES," "OR," "AND," and "logic switch" are implemented based on DNAzyme-mediated tile recognition with the DNA origami frame. DNAzyme is designed to play two roles: (1) as an intermediate messenger to motivate downstream reactions and (2) as a final trigger to report fluorescent signals, enabling information relay between the DNA origami-framed tile assembly and fluorescent signaling. The results of this study demonstrate the plausibility of DNAzyme-mediated hierarchical self-assembly and provide new tools for generating dynamic and responsive self-assembly systems.

  10. OligArch: A software tool to allow artificially expanded genetic information systems (AEGIS to guide the autonomous self-assembly of long DNA constructs from multiple DNA single strands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin M. Bradley

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic biologists wishing to self-assemble large DNA (L-DNA constructs from small DNA fragments made by automated synthesis need fragments that hybridize predictably. Such predictability is difficult to obtain with nucleotides built from just the four standard nucleotides. Natural DNA's peculiar combination of strong and weak G:C and A:T pairs, the context-dependence of the strengths of those pairs, unimolecular strand folding that competes with desired interstrand hybridization, and non-Watson–Crick interactions available to standard DNA, all contribute to this unpredictability. In principle, adding extra nucleotides to the genetic alphabet can improve the predictability and reliability of autonomous DNA self-assembly, simply by increasing the information density of oligonucleotide sequences. These extra nucleotides are now available as parts of artificially expanded genetic information systems (AEGIS, and tools are now available to generate entirely standard DNA from AEGIS DNA during PCR amplification. Here, we describe the OligArch (for "oligonucleotide architecting" software, an application that permits synthetic biologists to engineer optimally self-assembling DNA constructs from both six- and eight-letter AEGIS alphabets. This software has been used to design oligonucleotides that self-assemble to form complete genes from 20 or more single-stranded synthetic oligonucleotides. OligArch is therefore a key element of a scalable and integrated infrastructure for the rapid and designed engineering of biology.

  11. DNA-mediated self-assembly of carbon nanotubes on gold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez-Pomales, Germarie; Rivera-Velez, Nelson E; Cabrera, Carlos R

    2007-01-01

    This report presents the use of disulfide-modified single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) to form DNA self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) and mixed DNA-carbon nanotube (CNT) hybrids SAMs on gold substrates. Mixed DNA-CNT SAMs are composed of DNA, mercaptohexanol (MCH) and DNA-CNT aggregates. Both, DNA-CNT and DNA areas of the mixed SAMs were analyzed and compared to traditional DNA SAMs. The results suggest the formation of a more compact and densely packed monolayer of DNA-CNT in comparison with DNA. The use of DNA-CNT hybrids to form SAMs on gold substrates might represent a new approach to improve the immobilization of DNA strands on gold, and might therefore help with the development of enhanced DNA sensors

  12. Logical NAND and NOR Operations Using Algorithmic Self-assembly of DNA Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanfeng; Cui, Guangzhao; Zhang, Xuncai; Zheng, Yan

    DNA self-assembly is the most advanced and versatile system that has been experimentally demonstrated for programmable construction of patterned systems on the molecular scale. It has been demonstrated that the simple binary arithmetic and logical operations can be computed by the process of self assembly of DNA tiles. Here we report a one-dimensional algorithmic self-assembly of DNA triple-crossover molecules that can be used to execute five steps of a logical NAND and NOR operations on a string of binary bits. To achieve this, abstract tiles were translated into DNA tiles based on triple-crossover motifs. Serving as input for the computation, long single stranded DNA molecules were used to nucleate growth of tiles into algorithmic crystals. Our method shows that engineered DNA self-assembly can be treated as a bottom-up design techniques, and can be capable of designing DNA computer organization and architecture.

  13. Shared robotic system: automated pipette calibration and pipette tip filter assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Addison, J.H. Jr.; Dyches, G.M.

    1985-01-01

    At the Savannah River Laboratory a Zymate Laboratory Automation System has been developed to perform two completely independent tasks within one work cell. One operation is the precise calibration of pipettes; the other is the assembly of a filter in a pipette tip. Since neither task requires full robot time, the shared system is an economical means of robotizing both processes. These are tedious, repetitive, time consuming tasks; and human operators fail to yield constant results. Automation insures a repeatable process which increases product quality

  14. Modelling DNA origami self-assembly at the domain level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dannenberg, Frits; Kwiatkowska, Marta [Department of Computer Science, University of Oxford, Wolfson Building, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QD (United Kingdom); Dunn, Katherine E. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Clarendon Laboratory, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Department of Electronics, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Bath, Jonathan; Turberfield, Andrew J. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Clarendon Laboratory, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Ouldridge, Thomas E. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); Department of Mathematics, Imperial College, 180 Queen’s Gate, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-28

    We present a modelling framework, and basic model parameterization, for the study of DNA origami folding at the level of DNA domains. Our approach is explicitly kinetic and does not assume a specific folding pathway. The binding of each staple is associated with a free-energy change that depends on staple sequence, the possibility of coaxial stacking with neighbouring domains, and the entropic cost of constraining the scaffold by inserting staple crossovers. A rigorous thermodynamic model is difficult to implement as a result of the complex, multiply connected geometry of the scaffold: we present a solution to this problem for planar origami. Coaxial stacking of helices and entropic terms, particularly when loop closure exponents are taken to be larger than those for ideal chains, introduce interactions between staples. These cooperative interactions lead to the prediction of sharp assembly transitions with notable hysteresis that are consistent with experimental observations. We show that the model reproduces the experimentally observed consequences of reducing staple concentration, accelerated cooling, and absent staples. We also present a simpler methodology that gives consistent results and can be used to study a wider range of systems including non-planar origami.

  15. Modelling DNA origami self-assembly at the domain level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dannenberg, Frits; Kwiatkowska, Marta; Dunn, Katherine E.; Bath, Jonathan; Turberfield, Andrew J.; Ouldridge, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    We present a modelling framework, and basic model parameterization, for the study of DNA origami folding at the level of DNA domains. Our approach is explicitly kinetic and does not assume a specific folding pathway. The binding of each staple is associated with a free-energy change that depends on staple sequence, the possibility of coaxial stacking with neighbouring domains, and the entropic cost of constraining the scaffold by inserting staple crossovers. A rigorous thermodynamic model is difficult to implement as a result of the complex, multiply connected geometry of the scaffold: we present a solution to this problem for planar origami. Coaxial stacking of helices and entropic terms, particularly when loop closure exponents are taken to be larger than those for ideal chains, introduce interactions between staples. These cooperative interactions lead to the prediction of sharp assembly transitions with notable hysteresis that are consistent with experimental observations. We show that the model reproduces the experimentally observed consequences of reducing staple concentration, accelerated cooling, and absent staples. We also present a simpler methodology that gives consistent results and can be used to study a wider range of systems including non-planar origami

  16. Modelling DNA origami self-assembly at the domain level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannenberg, Frits; Dunn, Katherine E.; Bath, Jonathan; Kwiatkowska, Marta; Turberfield, Andrew J.; Ouldridge, Thomas E.

    2015-10-01

    We present a modelling framework, and basic model parameterization, for the study of DNA origami folding at the level of DNA domains. Our approach is explicitly kinetic and does not assume a specific folding pathway. The binding of each staple is associated with a free-energy change that depends on staple sequence, the possibility of coaxial stacking with neighbouring domains, and the entropic cost of constraining the scaffold by inserting staple crossovers. A rigorous thermodynamic model is difficult to implement as a result of the complex, multiply connected geometry of the scaffold: we present a solution to this problem for planar origami. Coaxial stacking of helices and entropic terms, particularly when loop closure exponents are taken to be larger than those for ideal chains, introduce interactions between staples. These cooperative interactions lead to the prediction of sharp assembly transitions with notable hysteresis that are consistent with experimental observations. We show that the model reproduces the experimentally observed consequences of reducing staple concentration, accelerated cooling, and absent staples. We also present a simpler methodology that gives consistent results and can be used to study a wider range of systems including non-planar origami.

  17. DNA-templated photonic arrays and assemblies: design principles and future opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Wu; Bonnard, Vanessa; Burley, Glenn A

    2011-07-11

    Molecular photonics is a rapidly developing and multi-disciplinary field of research involving the construction of molecular assemblies comprising photoactive building blocks that are responsive to a light stimulus. A salient challenge in this field is the controlled assembly of these building blocks with nanoscale precision. DNA exhibits considerable promise as an architecture for the templated assembly of photoactive materials. In this Concept Article we describe the progress that has been made in the area of DNA photonics, in which DNA acts as a platform for the construction of optoelectronic assemblies, thin films and devices. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Hierarchical Self Assembly of Patterns from the Robinson Tilings: DNA Tile Design in an Enhanced Tile Assembly Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Jennifer E; Liu, Wenyan; Seeman, Nadrian C

    2012-06-01

    We introduce a hierarchical self assembly algorithm that produces the quasiperiodic patterns found in the Robinson tilings and suggest a practical implementation of this algorithm using DNA origami tiles. We modify the abstract Tile Assembly Model, (aTAM), to include active signaling and glue activation in response to signals to coordinate the hierarchical assembly of Robinson patterns of arbitrary size from a small set of tiles according to the tile substitution algorithm that generates them. Enabling coordinated hierarchical assembly in the aTAM makes possible the efficient encoding of the recursive process of tile substitution.

  19. FOLDNA, a Web Server for Self-Assembled DNA Nanostructure Autoscaffolds and Autostaples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chensheng Zhou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA self-assembly is a nanotechnology that folds DNA into desired shapes. Self-assembled DNA nanostructures, also known as origami, are increasingly valuable in nanomaterial and biosensing applications. Two ways to use DNA nanostructures in medicine are to form nanoarrays, and to work as vehicles in drug delivery. The DNA nanostructures perform well as a biomaterial in these areas because they have spatially addressable and size controllable properties. However, manually designing complementary DNA sequences for self-assembly is a technically demanding and time consuming task, which makes it advantageous for computers to do this job instead. We have developed a web server, FOLDNA, which can automatically design 2D self-assembled DNA nanostructures according to custom pictures and scaffold sequences provided by the users. It is the first web server to provide an entirely automatic design of self-assembled DNA nanostructure, and it takes merely a second to generate comprehensive information for molecular experiments including: scaffold DNA pathways, staple DNA directions, and staple DNA sequences. This program could save as much as several hours in the designing step for each DNA nanostructure. We randomly selected some shapes and corresponding outputs from our server and validated its performance in molecular experiments.

  20. A new building block for DNA network formation by self-assembly and polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bußkamp, Holger; Keller, Sascha; Robotta, Marta; Drescher, Malte; Marx, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The predictability of DNA self-assembly is exploited in many nanotechnological approaches. Inspired by naturally existing self-assembled DNA architectures, branched DNA has been developed that allows self-assembly to predesigned architectures with dimensions on the nanometer scale. DNA is an attractive material for generation of nanostructures due to a plethora of enzymes which modify DNA with high accuracy, providing a toolbox for many different manipulations to construct nanometer scaled objects. We present a straightforward synthesis of a rigid DNA branching building block successfully used for the generation of DNA networks by self-assembly and network formation by enzymatic DNA synthesis. The Y-shaped 3-armed DNA construct, bearing 3 primer strands is accepted by Taq DNA polymerase. The enzyme uses each arm as primer strand and incorporates the branched construct into large assemblies during PCR. The networks were investigated by agarose gel electrophoresis, atomic force microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. The findings indicate that rather rigid DNA networks were formed. This presents a new bottom-up approach for DNA material formation and might find applications like in the generation of functional hydrogels.

  1. Automated assembly of microfluidic "lab-on-a-disc"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, M.; Müller, T.; Voebel, T.; Baum, C.; Glennon, T.; Mishra, R.; Kinahan, D.; King, D.; Ducrée, J.; Brecher, C.

    2018-02-01

    Point-of-care (POC) testing attracts more and more attention in the medical health sector because of their specific property to perform the diagnostic close to the patient. The fast diagnosis right at the hospital or the doctor's office improves the medical reaction time and the chances for a successful healing process. One of this POC test systems is a "Lab-on-a-Disc" (LoaD) which looks like a compact disc crisscrossed with microfluidic tubes and cavities. The fluid to be analysed is placed in the LoaD and an external device then rotates the LoaD. The cavities inside the LoaD and the centrifugal force ensure a clearly defined sequence of the analysis. Furthermore, we aim for an inexpensive manufacture of the medical product without neglecting its quality and functionality. Therefore, the Fraunhofer IPT works on an assembly cell to implement dissoluble films concisely into the disc. This dissoluble film demonstrates its successful usage as a gate for the fluid, which opens after a predefined moment in the cycle. Furthermore, we investigate to integrate a laser welding process into our gantry system and demonstrate its efficiency with the welding of polymer discs. This procedure is clinically safe because no further laser absorption material is needed in the sealing process, which might pollute the LoaD. Moreover, this process allows the alignment of several discs before the welding and therefore leads to precisely manufactured LoaDs in large quantities. All these methods together enable a fast, costefficient and reliable mass production to bring POC testing among the people.

  2. [DNA Extraction from Old Bones by AutoMate Express™ System].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, B; Lü, Z

    2017-08-01

    To establish a method for extracting DNA from old bones by AutoMate Express™ system. Bones were grinded into powder by freeze-mill. After extraction by AutoMate Express™, DNA were amplified and genotyped by Identifiler®Plus and MinFiler™ kits. DNA were extracted from 10 old bone samples, which kept in different environments with the postmortem interval from 10 to 20 years, in 3 hours by AutoMate Express™ system. Complete STR typing results were obtained from 8 samples. AutoMate Express™ system can quickly and efficiently extract DNA from old bones, which can be applied in forensic practice. Copyright© by the Editorial Department of Journal of Forensic Medicine

  3. Digital image analysis applied to industrial nondestructive evaluation and automated parts assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janney, D.H.; Kruger, R.P.

    1979-01-01

    Many ideas of image enhancement and analysis are relevant to the needs of the nondestructive testing engineer. These ideas not only aid the engineer in the performance of his current responsibilities, they also open to him new areas of industrial development and automation which are logical extensions of classical testing problems. The paper begins with a tutorial on the fundamentals of computerized image enhancement as applied to nondestructive testing, then progresses through pattern recognition and automated inspection to automated, or robotic, assembly procedures. It is believed that such procedures are cost-effective in many instances, and are but the logical extension of those techniques now commonly used, but often limited to analysis of data from quality-assurance images. Many references are given in order to help the reader who wishes to pursue a given idea further

  4. A Capping Step During Automated Glycan Assembly Enables Access to Complex Glycans in High Yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yang; Kononov, Andrew; Delbianco, Martina; Seeberger, Peter H

    2018-04-20

    The products of multi-step automated solid phase syntheses are purified after release from the resin. Capping of unreacted nucleophiles is commonplace in automated oligonucleotide synthesis to minimize accumulation of deletion sequences. To date, capping was not used routinely during automated glycan assembly (AGA) since previous capping protocols suffered from long reaction times and conditions incompatible with some protective groups. Here, a method using methanesulfonic acid and acetic anhydride for the fast and quantitative capping of hydroxyl groups that failed to be glycosylated is reported. Commonly used protective groups in AGA are stable under these capping conditions. The introduction of a capping step into the coupling cycle drastically improved overall yields by decreasing side-products and simplifying purification, while reducing building block consumption. To illustrate the method, the biologically important tetrasaccharide Lc4, as well as a 50-mer polymannoside were prepared. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Automated assembly of fast-axis collimation (FAC) lenses for diode laser bar modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miesner, Jörn; Timmermann, Andre; Meinschien, Jens; Neumann, Bernhard; Wright, Steve; Tekin, Tolga; Schröder, Henning; Westphalen, Thomas; Frischkorn, Felix

    2009-02-01

    Laser diodes and diode laser bars are key components in high power semiconductor lasers and solid state laser systems. During manufacture, the assembly of the fast axis collimation (FAC) lens is a crucial step. The goal of our activities is to design an automated assembly system for high volume production. In this paper the results of an intermediate milestone will be reported: a demonstration system was designed, realized and tested to prove the feasibility of all of the system components and process features. The demonstration system consists of a high precision handling system, metrology for process feedback, a powerful digital image processing system and tooling for glue dispensing, UV curing and laser operation. The system components as well as their interaction with each other were tested in an experimental system in order to glean design knowledge for the fully automated assembly system. The adjustment of the FAC lens is performed by a series of predefined steps monitored by two cameras concurrently imaging the far field and the near field intensity distributions. Feedback from these cameras processed by a powerful and efficient image processing algorithm control a five axis precision motion system to optimize the fast axis collimation of the laser beam. Automated cementing of the FAC to the diode bar completes the process. The presentation will show the system concept, the algorithm of the adjustment as well as experimental results. A critical discussion of the results will close the talk.

  6. Multi-scale coarse-graining for the study of assembly pathways in DNA-brick self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Pedro; Romano, Flavio; Schreck, John S.; Ouldridge, Thomas E.; Doye, Jonathan P. K.; Louis, Ard A.

    2018-04-01

    Inspired by recent successes using single-stranded DNA tiles to produce complex structures, we develop a two-step coarse-graining approach that uses detailed thermodynamic calculations with oxDNA, a nucleotide-based model of DNA, to parametrize a coarser kinetic model that can reach the time and length scales needed to study the assembly mechanisms of these structures. We test the model by performing a detailed study of the assembly pathways for a two-dimensional target structure made up of 334 unique strands each of which are 42 nucleotides long. Without adjustable parameters, the model reproduces a critical temperature for the formation of the assembly that is close to the temperature at which assembly first occurs in experiments. Furthermore, the model allows us to investigate in detail the nucleation barriers and the distribution of critical nucleus shapes for the assembly of a single target structure. The assembly intermediates are compact and highly connected (although not maximally so), and classical nucleation theory provides a good fit to the height and shape of the nucleation barrier at temperatures close to where assembly first occurs.

  7. Contact assembly of cell-laden hollow microtubes through automated micromanipulator tip locating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Huaping; Shi, Qing; Guo, Yanan; Li, Yanan; Sun, Tao; Huang, Qiang; Fukuda, Toshio

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an automated contact assembly method to fabricate a cell-laden microtube based on accurate locating of the micromanipulator tip. Essential for delivering nutrients in thick engineered tissues, a vessel-mimetic microtube can be precisely assembled through microrobotic contact biomanipulation. The biomanipulation is a technique to spatially order and immobilize cellular targets with high precision. However, due to image occlusion during contact, it is challenging to locate the micromanipulator tip for fully automated assembly. To achieve pixel-wise tracking and locating of the tip in contact, a particle filter algorithm integrated with a determined level set model is employed here. The model ensures precise convergence of the micromanipulator’s contour during occlusion. With the converged active contour, the algorithm is able to pixel-wisely separate the micromanipulator from the low-contrast background and precisely locate the tip with error around 1 pixel (2 µ m at 4  ×  magnification). As a result, the cell-laden microtube is automatically assembled at six layers/min, which is effective enough to fabricate vessel-mimetic constructs for vascularization in tissue engineering. (paper)

  8. Toolchain concept for the automated assembly of micro-optical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haag, Sebastian; Müller, Tobias; Brecher, Christian

    2014-05-01

    In micro-optical assembly, the mastering of the steps of passive and active alignment, bonding, and part feeding as well as their interdependencies are crucial to the success of an automation solution. Process development is therefore complex and time consuming. Separation of assembly process planning and assembly execution decouples both phases so that production and process development can take place in parallel and even in spatially separated stations. The work presented in this paper refines the concept of flexible assembly systems by separating the phases of assembly process planning and assembly execution by providing a dedicated process development platform on the one hand and by providing automatisms regarding the transfer from the development platform into industrial production on the other. For this purpose, two key concepts are being developed by the research carried out at Fraunhofer IPT. The paper introduces the overall approach and formalisms as well as a form of notation based on part lists, product features and key characteristics and it shows industrial use cases the approach has been applied to. Key characteristics are constraints on spatial relations and they are expressed in terms of optical functions or geometric constraints which need to be fulfilled. In the paper, special attention is paid to the illustration of the end-user perspective.

  9. Three-dimensional plasmonic chiral tetramers assembled by DNA origami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xibo; Asenjo-Garcia, Ana; Liu, Qing; Jiang, Qiao; García de Abajo, F Javier; Liu, Na; Ding, Baoquan

    2013-05-08

    Molecular chemistry offers a unique toolkit to draw inspiration for the design of artificial metamolecules. For a long time, optical circular dichroism has been exclusively the terrain of natural chiral molecules, which exhibit optical activity mainly in the UV spectral range, thus greatly hindering their significance for a broad range of applications. Here we demonstrate that circular dichroism can be generated with artificial plasmonic chiral nanostructures composed of the minimum number of spherical gold nanoparticles required for three-dimensional (3D) chirality. We utilize a rigid addressable DNA origami template to precisely organize four nominally identical gold nanoparticles into a three-dimensional asymmetric tetramer. Because of the chiral structural symmetry and the strong plasmonic resonant coupling between the gold nanoparticles, the 3D plasmonic assemblies undergo different interactions with left and right circularly polarized light, leading to pronounced circular dichroism. Our experimental results agree well with theoretical predictions. The simplicity of our structure geometry and, most importantly, the concept of resorting on biology to produce artificial photonic functionalities open a new pathway to designing smart artificial plasmonic nanostructures for large-scale production of optically active metamaterials.

  10. Interdependence of pyrene interactions and tetramolecular G4-DNA assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doluca, Osman; Withers, Jamie M; Loo, Trevor S; Edwards, Patrick J B; González, Carlos; Filichev, Vyacheslav V

    2015-03-28

    Controlling the arrangement of organic chromophores in supramolecular architectures is of primary importance for the development of novel functional molecules. Insertion of a twisted intercalating nucleic acid (TINA) moiety, containing phenylethynylpyren-1-yl derivatives, into a G-rich DNA sequence alters G-quadruplex folding, resulting in supramolecular structures with defined pyrene arrangements. Based on CD, NMR and ESI-mass-spectra, as well as TINA excited dimer (excimer) fluorescence emission we propose that insertion of the TINA monomer in the middle of a dTG4T sequence (i.e. dTGGXGGT, where X is TINA) converts a parallel tetramolecular G-quadruplex into an assembly composed of two identical antiparallel G-quadruplex subunits stacked via TINA-TINA interface. Kinetic analysis showed that TINA-TINA association controls complex formation in the presence of Na(+) but barely competes with guanine-mediated association in K(+) or in the sequence with the longer G-run (dTGGGXGGGT). These results demonstrate new perspectives in the design of molecular entities that can kinetically control G-quadruplex formation and show how tetramolecular G-quadruplexes can be used as a tuneable scaffold to control the arrangement of organic chromophores.

  11. Plasmonic photonic crystals realized through DNA-programmable assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Daniel J; Zhang, Chuan; Ku, Jessie C; Zhou, Yu; Schatz, George C; Mirkin, Chad A

    2015-01-27

    Three-dimensional dielectric photonic crystals have well-established enhanced light-matter interactions via high Q factors. Their plasmonic counterparts based on arrays of nanoparticles, however, have not been experimentally well explored owing to a lack of available synthetic routes for preparing them. However, such structures should facilitate these interactions based on the small mode volumes associated with plasmonic polarization. Herein we report strong light-plasmon interactions within 3D plasmonic photonic crystals that have lattice constants and nanoparticle diameters that can be independently controlled in the deep subwavelength size regime by using a DNA-programmable assembly technique. The strong coupling within such crystals is probed with backscattering spectra, and the mode splitting (0.10 and 0.24 eV) is defined based on dispersion diagrams. Numerical simulations predict that the crystal photonic modes (Fabry-Perot modes) can be enhanced by coating the crystals with a silver layer, achieving moderate Q factors (∼10(2)) over the visible and near-infrared spectrum.

  12. Proton-Fueled, Reversible DNA Hybridization Chain Assembly for pH Sensing and Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lan; Liu, Jin-Wen; Huang, Zhi-Mei; Wu, Han; Li, Na; Tang, Li-Juan; Jiang, Jian-Hui

    2017-07-05

    Design of DNA self-assembly with reversible responsiveness to external stimuli is of great interest for diverse applications. We for the first time develop a pH-responsive, fully reversible hybridization chain reaction (HCR) assembly that allows sensitive sensing and imaging of pH in living cells. Our design relies on the triplex forming sequences that form DNA triplex with toehold regions under acidic conditions and then induce a cascade of strand displacement and DNA assembly. The HCR assembly has shown dynamic responses in physiological pH ranges with excellent reversibility and demonstrated the potential for in vitro detection and live-cell imaging of pH. Moreover, this method affords HCR assemblies with highly localized fluorescence responses, offering advantages of improving sensitivity and better selectivity. The proton-fueled, reversible HCR assembly may provide a useful approach for pH-related cell biology study and disease diagnostics.

  13. Molecular Precision at Micrometer Length Scales: Hierarchical Assembly of DNA-Protein Nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffels, Daniel; Szalai, Veronika A; Liddle, J Alexander

    2017-07-25

    Robust self-assembly across length scales is a ubiquitous feature of biological systems but remains challenging for synthetic structures. Taking a cue from biology-where disparate molecules work together to produce large, functional assemblies-we demonstrate how to engineer microscale structures with nanoscale features: Our self-assembly approach begins by using DNA polymerase to controllably create double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) sections on a single-stranded template. The single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) sections are then folded into a mechanically flexible skeleton by the origami method. This process simultaneously shapes the structure at the nanoscale and directs the large-scale geometry. The DNA skeleton guides the assembly of RecA protein filaments, which provides rigidity at the micrometer scale. We use our modular design strategy to assemble tetrahedral, rectangular, and linear shapes of defined dimensions. This method enables the robust construction of complex assemblies, greatly extending the range of DNA-based self-assembly methods.

  14. Accurate DNA assembly and genome engineering with optimized uracil excision cloning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavaleiro, Mafalda; Kim, Se Hyeuk; Seppala, Susanna

    2015-01-01

    Simple and reliable DNA editing by uracil excision (a.k.a. USER cloning) has been described by several research groups, but the optimal design of cohesive DNA ends for multigene assembly remains elusive. Here, we use two model constructs based on expression of gfp and a four-gene pathway that pro......Simple and reliable DNA editing by uracil excision (a.k.a. USER cloning) has been described by several research groups, but the optimal design of cohesive DNA ends for multigene assembly remains elusive. Here, we use two model constructs based on expression of gfp and a four-gene pathway...... that produces β-carotene to optimize assembly junctions and the uracil excision protocol. By combining uracil excision cloning with a genomic integration technology, we demonstrate that up to six DNA fragments can be assembled in a one-tube reaction for direct genome integration with high accuracy, greatly...... facilitating the advanced engineering of robust cell factories....

  15. Assembly and melting of DNA nanotubes from single-sequence tiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobey, T L; Renner, S; Simmel, F C

    2009-01-01

    DNA melting and renaturation studies are an extremely valuable tool to study the kinetics and thermodynamics of duplex dissociation and reassociation reactions. These are important not only in a biological or biotechnological context, but also for DNA nanotechnology which aims at the construction of molecular materials by DNA self-assembly. We here study experimentally the formation and melting of a DNA nanotube structure, which is composed of many copies of an oligonucleotide containing several palindromic sequences. This is done using temperature-controlled UV absorption measurements correlated with atomic force microscopy, fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy techniques. In the melting studies, important factors such as DNA strand concentration, hierarchy of assembly and annealing protocol are investigated. Assembly and melting of the nanotubes are shown to proceed via different pathways. Whereas assembly occurs in several hierarchical steps related to the formation of tiles, lattices and tubes, melting of DNA nanotubes appears to occur in a single step. This is proposed to relate to fundamental differences between closed, three-dimensional tube-like structures and open, two-dimensional lattices. DNA melting studies can lead to a better understanding of the many factors that affect the assembly process which will be essential for the assembly of increasingly complex DNA nanostructures.

  16. Noncanonical self-assembly of multifunctional DNA nanoflowers for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guizhi; Hu, Rong; Zhao, Zilong; Chen, Zhuo; Zhang, Xiaobing; Tan, Weihong

    2013-11-06

    DNA nanotechnology has been extensively explored to assemble various functional nanostructures for versatile applications. Mediated by Watson-Crick base-pairing, these DNA nanostructures have been conventionally assembled through hybridization of many short DNA building blocks. Here we report the noncanonical self-assembly of multifunctional DNA nanostructures, termed as nanoflowers (NFs), and the versatile biomedical applications. These NFs were assembled from long DNA building blocks generated via rolling circle replication (RCR) of a designer template. NF assembly was driven by liquid crystallization and dense packaging of building blocks, without relying on Watson-Crick base-pairing between DNA strands, thereby avoiding the otherwise conventional complicated DNA sequence design. NF sizes were readily tunable in a wide range, by simply adjusting such parameters as assembly time and template sequences. NFs were exceptionally resistant to nuclease degradation, denaturation, or dissociation at extremely low concentration, presumably resulting from the dense DNA packaging in NFs. The exceptional biostability is critical for biomedical applications. By rational design, NFs can be readily incorporated with myriad functional moieties. All these properties make NFs promising for versatile applications. As a proof-of-principle demonstration, in this study, NFs were integrated with aptamers, bioimaging agents, and drug loading sites, and the resultant multifunctional NFs were demonstrated for selective cancer cell recognition, bioimaging, and targeted anticancer drug delivery.

  17. Cerium chloride stimulated controlled conversion of B-to-Z DNA in self-assembled nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhanjadeo, Madhabi M.; Nayak, Ashok K.; Subudhi, Umakanta

    2017-01-01

    DNA adopts different conformation not only because of novel base pairs but also while interacting with inorganic or organic compounds. Self-assembled branched DNA (bDNA) structures or DNA origami that change conformation in response to environmental cues hold great promises in sensing and actuation at the nanoscale. Recently, the B-Z transition in DNA is being explored to design various nanomechanical devices. In this communication we have demonstrated that Cerium chloride binds to the phosphate backbone of self-assembled bDNA structure and induce B-to-Z transition at physiological concentration. The mechanism of controlled conversion from right-handed to left-handed has been assayed by various dye binding studies using CD and fluorescence spectroscopy. Three different bDNA structures have been identified to display B-Z transition. This approach provides a rapid and reversible means to change bDNA conformation, which can be used for dynamic and progressive control at the nanoscale. - Highlights: • Cerium-induced B-to-Z DNA transition in self-assembled nanostructures. • Lower melting temperature of Z-DNA than B-DNA confirmed by CD spectroscopy. • Binding mechanism of cerium chloride is explained using fluorescence spectroscopy. • Right-handed to left-handed DNA conformation is also noticed in modified bDNA structure.

  18. Process development for automated solar cell and module production. Task 4. Automated array assembly. Quarterly report No. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagerty, J. J.

    1980-10-15

    Work has been divided into five phases. The first phase is to modify existing hardware and controlling computer software to: (1) improve cell-to-cell placement accuracy, (2) improve the solder joint while reducing the amount of solder and flux smear on the cell's surface, and (3) reduce the system cycle time to 10 seconds. The second phase involves expanding the existing system's capabilities to be able to reject broken cells and make post-solder electrical tests. Phase 3 involves developing new hardware to allow for the automated encapsulation of solar modules. This involves three discrete pieces of hardware: (1) a vacuum platen end effector for the robot which allows it to pick up the 1' x 4' array of 35 inter-connected cells. With this, it can also pick up the cover glass and completed module, (2) a lamination preparation station which cuts the various encapsulation components from roll storage and positions them for encapsulation, and (3) an automated encapsulation chamber which interfaces with the above two and applies the heat and vacuum to cure the encapsulants. Phase 4 involves the final assembly of the encapsulated array into a framed, edge-sealed module completed for installation. For this we are using MBA's Glass Reinforced Concrete (GRC) in panels such as those developed by MBA for JPL under contract No. 955281. The GRC panel plays the multiple role of edge frame, substrate and mounting structure. An automated method of applying the edge seal will also be developed. The final phase (5) is the fabrication of six 1' x 4' electrically active solar modules using the above developed equipment. Progress is reported. (WHK)

  19. Programmable DNA tile self-assembly using a hierarchical sub-tile strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaolong; Lu, Wei; Wang, Zhiyu; Pan, Linqiang; Cui, Guangzhao; Xu, Jin; LaBean, Thomas H

    2014-02-21

    DNA tile based self-assembly provides a bottom-up approach to construct desired nanostructures. DNA tiles have been directly constructed from ssDNA and readily self-assembled into 2D lattices and 3D superstructures. However, for more complex lattice designs including algorithmic assemblies requiring larger tile sets, a more modular approach could prove useful. This paper reports a new DNA 'sub-tile' strategy to easily create whole families of programmable tiles. Here, we demonstrate the stability and flexibility of our sub-tile structures by constructing 3-, 4- and 6-arm DNA tiles that are subsequently assembled into 2D lattices and 3D nanotubes according to a hierarchical design. Assembly of sub-tiles, tiles, and superstructures was analyzed using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and atomic force microscopy. DNA tile self-assembly methods provide a bottom-up approach to create desired nanostructures; the sub-tile strategy adds a useful new layer to this technique. Complex units can be made from simple parts. The sub-tile approach enables the rapid redesign and prototyping of complex DNA tile sets and tiles with asymmetric designs.

  20. Programmable DNA tile self-assembly using a hierarchical sub-tile strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Xiaolong; Lu, Wei; Wang, Zhiyu; Pan, Linqiang; Cui, Guangzhao; Xu, Jin; LaBean, Thomas H

    2014-01-01

    DNA tile based self-assembly provides a bottom-up approach to construct desired nanostructures. DNA tiles have been directly constructed from ssDNA and readily self-assembled into 2D lattices and 3D superstructures. However, for more complex lattice designs including algorithmic assemblies requiring larger tile sets, a more modular approach could prove useful. This paper reports a new DNA ‘sub-tile’ strategy to easily create whole families of programmable tiles. Here, we demonstrate the stability and flexibility of our sub-tile structures by constructing 3-, 4- and 6-arm DNA tiles that are subsequently assembled into 2D lattices and 3D nanotubes according to a hierarchical design. Assembly of sub-tiles, tiles, and superstructures was analyzed using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and atomic force microscopy. DNA tile self-assembly methods provide a bottom-up approach to create desired nanostructures; the sub-tile strategy adds a useful new layer to this technique. Complex units can be made from simple parts. The sub-tile approach enables the rapid redesign and prototyping of complex DNA tile sets and tiles with asymmetric designs. (paper)

  1. Programmed self-assembly of DNA/RNA for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pengfei

    Three self-assembly strategies were utilized for assembly of novel functional DNA/RNA nanostructures. RNA-DNA hybrid origami method was developed to fabricate nano-objects (ribbon, rectangle, and triangle) with precisely controlled geometry. Unlike conventional DNA origami which use long DNA single strand as scaffold, a long RNA single strand was used instead, which was folded by short DNA single strands (staples) into prescribed objects through sequence specific hybridization between RNA and DNA. Single stranded tiles (SST) and RNA-DNA hybrid origami were utilized to fabricate a variety of barcode-like nanostructures with unique patterns by expanding a plain rectangle via introducing spacers (10-bp dsDNA segment) between parallel duplexes. Finally, complex 2D array and 3D polyhedrons with multiple patterns within one structure were assembled from simple DNA motifs. Two demonstrations of biomedical applications of DNA nanotechnology were presented. Firstly, lambda-DNA was used as template to direct the fabrication of multi-component magnetic nanoparticle chains. Nuclear magnetic relaxation (NMR) characterization showed superb magnetic relaxativity of the nanoparticle chains which have large potential to be utilized as MRI contrast agents. Secondly, DNA nanotechnology was introduced into the conformational study of a routinely used catalytic DNAzyme, the RNA-cleaving 10-23 DNAzyme. The relative angle between two flanking duplexes of the catalytic core was determined (94.8°), which shall be able to provide a clue to further understanding of the cleaving mechanism of this DNAzyme from a conformational perspective.

  2. Binary self-assembly of highly symmetric DNA nanocages via sticky-end engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Rong Wu; Chen-Wei Wu; Fei Ding; Cheng Tian; Wen Jiang; Cheng-De Mao; Chuan Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Discrete and symmetric three-dimensional (3D) DNA nanocages have been revoked as excellent candidates for various applications,such as guest component encapsulation and organization (e.g.dye molecules,proteins,inorganic nanoparticles,etc.) to construct new materials and devices.To date,a large variety of DNA nanocages has been synthesized through assembling small individual DNA motifs into predesigned structures in a bottom-up fashion.Most of them rely on the assembly using multiple copies of single type of motifs and a few sophisticated nanostructures have been engineered by co-assembling multi-types of DNA tiles simultaneously.However,the availability of complex DNA nanocages is still limited.Herein,we demonstrate that highly symmetric DNA nanocages consisted of binary DNA pointstar motifs can be easily assembled by deliberately engineering the sticky-end interaction between the component building blocks.As such,DNA nanocages with new geometries,including elongated tetrahedron (E-TET),rhombic dodecahedron (R-DOD),and rhombic triacontahedron (R-TRI) are successfully synthesized.Moreover,their design principle,assembly process,and structural features are revealed by polyacryalmide gel electrophoresis (PAGE),atomic force microscope (AFM) imaging,and cryogenic transmission electron microscope imaging (cryo-TEM) associated with single particle reconstruction.

  3. Automated Glycan Assembly of Complex Oligosaccharides Related to Blood Group Determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahm, Heung Sik; Liang, Chien-Fu; Lai, Chian-Hui; Fair, Richard J; Schuhmacher, Frank; Seeberger, Peter H

    2016-07-15

    Lactotetraosyl (Lc4) and neo-lactotetraosyl (nLc4) are backbones that are common to many glycans. Using automated glycan assembly, these common core structures were constructed and elaborated to access synthetically challenging glycans of biological relevance. The incorporation of α-fucoses is demonstrated for H-type I and II; α(1,3)-galactose epitopes were prepared, and the pentasaccharide HNK-1 required incorporation of a 3-O-sulfate. In addition to preparing the target structures, essential insights were gained regarding the relationships of glycosylating agents and nucleophiles as well as the linker stability.

  4. DNA Assembly in 3D Printed Fluidics (Open Access, Publisher’s Version)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-30

    millifluidics to mix linear double stranded DNA with enzymes to assemble plasmids via Golden Gate biochemistry . The assembly reac- tions occurred at...used, a constitutively expressed yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) reporter, and a plasmid backbone containing an ampicillin selection marker ( AMP ) and...proof-of- principle that 3D printed devices can adequately mix the Golden Gate enzymes and DNA and that the Golden Gate biochemistry proceeds

  5. Protein dynamics during presynaptic complex assembly on individual ssDNA molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Gibb, Bryan; Ye, Ling F.; Kwon, YoungHo; Niu, Hengyao; Sung, Patrick; Greene, Eric C.

    2014-01-01

    Homologous recombination is a conserved pathway for repairing double?stranded breaks, which are processed to yield single?stranded DNA overhangs that serve as platforms for presynaptic complex assembly. Here we use single?molecule imaging to reveal the interplay between Saccharomyce cerevisiae RPA, Rad52, and Rad51 during presynaptic complex assembly. We show that Rad52 binds RPA?ssDNA and suppresses RPA turnover, highlighting an unanticipated regulatory influence on protein dynamics. Rad51 b...

  6. Assembly of presynaptic filaments. Factors affecting the assembly of RecA protein onto single-stranded DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thresher, RJ; Christiansen, Gunna; Griffith, JD

    1988-01-01

    We have previously shown that the assembly of RecA protein onto single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) facilitated by SSB protein occurs in three steps: (1) rapid binding of SSB protein to the ssDNA; (2) nucleation of RecA protein onto this template; and (3) co-operative polymerization of additional Rec......M in the presence of 12 mM-Mg2+), and relatively low concentrations of SSB protein (1 monomer per 18 nucleotides). Assembly was depressed threefold when SSB protein was added to one monomer per nine nucleotides. These effects appeared to be exerted at the nucleation step. Following nucleation, RecA protein...... assembled onto ssDNA at net rates that varied from 250 to 900 RecA protein monomers per minute, with the rate inversely related to the concentration of SSB protein. Combined sucrose sedimentation and electron microscope analysis established that SSB protein was displaced from the ssDNA during RecA protein...

  7. Fractal assembly of micrometre-scale DNA origami arrays with arbitrary patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhomirov, Grigory; Petersen, Philip; Qian, Lulu

    2017-12-01

    Self-assembled DNA nanostructures enable nanometre-precise patterning that can be used to create programmable molecular machines and arrays of functional materials. DNA origami is particularly versatile in this context because each DNA strand in the origami nanostructure occupies a unique position and can serve as a uniquely addressable pixel. However, the scale of such structures has been limited to about 0.05 square micrometres, hindering applications that demand a larger layout and integration with more conventional patterning methods. Hierarchical multistage assembly of simple sets of tiles can in principle overcome this limitation, but so far has not been sufficiently robust to enable successful implementation of larger structures using DNA origami tiles. Here we show that by using simple local assembly rules that are modified and applied recursively throughout a hierarchical, multistage assembly process, a small and constant set of unique DNA strands can be used to create DNA origami arrays of increasing size and with arbitrary patterns. We illustrate this method, which we term ‘fractal assembly’, by producing DNA origami arrays with sizes of up to 0.5 square micrometres and with up to 8,704 pixels, allowing us to render images such as the Mona Lisa and a rooster. We find that self-assembly of the tiles into arrays is unaffected by changes in surface patterns on the tiles, and that the yield of the fractal assembly process corresponds to about 0.95m - 1 for arrays containing m tiles. When used in conjunction with a software tool that we developed that converts an arbitrary pattern into DNA sequences and experimental protocols, our assembly method is readily accessible and will facilitate the construction of sophisticated materials and devices with sizes similar to that of a bacterium using DNA nanostructures.

  8. Automated genomic DNA purification options in agricultural applications using MagneSil paramagnetic particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitner, Rex M.; Koller, Susan C.

    2002-06-01

    The automated high throughput purification of genomic DNA form plant materials can be performed using MagneSil paramagnetic particles on the Beckman-Coulter FX, BioMek 2000, and the Tecan Genesis robot. Similar automated methods are available for DNA purifications from animal blood. These methods eliminate organic extractions, lengthy incubations and cumbersome filter plates. The DNA is suitable for applications such as PCR and RAPD analysis. Methods are described for processing traditionally difficult samples such as those containing large amounts of polyphenolics or oils, while still maintaining a high level of DNA purity. The robotic protocols have ben optimized for agricultural applications such as marker assisted breeding, seed-quality testing, and SNP discovery and scoring. In addition to high yield purification of DNA from plant samples or animal blood, the use of Promega's DNA-IQ purification system is also described. This method allows for the purification of a narrow range of DNA regardless of the amount of additional DNA that is present in the initial sample. This simultaneous Isolation and Quantification of DNA allows the DNA to be used directly in applications such as PCR, SNP analysis, and RAPD, without the need for separate quantitation of the DNA.

  9. Automated DNA extraction from genetically modified maize using aminosilane-modified bacterial magnetic particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Hiroyuki; Lim, Tae-Kyu; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Yoshino, Tomoko; Harada, Manabu; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2006-09-18

    A novel, automated system, PNE-1080, equipped with eight automated pestle units and a spectrophotometer was developed for genomic DNA extraction from maize using aminosilane-modified bacterial magnetic particles (BMPs). The use of aminosilane-modified BMPs allowed highly accurate DNA recovery. The (A(260)-A(320)):(A(280)-A(320)) ratio of the extracted DNA was 1.9+/-0.1. The DNA quality was sufficiently pure for PCR analysis. The PNE-1080 offered rapid assay completion (30 min) with high accuracy. Furthermore, the results of real-time PCR confirmed that our proposed method permitted the accurate determination of genetically modified DNA composition and correlated well with results obtained by conventional cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB)-based methods.

  10. AFEAP cloning: a precise and efficient method for large DNA sequence assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Fanli; Zang, Jinping; Zhang, Suhua; Hao, Zhimin; Dong, Jingao; Lin, Yibin

    2017-11-14

    Recent development of DNA assembly technologies has spurred myriad advances in synthetic biology, but new tools are always required for complicated scenarios. Here, we have developed an alternative DNA assembly method named AFEAP cloning (Assembly of Fragment Ends After PCR), which allows scarless, modular, and reliable construction of biological pathways and circuits from basic genetic parts. The AFEAP method requires two-round of PCRs followed by ligation of the sticky ends of DNA fragments. The first PCR yields linear DNA fragments and is followed by a second asymmetric (one primer) PCR and subsequent annealing that inserts overlapping overhangs at both sides of each DNA fragment. The overlapping overhangs of the neighboring DNA fragments annealed and the nick was sealed by T4 DNA ligase, followed by bacterial transformation to yield the desired plasmids. We characterized the capability and limitations of new developed AFEAP cloning and demonstrated its application to assemble DNA with varying scenarios. Under the optimized conditions, AFEAP cloning allows assembly of an 8 kb plasmid from 1-13 fragments with high accuracy (between 80 and 100%), and 8.0, 11.6, 19.6, 28, and 35.6 kb plasmids from five fragments at 91.67, 91.67, 88.33, 86.33, and 81.67% fidelity, respectively. AFEAP cloning also is capable to construct bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC, 200 kb) with a fidelity of 46.7%. AFEAP cloning provides a powerful, efficient, seamless, and sequence-independent DNA assembly tool for multiple fragments up to 13 and large DNA up to 200 kb that expands synthetic biologist's toolbox.

  11. Automated Array Assembly, Phase 2. Quarterly technical progress report, April-June 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carbajal, B.G.

    1979-07-01

    The Automated Array Assembly Task, Phase 2 of the Low Cost Solar Array (LSA) Project is a process development task. This contract provides for the fabrication of modules from large area Tandem Junction Cells (TJC). The key activities in this contract effort are (a) Large Area TJC including cell design, process verification and cell fabrication and (b) Tandem Junction Module (TJM) including definition of the cell-module interfaces, substrate fabrication, interconnect fabrication and module assembly. The overall goal is to advance solar cell module process technology to meet the 1986 goal of a production capability of 500 megawatts per year at a cost of less than $500 per peak kilowatt. This contract will focus on the Tandem Junction Module process. During this quarter, effort was focused on design and process verification. The large area TJC design was completed and the design verification was completed. Process variation experiments led to refinements in the baseline TJC process. Formed steel substrates were porcelainized. Cell array assembly techniques using infrared soldering are being checked out. Dummy cell arrays up to 5 cell by 5 cell have been assembled using all backside contacts.

  12. Evaluation of four automated protocols for extraction of DNA from FTA cards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stangegaard, Michael; Børsting, Claus; Ferrero-Miliani, Laura; Frank-Hansen, Rune; Poulsen, Lena; Hansen, Anders J; Morling, Niels

    2013-10-01

    Extraction of DNA using magnetic bead-based techniques on automated DNA extraction instruments provides a fast, reliable, and reproducible method for DNA extraction from various matrices. Here, we have compared the yield and quality of DNA extracted from FTA cards using four automated extraction protocols on three different instruments. The extraction processes were repeated up to six times with the same pieces of FTA cards. The sample material on the FTA cards was either blood or buccal cells. With the QIAamp DNA Investigator and QIAsymphony DNA Investigator kits, it was possible to extract DNA from the FTA cards in all six rounds of extractions in sufficient amount and quality to obtain complete short tandem repeat (STR) profiles on a QIAcube and a QIAsymphony SP. With the PrepFiler Express kit, almost all the extractable DNA was extracted in the first two rounds of extractions. Furthermore, we demonstrated that it was possible to successfully extract sufficient DNA for STR profiling from previously processed FTA card pieces that had been stored at 4 °C for up to 1 year. This showed that rare or precious FTA card samples may be saved for future analyses even though some DNA was already extracted from the FTA cards.

  13. Magnetic Actuation of Self-Assembled DNA Hinges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauback, S.; Mattioli, K.; Armstrong, M.; Miller, C.; Pease, C.; Castro, C.; Sooryakumar, R.

    DNA nanotechnology offers a broad range of applications spanning from the creation of nanoscale devices, motors and nanoparticle templates to the development of precise drug delivery systems. Central to advancing this technology is the ability to actuate or reconfigure structures in real time, which is currently achieved primarily by DNA strand displacement yielding slow actuation times (about 1-10min). Here we exploit superparamagnetic beads to magnetically actuate DNA structures which also provides a system to measure forces associated with molecular interactions. DNA nanodevices are folded using DNA origami, whereby a long single-stranded DNA is folded into a precise compact geometry using hundreds of short oligonucleotides. Our DNA nanodevice is a nanohinge from which rod shaped DNA nanostructures are polymerized into micron-scale filaments forming handles for actuation. By functionalizing one arm of the hinge and the filament ends, the hinge can be attached to a surface while still allowing an arm to rotate and the filaments can be labeled with magnetic beads enabling the hinge to be actuated almost instantaneously by external magnetic fields. These results lay the groundwork to establish real-time manipulation and direct force application of DNA constructs.

  14. DNA origami: a quantum leap for self-assembly of complex structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tørring, Thomas; Voigt, Niels Vinther; Nangreave, Jeanette

    2011-01-01

    The spatially controlled positioning of functional materials by self-assembly is one of the fundamental visions of nanotechnology. Major steps towards this goal have been achieved using DNA as a programmable building block. This tutorial review will focus on one of the most promising methods: DNA...... origami. The basic design principles, organization of a variety of functional materials and recent implementation of DNA robotics are discussed together with future challenges and opportunities....

  15. Lipid-bilayer-assisted two-dimensional self-assembly of DNA origami nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yuki; Endo, Masayuki; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    Self-assembly is a ubiquitous approach to the design and fabrication of novel supermolecular architectures. Here we report a strategy termed `lipid-bilayer-assisted self-assembly' that is used to assemble DNA origami nanostructures into two-dimensional lattices. DNA origami structures are electrostatically adsorbed onto a mica-supported zwitterionic lipid bilayer in the presence of divalent cations. We demonstrate that the bilayer-adsorbed origami units are mobile on the surface and self-assembled into large micrometre-sized lattices in their lateral dimensions. Using high-speed atomic force microscopy imaging, a variety of dynamic processes involved in the formation of the lattice, such as fusion, reorganization and defect filling, are successfully visualized. The surface modifiability of the assembled lattice is also demonstrated by in situ decoration with streptavidin molecules. Our approach provides a new strategy for preparing versatile scaffolds for nanofabrication and paves the way for organizing functional nanodevices in a micrometer space.

  16. Electrostatic assembly of CTAB-capped silver nanoparticles along predefined λ-DNA template

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Gang; Wang Li; Zhou Hualan; Liu Zhiguo; Song Yonghai; Li Zhuang

    2005-01-01

    Cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB)-capped positively-charged silver nanoparticles synthesized in water-ethanol system was electrostatic assembled on predefined aligned λ-DNA template. Silver nanowire can be obtained by changing the reaction time and the particles concentration. In our work, the length of the silver nanowire obtained is about 10 μm, and the dimension of the wires is about 20 nm. AFM data reveal that the assembly of CTAB-capped silver nanoparticles on DNA is ordered, but there is space between two particles absorbed on the DNA template. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was applied to characterize the linear silver clusters, which provides an additional proof that the silver particles were assembled onto DNA template with fine order

  17. Directed nucleation assembly of DNA tile complexes for barcode-patterned lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hao; Labean, Thomas H.; Feng, Liping; Reif, John H.

    2003-07-01

    The programmed self-assembly of patterned aperiodic molecular structures is a major challenge in nanotechnology and has numerous potential applications for nanofabrication of complex structures and useful devices. Here we report the construction of an aperiodic patterned DNA lattice (barcode lattice) by a self-assembly process of directed nucleation of DNA tiles around a scaffold DNA strand. The input DNA scaffold strand, constructed by ligation of shorter synthetic oligonucleotides, provides layers of the DNA lattice with barcode patterning information represented by the presence or absence of DNA hairpin loops protruding out of the lattice plane. Self-assembly of multiple DNA tiles around the scaffold strand was shown to result in a patterned lattice containing barcode information of 01101. We have also demonstrated the reprogramming of the system to another patterning. An inverted barcode pattern of 10010 was achieved by modifying the scaffold strands and one of the strands composing each tile. A ribbon lattice, consisting of repetitions of the barcode pattern with expected periodicity, was also constructed by the addition of sticky ends. The patterning of both classes of lattices was clearly observable via atomic force microscopy. These results represent a step toward implementation of a visual readout system capable of converting information encoded on a 1D DNA strand into a 2D form readable by advanced microscopic techniques. A functioning visual output method would not only increase the readout speed of DNA-based computers, but may also find use in other sequence identification techniques such as mutation or allele mapping.

  18. Total synthesis of TMG-chitotriomycin based on an automated electrochemical assembly of a disaccharide building block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isoda, Yuta; Sasaki, Norihiko; Kitamura, Kei; Takahashi, Shuji; Manmode, Sujit; Takeda-Okuda, Naoko; Tamura, Jun-Ichi; Nokami, Toshiki; Itoh, Toshiyuki

    2017-01-01

    The total synthesis of TMG-chitotriomycin using an automated electrochemical synthesizer for the assembly of carbohydrate building blocks is demonstrated. We have successfully prepared a precursor of TMG-chitotriomycin, which is a structurally-pure tetrasaccharide with typical protecting groups, through the methodology of automated electrochemical solution-phase synthesis developed by us. The synthesis of structurally well-defined TMG-chitotriomycin has been accomplished in 10-steps from a disaccharide building block.

  19. Total synthesis of TMG-chitotriomycin based on an automated electrochemical assembly of a disaccharide building block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuta Isoda

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The total synthesis of TMG-chitotriomycin using an automated electrochemical synthesizer for the assembly of carbohydrate building blocks is demonstrated. We have successfully prepared a precursor of TMG-chitotriomycin, which is a structurally-pure tetrasaccharide with typical protecting groups, through the methodology of automated electrochemical solution-phase synthesis developed by us. The synthesis of structurally well-defined TMG-chitotriomycin has been accomplished in 10-steps from a disaccharide building block.

  20. Self-Assembly of 3D DNA Crystals Containing a Torsionally Stressed Component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Carina; Birktoft, Jens J; Ohayon, Yoel P; Chandrasekaran, Arun Richard; Abdallah, Hatem; Sha, Ruojie; Stojanoff, Vivian; Mao, Chengde; Seeman, Nadrian C

    2017-11-16

    There is an increasing appreciation for structural diversity of DNA that is of interest to both DNA nanotechnology and basic biology. Here, we have explored how DNA responds to torsional stress by building on a previously reported two-turn DNA tensegrity triangle and demonstrating that we could introduce an extra nucleotide pair (np) into the original sequence without affecting assembly and crystallization. The extra np imposes a significant torsional stress, which is accommodated by global changes throughout the B-DNA duplex and the DNA lattice. The work reveals a near-atomic structure of naked DNA under a torsional stress of approximately 14%, and thus provides an example of DNA distortions that occur without a requirement for either an external energy source or the free energy available from protein or drug binding. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Automated extraction of DNA and PCR setup using a Tecan Freedom EVO® liquid handler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøslev, Tobias Guldberg; Hansen, Anders Johannes; Stangegaard, Michael

    2009-01-01

    We have implemented and validated automated protocols for DNA extraction and PCR setup using a Tecan Freedom EVO® liquid handler mounted with the TeMagS magnetic separation device. The methods were validated for accredited, forensic genetic work according to ISO 17025 using the Qiagen Mag...... genetic DNA typing can be implemented on a simple robot leading to the reduction of manual work as well as increased quality and throughput....

  2. Fast and automated DNA assays on a compact disc (CD)-based microfluidic platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Guangyao

    Nucleic acid-based molecular diagnostics offers enormous potential for the rapid and accurate diagnosis of infectious diseases. However, most of the existing commercial tests are time-consuming and technically complicated, and are thus incompatible with the need for rapid identification of infectious agents. We have successfully developed a CD-based microfluidic platform for fast and automated DNA array hybridization and a low cost, disposable plastic microfluidic platform for polymerase chain reaction (PCR). These platforms have proved to be a promising approach to meet the requirements in terms of detection speed and operational convenience in diagnosis of infectious diseases. In the CD-based microfluidic platform for DNA hybridization, convection is introduced to the system to enhance mass transport so as to accelerate the hybridization rate since DNA hybridization is a diffusion limited reaction. Centrifugal force is utilized for sample propulsion and surface force is used for liquid gating. Standard microscope glass slides are used as the substrates for capture probes owing to their compatibility with commercially available instrumentation (e.g. laser scanners) for detection. Microfabricated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) structures are used to accomplish the fluidic functions required by the protocols for DNA hybridization. The assembly of the PDMS structure and the glass slide forms a flow-through hybridization unit that can be accommodated onto the CD platform for reagent manipulation. The above scheme has been validated with oligonucleotides as the targets using commercially available enzyme-labeled fluorescence (ELF 97) for detection of the hybridization events, and tested with amplicons of genomic staphylococcus DNA labeled with Cy dye. In both experiments, significantly higher fluorescence intensities were observed in the flow-through hybridization unit compared to the passive assays. The CD fluidic scheme was also adapted to the immobilization of

  3. Protein adsorption and biomimetic mineralization behaviors of PLL-DNA multilayered films assembled onto titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao Wenli [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Feng Bo, E-mail: fengbo@swjtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Ni Yuxiang [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Yang Yongli [College of Material Science and Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610054 (China); Lu Xiong; Weng Jie [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China)

    2010-11-01

    Titanium and its alloys are frequently used as surgical implants in load bearing situations, such as hip prostheses and dental implants, owing to their biocompatibility, mechanical and physical properties. In this paper, a layer-by-layer (LBL) self-assembly technique, based on the polyelectrolyte-mediated electrostatic adsorption of poly-L-lysine (PLL) and DNA, was used to the formation of multilayer on titanium surfaces. Then bovine serum albumin (BSA) adsorption and biomimetic mineralization of modified surfaces were studied. The chemical composition and wettability of assembled substrates were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), fluorescence microscopy and water contact angle measurement, respectively. The XPS analysis indicated that the layers were assembled successfully through electrostatic attractions. The measurement with ultraviolet (UV) spectrophotometer revealed that the LBL films enhanced ability of BSA adsorption onto titanium. The adsorption quantity of BSA on the surface terminated with PLL was higher than that of the surface terminated with DNA, and the samples of TiOH/P/D/P absorbed BSA most. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed that samples of assembled PLL or/and DNA had better bioactivity in inducing HA formation. Thus the assembling of PLL and DNA onto the surface of titanium in turn via a layer-by-layer self-assembly technology can improve the bioactivity of titanium.

  4. Coupling mechanisms between nucleosome assembly and the cellular response to DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lautrette, Aurelie

    2006-01-01

    Cells are continuously exposed to genotoxic stresses that induce a variety of DNA lesions. To protect their genome, cells have specific pathways that orchestrate the detection, signaling and repair of DNA damages. This work is dedicated to the characterization of such pathways that couple the DNA damage response to the assembly of chromatin, a complex that protects and regulates DNA accessibility. We have focused our study on two multifunctional proteins: Rad53, a central checkpoint kinase in the cellular response to DNA damage and Asf1, a histone chaperone involved in chromatin assembly. We have characterized in vitro the binding mode of Asf1 with Rad53 and Asfl with histones. This study is associated with the functional analysis of the role of these interactions in vivo in yeast cells. (author) [fr

  5. An efficient enzyme-powered micromotor device fabricated by cyclic alternate hybridization assembly for DNA detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Shizhe; Zhang, Xueqing; Xie, Yuzhe; Wu, Jie; Ju, Huangxian

    2017-07-06

    An efficient enzyme-powered micromotor device was fabricated by assembling multiple layers of catalase on the inner surface of a poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene and sodium 4-styrenesulfonate)/Au microtube (PEDOT-PSS/Au). The catalase assembly was achieved by programmed DNA hybridization, which was performed by immobilizing a designed sandwich DNA structure as the sensing unit on the PEDOT-PSS/Au, and then alternately hybridizing with two assisting DNA to bind the enzyme for efficient motor motion. The micromotor device showed unique features of good reproducibility, stability and motion performance. Under optimal conditions, it showed a speed of 420 μm s -1 in 2% H 2 O 2 and even 51 μm s -1 in 0.25% H 2 O 2 . In the presence of target DNA, the sensing unit hybridized with target DNA to release the multi-layer DNA as well as the multi-catalase, resulting in a decrease of the motion speed. By using the speed as a signal, the micromotor device could detect DNA from 10 nM to 1 μM. The proposed micromotor device along with the cyclic alternate DNA hybridization assembly technique provided a new path to fabricate efficient and versatile micromotors, which would be an exceptional tool for rapid and simple detection of biomolecules.

  6. Long-range energy transfer in self-assembled quantum dot-DNA cascades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Samuel M.; Siu, Albert; Singh, Vivek; Nagpal, Prashant

    2015-11-01

    The size-dependent energy bandgaps of semiconductor nanocrystals or quantum dots (QDs) can be utilized in converting broadband incident radiation efficiently into electric current by cascade energy transfer (ET) between layers of different sized quantum dots, followed by charge dissociation and transport in the bottom layer. Self-assembling such cascade structures with angstrom-scale spatial precision is important for building realistic devices, and DNA-based QD self-assembly can provide an important alternative. Here we show long-range Dexter energy transfer in QD-DNA self-assembled single constructs and ensemble devices. Using photoluminescence, scanning tunneling spectroscopy, current-sensing AFM measurements in single QD-DNA cascade constructs, and temperature-dependent ensemble devices using TiO2 nanotubes, we show that Dexter energy transfer, likely mediated by the exciton-shelves formed in these QD-DNA self-assembled structures, can be used for efficient transport of energy across QD-DNA thin films.The size-dependent energy bandgaps of semiconductor nanocrystals or quantum dots (QDs) can be utilized in converting broadband incident radiation efficiently into electric current by cascade energy transfer (ET) between layers of different sized quantum dots, followed by charge dissociation and transport in the bottom layer. Self-assembling such cascade structures with angstrom-scale spatial precision is important for building realistic devices, and DNA-based QD self-assembly can provide an important alternative. Here we show long-range Dexter energy transfer in QD-DNA self-assembled single constructs and ensemble devices. Using photoluminescence, scanning tunneling spectroscopy, current-sensing AFM measurements in single QD-DNA cascade constructs, and temperature-dependent ensemble devices using TiO2 nanotubes, we show that Dexter energy transfer, likely mediated by the exciton-shelves formed in these QD-DNA self-assembled structures, can be used for efficient

  7. DNA mediated assembly of lipid particles and uses therefor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    The present invention relates to detection of target nucleic acids by targetnucleic acid induced liposome assembly. The invention provides oligonucleotides for use in detection and a method of detecting target nucleic acids.Other aspects of the invention are use of the oligonucleotide of the inve...

  8. Understanding the role of thiol and disulfide self-assembled DNA receptor monolayers for biosensing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrascosa, Laura G; Martínez, Lidia; Huttel, Yves; Román, Elisa; Lechuga, Laura M

    2010-09-01

    A detailed study of the immobilization of three differently sulfur-modified DNA receptors for biosensing applications is presented. The three receptors are DNA-(CH)n-SH-, DNA-(CH)n-SS-(CH)n-DNA, and DNA-(CH)n-SS-DMTO. Nanomechanical and surface plasmon resonance biosensors and fluorescence and radiolabelling techniques were used for the experimental evaluation. The results highlight the critical role of sulfur linker type in DNA self-assembly, affecting the kinetic adsorption and spatial distribution of DNA chains within the monolayer and the extent of chemisorption and physisorption. A spacer (mercaptohexanol, MCH) is used to evaluate the relative efficiencies of chemisorption of the three receptors by analysing the extent to which MCH can remove physisorbed molecules from each type of monolayer. It is demonstrated that -SH derivatization is the most suitable for biosensing purposes as it results in densely packed monolayers with the lowest ratio of physisorbed probes.

  9. GenePublisher: automated analysis of DNA microarray data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Steen; Workman, Christopher; Sicheritz-Ponten, T.

    2003-01-01

    GenePublisher, a system for automatic analysis of data from DNA microarray experiments, has been implemented with a web interface at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/GenePublisher. Raw data are uploaded to the server together with aspecification of the data. The server performs normalization...

  10. Gold-nanoparticle-mediated jigsaw-puzzle-like assembly of supersized plasmonic DNA origami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Guangbao; Li, Jiang; Chao, Jie; Pei, Hao; Liu, Huajie; Zhao, Yun; Shi, Jiye; Huang, Qing; Wang, Lianhui; Huang, Wei; Fan, Chunhai

    2015-03-02

    DNA origami has rapidly emerged as a powerful and programmable method to construct functional nanostructures. However, the size limitation of approximately 100 nm in classic DNA origami hampers its plasmonic applications. Herein, we report a jigsaw-puzzle-like assembly strategy mediated by gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to break the size limitation of DNA origami. We demonstrated that oligonucleotide-functionalized AuNPs function as universal joint units for the one-pot assembly of parent DNA origami of triangular shape to form sub-microscale super-origami nanostructures. AuNPs anchored at predefined positions of the super-origami exhibited strong interparticle plasmonic coupling. This AuNP-mediated strategy offers new opportunities to drive macroscopic self-assembly and to fabricate well-defined nanophotonic materials and devices. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Self-Assembly of Hierarchical DNA Nanotube Architectures with Well-Defined Geometries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgenson, Tyler D; Mohammed, Abdul M; Agrawal, Deepak K; Schulman, Rebecca

    2017-02-28

    An essential motif for the assembly of biological materials such as actin at the scale of hundreds of nanometers and beyond is a network of one-dimensional fibers with well-defined geometry. Here, we demonstrate the programmed organization of DNA filaments into micron-scale architectures where component filaments are oriented at preprogrammed angles. We assemble L-, T-, and Y-shaped DNA origami junctions that nucleate two or three micron length DNA nanotubes at high yields. The angles between the nanotubes mirror the angles between the templates on the junctions, demonstrating that nanoscale structures can control precisely how micron-scale architectures form. The ability to precisely program filament orientation could allow the assembly of complex filament architectures in two and three dimensions, including circuit structures, bundles, and extended materials.

  12. Photochemical-chemiluminometric determination of aldicarb in a fully automated multicommutation based flow-assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palomeque, M.; Garcia Bautista, J.A.; Catala Icardo, M.; Garcia Mateo, J.V.; Martinez Calatayud, J.

    2004-01-01

    A sensitive and fully automated method for determination of aldicarb in technical formulations (Temik) and mineral waters is proposed. The automation of the flow-assembly is based on the multicommutation approach, which uses a set of solenoid valves acting as independent switchers. The operating cycle for obtaining a typical analytical transient signal can be easily programmed by means of a home-made software running in the Windows environment. The manifold is provided with a photoreactor consisting of a 150 cm long x 0.8 mm i.d. piece of PTFE tubing coiled around a 20 W low-pressure mercury lamp. The determination of aldicarb is performed on the basis of the iron(III) catalytic mineralization of the pesticide by UV irradiation (150 s), and the chemiluminescent (CL) behavior of the photodegradated pesticide in presence of potassium permanganate and quinine sulphate as sensitizer. UV irradiation of aldicarb turns the very week chemiluminescent pesticide into a strongly chemiluminescent photoproduct. The method is linear over the range 2.2-100.0 μg l -1 of aldicarb; the limit of detection is 0.069 μg l -1 ; the reproducibility (as the R.S.D. of 20 peaks of a 24 μg l -1 solution) is 3.7% and the sample throughput is 17 h -1

  13. 75 FR 3253 - Lamb Assembly and Test, LLC, Subsidiary of Mag Industrial Automation Systems, Machesney Park, IL...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-20

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-70,516] Lamb Assembly and Test, LLC, Subsidiary of Mag Industrial Automation Systems, Machesney Park, IL; Notice of Negative... workers of Lamb Technicon, a division of Unova, Warren, Michigan and Lake Orion, Michigan were previously...

  14. Comparison of Integer Programming (IP) Solvers for Automated Test Assembly (ATA). Research Report. ETS RR-15-05

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoghue, John R.

    2015-01-01

    At the heart of van der Linden's approach to automated test assembly (ATA) is a linear programming/integer programming (LP/IP) problem. A variety of IP solvers are available, ranging in cost from free to hundreds of thousands of dollars. In this paper, I compare several approaches to solving the underlying IP problem. These approaches range from…

  15. Optimizing DNA assembly based on statistical language modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Gang; Zhang, Shemin; Dong, Yafei

    2017-12-15

    By successively assembling genetic parts such as BioBrick according to grammatical models, complex genetic constructs composed of dozens of functional blocks can be built. However, usually every category of genetic parts includes a few or many parts. With increasing quantity of genetic parts, the process of assembling more than a few sets of these parts can be expensive, time consuming and error prone. At the last step of assembling it is somewhat difficult to decide which part should be selected. Based on statistical language model, which is a probability distribution P(s) over strings S that attempts to reflect how frequently a string S occurs as a sentence, the most commonly used parts will be selected. Then, a dynamic programming algorithm was designed to figure out the solution of maximum probability. The algorithm optimizes the results of a genetic design based on a grammatical model and finds an optimal solution. In this way, redundant operations can be reduced and the time and cost required for conducting biological experiments can be minimized. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. Understanding the Elementary Steps in DNA Tile-Based Self-Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shuoxing; Hong, Fan; Hu, Huiyu; Yan, Hao; Liu, Yan

    2017-09-26

    Although many models have been developed to guide the design and implementation of DNA tile-based self-assembly systems with increasing complexity, the fundamental assumptions of the models have not been thoroughly tested. To expand the quantitative understanding of DNA tile-based self-assembly and to test the fundamental assumptions of self-assembly models, we investigated DNA tile attachment to preformed "multi-tile" arrays in real time and obtained the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of single tile attachment in various sticky end association scenarios. With more sticky ends, tile attachment becomes more thermostable with an approximately linear decrease in the free energy change (more negative). The total binding free energy of sticky ends is partially compromised by a sequence-independent energy penalty when tile attachment forms a constrained configuration: "loop". The minimal loop is a 2 × 2 tetramer (Loop4). The energy penalty of loops of 4, 6, and 8 tiles was analyzed with the independent loop model assuming no interloop tension, which is generalizable to arbitrary tile configurations. More sticky ends also contribute to a faster on-rate under isothermal conditions when nucleation is the rate-limiting step. Incorrect sticky end contributes to neither the thermostability nor the kinetics. The thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of DNA tile attachment elucidated here will contribute to the future improvement and optimization of tile assembly modeling, precise control of experimental conditions, and structural design for error-free self-assembly.

  17. Stepwise Assembly and Characterization of DNA Linked Two-Color Quantum Dot Clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coopersmith, Kaitlin; Han, Hyunjoo; Maye, Mathew M

    2015-07-14

    The DNA-mediated self-assembly of multicolor quantum dot (QD) clusters via a stepwise approach is described. The CdSe/ZnS QDs were synthesized and functionalized with an amphiphilic copolymer, followed by ssDNA conjugation. At each functionalization step, the QDs were purified via gradient ultracentrifugation, which was found to remove excess polymer and QD aggregates, allowing for improved conjugation yields and assembly reactivity. The QDs were then assembled and disassembled in a stepwise manner at a ssDNA functionalized magnetic colloid, which provided a convenient way to remove unreacted QDs and ssDNA impurities. After assembly/disassembly, the clusters' optical characteristics were studied by fluorescence spectroscopy and the assembly morphology and stoichiometry was imaged via electron microscopy. The results indicate that a significant amount of QD-to-QD energy transfer occurred in the clusters, which was studied as a function of increasing acceptor-to-donor ratios, resulting in increased QD acceptor emission intensities compared to controls.

  18. Assembly of Slx4 signaling complexes behind DNA replication forks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balint, Attila; Kim, TaeHyung; Gallo, David; Cussiol, Jose Renato; Bastos de Oliveira, Francisco M; Yimit, Askar; Ou, Jiongwen; Nakato, Ryuichiro; Gurevich, Alexey; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Smolka, Marcus B; Zhang, Zhaolei; Brown, Grant W

    2015-08-13

    Obstructions to replication fork progression, referred to collectively as DNA replication stress, challenge genome stability. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cells lacking RTT107 or SLX4 show genome instability and sensitivity to DNA replication stress and are defective in the completion of DNA replication during recovery from replication stress. We demonstrate that Slx4 is recruited to chromatin behind stressed replication forks, in a region that is spatially distinct from that occupied by the replication machinery. Slx4 complex formation is nucleated by Mec1 phosphorylation of histone H2A, which is recognized by the constitutive Slx4 binding partner Rtt107. Slx4 is essential for recruiting the Mec1 activator Dpb11 behind stressed replication forks, and Slx4 complexes are important for full activity of Mec1. We propose that Slx4 complexes promote robust checkpoint signaling by Mec1 by stably recruiting Dpb11 within a discrete domain behind the replication fork, during DNA replication stress. © 2015 The Authors.

  19. Self-assembly of multiferroic core-shell particulate nanocomposites through DNA-DNA hybridization and magnetic field directed assembly of superstructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sreenivasulu, Gollapudi; Srinivasan, Gopalan, E-mail: srinivas@oakland.edu, E-mail: chavez@oakland.edu [Department of Physics, Oakland University, Rochester, MI 48309-4401 (United States); Lochbiler, Thomas A.; Panda, Manashi; Chavez, Ferman A., E-mail: srinivas@oakland.edu, E-mail: chavez@oakland.edu [Department of Chemistry, Oakland University, Rochester, MI 48309-4401 (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Multiferroic composites of ferromagnetic and ferroelectric phases are of importance for studies on mechanical strain mediated coupling between the magnetic and electric subsystems. This work is on DNA-assisted self-assembly of superstructures of such composites with nanometer periodicity. The synthesis involved oligomeric DNA-functionalized ferroelectric and ferromagnetic nanoparticles, 600 nm BaTiO{sub 3} (BTO) and 200 nm NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (NFO), respectively. Mixing BTO and NFO particles, possessing complementary DNA sequences, resulted in the formation of ordered core-shell heteronanocomposites held together by DNA hybridization. The composites were imaged by scanning electron microscopy and scanning microwave microscopy. The presence of heteroassemblies along with core-shell architecture is clearly observed. The reversible nature of the DNA hybridization allows for restructuring the composites into mm-long linear chains and 2D-arrays in the presence of a static magnetic field and ring-like structures in a rotating-magnetic field. Strong magneto-electric (ME) coupling in as-assembled composites is evident from static magnetic field H induced polarization and low-frequency magnetoelectric voltage coefficient measurements. Upon annealing the nanocomposites at high temperatures, evidence for the formation of bulk composites with excellent cross-coupling between the electric and magnetic subsystems is obtained by H-induced polarization and low-frequency ME voltage coefficient. The ME coupling strength in the self-assembled composites is measured to be much stronger than in bulk composites with randomly distributed NFO and BTO prepared by direct mixing and sintering.

  20. Photoligation of self-assembled DNA constructs containing anthracene-functionalized 2'-amino-LNA monomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pasternak, Karol; Pasternak, Anna; Gupta, Pankaj

    2011-01-01

    Efficient synthesis of a novel anthracene-functionalized 2'-amino-LNA phosphoramidite derivative is described together with its incorporation into oligodeoxynucleotides. Two DNA strands with the novel 2'-N-anthracenylmethyl-2'-amino-LNA monomers can be effectively cross-linked by photoligation...... at 366nm in various types of DNA constructs. Successful application of three differently functionalized 2'-amino-LNA monomers in self-assembled higher ordered structures for simultaneous cross-linking and monitoring of assembly formation is furthermore demonstrated....

  1. Automated glycan assembly of a S. pneumoniae serotype 3 CPS antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus W. Weishaupt

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Vaccines against S. pneumoniae, one of the most prevalent bacterial infections causing severe disease, rely on isolated capsular polysaccharide (CPS that are conjugated to proteins. Such isolates contain a heterogeneous oligosaccharide mixture of different chain lengths and frame shifts. Access to defined synthetic S. pneumoniae CPS structures is desirable. Known syntheses of S. pneumoniae serotype 3 CPS rely on a time-consuming and low-yielding late-stage oxidation step, or use disaccharide building blocks which limits variability. Herein, we report the first iterative automated glycan assembly (AGA of a conjugation-ready S. pneumoniae serotype 3 CPS trisaccharide. This oligosaccharide was assembled using a novel glucuronic acid building block to circumvent the need for a late-stage oxidation. The introduction of a washing step with the activator prior to each glycosylation cycle greatly increased the yields by neutralizing any residual base from deprotection steps in the synthetic cycle. This process improvement is applicable to AGA of many other oligosaccharides.

  2. Rnnotator: an automated de novo transcriptome assembly pipeline from stranded RNA-Seq reads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Jeffrey; Bruno, Vincent M.; Fang, Zhide; Meng, Xiandong; Blow, Matthew; Zhang, Tao; Sherlock, Gavin; Snyder, Michael; Wang, Zhong

    2010-11-19

    Background: Comprehensive annotation and quantification of transcriptomes are outstanding problems in functional genomics. While high throughput mRNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) has emerged as a powerful tool for addressing these problems, its success is dependent upon the availability and quality of reference genome sequences, thus limiting the organisms to which it can be applied. Results: Here, we describe Rnnotator, an automated software pipeline that generates transcript models by de novo assembly of RNA-Seq data without the need for a reference genome. We have applied the Rnnotator assembly pipeline to two yeast transcriptomes and compared the results to the reference gene catalogs of these organisms. The contigs produced by Rnnotator are highly accurate (95percent) and reconstruct full-length genes for the majority of the existing gene models (54.3percent). Furthermore, our analyses revealed many novel transcribed regions that are absent from well annotated genomes, suggesting Rnnotator serves as a complementary approach to analysis based on a reference genome for comprehensive transcriptomics. Conclusions: These results demonstrate that the Rnnotator pipeline is able to reconstruct full-length transcripts in the absence of a complete reference genome.

  3. Self-Assembly of DNA-Coated Particles: Experiment, Simulation and Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Minseok

    The bottom-up assembly of material architectures with tunable complexity, function, composition, and structure is a long sought goal in rational materials design. One promising approach aims to harnesses the programmability and specificity of DNA hybridization in order to direct the assembly of oligonucleotide-functionalized nano- and micro-particles by tailoring, in part, interparticle interactions. DNA-programmable assembly into three-dimensionally ordered structures has attracted extensive research interest owing to emergent applications in photonics, plasmonics and catalysis and potentially many other areas. Progress on the rational design of DNA-mediated interactions to create useful two-dimensional structures (e.g., structured films), on the other hand, has been rather slow. In this thesis, we establish strategies to engineer a diversity of 2D crystalline arrangements by designing and exploiting DNA-programmable interparticle interactions. We employ a combination of simulation, theory and experiments to predict and confirm accessibility of 2D structural diversity in an effort to establish a rational approach to 2D DNA-mediated particle assembly. We start with the experimental realization of 2D DNA-mediated assembly by decorating micron-sized silica particles with covalently attached single-stranded DNA through a two-step reaction. Subsequently, we elucidate sensitivity and ultimate controllability of DNA-mediated assembly---specifically the melting transition from dispersed singlet particles to aggregated or assembled structures---through control of the concentration of commonly employed nonionic surfactants. We relate the observed tunability to an apparent coupling with the critical micelle temperature in these systems. Also, both square and hexagonal 2D ordered particle arrangements are shown to evolve from disordered aggregates under appropriate annealing conditions defined based upon pre-established melting profiles. Subsequently, the controlled mixing of

  4. Submicrometre geometrically encoded fluorescent barcodes self-assembled from DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chenxiang; Jungmann, Ralf; Leifer, Andrew M.; Li, Chao; Levner, Daniel; Church, George M.; Shih, William M.; Yin, Peng

    2012-10-01

    The identification and differentiation of a large number of distinct molecular species with high temporal and spatial resolution is a major challenge in biomedical science. Fluorescence microscopy is a powerful tool, but its multiplexing ability is limited by the number of spectrally distinguishable fluorophores. Here, we used (deoxy)ribonucleic acid (DNA)-origami technology to construct submicrometre nanorods that act as fluorescent barcodes. We demonstrate that spatial control over the positioning of fluorophores on the surface of a stiff DNA nanorod can produce 216 distinct barcodes that can be decoded unambiguously using epifluorescence or total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. Barcodes with higher spatial information density were demonstrated via the construction of super-resolution barcodes with features spaced by ˜40 nm. One species of the barcodes was used to tag yeast surface receptors, which suggests their potential applications as in situ imaging probes for diverse biomolecular and cellular entities in their native environments.

  5. Dynamic protein assembly by programmable DNA strand displacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rebecca P.; Blackstock, Daniel; Sun, Qing; Chen, Wilfred

    2018-03-01

    Inspired by the remarkable ability of natural protein switches to sense and respond to a wide range of environmental queues, here we report a strategy to engineer synthetic protein switches by using DNA strand displacement to dynamically organize proteins with highly diverse and complex logic gate architectures. We show that DNA strand displacement can be used to dynamically control the spatial proximity and the corresponding fluorescence resonance energy transfer between two fluorescent proteins. Performing Boolean logic operations enabled the explicit control of protein proximity using multi-input, reversible and amplification architectures. We further demonstrate the power of this technology beyond sensing by achieving dynamic control of an enzyme cascade. Finally, we establish the utility of the approach as a synthetic computing platform that drives the dynamic reconstitution of a split enzyme for targeted prodrug activation based on the sensing of cancer-specific miRNAs.

  6. An automated microfluidic DNA microarray platform for genetic variant detection in inherited arrhythmic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shu-Hong; Chang, Yu-Shin; Juang, Jyh-Ming Jimmy; Chang, Kai-Wei; Tsai, Mong-Hsun; Lu, Tzu-Pin; Lai, Liang-Chuan; Chuang, Eric Y; Huang, Nien-Tsu

    2018-03-12

    In this study, we developed an automated microfluidic DNA microarray (AMDM) platform for point mutation detection of genetic variants in inherited arrhythmic diseases. The platform allows for automated and programmable reagent sequencing under precise conditions of hybridization flow and temperature control. It is composed of a commercial microfluidic control system, a microfluidic microarray device, and a temperature control unit. The automated and rapid hybridization process can be performed in the AMDM platform using Cy3 labeled oligonucleotide exons of SCN5A genetic DNA, which produces proteins associated with sodium channels abundant in the heart (cardiac) muscle cells. We then introduce a graphene oxide (GO)-assisted DNA microarray hybridization protocol to enable point mutation detection. In this protocol, a GO solution is added after the staining step to quench dyes bound to single-stranded DNA or non-perfectly matched DNA, which can improve point mutation specificity. As proof-of-concept we extracted the wild-type and mutant of exon 12 and exon 17 of SCN5A genetic DNA from patients with long QT syndrome or Brugada syndrome by touchdown PCR and performed a successful point mutation discrimination in the AMDM platform. Overall, the AMDM platform can greatly reduce laborious and time-consuming hybridization steps and prevent potential contamination. Furthermore, by introducing the reciprocating flow into the microchannel during the hybridization process, the total assay time can be reduced to 3 hours, which is 6 times faster than the conventional DNA microarray. Given the automatic assay operation, shorter assay time, and high point mutation discrimination, we believe that the AMDM platform has potential for low-cost, rapid and sensitive genetic testing in a simple and user-friendly manner, which may benefit gene screening in medical practice.

  7. DNA index determination with Automated Cellular Imaging System (ACIS in Barrett's esophagus: Comparison with CAS 200

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klein Michael

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For solid tumors, image cytometry has been shown to be more sensitive for diagnosing DNA content abnormalities (aneuploidy than flow cytometry. Image cytometry has often been performed using the semi-automated CAS 200 system. Recently, an Automated Cellular Imaging System (ACIS was introduced to determine DNA content (DNA index, but it has not been validated. Methods Using the CAS 200 system and ACIS, we compared the DNA index (DI obtained from the same archived formalin-fixed and paraffin embedded tissue samples from Barrett's esophagus related lesions, including samples with specialized intestinal metaplasia without dysplasia, low-grade dysplasia, high-grade dysplasia and adenocarcinoma. Results Although there was a very good correlation between the DI values determined by ACIS and CAS 200, the former was 25% more sensitive in detecting aneuploidy. ACIS yielded a mean DI value 18% higher than that obtained by CAS 200 (p t test. In addition, the average time required to perform a DNA ploidy analysis was shorter with the ACIS (30–40 min than with the CAS 200 (40–70 min. Results obtained by ACIS gave excellent inter-and intra-observer variability (coefficient of correlation >0.9 for both, p Conclusion Compared with the CAS 200, the ACIS is a more sensitive and less time consuming technique for determining DNA ploidy. Results obtained by ACIS are also highly reproducible.

  8. Speeding up the self-assembly of a DNA nanodevice using a variety of polar solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Di; Duan, Ruixue; Tan, Yerpeng; Hong, Fan; Wang, Boya; Chen, Zhifei; Xu, Shaofang; Lou, Xiaoding; Wei, Wei; Yurke, Bernard; Xia, Fan

    2014-11-01

    The specific recognition and programmable assembly properties make DNA a potential material for nanodevices. However, the more intelligent the nanodevice is, the more complicated the structure of the nanodevice is, which limits the speed of DNA assembly. Herein, to address this problem, we investigate the performance of DNA Strand Displacement Reaction (DSDR) in a mixture of polar organic solvents and aqueous buffer and demonstrate that the organic polar solvent can speed up DNA self-assembly efficiently. Taking DSDR in 20% ethanol as an example, first we have demonstrated that the DSDR is highly accelerated in the beginning of the reaction and it can complete 60% of replacement reactions (160% enhancement compared with aqueous buffer) in the first 300 seconds. Secondly, we calculated that the ΔΔG of the DSDR in 20% ethanol (-18.2 kcal mol-1) is lower than that in pure aqueous buffer (-32.6 kcal mol-1), while the activation energy is lowered by introducing ethanol. Finally, we proved that the DSDR on the electrode surface can also be accelerated using this simple strategy. More importantly, to test the efficacy of this approach in nanodevices with a complicated and slow DNA self-assembly process, we apply this strategy in the hybridization chain reaction (HCR) and prove the acceleration is fairly obvious in 20% ethanol, which demonstrates the feasibility of the proposed strategy in DNA nanotechnology and DNA-based biosensors.The specific recognition and programmable assembly properties make DNA a potential material for nanodevices. However, the more intelligent the nanodevice is, the more complicated the structure of the nanodevice is, which limits the speed of DNA assembly. Herein, to address this problem, we investigate the performance of DNA Strand Displacement Reaction (DSDR) in a mixture of polar organic solvents and aqueous buffer and demonstrate that the organic polar solvent can speed up DNA self-assembly efficiently. Taking DSDR in 20% ethanol as an

  9. Selective DNA-Mediated Assembly of Gold Nanoparticles on Electroded Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    might use the Watson - Crick base-pairing of DNA as a means for ultrahigh-precision engineering is well- known.5,6 The idea is to use the highly specific...Selective DNA -Mediated Assembly of Gold Nanoparticles on Electroded Substrates K. E. Sapsford,†,‡,∇ D. Park,§ E. R. Goldman,‡ E. E. Foos,| S. A...electrodes via DNA hybridization. Protocols are demonstrated for maximizing selectivity and coverage using 15mers as the active binding agents. Detailed

  10. Norgal: extraction and de novo assembly of mitochondrial DNA from whole-genome sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Nakeeb, Kosai; Petersen, Thomas Nordahl; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas

    2017-11-21

    Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) projects provide short read nucleotide sequences from nuclear and possibly organelle DNA depending on the source of origin. Mitochondrial DNA is present in animals and fungi, while plants contain DNA from both mitochondria and chloroplasts. Current techniques for separating organelle reads from nuclear reads in WGS data require full reference or partial seed sequences for assembling. Norgal (de Novo ORGAneLle extractor) avoids this requirement by identifying a high frequency subset of k-mers that are predominantly of mitochondrial origin and performing a de novo assembly on a subset of reads that contains these k-mers. The method was applied to WGS data from a panda, brown algae seaweed, butterfly and filamentous fungus. We were able to extract full circular mitochondrial genomes and obtained sequence identities to the reference sequences in the range from 98.5 to 99.5%. We also assembled the chloroplasts of grape vines and cucumbers using Norgal together with seed-based de novo assemblers. Norgal is a pipeline that can extract and assemble full or partial mitochondrial and chloroplast genomes from WGS short reads without prior knowledge. The program is available at: https://bitbucket.org/kosaidtu/norgal .

  11. Studies of G-quadruplexes formed within self-assembled DNA mini-circles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klejevskaja, Beata; Pyne, Alice L B; Reynolds, Matthew; Shivalingam, Arun; Thorogate, Richard; Hoogenboom, Bart W; Ying, Liming; Vilar, Ramon

    2016-10-13

    We have developed self-assembled DNA mini-circles that contain a G-quadruplex-forming sequence from the c-Myc oncogene promoter and demonstrate by FRET that the G-quadruplex unfolding kinetics are 10-fold slower than for the simpler 24-mer G-quadruplex that is commonly used for FRET experiments.

  12. Monitoring the hydration of DNA self-assembled monolayers using an extensional nanomechanical resonator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cagliani, Alberto; Kosaka, Priscila; Tamayo, Javier

    2012-01-01

    We have fabricated an ultrasensitive nanomechanical resonator based on the extensional vibration mode to weigh the adsorbed water on self-assembled monolayers of DNA as a function of the relative humidity. The water adsorption isotherms provide the number of adsorbed water molecules per nucleotid...

  13. Defined DNA-mediated assemblies of gene-expressing giant unilamellar vesicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hadorn, M.; Boenzli, E.; Sørensen, Kristian T.

    2013-01-01

    The technological aspects of artificial vesicles as prominent cell mimics are evolving toward higher-order assemblies of functional vesicles with tissuelike architectures. Here, we demonstrate the spatially controlled DNA-directed bottom-up synthesis of complex microassemblies and macroassemblies...

  14. Crystal structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase protein clusters assembled on to damaged DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miggiano, Riccardo; Perugino, Giuseppe; Ciaramella, Maria; Serpe, Mario; Rejman, Dominik; Páv, Ondřej; Pohl, Radek; Garavaglia, Silvia; Lahiri, Samarpita; Rizzi, Menico; Rossi, Franca

    2016-01-15

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MtOGT) contributes to protect the bacterial GC-rich genome against the pro-mutagenic potential of O(6)-methylated guanine in DNA. Several strains of M. tuberculosis found worldwide encode a point-mutated O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (OGT) variant (MtOGT-R37L), which displays an arginine-to-leucine substitution at position 37 of the poorly functionally characterized N-terminal domain of the protein. Although the impact of this mutation on the MtOGT activity has not yet been proved in vivo, we previously demonstrated that a recombinant MtOGT-R37L variant performs a suboptimal alkylated-DNA repair in vitro, suggesting a direct role for the Arg(37)-bearing region in catalysis. The crystal structure of MtOGT complexed with modified DNA solved in the present study reveals details of the protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions occurring during alkylated-DNA binding, and the protein capability also to host unmodified bases inside the active site, in a fully extrahelical conformation. Our data provide the first experimental picture at the atomic level of a possible mode of assembling three adjacent MtOGT monomers on the same monoalkylated dsDNA molecule, and disclose the conformational flexibility of discrete regions of MtOGT, including the Arg(37)-bearing random coil. This peculiar structural plasticity of MtOGT could be instrumental to proper protein clustering at damaged DNA sites, as well as to protein-DNA complexes disassembling on repair. © 2016 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  15. CasEMBLR: Cas9-Facilitated Multiloci Genomic Integration of in Vivo Assembled DNA Parts in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakociunas, Tadas; Rajkumar, Arun Stephen; Zhang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    , we present a method for marker-free multiloci integration of in vivo assembled DNA parts. By the use of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated one-step double-strand breaks at single, double and triple integration sites we report the successful in vivo assembly and chromosomal integration of DNA parts. We call our...

  16. Role of Chromatin assembly factor 1 in DNA replication of Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Mohit Kumar; Agarawal, Meetu; Banu, Khadija; Reddy, K Sony; Gaur, Deepak; Dhar, Suman Kumar

    2018-01-01

    Nucleosome assembly in P. falciparum could be the key process in maintaining its genomic integrity as DNA replicates more than once per cell cycle during several stages of its life cycle. Here, we report the functional characterization of P. falciparum chromatin assembly factor 1 (CAF1), which interacts with several proteins namely PfCAF2, Histones, PfHP1 and others. Consistent with the above findings, we demonstrate the presence of PfCAF1 at the telomeric repeat regions, central and subtelomeric var genes of multiple var gene family along with PfHP1. Further, we report the upregulation of PfCAF1 after treatment with genotoxic agents like MMS and HU. Together, these findings establish role of PfCAF1 in heterochromatin maintenance and as histone chaperone in nucleosome assembly and DNA damage repair. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Construction of energy transfer pathways self-assembled from DNA-templated stacks of anthracene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaura, Rika; Yui, Hiroharu; Someya, Yuu; Ohnishi-Kameyama, Mayumi

    2014-01-05

    We describe optical properties of anthracene stacks formed from single-component self-assembly of thymidylic acid-appended anthracene 2,6-bis[5-(3'-thymidylic acid)pentyloxy] anthracene (TACT) and the binary self-assembly of TACT and complementary 20-meric oligoadenylic acid (TACT/dA20) in an aqueous buffer. UV-Vis and emission spectra for the single-component self-assembly of TACT and the binary self-assembly of TACT/dA20 were very consistent with stacked acene moieties in both self-assemblies. Interestingly, time-resolved fluorescence spectra from anthracene stacks exhibited very different features of the single-component and binary self-assemblies. In the single-component self-assembly of TACT, a dynamic Stokes shift (DSS) and relatively short fluorescence lifetime (τ=0.35ns) observed at around 450nm suggested that the anthracene moieties were flexible. Moreover, a broad emission at 530nm suggested the formation of an excited dimer (excimer). In the binary self-assembly of TACT/dA20, we detected a broad, red-shifted emission component at 534nm with a lifetime (τ=0.4ns) shorter than that observed in the TACT single-component self-assembly. Combining these results with the emission spectrum of the binary self-assembly of TACT/5'-HEX dA20, we concluded that the energy transfer pathway was constructed by columnar anthracene stacks formed from the DNA-templated self-assembly of TACT. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Precision polymers and 3D DNA nanostructures: emergent assemblies from new parameter space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serpell, Christopher J; Edwardson, Thomas G W; Chidchob, Pongphak; Carneiro, Karina M M; Sleiman, Hanadi F

    2014-11-05

    Polymer self-assembly and DNA nanotechnology have both proved to be powerful nanoscale techniques. To date, most attempts to merge the fields have been limited to placing linear DNA segments within a polydisperse block copolymer. Here we show that, by using hydrophobic polymers of a precisely predetermined length conjugated to DNA strands, and addressable 3D DNA prisms, we are able to effect the formation of unprecedented monodisperse quantized superstructures. The structure and properties of larger micelles-of-prisms were probed in depth, revealing their ability to participate in controlled release of their constituent nanostructures, and template light-harvesting energy transfer cascades, mediated through both the addressability of DNA and the controlled aggregation of the polymers.

  19. Self-assembled catalytic DNA nanostructures for synthesis of para-directed polyaniline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen-Gang; Zhan, Pengfei; Ding, Baoquan

    2013-02-26

    Templated synthesis has been considered as an efficient approach to produce polyaniline (PANI) nanostructures. The features of DNA molecules enable a DNA template to be an intriguing template for fabrication of emeraldine PANI. In this work, we assembled HRP-mimicking DNAzyme with different artificial DNA nanostructures, aiming to manipulate the molecular structures and morphologies of PANI nanostructures through the controlled DNA self-assembly. UV-vis absorption spectra were used to investigate the molecular structures of PANI and monitor kinetic growth of PANI. It was found that PANI was well-doped at neutral pH and the redox behaviors of the resultant PANI were dependent on the charge density of the template, which was controlled by the template configurations. CD spectra indicated that the PANI threaded tightly around the helical DNA backbone, resulting in the right handedness of PANI. These reveal the formation of the emeraldine form of PANI that was doped by the DNA. The morphologies of the resultant PANI were studied by AFM and SEM. It was concluded from the imaging and spectroscopic kinetic results that PANI grew preferably from the DNAzyme sites and then expanded over the template to form 1D PANI nanostructures. The strategy of the DNAzyme-DNA template assembly brings several advantages in the synthesis of para-coupling PANI, including the region-selective growth of PANI, facilitating the formation of a para-coupling structure and facile regulation. We believe this study contributes significantly to the fabrication of doped PANI nanopatterns with controlled complexity, and the development of DNA nanotechnology.

  20. Time lapse microscopy of temperature control during self-assembly of 3D DNA crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conn, Fiona W.; Jong, Michael Alexander; Tan, Andre; Tseng, Robert; Park, Eunice; Ohayon, Yoel P.; Sha, Ruojie; Mao, Chengde; Seeman, Nadrian C.

    2017-10-01

    DNA nanostructures are created by exploiting the high fidelity base-pairing interactions of double-stranded branched DNA molecules. These structures present a convenient medium for the self-assembly of macroscopic 3D crystals. In some self-assemblies in this system, crystals can be formed by lowering the temperature, and they can be dissolved by raising it. The ability to monitor the formation and melting of these crystals yields information that can be used to monitor crystal formation and growth. Here, we describe the development of an inexpensive tool that enables direct observation of the crystal growth process as a function of both time and temperature. Using the hanging-drop crystallization of the well-characterized 2-turn DNA tensegrity triangle motif for our model system, its response to temperature has been characterized visually.

  1. Self-Assembling Molecular Logic Gates Based on DNA Crossover Tiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Eleanor A; Peterson, Evan; Kolpashchikov, Dmitry M

    2017-07-05

    DNA-based computational hardware has attracted ever-growing attention due to its potential to be useful in the analysis of complex mixtures of biological markers. Here we report the design of self-assembling logic gates that recognize DNA inputs and assemble into crossover tiles when the output signal is high; the crossover structures disassemble to form separate DNA stands when the output is low. The output signal can be conveniently detected by fluorescence using a molecular beacon probe as a reporter. AND, NOT, and OR logic gates were designed. We demonstrate that the gates can connect to each other to produce other logic functions. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Tuning the Cavity Size and Chirality of Self-Assembling 3D DNA Crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, Chad R.; Zhang, Fei; MacCulloch, Tara; Fahmi, Noureddine; Stephanopoulos, Nicholas; Liu, Yan; Seeman, Nadrian C. [Department; Yan, Hao

    2017-08-02

    The foundational goal of structural DNA nanotechnology—the field that uses oligonucleotides as a molecular building block for the programmable self-assembly of nanostructured systems—was to use DNA to construct three-dimensional (3D) lattices for solving macromolecular structures. The programmable nature of DNA makes it an ideal system for rationally constructing self-assembled crystals and immobilizing guest molecules in a repeating 3D array through their specific stereospatial interactions with the scaffold. In this work, we have extended a previously described motif (4 × 5) by expanding the structure to a system that links four double-helical layers; we use a central weaving oligonucleotide containing a sequence of four six-base repeats (4 × 6), forming a matrix of layers that are organized and dictated by a series of Holliday junctions. In addition, we have assembled mirror image crystals (l-DNA) with the identical sequence that are completely resistant to nucleases. Bromine and selenium derivatives were obtained for the l- and d-DNA forms, respectively, allowing phase determination for both forms and solution of the resulting structures to 3.0 and 3.05 Å resolution. Both right- and left-handed forms crystallized in the trigonal space groups with mirror image 3-fold helical screw axes P32 and P31 for each motif, respectively. The structures reveal a highly organized array of discrete and well-defined cavities that are suitable for hosting guest molecules and allow us to dictate a priori the assembly of guest–DNA conjugates with a specified crystalline hand.

  3. Assembly of positioner of automated two-dimensional scan coupled to X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Leonardo Santiago Melgaço

    2011-01-01

    This work describes the design and assembling of a prototype automated positioner two-dimensional scanning coupled to X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. The work aims to achieve a portable and easy to use, device of broad utility in the analysis of samples by X-ray fluorescence area of expertise and research. The two-dimensional scanning of the positioner is by means of two stepper motors controlled by a microcontroller PIC 16F877A, encoder and optical sensors. The user interacts with the XY table through an interface program for the Windows operating system, which communicates with the microcontroller through the serial port. The system of Fluorescence Spectroscopy incorporated into the positioner consists of a system commercially available system from the company AMPTEK, where the primary source of excitation of the sample was a source of 241 Am of 59.5 KeV emissions. Resolution and accuracy of tests were performed in the XY scanning process and reproducibility of the same kit with the fluorescence spectrometry X-ray. Qualitative tests by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry in samples were performed to demonstrate the applicability and versatility of the project. It follows that the prototype illustrates a possible adequately to portable device for X-ray spectrometry of two-dimensional. (author)

  4. Gene assembly via one-pot chemical ligation of DNA promoted by DNA nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manuguerra, Ilenia; Croce, Stefano; El-Sagheer, Afaf H.

    2018-01-01

    Current gene synthesis methods are driven by enzymatic reactions. Here we report the one-pot synthesis of a chemically-ligated gene from 14 oligonucleotides. The chemical ligation benefits from the highly efficient click chemistry approach templated by DNA nanostructures, and produces modified DNA...

  5. Establishing a novel automated magnetic bead-based method for the extraction of DNA from a variety of forensic samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Sebastian; Neumann, Jan; Zierdt, Holger; Gébel, Gabriella; Röscheisen, Christiane

    2012-09-01

    Automated systems have been increasingly utilized for DNA extraction by many forensic laboratories to handle growing numbers of forensic casework samples while minimizing the risk of human errors and assuring high reproducibility. The step towards automation however is not easy: The automated extraction method has to be very versatile to reliably prepare high yields of pure genomic DNA from a broad variety of sample types on different carrier materials. To prevent possible cross-contamination of samples or the loss of DNA, the components of the kit have to be designed in a way that allows for the automated handling of the samples with no manual intervention necessary. DNA extraction using paramagnetic particles coated with a DNA-binding surface is predestined for an automated approach. For this study, we tested different DNA extraction kits using DNA-binding paramagnetic particles with regard to DNA yield and handling by a Freedom EVO(®)150 extraction robot (Tecan) equipped with a Te-MagS magnetic separator. Among others, the extraction kits tested were the ChargeSwitch(®)Forensic DNA Purification Kit (Invitrogen), the PrepFiler™Automated Forensic DNA Extraction Kit (Applied Biosystems) and NucleoMag™96 Trace (Macherey-Nagel). After an extensive test phase, we established a novel magnetic bead extraction method based upon the NucleoMag™ extraction kit (Macherey-Nagel). The new method is readily automatable and produces high yields of DNA from different sample types (blood, saliva, sperm, contact stains) on various substrates (filter paper, swabs, cigarette butts) with no evidence of a loss of magnetic beads or sample cross-contamination. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Rapid DNA analysis for automated processing and interpretation of low DNA content samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turingan, Rosemary S; Vasantgadkar, Sameer; Palombo, Luke; Hogan, Catherine; Jiang, Hua; Tan, Eugene; Selden, Richard F

    2016-01-01

    Short tandem repeat (STR) analysis of casework samples with low DNA content include those resulting from the transfer of epithelial cells from the skin to an object (e.g., cells on a water bottle, or brim of a cap), blood spatter stains, and small bone and tissue fragments. Low DNA content (LDC) samples are important in a wide range of settings, including disaster response teams to assist in victim identification and family reunification, military operations to identify friend or foe, criminal forensics to identify suspects and exonerate the innocent, and medical examiner and coroner offices to identify missing persons. Processing LDC samples requires experienced laboratory personnel, isolated workstations, and sophisticated equipment, requires transport time, and involves complex procedures. We present a rapid DNA analysis system designed specifically to generate STR profiles from LDC samples in field-forward settings by non-technical operators. By performing STR in the field, close to the site of collection, rapid DNA analysis has the potential to increase throughput and to provide actionable information in real time. A Low DNA Content BioChipSet (LDC BCS) was developed and manufactured by injection molding. It was designed to function in the fully integrated Accelerated Nuclear DNA Equipment (ANDE) instrument previously designed for analysis of buccal swab and other high DNA content samples (Investigative Genet. 4(1):1-15, 2013). The LDC BCS performs efficient DNA purification followed by microfluidic ultrafiltration of the purified DNA, maximizing the quantity of DNA available for subsequent amplification and electrophoretic separation and detection of amplified fragments. The system demonstrates accuracy, precision, resolution, signal strength, and peak height ratios appropriate for casework analysis. The LDC rapid DNA analysis system is effective for the generation of STR profiles from a wide range of sample types. The technology broadens the range of sample

  7. Automated extraction of DNA from biological stains on fabric from crime cases. A comparison of a manual and three automated methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stangegaard, Michael; Hjort, Benjamin B; Hansen, Thomas N; Hoflund, Anders; Mogensen, Helle S; Hansen, Anders J; Morling, Niels

    2013-05-01

    The presence of PCR inhibitors in extracted DNA may interfere with the subsequent quantification and short tandem repeat (STR) reactions used in forensic genetic DNA typing. DNA extraction from fabric for forensic genetic purposes may be challenging due to the occasional presence of PCR inhibitors that may be co-extracted with the DNA. Using 120 forensic trace evidence samples consisting of various types of fabric, we compared three automated DNA extraction methods based on magnetic beads (PrepFiler Express Forensic DNA Extraction Kit on an AutoMate Express, QIAsyphony DNA Investigator kit either with the sample pre-treatment recommended by Qiagen or an in-house optimized sample pre-treatment on a QIAsymphony SP) and one manual method (Chelex) with the aim of reducing the amount of PCR inhibitors in the DNA extracts and increasing the proportion of reportable STR-profiles. A total of 480 samples were processed. The highest DNA recovery was obtained with the PrepFiler Express kit on an AutoMate Express while the lowest DNA recovery was obtained using a QIAsymphony SP with the sample pre-treatment recommended by Qiagen. Extraction using a QIAsymphony SP with the sample pre-treatment recommended by Qiagen resulted in the lowest percentage of PCR inhibition (0%) while extraction using manual Chelex resulted in the highest percentage of PCR inhibition (51%). The largest number of reportable STR-profiles was obtained with DNA from samples extracted with the PrepFiler Express kit (75%) while the lowest number was obtained with DNA from samples extracted using a QIAsymphony SP with the sample pre-treatment recommended by Qiagen (41%). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Lipid-bilayer-assisted two-dimensional self-assembly of DNA origami nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Masayuki; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Self-assembly is a ubiquitous approach to the design and fabrication of novel supermolecular architectures. Here we report a strategy termed ‘lipid-bilayer-assisted self-assembly' that is used to assemble DNA origami nanostructures into two-dimensional lattices. DNA origami structures are electrostatically adsorbed onto a mica-supported zwitterionic lipid bilayer in the presence of divalent cations. We demonstrate that the bilayer-adsorbed origami units are mobile on the surface and self-assembled into large micrometre-sized lattices in their lateral dimensions. Using high-speed atomic force microscopy imaging, a variety of dynamic processes involved in the formation of the lattice, such as fusion, reorganization and defect filling, are successfully visualized. The surface modifiability of the assembled lattice is also demonstrated by in situ decoration with streptavidin molecules. Our approach provides a new strategy for preparing versatile scaffolds for nanofabrication and paves the way for organizing functional nanodevices in a micrometer space. PMID:26310995

  9. Structure and assembly of the essential RNA ring component of a viral DNA packaging motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Fang; Lu, Changrui; Zhao, Wei; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R; Anderson, Dwight L; Jardine, Paul J; Grimes, Shelley; Ke, Ailong

    2011-05-03

    Prohead RNA (pRNA) is an essential component in the assembly and operation of the powerful bacteriophage 29 DNA packaging motor. The pRNA forms a multimeric ring via intermolecular base-pairing interactions between protomers that serves to guide the assembly of the ring ATPase that drives DNA packaging. Here we report the quaternary structure of this rare multimeric RNA at 3.5 Å resolution, crystallized as tetrameric rings. Strong quaternary interactions and the inherent flexibility helped rationalize how free pRNA is able to adopt multiple oligomerization states in solution. These characteristics also allowed excellent fitting of the crystallographic pRNA protomers into previous prohead/pRNA cryo-EM reconstructions, supporting the presence of a pentameric, but not hexameric, pRNA ring in the context of the DNA packaging motor. The pentameric pRNA ring anchors itself directly to the phage prohead by interacting specifically with the fivefold symmetric capsid structures that surround the head-tail connector portal. From these contacts, five RNA superhelices project from the pRNA ring, where they serve as scaffolds for binding and assembly of the ring ATPase, and possibly mediate communication between motor components. Construction of structure-based designer pRNAs with little sequence similarity to the wild-type pRNA were shown to fully support the packaging of 29 DNA.

  10. DNA-nanoparticle assemblies go organic: Macroscopic polymeric materials with nanosized features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mentovich Elad D

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the goals in the field of structural DNA nanotechnology is the use of DNA to build up 2- and 3-D nanostructures. The research in this field is motivated by the remarkable structural features of DNA as well as by its unique and reversible recognition properties. Nucleic acids can be used alone as the skeleton of a broad range of periodic nanopatterns and nanoobjects and in addition, DNA can serve as a linker or template to form DNA-hybrid structures with other materials. This approach can be used for the development of new detection strategies as well as nanoelectronic structures and devices. Method Here we present a new method for the generation of unprecedented all-organic conjugated-polymer nanoparticle networks guided by DNA, based on a hierarchical self-assembly process. First, microphase separation of amphiphilic block copolymers induced the formation of spherical nanoobjects. As a second ordering concept, DNA base pairing has been employed for the controlled spatial definition of the conjugated-polymer particles within the bulk material. These networks offer the flexibility and the diversity of soft polymeric materials. Thus, simple chemical methodologies could be applied in order to tune the network's electrical, optical and mechanical properties. Results and conclusions One- two- and three-dimensional networks have been successfully formed. Common to all morphologies is the integrity of the micelles consisting of DNA block copolymer (DBC, which creates an all-organic engineered network.

  11. DNA-nanoparticle assemblies go organic: macroscopic polymeric materials with nanosized features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentovich, Elad D; Livanov, Konstantin; Prusty, Deepak K; Sowwan, Mukules; Richter, Shachar

    2012-05-30

    One of the goals in the field of structural DNA nanotechnology is the use of DNA to build up 2- and 3-D nanostructures. The research in this field is motivated by the remarkable structural features of DNA as well as by its unique and reversible recognition properties. Nucleic acids can be used alone as the skeleton of a broad range of periodic nanopatterns and nanoobjects and in addition, DNA can serve as a linker or template to form DNA-hybrid structures with other materials. This approach can be used for the development of new detection strategies as well as nanoelectronic structures and devices. Here we present a new method for the generation of unprecedented all-organic conjugated-polymer nanoparticle networks guided by DNA, based on a hierarchical self-assembly process. First, microphase separation of amphiphilic block copolymers induced the formation of spherical nanoobjects. As a second ordering concept, DNA base pairing has been employed for the controlled spatial definition of the conjugated-polymer particles within the bulk material. These networks offer the flexibility and the diversity of soft polymeric materials. Thus, simple chemical methodologies could be applied in order to tune the network's electrical, optical and mechanical properties. One- two- and three-dimensional networks have been successfully formed. Common to all morphologies is the integrity of the micelles consisting of DNA block copolymer (DBC), which creates an all-organic engineered network.

  12. A universal molecular translator for non-nucleic acid targets that enables dynamic DNA assemblies and logic operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wei; Hu, Shichao; Wang, Huaming; Zhao, Yan; Li, Na; Liu, Feng

    2014-11-28

    A universal molecular translator based on the target-triggered DNA strand displacement was developed, which was able to convert various kinds of non-nucleic acid targets into a unique output DNA. This translation strategy was successfully applied in directing dynamic DNA assemblies and in realizing three-input logic gate operations.

  13. DNA-mediated self-assembly of tetrahedral plasmonic clusters for metafluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schade, Nicholas; Sun, Li; Lee, You-Jin; Fan, Jonathan; Capasso, Federico; Yi, Gi-Ra; Manoharan, Vinothan

    2014-03-01

    We direct the self-assembly of clusters of gold nanospheres with the goal of creating a bulk, isotropic, optical metafluid. We use spherical gold nanoparticles that are exceptionally smooth, monocrystalline, and monodisperse. These particles exhibit highly reproducible scattering spectra compared with commercially available gold colloids. We label them with DNA sequences and mix them together to self-assemble small clusters. By controlling the particle sizes and the interactions between them, we maximize the yield of tetrahedral clusters, the ideal structures for isotropic metamaterials.

  14. Automated Solar Cell Assembly Teamed Process Research. Final subcontract report, 6 January 1993--31 October 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowlan, M. J.; Hogan, S. J.; Breen, W. F.; Murach, J. M.; Sutherland, S. F.; Patterson, J. S.; Darkazalli, G. [Spire Corp., Bedford, MA (US)

    1996-02-01

    This is the Final Technical Report for a program entitled ''Automated Solar Cell Assembly Teamed Process Research,'' funded by the US Department of Energy. This program was part of Phase 3A of the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project, which addressed the generic needs of the photovoltaic (PV) industry for improved quality, accelerated production scale-up, and substantially reduced manufacturing cost. Crystalline silicon solar cells (Czochralski monocrystalline, cast polycrystalline, and ribbon polycrystalline) are used in the great majority of PV modules produced in the US, accounting for 95% of all shipments in 1994. Spire's goal in this program was to reduce the cost of these modules by developing high throughput (5 MW per year) automated processes for interconnecting solar cells made from standard and thin silicon wafers. Spire achieved this goal by developing a completely new automated processing system, designated the SPI-ASSEMBLER{trademark} 5000, which is now offered as a commercial product to the PV industry. A discussion of the project and of the Assembler is provided.

  15. An optimized routing algorithm for the automated assembly of standard multimode ribbon fibers in a full-mesh optical backplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basile, Vito; Guadagno, Gianluca; Ferrario, Maddalena; Fassi, Irene

    2018-03-01

    In this paper a parametric, modular and scalable algorithm allowing a fully automated assembly of a backplane fiber-optic interconnection circuit is presented. This approach guarantees the optimization of the optical fiber routing inside the backplane with respect to specific criteria (i.e. bending power losses), addressing both transmission performance and overall costs issues. Graph theory has been exploited to simplify the complexity of the NxN full-mesh backplane interconnection topology, firstly, into N independent sub-circuits and then, recursively, into a limited number of loops easier to be generated. Afterwards, the proposed algorithm selects a set of geometrical and architectural parameters whose optimization allows to identify the optimal fiber optic routing for each sub-circuit of the backplane. The topological and numerical information provided by the algorithm are then exploited to control a robot which performs the automated assembly of the backplane sub-circuits. The proposed routing algorithm can be extended to any array architecture and number of connections thanks to its modularity and scalability. Finally, the algorithm has been exploited for the automated assembly of an 8x8 optical backplane realized with standard multimode (MM) 12-fiber ribbons.

  16. Assembly and structural analysis of a covalently closed nano-scale DNA cage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Félicie Faucon; Knudsen, Bjarne; Oliveira, Cristiano Luis Pinto De

    2008-01-01

    for investigations of DNA-interacting enzymes. More recently, strategies for synthesis of more complex two-dimensional (2D) and 3D DNA structures have emerged. However, the building of such structures is still in progress and more experiences from different research groups and different fields of expertise...... be described as a nano-scale DNA cage, Hence, in theory it could hold proteins or other bio-molecules to enable their investigation in certain harmful environments or even allow their organization into higher order structures...... The inherent properties of DNA as a stable polymer with unique affinity for partner molecules determined by the specific Watson-Crick base pairing makes it an ideal component in self-assembling structures. This has been exploited for decades in the design of a variety of artificial substrates...

  17. Automated DNA extraction platforms offer solutions to challenges of assessing microbial biofouling in oil production facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldham, Athenia L; Drilling, Heather S; Stamps, Blake W; Stevenson, Bradley S; Duncan, Kathleen E

    2012-11-20

    The analysis of microbial assemblages in industrial, marine, and medical systems can inform decisions regarding quality control or mitigation. Modern molecular approaches to detect, characterize, and quantify microorganisms provide rapid and thorough measures unbiased by the need for cultivation. The requirement of timely extraction of high quality nucleic acids for molecular analysis is faced with specific challenges when used to study the influence of microorganisms on oil production. Production facilities are often ill equipped for nucleic acid extraction techniques, making the preservation and transportation of samples off-site a priority. As a potential solution, the possibility of extracting nucleic acids on-site using automated platforms was tested. The performance of two such platforms, the Fujifilm QuickGene-Mini80™ and Promega Maxwell®16 was compared to a widely used manual extraction kit, MOBIO PowerBiofilm™ DNA Isolation Kit, in terms of ease of operation, DNA quality, and microbial community composition. Three pipeline biofilm samples were chosen for these comparisons; two contained crude oil and corrosion products and the third transported seawater. Overall, the two more automated extraction platforms produced higher DNA yields than the manual approach. DNA quality was evaluated for amplification by quantitative PCR (qPCR) and end-point PCR to generate 454 pyrosequencing libraries for 16S rRNA microbial community analysis. Microbial community structure, as assessed by DGGE analysis and pyrosequencing, was comparable among the three extraction methods. Therefore, the use of automated extraction platforms should enhance the feasibility of rapidly evaluating microbial biofouling at remote locations or those with limited resources.

  18. Reversible assembly of protein-DNA nanostructures triggered by mediated electron transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogt, Stephan; Wenderhold-Reeb, Sabine; Nöll, Gilbert

    2017-01-01

    Stable protein-DNA nanostructures have been assembled by reconstitution of the multi-ligand binding flavoprotein dodecin on top of flavin-terminated dsDNA monolayers on gold electrodes. These structures could be disassembled by electrochemical flavin reduction via mediated electron transfer. For this purpose a negative potential was applied at the Au working electrode in the presence of the redox mediator bis-(ammoniumethyl)-4,4′-bipyridinium tetrabromide. The stepwise formation of the flavin-terminated dsDNA monolayers as well as the binding and electrochemically triggered release of apododecin were monitored by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) measurements. The assembly and disassembly of the protein-DNA nanostructures were fully reversible processes, which could be carried out multiple times at the same flavin-dsDNA modified surface. When a negative potential was applied in the absence of a redox mediator apododecin could not be released, i.e. direct electron transfer was not possible. As alternative redox mediators also methylene blue and phenosafranine were studied, but in the presence of these molecules apododecin was released without applying a potential, probably because the tricyclic aromatic compounds are able to replace the flavins at the binding sites.

  19. Development of an Automated Microfluidic System for DNA Collection, Amplification, and Detection of Pathogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagan, Bethany S.; Bruckner-Lea, Cynthia J.

    2002-12-01

    This project was focused on developing and testing automated routines for a microfluidic Pathogen Detection System. The basic pathogen detection routine has three primary components; cell concentration, DNA amplification, and detection. In cell concentration, magnetic beads are held in a flow cell by an electromagnet. Sample liquid is passed through the flow cell and bacterial cells attach to the beads. These beads are then released into a small volume of fluid and delivered to the peltier device for cell lysis and DNA amplification. The cells are lysed during initial heating in the peltier device, and the released DNA is amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or strand displacement amplification (SDA). Once amplified, the DNA is then delivered to a laser induced fluorescence detection unit in which the sample is detected. These three components create a flexible platform that can be used for pathogen detection in liquid and sediment samples. Future developments of the system will include on-line DNA detection during DNA amplification and improved capture and release methods for the magnetic beads during cell concentration.

  20. Facile Site-Directed Mutagenesis of Large Constructs Using Gibson Isothermal DNA Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonemoto, Isaac T; Weyman, Philip D

    2017-01-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis is a commonly used molecular biology technique to manipulate biological sequences, and is especially useful for studying sequence determinants of enzyme function or designing proteins with improved activity. We describe a strategy using Gibson Isothermal DNA Assembly to perform site-directed mutagenesis on large (>~20 kbp) constructs that are outside the effective range of standard techniques such as QuikChange II (Agilent Technologies), but more reliable than traditional cloning using restriction enzymes and ligation.

  1. Building superlattices from individual nanoparticles via template-confined DNA-mediated assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Qing-Yuan; Mason, Jarad A.; Li, Zhongyang; Zhou, Wenjie; O’Brien, Matthew N.; Brown, Keith A.; Jones, Matthew R.; Butun, Serkan; Lee, Byeongdu; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Aydin, Koray; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2018-01-18

    DNA programmable assembly has been combined with top-down lithography to construct superlattices of discrete, reconfigurable nanoparticle architectures on a gold surface over large areas. Specifically, individual colloidal plasmonic nanoparticles with different shapes and sizes are assembled with ‘locked” nucleic acids in polymer pores into oriented architectures that feature tunable arrangements and independently controllable distances at both nanometer and micrometer length scales. These structures, which would be difficult to construct via other common assembly methods, provide a platform to systematically study and control light-matter interactions in nanoparticle-based optical materials. The generality and potential of this approach is explored by identifying a broadband absorber with a solvent polarity response that allows dynamic tuning of the wavelength response and amplitude of visible light absorption.

  2. Assembling the Streptococcus thermophilus clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) array for multiplex DNA targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lijun; Xu, Kun; Liu, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Cunfang; Xin, Ying; Zhang, Zhiying

    2015-06-01

    In addition to the advantages of scalable, affordable, and easy to engineer, the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein (Cas) technology is superior for multiplex targeting, which is laborious and inconvenient when achieved by cloning multiple gRNA expressing cassettes. Here, we report a simple CRISPR array assembling method which will facilitate multiplex targeting usage. First, the Streptococcus thermophilus CRISPR3/Cas locus was cloned. Second, different CRISPR arrays were assembled with different crRNA spacers. Transformation assays using different Escherichia coli strains demonstrated efficient plasmid DNA targeting, and we achieved targeting efficiency up to 95% with an assembled CRISPR array with three crRNA spacers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Building superlattices from individual nanoparticles via template-confined DNA-mediated assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qing-Yuan; Mason, Jarad A.; Li, Zhongyang; Zhou, Wenjie; O’Brien, Matthew N.; Brown, Keith A.; Jones, Matthew R.; Butun, Serkan; Lee, Byeongdu; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Aydin, Koray; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2018-02-01

    DNA programmable assembly has been combined with top-down lithography to construct superlattices of discrete, reconfigurable nanoparticle architectures on a gold surface over large areas. Specifically, the assembly of individual colloidal plasmonic nanoparticles with different shapes and sizes is controlled by oligonucleotides containing “locked” nucleic acids and confined environments provided by polymer pores to yield oriented architectures that feature tunable arrangements and independently controllable distances at both nanometer- and micrometer-length scales. These structures, which would be difficult to construct by other common assembly methods, provide a platform to systematically study and control light-matter interactions in nanoparticle-based optical materials. The generality and potential of this approach are explored by identifying a broadband absorber with a solvent polarity response that allows dynamic tuning of visible light absorption.

  4. Cloning Should Be Simple: Escherichia coli DH5α-Mediated Assembly of Multiple DNA Fragments with Short End Homologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Ruth E.; Suzuki, Yo

    2015-01-01

    Numerous DNA assembly technologies exist for generating plasmids for biological studies. Many procedures require complex in vitro or in vivo assembly reactions followed by plasmid propagation in recombination-impaired Escherichia coli strains such as DH5α, which are optimal for stable amplification of the DNA materials. Here we show that despite its utility as a cloning strain, DH5α retains sufficient recombinase activity to assemble up to six double-stranded DNA fragments ranging in size from 150 bp to at least 7 kb into plasmids in vivo. This process also requires surprisingly small amounts of DNA, potentially obviating the need for upstream assembly processes associated with most common applications of DNA assembly. We demonstrate the application of this process in cloning of various DNA fragments including synthetic genes, preparation of knockout constructs, and incorporation of guide RNA sequences in constructs for clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) genome editing. This consolidated process for assembly and amplification in a widely available strain of E. coli may enable productivity gain across disciplines involving recombinant DNA work. PMID:26348330

  5. Crystallization of a self-assembled three-dimensional DNA nanostructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rendek, Kimberly N.; Fromme, Raimund; Grotjohann, Ingo; Fromme, Petra

    2013-01-01

    In this work, the crystallization of a self-assembling three-dimensional B-DNA nanostructure is described. The powerful and specific molecular-recognition system present in the base-pairing of DNA allows for the design of a plethora of nanostructures. In this work, the crystallization of a self-assembling three-dimensional B-DNA nanostructure is described. The DNA nanostructure consists of six single-stranded oligonucleotides that hybridize to form a three-dimensional tetrahedron of 80 kDa in molecular mass and 20 bp on each edge. Crystals of the tetrahedron have been successfully produced and characterized. These crystals may form the basis for an X-ray structure of the tetrahedron in the future. Nucleotide crystallography poses many challenges, leading to the fact that only 1352 X-ray structures of nucleic acids have been solved compared with more than 80 000 protein structures. In this work, the crystallization optimization for three-dimensional tetrahedra is also described, with the eventual goal of producing nanocrystals to overcome the radiation-damage obstacle by the use of free-electron laser technology in the future

  6. Modular assembly of chimeric phi29 packaging RNAs that support DNA packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yun; Shu, Dan; Xiao, Feng; Guo, Peixuan; Qin, Peter Z

    2008-08-08

    The bacteriophage phi29 DNA packaging motor is a protein/RNA complex that can produce strong force to condense the linear-double-stranded DNA genome into a pre-formed protein capsid. The RNA component, called the packaging RNA (pRNA), utilizes magnesium-dependent inter-molecular base-pairing interactions to form ring-shaped complexes. The pRNA is a class of non-coding RNA, interacting with phi29 motor proteins to enable DNA packaging. Here, we report a two-piece chimeric pRNA construct that is fully competent in interacting with partner pRNA to form ring-shaped complexes, in packaging DNA via the motor, and in assembling infectious phi29 virions in vitro. This is the first example of a fully functional pRNA assembled using two non-covalently interacting fragments. The results support the notion of modular pRNA architecture in the phi29 packaging motor.

  7. Pydna: a simulation and documentation tool for DNA assembly strategies using python.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Filipa; Azevedo, Flávio; Carvalho, Ângela; Ribeiro, Gabriela F; Budde, Mark W; Johansson, Björn

    2015-05-02

    Recent advances in synthetic biology have provided tools to efficiently construct complex DNA molecules which are an important part of many molecular biology and biotechnology projects. The planning of such constructs has traditionally been done manually using a DNA sequence editor which becomes error-prone as scale and complexity of the construction increase. A human-readable formal description of cloning and assembly strategies, which also allows for automatic computer simulation and verification, would therefore be a valuable tool. We have developed pydna, an extensible, free and open source Python library for simulating basic molecular biology DNA unit operations such as restriction digestion, ligation, PCR, primer design, Gibson assembly and homologous recombination. A cloning strategy expressed as a pydna script provides a description that is complete, unambiguous and stable. Execution of the script automatically yields the sequence of the final molecule(s) and that of any intermediate constructs. Pydna has been designed to be understandable for biologists with limited programming skills by providing interfaces that are semantically similar to the description of molecular biology unit operations found in literature. Pydna simplifies both the planning and sharing of cloning strategies and is especially useful for complex or combinatorial DNA molecule construction. An important difference compared to existing tools with similar goals is the use of Python instead of a specifically constructed language, providing a simulation environment that is more flexible and extensible by the user.

  8. Protein dynamics during presynaptic complex assembly on individual ssDNA molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibb, Bryan; Ye, Ling F.; Kwon, YoungHo; Niu, Hengyao; Sung, Patrick; Greene, Eric C.

    2014-01-01

    Homologous recombination is a conserved pathway for repairing double–stranded breaks, which are processed to yield single–stranded DNA overhangs that serve as platforms for presynaptic complex assembly. Here we use single–molecule imaging to reveal the interplay between Saccharomyce cerevisiae RPA, Rad52, and Rad51 during presynaptic complex assembly. We show that Rad52 binds RPA–ssDNA and suppresses RPA turnover, highlighting an unanticipated regulatory influence on protein dynamics. Rad51 binding extends the ssDNA, and Rad52–RPA clusters remain interspersed along the presynaptic complex. These clusters promote additional binding of RPA and Rad52. Together, our work illustrates the spatial and temporal progression of RPA and Rad52 association with the presynaptic complex, and reveals a novel RPA–Rad52–Rad51–ssDNA intermediate, which has implications for understanding how the activities of Rad52 and RPA are coordinated with Rad51 during the later stages recombination. PMID:25195049

  9. Aptaligner: automated software for aligning pseudorandom DNA X-aptamers from next-generation sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Emily; Elizondo-Riojas, Miguel-Angel; Chang, Jeffrey T; Volk, David E

    2014-06-10

    Next-generation sequencing results from bead-based aptamer libraries have demonstrated that traditional DNA/RNA alignment software is insufficient. This is particularly true for X-aptamers containing specialty bases (W, X, Y, Z, ...) that are identified by special encoding. Thus, we sought an automated program that uses the inherent design scheme of bead-based X-aptamers to create a hypothetical reference library and Markov modeling techniques to provide improved alignments. Aptaligner provides this feature as well as length error and noise level cutoff features, is parallelized to run on multiple central processing units (cores), and sorts sequences from a single chip into projects and subprojects.

  10. Automated High-Volume Manufacturing of Modular Photovoltaic Panel Assemblies for Space Solar Arrays, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Deployable Space Systems, Inc. (DSS) will focus the proposed SBIR program on the creation and development of an automated robotic manufacturing infrastructure...

  11. Comparison of QIAsymphony Automated and QIAamp Manual DNA Extraction Systems for Measuring Epstein-Barr Virus DNA Load in Whole Blood Using Real-Time PCR

    OpenAIRE

    Laus, Stella; Kingsley, Lawrence A.; Green, Michael; Wadowsky, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    Automated and manual extraction systems have been used with real-time PCR for quantification of Epstein-Barr virus [human herpesvirus 4 (HHV-4)] DNA in whole blood, but few studies have evaluated relative performances. In the present study, the automated QIAsymphony and manual QIAamp extraction systems (Qiagen, Valencia, CA) were assessed using paired aliquots derived from clinical whole-blood specimens and an in-house, real-time PCR assay. The detection limits using the QIAsymphony and QIAam...

  12. Stabilization of Pt nanoparticles by single stranded DNA and the binary assembly of Au and Pt nanoparticles without hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, J.; Lee, Jim Yang; Too, Heng-Phon; Chow, Gan-Moog; Gan, Leong M.

    2006-01-01

    The non-specific interaction between single stranded DNA (ssDNA) and 12 nm Pt nanoparticles is investigated in this work. The data show a strong and non-specific interaction between the two which can be exploited for the stabilization of Pt nanoparticles in aqueous solutions. Based on the experimental findings, a non-hybridization based protocol to assemble 17 nm Au and Pt nanoparticles (12 nm cubic and 3.6 nm spherical) by single-stranded DNA was developed. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and UV-visible spectroscopy confirmed that Au and Pt nanoparticles could be assembled by the non-specific interaction in an orderly manner. The experimental results also caution against the potential pitfalls in using DNA melting point analysis to infer metal nanoparticle assembly by DNA hybridization

  13. A Dynamic Combinatorial Approach for Identifying Side Groups that Stabilize DNA-Templated Supramolecular Self-Assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delphine Paolantoni

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available DNA-templated self-assembly is an emerging strategy for generating functional supramolecular systems, which requires the identification of potent multi-point binding ligands. In this line, we recently showed that bis-functionalized guanidinium compounds can interact with ssDNA and generate a supramolecular complex through the recognition of the phosphodiester backbone of DNA. In order to probe the importance of secondary interactions and to identify side groups that stabilize these DNA-templated self-assemblies, we report herein the implementation of a dynamic combinatorial approach. We used an in situ fragment assembly process based on reductive amination and tested various side groups, including amino acids. The results reveal that aromatic and cationic side groups participate in secondary supramolecular interactions that stabilize the complexes formed with ssDNA.

  14. DNA damage response and spindle assembly checkpoint function throughout the cell cycle to ensure genomic integrity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine S Lawrence

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Errors in replication or segregation lead to DNA damage, mutations, and aneuploidies. Consequently, cells monitor these events and delay progression through the cell cycle so repair precedes division. The DNA damage response (DDR, which monitors DNA integrity, and the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC, which responds to defects in spindle attachment/tension during metaphase of mitosis and meiosis, are critical for preventing genome instability. Here we show that the DDR and SAC function together throughout the cell cycle to ensure genome integrity in C. elegans germ cells. Metaphase defects result in enrichment of SAC and DDR components to chromatin, and both SAC and DDR are required for metaphase delays. During persistent metaphase arrest following establishment of bi-oriented chromosomes, stability of the metaphase plate is compromised in the absence of DDR kinases ATR or CHK1 or SAC components, MAD1/MAD2, suggesting SAC functions in metaphase beyond its interactions with APC activator CDC20. In response to DNA damage, MAD2 and the histone variant CENPA become enriched at the nuclear periphery in a DDR-dependent manner. Further, depletion of either MAD1 or CENPA results in loss of peripherally associated damaged DNA. In contrast to a SAC-insensitive CDC20 mutant, germ cells deficient for SAC or CENPA cannot efficiently repair DNA damage, suggesting that SAC mediates DNA repair through CENPA interactions with the nuclear periphery. We also show that replication perturbations result in relocalization of MAD1/MAD2 in human cells, suggesting that the role of SAC in DNA repair is conserved.

  15. Evaluation of Sample Stability and Automated DNA Extraction for Fetal Sex Determination Using Cell-Free Fetal DNA in Maternal Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Ordoñez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The detection of paternally inherited sequences in maternal plasma, such as the SRY gene for fetal sexing or RHD for fetal blood group genotyping, is becoming part of daily routine in diagnostic laboratories. Due to the low percentage of fetal DNA, it is crucial to ensure sample stability and the efficiency of DNA extraction. We evaluated blood stability at 4°C for at least 24 hours and automated DNA extraction, for fetal sex determination in maternal plasma. Methods. A total of 158 blood samples were collected, using EDTA-K tubes, from women in their 1st trimester of pregnancy. Samples were kept at 4°C for at least 24 hours before processing. An automated DNA extraction was evaluated, and its efficiency was compared with a standard manual procedure. The SRY marker was used to quantify cfDNA by real-time PCR. Results. Although lower cfDNA amounts were obtained by automated DNA extraction (mean 107,35 GE/mL versus 259,43 GE/mL, the SRY sequence was successfully detected in all 108 samples from pregnancies with male fetuses. Conclusion. We successfully evaluated the suitability of standard blood tubes for the collection of maternal blood and assessed samples to be suitable for analysis at least 24 hours later. This would allow shipping to a central reference laboratory almost from anywhere in Europe.

  16. A high sensitivity, high throughput, automated single-cell gel electrophoresis ('Comet') DNA damage assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vojnovic, B.; Barber, P.R.; Johnston, P.J.; Gregory, H.C.; Locke, R.J.

    2003-01-01

    A fully automated microscopy machine vision image capture and analysis system for the collection of data from slides of 'comets' has been developed. The novel image processing algorithms employed in delineating the 'comet head' from the 'comet tail' allow us to determine accurately very low levels of damage. In conjunction with calibrated and automated image capture methods, we are able to eliminate operator subjectivity and analyse large numbers of cells (>2500) in a short time (<1 hour). The image processing algorithm is designed to handle particularly difficult nuclei containing a high degree of structure, due to DNA clumping. We also present techniques used to extend the assay's dynamic range by removing interfering background fluorescence and to define a region of interest. If subtle biological variations are to be quantified (e.g. cell cycle dependant damage), then the use of large cell populations is dictated. Under those circumstances, the use of a fully automated system is particularly advantageous providing that the manner in which data is extracted does not introduce any inadvertent bias. In practice, it is essential that the image processing steps are geared towards the correct recognition of an acceptable cell nucleus, i.e. comet 'head'. We acknowledge the financial support of CRUK, Programme Grant C133/A1812 - SP 2195-01/02 and the US Department of Energy Low Dose Radiation Research Program grant DE-FG07-99ER62878

  17. Complexing DNA Origami Frameworks through Sequential Self-Assembly Based on Directed Docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yuki; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Endo, Masayuki

    2018-06-11

    Ordered DNA origami arrays have the potential to compartmentalize space into distinct periodic domains that can incorporate a variety of nanoscale objects. Herein, we used the cavities of a preassembled 2D DNA origami framework to incorporate square-shaped DNA origami structures (SQ-origamis). The framework was self-assembled on a lipid bilayer membrane from cross-shaped DNA origami structures (CR-origamis) and subsequently exposed to the SQ-origamis. High-speed AFM revealed the dynamic adsorption/desorption behavior of the SQ-origamis, which resulted in continuous changing of their arrangements in the framework. These dynamic SQ-origamis were trapped in the cavities by increasing the Mg 2+ concentration or by introducing sticky-ended cohesions between extended staples, both from the SQ- and CR-origamis, which enabled the directed docking of the SQ-origamis. Our study offers a platform to create supramolecular structures or systems consisting of multiple DNA origami components. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Self-assembling of calcium salt of the new DNA base 5-carboxylcytosine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irrera, Simona [Department of Chemistry, SAPIENZA University of Rome, Piazzale A. Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); Department of Chemistry, University College London, 20 Grodon Street, WC1H0AJ London (United Kingdom); Ruiz-Hernandez, Sergio E. [School of Chemistry, Cardiff University Main Building, Park Place, CF103AT Cardiff (United Kingdom); Reggente, Melania [Department of Basic and Applied Sciences for Engineering, SAPIENZA University of Rome, Via A. Scarpa 16, 00161 Rome (Italy); Passeri, Daniele, E-mail: daniele.passeri@uniroma1.it [Department of Basic and Applied Sciences for Engineering, SAPIENZA University of Rome, Via A. Scarpa 16, 00161 Rome (Italy); Natali, Marco [Department of Basic and Applied Sciences for Engineering, SAPIENZA University of Rome, Via A. Scarpa 16, 00161 Rome (Italy); Gala, Fabrizio [Department of Basic and Applied Sciences for Engineering, SAPIENZA University of Rome, Via A. Scarpa 16, 00161 Rome (Italy); Department of Medical-Surgical, Techno-Biomedical Sciences and Translational Medicine of SAPIENZA University of Rome, Sant’Andrea Hospital, Rome (Italy); Zollo, Giuseppe [Department of Basic and Applied Sciences for Engineering, SAPIENZA University of Rome, Via A. Scarpa 16, 00161 Rome (Italy); Rossi, Marco [Department of Basic and Applied Sciences for Engineering, SAPIENZA University of Rome, Via A. Scarpa 16, 00161 Rome (Italy); Research Center for Nanotechnology applied to Engineering of SAPIENZA University of Rome (CNIS), Piazzale A. Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); Portalone, Gustavo, E-mail: gustavo.portalone@uniroma1.it [Department of Chemistry, SAPIENZA University of Rome, Piazzale A. Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Ca salt of 5-carboxylcytosine has been deposited on HOPG substrate. • Molecules self-assembled in monolayers and filaments. • Height of the features were measured by atomic force microscopy. • Ab-initio calculations confirmed the AFM results. - Abstract: Supramolecular architectures involving DNA bases can have a strong impact in several fields such as nanomedicine and nanodevice manufacturing. To date, in addition to the four canonical nucleobases (adenine, thymine, guanine and cytosine), four other forms of cytosine modified at the 5 position have been identified in DNA. Among these four new cytosine derivatives, 5-carboxylcytosine has been recently discovered in mammalian stem cell DNA, and proposed as the final product of the oxidative epigenetic demethylation pathway on the 5 position of cytosine. In this work, a calcium salt of 5-carboxylcytosine has been synthesized and deposited on graphite surface, where it forms self-assembled features as long range monolayers and up to one micron long filaments. These structures have been analyzed in details combining different theoretical and experimental approaches: X-ray single-crystal diffraction data were used to simulate the molecule-graphite interaction, first using molecular dynamics and then refining the results using density functional theory (DFT); finally, data obtained with DFT were used to rationalize atomic force microscopy (AFM) results.

  19. Optimized assembly and covalent coupling of single-molecule DNA origami nanoarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, Ashwin; Rothemund, Paul W K

    2014-12-23

    Artificial DNA nanostructures, such as DNA origami, have great potential as templates for the bottom-up fabrication of both biological and nonbiological nanodevices at a resolution unachievable by conventional top-down approaches. However, because origami are synthesized in solution, origami-templated devices cannot easily be studied or integrated into larger on-chip architectures. Electrostatic self-assembly of origami onto lithographically defined binding sites on Si/SiO2 substrates has been achieved, but conditions for optimal assembly have not been characterized, and the method requires high Mg2+ concentrations at which most devices aggregate. We present a quantitative study of parameters affecting origami placement, reproducibly achieving single-origami binding at 94±4% of sites, with 90% of these origami having an orientation within ±10° of their target orientation. Further, we introduce two techniques for converting electrostatic DNA-surface bonds to covalent bonds, allowing origami arrays to be used under a wide variety of Mg2+-free solution conditions.

  20. Characterization and Application of DNA-templated Silver Nanoclusters and Polarized Spectroscopy of Self-Assembled Nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carro-Temboury, Miguel R.

    In this thesis two different systems are investigated envisioning their potential applications: DNA-templated silver nanoclusters (DNA-AgNCs) and ionic self-assembled (ISA) nanostructures based on azo-dyes. Mainly Visible-NIR spectroscopy was used to probe electronic transitions with absorbance a...

  1. Assembly of Four Diverse Heterocyclic Libraries Enabled by Prins Cyclization, Au-Catalyzed Enyne Cycloisomerization, and Automated Amide Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jiayue; Chai, David I.; Miller, Christopher; Hao, Jason; Thomas, Christopher; Wang, JingQi; Scheidt, Karl A.; Kozmin, Sergey A.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a unified synthetic strategy for efficient assembly of four new heterocyclic libraries. The synthesis began by creating a range of structurally diverse pyrrolidinones or piperidinones. Such compounds were obtained in a simple one-flask operation starting with readily available amines, ketoesters, and unsaturated anhydrides. The use of tetrahydropyran-containing ketoesters, which were rapidly assembled by our Prins cyclization protocol, enabled efficient fusion of pyran and piperidinone cores. A newly developed Au(I)-catalyzed cycloisomerization of alkyne-containing enamides further expanded heterocyclic diversity by providing rapid entry into a wide range of bicyclic and tricyclic dienamides. The final stage of the process entailed diversification of each of the initially produced carboxylic acids using a fully automated platform for amide synthesis, which delivered 1872 compounds in high diastereomeric and chemical purity. PMID:22860634

  2. Process development for automated solar cell and module production. Task 4: automated array assembly. Quarterly report No. 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagerty, J.J.

    1980-01-31

    Construction of an automated solar cell layup and interconnect system is now complete. This system incorporates a Unimate 2000 B industrial robot with an end effector consisting of a vacuum pick up and induction heating coil. The robot interfaces with a smart cell preparation station which correctly orients the cell, applies solder paste and forms and positions the correct lengths of interconnect lead. The system is controlled and monitored by a TRS-80 micro computer. The first operational tests of the fully integrated station have been run. These tests proved the soundness of the basic design concept but also pointed to areas in which modifications are necessary. These modifications are nearly complete and the improved parts are being integrated. Development of the controlling computer program is progressing to both reflect these changes and reduce operating time.

  3. Structural and thermodynamic analysis of modified nucleosides in self-assembled DNA cross-tiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakker, Lauren; Marchi, Alexandria N; Harris, Kimberly A; LaBean, Thomas H; Agris, Paul F

    2014-01-01

    DNA Holliday junctions are important natural strand-exchange structures that form during homologous recombination. Immobile four-arm junctions, analogs to Holliday junctions, have been designed to self-assemble into cross-tile structures by maximizing Watson-Crick base pairing and fixed crossover points. The cross-tiles, self-assembled from base pair recognition between designed single-stranded DNAs, form higher order lattice structures through cohesion of self-associating sticky ends. These cross-tiles have 16 unpaired nucleosides in the central loop at the junction of the four duplex stems. The importance of the centralized unpaired nucleosides to the structure's thermodynamic stability and self-assembly is unknown. Cross-tile DNA nanostructures were designed and constructed from nine single-stranded DNAs with four shell strands, four arms, and a central loop containing 16 unpaired bases. The 16 unpaired bases were either 2'-deoxyribothymidines, 2'-O-methylribouridines, or abasic 1',2'-dideoxyribonucleosides. Thermodynamic profiles and structural base-stacking contributions were assessed using UV absorption spectroscopy during thermal denaturation and circular dichroism spectroscopy, respectively, and the resulting structures were observed by atomic force microscopy. There were surprisingly significant changes in the thermodynamic and structural properties of lattice formation as a result of altering only the 16 unpaired, centralized nucleosides. The 16 unpaired 2'-O-methyluridines were stabilizing and produced uniform tubular structures. In contrast, the abasic nucleosides were destabilizing producing a mixture of structures. These results strongly indicate the importance of a small number of centrally located unpaired nucleosides within the structures. Since minor modifications lead to palpable changes in lattice formation, DNA cross-tiles present an easily manipulated structure convenient for applications in biomedical and biosensing devices.

  4. Automated High-Volume Manufacturing of Modular Photovoltaic Panel Assemblies for Space Solar Arrays, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Deployable Space Systems, Inc. (DSS) will focus the proposed SBIR Phase 2 program on the development and demonstration of an automated robotic manufacturing...

  5. Two-dimensional self-assembly of DNA-functionalized gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenjie; Zhang, Honghu; Hagen, Noah; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Akinc, Mufit; Travesset, Alex; Mallapragada, Surya; Vaknin, David

    2D superlattices of nanoparticles (NPs) are promising candidates for nano-devices. It is still challenging to develop a simple yet efficient protocol to assemble NPs in a controlled manner. Here, we report on formation of 2D Gibbs monolayers of single-stranded DNA-coated gold nanoparticles (ssDNA-AuNPs) at the air-water interface by manipulation of salts contents. MgCl2 and CaCl2 in solutions facilitate the accumulation of the non-complementary ssDNA-AuNPs on aqueous surfaces. Grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) and X-ray reflectivity show that the surface AuNPs assembly forms a mono-particle layer and undergoes a transformation from short-range to long-range (hexagonal) order above a threshold of [MgCl2] or [CaCl2]. For solutions that include two kinds of ssDNA-AuNPs with complementary base-pairing, the surface AuNPs form a thicker film and only in-plane short-range order is observed. By using other salts (NaCl or LaCl3) at concentrations of similar ionic strength to those of MgCl2 or CaCl2, we find that surface adsorbed NPs lack any orders. X-ray fluorescence measurements provide direct evidence of surface enrichment of AuNPs and divalent ions (Ca2 +) . The work was supported by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, USDOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358 and DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  6. Sub–100-nm metafluorophores with digitally tunable optical properties self-assembled from DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woehrstein, Johannes B.; Strauss, Maximilian T.; Ong, Luvena L.; Wei, Bryan; Zhang, David Y.; Jungmann, Ralf; Yin, Peng

    2017-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy allows specific target detection down to the level of single molecules and has become an enabling tool in biological research. To transduce the biological information to an imageable signal, we have developed a variety of fluorescent probes, such as organic dyes or fluorescent proteins with different colors. Despite their success, a limitation on constructing small fluorescent probes is the lack of a general framework to achieve precise and programmable control of critical optical properties, such as color and brightness. To address this challenge, we introduce metafluorophores, which are constructed as DNA nanostructure–based fluorescent probes with digitally tunable optical properties. Each metafluorophore is composed of multiple organic fluorophores, organized in a spatially controlled fashion in a compact sub–100-nm architecture using a DNA nanostructure scaffold. Using DNA origami with a size of 90 × 60 nm2, substantially smaller than the optical diffraction limit, we constructed small fluorescent probes with digitally tunable brightness, color, and photostability and demonstrated a palette of 124 virtual colors. Using these probes as fluorescent barcodes, we implemented an assay for multiplexed quantification of nucleic acids. Additionally, we demonstrated the triggered in situ self-assembly of fluorescent DNA nanostructures with prescribed brightness upon initial hybridization to a nucleic acid target. PMID:28691083

  7. DNA-Directed Assembly of Capture Tools for Constitutional Studies of Large Protein Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Rebecca; Faesen, Alex; Vogel, Katrin; Jeganathan, Sadasivam; Musacchio, Andrea; Niemeyer, Christof M

    2015-06-10

    Large supramolecular protein complexes, such as the molecular machinery involved in gene regulation, cell signaling, or cell division, are key in all fundamental processes of life. Detailed elucidation of structure and dynamics of such complexes can be achieved by reverse-engineering parts of the complexes in order to probe their interactions with distinctive binding partners in vitro. The exploitation of DNA nanostructures to mimic partially assembled supramolecular protein complexes in which the presence and state of two or more proteins are decisive for binding of additional building blocks is reported here. To this end, four-way DNA Holliday junction motifs bearing a fluorescein and a biotin tag, for tracking and affinity capture, respectively, are site-specifically functionalized with centromeric protein (CENP) C and CENP-T. The latter serves as baits for binding of the so-called KMN component, thereby mimicking early stages of the assembly of kinetochores, structures that mediate and control the attachment of microtubules to chromosomes in the spindle apparatus. Results from pull-down experiments are consistent with the hypothesis that CENP-C and CENP-T may bind cooperatively to the KMN network. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Cholesterol-conjugated supramolecular assemblies of low generations polyamidoamine dendrimers for enhanced EGFP plasmid DNA transfection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golkar, Nasim; Samani, Soliman Mohammadi; Tamaddon, Ali Mohammad, E-mail: amtamadon@gmail.com [Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Department of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmacy (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Aimed to prepare an enhanced gene delivery system with low cytotoxicity and high transfection efficiency, various cholesterol-conjugated derivates of low generation polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers were prepared. The conjugates were characterized by TNBS assay, FTIR, and {sup 1}H-NMR spectroscopy. Self-assembly of the dendrimer conjugates (G1-Chol, G2-Chol, and G3-Chol) was investigated by pyrene assay. Following formation of the complexes between enhanced green fluorescence protein plasmid and the dendrimer conjugates at various N (primary amine)/P (phosphate) mole ratios, plasmid condensation, biologic stability, cytotoxicity, and protein expression were investigated. The conjugates self-assembled into micellar dispersions with the critical micelle concentration values (<50 µg/ml) depending on the dendrimer generation and cholesterol/amine mole ratio. Cholesterol conjugation resulted in higher resistance of the condensed plasmid DNA in a competition assay with heparin sulfate. Also, the transfection efficiency was determined higher for the cholesterol conjugates than unmodified dendrimers in HepG2 cells, showing the highest for G2-Chol at 40 % degree of cholesterol modification (G2-Chol{sub 40 %}) among various dendrimer generations. Interestingly, such conjugate showed a complete protection of plasmid against serum nucleases. Our results confirmed that the cholesterol conjugation to PAMAM dendrimers of low generations bearing little cytotoxicity improves their several physicochemical and biological characteristics required for an enhanced delivery of plasmid DNA into cells.

  9. Assembling high activity phosphotriesterase composites using hybrid nanoparticle peptide-DNA scaffolded architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breger, Joyce C.; Buckhout-White, Susan; Walper, Scott A.; Oh, Eunkeu; Susumu, Kimihiro; Ancona, Mario G.; Medintz, Igor L.

    2017-06-01

    Nanoparticle (NP) display potentially offers a new way to both stabilize and, in many cases, enhance enzyme activity over that seen for native protein in solution. However, the large, globular and sometimes multimeric nature of many enzymes limits their ability to attach directly to the surface of NPs, especially when the latter are colloidally stabilized with bulky PEGylated ligands. Engineering extended protein linkers into the enzymes to achieve direct attachment through the PEG surface often detrimentally alters the enzymes catalytic ability. Here, we demonstrate an alternate, hybrid biomaterials-based approach to achieving directed enzyme assembly on PEGylated NPs. We self-assemble a unique architecture consisting of a central semiconductor quantum dot (QD) scaffold displaying controlled ratios of extended peptide-DNA linkers which penetrate through the PEG surface to directly couple enzymes to the QD surface. As a test case, we utilize phosphotriesterase (PTE), an enzyme of bio-defense interest due to its ability to hydrolyze organophosphate nerve agents. Moreover, this unique approach still allows PTE to maintain enhanced activity while also suggesting the ability of DNA to enhance enzyme activity in and of itself.

  10. Automated forensic DNA purification optimized for FTA card punches and identifiler STR-based PCR analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tack, Lois C; Thomas, Michelle; Reich, Karl

    2007-03-01

    Forensic labs globally face the same problem-a growing need to process a greater number and wider variety of samples for DNA analysis. The same forensic lab can be tasked all at once with processing mixed casework samples from crime scenes, convicted offender samples for database entry, and tissue from tsunami victims for identification. Besides flexibility in the robotic system chosen for forensic automation, there is a need, for each sample type, to develop new methodology that is not only faster but also more reliable than past procedures. FTA is a chemical treatment of paper, unique to Whatman Bioscience, and is used for the stabilization and storage of biological samples. Here, the authors describe optimization of the Whatman FTA Purification Kit protocol for use with the AmpFlSTR Identifiler PCR Amplification Kit.

  11. Development of a sensitive electrochemical DNA sensor by 4-aminothiophenol self-assembled on electrodeposited nanogold electrode coupled with Au nanoparticles labeled reporter ssDNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Guangjiu; Liu Lihua; Qi Xiaowei; Guo Yaqing; Sun Wei; Li Xiaolin

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Abstract: A novel and sensitive electrochemical DNA biosensor was fabricated by using the 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) self-assembled on electrodeposited gold nanoparticles (NG) modified electrode to anchor capture ssDNA sequences and Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) labeled with reporter ssDNA sequences, which were further coupled with electroactive indicator of hexaammineruthenium (III) ([Ru(NH 3 ) 6 ] 3+ ) to amplify the electrochemical signal of hybridization reaction. Different modified electrodes were prepared and characterized by cyclic voltammetry, scanning electron microscope and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. By using a sandwich model for the capture of target ssDNA sequences, which was based on the shorter probe ssDNA and AuNPs label reporter ssDNA hybridized with longer target ssDNA, the electrochemical behavior of [Ru(NH 3 ) 6 ] 3+ was monitored by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). The fabricated electrochemical DNA sensor exhibited good distinguish capacity for the complementary ssDNA sequence and two bases mismatched ssDNA. The dynamic detection range of the target ssDNA sequences was from 1.4 × 10 −11 to 2.0 × 10 −9 mol/L with the detection limit as 9.5 × 10 −12 mol/L (3σ). So in this paper a new electrochemical DNA sensor was designed with gold nanoparticles as the immobilization platform and the signal amplifier simultaneously.

  12. Prereplicative complexes assembled in vitro support origin-dependent and independent DNA replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    On, Kin Fan; Beuron, Fabienne; Frith, David; Snijders, Ambrosius P; Morris, Edward P; Diffley, John F X

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic DNA replication initiates from multiple replication origins. To ensure each origin fires just once per cell cycle, initiation is divided into two biochemically discrete steps: the Mcm2-7 helicase is first loaded into prereplicative complexes (pre-RCs) as an inactive double hexamer by the origin recognition complex (ORC), Cdt1 and Cdc6; the helicase is then activated by a set of “firing factors.” Here, we show that plasmids containing pre-RCs assembled with purified proteins support complete and semi-conservative replication in extracts from budding yeast cells overexpressing firing factors. Replication requires cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) and Dbf4-dependent kinase (DDK). DDK phosphorylation of Mcm2-7 does not by itself promote separation of the double hexamer, but is required for the recruitment of firing factors and replisome components in the extract. Plasmid replication does not require a functional replication origin; however, in the presence of competitor DNA and limiting ORC concentrations, replication becomes origin-dependent in this system. These experiments indicate that Mcm2-7 double hexamers can be precursors of replication and provide insight into the nature of eukaryotic DNA replication origins. PMID:24566989

  13. Assembling and auditing a comprehensive DNA barcode reference library for European marine fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, L M; Knebelsberger, T; Landi, M; Soares, P; Raupach, M J; Costa, F O

    2016-12-01

    A large-scale comprehensive reference library of DNA barcodes for European marine fishes was assembled, allowing the evaluation of taxonomic uncertainties and species genetic diversity that were otherwise hidden in geographically restricted studies. A total of 4118 DNA barcodes were assigned to 358 species generating 366 Barcode Index Numbers (BIN). Initial examination revealed as much as 141 BIN discordances (more than one species in each BIN). After implementing an auditing and five-grade (A-E) annotation protocol, the number of discordant species BINs was reduced to 44 (13% grade E), while concordant species BINs amounted to 271 (78% grades A and B) and 14 other had insufficient data (grade D). Fifteen species displayed comparatively high intraspecific divergences ranging from 2·6 to 18·5% (grade C), which is biologically paramount information to be considered in fish species monitoring and stock assessment. On balance, this compilation contributed to the detection of 59 European fish species probably in need of taxonomic clarification or re-evaluation. The generalized implementation of an auditing and annotation protocol for reference libraries of DNA barcodes is recommended. © 2016 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  14. Self-assembling of calcium salt of the new DNA base 5-carboxylcytosine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irrera, Simona; Ruiz-Hernandez, Sergio E.; Reggente, Melania; Passeri, Daniele; Natali, Marco; Gala, Fabrizio; Zollo, Giuseppe; Rossi, Marco; Portalone, Gustavo

    2017-06-01

    Supramolecular architectures involving DNA bases can have a strong impact in several fields such as nanomedicine and nanodevice manufacturing. To date, in addition to the four canonical nucleobases (adenine, thymine, guanine and cytosine), four other forms of cytosine modified at the 5 position have been identified in DNA. Among these four new cytosine derivatives, 5-carboxylcytosine has been recently discovered in mammalian stem cell DNA, and proposed as the final product of the oxidative epigenetic demethylation pathway on the 5 position of cytosine. In this work, a calcium salt of 5-carboxylcytosine has been synthesized and deposited on graphite surface, where it forms self-assembled features as long range monolayers and up to one micron long filaments. These structures have been analyzed in details combining different theoretical and experimental approaches: X-ray single-crystal diffraction data were used to simulate the molecule-graphite interaction, first using molecular dynamics and then refining the results using density functional theory (DFT); finally, data obtained with DFT were used to rationalize atomic force microscopy (AFM) results.

  15. Proximity hybridization-regulated catalytic DNA hairpin assembly for electrochemical immunoassay based on in situ DNA template-synthesized Pd nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Fuyi; Yao, Yao; Luo, Jianjun; Zhang, Xing; Zhang, Yu; Yin, Dengyang; Gao, Fenglei; Wang, Po

    2017-01-01

    Novel hybridization proximity-regulated catalytic DNA hairpin assembly strategy has been proposed for electrochemical immunoassay based on in situ DNA template-synthesized Pd nanoparticles as signal label. The DNA template-synthesized Pd nanoparticles were characterized with atomic force microscopic and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The highly efficient electrocatalysis by DNA template synthesized Pd nanoparticles for NaBH 4 oxidation produced an intense detection signal. The label-free electrochemical method achieved the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) with a linear range from 10 −15 to 10 −11  g mL −1 and a detection limit of 0.43 × 10 −15  g mL −1 . Through introducing a supersandwich reaction to increase the DNA length, the electrochemical signal was further amplified, leading to a detection limit of 0.52 × 10 −16  g mL −1 . And it rendered satisfactory analytical performance for the determination of CEA in serum samples. Furthermore, it exhibited good reproducibility and stability; meanwhile, it also showed excellent specificity due to the specific recognition of antigen by antibody. Therefore, the DNA template synthesized Pd nanoparticles based signal amplification approach has great potential in clinical applications and is also suitable for quantification of biomarkers at ultralow level. - Graphical abstract: A novel label-free and enzyme-free electrochemical immunoassay based on proximity hybridization-regulated catalytic DNA hairpin assemblies for recycling of the CEA. - Highlights: • A novel enzyme-free electrochemical immunosensor was developed for detection of CEA. • The signal amplification was based on catalytic DNA hairpin assembly and DNA-template-synthesized Pd nanoparticles. • The biosensor could detect CEA down to 0.52 × 10 −16  g mL −1 level with a dynamic range spanning 5 orders of magnitude.

  16. The self-assembly of particles with isotropic interactions: Using DNA coated colloids to create designer nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, R. B.; Dion, S.; Konigslow, K. von

    2014-01-01

    Self-consistent field theory equations are presented that are suitable for use as a coarse-grained model for DNA coated colloids, polymer-grafted nanoparticles and other systems with approximately isotropic interactions. The equations are generalized for arbitrary numbers of chemically distinct colloids. The advantages and limitations of such a coarse-grained approach for DNA coated colloids are discussed, as are similarities with block copolymer self-assembly. In particular, preliminary results for three species self-assembly are presented that parallel results from a two dimensional ABC triblock copolymer phase. The possibility of incorporating crystallization, dynamics, inverse statistical mechanics and multiscale modelling techniques are discussed

  17. Automated Array Assembly, Phase 2. Quarterly technical progress report, fourth quarter 1977. Texas Instruments report No. 03-77-56

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carbajal, B.G.

    1978-01-01

    The Automated Array Assembly Task, Phase 2 of the Low Cost Silicon Solar Array (LSSA) Project, is a process development task. This contract includes solar cell module process development activities in the areas of Surface Preparation, Plasma Processing, Diffusion, Cell Processing and Module Fabrication. In addition, a High Efficiency Cell Development Activity is included. During this quarter, effort was concentrated on wafer etching for saw damage removal, establishing a standard phosphorous diffusion process and a baseline solar cell process as a test bed, designing a large area square cell including test sites, analyzing module layouts for optimum packing efficiency and fabricating the first Tandem Junction Cells (TJC) for this contract. A TJC with backside contacts gave 15.1% efficiency at AM1.

  18. Technologies for the Fast Set-Up of Automated Assembly Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krüger, Norbert; Ude, Ales; Petersen, Henrik Gordon

    2014-01-01

    of so called few-of-a-kind production. Therefore, most production of this kind is done manually and thus often performed in low-wage countries. In the IntellAct project, we have developed a set of methods which facilitate the set-up of a complex automatic assembly process, and here we present our work...

  19. Vision feedback driven automated assembly of photopolymerized structures by parallel optical trapping and manipulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Jeppe Seidelin; Perch-Nielsen, Ivan Ryberg; Rodrigo, Peter John

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate how optical trapping and manipulation can be used to assemble microstructures. The microstructures we show being automatically recognized and manipulated are produced using the two-photon polymerization (2PP) technique with submicron resolution. In this work, we show identical shape...

  20. Automated simultaneous assembly of multi-stage testing for the uniform CPA examination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breithaupt, Krista; Ariel, A.; Veldkamp, Bernard P.

    2004-01-01

    Some solutions used in the assembly of the computerized Uniform Certified Public Accountancy (CPA) licensing examination are offered as practical alternatives for operational programs producing large numbers of forms. The Uniform CPA examination will be offered as an adaptive multi-stage test (MST)

  1. Efficient systemic DNA delivery to the tumor by self-assembled nanoparticle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hailin; Xie, Xinhua; Guo, Jiaoli; Wei, Weidong; Wu, Minqing; Liu, Peng; Kong, Yanan; Yang, Lu; Hung, Mien-Chie; Xie, Xiaoming

    2014-01-01

    There are few delivery agents that could deliver gene with high efficiency and low toxicity, especially for animal experiments. Therefore, creating vectors with good delivery efficiency and safety profile is a meaningful work. We have developed a self-assembled gene delivery system (XM001), which can more efficiently deliver DNA to multiple cell lines and breast tumor, as compared to commercial delivery agents. In addition, systemically administrated XM001-BikDD (BikDD is a mutant form of proapoptotic gene Bik) significantly inhibited the growth of human breast cancer cells and prolonged the life span in implanted nude mice. This study demonstrates that XM001 is an efficient and widespread transfection agent, which could be a promising tumor delivery vector for cancer targeted therapy.

  2. Mapping Nanoscale Hotspots with Single-Molecule Emitters Assembled into Plasmonic Nanocavities Using DNA Origami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikkaraddy, Rohit; Turek, V. A.; Kongsuwan, Nuttawut; Benz, Felix; Carnegie, Cloudy; van de Goor, Tim; de Nijs, Bart; Demetriadou, Angela; Hess, Ortwin; Keyser, Ulrich F.; Baumberg, Jeremy J.

    2018-01-01

    Fabricating nanocavities in which optically-active single quantum emitters are precisely positioned, is crucial for building nanophotonic devices. Here we show that self-assembly based on robust DNA-origami constructs can precisely position single molecules laterally within sub-5nm gaps between plasmonic substrates that support intense optical confinement. By placing single-molecules at the center of a nanocavity, we show modification of the plasmon cavity resonance before and after bleaching the chromophore, and obtain enhancements of $\\geq4\\times10^3$ with high quantum yield ($\\geq50$%). By varying the lateral position of the molecule in the gap, we directly map the spatial profile of the local density of optical states with a resolution of $\\pm1.5$ nm. Our approach introduces a straightforward non-invasive way to measure and quantify confined optical modes on the nanoscale.

  3. Healing assessment of tile sets for error tolerance in DNA self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashempour, M; Mashreghian Arani, Z; Lombardi, F

    2008-12-01

    An assessment of the effectiveness of healing for error tolerance in DNA self-assembly tile sets for algorithmic/nano-manufacturing applications is presented. Initially, the conditions for correct binding of a tile to an existing aggregate are analysed using a Markovian approach; based on this analysis, it is proved that correct aggregation (as identified with a so-called ideal tile set) is not always met for the existing tile sets for nano-manufacturing. A metric for assessing tile sets for healing by utilising punctures is proposed. Tile sets are investigated and assessed with respect to features such as error (mismatched tile) movement, punctured area and bond types. Subsequently, it is shown that the proposed metric can comprehensively assess the healing effectiveness of a puncture type for a tile set and its capability to attain error tolerance for the desired pattern. Extensive simulation results are provided.

  4. DNA-programmed dynamic assembly of quantum dots for molecular computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xuewen; Li, Zhi; Chen, Muzi; Ma, Nan

    2014-12-22

    Despite the widespread use of quantum dots (QDs) for biosensing and bioimaging, QD-based bio-interfaceable and reconfigurable molecular computing systems have not yet been realized. DNA-programmed dynamic assembly of multi-color QDs is presented for the construction of a new class of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based QD computing systems. A complete set of seven elementary logic gates (OR, AND, NOR, NAND, INH, XOR, XNOR) are realized using a series of binary and ternary QD complexes operated by strand displacement reactions. The integration of different logic gates into a half-adder circuit for molecular computation is also demonstrated. This strategy is quite versatile and straightforward for logical operations and would pave the way for QD-biocomputing-based intelligent molecular diagnostics. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Mapping Nanoscale Hotspots with Single-Molecule Emitters Assembled into Plasmonic Nanocavities Using DNA Origami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikkaraddy, Rohit; Turek, V A; Kongsuwan, Nuttawut; Benz, Felix; Carnegie, Cloudy; van de Goor, Tim; de Nijs, Bart; Demetriadou, Angela; Hess, Ortwin; Keyser, Ulrich F; Baumberg, Jeremy J

    2018-01-10

    Fabricating nanocavities in which optically active single quantum emitters are precisely positioned is crucial for building nanophotonic devices. Here we show that self-assembly based on robust DNA-origami constructs can precisely position single molecules laterally within sub-5 nm gaps between plasmonic substrates that support intense optical confinement. By placing single-molecules at the center of a nanocavity, we show modification of the plasmon cavity resonance before and after bleaching the chromophore and obtain enhancements of ≥4 × 10 3 with high quantum yield (≥50%). By varying the lateral position of the molecule in the gap, we directly map the spatial profile of the local density of optical states with a resolution of ±1.5 nm. Our approach introduces a straightforward noninvasive way to measure and quantify confined optical modes on the nanoscale.

  6. Discovery of human inversion polymorphisms by comparative analysis of human and chimpanzee DNA sequence assemblies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available With a draft genome-sequence assembly for the chimpanzee available, it is now possible to perform genome-wide analyses to identify, at a submicroscopic level, structural rearrangements that have occurred between chimpanzees and humans. The goal of this study was to investigate chromosomal regions that are inverted between the chimpanzee and human genomes. Using the net alignments for the builds of the human and chimpanzee genome assemblies, we identified a total of 1,576 putative regions of inverted orientation, covering more than 154 mega-bases of DNA. The DNA segments are distributed throughout the genome and range from 23 base pairs to 62 mega-bases in length. For the 66 inversions more than 25 kilobases (kb in length, 75% were flanked on one or both sides by (often unrelated segmental duplications. Using PCR and fluorescence in situ hybridization we experimentally validated 23 of 27 (85% semi-randomly chosen regions; the largest novel inversion confirmed was 4.3 mega-bases at human Chromosome 7p14. Gorilla was used as an out-group to assign ancestral status to the variants. All experimentally validated inversion regions were then assayed against a panel of human samples and three of the 23 (13% regions were found to be polymorphic in the human genome. These polymorphic inversions include 730 kb (at 7p22, 13 kb (at 7q11, and 1 kb (at 16q24 fragments with a 5%, 30%, and 48% minor allele frequency, respectively. Our results suggest that inversions are an important source of variation in primate genome evolution. The finding of at least three novel inversion polymorphisms in humans indicates this type of structural variation may be a more common feature of our genome than previously realized.

  7. Architecture and Assembly of HIV Integrase Multimers in the Absence of DNA Substrates*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojja, Ravi Shankar; Andrake, Mark D.; Merkel, George; Weigand, Steven; Dunbrack, Roland L.; Skalka, Anna Marie

    2013-01-01

    We have applied small angle x-ray scattering and protein cross-linking coupled with mass spectrometry to determine the architectures of full-length HIV integrase (IN) dimers in solution. By blocking interactions that stabilize either a core-core domain interface or N-terminal domain intermolecular contacts, we show that full-length HIV IN can form two dimer types. One is an expected dimer, characterized by interactions between two catalytic core domains. The other dimer is stabilized by interactions of the N-terminal domain of one monomer with the C-terminal domain and catalytic core domain of the second monomer as well as direct interactions between the two C-terminal domains. This organization is similar to the “reaching dimer” previously described for wild type ASV apoIN and resembles the inner, substrate binding dimer in the crystal structure of the PFV intasome. Results from our small angle x-ray scattering and modeling studies indicate that in the absence of its DNA substrate, the HIV IN tetramer assembles as two stacked reaching dimers that are stabilized by core-core interactions. These models of full-length HIV IN provide new insight into multimer assembly and suggest additional approaches for enzyme inhibition. PMID:23322775

  8. An automated quantitative DNA image cytometry system detects abnormal cells in cervical cytology with high sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, O G; Ho, M W; Tsun, O K; Ng, A K; Tsui, E Y; Chow, J N; Ip, P P; Cheung, A N

    2018-03-26

    To evaluate the performance of an automated DNA-image-cytometry system as a tool to detect cervical carcinoma. Of 384 liquid-based cervical cytology samples with available biopsy follow-up were analyzed by both the Imager System and a high-risk HPV test (Cobas). The sensitivity and specificity of Imager System for detecting biopsy proven high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia [CIN]2-3) and carcinoma were 89.58% and 56.25%, respectively, compared to 97.22% and 23.33% of HPV test but additional HPV 16/18 genotyping increased the specificity to 69.58%. The sensitivity and specificity of the Imager System for predicting HSIL+ (CIN2-3+) lesions among atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance samples were 80.00% and 70.53%, respectively, compared to 100% and 11.58% of HPV test whilst the HPV 16/18 genotyping increased the specificity to 77.89%. Among atypical squamous cells-cannot exclude HSIL, the sensitivity and specificity of Imager System for predicting HSIL+ (CIN2-3+) lesions upon follow up were 82.86% and 33.33%%, respectively, compared to 97.14% and 4.76% of HPV test and the HPV 16/18 genotyping increased the specificity to 19.05%. Among low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion cases, the sensitivity and specificity of the Imager System for predicting HSIL+ (CIN2-3+) lesions were 66.67% and 35.71%%, respectively, compared to 66.67% and 29.76% of HPV test while HPV 16/18 genotyping increased the specificity to 79.76%. The overall results of imager and high-risk HPV test agreed in 69.43% (268) of all samples. The automated imager system and HPV 16/18 genotyping can enhance the specificity of detecting HSIL+ (CIN2-3+) lesions. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Application of X-ray digital radiography to online automated inspection of interior assembly structures of complex products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Yueping; Han Yan; Li Ruihong; Wang Liming

    2009-01-01

    The paper proposes an application of X-ray digital radiography to online automated inspection and recognition of the interior assembly structures of complex products by means of the multiple views techniques. First, a vertical hybrid projection function (VHPF) is proposed as the recognition feature of a two-dimensional image. VHPF combines an integral projection function and a standard deviation function so that it can reflect the mean and the variance of the pixels in the vertical direction in an image. Secondly, by considering the different importance grades of objects inside the product and the independence of these objects along the circumference, the paper presents a hierarchical recognition method and uses a neural network system to speed up the computation process with parallel operations. Thirdly, using the whole-orientation features of one standard swatch and by extracting its maximal system of linear independence as the feature basis, the issue of blind areas for recognition is resolved. Based on this approach, the first domestic X-ray multi-view digital detection system has been developed and applied to the online detection of objects containing complicated assembly structures.

  10. A Problem of Particulate Contamination in an Automated Assembly Machine Successfully Solved by CFD and Simple Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jatuporn Thongsri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Assembly of hard disk drives (HDDs needs to be done in an automated assembly machine (AAM virtually free of particulate contamination that can cause them to malfunction. Fan filter units (FFUs are installed above the AAM to reduce the number of suspended particles in the recirculating air flowing over and around them. At one time, several HDDs were found to be defective. To find out the root cause of this problem, computational fluid dynamics (CFD was used to investigate the airflow over and around the AAM. It was found that the cause of the high particle counts was improper air speed from the FFUs. The optimal FFUs air speed needed to be in the range of 0.35–0.65 m/s in which the airflow would block out nearby airborne particles and purge away particles generated by the AAM effectively which would, in effect, reduce the particle counts down below the threshold level of class 100 clean room. A few available measurement tools at the factory were then used to perform validating measurements against the simulation results, and the validation was positive. This optimal speed range was implemented at the factory after which the level of contamination was reduced to an acceptable level.

  11. Efficient self-assembly of DNA-functionalized fluorophores and gold nanoparticles with DNA functionalized silicon surfaces: the effect of oligomer spacers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milton, James A.; Patole, Samson; Yin, Huabing; Xiao, Qiang; Brown, Tom; Melvin, Tracy

    2013-01-01

    Although strategies for the immobilization of DNA oligonucleotides onto surfaces for bioanalytical and top-down bio-inspired nanobiofabrication approaches are well developed, the effect of introducing spacer molecules between the surface and the DNA oligonucleotide for the hybridization of nanoparticle–DNA conjugates has not been previously assessed in a quantitative manner. The hybridization efficiency of DNA oligonucleotides end-labelled with gold nanoparticles (1.4 or 10 nm diameter) with DNA sequences conjugated to silicon surfaces via hexaethylene glycol phosphate diester oligomer spacers (0, 1, 2, 6 oligomers) was found to be independent of spacer length. To quantify both the density of DNA strands attached to the surfaces and hybridization with the surface-attached DNA, new methodologies have been developed. Firstly, a simple approach based on fluorescence has been developed for determination of the immobilization density of DNA oligonucleotides. Secondly, an approach using mass spectrometry has been created to establish (i) the mean number of DNA oligonucleotides attached to the gold nanoparticles and (ii) the hybridization density of nanoparticle–oligonucleotide conjugates with the silicon surface–attached complementary sequence. These methods and results will be useful for application with nanosensors, the self-assembly of nanoelectronic devices and the attachment of nanoparticles to biomolecules for single-molecule biophysical studies. PMID:23361467

  12. Automated assembling of single fuel cell units for use in a fuel cell stack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalba, C. K.; Muminovic, A.; Barz, C.; Nasui, V.

    2017-05-01

    The manufacturing of PEMFC stacks (POLYMER ELEKTROLYT MEMBRAN Fuel Cell) is nowadays still done by hand. Over hundreds of identical single components have to be placed accurate together for the construction of a fuel cell stack. Beside logistic problems, higher total costs and disadvantages in weight the high number of components produce a higher statistic interference because of faulty erection or material defects and summation of manufacturing tolerances. The saving of costs is about 20 - 25 %. Furthermore, the total weight of the fuel cells will be reduced because of a new sealing technology. Overall a one minute cycle time has to be aimed per cell at the manufacturing of these single components. The change of the existing sealing concept to a bonded sealing is one of the important requisites to get an automated manufacturing of single cell units. One of the important steps for an automated gluing process is the checking of the glue application by using of an image processing system. After bonding the single fuel cell the sealing and electrical function can be checked, so that only functional and high qualitative cells can get into further manufacturing processes.

  13. NASA Wrangler: Automated Cloud-Based Data Assembly in the RECOVER Wildfire Decision Support System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnase, John; Carroll, Mark; Gill, Roger; Wooten, Margaret; Weber, Keith; Blair, Kindra; May, Jeffrey; Toombs, William

    2017-01-01

    NASA Wrangler is a loosely-coupled, event driven, highly parallel data aggregation service designed to take advantageof the elastic resource capabilities of cloud computing. Wrangler automatically collects Earth observational data, climate model outputs, derived remote sensing data products, and historic biophysical data for pre-, active-, and post-wildfire decision making. It is a core service of the RECOVER decision support system, which is providing rapid-response GIS analytic capabilities to state and local government agencies. Wrangler reduces to minutes the time needed to assemble and deliver crucial wildfire-related data.

  14. De Novo Assembly of Complete Chloroplast Genomes from Non-model Species Based on a K-mer Frequency-Based Selection of Chloroplast Reads from Total DNA Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shairul Izan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Whole Genome Shotgun (WGS sequences of plant species often contain an abundance of reads that are derived from the chloroplast genome. Up to now these reads have generally been identified and assembled into chloroplast genomes based on homology to chloroplasts from related species. This re-sequencing approach may select against structural differences between the genomes especially in non-model species for which no close relatives have been sequenced before. The alternative approach is to de novo assemble the chloroplast genome from total genomic DNA sequences. In this study, we used k-mer frequency tables to identify and extract the chloroplast reads from the WGS reads and assemble these using a highly integrated and automated custom pipeline. Our strategy includes steps aimed at optimizing assemblies and filling gaps which are left due to coverage variation in the WGS dataset. We have successfully de novo assembled three complete chloroplast genomes from plant species with a range of nuclear genome sizes to demonstrate the universality of our approach: Solanum lycopersicum (0.9 Gb, Aegilops tauschii (4 Gb and Paphiopedilum henryanum (25 Gb. We also highlight the need to optimize the choice of k and the amount of data used. This new and cost-effective method for de novo short read assembly will facilitate the study of complete chloroplast genomes with more accurate analyses and inferences, especially in non-model plant genomes.

  15. Self-assembled nanocomplexes of anionic pullulan and polyallylamine for DNA and pH-sensitive intracellular drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vora, Lalit; Tyagi, Monica; Patel, Ketan; Gupta, Sanjay; Vavia, Pradeep

    2014-12-01

    The amalgamation of chemotherapy and gene therapy is promising treatment option for cancer. In this study, novel biocompatible self-assembled nanocomplexes (NCs) between carboxylmethylated pullulan t335 (CMP) with polyallylamine (CMP-PAA NCs) were developed for plasmid DNA (pDNA) and pH-sensitive doxorubicin (DOX) delivery. DOX was conjugated to CMP (DOX-CMP) via hydrazone and confirmed by FTIR and 1H-NMR. In vitro release studies of pH-sensitive DOX-CMP conjugate showed 23 and 85 % release after 48 h at pH 7.4 (physiological pH) and pH 5 (intracellular/tumoral pH), respectively. The CMP-PAA NCs or DOX-CMP-PAA NCs self-assembled into a nanosized (successful cellular uptake of DOX-CMP-PAA NCs in HEK293 cells. Thus, NCs hold great potential for targeted pDNA and pH-sensitive intratumoral drug delivery.

  16. Self-assembled nanocomplexes of anionic pullulan and polyallylamine for DNA and pH-sensitive intracellular drug delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vora, Lalit; Tyagi, Monica; Patel, Ketan; Gupta, Sanjay; Vavia, Pradeep

    2014-01-01

    The amalgamation of chemotherapy and gene therapy is promising treatment option for cancer. In this study, novel biocompatible self-assembled nanocomplexes (NCs) between carboxylmethylated pullulan t335 (CMP) with polyallylamine (CMP–PAA NCs) were developed for plasmid DNA (pDNA) and pH-sensitive doxorubicin (DOX) delivery. DOX was conjugated to CMP (DOX–CMP) via hydrazone and confirmed by FTIR and 1 H-NMR. In vitro release studies of pH-sensitive DOX–CMP conjugate showed 23 and 85 % release after 48 h at pH 7.4 (physiological pH) and pH 5 (intracellular/tumoral pH), respectively. The CMP–PAA NCs or DOX–CMP–PAA NCs self-assembled into a nanosized (<250 nm) spherical shape as confirmed by DLS and TEM. The hemolysis and cytotoxicity study indicated that the CMP–PAA NCs did not show cytotoxicity in comparison with plain polyallylamine. Gel retardation assay showed complete binding of pDNA with CMP–PAA NCs at 1:2 weight ratio. CMP–PAA NCs/pDNA showed significantly higher transfection in HEK293 cells compared to PAA/pDNA complexes. Confocal imaging demonstrated successful cellular uptake of DOX–CMP–PAA NCs in HEK293 cells. Thus, NCs hold great potential for targeted pDNA and pH-sensitive intratumoral drug delivery

  17. Assembling of G-strands into novel tetra-molecular parallel G4-DNA nanostructures using avidin-biotin recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovok, Natalia; Iram, Natalie; Zikich, Dragoslav; Ghabboun, Jamal; Livshits, Gideon I; Porath, Danny; Kotlyar, Alexander B

    2008-09-01

    We describe a method for the preparation of novel long (hundreds of nanometers), uniform, inter-molecular G4-DNA molecules composed of four parallel G-strands. The only long continuous G4-DNA reported so far are intra-molecular structures made of a single G-strand. To enable a tetra-molecular assembly of the G-strands we developed a novel approach based on avidin-biotin biological recognition. The steps of the G4-DNA production include: (i) Enzymatic synthesis of long poly(dG)-poly(dC) molecules with biotinylated poly(dG)-strand; (ii) Formation of a complex between avidin-tetramer and four biotinylated poly(dG)-poly(dC) molecules; (iii) Separation of the poly(dC) strands from the poly(dG)-strands, which are connected to the avidin; (iv) Assembly of the four G-strands attached to the avidin into tetra-molecular G4-DNA. The average contour length of the formed structures, as measured by AFM, is equal to that of the initial poly(dG)-poly(dC) molecules, suggesting a tetra-molecular mechanism of the G-strands assembly. The height of tetra-molecular G4-nanostructures is larger than that of mono-molecular G4-DNA molecules having similar contour length. The CD spectra of the tetra- and mono-molecular G4-DNA are markedly different, suggesting different structural organization of these two types of molecules. The tetra-molecular G4-DNA nanostructures showed clear electrical polarizability. This suggests that they may be useful for molecular electronics.

  18. Crystal structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase protein clusters assembled on to damaged DNA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Miggiano, R.; Perugino, G.; Ciaramella, M.; Serpe, M.; Rejman, Dominik; Páv, Ondřej; Pohl, Radek; Garavaglia, S.; Lahiri, S.; Rizzi, M.; Rossi, F.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 473, č. 2 (2016), s. 123-133 ISSN 0264-6021 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 241587 - SYSTEMTB Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : DNA repair * DNA-binding protein * Mycobacterium tuberculosis * O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase * co-operativity * crystal structure Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.797, year: 2016

  19. Methodology on Investigating the Influences of Automated Material Handling System in Automotive Assembly Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffar, Seha; Azni Jafar, Fairul; Jamaludin, Zamberi

    2016-02-01

    A case study was selected as a method to collect data in actual industry situation. The study aimed to assess the influences of automated material handling system in automotive industry by proposing a new design of integration system through simulation, and analyze the significant effect and influence of the system. The method approach tool will be CAD Software (Delmia & Quest). The process of preliminary data gathering in phase 1 will collect all data related from actual industry situation. It is expected to produce a guideline and limitation in designing a new integration system later. In phase 2, an idea or concept of design will be done by using 10 principles of design consideration for manufacturing. A full factorial design will be used as design of experiment in order to analyze the performance measured of the integration system with the current system in case study. From the result of the experiment, an ANOVA analysis will be done to study the performance measured. Thus, it is expected that influences can be seen from the improvement made in the system.

  20. A DNA aptamer recognising a malaria protein biomarker can function as part of a DNA origami assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godonoga, Maia; Lin, Ting-Yu; Oshima, Azusa; Sumitomo, Koji; Tang, Marco S. L.; Cheung, Yee-Wai; Kinghorn, Andrew B.; Dirkzwager, Roderick M.; Zhou, Cunshan; Kuzuya, Akinori; Tanner, Julian A.; Heddle, Jonathan G.

    2016-01-01

    DNA aptamers have potential for disease diagnosis and as therapeutics, particularly when interfaced with programmable molecular technology. Here we have combined DNA aptamers specific for the malaria biomarker Plasmodium falciparum lactate dehydrogenase (PfLDH) with a DNA origami scaffold. Twelve aptamers that recognise PfLDH were integrated into a rectangular DNA origami and atomic force microscopy demonstrated that the incorporated aptamers preserve their ability to specifically bind target protein. Captured PfLDH retained enzymatic activity and protein-aptamer binding was observed dynamically using high-speed AFM. This work demonstrates the ability of DNA aptamers to recognise a malaria biomarker whilst being integrated within a supramolecular DNA scaffold, opening new possibilities for malaria diagnostic approaches based on DNA nanotechnology. PMID:26891622

  1. The sequence d(CGGCGGCCGC) self-assembles into a two dimensional rhombic DNA lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkadesh, S.; Mandal, P.K.; Gautham, N.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → This is the first crystal structure of a four-way junction with sticky ends. → Four junction structures bind to each other and form a rhombic cavity. → Each rhombus binds to others to form 'infinite' 2D tiles. → This is an example of bottom-up fabrication of a DNA nano-lattice. -- Abstract: We report here the crystal structure of the partially self-complementary decameric sequence d(CGGCGGCCGC), which self assembles to form a four-way junction with sticky ends. Each junction binds to four others through Watson-Crick base pairing at the sticky ends to form a rhombic structure. The rhombuses bind to each other and form two dimensional tiles. The tiles stack to form the crystal. The crystal diffracted in the space group P1 to a resolution of 2.5 A. The junction has the anti-parallel stacked-X conformation like other junction structures, though the formation of the rhombic net noticeably alters the details of the junction geometry.

  2. Proximity hybridization-regulated catalytic DNA hairpin assembly for electrochemical immunoassay based on in situ DNA template-synthesized Pd nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Fuyi [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu Normal University, Xuzhou 221116 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of New Drug Research and Clinical Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Analysis, School of Pharmacy, Xuzhou Medical College, 221004, Xuzhou (China); Yao, Yao; Luo, Jianjun; Zhang, Xing; Zhang, Yu; Yin, Dengyang [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of New Drug Research and Clinical Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Analysis, School of Pharmacy, Xuzhou Medical College, 221004, Xuzhou (China); Gao, Fenglei, E-mail: jsxzgfl@sina.com [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of New Drug Research and Clinical Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Analysis, School of Pharmacy, Xuzhou Medical College, 221004, Xuzhou (China); Wang, Po, E-mail: wangpo@jsnu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu Normal University, Xuzhou 221116 (China)

    2017-05-29

    Novel hybridization proximity-regulated catalytic DNA hairpin assembly strategy has been proposed for electrochemical immunoassay based on in situ DNA template-synthesized Pd nanoparticles as signal label. The DNA template-synthesized Pd nanoparticles were characterized with atomic force microscopic and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The highly efficient electrocatalysis by DNA template synthesized Pd nanoparticles for NaBH{sub 4} oxidation produced an intense detection signal. The label-free electrochemical method achieved the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) with a linear range from 10{sup −15} to 10{sup −11} g mL{sup −1} and a detection limit of 0.43 × 10{sup −15} g mL{sup −1}. Through introducing a supersandwich reaction to increase the DNA length, the electrochemical signal was further amplified, leading to a detection limit of 0.52 × 10{sup −16} g mL{sup −1}. And it rendered satisfactory analytical performance for the determination of CEA in serum samples. Furthermore, it exhibited good reproducibility and stability; meanwhile, it also showed excellent specificity due to the specific recognition of antigen by antibody. Therefore, the DNA template synthesized Pd nanoparticles based signal amplification approach has great potential in clinical applications and is also suitable for quantification of biomarkers at ultralow level. - Graphical abstract: A novel label-free and enzyme-free electrochemical immunoassay based on proximity hybridization-regulated catalytic DNA hairpin assemblies for recycling of the CEA. - Highlights: • A novel enzyme-free electrochemical immunosensor was developed for detection of CEA. • The signal amplification was based on catalytic DNA hairpin assembly and DNA-template-synthesized Pd nanoparticles. • The biosensor could detect CEA down to 0.52 × 10{sup −16} g mL{sup −1} level with a dynamic range spanning 5 orders of magnitude.

  3. Rapid and annealing-free self-assembly of DNA building blocks for 3D hydrogel chaperoned by cationic comb-type copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zheng; Wu, Yuyang; Yu, Feng; Niu, Chaoqun; Du, Zhi; Chen, Yong; Du, Jie

    2017-10-01

    The construction and self-assembly of DNA building blocks are the foundation of bottom-up development of three-dimensional DNA nanostructures or hydrogels. However, most self-assembly from DNA components is impeded by the mishybridized intermediates or the thermodynamic instability. To enable rapid production of complicated DNA objects with high yields no need for annealing process, herein different DNA building blocks (Y-shaped, L- and L'-shaped units) were assembled in presence of a cationic comb-type copolymer, poly (L-lysine)-graft-dextran (PLL-g-Dex), under physiological conditions. The results demonstrated that PLL-g-Dex not only significantly promoted the self-assembly of DNA blocks with high efficiency, but also stabilized the assembled multi-level structures especially for promoting the complicated 3D DNA hydrogel formation. This study develops a novel strategy for rapid and high-yield production of DNA hydrogel even derived from instable building blocks at relatively low DNA concentrations, which would endow DNA nanotechnology for more practical applications.

  4. Modular Nuclease-Responsive DNA Three-Way Junction-Based Dynamic Assembly of a DNA Device and Its Sensing Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jing; Wang, Lei; Xu, Xiaowen; Wei, Haiping; Jiang, Wei

    2016-04-05

    Here, we explored a modular strategy for rational design of nuclease-responsive three-way junctions (TWJs) and fabricated a dynamic DNA device in a "plug-and-play" fashion. First, inactivated TWJs were designed, which contained three functional domains: the inaccessible toehold and branch migration domains, the specific sites of nucleases, and the auxiliary complementary sequence. The actions of different nucleases on their specific sites in TWJs caused the close proximity of the same toehold and branch migration domains, resulting in the activation of the TWJs and the formation of a universal trigger for the subsequent dynamic assembly. Second, two hairpins (H1 and H2) were introduced, which could coexist in a metastable state, initially to act as the components for the dynamic assembly. Once the trigger initiated the opening of H1 via TWJs-driven strand displacement, the cascade hybridization of hairpins immediately switched on, resulting in the formation of the concatemers of H1/H2 complex appending numerous integrated G-quadruplexes, which were used to obtain label-free signal readout. The inherent modularity of this design allowed us to fabricate a flexible DNA dynamic device and detect multiple nucleases through altering the recognition pattern slightly. Taking uracil-DNA glycosylase and CpG methyltransferase M.SssI as models, we successfully realized the butt joint between the uracil-DNA glycosylase and M.SssI recognition events and the dynamic assembly process. Furthermore, we achieved ultrasensitive assay of nuclease activity and the inhibitor screening. The DNA device proposed here will offer an adaptive and flexible tool for clinical diagnosis and anticancer drug discovery.

  5. DNA origami design of 3D nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ebbe Sloth; Nielsen, Morten Muhlig

    2009-01-01

    [8]. We have recently developed a semi-automated DNA origami software package [9] that uses a 2D sequence editor in conjunction with several automated tools to facilitate the design process. Here we extend the use of the program for designing DNA origami structures in 3D and show the application......Structural DNA nanotechnology has been heavily dependent on the development of dedicated software tools for the design of unique helical junctions, to define unique sticky-ends for tile assembly, and for predicting the products of the self-assembly reaction of multiple DNA strands [1-3]. Recently......, several dedicated 3D editors for computer-aided design of DNA structures have been developed [4-7]. However, many of these tools are not efficient for designing DNA origami structures that requires the design of more than 200 unique DNA strands to be folded along a scaffold strand into a defined 3D shape...

  6. Transcriptator: An Automated Computational Pipeline to Annotate Assembled Reads and Identify Non Coding RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Parijat Tripathi

    Full Text Available RNA-seq is a new tool to measure RNA transcript counts, using high-throughput sequencing at an extraordinary accuracy. It provides quantitative means to explore the transcriptome of an organism of interest. However, interpreting this extremely large data into biological knowledge is a problem, and biologist-friendly tools are lacking. In our lab, we developed Transcriptator, a web application based on a computational Python pipeline with a user-friendly Java interface. This pipeline uses the web services available for BLAST (Basis Local Search Alignment Tool, QuickGO and DAVID (Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery tools. It offers a report on statistical analysis of functional and Gene Ontology (GO annotation's enrichment. It helps users to identify enriched biological themes, particularly GO terms, pathways, domains, gene/proteins features and protein-protein interactions related informations. It clusters the transcripts based on functional annotations and generates a tabular report for functional and gene ontology annotations for each submitted transcript to the web server. The implementation of QuickGo web-services in our pipeline enable the users to carry out GO-Slim analysis, whereas the integration of PORTRAIT (Prediction of transcriptomic non coding RNA (ncRNA by ab initio methods helps to identify the non coding RNAs and their regulatory role in transcriptome. In summary, Transcriptator is a useful software for both NGS and array data. It helps the users to characterize the de-novo assembled reads, obtained from NGS experiments for non-referenced organisms, while it also performs the functional enrichment analysis of differentially expressed transcripts/genes for both RNA-seq and micro-array experiments. It generates easy to read tables and interactive charts for better understanding of the data. The pipeline is modular in nature, and provides an opportunity to add new plugins in the future. Web application is

  7. Structural Basis of Mec1-Ddc2-RPA Assembly and Activation on Single-Stranded DNA at Sites of Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Ishan; Seeber, Andrew; Shimada, Kenji; Keusch, Jeremy J; Gut, Heinz; Gasser, Susan M

    2017-10-19

    Mec1-Ddc2 (ATR-ATRIP) is a key DNA-damage-sensing kinase that is recruited through the single-stranded (ss) DNA-binding replication protein A (RPA) to initiate the DNA damage checkpoint response. Activation of ATR-ATRIP in the absence of DNA damage is lethal. Therefore, it is important that damage-specific recruitment precedes kinase activation, which is achieved at least in part by Mec1-Ddc2 homodimerization. Here, we report a structural, biochemical, and functional characterization of the yeast Mec1-Ddc2-RPA assembly. High-resolution co-crystal structures of Ddc2-Rfa1 and Ddc2-Rfa1-t11 (K45E mutant) N termini and of the Ddc2 coiled-coil domain (CCD) provide insight into Mec1-Ddc2 homodimerization and damage-site targeting. Based on our structural and functional findings, we present a Mec1-Ddc2-RPA-ssDNA composite structural model. By way of validation, we show that RPA-dependent recruitment of Mec1-Ddc2 is crucial for maintaining its homodimeric state at ssDNA and that Ddc2's recruitment domain and CCD are important for Mec1-dependent survival of UV-light-induced DNA damage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Dynamic DNA devices and assemblies formed by shape-complementary, non-base pairing 3D components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerling, Thomas; Wagenbauer, Klaus F.; Neuner, Andrea M.; Dietz, Hendrik

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate that discrete three-dimensional (3D) DNA components can specifically self-assemble in solution on the basis of shape-complementarity and without base pairing. Using this principle, we produced homo- and heteromultimeric objects, including micrometer-scale one- and two-stranded filaments and lattices, as well as reconfigurable devices, including an actuator, a switchable gear, an unfoldable nanobook, and a nanorobot. These multidomain assemblies were stabilized via short-ranged nucleobase stacking bonds that compete against electrostatic repulsion between the components’ interfaces. Using imaging by electron microscopy, ensemble and single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer spectroscopy, and electrophoretic mobility analysis, we show that the balance between attractive and repulsive interactions, and thus the conformation of the assemblies, may be finely controlled by global parameters such as cation concentration or temperature and by an allosteric mechanism based on strand-displacement reactions.

  9. Exploring repetitive DNA landscapes using REPCLASS, a tool that automates the classification of transposable elements in eukaryotic genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feschotte, Cédric; Keswani, Umeshkumar; Ranganathan, Nirmal; Guibotsy, Marcel L; Levine, David

    2009-07-23

    Eukaryotic genomes contain large amount of repetitive DNA, most of which is derived from transposable elements (TEs). Progress has been made to develop computational tools for ab initio identification of repeat families, but there is an urgent need to develop tools to automate the annotation of TEs in genome sequences. Here we introduce REPCLASS, a tool that automates the classification of TE sequences. Using control repeat libraries, we show that the program can classify accurately virtually any known TE types. Combining REPCLASS to ab initio repeat finding in the genomes of Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster allowed us to recover the contrasting TE landscape characteristic of these species. Unexpectedly, REPCLASS also uncovered several novel TE families in both genomes, augmenting the TE repertoire of these model species. When applied to the genomes of distant Caenorhabditis and Drosophila species, the approach revealed a remarkable conservation of TE composition profile within each genus, despite substantial interspecific covariations in genome size and in the number of TEs and TE families. Lastly, we applied REPCLASS to analyze 10 fungal genomes from a wide taxonomic range, most of which have not been analyzed for TE content previously. The results showed that TE diversity varies widely across the fungi "kingdom" and appears to positively correlate with genome size, in particular for DNA transposons. Together, these data validate REPCLASS as a powerful tool to explore the repetitive DNA landscapes of eukaryotes and to shed light onto the evolutionary forces shaping TE diversity and genome architecture.

  10. Co-evolution of transcriptional silencing proteins and the DNA elements specifying their assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver A Zill

    Full Text Available Co-evolution of transcriptional regulatory proteins and their sites of action has been often hypothesized but rarely demonstrated. Here we provide experimental evidence of such co-evolution in yeast silent chromatin, a finding that emerged from studies of hybrids formed between two closely related Saccharomyces species. A unidirectional silencing incompatibility between S. cerevisiae and S. bayanus led to a key discovery: asymmetrical complementation of divergent orthologs of the silent chromatin component Sir4. In S. cerevisiae/S. bayanus interspecies hybrids, ChIP-Seq analysis revealed a restriction against S. cerevisiae Sir4 associating with most S. bayanus silenced regions; in contrast, S. bayanus Sir4 associated with S. cerevisiae silenced loci to an even greater degree than did S. cerevisiae's own Sir4. Functional changes in silencer sequences paralleled changes in Sir4 sequence and a reduction in Sir1 family members in S. cerevisiae. Critically, species-specific silencing of the S. bayanus HMR locus could be reconstituted in S. cerevisiae by co-transfer of the S. bayanus Sir4 and Kos3 (the ancestral relative of Sir1 proteins. As Sir1/Kos3 and Sir4 bind conserved silencer-binding proteins, but not specific DNA sequences, these rapidly evolving proteins served to interpret differences in the two species' silencers presumably involving emergent features created by the regulatory proteins that bind sequences within silencers. The results presented here, and in particular the high resolution ChIP-Seq localization of the Sir4 protein, provided unanticipated insights into the mechanism of silent chromatin assembly in yeast.

  11. Properties of the chromatin assembled on DNA injected into Xenopus oocytes and eggs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gargiulo, G.; Wasserman, W.; Worcel, A.

    1983-01-01

    The onset of DNA synthesis occurs between 10 and 30 minutes after activation of the egg and thus the transition from nuclease-sensitive to nuclease-resistant supercoils may take place on the newly replicated DNA. To test this possibility, the nonradioactive circular 5-kb DNA carrying the Drosophila histone gene repeat and [α -32 P]dCTP were coinjected into fertilized eggs. Such protocol labels both the injected, replicated heterologous DNA and the replicated endogenous, maternal Xenopus DNA. The labeled, presumably replicated, supercoiled DNA is resistant to micrococcal nuclease as expected. The endogenous, high-molecular-weight Xenopus DNA is degraded to 180-bp nucleosomal DNA. Thus, the nuclease resistance is not a general property of chromatin during the cleavage stage of the Xenopus embryo but is a peculiar feature of the injected DNA. 42 references, 5 figures

  12. Molecular mechanism of protein assembly on DNA double-strand breaks in the non-homologous end-joining pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yano, Ken-ichi; Morotomi-Yano, Keiko; Adachi, Noritaka; Akiyama, Hidenori

    2009-01-01

    Non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) is the major repair pathway for DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in mammalian species. Upon DSB induction, a living cell quickly activates the NHEJ pathway comprising of multiple molecular events. However, it has been difficult to analyze the initial phase of DSB responses in living cells, primarily due to technical limitations. Recent advances in real-time imaging and site-directed DSB induction using laser microbeam allow us to monitor the spatiotemporal dynamics of NHEJ factors in the immediate-early phase after DSB induction. These new approaches, together with the use of cell lines deficient in each essential NHEJ factor, provide novel mechanistic insights into DSB recognition and protein assembly on DSBs in the NHEJ pathway. In this review, we provide an overview of recent progresses in the imaging analyses of the NHEJ core factors. These studies strongly suggest that the NHEJ core factors are pre-assembled into a large complex on DSBs prior to the progression of the biochemical reactions in the NHEJ pathway. Instead of the traditional step-by-step assembly model from the static view of NHEJ, a novel model for dynamic protein assembly in the NHEJ pathway is proposed. This new model provides important mechanistic insights into the protein assembly at DSBs and the regulation of DSB repair. (author)

  13. Proteomics reveals dynamic assembly of repair complexes during bypass of DNA cross-links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Räschle, Markus; Smeenk, Godelieve; Hansen, Rebecca K

    2015-01-01

    DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs) block replication fork progression by inhibiting DNA strand separation. Repair of ICLs requires sequential incisions, translesion DNA synthesis, and homologous recombination, but the full set of factors involved in these transactions remains unknown. We devised ...

  14. DNA-nanoparticle assemblies go organic : Macroscopic polymeric materials with nanosized features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mentovich, Elad D.; Livanov, Konstantin; Prusty, Deepak K.; Sowwan, Mukules; Richter, Shachar

    2012-01-01

    Background: One of the goals in the field of structural DNA nanotechnology is the use of DNA to build up 2- and 3-D nanostructures. The research in this field is motivated by the remarkable structural features of DNA as well as by its unique and reversible recognition properties. Nucleic acids can

  15. Toward three-dimensional microelectronic systems: directed self-assembly of silicon microcubes via DNA surface functionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lämmerhardt, Nico; Merzsch, Stephan; Ledig, Johannes; Bora, Achyut; Waag, Andreas; Tornow, Marc; Mischnick, Petra

    2013-07-02

    The huge and intelligent processing power of three-dimensional (3D) biological "processors" like the human brain with clock speeds of only 0.1 kHz is an extremely fascinating property, which is based on a massively parallel interconnect strategy. Artificial silicon microprocessors are 7 orders of magnitude faster. Nevertheless, they do not show any indication of intelligent processing power, mostly due to their very limited interconnectivity. Massively parallel interconnectivity can only be realized in three dimensions. Three-dimensional artificial processors would therefore be at the root of fabricating artificially intelligent systems. A first step in this direction would be the self-assembly of silicon based building blocks into 3D structures. We report on the self-assembly of such building blocks by molecular recognition, and on the electrical characterization of the formed assemblies. First, planar silicon substrates were functionalized with self-assembling monolayers of 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane for coupling of oligonucleotides (single stranded DNA) with glutaric aldehyde. The oligonucleotide immobilization was confirmed and quantified by hybridization with fluorescence-labeled complementary oligonucleotides. After the individual processing steps, the samples were analyzed by contact angle measurements, ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy, and fluorescence microscopy. Patterned DNA-functionalized layers were fabricated by microcontact printing (μCP) and photolithography. Silicon microcubes of 3 μm edge length as model objects for first 3D self-assembly experiments were fabricated out of silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers by a combination of reactive ion etching (RIE) and selective wet etching. The microcubes were then surface-functionalized using the same protocol as on planar substrates, and their self-assembly was demonstrated both on patterned silicon surfaces (88% correctly placed cubes), and to cube aggregates by complementary DNA

  16. Evaluation of Four Automated Protocols for Extraction of DNA from FTA Cards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stangegaard, Michael; Børsting, Claus; Ferrero-Miliani, Laura

    2013-01-01

    protocols on three different instruments. The extraction processes were repeated up to six times with the same pieces of FTA cards. The sample material on the FTA cards was either blood or buccal cells. With the QIAamp DNA Investigator and QIAsymphony DNA Investigator kits, it was possible to extract DNA...... from the FTA cards in all six rounds of extractions in sufficient amount and quality to obtain complete short tandem repeat (STR) profiles on a QIAcube and a QIAsymphony SP. With the PrepFiler Express kit, almost all the extractable DNA was extracted in the first two rounds of extractions. Furthermore......, we demonstrated that it was possible to successfully extract sufficient DNA for STR profiling from previously processed FTA card pieces that had been stored at 4 °C for up to 1 year. This showed that rare or precious FTA card samples may be saved for future analyses even though some DNA was already...

  17. Protein dynamics of human RPA and RAD51 on ssDNA during assembly and disassembly of the RAD51 filament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chu Jian; Gibb, Bryan; Kwon, YoungHo; Sung, Patrick; Greene, Eric C

    2017-01-25

    Homologous recombination (HR) is a crucial pathway for double-stranded DNA break (DSB) repair. During the early stages of HR, the newly generated DSB ends are processed to yield long single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) overhangs, which are quickly bound by replication protein A (RPA). RPA is then replaced by the DNA recombinase Rad51, which forms extended helical filaments on the ssDNA. The resulting nucleoprotein filament, known as the presynaptic complex, is responsible for pairing the ssDNA with homologous double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), which serves as the template to guide DSB repair. Here, we use single-molecule imaging to visualize the interplay between human RPA (hRPA) and human RAD51 during presynaptic complex assembly and disassembly. We demonstrate that ssDNA-bound hRPA can undergo facilitated exchange, enabling hRPA to undergo rapid exchange between free and ssDNA-bound states only when free hRPA is present in solution. Our results also indicate that the presence of free hRPA inhibits RAD51 filament nucleation, but has a lesser impact upon filament elongation. This finding suggests that hRPA exerts important regulatory influence over RAD51 and may in turn affect the properties of the assembled RAD51 filament. These experiments provide an important basis for further investigations into the regulation of human presynaptic complex assembly. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  18. Self-assembly of proglycinin and hybrid proglycinin synthesized in vitro from cDNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Craig D.; Floener, Liliane A.; Lilley, Glenn G.; Nielsen, Niels C.

    1987-01-01

    An in vitro system was developed that results in the self-assembly of subunit precursors into complexes that resemble those found naturally in the endoplasmic reticulum. Subunits of glycinin, the predominant seed protein of soybeans, were synthesized from modified cDNAs using a combination of the SP6 transcription and the rabbit reticulocyte translation systems. Subunits produced from plasmid constructions that encoded either Gy4 or Gy5 gene products, but modified such that their signal sequences were absent, self-assembled into trimers equivalent in size to those precursors found in the endoplasmic reticulum. In contrast, proteins synthesized in vitro from Gy4 constructs failed to self-assemble when the signal sequence was left intact (e.g., preproglycinin) or when the coding sequence was modified to remove 27 amino acids from an internal hydrophobic region, which is highly conserved among the glycinin subunits. Various hybrid subunits were also produced by trading portions of Gy4 and Gy5 cDNAs and all self-assembled in our system. The in vitro assembly system provides an opportunity to study the self-assembly of precursors and to probe for regions important for assembly. It will also be helpful in attempts to engineer beneficial nutritional changes into this important food protein. Images PMID:16593868

  19. CometQ: An automated tool for the detection and quantification of DNA damage using comet assay image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganapathy, Sreelatha; Muraleedharan, Aparna; Sathidevi, Puthumangalathu Savithri; Chand, Parkash; Rajkumar, Ravi Philip

    2016-09-01

    DNA damage analysis plays an important role in determining the approaches for treatment and prevention of various diseases like cancer, schizophrenia and other heritable diseases. Comet assay is a sensitive and versatile method for DNA damage analysis. The main objective of this work is to implement a fully automated tool for the detection and quantification of DNA damage by analysing comet assay images. The comet assay image analysis consists of four stages: (1) classifier (2) comet segmentation (3) comet partitioning and (4) comet quantification. Main features of the proposed software are the design and development of four comet segmentation methods, and the automatic routing of the input comet assay image to the most suitable one among these methods depending on the type of the image (silver stained or fluorescent stained) as well as the level of DNA damage (heavily damaged or lightly/moderately damaged). A classifier stage, based on support vector machine (SVM) is designed and implemented at the front end, to categorise the input image into one of the above four groups to ensure proper routing. Comet segmentation is followed by comet partitioning which is implemented using a novel technique coined as modified fuzzy clustering. Comet parameters are calculated in the comet quantification stage and are saved in an excel file. Our dataset consists of 600 silver stained images obtained from 40 Schizophrenia patients with different levels of severity, admitted to a tertiary hospital in South India and 56 fluorescent stained images obtained from different internet sources. The performance of "CometQ", the proposed standalone application for automated analysis of comet assay images, is evaluated by a clinical expert and is also compared with that of a most recent and related software-OpenComet. CometQ gave 90.26% positive predictive value (PPV) and 93.34% sensitivity which are much higher than those of OpenComet, especially in the case of silver stained images. The

  20. Label-free DNA biosensor based on resistance change of platinum nanoparticles assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skotadis, Evangelos; Voutyras, Konstantinos; Chatzipetrou, Marianneza; Tsekenis, Georgios; Patsiouras, Lampros; Madianos, Leonidas; Chatzandroulis, Stavros; Zergioti, Ioanna; Tsoukalas, Dimitris

    2016-07-15

    A novel nanoparticle based biosensor for the fast and simple detection of DNA hybridization events is presented. The sensor utilizes hybridized DNA's charge transport properties, combining them with metallic nanoparticle networks that act as nano-gapped electrodes. The DNA hybridization events can be detected by a significant reduction in the sensor's resistance due to the conductive bridging offered by hybridized DNA. By modifying the nanoparticle surface coverage, which can be controlled experimentally being a function of deposition time, and the structural properties of the electrodes, an optimized biosensor for the in situ detection of DNA hybridization events is ultimately fabricated. The fabricated biosensor exhibits a wide response range, covering four orders of magnitude, a limit of detection of 1nM and can detect a single base pair mismatch between probe and complementary DNA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Low cost automation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-03-01

    This book indicates method of building of automation plan, design of automation facilities, automation and CHIP process like basics of cutting, NC processing machine and CHIP handling, automation unit, such as drilling unit, tapping unit, boring unit, milling unit and slide unit, application of oil pressure on characteristics and basic oil pressure circuit, application of pneumatic, automation kinds and application of process, assembly, transportation, automatic machine and factory automation.

  2. Automated property optimization via ab initio O(N) elongation method: Application to (hyper-)polarizability in DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orimoto, Yuuichi, E-mail: orimoto.yuuichi.888@m.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Material Sciences, Faculty of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga-Park, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Aoki, Yuriko [Department of Material Sciences, Faculty of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga-Park, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, 4-1-8 Hon-chou, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan)

    2016-07-14

    An automated property optimization method was developed based on the ab initio O(N) elongation (ELG) method and applied to the optimization of nonlinear optical (NLO) properties in DNA as a first test. The ELG method mimics a polymerization reaction on a computer, and the reaction terminal of a starting cluster is attacked by monomers sequentially to elongate the electronic structure of the system by solving in each step a limited space including the terminal (localized molecular orbitals at the terminal) and monomer. The ELG-finite field (ELG-FF) method for calculating (hyper-)polarizabilities was used as the engine program of the optimization method, and it was found to show linear scaling efficiency while maintaining high computational accuracy for a random sequenced DNA model. Furthermore, the self-consistent field convergence was significantly improved by using the ELG-FF method compared with a conventional method, and it can lead to more feasible NLO property values in the FF treatment. The automated optimization method successfully chose an appropriate base pair from four base pairs (A, T, G, and C) for each elongation step according to an evaluation function. From test optimizations for the first order hyper-polarizability (β) in DNA, a substantial difference was observed depending on optimization conditions between “choose-maximum” (choose a base pair giving the maximum β for each step) and “choose-minimum” (choose a base pair giving the minimum β). In contrast, there was an ambiguous difference between these conditions for optimizing the second order hyper-polarizability (γ) because of the small absolute value of γ and the limitation of numerical differential calculations in the FF method. It can be concluded that the ab initio level property optimization method introduced here can be an effective step towards an advanced computer aided material design method as long as the numerical limitation of the FF method is taken into account.

  3. Automated property optimization via ab initio O(N) elongation method: Application to (hyper-)polarizability in DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orimoto, Yuuichi; Aoki, Yuriko

    2016-01-01

    An automated property optimization method was developed based on the ab initio O(N) elongation (ELG) method and applied to the optimization of nonlinear optical (NLO) properties in DNA as a first test. The ELG method mimics a polymerization reaction on a computer, and the reaction terminal of a starting cluster is attacked by monomers sequentially to elongate the electronic structure of the system by solving in each step a limited space including the terminal (localized molecular orbitals at the terminal) and monomer. The ELG-finite field (ELG-FF) method for calculating (hyper-)polarizabilities was used as the engine program of the optimization method, and it was found to show linear scaling efficiency while maintaining high computational accuracy for a random sequenced DNA model. Furthermore, the self-consistent field convergence was significantly improved by using the ELG-FF method compared with a conventional method, and it can lead to more feasible NLO property values in the FF treatment. The automated optimization method successfully chose an appropriate base pair from four base pairs (A, T, G, and C) for each elongation step according to an evaluation function. From test optimizations for the first order hyper-polarizability (β) in DNA, a substantial difference was observed depending on optimization conditions between “choose-maximum” (choose a base pair giving the maximum β for each step) and “choose-minimum” (choose a base pair giving the minimum β). In contrast, there was an ambiguous difference between these conditions for optimizing the second order hyper-polarizability (γ) because of the small absolute value of γ and the limitation of numerical differential calculations in the FF method. It can be concluded that the ab initio level property optimization method introduced here can be an effective step towards an advanced computer aided material design method as long as the numerical limitation of the FF method is taken into account.

  4. Mismatch discrimination of lipidated DNA and LNA-probes (LiNAs) in hybridization-controlled liposome assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Ulla; Vogel, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Assays for mismatch discrimination and detection of single nucleotide variations by hybridization-controlled assembly of liposomes, which do not require tedious surface chemistry, are versatile for both DNA and RNA targets. We report herein a comprehensive study on different DNA and LNA (locked...... assay in the context of mismatch discrimination and SNP detection are presented. The advantages of membrane-anchored LiNA-probes compared to chemically attached probes on solid nanoparticles (e.g. gold nanoparticles) are described. Key functionalities such as non-covalent attachment of LiNA probes...... without the need for long spacers and the inherent mobility of membrane-anchored probes in lipid-bilayer membranes will be described for several different probe designs....

  5. Single-step rapid assembly of DNA origami nanostructures for addressable nanoscale bioreactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fu, Yanming; Zeng, Dongdong; Chao, Jie

    2013-01-01

    nm resolution and at the single-molecule level. We attach a pair of enzymes (horseradish peroxidase and glucose oxidase) at the inner side of DNA nanotubes and observe high coupling efficiency of enzyme cascade within this confined nanospace. Hence, DNA nanostructures with such unprecedented...

  6. Assembly and function of DNA double-strand break repair foci in mammalian cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekker-Jensen, Simon; Mailand, Niels

    2010-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are among the most cytotoxic types of DNA damage, which if left unrepaired can lead to mutations or gross chromosomal aberrations, and promote the onset of diseases associated with genomic instability such as cancer. One of the most discernible hallmarks...

  7. DNA-assisted assembly of carbon nanotubes and MnO2 nanospheres as electrodes for high-performance asymmetric supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chun Xian; Chitre, Amey Anil; Lu, Xianmao

    2014-03-14

    A DNA-assisted assembly approach is developed to fabricate a capacitor-type electrode material, DNA-functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs@DNA), and a battery-type electrode material, DNA@CNTs-bridged MnO2 spheres (CNTs@DNA-MnO2), for asymmetric supercapacitors. An energy density of 11.6 W h kg(-1) is achieved at a power density of 185.5 W kg(-1) with a high MnO2 mass loading of 4.2 mg cm(-2). It is found that DNA assembly plays a critical role in the enhanced supercapacitor performance. This is because while DNA molecules functionalize carbon nanotubes (CNTs) via π-π stacking, their hydrophilic sugar-phosphate backbones also promote the dispersion of CNTs. The resultant CNTs@DNA chains can link multiple MnO2 spheres to form a networked architecture that facilitates charge transfer and effective MnO2 utilization. The improved performance of the asymmetric supercapacitors indicates that DNA-assisted assembly offers a promising approach to the fabrication of high-performance energy storage devices.

  8. Comparison of QIAsymphony automated and QIAamp manual DNA extraction systems for measuring Epstein-Barr virus DNA load in whole blood using real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laus, Stella; Kingsley, Lawrence A; Green, Michael; Wadowsky, Robert M

    2011-11-01

    Automated and manual extraction systems have been used with real-time PCR for quantification of Epstein-Barr virus [human herpesvirus 4 (HHV-4)] DNA in whole blood, but few studies have evaluated relative performances. In the present study, the automated QIAsymphony and manual QIAamp extraction systems (Qiagen, Valencia, CA) were assessed using paired aliquots derived from clinical whole-blood specimens and an in-house, real-time PCR assay. The detection limits using the QIAsymphony and QIAamp systems were similar (270 and 560 copies/mL, respectively). For samples estimated as having ≥10,000 copies/mL, the intrarun and interrun variations were significantly lower using QIAsymphony (10.0% and 6.8%, respectively), compared with QIAamp (18.6% and 15.2%, respectively); for samples having ≤1000 copies/mL, the two variations ranged from 27.9% to 43.9% and were not significantly different between the two systems. Among 68 paired clinical samples, 48 pairs yielded viral loads ≥1000 copies/mL under both extraction systems. Although the logarithmic linear correlation from these positive samples was high (r(2) = 0.957), the values obtained using QIAsymphony were on average 0.2 log copies/mL higher than those obtained using QIAamp. Thus, the QIAsymphony and QIAamp systems provide similar EBV DNA load values in whole blood. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A memory-efficient data structure representing exact-match overlap graphs with application for next-generation DNA assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinh, Hieu; Rajasekaran, Sanguthevar

    2011-07-15

    Exact-match overlap graphs have been broadly used in the context of DNA assembly and the shortest super string problem where the number of strings n ranges from thousands to billions. The length ℓ of the strings is from 25 to 1000, depending on the DNA sequencing technologies. However, many DNA assemblers using overlap graphs suffer from the need for too much time and space in constructing the graphs. It is nearly impossible for these DNA assemblers to handle the huge amount of data produced by the next-generation sequencing technologies where the number n of strings could be several billions. If the overlap graph is explicitly stored, it would require Ω(n(2)) memory, which could be prohibitive in practice when n is greater than a hundred million. In this article, we propose a novel data structure using which the overlap graph can be compactly stored. This data structure requires only linear time to construct and and linear memory to store. For a given set of input strings (also called reads), we can informally define an exact-match overlap graph as follows. Each read is represented as a node in the graph and there is an edge between two nodes if the corresponding reads overlap sufficiently. A formal description follows. The maximal exact-match overlap of two strings x and y, denoted by ov(max)(x, y), is the longest string which is a suffix of x and a prefix of y. The exact-match overlap graph of n given strings of length ℓ is an edge-weighted graph in which each vertex is associated with a string and there is an edge (x, y) of weight ω=ℓ-|ov(max)(x, y)| if and only if ω ≤ λ, where |ov(max)(x, y)| is the length of ov(max)(x, y) and λ is a given threshold. In this article, we show that the exact-match overlap graphs can be represented by a compact data structure that can be stored using at most (2λ-1)(2⌈logn⌉+⌈logλ⌉)n bits with a guarantee that the basic operation of accessing an edge takes O(log λ) time. We also propose two algorithms for

  10. Cooperative assembly of Co-Smad4 MH1 with R-Smad1/3 MH1 on DNA: a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guihong Wang

    Full Text Available Smads, the homologs of Sma and MAD proteins, play a key role in gene expression regulation in the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β signaling pathway. Recent experimental studies have revealed that Smad4/R-Smad heterodimers bound on DNA are energetically more favorable than homodimeric R-Smad/R-Smad complexes bound on DNA, which indicates that Smad4 might act as binding vehicle to cooperatively assemble with activated R-Smads on DNA in the nucleus. However, the details of interaction mechanism for cooperative recruitment of Smad4 protein to R-Smad proteins on DNA, and allosteric communication between the Smad4-DNA and R-Smad-DNA interfaces via DNA mediating are not yet clear so far.In the present work, we have constructed a series of Smadn+DNA+Smadn (n = 1, 3, 4 models and carried out molecular dynamics simulations, free energy calculations and DNA dynamics analysis for them to study the interaction properties of Smadn (n = 1, 3, 4 with DNA molecule.The results revealed that the binding of Smad4 protein to DNA molecule facilitates energetically the formation of the heteromeric Smad4+DNA+Smad1/3 complex by increasing the affinity of Smad1/3 with DNA molecule. Further investigations through the residue/base motion correlation and DNA dynamics analyses predicted that the binding of Smad4 protein to DNA molecule in the heteromeric Smad4+DNA+Smad1/3 model induces an allosteric communication from the Smad4-DNA interface to Smad1/Smad3-DNA interface via DNA base-pair helical motions, surface conformation changes and new hydrogen bond formations. The present work theoretically explains the mechanism of cooperative recruitment of Smad4 protein to Smad1/3 protein via DNA-mediated indirect readout mode in the nucleus.

  11. Automated electrochemical assembly of the protected potential TMG-chitotriomycin precursor based on rational optimization of the carbohydrate building block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nokami, Toshiki; Isoda, Yuta; Sasaki, Norihiko; Takaiso, Aki; Hayase, Shuichi; Itoh, Toshiyuki; Hayashi, Ryutaro; Shimizu, Akihiro; Yoshida, Jun-ichi

    2015-03-20

    The anomeric arylthio group and the hydroxyl-protecting groups of thioglycosides were optimized to construct carbohydrate building blocks for automated electrochemical solution-phase synthesis of oligoglucosamines having 1,4-β-glycosidic linkages. The optimization study included density functional theory calculations, measurements of the oxidation potentials, and the trial synthesis of the chitotriose trisaccharide. The automated synthesis of the protected potential N,N,N-trimethyl-d-glucosaminylchitotriomycin precursor was accomplished by using the optimized building block.

  12. Rolling cycle amplification based single-color quantum dots–ruthenium complex assembling dyads for homogeneous and highly selective detection of DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Chen; Liu, Yufei; Ye, Tai; Xiang, Xia; Ji, Xinghu; He, Zhike, E-mail: zhkhe@whu.edu.cn

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: A universal, label-free, homogeneous, highly sensitive, and selective fluorescent biosensor for DNA detection is developed by using rolling-circle amplification (RCA) based single-color quantum dots–ruthenium complex (QDs–Ru) assembling dyads. - Highlights: • The single-color QDs–Ru assembling dyads were applied in homogeneous DNA assay. • This biosensor exhibited high selectivity against base mismatched sequences. • This biosensor could be severed as universal platform for the detection of ssDNA. • This sensor could be used to detect the target in human serum samples. • This DNA sensor had a good selectivity under the interference of other dsDNA. - Abstract: In this work, a new, label-free, homogeneous, highly sensitive, and selective fluorescent biosensor for DNA detection is developed by using rolling-circle amplification (RCA) based single-color quantum dots–ruthenium complex (QDs–Ru) assembling dyads. This strategy includes three steps: (1) the target DNA initiates RCA reaction and generates linear RCA products; (2) the complementary DNA hybridizes with the RCA products to form long double-strand DNA (dsDNA); (3) [Ru(phen){sub 2}(dppx)]{sup 2+} (dppx = 7,8-dimethyldipyrido [3,2-a:2′,3′-c] phenanthroline) intercalates into the long dsDNA with strong fluorescence emission. Due to its strong binding propensity with the long dsDNA, [Ru(phen){sub 2}(dppx)]{sup 2+} is removed from the surface of the QDs, resulting in restoring the fluorescence of the QDs, which has been quenched by [Ru(phen){sub 2}(dppx)]{sup 2+} through a photoinduced electron transfer process and is overlaid with the fluorescence of dsDNA bonded Ru(II) polypyridyl complex (Ru-dsDNA). Thus, high fluorescence intensity is observed, and is related to the concentration of target. This sensor exhibits not only high sensitivity for hepatitis B virus (HBV) ssDNA with a low detection limit (0.5 pM), but also excellent selectivity in the complex matrix. Moreover

  13. Self-Assembly DNA Polyplex Vaccine inside Dissolving Microneedles for High-Potency Intradermal Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Jing-Fong; Lee, Jin-Ching; Lin, Chun-Kuang; Wei, Kuo-Chen; Chen, Pin-Yuan; Yang, Hung-Wei

    2017-01-01

    The strong immunogenicity induction is the powerful weapon to prevent the virus infections. This study demonstrated that one-step synthesis of DNA polyplex vaccine in microneedle (MN) patches can induce high immunogenicity through intradermal vaccination and increase the vaccine stability for storage outside the cold chain. More negative charged DNA vaccine was entrapped into the needle region of MNs followed by DNA polyplex formation with branched polyethylenimine (bPEI) pre-coated in the cavities of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) molds that can deliver more DNA vaccine to immune-cell rich epidermis with high transfection efficiency. Our data in this study support the safety and immunogenicity of the MN-based vaccine; the MN patch delivery system induced an immune response 3.5-fold as strong as seen with conventional intramuscular administration; the DNA polyplex formulation provided excellent vaccine stability at high temperature (could be stored at 45ºC for at least 4 months); the DNA vaccine is expected to be manufactured at low cost and not generate sharps waste. We think this study is significant to public health because there is a pressing need for an effective vaccination in developing countries. PMID:28819449

  14. Automated extraction of DNA from blood and PCR setup using a Tecan Freedom EVO liquid handler for forensic genetic STR typing of reference samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stangegaard, Michael; Frøslev, Tobias G; Frank-Hansen, Rune

    2011-01-01

    We have implemented and validated automated protocols for DNA extraction and PCR setup using a Tecan Freedom EVO liquid handler mounted with the Te-MagS magnetic separation device (Tecan, Männedorf, Switzerland). The protocols were validated for accredited forensic genetic work according to ISO...... handler leading to the reduction of manual work, and increased quality and throughput....

  15. Solid-phase cloning for high-throughput assembly of single and multiple DNA parts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundqvist, Magnus; Edfors, Fredrik; Sivertsson, Åsa

    2015-01-01

    We describe solid-phase cloning (SPC) for high-throughput assembly of expression plasmids. Our method allows PCR products to be put directly into a liquid handler for capture and purification using paramagnetic streptavidin beads and conversion into constructs by subsequent cloning reactions. We ...

  16. Norgal: Extraction and de novo assembly of mitochondrial DNA from whole-genome sequencing data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Nakeeb, Kosai Ali Ahmed; Petersen, Thomas Nordahl; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    and performing a de novo assembly on a subset of reads that contains these k-mers. The method was applied to WGS data from a panda, brown algae seaweed, butterfly and filamentous fungus. We were able to extract full circular mitochondrial genomes and obtained sequence identities to the reference sequences...

  17. Regular Nanoscale Protein Patterns via Directed Adsorption through Self-Assembled DNA Origami Masks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Saminathan; Subramaniam, Sivaraman; Stewart, A Francis; Grundmeier, Guido; Keller, Adrian

    2016-11-16

    DNA origami has become a widely used method for synthesizing well-defined nanostructures with promising applications in various areas of nanotechnology, biophysics, and medicine. Recently, the possibility to transfer the shape of single DNA origami nanostructures into different materials via molecular lithography approaches has received growing interest due to the great structural control provided by the DNA origami technique. Here, we use ordered monolayers of DNA origami nanostructures with internal cavities on mica surfaces as molecular lithography masks for the fabrication of regular protein patterns over large surface areas. Exposure of the masked sample surface to negatively charged proteins results in the directed adsorption of the proteins onto the exposed surface areas in the holes of the mask. By controlling the buffer and adsorption conditions, the protein coverage of the exposed areas can be varied from single proteins to densely packed monolayers. To demonstrate the versatility of this approach, regular nanopatterns of four different proteins are fabricated: the single-strand annealing proteins Redβ and Sak, the iron-storage protein ferritin, and the blood protein bovine serum albumin (BSA). We furthermore demonstrate the desorption of the DNA origami mask after directed protein adsorption, which may enable the fabrication of hierarchical patterns composed of different protein species. Because selectivity in adsorption is achieved by electrostatic interactions between the proteins and the exposed surface areas, this approach may enable also the large-scale patterning of other charged molecular species or even nanoparticles.

  18. Correlation of the UV-induced mutational spectra and the DNA damage distribution of the human HPRT gene: Automating the analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotturi, G.; Erfle, H.; Koop, B.F.; Boer, J.G. de; Glickman, B.W.

    1994-01-01

    Automated DNA sequencers can be readily adapted for various types of sequence-based nucleic acid analysis: more recently it was determined the distribution of UV photoproducts in the E. coli laci gene using techniques developed for automated fluorescence-based analysis. We have been working to improve the automated approach of damage distribution. Our current method is more rigorous. We have new software that integrates the area under the individual peaks, rather than measuring the height of the curve. In addition, we now employ an internal standard. The analysis can also be partially automated. Detection limits for both major types of UV-photoproducts (cyclobutane dimers and pyrimidine (6-4) pyrimidone photoproducts) are reported. The UV-induced damage distribution in the hprt gene is compared to the mutational spectra in human and rodents cells

  19. Self-assembled Multifunctional DNA Nanoflowers for the Circumvention of Multidrug Resistance in Targeted Anticancer Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Lei; Zhu, Guizhi; Qiu, Liping; Wu, Cuichen; Chen, Huapei; Liang, Hao; Cansiz, Sena; Lv, Yifan; Zhang, Xiaobing; Tan, Weihong

    2015-11-01

    Cancer chemotherapy has been impeded by side effects and multidrug resistance (MDR) partially caused by drug efflux from cancer cells, which call for targeted drug delivery systems additionally able to circumvent MDR. Here we report multifunctional DNA nanoflowers (NFs) for targeted drug delivery to both chemosensitive and MDR cancer cells and circumvent MDR in both leukemia and breast cancer cell models. NFs are self-assembled via liquid crystallization of DNA generated by Rolling Circle Replication, during which NFs are incorporated with aptamers for specific cancer cell recognition, fluorophores for bioimaging, and Doxorubicin (Dox)-binding DNA for drug delivery. NF sizes are tunable (down to ~200 nm in diameter), and the densely packed drug-binding motifs and porous intrastructures endow NFs with high drug loading capacity (71.4%, wt/wt). The Dox-loaded NFs (NF-Dox) are stable at physiological pH, yet drug release is facilitated in acidic or basic conditions. NFs deliver Dox into target chemosensitive and MDR cancer cells, preventing drug efflux and enhancing drug retention in MDR cells. Consequently, NF-Dox induces potent cytotoxicity in both target chemosensitive cells and MDR cells, but not nontarget cells, thus concurrently circumventing MDR and reducing side effects. Overall, these NFs are promising to circumvent MDR in targeted cancer therapy.

  20. Constructing of DNA vectors with controlled nanosize and single dispersion by block copolymer coating gold nanoparticles as template assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Junbo, E-mail: Lijunbo@haust.edu.cn [Henan University of Science and Technology, School of Chemical Engineering and Pharmaceutics (China); Wu, Wenlan [Henan University of Science and Technology, School of Medicine (China); Gao, Jiayu; Liang, Ju; Zhou, Huiyun; Liang, Lijuan [Henan University of Science and Technology, School of Chemical Engineering and Pharmaceutics (China)

    2017-03-15

    Synthesized vectors with nanoscale size and stable colloid dispersion are highly desirable for improving gene delivery efficiency. Here, a core-shell template particle was constructed with polyethylene glycol-b-poly1-(3-aminopropyl)-3-(2-methacryloyloxy propylimidazolium bromine) (PEG-b-PAMPImB) coating gold nanoparticles (PEG-b-PAMPImB-@-Au NPs) for loading DNA and delivering in vitro. Data from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) suggest that these nanoplexes, by forming an electrostatic complex with DNA at the inner PAMPImB shell, offer steric protection for the outer PEG corona leading to single dispersion and small size. Notably, higher colloid stability and lower cytotoxicity were achieved with these nanoplexes when compared with PAMPImB monolayer-coated gold nanoparticles (Au NPs). Confocal laser scanning microscopy and intracellular trafficking TEM further indicate that the nanoplexes can translocate across the cell membrane and partly enter the nucleus for high efficient expression. Thus, template assembly represents a promising approach to control the size and colloid stability of gene vectors and ensure safety and efficiency of DNA delivery.

  1. Constructing of DNA vectors with controlled nanosize and single dispersion by block copolymer coating gold nanoparticles as template assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junbo; Wu, Wenlan; Gao, Jiayu; Liang, Ju; Zhou, Huiyun; Liang, Lijuan

    2017-03-01

    Synthesized vectors with nanoscale size and stable colloid dispersion are highly desirable for improving gene delivery efficiency. Here, a core-shell template particle was constructed with polyethylene glycol- b-poly1-(3-aminopropyl)-3-(2-methacryloyloxy propylimidazolium bromine) (PEG- b-PAMPImB) coating gold nanoparticles (PEG- b-PAMPImB-@-Au NPs) for loading DNA and delivering in vitro. Data from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) suggest that these nanoplexes, by forming an electrostatic complex with DNA at the inner PAMPImB shell, offer steric protection for the outer PEG corona leading to single dispersion and small size. Notably, higher colloid stability and lower cytotoxicity were achieved with these nanoplexes when compared with PAMPImB monolayer-coated gold nanoparticles (Au NPs). Confocal laser scanning microscopy and intracellular trafficking TEM further indicate that the nanoplexes can translocate across the cell membrane and partly enter the nucleus for high efficient expression. Thus, template assembly represents a promising approach to control the size and colloid stability of gene vectors and ensure safety and efficiency of DNA delivery.

  2. Automated Extraction of Genomic DNA from Medically Important Yeast Species and Filamentous Fungi by Using the MagNA Pure LC System

    OpenAIRE

    Loeffler, Juergen; Schmidt, Kathrin; Hebart, Holger; Schumacher, Ulrike; Einsele, Hermann

    2002-01-01

    A fully automated assay was established for the extraction of DNA from clinically important fungi by using the MagNA Pure LC instrument. The test was evaluated by DNA isolation from 23 species of yeast and filamentous fungi and by extractions (n = 28) of serially diluted Aspergillus fumigatus conidia (105 to 0 CFU/ml). Additionally, DNA from 67 clinical specimens was extracted and compared to the manual protocol. The detection limit of the MagNA Pure LC assay of 10 CFU corresponded to the sen...

  3. Automation Study for Longhorn Army Ammunition Plant Hand Held Signal Flight Assembly, Rocket Barrel Assembly, 40 MM Signal, Final Packaging/Pack-Out, and Star Finishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-03-01

    wood protectors in the HHS Rocket Barrel Assembly Operations. d) Use of hot melt sealant rather than lacquer on the end of the assembled Hand Held...4OL.UA8LYADHRlE CG411!cLVPAM-1 ~LW7m~I~o~c~c LCA ~TM18UX"Y.31nSRGU-11 STiIM ASSELYJMACE FINh1TZ1A1*4CWAJKRZAM’ WAOiNt rs~my" LOCATM1ED 0~7 LOCA1ED’ IWCM-1W...Moorfeed Fairview, PA Indianapolis, IN Voice Synthesis Module Square D Micro Chip Technology Palatine, IL Chandler, AZ 85224 Vacuum Unit Venturi’s

  4. Coexposure to benzo[a]pyrene plus UVA induced DNA double strand breaks: visualization of Ku assembly in the nucleus having DNA lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyooka, Tatsushi; Ibuki, Yuko; Koike, Manabu; Ohashi, Norio; Takahashi, Sentaro; Goto, Rensuke

    2004-01-01

    Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant with potential carcinogenicity. It has been shown that BaP, upon UVA irradiation, synergistically induced oxidative DNA damage, but other DNA damage was not confirmed. In this study, we examined whether coexposure to BaP plus UVA induces double strand breaks (DSBs) using xrs-5 cells, deficient in the repair of DSBs (Ku80 mutant), and whether Ku translocates involving the formation of DSBs. BaP plus UVA had a significant cytotoxic effect on CHO-K1 cells and an even more drastic effect on Ku80-deficient, xrs-5 cells, suggesting that the DSBs were generated by coexposure to BaP plus UVA. The DSBs were repaired in CHO-K1 cells within 30 min, but not in xrs-5 cells, indicating the involvement of a non-homologous end joining, which needs Ku proteins. Furthermore, we succeeded in visualizing that Ku80 rapidly assembled to the exposed region, in which DSBs might be generated, and clarified that the presence of both Ku70 and Ku80 was important for their accumulation

  5. Sequence assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheibye-Alsing, Karsten; Hoffmann, S.; Frankel, Annett Maria

    2009-01-01

    Despite the rapidly increasing number of sequenced and re-sequenced genomes, many issues regarding the computational assembly of large-scale sequencing data have remain unresolved. Computational assembly is crucial in large genome projects as well for the evolving high-throughput technologies and...... in genomic DNA, highly expressed genes and alternative transcripts in EST sequences. We summarize existing comparisons of different assemblers and provide a detailed descriptions and directions for download of assembly programs at: http://genome.ku.dk/resources/assembly/methods.html....

  6. A Novel Reconfigurable Logic Unit Based on the DNA-Templated Potassium-Concentration-Dependent Supramolecular Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chunrong; Zou, Dan; Chen, Jianchi; Zhang, Linyan; Miao, Jiarong; Huang, Dan; Du, Yuanyuan; Yang, Shu; Yang, Qianfan; Tang, Yalin

    2018-03-15

    Plenty of molecular circuits with specific functions have been developed; however, logic units with reconfigurability, which could simplify the circuits and speed up the information process, are rarely reported. In this work, we designed a novel reconfigurable logic unit based on a DNA-templated, potassium-concentration-dependent, supramolecular assembly, which could respond to the input stimuli of H + and K + . By inputting different concentrations of K + , the logic unit could implement three significant functions, including a half adder, a half subtractor, and a 2-to-4 decoder. Considering its reconfigurable ability and good performance, the novel prototypes developed here may serve as a promising proof of principle in molecular computers. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. DNA bases assembled on the Au(110)/electrolyte interface: A combined experimental and theoretical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salvatore, Princia; Nazmutdinov, Renat R.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Among the low-index single-crystal gold surfaces, the Au(110) surface is the most active toward molecular adsorption and the one with fewest electrochemical adsorption data reported. Cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemically controlled scanning tunneling microscopy (EC-STM), and density functional......, accompanied by a pair of strong voltammetry peaks in the double-layer region in acid solutions. Adsorption of the DNA bases gives featureless voltammograms with lower double-layer capacitance, suggesting that all the bases are chemisorbed on the Au(110) surface. Further investigation of the surface structures...... of the adlayers of the four DNA bases by EC-STM disclosed lifting of the Au(110) reconstruction, specific molecular packing in dense monolayers, and pH dependence of the A and G adsorption. DFT computations based on a cluster model for the Au(110) surface were performed to investigate the adsorption energy...

  8. Functionalized Nanostructures: Redox-Active Porphyrin Anchors for Supramolecular DNA Assemblies

    KAUST Repository

    Börjesson, Karl

    2010-09-28

    We have synthesized and studied a supramolecular system comprising a 39-mer DNA with porphyrin-modified thymidine nucleosides anchored to the surface of large unilamellar vesicles (liposomes). Liposome porphyrin binding characteristics, such as orientation, strength, homogeneity, and binding site size, was determined, suggesting that the porphyrin is well suited as a photophysical and redox-active lipid anchor, in comparison to the inert cholesterol anchor commonly used today. Furthermore, the binding characteristics and hybridization capabilities were studied as a function of anchor size and number of anchoring points, properties that are of importance for our future plans to use the addressability of these redox-active nodes in larger DNA-based nanoconstructs. Electron transfer from photoexcited porphyrin to a lipophilic benzoquinone residing in the lipid membrane was characterized by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence and verified by femtosecond transient absorption. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  9. Self-Assembly of Large-Scale Shape-Controlled DNA Nano-Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-16

    for single-molecule imaging. Nano Lett. 11, 657-660 (2011). 46. Dang, X. N. et at. Virus -templated self-assembled single-walled carbon nanotubes for...email: alik(a)rics.bwh.harvard edu). NATURE C0,M.MUN! CAT !0N5 14:2275 I DOI: 10.1038/ncomm53275 | wwwnature.com/naturecommunications 1 @ 2013 Macmillan...prevent non-specific binding between hydrogel and microtube, the inside surface of microtube was treated with a corona treater (BD-20AC from Electro

  10. Circularly polarized luminescence of helically assembled pyrene π-stacks on RNA and DNA duplexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Mitsunobu; Ota, Fuyuki; Takada, Tadao; Akagi, Kazuo; Yamana, Kazushige

    2018-05-01

    In this report, we describe the circularly polarized luminescence (CPL) of the RNA duplexes having one to four 2'-O-pyrene modified uridines (Upy) and the DNA duplexes having two, four, and six pyrene modified non-nucleosidic linkers (Py). Both the pyrene π-stack arrays formed on the RNA and DNA double helical structures exhibited pyrene excimer fluorescence. In the pyrene-modified RNA systems, the RNA duplex having four Upys gives CPL emission with g lum value of <0.01 at 480 nm. The structure of pyrene stacks on the RNA duplex may be rigidly regulated with increase in the Upy domains, which resulted in the CPL emission. In the DNA systems, the pyrene-modified duplexes containing two and four Pys exhibited CPL emission with g lum values of <0.001 at 505 nm. The pyrene π-stack arrays presented here show CPL emission. However, the g lum values are relatively small when compared with our previous system consisting of the pyrene-zipper arrays on RNA. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Improved protocols to accelerate the assembly of DNA barcode reference libraries for freshwater zooplankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elías-Gutiérrez, Manuel; Valdez-Moreno, Martha; Topan, Janet; Young, Monica R; Cohuo-Colli, José Angel

    2018-03-01

    Currently, freshwater zooplankton sampling and identification methodologies have remained virtually unchanged since they were first established in the beginning of the XX century. One major contributing factor to this slow progress is the limited success of modern genetic methodologies, such as DNA barcoding, in several of the main groups. This study demonstrates improved protocols which enable the rapid assessment of most animal taxa inhabiting any freshwater system by combining the use of light traps, careful fixation at low temperatures using ethanol, and zooplankton-specific primers. We DNA-barcoded 2,136 specimens from a diverse array of taxonomic assemblages (rotifers, mollusks, mites, crustaceans, insects, and fishes) from several Canadian and Mexican lakes with an average sequence success rate of 85.3%. In total, 325 Barcode Index Numbers (BINs) were detected with only three BINs (two cladocerans and one copepod) shared between Canada and Mexico, suggesting a much narrower distribution range of freshwater zooplankton than previously thought. This study is the first to broadly explore the metazoan biodiversity of freshwater systems with DNA barcodes to construct a reference library that represents the first step for future programs which aim to monitor ecosystem health, track invasive species, or improve knowledge of the ecology and distribution of freshwater zooplankton.

  12. Automated extraction of genomic DNA from medically important yeast species and filamentous fungi by using the MagNA Pure LC system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeffler, Juergen; Schmidt, Kathrin; Hebart, Holger; Schumacher, Ulrike; Einsele, Hermann

    2002-06-01

    A fully automated assay was established for the extraction of DNA from clinically important fungi by using the MagNA Pure LC instrument. The test was evaluated by DNA isolation from 23 species of yeast and filamentous fungi and by extractions (n = 28) of serially diluted Aspergillus fumigatus conidia (10(5) to 0 CFU/ml). Additionally, DNA from 67 clinical specimens was extracted and compared to the manual protocol. The detection limit of the MagNA Pure LC assay of 10 CFU corresponded to the sensitivity when DNA was extracted manually; in 9 of 28 runs, we could achieve a higher sensitivity of 1 CFU/ml blood, which was found to be significant (p DNA from all fungal species analyzed could be extracted and amplified by real-time PCR. Negative controls from all MagNA Pure isolations remained negative. Sixty-three clinical samples showed identical results by both methods, whereas in 4 of 67 samples, discordant results were obtained. Thus, the MagNA Pure LC technique offers a fast protocol for automated DNA isolation from numerous fungi, revealing high sensitivity and purity.

  13. Cost-effective sequencing of full-length cDNA clones powered by a de novo-reference hybrid assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroshu, Reginaldo M; Watanabe, Junichi; Sugano, Sumio; Morishita, Shinichi; Suzuki, Yutaka; Kasahara, Masahiro

    2010-05-07

    Sequencing full-length cDNA clones is important to determine gene structures including alternative splice forms, and provides valuable resources for experimental analyses to reveal the biological functions of coded proteins. However, previous approaches for sequencing cDNA clones were expensive or time-consuming, and therefore, a fast and efficient sequencing approach was demanded. We developed a program, MuSICA 2, that assembles millions of short (36-nucleotide) reads collected from a single flow cell lane of Illumina Genome Analyzer to shotgun-sequence approximately 800 human full-length cDNA clones. MuSICA 2 performs a hybrid assembly in which an external de novo assembler is run first and the result is then improved by reference alignment of shotgun reads. We compared the MuSICA 2 assembly with 200 pooled full-length cDNA clones finished independently by the conventional primer-walking using Sanger sequencers. The exon-intron structure of the coding sequence was correct for more than 95% of the clones with coding sequence annotation when we excluded cDNA clones insufficiently represented in the shotgun library due to PCR failure (42 out of 200 clones excluded), and the nucleotide-level accuracy of coding sequences of those correct clones was over 99.99%. We also applied MuSICA 2 to full-length cDNA clones from Toxoplasma gondii, to confirm that its ability was competent even for non-human species. The entire sequencing and shotgun assembly takes less than 1 week and the consumables cost only approximately US$3 per clone, demonstrating a significant advantage over previous approaches.

  14. Mathematical modelling of the automated FADU assay for the quantification of DNA strand breaks and their repair in human peripheral mononuclear blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junk, Michael; Salzwedel, Judy; Sindlinger, Thilo; Bürkle, Alexander; Moreno-Villanueva, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Cells continuously undergo DNA damage from exogenous agents like irradiation or genotoxic chemicals or from endogenous radicals produced by normal cellular metabolic activities. DNA strand breaks are one of the most common genotoxic lesions and they can also arise as intermediates of DNA repair activity. Unrepaired DNA damage can lead to genomic instability, which can massively compromise the health status of organisms. Therefore it is important to measure and quantify DNA damage and its repair. We have previously published an automated method for measuring DNA strand breaks based on fluorimetric detection of alkaline DNA unwinding [1], and here we present a mathematical model of the FADU assay, which enables to an analytic expression for the relation between measured fluorescence and the number of strand breaks. Assessment of the formation and also the repair of DNA strand breaks is a crucial functional parameter to investigate genotoxicity in living cells. A reliable and convenient method to quantify DNA strand breakage is therefore of significant importance for a wide variety of scientific fields, e.g. toxicology, pharmacology, epidemiology and medical sciences

  15. Crystal Structure of the VapBC Toxin–Antitoxin Complex from Shigella flexneri Reveals a Hetero-Octameric DNA-Binding Assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dienemann, Christian; Bøggild, Andreas; Winther, Kristoffer S.

    2011-01-01

    the crystal structure of the intact Shigella flexneri VapBC TA complex, determined to 2.7 Å resolution. Both in solution and in the crystal structure, four molecules of each protein combine to form a large and globular hetero-octameric assembly with SpoVT/AbrB-type DNA-binding domains at each end and a total...

  16. An att site-based recombination reporter system for genome engineering and synthetic DNA assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bland, Michael J; Ducos-Galand, Magaly; Val, Marie-Eve; Mazel, Didier

    2017-07-14

    Direct manipulation of the genome is a widespread technique for genetic studies and synthetic biology applications. The tyrosine and serine site-specific recombination systems of bacteriophages HK022 and ΦC31 are widely used for stable directional exchange and relocation of DNA sequences, making them valuable tools in these contexts. We have developed site-specific recombination tools that allow the direct selection of recombination events by embedding the attB site from each system within the β-lactamase resistance coding sequence (bla). The HK and ΦC31 tools were developed by placing the attB sites from each system into the signal peptide cleavage site coding sequence of bla. All possible open reading frames (ORFs) were inserted and tested for recombination efficiency and bla activity. Efficient recombination was observed for all tested ORFs (3 for HK, 6 for ΦC31) as shown through a cointegrate formation assay. The bla gene with the embedded attB site was functional for eight of the nine constructs tested. The HK/ΦC31 att-bla system offers a simple way to directly select recombination events, thus enhancing the use of site-specific recombination systems for carrying out precise, large-scale DNA manipulation, and adding useful tools to the genetics toolbox. We further show the power and flexibility of bla to be used as a reporter for recombination.

  17. Prioritizing multiple therapeutic targets in parallel using automated DNA-encoded library screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machutta, Carl A.; Kollmann, Christopher S.; Lind, Kenneth E.; Bai, Xiaopeng; Chan, Pan F.; Huang, Jianzhong; Ballell, Lluis; Belyanskaya, Svetlana; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Barros-Aguirre, David; Bates, Robert H.; Centrella, Paolo A.; Chang, Sandy S.; Chai, Jing; Choudhry, Anthony E.; Coffin, Aaron; Davie, Christopher P.; Deng, Hongfeng; Deng, Jianghe; Ding, Yun; Dodson, Jason W.; Fosbenner, David T.; Gao, Enoch N.; Graham, Taylor L.; Graybill, Todd L.; Ingraham, Karen; Johnson, Walter P.; King, Bryan W.; Kwiatkowski, Christopher R.; Lelièvre, Joël; Li, Yue; Liu, Xiaorong; Lu, Quinn; Lehr, Ruth; Mendoza-Losana, Alfonso; Martin, John; McCloskey, Lynn; McCormick, Patti; O'Keefe, Heather P.; O'Keeffe, Thomas; Pao, Christina; Phelps, Christopher B.; Qi, Hongwei; Rafferty, Keith; Scavello, Genaro S.; Steiginga, Matt S.; Sundersingh, Flora S.; Sweitzer, Sharon M.; Szewczuk, Lawrence M.; Taylor, Amy; Toh, May Fern; Wang, Juan; Wang, Minghui; Wilkins, Devan J.; Xia, Bing; Yao, Gang; Zhang, Jean; Zhou, Jingye; Donahue, Christine P.; Messer, Jeffrey A.; Holmes, David; Arico-Muendel, Christopher C.; Pope, Andrew J.; Gross, Jeffrey W.; Evindar, Ghotas

    2017-07-01

    The identification and prioritization of chemically tractable therapeutic targets is a significant challenge in the discovery of new medicines. We have developed a novel method that rapidly screens multiple proteins in parallel using DNA-encoded library technology (ELT). Initial efforts were focused on the efficient discovery of antibacterial leads against 119 targets from Acinetobacter baumannii and Staphylococcus aureus. The success of this effort led to the hypothesis that the relative number of ELT binders alone could be used to assess the ligandability of large sets of proteins. This concept was further explored by screening 42 targets from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Active chemical series for six targets from our initial effort as well as three chemotypes for DHFR from M. tuberculosis are reported. The findings demonstrate that parallel ELT selections can be used to assess ligandability and highlight opportunities for successful lead and tool discovery.

  18. A fully automated 384 capillary array for DNA sequencer. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Qingbo; Kane, T

    2003-03-20

    Phase I SpectruMedix has successfully developed an automatic 96-capillary array DNA prototype based on the multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system originated from Ames Laboratory-USDOE, Iowa State University. With computer control of all steps involved in a 96-capillary array running cycle, the prototype instrument (the SCE9600) is now capable of sequencing 450 base pairs (bp) per capillary, or 48,000 bp per instrument run within 2 hrs. Phase II of this grant involved the advancement of the core 96 capillary technologies, as well as designing a high density 384 capillary prototype. True commercialization of the 96 capillary instrument involved finalization of the gel matrix, streamlining the instrument hardware, creating a more reliable capillary cartridge, and further advancement of the data processing software. Together these silos of technology create a truly commercializable product (the SCE9610) capable of meeting the operation needs of the sequencing centers.

  19. Automated extraction of DNA from biological stains on fabric from crime cases. A comparison of a manual and three automated methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stangegaard, Michael; Hjort, Benjamin B; Hansen, Thomas N

    2013-01-01

    The presence of PCR inhibitors in extracted DNA may interfere with the subsequent quantification and short tandem repeat (STR) reactions used in forensic genetic DNA typing. DNA extraction from fabric for forensic genetic purposes may be challenging due to the occasional presence of PCR inhibitors...

  20. A device that operates within a self-assembled 3D DNA crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yudong; Kristiansen, Martin; Sha, Ruojie; Birktoft, Jens J.; Hernandez, Carina; Mao, Chengde; Seeman, Nadrian C.

    2017-08-01

    Structural DNA nanotechnology finds applications in numerous areas, but the construction of objects, 2D and 3D crystalline lattices and devices is prominent among them. Each of these components has been developed individually, and most of them have been combined in pairs. However, to date there are no reports of independent devices contained within 3D crystals. Here we report a three-state 3D device whereby we change the colour of the crystals by diffusing strands that contain dyes in or out of the crystals through the mother-liquor component of the system. Each colouring strand is designed to pair with an extended triangle strand by Watson-Crick base pairing. The arm that contains the dyes is quite flexible, but it is possible to establish the presence of the duplex proximal to the triangle by X-ray crystallography. We modelled the transition between the red and blue states through a simple kinetic model.

  1. Centrifugal LabTube platform for fully automated DNA purification and LAMP amplification based on an integrated, low-cost heating system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehl, Melanie M; Weißert, Michael; Dannenberg, Arne; Nesch, Thomas; Paust, Nils; von Stetten, Felix; Zengerle, Roland; Slocum, Alexander H; Steigert, Juergen

    2014-06-01

    This paper introduces a disposable battery-driven heating system for loop-mediated isothermal DNA amplification (LAMP) inside a centrifugally-driven DNA purification platform (LabTube). We demonstrate LabTube-based fully automated DNA purification of as low as 100 cell-equivalents of verotoxin-producing Escherichia coli (VTEC) in water, milk and apple juice in a laboratory centrifuge, followed by integrated and automated LAMP amplification with a reduction of hands-on time from 45 to 1 min. The heating system consists of two parallel SMD thick film resistors and a NTC as heating and temperature sensing elements. They are driven by a 3 V battery and controlled by a microcontroller. The LAMP reagents are stored in the elution chamber and the amplification starts immediately after the eluate is purged into the chamber. The LabTube, including a microcontroller-based heating system, demonstrates contamination-free and automated sample-to-answer nucleic acid testing within a laboratory centrifuge. The heating system can be easily parallelized within one LabTube and it is deployable for a variety of heating and electrical applications.

  2. DNA biosensor for detection of Salmonella typhi from blood sample of typhoid fever patient using gold electrode modified by self-assembled monolayers of thiols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryapratiwi, Windha Novita; Paat, Vlagia Indira; Gaffar, Shabarni; Hartati, Yeni Wahyuni

    2017-05-01

    Electrochemical biosensors are currently being developed in order to handle various clinical problems in diagnosing infectious diseases caused by pathogenic bacteria, or viruses. On this research, voltammetric DNA biosensor using gold electrode modified by thiols with self-assembled monolayers had been developed to detect a certain sequence of Salmonella typhi DNA from blood sample of typhoid fever patient. Thiol groups of cysteamines (Cys) and aldehyde groups from glutaraldehydes (Glu) were used as a link to increase the performance of gold electrode in detecting guanine oxidation signal of hybridized S. typhi DNA and ssDNA probe. Standard calibration method was used to determine analytical parameters from the measurements. The result shown that, the detection of S. typhi DNA from blood sample of typhoid fever patient can be carried out by voltammetry using gold electrode modified by self-assembled monolayers of thiols. A characteristic oxidation potential of guanine using Au/Cys/Gluwas obtained at +0.17 until +0.20 V. Limit of detection and limit of quantification from this measurements were 1.91μg mL-1 and 6.35 μg mL-1. The concentration of complement DNA from sample was 6.96 μg mL-1.

  3. An ImageJ-based algorithm for a semi-automated method for microscopic image enhancement and DNA repair foci counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klokov, D.; Suppiah, R.

    2015-01-01

    Proper evaluation of the health risks of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure heavily relies on the ability to accurately measure very low levels of DNA damage in cells. One of the most sensitive methods for measuring DNA damage levels is the quantification of DNA repair foci that consist of macromolecular aggregates of DNA repair proteins, such as γH2AX and 53BP1, forming around individual DNA double-strand breaks. They can be quantified using immunofluorescence microscopy and are widely used as markers of DNA double-strand breaks. However this quantification, if performed manually, may be very tedious and prone to inter-individual bias. Low-dose radiation studies are especially sensitive to this potential bias due to a very low magnitude of the effects anticipated. Therefore, we designed and validated an algorithm for the semi-automated processing of microscopic images and quantification of DNA repair foci. The algorithm uses ImageJ, a freely available image analysis software that is customizable to individual cellular properties or experimental conditions. We validated the algorithm using immunolabeled 53BP1 and γH2AX in normal human fibroblast AG01522 cells under both normal and irradiated conditions. This method is easy to learn, can be used by nontrained personnel, and can help avoiding discrepancies in inter-laboratory comparison studies examining the effects of low-dose radiation. (author)

  4. An ImageJ-based algorithm for a semi-automated method for microscopic image enhancement and DNA repair foci counting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klokov, D., E-mail: dmitry.klokov@cnl.ca [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Suppiah, R. [Queen' s Univ., Dept. of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Proper evaluation of the health risks of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure heavily relies on the ability to accurately measure very low levels of DNA damage in cells. One of the most sensitive methods for measuring DNA damage levels is the quantification of DNA repair foci that consist of macromolecular aggregates of DNA repair proteins, such as γH2AX and 53BP1, forming around individual DNA double-strand breaks. They can be quantified using immunofluorescence microscopy and are widely used as markers of DNA double-strand breaks. However this quantification, if performed manually, may be very tedious and prone to inter-individual bias. Low-dose radiation studies are especially sensitive to this potential bias due to a very low magnitude of the effects anticipated. Therefore, we designed and validated an algorithm for the semi-automated processing of microscopic images and quantification of DNA repair foci. The algorithm uses ImageJ, a freely available image analysis software that is customizable to individual cellular properties or experimental conditions. We validated the algorithm using immunolabeled 53BP1 and γH2AX in normal human fibroblast AG01522 cells under both normal and irradiated conditions. This method is easy to learn, can be used by nontrained personnel, and can help avoiding discrepancies in inter-laboratory comparison studies examining the effects of low-dose radiation. (author)

  5. Miniaturized bead-beating device to automate full DNA sample preparation processes for gram-positive bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Kyu-Youn; Kwon, Sung Hong; Jung, Sun-Ok; Lim, Hee-Kyun; Jung, Won-Jong; Park, Chin-Sung; Kim, Joon-Ho; Suh, Kahp-Yang; Huh, Nam

    2011-11-07

    We have developed a miniaturized bead-beating device to automate nucleic acids extraction from Gram-positive bacteria for molecular diagnostics. The microfluidic device was fabricated by sandwiching a monolithic flexible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane between two glass wafers (i.e., glass-PDMS-glass), which acted as an actuator for bead collision via its pneumatic vibration without additional lysis equipment. The Gram-positive bacteria, S. aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus, were captured on surface-modified glass beads from 1 mL of initial sample solution and in situ lyzed by bead-beating operation. Then, 10 μL or 20 μL of bacterial DNA solution was eluted and amplified successfully by real-time PCR. It was found that liquid volume fraction played a crucial role in determining the cell lysis efficiency in a confined chamber by facilitating membrane deflection and bead motion. The miniaturized bead-beating operation disrupted most of S. aureus within 3 min, which turned out to be as efficient as the conventional benchtop vortexing machine or the enzyme-based lysis technique. The effective cell concentration was significantly enhanced with the reduction of initial sample volume by 50 or 100 times. Combination of such analyte enrichment and in situ bead-beating lysis provided an excellent PCR detection sensitivity amounting to ca. 46 CFU even for the Gram-positive bacteria. The proposed bead-beating microdevice is potentially useful as a nucleic acid extraction method toward a PCR-based sample-to-answer system. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  6. Porcine transcriptome analysis based on 97 non-normalized cDNA libraries and assembly of 1,021,891 expressed sequence tags

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorodkin, Jan; Cirera, Susanna; Hedegaard, Jacob

    2007-01-01

    public databases. The Sino-Danish ESTs were generated from one normalized and 97 non-normalized cDNA libraries representing 35 different tissues and three developmental stages. RESULTS: Using the Distiller package, the ESTs were assembled to roughly 48,000 contigs and 73,000 singletons, of which...... with the greatest number of different expressed genes, whereas tissues with more specialized function, such as developing liver, have fewer expressed genes. There are at least 65 high confidence housekeeping gene candidates and 876 cDNA library-specific gene candidates. We identified differential expression...

  7. Toward allotetraploid cotton genome assembly: integration of a high-density molecular genetic linkage map with DNA sequence information

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Cotton is the world’s most important natural textile fiber and a significant oilseed crop. Decoding cotton genomes will provide the ultimate reference and resource for research and utilization of the species. Integration of high-density genetic maps with genomic sequence information will largely accelerate the process of whole-genome assembly in cotton. Results In this paper, we update a high-density interspecific genetic linkage map of allotetraploid cultivated cotton. An additional 1,167 marker loci have been added to our previously published map of 2,247 loci. Three new marker types, InDel (insertion-deletion) and SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) developed from gene information, and REMAP (retrotransposon-microsatellite amplified polymorphism), were used to increase map density. The updated map consists of 3,414 loci in 26 linkage groups covering 3,667.62 cM with an average inter-locus distance of 1.08 cM. Furthermore, genome-wide sequence analysis was finished using 3,324 informative sequence-based markers and publicly-available Gossypium DNA sequence information. A total of 413,113 EST and 195 BAC sequences were physically anchored and clustered by 3,324 sequence-based markers. Of these, 14,243 ESTs and 188 BACs from different species of Gossypium were clustered and specifically anchored to the high-density genetic map. A total of 2,748 candidate unigenes from 2,111 ESTs clusters and 63 BACs were mined for functional annotation and classification. The 337 ESTs/genes related to fiber quality traits were integrated with 132 previously reported cotton fiber quality quantitative trait loci, which demonstrated the important roles in fiber quality of these genes. Higher-level sequence conservation between different cotton species and between the A- and D-subgenomes in tetraploid cotton was found, indicating a common evolutionary origin for orthologous and paralogous loci in Gossypium. Conclusion This study will serve as a valuable genomic resource

  8. DNA mediated wire-like clusters of self-assembled TiO₂ nanomaterials: supercapacitor and dye sensitized solar cell applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nithiyanantham, U; Ramadoss, Ananthakumar; Ede, Sivasankara Rao; Kundu, Subrata

    2014-07-21

    A new route for the formation of wire-like clusters of TiO₂ nanomaterials self-assembled in DNA scaffold within an hour of reaction time is reported. TiO₂ nanomaterials are synthesized by the reaction of titanium-isopropoxide with ethanol and water in the presence of DNA under continuous stirring and heating at 60 °C. The individual size of the TiO₂ NPs self-assembled in DNA and the diameter of the wires can be tuned by controlling the DNA to Ti-salt molar ratios and other reaction parameters. The eventual diameter of the individual particles varies between 15 ± 5 nm ranges, whereas the length of the nanowires varies in the 2-3 μm range. The synthesized wire-like DNA-TiO₂ nanomaterials are excellent materials for electrochemical supercapacitor and DSSC applications. From the electrochemical supercapacitor experiment, it was found that the TiO₂ nanomaterials showed different specific capacitance (Cs) values for the various nanowires, and the order of Cs values are as follows: wire-like clusters (small size) > wire-like clusters (large size). The highest Cs of 2.69 F g(-1) was observed for TiO₂ having wire-like structure with small sizes. The study of the long term cycling stability of wire-like clusters (small size) electrode were shown to be stable, retaining ca. 80% of the initial specific capacitance, even after 5000 cycles. The potentiality of the DNA-TiO₂ nanomaterials was also tested in photo-voltaic applications and the observed efficiency was found higher in the case of wire-like TiO₂ nanostructures with larger sizes compared to smaller sizes. In future, the described method can be extended for the synthesis of other oxide based materials on DNA scaffold and can be further used in other applications like sensors, Li-ion battery materials or treatment for environmental waste water.

  9. Toehold strand displacement-driven assembly of G-quadruplex DNA for enzyme-free and non-label sensitive fluorescent detection of thrombin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yunying; Zhou, Wenjiao; Zhou, Ming; Xiang, Yun; Yuan, Ruo; Chai, Yaqin

    2015-02-15

    Based on a new signal amplification strategy by the toehold strand displacement-driven cyclic assembly of G-quadruplex DNA, the development of an enzyme-free and non-label aptamer sensing approach for sensitive fluorescent detection of thrombin is described. The target thrombin associates with the corresponding aptamer of the partial dsDNA probes and liberates single stranded initiation sequences, which trigger the toehold strand displacement assembly of two G-quadruplex containing hairpin DNAs. This toehold strand displacement reaction leads to the cyclic reuse of the initiation sequences and the production of DNA assemblies with numerous G-quadruplex structures. The fluorescent dye, N-Methyl mesoporphyrin IX, binds to these G-quadruplex structures and generates significantly amplified fluorescent signals to achieve highly sensitive detection of thrombin down to 5 pM. Besides, this method shows high selectivity towards the target thrombin against other control proteins. The developed thrombin sensing method herein avoids the modification of the probes and the involvement of any enzyme or nanomaterial labels for signal amplification. With the successful demonstration for thrombin detection, our approach can be easily adopted to monitor other target molecules in a simple, low-cost, sensitive and selective way by choosing appropriate aptamer/ligand pairs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Application of a Novel and Automated Branched DNA in Situ Hybridization Method for the Rapid and Sensitive Localization of mRNA Molecules in Plant Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. Bowling

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: A novel branched DNA detection technology, RNAscope in situ hybridization (ISH, originally developed for use on human clinical and animal tissues, was adapted for use in plant tissue in an attempt to overcome some of the limitations associated with traditional ISH assays. Methods and Results: Zea mays leaf tissue was formaldehyde fixed and paraffin embedded (FFPE and then probed with the RNAscope ISH assay for two endogenous genes, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK. Results from both manual and automated methods showed tissue- and cell-specific mRNA localization patterns expected from these well-studied genes. Conclusions: RNAscope ISH is a sensitive method that generates high-quality, easily interpretable results from FFPE plant tissues. Automation of the RNAscope method on the Ventana Discovery Ultra platform allows significant advantages for repeatability, reduction in variability, and flexibility of workflow processes.

  11. Automated imaging system for single molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, David Charles; Runnheim, Rodney; Forrest, Daniel

    2012-09-18

    There is provided a high throughput automated single molecule image collection and processing system that requires minimal initial user input. The unique features embodied in the present disclosure allow automated collection and initial processing of optical images of single molecules and their assemblies. Correct focus may be automatically maintained while images are collected. Uneven illumination in fluorescence microscopy is accounted for, and an overall robust imaging operation is provided yielding individual images prepared for further processing in external systems. Embodiments described herein are useful in studies of any macromolecules such as DNA, RNA, peptides and proteins. The automated image collection and processing system and method of same may be implemented and deployed over a computer network, and may be ergonomically optimized to facilitate user interaction.

  12. Improvement of Synthetic Biology Tools for DNA Editing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavaleiro, Mafalda

    with the development and improvement of DNA editing strategies,compatible with other DNA assembly methodologies, genome engineering and,eventually, automation processes. Expanding and optimizing the synbio toolkit has important applications in pathway optimization for metabolic engineering, design and characterization...... of gene circuits, synthesis of whole genomes and natural product discovery. In line with this, it is also described in this thesis how discovery of new cytochromes P450 (CYPs) from marine bacteria could benefit industrial processes....

  13. ATR- and ATM-Mediated DNA Damage Response Is Dependent on Excision Repair Assembly during G1 but Not in S Phase of Cell Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Alo; Blevins, Chessica; Wani, Gulzar; Wani, Altaf A

    2016-01-01

    Cell cycle checkpoint is mediated by ATR and ATM kinases, as a prompt early response to a variety of DNA insults, and culminates in a highly orchestrated signal transduction cascade. Previously, we defined the regulatory role of nucleotide excision repair (NER) factors, DDB2 and XPC, in checkpoint and ATR/ATM-dependent repair pathway via ATR and ATM phosphorylation and recruitment to ultraviolet radiation (UVR)-induced damage sites. Here, we have dissected the molecular mechanisms of DDB2- and XPC- mediated regulation of ATR and ATM recruitment and activation upon UVR exposures. We show that the ATR and ATM activation and accumulation to UVR-induced damage not only depends on DDB2 and XPC, but also on the NER protein XPA, suggesting that the assembly of an active NER complex is essential for ATR and ATM recruitment. ATR and ATM localization and H2AX phosphorylation at the lesion sites occur as early as ten minutes in asynchronous as well as G1 arrested cells, showing that repair and checkpoint-mediated by ATR and ATM starts early upon UV irradiation. Moreover, our results demonstrated that ATR and ATM recruitment and H2AX phosphorylation are dependent on NER proteins in G1 phase, but not in S phase. We reasoned that in G1 the UVR-induced ssDNA gaps or processed ssDNA, and the bound NER complex promote ATR and ATM recruitment. In S phase, when the UV lesions result in stalled replication forks with long single-stranded DNA, ATR and ATM recruitment to these sites is regulated by different sets of proteins. Taken together, these results provide evidence that UVR-induced ATR and ATM recruitment and activation differ in G1 and S phases due to the existence of distinct types of DNA lesions, which promote assembly of different proteins involved in the process of DNA repair and checkpoint activation.

  14. A robotics platform for automated batch fabrication of high density, microfluidics-based DNA microarrays, with applications to single cell, multiplex assays of secreted proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Habib; Sutherland, Alex; Shin, Young Shik; Hwang, Kiwook; Qin, Lidong; Krom, Russell-John; Heath, James R.

    2011-09-01

    Microfluidics flow-patterning has been utilized for the construction of chip-scale miniaturized DNA and protein barcode arrays. Such arrays have been used for specific clinical and fundamental investigations in which many proteins are assayed from single cells or other small sample sizes. However, flow-patterned arrays are hand-prepared, and so are impractical for broad applications. We describe an integrated robotics/microfluidics platform for the automated preparation of such arrays, and we apply it to the batch fabrication of up to eighteen chips of flow-patterned DNA barcodes. The resulting substrates are comparable in quality with hand-made arrays and exhibit excellent substrate-to-substrate consistency. We demonstrate the utility and reproducibility of robotics-patterned barcodes by utilizing two flow-patterned chips for highly parallel assays of a panel of secreted proteins from single macrophage cells.

  15. A robotics platform for automated batch fabrication of high density, microfluidics-based DNA microarrays, with applications to single cell, multiplex assays of secreted proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Habib; Sutherland, Alex; Shin, Young Shik; Hwang, Kiwook; Qin, Lidong; Krom, Russell-John; Heath, James R

    2011-09-01

    Microfluidics flow-patterning has been utilized for the construction of chip-scale miniaturized DNA and protein barcode arrays. Such arrays have been used for specific clinical and fundamental investigations in which many proteins are assayed from single cells or other small sample sizes. However, flow-patterned arrays are hand-prepared, and so are impractical for broad applications. We describe an integrated robotics/microfluidics platform for the automated preparation of such arrays, and we apply it to the batch fabrication of up to eighteen chips of flow-patterned DNA barcodes. The resulting substrates are comparable in quality with hand-made arrays and exhibit excellent substrate-to-substrate consistency. We demonstrate the utility and reproducibility of robotics-patterned barcodes by utilizing two flow-patterned chips for highly parallel assays of a panel of secreted proteins from single macrophage cells. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  16. Parkinson's disease brain mitochondria have impaired respirasome assembly, age-related increases in distribution of oxidative damage to mtDNA and no differences in heteroplasmic mtDNA mutation abundance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keeney Paula M

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sporadic Parkinson's disease (sPD is a nervous system-wide disease that presents with a bradykinetic movement disorder and is frequently complicated by depression and cognitive impairment. sPD likely has multiple interacting causes that include increased oxidative stress damage to mitochondrial components and reduced mitochondrial bioenergetic capacity. We analyzed mitochondria from postmortem sPD and CTL brains for evidence of oxidative damage to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA, heteroplasmic mtDNA point mutations and levels of electron transport chain proteins. We sought to determine if sPD brains possess any mtDNA genotype-respiratory phenotype relationships. Results Treatment of sPD brain mtDNA with the mitochondrial base-excision repair enzyme 8-oxyguanosine glycosylase-1 (hOGG1 inhibited, in an age-dependent manner, qPCR amplification of overlapping ~2 kbase products; amplification of CTL brain mtDNA showed moderate sensitivity to hOGG1 not dependent on donor age. hOGG1 mRNA expression was not different between sPD and CTL brains. Heteroplasmy analysis of brain mtDNA using Surveyor nuclease® showed asymmetric distributions and levels of heteroplasmic mutations across mtDNA but no patterns that statistically distinguished sPD from CTL. sPD brain mitochondria displayed reductions of nine respirasome proteins (respiratory complexes I-V. Reduced levels of sPD brain mitochondrial complex II, III and V, but not complex I or IV proteins, correlated closely with rates of NADH-driven electron flow. mtDNA levels and PGC-1α expression did not differ between sPD and CTL brains. Conclusion PD brain mitochondria have reduced mitochondrial respiratory protein levels in complexes I-V, implying a generalized defect in respirasome assembly. These deficiencies do not appear to arise from altered point mutational burden in mtDNA or reduction of nuclear signaling for mitochondrial biogenesis, implying downstream etiologies. The origin of age

  17. Genome Partitioner: A web tool for multi-level partitioning of large-scale DNA constructs for synthetic biology applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christen, Matthias; Del Medico, Luca; Christen, Heinz; Christen, Beat

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in lower-cost DNA synthesis techniques have enabled new innovations in the field of synthetic biology. Still, efficient design and higher-order assembly of genome-scale DNA constructs remains a labor-intensive process. Given the complexity, computer assisted design tools that fragment large DNA sequences into fabricable DNA blocks are needed to pave the way towards streamlined assembly of biological systems. Here, we present the Genome Partitioner software implemented as a web-based interface that permits multi-level partitioning of genome-scale DNA designs. Without the need for specialized computing skills, biologists can submit their DNA designs to a fully automated pipeline that generates the optimal retrosynthetic route for higher-order DNA assembly. To test the algorithm, we partitioned a 783 kb Caulobacter crescentus genome design. We validated the partitioning strategy by assembling a 20 kb test segment encompassing a difficult to synthesize DNA sequence. Successful assembly from 1 kb subblocks into the 20 kb segment highlights the effectiveness of the Genome Partitioner for reducing synthesis costs and timelines for higher-order DNA assembly. The Genome Partitioner is broadly applicable to translate DNA designs into ready to order sequences that can be assembled with standardized protocols, thus offering new opportunities to harness the diversity of microbial genomes for synthetic biology applications. The Genome Partitioner web tool can be accessed at https://christenlab.ethz.ch/GenomePartitioner.

  18. Genome Partitioner: A web tool for multi-level partitioning of large-scale DNA constructs for synthetic biology applications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Christen

    Full Text Available Recent advances in lower-cost DNA synthesis techniques have enabled new innovations in the field of synthetic biology. Still, efficient design and higher-order assembly of genome-scale DNA constructs remains a labor-intensive process. Given the complexity, computer assisted design tools that fragment large DNA sequences into fabricable DNA blocks are needed to pave the way towards streamlined assembly of biological systems. Here, we present the Genome Partitioner software implemented as a web-based interface that permits multi-level partitioning of genome-scale DNA designs. Without the need for specialized computing skills, biologists can submit their DNA designs to a fully automated pipeline that generates the optimal retrosynthetic route for higher-order DNA assembly. To test the algorithm, we partitioned a 783 kb Caulobacter crescentus genome design. We validated the partitioning strategy by assembling a 20 kb test segment encompassing a difficult to synthesize DNA sequence. Successful assembly from 1 kb subblocks into the 20 kb segment highlights the effectiveness of the Genome Partitioner for reducing synthesis costs and timelines for higher-order DNA assembly. The Genome Partitioner is broadly applicable to translate DNA designs into ready to order sequences that can be assembled with standardized protocols, thus offering new opportunities to harness the diversity of microbial genomes for synthetic biology applications. The Genome Partitioner web tool can be accessed at https://christenlab.ethz.ch/GenomePartitioner.

  19. Automation and robotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montemerlo, Melvin

    1988-01-01

    The Autonomous Systems focus on the automation of control systems for the Space Station and mission operations. Telerobotics focuses on automation for in-space servicing, assembly, and repair. The Autonomous Systems and Telerobotics each have a planned sequence of integrated demonstrations showing the evolutionary advance of the state-of-the-art. Progress is briefly described for each area of concern.

  20. Enhanced cellular immune response against SIV Gag induced by immunization with DNA vaccines expressing assembly and release-defective SIV Gag proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bu Zhigao; Ye Ling; Compans, Richard W.; Yang Chinglai

    2003-01-01

    Codon-optimized genes were synthesized for the SIVmac239 Gag, a mutant Gag with mutations in the major homology region, and a chimeric Gag containing a protein destruction signal at the N-terminus of Gag. The mutant and chimeric Gag were expressed at levels comparable to that observed for the wild-type Gag protein but their stability and release into the medium were found to be significantly reduced. Immunization of mice with DNA vectors encoding the mutant or chimeric Gag induced fourfold higher levels of anti-SIV Gag CD4 T cell responses than the DNA vector encoding the wild-type SIV Gag. Moreover, anti-SIV Gag CD8 T cell responses induced by DNA vectors encoding the mutant or chimeric Gag were found to be 5- to 10-fold higher than those induced by the DNA construct for the wild-type Gag. These results indicate that mutations disrupting assembly and/or stability of the SIV Gag protein effectively enhance its immunogenicity when expressed from DNA vaccines

  1. Virus-sized self-assembling lamellar complexes between plasmid DNA and cationic micelles promote gene transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitard, Bruno; Aguerre, Olivier; Airiau, Marc; Lachagès, Anne-Marie; Boukhnikachvili, Tsiala; Byk, Gérardo; Dubertret, Catherine; Herviou, Christian; Scherman, Daniel; Mayaux, Jean-François; Crouzet, Joël

    1997-01-01

    Gene therapy is based on the vectorization of genes to target cells and their subsequent expression. Cationic amphiphile-mediated delivery of plasmid DNA is the nonviral gene transfer method most often used. We examined the supramolecular structure of lipopolyamine/plasmid DNA complexes under various condensing conditions. Plasmid DNA complexation with lipopolyamine micelles whose mean diameter was 5 nm revealed three domains, depending on the lipopolyamine/plasmid DNA ratio. These domains respectively corresponded to negatively, neutrally, and positively charged complexes. Transmission electron microscopy and x-ray scattering experiments on complexes originating from these three domains showed that although their morphology depends on the lipopolyamine/plasmid DNA ratio, their particle structure consists of ordered domains characterized by even spacing of 80 Å, irrespective of the lipid/DNA ratio. The most active lipopolyamine/DNA complexes for gene transfer were positively charged. They were characterized by fully condensed DNA inside spherical particles (diameter: 50 nm) sandwiched between lipid bilayers. These results show that supercoiled plasmid DNA is able to transform lipopolyamine micelles into a supramolecular organization characterized by ordered lamellar domains. PMID:9405626

  2. Enantiomeric and Diastereomeric Self-Assembled Multivalent (SAMul) Nanostructures - Understanding the Effects of Chirality on Binding to Polyanionic Heparin and DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornalley, Kiri; Laurini, Erik; Pricl, Sabrina; Smith, David K

    2018-05-15

    A family of four self-assembling lipopeptides containing Ala-Lys peptides attached to a C16 aliphatic chain was synthesised. These compounds form two enantiomeric pairs that bear a diastereomeric relationship to one another (C16-L-Ala-L-Lys/C16-D-Ala-D-Lys) and (C16-D-Ala-L-Lys/C16-L-Ala-D-Lys). These diastereomeric pairs have very different critical micelle concentrations (CMCs), with LL/DD < DL/LD suggesting more effective assembly of the former. The self-assembled multivalent (SAMul) systems bind biological polyanions as result of the cationic lysine groups on their surfaces. Polyanion binding was investigated using dye displacement assays and isothermal calorimetry (ITC). On heparin binding, there was no significant enantioselectivity, but there was a binding preference for the diastereomeric assemblies with lower CMCs. Conversely, on binding DNA, there was a significant enantioselective preference for systems displaying D-lysine ligands, with a further slight preference for attachment to L-alanine, with the CMC being irrelevant. Binding to adaptive, ill-defined heparin has a large favourable entropic term, suggesting it depends primarily on the cationic SAMul nanostructure maximising surface contact with heparin, which can adapt, displacing solvent and other ions. Conversely, binding to well-defined, shape-persistent DNA has a larger favourable enthalpic term, and combined with the enantioselectivity, this allows us to suggest that its SAMul binding is based on optimised individual electrostatic interactions at the molecular level, with a preference for binding to D-lysine. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. The convergence of quantum-dot-mediated fluorescence resonance energy transfer and microfluidics for monitoring DNA polyplex self-assembly in real time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho Yiping; Wang, T-H; Chen, Hunter H; Leong, Kam W

    2009-01-01

    We present a novel convergence of quantum-dot-mediated fluorescence resonance energy transfer (QD-FRET) and microfluidics, through which molecular interactions were precisely controlled and monitored using highly sensitive quantum-dot-mediated FRET. We demonstrate its potential in studying the kinetics of self-assembly of DNA polyplexes under laminar flow in real time with millisecond resolution. The integration of nanophotonics and microfluidics offers a powerful tool for elucidating the formation of polyelectrolyte polyplexes, which is expected to provide better control and synthesis of uniform and customizable polyplexes for future nucleic acid-based therapeutics.

  4. Auto-assembly of nanometer thick, water soluble layers of plasmid DNA complexed with diamines and basic amino acids on graphite: Greatest DNA protection is obtained with arginine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalil, T.T.; Boulanouar, O. [Université de Bourgogne Franche-Comté, UMR CNRS 6249 Chrono-Environnement, 16, Route de Gray, 25030 Besançon Cedex (France); Heintz, O. [Université de Bourgogne Franche-Comté, UMR CNRS 6303Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, DTAI/Centre de micro/nano caractérisation, 9 Av. A. Savary, BP 47870, F-21078 DIJON Cedex (France); Fromm, M., E-mail: michel.fromm@univ-fcomte.fr [Université de Bourgogne Franche-Comté, UMR CNRS 6249 Chrono-Environnement, 16, Route de Gray, 25030 Besançon Cedex (France)

    2017-02-01

    We have investigated the ability of diamines as well as basic amino acids to condense DNA onto highly ordered pyrolytic graphite with minimum damage after re-dissolution in water. Based on a bibliographic survey we briefly summarize DNA binding properties with diamines as compared to basic amino acids. Thus, solutions of DNA complexed with these linkers were drop-cast in order to deposit ultra-thin layers on the surface of HOPG in the absence or presence of Tris buffer. Atomic Force Microscopy analyses showed that, at a fixed ligand-DNA mixing ratio of 16, the mean thickness of the layers can be statistically predicted to lie in the range 0–50 nm with a maximum standard deviation ± 6 nm, using a simple linear law depending on the DNA concentration. The morphology of the layers appears to be ligand-dependent. While the layers containing diamines present holes, those formed in the presence of basic amino acids, except for lysine, are much more compact and dense. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy measurements provide compositional information indicating that, compared to the maximum number of DNA sites to which the ligands may bind, the basic amino acids Arg and His are present in large excess. Conservation of the supercoiled topology of the DNA plasmids was studied after recovery of the complex layers in water. Remarkably, arginine has the best protection capabilities whether Tris was present or not in the initial solution. - Highlights: • Characterization of nanometer scaled layers composed of pUC21 plasmid DNA • Relation between nature of the ligand and structure of the layers • Capacities of the ligands to protect plasmids from strand break depending on their nature.

  5. DNA data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Raw DNA chromatogram data produced by the ABI 373, 377, 3130 and 3730 automated sequencing machines in ABI format. These are from fish (primarily Sebastes spp.,...

  6. Exciplex fluorescence emission from simple organic intramolecular constructs in non-polar and highly polar media as model systems for DNA-assembled exciplex detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bichenkova, Elena V; Sardarian, Ali R; Wilton, Amanda N; Bonnet, Pascal; Bryce, Richard A; Douglas, Kenneth T

    2006-01-21

    Organic intramolecular exciplexes, N-(4-dimethylaminobenzyl)-N-(1-pyrenemethyl)amine (1) and N'-4-dimethylaminonaphthyl-N-(1-pyrenemethyl)amine (2), were used as model systems to reveal major factors affecting their exciplex fluorescence, and thus lay the basis for developing emissive target-assembled exciplexes for DNA-mounted systems in solution. These models with an aromatic pyrenyl hydrocarbon moiety as an electron acceptor appropriately connected to an aromatic dimethylamino electron donor component (N,N-dimethylaminophenyl or N,N-dimethylaminonaphthyl) showed strong intramolecular exciplex emission in both non-polar and highly polar solvents. The effect of dielectric constant on the maximum wavelength for exciplex emission was studied, and emission was observed for 1 and 2 over the full range of solvent from non-polar hydrocarbons up to N-methylformamide with a dielectric constant of 182. Quantum yields were determined for these intramolecular exciplexes in a range of solvents relative to that for Hoechst 33,258. Conformational analysis of 1 was performed both computationally and via qualitative 2D NMR using (1)H-NOESY experiments. The results obtained indicated the contribution of pre-folded conformation(s) to the ground state of 1 conducive to exciplex emission. This research provides the initial background for design of self-assembled, DNA-mounted exciplexes and underpins further development of exciplex-based hybridisation bioassays.

  7. De novo transcriptome sequence assembly from coconut leaves and seeds with a focus on factors involved in RNA-directed DNA methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ya-Yi; Lee, Chueh-Pai; Fu, Jason L; Chang, Bill Chia-Han; Matzke, Antonius J M; Matzke, Marjori

    2014-09-04

    Coconut palm (Cocos nucifera) is a symbol of the tropics and a source of numerous edible and nonedible products of economic value. Despite its nutritional and industrial significance, coconut remains under-represented in public repositories for genomic and transcriptomic data. We report de novo transcript assembly from RNA-seq data and analysis of gene expression in seed tissues (embryo and endosperm) and leaves of a dwarf coconut variety. Assembly of 10 GB sequencing data for each tissue resulted in 58,211 total unigenes in embryo, 61,152 in endosperm, and 33,446 in leaf. Within each unigene pool, 24,857 could be annotated in embryo, 29,731 could be annotated in endosperm, and 26,064 could be annotated in leaf. A KEGG analysis identified 138, 138, and 139 pathways, respectively, in transcriptomes of embryo, endosperm, and leaf tissues. Given the extraordinarily large size of coconut seeds and the importance of small RNA-mediated epigenetic regulation during seed development in model plants, we used homology searches to identify putative homologs of factors required for RNA-directed DNA methylation in coconut. The findings suggest that RNA-directed DNA methylation is important during coconut seed development, particularly in maturing endosperm. This dataset will expand the genomics resources available for coconut and provide a foundation for more detailed analyses that may assist molecular breeding strategies aimed at improving this major tropical crop. Copyright © 2014 Huang et al.

  8. DNA mediated wire-like clusters of self-assembled TiO2 nanomaterials: supercapacitor and dye sensitized solar cell applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nithiyanantham, U.; Ramadoss, Ananthakumar; Ede, Sivasankara Rao; Kundu, Subrata

    2014-06-01

    A new route for the formation of wire-like clusters of TiO2 nanomaterials self-assembled in DNA scaffold within an hour of reaction time is reported. TiO2 nanomaterials are synthesized by the reaction of titanium-isopropoxide with ethanol and water in the presence of DNA under continuous stirring and heating at 60 °C. The individual size of the TiO2 NPs self-assembled in DNA and the diameter of the wires can be tuned by controlling the DNA to Ti-salt molar ratios and other reaction parameters. The eventual diameter of the individual particles varies between 15 +/- 5 nm ranges, whereas the length of the nanowires varies in the 2-3 μm range. The synthesized wire-like DNA-TiO2 nanomaterials are excellent materials for electrochemical supercapacitor and DSSC applications. From the electrochemical supercapacitor experiment, it was found that the TiO2 nanomaterials showed different specific capacitance (Cs) values for the various nanowires, and the order of Cs values are as follows: wire-like clusters (small size) > wire-like clusters (large size). The highest Cs of 2.69 F g-1 was observed for TiO2 having wire-like structure with small sizes. The study of the long term cycling stability of wire-like clusters (small size) electrode were shown to be stable, retaining ca. 80% of the initial specific capacitance, even after 5000 cycles. The potentiality of the DNA-TiO2 nanomaterials was also tested in photo-voltaic applications and the observed efficiency was found higher in the case of wire-like TiO2 nanostructures with larger sizes compared to smaller sizes. In future, the described method can be extended for the synthesis of other oxide based materials on DNA scaffold and can be further used in other applications like sensors, Li-ion battery materials or treatment for environmental waste water.A new route for the formation of wire-like clusters of TiO2 nanomaterials self-assembled in DNA scaffold within an hour of reaction time is reported. TiO2 nanomaterials are

  9. A Microfluidic Device for Preparing Next Generation DNA Sequencing Libraries and for Automating Other Laboratory Protocols That Require One or More Column Chromatography Steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Swee Jin; Phan, Huan; Gerry, Benjamin Michael; Kuhn, Alexandre; Hong, Lewis Zuocheng; Min Ong, Yao; Poon, Polly Suk Yean; Unger, Marc Alexander; Jones, Robert C.; Quake, Stephen R.; Burkholder, William F.

    2013-01-01

    Library preparation for next-generation DNA sequencing (NGS) remains a key bottleneck in the sequencing process which can be relieved through improved automation and miniaturization. We describe a microfluidic device for automating laboratory protocols that require one or more column chromatography steps and demonstrate its utility for preparing Next Generation sequencing libraries for the Illumina and Ion Torrent platforms. Sixteen different libraries can be generated simultaneously with significantly reduced reagent cost and hands-on time compared to manual library preparation. Using an appropriate column matrix and buffers, size selection can be performed on-chip following end-repair, dA tailing, and linker ligation, so that the libraries eluted from the chip are ready for sequencing. The core architecture of the device ensures uniform, reproducible column packing without user supervision and accommodates multiple routine protocol steps in any sequence, such as reagent mixing and incubation; column packing, loading, washing, elution, and regeneration; capture of eluted material for use as a substrate in a later step of the protocol; and removal of one column matrix so that two or more column matrices with different functional properties can be used in the same protocol. The microfluidic device is mounted on a plastic carrier so that reagents and products can be aliquoted and recovered using standard pipettors and liquid handling robots. The carrier-mounted device is operated using a benchtop controller that seals and operates the device with programmable temperature control, eliminating any requirement for the user to manually attach tubing or connectors. In addition to NGS library preparation, the device and controller are suitable for automating other time-consuming and error-prone laboratory protocols requiring column chromatography steps, such as chromatin immunoprecipitation. PMID:23894273

  10. A microfluidic device for preparing next generation DNA sequencing libraries and for automating other laboratory protocols that require one or more column chromatography steps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swee Jin Tan

    Full Text Available Library preparation for next-generation DNA sequencing (NGS remains a key bottleneck in the sequencing process which can be relieved through improved automation and miniaturization. We describe a microfluidic device for automating laboratory protocols that require one or more column chromatography steps and demonstrate its utility for preparing Next Generation sequencing libraries for the Illumina and Ion Torrent platforms. Sixteen different libraries can be generated simultaneously with significantly reduced reagent cost and hands-on time compared to manual library preparation. Using an appropriate column matrix and buffers, size selection can be performed on-chip following end-repair, dA tailing, and linker ligation, so that the libraries eluted from the chip are ready for sequencing. The core architecture of the device ensures uniform, reproducible column packing without user supervision and accommodates multiple routine protocol steps in any sequence, such as reagent mixing and incubation; column packing, loading, washing, elution, and regeneration; capture of eluted material for use as a substrate in a later step of the protocol; and removal of one column matrix so that two or more column matrices with different functional properties can be used in the same protocol. The microfluidic device is mounted on a plastic carrier so that reagents and products can be aliquoted and recovered using standard pipettors and liquid handling robots. The carrier-mounted device is operated using a benchtop controller that seals and operates the device with programmable temperature control, eliminating any requirement for the user to manually attach tubing or connectors. In addition to NGS library preparation, the device and controller are suitable for automating other time-consuming and error-prone laboratory protocols requiring column chromatography steps, such as chromatin immunoprecipitation.

  11. Comparison of Boiling and Robotics Automation Method in DNA Extraction for Metagenomic Sequencing of Human Oral Microbes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Junya; Sato, Yukuto; Shinozaki, Natsuko; Ye, Bin; Tsuboi, Akito; Nagasaki, Masao; Yamashita, Riu

    2016-01-01

    The rapid improvement of next-generation sequencing performance now enables us to analyze huge sample sets with more than ten thousand specimens. However, DNA extraction can still be a limiting step in such metagenomic approaches. In this study, we analyzed human oral microbes to compare the performance of three DNA extraction methods: PowerSoil (a method widely used in this field), QIAsymphony (a robotics method), and a simple boiling method. Dental plaque was initially collected from three volunteers in the pilot study and then expanded to 12 volunteers in the follow-up study. Bacterial flora was estimated by sequencing the V4 region of 16S rRNA following species-level profiling. Our results indicate that the efficiency of PowerSoil and QIAsymphony was comparable to the boiling method. Therefore, the boiling method may be a promising alternative because of its simplicity, cost effectiveness, and short handling time. Moreover, this method was reliable for estimating bacterial species and could be used in the future to examine the correlation between oral flora and health status. Despite this, differences in the efficiency of DNA extraction for various bacterial species were observed among the three methods. Based on these findings, there is no "gold standard" for DNA extraction. In future, we suggest that the DNA extraction method should be selected on a case-by-case basis considering the aims and specimens of the study.

  12. Comparison of Boiling and Robotics Automation Method in DNA Extraction for Metagenomic Sequencing of Human Oral Microbes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junya Yamagishi

    Full Text Available The rapid improvement of next-generation sequencing performance now enables us to analyze huge sample sets with more than ten thousand specimens. However, DNA extraction can still be a limiting step in such metagenomic approaches. In this study, we analyzed human oral microbes to compare the performance of three DNA extraction methods: PowerSoil (a method widely used in this field, QIAsymphony (a robotics method, and a simple boiling method. Dental plaque was initially collected from three volunteers in the pilot study and then expanded to 12 volunteers in the follow-up study. Bacterial flora was estimated by sequencing the V4 region of 16S rRNA following species-level profiling. Our results indicate that the efficiency of PowerSoil and QIAsymphony was comparable to the boiling method. Therefore, the boiling method may be a promising alternative because of its simplicity, cost effectiveness, and short handling time. Moreover, this method was reliable for estimating bacterial species and could be used in the future to examine the correlation between oral flora and health status. Despite this, differences in the efficiency of DNA extraction for various bacterial species were observed among the three methods. Based on these findings, there is no "gold standard" for DNA extraction. In future, we suggest that the DNA extraction method should be selected on a case-by-case basis considering the aims and specimens of the study.

  13. Accurate Dna Assembly And Direct Genome Integration With Optimized Uracil Excision Cloning To Facilitate Engineering Of Escherichia Coli As A Cell Factory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavaleiro, Mafalda; Kim, Se Hyeuk; Nørholm, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Plants produce a vast diversity of valuable compounds with medical properties, but these are often difficult to purify from the natural source or produce by organic synthesis. An alternative is to transfer the biosynthetic pathways to an efficient production host like the bacterium Escherichia co......-excision-based cloning and combining it with a genome-engineering approach to allow direct integration of whole metabolic pathways into the genome of E. coli, to facilitate the advanced engineering of cell factories........ Cloning and heterologous gene expression are major bottlenecks in the metabolic engineering field. We are working on standardizing DNA vector design processes to promote automation and collaborations in early phase metabolic engineering projects. Here, we focus on optimizing the already established uracil...

  14. Using herbarium-derived DNAs to assemble a large-scale DNA barcode library for the vascular plants of Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmina, Maria L; Braukmann, Thomas W A; Fazekas, Aron J; Graham, Sean W; Dewaard, Stephanie L; Rodrigues, Anuar; Bennett, Bruce A; Dickinson, Timothy A; Saarela, Jeffery M; Catling, Paul M; Newmaster, Steven G; Percy, Diana M; Fenneman, Erin; Lauron-Moreau, Aurélien; Ford, Bruce; Gillespie, Lynn; Subramanyam, Ragupathy; Whitton, Jeannette; Jennings, Linda; Metsger, Deborah; Warne, Connor P; Brown, Allison; Sears, Elizabeth; Dewaard, Jeremy R; Zakharov, Evgeny V; Hebert, Paul D N

    2017-12-01

    Constructing complete, accurate plant DNA barcode reference libraries can be logistically challenging for large-scale floras. Here we demonstrate the promise and challenges of using herbarium collections for building a DNA barcode reference library for the vascular plant flora of Canada. Our study examined 20,816 specimens representing 5076 of 5190 vascular plant species in Canada (98%). For 98% of the specimens, at least one of the DNA barcode regions was recovered from the plastid loci rbcL and matK and from the nuclear ITS2 region. We used beta regression to quantify the effects of age, type of preservation, and taxonomic affiliation (family) on DNA sequence recovery. Specimen age and method of preservation had significant effects on sequence recovery for all markers, but influenced some families more (e.g., Boraginaceae) than others (e.g., Asteraceae). Our DNA barcode library represents an unparalleled resource for metagenomic and ecological genetic research working on temperate and arctic biomes. An observed decline in sequence recovery with specimen age may be associated with poor primer matches, intragenomic variation (for ITS2), or inhibitory secondary compounds in some taxa.

  15. High throughput detection of Coxiella burnetii by real-time PCR with internal control system and automated DNA preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kramme Stefanie

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coxiella burnetii is the causative agent of Q-fever, a widespread zoonosis. Due to its high environmental stability and infectivity it is regarded as a category B biological weapon agent. In domestic animals infection remains either asymptomatic or presents as infertility or abortion. Clinical presentation in humans can range from mild flu-like illness to acute pneumonia and hepatitis. Endocarditis represents the most common form of chronic Q-fever. In humans serology is the gold standard for diagnosis but is inadequate for early case detection. In order to serve as a diagnostic tool in an eventual biological weapon attack or in local epidemics we developed a real-time 5'nuclease based PCR assay with an internal control system. To facilitate high-throughput an automated extraction procedure was evaluated. Results To determine the minimum number of copies that are detectable at 95% chance probit analysis was used. Limit of detection in blood was 2,881 copies/ml [95%CI, 2,188–4,745 copies/ml] with a manual extraction procedure and 4,235 copies/ml [95%CI, 3,143–7,428 copies/ml] with a fully automated extraction procedure, respectively. To demonstrate clinical application a total of 72 specimens of animal origin were compared with respect to manual and automated extraction. A strong correlation between both methods was observed rendering both methods suitable. Testing of 247 follow up specimens of animal origin from a local Q-fever epidemic rendered real-time PCR more sensitive than conventional PCR. Conclusion A sensitive and thoroughly evaluated real-time PCR was established. Its high-throughput mode may show a useful approach to rapidly screen samples in local outbreaks for other organisms relevant for humans or animals. Compared to a conventional PCR assay sensitivity of real-time PCR was higher after testing samples from a local Q-fever outbreak.

  16. Paramecium tetraurelia chromatin assembly factor-1-like protein PtCAF-1 is involved in RNA-mediated control of DNA elimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignarski, Michael; Singh, Aditi; Swart, Estienne C; Arambasic, Miroslav; Sandoval, Pamela Y; Nowacki, Mariusz

    2014-10-29

    Genome-wide DNA remodelling in the ciliate Paramecium is ensured by RNA-mediated trans-nuclear crosstalk between the germline and the somatic genomes during sexual development. The rearrangements include elimination of transposable elements, minisatellites and tens of thousands non-coding elements called internally eliminated sequences (IESs). The trans-nuclear genome comparison process employs a distinct class of germline small RNAs (scnRNAs) that are compared against the parental somatic genome to select the germline-specific subset of scnRNAs that subsequently target DNA elimination in the progeny genome. Only a handful of proteins involved in this process have been identified so far and the mechanism of DNA targeting is unknown. Here we describe chromatin assembly factor-1-like protein (PtCAF-1), which we show is required for the survival of sexual progeny and localizes first in the parental and later in the newly developing macronucleus. Gene silencing shows that PtCAF-1 is required for the elimination of transposable elements and a subset of IESs. PTCAF-1 depletion also impairs the selection of germline-specific scnRNAs during development. We identify specific histone modifications appearing during Paramecium development which are strongly reduced in PTCAF-1 depleted cells. Our results demonstrate the importance of PtCAF-1 for the epigenetic trans-nuclear cross-talk mechanism. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  17. Label-free and ultrasensitive electrochemiluminescence detection of microRNA based on long-range self-assembled DNA nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Ting; Chen, Xian; Hong, Cheng-Yi; Xu, Xiao-Ping; Yang, Huang-Hao

    2014-01-01

    Electrochemiluminescence (ECL) integrates the advantages of electrochemical detection and chemiluminescent techniques. The method has received particular attention because it is highly sensitive and selective, has a wide linear range but low reagent costs. The use of nanomaterials with their unique physical and chemical properties has led to new kinds of biosensors that exhibit high sensitivity and stability. Compared to other nanomaterials, DNA nanostructures are more biocompatible, more hydrophilic, and thus less prone to nonspecific adsorption onto the electrode surface. We describe here a label-free and ultrasensitive ECL biosensor for detecting a cancer-associated microRNA at a femtomolar level. We have designed two auxiliary probes that cause the formation of a long-range self-assembly in the form of a μm-long 1-dimensional DNA concatamer. These can be used as carriers for signal amplification. The intercalation of the ECL probe Ru(phen) 3 2+ into the grooves of the concatamers leads to a substantial increase in ECL intensity. This amplified sensor shows high selectivity for discriminating complementary target and other mismatched RNAs. The biosensor enables the quantification of the expression of microRNA-21 in MCF-7 cells. It also displays very low limits of detection and provides an alternative approach for the detection of RNA or DNA detection in diagnostics and gene analysis. (author)

  18. Low-dose DNA damage and replication stress responses quantified by optimized automated single-cell image analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mistrik, Martin; Oplustilova, Lenka; Lukas, Jiri

    2009-01-01

    sensitive, quantitative, rapid and simple fluorescence image analysis in thousands of adherent cells per day. Sensitive DNA breakage estimation through analysis of phosphorylated histone H2AX (gamma-H2AX), and homologous recombination (HR) assessed by a new RPA/Rad51 dual-marker approach illustrate...

  19. Post-assembly transformations of porphyrin-containing metal-organic framework (MOF) films fabricated via automated layer-by-layer coordination

    KAUST Repository

    So, Monica; Beyzavi, M. Hassan; Sawhney, Rohan; Shekhah, Osama; Eddaoudi, Mohamed; Al-Juaid, Salih Salem; Hupp, Joseph T.; Farha, Omar K.

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we demonstrate the robustness of layer-by-layer (LbL)-assembled, pillared-paddlewheel-type MOF films toward conversion to new or modified MOFs via solvent-assisted linker exchange (SALE) and post-assembly linker metalation. Further, we show that LbL synthesis can afford MOFs that have proven inaccessible through other de novo strategies.

  20. Anchoring of self-assembled plasmid DNA/ anti-DNA antibody/cationic lipid micelles on bisphosphonate-modified stent for cardiovascular gene delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma G

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Guilei Ma,1,# Yong Wang,1,# Ilia Fishbein,2 Mei Yu,1 Linhua Zhang,1 Ivan S Alferiev,2 Jing Yang,1 Cunxian Song,1 Robert J Levy2 1Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Tianjin, People's Republic of China; 2Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Abramson Research Building, Philadelphia, PA, USA #These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: To investigate the anchoring of plasmid DNA/anti-DNA antibody/cationic lipid tri-complex (DAC micelles onto bisphosphonate-modified 316 L coronary stents for cardiovascular site-specific gene delivery. Methods: Stents were first modified with polyallylamine bisphosphonate (PAA-BP, thereby enabling the retention of a PAA-BP molecular monolayer that permits the anchoring (via vector-binding molecules of DAC micelles. DAC micelles were then chemically linked onto the PAA-BP-modified stents by using N-succinimidyl-3-(2-pyridyldithiol-propionate (SPDP as a crosslinker. Rhodamine-labeled DNA was used to assess the anchoring of DAC micelles, and radioactive-labeled antibody was used to evaluate binding capacity and stability. DAC micelles (encoding green fluorescent protein were tethered onto the PAA-BP-modified stents, which were assessed in cell culture. The presence of a PAA-BP molecular monolayer on the steel surface was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscope analysis. Results: The anchoring of DAC micelles was generally uniform and devoid of large-scale patches of defects. Isotopic quantification confirmed that the amount of antibody chemically linked on the stents was 17-fold higher than that of the physical adsorbed control stents and its retention time was also significantly longer. In cell culture, numerous green fluorescent protein-positive cells were found on the PAA-BP modified stents, which demonstrated high localization and efficiency of gene delivery. Conclusion: The DAC micelle

  1. Automated Temperature and Emission Measure Analysis of Coronal Loops and Active Regions Observed with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO/AIA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Boerner, Paul; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Malanushenko, Anna

    2013-03-01

    We developed numerical codes designed for automated analysis of SDO/AIA image datasets in the six coronal filters, including: i) coalignment test between different wavelengths with measurements of the altitude of the EUV-absorbing chromosphere, ii) self-calibration by empirical correction of instrumental response functions, iii) automated generation of differential emission measure [DEM] distributions with peak-temperature maps [ T p( x, y)] and emission measure maps [ EM p( x, y)] of the full Sun or active region areas, iv) composite DEM distributions [d EM( T)/d T] of active regions or subareas, v) automated detection of coronal loops, and vi) automated background subtraction and thermal analysis of coronal loops, which yields statistics of loop temperatures [ T e], temperature widths [ σ T], emission measures [ EM], electron densities [ n e], and loop widths [ w]. The combination of these numerical codes allows for automated and objective processing of numerous coronal loops. As an example, we present the results of an application to the active region NOAA 11158, observed on 15 February 2011, shortly before it produced the largest (X2.2) flare during the current solar cycle. We detect 570 loop segments at temperatures in the entire range of log( T e)=5.7 - 7.0 K and corroborate previous TRACE and AIA results on their near-isothermality and the validity of the Rosner-Tucker-Vaiana (RTV) law at soft X-ray temperatures ( T≳2 MK) and its failure at lower EUV temperatures.

  2. Comparative evaluation of three automated systems for DNA extraction in conjunction with three commercially available real-time PCR assays for quantitation of plasma Cytomegalovirus DNAemia in allogeneic stem cell transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Dayana; Clari, María Ángeles; Costa, Elisa; Muñoz-Cobo, Beatriz; Solano, Carlos; José Remigia, María; Navarro, David

    2011-08-01

    Limited data are available on the performance of different automated extraction platforms and commercially available quantitative real-time PCR (QRT-PCR) methods for the quantitation of cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNA in plasma. We compared the performance characteristics of the Abbott mSample preparation system DNA kit on the m24 SP instrument (Abbott), the High Pure viral nucleic acid kit on the COBAS AmpliPrep system (Roche), and the EZ1 Virus 2.0 kit on the BioRobot EZ1 extraction platform (Qiagen) coupled with the Abbott CMV PCR kit, the LightCycler CMV Quant kit (Roche), and the Q-CMV complete kit (Nanogen), for both plasma specimens from allogeneic stem cell transplant (Allo-SCT) recipients (n = 42) and the OptiQuant CMV DNA panel (AcroMetrix). The EZ1 system displayed the highest extraction efficiency over a wide range of CMV plasma DNA loads, followed by the m24 and the AmpliPrep methods. The Nanogen PCR assay yielded higher mean CMV plasma DNA values than the Abbott and the Roche PCR assays, regardless of the platform used for DNA extraction. Overall, the effects of the extraction method and the QRT-PCR used on CMV plasma DNA load measurements were less pronounced for specimens with high CMV DNA content (>10,000 copies/ml). The performance characteristics of the extraction methods and QRT-PCR assays evaluated herein for clinical samples were extensible at cell-based standards from AcroMetrix. In conclusion, different automated systems are not equally efficient for CMV DNA extraction from plasma specimens, and the plasma CMV DNA loads measured by commercially available QRT-PCRs can differ significantly. The above findings should be taken into consideration for the establishment of cutoff values for the initiation or cessation of preemptive antiviral therapies and for the interpretation of data from clinical studies in the Allo-SCT setting.

  3. DNA nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeman, Nadrian C.; Sleiman, Hanadi F.

    2018-01-01

    DNA is the molecule that stores and transmits genetic information in biological systems. The field of DNA nanotechnology takes this molecule out of its biological context and uses its information to assemble structural motifs and then to connect them together. This field has had a remarkable impact on nanoscience and nanotechnology, and has been revolutionary in our ability to control molecular self-assembly. In this Review, we summarize the approaches used to assemble DNA nanostructures and examine their emerging applications in areas such as biophysics, diagnostics, nanoparticle and protein assembly, biomolecule structure determination, drug delivery and synthetic biology. The introduction of orthogonal interactions into DNA nanostructures is discussed, and finally, a perspective on the future directions of this field is presented.

  4. Temperature-Controlled Encapsulation and Release of an Active Enzyme in the Cavity of a Self-Assembled DNA Nanocage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Sissel; Iacovelli, Federico; Falconi, Mattia

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT We demonstrate temperature-controlled encapsulation and release of the enzyme horseradish peroxidase using a preassembled and covalently closed three-dimensional DNA cage structure as a controllable encapsulation device. The utilized cage structure was covalently closed and composed of 12...... to fold into hairpin structures. As demonstrated by gel-electrophoretic and fluorophore-quenching experiments this design imposed a temperature-controlled conformational transition capability to the structure, which allowed entrance or release of an enzyme cargo at 37 C while ensuring retainment...

  5. Correction: One-step coelectrodeposition-assisted layer-by-layer assembly of gold nanoparticles and reduced graphene oxide and its self-healing three-dimensional nanohybrid for an ultrasensitive DNA sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, Kumarasamy; Camarada, María Belén; Dharuman, Venkataraman; Ju, Huangxian; Dey, Ramendra Sundar; Wen, Yangping

    2018-02-01

    Correction for 'One-step coelectrodeposition-assisted layer-by-layer assembly of gold nanoparticles and reduced graphene oxide and its self-healing three-dimensional nanohybrid for an ultrasensitive DNA sensor' by Jayakumar Kumarasamy, et al., Nanoscale, 2018, DOI: 10.1039/c7nr06952a.

  6. Oligonucleotide PIK3CA/Chromosome 3 Dual in Situ Hybridization Automated Assay with Improved Signals, One-Hour Hybridization, and No Use of Blocking DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenjun; Hubbard, Antony; Baca-Parkinson, Leslie; Stanislaw, Stacey; Vladich, Frank; Robida, Mark D; Grille, James G; Maxwell, Daniel; Tsao, Tsu-Shuen; Carroll, William; Gardner, Tracie; Clements, June; Singh, Shalini; Tang, Lei

    2015-09-01

    The PIK3CA gene at chromosome 3q26.32 was found to be amplified in up to 45% of patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the lung. The strong correlation between PIK3CA amplification and increased phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway activities suggested that PIK3CA gene copy number is a potential predictive biomarker for PI3K inhibitors. Currently, all microscopic assessments of PIK3CA and chromosome 3 (CHR3) copy numbers use fluorescence in situ hybridization. PIK3CA probes are derived from bacterial artificial chromosomes whereas CHR3 probes are derived mainly from the plasmid pHS05. These manual fluorescence in situ hybridization assays mandate 12- to 18-hour hybridization and use of blocking DNA from human sources. Moreover, fluorescence in situ hybridization studies provide limited morphologic assessment and suffer from signal decay. We developed an oligonucleotide-based bright-field in situ hybridization assay that overcomes these shortcomings. This assay requires only a 1-hour hybridization with no need for blocking DNA followed by indirect chromogenic detection. Oligonucleotide probes produced discrete and uniform CHR3 stains superior to those from the pHS05 plasmid. This assay achieved successful staining in 100% of the 195 lung squamous cell carcinoma resections and in 94% of the 33 fine-needle aspirates. This robust automated bright-field dual in situ hybridization assay for the simultaneous detection of PIK3CA and CHR3 centromere provides a potential clinical diagnostic method to assess PIK3CA gene abnormality in lung tumors. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Programme DNA Lattices: Design, Synthesis and Applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reif, John

    2006-01-01

    .... Self-assembled DNA nanostructures provide a methodology for bottom-up nanoscale construction of highly patterned systems, utilizing macromolecular DNA tiles" composed of branched DNA, self-assembled...

  8. Human Assisted Assembly Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CALTON,TERRI L.; PETERS,RALPH R.

    2000-01-01

    Automatic assembly sequencing and visualization tools are valuable in determining the best assembly sequences, but without Human Factors and Figure Models (HFFMs) it is difficult to evaluate or visualize human interaction. In industry, accelerating technological advances and shorter market windows have forced companies to turn to an agile manufacturing paradigm. This trend has promoted computerized automation of product design and manufacturing processes, such as automated assembly planning. However, all automated assembly planning software tools assume that the individual components fly into their assembled configuration and generate what appear to be a perfectly valid operations, but in reality the operations cannot physically be carried out by a human. Similarly, human figure modeling algorithms may indicate that assembly operations are not feasible and consequently force design modifications; however, if they had the capability to quickly generate alternative assembly sequences, they might have identified a feasible solution. To solve this problem HFFMs must be integrated with automated assembly planning to allow engineers to verify that assembly operations are possible and to see ways to make the designs even better. Factories will very likely put humans and robots together in cooperative environments to meet the demands for customized products, for purposes including robotic and automated assembly. For robots to work harmoniously within an integrated environment with humans the robots must have cooperative operational skills. For example, in a human only environment, humans may tolerate collisions with one another if they did not cause much pain. This level of tolerance may or may not apply to robot-human environments. Humans expect that robots will be able to operate and navigate in their environments without collisions or interference. The ability to accomplish this is linked to the sensing capabilities available. Current work in the field of cooperative

  9. Quantification of Parvovirus B19 DNA Using COBAS AmpliPrep Automated Sample Preparation and LightCycler Real-Time PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schorling, Stefan; Schalasta, Gunnar; Enders, Gisela; Zauke, Michael

    2004-01-01

    The COBAS AmpliPrep instrument (Roche Diagnostics GmbH, D-68305 Mannheim, Germany) automates the entire sample preparation process of nucleic acid isolation from serum or plasma for polymerase chain reaction analysis. We report the analytical performance of the LightCycler Parvovirus B19 Quantification Kit (Roche Diagnostics) using nucleic acids isolated with the COBAS AmpliPrep instrument. Nucleic acids were extracted using the Total Nucleic Acid Isolation Kit (Roche Diagnostics) and amplified with the LightCycler Parvovirus B19 Quantification Kit. The kit combination processes 72 samples per 8-hour shift. The lower detection limit is 234 IU/ml at a 95% hit-rate, linear range approximately 104-1010 IU/ml, and overall precision 16 to 40%. Relative sensitivity and specificity in routine samples from pregnant women are 100% and 93%, respectively. Identification of a persistent parvovirus B19-infected individual by the polymerase chain reaction among 51 anti-parvovirus B19 IgM-negative samples underlines the importance of additional nucleic acid testing in pregnancy and its superiority to serology in identifying the risk of parvovirus B19 transmission via blood or blood products. Combination of the Total Nucleic Acid Isolation Kit on the COBAS AmpliPrep instrument with the LightCycler Parvovirus B19 Quantification Kit provides a reliable and time-saving tool for sensitive and accurate detection of parvovirus B19 DNA. PMID:14736825

  10. Automated Test-Form Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Linden, Wim J.; Diao, Qi

    2011-01-01

    In automated test assembly (ATA), the methodology of mixed-integer programming is used to select test items from an item bank to meet the specifications for a desired test form and optimize its measurement accuracy. The same methodology can be used to automate the formatting of the set of selected items into the actual test form. Three different…

  11. Fast and quantitative differentiation of single-base mismatched DNA by initial reaction rate of catalytic hairpin assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chenxi; Li, Yixin; Xu, Xiao; Wang, Xinyi; Chen, Yang; Yang, Xiaoda; Liu, Feng; Li, Na

    2014-10-15

    The widely used catalytic hairpin assembly (CHA) amplification strategy generally needs several hours to accomplish one measurement based on the prevailingly used maximum intensity detection mode, making it less practical for assays where high throughput or speed is desired. To make the best use of the kinetic specificity of toehold domain for circuit reaction initiation, we developed a mathematical model and proposed an initial reaction rate detection mode to quantitatively differentiate the single-base mismatch. Using the kinetic mode, assay time can be reduced substantially to 10 min for one measurement with the comparable sensitivity and single-base mismatch differentiating ability as were obtained by the maximum intensity detection mode. This initial reaction rate based approach not only provided a fast and quantitative differentiation of single-base mismatch, but also helped in-depth understanding of the CHA system, which will be beneficial to the design of highly sensitive and specific toehold-mediated hybridization reactions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. A Case Study into Microbial Genome Assembly Gap Sequences and Finishing Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utturkar, Sagar M; Klingeman, Dawn M; Hurt, Richard A; Brown, Steven D

    2017-01-01

    This study characterized regions of DNA which remained unassembled by either PacBio and Illumina sequencing technologies for seven bacterial genomes. Two genomes were manually finished using bioinformatics and PCR/Sanger sequencing approaches and regions not assembled by automated software were analyzed. Gaps present within Illumina assemblies mostly correspond to repetitive DNA regions such as multiple rRNA operon sequences. PacBio gap sequences were evaluated for several properties such as GC content, read coverage, gap length, ability to form strong secondary structures, and corresponding annotations. Our hypothesis that strong secondary DNA structures blocked DNA polymerases and contributed to gap sequences was not accepted. PacBio assemblies had few limitations overall and gaps were explained as cumulative effect of lower than average sequence coverage and repetitive sequences at contig termini. An important aspect of the present study is the compilation of biological features that interfered with assembly and included active transposons, multiple plasmid sequences, phage DNA integration, and large sequence duplication. Our targeted genome finishing approach and systematic evaluation of the unassembled DNA will be useful for others looking to close, finish, and polish microbial genome sequences.

  13. Integrity of chromatin and replicating DNA in nuclei released from fission yeast by semi-automated grinding in liquid nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Studies of nuclear function in many organisms, especially those with tough cell walls, are limited by lack of availability of simple, economical methods for large-scale preparation of clean, undamaged nuclei. Findings Here we present a useful method for nuclear isolation from the important model organism, the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe. To preserve in vivo molecular configurations, we flash-froze the yeast cells in liquid nitrogen. Then we broke their tough cell walls, without damaging their nuclei, by grinding in a precision-controlled motorized mortar-and-pestle apparatus. The cryo-ground cells were resuspended and thawed in a buffer designed to preserve nuclear morphology, and the nuclei were enriched by differential centrifugation. The washed nuclei were free from contaminating nucleases and have proven well-suited as starting material for genome-wide chromatin analysis and for preparation of fragile DNA replication intermediates. Conclusions We have developed a simple, reproducible, economical procedure for large-scale preparation of endogenous-nuclease-free, morphologically intact nuclei from fission yeast. With appropriate modifications, this procedure may well prove useful for isolation of nuclei from other organisms with, or without, tough cell walls. PMID:22088094

  14. Integrity of chromatin and replicating DNA in nuclei released from fission yeast by semi-automated grinding in liquid nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Givens, Robert M; Mesner, Larry D; Hamlin, Joyce L; Buck, Michael J; Huberman, Joel A

    2011-11-16

    Studies of nuclear function in many organisms, especially those with tough cell walls, are limited by lack of availability of simple, economical methods for large-scale preparation of clean, undamaged nuclei. Here we present a useful method for nuclear isolation from the important model organism, the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe. To preserve in vivo molecular configurations, we flash-froze the yeast cells in liquid nitrogen. Then we broke their tough cell walls, without damaging their nuclei, by grinding in a precision-controlled motorized mortar-and-pestle apparatus. The cryo-ground cells were resuspended and thawed in a buffer designed to preserve nuclear morphology, and the nuclei were enriched by differential centrifugation. The washed nuclei were free from contaminating nucleases and have proven well-suited as starting material for genome-wide chromatin analysis and for preparation of fragile DNA replication intermediates. We have developed a simple, reproducible, economical procedure for large-scale preparation of endogenous-nuclease-free, morphologically intact nuclei from fission yeast. With appropriate modifications, this procedure may well prove useful for isolation of nuclei from other organisms with, or without, tough cell walls.

  15. Integrity of chromatin and replicating DNA in nuclei released from fission yeast by semi-automated grinding in liquid nitrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Givens Robert M

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies of nuclear function in many organisms, especially those with tough cell walls, are limited by lack of availability of simple, economical methods for large-scale preparation of clean, undamaged nuclei. Findings Here we present a useful method for nuclear isolation from the important model organism, the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe. To preserve in vivo molecular configurations, we flash-froze the yeast cells in liquid nitrogen. Then we broke their tough cell walls, without damaging their nuclei, by grinding in a precision-controlled motorized mortar-and-pestle apparatus. The cryo-ground cells were resuspended and thawed in a buffer designed to preserve nuclear morphology, and the nuclei were enriched by differential centrifugation. The washed nuclei were free from contaminating nucleases and have proven well-suited as starting material for genome-wide chromatin analysis and for preparation of fragile DNA replication intermediates. Conclusions We have developed a simple, reproducible, economical procedure for large-scale preparation of endogenous-nuclease-free, morphologically intact nuclei from fission yeast. With appropriate modifications, this procedure may well prove useful for isolation of nuclei from other organisms with, or without, tough cell walls.

  16. Should We Stop Developing Heuristics and Only Rely on Mixed Integer Programming Solvers in Automated Test Assembly? A Rejoinder to van der Linden and Li (2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pei-Hua

    2017-05-01

    This rejoinder responds to the commentary by van der Linden and Li entiled "Comment on Three-Element Item Selection Procedures for Multiple Forms Assembly: An Item Matching Approach" on the article "Three-Element Item Selection Procedures for Multiple Forms Assembly: An Item Matching Approach" by Chen. Van der Linden and Li made a strong statement calling for the cessation of test assembly heuristics development, and instead encouraged embracing mixed integer programming (MIP). This article points out the nondeterministic polynomial (NP)-hard nature of MIP problems and how solutions found using heuristics could be useful in an MIP context. Although van der Linden and Li provided several practical examples of test assembly supporting their view, the examples ignore the cases in which a slight change of constraints or item pool data might mean it would not be possible to obtain solutions as quickly as before. The article illustrates the use of heuristic solutions to improve both the performance of MIP solvers and the quality of solutions. Additional responses to the commentary by van der Linden and Li are included.

  17. phylotaR: An Automated Pipeline for Retrieving Orthologous DNA Sequences from GenBank in R

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominic J. Bennett

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The exceptional increase in molecular DNA sequence data in open repositories is mirrored by an ever-growing interest among evolutionary biologists to harvest and use those data for phylogenetic inference. Many quality issues, however, are known and the sheer amount and complexity of data available can pose considerable barriers to their usefulness. A key issue in this domain is the high frequency of sequence mislabeling encountered when searching for suitable sequences for phylogenetic analysis. These issues include, among others, the incorrect identification of sequenced species, non-standardized and ambiguous sequence annotation, and the inadvertent addition of paralogous sequences by users. Taken together, these issues likely add considerable noise, error or bias to phylogenetic inference, a risk that is likely to increase with the size of phylogenies or the molecular datasets used to generate them. Here we present a software package, phylotaR that bypasses the above issues by using instead an alignment search tool to identify orthologous sequences. Our package builds on the framework of its predecessor, PhyLoTa, by providing a modular pipeline for identifying overlapping sequence clusters using up-to-date GenBank data and providing new features, improvements and tools. We demonstrate and test our pipeline’s effectiveness by presenting trees generated from phylotaR clusters for two large taxonomic clades: Palms and primates. Given the versatility of this package, we hope that it will become a standard tool for any research aiming to use GenBank data for phylogenetic analysis.

  18. PR-PR: cross-platform laboratory automation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linshiz, Gregory; Stawski, Nina; Goyal, Garima; Bi, Changhao; Poust, Sean; Sharma, Monica; Mutalik, Vivek; Keasling, Jay D; Hillson, Nathan J

    2014-08-15

    To enable protocol standardization, sharing, and efficient implementation across laboratory automation platforms, we have further developed the PR-PR open-source high-level biology-friendly robot programming language as a cross-platform laboratory automation system. Beyond liquid-handling robotics, PR-PR now supports microfluidic and microscopy platforms, as well as protocol translation into human languages, such as English. While the same set of basic PR-PR commands and features are available for each supported platform, the underlying optimization and translation modules vary from platform to platform. Here, we describe these further developments to PR-PR, and demonstrate the experimental implementation and validation of PR-PR protocols for combinatorial modified Golden Gate DNA assembly across liquid-handling robotic, microfluidic, and manual platforms. To further test PR-PR cross-platform performance, we then implement and assess PR-PR protocols for Kunkel DNA mutagenesis and hierarchical Gibson DNA assembly for microfluidic and manual platforms.

  19. Mediator binds to boundaries of chromosomal interaction domains and to proteins involved in DNA looping, RNA metabolism, chromatin remodeling, and actin assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chereji, Razvan V; Bharatula, Vasudha; Elfving, Nils; Blomberg, Jeanette; Larsson, Miriam; Morozov, Alexandre V; Broach, James R; Björklund, Stefan

    2017-09-06

    Mediator is a multi-unit molecular complex that plays a key role in transferring signals from transcriptional regulators to RNA polymerase II in eukaryotes. We have combined biochemical purification of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mediator from chromatin with chromatin immunoprecipitation in order to reveal Mediator occupancy on DNA genome-wide, and to identify proteins interacting specifically with Mediator on the chromatin template. Tandem mass spectrometry of proteins in immunoprecipitates of mediator complexes revealed specific interactions between Mediator and the RSC, Arp2/Arp3, CPF, CF 1A and Lsm complexes in chromatin. These factors are primarily involved in chromatin remodeling, actin assembly, mRNA 3'-end processing, gene looping and mRNA decay, but they have also been shown to enter the nucleus and participate in Pol II transcription. Moreover, we have found that Mediator, in addition to binding Pol II promoters, occupies chromosomal interacting domain (CID) boundaries and that Mediator in chromatin associates with proteins that have been shown to interact with CID boundaries, such as Sth1, Ssu72 and histone H4. This suggests that Mediator plays a significant role in higher-order genome organization. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  20. De novo assembly and annotation of the Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus) repeatome with dnaPipeTE from raw genomic reads and comparative analysis with the yellow fever mosquito (Aedes aegypti).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goubert, Clément; Modolo, Laurent; Vieira, Cristina; ValienteMoro, Claire; Mavingui, Patrick; Boulesteix, Matthieu

    2015-03-11

    Repetitive DNA, including transposable elements (TEs), is found throughout eukaryotic genomes. Annotating and assembling the "repeatome" during genome-wide analysis often poses a challenge. To address this problem, we present dnaPipeTE-a new bioinformatics pipeline that uses a sample of raw genomic reads. It produces precise estimates of repeated DNA content and TE consensus sequences, as well as the relative ages of TE families. We shows that dnaPipeTE performs well using very low coverage sequencing in different genomes, losing accuracy only with old TE families. We applied this pipeline to the genome of the Asian tiger mosquito Aedes albopictus, an invasive species of human health interest, for which the genome size is estimated to be over 1 Gbp. Using dnaPipeTE, we showed that this species harbors a large (50% of the genome) and potentially active repeatome with an overall TE class and order composition similar to that of Aedes aegypti, the yellow fever mosquito. However, intraorder dynamics show clear distinctions between the two species, with differences at the TE family level. Our pipeline's ability to manage the repeatome annotation problem will make it helpful for new or ongoing assembly projects, and our results will benefit future genomic studies of A. albopictus. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  1. Array Automated Assembly Task Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. Phase 2. Annual technical report, September 20, 1977-December 31, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhee, Sang S.; Jones, Gregory T.; Allison, Kimberly L.

    1978-01-01

    This program was conducted to develop and demonstrate those solar cells and module process steps which have the technological readiness or capability to achieve the 1986 LSA goals. Results are reported. Seventeen process groups were investigated. Very promising results were achieved. A laserscribe computer program was developed. It demonstrated that silicon solar cells could be trimmed and holed by laser without causing mechanical defects (i.e., microcracks) nor any major degradation in solar cell electrical performance. The silicon wafer surface preparation task demonstrated a low-cost, high throughput texturizing process readily adaptable to automation. Performance verification tests of a laser scanning system showed a limited capability to detect hidden cracks or defects in solar cells. A general review of currently available thick film printing equipment provided the indication that state-of-the-art technology can adequately transform the capability of current printing machines to the elevated rate of 7200 wafers per hour. The LFE System 8000 silicon nitride plasma deposition system with the inclusion of minor equipment modifications was shown to be consistent with the 1986 LSA pricing goals. The performance verification test of the silicon nitride A.R. coating process provided the result that texturized, A.R. coated solar cells display a 14.1% improvement in electrical performance over identical solar cells without an A.R. coating. A new electroless nickel plating system was installed and demonstrated a low-cost, high throughput process readily adaptable to automation. A multiple wafer dipping method was investigated and operational parameters defined. A flux removal method consisting of a three stage D.I. water cascade rinse system with ultrasonic agitator was found to be very promising. Also, a SAMICS cost analysis was performed. (WHK)

  2. Functional Annotation, Genome Organization and Phylogeny of the Grapevine (Vitis vinifera Terpene Synthase Gene Family Based on Genome Assembly, FLcDNA Cloning, and Enzyme Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toub Omid

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Terpenoids are among the most important constituents of grape flavour and wine bouquet, and serve as useful metabolite markers in viticulture and enology. Based on the initial 8-fold sequencing of a nearly homozygous Pinot noir inbred line, 89 putative terpenoid synthase genes (VvTPS were predicted by in silico analysis of the grapevine (Vitis vinifera genome assembly 1. The finding of this very large VvTPS family, combined with the importance of terpenoid metabolism for the organoleptic properties of grapevine berries and finished wines, prompted a detailed examination of this gene family at the genomic level as well as an investigation into VvTPS biochemical functions. Results We present findings from the analysis of the up-dated 12-fold sequencing and assembly of the grapevine genome that place the number of predicted VvTPS genes at 69 putatively functional VvTPS, 20 partial VvTPS, and 63 VvTPS probable pseudogenes. Gene discovery and annotation included information about gene architecture and chromosomal location. A dense cluster of 45 VvTPS is localized on chromosome 18. Extensive FLcDNA cloning, gene synthesis, and protein expression enabled functional characterization of 39 VvTPS; this is the largest number of functionally characterized TPS for any species reported to date. Of these enzymes, 23 have unique functions and/or phylogenetic locations within the plant TPS gene family. Phylogenetic analyses of the TPS gene family showed that while most VvTPS form species-specific gene clusters, there are several examples of gene orthology with TPS of other plant species, representing perhaps more ancient VvTPS, which have maintained functions independent of speciation. Conclusions The highly expanded VvTPS gene family underpins the prominence of terpenoid metabolism in grapevine. We provide a detailed experimental functional annotation of 39 members of this important gene family in grapevine and comprehensive information

  3. Synthesis of DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.

    2008-11-18

    A method of synthesizing a desired double-stranded DNA of a predetermined length and of a predetermined sequence. Preselected sequence segments that will complete the desired double-stranded DNA are determined. Preselected segment sequences of DNA that will be used to complete the desired double-stranded DNA are provided. The preselected segment sequences of DNA are assembled to produce the desired double-stranded DNA.

  4. One-step coelectrodeposition-assisted layer-by-layer assembly of gold nanoparticles and reduced graphene oxide and its self-healing three-dimensional nanohybrid for an ultrasensitive DNA sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumarasamy, Jayakumar; Camarada, María Belén; Venkatraman, Dharuman; Ju, Huangxian; Dey, Ramendra Sundar; Wen, Yangping

    2018-01-18

    A layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly was employed for preparing multilayer thin films with a controlled architecture and composition. In this study, we report the one-step coelectrodeposition-assisted LBL assembly of both gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) on the surface of a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) for the ultrasensitive electrochemical impedance sensing of DNA hybridization. A self-healable nanohybrid thin film with a three-dimensional (3D) alternate-layered nanoarchitecture was obtained by the one-step simultaneous electro-reduction of both graphene oxide and gold chloride in a high acidic medium of H 2 SO 4 using cyclic voltammetry and was confirmed by different characterization techniques. The DNA bioelectrode was prepared by immobilizing the capture DNA onto the surface of the as-obtained self-healable AuNP/rGO/AuNP/GCE with a 3D LBL nanoarchitecture via gold-thiol interactions, which then served as an impedance sensing platform for the label-free ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of DNA hybridization over a wide range from 1.0 × 10 -9 to 1.0 × 10 -13 g ml -1 , a low limit of detection of 3.9 × 10 -14 g ml -1 (S/N = 3), ultrahigh sensitivity, and excellent selectivity. This study presents a promising electrochemical sensing platform for the label-free ultrasensitive detection of DNA hybridization with potential application in cancer diagnostics and the preparation of a self-healable nanohybrid thin film with a 3D alternate-layered nanoarchitecture via a one-step coelectrodeposition-assisted LBL assembly.

  5. Uracil Excision for Assembly of Complex Pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavaleiro, Mafalda; Nielsen, Morten Thrane; Kim, Se Hyeuk

    2015-01-01

    Despite decreasing prices on synthetic DNA constructs, higher-order assembly of PCR-generated DNA continues to be an important exercise in molecular and synthetic biology. Simplicity and robustness are attractive features met by the uracil excision DNA assembly method, which is one of the most in...

  6. Automation, Performance and International Competition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kromann, Lene; Sørensen, Anders

    This paper presents new evidence on trade‐induced automation in manufacturing firms using unique data combining a retrospective survey that we have assembled with register data for 2005‐2010. In particular, we establish a causal effect where firms that have specialized in product types for which...... the Chinese exports to the world market has risen sharply invest more in automated capital compared to firms that have specialized in other product types. We also study the relationship between automation and firm performance and find that firms with high increases in scale and scope of automation have faster...... productivity growth than other firms. Moreover, automation improves the efficiency of all stages of the production process by reducing setup time, run time, and inspection time and increasing uptime and quantity produced per worker. The efficiency improvement varies by type of automation....

  7. Apparatus for assembling and welding end plugs to nuclear fuel cladding tubes and inspecting the end plug welds on an automated basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenig, F.C. Jr.; Walker, E.S.; Cueman, M.K.; Haughton, R.A.; Zuloaga, J.A. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    This patent describes an automated apparatus for welding a separate end plug to one open end of each of a succession of nuclear fuel cladding tubes and for inspecting each end plug weld. The apparatus comprising, in combination: a welding station; a cooldown station for cooling each end plug weld in an inert gas atmosphere; a serial number reader station for reading a serial number on each end plug; a first weld inspection station; a second weld inspection station for generating second weld inspection data; a computer system linked with the serial number reader and the first and second weld inspection stations; an input queue for holding a plurality of tubes; a tube transporter for periodically picking individual tubes from the input queque and conveying the tubes in a direction transverse to their tube axis in indexing steps to index positions respectively axially aligned with the welding, serial number reader, and first and second weld inspection stations; and a sorter positioned at an output end of the tube transporter

  8. Molecular self-assembly advances and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Dequan, Alex Li

    2012-01-01

    In the past several decades, molecular self-assembly has emerged as one of the main themes in chemistry, biology, and materials science. This book compiles and details cutting-edge research in molecular assemblies ranging from self-organized peptide nanostructures and DNA-chromophore foldamers to supramolecular systems and metal-directed assemblies, even to nanocrystal superparticles and self-assembled microdevices

  9. Identification of nucleosome assembly protein 1 (NAP1) as an interacting partner of plant ribosomal protein S6 (RPS6) and a positive regulator of rDNA transcription

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Ora [Department of Biological Science, Sookmyung Women' s University, Seoul 140-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sunghan [Department of Biological Science, Sookmyung Women' s University, Seoul 140-742 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Plant Science, Plant Genomics and Breeding Institute, Research Institute of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Yun-jeong [Department of Biological Science, Sookmyung Women' s University, Seoul 140-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Woo-Young [College of Pharmacy, Sookmyung Women' s University, Seoul 140-742 (Korea, Republic of); Koh, Hee-Jong, E-mail: heejkoh@snu.ac.kr [Department of Plant Science, Plant Genomics and Breeding Institute, Research Institute of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Cheon, Choong-Ill, E-mail: ccheon@sookmyung.ac.kr [Department of Biological Science, Sookmyung Women' s University, Seoul 140-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-18

    The ribosomal protein S6 (RPS6) is a downstream component of the signaling mediated by the target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase that acts as a central regulator of the key metabolic processes, such as protein translation and ribosome biogenesis, in response to various environmental cues. In our previous study, we identified a novel role of plant RPS6, which negatively regulates rDNA transcription, forming a complex with a plant-specific histone deacetylase, AtHD2B. Here we report that the Arabidopsis RPS6 interacts additionally with a histone chaperone, nucleosome assembly protein 1(AtNAP1;1). The interaction does not appear to preclude the association of RPS6 with AtHD2B, as the AtNAP1 was also able to interact with AtHD2B as well as with an RPS6-AtHD2B fusion protein in the BiFC assay and pulldown experiment. Similar to a positive effect of the ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (AtS6K1) on rDNA transcription observed in this study, overexpression or down regulation of the AtNAP1;1 resulted in concomitant increase and decrease, respectively, in rDNA transcription suggesting a positive regulatory role played by AtNAP1 in plant rDNA transcription, possibly through derepression of the negative effect of the RPS6-AtHD2B complex. - Highlights: • Nucleosome assembly protein 1 (AtNAP1) interacts with RPS6 as well as with AtHD2B. • rDNA transcription is regulated S6K1. • Overexpression or down regulation of AtNAP1 results in concomitant increase or decrease in rDNA transcription.

  10. Low-Resolution Tactile Image Recognition for Automated Robotic Assembly Using Kernel PCA-Based Feature Fusion and Multiple Kernel Learning-Based Support Vector Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Hung Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a robust tactile sensing image recognition scheme for automatic robotic assembly. First, an image reprocessing procedure is designed to enhance the contrast of the tactile image. In the second layer, geometric features and Fourier descriptors are extracted from the image. Then, kernel principal component analysis (kernel PCA is applied to transform the features into ones with better discriminating ability, which is the kernel PCA-based feature fusion. The transformed features are fed into the third layer for classification. In this paper, we design a classifier by combining the multiple kernel learning (MKL algorithm and support vector machine (SVM. We also design and implement a tactile sensing array consisting of 10-by-10 sensing elements. Experimental results, carried out on real tactile images acquired by the designed tactile sensing array, show that the kernel PCA-based feature fusion can significantly improve the discriminating performance of the geometric features and Fourier descriptors. Also, the designed MKL-SVM outperforms the regular SVM in terms of recognition accuracy. The proposed recognition scheme is able to achieve a high recognition rate of over 85% for the classification of 12 commonly used metal parts in industrial applications.

  11. Layer-by-Layer-Assembled AuNPs-Decorated First-Generation Poly(amidoamine) Dendrimer with Reduced Graphene Oxide Core as Highly Sensitive Biosensing Platform with Controllable 3D Nanoarchitecture for Rapid Voltammetric Analysis of Ultratrace DNA Hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, Kumarasamy; Camarada, María Belén; Dharuman, Venkataraman; Rajesh, Rajendiran; Venkatesan, Rengarajan; Ju, Huangxian; Maniraj, Mahalingam; Rai, Abhishek; Barman, Sudipta Roy; Wen, Yangping

    2018-06-12

    The structure and electrochemical properties of layer-by-layer-assembled gold nanoparticles (AuNPs)-decorated first-generation (G1) poly(amidoamine) dendrimer (PD) with reduced graphene oxide (rGO) core as a highly sensitive and label-free biosensing platform with a controllable three-dimensional (3D) nanoarchitecture for the rapid voltammetric analysis of DNA hybridization at ultratrace levels were characterized. Mercaptopropinoic acid (MPA) was self-assembled onto Au substrate, then GG1PD formed by the covalent functionalization between the amino terminals of G1PD and carboxyl terminals of rGO was covalently linked onto MPA, and finally AuNPs were decorated onto GG1PD by strong physicochemical interaction between AuNPs and -OH of rGO in GG1PD, which was characterized through different techniques and confirmed by computational calculation. This 3D controllable thin-film electrode was optimized and evaluated using [Fe(CN) 6 ] 3-/4- as the redox probe and employed to covalently immobilize thiol-functionalized single-stranded DNA as biorecognition element to form the DNA nanobiosensor, which achieved fast, ultrasensitive, and high-selective differential pulse voltammetric analysis of DNA hybridization in a linear range from 1 × 10 -6 to 1 × 10 -13 g m -1 with a low detection limit of 9.07 × 10 -14 g m -1 . This work will open a new pathway for the controllable 3D nanoarchitecture of the layer-by-layer-assembled metal nanoparticles-functionalized lower-generation PD with two-dimensional layered nanomaterials as cores that can be employed as ultrasensitive and label-free nanobiodevices for the fast diagnosis of specific genome diseases in the field of biomedicine.

  12. Assembly of positioner of automated two-dimensional scan coupled to X-ray fluorescence spectrometry; Montagem de posicionador de varredura bidimensional automatizada acoplado a espectrometria de fluorescência de raios-X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Leonardo Santiago Melgaço

    2011-07-01

    This work describes the design and assembling of a prototype automated positioner two-dimensional scanning coupled to X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. The work aims to achieve a portable and easy to use, device of broad utility in the analysis of samples by X-ray fluorescence area of expertise and research. The two-dimensional scanning of the positioner is by means of two stepper motors controlled by a microcontroller PIC 16F877A, encoder and optical sensors. The user interacts with the XY table through an interface program for the Windows operating system, which communicates with the microcontroller through the serial port. The system of Fluorescence Spectroscopy incorporated into the positioner consists of a system commercially available system from the company AMPTEK, where the primary source of excitation of the sample was a source of {sup 241}Am of 59.5 KeV emissions. Resolution and accuracy of tests were performed in the XY scanning process and reproducibility of the same kit with the fluorescence spectrometry X-ray. Qualitative tests by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry in samples were performed to demonstrate the applicability and versatility of the project. It follows that the prototype illustrates a possible adequately to portable device for X-ray spectrometry of two-dimensional. (author)

  13. Home Automation

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Zeeshan

    2010-01-01

    In this paper I briefly discuss the importance of home automation system. Going in to the details I briefly present a real time designed and implemented software and hardware oriented house automation research project, capable of automating house's electricity and providing a security system to detect the presence of unexpected behavior.

  14. Multi-Robot Assembly Strategies and Metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    MARVEL, JEREMY A.; BOSTELMAN, ROGER; FALCO, JOE

    2018-01-01

    We present a survey of multi-robot assembly applications and methods and describe trends and general insights into the multi-robot assembly problem for industrial applications. We focus on fixtureless assembly strategies featuring two or more robotic systems. Such robotic systems include industrial robot arms, dexterous robotic hands, and autonomous mobile platforms, such as automated guided vehicles. In this survey, we identify the types of assemblies that are enabled by utilizing multiple robots, the algorithms that synchronize the motions of the robots to complete the assembly operations, and the metrics used to assess the quality and performance of the assemblies. PMID:29497234

  15. Multi-Robot Assembly Strategies and Metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvel, Jeremy A; Bostelman, Roger; Falco, Joe

    2018-02-01

    We present a survey of multi-robot assembly applications and methods and describe trends and general insights into the multi-robot assembly problem for industrial applications. We focus on fixtureless assembly strategies featuring two or more robotic systems. Such robotic systems include industrial robot arms, dexterous robotic hands, and autonomous mobile platforms, such as automated guided vehicles. In this survey, we identify the types of assemblies that are enabled by utilizing multiple robots, the algorithms that synchronize the motions of the robots to complete the assembly operations, and the metrics used to assess the quality and performance of the assemblies.

  16. Genome Sequence Databases (Overview): Sequencing and Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapidus, Alla L.

    2009-01-01

    From the date its role in heredity was discovered, DNA has been generating interest among scientists from different fields of knowledge: physicists have studied the three dimensional structure of the DNA molecule, biologists tried to decode the secrets of life hidden within these long molecules, and technologists invent and improve methods of DNA analysis. The analysis of the nucleotide sequence of DNA occupies a special place among the methods developed. Thanks to the variety of sequencing technologies available, the process of decoding the sequence of genomic DNA (or whole genome sequencing) has become robust and inexpensive. Meanwhile the assembly of whole genome sequences remains a challenging task. In addition to the need to assemble millions of DNA fragments of different length (from 35 bp (Solexa) to 800 bp (Sanger)), great interest in analysis of microbial communities (metagenomes) of different complexities raises new problems and pushes some new requirements for sequence assembly tools to the forefront. The genome assembly process can be divided into two steps: draft assembly and assembly improvement (finishing). Despite the fact that automatically performed assembly (or draft assembly) is capable of covering up to 98% of the genome, in most cases, it still contains incorrectly assembled reads. The error rate of the consensus sequence produced at this stage is about 1/2000 bp. A finished genome represents the genome assembly of much higher accuracy (with no gaps or incorrectly assembled areas) and quality ({approx}1 error/10,000 bp), validated through a number of computer and laboratory experiments.

  17. BRET fuel assembly dismantling machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titzler, P.A.; Bennett, K.L.; Kelley, R.S. Jr.; Stringer, J.L.

    1984-08-01

    An automated remote nuclear fuel assembly milling and dismantling machine has been designed, developed, and demonstrated at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) in Richland, Washington. The machine can be used to dismantle irradiated breeder fuel assemblies from the Fast Flux Test Facility prior to fuel reprocessing. It can be installed in an existing remotely operated shielded hot cell facility, the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF), at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington

  18. Partial Automated Alignment and Integration System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Gary Wayne (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention is a Partial Automated Alignment and Integration System (PAAIS) used to automate the alignment and integration of space vehicle components. A PAAIS includes ground support apparatuses, a track assembly with a plurality of energy-emitting components and an energy-receiving component containing a plurality of energy-receiving surfaces. Communication components and processors allow communication and feedback through PAAIS.

  19. Powder handling for automated fuel processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frederickson, J.R.; Eschenbaum, R.C.; Goldmann, L.H.

    1989-01-01

    Installation of the Secure Automated Fabrication (SAF) line has been completed. It is located in the Fuel Cycle Plant (FCP) at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford site near Richland, Washington. The SAF line was designed to fabricate advanced reactor fuel pellets and assemble fuel pins by automated, remote operation. This paper describes powder handling equipment and techniques utilized for automated powder processing and powder conditioning systems in this line. 9 figs

  20. Automation Revolutionize the Business Service Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Marciniak, Róbert

    2017-01-01

    In the last decades significant disruptive changes began with the extended use of automation. Many jobs are changed or disappeared and others were born totally with the automation. Together with the progress of technology, the automation was primarily spread in the industrial sector, mostly in the production and assembly lines. The growth maycontinue in the future further, researchers expect more than 35 million industrial robots globally by 2018.But it shades the situati...

  1. DNA nanotechnology and its applications in biomedical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lifan; Yu, Lu; Shen, Wanqiu

    2014-09-01

    DNA nanotechnology, which uses DNA as a material to self-assemble designed nanostructures, including DNA 2D arrays, 3D nanostructures, DNA nanotubes and DNA nanomechanical devices, has showed great promise in biomedical applications. Various DNA nanostructures have been used for protein characterization, enzyme assembly, biosensing, drug delivery and biomimetic assemblies. In this review, we will present recent advances of DNA nanotechnology and its applications in biomedical research field.

  2. Automated extraction of DNA from reference samples from various types of biological materials on the Qiagen BioRobot EZ1 Workstation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stangegaard, Michael; Jørgensen, Mads; Hansen, Anders Johannes

    2009-01-01

    , and muscle biopsies. The DNA extraction was validated according to EN/ISO 17025 for the STR kits AmpFlSTR« Identifiler« and AmpFlSTR« Yfiler« (Applied Biosystems). Of 298 samples extracted, 11 (4%) did not yield acceptable results. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that extraction of DNA from various types......We have validated and implemented a protocol for DNA extraction from various types of biological materials using a Qiagen BioRobot EZ1 Workstation. The sample materials included whole blood, blood from deceased, buccal cells on Omni swabs and FTA Cards, blood on FTA Cards and cotton swabs...... of biological material can be performed quickly and without the use of hazardous chemicals, and that the DNA may be successfully STR typed according to the requirements of forensic genetic investigations accredited according to EN/ISO 17025...

  3. Simple design for DNA nanotubes from a minimal set of unmodified strands: rapid, room-temperature assembly and readily tunable structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamblin, Graham D; Hariri, Amani A; Carneiro, Karina M M; Lau, Kai L; Cosa, Gonzalo; Sleiman, Hanadi F

    2013-04-23

    DNA nanotubes have great potential as nanoscale scaffolds for the organization of materials and the templation of nanowires and as drug delivery vehicles. Current methods for making DNA nanotubes either rely on a tile-based step-growth polymerization mechanism or use a large number of component strands and long annealing times. Step-growth polymerization gives little control over length, is sensitive to stoichiometry, and is slow to generate long products. Here, we present a design strategy for DNA nanotubes that uses an alternative, more controlled growth mechanism, while using just five unmodified component strands and a long enzymatically produced backbone. These tubes form rapidly at room temperature and have numerous, orthogonal sites available for the programmable incorporation of arrays of cargo along their length. As a proof-of-concept, cyanine dyes were organized into two distinct patterns by inclusion into these DNA nanotubes.

  4. Welding process automation in power machine building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mel'bard, S.N.; Shakhnov, A.F.; Shergov, I.V.

    1977-01-01

    The level of welding automation operations in power engineering and ways of its enhancement are highlighted. Used as the examples of comlex automation are an apparatus for the horizontal welding of turbine rotors, remotely controlled automatic machine for welding ring joint of large-sized vessels, equipment for the electron-beam welding of steam turbine assemblies of alloyed steels. The prospects of industrial robots are noted. The importance of the complex automation of technological process, including stocking, assemblying, transportation and auxiliary operations, is emphasized

  5. Illustrating how mechanical assemblies work

    KAUST Repository

    Mitra, Niloy J.; Yang, Yongliang; Yan, Dongming; Li, Wilmot; Agrawala, Maneesh

    2010-01-01

    How things work visualizations use a variety of visual techniques to depict the operation of complex mechanical assemblies. We present an automated approach for generating such visualizations. Starting with a 3D CAD model of an assembly, we first infer the motions of individual parts and the interactions between parts based on their geometry and a few user specified constraints. We then use this information to generate visualizations that incorporate motion arrows, frame sequences and animation to convey the causal chain of motions and mechanical interactions between parts. We present results for a wide variety of assemblies. © 2010 ACM.

  6. Illustrating how mechanical assemblies work

    KAUST Repository

    Mitra, Niloy J.; Yang, Yongliang; Yan, Dongming; Li, Wilmot; Agrawala, Maneesh

    2013-01-01

    How-things-work visualizations use a variety of visual techniques to depict the operation of complex mechanical assemblies. We present an automated approach for generating such visualizations. Starting with a 3D CAD model of an assembly, we first infer the motions of the individual parts and the interactions across the parts based on their geometry and a few user-specified constraints. We then use this information to generate visualizations that incorporate motion arrows, frame sequences, and animation to convey the causal chain of motions and mechanical interactions across parts. We demonstrate our system on a wide variety of assemblies. © 2013 ACM 0001-0782/13/01.

  7. Illustrating how mechanical assemblies work

    KAUST Repository

    Mitra, Niloy J.

    2010-07-26

    How things work visualizations use a variety of visual techniques to depict the operation of complex mechanical assemblies. We present an automated approach for generating such visualizations. Starting with a 3D CAD model of an assembly, we first infer the motions of individual parts and the interactions between parts based on their geometry and a few user specified constraints. We then use this information to generate visualizations that incorporate motion arrows, frame sequences and animation to convey the causal chain of motions and mechanical interactions between parts. We present results for a wide variety of assemblies. © 2010 ACM.

  8. 3D DNA Crystals and Nanotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J. Paukstelis

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available DNA’s molecular recognition properties have made it one of the most widely used biomacromolecular construction materials. The programmed assembly of DNA oligonucleotides has been used to create complex 2D and 3D self-assembled architectures and to guide the assembly of other molecules. The origins of DNA nanotechnology are rooted in the goal of assembling DNA molecules into designed periodic arrays, i.e., crystals. Here, we highlight several DNA crystal structures, the progress made in designing DNA crystals, and look at the current prospects and future directions of DNA crystals in nanotechnology.

  9. Modelling reversible execution of robotic assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Johan Sund; Ellekilde, Lars Peter; Schultz, Ulrik Pagh

    2018-01-01

    Programming robotic assembly for industrial small-batch production is challenging; hence, it is vital to increase robustness and reduce development effort in order to achieve flexible robotic automation. A human who has made an assembly error will often simply undo the process until the error is ...

  10. Photonic hybrid assembly through flexible waveguides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wörhoff, K.; Prak, A.; Postma, F.; Leinse, A.; Wu, K.; Peters, T. J.; Tichem, M.; Amaning-Appiah, B.; Renukappa, V.; Vollrath, G.; Balcells-Ventura, J.; Uhlig, P.; Seyfried, M.; Rose, D.; Santos, R.; Leijtens, X.J.M.; Flintham, B.; Wale, M.; Robbins, D.

    2016-01-01

    Fully automated, high precision, cost-effective assembly technology for photonic packages remains one of the main challenges in photonic component manufacturing. Next to the cost aspect the most demanding assembly task for multiport photonic integrated circuits (PICs) is the high-precision (±0.1 μm)

  11. Photonic hybrid assembly through flexible waveguides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wörhoff, Kerstin; Prak, Albert; postma, F; Leinse, A; Wu, K.; Peters, T.J.; Tichem, M.; Amaning-Appiah, B.; Renukappa, V.; Vollrath, G.; Balcells-Ventura, J.; Uhlig, P.; Seyfried, M.; Rose, D.; Santos, Raquel; Leijtens, XJM; Flintham, B.; Wale, M.; Robbins, D.; Vivien, Laurent; Pavesi, Lorenzo; Pelli, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Fully automated, high precision, cost-effective assembly technology for photonic packages remains one of the main challenges in photonic component manufacturing. Next to the cost aspect the most demanding assembly task for multiport photonic integrated circuits (PICs) is the high-precision (±0.1

  12. Replication protein A and γ-H2AX foci assembly is triggered by cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balajee, Adayabalam S.; Geard, Charles R.

    2004-01-01

    Human replication protein A (RPA p34), a crucial component of diverse DNA excision repair pathways, is implicated in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. To evaluate its role in DSB repair, the intranuclear dynamics of RPA was investigated after DNA damage and replication blockage in human cells. Using two different agents [ionizing radiation (IR) and hydroxyurea (HU)] to generate DSBs, we found that RPA relocated into distinct nuclear foci and colocalized with a well-known DSB binding factor, γ-H2AX, at the sites of DNA damage in a time-dependent manner. Colocalization of RPA and γ-H2AX foci peaked at 2 h after IR treatment and subsequently declined with increasing postrecovery times. The time course of RPA and γ-H2AX foci association correlated well with the DSB repair activity detected by a neutral comet assay. A phosphatidylinositol-3 (PI-3) kinase inhibitor, wortmannin, completely abolished both RPA and γ-H2AX foci formation triggered by IR. Additionally, radiosensitive ataxia telangiectasia (AT) cells harboring mutations in ATM gene product were found to be deficient in RPA and γ-H2AX colocalization after IR. Transfection of AT cells with ATM cDNA fully restored the association of RPA foci with γ-H2AX illustrating the requirement of ATM gene product for this process. The exact coincidence of RPA and γ-H2AX in response to HU specifically in S-phase cells supports their role in DNA replication checkpoint control. Depletion of RPA by small interfering RNA (SiRNA) substantially elevated the frequencies of IR-induced micronuclei (MN) and apoptosis in human cells suggestive of a role for RPA in DSB repair. We propose that RPA in association with γ-H2AX contributes to both DNA damage checkpoint control and repair in response to strand breaks and stalled replication forks in human cells

  13. Automated refueling inventory control system at FFTF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ordonez, C.R.

    1983-10-01

    The Refueling Inventory Control System (RICS) at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) keeps track of all assemblies that reside in the various refueling facilities. The automated RICS allows the user to obtain information regarding any assembly under its control by displaying the data on a screen. It also provides a simulation mode which allows assembly moves on a duplicated data base. This simulation is used to verify the refueling documentation before it is issued

  14. Using herbarium-derived DNAs to assemble a large-scale DNA barcode library for the vascular plants of Canada1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmina, Maria L.; Braukmann, Thomas W. A.; Fazekas, Aron J.; Graham, Sean W.; Dewaard, Stephanie L.; Rodrigues, Anuar; Bennett, Bruce A.; Dickinson, Timothy A.; Saarela, Jeffery M.; Catling, Paul M.; Newmaster, Steven G.; Percy, Diana M.; Fenneman, Erin; Lauron-Moreau, Aurélien; Ford, Bruce; Gillespie, Lynn; Subramanyam, Ragupathy; Whitton, Jeannette; Jennings, Linda; Metsger, Deborah; Warne, Connor P.; Brown, Allison; Sears, Elizabeth; Dewaard, Jeremy R.; Zakharov, Evgeny V.; Hebert, Paul D. N.

    2017-01-01

    Premise of the study: Constructing complete, accurate plant DNA barcode reference libraries can be logistically challenging for large-scale floras. Here we demonstrate the promise and challenges of using herbarium collections for building a DNA barcode reference library for the vascular plant flora of Canada. Methods: Our study examined 20,816 specimens representing 5076 of 5190 vascular plant species in Canada (98%). For 98% of the specimens, at least one of the DNA barcode regions was recovered from the plastid loci rbcL and matK and from the nuclear ITS2 region. We used beta regression to quantify the effects of age, type of preservation, and taxonomic affiliation (family) on DNA sequence recovery. Results: Specimen age and method of preservation had significant effects on sequence recovery for all markers, but influenced some families more (e.g., Boraginaceae) than others (e.g., Asteraceae). Discussion: Our DNA barcode library represents an unparalleled resource for metagenomic and ecological genetic research working on temperate and arctic biomes. An observed decline in sequence recovery with specimen age may be associated with poor primer matches, intragenomic variation (for ITS2), or inhibitory secondary compounds in some taxa. PMID:29299394

  15. A method for determining the actual rate of orientation switching of DNA self-assembled monolayers using optical and electrochemical frequency response analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova-Moreno, J; Bizzotto, D

    2015-02-17

    Electrostatic control of the orientation of fluorophore-labeled DNA strands immobilized on an electrode surface has been shown to be an effective bioanalytical tool. Modulation techniques and later time-resolved measurements were used to evaluate the kinetics of the switching between lying and standing DNA conformations. These measurements, however, are the result of a convolution between the DNA "switching" response time and the other frequency limited responses in the measurement. In this work, a method for analyzing the response of a potential driven DNA sensor is presented by calculating the potential effectively dropped across the electrode interface (using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy) as opposed to the potential applied to the electrochemical cell. This effectively deconvolutes the effect of the charging time on the observed frequency response. The corrected response shows that DNA is able to switch conformation faster than previously reported using modulation techniques. This approach will ensure accurate measurements independent of the electrochemical system, removing the uncertainty in the analysis of the switching response, enabling comparison between samples and measurement systems.

  16. Monothiol glutaredoxin Grx5 interacts with Fe-S scaffold proteins Isa1 and Isa2 and supports Fe-S assembly and DNA integrity in mitochondria of fission yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyoung-Dong; Chung, Woo-Hyun; Kim, Hyo-Jin; Lee, Kyung-Chang; Roe, Jung-Hye

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial monothiol glutaredoxins that bind Fe-S cluster are known to participate in Fe-S cluster assembly. However, their precise role has not been well understood. Among three monothiol glutaredoxins (Grx3, 4, and 5) in Schizosaccharomyces pombe only Grx5 resides in mitochondria. The Δgrx5 mutant requires cysteine on minimal media, and does not grow on non-fermentable carbon source such as glycerol. We found that the mutant is low in the activity of Fe-S enzymes in mitochondria as well as in the cytoplasm. Screening of multi-copy suppressor of growth defects of the mutant identified isa1 + gene encoding a putative A-type Fe-S scaffold, in addition to mas5 + and hsc1 + genes encoding putative chaperones for Fe-S assembly process. Examination of other scaffold and chaperone genes revealed that isa2 + , but not isu1 + and ssc1 + , complemented the growth phenotype of Δgrx5 mutant as isa1 + did, partly through restoration of Fe-S enzyme activities. The mutant also showed a significant decrease in the amount of mitochondrial DNA. We demonstrated that Grx5 interacts in vivo with Isa1 and Isa2 proteins in mitochondria by observing bimolecular fluorescence complementation. These results indicate that Grx5 plays a central role in Fe-S assembly process through interaction with A-type Fe-S scaffold proteins Isa1 and Isa2, each of which is an essential protein in S. pombe, and supports mitochondrial genome integrity as well as Fe-S assembly.

  17. Robotically Assembled Aerospace Structures: Digital Material Assembly using a Gantry-Type Assembler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Greenfield; Copplestone, Grace; O'Connor, Molly; Hu, Steven; Nowak, Sebastian; Cheung, Kenneth; Jenett, Benjamin; Cellucci, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    This paper evaluates the development of automated assembly techniques for discrete lattice structures using a multi-axis gantry type CNC machine. These lattices are made of discrete components called "digital materials." We present the development of a specialized end effector that works in conjunction with the CNC machine to assemble these lattices. With this configuration we are able to place voxels at a rate of 1.5 per minute. The scalability of digital material structures due to the incremental modular assembly is one of its key traits and an important metric of interest. We investigate the build times of a 5x5 beam structure on the scale of 1 meter (325 parts), 10 meters (3,250 parts), and 30 meters (9,750 parts). Utilizing the current configuration with a single end effector, performing serial assembly with a globally fixed feed station at the edge of the build volume, the build time increases according to a scaling law of n4, where n is the build scale. Build times can be reduced significantly by integrating feed systems into the gantry itself, resulting in a scaling law of n3. A completely serial assembly process will encounter time limitations as build scale increases. Automated assembly for digital materials can assemble high performance structures from discrete parts, and techniques such as built in feed systems, parallelization, and optimization of the fastening process will yield much higher throughput.

  18. Workload analyse of assembling process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghenghea, L. D.

    2015-11-01

    The workload is the most important indicator for managers responsible of industrial technological processes no matter if these are automated, mechanized or simply manual in each case, machines or workers will be in the focus of workload measurements. The paper deals with workload analyses made to a most part manual assembling technology for roller bearings assembling process, executed in a big company, with integrated bearings manufacturing processes. In this analyses the delay sample technique have been used to identify and divide all bearing assemblers activities, to get information about time parts from 480 minutes day work time that workers allow to each activity. The developed study shows some ways to increase the process productivity without supplementary investments and also indicated the process automation could be the solution to gain maximum productivity.

  19. Bacteriophage Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia A. Aksyuk

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophages have been a model system to study assembly processes for over half a century. Formation of infectious phage particles involves specific protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interactions, as well as large conformational changes of assembly precursors. The sequence and molecular mechanisms of phage assembly have been elucidated by a variety of methods. Differences and similarities of assembly processes in several different groups of bacteriophages are discussed in this review. The general principles of phage assembly are applicable to many macromolecular complexes.

  20. Fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatsuka, Masafumi.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent scattering of gaseous fission products released from fuel assemblies stored in an fbr type reactor. Constitution; A cap provided with means capable of storing gas is adapted to amount to the assembly handling head, for example, by way of threading in a storage rack of spent fuel assemblies consisting of a bottom plate, a top plate and an assembly support mechanism. By previously eliminating the gas inside of the assembly and the cap in the storage rack, gaseous fission products upon loading, if released from fuel rods during storage, are stored in the cap and do not scatter in the storage rack. (Horiuchi, T.)

  1. A semi-automated magnetic capture probe based DNA extraction and real-time PCR method applied in the Swedish surveillance of Echinococcus multilocularis in red fox (Vulpes vulpes) faecal samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaksson, Mats; Hagström, Åsa; Armua-Fernandez, Maria Teresa; Wahlström, Helene; Ågren, Erik Olof; Miller, Andrea; Holmberg, Anders; Lukacs, Morten; Casulli, Adriano; Deplazes, Peter; Juremalm, Mikael

    2014-12-19

    Following the first finding of Echinococcus multilocularis in Sweden in 2011, 2985 red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) were analysed by the segmental sedimentation and counting technique. This is a labour intensive method and requires handling of the whole carcass of the fox, resulting in a costly analysis. In an effort to reduce the cost of labour and sample handling, an alternative method has been developed. The method is sensitive and partially automated for detection of E. multilocularis in faecal samples. The method has been used in the Swedish E. multilocularis monitoring program for 2012-2013 on more than 2000 faecal samples. We describe a new semi-automated magnetic capture probe DNA extraction method and real time hydrolysis probe polymerase chain reaction assay (MC-PCR) for the detection of E. multilocularis DNA in faecal samples from red fox. The diagnostic sensitivity was determined by validating the new method against the sedimentation and counting technique in fox samples collected in Switzerland where E. multilocularis is highly endemic. Of 177 foxes analysed by the sedimentation and counting technique, E. multilocularis was detected in 93 animals. Eighty-two (88%, 95% C.I 79.8-93.9) of these were positive in the MC-PCR. In foxes with more than 100 worms, the MC-PCR was positive in 44 out of 46 (95.7%) cases. The two MC-PCR negative samples originated from foxes with only immature E. multilocularis worms. In foxes with 100 worms or less, (n = 47), 38 (80.9%) were positive in the MC-PCR. The diagnostic specificity of the MC-PCR was evaluated using fox scats collected within the Swedish screening. Of 2158 samples analysed, two were positive. This implies that the specificity is at least 99.9% (C.I. = 99.7-100). The MC-PCR proved to have a high sensitivity and a very high specificity. The test is partially automated but also possible to perform manually if desired. The test is well suited for nationwide E. multilocularis surveillance programs where sampling

  2. Danger! Automation at Work; Report of the State of Illinois Commission on Automation and Technological Progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, William

    The 74th Illinois General Assembly created the Illinois Commission on Automation and Technological Progress to study and analyze the economic and social effects of automation and other technological changes on industry, commerce, agriculture, education, manpower, and society in Illinois. Commission members visited industrial plants and business…

  3. Process automation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moser, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    Process automation technology has been pursued in the chemical processing industries and to a very limited extent in nuclear fuel reprocessing. Its effective use has been restricted in the past by the lack of diverse and reliable process instrumentation and the unavailability of sophisticated software designed for process control. The Integrated Equipment Test (IET) facility was developed by the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) in part to demonstrate new concepts for control of advanced nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. A demonstration of fuel reprocessing equipment automation using advanced instrumentation and a modern, microprocessor-based control system is nearing completion in the facility. This facility provides for the synergistic testing of all chemical process features of a prototypical fuel reprocessing plant that can be attained with unirradiated uranium-bearing feed materials. The unique equipment and mission of the IET facility make it an ideal test bed for automation studies. This effort will provide for the demonstration of the plant automation concept and for the development of techniques for similar applications in a full-scale plant. A set of preliminary recommendations for implementing process automation has been compiled. Some of these concepts are not generally recognized or accepted. The automation work now under way in the IET facility should be useful to others in helping avoid costly mistakes because of the underutilization or misapplication of process automation. 6 figs

  4. The effects of linear assembly of two carbazole groups on acid-base and DNA-binding properties of a ruthenium(II) complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Xue, Long-Xin; Ju, Chun-Chuan; Wang, Ke-Zhi

    2013-07-01

    A novel Ru(II) complex of [Ru(bpy)2(Hbcpip)](ClO4)2 {where bpy = 2,2-bipyridine, Hbcpip = 2-(4-(9H-3,9'-bicarbazol-9-yl)phenyl)-1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline} is synthesized and characterized. Calf-thymus DNA-binding properties of the complex were studied by UV-vis absorption and luminescence titrations, steady-state emission quenching by [Fe(CN)6]4-, DNA competitive binding with ethidium bromide, thermal denaturation and DNA viscosity measurements. The results indicate that the complex partially intercalated into the DNA with a binding constant of (5.5 ± 1.4) × 105 M-1 in buffered 50 mM NaCl. The acid-base properties of the complex were also studied by UV-visible and luminescence spectrophotometric pH titrations, and ground- and excited-state acidity ionization constant values were derived.

  5. Polymer Directed Protein Assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick van Rijn

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Protein aggregation and protein self-assembly is an important occurrence in natural systems, and is in some form or other dictated by biopolymers. Very obvious influences of biopolymers on protein assemblies are, e.g., virus particles. Viruses are a multi-protein assembly of which the morphology is dictated by poly-nucleotides namely RNA or DNA. This “biopolymer” directs the proteins and imposes limitations on the structure like the length or diameter of the particle. Not only do these bionanoparticles use polymer-directed self-assembly, also processes like amyloid formation are in a way a result of directed protein assembly by partial unfolded/misfolded biopolymers namely, polypeptides. The combination of proteins and synthetic polymers, inspired by the natural processes, are therefore regarded as a highly promising area of research. Directed protein assembly is versatile with respect to the possible interactions which brings together the protein and polymer, e.g., electrostatic, v.d. Waals forces or covalent conjugation, and possible combinations are numerous due to the large amounts of different polymers and proteins available. The protein-polymer interacting behavior and overall morphology is envisioned to aid in clarifying protein-protein interactions and are thought to entail some interesting new functions and properties which will ultimately lead to novel bio-hybrid materials.

  6. A Droplet Microfluidic Platform for Automating Genetic Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gach, Philip C; Shih, Steve C C; Sustarich, Jess; Keasling, Jay D; Hillson, Nathan J; Adams, Paul D; Singh, Anup K

    2016-05-20

    We present a water-in-oil droplet microfluidic platform for transformation, culture and expression of recombinant proteins in multiple host organisms including bacteria, yeast and fungi. The platform consists of a hybrid digital microfluidic/channel-based droplet chip with integrated temperature control to allow complete automation and integration of plasmid addition, heat-shock transformation, addition of selection medium, culture, and protein expression. The microfluidic format permitted significant reduction in consumption (100-fold) of expensive reagents such as DNA and enzymes compared to the benchtop method. The chip contains a channel to continuously replenish oil to the culture chamber to provide a fresh supply of oxygen to the cells for long-term (∼5 days) cell culture. The flow channel also replenished oil lost to evaporation and increased the number of droplets that could be processed and cultured. The platform was validated by transforming several plasmids into Escherichia coli including plasmids containing genes for fluorescent proteins GFP, BFP and RFP; plasmids with selectable markers for ampicillin or kanamycin resistance; and a Golden Gate DNA assembly reaction. We also demonstrate the applicability of this platform for transformation in widely used eukaryotic organisms such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Aspergillus niger. Duration and temperatures of the microfluidic heat-shock procedures were optimized to yield transformation efficiencies comparable to those obtained by benchtop methods with a throughput up to 6 droplets/min. The proposed platform offers potential for automation of molecular biology experiments significantly reducing cost, time and variability while improving throughput.

  7. LEGO-like DNA Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gothelf, Kurt Vesterager

    2012-01-01

    -dimensional (3D) DNA structures by self-assembly of single-stranded DNA “bricks.” The method opens a new route to complex self-assembled (3D) nanostructures that may serve as addressable templates for placing guest molecules with high precision, with possible applications in biophysics, medicine...

  8. Distribution automation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruenemeyer, D.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on a Distribution Automation (DA) System enhances the efficiency and productivity of a utility. It also provides intangible benefits such as improved public image and market advantages. A utility should evaluate the benefits and costs of such a system before committing funds. The expenditure for distribution automation is economical when justified by the deferral of a capacity increase, a decrease in peak power demand, or a reduction in O and M requirements

  9. EDNA-An expert software system for comparison and evaluation of DNA profiles in forensic casework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haldemann, B.; Dornseifer, S.; Heylen, T.

    2015-01-01

    eDNA is an expert software system for DNA profile comparison, match interpretation and automated report generation in forensic DNA casework. Process automation and intelligent graphical representation maximise reliability of DNA evidence, while facilitating and accelerating the work of DNA experts....

  10. DNA-Mediated Electrochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorodetsky, Alon A.; Buzzeo, Marisa C.

    2009-01-01

    The base pair stack of DNA has been demonstrated as a medium for long range charge transport chemistry both in solution and at DNA-modified surfaces. This chemistry is exquisitely sensitive to structural perturbations in the base pair stack as occur with lesions, single base mismatches, and protein binding. We have exploited this sensitivity for the development of reliable electrochemical assays based on DNA charge transport at self-assembled DNA monolayers. Here we discuss the characteristic features, applications, and advantages of DNA-mediated electrochemistry. PMID:18980370

  11. Virtual automation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casis, E; Garrido, A; Uranga, B; Vives, A; Zufiaurre, C

    2001-01-01

    Total laboratory automation (TLA) can be substituted in mid-size laboratories by a computer sample workflow control (virtual automation). Such a solution has been implemented in our laboratory using PSM, software developed in cooperation with Roche Diagnostics (Barcelona, Spain), to this purpose. This software is connected to the online analyzers and to the laboratory information system and is able to control and direct the samples working as an intermediate station. The only difference with TLA is the replacement of transport belts by personnel of the laboratory. The implementation of this virtual automation system has allowed us the achievement of the main advantages of TLA: workload increase (64%) with reduction in the cost per test (43%), significant reduction in the number of biochemistry primary tubes (from 8 to 2), less aliquoting (from 600 to 100 samples/day), automation of functional testing, drastic reduction of preanalytical errors (from 11.7 to 0.4% of the tubes) and better total response time for both inpatients (from up to 48 hours to up to 4 hours) and outpatients (from up to 10 days to up to 48 hours). As an additional advantage, virtual automation could be implemented without hardware investment and significant headcount reduction (15% in our lab).

  12. Impact of a Central Scaffold on the Binding Affinity of Fragment Pairs Isolated from DNA-Encoded Self-Assembling Chemical Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigatti, Martina; Dal Corso, Alberto; Vanetti, Sara; Cazzamalli, Samuele; Rieder, Ulrike; Scheuermann, Jörg; Neri, Dario; Sladojevich, Filippo

    2017-11-08

    The screening of encoded self-assembling chemical libraries allows the identification of fragment pairs that bind to adjacent pockets on target proteins of interest. For practical applications, it is necessary to link these ligand pairs into discrete organic molecules, devoid of any nucleic acid component. Here we describe the discovery of a synergistic binding pair for acid alpha-1 glycoprotein and a chemical strategy for the identification of optimal linkers, connecting the two fragments. The procedure yielded a set of small organic ligands, the best of which exhibited a dissociation constant of 9.9 nm, as measured in solution by fluorescence polarization. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Testing Whether Defective Chromatin Assembly in S-Phase Contributes to Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adams, Peter

    2003-01-01

    .... We used a dominant negative mutant of (chromatin assembly factor-I) CAF1, a complex that assembles newly synthesized DNA into nucleosomes, to inhibit S-phase chromatin assembly and found that this induced S-phase arrest...

  14. Testing Whether Defective Chromatin Assembly in S-Phase Contributes to Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adams, Peter

    2004-01-01

    .... We used a dominant negative mutant of (chromatin assembly factor-I) CAF1, a complex that assembles newly synthesized DNA into nucleosomes, to inhibit S-phase chromatin assembly and found that this induced S-phase arrest...

  15. Inositol hexakisphosphate kinase-1 mediates assembly/disassembly of the CRL4–signalosome complex to regulate DNA repair and cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Feng; Xu, Jing; Khan, A. Basit; Gadalla, Moataz M.; Cha, Jiyoung Y.; Xu, Risheng; Tyagi, Richa; Dang, Yongjun; Chakraborty, Anutosh; Snyder, Solomon H.

    2014-01-01

    Inositol polyphosphates containing an energetic pyrophosphate bond are formed primarily by a family of three inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6) kinases (IP6K1–3). The Cullin-RING ubiquitin ligases (CRLs) regulate diverse biological processes through substrate ubiquitylation. CRL4, comprising the scaffold Cullin 4A/B, the E2-interacting Roc1/2, and the adaptor protein damage-specific DNA-binding protein 1, is activated by DNA damage. Basal CRL4 activity is inhibited by binding to the COP9 signalosome (CSN). UV radiation and other stressors dissociate the complex, leading to E3 ligase activation, but signaling events that trigger signalosome dissociation from CRL4 have been unclear. In the present study, we show that, under basal conditions, IP6K1 forms a ternary complex with CSN and CRL4 in which IP6K1 and CRL4 are inactive. UV dissociates IP6K1 to generate IP7, which then dissociates CSN–CRL4 to activate CRL4. Thus, IP6K1 is a novel CRL4 subunit that transduces UV signals to mediate disassembly of the CRL4–CSN complex, thereby regulating nucleotide excision repair and cell death. PMID:25349427

  16. Automating Finance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, John

    2007-01-01

    In past years, higher education's financial management side has been riddled with manual processes and aging mainframe applications. This article discusses schools which had taken advantage of an array of technologies that automate billing, payment processing, and refund processing in the case of overpayment. The investments are well worth it:…

  17. Library Automation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husby, Ole

    1990-01-01

    The challenges and potential benefits of automating university libraries are reviewed, with special attention given to cooperative systems. Aspects discussed include database size, the role of the university computer center, storage modes, multi-institutional systems, resource sharing, cooperative system management, networking, and intelligent…

  18. Evaluation of cell lysis procedures and use of a micro fluidic system for an automated DNA-based cell identification in interplanetary missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, J. A.; Felnagle, E.; Fries, M.; Spearing, S.; Monaco, L.; Steele, A.

    2006-12-01

    A Modular Assay System for Solar System Exploration (MASSE) is being developed to include sample handling, pre-treatment, separation and analysis of biological target compounds by both DNA and protein microarrays. To better design sensitive and accurate initial upstream sample handling of the MASSE instrument, experiments investigating the sensitivity and potential extraction bias of commercially available DNA extraction kits between classes of environmentally relevant prokaryotes such as gram-negative bacteria ( Escherichia coli), gram-positive bacteria ( Bacillus megatarium), and Archaea ( Haloarcula marismortui) were performed. For extractions of both planktonic cultures and spiked Mars simulated regolith, FTA ® paper demonstrated the highest sensitivity, with detection as low as ˜1×10 1 cells and ˜3.3×10 2 cells, respectively. In addition to the highest sensitivity, custom modified application of FTA ® paper extraction protocol is the simplest in terms of incorporation into MASSE and displayed little bias in sensitivity with respect to prokaryotic cell type. The implementation of FTA paper for environmental microbiology investigations appears to be a viable and effective option potentially negating the need for other pre-concentration steps such as filtration and negating concerns regarding extraction efficiency of cells. In addition to investigations on useful technology for upstream sample handling in MASSE, we have also evaluated the potential for μTAS to be employed in the MASSE instrument by employing proprietary lab-on-a-chip development technology to investigate the potential for microfluidic cell lysis of different prokaryotic cells employing both chemical and biological lysis agents. Real-time bright-field microscopy and quantitative PMT detection indicated that that gram positive, gram negative and archaeal cells were effectively lyzed in a few seconds using the microfluidic chip protocol developed. This included employing a lysis buffer with

  19. A pipeline for the de novo assembly of the Themira biloba (Sepsidae: Diptera) transcriptome using a multiple k-mer length approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melicher, Dacotah; Torson, Alex S; Dworkin, Ian; Bowsher, Julia H

    2014-03-12

    The Sepsidae family of flies is a model for investigating how sexual selection shapes courtship and sexual dimorphism in a comparative framework. However, like many non-model systems, there are few molecular resources available. Large-scale sequencing and assembly have not been performed in any sepsid, and the lack of a closely related genome makes investigation of gene expression challenging. Our goal was to develop an automated pipeline for de novo transcriptome assembly, and to use that pipeline to assemble and analyze the transcriptome of the sepsid Themira biloba. Our bioinformatics pipeline uses cloud computing services to assemble and analyze the transcriptome with off-site data management, processing, and backup. It uses a multiple k-mer length approach combined with a second meta-assembly to extend transcripts and recover more bases of transcript sequences than standard single k-mer assembly. We used 454 sequencing to generate 1.48 million reads from cDNA generated from embryo, larva, and pupae of T. biloba and assembled a transcriptome consisting of 24,495 contigs. Annotation identified 16,705 transcripts, including those involved in embryogenesis and limb patterning. We assembled transcriptomes from an additional three non-model organisms to demonstrate that our pipeline assembled a higher-quality transcriptome than single k-mer approaches across multiple species. The pipeline we have developed for assembly and analysis increases contig length, recovers unique transcripts, and assembles more base pairs than other methods through the use of a meta-assembly. The T. biloba transcriptome is a critical resource for performing large-scale RNA-Seq investigations of gene expression patterns, and is the first transcriptome sequenced in this Dipteran family.

  20. Smart DNA Fabrication Using Sound Waves: Applying Acoustic Dispensing Technologies to Synthetic Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanigowska, Paulina; Shen, Yue; Zheng, Yijing; Rosser, Susan; Cai, Yizhi

    2016-02-01

    Acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) technology uses focused acoustic energy to transfer nanoliter-scale liquid droplets with high precision and accuracy. This noncontact, tipless, low-volume dispensing technology minimizes the possibility of cross-contamination and potentially reduces the costs of reagents and consumables. To date, acoustic dispensers have mainly been used in screening libraries of compounds. In this paper, we describe the first application of this powerful technology to the rapidly developing field of synthetic biology, for DNA synthesis and assembly at the nanoliter scale using a Labcyte Echo 550 acoustic dispenser. We were able to successfully downscale PCRs and the popular one-pot DNA assembly methods, Golden Gate and Gibson assemblies, from the microliter to the nanoliter scale with high assembly efficiency, which effectively cut the reagent cost by 20- to 100-fold. We envision that acoustic dispensing will become an instrumental technology in synthetic biology, in particular in the era of DNA foundries. © 2015 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  1. Self-optimizing approach for automated laser resonator alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brecher, C.; Schmitt, R.; Loosen, P.; Guerrero, V.; Pyschny, N.; Pavim, A.; Gatej, A.

    2012-02-01

    Nowadays, the assembly of laser systems is dominated by manual operations, involving elaborate alignment by means of adjustable mountings. From a competition perspective, the most challenging problem in laser source manufacturing is price pressure, a result of cost competition exerted mainly from Asia. From an economical point of view, an automated assembly of laser systems defines a better approach to produce more reliable units at lower cost. However, the step from today's manual solutions towards an automated assembly requires parallel developments regarding product design, automation equipment and assembly processes. This paper introduces briefly the idea of self-optimizing technical systems as a new approach towards highly flexible automation. Technically, the work focuses on the precision assembly of laser resonators, which is one of the final and most crucial assembly steps in terms of beam quality and laser power. The paper presents a new design approach for miniaturized laser systems and new automation concepts for a robot-based precision assembly, as well as passive and active alignment methods, which are based on a self-optimizing approach. Very promising results have already been achieved, considerably reducing the duration and complexity of the laser resonator assembly. These results as well as future development perspectives are discussed.

  2. Nucleic acid nanomaterials: Silver-wired DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auffinger, Pascal; Ennifar, Eric

    2017-10-01

    DNA double helical structures are supramolecular assemblies that are typically held together by classical Watson-Crick pairing. Now, nucleotide chelation of silver ions supports an extended silver-DNA hybrid duplex featuring an uninterrupted silver array.

  3. Automation of Electrical Cable Harnesses Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuming Bi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Traditional automated systems, such as industrial robots, are applied in well-structured environments, and many automated systems have a limited adaptability to deal with complexity and uncertainty; therefore, the applications of industrial robots in small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs are very limited. The majority of manual operations in SMEs are too complicated for automation. The rapidly developed information technologies (IT has brought new opportunities for the automation of manufacturing and assembly processes in the ill-structured environments. Note that an automation solution should be designed to meet the given requirements of the specified application, and it differs from one application to another. In this paper, we look into the feasibility of automated testing for electric cable harnesses, and our focus is on some of the generic strategies for the improvement of the adaptability of automation solutions. Especially, the concept of modularization is adopted in developing hardware and software to maximize system adaptability in testing a wide scope of products. A proposed system has been implemented, and the system performances have been evaluated by executing tests on actual products. The testing experiments have shown that the automated system outperformed manual operations greatly in terms of cost-saving, productivity and reliability. Due to the potential of increasing system adaptability and cost reduction, the presented work has its theoretical and practical significance for an extension for other automation solutions in SMEs.

  4. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Hideaki; Sakai, Takao; Ishida, Tomio; Yokota, Norikatsu.

    1992-01-01

    The lower ends of a plurality of plate-like shape memory alloys are secured at the periphery of the upper inside of the handling head of a fuel assembly. As the shape memory alloy, a Cu-Zn alloy, a Ti-Pd alloy or a Fe-Ni alloy is used. When high temperature coolants flow out to the handling head, the shape memory alloy deforms by warping to the outer side more greatly toward the upper portion thereof with the temperature increase of the coolants. As the result, the shape of the flow channel of the coolants is changed so as to enlarge at the exit of the upper end of the fuel assembly. Then, the pressure loss of the coolants in the fuel assembly is decreased by the enlargement. Accordingly, the flow rate of the coolants in the fuel assembly is increased to lower the temperature of the coolants. Further, high temperature coolants and low temperature coolants are mixed sufficiently just above the fuel assembly. This can suppress the temperature fluctuation of the mixed coolants in the upper portion of the reactor core, thereby enabling to decrease a fatigue and failures of the structural components in the upper portion of the reactor core. (I.N.)

  5. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatsuka, Masafumi; Matsuzuka, Ryuji.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To provide a fuel assembly which can decrease pressure loss of coolant to uniform temperature. Structure: A sectional area of a flow passage in the vicinity of an inner peripheral surface of a wrapper tube is limited over the entire length to prevent the temperature of a fuel element in the outermost peripheral portion from being excessively decreased to thereby flatten temperature distribution. To this end, a plurality of pincture-frame-like sheet metals constituting a spacer for supporting a fuel assembly, which has a plurality of fuel elements planted lengthwise and in given spaced relation within the wrapper tube, is disposed in longitudinal grooves and in stacked fashion to form a substantially honeycomb-like space in cross section. The fuel elements are inserted and supported in the space to form a fuel assembly. (Kamimura, M.)

  6. Fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagano, Mamoru; Yoshioka, Ritsuo

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To effectively utilize nuclear fuels by increasing the reactivity of a fuel assembly and reduce the concentration at the central region thereof upon completion of the burning. Constitution: A fuel assembly is bisected into a central region and a peripheral region by disposing an inner channel box within a channel box. The flow rate of coolants passing through the central region is made greater than that in the peripheral region. The concentration of uranium 235 of the fuel rods in the central region is made higher. In such a structure, since the moderating effect in the central region is improved, the reactivity of the fuel assembly is increased and the uranium concentration in the central region upon completion of the burning can be reduced, fuel economy and effective utilization of uranium can be attained. (Kamimura, M.)

  7. Human-automation collaboration in manufacturing: identifying key implementation factors

    OpenAIRE

    Charalambous, George; Fletcher, Sarah; Webb, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Human-automation collaboration refers to the concept of human operators and intelligent automation working together interactively within the same workspace without conventional physical separation. This concept has commanded significant attention in manufacturing because of the potential applications, such as the installation of large sub-assemblies. However, the key human factors relevant to human-automation collaboration have not yet been fully investigated. To maximise effective implement...

  8. Conducting Automated Test Assembly Using the Premium Solver Platform Version 7.0 with Microsoft Excel and the Large-Scale LP/QP Solver Engine Add-In

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cor, Ken; Alves, Cecilia; Gierl, Mark J.

    2008-01-01

    This review describes and evaluates a software add-in created by Frontline Systems, Inc., that can be used with Microsoft Excel 2007 to solve large, complex test assembly problems. The combination of Microsoft Excel 2007 with the Frontline Systems Premium Solver Platform is significant because Microsoft Excel is the most commonly used spreadsheet…

  9. Repeated extraction of DNA from FTA cards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stangegaard, Michael; Ferrero, Laura; Børsting, Claus

    2011-01-01

    Extraction of DNA using magnetic bead based techniques on automated DNA extraction instruments provides a fast, reliable and reproducible method for DNA extraction from various matrices. However, the yield of extracted DNA from FTA-cards is typically low. Here, we demonstrate that it is possible...... to repeatedly extract DNA from the processed FTA-disk. The method increases the yield from the nanogram range to the microgram range....

  10. A microfluidic DNA library preparation platform for next-generation sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanyoup Kim

    Full Text Available Next-generation sequencing (NGS is emerging as a powerful tool for elucidating genetic information for a wide range of applications. Unfortunately, the surging popularity of NGS has not yet been accompanied by an improvement in automated techniques for preparing formatted sequencing libraries. To address this challenge, we have developed a prototype microfluidic system for preparing sequencer-ready DNA libraries for analysis by Illumina sequencing. Our system combines droplet-based digital microfluidic (DMF sample handling with peripheral modules to create a fully-integrated, sample-in library-out platform. In this report, we use our automated system to prepare NGS libraries from samples of human and bacterial genomic DNA. E. coli libraries prepared on-device from 5 ng of total DNA yielded excellent sequence coverage over the entire bacterial genome, with >99% alignment to the reference genome, even genome coverage, and good quality scores. Furthermore, we produced a de novo assembly on a previously unsequenced multi-drug resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae strain BAA-2146 (KpnNDM. The new method described here is fast, robust, scalable, and automated. Our device for library preparation will assist in the integration of NGS technology into a wide variety of laboratories, including small research laboratories and clinical laboratories.

  11. A microfluidic DNA library preparation platform for next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hanyoup; Jebrail, Mais J; Sinha, Anupama; Bent, Zachary W; Solberg, Owen D; Williams, Kelly P; Langevin, Stanley A; Renzi, Ronald F; Van De Vreugde, James L; Meagher, Robert J; Schoeniger, Joseph S; Lane, Todd W; Branda, Steven S; Bartsch, Michael S; Patel, Kamlesh D

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) is emerging as a powerful tool for elucidating genetic information for a wide range of applications. Unfortunately, the surging popularity of NGS has not yet been accompanied by an improvement in automated techniques for preparing formatted sequencing libraries. To address this challenge, we have developed a prototype microfluidic system for preparing sequencer-ready DNA libraries for analysis by Illumina sequencing. Our system combines droplet-based digital microfluidic (DMF) sample handling with peripheral modules to create a fully-integrated, sample-in library-out platform. In this report, we use our automated system to prepare NGS libraries from samples of human and bacterial genomic DNA. E. coli libraries prepared on-device from 5 ng of total DNA yielded excellent sequence coverage over the entire bacterial genome, with >99% alignment to the reference genome, even genome coverage, and good quality scores. Furthermore, we produced a de novo assembly on a previously unsequenced multi-drug resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae strain BAA-2146 (KpnNDM). The new method described here is fast, robust, scalable, and automated. Our device for library preparation will assist in the integration of NGS technology into a wide variety of laboratories, including small research laboratories and clinical laboratories.

  12. Rational assembly of nanoparticle superlattices with designed lattice symmetries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gang, Oleg; Lu, Fang; Tagawa, Miho

    2017-09-05

    A method for lattice design via multivalent linkers (LDML) is disclosed that introduces a rationally designed symmetry of connections between particles in order to achieve control over the morphology of their assembly. The method affords the inclusion of different programmable interactions within one linker that allow an assembly of different types of particles. The designed symmetry of connections is preferably provided utilizing DNA encoding. The linkers may include fabricated "patchy" particles, DNA scaffold constructs and Y-shaped DNA linkers, anisotropic particles, which are preferably functionalized with DNA, multimeric protein-DNA complexes, and particles with finite numbers of DNA linkers.

  13. Valve assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandling, M.

    1981-01-01

    An improved valve assembly, used for controlling the flow of radioactive slurry, is described. Radioactive contamination of the air during removal or replacement of the valve is prevented by sucking air from the atmosphere through a portion of the structure above the valve housing. (U.K.)

  14. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gjertsen, R.K.; Bassler, E.A.; Huckestein, E.A.; Salton, R.B.; Tower, S.N.

    1988-01-01

    A fuel assembly adapted for use with a pressurized water nuclear reactor having capabilities for fluid moderator spectral shift control is described comprising: parallel arranged elongated nuclear fuel elements; means for providing for axial support of the fuel elements and for arranging the fuel elements in a spaced array; thimbles interspersed among the fuel elements adapted for insertion of a rod control cluster therewithin; means for structurally joining the fuel elements and the guide thimbles; fluid moderator control means for providing a volume of low neutron absorbing fluid within the fuel assembly and for removing a substantially equivalent volume of reactor coolant water therefrom, a first flow manifold at one end of the fuel assembly sealingly connected to a first end of the moderator control tubes whereby the first ends are commonly flow connected; and a second flow manifold, having an inlet passage and an outlet passage therein, sealingly connected to a second end of the moderator control tubes at a second end of the fuel assembly

  15. Ancient DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willerslev, Eske; Cooper, Alan

    2004-01-01

    ancient DNA, palaeontology, palaeoecology, archaeology, population genetics, DNA damage and repair......ancient DNA, palaeontology, palaeoecology, archaeology, population genetics, DNA damage and repair...

  16. Plant automation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, L.J.; Sackett, J.I.; Dayal, Y.; Wagner, W.K.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes work at EBR-II in the development and demonstration of new control equipment and methods and associated schemes for plant prognosis, diagnosis, and automation. The development work has attracted the interest of other national laboratories, universities, and commercial companies. New initiatives include use of new control strategies, expert systems, advanced diagnostics, and operator displays. The unique opportunity offered by EBR-II is as a test bed where a total integrated approach to automatic reactor control can be directly tested under real power plant conditions

  17. Grid structure for nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachter, W.J.; Akey, J.G.

    1975-01-01

    Described is a nuclear fuel element support system comprising an egg-crate-type grid made up of slotted vertical portions interconnected at right angles to each other, the vertical portions being interconnected by means of cross straps which are dimpled midway between their ends to engage fuel elements disposed within openings formed in the egg-crate assembly. The cross straps are disposed at an angle, other than a right angle, to the vertical portions of the assembly whereby their lengths are increased for a given span, and the total elastic deflection capability of the cell is increased. The assembly is particularly adapted for computer design and automated machine tool fabrication

  18. Prototype implementation of segment assembling software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pešić Đorđe

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available IT education is very important and a lot of effort is put into the development of tools for helping students to acquire programming knowledge and for helping teachers in automating the examination process. This paper describes a prototype of the program segment assembling software used in the context of making tests in the field of algorithmic complexity. The proposed new program segment assembling model uses rules and templates. A template is a simple program segment. A rule defines combining method and data dependencies if they exist. One example of program segment assembling by the proposed system is given. Graphical user interface is also described.

  19. Synthetic Self-Assembled Materials in Biological Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versluis, F.; van Esch, J.H.; Eelkema, R.

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic self-assembly has long been recognized as an excellent approach for the formation of ordered structures on the nanoscale. Although the development of synthetic self-assembling materials has often been inspired by principles observed in nature (e.g., the assembly of lipids, DNA,

  20. Building block synthesis using the polymerase chain assembly method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, Julie A; Peccoud, Jean

    2012-01-01

    De novo gene synthesis allows the creation of custom DNA molecules without the typical constraints of traditional cloning assembly: scars, restriction site incompatibility, and the quest to find all the desired parts to name a few. Moreover, with the help of computer-assisted design, the perfect DNA molecule can be created along with its matching sequence ready to download. The challenge is to build the physical DNA molecules that have been designed with the software. Although there are several DNA assembly methods, this section presents and describes a method using the polymerase chain assembly (PCA).

  1. Human Contamination in Public Genome Assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryukov, Kirill; Imanishi, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    Contamination in genome assembly can lead to wrong or confusing results when using such genome as reference in sequence comparison. Although bacterial contamination is well known, the problem of human-originated contamination received little attention. In this study we surveyed 45,735 available genome assemblies for evidence of human contamination. We used lineage specificity to distinguish between contamination and conservation. We found that 154 genome assemblies contain fragments that with high confidence originate as contamination from human DNA. Majority of contaminating human sequences were present in the reference human genome assembly for over a decade. We recommend that existing contaminated genomes should be revised to remove contaminated sequence, and that new assemblies should be thoroughly checked for presence of human DNA before submitting them to public databases.

  2. WIDAFELS flexible automation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shende, P.S.; Chander, K.P.; Ramadas, P.

    1990-01-01

    After discussing the various aspects of automation, some typical examples of various levels of automation are given. One of the examples is of automated production line for ceramic fuel pellets. (M.G.B.)

  3. An Automation Planning Primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paynter, Marion

    1988-01-01

    This brief planning guide for library automation incorporates needs assessment and evaluation of options to meet those needs. A bibliography of materials on automation planning and software reviews, library software directories, and library automation journals is included. (CLB)

  4. DNA topology and transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouzine, Fedor; Levens, David; Baranello, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin is a complex assembly that compacts DNA inside the nucleus while providing the necessary level of accessibility to regulatory factors conscripted by cellular signaling systems. In this superstructure, DNA is the subject of mechanical forces applied by variety of molecular motors. Rather than being a rigid stick, DNA possesses dynamic structural variability that could be harnessed during critical steps of genome functioning. The strong relationship between DNA structure and key genomic processes necessitates the study of physical constrains acting on the double helix. Here we provide insight into the source, dynamics, and biology of DNA topological domains in the eukaryotic cells and summarize their possible involvement in gene transcription. We emphasize recent studies that might inspire and impact future experiments on the involvement of DNA topology in cellular functions. PMID:24755522

  5. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokota, Tokunobu.

    1990-01-01

    A fuel assembly used in a FBR type nuclear reactor comprises a plurality of fuel rods and a moderator guide member (water rod). A moderator exit opening/closing mechanism is formed at the upper portion of the moderator guide member for opening and closing a moderator exit. In the initial fuel charging operation cycle to the reactor, the moderator exit is closed by the moderator exit opening/closing mechanism. Then, voids are accumulated at the inner upper portion of the moderator guide member to harden spectrum and a great amount of plutonium is generated and accumulated in the fuel assembly. Further, in the fuel re-charging operation cycle, the moderator guide member is used having the moderator exit opened. In this case, voids are discharged from the moderator guide member to decrease the ratio, and the plutonium accumulated in the initial charging operation cycle is burnt. In this way, the fuel economy can be improved. (I.N.)

  6. Fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Echigoya, Hironori; Nomata, Terumitsu.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To render the axial distribution relatively flat. Constitution: First nuclear element comprises a fuel can made of zircalloy i.e., the metal with less neutron absorption, which is filled with a plurality of UO 2 pellets and sealed by using a lower end plug, a plenum spring and an upper end plug by means of welding. Second fuel element is formed by substituting a part of the UO 2 pellets with a water tube which is sealed with water and has a space for allowing the heat expansion. The nuclear fuel assembly is constituted by using the first and second fuel elements together. In such a structure, since water reflects neutrons and decrease their leakage to increase the temperature, reactivity is added at the upper portion of the fuel assembly to thereby flatten the axial power distribution. Accordingly, stable operation is possible only by means of deep control rods while requiring no shallow control rods. (Sekiya, K.)

  7. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Mitsuo.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the corrosion rate and suppress the increase of radioactive corrosion products in reactor water of nuclear fuel assemblies for use in BWR type reactors having spacer springs made of nickel based deposition reinforced type alloys. Constitution: Spacer rings made of nickel based deposition reinforced type alloy are incorporated and used as fuel assemblies after applying treatment of dipping and maintaining at high temperature water followed by heating in steams. Since this can remove the nickel leaching into reactor water at the initial stage, Co-58 as the radioactive corrosion products in the reactor water can be reduced, and the operation at in-service inspection or repairement can be facilitated to improve the working efficiency of the nuclear power plant. The dipping time is desirably more than 10 hours and more desirably more than 30 hours. (Horiuchi, T. )

  8. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Shoichi; Hirano, Yasushi.

    1998-01-01

    A one-half or more of entire fuel rods in a fuel assembly comprises MOX fuel rods containing less than 1wt% of burnable poisons, and at least a portion of the burnable poisons comprises gadolinium. Then, surplus reactivity at an initial stage of operation cycle is controlled to eliminate burnable poisons remained unburnt at a final stage, as well as increase thermal reactivity. In addition, the content of fission plutonium is determined to greater than the content of uranium 235, and fuel rods at corner portions are made not to incorporate burnable poisons. Fuel rods not containing burnable poisons are disposed at positions in adjacent with fuel rods facing to a water rod at one or two directions. Local power at radial center of the fuel assembly is increased to flatten the distortion of radial power distribution. (N.H.)

  9. General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    5th April, 2016 – Ordinary General Assembly of the Staff Association! In the first semester of each year, the Staff Association (SA) invites its members to attend and participate in the Ordinary General Assembly (OGA). This year the OGA will be held on Tuesday, April 5th 2016 from 11:00 to 12:00 in BE Auditorium, Meyrin (6-2-024). During the Ordinary General Assembly, the activity and financial reports of the SA are presented and submitted for approval to the members. This is the occasion to get a global view on the activities of the SA, its financial management, and an opportunity to express one’s opinion, including taking part in the votes. Other points are listed on the agenda, as proposed by the Staff Council. Who can vote? Only “ordinary” members (MPE) of the SA can vote. Associated members (MPA) of the SA and/or affiliated pensioners have a right to vote on those topics that are of direct interest to them. Who can give his/her opinion? The Ordinary General Asse...

  10. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Sei; Ando, Ryohei; Mitsutake, Toru.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention concerns a fuel assembly suitable to a BWR-type reactor and improved especially with the nuclear characteristic, heat performance, hydraulic performance, dismantling or assembling performance and economical property. A part of poison rods are formed as a large-diameter/multi-region poison rods having a larger diameter than a fuel rod. A large number of fuel rods are disposed surrounding a large diameter water rod and a group of the large-diameter/multi-region poison rods in adjacent with the water rod. The large-diameter water rod has a burnable poison at the tube wall portion. At least a portion of the large-diameter poison rods has a coolant circulation portion allowing coolants to circulate therethrough. Since the large-diameter poison rods are disposed at a position of high neutron fluxes, a large neutron multiplication factor suppression effect can be provided, thereby enabling to reduce the number of burnable poison rods relative to fuels. As a result, power peaking in the fuel assembly is moderated and a greater amount of plutonium can be loaded. In addition the flow of cooling water which tends to gather around the large diameter water rod can be controlled to improve cooling performance of fuels. (N.H.)

  11. Automated Budget System -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The Automated Budget System (ABS) automates management and planning of the Mike Monroney Aeronautical Center (MMAC) budget by providing enhanced capability to plan,...

  12. Case Study in Biomimetic Design: Handling and Assembly of Microparts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shu, Li; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Gegeckaite, Asta

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the application of the biomimetic design process to the development of automated gripping devices for microparts. Handling and assembly of micromechanical parts is complicated by size effects that occur when part dimensions are scaled down. A common complication involves stic...... and the abscission process in plants inspired concepts of new automated handling devices for microobjects. The design, development and testing of a gripping device based on biological principles for the automated handling and assembly of a microscrew is presented.......This paper describes the application of the biomimetic design process to the development of automated gripping devices for microparts. Handling and assembly of micromechanical parts is complicated by size effects that occur when part dimensions are scaled down. A common complication involves...

  13. Automated nutrient analyses in seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitledge, T.E.; Malloy, S.C.; Patton, C.J.; Wirick, C.D.

    1981-02-01

    This manual was assembled for use as a guide for analyzing the nutrient content of seawater samples collected in the marine coastal zone of the Northeast United States and the Bering Sea. Some modifications (changes in dilution or sample pump tube sizes) may be necessary to achieve optimum measurements in very pronounced oligotrophic, eutrophic or brackish areas. Information is presented under the following section headings: theory and mechanics of automated analysis; continuous flow system description; operation of autoanalyzer system; cookbook of current nutrient methods; automated analyzer and data analysis software; computer interfacing and hardware modifications; and trouble shooting. The three appendixes are entitled: references and additional reading; manifold components and chemicals; and software listings. (JGB)

  14. Automating occupational protection records systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, M.; Martin, J.B.

    1991-10-01

    Occupational protection records have traditionally been generated by field and laboratory personnel, assembled into files in the safety office, and eventually stored in a warehouse or other facility. Until recently, these records have been primarily paper copies, often handwritten. Sometimes, the paper is microfilmed for storage. However, electronic records are beginning to replace these traditional methods. The purpose of this paper is to provide guidance for making the transition to automated record keeping and retrieval using modern computer equipment. This paper describes the types of records most readily converted to electronic record keeping and a methodology for implementing an automated record system. The process of conversion is based on a requirements analysis to assess program needs and a high level of user involvement during the development. The importance of indexing the hard copy records for easy retrieval is also discussed. The concept of linkage between related records and its importance relative to reporting, research, and litigation will be addressed. 2 figs

  15. Automated protein structure calculation from NMR data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, Mike P.; Craven, C. Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    Current software is almost at the stage to permit completely automatic structure determination of small proteins of <15 kDa, from NMR spectra to structure validation with minimal user interaction. This goal is welcome, as it makes structure calculation more objective and therefore more easily validated, without any loss in the quality of the structures generated. Moreover, it releases expert spectroscopists to carry out research that cannot be automated. It should not take much further effort to extend automation to ca 20 kDa. However, there are technological barriers to further automation, of which the biggest are identified as: routines for peak picking; adoption and sharing of a common framework for structure calculation, including the assembly of an automated and trusted package for structure validation; and sample preparation, particularly for larger proteins. These barriers should be the main target for development of methodology for protein structure determination, particularly by structural genomics consortia

  16. Automation 2017

    CERN Document Server

    Zieliński, Cezary; Kaliczyńska, Małgorzata

    2017-01-01

    This book consists of papers presented at Automation 2017, an international conference held in Warsaw from March 15 to 17, 2017. It discusses research findings associated with the concepts behind INDUSTRY 4.0, with a focus on offering a better understanding of and promoting participation in the Fourth Industrial Revolution. Each chapter presents a detailed analysis of a specific technical problem, in most cases followed by a numerical analysis, simulation and description of the results of implementing the solution in a real-world context. The theoretical results, practical solutions and guidelines presented are valuable for both researchers working in the area of engineering sciences and practitioners looking for solutions to industrial problems. .

  17. Marketing automation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TODOR Raluca Dania

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The automation of the marketing process seems to be nowadays, the only solution to face the major changes brought by the fast evolution of technology and the continuous increase in supply and demand. In order to achieve the desired marketing results, businessis have to employ digital marketing and communication services. These services are efficient and measurable thanks to the marketing technology used to track, score and implement each campaign. Due to the technical progress, the marketing fragmentation, demand for customized products and services on one side and the need to achieve constructive dialogue with the customers, immediate and flexible response and the necessity to measure the investments and the results on the other side, the classical marketing approached had changed continue to improve substantially.

  18. The Self- and Directed Assembly of Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Benjamin David

    This thesis explores the self- and directed assembly of nanowires. Specifically, we examine the driving forces behind nanowire self-assembly and the macro-structures that are formed. Particle-dense, oriented nanowire structures show promise in the fields of photonics, energy, sensing, catalysis, and electronics. Arrays of spherical particles have already found uses in electronic inks, sensing arrays, and many other commercial applications; but, it is a challenge to create specific arrays of morphologically and/or compositionally anisotropic particles. The following chapters illuminate the interactions that drive the assembly of anisotropic particles in high density solutions in the absence of applied fields or solution drying. Special emphasis is placed on the structures that are formed. The properties of micro- and nanoparticles and their assembly are introduced in Chapter 1. In particular, the properties of shape and material anisotropic particles are highlighted, while challenges in producing desired arrays are discussed. In this thesis, metallic nanowires of increasing complexity were used to examine the self-assembly behavior of both shape and material anisotropic particles. Nanowires were synthesized through templated electrodeposition. In this process, porous alumina membranes served as a template in which metal salts were reduced to form particles. Upon template dissolution, billions of nominally identical particles were released. We specifically focused on segmented, metallic nanowires 2-13 mum in length and 180 to 350 nm in diameter. Since these particles have strong van der Waals (VDWs) attractions, an electrostatically repulsive coating was necessary to prevent aggregation; we used small molecule, DNA, or amorphous silica coatings. Nanowires and their coatings were characterized by electron microscopy. In order to study self-assembly behavior, particle-dense aqueous suspensions were placed within an assembly chamber defined by a silicone spacer. The

  19. Flexible manufacturing for photonics device assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shin-Yee; Pocha, Michael D.; Strand, Oliver T.; Young, K. David

    1994-01-01

    The assembly of photonics devices such as laser diodes, optical modulators, and opto-electronics multi-chip modules (OEMCM), usually requires the placement of micron size devices such as laser diodes, and sub-micron precision attachment between optical fibers and diodes or waveguide modulators (usually referred to as pigtailing). This is a very labor intensive process. Studies done by the opto-electronics (OE) industry have shown that 95 percent of the cost of a pigtailed photonic device is due to the use of manual alignment and bonding techniques, which is the current practice in industry. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we are working to reduce the cost of packaging OE devices through the use of automation. Our efforts are concentrated on several areas that are directly related to an automated process. This paper will focus on our progress in two of those areas, in particular, an automated fiber pigtailing machine and silicon micro-technology compatible with an automated process.

  20. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujibayashi, Toru.

    1970-01-01

    Herein disclosed is a fuel assembly in which a fuel rod bundle is easily detachable by rotating a fuel rod fastener rotatably mounted to the upper surface of an upper tie-plate supporting a fuel bundle therebelow. A locking portion at the leading end of each fuel rod protrudes through the upper tie-plate and is engaged with or separated from the tie-plate by the rotation of the fastener. The removal of a desired fuel rod can therefore be remotely accomplished without the necessity of handling pawls, locking washers and nuts. (Owens, K.J.)

  1. Assembling consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assembling Consumption marks a definitive step in the institutionalisation of qualitative business research. By gathering leading scholars and educators who study markets, marketing and consumption through the lenses of philosophy, sociology and anthropology, this book clarifies and applies...... the investigative tools offered by assemblage theory, actor-network theory and non-representational theory. Clear theoretical explanation and methodological innovation, alongside empirical applications of these emerging frameworks will offer readers new and refreshing perspectives on consumer culture and market...... societies. This is an essential reading for both seasoned scholars and advanced students of markets, economies and social forms of consumption....

  2. DNA nanotechnology: a future perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    In addition to its genetic function, DNA is one of the most distinct and smart self-assembling nanomaterials. DNA nanotechnology exploits the predictable self-assembly of DNA oligonucleotides to design and assemble innovative and highly discrete nanostructures. Highly ordered DNA motifs are capable of providing an ultra-fine framework for the next generation of nanofabrications. The majority of these applications are based upon the complementarity of DNA base pairing: adenine with thymine, and guanine with cytosine. DNA provides an intelligent route for the creation of nanoarchitectures with programmable and predictable patterns. DNA strands twist along one helix for a number of bases before switching to the other helix by passing through a crossover junction. The association of two crossovers keeps the helices parallel and holds them tightly together, allowing the assembly of bigger structures. Because of the DNA molecule's unique and novel characteristics, it can easily be applied in a vast variety of multidisciplinary research areas like biomedicine, computer science, nano/optoelectronics, and bionanotechnology. PMID:23497147

  3. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurihara, Kunitoshi; Azekura, Kazuo.

    1992-01-01

    In a reactor core of a heavy water moderated light water cooled pressure tube type reactor, no sufficient effects have been obtained for the transfer width to a negative side of void reactivity change in a region of a great void coefficient. Then, a moderation region divided into upper and lower two regions is disposed at the central portion of a fuel assembly. Coolants flown into the lower region can be discharged to the cooling region from an opening disposed at the upper end portion of the lower region. Light water flows from the lower region of the moderator region to the cooling region of the reactor core upper portion, to lower the void coefficient. As a result, the reactivity performance at low void coefficient, i.e., a void reaction rate is transferred to the negative side. Thus, this flattens the power distribution in the fuel assembly, increases the thermal margin and enables rapid operaiton and control of the reactor core, as well as contributes to the increase of fuel burnup ratio and reduction of the fuel cycle cost. (N.H.)

  4. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaki, Masao; Nishida, Koji; Karasawa, Hidetoshi; Kanazawa, Toru; Orii, Akihito; Nagayoshi, Takuji; Kashiwai, Shin-ichi; Masuhara, Yasuhiro

    1998-01-01

    The present invention concerns a fuel assembly, for a BWR type nuclear reactor, comprising fuel rods in 9 x 9 matrix. The inner width of the channel box is about 132mm and the length of the fuel rods which are not short fuel rods is about 4m. Two water rods having a circular cross section are arranged on a diagonal line in a portion of 3 x 3 matrix at the center of the fuel assembly, and two fuel rods are disposed at vacant spaces, and the number of fuel rods is 74. Eight fuel rods are determined as short fuel rods among 74 fuel rods. Assuming the fuel inventory in the short fuel rod as X(kg), and the fuel inventory in the fuel rods other than the short fuel rods as Y(kg), X and Y satisfy the relation: X + Y ≥ 173m, Y ≤ - 9.7X + 292, Y ≤ - 0.3X + 203 and X > 0. Then, even when the short fuel rods are used, the fuel inventory is increased and fuel economy can be improved. (I.N.)

  5. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fushimi, Atsushi; Shimada, Hidemitsu; Aoyama, Motoo; Nakajima, Junjiro

    1998-01-01

    In a fuel assembly for an n x n lattice-like BWR type reactor, n is determined to 9 or greater, and the enrichment degree of plutonium is determined to 4.4% by weight or less. Alternatively, n is determined to 10 or greater, and the enrichment degree of plutonium is determined to 5.2% by weight or less. An average take-out burnup degree is determined to 39GWd/t or less, and the matrix is determined to 9 x 9 or more, or the average take-out burnup degree is determined to 51GWd/t, and the matrix is determined to 10 x 10 or more and the increase of the margin of the maximum power density obtained thereby is utilized for the compensation of the increase of distortion of power distribution due to decrease of the kinds of plutonium enrichment degree, thereby enabling to reduce the kind of the enrichment degree of MOX fuel rods to one. As a result, the manufacturing step for fuel pellets can be simplified to reduce the manufacturing cost for MOX fuel assemblies. (N.H.)

  6. General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    Mardi 5 mai à 11 h 00 Salle 13-2-005 Conformément aux statuts de l’Association du personnel, une Assemblée générale ordinaire est organisée une fois par année (article IV.2.1). Projet d’ordre du jour : 1- Adoption de l’ordre du jour. 2- Approbation du procès-verbal de l’Assemblée générale ordinaire du 22 mai 2014. 3- Présentation et approbation du rapport d’activités 2014. 4- Présentation et approbation du rapport financier 2014. 5- Présentation et approbation du rapport des vérificateurs aux comptes pour 2014. 6- Programme 2015. 7- Présentation et approbation du projet de budget 2015 et taux de cotisation pour 2015. 8- Pas de modifications aux Statuts de l'Association du personnel proposée. 9- Élections des membres de la Commission é...

  7. General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Conformément aux statuts de l’Association du personnel, une Assemblée générale ordinaire est organisée une fois par année (article IV.2.1). Projet d’ordre du jour : Adoption de l’ordre du jour. Approbation du procès-verbal de l’Assemblée générale ordinaire du 5 avril 2016. Présentation et approbation du rapport d’activités 2016. Présentation et approbation du rapport financier 2016. Présentation et approbation du rapport des vérificateurs aux comptes pour 2016. Programme de travail 2017. Présentation et approbation du projet de budget 2017 Approbation du taux de cotisation pour 2018. Modifications aux Statuts de l'Association du personnel proposées. Élections des membres de la Commission électorale. Élections des vérifica...

  8. General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    Mardi 5 avril à 11 h 00 BE Auditorium Meyrin (6-2-024) Conformément aux statuts de l’Association du personnel, une Assemblée générale ordinaire est organisée une fois par année (article IV.2.1). Projet d’ordre du jour : Adoption de l’ordre du jour. Approbation du procès-verbal de l’Assemblée générale ordinaire du 5 mai 2015. Présentation et approbation du rapport d’activités 2015. Présentation et approbation du rapport financier 2015. Présentation et approbation du rapport des vérificateurs aux comptes pour 2015. Programme de travail 2016. Présentation et approbation du projet de budget 2016 Approbation du taux de cotisation pour 2017. Modifications aux Statuts de l'Association du personnel proposée. Élections des membres de la Commissio...

  9. General assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    Mardi 5 mai à 11 h 00 Salle 13-2-005 Conformément aux statuts de l’Association du personnel, une Assemblée générale ordinaire est organisée une fois par année (article IV.2.1). Projet d’ordre du jour : Adoption de l’ordre du jour. Approbation du procès-verbal de l’Assemblée générale ordinaire du 22 mai 2014. Présentation et approbation du rapport d’activités 2014. Présentation et approbation du rapport financier 2014. Présentation et approbation du rapport des vérificateurs aux comptes pour 2014. Programme 2015. Présentation et approbation du projet de budget 2015 et taux de cotisation pour 2015. Pas de modifications aux Statuts de l'Association du personnel proposée. Élections des membres de la Commission électorale. &am...

  10. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomata, Terumitsu.

    1993-01-01

    Among fuel pellets to be loaded to fuel cans of a fuel assembly, fuel pellets having a small thermal power are charged in a region from the end of each of spacers up to about 50mm on the upstream of coolants that flow vertically at the periphery of fuel rods. Coolants at the periphery of fuel rods are heated by the heat generation, to result in voids. However, since cooling effect on the upstream of the spacers is low due to influences of the spacers. Further, since the fuel pellets disposed in the upstream region have small thermal power, a void coefficient is not increased. Even if a thermal power exceeding cooling performance should be generated, there is no worry of causing burnout in the upstream region. Even if burnout should be caused, safety margin and reliability relative to burnout are improved, to increase an allowable thermal power, thereby enabling to improve integrity and reliability of fuel rods and fuel assemblies. (N.H.)

  11. Both Automation and Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Royal

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the concept of a paperless society and the current situation in library automation. Various applications of automation and telecommunications are addressed, and future library automation is considered. Automation at the Monroe County Public Library in Bloomington, Indiana, is described as an example. (MES)

  12. A Framework for Geometric Reasoning About Human Figures and Factors in Assembly Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calton, Terri L.

    1999-07-20

    Automatic assembly sequencing and visualization tools are valuable in determining the best assembly sequences, but without Human Factors and Figure Models (HFFMs) it is difficult to evaluate or visualize human interaction. In industry, accelerating technological advances and shorter market windows have forced companies to turn to an agile manufacturing paradigm. This trend has promoted computerized automation of product design and manufacturing processes, such as automated assembly planning. However, all automated assembly planning software tools assume that the individual components fly into their assembled configuration and generate what appear to be perfectly valid operations, but in reality some operations cannot physically be carried out by a human. For example, the use of a ratchet may be reasoned feasible for an assembly operation; however, when a hand is placed on the tool the operation is no longer feasible, perhaps because of inaccessibility, insufficient strength or human interference with assembly components. Similarly, human figure modeling algorithms may indicate that assembly operations are not feasible and consequently force design modifications, however, if they had the capability to quickly generate alternative assembly sequences, they might have identified a feasible solution. To solve this problem, HFFMs must be integrated with automated assembly planning which allows engineers to quickly verify that assembly operations are possible and to see ways to make the designs even better. This paper presents a framework for integrating geometry-based assembly planning algorithms with commercially available human figure modeling software packages. Experimental results to selected applications along with lessons learned are presented.

  13. DNA nanotechnology and fluorescence applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlichthaerle, Thomas; Strauss, Maximilian T; Schueder, Florian; Woehrstein, Johannes B; Jungmann, Ralf

    2016-06-01

    Structural DNA nanotechnology allow researchers to use the unique molecular recognition properties of DNA strands to construct nanoscale objects with almost arbitrary complexity in two and three dimensions. Abstracted as molecular breadboards, DNA nanostructures enable nanometer-precise placement of guest molecules such as proteins, fluorophores, or nanoparticles. These assemblies can be used to study biological phenomena with unprecedented control over number, spacing, and molecular identity. Here, we give a general introduction to structural DNA nanotechnology and more specifically discuss applications of DNA nanostructures in the field of fluorescence and plasmonics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Spermine induced reversible collapse of deoxyribonucleic acid-bridged nanoparticle-based assemblies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Göeken, Kristian L.; Schasfoort, Richardus B.M.; Subramaniam, Vinod; Gill, Ron

    DNA-linked 2D and 3D nano-assemblies find use in a diverse set of applications, ranging from DNA-origami in drug delivery and medical imaging, to DNA-linked nanoparticle structures for use in plasmonics and (bio)sensing. However, once these structures have been fully assembled, few options are

  15. Single Day Construction of Multigene Circuits with 3G Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halleran, Andrew D; Swaminathan, Anandh; Murray, Richard M

    2018-05-18

    The ability to rapidly design, build, and test prototypes is of key importance to every engineering discipline. DNA assembly often serves as a rate limiting step of the prototyping cycle for synthetic biology. Recently developed DNA assembly methods such as isothermal assembly and type IIS restriction enzyme systems take different approaches to accelerate DNA construction. We introduce a hybrid method, Golden Gate-Gibson (3G), that takes advantage of modular part libraries introduced by type IIS restriction enzyme systems and isothermal assembly's ability to build large DNA constructs in single pot reactions. Our method is highly efficient and rapid, facilitating construction of entire multigene circuits in a single day. Additionally, 3G allows generation of variant libraries enabling efficient screening of different possible circuit constructions. We characterize the efficiency and accuracy of 3G assembly for various construct sizes, and demonstrate 3G by characterizing variants of an inducible cell-lysis circuit.

  16. Patterning nanocrystals using DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Shara Carol [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2003-01-01

    One of the goals of nanotechnology is to enable programmed self-assembly of patterns made of various materials with nanometer-sized control. This dissertation describes the results of experiments templating arrangements of gold and semiconductor nanocrystals using 2'-deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). Previously, simple DNA-templated linear arrangements of two and three nanocrystals structures have been made.[1] Here, we have sought to assemble larger and more complex nanostructures. Gold-DNA conjugates with 50 to 100 bases self-assembled into planned arrangements using strands of DNA containing complementary base sequences. We used two methods to increase the complexity of the arrangements: using branched synthetic doublers within the DNA covalent backbone to create discrete nanocrystal groupings, and incorporating the nanocrystals into a previously developed DNA lattice structure [2][3] that self-assembles from tiles made of DNA double-crossover molecules to create ordered nanoparticle arrays. In the first project, the introduction of a covalently-branched synthetic doubler reagent into the backbone of DNA strands created a branched DNA ''trimer.'' This DNA trimer templated various structures that contained groupings of three and four gold nanoparticles, giving promising, but inconclusive transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results. Due to the presence of a variety of possible structures in the reaction mixtures, and due to the difficulty of isolating the desired structures, the TEM and gel electrophoresis results for larger structures having four particles, and for structures containing both 5 and 10 nm gold nanoparticles were inconclusive. Better results may come from using optical detection methods, or from improved sample preparation. In the second project, we worked toward making two-dimensional ordered arrays of nanocrystals. We replicated and improved upon previous results for making DNA lattices, increasing the size of the lattices

  17. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Makoto; Ogiya, Shunsuke.

    1989-01-01

    For improving the economy of a BWR type reactor by making the operation cycle longer, the fuel enrichment degree has to be increased further. However, this makes the subcriticality shallower in the upper portion of the reactor core, to bring about a possibility that the reactor shutdown becomes impossible. In the present invention, a portion of fuel rod is constituted as partial length fuel rods (P-fuel rods) in which the entire stack length in the effective portion is made shorter by reducing the concentration of fissionable materials in the axial portion. A plurality of moderator rods are disposed at least on one diagonal line of a fuel assembly and P-fuel rods are arranged at a position put between the moderator rods. This makes it possible to reactor shutdown and makes the axial power distribution satisfactory even if the fuel enrichment degree is increased. (T.M.)

  18. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bando, Masaru.

    1993-01-01

    As neutron irradiation progresses on a fuel assembly of an FBR type reactor, a strong force is exerted to cause ruptures if the arrangement of fuel elements is not displaced, whereas the fuel elements may be brought into direct contact with each other not by way of spacers to cause burning damages if the arrangement is displaced. In the present invention, the circumference of fuel elements arranged in a normal triangle lattice is surrounded by a wrapper tube having a hexagonal cross section, wire spacers are wound therearound, and deformable spacers are distributed to optional positions for fuel elements in the wrapper tube. Interaction between the fuel elements caused by irradiation is effectively absorbed, thereby enabling to delay the occurrence of the rupture and burning damages of the elements. (N.H.)

  19. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Makoto.

    1991-01-01

    In a fuel assembly in which spectral shift type moderator guide members are arranged, the moderator guide member has a flow channel resistance member, that provides flow resistance against the moderators, in the upstream of a moderator flowing channel, by which the ratio of removing coolants is set greater at the upstream than downstream. With such a constitution, the void distribution increasing upward in the channel box except for the portion of the moderator guide member is moderated by the increase of the area of the void region that expands downward in the guide member. Accordingly, the axial power distribution is flattened throughout the operation cycle and excess distortion is eliminated to improve the fuel integrity. (T.M.)

  20. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wataumi, Kazutoshi; Tajiri, Hiroshi.

    1992-01-01

    In a fuel assembly of a BWR type reactor, a pellet to be loaded comprises an external layer of fissile materials containing burnable poisons and an internal layer of fissile materials not containing burnable poison. For example, there is provided a dual type pellet comprising an external layer made of UO 2 incorporated with Gd 2 O 3 at a predetermined concentration as the burnable poisons and an internal layer made of UO 2 not containing Gd 2 O 3 . The amount of the burnable poisons required for predetermined places is controlled by the thickness of the ring of the external layer. This can dissipate an unnecessary poisoning effect at the final stage of the combustion cycle. Further, since only one or a few kinds of powder mixture of the burnable poisons and the fissile materials is necessary, production and product control can be facilitated. (I.N.)