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Sample records for autologous human tyrosine

  1. Tyrosine phosphorylation in human lymphomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haralambieva, E; Jones, M.; Roncador, GM; Cerroni, L; Lamant, L; Ott, G; Rosenwald, A; Sherman, C; Thorner, P; Kusec, R; Wood, KM; Campo, E; Falini, B; Ramsay, A; Marafioti, T; Stein, H; Kluin, PM; Pulford, K; Mason, DY

    2002-01-01

    In a previous study, we showed that the high level of protein tyrosine phosphorylation present in lymphomas containing an anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) can be demonstrated in routinely processed paraffin tissue sections using immunolabelling techniques. In the present study we investigated

  2. Protein tyrosine adduct in humans self-poisoned by chlorpyrifos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Eyer, Peter; Eddleston, Michael; Jiang, Wei; Schopfer, Lawrence M.; Lockridge, Oksana

    2013-01-01

    Studies of human cases of self-inflicted poisoning suggest that chlorpyrifos oxon reacts not only with acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase but also with other blood proteins. A favored candidate is albumin because in vitro and animal studies have identified tyrosine 411 of albumin as a site covalently modified by organophosphorus poisons. Our goal was to test this proposal in humans by determining whether plasma from humans poisoned by chlorpyrifos has adducts on tyrosine. Plasma samples from 5 self-poisoned humans were drawn at various time intervals after ingestion of chlorpyrifos for a total of 34 samples. All 34 samples were analyzed for plasma levels of chlorpyrifos and chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO) as a function of time post-ingestion. Eleven samples were analyzed for the presence of diethoxyphosphorylated tyrosine by mass spectrometry. Six samples yielded diethoxyphosphorylated tyrosine in pronase digests. Blood collected as late as 5 days after chlorpyrifos ingestion was positive for CPO-tyrosine, consistent with the 20-day half-life of albumin. High plasma CPO levels did not predict detectable levels of CPO-tyrosine. CPO-tyrosine was identified in pralidoxime treated patients as well as in patients not treated with pralidoxime, indicating that pralidoxime does not reverse CPO binding to tyrosine in humans. Plasma butyrylcholinesterase was a more sensitive biomarker of exposure than adducts on tyrosine. In conclusion, chlorpyrifos oxon makes a stable covalent adduct on the tyrosine residue of blood proteins in humans who ingested chlorpyrifos. PMID:23566956

  3. Protein tyrosine adduct in humans self-poisoned by chlorpyrifos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Bin; Eyer, Peter; Eddleston, Michael; Jiang, Wei; Schopfer, Lawrence M.; Lockridge, Oksana

    2013-01-01

    Studies of human cases of self-inflicted poisoning suggest that chlorpyrifos oxon reacts not only with acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase but also with other blood proteins. A favored candidate is albumin because in vitro and animal studies have identified tyrosine 411 of albumin as a site covalently modified by organophosphorus poisons. Our goal was to test this proposal in humans by determining whether plasma from humans poisoned by chlorpyrifos has adducts on tyrosine. Plasma samples from 5 self-poisoned humans were drawn at various time intervals after ingestion of chlorpyrifos for a total of 34 samples. All 34 samples were analyzed for plasma levels of chlorpyrifos and chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO) as a function of time post-ingestion. Eleven samples were analyzed for the presence of diethoxyphosphorylated tyrosine by mass spectrometry. Six samples yielded diethoxyphosphorylated tyrosine in pronase digests. Blood collected as late as 5 days after chlorpyrifos ingestion was positive for CPO-tyrosine, consistent with the 20-day half-life of albumin. High plasma CPO levels did not predict detectable levels of CPO-tyrosine. CPO-tyrosine was identified in pralidoxime treated patients as well as in patients not treated with pralidoxime, indicating that pralidoxime does not reverse CPO binding to tyrosine in humans. Plasma butyrylcholinesterase was a more sensitive biomarker of exposure than adducts on tyrosine. In conclusion, chlorpyrifos oxon makes a stable covalent adduct on the tyrosine residue of blood proteins in humans who ingested chlorpyrifos. - Highlights: • Chlorpyrifos-poisoned patients have adducts on protein tyrosine. • Diethoxyphosphate-tyrosine does not lose an alkyl group. • Proteins in addition to AChE and BChE are modified by organophosphates

  4. Protein tyrosine adduct in humans self-poisoned by chlorpyrifos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Bin, E-mail: binli@unmc.edu [Eppley Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-5950 (United States); Eyer, Peter, E-mail: peter.eyer@lrz.uni-muenchen.de [Walther-Straub-Institut Für Pharmakologie und Toxikologie, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, 80336 München (Germany); Eddleston, Michael, E-mail: M.Eddleston@ed.ac.uk [Clinical Pharmacology Unit, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Jiang, Wei, E-mail: wjiang@unmc.edu [Eppley Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-5950 (United States); Schopfer, Lawrence M., E-mail: lmschopf@unmc.edu [Eppley Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-5950 (United States); Lockridge, Oksana, E-mail: olockrid@unmc.edu [Eppley Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-5950 (United States)

    2013-06-15

    Studies of human cases of self-inflicted poisoning suggest that chlorpyrifos oxon reacts not only with acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase but also with other blood proteins. A favored candidate is albumin because in vitro and animal studies have identified tyrosine 411 of albumin as a site covalently modified by organophosphorus poisons. Our goal was to test this proposal in humans by determining whether plasma from humans poisoned by chlorpyrifos has adducts on tyrosine. Plasma samples from 5 self-poisoned humans were drawn at various time intervals after ingestion of chlorpyrifos for a total of 34 samples. All 34 samples were analyzed for plasma levels of chlorpyrifos and chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO) as a function of time post-ingestion. Eleven samples were analyzed for the presence of diethoxyphosphorylated tyrosine by mass spectrometry. Six samples yielded diethoxyphosphorylated tyrosine in pronase digests. Blood collected as late as 5 days after chlorpyrifos ingestion was positive for CPO-tyrosine, consistent with the 20-day half-life of albumin. High plasma CPO levels did not predict detectable levels of CPO-tyrosine. CPO-tyrosine was identified in pralidoxime treated patients as well as in patients not treated with pralidoxime, indicating that pralidoxime does not reverse CPO binding to tyrosine in humans. Plasma butyrylcholinesterase was a more sensitive biomarker of exposure than adducts on tyrosine. In conclusion, chlorpyrifos oxon makes a stable covalent adduct on the tyrosine residue of blood proteins in humans who ingested chlorpyrifos. - Highlights: • Chlorpyrifos-poisoned patients have adducts on protein tyrosine. • Diethoxyphosphate-tyrosine does not lose an alkyl group. • Proteins in addition to AChE and BChE are modified by organophosphates.

  5. Putative tyrosine kinases expressed in K-562 human leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partanen, J.; Maekelae, T.P.; Lehvaeslaiho, H.; Alitalo, K.; Alitalo, R.

    1990-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation is important in the transmission of growth and differentiation signals; known tyrosine kinases include several oncoproteins and growth factor receptors. Interestingly, some differentiated cell types, such as erythrocytes and platelets contain high amounts of phosphotyrosine. The authors analyzed tyrosine kinases expressed in the K-562 chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line, which has a bipotential erythroid and megakaryoblastoid differentiation capacity. Analysis of 359 polymerase chain reaction-amplified cDNA clones led to the identification of 14 different tyrosine kinase-related sequences (JTK1-14). Two of the clones (JTK2 and JTK4) represent unusual members of the fibroblast growth factor receptor gene family, and the clones JTK5, JTK11, and JTK14 may also belong to the family of receptor tyrosine kinases but lack a close relationship to any known tyrosine kinase. Each of these different genes has its own characteristic expression pattern in K-562 cells and several other human tumor cell lines. In addition, the JTK11 and JTK14 mRNAs are induced during the megakaryoblastoid differentiation of K-562 cells. These tyrosine kinases may have a role in the differentiation of megakaryoblasts or in the physiology of platelets

  6. Human induced pluripotent stem cells on autologous feeders.

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    Kazutoshi Takahashi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: For therapeutic usage of induced Pluripotent Stem (iPS cells, to accomplish xeno-free culture is critical. Previous reports have shown that human embryonic stem (ES cells can be maintained in feeder-free condition. However, absence of feeder cells can be a hostile environment for pluripotent cells and often results in karyotype abnormalities. Instead of animal feeders, human fibroblasts can be used as feeder cells of human ES cells. However, one still has to be concerned about the existence of unidentified pathogens, such as viruses and prions in these non-autologous feeders. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This report demonstrates that human induced Pluripotent Stem (iPS cells can be established and maintained on isogenic parental feeder cells. We tested four independent human skin fibroblasts for the potential to maintain self-renewal of iPS cells. All the fibroblasts tested, as well as their conditioned medium, were capable of maintaining the undifferentiated state and normal karyotypes of iPS cells. Furthermore, human iPS cells can be generated on isogenic parental fibroblasts as feeders. These iPS cells carried on proliferation over 19 passages with undifferentiated morphologies. They expressed undifferentiated pluripotent cell markers, and could differentiate into all three germ layers via embryoid body and teratoma formation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that autologous fibroblasts can be not only a source for iPS cells but also be feeder layers. Our results provide a possibility to solve the dilemma by using isogenic fibroblasts as feeder layers of iPS cells. This is an important step toward the establishment of clinical grade iPS cells.

  7. Regeneration of Cartilage in Human Knee Osteoarthritis with Autologous Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells and Autologous Extracellular Matrix

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    Jaewoo Pak

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This clinical case series demonstrates that percutaneous injections of autologous adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs and homogenized extracellular matrix (ECM in the form of adipose stromal vascular fraction (SVF, along with hyaluronic acid (HA and platelet-rich plasma (PRP activated by calcium chloride, could regenerate cartilage-like tissue in human knee osteoarthritis (OA patients. Autologous lipoaspirates were obtained from adipose tissue of the abdominal origin. Afterward, the lipoaspirates were minced to homogenize the ECM. These homogenized lipoaspirates were then mixed with collagenase and incubated. The resulting mixture of ADSCs and ECM in the form of SVF was injected, along with HA and PRP activated by calcium chloride, into knees of three Korean patients with OA. The same affected knees were reinjected weekly with additional PRP activated by calcium chloride for 3 weeks. Pretreatment and post-treatment magnetic resonance imaging (MRI data, functional rating index, range of motion (ROM, and pain score data were then analyzed. All patients' MRI data showed cartilage-like tissue regeneration. Along with MRI evidence, the measured physical therapy outcomes in terms of ROM, subjective pain, and functional status were all improved. This study demonstrates that percutaneous injection of ADSCs with ECM contained in autologous adipose SVF, in conjunction with HA and PRP activated by calcium chloride, is a safe and potentially effective minimally invasive therapy for OA of human knees.

  8. Autologous Pancreatic Islet Transplantation in Human Bone Marrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffi, Paola; Balzano, Gianpaolo; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Nano, Rita; Sordi, Valeria; Melzi, Raffaella; Mercalli, Alessia; Scavini, Marina; Esposito, Antonio; Peccatori, Jacopo; Cantarelli, Elisa; Messina, Carlo; Bernardi, Massimo; Del Maschio, Alessandro; Staudacher, Carlo; Doglioni, Claudio; Ciceri, Fabio; Secchi, Antonio; Piemonti, Lorenzo

    2013-01-01

    The liver is the current site of choice for pancreatic islet transplantation, even though it is far from being ideal. We recently have shown in mice that the bone marrow (BM) may be a valid alternative to the liver, and here we report a pilot study to test feasibility and safety of BM as a site for islet transplantation in humans. Four patients who developed diabetes after total pancreatectomy were candidates for the autologous transplantation of pancreatic islet. Because the patients had contraindications for intraportal infusion, islets were infused in the BM. In all recipients, islets engrafted successfully as shown by measurable posttransplantation C-peptide levels and histopathological evidence of insulin-producing cells or molecular markers of endocrine tissue in BM biopsy samples analyzed during follow-up. Thus far, we have recorded no adverse events related to the infusion procedure or the presence of islets in the BM. Islet function was sustained for the maximum follow-up of 944 days. The encouraging results of this pilot study provide new perspectives in identifying alternative sites for islet infusion in patients with type 1 diabetes. Moreover, this is the first unequivocal example of successful engraftment of endocrine tissue in the BM in humans. PMID:23733196

  9. Chimeric Human Skin Substitute Tissue: A Novel Treatment Option for the Delivery of Autologous Keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Cathy A; Allen-Hoffmann, B Lynn

    2012-04-01

    For patients suffering from catastrophic burns, few treatment options are available. Chimeric coculture of patient-derived autologous cells with a "carrier" cell source of allogeneic keratinocytes has been proposed as a means to address the complex clinical problem of severe skin loss. Currently, autologous keratinocytes are harvested, cultured, and expanded to form graftable epidermal sheets. However, epidermal sheets are thin, are extremely fragile, and do not possess barrier function, which only develops as skin stratifies and matures. Grafting is typically delayed for up to 4 weeks to propagate a sufficient quantity of the patient's cells for application to wound sites. Fully stratified chimeric bioengineered skin substitutes could not only provide immediate wound coverage and restore barrier function, but would simultaneously deliver autologous keratinocytes to wounds. The ideal allogeneic cell source for this application would be an abundant supply of clinically evaluated, nontumorigenic, pathogen-free, human keratinocytes. To evaluate this potential cell-based therapy, mixed populations of a green fluorescent protein-labeled neonatal human keratinocyte cell line (NIKS) and unlabeled primary keratinocytes were used to model the allogeneic and autologous components of chimeric monolayer and organotypic cultures. Relatively few autologous keratinocytes may be required to produce fully stratified chimeric skin substitute tissue substantially composed of autologous keratinocyte-derived regions. The need for few autologous cells interspersed within an allogeneic "carrier" cell population may decrease cell expansion time, reducing the time to patient application. This study provides proof of concept for utilizing NIKS keratinocytes as the allogeneic carrier for the generation of bioengineered chimeric skin substitute tissues capable of providing immediate wound coverage while simultaneously supplying autologous human cells for tissue regeneration.

  10. Further RFLPs at the human tyrosine hydroxylase locus

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    Koerner, J; Uhlhaas, S; Propping, P; Gal, A [Institut fuer Humangenetik der Universitaet, Bonn (West Germany); Mallet, J [CNRS, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1988-09-26

    The human cDNA clone (Ty7) of tyrosine hydroxylase was used. A two-allele (C1 and C2) Bg1II RFLP has been described recently with bands either at 6.9 or 8.4 kb (2). In addition, a faint invariant band appears at 9.0 kb. A third Bg1II allele (C3) with a band at 8.0 kb was detected. The allele frequency was studied in 35 and 39 unrelated Caucasians. Co-dominant inheritance for both RFLPs described here was demonstrated in 6 nuclear kindreds. RFLPs were observed under normal hybridization and wash stringencies.

  11. Impaired absorption of marked oligopeptide Glycine-I Tyrosine-Glycine after successful autologous-allotopic ileal mucosa transplantation in beagles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiler, H A; Steinorth, J; Witt, A; Mier, W; Mohammed, A; Waag, K L; Zachariou, Z

    2004-10-01

    After establishing a method for ileal mucosa transplantation in an animal model, the authors investigated the absorptive capacity for oligopeptides of the transplanted mucosa. In 14 beagle dogs the authors transplanted ileal mucosa in a vascularized demucosed segment of the transverse colon. The colonic wall-ileal mucosa complex then was integrated in the ileal continuity. Six animals were lost owing to operative complications. Absorptive capacity for oligopeptides was measured in the remaining 8 animals with the iodine 131 (131I)-marked tripeptide glycine-tyrosine-glycine before and 4 weeks after transplantation. The results were compared and analyzed with the Student's t test for matched pairs. Blood concentrations of the marked tripeptide with P value less than .05 were considered as a significant reduction in the absorptive capacity of the transplanted ileal mucosa. After fixation with glutaraldehyd graft, uptake of the colonic wall-ileal mucosa complex was evaluated histologically in 8 animals. In all 8 animals, a 100% graft uptake was verified in all sections. Fifteen minutes after application of 15 MBc Glycine-131I-Tyrosine-Glycine there was no significant difference in the absorption between normal and transplanted ileal mucosa. After 30 minutes, the absorption of the transplanted ileal mucosa showed a tendency (P < .1) for an impaired uptake of the marked tripeptide. However, 60 minutes after application the difference in the absorptive capacity of the transplanted ileal mucosa was significant (P < .05). Autologous allotopic ileal mucosa transplantation is feasible; however, an impaired absorption of oligopeptides of the transplanted mucosa 4 weeks after transplantation could be observed.

  12. Autologous Dendritic Cells Pulsed with Allogeneic Tumor Cell Lysate in Mesothelioma: From Mouse to Human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aerts, Joachim G J V; de Goeje, Pauline L; Cornelissen, Robin; Kaijen-Lambers, Margaretha E H; Bezemer, Koen; van der Leest, Cor H; Mahaweni, Niken M; Kunert, André; Eskens, Ferry A L M; Waasdorp, Cynthia; Braakman, Eric; van der Holt, Bronno; Vulto, Arnold G; Hendriks, Rudi W; Hegmans, Joost P J J; Hoogsteden, Henk C

    2018-02-15

    Purpose: Mesothelioma has been regarded as a nonimmunogenic tumor, which is also shown by the low response rates to treatments targeting the PD-1/PD-L1 axis. Previously, we demonstrated that autologous tumor lysate-pulsed dendritic cell (DC) immunotherapy increased T-cell response toward malignant mesothelioma. However, the use of autologous tumor material hampers implementation in large clinical trials, which might be overcome by using allogeneic tumor cell lines as tumor antigen source. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether allogeneic lysate-pulsed DC immunotherapy is effective in mice and safe in humans. Experimental Design: First, in two murine mesothelioma models, mice were treated with autologous DCs pulsed with either autologous or allogeneic tumor lysate or injected with PBS (negative control). Survival and tumor-directed T-cell responses of these mice were monitored. Results were taken forward in a first-in-human clinical trial, in which 9 patients were treated with 10, 25, or 50 million DCs per vaccination. DC vaccination consisted of autologous monocyte-derived DCs pulsed with tumor lysate from five mesothelioma cell lines. Results: In mice, allogeneic lysate-pulsed DC immunotherapy induced tumor-specific T cells and led to an increased survival, to a similar extent as DC immunotherapy with autologous tumor lysate. In the first-in-human clinical trial, no dose-limiting toxicities were established and radiographic responses were observed. Median PFS was 8.8 months [95% confidence interval (CI), 4.1-20.3] and median OS not reached (median follow-up = 22.8 months). Conclusions: DC immunotherapy with allogeneic tumor lysate is effective in mice and safe and feasible in humans. Clin Cancer Res; 24(4); 766-76. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. Human autologous serum as a substitute for fetal bovine serum in human Schwann cell culture.

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    Parisa Goodarzi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, cell -based and tissue engineered products have opened new horizons in treatment of incurable nervous system disorders. The number of studies on the role of Schwann cells (SC in treating nervous disorders is higher than other cell types. Different protocols have been suggested for isolation and expansion of SC which most of them have used multiple growth factors, mitogens and fetal bovine sera (FBS in culture medium. Because of potential hazards of animal-derived reagents, this study was designed to evaluate the effect of replacing FBS with human autologous serum (HAS on SC's yield and culture parameters. Samples from 10 peripheral nerve biopsies were retrieved and processed under aseptic condition. The isolated cells cultured in FBS (1st group or autologous serum (2nd group. After primary culture the cells were seeded at 10000 cell/cm2 in a 12 wells cell culture plate for each group. At 100% confluency, the cell culture parameters (count, viability, purity and culture duration of 2 groups were compared using paired t-test. The average donors' age was 35.80 (SD=13.35 and except for 1 sample the others cultured successfully. In first group, the averages of cell purity, viability and culture duration were 97% (SD=1.32, 97/33% (SD=1.22 and 11.77 (SD=2.58 days respectively. This parameters were 97.33% (SD=1.00, 97.55% (SD=1.33 and 10.33 days (SD=1.65 in second group. The difference of cell count, purity and viability were not significant between 2 groups (P>0.05. The cells of second group reached to 100% confluency in shorter period of time (P=0.03. The results of this study showed that autologous serum can be a good substitute for FBS in human SC culture. This can reduce the costs and improve the safety of cell product for clinical application.

  14. IgM-specific serodiagnosis of acute human cytomegalovirus infection using recombinant autologous fusion proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vornhagen, R; Hinderer, W; Sonneborn, HH; Bein, G; Matter, L; The, T. Hauw; Enders, G; Jahn, G; Plachter, B

    Portions of three human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) polypeptides, which were shown previously to be highly reactive with patient sera, were expressed in Escherichia coli as autologous fusion proteins. Purified recombinant polypeptides were used as antigens in enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and

  15. Lysis of fresh human solid tumors by autologous lymphocytes activated in vitro with lectins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazumder, A.; Grimm, E.A.; Zhang, H.Z.; Rosenberg, S.A.

    1982-01-01

    Human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL), obtained from patients with a variety of cancers, were incubated in vitro with phytohemagglutinin, concanavalin A, and crude or lectin-free T-cell growth factors. The lectin-activated PBL of nine patients were capable of lysing fresh autologous tumor during a 4-hr 51Cr release assay. Multiple metastases from the same patient were equivalently lysed by these activated autologous PBL. No lysis of fresh PBL or lectin-induced lymphoblast cell targets was seen, although tumor, PBL, and lymphoblast cells were shown to be equally lysable using allosensitized cells. The activated cells could be expanded without loss of cytotoxicity in crude or lectin-free T-cell growth factors. The generation of cells lytic to fresh autologous tumor was dependent on the presence of adherent cells, although the lytic cell itself was not adherent. Proliferation was not involved in the induction of lytic cells since equal lysis was induced in irradiated and nonirradiated lymphocytes. Lectin was not required in the lytic assay, and the addition of alpha-methyl-D-mannoside to concanavalin A-activated lymphoid cells did not increase the lysis of fresh tumor cells. Activation by lectin for 3 days appears to be an efficient and convenient method for generating human cells lytic to fresh autologous tumor. These lytic cells may be of value for studies of the cell-mediated lysis of human tumor and possibly for tumor immunotherapy as well

  16. Ionization of tyrosine residues in human serum albumin and in its complexes with bilirubin and laurate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, B; Brodersen, R

    1992-01-01

    Spectrophotometric titration of human serum albumin indicates that ionization of the 18 tyrosine residues takes place between pH 9 and 12.7. A Hill plot indicates that protons dissociate co-operatively from tyrosine residues, in pure albumin between pH 11.0 and 11.4 with a Hill coefficient 1.7, a...

  17. [Human herpesvirus-6 pneumonitis following autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitoh, Yuu; Gotoh, Moritaka; Yoshizawa, Seiichiro; Akahane, Daigo; Fujimoto, Hiroaki; Ito, Yoshikazu; Ohyashiki, Kazuma

    2018-01-01

    A-46-year-old man was diagnosed with peripheral T cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified. He achieved a complete remission after pirarubicin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, and prednisolone (THP-COP) therapy and successful autologous peripheral blood stem-cell transplantation (AutoSCT). However, 6 months post AutoSCT, he complained of fever. Chest computed tomography of the patient displayed bilateral interstitial pneumonitis. Human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) DNA was detected in his bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Therefore, the patient was confirmed for HHV-6 pneumonitis. The treatment with foscarnet was effective, and no relapse was noticed in the patient. Besides, we have experienced pneumonitis of unknown origin in some patients after autologous or allogeneic stem-cell transplantations. Moreover, most of the above patients were clinically diagnosed using serum or plasma markers. Therefore, examining respiratory symptoms after AutoSCT would enable a more accurate diagnosis as well as treatment of patients with HHV-6 pneumonitis.

  18. Human T-Cell Clones from Autoimmune Thyroid Glands: Specific Recognition of Autologous Thyroid Cells

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    Londei, Marco; Bottazzo, G. Franco; Feldmann, Marc

    1985-04-01

    The thyroid glands of patients with autoimmune diseases such as Graves' disease and certain forms of goiter contain infiltrating activated T lymphocytes and, unlike cells of normal glands, the epithelial follicular cells strongly express histocompatability antigens of the HLA-DR type. In a study of such autoimmune disorders, the infiltrating T cells from the thyroid glands of two patients with Graves' disease were cloned in mitogen-free interleukin-2 (T-cell growth factor). The clones were expanded and their specificity was tested. Three types of clones were found. One group, of T4 phenotype, specifically recognized autologous thyroid cells. Another, also of T4 phenotype, recognized autologous thyroid or blood cells and thus responded positively in the autologous mixed lymphocyte reaction. Other clones derived from cells that were activated in vivo were of no known specificity. These clones provide a model of a human autoimmune disease and their analysis should clarify mechanisms of pathogenesis and provide clues to abrogating these undesirable immune responses.

  19. Proteomic analysis of tyrosine phosphorylation during human liver transplantation

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    Boutros Tarek

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ischemia-reperfusion (I/R causes a dramatic reprogramming of cell metabolism during liver transplantation and can be linked to an alteration of the phosphorylation level of several cellular proteins. Over the past two decades, it became clear that tyrosine phosphorylation plays a pivotal role in a variety of important signalling pathways and was linked to a wide spectrum of diseases. Functional profiling of the tyrosine phosphoproteome during liver transplantation is therefore of great biological significance and is likely to lead to the identification of novel targets for drug discovery and provide a basis for novel therapeutic strategies. Results Using liver biopsies collected during the early phases of organ procurement and transplantation, we aimed at characterizing the global patterns of tyrosine phosphorylation during hepatic I/R. A proteomic approach, based on the purification of tyrosine phosphorylated proteins followed by their identification using mass spectrometry, allowed us to identify Nck-1, a SH2/SH3 adaptor, as a potential regulator of I/R injury. Using immunoblot, cell fractionation and immunohistochemistry, we demonstrate that Nck-1 phosphorylation, expression and localization were affected in liver tissue upon I/R. In addition, mass spectrometry identification of Nck-1 binding partners during the course of the transplantation also suggested a dynamic interaction between Nck-1 and actin during I/R. Conclusion Taken together, our data suggest that Nck-1 may play a role in I/R-induced actin reorganization, which was previously reported to be detrimental for the hepatocytes of the transplanted graft. Nck-1 could therefore represent a target of choice for the design of new organ preservation strategies, which could consequently help to reduce post-reperfusion liver damages and improve transplantation outcomes.

  20. Enzymatic-induced upconversion photoinduced electron transfer for sensing tyrosine in human serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qiongqiong; Fang, Aijin; Li, Haitao; Zhang, Youyu; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2016-03-15

    This paper reports a novel nanosensor for tyrosine based on photoinduced electron-transfer (PET) between NaYF4:Yb, Tm upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) and melanin-like polymers. Melanin-like films were obtained from catalytic oxidation of tyrosine by tyrosinase, and deposited on the surface of UCNPs, and then quenched the fluorescence of UCNPs. Under the optimized conditions, the fluorescence quenching of UCNPs showed a good linear response to tyrosine concentration in the range of 0.8-100 μΜ with a detection limit of 1.1 μΜ. Meanwhile, it showed good sensitivity, stability and has been successfully applied to the detection of tyrosine in human serum. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparison of radiosensitivities of human autologous normal and neoplastic thyroid epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.C.; Kopecky, K.J.; Hiraoka, T.; Ezaki, H.; Clifton, K.H.

    1986-01-01

    Studies were conducted to examine differences between the radiosensitivities of normal and neoplastic epithelial cells of the human thyroid. Freshly excised thyroid tissues from the tumours of eight patients with papillary carcinoma (PC) and five with follicular adenoma (FA) were cultured in vitro separately from normal thyroid tissue obtained from the surgical margins of the same patients. Plating efficiency of unirradiated control tissue was lower, on average for tumour tissue compared with normal tissue. Radiosensitivity, measured by the 37% inactivation dose D 0 , was greater for carcinoma tissue than for normal tissue in seven out of eight PC cases. Adenomatous tissue was less radiosensitive than normal tissue in four out of five FA cases. This is the first report comparing the radiosensitivity of autologous normal and abnormal epithelial tissue from the human thyroid. (author)

  2. Tyrosine Phosphorylation of the Human Serotonin Transporter: A Role in the Transporter Stability and Function

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    Annamalai, Balasubramaniam; Mannangatti, Padmanabhan; Arapulisamy, Obulakshmi; Shippenberg, Toni S.; Jayanthi, Lankupalle D.

    2012-01-01

    The serotonin (5-HT) transporter (SERT) regulates serotoninergic neurotransmission by clearing 5-HT released into the synaptic space. Phosphorylation of SERT on serine and threonine mediates SERT regulation. Whether tyrosine phosphorylation regulates SERT is unknown. Here, we tested the hypothesis that tyrosine-phosphorylation of SERT regulates 5-HT transport. In support of this, alkali-resistant 32P-labeled SERT was found in rat platelets, and Src-tyrosine kinase inhibitor 4-amino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo [3,4,d]pyrimidine (PP2) decreased platelet SERT function and expression. In human placental trophoblast cells expressing SERT, PP2 reduced transporter function, expression, and stability. Although siRNA silencing of Src expression decreased SERT function and expression, coexpression of Src resulted in PP2-sensitive increases in SERT function and expression. PP2 treatment markedly decreased SERT protein stability. Compared with WT-SERT, SERT tyrosine mutants Y47F and Y142F exhibited reduced 5-HT transport despite their higher total and cell surface expression levels. Moreover, Src-coexpression increased total and cell surface expression of Y47F and Y142F SERT mutants without affecting their 5-HT transport capacity. It is noteworthy that Y47F and Y142F mutants exhibited higher protein stability compared with WT-SERT. However, similar to WT-SERT, PP2 treatment decreased the stability of Y47F and Y142F mutants. Furthermore, compared with WT-SERT, Y47F and Y142F mutants exhibited lower basal tyrosine phosphorylation and no further enhancement of tyrosine phosphorylation in response to Src coexpression. These results provide the first evidence that SERT tyrosine phosphorylation supports transporter protein stability and 5HT transport. PMID:21992875

  3. FAK tyrosine phosphorylation is regulated by AMPK and controls metabolism in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassiter, David G; Nylén, Carolina; Sjögren, Rasmus J O

    2018-01-01

    the FAK gene, PTK2. RESULTS: AMPK activation reduced tyrosine phosphorylation of FAK in skeletal muscle. AICAR reduced p-FAKY397in isolated human skeletal muscle and cultured myotubes. Insulin stimulation did not alter FAK phosphorylation. Serum starvation increased AMPK activation, as demonstrated...

  4. Interleukin-2 induces tyrosine phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of stat3 in human T lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M; Svejgaard, A; Skov, S

    1994-01-01

    that stimulation through the IL-2R induced tyrosine phosphorylation and subsequent nuclear translocation of stat3, a newly identified member of the signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) family of proteins. In contrast, stat1 proteins were not tyrosine phosphorylated after IL-2 ligation, whereas...... an apparent molecular mass of 84 kDa and was not recognized by stat3 or stat1 mAb or antisera. Since IL-2 induced nuclear translocation of the 84 kDa protein and stat3 followed identical kinetics, p84 is a candidate for a new, yet undefined, member of the STAT family. Taken together, we report that IL-2...... induces tyrosine phosphorylation and subsequent nuclear translocation of stat3 and an as yet undefined 84-kDa protein in antigen-specific human T cell lines....

  5. Clinical responses to adoptive T-cell transfer can be modeled in an autologous immune-humanized mouse model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Henrik; Lindberg, Mattias F; Donia, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors and adoptive cell transfer (ACT) of autologous tumor-infiltrating T cells have shown durable responses in patients with melanoma. To study ACT and immunotherapies in a humanized model, we have developed PDXv2.0 - a melanoma PDX model where tumor cells and tumor...

  6. Human and Autologous Adipose-derived Stromal Cells Increase Flap Survival in Rats Independently of Host Immune Response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toyserkani, Navid Mohamadpour; Jensen, Charlotte Harken; Andersen, Ditte Caroline

    2018-01-01

    evaluated after 7 days. RESULTS: The mean survival rates for SVF treatment regardless of human or autologous origin were significantly increased as compared with the control group. Adipose stem/stromal cell and SVF lysate injection did not increase flap survival. Vessel density was increased for human...... injections lead to increased vessel density, but it did not necessarily lead to increased flap survival. Further research should elaborate which molecular events make SVF treatment more efficacious than ASC....

  7. Behavioral and cognitive effects of tyrosine intake in healthy human adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hase, Adrian; Jung, Sophie E.; aan het Rot, Marije

    2015-01-01

    The amino acid tyrosine is the precursor to the catecholamine neurotransmitters dopamine and norepinephrine. Increasing tyrosine uptake may positively influence catecholamine-related psychological functioning. We conducted a systematic review to examine the effects of tyrosine on behavior and

  8. INHIBITION OF PROTEIN TYROSINE PHOSPHATASE ACTIVITY MEDIATES EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR SIGNALING IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epidemiological studies have implicated zinc in the toxicity of ambient particulate matter (PM) inhalation. We previously showed that exposure to metal-laden PM inhibits protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity in human primary bronchial epithelial cells (HAEC) and leads t...

  9. A New Approach to Heart Valve Tissue Engineering Based on Modifying Autologous Human Pericardium by 3D Cellular Mechanotransduction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Straka, František; Schorník, David; Mašín, J.; Filová, Elena; Miřejovský, T.; Burdíková, Z.; Švindrych, Z.; Chlup, H.; Horný, L.; Veselý, J.; Pirk, J.; Bačáková, Lucie

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 7 (2017), s. 527-543 ISSN 2157-9083 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NV15-29153A; GA MZd(CZ) NT11270 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : autologous human pericardium * pericardial interstitial cells * heart valve * 3D mechanotranduction * bioreactor Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery OBOR OECD: Cardiac and Cardiovascular systems Impact factor: 1.383, year: 2016

  10. A low percentage of autologous serum can replace bovine serum to engineer human nasal cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Wolf

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available For the generation of cell-based therapeutic products, it would be preferable to avoid the use of animal-derived components. Our study thus aimed at investigating the possibility to replace foetal bovine serum (FBS with autologous serum (AS for the engineering of cartilage grafts using expanded human nasal chondrocytes (HNC. HNC isolated from 7 donors were expanded in medium containing 10% FBS or AS at different concentrations (2%, 5% and 10% and cultured in pellets using serum-free medium or in Hyaff®-11 meshes using medium containing FBS or AS. Tissue forming capacity was assessed histologically (Safranin O, immunohistochemically (type II collagen and biochemically (glycosaminoglycans -GAG- and DNA. Differences among experimental groups were assessed by Mann Whitney tests. HNC expanded under the different serum conditions proliferated at comparable rates and generated cartilaginous pellets with similar histological appearance and amounts of GAG. Tissues generated by HNC from different donors cultured in Hyaff®-11 had variable quality, but the accumulated GAG amounts were comparable among the different serum conditions. Staining intensity for collagen type II was consistent with GAG deposition. Among the different serum conditions tested, the use of 2% AS resulted in the lowest variability in the GAG contents of generated tissues. In conclusion, a low percentage of AS can replace FBS both during the expansion and differentiation of HNC and reduce the variability in the quality of the resulting engineered cartilage tissues.

  11. Structural stability of human protein tyrosine phosphatase ρ catalytic domain: effect of point mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Pasquo

    Full Text Available Protein tyrosine phosphatase ρ (PTPρ belongs to the classical receptor type IIB family of protein tyrosine phosphatase, the most frequently mutated tyrosine phosphatase in human cancer. There are evidences to suggest that PTPρ may act as a tumor suppressor gene and dysregulation of Tyr phosphorylation can be observed in diverse diseases, such as diabetes, immune deficiencies and cancer. PTPρ variants in the catalytic domain have been identified in cancer tissues. These natural variants are nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms, variations of a single nucleotide occurring in the coding region and leading to amino acid substitutions. In this study we investigated the effect of amino acid substitution on the structural stability and on the activity of the membrane-proximal catalytic domain of PTPρ. We expressed and purified as soluble recombinant proteins some of the mutants of the membrane-proximal catalytic domain of PTPρ identified in colorectal cancer and in the single nucleotide polymorphisms database. The mutants show a decreased thermal and thermodynamic stability and decreased activation energy relative to phosphatase activity, when compared to wild- type. All the variants show three-state equilibrium unfolding transitions similar to that of the wild- type, with the accumulation of a folding intermediate populated at ~4.0 M urea.

  12. Production of a Dendritic Cell-Based Vaccine Containing Inactivated Autologous Virus for Therapy of Patients with Chronic Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infection▿

    OpenAIRE

    Whiteside, Theresa L.; Piazza, Paolo; Reiter, Amanda; Stanson, Joanna; Connolly, Nancy C.; Rinaldo, Charles R.; Riddler, Sharon A.

    2008-01-01

    In preparation for a pilot clinical trial in patients with chronic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, a novel dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccine is being manufactured. The trial will test the hypothesis that isolated endogenous virus presented by DCs serves as a potent immunogen for activation of CD8+ and CD4+ T cells specific for a broad range of autologous HIV-1 antigens. Production of the vaccine under good manufacture practice conditions involves (i) autologous virus is...

  13. Monitoring the initiation and kinetics of human dendritic cell-induced polarization of autologous naive CD4+ T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tammy Oth

    Full Text Available A crucial step in generating de novo immune responses is the polarization of naive cognate CD4+ T cells by pathogen-triggered dendritic cells (DC. In the human setting, standardized DC-dependent systems are lacking to study molecular events during the initiation of a naive CD4+ T cell response. We developed a TCR-restricted assay to compare different pathogen-triggered human DC for their capacities to instruct functional differentiation of autologous, naive CD4+ T cells. We demonstrated that this methodology can be applied to compare differently matured DC in terms of kinetics, direction, and magnitude of the naive CD4+ T cell response. Furthermore, we showed the applicability of this assay to study the T cell polarizing capacity of low-frequency blood-derived DC populations directly isolated ex vivo. This methodology for addressing APC-dependent instruction of naive CD4+ T cells in a human autologous setting will provide researchers with a valuable tool to gain more insight into molecular mechanisms occurring in the early phase of T cell polarization. In addition, it may also allow the study of pharmacological agents on DC-dependent T cell polarization in the human system.

  14. Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation Disrupts Adaptive Immune Responses during Rebound Simian/Human Immunodeficiency Virus Viremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Daniel B; Peterson, Christopher W; Kiem, Hans-Peter; Schiffer, Joshua T

    2017-07-01

    Primary HIV-1 infection induces a virus-specific adaptive/cytolytic immune response that impacts the plasma viral load set point and the rate of progression to AIDS. Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) suppresses plasma viremia to undetectable levels that rebound upon cART treatment interruption. Following cART withdrawal, the memory component of the virus-specific adaptive immune response may improve viral control compared to primary infection. Here, using primary infection and treatment interruption data from macaques infected with simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV), we observe a lower peak viral load but an unchanged viral set point during viral rebound. The addition of an autologous stem cell transplant before cART withdrawal alters viral dynamics: we found a higher rebound set point but similar peak viral loads compared to the primary infection. Mathematical modeling of the data that accounts for fundamental immune parameters achieves excellent fit to heterogeneous viral loads. Analysis of model output suggests that the rapid memory immune response following treatment interruption does not ultimately lead to better viral containment. Transplantation decreases the durability of the adaptive immune response following cART withdrawal and viral rebound. Our model's results highlight the impact of the endogenous adaptive immune response during primary SHIV infection. Moreover, because we capture adaptive immune memory and the impact of transplantation, this model will provide insight into further studies of cure strategies inspired by the Berlin patient. IMPORTANCE HIV patients who interrupt combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) eventually experience viral rebound, the return of viral loads to pretreatment levels. However, the "Berlin patient" remained free of HIV rebound over a decade after stopping cART. His cure is attributed to leukemia treatment that included an HIV-resistant stem cell transplant. Inspired by this case, we studied the impact

  15. Ex-vivo expanded human NK cells express activating receptors that mediate cytotoxicity of allogeneic and autologous cancer cell lines by direct recognition and antibody directed cellular cytotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campana Dario

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The possibility that autologous NK cells could serve as an effective treatment modality for solid tumors has long been considered. However, implementation is hampered by (i the small number of NK cells in peripheral blood, (ii the difficulties associated with large-scale production of GMP compliant cytolytic NK cells, (iii the need to activate the NK cells in order to induce NK cell mediated killing and (iv the constraints imposed by autologous inhibitory receptor-ligand interactions. To address these issues, we determined (i if large numbers of NK cells could be expanded from PBMC and GMP compliant cell fractions derived by elutriation, (ii their ability to kill allogeneic and autologous tumor targets by direct cytotoxitiy and by antibody-mediated cellular cytotoxicity and (iii defined NK cell specific receptor-ligand interactions that mediate tumor target cell killing. Methods Human NK cells were expanded during 14 days. Expansion efficiency, NK receptor repertoire before and after expansion, expression of NK specific ligands, cytolytic activity against allogeneic and autologous tumor targets, with and without the addition of chimeric EGFR monoclonal antibody, were investigated. Results Cell expansion shifted the NK cell receptor repertoire towards activation and resulted in cytotoxicity against various allogeneic tumor cell lines and autologous gastric cancer cells, while sparing normal PBMC. Blocking studies confirmed that autologous cytotoxicity is established through multiple activating receptor-ligand interactions. Importantly, expanded NK cells also mediated ADCC in an autologous and allogeneic setting by antibodies that are currently being used to treat patients with select solid tumors. Conclusion These data demonstrate that large numbers of cytolytic NK cells can be generated from PBMC and lymphocyte-enriched fractions obtained by GMP compliant counter current elutriation from PBMC, establishing the preclinical

  16. Increased preoperative collection of autologous blood with recombinant human erythropoietin therapy in tertiary care hospitals of Jammu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumkum Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To study whether the administration of recombinant human erythropoietin increases the amount of autologous blood that can be collected before orthopaedic surgery. Materials and Methods: We conducted a randomized controlled trial of recombinant human erythropoietin in 68 adults scheduled for elective orthopedic procedures. The patients received either erythropoietin 600 units/kg of body weight or placebo intravenously every 5 th day prior to each phlebotomy for 21 days during which time up to 5 units of blood was collected. Patients were excluded from donation when their hematocrit values were less than 33%. All patients received iron sulphate 325mg orally 3 times daily. The mean number of units collected per patient was 4.33 ± 0.4 for erythropoietin group and 3.05± 0.71 for the placebo group. Results: The mean packed red cell volume donated by patients who received erythropoietin was 32% greater than that donated by patients who received placebo (196.3 vs. 169.4 ml, p<0.05. 68% in the placebo group and 9% of patients treated with erythropoietin were unable to donate ≥4 units. No adverse effects were attributed to erythropoietin. While participating in the study, complications developed in 2 patients one in each group necessitating their removal from the study. Conclusion: We conclude that recombinant human erythropoietin increases the ability of the patients about to undergo elective surgery to donate autologous blood units.

  17. Receptor tyrosine kinase EphA5 is a functional molecular target in human lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staquicini, Fernanda I; Qian, Ming D; Salameh, Ahmad; Dobroff, Andrey S; Edwards, Julianna K; Cimino, Daniel F; Moeller, Benjamin J; Kelly, Patrick; Nunez, Maria I; Tang, Ximing; Liu, Diane D; Lee, J Jack; Hong, Waun Ki; Ferrara, Fortunato; Bradbury, Andrew R M; Lobb, Roy R; Edelman, Martin J; Sidman, Richard L; Wistuba, Ignacio I; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata

    2015-03-20

    Lung cancer is often refractory to radiotherapy, but molecular mechanisms of tumor resistance remain poorly defined. Here we show that the receptor tyrosine kinase EphA5 is specifically overexpressed in lung cancer and is involved in regulating cellular responses to genotoxic insult. In the absence of EphA5, lung cancer cells displayed a defective G1/S cell cycle checkpoint, were unable to resolve DNA damage, and became radiosensitive. Upon irradiation, EphA5 was transported into the nucleus where it interacted with activated ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) at sites of DNA repair. Finally, we demonstrate that a new monoclonal antibody against human EphA5 sensitized lung cancer cells and human lung cancer xenografts to radiotherapy and significantly prolonged survival, thus suggesting the likelihood of translational applications. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Human autologous in vitro models of glioma immunogene therapy using B7-2, GM-CSF, and IL12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parney, I.F.; Farr-Jones, M.A.; Kane, K.; Chang, L.-J.; Petruk, K.C.

    2002-01-01

    Cancer immunogene therapy is based on vaccination with radiated, autologous tumor cells transduced with immunostimulatory genes. To help determine an optimal glioma immunogene therapy strategy, we stimulated lymphocytes with autologous human glioma cells transduced with B7-2 (CD86), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and/or interleukin-12 (IL12). A human glioma-derived cell culture (Ed147.BT) was transduced with B7-2, GM-CSF, and/or IL12 using retroviral vectors. Autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were co-cultured with irradiated gene-transduced tumor alone or a combination of radiated wild type and gene-transduced cells. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells proliferation was determined by serial cell counts. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells phenotype was assessed by flow cytometry for CD4, CD8, and CD16. Anti-tumor cytotoxicity was determined by chromium-51 ( 51 Cr) release assay. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells cell numbers all decreased during primary stimulation but tumor cells expressing B7-2 or GM-CSF consistently caused secondary proliferation. Tumors expressing B7-2 and GM-CSF or B7-2,GM-CSF,and IL12 consistently increased PBMC CD8+ (cytotoxic T) and CD16+ (natural killer) percentages. Interestingly, anti-tumor cytotoxicity only exceeded that of PBMC stimulated with wild type tumor alone when peripheral blood mononuclear cells were stimulated with both wild type tumor and B7-2/GM-CSF- (but not IL12) transduced cells. PBMC proliferation and phenotype is altered as expected by exposure to immunostimulatory gene-transduced tumor. However, transduced tumor cells alone do not stimulate greater anti-tumor cytotoxicity than wild type tumor. Only B7-2/GM-CSF-transduced cells combined with wild type produced increased cytotoxicity. This may reflect selection of turnor subclones with limited antigenic spectra during retrovirus-mediated gene transfer. (author)

  19. Tyrosine phosphorylation of a 66KD soluble protein and augmentation of lectin induced mitogenesis by DMSO in human T lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wedner, H.J.; Bass, G.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have demonstrated that induction of mitogenesis in human T lymphocytes is associated with the tyrosine phosphorylation of a 66KD soluble substrate-TPP 66. Since DMSO has been shown to be a non-specific stimulator of tyrosine protein kinases they have examined the effect of DMSO on both activation and tyrosine phosphorylation in human T cells. Human peripheral blood T lymphocytes were isolated by dextran sedimentation, Ficol/Paque centrifugation and nylon wool filtration. Phosphorylation was performed in cells incubated with [ 32 P] orthophosphate followed by DMSO for 30 min. TPP 66 was identified by 2-D PAGE, autoradiography, and HV electrophoresis of the hydrolyzed protein. Concentrations of DMSO from 1% to 50% induced the tyrosine phosphorylation of TPP 66 with maximal stimulation seen at 20%. DMSO alone did not activate the T cells (measured by [ 3 H] thymidine incorporation) when tested at high concentrations for 30 sec to 10 min. (longer incubations were markedly toxic) or low concentrations for 12 to 48 hrs. Low concentrations of DMSO 0.1%-0.5% did however, markedly augment [ 3 H] thymidine incorporation induced by PHA or Con A. These data suggest that tyrosine phosphorylation of TPP 66 alone may not constitute sufficient signal for the activation sequence to begin but the phosphorylation of this soluble substrate may be a critical factor in the propagation of the activation sequence

  20. Detection and Quantification of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor Tyrosine Kinases in Primary Human Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fearnley, Gareth W; Wheatcroft, Stephen B; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2015-01-01

    Proteins differ widely in their pattern of expression depending on organism, tissue, and regulation in response to changing conditions. In the mammalian vasculature, the endothelium responds to vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs) via membrane-bound receptor tyrosine kinases (VEGFRs) to modulate many aspects of vascular physiology including vasculogenesis, angiogenesis, and blood pressure. Studies on VEGFR biology are thus dependent on detecting expression levels in different cell types and evaluating how changes in protein levels correlate with changing conditions including circulating VEGF levels. Here, we present a robust immunoblot-based protocol for detecting and quantifying VEGFRs in human endothelial cells. Using internal and external standards, we can rapidly evaluate receptor copy number and assess how this is altered in response to the cellular environment.

  1. Putaminal mosaic visualized by tyrosine hydroxylase immunohistochemistry in the human neostriatum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryoma eMorigaki

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Among the basal ganglia-thalamocortical circuits, the putamen plays a critical role in the ‘motor’ circuits that control voluntary movements and motor learning. The human neostriatum comprises two functional subdivisions known as the striosome (patch and matrix compartments. Accumulating evidence suggests that compartment-specific dysregulations of dopamine activity might be involved in the disease-specific pathology and symptoms of human striatal diseases including movement disorders. This study was undertaken to examine whether or how striatal dopaminergic innervations are organized into the compartmentalized architecture found in the putamen of adult human brains. For this purpose, we used a highly sensitive immunohistochemistry technique to identify tyrosine hydroxylase (TH, EC 1.14.16.2, a marker for striatal dopaminergic axons and terminals, in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues obtained from autopsied human brains. Herein, we report that discrete compartmentalization of TH-labeled innervations occurs in the putamen, as in the caudate nucleus, with a higher density of TH labeling in the matrix compared to the striosomes. Our results provide anatomical evidence to support the hypothesis that compartment-specific dysfunction of the striosome-matrix dopaminergic systems might contribute to the genesis of movement disorders.

  2. Study on human chondrocyte culture viability for autologous transplantation in clinical application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Lombello

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The limited regenerative capacity of the cartilage tissuemakes the treatment of chondral lesions difficult. The techniquescurrently available to treat cartilage lesions may relieve symptoms,but do not regenerate the injured tissue. Autologous chondrocytetransplantation uses cell biology and cell culture techniques toregenerate the hyaline cartilage. Methods: In this study, we analyzechondrocyte biopsy collection and culture for autologoustransplantation. Ultrastructural analyses of hyaline cartilage biopsieswere performed 0, 6, 24 and 48 hours after collection. The tissue evenafter 48 hours. Eleven cell culture assays were performed to evaluateisolation, viability, morphology, proliferation and absence ofcontaminants. Results: The cell culture techniques used allowedchondrocyte proliferation. Rates on cell viability were maintained abovethe acceptable patterns (above 90. Control of cell culture laboratoryconditions showed absence of contaminants, assuring safety of theprocess. The chondrocytes obtained presented the morphology typicalof cultured cell monolayers. Conclusion: The results indicate viabilityof chondrocyte culture technique for clinical application in autologoustransplantation.

  3. Multiple injections of electroporated autologous T cells expressing a chimeric antigen receptor mediate regression of human disseminated tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yangbing; Moon, Edmund; Carpenito, Carmine; Paulos, Chrystal M; Liu, Xiaojun; Brennan, Andrea L; Chew, Anne; Carroll, Richard G; Scholler, John; Levine, Bruce L; Albelda, Steven M; June, Carl H

    2010-11-15

    Redirecting T lymphocyte antigen specificity by gene transfer can provide large numbers of tumor-reactive T lymphocytes for adoptive immunotherapy. However, safety concerns associated with viral vector production have limited clinical application of T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CAR). T lymphocytes can be gene modified by RNA electroporation without integration-associated safety concerns. To establish a safe platform for adoptive immunotherapy, we first optimized the vector backbone for RNA in vitro transcription to achieve high-level transgene expression. CAR expression and function of RNA-electroporated T cells could be detected up to a week after electroporation. Multiple injections of RNA CAR-electroporated T cells mediated regression of large vascularized flank mesothelioma tumors in NOD/scid/γc(-/-) mice. Dramatic tumor reduction also occurred when the preexisting intraperitoneal human-derived tumors, which had been growing in vivo for >50 days, were treated by multiple injections of autologous human T cells electroporated with anti-mesothelin CAR mRNA. This is the first report using matched patient tumor and lymphocytes showing that autologous T cells from cancer patients can be engineered to provide an effective therapy for a disseminated tumor in a robust preclinical model. Multiple injections of RNA-engineered T cells are a novel approach for adoptive cell transfer, providing flexible platform for the treatment of cancer that may complement the use of retroviral and lentiviral engineered T cells. This approach may increase the therapeutic index of T cells engineered to express powerful activation domains without the associated safety concerns of integrating viral vectors. Copyright © 2010 AACR.

  4. Concise Review: Human Dermis as an Autologous Source of Stem Cells for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vapniarsky, Natalia; Arzi, Boaz; Hu, Jerry C; Nolta, Jan A; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A

    2015-10-01

    The exciting potential for regenerating organs from autologous stem cells is on the near horizon, and adult dermis stem cells (DSCs) are particularly appealing because of the ease and relative minimal invasiveness of skin collection. A substantial number of reports have described DSCs and their potential for regenerating tissues from mesenchymal, ectodermal, and endodermal lineages; however, the exact niches of these stem cells in various skin types and their antigenic surface makeup are not yet clearly defined. The multilineage potential of DSCs appears to be similar, despite great variability in isolation and in vitro propagation methods. Despite this great potential, only limited amounts of tissues and clinical applications for organ regeneration have been developed from DSCs. This review summarizes the literature on DSCs regarding their niches and the specific markers they express. The concept of the niches and the differentiation capacity of cells residing in them along particular lineages is discussed. Furthermore, the advantages and disadvantages of widely used methods to demonstrate lineage differentiation are considered. In addition, safety considerations and the most recent advancements in the field of tissue engineering and regeneration using DSCs are discussed. This review concludes with thoughts on how to prospectively approach engineering of tissues and organ regeneration using DSCs. Our expectation is that implementation of the major points highlighted in this review will lead to major advancements in the fields of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. Autologous dermis-derived stem cells are generating great excitement and efforts in the field of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. The substantial impact of this review lies in its critical coverage of the available literature and in providing insight regarding niches, characteristics, and isolation methods of stem cells derived from the human dermis. Furthermore, it provides

  5. Lysis of autologous human macrophages by lymphokine-activated killer cells: interaction of effector cell and target cell conjugates analyzed by scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streck, R J; Helinski, E H; Ovak, G M; Pauly, J L

    1990-09-01

    Lymphokine (i.e., interleukin 2; IL-2)-activated killer (LAK) cells derived from normal human blood are known to destroy human tumor target cells. Accordingly, immunotherapy modalities using IL-2, either alone or in combination with LAK cells, have been evaluated for eradicating metastatic cancer. In studies conducted to characterize receptors on LAK cell membrane ultrastructures, we observed that LAK cells kill autologous human monocyte-derived macrophages (M phi). In these experiments, peripheral blood mononuclear cells of a healthy adult donor were cultured to generate LAK cells and autologous non-adherent M phi. Thereafter, conjugates were prepared by incubating for 3 h autologous populations of LAK cells and M phi. Examination of the conjugates by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) identified LAK cell-mediated killing of M phi. Moreover, SEM analysis of the LAK cell membrane architecture identified microvilli-like ultrastructures that provided a physical bridge that joined together the LAK cell and M phi. The immunological mechanism(s) underling LAK cell killing of autologous M phi is not known; nevertheless, these conjugates will provide a useful model to study membrane receptors on ultrastructures that mediate the initial stages of cytolysis that include target cell recognition and cell-to-cell adhesion. The results of our observations and the findings of other investigators who have also demonstrated LAK cell killing of autologous normal human leukocytes are discussed in the context of the association of IL-2 and IL-2-activated killer cells with side effects observed in ongoing clinical trials and with autoimmune disorders.

  6. The tyrosine kinase inhibitor dasatinib induces a marked adipogenic differentiation of human multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Borriello

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The introduction of specific BCR-ABL inhibitors in chronic myelogenous leukemia therapy has entirely mutated the prognosis of this hematologic cancer from being a fatal disorder to becoming a chronic disease. Due to the probable long lasting treatment with tyrosine-kinase inhibitors (TKIs, the knowledge of their effects on normal cells is of pivotal importance. DESIGN AND METHODS: We investigated the effects of dasatinib treatment on human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs. RESULTS: Our findings demonstrate, for the first time, that dasatinib induces MSCs adipocytic differentiation. Particularly, when the TKI is added to the medium inducing osteogenic differentiation, a high MSCs percentage acquires adipocytic morphology and overexpresses adipocytic specific genes, including PPARγ, CEBPα, LPL and SREBP1c. Dasatinib also inhibits the activity of alkaline phosphatase, an osteogenic marker, and remarkably reduces matrix mineralization. The increase of PPARγ is also confirmed at protein level. The component of osteogenic medium required for dasatinib-induced adipogenesis is dexamethasone. Intriguingly, the increase of adipocytic markers is also observed in MSCs treated with dasatinib alone. The TKI effect is phenotype-specific, since fibroblasts do not undergo adipocytic differentiation or PPARγ increase. CONCLUSIONS: Our data demonstrate that dasatinib treatment affects bone marrow MSCs commitment and suggest that TKIs therapy might modify normal phenotypes with potential significant negative consequences.

  7. Expression of Eph receptor tyrosine kinases and their ligands in human Granulosa lutein cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y; Zagoura, D; Keck, C; Pietrowski, D

    2006-11-01

    Corpus luteum development is regulated by gonadotropins and accompanied by extremely rapid vascularization of the avascular granulosa cell compartiment by endothelial cells (EC). The proliferation of Granulosa cells (GC) and EC is a complex interplay and takes place in a spatially and temporarily coordinated manner. The erythropoietin-producing hepatoma amplified sequence (Eph) receptors and their ligands-the ephrins- are a recently detected family of membrane located protein tyrosine kinases which play a crucial role in the growth and development of nerve and blood vessel network. We report about the mRNA expression pattern of Ephs and their ligands in human GC, in human EC, and in carcinoma cell lines OvCar-3 and Hela. The mRNA of EphA4, EphA7, ephrinA4, ephrinB1 and ephrinB2 was detected in GC and EC, while EphA2 was expressed only in GC. The expression of various Ephs and ephrins did not change in GC after stimulation with human chorion gonadotropin. Our study analyzes for the first time the expression of the complete human Eph/ephriny-system in GC and in EC. The remarkable similarity between these two cell types supports the theory of a functional relationship of EC and GC. In addition, it was shown that hCG is not a major determinant of Eph/ephrin regulation in GC.

  8. Dosimetric estimation of O-(3-18F-fluoropropyl)-L-tyrosine in human based on mice biodistribution data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Ganghua; Wang Mingfang; Luo Lei; Gan Manquan; Tang Xiaolan

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To estimate the radiation absorbed doses in humans due to intravenous administration of O-(3- 18 F-fluoropropyl)-L-tyrosine (FPT) based on mice biodistribution data and appraise the security of FPT in humans. Methods: FPT was injected into mice through a tail vein. At 10, 30, 60, 120 and 180 min after injection, the mice were killed by cervical fracture and biodistribution in mice were determined. Human dosimetric estimation was performed from the biodistribution of FPT in mice and the standard MIRD method using fractional radioactivity-time curves for humans. Results: The bone in human was the organ receiving highest dose of 4.29 x 10 -3 mGy/MBq, the brain received lowest dose of 1.57 x 10 -3 mGy/MBq, and other organs received doses between 1.8 x 10 -3 and 2.4 x 10 -3 mGy/MBq. The effective dose was estimated to be 9.15 x 10 -3 mSv/MBq. These results were comparable to values reported by foreign authors on the radiation dosimetry of O-(2- 18 F-fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine. Conclusion: Human dosimetric estimation can be performed based on mice biodistribution data. The study provides an important data for clinical safety of FPT

  9. Restoring the quantity and quality of elderly human mesenchymal stem cells for autologous cell-based therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Travis J; Marinkovic, Milos; Tran, Olivia N; Gonzalez, Aaron O; Marshall, Amanda; Dean, David D; Chen, Xiao-Dong

    2017-10-27

    Degenerative diseases are a major public health concern for the aging population and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have great potential for treating many of these diseases. However, the quantity and quality of MSCs declines with aging, limiting the potential efficacy of autologous MSCs for treating the elderly population. Human bone marrow (BM)-derived MSCs from young and elderly donors were obtained and characterized using standard cell surface marker criteria (CD73, CD90, CD105) as recommended by the International Society for Cellular Therapy (ISCT). The elderly MSC population was isolated into four subpopulations based on size and stage-specific embryonic antigen-4 (SSEA-4) expression using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), and subpopulations were compared to the unfractionated young and elderly MSCs using assays that evaluate MSC proliferation, quality, morphology, intracellular reactive oxygen species, β-galactosidase expression, and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content. The ISCT-recommended cell surface markers failed to detect any differences between young and elderly MSCs. Here, we report that elderly MSCs were larger in size and displayed substantially higher concentrations of intracellular reactive oxygen species and β-galactosidase expression and lower amounts of ATP and SSEA-4 expression. Based on these findings, cell size and SSEA-4 expression were used to separate the elderly MSCs into four subpopulations by FACS. The original populations (young and elderly MSCs), as well as the four subpopulations, were then characterized before and after culture on tissue culture plastic and BM-derived extracellular matrix (BM-ECM). The small SSEA-4-positive subpopulation representing ~ 8% of the original elderly MSC population exhibited a "youthful" phenotype that was similar to that of young MSCs. The biological activity of this elderly subpopulation was inhibited by senescence-associated factors produced by the unfractionated parent population

  10. Expansion of Human Tregs from Cryopreserved Umbilical Cord Blood for GMP-Compliant Autologous Adoptive Cell Transfer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard R. Seay

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Umbilical cord blood is a traditional and convenient source of cells for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Thymic regulatory T cells (Tregs are also present in cord blood, and there is growing interest in the use of autologous Tregs to provide a low-risk, fully human leukocyte antigen (HLA-matched cell product for treating autoimmune diseases, such as type 1 diabetes. Here, we describe a good manufacturing practice (GMP-compatible Treg expansion protocol using fluorescence-activated cell sorting, resulting in a mean 2,092-fold expansion of Tregs over a 16-day culture for a median yield of 1.26 × 109 Tregs from single-donor cryopreserved units. The resulting Tregs passed prior clinical trial release criteria for Treg purity and sterility, including additional rigorous assessments of FOXP3 and Helios expression and epigenetic analysis of the FOXP3 Treg-specific demethylated region (TSDR. Compared with expanded adult peripheral blood Tregs, expanded cord blood Tregs remained more naive, as assessed by continued expression of CD45RA, produced reduced IFN-γ following activation, and effectively inhibited responder T cell proliferation. Immunosequencing of the T cell receptor revealed a remarkably diverse receptor repertoire within cord blood Tregs that was maintained following in vitro expansion. These data support the feasibility of generating GMP-compliant Tregs from cord blood for adoptive cell transfer therapies and highlight potential advantages in terms of safety, phenotypic stability, autoantigen specificity, and tissue distribution.

  11. Survey of tyrosine kinase signaling reveals ROS kinase fusions in human cholangiocarcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Lei Gu

    Full Text Available Cholangiocarcinoma, also known as bile duct cancer, is the second most common primary hepatic carcinoma with a median survival of less than 2 years. The molecular mechanisms underlying the development of this disease are not clear. To survey activated tyrosine kinases signaling in cholangiocarcinoma, we employed immunoaffinity profiling coupled to mass spectrometry and identified DDR1, EPHA2, EGFR, and ROS tyrosine kinases, along with over 1,000 tyrosine phosphorylation sites from about 750 different proteins in primary cholangiocarcinoma patients. Furthermore, we confirmed the presence of ROS kinase fusions in 8.7% (2 out of 23 of cholangiocarcinoma patients. Expression of the ROS fusions in 3T3 cells confers transforming ability both in vitro and in vivo, and is responsive to its kinase inhibitor. Our data demonstrate that ROS kinase is a promising candidate for a therapeutic target and for a diagnostic molecular marker in cholangiocarcinoma. The identification of ROS tyrosine kinase fusions in cholangiocarcinoma, along with the presence of other ROS kinase fusions in lung cancer and glioblastoma, suggests that a more broadly based screen for activated ROS kinase in cancer is warranted.

  12. MECHANISM OF PROTEIN TYROSINE PHOSPHATASE INHIBITION IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS (HAEC) EXPOSED TO ZN2+

    Science.gov (United States)

    A number of studies have implicated zinc in the toxicity of ambient particulate matter (PM) inhalation. We previously showed that exposure to Zn2+ inhibits protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity and leads to activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling in ...

  13. Multiple forms of the human tyrosine phosphatase RPTP alpha. Isozymes and differences in glycosylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daum, G; Regenass, S; Sap, J

    1994-01-01

    Among all the receptor-linked protein-tyrosine-phosphatase RPTP alpha clones described from mammalian tissues, one differed in that it encoded a 9-amino-acid insert 3 residues upstream from the transmembrane segment (Kaplan, R., Morse, B., Huebner, K., Croce, C., Howk, R. Ravera, M., Ricca, G...

  14. The Pattern of Tyrosine Phosphorylation in Human Sperm in Response to Binding to Zona Pellucida or Hyaluronic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sati, Leyla; Cayli, Sevil; Delpiano, Elena; Sakkas, Denny

    2014-01-01

    In mammalian species, acquisition of sperm fertilization competence is dependent on the phenomenon of sperm capacitation. One of the key elements of capacitation is protein tyrosine phosphorylation (TP) in various sperm membrane regions. In previous studies performed, the pattern of TP was examined in human sperm bound to zona pellucida of oocytes. In the present comparative study, TP patterns upon sperm binding to the zona pellucida or hyaluronic acid (HA) were investigated in spermatozoa arising from the same semen samples. Tyrosine phosphorylation, visualized by immunofluorescence, was localized within the acrosomal cap, equatorial head region, neck, and the principal piece. Tyrosine phosphorylation has increased in a time-related manner as capacitation progressed, and the phosphorylation pattern was identical within the principal piece and neck, regardless of the sperm bound to the zona pellucida or HA. Thus, the data demonstrated that the patterns of sperm activation-related TP were similar regardless of the spermatozoa bound to zona pellucida or HA. Further, sperm with incomplete development, as detected by excess cytoplasmic retention, failed to exhibit TP. PMID:24077441

  15. Successful function of autologous iPSC-derived dopamine neurons following transplantation in a non-human primate model of Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallett, Penelope J; Deleidi, Michela; Astradsson, Arnar

    2015-01-01

    that unilateral engraftment of CM-iPSCs could provide a gradual onset of functional motor improvement contralateral to the side of dopamine neuron transplantation, and increased motor activity, without a need for immunosuppression. Postmortem analyses demonstrated robust survival of midbrain-like dopaminergic......Autologous transplantation of patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived neurons is a potential clinical approach for treatment of neurological disease. Preclinical demonstration of long-term efficacy, feasibility, and safety of iPSC-derived dopamine neurons in non-human primate...... models will be an important step in clinical development of cell therapy. Here, we analyzed cynomolgus monkey (CM) iPSC-derived midbrain dopamine neurons for up to 2 years following autologous transplantation in a Parkinson's disease (PD) model. In one animal, with the most successful protocol, we found...

  16. Specific Cytotoxicity Against Autologous Tumour and Proliferative Responses of Human Lymphocytes Grown in Interleukin 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-11

    reactivity against tumour cells. These cellular reagents will be useful in defining the antigenicity of human neoplasms and possibly in therapy . S, N 0) 02...Stjernswird. of human neoplasms and possibly in therapy . 1979; Vose et al., 1978; Vinky et al., 1979). Purifica- The derivation of cultured T cells...mononuclear cells were sepa- had increased 100- to 200-fold. Cells were cultured in rated by floatation on Ficoll-Hypaque (LSM, Litton- medium without IL-2 for

  17. Generating autologous hematopoietic cells from human-induced pluripotent stem cells through ectopic expression of transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Yongsung; Broxmeyer, Hal E; Lee, Man Ryul

    2017-07-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is a successful treatment modality for patients with malignant and nonmalignant disorders, usually when no other treatment option is available. The cells supporting long-term reconstitution after HCT are the hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), which can be limited in numbers. Moreover, finding an appropriate human leukocyte antigen-matched donor can be problematic. If HSCs can be stably produced in large numbers from autologous or allogeneic cell sources, it would benefit HCT. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) established from patients' own somatic cells can be differentiated into hematopoietic cells in vitro. This review will highlight recent methods for regulating human (h) iPSC production of HSCs and more mature blood cells. Advancements in transcription factor-mediated regulation of the developmental stages of in-vivo hematopoietic lineage commitment have begun to provide an understanding of the molecular mechanism of hematopoiesis. Such studies involve not only directed differentiation in which transcription factors, specifically expressed in hematopoietic lineage-specific cells, are overexpressed in iPSCs, but also direct conversion in which transcription factors are introduced into patient-derived somatic cells which are dedifferentiated to hematopoietic cells. As iPSCs derived from patients suffering from genetically mutated diseases would express the same mutated genetic information, CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing has been utilized to differentiate genetically corrected iPSCs into normal hematopoietic cells. IPSCs provide a model for molecular understanding of disease, and also may function as a cell population for therapy. Efficient differentiation of patient-specific iPSCs into HSCs and progenitor cells is a potential means to overcome limitations of such cells for HCT, as well as for providing in-vitro drug screening templates as tissue-on-a-chip models.

  18. Effect of activated autologous platelet-rich plasma on proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fang-Tian; Li, Hong-Mian; Yin, Qing-Shui; Liang, Zhi-Jie; Huang, Min-Hong; Chi, Guang-Yi; Huang, Lu; Liu, Da-Lie; Nan, Hua

    2015-01-01

    To investigate whether activated autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP) can promote proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) in vitro. hASCs were isolated from lipo-aspirates, and characterized by specific cell markers and multilineage differentiation capacity after culturing to the 3rd passage. PRP was collected and activated from human peripheral blood of the same patient. Cultured hASCs were treated with normal osteogenic inductive media alone (group A, control) or osteogenic inductive media plus 5%, 10%, 20%, 40%PRP (group B, C, D, E, respectively). Cell proliferation was assessed by CCK-8 assay. mRNA expression of osteogenic marker genes including alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteopontin (OPN), osteocalcin (OCN) and core binding factor alpha 1 (Cbfa1) were determined by Real-Time Quantitative PCR Analysis (qPCR). Data revealed that different concentrations of activated autologous PRP significantly promoted hASCs growth in the proliferation phase compared to the without PRP group and resulted in a dose-response relationship. At 7-d and 14-d time point of the osteogenic induced stage, ALP activity in PRP groups gradually increased with the increasing of concentrations of PRP and showed that dose-response relationship. At 21-d time point of the osteogenic induced stage, PRP groups make much more mineralization and mRNA relative expression of ALP, OPN, OCN and Cbfa1 than that without PRP groups and show that dose-response relationship. This study indicated that different concentrations of activated autologous PRP can promote cell proliferation at earlier stage and promote osteogenic differentiation at later stage of hASCs in vitro. Moreover, it displayed a dose-dependent effect of activated autologous PRP on cell proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of hASCs in vitro. PMID:25901195

  19. Production of a Dendritic Cell-Based Vaccine Containing Inactivated Autologous Virus for Therapy of Patients with Chronic Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infection▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, Theresa L.; Piazza, Paolo; Reiter, Amanda; Stanson, Joanna; Connolly, Nancy C.; Rinaldo, Charles R.; Riddler, Sharon A.

    2009-01-01

    In preparation for a pilot clinical trial in patients with chronic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, a novel dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccine is being manufactured. The trial will test the hypothesis that isolated endogenous virus presented by DCs serves as a potent immunogen for activation of CD8+ and CD4+ T cells specific for a broad range of autologous HIV-1 antigens. Production of the vaccine under good manufacture practice conditions involves (i) autologous virus isolation; (ii) superinfection of CD4+ T cells with the virus; (iii) inactivation of the virus in CD4+ T cells, T-cell apoptosis, and coincubation of T cells with autologous DCs; and (iv) product testing and release. Endogenous virus was isolated from peripheral blood-derived CD4+ T cells of three HIV-1-positive subjects by coincubation with autologous OKT-3-stimulated CD4+ T cells. CD4+ T-cell supernatants were tested for p24 levels by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (>25 ng/ml) and for the 50% tissue culture infective doses (TCID50; which ranged from 4,642 to 46,416/ml on day 19 of culture). Autologous CD4+ T cells that were separated on immunobeads (>95% purity) and superinfected with virus-expressed p24 (28 to 54%) had TCID50 of >400/ml on days 5 to 10. Virus inactivation with psoralen (20 μg/ml) and UVB irradiation (312 nm) reduced the TCID50 of the supernatants from 199,986 to 11/ml (>99%). 7-Amino-actinomycin D-positive, annexin V-positive CD4+ T cells were fed to autologous DCs generated by using the Elutra cell separation system and the Aastrom system. Flow analysis showed that DC loading was complete in 24 h. On the basis of these translational results and experience with the generation of DCs from HIV-1-infected patients in a previous clinical trial, the Investigational New Drug application for clinical vaccination was submitted and approved by the FDA (application no. BB-IND-13137). PMID:19038780

  20. Production of a dendritic cell-based vaccine containing inactivated autologous virus for therapy of patients with chronic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, Theresa L; Piazza, Paolo; Reiter, Amanda; Stanson, Joanna; Connolly, Nancy C; Rinaldo, Charles R; Riddler, Sharon A

    2009-02-01

    In preparation for a pilot clinical trial in patients with chronic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, a novel dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccine is being manufactured. The trial will test the hypothesis that isolated endogenous virus presented by DCs serves as a potent immunogen for activation of CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells specific for a broad range of autologous HIV-1 antigens. Production of the vaccine under good manufacture practice conditions involves (i) autologous virus isolation; (ii) superinfection of CD4(+) T cells with the virus; (iii) inactivation of the virus in CD4(+) T cells, T-cell apoptosis, and coincubation of T cells with autologous DCs; and (iv) product testing and release. Endogenous virus was isolated from peripheral blood-derived CD4(+) T cells of three HIV-1-positive subjects by coincubation with autologous OKT-3-stimulated CD4(+) T cells. CD4(+) T-cell supernatants were tested for p24 levels by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (>25 ng/ml) and for the 50% tissue culture infective doses (TCID(50); which ranged from 4,642 to 46,416/ml on day 19 of culture). Autologous CD4(+) T cells that were separated on immunobeads (>95% purity) and superinfected with virus-expressed p24 (28 to 54%) had TCID(50) of >400/ml on days 5 to 10. Virus inactivation with psoralen (20 microg/ml) and UVB irradiation (312 nm) reduced the TCID(50) of the supernatants from 199,986 to 11/ml (>99%). 7-Amino-actinomycin D-positive, annexin V-positive CD4(+) T cells were fed to autologous DCs generated by using the Elutra cell separation system and the Aastrom system. Flow analysis showed that DC loading was complete in 24 h. On the basis of these translational results and experience with the generation of DCs from HIV-1-infected patients in a previous clinical trial, the Investigational New Drug application for clinical vaccination was submitted and approved by the FDA (application no. BB-IND-13137).

  1. Human Breast Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Transfected with the Stromal Cell-Derived Factor-1 Receptor CXCR4 Exhibit Enhanced Viability in Human Autologous Free Fat Grafts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang-tian Xu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The main complication of autologous free fat tissue transplantation is fat resorption and calcification due to the ischemic necrosis of fat. The promotion of transplant neovascularization soon after autologous free fat grafts may reduce these outcomes. In adulthood, stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1 and its membrane receptor C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4 are involved in the homing and migration of multiple stem cell types, neovascularization, and cell proliferation. We hypothesized that CXCR4 may improve the long-term survival of free fat tissue transplants by recruiting endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs and may therefore improve graft revascularization. In this study, we aimed to determine the effect of human breast adipose-derived stem cells (HBASCs transfected with the CXCR4 gene on the survival rate of human autologous free fat transplants in nude mice. Methods: Human breast adipose-derived stem cells (HBASCs were expanded ex vivo for 3 passages, labeled with green fluorescent protein (GFP and transfected with CXCR4 or left untransfected. Autologous fat tissues were mixed with the GFP-labeled, CXCR4-transfected HBASCs (group A, GFP-labeled HBASCs (group B, the known vascularization-promoting agent VEGF (group C, or medium (group D and then injected subcutaneously into 32 nude mice at 4 spots in a random fashion. Six months later, the transplanted tissue volume and histology were evaluated, and neo-vascularization was quantified by counting the capillaries. CXCR4 and SDF-1α mRNA expression in the transplants was determined using real-time quantitative PCR analysis (qPCR. Results: The data revealed that the control (group D transplant volume survival was 28.3 ± 4.5%. Mixing CXCR4-transfected (group A and untransfected (group B HBASCs significantly increased transplant volume survival (79.5 ± 8.3% and 67.2 ± 5.9%, respectively, whereas VEGF-transfected HBASCs (group C were less effective (41.2 ± 5.1%. Histological

  2. Endothelial network formed with human dermal microvascular endothelial cells in autologous multicellular skin substitutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponec, Maria; El Ghalbzouri, Abdoelwaheb; Dijkman, Remco; Kempenaar, Johanna; van der Pluijm, Gabri; Koolwijk, Pieter

    2004-01-01

    A human skin equivalent from a single skin biopsy harboring keratinocytes and melanocytes in the epidermal compartment, and fibroblasts and microvascular dermal endothelial cells in the dermal compartment was developed. The results of the study revealed that the nature of the extracellular matrix of the dermal compartments plays an important role in establishment of endothelial network in vitro. With rat-tail type I collagen matrices only lateral but not vertical expansion of endothelial networks was observed. In contrast, the presence of extracellular matrix of entirely human origin facilitated proper spatial organization of the endothelial network. Namely, when human dermal fibroblasts and microvascular endothelial cells were seeded on the bottom of an inert filter and subsequently epidermal cells were seeded on top of it, fibroblasts produced extracellular matrix throughout which numerous branched tubes were spreading three-dimensionally. Fibroblasts also facilitated the formation of basement membrane at the epidermal/matrix interface. Under all culture conditions, fully differentiated epidermis was formed with numerous melanocytes present in the basal epidermal cell layer. The results of the competitive RT-PCR revealed that both keratinocytes and fibroblasts expressed VEGF-A, -B, -C, aFGF and bFGF mRNA, whereas fibroblasts also expressed VEGF-D mRNA. At protein level, keratinocytes produced 10 times higher amounts of VEGF-A than fibroblasts did. The generation of multicellular skin equivalent from a single human skin biopsy will stimulate further developments for its application in the treatment of full-thickness skin defects. The potential development of biodegradable, biocompatible material suitable for these purposes is a great challenge for future research.

  3. Improvement in autologous human fat transplant survival with SVF plus VEGF-PLA nano-sustained release microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liqun; Pan, Shengsheng; Ni, Binting; Lin, Yuanshao

    2014-08-01

    Early neovascularization is important for autologous fat transplant survival. SVF cells are ideal seed cells. Both vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and SVF cells can promote neovascularization. However, the half-life (about 50 min) of VEGF is too short to sustain an adequate local concentration. We have investigated whether VEGF-polylactic acid (PLA) nano-sustained release microspheres plus SVF cells can improve neovascularization and survival of transplanted fat tissues. SVF cells were harvested and constructed VEGF-PLA nano-sustained release microspheres in vitro. Human fat tissues was mixed with SVF cells plus VEGF-PLA, SVF cells alone or Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium as the control. These three mixtures were injected into random sites in 18 nude mice. Two months later, the transplants were weighed and examined histologically; and capillaries were counted to quantify neovascularization. Hematoxylin-eosin (HE) and anti-VEGF stains were applied to reveal cell infiltration. The mean wet weight of fat in the SVF plus VEGF-PLA, SVF alone, and control transplants were 0.18 ± 0.013 g, 0.16 ± 0.015 g, and 0.071 ± 0.12 g, respectively; the differences between groups were statistically significant. More vessels were present in the SVF plus VEGF-PLA transplants than in the other two types. Transplants mixed with SVF cells also had an acceptable density of capillaries. Histological analysis revealed that both the SVF plus VEGF-PLA and SVF alone transplants, but not the control transplants, were composed of adipose tissue, and had less fat necrosis and less fibrosis than control specimens. SVF plus VEGF-PLA transplants had significantly greater capillary density and VEGF expression than the other two transplant groups. Thus transplanted fat tissue survival and quality can be enhanced by the addition of VEGF-PLA nano-sustained release microspheres plus SVF cells. © 2014 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  4. The Buecherer-Strecker synthesis of D- and L-(1-11C)tyrosine and the in vivo study of 0100L-(1-11C)tyrosine in human brain using positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halldin, C.; Wiesel, F.A.

    1987-01-01

    The synthesis of D- and L-(1- 11 C)tyrosine, starting with 11 C-cyanide, is reported. DL-(1- 11 C)tyrosine was prepared by the Buecherer-Strecker reaction, from carrier added 11 C-cyanide with an incorporation of 80% in 20 min. The isolation of the pure D- and L-amino acid isomers from the enantiomeric mixture was accomplished within 15 min by preparative HPLC using a chiral stationary phase and a phosphate buffer as the mobile phase. Typically, the total synthesis time was 50 min (including purification) from end of trapping of 11 C-cyanide, with a radiochemical yield of D- and L-amino acid of 40%-60%. The D- and L-(1- 11 C)tyrosine were both obtained optically pure, with a carrier added specific activity of 0.3-0.5 Ci/mmol and a radiochemical purity better than 99%. The 11 C labelled L-tyrosine was used in an in vivo study in the human brain using positron emission tomography (PET). (orig.)

  5. Ortho- and meta-tyrosine formation from phenylalanine in human saliva as a marker of hydroxyl radical generation during betel quid chewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, U J; Nair, J; Friesen, M D; Bartsch, H; Ohshima, H

    1995-05-01

    The habit of betel quid chewing, common in South-East Asia and the South Pacific islands, is causally associated with an increased risk of oral cancer. Reactive oxygen species formed from polyphenolic betel quid ingredients and lime at alkaline pH have been implicated as the agents responsible for DNA and tissue damage. To determine whether hydroxyl radical (HO.) is generated in the human oral cavity during chewing of betel quid, the formation of o- and m-tyrosine from L-phenylalanine was measured. Both o- and m-tyrosine were formed in vitro in the presence of extracts of areca nut and/or catechu, transition metal ions such as Cu2+ and Fe2+ and lime or sodium carbonate (alkaline pH). Omission of any of these ingredients from the reaction mixture significantly reduced the yield of tyrosines. Hydroxyl radical scavengers such as ethanol, D-mannitol and dimethylsulfoxide inhibited the phenylalanine oxidation in a dose-dependent fashion. Five volunteers chewed betel quid consisting of betel leaf, areca nut, catechu and slaked lime (without tobacco). Their saliva, collected after chewing betel quid, contained high concentrations of p-tyrosine, but no appreciable amounts of o- or m-tyrosine. Saliva samples from the same subjects after chewing betel quid to which 20 mg phenylalanine had been added contained o- and m-tyrosine at concentrations ranging from 1010 to 3000 nM and from 1110 to 3140 nM respectively. These levels were significantly higher (P betel quid, which ranged from 14 to 70 nM for o-tyrosine and from 10 to 35 nM for m-tyrosine. These studies clearly demonstrate that the HO. radical is formed in the human oral cavity during betel quid chewing and is probably implicated in the genetic damage that has been observed in oral epithelial cells of chewers.

  6. A Dual Role for the Nonreceptor Tyrosine Kinase Pyk2 during the Intracellular Trafficking of Human Papillomavirus 16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschalk, Elinor Y; Meneses, Patricio I

    2015-09-01

    The infectious process of human papillomaviruses (HPVs) has been studied considerably, and many cellular components required for viral entry and trafficking continue to be revealed. In this study, we investigated the role of the nonreceptor tyrosine kinase Pyk2 during HPV16 pseudovirion infection of human keratinocytes. We found that Pyk2 is necessary for infection and appears to be involved in the intracellular trafficking of the virus. Small interfering RNA-mediated reduction of Pyk2 resulted in a significant decrease in infection but did not prevent viral entry at the plasma membrane. Pyk2 depletion resulted in altered endolysosomal trafficking of HPV16 and accelerated unfolding of the viral capsid. Furthermore, we observed retention of the HPV16 pseudogenome in the trans-Golgi network (TGN) in Pyk2-depleted cells, suggesting that the kinase could be required for the viral DNA to exit the TGN. While Pyk2 has previously been shown to function during the entry of enveloped viruses at the plasma membrane, the kinase has not yet been implicated in the intracellular trafficking of a nonenveloped virus such as HPV. Additionally, these data enrich the current literature on Pyk2's function in human keratinocytes. In this study, we investigated the role of the nonreceptor tyrosine kinase Pyk2 during human papillomavirus (HPV) infection of human skin cells. Infections with high-risk types of HPV such as HPV16 are the leading cause of cervical cancer and a major cause of genital and oropharyngeal cancer. As a nonenveloped virus, HPV enters cells by interacting with cellular receptors and established cellular trafficking routes to ensure that the viral DNA reaches the nucleus for productive infection. This study identified Pyk2 as a cellular component required for the intracellular trafficking of HPV16 during infection. Understanding the infectious pathways of HPVs is critical for developing additional preventive therapies. Furthermore, this study advances our knowledge of

  7. Human albumin prevents 6-hydroxydopamine-induced loss of tyrosine hydroxylase in in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Juan Zhang

    Full Text Available Human albumin has recently been demonstrated to protect brain neurons from injury in rat ischemic brain. However, there is no information available about whether human albumin can prevent loss of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH expression of dopaminergic (DA neurons induced by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA toxicity that is most commonly used to create a rat model of Parkinson's disease (PD. In the present study, two microliters of 1.25% human albumin were stereotaxically injected into the right striatum of rats one day before or 7 days after the 6-OHDA lesion in the same side. D-Amphetamine-induced rotational asymmetry was measured 7 days, 3 and 10 weeks after 6-OHDA lesion. We observed that intrastriatal administration of human albumin significantly reduced the degree of rotational asymmetry. The number of TH-immunoreactive neurons present in the substantia nigra was greater in 6-OHDA lesioned rats following human albumin-treatment than non-human albumin treatment. TH-immunoreactivity in the 6-OHDA-lesioned striatum was also significantly increased in the human albumin-treated rats. To examine the mechanisms underlying the effects of human albumin, we challenged PC12 cells with 6-OHDA as an in vitro model of PD. Incubation with human albumin prevented 6-OHDA-induced reduction of cell viability in PC12 cell cultures, as measured by MTT assay. Furthermore, human albumin reduced 6-OHDA-induced formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS and apoptosis in cultured PC12 cells, as assessed by flow cytometry. Western blot analysis showed that human albumin inhibited 6-OHDA-induced activation of JNK, c-Jun, ERK, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK signaling in PC12 cultures challenged with 6-OHDA. Human albumin may protect against 6-OHDA toxicity by influencing MAPK pathway followed by anti-ROS formation and anti-apoptosis.

  8. Human Albumin Prevents 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced Loss of Tyrosine Hydroxylase in In Vitro and In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li-Juan; Xue, Yue-Qiang; Yang, Chun; Yang, Wei-Hua; Chen, Long; Zhang, Qian-Jin; Qu, Ting-Yu; Huang, Shile; Zhao, Li-Ru; Wang, Xiao-Min; Duan, Wei-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Human albumin has recently been demonstrated to protect brain neurons from injury in rat ischemic brain. However, there is no information available about whether human albumin can prevent loss of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression of dopaminergic (DA) neurons induced by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) toxicity that is most commonly used to create a rat model of Parkinson's disease (PD). In the present study, two microliters of 1.25% human albumin were stereotaxically injected into the right striatum of rats one day before or 7 days after the 6-OHDA lesion in the same side. D-Amphetamine-induced rotational asymmetry was measured 7 days, 3 and 10 weeks after 6-OHDA lesion. We observed that intrastriatal administration of human albumin significantly reduced the degree of rotational asymmetry. The number of TH-immunoreactive neurons present in the substantia nigra was greater in 6-OHDA lesioned rats following human albumin-treatment than non-human albumin treatment. TH-immunoreactivity in the 6-OHDA-lesioned striatum was also significantly increased in the human albumin-treated rats. To examine the mechanisms underlying the effects of human albumin, we challenged PC12 cells with 6-OHDA as an in vitro model of PD. Incubation with human albumin prevented 6-OHDA-induced reduction of cell viability in PC12 cell cultures, as measured by MTT assay. Furthermore, human albumin reduced 6-OHDA-induced formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptosis in cultured PC12 cells, as assessed by flow cytometry. Western blot analysis showed that human albumin inhibited 6-OHDA-induced activation of JNK, c-Jun, ERK, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) signaling in PC12 cultures challenged with 6-OHDA. Human albumin may protect against 6-OHDA toxicity by influencing MAPK pathway followed by anti-ROS formation and anti-apoptosis. PMID:22815976

  9. Quantitation of deuterated and non-deuterated phenylalanine and tyrosine in human plasma using the selective ion monitoring method with combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagalak, M.-J.; Curtius, H.-Ch.; Leimbacher, W.; Redweik, U.

    1977-01-01

    A specific method is described for the quantitative analysis of deutarated and non-deuterated phenylalanine and tyrosine in human plasma by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry using selective ion monitoring. From the several derivatives investigated, the N- or N,O-trifluoroacetyl methyl esters were found to be the most suitable for our purposes. DL-Phenylalanine-4-d 1 and L-tyrosine-d 7 were used as internal standards. The sensitivity of this method permits the measurement of amounts as small as ca. 2.5 ng/ml in plasma for both phenylalanine and tyrosine. The coefficients of variation were found to be ca. 1.6% (n=12) for phenylalanine and 3.0% (n=12) for tyrosine. Using this method, an in vivo determination of phenylalanine-4-monooxygenase activity in humans is possible by loading the subjects with deuterated L-phenylalanine-d 5 (accepted as substrate by phenylalanine-4-monooxygenase E.C. 1.14.16.1) and the subsequent measuring of deuterated L-tyrosine-d 4 formed and residual L-phenylalanine-d 5

  10. CCR 20th Anniversary Commentary: Autologous T Cells-The Ultimate Personalized Drug for the Immunotherapy of Human Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Steven A

    2015-12-15

    The article by Rosenberg and colleagues, which was published in the July 1, 2011, issue of Clinical Cancer Research, demonstrated the power of the adoptive transfer of autologous antitumor T cells to mediate the complete, durable, and likely curative regression of cancer in patients with heavily pretreated metastatic melanoma. It also provided a stimulus to the development of cell transfer approaches for other cancer types using both natural and genetically engineered lymphocytes. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. 21 CFR 582.5920 - Tyrosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tyrosine. 582.5920 Section 582.5920 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS... § 582.5920 Tyrosine. (a) Product. Tyrosine (L- and DL-forms). (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  12. Human dosimetric estimation of O-(2-18F-fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine based on mice biodistribution data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Ganghua; Wang Mingfang; Luo Lei; Gan Manquan; Tang Xiaolan

    2004-01-01

    To estimate the human radiation absorbed doses of O-(2- 18 F-fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine (FET), mice are considered as model. FET is injected into mice through a tail vein. At 10, 30, 60, 120 and 180 min after injection, the mice are killed by cervical fracture and the biodistribution in mice are determined. Human dosimetric estimation is performed from the biodistribution of FET in mice and the standard Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) method using time-fractional radioactivity curves for humans. The bone in human is the organ receiving highest dose of 4.78 pGy/Bq, the brain and the whole body receive the lowest dose of 1.6 pGy/Bq, and other organs receive doses between 1.6 and 3.5 pGy/Bq. The effective dose is estimated to be 9.0 pSv/Bq. The data show that a 370 MBq injection of FET leads to an estimated effective dose of 3.3 mSv, which is in the range of routine nuclear medicine investigations. The potential radiation risks associated with this study are well within accepted limits

  13. Regulation of Discrete Functional Responses by Syk and Src Family Tyrosine Kinases in Human Neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thornin Ear

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophils play a critical role in innate immunity and also influence adaptive immune responses. This occurs in good part through their production of inflammatory and immunomodulatory cytokines, in conjunction with their prolonged survival at inflamed foci. While a picture of the signaling machinery underlying these neutrophil responses is now emerging, much remains to be uncovered. In this study, we report that neutrophils constitutively express various Src family isoforms (STKs, as well as Syk, and that inhibition of these protein tyrosine kinases selectively hinders inflammatory cytokine generation by acting posttranscriptionally. Accordingly, STK or Syk inhibition decreases the phosphorylation of signaling intermediates (e.g., eIF-4E, S6K, and MNK1 involved in translational control. By contrast, delayed apoptosis appears to be independent of either STKs or Syk. Our data therefore significantly extend our understanding of which neutrophil responses are governed by STKs and Syk and pinpoint some signaling intermediates that are likely involved. In view of the foremost role of neutrophils in several chronic inflammatory conditions, our findings identify potential molecular targets that could be exploited for future therapeutic intervention.

  14. Tyrosine kinase signalling in breast cancer: Modulation of tyrosine kinase signalling in human breast cancer through altered expression of signalling intermediates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kairouz, Rania; Daly, Roger J

    2000-01-01

    The past decade has seen the definition of key signalling pathways downstream of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) in terms of their components and the protein-protein interactions that facilitate signal transduction. Given the strong evidence that links signalling by certain families of RTKs to the progression of breast cancer, it is not surprising that the expression profile of key downstream signalling intermediates in this disease has also come under scrutiny, particularly because some exhibit transforming potential or amplify mitogenic signalling pathways when they are overexpressed. Reflecting the diverse cellular processes regulated by RTKs, it is now clear that altered expression of such signalling proteins in breast cancer may influence not only cellular proliferation (eg Grb2) but also the invasive properties of the cancer cells (eg EMS1/cortactin)

  15. Interferon-α-conditioned human monocytes combine a Th1-orienting attitude with the induction of autologous Th17 responses: role of IL-23 and IL-12.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano M Santini

    Full Text Available IFN-α exerts multiple effects leading to immune protection against pathogens and cancer as well to autoimmune reactions by acting on monocytes and dendritic cells. We analyzed the versatility of human monocytes conditioned by IFN-α towards dendritic cell differentiation (IFN-DC in shaping the autologous T-helper response. Priming of naïve CD4 T cells with autologous IFN-DC in the presence of either SEA or anti-CD3, resulted, in addition to a prominent expansion of CXCR3+ IFN-γ-producing CD4 Th1 cells, in the emergence of two distinct subsets of IL-17-producing CD4 T cells: i a predominant Th17 population selectively producing IL-17 and expressing CCR6; ii a minor Th1/Th17 population, producing both IL-17 and IFN-γ. After phagocytosis of apoptotic cells, IFN-DC induced Th17 cell expansion and IL-17 release. Notably, the use of neutralizing antibodies revealed that IL-23 was an essential cytokine in mediating Th17 cell development by IFN-DC. The demonstration of the IFN-DC-induced expansion of both Th1 and Th17 cell populations reveals the intrinsic plasticity of these DC in orienting the immune response and provides a mechanistic link between IFN-α and the onset of autoimmune phenomena, which have been correlated with both IL-17 production and exposure to IFN-α.

  16. A human pericardium biopolymeric scaffold for autologous heart valve tissue engineering: cellular and extracellular matrix structure and biomechanical properties in comparison with a normal aortic heart valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straka, Frantisek; Schornik, David; Masin, Jaroslav; Filova, Elena; Mirejovsky, Tomas; Burdikova, Zuzana; Svindrych, Zdenek; Chlup, Hynek; Horny, Lukas; Daniel, Matej; Machac, Jiri; Skibová, Jelena; Pirk, Jan; Bacakova, Lucie

    2018-04-01

    The objective of our study was to compare the cellular and extracellular matrix (ECM) structure and the biomechanical properties of human pericardium (HP) with the normal human aortic heart valve (NAV). HP tissues (from 12 patients) and NAV samples (from 5 patients) were harvested during heart surgery. The main cells in HP were pericardial interstitial cells, which are fibroblast-like cells of mesenchymal origin similar to the valvular interstitial cells in NAV tissue. The ECM of HP had a statistically significantly (p structures of the two tissues, the dense part of fibrous HP (49 ± 2%) and the lamina fibrosa of NAV (47 ± 4%), was similar. In both tissues, the secant elastic modulus (Es) was significantly lower in the transversal direction (p structure and has the biomechanical properties required for a tissue from which an autologous heart valve replacement may be constructed.

  17. Reactivity of inducer cell subsets and T8-cell activation during the human autologous mixed lymphocyte reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romain, P L; Morimoto, C; Daley, J F; Palley, L S; Reinherz, E L; Schlossman, S F

    1984-01-01

    To characterize the responding T cells in the autologous mixed lymphocyte reaction (AMLR), T cells were fractionated into purified subpopulations employing monoclonal antibodies and a variety of separation techniques including fluorescence-activated cell sorting. It was found that isolated T4 cells, but not T8 cells, proliferated in response to autologous non-T cells. More importantly, within the T4 subset, the autoreactive population was greatly enriched in a fraction reactive with an autoantibody from patients with juvenile chronic arthritis (JRA) or the monoclonal antibody anti-TQ1. Although T8 cells themselves were unable to proliferate in the AMLR, they could be induced to respond in the presence of either T4 cells or exogenous IL-2 containing medium. This was demonstrated by direct measurement of tritiated thymidine uptake by T8 cells during the course of the AMLR as well as by analysis of their relative DNA content. Taken together, these data indicate that the AMLR represents a complex pattern of immune responsiveness distinct from that observed in response to soluble antigen or alloantigen. The precise function of this T-cell circuit remains to be determined.

  18. Adoptively transferred human lung tumor specific cytotoxic T cells can control autologous tumor growth and shape tumor phenotype in a SCID mouse xenograft model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrone Soldano

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The anti-tumor efficacy of human immune effector cells, such as cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTLs, has been difficult to study in lung cancer patients in the clinical setting. Improved experimental models for the study of lung tumor-immune cell interaction as well as for evaluating the efficacy of adoptive transfer of immune effector cells are needed. Methods To address questions related to the in vivo interaction of human lung tumor cells and immune effector cells, we obtained an HLA class I + lung tumor cell line from a fresh surgical specimen, and using the infiltrating immune cells, isolated and characterized tumor antigen-specific, CD8+ CTLs. We then established a SCID mouse-human tumor xenograft model with the tumor cell line and used it to study the function of the autologous CTLs provided via adoptive transfer. Results The tumor antigen specific CTLs isolated from the tumor were found to have an activated memory phenotype and able to kill tumor cells in an antigen specific manner in vitro. Additionally, the tumor antigen-specific CTLs were fully capable of homing to and killing autologous tumors in vivo, and expressing IFN-γ, each in an antigen-dependent manner. A single injection of these CTLs was able to provide significant but temporary control of the growth of autologous tumors in vivo without the need for IL-2. The timing of injection of CTLs played an essential role in the outcome of tumor growth control. Moreover, immunohistochemical analysis of surviving tumor cells following CTL treatment indicated that the surviving tumor cells expressed reduced MHC class I antigens on their surface. Conclusion These studies confirm and extend previous studies and provide additional information regarding the characteristics of CTLs which can be found within a patient's tumor. Moreover, the in vivo model described here provides a unique window for observing events that may also occur in patients undergoing adoptive cellular

  19. Demonstration of tyrosinase in the vitiligo skin of human beings by a sensitive fluorometric method as well as by 14C(U)-L-tyrosine incorporation into melanin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husain, I.; Vijayan, E.; Ramaiah, A.; Pasricha, J.S.; Madan, N.C.

    1982-01-01

    Tyrosinase activity (Monophenol, dihydroxyphenylalanine: oxygen oxidoreductase EC 1.14.18.1) in vitiligo and normal epidermal homogenates of skin from human beings was measured by estimating beta 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (dopa) by a highly sensitive fluorometric method described in this paper. The tyrosine activity in the vitiligo skin was about 4 to 37% of corresponding normal skin. The activity of tyrosinase in normal human skin from different individuals and from different regions of the body was in the range of 4 to 140 picomoles of beta 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine formed per min/mg protein of epidermal homogenate. The enzyme from vitiligo and normal skin was severely inhibited by substance(s) of low molecular weight. The enzyme exhibits a lag of about 4 hr in the absence of added beta 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine and 1 hr in presence of 5 microM dopa. Tyrosinase from the normal and vitiligo skin was inhibited by excess concentration of tyrosine. The homogenates from vitiligo skin could synthesize melanin from C14(U)-L-Tyrosine. The rate of tyrosine incorporation into melanin by the epidermal homogenates is increased by 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (dopa) disproportionate to its effect on tyrosinase activity. Based on the data presented in this paper it is concluded that melanocytes are present in the vitiligo skin. A tentative hypothesis is put forward to explain the lack of melanin synthesis by the vitiligo skin under in vivo conditions, although melanocytes are present

  20. Experimental and Theoretical Study of the Movement of the Wpd Flexible Loop of Human Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase PTP1B in Complex with Halide Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Aline; Saenz-Méndez, Patricia; Cousido-Siah, Alexandra; Podjarny, Alberto D.; Ventura, Oscar N.

    2012-11-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation is a post-translational modification mechanism, crucial for the regulation of nearly all aspects of cell life. This dynamic, reversible process is regulated by the balanced opposing activity of protein tyrosine kinases and protein tyrosine phosphatases. In particular, the protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is implicated in the regulation of the insulin-receptor activity, leptin-stimulated signal transduction pathways and other clinically relevant metabolic routes, and it has been found overexpressed or overregulated in human breasts, colon and ovary cancers. The WPD loop of the enzyme presents an inherent flexibility, and it plays a fundamental role in the enzymatic catalysis, turning it into a potential target in the design of new efficient PTP1B inhibitors. In order to determine the interactions that control the spatial conformation adopted by the WPD loop, complexes between the enzyme and halide ions (Br- and I- in particular) were crystallized and their crystallographic structure determined, and the collective movements of the aforementioned complexes were studied through Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations. Both studies yielded concordant results, indicating the existence of a relationship between the identity of the ion present in the complex and the strength of the interactions it establishes with the surrounding protein residues.

  1. LC-MS/MS assay for the quantitation of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor neratinib in human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiesel, Brian F; Parise, Robert A; Wong, Alvin; Keyvanjah, Kiana; Jacobs, Samuel; Beumer, Jan H

    2017-02-05

    Neratinib is an orally available tyrosine kinase inhibitor targeting HER2 (ERBB2) and EGFR (ERBB). It is being clinically evaluated for the treatment of breast and other solid tumors types as a single agent or in combination with other chemotherapies. In support of several phase I/II clinical trials investigating neratinib combinations, we developed and validated a novel LC-MS/MS assay for the quantification of neratinib in 100μL of human plasma with a stable isotopic internal standard. Analytes were extracted from plasma using protein precipitation and evaporation of the resulting supernatant followed by resuspension. Chromatographic separation was achieved using an Acquity UPLC BEH Shield RP18 column and a gradient methanol-water mobile phase containing 10% ammonium acetate. An ABI 4000 mass spectrometer and electrospray positive mode ionization were used for detection. The assay was linear from 2 to 1,000ng/mL and proved to be accurate (98.9-106.5%) and precise (neratinib. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A rapid lateral flow immunoassay for the detection of tyrosine phosphatase-like protein IA-2 autoantibodies in human serum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Kikkas

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes (T1D results from the destruction of pancreatic insulin-producing beta cells and is strongly associated with the presence of islet autoantibodies. Autoantibodies to tyrosine phosphatase-like protein IA-2 (IA-2As are considered to be highly predictive markers of T1D. We developed a novel lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA based on a bridging format for the rapid detection of IA-2As in human serum samples. In this assay, one site of the IA-2As is bound to HA-tagged-IA-2, which is subsequently captured on the anti-HA-Tag antibody-coated test line on the strip. The other site of the IA-2As is bound to biotinylated IA-2, allowing the complex to be visualized using colloidal gold nanoparticle-conjugated streptavidin. For this study, 35 serum samples from T1D patients and 44 control sera from non-diabetic individuals were analyzed with our novel assay and the results were correlated with two IA-2A ELISAs. Among the 35 serum samples from T1D patients, the IA-2A LFIA, the in-house IA-2A ELISA and the commercial IA-2A ELISA identified as positive 21, 29 and 30 IA-2A-positive sera, respectively. The major advantages of the IA-2A LFIA are its rapidity and simplicity.

  3. Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase PTPRS Is an Inhibitory Receptor on Human and Murine Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunin, A.; Sisirak, V.; Ghosh, H.S.; Grajkowska, L.T.; Hou, Z.E.; Miron, M.; Yang, C.; Ceribelli, M.; Uetani, N.; Chaperot, L.; Plumas, J.; Hendriks, W.J.; Tremblay, M.L.; Hacker, H.; Staudt, L.M.; Green, P.H.; Bhagat, G.; Reizis, B.

    2015-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are primary producers of type I interferon (IFN) in response to viruses. The IFN-producing capacity of pDCs is regulated by specific inhibitory receptors, yet none of the known receptors are conserved in evolution. We report that within the human immune system,

  4. The use of gamma-irradiation and ultraviolet-irradiation in the preparation of human melanoma cells for use in autologous whole-cell vaccines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deacon, Donna H; Slingluff, Craig L Jr; Hogan, Kevin T; Swanson, Erin M; Chianese-Bullock, Kimberly A; Denlinger, Chadrick E; Czarkowski, Andrea R; Schrecengost, Randy S; Patterson, James W; Teague, Mark W

    2008-01-01

    Human cancer vaccines incorporating autologous tumor cells carry a risk of implantation and subsequent metastasis of viable tumor cells into the patient who is being treated. Despite the fact that the melanoma cell preparations used in a recent vaccine trial (Mel37) were gamma-irradiated (200 Gy), approximately 25% of the preparations failed quality control release criteria which required that the irradiated cells incorporate 3 H-thymidine at no more than 5% the level seen in the non-irradiated cells. We have, therefore, investigated ultraviolet (UV)-irradiation as a possible adjunct to, or replacement for gamma-irradiation. Melanoma cells were gamma- and/or UV-irradiated. 3 H-thymidine uptake was used to assess proliferation of the treated and untreated cells. Caspase-3 activity and DNA fragmentation were measured as indicators of apoptosis. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis was used to assess antigen expression. UV-irradiation, either alone or in combination with gamma-irradiation, proved to be extremely effective in controlling the proliferation of melanoma cells. In contrast to gamma-irradiation, UV-irradiation was also capable of inducing significant levels of apoptosis. UV-irradiation, but not gamma-irradiation, was associated with the loss of tyrosinase expression. Neither form of radiation affected the expression of gp100, MART-1/MelanA, or S100. These results indicate that UV-irradiation may increase the safety of autologous melanoma vaccines, although it may do so at the expense of altering the antigenic profile of the irradiated tumor cells

  5. Dual Inhibition of Topoisomerase II and Tyrosine Kinases by the Novel Bis-Fluoroquinolone Chalcone-Like Derivative HMNE3 in Human Pancreatic Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Chao Ma

    Full Text Available Both tyrosine kinase and topoisomerase II (TopII are important anticancer targets, and their respective inhibitors are widely used in cancer therapy. However, some combinations of anticancer drugs could exhibit mutually antagonistic actions and drug resistance, which further limit their therapeutic efficacy. Here, we report that HMNE3, a novel bis-fluoroquinolone chalcone-like derivative that targets both tyrosine kinase and TopII, induces tumor cell proliferation and growth inhibition. The viabilities of 6 different cancer cell lines treated with a range of HMNE3 doses were detected using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. Cellular apoptosis was determined using Hoechst 33258 fluorescence staining and the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL assay. The expression of activated Caspase-3 was examined by immunocytochemistry. The tyrosine kinase activity was measured with a human receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK detection kit using a horseradish peroxidase (HRP-conjugated phosphotyrosine (pY20 antibody as the substrate. The topoisomerase II activity was measured using agarose gel electrophoresis with the DNA plasmid pBR322 as the substrate. The expression levels of the P53, Bax, Bcl-2, Caspase-3, -8, -9, p-cSrc, c-Src and topoisomerase II proteins were detected by western blot analysis. The proliferation of five of the six cancer cell lines was significantly inhibited by HMNE3 at 0.312 to 10 μmol/L in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Treatment of the Capan-1 and Panc-1 cells with 1.6 to 3.2 μM HMNE3 for 48 h significantly increased the percentage of apoptotic cells (P<0.05, and this effect was accompanied by a decrease in tyrosine kinase activity. HMNE3 potentially inhibited tyrosine kinase activity in vitro with an IC50 value of 0.64±0.34 μmol/L in Capan-1 cells and 3.1±0.86 μmol/L in Panc-1 cells. The activity of c-Src was significantly inhibited by HMNE3 in a dose

  6. Human phenylalanine hydroxylase is activated by H2O2: a novel mechanism for increasing the L-tyrosine supply for melanogenesis in melanocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schallreuter, Karin U.; Wazir, Umar; Kothari, Sonal; Gibbons, Nicholas C.J.; Moore, Jeremy; Wood, John M.

    2004-01-01

    Epidermal phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) produces L-tyrosine from the essential amino acid L-phenylalanine supporting melanogenesis in human melanocytes. Those PAH activities increase linearly in the different skin phototypes I-VI (Fitzpatrick classification) and also increase up to 24 h after UVB light with only one minimal erythemal dose. Since UVB generates also H 2 O 2 , we here asked the question whether this reactive oxygen species could influence the activity of pure recombinant human PAH. Under saturating conditions with the substrate L-phenylalanine (1 x 10 -3 M), the V max for enzyme activity increased 4-fold by H 2 O 2 (>2.0 x 10 -3 M). Lineweaver-Burk analysis identified a mixed activation mechanism involving both the regulatory and catalytic domains of PAH. Hyperchem molecular modelling and Deep View analysis support oxidation of the single Trp 120 residue to 5-OH-Trp 120 by H 2 O 2 causing a conformational change in the regulatory domain. PAH was still activated by H 2 O 2 in the presence of the electron donor/cofactor 6(R)-L-erythro-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin despite slow oxidation of this cofactor. In vivo FT-Raman spectroscopy confirmed decreased epidermal phenylalanine in association with increased tyrosine after UVB exposure. Hence, generation of H 2 O 2 by UVB can activate epidermal PAH leading to an increased L-tyrosine pool for melanogenesis

  7. Substitution of Active Site Tyrosines with Tryptophan Alters the Free Energy for Nucleotide Flipping by Human Alkyladenine DNA Glycosylase†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendershot, Jenna M.; Wolfe, Abigail E.; O'Brien, Patrick J.

    2011-01-01

    Human alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG) locates and excises a wide variety of structurally diverse alkylated and oxidized purine lesions from DNA to initiate the base excision repair pathway. Recognition of a base lesion requires flipping of the damaged nucleotide into a relatively open active site pocket between two conserved tyrosine residues, Y127 and Y159. We have mutated each of these amino acids to tryptophan and measured the kinetic effects on the nucleotide flipping and base excision steps. The Y127W and Y159W mutant proteins have robust glycosylase activity toward DNA containing 1,N6-ethenoadenine (εA), within 4-fold of that of the wildtype enzyme, raising the possibility that tryptophan fluorescence could be used to probe the DNA binding and nucleotide flipping steps. Stopped-flow fluorescence was used to compare the time-dependent changes in tryptophan fluorescence and εA fluorescence. For both mutants, the tryptophan fluorescence exhibited two-step binding with essentially identical rate constants as were observed for the εA fluorescence changes. These results provide evidence that AAG forms an initial recognition complex in which the active site pocket is perturbed and the stacking of the damaged base is disrupted. Upon complete nucleotide flipping, there is further quenching of the tryptophan fluorescence with coincident quenching of the εA fluorescence. Although these mutations do not have large effects on the rate constant for excision of εA, there are dramatic effects on the rate constants for nucleotide flipping that result in 40 to 100-fold decreases in the flipping equilibrium relative to wildtype. Most of this effect is due to an increased rate of unflipping, but surprisingly the Y159W mutation causes a 5-fold increase in the rate constant for flipping. The large effect on the equilibrium for nucleotide flipping explains the greater deleterious effects that these mutations have on the glycosylase activity toward base lesions that are in

  8. The biological activity of the human epidermal growth factor receptor is positively regulated by its C-terminal tyrosines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helin, K; Velu, T; Martin, P

    1991-01-01

    mutants in the full length receptor. EGF-dependent transforming ability of the single point mutants is similar to that of the wild type, while that of double mutants is decreased and an even lower activity is present in the triple mutant. In each bioassay, including EGF-dependent focal transformation...... biologically. The EGF-R kinase activity is affected by tyrosine substitution since in vitro phosphorylation of exogenous substrates is reduced in the double and triple mutants. Autophosphorylation, in vivo and in vitro, is also reduced, but not totally abolished in the triple point mutant and Dc123 indicating......The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) C-terminus contains three conserved tyrosines (Y-1068, Y-1148, Y-1173) which are phosphorylated upon EGF activation. To clarify the functional role of these tyrosines, each has been mutated to phenylalanine and studied as single, double and triple...

  9. Preclinical evaluation of sunitinib, a multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitor, as a radiosensitizer for human prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, Colin; Sheu, Tommy; Bridges, Kathleen; Mason, Kathy; Kuban, Deborah; Mathew, Paul; Meyn, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    Many prostate cancers demonstrate an increased expression of growth factor receptors such as vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) and platelet derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) which have been correlated with increased resistance to radiotherapy and poor prognosis in other tumors. Therefore, response to radiation could potentially be improved by using inhibitors of these abnormally activated pathways. We have investigated the radiosensitizing effects of sunitinib, a potent, multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitor of the VEGFR and PDGFR receptors, on human prostate cancer cells. The radiosensitizing effects of sunitinib were assessed on human prostate cancer cell lines DU145, PC3 and LNCaP by clonogenic assay. Sunitinib’s ability to inhibit the activities of its key targets was determined by immunoblot analysis. The radiosensitizing effects of sunitinib in vivo were tested on human tumor xenografts growing in nude mice where response was assessed by tumor growth delay. Clonogenic survival curve assays for both DU145 and PC3 cells showed that the surviving fraction at 2 Gy was reduced from 0.70 and 0.52 in controls to 0.44 and 0.38, respectively, by a 24 hr pretreatment with 100 nM sunitinib. LNCaP cells were not radiosensitized by sunitinib. Dose dependent decreases in VEGFR and PDGFR activation were also observed following sunitinib in both DU145 and PC3 cells. We assessed the ability of sunitinib to radiosensitize PC3 xenograft tumors growing in the hind limb of nude mice. Sunitinib given concurrently with radiation did not prolong tumor growth delay. However, when animals were treated with sunitinib commencing the day after fractionated radiation was complete, tumor growth delay was enhanced compared to radiation alone. We conclude, based on the in vivo results, that sunitinib and radiation do not interact directly to radiosensitize the PC3 tumor cells in vivo as they did in vitro. The fact that tumor growth delay was enhanced when sunitinib was

  10. Genistein and tyrphostin AG556 decrease ultra-rapidly activating delayed rectifier K+ current of human atria by inhibiting EGF receptor tyrosine kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Guo-Sheng; Zhang, Yan-Hui; Wu, Wei; Sun, Hai-Ying; Wang, Yan; Li, Gui-Rong

    2017-03-01

    The ultra-rapidly activating delayed rectifier K + current I Kur (encoded by K v 1.5 or KCNA5) plays an important role in human atrial repolarization. The present study investigates the regulation of this current by protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs). Whole-cell patch voltage clamp technique and immunoprecipitation and Western blotting analysis were used to investigate whether the PTK inhibitors genistein, tyrphostin AG556 (AG556) and PP2 regulate human atrial I Kur and hKv1.5 channels stably expressed in HEK 293 cells. Human atrial I Kur was decreased by genistein (a broad-spectrum PTK inhibitor) and AG556 (a highly selective EGFR TK inhibitor) in a concentration-dependent manner. Inhibition of I Kur induced by 30 μM genistein or 10 μM AG556 was significantly reversed by 1 mM orthovanadate (a protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor). Similar results were observed in HEK 293 cells stably expressing hK v 1.5 channels. On the other hand, the Src family kinase inhibitor PP2 (1 μM) slightly enhanced I Kur and hK v 1.5 current, and the current increase was also reversed by orthovanadate. Immunoprecipitation and Western blotting analysis showed that genistein, AG556, and PP2 decreased tyrosine phosphorylation of hK v 1.5 channels and that the decrease was countered by orthovanadate. The PTK inhibitors genistein and AG556 decrease human atrial I Kur and cloned hK v 1.5 channels by inhibiting EGFR TK, whereas the Src kinase inhibitor PP2 increases I Kur and hK v 1.5 current. These results imply that EGFR TK and the soluble Src kinases may have opposite effects on human atrial I Kur . © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  11. Crystal Structure of Human Dual-Specificity Tyrosine-Regulated Kinase 3 Reveals New Structural Features and Insights into its Auto-phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kuglae; Cha, Jeong Seok; Cho, Yong-Soon; Kim, Hoyoung; Chang, Nienping; Kim, Hye-Jung; Cho, Hyun-Soo

    2018-04-07

    Dual-specificity tyrosine-regulated kinases (DYRKs) auto-phosphorylate a critical tyrosine residue in their activation loop and phosphorylate their substrate on serine and threonine residues. The auto-phosphorylation occurs intramolecularly and is a one-off event. DYRK3 is selectively expressed at a high level in hematopoietic cells and attenuates erythroblast development, leading to anemia. In the present study, we determined the crystal structure of the mature form of human DYRK3 in complex with harmine, an ATP competitive inhibitor. The crystal structure revealed a phosphorylation site, residue S350, whose phosphorylation increases the stability of DYRK3 and enhances its kinase activity. In addition, our structural and biochemical assays suggest that the N-terminal auto-phosphorylation accessory domain stabilizes the DYRK3 protein, followed by auto-phosphorylation of the tyrosine of the activation loop, which is important for kinase activity. Finally, our docking analysis provides information for the design of novel and potent therapeutics to treat anemia. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Nasal chondrocyte-based engineered autologous cartilage tissue for repair of articular cartilage defects: an observational first-in-human trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumme, Marcus; Barbero, Andrea; Miot, Sylvie; Wixmerten, Anke; Feliciano, Sandra; Wolf, Francine; Asnaghi, Adelaide M; Baumhoer, Daniel; Bieri, Oliver; Kretzschmar, Martin; Pagenstert, Geert; Haug, Martin; Schaefer, Dirk J; Martin, Ivan; Jakob, Marcel

    2016-10-22

    Articular cartilage injuries have poor repair capacity, leading to progressive joint damage, and cannot be restored predictably by either conventional treatments or advanced therapies based on implantation of articular chondrocytes. Compared with articular chondrocytes, chondrocytes derived from the nasal septum have superior and more reproducible capacity to generate hyaline-like cartilage tissues, with the plasticity to adapt to a joint environment. We aimed to assess whether engineered autologous nasal chondrocyte-based cartilage grafts allow safe and functional restoration of knee cartilage defects. In a first-in-human trial, ten patients with symptomatic, post-traumatic, full-thickness cartilage lesions (2-6 cm 2 ) on the femoral condyle or trochlea were treated at University Hospital Basel in Switzerland. Chondrocytes isolated from a 6 mm nasal septum biopsy specimen were expanded and cultured onto collagen membranes to engineer cartilage grafts (30 × 40 × 2 mm). The engineered tissues were implanted into the femoral defects via mini-arthrotomy and assessed up to 24 months after surgery. Primary outcomes were feasibility and safety of the procedure. Secondary outcomes included self-assessed clinical scores and MRI-based estimation of morphological and compositional quality of the repair tissue. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01605201. The study is ongoing, with an approved extension to 25 patients. For every patient, it was feasible to manufacture cartilaginous grafts with nasal chondrocytes embedded in an extracellular matrix rich in glycosaminoglycan and type II collagen. Engineered tissues were stable through handling with forceps and could be secured in the injured joints. No adverse reactions were recorded and self-assessed clinical scores for pain, knee function, and quality of life were improved significantly from before surgery to 24 months after surgery. Radiological assessments indicated variable degrees of

  13. Autologous method for ex vivo expansion of human limbal epithelial progenitor cells based on plasma rich in growth factors technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riestra, A C; Vazquez, N; Chacon, M; Berisa, S; Sanchez-Avila, R M; Orive, G; Anitua, E; Meana, A; Merayo-Lloves, J

    2017-04-01

    Develop an autologous culture method for ex vivo expansion of human limbal epithelial progenitor cells (LEPCs) using Plasma Rich in Growth Factors (PRGF) as a growth supplement and as a scaffold for the culture of LEPCs. LEPCs were cultivated in different media supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) or 10% PRGF. The outgrowths, total number of cells, colony forming efficiency (CFE), morphology and immunocytochemistry against p63- α and cytokeratins 3 and 12 (CK3-CK12) were analyzed. PRGF was also used to elaborate a fibrin membrane. The effects of the scaffold on the preservation of stemness and the phenotypic characterization of LEPCs were investigated through analysis of CK3-CK12, ABCG-2 and p63. LEPCs cultivated with PRGF showed a significantly higher growth area than FBS cultures. Moreover, the number of cells were also higher in PRGF than FBS, while displaying a better morphology overall. CFE was found to be also higher in PRGF groups compared to FBS, and the p63-α expression also differed between groups. LEPCs cultivated on PRGF membranes appeared as a confluent monolayer of cells and still retained p63 and ABCG-2 expression, being negative for CK3-CK12. PRGF can be used in corneal tissue engineering, supplementing the culture media, even in a basal media without any other additives, as well as providing a scaffold for the culture. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Technological progress and challenges towards cGMP manufacturing of human pluripotent stem cells based therapeutic products for allogeneic and autologous cell therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasalizadeh, Saeed; Baharvand, Hossein

    2013-12-01

    Recent technological advances in the generation, characterization, and bioprocessing of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have created new hope for their use as a source for production of cell-based therapeutic products. To date, a few clinical trials that have used therapeutic cells derived from hESCs have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), but numerous new hPSC-based cell therapy products are under various stages of development in cell therapy-specialized companies and their future market is estimated to be very promising. However, the multitude of critical challenges regarding different aspects of hPSC-based therapeutic product manufacturing and their therapies have made progress for the introduction of new products and clinical applications very slow. These challenges include scientific, technological, clinical, policy, and financial aspects. The technological aspects of manufacturing hPSC-based therapeutic products for allogeneic and autologous cell therapies according to good manufacturing practice (cGMP) quality requirements is one of the most important challenging and emerging topics in the development of new hPSCs for clinical use. In this review, we describe main critical challenges and highlight a series of technological advances in all aspects of hPSC-based therapeutic product manufacturing including clinical grade cell line development, large-scale banking, upstream processing, downstream processing, and quality assessment of final cell therapeutic products that have brought hPSCs closer to clinical application and commercial cGMP manufacturing. © 2013.

  15. Derivation of mouse embryonic stem cell lines from tyrosine hydroxylase reporter mice crossed with a human SNCA transgenic mouse model of Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Chumarina

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC lines were derived by crossing heterozygous transgenic (tg mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP under the control of the rat tyrosine hydroxylase (TH promoter, with homozygous alpha-synuclein (aSYN mice expressing human mutant SNCAA53T under the control of the mouse Prion promoter (MoPrP, or wildtype (WT mice. The expression of GFP and human aSYN was validated by immunocytochemistry in midbrain neuron cultures upon differentiation of mESC lines using stromal cell-derived inducing activity. These mESC lines can help to study the impact of human aSYN expression in neurons and oligodendrocytes, and also trace GFP-expressing midbrain neurons.

  16. SDS-binding assay based on tyrosine fluorescence as a tool to determine binding properties of human serum albumin in blood plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdanova, Nadezda; Shirshin, Evgeny; Fadeev, Victor; Priezzhev, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Among all plasma proteins human serum albumin (HSA) is the most studied one as it is the main transport protein and can bind a wide variety of ligands especially fatty acids (FAs). The concentration of FAs bound to HSA in human blood plasma differs by three times under abnormal conditions (fasting, physical exercises or in case of social important diseases). In the present study a surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was used to simulate FAs binding to HSA. It was shown that the increase of Tyr fluorescence of human blood plasma due to SDS addition can be completely explained by HSA-SDS complex formation. Binding parameters of SDS-HSA complex (average number of sites and apparent constant of complex formation) were determined from titration curves based on tyrosine (Tyr) fluorescence.

  17. Comparison of autologous cell therapy and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) injection vs. G-CSF injection alone for the treatment of acute radiation syndrome in a non-human primate model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertho, Jean-Marc; Frick, Johanna; Prat, Marie; Demarquay, Christelle; Dudoignon, Nicolas; Trompier, Francois; Gorin, Norbert-Claude; Thierry, Dominique; Gourmelon, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the efficacy of autologous cell therapy after irradiation combined with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) injections with G-CSF treatment alone in a heterogeneous model of irradiation representative of an accidental situation. Material and Methods: Non-human primates were irradiated at 8.7 Gy whole-body dose with the right arm shielded to receive 4.8 Gy. The first group of animals received G-CSF (lenograstim) injections starting 6 h after irradiation, and a second group received a combination of G-CSF (lenograstim) injections and autologous expanded hematopoietic cells. Animals were followed up for blood cell counts, circulating progenitors, and bone marrow cellularity. Results: No significant differences were seen between the two treatment groups, whatever the parameter observed: time to leukocyte or platelet recovery and duration and severity of aplasia. Conclusion: Our results indicated that identical recovery kinetic was observed when irradiated animals are treated with G-CSF independently of the reinjection of ex vivo expanded autologous hematopoietic cells. Thus G-CSF injections might be chosen as a first-line therapeutic strategy in the treatment of accidental acute radiation victims

  18. Treatment of advanced gastrointestinal cancer with genetically modified autologous mesenchymal stem cells - TREAT-ME-1 - a phase I, first in human, first in class trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Einem, Jobst C; Peter, Sylvia; Günther, Christine; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Grütz, Gerald; Salat, Christoph; Stoetzer, Oliver; Nelson, Peter J; Michl, Marlies; Modest, Dominik P; Holch, Julian W; Angele, Martin; Bruns, Christiane; Niess, Hanno; Heinemann, Volker

    2017-10-06

    This phase I, first in human, first in class clinical study aimed at evaluating the safety, tolerability and efficacy of treatment with genetically modified mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) in combination with ganciclovir (GCV). MSC_apceth_101 are genetically modified autologous MSCs used as vehicles for a cell-based gene therapy in patients with advanced gastrointestinal adenocarcinoma. The study design consisted of a dose-escalation 3 + 3 design. All patients ( n = 6) were treated with up to three applications of MSC_apceth_101, followed by GCV infusions given on three consecutive days starting 48 hours after injection of MSC_apceth_101. Three of six patients received a total dose of 1.5 × 10 6 cells/kg. Two patients received three doses of 1 × 10 6 cells/kg, while one patient received only two doses of 1 × 10 6 cells/kg due to a SADR. Six patients received MSC_apceth_101. No IMP-related serious adverse events occurred. Adverse-events related to IMP-injection were increased creatinine, cough, fever, and night sweat. TNF, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and sE-Selectin, showed that repeated application is immunologically safe, but induces a switch of the functional properties of monocytes to an inflammatory phenotype. Treatment induced stable disease in 4/6 patients, and progressive disease in 2/6 patients. Treatment with MSC_apceth_101 in combination with GCV demonstrated acceptable safety and tolerability in patients with advanced gastrointestinal adenocarcinoma.

  19. Kinetic alteration of a human dihydrodiol/3alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase isoenzyme, AKR1C4, by replacement of histidine-216 with tyrosine or phenylalanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, T; Ishikura, S; Shintani, S; Usami, N; Hara, A

    2000-01-01

    Human dihydrodiol dehydrogenase with 3alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity exists in four forms (AKR1C1-1C4) that belong to the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) family. Recent crystallographic studies on the other proteins in this family have indicated a role for a tyrosine residue (corresponding to position 216 in these isoenzymes) in stacking the nicotinamide ring of the coenzyme. This tyrosine residue is conserved in most AKR family members including AKR1C1-1C3, but is replaced with histidine in AKR1C4 and phenylalanine in some AKR members. In the present study we prepared mutant enzymes of AKR1C4 in which His-216 was replaced with tyrosine or phenylalanine. The two mutations decreased 3-fold the K(m) for NADP(+) and differently influenced the K(m) and k(cat) for substrates depending on their structures. The kinetic constants for bile acids with a 12alpha-hydroxy group were decreased 1.5-7-fold and those for the other substrates were increased 1.3-9-fold. The mutation also yielded different changes in sensitivity to competitive inhibitors such as hexoestrol analogues, 17beta-oestradiol, phenolphthalein and flufenamic acid and 3,5,3', 5'-tetraiodothyropropionic acid analogues. Furthermore, the mutation decreased the stimulatory effects of the enzyme activity by sulphobromophthalein, clofibric acid and thyroxine, which increased the K(m) for the coenzyme and substrate of the mutant enzymes more highly than those of the wild-type enzyme. These results indicate the importance of this histidine residue in creating the cavity of the substrate-binding site of AKR1C4 through the orientation of the nicotinamide ring of the coenzyme, as well as its involvement in the conformational change by binding non-essential activators. PMID:11104674

  20. Both stimulatory and inhibitory effects of dietary 5-hydroxytryptophan and tyrosine are found on urinary excretion of serotonin and dopamine in a large human population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George J Trachte

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available George J Trachte1, Thomas Uncini2, Marty Hinz31Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, University of MN Medical School Duluth, Duluth, MN, USA; 2Chief Medical Examiner, St. Louis County, Hibbing, MN, USA; 3Clinical Research, NeuroResearch Clinics, Inc., Duluth, MN, USA Abstract: Amino acid precursors of dopamine and serotonin have been administered for decades to treat a variety of clinical conditions including depression, anxiety, insomnia, obesity, and a host of other illnesses. Dietary administration of these amino acids is designed to increase dopamine and serotonin levels within the body, particularly the brain. Convincing evidence exists that these precursors normally elevate dopamine and serotonin levels within critical brain tissues and other organs. However, their effects on urinary excretion of neurotransmitters are described in few studies and the results appear equivocal. The purpose of this study was to define, as precisely as possible, the influence of both 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP and tyrosine on urinary excretion of serotonin and dopamine in a large human population consuming both 5-HTP and tyrosine. Curiously, only 5-HTP exhibited a marginal stimulatory influence on urinary serotonin excretion when 5-HTP doses were compared to urinary serotonin excretion; however, a robust relationship was observed when alterations in 5-HTP dose were compared to alterations in urinary serotonin excretion in individual patients. The data indicate three statistically discernible components to 5-HTP responses, including inverse, direct, and no relationships between urinary serotonin excretion and 5-HTP doses. The response to tyrosine was more consistent but primarily yielded an unexpected reduction in urinary dopamine excretion. These data indicate that the urinary excretion pattern of neurotransmitters after consumption of their precursors is far more complex than previously appreciated. These data on urinary neurotransmitter excretion might

  1. Importance of the content and localization of tyrosine residues for thyroxine formation within the N-terminal part of human thyroglobulin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Hartog, M. T.; Sijmons, C. C.; Bakker, O.; Ris-Stalpers, C.; de Vijlder, J. J.

    1995-01-01

    Thyroxine (T4) is formed by coupling of iodinated tyrosine residues within thyroglobulin (TG). In mature TG, some iodinated tyrosine residues are involved preferentially in T4 formation. In order to investigate the specific role of various tyrosine residues in T4 formation, N-terminal TG fragments

  2. Tyrosine411 and Arginine410 of Human Serum Albumin Play an Important Role in the Binding of Sodium 4-Phenylbutyrate to Site II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enokida, Taisuke; Yamasaki, Keishi; Okamoto, Yuko; Taguchi, Kazuaki; Ishiguro, Takako; Maruyama, Toru; Seo, Hakaru; Otagiri, Masaki

    2016-06-01

    Sodium 4-phenylbutyrate (PB) has many pharmacological activities; therefore extending its clinical use to the treatment of a wider variety of diseases would be desirable. However, our knowledge of the binding of PB to plasma proteins is not extensive. To address this issue in more detail, we characterized the protein binding of PB. Binding experiments showed that PB mainly binds to human serum albumin (HSA) in plasma. PB was also found to bind to a single site on HSA, which was identified as site II by fluorescent probe displacement experiment. Furthermore, an appropriate alkyl chain length and a carboxylic group in the PB structure were required for PB binding to HSA, suggesting that hydrophobic (and van der Waals) and electrostatic interactions are involved as binding modes. The contributions of hydrogen bonding and/or van der Waals interactions were also indicated by thermodynamic analyses. Tyrosine411 and arginine410 were identified as being involved in the binding of PB to site II, based on binding experiments using chemically modified- and mutant-HSA preparations. In conclusion, the available evidence indicates that PB binds to site II of HSA with assistance by multiple forces and that tyrosine411 and arginine410 both play important roles in this phenomenon. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Selective expression of a protein-tyrosine kinase, p56lyn, in hematopoietic cells and association with production of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanashi, Yuji; Mori, Shigeo; Inoue, Kazushi; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Toyoshima, Kumao; Yoshida, Mitsuaki; Kishimoto, Tadamitsu

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports the identification of the lyn gene product, a member of the src-related family of protein-tyrosine kinases, and its expression in hematopoietic cells. A lyn-specific sequence (Arg-25 to Ala-119 of the protein) was expressed in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein with β-galactosidase. Antiserum raised against the fusion protein immunoprecipitated a 56-kDa protein from human B lymphocytes. Incubation of the immunoprecipitate with [γ- 32 P]ATP resulted in the phosphorylation of this protein at tyrosine residues. Immunohistological and immunoblotting analyses showed that the lyn gene product was expressed in lymphatic tissues (spleen and tonsil) and in adult lung, which contains many macrophages. Furthermore, both the transcripts and the protein products of the lyn gene accumulated in macrophages/monocytes, platelets, and B lymphocytes but were not expressed appreciably in granulocytes, erythrocytes, or T lymphocytes, suggesting that lyn gene products function primarily in certain differentiated cells of lymphoid and myeloid lineages

  4. Apoptosis-related molecular differences for response to tyrosin kinase inhibitors in drug-sensitive and drug-resistant human bladder cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jixia Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR family is reportedly overexpressed in bladder cancer, and tyrosine kinaseinhibitors (TKIs have been suggested as treatment. Gefitinib is a selective inhibitor of the EGFR and lapatinib is a dual inhibitor of both the EGFR and HER2 (human EGFR type 2 receptor. Both compounds compete with the binding of adenosine triphosphate (ATP to the tyrosine kinase domain of the respective receptors to inhibit receptor autophosphorylation causing suppression of signal transduction. Unfortunately, resistance to these inhibitors is a major clinical problem. Aims: To compare the apoptosis signaling pathway(s induced by gefitinib and lapatinib, in UM-UC-5 (drug-sensitive and UM-UC-14 (drug-resistant bladder cancer cells and to identify molecular differences that might be useful predictors of their efficacy. Materials and Methods: Cell proliferation, cell cycle and apoptosis assay were used to detect the effect of TKIs on UM-UC-5 and UM-UC-14 cells. Molecular differences for response to TKIs were examined by protein array. Results: TKIs strongly inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell cycle G1 arrest and apoptosis in UM-UC-5 cells. Most notable apoptosis molecular differences included decreased claspin, trail, and survivin by TKIs in the sensitive cells. In contrast, TKIs had no effect on resistant cells. Conclusions: Claspin, trail, and survivin might be used to determine the sensitivity of bladder cancers to TKIs.

  5. Identification of tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins associated with metastasis and functional analysis of FER in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Haiyu; Ren, Zhenggang; Kang, Xiaonan; Zhang, Lan; Li, Xuefei; Wang, Yan; Xue, Tongchun; Shen, Yuefang; Liu, Yinkun

    2009-01-01

    Aberrant activity of tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins is commonly associated with HCC metastasis. Cell signaling events driven by these proteins are implicated in numerous processes that alter cancer cell behavior. Exploring the activities and signaling pathways of these proteins in HCC metastasis may help in identifying new candidate molecules for HCC-targeted therapy. Hep3B (a nonmetastatic HCC cell line) and MHCC97H (a highly metastatic HCC cell line) were used in this study, and the tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins expressed in these cell lines were profiled by a phosphoproteomics technique based on LC-MS/MS. Protein-protein interaction and functional clustering analyses were performed to determine the activities of the identified proteins and the signaling pathways closely related to HCC metastasis. In both cell lines, a total of 247 phosphotyrosine (pTyr) proteins containing 281 pTyr sites were identified without any stimulation. The involvement of almost 30% of these in liver or liver cancer has not been reported previously. Biological process clustering analysis indicated that pTyr proteins involved in cell motility, migration, protein autophosphorylation, cell-cell communication, and antiapoptosis functions were overexpressed during metastasis. Pathway clustering analysis revealed that signaling pathways such as those involved in EGFR signaling, cytokine- and chemokine-mediated signal transduction, and the PI3K and JAK-STAT cascades were significantly activated during HCC metastasis. Moreover, noncanonical regulation of the JNK cascade might also provide new targets for HCC metastasis. After comparing the pTyr proteins that were differentially expressed during HCC cell metastasis, we selected FER, a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase, and validated its role in terms of both expression and function. The data confirmed that FER might play a critical role in the invasion and metastasis of HCC. The identification of pTyr proteins and signaling pathways associated

  6. Internalization and down-regulation of the human epidermal growth factor receptor are regulated by the carboxyl-terminal tyrosines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helin, K; Beguinot, L

    1991-01-01

    with receptors in which 1, 2, or all 3 tyrosines were changed to phenylalanines. The triple point mutant EGF-R, expressed in NIH-3T3, exhibited low autophosphorylation in vivo, low biological and reduced kinase activities. Single and double point mutants were down-regulated, as well as wild type EGF......-R in response to EGF showing a half-life of about 1 h. Degradation of the triple point mutant, however, was impaired and resulted in a half-life of 4 h in the presence of EGF. EGF-dependent down-regulation of surface receptors was decreased in the triple point mutant EGF-R as was internalization and degradation...... of EGF. The specific rate of internalization of the triple point mutant was reduced. By contrast, intracellular processing of ligand previously internalized at 20 degrees C was similar between wild type and mutant receptors. Taken together the data indicate that the delay in degradation observed in cells...

  7. Anti-VEGF strategies - from antibodies to tyrosine kinase inhibitors: background and clinical development in human cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Korpanty, Grzegorz

    2012-01-01

    Tumour angiogenesis (formation of new blood vessels supporting tumour growth and metastasis) is a result of complex interactions between the tumour and the surrounding microenvironment. Targeting tumours with anti-angiogenic therapy remains an exciting area of preclinical and clinical studies. Although many significant advances have been achieved and the clinical use of anti-angiogenic drugs is now well recognized in many solid malignancies, these therapies fall short of their anticipated clinical benefits and leave many unanswered questions like exact mechanism of action, patients\\' selection and monitoring response to anti-angiogenic drugs. Tumour angiogenesis is controlled by complex signaling cascades and ongoing research into molecular mechanisms of tumour angiogenesis not only helps to understand its basic mechanisms but hopefully will identify new therapeutic targets. In 2012, both monoclonal antibodies and small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors remain the two major clinically useful therapeutic options that interfere with tumour angiogenesis in many solid malignancies.

  8. Irradiation and various cytotoxic drugs enhance tyrosine phosphorylation and β1-integrin clustering in human A549 lung cancer cells in a substratum-dependent manner in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordes, N.; Beinke, C.; Beuningen, D. van; Plasswilm, L.

    2004-01-01

    Background and purpose: interactions of cells with a substratum, especially extracellular matrix proteins, initiate clustering of integrin receptors in the cell membrane. This process represents the initial step for the activation of signaling pathways regulating survival, proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, and migration, and could, furthermore, be important for cellular resistance-mediating mechanisms against radiation or cytotoxic drugs. The lack of data elucidating the impact of irradiation or cytotoxic drugs on this important phenomenon led to this study on human A549 lung cancer cells in vitro. Material and methods: the human lung carcinoma cell line A549 grown on polystyrene or fibronectin (FN) was irradiated with 0-8 Gy or treated with cisplatin (0.1-50 μM), paclitaxel (0.1-50 nM), or mitomycin (0.1-50 μM). Colony formation assays, immunofluorescence staining in combination with activation of integrin clustering using anti-β 1 -integrin antibodies (K20), and Western blotting for tyrosine phosphorylation under treatment of cells with the IC 50 for irradiation (2 Gy; IC 50 = 2.2 Gy), cisplatin (2 μM), paclitaxel (5 nM), or mitomycin (7 μM) were performed. Results: attachment of cells to FN resulted in a significantly reduced radio- and chemosensitivity compared to polystyrene. The clustering of β 1 -integrins examined by immunofluorescence staining was only stimulated by irradiation, cisplatin, paclitaxel, or mitomycin in case of cell attachment to FN. By contrast, tyrosine phosphorylation, as one of the major events following β 1 -integrin clustering, showed a 3.7-fold, FN-related enhancement, and treatment of cells with the IC 50 of radiation, cisplatin, paclitaxel, or mitomycin showed a substratum-dependent induction. Conclusion: for the first time, a strong influence of irradiation and a variety of cytotoxic drugs on the clustering of β 1 -integrins could be shown. This event is a prerequisite for tyrosine phosphorylation and, thus, the

  9. Eating to stop: Tyrosine supplementation enhances inhibitory control but not response execution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colzato, L.S.; Jongkees, B.J.; Sellaro, R.; van den Wildenberg, W.P.M.; Hommel, B.

    2014-01-01

    Animal studies and research in humans have shown that the supplementation of tyrosine, or tyrosine-containing diets, increase the plasma tyrosine and enhance brain dopamine (DA). However, the strategy of administering tyrosine (and the role of DA therein) to enhance cognition is unclear and heavily

  10. Early fetal acquisition of the chromaffin and neuronal immunophenotype by human adrenal medullary cells. An immunohistological study using monoclonal antibodies to chromogranin A, synaptophysin, tyrosine hydroxylase, and neuronal cytoskeletal proteins.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenaar, W M; Lee, V M; Trojanowski, J Q

    1990-01-01

    The development of chromaffin and neuronal features in the adrenal medulla was studied in normal human fetuses with gestational ages (GAs) of 6-34 weeks. Monoclonal antibodies specific for chromogranin A, synaptophysin, and tyrosine hydroxylase; for different subunits and phosphoisoforms of

  11. MHC class I ligation of human T cells activates the ZAP70 and p56lck tyrosine kinases, leads to an alternative phenotype of the TCR/CD3 zeta-chain, and induces apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, S; Bregenholt, S; Claesson, Mogens Helweg

    1997-01-01

    Cross-linking of MHC class I (MHC-I) molecules on human T cells induces signal-transduction events, including activation of tyrosine kinases, tyrosine phosphorylation of phospholipase C-gamma 1, and elevation of the intracellular free calcium concentration. In this study, we demonstrate...... that the ZAP70 tyrosine kinase is tyrosine phosphorylated in Jurkat T cells and in purified peripheral T cells after MHC-I ligation. The tyrosine-phosphorylated ZAP70 kinase exhibits a particular phenotype with low affinities for proteins at 21, 40, 60, and 120 kDa, proteins normally co-precipitated with ZAP70...... after TCR/CD3 stimulation. The phosphorylation of ZAP70 after MHC-I ligation was dependent on TCR/CD3 surface expression. One of the natural substrates for ZAP70 is the zeta-chain dimer of the TCR/CD3 complex. MHC-I cross-linking induces a phosphorylated zeta-protein that migrates as a dimer at 42 k...

  12. The human cytomegalovirus UL11 protein interacts with the receptor tyrosine phosphatase CD45, resulting in functional paralysis of T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ildar Gabaev

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (CMV exerts diverse and complex effects on the immune system, not all of which have been attributed to viral genes. Acute CMV infection results in transient restrictions in T cell proliferative ability, which can impair the control of the virus and increase the risk of secondary infections in patients with weakened or immature immune systems. In a search for new immunomodulatory proteins, we investigated the UL11 protein, a member of the CMV RL11 family. This protein family is defined by the RL11 domain, which has homology to immunoglobulin domains and adenoviral immunomodulatory proteins. We show that pUL11 is expressed on the cell surface and induces intercellular interactions with leukocytes. This was demonstrated to be due to the interaction of pUL11 with the receptor tyrosine phosphatase CD45, identified by mass spectrometry analysis of pUL11-associated proteins. CD45 expression is sufficient to mediate the interaction with pUL11 and is required for pUL11 binding to T cells, indicating that pUL11 is a specific CD45 ligand. CD45 has a pivotal function regulating T cell signaling thresholds; in its absence, the Src family kinase Lck is inactive and signaling through the T cell receptor (TCR is therefore shut off. In the presence of pUL11, several CD45-mediated functions were inhibited. The induction of tyrosine phosphorylation of multiple signaling proteins upon TCR stimulation was reduced and T cell proliferation was impaired. We therefore conclude that pUL11 has immunosuppressive properties, and that disruption of T cell function via inhibition of CD45 is a previously unknown immunomodulatory strategy of CMV.

  13. Growth inhibitory effects of the dual ErbB1/ErbB2 tyrosine kinase inhibitor PKI-166 on human prostate cancer xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellinghoff, Ingo K; Tran, Chris; Sawyers, Charles L

    2002-09-15

    Experiments with human prostate cancer cell lines have shown that forced overexpression of the ErbB2-receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) promotes androgen-independent growth and increases androgen receptor-transcriptional activity in a ligand-independent fashion. To investigate the relationship between ErbB-RTK signaling and androgen in genetically unmanipulated human prostate cancer, we performed biochemical and biological studies with the dual ErbB1/ErbB2 RTK inhibitor PKI-166 using human prostate cancer xenograft models with isogenic sublines reflecting the transition from androgen-dependent to androgen-independent growth. In the presence of low androgen concentrations, PKI-166 showed profound growth-inhibitory effects on tumor growth, which could be partially reversed by androgen add-back. At physiological androgen concentrations, androgen withdrawal greatly enhanced the ability of PKI-166 to retard tumor growth. The level of extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation correlated with the response to PKI-166 treatment, whereas the expression levels of ErbB1 and ErbB2 did not. These results suggest that ErbB1/ErbB2 RTKs play an important role in the biology of androgen-independent prostate cancer and provide a rationale for clinical evaluation of inhibitors targeted to this pathway.

  14. Autopoiesis: Autology, Autotranscendence and Autonomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    and 1990s – particularly in a French context. While his work has remained (to date) at distance from the rising number of suggestions, especi- ally regarding social and cultural theory, that have come out of these debates on self-organization, Castoriadis made a speci¿c and original contribution to them...... ‘reality-modeling’ (John Casti) – whether via cognitive frameworks or models of society and culture. Secondly, attempts to adapt debates within the humanities, e.g. in philosophy, social theory and cultural studies, have tended to end in anti-humanism, ranging from Deleuze and Guattari’s ‘abstract machine......’s philosophy. She argues that a focus on the self-organization of the living being implies not only a distinct move towards an ontology of radical physis in Castoriadis’s later work, but also, along with it, a revised version of his project of autonomy. Autonomy, like autology and the other theme of this issue...

  15. SAM domain-dependent activity of PfTKL3, an essential tyrosine kinase-like kinase of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdi, Abdirahman; Eschenlauer, Sylvain; Reininger, Luc; Doerig, Christian

    2010-10-01

    Over the last decade, several protein kinases inhibitors have reached the market for cancer chemotherapy. The kinomes of pathogens represent potentially attractive targets in infectious diseases. The functions of the majority of protein kinases of Plasmodium falciparum, the parasitic protist responsible for the most virulent form of human malaria, remain unknown. Here we present a thorough characterisation of PfTKL3 (PF13_0258), an enzyme that belongs to the tyrosine kinase-like kinase (TKL) group. We demonstrate by reverse genetics that PfTKL3 is essential for asexual parasite proliferation in human erythrocytes. PfTKL3 is expressed in both asexual and gametocytes stages, and in the latter the protein co-localises with cytoskeleton microtubules. Recombinant PfTKL3 displays in vitro autophosphorylation activity and is able to phosphorylate exogenous substrates, and both activities are dramatically dependent on the presence of an N-terminal "sterile alpha-motif" domain. This study identifies PfTKL3 as a validated drug target amenable to high-throughput screening.

  16. Mutations of the central tyrosines of putative cholesterol recognition amino acid consensus (CRAC) sequences modify folding, activity, and sterol-sensing of the human ABCG2 multidrug transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gál, Zita; Hegedüs, Csilla; Szakács, Gergely; Váradi, András; Sarkadi, Balázs; Özvegy-Laczka, Csilla

    2015-02-01

    Human ABCG2 is a plasma membrane glycoprotein causing multidrug resistance in cancer. Membrane cholesterol and bile acids are efficient regulators of ABCG2 function, while the molecular nature of the sterol-sensing sites has not been elucidated. The cholesterol recognition amino acid consensus (CRAC, L/V-(X)(1-5)-Y-(X)(1-5)-R/K) sequence is one of the conserved motifs involved in cholesterol binding in several proteins. We have identified five potential CRAC motifs in the transmembrane domain of the human ABCG2 protein. In order to define their roles in sterol-sensing, the central tyrosines of these CRACs (Y413, 459, 469, 570 and 645) were mutated to S or F and the mutants were expressed both in insect and mammalian cells. We found that mutation in Y459 prevented protein expression; the Y469S and Y645S mutants lost their activity; while the Y570S, Y469F, and Y645F mutants retained function as well as cholesterol and bile acid sensitivity. We found that in the case of the Y413S mutant, drug transport was efficient, while modulation of the ATPase activity by cholesterol and bile acids was significantly altered. We suggest that the Y413 residue within a putative CRAC motif has a role in sterol-sensing and the ATPase/drug transport coupling in the ABCG2 multidrug transporter. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. MHC-I-induced apoptosis in human B-lymphoma cells is dependent on protein tyrosine and serine/threonine kinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Elm; Bregenholt, S; Johansen, B

    1999-01-01

    B lymphoma cells, is dependent on protein tyrosine kinases and the phosphatidylinositol 3 (PI-3) kinase. Functional studies showed that MHC-I crosslinking induced almost complete inhibition of the spontaneous proliferation of the B lymphoma cells as early as 6 h post-crosslinking and apoptosis 24 h...... post-crosslinking. Preincubation with either protein tyrosine kinase or protein serine/threonine kinase inhibitors reduced the MHC-I-induced apoptosis to background levels, whereas inhibition of PI-3 kinase had no effect. These data demonstrate a pivotal role for protein tyrosine and serine...

  18. Tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase-1 and tyrosine sulfation of chemokine receptor 4 are induced by Epstein-Barr virus encoded latent membrane protein 1 and associated with the metastatic potential of human nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Xu

    Full Text Available The latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1, which is encoded by the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, is an important oncogenic protein that is closely related to carcinogenesis and metastasis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC, a prevalent cancer in China. We previously reported that the expression of the functional chemokine receptor CXCR4 is associated with human NPC metastasis. In this study, we show that LMP1 induces tyrosine sulfation of CXCR4 through tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase-1 (TPST-1, an enzyme that is responsible for catalysis of tyrosine sulfation in vivo, which is likely to contribute to the highly metastatic character of NPC. LMP1 could induce tyrosine sulfation of CXCR4 and its associated cell motility and invasiveness in a NPC cell culture model. In contrast, the expression of TPST-1 small interfering RNA reversed LMP1-induced tyrosine sulfation of CXCR4. LMP1 conveys signals through the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR pathway, and EGFR-targeted siRNA inhibited the induction of TPST-1 by LMP1. We used a ChIP assay to show that EGFR could bind to the TPST-1 promoter in vivo under the control of LMP1. A reporter gene assay indicated that the activity of the TPST-1 promoter could be suppressed by deleting the binding site between EGFR and TPST-1. Finally, in human NPC tissues, the expression of TPST-1 and LMP1 was directly correlated and clinically, the expression of TPST-1 was associated with metastasis. These results suggest the up-regulation of TPST-1 and tyrosine sulfation of CXCR4 by LMP1 might be a potential mechanism contributing to NPC metastasis.

  19. Human NACHT, LRR, and PYD domain-containing protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome activity is regulated by and potentially targetable through Bruton tyrosine kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao; Pichulik, Tica; Wolz, Olaf-Oliver; Dang, Truong-Minh; Stutz, Andrea; Dillen, Carly; Delmiro Garcia, Magno; Kraus, Helene; Dickhöfer, Sabine; Daiber, Ellen; Münzenmayer, Lisa; Wahl, Silke; Rieber, Nikolaus; Kümmerle-Deschner, Jasmin; Yazdi, Amir; Franz-Wachtel, Mirita; Macek, Boris; Radsak, Markus; Vogel, Sebastian; Schulte, Berit; Walz, Juliane Sarah; Hartl, Dominik; Latz, Eicke; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Grimbacher, Bodo; Miller, Lloyd; Brunner, Cornelia; Wolz, Christiane; Weber, Alexander N R

    2017-10-01

    The Nod-like receptor NACHT, LRR, and PYD domain-containing protein 3 (NLRP3) and Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK) are protagonists in innate and adaptive immunity, respectively. NLRP3 senses exogenous and endogenous insults, leading to inflammasome activation, which occurs spontaneously in patients with Muckle-Wells syndrome; BTK mutations cause the genetic immunodeficiency X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA). However, to date, few proteins that regulate NLRP3 inflammasome activity in human primary immune cells have been identified, and clinically promising pharmacologic targeting strategies remain elusive. We sought to identify novel regulators of the NLRP3 inflammasome in human cells with a view to exploring interference with inflammasome activity at the level of such regulators. After proteome-wide phosphoproteomics, the identified novel regulator BTK was studied in human and murine cells by using pharmacologic and genetic BTK ablation. Here we show that BTK is a critical regulator of NLRP3 inflammasome activation: pharmacologic (using the US Food and Drug Administration-approved inhibitor ibrutinib) and genetic (in patients with XLA and Btk knockout mice) BTK ablation in primary immune cells led to reduced IL-1β processing and secretion in response to nigericin and the Staphylococcus aureus toxin leukocidin AB (LukAB). BTK affected apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD (ASC) speck formation and caspase-1 cleavage and interacted with NLRP3 and ASC. S aureus infection control in vivo and IL-1β release from cells of patients with Muckle-Wells syndrome were impaired by ibrutinib. Notably, IL-1β processing and release from immune cells isolated from patients with cancer receiving ibrutinib therapy were reduced. Our data suggest that XLA might result in part from genetic inflammasome deficiency and that NLRP3 inflammasome-linked inflammation could potentially be targeted pharmacologically through BTK. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy

  20. Genistein, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, enhanced radiosensitivity in human esophageal cancer cell lines in vitro: Possible involvement of inhibition of survival signal transduction pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimoto, Tetsuo; Nonaka, Tetsuo; Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Saitoh, Jun-ichi; Takahashi, Takeo; Mitsuhashi, Norio

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: The effect of genistein, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, on radiosensitivity was examined, especially focusing on 'survival signal transduction pathways'. Methods and Materials: Two human esophageal squamous cell cancer cell lines, TE-1 (p53, mutant) and TE-2 (p53, wild), were used. Radiosensitivity was determined by clonogenic assay, and activation of survival signals was examined by Western blot. Results: Genistein (30 μM) greatly enhanced radiosensitivity in these cell lines by suppressing radiation-induced activation of survival signals, p42/p44 extracellular signal-regulated kinase and AKT/PKB. Significant increase in the percentage of apoptotic cells and increased poly[ADP-ribose] polymerase cleavage were observed in TE-2, but not in TE-1 even after combination of genistein with irradiation. In terms of changes in expression of p53-related proteins, increase in expression of Bax and decrease in that of Bcl-2 were observed in TE-2 but not in TE-1, suggesting that the main mode of cell death induced by genistein in a cell line with wild type p53 differed from that with mutant p53. Conclusions: This study suggested that survival signals, including p42/p44 ERK and AKT/PKB, may be involved in determining radiosensitivity, and genistein would be a potent therapeutic agent that has an enhancing effect on radiation

  1. Antibody-mediated platelet phagocytosis by human macrophages is inhibited by siRNA specific for sequences in the SH2 tyrosine kinase, Syk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ying; Wang, Weiming; Mao, Huiming; Hu, Hai; Wu, Yanling; Chen, Bing-Guan; Liu, Zhongmin

    2011-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia depends upon Fc receptor-mediated phagocytosis that involves signaling through the SH2 tyrosine kinase, Syk. We designed small interfering (siRNA) sequences complementary to Syk coding regions to decrease the expression of Syk in the human macrophage cell line, THP-1. To evaluate the functional effect of siRNA on phagocytosis, we developed a new in vitro assay for antibody-mediated platelet ingestion by THP-1 cells. Incubation of THP-1 cells at 37°C with fluorescence-labeled platelets and anti-platelet antibody promoted ingestion of platelets that could be quantitated by flow cytometry. Transfection of THP-1 cells with Syk-specific siRNA resulted in a reduction in the amount of FcγRII-associated Syk protein. Coincident with decreased Syk expression, we observed inhibition of antibody-mediated platelet ingestion. These results confirm a key role for Syk in antibody-mediated phagocytosis and suggest Syk-specific siRNA as a possible therapeutic candidate for immune thrombocytopenia. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Differential role of EGF and BFGF in human GBM-TIC proliferation: relationship to EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitor sensibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajetto, A; Porcile, C; Pattarozzi, A; Scotti, L; Aceto, A; Daga, A; Barbieri, F; Florio, T

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is among the most devastating human tumors being rapidly fatal despite aggressive surgery, radiation and chemotherapies. It is characterized by extensive dissemination of tumor cells within the brain that hinders complete surgical resection. GBM tumor initiating-cells (TICs) are a rare subpopulation of cells responsible for tumor development, growth, invasiveness and recurrence after chemotherapy. TICs from human GBM can be selected in vitro using the same conditions permissive for the growth of normal neural cells, of which share some features including marker expression, self-renewal capacity, long-term proliferation, and ability to differentiate into neuronal and glial cells. EGFR overexpression and its constitutive activation is one of the most important signaling alteration identified in GBM, and its pharmacological targeting represents an attractive therapeutic goal. We previously demonstrated that human GBM TICs have different sensitivity to the EGFR kinase inhibitors erlotinib and gefitinib, depending on the differential modulation of downstream signaling cascades. In this work we investigated the mechanisms of resistance to erlotinib in two human GBM TIC cultures, analyzing EGF and bFGF individual contribution to proliferation, clonogenicity, and migration. We demonstrated the presence of a small cell subpopulation whose proliferation is supported by EGF and a larger one mainly dependent on bFGF. Thus, insensitivity to EGFR kinase inhibitors as far as TIC proliferation results from a predominant FGFR activation that hides the inhibitory effects induced on EGFR signaling. Conversely, EGF and bFGF induced cell migration with similar efficacy. In addition, unlike neural stem/progenitors cells, the removal of chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans from cell surface was unable to discern EGF- and bFGF-dependent subpopulations in GBM TICs.

  3. [F-18]fluoro-meta-L-tyrosine is a better PET tracer than [F-18]fluoro-L-dopa for the delineation of dopaminergic structures in the human brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firnau, G.; Chirakal, R.; Nahmias, C.; Garnett, E.S.

    1990-01-01

    Fluorine-18 labelled fluoro-m-L-tyrosine (FmLtyr) and fluoro-L-Dopa (F-Dopa) have been synthesized, and the utility of FmLtyr for PET investigations of dopaminergic brain regions has been compared to that of F-dopa. Experimental results from both monkey and human studies indicate that FmLtyr gives better delineation of striatum, and is a better PET tracer than F-dopa

  4. Concurrent Autophagy Inhibition Overcomes the Resistance of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors in Human Bladder Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Minyong; Lee, Kyoung-Hwa; Lee, Hye Sun; Jeong, Chang Wook; Kwak, Cheol; Kim, Hyeon Hoe; Ku, Ja Hyeon

    2017-02-04

    Despite the potential therapeutic efficacy of epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors in the treatment of advanced stage bladder cancer, there currently is no clear evidence to support this hypothesis. In this study, we investigate whether the concurrent treatment of autophagy-blocking agents with EGFR inhibitors exerts synergistic anti-cancer effects in T24 and J82 human bladder cancer cells. Lapatinib and gefitinib were used as EGFR inhibitors, and bafilomycin A1 (BFA1), chloroquine (CQ) and 3-methyladenine (3-MA) were used as the pharmacologic inhibitors of autophagy activities. To assess the proliferative and self-renewal capabilities, the Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay and a clonogenic assay were performed, respectively. To examine apoptotic cell death, flow cytometry using annexin-V/propidium iodide (PI) was used. To measure the autophagy activities, the expression levels of LC3I and II was determined by Western blot analysis. To validate the synergistic effects of autophagy inhibition with EGFR inhibitors, we specifically blocked key autophagy regulatory gene ATG12 by transfection of small interference RNA and examined the phenotypic changes. Of note, lapatinib and gefitinib triggered autophagy activities in T24 and J82 human bladder cancer cells, as indicated by upregulation of LC3II. More importantly, inhibiting autophagy activities with pharmacologic inhibitors (BFA1, CQ or 3-MA) remarkably reduced the cell viabilities and clonal proliferation of T24 and J82 cells, compared to those treated with either of the agents alone. We also obtained similar results of the enhanced anti-cancer effects of EGFR inhibitors by suppressing the expression of ATG12. Notably, the apoptotic assay showed that synergistic anti-cancer effects were induced via the increase of apoptotic cell death. In summary, concomitant inhibition of autophagy activities potentiated the anti-cancer effects of EGFR inhibitors in human bladder cancer cells, indicating a novel

  5. Concurrent Autophagy Inhibition Overcomes the Resistance of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors in Human Bladder Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minyong Kang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite the potential therapeutic efficacy of epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR inhibitors in the treatment of advanced stage bladder cancer, there currently is no clear evidence to support this hypothesis. In this study, we investigate whether the concurrent treatment of autophagy-blocking agents with EGFR inhibitors exerts synergistic anti-cancer effects in T24 and J82 human bladder cancer cells. Lapatinib and gefitinib were used as EGFR inhibitors, and bafilomycin A1 (BFA1, chloroquine (CQ and 3-methyladenine (3-MA were used as the pharmacologic inhibitors of autophagy activities. To assess the proliferative and self-renewal capabilities, the Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8 assay and a clonogenic assay were performed, respectively. To examine apoptotic cell death, flow cytometry using annexin-V/propidium iodide (PI was used. To measure the autophagy activities, the expression levels of LC3I and II was determined by Western blot analysis. To validate the synergistic effects of autophagy inhibition with EGFR inhibitors, we specifically blocked key autophagy regulatory gene ATG12 by transfection of small interference RNA and examined the phenotypic changes. Of note, lapatinib and gefitinib triggered autophagy activities in T24 and J82 human bladder cancer cells, as indicated by upregulation of LC3II. More importantly, inhibiting autophagy activities with pharmacologic inhibitors (BFA1, CQ or 3-MA remarkably reduced the cell viabilities and clonal proliferation of T24 and J82 cells, compared to those treated with either of the agents alone. We also obtained similar results of the enhanced anti-cancer effects of EGFR inhibitors by suppressing the expression of ATG12. Notably, the apoptotic assay showed that synergistic anti-cancer effects were induced via the increase of apoptotic cell death. In summary, concomitant inhibition of autophagy activities potentiated the anti-cancer effects of EGFR inhibitors in human bladder cancer cells, indicating

  6. Complete covalent structure of statherin, a tyrosine-rich acidic peptide which inhibits calcium phosphate precipitation from human parotid saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, D H; Hay, D I

    1977-03-10

    The complete amino acid sequence of human salivary statherin, a peptide which strongly inhibits precipitation from supersaturated calcium phosphate solutions, and therefore stabilizes supersaturated saliva, has been determined. The NH2-terminal half of this Mr=5380 (43 amino acids) polypeptide was determined by automated Edman degradations (liquid phase) on native statherin. The peptide was digested separately with trypsin, chymotrypsin, and Staphylococcus aureus protease, and the resulting peptides were purified by gel filtration. Manual Edman degradations on purified peptide fragments yielded peptides that completed the amino acid sequence through the penultimate COOH-terminal residue. These analyses, together with carboxypeptidase digestion of native statherin and of peptide fragments of statherin, established the complete sequence of the molecule. The 2 serine residues (positions 2 and 3) in statherin were identified as phosphoserine. The amino acid sequence of human salivary statherin is striking in a number of ways. The NH2-terminal one-third is highly polar and includes three polar dipeptides: H2PO3-Ser-Ser-H2PO3-Arg-Arg-, and Glu-Glu-. The COOH-terminal two-thirds of the molecule is hydrophobic, containing several repeating dipeptides: four of -Gn-Pro-, three of -Tyr-Gln-, two of -Gly-Tyr-, two of-Gln-Tyr-, and two of the tetrapeptide sequence -Pro-Tyr-Gln-Pro-. Unusual cleavage sites in the statherin sequence obtained with chymotrypsin and S. aureus protease were also noted.

  7. Cisplatin and ultra-violet-C synergistically down-regulate receptor tyrosine kinases in human colorectal cancer cells

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    Kawaguchi Junji

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Platinum-containing anti-cancer drugs such as cisplatin are widely used for patients with various types of cancers, however, resistance to cisplatin is observed in some cases. Whereas we have recently reported that high dose UV-C (200 J/m² induces colorectal cancer cell proliferation by desensitization of EGFR, which leads oncogenic signaling in these cells, in this study we investigated the combination effect of low dose cisplatin (10 μM and low dose UV-C (10 J/m² on cell growth and apoptosis in several human colorectal cancer cells, SW480, DLD-1, HT29 and HCT116. Results The combination inhibited cell cycle and colony formation, while either cisplatin or UV-C alone had little effect. The combination also induced apoptosis in these cells. In addition, the combination caused the downregulation of EGFR and HER2. Moreover, UV-C alone caused the transient internalization of the EGFR, but with time EGFR recycled back to the cell surface, while cisplatin did not affect its localization. Surprisingly, the combination caused persistent internalization of the EGFR, which results in the lasting downregulation of the EGFR. Conclusions The combination of low dose cisplatin and low dose UV-C synergistically exerted anti-cancer effect by down-regulating RTK, such as EGFR and HER2. These findings may provide a novel strategy for the treatment of patients with colorectal cancer.

  8. A Tyrosine-Based Trafficking Motif of the Tegument Protein pUL71 Is Crucial for Human Cytomegalovirus Secondary Envelopment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Andrea N; Villinger, Clarissa; Becker, Stefan; Frick, Manfred; von Einem, Jens

    2018-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) tegument protein pUL71 is required for efficient secondary envelopment and accumulates at the Golgi compartment-derived viral assembly complex (vAC) during infection. Analysis of various C-terminally truncated pUL71 proteins fused to enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) identified amino acids 23 to 34 as important determinants for its Golgi complex localization. Sequence analysis and mutational verification revealed the presence of an N-terminal tyrosine-based trafficking motif (YXXΦ) in pUL71. This led us to hypothesize a requirement of the YXXΦ motif for the function of pUL71 in infection. Mutation of both the tyrosine residue and the entire YXXΦ motif resulted in an altered distribution of mutant pUL71 at the plasma membrane and in the cytoplasm during infection. Both YXXΦ mutant viruses exhibited similarly decreased focal growth and reduced virus yields in supernatants. Ultrastructurally, mutant-virus-infected cells exhibited impaired secondary envelopment manifested by accumulations of capsids undergoing an envelopment process. Additionally, clusters of capsid accumulations surrounding the vAC were observed, similar to the ultrastructural phenotype of a UL71-deficient mutant. The importance of endocytosis and thus the YXXΦ motif for targeting pUL71 to the Golgi complex was further demonstrated when clathrin-mediated endocytosis was inhibited either by coexpression of the C-terminal part of cellular AP180 (AP180-C) or by treatment with methyl-β-cyclodextrin. Both conditions resulted in a plasma membrane accumulation of pUL71. Altogether, these data reveal the presence of a functional N-terminal endocytosis motif that is an important determinant for intracellular localization of pUL71 and that is furthermore required for the function of pUL71 during secondary envelopment of HCMV capsids at the vAC. IMPORTANCE Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is the leading cause of birth defects among congenital virus infections and can

  9. Csk-Induced Phosphorylation of Src at Tyrosine 530 is Essential for H2O2-Mediated Suppression of ERK1/2 in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Bo Kyung; Kwon, Kihwan; Kang, Jihee Lee; Choi, Youn-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are key signal transducers involved in various cellular events such as growth, proliferation, and differentiation. Previous studies have reported that H2O2 leads to phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), one of the MAPKs in endothelial cells. The current study shows that H2O2 suppressed ERK1/2 activation and phosphorylation at specific concentrations and times in human umbilical vein endothelial cells but not in immortalized mouse aortic endothelial cells or human astrocytoma cell line CRT-MG. Phosphorylation of other MAPK family members (i.e., p38 and JNK) was not suppressed by H2O2. The decrease in ERK1/2 phosphorylation induced by H2O2 was inversely correlated with the level of phosphorylation of Src tyrosine 530. Using siRNA, it was found that H2O2-induced suppression of ERK1/2 was dependent on Csk. Physiological laminar flow abrogated, but oscillatory flow did not affect, the H2O2-induced suppression of ERK1/2 phosphorylation. In conclusion, H2O2-induced Csk translocation to the plasma membrane leads to phosphorylation of Src at the tyrosine 530 residue resulting in a reduction of ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Physiological laminar flow abrogates this effect of H2O2 by inducing phosphorylation of Src tyrosine 419. These findings broaden our understanding of signal transduction mechanisms in the endothelial cells against oxidative stress. PMID:26234813

  10. Molecular mechanisms of the synergy between cysteinyl-leukotrienes and receptor tyrosine kinase growth factors on human bronchial fibroblast proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajime Yoshisue

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available We have reported that cysteinyl-leukotrienes (cys-LTs synergise not only with epidermal growth factor (EGF but also with platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF and fibroblast growth factor (FGF to induce mitogenesis in human bronchial fibroblasts. We now describe the molecular mechanisms underlying this synergism. Mitogenesis was assessed by incorporation of [3H]thymidine into DNA and changes in protein phosphorylation by Western blotting. Surprisingly, no CysLT receptor antagonists (MK-571, montelukast, BAY u9773 prevented the synergistic mitogenesis. LTD4 did not cause phosphorylation of EGFR nor did it augment EGF-induced phosphorylation of EGFR, and the synergy between LTD4 and EGF was not blocked by the metalloproteinase inhibitor GM6001 or by an HB-EGF neutralising antibody. The EGFR-selective kinase inhibitor, AG1478, suppressed the synergy by LTD4 and EGF, but had no effect on the synergy with PDGF and FGF. While inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and protein kinase C (PKC prevented the synergy, these drugs also inhibited mitogenesis elicited by EGF alone. In contrast, pertussis toxin (PTX efficiently inhibited the potentiating effect of LTD4 on EGF-induced mitogenesis, as well as that provoked by PDGF or FGF, but had no effect on mitogenesis elicited by the growth factors alone. Whereas LTD4 alone did not augment phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk-1/2 and Akt, it increased phosphorylation of PKC in a Gi-dependent manner. Addition of LTD4 prolonged the duration of EGF-induced phosphorylation of Erk-1/2 and Akt, both of which were sensitive to PTX. The effect of cys-LTs involves a PTX-sensitive and PKC-mediated intracellular pathway leading to sustained growth factor-dependent phosphorylation of Erk-1/2 and Akt.

  11. Calix[6]arene bypasses human pancreatic cancer aggressiveness: downregulation of receptor tyrosine kinases and induction of cell death by reticulum stress and autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelizzaro-Rocha, Karin Juliane; de Jesus, Marcelo Bispo; Ruela-de-Sousa, Roberta Regina; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; Reis, Fabiano Souza; de Fátima, Angelo; Ferreira-Halder, Carmen Veríssima

    2013-12-01

    Pancreatic cancer ranks fourth among cancer-related causes of death in North America. Minimal progress has been made in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with late-stage tumors. Moreover, pancreatic cancer aggressiveness is closely related to high levels of pro-survival mediators, which can ultimately lead to rapid disease progression, resistance and metastasis. The main goal of this study was to define the mechanisms by which calix[6]arene, but not other calixarenes, efficiently decreases the aggressiveness of a drug resistant human pancreas carcinoma cell line (Panc-1). Calix[6]arene was more potent in reducing Panc-1 cell viability than gemcitabine and 5-fluorouracil. In relation to the underlying mechanisms of cytotoxic effects, it led to cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase through downregulation of PIM1, CDK2, CDK4 and retinoblastoma proteins. Importantly, calix[6]arene abolished signal transduction of Mer and AXL tyrosine kinase receptors, both of which are usually overexpressed in pancreatic cancer. Accordingly, inhibition of PI3K and mTOR was also observed, and these proteins are positively modulated by Mer and AXL. Despite decreasing the phosphorylation of AKT at Thr308, calix[6]arene caused an increase in phosphorylation at Ser473. These findings in conjunction with increased BiP and IRE1-α provide a molecular basis explaining the capacity of calix[6]arene to trigger endoplasmic reticulum stress and autophagic cell death. Our findings highlight calix[6]arene as a potential candidate for overcoming pancreatic cancer aggressiveness. Importantly, we provide evidence that calix[6]arene affects a broad array of key targets that are usually dysfunctional in pancreatic cancer, a highly desirable characteristic for chemotherapeutics. © 2013.

  12. Tyrosine supplementation for phenylketonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Diana; Wildgoose, Joanne

    2013-06-05

    Phenylketonuria is an inherited disease for which the main treatment is the dietary restriction of the amino acid phenylalanine. The diet has to be initiated in the neonatal period to prevent or reduce mental handicap. However, the diet is very restrictive and unpalatable and can be difficult to follow. A deficiency of the amino acid tyrosine has been suggested as a cause of some of the neuropsychological problems exhibited in phenylketonuria. Therefore, this review aims to assess the efficacy of tyrosine supplementation for phenylketonuria. To assess the effects of tyrosine supplementation alongside or instead of a phenylalanine-restricted diet for people with phenylketonuria, who commenced on diet at diagnosis and either continued on the diet or relaxed the diet later in life. To assess the evidence that tyrosine supplementation alongside, or instead of a phenylalanine-restricted diet improves intelligence, neuropsychological performance, growth and nutritional status, mortality rate and quality of life. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group's Trials Register which is comprised of references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches, handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. Additional studies were identified from handsearches of the Journal of Inherited Metabolic Disease (from inception in 1978 to 1998). The manufacturers of prescribable dietary products used in the treatment of phenylketonuria were also contacted for further references.Date of the most recent search of the Group's Inborn Errors of Metabolism Trials Register: 28 June 2012. All randomised or quasi-randomised trials investigating the use of tyrosine supplementation versus placebo in people with phenylketonuria in addition to, or instead of, a phenylalanine-restricted diet. People treated for maternal phenylketonuria were excluded. Two authors independently assessed the trial eligibility, methodological quality

  13. New Rising Infection: Human Herpesvirus 6 Is Frequent in Myeloma Patients Undergoing Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation after Induction Therapy with Bortezomib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Netanel Horowitz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6 infection is a common complication during immunosuppression. Its significance for multiple myeloma (MM patients undergoing autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT after treatment with novel agents affecting immune system remains undetermined. Data on 62 consecutive MM patients receiving bortezomib-dexamethasone (VD (; 66% or thalidomide-dexamethasone (TD (, 34% induction, together with melphalan 200 mg/m2 autograft between 01.2005 and 09.2010, were reviewed. HHV-6 reactivation was diagnosed in patients experiencing postengraftment unexplained fever (PEUF in the presence of any level of HHHV-6 DNA in blood. There were no statistically significant differences in patient characteristics between the groups, excluding dexamethasone dosage, which was significantly higher in patients receiving TD. Eight patients in TD and 18 in VD cohorts underwent viral screening for PEUF. HHV-6 reactivation was diagnosed in 10 patients of the entire series (16%, accounting for 35% of those screened; its incidence was 19.5% ( in the VD group versus 9.5% ( in the TD group. All patients recovered without sequelae. In conclusion, HHV-6 reactivation is relatively common after ASCT, accounting for at least a third of PEUF episodes. Further studies are warranted to investigate whether bortezomib has an impact on HHV-6 reactivation development.

  14. Protein tyrosine phosphatase-1B (PTP1B) helps regulate EGF-induced stimulation of S-phase entry in human corneal endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishino, Yutaka; Zhu, Cheng; Harris, Deshea L.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Human corneal endothelial cells (HCEC), particularly from older donors, only proliferate weakly in response to EGF. The protein tyrosine phosphatase, PTP1B, is known to negatively regulate EGF-induced signaling in several cell types by dephosphorylating the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). The current studies were conducted to determine whether PTP1B plays a role in regulating cell cycle entry in HCEC in response to EGF stimulation. Methods Donor corneas were obtained from the National Disease Research Interchange and accepted for study based on established exclusion criteria. PTP1B was localized in the endothelium of ex vivo corneas and in cultured cells by immunocytochemistry. Western blot analysis verified PTP1B protein expression in HCEC and then compared the relative expression of EGFR and PTP1B in HCEC from young (60 years old). The effect of inhibiting the activity of PTP1B on S-phase entry was tested by comparing time-dependent BrdU incorporation in subconfluent HCEC incubated in the presence or absence of the PTP1B inhibitor, CinnGEL 2Me, before EGF stimulation. Results PTP1B was localized in a punctate pattern mainly within the cytoplasm of HCEC in ex vivo corneas and cultured cells. Western blots revealed the presence of three PTP1B-positive bands in HCEC and the control. Further western blot analysis showed no significant age-related difference in expression of EGFR (p=0.444>0.05); however, PTP1B expression was significantly higher in HCEC from older donors (p=0.024<0.05). Pre-incubation of HCEC with the PTP1B inhibitor significantly increased (p=0.019<0.05) the number of BrdU positive cells by 48 h after EGF stimulation. Conclusions Both immunolocalization and western blot studies confirmed that PTP1B is expressed in HCEC. Staining patterns strongly suggest that at least a subset of PTP1B is localized to the cytoplasm and most likely to the endoplasmic reticulum, the known site of EGFR/PTP1B interaction following EGF stimulation. PTP1B

  15. SH3 domain tyrosine phosphorylation--sites, role and evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzana Tatárová

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: SH3 domains are eukaryotic protein domains that participate in a plethora of cellular processes including signal transduction, proliferation, and cellular movement. Several studies indicate that tyrosine phosphorylation could play a significant role in the regulation of SH3 domains. RESULTS: To explore the incidence of the tyrosine phosphorylation within SH3 domains we queried the PhosphoSite Plus database of phosphorylation sites. Over 100 tyrosine phosphorylations occurring on 20 different SH3 domain positions were identified. The tyrosine corresponding to c-Src Tyr-90 was by far the most frequently identified SH3 domain phosphorylation site. A comparison of sequences around this tyrosine led to delineation of a preferred sequence motif ALYD(Y/F. This motif is present in about 15% of human SH3 domains and is structurally well conserved. We further observed that tyrosine phosphorylation is more abundant than serine or threonine phosphorylation within SH3 domains and other adaptor domains, such as SH2 or WW domains. Tyrosine phosphorylation could represent an important regulatory mechanism of adaptor domains. CONCLUSIONS: While tyrosine phosphorylation typically promotes signaling protein interactions via SH2 or PTB domains, its role in SH3 domains is the opposite - it blocks or prevents interactions. The regulatory function of tyrosine phosphorylation is most likely achieved by the phosphate moiety and its charge interfering with binding of polyproline helices of SH3 domain interacting partners.

  16. Exploring oxidative modifications of tyrosine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houée-Lévin, C; Bobrowski, K; Horakova, L

    2015-01-01

    residues are oxidised in vivo with impact on cellular homeostasis and redox signalling pathways. A notable example is tyrosine, which can undergo a number of oxidative post-translational modifications to form 3-hydroxy-tyrosine, tyrosine crosslinks, 3-nitrotyrosine and halogenated tyrosine, with different...... effects on cellular functions. Tyrosine oxidation has been studied extensively in vitro, and this has generated detailed information about the molecular mechanisms that may occur in vivo. An important aspect of studying tyrosine oxidation both in vitro and in biological systems is the ability to monitor...... residues modified and the nature of the modification. These approaches have helped understanding of the consequences of tyrosine oxidation in biological systems, especially its effects on cell signalling and cell dysfunction, linking to roles in disease. There is mounting evidence that tyrosine oxidation...

  17. Screening for autologous blood transfusions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørkeberg, J; Belhage, B; Ashenden, M

    2009-01-01

    parameter in the screening for autologous blood doping. Three bags of blood (approximately 201+/-11 g of Hb) were withdrawn from 16 males and stored at either -80 degrees C (-80 T, n=8) or +4 degrees C (+4 T, n=8) and reinfused 10 weeks or 4 weeks later, respectively. Seven subjects served as controls...

  18. Hyaline cartilage degenerates after autologous osteochondral transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibesku, C O; Szuwart, T; Kleffner, T O; Schlegel, P M; Jahn, U R; Van Aken, H; Fuchs, S

    2004-11-01

    Autologous osteochondral grafting is a well-established clinical procedure to treat focal cartilage defects in patients, although basic research on this topic remains sparse. The aim of the current study was to evaluate (1) histological changes of transplanted hyaline cartilage of osteochondral grafts and (2) the tissue that connects the transplanted cartilage with the adjacent cartilage in a sheep model. Both knee joints of four sheep were opened surgically and osteochondral grafts were harvested and simultaneously transplanted to the contralateral femoral condyle. The animals were sacrificed after three months and the received knee joints were evaluated histologically. Histological evaluation showed a complete ingrowth of the osseous part of the osteochondral grafts. A healing or ingrowth at the level of the cartilage could not be observed. Histological evaluation of the transplanted grafts according to Mankin revealed significantly more and more severe signs of degeneration than the adjacent cartilage, such as cloning of chondrocytes and irregularities of the articular surface. We found no connecting tissue between the transplanted and the adjacent cartilage and histological signs of degeneration of the transplanted hyaline cartilage. In the light of these findings, long-term results of autologous osteochondral grafts in human beings have to be followed critically.

  19. Epithelial mesenchymal transition status is associated with anti-cancer responses towards receptor tyrosine-kinase inhibition by dovitinib in human bladder cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hänze, Jörg; Henrici, Marcus; Hegele, Axel; Hofmann, Rainer; Olbert, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Dovitinib (TKI-258) is a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) inhibitor targeting fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) and further related RTKs. TKI-258 is under investigation as anticancer drug for the treatment of various cancers including bladder cancer with aberrant RTK signaling. Here, we analyzed the responses of ten human bladder cancer cell lines towards TKI-258 treatment in relation to the epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) status of the cells. Expression of epithelial marker E-cadherin as well as mesenchymal markers N-cadherin and vimentin was determined by quantitative RT-PCR and Western-blot in RNA and protein extracts from the cultured cell lines. The cell responses were analyzed upon addition of TKI-258 by viability/proliferation (XTT assay) and colony formation assay for measurement of cell contact independent growth. The investigated bladder cancer cell lines turned out to display quite different EMT patterns as indicated by the abundance of E-cadherin or N-cadherin and vimentin. Protein and mRNA levels of the respective components strongly correlated. Based on E-cadherin and N-cadherin mRNA levels that were expressed approximately mutual exclusively, an EMT-score was calculated for each cell line. A high EMT-score indicated mesenchymal-like cells and a low EMT-score epithelial-like cells. Then, we determined the IC 50 values for TKI-258 by dose response curves (0-12 μM TKI-258) in XTT assays for each cell line. Also, we measured the clonogenic survival fraction after adding TKI-258 (1 μM) by colony formation assay. We observed significant correlations between EMT-score and IC 50 values (r = 0.637, p = 0.0474) and between EMT-score and clonogenic survival fraction (r = 0.635, p = 0.0483) as analyzed by linear regression analyses. In sum, we demonstrated that the EMT status based on E-cadherin and N-cadherin mRNA levels may be useful to predict responses towards TKI-258 treatment in bladder cancer

  20. Do the metabolites of 6-[F-18]fluoro-L-dopa and of [F-18]fluoro-meta-L-tyrosine contribute to the F-18 accumulation in the human brain?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firnau, G.; Chirakal, R.; Nahmias, C.; Garnett, E.S.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the metabolites of 6-[F-18]fluoro-L-dopa (F-dopa) and of [F-18]fluoro-meta-L-tyrosine (FmLtyr) contribute to the accumulation of fluorine-18 in the brain through unspecific retention. PET studies were conducted on a healthy human subject who was treated with both of the radiopharmaceuticals and their labelled metabolites. Results indicated that in contrast to F-dopa, the metabolite of FmLtyr does not 'contaminate' the brain with extraneous fluorine-18

  1. Autologous Fat Injection for Augmented Mammoplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Eul Sik; Seo, Bo Kyoung; Yi, Ann; Cho, Kyu Ran

    2008-01-01

    Autologous fat injection is one of the methods utilized for augmented mammoplasty methods. In this surgical procedure, the fat for transfer is obtained from the donor site of the patient's own body by liposuction and the fat is then injected into the breast. We report here cases of three patients who underwent autologous fat injection. Two of the patients had palpable masses that were present after surgery. The serial imaging findings and surgical method of autologous fat transfer are demonstrated

  2. Roles of the tyrosine isomers meta-tyrosine and ortho-tyrosine in oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipson, Brett R; Fisher, Alfred L

    2016-05-01

    The damage to cellular components by reactive oxygen species, termed oxidative stress, both increases with age and likely contributes to age-related diseases including Alzheimer's disease, atherosclerosis, diabetes, and cataract formation. In the setting of oxidative stress, hydroxyl radicals can oxidize the benzyl ring of the amino acid phenylalanine, which then produces the abnormal tyrosine isomers meta-tyrosine or ortho-tyrosine. While elevations in m-tyrosine and o-tyrosine concentrations have been used as a biological marker of oxidative stress, there is emerging evidence from bacterial, plant, and mammalian studies demonstrating that these isomers, particularly m-tyrosine, directly produce adverse effects to cells and tissues. These new findings suggest that the abnormal tyrosine isomers could in fact represent mediators of the effects of oxidative stress. Consequently the accumulation of m- and o-tyrosine may disrupt cellular homeostasis and contribute to disease pathogenesis, and as result, effective defenses against oxidative stress can encompass not only the elimination of reactive oxygen species but also the metabolism and ultimately the removal of the abnormal tyrosine isomers from the cellular amino acid pool. Future research in this area is needed to clarify the biologic mechanisms by which the tyrosine isomers damage cells and disrupt the function of tissues and organs and to identify the metabolic pathways involved in removing the accumulated isomers after exposure to oxidative stress. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Combination of EGFR/HER2 tyrosine kinase inhibition by BIBW 2992 and BIBW 2669 with irradiation in FaDu human squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuetze, C.; Doerfler, A.; Zips, D.; Krause, M. [Univ. of Technology, Dresden (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Eicheler, W.; Baumann, M. [Univ. of Technology, Dresden (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Univ. of Technology, Dresden (Germany). Experimental Center; Hering, S. [Univ. of Technology, Dresden (Germany). Inst. of Legal Medicine; Solca, F. [Boehringer Ingelheim Austria, Vienna (Austria)

    2007-05-15

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of the dual EGFR/HER2 (ErbB2) tyrosine kinase inhibitors BIBW 2992 and BIBW 2669 on proliferation and clonogenic cell survival of FaDu human squamous cell carcinoma in vitro, and on tumor growth after single-dose irradiation in nude mice. Material and Methods: Cell proliferation, cell-cycle distribution and clonogenic cell survival after irradiation were assayed with and without BIBW 2992 or BIBW 2669 (3, 30, and 300 nM) in vitro. Tumor volume and tumor growth delay (GD{sub V2}) were determined in tumors growing in NMRI (nu/nu) nude mice, treated with (a) BIBW 2992 (20 mg kg{sup -1} body weight orally), BIBW 2669 (3-4 mg kg{sup -1} body weight orally) or carrier until a final tumor diameter of 15 mm, or, (b) 3 days before a 20-Gy single-dose irradiation or, (c) after a 20-Gy single-dose irradiation until reaching the final tumor diameter. Results: BIBW 2992 and BIBW 2669 significantly increased the doubling time of FaDu cells in vitro. A marked dose-dependent antiproliferative effect with blockade of the cells in G0/G1-phase of the cell cycle was found. Incubation with BIBW 2669 or BIBW 2992 for 3 days marginally increased radiosensitivity of FaDu cells in vitro. For BIBW 2992, this effect was statistically significant (p = 0.006). Daily oral application of BIBW 2669 or BIBW 2992 in mice bearing unirradiated FaDu tumors showed a marked antiproliferative effect with a significant prolongation of tumor growth delay (p < 0.0001). After drug application for 3 days, followed by 20-Gy single-dose irradiation, a slight effect of both drugs on tumor growth delay was seen. For BIBW 2669, this effect was statistically significant (p = 0.007). However, this effect disappeared when tumor volumes were normalized to the time point of irradiation suggesting that both drugs showed no or only a slight radiosensitizing effect in vivo. Daily application of BIBW 2669 or BIBW 2992 after a single-dose irradiation showed a clear inhibition of tumor

  4. Role of Tyrosine Isomers in Acute and Chronic Diseases Leading to Oxidative Stress - A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnár, Gergő A; Kun, Szilárd; Sélley, Eszter; Kertész, Melinda; Szélig, Lívia; Csontos, Csaba; Böddi, Katalin; Bogár, Lajos; Miseta, Attila; Wittmann, István

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a major role in the pathogenesis of a variety of acute and chronic diseases. Measurement of the oxidative stress-related end products may be performed, e.g. that of structural isomers of the physiological para-tyrosine, namely meta- and ortho-tyrosine, that are oxidized derivatives of phenylalanine. Recent data suggest that in sepsis, serum level of meta-tyrosine increases, which peaks on the 2(nd) and 3(rd) days (ptyrosine excretion correlated with both need of daily insulin dose and the insulin-glucose product in non-diabetic septic cases (ptyrosine excretion, urinary meta-tyrosine/para-tyrosine, urinary ortho-tyrosine/para-tyrosine and urinary (meta- + orthotyrosine)/ para-tyrosine proved to be markers of carbohydrate homeostasis. In a chronic rodent model, we tried to compensate the abnormal tyrosine isomers using para-tyrosine, the physiological amino acid. Rats were fed a standard high cholesterol-diet, and were given para-tyrosine or vehicle orally. High-cholesterol feeding lead to a significant increase in aortic wall meta-tyrosine content and a decreased vasorelaxation of the aorta to insulin and the glucagon-like peptide-1 analogue, liraglutide, that both could be prevented by administration of para-tyrosine. Concluding, these data suggest that meta- and ortho-tyrosine are potential markers of oxidative stress in acute diseases related to oxidative stress, and may also interfere with insulin action in septic humans. Competition of meta- and ortho-tyrosine by supplementation of para-tyrosine may exert a protective role in oxidative stress-related diseases.

  5. Helicobacter pylori VacA, acting through receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase ?, is crucial for CagA phosphorylation in human duodenum carcinoma cell line AZ-521

    OpenAIRE

    Nakano, Masayuki; Yahiro, Kinnosuke; Yamasaki, Eiki; Kurazono, Hisao; Akada, Junko; Yamaoka, Yoshio; Niidome, Takuro; Hatakeyama, Masanori; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Yamamoto, Taro; Moss, Joel; Isomoto, Hajime; Hirayama, Toshiya

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Helicobacter pylori, a major cause of gastroduodenal diseases, produces vacuolating cytotoxin (VacA) and cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA), which seem to be involved in virulence. VacA exhibits pleiotropic actions in gastroduodenal disorders via its specific receptors. Recently, we found that VacA induced the phosphorylation of cellular Src kinase (Src) at Tyr418 in AZ-521 cells. Silencing of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase (RPTP)?, a VacA receptor, reduced VacA-induced Src ph...

  6. [Autologous fat grafting in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, C; Bertrand, B; Philandrianos, C; Degardin, N; Casanova, D

    2016-10-01

    Lipofilling or fat grafting transfer is defined as a technique of filling soft tissue by autologous fat grafting. The basic principle of lipofilling is based on a harvest of adipose tissue, followed by a reinjection after treatment. Lipofilling main objective is a volume defect filling, but also improving cutaneous trophicity. Lipofilling specificities among children is mainly based on these indications. Complications of autologous fat grafting among children are the same as those in adults: we distinguish short-term complications (intraoperative and perioperative) and the medium and long-term complications. The harvesting of fat tissue is the main limiting factor of the technique, due to low percentage of body fat of children. Indications of lipofilling among children may be specific or similar to those in adults. There are two types of indications: cosmetic, in which the aim of lipofilling is correcting a defect density, acquired (iatrogenic, post-traumatic scar) or malformation (otomandibular dysplasia, craniosynostosis, Parry Romberg syndrom, Poland syndrom, pectus excavatum…). The aim of functional indications is correcting a velar insufficiency or lagophthalmos. In the paediatric sector, lipofilling has become an alternative to the conventional techniques, by its reliability, safety, reproducibility, and good results. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Bio-artificial pleura using an autologous dermal fibroblast sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanzaki, Masato; Takagi, Ryo; Washio, Kaoru; Kokubo, Mami; Yamato, Masayuki

    2017-10-01

    Air leaks (ALs) are observed after pulmonary resections, and without proper treatment, can produce severe complications. AL prevention is a critical objective for managing patients after pulmonary resection. This study applied autologous dermal fibroblast sheets (DFS) to close ALs. For sealing ALs in a 44-year-old male human patient with multiple bullae, a 5 × 15-mm section of skin was surgically excised. From this skin specimen, primary dermal fibroblasts were isolated and cultured for 4 weeks to produce DFSs that were harvested after a 10-day culture. ALs were completely sealed using surgical placement of these autologous DFSs. DFS were found to be a durable long-term AL sealant, exhibiting requisite flexibility, elasticity, durability, biocompatibility, and usability, resulting reliable AL closure. DFS should prove to be an extremely useful tissue-engineered pleura substitute.

  8. The role of oestrogen receptor {alpha} in human thyroid cancer: contributions from coregulatory proteins and the tyrosine kinase receptor HER2.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kavanagh, Dara O

    2012-02-01

    Epidemiological, clinical, and molecular studies suggest a role for oestrogen in thyroid cancer. How oestrogen mediates its effects and the consequence of it on clinical outcome has not been fully elucidated. The participation of coregulatory proteins in modulating oestrogen receptor (ER) function and input of crosstalk with the tyrosine kinase receptor HER2 was investigated. Oestrogen induced cell proliferation in the follicular thyroid cancer (FTC)-133 cells, but not in the anaplastic 8305C cell line. Knockdown of the coactivator steroid receptor coactivator (SRC)-1 inhibited FTC-133 basal, but not oestrogen induced, cell proliferation. Oestrogen also increased protein expression of SRC-1 and the ER target gene cyclin D1 in the FTC-133 cell line. ERalpha, ERbeta, the coregulatory proteins SRC-1 and nuclear corepressor (NCoR), and the tyrosine kinase receptor HER2 were localised by immunohistochemistry and immnofluorescence in paraffin-embedded tissue from thyroid tumour patients (n=111). ERalpha was colocalised with both SRC-1 and NCoR to the nuclei of the tumour epithelial cells. Expression of ERalpha and NCoR was found predominantly in non-anaplastic tumours and was significantly associated with well-differentiated tumours and reduced incidence of disease recurrence. In non-anaplastic tumours, HER2 was significantly associated with SRC-1, and these proteins were associated with poorly differentiated tumours, capsular invasion and disease recurrence. Totally, 87% of anaplastic tumours were positive for SRC-1. Kaplan-Meier estimates of disease-free survival indicated that in thyroid cancer, SRC-1 strongly correlates with reduced disease-free survival (P<0.001), whereas NCoR predicted increased survival (P<0.001). These data suggest opposing roles for the coregulators SRC-1 and NCoR in thyroid tumour progression.

  9. Bone formation in sinus augmentation procedures using autologous bone, porcine bone, and a 50 : 50 mixture: a human clinical and histological evaluation at 2 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassetta, Michele; Perrotti, Vittoria; Calasso, Sabrina; Piattelli, Adriano; Sinjari, Bruna; Iezzi, Giovanna

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to perform a 2 months clinical and histological comparison of autologous bone, porcine bone, and a 50 : 50 mixture in maxillary sinus augmentation procedures. A total of 10 consecutive patients, undergoing two-stage sinus augmentation procedures using 100% autologous bone (Group A), 100% porcine bone (Group B), and a 50 : 50 mixture of autologous and porcine bone (Group C) were included in this study. After a 2-month healing period, at the time of implant insertion, clinical evaluation was performed and bone core biopsies were harvested and processed for histological analysis. The postoperative healing was uneventful regardless of the materials used for the sinus augmentation procedures. The histomorphometrical analysis revealed comparable percentages of newly formed bone, marrow spaces, and residual grafted material in the three groups. The clinical and histological results of this study indicated that porcine bone alone or in combination with autologous bone are biocompatible and osteoconductive materials and can be successfully used in sinus augmentation procedures. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Co-culture of human embryos with autologous cumulus cell clusters and its beneficial impact of secreted growth factors on preimplantation development as compared to standard embryo culture in assisted reproductive technologies (ART

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandros Vithoulkas

    2017-12-01

    Conclusion(s: The investigated factors, among other substances, may be causally connected to the beneficial effect observed on embryo development. Our findings suggest that co-culture with autologous cumulus cell clusters improves the outcome of embryo culture in IVF programs.

  11. Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), its cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), other catecholamine-related enzymes, and their human genes in relation to the drug and gene therapies of Parkinson's disease (PD): historical overview and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatsu, Toshiharu; Nagatsu, Ikuko

    2016-11-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), which was discovered at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in 1964, is a tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4)-requiring monooxygenase that catalyzes the first and rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of catecholamines (CAs), such as dopamine, noradrenaline, and adrenaline. Since deficiencies of dopamine and noradrenaline in the brain stem, caused by neurodegeneration of dopamine and noradrenaline neurons, are mainly related to non-motor and motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD), we have studied human CA-synthesizing enzymes [TH; BH4-related enzymes, especially GTP-cyclohydrolase I (GCH1); aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC); dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH); and phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT)] and their genes in relation to PD in postmortem brains from PD patients, patients with CA-related genetic diseases, mice with genetically engineered CA neurons, and animal models of PD. We purified all human CA-synthesizing enzymes, produced their antibodies for immunohistochemistry and immunoassay, and cloned all human genes, especially the human TH gene and the human gene for GCH1, which synthesizes BH4 as a cofactor of TH. This review discusses the historical overview of TH, BH4-, and other CA-related enzymes and their genes in relation to the pathophysiology of PD, the development of drugs, such as L-DOPA, and future prospects for drug and gene therapy for PD, especially the potential of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells.

  12. Optimization of Human NK Cell Manufacturing: Fully Automated Separation, Improved Ex Vivo Expansion Using IL-21 with Autologous Feeder Cells, and Generation of Anti-CD123-CAR-Expressing Effector Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klöß, Stephan; Oberschmidt, Olaf; Morgan, Michael; Dahlke, Julia; Arseniev, Lubomir; Huppert, Volker; Granzin, Markus; Gardlowski, Tanja; Matthies, Nadine; Soltenborn, Stephanie; Schambach, Axel; Koehl, Ulrike

    2017-10-01

    The administration of ex vivo expanded natural killer (NK) cells as potential antitumor effector cells appears to be suitable for effector cell-based immunotherapies in high-risk cancer patients. However, good manufacturing practice (GMP)-compliant manufacturing of clinical-grade NK cells at sufficiently high numbers represents a great challenge. Therefore, previous expansion protocols for those effector cells were improved and optimized by using newly developed culture medium, interleukin (IL)-21, and autologous feeder cells (FCs). Separation of primary human NK cells (CD56 + CD3 - ) was carried out with the CliniMACS Prodigy ® in a single process, starting with approximately 1.2 × 10 9 leukocytes collected by small-scale lymphapheresis or from buffy coats. Enriched NK cells were adjusted to starting cell concentrations within approximately 1 × 10 6 effector cells/mL and cultured in comparative expansion experiments for 14 days with IL-2 (1,000 IU/mL) in different GMP-compliant media (X-VIVO ™ 10, CellGro ® , TexMACS ™ , and NK MACS ® ). After medium optimization, beneficial effects for functionality and phenotype were investigated at the beginning of cell expansion with irradiated (25 Gy) autologous FCs at a ratio of 20:1 (feeder: NK) in the presence or absence of IL-21 (100 ng/mL). Additionally, expanded NK cells were gene modified to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) against CD123, a common marker for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Cytotoxicity, degranulation, and cytokine release of transduced NK cells were determined against KG1a cells in flow cytometric analysis and fluorescent imaging. The Prodigy manufacturing process revealed high target cell viabilities (median 95.4%), adequate NK cell recovery (median 60.4%), and purity of 95.4% in regard to CD56 + CD3 - target cells. The process in its early phase of development led to a median T-cell depletion of log 3.5 after CD3 depletion and log 3.6 after the whole process, including CD3

  13. Perinatal outcomes after gestational surrogacy versus autologous IVF: analysis of national data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunkara, Sesh Kamal; Antonisamy, Belavendra; Selliah, Hepsy Y; Kamath, Mohan S

    2017-12-01

    Anonymized data were obtained from the Human Fertilization and Embryology Authority to determine whether gestational surrogacy influences perinatal outcomes compared with pregnancies after autologous IVF. A total of 103,160 singleton live births, including 244 after gestational surrogacy, 87,571 after autologous fresh IVF and intractyoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) and 15,345 after autologous frozen embryo transfers were analysed. Perinatal outcomes of pretern birth (PTB), low birth weight (LBW) and high birth weight (HBW) were compared. No difference was found in the risk of PTB and LBW after gestational surrogacy compared with autologous fresh IVF-ICSI: PTB (adjusted OR 0.90, 95% CI 0.56 to 1.42), LBW (adjusted OR 0.90, 95% CI 0.57 to 1.43) and gestational surrogacy compared with autologous frozen embryo transfers: PTB (adjusted OR 0.96, 95% CI 0.58 to 1.60), LBW (adjusted OR 1.16, 95% CI 0.69 to 1.96). The incidence of HBW was significantly higher after gestational surrogacy compared with fresh IVF-ICSI (adjusted OR 1.94, 95% CI 1.38 to 2.75); no difference was found in HBW between gestational surrogacy and autologous frozen embryo transfers. The dataset is limited by lack of information on confounders, i.e. ethnicity, body mass index, underlying medical history, which could result in residual confounding. Copyright © 2017 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Clinical Allogeneic and Autologous Islet Cell Transplantation: Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinichi Matsumoto

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Islet cell transplantation is categorized as a β-cell replacement therapy for diabetic patients who lack the ability to secrete insulin. Allogeneic islet cell transplantation is for the treatment of type 1 diabetes, and autologous islet cell transplantation is for the prevention of surgical diabetes after a total pancreatectomy. The issues of allogeneic islet cell transplantation include poor efficacy of islet isolation, the need for multiple donor pancreata, difficulty maintaining insulin independence and undesirable side effects of immunosuppressive drugs. Those issues have been solved step by step and allogeneic islet cell transplantation is almost ready to be the standard therapy. The donor shortage will be the next issue and marginal and/or living donor islet cell transplantation might alleviate the issue. Xeno-islet cell transplantation, β-cell regeneration from human stem cells and gene induction of the naïve pancreas represent the next generation of β-cell replacement therapy. Autologous islet cell transplantation after total pancreatectomy for the treatment of chronic pancreatitis with severe abdominal pain is the standard therapy, even though only limited centers are able to perform this treatment. Remote center autologous islet cell transplantation is an attractive option for hospitals performing total pancreatectomies without the proper islet isolation facilities.

  15. Tyrosine kinases in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobayashi Akiko

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is an inflammatory, polyarticular joint disease. A number of cellular responses are involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis, including activation of inflammatory cells and cytokine expression. The cellular responses involved in each of these processes depends on the specific signaling pathways that are activated; many of which include protein tyrosine kinases. These pathways include the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, Janus kinases/signal transducers and activators transcription pathway, spleen tyrosine kinase signaling, and the nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells pathway. Many drugs are in development to target tyrosine kinases for the treatment of RA. Based on the number of recently published studies, this manuscript reviews the role of tyrosine kinases in the pathogenesis of RA and the potential role of kinase inhibitors as new therapeutic strategies of RA.

  16. Protein tyrosine phosphatases: regulatory mechanisms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Hertog, J.; Ostman, A.; Bohmer, F.D.

    2008-01-01

    Protein-tyrosine phosphatases are tightly controlled by various mechanisms, ranging from differential expression in specific cell types to restricted subcellular localization, limited proteolysis, post-translational modifications affecting intrinsic catalytic activity, ligand binding and

  17. Tyrosine phosphorylation of WW proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuven, Nina; Shanzer, Matan

    2015-01-01

    A number of key regulatory proteins contain one or two copies of the WW domain known to mediate protein–protein interaction via proline-rich motifs, such as PPxY. The Hippo pathway components take advantage of this module to transduce tumor suppressor signaling. It is becoming evident that tyrosine phosphorylation is a critical regulator of the WW proteins. Here, we review the current knowledge on the involved tyrosine kinases and their roles in regulating the WW proteins. PMID:25627656

  18. Autologous serum therapy in chronic urticaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharmila Patil

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Autologous serum therapy is a promising therapy for treatment resistant urticaria. This is useful in developing countries as this is economical option. Minimum instruments like centrifuge, syringe and needles are required for the procedure.

  19. Intraurethral Injection of Autologous Minced Skeletal Muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gräs, Søren; Klarskov, Niels; Lose, Gunnar

    2014-01-01

    noted. CONCLUSIONS: Intraurethral injection of minced autologous muscle tissue is a simple surgical procedure that appears safe and moderately effective in women with uncomplicated stress urinary incontinence. It compares well to a more complicated regenerative strategy using in vitro expanded muscle......PURPOSE: Intraurethral injection of in vitro expanded autologous skeletal muscle derived cells is a new regenerative therapy for stress urinary incontinence. We examined the efficacy and safety of a simpler alternative strategy using freshly harvested, minced autologous skeletal muscle tissue...... with its inherent content of regenerative cells. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 20 and 15 women with uncomplicated and complicated stress urinary incontinence, respectively, received intraurethral injections of minced autologous skeletal muscle tissue and were followed for 1 year. Efficacy was assessed...

  20. Hemifacial atrophy treated with autologous fat transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gandhi Vijay

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A 23-year-old male developed right hemifacial atrophy following marphea profunda. Facial asymmetry due to residual atrophy was treated with autologous fat harvested from buttocks with marked cosmetic improvement.

  1. Defective TCR stimulation in anergized type 2 T helper cells correlates with abrogated p56(lck) and ZAP-70 tyrosine kinase activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faith, A; Akdis, C A; Akdis, M; Simon, H U; Blaser, K

    1997-07-01

    Development of IgE-mediated allergic conditions is dependent on the secretion of a Th2 cytokine pattern, including IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13. The induction of anergy would be one mechanism to abrogate cytokine secretion by Th2 cells, which may be pivotal to the allergic response. We demonstrate here that incubation of cloned human CD4+ phospholipase A2 (PLA)-specific Th2 cells with antigenic peptide, in the absence of professional APC, results in a state of nonresponsiveness. The anergic T cells failed to proliferate or secrete IL-4 in response to optimal stimulation with PLA and autologous, professional APC. Secretion of IL-5 and IL-13, however, was only partially inhibited. The anergic state of the Th2 cells was not associated with CD3 or CD28 down-regulation. However, anergy did appear to be closely related to alterations in signaling pathways, mediated through the TCR, of the cells. In contrast to untreated Th2 cells, anergized Th2 cells failed to respond to anti-CD3 mAb with either increased tyrosine kinase activity or increased levels of tyrosine phosphorylation of p56(lck) or ZAP70. A strong and sustained intracellular calcium flux, observed in untreated Th2 cells in response to anti-CD3 mAb, was absent in anergic Th2 cells. Furthermore, the induction of anergy seems to represent an active process, associated with increased levels of basal tyrosine kinase activity, cytokine production, and CD25 up-regulation in anergic Th2 cells. Together, our results indicate that anergy in Th2 cells is associated with defective transmembrane signaling through the TCR.

  2. Autologous fat transplantation for labia majora reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, P M; Herold, C; Rennekampff, H O

    2011-10-01

    A case of autologous fat transplantation for labia majora augmentation after ablative surgery is presented. The patient reported pain and deformity of the left labium majus after resection for Bowen's disease. The symptoms had not been solved by classic plastic surgical reconstructions including a pudendal thigh fasciocutaneous flap. Use of autologous fat transplantation facilitated an improved aesthetic result while preserving residual sensation to the external genitalia and improving symptoms of mucosal exposure and dryness.

  3. Autologous bone marrow purging with LAK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliodori, L; Moretti, L; Stramigioli, S; Luchetti, F; Annibali, G M; Baldi, A

    1993-12-01

    In this study we will demonstrate that LAK cells, in vitro, can lyse hematologic neoplastic cells with a minor toxicity of the staminal autologous marrow cells. In fact, after bone marrow and LAK co-culture at a ratio of 1/1 for 8 hours, the inhibition on the GEMM colonies resulted to be 20% less compared to the untreated marrow. These data made LAK an inviting agent for marrow purging in autologous bone marrow transplantation.

  4. In vitro regulation of immunoglobulin synthesis after human marrow transplantation. II. Deficient T and non-T lymphocyte function within 3-4 months of allogeneic, syngeneic, or autologous marrow grafting for hematologic malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witherspoon, R.P.; Lum, L.G.; Storb, R.; Thomas, E.D.

    1982-01-01

    Immunoglobulin secretion was studied in 37 patients between 19 and 106 days after allogeneic HLA-identical (30 patients), allogeneic one HLA-haplotype-identical (three patients), syngeneic (three patients), or autologous (one patient) marrow grafting. E rosette-positive (T) and E rosette-negative (non-T) peripheral blood mononuclear cells were cocultured with pokeweed mitogen for 6 days. Polyvalent immunoglobulin secretion was determined by counting plaque forming cells in a reverse hemolytic plaque assay. The number of antibody secreting cells in cocultures of autologous T and non-T lymphocytes was low in 40 of 44 tests conducted on samples from the 37 patients. Mononuclear or non-T cells from 38 of 40 tests failed to produce antibody when cultured with normal helper T cells. T cells from 23 of 37 tests failed to help normal non-T cells secrete antibody. T lymphocytes from 23 of 41 tests suppressed antibody production greater than 80% by normal T and non-T cells. The suppressor cells were radiosensitive in 17 of the 25 tests. The abnormal function of lymphocyte subpopulations in patients during the first 3 mo after syngeneic, allogeneic or autologous marrow grafting was similar regardless of the type of graft or the presence of acute graft versus host disease

  5. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 are induced differently by metal nanoparticles in human monocytes: The role of oxidative stress and protein tyrosine kinase activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Rong; Mo Yiqun; Zhang Xing; Chien Sufan; Tollerud, David J.; Zhang Qunwei

    2008-01-01

    Recently, many studies have shown that nanoparticles can translocate from the lungs to the circulatory system. As a particulate foreign body, nanoparticles could induce host responses such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, inflammatory cytokine and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) release which play a major role in tissue destruction and remodeling. However, the direct effects of nanoparticles on leukocytes, especially monocytes, are still unclear. The objective of the present study was to compare the ability of Nano-Co and Nano-TiO 2 to cause alteration of transcription and activity of MMPs and to explore possible mechanisms. We hypothesized that non-toxic doses of some transition metal nanoparticles stimulate an imbalance of MMP/TIMP that cause MMP production that may contribute to their health effects. To test this hypothesis, U937 cells were treated with Nano-Co and Nano-TiO 2 and cytotoxic effects and ROS generation were measured. The alteration of MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression and activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9 after exposure to these metal nanoparticles were subsequently determined. To investigate the potential signaling pathways involved in the Nano-Co-induced MMP activation, the ROS scavengers or inhibitors, AP-1 inhibitor, and protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) inhibitors were also used to pre-treat U937 cells. Our results demonstrated that exposure of U937 cells to Nano-Co, but not to Nano-TiO 2 , at a dose that does not cause cytotoxicity, resulted in ROS generation and up-regulation of MMP-2 and MMP-9 mRNA expression .. Our results also showed dose- and time-related increases in pro-MMP-2 and pro-MMP-9 gelatinolytic activities in conditioned media after exposure of U937 cells to Nano-Co, but not to Nano-TiO 2 . Nano-Co-induced pro-MMP-2 and pro-MMP-9 activity increases were inhibited by pre-treatment with ROS scavengers or inhibitors. We also demonstrated dose- and time-related decreases in tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases 2 (TIMP-2) in U937 cells

  6. Raman scattering tensors of tyrosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboi, M; Ezaki, Y; Aida, M; Suzuki, M; Yimit, A; Ushizawa, K; Ueda, T

    1998-01-01

    Polarized Raman scattering measurements have been made of a single crystal of L-tyrosine by the use of a Raman microscope with the 488.0-nm exciting beam from an argon ion laser. The L-tyrosine crystal belongs to the space group P2(1)2(1)2(1) (orthorhombic), and Raman scattering intensities corresponding to the aa, bb, cc, ab and ac components of the crystal Raman tensor have been determined for each prominent Raman band. A similar set of measurements has been made of L-tyrosine-d4, in which four hydrogen atoms on the benzene ring are replaced by deuterium atoms. The effects of NH3-->ND3 and OH-->OD on the Raman spectrum have also been examined. In addition, depolarization ratios of some bands of L-tyrosine in aqueous solutions of pH 13 and pH 1 were examined. For comparison with these experimental results, on the other hand, ab initio molecular orbital calculations have been made of the normal modes of vibration and their associated polarizability oscillations of the L-tyrosine molecule. On the basis of these experimental data and by referring to the results of the calculations, discussions have been presented on the Raman tensors associated to some Raman bands, including those at 829 cm-1 (benzene ring breathing), 642 cm-1 (benzene ring deformation), and 432 cm-1 (C alpha-C beta-C gamma bending).

  7. Measurement of tyrosine kinase activity in non-denaturing polyacrylamide gels and its induction during differentiation of human leukemia HL-60 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glazer, R.I.; Chapekar, M.S.; Knode, M.C.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have developed a PAGE assay to measure tyrosine kinase (PK-T) activity in cell extracts. HL-60 cells were extracted sequentially with 0.1% and 1.0% Triton X-100 buffer to obtain soluble and membrane-bound proteins, respectively. Extracts were separated by PAGE at 4 0 and gels were incubated in the presence of the substrate Glu:Tyr (4:1) and an assay mixture containing Mn ++ , Mg ++ and [γ 32 P]ATP. Gels were washed in TCA:PPi, dried and autoradiographed. 0.1% Triton extracts of untreated cells in log phase displayed several PK-T activities of which the major species was ∼75 kD; 1% Triton extracts exhibited only residual 75 kD PK-T. In contrast, induction of differentiation in HL-60 cells with optimal concentrations of DMSO, retinoic acid, 1.25(OH) 2 vitamin D 3 , phorbol ester, immune interferon (IFN-γ) or tumor necrosis factor (TNF) induced the appearance of a ∼170 kD PK-T in the 1% Triton extracts and a reduction of the 75 kD PK-T in the 0.1% Triton extracts. The 170 kD PK-T could also utilize Glu:Tyr (6:3:1), histone H 1 , pp60/sup src/ substrate Lys-14-Gly and vinculin as substrates but not Glu:Tyr (1:1). The 170 kD PK-T appeared within 2 days after treatment with 2500 μ/ml of IFN-γ or 100 μ/ml of TNF and its appearance coincided with the induction of the monocyte phenotype. These results suggest that the appearance of the 170 kD PK-T is related to the mature granulocyte or monocyte phenotype. Studies are in progress with radiolabeled IFN-γ to determine if the 170 kD PK-T is related to the IFN-γ receptor

  8. Bacterial Protein-Tyrosine Kinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Lei; Kobir, Ahasanul; Jers, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    in exopolysaccharide production, virulence, DNA metabolism, stress response and other key functions of the bacterial cell. BY-kinases act through autophosphorylation (mainly in exopolysaccharide production) and phosphorylation of other proteins, which have in most cases been shown to be activated by tyrosine......Bacteria and Eukarya share essentially the same family of protein-serine/threonine kinases, also known as the Hanks-type kinases. However, when it comes to protein-tyrosine phosphorylation, bacteria seem to have gone their own way. Bacterial protein-tyrosine kinases (BY-kinases) are bacterial...... and highlighted their importance in bacterial physiology. Having no orthologues in Eukarya, BY-kinases are receiving a growing attention from the biomedical field, since they represent a particularly promising target for anti-bacterial drug design....

  9. Radiolytic dimerization of tyrosine in alkaline solutions of poly-L-tyrosine, glycyl-L-tyrosine and tyrosine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boguta, G.; Dancewicz, A.M.

    1982-01-01

    Blue fluorescence characteristic of dityrosine appeared in γ-irradiated solutions of tyrosine, glycyl-L-tyrosine or polytyrosine (MW 110,000). The intensity of fluorescence was used for the determination of the dityrosine concentration in hydrolysed samples. The radiation-induced formation of dityrosine depended on pH and on the presence of oxygen during radiolysis carried out with a total dose of the order of 1000 Gy. The presence of oxygen in the system suppressed the formation of dityrosine in solution at low or neutral pH but had no effect on this process in alkaline solutions. Except for the radiolysis of air-saturated poly-L-tyrosine solutions, where G(Dityrosine) = 0.35, the yields of dityrosine at high pH were lower than the yields obtained during radiolysis at low pH and in the absence of oxygen. (author)

  10. Autologous dental pulp stem cells in periodontal regeneration: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aimetti, Mario; Ferrarotti, Francesco; Cricenti, Luca; Mariani, Giulia Maria; Romano, Federica

    2014-01-01

    Histologic findings in animal models suggest that the application of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) may promote periodontal regeneration in infrabony defects. This case report describes the clinical and radiographic regenerative potential of autologous DPSCs in the treatment of human noncontained intraosseous defects. A chronic periodontitis patient with one vital third molar requiring extraction was surgically treated. The third molar was extracted and used as an autologous DPSCs source to regenerate the infrabony defect on the mandibular right second premolar. At the 1-year examination, the defect was completely filled with bonelike tissue as confirmed through the reentry procedure.

  11. Genetics Home Reference: tyrosine hydroxylase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions TH deficiency Tyrosine hydroxylase deficiency Printable PDF Open All Close All ... Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) deficiency is a disorder that primarily ...

  12. SOCS proteins in regulation of receptor tyrosine kinase signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazi, Julhash U.; Kabir, Nuzhat N.; Flores Morales, Amilcar

    2014-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are a family of cell surface receptors that play critical roles in signal transduction from extracellular stimuli. Many in this family of kinases are overexpressed or mutated in human malignancies and thus became an attractive drug target for cancer treatment....... The signaling mediated by RTKs must be tightly regulated by interacting proteins including protein-tyrosine phosphatases and ubiquitin ligases. The suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS) family proteins are well-known negative regulators of cytokine receptors signaling consisting of eight structurally similar...

  13. Platelet lysate as an autologous alternative for fetal bovine serum in cardiovascular tissue engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riem Vis, P.W.; Bouten, C.V.C.; Sluijter, J.P.G.; Herwerden, van L.A.; Kluin, J.

    2010-01-01

    There is an ongoing search for alternative tissue culture sera to engineer autologous tissues, since use of fetal bovine serum (FBS) is limited under Good Tissue Practice (GTP) guidelines. We compared FBS with human Platelet-lysate (PL) in media for in vitro cell culture. A threefold increase in

  14. Synthesis of deuterium and tritium labelled tyrosine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanska, M.; Drabarek, S.

    1980-01-01

    A new method of synthesis of tyrosine labelled with deuterium and tritium in the aromatic ring has been developed. Deuterated and tritiated tyrosine was obtained by isotope exchange between tyrosine and deuterated or tritiated water at elevated temperature in hydrochloric acid medium using K 2 PtCl 4 as a catalyst. For synthesis of tritiated tyrosine 1 Ci HTO was used; the specific activity of the product was 5 mCi/mMol. (author)

  15. Tyrosine phosphorylation in signal transduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, T.M.; Kaplan, D.; Morgan, W.; Keller, T.; Mamon, H.; Piwnica-Worms, H.; Druker, B.; Whitman, M.; Morrison, D.; Cohen, B.; Schaffhausen, B.; Cantley, L.; Rapp, U.

    1988-01-01

    Recent work has focused on the elucidation of the mechanisms by which membrane-bound tyrosine kinases transmit signals within the cell. To examine the role of tyrosine phosphorylation the authors have employed the following strategy. First, they have utilized antibodies to phosphotyrosine (anti-P.Tyr) to identify candidate substrates of various tyrosine kinases, such as pp60 c-src , the CSF- receptor, or the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor. Second, they have attempted to characterize the biochemical properties of the putative substrates and to determine in what manner these properties are modified by phosphorylation on tyrosine residues. In this endeavor, they are recapitulating the classic biochemical analysis used to study the effect of kinases on metabolism. The final portion of our work consists of using modern molecular biological strategies to clone the genes or cDNAs for the substrates and overproduce the relevant proteins for studies in vitro in defined systems. This paper describes the first and second aspects of this strategy, the identification and characterization of novel substrate molecules

  16. Impact of adjuvant inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases on tumor growth delay and local tumor control after fractionated irradiation in human squamous cell carcinomas in nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zips, Daniel; Hessel, Franziska; Krause, Mechthild; Schiefer, Yvonne; Hoinkis, Cordelia; Thames, Howard D.; Haberey, Martin; Baumann, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Previous experiments have shown that adjuvant inhibition of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor after fractionated irradiation prolonged tumor growth delay and may also improve local tumor control. To test the latter hypothesis, local tumor control experiments were performed. Methods and materials: Human FaDu and UT-SCC-14 squamous cell carcinomas were studied in nude mice. The vascular endothelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor PTK787/ZK222584 (50 mg/kg body weight b.i.d.) was administered for 75 days after irradiation with 30 fractions within 6 weeks. Tumor growth time and tumor control dose 50% (TCD 50 ) were determined and compared to controls (carrier without PTK787/ZK222584). Results: Adjuvant administration of PTK787/ZK222584 significantly prolonged tumor growth time to reach 5 times the volume at start of drug treatment by an average of 11 days (95% confidence interval 0.06;22) in FaDu tumors and 29 days (0.6;58) in UT-SCC-14 tumors. In both tumor models, TCD 50 values were not statistically significantly different between the groups treated with PTK787/ZK222584 compared to controls. Conclusions: Long-term inhibition of angiogenesis after radiotherapy significantly reduced the growth rate of local recurrences but did not improve local tumor control. This indicates that recurrences after irradiation depend on vascular endothelial growth factor-driven angiogenesis, but surviving tumor cells retain their clonogenic potential during adjuvant antiangiogenic treatment with PTK787/ZK222584

  17. Phosphoproteomics identified Endofin, DCBLD2, and KIAA0582 as novel tyrosine phosphorylation targets of EGF signaling and Iressa in human cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yunhao; Low, Teck-Yew; Choong, Lee-Yee

    2007-01-01

    With the completion of the human genome project, analysis of enriched phosphotyrosyl proteins from epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced phosphotyrosine proteome permits the identification of novel downstream substrates of the EGF receptor (EGFR). Using cICAT-based LC-MS/MS method, we identified...

  18. Novel Tyrosine Phosphorylation Sites in Rat Skeletal Muscle Revealed by Phosphopeptide Enrichment and HPLC-ESI-MS/MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiangmin; Højlund, Kurt; Luo, Moulun; Meyer, Christian; Thangiah, Geetha; Yi, Zhengping

    2012-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation plays a fundamental role in many cellular processes including differentiation, growth and insulin signaling. In insulin resistant muscle, aberrant tyrosine phosphorylation of several proteins has been detected. However, due to the low abundance of tyrosine phosphorylation (tyrosine phosphorylation sites have been identified in mammalian skeletal muscle to date. Here, we used immunoprecipitation of phosphotyrosine peptides prior to HPLC-ESI-MS/MS analysis to improve the discovery of tyrosine phosphorylation in relatively small skeletal muscle biopsies from rats. This resulted in the identification of 87 distinctly localized tyrosine phosphorylation sites in 46 muscle proteins. Among them, 31 appear to be novel. The tyrosine phosphorylated proteins included major enzymes in the glycolytic pathway and glycogen metabolism, sarcomeric proteins, and proteins involved in Ca2+ homeostasis and phosphocreatine resynthesis. Among proteins regulated by insulin, we found tyrosine phosphorylation sites in glycogen synthase, and two of its inhibitors, GSK-3α and DYRK1A. Moreover, tyrosine phosphorylation sites were identified in several MAP kinases and a protein tyrosine phosphatase, SHPTP2. These results provide the largest catalogue of mammalian skeletal muscle tyrosine phosphorylation sites to date and provide novel targets for the investigation of human skeletal muscle phosphoproteins in various disease states. PMID:22609512

  19. Cord Blood Banking Standards: Autologous Versus Altruistic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armitage, Sue

    2015-01-01

    Cord blood (CB) is either donated to public CB banks for use by any patient worldwide for whom it is a match or stored in a private bank for potential autologous or family use. It is a unique cell product that has potential for treating life-threatening diseases. The majority of CB products used today are for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and are accessed from public banks. CB is still evolving as a hematopoietic stem cell source, developing as a source for cellular immunotherapy products, such as natural killer, dendritic, and T-cells, and fast emerging as a non-hematopoietic stem cell source in the field of regenerative medicine. This review explores the regulations, standards, and accreditation schemes that are currently available nationally and internationally for public and private CB banking. Currently, most of private banking is under regulated as compared to public banking. Regulations and standards were initially developed to address the public arena. Early responses from the medical field regarding private CB banking was that at the present time, because of insufficient scientific data to support autologous banking and given the difficulty of making an accurate estimate of the need for autologous transplantation, private storage of CB as "biological insurance" should be discouraged (1, 2, 3). To ensure success and the true realization of the full potential of CB, whether for autologous or allogeneic use, it is essential that each and every product provided for current and future treatments meets high-quality, international standards.

  20. Receptor Tyrosine Kinases in Drosophila Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopko, Richelle; Perrimon, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation plays a significant role in a wide range of cellular processes. The Drosophila genome encodes more than 20 receptor tyrosine kinases and extensive studies in the past 20 years have illustrated their diverse roles and complex signaling mechanisms. Although some receptor tyrosine kinases have highly specific functions, others strikingly are used in rather ubiquitous manners. Receptor tyrosine kinases regulate a broad expanse of processes, ranging from cell survival and proliferation to differentiation and patterning. Remarkably, different receptor tyrosine kinases share many of the same effectors and their hierarchical organization is retained in disparate biological contexts. In this comprehensive review, we summarize what is known regarding each receptor tyrosine kinase during Drosophila development. Astonishingly, very little is known for approximately half of all Drosophila receptor tyrosine kinases. PMID:23732470

  1. Sequence, 'subtle' alternative splicing and expression of the CYYR1 (cysteine/tyrosine-rich 1) mRNA in human neuroendocrine tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitale, Lorenza; Coppola, Domenico; Strippoli, Pierluigi; Frabetti, Flavia; Huntsman, Shane A; Canaider, Silvia; Casadei, Raffaella; Lenzi, Luca; Facchin, Federica; Carinci, Paolo; Zannotti, Maria

    2007-01-01

    CYYR1 is a recently identified gene located on human chromosome 21 whose product has no similarity to any known protein and is of unknown function. Analysis of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) have revealed high human CYYR1 expression in cells belonging to the diffuse neuroendocrine system (DNES). These cells may be the origin of neuroendocrine (NE) tumors. The aim of this study was to conduct an initial analysis of sequence, splicing and expression of the CYYR1 mRNA in human NE tumors. The CYYR1 mRNA coding sequence (CDS) was studied in 32 NE tumors by RT-PCR and sequence analysis. A subtle alternative splicing was identified generating two isoforms of CYYR1 mRNA differing in terms of the absence (CAG - isoform, the first described mRNA for CYYR1 locus) or the presence (CAG + isoform) of a CAG codon. When present, this specific codon determines the presence of an alanine residue, at the exon 3/exon 4 junction of the CYYR1 mRNA. The two mRNA isoform amounts were determined by quantitative relative RT-PCR in 29 NE tumors, 2 non-neuroendocrine tumors and 10 normal tissues. A bioinformatic analysis was performed to search for the existence of the two CYYR1 isoforms in other species. The CYYR1 CDS did not show differences compared to the reference sequence in any of the samples, with the exception of an NE tumor arising in the neck region. Sequence analysis of this tumor identified a change in the CDS 333 position (T instead of C), leading to the amino acid mutation P111S. NE tumor samples showed no significant difference in either CYYR1 CAG - or CAG + isoform expression compared to control tissues. CYYR1 CAG - isoform was significantly more expressed than CAG + isoform in NE tumors as well as in control samples investigated. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that only the genomic sequence of Pan troglodytes CYYR1 is consistent with the possible existence of the two described mRNA isoforms. A new 'subtle' splicing isoform (CAG + ) of CYYR1 mRNA, the sequence and

  2. Characterisation of adiponectin multimers and the IGF axis in humans with a heterozygote mutation in the tyrosine kinase domain of the insulin receptor gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund, Kurt; Beck-Nielsen, Henning; Flyvbjerg, Allan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Low levels of adiponectin, IGF-binding protein (IGFBP)-1, and IGFBP-2, and high levels of leptin correlate with several indices of insulin resistance and risk of type 2 diabetes. However, in insulin receptoropathies plasma adiponectin is paradoxically increased despite severe insulin...... resistance, whereas the IGF-axis is sparsely described. Here, we aimed to characterize the multimeric distribution of adiponectin and the IGF-axis in humans with a heterozygous INSR mutation (Arg1174Gln).Methods: Blood samples obtained in six Arg1174Gln-carriers and 10 lean, healthy controls before and after...... an euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp were examined for plasma adiponectin multimers, leptin, total IGF-I, IGF-II, free IGF-I, IGFBP-1 and IGFBP-2.Results: Despite 10-fold elevated fasting insulin and marked insulin resistance in Arg1174Gln-carriers, the levels of total adiponectin, leptin, IGFBP-1 and IGFBP-2...

  3. Evidence for association of the cloned liver growth hormone receptor with a tyrosine kinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, X; Uhler, M D; Billestrup, N

    1992-01-01

    The ability of the cloned liver growth hormone (GH) receptor, when expressed in mammalian cell lines, to copurify with tyrosine kinase activity and be tyrosyl phosphorylated was examined. 125I-human growth hormone-GH receptor complexes isolated from COS-7 cells transiently expressing high levels...... of tyrosine kinase activity with cloned liver GH receptor. The level of phosphorylation of the GH receptor was very low, as compared with the endogenous GH receptor in 3T3-F442A cells, suggesting that tyrosine kinase activity is not intrinsic to the cloned GH receptor but rather resides with a kinase present...... in a variety of cell types. The finding that the level of phosphorylation of GH receptor appears to vary with cell type is consistent with the cloned liver GH receptor being a substrate for an associated tyrosine kinase and with the amount of such a GH receptor-associated tyrosine kinase being cell type-specific....

  4. Tyrosine-Nitrated Proteins: Proteomic and Bioanalytical Aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batthyány, Carlos; Bartesaghi, Silvina; Mastrogiovanni, Mauricio; Lima, Analía; Demicheli, Verónica; Radi, Rafael

    2017-03-01

    "Nitroproteomic" is under active development, as 3-nitrotyrosine in proteins constitutes a footprint left by the reactions of nitric oxide-derived oxidants that are usually associated to oxidative stress conditions. Moreover, protein tyrosine nitration can cause structural and functional changes, which may be of pathophysiological relevance for human disease conditions. Biological protein tyrosine nitration is a free radical process involving the intermediacy of tyrosyl radicals; in spite of being a nonenzymatic process, nitration is selectively directed toward a limited subset of tyrosine residues. Precise identification and quantitation of 3-nitrotyrosine in proteins has represented a "tour de force" for researchers. Recent Advances: A small number of proteins are preferential targets of nitration (usually less than 100 proteins per proteome), contrasting with the large number of proteins modified by other post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation, acetylation, and, notably, S-nitrosation. Proteomic approaches have revealed key features of tyrosine nitration both in vivo and in vitro, including selectivity, site specificity, and effects in protein structure and function. Identification of 3-nitrotyrosine-containing proteins and mapping nitrated residues is challenging, due to low abundance of this oxidative modification in biological samples and its unfriendly behavior in mass spectrometry (MS)-based technologies, that is, MALDI, electrospray ionization, and collision-induced dissociation. The use of (i) classical two-dimensional electrophoresis with immunochemical detection of nitrated proteins followed by protein ID by regular MS/MS in combination with (ii) immuno-enrichment of tyrosine-nitrated peptides and (iii) identification of nitrated peptides by a MIDAS™ experiment is arising as a potent methodology to unambiguously map and quantitate tyrosine-nitrated proteins in vivo. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 26, 313-328.

  5. Conformational Clusters of Phosphorylated Tyrosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelrasoul, Maha; Ponniah, Komala; Mao, Alice; Warden, Meghan S; Elhefnawy, Wessam; Li, Yaohang; Pascal, Steven M

    2017-12-06

    Tyrosine phosphorylation plays an important role in many cellular and intercellular processes including signal transduction, subcellular localization, and regulation of enzymatic activity. In 1999, Blom et al., using the limited number of protein data bank (PDB) structures available at that time, reported that the side chain structures of phosphorylated tyrosine (pY) are partitioned into two conserved conformational clusters ( Blom, N.; Gammeltoft, S.; Brunak, S. J. Mol. Biol. 1999 , 294 , 1351 - 1362 ). We have used the spectral clustering algorithm to cluster the increasingly growing number of protein structures with pY sites, and have found that the pY residues cluster into three distinct side chain conformations. Two of these pY conformational clusters associate strongly with a narrow range of tyrosine backbone conformation. The novel cluster also highly correlates with the identity of the n + 1 residue, and is strongly associated with a sequential pYpY conformation which places two adjacent pY side chains in a specific relative orientation. Further analysis shows that the three pY clusters are associated with distinct distributions of cognate protein kinases.

  6. From fresh heterologous oocyte donation to autologous oocyte banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoop, D

    2012-01-01

    Today, oocyte donation has become well established, giving rise to thousands of children born worldwide annually. The introduction of oocyte cryopreservation through vitrification allows the introduction of egg banking, improving the efficiency and comfort of oocyte donation. Moreover, the vitrification technique can now enable autologous donation of oocytes to prevent future infertility. We evaluated fresh heterologous oocyte donation in terms of obstetrical and perinatal outcome as well as of the reproductive outcome of past donors. We then evaluated the efficiency of a closed vitrification device and its clinical applications within ART. Thirdly, we evaluated the opinion of women with regard to preventive egg freezing and the efficiency of a human oocyte in relation to age. Oocyte donation is associated with an increased risk of first trimester bleeding and pregnancy induced hypertension. Donating oocytes does not seem to increase the likelihood for a later need of fertility treatment. The chance of an oocyte to result in live birth (utilization rate) in women women would consider safeguarding their reproductive potential through egg freezing or are at least open to the idea. The introduction of efficient oocyte cryopreservation has revolutionized oocyte donation through the establishment of eggbank donation. The technique also enables women to perform autologous donation after preventive oocyte storage in order to circumvent their biological clock.

  7. Risk of hormone escape in a human prostate cancer model depends on therapy modalities and can be reduced by tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Guyader

    Full Text Available Almost all prostate cancers respond to androgen deprivation treatment but many recur. We postulated that risk of hormone escape--frequency and delay--are influenced by hormone therapy modalities. More, hormone therapies induce crucial biological changes involving androgen receptors; some might be targets for escape prevention. We investigated the relationship between the androgen deprivation treatment and the risk of recurrence using nude mice bearing the high grade, hormone-dependent human prostate cancer xenograft PAC120. Tumor-bearing mice were treated by Luteinizing-Hormone Releasing Hormone (LHRH antagonist alone, continuous or intermittent regimen, or combined with androgen receptor (AR antagonists (bicalutamide or flutamide. Tumor growth was monitored. Biological changes were studied as for genomic alterations, AR mutations and protein expression in a large series of recurrent tumors according to hormone therapy modalities. Therapies targeting Her-2 or AKT were tested in combination with castration. All statistical tests were two-sided. Tumor growth was inhibited by continuous administration of the LH-RH antagonist degarelix (castration, but 40% of tumors recurred. Intermittent castration or complete blockade induced by degarelix and antiandrogens combination, inhibited tumor growth but increased the risk of recurrence (RR as compared to continuous castration (RR(intermittent: 14.5, RR(complete blockade: 6.5 and 1.35. All recurrent tumors displayed new quantitative genetic alterations and AR mutations, whatever the treatment modalities. AR amplification was found after complete blockade. Increased expression of Her-2/neu with frequent ERK/AKT activation was detected in all variants. Combination of castration with a Her-2/neu inhibitor decreased recurrence risk (0.17 and combination with an mTOR inhibitor prevented it. Anti-hormone treatments influence risk of recurrence although tumor growth inhibition was initially similar. Recurrent

  8. Tyrosine kinases, drugs, and Shigella flexneri dissemination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragoi, Ana-Maria; Agaisse, Hervé

    2014-01-01

    Shigella flexneri is an enteropathogenic bacterium responsible for approximately 100 million cases of severe dysentery each year. S. flexneri colonization of the human colonic epithelium is supported by direct spread from cell to cell, which relies on actin-based motility. We have recently uncovered that, in intestinal epithelial cells, S. flexneri actin-based motility is regulated by the Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk). Consequently, treatment with Ibrutinib, a specific Btk inhibitor currently used in the treatment of B-cell malignancies, effectively impaired S. flexneri spread from cell to cell. Thus, therapeutic intervention capitalizing on drugs interfering with host factors supporting the infection process may represent an effective alternative to treatments with antimicrobial compounds.

  9. Testing whether Metazoan Tyrosine Loss Was Driven by Selection against Promiscuous Phosphorylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Siddharth; Struck, Travis J.; Mannakee, Brian K.; Paniscus, Mary; Gutenkunst, Ryan N.

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation is a key regulatory modification in metazoans, and the corresponding kinase enzymes have diversified dramatically. This diversification is correlated with a genome-wide reduction in protein tyrosine content, and it was recently suggested that this reduction was driven by selection to avoid promiscuous phosphorylation that might be deleterious. We tested three predictions of this intriguing hypothesis. 1) Selection should be stronger on residues that are more likely to be phosphorylated due to local solvent accessibility or structural disorder. 2) Selection should be stronger on proteins that are more likely to be promiscuously phosphorylated because they are abundant. We tested these predictions by comparing distributions of tyrosine within and among human and yeast orthologous proteins. 3) Selection should be stronger against mutations that create tyrosine versus remove tyrosine. We tested this prediction using human population genomic variation data. We found that all three predicted effects are modest for tyrosine when compared with the other amino acids, suggesting that selection against deleterious phosphorylation was not dominant in driving metazoan tyrosine loss. PMID:25312910

  10. Tumescent mastectomy technique in autologous breast reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Christina R; Koolen, Pieter G L; Ho, Olivia A; Ricci, Joseph A; Tobias, Adam M; Lin, Samuel J; Lee, Bernard T

    2015-10-01

    Use of the tumescent mastectomy technique has been reported to facilitate development of a hydrodissection plane, reduce blood loss, and provide adjunct analgesia. Previous studies suggest that tumescent dissection may contribute to adverse outcomes after immediate implant reconstruction; however, its effect on autologous microsurgical reconstruction has not been established. A retrospective review was conducted of all immediate microsurgical breast reconstruction procedures at a single academic center between January 2004 and December 2013. Records were queried for age, body mass index, mastectomy weight, diabetes, hypertension, smoking, preoperative radiation, reconstruction flap type, and autologous flap weight. Outcomes of interest were mastectomy skin necrosis, complete and partial flap loss, return to the operating room, breast hematoma, seroma, and infection. There were 730 immediate autologous breast reconstructions performed during the study period; 46% with the tumescent dissection technique. Groups were similar with respect to baseline patient and procedural characteristics. Univariate analysis revealed no significant difference in the incidence of mastectomy skin necrosis, complete or partial flap loss, return to the operating room, operative time, estimated blood loss, recurrence, breast hematoma, seroma, or infection in patients undergoing tumescent mastectomy. Multivariate analysis also demonstrated no significant association between the use of tumescent technique and postoperative breast mastectomy skin necrosis (P = 0.980), hematoma (P = 0.759), or seroma (P = 0.340). Use of the tumescent dissection technique during mastectomy is not significantly associated with adverse outcomes after microsurgical breast reconstruction. Despite concern for its impact on implant reconstruction, our findings suggest that this method can be used safely preceding autologous procedures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Autologous patch graft in tube shunt surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslanides, I M; Spaeth, G L; Schmidt, C M; Lanzl, I M; Gandham, S B

    1999-10-01

    To evaluate an alternate method of covering the subconjunctival portion of the tube in aqueous shunt surgery. Evidence of tube erosion, graft-related infection, graft melting, or other associated intraocular complications were evaluated. A retrospective study of 16 patients (17 eyes) who underwent tube shunt surgery at Wills Eye Hospital between July 1991 and October 1996 was conducted. An autologous either "free" or "rotating" scleral lamellar graft was created to cover the subconjunctival portion of the tube shunt. All patients were evaluated for at least 6 months, with a mean follow-up of 14.8 months (range 6-62 months). All eyes tolerated the autologous graft well, with no clinical evidence of tube erosion, or graft-related or intraocular complications. Autologous patch graft in tube shunt surgery appears--in selected cases--to be an effective, safe and inexpensive surgical alternative to allogenic graft materials. It also offers ease of availability, and eliminates the risk of transmitting infectious disease.

  12. Specifically activated memory T cell subsets from cancer patients recognize and reject xenotransplanted autologous tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckhove, Philipp; Feuerer, Markus; Dolenc, Mathias; Schuetz, Florian; Choi, Carmen; Sommerfeldt, Nora; Schwendemann, Jochen; Ehlert, Katrin; Altevogt, Peter; Bastert, Gunther; Schirrmacher, Volker; Umansky, Viktor

    2004-01-01

    Bone marrow of breast cancer patients was found to contain CD8+ T cells specific for peptides derived from breast cancer–associated proteins MUC1 and Her-2/neu. Most of these cells had a central or effector memory phenotype (CD45RA–CD62L+ or CD45RA–CD62L–, respectively). To test their in vivo function, we separated bone marrow–derived CD45RA+ naive or CD45RA–CD45RO+ memory T cells, stimulated them with autologous dendritic cells pulsed with tumor lysate, and transferred them into NOD/SCID mice bearing autologous breast tumors and normal skin transplants. CD45RA– memory but not CD45RA+ naive T cells infiltrated autologous tumor but not skin tissues after the transfer. These tumor-infiltrating cells had a central or effector memory phenotype and produced perforin. Many of them expressed the P-selectin glycoprotein ligand 1 and were found around P-selectin+ tumor endothelium. Tumor infiltration included cluster formation in tumor tissue by memory T cells with cotransferred dendritic cells. It was associated with the induction of tumor cell apoptosis and significant tumor reduction. We thus demonstrate selective homing of memory T cells to human tumors and suggest that tumor rejection is based on the recognition of tumor-associated antigens on tumor cells and dendritic cells by autologous specifically activated central and effector memory T cells. PMID:15232613

  13. Correction of the X-linked immunodeficiency phenotype by transgenic expression of human Bruton Tyrosine kinase under the control of the class II major histocompatibility complex Ea locus control region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drabek, D.; Raguz, S.; Wit, de T.P.M.; Dingjan, G.M.; Savelkoul, H.F.J.; Grosveld, F.; Hendriks, R.W.

    1997-01-01

    Bruton tyrosine kinase (Btk) is essential for the development of pre-B cells to mature B cell stages. Btk-deficient mice manifest an X-linked immunodeficiency (xid) defect characterized by a reduction of peripheral IgMlow IgDhigh B cells, a lack of peritoneal CD5 B cells, low serum levels of IgM and

  14. The Syk protein tyrosine kinase can function independently of CD45 or Lck in T cell antigen receptor signaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chu, D. H.; Spits, H.; Peyron, J. F.; Rowley, R. B.; Bolen, J. B.; Weiss, A.

    1996-01-01

    The protein tyrosine phosphatase CD45 is a critical component of the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) signaling pathway, acting as a positive regulator of Src family protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) such as Lck. Most CD45-deficient human and murine T cell lines are unable to signal through their TCRs.

  15. Dose-dependent effects of oral tyrosine administration on plasma tyrosine levels and cognition in aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rest, van de Ondine; Bloemendaal, Mirjam; Heus, De Rianne; Aarts, Esther

    2017-01-01

    The effects of tyrosine on plasma response and cognition in aging are unknown. We assessed the dose-dependent response to tyrosine administration in older adults in both plasma tyrosine concentrations and working memory performance. In this double blind randomized cross-over trial 17 older adults

  16. Dose-Dependent Effects of Oral Tyrosine Administration on Plasma Tyrosine Levels and Cognition in Aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rest, O. van de; Bloemendaal, M.; Heus, R.A.A. de; Aarts, E.

    2017-01-01

    The effects of tyrosine on plasma response and cognition in aging are unknown. We assessed the dose-dependent response to tyrosine administration in older adults in both plasma tyrosine concentrations and working memory performance. In this double blind randomized cross-over trial 17 older adults

  17. The mechanism of the tyrosine transporter TyrP supports a proton motive tyrosine decarboxylation pathway in Lactobacillus brevis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolken, WAM; Lucas, PM; Lonvaud-Funel, A; Lolkema, JS; Wolken, Wout A.M.; Lucas, Patrick M.

    The tyrosine decarboxylase operon of Lactobacillus brevis IOEB9809 contains, adjacent to the tyrosine decarboxylase gene, a gene for TyrP, a putative tyrosine transporter. The two genes potentially form a proton motive tyrosine decarboxylation pathway. The putative tyrosine transporter gene of L.

  18. Scintigraphy of infection and inflammation with autologous leukocytes and murine monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, W.

    1992-01-01

    Scintigraphy of infection and inflammation with autologous leukocytes (In-111- oxin; Tc-99m-HMPAO) and murine monoclonal antibodies (Tc-99m-anti- NCA-95; BW250/183; I-123-anti-NCA-95; AK-47) has been evaluated in different diseases and revealed comparable results. The use of one of these radiopharmaceuticals is dependant both from the diagnostic accuracy in different diseases and stages of disease and from its ready availability and ease of preparation. Tc-99m- HMPAO should be prefered when autologous leucocytes are labeled, except of differential diagnosis of circumscript inflammatory bowel disease from abdominal abscesses and of chronic osteomyelitis. In these cases In-111-oxin is superior. Immunoscintigraphic techniques are superior regarding the ease of preparation and the unnecessity of handling patients blood. Disadvantageous are the possible human antimouse antibodies, especially regarding the development of human antimouse antibodies. (orig.) [de

  19. Technetium-99m-Labeled Autologous Serum Albumin: A Personal-Exclusive Source of Serum Component

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yuh-Feng; Chen, Yi-Chun; Li, Dian-Kun; Chuang, Mei-Hua

    2011-01-01

    Technetium-99m human serum albumin (99mTc-HSA) is an important radiopharmaceutical required in nuclear medicine studies. However, the risk of transfusion-transmitted infection remains a major safety concern. Autopreparation of serum component acquired from patient provides a “personal-exclusive” source for radiolabeling. This paper is to evaluate the practicality of on-site elusion and subsequent radiolabeling efficacy for serum albumin. Results showed that the autologous elute contained more...

  20. Role of tyrosine phosphatase inhibitors in cancer treatment with emphasis on SH2 domain-containing tyrosine phosphatases (SHPs)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Irandoust, Mahban; van den Berg, Timo K.; Kaspers, Gertjan J. L.; Cloos, Jacqueline

    2009-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation is one of the key mechanisms involved in signal transduction pathways. This modification is regulated by concerted action of protein tyrosine phosphatases and protein tyrosine kinases. Deregulation of either of these key regulators lead to abnormal cellular

  1. Dietary Tyrosine Benefits Cognitive and Psychomotor Performance During Body Cooling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    O'Brien, Catherine; Mahoney, Caroline; Tharion, William J; Sils, Ingrid V; Castellani, John W

    2007-01-01

    Supplemental tyrosine is effective at limiting cold-induced decreases in working memory, presumably by augmenting brain catecholamine levels, since tyrosine is a precursor for catecholamine synthesis...

  2. Lymphoscintigraphy and autologous stem cell implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peña, Yamile; Batista, Juan F.; Perera, Alejandro; Torres, Leonel A.; Sánchez, Elvia L.; Sánchez, Yolaine; Ducat, Luis; Prats, Anais; Hernández, Porfirio; Romero, Susana; Goicochea, Pedro; Quintela, Ana M.

    2016-01-01

    Lymphoscintigraphy is the criterion standard technique for the diagnosis of lymphedema. Advances of the application of autologous hematopoietic stem cells in ischemic disorders of lower limbs have increased the attention of researchers in this field. Aim: To determine the usefulness of lymphoscintigraphy for the assessment the efficacy of autologous stem cell implantation in patients with chronic lymphedema of the upper and lower limbs. Methods: Sixty-five patients were included. Clinical evaluation and lymphoscintigraphy were performed before and six months after stem cells implantation. The stem cells implantations were carried out by multiple superficial and deep injections in the trajectory of the lymphatic vessels and also in the inguinal region. A volume of 0.75 to 1.00 mL of cell suspension (1.0-2.2 x 109 stem cells) was administered in each injection site. Lymphoscintigraphy: Whole-body scans were acquired at 20 minutes, 1 hour, and 3 hours after administration of 185 to 259 MBq (5–7mCi) of 99m Tc-albumin nanocolloids in the interdigital space of both limbs. The anatomy and function of the lymphatic system were evaluated. Results: Functional assessment before implantation of stem cells showed that 69.2% of the patients had severe lymphatic insufficiency. The 61.5% of patients showed clinical improvement, confirmed by the results of the lymphoscintigraphy. The 46.1% of the cases evaluated showed a clear improvement. The study showed that the isotopic lymphography can evaluate the therapeutic response and its intensity. Conclusion: Lymphoscintigraphy is a useful technique for the evaluation and monitoring of autologous stem cell transplantation in patients with chronic lymphedema. (author)

  3. TYROSINE KINASE INHIBITORS AND PREGNANCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Abruzzese

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The management of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML during pregnancy has became recently a matter of continuous debate.  The introduction of the Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors (TKIs in clinical practice has dramatically changed the prognosis of CML patients.  Patients diagnosed in chronic phase can reasonably expect many years of excellent disease control and good quality of life, as well as a normal life expectancy.  This fact has come the necessity to address issues relating to fertility and pregnancy. Physicians are not infrequently being asked for advice regarding the need for, and or the appropriateness of, stopping treatment in order to conceive. In this report we will review the data published in terms of fertility, conception, pregnancy, pregnancy outcome and illness control for all the approved TKIs, as well as suggest how to manage a planned and/or unplanned pregnancy.

  4. Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation in Osteoarthritic Surroundings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ossendorff, Robert; Grad, Sibylle; Stoddart, Martin J

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) fails in up to 20% of cases. Advanced intra-articular degeneration paired with an inflammatory environment may be closely related to implantation failure. Certain cytokines have been identified to play a major role during early osteoarthritis....... PURPOSE: To investigate the effects of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) and its potential inhibition by adalimumab on cartilage regeneration in an in vitro model of ACI. STUDY DESIGN: Controlled laboratory study. METHODS: Bovine articular chondrocytes were cultivated and transferred at passage 3 to fibrin...

  5. Mapping of the receptor protein-tyrosine kinase 10 to human chromosome 1q21-q23 and mouse chromosome 1H1-5 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelhoff, S.; Disteche, C.M. [Univ. of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA (United States); Lai, C. [Scripps Research Inst., LaJolla, CA (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Receptor protein-tyrosine kinases (PTKs) play a critical role in the transduction of signals important to cell growth, differentiation, and survival. Mutations affecting the expression of receptor PTK genes have been associated with a number of vertebrate and invertebrate developmental abnormalities, and the aberrant regulation of tyrosine phosphorylation is implicated in a variety of neoplasias. One estimate suggests that approximately 100 receptor PTK genes exist in the mammalian genome, about half of which have been identified. The tyro-10 receptor protein-tyrosine kinase, first identified in a PCR-based survey for novel tyrosine kinases in the rat nervous system, defines a new subfamily of PTKs. It exhibits a catalytic domain most closely related to those found in the trk PTK receptor subfamily, which transduces signals for nerve growth factor and the related molecules brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotrophin-3, and neurotrophin-4 (NT-3 and NT-4). Trk and the related PTK receptors trkB and trkC play a critical role in the neurotrophin-dependent survival of subsets of sensory and motor neurons. The predicted tyro-10 extracellular region is, however, distinct from that of the trk subfamily and is unique except for a domain shared with the blood coagulation factors V and VIII, thought to be involved in phospholipid binding. Although tyro-10 RNA is most abundant in heart and skeletal muscle in the adult rat, it is expressed in a wide variety of tissues, including the developing and mature brain. Tyro-10 appears identical to the murine TKT sequence reported by Karn et al. and exhibits a high degree of similarity with the CaK, DDR, and Nep PTKs. A ligand for tyro-10 has not yet been identified. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  6. Cost effectiveness of autologous blood transfusion – A developing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An autologous blood donation program was set up at National Orthopaedic Hospital, Igbobi Lagos in 1992 in response to the rising sero prevalence of HIV observed in our “relative replacement” donors. A retrospective batch analysis of patients who received autologous transfusion and those who received homologous ...

  7. Oligonucleotide aptamers against tyrosine kinase receptors: Prospect for anticancer applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camorani, Simona; Crescenzi, Elvira; Fedele, Monica; Cerchia, Laura

    2018-04-01

    Transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) play crucial roles in cancer cell proliferation, survival, migration and differentiation. Area of intense research is searching for effective anticancer therapies targeting these receptors and, to date, several monoclonal antibodies and small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors have entered the clinic. However, some of these drugs show limited efficacy and give rise to acquired resistance. Emerging highly selective compounds for anticancer therapy are oligonucleotide aptamers that interact with their targets by recognizing a specific three-dimensional structure. Because of their nucleic acid nature, the rational design of advanced strategies to manipulate aptamers for both diagnostic and therapeutic applications is greatly simplified over antibodies. In this manuscript, we will provide a comprehensive overview of oligonucleotide aptamers as next generation strategies to efficiently target RTKs in human cancers. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Excess amounts of 3-iodo-l-tyrosine induce Parkinson-like features in experimental approaches of Parkinsonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Espejo, Emilio; Bis-Humbert, Cristian

    2018-06-06

    3-iodo-l-tyrosine might play a role in Parkinson's disease since this molecule is able, at high concentration, to inhibit tyrosine-hydroxylase activity, the rate-limiting enzyme in dopamine biosynthesis. The possible Parkinson-like effects of 3-iodo-l-tyrosine were tested on three experimental approaches in mice: cultured substantia nigra neurons, the enteric nervous system of the jejunum after intra-peritoneal infusions, and the nigrostriatal system following unilateral intrabrain injections. 3-iodo-l-tyrosine, a physiological molecule, was used at concentrations higher than its serum levels in humans. Parkinson-like signs were evaluated through abnormal aggregation of α-synuclein and tyrosine-hydroxylase, loss of tyrosine-hydroxylase-expressing and striatum-projecting neurons and fibers, reduced tyrosine-hydroxylase density, and Parkinson-like motor and non-motor deficits. The retrograde tracer FluoroGold was used in the brain model. The findings revealed that excess amounts of 3-iodo-l-tyrosine induce Parkinson-like effects in the three experimental approaches. Thus, culture neurons of substantia nigra show, after 3-iodo-l-tyrosine exposure, intracytoplasmic inclusions that express α-synuclein and tyrosine-hydroxylase. Intra-peritoneal infusions of 3-iodo-l-tyrosine cause, in the long-term, α-synuclein aggregation, thicker α-synuclein-positive fibers, and loss of tyrosine-hydroxylase-positive cells and fibers in intramural plexuses and ganglia of the jejunum. Infusion of 3-iodo-l-tyrosine into the left dorsal striata of mice damages the nigrostriatal system, as revealed through lower striatal tyrosine-hydroxylase density, reduced number of tyrosine-hydroxylase-expressing and striatum-projecting neurons in the left substantia nigra, as well as the emergence of Parkinson-like behavioral deficits such as akinesia, bradykinesia, motor disbalance, and locomotion directional bias. In conclusion, excess amounts of 3-iodo-l-tyrosine induce Parkinson-like features in

  9. Structural basis for the regulation mechanism of the tyrosine kinase CapB from Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olivares-Illana, Vanesa; Meyer, Philippe; Bechet, Emmanuelle

    2008-01-01

    Bacteria were thought to be devoid of tyrosine-phosphorylating enzymes. However, several tyrosine kinases without similarity to their eukaryotic counterparts have recently been identified in bacteria. They are involved in many physiological processes, but their accurate functions remain poorly...... understood due to slow progress in their structural characterization. They have been best characterized as copolymerases involved in the synthesis and export of extracellular polysaccharides. These compounds play critical roles in the virulence of pathogenic bacteria, and bacterial tyrosine kinases can thus...... be considered as potential therapeutic targets. Here, we present the crystal structures of the phosphorylated and unphosphorylated states of the tyrosine kinase CapB from the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus together with the activator domain of its cognate transmembrane modulator CapA. This first high...

  10. Cartilage repair: Generations of autologous chondrocyte transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marlovits, Stefan; Zeller, Philip; Singer, Philipp; Resinger, Christoph; Vecsei, Vilmos

    2006-01-01

    Articular cartilage in adults has a limited capacity for self-repair after a substantial injury. Surgical therapeutic efforts to treat cartilage defects have focused on delivering new cells capable of chondrogenesis into the lesions. Autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) is an advanced cell-based orthobiologic technology used for the treatment of chondral defects of the knee that has been in clinical use since 1987 and has been performed on 12,000 patients internationally. With ACT, good to excellent clinical results are seen in isolated post-traumatic lesions of the knee joint in the younger patient, with the formation of hyaline or hyaline-like repair tissue. In the classic ACT technique, chondrocytes are isolated from small slices of cartilage harvested arthroscopically from a minor weight-bearing area of the injured knee. The extracellular matrix is removed by enzymatic digestion, and the cells are then expanded in monolayer culture. Once a sufficient number of cells has been obtained, the chondrocytes are implanted into the cartilage defect, using a periosteal patch over the defect as a method of cell containment. The major complications are periosteal hypertrophy, delamination of the transplant, arthrofibrosis and transplant failure. Further improvements in tissue engineering have contributed to the next generation of ACT techniques, where cells are combined with resorbable biomaterials, as in matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT). These biomaterials secure the cells in the defect area and enhance their proliferation and differentiation

  11. Autologous proliferative therapies in recalcitrant lateral epicondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetschke, Elisa; Rudolf, Margit; Lohmann, Christoph H; Stärke, Christian

    2015-09-01

    This study investigates the clinical effects of autologous conditioned plasma (ACP) injections and low-level laser application as therapy options for chronic lateral epicondylitis. A total of 52 patients with chronic lateral epicondylitis were evaluated in this study; 26 of these patients received three ACP injections and the control group, with 26 patients, received 12 laser applications, with standardized physical therapy for all patients afterward. Control examinations took place before treatment, after 2 and 6 mos, and in the 1 yr final follow-up. The control examination included the visual analog scale for pain and Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand outcome measure scores. The analysis at final follow-up after 1 yr showed that both treatment options resulted in successful therapy outcome for the patients. In total, 63.5 % were successfully treated. Successful treatment was defined as more than 30% improvement in the visual analog score and more than 10.2 points in the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand score. Both groups showed a significant improvement in time response. This study demonstrates the beneficial effects of autologous proliferative therapies in the treatment of lateral epicondylitis. The data show that laser application and ACP therapy lead to a clinical improvement in epicondylopathia. Especially the new treatment with ACP can be highlighted as an alternative and as an easy-to-apply therapy option for clinical practice.

  12. Complications Following Autologous Latissimus Flap Breast Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mufid Burgić

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Use of an autologous latissimus flap in breast reconstruction accounts for a supple and natural look of reconstructed breast. Most common postoperative complication, seroma, became more of a rule then an exception when it comes to postoperative evaluation of the patients who underwent this reconstructive procedure. A retrospective study analysing and evaluating different complication rates in 20 patients who underwent breast reconstruction by autologous latissimus flap, was conducted. All patients included in the study were operated at the Department of plastic surgery of Hôpital Civil in Strasbourg, France, between 1996 and 2008. The complication rates were noted as follows: seroma in 19 of our 20 patients (95%, late hypertrophic scarring in 3 patients (15%, postoperative surgical site hematoma in 3 patients (15%, and 2 patients (10% presented postoperative chronic back pain. Different options used in seroma treatment and prevention (subcutaneous-fascia anchor sutures of donor site, application of corticosteroids by injection into donor site postoperatively, passive drainage can reduce seroma formation and thus overall complication rates, leading to much faster patient’s recovery time and return to normal daily activities.

  13. Cartilage repair: Generations of autologous chondrocyte transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marlovits, Stefan [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: stefan.marlovits@meduniwien.ac.at; Zeller, Philip [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Singer, Philipp [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Resinger, Christoph [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Vecsei, Vilmos [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2006-01-15

    Articular cartilage in adults has a limited capacity for self-repair after a substantial injury. Surgical therapeutic efforts to treat cartilage defects have focused on delivering new cells capable of chondrogenesis into the lesions. Autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) is an advanced cell-based orthobiologic technology used for the treatment of chondral defects of the knee that has been in clinical use since 1987 and has been performed on 12,000 patients internationally. With ACT, good to excellent clinical results are seen in isolated post-traumatic lesions of the knee joint in the younger patient, with the formation of hyaline or hyaline-like repair tissue. In the classic ACT technique, chondrocytes are isolated from small slices of cartilage harvested arthroscopically from a minor weight-bearing area of the injured knee. The extracellular matrix is removed by enzymatic digestion, and the cells are then expanded in monolayer culture. Once a sufficient number of cells has been obtained, the chondrocytes are implanted into the cartilage defect, using a periosteal patch over the defect as a method of cell containment. The major complications are periosteal hypertrophy, delamination of the transplant, arthrofibrosis and transplant failure. Further improvements in tissue engineering have contributed to the next generation of ACT techniques, where cells are combined with resorbable biomaterials, as in matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT). These biomaterials secure the cells in the defect area and enhance their proliferation and differentiation.

  14. A Systematic Review of Autologous Platelet-Rich Plasma and Fat Graft Preparation Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luck, Joshua; Smith, Oliver J; Mosahebi, Afshin

    2017-12-01

    The addition of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) to adipose tissue may improve fat graft survival, although graft retention rates vary markedly between studies. To what extent this outcome heterogeneity reflects differing methodological factors remains unknown. This systematic review aims to synthesize and critically review methodological approaches to autologous PRP and fat cotransplantation in both human and animal studies. In accordance with PRISMA guidelines, Ovid MEDLINE, Scopus, and Cochrane Library databases were searched from inception to April 2017. Data were extracted from all in vivo studies involving autologous PRP and fat cotransplantation. A secondary aim was to assess reporting of technical detail; authors were not contacted to provide missing data. From 335 articles, 23 studies were included in the qualitative synthesis. Some 21 were performed in humans and 2 in rabbits. Six studies were randomized control trials; the remainder reported on observational data. Methods of PRP extraction and activation varied markedly between studies. Fat graft preparation was comparatively more consistent. Methods of PRP and fat mixing differed significantly, especially with regards to relative volume/volume ratios. Our study represents the first systematic review of methodological factors in autologous PRP and fat cotransplantation. It demonstrates that technical factors in graft preparation and administration vary significantly between in vivo studies. Such methodological heterogeneity may explain observed differences in experimental and clinical outcomes. Reporting of key procedural information is inconsistent and often inadequate. These issues make meaningful evaluation of the PRP-enhanced fat grafting literature difficult and may limit its translation into clinical practice.

  15. 21 CFR 862.1730 - Free tyrosine test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Free tyrosine test system. 862.1730 Section 862....1730 Free tyrosine test system. (a) Identification. A free tyrosine test system is a device intended to measure free tyrosine (an amono acid) in serum and urine. Measurements obtained by this device are used in...

  16. Preclinical and clinical evaluation of O-[11C]methyl-L-tyrosine for tumor imaging by positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiwata, Kiichi; Tsukada, Hideo; Kubota, Kazuo; Nariai, Tadashi; Harada, Norihiro; Kawamura, Kazunori; Kimura, Yuichi; Oda, Keiichi; Iwata, Ren; Ishii, Kenji

    2005-01-01

    We performed preclinical and clinical studies of O-[ 11 C]methyl-L-tyrosine, a potential tracer for imaging amino acid transport of tumors by positron emission tomography (PET). Examinations of the radiation-absorbed dose by O-[ 11 C]methyl-L-tyrosine and the acute toxicity and mutagenicity of O-methyl-L-tyrosine showed suitability of the tracer for clinical use. The whole-body imaging of monkeys and healthy humans by PET showed low uptake of O-[ 11 C]methyl-L-tyrosine in all normal organs except for the urinary track and bladder, suggesting that the O-[ 11 C]methyl-L-tyrosine PET has the potential for tumor imaging in the whole-body. Finally, the brain tumor imaging was preliminarily demonstrated

  17. Tyrosine biosynthesis, metabolism, and catabolism in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenck, Craig A; Maeda, Hiroshi A

    2018-05-01

    L-Tyrosine (Tyr) is an aromatic amino acid (AAA) required for protein synthesis in all organisms, but synthesized de novo only in plants and microorganisms. In plants, Tyr also serves as a precursor of numerous specialized metabolites that have diverse physiological roles as electron carriers, antioxidants, attractants, and defense compounds. Some of these Tyr-derived plant natural products are also used in human medicine and nutrition (e.g. morphine and vitamin E). While the Tyr biosynthesis and catabolic pathways have been extensively studied in microbes and animals, respectively, those of plants have received much less attention until recently. Accumulating evidence suggest that the Tyr biosynthetic pathways differ between microbes and plants and even within the plant kingdom, likely to support the production of lineage-specific plant specialized metabolites derived from Tyr. The interspecies variations of plant Tyr pathway enzymes can now be used to enhance the production of Tyr and Tyr-derived compounds in plants and other synthetic biology platforms. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Expression Profiling of Tyrosine Kinase Genes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weier, Heinz

    2000-01-01

    ... of these genes parallels the progression of tumors to a more malignant phenotype. We developed a DNA micro-array based screening system to monitor the level of expression of tyrosine kinase (tk...

  19. Rapid enzymatic analysis of plasma for tyrosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, H; Taniguchi, K; Sugiyama, M; Kanno, T

    1990-01-01

    In this rapid, simple, and convenient enzymatic method for measurement of tyrosine in plasma, tyrosine is converted to tyramine by action of tyrosine decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.25) and the tyramine produced is oxidized to p-hydroxybenzyl aldehyde and hydrogen peroxide by action of tyramine oxidase (EC 1.4.3.9). The hydrogen peroxide is reacted with 4-aminoantipyrine and N-ethyl-N-(2-hydroxy-3-sulfopropyl)-m-toluidine in the presence of peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7) to obtain quinoneimine dye, the absorbance of which is measured at 570 nm. Thus tyrosine is measured in the visible range. The CV was 4.6% or less, and the measurement was unaffected by other amino acids, except for phenylalanine. The values obtained (y) correlated well with those obtained with an amino acid analyzer (x): y = 0.902x + 3.92 mumol/L (Syx = 12.3; r = 0.985; n = 54).

  20. The Tyrosine Aminomutase TAM1 Is Required for β-Tyrosine Biosynthesis in Rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jian; Aboshi, Takako; Teraishi, Masayoshi; Strickler, Susan R.; Spindel, Jennifer E.; Tung, Chih-Wei; Takata, Ryo; Matsumoto, Fuka; Maesaka, Yoshihiro; McCouch, Susan R.; Okumoto, Yutaka; Mori, Naoki; Jander, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Non-protein amino acids, often isomers of the standard 20 protein amino acids, have defense-related functions in many plant species. A targeted search for jasmonate-induced metabolites in cultivated rice (Oryza sativa) identified (R)-β-tyrosine, an isomer of the common amino acid (S)-α-tyrosine in the seeds, leaves, roots, and root exudates of the Nipponbare cultivar. Assays with 119 diverse cultivars showed a distinct presence/absence polymorphism, with β-tyrosine being most prevalent in temperate japonica cultivars. Genetic mapping identified a candidate gene on chromosome 12, which was confirmed to encode a tyrosine aminomutase (TAM1) by transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana and in vitro enzyme assays. A point mutation in TAM1 eliminated β-tyrosine production in Nipponbare. Rice cultivars that do not produce β-tyrosine have a chromosome 12 deletion that encompasses TAM1. Although β-tyrosine accumulation was induced by the plant defense signaling molecule jasmonic acid, bioassays with hemipteran and lepidopteran herbivores showed no negative effects at physiologically relevant β-tyrosine concentrations. In contrast, root growth of Arabidopsis thaliana and other tested dicot plants was inhibited by concentrations as low as 1 μM. As β-tyrosine is exuded into hydroponic medium at higher concentrations, it may contribute to the allelopathic potential of rice. PMID:25901084

  1. SH2 domains: modulators of nonreceptor tyrosine kinase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Müller, Susanne; Knapp, Stefan

    2009-12-01

    The Src homology 2 (SH2) domain is a sequence-specific phosphotyrosine-binding module present in many signaling molecules. In cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases, the SH2 domain is located N-terminally to the catalytic kinase domain (SH1) where it mediates cellular localization, substrate recruitment, and regulation of kinase activity. Initially, structural studies established a role of the SH2 domain stabilizing the inactive state of Src family members. However, biochemical characterization showed that the presence of the SH2 domain is frequently required for catalytic activity, suggesting a crucial function stabilizing the active state of many nonreceptor tyrosine kinases. Recently, the structure of the SH2-kinase domain of Fes revealed that the SH2 domain stabilizes the active kinase conformation by direct interactions with the regulatory helix alphaC. Stabilizing interactions between the SH2 and the kinase domains have also been observed in the structures of active Csk and Abl. Interestingly, mutations in the SH2 domain found in human disease can be explained by SH2 domain destabilization or incorrect positioning of the SH2. Here we summarize our understanding of mechanisms that lead to tyrosine kinase activation by direct interactions mediated by the SH2 domain and discuss how mutations in the SH2 domain trigger kinase inactivation.

  2. Predeposit autologous blood transfusion: Do we require to promote it?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurjit Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Safest blood a patient can receive is his own. Quest for safe blood transfusion has remained of prime concern. To meet this aspiration, various forms of autologous blood transfusions can be practiced. It is especially suitable for patients with rare blood groups and religious sects such as Jehovah′s witness autologous transfusion is extremely safe. Cross matching is not required; iso-immunization to a foreign body is excluded. Fear of transfusion transmissible disease can be ignored. Therefore, autologous blood transfusion is required to be revisited. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective study carried out at Padmashree Dr. D. Y. Patil Medical College, Hospital and Research Centre, Pune between July 2010 and May 2012. Study comprised of 100 patients divided into two groups, autologous and homologous. Benefits of autologous transfusion were studied. Results: There was no significant change in hematocrit and blood parameters after blood donation. That is mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (P < 0.001 after blood donation. Only one complication of vasovagal syncope was observed at the time of blood donation. Conclusion: Autologous blood transfusion is safe. Easy alternative to be practiced in elective surgeries, especially in patients with rare blood group or believers of Jehovah′s witness faith. It helps to reduce the shortfall in national blood inventory. Autologous blood donation should be practiced whenever possible.

  3. Ror receptor tyrosine kinases: orphans no more

    OpenAIRE

    Green, Jennifer L.; Kuntz, Steven G.; Sternberg, Paul W.

    2008-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptor (Ror) proteins are a conserved family of tyrosine kinase receptors that function in developmental processes including skeletal and neuronal development, cell movement and cell polarity. Although Ror proteins were originally named because the associated ligand and signaling pathway were unknown, recent studies in multiple species have now established that Ror proteins are Wnt receptors. Depending on the cellular context, Ror proteins can either act...

  4. Oral mucosa: an alternative epidermic cell source to develop autologous dermal-epidermal substitutes from diabetic subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela GUZMÁN-URIBE

    Full Text Available Abstract Oral mucosa has been highlighted as a suitable source of epidermal cells due to its intrinsic characteristics such as its higher proliferation rate and its obtainability. Diabetic ulcers have a worldwide prevalence that is variable (1%-11%, meanwhile treatment of this has been proven ineffective. Tissue-engineered skin plays an important role in wound care focusing on strategies such autologous dermal-epidermal substitutes. Objective The aim of this study was to obtain autologous dermal-epidermal skin substitutes from oral mucosa from diabetic subjects as a first step towards a possible clinical application for cases of diabetic foot. Material and Methods Oral mucosa was obtained from diabetic and healthy subjects (n=20 per group. Epidermal cells were isolated and cultured using autologous fibrin to develop dermal-epidermal in vitro substitutes by the air-liquid technique with autologous human serum as a supplement media. Substitutes were immunocharacterized with collagen IV and cytokeratin 5-14 as specific markers. A Student´s t- test was performed to assess the differences between both groups. Results It was possible to isolate epidermal cells from the oral mucosa of diabetic and healthy subjects and develop autologous dermal-epidermal skin substitutes using autologous serum as a supplement. Differences in the expression of specific markers were observed and the cytokeratin 5-14 expression was lower in the diabetic substitutes, and the collagen IV expression was higher in the diabetic substitutes when compared with the healthy group, showing a significant difference. Conclusion Cells from oral mucosa could be an alternative and less invasive source for skin substitutes and wound healing. A difference in collagen production of diabetic cells suggests diabetic substitutes could improve diabetic wound healing. More research is needed to determine the crosstalk between components of these skin substitutes and damaged tissues.

  5. Protein tyrosine nitration in the cell cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, Min; Mateoiu, Claudia; Souchelnytskyi, Serhiy

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Enrichment of 3-nitrotyrosine containing proteins from cells synchronized in different phases of the cell cycle. → Identification of 76 tyrosine nitrated proteins that change expression during the cell cycle. → Nineteen identified proteins were previously described as regulators of cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Nitration of tyrosine residues in proteins is associated with cell response to oxidative/nitrosative stress. Tyrosine nitration is relatively low abundant post-translational modification that may affect protein functions. Little is known about the extent of protein tyrosine nitration in cells during progression through the cell cycle. Here we report identification of proteins enriched for tyrosine nitration in cells synchronized in G0/G1, S or G2/M phases of the cell cycle. We identified 27 proteins in cells synchronized in G0/G1 phase, 37 proteins in S phase synchronized cells, and 12 proteins related to G2/M phase. Nineteen of the identified proteins were previously described as regulators of cell proliferation. Thus, our data indicate which tyrosine nitrated proteins may affect regulation of the cell cycle.

  6. Functionalization of protected tyrosine via Sonogashira reaction: synthesis of 3-(1,2,3-triazolyl)-tyrosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, Stanley N S; Shamim, Anwar; Ali, Bakhat; de Oliveira, Isadora M; Stefani, Hélio A

    2016-05-01

    1,2,3-Triazol tyrosines were synthesized from tyrosine alkynes that were in turn prepared via Sonogashira cross-coupling reaction. The tyrosine alkynes were subjected to click-chemistry reaction conditions leading to the corresponding 3-(1,2,3-triazolyl)-tyrosines in yields ranging from moderate to good.

  7. Structural basis for the regulation mechanism of the tyrosine kinase CapB from Staphylococcus aureus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanesa Olivares-Illana

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria were thought to be devoid of tyrosine-phosphorylating enzymes. However, several tyrosine kinases without similarity to their eukaryotic counterparts have recently been identified in bacteria. They are involved in many physiological processes, but their accurate functions remain poorly understood due to slow progress in their structural characterization. They have been best characterized as copolymerases involved in the synthesis and export of extracellular polysaccharides. These compounds play critical roles in the virulence of pathogenic bacteria, and bacterial tyrosine kinases can thus be considered as potential therapeutic targets. Here, we present the crystal structures of the phosphorylated and unphosphorylated states of the tyrosine kinase CapB from the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus together with the activator domain of its cognate transmembrane modulator CapA. This first high-resolution structure of a bacterial tyrosine kinase reveals a 230-kDa ring-shaped octamer that dissociates upon intermolecular autophosphorylation. These observations provide a molecular basis for the regulation mechanism of the bacterial tyrosine kinases and give insights into their copolymerase function.

  8. Tyrosine-sensitized photodimerization of thymine in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, M.; Matsuyama, A.; Nagata, C.

    1978-01-01

    Photodimerization of thymine in aqueous solution in the presence of tyrosine was studied with monochromatic UV irradiation. The total dimer formation was sensitized in the presence of tyrosine. The action spectrum of sensitized total dimer formation has a peak near 280 nm corresponding to the absorption maximum of tyrosine. Triplet quenchers reduced the sensitization substantially. It seems probable that tyrosine-sensitized photodimerization of thymine occurred via triplet-triplet energy transfer from tyrosine to thymine. (author)

  9. Autologous Stem Cell Transplant for AL Amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Roy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available AL amyloidosis is caused by clonal plasma cells that produce immunoglobulin light chains which misfold and get deposited as amyloid fibrils. Therapy directed against the plasma cell clone leads to clinical benefit. Melphalan and corticosteroids have been the mainstay of treatment for a number of years and the recent availability of other effective agents (IMiDs and proteasome inhibitors has increased treatment options. Autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT has been used in the treatment of AL amyloidosis for many years. It is associated with high rates of hematologic response and improvement in organ function. However, transplant carries considerable risks. Careful patient selection is important to minimize transplant related morbidity and mortality and ensure optimal patient outcomes. As newer more affective therapies become available the role and timing of ASCT in the overall treatment strategy of AL amyloidosis will need to be continually reassessed.

  10. Rapid cell separation with minimal manipulation for autologous cell therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alban J.; O'Rorke, Richard D.; Kale, Akshay; Rimsa, Roberts; Tomlinson, Matthew J.; Kirkham, Jennifer; Davies, A. Giles; Wälti, Christoph; Wood, Christopher D.

    2017-02-01

    The ability to isolate specific, viable cell populations from mixed ensembles with minimal manipulation and within intra-operative time would provide significant advantages for autologous, cell-based therapies in regenerative medicine. Current cell-enrichment technologies are either slow, lack specificity and/or require labelling. Thus a rapid, label-free separation technology that does not affect cell functionality, viability or phenotype is highly desirable. Here, we demonstrate separation of viable from non-viable human stromal cells using remote dielectrophoresis, in which an electric field is coupled into a microfluidic channel using shear-horizontal surface acoustic waves, producing an array of virtual electrodes within the channel. This allows high-throughput dielectrophoretic cell separation in high conductivity, physiological-like fluids, overcoming the limitations of conventional dielectrophoresis. We demonstrate viable/non-viable separation efficacy of >98% in pre-purified mesenchymal stromal cells, extracted from human dental pulp, with no adverse effects on cell viability, or on their subsequent osteogenic capabilities.

  11. Complement activated granulocytes can cause autologous tissue destruction in man

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Löhde

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Activation of polymorphonuclear granulocytes (PMNs by C5a is thought to be important in the pathogenesis of multiple organ failure during sepsis and after trauma. In our experiment exposure of human PMNs to autologous zymosan activated plasma (ZAP leads to a rapid increase in chemiluminescence. Heating the ZAP at 56°C for 30 min did not alter the changes, while untreated plasma induced only baseline activity. The respiratory burst could be completely abolished by decomplementation and preincubation with rabbit antihuman C5a antibodies. Observation of human omentum using electron microscopy showed intravascular aggregation of PMNs, with capillary thrombosis and diapedesis of the cells through endothelial junctions 90 s after exposure to ZAP. PMNs caused disruption of connections between the mesothelial cells. After 4 min the mesothelium was completely destroyed, and connective tissue and fat cells exposed. Native plasma and minimum essential medium did not induce any morphological changes. These data support the concept that C5a activated PMNs can cause endothelial and mesothelial damage in man. Even though a causal relationship between anaphylatoxins and organ failure cannot be proved by these experiments C5a seems to be an important mediator in the pathogenesis of changes induced by severe sepsis and trauma in man.

  12. Differentiation within autologous fibrin scaffolds of porcine dermal cells with the mesenchymal stem cell phenotype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puente, Pilar de la; Ludeña, Dolores; López, Marta; Ramos, Jennifer; Iglesias, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Porcine mesenchymal stem cells (pMSCs) are an attractive source of cells for tissue engineering because their properties are similar to those of human stem cells. pMSCs can be found in different tissues but their dermal origin has not been studied in depth. Additionally, MSCs differentiation in monolayer cultures requires subcultured cells, and these cells are at risk of dedifferentiation when implanting them into living tissue. Following this, we attempted to characterize the MSCs phenotype of porcine dermal cells and to evaluate their cellular proliferation and differentiation in autologous fibrin scaffolds (AFSs). Dermal biopsies and blood samples were obtained from 12 pigs. Dermal cells were characterized by flow cytometry. Frozen autologous plasma was used to prepare AFSs. pMSC differentiation was studied in standard structures (monolayers and pellets) and in AFSs. The pMSCs expressed the CD90 and CD29 markers of the mesenchymal lineage. AFSs afforded adipogenic, osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation. The porcine dermis can be proposed to be a good source of MSCs with adequate proliferative capacity and a suitable expression of markers. The pMSCs also showed optimal proliferation and differentiation in AFSs, such that these might serve as a promising autologous and implantable material for use in tissue engineering. -- Highlights: ► Low fibrinogen concentration provides a suitable matrix for cell migration and differentiation. ► Autologous fibrin scaffolds is a promising technique in tissue engineering. ► Dermal cells are an easily accessible mesenchymal stem cell source. ► Fibrin scaffolds afforded adipogenic, osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation.

  13. Autologous bone marrow mononuclear cell delivery to dilated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Autologous bone marrow mononuclear cell delivery to dilated cardiomyopathy patients: A clinical trial. PLN Kaparthi, G Namita, LK Chelluri, VSP Rao, PK Shah, A Vasantha, SK Ratnakar, K Ravindhranath ...

  14. Organization and evolution of the rat tyrosine hydroxylase gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, E.R.; Coker, G.T. III; O'Malley, K.L.

    1987-01-01

    This report describes the organization of the rat tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene and compares its structure with the human phenylalanine hydroxylase gene. Both genes are single copy and contain 13 exons separated by 12 introns. Remarkably, the positions of 10 out 12 intron/exon boundaries are identical for the two genes. These results support the idea that these hydroxylases genes are members of a gene family which has a common evolutionary origin. The authors predict that this ancestral gene would have encoded exons similar to those of TH prior to evolutionary drift to other members of this gene family

  15. Brain catecholamine depletion and motor impairment in a Th knock-in mouse with type B tyrosine hydroxylase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korner, Germaine; Noain, Daniela; Ying, Ming; Hole, Magnus; Flydal, Marte I; Scherer, Tanja; Allegri, Gabriella; Rassi, Anahita; Fingerhut, Ralph; Becu-Villalobos, Damasia; Pillai, Samyuktha; Wueest, Stephan; Konrad, Daniel; Lauber-Biason, Anna; Baumann, Christian R; Bindoff, Laurence A; Martinez, Aurora; Thöny, Beat

    2015-10-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase catalyses the hydroxylation of L-tyrosine to l-DOPA, the rate-limiting step in the synthesis of catecholamines. Mutations in the TH gene encoding tyrosine hydroxylase are associated with the autosomal recessive disorder tyrosine hydroxylase deficiency, which manifests phenotypes varying from infantile parkinsonism and DOPA-responsive dystonia, also termed type A, to complex encephalopathy with perinatal onset, termed type B. We generated homozygous Th knock-in mice with the mutation Th-p.R203H, equivalent to the most recurrent human mutation associated with type B tyrosine hydroxylase deficiency (TH-p.R233H), often unresponsive to l-DOPA treatment. The Th knock-in mice showed normal survival and food intake, but hypotension, hypokinesia, reduced motor coordination, wide-based gate and catalepsy. This phenotype was associated with a gradual loss of central catecholamines and the serious manifestations of motor impairment presented diurnal fluctuation but did not improve with standard l-DOPA treatment. The mutant tyrosine hydroxylase enzyme was unstable and exhibited deficient stabilization by catecholamines, leading to decline of brain tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactivity in the Th knock-in mice. In fact the substantia nigra presented an almost normal level of mutant tyrosine hydroxylase protein but distinct absence of the enzyme was observed in the striatum, indicating a mutation-associated mislocalization of tyrosine hydroxylase in the nigrostriatal pathway. This hypomorphic mouse model thus provides understanding on pathomechanisms in type B tyrosine hydroxylase deficiency and a platform for the evaluation of novel therapeutics for movement disorders with loss of dopaminergic input to the striatum. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Giant hub Src and Syk tyrosine kinase thermodynamic profiles recapitulate evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, J. C.

    2017-10-01

    Thermodynamic scaling theory, previously applied mainly to small proteins, here analyzes quantitative evolution of the titled functional network giant hub enzymes. The broad domain structure identified homologically is confirmed hydropathically using amino acid sequences only. The most surprising results concern the evolution of the tyrosine kinase globular surface roughness from avians to mammals, which is first order, compared to the evolution within mammals from rodents to humans, which is second order. The mystery of the unique amide terminal region of proto oncogene tyrosine protein kinase is resolved by the discovery there of a rare hydroneutral septad targeting cluster, which is paralleled by an equally rare octad catalytic cluster in tyrosine kinase in humans and a few other species (cat and dog). These results, which go far towards explaining why these proteins are among the largest giant hubs in protein interaction networks, use no adjustable parameters.

  17. Autologous blood cell therapies from pluripotent stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengerke, Claudia; Daley, George Q.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The discovery of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) raised promises for a universal resource for cell based therapies in regenerative medicine. Recently, fast-paced progress has been made towards the generation of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) amenable for clinical applications, culminating in reprogramming of adult somatic cells to autologous PSCs that can be indefinitely expanded in vitro. However, besides the efficient generation of bona fide, clinically safe PSCs (e.g. without the use of oncoproteins and gene transfer based on viruses inserting randomly into the genome), a major challenge in the field remains how to efficiently differentiate PSCs to specific lineages and how to select for cells that will function normally upon transplantation in adults. In this review, we analyse the in vitro differentiation potential of PSCs to the hematopoietic lineage discussing blood cell types that can be currently obtained, limitations in derivation of adult-type HSCs and prospects for clinical application of PSCs-derived blood cells. PMID:19910091

  18. A fusion of minicircle DNA and nanoparticle delivery technologies facilitates therapeutic genetic engineering of autologous canine olfactory mucosal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Alexander M; Adams, Christopher F; Fernandes, Alinda R; Al-Shakli, Arwa F; Sen, Jon; Carwardine, Darren R; Granger, Nicolas; Chari, Divya M

    2017-06-29

    Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) promote axonal regeneration and improve locomotor function when transplanted into the injured spinal cord. A recent clinical trial demonstrated improved motor function in domestic dogs with spinal injury following autologous OEC transplantation. Their utility in canines offers promise for human translation, as dogs are comparable to humans in terms of clinical management and genetic/environmental variation. Moreover, the autologous, minimally invasive derivation of OECs makes them viable for human spinal injury investigation. Genetic engineering of transplant populations may augment their therapeutic potential, but relies heavily on viral methods which have several drawbacks for clinical translation. We present here the first proof that magnetic particles deployed with applied magnetic fields and advanced DNA minicircle vectors can safely bioengineer OECs to secrete a key neurotrophic factor, with an efficiency approaching that of viral vectors. We suggest that our alternative approach offers high translational potential for the delivery of augmented clinical cell therapies.

  19. Implications of tyrosine phosphoproteomics in cervical carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DeFord James

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Worldwide cervical cancer remains a leading cause of mortality from gynecologic malignancies. The link between cervical cancer and persistent infection with HPV has been established. At a molecular level little is known about the transition from the precancerous state to invasive cancer. To elucidate this process, cervical biopsies from human specimens were obtained from precancerous state to stage III disease. Methods Cervical biopsies were obtained from patients with a diagnosis of cervical cancer undergoing definitive surgery or staging operation. Biopsies were obtained from patients with precancerous lesions at the time of their excisional procedure. Control samples were obtained from patients undergoing hysterectomy for benign conditions such as fibroids. Samples were subjected to proteomic profiling using two dimensional gel electrophoresis with subsequent trypsin digestion followed by MALDI-TOF protein identification. Candidate proteins were then further studied using western blotting, immunoprecipitation and immunohistochemistry. Results Annexin A1 and DNA-PKcs were found to be differentially expressed. Phosphorylated annexin A1 was up regulated in diseased states in comparison to control and its level was strongly detected in the serum of cervical cancer patients compared to controls. DNA-PKcs was noted to be hyperphosphorylated and fragmented in cancer when compared to controls. By immunohistochemistry annexin A1 was noted in the vascular environment in cancer and certain precancerous samples. Conclusion This study suggests a probable role for protein tyrosine phosphorylation in cervical carcinogenesis. Annexin A1 and DNA-PK cs may have synergistic effects with HPV infection. Precancerous lesions that may progress to cervical cancer may be differentiated from lesions that will not base on similar immunohistochemical profile to invasive squamous cell carcinoma.

  20. Autologous fat grafting: use of closed syringe microcannula system for enhanced autologous structural grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander RW

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Robert W Alexander,1 David Harrell2 1Department of Surgery, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA; 2Harvest-Terumo Inc, Plymouth, MA, USA Objectives: Provide background for use of acquiring autologous adipose tissue as a tissue graft and source of adult progenitor cells for use in cosmetic plastic surgery. Discuss the background and mechanisms of action of closed syringe vacuum lipoaspiration, with emphasis on accessing adipose-derived mesenchymal/stromal cells and the stromal vascular fraction (SVF for use in aesthetic, structural reconstruction and regenerative applications. Explain a proven protocol for acquiring high-quality autologous fat grafts (AFG with use of disposable, microcannula systems. Design: Explain the components and advantage of use of the patented super luer-lock and microcannulas system for use with the closed-syringe system. A sequential explanation of equipment selection for minimally traumatic lipoaspiration in small volumes is presented, including use of blunt injection cannulas to reduce risk of embolism. Results: Thousands of AFG have proven safe and efficacious for lipoaspiration techniques for large and small structural fat grafting procedures. The importance and advantages of gentle harvesting of the adipose tissue complex has become very clear in the past 5 years. The closed-syringe system offers a minimally invasive, gentle system with which to mobilize subdermal fat tissues in a suspension form. Resulting total nuclear counting of undifferentiated cells of the adipose-derived -SVF suggests that the yield achieved is better than use of always-on, constant mechanical pump applied vacuum systems. Conclusion: Use of a closed-syringe lipoaspiration system featuring disposable microcannulas offers a safe and effective means of harvesting small volumes of nonmanipulated adipose tissues and its accompanying progenitor cells within the SVF. Closed syringes and microcannulas are

  1. Inflammatory effects of autologous, genetically modified autologous, allogeneic, and xenogeneic mesenchymal stem cells after intra-articular injection in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigott, J H; Ishihara, A; Wellman, M L; Russell, D S; Bertone, A L

    2013-01-01

    To compare the clinical and inflammatory joint responses to intra-articular injection of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) including autologous, genetically modified autologous, allogeneic, or xenogeneic cells in horses. Six five-year-old Thoroughbred mares had one fetlock joint injected with Gey's balanced salt solution as the vehicle control. Each fetlock joint of each horse was subsequently injected with 15 million MSC from the described MSC groups, and were assessed for 28 days for clinical and inflammatory parameters representing synovitis, joint swelling, and pain. There were not any significant differences between autologous and genetically modified autologous MSC for synovial fluid total nucleated cell count, total protein, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, fetlock circumference, oedema score, pain-free range-of-motion, and soluble gene products that were detected for at least two days. Allogeneic and xenogeneic MSC produced a greater increase in peak of inflammation at 24 hours than either autologous MSC group. Genetically engineered MSC can act as vehicles to deliver gene products to the joint; further investigation into the therapeutic potential of this cell therapy is warranted. Intra-articular MSC injection resulted in a moderate acute inflammatory joint response that was greater for allogeneic and xenogeneic MSC than autologous MSC. Clinical management of this response may minimize this effect.

  2. Tyrosine and carboxyl protonation changes in the bacteriorhodopsin photocycle. 2. Tyrosine-26 and -64

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roepe, P.; Scherrer, P.; Ahl, P.L.; Gupta, S.K.D.; Bogomolni, R.A.; Herzfeld, J.; Rothschild, K.J.

    1987-01-01

    Low-temperature Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and UV difference spectroscopies combined with selective tyrosine nitration and tyrosine isotopic labeling have been used to investigate the participation of tyrosines-26 and -64 in the bacteriorhodopsin (bR) photocycle. Nitration of Tyr-26 has no detectable effect on the FTIR or UV difference spectra of the BR 570 → K 630 or BR 570 → M 412 transitions. In contrast, nitration of Tyr-64 causes changes in both the FTIR and UV spectra of these transitions. However, this nitration does not alter tyrosine peaks in the FTIR difference spectra which have previously been associated with the protonation of a tyrosinate by K 630 and the deprotonation of a tyrosine by M 412 . Instead, Tyr-64 nitration appears to affect other tyrosine peaks. These results and changes in UV difference spectra upon Tyr-64 nitration are consistent with the deprotonation of Tyr-64 by M 412 as concluded previously. Effects on chromophore vibrations caused by Tyr-64 nitration are unaltered upon reducing the nitrotyrosine to aminotyrosine with sodium dithionite. Finally, nitro-Tyr-64 causes a shift in the frequency of a positive peak at 1739 cm -1 in the BR 570 → M 412 FTIR difference spectrum which reflects the protonation of a carboxyl-containing residue. The shift does not occur for samples containing amino-Tyr-64. These data suggest that Tyr-64 may interact with this carboxyl group

  3. Autologous blood transfusion during emergency trauma operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Carlos V R; Foulkrod, Kelli H; Sadler, Holli T; Richards, E Kalem; Biggan, Dennis P; Czysz, Clea; Manuel, Tony

    2010-07-01

    Intraoperative cell salvage (CS) of shed blood during emergency surgical procedures provides an effective and cost-efficient resuscitation alternative to allogeneic blood transfusion, which is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in trauma patients. Retrospective matched cohort study. Level I trauma center. All adult trauma patients who underwent an emergency operation and received CS as part of their intraoperative resuscitation. The CS group was matched to a no-CS group for age, sex, Injury Severity Score, mechanism of injury, and operation performed. Amount and cost of allogeneic transfusion of packed red blood cells and plasma. The 47 patients in the CS group were similar to the 47 in the no-CS group for all matched variables. Patients in the CS group received an average of 819 mL of autologous CS blood. The CS group received fewer intraoperative (2 vs 4 U; P = .002) and total (4 vs 8 U; P blood cells. The CS group also received fewer total units of plasma (3 vs 5 U; P = .03). The cost of blood product transfusion (including the total cost of CS) was less in the CS group ($1616 vs $2584 per patient; P = .004). Intraoperative CS provides an effective and cost-efficient resuscitation strategy as an alternative to allogeneic blood transfusion in trauma patients undergoing emergency operative procedures.

  4. Autologous Blood Transfusion for Postpartum Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenawalt, Julia A; Zernell, Denise

    Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is a leading contributor to maternal morbidity and mortality in the United States and globally. Although the rate of PPH is generally decreasing nationally, severity of PPH appears to be increasing, potentially related to the various comorbidities associated with women of childbearing age. There is increasing evidence of risks associated with allogeneic blood transfusion, which has historically been the classic therapeutic approach for treatment to PPH. Pregnant women are particularly susceptible to the implications of sensitization to red cell antigens, a common sequela to allogenic blood transfusion. Autologous blood transfusion eliminates the potential of communicable disease transmission as well as the conceivable threat of a blood transfusion reaction. Recent technological advances allow cell salvage coupled with the use of a leukocyte filter to be used as an alternative approach for improving the outcome for women experiencing a PPH. Modest changes in standard operating procedure and continued training in use and application of cell salvaged blood may assist in minimizing negative outcomes from PPH. Salvaged blood has been demonstrated to be at least equal and often superior to banked blood. We discuss nursing implications for application of this technology for women with PPH. Continued research is warranted to evaluate the impact that application of cell salvage with filtration has on the patient experiencing a PPH.

  5. Chlorinated tyrosine derivatives in insect cuticle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Svend Olav

    2004-01-01

    A method for quantitative measurement of 3-monochlorotyrosine and 3,5-dichlorotyrosine in insect cuticles is described, and it is used for determination of their distribution in various cuticular regions in nymphs and adults of the desert locust, Schistocerca gregaria. The two chlorinated tyrosine......, not-yet sclerotized cuticle of adult femur and tibia, the amounts increased rapidly during the first 24 h after ecdysis and more slowly during the next two weeks. Control analyses using stable isotope dilution mass spectrometry have confirmed that the chlorinated tyrosines are not artifacts formed...

  6. Protein-Tyrosine Phosphorylation in Bacillus subtilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mijakovic, Ivan; Petranovic, Dina; Bottini, N.

    2005-01-01

    phosphorylation, indicating that this post-translational modifi cation could regulate physiological processes ranging from stress response and exopolysaccharide synthesis to DNA metabolism. Some interesting work in this fi eld was done in Bacillus subtilis , and we here present the current state of knowledge...... on protein-tyrosine phosphorylation in this gram-positive model organism. With its two kinases, two kinase modulators, three phosphatases and at least four different tyrosine-phosphorylated substrates, B. subtilis is the bacterium with the highest number of presently known participants in the global network...

  7. Differentiation of human endometrial stem cells into urothelial cells on a three-dimensional nanofibrous silk-collagen scaffold: an autologous cell resource for reconstruction of the urinary bladder wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoae-Hassani, Alireza; Mortazavi-Tabatabaei, Seyed Abdolreza; Sharif, Shiva; Seifalian, Alexander Marcus; Azimi, Alireza; Samadikuchaksaraei, Ali; Verdi, Javad

    2015-11-01

    Reconstruction of the bladder wall via in vitro differentiated stem cells on an appropriate scaffold could be used in such conditions as cancer and neurogenic urinary bladder. This study aimed to examine the potential of human endometrial stem cells (EnSCs) to form urinary bladder epithelial cells (urothelium) on nanofibrous silk-collagen scaffolds, for construction of the urinary bladder wall. After passage 4, EnSCs were induced by keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) and seeded on electrospun collagen-V, silk and silk-collagen nanofibres. Later we tested urothelium-specific genes and proteins (uroplakin-Ia, uroplakin-Ib, uroplakin-II, uroplakin-III and cytokeratin 20) by immunocytochemistry, RT-PCR and western blot analyses. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and histology were used to detect cell-matrix interactions. DMEM/F12 supplemented by KGF and EGF induced EnSCs to express urothelial cell-specific genes and proteins. Either collagen, silk or silk-collagen scaffolds promoted cell proliferation. The nanofibrous silk-collagen scaffolds provided a three-dimensional (3D) structure to maximize cell-matrix penetration and increase differentiation of the EnSCs. Human EnSCs seeded on 3D nanofibrous silk-collagen scaffolds and differentiated to urothelial cells provide a suitable source for potential use in bladder wall reconstruction in women. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Local corticosteroid versus autologous blood injections in lateral epicondylitis: meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirico, Felice; Ricca, Flavia; DI Meglio, Franca; Nurzynska, Daria; Castaldo, Clotilde; Spera, Rocco; Montagnani, Stefania

    2017-06-01

    Lateral epicondylitis is a common painful elbow disorder. Several approaches to treatment have been proposed, with a local injection of corticosteroids being the most frequently used. Recent insights into the pathophysiology encouraged the introduction of autologous blood injections as an alternative treatment method. The aim of this meta-analysis is to summarize quantitatively the evidence regarding the efficacy of corticosteroids and autologous blood injections for treatment of pain in lateral epicondylitis. Studies were considered eligible based on the following inclusion criteria: adult human, diagnosis of lateral epicondylitis, randomized controlled trials comparing corticosteroids versus autologous blood injections, pain assessment. Exclusion criteria were previous surgery for lateral epicondylitis or for other elbow disorders, concurrent treatment with drugs or physiotherapy, diagnosis of musculoskeletal systemic disorder. A systematic search of literature was performed according to the PRISMA statement. Effect size of each included study was calculated and analyzed in a random-effects model. Four studies, enrolling total of 218 patients (139 females and 79 males), were included in quantitative analysis. At 2 weeks, there was a trend towards a reduction of VAS score in the corticosteroid group (WMD=2.12 [95% CI: 4.38 to 0.14], P=0.07). No significant differences were recorded in the medium-term (4-12 weeks; WMD=0.85 [95% CI: -0.44 to 2.15], P=0.19) and long-term (24 weeks; WMD=0.63 [95% CI: -2.40 to 3.66], P=0.68) follow-up. Few high-quality trials compare the efficacy of corticosteroid and autologous blood injections in the control of pain related to lateral epicondylitis. Available data indicate that corticosteroids tend to reduce VAS score in short-term follow-up, although these data are not statistically significant. No differences were recorded in the medium and long term. Contrary to popular opinion among medical professionals, and despite

  9. Preoperative autologous plateletpheresis in patients undergoing open heart surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomar, Akhlesh S; Tempe, Deepak K; Banerjee, Amit; Hegde, Radhesh; Cooper, Andrea; Khanna, S K

    2003-07-01

    Blood conservation is an important aspect of care provided to the patients undergoing cardiac operations with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). It is even more important in patients with anticipated prolonged CPB, redo cardiac surgery, patients having negative blood group and in patients undergoing emergency cardiac surgery. In prolonged CPB the blood is subjected to more destruction of important coagulation factors, in redo surgery the separation of adhesions leads to increased bleeding and difficulty in achieving the haemostasis and in patients with negative blood group and emergency operations, the availability of sufficient blood can be a problem. Harvesting the autologous platelet rich plasma (PRP) can be a useful method of blood conservation in these patients. The above four categories of patients were prospectively studied, using either autologous whole blood donation or autologous platelet rich plasma (PRP) harvest in the immediate pre-bypass period. Forty two patients were included in the study and randomly divided into two equal groups of 21 each, control group (Group I) in which one unit of whole blood was withdrawn, and PRP group (Group II) where autologous plateletpheresis was utilised. After reversal of heparin, autologous whole blood was transfused in the control group and autologous PRP was transfused in the PRP group. The chest tube drainage and the requirement of homologous blood and blood products were recorded. Average PRP harvest was 643.33 +/- 133.51 mL in PRP group and the mean whole blood donation was 333.75 +/- 79.58 mL in the control group. Demographic, preoperative and intra operative data showed no statistically significant differences between the two groups. The PRP group patients drained 26.44% less (pblood products (pconservation in terms of better haemostasis, and less requirement of blood and blood products in the postoperative period as compared with the autologous whole blood donation. This technique can be especially useful in the

  10. Phenylketonuria : tyrosine supplementation in phenylalanine-restricted diets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Spronsen, FJ; van Rijn, M; Bekhof, J; Koch, R; Smit, PGA

    Treatment of phenylketonuria (PKU) consists of restriction of natural protein and provision of a protein substitute that lacks phenylalanine but is enriched in tyrosine. Large and unexplained differences exist, however, in the tyrosine enrichment of the protein substitutes. Furthermore, some

  11. Receptor tyrosine kinase signaling: a view from quantitative proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dengjel, Joern; Kratchmarova, Irina; Blagoev, Blagoy

    2009-01-01

    Growth factor receptor signaling via receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) is one of the basic cellular communication principals found in all metazoans. Extracellular signals are transferred via membrane spanning receptors into the cytoplasm, reversible tyrosine phosphorylation being the hallmark of all...

  12. Expression of protein-tyrosine phosphatases in the major insulin target tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norris, K; Norris, F; Kono, D H

    1997-01-01

    Protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are key regulators of the insulin receptor signal transduction pathway. We have performed a detailed analysis of PTP expression in the major human insulin target tissues or cells (liver, adipose tissue, skeletal muscle and endothelial cells). To obtain a repre...

  13. In-vitro chondrogenic potential of synovial stem cells and chondrocytes allocated for autologous chondrocyte implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kubosch, Eva Johanna; Heidt, Emanuel; Niemeyer, Philipp

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The use of passaged chondrocytes is the current standard for autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI). De-differentiation due to amplification and donor site morbidity are known drawbacks highlighting the need for alternative cell sources. Methods: Via clinically validated flow cytometry...... analysis, we compared the expression of human stem cell and cartilage markers (collagen type 2 (Col2), aggrecan (ACAN), CD44) of chondrocytes (CHDR), passaged chondrocytes for ACI (CellGenix™), bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSC), and synovial derived stem cells (SDSC). Results: Primary...

  14. HER2-targeted therapy in breast cancer. Monoclonal antibodies and tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Dorte Lisbet; Andersson, Michael; Kamby, Claus

    2008-01-01

    There is strong clinical evidence that trastuzumab, a monoclonal antibody targeting the human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) two tyrosine kinase receptor, is an important component of first-line treatment of patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer. In particular the combination...... of trastuzumab to chemotherapy improves disease-free and overall survival. The use of lapatinib, a dual tyrosine kinase inhibitor of both HER1 and HER2, in combination with capecitabine in the second-line treatment of HER2-positive patients with metastatic breast cancer previously treated with trastuzumab has...

  15. Tyrosine phosphorylation of AAV2 vectors and its consequences on viral intracellular trafficking and transgene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Li; Li, Baozheng; Jayandharan, Giridhararao; Mah, Cathryn S.; Govindasamy, Lakshmanan; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Herzog, Roland W.; Weigel-Van Aken, Kirsten A.; Hobbs, Jacqueline A.; Zolotukhin, Sergei; Muzyczka, Nicholas; Srivastava, Arun

    2008-01-01

    We have documented that epidermal growth factor receptor protein tyrosine kinase (EGFR-PTK) signaling negatively affects intracellular trafficking and transduction efficiency of recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) vectors. Specifically, inhibition of EGFR-PTK signaling leads to decreased ubiquitination of AAV2 capsid proteins, which in turn, facilitates viral nuclear transport by limiting proteasome-mediated degradation of AAV2 vectors. In the present studies, we observed that AAV capsids can indeed be phosphorylated at tyrosine residues by EGFR-PTK in in vitro phosphorylation assays and that phosphorylated AAV capsids retain their structural integrity. However, although phosphorylated AAV vectors enter cells as efficiently as their unphosphorylated counterparts, their transduction efficiency is significantly reduced. This reduction is not due to impaired viral second-strand DNA synthesis since transduction efficiency of both single-stranded AAV (ssAAV) and self-complementary AAV (scAAV) vectors is decreased by ~68% and ~74%, respectively. We also observed that intracellular trafficking of tyrosine-phosphorylated AAV vectors from cytoplasm to nucleus is significantly decreased, which leads to ubiquitination of AAV capsids followed by proteasome-mediated degradation, although downstream consequences of capsid ubiquitination may also be affected by tyrosine-phosphorylation. These studies provide new insights into the role of tyrosine-phosphorylation of AAV capsids in various steps in the virus life cycle, which has implications in the optimal use of recombinant AAV vectors in human gene therapy. PMID:18834608

  16. Scintigraphy of infection and inflammation with autologous leukocytes and murine monoclonal antibodies. Entzuendungsszintigraphie mit autologen Leukozyten und murinen monoklonalen Antikoerpern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, W. (Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Nuklearmedizinische Klinik mit Poliklinik)

    1992-10-01

    Scintigraphy of infection and inflammation with autologous leukocytes (In-111- oxin; Tc-99m-HMPAO) and murine monoclonal antibodies (Tc-99m-anti- NCA-95; BW250/183; I-123-anti-NCA-95; AK-47) has been evaluated in different diseases and revealed comparable results. The use of one of these radiopharmaceuticals is dependant both from the diagnostic accuracy in different diseases and stages of disease and from its ready availability and ease of preparation. Tc-99m- HMPAO should be prefered when autologous leucocytes are labeled, except of differential diagnosis of circumscript inflammatory bowel disease from abdominal abscesses and of chronic osteomyelitis. In these cases In-111-oxin is superior. Immunoscintigraphic techniques are superior regarding the ease of preparation and the unnecessity of handling patients blood. Disadvantageous are the possible human antimouse antibodies, especially regarding the development of human antimouse antibodies. (orig.).

  17. Evolution: Weevils Get Tough on Symbiotic Tyrosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Colin

    2017-12-04

    Weevils, which represent one of the most diverse groups of terrestrial insects in nature, obtain a tough exoskeleton through the activity of an ancient bacterial symbiont with a tiny genome that serves as a factory for the production of tyrosine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Morphological Features of Tyrosine Hydroxylase Immunoreactive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The current immunohistochemical study used the antibody against tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) to observe the immunoreactive elements in the mouse pancreas. The results indicated the presence of immunoreactive nerve fibers and endocrine cells. The immunopositive nerve fibers appeared as thick and thin bundles; thick ...

  19. Enzyme kinetic characterization of protein tyrosine phosphatases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Günther H.J.; Branner, S.; Møller, K. B.

    2003-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) play a central role in cellular signaling processes, resulting in an increased interest in modulating the activities of PTPs. We therefore decided to undertake a detailed enzyme kinetic evaluation of various transmembrane and cytosolic PTPs (PTPalpha, PTPbeta...

  20. [Development and Application of Catalytic Tyrosine Modification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Shinichi; Tsushima, Michihiko; Nakamura, Kosuke; Nakamura, Hiroyuki

    2018-01-01

     The chemical labeling of proteins with synthetic probes is a key technique used in chemical biology, protein-based therapy, and material science. Much of the chemical labeling of native proteins, however, depends on the labeling of lysine and cysteine residues. While those methods have significantly contributed to native protein labeling, alternative methods that can modify different amino acid residues are still required. Herein we report the development of a novel methodology of tyrosine labeling, inspired by the luminol chemiluminescence reaction. Tyrosine residues are often exposed on a protein's surface and are thus expected to be good targets for protein functionalization. In our studies so far, we have found that 1) hemin oxidatively activates luminol derivatives as a catalyst, 2) N-methyl luminol derivative specifically forms a covalent bond with a tyrosine residue among the 20 kinds of natural amino acid residues, and 3) the efficiency of tyrosine labeling with N-methyl luminol derivative is markedly improved by using horseradish peroxidase (HRP) as a catalyst. We were able to use molecular oxygen as an oxidant under HRP/NADH conditions. By using these methods, the functionalization of purified proteins was carried out. Because N-methyl luminol derivative is an excellent protein labeling reagent that responds to the activation of peroxidase, this new method is expected to open doors to such biological applications as the signal amplification of HRP-conjugated antibodies and the detection of protein association in combination with peroxidase-tag technology.

  1. Chimeric autologous/allogeneic constructs for skin regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Cathy Ann; Tam, Joshua; Steiglitz, Barry M; Bauer, Rebecca L; Peters, Noel R; Wang, Ying; Anderson, R Rox; Allen-Hoffmann, B Lynn

    2014-08-01

    The ideal treatment for severe cutaneous injuries would eliminate the need for autografts and promote fully functional, aesthetically pleasing autologous skin regeneration. NIKS progenitor cell-based skin tissues have been developed to promote healing by providing barrier function and delivering wound healing factors. Independently, a device has recently been created to "copy" skin by harvesting full-thickness microscopic tissue columns (MTCs) in lieu of autografts traditionally harvested as sheets. We evaluated the feasibility of combining these two technologies by embedding MTCs in NIKS-based skin tissues to generate chimeric autologous/allogeneic constructs. Chimeric constructs have the potential to provide immediate wound coverage, eliminate painful donor site wounds, and promote restoration of a pigmented skin tissue possessing hair follicles, sweat glands, and sebaceous glands. After MTC insertion, chimeric constructs and controls were reintroduced into air-interface culture and maintained in vitro for several weeks. Tissue viability, proliferative capacity, and morphology were evaluated after long-term culture. Our results confirmed successful MTC insertion and integration, and demonstrated the feasibility of generating chimeric autologous/allogeneic constructs that preserved the viability, proliferative capacity, and structure of autologous pigmented skin. These feasibility studies established the proof-of-principle necessary to further develop chimeric autologous/allogeneic constructs for the treatment of complex skin defects. Reprint & Copyright © 2014 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  2. Autologous chondrocyte implantation: superior biologic properties of hyaline cartilage repairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Ian; Lavigne, Patrick; Valenzuela, Herminio; Oakes, Barry

    2007-02-01

    Information regarding the quality of autologous chondrocyte implantation repair is needed to determine whether the current autologous chondrocyte implantation surgical technology and the subsequent biologic repair processes are capable of reliably forming durable hyaline or hyaline-like cartilage in vivo. We report and analyze the properties and qualities of autologous chondrocyte implantation repairs. We evaluated 66 autologous chondrocyte implantation repairs in 57 patients, 55 of whom had histology, indentometry, and International Cartilage Repair Society repair scoring at reoperation for mechanical symptoms or pain. International Knee Documentation Committee scores were used to address clinical outcome. Maximum stiffness, normalized stiffness, and International Cartilage Repair Society repair scoring were higher for hyaline articular cartilage repairs compared with fibrocartilage, with no difference in clinical outcome. Reoperations revealed 32 macroscopically abnormal repairs (Group B) and 23 knees with normal-looking repairs in which symptoms leading to arthroscopy were accounted for by other joint disorders (Group A). In Group A, 65% of repairs were either hyaline or hyaline-like cartilage compared with 28% in Group B. Autologous chondrocyte repairs composed of fibrocartilage showed more morphologic abnormalities and became symptomatic earlier than hyaline or hyaline-like cartilage repairs. The hyaline articular cartilage repairs had biomechanical properties comparable to surrounding cartilage and superior to those associated with fibrocartilage repairs.

  3. Phenylketonuria : Tyrosine beyond the phenylalanine-restricted diet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Spronsen, FJ; Smit, PGA; Koch, R

    Controversies exist on the role of tyrosine in the pathogenesis of phenylketonuria (PKU) and, consequently, on the therapeutic role of tyrosine. This review examines data and theoretical considerations on the role of tyrosine in the pathogenesis and treatment of PKU. It is concluded that treatment

  4. Protein synthesis rate measured with l-[1-11C]tyrosine positron emission tomography correlates with mitotic activity and MIB-1 antibody-detected proliferation in human soft tissue sarcomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plaat, B.; Mastik, M.; Molenaar, W.; Kole, A.; Vaalburg, W.; Hoekstra, H.

    1999-01-01

    Protein synthesis rate (PSR) can be assessed in vivo using positron emission tomography with l-[1- 11 C]tyrosine (TYR-PET). Biological activity of soft tissue sarcomas (STS) can be measured in vitro by the mitotic rate and number of proliferating cells. In STS the grade of malignancy, in which the mitotic index plays a major role, is considered to be the major standard in predicting biological tumour behaviour. This study was designed to test the validity of TYR-PET in relation to different histopathological features. In 21 patients with untreated STS, the PSR was measured using TYR-PET. The number of mitoses was counted and tumours were graded according to the grading system of Coindre et al. (Cancer 1986; 58:306-309). Proliferative activity was assessed by immunohistological detection of the Ki-67 nuclear antigen using MIB-1 monoclonal antibody. To test the association between the PSR and these tumour parameters, a correlation analysis was performed. A significant (P<0.05) correlation was found between PSR and the Ki-67 proliferation index (R = 0.54), and between PSR and mitotic rate (R = 0.64). There was no correlation between PSR and tumour grade. The present study in malignant soft tissue tumours relates in vivo tumour metabolism as established with TYR-PET to tumour activity measured in vitro and indicates that the non-invasive method of TYR-PET can estimate the mitotic and proliferative activity in STS. (orig.)

  5. Autologous Blood Transfusion in Sports: Emerging Biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamin, Olivier; De Angelis, Sara; Tissot, Jean-Daniel; Saugy, Martial; Leuenberger, Nicolas

    2016-07-01

    Despite being prohibited by the World Anti-Doping Agency, blood doping through erythropoietin injection or blood transfusion is frequently used by athletes to increase oxygen delivery to muscles and enhance performance. In contrast with allogeneic blood transfusion and erythropoietic stimulants, there is presently no direct method of detection for autologous blood transfusion (ABT) doping. Blood reinfusion is currently monitored with individual follow-up of hematological variables via the athlete biological passport, which requires further improvement. Microdosage is undetectable, and suspicious profiles in athletes are often attributed to exposure to altitude, heat stress, or illness. Additional indirect biomarkers may increase the sensitivity and specificity of the longitudinal approach. The emergence of "-omics" strategies provides new opportunities to discover biomarkers for the indirect detection of ABT. With the development of direct quantitative methods, transcriptomics based on microRNA or messenger RNA expression is a promising approach. Because blood donation and blood reinfusion alter iron metabolism, quantification of proteins involved in metal metabolism, such as hepcidin, may be applied in an "ironomics" strategy to improve the detection of ABT. As red blood cell (RBC) storage triggers changes in membrane proteins, proteomic methods have the potential to identify the presence of stored RBCs in blood. Alternatively, urine matrix can be used for the quantification of the plasticizer di(2-ethyhexyl)phthalate and its metabolites that originate from blood storage bags, suggesting recent blood transfusion, and have an important degree of sensitivity and specificity. This review proposes that various indirect biomarkers should be applied in combination with mathematical approaches for longitudinal monitoring aimed at improving ABT detection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Acute phenylalanine/tyrosine depletion of phasic dopamine in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shnitko, Tatiana A; Taylor, Sarah C; Stringfield, Sierra J; Zandy, Shannon L; Cofresí, Roberto U; Doherty, James M; Lynch, William B; Boettiger, Charlotte A; Gonzales, Rueben A; Robinson, Donita L

    2016-06-01

    Dopamine plays a critical role in striatal and cortical function, and depletion of the dopamine precursors phenylalanine and tyrosine is used in humans to temporarily reduce dopamine and probe the role of dopamine in behavior. This method has been shown to alter addiction-related behaviors and cognitive functioning presumably by reducing dopamine transmission, but it is unclear what specific aspects of dopamine transmission are altered. We performed this study to confirm that administration of an amino acid mixture omitting phenylalanine and tyrosine (Phe/Tyr[-]) reduces tyrosine tissue content in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and nucleus accumbens (NAc), and to test the hypothesis that Phe/Tyr[-] administration reduces phasic dopamine release in the NAc. Rats were injected with a Phe/Tyr[-] amino acid mixture, a control amino acid mixture, or saline. High-performance liquid chromatography was used to determine the concentration of tyrosine, dopamine, or norepinephrine in tissue punches from the PFC and ventral striatum. In a separate group of rats, phasic dopamine release was measured with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in the NAc core after injection with either the Phe/Tyr[-] mixture or the control amino acid solution. Phe/Tyr[-] reduced tyrosine content in the PFC and NAc, but dopamine and norepinephrine tissue content were not reduced. Moreover, Phe/Tyr[-] decreased the frequency of dopamine transients, but not their amplitude, in freely moving rats. These results indicate that depletion of tyrosine via Phe/Tyr[-] decreases phasic dopamine transmission, providing insight into the mechanism by which this method modifies dopamine-dependent behaviors in human imaging studies.

  7. Enteric Neural Cells From Hirschsprung Disease Patients Form Ganglia in Autologous Aneuronal ColonSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin N. Rollo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: Hirschsprung disease (HSCR is caused by failure of cells derived from the neural crest (NC to colonize the distal bowel in early embryogenesis, resulting in absence of the enteric nervous system (ENS and failure of intestinal transit postnatally. Treatment is by distal bowel resection, but neural cell replacement may be an alternative. We tested whether aneuronal (aganglionic colon tissue from patients may be colonized by autologous ENS-derived cells. Methods: Cells were obtained and cryopreserved from 31 HSCR patients from the proximal resection margin of colon, and ENS cells were isolated using flow cytometry for the NC marker p75 (nine patients. Aneuronal colon tissue was obtained from the distal resection margin (23 patients. ENS cells were assessed for NC markers immunohistologically and by quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, and mitosis was detected by ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine labeling. The ability of human HSCR postnatal ENS-derived cells to colonize the embryonic intestine was demonstrated by organ coculture with avian embryo gut, and the ability of human postnatal HSCR aneuronal colon muscle to support ENS formation was tested by organ coculture with embryonic mouse ENS cells. Finally, the ability of HSCR patient ENS cells to colonize autologous aneuronal colon muscle tissue was assessed. Results: ENS-derived p75-sorted cells from patients expressed multiple NC progenitor and differentiation markers and proliferated in culture under conditions simulating Wnt signaling. In organ culture, patient ENS cells migrated appropriately in aneural quail embryo gut, and mouse embryo ENS cells rapidly spread, differentiated, and extended axons in patient aneuronal colon muscle tissue. Postnatal ENS cells derived from HSCR patients colonized autologous aneuronal colon tissue in cocultures, proliferating and differentiating as neurons and glia. Conclusions: NC-lineage cells can be obtained from HSCR

  8. Effectiveness of autologous transfusion system in primary total hip and knee arthroplasty.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Schneider, Marco M

    2014-01-01

    Autologous transfusion has become a cost-efficient and useful option in the treatment of patients with high blood loss following major orthopaedic surgery. However, the effectiveness of autologous transfusion in total joint replacement remains controversial.

  9. Treatment of Refractory Filamentary Keratitis With Autologous Serum Tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Sarah P; Rodriguez, Marianeli; Dubovy, Sander; Karp, Carol L; Galor, Anat

    2017-09-01

    To report a case of filamentary keratitis (FK) successfully treated with autologous serum tears and to review the pathogenesis and management of FK. Case report including high-resolution anterior segment optical coherence tomography and filament histopathology. A 61-year-old Hispanic man presented with pain and photophobia of the right eye. He was found to have a corneal epithelial defect and a small peripheral infiltrate 4 months after Laser Assisted in situ Keratomileusis. After resolution of the epithelial defect, he developed FK. Over a 4-month period, conservative management with aggressive lubrication, lid hygiene, topical corticosteroids, topical cyclosporine, bandage contact lenses, and oral doxycycline failed to resolve the corneal filaments. Notably, treatment with 20% autologous serum tears, four times daily, led to a sustained resolution of the FK within 1 week. This case demonstrates the complexity of FK management and introduces autologous serum tears as a viable management option when conservative approaches to this condition fail.

  10. Peripheral blood progenitor cell transplantation mobilised by r-metHuG-CSF (filgrastim); a less costly alternative to autologous bone marrow transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.A. Uyl-de Groot (Carin); D.J. Richel (Dirk); F.F.H. Rutten (Frans)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractIn a retrospective study, we calculated the treatment costs of 63 patients who received either autologous bone marrow transplantation (ABMT) with recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (r-metHuG-CSF) (filgrastim) (n=13) or without r-metHuG-CSF (n=22) or altenatively,

  11. Protein synthesis rate measured with l-[1-{sup 11}C]tyrosine positron emission tomography correlates with mitotic activity and MIB-1 antibody-detected proliferation in human soft tissue sarcomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plaat, B.; Mastik, M.; Molenaar, W. [Department of Pathology, University Hospital Groningen (Netherlands); Kole, A.; Vaalburg, W. [PET Centre, University Hospital Groningen (Netherlands); Hoekstra, H. [Department of Surgical Oncology, University Hospital Groningen (Netherlands)

    1999-04-29

    Protein synthesis rate (PSR) can be assessed in vivo using positron emission tomography with l-[1-{sup 11}C]tyrosine (TYR-PET). Biological activity of soft tissue sarcomas (STS) can be measured in vitro by the mitotic rate and number of proliferating cells. In STS the grade of malignancy, in which the mitotic index plays a major role, is considered to be the major standard in predicting biological tumour behaviour. This study was designed to test the validity of TYR-PET in relation to different histopathological features. In 21 patients with untreated STS, the PSR was measured using TYR-PET. The number of mitoses was counted and tumours were graded according to the grading system of Coindre et al. (Cancer 1986; 58:306-309). Proliferative activity was assessed by immunohistological detection of the Ki-67 nuclear antigen using MIB-1 monoclonal antibody. To test the association between the PSR and these tumour parameters, a correlation analysis was performed. A significant (P<0.05) correlation was found between PSR and the Ki-67 proliferation index (R = 0.54), and between PSR and mitotic rate (R = 0.64). There was no correlation between PSR and tumour grade. The present study in malignant soft tissue tumours relates in vivo tumour metabolism as established with TYR-PET to tumour activity measured in vitro and indicates that the non-invasive method of TYR-PET can estimate the mitotic and proliferative activity in STS. (orig.) With 2 figs., 2 tabs., 30 refs.

  12. Preoperative autologous plateletpheresis in patients undergoing open heart surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomar Akhlesh

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Blood conservation is an important aspect of care provided to the patients undergoing cardiac operations with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB. It is even more important in patients with anticipated prolonged CPB, redo cardiac surgery, patients having negative blood group and in patients undergoing emergency cardiac surgery. In prolonged CPB the blood is subjected to more destruction of important coagulation factors, in redo surgery the separation of adhesions leads to increased bleeding and difficulty in achieving the haemostasis and in patients with negative blood group and emergency operations, the availability of sufficient blood can be a problem. Harvesting the autologous platelet rich plasma (PRP can be a useful method of blood conservation in these patients. The above four categories of patients were prospectively studied, using either autologous whole blood donation or autologous platelet rich plasma (PRP harvest in the immediate pre-bypass period. Forty two patients were included in the study and randomly divided into two equal groups of 21 each, control group (Group I in which one unit of whole blood was withdrawn, and PRP group (Group II where autologous plateletpheresis was utilised. After reversal of heparin, autologous whole blood was transfused in the control group and autologous PRP was transfused in the PRP group. The chest tube drainage and the requirement of homologous blood and blood products were recorded. Average PRP harvest was 643.33 +/- 133.51 mL in PRP group and the mean whole blood donation was 333.75 +/- 79.58 mL in the control group. Demographic, preoperative and intra operative data showed no statistically significant differences between the two groups. The PRP group patients drained 26.44% less (p<0.001 and required 38.5% less homologous blood and blood products (p<0.05, in the postoperative period. Haemoglobin levels on day zero (day of operation and day three were statistically not different between the two groups. We

  13. Autologous Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Chronic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashu Bhasin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cell transplantation is a ‘hype and hope’ in the current scenario. It is in the early stage of development with promises to restore function in chronic diseases. Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC transplantation in stroke patients has shown significant improvement by reducing clinical and functional deficits. They are feasible and multipotent and have homing characteristics. This study evaluates the safety, feasibility and efficacy of autologous MSC transplantation in patients with chronic stroke using clinical scores and functional imaging (blood oxygen level-dependent and diffusion tensor imaging techniques. Methods: Twelve chronic stroke patients were recruited; inclusion criteria were stroke lasting 3 months to 1 year, motor strength of hand muscles of at least 2, and NIHSS of 4–15, and patients had to be conscious and able to comprehend. Fugl Meyer (FM, modified Barthel index (mBI, MRC, Ashworth tone grade scale scores and functional imaging scans were assessed at baseline, and after 8 and 24 weeks. Bone marrow was aspirated under aseptic conditions and expansion of MSC took 3 weeks with animal serum-free media (Stem Pro SFM. Six patients were administered a mean of 50–60 × 106 cells i.v. followed by 8 weeks of physiotherapy. Six patients served as controls. This was a non-randomized experimental controlled trial. Results: Clinical and radiological scanning was normal for the stem cell group patients. There was no mortality or cell-related adverse reaction. The laboratory tests on days 1, 3, 5 and 7 were also normal in the MSC group till the last follow-up. The FM and mBI showed a modest increase in the stem cell group compared to controls. There was an increased number of cluster activation of Brodmann areas BA 4 and BA 6 after stem cell infusion compared to controls, indicating neural plasticity. Conclusion: MSC therapy aiming to restore function in stroke is safe and feasible. Further randomized controlled trials are needed

  14. Tissue engineering applications: cartilage lesions repair by the use of autologous chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. De Franceschi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Promising new therapies based on tissue engineering have been recently developed for cartilage repair. The association of biomaterials with autologous chondrocytes expanded in vitro can represent a useful tool to regenerate this tissue. The scaffolds utilised in such therapeutical applications should provide a pre-formed three-dimensional shape, prevent cells from floating out of the defect, have sufficient mechanical strength, facilitate uniform spread of cells and stimulate the phenotype of transplanted cells. Hyaff®-11 is a hyaluronic-acid based biodegradable polymer, that has been shown to provide successful cell carrier for tissue-engineered repair. From our findings we can state that human chondrocytes seeded on Hyaff®-11 are able to maintain in vitro the characteristic of differentiated cells, expressing and producing collagen type II and aggrecan which are the main markers of cartilage phenotype, down-regulating collagen type I. Moreover, it seems to be a useful scaffold for cartilage repair both in animal models and clinical trials in humans, favouring the formation of a hyaline-like tissue. In the light of these data, we can hypothesise, for the future, the use of autologous chondrocyte transplantation together with gene therapy as a treatment for rheumatic diseases such as osteoarthritis.

  15. Preclinical and clinical evaluation of O-[{sup 11}C]methyl-L-tyrosine for tumor imaging by positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishiwata, Kiichi [Positron Medical Center, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-0022 (Japan)]. E-mail: ishiwata@pet.tmig.or.jp; Tsukada, Hideo [Central Research Laboratory, Hamamatsu Photonics K.K., Hamakita 434-8601 (Japan); Kubota, Kazuo [Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, International Medical Center of Japan, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8655 (Japan); Nariai, Tadashi [Department of Neurosurgery, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8519 (Japan); Harada, Norihiro [Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, International Medical Center of Japan, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8655 (Japan); Kawamura, Kazunori [Positron Medical Center, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-0022 (Japan); SHI Accelerator Service Ltd., Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 141-8686 (Japan); Kimura, Yuichi [Positron Medical Center, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-0022 (Japan); Oda, Keiichi [Positron Medical Center, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-0022 (Japan); Iwata, Ren [CYRIC, Tohoku University, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Ishii, Kenji [Positron Medical Center, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-0022 (Japan)

    2005-04-01

    We performed preclinical and clinical studies of O-[{sup 11}C]methyl-L-tyrosine, a potential tracer for imaging amino acid transport of tumors by positron emission tomography (PET). Examinations of the radiation-absorbed dose by O-[{sup 11}C]methyl-L-tyrosine and the acute toxicity and mutagenicity of O-methyl-L-tyrosine showed suitability of the tracer for clinical use. The whole-body imaging of monkeys and healthy humans by PET showed low uptake of O-[{sup 11}C]methyl-L-tyrosine in all normal organs except for the urinary track and bladder, suggesting that the O-[{sup 11}C]methyl-L-tyrosine PET has the potential for tumor imaging in the whole-body. Finally, the brain tumor imaging was preliminarily demonstrated.

  16. Analysis of tyrosine-O-sulfation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard, J.R.; Sen, J.W.; Johnsen, A.H.

    2008-01-01

    Tyrosine O-sulfation was first described about 50 years ago as a post-translational modification of fibrinogen. In the following 30 years it was considered to be a rare modification affecting only a few proteins and peptides. However, in the beginning of the 1980s tyrosine (Tyr) sulfation was shown...... to be a common modification and since then an increasing number of proteins have been identified as sulfated. The target proteins belong to the classes of secretory, plasma membrane, and lysosomal proteins, which reflects the intracellular localization of the enzymes catalyzing Tyr sulfation, the tyrosylprotein...... sulfotransferases (TPSTs).Traditionally, Tyr sulfation has been analyzed by incorporation of radiolabeled sulfate into target cells followed by purification of the target protein. Subsequently, the protein is degraded enzymatically or by alkaline hydrolysis followed by thin-layer electrophoresis to demonstrate...

  17. Tyrosine kinase signalling in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hynes, Nancy E

    2000-01-01

    Cells are continuously exposed to diverse stimuli ranging from soluble endocrine and paracrine factors to signalling molecules on neighbouring cells. Receptors of the tyrosine kinase family play an important role in the integration and interpretation of these external stimuli, allowing a cell to respond appropriately to its environment. The activation of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) is tightly controlled, allowing a normal cell to correctly integrate its external environment with internal signal transduction pathways. In contrast, due to numerous molecular alterations arising during the course of malignancy, a tumour is characterized by an abnormal response to its environment, which allows cancer cells to evade the normal mechanisms controlling cellular proliferation. Alterations in the expression of various RTKs, in their activation, and in the signalling molecules lying downstream of the receptors play important roles in the development of cancer. This topic is the major focus of the thematic review section of this issue of Breast Cancer Research

  18. Ror receptor tyrosine kinases: orphans no more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Jennifer L; Kuntz, Steven G; Sternberg, Paul W

    2008-11-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptor (Ror) proteins are a conserved family of tyrosine kinase receptors that function in developmental processes including skeletal and neuronal development, cell movement and cell polarity. Although Ror proteins were originally named because the associated ligand and signaling pathway were unknown, recent studies in multiple species have now established that Ror proteins are Wnt receptors. Depending on the cellular context, Ror proteins can either activate or repress transcription of Wnt target genes and can modulate Wnt signaling by sequestering Wnt ligands. New evidence implicates Ror proteins in planar cell polarity, an alternative Wnt pathway. Here, we review the progress made in understanding these mysterious proteins and, in particular, we focus on their function as Wnt receptors.

  19. Autologous stem cell transplantation in refractory Asherman′s syndrome: A novel cell based therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeta Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : There is substantial evidence that adult stem cell populations exist in human endometrium, and hence it is suggested that either endogenous endometrial stem/progenitor cells can be activated or bone marrow derived stem cells can be transplanted in the uterine cavity for endometrial regeneration in Asherman′s syndrome (AS. Aims and Objectives : The objective was to evaluate the role of sub-endometrial autologous stem cell implantation in women with refractory AS in attaining menstruation and fertility. Setting : Tertiary care referral center. DESIGN: Prospective case series. Materials and Methods : Six cases of refractory AS with failed standard treatment option of hysteroscopic adhesiolysis in the past were included. Mononuclear stem cells (MNCs were implanted in sub-endometrial zone followed by exogenous oral estrogen therapy. Endometrial thickness (ET was assessed at 3, 6, and 9 months. RESULTS: Descriptive statistics and statistical analysis of study variables was carried out using STATA version 9.0. The mean MNC count was 103.3 × 106 (±20.45 with mean CD34+ count being 203,642 (±269,274. Mean of ET (mm at 3 months (4.05 ± 1.40, 6 months (5.46 ± 1.36 and 9 months (5.48 ± 1.14 were significantly (P < 0.05 increased from pretreatment level (1.38 ± 0.39. Five out of six patients resumed menstruation. Conclusion : The autologous stem cell implantation leads to endometrial regeneration reflected by restoration of menstruation in five out of six cases. Autologous stem cell implantation is a promising novel cell based therapy for refractory AS.

  20. Determinants of the Use of Autologous Blood in Elective General ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The study reports the 7 year experience of the authors with autologous blood transfusion in elective general surgery using the predeposit method. Material and Method: Patients aged 18 years and older, presenting for elective surgery and for whom blood donation was required were encouraged to predonate one ...

  1. Osteoarthritis treatment using autologous conditioned serum after placebo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutgers, Marijn; Creemers, Laura B; Auw Yang, Kiem Gie; Raijmakers, Natasja J H; Dhert, Wouter J A; Saris, Daniel B F

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Autologous conditioned serum (ACS) is a disease-modifying drug for treatment of knee osteoarthritis, and modest superiority over placebo was reported in an earlier randomized controlled trial (RCT). We hypothesized that when given the opportunity, placebo-treated patients

  2. Bortezomib consolidation after autologous stem cell transplantation in multiple myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mellqvist, Ulf-Henrik; Gimsing, Peter; Hjertner, Oyvind

    2013-01-01

    The Nordic Myeloma Study Group conducted an open randomized trial to compare bortezomib as consolidation therapy given after high-dose therapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) with no consolidation in bortezomib-naive patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma. Overall, 370...

  3. Experience with predonated autologous blood transfusion in open ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To find out the practicability, the acceptability, the effectiveness and the safety level of pre-donated, autologous blood transfusion (ABT) in patients who underwent open prostatectomy. Study design: Prospective. Patients and methods: It was a prospective study carried out in Nigeria over a 5-year period.

  4. Review of autologous blood transfusion at the Kenyatta National ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This study was performed over a three- month period to establish the pattern of autologous blood transfusion with specific focus on age, sex, type of surgery, duration of hospital stay and religious beliefs. Design: Hospital based prospective study. Setting: The study was conducted at the Kenyatta National Hospital ...

  5. Surgical Patients\\' Knowledge and Acceptance of Autologous Blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Homologous blood transfusion carries a well-documented array of risks especially in an HIV endemic environment like Nigeria. It is therefore imperative to consider other forms of restoring blood volume in surgical patients. Autologous blood transfusion (ABT) is one of the ways the problem of HIV transmission ...

  6. Resorbable screws for fixation of autologous bone grafts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raghoebar, GM; Liem, RSB; Bos, RRM; van der Wal, JE; Vissink, A

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the suitability of resorbable screws made of poly (D,L-lactide) acid (PDLLA) for fixation of autologous bone grafts related to graft regeneration and osseointegration of dental implants. In eight edentulous patients suffering from insufficient retention of their

  7. Vaccination with apoptosis colorectal cancer cell pulsed autologous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To investigate vaccination with apoptosis colorectal cancer (CRC) cell pulsed autologous dendritic cells (DCs) in advanced CRC, 14 patients with advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) were enrolled and treated with DCs vaccine to assess toxicity, tolerability, immune and clinical responses to the vaccine. No severe toxicity ...

  8. Regeneration of Tissues and Organs Using Autologous Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony Atala

    2010-04-28

    The Joint Commission for Health Care Organizations recently declared the shortage of transplantable organs and tissues a public health crisis. As such, there is about one death every 30 seconds due to organ failure. Complications and rejection are still significant albeit underappreciated problems. It is often overlooked that organ transplantation results in the patient being placed on an immune suppression regimen that will ultimate shorten their life span. Patients facing reconstruction often find that surgery is difficult or impossible due to the shortage of healthy autologous tissue. In many cases, autografting is a compromise between the condition and the cure that can result in substantial diminution of quality of life. The national cost of caring for persons who might benefit from engineered tissues or organs has reached $600 billion annually. Autologous tissue technologies have been developed as an alternative to transplantation or reconstructive surgery. Autologous tissues derived from the patient's own cells are capable of correcting numerous pathologies and injuries. The use of autologous cells eliminates the risks of rejection and immunological reactions, drastically reduces the time that patients must wait for lifesaving surgery, and negates the need for autologous tissue harvest, thereby eliminating the associated morbidities. In fact, the use of autologous tissues to create functional organs is one of the most important and groundbreaking steps ever taken in medicine. Although the basic premise of creating tissues in the laboratory has progressed dramatically, only a limited number of tissue developments have reached the patients to date. This is due, in part, to the several major technological challenges that require solutions. To that end, we have been in pursuit of more efficient ways to expand cells in vitro, methods to improve vascular support so that relevant volumes of engineered tissues can be grown, and constructs that can mimic the

  9. Autologous serum eye drops for dry eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Qing; Angelina, Adla; Marrone, Michael; Stark, Walter J; Akpek, Esen K

    2017-01-01

    Background Theoretically, autologous serum eye drops (AS) offer a potential advantage over traditional therapies on the assumption that AS not only serve as a lacrimal substitute to provide lubrication but contain other biochemical components that allow them to mimic natural tears more closely. Application of AS has gained popularity as second-line therapy for patients with dry eye. Published studies on this subject indicate that autologous serum could be an effective treatment for dry eye. Objectives We conducted this review to evaluate the efficacy and safety of AS given alone or in combination with artificial tears as compared with artificial tears alone, saline, placebo, or no treatment for adults with dry eye. Search methods We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Trials Register) (2016, Issue 5), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to July 2016), Embase (January 1980 to July 2016), Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences (LILACS) (January 1982 to July 2016), the ISRCTN registry (www.isrctn.com/editAdvancedSearch), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We also searched the Science Citation Index Expanded database (December 2016) and reference lists of included studies. We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 5 July 2016. Selection criteria We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared AS versus artificial tears for treatment of adults with dry eye. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently screened all titles and abstracts and assessed full-text reports of potentially eligible trials. Two review authors extracted data and assessed risk of bias and characteristics of included

  10. Tyrosine phosphorylation in T cells is regulated by phosphatase activity: studies with phenylarsine oxide.

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia-Morales, P; Minami, Y; Luong, E; Klausner, R D; Samelson, L E

    1990-01-01

    Activation of T cells induces rapid tyrosine phosphorylation on the T-cell receptor zeta chain and other substrates. These phosphorylations can be regulated by a number of protein-tyrosine kinases (ATP: protein-tyrosine O-phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.112) and protein-tyrosine-phosphatases (protein-tyrosine-phosphate phosphohydrolase, EC 3.1.3.48). In this study, we demonstrate that phenylarsine oxide can inhibit tyrosine phosphatases while leaving tyrosine kinase function intact. We use this ...

  11. Treatment of chronic non-healing ulcers using autologous platelet rich plasma: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suthar, Manish; Gupta, Saniya; Bukhari, Suhail; Ponemone, Venkatesh

    2017-02-27

    Non-healing ulcers are a major health problem worldwide and have great impact at personal, professional and social levels, with high cost in terms of human and material resources. Recalcitrant non-healing ulcers are inevitable and detrimental to the lower limb and are a major cause of non-traumatic lower limb amputations. Application of autologous Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) has been a major breakthrough for the treatment of non-healing and diabetic foot ulcers, as it is an easy and cost-effective method, and provides the necessary growth factors that enhance tissue healing. PRP is a conglomeration of thrombocytes, cytokines and various growth factors which are secreted by α-granules of platelets that augment the rate of natural healing process with decrease in time. The purpose of this case series was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of autologous platelet rich plasma for the treatment of chronic non-healing ulcers on the lower extremity. Autologous PRP was prepared from whole blood utilizing a rapid, intraoperative point-of-care system that works on the principle of density gradient centrifugation. Twenty Four (24) patients with non-healing ulcers of different etiologies, who met the inclusion criteria, were treated with single dose of subcutaneous PRP injections along with topical application of PRP gel under compassionate use. The mean age of the treated patients was 62.5 ± 13.53 years and they were followed-up for a period of 24 weeks. All the patients showed signs of wound healing with reduction in wound size, and the mean time duration to ulcer healing was 8.2 weeks. Also, an average five fold increase in the platelet concentrate was observed in the final PRP product obtained using the rapid point-of-care device, and the average platelet dose administered to the patients was 70.10 × 10 8 . This case series has demonstrated the potential safety and efficacy of autologous platelet rich plasma for the treatment of chronic non-healing ulcers. NCT

  12. Use of containers with sterilizing filter in autologous serum eyedrops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-García, José S; García-Lozano, Isabel

    2012-11-01

    To assess the effect of the use of containers with an adapted sterilizing filter on the contamination of autologous serum eyedrops. Prospective, consecutive, comparative, and randomized study. Thirty patients with Sjögren syndrome. One hundred seventy-six autologous serum containers used in home therapy were studied; 48 of them included an adapted filter (Hyabak; Thea, Clermont-Ferrand, France), and the other 128 were conventional containers. Containers equipped with a filter were tested at 7, 14, 21, and 28 days of use, whereas conventional containers were studied after 7 days of use. In addition, testing for contamination was carried out in 14 conventional containers used during in-patient therapy every week for 4 weeks. In all cases, the preparation of the autologous serum was similar. Blood agar and chocolate agar were used as regular culture media for the microbiologic studies, whereas Sabouraud agar with chloramphenicol was the medium for fungal studies. Microbiologic contamination of containers with autologous serum eyedrops. Only one of the containers with an adapted sterilizing filter (2.1%) became contaminated with Staphylococcus epidermidis after 1 month of treatment, whereas the contamination rate among conventional containers reached 28.9% after 7 days of treatment. The most frequent germs found in the samples were coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (48.6%). With regard the containers used in the in-patient setting, 2 (14.3%) became contaminated after 2 weeks, 5 (35.7%) became contaminated after 3 weeks, and 5 (50%) became contaminated after 4 weeks, leaving 7 (50%) that did not become contaminated after 1 month of treatment. Using containers with an adapted filter significantly reduces the contamination rates in autologous serum eyedrops, thus extending the use of such container by the patients for up to 4 weeks with virtually no contamination risks. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Mortality of monkeys after exposure to fission neutrons and the effects of autologous bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broerse, J.J.; Bekkum, D.W. van; Hollander, C.F.; Davids, J.A.G.

    1978-01-01

    In order to assess the risk of exposure to ionizing radiation in man, and to evaluate the results of therapeutic measures, the mortality of rhesus monkeys irradiated with X-rays and fission neutrons and the effect of autologous bone marrow transplantation have been investigated. The LDsub(50/30d) values for X- and neutron-irradiated monkeys amount to 525 and 260 rad respectively, resulting in an r.b.e. of approximately 2 for the occurrence of the bone marrow syndrome. Protection of the animals by autologous bone marrow transplantation was observed up to doses of 860 rad of X-rays and 440 rad of fission neutrons. After both fission-neutron irradiation and X-irradiation in the lowest range of lethal doses, the bone marrow syndrome was found to occur without the concurrent incidence of the intestinal syndrome. The studies indicate that, for humans accidentally exposed to what would otherwise be lethal doses of fast neutrons, bone marrow transplantation may be beneficial. (author)

  14. Perivascular Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Sheep: Characterization and Autologous Transplantation in a Model of Articular Cartilage Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, Paul; Baily, James; Khan, Nusrat; Biant, Leela C; Simpson, A Hamish R; Péault, Bruno

    2016-11-01

    Previous research has indicated that purified perivascular stem cells (PSCs) have increased chondrogenic potential compared to conventional mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived in culture. This study aimed to develop an autologous large animal model for PSC transplantation and to specifically determine if implanted cells are retained in articular cartilage defects. Immunohistochemistry and fluorescence-activated cell sorting were used to ascertain the reactivity of anti-human and anti-ovine antibodies, which were combined and used to identify and isolate pericytes (CD34 - CD45 - CD146 + ) and adventitial cells (CD34 + CD45 - CD146 - ). The purified cells demonstrated osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic potential in culture. Autologous ovine PSCs (oPSCs) were isolated, cultured, and efficiently transfected using a green fluorescence protein (GFP) encoding lentivirus. The cells were implanted into articular cartilage defects on the medial femoral condyle using hydrogel and collagen membranes. Four weeks following implantation, the condyle was explanted and confocal laser scanning microscopy demonstrated the presence of oPSCs in the defect repaired with the hydrogel. These data suggest the testability in a large animal of native MSC autologous grafting, thus avoiding possible biases associated with xenotransplantation. Such a setting will be used in priority for indications in orthopedics, at first to model articular cartilage repair.

  15. Soft Tissue Repair with Easy-Accessible Autologous Newborn Placenta or Umbilical Cord Blood in Severe Malformations: A Primary Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Disrupted organogenesis leads to permanent malformations that may require surgical correction. Autologous tissue grafts may be needed in severe lack of orthotopic tissue but include donor site morbidity. The placenta is commonly discarded after birth and has a therapeutic potential. The aim of this study was to determine if the amnion from placenta or plasma rich of growth factors (PRGF) with mononuclear cells (MNC) from umbilical cord blood (UCB), collected noninvasively, could be used as bio-constructs for autologous transplantation as an easy-accessible no cell culture-required method. Human amnion and PRGF gel were isolated and kept in culture for up to 21 days with or without small intestine submucosa (SIS). The cells in the constructs showed a robust phenotype without induced increased proliferation (Ki67) or apoptosis (caspase 3), but the constructs showed decreased integrity of the amnion-epithelial layer at the end of culture. Amnion-residing cells in the SIS constructs expressed CD73 or pan-cytokeratin, and cells in the PRGF-SIS constructs expressed CD45 and CD34. This study shows that amnion and UCB are potential sources for production of autologous grafts in the correction of congenital soft tissue defects. The constructs can be made promptly after birth with minimal handling or cell expansion needed. PMID:29403534

  16. Soft Tissue Repair with Easy-Accessible Autologous Newborn Placenta or Umbilical Cord Blood in Severe Malformations: A Primary Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Åsa Ekblad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Disrupted organogenesis leads to permanent malformations that may require surgical correction. Autologous tissue grafts may be needed in severe lack of orthotopic tissue but include donor site morbidity. The placenta is commonly discarded after birth and has a therapeutic potential. The aim of this study was to determine if the amnion from placenta or plasma rich of growth factors (PRGF with mononuclear cells (MNC from umbilical cord blood (UCB, collected noninvasively, could be used as bio-constructs for autologous transplantation as an easy-accessible no cell culture-required method. Human amnion and PRGF gel were isolated and kept in culture for up to 21 days with or without small intestine submucosa (SIS. The cells in the constructs showed a robust phenotype without induced increased proliferation (Ki67 or apoptosis (caspase 3, but the constructs showed decreased integrity of the amnion-epithelial layer at the end of culture. Amnion-residing cells in the SIS constructs expressed CD73 or pan-cytokeratin, and cells in the PRGF-SIS constructs expressed CD45 and CD34. This study shows that amnion and UCB are potential sources for production of autologous grafts in the correction of congenital soft tissue defects. The constructs can be made promptly after birth with minimal handling or cell expansion needed.

  17. Euglena mitochondria and chloroplasts form tyrosine-O-sulfate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saidha, T.; Hanfstingl, U.; Schiff, J.A. (Brandeis Univ., Waltham, MA (USA))

    1989-04-01

    Mitochondria from light-grown wild-type Euglena gracilis var. bacillaris Cori or dark-grown mutant W{sub 10}BSmL incubated with {sup 35}SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} and ATP, or with {sup 14}C-tyrosine, non-radioactive sulfate and ATP accumulate a labeled compound in the medium. Since this compound shows exact coelectrophoresis with tyrosine-O-sulfate (TOS) at pH 2.0, 5.8 or 8.0., yields sulfate and tyrosine on acid hydrolysis, and treatment with aryl sulfatase from Aerobacter aerogenes yields sulfate and tyrosine but no tyrosine methyl ester, it is identified as TOS. No TOS is found outside purified developing chloroplasts incubated with {sup 35}SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} and ATP, but both chloroplasts and mitochondria form to {sup 35}S externally when incubated with adenosine 3{prime} phosphate 5{prime}phospho({sup 35}S) sulfate (PAP{sup 35}S). Since no tyrosine need be added, tyrosine is provided from endogenous sources. Although TOS is found in the free pool of Euglena cells it cannot be detected in proteins of cells or mucus ruling our sulfation of tyrosine of protein or incorporation of TOS into proteins. The system forming TOS is membrane-bound and may be involved in tyrosine transport.

  18. Dietary Tyrosine Benefits Cognitive and Psychomotor Performance During Body Cooling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    O'Brien, Catherine; Mahoney, Caroline; Tharion, William J; Sils, Ingrid V; Castellani, John W

    2007-01-01

    ... examined. This study evaluated the effect of tyrosine supplementation on cognitive, psychomotor, and physical performance following a cold water immersion protocol that lowered body core temperature...

  19. Tyrosine metabolic enzymes from insects and mammals: a comparative perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavricka, Christopher John; Han, Qian; Mehere, Prajwalini; Ding, Haizhen; Christensen, Bruce M; Li, Jianyong

    2014-02-01

    Differences in the metabolism of tyrosine between insects and mammals present an interesting example of molecular evolution. Both insects and mammals possess fine-tuned systems of enzymes to meet their specific demands for tyrosine metabolites; however, more homologous enzymes involved in tyrosine metabolism have emerged in many insect species. Without knowledge of modern genomics, one might suppose that mammals, which are generally more complex than insects and require tyrosine as a precursor for important catecholamine neurotransmitters and for melanin, should possess more enzymes to control tyrosine metabolism. Therefore, the question of why insects actually possess more tyrosine metabolic enzymes is quite interesting. It has long been known that insects rely heavily on tyrosine metabolism for cuticle hardening and for innate immune responses, and these evolutionary constraints are likely the key answers to this question. In terms of melanogenesis, mammals also possess a high level of regulation; yet mammalian systems possess more mechanisms for detoxification whereas insects accelerate pathways like melanogenesis and therefore must bear increased oxidative pressure. Our research group has had the opportunity to characterize the structure and function of many key proteins involved in tyrosine metabolism from both insects and mammals. In this mini review we will give a brief overview of our research on tyrosine metabolic enzymes in the scope of an evolutionary perspective of mammals in comparison to insects. © 2013 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  20. Tyrosine Residues Regulate Multiple Nuclear Functions of P54nrb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ahn R; Hung, Wayne; Xie, Ning; Liu, Liangliang; He, Leye; Dong, Xuesen

    2017-04-01

    The non-POU-domain-containing octamer binding protein (NONO; also known as p54nrb) has various nuclear functions ranging from transcription, RNA splicing, DNA synthesis and repair. Although tyrosine phosphorylation has been proposed to account for the multi-functional properties of p54nrb, direct evidence on p54nrb as a phosphotyrosine protein remains unclear. To investigate the tyrosine phosphorylation status of p54nrb, we performed site-directed mutagenesis on the five tyrosine residues of p54nrb, replacing the tyrosine residues with phenylalanine or alanine, and immunoblotted for tyrosine phosphorylation. We then preceded with luciferase reporter assays, RNA splicing minigene assays, co-immunoprecipitation, and confocal microscopy to study the function of p54nrb tyrosine residues on transcription, RNA splicing, protein-protein interaction, and cellular localization. We found that p54nrb was not phosphorylated at tyrosine residues. Rather, it has non-specific binding affinity to anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies. However, replacement of tyrosine with phenylalanine altered p54nrb activities in transcription co-repression and RNA splicing in gene context-dependent fashions by means of differential regulation of p54nrb protein association with its interacting partners and co-regulators of transcription and splicing. These results demonstrate that tyrosine residues, regardless of phosphorylation status, are important for p54nrb function. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 852-861, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Tyrosine phosphorylation of Grb14 by Tie2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumont Daniel J

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Growth factor receptor bound (Grb proteins 7, 10 and 14 are a family of structurally related multi-domain adaptor proteins involved in a variety of biological processes. Grb7, 10 and 14 are known to become serine and/or threonine phosphorylated in response to growth factor (GF stimulation. Grb7 and 10 have also been shown to become tyrosine phosphorylated under certain conditions. Under experimental conditions Grb7 is tyrosine phosphorylated by the Tie2/Tie-2/Tek angiogenic receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK. Furthermore, Grb14 has also been shown to interact with Tie2, however tyrosine phosphorylation of this Grb family member has yet to be reported. Results Here we report for the first time tyrosine phosphorylation of Grb14. This phosphorylation requires a kinase competent Tie2 as well as intact tyrosines 1100 and 1106 (Y1100 and Y1106 on the receptor. Furthermore, a complete SH2 domain on Grb14 is required for Grb14 tyrosine phosphorylation by Tie2. Grb14 was also able to become tyrosine phosphorylated in primary endothelial cells when treated with a soluble and potent variant of the Tie2 ligand, cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP Ang1. Conclusion Our results show that Grb14, like its family members Grb7 and Grb10, is able to be tyrosine phosphorylated. Furthermore, our data indicate a role for Grb14 in endothelial signaling downstream of the Tie2 receptor.

  2. Recent advances in post autologous transplantation maintenance therapies in B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epperla, Narendranath; Fenske, Timothy S; Hari, Parameswaran N; Hamadani, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Lymphomas constitute the second most common indication for high dose therapy (HDT) followed by autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (auto-HCT). The intent of administering HDT in these heterogeneous disorders varies from cure (e.g., in relapsed aggressive lymphomas) to disease control (e.g., most indolent lymphomas). Regardless of the underlying histology or remission status at transplantation, disease relapse remains the number one cause of post auto-HCT therapy failure and mortality. The last decade has seen a proliferation of clinical studies looking at prevention of post auto-HCT therapy failure with various maintenance strategies. The benefit of such therapies is in turn dependent on disease histology and timing of transplantation. In relapsed, chemosensitive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), although post auto-HCT maintenance rituximab seems to be safe and feasible, it does not provide improved survival outcomes and is not recommended. The preliminary results with anti- programmed death -1 (PD-1) antibody therapy as post auto-HCT maintenance in DLBCL is promising but requires randomized validation. Similarly in follicular lymphoma, maintenance therapies including rituximab following auto-HCT should be considered investigational and offered only on a clinical trial. Rituximab maintenance results in improved progression-free survival but has not yet shown to improve overall survival in mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), but given the poor prognosis with post auto-HCT failure in MCL, maintenance rituximab can be considered on a case-by-case basis. Ongoing trials evaluating the efficacy of post auto-HCT maintenance with novel compounds (e.g., immunomodulators, PD-1 inhibitors, proteasome inhibitors and bruton’s tyrosine kinase inhibitors) will likely change the practice landscape in the near future for B cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas patients following HDT and auto-HCT. PMID:26421260

  3. Experimental autoimmune glomerulonephritis induced by anti-glomerular basement membrane antibody. II. Effects of injecting heterologous, homologous, or autologous glomerular basement membranes and complete Freund's adjuvant into sheep.

    OpenAIRE

    Steblay, R. W.; Rudofsky, U. H.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of injecting human, rabbit, rat, or single-kidney homologous glomerular basement membrane (GBM) or autologous GBM, each in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA), into 15- to 18-month-old sheep are compared. All sheep receiving heterologous GBM and 3 of 6 sheep receiving homologous GBM had anti-GBM nephritis, but such sheep did not bind autoantibodies or have Goodpasturelike lesions in their lungs. Sheep given injections of human GBM had autoantibodies to antigenic determinants shared b...

  4. Large daily fluctuations in plasma tyrosine in treated patients with phenylketonuria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanSpronsen, FJ; vanDijk, T; Smit, GPA; vanRijn, M; Reijngoud, DJ; Berger, Ruud; Heymans, HSA

    1996-01-01

    In patients with phenylketonuria (PKU), extra tyrosine supplementation is advocated in addition to tyrosine-enriched amino acid mixtures. PKU patients have low fasting plasma tyrosine concentrations, but little is known about tyrosine fluctuations during the day. Plasma tyrosine concentrations were

  5. HD-PTP is a catalytically inactive tyrosine phosphatase due to a conserved divergence in its phosphatase domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Claude Gingras

    Full Text Available The HD-PTP protein has been described as a tumor suppressor candidate and based on its amino acid sequence, categorized as a classical non-transmembrane protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP. To date, no HD-PTP phosphorylated substrate has been identified and controversial results concerning its catalytic activity have been recently reported.Here we report a rigorous enzymatic analysis demonstrating that the HD-PTP protein does not harbor tyrosine phosphatase or lipid phosphatase activity using the highly sensitive DiFMUP substrate and a panel of different phosphatidylinositol phosphates. We found that HD-PTP tyrosine phosphatase inactivity is caused by an evolutionary conserved amino acid divergence of a key residue located in the HD-PTP phosphatase domain since its back mutation is sufficient to restore the HD-PTP tyrosine phosphatase activity. Moreover, in agreement with a tumor suppressor activity, HD-PTP expression leads to colony growth reduction in human cancer cell lines, independently of its catalytic PTP activity status.In summary, we demonstrate that HD-PTP is a catalytically inactive protein tyrosine phosphatase. As such, we identify one residue involved in its inactivation and show that its colony growth reduction activity is independent of its PTP activity status in human cancer cell lines.

  6. Quantitative Tyrosine Phosphoproteomics of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor-treated Lung Adenocarcinoma Cells Reveals Potential Novel Biomarkers of Therapeutic Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu; Maity, Tapan; Kashyap, Manoj K; Bansal, Mukesh; Venugopalan, Abhilash; Singh, Sahib; Awasthi, Shivangi; Marimuthu, Arivusudar; Charles Jacob, Harrys Kishore; Belkina, Natalya; Pitts, Stephanie; Cultraro, Constance M; Gao, Shaojian; Kirkali, Guldal; Biswas, Romi; Chaerkady, Raghothama; Califano, Andrea; Pandey, Akhilesh; Guha, Udayan

    2017-05-01

    Mutations in the Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) kinase domain, such as the L858R missense mutation and deletions spanning the conserved sequence 747 LREA 750 , are sensitive to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). The gatekeeper site residue mutation, T790M accounts for around 60% of acquired resistance to EGFR TKIs. The first generation EGFR TKIs, erlotinib and gefitinib, and the second generation inhibitor, afatinib are FDA approved for initial treatment of EGFR mutated lung adenocarcinoma. The predominant biomarker of EGFR TKI responsiveness is the presence of EGFR TKI-sensitizing mutations. However, 30-40% of patients with EGFR mutations exhibit primary resistance to these TKIs, underscoring the unmet need of identifying additional biomarkers of treatment response. Here, we sought to characterize the dynamics of tyrosine phosphorylation upon EGFR TKI treatment of mutant EGFR-driven human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines with varying sensitivity to EGFR TKIs, erlotinib and afatinib. We employed stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative mass spectrometry to identify and quantify tyrosine phosphorylated peptides. The proportion of tyrosine phosphorylated sites that had reduced phosphorylation upon erlotinib or afatinib treatment correlated with the degree of TKI-sensitivity. Afatinib, an irreversible EGFR TKI, more effectively inhibited tyrosine phosphorylation of a majority of the substrates. The phosphosites with phosphorylation SILAC ratios that correlated with the TKI-sensitivity of the cell lines include sites on kinases, such as EGFR-Y1197 and MAPK7-Y221, and adaptor proteins, such as SHC1-Y349/350, ERRFI1-Y394, GAB1-Y689, STAT5A-Y694, DLG3-Y705, and DAPP1-Y139, suggesting these are potential biomarkers of TKI sensitivity. DAPP1, is a novel target of mutant EGFR signaling and Y-139 is the major site of DAPP1 tyrosine phosphorylation. We also uncovered several off-target effects of these TKIs, such as MST1R-Y1238

  7. Inhibition of biofilm formation by D-tyrosine: Effect of bacterial type and D-tyrosine concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Cong; Li, Xuening; Zhang, Nan; Wen, Donghui; Liu, Charles; Li, Qilin

    2016-04-01

    D-Tyrosine inhibits formation and triggers disassembly of bacterial biofilm and has been proposed for biofouling control applications. This study probes the impact of D-tyrosine in different biofilm formation stages in both G+ and G- bacteria, and reveals a non-monotonic correlation between D-tyrosine concentration and biofilm inhibition effect. In the attachment stage, cell adhesion was studied in a flow chamber, where D-tyrosine caused significant reduction in cell attachment. Biofilms formed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Bacillus subtilis were characterized by confocal laser scanning microscopy as well as quantitative analysis of cellular biomass and extracellular polymeric substances. D-Tyrosine exhibited strong inhibitive effects on both biofilms with an effective concentration as low as 5 nM; the biofilms responded to D-tyrosine concentration change in a non-monotonic, bi-modal pattern. In addition, D-tyrosine showed notable and different impact on EPS production by G+ and G- bacteria. Extracellular protein was decreased in P. aeruginosa biofilms, but increased in those of B. subtilis. Exopolysaccharides production by P. aeruginosa was increased at low concentrations and reduced at high concentrations while no impact was found in B. subtilis. These results suggest that distinct mechanisms are at play at different D-tyrosine concentrations and they may be species specific. Dosage of D-tyrosine must be carefully controlled for biofouling control applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Recovery of autologous sickle cells by hypotonic wash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Emily; Kezeor, Kelly; Crosby, Monica

    2018-01-01

    It is important to isolate autologous red blood cells (RBCs) from transfused RBCs in samples from recently transfused patients to ensure that accurate serologic results are obtained. Typically, this isolation can be performed using methods that separate patient reticulocytes from transfused, older donor RBCs. Patients with sickle cell disease (SCD), however, characteristically have RBCs with altered membrane and morphological features, causing their RBCs to take on a sickle-shape appearance different from the biconcave disc-shape appearance of "normal" RBCs. These characteristics enable the use of hypotonic saline solution to lyse normal RBCs while allowing "sickle cells" to remain intact. Because many patients with SCD undergo frequent transfusions to treat their condition, the use of hypotonic saline solution provides a rapid method to obtain autologous RBCs for serologic testing from this patient population using standard laboratory equipment and supplies.

  9. Beneficial Effects of Autologous Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Naturally Occurring Tendinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Roger Kenneth Whealands; Werling, Natalie Jayne; Dakin, Stephanie Georgina; Alam, Rafiqul; Goodship, Allen E.; Dudhia, Jayesh

    2013-01-01

    Tendon injuries are a common age-related degenerative condition where current treatment strategies fail to restore functionality and normal quality of life. This disease also occurs naturally in horses, with many similarities to human tendinopathy making it an ideal large animal model for human disease. Regenerative approaches are increasingly used to improve outcome involving mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), supported by clinical data where injection of autologous bone marrow derived MSCs (BM-MSCs) suspended in marrow supernatant into injured tendons has halved the re-injury rate in racehorses. We hypothesized that stem cell therapy induces a matrix more closely resembling normal tendon than the fibrous scar tissue formed by natural repair. Twelve horses with career-ending naturally-occurring superficial digital flexor tendon injury were allocated randomly to treatment and control groups. 1X107 autologous BM-MSCs suspended in 2 ml of marrow supernatant were implanted into the damaged tendon of the treated group. The control group received the same volume of saline. Following a 6 month exercise programme horses were euthanized and tendons assessed for structural stiffness by non-destructive mechanical testing and for morphological and molecular composition. BM-MSC treated tendons exhibited statistically significant improvements in key parameters compared to saline-injected control tendons towards that of normal tendons and those in the contralateral limbs. Specifically, treated tendons had lower structural stiffness (ptendon repair in enhancing normalisation of biomechanical, morphological, and compositional parameters. These data in natural disease, with no adverse findings, support the use of this treatment for human tendon injuries. PMID:24086616

  10. The Power and the Promise of Cell Reprogramming: Personalized Autologous Body Organ and Cell Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Belen Alvarez Palomo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Reprogramming somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs or direct reprogramming to desired cell types are powerful and new in vitro methods for the study of human disease, cell replacement therapy, and drug development. Both methods to reprogram cells are unconstrained by the ethical and social questions raised by embryonic stem cells. iPSC technology promises to enable personalized autologous cell therapy and has the potential to revolutionize cell replacement therapy and regenerative medicine. Potential applications of iPSC technology are rapidly increasing in ambition from discrete cell replacement applications to the iPSC assisted bioengineering of body organs for personalized autologous body organ transplant. Recent work has demonstrated that the generation of organs from iPSCs is a future possibility. The development of embryonic-like organ structures bioengineered from iPSCs has been achieved, such as an early brain structure (cerebral organoids, bone, optic vesicle-like structures (eye, cardiac muscle tissue (heart, primitive pancreas islet cells, a tooth-like structure (teeth, and functional liver buds (liver. Thus, iPSC technology offers, in the future, the powerful and unique possibility to make body organs for transplantation removing the need for organ donation and immune suppressing drugs. Whilst it is clear that iPSCs are rapidly becoming the lead cell type for research into cell replacement therapy and body organ transplantation strategies in humans, it is not known whether (1 such transplants will stimulate host immune responses; and (2 whether this technology will be capable of the bioengineering of a complete and fully functional human organ. This review will not focus on reprogramming to iPSCs, of which a plethora of reviews can be found, but instead focus on the latest developments in direct reprogramming of cells, the bioengineering of body organs from iPSCs, and an analysis of the immune response induced by i

  11. Autologous blood transfusion in total knee replacement surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkanović, Mirka Lukić; Gvozdenović, Ljiljana; Savić, Dragan; Ilić, Miroslav P; Jovanović, Gordana

    2013-03-01

    Total knee replacement (TKR) surgery is one of the most frequent and the most extensive procedures in orthopedic surgery, accompanied with some serious complications. Perioperative blood loss is one of the most serious losses, so it is vital to recognize and treat such losses properly. Autologous blood transfusion is the only true alternative for the allogeneic blood. The aim of this study was to to examine if autologous blood transfusion reduces usage of allogenic blood in total knee replacement surgery, as well as to examine possible effect of autologous blood transfusion on postoperative complications, recovery and hospital stay of patients after total knee replacement surgery. During the controlled, prospective, randomised study we compared two groups of patients (n = 112) with total prosthesis implanted in their knee. The group I consisted of the patients who received the transfusion of other people's (allogeneic) blood (n = 57) and the group II of the patients whose blood was collected postoperatively and then given them [their own (autologous) blood] (n = 55). The transfusion trigger for both groups was hemoglobin level of 85 g/L. In the group of patients whose blood was collected perioperatively only 9 (0.9%) of the patients received transfusion of allogeneic blood, as opposed to the control group in which 98.24% of the patients received the transfusion of allogeneic blood (p blood was collected stayed in hospital for 6.18 days, while the patients of the control group stayed 7.67 days (p blood transfusion is a very effective method for reducing consumption of allogenic blood and thus, indirectly for reducing all complications related to allogenic blood transfusion. There is also a positive influence on postoperative recovery after total knee replacement surgery due to the reduction of hospital stay, and indirectly on the reduction of hospital costs.

  12. Autologous Fat Transfer in a Patient with Lupus Erythematosus Profundus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimi Yoon

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Lupus erythematosus profundus, a form of chronic cutaneous lupus erythematosus, is a rare inflammatory disease involving in the lower dermis and subcutaneous tissues. It primarily affects the head, proximal upper arms, trunk, thighs, and presents as firm nodules, 1 to 3 cm in diameter. The overlying skin often becomes attached to the subcutaneous nodules and is drawn inward to produce deep, saucerized depressions. We present a rare case of lupus erythematosus profundus treated with autologous fat transfer.

  13. Autologous Adipose-Derived Tissue Matrix Part I: Biologic Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schendel, Stephen A

    2017-10-01

    Autologous collagen is an ideal soft tissue filler and may serve as a matrix for stem cell implantation and growth. Procurement of autologous collagen has been limited, though, secondary to a sufficient source. Liposuction is a widely performed and could be a source of autologous collagen. The amount of collagen and its composition in liposuctioned fat remains unknown. The purpose of this research was to characterize an adipose-derived tissue-based product created using ultrasonic cavitation and cryo-grinding. This study evaluated the cellular and protein composition of the final product. Fat was obtained from individuals undergoing routine liposuction and was processed by a 2 step process to obtain only the connective tissue. The tissue was then evaluated by scanning electronic microscope, Western blot analysis, and flow cytometry. Liposuctioned fat was obtained from 10 individuals with an average of 298 mL per subject. After processing an average of 1 mL of collagen matrix was obtained from each 100 mL of fat. Significant viable cell markers were present in descending order for adipocytes > CD90+ > CD105+ > CD45+ > CD19+ > CD144+ > CD34+. Western blot analysis showed collagen type II, III, IV, and other proteins. Scanning electronic microscope study showed a regular pattern of cross-linked, helical collagen. Additionally, vital staing demonstrated that the cells were still viable after processing. Collagen and cells can be easily obtained from liposuctioned fat by ultrasonic separation without alteration of the overall cellular composition of the tissue. Implantation results in new collagen and cellular growth. Collagen matrix with viable cells for autologous use can be obtained from liposuctioned fat and may provide long term results. 5. © 2017 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com

  14. Autologous mesenchymal stem cells: clinical applications in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzini, Letizia; Mareschi, Katia; Ferrero, Ivana; Vassallo, Elena; Oliveri, Giuseppe; Boccaletti, Riccardo; Testa, Lucia; Livigni, Sergio; Fagioli, Franca

    2006-07-01

    Our study was aimed to evaluate the feasibility and safety of intraspinal cord implantation of autologous mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in a few well-monitored amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients. Seven patients affected by definite ALS were enrolled in the study and two patients were treated for compassionate use and monitored for at least 3 years. Bone marrow was collected from the posterior iliac crest according to the standard procedure and MSCs were expanded ex vivo according to Pittenger's protocol. The cells were suspended in 2 ml autologous cerebrospinal fluid and transplanted into the spinal cord by a micrometric pump injector. The in vitro expanded MSCs did not show any bacterial o fungal contamination, hemopoietic cell contamination, chromosomic alterations and early cellular senescence. No patient manifested major adverse events such as respiratory failure or death. Minor adverse events were intercostal pain irradiation and leg sensory dysesthesia, both reversible after a mean period of 6 weeks. No modification of the spinal cord volume or other signs of abnormal cell proliferation were observed. A significant slowing down of the linear decline of the forced vital capacity was evident in four patients 36 months after MSCs transplantation. Our results demonstrate that direct injection of autologous expanded MSCs into the spinal cord of ALS patients is safe, with no significant acute or late toxicity, and well tolerated. The clinical results seem to be encouraging.

  15. Efficacy of autologous platelets in macular hole surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinidis A

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Aristeidis Konstantinidis,1,2 Mark Hero,2 Panagiotis Nanos,1 Georgios D Panos1,3 1Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital of Alexandroupolis, Alexandroupolis, Greece; 2Opthalmology Department, University Hospital Coventry and Warwickshire, Coventry, UK; 3Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospitals of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland Abstract: The introduction of optical coherence tomography has allowed accurate measurement of the size of macular holes. A retrospective consecutive review was performed of 21 patients undergoing macular hole repair with vitrectomy, gas tamponade, and autologous platelet injection and we assessed the effect of macular hole parameters on anatomic and functional outcomes. We looked at the demographic features, final visual outcome, and anatomical closure. Twenty-one patients were included in the study. They underwent routine vitrectomy with gas tamponade (C3F8 and injection of autologous platelets. All patients were advised to maintain a facedown posture for 2 weeks. Anatomical closure was confirmed in all cases and 20 out of 21 of patients had improved postoperative visual acuity by two or more lines. In our series, the macular hole dimensions did not have much effect on the final results. The use of autologous platelets and strict facedown posture seems to be the deciding factor in good anatomical and visual outcome irrespective of macular hole dimensions. Keywords: macular hole, platelets, vitrectomy

  16. Efficacy of autologous platelets in macular hole surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinidis, Aristeidis; Hero, Mark; Nanos, Panagiotis; Panos, Georgios D

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of optical coherence tomography has allowed accurate measurement of the size of macular holes. A retrospective consecutive review was performed of 21 patients undergoing macular hole repair with vitrectomy, gas tamponade, and autologous platelet injection and we assessed the effect of macular hole parameters on anatomic and functional outcomes. We looked at the demographic features, final visual outcome, and anatomical closure. Twenty-one patients were included in the study. They underwent routine vitrectomy with gas tamponade (C3F8) and injection of autologous platelets. All patients were advised to maintain a facedown posture for 2 weeks. Anatomical closure was confirmed in all cases and 20 out of 21 of patients had improved postoperative visual acuity by two or more lines. In our series, the macular hole dimensions did not have much effect on the final results. The use of autologous platelets and strict facedown posture seems to be the deciding factor in good anatomical and visual outcome irrespective of macular hole dimensions.

  17. Autologous fat graft in irradiated orbit postenucleation for retinoblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinger, Francesco; Maione, Luca; Vinci, Valeriano; Lisa, Andrea; Barbera, Federico; Balia, Laura; Caviggioli, Fabio; Di Maria, Alessandra

    2018-01-05

    Autologous fat grafting has been extensively and successfully adopted in a number of pathologic conditions in regenerative surgery especially on irradiated fields in order to improve pain symptoms and tissue trophism promoting scar release. In the present study, we report our experience with autologous fat grafting for the treatment of postirradiation fibrosis and pain on three consecutive patients undergoing orbital enucleation for locally advanced retinoblastoma (RB) and subsequent radiotherapy. We selected three consecutive patients who underwent orbital enucleation for locally advanced RB and subsequent local radiotherapy showing severe reduction in orbital volume and eyelid length and retraction due to fibrosis, spontaneous local pain exacerbated after digital pressure with no possibility to place an ocular implant. They underwent autologous fat grafting in the orbital cavity and results were evaluated by clinical examination at 5 and 14 days, and 1, 3, 6 months, and 1 year after surgery. A significant release of scar retraction, reduction of fibrosis and orbital rim contraction together with an important improvement of pain symptoms was observed in all patients. The local changes observed enabled an ease placement of an ocular prosthetic implant (implant). No local or systemic complication occurred. Fat grafting is a promising treatment for patients showing radiotherapy related complication in the orbital area and it should be adopted by all oculoplastic surgeon in order to improve pain syndrome creating the ideal local conditions for the placement of an ocular prosthetic implant.

  18. Characterizing tyrosine phosphorylation signaling in lung cancer using SH2 profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuya Machida

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Tyrosine kinases drive the proliferation and survival of many human cancers. Thus profiling the global state of tyrosine phosphorylation of a tumor is likely to provide a wealth of information that can be used to classify tumors for prognosis and prediction. However, the comprehensive analysis of tyrosine phosphorylation of large numbers of human cancer specimens is technically challenging using current methods.We used a phosphoproteomic method termed SH2 profiling to characterize the global state of phosphotyrosine (pTyr signaling in human lung cancer cell lines. This method quantifies the phosphorylated binding sites for SH2 domains, which are used by cells to respond to changes in pTyr during signaling. Cells could be grouped based on SH2 binding patterns, with some clusters correlated with EGF receptor (EGFR or K-RAS mutation status. Binding of specific SH2 domains, most prominently RAS pathway activators Grb2 and ShcA, correlated with EGFR mutation and sensitivity to the EGFR inhibitor erlotinib. SH2 binding patterns also reflected MET activation and could identify cells driven by multiple kinases. The pTyr responses of cells treated with kinase inhibitors provided evidence of distinct mechanisms of inhibition.This study illustrates the potential of modular protein domains and their proteomic binding profiles as powerful molecular diagnostic tools for tumor classification and biomarker identification.

  19. Autologous Immune Enhancement Therapy for Cancer - Our experience since 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Terunuma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer, the major killer disease of the century requires a multi-pronged approach and among the latest modalities of treatments, Immunotherapy occupies a promising role. Immunotherapy for cancer was first started to be practised in the NIH and cell based immunotherapy for cancer is in practice for the past three decades. [1, 2] There are several literatures from various countries on the successful application of cell based Immunotherapies for various solid tumours and haematological malignancies. [3-8] Our team’s association with immune cells started when I was working on RNA transcriptome analysis to understand the immune system in HIV carriers which in turn required in vitro expansion of human Natural Killer (NK cells. [9] This led to the customization of protocols which has resulted in successful in vitro expansion, activation of NK cells and T cells for Immunotherapy. The purpose of Biotherapy institute of Japan (BIJ is to support research and clinical application of immune cells like NK cells, γδT cells, αβT cells, Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL and Dendritic cells (DC for application as Autologous Immune Enhancement Therapy (AIET to fight against cancer. AIET using NK cells, CTLs, DCs etc have been administered for more than 5000 patients since 2004 till date by BIJ. Principle of AIET: For AIET using NK cells, the process involves separation of lymphocytes from the peripheral blood of the patient followed by selective NK cell expansion using the expansion kit (BINKIT, BIJ, JAPAN without feeder layers and then infusion of the expanded-activated NK cells. [10,11] As reports suggest that the activity of peripheral blood NK cells are lower in cancer patients compared to normal individuals [12] and as in vitro expansion of NK cells increases the cytotoxic ability 5 to 10 fold, [13] the NK cells are expanded in vivo and then infused to the patient in AIET. We are also working on combination immunotherapy using NK cells and CTLs and also NK

  20. Determination of o-tyrosine in irradiated chicken

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoller, O.; Schoeni, D.; Zimmerli, B.

    1991-01-01

    The author explains his method to determine O-Tyrosine in irradiated chickens with a high-performance liquid chromatography. The method is simple and fast, but a proper chromatographic separation is difficult. The detection limit with a high sensitive detector is about 0.05-0.1 mg O-Tyrosine/kg meat (9 refs)

  1. A single tyrosine of the interleukin-9 (IL-9) receptor is required for STAT activation, antiapoptotic activity, and growth regulation by IL-9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demoulin, J B; Uyttenhove, C; Van Roost, E; DeLestré, B; Donckers, D; Van Snick, J; Renauld, J C

    1996-09-01

    Interleukin-9 (IL-9), a T-cell-derived cytokine, interacts with a specific receptor associated with the IL-2 receptor gamma chain. In this report, we analyze the functional domains of the human IL-9 receptor transfected into mouse lymphoid cell lines. Three different functions were examined: growth stimulation in factor-dependent pro-B Ba/F3 cells, protection against dexamethasone-induced apoptosis, and Ly-6A2 induction in BW5147 lymphoma cells. The results indicated that a single tyrosine, at position 116 in the cytoplasmic domain, was required for all three activities. In addition, we observed that human IL-9 reduced the proliferation rate of transfected BW5147 cells, an effect also dependent on the same tyrosine. This amino acid was necessary for IL-9-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of the receptor and for STAT activation but not for IRS-2/4PS activation or for JAK1 phosphorylation, which depended on a domain closer to the plasma membrane. We also showed that JAK1 was constitutively associated with the IL-9 receptor. Activated STAT complexes induced by IL-9 were found to contain STAT1, STAT3, and STAT5 transcription factors. Moreover, sequence homologies between human IL-9 receptor tyrosine 116 and tyrosines (of other receptors activating STAT3 and STAT5 were observed. Taken together, these data indicate that a single tyrosine of the IL-9 receptor, required for activation of three different STAT proteins, is necessary for distinct activities of this cytokine, including proliferative responses.

  2. Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation to Prevent Antibody Mediated Rejection After Vascularized Composite Allotransplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-16-1-0664 TITLE: Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation to Prevent Antibody-Mediated Rejection after...Annual 3. DATES COVERED 15 Sep 2016 – 14 Sep 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation to...sensitization, autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, antibody mediated rejection, donor specific antibodies 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF

  3. Importance of tyrosine phosphorylation in receptor kinase complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macho, Alberto P; Lozano-Durán, Rosa; Zipfel, Cyril

    2015-05-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation is an important post-translational modification that is known to regulate receptor kinase (RK)-mediated signaling in animals. Plant RKs are annotated as serine/threonine kinases, but recent work has revealed that tyrosine phosphorylation is also crucial for the activation of RK-mediated signaling in plants. These initial observations have paved the way for subsequent detailed studies on the mechanism of activation of plant RKs and the biological relevance of tyrosine phosphorylation for plant growth and immunity. In this Opinion article we review recent reports on the contribution of RK tyrosine phosphorylation in plant growth and immunity; we propose that tyrosine phosphorylation plays a major regulatory role in the initiation and transduction of RK-mediated signaling in plants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Requirements for superoxide-dependent tyrosine hydroperoxide formation in peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winterbourn, Christine C; Parsons-Mair, Helena N; Gebicki, Silvia

    2004-01-01

    Superoxide reacts rapidly with other radicals, but these reactions have received little attention in the context of oxidative stress. For tyrosyl radicals, reaction with superoxide is 3-fold faster than dimerization, and forms the addition product tyrosine hydroperoxide. We have explored structural...... requirements for hydroperoxide formation using tyrosine analogues and di- and tri-peptides. Superoxide and phenoxyl radicals were generated using xanthine oxidase, peroxidase and the respective tyrosine derivative, or by gamma-radiation. Peroxides were measured using FeSO4/Xylenol Orange. Tyrosine and tyramine...... formed stable hydroperoxides, but N-acetyltyrosine and p-hydroxyphenylacetic acid did not, demonstrating a requirement for a free amino group. Using [14C]tyrosine, the hydroperoxide and dityrosine were formed at a molar ratio of 1.8:1. Studies with pre-formed hydroperoxides, and measurements of substrate...

  5. New perspectives in the treatment of damaged myocardium using autologous skeletal myoblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigatelli, Gianluca; Rossini, Katia; Vindigni, Vincenzo; Mazzoleni, Francesco; Rigatelli, Giorgio; Carraro, Ugo

    2004-01-01

    Autologous skeletal myoblast transplantation may be used to ameliorate the healing process following myocardium infarct and, hopefully, cardiomyopathies. Despite successful animal experimentation, several issues need to be addressed in clinical settings, i.e., the impact of the delivery route, the extent of short- and long-term survival, and differentiation of the injected skeletal myoblasts. The authors offer some new hypotheses resulting from basic research, i.e., where and when to inject the myogenic cells, whatever their source, how to decrease new myofiber atrophy and improve their regeneration. Although these new hypotheses still need to be tested in humans, they may be decisive for future experimental studies and will lead to making endovascular cell implantation a more effective way to treat ischemic heart disease and failure

  6. Autologous chondrocyte implantation for cartilage injury treatment in Chiang Mai University Hospital: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongtriratanachai, Prasit; Pruksakorn, Dumnoensun; Pothacharoen, Peraphan; Nimkingratana, Puwapong; Pattamapaspong, Nuttaya; Phornphutkul, Chanakarn; Setsitthakun, Sasiwariya; Fongsatitkul, Ladda; Phrompaet, Sureeporn

    2013-11-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) has become one of the standard procedures for articular cartilage defect treatment. This technique provides a promising result. However the procedural process requires an approach of several steps from multidisciplinary teams. Although the success of this procedure has been reported from Srinakharinvirot University since 2007, the application of ACI is still limited in Thailand due to the complexity of processes and stringent quality control. This report is to present the first case of the cartilage defect treatment using the first generation-ACI under Chiang Mai University's (CMU) own facility and Ethics Committee. This paper also reviews the process of biotechnology procedures, patient selection, surgical, and rehabilitation techniques. The success of the first case is an important milestone for the further development of the CMU Human Translational Research Laboratory in near future.

  7. Homogeneous antibodies in lethally irradiated and autologous bone marrow reconstituted Rhesus monkeys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, P. Van Den; Radl, J.; Loewenberg, B.; Swart, A.C.W.

    1976-01-01

    Ten Rhesus monkeys were lethally irradiated and reconstituted with autologous bone marrow. During the restoration period, the animals were immunized with DNP-Rhesus albumin and IgA1lambda-10S human paraprotein. One or more transient homogenous immunoglobulin components appeared in sera of all experimental monkeys. In four animals, these homogeneous immunoglobulins were shown to be specific antibodies against DNP-Rhesus albumin. They gradually became as heterogeneous as those in control monkeys which were immunized but not irradiated and transplanted. The onset of the specific antibody response after immunization was slightly delayed in the experimental group. On determining the time necessary to reach normalization of the overall immunoglobulin levels and the normal heterogeneity of the immunoglobulin spectrum, it was found to be more than 1 year in most of the animals. (author)

  8. Tailor-Made Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases: In Vitro Site-Directed Mutagenesis of PTEN and PTPRZ-B

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luna, S.; Mingo, J.; Aurtenetxe, O.; Blanco, L.; Amo, L.; Schepens, J.; Hendriks, W.J.A.J.; Pulido, R.

    2016-01-01

    In vitro site-directed mutagenesis (SDM) of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) is a commonly used approach to experimentally analyze PTP functions at the molecular and cellular level and to establish functional correlations with PTP alterations found in human disease. Here, using the

  9. Melanoma-associated antigen expression and the efficacy of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in head and neck cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, Stefan; Brands, Roman C; Küchler, Nora

    2015-01-01

    receptor (EGFR). The efficacy of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) in the context of melanoma-associated antigens is discussed in the present study. Five human squamous cell carcinoma cell lines were treated with the EGFR TKIs, erlotinib and gefitinib. The efficacy of these agents was measured using...

  10. Alternatives to Autologous Bone Graft in Alveolar Cleft Reconstruction: The State of Alveolar Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Fan; Leland, Hyuma; Jedrzejewski, Breanna; Auslander, Allyn; Maniskas, Seija; Swanson, Jordan; Urata, Mark; Hammoudeh, Jeffrey; Magee, William

    2018-05-01

    Alveolar cleft reconstruction has historically relied on autologous iliac crest bone grafting (ICBG), but donor site morbidity, pain, and prolonged hospitalization have prompted the search for bone graft substitutes. The authors evaluated bone graft substitutes with the highest levels of evidence, and highlight the products that show promise in alveolar cleft repair and in maxillary augmentation. This comprehensive review guides the craniofacial surgeon toward safe and informed utilization of biomaterials in the alveolar cleft.A literature search was performed to identify in vitro human studies that fulfilled the following criteria: Level I or Level II of evidence, ≥30 subjects, and a direct comparison between a autologous bone graft and a bone graft substitute. A second literature search was performed that captured all studies, regardless of level of evidence, which evaluated bone graft substitutes for alveolar cleft repair or alveolar augmentation for dental implants. Adverse events for each of these products were tabulated as well.Sixteen studies featuring 6 bone graft substitutes: hydroxyapatite, demineralized bone matrix (DBM), β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP), calcium phosphate, recombinant human bone morphogenic protein-2 (rhBMP-2), and rhBMP7 fit the inclusion criteria for the first search. Through our second search, the authors found that DBM, TCP, rhBMP-2, and rhBMP7 have been studied most extensively in the alveolar cleft literature, though frequently in studies using less rigorous methodology (Level III evidence or below). rhBMP-2 was the best studied and showed comparable efficacy to ICBG in terms of volume of bone regeneration, bone density, and capacity to accommodate tooth eruption within the graft site. Pricing for products ranged from $290 to $3110 per 5 mL.The balance between innovation and safety is a complex process requiring constant vigilance and evaluation. Here, the authors profile several bone graft substitutes that demonstrate the most

  11. Cartilage Repair With Autologous Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation: Review of Preclinical and Clinical Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Shinya; Mera, Hisashi; Itokazu, Maki; Hashimoto, Yusuke; Wakitani, Shigeyuki

    2014-10-01

    Clinical trials of various procedures, including bone marrow stimulation, mosaicplasty, and autologous chondrocyte implantation, have been explored to treat articular cartilage defects. However, all of them have some demerits. We focused on autologous culture-expanded bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSC), which can proliferate without losing their capacity for differentiation. First, we transplanted BMSC into the defective articular cartilage of rabbit and succeeded in regenerating osteochondral tissue. We then applied this transplantation in humans. Our previous reports showed that treatment with BMSC relieves the clinical symptoms of chondral defects in the knee and elbow joint. We investigated the efficacy of BMSC for osteoarthritic knee treated with high tibial osteotomy, by comparing 12 BMSC-transplanted patients with 12 cell-free patients. At 16-month follow-up, although the difference in clinical improvement between both groups was not significant, the arthroscopic and histological grading score was better in the cell-transplanted group. At the over 10-year follow-up, Hospital for Special Surgery knee scores improved to 76 and 73 in the BMSC-transplanted and cell-free groups, respectively, which were better than preoperative scores. Additionally, neither tumors nor infections were observed in all patients, and in the clinical study, we have never observed hypertrophy of repaired tissue, thereby guaranteeing the clinical safety of this therapy. Although we have never observed calcification above the tidemark in rabbit model and human histologically, the repair cartilage was not completely hyaline cartilage. To elucidate the optimum conditions for cell therapy, other stem cells, culture conditions, growth factors, and gene transfection methods should be explored.

  12. Tyrosine-phosphorylation of AAV2 vectors and its consequences on viral intracellular trafficking and transgene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong Li; Li Baozheng; Jayandharan, Giridhararao; Mah, Cathryn S.; Govindasamy, Lakshmanan; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Herzog, Roland W.

    2008-01-01

    We have documented that epidermal growth factor receptor protein tyrosine kinase (EGFR-PTK) signaling negatively affects intracellular trafficking and transduction efficiency of recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) vectors. Specifically, inhibition of EGFR-PTK signaling leads to decreased ubiquitination of AAV2 capsid proteins, which in turn, facilitates viral nuclear transport by limiting proteasome-mediated degradation of AAV2 vectors. In the present studies, we observed that AAV capsids can indeed be phosphorylated at tyrosine residues by EGFR-PTK in in vitro phosphorylation assays and that phosphorylated AAV capsids retain their structural integrity. However, although phosphorylated AAV vectors enter cells as efficiently as their unphosphorylated counterparts, their transduction efficiency is significantly reduced. This reduction is not due to impaired viral second-strand DNA synthesis since transduction efficiency of both single-stranded AAV (ssAAV) and self-complementary AAV (scAAV) vectors is decreased by ∼ 68% and ∼ 74%, respectively. We also observed that intracellular trafficking of tyrosine-phosphorylated AAV vectors from cytoplasm to nucleus is significantly decreased, which results from ubiquitination of AAV capsids followed by proteasome-mediated degradation, although downstream consequences of capsid ubiquitination may also be affected by tyrosine-phosphorylation. These studies provide new insights into the role of tyrosine-phosphorylation of AAV capsids in various steps in the virus life cycle, which has implications in the optimal use of recombinant AAV vectors in human gene therapy

  13. Protein Tyrosine Nitration : Selectivity, Physicochemical and Biological Consequences, Denitration, and Proteomics Methods for the Identification of Tyrosine-Nitrated Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abello, Nicolas; Kerstjens, Huib A. M.; Postma, Dirkje S.; Bischoff, Rainer

    Protein tyrosine nitration (PTN) is a post-translational modification occurring under the action of a nitrating agent. Tyrosine is modified in the 3-position of the phenolic ring through the addition of a nitro group (NO(2)). In the present article, we review the main nitration reactions and

  14. Spectroscopic studies of fluorescent complexes of tyrosine 8-hydroxyquinoline and tyrosine-8-hydroxyquinaldine in aqueous phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakhrani, M.A.; Kazi, T.G.

    2002-01-01

    A new method has been developed by preparing complexes involving condensation of tyrosine with 8-hydroxyquinoline (Oxine) and 8-hydroxyquinaldine (Quinaldine) respectively, producing fluorescent products. The products obtained have been investigated for identification and quantitative estimation using different spectroscopic techniques including fluorescence activity of newly synthesized products. 8-hydroxyquinaldine and 8-hydroxyquinoline (Oxine) condensed with tyrosine separately produced water soluble fluorescent complexes. The complexes have been investigated for identification and quantitative estimation of amino acids. Identification of amino acids in nano mole or below than nano mole has become possible by present fluorometric activity of these complexes involving different excitation and emission wavelengths. The fluorometric activity of complexes has been observed to be 100 to 1000 times higher than assay method involving ninhydrin and amino acid analyzer. The method adopted in our laboratory is rapid, versatile with good reproducibility and provides excellent results for adoption by analytical, agricultural and biomedical laboratories to estimate amino acids and metals in composite matrix. (author)

  15. Erkitinib, a novel EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor screened using a ProteoChip system from a phytochemical library

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eung-Yoon; Choi, Young-Jin [Biochip Research Center, Hoseo University, Asan 336-795 (Korea, Republic of); Innopharmascreen, Inc., Asan 336-795 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Chan-Won [Biochip Research Center, Hoseo University, Asan 336-795 (Korea, Republic of); Dept. of Biological Science, Hoseo University, Asan 336-795 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, In-Cheol, E-mail: ickang@hoseo.edu [Biochip Research Center, Hoseo University, Asan 336-795 (Korea, Republic of); Dept. of Biological Science, Hoseo University, Asan 336-795 (Korea, Republic of); Innopharmascreen, Inc., Asan 336-795 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-11-20

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (PTKs) play key roles in the pathogenesis of numerous human diseases, including cancer. Therefore PTK inhibitors are currently under intensive investigation as potential drug candidates. Herein, we report on a ProteoChip-based screening of an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase (TK) inhibitor, Erkitinibs, from phytochemical libraries. PLC-{gamma}-1 was used as a substrate immobilized on a ProteoChip and incubated with an EGFR kinase to phosphorylate tyrosine residues of the substrate, followed by a fluorescence detection of the substrate recognized by a phospho-specific monoclonal antibody. Erkitinibs inhibited HeLa cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, these data suggest that Erkitinibs can be a specific inhibitor of an EGFR kinase and can be further developed as a potent anti-tumor agent.

  16. Erkitinib, a novel EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor screened using a ProteoChip system from a phytochemical library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eung-Yoon; Choi, Young-Jin; Park, Chan-Won; Kang, In-Cheol

    2009-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (PTKs) play key roles in the pathogenesis of numerous human diseases, including cancer. Therefore PTK inhibitors are currently under intensive investigation as potential drug candidates. Herein, we report on a ProteoChip-based screening of an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase (TK) inhibitor, Erkitinibs, from phytochemical libraries. PLC-γ-1 was used as a substrate immobilized on a ProteoChip and incubated with an EGFR kinase to phosphorylate tyrosine residues of the substrate, followed by a fluorescence detection of the substrate recognized by a phospho-specific monoclonal antibody. Erkitinibs inhibited HeLa cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, these data suggest that Erkitinibs can be a specific inhibitor of an EGFR kinase and can be further developed as a potent anti-tumor agent.

  17. Receptor tyrosine phosphatase R-PTP-alpha is tyrosine-phosphorylated and associated with the adaptor protein Grb2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Su, J; Batzer, A; Sap, J

    1994-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine phosphatases (R-PTPases) have generated interest because of their suspected involvement in cellular signal transduction. The adaptor protein Grb2 has been implicated in coupling receptor tyrosine kinases to Ras. We report that a ubiquitous R-PTPase, R-PTP-alpha, is tyrosine......-phosphorylated and associated in vivo with the Grb2 protein. This association can be reproduced in stably and transiently transfected cells, as well as in vitro using recombinant Grb2 protein. Association requires the presence of an intact SH2 domain in Grb2, as well as tyrosine phosphorylation of R-PTP-alpha. This observation...... links a receptor tyrosine phosphatase with a key component of a central cellular signalling pathway and provides a basis for addressing R-PTP-alpha function....

  18. Identification of a variant form of tyrosine phosphatase LYP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Wanting T

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs are important cell signaling regulators with major pathological implications. LYP (also known as PTPN22 is an intracellular enzyme initially found to be predominately expressed in lymphocytes. Importantly, an allelic R620W variant of LYP is strongly associated with multiple autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes, and autoimmune thyroid disease. Results In this study, we isolated a novel isoform of LYP designated LYP3. LYP3 differs from LYP1, the known isoform of LYP, in that it lacks a 28 amino acid segment right after the R620W site embedded in a proline-rich protein-protein interaction motif. Genomic sequence analysis revealed that LYP3 resulted from alternative splicing of the LYP gene located on chromosome 1p 13.3-13.1. Reverse transcription PCR analyses of 48 human tissues demonstrated that both LYP1 and LYP3 are predominantly expressed in primary and secondary lymphoid tissues but the relative expression levels of the two isoforms varies in different human tissues and individuals. Conclusions We thus identified a new variant form of LYP and conducted a comprehensive analysis of LYP tissue expressions. Considering the pathogenesis of LYP R620W, we believe that the expression of LYP3 may have an important role in regulating activity and function of LYP and may be implicated in autoimmune diseases.

  19. A comparison of two methods of labelling autologous platelets with 111In-oxine in five different species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christenson, J.T.; Arvidsson, D.; Thoerne, J.; Norgren, L.; Olsson, P.I.; Strand, S.E.

    1983-01-01

    Several different methods for labelling autologous platelets with 111 In-oxine have been described. However, no comparative study has been reported. In the present investigation two different labelling methods were compared in terms of labelling efficiency and platelet function in five species: human, dog, pig, rabbit and rat. One of the labelling methods, utilising among other things a serum albumin gradient separation fo platelets and incubation of 111 In-oxine in a water bath at 37 0 C, was superior in all species with significantly higher labelling efficiency and unchanged platelet function. (orig.)

  20. Highly sensitive assay for tyrosine hydroxylase activity by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatsu, T; Oka, K; Kato, T

    1979-07-21

    A highly sensitive assay for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) activity by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with amperometric detection was devised based on the rapid isolation of enzymatically formed DOPA by a double-column procedure, the columns fitted together sequentially (the top column of Amberlite CG-50 and the bottom column of aluminium oxide). DOPA was adsorbed on the second aluminium oxide column, then eluted with 0.5 M hydrochloric acid, and assayed by HPLC with amperometric detection. D-Tyrosine was used for the control. alpha-Methyldopa was added to the incubation mixture as an internal standard after incubation. This assay was more sensitive than radioassays and 5 pmol of DOPA formed enzymatically could be measured in the presence of saturating concentrations of tyrosine and 6-methyltetrahydropterin. The TH activity in 2 mg of human putamen could be easily measured, and this method was found to be particularly suitable for the assay of TH activity in a small number of nuclei from animal and human brain.

  1. Expression, purification and preliminary crystallographic studies on the catalytic region of the nonreceptor tyrosine kinase Fes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnemmi, Ilaria; Scotti, Claudia; Cappelletti, Donata; Canonico, Pier Luigi; Condorelli, Fabrizio; Rosano, Camillo

    2006-01-01

    The catalytic domain of human Fes tyrosine kinase has been cloned, expressed, purified and crystallized. The proto-oncogene tyrosine protein kinase c-fps/fes encodes a structurally unique protein (Fes) of the nonreceptor protein-tyrosine kinase (PTK) family. Its expression has been demonstrated in myeloid haematopoietic cells, vascular endothelial cells and in neurons. In human-derived and murine-derived cell lines, the activated form of this kinase can induce cellular transformation; moreover, it has been shown that Fes is involved in the regulation of cell–cell and cell–matrix interactions mediated by adherens junctions and focal adhesions. The N-terminus of Fes contains the FCH (Fps/Fes/Fer/CIP4 homology) domain, which is unique to the Fes/Fer kinase family. It is followed by three coiled-coil domains and an SH2 (Src-homology 2) domain. The catalytic region (Fes-CR) is located at the C-terminus of the protein. The successful expression, purification and crystallization of the catalytic part of Fes (Fes-CR) are described

  2. Autologous transfusion of drain contents in elective primary knee arthroplasty: its value and relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vinay Kumar; Singh, Pankaj Kumar; Javed, Sadaf; Kumar, Kuldeep; Tomar, Juhi

    2011-07-01

    Total knee arthroplasty is associated with significant post-operative blood loss often necessitating blood transfusions. Blood transfusions may be associated with transfusion reactions and may transmit human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis C virus and hepatitis B virus, with devastating consequences. After total knee arthroplasty, transfusion of the contents of an autologous drain is becoming common practice. The aim of our study was to look at the effectiveness of these drains in elective primary total knee arthroplasty. A prospective study was conducted including 70 non-randomised patients. A normal suction drain was used in 35 patients (group A), whereas in the other 35 patients, a CellTrans™ drain was used (group B). All the operations were performed by four surgeons using a tourniquet with a medial parapatellar approach. Pre- and post-operative haemoglobin concentrations were recorded in both groups. A Student's t-test was applied to determine the statistical significance of the data collected. The average fall in post-operative haemoglobin was 3.66 g/dL (SD 1.46; range, 0.6-7.0) among patients in whom the simple drain was used (group A) and 2.29 g/dL (SD 0.92; range, 0.6-5.9) among those in whom the CellTrans™ drain was used (group B) (p<0.0001). Twenty-five units of allogeneic blood were required in group A compared to four units in group B. The rate of transfusion was 5.7% (2 patients) in the group in which CellTrans™ drain was used and 25.7% (9 patients) in the group in which a simple suction drain was used. Total knee arthroplasty is associated with significant post-operative blood loss despite best operative technique. Autologous reinfusion of the contents of a CellTrans™ drain significantly reduces the rate of post-operative blood transfusion. This study indicates that the use of an autologous drain could be recommended as routine practice in primary total knee arthroplasty.

  3. Autologous blood transfusion with recombinant erythropoietin treatment in anaemic patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, N; Ito, K; Ishii, S; Yamazaki, I

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the conditions under which a sufficient preoperative amount of autologous blood could be obtained with administration of rHuEPO (recombinant human erythropoietin) in anaemic patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Thirty-one patients (29 female, two male) with RA who were unable to donate any autologous blood owing to a haemoglobin level of less than 11 g/dl were recruited for this study. Their mean age at the time of operation was 59.3 years. The study protocol for preoperative autologous blood donations started 2.7 weeks before surgery. All patients received 6000 IU rHuEPO intravenously three times a week, supplemented with 40 mg intravenous saccharated ferric oxide at each rHuEPO administration. The protocol also included the provision that 200 g of blood at the first and third donations and 400 g of blood at the second donation were collected. The patients who were able or unable to donate 800 g of blood by this protocol were regarded as having a good or poor response, respectively, to rHuEPO. Patients with a poor response to rHuEPO showed greater clinical symptoms (morning stiffness, the number of swollen joints, Ritchie index) and higher laboratory inflammation parameters (ESR, CRP, platelets, IL-6, TNFalpha, IL-1beta) than patients with a good response to rHuEPO. The poor-response group showed a significant decrease in the progression of inflammation compared with the good-response group. Before treatment with rHuEPO, anaemia in the poor-response group was the same as that in the good-response group, except for impairment of UIBC (unsaturated iron-binding capacity). The poor-response group had a higher blood loss than the good-response group. In conclusion, anaemic RA patients should be considered as candidates for aggressive blood conservation interventions that depend on erythropoietin-modulated erythropoiesis. However, it is important to determine this approach under good control of inflammation.

  4. Antitumor activity of ZD6126, a novel vascular-targeting agent, is enhanced when combined with ZD1839, an epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, and potentiates the effects of radiation in a human non-small cell lung cancer xenograft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raben, David; Bianco, Cataldo; Damiano, Vincenzo; Bianco, Roberto; Melisi, Davide; Mignogna, Chiara; D'Armiento, Francesco Paolo; Cionini, Luca; Bianco, A Raffaele; Tortora, Giampaolo; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Bunn, Paul

    2004-08-01

    Targeting the tumor vasculature may offer an alternative or complementary therapeutic approach to targeting growth factor signaling in lung cancer. The aim of these studies was to evaluate the antitumor effects in vivo of the combination of ZD6126, a tumor-selective vascular-targeting agent; ZD1839 (gefitinib, Iressa), an epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor; and ionizing radiation in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer xenograft model. Athymic nude mice with established flank A549 human non-small cell lung cancer xenograft model xenografts were treated with fractionated radiation therapy, ZD6126, ZD1839, or combinations of each treatment. ZD6126 (150 mg/kg) was given i.p. the day after each course of radiation. Animals treated with ZD1839 received 100 mg/kg per dose per animal, 5 or 7 days/wk for 2 weeks. Immunohistochemistry was done to evaluate the effects on tumor growth using an anti-Ki67 monoclonal antibody. Effects on tumor-induced vascularization were quantified using an anti-factor VIII-related antigen monoclonal antibody. ZD6126 attenuated the growth of human A549 flank xenografts compared with untreated animals. Marked antitumor effects were observed when animals were treated with a combination of ZD6126 and fractionated radiation therapy with protracted tumor regression. ZD6126 + ZD1839 resulted in a greater tumor growth delay than either agent alone. Similar additive effects were seen with ZD1839 + fractionated radiation. Finally, the addition of ZD6126 to ZD1839 and radiation therapy seemed to further improve tumor growth control, with a significant tumor growth delay compared with animals treated with single agent or with double combinations. Immunohistochemistry showed that ZD1839 induced a marked reduction in A549 tumor cell proliferation. Both ZD1839 and ZD6126 treatment substantially reduced tumor-induced angiogenesis. ZD6126 caused marked vessel destruction through loss of endothelial cells and thrombosis

  5. rse, a novel receptor-type tyrosine kinase with homology to Axl/Ufo, is expressed at high levels in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, M R; Scadden, D T; Wang, Z; Gu, Q; Goddard, A; Godowski, P J

    1994-04-08

    We have isolated cDNA clones that encode the human and murine forms of a novel receptor-type tyrosine kinase termed Rse. Sequence analysis indicates that human Rse contains 890 amino acids, with an extracellular region composed of two immunoglobulin-like domains followed by two fibronectin type III domains. Murine Rse contains 880 amino acids and shares 90% amino acid identity with its human counterpart. Rse is structurally similar to the receptor-type tyrosine kinase Axl/Ufo, and the two proteins have 35 and 63% sequence identity in their extracellular and intracellular domains, respectively. To study the synthesis and activation of this putative receptor-type tyrosine kinase, we constructed a version of Rse (termed gD-Rse, where gD represents glycoprotein D) that contains an NH2-terminal epitope tag. NIH3T3 cells were engineered to express gD-Rse, which could be detected at the cell surface by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Moreover, gD-Rse was rapidly phosphorylated on tyrosine residues upon incubation of the cells with an antibody directed against the epitope tag, suggesting that rse encodes an active tyrosine kinase. In the human tissues we examined, the highest level of expression of rse mRNA was observed in the brain; rse mRNA was also detected in the premegakaryocytopoietic cell lines CMK11-5 and Dami. The gene for rse was localized to human chromosome 15.

  6. Exposure of tropoelastin to peroxynitrous acid gives high yields of nitrated tyrosine residues, di-tyrosine cross-links and altered protein structure and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Degendorfer, Georg; Chuang, Christine Yu-Nung; Mariotti, Michele

    2018-01-01

    Elastin is an abundant extracellular matrix protein in elastic tissues, including the lungs, skin and arteries, and comprises 30–57% of the aorta by dry mass. The monomeric precursor, tropoelastin (TE), undergoes complex processing during elastogenesis to form mature elastic fibres. Peroxynitrous......-protein di-tyrosine cross-links have been characterized by mass spectrometry. Examination of human atherosclerotic lesions shows colocalization of 3-nitroTyr with elastin epitopes, consistent with TE or elastin modification in vivo, and also an association of 3-nitroTyr containing proteins and elastin...

  7. Differentiation of Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells into Dopaminergic Neuron-like Cells in Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, So Young; Soker, Shay; Jang, Yu-Jin; Kwon, Tae Gyun; Yoo, Eun Sang

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the potential of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) to differentiate into dopaminergic neurons in vitro as an autologous stem cell source for Parkinson's disease treatment. The hDPSCs were expanded in knockout-embryonic stem cell (KO-ES) medium containing leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) on gelatin-coated plates for 3-4 days. Then, the medium was replaced with KO-ES medium without LIF to allow the formation of the neurosphere for 4 days. The neurosphere was transferred into ITS medium, containing ITS (human insulin-transferrin-sodium) and fibronectin, to select for Nestin-positive cells for 6-8 days. The cells were then cultured in N-2 medium containing basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF), FGF-8b, sonic hedgehog-N, and ascorbic acid on poly-l-ornithine/fibronectin-coated plates to expand the Nestin-positive cells for up to 2 weeks. Finally, the cells were transferred into N-2/ascorbic acid medium to allow for their differentiation into dopaminergic neurons for 10-15 days. The differentiation stages were confirmed by morphological, immunocytochemical, flow cytometric, real-time PCR, and ELISA analyses. The expressions of mesenchymal stem cell markers were observed at the early stages. The expressions of early neuronal markers were maintained throughout the differentiation stages. The mature neural markers showed increased expression from stage 3 onwards. The percentage of cells positive for tyrosine hydroxylase was 14.49%, and the amount was 0.526 ± 0.033 ng/mL at the last stage. hDPSCs can differentiate into dopaminergic neural cells under experimental cell differentiation conditions, showing potential as an autologous cell source for the treatment of Parkinson's disease.

  8. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in classical Hodgkin's lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afonso José Pereira Cortez

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hodgkin's lymphoma has high rates of cure, but in 15% to 20% of general patients and between 35% and 40% of those in advanced stages, the disease will progress or will relapse after initial treatment. For this group, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is considered one option of salvage therapy. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate a group of 106 patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma, who suffered relapse or who were refractory to treatment, submitted to autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in a single transplant center. METHODS: A retrospective study was performed with data collected from patient charts. The analysis involved 106 classical Hodgkin's lymphoma patients who were consecutively submitted to high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous transplants in a single institution from April 1993 to December 2006. RESULTS: The overall survival rates of this population at five and ten years were 86% and 70%, respectively. The disease-free survival was approximately 60% at five years. Four patients died of procedure-related causes but relapse of classical Hodgkin's lymphoma after transplant was the most frequent cause of death. Univariate analysis shows that sensitivity to pre-transplant treatment and hemoglobin < 10 g/dL at diagnosis had an impact on patient survival. Unlike other studies, B-type symptoms did not seem to affect overall survival. Lactic dehydrogenase and serum albumin concentrations analyzed at diagnosis did not influence patient survival either. CONCLUSION: Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is an effective treatment strategy for early and late relapse in classical Hodgkin's lymphoma for cases that were responsive to pre-transplant chemotherapy. Refractory to treatment is a sign of worse prognosis. Additionally, a hemoglobin concentration below 10 g/dL at diagnosis of Hodgkin's lymphoma has a negative impact on the survival of patients after transplant. As far as we know this relationship has not

  9. Outcomes of rotator cuff augmentation surgery with autologous fascia lata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales-Varo, A P; García-Espona, M A; Roda-Murillo, O

    To evaluate whether augmentation grafts using autologous fascia lata improve functional results for rotator cuff repairs and reduce the retear rate compared to those without augmentation. This is a prospective evaluation comprising 20 patients with a complete symptomatic rotator cuff tear. The operations were carried out from a superior approach performing a total cuff repair, for 10 patients we used a suture augmented with an autologous graft taken from their own fascia lata while unaugmented sutures were used for the other 10 patients. The follow-up period lasted for one year post-intervention. We measured variables for tear type, functionality and pain, both baseline and at 6 and 12-month follow ups. We evaluated retear incidence in each group as well as each group's pain and functionality response. The improved pain levels in the non-graft group evolved gradually over time. Conversely, in the group with the augmentation grafts, average Constant-Murley shoulder outcome scores at six months were already above 10 and were maintained at 12 months. One retear occurred in the graft group and 2 in the group without grafts, thus presenting no significant differences. There were no significant changes in pain and function values at the one year follow up in either group. Our preliminary results regarding rotator cuff augmentation surgery with autologous fascia lata showed a significant improvement in pain levels after 6 months compared to the patients with no augmentation, who required 12 months to reach the same values. After a year of follow up, there were no differences between the mean Constant and pain scores in either intervention group The number of retears in the non-graft group was greater than that in the group with grafts although the difference was not significant. Copyright © 2018 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Autologous Blood Pleurodesis In Patients With Persistent Air Leaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agkajanzadeh M

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Persistent air leaks occur after Spontaneous pneumothorax both primary and secondary, and after lungs trauma and lung surgeries are sever problems encountered chest surgeons with. Persistent air leak causes longer patients hospitalization."nMaterials and Methods: We used autologous blood pleurodesis in patients with persistent air leak for 30patients with more than 8 days air leaks, during a three years period 1377-1380 (1999-2002."nResults: The patients had 19 years up to 70 years old. Eight patients had thoracotomy and lobectomy and /or segmentectomies 6 with primary pneumothorax, 10 with secondary pneumothorax, and four with penetrated or blunt thoracic traumas. Blood was obtained from femoral or brachial veins and 70-150 mis. Injected in chest tubes. Chest bottle was first lied 80cm higher than body levels. After 24 hours repositioned in normal levels, and patients were supervised. Via chest tube we injected blood 70-100ml.for young patients, and 100-150 ml for older patients into intra pleural space. There were no clamped chest tubes. There were no pain, respiratory distress, fever, or cough in pleurodesized patients. The only patient's complaint was local pain in femoral vein or brachial vein because blood sampling and blood obtaining, although there was no local visible complication as hematoma or bleeding. After 48 hours in 24 patients air leak ceased. In six patients because persistent air leak autologous blood pleurodesis repeated, two patients after 48hours"nair leak ceased, remaining four patients underwent for thoracotomies, success rate"nwas 86.6%."nConclusion: According above success rate we suggest autologous blood pleurodesis in patients with persistent air leak is a reliable, effective, and no complicated procedure for persistent air leaks.

  11. Robotic synthesis of L-[1-11C]tyrosine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luurtsema, Gert; Medema, Jitze; Elsinga, P.H.; Visser, G.M.; Vaalburg, Willem

    1994-01-01

    L-[1- 11 C]tyrosine promises to become an important tracer for determination of the protein synthesis rate (PSR) in tumor tissue and brain. The commercially available Anatech RB-86 robotic system is utilized for the automation of the L-[1- 11 C]tyrosine production via the isocyanide method as reported by Bolster et al. (Eur. J. Nucl. Med. 12, 321-324, 1986). The total synthesis time, including HPLC-purification and enantiomeric separation is 60 min. With a practical yield of 20 mCi L-[1- 11 C]tyrosine at a specific activity > 1000 Ci/mmol. (author)

  12. Facial fat necrosis following autologous fat transfer and its management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sweta Rai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autologous fat transfer (AFT is an increasingly popular cosmetic procedure practiced by dermatologic surgeons worldwide. As this is an office based procedure performed under local or tumescent anaesthesia with fat transferred within the same individual and limited associated down time its is considered relatively safe and risk free in the cosmetic surgery arena. We describe a case of AFT related fat necrosis causing significant facial dysmorphia and psychosocial distress. We also discuss the benefits and risks of AFT highlighting common causes of fat graft failure.

  13. Autologous fat grafting for cosmetic enhancement of the perioral region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasgold, Mark; Lam, Samuel M; Glasgold, Robert

    2007-11-01

    The role of volume loss in the progression of facial aging is widely accepted as an important cause. The aging appearance of the perioral region and lower face is significantly affected by this volume loss, which contributes to the development of labiomental folds, the loss of definition of the jawline, and worsening of skin texture, among other manifestations. Autologous fat transfer can effectively replace this lost volume and contribute to any facial rejuvenation plan. Fat can replace larger volumes than off-the-shelf fillers and provides a potentially permanent solution.

  14. LOCAL CORTICOSTEROID VS. AUTOLOGOUS BLOOD FOR PLANTAR FASCIITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syam Sunder B

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Plantar fasciitis is the most common cause of heel pain for which professional care is sought. Initially thought of as an inflammatory process, plantar fasciitis is a disorder of degenerative changes in the fascia and maybe more accurately termed plantar fasciosis. Traditional therapeutic efforts have been directed at decreasing the presumed inflammation. These treatments include icing, Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs, rest and activity modification, corticosteroids, botulinum toxin type A, splinting, shoe modifications and orthosis. Other treatment techniques have been directed at resolving the degeneration caused by the disease process. In general, these techniques are designed to create an acute inflammatory reaction with the goal of restarting the healing process. These techniques include autologous blood injection, Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP injection, nitroglycerin patches, Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy (ESWT and surgical procedures. Recently, research has focused on regenerative therapies with high expectations of success. The use of autologous growth factors is thought to heal through collagen regeneration and the stimulation of a well-ordered angiogenesis. These growth factors are administered in the form of autologous whole blood or Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP. Platelets can be isolated using simple cell-separating systems. The degranulation of the alpha granules in the platelets releases many different growth factors that play a role in tissue regeneration processes. Platelet-derived growth factor, transforming growth factor-P, vascular-derived endothelial growth factor, epithelial growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor and insulin-like growth factor are examples of such growth factors. Injections with autologous growth factors are becoming common in clinical practice. The present study was an attempt to compare the efficacy of autologous blood injection in plantar fasciitis by comparing it with the local

  15. Autologous 111In-oxine-labeled granulocytes in Yersinia infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, W.; Boerner, W.; Fischbach, W.

    1985-01-01

    Autologous 111 In-oxine-labeled granulocytes have proved to be valuable for the localization of inflammatory bowel diseases, especially Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Other rare inflammatory bowel diseases also yield positive 111 In scans. One case of Yersinia infection of the terminal ileum (Yersinia enterocolitica) showing an accumulation of 111 In-oxine-labeled granulocytes 0.5, 4, and 24 h after the reinjection of the labeled cells is described. The 4-day fecal excretion of 111 In-oxine granulocytes showed a slight inflammatory activity of the terminal ileum. One negative scan is reported in a cotrimoxazole-treated patient with Yersinia infection. (orig.)

  16. Biological and mechanical evaluation of a Bio-Hybrid scaffold for autologous valve tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jahnavi, S [Stem Cell and Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai, TN 600036 (India); Tissue Culture Laboratory, Biomedical Technology Wing, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Poojappura, Trivandrum, Kerala 695012 (India); Saravanan, U [Department of Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai, TN 600036 (India); Arthi, N [Stem Cell and Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai, TN 600036 (India); Bhuvaneshwar, G S [Department of Engineering Design, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai, TN 600036 (India); Kumary, T V [Tissue Culture Laboratory, Biomedical Technology Wing, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Poojappura, Trivandrum, Kerala 695012 (India); Rajan, S [Madras Medical Mission, Institute of Cardio-Vascular Diseases, Mogappair, Chennai, Tamil Nadu 600037 (India); Verma, R S, E-mail: vermars@iitm.ac.in [Stem Cell and Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai, TN 600036 (India)

    2017-04-01

    Major challenge in heart valve tissue engineering for paediatric patients is the development of an autologous valve with regenerative capacity. Hybrid tissue engineering approach is recently gaining popularity to design scaffolds with desired biological and mechanical properties that can remodel post implantation. In this study, we fabricated aligned nanofibrous Bio-Hybrid scaffold made of decellularized bovine pericardium: polycaprolactone-chitosan with optimized polymer thickness to yield the desired biological and mechanical properties. CD44{sup +}, αSMA{sup +}, Vimentin{sup +} and CD105{sup −} human valve interstitial cells were isolated and seeded on these Bio-Hybrid scaffolds. Subsequent biological evaluation revealed interstitial cell proliferation with dense extra cellular matrix deposition that indicated the viability for growth and proliferation of seeded cells on the scaffolds. Uniaxial mechanical tests along axial direction showed that the Bio-Hybrid scaffolds has at least 20 times the strength of the native valves and its stiffness is nearly 3 times more than that of native valves. Biaxial and uniaxial mechanical studies on valve interstitial cells cultured Bio-Hybrid scaffolds revealed that the response along the axial and circumferential direction was different, similar to native valves. Overall, our findings suggest that Bio-Hybrid scaffold is a promising material for future development of regenerative heart valve constructs in children. - Highlights: • We report detailed biological and mechanical investigations of a Bio-Hybrid scaffold. • Optimized polymer thickness yielded desired biological and mechanical properties. • Bio-Hybrid scaffold revealed hVIC proliferation with dense ECM deposition. • Biaxial testing indicated that Bio-Hybrid scaffolds are mechanically stronger than native valves. • Bio-Hybrid scaffold is a promising material for autologous valve tissue engineering.

  17. Transplantation of autologous adipose stem cells lacks therapeutic efficacy in the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiujuan Zhang

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS, characterized by chronic inflammation, demyelination, and axonal damage, is a complicated neurological disease of the human central nervous system. Recent interest in adipose stromal/stem cell (ASCs for the treatment of CNS diseases has promoted further investigation in order to identify the most suitable ASCs. To investigate whether MS affects the biologic properties of ASCs and whether autologous ASCs from MS-affected sources could serve as an effective source for stem cell therapy, cells were isolated from subcutaneous inguinal fat pads of mice with established experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, a murine model of MS. ASCs from EAE mice and their syngeneic wild-type mice were cultured, expanded, and characterized for their cell morphology, surface antigen expression, osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation, colony forming units, and inflammatory cytokine and chemokine levels in vitro. Furthermore, the therapeutic efficacy of the cells was assessed in vivo by transplantation into EAE mice. The results indicated that the ASCs from EAE mice displayed a normal phenotype, typical MSC surface antigen expression, and in vitro osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation capacity, while their osteogenic differentiation capacity was reduced in comparison with their unafflicted control mice. The ASCs from EAE mice also demonstrated increased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, specifically an elevation in the expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and keratin chemoattractant. In vivo, infusion of wild type ASCs significantly ameliorate the disease course, autoimmune mediated demyelination and cell infiltration through the regulation of the inflammatory responses, however, mice treated with autologous ASCs showed no therapeutic improvement on the disease progression.

  18. Transplantation of autologous synovial mesenchymal stem cells promotes meniscus regeneration in aged primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Shimpei; Muneta, Takeshi; Nakagawa, Yusuke; Koga, Hideyuki; Watanabe, Toshifumi; Tsuji, Kunikazu; Sotome, Shinichi; Okawa, Atsushi; Kiuchi, Shinji; Ono, Hideo; Mizuno, Mitsuru; Sekiya, Ichiro

    2017-06-01

    Transplantation of aggregates of synovial mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) enhanced meniscus regeneration in rats. Anatomy and biological properties of the meniscus depend on animal species. To apply this technique clinically, it is valuable to investigate the use of animals genetically close to humans. We investigated whether transplantation of aggregates of autologous synovial MSCs promoted meniscal regeneration in aged primates. Chynomolgus primates between 12 and 13 years old were used. After the anterior halves of the medial menisci in both knees were removed, an average of 14 aggregates consisting of 250,000 synovial MSCs were transplanted onto the meniscus defect. No aggregates were transplanted to the opposite knee for the control. Meniscus and articular cartilage were analyzed macroscopically, histologically, and by MRI T1rho mapping at 8 (n = 3) and 16 weeks (n = 4). The medial meniscus was larger and the modified Pauli's histological score for the regenerated meniscus was better in the MSC group than in the control group in each primate at 8 and 16 weeks. Mankin's score for the medial femoral condyle cartilage was better in the MSC group than in the control group in all primates at 16 weeks. T1rho value for both the regenerated meniscus and adjacent articular cartilage in the MSC group was closer to the normal meniscus than in the control group in all primates at 16 weeks. Transplantation of aggregates of autologous synovial MSCs promoted meniscus regeneration and delayed progression of degeneration of articular cartilage in aged primates. This is the first report dealing with meniscus regeneration in primates. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:1274-1282, 2017. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Pulmonary heart valve replacement using stabilized acellular xenogeneic scaffolds; effects of seeding with autologous stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harpa Marius Mihai

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: We hypothesized that an ideal heart valve replacement would be acellular valve root scaffolds seeded with autologous stem cells. To test this hypothesis, we prepared porcine acellular pulmonary valves, seeded them with autologous adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs and implanted them in sheep and compared them to acellular valves.

  20. Bruton's Tyrosine Kinase: An Emerging Key Player in Innate Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Alexander N R; Bittner, Zsofia; Liu, Xiao; Dang, Truong-Minh; Radsak, Markus Philipp; Brunner, Cornelia

    2017-01-01

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) was initially discovered as a critical mediator of B cell receptor signaling in the development and functioning of adaptive immunity. Growing evidence also suggests multiple roles for BTK in mononuclear cells of the innate immune system, especially in dendritic cells and macrophages. For example, BTK has been shown to function in Toll-like receptor-mediated recognition of infectious agents, cellular maturation and recruitment processes, and Fc receptor signaling. Most recently, BTK was additionally identified as a direct regulator of a key innate inflammatory machinery, the NLRP3 inflammasome. BTK has thus attracted interest not only for gaining a more thorough basic understanding of the human innate immune system but also as a target to therapeutically modulate innate immunity. We here review the latest developments on the role of BTK in mononuclear innate immune cells in mouse versus man, with specific emphasis on the sensing of infectious agents and the induction of inflammation. Therapeutic implications for modulating innate immunity and critical open questions are also discussed.

  1. Neratinib, A Novel HER2-Targeted Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Shruti Rakesh; Mishra, Prasun; Abraham, Jame

    2016-10-01

    HER2 gene amplification and receptor overexpression is identified in 20% to 25% of human breast cancers. Use of targeted therapy for HER2-amplified breast cancer has led to improvements in disease-free and overall survival in this subset of patients. Neratinib is an oral pan HER inhibitor, that irreversibly inhibits the tyrosine kinase activity of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR or HER1), HER2, and HER4, which leads to reduced phosphorylation and activation of downstream signaling pathways. Neratinib is currently being tested in a number of clinical trials for its safety and efficacy in lung cancer, and colorectal, bladder, and breast cancers. In this review we discuss the available phase I, II, and III data for use of neratinib in the metastatic, adjuvant, neoadjuvant, and extended adjuvant settings along with the ongoing clinical trials of neratinib in breast cancer. We also elaborate on the side effect profile of this relatively new drug and provide guidelines for its use in clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Cytochrome c Is Tyrosine 97 Phosphorylated by Neuroprotective Insulin Treatment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sanderson, T. H.; Mahapatra, G.; Pecina, Petr; Ji, Q.; Yu, K.; Sinkler, Ch.; Varughese, A.; Kumar, R.; Bukowski, M. J.; Tousignant, R. N.; Salomon, A. R.; Lee, I.; Hüttemann, M.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 11 (2013), e78627 E-ISSN 1932-6203 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : cytochrome c * tyrosine phosphorylation * brain ischemia * insulin Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.534, year: 2013

  3. Tyrosine Kinase Gene Expression Profiling in Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weier, Heinz-Ulrich

    2001-01-01

    ... of these genes parallels the progression of tumors to a more malignant phenotype. We developed a DNA micro-array based screening system to monitor the level of expression of tyrosine kinase (tk...

  4. Tyrosine Kinase Gene Expression Profiling in Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weier, Heinz-Ulrich

    2002-01-01

    ... of these genes parallels the progression of tumors to a more malignant phenotype. We developed a DNA micro-array based screening system to monitor the level of expression of tyrosine kinase (tk...

  5. Tyrosine Kinase Inhibition in HPV-related Squamous Cell Carcinoma Reveals Beneficial Expression of cKIT and Src.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Benedikt; Kneissle, Marcel; Birk, Richard; Rotter, Nicole; Aderhold, Christoph

    2018-05-01

    Therapeutic options of locally advanced or metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) are limited. Src and cKIT are key protein regulators for local tumor progression. The aim of the study was to investigate the therapeutic potential of targeted therapies in human squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) in vitro. Therefore, the influence of the selective tyrosine kinase inhibitors niotinib, dasatinib, erlotinib, gefitinib and afatinib on Src and cKIT expression in Human papilloma virus (HPV)-positive and HPV-negative squamous cancer cells (SCC) was analyzed in vitro. ELISA was performed to evaluate the expression of Src and cKIT under the influence of nilotinib, dasatinib, erlotinib, gefitinib and afatinib (10 μmol/l) in HPV-negative and HPV-positive SCC (24-96 h of incubation). Gefitinib significantly increased cKIT expression in HPV-positive and HPV-negative cells whereas nilotinib and afatinib decreased cKIT expression in HPV-positive SCC. The influence of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in HPV-negative SCC was marginal. Surprisingly, Src expression was significantly increased by all tested tyrosine kinase inhibitors in HPV-positive SCC. The results revealed beneficial and unexpected information concerning the interaction of selective tyrosine kinase inhibitors and the tumor biology of HNSCC. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  6. Crystal structure and putative substrate identification for the Entamoeba histolytica low molecular weight tyrosine phosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linford, Alicia S; Jiang, Nona M; Edwards, Thomas E; Sherman, Nicholas E; Van Voorhis, Wesley C; Stewart, Lance J; Myler, Peter J; Staker, Bart L; Petri, William A

    2014-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is a eukaryotic intestinal parasite of humans, and is endemic in developing countries. We have characterized the E. histolytica putative low molecular weight protein tyrosine phosphatase (LMW-PTP). The structure for this amebic tyrosine phosphatase was solved, showing the ligand-induced conformational changes necessary for binding of substrate. In amebae, it was expressed at low but detectable levels as detected by immunoprecipitation followed by immunoblotting. A mutant LMW-PTP protein in which the catalytic cysteine in the active site was replaced with a serine lacked phosphatase activity, and was used to identify a number of trapped putative substrate proteins via mass spectrometry analysis. Seven of these putative substrate protein genes were cloned with an epitope tag and overexpressed in amebae. Five of these seven putative substrate proteins were demonstrated to interact specifically with the mutant LMW-PTP. This is the first biochemical study of a small tyrosine phosphatase in Entamoeba, and sets the stage for understanding its role in amebic biology and pathogenesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Keratinocyte-derived laminin-332 protein promotes melanin synthesis via regulation of tyrosine uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Heesung; Jung, Hyejung; Lee, Jung-Hyun; Oh, Hye Yun; Kim, Ok Bin; Han, Inn-Oc; Oh, Eok-Soo

    2014-08-01

    Melanocytes, which produce the pigment melanin, are known to be closely regulated by neighboring keratinocytes. However, how keratinocytes regulate melanin production is unclear. Here we report that melanin production in melanoma cells (B16F10 and MNT-1) was increased markedly on a keratinocyte-derived extracellular matrix compared with a melanoma cell-derived extracellular matrix. siRNA-mediated reduction of keratinocyte-derived laminin-332 expression decreased melanin synthesis in melanoma cells, and laminin-332, but not fibronectin, enhanced melanin content and α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone-regulated melanin production in melanoma cells. Similar effects were observed in human melanocytes. Interestingly, however, laminin-332 did not affect the expression or activity of tyrosinase. Instead, laminin-332 promoted the uptake of extracellular tyrosine and, subsequently, increased intracellular levels of tyrosine in both melanocytes and melanoma cells. Taken together, these data strongly suggest that keratinocyte-derived laminin-332 contributes to melanin production by regulating tyrosine uptake. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Ret function in muscle stem cells points to tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy for facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyle, Louise A; Blanc, Eric; Jaka, Oihane; Prueller, Johanna; Banerji, Christopher Rs; Tedesco, Francesco Saverio; Harridge, Stephen Dr; Knight, Robert D; Zammit, Peter S

    2016-11-14

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) involves sporadic expression of DUX4, which inhibits myogenesis and is pro-apoptotic. To identify target genes, we over-expressed DUX4 in myoblasts and found that the receptor tyrosine kinase Ret was significantly up-regulated, suggesting a role in FSHD. RET is dynamically expressed during myogenic progression in mouse and human myoblasts. Constitutive expression of either RET9 or RET51 increased myoblast proliferation, whereas siRNA-mediated knockdown of Ret induced myogenic differentiation. Suppressing RET activity using Sunitinib, a clinically-approved tyrosine kinase inhibitor, rescued differentiation in both DUX4-expressing murine myoblasts and in FSHD patient-derived myoblasts. Importantly, Sunitinib also increased engraftment and differentiation of FSHD myoblasts in regenerating mouse muscle. Thus, DUX4-mediated activation of Ret prevents myogenic differentiation and could contribute to FSHD pathology by preventing satellite cell-mediated repair. Rescue of DUX4-induced pathology by Sunitinib highlights the therapeutic potential of tyrosine kinase inhibitors for treatment of FSHD.

  9. Electrode Potentials of l-Tryptophan, l-Tyrosine, 3-Nitro-l-tyrosine, 2,3-Difluoro-l-tyrosine, and 2,3,5-Trifluoro-l-tyrosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudi, Leila; Kissner, Reinhard; Nauser, Thomas; Koppenol, Willem H

    2016-05-24

    Electrode potentials for aromatic amino acid radical/amino acid couples were deduced from cyclic voltammograms and pulse radiolysis experiments. The amino acids investigated were l-tryptophan, l-tyrosine, N-acetyl-l-tyrosine methyl ester, N-acetyl-3-nitro-l-tyrosine ethyl ester, N-acetyl-2,3-difluoro-l-tyrosine methyl ester, and N-acetyl-2,3,5-trifluoro-l-tyrosine methyl ester. Conditional potentials were determined at pH 7.4 for all compounds listed; furthermore, Pourbaix diagrams for l-tryptophan, l-tyrosine, and N-acetyl-3-nitro-l-tyrosine ethyl ester were obtained. Electron transfer accompanied by proton transfer is reversible, as confirmed by detailed analysis of the current waves, and because the slopes of the Pourbaix diagrams obey Nernst's law. E°'(Trp(•),H(+)/TrpH) and E°'(TyrO(•),H(+)/TyrOH) at pH 7 are 0.99 ± 0.01 and 0.97 ± 0.01 V, respectively. Pulse radiolysis studies of two dipeptides that contain both amino acids indicate a difference in E°' of approximately 0.06 V. Thus, in small peptides, we recommend values of 1.00 and 0.96 V for E°'(Trp(•),H(+)/TrpH) and E°'(TyrO(•),H(+)/TyrOH), respectively. The electrode potential of N-acetyl-3-nitro-l-tyrosine ethyl ester is higher, while because of mesomeric stabilization of the radical, those of N-acetyl-2,3-difluoro-l-tyrosine methyl ester and N-acetyl-2,3,5-trifluoro-l-tyrosine methyl ester are lower than that of tyrosine. Given that the electrode potentials at pH 7 of E°'(Trp(•),H(+)/TrpH) and E°'(TyrO(•),H(+)/TyrOH) are nearly equal, they would be, in principle, interchangeable. Proton-coupled electron transfer pathways in proteins that use TrpH and TyrOH are thus nearly thermoneutral.

  10. Tyrosine phosphorylation switching of a G protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Tunc-Ozdemir, Meral; Urano, Daisuke; Jia, Haiyan; Werth, Emily G; Mowrey, David D; Hicks, Leslie M; Dokholyan, Nikolay V; Torres, Matthew P; Jones, Alan M

    2018-03-30

    Heterotrimeric G protein complexes are molecular switches relaying extracellular signals sensed by G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to downstream targets in the cytoplasm, which effect cellular responses. In the plant heterotrimeric GTPase cycle, GTP hydrolysis, rather than nucleotide exchange, is the rate-limiting reaction and is accelerated by a receptor-like regulator of G signaling (RGS) protein. We hypothesized that posttranslational modification of the Gα subunit in the G protein complex regulates the RGS-dependent GTPase cycle. Our structural analyses identified an invariant phosphorylated tyrosine residue (Tyr 166 in the Arabidopsis Gα subunit AtGPA1) located in the intramolecular domain interface where nucleotide binding and hydrolysis occur. We also identified a receptor-like kinase that phosphorylates AtGPA1 in a Tyr 166 -dependent manner. Discrete molecular dynamics simulations predicted that phosphorylated Tyr 166 forms a salt bridge in this interface and potentially affects the RGS protein-accelerated GTPase cycle. Using a Tyr 166 phosphomimetic substitution, we found that the cognate RGS protein binds more tightly to the GDP-bound Gα substrate, consequently reducing its ability to accelerate GTPase activity. In conclusion, we propose that phosphorylation of Tyr 166 in AtGPA1 changes the binding pattern with AtRGS1 and thereby attenuates the steady-state rate of the GTPase cycle. We coin this newly identified mechanism "substrate phosphoswitching." © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Autologous Blood Injection Works for Recalcitrant Lateral Epicondylitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bora Bostan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recalcitrant lateral epicondylitis may be a disabling condition. Treatment of this condition is still controversial. Aims: In the present prospective study, we evaluated the long-term results of autologous blood injection for the treatment of recalcitrant lateral epicondylitis. Study Design: Prospective clinical study. Methods: A total of 42 elbows of 40 consecutive patients (28 female, 12 male were enrolled in this prospective study. Seven patients left the study (3 patients moved to another city, 1 patient died in the second week due to a heart condition, 1 patient quit the study because of the resolution of pain in the fourth week and 2 patients did not agree to the second injection. Thirteen patients were lost to third year follow-up. Therefore, a total of 21 elbows of 20 patients with 3 years of follow-up were included in this study. The mean age of the patients was 47.25 years (range, 20-68 years. Results: Visual analogue scale (VAS, Nirschl score and grip strength were significantly improved after injections when compared to before treatment. The best improvement in terms of grip strength, Nirschl score and VAS score was detected at the one year follow-up. The improvement in Nirschl and VAS score sustained until the third year. Conclusion: We suggest that autologous blood injection for the treatment of recalcitrant lateral epicondylitis is an effective, safe and successful procedure in the long-term.

  12. Autologous Blood Injection and Wrist Immobilisation for Chronic Lateral Epicondylitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Massy-Westropp

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This study explored the effect of autologous blood injection (with ultrasound guidance to the elbows of patients who had radiologically assessed degeneration of the origin of extensor carpi radialis brevis and failed cortisone injection/s to the lateral epicondylitis. Methods. This prospective longitudinal series involved preinjection assessment of pain, grip strength, and function, using the patient-rated tennis elbow evaluation. Patients were injected with blood from the contralateral limb and then wore a customised wrist support for five days, after which they commenced a stretching, strengthening, and massage programme with an occupational therapist. These patients were assessed after six months and then finally between 18 months and five years after injection, using the patient-rated tennis elbow evaluation. Results. Thirty-eight of 40 patients completed the study, showing significant improvement in pain; the worst pain decreased by two to five points out of a 10-point visual analogue for pain. Self-perceived function improved by 11–25 points out of 100. Women showed significant increase in grip, but men did not. Conclusions. Autologous blood injection improved pain and function in a worker’s compensation cohort of patients with chronic lateral epicondylitis, who had not had relief with cortisone injection.

  13. Long term results in refractory tennis elbow using autologous blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gani, Naseem Ul; Khan, Hayat Ahmad; Kamal, Younis; Farooq, Munir; Jeelani, Hina; Shah, Adil Bashir

    2014-10-27

    Tennis elbow (TE) is one of the commonest myotendinosis. Different treatment options are available and autologous blood injection has emerged as the one of the acceptable modalities of treatment. Long term studies over a larger group of patients are however lacking. The purpose of this study was to evaluate these patients on longer durations. One-hundred and twenty patients of TE, who failed to respond to conventional treatment including local steroid injections were taken up for this prospective study over the period from year 2005 to 2011 and were followed up for the minimum of 3 years (range 3-9 years). Two mL of autologous blood was taken from the ipsilateral limb and injected into the lateral epicondyle. The effectiveness of the procedure was assessed by Pain Rating Sscale and Nirschl Staging, which was monitored before the procedure, at first week, monthly for first three months, at 6 months and then 3 monthly for first year, six monthly for next 2 years and then yearly. Statistical analysis was done and a P value of tennis elbow should be made as there is lot of controversy regarding the treatment.

  14. Autologous Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells Intrathecal Transplantation in Chronic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell therapy is being widely explored in the management of stroke and has demonstrated great potential. It has been shown to assist in the remodeling of the central nervous system by inducing neurorestorative effect through the process of angiogenesis, neurogenesis, and reduction of glial scar formation. In this study, the effect of intrathecal administration of autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNCs is analyzed on the recovery process of patients with chronic stroke. 24 patients diagnosed with chronic stroke were administered cell therapy, followed by multidisciplinary neurorehabilitation. They were assessed on functional independence measure (FIM objectively, along with assessment of standing and walking balance, ambulation, and hand functions. Out of 24 patients, 12 improved in ambulation, 10 in hand functions, 6 in standing balance, and 9 in walking balance. Further factor analysis was done. Patients of the younger groups showed higher percentage of improvement in all the areas. Patients who underwent cell therapy within 2 years after the stroke showed better changes. Ischemic type of stroke had better recovery than the hemorrhagic stroke. This study demonstrates the potential of autologous BMMNCs intrathecal transplantation in improving the prognosis of functional recovery in chronic stage of stroke. Further clinical trials are recommended. This trial is registered with NCT02065778.

  15. Autologous blood injection in the treatment of lateral epicondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Qazi Muhammad; Ahmed, Ijaz; Aziz, Amer

    2014-12-01

    To determine mean decrease in visual analogue pain score after autologous blood injection in patients with lateral epicondylitis. The quasi-experimental study was conducted at Ghurki Trust Hospital, Lahore, from December 10, 2012, to June 8, 2013, and comprised patients having lateral epicondylitis of elbow. Pre-procedure baseline visual analogue score was measured. Under aseptic conditions, 2ml of autologous blood was drawn from the contra-lateral antecubital fossa of the patient and slowly injected into the site of maximum tenderness. Patients were advised to continue their normal daily activities and were followed up at third and sixth week for assessment of pain intensity. Mean decrease was calculated by subtracting the post-procedure visual analogue score from the baseline value.SPSS 11 was used for data analysis. Of the 150 patients in the study, there were 127(84.7%) males and 23(15.3%) females. Male-to-female ratio was 5.5:1 Overall mean age of was 33.91±10.23 years. The mean pre-injection pain score was 8.97±1.02 and post-injection was 3.59±1.58. Mean decrease in VAS pain score was 5.37±1.80. Autolgous blood injection was found to be an effective way to treat patients of epicondylitis elbow.

  16. Autologous Blood Injection and Wrist Immobilisation for Chronic Lateral Epicondylitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massy-Westropp, Nicola; Simmonds, Stuart; Caragianis, Suzanne; Potter, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. This study explored the effect of autologous blood injection (with ultrasound guidance) to the elbows of patients who had radiologically assessed degeneration of the origin of extensor carpi radialis brevis and failed cortisone injection/s to the lateral epicondylitis. Methods. This prospective longitudinal series involved preinjection assessment of pain, grip strength, and function, using the patient-rated tennis elbow evaluation. Patients were injected with blood from the contralateral limb and then wore a customised wrist support for five days, after which they commenced a stretching, strengthening, and massage programme with an occupational therapist. These patients were assessed after six months and then finally between 18 months and five years after injection, using the patient-rated tennis elbow evaluation. Results. Thirty-eight of 40 patients completed the study, showing significant improvement in pain; the worst pain decreased by two to five points out of a 10-point visual analogue for pain. Self-perceived function improved by 11–25 points out of 100. Women showed significant increase in grip, but men did not. Conclusions. Autologous blood injection improved pain and function in a worker's compensation cohort of patients with chronic lateral epicondylitis, who had not had relief with cortisone injection. PMID:23251809

  17. Autologous Blood Injection Works for Recalcitrant Lateral Epicondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostan, Bora; Balta, Orhan; Aşçı, Murat; Aytekin, Kürşad; Eser, Enes

    2016-03-01

    Recalcitrant lateral epicondylitis may be a disabling condition. Treatment of this condition is still controversial. In the present prospective study, we evaluated the long-term results of autologous blood injection for the treatment of recalcitrant lateral epicondylitis. Prospective clinical study. A total of 42 elbows of 40 consecutive patients (28 female, 12 male) were enrolled in this prospective study. Seven patients left the study (3 patients moved to another city, 1 patient died in the second week due to a heart condition, 1 patient quit the study because of the resolution of pain in the fourth week and 2 patients did not agree to the second injection). Thirteen patients were lost to third year follow-up. Therefore, a total of 21 elbows of 20 patients with 3 years of follow-up were included in this study. The mean age of the patients was 47.25 years (range, 20-68 years). Visual analogue scale (VAS), Nirschl score and grip strength were significantly improved after injections when compared to before treatment. The best improvement in terms of grip strength, Nirschl score and VAS score was detected at the one year follow-up. The improvement in Nirschl and VAS score sustained until the third year. We suggest that autologous blood injection for the treatment of recalcitrant lateral epicondylitis is an effective, safe and successful procedure in the long-term.

  18. Autologous blood preparations rich in platelets, fibrin and growth factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fioravanti, C; Frustaci, I; Armellin, E; Condò, R; Arcuri, C; Cerroni, L

    2015-01-01

    Bone regeneration is often needed prior to dental implant treatment due to the lack of adequate quantity and quality after infectious diseases. The greatest regenerative power was obtained with autologous tissue, primarily the bone alive, taken from the same site or adjacent sites, up to the use centrifugation of blood with the selection of the parts with the greatest potential regenerative. In fact, various techniques and technologies were chronologically successive to cope with an ever better preparation of these concentrates of blood. Our aim is to review these advances and discuss the ways in which platelet concentrates may provide such unexpected beneficial therapeutic effects. The research has been carried out in the MEDLINE and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials database by choosing keywords as "platelet rich plasma", "platelet rich fibrin", "platelet growth factors", and "bone regeneration" and "dentistry". Autologous platelet rich plasma is a safe and low cost procedure to deliver growth factors for bone and soft tissue healing. The great heterogeneity of clinical outcomes can be explained by the different PRP products with qualitative and quantitative difference among substance.

  19. Illness intrusiveness among survivors of autologous blood and marrow transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmer, A D; Elliott, M E; Abbey, S E; Raiz, L; Keating, A; Beanlands, H J; McCay, E; Messner, H A; Lipton, J H; Devins, G M

    2001-12-15

    Illness-induced disruptions to lifestyles, activities, and interests (i.e., illness intrusiveness) compromise subjective well-being. The authors measured illness intrusiveness in autologous blood and bone marrow transplantation (ABMT) survivors and compared the results with survivors of solid organ transplants. Forty-four of 64 consecutive ABMT survivors referred to the University of Toronto ABMT long-term follow-up clinic completed the Illness Intrusiveness Ratings Scale (IIRS), the Affect Balance Scale (ABS), the Atkinson Life Happiness Rating (ATKLH), the Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS), and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D) Scale. Mean time from ABMT to evaluation was 4.6 +/- 2.8 years. All patients were in remission or had stable disease at the time of evaluation. Autologous blood and bone marrow transplantation patients' IIRS scores were compared with scores reported by recipients of kidney (n = 357), liver (n = 150), lung (n = 77), and heart (n = 60) transplants. Mean IIRS score for the 44 ABMT patients was 37.2 +/- 17 (maximum possible score, 91; minimum possible score, 13). Higher IIRS scores correlated with lower scores on the ABS (r = -0.54; P work, financial situation, and active recreation. Despite achieving a remission after ABMT, patients continue to experience illness intrusiveness compromising subjective well-being. Copyright 2001 American Cancer Society.

  20. Calculations for reproducible autologous skin cell-spray grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban-Vives, Roger; Young, Matthew T; Zhu, Toby; Beiriger, Justin; Pekor, Chris; Ziembicki, Jenny; Corcos, Alain; Rubin, Peter; Gerlach, Jörg C

    2016-12-01

    Non-cultured, autologous cell-spray grafting is an alternative to mesh grafting for larger partial- and deep partial-thickness burn wounds. The treatment uses a suspension of isolated cells, from a patient's donor site skin tissue, and cell-spray deposition onto the wound that facilitates re-epithelialization. Existing protocols for therapeutic autologous skin cell isolation and cell-spray grafting have defined the donor site area to treatment area ratio of 1:80, substantially exceeding the coverage of conventional mesh grafting. However, ratios of 1:100 are possible by maximizing the wound treatment area with harvested cells from a given donor site skin tissue according to a given burn area. Although cell isolation methods are very well described in the literature, a rational approach addressing critical aspects of these techniques are of interest in planning clinical study protocols. We considered in an experimental study the cell yield as a function of the donor site skin tissue, the cell density for spray grafting, the liquid spray volume, the sprayed distribution area, and the percentage of surface coverage. The experimental data was then used for the development of constants and mathematical equations to give a rationale for the cell isolation and cell-spray grafting processes and in planning for clinical studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  1. Autophosphorylation of JAK2 on tyrosines 221 and 570 regulates its activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Argetsinger, Lawrence S; Kouadio, Jean-Louis K; Steen, Hanno

    2004-01-01

    or which of the 49 tyrosines in JAK2 are autophosphorylated. In this study, mass spectrometry and two-dimensional peptide mapping were used to determine that tyrosines 221, 570, and 1007 in JAK2 are autophosphorylated. Phosphorylation of tyrosine 570 is particularly robust. In response to growth hormone......, JAK2 was rapidly and transiently phosphorylated at tyrosines 221 and 570, returning to basal levels by 60 min. Analysis of the sequences surrounding tyrosines 221 and 570 in JAK2 and tyrosines in other proteins that are phosphorylated in response to ligands that activate JAK2 suggests that the YXX......[L/I/V] motif is one of the motifs recognized by JAK2. Experiments using JAK2 with tyrosines 221 and 570 mutated to phenylalanine suggest that tyrosines 221 and 570 in JAK2 may serve as regulatory sites in JAK2, with phosphorylation of tyrosine 221 increasing kinase activity and phosphorylation of tyrosine 570...

  2. Allosteric inhibition of SHP2 phosphatase inhibits cancers driven by receptor tyrosine kinases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ying-Nan P.; LaMarche, Matthew J.; Chan, Ho Man; Fekkes, Peter; Garcia-Fortanet, Jorge; Acker, Michael G.; Antonakos, Brandon; Chen, Christine Hiu-Tung; Chen, Zhouliang; Cooke, Vesselina G.; Dobson, Jason R.; Deng, Zhan; Fei, Feng; Firestone, Brant; Fodor, Michelle; Fridrich, Cary; Gao, Hui; Grunenfelder, Denise; Hao, Huai-Xiang; Jacob, Jaison; Ho, Samuel; Hsiao, Kathy; Kang, Zhao B.; Karki, Rajesh; Kato, Mitsunori; Larrow, Jay; La Bonte, Laura R.; Lenoir, Francois; Liu, Gang; Liu, Shumei; Majumdar, Dyuti; Meyer, Matthew J.; Palermo, Mark; Perez, Lawrence; Pu, Minying; Price, Edmund; Quinn, Christopher; Shakya, Subarna; Shultz, Michael D.; Slisz, Joanna; Venkatesan, Kavitha; Wang, Ping; Warmuth, Markus; Williams, Sarah; Yang, Guizhi; Yuan, Jing; Zhang, Ji-Hu; Zhu, Ping; Ramsey, Timothy; Keen, Nicholas J.; Sellers, William R.; Stams, Travis; Fortin , Pascal D. (Novartis)

    2016-06-29

    The non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP2, encoded by PTPN11, has an important role in signal transduction downstream of growth factor receptor signalling and was the first reported oncogenic tyrosine phosphatase1. Activating mutations of SHP2 have been associated with developmental pathologies such as Noonan syndrome and are found in multiple cancer types, including leukaemia, lung and breast cancer and neuroblastoma1, 2, 3, 4, 5. SHP2 is ubiquitously expressed and regulates cell survival and proliferation primarily through activation of the RAS–ERK signalling pathway2, 3. It is also a key mediator of the programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) and B- and T-lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA) immune checkpoint pathways6, 7. Reduction of SHP2 activity suppresses tumour cell growth and is a potential target of cancer therapy8, 9. Here we report the discovery of a highly potent (IC50 = 0.071 μM), selective and orally bioavailable small-molecule SHP2 inhibitor, SHP099, that stabilizes SHP2 in an auto-inhibited conformation. SHP099 concurrently binds to the interface of the N-terminal SH2, C-terminal SH2, and protein tyrosine phosphatase domains, thus inhibiting SHP2 activity through an allosteric mechanism. SHP099 suppresses RAS–ERK signalling to inhibit the proliferation of receptor-tyrosine-kinase-driven human cancer cells in vitro and is efficacious in mouse tumour xenograft models. Together, these data demonstrate that pharmacological inhibition of SHP2 is a valid therapeutic approach for the treatment of cancers.

  3. Tyrosine phosphorylation of the human guanylyl cyclase C receptor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    **Laboratory of Cellular Carcinogenesis and Tumor Promotion, National Cancer Institute, National Institute of Health, .... This construct expresses the N-terminal 330 amino acids ... C-terminal 112 amino acids of GCC as fusion with GST.

  4. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors: Multi-targeted or single-targeted?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broekman, Fleur; Giovannetti, Elisa; Peters, Godefridus J

    2011-02-10

    Since in most tumors multiple signaling pathways are involved, many of the inhibitors in clinical development are designed to affect a wide range of targeted kinases. The most important tyrosine kinase families in the development of tyrosine kinase inhibitors are the ABL, SCR, platelet derived growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor and epidermal growth factor receptor families. Both multi-kinase inhibitors and single-kinase inhibitors have advantages and disadvantages, which are related to potential resistance mechanisms, pharmacokinetics, selectivity and tumor environment. In different malignancies various tyrosine kinases are mutated or overexpressed and several resistance mechanisms exist. Pharmacokinetics is influenced by interindividual differences and differs for two single targeted inhibitors or between patients treated by the same tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Different tyrosine kinase inhibitors have various mechanisms to achieve selectivity, while differences in gene expression exist between tumor and stromal cells. Considering these aspects, one type of inhibitor can generally not be preferred above the other, but will depend on the specific genetic constitution of the patient and the tumor, allowing personalized therapy. The most effective way of cancer treatment by using tyrosine kinase inhibitors is to consider each patient/tumor individually and to determine the strategy that specifically targets the consequences of altered (epi)genetics of the tumor. This strategy might result in treatment by a single multi kinase inhibitor for one patient, but in treatment by a couple of single kinase inhibitors for other patients.

  5. Synthesis of 14C-labelled α-methyl tyrosine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajagopal, S.; Venkatachalam, T.K.; Conway, T.; Diksic, M.

    1992-01-01

    A new route for the preparation of radioactively labelled α-methyl L-tyrosine is described. The labelling at the α position has been successfully achieved with 14 C-, 11 C- (very preliminary, unpublished), and 3 H-labelled methyl iodide. A detailed report on 14 C-labelling at the α position and the hydrolysis of 4-methoxy α-methyl phenylalanine is presented. The alkylation proceeds via the methylation of the carbanion of N-benzylidene 4-methoxy phenylalanine methyl ester 2. Hydrolysis of 4-O methyl tyrosine to tyrosine by HBr and HI were analysed and used in the optimization of the hydrolysis conditions of 4. Enantiomeric purity of the isolated L-isomer has been found to be 99% as judged by HPLC. Pseudo first-order rate constant for the hydrolysis of 14 C-labelled α-methyl 4-methoxy phenyl alanine methyl ester was determined. Preliminary findings of the 3 H- and 11 C-radiolabelled α-methyl tyrosine (methyl labelled) are also mentioned. For the first time it was shown that α-methyl D,L-tyrosine can be separated into enantiomerically pure α-methyl D- and L-tyrosine using a CHIRALPAK WH column. (author)

  6. Novel Mutations in the Tyrosine Hydroxylase Gene in the First Czech Patient with Tyrosine Hydroxylase Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Szentiványi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tyrosine hydroxylase deficiency manifests mainly in early childhood and includes two clinical phenotypes: an infantile progressive hypokinetic-rigid syndrome with dystonia (type A and a neonatal complex encephalopathy (type B. The biochemical diagnostics is exclusively based on the quantitative determination of the neurotransmitters or their metabolites in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. The implementation of neurotransmitter analysis in clinical praxis is necessary for early diagnosis and adequate treatment. Neurotransmitter metabolites in CSF were analyzed in 82 children (at the age 1 month to 17 years with clinical suspicion for neurometabolic disorders using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC with electrochemical detection. The CSF level of homovanillic acid (HVA was markedly decreased in three children (64, 79 and 94 nmol/l in comparison to age related controls (lower limit 218–450 nmol/l. Neurological findings including severe psychomotor retardation, quadruspasticity and microcephaly accompanied with marked dystonia, excessive sweating in the first patient was compatible with the diagnosis of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH deficiency (type B and subsequent molecular analysis revealed two novel heterozygous mutations c.636A>C and c.1124G>C in the TH gene. The treatment with L-DOPA/carbidopa resulted in the improvement of dystonia. Magnetic resonance imaging studies in two other patients with microcephaly revealed postischaemic brain damage, therefore secondary HVA deficit was considered in these children. Diagnostic work-up in patients with neurometabolic disorders should include analysis of neurotransmitter metabolites in CSF.

  7. Salivary peptide tyrosine-tyrosine 3-36 modulates ingestive behavior without inducing taste aversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado, Maria D; Sergeyev, Valeriy G; Acosta, Andres; Spegele, Michael; La Sala, Michael; Waler, Nickolas J; Chiriboga-Hurtado, Juan; Currlin, Seth W; Herzog, Herbert; Dotson, Cedrick D; Gorbatyuk, Oleg S; Zolotukhin, Sergei

    2013-11-20

    Hormone peptide tyrosine-tyrosine (PYY) is secreted into circulation from the gut L-endocrine cells in response to food intake, thus inducing satiation during interaction with its preferred receptor, Y2R. Clinical applications of systemically administered PYY for the purpose of reducing body weight were compromised as a result of the common side effect of visceral sickness. We describe here a novel approach of elevating PYY in saliva in mice, which, although reliably inducing strong anorexic responses, does not cause aversive reactions. The augmentation of salivary PYY activated forebrain areas known to mediate feeding, hunger, and satiation while minimally affecting brainstem chemoreceptor zones triggering nausea. By comparing neuronal pathways activated by systemic versus salivary PYY, we identified a metabolic circuit associated with Y2R-positive cells in the oral cavity and extending through brainstem nuclei into hypothalamic satiety centers. The discovery of this alternative circuit that regulates ingestive behavior without inducing taste aversion may open the possibility of a therapeutic application of PYY for the treatment of obesity via direct oral application.

  8. Alzheimer's disease pathological lesions activate the spleen tyrosine kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweig, Jonas Elias; Yao, Hailan; Beaulieu-Abdelahad, David; Ait-Ghezala, Ghania; Mouzon, Benoit; Crawford, Fiona; Mullan, Michael; Paris, Daniel

    2017-09-06

    The pathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by dystrophic neurites (DNs) surrounding extracellular Aβ-plaques, microgliosis, astrogliosis, intraneuronal tau hyperphosphorylation and aggregation. We have previously shown that inhibition of the spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) lowers Aβ production and tau hyperphosphorylation in vitro and in vivo. Here, we demonstrate that Aβ-overexpressing Tg PS1/APPsw, Tg APPsw mice, and tau overexpressing Tg Tau P301S mice exhibit a pathological activation of Syk compared to wild-type littermates. Syk activation is occurring in a subset of microglia and is age-dependently increased in Aβ-plaque-associated dystrophic neurites of Tg PS1/APPsw and Tg APPsw mice. In Tg Tau P301S mice, a pure model of tauopathy, activated Syk occurs in neurons that show an accumulation of misfolded and hyperphosphorylated tau in the cortex and hippocampus. Interestingly, the tau pathology is exacerbated in neurons that display high levels of Syk activation supporting a role of Syk in the formation of tau pathological species in vivo. Importantly, human AD brain sections show both pathological Syk activation in DNs around Aβ deposits and in neurons immunopositive for pathological tau species recapitulating the data obtained in transgenic mouse models of AD. Additionally, we show that Syk overexpression leads to increased tau accumulation and promotes tau hyperphosphorylation at multiple epitopes in human neuron-like SH-SY5Y cells, further supporting a role of Syk in the formation of tau pathogenic species. Collectively, our data show that Syk activation occurs following Aβ deposition and the formation of tau pathological species. Given that we have previously shown that Syk activation also promotes Aβ formation and tau hyperphosphorylation, our data suggest that AD pathological lesions may be self-propagating via a Syk dependent mechanism highlighting Syk as an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of AD.

  9. Autologous serum improves bone formation in a primary stable silica-embedded nanohydroxyapatite bone substitute in combination with mesenchymal stem cells and rhBMP-2 in the sheep model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boos AM

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Anja M Boos,1,* Annika Weigand,1,* Gloria Deschler,1 Thomas Gerber,2 Andreas Arkudas,1 Ulrich Kneser,1 Raymund E Horch,1 Justus P Beier11Department of Plastic and Hand Surgery, University Hospital of Erlangen, Friedrich-Alexander-University of Erlangen-Nürnberg FAU, Erlangen, 2Institute of Physics, University of Rostock, Rostock, Germany *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: New therapeutic strategies are required for critical size bone defects, because the gold standard of transplanting autologous bone from an unharmed area of the body often leads to several severe side effects and disadvantages for the patient. For years, tissue engineering approaches have been seeking a stable, axially vascularized transplantable bone replacement suitable for transplantation into the recipient bed with pre-existing insufficient conditions. For this reason, the arteriovenous loop model was developed and various bone substitutes have been vascularized. However, it has not been possible thus far to engineer a primary stable and axially vascularized transplantable bone substitute. For that purpose, a primary stable silica-embedded nanohydroxyapatite (HA bone substitute in combination with blood, bone marrow, expanded, or directly retransplanted mesenchymal stem cells, recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (rhBMP-2, and different carrier materials (fibrin, cell culture medium, autologous serum was tested subcutaneously for 4 or 12 weeks in the sheep model. Autologous serum lead to an early matrix change during degradation of the bone substitute and formation of new bone tissue. The best results were achieved in the group combining mesenchymal stem cells expanded with 60 µg/mL rhBMP-2 in autologous serum. Better ingrowth of fibrovascular tissue could be detected in the autologous serum group compared with the control (fibrin. Osteoclastic activity indicating an active bone remodeling process was observed after 4 weeks, particularly

  10. Long term results in refractory tennis elbow using autologous blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naseem ul Gani

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Tennis elbow (TE is one of the commonest myotendinosis. Different treatment options are available and autologous blood injection has emerged as the one of the acceptable modalities of treatment. Long term studies over a larger group of patients are however lacking. The purpose of this study was to evaluate these patients on longer durations. One-hundred and twenty patients of TE, who failed to respond to conventional treatment including local steroid injections were taken up for this prospective study over the period from year 2005 to 2011 and were followed up for the minimum of 3 years (range 3-9 years. Two mL of autologous blood was taken from the ipsilateral limb and injected into the lateral epicondyle. The effectiveness of the procedure was assessed by Pain Rating Sscale and Nirschl Staging, which was monitored before the procedure, at first week, monthly for first three months, at 6 months and then 3 monthly for first year, six monthly for next 2 years and then yearly. Statistical analysis was done and a P value of <0.05 was taken as significant. The patients (76 females and 44 males were evaluated after procedure. The mean age group was 40.67±8.21. The mean follow up was 5.7±1.72 (range 3 to 9 years. The mean pain score and Nirschl stage before the procedure was 3.3±0.9 and 6.2±0.82 respectively. At final follow up the pain score and Nirschl were 1.1±0.9 and 1.5±0.91 respectively. Autologous blood injection was found to be one of the modalities for treatment of TE. Being cheap, available and easy method of treatment, it should be considered as a treatment modality before opting for the surgery. Universal guidelines for the management of tennis elbow should be made as there is lot of controversy regarding the treatment.

  11. Quality of harvested autologous platelets compared with stored donor platelets for use after cardiopulmonary bypass procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowther, M; Ford, I; Jeffrey, R R; Urbaniak, S J; Greaves, M

    2000-10-01

    Platelet dysfunction has a major contribution in bleeding after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and transfusion of platelets is frequently used to secure haemostasis. Allogeneic platelets prepared for transfusion are functionally impaired. Autologous platelets harvested preoperatively require a shorter storage time before transfusion and their use also avoids the risks associated with transfusion of allogeneic blood products. For the first time, we have compared the functional quality of autologous platelets with allogeneic platelets prepared by two methods, immediately before infusion. Platelet activation was assessed by P-selectin expression and fibrinogen binding using flow cytometry. We also monitored the effects of CPB surgery and re-infusion of autologous platelets on platelet function. Autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP) contained a significantly lower (P platelets compared with allogeneic platelet preparations, and also contained a significantly higher (P platelets. Allogeneic platelets prepared by donor apheresis were more activated and less responsive than those produced by centrifugation of whole blood. In patients' blood, the percentage of platelets expressing P-selectin or binding fibrinogen increased significantly after CPB (P platelets responsive to in vitro agonists was decreased (P platelet activation during the procedure. The percentage of activated platelets decreased (statistically not significant) after re-infusion of autologous PRP. P-selectin expression had returned to pre-CPB levels 24 h post-operatively. Autologous platelet preparations display minimal activation, but remain responsive. Conservation of platelet function may contribute to the potential clinical benefits of autologous transfusion in cardiopulmonary bypass.

  12. Effect of hyperbaric oxygen therapy combined with autologous platelet concentrate applied in rabbit fibula fraction healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Cesar Fagundes Neves

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The purpose is to study the effects of hyperbaric oxygen therapy and autologous platelet concentrates in healing the fibula bone of rabbits after induced fractures. METHODS: A total of 128 male New Zealand albino rabbits, between 6-8 months old, were subjected to a total osteotomy of the proximal portion of the right fibula. After surgery, the animals were divided into four groups (n = 32 each: control group, in which animals were subjected to osteotomy; autologous platelet concentrate group, in which animals were subjected to osteotomy and autologous platelet concentrate applied at the fracture site; hyperbaric oxygen group, in which animals were subjected to osteotomy and 9 consecutive daily hyperbaric oxygen therapy sessions; and autologous platelet concentrate and hyperbaric oxygen group, in which animals were subjected to osteotomy, autologous platelet concentrate applied at the fracture site, and 9 consecutive daily hyperbaric oxygen therapy sessions. Each group was divided into 4 subgroups according to a pre-determined euthanasia time points: 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks postoperative. After euthanasia at a specific time point, the fibula containing the osseous callus was prepared histologically and stained with hematoxylin and eosin or picrosirius red. RESULTS: Autologous platelet concentrates and hyperbaric oxygen therapy, applied together or separately, increased the rate of bone healing compared with the control group. CONCLUSION: Hyperbaric oxygen therapy and autologous platelet concentrate combined increased the rate of bone healing in this experimental model.

  13. Autologous glioma cell vaccine admixed with interleukin-4 gene transfected fibroblasts in the treatment of patients with malignant gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torres-Trejo Alejandro

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prognosis for malignant gliomas remains dismal. We addressed the safety, feasibility and preliminary clinical activity of the vaccinations using autologous glioma cells and interleukin (IL-4 gene transfected fibroblasts. Methods In University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI protocol 95-033, adult participants with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM or anaplastic astrocytoma (AA received gross total resection (GTR of the recurrent tumors, followed by two vaccinations with autologous fibroblasts retrovirally transfected with TFG-IL4-Neo-TK vector admixed with irradiated autologous glioma cells. In UPCI 99-111, adult participants with newly diagnosed GBM or AA, following GTR and radiation therapy, received two intradermal vaccinations with the TFG-IL4-Neo-TK-transfected fibroblasts admixed with type-1 dendritic cells (DC loaded with autologous tumor lysate. The participants were evaluated for occurrence of adverse events, immune response, and clinical response by radiological imaging. Results and Discussion In UPCI 95-033, only 2 of 6 participants received the vaccinations. Four other participants were withdrawn from the trial because of tumor progression prior to production of the cellular vaccine. However, both participants who received two vaccinations demonstrated encouraging immunological and clinical responses. Biopsies from the local vaccine sites from one participant displayed IL-4 dose-dependent infiltration of CD4+ as well as CD8+ T cells. Interferon (IFN-γ Enzyme-Linked Immuno-SPOT (ELISPOT assay in another human leukocyte antigen (HLA-A2+ participant demonstrated systemic T-cell responses against an HLA-A2-restricted glioma-associated antigen (GAA epitope EphA2883–891. Moreover, both participants demonstrated clinical and radiological improvement with no evidence of allergic encephalitis, although both participants eventually succumbed with the tumor recurrence. In 99-111, 5 of 6 enrolled participants

  14. Small Molecule Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors of ErbB2/HER2/Neu in the Treatment of Aggressive Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard L. Schroeder

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 is a member of the erbB class of tyrosine kinase receptors. These proteins are normally expressed at the surface of healthy cells and play critical roles in the signal transduction cascade in a myriad of biochemical pathways responsible for cell growth and differentiation. However, it is widely known that amplification and subsequent overexpression of the HER2 encoding oncogene results in unregulated cell proliferation in an aggressive form of breast cancer known as HER2-positive breast cancer. Existing therapies such as trastuzumab (Herceptin® and lapatinib (Tyverb/Tykerb®, a monoclonal antibody inhibitor and a dual EGFR/HER2 kinase inhibitor, respectively, are currently used in the treatment of HER2-positive cancers, although issues with high recurrence and acquired resistance still remain. Small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors provide attractive therapeutic targets, as they are able to block cell signaling associated with many of the proposed mechanisms for HER2 resistance. In this regard we aim to present a review on the available HER2 tyrosine kinase inhibitors, as well as those currently in development. The use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors as sequential or combinatorial therapeutic strategies with other HER family inhibitors is also discussed.

  15. Rapid Phospho-Turnover by Receptor Tyrosine Kinases Impacts Downstream Signaling and Drug Binding

    OpenAIRE

    Kleiman, Laura B.; Maiwald, Thomas; Conzelmann, Holger; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Sorger, Peter K.

    2011-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptors (ErbB1–4) are oncogenic receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) that regulate diverse cellular processes. In this study, we combine measurement and mathematical modeling to quantify phospho-turnover at ErbB receptors in human cells and to determine the consequences for signaling and drug binding. We find that phosphotyrosine residues on ErbB1 have half-lives of a few seconds and therefore turn over 100–1000 times in the course of a typical immediate-early response t...

  16. Transcriptomic biomarkers of altered erythropoiesis to detect autologous blood transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamin, Olivier; Mignot, Jonathan; Kuuranne, Tiia; Saugy, Martial; Leuenberger, Nicolas

    2018-03-01

    Autologous blood transfusion is a powerful means of improving performance and remains one of the most challenging methods to detect. Recent investigations have identified 3 candidate reticulocytes genes whose expression was significantly influenced by blood transfusion. Using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction as an alternative quantitative method, the present study supports that delta-aminolevulinate synthase 2 (ALAS2), carbonic anhydrase (CA1), and solute carrier family 4 member 1 (SLC4A1) genes are down-regulated post-transfusion. The expression of these genes exhibited stronger correlation with immature reticulocyte fraction than with reticulocytes percentage. Moreover, the repression of reticulocytes' gene expression was more pronounced than the diminution of immature reticulocyte fraction and reticulocyte percentage following blood transfusion. It suggests that the 3 candidate genes are reliable predictors of bone marrow's response to blood transfusion and that they represent potential biomarkers for the detection of this method prohibited in sports. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Immunisation of colorectal cancer patients with autologous tumour cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, Alice; Stenholm, Anna Catharina Olsen; Kronborg, O

    1998-01-01

    Patients with colorectal cancer were entered into a clinical phase I trial of immunotherapy with an autologous tumour cell/bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine. We attempted to describe the possible effects and side effects of the immunisation, and further to investigate whether expression...... of immune-response-related surface molecules on the tumour cells in the vaccine correlated with survival. The first and second vaccine comprised of 107 irradiated tumour cells mixed with BCG, the third of irradiated tumour cells only. Thirty-nine patients were considered, but only 6 patients fulfilled...... the criteria for inclusion. No serious side effects were observed. With three years of observation time, two patients are healthy, while the rest have had recurrence, and two of them have died. In all vaccines, all tumour cells expressed HLA class I, some expressed HLA class II and none expressed CD80...

  18. Is gender influencing the biomechanical results after autologous chondrocyte implantation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuz, Peter C; Müller, Sebastian; Erggelet, Christoph; von Keudell, Arvind; Tischer, Thomas; Kaps, Christian; Niemeyer, Philipp; Hirschmüller, Anja

    2014-01-01

    The influence of gender on the biomechanical outcome after autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) including isokinetic muscle strength measurements has not been investigated. The present prospective study was performed to evaluate gender-specific differences in the biomechanical function 48 months after ACI. Fifty-two patients (mean age 35.6 ± 8.5 years) that met our inclusion criteria, underwent ACI with Bioseed C(®) and were evaluated with the KOOS score preoperatively, 6, 12 and 48 months after surgery. At final follow-up, 44 out of the 52 patients underwent biomechanical evaluation with isokinetic strength measurements of both knees. All data were evaluated separately for men and women and compared for each time interval using the Mann-Whitney U test. Clinical scores improved significantly over the whole study period (p genders. Isokinetic muscle strength measures are significantly worse in women (p role for the explanation of gender-specific results after ACI.

  19. MR imaging of autologous chondrocyte implantation of the knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, S.L.J.; Connell, D.A.; Saifuddin, A.; Skinner, J.A.; Briggs, T.W.R. [RNOH Stanmore, Department of Radiology, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom)

    2006-05-15

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) is a surgical technique that is increasingly being used in the treatment of full-thickness defects of articular cartilage in the knee. It involves the arthroscopic harvesting and in vitro culture of chondrocytes that are subsequently implanted into a previously identified chondral defect. The aim is to produce a repair tissue that closely resembles hyaline articular cartilage that gradually becomes incorporated, restoring joint congruity. Over the long term, it is hoped that this will prevent the progression of full-thickness articular cartilage defects to osteoarthritis. This article reviews the indications and operative procedure performed in ACI. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences that provide optimal visualization of articular cartilage in the post-operative period are discussed. Normal appearances of ACI on MRI are presented along with common complications that are encountered with this technique. (orig.)

  20. Radiation-induced autologous in situ tumor vaccines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guha, Chandan

    2014-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) has been used as a definitive treatment for many solid tumors. While tumoricidal properties of RT are instrumental for standard clinical application, irradiated tumors can potentially serve as a source of tumor antigens in vivo, where dying tumor cells would release tumor antigens and danger signals and serve as autologous in situ tumor vaccines. Using murine tumor models of prostate, metastatic lung cancer and melanoma, we have demonstrated evidence of radiation-enhanced tumor-specific immune response that resulted in improved primary tumor control and reduction in systemic metastasis and cure. We will discuss the immunogenic properties of RT and determine how immunotherapeutic approaches can synergize with RT in boosting immune cells cell function. (author)

  1. Autologous blood transfusion in open heart surgeries under cardio-pulmonary bypass - Clinical appraisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Sartaj Hussain

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Autologous blood withdrawal before instituting cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB protects the platelets, preserve red cell mass and reduce allogeneic transfusion requirements. Ideal condition for autologous blood donation is elective cardiac surgery where there is a high probability of blood transfusion. The purpose of this study was to assess the role of preoperative autologous blood donation in cardiac surgeries. Out of 150 patients registered, 50 cases were excluded on the basis of hemoglobin content ( [J Med Allied Sci 2017; 7(1.000: 48-54

  2. Chronic Spinal Injury Repair by Olfactory Bulb Ensheathing Glia and Feasibility for Autologous Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Quiles, Cintia; Santos-Benito, Fernando F.; Llamusí, M. Beatriz; Ramón-Cueto, Almudena

    2009-01-01

    Olfactory bulb ensheathing glia (OB-OEG) promote repair of spinal cord injury (SCI) in rats after transplantation at acute or subacute (up to 45 days) stages. The most relevant clinical scenario in humans, however, is chronic SCI, in which no more major cellular or molecular changes occur at the injury site; this occurs after the third month in rodents. Whether adult OB-OEG grafts promote repair of severe chronic SCI has not been previously addressed. Rats with complete SCI that were transplanted with OB-OEG 4 months after injury exhibited progressive improvement in motor function and axonal regeneration from different brainstem nuclei across and beyond the SCI site. A positive correlation between motor outcome and axonal regeneration suggested a role for brainstem neurons in the recovery. Functional and histological outcomes did not differ at subacute or chronic stages. Thus, autologous transplantation is a feasible approach as there is time for patient stabilization and OEG preparation in human chronic SCI; the healing effects of OB-OEG on established injuries may offer new therapeutic opportunities for chronic SCI patients. PMID:19915486

  3. Autologous Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived β-Like Cells for Diabetes Cellular Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millman, Jeffrey R; Pagliuca, Felicia W

    2017-05-01

    Development of stem cell technologies for cell replacement therapy has progressed rapidly in recent years. Diabetes has long been seen as one of the first applications for stem cell-derived cells because of the loss of only a single cell type-the insulin-producing β-cell. Recent reports have detailed strategies that overcome prior hurdles to generate functional β-like cells from human pluripotent stem cells in vitro, including from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). Even with this accomplishment, addressing immunological barriers to transplantation remains a major challenge for the field. The development of clinically relevant hiPSC derivation methods from patients and demonstration that these cells can be differentiated into β-like cells presents a new opportunity to treat diabetes without immunosuppression or immunoprotective encapsulation or with only targeted protection from autoimmunity. This review focuses on the current status in generating and transplanting autologous β-cells for diabetes cell therapy, highlighting the unique advantages and challenges of this approach. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  4. Brief report: reconstruction of joint hyaline cartilage by autologous progenitor cells derived from ear elastic cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Mitsuru; Kobayashi, Shinji; Takebe, Takanori; Kan, Hiroomi; Yabuki, Yuichiro; Matsuzaki, Takahisa; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi Y; Nakabayashi, Seiichiro; Ik, Lee Jeong; Maegawa, Jiro; Taniguchi, Hideki

    2014-03-01

    In healthy joints, hyaline cartilage covering the joint surfaces of bones provides cushioning due to its unique mechanical properties. However, because of its limited regenerative capacity, age- and sports-related injuries to this tissue may lead to degenerative arthropathies, prompting researchers to investigate a variety of cell sources. We recently succeeded in isolating human cartilage progenitor cells from ear elastic cartilage. Human cartilage progenitor cells have high chondrogenic and proliferative potential to form elastic cartilage with long-term tissue maintenance. However, it is unknown whether ear-derived cartilage progenitor cells can be used to reconstruct hyaline cartilage, which has different mechanical and histological properties from elastic cartilage. In our efforts to develop foundational technologies for joint hyaline cartilage repair and reconstruction, we conducted this study to obtain an answer to this question. We created an experimental canine model of knee joint cartilage damage, transplanted ear-derived autologous cartilage progenitor cells. The reconstructed cartilage was rich in proteoglycans and showed unique histological characteristics similar to joint hyaline cartilage. In addition, mechanical properties of the reconstructed tissues were higher than those of ear cartilage and equal to those of joint hyaline cartilage. This study suggested that joint hyaline cartilage was reconstructed from ear-derived cartilage progenitor cells. It also demonstrated that ear-derived cartilage progenitor cells, which can be harvested by a minimally invasive method, would be useful for reconstructing joint hyaline cartilage in patients with degenerative arthropathies. © AlphaMed Press.

  5. Autologous Mesenchymal Stem Cell and Islet Cotransplantation: Safety and Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongjun; Strange, Charlie; Nietert, Paul J; Wang, Jingjing; Turnbull, Taylor L; Cloud, Colleen; Owczarski, Stefanie; Shuford, Betsy; Duke, Tara; Gilkeson, Gary; Luttrell, Louis; Hermayer, Kathie; Fernandes, Jyotika; Adams, David B; Morgan, Katherine A

    2018-01-01

    Islet engraftment after transplantation is impaired by high rates of islet/β cell death caused by cellular stressors and poor graft vascularization. We studied whether cotransplantation of ex vivo expanded autologous bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) with islets is safe and beneficial in chronic pancreatitis patients undergoing total pancreatectomy with islet autotransplantation. MSCs were harvested from the bone marrow of three islet autotransplantation patients and expanded at our current Good Manufacturing Practices (cGMP) facility. On the day of islet transplantation, an average dose of 20.0 ± 2.6 ×10 6 MSCs was infused with islets via the portal vein. Adverse events and glycemic control at baseline, 6, and 12 months after transplantation were compared with data from 101 historical control patients. No adverse events directly related to the MSC infusions were observed. MSC patients required lower amounts of insulin during the peritransplantation period (p = .02 vs. controls) and had lower 12-month fasting blood glucose levels (p = .02 vs. controls), smaller C-peptide declines over 6 months (p = .01 vs. controls), and better quality of life compared with controls. In conclusion, our pilot study demonstrates that autologous MSC and islet cotransplantation may be a safe and potential strategy to improve islet engraftment after transplantation. (Clinicaltrials.gov registration number: NCT02384018). Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2018;7:11-19. © 2017 The Authors Stem Cells Translational Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  6. Tear trough – Anatomy and treatment by autologous fat grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Yung Chia

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Tear trough is the main irregularity at midface, of which treatment is difficult. There is no agreement in literature about its anatomy and best treatment. The author presented an anatomical study and personal autologous fat grafting technique for tear trough treatment. Anatomical dissections were done on two fresh cadavers to examine the skin, subcutaneous, muscle and bone layers, spaces, and attachments. Safety and efficacy were evaluated via retrospective analysis of the last 200 consecutive procedures performed by the author. Tear trough is caused by the abrupt transition of the palpebral orbicular oculi muscle (OOM (i.e., thin skin without subcutaneous fat compartment to the orbital OOM (i.e., thicker skin with malar fat compartment. The tear trough region is located at the OOM bony origin at the medial canthus where no specific ligament was found. The grafted fat volume stabilized at two or three months after the procedure, instead of six months as stated in literature, with excellent results and no severe complications. Tear trough is a personal characteristic, a natural anatomical depression caused by subcutaneous irregularity and can worsen with age. The lack of volume is not effectively corrected by surgeries and thus it must be filled. Fat grafting has several advantages over alloplastic fillers, although it may be more difficult. Fat graft is autologous and abundant, and tissue transplantation could enhance skin quality. Fat grafting is a simple, safe, and effective solution for adding extra volume to correct the deflation phenomenon of the midface aging process. There is no specific anatomical plane for volume injection; the fat graft must be evenly distributed in the deep and superficial plane for uniformity.

  7. Factors affecting the autologous mixed lymphocyte reaction in kidney transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, L.; Flaa, C.; Jaffe, D.; Strauss, J.; Kyriakides, G.K.; Miller, J.

    1983-01-01

    In long-term well adapted kidney transplant recipients we have found a close correlation between the T helper (TH):T suppressor/cytotoxic (TS/C) subset ratios and the presence of T cells that respond in the autologous mixed lymphocyte reaction (AMLR). In 21 recipients with T cell E rosette levels ranging between 53 and 86% and TH:TS/C ratios between 0.15 to 2.10, ratios of greater than 0.8 correlated with AMLR responses (13/13), and ratios of less than 0.8 with AMLR nonreactivity (7/7). By contrast, the allogeneic MLR showed no apparent correlation with the TH:TS/C ratios or with the AMLR pre- or postoperatively. It was found that the AMLR in 22 of 23 normal individuals was markedly inhibited by autologous T cells obtained from peripheral blood lymphocytes, exposed to 3,000 rad (Tx) and added as a third component to the cultures. In contrast, 13 of 13 kidney transplant recipients failed to exhibit this Tx AMLR inhibitory cell population. The ''naturally occurring'' T inhibitory cells, fractionated by an affinity column chromatography procedure into x-irradiated TH and TS/C subsets, inhibited the AMLR to the same extent as unseparated Tx cells. In cell interchange studies performed in four of five HLA identical donor-recipient pairs the Tx cells of the (normal) donor inhibited the recipient AMLR (immunosuppressed), but recipient Tx cells failed to inhibit the donor AMLR. Finally T cells, primed in AMLR and allogeneic MLR for 10 d were tested for AMLR or allogeneic MLR inhibitory activity. Allogeneic MLR primed x-irradiated cells, inhibited both the AMLR and allogeneic MLR while AMLR x-irradiated primed cells inhibited neither reaction. The Tx AMLR inhibitor found in normal peripheral blood, appears to be a cell that is highly sensitive to the effects of biologic or pharmacologic immunosuppressive agents

  8. Fundamentals on the biochemistry of peroxynitrite and protein tyrosine nitration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvina Bartesaghi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In this review we provide an analysis of the biochemistry of peroxynitrite and tyrosine nitration. Peroxynitrite is the product of the diffusion-controlled reaction between superoxide (O2•- and nitric oxide (•NO. This process is in competition with the enzymatic dismutation of O2•- and the diffusion of •NO across cells and tissues and its reaction with molecular targets (e.g. guanylate cyclase. Understanding the kinetics and compartmentalization of the O2•- / •NO interplay is critical to rationalize the shift of •NO from a physiological mediator to a cytotoxic intermediate. Once formed, peroxynitrite (ONOO- and ONOOH; pKa = 6,8 behaves as a strong one and two-electron oxidant towards a series of biomolecules including transition metal centers and thiols. In addition, peroxynitrite anion can secondarily evolve to secondary radicals either via its fast reaction with CO2 or through proton-catalyzed homolysis. Thus, peroxynitrite can participate in direct (bimolecular and indirect (through secondary radical intermediates oxidation reactions; through these processes peroxynitrite can participate as cytotoxic effector molecule against invading pathogens and/or as an endogenous pathogenic mediator. Peroxynitrite can cause protein tyrosine nitration in vitro and in vivo. Indeed, tyrosine nitration is a hallmark of the reactions of •NO-derived oxidants in cells and tissues and serves as a biomarker of oxidative damage. Protein tyrosine nitration can mediate changes in protein structure and function that affect cell homeostasis. Tyrosine nitration in biological systems is a free radical process that can be promoted either by peroxynitrite-derived radicals or by other related •NO-dependent oxidative processes. Recently, mechanisms responsible of tyrosine nitration in hydrophobic biostructures such as membranes and lipoproteins have been assessed and involve the parallel occurrence and connection with lipid

  9. Autologous albumin enhances the humoral immune response to capsular polysaccharide covalently co-attached to bacteria-sized latex beads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colino, Jesus; Duke, Leah; Snapper, Clifford M.

    2014-01-01

    Abundant autologous proteins, like serum albumin, should be immunologically inert. However, individuals with no apparent predisposition to autoimmune disease can develop immune responses to autologous therapeutic proteins. Protein aggregation is a potential major trigger of these responses. Adsorption of proteins to particles provides macromolecular size and may generate structural changes in the protein, resembling aggregation. Using aldehyde/sulfate latex beads coated with murine serum albumin (MSA), we found that mice mounted MSA-specific IgG responses that were dependent on CD4+ T cells. IgG were specific for MSA adsorbed to solid surfaces and non-cross-reactive with human, bovine or pig albumins. T cells induced in response to MSA, augmented the primary and induced boosted secondary IgG and IgM responses specific for the T cell-independent antigen, capsular polysaccharide of Streptococcus pneumoniae type 14 (PPS14), when the latter was attached to the same bead. Similar to the anti-MSA IgG response, the boosted PPS14-specific IgG secondary response was CD4+ T cell-dependent, displayed a typical carrier effect, and was enhanced by, but did not require, Toll-like receptor stimulation. These results provide a potential mechanism for the induction of responses to autoantigens unable to induce specific T cell responses, and provide new insights into polysaccharide-specific immunity. PMID:24481921

  10. Autologous Cell Delivery to the Skin-Implant Interface via the Lumen of Percutaneous Devices in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Peramo

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Induced tissue regeneration around percutaneous medical implants could be a useful method to prevent the failure of the medical device, especially when the epidermal seal around the implant is disrupted and the implant must be maintained over a long period of time. In this manuscript, a novel concept and technique is introduced in which autologous keratinocytes were delivered to the interfacial area of a skin-implant using the hollow interior of a fixator pin as a conduit. Full thickness human skin explants discarded from surgeries were cultured at the air-liquid interface and were punctured to fit at the bottom of hollow cylindrical stainless steel fixator pins. Autologous keratinocytes, previously extracted from the same piece of skin and cultured separately, were delivered to the specimens thorough the interior of the hollow pins. The delivered cells survived the process and resembled undifferentiated epithelium, with variations in size and shape. Viability was demonstrated by the lack of morphologic evidence of necrosis or apoptosis. Although the cells did not form organized epithelial structures, differentiation toward a keratinocyte phenotype was evident immunohistochemically. These results suggest that an adaptation of this technique could be useful for the treatment of complications arising from the contact between skin and percutaneous devices in vivo.

  11. Genome Therapy of Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1 iPS Cells for Development of Autologous Stem Cell Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yuanzheng; Guo, Xiuming; Santostefano, Katherine; Wang, Yanlin; Reid, Tammy; Zeng, Desmond; Terada, Naohiro; Ashizawa, Tetsuo; Xia, Guangbin

    2016-08-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is caused by expanded Cytosine-Thymine-Guanine (CTG) repeats in the 3'-untranslated region (3' UTR) of the Dystrophia myotonica protein kinase (DMPK) gene, for which there is no effective therapy. The objective of this study is to develop genome therapy in human DM1 induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells to eliminate mutant transcripts and reverse the phenotypes for developing autologous stem cell therapy. The general approach involves targeted insertion of polyA signals (PASs) upstream of DMPK CTG repeats, which will lead to premature termination of transcription and elimination of toxic mutant transcripts. Insertion of PASs was mediated by homologous recombination triggered by site-specific transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN)-induced double-strand break. We found genome-treated DM1 iPS cells continue to maintain pluripotency. The insertion of PASs led to elimination of mutant transcripts and complete disappearance of nuclear RNA foci and reversal of aberrant splicing in linear-differentiated neural stem cells, cardiomyocytes, and teratoma tissues. In conclusion, genome therapy by insertion of PASs upstream of the expanded DMPK CTG repeats prevented the production of toxic mutant transcripts and reversal of phenotypes in DM1 iPS cells and their progeny. These genetically-treated iPS cells will have broad clinical application in developing autologous stem cell therapy for DM1.

  12. Platelet-rich plasma-enriched autologous fat graft in regenerative and aesthetic facial surgery: Technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, F; Hersant, B; La Padula, S; Meningaud, J-P

    2017-09-01

    The goal of adding platelet-rich plasma (PRP) to autologous fat graft is to increase the survival rate of the graft. After their activation, platelets release some important growth factors. As a result, PRP may increase the proliferation and differentiation of Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) into adipocytes, improve fat graft vascularisation, and may block the apoptosis of grafted adipocytes. The other benefit expected from the addition of PRP to fat graft is the improvement of cutaneous trophicity above the grafted areas. An exhaustive review of the literature retrieved 11 clinical studies on humans and 7 on animals. A statistically significant increase of the survival rate of fat grafts has been found in 9 comparative studies. Our synthesis allowed us to set up the following protocol: addition of 20% of PRP activated with calcium hydrochloride to fat grafts. It may enhance the results of autologous facial fat graft in regenerative and aesthetic facial surgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Characteristics of an autologous leukocyte and platelet-rich fibrin patch intended for the treatment of recalcitrant wounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundquist, Rasmus; Holmstrøm, Kim; Clausen, Christian

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated the physical, biochemical, and cellular properties of an autologous leukocyte and platelet-rich fibrin patch. This was generated in an automated device from a sample of a patient's blood at the point of care. Using microscopy, cell counting, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay...... of chronic wound fluid. By comparison with traditional platelet-rich plasma, differences in immune components were found. The relevance of these findings was assessed by showing a mitogenic and migratory effect on cultured human dermal fibroblasts. Further, we showed that fibrocytes, a cell type important......, antibody arrays, and cell culture assays, we show that the patch is a three-layered membrane comprising a fibrin sheet, a layer of platelets, and a layer of leukocytes. Mean recovery of platelets from the donated blood was 98% (±95%CI 0.8%). Mean levels of platelet-derived growth factor AB, human...

  14. Urokinase receptor expression involves tyrosine phosphorylation of phosphoglycerate kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Praveenkumar; Velusamy, Thirunavukkarasu; Bhandary, Yashodhar P; Liu, Ming C; Shetty, Sreerama

    2010-02-01

    The interaction of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) with its receptor, uPAR, plays a central role in several pathophysiological processes, including cancer. uPA induces its own cell surface receptor expression through stabilization of uPAR mRNA. The mechanism involves binding of a 51 nt uPAR mRNA coding sequence with phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) to down regulate cell surface uPAR expression. Tyrosine phosphorylation of PGK mediated by uPA treatment enhances uPAR mRNA stabilization. In contrast, inhibition of tyrosine phosphorylation augments PGK binding to uPAR mRNA and attenuates uPA-induced uPAR expression. Mapping the specific peptide region of PGK indicated that its first quarter (amino acids 1-100) interacts with uPAR mRNA. To determine if uPAR expression by uPA is regulated through activation of tyrosine residues of PGK, we mutated the specific tyrosine residue and tested mutant PGK for its ability to interfere with uPAR expression. Inhibition of tyrosine phosphorylation by mutating Y76 residue abolished uPAR expression induced by uPA treatment. These findings collectively demonstrate that Y76 residue present in the first quarter of the PGK molecule is involved in lung epithelial cell surface uPAR expression. This region can effectively mimic the function of a whole PGK molecule in inhibiting tumor cell growth.

  15. Tyrosine isomers mediate the classical phenomenon of concomitant tumor resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggiero, Raúl A; Bruzzo, Juan; Chiarella, Paula; di Gianni, Pedro; Isturiz, Martín A; Linskens, Susana; Speziale, Norma; Meiss, Roberto P; Bustuoabad, Oscar D; Pasqualini, Christiane D

    2011-11-15

    Concomitant tumor resistance (CR) is a phenomenon originally described in 1906 in which a tumor-bearing host is resistant to the growth of secondary tumor implants and metastasis. Although recent studies have indicated that T-cell-dependent processes mediate CR in hosts bearing immunogenic small tumors, manifestations of CR induced by immunogenic and nonimmunogenic large tumors have been associated with an elusive serum factor. In this study, we identify this serum factor as tyrosine in its meta and ortho isoforms. In three different murine models of cancer that generate CR, both meta-tyrosine and ortho-tyrosine inhibited tumor growth. In addition, we showed that both isoforms of tyrosine blocked metastasis in a fourth model that does not generate CR but is sensitive to CR induced by other tumors. Mechanistic studies showed that the antitumor effects of the tyrosine isoforms were mediated, in part, by early inhibition of mitogen-activated protein/extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway and inactivation of STAT3, potentially driving tumor cells into a state of dormancy. By revealing a molecular basis for the classical phenomenon of CR, our findings may stimulate new generalized approaches to limit the development of metastases that arise after resection of primary tumors, an issue of pivotal importance to oncologists and their patients. ©2011 AACR

  16. Tyrosine sulfation modulates activity of tick-derived thrombin inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Robert E.; Liu, Xuyu; Ripoll-Rozada, Jorge; Alonso-García, Noelia; Parker, Benjamin L.; Pereira, Pedro José Barbosa; Payne, Richard J.

    2017-09-01

    Madanin-1 and chimadanin are two small cysteine-free thrombin inhibitors that facilitate blood feeding in the tick Haemaphysalis longicornis. Here, we report a post-translational modification—tyrosine sulfation—of these two proteins that is critical for potent anti-thrombotic and anticoagulant activity. Inhibitors produced in baculovirus-infected insect cells displayed heterogeneous sulfation of two tyrosine residues within each of the proteins. One-pot ligation-desulfurization chemistry enabled access to homogeneous samples of all possible sulfated variants of the proteins. Tyrosine sulfation of madanin-1 and chimadanin proved crucial for thrombin inhibitory activity, with the doubly sulfated variants three orders of magnitude more potent than the unmodified inhibitors. The three-dimensional structure of madanin-1 in complex with thrombin revealed a unique mode of inhibition, with the sulfated tyrosine residues binding to the basic exosite II of the protease. The importance of tyrosine sulfation within this family of thrombin inhibitors, together with their unique binding mode, paves the way for the development of anti-thrombotic drug leads based on these privileged scaffolds.

  17. Activation of the protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP2 via the interleukin-6 signal transducing receptor protein gp130 requires tyrosine kinase Jak1 and limits acute-phase protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaper, F; Gendo, C; Eck, M; Schmitz, J; Grimm, C; Anhuf, D; Kerr, I M; Heinrich, P C

    1998-11-01

    Stimulation of the interleukin-6 (IL-6) signalling pathway occurs via the IL-6 receptor-glycoprotein 130 (IL-6R-gp130) receptor complex and results in the regulation of acute-phase protein genes in liver cells. Ligand binding to the receptor complex leads to tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of Janus kinases (Jak), phosphorylation of the signal transducing subunit gp130, followed by recruitment and phosphorylation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription factors STAT3 and STAT1 and the src homology domain (SH2)-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase (SHP2). The tyrosine phosphorylated STAT factors dissociate from the receptor, dimerize and translocate to the nucleus where they bind to enhancer sequences of IL-6 target genes. Phosphorylated SHP2 is able to bind growth factor receptor bound protein (grb2) and thus might link the Jak/STAT pathway to the ras/raf/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Here we present data on the dose-dependence, kinetics and kinase requirements for SHP2 phosphorylation after the activation of the signal transducer, gp130, of the IL-6-type family receptor complex. When human fibrosarcoma cell lines deficient in Jak1, Jak2 or tyrosine kinase 2 (Tyk2) were stimulated with IL-6-soluble IL-6R complexes it was found that only in Jak1-, but not in Jak 2- or Tyk2-deficient cells, SHP2 activation was greatly impaired. It is concluded that Jak1 is required for the tyrosine phosphorylation of SHP2. This phosphorylation depends on Tyr-759 in the cytoplasmatic domain of gp130, since a Tyr-759-->Phe exchange abrogates SHP2 activation and in turn leads to elevated and prolonged STAT3 and STAT1 activation as well as enhanced acute-phase protein gene induction. Therefore, SHP2 plays an important role in acute-phase gene regulation.

  18. Autologous circulating angiogenic cells treated with osteopontin and delivered via a collagen scaffold enhance wound healing in the alloxan-induced diabetic rabbit ear ulcer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Loughlin, Aonghus; Kulkarni, Mangesh; Vaughan, Erin E; Creane, Michael; Liew, Aaron; Dockery, Peter; Pandit, Abhay; O'Brien, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration is the leading cause of amputation in people with diabetes mellitus. Peripheral vascular disease is present in the majority of patients with diabetic foot ulcers. Despite standard treatments there exists a high amputation rate. Circulating angiogenic cells previously known as early endothelial progenitor cells are derived from peripheral blood and support angiogenesis and vasculogenesis, providing a potential topical treatment for non-healing diabetic foot ulcers. A scaffold fabricated from Type 1 collagen facilitates topical cell delivery to a diabetic wound. Osteopontin is a matricellular protein involved in wound healing and increases the angiogenic potential of circulating angiogenic cells. A collagen scaffold seeded with circulating angiogenic cells was developed. Subsequently the effect of autologous circulating angiogenic cells that were seeded in a collagen scaffold and topically delivered to a hyperglycemic cutaneous wound was assessed. The alloxan-induced diabetic rabbit ear ulcer model was used to determine healing in response to the following treatments: collagen seeded with autologous circulating angiogenic cells exposed to osteopontin, collagen seeded with autologous circulating angiogenic cells, collagen alone and untreated wound. Stereology was used to assess angiogenesis in wounds. The cells exposed to osteopontin and seeded on collagen increased percentage wound closure as compared to other groups. Increased angiogenesis was observed with the treatment of collagen and collagen seeded with circulating angiogenic cells. These results demonstrate that topical treatment of full thickness cutaneous ulcers with autologous circulating angiogenic cells increases wound healing. Cells exposed to the matricellular protein osteopontin result in superior wound healing. The wound healing benefit is associated with a more efficient vascular network. This topical therapy provides a potential novel therapy for the treatment of non

  19. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors and mesenchymal stromal cells: effects on self-renewal, commitment and functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borriello, Adriana; Caldarelli, Ilaria; Bencivenga, Debora; Stampone, Emanuela; Perrotta, Silverio; Oliva, Adriana; Ragione, Fulvio Della

    2017-01-01

    The hope of selectively targeting cancer cells by therapy and eradicating definitively malignancies is based on the identification of pathways or metabolisms that clearly distinguish “normal” from “transformed” phenotypes. Some tyrosine kinase activities, specifically unregulated and potently activated in malignant cells, might represent important targets of therapy. Consequently, tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) might be thought as the “vanguard” of molecularly targeted therapy for human neoplasias. Imatinib and the successive generations of inhibitors of Bcr-Abl1 kinase, represent the major successful examples of TKI use in cancer treatment. Other tyrosine kinases have been selected as targets of therapy, but the efficacy of their inhibition, although evident, is less definite. Two major negative effects exist in this therapeutic strategy and are linked to the specificity of the drugs and to the role of the targeted kinase in non-malignant cells. In this review, we will discuss the data available on the TKIs effects on the metabolism and functions of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). MSCs are widely distributed in human tissues and play key physiological roles; nevertheless, they might be responsible for important pathologies. At present, bone marrow (BM) MSCs have been studied in greater detail, for both embryological origins and functions. The available data are evocative of an unexpected degree of complexity and heterogeneity of BM-MSCs. It is conceivable that this grade of intricacy occurs also in MSCs of other organs. Therefore, in perspective, the negative effects of TKIs on MSCs might represent a critical problem in long-term cancer therapies based on such inhibitors. PMID:27750212

  20. Tyrosine-like condensed derivatives as tyrosinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, Maria João; Santana, Lourdes; Uriarte, Eugenio; Serra, Silvia; Corda, Marcella; Fadda, Maria Benedetta; Era, Benedetta; Fais, Antonella

    2012-05-01

    We report the pharmacological evaluation of a new series of 3-aminocoumarins differently substituted with hydroxyl groups, which have been synthesized because they include in their structures the tyrosine fragment (tyrosine-like compounds), with the aim of discovering structural features necessary for tyrosinase inhibitory activity. The synthesized compounds 4 and 7-9 were evaluated in vitro as mushroom tyrosinase inhibitors. Two of the described compounds showed lower IC50 (concentration giving 50% inhibition of tyrosinase activity) than umbelliferone, used as a reference compound. Compound 7 (IC50=53µm) was the best tyrosinase inhibitor of this small series, having an IC50 value 10-fold lower than umbelliferone. Compound 7 (3-amino-7-hydroxycoumarin) had amino and hydroxyl groups precisely mimicking the same positions that both groups occupy on the tyrosine molecule. © 2012 The Authors. JPP © 2012 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  1. Tyrosine residues modification studied by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santrucek, Jiri; Strohalm, Martin; Kadlcik, Vojtech; Hynek, Radovan; Kodicek, Milan

    2004-01-01

    Amino acid residue-specific reactivity in proteins is of great current interest in structural biology as it provides information about solvent accessibility and reactivity of the residue and, consequently, about protein structure and possible interactions. In the work presented tyrosine residues of three model proteins with known spatial structure are modified with two tyrosine-specific reagents: tetranitromethane and iodine. Modified proteins were specifically digested by proteases and the mass of resulting peptide fragments was determined using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Our results show that there are only small differences in the extent of tyrosine residues modification by tetranitromethane and iodine. However, data dealing with accessibility of reactive residues obtained by chemical modifications are not completely identical with those obtained by nuclear magnetic resonance and X-ray crystallography. These interesting discrepancies can be caused by local molecular dynamics and/or by specific chemical structure of the residues surrounding

  2. The autism associated MET receptor tyrosine kinase engages early neuronal growth mechanism and controls glutamatergic circuits development in the forebrain

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Yun; Lu, Zhongming; Li, Guohui; Piechowicz, Mariel; Anderson, Miranda; Uddin, Yasin; Wu, Jie; Qiu, Shenfeng

    2016-01-01

    The human MET gene imparts a replicated risk for autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and is implicated in the structural and functional integrity of brain. MET encodes a receptor tyrosine kinase, MET, which plays a pleiotropic role in embryogenesis and modifies a large number of neurodevelopmental events. Very little is known, however, on how MET signaling engages distinct cellular events to collectively affect brain development in ASD-relevant disease domains. Here, we show that MET protein expr...

  3. Evaluation of Brachypodium distachyon L-Tyrosine Decarboxylase Using L-Tyrosine Over-Producing Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhei Noda

    Full Text Available To demonstrate that herbaceous biomass is a versatile gene resource, we focused on the model plant Brachypodium distachyon, and screened the B. distachyon for homologs of tyrosine decarboxylase (TDC, which is involved in the modification of aromatic compounds. A total of 5 candidate genes were identified in cDNA libraries of B. distachyon and were introduced into Saccharomyces cerevisiae to evaluate TDC expression and tyramine production. It is suggested that two TDCs encoded in the transcripts Bradi2g51120.1 and Bradi2g51170.1 have L-tyrosine decarboxylation activity. Bradi2g51170.1 was introduced into the L-tyrosine over-producing strain of S. cerevisiae that was constructed by the introduction of mutant genes that promote deregulated feedback inhibition. The amount of tyramine produced by the resulting transformant was 6.6-fold higher (approximately 200 mg/L than the control strain, indicating that B. distachyon TDC effectively converts L-tyrosine to tyramine. Our results suggest that B. distachyon possesses enzymes that are capable of modifying aromatic residues, and that S. cerevisiae is a suitable host for the production of L-tyrosine derivatives.

  4. Skin peptide tyrosine-tyrosine, a member of the pancreatic polypeptide family: isolation, structure, synthesis, and endocrine activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mor, A; Chartrel, N; Vaudry, H; Nicolas, P

    1994-10-25

    Pancreatic polypeptide, peptide tyrosine-tyrosine (PYY), and neuropeptide tyrosine (NPY), three members of a family of structurally related peptides, are mainly expressed in the endocrine pancreas, in endocrine cells of the gut, and in the brain, respectively. In the present study, we have isolated a peptide of the pancreatic polypeptide family from the skin of the South American arboreal frog Phyllomedusa bicolor. The primary structure of the peptide was established as Tyr-Pro-Pro-Lys-Pro-Glu-Ser-Pro-Gly-Glu10-Asp-Ala-Ser-Pro-Glu-Glu- Met-Asn- Lys-Tyr20-Leu-Thr-Ala-Leu-Arg-His-Tyr-Ile-Asn-Leu30-Val-Thr- Arg-Gln-Arg-Tyr-NH2 . This unusual peptide, named skin peptide tyrosine-tyrosine (SPYY), exhibits 94% similarity with PYY from the frog Rana ridibunda. A synthetic replicate of SPYY inhibits melanotropin release from perifused frog neurointermediate lobes in very much the same way as NPY. These results demonstrate the occurrence of a PYY-like peptide in frog skin. Our data also suggest the existence of a pituitary-skin regulatory loop in amphibians.

  5. Local administration of autologous platelet-rich plasma in a female patient with skin ulcer defect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S M Noskov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes a clinical observation of the efficiency of local therapy with autologous platelet-rich plasma for .skin ulcer defect in a female with chronic lymphocytic leukemia

  6. Comparison of immune reconstitution after allogeneic vs. autologous stem cell transplantation in 182 pediatric recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Wiegering

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion: Children undergoing a HSCT show a different pattern of immune reconstitution in the allogeneic and autologous setting. This might influence the outcome and should affect the clinical handling of infectious prophylaxis and re-vaccinations.

  7. Use of autologous platelet - Rich plasma in the treatment of intrabony defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharath K Shetty

    2009-01-01

    Treatment of intrabony defects by autologous PRP gel alone caused significant soft tissue clinical improvement as well as hard tissue defect fill as evidenced by SSD view in spiral computed tomography.

  8. Cortactin Tyrosine Phosphorylation Promotes Its Deacetylation and Inhibits Cell Spreading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiler, Eugenia; Nieto-Pelegrín, Elvira; Martinez-Quiles, Narcisa

    2012-01-01

    Background Cortactin is a classical Src kinase substrate that participates in actin cytoskeletal dynamics by activating the Arp2/3 complex and interacting with other regulatory proteins, including FAK. Cortactin has various domains that may contribute to the assembly of different protein platforms to achieve process specificity. Though the protein is known to be regulated by post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation and acetylation, how tyrosine phosphorylation regulates cortactin activity is poorly understood. Since the basal level of tyrosine phosphorylation is low, this question must be studied using stimulated cell cultures, which are physiologically relevant but unreliable and difficult to work with. In fact, their unreliability may be the cause of some contradictory findings about the dynamics of tyrosine phosphorylation of cortactin in different processes. Methodology/Principal Findings In the present study, we try to overcome these problems by using a Functional Interaction Trap (FIT) system, which involves cotransfecting cells with a kinase (Src) and a target protein (cortactin), both of which are fused to complementary leucine-zipper domains. The FIT system allowed us to control precisely the tyrosine phosphorylation of cortactin and explore its relationship with cortactin acetylation. Conclusions/Significance Using this system, we provide definitive evidence that a competition exists between acetylation and tyrosine phosphorylation of cortactin and that phosphorylation inhibits cell spreading. We confirmed the results from the FIT system by examining endogenous cortactin in different cell types. Furthermore, we demonstrate that cell spreading promotes the association of cortactin and FAK and that tyrosine phosphorylation of cortactin disrupts this interaction, which may explain how it inhibits cell spreading. PMID:22479425

  9. Modular Engineering of l-Tyrosine Production in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juminaga, Darmawi; Baidoo, Edward E. K.; Redding-Johanson, Alyssa M.; Batth, Tanveer S.; Burd, Helcio; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Petzold, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    Efficient biosynthesis of l-tyrosine from glucose is necessary to make biological production economically viable. To this end, we designed and constructed a modular biosynthetic pathway for l-tyrosine production in E. coli MG1655 by encoding the enzymes for converting erythrose-4-phosphate (E4P) and phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) to l-tyrosine on two plasmids. Rational engineering to improve l-tyrosine production and to identify pathway bottlenecks was directed by targeted proteomics and metabolite profiling. The bottlenecks in the pathway were relieved by modifications in plasmid copy numbers, promoter strength, gene codon usage, and the placement of genes in operons. One major bottleneck was due to the bifunctional activities of quinate/shikimate dehydrogenase (YdiB), which caused accumulation of the intermediates dehydroquinate (DHQ) and dehydroshikimate (DHS) and the side product quinate; this bottleneck was relieved by replacing YdiB with its paralog AroE, resulting in the production of over 700 mg/liter of shikimate. Another bottleneck in shikimate production, due to low expression of the dehydroquinate synthase (AroB), was alleviated by optimizing the first 15 codons of the gene. Shikimate conversion to l-tyrosine was improved by replacing the shikimate kinase AroK with its isozyme, AroL, which effectively consumed all intermediates formed in the first half of the pathway. Guided by the protein and metabolite measurements, the best producer, consisting of two medium-copy-number, dual-operon plasmids, was optimized to produce >2 g/liter l-tyrosine at 80% of the theoretical yield. This work demonstrates the utility of targeted proteomics and metabolite profiling in pathway construction and optimization, which should be applicable to other metabolic pathways. PMID:22020510

  10. The Efficacy and Safety of Autologous Transfusion in Unilateral Total Knee Arthroplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Yoo, Moon-Jib; Park, Hee-Gon; Ryu, Jee-Won; Kim, Jeong-Sang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Although allogeneic blood transfusion is the most common method of transfusion in total knee arthroplasty (TKA), there are reports showing significant decrease in the amount of allogeneic transfusion and incidence of side effects after combined use of autologous transfusion. The purpose of this study is to investigate the efficacy of using an autologous transfusion device in TKA. Materials and Methods Patients who underwent TKA at our institution from January 2003 to January 2014 were...

  11. Comparative analysis of autologous blood transfusion and allogeneic blood transfusion in surgical patients

    OpenAIRE

    Long, Miao-Yun; Liu, Zhong-Han; Zhu, Jian-Guang

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate application effects of autologous blood transfusion and allogeneic blood transfusion in surgically treated patients receiving spine surgery, abdomen surgery and ectopic pregnancy surgery. Methods: 130 patients who would undergo selective operations were divided into autologous transfusion group and allogeneic transfusion group. Both groups received the same anesthesia, and there was no significant difference in transfusion volume or fluid infusion volume. Results: Th...

  12. Persistent seropositivity for yellow fever in a previously vaccinated autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Kayoko; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Tsunemine, Hiroko; Kanagawa, Shuzo; Kutsuna, Satoshi; Takeshita, Nozomi; Mawatari, Momoko; Fujiya, Yoshihiro; Yamamoto, Kei; Ohmagari, Norio; Kato, Yasuyuki

    2015-08-01

    The duration of a protective level of yellow fever antibodies after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in a previously vaccinated person is unclear. The case of a patient who had previously been vaccinated for yellow fever and who remained seropositive for 22 months after autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for malignant lymphoma is described herein. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. The composite of bone marrow concentrate and PRP as an alternative to autologous bone grafting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohssen Hakimi

    Full Text Available One possible alternative to the application of autologous bone grafts represents the use of autologous bone marrow concentrate (BMC. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the potency of autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP in combination with BMC. In 32 mini-pigs a metaphyseal critical-size defect was surgically created at the proximal tibia. The animals were allocated to four treatment groups of eight animals each (1. BMC+CPG group, 2. BMC+CPG+PRP group, 3. autograft group, 4. CPG group. In the BMC+CPG group the defect was filled with autologous BMC in combination with calcium phosphate granules (CPG, whereas in the BMC+CPG+PRP group the defect was filled with the composite of autologous BMC, CPG and autologous PRP. In the autograft group the defect was filled with autologous cancellous graft, whereas in the CPG group the defect was filled with CPG solely. After 6 weeks radiological and histomorphometrical analysis showed significantly more new bone formation in the BMC+CPG+PRP group compared to the BMC+CPG group and the CPG group. There were no significant differences between the BMC+CPG+PRP group and the autograft group. In the PRP platelets were enriched significantly about 4.7-fold compared to native blood. In BMC the count of mononuclear cells increased significantly (3.5-fold compared to the bone marrow aspirate. This study demonstrates that the composite of BMC+CPG+PRP leads to a significantly higher bone regeneration of critical-size defects at the proximal tibia in mini-pigs than the use of BMC+CPG without PRP. Furthermore, within the limits of the present study the composite BMC+CPG+PRP represents a comparable alternative to autologous bone grafting.

  14. The model of pulmonary embolism caused by autologous thrombus in rabbits

    OpenAIRE

    Yu-Jiao Ding; Yang Chen

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To establish a model of pulmonary embolism in rabbits by using autologous thrombosis of rabbit ear vein, to study the method of establishing acute pulmonary embolism by using autologous thrombus and to explore the diagnostic value of oxygen partial pressure in acute pulmonary embolism. Methods: Twenty rabbits were randomly divided into normal group (n=5), 7 h group, 24h group, 1 week after model establishment Group. The arterial blood gas analysis was performed on th...

  15. A clinical study on the feasibility of autologous cord blood transfusion for anemia of prematurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodabux, Chantal M; von Lindern, Jeannette S; van Hilten, Joost A; Scherjon, Sicco; Walther, Frans J; Brand, Anneke

    2008-08-01

    The objective was to investigate the use of autologous red blood cells (RBCs) derived from umbilical cord blood (UCB), as an alternative for allogeneic transfusions in premature infants admitted to a tertiary neonatal center. UCB collection was performed at deliveries of less than 32 weeks of gestation and processed into autologous RBC products. Premature infants requiring a RBC transfusion were randomly assigned to an autologous or allogeneic product. The primary endpoint was an at least 50 percent reduction in allogeneic transfusion needs. Fifty-seven percent of the collections harvested enough volume (> or =15 mL) for processing. After being processed, autologous products (> or =10 mL/kg) were available for 36 percent of the total study population and for 27 percent of the transfused infants and could cover 58 percent (range, 25%-100%) of the transfusion needs within the 21-day product shelf life. Availability of autologous products depended most on the gestational age. Infants born between 24 and 28 weeks had the lowest availability (17%). All products, however, would be useful in view of their high (87%) transfusion needs. Availability was highest (48%) for the infants born between 28 and 30 weeks. For 42 percent of the infants with transfusion needs in this group, autologous products were available. For the infants born between 30 and 32 weeks, autologous products were available for 36 percent of the infants. Transfusion needs in this group were, however, much lower (19%) compared to the other gestational groups. Autologous RBCs derived from UCB could not replace 50 percent of allogeneic transfusions due to the low UCB volumes collected and subsequent low product availability.

  16. Latissimus Dorsi and Immediate Fat Transfer (LIFT for Complete Autologous Breast Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James M. Economides, MD

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion:. Autologous augmentation of the LD flap with lipotransfer has been used to avoid placement of an implant. We improve the technique by performing lipotransfer during index reconstruction. Furthermore, we perform lipotransfer prior to disorigination of the LD muscle to minimize trauma to the flap and increase the efficiency of fat grafting. Our experience demonstrates that this technique is a viable autologous alternative to microsurgical breast reconstruction.

  17. Receptor tyrosine phosphatase R-PTP-kappa mediates homophilic binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sap, J; Jiang, Y P; Friedlander, D

    1994-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine phosphatases (R-PTPases) feature PTPase domains in the context of a receptor-like transmembrane topology. The R-PTPase R-PTP-kappa displays an extracellular domain composed of fibronectin type III motifs, a single immunoglobulin domain, as well as a recently defined MAM domain (Y...... not require PTPase activity or posttranslational proteolytic cleavage of the R-PTP-kappa protein and is calcium independent. The results suggest that R-PTPases may provide a link between cell-cell contact and cellular signaling events involving tyrosine phosphorylation....

  18. Cloning and expression of a widely expressed receptor tyrosine phosphatase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sap, J; D'Eustachio, P; Givol, D

    1990-01-01

    We describe the identification of a widely expressed receptor-type (transmembrane) protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTPase; EC 3.1.3.48). Screening of a mouse brain cDNA library under low-stringency conditions with a probe encompassing the intracellular (phosphatase) domain of the CD45 lymphocyte...... antigen yielded cDNA clones coding for a 794-amino acid transmembrane protein [hereafter referred to as receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase alpha (R-PTP-alpha)] with an intracellular domain displaying clear homology to the catalytic domains of CD45 and LAR (45% and 53%, respectively). The 142-amino acid...

  19. Natural compounds as a source of protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibitors : Application to the rational design of small-molecule derivatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferreira, Carmen V.; Justo, Giselle Z.; Souza, Ana C. S.; Queiroz, Karla C. S.; Zambuzzi, William F.; Aoyama, Hiroshi; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.

    2006-01-01

    Reversible phosphorylation of tyrosine residues is a key regulatory mechanism for numerous cellular events. Protein tyrosine kinases and protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) have a pivotal role in regulating both normal cell physiology and pathophysiology. Accordingly, deregulated activity of both

  20. Novel tyrosine phosphorylation sites in rat skeletal muscle revealed by phosphopeptide enrichment and HPLC-ESI-MS/MS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xiangmin; Højlund, Kurt; Luo, Moulun

    2012-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation plays a fundamental role in many cellular processes including differentiation, growth and insulin signaling. In insulin resistant muscle, aberrant tyrosine phosphorylation of several proteins has been detected. However, due to the low abundance of tyrosine phosphorylation (...

  1. What is the role of autologous blood transfusion in major spine surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Naresh; Chen, Yongsheng; Nath, Chinmoy; Liu, Eugene Hern Choon

    2012-06-01

    Major spine surgery is associated with significant blood loss, which has numerous complications. Blood loss is therefore an important concern when undertaking any major spine surgery. Blood loss can be addressed by reducing intraoperative blood loss and replenishing perioperative blood loss. Reducing intraoperative blood loss helps maintain hemodynamic equilibrium and provides a clearer operative field during surgery. Homologous blood transfusion is still the mainstay for replenishing blood loss in major spine surgery across the world, despite its known adverse effects. These significant adverse effects can be seen in up to 20% of patients. Autologous blood transfusion avoids the risks associated with homologous blood transfusion and has been shown to be cost-effective. This article reviews the different methods of autologous transfusion and focuses on the use of intraoperative cell salvage in major spine surgery. Autologous blood transfusion is a proven alternative to homologous transfusion in major spine surgery, avoiding most, if not all of these adverse effects. However, autologous blood transfusion rates in major spine surgery remain low across the world. Autologous blood transfusion may obviate the need for homologous transfusion completely. We encourage spine surgeons to consider autologous blood transfusion wherever feasible.

  2. The role of NK cells in HIV-1 protection: autologous, allogeneic or both?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hens, Jef; Jennes, Wim; Kestens, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells specialize in killing virally infected- or tumor cells and are part of the innate immune system. The activational state of NK cells is determined by the balance of incoming activating and inhibitory signals mediated by receptor-ligand binding with the target cell. These receptor-ligand bonds mainly consist of the killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR), which are expressed at the cell surface of NK cells, and their ligands: the highly variable human leukocyte antigen -class I molecules (HLA). Absence of an inhibitory receptor-ligand bond lowers the NK cell activation threshold, whereas an activating receptor-ligand bond stimulates the cell, potentially overcoming this threshold and triggering NK cell activation. NK cells influence the course of infection as well as the acquisition of HIV-1. Several lines of evidence relate the activating NK cell receptor KIR3DS1, in the presence or absence of its putative ligand HLA-Bw4, with slower disease progression as well as resistance to HIV-1 infection. Overall, resistance to HIV-1 infection predominantly correlates with activating KIR/HLA profiles, consisting of e.g. activating KIRs, group B haplotypes, or inhibitory KIRs in absence of their ligands. Such a conclusion is less evident for studies of HIV-1 disease progression, with studies reporting beneficial as well as detrimental effects of activating KIR/HLA genotypes. It is likely that KIR/HLA association studies are complicated by the complexity of the KIR and HLA loci and their mutual interactions, as well as by additional factors like route of HIV exposure, immune activation, presence of co-infections, and the effect of anti-HIV-1 antibodies. One newly discovered NK cell activation pathway associated with resistance to HIV-1 infection involves the presence of an iKIR/HLA mismatch between partners. The absence of such an iKIR/HLA bond renders donor-derived allogeneic HIV-1 infected cells vulnerable to NK cell responses during HIV-1

  3. Icotinib (BPI-2009H), a novel EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor, displays potent efficacy in preclinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Fenlai; Shen, Xiaoyan; Wang, Dechang; Xie, Guojian; Zhang, Xiaodong; Ding, Lieming; Hu, Yunyan; He, Wei; Wang, Yanping; Wang, Yinxiang

    2012-05-01

    Icotinib, one of the leading compounds selected from our compound library, was found to be a potent and specific epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) with an IC(50) of 5 nM. When profiled with 88 kinases, Icotinib only showed meaningful inhibitory activity to EGFR and its mutants. Icotinib blocked EGFR-mediated intracellular tyrosine phosphorylation (IC(50)=45 nM) in the human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cell line and inhibits tumor cell proliferation. In vivo studies demonstrated that Icotinib exhibited potent dose-dependent antitumor effects in nude mice carrying a variety of human tumor-derived xenografts. The drug was well tolerated at doses up to 120 mg/kg/day in mice without mortality or significant body weight loss during the treatment. A head to head randomized, double blind phase III trial using Gefitinib as an active control for patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) was finished recently (Trial registration ID: NCT01040780). The data shows that Icotinib was non-inferior to Gefitinib in terms of median progression free survival (PFS) and safety superior favor to Icotinib compared to Gefitinib. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Adaptive Immune Response Impairs the Efficacy of Autologous Transplantation of Engineered Stem Cells in Dystrophic Dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitzia, Clementina; Farini, Andrea; Jardim, Luciana; Razini, Paola; Belicchi, Marzia; Cassinelli, Letizia; Villa, Chiara; Erratico, Silvia; Parolini, Daniele; Bella, Pamela; da Silva Bizario, Joao Carlos; Garcia, Luis; Dias-Baruffi, Marcelo; Meregalli, Mirella; Torrente, Yvan

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is the most common genetic muscular dystrophy. It is caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene, leading to absence of muscular dystrophin and to progressive degeneration of skeletal muscle. We have demonstrated that the exon skipping method safely and efficiently brings to the expression of a functional dystrophin in dystrophic CD133+ cells injected scid/mdx mice. Golden Retriever muscular dystrophic (GRMD) dogs represent the best preclinical model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, mimicking the human pathology in genotypic and phenotypic aspects. Here, we assess the capacity of intra-arterial delivered autologous engineered canine CD133+ cells of restoring dystrophin expression in Golden Retriever muscular dystrophy. This is the first demonstration of five-year follow up study, showing initial clinical amelioration followed by stabilization in mild and severe affected Golden Retriever muscular dystrophy dogs. The occurrence of T-cell response in three Golden Retriever muscular dystrophy dogs, consistent with a memory response boosted by the exon skipped-dystrophin protein, suggests an adaptive immune response against dystrophin. PMID:27506452

  5. Biological and mechanical evaluation of a Bio-Hybrid scaffold for autologous valve tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnavi, S; Saravanan, U; Arthi, N; Bhuvaneshwar, G S; Kumary, T V; Rajan, S; Verma, R S

    2017-04-01

    Major challenge in heart valve tissue engineering for paediatric patients is the development of an autologous valve with regenerative capacity. Hybrid tissue engineering approach is recently gaining popularity to design scaffolds with desired biological and mechanical properties that can remodel post implantation. In this study, we fabricated aligned nanofibrous Bio-Hybrid scaffold made of decellularized bovine pericardium: polycaprolactone-chitosan with optimized polymer thickness to yield the desired biological and mechanical properties. CD44 + , αSMA + , Vimentin + and CD105 - human valve interstitial cells were isolated and seeded on these Bio-Hybrid scaffolds. Subsequent biological evaluation revealed interstitial cell proliferation with dense extra cellular matrix deposition that indicated the viability for growth and proliferation of seeded cells on the scaffolds. Uniaxial mechanical tests along axial direction showed that the Bio-Hybrid scaffolds has at least 20 times the strength of the native valves and its stiffness is nearly 3 times more than that of native valves. Biaxial and uniaxial mechanical studies on valve interstitial cells cultured Bio-Hybrid scaffolds revealed that the response along the axial and circumferential direction was different, similar to native valves. Overall, our findings suggest that Bio-Hybrid scaffold is a promising material for future development of regenerative heart valve constructs in children. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase alpha is essential for hippocampal neuronal migration and long-term potentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrone, Angiola; Battaglia, Fortunato; Wang, Cheng

    2003-01-01

    Despite clear indications of their importance in lower organisms, the contributions of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) to development or function of the mammalian nervous system have been poorly explored. In vitro studies have indicated that receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase alpha...

  7. Regulation of hematopoietic cell function by protein tyrosine kinase-encoding oncogenes, a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Punt, C. J.

    1992-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation of proteins by protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) is an important mechanism in the regulation of various cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, and transformation. Accumulating data implicate PTKs as essential intermediates in the transduction of

  8. Increased expression of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity in paraventricular and supraoptic neurons in illnesses with prolonged osmotic or nonosmotic stimulation of vasopressin release

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Panayotacopoulou, Maria T.; Malidelis, Yiannis I.; Fliers, Eric; Bouras, Constantin; Ravid, Rivka; Swaab, Dick F.

    2002-01-01

    Our previous studies indicated that in the human para-ventricular (PVN) and supraoptic (SON) nuclei, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) - the first and rate-limiting enzyme in catecholamine synthesis - is localized mainly in magnocellular neurons and that antemortem factors regulate its expression. The

  9. Signal transduction by HLA-DR is mediated by tyrosine kinase(s) and regulated by CD45 in activated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odum, Niels; Martin, P J; Schieven, G L

    1991-01-01

    Recently, it was shown that HLA class II molecules on B cells and activated human T cells can transmit signals involving tyrosine phosphorylation of specific proteins, activation of the inositol phospholipid pathway, and release of cytosolic free Ca2+(Ca2+)i. The regulation of class II induced si...

  10. Combined treatment of tyrosine kinase inhibitor labeled gold nanorod encapsulated albumin with laser thermal ablation in a renal cell carcinoma model

    Science.gov (United States)

    This manuscript served to characterize and evaluate Human Serum Albumin-encapsulated Nanoparticles (NPs) for drug delivery of a tyrosine kinase inhibitor combined with induction of photothermal ablation (PTA) combination therapy of Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC). RCC is the most common type of kidney c...

  11. Fluorescence anisotropy of tyrosinate anion using one-, two- and three-photon excitation: tyrosinate anion fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierdaszuk, Borys

    2013-03-01

    We examined the emission spectra and steady-state anisotropy of tyrosinate anion fluorescence with one-photon (250-310 nm), two-photon (570-620 nm) and three-photon (750-930 nm) excitation. Similar emission spectra of the neutral (pH 7.2) and anionic (pH 13) forms of N-acetyl-L-tyrosinamide (NATyrA) (pKa 10.6) were observed for all modes of excitation, with the maxima at 302 and 352 nm, respectively. Two-photon excitation (2PE) and three-photon excitation (3PE) spectra of the anionic form were the same as that for one-photon excitation (1PE). In contrast, 2PE spectrum from the neutral form showed ~30-nm shift to shorter wavelengths relative to 1PE spectrum (λmax 275 nm) at two-photon energy (550 nm), the latter being overlapped with 3PE spectrum, both at two-photon energy (550 nm). Two-photon cross-sections for NATyrA anion at 565-580 nm were 10 % of that for N-acetyl-L-tryptophanamide (NATrpA), and increased to 90 % at 610 nm, while for the neutral form of NATyrA decreased from 2 % of that for NATrpA at 570 nm to near zero at 585 nm. Surprisingly, the fundamental anisotropy of NATyrA anion in vitrified solution at -60 °C was ~0.05 for 2PE at 610 nm as compared to near 0.3 for 1PE at 305 nm, and wavelength-dependence appears to be a basic feature of its anisotropy. In contrast, the 3PE anisotropy at 900 nm was about 0.5, and 3PE and 1PE anisotropy values appear to be related by the cos(6) θ to cos(2) θ photoselection factor (approx. 10/6) independently of excitation wavelength. Attention is drawn to the possible effect of tyrosinate anions in proteins on their multi-photon induced fluorescence emission and excitation spectra as well as excitation anisotropy spectra.

  12. Evidence for a tyrosine protonation change during the primary phototransition of bacteriorhodopsin at low temperature.

    OpenAIRE

    Rothschild, K J; Roepe, P; Ahl, P L; Earnest, T N; Bogomolni, R A; Das Gupta, S K; Mulliken, C M; Herzfeld, J

    1986-01-01

    Isotopically labeled tyrosines have been selectively incorporated into bacteriorhodopsin (bR). A comparison of the low-temperature bR570 to K Fourier transform infrared-difference spectra of these samples and normal bR provides information about the role of tyrosine in the primary phototransition. Several tyrosine contributions to the difference spectrum are found. These results and comparison with the spectra of model compounds suggest that a tyrosinate group protonates during the bR570 to K...

  13. Role of Bruton's tyrosine kinase in B cells and malignancies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pal Singh, S. (Simar); F. Dammeijer (Floris); R.W. Hendriks (Rudi)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractBruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) is a non-receptor kinase that plays a crucial role in oncogenic signaling that is critical for proliferation and survival of leukemic cells in many B cell malignancies. BTK was initially shown to be defective in the primary immunodeficiency X-linked

  14. Anxious moments for the protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B

    OpenAIRE

    Krishnan, Navasona; Tonks, Nicholas K.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic stress can lead to the development of anxiety and mood disorders. Thus, novel therapies for preventing adverse effects of stress are vitally important. Recently, the protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B was identified as a novel regulator of stress-induced anxiety. This opens up exciting opportunities to exploit PTP1B inhibitors as anxiolytics.

  15. Eosin-sensitized photooxidation of substituted phenylalanines and tyrosines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizzuto, F.; Spikes, J.D.

    1977-01-01

    The cosin-sensitized photooxidation of tyrosine and a number of compounds related to tyrosine (substituted phenylalanines) was studied by steady-state kinetic and flash photolysis techniques. In particular, the role of the phenolic group and the amino and carboxyl groups of the alanyl side chain in the photooxidation mechanism was investigated in detail. Several relationships between substrate structure and susceptibility to photooxidation as well as effects of substrate structure on photooxidation mechanisms were found. For example, phenylalanine is not photooxidizable, but substitution of electron-donating (activating) groups such as -OH (as in tyrosine) or -NH/sub 2/ (as in p-aminophenylalanine) results in rapidly photooxidized derivatives. However, substituting deactivating groups such as -Cl (as in p-chlorophenylalanine) or weakly activating groups such as -OCH/sub 3/ (as in 4-methoxyphenylalanine) result in non-photooxidizable derivatives. Substitution of additional activating groups to the ring of hydroxy-substituted phenylalanines results in increased rates of photooxidation, whereas additional deactivating groups result in decreased photooxidation rates. The rate-determining step in the photooxidation mechanism is shown to be dependent on the presence and position of an electron-donating substituent on the benzenoid ring. Only minor involvement of the side chain amino and carboxyl groups was found. Both singlet oxygen and hydrogen abstraction mechanisms are involved in the eosin-sensitized photooxidation of hydroxy-substituted phenylalanines (e.g., tyrosine). The hydrogen abstraction mechanism probably predominates at both pH 8 and 11.

  16. Isolation of a tyrosine-activating enzyme from baker's yeast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ven, A.M. van de; Koningsberger, V.V.; Overbeek, J.Th.G.

    1958-01-01

    The extracts of ether-CO2-frozen baker's yeast contain enzymes that catalyze the ATP-linked amino acid activation by way of pyrophosphate elimination. From the extract a tyrosine-activating enzyme could be isolated, which, judging from ultracentrifugation and electrophoretic data, was about 70% pure

  17. Variability in bioavailability of small molecular tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herbrink, Maikel; Nuijen, Bastiaan; Schellens, Jan H M; Beijnen, Jos H.

    2015-01-01

    Small molecular tyrosine kinase inhibitors (smTKIs) are in the centre of the very quickly expanding area of personalized chemotherapy and oral applicability thereof. The number of drugs in this class is rapidly growing, with twenty current approvals by both the European Medicines Agency (EMA) and

  18. Expression of tyrosine kinase gene in mouse thymic stromal cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rinke de Wit, T. F.; Izon, D. J.; Revilla, C.; Oosterwegel, M.; Bakker, A. Q.; van Ewijk, W.; Kruisbeek, A. M.

    1996-01-01

    Amongst the most important signal transduction molecules involved in regulating growth and differentiation are the protein tyrosine kinases (PTK). Since T cell development is a consequence of interactions between thymic stromal cells (TSC) and thymocytes, identification of the PTK in both

  19. ZDHHC3 Tyrosine Phosphorylation Regulates Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule Palmitoylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lievens, Patricia Marie-Jeanne; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Kochlamazashvili, Gaga; Cesca, Fabrizia; Gorinski, Natalya; Galil, Dalia Abdel; Cherkas, Volodimir; Ronkina, Natalia; Lafera, Juri; Gaestel, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) mediates cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion. It is broadly expressed in the nervous system and regulates neurite outgrowth, synaptogenesis, and synaptic plasticity. Previous in vitro studies revealed that palmitoylation of NCAM is required for fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2)-stimulated neurite outgrowth and identified the zinc finger DHHC (Asp-His-His-Cys)-containing proteins ZDHHC3 and ZDHHC7 as specific NCAM-palmitoylating enzymes. Here, we verified that FGF2 controlled NCAM palmitoylation in vivo and investigated molecular mechanisms regulating NCAM palmitoylation by ZDHHC3. Experiments with overexpression and pharmacological inhibition of FGF receptor (FGFR) and Src revealed that these kinases control tyrosine phosphorylation of ZDHHC3 and that ZDHHC3 is phosphorylated by endogenously expressed FGFR and Src proteins. By site-directed mutagenesis, we found that Tyr18 is an FGFR1-specific ZDHHC3 phosphorylation site, while Tyr295 and Tyr297 are specifically phosphorylated by Src kinase in cell-based and cell-free assays. Abrogation of tyrosine phosphorylation increased ZDHHC3 autopalmitoylation, enhanced interaction with NCAM, and upregulated NCAM palmitoylation. Expression of ZDHHC3 with tyrosine mutated in cultured hippocampal neurons promoted neurite outgrowth. Our findings for the first time highlight that FGFR- and Src-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of ZDHHC3 modulates ZDHHC3 enzymatic activity and plays a role in neuronal morphogenesis. PMID:27247265

  20. Association of connexin43 with a receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giepmans, Ben N G; Feiken, Elles; Gebbink, Martijn F B G; Moolenaar, Wouter H

    2003-01-01

    Connexin-43(Cx43)-based gap junctional communication is transiently inhibited by certain G protein-coupled receptor agonists, including lysophosphatidic acid, endothelin and thrombin. Our previous studies have implicated the c-Src protein tyrosine kinase in mediating closure of Cx43 based gap

  1. Uptake of Tyrosine Amino Acid on Nano-Graphene Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossam M. Nassef

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Graphene oxide (GO is emerging as a promising nanomaterial with potential application in the detection and analysis of amino acids, DNA, enzymes, and proteins in biological fluid samples. So, the reaction of GO with amino acids should be characterized and determined before using it in biosensing methods and devices. In this study, the reaction of tyrosine amino acid (Tyr with GO was characterized using FT-IR, UV-vis spectrophotometry, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM before its use. The optimum conditions for GO’s interaction with Tyr amino acid have been studied under variable conditions. The optimum conditions of pH, temperature, shaking time, and GO and tyrosine concentrations for the uptaking of tyrosine amino acid onto the GO’s surface from aqueous solution were determined. The SEM analysis showed that the GO supplied was in a particle size range between 5.4 and 8.1 nm. A pH of 8.4–9.4 at 25 °C and 5 min of shaking time were the optimum conditions for a maximum uptake of 1.4 μg/mL of tyrosine amino acid onto 0.2 mg/mL of GO.

  2. Constitutive Activity in an Ancestral Form of Abl Tyrosine Kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saadat U Aleem

    Full Text Available The c-abl proto-oncogene encodes a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase that is found in all metazoans, and is ubiquitously expressed in mammalian tissues. The Abl tyrosine kinase plays important roles in the regulation of mammalian cell physiology. Abl-like kinases have been identified in the genomes of unicellular choanoflagellates, the closest relatives to the Metazoa, and in related unicellular organisms. Here, we have carried out the first characterization of a premetazoan Abl kinase, MbAbl2, from the choanoflagellate Monosiga brevicollis. The enzyme possesses SH3, SH2, and kinase domains in a similar arrangement to its mammalian counterparts, and is an active tyrosine kinase. MbAbl2 lacks the N-terminal myristoylation and cap sequences that are critical regulators of mammalian Abl kinase activity, and we show that MbAbl2 is constitutively active. When expressed in mammalian cells, MbAbl2 strongly phosphorylates cellular proteins on tyrosine, and transforms cells much more potently than mammalian Abl kinase. Thus, MbAbl2 appears to lack the autoinhibitory mechanism that tightly constrains the activity of mammalian Abl kinases, suggesting that this regulatory apparatus arose more recently in metazoan evolution.

  3. Cardiac sodium channel Na(v)1.5 interacts with and is regulated by the protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPH1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Thomas; Gavillet, Bruno; van Bemmelen, Miguel X

    2006-01-01

    In order to identify proteins interacting with the cardiac voltage-gated sodium channel Na(v)1.5, we used the last 66 amino acids of the C-terminus of the channel as bait to screen a human cardiac cDNA library. We identified the protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPH1 as an interacting protein. Pull......-down experiments confirmed the interaction, and indicated that it depends on the PDZ-domain binding motif of Na(v)1.5. Co-expression experiments in HEK293 cells showed that PTPH1 shifts the Na(v)1.5 availability relationship toward hyperpolarized potentials, whereas an inactive PTPH1 or the tyrosine kinase Fyn...... does the opposite. The results of this study suggest that tyrosine phosphorylation destabilizes the inactivated state of Na(v)1.5....

  4. Tyrosine sulfation of the amino terminus of PSGL-1 is critical for enterovirus 71 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yorihiro Nishimura

    Full Text Available Enterovirus 71 (EV71 is one of the major causative agents of hand, foot, and mouth disease, a common febrile disease in children; however, EV71 has been also associated with various neurological diseases including fatal cases in large EV71 outbreaks particularly in the Asia Pacific region. Recently we identified human P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1 as a cellular receptor for entry and replication of EV71 in leukocytes. PSGL-1 is a sialomucin expressed on the surface of leukocytes, serves as a high affinity counterreceptor for selectins, and mediates leukocyte rolling on the endothelium. The PSGL-1-P-selectin interaction requires sulfation of at least one of three clustered tyrosines and an adjacent O-glycan expressing sialyl Lewis x in an N-terminal region of PSGL-1. To elucidate the molecular basis of the PSGL-1-EV71 interaction, we generated a series of PSGL-1 mutants and identified the post-translational modifications that are critical for binding of PSGL-1 to EV71. We expressed the PSGL-1 mutants in 293T cells and the transfected cells were assayed for their abilities to bind to EV71 by flow cytometry. We found that O-glycosylation on T57, which is critical for PSGL-1-selectin interaction, is not necessary for PSGL-1 binding to EV71. On the other hand, site-directed mutagenesis at one or more potential tyrosine sulfation sites in the N-terminal region of PSGL-1 significantly impaired PSGL-1 binding to EV71. Furthermore, an inhibitor of sulfation, sodium chlorate, blocked the PSGL-1-EV71 interaction and inhibited PSGL-1-mediated viral replication of EV71 in Jurkat T cells in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, the results presented in this study reveal that tyrosine sulfation, but not O-glycosylation, in the N-terminal region of PSGL-1 may facilitate virus entry and replication of EV71 in leukocytes.

  5. A Mass Spectrometry-Based Predictive Strategy Reveals ADAP1 is Phosphorylated at Tyrosine 364

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Littrell, BobbiJo R [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2018-04-16

    The goal of this work was to identify phosphorylation sites within the amino acid sequence of human ADAP1. Using traditional mass spectrometry-based techniques we were unable to produce interpretable spectra demonstrating modification by phosphorylation. This prompted us to employ a strategy in which phosphorylated peptides were first predicted using peptide mapping followed by targeted MS/MS acquisition. ADAP1 was immunoprecipitated from extracts of HEK293 cells stably-transfected with ADAP1 cDNA. Immunoprecipitated ADAP1 was digested with proteolytic enzymes and analyzed by LC-MS in MS1 mode by high-resolution quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (QTOF-MS). Peptide molecular features were extracted using an untargeted data mining algorithm. Extracted peptide neutral masses were matched against the ADAP1 amino acid sequence with phosphorylation included as a predicted modification. Peptides with predicted phosphorylation sites were analyzed by targeted LC-MS2. Acquired MS2 spectra were then analyzed using database search engines to confirm phosphorylation. Spectra of phosphorylated peptides were validated by manual interpretation. Further confirmation was performed by manipulating phospho-peptide abundance using calf intestinal phosphatase (CIP) and the phorbol ester, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). Of five predicted phosphopeptides, one, comprised of the sequence AVDRPMLPQEYAVEAHFK, was confirmed to be phosphorylated on a Tyrosine at position 364. Pre-treatment of cells with PMA prior to immunoprecipitation increased the ratio of phosphorylated to unphosphorylated peptide as determined by area counts of extracted ion chromatograms (EIC). Addition of CIP to immunoprecipitation reactions eliminated the phosphorylated form. A novel phosphorylation site was identified at Tyrosine 364. Phosphorylation at this site is increased by treatment with PMA. PMA promotes membrane translocation and activation of protein kinase C (PKC), indicating that Tyrosine 364

  6. Finding the smoking gun: protein tyrosine phosphatases as tools and targets of unicellular microorganisms and viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heneberg, P

    2012-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are increasingly recognized as important effectors of host-pathogen interactions. Since Guan and Dixon reported in 1990 that phosphatase YopH serves as an essential virulence determinant of Yersinia, the field shifted significantly forward, and dozens of PTPs were identified in various microorganisms and even in viruses. The discovery of extensive tyrosine signaling networks in non-metazoan organisms refuted the moth-eaten paradigm claiming that these organisms rely exclusively on phosphoserine/phosphothreonine signaling. Similarly to humans, phosphotyrosine signaling is thought to comprise a small fraction of total protein phosphorylation, but plays a disproportionately important role in cell-cycle control, differentiation, and invasiveness. Here we summarize the state-of-art knowledge on PTPs of important non-metazoan pathogens (Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Caulobacter crescentus, Yersinia, Synechocystis, Leishmania, Plasmodium falciparum, Entamoeba histolytica, etc.), and focus also at the microbial proteins affecting directly or indirectly the PTPs of the host (Mycobacterium tuberculosis MTSA-10, Bacillus anthracis anthrax toxin, streptococcal β protein, Helicobacter pylori CagA and VacA, Leishmania GP63 and EF-1α, Plasmodium hemozoin, etc.). This is the first review summarizing the knowledge on biological activity and pharmacological inhibition of non-metazoan PTPs, with the emphasis of those important in host-pathogen interactions. Targeting of numerous non-metazoan PTPs is simplified by the fact that they act either as ectophosphatases or are secreted outside of the pathogen. Interfering with tyrosine phosphorylation represents a powerful pharmacologic approach, and even though the PTP inhibitors are difficult to develop, lifting the fog of phosphatase inhibition is of the great market potential and further clinical impact.

  7. Metformin as a prevention and treatment for preeclampsia: effects on soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 and soluble endoglin secretion and endothelial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownfoot, Fiona C; Hastie, Roxanne; Hannan, Natalie J; Cannon, Ping; Tuohey, Laura; Parry, Laura J; Senadheera, Sevvandi; Illanes, Sebastian E; Kaitu'u-Lino, Tu'uhevaha J; Tong, Stephen

    2016-03-01

    Preeclampsia is associated with placental ischemia/hypoxia and secretion of soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 and soluble endoglin into the maternal circulation. This causes widespread endothelial dysfunction that manifests clinically as hypertension and multisystem organ injury. Recently, small molecule inhibitors of hypoxic inducible factor 1α have been found to reduce soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 and soluble endoglin secretion. However, their safety profile in pregnancy is unknown. Metformin is safe in pregnancy and is also reported to inhibit hypoxic inducible factor 1α by reducing mitochondrial electron transport chain activity. The purposes of this study were to determine (1) the effects of metformin on placental soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 and soluble endoglin secretion, (2) to investigate whether the effects of metformin on soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 and soluble endoglin secretion are regulated through the mitochondrial electron transport chain, and (3) to examine its effects on endothelial dysfunction, maternal blood vessel vasodilation, and angiogenesis. We performed functional (in vitro and ex vivo) experiments using primary human tissues to examine the effects of metformin on soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 and soluble endoglin secretion from placenta, endothelial cells, and placental villous explants. We used succinate, mitochondrial complex II substrate, to examine whether the effects of metformin on soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 and soluble endoglin secretion were mediated through the mitochondria. We also isolated mitochondria from preterm preeclamptic placentas and gestationally matched control subjects and measured mitochondrial electron transport chain activity using kinetic spectrophotometric assays. Endothelial cells or whole maternal vessels were incubated with metformin to determine whether it rescued endothelial dysfunction induced by either tumor necrosis factor-α (to endothelial cells) or placenta villous

  8. Radiolabelling of autologous leucocytes: technique and clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strobl-Jaeger, E.; Kolbe, H.; Ludwig, H.; Sinzinger, H.

    1988-01-01

    Gamma-camera imaging after injection of radiolabelled autologous leucocytes can be very helpful in the diagnosis, localization and further clinical treatment of inflammatory diseases. We present a technique allowing sterile separation of white blood cells and labelling with 99m Tc-phytate or -oxine and with 111 In-oxine, -oxine sulphate or -tropolone. The method is non-invasive and the radiation dose amounts to less than 80 mrad using 100 μCi 111 Indium. The use of radiolabelled granulocytes is of particular diagnostic value in patients with septicaemia of unknown origin. Whole body scanning allows not only visualization of enhanced splenic uptake in septicaemia, but also localization of an inflammatory process. Preferential indications for a diagnostic approach using radiolabelled granulocytes are inflammatory abdominal processes which cannot easily be documented by means of other non-invasive techniques, such as inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn's diseases and ulcerative colitis), arthritic processes and abscesses of the liver and spleen, as well as subphrenic and retroperitoneal abscesses. Untreated osteomyelitis can be located with the help of labelled granulocytes, but in patients treated with antibiotics a false negative result is obtained in approximately 50 % of cases for as yet unknown reasons, even in the presence of a still active osteomyelitic process. (Authors)

  9. Hepcidin as a new biomarker for detecting autologous blood transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuenberger, Nicolas; Barras, Laura; Nicoli, Raul; Robinson, Neil; Baume, Norbert; Lion, Niels; Barelli, Stefano; Tissot, Jean-Daniel; Saugy, Martial

    2016-05-01

    Autologous blood transfusion (ABT) is an efficient way to increase sport performance. It is also the most challenging doping method to detect. At present, individual follow-up of haematological variables via the athlete biological passport (ABP) is used to detect it. Quantification of a novel hepatic peptide called hepcidin may be a new alternative to detect ABT. In this prospective clinical trial, healthy subjects received a saline injection for the control phase, after which they donated blood that was stored and then transfused 36 days later. The impact of ABT on hepcidin as well as haematological parameters, iron metabolism, and inflammation markers was investigated. Blood transfusion had a particularly marked effect on hepcidin concentrations compared to the other biomarkers, which included haematological variables. Hepcidin concentrations increased significantly: 12 hr and 1 day after blood reinfusion, these concentrations rose by seven- and fourfold, respectively. No significant change was observed in the control phase. Hepcidin quantification is a cost-effective strategy that could be used in an "ironomics" strategy to improve the detection of ABT. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Endocrinopathies after Allogeneic and Autologous Transplantation of Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Orio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Early and late endocrine disorders are among the most common complications in survivors after hematopoietic allogeneic- (allo- and autologous- (auto- stem cell transplant (HSCT. This review summarizes main endocrine disorders reported in literature and observed in our center as consequence of auto- and allo-HSCT and outlines current options for their management. Gonadal impairment has been found early in approximately two-thirds of auto- and allo-HSCT patients: 90–99% of women and 60–90% of men. Dysfunctions of the hypothalamus-pituitary-growth hormone/insulin growth factor-I axis, hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis, and hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis were documented as later complicances, occurring in about 10, 30, and 40–50% of transplanted patients, respectively. Moreover, overt or subclinical thyroid complications (including persistent low-T3 syndrome, chronic thyroiditis, subclinical hypo- or hyperthyroidism, and thyroid carcinoma, gonadal failure, and adrenal insufficiency may persist many years after HSCT. Our analysis further provides evidence that main recognized risk factors for endocrine complications after HSCT are the underlying disease, previous pretransplant therapies, the age at HSCT, gender, total body irradiation, posttransplant derangement of immune system, and in the allogeneic setting, the presence of graft-versus-host disease requiring prolonged steroid treatment. Early identification of endocrine complications can greatly improve the quality of life of long-term survivors after HSCT.

  11. Quality Improvement Methodologies Increase Autologous Blood Product Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, Ashley B.; Preston, Thomas J.; Fitch, Jill A.; Harrison, Sheilah K.; Hersey, Diane K.; Nicol, Kathleen K.; Naguib, Aymen N.; McConnell, Patrick I.; Galantowicz, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: Whole blood from the heart–lung (bypass) machine may be processed through a cell salvaging device (i.e., cell saver [CS]) and subsequently administered to the patient during cardiac surgery. It was determined at our institution that CS volume was being discarded. A multidisciplinary team consisting of anesthesiologists, perfusionists, intensive care physicians, quality improvement (QI) professionals, and bedside nurses met to determine the challenges surrounding autologous blood delivery in its entirety. A review of cardiac surgery patients’ charts (n = 21) was conducted for analysis of CS waste. After identification of practices that were leading to CS waste, interventions were designed and implemented. Fishbone diagram, key driver diagram, Plan–Do–Study–Act (PDSA) cycles, and data collection forms were used throughout this QI process to track and guide progress regarding CS waste. Of patients under 6 kg (n = 5), 80% had wasted CS blood before interventions, whereas those patients larger than 36 kg (n = 8) had 25% wasted CS before interventions. Seventy-five percent of patients under 6 kg who had wasted CS blood received packed red blood cell transfusions in the cardiothoracic intensive care unit within 24 hours of their operation. After data collection and didactic education sessions (PDSA Cycle I), CS blood volume waste was reduced to 5% in all patients. Identification and analysis of the root cause followed by implementation of education, training, and management of change (PDSA Cycle II) resulted in successful use of 100% of all CS blood volume. PMID:24783313

  12. Sleep disruption among cancer patients following autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Ashley M; Jim, Heather S L; Small, Brent J; Nishihori, Taiga; Gonzalez, Brian D; Cessna, Julie M; Hyland, Kelly A; Rumble, Meredith E; Jacobsen, Paul B

    2018-03-01

    Despite a high prevalence of sleep disruption among hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients, relatively little research has investigated its relationships with modifiable cognitive or behavioral factors or used actigraphy to characterize sleep disruption in this population. Autologous HCT recipients who were 6-18 months post transplant completed self-report measures of cancer-related distress, fear of cancer recurrence, dysfunctional sleep cognitions, and inhibitory sleep behaviors upon enrollment. Patients then wore an actigraph for 7 days and completed a self-report measure of sleep disruption on day 7 of the study. Among the 84 participants (age M = 60, 45% female), 41% reported clinically relevant sleep disruption. Examination of actigraph data confirmed that, on average, sleep was disrupted (wake after sleep onset M = 66 min) and sleep efficiency was less than recommended (sleep efficiency M = 78%). Cancer-related distress, fear of recurrence, dysfunctional sleep cognitions, and inhibitory sleep behaviors were related to self-reported sleep disruption (p valuesdisruption after transplant. Cancer-related distress, fear of recurrence, dysfunctional sleep cognitions, and maladaptive sleep behaviors are related to self-reported sleep disruption and should be considered targets for cognitive behavioral intervention in this population.

  13. Autologous Platelet-rich Plasma after Third Molar Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandevivala, Adil; Sangle, Amit; Shah, Dinesh; Tejnani, Avneesh; Sayyed, Aatif; Khutwad, Gaurav; Patel, Arpit Arunbhai

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the efficacy of autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP) in the third molar impactions, with respect to: pain, swelling, healing, and periodontal status distal to the second molar in patients who need surgical removal of bilateral impacted mandibular third molars. Twenty-five patients of both sexes aged between 16 and 60 years who required bilateral surgical removal of their impacted third molars and met the inclusion criteria were included in the study. After surgical extraction of the third molar, primary closure was performed in the control group, whereas PRP was placed in the socket followed by primary closure in the case group. The outcome variables were pain, swelling, wound healing, and periodontal probe depth that were follow-up period of 2 months. Quantitative data are presented as mean. Statistical significance was checked by t -test. There was a difference in the pain (0.071) and facial swelling (0.184), reduction between test and control on day 3, but it was not found to be significant. Periodontal pocket depth (0.001) and wound healing (0.001) less in case group compared with the control group was found to be significant. The use of PRP lessens the severity of immediate postoperative sequelae and decreases preoperative pocket depth.

  14. Next generation of adeno-associated virus 2 vectors: Point mutations in tyrosines lead to high-efficiency transduction at lower doses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Li; Li, Baozheng; Mah, Cathryn S.; Govindasamy, Lakshmanan; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Cooper, Mario; Herzog, Roland W.; Zolotukhin, Irene; Warrington, Kenneth H.; Weigel-Van Aken, Kirsten A.; Hobbs, Jacqueline A.; Zolotukhin, Sergei; Muzyczka, Nicholas; Srivastava, Arun

    2008-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) vectors are in use in several Phase I/II clinical trials, but relatively large vector doses are needed to achieve therapeutic benefits. Large vector doses also trigger an immune response as a significant fraction of the vectors fails to traffic efficiently to the nucleus and is targeted for degradation by the host cell proteasome machinery. We have reported that epidermal growth factor receptor protein tyrosine kinase (EGFR-PTK) signaling negatively affects transduction by AAV2 vectors by impairing nuclear transport of the vectors. We have also observed that EGFR-PTK can phosphorylate AAV2 capsids at tyrosine residues. Tyrosine-phosphorylated AAV2 vectors enter cells efficiently but fail to transduce effectively, in part because of ubiquitination of AAV capsids followed by proteasome-mediated degradation. We reasoned that mutations of the surface-exposed tyrosine residues might allow the vectors to evade phosphorylation and subsequent ubiquitination and, thus, prevent proteasome-mediated degradation. Here, we document that site-directed mutagenesis of surface-exposed tyrosine residues leads to production of vectors that transduce HeLa cells ≈10-fold more efficiently in vitro and murine hepatocytes nearly 30-fold more efficiently in vivo at a log lower vector dose. Therapeutic levels of human Factor IX (F.IX) are also produced at an ≈10-fold reduced vector dose. The increased transduction efficiency of tyrosine-mutant vectors is due to lack of capsid ubiquitination and improved intracellular trafficking to the nucleus. These studies have led to the development of AAV vectors that are capable of high-efficiency transduction at lower doses, which has important implications in their use in human gene therapy. PMID:18511559

  15. Design of a hybrid biomaterial for tissue engineering: Biopolymer-scaffold integrated with an autologous hydrogel carrying mesenchymal stem-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein-Oppenheimer, Caroline R; Brown, Donald I; Coloma, Rodrigo; Morales, Patricio; Reyna-Jeldes, Mauricio; Díaz, María J; Sánchez, Elizabeth; Acevedo, Cristian A

    2017-10-01

    Biologically active biomaterials as biopolymers and hydrogels have been used in medical applications providing favorable results in tissue engineering. In this research, a wound dressing device was designed by integration of an autologous clot hydrogel carrying mesenchymal stem-cells onto a biopolymeric scaffold. This hybrid biomaterial was tested in-vitro and in-vivo, and used in a human clinical case. The biopolymeric scaffold was made with gelatin, chitosan and hyaluronic acid, using a freeze-drying method. The scaffold was a porous material which was designed evaluating both physical properties (glass transition, melting temperature and pore size) and biological properties (cell viability and fibronectin expression). Two types of chitosan (120 and 300kDa) were used to manufacture the scaffold, being the high molecular weight the most biologically active and stable after sterilization with gamma irradiation (25kGy). A clot hydrogel was formulated with autologous plasma and calcium chloride, using an approach based on design of experiments. The optimum hydrogel was used to incorporate cells onto the porous scaffold, forming a wound dressing biomaterial. The wound dressing device was firstly tested in-vitro using human cells, and then, its biosecurity was evaluated in-vivo using a rabbit model. The in-vitro results showed high cell viability after one week (99.5%), high mitotic index (19.8%) and high fibronectin expression. The in-vivo application to rabbits showed adequate biodegradability capacity (between 1 and 2weeks), and the histological evaluation confirmed absence of rejection signs and reepithelization on the wound zone. Finally, the wound dressing biomaterial was used in a single human case to implant autologous cells on a skin surgery. The medical examination indicated high biocompatibility, partial biodegradation at one week, early regeneration capacity at 4weeks and absence of rejection signs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Long-term use and follow-up of autologous and homologous cartilage graft in rhinoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghasemali Khorasani

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cartilage grafting is used in rhinoplasty and reconstructive surgeries. Autologous rib and nasal septum cartilage (auto graft is the preferred source of graft material in rhinoplasty, however, homologous cartilage (allograft has been extensively used to correct the nasal framework in nasal deformities. Autologous cartilage graft usage is restricted with complication of operation and limiting availability of tissue for extensive deformities. Alternatively, preserved costal cartilage allograft represents a readily available and easily contoured material. The current study was a formal systematic review of complications associated with autologous versus homologous cartilage grafting in rhinoplasty patients. Methods: In this cohort retrospective study, a total of 124 patients undergone primary or revision rhinoplasty using homologous or autologus grafts with postoperative follow-up ranging from 6 to 60 months were studied. The types of grafts and complications related to the grafts were evaluated. This included evaluation for warping, infection, resorption, mobility and fracture. Results: The total complications related to the cartilage grafts were 7 cases, which included 1 warped in auto graft group, three cases of graft displacement (two in allograft group and one in auto graft group and three fractures in allograft group. No infection and resorption was recorded. Complication rate (confidence interval 0.95 in autologous and homologous group were 1.25(0.4-3.88 and 2.08(0.78-5.55 in 1000 months follow up. There was no statistically significant difference between autologous and homologous group complications. Onset of complication in autologous and homologous group were 51.23(49.27-53.19 and 58.7(54.51-62.91 month respectively (P=0.81. Conclusion: The allograft cartilage has the advantage of avoiding donor-site scar. Moreover, it provides the same benefits as autologous costal cartilage with comparable complication rate. Therefore, it

  17. Outcomes of Autologous Fascia Pubovaginal Sling for Patients with Transvaginal Mesh Related Complications Requiring Mesh Removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Olugbemisola; Vaughan, Taylor; Nickles, S Walker; Ashley, Matt; MacLachlan, Lara S; Ginsberg, David; Rovner, Eric

    2016-08-01

    We reviewed the outcomes of the autologous fascial pubovaginal sling as a salvage procedure for recurrent stress incontinence after intervention for polypropylene mesh erosion/exposure and/or bladder outlet obstruction in patients treated with prior transvaginal synthetic mesh for stress urinary incontinence. In a review of surgical databases at 2 institutions between January 2007 and June 2013 we identified 46 patients who underwent autologous fascial pubovaginal sling following removal of transvaginal synthetic mesh in simultaneous or staged fashion. This cohort of patients was evaluated for outcomes, including subjective and objective success, change in quality of life and complications between those who underwent staged vs concomitant synthetic mesh removal with autologous fascial pubovaginal sling placement. All 46 patients had received at least 1 prior mesh sling for incontinence and 8 (17%) had received prior transvaginal polypropylene mesh for pelvic organ prolapse repair. A total of 30 patients underwent concomitant mesh incision with or without partial excision and autologous sling placement while 16 underwent staged autologous sling placement. Mean followup was 16 months. Of the patients 22% required a mean of 1.8 subsequent interventions an average of 6.5 months after autologous sling placement with no difference in median quality of life at final followup. At last followup 42 of 46 patients (91%) and 35 of 46 (76%) had achieved objective and subjective success, respectively. There was no difference in subjective success between patients treated with a staged vs a concomitant approach (69% vs 80%, p = 0.48). Autologous fascial pubovaginal sling placement after synthetic mesh removal can be performed successfully in patients with stress urinary incontinence as a single or staged procedure. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A protein-tyrosine phosphatase with sequence similarity to the SH2 domain of the protein-tyrosine kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, S H; Bastien, L; Posner, B I; Chrétien, P

    1991-08-22

    The phosphorylation of proteins at tyrosine residues is critical in cellular signal transduction, neoplastic transformation and control of the mitotic cycle. These mechanisms are regulated by the activities of both protein-tyrosine kinases (PTKs) and protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPases). As in the PTKs, there are two classes of PTPases: membrane associated, receptor-like enzymes and soluble proteins. Here we report the isolation of a complementary DNA clone encoding a new form of soluble PTPase, PTP1C. The enzyme possesses a large noncatalytic region at the N terminus which unexpectedly contains two adjacent copies of the Src homology region 2 (the SH2 domain) found in various nonreceptor PTKs and other cytoplasmic signalling proteins. As with other SH2 sequences, the SH2 domains of PTP1C formed high-affinity complexes with the activated epidermal growth factor receptor and other phosphotyrosine-containing proteins. These results suggest that the SH2 regions in PTP1C may interact with other cellular components to modulate its own phosphatase activity against interacting substrates. PTPase activity may thus directly link growth factor receptors and other signalling proteins through protein-tyrosine phosphorylation.

  19. C-Terminal Tyrosine Residue Modifications Modulate the Protective Phosphorylation of Serine 129 of α-Synuclein in a Yeast Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinknecht, Alexandra; Popova, Blagovesta; Lázaro, Diana F; Pinho, Raquel; Valerius, Oliver; Outeiro, Tiago F; Braus, Gerhard H

    2016-06-01

    Parkinson´s disease (PD) is characterized by the presence of proteinaceous inclusions called Lewy bodies that are mainly composed of α-synuclein (αSyn). Elevated levels of oxidative or nitrative stresses have been implicated in αSyn related toxicity. Phosphorylation of αSyn on serine 129 (S129) modulates autophagic clearance of inclusions and is prominently found in Lewy bodies. The neighboring tyrosine residues Y125, Y133 and Y136 are phosphorylation and nitration sites. Using a yeast model of PD, we found that Y133 is required for protective S129 phosphorylation and for S129-independent proteasome clearance. αSyn can be nitrated and form stable covalent dimers originating from covalent crosslinking of two tyrosine residues. Nitrated tyrosine residues, but not di-tyrosine-crosslinked dimers, contributed to αSyn cytotoxicity and aggregation. Analysis of tyrosine residues involved in nitration and crosslinking revealed that the C-terminus, rather than the N-terminus of αSyn, is modified by nitration and di-tyrosine formation. The nitration level of wild-type αSyn was higher compared to that of A30P mutant that is non-toxic in yeast. A30P formed more dimers than wild-type αSyn, suggesting that dimer formation represents a cellular detoxification pathway in yeast. Deletion of the yeast flavohemoglobin gene YHB1 resulted in an increase of cellular nitrative stress and cytotoxicity leading to enhanced aggregation of A30P αSyn. Yhb1 protected yeast from A30P-induced mitochondrial fragmentation and peroxynitrite-induced nitrative stress. Strikingly, overexpression of neuroglobin, the human homolog of YHB1, protected against αSyn inclusion formation in mammalian cells. In total, our data suggest that C-terminal Y133 plays a major role in αSyn aggregate clearance by supporting the protective S129 phosphorylation for autophagy and by promoting proteasome clearance. C-terminal tyrosine nitration increases pathogenicity and can only be partially detoxified by

  20. A new monoclonal antibody detects downregulation of protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type γ in chronic myeloid leukemia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzia Vezzalini

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor gamma (PTPRG is a ubiquitously expressed member of the protein tyrosine phosphatase family known to act as a tumor suppressor gene in many different neoplasms with mechanisms of inactivation including mutations and methylation of CpG islands in the promoter region. Although a critical role in human hematopoiesis and an oncosuppressor role in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML have been reported, only one polyclonal antibody (named chPTPRG has been described as capable of recognizing the native antigen of this phosphatase by flow cytometry. Protein biomarkers of CML have not yet found applications in the clinic, and in this study, we have analyzed a group of newly diagnosed CML patients before and after treatment. The aim of this work was to characterize and exploit a newly developed murine monoclonal antibody specific for the PTPRG extracellular domain (named TPγ B9-2 to better define PTPRG protein downregulation in CML patients. Methods TPγ B9-2 specifically recognizes PTPRG (both human and murine by flow cytometry, western blotting, immunoprecipitation, and immunohistochemistry. Results Co-localization experiments performed with both anti-PTPRG antibodies identified the presence of isoforms and confirmed protein downregulation at diagnosis in the Philadelphia-positive myeloid lineage (including CD34+/CD38bright/dim cells. After effective tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI treatment, its expression recovered in tandem with the return of Philadelphia-negative hematopoiesis. Of note, PTPRG mRNA levels remain unchanged in tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI non-responder patients, confirming that downregulation selectively occurs in primary CML cells. Conclusions The availability of this unique antibody permits its evaluation for clinical application including the support for diagnosis and follow-up of these disorders. Evaluation of PTPRG as a potential therapeutic target is also facilitated by the

  1. Exploring the sensitivity of ZnO nanotubes to tyrosine nitration: A DFT approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maddahi, Pari Sadat; Shahtahmassebi, Nasser; Rezaee Roknabadi, Mahmood; Moosavi, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Due to association of protein tyrosine nitration (PTN) with development of some serious human disorders and diseases, in this paper, the possible applications of ZnO-based nanobiosensors in nitrated tyrosine (nTyr) detection were explored within the density functional framework. With this motivation, the interaction of nTyr with ZnO single walled nanotubes via all possible active sites of nTyr was investigated. The results show the tendency of nTyr to interact through its nitro site (forming nitro-site configuration) with ZnO SWNTs as it has the highest binding energy; while, the charge–solvent configuration involving the interaction of nTyr's phenolic ring has the second place in terms of binding energy magnitude. Regardless of which active site contributes in interaction, the binding energies exhibit an ascending trend with decrease of SWNTs' curvature. Electronic properties analysis indicates that nTyr interaction via its nitro group results in formation of some flat bands inside the band gap region leading to significant reduction of overall band gap energy. Similar behavior is also observed in charge–solvent configuration but the band gap energy is larger. These red shifts are mainly attributed to contribution of 2p orbitals of species present in nTyr. Also, the hybridization of 3d orbital of Zn atom with 2p orbitals of nitro group atomic species is found responsible for bonding formation in bioconjugated system possessing the highest binding energy. Comparison of the electronic band structure of ZnO SWNT–Tyr with that of ZnO SWNT–nTyr indicates the sensitivity of ZnO SWNTs toward tyrosine nitration hence, a considerable change in its optical spectra is expectable. This introduces ZnO SWNTs as a promising candidate for PTN detection. - Highlights: • Physical properties of ZnO SWNT conjugated with nTyr is studied by DFT method. • nTyr prefers to interact with ZnO SWNTs via the nitro site. • An ascending trend is observed in binding energy by

  2. Mechanisms underlying the inhibitory effects of arsenic compounds on protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, Kanwal; Chen, Zhe; Wang, Wen Wen; Wang, Yan Wei; Sakamoto, Akira; Zhang, Yan Fang; Naranmandura, Hua; Suzuki, Noriyuki

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic binding to biomolecules is considered one of the major toxic mechanisms, which may also be related to the carcinogenic risks of arsenic in humans. At the same time, arsenic is also known to activate the phosphorylation-dependent signaling pathways including the epidermal growth factor receptor, the mitogen-activated protein kinase and insulin/insulin-like growth factor-1 pathways. These signaling pathways originate at the level of receptor tyrosine kinases whose phosphorylation status is regulated by opposing protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity. Reversible tyrosine phosphorylation, which is governed by the balanced action of protein tyrosine kinases and phosphatases, regulates important signaling pathways that are involved in the control of cell proliferation, adhesion and migration. In the present study, we have focused on the interaction of cellular PTPs with toxic trivalent arsenite (iAs III ) and its intermediate metabolites such as monomethylarsonous acid (MMA III ) and dimethylarsinous acid (DMA III ) in vitro, and then determined the arsenic binding site in PTP by the use of recombinant PTPs (e.g., PTP1B and CD45). Interestingly, the activities of PTP1B (cytoplasm-form) or CD45 (receptor-linked form) were observed to be strongly inhibited by both methylated metabolites (i.e., MMA III and DMA III ) but not by iAs III . Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has clearly confirmed that the organic intermediate, DMA III directly bound to the active site cysteine residue of PTP1B (e.g., Cys215), resulting in inhibition of enzyme activity. These results suggest that arsenic exposure may disturb the cellular signaling pathways through PTP inactivation. Highlights: ► This study focused on the interaction of PTPs with trivalent arsenicals in vitro. ► We for the first time confirmed that DMA III strongly inhibited activity of PTP1B. ► DMA III directly bound to PTP1B, resulting in inhibition of

  3. Exploring the sensitivity of ZnO nanotubes to tyrosine nitration: A DFT approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maddahi, Pari Sadat [Department of Physics, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nanoresearch Center, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shahtahmassebi, Nasser, E-mail: Nasser@um.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nanoresearch Center, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rezaee Roknabadi, Mahmood [Department of Physics, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moosavi, Fatemeh [Department of Chemistry, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-05-27

    Due to association of protein tyrosine nitration (PTN) with development of some serious human disorders and diseases, in this paper, the possible applications of ZnO-based nanobiosensors in nitrated tyrosine (nTyr) detection were explored within the density functional framework. With this motivation, the interaction of nTyr with ZnO single walled nanotubes via all possible active sites of nTyr was investigated. The results show the tendency of nTyr to interact through its nitro site (forming nitro-site configuration) with ZnO SWNTs as it has the highest binding energy; while, the charge–solvent configuration involving the interaction of nTyr's phenolic ring has the second place in terms of binding energy magnitude. Regardless of which active site contributes in interaction, the binding energies exhibit an ascending trend with decrease of SWNTs' curvature. Electronic properties analysis indicates that nTyr interaction via its nitro group results in formation of some flat bands inside the band gap region leading to significant reduction of overall band gap energy. Similar behavior is also observed in charge–solvent configuration but the band gap energy is larger. These red shifts are mainly attributed to contribution of 2p orbitals of species present in nTyr. Also, the hybridization of 3d orbital of Zn atom with 2p orbitals of nitro group atomic species is found responsible for bonding formation in bioconjugated system possessing the highest binding energy. Comparison of the electronic band structure of ZnO SWNT–Tyr with that of ZnO SWNT–nTyr indicates the sensitivity of ZnO SWNTs toward tyrosine nitration hence, a considerable change in its optical spectra is expectable. This introduces ZnO SWNTs as a promising candidate for PTN detection. - Highlights: • Physical properties of ZnO SWNT conjugated with nTyr is studied by DFT method. • nTyr prefers to interact with ZnO SWNTs via the nitro site. • An ascending trend is observed in binding

  4. Site specific interaction between ZnO nanoparticles and tyrosine: A density functional theory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Satvinder; Singh, Janpreet; Singh, Baljinder; Singh, Gurinder; Kaura, Aman; Tripathi, S. K.

    2018-05-01

    First Principles Calculations have been performed on ZnO/Tyrosine atomic complex to study site specific interaction of Tyrosine and ZnO nanoparticles. Calculated results shows that -COOH group present in Tyrosine is energetically more favorable than -NH2 group. Interactions show ionic bonding between ZnO and Tyrosine. All the calculations have been performed under the Density Functional Theory (DFT) framework. Structural and electronic properties of (ZnO)3/Tyrosine complex have been studied. Gaussian basis set approach has been adopted for the calculations. A ring type most stable (ZnO)3 atomic cluster has been modeled, analyzed and used for the calculations.

  5. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of rat protein tyrosine phosphatase η

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matozo, Huita C.; Nascimento, Alessandro S.; Santos, Maria A. M. [Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Departamento de Física e Informática, Universidade de São Paulo, Avenida Trabalhador São Carlense 400, CEP 13566-590 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Iuliano, Rodolfo [Dipartimento di Medicina Sperimentale e Clinica, Facoltà di Medicina e Chirurgia, Università di Catanzaro, 88100 Catanzaro (Italy); Fusco, Alfredo [Dipartimento di Biologia e Patologia Cellulare e Molecolare, c/o Instituto di Endocrinologia ed Oncologia Sperimentale del CNR, Facolta di Medicina e Chirurgia, Università degli Studi di Napoli ‘Federico II’, Via Pansini 5, 80131 Naples (Italy); NOGEC (Naples Oncogenomocs Center)-CEINGE, Biotecnologie Avanzate, Via Comunale Margherita 482, 80145 Naples (Italy); Polikarpov, Igor, E-mail: ipolikarpov@if.sc.usp.br [Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Departamento de Física e Informática, Universidade de São Paulo, Avenida Trabalhador São Carlense 400, CEP 13566-590 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Laboratório Nacional de Luz Síncrotron, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2006-09-01

    In this study, the catalytic domain of rat protein tyrosine phosphatase η was produced in Escherichia coli in soluble form and purified to homogeneity. Crystals were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The rat protein tyrosine phosphatase η (rPTPη) is a cysteine-dependent phosphatase which hydrolyzes phosphoester bonds in proteins and other molecules. rPTPη and its human homologue DEP-1 are involved in neoplastic transformations. Thus, expression of the protein is reduced in all oncogene-transformed thyroid cell lines and is absent in highly malignant thyroid cells. Moreover, consistent with the suggested tumour suppression role of PTPη, inhibition of the tumorigenic process occurs after its exogenous reconstitution, suggesting that PTPη might be important for gene therapy of cancers. In this study, the catalytic domain of rPTPη was produced in Escherichia coli in soluble form and purified to homogeneity. Crystals were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Diffraction data were collected to 1.87 Å resolution. The crystal belongs to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 46.46, b = 63.07, c = 111.64 Å, and contains one molecule per asymmetric unit.

  6. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of rat protein tyrosine phosphatase η

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matozo, Huita C.; Nascimento, Alessandro S.; Santos, Maria A. M.; Iuliano, Rodolfo; Fusco, Alfredo; Polikarpov, Igor

    2006-01-01

    In this study, the catalytic domain of rat protein tyrosine phosphatase η was produced in Escherichia coli in soluble form and purified to homogeneity. Crystals were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The rat protein tyrosine phosphatase η (rPTPη) is a cysteine-dependent phosphatase which hydrolyzes phosphoester bonds in proteins and other molecules. rPTPη and its human homologue DEP-1 are involved in neoplastic transformations. Thus, expression of the protein is reduced in all oncogene-transformed thyroid cell lines and is absent in highly malignant thyroid cells. Moreover, consistent with the suggested tumour suppression role of PTPη, inhibition of the tumorigenic process occurs after its exogenous reconstitution, suggesting that PTPη might be important for gene therapy of cancers. In this study, the catalytic domain of rPTPη was produced in Escherichia coli in soluble form and purified to homogeneity. Crystals were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Diffraction data were collected to 1.87 Å resolution. The crystal belongs to space group P2 1 2 1 2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 46.46, b = 63.07, c = 111.64 Å, and contains one molecule per asymmetric unit

  7. Negative Regulation of Receptor Tyrosine Kinase (RTK Signaling: A Developing Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Ledda

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available ophic factors control cellular physiology by activating specific receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs. While the over activation of RTK signaling pathways is associated with cell growth and cancer, recent findings support the concept that impaired down-regulation or deactivation of RTKs may also be a mechanism involved in tumor formation. Under this perspective, the molecular determinants of RTK signaling inhibition may act as tumor-suppressor genes and have a potential role as tumor markers to monitor and predict disease progression. Here, we review the current understanding of the physiological mechanisms that attenuate RTK signaling and discuss evidence that implicates deregulation of these events in cancer.Abbreviations: BDP1: Brain-derived phosphatase 1; Cbl: Casitas B-lineage lymphoma; CIN-85: Cbl-interacting protein of 85 kDa; DER: Drosophila EGFR; EGFR: Epidermal growth factor receptor; ERK 1/2: Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2; Grb2: Growth factor receptor-bound protein 2; HER2: Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2; LRIG: Leucine-rich repeats and immunoglobulin-like domain 1; MAPK: Mitogen-activated protein kinase; Mig 6: Mitogen-inducible gene 6; PTEN: Phosphatase and tensin homologue; RET: Rearranged in transformation; RTK: Receptor tyrosine kinase. SH2 domain: Src-homology 2 domain; SH3 domain: Src-homology 3 domain; Spry: Sprouty.

  8. Lemur Tyrosine Kinase-3 Suppresses Growth of Prostate Cancer Via the AKT and MAPK Signaling Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengcheng Sun

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Lemur tyrosine kinase (LMTK-3 is a member of the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK family. Abnormal expression of LMTK-3 exists in various types of cancers, especially in endocrine-resistant breast cancers; however, the precise level of expression and the biological function in prostate cancer are poorly understood. Methods: In the present study, we determined the expression of LMTK-3 in prostate cancer using immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. We infected PC3 and LNCaP cells with lentivirus-LMTK-3 and observed the biologic characteristics of the PC3 and LNCaP cells in vitro with TUNEL, and migration and invasion assays, respectively. We also established a transplant tumor model of human prostate cancer with infected cells in 15 BALB/c-nu/nu nude mice. Results: LMTK-3 was expressed in prostate epithelial cells. There was a significant decline in the level of LMTK-3 expression in prostate cancers compared to normal tissues. LMTK-3 inhibited PC3 and LNCaP cell growth, migration, and invasion, and induced cell apoptosis in vitro. We also observed that LMTK-3 induced PC3 cell apoptosis in vivo. Further study showed that LMTK-3 inhibited phosphorylation of AKT and ERK, and promoted phosphorylation and activation of p38 kinase and Jun kinase (JNK. Conclusion: Recombinant lentivirus with enhanced expression of LMTK-3 inhibited prostate cancer cell growth and induced apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. AKT and MAPK signaling pathways may contribute to the process.

  9. Preeclampsia in autologous and oocyte donation pregnancy: is there a different pathophysiology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lashley, Lisa E E L O; Buurma, Aletta; Swings, Godelieve M J S; Eikmans, Michael; Anholts, Jacqueline D H; Bakker, Jaap A; Claas, Frans H J

    2015-06-01

    Oocyte donation (OD) is a specific method of artificial reproductive technology that is accompanied by a higher risk of preeclampsia during pregnancy. The pathophysiological mechanism underlying preeclampsia in OD pregnancies is thought to differ from preeclampsia in autologous pregnancies. As preeclampsia in autologous pregnancies is suggested to be associated with complement activation, we studied C4d deposition, circulating complement components and placental complement regulatory proteins in preeclamptic OD pregnancies. Women with uncomplicated and preeclamptic pregnancies after OD or spontaneous conception were selected. We stained the placentas for C4d, marker for complement activation, measured complement factors C1q, C3 and C4 in maternal sera and quantified the placental mRNA expression of complement regulatory proteins CD46, CD55 and CD59. A significantly (p preeclampsia compared with uncomplicated pregnancies, both OD and autologous. The level of complement factors in serum did not differ between the groups. Children born in the autologous preeclampsia group were significantly lower in birth weight (p preeclampsia pregnancies, there is excessive activation of complement in preeclamptic OD pregnancies. However, in contrast to autologous pregnancies this is not associated with counterbalancing upregulation of complement regulatory proteins. Furthermore, C4d deposition in OD pregnancies is not related to the severity of preeclampsia, suggesting another trigger or regulatory mechanism of placental C4d deposition in preeclamptic OD pregnancies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Autologous fibrin sealant (Vivostat®) in the neurosurgical practice: Part I: Intracranial surgical procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziano, Francesca; Certo, Francesco; Basile, Luigi; Maugeri, Rosario; Grasso, Giovanni; Meccio, Flavia; Ganau, Mario; Iacopino, Domenico G.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hemorrhages, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fistula and infections are the most challenging postoperative complications in Neurosurgery. In this study, we report our preliminary results using a fully autologous fibrin sealant agent, the Vivostat® system, in achieving hemostasis and CSF leakage repair during cranio-cerebral procedures. Methods: From January 2012 to March 2014, 77 patients were studied prospectively and data were collected and analyzed. Autologous fibrin sealant, taken from patient's blood, was prepared with the Vivostat® system and applied on the resection bed or above the dura mater to achieve hemostasis and dural sealing. The surgical technique, time to bleeding control and associated complications were recorded. Results: A total of 79 neurosurgical procedures have been performed on 77 patients. In the majority of cases (98%) the same autologous fibrin glue provided rapid hemostasis and dural sealing. No patient developed allergic reactions or systemic complications in association with its application. There were no cases of cerebral hematoma, swelling, infection, or epileptic seizures after surgery whether in the immediate or in late period follow-up. Conclusions: In this preliminary study, the easy and direct application of autologous fibrin sealant agent helped in controlling cerebral bleeding and in providing prompt and efficient dural sealing with resolution of CSF leaks. Although the use of autologous fibrin glue seems to be safe, easy, and effective, further investigations are strongly recommended to quantify real advantages and potential limitations. PMID:25984391

  11. Autologous tenocyte therapy for experimental Achilles tendinopathy in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jimin; Yu, Qian; Wu, Bing; Lin, Zhen; Pavlos, Nathan J; Xu, Jiake; Ouyang, Hongwei; Wang, Allan; Zheng, Ming H

    2011-08-01

    Tendinopathy of the Achilles tendon is a chronic degenerative condition that frequently does not respond to treatment. In the current study, we propose that autologous tenocytes therapy (ATT) is effective in treating tendon degeneration in a collagenase-induced rabbit Achilles tendinopathy model. Chronic tendinopathy was created in the left Achilles tendon of 44 rabbits by an intratendonous injection of type I collagenase. Fo