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Sample records for autoionizing resonances observed

  1. Observation of autoionization resonances in uranium by step-wise laser photoionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manohar, K.G.; Bajaj, P.N.; Suri, B.M.; Talukdar, R.; Dasgupta, K.; Chakraborti, P.K.; Rao, P.R.K.

    1989-06-01

    A large number of autoionization resonances have been observed in uranium in the energy range 50,590-51,560 cm/sup -1/ by two-step three-photon ionization technique, using two copper vapor laser pumped dye lasers. A Rydberg series converging to the ionization limit of UII at 1749 cm/sup -1/ (/sup 6/L/sub 13/2/) has been identified. Some of these resonances are very narrow with a fwhm of 0.1 cm/sup -1/. Possible origins of these are discussed.

  2. Identification of weak autoionizing resonances observed through fluorescence from the satellite states of Ar{sup +}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLaughlin, K.W.; Yenen, O.; Samson, J.A.R. [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Photoionization accompanied by excitation of the residual ionic state violates an independent electron model since, according to QED, photons interact only with individual electrons. By allowing measurements at a threshold event with high resolution, the observation of the fluorescence from the decay of these excited states (satellite states) is a sensitive method in the study of electron-electron interactions, providing complementary information to photoelectron spectroscopy. In the measurements reported here, an atomic beam of argon has been photoionized with 34 to 39 eV synchrotron radiation at beamline 9.0.1 of the Advanced Light Source. This energy range encompasses the 3p{sup 4} [{sup 3}P] 4p {sup 4}P, {sup 2}P, and {sup 2}D as well as the [{sup 1}D]4p {sup 2}F satellite states of Ar{sup +}. By observing the fine-structure resolved fluorescence from these satellite states, new Rydberg series and extensions of previously known series have been resolved with an energy resolution of 3 meV. With the high photon flux available from the high resolution monochromator of beamline 9.0.1, even the weakly excited [{sup 3}P] 4p ({sup 2}S) ns,d autoionizing structure has been observed for the first time.

  3. Identification of weak autoionizing resonances observed through fluorescence from the satellite states of Ar+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaughlin, K.W.; Yenen, O.; Samson, J.A.R.

    1997-01-01

    Photoionization accompanied by excitation of the residual ionic state violates an independent electron model since, according to QED, photons interact only with individual electrons. By allowing measurements at a threshold event with high resolution, the observation of the fluorescence from the decay of these excited states (satellite states) is a sensitive method in the study of electron-electron interactions, providing complementary information to photoelectron spectroscopy. In the measurements reported here, an atomic beam of argon has been photoionized with 34 to 39 eV synchrotron radiation at beamline 9.0.1 of the Advanced Light Source. This energy range encompasses the 3p 4 [ 3 P] 4p 4 P, 2 P, and 2 D as well as the [ 1 D]4p 2 F satellite states of Ar + . By observing the fine-structure resolved fluorescence from these satellite states, new Rydberg series and extensions of previously known series have been resolved with an energy resolution of 3 meV. With the high photon flux available from the high resolution monochromator of beamline 9.0.1, even the weakly excited [ 3 P] 4p ( 2 S) ns,d autoionizing structure has been observed for the first time

  4. Three-photon resonances due to autoionizing states in calcium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zawadzka, A.; Dygdala, R.S.; Raczynski, A.; Zaremba, J.; Kobus, J. [Instytut Fizyki, Uniwersytet M Kopernika w Toruniu, Torun (Poland)

    2002-04-28

    In the present study we have investigated three-photon ionization in Ca in which autoionizing states are engaged. The two-photon resonant process (from the Ca ground state 4s{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0}) occurred through or at least in the vicinity of one of the following states: 4s4d {sup 1}D{sub 2}, 4p{sup 2} {sup 3}P{sub 2}, 4s6s {sup 1}S{sub 0}, 4p{sup 2} {sup 1}D{sub 2} and 4p{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0}, with the third photon either reaching the continuum directly or one of the autoionizing states. The three-photon resonant transitions to 3dmp, mf: {sup 1}P{sub 1}, {sup 3}P{sub 1} and {sup 3}D{sub 1} autoionizing states for m up to 21 have been observed. Some of the autoionizing resonances which we have found had not been observed before in a high-resolution one-photon absorption experiment (for J=1) and in multiphoton experiments (for J=3). We have compared the ionization signal as a function of the laser detuning and the laser intensity with theoretical curves obtained within a simple model (three-level atom + one-mode laser field). This gives information about the order of magnitude of the three-photon ionization probability through autoionizing states. (author)

  5. Autoionization resonances in the photoabsorption spectra of Fe{sup n+} iron ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konovalov, A. V., E-mail: alkonvit@yandex.ru; Ipatov, A. N., E-mail: andrei-ipatov@mail.ru [Peter the Great St. Petersburg State Polytechnic University (Russian Federation)

    2016-11-15

    The photoabsorption cross sections of a neutral iron atom, as well as positive Fe{sup +} and Fe{sup 2+} ions, are calculated in the relativistic random-phase approximation with exchange in the energy range 20–160 eV. The wavefunctions of the ground and excited states are calculated in the single-configuration Hartree–Fock–Dirac approximation. The resultant photoabsorption spectra are compared with experimental data and with the results of calculations based on the nonrelativistic spin-polarized version of the random-phase approximation with exchange. Series of autoionization resonance peaks, as well as giant autoionization resonance lines corresponding to discrete transitions 3p → 3d, are clearly observed in the photoabsorption cross sections. The conformity of the positions of calculated peaks of giant autoionization resonances with experimental data is substantially improved by taking into account additionally the correlation electron–electron interaction based on the model of the dynamic polarization potential.

  6. Precision angle-resolved autoionization resonances in Ar and Ne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berrah, N.; Langer, B.; Gorczyca, T.W. [Western Michigan Univ., Kalamazoo, MI (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Theoretical work has shown that the electron angular distribution and the shape of the autoionization resonances are crucial to the understanding of certain types of electron-electron correlation. Autoionization resonances in Ne (Ar) result from the decay of the excited discrete state Ne{sup *} 2s2p{sup 6} np (Ar{sup *} 3s3p{sup 6} np) into the continuum state Ne{sup +} 2s{sup 2}2p{sup 5} + e{sup {minus}} (ks,kd) (Ar{sup +} 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 5} + e{sup {minus}} (ks,kd)). Since the continuum can also be reached by direct photoionization, both paths add coherently, giving rise to interferences that produce the characteristic Beutler-Fano line shape. In this work, the authors report on quantitative angle-resolved electron spectrometry studies of (a) the Ne 2s{sup 2}2p{sup 6} {r_arrow} 2s2p{sup 6} np (n=3-5) autoionizing resonances and the 2s{sup 2}2p{sup 6} {r_arrow} 2p{sup 4}3s3p doubly excited resonance, (b) the Ar 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 6} {r_arrow} 3s3p{sup 6} np (n=4-9) autoionization resonances and extended R-matrix calculations of the angular-distribution parameters for both Ne and Ar measurements. Their results are compared with previous theoretical work by Taylor.

  7. Laser-optogalvanic studies of the 4p5 ns and nd autoionizing resonances in krypton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baig, M A; Hanif, M; Aslam, M

    2008-01-01

    We report new measurements of the odd-parity autoionizing resonances in krypton using resonant two-photon excitation from the 4p 5 5s[3/2] 2 metastable level in a mild DC discharge and an optogalvanic detection technique. We have observed the 4p 5 ns [1/2] 0,1 , 4p 5 nd [3/2] 2 and 4p 5 nd [5/2] 2,3 autoionizing resonances excited from three intermediate levels 4p 5 5p' [1/2] 1 , 4p 5 5p' [3/2] 1 and 4p 5 5p' [3/2] 2 . The spectra are notable for the absence of the broad autoionizing 4p 5 nd [3/2] 1 series which dominates in the photo-absorption spectrum from the ground state. The prominent transitions follow ΔK = ΔJ = Δl selection rules of the JK-coupling scheme. We report nearly 100 new energy levels in krypton besides the quantum defects and the reduced widths Γ r Γ(ν) 3 of the nd' [3/2] 2 , nd' [5/2] 2 and nd' [5/2] 3 Rydberg states

  8. Isotopically resolved photoelectron imaging unravels complex atomic autoionization dynamics by two-color resonant ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keeffe, P; Gryzlova, E V; Cubaynes, D; Garcia, G A; Nahon, L; Grum-Grzhimailo, A N; Meyer, M

    2013-12-13

    Angle-resolved electron spectroscopy in coincidence with high-resolution mass spectroscopy has been applied to study two-color resonant photoionization in atomic xenon. Separation of different isotopes enabled us to extract results for the electronic dynamics free from depolarization effects, which are generally introduced by the coupling of the electronic and nuclear angular momenta. The concerted experimental and theoretical analysis of the photoelectron angular distributions in the region of an autoionizing resonance emphasizes the strong sensitivity of the observed structures to the fine details of the treatment of the underlying dynamics.

  9. Resonant excitation and the decay of autoionization states in a strong electromagnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andryushin, A.I.; Kazakov, A.E.; Fedorov, M.V.

    1985-01-01

    Photoionization of atoms involving resonant excitation of the auto-ionization state is studied. The evolution of the total ionization probability, its dependence on the frequency of the resonance radiation and also the photoelectron energy spectrum are investigated. It is shown that the energy of the final state of the system may be localized either in the vicinity of E approximately Esub(α), where Esub(α) is the auto-ionization energy, or in the vicinity of E approximately Esub(α)+h/2πω where h/2πω is the quantum energy of the resonance radiation. The photoelectron specturum in the region E approximately Esub(α)+h/2πω as a whole is similar to the electron spectrum on photoionization of atoms involving resonance excitation of the bound state. A strong effect on the photoelectron spectrum in the region E approximately Esub(α) is exerted by interference of various decay channels of the ground state in the resonance field which leads to the appearance in the spectrum of a characteristic structure of the Fano type. Interence also affects the widths of the two spectral curves, the relatve amount of electrons in the two energy ranges and also other characteristics of the ionization process. It is shown that the presence of a noninterfering photoionization channel of the autoionization state ensures the finiteness of the swidths and heights of the spectral curves and the absence of complete ''coherency merging''

  10. Even-parity Rydberg and autoionizing states of lutetium by laser resonance-ionization spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, R.; Lassen, J.; Zhong, Z. P.; Jia, F. D.; Mostamand, M.; Li, X. K.; Reich, B. B.; Teigelhöfer, A.; Yan, H.

    2017-05-01

    Multistep laser resonance ionization spectroscopy of lutetium (Lu) has been performed at TRIUMF's off-line laser ion source test stand. The even-parity Rydberg series 6 s2n d 2D3 /2 , 6 s2n d 2D5 /2 , and 6 s2n s 2S1 /2 were observed converging to the 6 s2 ionization potential. The experimental results have been compared to those of previous work. Fifty-one levels of Rydberg series 6 s2n d 2D5 /2 and 52 levels of Rydberg series 6 s2n s 2S1 /2 were reported. Additionally, six even-parity autoionization (AI) series converging to Lu ionic states 5 d 6 s 3D1 and 5 d 6 s 3D2 were observed. The level energies of these AI states were measured. The configurations of the AI states were assigned by relativistic multichannel theory within the framework of multichannel quantum defect theory.

  11. The identification of autoionizing states of atomic chromium for the resonance ionization laser ion source of the ISOLDE radioactive ion beam facility

    CERN Document Server

    Goodacre, T Day; Fedorovc, D; Fedosseev, V N; Marsh, B A; Molkanov, P; Rossel, R E; Rothe, S; Seiffert, C

    2015-01-01

    The resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) is the principal ion source of the ISOLDE radioactive beam facility based at CERN. Using the method of in-source resonance ionization spectroscopy, an optimal three-step, three-resonance photo-ionization scheme has been developed for chromium. The scheme uses an ionizing transition to one of the 14 newly observed autoionizing states. This work increases the range of ISOLDE-RILIS ionized beams to 32 chemical elements. Details of the spectroscopic studies are described and the new ionization scheme is summarized. A link to the complete version of this document will be added here following publication:

  12. Observation of Cd 4d95s25p J=3 autoionizing levels in (e,2e) energy spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, N.L.S.; Bauman, R.P.; Wilson, M.

    1998-01-01

    Cadmium (e,2e) energy spectra have been measured for kinematics corresponding to a momentum transfer of 1 a.u. Two previously unknown cadmium autoinizing levels have been observed. Their energies are in excellent agreement with existing ab initio structure calculations of the 4d 9 5s 2 5p J=3 levels. One level is easily seen at an ejected-electron direction along the momentum-transfer axis, but is absent for a direction 39 degree away from this axis. The opposite is true for the other level; it is absent in the former, but present in the latter case. This behavior is in agreement with a calculation that takes into account that the J=3 levels can autoionize into both singlet and triplet 5sEf continua. The intensity of the new levels, relative to the well-known 4d 9 5s 2 5p J=1 levels, agrees well with a plane-wave Born approximation calculation for the J=3 levels. The third 4d 9 5s 2 5p J=3 level is calculated to lie within the broad 4d 9 5s 2 5p 1 P 1 level and cannot be seen in the present experiments. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  13. Polarization of fluorescence: a probe of molecular autoionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leroi, G.E.; Dehmer, J.L.; Parr, A.C.; Poliakoff, E.D.

    1983-01-01

    The polarization of fluorescence from excited-state molecular photoions provides a direct probe of the photoionization dynamics and the symmetry signatures of autoionizing resonances. Measurements on CO 2 and CS 2 are presented as examples

  14. Three-colour photoionization optogalvanic spectroscopy in U-Ne hollow cathode discharges: observation of even-parity autoionization states of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandal, P.K.; Seema, A.U.; Das, R.C.; Shah, M.L.; Dev, Vas; Suri, B.M.

    2013-01-01

    Three-colour three-step photoionization spectroscopy of uranium has been performed in a U-Ne hollow cathode discharge tube by temporally resolving three-colour photoionization optogalvanic (PIOG) signal from the normal optogalvanic (OG) signal using three tunable pulsed dye lasers. U-Ne hollow cathode discharge tube has been used as a source of uranium atomic vapour and photoionization detector. Using this technique, photoionization spectra of uranium have been investigated systematically in the energy region 52150-52590 cm -1 , through three different excitation pathways, originating from its ground state, 0 cm -1 ( 5 L 0 6 ). By analyzing the three-colour photoionization spectra sixty new even-parity autoionization resonances of uranium have been identified and their probable total angular momentum (J) values have been assigned according to the J-momentum selection rule. (author)

  15. High resolution autoionization spectra in atomic uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paisner, J.A.; Solarz, R.W.; Carlson, L.R.; May, C.A.; Johnson, S.A.

    1975-11-17

    High resolution (less than or equal to .5 cm/sup -1/) autoionization spectra of atomic uranium has been observed from newly identified odd parity levels between 32,660 and 34,165 cm/sup -1/. Photoionization cross sections are presented.

  16. Field-induced narrowing of auto-ionization atomic states as a way of creating inverse population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotochigova, S.A.

    1990-10-01

    We discuss the possibility of narrowing the atomic auto-ionization states via their resonance mixing in a field. The results of Ref.1 show that, in contrast to the mixing of isolated states, with mixing of multiplets one may expect substantial narrowing of auto-ionization states owing to their intersection with bound electron states. (author). 5 refs, 5 figs, 1 tab

  17. Autoionizing states driven by stochastic electromagnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouloudakis, G.; Lambropoulos, P.

    2018-01-01

    We have examined the profile of an isolated autoionizing resonance driven by a pulse of short duration and moderately strong field. The analysis has been based on stochastic differential equations governing the time evolution of the density matrix under a stochastic field. Having focused our quantitative analysis on the 2{{s}}2{{p}}({}1{{P}}) resonance of helium, we have investigated the role of field fluctuations and of the duration of the pulse. We report surprisingly strong distortion of the profile, even for peak intensity below the strong field limit. Our results demonstrate the intricate connection between intensity and pulse duration, with the latter appearing to be the determining influence, even for a seemingly short pulse of 50 fs. Further effects that would arise under much shorter pulses are discussed.

  18. Autoionization spectra of He excited by fast (MeV) H/sup +/, He/sup +/, and Li/sup n+/ (n = 1,2,3) ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, D.; Arcuni, P.; Bruch, P.; Stoeffler, W.

    1983-01-01

    Autoionization spectra of He following excitation by 1 to 3 MeV H/sup +/, He/sup +/, and Li/sup n+/ (n = 1,2,3) have been measured as a function of observation angle. The (2p/sup 2/)/sup 1/D and (2s2p)/sup 1/P resonances have been examined and a strong dependence on projectile velocities, charge state and observation angle was found.

  19. Coulomb focusing and path'' interference of autoionizing electrons produced in 10 keV He sup + + He collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swenson, J.K. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Burgdoerfer, J. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA)); Meyer, F.W.; Havener, C.C.; Gregory, D.C.; Stolterfoht, N. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1991-03-13

    Autoionizing electrons emitted following low energy ion-atom collisions may scatter significantly from the receding spectator ion's attractive Coulomb field. In such cases the observed electron intensity is focused'' in the direction of the scattering ion as a result of the effective compression of the emission solid angle. In addition, interference may occur between trajectories, corresponding to electrons scattering around opposite sides of the ion, which lead to the same final laboratory electron energy and emission angle. This Coulomb path'' interference mechanism manifests itself in the uncharacteristically rapid angular dependence of the He target 2s{sup 2} {sup 1}S autoionizing state measured near 0{degree} following low energy He{sup +} + He collisions. A classical trajectory model for Coulomb focusing is presented and a semi-classical approximation is used to model the Coulomb path'' interference mechanism. In this description we account for the evolution of the phase of the autoionizing state until its decay and the path dependence of the amplitude of the emitted electron following decay of the autoionizing state. Calculated model lineshapes, which include contributions from adjacent overlapping resonances, reproduce quite well the angular dependence observed in the data near 0{degree}. 14 refs., 7 figs.

  20. Electron spectra resulting from autoionization in low-energy Li+ + He collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagishita, A.; Wakiya, K.; Takayanagi, T.; Suzuki, H.; Koike, F.

    1979-09-01

    Spectra of electrons ejected from doubly excited states of helium have been extensively measured at several observation angles fro impact with lithium ions at energies lower than 5 KeV. ''Molecular-autoionization'' spectra have been found at forward observation angles, and analyzed in terms of the Gerber-Niehaus theory with modification. The spectral shapes of atomic-autoionization peaks have been discussed in relation to both the Barker-Berry effect and the Doppler effect. Excitation cross sections of autoionizing states have been determined by a new method that uses simultaneous impact of ions and electrons. (author)

  1. $0^{++}$ Resonances Observed at BES

    OpenAIRE

    Zou, B. S.; Collaboration, for BES

    2008-01-01

    In last 10 years, $0^{++}$ resonances have been observed and studied at BES in many processes, such as $J/\\psi\\to\\gamma\\pi^+\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-$, $\\gamma\\pi^+\\pi^-$, $\\gamma\\pi^0\\pi^0$, $\\gamma K^+K^-$, $\\gamma K_SK_S$, $\\gamma\\omega\\phi$, $\\omega\\pi^+\\pi^-$, $\\omega K^+K^-$, $\\phi\\pi^+\\pi^-$, $\\phi K^+K^-$, $\\psi(2S)\\to J/\\psi\\pi^+\\pi^-$, $\\chi_{c0}\\to\\pi^+\\pi^-K^+K^-$, $\\pi^+\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-$ etc.. The results on $0^{++}$ resonances observed at BES are reviewed.

  2. The conversion of resonances to bound states in the presence of a Coulomb potential and the computation of autoionization lifetimes from quantum defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucchese, Robert; McCurdy, C. W.; Rescigno, T. N.

    2017-04-01

    The conversion of resonant metastable states to bound states with changing potential strength in the presence of a Coulomb potential proceeds by a mechanism fundamentally different from the same process in the case of short-range potentials. This phenomenon, which can accompany changes in molecular geometry, is central to the physics of the process of dissociative recombination of electrons with molecular cations. We verify computationally that there is no direct connection between a resonance pole of the S-matrix and the bound state poles for several model problems. We present a detailed analysis of the analytic structure of the scattering matrix in which the resonance pole remains distinct in the complex plane while a new state appears in the bound state spectrum. Nonetheless, as might be expected from quantum-defect theory, there is a close analytic relation between the resonant behavior of scattering at positive energies and the energies of the bound states. This connection allows the width of a resonance at low energies to be calculated directly from the behavior of the quantum defects with changing potential strength or molecular geometry. US-DOE, OBES, Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division.

  3. Recurrence Spectroscopy of Autoionizing Rydberg Argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, J. D.; Walker, P. A.; Gurian, J. H.; van Lier-Walqui, M.; Lambert, J. M.; Flores-Rueda, H.; Morgan, T. J.

    2004-05-01

    We have extended scaled energy spectroscopy of meta-stable argon to measure Rydberg states above the first ionization limit. Prior measurements [1] showed a principal Rydberg series converging to the ground state of the Ar+ ion. The spectra also showed strong perturbing resonances of the Rydberg electron orbiting an excited ion core. New experiments show that single uv-photon excitation of the meta-stable state can produce strong transitions to doubly excited states above the first ionization limit. In this auto-ionizing regime the electron escapes leaving behind an excited ion core. The excitation creates an electron-hole pair which interacts with the rest of the atom. This three body system provides an opportunity to test extensions of closed orbit theory [2,3] and experimentally probe the classical dynamics using recurrence spectroscopy. Work supported by National Science Foundation. [1] M.L. Keeler, J.D. Wright, H. Flores-Rueda, and T.J. Morgan, J. Phys. B (to be published) [2] B.E. Granger and C.H. Green, PRA 62, 12511 (2000) [3] W. Huang and T.J. Morgan, PRA 65 033409 (2002)

  4. Studies of autoionizing states relevant to dielectronic recombination. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallagher, T.F.

    1985-01-01

    Dielectronic recombinaation, the inverse of autoionization, is a process leading to significant power loss in CTR plasmas. Although it is known that dielectronic recombination proceeds via autoionization Rydberg states, few data exist on autoionizing states and how they are affected by conditions found in a CTR plasma. Under this research program we have been using a novel laser excitation technique developed at SRI to study autoionizing states and the perturbing effects of electric fields found in CTR plasmas. We describe experimental investigations of the spectroscopy of autoionizing Rydberg states, the energy analysis of electrons ejected from autoionizing states, autoionizing in electric fields, and the autoionization induced by an electric field. 33 refs., 16 figs

  5. Observation of pulsed neutron Ramsey resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masuda, Y. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)]. E-mail: yasuhiro.masuda@kek.jp; Skoy, V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Reasearch, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Ino, T. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Jeong, S.C. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Watanabe, Y. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2007-07-15

    A Ramsey resonance for pulsed neutrons was observed. The separated oscillatory fields for nuclear magnetic resonance were synchronized with a neutron pulse, and then the Ramsey resonance was observed as a function of the neutron velocity. The phase of one of the oscillatory fields was modulated as a function of the neutron time of flight for a neutron velocity measurement.

  6. Simple discretization method for autoionization widths. III. Molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macas, A.; Martn, F.; Riera, A.; Yanez, M.

    1987-01-01

    We apply a new method to calculate widths of two-electron Feshbach resonances, which was described in detail and applied to atomic systems in preceding articles (this issue), to molecular and quasimolecular autoionizing states. For simplicity in the programming effort, we restrict our calculations to the small-R region where one-centered expansions are sufficiently accurate to describe the wave functions. As test cases, positions and widths for the H 2 , He 2 /sup 2+/, HeH + , and LiHe/sup 3+/ resonances of lowest energy are computed for R<0.6 a.u. The advantage of using block-diagonalization techniques to define diabatic resonant states instead of generalizing the Feshbach formalism is pointed out

  7. The influence of autoionizing states on the excitation of helium by electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ittersum, T. van

    1976-01-01

    The work described in this thesis deals with resonance effects in the scattering of electrons by helium at energies near the threshold of the autoionizing states (50-70 eV). The investigation is performed by studying light emission following the excitation of singly excited states. In some cases, the polarization of the radiation was also investigated. The purpose of the research was (i) to enlarge our knowledge of triply excited negative ion states, i.e. resonance states which are formed by temporary binding of the incident electron to a doubly excited (autoionizing) state of neutral helium, and (ii) to clear up the nature of some resonance structures which could not be explained in terms of negative ion resonances

  8. Near-threshold electron-impact excitation of the (2p53s2)2P3/2,1/2 autoionizing states in sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borovik, A; Zatsarinny, O; Bartschat, K

    2008-01-01

    The ejected-electron excitation functions of the J = 3/2, 1/2 components of the (2p 5 3s 2 ) 2 P leading autoionizing doublet in sodium atoms were measured at an incident electron energy resolution of 0.25 eV over the incident electron energy range from the lowest excitation threshold up to 36 eV. On the basis of 56-state R-matrix (close-coupling) calculations, the observed strong near-threshold structures were classified as negative-ion resonances with likely configurations 2p 5 3s 2 3p and 2p 5 3s3p 2

  9. Branching ratio and angular distribution of ejected electrons from Eu 4f76p1/2 n d auto-ionizing states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Xiao-Rui; Shen Li; Zhang Kai; Dai Chang-Jian; Yang Yu-Na

    2016-01-01

    The branching ratios of ions and the angular distributions of electrons ejected from the Eu 4f 7 6p 1/2 n d auto-ionizing states are investigated with the velocity-map-imaging technique. To populate the above auto-ionizing states, the relevant bound Rydberg states have to be detected first. Two new bound Rydberg states are identified in the region between 41150 cm −1 and 44580 cm −1 , from which auto-ionization spectra of the Eu 4f 7 6p 1/2 n d states are observed with isolated core excitation method. With all preparations above, the branching ratios from the above auto-ionizing states to different final ionic states and the angular distributions of electrons ejected from these processes are measured systematically. Energy dependence of branching ratios and anisotropy parameters within the auto-ionization spectra are carefully analyzed, followed by a qualitative interpretation. (paper)

  10. Observations of Snake Resonance in RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Mei; Lee, Shyh-Yuan; Lin, Fanglei; MacKay, William; Ptitsyn, Vadim; Roser, Thomas; Tepikian, Steven

    2005-01-01

    Siberian snakes now become essential in the polarized proton acceleration. With proper configuration of Siberian snakes, the spin precession tune of the beam becomes $\\frac{1}{2}$ which avoids all the spin depolarizing resonance. However, the enhancement of the perturbations on the spin motion can still occur when the betatron tune is near some low order fractional numbers, called snake resonances, and the beam can be depolarized when passing through the resonance. The snake resonances have been confirmed in the spin tracking calculations, and observed in RHIC with polarized proton beam. Equipped with two full Siberian snakes in each ring, RHIC provides us a perfect facility for snake resonance studies. This paper presents latest experimental results. New insights are also discussed.

  11. AUTOIONIZATION OF LOW-LYING 5DNG STATES IN BARIUM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, R.; Ubachs, W.M.G.; Hogervorst, W.

    1994-01-01

    The autoionizing 5dng J = 1-5 states in barium for n=5-8 were investigated in a two-step pulsed laser atomic beam experiment. The wavefunctions of the 5dng configuration can be well described in a (jl)K-coupled basis. Each 5d(j)ng[K] fine structure state autoionizes into a single 6sepsilonl

  12. Auto-ionizing states in MgI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Sherbini, Th.M.; Rahman, A.A.

    1982-01-01

    Hartree-Fock calculations have been performed for the auto-ionizing levels of the 3pns, 3pnp, 4snp (n=4 to 7) and 3pnd (n=3 to 7) series in MgI. The calculated energies of the auto-ionizing states are compared with the available results from photo-absorption measurements and ejected-electron experiments. (author)

  13. Photoelectron studies of autoionizing Rydberg states in HCl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, M.G.; Grover, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    The results of a systematic investigation of electronically autoionizing Rydberg states in HCl are discussed. Vibrationally resolved photoelectron spectroscopy was used to map out the non-radiative decay of vibronic levels of 3psigma → n(/sub d//sup s/)sigma Rydberg states converging to the A 2 Σ + (3psigma) -1 excited ionic state. The observed vibrational distributions of the resulting X 2 PI(1π) -1 ionic state are compared with the results of model calculations of Terwilliger and Smith based on spectral analysis of the absorption spectrum. Overall, the X 2 PI vibrational branching ratios are found to be in only rough qualitative agreement with the calculations and these results are discussed in relation to the approximations involved. 18 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  14. Ettore Majorana and the birth of autoionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimondo, Ennio; Clark, Charles W.; Martin, William C.

    2010-02-01

    In some of the first applications of modern quantum mechanics to the spectroscopy of many-electron atoms, Ettore Majorana in 1931 solved several outstanding problems by developing the theory of autoionization [1]. Later literature makes only sporadic references to this accomplishment. After reviewing his work in its contemporary context, we describe subsequent developments in understanding the spectra treated by Majorana, and extensions of his theory to other areas of physics. We find several puzzles concerning the treatment of Majorana's work in the subsequent literature and the way in which the modern theory of autoionization was developed. [1] The relevant papers are those numbered 3 and 5 in the convenient collection, Ettore Majorana Scientific Papers: On the occasion of the centenary of his birth, ed. G. F. Bassani et al. (SIF, Bologna 2006), where they are accompanied by English translations and commentary. The originals are, respectively, ``I presunti termini anomali dell'elio," E. Majorana, Il Nuovo Cimento 8, 78 (1931) and ``Teoria dei tripletti P' incompleti," E. Majorana, Il Nuovo Cimento 8, 107 (1931). )

  15. Assignments of autoionization states of O2-asterisk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, C. Y. Robert

    1987-01-01

    Attention is given to the uncertainties that remain concerning the autoionization states of O2 leading to the a 4Pi(u) and A 2Pi(u) states of O2(+), as well as some of the assignments of the autoionization states and the determinations of effective quantum numbers and quantum defects. The former problems of vibrational assignments are unambiguously established in view of a study of isotopic oxygen molecules. A systematic examination of the known Rydberg series is conducted, and new assignments and interpretations for several autoionization states leading to the various states of O2(+) are suggested.

  16. Autoionizing states of atoms calculated using generalized sturmians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avery, James Emil; Avery, John Scales

    2005-01-01

    The generalized Sturmian method is applied to autoionizing states of atoms and ions. If the Goscinskian basis sets allow for a sufficient amount of angular correletion, the calculated energies of doubly-excited (autoionizing) states are found to agree well with the few available experimental...... energies. A large-Z approximation is discussed, and simple formulas are derived which are valid not only for autoionizing states, but for all states of an isoelectronic atomic series. Diagonalization of a small block of the interelectron repulsion matrix yields roots that can be used for a wide range of Z...

  17. 4pnp J=0e-2e autoionizing series of calcium: experimental and theoretical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolovinos, A.; Luc-Koenig, E.; Assimopoulos, S.; Lyras, A.; Karapanagioti, N.E.; Crete Univ., Iraklion; Charalambidis, D.; Crete Univ., Iraklion; Aymar, M.

    1996-01-01

    The even parity 4pnp J=0, 1, 2 doubly excited autoionizing states of neutral calcium in an atomic beam are investigated by a two-step isolated core excitation (ICE) method using two different combinations of polarization of the laser beams. The different excited energy levels are assigned to nine autoionizing Rydberg series 4p 1/2,3/2 np J=0, 1, 2 for 8≤n≤22. The theoretical interpretation is achieved by a combination of the eigenchannel R-matrix theory and the multichannel quantum defect (MQDT) method. Two, five and six closed interacting channels are introduced for the J=0, J=1 and J=2 series respectively. Theoretical energy level positions, autoionization widths and excitation profiles are compared with the experimental data, confirming the identification of the observed structures and providing evidence of extended mixing between the 4p 1/2 np and 4p 3/2 np series. (orig.). With 9 figs., 3 tabs

  18. Non-LTE profiles of the Al I autoionization lines. [for solar model atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, G. D.; Jefferies, J. T.

    1974-01-01

    A non-LTE formulation is given for the transfer of radiation in the autoionizing lines of neutral aluminum at 1932 and 1936 A through both the Bilderberg and Harvard-Smithsonian model atmospheres. Numerical solutions for the common source function of these lines and their theoretical line profiles are calculated and compared with the corresponding LTE profiles. The results show that the non-LTE profiles provide a better match with the observations. They also indicate that the continuous opacity of the standard solar models should be increased in this wavelength region if the center-limb variations of observed and theoretical profiles of these lines are to be in reasonable agreement.

  19. Forces on nuclei moving on autoionizing molecular potential energy surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2017-01-14

    Autoionization of molecular systems occurs in diatomic molecules and in small biochemical systems. Quantum chemistry packages enable calculation of complex potential energy surfaces (CPESs). The imaginary part of the CPES is associated with the autoionization decay rate, which is a function of the molecular structure. Molecular dynamics simulations, within the framework of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, require the definition of a force field. The ability to calculate the forces on the nuclei in bio-systems when autoionization takes place seems to rely on an understanding of radiative damages in RNA and DNA arising from the release of slow moving electrons which have long de Broglie wavelengths. This work addresses calculation of the real forces on the nuclei moving on the CPES. By using the transformation of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, previously used by Madelung, we proved that the classical forces on nuclei moving on the CPES correlated with the gradient of the real part of the CPES. It was proved that the force on the nuclei of the metastable molecules is time independent although the probability to detect metastable molecules exponentially decays. The classical force is obtained from the transformed Schrödinger equation when ℏ=0 and the Schrödinger equation is reduced to the classical (Newtonian) equations of motion. The forces on the nuclei regardless on what potential energy surface they move (parent CPES or product real PESs) vary in time due to the autoionization process.

  20. First Observation of a Snake Depolarizing Resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phelps, R.; Anferov, V.; Blinov, B.; Crandell, D.; Koutin, S.; Krisch, A.; Liu, T.; Ratner, L.; Wong, V.; Chu, C.; Lee, S.; Rinckel, T.; Schwandt, P.; Sperisen, F.; Stephenson, E.; von Przewoski, B.; Sato, H.

    1997-01-01

    Using a 104MeV stored polarized proton beam and a full Siberian snake, we recently found evidence for a so-called open-quotes snakeclose quotes depolarizing resonance. A full Siberian snake forces the spin tune ν s to be a half integer. Thus, if the vertical betatron tune ν y is set near a quarter integer, then the ν s =n±2ν y second-order snake resonance can depolarize the beam. Indeed, with a full Siberian snake, we found a deep depolarization dip when ν y was equal to 4.756; moreover, when ν y was changed to 4.781, the deep dip disappeared and the polarization was preserved. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  1. Autoionization spectra of He excited by fast (MeV) H/sup +/, He/sup +/, and Li/sup n//sup +/ (N = 1,2,3) ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, D.; Arcuni, P.; Bruch, P.; Stoeffler, W.

    1983-01-01

    Autoionization spectra of He following excitation by 1 to 3 MeV H/sup +/, He/sup +/, and Li/sup n//sup +/ (n = 1,2,3) have been measured as a function of observation angle. The (2p/sup 2/)/sup 1/D and (2s2p)/sup 1/P resonances have been examined and a strong dependence on projectile velocities, charge state and observation angle was found. The measurements were performed in a crossed-beam scattering chamber. The target-gas pressure was in the order of 10/sup -4/ Torr. The secondary electrons have been energy analyzed by a 45/sup 0/ parallel-plate analyzer. Results are presented and discussed. (WHK)

  2. Entanglement between an autoionizing system and a neighboring atom

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lukš, A.; Peřina ml., Jan; Leoński, W.; Peřinová, V.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 85, č. 1 (2012), "012321-1"-"012321-10" ISSN 1050-2947 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06002 Grant - others:MSM(CZ) OC09026 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : laser-induced autoionization * continuum * spectra * fields * states Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.042, year: 2012 http:// pra .aps.org/pdf/ PRA /v85/i1/e012321

  3. Recurrence Spectroscopy of Autoionizing Rydberg Argon in an Electric Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, J. D.

    2005-05-01

    Previously, we have performed single uv-photon excitation of metastable argon to spin-orbit autoionizing states between the first and second fine structure ionization limits. [1] A pulsed frequency-doubled dye laser excites the valence electron to a Rydberg state and excites the ionic core from j=1/2 to j=3/2. The core then relaxes and ejects the Rydberg electron. We have developed a new apparatus that allows us to measure these autoionizing states in an electric field using a fast beam. Using this apparatus we have extended the field-free measurements to probe the semi-classical dynamics of this system in an electric field using the method of recurrence spectroscopy [2]. Recurrence spectra for the autoionizing states in an electric will be compared to the corresponding spectra in the bound state region. Work supported by National Science Foundation. [1] J.D. Wright, P.A. Walker, J.H. Gurian, M. van Lier-Walqui, J.M. Lambert, H. Flores-Rueda, and T.J. Morgan; Bulletin of the American Physical Society (2004) [2] M L Keeler, H Flores-Rueda, J D Wright, and T J Morgan; J. Phys. B. 37, 809-815 (2004)

  4. Excitation of autoionizing states of helium by 100 keV proton impact: II. Excitation cross sections and mechanisms of excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godunov, A.L. [Department of Physics, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118-5698 (United States); Ivanov, P.B.; Schipakov, V.A. [Troitsk Institute of Innovation and Fusion Research Troitsk, Moscow region, 142092 (Russian Federation); Moretto-Capelle, P.; Bordenave-Montesquieu, D.; Bordenave-Montesquieu, A. [Laboratoire Collisions, Agregats, Reactivite, IRSAMC, UMR 5589, CNRS-Universite Paul Sabatier, 31062 Toulouse Cedex (France)

    2000-03-14

    Mechanisms of two-electron excitation of the (2s{sup 2}){sup 1} S, (2p{sup 2} ){sup 1} D and (2s2p){sup 1} P autoionizing states of helium are studied both experimentally and theoretically. It is shown that an explicit introduction of a kinematic factor, with a process-specific phase leads to a productive parametrization of experimental cross sections of ionization, allowing one to extract cross sections of excitation of autoionizing states. Using a new fitting procedure together with the proposed parametrization made it possible to obtain the excitation cross sections and magnetic sublevel population from electron spectra as well as, for the first time, to resolve the contribution of resonance and interference components to resonance profiles. Interference with direct ionization is shown to contribute significantly into resonance formation even for backward ejection angles. We demonstrate theoretically that the excitation cross sections thus extracted from experimental electron spectra hold information about the interaction of autoionizing states with an adjacent continuum. (author)

  5. Electron capture to autoionizing states of multiply charged ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mack, E.M.

    1987-01-01

    The present thesis investigates electron capture reactions resulting from slow collisions (V q+ ) and neutral gas targets (B). The energy spectra of the emitted electrons are measured; detection angle is 50 0 . Mainly, autoionizing double capture resulting from collisions with two-electron targets (He, H 2 ) is studied; then, the emitted electrons stem from doubly excited projectile states. The projectiles used are bare C 6+ , the H-like and He-like ions of C, N and O, He-like Ne 8+ and Ne-like Ar 8+ . Excited metastable projectiles used are C 5+ (2s), He-like projectiles A q+ (1s2s 3 S) and Ar 8+ (...2p 5 3s). Comparison is made with the predictions of a recently proposed extended classical barrier model, that was developed in connection with the work. This model assumes sequential capture of the electrons ('two-step' process); it predicts the realized binding enegies of the captured electrons - which may be directly determined from the autoionization spectra using only the projectile charge, the ionization potentials of the target and the collision velocity as parameters. No adjustable parameter enters into the calculations. The term energies and decay modes of the highly excited product ions themselves are studied. Generally, the autoionizing decay of these states is found to proceed preferentially to the directly adjacent lower singly excited state. Experimental evidence is presented, that triply excited states decay by successive emission of two electrons, whenever this is energetically possible. Finally, the L-MM decay in few-electron systems is considered. 314 refs.; 96 figs.; 29 tabs

  6. Excitation of autoionizing states of helium by 100 keV proton impact: theory and experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godunov, A.L.; Moretto-Capelle, P.; Bordenave-Montesquieu, D.; Benhenni, M.; Bordenave-Montesquieu, A. [Universite Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France). Laboratoire Collisions, Agregats, Reactivite; Schipakov, V.A. [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-14

    A joint theoretical and experimental study of the excitation of the autoionizing (2s{sup 2}){sup 1}S, (2p{sup 2}){sup 1}D and (2s2p){sup 1}P states of helium by 100 keV proton impact is presented for the first time. The role of the three-body Coulomb interaction in the final state between the ejected electron, the scattered proton and the recoil helium ion is emphasized. Calculations have been carried out with inclusion of the three-body Coulomb interaction and within an expansion of a two-electron excitation amplitude in powers of projectile-target interaction up to the second order. A new parametrization is proposed to describe resonance profiles distorted by the Coulomb interaction in the final state (CIFS). New high-resolution (up to 68 meV) measurements of electron emission spectra made it possible to resolve the near-lying (2p{sup 2}){sup 1}D and (2s2p){sup 1}P resonances and reveal an evident distortion of the resonance profiles by CIFS for forward electron ejection angles below 40{sup o}. (author).

  7. Autoionizing states in highly ionized oxygen, fluorine and silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forester, J.P.; Peterson, R.S.; Griffin, P.M.; Pegg, D.J.; Haselton, H.H.; Liao, K.H.; Sellin, I.A.; Mowat, J.R.; Thoe, R.S.

    1975-01-01

    Autoionizing states in high Z 3-electron ions associated with core excited configurations of the type 1s2snl and 1s2pnl are reported. The electron decay-in-flight spectra of lithium-like oxygen, fluorine, and silicon ions are presented. Initial beam energies of 6.75-MeV oxygen and fluorine ions and 22.5-MeV silicon ions were used. Stripping and excitation were done by passing the beams through a thin carbon foil. The experimental technique is described. 4 figs, 1 table, 7 refs

  8. Observation of high-lying resonances in the H- ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, P.G.; New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM

    1990-05-01

    This dissertation reports the observation of several series of resonances, for which both electrons are in excited states, in the photodetachment cross section of H - . These 1 P doubly-excited states interfere with the continuum in which they are embedded, and appear as dips in the production cross section of excited neutral hydrogen. The experiment was performed by intersecting an 800 MeV H - beam with a (266 nm) laser beam at varying angles; the relativistic Doppler shift then ''tuned'' the photon energy in the barycentric frame. The process was observed by using a magnet strong enough the strip the electrons from the excited hydrogen atoms in selected states n and detecting the resulting protons, which allowed the isolation of the individual n channels. Three resonances are clearly visible in each channel. The data support recent theoretical calculations for the positions of doubly-excited 1 P resonances, and verify a new Rydberg-like formula for the modified Coulomb potential

  9. Observation of Antiferromagnetic Resonance in an Organic Superconductor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torrance, J. B.; Pedersen, H. J.; Bechgaard, K.

    1982-01-01

    Anomalous microwave absorption has been observed in the organic superconductor TMTSF2AsF6 (TMTSF: tetramethyltetraselenafulvalene) below its metal-nonmetal transition near 12 K. This absorption is unambiguously identified as antiferromagnetic resonance by the excellent agreement between a spin...

  10. Observation of Two New Xi(-)(b) Baryon Resonances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Bettler, M. -O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjornstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carson, L.; Akiba, K. Carvalho; Casanova Mohr, R. C. M.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S. -F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Vidal, X. Cid; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A. C.; Torres, M. Cruz; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C. -T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Deleage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Domenico, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suarez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. -M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Faerber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garcia Pardinas, J.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gastaldi, U.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, U.; Geraci, A.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Giani, S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Goebel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Gandara, M. Grabalosa; Graciani Diaz, R.; Cardoso, L. A. Granado; Grauges, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griftith, P.; Grillo, L.; Gruenberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Hess, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; Van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J. -P.; Lefevre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrancois, J.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lowdon, P.; Lucchesi, D.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Benito, C. Mann; Marino, P.; Maerki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martinelli, M.; Santos, D. Martinez; Vidal, F. Martinez; Martin Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M. -N.; Moggi, N.; Rodriguez, J. Molina; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Morda, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. -B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Mueller, K.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obratsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B. K.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Altarelli, M. Pepe; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Pesen, E.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilar, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Navarro, A. Puig; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Perez, P. Rodriguez; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M. -H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sepp, I.; Sena, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Sheychenko, V.; Shires, A.; Coutinho, R. Silva; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skillicorn, I.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Sterpka, F.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; Van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Todd, J.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Garcia, M. Ubeda; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Gomez, R. Vazquez; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vazquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Barbosa, J. V. V. B. Viana; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voss, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Wraldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilschut, H. W.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyae, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.

    2015-01-01

    Two structures are observed close to the kinematic threshold in the Xi(0)(b)pi(-) mass spectrum in a sample of proton-proton collision data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb(-1), recorded by the LEICb experiment. In the quark model, two baryonic resonances with quark content bds

  11. Holographic observation of magnetic resonance image CT of intracranial tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwata, Kinjiro; Watanabe, Saburo; Yuasa, Hiromi; Yamada, Takahisa; Hoshino, Daisaku; Suzuki, Masane; Saito, Takayuki.

    1987-01-01

    In 1975, we developed a new method of 3-dimensional observation of CT pictures using Gabor's holography principle. In this study, we are reporting our experience with the multi-tomogram holography using magnetic resonance image CT in order to reconstruct 3-dimensional viewing of the central nervous system and intracranial lesions. (J.P.N.)

  12. Observation and correction of resonance stopbands in the AGS Booster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, C.; Shoji, Y.; Ahrens, L.; Glenn, J.W.; Lee, Y.Y.; Roser, T.; Soukas, A.; van Asselt, W.; Weng, W.T.

    1993-01-01

    At the design intensity of 1.5 x 10 13 ppp, the space charge tune shift in the AGS Booster at injection has been estimated to be about 0.35. Therefore, the beam is spread over may lower order resonance lines and the stopbands have to be corrected to minimize the amplitude growth by proper compensation of the driving harmonics resulting from random errors. The observation and correction of second and third order resonance stopbands in the AGS Booster, and the establishment of a favorable operating point at high intensity are discussed

  13. Observation of the resonant character of the Z(4430)(-) state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, S; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Counts, I; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dalseno, J; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dujany, G; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farley, N; Farry, S; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Fu, J; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gavardi, L; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianelle, A; Giani', S; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jezabek, M; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kelsey, M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Klaver, S; Kochebina, O; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Langhans, B; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lowdon, P; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Manzali, M; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martinez Vidal, F; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Moggi, N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morandin, M; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Moron, J; Morris, A-B; Mountain, R; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Mussini, M; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neri, N; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Neuner, M; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, G; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Pistone, A; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rama, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Reichert, S; Reid, M M; Dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rihl, M; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rotondo, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanchez Mayordomo, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Sestini, L; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Simi, G; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Snoek, H; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spinella, F; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stenyakin, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Stroili, R; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szilard, D; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Tellarini, G; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vieites Diaz, M; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; de Vries, J A; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Walsh, J; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiedner, D; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Xu, Z; Yang, Z; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2014-06-06

    Resonant structures in B^{0}→ψ^{'}π^{-}K^{+} decays are analyzed by performing a four-dimensional fit of the decay amplitude, using pp collision data corresponding to 3  fb^{-1} collected with the LHCb detector. The data cannot be described with K^{+}π^{-} resonances alone, which is confirmed with a model-independent approach. A highly significant Z(4430)^{-}→ψ^{'}π^{-} component is required, thus confirming the existence of this state. The observed evolution of the Z(4430)^{-} amplitude with the ψ^{'}π^{-} mass establishes the resonant nature of this particle. The mass and width measurements are substantially improved. The spin parity is determined unambiguously to be 1^{+}.

  14. Observation of the resonant character of the $Z(4430)^-$ state

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassen, Rolf; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Balagura, Vladislav; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Bauer, Thomas; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Belogurov, Sergey; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Bizzeti, Andrea; Bjørnstad, Pål Marius; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borgia, Alessandra; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Brambach, Tobias; van den Brand, Johannes; Bressieux, Joël; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Brown, Henry; Bursche, Albert; Busetto, Giovanni; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Camboni, Alessandro; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carranza-Mejia, Hector; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Ciba, Krzystof; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Counts, Ian; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pascal; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gaspar, Clara; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Giani', Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, Vladimir; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gordon, Hamish; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Hampson, Thomas; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; Hartmann, Thomas; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Hunt, Philip; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jaton, Pierre; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jezabek, Marek; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kaballo, Michael; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Klaver, Suzanne; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Korolev, Mikhail; Kozlinskiy, Alexandr; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; La Thi, Viet Nga; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lambert, Robert W; Lanciotti, Elisa; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Leo, Sabato; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Liu, Guoming; Lohn, Stefan; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lopez-March, Neus; Lowdon, Peter; Lu, Haiting; Lucchesi, Donatella; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Machefert, Frederic; Machikhiliyan, Irina V; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Malde, Sneha; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manzali, Matteo; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Märki, Raphael; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martens, Aurelien; Martín Sánchez, Alexandra; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; McSkelly, Ben; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Merk, Marcel; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Moggi, Niccolò; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monteil, Stephane; Moran, Dermot; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Katharina; Muresan, Raluca; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nicol, Michelle; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Oggero, Serena; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Orlandea, Marius; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Arantza; Pal, Bilas Kanti; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Parkes, Christopher; Parkinson, Christopher John; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pazos Alvarez, Antonio; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perez Trigo, Eliseo; Perret, Pascal; Perrin-Terrin, Mathieu; Pescatore, Luca; Pesen, Erhan; Petridis, Konstantin; Petrolini, Alessandro; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Powell, Andrew; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rakotomiaramanana, Barinjaka; Rama, Matteo; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Alexander; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Roa Romero, Diego; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruffini, Fabrizio; Ruiz, Hugo; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Sabatino, Giovanni; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sapunov, Matvey; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Savrie, Mauro; Savrina, Darya; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Seco, Marcos; Semennikov, Alexander; Senderowska, Katarzyna; Sepp, Indrek; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Anthony; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Sparkes, Ailsa; Spinella, Franco; Spradlin, Patrick; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Sascha; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Stroili, Roberto; Subbiah, Vijay Kartik; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szilard, Daniela; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ubeda Garcia, Mario; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; Voss, Helge; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wiedner, Dirk; Wilkinson, Guy; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wu, Suzhi; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Wen Chao; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zvyagin, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Resonant structures in $B^0\\to\\psi'\\pi^-K^+$ decays are analyzed by performing a four-dimensional fit of the decay amplitude, using $pp$ collision data corresponding to $\\rm 3 fb^{-1}$ collected with the LHCb detector. The data cannot be described with $K^+\\pi^-$ resonances alone, which is confirmed with a model-independent approach. A highly significant $Z(4430)^-\\to\\psi'\\pi^-$ component is required, thus confirming the existence of this state. The observed evolution of the $Z(4430)^-$ amplitude with the $\\psi'\\pi^-$ mass establishes the resonant nature of this particle. The mass and width measurements are substantially improved. The spin-parity is determined unambiguously to be $1^+$.

  15. Observation of nuclear gamma resonance with superconducting tunnel junction detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. G. Kozin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Nb-based superconducting tunnel junction detectors have been used for the registration of electrons following a nuclear gamma resonance (Mössbauer effect. Electrons were produced by a RhFe scatterer under irradiation by the 57Co(Rh Mössbauer source. This observation demonstrates the role which can be played by superconducting tunnel junction detectors in the field of conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy and other types of electron spectroscopy.

  16. Decay of long-lived autoionization atomic states in atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakov, B.G.

    1994-01-01

    Radiationless decay of long-lived autoionization states of helium atoms in atom collisions is investigated. It is shown that the states may decay in atom collisions due to softening of the selection rules

  17. Observing atomic collapse resonances in artificial nuclei on graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Wong, Dillon; Shytov, Andrey V; Brar, Victor W; Choi, Sangkook; Wu, Qiong; Tsai, Hsin-Zon; Regan, William; Zettl, Alex; Kawakami, Roland K; Louie, Steven G; Levitov, Leonid S; Crommie, Michael F

    2013-05-10

    Relativistic quantum mechanics predicts that when the charge of a superheavy atomic nucleus surpasses a certain threshold, the resulting strong Coulomb field causes an unusual atomic collapse state; this state exhibits an electron wave function component that falls toward the nucleus, as well as a positron component that escapes to infinity. In graphene, where charge carriers behave as massless relativistic particles, it has been predicted that highly charged impurities should exhibit resonances corresponding to these atomic collapse states. We have observed the formation of such resonances around artificial nuclei (clusters of charged calcium dimers) fabricated on gated graphene devices via atomic manipulation with a scanning tunneling microscope. The energy and spatial dependence of the atomic collapse state measured with scanning tunneling microscopy revealed unexpected behavior when occupied by electrons.

  18. Observation with Calcifications of Breast Tissue Phantoms Using Acoustic Resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeong Goo [Dept. of Radiological Science, Hanseo University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Myeung Jin [Haesung OB and GY Clinic, Seosan (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-03-15

    Diagnosis of breast ultrasound is better than mammography in the early detection of breast cancer, but, it is difficult to detect microcalcification. We studied on detection for calcification of breast tissue using acoustic resonance and power doppler with 7.5 MHz linear probe in breast ultrasound. We first constructed breast tissue phantom made of gelatin and saw breast, and then observed calcification by the change of external vibration. Calcification injected breast tissue phantom visualized the difference for brightness and region of color in ROI regions of power doppler. Acoustic resonance almost never visualized in low frequency regions, plateau constituted in about 300-400 Hz and colors vanished according to the increase of frequency.

  19. Observation of Bs production at the Y(5S) resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Dubrovin, M; Lincoln, A; Bornheim, A; Pappas, S P; Weinstein, A J; Asner, D M; Edwards, K W; Briere, R A; Chen, G P; Chen, J; Ferguson, T; Tatishvili, G; Vogel, H; Watkins, M E; Rosner, J L; Adam, N E; Alexander, J P; Berkelman, K; Cassel, D G; Crede, V; Duboscq, J E; Ecklund, K M; Ehrlich, R; Fields, L; Gibbons, L; Gittelman, B; Gray, R; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hertz, D; Jones, C D; Kandaswamy, J; Kreinick, D L; Kuznetsov, V E; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Meyer, T O; Onyisi, P U E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Phillips, E A; Pivarski, J; Riley, D; Ryd, A; Sadoff, A J; Schwarthoff, H; Shi, X; Shepherd, M R; Stroiney, S; Sun, W M; Urner, D; Wilksen, T; Weaver, K M; Weinberger, M; Athar, S B; Avery, P; Breva-Newell, L; Patel, R; Potlia, V; Stoeck, H; Yelton, J; Rubin, P; Cawlfield, C; Eisenstein, B I; Gollin, G D; Karliner, I; Kim, D; Lowrey, N; Naik, P; Sedlack, C; Selen, M; White, E J; Williams, J; Wiss, J; Besson, D; Pedlar, T K; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Gao, K Y; Gong, D T; Hietala, J; Kubota, Y; Klein, T; Lang, B W; Li, S Z; Poling, R; Scott, A W; Smith, A; Dobbs, S; Metreveli, Z; Seth, K K; Tomaradze, A; Zweber, P; Ernst, J; Arms, K; Severini, H; Dytman, S A; Love, W; Mehrabyan, S; Mueller, J A; Savinov, V; Li, Z; Lopez, A; Mendez, H; Ramirez, J; Huang, G S; Miller, D H; Pavlunin, V; Sanghi, B; Shipsey, I P J; Adams, G S; Anderson, M; Cummings, J P; Danko, I; Napolitano, J; He, Q; Muramatsu, H; Park, C S; Thorndike, E H; Coan, T E; Gao, Y S; Liu, F; Maravin, Y; Artuso, M; Boulahouache, C; Blusk, S; Butt, J; Dorjkhaidav, O; Li, J; Menaa, N; Mountain, R; Nandakumar, R; Randrianarivony, K; Redjimi, R; Sia, R; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Zhang, K; Csorna, S E

    2006-01-20

    Using the CLEO detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring, we have observed the Bs meson in e+e- annihilation at the Y(5S) resonance. We find 14 candidates consistent with Bs decays into final states with a J/psi or a Ds(*)- . The probability that we have observed a background fluctuation is less than 8 x 10(-10) . We have established that at the energy of the Y(5S) resonance Bs production proceeds predominantly through the creation of Bs*Bs* pairs. We find sigma(e+e- --> Bs*Bs*) = [0.11(-0.03))(+0.04)(stat) +/- 0.02(syst)]nb , and set the following limits: sigma(e+e- --> BsBs)/ sigma(e+ e- --> Bs*Bs*) BsBs*) + sigma(e+e- --> Bs*Bs)]/sigma(e+e- -->Bs*Bs*) < 0.16 (90% C.L.). The mass of the Bs* meson is measured to be M(Bs*) = [5.414+/- 0.001(stat) +/- 0.003(syst)] GeV/c2 .

  20. Spectra of resonance surface photoionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antsiferov, V.V.; Smirnov, G.I.; Telegin, G.G. [Budker Nuclear Physics Institute, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    1995-09-01

    The theory of nonactivated electron transfer between atoms interacting reasonantly with coherent radiation and a metal surface is developed. The spectral resonances in photoabsorption and surface photoionization are found to be related to nonlinear interference effects in the interaction between discrete atomic levels and the continuum formed by the quasi-continuous electron spectrum of a normal metal. The asymmetry in the resonance surface photoionization spectrum is shown to have a shape typical of the Fano autoionization resonances. 18 refs.

  1. Observation of two new Ξ(b)(-) baryon resonances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bertolin, A; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Brook, N H; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Capriotti, L; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casanova Mohr, R C M; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Cogoni, V; Cojocariu, L; Collazuol, G; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Counts, I; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Crocombe, A C; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dalseno, J; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Dean, C-T; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dey, B; Di Canto, A; Di Domenico, A; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dujany, G; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H-M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farley, N; Farry, S; Fay, R; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fol, P; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Fu, J; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; García Pardiñas, J; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gastaldi, U; Gauld, R; Gavardi, L; Gazzoni, G; Geraci, A; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianelle, A; Gianì, S; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graverini, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hess, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Karodia, S; Kelsey, M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Kochebina, O; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Langhans, B; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Likhomanenko, T; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lowdon, P; Lucchesi, D; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Malinin, A; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mapelli, A; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martinez Vidal, F; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Moggi, N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Morandin, M; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Moron, J; Morris, A-B; Mountain, R; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Mussini, M; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neri, N; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Neuner, M; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Novoselov, A; O'Hanlon, D P; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, C J G; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Otto, A; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L L; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perret, P; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Pistone, A; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Poluektov, A; Polyakov, I; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Price, E; Price, J D; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rama, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redi, F; Reichert, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, S; Rihl, M; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rotondo, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanchez Mayordomo, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Saunders, D M; Savrina, D; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Semennikov, A; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Sestini, L; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Simi, G; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skillicorn, I; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Snoek, H; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Spradlin, P; Sridharan, S; Stagni, F; Stahl, M; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stenyakin, O; Sterpka, F; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Stroili, R; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Tellarini, G; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Todd, J; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Trisovic, A; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vacca, C; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viana Barbosa, J V V B; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vieites Diaz, M; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voss, C; de Vries, J A; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Walsh, J; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wiedner, D; Wilkinson, G; Wilkinson, M; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilschut, H W; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Xu, Z; Yang, Z; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L

    2015-02-13

    Two structures are observed close to the kinematic threshold in the Ξ(b)(0)π(-) mass spectrum in a sample of proton-proton collision data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0  fb(-1), recorded by the LHCb experiment. In the quark model, two baryonic resonances with quark content bds are expected in this mass region: the spin-parity J(P)=(1/2)(+) and J(P)=(3/2)(+) states, denoted Ξ(b)('-) and Ξ(b)(*-). Interpreting the structures as these resonances, we measure the mass differences and the width of the heavier state to be m(Ξ(b)('-))-m(Ξ(b)(0))-m(π(-))=3.653±0.018±0.006  MeV/c(2), m(Ξ(b)(*-))-m(Ξ(b)(0))-m(π(-))=23.96±0.12±0.06  MeV/c(2), Γ(Ξ(b)(*-))=1.65±0.31±0.10  MeV, where the first and second uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. The width of the lighter state is consistent with zero, and we place an upper limit of Γ(Ξ(b)('-))<0.08  MeV at 95% confidence level. Relative production rates of these states are also reported.

  2. Excitation of the helium autoionizing states in He/sup +/+He collisions, between 3 and 140 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordenave-Montesquieu, A.; Gleizes, A.; Benoit-Cattin, P.

    1982-01-01

    The autoionization of the helium atom has been experimentally studied in He/sup +/+He collisions between 3 and 140 keV by electron spectrometry. The excitation of the two collision partners has been considered. Above 10 keV, the shapes and excitation cross sections of the 2s/sup 2/ /sup 1/S, 2s2p /sup 3/P, 2p/sup 2/ /sup 1/D, and 2s2p /sup 1/P are determined by a numerical fitting procedure which is reported in detail; below 10 keV the (/sup 1/D+/sup 1/P), and 2p/sup 2/ /sup 1/S line intensities are obtained by planimetry since important post-collision effects are observed. From the angular distributions measured below 15 keV, the relative sublevel populations are deduced for the 2p/sup 2/ /sup 1/D and 2s2p/sup 1/ P levels and are compared with those obtained by other authors in a coincidence experiment; the excitation processes are then discussed within the quasimolecular-excitation model. For the highest collision energies, the asymmetry of the angular distributions with respect to 90 /sup 0/ as well as the line shapes above 100 keV are interpreted by the occurrence of sudden electronic transitions to the continuum. A comparison of the differential cross sections for emission of electrons by autoionization of the fast and slow particles permits us to show that the quasimolecule model cannot explain what is observed above a collision velocity of about 0.5 a.u. The dependence of the total cross sections against the collision energy is also discussed in terms of an evolution of the excitation mechanism from a quasimolecular to an atomic one; the specific variation of the 2s2p /sup 3/P cross section strengthens this interpretation. These total cross sections are compared with those estimated from earlier H/sup +/+He data published by us; similar autoionization cross-section values are expected for the two systems at high collision velocity.

  3. Electromagnetically induced transparency in systems with degenerate autoionizing levels in Λ-configuration

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dinh, T.B.; Leoński, W.; Long, V.C.; Peřina ml., Jan

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 3 (2013), s. 471-484 ISSN 0078-5466 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) * lambda configuration * autoionizing states * double Fano profile Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 0.643, year: 2013

  4. Decay of autoionizing states in time-dependent density functional and reduced density matrix functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapoor, Varun; Brics, Martins; Bauer, Dieter [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Rostock, 18051 Rostock (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Autoionizing states are inaccessible to time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) using known, adiabatic Kohn-Sham (KS) potentials. We determine the exact KS potential for a numerically exactly solvable model Helium atom interacting with a laser field that is populating an autoionizing state. The exact single-particle density of the population in the autoionizing state corresponds to that of the energetically lowest quasi-stationary state in the exact KS potential. We describe how this exact potential controls the decay by a barrier whose height and width allows for the density to tunnel out and decay with the same rate as in the ab initio time-dependent Schroedinger calculation. However, devising a useful exchange-correlation potential that is capable of governing such a scenario in general and in more complex systems is hopeless. As an improvement over TDDFT, time-dependent reduced density matrix functional theory has been proposed. We are able to obtain for the above described autoionization process the exact time-dependent natural orbitals (i.e., the eigenfunctions of the exact, time-dependent one-body reduced density matrix) and study the potentials that appear in the equations of motion for the natural orbitals and the structure of the two-body density matrix expanded in them.

  5. Observation of Motion of Bowed Strings and Resonant Strings in Violin Performances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsutani, Akihiro

    2013-10-01

    The motion of a bowed string and a resonant string of a violin were simultaneously observed for the first time. The results of the direct observation of string motion in double stops and harmonics are also presented. The importance of the resonance was experimentally demonstrated from these observations. It is suggested that players should take account of the resonance and ideal Helmholtz motion in violin performances.

  6. Resonance ionization scheme development for europium

    CERN Document Server

    Chrysalidis, K; Fedosseev, V N; Marsh, B A; Naubereit, P; Rothe, S; Seiffert, C; Kron, T; Wendt, K

    2017-01-01

    Odd-parity autoionizing states of europium have been investigated by resonance ionization spectroscopy via two-step, two-resonance excitations. The aim of this work was to establish ionization schemes specifically suited for europium ion beam production using the ISOLDE Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source (RILIS). 13 new RILIS-compatible ionization schemes are proposed. The scheme development was the first application of the Photo Ionization Spectroscopy Apparatus (PISA) which has recently been integrated into the RILIS setup.

  7. Resonance ionization scheme development for europium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chrysalidis, K., E-mail: katerina.chrysalidis@cern.ch; Goodacre, T. Day; Fedosseev, V. N.; Marsh, B. A. [CERN (Switzerland); Naubereit, P. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, Institiut für Physik (Germany); Rothe, S.; Seiffert, C. [CERN (Switzerland); Kron, T.; Wendt, K. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, Institiut für Physik (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    Odd-parity autoionizing states of europium have been investigated by resonance ionization spectroscopy via two-step, two-resonance excitations. The aim of this work was to establish ionization schemes specifically suited for europium ion beam production using the ISOLDE Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source (RILIS). 13 new RILIS-compatible ionization schemes are proposed. The scheme development was the first application of the Photo Ionization Spectroscopy Apparatus (PISA) which has recently been integrated into the RILIS setup.

  8. Observation of the M1 giant resonance by resonance averaging in 106Pd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopecky, J.

    1987-01-01

    An investigation of capture of 2 keV and 24 keV neutrons in a 105 Pd target resulted in resonance-averaged intensities of primary gamma rays with energies between 5.2 and 9.5 MeV. From these intensities the gamma ray strength functions have been evaluated for E1, M1 and E2 radiation and compared with predictions of the giant resonance theory. The inclusion of an energy dependent spreading width for the E1 giant resonance is necessary. The energy distribution of M1 reduced strength is consistent with an interpretation of a broad resonance around 8.8 MeV. E2 data agrees satisfactorily with the giant extrapolation. (orig.)

  9. Observation of large scissors resonance strength in actinides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttormsen, M; Bernstein, L A; Bürger, A; Görgen, A; Gunsing, F; Hagen, T W; Larsen, A C; Renstrøm, T; Siem, S; Wiedeking, M; Wilson, J N

    2012-10-19

    The orbital M1 scissors resonance has been measured for the first time in the quasicontinuum of actinides. Particle-γ coincidences are recorded with deuteron and (3)He-induced reactions on (232)Th. The residual nuclei (231,232,233)Th and (232,233) Pa show an unexpectedly strong integrated strength of B(M1)=11-15μ(n)(2) in the E(γ)=1.0-3.5 MeV region. The increased γ-decay probability in actinides due to scissors resonance is important for cross-section calculations for future fuel cycles of fast nuclear reactors and may also have an impact on stellar nucleosynthesis.

  10. Photoionization using the xchem approach: Total and partial cross sections of Ne and resonance parameters above the 2 s22 p5 threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marante, Carlos; Klinker, Markus; Kjellsson, Tor; Lindroth, Eva; González-Vázquez, Jesús; Argenti, Luca; Martín, Fernando

    2017-08-01

    The XCHEM approach interfaces well established quantum chemistry packages with scattering numerical methods in order to describe single-ionization processes in atoms and molecules. This should allow one to describe electron correlation in the continuum at the same level of accuracy as quantum chemistry methods do for bound states. Here we have applied this method to study multichannel photoionization of Ne in the vicinity of the autoionizing states lying between the 2 s22 p5 and 2 s 2 p6 ionization thresholds. The calculated total photoionization cross sections are in very good agreement with the absolute measurement of Samson et al. [J. Electron Spectrosc. Relat. Phenom. 123, 265 (2002), 10.1016/S0368-2048(02)00026-9], and with independent benchmark calculations performed at the same level of theory. From these cross sections, we have extracted resonance positions, total autoionization widths, Fano profile parameters, and correlation parameters for the lowest three autoionizing states. The values of these parameters are in good agreement with those reported in earlier theoretical and experimental work. We have also evaluated β asymmetry parameter and partial photoionization cross sections and, from the latter, partial autoionization widths and Starace parameters for the same resonances, not yet available in the literature. Resonant features in the calculated β parameter are in good agreement with the experimental observations. We have found that the three lowest resonances preferentially decay into the 2 p-1ɛ d continuum rather than into the 2 p-1ɛ s one [Phys. Rev. A 89, 043415 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevA.89.043415], in agreement with previous expectations, and that in the vicinity of the resonances the partial 2 p-1ɛ s cross section can be larger than the 2 p-1ɛ d one, in contrast with the accepted idea that the latter should amply dominate in the whole energy range. These results show the potential of the XCHEM approach to describe highly correlated process

  11. An experimental study of the role of autoionizing states of H2 (D2) in the production of energetic protons (deuterons) by electron impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landau, M.

    1982-06-01

    The autoionizing state study seemed interesting to be taken up again in energy ranges corresponding to formation thresholds, a device well adapted to this range was available concerning electron measurements. Among other things, the overlapping autoionizing states have been displayed; proton kinetic energy distribution appropriate to each state at its formation threshold have been got. The whole of these results represents a proton (and D + ) production mechanism study contribution via autoionizing states. The theory used to describe autoionization cross-section calculations are recalled. Experimental results are presented, discussed, compared to experimental results and theoretical predictions [fr

  12. Calculation of autoionization positions and widths with applications to Penning ionization reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaacson, A.D.

    1978-08-01

    Using an approximate evaluation of Miller's golden rule formula to calculate autoionization widths which allows for the consideration only of L 2 functions, the positions and lifetimes of the lowest 1 , 3 P autoionizing states of He have been obtained to reasonable accuracy. This method has been extended to molecular problems, and the ab initio configuration interaction potential energy and width surfaces for the He(2 3 S) + H 2 system have been obtained. Quantum mechanical close-coupling calculations of ionization cross sections using the complex V* - (i/2) GAMMA-potential have yielded rate constants in good agreement with the experimental results of Lindinger, et al. The potential energy surface of the He(2 1 S) + H 2 system has also been obtained and exhibits not only a high degree of anisotropy, but also contains a relative maximum for a perpendicular (C 2 /sub v/) approach which appears to arise from s-p hybridization of the outer He orbital. However, similar ab initio calculations on the He(2 1 S) + Ar system do not show such anomalous structure. In addition, the complex poles of the S-matrix (Siegert eigenvalues) were calculated for several autoionizing states of He and H - , with encouraging results even for quite modest basis sets. This method was extended to molecular problems, and results obtained for the He(2 3 S) + H and He(2 1 S) + H systems. 75 references

  13. Giant quadrupole resonance in 12C, 24Mg, and 27Al observed via deuteron inelastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C.C.; Didelez, J.P.; Kwiatowski, K.; Wo, J.R.

    1977-06-01

    Giant quadrupole resonance in 12 C, 24 Mg, and 27 Al was studied using 70 MeV deuteron beam. The results clearly show, in all three targets, resonance-like structures peaked at E/sub x/ approximately 63A/sup -1/3/ MeV, with a width of about 10 MeV. The experimental angular distributions for these resonances agree well with the l = 2 DWBA prediction. For 12 C, a binary splitting was observed, and for 24 Mg, there are indications of finer structure in the main giant quadrupole resonance region

  14. Systematic investigation of electron impact excitation-autoionization from the ground state of highly charged GaI-like ions through ΔN=1 transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oreg, J.; Bar-Shalom, A.; Mandlebaum, P.; Mittnik, D.; Meroz, E.; Schwob, J.L.; Klapisch, M.

    1991-01-01

    A systematic variation in the line intensity ratios of GaI-like and ZnI-like ions of rare earth elements has been recently observed in spectra emitted in a low density, high temperature tokamak plasma. This variation is shown to be correlated with the gradual opening of autoionizing channels through inner-shell excited configurations of the GaI-like charge-state. These channels enhance the indirect ionization rate of GaI-like ions through excitation-autoionization (EA), effecting the ionization balance and temperatures of greatest abundance. We present a systematic investigation of EA and direct impact ionization (DI) in the GaI-like isoelectronic sequence from Mo (Z = 42) to Dy (Z = 66). As Z decreases from Dy to Pr (Z = 59) the levels of the configuration 3d 9 4p4f, which are excited from the ground state by strong dipole collisional transitions, gradually cross the first ionization limit of the ion and are responsible for this ionization enhancement. When Z decreases further an additional channel is opened through the configuration 3d 9 4p4d. 9 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  15. Systematic investigation of electron impact excitation-autoionization from the ground state of highly charged GaI-like ions through ΔN = 1 transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oreg, J.; Bar-Shalom, A.; Goldstein, W.H.; Mandlebaum, P.; Mittnik, D.; Meroz, E.; Schwob, J.L.; Klapisch, M.

    1991-01-01

    A systematic variation in the line intensity ratios of GaI-like and ZnI-like ions of rare earth elements has been recently observed in spectra emitted in a low density, high temperature Tokamak plasma. This variation is shown to be correlated with the gradual opening of autoionizing channels through inner-shell excited configurations of the GaI-like charge-state. These channels enhance the indirect ionization rate of GaI-like ions through excitation-autoionization (EA), effecting the ionization balance and temperatures of greatest abundance. The authors a systematic investigations of EA and direct impact ionizations (DI) in the GaI-like isoelectronic sequence from Mo (Z = 42) to Dy (Z = 66). As Z decreases from Dy to Pr (Z = 59) the levels of the configuration 3d 9 4p4f, which are excited from the ground state by strong dipole collisional transitions, gradually cross the first ionization limit of the ion and are responsible for this ionization enhancement. When Z decreases further an additional channel is opened through the configuration 3d 9 4p4d

  16. Probing autoionizing states of molecular oxygen with XUV transient absorption: Electronic-symmetry-dependent line shapes and laser-induced modifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Chen-Ting; Li, Xuan; Haxton, Daniel J.; Rescigno, Thomas N.; Lucchese, Robert R.; McCurdy, C. William; Sandhu, Arvinder

    2017-04-01

    We used extreme ultraviolet (XUV) transient absorption spectroscopy to study the autoionizing Rydberg states of oxygen in an electronically- and vibrationally-resolved fashion. XUV pulse initiates molecular polarization and near-infrared pulse perturbs its evolution. Transient absorption spectra show positive optical-density (OD) change in the case of n s σg and n d πg autoionizing states of oxygen and negative OD change for n d σg states. Multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree-Fock (MCTDHF) calculations are used to simulate the transient absorption and the resulting spectra and temporal evolution agree with experimental observations. We model the effect of near-infrared perturbation on molecular polarization and find that the laser-induced phase-shift model agrees with the experimental and MCTDHF results, while the laser-induced attenuation model does not. We relate the electronic-state-symmetry-dependent sign of the OD change to the Fano parameters of the static absorption line shapes.

  17. Observation of resonant and non-resonant magnetic braking in the n = 1 non-axisymmetric configurations on KSTAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kimin; Choe, W.; In, Y.; Ko, W. H.; Choi, M. J.; Bak, J. G.; Kim, H. S.; Jeon, Y. M.; Kwak, J. G.; Yoon, S. W.; Oh, Y. K.; Park, J.-K.

    2017-12-01

    Toroidal rotation braking by neoclassical toroidal viscosity driven by non-axisymmetric (3D) magnetic fields, called magnetic braking, has great potential to control rotation profile, and thereby modify tokamak stability and performance. In order to characterize magnetic braking in the various 3D field configurations, dedicated experiments have been carried out in KSTAR, applying a variety of static n=1 , 3D fields of different phasing of -90 , 0, and +90 . Resonant-type magnetic braking was achieved by -90 phasing fields, accompanied by strong density pump-out and confinement degradation, and explained by excitation of kink response captured by ideal plasma response calculation. Strong resonant plasma response was also observed under +90 phasing at q95 ∼ 6 , leading to severe confinement degradation and eventual disruption by locked modes. Such a strong resonant transport was substantially modified to non-resonant-type transport at higher q95 ∼ 7.2 , as the resonant particle transport was significantly reduced and the rotation braking was pushed to plasma edge. This is well explained by ideal perturbed equilibrium calculations indicating the strong kink coupling at lower q95 is reduced at higher q95 discharge. The 0 phasing fields achieved quiescent magnetic braking without density pump-out and confinement degradation, which is consistent with vacuum and ideal plasma response analysis predicting deeply penetrating 3D fields without an excitation of strong kink response.

  18. Observation of Broad d-Wave Feshbach Resonances with a Triplet Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yue; Shen, Chuyang; Deng, Min; Dong, Shen; Chen, Cheng; Lü, Rong; Gao, Bo; Tey, Meng Khoon; You, Li

    2017-11-17

    High partial-wave (l≥2) Feshbach resonance (FR) in an ultracold mixture of ^{85}Rb-^{87}Rb atoms is investigated experimentally aided by a partial-wave insensitive analytic multichannel quantum-defect theory. Two "broad" resonances from coupling between d waves in both the open and closed channels are observed and characterized. One of them shows a fully resolved triplet structure with a splitting ratio well explained by the perturbation to the closed channel due to interatomic spin-spin interaction. These tunable "broad" d-wave resonances, especially the one in the lowest-energy open channel, could find important applications in simulating d-wave coupling dominated many-body systems. In addition, we find that there is generally a time and temperature requirement, associated with tunneling through the angular momentum barrier, to establish and observe resonant coupling in nonzero partial waves.

  19. Vibrational autoionization of state-selective jet-cooled methanethiol (CH3SH) investigated with infrared vacuum-ultraviolet photoionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Min; Sen, Zhitao; Pratt, S. T.; Lee, Yuan-Pern

    2017-11-21

    Vibrational autoionization of Rydberg states provides key information about nonadiabatic processes above an ionization threshold. We employed time-of-flight mass detection of CH3SH+ to record vibrational-state selective photo-ionization efficiency (PIE) spectra of jet-cooled methanethiol (CH3SH) on exciting CH3SH to a specific vibrationally excited state with an infrared (IR) laser, followed by excitation with a tunable laser in the vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) region for ionization. Autoionizing Rydberg states assigned to the ns, np, nd and nf series are identified. When IR light at 2601 (ν3, SH stretching mode) and 2948 cm-12, CH3 symmetric stretching mode) was employed, the Rydberg series converged to the respective vibrationally excited (ν3 and ν2) states of CH3SH+. When IR light at 3014 cm-1 (overlapped ν19, CH3 antisymmetric stretching and CH2 antisymmetric stretching modes) was employed, two converging limits towards vibrationally excited states (ν1 and ν9) of CH3SH+ were observed. In contrast, when IR light at 2867 cm-1 (2ν10, overtone of CH3 deformation mode) and 2892 cm-1 (2ν4, overtone of CH2 scissoring mode) was employed, both Δν = -1 and Δν = -2 ionization transitions were observed; there is evidence for direct ionization from the initial state into the CH3SH+ (v4+ = 1) continuum. In all observed IR-VUV-PIE spectra, the ns and nd series show intensity greater than the other Rydberg series, which is consistent with the fact that the highest-occupied molecular orbital of CH3SH is a p-like lone pair orbital on the S atom. The quantum yields for autoionization of various vibrational excited states are discussed.

  20. Calculation of autoionization positions and widths with applications to Penning ionization reactions. [Miller golden rule formula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isaacson, A.D.

    1978-08-01

    Using an approximate evaluation of Miller's golden rule formula to calculate autoionization widths which allows for the consideration only of L/sup 2/ functions, the positions and lifetimes of the lowest /sup 1/,/sup 3/P autoionizing states of He have been obtained to reasonable accuracy. This method has been extended to molecular problems, and the ab initio configuration interaction potential energy and width surfaces for the He(2/sup 3/S) + H/sub 2/ system have been obtained. Quantum mechanical close-coupling calculations of ionization cross sections using the complex V* - (i/2) GAMMA-potential have yielded rate constants in good agreement with the experimental results of Lindinger, et al. The potential energy surface of the He(2/sup 1/S) + H/sub 2/ system has also been obtained and exhibits not only a high degree of anisotropy, but also contains a relative maximum for a perpendicular (C/sub 2//sub v/) approach which appears to arise from s-p hybridization of the outer He orbital. However, similar ab initio calculations on the He(2/sup 1/S) + Ar system do not show such anomalous structure. In addition, the complex poles of the S-matrix (Siegert eigenvalues) were calculated for several autoionizing states of He and H/sup -/, with encouraging results even for quite modest basis sets. This method was extended to molecular problems, and results obtained for the He(2/sup 3/S) + H and He(2/sup 1/S) + H systems. 75 references.

  1. Femtosecond laser control of the angular distribution of electrons due to autoionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajema, M.L.; Jones, R.R.; Gallagher, T.F.

    2004-01-01

    Using two 500-fs laser pulses and a controlled time delay between them we are able to manipulate the angular distributions of the electrons ejected by autoionization of Ca atoms in the 4p 3/2 21s and 4p 3/2 19d states. Subsequent to their isolated core excitation by a 500-fs 393-nm laser pulse, Ca 4p 3/2 21s(19d) Rydberg atoms coherently evolve, via configuration interaction, into the degenerate 4p 1/2 ns(nd) states. While in the 4p 1/2 ns(nd) states atoms can be de-excited to bound 4sns(nd) levels using a 500-fs 397-nm pulse. Removing these atoms from the autoionizing states leads to a greater fraction of electrons leaving the atom along the direction of the laser polarization than is possible through direct excitation of 4 3/2 ns(nd) or 4p 1/2 ns(nd) using either the 393- or 397-nm pulse alone

  2. Observation of self-pulsing in singly resonant optical second-harmonic generation with competing nonlinearities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Morten; Lodahl, Peter; Mamaev, Alexander V.

    2002-01-01

    We predict and experimentally observe temporal self-pulsing in singly resonant intracavity second-harmonic generation under conditions of simultaneous parametric oscillation. The threshold for self-pulsing as a function of cavity tuning and phase mismatch are found from analysis of a three-compon...

  3. A comparison of field-line resonances observed at the Goose Bay and Wick radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Provan

    Full Text Available Previous observations with the Goose Bay HF coherent-scatter radar have revealed structured spectral peaks at ultra-low frequencies. The frequencies of these spectral peaks have been demonstrated to be extremely consistent from day to day. The stability of these spectral peaks can be seen as evidence for the existence of global magnetospheric cavity modes whose resonant frequencies are independent of latitude. Field-line resonances occur when successive harmonics of the eigenfrequency of the magnetospheric cavity or waveguide match either the first harmonic eigenfrequency of the geomagnetic field lines or higher harmonics of this frequency. Power spectra observed at the SABRE VHF coherent-scatter radar at Wick, Scotland, during night and early morning are revealed to show similarly clearly structured spectral peaks. These spectral peaks are the result of local field-line resonances due to Alfvén waves standing on magnetospheric field lines. A comparison of the spectra observed by the Goose Bay and Wick radars demonstrate that the frequencies of the field-line resonances are, on average, almost identical, despite the different latitudinal ranges covered by the two radars. Possible explanations for the similarity of the signatures on the two radar systems are discussed.

  4. A comparison of field-line resonances observed at the Goose Bay and Wick radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Provan

    1997-02-01

    Full Text Available Previous observations with the Goose Bay HF coherent-scatter radar have revealed structured spectral peaks at ultra-low frequencies. The frequencies of these spectral peaks have been demonstrated to be extremely consistent from day to day. The stability of these spectral peaks can be seen as evidence for the existence of global magnetospheric cavity modes whose resonant frequencies are independent of latitude. Field-line resonances occur when successive harmonics of the eigenfrequency of the magnetospheric cavity or waveguide match either the first harmonic eigenfrequency of the geomagnetic field lines or higher harmonics of this frequency. Power spectra observed at the SABRE VHF coherent-scatter radar at Wick, Scotland, during night and early morning are revealed to show similarly clearly structured spectral peaks. These spectral peaks are the result of local field-line resonances due to Alfvén waves standing on magnetospheric field lines. A comparison of the spectra observed by the Goose Bay and Wick radars demonstrate that the frequencies of the field-line resonances are, on average, almost identical, despite the different latitudinal ranges covered by the two radars. Possible explanations for the similarity of the signatures on the two radar systems are discussed.

  5. Vibration Mode Observation of Piezoelectric Disk-type Resonator by High Frequency Laser Doppler Vibrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Takeshi; Esashi, Masayoshi; Harada, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Shuji

    For future mobile phones based on cognitive radio technology, a compact multi-band RF front-end architecture is strongly required and an integrated multi-band RF filter bank is a key component in it. Contour-mode resonators are receiving increased attention for a multi-band filter solution, because its resonant frequency is mainly determined by its size and shape, which are defined by lithography. However, spurious responses including flexural vibration are also excited due to its thin structure. To improve resonator performance and suppress spurious modes, visual observation with a laser probe system is very effective. In this paper, we have prototyped a mechanically-coupled disk-array filter, which consists of a Si disk and 2 disk-type resonators of higher-order wine-glass mode, and observed its vibration modes using a high-frequency laser-Doppler vibrometer (UHF-120, Polytec, Inc.). As a result, it was confirmed that higher order wine-glass mode vibration included a compound displacement, and that its out-of-plane vibration amplitude was much smaller than other flexural spurious modes. The observed vibration modes were compared with FEM (Finite Element Method) simulation results. In addition, it was also confirmed that the fabrication error, e.g. miss-alignment, induced asymmetric vibration.

  6. Inter-observer variability between radiologists reporting on cerebellopontine angle tumours on magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, S R; Ranguis, S; Fagan, P

    2017-01-01

    Studies demonstrate the significance of intra- and inter-observer variability when measuring cerebellopontine angle tumours on magnetic resonance imaging, with measured differences as high as 2 mm. To determine intra- and inter-observer measurement variability of cerebellopontine angle tumours in a specialised institution. The magnetic resonance imaging maximal diameter of 12 randomly selected cerebellopontine angle tumours were independently measured by 4 neuroradiologists at a tertiary referral centre using a standard definition for maximal tumour diameter. Average deviation and intraclass correlation were subsequently calculated. Inter-observer difference averaged 0.33 ± 0.04 mm (range, 0.0-0.8 mm). Intra-observer measurements were more consistent than inter-observer measurements, with differences averaging 0.17 mm (95 per cent confidence interval = 0.27-0.06, p = 0.002). Inter-observer reliability was 0.99 (95 per cent confidence interval = 0.97-0.99), suggesting high reliability between the readings. The use of a standard definition for maximal tumour volume provided high reliability amongst radiologists' readings. To avoid oversizing tumours, it is recommended that conservative monitoring be conducted by the same institution with thin slice magnetic resonance imaging scans.

  7. Weight dependent modulation of motor resonance induced by weight estimation during observation of partially occluded lifting actions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valchev, Nikola; Zijdewind, Inge; Keysers, Christian; Gazzola, Valeria; Avenanti, Alessio; Maurits, Natasha M.

    Seeing others performing an action induces the observers' motor cortex to "resonate" with the observed action. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) studies suggest that such motor resonance reflects the encoding of various motor features of the observed action, including the apparent motor

  8. Weight dependent modulation of motor resonance induced by weight estimation during observation of partially occluded lifting actions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valchev, N.; Zijdewind, I.; Keysers, C.; Gazzola, V.; Avenanti, A.; Maurits, N.M.

    2015-01-01

    Seeing others performing an action induces the observers' motor cortex to "resonate" with the observed action. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) studies suggest that such motor resonance reflects the encoding of various motor features of the observed action, including the apparent motor

  9. Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nils Holger

    2014-01-01

    A chapter in a book about terminology within the field of medievalism: the chapter discusses the resonance of medieval music and ritual in modern (classical) music culture and liturgical practice.......A chapter in a book about terminology within the field of medievalism: the chapter discusses the resonance of medieval music and ritual in modern (classical) music culture and liturgical practice....

  10. Observation of orbital resonance Hall effect in (TMTSF)2ClO4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kaya; Satsukawa, H; Yamada, J; Terashima, T; Uji, S

    2014-03-21

    We report the observation of a Hall effect driven by orbital resonance in the quasi-1-dimensional (q1D) organic conductor (TMTSF)2ClO4. Although a conventional Hall effect is not expected in this class of materials due to their reduced dimensionality, we observed a prominent Hall response at certain orientations of the magnetic field B corresponding to lattice vectors of the constituent molecular chains, known as the magic angles (MAs). We show that this Hall effect can be understood as the response of conducting planes generated by an effective locking of the orbital motion of the charge carriers to the MA driven by an electron-trajectory resonance. This phenomenon supports a class of theories describing the rich behavior of MA phenomena in q1D materials based on altered dimensionality. Furthermore, we observed that the effective carrier density of the conducting planes is exponentially suppressed in large B, which indicates possible density wave formation.

  11. Atomic and Molecular Complex Resonances from Real Eigenvalues Using Standard (Hermitian) Electronic Structure Calculations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Landau, A.; Haritan, I.; Kaprálová-Žďánská, Petra Ruth; Moiseyev, N.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 120, č. 19 (2016), s. 3098-3108 ISSN 1089-5639 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG13029 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : autoionizing states * coordinate calculation * scattering resonances Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 2.847, year: 2016

  12. Resonances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    an impetus or drive to that account: change, innovation, rupture, or discontinuity. Resonances: Historical Essays on Continuity and Change explores the historiographical question of the modes of interrelation between these motifs in historical narratives. The essays in the collection attempt to realize...... theoretical consciousness through historical narrative ‘in practice’, by discussing selected historical topics from Western cultural history, within the disciplines of history, literature, visual arts, musicology, archaeology, philosophy, and theology. The title Resonances indicates the overall perspective...... of the book: how connotations of past meanings may resonate through time, in new contexts, assuming new meanings without surrendering the old....

  13. Angular correlation of autoionization electrons and photons emitted from collisionally aligned atomic states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichler, J.; Fritsch, W.

    1976-01-01

    The angular correlation of autoionization electrons or of photons ejected from collisionally aligned excited atoms is calculated assuming unpolarized beam and target, and polarization-insensitive detectors. Starting from the two-step hypothesis for the formation and decay of the intermediate excited atoms, the angular correlation is expressed in terms of the density matrix describing the excited system. Using the symmetries of the density matrix, a minimal set of independent matrix elements is given and the conditions for which a complete determination of this set is experimentally possible are discussed. For the case of electron emission, simple examples are pointed out in which the angular correlation is independent of the reduced Coulomb matrix elements describing the decay. (author)

  14. Two-color spectroscopy of UV excited ssDNA complex with a single-wall nanotube probe: Fast nucleobase autoionization mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Ignatova, Tetyana; Balaeff, Alexander; Zheng, Ming; Blades, Michael; Stoeckl, Peter; Rotkin, Slava V.

    2015-01-01

    DNA autoionization is a fundamental process wherein UV-photoexcited nucleobases dissipate energy by charge transfer to the environment without undergoing chemical damage. Here, single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) are explored as a photoluminescent reporter for studying the mechanism and rates of DNA autoionization. Two-color photoluminescence spectroscopy allows separate photoexcitation of the DNA and the SWNTs in the UV and visible range, respectively. A strong SWNT photoluminescence quenchi...

  15. Schumann resonance frequency variations observed in magnetotelluric data recorded from Garhwal Himalayan region India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Chand

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Schumann resonance (SR frequency variation has been studied using Magnetotelluric (MT data recorded in one of the world's toughest and generally inaccessible Himalayan terrain for the first time in the author's knowledge. The magnetotelluric data, in the form of orthogonal time varying electric and magnetic field components (Ex, Ey, Bx and By, recorded during 10 March–23 May 2006, in the Himalayan region, India, at elevations between 1228–2747 m above mean sea level (amsl, were used to study the SR frequency variation. Electromagnetic field components, in the form of time series, were recorded at 64 Hz sampling frequency at a site located away from the cultural noise. Spectral analysis of time series data, at a frequency resolution of 0.03 Hz, has been performed using Fast Fourier Transform (FFT algorithm. Spectral stabilization in three Schumann resonance modes is achieved by averaging the power spectral magnitude of 32 data segments, each with 2048 sample data. Amplitude variation in the Schumann resonance frequency associated with day-night, sunrise and terminator effect was observed. Average diurnal variation in the first three Schumann resonance frequencies associated with magnetic field components is presented. The maximum frequency variation of about 0.3, 0.4 and 0.7 Hz was observed in the first, second and third mode, respectively. The frequency variations observed in electric and magnetic field components also show phase shift and varying attenuation. The SR frequency variation has been used to define the ionospheric electron density variation in the Himalayan region, India.

  16. Schumann resonance frequency variations observed in magnetotelluric data recorded from Garhwal Himalayan region India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Chand

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Schumann resonance (SR frequency variation has been studied using Magnetotelluric (MT data recorded in one of the world's toughest and generally inaccessible Himalayan terrain for the first time in the author's knowledge. The magnetotelluric data, in the form of orthogonal time varying electric and magnetic field components (Ex, Ey, Bx and By, recorded during 10 March–23 May 2006, in the Himalayan region, India, at elevations between 1228–2747 m above mean sea level (amsl, were used to study the SR frequency variation. Electromagnetic field components, in the form of time series, were recorded at 64 Hz sampling frequency at a site located away from the cultural noise. Spectral analysis of time series data, at a frequency resolution of 0.03 Hz, has been performed using Fast Fourier Transform (FFT algorithm. Spectral stabilization in three Schumann resonance modes is achieved by averaging the power spectral magnitude of 32 data segments, each with 2048 sample data. Amplitude variation in the Schumann resonance frequency associated with day-night, sunrise and terminator effect was observed. Average diurnal variation in the first three Schumann resonance frequencies associated with magnetic field components is presented. The maximum frequency variation of about 0.3, 0.4 and 0.7 Hz was observed in the first, second and third mode, respectively. The frequency variations observed in electric and magnetic field components also show phase shift and varying attenuation. The SR frequency variation has been used to define the ionospheric electron density variation in the Himalayan region, India.

  17. Propagation of optical pulses in a resonantly absorbing medium: Observation of negative velocity in Rb vapor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, H.; Hayami, K.; Furue, S.; Nakayama, K.; Niwa, H.; Kohmoto, T.; Kunitomo, M.; Fukuda, Y.

    2003-01-01

    Propagation of optical pulses in a resonantly absorbing medium is studied. Propagation time of nanosecond pulses was measured for the Rb D 1 transition. At the center of two absorption lines, delay of the pulse peak which is about ten times as large as the pulse width was observed, where zero delay is defined for the propagation with the light velocity in vacuum. On the other hand, at the peak of an absorption line, negative delay was observed for large absorption, where the advance time is as large as 25% of the pulse width. Simulation including the effect of absorption and phase shift reproduced well the experimental results

  18. Observation of a resonance in $B^+ \\to K^+ \\mu^+\\mu^-$ decays at low recoil

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, R; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Cowie, E; Craik, D C; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gorbounov, P; Gordon, H; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hess, M; Hicheur, A; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Maratas, J; Marconi, U; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Martynov, A; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M -N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palczewski, T; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Roberts, D A; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M -H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Van Dijk, M; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-01-01

    A broad peaking structure is observed in the dimuon spectrum of $B^+ \\to K^+ \\mu^+\\mu^-$ decays in the kinematic region where the kaon has a low recoil against the dimuon system. The structure is consistent with interference between the $B^+ \\to K^+ \\mu^+\\mu^-$ decay and a resonance and has a statistical significance exceeding six standard deviations. The mean and width of the resonance are measured to be $4191^{+9}_{-8}\\mathrm{\\,Me\\kern -0.1em V/}c^2$ and $65^{+22}_{-16}\\mathrm{\\,Me\\kern -0.1em V/}c^2$, respectively, where the uncertainties include statistical and systematic contributions. These measurements are compatible with the properties of the $\\psi(4160)$ meson. First observations of both the decay $B^+ \\to \\psi(4160) K^+$ and the subsequent decay $\\psi(4160) \\to \\mu^+\\mu^-$ are reported. The resonant decay and the interference contribution make up 20% of the yield for dimuon masses above 3770  MeV/c2. This contribution is larger than theoretical estimates.

  19. Observation of a resonance in B+ → K+ μ+ μ- decays at low recoil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Cowie, E; Craik, D C; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gorbounov, P; Gordon, H; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hess, M; Hicheur, A; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Maratas, J; Marconi, U; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Martynov, A; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palczewski, T; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Roberts, D A; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Van Dijk, M; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-09-13

    A broad peaking structure is observed in the dimuon spectrum of B+ → K+ μ+ μ- decays in the kinematic region where the kaon has a low recoil against the dimuon system. The structure is consistent with interference between the B+ → K+ μ+ μ- decay and a resonance and has a statistical significance exceeding six standard deviations. The mean and width of the resonance are measured to be 4191(-8)(+9)  MeV/c2 and 65(-16)(+22)  MeV/c2, respectively, where the uncertainties include statistical and systematic contributions. These measurements are compatible with the properties of the ψ(4160) meson. First observations of both the decay B+ → ψ(4160)K+ and the subsequent decay ψ(4160) → μ+ μ- are reported. The resonant decay and the interference contribution make up 20% of the yield for dimuon masses above 3770  MeV/c2. This contribution is larger than theoretical estimates.

  20. Observation of high-lying resonances in the H sup minus ion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, P.G. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA) New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (USA). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy)

    1990-05-01

    This dissertation reports the observation of several series of resonances, for which both electrons are in excited states, in the photodetachment cross section of H{sup {minus}}. These {sup 1}P doubly-excited states interfere with the continuum in which they are embedded, and appear as dips in the production cross section of excited neutral hydrogen. The experiment was performed by intersecting an 800 MeV H{sup {minus}} beam with a (266 nm) laser beam at varying angles; the relativistic Doppler shift then tuned'' the photon energy in the barycentric frame. The process was observed by using a magnet strong enough the strip the electrons from the excited hydrogen atoms in selected states n and detecting the resulting protons, which allowed the isolation of the individual n channels. Three resonances are clearly visible in each channel. The data support recent theoretical calculations for the positions of doubly-excited {sup 1}P resonances, and verify a new Rydberg-like formula for the modified Coulomb potential.

  1. Observation of pentaquark resonances in Λb → J/ψK−p decays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeva B.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available LHCb has recently reported the observation of exotic structures in the J/ψp channel, in Λb → J/ψK−p decay, which we discuss here and refer to as charmoniumpentaquarkstates. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb−1acquired with the LHCb detector from 7 and 8 TeV pp collisions. An amplitude analysisof the three-body final state reproduces the two-body mass and angular distributions. Toobtain a satisfactory fit of the structures seen in the J/ψp mass spectrum, it is necessaryto include two Breit-Wigner amplitudes that each describe a resonant state. Details aregiven on the significance, and prefered quantum numbers, of these two resonances.

  2. RESONANCE

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    maceutical, paper, food, dyes, petrochemi- cals, pigments, etc., to identify molecules, to monitor reaction products and so on. One of the most spectacular contributions of NMR has been in the development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a method that has today revolutionized diagnosis and treatment of diseases in ...

  3. Precision spectroscopy with COMPASS and the observation of a new iso-vector resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Stephan Paul

    2014-01-01

    We report on the results of a novel partial-wave analysis based on $50\\cdot 10^6$ events from the reaction $\\pi^- + p \\to \\pi^- \\pi^- \\pi^+ + p_\\text{recoil}$ at 190 $\\text{GeV/c}$ incoming beam momentum using the COMPASS spectrometer. A separated analysis in bins of $m_{3\\pi}$ and four-momentum transfer $t'$ reveals the interference of resonant and non-resonant particle production and allows their spectral separation. Besides well known resonances we observe a new iso-vector meson $a_1(1420)$ at a mass of 1420 $\\text{MEV\\c}^2$ in the $f_0(980)\\pi$ final state only, the origin of which is unclear. We have also examined the structure of the $0^{++}$ $\\pi\\pi$-isobar in the $J^{PC}=0^{-+}, 1^{++}, 2^{-+}$ three pion waves. This clearly reveals the various $0^{++}$ $\\pi\\pi$-isobar components and its correlation to the decay of light mesons.

  4. Ionospheric Alfvén resonator and aurora: Modeling of MICA observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulegenov, B.; Streltsov, A. V.

    2017-07-01

    We present results from a numerical study of small-scale, intense magnetic field-aligned currents observed in the vicinity of the discrete auroral arc by the Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Coupling in the Alfvén Resonator (MICA) sounding rocket launched from Poker Flat, Alaska, on 19 February 2012. The goal of the MICA project was to investigate the hypothesis that such currents can be produced inside the ionospheric Alfvén resonator by the ionospheric feedback instability (IFI) driven by the system of large-scale magnetic field-aligned currents interacting with the ionosphere. The trajectory of the MICA rocket crossed two discrete auroral arcs and detected packages of intense, small-scale currents at the edges of these arcs, in the most favorable location for the development of the ionospheric feedback instability, predicted by the IFI theory. Simulations of the reduced MHD model derived in the dipole magnetic field geometry with realistic background parameters confirm that IFI indeed generates small-scale ULF waves inside the ionospheric Alfvén resonator with frequency, scale size, and amplitude showing a good, quantitative agreement with the observations. The comparison between numerical results and observations was performed by "flying" a virtual MICA rocket through the computational domain, and this comparison shows that, for example, the waves generated in the numerical model have frequencies in the range from 0.30 to 0.45 Hz, and the waves detected by the MICA rocket have frequencies in the range from 0.18 to 0.50 Hz.

  5. Physics of orbital degree of freedom - resonant X-ray scattering for observation of orbital ordering

    CERN Document Server

    Hirota, K

    2003-01-01

    Orbital degree of freedom plays very important roles in electric and magnetic properties in strongly correlated electron systems. The method for measurement of orbital ordering, however, has been limited so far. Recently it has been pointed out that the resonant X-ray scattering (RXS) technique is a very powerful tool to observe the ordering. In ths paper, the principle of RXS and the recent development are described after the general introduction of orbital degree of freedom. Finally the future in orbital physics will be discussed. (author)

  6. Observation of bilaminar zone in magnetic resonance images of temporomandibular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nah, Soo Kyung

    2001-01-01

    To observe the relationship of bilaminar zone of temporomandibular joint retrodical tissues to the disc condition. The upper and lower stratum of bilaminar zone were identified on magnetic resonance open mouth images of 148 joints from 74 parents with disc displacements. Both strata sere identifiable in 105 joints which had disc displacement without reduction but 12 of 35 had hyalinized posterior attachment where the disc was. The 8 joints which had partial disc displacement without reduction showed identifiable lower stratum at the reducing site which was medial. Disruption or no identification of lower stratum which corresponds to the condylar portion of posterior attachment may be the sign of disc displacement without reduction

  7. Observation of Conducting Structures in Detonation Nanodiamond Powder by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binh, Nguyen Thi Thanh; Dolmatov, V. Yu.; Lapchuk, N. M.

    2018-01-01

    We have used electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) to study high-purity detonation nanodiamond (DND) powders at room temperature. In recording the EPR signal with g factor 2.00247 and line width 0.890 mT, with automatic frequency control locking the frequency of the microwave generator (klystron) to the frequency of the experimental cavity, we observed a change in the shape of the EPR signal from the DND powder due to formation of an anisotropic electrically conducting structure in the powder. The electrical conductivity of the DND sample is apparent in the Dysonian EPR lineshape (strongly asymmetric signal with g factor 2.00146 and line width 0.281 mT) together with an abrupt shift of the baseline at the time of resonant absorption, and in the decrease in the cavity Q due to nonresonant microwave absorption. The observed effect can be explained by transition of the DND powder from a dielectric state to a state with metallic conductivity, due to spin ordering in a preferred direction.

  8. Experimental investigation of shaping disturbance observer design for motion control of precision mechatronic stages with resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jin; Hu, Chuxiong; Zhu, Yu; Wang, Ze; Zhang, Ming

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, shaping disturbance observer (SDOB) is investigated for precision mechatronic stages with middle-frequency zero/pole type resonance to achieve good motion control performance in practical manufacturing situations. Compared with traditional standard disturbance observer (DOB), in SDOB a pole-zero cancellation based shaping filter is cascaded to the mechatronic stage plant to meet the challenge of motion control performance deterioration caused by actual resonance. Noting that pole-zero cancellation is inevitably imperfect and the controller may even consequently become unstable in practice, frequency domain stability analysis is conducted to find out how each parameter of the shaping filter affects the control stability. Moreover, the robust design criterion of the shaping filter, and the design procedure of SDOB, are both proposed to guide the actual design and facilitate practical implementation. The SDOB with the proposed design criterion is applied to a linear motor driven stage and a voice motor driven stage, respectively. Experimental results consistently validate the effectiveness nature of the proposed SDOB scheme in practical mechatronics motion applications. The proposed SDOB design actually could be an effective unit in the controller design for motion stages of mechanical manufacture equipments.

  9. Resonant x-ray scattering in perovskite manganite superlattice. Observation of 'orbital superlattice'

    CERN Document Server

    Kiyama, T; Ohsumi, H; Murakami, Y; Wakabayashi, Y; Izumi, M; Kawasaki, M; Tokura, Y

    2003-01-01

    We report the results of resonant X-ray scattering (RXS) measurement of superlattices which consist of La sub 0 sub . sub 4 sub 5 Sr sub 0 sub . sub 5 sub 5 MnO sub 3 and La sub 0 sub . sub 6 sub 0 Sr sub 0 sub . sub 4 sub 0 MnO sub 3 multilayers. An interference technique made it possible to observe RXS reflections from ferro-type orbital ordering in the superlattices. RXS can reveal the local circumstances around specific atoms in materials regulated atomically. In this experiment, we observed that the superlattice is actually composed of two kinds of layers with different lattice distortion states, presenting 'orbital superlattices', in which layers with different orbital states are stacked alternately in an atomic scale. (author)

  10. Observation of lobes near the X point in resonant magnetic perturbation experiments on MAST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, A; Harrison, J; Liu, Yueqiang; Nardon, E; Chapman, I T; Denner, P

    2012-06-22

    The application of nonaxisymmetric resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) with a toroidal mode number n = 6 in the MAST tokamak produces a significant reduction in plasma energy loss associated with type-I edge localized modes (ELMs), the first such observation with n > 3. During the ELM mitigated stage clear lobe structures are observed in visible-light imaging of the X-point region. These lobes or manifold structures, that were predicted previously, have been observed for the first time in a range of discharges and their appearance is correlated with the effect of RMPs on the plasma; i.e., they only appear above a threshold when a density pump out is observed or when the ELM frequency is increased. They appear to be correlated with the RMPs penetrating the plasma and may be important in explaining why the ELM frequency increases. The number and location of the structures observed can be well described using vacuum modeling. Differences in radial extent and poloidal width from vacuum modeling are likely to be due to a combination of transport effects and plasma screening.

  11. Observation of the Borromean Three-Body Förster Resonances for Three Interacting Rb Rydberg Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tretyakov, D B; Beterov, I I; Yakshina, E A; Entin, V M; Ryabtsev, I I; Cheinet, P; Pillet, P

    2017-10-27

    Three-body Förster resonances at long-range interactions of Rydberg atoms were first predicted and observed in Cs Rydberg atoms by Faoro et al. [Nat. Commun. 6, 8173 (2015)NCAOBW2041-172310.1038/ncomms9173]. In these resonances, one of the atoms carries away an energy excess preventing the two-body resonance, leading thus to a Borromean type of Förster energy transfer. But they were in fact observed as the average signal for the large number of atoms N≫1. In this Letter, we report on the first experimental observation of the three-body Förster resonances 3×nP_{3/2}(|M|)→nS_{1/2}+(n+1)S_{1/2}+nP_{3/2}(|M^{*}|) in a few Rb Rydberg atoms with n=36, 37. We have found here clear evidence that there is no signature of the three-body Förster resonance for exactly two interacting Rydberg atoms, while it is present for N=3-5 atoms. This demonstrates the assumption that three-body resonances can generalize to any Rydberg atom. As such resonance represents an effective three-body operator, it can be used to directly control the three-body interactions in quantum simulations and quantum information processing with Rydberg atoms.

  12. Relaxation study of a paramagnetic ion by the observation of nuclear resonance signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landesman, A.

    1960-01-01

    Dynamic polarization of protons in water containing the paramagnetic ion NO(SO 3 ) 2 was studied, both theoretically and experimentally, as a function of magnetic field. The enhancement of the proton polarization depends appreciably on the relaxation process of the electron spin and so enables us to decide which is the real relaxation process. We tried the two following processes: a) The electron spin is coupled with the nitrogen magnetic moment by hyperfine interaction; if this interaction has an anisotropic part, a relaxation process for the electronic spin will result through the Brownian motion of the ion. b) The relaxation of the electron spin takes place through spin-orbit coupling of the electron spin. Experimental results showed that the relaxation took place through the second process with the help of dynamic polarization we were able to study the relaxation of an electron spin in a liquid without using any electron resonance spectrometer, simply by observing the resonance of a nuclear spin coupled with the electron spin. Reprint of a paper published in Le Journal de Physique et le Radium, t. 20, p. 937-948, 1959 [fr

  13. Coordinated observation of field line resonance in the mid-tail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Zheng

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Standing Alfvén waves of 1.1 mHz (~15 min in period were observed by the Cluster satellites in the mid-tail during 06:00-07:00 UT on 8 August 2003. Pulsations with the same frequency were also observed at several ground stations near Cluster's footpoint. The standing wave properties were determined from the electric and magnetic field measurements of Cluster. Data from the ground magnetometers indicated a latitudinal amplitude and phase structure consistent with the driven field line resonance (FLR at 1.1 mHz. Simultaneously, quasi-periodic oscillations at different frequencies were observed in the post-midnight/early morning sector by GOES 12 (l0≈8.7, Polar (l0≈11-14 and Geotail (l0≈9.8. The 8 August 2003 event yields rare and interesting datasets. It provides, for the first time, coordinated in situ and ground-based observations of a very low frequency FLR in the mid-tail on stretched field lines.

  14. Internal DNA modes below 25 cm-1: a resonance Raman spectroscopy observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisy, V; Miskovsky, P; Brutovsky, B; Chinsky, L

    1997-02-01

    The first resonance Raman scattering observation of the low-frequency (LF) region (below 40 up to 12 cm-1) of DNA motions is presented. Since the concentration of the studied DNA solution was very low (1 mg/ml), the spectra features reflect internal vibrations of the macromolecule. The decomposition of the spectra into Lorentzians clearly indicate three intrahelical DNA modes: the corresponding peaks are located at the frequencies 16, 19, and 23 (+/- 1) cm-1. This result is in agreement with our quasi-continuity model of the LF B-form DNA dynamics (V. Lisy, P. Miskovsky and P. Schreiber, J. Biomol. Struct. Dyn. 13, 707 (1996)). The fit of the experimental frequencies to the theory, using the Genetic Algorithms approach, allowed us to make some conclusions about the model force constants which could be found by independent conformational energy calculations. Possible positions of five lowest-frequency DNA peaks, predicted by the model, are discussed.

  15. Horizontal shear wave scattering from a nonwelded interface observed by magnetic resonance elastography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papazoglou, S; Hamhaber, U; Braun, J; Sack, I

    2007-01-01

    A method based on magnetic resonance elastography is presented that allows measuring the weldedness of interfaces between soft tissue layers. The technique exploits the dependence of shear wave scattering at elastic interfaces on the frequency of vibration. Experiments were performed on gel phantoms including differently welded interfaces. Plane wave excitation parallel to the planar interface with corresponding motion sensitization enabled the observation of only shear-horizontal (SH) wave scattering. Spatio-temporal filtering was applied to calculate scattering coefficients from the amplitudes of the incident, transmitted and reflected SH-waves in the vicinity of the interface. The results illustrate that acoustic wave scattering in soft tissues is largely dependent on the connectivity of interfaces, which is potentially interesting for imaging tissue mechanics in medicine and biology

  16. Observation of a photoinduced, resonant tunneling effect in a carbon nanotube–silicon heterojunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Aramo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A significant resonant tunneling effect has been observed under the 2.4 V junction threshold in a large area, carbon nanotube–silicon (CNT–Si heterojunction obtained by growing a continuous layer of multiwall carbon nanotubes on an n-doped silicon substrate. The multiwall carbon nanostructures were grown by a chemical vapor deposition (CVD technique on a 60 nm thick, silicon nitride layer, deposited on an n-type Si substrate. The heterojunction characteristics were intensively studied on different substrates, resulting in high photoresponsivity with a large reverse photocurrent plateau. In this paper, we report on the photoresponsivity characteristics of the device, the heterojunction threshold and the tunnel-like effect observed as a function of applied voltage and excitation wavelength. The experiments are performed in the near-ultraviolet to near-infrared wavelength range. The high conversion efficiency of light radiation into photoelectrons observed with the presented layout allows the device to be used as a large area photodetector with very low, intrinsic dark current and noise.

  17. Angular distributions of autoionization electrons from Ne(2p43s2) 1D in Li+-Ne collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oud, M.; Pas, S.F. te; Westerveld, W.B.; Niehaus, A.

    1993-01-01

    Angular distributions of autoionization electrons from Ne(2p 4 3s 2 ) 1 D due to Li + -Ne collisions measured in coincidence with the scattered projectile ions are presented. The measurements are performed at four different collision energies between 1.0 keV and 3.0 keV, and the complex population amplitudes for the excited 1 D state are determined. A nearly pure M = O sublevel population is found with respect to an axis coinciding with the direction of the angular distribution. The direction of the angular distribution is found to deviate from the final direction of the asymptotic internuclear axis. (author)

  18. Autoionization dynamics of excited collision systems: Angular dependence of the electron and ion energy spectra for He*(23S)+H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merz, A.; Ruf, M.; Hotop, H.

    1992-01-01

    We present the first angle-dependent energy spectra for the basic autoionization process He * (2 3 S)+H(1 2 S) leading to Penning ionization (→He+H + +e - ; PI) and associative ionization [→HeH + (v + ,J + )+e - ; AI]. Our results include electron energy spectra for both reaction channels and the H + -ion energy spectra for PI. The variation of the electron spectra with angle demonstrates the presence of substantial contributions from non-s-type electron partial waves, with the angle-dependent electron signals due to AI yielding clear information on the internal electron angular distribution of the autoionizing quasimolecule

  19. Spatial Variations of Poloidal and Toroidal Mode Field Line Resonances Observed by MMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, G.; Chi, P. J.; Strangeway, R. J.; Russell, C. T.; Slavin, J. A.; Anderson, B. J.; Kepko, L.; Nakamura, R.; Plaschke, F.; Torbert, R. B.

    2017-12-01

    Field line resonances (FLRs) are magnetosphere's responses to solar wind forcing and internal instabilities generated by solar wind-magnetospheric interactions. They are standing waves along the Earth's magnetic field lines oscillating in either poloidal or toroidal modes. The two types of waves have their unique frequency characteristics. The eigenfrequency of FLRs is determined by the length of the field line and the plasma density, and thus gradually changes with L. For toroidal mode oscillations with magnetic field perturbations in the azimuthal direction, ideal MHD predicts that each field line oscillates independently with its own eigenfrequency. For poloidal mode waves with field lines oscillating radially, their frequency cannot change with L easily as L shells need to oscillate in sync to avoid efficient damping due to phase mixing. Observations, mainly during quiet times, indeed show that poloidal mode waves often exhibit nearly constant frequency across L shells. Our recent observations, on the other hand, reveal a clear L-dependent frequency trend for a long lasting storm-time poloidal wave event, indicating the wave can maintain its power with changing frequencies for an extended period [Le et al., 2017]. The spatial variation of the frequency shows discrete spatial structures. The frequency remains constant within each discrete structure that spans about 1 REalong L, and changes discretely. We present a follow-up study to investigate spatial variations of wave frequencies using the Wigner-Ville distribution. We examine both poloidal and toroidal waves under different geomagnetic conditions using multipoint observations from MMS, and compare their frequency and occurrence characteristics for insights into their generation mechanisms. Reference: Le, G., et al. (2017), Global observations of magnetospheric high-m poloidal waves during the 22 June 2015 magnetic storm, Geophys. Res. Lett., 44, 3456-3464, doi:10.1002/2017GL073048.

  20. Coherent and incoherent processes in resonant photoemission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnuson, M.; Karis, O.; Weinelt, M. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    In this contribution the authors present the distinction between coherent and incoherent processes in resonant photoemission. As a first step they determine whether an autoionization process is photoemission-like or Auger-like. The discussion is based on measurements for a weakly bonded adsorption system, Ar/Pt(111). This type of system is well adapted to investigate these effects since it yields distinctly shifted spectral features depending on the nature of the process. After this, the question of resonance photoemission in metallic systems is addressed. This is done in connection with measurements at the 2p edges for Ni metal. Ni has been one of the prototype systems for resonant photoemission. The resonances have been discussed in connection with the strong correlation and d-band localization effects in this system. Based on the results some general comments about the appearance of resonant effects in metallic systems are made.

  1. Ultrasensitive analysis of thorium by resonance ionization mass spectroscopy (RIMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, S.G.; Nogar, N.S.; Miller, C.M.; Murrell, M.T.; Fearey, B.L.

    1991-01-01

    This communication presents results on a RIMS analysis of thorium. Thorium is of interest for geochronological and geochemical purposes. The measurement of uranium series disequilibrium is a well established and valuable approach for geochronological studies: disequilibrium between 234/238 U and 230 Th can be used to date samples younger than 350,000 years. Both continuous wave (cw) and pulsed lasers were utilized in this study for resonantly exciting and subsequently ionizing thorium. In the case of the pulsed laser RIMS experiments, two excimer laser-pumped dye lasers were used in conjunction with a 0.4 m time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The cw RIMS experiments used an Ar + laser-pumped dye laser and a second Ar + in combination with a single magnetic sector mass spectrometer (NBS 12-90 design). Experiments performed with the pulsed RIMS apparatus were aimed at determining the autoionization state structure and re-determining the ionization potential (IP). By tuning one dye laser to a resonance and scanning the second laser such that the total energy was equal to or above the IP, over 150 autoionization states were determined. The IP was re-determined to be 6.211±.002 eV (50900 ± 20 cm -1 ). In addition, the typical cross section for ionization of an autoionizing state was determined to be 1 x 10 -15 cm 2

  2. ULF Waves in the Ionospheric Alfven Resonator: Modeling of MICA Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streltsov, A. V.; Tulegenov, B.

    2017-12-01

    We present results from a numerical study of physical processes responsible for the generation of small-scale, intense electromagnetic structures in the ultra-low-frequency range frequently observed in the close vicinity of bright discrete auroral arcs. In particular, our research is focused on the role of the ionosphere in generating these structures. A significant body of observations demonstrate that small-scale electromagnetic waves with frequencies below 1 Hz are detected at high latitudes where the large-scale, downward magnetic field-aligned current (FAC) interact with the ionosphere. Some theoretical studies suggest that these waves can be generated by the ionospheric feedback instability (IFI) inside the ionospheric Alfven resonator (IAR). The IAR is the region in the low-altitude magnetosphere bounded by the strong gradient in the Alfven speed at high altitude and the conducting bottom of the ionosphere (ionospheric E-region) at low altitude. To study ULF waves in this region we use a numerical model developed from reduced two fluid MHD equations describing shear Alfven waves in the ionosphere and magnetosphere of the earth. The active ionospheric feedback on structure and amplitude of magnetic FACs that interact with the ionosphere is implemented through the ionospheric boundary conditions that link the parallel current density with the plasma density and the perpendicular electric field in the ionosphere. Our numerical results are compared with the in situ measurements performed by the Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Coupling in the Alfven Resonator (MICA) sounding rocket, launched on February 19, 2012 from Poker Flat Research Range in Alaska to measure fields and particles during a passage through a discreet auroral arc. Parameters of the simulations are chosen to match actual MICA parameters, allowing the comparison in the most precise and rigorous way. Waves generated in the numerical model have frequencies between 0.30 and 0.45 Hz, while MICA measured

  3. Direct observation of a surface resonance state and surface band inversion control in black phosphorus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlen, N.; Sanna, A.; Senkovskiy, B. V.; Petaccia, L.; Fedorov, A. V.; Profeta, G.; Grüneis, A.

    2018-01-01

    We report a Cs-doping-induced band inversion and the direct observation of a surface resonance state with an elliptical Fermi surface in black phosphorus (BP) using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. By selectively inducing a higher electron concentration (1.7 ×1014cm-2 ) in the topmost layer, the changes in the Coulomb potential are sufficiently large to cause surface band inversion between the parabolic valence band of BP and a parabolic surface state around the Γ point of the BP Brillouin zone. Tight-binding calculations reveal that band gap openings at the crossing points in the two high-symmetry directions of the Brillouin zone require out-of-plane hopping and breaking of the glide mirror symmetry. Ab initio calculations are in very good agreement with the experiment if a stacking fault on the BP surface is taken into account. The demonstrated level of control over the band structure suggests the potential application of few-layer phosphorene in topological field-effect transistors.

  4. New observations concerning the interpretation of magnetic resonance spectroscopy of meningioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yue, Qiang [University of Tsukuba, Department of Neurosurgery, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Tsukuba Science City, Ibaraki (Japan); West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Huaxi MR Research Center, Department of Radiology, Chengdu (China); Isobe, Tomonori [Kitasato University, Department of Medical Technology, School of Allied Health Sciences, Minato (Japan); Shibata, Yasushi; Kawamura, Hiraku; Yamamoto, Youhei; Takano, Shingo; Matsumura, Akira [University of Tsukuba, Department of Neurosurgery, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Tsukuba Science City, Ibaraki (Japan); Anno, Izumi [University of Tsukuba, Department of Radiology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Tsukuba (Japan)

    2008-12-15

    This study was aimed to clarify some ambiguities in the interpretation of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) of meningiomas. The cases of 31 meningioma patients (27 benign and 4 nonbenign meningiomas) that underwent single-voxel 1H-MRS (PRESS sequence, TR/TE = 2,000 ms/68, 136, 272 ms) were retrospectively analyzed. To verify the findings of in-vivo study, phantoms were measured, and pathological sections of 11 patients were reviewed. All meningiomas demonstrated increased choline and decreased creatine, except for a lipomatous meningioma that only displayed a prominent lipid (Lip) peak. Alanine (Ala) and lactate (Lac) coexisted in eight cases, indicating an alternative pathway of energy metabolism in meningiomas. They partially overlapped with each other and demonstrated a triplet-like spectral pattern, which was consistent with phantom study. Glutamine/glutamate (Glx) was helpful for the recognition of meningioma when Ala was absent. N-acetyl compounds(NACs) were observed in nine cases whose voxels were completely limited within the tumors, indicating that meningiomas might have endogenous NACs. Lac was indicative of an aggressive meningioma, although not always a nonbenign one. Lip not only represented micronecrosis in nonbenign meningiomas, but also reflected microcystic changes or fatty degeneration in benign meningiomas. 1H-MRS reflects some distinctive biochemical and pathological changes of meningiomas that might be misinterpreted. (orig.)

  5. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate with computer-aided detection: experienced observer performance study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giannini, Valentina; Mazzetti, Simone; Armando, Enrico; Carabalona, Silvia; Russo, Filippo; Giacobbe, Alessandro; Muto, Giovanni; Regge, Daniele

    2017-01-01

    To compare the performance of experienced readers in detecting prostate cancer (PCa) using likelihood maps generated by a CAD system with that of unassisted interpretation of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI). Three experienced radiologists reviewed mp-MRI prostate cases twice. First, readers observed CAD marks on a likelihood map and classified as positive those suspicious for cancer. After 6 weeks, radiologists interpreted mp-MRI examinations unassisted, using their favourite protocol. Sensitivity, specificity, reading time and interobserver variability were compared for the two reading paradigms. The dataset comprised 89 subjects of whom 35 with at least one significant PCa. Sensitivity was 80.9% (95% CI 72.1-88.0%) and 87.6% (95% CI 79.8-93.2; p = 0.105) for unassisted and CAD paradigm respectively. Sensitivity was higher with CAD for lesions with GS > 6 (91.3% vs 81.2%; p = 0.046) or diameter ≥10 mm (95.0% vs 80.0%; p = 0.006). Specificity was not affected by CAD. The average reading time with CAD was significantly lower (220 s vs 60 s; p < 0.001). Experienced readers using likelihood maps generated by a CAD scheme can detect more patients with ≥10 mm PCa lesions than unassisted MRI interpretation; overall reporting time is shorter. To gain more insight into CAD-human interaction, different reading paradigms should be investigated. (orig.)

  6. Energy calibration issues in nuclear resonant vibrational spectroscopy: observing small spectral shifts and making fast calibrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongxin; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Dong, Weibing; Huang, Songping D

    2013-09-01

    The conventional energy calibration for nuclear resonant vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) is usually long. Meanwhile, taking NRVS samples out of the cryostat increases the chance of sample damage, which makes it impossible to carry out an energy calibration during one NRVS measurement. In this study, by manipulating the 14.4 keV beam through the main measurement chamber without moving out the NRVS sample, two alternative calibration procedures have been proposed and established: (i) an in situ calibration procedure, which measures the main NRVS sample at stage A and the calibration sample at stage B simultaneously, and calibrates the energies for observing extremely small spectral shifts; for example, the 0.3 meV energy shift between the 100%-(57)Fe-enriched [Fe4S4Cl4](=) and 10%-(57)Fe and 90%-(54)Fe labeled [Fe4S4Cl4](=) has been well resolved; (ii) a quick-switching energy calibration procedure, which reduces each calibration time from 3-4 h to about 30 min. Although the quick-switching calibration is not in situ, it is suitable for normal NRVS measurements.

  7. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate with computer-aided detection: experienced observer performance study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giannini, Valentina; Mazzetti, Simone; Armando, Enrico; Carabalona, Silvia; Russo, Filippo [FPO, IRCCS, Department of Radiology at the Candiolo Cancer Institute, Candiolo, Turin (Italy); Giacobbe, Alessandro [San Giovanni Bosco Hospital, Department of Urology, Turin (Italy); Muto, Giovanni [University Campus Biomedico, Department of Urology, Rome (Italy); Regge, Daniele [FPO, IRCCS, Department of Radiology at the Candiolo Cancer Institute, Candiolo, Turin (Italy); University of Torino, A.O.U. Citta della Salute e della Scienza, Department of Surgical Sciences, Turin (Italy)

    2017-10-15

    To compare the performance of experienced readers in detecting prostate cancer (PCa) using likelihood maps generated by a CAD system with that of unassisted interpretation of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI). Three experienced radiologists reviewed mp-MRI prostate cases twice. First, readers observed CAD marks on a likelihood map and classified as positive those suspicious for cancer. After 6 weeks, radiologists interpreted mp-MRI examinations unassisted, using their favourite protocol. Sensitivity, specificity, reading time and interobserver variability were compared for the two reading paradigms. The dataset comprised 89 subjects of whom 35 with at least one significant PCa. Sensitivity was 80.9% (95% CI 72.1-88.0%) and 87.6% (95% CI 79.8-93.2; p = 0.105) for unassisted and CAD paradigm respectively. Sensitivity was higher with CAD for lesions with GS > 6 (91.3% vs 81.2%; p = 0.046) or diameter ≥10 mm (95.0% vs 80.0%; p = 0.006). Specificity was not affected by CAD. The average reading time with CAD was significantly lower (220 s vs 60 s; p < 0.001). Experienced readers using likelihood maps generated by a CAD scheme can detect more patients with ≥10 mm PCa lesions than unassisted MRI interpretation; overall reporting time is shorter. To gain more insight into CAD-human interaction, different reading paradigms should be investigated. (orig.)

  8. Observations of magnetospheric ionization enhancements using upper-hybrid resonance noise band data from the RAE-1 satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosier, S. R.

    1975-01-01

    Noise bands associated with the upper-hybrid resonance were used to provide direct evidence for the existence of regions of enhanced density in the equatorial magnetosphere near L = 2. Density enhancements ranging from several percent to as high as 45 percent are observed with radial dimensions of several hundred kilometers. The enhancement characteristics strongly suggest their identification as magnetospheric whistler ducts.

  9. Resonance phase and sings of P-odd and P-even effects, observable in the reactions with neutrons

    CERN Document Server

    Smotritskij, L M

    2002-01-01

    It is shown that introduction of the resonance phase for two quasistationary states with a similar spin and counter parity makes it possible to correlate the sing dependence of both the P-odd and P-even effects, experimentally observed in the reactions with neutrons. The common description of such effects enables determination of the theory unknown (free) parameters from the experiment

  10. Magnetization exchange observed in human skeletal muscle by non-water-suppressed proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    OpenAIRE

    Macmillan Erin L; Boesch Chris; Kreis Roland

    2012-01-01

    Many metabolites in the proton magnetic resonance spectrum undergo magnetization exchange with water such as those in the downfield region (6.0 8.5 ppm) and the upfield peaks of creatine which can be measured to reveal additional information about the molecular environment. In addition these resonances are attenuated by conventional water suppression techniques complicating detection and quantification. To characterize these metabolites in human skeletal muscle in vivo at 3 T metabolite cycle...

  11. Resonance scattering by auroral N2+: steady state theory and observations from Svalbard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Jokiaho

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Studies of auroral energy input at high latitudes often depend on observations of emissions from the first negative band of ionised nitrogen. However, these emissions are affected by solar resonance scattering, which makes photometric and spectrographic measurements difficult to interpret. This work is a statistical study from Longyearbyen, Svalbard, Norway, during the solar minimum between January and March 2007, providing a good coverage in shadow height position and precipitation conditions. The High Throughput Imaging Echelle Spectrograph (HiTIES measured three bands of N2+ 1N (0,1, (1,2 and (2,3, and one N2 2P band (0,3 in the magnetic zenith. The brightness ratios of the N2+ bands are compared with a theoretical treatment with excellent results. Balance equations for all important vibrational levels of the three lowest electronic states of the N2+ molecule are solved for steady-state, and the results combined with ion chemistry modelling. Brightnesses of the (0,1, (1,2 and (2,3 bands of N2+ 1N are calculated for a range of auroral electron energies, and different values of shadow heights. It is shown that in sunlit aurora, the brightness of the (0,1 band is enhanced, with the scattered contribution increasing with decreasing energy of precipitation (10-fold enhancements for energies of 100 eV. The higher vibrational bands are enhanced even more significantly. In sunlit aurora the observed 1N (1,2/(0,1 and (2,3/(0,1 ratios increase as a function of decreasing precipitation energy, as predicted by theory. In non-sunlit aurora the N2+ species have a constant proportionality to neutral N2. The ratio of 2P(0,3/1N(0,1 in the morning hours shows a pronounced decrease, indicating enhancement of N2+ 1N emission. Finally we study the relationship of all emissions and their ratios to rotational temperatures. A clear effect is observed on rotational development of the bands. It is possible that greatly enhanced rotational temperatures may be a

  12. Resonance ionization spectroscopy of Europium The first application of the PISA at ISOLDE-RILIS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2099873; Marsh, Bruce Alan

    The following work has been carried out at the radioactive ion beam facility ISOLDE at CERN. A compact atomic beam unit named PISA (Photo Ionization Spectroscopy Apparatus) has been implemented as a recent addition to the laboratory of the Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source (RILIS). The scope of this thesis work was to demonstrate different applications of the PISA, using the existing and highly developed laser setup of the RILIS installation. In a demonstration of the suitability of PISA for ionization scheme development, a new ionization scheme for Europium has been developed. This resulted in the observation of several new autoionizing states and Rydberg series. Through the analysis of the observed Rydberg resonances a refined value of $45734.33(3)(3)$ cm$^{-1}$ for the ionization potential of the europium atom has been determined. In addition this thesis reports on the feasibility of the use of the PISA as a RILIS performance monitoring device during laser ion source operations. Finally the present wor...

  13. The motor system resonates to the distal goal of observed actions: testing the inverse pliers paradigm in an ecological setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, Luigi; Maule, Francesca; Barchiesi, Guido; Rizzolatti, Giacomo

    2013-11-01

    Does motor mirroring in humans reflect the observed movements or the goal of the observed motor acts? Tools that dissociate the agent/object dynamics from the movements of the body parts used to operate them provide a model for testing resonance to both movements and goals. Here, we describe the temporal relationship of the observer's motor excitability, assessed with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), with the observed goal-directed tool actions, in an ecological setting. Motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) to TMS were recorded from the opponens pollicis (OP, thumb flexor) and the extensor indicis proprius (EIP, index extensor) muscles of participants while they observed a person moving several small objects with a pair of normal pliers (closed by finger flexion) or reverse pliers (opened by finger flexion). The MEPs were a significant predictor of the pliers' kinematics that occurred in a variable time interval between -400 and +300 ms from TMS. Whatever pliers' type was being observed, OP MEPs correlated positively and EIP MEPs correlated negatively with the velocity of pliers' tips closure. This datum was confirmed both at individual and at a group level. Motor simulation can be demonstrated in single observers in a "real-life" ecological setting. The relation of motor resonance to the tool type shows that the observer's motor system codes the distal goal of the observed acts (i.e., grasping and releasing objects) in terms of its own motor vocabulary, irrespective of the actual finger movements that were performed by the observed actor.

  14. Solving the field line resonance equation in the FLIP model and comparison with FLR observations in the inner magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Jared; Chi, Peter; Moldwin, Mark; Jorgensen, Anders; Richards, Phil; Zesta, Eftyhia; Boudouridis, Athanasios; Stone, William

    2012-07-01

    Field Line Resonances (FLR) have been shown to be an effective method for remote sensing of the plasmaspheric mass density. A power law solution models the mass density well in the outer plasmasphere, and solutions have been tabulated that allow direct conversion between resonance frequency and mass density. The plasma density in the inner plasmasphere, L SAMBA), magnetometers along the Eastern Atlantic Seaboard for Undergraduate Research and Education (MEASURE), and Mid-continent Magnetoseismic Chain (McMAC). We find good agreement in comparison between the FLIP model and observations during quiet times. During a large storm, we find significant differences between the FLIP model and observations. The agreement can be improved by including the effects of flux tube depletion and electric convection. By comparing with observations, we can infer the importance of these drivers in the inner magnetosphere during large storms.

  15. Reflecting on mirror mechanisms: motor resonance effects during action observation only present with low-intensity transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela Loporto

    Full Text Available Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS studies indicate that the observation of other people's actions influences the excitability of the observer's motor system. Motor evoked potential (MEP amplitudes typically increase in muscles which would be active during the execution of the observed action. This 'motor resonance' effect is thought to result from activity in mirror neuron regions, which enhance the excitability of the primary motor cortex (M1 via cortico-cortical pathways. The importance of TMS intensity has not yet been recognised in this area of research. Low-intensity TMS predominately activates corticospinal neurons indirectly, whereas high-intensity TMS can directly activate corticospinal axons. This indicates that motor resonance effects should be more prominent when using low-intensity TMS. A related issue is that TMS is typically applied over a single optimal scalp position (OSP to simultaneously elicit MEPs from several muscles. Whether this confounds results, due to differences in the manner that TMS activates spatially separate cortical representations, has not yet been explored. In the current study, MEP amplitudes, resulting from single-pulse TMS applied over M1, were recorded from the first dorsal interosseous (FDI and abductor digiti minimi (ADM muscles during the observation of simple finger abductions. We tested if the TMS intensity (110% vs. 130% resting motor threshold or stimulating position (FDI-OSP vs. ADM-OSP influenced the magnitude of the motor resonance effects. Results showed that the MEP facilitation recorded in the FDI muscle during the observation of index-finger abductions was only detected using low-intensity TMS. In contrast, changes in the OSP had a negligible effect on the presence of motor resonance effects in either the FDI or ADM muscles. These findings support the hypothesis that MN activity enhances M1 excitability via cortico-cortical pathways and highlight a methodological framework by which the

  16. Weight dependent modulation of motor resonance induced by weight estimation during observation of partially occluded lifting actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valchev, Nikola; Zijdewind, Inge; Keysers, Christian; Gazzola, Valeria; Avenanti, Alessio; Maurits, Natasha M

    2015-01-01

    Seeing others performing an action induces the observers' motor cortex to "resonate" with the observed action. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) studies suggest that such motor resonance reflects the encoding of various motor features of the observed action, including the apparent motor effort. However, it is unclear whether such encoding requires direct observation or whether force requirements can be inferred when the moving body part is partially occluded. To address this issue, we presented participants with videos of a right hand lifting a box of three different weights and asked them to estimate its weight. During each trial we delivered one transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) pulse over the left primary motor cortex of the observer and recorded the motor evoked potentials (MEPs) from three muscles of the right hand (first dorsal interosseous, FDI, abductor digiti minimi, ADM, and brachioradialis, BR). Importantly, because the hand shown in the videos was hidden behind a screen, only the contractions in the actor's BR muscle under the bare skin were observable during the entire videos, while the contractions in the actor's FDI and ADM muscles were hidden during the grasp and actual lift. The amplitudes of the MEPs recorded from the BR (observable) and FDI (hidden) muscle increased with the weight of the box. These findings indicate that the modulation of motor excitability induced by action observation extends to the cortical representation of muscles with contractions that could not be observed. Thus, motor resonance appears to reflect force requirements of observed lifting actions even when the moving body part is occluded from view. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Anomalous effect in Schumann resonance phenomena observed in Japan, possibly associated with the Chi-chi earthquake in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hayakawa

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The Schumann resonance phenomenon has been monitored at Nakatsugawa (near Nagoya in Japan since the beginning of 1999, and due to the occurance of a severe earthquake (so-called Chi-chi earthquake on 21 September 1999 in Taiwan we have examined our Schumann resonance data at Nakatsugawa during the entire year of 1999. We have found a very anomalous effect in the Schumann resonance, possibly associated with two large land earthquakes (one is the Chi-chi earthquake and another one on 2 November 1999 (Chia-yi earthquake with a magnitude again greater than 6.0. Conspicuous effects are observed for the larger Chi-chi earthquake, so that we summarize the characteristics for this event. The anomaly is characterized mainly by the unusual increase in amplitude of the fourth Schumann resonance mode and a significant frequency shift of its peak frequency (~1.0Hz from the conventional value on the By magnetic field component which is sensitive to the waves propagating in the NS meridian plane. Anomalous Schumann resonance signals appeared from about one week to a few days before the main shock. Secondly, the goniometric estimation of the arrival angle of the anomalous signal is found to coincide with the Taiwan azimuth (the unresolved dual direction indicates toward South America. Also, the pulsed signals, such as the Q-bursts, were simultaneously observed with the "carrier" frequency around the peak frequency of the fourth Schumann resonance mode. The anomaly for the second event for the Chia-yi earthquake on 2 November had much in common. But, most likely due to a small magnitude, the anomaly appears one day before and lasts until one day after the main shock, with the enhancement at the fourth Schumann resonance mode being smaller in amplitude than the case of the Chi-chi earthquake. Yet, the other characteristics, including the goniometric direction finding result, frequency shift, etc., are nearly the same. Although the emphasis of

  18. Anomalous effect in Schumann resonance phenomena observed in Japan, possibly associated with the Chi-chi earthquake in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hayakawa

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The Schumann resonance phenomenon has been monitored at Nakatsugawa (near Nagoya in Japan since the beginning of 1999, and due to the occurance of a severe earthquake (so-called Chi-chi earthquake on 21 September 1999 in Taiwan we have examined our Schumann resonance data at Nakatsugawa during the entire year of 1999. We have found a very anomalous effect in the Schumann resonance, possibly associated with two large land earthquakes (one is the Chi-chi earthquake and another one on 2 November 1999 (Chia-yi earthquake with a magnitude again greater than 6.0. Conspicuous effects are observed for the larger Chi-chi earthquake, so that we summarize the characteristics for this event. The anomaly is characterized mainly by the unusual increase in amplitude of the fourth Schumann resonance mode and a significant frequency shift of its peak frequency (~1.0Hz from the conventional value on the By magnetic field component which is sensitive to the waves propagating in the NS meridian plane. Anomalous Schumann resonance signals appeared from about one week to a few days before the main shock. Secondly, the goniometric estimation of the arrival angle of the anomalous signal is found to coincide with the Taiwan azimuth (the unresolved dual direction indicates toward South America. Also, the pulsed signals, such as the Q-bursts, were simultaneously observed with the "carrier" frequency around the peak frequency of the fourth Schumann resonance mode. The anomaly for the second event for the Chia-yi earthquake on 2 November had much in common. But, most likely due to a small magnitude, the anomaly appears one day before and lasts until one day after the main shock, with the enhancement at the fourth Schumann resonance mode being smaller in amplitude than the case of the Chi-chi earthquake. Yet, the other characteristics, including the goniometric direction finding result, frequency shift, etc., are nearly the same. Although the emphasis of the present study is

  19. The resonance frequency of SonoVue (tm) as observed by high-speed optical imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, S.M.; Versluis, Michel; Lohse, Detlef; Chin, C.T.; Bouakaz, A.; de Jong, N.

    2004-01-01

    The resonance frequencies of individual SonoVue/spl trade/ contrast agent bubbles were measured optically by recording the radius-time curves of a single microbubble at 24 different frequencies. For these experiments, the Brandaris 128 fast framing camera was operated in a special segmented mode.

  20. ULF waves with drift resonance and drift-bounce resonance energy sources as observed in artificially-induced HF radar backscatter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. K. Yeoman

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available HF radar backscatter which has been artificially-induced by a high power RF facility such as the EISCAT heater at Tromsø has been demonstrated to provide ionospheric electric field data of unprecedented temporal resolution and accuracy. Here such data are used to investigate ULF wave processes observed by the CUTLASS HF radars. Within a short period of time during a single four hour experiment three distinct wave types are observed with differing periods, and latitudinal and longitudinal phase evolution. Combining information from the three waves allows them to be divided into those with a large-scale nature, driven externally to the magnetosphere, and those with small azimuthal scale lengths, driven by wave-particle interactions. Furthermore, the nature of the wave-particle interactions for two distinct small-scale waves is revealed, with one wave interpreted as being driven by a drift resonance process and the other by a drift-bounce resonance interaction. Both of these mechanisms with m ≈ -35 and proton energies of 35–45 keV appear to be viable wave energy sources in the postnoon sector.Key words. Ionosphere (active experiments; wave-particle interactions – Magnetospheric physics (MHD waves and in-stabilities.

  1. Observation of resonance fluorescence and the Mollow triplet from a coherently driven site-controlled quantum dot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Unsleber, Sebastian; Maier, Sebastian; McCutcheon, Dara

    2015-01-01

    -controlled semiconductor quantum dot to an external resonant laser field. For strong continuous-wave driving we observe the characteristic Mollow triplet and analyze the Rabi splitting and sideband widths as a function of driving strength and temperature. The sideband widths increase linearly with temperature...... and the square of the driving strength, which we explain via coupling of the exciton to longitudinal acoustic phonons. We also find an increase of the Rabi splitting with temperature, which indicates a temperature induced delocalization of the excitonic wave function resulting in an increase of the oscillator...... strength. Finally, we demonstrate coherent control of the exciton excited state population via pulsed resonant excitation and observe a damping of the Rabi oscillations with increasing pulse area, which is consistent with our exciton-photon coupling model. We believe that our work outlines the possibility...

  2. Diurnal behaviour of the ionospheric Alfvén resonator signatures as observed at high latitude observatory Barentsburg (L=15

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Semenova

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The signature of the ionospheric Alfvén resonator (IAR, so called spectral resonant structures (SRS in the spectra of the electromagnetic noise in the range of 0.1–10 Hz is rather frequently observed with the search coil magnetometer at observatory Barentsburg on Svalbard (L=15. In this report we discuss some peculiarities of diurnal occurrence of SRS at this high latitude station. We show that the pronounced minimum of the SRS occurrence around noon can not be explained by the diurnal variations of the solar zenith angle (illumination of ionosphere. We conclude that the SRS occurrence minimum is the result of the enhanced variability of ionospheric parameters when the observing point enters (during the Earth's rotation the region of the ionospheric projection of the dayside cusp and its vicinity.

  3. Laser resonance ionization scheme development for tellurium and germanium at the dual Ti:Sa–Dye ISOLDE RILIS

    CERN Document Server

    Day Goodacre, T.; Fedosseev, V.N.; Forster, L.; Marsh, B.A.; Rossel, R.E.; Rothe, S.; Veinhard, M.

    2016-01-01

    The resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) is the principal ion source of the ISOLDE radioactive beam facility based at CERN. Using the method of in-source laser resonance ionization spectroscopy, a transition to a new autoionizing state of tellurium was discovered and applied as part of a three-step, three-resonance, photo-ionization scheme. In a second study, a three-step, two-resonance, photo-ionization scheme for germanium was developed and the ionization efficiency was measured at ISOLDE. This work increases the range of ISOLDE RILIS ionized beams to 31 elements. Details of the spectroscopy studies are described and the new ionization schemes are summarized.

  4. Observing Interferences between Past and Future Quantum States in Resonance Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campagne-Ibarcq, P.; Bretheau, L.; Flurin, E.; Auffèves, A.; Mallet, F.; Huard, B.

    2014-05-01

    The fluorescence of a resonantly driven superconducting qubit is measured in the time domain, providing a weak probe of the qubit dynamics. Prior preparation and final, single-shot measurement of the qubit allows us to average fluorescence records conditionally on past and future knowledge. The resulting interferences reveal purely quantum features characteristic of weak values. We demonstrate conditional averages that go beyond classical boundaries and probe directly the jump operator associated with relaxation. The experimental results are remarkably captured by a recent theory, which generalizes quantum mechanics to open quantum systems whose past and future are known.

  5. Observing interferences between past and future quantum states in resonance fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campagne-Ibarcq, P; Bretheau, L; Flurin, E; Auffèves, A; Mallet, F; Huard, B

    2014-05-09

    The fluorescence of a resonantly driven superconducting qubit is measured in the time domain, providing a weak probe of the qubit dynamics. Prior preparation and final, single-shot measurement of the qubit allows us to average fluorescence records conditionally on past and future knowledge. The resulting interferences reveal purely quantum features characteristic of weak values. We demonstrate conditional averages that go beyond classical boundaries and probe directly the jump operator associated with relaxation. The experimental results are remarkably captured by a recent theory, which generalizes quantum mechanics to open quantum systems whose past and future are known.

  6. Hexachlorophene-induced brain edema in rat observed by proton magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Y; Matsumura, H; Igisu, H; Yokota, A

    2000-08-04

    Rat brain was examined with 4.7 T proton magnetic resonance (MR). On administering hexachlorophene (HCP) 30 mg/kg/day for 5 days, myelin-rich structures stood out in T2-weighted images. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) was markedly suppressed in all regions examined except for cerebral cortex. Seven days after terminating the exposure to HCP, without enhancement in T2-weighted images, ADC was still decreased in corpus callosum, optic nerve and trigeminal nerve. Rat administered with HCP and followed with high magnetic field proton MR seems to provide a good model for cytotoxic brain edema, and it may also be useful to visualize heavily myelinated structures.

  7. Lesion evolution after gamma knife irradiation observed by magnetic resonance imaging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jirák, D.; Náměstková, K.; Herynek, V.; Liščák, R.; Vymazal, J.; Mareš, Vladislav; Syková, Eva; Hájek, M.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 83, č. 4 (2007), s. 237-244 ISSN 0955-3002 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0538; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Grant - others:EU(DE) 512146 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512; CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Source of funding: R - rámcový projekt EK Keywords : Gamma knife * Rat brain * Magnetic resonance imaging Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.468, year: 2007

  8. gamma-decay of resonance-like structure observed in sup 3 sup 0 Si(p,gamma) sup 3 sup 1 P reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Kachan, A S; Korda, L P; Mishchenko, V M; Korda, V Y

    2002-01-01

    gamma-Decay of a resonance-like structure observed in the reaction sup 3 sup 0 Si (p, gamma) sup 3 sup 1 P in the energy region E sub p = 1.4 - 2.7 MeV of accelerated protons is studied. The M1 resonance built on the ground state of sup 3 sup 1 P is identified. The position of the M1 resonance is explained taking into account pairing forces.

  9. Observation of resonant symmetry lifting by an effective bias field in a parametrically modulated atomic trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yonghee; Heo, Myoung-Sun; Moon, Geol; Kim, Ji-Hyoun; Jhe, Wonho; Noh, Heung-Ryoul

    2010-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate resonant symmetry lifting in a parametrically modulated magneto-optical trap of cold 85 Rb atoms. This is achieved by applying a weak additional modulation at half the frequency of the strong parametric modulation, which acts as an effective static bias field to the system. We measure the system response by varying the amplitude of the additional fictitious bias as well as the relative phase between the bias and the parametric drive, and the results are in good agreement with theory. The additional modulation provides an additional degree of freedom to control the system, which is useful for investigating system properties such as susceptibility, dynamic response, and related critical phenomena. We also have measured the amplitude of the response to higher harmonics of the additional modulation frequency, which allows more precise understanding of the system dynamics.

  10. Observation of the Distribution of Molecular Spin States by Resonant Quantum Tunneling of the Magnetization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernsdorfer, W.; Ohm, T.; Sangregorio, C.; Sessoli, R.; Mailly, D.; Paulsen, C.

    1999-05-01

    Below 360 mK, Fe8 magnetic molecular clusters are in the pure quantum relaxation regime and we show that the predicted ``square-root time'' relaxation is obeyed, allowing us to develop a new method for watching the evolution of the distribution of molecular spin states in the sample. We measure as a function of applied field H the statistical distribution P\\(ξH\\) of magnetic energy bias ξH acting on the molecules. Tunneling initially causes rapid transitions of molecules, thereby ``digging a hole'' in P\\(ξH\\) (around the resonant condition ξH = 0). For small initial magnetization values, the hole width shows an intrinsic broadening which may be due to nuclear spins.

  11. Metastable Autoionizing States of Molecules and Radicals in Highly Energetic Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-22

    molecular shape resonances. By analyzing analytic energy expression, we discovered a simple yet efficient de-perturbative correction that eliminates the...Barak Hirshberg. Calculations predict a stable molecularcrystal of N8, Nature Chemistry , (01 2014): 52. doi: TOTAL: 6 Number of Papers published...Lowdin Lecturer (Uppsala); 2012 Fellow, American Association for the Advancement of Science; 2012 ACS Physical Chemistry Division Award in

  12. Measurement of the np→npπ0π0 reaction in search for the recently observed d⁎(2380 resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Adlarson

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Exclusive measurements of the quasi-free np→npπ0π0 reaction have been performed by means of dp collisions at Td=2.27 GeV using the WASA detector setup at COSY. Total and differential cross sections have been obtained covering the energy region s=(2.35–2.46 GeV, which includes the region of the ABC effect and its associated d⁎(2380 resonance. Adding the d⁎ resonance amplitude to that for the conventional processes leads to a reasonable description of the data. The observed resonance effect in the total cross section is in agreement with the predictions of Fäldt and Wilkin as well with those of Albadajedo and Oset. The ABC effect, i.e. the low-mass enhancement in the π0π0-invariant mass spectrum, is found to be very modest – if present at all, which might pose a problem to some of its interpretations.

  13. The clinical utility of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy: recent in vitro, in vivo animal and clinical observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackstock, A. William; Kwock, Lester; Mukherji, Suresh K.; Schiro, Sharon; Tepper, Joel E.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Combined radiation and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) has resulted in improved outcomes in patients treated with gastrointestinal malignancies and squamous cancers of the head and neck. In our first aim, we proposed that the enhanced cell kill and tumor regression observed with the combination of 5-FU and radiation is related to radiation potentiating the anti-tumor effects of 5-FU. Using fluorine-19 ( 19 F) nuclear magnetic resonance (nmr) we non-invasively determined the tumor clearance rates of 5-FU +/- radiation in an animal model and used this research tool to predict tumor response in patients receiving concurrent radiation and 5-FU therapy. Our second aim was to evaluate the use of proton ( 1 H) nmr spectroscopy to non-invasively determine the spectral characteristics of malignant tumors in the head and neck and liver and correlate these clinical observations with in vitro and in vivo data. Materials and Methods: 1 H and 19 F spectroscopic analysis were performed with a 2.0T Otsuka magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy system. 1 H nmr patient studies were done on a clinical 1.5T Philips MR system. In vitro magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies were performed on a 11 T Bruker nmr system. Animal experiments for the 19 F nmr studies were performed on 3-6 week old female (Nu/Nu) athymic nude mice. Animals were injected s.c. with 10 6 human colon adenocarcinoma (HT-29) cells. At a tumor size of 1.0 cm, animals in the first group received i.v. 5-FU (100 mg/kg) immediately prior to spectroscopic analysis. Animals in the second group were treated with a single radiation dose of either 2 Gy or 10 Gy just prior to the 5-FU injection and subsequent spectroscopy. Spectroscopic analyses were performed at 20-30 minute intervals for 4-6 hr's. Results: 19 F nmr: A decrease in tumor clearance was observed in tumors pre-treated with a single dose of irradiation (2.0 Gy and 10 Gy). The clearance rate of the 5-FU for non-irradiated animals was 0.0178 min

  14. Correlation between magnetic properties and nuclear magnetic resonance observations in Sr2FeMoO6 double perovskite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colis, S.; Pourroy, G.; Panissod, P.; Meny, C.; Dinia, A.

    2004-01-01

    We present the influence of the sintering temperature on the magnetic properties of Sr 2 FeMoO 6 double perovskite, on the basis of magnetization and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements. Interestingly, the saturation magnetization originating mainly from the Fe moments is correlated with the amount of Mo magnetic moments observed by NMR measurements. We show that there is an optimum temperature of 1000 deg. C for which the reaction leading to the double perovskite becomes more advanced and/or the number of antisite defects is minimum

  15. Observation of low-lying resonances in the quasicontinuum of 195,196Pt and enhanced astrophysical reaction rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacoppo F.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An excess of strength on the low-energy tail of the giant dipole resonance recently has been observed in the γ-decay from the quasicontinuum of 195,196Pt. The nature of this phenomenon is not yet fully investigated. If this feature is present also in the γ-ray strength of the neutron-rich isotopes, it can affect the neutron-capture reactions involved in the formation of heavy-elements in stellar nucleosynthesis. The experimental level density and γ-ray strength function of 195,196Pt are presented together with preliminary calculations of the corresponding neutron-capture cross sections.

  16. Observations of a free-energy source for intense electrostatic waves. [in upper atmosphere near upper hybrid resonance frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurth, W. S.; Frank, L. A.; Gurnett, D. A.; Burek, B. G.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.

    1980-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in understanding intense electrostatic waves near the upper hybrid resonance frequency in terms of the theory of multiharmonic cyclotron emission using a classical loss-cone distribution function as a model. Recent observations by Hawkeye 1 and GEOS 1 have verified the existence of loss-cone distributions in association with the intense electrostatic wave events, however, other observations by Hawkeye and ISEE have indicated that loss cones are not always observable during the wave events, and in fact other forms of free energy may also be responsible for the instability. Now, for the first time, a positively sloped feature in the perpendicular distribution function has been uniquely identified with intense electrostatic wave activity. Correspondingly, we suggest that the theory is flexible under substantial modifications of the model distribution function.

  17. Melting of chiral order in terbium manganate (TbMnO3) observed with resonant x-ray Bragg diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovesey, S W; Scagnoli, V; Garganourakis, M; Koohpayeh, S M; Detlefs, C; Staub, U

    2013-09-11

    Resonant Bragg diffraction of soft, circularly polarized x-rays has been used to observe directly the temperature dependence of chiral-order melting in a motif of Mn ions in terbium manganate. The underlying mechanism uses the b-axis component of a cycloid, which vanishes outside the polar phase. Melting is witnessed by the first and second harmonics of a cycloid, and we explain why the observed temperature dependence differs in the two harmonics. Conclusions follow from an exact treatment of diffraction by using atomic multipoles in a circular cycloid, since a standard treatment of the diffraction, based on a single material-vector identified with the magnetic dipole, does not reproduce correctly observations at the second harmonic.

  18. Clinical observation of metal artifacts on magnetic resonance images of oral and maxillofacial regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ariyoshi, Yasunori; Shimahara, Masashi; Takeishi, Hiroshi; Uesugi, Yasuo; Narabayashi, Isamu

    2002-01-01

    We assessed the effect of metal materials used in prosthodontics on the clarity of clinical magnetic resonance (MR) images of the oral and maxillofacial regions in 37 patients. Excluded were patients who had undergone surgery in either region, patients with deciduous teeth, patients with a space-occupying lesion, i.e., an inflammatory change or a malignant process, and patients for whom images were affected by motion artifacts. The patients had all undergone orthopantomography, though none received dental treatment in the period between the MR imaging and orthopantomography study. T1- and T2- weighted axial images were used. There were no apparent differences between T1- and T2- weighted images in artifacts caused by metal prosthodontics, whereas artifacts caused by metal crowns were severe in comparison to those caused by metal inlays. In the lateral and apex portions of the tongue, when more than four crowns were present, artifacts had a marked influence on the image, and diagnosis could not be made. Moreover, in the upper and lower alveolus, the presence of two crowns had a similar effect, precluding diagnosis. However, in the antrum, mandibular body, and mental regions, metal artifacts had less of an effect on the images compared to that of metal artifacts in the alveolus region. (author)

  19. Uterine Fibroid Embolization Can Still Be Improved: Observations on Post-Procedure Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorenberg, E.J.; Novakovic, Z.; Smith, H.J.; Hafsahl, G.; Jakobsen, J.Aa.

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the efficacy and completeness of uterine fibroid embolization (UFE) measured by changes in volume and signal intensity at magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and to compare with clinical outcome. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 40 women with symptomatic uterine fibroids underwent bilateral uterine artery embolization. At MRI studies, including post-contrast sequences before and repeatedly after treatment, the uterus and dominant fibroids were evaluated for volume, location, and contrast enhancement. Prior to treatment, all myomas showed significant contrast enhancement. The mean uterine volume was 929 ml. Clinical examinations with emphasis on menorrhagia, pelvic pain, and urinary dysfunction were performed before and 6 and 12 months after treatment. RESULTS: UFE was bilaterally successful in 38 patients. After UFE, MRI showed no enhancement of myomas in 30 patients. In 8 patients, post-procedural MRI revealed partially remaining vascularization of fibroids despite angiographically complete embolization of the uterine arteries. On average, uterine volume decreased by 46.2% at 12 months. There was significant improvement of symptoms in the majority of patients, but slightly less improvement in patients with partially remaining vascularization of myomas. CONCLUSION: UFE causes significant volume reduction of myomas and clinical improvement. MRI can reveal remaining vascularization in myomas despite angiographically complete embolization of uterine arteries

  20. Observation of electromagnetically induced transparency and absorption in Yttrium Iron Garnet loaded split ring resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Z. J.; Soh, W. T.; Ong, C. K.

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a new method of controlling microwave transmission from Electromagnetically Induced Absorption (EIA) to Electromagnetically Induced Transparency (EIT). EIA describes the state where the system strongly absorbs microwaves, whereas EIT describes the state in which the system is transparent to microwaves. Control is achieved via coupling of the 3 GHz photon mode of a metamaterial Split Ring Resonator (SRR) to the spin wave magnon modes of a Yttrium Iron Garnet (YIG) bulk. The system is described by a 2-body interaction matrix with an additional fitting parameter τ which takes into account the fact that the microstrip feed line could excite the SRR as well as the YIG. The parameter τ reveals the effect of geometry and shielding on the coupling behaviour and gives rise to unique physics. In low τ (τ ⩽ 2) configurations, only EIT is reported. However, in high τ (τ ≈ 10) configurations, EIA is reported. Furthermore, we report that the system can be easily changed from a low τ to high τ configuration by shielding the SRR from the microstrip with a thin metal piece. Varying the τ parameter through shielding is thus proposed as a new method of controlling the microwave transmission at the coupling region.

  1. Near Mean-motion Resonances in the System Observed by Kepler: Affected by Mass Accretion and Type I Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Su; Ji, Jianghui

    2017-12-01

    The Kepler mission has released over 4496 planetary candidates, among which 3483 planets have been confirmed as of 2017 April. The statistical results of the planets show that there are two peaks around 1.5 and 2.0 in the distribution of orbital period ratios. The observations indicate that plenty of planet pairs could have first been captured into mean-motion resonances (MMRs) in planetary formation. Subsequently, these planets depart from exact resonant locations to be near-MMR configurations. Through type I migration, two low-mass planets have a tendency to be trapped in first-order MMRs (2:1 or 3:2 MMRs); however, two scenarios of mass accretion of planets and potential outward migration play important roles in reshaping their final orbital configurations. Under the scenario of mass accretion, the planet pairs can cross 2:1 MMRs and then enter into 3:2 MMRs, especially for the inner pairs. With such a formation scenario, the possibility that two planets are locked into 3:2 MMRs can increase if they are formed in a flat disk. Moreover, the outward migration can make planets have a high likelihood to be trapped into 3:2 MMRs. We perform additional runs to investigate the mass relationship for those planets in three-planet systems, and we show that two peaks near 1.5 and 2.0 for the period ratios of two planets can be easily reproduced through our formation scenario. We further show that the systems in chain resonances (e.g., 4:2:1, 3:2:1, 6:3:2, and 9:6:4 MMRs), have been observed in our simulations. This mechanism can be applicable to understand the formation of systems of Kepler-48, Kepler-53, Kepler-100, Kepler-192, Kepler-297, Kepler-399, and Kepler-450.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging for prostate bed radiotherapy planning: An inter- and intra-observer variability study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barkati, Maroie; Simard, Dany; Taussky, Daniel; Delouya, Guiula

    2016-01-01

    We assessed the inter- and intra-observer variability in contouring the prostate bed for radiation therapy planning using MRI compared with computed tomography (CT). We selected 15 patients with prior radical prostatectomy. All had CT and MRI simulation for planning purposes. Image fusions were done between CT and MRI. Three radiation oncologists with several years of experience in treating prostate cancer contoured the prostate bed first on CT and then on MRI. Before contouring, each radiation oncologist had to review the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group guidelines for postoperative external beam radiotherapy. The agreement between volumes was calculated using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). Analysis was done using the Matlab software. The DSC was compared using non-parametric statistical tests. Contouring on CT alone showed a statistically significant (P = 0.001) higher similarity between observers with a mean DSC of 0.76 (standard deviation ± 0.05) compared with contouring on MRI with a mean of 0.66 (standard deviation ± 0.05). Mean intra-observer variability between CT and MRI was 0.68, 0.75 and 0.78 for the three observers. The clinical target volume was 19 - 74% larger on CT than on MRI. The intra-observer difference in clinical target volume between CT and MRI was statistically significant in two observers and non-significant in the third one (P = 0.09). We found less inter-observer variability when contouring on CT than on MRI. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group contouring guidelines are based on anatomical landmarks readily visible on CT. These landmarks are more inter-observer dependent on MRI. Therefore, present contouring guidelines might not be applicable to MRI planning.

  3. Chaos control of the micro-electro-mechanical resonator by using adaptive dynamic surface technology with extended state observer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Shaohua [The Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Advanced Manufacturing Technology, Huaiyin Institute of Technology, Huai’an 223003 (China); School of Automation, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Sun, Quanping; Cheng, Wei [The Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Advanced Manufacturing Technology, Huaiyin Institute of Technology, Huai’an 223003 (China)

    2016-04-15

    This paper addresses chaos control of the micro-electro- mechanical resonator by using adaptive dynamic surface technology with extended state observer. To reveal the mechanism of the micro- electro-mechanical resonator, the phase diagrams and corresponding time histories are given to research the nonlinear dynamics and chaotic behavior, and Homoclinic and heteroclinic chaos which relate closely with the appearance of chaos are presented based on the potential function. To eliminate the effect of chaos, an adaptive dynamic surface control scheme with extended state observer is designed to convert random motion into regular motion without precise system model parameters and measured variables. Putting tracking differentiator into chaos controller solves the ‘explosion of complexity’ of backstepping and poor precision of the first-order filters. Meanwhile, to obtain high performance, a neural network with adaptive law is employed to approximate unknown nonlinear function in the process of controller design. The boundedness of all the signals of the closed-loop system is proved in theoretical analysis. Finally, numerical simulations are executed and extensive results illustrate effectiveness and robustness of the proposed scheme.

  4. Observation of Point-Light-Walker Locomotion Induces Motor Resonance When Explicitly Represented; An EEG Source Analysis Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Inuggi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Understanding human motion, to infer the goal of others' actions, is thought to involve the observer's motor repertoire. One prominent class of actions, the human locomotion, has been object of several studies, all focused on manipulating the shape of degraded human figures like point-light walker (PLW stimuli, represented as walking on the spot. Nevertheless, since the main goal of the locomotor function is to displace the whole body from one position to the other, these stimuli might not fully represent a goal-directed action and thus might not be able to induce the same motor resonance mechanism expected when observing a natural locomotion. To explore this hypothesis, we recorded the event-related potentials (ERP of canonical/scrambled and translating/centered PLWs decoding. We individuated a novel ERP component (N2c over central electrodes, around 435 ms after stimulus onset, for translating compared to centered PLW, only when the canonical shape was preserved. Consistently with our hypothesis, sources analysis associated this component to the activation of trunk and lower legs primary sensory-motor and supplementary motor areas. These results confirm the role of own motor repertoire in processing human action and suggest that ERP can detect the associated motor resonance only when the human figure is explicitly involved in performing a meaningful action.

  5. Observation of Pseudoscalar and Axial Vector Resonances in pi- p -> K+ K- pi0 n at 18 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G.S. Adams; T. Adams; Z. Bar-Yam; J.M. Bishop; V.A. Bodyagin; D.S. Brown; N.M. Cason; S.U. Chung; J.P. Cummings; K. Danyo; A.I. Demianov; S. Denisov; V. Dorofeev; J.P. Dowd; P. Eugenio; X.L. Fan; A.M. Gribushin; R.W. Hackenburg; M. Hayek; J. Hu; E.I. Ivanov; D. Joffe; I. Kachaev; W. Kern; E. King; O.L. Kodolova; V.L. Korotkikh; M.A. Kostin; Joachim Kuhn; V. Lipaev; J.M. Losecco; M. Lu; J.J. Manak; J. Napolitano; M. Nozar; C. Olchanski; A.I. Ostrovidov; T.K. Pedlar; A. Popov; D. Ryabchikov; A.H. Sanjari; L.I. Sarycheva; K.K. Seth; N. Shenhav; X. Shen; W.D. Shephard; N.B. Sinev; D.L. Stienike; S.A. Taegar; D.R. Thompson; A. Tomaradze; I.N. Vardanyan; D.P. Weygand; D. White; H.J. Willutzki; A.A. Yershov

    2001-09-01

    The number of pseudoscalar mesons in the mass range from 1400 to 1500 MeV/c{sup 2} has been a subject of considerable interest for many years, with several experiments having presented evidence for two closely spaced states. A new measurement of the reaction {pi}{sup -} p {yields} K{sup +} K{sup -} {pi}{sup 0}n has been made at a beam energy of 18 GeV. A partial wave analysis of the K{sup +} K{sup -} {pi}{sup 0} system shows evidence for three pseudoscalar resonances, {eta}(1295), {eta}(1416), and {eta}(1485), as well as two axial vectors, f{sub 1}(1285), and f{sub 1}(1420). Their observed masses, widths and decay properties are reported. No signal was observed for C(1480), an I{sub G} J{sup PC} = 1{sup +} 1{sup --} state previously reported in {phi}{pi}{sup 0} decay.

  6. Förster resonance energy transfer: Role of diffusion of fluorophore orientation and separation in observed shifts of FRET efficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bram Wallace

    Full Text Available Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET is a widely used single-molecule technique for measuring nanoscale distances from changes in the non-radiative transfer of energy between donor and acceptor fluorophores. For macromolecules and complexes this observed transfer efficiency is used to infer changes in molecular conformation under differing experimental conditions. However, sometimes shifts are observed in the FRET efficiency even when there is strong experimental evidence that the molecular conformational state is unchanged. We investigate ways in which such discrepancies can arise from kinetic effects. We show that significant shifts can arise from the interplay between excitation kinetics, orientation diffusion of fluorophores, separation diffusion of fluorophores, and non-emitting quenching.

  7. Subcellular localization and paramagnetic properties of signals observed in Krebs II ascites cells by electron spin resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloveras, J.; Vincensini, P.; Ribbes, G.; Record, M.; Ferre, G.; Douste-Blazy, L.; Pescia, J.

    1980-01-01

    Subcellular fractions of Krebs II ascites cells were examined by Electron Spin Resonance spectroscopy. Three signals were observed: (1) one at g = 2.005 associated with organic free radicals; (2) another at g = 2.01 formed by three peaks with a hyperfine splitting of 16 G; and (3) a third at g = 2.03, observed only in the particulate fraction 40,000 x g (30 min) and in the cytosol. This latter signal, of endogenous origin, seems similar to the one which is assigned in the literature to dinitrosyl-non-hem-iron complexes, and the role of such complexes in the carcinogenic process is often emphasized. Therefore, Krebs II ascites cells appear to be a useful model for investigating the endogenous 2.03 complex in relation to its localization and nature

  8. Intense Interactions of Molecules with a Short-Wavelength Electromagnetic Radiation Field: II. Resonance Scattering of Radiation and Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegarkov, A. I.

    2001-07-01

    Within the framework of the nonadiabatic approach developed in the preceding paper, the resonance scattering, resonance Raman scattering, and resonance fluorescence are studied in detail for diatomic and triatomic molecules, and polyatomic symmetric and antisymmetric top molecules, which interact with the field of short-wavelength radiation with a wavelength λ ≥ Å and an intensity up to 1014 W/cm2. The coherent excitations of high-lying Rydberg and autoionizing states are taken into account. Analytical expressions for calculating the tensors and cross sections of the above processes are derived.

  9. Determination of the plasmapause boundary using ground magnetometer field line resonances, satellite observations, and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zesta, E.; Boudouridis, A.; Jorgensen, A. M.; Yizengaw, E.; Chi, P. J.; Moldwin, M.; Carranza, T.; Mann, I. R.; Johnston, W. R.; Wilson, G. R.

    2012-12-01

    The plasmapause boundary layer (PBL) separates the cold and dense plasmaspheric plasma from the more tenuous and hot plasma sheet plasma and organizes the spatial distribution of ULF and VLF waves that can contribute to acceleration or loss processes of radiation belt particles through wave-particle interactions. The PBL has been traditionally determined by in situ observations and can be given by empirical models. Recent work has shown that a mid-latitude chain of well-spaced ground magnetometers can also determine the PBL boundary location. Spectral properties, like the cross-phase reversal between two stations closely aligned in latitude, have been shown to indicate the presence of a sharp PBL. We show here an example of such a PBL identification during the moderate storm of Nov 9-12, 2006. We combine observations from the SAMBA (South American Meridional B-field Array), MEASURE (Magnetometers along the Eastern Atlantic Seaboard for Undergraduate Research and Education), McMAC (Mid-continent Magnetoseismic Chain), and CARISMA ground magnetometer chains covering L values from L=2 to L=5 to statistically determine how commonly the PBL is determined from ground magnetometers. In our initial study we examine observations from June to December, 2006. We compare our PBL determinations with the determination of the same boundary from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites, based on the H+ density observations, which have been shown to accurately identify the PBL from a low-Earth orbiting satellite. We also compare our PBL identification with those determined from a global GPS TEC map and GPS TEC tomography technique used by a chain of ground GPS receivers. Finally, we compare our observations with results from the Dynamic Global Core Plasma Model (DGCPM), as well as existing empirical models based on in situ observations.

  10. Observation of new satellites in Cs-Ar system using resonance ionization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nayfeh, M.H.; Hurst, G.S.; Payne, M.G.; Young, J.P.

    1978-01-01

    The absorption line shape of Cs-Ar system is recorded using two-photon ionization of the system with Cs(7P) as an intermediate state. New satellite structures in the wings of Cs(7P) are observed which were not resolved in previous absorption measurements. Also the absolute absorption cross section in the blue wing is measured

  11. Autoionization study of the Argon 2p satellites excited near the argon 2s threshold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, H.; Glans, P.; Hemmers, O. [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    The dynamics of near-threshold photoionization is a complex phenomenon in which the many-electron character of the wavefunctions plays an important role. According to generalized time-independent resonant scattering theory, the transition matrix element from an initial state to a final state is the summation of the amplitudes of direct photoionization and an indirect term in which intermediate states are involved and the resonant behavior is embedded. Studies of the interference effects of intermediate states have been explored in the cases where the direct term is negligible. In the present work, electron time-of-flight spectra of the Ar 2p satellites were measured at two angles (magic and 0{degrees}) in the dipole plane with the exciting photon energy tuned in the vicinity of the Ar 2s threshold. For excitation far below or above the 2s threshold, the 2p satellites spectrum is dominated by 3p to np shakeup contributions upon the ionization of a 2p electron.

  12. Spin observables for pion photoproduction on the deuteron in the {delta}(1232)-resonance region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darwish, Eed M [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, South Valley University, Sohag 82524 (Egypt)

    2005-02-01

    Spin observables for the three charge states of the pion for the pion photoproduction reaction on the deuteron, {gamma}d {yields} {pi}NN, with polarized photon beam and/or oriented deuteron target are predicted. For the beam-target double-spin asymmetries, it is found that only the longitudinal asymmetries T{sup l}{sub 20} and T{sup l}{sub 2{+-}}{sub 2} do not vanish, whereas all the circular and the other longitudinal asymmetries do vanish. The sensitivity of spin observables to the model deuteron wavefunction is investigated. It has been found that only T{sub 21} and T{sub 22} are sensitive to the model deuteron wavefunction, in particular in the case of {pi}{sup 0}-production above the {delta}-region, and that other asymmetries are not.

  13. The observation of resonance maxima in H+CF4 and H+SF6 scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, J.R.; Toennies, J.P.; Welz, W.; Wolf, G.

    1977-01-01

    High resolution relative integral cross sections were measured for the interactions of low-velocity H atoms with CF 4 and SF 6 . In each system two maxima were resolved, and the lower peak occurs at relative velocities of about 450-500 m/s. The shapes of the 'spectra' are similar to those observed for H-rare gas scattering but differ in details. (Auth.)

  14. Resonance-ionization mass spectrometry of uranium and neptunium. Resonanz-Ionisations-Massenspektrometrie an Uran und Neptunium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sattelberger, P.

    1990-01-01

    The laser resonant three-stage photoionization with subsequent time-of-flight mass analysis of uranium and neptunium was studied. For uranium, excitation schemes were sought which, in addition to excitation from the initial state, permit the depopulation of a thermally occupied state at 620.3 cm{sup -1}. By means of narrow-band laser light, a large number of autoionizing states above the ionization limit could be found. For {sup 235}U the hyperfine structural splitting of transitions was studied. The examined inner atomic transitions showed a great isotopy shift between {sup 235}U and {sup 236}U which even permitted selective ionization of the individual isotopes. Preliminary measurements of neptunium resulted in autoionizing states for two schemes. By wide-band laser light the hyperfine structural splitting of {sup 237}Np for inner atomic transitions was examined and compared with reference values found in specialized literature. (BBR).

  15. Synchrobetatron resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-03-01

    At the 1975 Particle Accelerator Conference it was reported that a class of resonances were observed in SPEAR II that had not appeared before in SPEAR I. While the existence of sideband resonances of the main betatron oscillation frequencies has been previously observed and analyzed, the resonances observed in SPEAR do not appear to be of the same variety. Experiments were performed at SPEAR to identify the mechanism believed to be the most likely explanation. Some of the current experimental knowledge and theoretical views on the source of these resonances are presented

  16. Direct observation of orbital ordering in V 2O 3 by X-ray resonant scattering technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolasini, L.; Vettier, C.; De Bergevin, F.; Yakhou, F.; Mannix, D.; Neubeck, W.; Stunault, A.; Altarelli, M.; Fabrizio, M.; Metcalf, P. A.; Honig, J. M.

    2000-06-01

    Among the materials exhibiting metal-insulator transition, vanadium sesquioxide V 2O 3 and its Cr-alloys have received most attention from the theoretical and experimental point of view. It is now widely agreed that the unusual magnetic properties can be explained by taking both orbital and spin degrees of freedom into account. Whereas many experiments give direct information on the magnetic structure, only indirect evidence suggests the existence of orbital order in cases like V 2O 3, where it is not accompanied by cooperative Jahn-Teller distortion. We have demonstrated the existence of orbital ordering in V 2O 3 by means of X-ray resonant scattering at the vanadium K-edge using tunable synchrotron radiation. The observed orbital structure confirms the interplay between orbital and magnetic order, and provides an illustration of a new experimental method to extract information on the electronic orbital occupancy in solids.

  17. Functional pools of oxidative and glycolytic fibers in human muscle observed by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy during exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J.H.; Brown, R.L.; Park, C.R.; McCully, K.; Cohn, M.; Haselgrove, J.; Chance, B.

    1987-01-01

    Quantitative probing of heterogeneous regions in muscle is feasible with phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy because of the differentiation of metabolic patterns of glycolytic and oxidative fibers. A differential recruitment of oxidative and glycolytic fibers during exercise was demonstrated in 4 of 10 untrained young men by following changes in phosphate metabolites. Concentrations of inorganic phosphate (P/sub i/), phosphocreatine, and ATP were estimated in the wrist flexor muscles of the forearm at rest, during two cycles of three grades of exercise, and in recovery. At high work levels (40% of maximum strength), two distinct P/sub i/ peaks were observed and identified with P/sub i/ pools at pH 6.9 and pH 5.9-6.4, respectively. These could be accounted for as follows. At the lowest level of work (using 20% of maximum strength), early recruitment primarily of oxidative (type I) and possibly some intermediate (type IIA) muscle fibers occurs with relatively little net lactate production and consequently little decrease in pH. At higher work loads, however, primarily glycolytic (type IIB) muscle fibers are recruited, which have relatively high net lactate production and therefore generate a second pool of P/sub i/ at low pH. These observations indicated exhaustion of glycolytic type IIB fibers, removal of lactate by high local blood flow, and sustained contractions largely by oxidative type I and IIA fibers. A functional differentiation of fiber types could also be demonstrated during recovery if exercise was stopped while two pools of P/sub i/ were still apparent. The potential of magnetic resonance spectroscopy to characterize oxidative and glycolytic fibers, predict capacity for aerobic performance, and signal the presence of muscle pathology is discussed

  18. Conjugate Observations of Field-Line Resonances in the Inner Magnetosphere from the MEASURE and SAMBA Magnetometer Chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zesta, E.; Boudouridis, A.; Berube, D.; Moldwin, M.

    2004-12-01

    The newly installed SAMBA (South American Meridional B-field Array) chain is a low latitude meridional chain of 11 magnetometers at L=1.1 to L=2.5 along the coast of Chile and in the Antarctica peninsula. Five of the SAMBA magnetometers at L=1.7 to L=2.5 are directly conjugate to an equivalent number of northern hemisphere magnetometers of the MEASURE (Magnetometers Along the Eastern Atlantic Seaboard for Undergraduate Research and Education) chain. A unique characteristic is that both the SAMBA and the MEASURE magnetometers are set up as pairs of stations making it possible to determine the local Field-Line Resonance (FLR) from conjugate points and thus testing the accuracy of the technique and the models used. An initial study of the local FLR from conjugate pairs of stations at L=1.6 and L=1.7 was done during the moderate storm of July 11, 2003. The frequency of the local resonance can be used to determine the equatorial mass density of the resonating flux tube. From our two conjugate pairs we found, surprisingly, that the difference between the derived mass density between these two very close L values does not agree with densities predicted by any of the existing models or from past observations. If this result is general and not an isolated or rare occurrence it indicates that our understanding of the inversion of FLRs to determine the equatorial mass density is not complete and existing models could be constrained by our observations. We have now isolated a period of approximately 60 days during 2003 with complete coverage from conjugate pairs of stations and we are extending the study of conjugate FLRs to a large amount of days in order to determine the generality, or not, of the results from the July 11, 2003 storm. Initial analysis indicates quite a number of asymmetries in the ULF wave power between the two hemispheres, which might be a contributing factor to the difference in the mass density derived from the conjugate pairs. We plan to investigate

  19. Some observations of the pressure distribution in a tube bank for conditions of self generated acoustic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzpatrick, J.A.; Donaldson, I.S.; McKnight, W.

    1979-01-01

    The results for mean and fluctuating pressure distributions around tubes in an in-line tube bank are presented for both non-resonant and self-excited acoustic standing wave resonant flow regimes. It is readily deduced that the nature of the flow in the bank is dramatically altered with the onset of acoustic resonance. The velocity gradients which appear across the bank with the onset of resonance would suggest regions of flow recirculation in the bank although no evidence of this was found. The spectra of fluctuating pressure on the duct roof in the bank and on tubes deep in the bank exhibited coherent peaks only during resonance. (author)

  20. Observation and resonant x-ray optical interpretation of multi-atom resonant photoemission effects in O 1s emission from NiO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mannella, N.; Yang, S.-H.; Mun, B.S.; Garcia de Abajo, F.J.; Kay, A.W.; Sell, B.C.; Watanabe, M.; Ohldag, H.; Arenholz, E.; Young, A.T.; Hussain, Z.; Van Hove, M.A.; Fadley, C.S.

    2006-01-01

    We present experimental and theoretical results for the variation of the O 1s intensity from a NiO(001) surface as the excitation energy is varied through the Ni 2p1/2,3/2 absorption resonances, and as the incidence angle of the radiation is varied from grazing to larger values. For grazing incidence, a strong multi-atom resonant photoemission(MARPE) effect is seen on the O 1s intensity as the Ni 2p resonances are crossed, but its magnitude decreases rapidly as the incidence angle is increased. Resonant x-ray optical (RXRO) calculations are found to predict these effects very well, although the experimental effects are found to decrease at higher incidence angles faster than those in theory. The potential influence of photoelectron diffraction effects on such measurements are also considered, including experimental data with azimuthal-angle variation and corresponding multiple-scattering-diffraction calculations, but we conclude that they do not vary beyond what is expected on the basis of the change in photoelectron kinetic energy. Varying from linear polarization to circular polarization is found to enhance these effects in NiO considerably, although the reasons are not clear. We also discuss the relationship of these measurements to other related interatomic resonance experiments and theoretical developments, and make some suggestions for future studies in this area

  1. Autoionization of Be-like ions following double electron capture in C sup 4+ , O sup 6+ and Ne sup 8+ ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, J.W.

    1990-09-11

    This paper describes electron emission following the autoionization of doubly excited states in Be-like ions. The Be-like Auger states are produced by two electron capture in slow C{sup 4+}, O{sup 6+} and Ne{sup 8+} ions. These measurements were performed by means of high resolution Auger electron spectroscopy on different target gases and at different projectile energies. Line assignments and relative cross sections are given for the investigated doubly excited states and the excitation mechanism is discussed. 15 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Rocket observation of atomic oxygen and night airglow: Measurement of concentration with an improved resonance fluorescence technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kita

    1996-02-01

    Full Text Available An improved resonant fluorescence instrument for measuring atomic oxygen concentration was developed to avoid the Doppler effect and the aerodynamic shock effect due to the supersonic motion of a rocket. The shock effect is reduced by adopting a sharp wedge-shaped housing and by scanning of the detector field of view to change the distance between the scattering volume and the surface of the housing. The scanning enables us to determine absolute values of atomic oxygen concentration from relative variation of the scattered light signal due to the self-absorption. The instrument was calibrated in the laboratory, and the numerical simulation reproduced the calibration result. Using the instrument, the altitude profile of atomic oxygen concentration was observed by a rocket experiment at Uchinoura (31°N on 28 January 1992. The data obtained from the rocket experiment were not perfectly free from the shock effect, but errors due to the effect were reduced by the data analysis procedure. The observed maximum concentration was 3.8× 1011 cm–3 at altitudes around 94 km. The systematic error is estimated to be less than ±0.7×1011 cm–3 and the relative random error is less than±0.07× 1011 cm–3at the same altitudes. The altitude profile of the OI 557.7-nm airglow was also observed in the same rocket experiment. The maximum volume emission rate was found to be 150 photons cm–3 s–1 at 94 km. The observed altitude profiles are compared with the MSIS model and other in situ observations.

  3. Morning sector drift-bounce resonance driven ULF waves observed in artificially-induced HF radar backscatter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. J. Baddeley

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available HF radar backscatter, which has been artificially-induced by a high power RF facility such as the EISCAT heater at Tromsø, has provided coherent radar ionospheric electric field data of unprecedented temporal resolution and accuracy. Here such data are used to investigate ULF wave processes observed by both the CUTLASS HF radars and the EISCAT UHF radar. Data from the SP-UK-OUCH experiment have revealed small-scale (high azimuthal wave number, m -45 waves, predominantly in the morning sector, thought to be brought about by the drift-bounce resonance processes. Conjugate observations from the Polar CAM-MICE instrument indicate the presence of a non-Maxwellian ion distribution function. Further statistical analysis has been undertaken, using the Polar TIMAS instrument, to reveal the prevalence and magnitude of the non-Maxwellian energetic particle populations thought to be responsible for generating these wave types.Key words. Ionosphere (active experiments; wave-particle interactions Magnetospheric physics (MHD waves and instabilities

  4. Morning sector drift-bounce resonance driven ULF waves observed in artificially-induced HF radar backscatter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. J. Baddeley

    Full Text Available HF radar backscatter, which has been artificially-induced by a high power RF facility such as the EISCAT heater at Tromsø, has provided coherent radar ionospheric electric field data of unprecedented temporal resolution and accuracy. Here such data are used to investigate ULF wave processes observed by both the CUTLASS HF radars and the EISCAT UHF radar. Data from the SP-UK-OUCH experiment have revealed small-scale (high azimuthal wave number, m -45 waves, predominantly in the morning sector, thought to be brought about by the drift-bounce resonance processes. Conjugate observations from the Polar CAM-MICE instrument indicate the presence of a non-Maxwellian ion distribution function. Further statistical analysis has been undertaken, using the Polar TIMAS instrument, to reveal the prevalence and magnitude of the non-Maxwellian energetic particle populations thought to be responsible for generating these wave types.

    Key words. Ionosphere (active experiments; wave-particle interactions Magnetospheric physics (MHD waves and instabilities

  5. Observation of exchangeable proton resonances of DNA in two-dimensional NOE spectra using a presaturation pulse; application to d(CGCGAATTCGCG) and d(CGCGAm 6ATTCGCG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopal, Ponni; Gilbert, Dara E.; Van Der Marel, Gijs A.; Van Boom, Jacques H.; Feigon, Juli

    Two-dimensional'H NOE spectra of the DNA dodecamers d(CGCGAATTCGCG) and d(CGCGAm 6ATTCGCG), which contain the EcoRI restriction and modified methylation sites, have been obtained in water using a presaturation pulse to suppress the large H2O resonance. This method has not previously been used with DNA because of the relatively rapid exchange rates of the imino and amino proton resonances with H2O. It is shown here that although there is some exchange of these resonances with water during the saturation pulse, almost all of the exchangeable proton resonances can still be observed and assigned. These assignments, and the method for obtaining them, will be of considerable value in studying the complexes of these DNA dodecamers with the EcoRI restriction enzyme and methylase.

  6. Van Allen Probes observations of drift-bounce resonance and energy transfer between energetic ring current protons and poloidal Pc4 wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oimatsu, S.; Masahito, N.; Takahashi, K.; Yamamoto, K.; Keika, K.; Kletzing, C.; MacDowall, R. J.; Smith, C.; Mitchell, D. G.

    2017-12-01

    Poloidal Pc4 wave and proton flux oscillation due to the drift-bounce resonance are observed in the inner magnetosphere on the dayside near the magnetic equator by the Van Allen Probes spacecraft on 2 March 2014. The flux modulation is observed in the energy range of 67.0 keV to 268.8 keV with the same frequency of poloidal Pc4 wave. We estimate the resonant energy to be 120 keV for pitch angle (α) of 20º-40º or 140º-160º, and 170-180 keV for α=40º-60º or 120º-140º. The drift-bounce resonance theory gives the resonant energy of 110-120 keV, which is consistent with the observation for small α (or large α when α≥90º), but slightly higher than the observation for large α (or small α when α≥90º). We consider that this discrepancy of the resonant energy is due to the drift shell splitting. In order to examine the direction of energy flow between protons and the wave, we calculate the sign of the gradient of proton phase space density (df/dW) in both outbound and inbound paths. Results showed positive gradient in both paths, which means that the energy is transferred from the protons to the wave. During the appearance of poloidal Pc4 wave, the Dst* index shows a sudden increase of 6.7 nT. We estimate the total energy loss of the ring current from the recovery of the Dst* index and the variation of proton flux by the drift-bounce resonance. The estimated energy loss is almost comparable for both cases. Therefore, we suggest that the energy transfer from the ring current protons to the wave via the drift-bounce resonance cause the increase of Dst* index.

  7. The association between cerebral developmental venous anomaly and concomitant cavernous malformation: an observational study using magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Guolu; Bai, Chuanfeng; Yu, Tengfei; Wu, Zhen; Liu, Xing; Zhang, Junting; zhao, Jizong

    2014-03-15

    Some studies reported that cerebral developmental venous anomaly (DVA) is often concurrent with cavernous malformation (CM). But there is lack of statistical evidence and study of bulk cases. The factors associated with concurrency are still unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of concomitant DVA and CM using observational data on Chinese patients and analyze the factors associated with the concurrency. The records of all cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed between January 2001 and December 2012 in Beijing Tiantan Hospital were reviewed retrospectively. The DVA and CM cases were selected according to imaging reports that met diagnostic criteria. Statistical analysis was performed using the Pearson chi-square statistic for binary variables and multivariable logistic regression analysis for predictors associated with the concurrent CM. We reviewed a total of 165,230 cranial MR images performed during the previous 12 year period, and identified 1,839 cases that met DVA radiographic criteria. There were 205 patients who presented concomitant CM among the 1,839 DVAs. The CM prevalence in DVA cases (11.1%) was significantly higher than that in the non-DVA cases (2.3%) (PDVA. There is a higher chance of concurrent CM with DVA when the DVA has three or more medullary veins in the same MRI scanning section, when the DVA is infratentorial, and when there are multiple DVAs. When diagnosing DVA cases, physicians should be alerted to the possibility of concurrent CM.

  8. Two-photon finite-pulse model for resonant transitions in attosecond experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Galán, Álvaro; Martín, Fernando; Argenti, Luca

    2016-02-01

    We present an analytical model capable of describing two-photon ionization of atoms with attosecond pulses in the presence of intermediate and final isolated autoionizing states. The model is based on the finite-pulse formulation of second-order time-dependent perturbation theory. It approximates the intermediate and final states with Fano's theory for resonant continua, and it depends on a small set of atomic parameters that can either be obtained from separate ab initio calculations or be extracted from a few selected experiments. We use the model to compute the two-photon resonant photoelectron spectrum of helium below the N =2 threshold for the RABITT (reconstruction of attosecond beating by interference of two-photon transitions) pump-probe scheme, in which an XUV attosecond pulse train is used in association with a weak IR probe, obtaining results in quantitative agreement with those from accurate ab initio simulations. In particular, we show that (i) the use of finite pulses results in a homogeneous redshift of the RABITT beating frequency, as well as a resonant modulation of the beating frequency in proximity to intermediate autoionizing states; (ii) the phase of resonant two-photon amplitudes generally experiences a continuous excursion as a function of the intermediate detuning, with either zero or 2 π overall variation.

  9. Observation of free electron cyclotron resonance in NaAlSi3O8 feldspar: Direct determination of the effective electron mass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poolton, N.R.J.; Nicholis, J.E.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.

    2001-01-01

    We report the first observation of cyclotron resonances in alkali feldspars, using highly sensitive optical detection methods. In Na-feldspar (NaAlSi3O8). a near isotropic effective electron mass value of m(c)(*) = 0.79m, has been determined. The significance of this measurement in terms...

  10. NOESY-WaterControl: a new NOESY sequence for the observation of under-water protein resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, Allan M.; Zheng, Gang, E-mail: g.zheng@westernsydney.edu.au; Price, William S. [Western Sydney University, Nanoscale Organisation and Dynamics Group, School of Science and Health (Australia)

    2017-03-15

    Highly selective and efficient water signal suppression is indispensable in biomolecular 2D nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) experiments. However, the application of conventional water suppression schemes can cause a significant or complete loss of the biomolecular resonances at and around the water chemical shift (ω{sub 2}). In this study, a new sequence, NOESY-WaterControl, was developed to address this issue. The new sequence was tested on lysozyme and bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI), demonstrating its efficiency in both water suppression and, more excitingly, preserving water-proximate biomolecular resonances in ω{sub 2}. The 2D NOESY maps obtained using the new sequence thus provide more information than the maps obtained with conventional water suppression, thereby lessening the number of experiments needed to complete resonance assignments of biomolecules. The 2D NOESY-WaterControl map of BPTI showed strong bound water and exchangeable proton signals in ω{sub 1} but these signals were absent in ω{sub 2}, indicating the possibility of using the new sequence to discriminate bound water and exchangeable proton resonances from non-labile proton resonances with similar chemical shifts to water.

  11. NOESY-WaterControl: a new NOESY sequence for the observation of under-water protein resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, Allan M.; Zheng, Gang; Price, William S.

    2017-01-01

    Highly selective and efficient water signal suppression is indispensable in biomolecular 2D nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) experiments. However, the application of conventional water suppression schemes can cause a significant or complete loss of the biomolecular resonances at and around the water chemical shift (ω 2 ). In this study, a new sequence, NOESY-WaterControl, was developed to address this issue. The new sequence was tested on lysozyme and bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI), demonstrating its efficiency in both water suppression and, more excitingly, preserving water-proximate biomolecular resonances in ω 2 . The 2D NOESY maps obtained using the new sequence thus provide more information than the maps obtained with conventional water suppression, thereby lessening the number of experiments needed to complete resonance assignments of biomolecules. The 2D NOESY-WaterControl map of BPTI showed strong bound water and exchangeable proton signals in ω 1 but these signals were absent in ω 2 , indicating the possibility of using the new sequence to discriminate bound water and exchangeable proton resonances from non-labile proton resonances with similar chemical shifts to water.

  12. Power line emission 50/60 Hz and Schumann resonances observed by microsatellite Chibis-M in the Earth's ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudkin, Denys; Pilipenko, Vyacheslav; Dudkin, Fedir; Pronenko, Vira; Klimov, Stanislav

    2015-04-01

    The overhead power lines are the sources of intense wideband electromagnetic (EM) emission, especially in ELF-VLF range, because of significant length (up to a few thousand kilometers) and strong 50/60 Hz currents with noticeable distortion. The radiation efficiency of the power line emission (PLE) increases with the harmonic order, so they are well observed by ground-based EM sensors. However their observations by low orbiting satellites (LEO) are very rare, particularly at basic harmonic 50/60 Hz, because of the ionospheric plasma opacity in ELF band. The Schumann resonance (SR) is the narrow-band EM noise that occurs due to the global thunderstorm activity in the Earth-ionosphere cavity. The first five eigenmodes of the SR are 7.8, 14.3, 20.8, 27.3 and 33.8 Hz and, thus, SR harmonics are also strongly absorbed by the Earth ionosphere. The published numerical simulations show that the penetration depth of such an ELF emission into the Earth's ionosphere is limited to 50-70 km for electric field and 120-240 km for magnetic field. From this follows, that PLE and SR can hardly ever be detected by LEO satellites, i.e. above the F-layer of ionosphere. In spite of this fact, these emissions were recently observed with use of the electric field antennas placed on the satellites C/NOFS (USA) and Chibis-M (Russia). Microsatellite Chibis-M was launched on January 24, 2012, at 23:18:30 UTC from the cargo ship "Progress M-13M" to circular orbit with altitude ~500 km and inclination ~52° . Chibis-M mass is about 40 kg where one third is a scientific instrumentation. The dimensions of the microsatellite case are 0.26x0.26x0.54 m with the outside mounted solar panels, service and scientific instrumentation. The main scientific objective of Chibis-M is the theoretical model verification for the atmospheric gamma-ray bursts. It requires the study of the accompanying EM processes such as the plasma waves produced by the lightning discharges in the VLF band. Chibis-M decayed on 15

  13. Observation of vector and tensor light shifts in 87Rb using near-resonant, stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qing-Qing; Freier, Christian; Sun, Yuan; Leykauf, Bastian; Schkolnik, Vladimir; Yang, Jun; Krutzik, Markus; Peters, Achim

    2018-01-01

    We present the derivation of the frequency-dependent scalar, vector, and tensor dynamical polarizabilities for the two hyperfine levels of the 87Rb atom 5 s ground state. Based on the characterization of the dynamical polarizabilities, we analyze and measure the differential vector and tensor light shift between the 5 s ground-state sublevels with near-resonant, stimulated Raman transitions. These results clarify that the tensor polarizabilities for the ground states of alkali atoms are absent when the light field is far detuned from the atomic resonance and the total electronic angular momentum J is a good quantum number. In the near-resonant case, the light shifts are nontrivial and the determination of the frequency-dependent vector and tensor dynamic polarizabilities will help to achieve higher fidelities for applications of neutral atoms in quantum information and precision measurements.

  14. Observation of a resonance at 4.4 GeV and additional structure near 4.1 GeV in e+e- annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegrist, J.; Abrams, G.S.; Boyarski, A.M.; Breidenbach, M.; Bulos, F.; Chinowsky, W.; Feldman, G.J.; Friedberg, C.E.; Fryberger, D.; Goldhaber, G.; Hanson, G.; Hartill, D.L.; Jaros, J.; Jean-Marie, B.; Kadyk, J.A.; Larsen, R.R.; Luke, D.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H.L.; Madaras, R.; Morehouse, C.C.; Nguyen, H.K.; Paterson, J.M.; Perl, M.L.; Peruzzi, I.; Pierre, F.M.; Piccolo, M.; Pun, T.P.; Rapidis, P.; Richter, B.; Sadoulet, B.; Schwitters, R.F.; Tanenbaum, W.; Trilling, G.H.; Vannucci, F.; Whitaker, J.S.; Winkelman, F.C.; Wiss, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    We observe a resonancelike structure in the total cross section for hadron production by e + e - colliding beams at a mass of 4414 +- 7 MeV having a total width GAMMA = 33 +- 10 MeV. From the area under this resonance, we deduce the partial width to electron pairs to be GAMMA/sub ee/ = 440 +- 140 eV. Further structure of comparable width is present near 4.1 GeV

  15. MODELING OBSERVED DECAY-LESS OSCILLATIONS AS RESONANTLY ENHANCED KELVIN–HELMHOLTZ VORTICES FROM TRANSVERSE MHD WAVES AND THEIR SEISMOLOGICAL APPLICATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antolin, P.; De Moortel, I. [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of St. Andrews, St. Andrews, Fife KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Van Doorsselaere, T. [Centre for mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Mathematics Department, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B bus 2400, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Yokoyama, T., E-mail: patrick.antolin@st-andrews.ac.uk [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, The University of Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2016-10-20

    In the highly structured solar corona, resonant absorption is an unavoidable mechanism of energy transfer from global transverse MHD waves to local azimuthal Alfvén waves. Due to its localized nature, direct detection of this mechanism is extremely difficult. Yet, it is the leading theory explaining the observed fast damping of the global transverse waves. However, at odds with this theoretical prediction are recent observations that indicate that in the low-amplitude regime such transverse MHD waves can also appear decay-less, a still unsolved phenomenon. Recent numerical work has shown that Kelvin–Helmholtz instabilities (KHI) often accompany transverse MHD waves. In this work, we combine 3D MHD simulations and forward modeling to show that for currently achieved spatial resolution and observed small amplitudes, an apparent decay-less oscillation is obtained. This effect results from the combination of periodic brightenings produced by the KHI and the coherent motion of the KHI vortices amplified by resonant absorption. Such an effect is especially clear in emission lines forming at temperatures that capture the boundary dynamics rather than the core, and reflects the low damping character of the local azimuthal Alfvén waves resonantly coupled to the kink mode. Due to phase mixing, the detected period can vary depending on the emission line, with those sensitive to the boundary having shorter periods than those sensitive to the loop core. This allows us to estimate the density contrast at the boundary.

  16. Observation of a $J^{PC} = 1^{-+}$ exotic resonance in diffractive dissociation of 190 GeV/c $\\pi^{-}$ into $\\pi^- \\pi^- \\pi^+$

    CERN Document Server

    Alekseev, M; Alexandrov, Yu; Alexeev, G D; Amoroso, A; Austregisilio, A; Badelek, B; Balestra, F; Ball, J; Barth, J; Baum, G; Bedfer, Y; Bernhard, J; Bertini, R; Bettinelli, M; Birsa, R; Bisplinghoff, J; Bordalo, P; Bradamante, F; Bravar, A; Bressan, A; Brona, G; Burtin, E; Bussa, M P; Chapiro, A; Chiosso, M; Chung, S U; Cicuttin, A; Colantoni, M; Crespo, M L; Dalla Torre, S; Dafni, T; Das, S; Dasgupta, S S; Denisov, O Yu; Dhara, L; Diaz, V; Dinkelbach, A M; Donskov, S V; Doshita, N; Duic, V; Dunnweber, W; Efremov, A; Eversheim, P D; Eyrich, W; Faessler, M; Ferrero, A; Finger, M; Finger, M., jr; Fischer, H; Franco, C; Friedrich, J M; Garfagnini, R; Gautheron, F; Gavrichtchouk, O P; Gazda, R; Gerassimov, S; Geyer, R; Giorgi, M; Gobbo, B; Goertz, S; Grabmuller, S; Grajek, O A; Grasso, A; Grube, B; Gushterski, R; Guskov, A; Haas, F; von Harrach, D; Hasegawa, T; Heckmann, J; Heinsius, F H; Hermann, R; Herrmann, F; Hess, C; Hinterberger, F; Horikawa, N; Hoppner, Ch; d'Hose, N; Ilgner, C; Ishimoto, S; Ivanov, O; Ivanshin, Yu; Iwata, T; Jahn, R; Jasinski, P; Jegou, G; Joosten, R; Kabuss, E; Kang, D; Ketzer, B; Khaustov, G V; Khokhlov, Yu.A; Kisselev, Yu; Klein, F; Klimaszewski, K; Koblitz, S; Koivuniemi, J H; Kolosov, V N; Komissarov, E V; Kondo, K; Konigsmann, Kay; Konopka, R; Konorov, I; Konstantinov, V F; Korzenev, A; Kotzinian, A M; Kouznetsov, O; Kowalik, K; Kramer, M; Kral, A; Kroumchtein, Z V; Kuhn, R; Kunne, F; Kurek, K; Lauser, L; Le Goff, J M; Lednev, A A; Lehmann, A; Levorato, S; Lichtenstadt, J; Liska, T; Maggiora, A; Maggiora, M; Magnon, A; Mallot, G K; Mann, A; Marchand, C; Marroncle, J; Martin, A; Marzec, J; Massmann, F; Matsuda, T; Meyer, W; Michigami, T; Mikhailov, Yu.V; Moinester, M A; Mutter, A; Nagaytsev, A; Nagel, T; Nassalski, J; Negrini, S; Nerling, F; Neubert, S; Neyret, D; Nikolaenko, V I; Olshevsky, A G; Ostrick, M; Padee, A; Panknin, R; Panzieri, D; Parsamyan, B; Paul, S; Pawlukiewicz-Kaminska, B; Perevalova, E; Pesaro, G; Peshekhonov, D V; Piragino, G; Platchkov, S; Pochodzalla, J; Polak, J; Polyakov, V A; Pontecorvo, G; Pretz, J; Quintans, C; Rajotte, J.-F; Ramos, S; Rapatsky, V; Reicherz, G; Reggiani, D; Richter, A; Robinet, F; Rocco, E; Rondio, E; Ryabchikov, D I; Samoylenko, V D; Sandacz, A; Santos, H; Sapozhnikov, M G; Sarkar, S; Savin, Igor A; Sbrizza, G; Schiavon, P; Schill, C; Schmitt, L; Schopferer, S; Schroder, W; Shevchenko, O Yu; Siebert, H.-W; Silva, L; Sinha, L; Sissakian, A N; Slunecka, M; Smirnov, G I; Sosio, S; Sozzi, F; Srnka, A; Stolarski, M; Sulc, M; Sulej, R; Takekawa, S; Tessaro, S; Tessarotto, F; Teufel, A; Tkatchev, L G; Uman, I; Venugopal, G; Virius, M; Vlassov, N V; Vossen, A; Weitzel, Q; Windmolders, R; Wislicki, W; Wollny, H; Zaremba, K; Zavertyaev, M; Zemlyanichkina, E; Ziembicki, M; Zhao, J; Zhuravlev, N; Zvyagin, A

    2010-01-01

    The COMPASS experiment at the CERN SPS has studied the diffractive dissociation of negative pions into the pi- pi- pi+ final state using a 190 GeV/c pion beam hitting a lead target. A partial wave analysis has been performed on a sample of 420000 events taken at values of the squared 4-momentum transfer t' between 0.1 and 1 GeV^2/c^2. The well-known resonances a1(1260), a2(1320), and pi2(1670) are clearly observed. In addition, the data show a significant natural parity exchange production of a resonance with spin-exotic quantum numbers J^PC = 1-+ at 1.66 GeV/c^2 decaying to rho pi. The resonant nature of this wave is evident from the mass-dependent phase differences to the J^PC = 2-+ and 1++ waves. From a mass-dependent fit a resonance mass of 1660 +- 10+0-64 MeV/c^2 and a width of 269+-21+42-64 MeV/c^2 is deduced.

  17. Observation of resistively detected hole spin resonance and zero-field pseudo-spin splitting in epitaxial graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Ramesh G.; Hankinson, John; Berger, Claire; de Heer, Walter A.

    2012-01-01

    Electronic carriers in graphene show a high carrier mobility at room temperature. Thus, this system is widely viewed as a potential future charge-based high-speed electronic material to complement–or replace–silicon. At the same time, the spin properties of graphene have suggested improved capability for spin-based electronics or spintronics and spin-based quantum computing. As a result, the detection, characterization and transport of spin have become topics of interest in graphene. Here we report a microwave photo-excited transport study of monolayer and trilayer graphene that reveals an unexpectedly strong microwave-induced electrical response and dual microwave-induced resonances in the dc resistance. The results suggest the resistive detection of spin resonance, and provide a measurement of the g-factor, the spin relaxation time and the sub-lattice degeneracy splitting at zero magnetic field. PMID:22871815

  18. Anomalous ELF phenomena in the Schumann resonance band as observed at Moshiri (Japan in possible association with an earthquake in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hayakawa

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The ELF observation at Moshiri (geographic coordinates: 44.29° N, 142.21° E in Hokkaido, Japan, was used to find anomalous phenomena in the Schumann resonance band, possibly associated with a large earthquake (magnitude of 7.8 in Taiwan on 26 December 2006. The Schumann resonance signal (fundamental (n=1, 8 Hz; 2nd harmonic, 14 Hz, 3rd harmonic, 20 Hz, 4th, 26 Hz etc. is known to be supported by electromagnetic radiation from the global thunderstorms, and the anomaly in this paper is characterized by an increase in intensity at frequencies from the third to fourth Schumann resonance modes mainly in the BEW component with a minor corresponding increase in the BNS component also. Spectral modification takes place only in the interval of 21:00 UT±1 h, which corresponds to the global lightning activity concentrated in America. While distortions were absent in other lightning-active UT intervals, in particular, around 08:00 UT±1 h (Asian thunderstorms and around 15±1 h (African lightning activity. The anomaly occurred on 23 December three days prior to the main shock. The results observed were explained in terms of ELF radio wave perturbation caused by the lower ionospheric depression around the earthquake epicenter. The difference in the path lengths between the direct radio wave from an active global thunderstorm center and the wave scattered from the non-uniformity above Taiwan causes interference at higher resonance modes, which is successful in explaining the observational data.

  19. Observation of overlapping spin-1 and spin-3 $\\overline{D}^0 K^-$ resonances at mass $2.86 {\\rm GeV}/c^2$

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassen, Rolf; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Belogurov, Sergey; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Bizzeti, Andrea; Bjørnstad, Pål Marius; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borgia, Alessandra; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Brambach, Tobias; van den Brand, Johannes; Bressieux, Joël; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Brown, Henry; Bursche, Albert; Busetto, Giovanni; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Ciba, Krzystof; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Counts, Ian; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pascal; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gaspar, Clara; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gavrilov, Gennadii; Geraci, Angelo; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, Vladimir; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Hampson, Thomas; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Hunt, Philip; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jaton, Pierre; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kaballo, Michael; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Karodia, Sarah; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Korolev, Mikhail; Kozlinskiy, Alexandr; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; La Thi, Viet Nga; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lambert, Robert W; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Leo, Sabato; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Lohn, Stefan; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lopez-March, Neus; Lowdon, Peter; Lu, Haiting; Lucchesi, Donatella; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Machefert, Frederic; Machikhiliyan, Irina V; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Mapelli, Alessandro; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Märki, Raphael; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martens, Aurelien; Martín Sánchez, Alexandra; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; McSkelly, Ben; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Merk, Marcel; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Moggi, Niccolò; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Katharina; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nicol, Michelle; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Oggero, Serena; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Orlandea, Marius; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Arantza; Pal, Bilas Kanti; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parkes, Christopher; Parkinson, Christopher John; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pazos Alvarez, Antonio; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perez Trigo, Eliseo; Perret, Pascal; Perrin-Terrin, Mathieu; Pescatore, Luca; Pesen, Erhan; Petridis, Konstantin; Petrolini, Alessandro; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rakotomiaramanana, Barinjaka; Rama, Matteo; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Roa Romero, Diego; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruffini, Fabrizio; Ruiz, Hugo; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrie, Mauro; Savrina, Darya; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Seco, Marcos; Semennikov, Alexander; Sepp, Indrek; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Anthony; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Sparkes, Ailsa; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Stroili, Roberto; Subbiah, Vijay Kartik; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szilard, Daniela; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ubeda Garcia, Mario; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; Voss, Helge; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wiedner, Dirk; Wilkinson, Guy; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wu, Suzhi; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Wen Chao; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zvyagin, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    The resonant substructure of $B_s^0 \\rightarrow \\overline{D}^0 K^- \\pi^+$ decays is studied using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $3.0\\,{\\rm fb}^{-1}$ of $pp$ collision data recorded by the LHCb detector. An excess at $m(\\overline{D}^0 K^-) \\approx 2.86 {\\rm GeV}/c^2$ is found to be an admixture of spin-1 and spin-3 resonances. Therefore the $D^*_{sJ}(2860)^-$ state previously observed in inclusive $e^+e^- \\rightarrow \\overline{D}^0 K^- X$ and $pp \\rightarrow \\overline{D}^0 K^- X$ processes consists of at least two particles. This is the first observation of a heavy flavoured spin-3 resonance, and the first time that any spin-3 particle has been seen to be produced in $B$ decays. The masses and widths of the new states and of the $D^*_{s2}(2573)^-$ meson are measured, giving the most precise determinations to date.

  20. Observation of overlapping spin-1 and spin-3 D0K- resonances at mass 2.86 GeV/c2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Counts, I; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dalseno, J; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dujany, G; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H-M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farley, N; Farry, S; Fay, Rf; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Fu, J; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; García Pardiñas, J; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gavardi, L; Gavrilov, G; Geraci, A; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianelle, A; Gianì, S; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Karodia, S; Kelsey, M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Kochebina, O; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Langhans, B; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Likhomanenko, T; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lowdon, P; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Malinin, A; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mapelli, A; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martinez Vidal, F; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Moggi, N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Morandin, M; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Moron, J; Morris, A-B; Mountain, R; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Mussini, M; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neri, N; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Neuner, M; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Novoselov, A; O'Hanlon, D P; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, G; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L L; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Pistone, A; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Price, E; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rama, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Reichert, S; Reid, M M; Dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, S; Rihl, M; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rotondo, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanchez Mayordomo, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Saunders, D M; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Sestini, L; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Simi, G; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Snoek, H; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Sridharan, S; Stagni, F; Stahl, M; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stenyakin, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Stroili, R; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szilard, D; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Tellarini, G; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vieites Diaz, M; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; de Vries, J A; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Walsh, J; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiedner, D; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Xu, Z; Yang, Z; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2014-10-17

    The resonant substructure of B(s)(0) → D(0)K(-)π(+) decays is studied using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb(-1) of pp collision data recorded by the LHCb detector. An excess at m(D(0)K(-))≈ 2.86 GeV/c(2) is found to be an admixture of spin-1 and spin-3 resonances. Therefore, the D(sJ)*(2860)(-) state previously observed in inclusive e(+)e(-) → D(0)K(-)X and pp → D(0)K(-)X processes consists of at least two particles. This is the first observation of a heavy flavored spin-3 resonance, and the first time that any spin-3 particle has been seen to be produced in B decays. The masses and widths of the new states and of the D(s2)*(2573)(-) meson are measured, giving the most precise determinations to date.

  1. Prospective observer and software-based assessment of magnetic resonance imaging quality in head and neck cancer: Should standard positioning and immobilization be required for radiation therapy applications?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yao; Mohamed, Abdallah S R; Yang, Jinzhong; Colen, Rivka R; Frank, Steven J; Wang, Jihong; Wassal, Eslam Y; Wang, Wenjie; Kantor, Michael E; Balter, Peter A; Rosenthal, David I; Lai, Stephen Y; Hazle, John D; Fuller, Clifton D

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential of a head and neck magnetic resonance simulation and immobilization protocol on reducing motion-induced artifacts and improving positional variance for radiation therapy applications. Two groups (group 1, 17 patients; group 2, 14 patients) of patients with head and neck cancer were included under a prospective, institutional review board-approved protocol and signed informed consent. A 3.0-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner was used for anatomic and dynamic contrast-enhanced acquisitions with standard diagnostic MRI setup for group 1 and radiation therapy immobilization devices for group 2 patients. The impact of magnetic resonance simulation/immobilization was evaluated qualitatively by 2 observers in terms of motion artifacts and positional reproducibility and quantitatively using 3-dimensional deformable registration to track intrascan maximum motion displacement of voxels inside 7 manually segmented regions of interest. The image quality of group 2 (29 examinations) was significantly better than that of group 1 (50 examinations) as rated by both observers in terms of motion minimization and imaging reproducibility (P quality of head and neck MRI in terms of motion-related artifacts and positional reproducibility was greatly improved by use of radiation therapy immobilization devices. Consequently, immobilization with external and intraoral fixation in MRI examinations is required for radiation therapy application. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Observer variation factor on advanced method for accurate, robust, and efficient spectral fitting of java based magnetic resonance user interface for MRS data analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Suk Jun [Dept. of Biomedical Laboratory Science, College of Health Science, Cheongju University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Seung Man [Dept. of Radiological Science, College of Health Science, Gimcheon University, Gimcheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    The purpose of this study was examined the measurement error factor on AMARES of jMRUI method for magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) quantitative analysis by skilled and unskilled observer method and identified the reason of independent observers. The Point-resolved spectroscopy sequence was used to acquired magnetic resonance spectroscopy data of 10 weeks male Sprague-Dawley rat liver. The methylene protons ((-CH2-)n) of 1.3 ppm and water proton (H2O) of 4.7 ppm ratio was calculated by LCModel software for using the reference data. The seven unskilled observers were calculated total lipid (methylene/water) using the jMRUI AMARES technique twice every 1 week, and we conducted interclass correlation coefficient (ICC) statistical analysis by SPSS software. The inter-observer reliability (ICC) of Cronbach's alpha value was less than 0.1. The average value of seven observer's total lipid (0.096±0.038) was 50% higher than LCModel reference value. The jMRUI AMARES analysis method is need to minimize the presence of the residual metabolite by identified metabolite MRS profile in order to obtain the same results as the LCModel.

  3. Multiquark Resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Esposito, A.; Polosa, A.D.

    2016-01-01

    Multiquark resonances are undoubtedly experimentally observed. The number of states and the amount of details on their properties has been growing over the years. It is very recent the discovery of two pentaquarks and the confirmation of four tetraquarks, two of which had not been observed before. We mainly review the theoretical understanding of this sector of particle physics phenomenology and present some considerations attempting a coherent description of the so called X and Z resonances. The prominent problems plaguing theoretical models, like the absence of selection rules limiting the number of states predicted, motivate new directions in model building. Data are reviewed going through all of the observed resonances with particular attention to their common features and the purpose of providing a starting point to further research.

  4. Comparison of the oswestry disability index and magnetic resonance imaging findings in lumbar canal stenosis: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goni, Vijay G; Hampannavar, Aravind; Gopinathan, Nirmal Raj; Singh, Paramjeet; Sudesh, Pebam; Logithasan, Rajesh Kumar; Sharma, Anurag; Bk, Shashidhar; Sament, Radheshyam

    2014-02-01

    Cross-sectional study. The aim of the study was to determine relationship between the degrees of radiologically demonstrated anatomical lumbar canal stenosis using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and its correlation with the patient's disability level, using the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). The relationship between the imaging studies and clinical symptoms has been uncertain in patients suffering from symptomatic lumbar canal stenosis. There is a limited number of studies which correlates the degree of stenosis with simple reproducible scoring methods. Fifty patients were selected from 350 patients who fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The patients answered the national-language translated form of ODI. The ratio of disability was interpreted, and the patients were grouped accordingly. They were subjected to MRI; and the anteroposterior diameters of the lumbar intervertebral disc spaces and the thecal sac cross sectional area were measured. Comparison was performed between the subdivisions of the degree of lumbar canal stenosis, based on the following: anteroposterior diameter (three groups: normal, relative stenosis and absolute stenosis); subdivisions of the degree of central canal stenosis, based on the thecal sac cross-sectional area, measured on axial views (three groups: normal, moderately stenotic and severely stenotic); and the ODI outcome, which was also presented in 20 percentiles. No significant correlation was established between the radiologically depicted anatomical lumbar stenosis and the Oswestry Disability scores. Magnetic resonance imaging alone should not be considered in isolation when assessing and treating patients diagnosed with lumbar canal stenosis.

  5. Competition between benzene and styrene in forming radicals under different solvent conditions observed by muon level crossing resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stadlbauer, J.M.; Venkateswaran, K.; Porter, G.B.; Walker, D.C.

    1994-01-01

    The muon level-crossing-resonance technique has been used to resolve major discrepancies that exist in muon-spin-resonance studies (both free-radical formation and muonium decay rates) in the competition between benzene and styrene. The results, obtained for ∼30 mM solutions in ethanol and for 2.5 mM aqueous micelles solutions, show that muonium atoms (Mu) react 8 (±2) times faster with styrene than with benzene. In the above cases thermalized Mu is unquestionably the reactive species, which is known to show nucleophilic intra-molecular selectivity in the case of styrene. But a similar value, 9 (±2), was also obtained for undiluted mixtures of liquid benzene and styrene (neat mixture) - where the precursor might have been 'hot Mu' (which should display weaker selectivity than Mu) or cations derived from μ + (which should show higher selectivity). These results support the view that thermalized Mu is the predominant reactive species in liquid benzene and styrene. (orig.)

  6. A new study of the 22Ne(p, γ)23Na reaction deep underground: Feasibility, setup and first observation of the 186 keV resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavanna, F.; Corvisiero, P.; Ferraro, F.; Prati, P.; Depalo, R.; Menzel, M.L.; Anders, M.; Aliotta, M.; Bruno, C.G.; Davinson, T.; Scott, D.A.; Bemmerer, D.; Szuecs, T.; Broggini, C.; Menegazzo, R.; Rossi Alvarez, C.; Caciolli, A.; Di Leva, A.; Imbriani, G.; Elekes, Z.; Fueloep, Z.; Gyuerky, G.; Somorjai, E.; Formicola, A.; Junker, M.; Gervino, G.; Guglielmetti, A.; Trezzi, D.; Gustavino, C.; Straniero, O.; Strieder, F.

    2014-01-01

    The 22 Ne(p,γ) 23 Na reaction takes part in the neon-sodium cycle of hydrogen burning. This cycle is active in asymptotic giant branch stars as well as in novae and contributes to the nucleosythesis of neon and sodium isotopes. In order to reduce the uncertainties in the predicted nucleosynthesis yields, new experimental efforts to measure the 22 Ne(p,γ) 23 Na cross section directly at the astrophysically relevant energies are needed. In the present work, a feasibility study for a 22 Ne(p,γ) 23 Na experiment at the Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics (LUNA) 400 kV accelerator deep underground in the Gran Sasso laboratory, Italy, is reported. The ion-beam-induced γ-ray background has been studied. The feasibility study led to the first observation of the E p =186 keV resonance in a direct experiment. An experimental lower limit of 0.12 x 10 -6 eV has been obtained for the resonance strength. Informed by the feasibility study, a dedicated experimental setup for the 22 Ne(p,γ) 23 Na experiment has been developed. The new setup has been characterized by a study of the temperature and pressure profiles. The beam heating effect that reduces the effective neon gas density due to the heating by the incident proton beam has been studied using the resonance scan technique, and the size of this effect has been determined for a neon gas target. (orig.)

  7. High-order Ho multipoles in HoB2C2 observed with soft resonant x-ray diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Princep, A J; Mulders, A M; Schierle, E; Weschke, E; Hester, J; Hutchison, W D; Tanaka, Y; Terada, N; Narumi, Y; Nakamura, T

    2012-02-22

    Soft resonant x-ray Bragg diffraction (SRXD) at the Ho M4,5 edges has been used to study Ho 4f multipoles in the combined magnetic and orbitally ordered phase of HoB2C2. A full description of the energy dependence for both σ and π incident x-rays at two different azimuthal angles, as well as the ratio I(σ)/I(π) as a function of azimuthal angle for a selection of energies, allows a determination of the higher order multipole moments of rank 1 (dipole) to 6 (hexacontatetrapole). The Ho 4f multipole moments have been estimated, indicating a dominant hexadecapole (rank 4) order with an almost negligible influence from either the dipole or the octupole magnetic terms. The analysis incorporates both the intra-atomic magnetic and quadrupolar interactions between the 3d core and 4f valence shells as well as the interference of contributions to the scattering that behave differently under time reversal. Comparison of SRXD, neutron diffraction and non-resonant x-ray diffraction shows that the magnetic and quadrupolar order parameters are distinct. The (00½) component of the magnetic order exhibits a Brillouin type increase below the orbital ordering temperature T(Q), while the quadrupolar order increases more sharply. We conclude that the quadrupolar interaction is strong, but quadrupolar order only occurs when the magnetic order gives rise to a quasi-doublet ground state, which results in a lock-in of the orbitals at T(Q).

  8. Inter-Observer Agreement on Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging Interpretation for Diagnosis of Acute Ischemic Stroke Among Emergency Physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniz ORAY

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY: Objectives: Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI is a highly sensitive tool for the detection of early ischemic stroke and is excellent at detecting small and early infarcts. Nevertheless, conflict may arise and judgments may differ among different interpreters. Inter-observer variability shows the systematic difference among different observers and is expressed as the kappa (Κ coefficient. In this study, we aimed to determinate the inter-observer variability among emergency physicians in the use of DW-MRI for the diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke. Methods: Cranial DW-MRI images of 50 patients were interpreted in this retrospective observational cross-sectional study. Patients who were submitted to DW-MRI imaging for a suspected acute ischemic stroke were included in the study, unless the scans were ordered by any of the reviewers or they were absent in the system. The scans were blindly and randomly interpreted by four emergency physicians. Inter-observer agreement between reviewers was evaluated using Fleiss’ Κ statistics. Results: The mean kappa value for high signal on diffusion-weighted images (DWI and for reduction on apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC were substantial (k=0.67 and moderate (k=0.60 respectively. The correlation for detection of the presence of ischemia and location was substantial (k: 0.67. There were 18 false-positive and 4 false-negative evaluations of DWI, 15 false positive and 8 false-negative evaluations of ADC. Conclusions: Our data suggest that DW-MRI is reliable in screening for ischemic stroke when interpreted by emergency physicians in the emergency department. The levels of stroke identification and variability show that emergency physicians may have an acceptable level of agreement. Key words: Emergency department, diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging, inter-observer agreement, ischemic stroke

  9. Autostereogram resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavey, Sean; Rae, Katherine; Murray, Adam; Courtial, Johannes

    2012-09-01

    Autostereograms, or "Magic Eye" pictures, are repeating patterns designed to give the illusion of depth. Here we discuss optical resonators that create light patterns which, when viewed from a suitable position by a monocular observer, are autostereograms of the three-dimensional shape of one of the mirror surfaces.

  10. A distribution-based method to resolve single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backović, Mihailo; Price, E Shane; Johnson, Carey K; Ralston, John P

    2011-04-14

    We introduce a new approach to analyze single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) data. The method recognizes that FRET efficiencies assumed by traditional ensemble methods are unobservable for single molecules. We propose instead a method to predict distributions of FRET parameters obtained directly from the data. Distributions of FRET rates, given the data, are precisely defined using Bayesian methods and increase the information derived from the data. Benchmark comparisons find that the response time of the new method outperforms traditional methods of averaging. Our approach makes no assumption about the number or distribution of underlying FRET states. The new method also yields information about joint parameter distributions going beyond the standard framework of FRET analysis. For example, the running distribution of FRET means contains more information than any conceivable single measure of FRET efficiency. The method is tested against simulated data and then applied to a pilot-study sample of calmodulin molecules immobilized in lipid vesicles, revealing evidence for multiple dynamical states.

  11. Low intensity areas observed T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the cerebral cortex in various neurological diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imon, Yukari [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1996-02-01

    We retrospectively studied magnetic resonance images of the brain in 158 patients (8 cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, 16 cases of Alzheimer`s disease, 8 cases of Parkinson`s disease, 53 cases of multiple cerebral infarct, 20 cases of other central nervous system (CNS) diseases, and 53 cases without any CNS disease) to examine the appearance of T2-weighted low signal intensity areas (LIA) in the cerebral cortex. The age of subjects ranged from 36 to 85 years with the mean 65.0 and SD 9.9 years. LIA in the motor and sensory cortices, and brain atrophy were evaluated visually on axial images of the spin-echo sequence obtained with a 1.5 tesla system. The incidence of LIA in the motor cortex was significantly higher in all CNS diseases than in cases without any CNS disease, but not significantly different among CNS diseases. LIA in the motor cortex showed a correlation with age, temporal and parietal atrophy. The appearance of LIA in the sensory cortex correlated with that of LIA in the motor cortex, and parietal atrophy. These results suggest that LIA may appear according to age and be associated with the accumulation of nonheme iron in the cortex, especially in patients with CNS diseases. (author)

  12. Radiofrequency ablation of small liver malignancies under magnetic resonance guidance: progress in targeting and preliminary observations with temperature monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terraz, Sylvain; Cernicanu, Alexandru; Lepetit-Coiffe, Matthieu; Viallon, Magalie; Salomir, Rares; Becker, Christoph D. [University Hospitals of Geneva, Department of Radiology, Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Mentha, Gilles [University Hospitals of Geneva, Department of Visceral Surgery and Transplantation, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2010-04-15

    To evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of magnetic resonance (MR)-guided radiofrequency (RF) ablation for small liver tumours with poor conspicuity on both contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (US) and computed tomography (CT), using fast navigation and temperature monitoring. Sixteen malignant liver nodules (long-axis diameter, 0.6-2.4 cm) were treated with multipolar RF ablation on a 1.5-T wide-bore MR system in ten patients. Targeting was performed interactively, using a fast steady-state free precession sequence. Real-time MR-based temperature mapping was performed, using gradient echo-echo planar imaging (GRE-EPI) and hardware filtering. MR-specific treatment data were recorded. The mean follow-up time was 19 {+-} 7 months. Correct placement of RF electrodes was obtained in all procedures (image update, <500 ms; mean targeting time, 21 {+-} 11 min). MR thermometry was available for 14 of 16 nodules (88%) with an accuracy of 1.6 C in a non-heated region. No correlation was found between the size of the lethal thermal dose and the ablation zone at follow-up imaging. The primary and secondary effectiveness rates were 100% and 91%, respectively. RF ablation of small liver tumours can be planned, targeted, monitored and controlled with MR imaging within acceptable procedure times. Temperature mapping is technically feasible, but the clinical benefit remains to be proven. (orig.)

  13. GNSS-TEC observations of the atmospheric resonance excited by the 2015 April Plinian eruptions of the Calbuco volcano, Chile: Comparison with the 2014 Kelud eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Y.; Heki, K.

    2015-12-01

    GNSS-Total Electron Content (TEC) method is a useful tool to observe the ionosphere. We observed ionospheric disturbances caused by the lower atmospheric resonance excited by two recent Plinian volcanic eruptions. In the case of the 2014 eruption of the Kelud volcano, Indonesia (Nakashima et al., submitted), the lower atmospheric resonance excited by the continuing eruption caused long-lasting harmonic oscillations not only in the ionosphere but also in the solid earth. This year, we add the new case of the 2015 eruption of the Calbuco volcano, Chile. Two large eruptions occurred at the Calbuco volcano over the days 22- 23 April 2015. The first sub-Plinian eruption started at ~16:04 UT, Apr. 22, and continued for about 1.5 hours. The second one started at ~4:00 UT, Apr. 23, and lasted for 6 hours. We detected continuous oscillations of ionospheric TEC corresponding to the two eruptions using GPS and GLONASS data from stations of the Argentine GNSS Array: RAMSAC. The waves propagated with a speed of ~1.0 km/s from the volcano. The frequency spectra of the TEC variation in the first eruption on Apr. 22 showed clear peaks at 3.7 and 4.4 mHz, the lower atmospheric resonance frequencies. The perturbation also showed overtone peaks and a 10 mHz pulse-like signal at the onset of the continuous oscillation. The results suggest that a Vulcanian explosion occurred prior to the Plinian eruption. On the other hand, the second eruption on Apr. 23 showed only a weaker peak at 4.4 mHz without overtones, suggesting that the second eruption was weaker but lasted longer than the first one. We are going to present detailed records of the 2015 Calbuco case, and compare it with past cases of ionospheric disturbances by volcanic eruptions, e.g. the 2014 Kelud volcano eruption.

  14. Effects of radiation damping on photorecombination of C4 + ions for the KLL resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuan-Ying; Wu, Yong; Qu, Yi-Zhi; Wang, Jian-Guo

    2016-10-01

    A numerical method based on Zabaydullin and Dubau's work [O. Zabaydullin and J. Dubau, J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 45, 115002 (2012), 10.1088/0953-4075/45/11/115002] has been developed to calculate the Cauchy principal value integral in scattering matrices and obtain photorecombination (PR) cross sections of low-lying resonances according to Davies and Seaton's theory [J. Phys. B 2, 757 (1969), 10.1088/0022-3700/2/7/304], in which radiation damping is included. The Dirac R -matrix method is employed to secure the dipole matrix. Using this method, PR cross sections of C4 + for the KLL resonance are acquired, and compared with available experimental measurements and other close-coupling theoretical results. It is shown that our damped cross sections reproduce the experimental data and are in agreement with other theoretical results. Meanwhile, radiation damping can reduce the PR cross section for the 1 s 2 p22P resonance (corresponding to two levels [(1s2p1 /2) 12 p3 /2] 1 /2 and [1s (2p3/22)2] 3 /2 by three orders of magnitude. The unresolved and underestimated resonances 1 s 2 p24P , 1 s 2 s 2 p 4P , and 1 s 2 p22P in the undamped Breit-Pauli R -matrix calculations [H. L. Zhang et al., J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 32, 1459 (1999), 10.1088/0953-4075/32/6/010] are corrected. Besides, dielectronic recombination cross sections of C4 + for the KLL resonance are also presented for comparison using the relativistic configuration-interaction (RCI) method implemented in flexible atomic code (fac), which show radiation damping has pronounced influences on 1 s 2 p22P due to much larger radiative rates compared with autoionization rates. Furthermore, radiative and autoionization rates for the intermediate states [(1s2p1 /2) 12 p3 /2] 1 /2 and [1s (2p3/22)2] 3 /2 of the He-like ions with 6 ≤Z ≤83 are calculated using fac, scaling laws of which are checked. Autoionization rates comply with the Zeff0 scaling law for Z ≥32 , which is caused by relativistic effects.

  15. Observation of J/ψp resonances consistent with pentaquark states in Λb→J/ψpK- decays at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    It has now been over 50 years since the inception of the quark model. The original papers by Gell-Mann and Zweig included the description of the now well known three-quark baryons and quark-antiquark mesons. They also included the possibility of "exotic" hadrons, such as mesons containing two quarks and two antiquarks (tetraquarks), or four quarks and an antiquark (pentaquarks). There is no clear reason why such exotic combinations of quarks should not exist. Indeed, in recent years strong tetraquark candidates have been discovered. However, until recently the observation of any lasting pentaquark candidates had eluded all searches. Using the LHCb Run 1 dataset, two J/ψp resonances consistent with pentaquark states have been observed in Λb→J/ψpK- decays. I will describe a full amplitude analysis which was performed in order to be most sensitive to the underlying physics and best study the resonant nature of these states. These states are overwhelmingly significant, and mark the first convincing observati...

  16. First observation and measurement of the resonant structure of the lambda_b->lambda_c pi-pi+pi- decay mode

    OpenAIRE

    Azzurri, P.; Barria, P.; Ciocci, M. A.; Donati, S.; Vataga, E.; Collaboration, for the CDF

    2009-01-01

    We present the first observation of the lambda_b->lambda_c pi-pi+pi- decay using data from an integrated luminosity of approximately 2.4 fb-1 of ppbar collisions at ECM=1.96 TeV, collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. We also present the first observation of the resonant decays lambda_b->sigma_c(2455)0 pi+pi- ->lambda_c pi-pi+pi-, lambda_b->sigma_c(2455)++ pi-pi- ->lambda_c pi-pi+pi-, lambda_b->lambda_c(2595)+ pi- ->lambda_c pi-pi+pi- and lambda_b->lambda_c(2625)+ pi- ->...

  17. Practical, computer-aided registration of multiple, three-dimensional, magnetic-resonance observations of the human brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diegert, C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sanders, J.A.; Orrison, W.W. Jr. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1992-12-31

    Researchers working with MR observations generally agree that far more information is available in a volume (3D) observation than is considered for diagnosis. The key to the new alignment method is in basing it on available information on surfaces. Using the skin surface is effective a robust algorithm can reliably extract this surface from almost any scan of the head, and a human operator`s exquisite sensitivity to facial features is allows him to manually align skin surfaces with precision. Following the definitions, we report on a preliminary experiment where we align three MR observations taken during a single MR examination, each weighting arterial, venous, and tissue features. When accurately aligned, a neurosurgeon can use these features as anatomical landmarks for planning and executing interventional procedures.

  18. Magnetic Resonance Enteroclysis in the Diagnosis of Small-Intestinal Crohn's Disease: Diagnostic Accuracy and Inter- and Intra-observer Agreement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negaard, A.; Sandvik, L.; Mulahasanovic, A.; Berstad, A.E.; Klow, N.E.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy and inter- and intra-observer agreement of magnetic resonance enteroclysis (MRE) in patients with or without Crohn's disease of the small intestine. Material and Methods: 60 consecutive patients with or without Crohn's disease examined with MRE were included. Two observers independently reviewed the MRE examinations, searching for 12 pathological signs. The reference standard was ileoscopy or surgery of the terminal ileum performed in 41 patients. Results: Crohn's disease of the small intestine was found in 24 (40%) patients. MRE findings of increased intestinal wall thickness, intestinal wall enhancement, intestinal wall ulcer, and inflammatory activity of the terminal ileum showed high sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values. Intestinal stenosis had sensitivities ranging from 43% to 100%, depending on the cut-off value. Inter- and intra-observer agreement was good or excellent for most pathological signs. However, observer agreement of intestinal wall edema was only fair and moderate. Conclusion: MRE evaluated Crohn's disease with a high diagnostic accuracy in the terminal ileum. Most MRE variables were evaluated with good or excellent observer agreement, indicating that the method was highly reproducible. Our study supports the notion that MRE is an appropriate method for diagnosing Crohn's disease

  19. Electron and ion angular distributions in resonant dissociative photoionization of H{sub 2} and D{sub 2} using linearly polarized light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, Jorge; MartIn, Fernando [Departamento de Quimica C-9, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: fernando.martin@uam.es

    2009-04-15

    We have evaluated fully differential electron angular distributions in H{sub 2} and D{sub 2} dissociative photoionization by using linearly polarized light of 20, 27 and 33 eV. At 20 eV, the distributions exhibit simple p-wave patterns, which is the signature of direct ionization through the X{sup 2}{sigma}{sub g}{sup +}(1s{sigma}{sub g}) channel. At 27 eV, where the Q{sub 1} autoionizing states are populated, we observe a similar pattern, except when the molecule is oriented perpendicularly to the polarization direction and the energy of the ejected electron is small. In contrast, at 33 eV, autoionization from the Q{sub 1} and Q{sub 2} states leads to interferences between the X{sup 2}{sigma}{sub g}{sup +}(1s{sigma}{sub g}) and {sup 2}{sigma}{sub u}{sup +}(2p{sigma}{sub u}) ionization channels that result in a strong asymmetry of the electron angular distributions along the molecular axis. This asymmetry changes rapidly with the energy of the ejected electron. Electron angular distributions integrated over all possible molecular orientations or ion angular distributions integrated over electron emission angle show no reminiscence of the above phenomena, but the corresponding asymmetry parameters dramatically change with electron and ion energies in the region of autoionizing states.

  20. Observation of $J/\\psi$ p resonances consistent with pentaquark states in$\\wedge_ b^0$ → $J/\\psi K^−p$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00400750

    The observation of structures consistent with charmonium-pentaquark states decaying to $J/\\psi p$ in $\\wedge_b^0$ → $J/\\psi K^−p$ decays is presented. The data sample analyzed corresponds to an integrated luminosity of $3 fb^−1$ acquired with the LHCb detector from 7 and 8 TeV $pp$ collisions. An amplitude analysis was performed which utilized all six kinematic degrees of freedom in the decay. It was shown that adequate descriptions of the data are unattainable with only $K^−p$ resonances in the amplitude model. For satisfactory fits of the data, it was found to be necessary to include two $J/\\psi p$ resonances, with each having significances of over 9 standard deviations. One has a mass of $4449.8 \\pm1.7\\pm2.2 MeV$ and a width of $39\\pm5\\pm16 MeV$, while the second is broader, with a mass of $4380 \\pm8\\pm29 MeV$ and a width of $205\\pm18\\pm87 MeV$. The $J^P$ assignments could not be uniquely determined, though there is a preference for one to have spin 3/2 and the other spin 5/2 with an opposite parit...

  1. LHCb- Observation of $J/\\psi p$ resonances consitent with pentaquark staes in $\\Lambda^0_b \\to J/\\psi K^-p$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Adeva Andany, Bernardo

    2015-01-01

    The observation of exotic structures in the $J/\\psi p$ channel, refered to as pentaquark-charmonium states, in the decay $\\Lambda^0_b \\rightarrow J/\\psi K^- p$, are presented. An amplitude analysis is performed on the three-body final state that reproduces the two-body mass and angular distributions. To obtain a satisfactory fit of the structures seen in the $J/\\psi p$ mass spectrum, it is necessary to include two Breit-Wigner amplitudes that each describe a resonant state. The significance of each of these resonances is more than 9 standard deviations. One has a mass of 4380 $\\pm$ 8 $\\pm$ 29 MeV and a width of 205 $\\pm$ 18 $\\pm$ 86 MeV, while the second is narrower, with a mass of 4449.8 $\\pm$ 1.7 $\\pm$ 2.5 MeV and a width of 39 $\\pm$ 5 $\\pm$ 19. The preferred $J^P$ assignments are of opposite parity, with one state having spin 3/2 and the other 5/2.

  2. Two methods for nuclear spin determination in collinear laser spectroscopy: classical r.f. magnetic resonance and observation of the Larmor precession

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bendali, N.; Duong, H.T.; Saint-Jalm, J.M.; Vialle, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    Measurement of nuclear spin in the collinear laser spectroscopy method has been investigated using a fast sodium atomic beam excited collinearly by a C.W. single mode dye laser beam. The atomic magnetic moments are first aligned by optical pumping process, then they interact with a static magnetic field H 0 . The magnetic alignment of the atomic system just at the exit of the magnetic field is monitored by the laser induced fluorescence. Upon varying the amplitude of H 0 , the fluorescence signal presents a fringed structure. This structure is due to the Larmor precession of the aligned magnetic moments around H 0 , and therefore it is a signature of the spin involved. The modulation patterns corresponding to different relative orientations of H 0 and light polarization direction, are fitted by an analytical formula. In a second step, a classical magnetic resonance experiment with a static magnetic field and a radiofrequency field has been performed. The monocinetic character of our fast atomic beam allowed us to observe, even at high r.f. power, resonances line shapes in agreement with the Majorana formula

  3. In-Source Laser Resonance Ionization at ISOL Facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Marsh, Bruce; Feddosseev, Valentin

    Resonance ionization laser ion source development has been carried out at two radioactive ion beam facilities: ISOLDE (CERN, Switzerland) and the IGISOL facility (Jyvaskyla, Finland). The scope of the Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source has been extended to 27 elements with the development of new three-step ionization schemes for Sb, Sc, Dy, Y and Au. The efficiencies were determined to be in the range of 2 - 20 %. Additionally, a new two-step ionization scheme has been developed for bismuth in an off-line atomic beam unit. The scheme relies on ionization via a strong and broad auto-ionizing resonance at an energy of 63196.79 cm$^{−1}$. This scheme may offer an improvement over the existing RILIS efficiency and will be more convenient for use during resonance ionization spectroscopy of Bi isotopes. The RILIS can be used as a spectroscopic tool to probe features such as the hyperfine structures and the isotope-shifts of radioisotopes with low production rates. By coupling a laser scanning process that dire...

  4. Observation of a hole-size-dependent energy shift of the surface-plasmon resonance in Ni antidot thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, H.; Akinoglu, E. M.; Fumagalli, P., E-mail: paul.fumagalli@fu-berlin.de [Institut für Experimentalphysik, Freie Universität Berlin, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Caballero, B.; García-Martín, A. [IMM-Instituto de Microelectrónica de Madrid (CNM-CSIC), Isaac Newton 8, PTM, Tres Cantos, E-28760 Madrid (Spain); Papaioannou, E. Th. [Fachbereich Physik and Landesforschungszentrum OPTIMAS, Technische Universität Kaiserslautern, 67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Cuevas, J. C. [Departamento de Física Teórica de la Materia Condensada and Condensed Matter Physics Center (IFIMAC), Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Giersig, M. [Institut für Experimentalphysik, Freie Universität Berlin, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin, Institute of Nanoarchitectures for Energy Conversion, 14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-04-13

    A combined experimental and theoretical study of the magneto-optic properties of a series of nickel antidot thin films is presented. The hole diameter varies from 869 down to 636 nm, while the lattice periodicity is fixed at 920 nm. This results in an overall increase of the polar Kerr rotation with decreasing hole diameter due to the increasing surface coverage with nickel. In addition, at photon energies of 2.7 and 3.3 eV, where surface-plasmon excitations are expected, we observe distinct features in the polar Kerr rotation not present in continuous nickel films. The spectral position of the peaks exhibits a red shift with decreasing hole size. This is explained within the context of an effective medium theory by a change in the effective dielectric function of the Ni thin films.

  5. Van Allen Probe observations of drift-bounce resonances with Pc 4 pulsations and wave–particle interactions in the pre-midnight inner magnetosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. I. Korotova

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We present Van Allen Probe B observations of azimuthally limited, antisymmetric, poloidal Pc 4 electric and magnetic field pulsations in the pre-midnight sector of the magnetosphere from 05:40 to 06:00 UT on 1 May 2013. Oscillation periods were similar for the magnetic and electric fields and proton fluxes. The flux of energetic protons exhibited an energy-dependent response to the pulsations. Energetic proton variations were anticorrelated at medium and low energies. Although we attribute the pulsations to a drift-bounce resonance, we demonstrate that the energy-dependent response of the ion fluxes results from pulsation-associated velocities sweeping energy-dependent radial ion flux gradients back and forth past the spacecraft.

  6. Observation of an angular change in the structure of an RNA complex using Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmanseresht, Sheema; Milas, Peker; Parrot, Louis; Goldner, Lori S.

    Single-molecular-pair FRET is often used to study distance fluctuations of single molecules. It is harder to capture angular changes using FRET, because rotational motion of the dyes tends to wash out the angular sensitivity. Using a dye labeling scheme that minimizes the rotational motion of the dyes with respect to the RNA, we use spFRET to measure an angular change in structure of an RNA kissing complex upon protein binding. The model system studied here, R1inv-R2inv, is derived from the RNAI-RNAII complex in E.coli. RNA II is a primer for replication of the ColE1 plasmid; its function is modulated by interaction with RNA I, Rop protein is known to stabilize the bent R1inv-R2inv kissing complex against dissociation. The effect, if any, of Rop protein on the conformation of the kissing complex is not known. The eight minimized-energy NMR structures reported for R1inv-R2inv show a small difference in end-to-end distances and much larger differences in twist and bend angles. We compare a first-principles model with spFRET data to determine if the observed change in FRET is consistent with an angular change in structure, as suggested by the model. Grant Number: NSF DBI-1152386.

  7. The impact of adsorption on the localization of spins in graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide, observed with electron paramagnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempiński, Mateusz; Florczak, Patryk; Jurga, Stefan; Śliwińska-Bartkowiak, Małgorzata; Kempiński, Wojciech

    2017-08-01

    We report the observations of electronic properties of graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide, performed with electron paramagnetic resonance technique in a broad temperature range. Both materials were examined in pure form and saturated with air, helium, and heavy water molecules. We show that spin localization strongly depends on the type and amount of molecules adsorbed at the graphene layer edges (and possible in-plane defects). Physical and chemical states of edges play crucial role in electrical transport within graphene-based materials, with hopping as the leading mechanism of charge carrier transport. Presented results are a good basis to understand the electronic properties of other carbon structures made of graphene-like building blocks. Most active carbons show some degree of functionalization and are known of having good adsorptive properties; thus, controlling both phenomena is important for many applications. Sample treatment with temperature, vacuum, and various adsorbents allowed for the observation of a possible metal-insulator transition and sorption pumping effects. The influence of adsorption on the localization phenomena in graphene would be very important if to consider the graphene-based material as possible candidates for the future spintronics that works in ambient conditions.

  8. Observation of persistent α-helical content and discrete types of backbone disorder during a molten globule to ordered peptide transition via deep-UV resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Mia C; Mutter, Andrew; Koder, Ronald L; JiJi, Renee D; Cooley, Jason W

    2013-07-01

    The molten globule state can aide in the folding of a protein to a functional structure and is loosely defined as an increase in structural disorder with conservation of the ensemble secondary structure content. Simultaneous observation of persistent secondary structure content with increased disorder has remained experimentally problematic. As a consequence, modeling how the molten globule state remains stable and how it facilitates proper folding remains difficult due to a lack of amenable spectroscopic techniques to characterize this class of partially unfolded proteins. Previously, deep-UV resonance Raman (dUVRR) spectroscopy has proven useful in the resolution of global and local structural fluctuations in the secondary structure of proteins. In this work, dUVRR was employed to study the molten globule to ordered transition of a model four-helix bundle protein, HP7. Both the average ensemble secondary structure and types of local disorder were monitored, without perturbation of the solvent, pH, or temperature. The molten globule to ordered transition is induced by stepwise coordination of two heme molecules. Persistent dUVRR spectral features in the amide III region at 1295-1301 and 1335-1338 cm -1 confirm previous observations that HP7 remains predominantly helical in the molten globule versus the fully ordered state. Additionally, these spectra represent the first demonstration of conserved helical content in a molten globule protein. With successive heme binding significant losses are observed in the spectral intensity of the amide III 3 and S regions (1230-1260 and 1390 cm -1 , respectively), which are known to be sensitive to local disorder. These observations indicate that there is a decrease in the structural populations able to explore various extended conformations, with successive heme binding events. DUVRR spectra indicate that the first heme coordination between two helical segments diminishes exploration of more elongated backbone structural

  9. Observer agreement in the reporting of knee and lumbar spine magnetic resonance (MR) imaging examinations: Selectively trained MR radiographers and consultant radiologists compared with an index radiologist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brealey, S.; Piper, K.; King, D.; Bland, M.; Caddick, J.; Campbell, P.; Gibbon, A.; Highland, A.; Jenkins, N.; Petty, D.; Warren, D.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To assess agreement between trained radiographers and consultant radiologists compared with an index radiologist when reporting on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations of the knee and lumbar spine and to examine the subsequent effect of discordant reports on patient management and outcome. Methods: At York Hospital two MR radiographers, two consultant radiologists and an index radiologist reported on a prospective, random sample of 326 MRI examinations. The radiographers reported in clinical practice conditions and the radiologists during clinical practice. An independent consultant radiologist compared these reports with the index radiologist report for agreement. Orthopaedic surgeons then assessed whether the discordance between reports was clinically important. Results: Overall observer agreement with the index radiologist was comparable between observers and ranged from 54% to 58%; for the knee it was 46–57% and for the lumbar spine was 56–66%. There was a very small observed difference of 0.6% (95% CI −11.9 to 13.0) in mean agreement between the radiographers and radiologists (P = 0.860). For the knee, lumbar spine and overall, radiographers’ discordant reports, when compared with the index radiologist, were less likely to have a clinically important effect on patient outcome than the radiologists’ discordant reports. Less than 10% of observer's reports were sufficiently discordant with the index radiologist's reports to be clinically important. Conclusion: Carefully selected MR radiographers with postgraduate education and training reported in clinical practice conditions on specific MRI examinations of the knee and lumbar spine to a level of agreement comparable with non-musculoskeletal consultant radiologists

  10. Observation of double resonant laser induced transitions in the $v = n - l - 1 = 2$ metastable cascade of antiprotonic helium-4 atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Hayano, R S; Tamura, H; Torii, H A; Hori, Masaki; Maas, F E; Morita, N; Kumakura, M; Sugai, I; Hartmann, F J; Daniel, H; Von Egidy, T; Ketzer, B; Pohl, R; Horváth, D; Eades, John; Widmann, E; Yamazaki, T

    1997-01-01

    A new laser-induced resonant transition in the $v=n-l-1=2$ metastable cascade of antiprotonic $^4$He atoms has been found by using a double resonance technique. This was done by setting the first laser to the already known 470.724 nm resonance ($(n,l)=(37,34)\\rightarrow (36,33)$), while the $(38,35)\\rightarrow (37,34)$ transition was searched for with the second laser. The resonant transition was found at wavelength of 529.622$\\pm$0.003 nm, showing excellent agreement with a recent prediction of Korobov.

  11. Study of the nature of the abovethreshold resonance radiation in lanthanum 4d-spectra and thorium 5d-spectra in compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimkina, T.M.; Shulakov, A.S.; Brajko, A.P.; Lyakhovskaya, I.I.; Alaverdov, V.I.

    1982-01-01

    The results of experimental and theoretical investigation of the nature of above the threshold resonance radiation in lanthanum and thorium in compounds spectra are presented. The emission spectra of lanthanum and thorium oxides obtained at 500 V are shown. It is known that resonance absorption bands are narrower than the emission bands. This effect in addition has been confirmed in the course of investigation of absorption and emission spectra in several lanthanum compounds: LaF 3 , LaS, LaSe, LaSb. The bremsstrahlung spectrum calculation performed for high electron energies correctly defines the general structure of emission spectrum in the field of energies coinciding with a giant resonance in the absorption spectrum. The results obtained show the necessity of the subsequent more detailed experimental and theoretical study of radiation channel of the decay of excited autoionization states [ru

  12. Absorption spectra of localized surface plasmon resonance observed in an inline/picoliter spectrometer cell fabricated by a near ultraviolet femtosecond laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Masahiko; Nishiyama, Michiko; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Kubodera, Shoichi

    2018-03-01

    Absorption spectra based on localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) were obtained with an inline/picoliter spectrometer cell. The spectrometer cell was fabricated into an optical glass fiber by focusing a near UV (NUV) femtosecond laser pulses at a wavelength of 400 nm with an energy of 30 μJ. The laser beam was focused from two directions opposite to each other to fabricate a through-hole spectrometer cell. A diameter of the cell was approximately 3 μm, and the length was approximately 62.5 μm, which was nearly equal to the core diameter of the optical fiber. Liquid solution of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) with a diameter of 5-10 nm was injected into the spectrometer cell with its volume of 0.4 pL. The absorption peak centered at 518 nm was observed. An increase of absorption associated with the increase of the number of nanoparticles was in agreement with the numerical calculation based on the Lambert-Beer law.

  13. Direct Observation of the Quantum Phase Transition of SrCu2(BO3)2 by High-Pressure and Terahertz Electron Spin Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Takahiro; Hirao, Yuki; Hijii, Keigo; Okubo, Susumu; Ohta, Hitoshi; Uwatoko, Yoshiya; Kudo, Kazutaka; Koike, Yoji

    2018-03-01

    High-pressure and high-field electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements have been performed on a single crystal of the orthogonal-dimer spin system SrCu2(BO3)2. With frequencies below 1 THz, ESR signals associated with transitions from the singlet ground state to the one-triplet excited states and the two-triplet bound state were observed at pressures up to 2.1 GPa. We obtained directly the pressure dependence of the gap energies, finding a clear first-order phase transition at Pc = 1.85 ± 0.05 GPa. By comparing this pressure dependence with the calculated excitation energies obtained from an exact diagonalization, we determined the precise pressure dependence for inter- (J') and intra-dimer (J) exchange interactions considering the Dzyaloshinski-Moriya interaction. Thus this system undergoes a first-order quantum phase transition from the dimer singlet phase to a plaquette singlet phase above the ratio (J'/J)c = 0.660 ± 0.003.

  14. Electron spin resonance studies of Bi1-xScxFeO3 nanoparticulates: Observation of an enhanced spin canting over a large temperature range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titus, S.; Balakumar, S.; Sakar, M.; Das, J.; Srinivasu, V. V.

    2017-12-01

    Bi1-xScxFeO3 (x = 0.0, 0.1, 0.15, 0.25) nano particles were synthesized by sol gel method. We then probed the spin system in these nano particles using electron spin resonance technique. Our ESR results strongly suggest the scenario of modified spin canted structures. Spin canting parameter Δg/g as a function of temperature for Scandium doped BFO is qualitatively different from undoped BFO. A broad peak is observed for all the Scandium doped BFO samples and an enhanced spin canting over a large temperature range (75-210 K) in the case of x = 0.15 doping. We also showed that the asymmetry parameter and thereby the magneto-crystalline anisotropy in these BSFO nanoparticles show peaks around 230 K for (x = 0.10 and 0.15) and beyond 300 K for x = 0.25 system. Thus, we established that the Sc doping significantly modifies the spin canting and magneto crystalline anisotropy in the BFO system.

  15. Planar limit-assisted structural interpretation of saturates/aromatics/resins/asphaltenes fractionated crude oil compounds observed by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yunju; Kim, Young Hwan; Kim, Sunghwan

    2011-08-01

    Planar limits, defined as lines generated by connecting maximum double-bond equivalence (DBE) values at given carbon numbers, are proposed as a means of predicting and understanding the molecular structure of compounds in crude oil. The slopes and y-intercepts of the lines are determined by the DBE/carbon number ratios of functional groups defining the planar limits. For example, the planar limit generated by a serial addition of saturated cyclic rings has a slope of 0.25. The planar limit formed by the linear and nonlinear addition of benzene rings yields lines with slopes of 0.75 and 1, respectively. The y-intercepts of these lines were determined by additional functional groups added within a series of molecules. Plots of DBE versus carbon number for S(1) class compounds observed by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR MS) showed that saturates/aromatics/resins/asphaltenes (SARA) fractions exhibited unique slopes and y-intercepts. The slope of the planar limit observed from a saturates fraction matched well with the slope of a planar limit generated by the serial addition of saturated cyclic rings. The slopes of planar limits of aromatics and resins fractions were very similar to that obtained from the linear addition of benzene rings. Finally, the slope of the asphaltenes fraction was almost identical to the slope obtained from the nonlinear addition of benzene rings. Simulated and experimental data show that SARA fractions exhibit different molecular structure characteristics. On the basis of the slope and y-intercept of the planar limit, the structures of molecules in SARA fractions were predicted and suggested. The use of planar limits for structural interpretation is not limited to crude oil compounds but can also be used to study other organic mixtures such as humic substances or metabolites.

  16. Scan-rescan and intra-observer variability of magnetic resonance imaging of carotid atherosclerosis at 1.5 T and 3.0 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidal, Arvin; Wade, Trevor; Rutt, Brian K; Fenster, Aaron; Parraga, Grace [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, 100 Perth Drive, London, N6A 5K8 (Canada); Bureau, Yves [Graduate Program in Biomedical Engineering, University of Western Ontario, London, N6A 5B9 (Canada); Spence, J David [Stroke Prevention and Atherosclerosis Research Centre, Robarts Research Institute, 1400 Western Road, London, N6A 5K8 (Canada)], E-mail: avidal@imaging.robarts.ca, E-mail: ybureau@lawsonimaging.ca, E-mail: twade@imaging.robarts.ca, E-mail: DSpence@robarts.ca, E-mail: brutt@imaging.robarts.ca, E-mail: afenster@imaging.robarts.ca, E-mail: gep@imaging.robarts.ca

    2008-12-07

    Carotid atherosclerosis measurements for eight subjects at baseline and 14 {+-} 2 days later were examined using 1.5 T and 3.0 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A single observer blinded to field strength, subject and timepoint manually segmented carotid artery wall and lumen boundaries in randomized images in five measurement trials. Mean increases in the signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) for T1-weighted images acquired at 3.0 T compared to 1.5 T were 90% (scan) and 80% (rescan). Despite significantly improved SNR and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) for images acquired at 3.0 T, vessel wall volume (VWV) intra-observer variability was not significantly different using coefficients of variation (COV), and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC). VWV interscan variability and consistency at both field strengths were not statistically different (1.5 T/3.0 T COV = 5.7%/7.8%, R{sup 2} = 0.96 for 1.5 T and R{sup 2} = 0.87 for 3.0 T). A two-way analysis of variance showed a VWV dependence on field strength but not scan timepoint. In addition, a paired t-test showed significant differences in VWV measured at 3.0 T as compared to 1.5 T. These results suggest that although images acquired at 1.5 T have lower SNR and CNR VWV, measurement variability was not significantly different from 3.0 T VWV and that VWV is field-strength dependent which may be an important consideration for longitudinal studies.

  17. Experimental (e, 2e) study of exchange interferences in the resonant Auger decay of Ar induced by electron impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paripás, Béla; Palásthy, Béla; Žitnik, Matjaz

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •The interference of autoionizing resonances with a common final ionic state is measured. •We have developed a method to experimentally verify for the exchange interference effect. •The sum of kinetic energies of the two detected electrons is kept constant. •Mainly the interference effects of [2p 3/2 ]4p and [2p 1/2 ]4p resonances in argon are studied. •The results possibly indicate small exchange interference effects. -- Abstract: Any two autoionizing resonances with a common final ionic state can be made to interfere by an appropriate selection of electron impact energy. To reveal the exchange interference effects a selective detection of electron pairs related to the selected final state is desired. We have performed a constant ionic state (e, 2e) experiment (CIS) isolating the final state by keeping the sum of transmission energies of two independent electron spectrometers constant. In the focus of this work are the exchange interference effects of 2p 3/2 −1 4p and 2p 1/2 −1 4p resonances in argon decaying to the 3p −2 ( 1 D)4p 2 P, 2 D final ionic state with energy E F = 37.3 ± 0.2 eV. We have developed a method to experimentally verify for the exchange interference effect. It is based on a comparison of the CIS spectrum recorded at the critical primary electron energy that activates the interferences, and the constructed, interference-free CIS spectrum that is build up from the CIS spectrum measured at primary electron energy away from the critical value. The results possibly indicate small exchange interference effects that may have been considerably smeared out at present experimental energy resolution

  18. Excitation energies, radiative and autoionization rates, dielectronic satellite lines, and dielectronic recombination rates for excited states of Rb-like W from Kr-like W [Relativistic atomic data for Rb-like tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safronova, University I.; Safronova, A. S.; Beiersdorfer, P.

    2016-01-01

    Energy levels, radiative transition probabilities, and autoionization rates for [Ni]4s 2 4p 6 nl, [Ni]4s 2 4p 5 4l ′ nl (l ′ =d,f,n = 4–7), [Ni]4s4p 6 4l ′ nl, (l ′ =d,f,n = 4–7), [Ni]4s 2 4p 5 5l ′ nl (n = 5–7), and [Ni]4s4p 6 6l ′ nl (n = 6–7) states in Rb-like tungsten (W37+) are calculated using the relativistic many-body perturbation theory method (RMBPT code) and the Hartree–Fock-relativistic method (COWAN code). Autoionizing levels above the [Ni]4s 2 4p 6 threshold are considered. It is found that configuration mixing among [Ni]4s 2 4p 5 4l ′ nl and [Ni]4s4p 6 4l ′ nl plays an important role for all atomic characteristics. Branching ratios relative to the first threshold and intensity factors are calculated for satellite lines, and dielectronic recombination (DR) rate coefficients are determined for the [Ni]4s 2 4p 6 nl (n = 4–7) singly excited states, as well as the [Ni]4s 2 4p 5 4dnl, [Ni]4s 2 4p 5 4fnl, [Ni]4s4p 6 4dnl, [Ni]4s 2 4p 6 4fnl, (n = 4–6), and [Ni]4s 2 4p 5 5l ′ 5l doubly excited nonautoionizing states in Rb-like W37+ ion. Contributions from the [Ni]4s24p 6 4fnl (n = 6–7), [Ni]4s 2 4p 5 5l ′ nl (n = 5–6), and [Ni]4s 2 4p 5 6l ′ nl (n = 6–7) doubly excited autoionizing states are evaluated numerically. The high-n state (with n up to 500) contributions are very important for high temperatures. These contributions are determined by using a scaling procedure. Synthetic dielectronic satellite spectra from Rb-like W are simulated in a broad spectral range from 8 to 70 Å. Here, these calculations provide highly accurate values for a number of W 37+ properties useful for a variety of applications including for fusion applications.

  19. Mechanical resonator

    OpenAIRE

    Padowitz, David; Matsiev, L; Kolosov, Oleg

    2004-01-01

    A sensor and methods for making and using the same in which a mechanical resonator is employed, comprising a resonator portion for resonating in a fluid without the substantial generation of acoustic waves; and an electrical connection between the resonator portion for oscillating and a source of an input signal; wherein the portion for resonating, the electrical connection or both includes a base material and a performance-tuning material that is different from the base material.

  20. Direct Observation of Thermal Equilibrium of Excited Triplet States of 9,10-Phenanthrenequinone. A Time-Resolved Resonance Raman Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Venkatraman Ravi; Rajkumar, Nagappan; Ariese, Freek; Umapathy, Siva

    2015-10-08

    The photochemistry of aromatic ketones plays a key role in various physicochemical and biological processes, and solvent polarity can be used to tune their triplet state properties. Therefore, a comprehensive analysis of the conformational structure and the solvent polarity induced energy level reordering of the two lowest triplet states of 9,10-phenanthrenequinone (PQ) was carried out using nanosecond-time-resolved absorption (ns-TRA), time-resolved resonance Raman (TR(3)) spectroscopy, and time dependent-density functional theory (TD-DFT) studies. The ns-TRA of PQ in acetonitrile displays two bands in the visible range, and these two bands decay with similar lifetime at least at longer time scales (μs). Interestingly, TR(3) spectra of these two bands indicate that the kinetics are different at shorter time scales (ns), while at longer time scales they followed the kinetics of ns-TRA spectra. Therefore, we report a real-time observation of the thermal equilibrium between the two lowest triplet excited states of PQ, assigned to nπ* and ππ* of which the ππ* triplet state is formed first through intersystem crossing. Despite the fact that these two states are energetically close and have a similar conformational structure supported by TD-DFT studies, the slow internal conversion (∼2 ns) between the T(2)(1(3)nπ*) and T(1)(1(3)ππ*) triplet states indicates a barrier. Insights from the singlet excited states of PQ in protic solvents [ J. Chem. Phys. 2015 , 142 , 24305 ] suggest that the lowest nπ* and ππ* triplet states should undergo hydrogen bond weakening and strengthening, respectively, relative to the ground state, and these mechanisms are substantiated by TD-DFT calculations. We also hypothesize that the different hydrogen bonding mechanisms exhibited by the two lowest singlet and triplet excited states of PQ could influence its ISC mechanism.

  1. Magnetic resonance arthrography including ABER view in diagnosing partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff: Accuracy, and inter- and intra-observer agreements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Joon-Yong; Jee, Won-Hee; Chun, Ho Jong; Ahn, Myeong Im (Dept. of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, School of Medicine, Catholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea)), e-mail: whjee@catholic.ac.kr; Kim, Yang-Soo (Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, School of Medicine, Catholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea))

    2010-03-15

    Background: Partial-thickness tear of the rotator cuff is a common cause of shoulder pain. Magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography has been described as a useful measure to diagnose rotator cuff abnormalities. Purpose: To determine the reliability and accuracy of MR arthrography with abduction and external rotation (ABER) view for the diagnosis of partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff. Material and Methods: Among patients who underwent MR arthrographies, 22 patients (12 men, 10 women; mean age 45 years) who had either partial-thickness tear or normal tendon on arthroscopy were included. MR images were independently scored by two observers for partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff. Interobserver and intraobserver agreements for detection of partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff were calculated by using kappa coefficients. The differences in areas under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were assessed with a univariate Z-score test. Differences in sensitivity and specificity for interpretations based on different imaging series were tested for significance using the McNemar statistic. Results: Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of each reader on MR imaging without ABER view were 83%, 90%, and 86%, and 83%, 80%, and 82%, respectively, whereas on overall interpretation including ABER view, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of each reader were 92%, 70%, and 82%, and 92%, 80%, and 86%, respectively. Including ABER view, interobserver agreement for partial-thickness tear increased from kappa=0.55 to kappa=0.68. Likewise, intraobserver agreements increased from kappa=0.79 and 0.53 to kappa=0.81 and 0.70 for each reader, respectively. The areas under the ROC curves for each reader were 0.96 and 0.90, which were not significantly different. Conclusion: Including ABER view in routine sequences of MR arthrography increases the sensitivity, and inter- and intraobserver agreements for detecting partial-thickness tear of rotator cuff

  2. Magnetic resonance observation of cartilage repair tissue (MOCART) for the evaluation of autologous chondrocyte transplantation: Determination of interobserver variability and correlation to clinical outcome after 2 years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marlovits, Stefan [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: stefan.marlovits@meduniwien.ac.at; Singer, Philipp [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Zeller, Philip [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Mandl, Irena [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Haller, Joerg [Department of Radiology, Hanusch Hospital, Heinrich-Collin-Strasse, A-1140 Vienna (Austria); Trattnig, Siegfried [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2006-01-15

    In an observational study, the validity and reliability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the assessment of autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) in the knee joint was determined. Two years after implantation, high-resolution MRI was used to analyze the repair tissue with nine pertinent variables. A complete filling of the defect was found in 61.5%, and a complete integration of the border zone to the adjacent cartilage in 76.9%. An intact subchondral lamina was present in 84.6% and an intact subchondral bone was present in 61.5%. Isointense signal intensities of the repair tissue compared to the adjacent native cartilage were seen in 92.3%. To evaluate interobserver variability, a reliability analysis with the determination of the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was calculated. An 'almost perfect' agreement, with an ICC value >0.81, was calculated in 8 of 9 variables. The clinical outcome after 2 years showed the visual analog score (VAS) at 2.62 (S.D. {+-}0.65). The values for the knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS) subgroups were 68.29 ({+-}23.90) for pain, 62.09 ({+-}14.62) for symptoms, 75.45 ({+-}21.91) for ADL function, 52.69 ({+-}28.77) for sport and 70.19 ({+-}22.41) for knee-related quality of life. The clinical scores were correlated with the MRI variables. A statistically significant correlation was found for the variables 'filling of the defect,' 'structure of the repair tissue,' 'changes in the subchondral bone,' and 'signal intensities of the repair issue'. High resolution MRI and well-defined MRI variables are a reliable, reproducible and accurate tool for assessing cartilage repair tissue.

  3. Longitudinal assessment of right ventricular structure and function by cardiovascular magnetic resonance in breast cancer patients treated with trastuzumab: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthur, Ashita; Brezden-Masley, Christine; Connelly, Kim A; Dhir, Vinita; Chan, Kelvin K W; Haq, Rashida; Kirpalani, Anish; Barfett, Joseph J; Jimenez-Juan, Laura; Karur, Gauri R; Deva, Djeven P; Yan, Andrew T

    2017-04-10

    There are limited data on the effects of trastuzumab on the right ventricle (RV). Therefore, we sought to evaluate the temporal changes in right ventricular (RV) structure and function as measured by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR), and their relationship with left ventricular (LV) structure and function in breast cancer patients treated with trastuzumab. Prospective, longitudinal, observational study involving 41 women with HER2+ breast cancer who underwent serial CMR at baseline, 6, 12, and 18 months after initiation of trastuzumab. A single blinded observer measured RV parameters on de-identified CMRs in a random order. Linear mixed models were used to investigate temporal changes in RV parameters. Of the 41 women (age 52 ± 11 years), only one patient experienced trastuzumab-induced cardiotoxicity. Compared to baseline, there were small but significant increases in the RV end-diastolic volume at 6 months (p = 0.002) and RV end-systolic volume at 6 and 12 months (p < 0.001 for both), but not at 18 months (p = 0.82 and 0.13 respectively). RV ejection fraction (RVEF), when compared to baseline (58.3%, 95% CI 57.1-59.5%), showed corresponding decreases at 6 months (53.9%, 95% CI 52.5-55.4%, p < 0.001) and 12 months (55%, 95% CI 53.8-56.2%, p < 0.001) that recovered at 18 months (56.6%, 95% CI 55.1-58.0%, p = 0.08). Although the temporal pattern of changes in LVEF and RVEF were similar, there was no significant correlation between RVEF and LVEF at baseline (r = 0.29, p = 0.07) or between their changes at 6 months (r = 0.24, p = 0.17). In patients receiving trastuzumab without overt cardiotoxicity, there is a subtle but significant deleterious effect on RV structure and function that recover at 18 months, which can be detected by CMR. Furthermore, monitoring of LVEF alone may not be sufficient in detecting early RV injury. These novel findings provide further support for CMR in monitoring early

  4. Snake resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tepikian, S.

    1989-01-01

    Siberian Snakes provide a practical means of obtaining polarized proton beams in large accelerators. The effect of snakes can be understood by studying the dynamics of spin precession in an accelerator with snakes and a single spin resonance. This leads to a new class of energy independent spin depolarizing resonances, called snake resonances. In designing a large accelerator with snakes to preserve the spin polarization, there is an added constraint on the choice of the vertical betatron tune due to the snake resonances

  5. Multiphoton resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shore, B.W.

    1977-01-01

    The long-time average of level populations in a coherently-excited anharmonic sequence of energy levels (e.g., an anharmonic oscillator) exhibits sharp resonances as a function of laser frequency. For simple linearly-increasing anharmonicity, each resonance is a superposition of various multiphoton resonances (e.g., a superposition of 3, 5, 7, . . . photon resonances), each having its own characteristic width predictable from perturbation theory

  6. Observation of a JPC = 1–+ exotic resonance in diffractive dissociation of 190 GeV/c pi– into pi–pi–pi+

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Alekseev, M.; Alexakhin, V. Yu.; Alexandrov, Yu.; Alexeev, G. D.; Amoroso, A.; Austregisilio, A.; Badelek, B.; Balestra, F.; Ball, J.; Barth, J.; Baum, G.; Bedfer, Y.; Bernhard, J.; Bertini, R.; Bettinelli, M.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Bravar, A.; Bressan, A.; Brona, G.; Burtin, E.; Bussa, M.; Chapiro, A.; Chiosso, M.; Chung, S.U.; Cicuttin, A.; Colantoni, M.; Crespo, M.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dafni, T.; Das, S.; Dasgupta, S. S.; Denisov, O.; Dhara, L.; Diaz, V.; Dinkelbach, A.; Donskov, S.; Doshita, N.; Duic, V.; Dünnweber, W.; Efremov, A.V.; El Alaoui, A.; Eversheim, P.; Eyrich, W.; Faessler, M.; Ferrero, A.; Finger, M.; Finger jr., M.; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; Friedrich, J.; Garfagnini, R.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O.; Gazda, R.; Gerassimov, S.; Geyer, R.; Giorgi, M.; Gobbo, B.; Goertz, S.; Grabmüller, S.; Grajek, O.; Grasso, A.; Grube, B.; Gushterski, R.; Guskov, A.; Haas, F.; von Harrach, D.; Hasegawa, T.; Heckmann, J.; Heinsius, F.; Hermann, R.; Herrmann, F.; Hess, C.; Hinterberger, F.; Horikawa, N.; Höppner, Ch.; d'Hose, N.; Ilgner, C.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanov, O.; Ivanshin, Yu.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Jasinski, P.; Jegou, G.; Joosten, R.; Kabuss, E.; Kang, D.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G.; Khokhlov, Y.; Kisselev, Y.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koblitz, S.; Koivuniemi, J.; Kolosov, V.; Komissarov, E.; Kondo, K.; Königsmann, K.; Konopka, R.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V.; Korzenev, A.; Kotzinian, A.; Kouznetsov, O.; Kowalik, K.; Krämer, M.; Kral, A.; Kroumchtein, Z.; Kuhn, R.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Lauser, L.; Le Goff, J.; Lednev, A.; Lehmann, A.; Levorato, S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Liska, T.; Maggiora, A.; Maggiora, M.; Magnon, A.; Mallot, G.; Mann, A.; Marchand, C.; Marroncle, J.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Massmann, F.; Matsuda, T.; Maximov, A.; Meyer, W.; Michigami, T.; Mikhailov, Y.; Moinester, M.; Mutter, A.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nagel, T.; Nassalski, J.; Negrini, S.; Nerling, F.; Neubert, S.; Neyret, D.; Nikolaenko, V.; Olshevsky, A.; Ostrick, M.; Padee, A.; Panknin, R.; Panzieri, D.; Parsamyan, B.; Paul, S.; Pawlukiewicz-Kaminska, B.; Perevalova, E.; Pesaro, G.; Peshekhonov, D.; Piragino, G.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polak, J.; Polyakov, V.; Pontecorvo, G.; Pretz, J.; Quintans, C.; Rajotte, J.; Ramos, S.; Rapatsky, V.; Reicherz, G.; Reggiani, D.; Richter, A.; Robinet, F.; Rocco, E.; Rondio, E.; Ryabchikov, D.; Samoylenko, V.; Sandacz, A.; Santos, H.; Sapozhnikov, M.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schill, C.; Schlütter, T.; Schmitt, L.; Schopferer, S.; Schröder, W.; Shevchenko, O.; Siebert, H.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sissakian, A.; Slunecka, M.; Smirnov, G.; Sosio, S.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, Aleš; Stolarski, M.; Sulc, M.; Sulej, R.; Takekawa, S.; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Teufel, A.; Tkatchev, L.; Uhl, S.; Uman, I.; Venugopal, G.; Virius, M.; Vlassov, N.; Vossen, A.; Weitzel, Q.; Windmolders, R.; Wislicki, W.; Wollny, H.; Zaremba, K.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Ziembicki, M.; Zhao, J.; Zhuravlev, N.; Zvyagin, A.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 104, č. 24 (2010), 241803:1-7 ISSN 0031-9007 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 492 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : exotic resonance * diffractive dissociation * pion * lead target Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 7.621, year: 2010

  7. 849 RESONANCE | September 2013

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    849. RESONANCE | September 2013. Page 2. 850. RESONANCE | September 2013. Page 3. 851. RESONANCE | September 2013. Page 4. 852. RESONANCE | September 2013. Page 5. 853. RESONANCE | September 2013. Page 6. 854. RESONANCE | September 2013. Page 7. 855. RESONANCE | September 2013.

  8. Competitive adsorption of strontium and fulvic acid at the muscovite-solution interface observed with resonant anomalous X-ray reflectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Soo; Park, Changyong; Fenter, Paul; Sturchio, Neil C.; Nagy, Kathryn L.

    2010-03-01

    Molecular-scale distributions of Sr 2+ and fulvic acid (FA) adsorbed on the muscovite (0 0 1) surface were investigated using in situ specular X-ray reflectivity (XR) and resonant anomalous X-ray reflectivity (RAXR). The total amount of Sr 2+ adsorbed from a 1 × 10 -2 mol/kg SrCl 2 and 100 mg/kg Elliott Soil Fulvic Acid II (ESFA II) solution at pH 5.5 compensated 81 ± 5% of the muscovite surface charge, less than previously measured (118 ± 5%) in an ESFA II-free solution with the same Sr concentration and pH. Inner-sphere (IS) and outer-sphere (OS) Sr 2+ constituted 87% of the total adsorbed species in IS:OS proportions of 19:81 compared to 42:58 in the solution without FA, suggesting that adsorbed FA competes with the IS Sr 2+ for surface sites. The coverage of both IS and OS Sr 2+ decreased even more in a pH 3.5 solution containing the same concentration of FA and 0.5 × 10 -2 mol/kg Sr(NO 3) 2, whereas a significant amount of Sr 2+ accumulated farther from the surface in the FA layer. The amount of Sr 2+ incorporated in the ˜10 Å thick FA layer decreased by 79% with decreasing FA concentration (100 → 1 mg/kg) and increasing Sr 2+ concentration (0.5 × 10 -2 → 1 × 10 -2 mol/kg) and pH (3.5 → 3.6). These results indicate not only that adsorbed FA molecules (and perhaps also H 3O +) displace Sr 2+ near the muscovite surface, but also that the sorbed FA film provides binding sites for additional Sr 2+ away from the surface. When a muscovite crystal pre-coated with FA after reaction in a 100 mg/kg ESFA II solution for 50 h was subsequently reacted with a 0.5 × 10 -2 mol/kg Sr(NO 3) 2 and 100 mg/kg ESFA II solution at pH 3.7, a significant fraction of Sr 2+ was distributed in the outer part of the FA film similar to that observed on fresh muscovite reacted at pH 3.5 with a pre-mixed Sr-FA solution at the same concentrations. However, this Sr 2+ sorbed in the pre-adsorbed organic film was more widely distributed and had a lower coverage, suggesting that

  9. Doubly resonant multiphoton ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crance, M.

    1978-01-01

    A particular case of doubly resonant multiphoton ionization is theoretically investigated. More precisely, two levels quasi-resonant with two successive harmonics of the field frequency are considered. The method used is based on the effective operator formalism first introduced for this problem by Armstrong, Beers and Feneuille. The main result is to show the possibility of observing large interference effects on the width of the resonances. Moreover this treatment allows us to make more precise the connection between effective operator formalism and standard perturbation theory

  10. Snake resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tepikian, S.

    1988-01-01

    Siberian Snakes provide a practical means of obtaining polarized proton beams in large accelerators. The effect of snakes can be understood by studying the dynamics of spin precession in an accelerator with snakes and a single spin resonance. This leads to a new class of energy independent spin depolarizing resonances, called snake resonances. In designing a large accelerator with snakes to preserve the spin polarization, there is an added constraint on the choice of the vertical betatron tune due to the snake resonances. 11 refs., 4 figs

  11. Long-range protein electron transfer observed at the single-molecule level: In situ mapping of redox-gated tunneling resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Qijin; Farver, O; Ulstrup, Jens

    2005-01-01

    A biomimetic long-range electron transfer (ET) system consisting of the blue copper protein azurin, a tunneling barrier bridge, and a gold single-crystal electrode was designed on the basis of molecular wiring self-assembly principles. This system is sufficiently stable and sensitive in a quasi...... on the redox potential. Maximum resonance appears around the equilibrium redox potential of azurin with an on/off current ratio of approximate to 9. Simulation analyses, based on a two-step interfacial ET model for the scanning tunneling microscopy redox process, were performed and provide quantitative...

  12. Size Dependence of Magnetic Properties of Nanoscale CoFeB-MgO Magnetic Tunnel Junctions with Perpendicular Magnetic Easy Axis Observed by Ferromagnetic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizunuma, Kotaro; Yamanouchi, Michihiko; Sato, Hideo; Ikeda, Shoji; Kanai, Shun; Matsukura, Fumihiro; Ohno, Hideo

    2013-06-01

    The junction diameter D dependence of effective magnetic fields in a recording layer of CoFeB-MgO magnetic tunnel junctions with perpendicular magnetic easy axis is evaluated by ferromagnetic resonance measurements using the homodyne detection technique. The effective perpendicular magnetic field increases with decreasing D, which reflects mainly the reduction of the demagnetizing factor normal to the film plane. The stray field from a reference layer also increases with reducing D, which is in agreement with the D dependence of the shift field of the center of minor resistance versus perpendicular magnetic field curves with respect to zero magnetic field.

  13. Observation of Thermoelectric Voltages from the Two-Dimensional Electron Gas of a HgTe Quantum Well Due to Resonant THz Laser Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakmehr, Mehdi; McCombe, B. D.; Bruene, C.; Buhmann, H.; Molenkamp, L. W.

    2015-10-01

    HgTe quantum wells (QWs) have shown a number of interesting phenomena, recently the first two-dimensional topological insulating state. We have studied thermoelectric photovoltages of two-dimensional electrons in a 6.1 nm wide HgTe QW induced by cyclotron resonance absorption ( B = 2 to 5 T) of a THz laser beam. We have estimated thermopower coefficients by detailed analysis of the photovoltage signals developed across various contacts of a large Hall bar structure at a bath temperature of 1.6 K. The photovoltage signals are washed out at bath temperature of 18 K.

  14. Inter- and intra-observer agreement of BI-RADS-based subjective visual estimation of amount of fibroglandular breast tissue with magnetic resonance imaging: comparison to automated quantitative assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wengert, G.J.; Helbich, T.H.; Woitek, R.; Kapetas, P.; Clauser, P.; Baltzer, P.A. [Medical University of Vienna/ Vienna General Hospital, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Division of Molecular and Gender Imaging, Vienna (Austria); Vogl, W.D. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Computational Imaging Research Lab, Wien (Austria); Weber, M. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Division of General and Pediatric Radiology, Wien (Austria); Meyer-Baese, A. [State University of Florida, Department of Scientific Computing in Medicine, Tallahassee, FL (United States); Pinker, Katja [Medical University of Vienna/ Vienna General Hospital, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Division of Molecular and Gender Imaging, Vienna (Austria); State University of Florida, Department of Scientific Computing in Medicine, Tallahassee, FL (United States); Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging and Therapy Services, New York City, NY (United States)

    2016-11-15

    To evaluate the inter-/intra-observer agreement of BI-RADS-based subjective visual estimation of the amount of fibroglandular tissue (FGT) with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and to investigate whether FGT assessment benefits from an automated, observer-independent, quantitative MRI measurement by comparing both approaches. Eighty women with no imaging abnormalities (BI-RADS 1 and 2) were included in this institutional review board (IRB)-approved prospective study. All women underwent un-enhanced breast MRI. Four radiologists independently assessed FGT with MRI by subjective visual estimation according to BI-RADS. Automated observer-independent quantitative measurement of FGT with MRI was performed using a previously described measurement system. Inter-/intra-observer agreements of qualitative and quantitative FGT measurements were assessed using Cohen's kappa (k). Inexperienced readers achieved moderate inter-/intra-observer agreement and experienced readers a substantial inter- and perfect intra-observer agreement for subjective visual estimation of FGT. Practice and experience reduced observer-dependency. Automated observer-independent quantitative measurement of FGT was successfully performed and revealed only fair to moderate agreement (k = 0.209-0.497) with subjective visual estimations of FGT. Subjective visual estimation of FGT with MRI shows moderate intra-/inter-observer agreement, which can be improved by practice and experience. Automated observer-independent quantitative measurements of FGT are necessary to allow a standardized risk evaluation. (orig.)

  15. Photothermal resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method for detecting photo-thermal absorbance of a material utilising a mechanically temperature sensitive resonator (20) and a sample being arrange in thermal communication with the temperature sensitive resonator. The present invention further relates...

  16. Nonlinear resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Rajasekar, Shanmuganathan

    2016-01-01

    This introductory text presents the basic aspects and most important features of various types of resonances and anti-resonances in dynamical systems. In particular, for each resonance, it covers the theoretical concepts, illustrates them with case studies, and reviews the available information on mechanisms, characterization, numerical simulations, experimental realizations, possible quantum analogues, applications and significant advances made over the years. Resonances are one of the most fundamental phenomena exhibited by nonlinear systems and refer to specific realizations of maximum response of a system due to the ability of that system to store and transfer energy received from an external forcing source. Resonances are of particular importance in physical, engineering and biological systems - they can prove to be advantageous in many applications, while leading to instability and even disasters in others. The book is self-contained, providing the details of mathematical derivations and techniques invo...

  17. A new observational approach to investigate the heliospheric interstellar wind interface - The study of extreme and far ultraviolet resonantly scattered solar radiation from neon, oxygen, carbon and nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowyer, Stuart; Fahr, Hans J.

    1990-01-01

    One of the outstanding uncertainties in the understanding of the heliosphere concerns the character of the interaction between the outflowing solar wind and the interstellar medium. A new possibility for obtaining information on this topic is suggested. The cosmically abundant elements neon, oxygen, carbon, and nitrogen will be affected differently at their interface passage depending upon the character of this region. Consequently, the distribution of these atoms and their ions will vary within the inner heliosphere. The study of resonantly scattered solar radiation from these species will then provide information on the nature of the interface. A preliminary evaluation of this approach has been carried out, and the results are encouraging. The relevant lines to be studied are in the extreme and far ulraviolet. The existing data in these bands are reviewed; unfortunately, past instrumentation has had insufficient resolution and sensitivity to provide useful information. The capabilities of future approved missions with capabilities in this area are evaluated.

  18. Inter- and intra-observer agreement of BI-RADS-based subjective visual estimation of amount of fibroglandular breast tissue with magnetic resonance imaging: comparison to automated quantitative assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wengert, G J; Helbich, T H; Woitek, R; Kapetas, P; Clauser, P; Baltzer, P A; Vogl, W-D; Weber, M; Meyer-Baese, A; Pinker, Katja

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the inter-/intra-observer agreement of BI-RADS-based subjective visual estimation of the amount of fibroglandular tissue (FGT) with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and to investigate whether FGT assessment benefits from an automated, observer-independent, quantitative MRI measurement by comparing both approaches. Eighty women with no imaging abnormalities (BI-RADS 1 and 2) were included in this institutional review board (IRB)-approved prospective study. All women underwent un-enhanced breast MRI. Four radiologists independently assessed FGT with MRI by subjective visual estimation according to BI-RADS. Automated observer-independent quantitative measurement of FGT with MRI was performed using a previously described measurement system. Inter-/intra-observer agreements of qualitative and quantitative FGT measurements were assessed using Cohen's kappa (k). Inexperienced readers achieved moderate inter-/intra-observer agreement and experienced readers a substantial inter- and perfect intra-observer agreement for subjective visual estimation of FGT. Practice and experience reduced observer-dependency. Automated observer-independent quantitative measurement of FGT was successfully performed and revealed only fair to moderate agreement (k = 0.209-0.497) with subjective visual estimations of FGT. Subjective visual estimation of FGT with MRI shows moderate intra-/inter-observer agreement, which can be improved by practice and experience. Automated observer-independent quantitative measurements of FGT are necessary to allow a standardized risk evaluation. • Subjective FGT estimation with MRI shows moderate intra-/inter-observer agreement in inexperienced readers. • Inter-observer agreement can be improved by practice and experience. • Automated observer-independent quantitative measurements can provide reliable and standardized assessment of FGT with MRI.

  19. Resonant Frequency Characteristics of a SAW Device Attached to Resonating Micropillars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Paily Palathinkal

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently we reported experimental and simulation results on an increase in resonance frequency of a SAW resonator caused by mass loading of micropillars made of SU-8, attached normal to the surface of the resonator. We concluded that SAW resonator and the SU-8 micropillars in unison form a system of coupled resonators. We have now extended this work and performed a finite element method simulation to study the resonance frequency characteristics of the SAW-based coupled resonator. In this paper we report the effect of the resonance frequency of the micropillars on the resonance frequency of the system of coupled resonators, and observe the coupling of micropillar resonance and the propagating SAW as described in the well known Dybwad system of coupled resonators.

  20. Anomalous Diffusion Near Resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, Tanaji; /Fermilab

    2010-05-01

    Synchro-betatron resonances can lead to emittance growth and the loss of luminosity. We consider the detailed dynamics of a bunch near such a low order resonance driven by crossing angles at the collision points. We characterize the nature of diffusion and find that it is anomalous and sub-diffusive. This affects both the shape of the beam distribution and the time scales for growth. Predictions of a simplified anomalous diffusion model are compared with direct simulations. Transport of particles near resonances is still not a well understood phenomenon. Often, without justification, phase space motion is assumed to be a normal diffusion process although at least one case of anomalous diffusion in beam dynamics has been reported [1]. Here we will focus on the motion near synchro-betatron resonances which can be excited by several means, including beams crossing at an angle at the collision points as in the LHC. We will consider low order resonances which couple the horizontal and longitudinal planes, both for simplicity and to observe large effects over short time scales. While the tunes we consider are not practical for a collider, nonetheless the transport mechanisms we uncover are also likely to operate at higher order resonances.

  1. Growing Region Segmentation Software (GRES) for quantitative magnetic resonance imaging of multiple sclerosis: intra- and inter-observer agreement variability: a comparison with manual contouring method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parodi, Roberto C.; Sardanelli, Francesco; Renzetti, Paolo; Rosso, Elisabetta; Losacco, Caterina; Ferrari, Alessandra; Levrero, Fabrizio; Pilot, Alberto; Inglese, Matilde; Mancardi, Giovanni L.

    2002-01-01

    Lesion area measurement in multiple sclerosis (MS) is one of the key points in evaluating the natural history and in monitoring the efficacy of treatments. This study was performed to check the intra- and inter-observer agreement variability of a locally developed Growing Region Segmentation Software (GRES), comparing them to those obtained using manual contouring (MC). From routine 1.5-T MRI study of clinically definite multiple sclerosis patients, 36 lesions seen on proton-density-weighted images (PDWI) and 36 enhancing lesion on Gd-DTPA-BMA-enhanced T1-weighted images (Gd-T1WI) were randomly chosen and were evaluated by three observers. The mean range of lesion size was 9.9-536.0 mm 2 on PDWI and 3.6-57.2 mm 2 on Gd-T1WI. The median intra- and inter-observer agreement were, respectively, 97.1 and 90.0% using GRES on PDWI, 81.0 and 70.0% using MC on PDWI, 88.8 and 80.0% using GRES on Gd-T1WI, and 85.8 and 70.0% using MC on Gd-T1WI. The intra- and inter-observer agreements were significantly greater for GRES compared with MC (P<0.0001 and P=0.0023, respectively) for PDWI, while no difference was found between GRES an MC for Gd-T1WI. The intra-observer variability for GRES was significantly lower on both PDWI (P=0.0001) and Gd-T1WI (P=0.0067), whereas for MC the same result was found only for PDWI (P=0.0147). These data indicate that GRES reduces both the intra- and the inter-observer variability in assessing the area of MS lesions on PDWI and may prove useful in multicentre studies. (orig.)

  2. Slow order-parameter fluctuations in superconducting Pb and Ag/Nb films observed using β-detected nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morenzoni, E.; Saadaoui, H.; Wang, D.; Horisberger, M.; Kirk, E. C.; MacFarlane, W. A.; Morris, G. D.; Chow, K. H.; Hossain, M. D.; Levy, C. P.; Parolin, T. J.; Pearson, M. R.; Song, Q.; Kiefl, R. F.

    2012-06-01

    We report β-NMR investigations of polarized 8Li implanted in thin Pb and Ag/Nb films. At the critical superconducting temperature, we observe a singular peak in the spin relaxation rate in small longitudinal magnetic fields, which is attributed to unexpected slow fluctuations in the superconducting order parameter. The peak is several orders of magnitude larger than the prediction based on the enhancement of the dynamic electron spin susceptibility by superconducting fluctuations. The observed peak in (1)/(T1) is rapidly suppressed in a small magnetic field, indicating that it is due to remarkably slow diamagnetic fluctuations which are undetectable with conventional NMR.

  3. Intra- and inter-observer reproducibility of global and regional magnetic resonance feature tracking derived strain parameters of the left and right ventricle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Björn, E-mail: bjoernschmidt1989@gmx.de [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Cologne, Kerpener Str. 62, D-50937, Cologne (Germany); Dick, Anastasia, E-mail: anastasia-dick@web.de [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Cologne, Kerpener Str. 62, D-50937, Cologne (Germany); Treutlein, Melanie, E-mail: melanie-treutlein@web.de [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Cologne, Kerpener Str. 62, D-50937, Cologne (Germany); Schiller, Petra, E-mail: petra.schiller@uni-koeln.de [Institute of Medical Statistics, Informatics and Epidemiology, University of Cologne, Kerpener Str. 62, D-50937, Cologne (Germany); Bunck, Alexander C., E-mail: alexander.bunck@uk-koeln.de [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Cologne, Kerpener Str. 62, D-50937, Cologne (Germany); Maintz, David, E-mail: david.maintz@uk-koeln.de [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Cologne, Kerpener Str. 62, D-50937, Cologne (Germany); Baeßler, Bettina, E-mail: bettina.baessler@uk-koeln.de [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Cologne, Kerpener Str. 62, D-50937, Cologne (Germany)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Left and right ventricular CMR feature tracking is highly reproducible. • The only exception is radial strain and strain rate. • Sample size estimations are presented as a practical reference for future studies. - Abstract: Objectives: To investigate the reproducibility of regional and global strain and strain rate (SR) parameters of both ventricles and to determine sample sizes for all investigated strain and SR parameters in order to generate a practical reference for future studies. Materials and methods: The study population consisted of 20 healthy individuals and 20 patients with acute myocarditis. Cine sequences in three horizontal long axis views and a stack of short axis views covering the entire left and right ventricle (LV, RV) were retrospectively analysed using a dedicated feature tracking (FT) software algorithm (TOMTEC). For intra-observer analysis, one observer analysed CMR images of all patients and volunteers twice. For inter-observer analysis, three additional blinded observers analysed the same datasets once. Intra- and inter-observer reproducibility were tested in all patients and controls using Bland-Altman analyses, intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) and coefficients of variation. Results: Intra-observer reproducibility of global LV strain and SR parameters was excellent (range of ICCs: 0.81–1.00), the only exception being global radial SR with a poor reproducibility (ICC 0.23). On a regional level, basal and midventricular strain and SR parameters were more reproducible when compared to apical parameters. Inter-observer reproducibility of all LV parameters was slightly lower than intra-observer reproducibility, yet still good to excellent for all global and regional longitudinal and circumferential strain and SR parameters (range of ICCs: 0.66–0.93). Similar to the LV, all global RV longitudinal and circumferential strain and SR parameters showed an excellent reproducibility, (range of ICCs: 0.75–0

  4. Intra- and inter-observer reproducibility of global and regional magnetic resonance feature tracking derived strain parameters of the left and right ventricle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, Björn; Dick, Anastasia; Treutlein, Melanie; Schiller, Petra; Bunck, Alexander C.; Maintz, David; Baeßler, Bettina

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Left and right ventricular CMR feature tracking is highly reproducible. • The only exception is radial strain and strain rate. • Sample size estimations are presented as a practical reference for future studies. - Abstract: Objectives: To investigate the reproducibility of regional and global strain and strain rate (SR) parameters of both ventricles and to determine sample sizes for all investigated strain and SR parameters in order to generate a practical reference for future studies. Materials and methods: The study population consisted of 20 healthy individuals and 20 patients with acute myocarditis. Cine sequences in three horizontal long axis views and a stack of short axis views covering the entire left and right ventricle (LV, RV) were retrospectively analysed using a dedicated feature tracking (FT) software algorithm (TOMTEC). For intra-observer analysis, one observer analysed CMR images of all patients and volunteers twice. For inter-observer analysis, three additional blinded observers analysed the same datasets once. Intra- and inter-observer reproducibility were tested in all patients and controls using Bland-Altman analyses, intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) and coefficients of variation. Results: Intra-observer reproducibility of global LV strain and SR parameters was excellent (range of ICCs: 0.81–1.00), the only exception being global radial SR with a poor reproducibility (ICC 0.23). On a regional level, basal and midventricular strain and SR parameters were more reproducible when compared to apical parameters. Inter-observer reproducibility of all LV parameters was slightly lower than intra-observer reproducibility, yet still good to excellent for all global and regional longitudinal and circumferential strain and SR parameters (range of ICCs: 0.66–0.93). Similar to the LV, all global RV longitudinal and circumferential strain and SR parameters showed an excellent reproducibility, (range of ICCs: 0.75–0

  5. Monopole resonances and Jastrow correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehesa, J.S.; Guardiola, R. (Granada Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Nuclear); Polls, A.; Ros, J. (Granada Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Teorica)

    1982-12-02

    The effect of short range correlations on isoscalar monopole resonances in /sup 4/He, /sup 16/O and /sup 40/Ca is analyzed by using a correlated generator coordinate method. We observe an important increase of the excitation energies of the first resonances with respect to the calculation without src, but small effects on the saturation of the EWSR.

  6. Orbital resonances around black holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brink, Jeandrew; Geyer, Marisa; Hinderer, Tanja

    2015-02-27

    We compute the length and time scales associated with resonant orbits around Kerr black holes for all orbital and spin parameters. Resonance-induced effects are potentially observable when the Event Horizon Telescope resolves the inner structure of Sgr A*, when space-based gravitational wave detectors record phase shifts in the waveform during the resonant passage of a compact object spiraling into the black hole, or in the frequencies of quasiperiodic oscillations for accreting black holes. The onset of geodesic chaos for non-Kerr spacetimes should occur at the resonance locations quantified here.

  7. Advances in magnetic resonance 6

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 6 focuses on the theoretical and practical aspects of applying magnetic resonance methods to various problems in physical chemistry, emphasizing the different aspects of the exegesis of these problems. This book discusses the gas phase magnetic resonance of electronically excited molecules; techniques for observing excited electronic states; NMR studies in liquids at high pressure; and effect of pressure on self-diffusion in liquids. The nuclear magnetic resonance investigations of organic free radicals; measurement of proton coupling constants by NMR; an

  8. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nuclear magnetic resonance in condensed matter was discov- ered simultaneously by Edward Purcell at Harvard and Felix. Bloch at Stanford in 1946 using different instrumentation and techniques. Both groups observed the response of magnetic nuclei, placed in a uniform magnetic field, to a continuous radio frequency ...

  9. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    The method- ology went through vigorous growth and development during this time, laying the theoretical basis for understanding a wide array of applications. The stage was set for ... nance (NMR) is the experimental observation of the resonant absorption of ..... siveness, ranging from qualitative to quantitative. More signifi-.

  10. Neuroaesthetic Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Anthony Lewis

    2013-01-01

    tailored channeling of sensory stimulus aligned as ‘art-making’ and ‘game playing’ core experiences. Thus, affecting brain plasticity and human motoric-performance via the adaptability (plasticity) of digital medias result in closure of the human afferent-efferent neural feedback loop closure through...... the unencumbered motion-to-computer-generated activities - ‘Music Making’, ‘Painting’, ‘Robotic’ and ‘Video Game’ control. A focus of this position paper is to highlight how Aesthetic Resonance, in this context, relates to the growing body of research on Neuroaesthetics to evolve Neuroaesthetic Resonance....

  11. Hadronic Resonances from STAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wada Masayuki

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The results of resonance particle productions (ρ0, ω, K*, ϕ, Σ*, and Λ* measured by the STAR collaboration at RHIC from various colliding systems and energies are presented. Measured mass, width, 〈pT〉, and yield of those resonances are reviewed. No significant mass shifts or width broadening beyond the experiment uncertainties are observed. New measurements of ϕ and ω from leptonic decay channels are presented. The yields from leptonic decay channels are compared with the measurements from hadronic decay channels and the two results are consistent with each other.

  12. First Observation of Charmed Resonances in the $\\Lambda^0_b \\to \\Lambda^+_c \\pi^- \\pi^+ \\pi^-$ Inclusive Decay and Measurement of Their Relative Branching Ratios at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barria, Patrizia [Univ. of Siena (Italy)

    2012-01-01

    We present the observation of the $\\Lambda^0_b$ decay into a $\\Lambda^+_c \\pi^- \\pi^+ \\pi^-$ final state, in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 1:96 TeV. The data analyzed were collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider, and correspond to 2:4 $fb^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity. We fit the invariant mass distribution of the reconstructed candidates to extract a signal yield of 848 $\\pm$ 93 $\\Lambda^0_b$ into $\\Lambda^+_c \\pi^- \\pi^+ \\pi^-$....

  13. 817 RESONANCE September 2013

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    817. RESONANCE ⎜ September 2013. Page 2. 818. RESONANCE ⎜ September 2013. Page 3. 819. RESONANCE ⎜ September 2013. Page 4. 820. RESONANCE ⎜ September 2013. Page 5. 821. RESONANCE ⎜ September 2013. Page 6. 822. RESONANCE ⎜ September 2013. Page 7. 823. RESONANCE ⎜ September ...

  14. 996 RESONANCE November 2013

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    996. RESONANCE. November 2013. Page 2. 997. RESONANCE. November 2013. Page 3. 998. RESONANCE. November 2013. Page 4. 999. RESONANCE. November 2013. Page 5. 1000. RESONANCE. November 2013. Page 6. 1001. RESONANCE. November 2013. Page 7. 1002. RESONANCE. November 2013 ...

  15. 369 RESONANCE April 2016

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    369. RESONANCE ⎜ April 2016. Page 2. 370. RESONANCE ⎜ April 2016. Page 3. 371. RESONANCE ⎜ April 2016. Page 4. 372. RESONANCE ⎜ April 2016. Page 5. 373. RESONANCE ⎜ April 2016. Page 6. 374. RESONANCE ⎜ April 2016. Page 7. 375. RESONANCE ⎜ April 2016.

  16. Resonating Statements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjelholt, Morten; Jensen, Tina Blegind

    2015-01-01

    IT projects are often complex arrangements of technological components, social actions, and organizational transformation that are difficult to manage in practice. This paper takes an analytical discourse perspective to explore the process of legitimizing IT projects. We introduce the concept of ...... as part of a feedback loop to re-attach the localized IT project to the broader national discourse. The paper concludes with reflections on how to actively build on resonating statements as a strategic resource for legitimizing IT projects...... of resonating statements to highlight how central actors navigate in various discourses over time. Particularly, the statements and actions of an IT project manager are portrayed to show how individuals can legitimize actions by connecting statements to historically produced discourses. The case study...... of an IT project in a Danish local government spans a two-year time period and demonstrates a double-loop legitimization process. First, resonating statements are produced to localize a national IT initiative to support the specificity of a local government discourse. Second, the resonating statements are used...

  17. Higgs-photon resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobrescu, Bogdan A.; Fox, Patrick J.; Kearney, John [Fermilab, Theoretical Physics Department, Batavia, IL (United States)

    2017-10-15

    We study models that produce a Higgs boson plus photon (h{sup 0}γ) resonance at the LHC. When the resonance is a Z{sup '} boson, decays to h{sup 0}γ occur at one loop. If the Z{sup '} boson couples at tree level to quarks, then the h{sup 0}γ branching fraction is typically of order 10{sup -5} or smaller. Nevertheless, there are models that would allow the observation of Z{sup '} → h{sup 0}γ at √(s) = 13 TeV with a cross section times branching fraction larger than 1 fb for a Z{sup '} mass in the 200-450 GeV range, and larger than 0.1 fb for a mass up to 800 GeV. The one-loop decay of the Z{sup '} into lepton pairs competes with h{sup 0}γ, even if the Z{sup '} couplings to leptons vanish at tree level. We also present a model in which a Z{sup '} boson decays into a Higgs boson and a pair of collimated photons, mimicking an h{sup 0}γ resonance. In this model, the h{sup 0}γ resonance search would be the discovery mode for a Z{sup '} as heavy as 2 TeV. When the resonance is a scalar, although decay to h{sup 0}γ is forbidden by angular momentum conservation, the h{sup 0} plus collimated photons channel is allowed. We comment on prospects of observing an h{sup 0}γ resonance through different Higgs decays, on constraints from related searches, and on models where h{sup 0} is replaced by a nonstandard Higgs boson. (orig.)

  18. Resonant behavior of dielectric objects (electrostatic resonances).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredkin, D R; Mayergoyz, I D

    2003-12-19

    Resonant behavior of dielectric objects occurs at certain frequencies for which the object permittivity is negative and the free-space wavelength is large in comparison with the object dimensions. Unique physical features of these resonances are studied and a novel technique for the calculation of resonance values of permittivity, and hence resonance frequencies, is proposed. Scale invariance of resonance frequencies, unusually strong orthogonality properties of resonance modes, and a two-dimensional phenomenon of "twin" spectra are reported. The paper concludes with brief discussions of optical controllability of these resonances in semiconductor nanoparticles and a plausible, electrostatic resonance based, mechanism for nucleation and formation of ball lightning.

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of TMJ. Inter-observer influence on diagnosis or therapy and difference of interpretation regarding abnormal signs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iinuma, Hideto; Minowa, Kazuyuki; Kobayashi, Ichizou; Matsuda, Akemi; Kaneko, Masayuki

    2006-01-01

    between disk and condyle; 3 TMJs, with respect to the features of the bilaminar zone and the behavior of the bilaminar zone during jaw opening; 3 TMJs, jouint effusions; 4, intracapsular tissue damages; 6 TMJs. The unexpected pathogens not related TMD; 8 TMJs. MRI has a measurable impact on the therapeutic approach to patients with TMD. Radiological findings of MRI influences an examination and the cure of the TMD patient. It is necessary for TMD patients to decide conditions of MRI by the object of MRI and the present symptoms. The almost position of the disk and condyle can be reproducibly judged, while the signal intensity of the disk and bilaminar zone and the bone changes are subject to wide observer variations. (author)

  20. Neuroaesthetic Resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Brooks, Anthony Lewis

    2013-01-01

    Neuroaesthetic Resonance emerged from a mature body of patient- centered gesture-control research investigating non-formal rehabilitation via ICT-enhanced-Art to question ‘Aesthetic Resonance’. Motivating participation, ludic engagement, and augmenting physical motion in non-formal (fun) treatment sessions are achieved via adaptive action-analyzed activities. These interactive virtual environments are designed to empower patients’ creative and/or playful expressions via digital feedback stimu...

  1. Amplitude saturation of MEMS resonators explained by autoparametric resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Avoort, C; Bontemps, J J M; Steeneken, P G; Le Phan, K; Van Beek, J T M; Van der Hout, R; Hulshof, J; Fey, R H B

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a phenomenon that limits the power handling of MEMS resonators. It is observed that above a certain driving level, the resonance amplitude becomes independent of the driving level. In contrast to previous studies of power handling of MEMS resonators, it is found that this amplitude saturation cannot be explained by nonlinear terms in the spring constant or electrostatic force. Instead we show that the amplitude in our experiments is limited by nonlinear terms in the equation of motion which couple the in-plane length-extensional resonance mode to one or more out-of-plane (OOP) bending modes. We present experimental evidence for the autoparametric excitation of these OOP modes using a vibrometer. The measurements are compared to a model that can be used to predict a power-handling limit for MEMS resonators

  2. Review on resonance cone fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuma, Toshiro.

    1980-02-01

    Resonance cone fields and lower hybrid heating are reviewed in this report. The resonance cone fields were reported by Fisher and Gould, and they proposed the use of the measurement of resonance cones and structure as a diagnostic tool to determine the plasma density and electron temperature in magnetoplasma. After the resonance cone, a wave-like disturbance persists. Ohnuma et al. have measured bending, reflection and ducting of resonance cones in detail. The thermal modes in inhomogeneous magnetoplasma were seen. The reflection of thermal mode near an electron plasma frequency layer and an insulating plate has been observed. The non-linear effects of resonance cones is reported. Monochromatic electron beam produces the noise of broad band whistler mode. Lower hybrid waves have been the subject of propagation from the edge of plasma to the lower hybrid layer. Linear lower hybrid waves were studied. The lower hybrid and ion acoustic waves radiated from a point source were observed. The parametric decay of finite-extent, cold electron plasma waves was studied. The lower hybrid cone radiated from a point source going along magnetic field lines was observed. Several experimental data on the lower hybrid heating in tokamak devices have been reported. The theories on resonance cones and lower hybrid waves are introduced in this report. (Kato, T.)

  3. 1004 RESONANCE November 2013

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    1004. RESONANCE │ November 2013. Page 2. 1005. RESONANCE │ November 2013. Page 3. 1006. RESONANCE │ November 2013. Page 4. 1007. RESONANCE │ November 2013. Page 5. 1008. RESONANCE │ November 2013. Page 6. 1009. RESONANCE │ November 2013. Page 7. 1010. RESONANCE ...

  4. Even order snake resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.Y.

    1993-01-01

    We found that the perturbed spin tune due to the imperfection resonance plays an important role in beam depolarization at snake resonances. We also found that even order snake resonances exist in the overlapping intrinsic and imperfection resonances. Due to the perturbed spin tune shift of imperfection resonances, each snake resonance splits into two

  5. Direct observation of an isopolyhalomethane O-H insertion reaction with water: Picosecond time-resolved resonance Raman (ps-TR3) study of the isobromoform reaction with water to produce a CHBr2OH product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwok, W.M.; Zhao Cunyuan; Li Yunliang; Guan Xiangguo; Phillips, David Lee

    2004-01-01

    Picosecond time-resolved resonance Raman (ps-TR 3 ) spectroscopy was used to obtain the first definitive spectroscopic observation of an isopolyhalomethane O-H insertion reaction with water. The ps-TR 3 spectra show that isobromoform is produced within several picoseconds after photolysis of CHBr 3 and then reacts on the hundreds of picosecond time scale with water to produce a CHBr 2 OH reaction product. Photolysis of low concentrations of bromoform in aqueous solution resulted in noticeable formation of HBr strong acid. Ab initio calculations show that isobromoform can react with water to produce a CHBr 2 (OH) O-H insertion reaction product and a HBr leaving group. This is consistent with both the ps-TR 3 experiments that observe the reaction of isobromoform with water to form a CHBr 2 (OH) product and photolysis experiments that show HBr acid formation. We briefly discuss the implications of these results for the phase dependent behavior of polyhalomethane photochemistry in the gas phase versus water solvated environments

  6. Zeroth-order resonance phenomenon in an acoustic composite right/left-handed metamaterial resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Wan-Gu; Kang, Hwi Suk; Yoon, Suk Wang; Lee, Kang Il

    2017-10-01

    This study proposes an acoustic theory that describes the resonance phenomena in a resonator made of acoustic composite right/left-handed (CRLH) metamaterials, and verifies it through numerical simulation. The established theory for a microwave CRLH metamaterial resonator is adapted to explain the resonance phenomena in an acoustic CRLH metamaterial resonator. In particular, attention is focused on the zeroth-order resonance phenomenon which has several interesting properties. When a resonator is composed of a CRLH metamaterial, a resonance with a flat acoustic field distribution may occur at one of the frequencies where the wavenumber becomes zero. This resonance is called zeroth-order resonance. Through numerical simulation, such unusual resonance phenomenon in acoustics is observed in more detail and the proposed theory is verified. The results of the theory and the numerical simulation clearly show that zeroth-order resonance can exist at those frequencies where the acoustic field distribution is flat due to infinite wavelength. It is also shown that the resonance frequency and the Q factor of this resonance depend on the boundary condition at both ends of the resonator, and they basically do not change even when the number of units is reduced or increased.

  7. Ringing phenomenon of the fiber ring resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Diqing; Ma, Huilian; Jin, Zhonghe

    2007-08-01

    A resonator fiber-optic gyro (R-FOG) is a high-accuracy inertial rotation sensor based on the Sagnac effect. A fiber ring resonator is the core sensing element in the R-FOG. When the frequency of the fiber ring resonator input laser is swept linearly with time, ringing of the output resonance curve is observed. The output field of the fiber ring resonator is derived from the superposition of the light transmitted through the directional coupler directly and the multiple light components circulated in the fiber ring resonator when the frequency of the laser is swept. The amplitude and phase of the output field are analyzed, and it is found that the difference in time for different light components in the fiber ring resonator to reach a point of destructive interference causes the ringing phenomenon. Finally the ringing phenomenon is observed in experiments, and the experimental results agree with the theoretical analysis well.

  8. Observation of the nd 1Delta(g) (n = 6, 7, and 8) Rydberg states of Na2 by optical-optical double resonance spectroscopy: L uncoupling and perturbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, Chanchal; Chang, Ray-Yuan; Tsai, Chin-Chun; Cheng, Chuen-Ping; Whang, Thou-Jen

    2008-07-14

    The nd (1)Delta(g) (n = 6, 7, and 8) Rydberg states of Na(2) correlating with the asymptotic limits of Na(3s) + Na(nd) have been observed using high-resolution cw optical-optical double resonance spectroscopy corresponding to the rovibrational transitions X (1)Sigma(g)(+)(v("),J(")) + h nu(pump) --> B (1)Pi(u)(v('),J(')) + h nu(probe) --> nd (1)Delta(g)(v,J). Totals of 104, 83, and 45 identified rovibrational e/f-parity levels in the ranges of v = 0-11, 11 observed quantum levels, molecular constants were determined from the Dunham fits of the e-parity levels and the Rydberg-Klein-Rees potential curves were constructed for the nd (1)Delta(g)(n = 6-8) states. The characteristics of the estimated Lambda-doubling splitting constants (q(0), q(v), and mu) with n(= 5-8) of the nd (1)Delta(g) series have been explored. Detailed investigations reveal that the nd (1)Delta(g)(n = 6-8) states involve L uncoupling from the internuclear axis and each of these states is affected by an asymmetric perturbation caused by the up and down adjacent states. The rotational-branch intensity and position anomalies in the observed spectra of the nd (1)Delta(g) series (n = 5-8) of Na(2) lead to the conclusion that due to the effects of the L-uncoupling perturbations, the same l complexes approaching the same ion-core limits result in the same l-mixing processes which lead to the formation of the supercomplexes due to the anisotropy of the molecular-ion [Na(2)(+)(3s)] field. This would open up opportunities to study the effects of L uncoupling and perturbations in the nd series and high Rydberg states of other alkali dimers.

  9. Applied neutron resonance theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froehner, F.H.

    1978-07-01

    Utilisation of resonance theory in basic and applications-oriented neutron cross section work is reviewed. The technically important resonance formalisms, principal concepts and methods as well as representative computer programs for resonance parameter extraction from measured data, evaluation of resonance data, calculation of Doppler-broadened cross sections and estimation of level-statistical quantities from resonance parameters are described. (orig.) [de

  10. Nanowire resonant tunneling diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björk, M. T.; Ohlsson, B. J.; Thelander, C.; Persson, A. I.; Deppert, K.; Wallenberg, L. R.; Samuelson, L.

    2002-12-01

    Semiconductor heterostructures and their implementation into electronic and photonic devices have had tremendous impact on science and technology. In the development of quantum nanoelectronics, one-dimensional (1D) heterostructure devices are receiving a lot of interest. We report here functional 1D resonant tunneling diodes obtained via bottom-up assembly of designed segments of different semiconductor materials in III/V nanowires. The emitter, collector, and the central quantum dot are made from InAs and the barrier material from InP. Ideal resonant tunneling behavior, with peak-to-valley ratios of up to 50:1 and current densities of 1 nA/μm2 was observed at low temperatures.

  11. Observation of cyclotron resonance and electron-phonon coupling in surface states of the bulk-insulating topological insulator Cu0.02Bi2Se3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Liang [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). The Inst. of Quantum Matter; Tse, Wang-Kong [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Morris, C. M. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). The Inst. of Quantum Matter; Brahlek, M. [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Koirala, N. [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Oh, S. [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Armitage, N. P. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). The Inst. of Quantum Matter

    2015-02-05

    We have utilized magneto-optical time-domain spectroscopy to investigate the low frequency optical response of topological insulator Cu0.02Bi2Se3 and Bi2Se3 films. With both field and frequency depedence, such experiments give sufficient information to measure the mobility and carrier density of multiple conduction channels simultaneously. We observe sharp cyclotron resonances (CRs) in both samples. The small amount of Cu substitution into the Cu0.02Bi2Se3 induces a true bulk insulator with only a single conduction channel with total sheet carrier density 4.9 x 1012/cm2 and mobility as large as 4000 cm2/V s. This is consistent with pure topological surface state (TSSs) conduction with a chemical potential 150 meV above the Dirac point. Hence, a true topological insulator with an insulating bulk is realized. The CR broadens at high fields, an e ect that we attribute to an electron-phonon interaction. This assignment is supported by an extended Drude model analysis on the zero field data. In contrast to Cu0.02Bi2Se3, two charge channels were observed in normal Bi2Se3 films. We demonstrate a method to distinguish between the dominant TSSs and trivial bulk/2DEG states. The dominant channel exhibits a CR with a carrier density of ~2.0 x 1013/cm2 and mobility ~3200 cm2/V s, consistent with TSSs with a chemical potential ~350meV above the Dirac point.

  12. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a medical imaging procedure for ...

  13. Photon decay of giant multipole resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertrand, F.E.; Beene, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    A brief review of the excitation of giant multipole resonances via Coulomb excitation is given which emphasizes the very large cross sections that can be realized through this reaction for both isoscalar and isovector resonances. Discussion and results where available, are provided for the measurement of the photon decay of one and two phonon giant resonances. It is pointed out throughout the presentation that the use of E1 photons as a tag'' provides a means to observe weakly excited resonances that cannot be observed in the shingles spectra. 26 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Observation of spin alignment of resonances produced in the 3-body reactions : $\\overline{p}$p $\\rightarrow$ $\\overline{p}$p $\\omega^{\\omicron}$ and $\\overline{p}$p $\\rightarrow$ $\\overline{N}^{x++}\\pi^{\\omicron}$ at 5.7 GeV/c

    CERN Document Server

    Alles-Borelli, V; Frisk, A; Michejda, L

    1966-01-01

    Observation of spin alignment of resonances produced in the 3-body reactions : $\\overline{p}$p $\\rightarrow$ $\\overline{p}$p $\\omega^{\\omicron}$ and $\\overline{p}$p $\\rightarrow$ $\\overline{N}^{x++}\\pi^{\\omicron}$ at 5.7 GeV/c

  15. Resonance suppression from color reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acconcia, R.; Chinellato, D. D.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Takahashi, J.; Torrieri, G.; Markert, C.

    2018-02-01

    We present studies that show how multi-parton interaction and color reconnection affect the hadro-chemistry in proton-proton (pp) collisions with special focus on the production of resonances using the pythia8 event generator. We find that color reconnection suppresses the relative production of meson resonances such as ρ0 and K* , providing an alternative explanation for the K*/K decrease observed in proton-proton collisions as a function of multiplicity by the ALICE collaboration. Detailed studies of the underlying mechanism causing meson resonance suppression indicate that color reconnection leads to shorter, less energetic strings whose fragmentation is less likely to produce more massive hadrons for a given quark content, therefore reducing ratios such as K*/K and ρ0/π in high-multiplicity pp collisions. In addition, we have also studied the effects of allowing string junctions to form and found that these may also contribute to resonance suppression.

  16. Regenerative feedback resonant circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. Mark; Kelly, James F.; McCloy, John S.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2014-09-02

    A regenerative feedback resonant circuit for measuring a transient response in a loop is disclosed. The circuit includes an amplifier for generating a signal in the loop. The circuit further includes a resonator having a resonant cavity and a material located within the cavity. The signal sent into the resonator produces a resonant frequency. A variation of the resonant frequency due to perturbations in electromagnetic properties of the material is measured.

  17. TU-H-CAMPUS-JeP2-01: Inter-Observer Delineation Comparison of Visible Glandular Breast Tissue On Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Computed Tomography (prone and Supine)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pogson, EM [Institute of Medical Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia); University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW (Australia); Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, Liverpool, NSW (United Kingdom); Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool Hospital, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Delaney, G; Yap, M [Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, Liverpool, NSW (United Kingdom); Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool Hospital, Sydney, NSW (Australia); South Western Sydney Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia); School of Medicine, University of Western Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Ahern, V [Westmead Hospital, Westmead, NSW (Australia); Boxer, M [Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, Liverpool, NSW (United Kingdom); Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool Hospital, Sydney, NSW (Australia); David, S [Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute,, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Dimigen, M [Department of Radiology, Liverpool Hospital, NSW (United Kingdom); Harvey, J [University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD (Australia); Princess Alexandra Hospital, QLD (Australia); Koh, E; Batumalai, V [Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, Liverpool, NSW (United Kingdom); Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool Hospital, Sydney, NSW (Australia); South Western Sydney Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Lim, K; Papadatos, G [Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, Liverpool, NSW (United Kingdom); Metcalfe, P [University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW (Australia); Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, Liverpool, NSW (United Kingdom); Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool Hospital, Sydney, NSW (Australia); and others

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Breast cancers predominantly arise from Glandular Breast Tissue (GBT). If the GBT can be treated effectively post-operatively utilising radiotherapy this may be adequate volumetric coverage for adjuvant breast radiotherapy. Adequate imaging of the GBT is necessary and will be assessed between MRI and CT modalities. GBT visualisation is acknowledged to be qualitatively superior on Magnetic Resonance Image (MRI) compared to Computed Tomography (CT), the current radiotherapy imaging standard, however this has not been quantitatively assessed. For radiotherapy purposes it is important that any treatment volume can be consistently defined between observers. This study investigates the consistency of CT and MRI GBT contours for potential radiotherapy planning. Methods: Ten experts (9 breast radiation oncologists and 1 radiologist) contoured the extent of the visible GBT for 33 patients on MRI and CT (both without contrast), which was performed according to a contouring guideline in supine and prone patient positions. The GBT volume was not a conventional whole breast radiotherapy planning volume, but rather the extent of GBT that was indicated from the CT or MR imaging. Volumes were compared utilizing the dice similarity coefficient (DSC), kappa statistic, and Hausdorff Distances (HDs) to ascertain the modality that was most consistently volumed. Results: The inter-observer concordance was of substantial agreement (kappa above 0.6) for the CT supine, CT prone, MRI supine and MRI prone datasets. The MRI GBT volumes were larger than the CT GBT volumes (p<0.001). Inter-observer conformity was higher for CT than MRI, although the magnitude of this difference was small (VOI<0.04). Conformity between modalities (CT and MRI) was in agreement for both prone and supine, DSC=0.75. Prone GBT volumes were larger than supine for both MRI and CT. Conclusion: MRI improves the extent of GBT delineation. The role of MRI guided, GBT-targeted radiotherapy requires investigation in

  18. TU-H-CAMPUS-JeP2-01: Inter-Observer Delineation Comparison of Visible Glandular Breast Tissue On Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Computed Tomography (prone and Supine)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pogson, EM; Delaney, G; Yap, M; Ahern, V; Boxer, M; David, S; Dimigen, M; Harvey, J; Koh, E; Batumalai, V; Lim, K; Papadatos, G; Metcalfe, P

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Breast cancers predominantly arise from Glandular Breast Tissue (GBT). If the GBT can be treated effectively post-operatively utilising radiotherapy this may be adequate volumetric coverage for adjuvant breast radiotherapy. Adequate imaging of the GBT is necessary and will be assessed between MRI and CT modalities. GBT visualisation is acknowledged to be qualitatively superior on Magnetic Resonance Image (MRI) compared to Computed Tomography (CT), the current radiotherapy imaging standard, however this has not been quantitatively assessed. For radiotherapy purposes it is important that any treatment volume can be consistently defined between observers. This study investigates the consistency of CT and MRI GBT contours for potential radiotherapy planning. Methods: Ten experts (9 breast radiation oncologists and 1 radiologist) contoured the extent of the visible GBT for 33 patients on MRI and CT (both without contrast), which was performed according to a contouring guideline in supine and prone patient positions. The GBT volume was not a conventional whole breast radiotherapy planning volume, but rather the extent of GBT that was indicated from the CT or MR imaging. Volumes were compared utilizing the dice similarity coefficient (DSC), kappa statistic, and Hausdorff Distances (HDs) to ascertain the modality that was most consistently volumed. Results: The inter-observer concordance was of substantial agreement (kappa above 0.6) for the CT supine, CT prone, MRI supine and MRI prone datasets. The MRI GBT volumes were larger than the CT GBT volumes (p<0.001). Inter-observer conformity was higher for CT than MRI, although the magnitude of this difference was small (VOI<0.04). Conformity between modalities (CT and MRI) was in agreement for both prone and supine, DSC=0.75. Prone GBT volumes were larger than supine for both MRI and CT. Conclusion: MRI improves the extent of GBT delineation. The role of MRI guided, GBT-targeted radiotherapy requires investigation in

  19. The new classification of elementary particle resonance mass spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gareev, F.A.; Barabanov, M.Yu.; Kazacha, G.S.

    1997-01-01

    Elementary particle resonances have been systematically analyzed from the first principles: the conservation laws of energy-momentum and Ehrenfest adiabatic invariant. As a result, resonance decay product momenta and masses of resonances were established to be quantized. Radial excited states of resonances were revealed. These observations give us a possibility to formulate the strategy of experimental searches for new resonances and to systematize already known ones. (author)

  20. Nonadiabatic electron wavepacket dynamics behind molecular autoionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Takahide; Takatsuka, Kazuo

    2018-01-01

    A theoretical method for real-time dynamics of nonadiabatic reorganization of electronic configurations in molecules is developed, with dual aim that the intramolecular electron dynamics can be probed by means of direct and/or indirect photoionizations and that the physical origins behind photoionization signals attained in the time domain can be identified in terms of the language of time-dependent quantum chemistry. In doing so, we first formulate and implement a new computational scheme for nonadiabatic electron dynamics associated with molecular ionization, which well fits in the general theory of nonadiabatic electron dynamics. In this method, the total nonadiabatic electron wavepackets are propagated in time directly with complex natural orbitals without referring to Hartree-Fock molecular orbitals, and the amount of electron flux from a molecular region leading to ionization is evaluated in terms of the relevant complex natural orbitals. In the second half of this paper, we apply the method to electron dynamics in the elementary processes consisting of the Auger decay to demonstrate the methodological significance. An illustrative example is taken from an Auger decay starting from the 2a1 orbital hole-state of H2O+. The roles of nuclear momentum (kinetic) couplings in electronic-state mixing during the decay process are analyzed in terms of complex natural orbitals, which are schematically represented in the conventional language of molecular symmetry of the Hartree-Fock orbitals.

  1. Fano resonances from gradient-index metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yadong; Li, Sucheng; Hou, Bo; Chen, Huanyang

    2016-01-27

    Fano resonances - resonant scattering features with a characteristic asymmetric profile - have generated much interest, due to their extensive and valuable applications in chemical or biological sensors, new types of optical switches, lasers and nonlinear optics. They have been observed in a wide variety of resonant optical systems, including photonic crystals, metamaterials, metallic gratings and nanostructures. In this work, a waveguide structure is designed by employing gradient-index metamaterials, supporting strong Fano resonances with extremely sharp spectra. As the changes in the transmission spectrum originate from the interaction of guided modes from different channels, instead of resonance structures or metamolecules, the Fano resonances can be observed for both transverse electric and transverse magnetic polarizations. These findings are verified by fine agreement with analytical calculations and experimental results at microwave, as well as simulated results at near infrared frequencies.

  2. Stochastic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wellens, Thomas; Shatokhin, Vyacheslav; Buchleitner, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    We are taught by conventional wisdom that the transmission and detection of signals is hindered by noise. However, during the last two decades, the paradigm of stochastic resonance (SR) proved this assertion wrong: indeed, addition of the appropriate amount of noise can boost a signal and hence facilitate its detection in a noisy environment. Due to its simplicity and robustness, SR has been implemented by mother nature on almost every scale, thus attracting interdisciplinary interest from physicists, geologists, engineers, biologists and medical doctors, who nowadays use it as an instrument for their specific purposes. At the present time, there exist a lot of diversified models of SR. Taking into account the progress achieved in both theoretical understanding and practical application of this phenomenon, we put the focus of the present review not on discussing in depth technical details of different models and approaches but rather on presenting a general and clear physical picture of SR on a pedagogical level. Particular emphasis will be given to the implementation of SR in generic quantum systems-an issue that has received limited attention in earlier review papers on the topic. The major part of our presentation relies on the two-state model of SR (or on simple variants thereof), which is general enough to exhibit the main features of SR and, in fact, covers many (if not most) of the examples of SR published so far. In order to highlight the diversity of the two-state model, we shall discuss several examples from such different fields as condensed matter, nonlinear and quantum optics and biophysics. Finally, we also discuss some situations that go beyond the generic SR scenario but are still characterized by a constructive role of noise

  3. Stochastic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellens, Thomas; Shatokhin, Vyacheslav; Buchleitner, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    We are taught by conventional wisdom that the transmission and detection of signals is hindered by noise. However, during the last two decades, the paradigm of stochastic resonance (SR) proved this assertion wrong: indeed, addition of the appropriate amount of noise can boost a signal and hence facilitate its detection in a noisy environment. Due to its simplicity and robustness, SR has been implemented by mother nature on almost every scale, thus attracting interdisciplinary interest from physicists, geologists, engineers, biologists and medical doctors, who nowadays use it as an instrument for their specific purposes. At the present time, there exist a lot of diversified models of SR. Taking into account the progress achieved in both theoretical understanding and practical application of this phenomenon, we put the focus of the present review not on discussing in depth technical details of different models and approaches but rather on presenting a general and clear physical picture of SR on a pedagogical level. Particular emphasis will be given to the implementation of SR in generic quantum systems—an issue that has received limited attention in earlier review papers on the topic. The major part of our presentation relies on the two-state model of SR (or on simple variants thereof), which is general enough to exhibit the main features of SR and, in fact, covers many (if not most) of the examples of SR published so far. In order to highlight the diversity of the two-state model, we shall discuss several examples from such different fields as condensed matter, nonlinear and quantum optics and biophysics. Finally, we also discuss some situations that go beyond the generic SR scenario but are still characterized by a constructive role of noise.

  4. Resonance phenomena in few-body reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micek, S.

    1976-01-01

    In this work resonant states observed in two-body (p,p) reactions are compared. Theoretical analysis gives agreement in the resonant parameters in both types of the reactions for 41 Sc and 59 Cu nuclei. The excitation of states with higher angular momenta in the three-body reactions allows one to use this reaction as an supplementary to the two-body reaction in the investigations of resonant states. (author)

  5. Three-dimensional magnetic resonance observation of cartilage repair tissue (MOCART) score assessed with an isotropic three-dimensional true fast imaging with steady-state precession sequence at 3.0 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsch, Goetz H; Zak, Lukas; Mamisch, Tallal C; Resinger, Christoph; Marlovits, Stefan; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2009-09-01

    Cartilage defects are common pathologies and surgical cartilage repair shows promising results. In its postoperative evaluation, the magnetic resonance observation of cartilage repair tissue (MOCART) score, using different variables to describe the constitution of the cartilage repair tissue and the surrounding structures, is widely used. High-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and 3-dimensional (3D) isotropic sequences may combine ideal preconditions to enhance the diagnostic performance of cartilage imaging.Aim of this study was to introduce an improved 3D MOCART score using the possibilities of an isotropic 3D true fast imaging with steady-state precession (True-FISP) sequence in the postoperative evaluation of patients after matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT) as well as to compare the results to the conventional 2D MOCART score using standard MR sequences. The study had approval by the local ethics commission. One hundred consecutive MR scans in 60 patients at standard follow-up intervals of 1, 3, 6, 12, 24, and 60 months after MACT of the knee joint were prospectively included. The mean follow-up interval of this cross-sectional evaluation was 21.4 +/- 20.6 months; the mean age of the patients was 35.8 +/- 9.4 years. MRI was performed at a 3.0 Tesla unit. All variables of the standard 2D MOCART score where part of the new 3D MOCART score. Furthermore, additional variables and options were included with the aims to use the capabilities of isotropic MRI, to include the results of recent studies, and to adapt to the needs of patients and physician in a clinical routine examination. A proton-density turbo spin-echo sequence, a T2-weighted dual fast spin-echo (dual-FSE) sequence, and a T1-weighted turbo inversion recovery magnitude (TIRM) sequence were used to assess the standard 2D MOCART score; an isotropic 3D-TrueFISP sequence was prepared to evaluate the new 3D MOCART score. All 9 variables of the 2D MOCART score were compared

  6. Resonant Tunneling and Hot Electron Spectroscopy in Buried Rare-Earth Arsenide/Semiconductor Heterostructures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Allen, S

    1997-01-01

    .... Resonant tunneling through semi-metal quantum wells was observed for the first time. A strong coupling of the magnetization and the resonant tunneling was discovered that demonstrates magnetization controlled resonant tunneling...

  7. Studies of photoionization processes from ground-state and excited-state atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ederer, D.L.; Parr, A.C.; West, J.B.

    1982-01-01

    Recent triply-differential photoelectron spectroscopy experiments designed for the study of correlation effects in atoms and molecules are described. Final-state symmetry of the n=2 state of helium has been determined. The non-Franck-Condon behavior of vibrational branching ratios and large variations of the angular asymmetry parameter has been observed for shape resonances and autoionizing resonances in CO and other molecules. Recent observations of the photoionization of excited sodium atoms are also described

  8. Systematic study on nuclear resonant scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez, A.A.; Freitas, M.L.

    1974-01-01

    New resonant scattering effect of thermal neutron capture gamma rays from Ti and Fe on Sb, Cu, Se and Ce target were observed. These results together with those published by other authors are summarized and discussed in terms of a possible systematic search for new resonant scattering effects

  9. Photon-detecting superconducting resonators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barends, R.

    2009-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges in astronomy is observing star and planetary formation, redshifted distant galaxies and molecular spectral ‘fingerprints’ in the far-infrared spectrum of light, using highly sensitive and large cameras. In this thesis we investigate superconducting resonators for

  10. Resonance and Neck Length for a Spherical Resonator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Corning

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between the neck length of a spherical resonator and its period of fundamental resonance was investigated. This was done by measuring the frequency of fundamental resonance of the resonator at 6 different neck lengths. It was found that its resonance resembled Helmholtz resonance but was not that of ideal Helmholtz resonance.

  11. Observing participating observation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    2010-01-01

    Current methodology concerning participating observation in general leaves the act of observation unobserved. Approaching participating observation from systems theory offers fundamental new insights into the topic. Observation is always participation. There is no way to escape becoming a partici......Current methodology concerning participating observation in general leaves the act of observation unobserved. Approaching participating observation from systems theory offers fundamental new insights into the topic. Observation is always participation. There is no way to escape becoming...... as the idea of the naïve observer becomes a void. Not recognizing and observing oneself as observer and co-producer of empirical data simply leaves the process of observation as the major unobserved absorber of contingency in data production based on participating observation....

  12. Observing participating observation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    2011-01-01

    Current methodology concerning participating observation in general leaves the act of observation unobserved. Approaching participating observation from systems theory offers fundamental new insights into the topic. Observation is always participation. There is no way to escape becoming a partici......Current methodology concerning participating observation in general leaves the act of observation unobserved. Approaching participating observation from systems theory offers fundamental new insights into the topic. Observation is always participation. There is no way to escape becoming...... as the idea of the naïve observer becomes a void. Not recognizing and observing oneself as observer and co-producer of empirical data simply leaves the process of observation as the major unobserved absorber of contingency in data production based on participating observation....

  13. Acoustic Resonance between Ground and Thermosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Matsumura

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Ultra-low frequency acoustic waves called "acoustic gravity waves" or "infrasounds" are theoretically expected to resonate between the ground and the thermosphere. This resonance is a very important phenomenon causing the coupling of the solid Earth, neutral atmosphere, and ionospheric plasma. This acoustic resonance, however, has not been confirmed by direct observations. In this study, atmospheric perturbations on the ground and ionospheric disturbances were observed and compared with each other to confirm the existence of resonance. Atmospheric perturbations were observed with a barometer, and ionospheric disturbances were observed using the HF Doppler method. An end point of resonance is in the ionosphere, where conductivity is high and the dynamo effect occurs. Thus, geomagnetic observation is also useful, so the geomagnetic data were compared with other data. Power spectral density was calculated and averaged for each month. Peaks appeared at the theoretically expected resonance frequencies in the pressure and HF Doppler data. The frequencies of the peaks varied with the seasons. This is probably because the vertical temperature profile of the atmosphere varies with the seasons, as does the reflection height of infrasounds. These results indicate that acoustic resonance occurs frequently.

  14. Interaction between 4p photoionization and 3p resonant excitation channels of krypton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buhr, T.; Kover, A.; Varga, D.; Muller, A.; Ricz, S.; Justus-Liebig- Universitat Giessen, Giessen; Holste, K.; Borovik, Jr.A.A.; Bernhardt, D.; Schippers, S.

    2011-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The angular distribution of Kr 4p photoelectrons was measured employing a linearly polarized photon beam at energies from 205 eV to 230 eV. In this range the Kr 3p→ns/md (n,m=4,5,6, etc.) resonances can be excited. The experimental anisotropy parameters (β, γ and δ) were determined for the Kr 4p shell and its fine structure components. The measurement was carried out at beamline BW3 of the DORIS III synchrotron light source at HASYLAB (Hamburg, Germany). The ESA-22D electrostatic electron spectrometer was used to analyze the emitted electrons. The spectrometer consists of a spherical and a cylindrical mirror analyzer. The spherical mirror focuses the electrons from the scattering plane to the entrance slit of the cylindrical analyzer performing the energy analysis of the electrons. (For detailed description of an ESA- 22-type electron spectrometer see Ref. [1].) The measured dipole anisotropy parameters ? of Kr 4p photoelectrons are shown in Fig. 1 as a function of photon energy. Resonance-like structure can be seen in the photon energy dependence of the dipole parameters. This structure indicates that the channel interactions are important between the 3p resonant excitation-autoionization and 4p direct photoionization processes in krypton. The natural line width of the 3p photoelectron peaks was determined from the measured spectra and it is about 0.8 eV while the experimental width of the resonance near 220 eV photon energy (3p 1/2 -1 →5s resonant excitation) is approximately 2 eV in Fig. 1. This broadening can be explained with the strong interference between the ionization and excitation channels. As before, we conclude that the angular distribution of photoelectrons is strongly influenced by the excitation processes. Acknowledgements. The authors wish to thank the DORIS III staff for providing excellent working conditions. This work was supported by the NKTH-OTKA (Grant No. K67719), and by the European Community

  15. Sample-size resonance, ferromagnetic resonance and magneto-permittivity resonance in multiferroic nano-BiFeO{sub 3}/paraffin composites at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lei; Li, Zhenyu; Jiang, Jia; An, Taiyu; Qin, Hongwei; Hu, Jifan, E-mail: hujf@sdu.edu.cn

    2017-01-01

    In the present work, we demonstrate that ferromagnetic resonance and magneto-permittivity resonance can be observed in appropriate microwave frequencies at room temperature for multiferroic nano-BiFeO{sub 3}/paraffin composite sample with an appropriate sample-thickness (such as 2 mm). Ferromagnetic resonance originates from the room-temperature weak ferromagnetism of nano-BiFeO{sub 3}. The observed magneto-permittivity resonance in multiferroic nano-BiFeO{sub 3} is connected with the dynamic magnetoelectric coupling through Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya (DM) magnetoelectric interaction or the combination of magnetostriction and piezoelectric effects. In addition, we experimentally observed the resonance of negative imaginary permeability for nano BiFeO{sub 3}/paraffin toroidal samples with longer sample thicknesses D=3.7 and 4.9 mm. Such resonance of negative imaginary permeability belongs to sample-size resonance. - Highlights: • Nano-BiFeO{sub 3}/paraffin composite shows a ferromagnetic resonance. • Nano-BiFeO{sub 3}/paraffin composite shows a magneto-permittivity resonance. • Resonance of negative imaginary permeability in BiFeO{sub 3} is a sample-size resonance. • Nano-BiFeO{sub 3}/paraffin composite with large thickness shows a sample-size resonance.

  16. Sample-size resonance, ferromagnetic resonance and magneto-permittivity resonance in multiferroic nano-BiFeO3/paraffin composites at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Lei; Li, Zhenyu; Jiang, Jia; An, Taiyu; Qin, Hongwei; Hu, Jifan

    2017-01-01

    In the present work, we demonstrate that ferromagnetic resonance and magneto-permittivity resonance can be observed in appropriate microwave frequencies at room temperature for multiferroic nano-BiFeO 3 /paraffin composite sample with an appropriate sample-thickness (such as 2 mm). Ferromagnetic resonance originates from the room-temperature weak ferromagnetism of nano-BiFeO 3 . The observed magneto-permittivity resonance in multiferroic nano-BiFeO 3 is connected with the dynamic magnetoelectric coupling through Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya (DM) magnetoelectric interaction or the combination of magnetostriction and piezoelectric effects. In addition, we experimentally observed the resonance of negative imaginary permeability for nano BiFeO 3 /paraffin toroidal samples with longer sample thicknesses D=3.7 and 4.9 mm. Such resonance of negative imaginary permeability belongs to sample-size resonance. - Highlights: • Nano-BiFeO 3 /paraffin composite shows a ferromagnetic resonance. • Nano-BiFeO 3 /paraffin composite shows a magneto-permittivity resonance. • Resonance of negative imaginary permeability in BiFeO 3 is a sample-size resonance. • Nano-BiFeO 3 /paraffin composite with large thickness shows a sample-size resonance.

  17. Observation of 2p3d(1Po)→1s3d(1De) Radiative Transition in He-like Si, S, and Cl Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasthurirangan, S.; Saha, J. K.; Agnihotri, A. N.; Bhattacharyya, S.; Misra, D.; Kumar, A.; Mukherjee, P. K.; Santos, J. P.; Costa, A. M.; Indelicato, P.; Mukherjee, T. K.; Tribedi, L. C.

    2013-12-01

    We present an experimental determination of the 2p3d(Po1)→1s3d(De1) x-ray line emitted from He-like Si, S, and Cl projectile ions, excited in collisions with thin carbon foils, using a high-resolution bent-crystal spectrometer. A good agreement between the observation and state-of-the-art relativistic calculations using the multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock formalism including the Breit interaction and QED effects implies the dominance of fluorescent decay over the autoionization process for the 2p3d(Po1) state of He-like heavy ions. This is the first observation of the fluorescence-active doubly excited states in He-like Si, S, and Cl ions.

  18. Nonlinear Dynamics of Nanomechanical Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Subramanian; Gulak, Yuiry; Sundaram, Bala; Benaroya, Haym

    2007-03-01

    Nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) offer great promise for many applications including motion and mass sensing. Recent experimental results suggest the importance of nonlinear effects in NEMS, an issue which has not been addressed fully in theory. We report on a nonlinear extension of a recent analytical model by Armour et al [1] for the dynamics of a single-electron transistor (SET) coupled to a nanomechanical resonator. We consider the nonlinear resonator motion in both (a) the Duffing and (b) nonlinear pendulum regimes. The corresponding master equations are derived and solved numerically and we consider moment approximations as well. In the Duffing case with hardening stiffness, we observe that the resonator is damped by the SET at a significantly higher rate. In the cases of softening stiffness and the pendulum, there exist regimes where the SET adds energy to the resonator. To our knowledge, this is the first instance of a single model displaying both negative and positive resonator damping in different dynamical regimes. The implications of the results for SET sensitivity as well as for, as yet unexplained, experimental results will be discussed. 1. Armour et al. Phys.Rev.B (69) 125313 (2004).

  19. Nanomechanical resonance detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Jeffrey C; Zettl, Alexander K

    2013-10-29

    An embodiment of a nanomechanical frequency detector includes a support structure and a plurality of elongated nanostructures coupled to the support structure. Each of the elongated nanostructures has a particular resonant frequency. The plurality of elongated nanostructures has a range of resonant frequencies. An embodiment of a method of identifying an object includes introducing the object to the nanomechanical resonance detector. A resonant response by at least one of the elongated nanostructures of the nanomechanical resonance detector indicates a vibrational mode of the object. An embodiment of a method of identifying a molecular species of the present invention includes introducing the molecular species to the nanomechanical resonance detector. A resonant response by at least one of the elongated nanostructures of the nanomechanical resonance detector indicates a vibrational mode of the molecular species.

  20. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    ARTICLE. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. Biological Applications. B G Hegde. Recently, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectros- copy has emerged as a powerful tool to study the structure and dynamics of biological macromolecules such as proteins, protein aggregates ... research interests are.

  1. Crossing simple resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, T.

    1985-08-01

    A simple criterion governs the beam distortion and/or loss of protons on a fast resonance crossing. Results from numerical integrations are illustrated for simple sextupole, octupole, and 10-pole resonances.

  2. Crossing a Nonlinear Resonance

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 19; Issue 9. Crossing a Nonlinear Resonance: Adiabatic Invariants and the Melnikov-Arnold Integral. Sudhir R Jain. General Article Volume 19 Issue 9 September 2014 pp 797-813 ...

  3. Feshbach resonances in cesium at ultralow static magnetic fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papoular, D.J.; Bize, S.; Clairon, A.; Marion, H.; Kokkelmans, S.J.J.M.F.; Shlyapnikov, G.V.

    2012-01-01

    We have observed Feshbach resonances for 133Cs atoms in two different hyperfine states at static magnetic fields of a few milligauss. These resonances are unusual for two main reasons. First, they are the lowest static-field resonances investigated up to now, and we explain their multipeak structure

  4. Resonant thermonuclear reaction rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubold, H.J.; Mathai, A.M.

    1986-01-01

    Basic physical principles for the resonant and nonresonant thermonuclear reaction rates are applied to find their standard representations for nuclear astrophysics. Closed-form representations for the resonant reaction rate are derived in terms of Meijer's G-function. Analytic representations of the resonant and nonresonant nuclear reaction rates are compared and the appearance of Meijer's G-function is discussed in physical terms

  5. Ovenized microelectromechanical system (MEMS) resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Roy H; Wojciechowski, Kenneth; Kim, Bongsang

    2014-03-11

    An ovenized micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) resonator including: a substantially thermally isolated mechanical resonator cavity; a mechanical oscillator coupled to the mechanical resonator cavity; and a heating element formed on the mechanical resonator cavity.

  6. Quantum mechanical resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cisneros S, A.; McIntosh, H.V.

    1982-01-01

    A discussion of the nature of quantum mechanical resonances is presented from the point of view of the spectral theory of operators. In the case of Bohr-Feshbach resonances, graphs are presented to illustrate the theory showing the decay of a doubly excited metastable state and the excitation of the resonance by an incident particle with proper energy. A characterization of resonances is given as well as a procedure to determine widths using the spectral density function. A sufficient condition is given for the validity of the Breit-Wigner formula for Bohr-Feshbach resonances. (author)

  7. Controlling Parametric Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galeazzi, Roberto; Pettersen, Kristin Ytterstad

    2012-01-01

    if the system undergoing it could transform the large amplitude motion into, for example, energy. Therefore the development of control strategies to induce parametric resonance into a system can be as valuable as those which aim at stabilizing the resonant oscillations. By means of a mechanical equivalent......Parametric resonance is a resonant phenomenon which takes place in systems characterized by periodic variations of some parameters. While seen as a threatening condition, whose onset can drive a system into instability, this chapter advocates that parametric resonance may become an advantage...... the authors review the conditions for the onset of parametric resonance, and propose a nonlinear control strategy in order to both induce the resonant oscillations and to stabilize the unstable motion. Lagrange’s theory is used to derive the dynamics of the system and input–output feedback linearization...

  8. A Clinical Prospective Observational Cohort Study on the Prevalence and Primary Diagnostic Accuracy of Occult Vertebral Fractures in Aged Women with Acute Lower Back Pain Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Terakado

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Elderly female patients complaints of acute low back pain (LBP may involve vertebral fracture (VF, among which occult VF (OVF: early-stage VF without any morphological change is often missed to be detected by primary X-ray examination. The current study aimed to investigate the prevalence of VF and OVF and the diagnostic accuracy of the initial X-ray in detecting OVF. Method. Subjects were elderly women (>70 years old complaining of acute LBP with an accurate onset date. Subjects underwent lumbar X-ray, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and bone mineral density (BMD measurement at their first visit. The distribution of radiological findings from X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI as well as the calculation of the prevalence of VF and OVF are investigated. Results. The prevalence of VF among elderly women with LBP was 76.5% and L1 was the most commonly injured level. Among VF cases, the prevalence of OVF was 33.3%. Furthermore, osteoporotic patients tend to show increased prevalence of VF (87.5%. The predictive values in detecting VF on the initial plain X-ray were as follows: sensitivity, 51.3%; specificity, 75.0%; and accuracy rate, 56.7%. Conclusions. Acute LBP patients may suffer vertebral injury with almost no morphologic change in X-ray, which can be detected using MRI.

  9. Accelerated Recombination in Cold Dense Plasmas with Metastable Ions due to Resonant Deexcitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ralchenko, Yu.V.; Maron, M.

    2001-01-01

    In a recombining plasma the metastable states are known to accumulate population thereby slowing down the recombination process. We show that a proper account of the doubly-excited autoionizing states, populated through collisional 3-body recombination of metastable ions, results in a significant acceleration of recombination. 3-body recombination followed by collisional (de)excitations and autoionization effectively produces deexcitation via the following chain of elementary events: A fully time-dependent collisional-radiative (CR) modeling for stripped ions of carbon recombining in a cold dense plasma demonstrates an order of magnitude faster recombination of He-like ions. The CR model used in calculations is discussed in details

  10. First trans-Neptunian object in polar resonance with Neptune

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, M. H. M.; Namouni, F.

    2017-11-01

    Capture in mean motion resonance has been observed in the Solar system for small objects with prograde as well as retrograde orbits of moderate inclinations. However, no example of an object with a nearly polar orbit was known to be in resonance with a planet. In this Letter, we report that the nearly-polar trans-Neptunian object (471325), nicknamed Niku, is in a 7:9 resonance with Neptune, with a mean lifetime in resonance of 16 ± 11 million years. While entrance and exit in the 7:9 resonance is caused by close encounters with Neptune, the resonant configuration provides a temporary protection mechanism against disruptive close encounters with this planet. The other nearly polar trans-Neptunian objects do not seem to be in resonance with the planets with the possible exception of 2008 KV42, also known as Drac, that has a small chance of being in the 8:13 resonance with Neptune.

  11. Feshbach resonances associated with Rydberg states of the hydrogen halides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spence, D.; Noguchi, T.

    1975-01-01

    Using an electron transmission spectrometer we locate Feshbach resonances in the hydrogen halides HF, HCl, HBr, and HI. These resonances consist of two Rydberg electrons bound to a positive ion core grandparent state. By analysis of previously published data, we determine the electron configurations of resonances observed in the isoelectronic rare gases and hence deduce the electron configurations of the resonances observed in HCl, HBr, and HI. We find that most of the observed resonances whose grandparent positive ion states have term value X 2 Pi are associated with Rydberg parent states of symmetry X 2 Pinssigma, X 2 Pinpsigma, and X 2 Pindlambda. In HF, only one resonance series, associated with the X 2 Pi3ssigma 1 , 3 Pi Rydberg state is observed

  12. Neutron resonance spectroscopy of 107Ag and 109Ag

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowie, L.Y.; Mitchell, G.E.; Stephenson, S.L.; Bowman, J.D.; Knudson, J.N.; Penttila, S.I.; Seestrom, S.J.; Yen, Y.; Yuan, V.W.; Crawford, B.E.; Roberson, N.R.; Delheij, P.P.; Haseyama, T.; Masaike, A.; Matsuda, Y.; Postma, H.; Sharapov, E.I.

    1997-01-01

    Parity violation has been observed in a number of previously unreported neutron resonances in silver. Analysis of these parity violation data requires improved neutron resonance spectroscopy. The neutron total cross section for natural silver was measured for E n =10 - 800 eV with the time-of-flight method at the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center. The neutron capture reaction was studied with both a natural silver target and a highly enriched sample (98.29%) of 107 Ag. A total of 38 previously unreported resonances were observed. The combination of the two measurements allowed assignment of the newly observed resonances to 107 Ag or to 109 Ag. Resonance parameters were determined for almost all of the neutron resonances observed. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  13. Fano resonance Rabi splitting of surface plasmons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhiguang; Li, Jiafang; Liu, Zhe; Li, Wuxia; Li, Junjie; Gu, Changzhi; Li, Zhi-Yuan

    2017-08-14

    Rabi splitting and Fano resonance are well-known physical phenomena in conventional quantum systems as atoms and quantum dots, arising from strong interaction between two quantum states. In recent years similar features have been observed in various nanophotonic and nanoplasmonic systems. Yet, realization of strong interaction between two or more Fano resonance states has not been accomplished either in quantum or in optical systems. Here we report the observation of Rabi splitting of two strongly coupled surface plasmon Fano resonance states in a three-dimensional plasmonic nanostructure consisting of vertical asymmetric split-ring resonators. The plasmonic system stably supports triple Fano resonance states and double Rabi splittings can occur between lower and upper pairs of the Fano resonance states. The experimental discovery agrees excellently with rigorous numerical simulations, and is well explained by an analytical three-oscillator model. The discovery of Fano resonance Rabi splitting could provide a stimulating insight to explore new fundamental physics in analogous atomic systems and could be used to significantly enhance light-matter interaction for optical sensing and detecting applications.

  14. Atlas of neutron resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Mughabghab, Said

    2018-01-01

    Atlas of Neutron Resonances: Resonance Properties and Thermal Cross Sections Z= 1-60, Sixth Edition, contains an extensive list of detailed individual neutron resonance parameters for Z=1-60, as well as thermal cross sections, capture resonance integrals, average resonance parameters and a short survey of the physics of thermal and resonance neutrons. The long introduction contains: nuclear physics formulas aimed at neutron physicists; topics of special interest such as valence neutron capture, nuclear level density parameters, and s-, p-, and d-wave neutron strength functions; and various comparisons of measured quantities with the predictions of nuclear models, such as the optical model. As in the last edition, additional features have been added to appeal to a wider spectrum of users. These include: spin-dependent scattering lengths that are of interest to solid-state physicists, nuclear physicists and neutron evaluators; calculated and measured Maxwellian average 5-keV and 30-keV capture cross sections o...

  15. Exploring Nurse Faculty Incivility and Resonant Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casale, Katherine R

    The purpose of this quantitative correlational study was to explore the relationship between the frequency of interfaculty incivility among nurses in academia and observed levels of resonant leadership of immediate supervisors. Despite mandates to address incivility in health care, nurse faculty report high levels of horizontal incivility among their peers. No known quantitative research has measured the relationship between nurse faculty-to-faculty incivility and resonant leadership traits of leaders. Nursing faculty from 17 universities (n = 260) were emailed an anonymous link to answer survey questions about horizontal peer incivility and leaders' management styles. There was a significant inverse relationship (Pearson's r, -.560) between the frequency of experienced faculty-to-faculty incivility and the level of observed resonant leadership behaviors of participants' immediate supervisors. Resonant supervisory behaviors inversely correlated with nurse faculty peer incivility, with potential to impact satisfaction, recruitment, and retention.

  16. Resonance in a Cone-Topped Tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angus Cheng-Huan Chia

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between ratio of the upper opening diameter of a cone-topped cylinder to the cylinder diameter,and the ratio of the length of the air column to resonant period was examined. Plastic cones with upper openings ranging from 1.3 cm to 3.6 cm and tuning forks with frequencies ranging from 261.6 Hz to 523.3 Hz were used. The transition from a standing wave in a cylindrical column to a Helmholtz-type resonance in a resonant cavity with a narrow opening was observed.

  17. Dynamically generated resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oset, E.; Vicente Vacas, M.J.; Gonzalez, P.; Martinez-Torres, A.; Ramos, A.; Sarkar, S.; Sun Baoxi; Vijande, J.; Jido, D.; Sekihara, T.; Khemchandani, K.

    2009-01-01

    In this talk I report on recent work related to the dynamical generation of baryonic resonances, some made up from pseudoscalar meson-baryon, others from vector meson-baryon and a third type from two meson-one baryon systems. We can establish a correspondence with known baryonic resonances, reinforcing conclusions previously drawn and bringing new light on the nature of some baryonic resonances of higher mass. (authors)

  18. Electron paramagnetic resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Al'tshuler, S A

    2013-01-01

    Electron Paramagnetic Resonance is a comprehensive text on the field of electron paramagnetic resonance, covering both the theoretical background and the results of experiment. This book is composed of eight chapters that cover theoretical materials and experimental data on ionic crystals, since these are the materials that have been most extensively studied by the methods of paramagnetic resonance. The opening chapters provide an introduction to the basic principles of electron paramagnetic resonance and the methods of its measurement. The next chapters are devoted to the theory of spectra an

  19. Pygmy dipole resonance in stable nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the ∆L = 0 spin-flip M1 resonance. A case study of the 208Pb(p, p ) reaction at. E = 295 MeV was performed. A background-subtracted spectrum measured at 0◦ spectrometer angle is displayed in the top part of figure 3. In the giant resonance region, prominent excitation of the GDR is observed. Because of the excellent.

  20. Overlapping resonances in e+e- annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dothan, Y.; Horn, D.

    1976-06-01

    The application of the general formalism of two overlapping resonances to the inclusive process of hadron production in e + e - annihilation is discussed. The strong dip observed near 4 GeV can be fitted by three different classes of solutions, all of which have to use an overlap close to its maximal value. This suggests that both resonances have one common main decay channel. The implications of this conclusion are briefly discussed

  1. A general theory for bandgap estimation in locally resonant metastructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugino, C.; Xia, Y.; Leadenham, S.; Ruzzene, M.; Erturk, A.

    2017-10-01

    Locally resonant metamaterials are characterized by bandgaps at wavelengths that are much larger than the lattice size, enabling low-frequency vibration attenuation. Typically, bandgap analyses and predictions rely on the assumption of traveling waves in an infinite medium, and do not take advantage of modal representations typically used for the analysis of the dynamic behavior of finite structures. Recently, we developed a method for understanding the locally resonant bandgap in uniform finite metamaterial beams using modal analysis. Here we extend that framework to general locally resonant 1D and 2D metastructures (i.e. locally resonant metamaterial-based finite structures) with specified boundary conditions using a general operator formulation. Using this approach, along with the assumption of an infinite number of resonators tuned to the same frequency, the frequency range of the locally resonant bandgap is easily derived in closed form. Furthermore, the bandgap expression is shown to be the same regardless of the type of vibration problem under consideration, depending only on the added mass ratio and target frequency. For practical designs with a finite number of resonators, it is shown that the number of resonators required for the bandgap to appear increases with increased target frequency, i.e. more resonators are required for higher vibration modes. Additionally, it is observed that there is an optimal, finite number of resonators which gives a bandgap that is wider than the infinite-resonator bandgap, and that the optimal number of resonators increases with target frequency and added mass ratio. As the number of resonators becomes sufficiently large, the bandgap converges to the derived infinite-resonator bandgap. Furthermore, the derived bandgap edge frequencies are shown to agree with results from dispersion analysis using the plane wave expansion method. The model is validated experimentally for a locally resonant cantilever beam under base

  2. On open electromagnetic resonators: relation between interferometers and resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manenkov, Aleksandr A; Bykov, Vladimir P; Kuleshov, N V

    2010-01-01

    The physical difference between the concepts 'Fabry-Perot interferometer' and 'open resonator' is discussed. It is shown that the use of the term 'Fabry-Perot resonator' for open laser resonators is incorrect both from the historical viewpoint and from the viewpoint of the physical meaning of the processes occurring in these resonators. (laser beams and resonators)

  3. Feshbach-Resonance-Enhanced Coherent Atom-Molecule Conversion with Ultranarrow Photoassociation Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taie, Shintaro; Watanabe, Shunsuke; Ichinose, Tomohiro; Takahashi, Yoshiro

    2016-01-01

    We reveal the existence of high-density Feshbach resonances in the collision between the ground and metastable states of 171Yb and coherently produce the associated Feshbach molecules by photoassociation. The extremely small transition rate is overcome by the enhanced Franck-Condon factor of the weakly bound Feshbach molecule, allowing us to observe Rabi oscillations with long decay time between an atom pair and a molecule in an optical lattice. We also perform the precision measurement of the binding energies, which characterizes the observed resonances. The ultranarrow photoassociation will be a basis for practical implementation of optical Feshbach resonances.

  4. Hadron scattering, resonances, and QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briceno, Raul [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-12-01

    The non-perturbative nature of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) has historically left a gap in our understanding of the connection between the fundamental theory of the strong interactions and the rich structure of experimentally observed phenomena. For the simplest properties of stable hadrons, this is now circumvented with the use of lattice QCD (LQCD). In this talk I discuss a path towards a rigorous determination of few-hadron observables from LQCD. I illustrate the power of the methodology by presenting recently determined scattering amplitudes in the light-meson sector and their resonance content.

  5. Top quark asymmetry and dijet resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Jung, Sunghoon; Wells, James D.

    2011-01-01

    CDF recently reported an anomaly in the $m_{jj}$ distribution of dijet events produced in association with a $W$ boson. If this anomaly is associated with a new flavor conserving vector resonance, $V$, one might have expected to observe effects in the analogous $m_{jj}$ distribution produced in association with a $\\gamma$. No such excess is observed. A single $u-t-V$ flavor changing coupling, however, can contribute to the $m_{jj}$ anomaly while being consistent with other resonance searches. Furthermore, it gives a potential explanation of the observed forward-backward asymmetry in top quark production.

  6. A New Resonance Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Alan

    2017-01-01

    The measurement of the speed of sound in air with the resonance tube is a popular experiment that often yields accurate results. One approach is to hold a vibrating tuning fork over an air column that is partially immersed in water. The column is raised and lowered in the water until the generated standing wave produces resonance: this occurs at…

  7. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 1. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. Susanta Das. General Article Volume 9 Issue 1 January 2004 pp 34-49. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/009/01/0034-0049. Keywords.

  8. Resonance and Fractal Geometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broer, Henk W.

    The phenomenon of resonance will be dealt with from the viewpoint of dynamical systems depending on parameters and their bifurcations. Resonance phenomena are associated to open subsets in the parameter space, while their complement corresponds to quasi-periodicity and chaos. The latter phenomena

  9. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 11. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: Biological Applications. B G Hegde. General Article Volume 20 Issue 11 November 2015 pp 1017-1032. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  10. Laser magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    The technique of laser resonance magnetic resonance allows one to study the high-resolution spectroscopy of transient paramagnetic species, viz, atoms, radicals, and molecular ions. This article is a brief exposition of the method, describing the principles, instrumentation and applicability of the IR and FIR-LMR and shows results of HF + . (Author) [pt

  11. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-03-06

    Mar 6, 2011 ... Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging is becoming a routine diagnostic technique. BRUCE s sPOTTiswOOdE, PhD. MRC/UCT Medical Imaging Research Unit, University of Cape Town, and Division of Radiology, Stellenbosch University. Bruce Spottiswoode ...

  12. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 1. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. Susanta Das. General Article Volume 9 Issue 1 January 2004 pp 34-49. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/009/01/0034-0049. Keywords.

  13. Noise in nonlinear nanoelectromechanical resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra Vidal, Diego N.

    Nano-Electro-Mechanical Systems (NEMS), due to their nanometer scale size, possess a number of desirable attributes: high sensitivity to applied forces, fast response times, high resonance frequencies and low power consumption. However, ultra small size and low power handling result in unwanted consequences: smaller signal size and higher dissipation, making the NEMS devices more susceptible to external and intrinsic noise. The simplest version of a NEMS, a suspended nanomechanical structure with two distinct excitation states, can be used as an archetypal two state system to study a plethora of fundamental phenomena such as Duffing nonlinearity, stochastic resonance, and macroscopic quantum tunneling at low temperatures. From a technical perspective, there are numerous applications such nanomechanical memory elements, microwave switches and nanomechanical computation. The control and manipulation of the mechanical response of these two state systems can be realized by exploiting a (seemingly) counterintuitive physical phenomenon, Stochastic Resonance: in a noisy nonlinear mechanical system, the presence of noise can enhance the system response to an external stimulus. This Thesis is mainly dedicated to study possible applications of Stochastic Resonance in two-state nanomechanical systems. First, on chip signal amplification by 1/falpha is observed. The effectiveness of the noise assisted amplification is observed to decrease with increasing a. Experimental evidence shows an increase in asymmetry between the two states with increasing noise color. Considering the prevalence of 1/f alpha noise in the materials in integrated circuits, the signal enhancement demonstrated here, suggests beneficial use of the otherwise detrimental noise. Finally, a nanomechanical device, operating as a reprogrammable logic gate, and performing fundamental logic functions such as AND/OR and NAND/NOR is presented. The logic function can be programmed (from AND to OR) dynamically, by

  14. Resonant snubber inverter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, J.S.; Young, R.W. Sr.; Chen, D.; Scudiere, M.B.; Ott, G.W. Jr.; White, C.P.; McKeever, J.W.

    1997-06-24

    A resonant, snubber-based, soft switching, inverter circuit achieves lossless switching during dc-to-ac power conversion and power conditioning with minimum component count and size. Current is supplied to the resonant snubber branches solely by the main inverter switches. Component count and size are reduced by use of a single semiconductor switch in the resonant snubber branches. Component count is also reduced by maximizing the use of stray capacitances of the main switches as parallel resonant capacitors. Resonance charging and discharging of the parallel capacitances allows lossless, zero voltage switching. In one embodiment, circuit component size and count are minimized while achieving lossless, zero voltage switching within a three-phase inverter. 14 figs.

  15. Fundamentals of nanomechanical resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Schmid, Silvan; Roukes, Michael Lee

    2016-01-01

    This authoritative book introduces and summarizes the latest models and skills required to design and optimize nanomechanical resonators, taking a top-down approach that uses macroscopic formulas to model the devices. The authors cover the electrical and mechanical aspects of nano electromechanical system (NEMS) devices. The introduced mechanical models are also key to the understanding and optimization of nanomechanical resonators used e.g. in optomechanics. Five comprehensive chapters address: The eigenmodes derived for the most common continuum mechanical structures used as nanomechanical resonators; The main sources of energy loss in nanomechanical resonators; The responsiveness of micro and nanomechanical resonators to mass, forces, and temperature; The most common underlying physical transduction mechanisms; The measurement basics, including amplitude and frequency noise. The applied approach found in this book is appropriate for engineering students and researchers working with micro and nanomechanical...

  16. Resonant snubber inverter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Jih-Sheng; Young, Sr., Robert W.; Chen, Daoshen; Scudiere, Matthew B.; Ott, Jr., George W.; White, Clifford P.; McKeever, John W.

    1997-01-01

    A resonant, snubber-based, soft switching, inverter circuit achieves lossless switching during dc-to-ac power conversion and power conditioning with minimum component count and size. Current is supplied to the resonant snubber branches solely by the main inverter switches. Component count and size are reduced by use of a single semiconductor switch in the resonant snubber branches. Component count is also reduced by maximizing the use of stray capacitances of the main switches as parallel resonant capacitors. Resonance charging and discharging of the parallel capacitances allows lossless, zero voltage switching. In one embodiment, circuit component size and count are minimized while achieving lossless, zero voltage switching within a three-phase inverter.

  17. Observation of $S=+1$ Narrow Resonances in the System $pK^0_s$ from $p+\\rm {C_3H_8}$ Collision at 10 GeV/$c$

    CERN Document Server

    Aslanyan, P Zh; Rikhvitskaya, G G

    2004-01-01

    Experimental data from a 2 m propane bubble chamber have been analyzed to search for an exotic baryon state, the $\\Theta^+$ baryon, in the $pK^0_s$ decay mode for the reaction $p+{\\rm C_3H_8}$ at 10 GeV/$c$. The $pK^0_s$ invariant mass spectrum shows resonant structures with $M_{p K_s^0}=1540\\pm 8$, $1613\\pm10$, $1821\\pm11$ MeV/$c^2$ and $\\Gamma_{p K_s^0}= 9.2\\pm1.8$, $16.1\\pm4.1$, $28.0\\pm9.4$ MeV/$c^2$. The statistical significance of these peaks has been estimated as $5.5$, $4.8$ and $5.0$ s.d., respectively. There are also small peaks in mass regions of 1487 (3.0 s.d.), 1690 (3.6 s.d.) and 1980 (3.0 s.d.) MeV/$c^2$.

  18. DYNAMICS AND TRANSIT VARIATIONS OF RESONANT EXOPLANETS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nesvorný, David [Department of Space Studies, Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut St., Ste 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States); Vokrouhlický, David, E-mail: davidn@boulder.swri.edu, E-mail: vokrouhl@cesnet.cz [Institute of Astronomy, Charles University, V Holešovičkách 2, CZ–18000 Prague 8 (Czech Republic)

    2016-06-01

    Transit timing variations (TTVs) are deviations of the measured midtransit times from the exact periodicity. One of the most interesting causes of TTVs is the gravitational interaction between planets. Here we consider a case of two planets in a mean motion resonance (orbital periods in a ratio of small integers). This case is important because the resonant interaction can amplify the TTV effect and allow planets to be detected more easily. We develop an analytic model of the resonant dynamics valid for small orbital eccentricities and use it to derive the principal TTV terms. We find that a resonant system should show TTV terms with two basic periods (and their harmonics). The resonant TTV period is proportional ( m / M {sub *}){sup −2/3}, where m and M {sub *} are the planetary and stellar masses. For m = 10{sup −4} M {sub *}, for example, the TTV period exceeds the orbital period by about two orders of magnitude. The amplitude of the resonant TTV terms scales linearly with the libration amplitude. The ratio of the TTV amplitudes of two resonant planets is inversely proportional to the ratio of their masses. These and other relationships discussed in the main text can be used to aid the interpretation of TTV observations.

  19. Nucleon Resonance Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkert, Volker D.

    2016-07-25

    Recent results of meson photo-production at the existing electron machines with polarized real photon beams and the measurement of polarization observables of the final state baryons have provided high precision data that led to the discovery of new excited nucleon and $\\Delta$ states using multi-channel partial wave analyses procedures. The internal structure of several prominent excited states has been revealed employing meson electroproduction processes. On the theoretical front, lattice QCD is now predicting the baryon spectrum with very similar characteristics as the constituent quark model, and continuum QCD, such as is represented in the Dyson-Schwinger Equations approach and in light front relativistic quark models, describes the non-perturbative behavior of resonance excitations at photon virtuality of $Q^2 > 1.5GeV^2$. In this talk I discuss the need to continue a vigorous program of nucleon spectroscopy and the study of the internal structure of excited states as a way to reveal the effective degrees of freedom underlying the excited states and their dependence on the distance scale probed.

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses ... of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical ...

  1. Resonant characteristics and sensitivity dependency on the contact surface in QCM-micropillar-based system of coupled resonator sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashan, M A M; Kalavally, V; Ramakrishnan, N; Lee, H W

    2016-01-01

    We report the characteristics and sensitivity dependence over the contact surface in coupled resonating sensors (CRSs) made of high aspect ratio resonant micropillars attached to a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). Through experiments and simulation, we observed that when the pillars of resonant heights were placed in maximum displacement regions the resonance frequency of the QCM increased following the coupled resonance characteristics, as the pillar offered elastic loading to the QCM surface. However, the same pillars when placed in relatively lower displacement regions, in spite of their resonant dimension, offered inertial loading and resulted in a decrease in QCM resonance frequency, as the displacement amplitude was insufficient to couple the vibrations from the QCM to the pillars. Accordingly, we discovered that the coupled resonance characteristics not only depend on the resonant structure dimensions but also on the contact regions in the acoustic device. Further analysis revealed that acoustic pressure at the contact surface also influences the resonance frequency characteristics and sensitivity of the CRS. To demonstrate the significance of the present finding for sensing applications, humidity sensing is considered as the example measurand. When a sensing medium made of resonant SU-8 pillars was placed in a maximum displacement region on a QCM surface, the sensitivity increased by 14 times in comparison to a resonant sensing medium placed in a lower displacement region of a QCM surface. (paper)

  2. Resonant characteristics and sensitivity dependency on the contact surface in QCM-micropillar-based system of coupled resonator sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashan, M. A. M.; Kalavally, V.; Lee, H. W.; Ramakrishnan, N.

    2016-05-01

    We report the characteristics and sensitivity dependence over the contact surface in coupled resonating sensors (CRSs) made of high aspect ratio resonant micropillars attached to a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). Through experiments and simulation, we observed that when the pillars of resonant heights were placed in maximum displacement regions the resonance frequency of the QCM increased following the coupled resonance characteristics, as the pillar offered elastic loading to the QCM surface. However, the same pillars when placed in relatively lower displacement regions, in spite of their resonant dimension, offered inertial loading and resulted in a decrease in QCM resonance frequency, as the displacement amplitude was insufficient to couple the vibrations from the QCM to the pillars. Accordingly, we discovered that the coupled resonance characteristics not only depend on the resonant structure dimensions but also on the contact regions in the acoustic device. Further analysis revealed that acoustic pressure at the contact surface also influences the resonance frequency characteristics and sensitivity of the CRS. To demonstrate the significance of the present finding for sensing applications, humidity sensing is considered as the example measurand. When a sensing medium made of resonant SU-8 pillars was placed in a maximum displacement region on a QCM surface, the sensitivity increased by 14 times in comparison to a resonant sensing medium placed in a lower displacement region of a QCM surface.

  3. Fano resonance in a subwavelength Mie-based metamolecule with split ring resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaobo; Zhou, Ji

    2017-06-01

    In this letter, we report a method of symmetry-breaking in an artificial Mie-based metamolecule. A Fano resonance with a Q factor of 96 is observed at microwave frequencies in a structure combining a split ring resonator and a high-permittivity dielectric cube. Calculations indicate that resonant frequency tunability will result from the alteration of the cube's permittivity. The asymmetric spectrum is attributed to both constructive and destructive near-field interactions between the two distinct resonators. Experimental data and simulation results are in good agreement. The underlying physics is seen in field distribution and dipole analysis. This work substantiates an approach for the manipulation of Mie resonances which can potentially be utilized in light modulating and sensing.

  4. Scattering processes and resonances from lattice QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briceño, Raúl A.; Dudek, Jozef J.; Young, Ross D.

    2018-04-01

    The vast majority of hadrons observed in nature are not stable under the strong interaction; rather they are resonances whose existence is deduced from enhancements in the energy dependence of scattering amplitudes. The study of hadron resonances offers a window into the workings of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) in the low-energy nonperturbative region, and in addition many probes of the limits of the electroweak sector of the standard model consider processes which feature hadron resonances. From a theoretical standpoint, this is a challenging field: the same dynamics that binds quarks and gluons into hadron resonances also controls their decay into lighter hadrons, so a complete approach to QCD is required. Presently, lattice QCD is the only available tool that provides the required nonperturbative evaluation of hadron observables. This article reviews progress in the study of few-hadron reactions in which resonances and bound states appear using lattice QCD techniques. The leading approach is described that takes advantage of the periodic finite spatial volume used in lattice QCD calculations to extract scattering amplitudes from the discrete spectrum of QCD eigenstates in a box. An explanation is given of how from explicit lattice QCD calculations one can rigorously garner information about a variety of resonance properties, including their masses, widths, decay couplings, and form factors. The challenges which currently limit the field are discussed along with the steps being taken to resolve them.

  5. A Separable Insertion Method to Calculate Atomic and Molecular Resonances on a FE-DVR Grid using Exterior Complex Scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeln, Brant Anthony

    The study of metastable electronic resonances, anion or neutral states of finite lifetime, in molecules is an important area of research where currently no theoretical technique is generally applicable. The role of theory is to calculate both the position and width, which is proportional to the inverse of the lifetime, of these resonances and how they vary with respect to nuclear geometry in order to generate potential energy surfaces. These surfaces are the basis of time-dependent models of the molecular dynamics where the system moves towards vibrational excitation or fragmentation. Three fundamental electronic processes that can be modeled this way are dissociative electronic attachment, vibrational excitation through electronic impact and autoionization. Currently, experimental investigation into these processes is being preformed on polyatomic molecules while theoreticians continue their fifty-year-old search for robust methods to calculate them. The separable insertion method, investigated in this thesis, seeks to tackle the problem of calculating metastable resonances by using existing quantum chemistry tools along with a grid-based method employing exterior complex scaling (ECS). Modern quantum chemistry methods are extremely efficient at calculating ground and (bound) excited electronic states of atoms and molecules by utilizing Gaussian basis functions. These functions provide both a numerically fast and analytic solution to the necessary two-electron, six-dimensional integrals required in structure calculations. However, these computer programs, based on analytic Gaussian basis sets, cannot construct solutions that are not square-integrable, such as resonance wavefunctions. ECS, on the other hand, can formally calculate resonance solutions by rotating the asymptotic electronic coordinates into the complex plane. The complex Siegert energies for resonances, Eres = ER - iGamma/2 where ER is the real-valued position of the resonance and Gamma is the width

  6. Neutron resonance spectroscopy of 113In and 115In

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frankle, C.M.; Bowman, J.D.; Crawford, B.E.; Delheij, P.P.J.; Gould, C.R.; Haase, D.G.; Knudson, J.N.; Mitchell, G.E.; Patterson, S.S.; Penttilae, S.I.; Popov, Y.P.; Roberson, N.R.; Seestrom, S.J.; Sharapov, E.I.; Yen, Y.; Yoo, S.H.; Yuan, V.W.; Zhu, X.

    1993-01-01

    The neutron total cross section for natural indium was measured for E n =25--500 eV with the time-of-flight method at the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center. The neutron capture reaction was studied on a highly enriched sample (99.99%) of 115 In. A total of 47 previously unreported resonances were observed. The combination of the two measurements allowed assignment of the new resonances to 113 In or 115 In. Resonance parameters were extracted for all of the neutron resonances observed

  7. Enhanced energy storage in chaotic optical resonators

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Changxu

    2013-05-05

    Chaos is a phenomenon that occurs in many aspects of contemporary science. In classical dynamics, chaos is defined as a hypersensitivity to initial conditions. The presence of chaos is often unwanted, as it introduces unpredictability, which makes it difficult to predict or explain experimental results. Conversely, we demonstrate here how chaos can be used to enhance the ability of an optical resonator to store energy. We combine analytic theory with ab initio simulations and experiments in photonic-crystal resonators to show that a chaotic resonator can store six times more energy than its classical counterpart of the same volume. We explain the observed increase by considering the equipartition of energy among all degrees of freedom of the chaotic resonator (that is, the cavity modes) and discover a convergence of their lifetimes towards a single value. A compelling illustration of the theory is provided by enhanced absorption in deformed polystyrene microspheres. © 2013 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  8. Advances in magnetic resonance 10

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 10, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains three chapters that examine superoperators in magnetic resonance; ultrasonically modulated paramagnetic resonance; and the utility of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron-nuclear double-resonance (ENDOR) techniques for studying low-frequency modes of atomic fluctuations and their significance for understanding the mechanism of structural phase transitions in solids.

  9. Properties of spiral resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeuser, J.

    1989-10-01

    The present thesis deals with the calculation and the study of the application possibilities of single and double spiral resonators. The main aim was the development and the construction of reliable and effective high-power spiral resonators for the UNILAC of the GSI in Darmstadt and the H - -injector for the storage ring HERA of DESY in Hamburg. After the presentation of the construction and the properties of spiral resonators and their description by oscillating-circuit models the theoretical foundations of the bunching are presented and some examples of a rebuncher and debuncher and their influence on the longitudinal particle dynamics are shown. After the description of the characteristic accelerator quantities by means of an oscillating-circuit model and the theory of an inhomogeneous λ/4 line it is shown, how the resonance frequency and the efficiency of single and double spiral resonators can be calculated from the geometrical quantities of the structure. In the following the dependence of the maximal reachable resonator voltage in dependence on the gap width and the surface of the drift tubes is studied. Furthermore the high-power resonators are presented, which were built for the different applications for the GSI in Darmstadt, DESY in Hamburg, and for the FOM Institute in Amsterdam. (orig./HSI) [de

  10. Atomic excitation and recombination in external fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nayfeh, M.H.; Clark, C.W.

    1985-01-01

    This volume offers a timely look at Rydberg states of atoms in external fields and dielectronic recombination. Each topic provides authoritative coverage, presents a fresh account of a flourishing field of current atomic physics and introduces new opportunities for discovery and development. Topics considered include electron-atom scattering in external fields; observations of regular and irregular motion as exemplified by the quadratic zeeman effect and other systems; Rydberg atoms in external fields and the Coulomb geometry; crossed-field effects in the absorption spectrum of lithium in a magnetic field; precise studies of static electric field ionization; widths and shapes of stark resonances in sodium above the saddle point; studies of electric field effects and barium autoionizing resonances; autoionization and dielectronic recombination in plasma electric microfields; dielectronic recombination measurements on multicharged ions; merged beam studies of dielectronic recombination; Rydberg atoms and dielectronic recombination in astrophysics; and observations on dielectronic recombination

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Contrast Materials Children ...

  12. Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (MRFM) system, developed by ARL, is the world's most sensitive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic analysis tool,...

  13. Resonant power converters

    CERN Document Server

    Kazimierczuk, Marian K

    2012-01-01

    This book is devoted to resonant energy conversion in power electronics. It is a practical, systematic guide to the analysis and design of various dc-dc resonant inverters, high-frequency rectifiers, and dc-dc resonant converters that are building blocks of many of today's high-frequency energy processors. Designed to function as both a superior senior-to-graduate level textbook for electrical engineering courses and a valuable professional reference for practicing engineers, it provides students and engineers with a solid grasp of existing high-frequency technology, while acquainting them wit

  14. Tunable multiwalled nanotube resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Kenneth J; Girit, Caglar O; Mickelson, William E; Zettl, Alexander K; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2013-11-05

    A tunable nanoscale resonator has potential applications in precise mass, force, position, and frequency measurement. One embodiment of this device consists of a specially prepared multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) suspended between a metal electrode and a mobile, piezoelectrically controlled contact. By harnessing a unique telescoping ability of MWNTs, one may controllably slide an inner nanotube core from its outer nanotube casing, effectively changing its length and thereby changing the tuning of its resonance frequency. Resonant energy transfer may be used with a nanoresonator to detect molecules at a specific target oscillation frequency, without the use of a chemical label, to provide label-free chemical species detection.

  15. Dihadronic and dileptonic resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gareev, F.A.; Barabanov, M.Yu.; Kazacha, G.S.

    1997-01-01

    Simple phenomenological rules are suggested for calculation of dihadron and dilepton resonance masses. A general interpretation is given for different exotic resonances in nuclear physics: Darmstadt-effect, dibaryon, dipion and other resonances. Information about the inner structure of e ± , proton, neutron, pions and so on can be obtained from the usual reactions of the type e + + e - =>γγ, e ± +γ=>e ± γ, e ± μ ± , e ± N... at low, intermediate and high energies using existing experimental devices

  16. Periodicity of resonant tunneling current induced by the Stark resonances in semiconductor nanowire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wołoszyn, M.; Adamowski, J.; Wójcik, P.; Spisak, B. J.

    2013-10-01

    The modification of the electronic current resulting from Stark resonances has been studied for the semiconductor nanowire with the double-barrier structure. Based on the calculated current-voltage characteristics, we have shown that the resonant tunneling current is a periodic function of the width of the spacer layer. We have also demonstrated that the simultaneous change of the source-drain voltage and the voltage applied to the gate located near the nanowire leads to almost periodic changes of the resonant tunneling current as a function of the source-drain and gate voltages. The periodic properties of the resonant tunneling current result from the formation of the Stark resonance states. If we change the electric field acting in the nanowire, the Stark states periodically acquire the energies from the transport window and enhance the tunneling current in a periodic manner. We have found that the separations between the resonant current peaks on the source-drain voltage scale can be described by a slowly increasing linear function of the Stark state quantum number. This allows us to identify the quantum states that are responsible for the enhancement of the resonant tunneling. We have proposed a method of the experimental observation of the Stark resonances in semiconductor double-barrier heterostructures.

  17. Neutron capture measurements and resonance parameters of dysprosium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, S.G.; Kye, Y.U.; Namkung, W.; Cho, M.H. [Pohang University of Science and Technology, Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, Pohang, Gyeongbuk (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Y.R.; Lee, M.W. [Dongnam Inst. of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Research Center, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, G.N. [Kyungpook National University, Department of Physics, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Ro, T.I. [Dong-A University, Department of Physics, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Danon, Y.; Williams, D. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering, Troy, NY (United States); Leinweber, G.; Block, R.C.; Barry, D.P.; Rapp, M.J. [Naval Nuclear Laboratory, Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory, Schenectady, NY (United States)

    2017-10-15

    Neutron capture yields of dysprosium isotopes ({sup 161}Dy, {sup 162}Dy, {sup 163}Dy, and {sup 164}Dy) were measured using the time-of-flight method with a 16 segment sodium iodide multiplicity detector. The measurements were made at the 25m flight station at the Gaerttner LINAC Center at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Resonance parameters were obtained using the multilevel R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY. The neutron capture data for four enriched dysprosium isotopes and one natural dysprosium sample were sequentially fitted. New resonances not listed in ENDF/B-VII.1 were observed. There were 29 and 17 new resonances from {sup 161}Dy and {sup 163}Dy isotopes, respectively. Six resonances from {sup 161}Dy isotope, two resonances from {sup 163}Dy, and four resonances from {sup 164}Dy were not observed. The capture resonance integrals of each isotope were calculated with the resulting resonance parameters and those of ENDF/B-VII.1 in the energy region from 0.5 eV to 20 MeV and were compared to the capture resonance integrals with the resonance parameters from ENDF/B-VII.1. A resonance integral value of the natural dysprosium calculated with present resonance parameters was 1405 ± 3.5 barn. The value is ∝ 0.3% higher than that obtained with the ENDF/B-VII.1 parameters. The distributions of the present and ENDF/B-VII.1 neutron widths were compared to a Porter-Thomas distribution. Neutron strength functions for {sup 161}Dy and {sup 163}Dy were calculated with the present resonance parameters and both values were in between the values of ''Atlas of Neutron Resonances'' and ENDF/B-VII.1. The present radiation width distributions of {sup 161}Dy and {sup 163}Dy were fitted with the χ{sup 2} distribution by varying the degrees of freedom. (orig.)

  18. Electromagnetic decay of giant resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beene, J.R.; Bertrand, F.E.; Halbert, M.L.; Auble, R.L.; Hensley, D.C.; Horen, D.J.; Robinson, R.L.; Sayer, R.O.; Sjoreen, T.P.

    1985-01-01

    Coincidence experiments were done to investigate the photon and neutron emission from the giant resonance regions of 208 Pb and 90 Zr using the ORNL Spin Spectrometer, a 72-segment NaI detector system. We have determined the total gamma-decay probability, the ground-state gamma branching ratio, and the branching ratios to a number of low-lying states as a function of excitation energy in 208 Pb to approx.15 MeV. Similar data were also obtained on 90 Zr. The total yield of ground-state E2 gamma radiation in 208 Pb and the comparative absence of such radiation in 90 Zr can only be understood if decay of compound (damped) states is considered. Other observations in 208 Pb include the absence of a significant branch from the giant quadrupole resonance (GQR) to the 3 - state at 2.6 MeV, a strong branch to a 3 - state at 4.97 MeV from the same region, and transitions to various 1 - states between 5 to 7 MeV from the E* approx. 14 MeV region (EO resonance)

  19. Electronic phase separation in La sub 1 sub . sub 2 Sr sub 1 sub . sub 8 Mn sub 2 O sub 7 observed by sup 5 sup 5 Mn nuclear magnetic resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Shimizu, K; Renard, J P; Pevcolevschi, A

    2003-01-01

    A single crystal of perovskite bilayer manganite La sub 1 sub . sub 2 Sr sub 1 sub . sub 8 Mn sub 2 O sub 7 has been studied by the sup 5 sup 5 Mn NMR technique. The observed spectra at 4.2 K in zero external magnetic field are broad and spread in the frequency range 310-480 MHz. The shape of the spectrum depends strongly on the rf radiation field for exciting and refocusing a spin-echo signal. In external magnetic fields up to 1.75 T, signals arising from both metallic and insulating phases are observed, which is an evidence of the electronic phase separation. (author)

  20. Resonant Orbital Dynamics in LEO Region: Space Debris in Focus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Sampaio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing number of objects orbiting the earth justifies the great attention and interest in the observation, spacecraft protection, and collision avoidance. These studies involve different disturbances and resonances in the orbital motions of these objects distributed by the distinct altitudes. In this work, objects in resonant orbital motions are studied in low earth orbits. Using the two-line elements (TLE of the NORAD, resonant angles and resonant periods associated with real motions are described, providing more accurate information to develop an analytical model that describes a certain resonance. The time behaviors of the semimajor axis, eccentricity, and inclination of some space debris are studied. Possible irregular motions are observed by the frequency analysis and by the presence of different resonant angles describing the orbital dynamics of these objects.

  1. Perspective on resonances of metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Li; Huang, Lirong

    2015-07-27

    Electromagnetic resonance as the most important characteristic of metamaterials enables lots of exotic phenomena, such as invisible, negative refraction, man-made magnetism, etc. Conventional LC-resonance circuit model as the most authoritative and classic model is good at explaining and predicting the fundamental resonance wavelength of a metamaterial, while feels hard for high-order resonances, especially for resonance intensity (strength of resonance, determining on the performance and efficiency of metamaterial-based devices). In present work, via an easy-to-understand mass-spring model, we present a different and comprehensive insight for the resonance mechanism of metamaterials, through which both the resonance wavelengths (including the fundamental and high-order resonance wavelengths) and resonance intensities of metamaterials can be better understood. This developed theory has been well verified by different-material and different-structure resonators. This perspective will provide a broader space for exploring novel optical devices based on metamaterials (or metasurfaces).

  2. Piezoelectric MEMS resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Piazza, Gianluca

    2017-01-01

    This book introduces piezoelectric microelectromechanical (pMEMS) resonators to a broad audience by reviewing design techniques including use of finite element modeling, testing and qualification of resonators, and fabrication and large scale manufacturing techniques to help inspire future research and entrepreneurial activities in pMEMS. The authors discuss the most exciting developments in the area of materials and devices for the making of piezoelectric MEMS resonators, and offer direct examples of the technical challenges that need to be overcome in order to commercialize these types of devices. Some of the topics covered include: Widely-used piezoelectric materials, as well as materials in which there is emerging interest Principle of operation and design approaches for the making of flexural, contour-mode, thickness-mode, and shear-mode piezoelectric resonators, and examples of practical implementation of these devices Large scale manufacturing approaches, with a focus on the practical aspects associate...

  3. Resonant diphoton phenomenology simplified

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panico, Giuliano [IFAE, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona,E-08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Vecchi, Luca [SISSA,via Bonomea 265, 34136, Trieste (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Padova and INFN - Sezione di Padova,via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Wulzer, Andrea [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Padova and INFN - Sezione di Padova,via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy)

    2016-06-30

    A framework is proposed to describe resonant diphoton phenomenology at hadron colliders in full generality. It can be employed for a comprehensive model-independent interpretation of the experimental data. Within the general framework, few benchmark scenarios are defined as representative of the various phenomenological options and/or of motivated new physics scenarios. Their usage is illustrated by performing a characterization of the 750 GeV excess, based on a recast of available experimental results. We also perform an assessment of which properties of the resonance could be inferred, after discovery, by a careful experimental study of the diphoton distributions. These include the spin J of the new particle and its dominant production mode. Partial information on its CP-parity can also be obtained, but only for J≥2. The complete determination of the resonance CP properties requires studying the pattern of the initial state radiation that accompanies the resonant diphoton production.

  4. Magnetic Resonance Cholangiopancreatography (MRCP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). ERCP is a diagnostic procedure that combines endoscopy , which uses an illuminated optical instrument to ... The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Biliary ...

  5. Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arlart, I.P.; Guhl, L.

    1992-01-01

    An account is given in this paper of the physical and technical principles underlying the 'time-of-flight' technique for imaging of vessels by magnetic resonance tomography. Major indications for the new procedure of magnetic resonance angiography at present are intracerebral and extracerebral vessels, with digital subtraction angiography quite often being required to cope with minor alterations (small aneurysms, small occlusions). Magnetic resonance angiography and digital subtraction angiography are compared to each other for advantages and disadvantages. Basically, replacement of radiological angiography by magnetic resonance angiography appears to be possible only within limits, since X-ray diagnostics primarily provides morphological information about vessels, whereas flow dynamics is visualized by the 'time-of-flight' technique. (orig.) [de

  6. Resonances in QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutz, Matthias F. M.; Lange, Jens Sören; Pennington, Michael; Bettoni, Diego; Brambilla, Nora; Crede, Volker; Eidelman, Simon; Gillitzer, Albrecht; Gradl, Wolfgang; Lang, Christian B.; Metag, Volker; Nakano, Takashi; Nieves, Juan; Neubert, Sebastian; Oka, Makoto; Olsen, Stephen L.; Pappagallo, Marco; Paul, Stephan; Pelizäus, Marc; Pilloni, Alessandro; Prencipe, Elisabetta; Ritman, Jim; Ryan, Sinead; Thoma, Ulrike; Uwer, Ulrich; Weise, Wolfram

    2016-04-01

    We report on the EMMI Rapid Reaction Task Force meeting 'Resonances in QCD', which took place at GSI October 12-14, 2015 (Fig.~1). A group of 26 people met to discuss the physics of resonances in QCD. The aim of the meeting was defined by the following three key questions; what is needed to understand the physics of resonances in QCD?; where does QCD lead us to expect resonances with exotic quantum numbers?; and what experimental efforts are required to arrive at a coherent picture? For light mesons and baryons only those with up, down and strange quark content were considered. For heavy-light and heavy-heavy meson systems, those with charm quarks were the focus.This document summarizes the discussions by the participants, which in turn led to the coherent conclusions we present here.

  7. Writing with resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Ninna; Wegener, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we explore what organization and management scholars can do to write with resonance and to facilitate an emotional, bodily, or in other ways sensory connection between the text and the reader. We propose that resonance can be relevant for organization and management scholars in two...... ways. First, it may facilitate a better understanding of the research we are attempting to convey in our papers, an understanding that draws on the reader’s prior experiences, and their embodied, embedded knowledge. Second, resonance may foster an inclination in the reader to engage with, contribute to......, and thus bring forward the field of research in question. We propose that writing with resonance may be a way to further the impact of academic work by extending the modalities with which our readers can relate to and experience our work....

  8. Lattices of dielectric resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Trubin, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    This book provides the analytical theory of complex systems composed of a large number of high-Q dielectric resonators. Spherical and cylindrical dielectric resonators with inferior and also whispering gallery oscillations allocated in various lattices are considered. A new approach to S-matrix parameter calculations based on perturbation theory of Maxwell equations, developed for a number of high-Q dielectric bodies, is introduced. All physical relationships are obtained in analytical form and are suitable for further computations. Essential attention is given to a new unified formalism of the description of scattering processes. The general scattering task for coupled eigen oscillations of the whole system of dielectric resonators is described. The equations for the  expansion coefficients are explained in an applicable way. The temporal Green functions for the dielectric resonator are presented. The scattering process of short pulses in dielectric filter structures, dielectric antennas  and lattices of d...

  9. Nuclear isovector giant resonances excited by pion single charge exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, B.H.

    1993-07-01

    This thesis is an experimental study of isovector giant resonances in light nuclei excited by pion single charge exchange reactions. Giant dipole resonances in light nuclei are known to be highly structured. For the mass 9 and 13 giant dipole resonances, isospin considerations were found to be very important to understanding this structure. by comparing the excitation functions from cross section measurements of the (π + , π 0 ) and (π, π 0 ) inclusive reactions, the authors determined the dominant isospin structure of the analog IVGR's. The comparison was made after decomposing the cross section into resonant and non-resonant components. This decomposition is made in the framework of strong absorption and quasi-free scattering. Measurements in the region of the isovector giant dipole resonances (IVGDR) were made to cover the inclusive angular distributions out to the second minimum. Study of the giant resonance decay process provides further understanding of the resonances. This study was carried out by observing the (π + , π 0 p) coincident reactions involving the resonances of 9 B and 13 N excited from 9 Be and 13 C nuclei. These measurements determined the spectra of the decay protons. This method also permitted a decomposition of the giant resonances into their isospin components. The multipolarities of the resonances were revealed by the decay proton angular correlations which, for dipoles, are of the form 1 + A 2 P 2 (cos θ)

  10. Resonant dielectric metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loui, Hung; Carroll, James; Clem, Paul G; Sinclair, Michael B

    2014-12-02

    A resonant dielectric metamaterial comprises a first and a second set of dielectric scattering particles (e.g., spheres) having different permittivities arranged in a cubic array. The array can be an ordered or randomized array of particles. The resonant dielectric metamaterials are low-loss 3D isotropic materials with negative permittivity and permeability. Such isotropic double negative materials offer polarization and direction independent electromagnetic wave propagation.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, Angus

    1990-01-01

    An assessment is made of the clinical benefits of expensive diagnostic technology, such as the magnetic resonance imaging. It is concluded that to most radiologists, magnetic resonance imaging has a definite place in the diagnostic scenario, especially for demonstrating central nervous system lesions in multiple sclerosis. While it is recognized that medical and financial resources are limited, it is emphasised that the cost to society must be balanced against the patient benefit. 17 refs

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, B.C.

    1984-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance gyro using two nuclear magnetic resonance gases, preferably xenon 129 and xenon 131, together with two alkaline metal vapors, preferably rubidium, potassium or cesium, one of the two alkaline metal vapors being pumped by light which has the wavelength of that alkaline metal vapor, and the other alkaline vapor being illuminated by light which has the wavelength of that other alkaline vapor

  13. Hexagonal quartz resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Roswell D. M.

    1982-01-01

    A generally flat, relatively thin AT-cut piezoelectric resonator element structured to minimize the force-frequency effect when mounted and energized in a housing. The resonator is in the form of an equilateral hexagon with the X crystallographic axis of the crystal passing through one set of opposing corners with mounting being effected at an adjacent set of corners respectively .+-.60.degree. away from the X axis which thereby results in a substantially zero frequency shift of the operating frequency.

  14. Parity nonconservation in neutron resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, G.E.; Grossmann, C.A.; Stephenson, S.L.; Bowman, J.D.; Knudson, J.; Penttila, S.; Seestrom, S.J.; Smith, D.A.; Yen Yifen; Yuan, V.W.; Crawford, B.E.; Roberson, N.R.; Delheij, P.P.J.; Haseyama, T.; Masaike, A.; Matsuda, Y.; Lowie, L.Y.; Postma, H.; Sharapov, E.I.

    2000-01-01

    The TRIPLE Collaboration has performed measurements of the helicity dependence of the neutron resonance cross section for many nuclides. More than 70 statistically significant parity violations have been observed. Generic enhancements amplify the signal for symmetry breaking and the stochastic properties of the compound nucleus permit the strength of the symmetry-breaking interaction to be determined without knowledge of the wave functions of individual states. The measurements are concentrated in the regions of the 3p and 4p maxima of the neutron strength function-near A=110 and A=230. The results to date are summarized

  15. Simulation study of resonant reflector for S-band BWO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choyal, Y; Parmar, Nidhi; Saini, Ajay Kumar; Chhotray, S K; Bhat, K S; Kumar, Lalit

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the result of simulation studies of resonant reflector used for reflection of backward wave in relativistic BWO. The resonant reflector is modelled and analyzed by CST MWS for TM 01 . A TM 01 mode is fed at the output end of the BWO and signal is observed at the cathode end. Results show that 90 percent of the backward TM 01 wave is get reflected back by the locked TM 02 mode in the resonant reflector.

  16. NN resonance and the corrections to Goldberger-Treiman relation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhamathi, G.; Raghavan, S.

    1977-01-01

    The relevance of the recent experimental observation of possible bound and resonant states in NN scattering to the Goldberger-Treiman (GT) relation is examined. It is pointed out that an S-wave resonance in NN scattering goes a long way towards accounting for the corrections to the GT relations. Values of the mass and width of the resonance capable of giving a reasonable fit for the GT relation are presented. (author)

  17. Radial Bragg Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuer, Jacob; Sun, Xiankai

    Circular resonators are promising candidates for a wide range of applications, ranging from optical communication systems through basic research involving highly confined fields and strong photon-atom interactions to biochemical and rotation sensing. The main characteristics of circular resonators are the Q factor, the free spectral range (FSR), and the modal volume, where the last two are primarily determined by the resonator radius. The total internal reflection (TIR) mechanism used for guidance in "conventional" resonators couples these attributes and limits the ability to realize compact devices exhibiting large FSR, small modal volume, and high Q. Recently, a new class of annular resonator, based on a single defect surrounded by radial Bragg reflectors, has been proposed and analyzed. The radial Bragg confinement decouples the modal volume from the Q and paves the way for the realization of compact, low-loss resonators. These properties as well as the unique mode profile of these circular Bragg nanoresonators (CBNRs) and nanolasers (CBNLs) make the devices within this class an excellent tool to realize nanometer scale semiconductor lasers and ultrasensitive detectors, as well as to study nonlinear optics.

  18. Acoustic resonance for nonmetallic mine detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kercel, S.W.

    1998-04-01

    The feasibility of acoustic resonance for detection of plastic mines was investigated by researchers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Instrumentation and Controls Division under an internally funded program. The data reported in this paper suggest that acoustic resonance is not a practical method for mine detection. Representative small plastic anti-personnel mines were tested, and were found to not exhibit detectable acoustic resonances. Also, non-metal objects known to have strong acoustic resonances were tested with a variety of excitation techniques, and no practical non-contact method of exciting a consistently detectable resonance in a buried object was discovered. Some of the experimental data developed in this work may be useful to other researchers seeking a method to detect buried plastic mines. A number of excitation methods and their pitfalls are discussed. Excitation methods that were investigated include swept acoustic, chopped acoustic, wavelet acoustic, and mechanical shaking. Under very contrived conditions, a weak response that could be attributed to acoustic resonance was observed, but it does not appear to be practical as a mine detection feature. Transfer properties of soil were investigated. Impulse responses of several representative plastic mines were investigated. Acoustic leakage coupling, and its implications as a disruptive mechanism were investigated.

  19. Apparent diffusion coefficient measurements in diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the anterior mediastinum: inter-observer reproducibility of five different methods of region-of-interest positioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priola, Adriano Massimiliano; Priola, Sandro Massimo; Parlatano, Daniela; Gned, Dario; Veltri, Andrea [San Luigi Gonzaga University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Regione Gonzole 10, Orbassano, Torino (Italy); Giraudo, Maria Teresa [University of Torino, Department of Mathematics ' ' Giuseppe Peano' ' , Torino (Italy); Giardino, Roberto; Ardissone, Francesco [San Luigi Gonzaga University Hospital, Department of Thoracic Surgery, Regione Gonzole 10, Orbassano, Torino (Italy); Ferrero, Bruno [San Luigi Gonzaga University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Regione Gonzole 10, Orbassano, Torino (Italy)

    2017-04-15

    To investigate inter-reader reproducibility of five different region-of-interest (ROI) protocols for apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurements in the anterior mediastinum. In eighty-one subjects, on ADC mapping, two readers measured the ADC using five methods of ROI positioning that encompassed the entire tissue (whole tissue volume [WTV], three slices observer-defined [TSOD], single-slice [SS]) or the more restricted areas (one small round ROI [OSR], multiple small round ROI [MSR]). Inter-observer variability was assessed with interclass correlation coefficient (ICC), coefficient of variation (CoV), and Bland-Altman analysis. Nonparametric tests were performed to compare the ADC between ROI methods. The measurement time was recorded and compared between ROI methods. All methods showed excellent inter-reader agreement with best and worst reproducibility in WTV and OSR, respectively (ICC, 0.937/0.874; CoV, 7.3 %/16.8 %; limits of agreement, ±0.44/±0.77 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s). ADC values of OSR and MSR were significantly lower compared to the other methods in both readers (p < 0.001). The SS and OSR methods required less measurement time (14 ± 2 s) compared to the others (p < 0.0001), while the WTV method required the longest measurement time (90 ± 56 and 77 ± 49 s for each reader) (p < 0.0001). All methods demonstrate excellent inter-observer reproducibility with the best agreement in WTV, although it requires the longest measurement time. (orig.)

  20. Metal-in-metal localized surface plasmon resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G B; Earp, A A

    2010-01-01

    Anomalous strong resonances in silver and gold nanoporous thin films which conduct are found to arise from isolated metal nano-islands separated from the surrounding percolating metal network by a thin loop of insulator. This observed resonant optical response is modelled. The observed peak position is in agreement with the observed average dimensions of the silver core and insulator shell. As the insulating ring thickness shrinks, the resonance moves to longer wavelengths and strengthens. This structure is the Babinet's principle counterpart of dielectric core-metal shell nanoparticles embedded in dielectric. Like for the latter, tuning of resonant absorption is possible, but here the matrix reflects rather than transmits, and tuning to longer wavelengths is more practical. A new class of metal mirror occurring as a single thin layer is identified using the same resonances in dense metal mirrors. Narrow band deep localized dips in reflectance result.

  1. Seismic resonances of acoustic cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, F. M.; Esterhazy, S.; Perugia, I.; Bokelmann, G.

    2016-12-01

    situated, whichis connected to a karst cave of 30 m diameter in 70 m depth. Our aim is toinvestigate whether resonances predicted from theoretical models can be alsoobserved in data from such real experiments. Observation of spectral resonantpeaks could serve as the foundation of a cavity detection method that could beutilized for nuclear verification.

  2. Resonance – Journal of Science Education | Indian Academy of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Ann C Neville. Articles written in Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Volume 23 Issue 2 February 2018 pp 235-239 Classics. Observations of Radio Galaxies with the One-mile Telescope at Cambridge · Martin Ryle B Elsmore Ann C Neville · More Details ...

  3. Low frequency wave resonance in fringing reef environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pomeroy, A.W.M.; van Dongeren, A.; Lowe, R.J.; Van Thiel de Vries, J.S.M.; Roelvink, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Low frequency wave resonance has been postulated to enhance damage to coral reef protected coastlines during storm events. This paper uses the numerical model XBeach to examine the dynamics that contribute to resonance that have been previously observed on a fringing reef on Guam during tropical

  4. Resonance magnetic x-ray scattering study of erbium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanyal, M.K.; Gibbs, D.; Bohr, J.

    1994-01-01

    The magnetic phases of erbium have been studied by resonance x-ray-scattering techniques. When the incident x-ray energy is tuned near the L(III) absorption edge, large resonant enhancements of the magnetic scattering are observed above 18 K. We have measured the energy and polarization dependence...

  5. MACHINERY RESONANCE AND DRILLING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leishear, R.; Fowley, M.

    2010-01-23

    New developments in vibration analysis better explain machinery resonance, through an example of drill bit chattering during machining of rusted steel. The vibration of an operating drill motor was measured, the natural frequency of an attached spring was measured, and the two frequencies were compared to show that the system was resonant. For resonance to occur, one of the natural frequencies of a structural component must be excited by a cyclic force of the same frequency. In this case, the frequency of drill bit chattering due to motor rotation equaled the spring frequency (cycles per second), and the system was unstable. A soft rust coating on the steel to be drilled permitted chattering to start at the drill bit tip, and the bit oscillated on and off of the surface, which increased the wear rate of the drill bit. This resonant condition is typically referred to as a motor critical speed. The analysis presented here quantifies the vibration associated with this particular critical speed problem, using novel techniques to describe resonance.

  6. Electrothermally Tunable Arch Resonator

    KAUST Repository

    Hajjaj, Amal Z.

    2017-03-18

    This paper demonstrates experimentally, theoretically, and numerically a wide-range tunability of electrothermally actuated microelectromechanical arch beams. The beams are made of silicon and are intentionally fabricated with some curvature as in-plane shallow arches. An electrothermal voltage is applied between the anchors of the beam generating a current that controls the axial stress caused by thermal expansion. When the electrothermal voltage increases, the compressive stress increases inside the arch beam. This leads to an increase in its curvature, thereby increasing its resonance frequencies. We show here that the first resonance frequency can increase monotonically up to twice its initial value. We show also that after some electrothermal voltage load, the third resonance frequency starts to become more sensitive to the axial thermal stress, while the first resonance frequency becomes less sensitive. These results can be used as guidelines to utilize arches as wide-range tunable resonators. Analytical results based on the nonlinear Euler Bernoulli beam theory are generated and compared with the experimental data and the results of a multi-physics finite-element model. A good agreement is found among all the results. [2016-0291

  7. Rabi resonance in spin systems: theory and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layton, Kelvin J; Tahayori, Bahman; Mareels, Iven M Y; Farrell, Peter M; Johnston, Leigh A

    2014-05-01

    The response of a magnetic resonance spin system is predicted and experimentally verified for the particular case of a continuous wave amplitude modulated radiofrequency excitation. The experimental results demonstrate phenomena not previously observed in magnetic resonance systems, including a secondary resonance condition when the amplitude of the excitation equals the modulation frequency. This secondary resonance produces a relatively large steady state magnetisation with Fourier components at harmonics of the modulation frequency. Experiments are in excellent agreement with the theoretical prediction derived from the Bloch equations, which provides a sound theoretical framework for future developments in NMR spectroscopy and imaging. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Resonant x-ray magnetic scattering in holmium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbs, D.

    1991-01-01

    We review the results of resonant x-ray magnetic scattering experiments on the rare earth metal holmium. When the incident incident x-ray energy is tuned near the L III absorption edge, large resonant enhancements of the magnetic scattering and resonant integer harmonics are observed. These results are analyzed within the theory of x-ray resonance exchange scattering assuming electric dipole (2p → 5d) and quadrupole (2p → 4f) transitions among atomic orbitals. 30 refs., 5 figs

  9. Ferromagnetic resonance study of Fe50Ag50 granular film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarmiento, G.; Fdez-Gubieda, M.L.; Siruguri, V.; Lezama, L.; Orue, I.

    2007-01-01

    Fe 50 Ag 50 granular film, produced by the pulsed laser deposition technique, has been studied using ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) at temperatures ranging from 4 to 300K. Three different resonance modes are well observed in the whole temperature range. We have also studied the angular evolution of the resonance peaks at three different temperatures T=150, 250, 300K. The thermal and the angular evolution of the three resonance fields has been interpreted on the basis of the existence of different magnetic coupling between the Fe nanoparticles and a weakly magnetized interface

  10. Phosphorus 31 nuclear magnetic resonance examination of female reproductive tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noyszewski, E.A.; Raman, J.; Trupin, S.R.; McFarlin, B.L.; Dawson, M.J. (Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign (USA))

    1989-08-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a powerful method of investigating the relationship between metabolism and function in living tissues. We present evidence that the phosphorus 31 spectra of myometrium and placenta are functions of physiologic state and gestational age. Specific spectroscopic abnormalities are observed in association with disorders of pregnancy and gynecologic diseases. Our results suggest that noninvasive nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy examinations may sometimes be a useful addition to magnetic resonance imaging examinations, and that nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of biopsy specimens could become a cost-effective method of evaluating certain biochemical abnormalities.

  11. Analysis of resonance-driving imperfections in the AGS Booster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, C.; Shoji, Y.; Danby, G.; Glenn, J.W.; Jackson, G.J.; Soukas, A.; van Asselt, W.; Whalen, C.

    1994-01-01

    At the design intensity of 1.5 x 10 13 ppp, the space charge tune shift in the AGS Booster at injection has been estimated to be about 0.35. The beam tunes are therefore spread over many lower order resonance lines and the associated stopbands must be corrected in order to minimize the amplitude growth due to resonance excitation. This requires proper compensation of the resonance-driving harmonics which result from random magnetic field errors. The observation and correction of second and third order resonance stopbands in the AGS Booster is reviewed, and an analysis of magnetic field imperfections based on the required corrections is given

  12. Identification of resonant earthquake ground motion

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Resonant ground motion has been observed in earthquake records measured at several parts of the world. This class of ground motion is characterized by its energy being contained in a narrow frequency band. This paper develops measures to quantify the frequency content of the ground motion using the entropy ...

  13. Imitation in Infancy: Rational or Motor Resonance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulus, Markus; Hunnius, Sabine; Vissers, Marlies; Bekkering, Harold

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigates the contribution of 2 mechanisms to imitation in infancy. The principle of rational action suggests that infants normatively evaluate the efficiency of observed actions. In contrast, it has been proposed that motor resonance (i.e., the mapping of others' actions onto one's own motor repertoire) plays a central role…

  14. Resonance Raman study of benzyl radical

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langkilde, F.W.; Bajdor, K.; Wilbrandt, R.

    1992-01-01

    symmetric a1 modes. The remaining observed bands are tentatively assigned to fundamental modes of b1, a2, and b2 symmetry, and to overtones and combinations. The resonance Raman spectra are found to be quite different from previous fluorescence spectra of benzyl, and the origins of these differences...

  15. Identification of resonant earthquake ground motion

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Resonant ground motion has been observed in earthquake records measured at several parts of the world. This class of ground motion is characteri- zed by its energy being contained in a narrow frequency band. This paper deve- lops measures to quantify the frequency content of the ground motion using the.

  16. Quartz resonator processing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Roswell D. M.

    1983-01-01

    Disclosed is a single chamber ultra-high vacuum processing system for the oduction of hermetically sealed quartz resonators wherein electrode metallization and sealing are carried out along with cleaning and bake-out without any air exposure between the processing steps. The system includes a common vacuum chamber in which is located a rotatable wheel-like member which is adapted to move a plurality of individual component sets of a flat pack resonator unit past discretely located processing stations in said chamber whereupon electrode deposition takes place followed by the placement of ceramic covers over a frame containing a resonator element and then to a sealing stage where a pair of hydraulic rams including heating elements effect a metallized bonding of the covers to the frame.

  17. Electrothermally Tunable Bridge Resonator

    KAUST Repository

    Hajjaj, Amal Z.

    2016-12-05

    This paper demonstrates experimentally, theoretically, and numerically a wide-range tunability of an in-plane clamped-clamped microbeam, bridge, and resonator compressed by a force due to electrothermal actuation. We demonstrate that a single resonator can be operated at a wide range of frequencies. The microbeam is actuated electrothermally, by passing a DC current through it. We show that when increasing the electrothermal voltage, the compressive stress inside the microbeam increases, which leads eventually to its buckling. Before buckling, the fundamental frequency decreases until it drops to very low values, almost to zero. After buckling, the fundamental frequency increases, which is shown to be as high as twice the original resonance frequency. Analytical results based on the Galerkin discretization of the Euler Bernoulli beam theory are generated and compared to the experimental data and to simulation results of a multi-physics finite-element model. A good agreement is found among all the results.

  18. Reconfigurable optical routers based on Coupled Resonator Induced Transparency resonances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancinelli, M; Bettotti, P; Fedeli, J M; Pavesi, L

    2012-10-08

    The interferometric coupling of pairs of resonators in a resonator sequence generates coupled ring induced transparency (CRIT) resonances. These have quality factors an order of magnitude greater than those of single resonators. We show that it is possible to engineer CRIT resonances in tapered SCISSOR (Side Coupled Integrated Space Sequence of Resonator) to realize fast and efficient reconfigurable optical switches and routers handling several channels while keeping single channel addressing capabilities. Tapered SCISSORs are fabricated in silicon-on-insulator technology. Furthermore, tapered SCISSORs show multiple-channel switching behavior that can be exploited in DWDM applications.

  19. Breaking mean-motion resonances during Type I planet migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hands, T. O.; Alexander, R. D.

    2018-03-01

    We present 2D hydrodynamical simulations of pairs of planets migrating simultaneously in the Type I regime in a protoplanetary disc. Convergent migration naturally leads to the trapping of these planets in mean-motion resonances. Once in resonance the planets' eccentricity grows rapidly, and disc-planet torques cause the planets to escape resonance on a time-scale of a few hundred orbits. The effect is more pronounced in highly viscous discs, but operates efficiently even in inviscid discs. We attribute this resonance-breaking to overstable librations driven by moderate eccentricity damping, but find that this mechanism operates differently in hydrodynamic simulations than in previous analytic calculations. Planets escaping resonance in this manner can potentially explain the observed paucity of resonances in Kepler multitransiting systems, and we suggest that simultaneous disc-driven migration remains the most plausible means of assembling tightly packed planetary systems.

  20. Electrical Modulation of Fano Resonance in Plasmonic Nanostructures Using Graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emani, Naresh K.; Chung, Ting-Fung; Kildishev, Alexander V.

    2014-01-01

    Pauli blocking of interband transistions gives rise to tunable optical properties in single layer graphene (SLG). This effect is exploited in a graphene-nanoantenna hybrid device where Fano resonant plasmonic nanostructures are fabricated on top of a graphene sheet. The use of Fano resonant eleme......-element simulations. Our approach can be used for development of next generation of tunable plasmonic and hybrid nanophotonic devices.......Pauli blocking of interband transistions gives rise to tunable optical properties in single layer graphene (SLG). This effect is exploited in a graphene-nanoantenna hybrid device where Fano resonant plasmonic nanostructures are fabricated on top of a graphene sheet. The use of Fano resonant...... elements enhances the interaction of incident radiation with the graphene sheet and enables efficient electrical modulation of the plasmonic resonance. We observe electrically controlled damping in the Fano resonances occurring at approximately 2 μm, and the results are verified by full-wave 3D finite...

  1. Extending Quantum Chemistry of Bound States to Electronic Resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagau, Thomas-C.; Bravaya, Ksenia B.; Krylov, Anna I.

    2017-05-01

    Electronic resonances are metastable states with finite lifetime embedded in the ionization or detachment continuum. They are ubiquitous in chemistry, physics, and biology. Resonances play a central role in processes as diverse as DNA radiolysis, plasmonic catalysis, and attosecond spectroscopy. This review describes novel equation-of-motion coupled-cluster (EOM-CC) methods designed to treat resonances and bound states on an equal footing. Built on complex-variable techniques such as complex scaling and complex absorbing potentials that allow resonances to be associated with a single eigenstate of the molecular Hamiltonian rather than several continuum eigenstates, these methods extend electronic-structure tools developed for bound states to electronic resonances. Selected examples emphasize the formal advantages as well as the numerical accuracy of EOM-CC in the treatment of electronic resonances. Connections to experimental observables such as spectra and cross sections, as well as practical aspects of implementing complex-valued approaches, are also discussed.

  2. Longitudinal Near-Field Coupling between Acoustic Resonators Grafted onto a Waveguide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Feng Wang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigate longitudinal near-field coupling between acoustic resonators grafted along a waveguide. Experiments are performed in the audible range with a simple acoustic system composed of a finite aperiodic sequence of air resonators. Transmission typically shows a zero around a resonance frequency of a single resonator, as is well known. When two identical resonators are brought in close proximity, however, we observe that longitudinal near-field coupling strongly influences the acoustic transmission. When the separation between resonators is increased so that they can be considered in the far field of one another, we further observe the appearance of Fano-like transmission profiles. We explain this observation by the formation of locally resonant Fabry-Perot interferometers from every pair of resonators. All experimental results are compared to three-dimensional finite element analysis of the acoustic system.

  3. Nanoantenna using mechanical resonance

    KAUST Repository

    Chang Hwa Lee,

    2010-11-01

    Nanoantenna using mechanical resonance vibration is made from an indium tin oxide (ITO) coated vertically aligned nanorod array. Only this structure works as a radio with demodulator without any electrical circuit using field emission phenomenon. A top-down fabrication method of an ITO coated nanorod array is proposed using a modified UV lithography. The received radio frequency and the resonance frequency of nanoantenna can be controlled by the fabrication condition through the height of a nanorod array. The modulated signals are received successfully with the transmission carrier wave frequency (248MHz) and the proposed nanoantenna is expected to be used in communication system for ultra small scale sensor. ©2010 IEEE.

  4. Acoustic Fano resonators

    KAUST Repository

    Amin, Muhammad

    2014-07-01

    The resonances with asymmetric Fano line-shapes were originally discovered in the context of quantum mechanics (U. Fano, Phys. Rev., 124, 1866-1878, 1961). Quantum Fano resonances were generated from destructive interference of a discrete state with a continuum one. During the last decade this concept has been applied in plasmonics where the interference between a narrowband polariton and a broader one has been used to generate electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) (M. Rahmani, et al., Laser Photon. Rev., 7, 329-349, 2013).

  5. Resonant freak microwaves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguiar, F.M. de

    2011-01-01

    The Helmholtz equation describing transverse magnetic modes in a closed flat microwave resonator with 60 randomly distributed discs is numerically solved. At lower frequencies, the calculated wave intensity spatially distributed obeys the universal Porter-Thomas form if localized modes are excluded. A superposition of resonant modes is shown to lead to rare events of extreme intensities (freak waves) at localized 'hot spots'. The temporally distributed intensity of such a superposition at the center of a hot spot also follows the Porter-Thomas form. Branched modes are found at higher frequencies. The results bear resemblance to recent experiments reported in an open cavity.

  6. Physics of Sports: Resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, David

    2000-04-01

    When force is applied by an athlete to sports equipment resonances can occur. Just a few examples are: the ringing of a spiked volleyball, the strumming of a golf club shaft during a swing, and multiple modes induced in an aluminum baseball bat when striking a ball. Resonances produce acoustic waves which, if conditions are favorable, can be detected off the playing field. This can provide a means to evaluate athletic performance during game conditions. Results are given from the use of a simple hand-held acoustic detector - by a spectator sitting in the stands - to determine how hard volleyballs were spiked during college and high school games.

  7. Passive fiber resonator gyro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groellmann, P.; Herth, J.; Kemmler, M.; Kempf, K.; Neumann, G.

    After presenting the design principles of the passive fiber resonator gyroscope, which possesses the good scale-factor stability and repeatability of its active, ring-laser gyro counterpart, attention is given to the state of the art in fiber-optic component fabrication, with a view to achieving the requirements of low-loss fiber resonators. Also important is the rugged narrow-band semiconductor-laser light source that had to be modified for application in a system of this kind. Such error terms as polarization cross coupling and fiber backscattering are discussed, and methods are presented with which system output can be improved.

  8. Resonance Capture and Dynamics of 3-Planet Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charalambous, C.; Martí, J. G.; Beaugé, C.; Ramos, X. S.

    2018-03-01

    We present a series of dynamical maps for fictitious 3-planets systems in initially circular coplanar orbits. These maps have unveiled a rich resonant structure involving two or three planets, as well as indicating possible migration routes from secular to double resonances or pure 3-planet commensurabilities. These structures are then compared to the present-day orbital architecture of observed resonant chains. In a second part of the paper we describe N-body simulations of type-I migration. Depending on the orbital decay timescale, we show that 3-planet systems may be trapped in different combinations of independent commensurabilities: (i) double resonances, (ii) intersection between a 2-planet and a first-order 3-planet resonance, and (iii) simultaneous libration in two first-order 3-planet resonances. These latter outcomes are found for slow migrations, while double resonances are almost always the final outcome in high-density disks. Finally, we discuss an application to the TRAPPIST-1 system. We find that, for low migration rates and planetary masses of the order of the estimated values, most 3-planet sub-systems are able to reach the observed double resonances after following evolutionary routes defined by pure 3-planet resonances. The final orbital configuration shows resonance offsets comparable with present-day values without the need of tidal dissipation. For the 8/5 resonance proposed to dominate the dynamics of the two inner planets, we find little evidence of its dynamical significance; instead, we propose that this relation between mean motions could be a consequence of the interaction between a pure 3-planet resonance and a 2-planet commensurability between planets c and d.

  9. Resonant Auger studies of metallic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulthard, I.; Antel, W. J. Jr.; Frigo, S. P.; Freeland, J. W.; Moore, J.; Calaway, W. S.; Pellin, M. J.; Mendelsohn, M.; Sham, T. K.; Naftel, S. J.

    2000-01-01

    Results of resonant Auger spectroscopy experimental are presented for Cu, Co, and oxidized Al. Sublifetime narrowing of Auger spectra and generation of sublifetime narrowed absorption spectra constructed from Auger yield measurements were observed. Resonant Auger yields are used to identify three chemical states of oxidized Al. Partial absorption yield spectra were derived giving detailed electronic information and thickness information for the various chemical states of the bulk metal, the passivating aluminum oxide layer, and the metal-oxide interface region. In addition, the total absorption yield spectrum for the oxidized Al sample was constructed from the partial yield data, supporting the consistency of our method. (c) 2000 American Vacuum Society

  10. Magnetic resonance of phase transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Owens, Frank J; Farach, Horacio A

    1979-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance of Phase Transitions shows how the effects of phase transitions are manifested in the magnetic resonance data. The book discusses the basic concepts of structural phase and magnetic resonance; various types of magnetic resonances and their underlying principles; and the radiofrequency methods of nuclear magnetic resonance. The text also describes quadrupole methods; the microwave technique of electron spin resonance; and the Mössbauer effect. Phase transitions in various systems such as fluids, liquid crystals, and crystals, including paramagnets and ferroelectrics, are also

  11. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  12. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Twentieth century bore witness to remarkable scientists whohave advanced our understanding of the brain. Among them,EPR (Electron Paramagnetic Resonance) imaging is particularlyuseful in monitoring hypoxic zones in tumors which arehighly resistant to radiation and chemotherapeutic treatment.This first part of the ...

  13. Magnetostatic wave tunable resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castera, J.-P.; Hartemann, P.

    1983-06-01

    Theoretical principles and techniques for the implementation of magnetostatic surface wave and volume wave resonators in high frequency oscillators are discussed. Magnetostatic waves are magnetic waves that propagate in materials exposed to a polarized magnetic field. The propagation speed ranges from 3-300 km/sec for wavelengths between 1 micron and 10 mm, in the presence of lags from 10-1000 nsec/ cm. Tunable resonators in the 1-20 GHz frequency range have been manufactured with YIG using liquid phase epitaxy for deposition on gadolinium and gallium substrates. Distributed-mirror Fabry-Perot cavity resonators are described and performance tests results are reported, including losses of 8 dB, a quality coefficient under voltage of 450, and frequency rejection outside of resonance better than 10 dB. However, saturation occurs at low power levels at frequencies lower than 4.2 GHz, a feature overcome with forward volume magnetostatic wave generators, which have a quality factor of 500, an insertion loss of 22 dB, and rejection around 15 dB.

  14. Isotopic effect giant resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buenerd, M.; Lebrun, D.; Martin, P.; Perrin, G.; Saintignon, P. de; Chauvin, J.; Duhamel, G.

    1981-10-01

    The systematics of the excitation energy of the giant dipole, monopole, and quadrupole resonances are shown to exhibit an isotopic effect. For a given element, the excitation energy of the transition decreases faster with the increasing neutron number than the empirical laws fitting the overall data. This effect is discussed in terms of the available models

  15. Neutron resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunsing, F

    2005-06-15

    The present document has been written in order to obtain the diploma 'Habilitation a Diriger des Recherches'. Since this diploma is indispensable to supervise thesis students, I had the intention to write a document that can be useful for someone starting in the field of neutron resonance spectroscopy. Although the here described topics are already described elsewhere, and often in more detail, it seemed useful to have most of the relevant information in a single document. A general introduction places the topic of neutron-nucleus interaction in a nuclear physics context. The large variations of several orders of magnitude in neutron-induced reaction cross sections are explained in terms of nuclear level excitations. The random character of the resonances make nuclear model calculation predictions impossible. Then several fields in physics where neutron-induced reactions are important and to which I have contributed in some way or another, are mentioned in a first synthetic chapter. They concern topics like parity nonconservation in certain neutron resonances, stellar nucleosynthesis by neutron capture, and data for nuclear energy applications. The latter item is especially important for the transmutation of nuclear waste and for alternative fuel cycles. Nuclear data libraries are also briefly mentioned. A second chapter details the R-matrix theory. This formalism is the foundation of the description of the neutron-nucleus interaction and is present in all fields of neutron resonance spectroscopy. (author)

  16. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Current Issue : Vol. 23, Issue 3. Current Issue Volume 23 | Issue 3. March 2018. Home · Volumes & Issues · Categories · Special Issues · Search · Editorial Board · Information for Authors · Subscription ...

  17. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    essential to understand their structure. Membrane-bound proteins are generally not amenable to crystallization and often their sizes are so large that conventional techniques such as X-ray crystal- lography and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy will have limited applications in deciphering their structure. In.

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... UltrasoundCT Head ScanElectrocardiogram (EKG or ECG)Pap Smear (Pap Test) Home Tests and Procedures Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) ... SafetyRead Article >>Imaging and Medical Radiation SafetyPap Smear (Pap Test)Read Article >>Pap Smear (Pap Test)Preconception Carrier ...

  19. Neutron resonance absorption theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuss, P.

    1991-11-01

    After some recalls on the physics of neutron resonance absorption during their slowing down, this paper presents the main features of the theoretical developments performed by the french school of reactor physics: the effective reaction rate method so called Livolant-Jeanpierre theory, the generalizations carried out by the author, and the probability table method [fr

  20. Resonant MEMS tunable VCSEL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ansbæk, Thor; Chung, Il-Sug; Semenova, Elizaveta

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate how resonant excitation of a microelectro-mechanical system can be used to increase the tuning range of a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser two-fold by enabling both blue- and red-shifting of the wavelength. In this way a short-cavity design enabling wide tuning range can be r...

  1. RE-SONANCE

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In school we are introduced to logarithms via the definition 'that number to which the base must be raised so as to equal the given ... A K Shukla should make for very interesting reading. There are other interesting articles and usual features which, we hope, will keep you busy till the next issue of Resonance comes along!

  2. Giant resonances in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohigas, O.

    1980-01-01

    The giant resonances: electric dipolar E1, T=1, isoscalar electric quadrupolar E2, T=0 and isoscalar electric monopolar E0, T=0 are presented. The experimental facts are reviewed and some examples are given of the kind of information supplied by experimental data [fr

  3. Resonant filtered fiber amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Laurila, Marko; Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present our recent result on utilizing resonant/bandgap fiber designs to achieve high performance ytterbium doped fiber amplifers for achieving diffraction limited beam quality in large mode area fibers, robust bending performance and gain shaping for long wavelength operation of...

  4. Electrically detected ferromagnetic resonance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goennenwein, S.T.B.; Schink, S.W.; Brandlmaier, A.; Boger, A.; Opel, M.; Gross, R.; Keizer, R.S.; Klapwijk, T.M.; Gupta, A.; Huebl, H.; Bihler, C.; Brandt, M.S.

    2007-01-01

    We study the magnetoresistance properties of thin ferromagnetic CrO2 and Fe3O4 films under microwave irradiation. Both the sheet resistance ? and the Hall voltage VHall characteristically change when a ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) occurs in the film. The electrically detected ferromagnetic

  5. Electron Cyclotron Resonances in Electron Cloud Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celata, Christine; Celata, C.M.; Furman, Miguel A.; Vay, J.-L.; Yu, Jennifer W.

    2008-01-01

    We report a previously unknown resonance for electron cloud dynamics. The 2D simulation code 'POSINST' was used to study the electron cloud buildup at different z positions in the International Linear Collider positron damping ring wiggler. An electron equilibrium density enhancement of up to a factor of 3 was found at magnetic field values for which the bunch frequency is an integral multiple of the electron cyclotron frequency. At low magnetic fields the effects of the resonance are prominent, but when B exceeds ∼(2 pi mec/(elb)), with lb = bunch length, effects of the resonance disappear. Thus short bunches and low B fields are required for observing the effect. The reason for the B field dependence, an explanation of the dynamics, and the results of the 2D simulations and of a single-particle tracking code used to elucidate details of the dynamics are discussed

  6. Progressive and resonant wave helices application to electron paramagnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volino, F.

    1969-01-01

    We show that helices can be used as resonant systems. Their properties are theoretically and experimentally studied. We describe resonant helices for electron paramagnetic resonance in X-band and develop a comparison between their sensitivity and the sensitivity of a normal resonant cavity. For cylindrical samples less than 3 mm diameter, the helix is more sensitive and can produce more intense microwave magnetic fields. (author) [fr

  7. Nonlinear effects in varactor-tuned resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everard, Jeremy; Zhou, Liang

    2006-05-01

    This paper describes the effects of RF power level on the performance of varactor-tuned resonator circuits. A variety of topologies are considered, including series and parallel resonators operating in both unbalanced and balanced modes. As these resonators were designed to produce oscillators with minimum phase noise, the initial small signal insertion loss was set to 6 dB and, hence, QL/Q0 = 1/2. To enable accurate analysis and simulation, S parameter and PSPICE models for the varactors were optimized and developed. It is shown that these resonators start to demonstrate nonlinear operation at very low power levels demonstrating saturation and lowering of the resonant frequency. On occasion squegging is observed for modified bias conditions. The nonlinear effects are dependent on the unloaded Q (Q0), the ratio of loaded to unloaded Q (QL/Q0), the bias voltage, and circuit configurations with typical nonlinear effects occurring at -8 dBm in a circuit with a loaded Q of 63 and a varactor bias voltage of 3 V. Analysis, simulation, and measurements that show close correlation are presented.

  8. Terahertz molecular resonance of cancer DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheon, Hwayeong; Yang, Hee-Jin; Lee, Sang-Hun; Kim, Young A; Son, Joo-Hiuk

    2016-11-15

    Carcinogenesis involves the chemical and structural alteration of biomolecules in cells. Aberrant methylation of DNA is a well-known carcinogenic mechanism and a common chemical modification of DNA. Terahertz waves can directly observe changes in DNA because the characteristic energies lie in the same frequency region. In addition, terahertz energy levels are not high enough to damage DNA by ionization. Here, we present terahertz molecular resonance fingerprints of DNA methylation in cancer DNA. Methylated cytidine, a nucleoside, has terahertz characteristic energies that give rise to the molecular resonance of methylation in DNA. Molecular resonance is monitored in aqueous solutions of genomic DNA from cancer cell lines using a terahertz time-domain spectroscopic technique. Resonance signals can be quantified to identify the types of cancer cells with a certain degree of DNA methylation. These measurements reveal the existence of molecular resonance fingerprints of cancer DNAs in the terahertz region, which can be utilized for the early diagnosis of cancer cells at the molecular level.

  9. Los resonance lines in promethiumlike heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Nobuyuki; Kobayashi, Yusuke; Kato, Daiji; Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Murakami, Izumi

    2016-01-01

    Identifying the ns - np resonance lines in alkali-metal-like ions is an important issue in fusion plasma science in the view of spectroscopic diagnostics and radiation power loss. Whereas for n=2, 3 and 4 these resonances are prominent and well studied, so far no one could clearly identify the resonance lines for n=5 in the promethiumlike sequence. We have now experimentally clarified the reason for the 'lost resonance lines. In the present study, highly-charged bismuth ions have been studied using a compact electron beam ion trap (EBIT). Extreme ultraviolet emission from the bismuth ions produced and trapped in the EBIT is observed with a grazing-incidence flat-field spectrometer. The energy dependent spectra are compared with a collisional-radiative model calculation, and we show that the 5s - 5p resonance lines are very weak in plasma with a wide range of electron density due to the presence of a long-lived metastable state. (author)

  10. A resonance approach to cochlear mechanics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Bell

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: How does the cochlea analyse sound into its component frequencies? In the 1850s Helmholtz thought it occurred by resonance, whereas a century later Békésy's work indicated a travelling wave. The latter answer seemed to settle the question, but with the discovery in 1978 that the cochlea emits sound, the mechanics of the cochlea was back on the drawing board. Recent studies have raised questions about whether the travelling wave, as currently understood, is adequate to explain observations. APPROACH: Applying basic resonance principles, this paper revisits the question. A graded bank of harmonic oscillators with cochlear-like frequencies and quality factors is simultaneously excited, and it is found that resonance gives rise to similar frequency responses, group delays, and travelling wave velocities as observed by experiment. The overall effect of the group delay gradient is to produce a decelerating wave of peak displacement moving from base to apex at characteristic travelling wave speeds. The extensive literature on chains of coupled oscillators is considered, and the occurrence of travelling waves, pseudowaves, phase plateaus, and forced resonance in such systems is noted. CONCLUSION AND SIGNIFICANCE: This alternative approach to cochlear mechanics shows that a travelling wave can simply arise as an apparently moving amplitude peak which passes along a bank of resonators without carrying energy. This highlights the possible role of the fast pressure wave and indicates how phase delays and group delays of a set of driven harmonic oscillators can generate an apparent travelling wave. It is possible to view the cochlea as a chain of globally forced coupled oscillators, and this model incorporates fundamental aspects of both the resonance and travelling wave theories.

  11. Resonance ionization spectroscopy in dysprosium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Studer, D., E-mail: dstuder@uni-mainz.de; Dyrauf, P.; Naubereit, P.; Heinke, R.; Wendt, K. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, Institut für Physik (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    We report on resonance ionization spectroscopy (RIS) of high-lying energy levels in dysprosium. We developed efficient excitation schemes and re-determined the first ionization potential (IP) via analysis of Rydberg convergences. For this purpose both two- and three-step excitation ladders were investigated. An overall ionization efficiency of 25(4) % could be demonstrated in the RISIKO mass separator of Mainz University, using a three-step resonance ionization scheme. Moreover, an extensive analysis of the even-parity 6sns- and 6snd-Rydberg-series convergences, measured via two-step excitation was performed. To account for strong perturbations in the observed s-series, the approach of multichannel quantum defect theory (MQDT) was applied. Considering all individual series limits we extracted an IP-value of 47901.76(5) cm{sup −1}, which agrees with the current literature value of 47901.7(6) cm{sup −1}, but is one order of magnitude more precise.

  12. Neutron resonance spectroscopy of 106Pd and 108Pd from 20 to 2000 eV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, B.E.; Roberson, N.R.; Bowman, J.D.; Knudson, J.N.; Penttilae, S.I.; Seestrom, S.J.; Yuan, V.W.; Delheij, P.P.; Haseyama, T.; Masaike, A.; Matsuda, Y.; Lowie, L.Y.; Mitchell, G.E.; Stephenson, S.L.; Postma, H.; Sharapov, E.I.

    1998-01-01

    Parity nonconserving asymmetries have been measured in p-wave resonances of 106 Pd and 108 Pd. The data analysis requires knowledge of the neutron resonance parameters. Transmission and capture γ-ray yields were measured for E n =20 - 2000 eV with the time-of-flight method at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). A total of 28 resonances in 106 Pd and 32 resonances in 108 Pd were studied. The resonance parameters for 106 Pd are new for all except one resonance. In 108 Pd six new resonances were observed and the precision improved for many of the resonance parameters. A Bayesian analysis was used to assign orbital angular momentum for the resonances studied. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Contrast Materials Children and Radiation Safety Videos related to Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful magnetic field, radio ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouts, Mark. J. R. J.; Wu, O.; Dijkhuizen, R. M.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides a powerful (neuro)imaging modality for the diagnosis and outcome prediction after (acute) stroke. Since MRI allows noninvasive, longitudinal, and three-dimensional assessment of vessel occlusion (with magnetic resonance angiography (MRA)), tissue injury

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the same effect. A very irregular heartbeat may affect the quality of images obtained using techniques that ... and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce ...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ports artificial limbs or metallic joint prostheses implanted nerve stimulators metal pins, screws, plates, stents or surgical ... Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer Others : American Stroke Association National Stroke Association ... MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  20. Resonance states in disordered systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentosela, F.

    1985-06-01

    To study the resonances for the Schroedinger equation of an electron in one dimensional disordered solids submitted to electric field, we use a WKB type ansatz and show that resonance widths so obtained are in good agreement with numerical computations

  1. P-wave Feshbach resonances of ultracold 6Li

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, J.; Kempen, E.G.M. van; Bourdel, T.; Cubizolles, J.; Chevy, F.; Teichmann, M.; Tarruell, L.; Salomon, C.; Khaykovich, L.; Kokkelmans, S.J.J.M.F.

    2004-01-01

    We report the observation of three p-wave Feshbach resonances of 6 Li atoms in the lowest hyperfine state f=1/2. The positions of the resonances are in good agreement with theory. We study the lifetime of the cloud in the vicinity of the Feshbach resonances and show that, depending on the spin states, two- or three-body mechanisms are at play. In the case of dipolar losses, we observe a nontrivial temperature dependence that is well explained by a simple model

  2. Quantum Light from a Whispering-Gallery-Mode Disk Resonator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fürst, J. U.; Strekalov, D. V.; Elser, D.

    2011-01-01

    the direct observation of intensity squeezing of -1.2 dB of each of the individual parametric beams in parametric down-conversion by use of a high quality whispering-gallery-mode disk resonator. In addition, we observed twin-beam quantum correlations of -2.7 dB with this cavity. Such resonators feature...... strong optical confinement and offer tunable coupling to an external optical field. This work exemplifies the potential of crystalline whispering-gallery-mode resonators for the generation of quantum light. The simplicity of this device makes the application of quantum light in various fields highly...

  3. Resonant photothermal IR spectroscopy of picogram samples with microstring resonator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yamada, Shoko; Schmid, Silvan; Boisen, Anja

    2013-01-01

    Here, we report a demonstration of resonant photothermal IR spectroscopy using microstrings in mid-infrared region providing rapid identification of picogram samples. In our microelectromechanical resonant photothermal IR spectroscopy system, samples are deposited directly on microstrings using...... an in-situ sampling method and the resonance frequency of the string is measured optically. Resonance frequency shifts, proportional to the absorbed heat, are recorded in real time as monochromatic infrared light is being scanned over the mid-infrared range. These resonant photothermal IR spectroscopy...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head ... limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful ... of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging ( ... the limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Facility (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-03-01

    This fact sheet provides information about Magnetic Resonance Facility capabilities and applications at NREL's National Bioenergy Center. Liquid and solid-state analysis capability for a variety of biomass, photovoltaic, and materials characterization applications across NREL. NREL scientists analyze solid and liquid samples on three nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometers as well as an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer.

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ...

  11. Analysis of Resonance Asymmetry Phenomenon in Resonant Fiber Optic Gyro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuoyan Li

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This experiment demonstrated the resonance asymmetry phenomenon in the resonant fiber optic gyro. The asymmetry of resonant curve affects the system open-loop bias and its stability, which directly affects the accuracy of angular velocity measurement. In this paper, a new mathematic model is established. The influence of the coupler normal mode loss difference (the phase difference between the coupler cross port output optical field and direct port is less than the ideal π/2 on the symmetry of resonant curve, the resonant signal modulated by the triangular wave, and the demodulation curve are analyzed. Moreover, the asymmetry of the resonant curve leads to the asymmetry of the resonant signal, as modulated by the triangular wave and the demodulation curve from the theoretical simulation and the experiment.

  12. Analysis of Resonance Asymmetry Phenomenon in Resonant Fiber Optic Gyro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhuoyan; He, Nie; Sun, Xuqiang; Jin, Chao; Liu, Chengxiang; Wu, Xu

    2018-02-26

    This experiment demonstrated the resonance asymmetry phenomenon in the resonant fiber optic gyro. The asymmetry of resonant curve affects the system open-loop bias and its stability, which directly affects the accuracy of angular velocity measurement. In this paper, a new mathematic model is established. The influence of the coupler normal mode loss difference (the phase difference between the coupler cross port output optical field and direct port is less than the ideal π/2) on the symmetry of resonant curve, the resonant signal modulated by the triangular wave, and the demodulation curve are analyzed. Moreover, the asymmetry of the resonant curve leads to the asymmetry of the resonant signal, as modulated by the triangular wave and the demodulation curve from the theoretical simulation and the experiment.

  13. Resonant magnetic fields from inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Byrnes, Christian T; Jain, Rajeev Kumar; Urban, Federico R

    2012-01-01

    We propose a novel scenario to generate primordial magnetic fields during inflation induced by an oscillating coupling of the electromagnetic field to the inflaton. This resonant mechanism has two key advantages over previous proposals. First of all, it generates a narrow band of magnetic fields at any required wavelength, thereby allaying the usual problem of a strongly blue spectrum and its associated backreaction. Secondly, it avoids the need for a strong coupling as the coupling is oscillating rather than growing or decaying exponentially. Despite these major advantages, we find that the backreaction is still far too large during inflation if the generated magnetic fields are required to have a strength of ${\\cal O}(10^{-15}\\, \\Gauss)$ today on observationally interesting scales. We provide a more general no-go argument, proving that this problem will apply to any model in which the magnetic fields are generated on subhorizon scales and freeze after horizon crossing.

  14. A New Resonance Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Alan

    2017-12-01

    The measurement of the speed of sound in air with the resonance tube is a popular experiment that often yields accurate results. One approach is to hold a vibrating tuning fork over an air column that is partially immersed in water. The column is raised and lowered in the water until the generated standing wave produces resonance: this occurs at the point where sound is perceived to have maximum loudness, or at the point where the amplitude of the standing wave has maximum value, namely an antinode. An antinode coincides with the position of the tuning fork, beyond the end of the air column, which consequently introduces an end correction. One way to minimize this end correction is to measure the distance between consecutive antinodes.

  15. Resonant SIMP dark matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Min Choi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We consider a resonant SIMP dark matter in models with two singlet complex scalar fields charged under a local dark U(1D. After the U(1D is broken down to a Z5 discrete subgroup, the lighter scalar field becomes a SIMP dark matter which has the enhanced 3→2 annihilation cross section near the resonance of the heavier scalar field. Bounds on the SIMP self-scattering cross section and the relic density can be fulfilled at the same time for perturbative couplings of SIMP. A small gauge kinetic mixing between the SM hypercharge and dark gauge bosons can be used to make SIMP dark matter in kinetic equilibrium with the SM during freeze-out.

  16. Off-resonance NOVEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Sheetal K.; Mathies, Guinevere; Griffin, Robert G.

    2017-10-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is theoretically able to enhance the signal in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments by a factor γe/γn, where γ 's are the gyromagnetic ratios of an electron and a nuclear spin. However, DNP enhancements currently achieved in high-field, high-resolution biomolecular magic-angle spinning NMR are well below this limit because the continuous-wave DNP mechanisms employed in these experiments scale as ω0-n where n ˜ 1-2. In pulsed DNP methods, such as nuclear orientation via electron spin-locking (NOVEL), the DNP efficiency is independent of the strength of the main magnetic field. Hence, these methods represent a viable alternative approach for enhancing nuclear signals. At 0.35 T, the NOVEL scheme was demonstrated to be efficient in samples doped with stable radicals, generating 1H NMR enhancements of ˜430. However, an impediment in the implementation of NOVEL at high fields is the requirement of sufficient microwave power to fulfill the on-resonance matching condition, ω0I = ω1S, where ω0I and ω1S are the nuclear Larmor and electron Rabi frequencies, respectively. Here, we exploit a generalized matching condition, which states that the effective Rabi frequency, ω1S e f f, matches ω0I. By using this generalized off-resonance matching condition, we generate 1H NMR signal enhancement factors of 266 (˜70% of the on-resonance NOVEL enhancement) with ω1S/2π = 5 MHz. We investigate experimentally the conditions for optimal transfer of polarization from electrons to 1H both for the NOVEL mechanism and the solid-effect mechanism and provide a unified theoretical description for these two historically distinct forms of DNP.

  17. Ultraminiature resonator accelerometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehler, D.R.; Kravitz, S.H.; Vianco, P.T.

    1996-04-01

    A new family of microminiature sensors and clocks is being developed with widespread application potential for missile and weapons applications, as biomedical sensors, as vehicle status monitors, and as high-volume animal identification and health sensors. To satisfy fundamental technology development needs, a micromachined clock and an accelerometer have initially been undertaken as development projects. A thickness-mode quartz resonator housed in a micromachined silicon package is used as the frequency-modulated basic component of the sensor family. Resonator design philosophy follows trapped energy principles and temperature compensation methodology through crystal orientation control, with operation in the 20--100 MHz range, corresponding to quartz wafer thicknesses in the 75--15 micron range. High-volume batch-processing manufacturing is utilized, with package and resonator assembly at the wafer level. Chemical etching of quartz, as well as micromachining of silicon, achieves the surface and volume mechanical features necessary to fashion the resonating element and the mating package. Integration of the associated oscillator and signal analysis circuitry into the silicon package is inherent to the realization of a size reduction requirement. A low temperature In and In/Sn bonding technology allows assembly of the dissimilar quartz and silicon materials, an otherwise challenging task. Unique design features include robust vibration and shock performance, capacitance sensing with micromachined diaphragms, circuit integration, capacitance-to-frequency transduction, and extremely small dimensioning. Accelerometer sensitivities were measured in the 1--3 ppm/g range for the milligram proof-mass structures employed in the prototypes evaluated to date.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takavar A

    1993-04-01

    Full Text Available Basic physical principles of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (N.M.R.I, a nonionizing medical imaging technique, are described. Principles of NMRI with other conventional imaging methods, ie, isotope scanning, ultrasonography and radiography have been compared. T1 and T2 and spin density (S.D. factors and different image construction techniques based on their different combinations is discussed and at the end physical properties of some N.M.R images is mentioned.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    OpenAIRE

    Takavar A

    1993-01-01

    Basic physical principles of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (N.M.R.I), a nonionizing medical imaging technique, are described. Principles of NMRI with other conventional imaging methods, ie, isotope scanning, ultrasonography and radiography have been compared. T1 and T2 and spin density (S.D.) factors and different image construction techniques based on their different combinations is discussed and at the end physical properties of some N.M.R images is mentioned.

  20. Resonant state expansions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lind, P.

    1993-02-01

    The completeness properties of the discrete set of bound state, virtual states and resonances characterizing the system of a single nonrelativistic particle moving in a central cutoff potential is investigated. From a completeness relation in terms of these discrete states and complex scattering states one can derive several Resonant State Expansions (RSE). It is interesting to obtain purely discrete expansion which, if valid, would significantly simplify the treatment of the continuum. Such expansions can be derived using Mittag-Leffler (ML) theory for a cutoff potential and it would be nice to see if one can obtain the same expansions starting from an eigenfunction theory that is not restricted to a finite sphere. The RSE of Greens functions is especially important, e.g. in the continuum RPA (CRPA) method of treating giant resonances in nuclear physics. The convergence of RSE is studied in simple cases using square well wavefunctions in order to achieve high numerical accuracy. Several expansions can be derived from each other by using the theory of analytic functions and one can the see how to obtain a natural discretization of the continuum. Since the resonance wavefunctions are oscillating with an exponentially increasing amplitude, and therefore have to be interpreted through some regularization procedure, every statement made about quantities involving such states is checked by numerical calculations.Realistic nuclear wavefunctions, generated by a Wood-Saxon potential, are used to test also the usefulness of RSE in a realistic nuclear calculation. There are some fundamental differences between different symmetries of the integral contour that defines the continuum in RSE. One kind of symmetry is necessary to have an expansion of the unity operator that is idempotent. Another symmetry must be used if we want purely discrete expansions. These are found to be of the same form as given by ML. (29 refs.)

  1. Resonant Tunneling Spin Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, David Z.

    2007-01-01

    The resonant tunneling spin pump is a proposed semiconductor device that would generate spin-polarized electron currents. The resonant tunneling spin pump would be a purely electrical device in the sense that it would not contain any magnetic material and would not rely on an applied magnetic field. Also, unlike prior sources of spin-polarized electron currents, the proposed device would not depend on a source of circularly polarized light. The proposed semiconductor electron-spin filters would exploit the Rashba effect, which can induce energy splitting in what would otherwise be degenerate quantum states, caused by a spin-orbit interaction in conjunction with a structural-inversion asymmetry in the presence of interfacial electric fields in a semiconductor heterostructure. The magnitude of the energy split is proportional to the electron wave number. Theoretical studies have suggested the possibility of devices in which electron energy states would be split by the Rashba effect and spin-polarized currents would be extracted by resonant quantum-mechanical tunneling.

  2. Unstable resonator with multiple outputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopnicki, M. J.; Smithers, M. E.

    1983-03-01

    Two or more unstable optical resonators can be coupled together by sharing optical elements. The result is then a single compound resonator with multiple outputs. For identical coupled cavities, the transverse structure of the outputs would be identical. In general, there will be misalignments and other aberrations that will vary from cavity to cavity. The cumulative effects of such aberrations are treated using both analytical and numerical approaches. It is shown that the average output of a multioutput resonator is the same as the output of a single uncoupled resonator with aberrations equal to the average of those contained in the multioutput resonator.

  3. Integrated Ring Resonators The Compendium

    CERN Document Server

    Rabus, Dominik G

    2007-01-01

    The optical filter, which has emerged in the last few years in integrated optics, is resonator based. Ring-resonator filters do not require facets or gratings for optical feedback and are thus particularly suited for monolithic integration with other components. Ring resonators find applications not only in optical networks, but also as sensors. The required passband shape of ring resonator-filters can be custom designed by the use of configurations of various ring coupled resonators. This book describes the current state-of-the-art on these devices with respect to design, fabrication and application.

  4. A resonant chain of four transiting, sub-Neptune planets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Sean M; Fabrycky, Daniel C; Migaszewski, Cezary; Ford, Eric B; Petigura, Erik; Isaacson, Howard

    2016-05-26

    Surveys have revealed many multi-planet systems containing super-Earths and Neptunes in orbits of a few days to a few months. There is debate whether in situ assembly or inward migration is the dominant mechanism of the formation of such planetary systems. Simulations suggest that migration creates tightly packed systems with planets whose orbital periods may be expressed as ratios of small integers (resonances), often in a many-planet series (chain). In the hundreds of multi-planet systems of sub-Neptunes, more planet pairs are observed near resonances than would generally be expected, but no individual system has hitherto been identified that must have been formed by migration. Proximity to resonance enables the detection of planets perturbing each other. Here we report transit timing variations of the four planets in the Kepler-223 system, model these variations as resonant-angle librations, and compute the long-term stability of the resonant chain. The architecture of Kepler-223 is too finely tuned to have been formed by scattering, and our numerical simulations demonstrate that its properties are natural outcomes of the migration hypothesis. Similar systems could be destabilized by any of several mechanisms, contributing to the observed orbital-period distribution, where many planets are not in resonances. Planetesimal interactions in particular are thought to be responsible for establishing the current orbits of the four giant planets in the Solar System by disrupting a theoretical initial resonant chain similar to that observed in Kepler-223.

  5. Parametric Resonance in Dynamical Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Nijmeijer, Henk

    2012-01-01

    Parametric Resonance in Dynamical Systems discusses the phenomenon of parametric resonance and its occurrence in mechanical systems,vehicles, motorcycles, aircraft and marine craft, and micro-electro-mechanical systems. The contributors provide an introduction to the root causes of this phenomenon and its mathematical equivalent, the Mathieu-Hill equation. Also included is a discussion of how parametric resonance occurs on ships and offshore systems and its frequency in mechanical and electrical systems. This book also: Presents the theory and principles behind parametric resonance Provides a unique collection of the different fields where parametric resonance appears including ships and offshore structures, automotive vehicles and mechanical systems Discusses ways to combat, cope with and prevent parametric resonance including passive design measures and active control methods Parametric Resonance in Dynamical Systems is ideal for researchers and mechanical engineers working in application fields such as MEM...

  6. RESONANT CLUMPING AND SUBSTRUCTURE IN GALACTIC DISKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molloy, Matthew; Smith, Martin C.; Shen, Juntai; Evans, N. Wyn

    2015-01-01

    We describe a method to extract resonant orbits from N-body simulations, exploiting the fact that they close in frames rotating with a constant pattern speed. Our method is applied to the N-body simulation of the Milky Way by Shen et al. This simulation hosts a massive bar, which drives strong resonances and persistent angular momentum exchange. Resonant orbits are found throughout the disk, both close to the bar and out to the very edges of the disk. Using Fourier spectrograms, we demonstrate that the bar is driving kinematic substructure even in the very outer parts of the disk. We identify two major orbit families in the outskirts of the disk, one of which makes significant contributions to the kinematic landscape, namely, the m:l = 3:−2 family, resonating with the bar. A mechanism is described that produces bimodal distributions of Galactocentric radial velocities at selected azimuths in the outer disk. It occurs as a result of the temporal coherence of particles on the 3:−2 resonant orbits, which causes them to arrive simultaneously at pericenter or apocenter. This resonant clumping, due to the in-phase motion of the particles through their epicycle, leads to both inward and outward moving groups that belong to the same orbital family and consequently produce bimodal radial velocity distributions. This is a possible explanation of the bimodal velocity distributions observed toward the Galactic anticenter by Liu et al. Another consequence is that transient overdensities appear and dissipate (in a symmetric fashion), resulting in a periodic pulsing of the disk’s surface density

  7. Persistence, resistance, resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsadka, Maayan

    Sound cannot travel in a vacuum, physically or socially. The ways in which sound operates are a result of acoustic properties, and the ways by which it is considered to be music are a result of social constructions. Therefore, music is always political, regardless of its content: the way it is performed and composed; the choice of instrumentation, notation, tuning; the medium of its distribution; its inherent hierarchy and power dynamics, and more. My compositional praxis makes me less interested in defining a relationship between music and politics than I am in erasing---or at least blurring---the borders between them. In this paper I discuss the aesthetics of resonance and echo in their metaphorical, physical, social, and musical manifestations. Also discussed is a political aesthetic of resonance, manifested through protest chants. I transcribe and analyze common protest chants from around the world, categorizing and unifying them as universal crowd-mobilizing rhythms. These ideas are explored musically in three pieces. Sumud: Rhetoric of Resistance in Three Movements, for two pianos and two percussion players, is a musical interpretation of the political/social concept of sumud, an Arabic word that literally means "steadfastness" and represents Palestinian non-violent resistance. The piece is based on common protest rhythms and uses the acoustic properties inherent to the instruments. The second piece, Three Piano Studies, extends some of the musical ideas and techniques used in Sumud, and explores the acoustic properties and resonance of the piano. The final set of pieces is part of my Critical Mess Music Project. These are site-specific musical works that attempt to blur the boundaries between audience, performers and composer, in part by including people without traditional musical training in the process of music making. These pieces use the natural structure and resonance of an environment, in this case, locations on the UCSC campus, and offer an active

  8. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy as a diagnostic modality for carcinoma thyroid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Nikhil [Department of Surgery, Maulana Azad Medical College, Lok Nayak Hospital, New Delhi (India)], E-mail: nikhil_ms26@yahoo.co.in; Kakar, Arun K. [Department of Surgery, Maulana Azad Medical College, Lok Nayak Hospital, New Delhi (India); Chowdhury, Veena [Department of Radiodiagnosis, Maulana Azad Medical College, Lok Nayak Hospital, New Delhi (India); Gulati, Praveen [MR Centre, A-23 Green Park, New Delhi (India); Shankar, L. Ravi [Department of Radioiodine Uptake and Imaging, Institute of Nucler Medicine and Allied Sciences (INMAS), Timarpur, New Delhi (India); Vindal, Anubhav [Department of Surgery, Maulana Azad Medical College, Lok Nayak Hospital, New Delhi (India)

    2007-12-15

    Aim: The aim of this study was to observe the findings of magnetic resonance spectroscopy of solitary thyroid nodules and its correlation with histopathology. Materials and methods: In this study, magnetic resonance spectroscopy was carried out on 26 patients having solitary thyroid nodules. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was performed on a 1.5 T super conductive system with gradient strength of 33 mTs. Fine needle aspiration cytology was done after MRS. All 26 patients underwent surgery either because of cytopathologically proven malignancy or because of cosmetic reasons. Findings of magnetic resonance spectroscopy were compared with histopathology of thyroid specimens. Results and conclusion: It was seen that presence or absence of choline peak correlates very well with presence or absence of malignant foci with in the nodule (sensitivity = 100%; specificity = 88.88%). These results indicate that magnetic resonance spectroscopy may prove to be an useful diagnostic modality for carcinoma thyroid.

  9. Ultraviolet Resonant Raman Enhancements in the Detection of Explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Short Jr., Billy Joe [Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA (United States)

    2009-06-01

    Raman-based spectroscopy is potentially militarily useful for standoff detection of high explosives. Normal (non-resonance) and resonance Raman spectroscopies are both light scattering techniques that use a laser to measure the vibrational spectrum of a sample. In resonance Raman, the laser is tuned to match the wavelength of a strong electronic absorbance in the molecule of interest, whereas, in normal Raman the laser is not tuned to any strong electronic absorbance bands. The selection of appropriate excitation wavelengths in resonance Raman can result in a dramatic increase in the Raman scattering efficiency of select band(s) associated with the electronic transition. Other than the excitation wavelength, however, resonance Raman is performed experimentally the same as normal Raman. In these studies, normal and resonance Raman spectral signatures of select solid high explosive (HE) samples and explosive precursors were collected at 785 nm, 244 nm and 229 nm. Solutions of PETN, TNT, and explosive precursors (DNT & PNT) in acetonitrile solvent as an internal Raman standard were quantitatively evaluated using ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) microscopy and normal Raman spectroscopy as a function of power and select excitation wavelengths. Use of an internal standard allowed resonance enhancements to be estimated at 229 nm and 244 nm. Investigations demonstrated that UVRR provided ~2000-fold enhancement at 244 nm and ~800-fold improvement at 229 nm while PETN showed a maximum of ~25-fold at 244 nm and ~190-fold enhancement at 229 nm solely from resonance effects when compared to normal Raman measurements. In addition to the observed resonance enhancements, additional Raman signal enhancements are obtained with ultraviolet excitation (i.e., Raman scattering scales as !4 for measurements based on scattered photons). A model, based partly on the resonance Raman enhancement results for HE solutions, is presented for estimating Raman enhancements for solid HE samples.

  10. Infrared radiative decay dynamics from the γ 1u ((3)P2), H 1u ((3)P1), and 1u ((1)D2) ion-pair states of I2 observed by a perturbation facilitated optical-optical double resonance technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, Shoma; Araki, Mitsunori; Nakano, Yukio; Ishiwata, Takashi; Tsukiyama, Koichi

    2016-01-21

    We report the spectroscopic and temporal analyses on the amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) from the single rovibrational levels of the Ω = 1u ion-pair series, γ 1u ((3)P2), H 1u ((3)P1), and 1u ((1)D2), of I2 by using a perturbation facilitated optical-optical double resonance technique through the c (1)Πg ∼ B (3)Π(0u (+)) hyperfine mixed valence state as the intermediate state. The ASE detected in the infrared region was assigned to the parallel transitions from the Ω = 1u ion-pair states down to the nearby Ω = 1g ion-pair states. The subsequent ultraviolet (UV) fluorescence from the Ω = 1g states was also observed and the relative vibrational populations in the Ω = 1g states were derived through the Franck-Condon simulation of the intensity pattern of the vibrational progression. In the temporal profiles of the UV fluorescence, an obvious delay in the onset of the fluorescence was recognized after the excitation laser pulse. These results revealed that ASE is a dominant energy relaxation process between the Ω = 1u and 1g ion-pair states of I2. Finally, the lifetimes of the relevant ion-pair states were evaluated by temporal analyses of the UV fluorescence. The propensity was found which was the longer lifetime in the upper level of the ASE transitions tends to give intense ASE.

  11. Crossover from plasmonic analogue of Fano resonance to Autler-Townes splitting in a double guide mode resonances system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Buzheng; Ren, Guobin; Jian, Shuisheng

    2017-09-01

    The plasmonic analogy from Fano resonance to Autler-Townes splitting (ATS) in mid-infrared spectral range is observed assisted by a dual parallel graphene-coated grating structure. The analytical derivation exhibits a height-dependent resonance which is crucial for discerning Fano resonance from ATS. The mechanism of generating a transparency window seeks a trade-off between Fano resonance and ATS at threshold height. While within the critical height, Fano resonance dominates. The Akaike Information Criterion test is used to discern these two effects quantitatively. Moreover, the device pronounces a good tunability accompanied with a slowing light application. Our ideas open up a new insight view of designing or constructing highly integrated, multi-functional graphene-based metamaterials in nanoscale.

  12. Impact of resonance regeneration and decay on the net proton fluctuations in a hadron resonance gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nahrgang, Marlene [Duke University, Department of Physics, Durham, NC (United States); Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies (FIAS), Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Bluhm, Marcus [North Carolina State University, Department of Physics, Raleigh, NC (United States); Alba, Paolo [Universita degli Studi di Torino, Dipartimento di Fisica, Turin (Italy); INFN, Turin (Italy); Bellwied, Rene; Ratti, Claudia [University of Houston, Department of Physics, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-12-15

    We investigate net proton fluctuations as important observables measured in heavy-ion collisions within the hadron resonance gas (HRG) model. Special emphasis is given to effects which are a priori not inherent in a thermally and chemically equilibrated HRG approach. In particular, we point out the importance of taking into account the successive regeneration and decay of resonances after the chemical freeze-out, which lead to a randomization of the isospin of nucleons and thus to additional fluctuations in the net proton number. We find good agreement between our model results and the recent STAR measurements of the higher-order moments of the net proton distribution. (orig.)

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance - from molecules to man

    OpenAIRE

    Wüthrich, Kurt

    2017-01-01

    Initial observations of the physical phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) date back to the late 1940s. In the following two decades high-resolution NMR in solution became an indispensible analytical tool in chemistry, and solid state NMR had an increasingly important role in physics. Some of the potentialities of the method for investigations of complex biological systems had also long been anticipated, and initial experiments with biological specimens were described already 30 year...

  14. Testing PVLAS axions with resonant photon splitting

    CERN Document Server

    Gabrielli, E; Gabrielli, Emidio; Giovannini, Massimo

    2007-01-01

    The photon splitting gamma -> gamma gamma in a time-independent and inhomogeneous magnetized background is considered when neutral and ultralight spin-0 particles are coupled to two-photons. Depending on the inhomogeneity scale of the external field, resonant photon splitting can occur. If an optical laser crosses a magnetic field of few Tesla with typical inhomogeneity scale of the order of the meter, a potentially observable rate of photon splittings is expected for the PVLAS range of couplings and masses.

  15. Stochastic resonance in a surface dipole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinsalu, E., E-mail: els@ifisc.uib-csic.es [IFISC, Instituto de Fisica Interdisciplinar y Sistemas Complejos (CSIC-UIB), E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); National Institute of Chemical Physics and Biophysics, Raevala 10, 15042 Tallinn (Estonia); Patriarca, M. [IFISC, Instituto de Fisica Interdisciplinar y Sistemas Complejos (CSIC-UIB), E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); National Institute of Chemical Physics and Biophysics, Raevala 10, 15042 Tallinn (Estonia); Marchesoni, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Camerino, I-62032 Camerino (Italy)

    2010-10-05

    The dynamics of a neutral dipole diffusing on a one-dimensional symmetric periodic substrate is numerically investigated in the presence of an ac electric field. It is observed that the amplitude of the forced oscillations of the dipole can be enhanced by tuning the noise strength, i.e., the substrate temperature. Such a manifestation of stochastic resonance turns out to be extremely sensitive to the mechanical properties of the dipole. This phenomenon has immediate applications in surface physics and nanodevice technology.

  16. Resonances and backward-angle scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stokstad, R.G.

    1978-01-01

    The strong enhancement of elastic scattering at large angles observed for systems such as α + 40 Ca and recently for 12 C + 28 Si and 16 O 28 Si was interpreted in terms of entrance channel resonances having a quasi-molecular character. Alternative explanations in terms of potential scattering were also presented. An overview is given of the experimental data and their interpretations. A consistent procedure for the evaluation of the experimental data is discussed. 50 references

  17. Resonance frequency analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv K Gupta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Initial stability at the placement and development of osseointegration are two major issues for implant survival. Implant stability is a mechanical phenomenon which is related to the local bone quality and quantity, type of implant, and placement technique used. The application of a simple, clinically applicable, non-invasive test to assess implant stability and osseointegration is considered highly desirable. Resonance frequency analysis (RFA is one of such techniques which is most frequently used now days. The aim of this paper was to review and analyze critically the current available literature in the field of RFA, and to also discuss based on scientific evidence, the prognostic value of RFA to detect implants at risk of failure. A search was made using the PubMed database to find all the literature published on "Resonance frequency analysis for implant stability" till date. Articles discussed in vivo or in vitro studies comparing RFA with other methods of implant stability measurement and articles discussing its reliability were thoroughly reviewed and discussed. A limited number of clinical reports were found. Various studies have demonstrated the feasibility and predictability of the technique. However, most of these articles are based on retrospective data or uncontrolled cases. Randomized, prospective, parallel-armed longitudinal human trials are based on short-term results and long-term follow up are still scarce in this field. Nonetheless, from available literature, it may be concluded that RFA technique evaluates implant stability as a function of stiffness of the implant bone interface and is influenced by factors such as bone type, exposed implant height above the alveolar crest. Resonance frequency analysis could serve as a non-invasive diagnostic tool for detecting the implant stability of dental implants during the healing stages and in subsequent routine follow up care after treatment. Future studies, preferably randomized

  18. Electroexcitation of nucleon resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inna Aznauryan, Volker D. Burkert

    2012-01-01

    We review recent progress in the investigation of the electroexcitation of nucleon resonances, both in experiment and in theory. The most accurate results have been obtained for the electroexcitation amplitudes of the four lowest excited states, which have been measured in a range of Q2 up to 8 and 4.5 GeV2 for the Delta(1232)P33, N(1535)S11 and N(1440)P11, N(1520)D13, respectively. These results have been confronted with calculations based on lattice QCD, large-Nc relations, perturbative QCD (pQCD), and QCD-inspired models. The amplitudes for the Delta(1232) indicate large pion-cloud contributions at low Q2 and don't show any sign of approaching the pQCD regime for Q2<7 GeV2. Measured for the first time, the electroexcitation amplitudes of the Roper resonance, N(1440)P11, provide strong evidence for this state as a predominantly radial excitation of a three-quark (3q) ground state, with additional non-3-quark contributions needed to describe the low Q2 behavior of the amplitudes. The longitudinal transition amplitude for the N(1535)S11 was determined and has become a challenge for quark models. Explanations may require large meson-cloud contributions or alternative representations of this state. The N(1520)D13 clearly shows the rapid changeover from helicity-3/2 dominance at the real photon point to helicity-1/2 dominance at Q2 > 0.5 GeV2, confirming a long-standing prediction of the constituent quark model. The interpretation of the moments of resonance transition form factors in terms of transition transverse charge distributions in infinite momentum frame is presented.

  19. Resonance test system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musial, Walter [Boulder, CO; White, Darris [Superior, CO

    2011-05-31

    An apparatus (10) for applying at least one load to a specimen (12) according to one embodiment of the invention may comprise a mass (18). An actuator (20) mounted to the specimen (12) and operatively associated with the mass (18) moves the mass (18) along a linear displacement path (22) that is perpendicular to a longitudinal axis of the specimen (12). A control system (26) operatively associated with the actuator (20) operates the actuator (20) to reciprocate the mass (18) along the linear displacement path (22) at a reciprocating frequency, the reciprocating frequency being about equal to a resonance frequency of the specimen (12) in a test configuration.

  20. Electron spin resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasson, J.R.; Salinas, J.E.

    1980-01-01

    Published literature concerning electron spin resonance (ESR) from July 1977 to July 1979 is reviewed. The 108 literature sources cited were chosen from literally thousands and are intended to serve as a guide to the current literature and to provide an eclectic selection of publications cited for their contributions to the advance and/or applications of ESR spectroscopy. 40 of the sources are reviews, and a table is included to indicate the topic(s) mainly covered in each review. Other divisions of the material reviewed are apparatus and spectral analysis, analytical applications, and selected paramagnetic materials