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Sample records for autoionizing resonances observed

  1. Identification of weak autoionizing resonances observed through fluorescence from the satellite states of Ar{sup +}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLaughlin, K.W.; Yenen, O.; Samson, J.A.R. [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Photoionization accompanied by excitation of the residual ionic state violates an independent electron model since, according to QED, photons interact only with individual electrons. By allowing measurements at a threshold event with high resolution, the observation of the fluorescence from the decay of these excited states (satellite states) is a sensitive method in the study of electron-electron interactions, providing complementary information to photoelectron spectroscopy. In the measurements reported here, an atomic beam of argon has been photoionized with 34 to 39 eV synchrotron radiation at beamline 9.0.1 of the Advanced Light Source. This energy range encompasses the 3p{sup 4} [{sup 3}P] 4p {sup 4}P, {sup 2}P, and {sup 2}D as well as the [{sup 1}D]4p {sup 2}F satellite states of Ar{sup +}. By observing the fine-structure resolved fluorescence from these satellite states, new Rydberg series and extensions of previously known series have been resolved with an energy resolution of 3 meV. With the high photon flux available from the high resolution monochromator of beamline 9.0.1, even the weakly excited [{sup 3}P] 4p ({sup 2}S) ns,d autoionizing structure has been observed for the first time.

  2. Resonance-enhanced photon excitation spectroscopy of the even-parity autoionizing Rydberg states of Kr

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Kr atoms were produced in their metastable states 4p55s [3/2]2 and 4p55s’ [1/2]0 in a pulsed DC dis-charge in a beam,and subsequently excited to the even-parity autoionizing Rydberg states 4p5np’ [3/2]1,2,[1/2]1 and 4p5nf’ [5/2]3 using single photon excitation.The excitation spectra of the even-parity autoionizing resonance series from the metastable Kr were obtained by recording the autoionized Kr+ ions with time-of-flight ion detection in the photon energy range of 29000-40000 cm1.A wealth of autoionizing resonances were newly observed,from which more precise and more systematic spec-troscopic data of the level energy and quantum defects were derived.

  3. Resonance-enhanced photon excitation spectroscopy of the even-parity autoionizing Rydberg states of Kr

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI ChunYan; WANG TingTing; ZHEN JunFeng; ZHANG Qun; CHEN Yang

    2009-01-01

    Kr atoms were produced in their metastable states 4p55s [3/2]2 and 4p55s' [1/2]0 in a pulsed DC discharge in a beam, and subsequently excited to the even-parity autoionizing Rydberg states 4p5np' [3/2]1,2, [1/2]1 and 4p5nf' [5/2]3 using single photon excitation. The excitation spectra of the even-parity autoionizing resonance series from the metastable Kr were obtained by recording the autoionized Kr+ ions with time-of-flight ion detection in the photon energy range of 29000-40000 cm-1. A wealth of autoionizing resonances were newly observed, from which more precise and more systematic spec-troscopic data of the level energy and quantum defects were derived.

  4. Resonance-Enhanced Photon Excitation Spectroscopy of the Even-Parity Autoionizing Rydberg States of Xe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-yan Li; Ting-ting Wang; Jun-feng Zhen; Qun Zhang; Yang Chen

    2008-01-01

    Xenon atoms were produced in their metastable states 5p56s[3/2]2 and 5p56s'[1/2]0 in a pulsed DC discharge in a beam, and subsequently excited to the even-parity autoionizing Rydberg states 5p5np' [3/2] 1 ,[1/2]1, t, and 5p5 nf'[5/2]3 using single photon excitation. The excitation spectra of the even-parity autoionizing resonance series from the metastable 129Xe were obtained by recording the autoionized Xe+ with time-of-flight ion detection in the photon energy range of 28000-42000 cm-1. A wealth of autoionizing resonances were newly observed, from which more precise and systematic spectroscopic data of the level energies and quantum defects were derived.

  5. Precision angle-resolved autoionization resonances in Ar and Ne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berrah, N.; Langer, B.; Gorczyca, T.W. [Western Michigan Univ., Kalamazoo, MI (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Theoretical work has shown that the electron angular distribution and the shape of the autoionization resonances are crucial to the understanding of certain types of electron-electron correlation. Autoionization resonances in Ne (Ar) result from the decay of the excited discrete state Ne{sup *} 2s2p{sup 6} np (Ar{sup *} 3s3p{sup 6} np) into the continuum state Ne{sup +} 2s{sup 2}2p{sup 5} + e{sup {minus}} (ks,kd) (Ar{sup +} 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 5} + e{sup {minus}} (ks,kd)). Since the continuum can also be reached by direct photoionization, both paths add coherently, giving rise to interferences that produce the characteristic Beutler-Fano line shape. In this work, the authors report on quantitative angle-resolved electron spectrometry studies of (a) the Ne 2s{sup 2}2p{sup 6} {r_arrow} 2s2p{sup 6} np (n=3-5) autoionizing resonances and the 2s{sup 2}2p{sup 6} {r_arrow} 2p{sup 4}3s3p doubly excited resonance, (b) the Ar 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 6} {r_arrow} 3s3p{sup 6} np (n=4-9) autoionization resonances and extended R-matrix calculations of the angular-distribution parameters for both Ne and Ar measurements. Their results are compared with previous theoretical work by Taylor.

  6. Observation of autoionization in O 2 by an electron-electron coincidence method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doering, J. P.; Yang, J.; Cooper, J. W.

    1995-01-01

    A strong transition to an autoionizing stata has been observed in O 2 at 16.83 ± 0.11 eV by means of a new electron-electron conincidence method. The method uses the fact that electrons arising from autoionizing states appear at a constant energy loss corresponding to the excitation energy of the autoionizing state rather than at a constant ionization potential as do electrons produced by direct ionization. Comparison of the present data with previous photoionization studies suggests that the autoionizing O 2 state is the same state deduced to be responsible for abnormal vibrational intensities in the O 2+X 2Πg ground state when 16.85 eV Ne(I) photons are used. These electron-electron coincidence experiments provide a direct new method for the study of autoionization produced by electron impact.

  7. Identification of autoionizing states of atomic chromium for resonance photo-ionization at the ISOLDE-RILIS

    CERN Document Server

    Goodacre, T Day; Fedorovc, D; Fedosseev, V N; Marsh, B A; Molkanov, P; Rossel, R E; Rothe, S; Seiffert, C

    2015-01-01

    The resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) is the principal ion source of the ISOLDE radioactive beam facility based at CERN. Using the method of in-source resonance ionization spectroscopy, an optimal three-step, three-resonance photo-ionization scheme has been developed for chromium. The scheme uses an ionizing transition to one of the 14 newly observed autoionizing states. This work increases the range of ISOLDE-RILIS ionized beams to 32 chemical elements. Details of the spectroscopic studies are described and the new ionization scheme is summarized. A link to the complete version of this document will be added here following publication:

  8. Ejected-electron spectroscopy of autoionizing resonances of helium excited by fast-electron impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhe; Shan, Xu; Wang, Enliang; Chen, Xiangjun

    2012-06-01

    The autoionizing resonances (2s2)1S, (2p2)1D, and (2s2p)1P of helium have been investigated employing ejected-electron spectroscopy by fast-electron impact at incident energies of 250-2000 eV and ejected angles of 26°-116°. Shore parameters of the line shapes for these three resonances have been obtained in such high incident energy regime except at 250 eV. Distinct discrepancies between the present results at 250 eV and those of McDonald and Crowe at 200 eV [D. G. McDonald and A. Crowe, J. Phys. BJPAMA40953-407510.1088/0953-4075/25/9/018 25, 2129 (1992); D. G. McDonald and A. Crowe, J. Phys. BJPAMA40953-407510.1088/0953-4075/25/20/024 25, 4313 (1992)] and Sise at 250 eV [O. Sise, M. Dogan, I. Okur, and A. Crowe, Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.84.022705 84, 022705 (2011)], especially for 1D and 1P states, are also observed.

  9. Extracting partial decay rates of helium from complex rotation: autoionizing resonances of the one-dimensional configurations

    CERN Document Server

    Zimmermann, Klaus; Jörder, Felix; Heitz, Nicolai; Schmidt, Maximilian; Bouri, Celsus; Rodriguez, Alberto; Buchleitner, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Partial autoionization rates of doubly excited one-dimensional helium in the collinear Zee and eZe configuration are obtained by means of the complex rotation method. The approach presented here relies on a projection of back-rotated resonance wave functions onto singly ionized $\\textrm{He}^{+}$ channel wave functions and the computation of the corresponding particle fluxes. In spite of the long-range nature of the Coulomb potential between the electrons and the nucleus, an asymptotic region where the fluxes are stationary is clearly observed. Low-lying doubly excited states are found to decay predomintantly into the nearest single-ionization continuum. This approach paves the way for a systematic analysis of the decay rates observed in higher-dimensional models, and of the role of electronic correlations and atomic structure in recent photoionization experiments.

  10. The identification of autoionizing states of atomic chromium for the resonance ionization laser ion source of the ISOLDE radioactive ion beam facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day Goodacre, T.; Chrysalidis, K.; Fedorov, D. V.; Fedosseev, V. N.; Marsh, B. A.; Molkanov, P. L.; Rossel, R. E.; Rothe, S.; Seiffert, C.

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents the results of an investigation into autoionizing states of atomic chromium, in the service of the resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS): the principal ion source of the ISOLDE radioactive ion beam facility based at CERN. The multi-step resonance photo-ionization process enables element selective ionization which, in combination with mass separation, allows isotope specific selectivity in the production of radioactive ion beams at ISOLDE. The element selective nature of the process requires a multi-step "ionization scheme" to be developed for each element. Using the method of in-source resonance ionization spectroscopy, an optimal three-step, three-resonance photo-ionization scheme originating from the 3d5(6S)4s a7S3 atomic ground state has been developed for chromium. The scheme uses an ionizing transition to one of the 15 newly observed autoionizing states reported here. Details of the spectroscopic studies are described and the new ionization scheme is summarized.

  11. Photoionization of cold gas phase coronene and its clusters: Autoionization resonances in monomer, dimer, and trimer and electronic structure of monomer cation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bréchignac, Philippe, E-mail: philippe.brechignac@u-psud.fr; Falvo, Cyril; Parneix, Pascal; Pino, Thomas; Pirali, Olivier [Institut des Sciences Moléculaires d’Orsay, CNRS UMR8214, Univ Paris-Sud, F-91405 Orsay (France); Garcia, Gustavo A.; Nahon, Laurent [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L’Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, B.P. 48, F-91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Joblin, Christine; Kokkin, Damian; Bonnamy, Anthony [IRAP, Université de Toulouse 3 - CNRS, 9 Av. Colonel Roche, B.P. 44346, F-31028 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Mulas, Giacomo [INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Cagliari, via della scienza 5, I-09047 Selargius (Italy)

    2014-10-28

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are key species encountered in a large variety of environments such as the Interstellar Medium (ISM) and in combustion media. Their UV spectroscopy and photodynamics in neutral and cationic forms are important to investigate in order to learn about their structure, formation mechanisms, and reactivity. Here, we report an experimental photoelectron-photoion coincidence study of a prototypical PAH molecule, coronene, and its small clusters, in a molecular beam using the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photons provided by the SOLEIL synchrotron facility. Mass-selected high resolution threshold photoelectron (TPES) and total ion yield spectra were obtained and analyzed in detail. Intense series of autoionizing resonances have been characterized as originating from the monomer, dimer, and trimer neutral species, which may be used as spectral fingerprints for their detection in the ISM by VUV absorption spectroscopy. Finally, a full description of the electronic structure of the monomer cation was made and discussed in detail in relation to previous spectroscopic optical absorption data. Tentative vibrational assignments in the near-threshold TPES spectrum of the monomer have been made with the support of a theoretical approach based on density functional theory.

  12. Creation and survival of autoionizing states in strong laser fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fechner, Lutz; Camus, Nicolas; Krupp, Andreas; Ullrich, Joachim; Pfeifer, Thomas; Moshammer, Robert

    2015-11-01

    Very sharp, low-energy structures observed in photoelectron spectra reveal the population of autoionizing states in krypton and argon in strong laser fields over a large range of different wavelengths. The energies of the electrons, emitted by autoionization in a field-free environment, provide direct information about the spectrum of states involved. Despite their ability to resist ionization by the populating laser pulse, we demonstrate the possibility to promote the excited electrons into the continuum by subsequent absorption of a single photon. Thus, applying a classical pump-probe scheme, we are able to manipulate the autoionization contribution on a picosecond time scale. Different scenarios for the creation of autoionizing states in strong laser fields are discussed.

  13. Fluorescence polarization studies of autoionization in CS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poliakoff, E. D.; Dehmer, J. L.; Parr, A. C.; Leroi, G. E.

    1987-03-01

    The fluorescence polarization spectrum of CS2(+) produced by photoionization of CS2 (using synchrotron radiation from the NBS SURF-II electron-storage ring) at excitation wavelengths 875-967 A is investigated experimentally, with a focus on autoionization features. The results of polarization measurements for the A2Pi-X2Pi transition are presented in graphs and compared with spectra simulated using the procedure of Poliakoff et al. (1982); qualitative agreement is obtained, but quantitative discrepancies are noted, especially on the low-wavelength side of the resonance. The spectral assignments of Ogawa and Chang (1970) for the autoionizing Rydberg states are confirmed.

  14. Interference stabilization of autoionizing states in molecular $N_2$ studied by time- and angular-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Eckstein, Martin; Yang, Chung-Hsin; Sansone, Giuseppe; Vrakking, Marc J J; Ivanov, Misha; Kornilov, Oleg

    2016-01-01

    An autoionizing resonance in molecular N$_2$ is excited by an ultrashort XUV pulse and probed by a subsequent weak IR pulse, which ionizes the contributing Rydberg states. Time- and angular-resolved photoelectron spectra recorded with a velocity map imaging spectrometer reveal two electronic contributions with different angular distributions. One of them has an exponential decay rate of $20\\pm5$ fs, while the other one is shorter than 10 fs. This observation is interpreted as a manifestation of interference stabilization involving the two overlapping discrete Rydberg states. A formalism of interference stabilization for molecular ionization is developed and applied to describe the autoionizing resonance. The results of calculations reveal, that the effect of the interference stabilization is facilitated by rotationally-induced couplings of electronic states with different symmetry.

  15. Autoionizing Distribution of the Triply Excited Double Rydberg States in La Atom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Wei; XIE Xiu-Ping; HUANG Wen; ZHONG Zhi-Ping; XU Cheng-Bin; XUE Ping; XU Xiang-Yuan

    2000-01-01

    The autoionization distribution of the triply excited double Rydberg states (TEDRS) 5d5/2NLnl (N _< 22; n _<50; L, l < 4) of La has been investigated by using five-laser resonance excitation in combination with a method of sequential ionization by a pulsed electric field and a constant electric field. The experimental results exhibit that the La atoms in TEDRS predominantly single-autoionize to the ionic Rydberg states located in a few Rydberg manifolds. Furthermore, a difference of autoionization mechanisms between TEDRS above and those below the double ionization threshold is found.

  16. Saturation effects on Ba 6pnl (l= 0, 2) and 6pnk (|M| = 0, 1) autoionization spectra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Shi-Ben; Dai Chang-Jian

    2007-01-01

    Using a three-step laser saturation excitation technique, the saturation effects on the Ba 6pns (J = 1) and 6pnd (J = 1, 3) autoionization spectra are observed systemically in zero field. These saturation spectra are introduced to determine the high n members of 6pnl (l = 0, 2) autoionizing series and are used to analyse the channel interactions among the autoionizing series in zero field. Furthermore, the saturation excitation technique is applied to the electric field case, in which the saturation spectra of Ba 6pnk (|M|= 0, 1) autoionizing Stark states are measured. Most of these saturation spectra are observed for the first time so far as we know, which indicate the mixing of the autoionizing states in the electric fields.

  17. Calculation of autoionization of He and H/-/ using the projection-operator formalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, A. K.; Temkin, A.

    1975-01-01

    Improved calculations are reported for the first several autoionization states of the lower symmetries of He and H(-). Unshifted energies are calculated by diagonalizing QHQ using a Hylleraes basis with more terms than previously used; shifts, widths, and photoabsorption shape parameters are obtained with the additional use of exchange-approximate nonresonant continuum functions. Previous calculations of H(-) resonances are reviewed and slightly augmented by applying various nonresonant continua and correcting small errors. A comparison is made between the calculations and experimental results and is found to be very satisfactory except for the lowest 1P autoionization state of He, which is shown to need a more accurate experimental determination.

  18. Autoionizing states of atomic boron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argenti, Luca; Moccia, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    We present a B -spline K -matrix method for three-active-electron atoms in the presence of a polarizable core, with which it is possible to compute multichannel single-ionization scattering states with good accuracy. We illustrate the capabilities of the method by computing the parameters of several autoionizing states of the boron atom, with S2e, 2,o2P and D2e symmetry, up to at least the 2 p2(1S) excitation threshold of the B ii parent ion, as well as selected portions of the photoionization cross section from the ground state. Our results exhibit remarkable gauge consistency, they significantly extend the existing sparse record of data for the boron atom, and they are in good agreement with the few experimental and theoretical data available in the literature. These results open the way to extend to three-active-electron systems the spectral analysis of correlated wave packets in terms of accurate scattering states that has already been demonstrated for two-electron atoms in Argenti and Lindroth [Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 053002 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.105.053002].

  19. Observation of a Hybrid Spin Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, M.; Allgower, C.; Ahrens, L.; Alessi, J.; Brown, K.; Bunce, G.; Cameron, P.; Chu, C. M.; Courant, E. D.; Glenn, J. W.; Huang, H.; Jeon, D.; Kponou, A. E.; Krueger, K.; Luccio, A.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Lee, S. Y.; Ratner, L.; Reece, K.; Roser, T.; Spinka, H.; Syphers, M. J.; Tsoupas, N.; Underwood, D. G.; van Asselt, W.; Williams, N.; Yokosawa, A.

    2000-02-01

    A new type of spin depolarization resonance has been observed at the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS). This spin resonance is identified as a strong closed-orbit sideband around the dominant intrinsic spin resonance. The strength of the resonance was proportional to the 9th harmonic component of the horizontal closed orbit and proportional to the vertical betatron oscillation amplitude. This ``hybrid'' spin resonance cannot be overcome by the partial snake at the AGS, but it can be corrected by the harmonic orbit correctors.

  20. Proceedings of the workshop on some aspects of autoionization in atoms and small molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkowitz, J.; Berry, H.G.; Berry, R.S. (eds.)

    1985-11-01

    Do we really understand the phenomenon of autoionization in atoms sufficiently well to consider it a ''mature'' topic. Can we generalize our understanding to predict behavior in systems not yet studied. Can we extract physical understanding from the encouraging results of the ''many-body calculations''. Or must we still try to understand one atom at a time. Molecular autoionization is clearly more difficult. Not only must we content with ''vibrational autoionization'' as well as ''electronic autoionization'', but the competing process of predissociation must also be taken into account. In this molecular domain, we have many experiments and many phenomena. The extant theories only deal with some cases, and are not yet able to explain some prominent observations. A group consisting of theorists and experimentalists active in the field of autoionization assembled at Argonne National Laboratory for a two-day Workshop on May 2-3, 1985, to try to provide some consensus of our present understanding and to point out the most promising direction for progress in the near future. Abstracts of individual items from the workshop were prepared separately for the data base.

  1. Fano Resonances observed in Helium Nanodroplets

    CERN Document Server

    LaForge, A C; Jabbari, G; Gokhberg, K; Kryzhevoi, N V; Krishnan, S R; Hess, M; O'Kee?e, P; Ciavardini, A; Prince, K C; Richter, R; Moshammer, R; Cederbaum, L S; Pfeifer, T; Stienkemeier, F; Mudrich, M

    2015-01-01

    Doubly-excited Rydberg states of helium (He) nanodroplets have been studied using synchrotron radiation. We observed Fano resonances related to the atomic N = 2,0 series as a function of droplet size. Although similar qualitatively to their atomic counterparts, the resonance lines are broader and exhibit a shift in energy which increases for the higher excited states. Furthermore, additional resonances are observed which are not seen in atomic systems. We discuss these features in terms of delocalized atomic states perturbed by the surrounding He atoms and compare to singly excited droplets.

  2. Observations of Snake Resonance in RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Mei; Lee, Shyh-Yuan; Lin, Fanglei; MacKay, William; Ptitsyn, Vadim; Roser, Thomas; Tepikian, Steven

    2005-01-01

    Siberian snakes now become essential in the polarized proton acceleration. With proper configuration of Siberian snakes, the spin precession tune of the beam becomes $\\frac{1}{2}$ which avoids all the spin depolarizing resonance. However, the enhancement of the perturbations on the spin motion can still occur when the betatron tune is near some low order fractional numbers, called snake resonances, and the beam can be depolarized when passing through the resonance. The snake resonances have been confirmed in the spin tracking calculations, and observed in RHIC with polarized proton beam. Equipped with two full Siberian snakes in each ring, RHIC provides us a perfect facility for snake resonance studies. This paper presents latest experimental results. New insights are also discussed.

  3. Observability of stochastic resonance in neutron scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condat, C A; Lamberti, P W

    1999-10-01

    The observability of the stochastic resonance phenomenon in a neutron scattering experiment is investigated, considering that the scatterer can hop between two sites. Under stochastic resonance conditions scattered intensity is transferred from the quasielastic region to two inelastic peaks. The magnitude of the signal-to-noise ratio is shown to be similar to that arising in the corresponding power spectrum. Effects of potential asymmetry are discussed in detail. Asymmetry leads to a reduction of the signal-to-noise ratio by a factor of 1-xi(2), where xi is an asymmetry parameter which is zero for symmetric problems and equal to unity in a completely asymmetric case.

  4. Autoionizing states of atoms calculated using generalized sturmians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avery, James Emil; Avery, John Scales

    2005-01-01

    The generalized Sturmian method is applied to autoionizing states of atoms and ions. If the Goscinskian basis sets allow for a sufficient amount of angular correletion, the calculated energies of doubly-excited (autoionizing) states are found to agree well with the few available experimental ener...

  5. A New Observable for Identifying Dijet Resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Izaguirre, Eder; Yavin, Itay

    2014-01-01

    The development of techniques for identifying hadronic signals from the overwhelming multi-jet backgrounds is an important part of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) program. Of prime importance are resonances decaying into a pair of partons, such as the Higgs and $\\rm W$/$\\rm Z$ bosons, as well as hypothetical new particles. We present a simple observable to help discriminate a dijet resonance from background that is effective even when the decaying resonance is not strongly boosted. We find consistent performance of the observable over a variety of processes and degree of boosts, and show that it leads to a reduction of the background by a factor of $3-5$ relative to signal at the price of $10-20\\%$ signal efficiency. This approach represents a significant increase in sensitivity for Standard Model (SM) measurements and searches for new physics that are dominated by systematic uncertainties, which is true of many analyses involving jets - particularly in the high-luminosity running of the LHC.

  6. Assignments of autoionization states of O2-asterisk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, C. Y. Robert

    1987-01-01

    Attention is given to the uncertainties that remain concerning the autoionization states of O2 leading to the a 4Pi(u) and A 2Pi(u) states of O2(+), as well as some of the assignments of the autoionization states and the determinations of effective quantum numbers and quantum defects. The former problems of vibrational assignments are unambiguously established in view of a study of isotopic oxygen molecules. A systematic examination of the known Rydberg series is conducted, and new assignments and interpretations for several autoionization states leading to the various states of O2(+) are suggested.

  7. Relativistic Multichannel Theory: Theoretical Study of C+ Autoionization States

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Dan; ZHANG Shi-Zhong; PENG Yong-Lun; LI Jia-Ming

    2003-01-01

    Based on relativistic multichannel theory, the autoionization states of C+ are studied. We calculate all the autoionization states in the energy region of 193900 ~ 231700cm"1, and the results are in good agreement with the experimental data. The energy structure we obtain will be important in the dielectronic recombination processes, which plays a key role in determining the abundance of carbon in a nebula.

  8. Observation of resonant lattice modes by inelastic neutron scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum Møller, Hans; Mackintosh, A.R.

    1965-01-01

    Observation by inelastic neutron scattering of resonant lattice modes due to small concentration of W atoms in Cr host crystal; frequencies and lifetimes of phonons with frequencies near that of resonant mode are considerably affected by presence of defects....

  9. Laser-induced collisional autoionization in europium and strontium atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffa, R

    1995-01-15

    An experiment that involves laser-induced collisional autoionization in europium and strontium atoms is proposed and the spectral line shape of the cross section is calculated on the basis of data available in the literature. The feasibility of the experiment both in oven cells and in a crossed-atomic-beam geometry is discussed.

  10. Controlling autoionization in strontium two-electron-excited states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Robert; Zhang, Xinyue; Dunning, F. Barry; Yoshida, Shuhei; Burgdörfer, Joachim

    2016-05-01

    One challenge in engineering long-lived two-electron-excited states, i.e., so-called planetary atoms, is autoionization. Autoionization, however, can be suppressed if the outermost electron is placed in a high- n, n ~ 300 - 600 , high- L state because such states have only a very small overlap with the inner electron, even when this is also excited to a state of relatively high n and hence of relatively long lifetime. Here the L-dependence of the autoionization rate for high- n strontium Rydberg atoms is examined during excitation of the core ion 5 s 2S1 / 2 - 5 p 2P3 / 2 transition. Measurements in which the angular momentum of the Rydberg electron is controlled using a pulsed electric field show that the autoionization rate decreases rapidly with increasing L and becomes very small for values larger than ~ 20 . The data are analyzed with the aid of calculations undertaken using complex scaling. Research supported by the NSF and Robert A. Welch Foundation.

  11. Observation of spin diffusion in zero-field magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suter, D.; Jarvie, T.P.; Sun, B.; Pines, A.

    1987-07-06

    We report the measurement of spin diffusion at zero field, observed by two-dimensional deuterium magnetic resonance of a polycrystalline sample. This demonstrates for the first time an appealing feature of pulsed zero-field magnetic resonance, namely the potential for structure determination in solids without the need for single crystals or oriented samples.

  12. Probing autoionizing states of molecular oxygen with XUV transient absorption: Electronic symmetry dependent lineshapes and laser induced modification

    CERN Document Server

    Liao, Chen-Ting; Haxton, Daniel J; Rescigno, Thomas N; Lucchese, Robert R; McCurdy, C William; Sandhu, Arvinder

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of autoionizing Rydberg states of oxygen are studied using attosecond transient absorption technique, where extreme ultraviolet (XUV) initiates molecular polarization and near infrared (NIR) pulse perturbs its evolution. Transient absorption spectra show positive optical density (OD) change in the case of $ns\\sigma_g$ and $nd\\pi_g$ autoionizing states of oxygen and negative OD change for $nd\\sigma_g$ states. Multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree-Fock (MCTDHF) calculation are used to simulate the transient absorption spectra and their results agree with experimental observations. The time evolution of superexcited states is probed in electronically and vibrationally resolved fashion and we observe the dependence of decay lifetimes on effective quantum number of the Rydberg series. We model the effect of near-infrared (NIR) perturbation on molecular polarization and find that the laser induced phase shift model agrees with the experimental and MCTDHF results, while the laser induced attenuation...

  13. Observation of optomechanical coupling in a microbottle resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Asano, Motoki; Chen, Weijian; Özdemir, Şahin Kaya; Ikuta, Rikizo; Imoto, Nobuyuki; Yang, Lan; Yamamoto, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we report optomechanical coupling, resolved sidebands and phonon lasing in a solid-core microbottle resonator fabricated on a single mode optical fiber. Mechanical modes with quality factors (Q_m) as high as 1.57*10^4 and 1.45*10^4 were observed, respectively, at the mechanical frequencies f_m=33.7 MHz and f_m=58.9 MHz. The maximum f_m*Q_m~0.85*10^12 Hz is close to the theoretical lower bound of 6*10^12 Hz needed to overcome thermal decoherence for resolved-sideband cooling of mechanical motion at room temperature, suggesting microbottle resonators as a possible platform for this endeavor. In addition to optomechanical effects, scatter-induced mode splitting and ringing phenomena, which are typical for high-quality optical resonances, were also observed in a microbottle resonator.

  14. Observation of wide rf induced synchrotron sideband depolarizing resonances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bychkov, M. A.; Anferov, V. A.; Blinov, B. B.; Courant, E. D.; Crandell, D. A.; Derbenev, Ya. S.; Kaufman, W. A.; Krisch, A. D.; Lorenzon, W.; Nurushev, T. S.; Phelps, R. A.; Wong, V. K.; Caussyn, D. D.; Chu, C. M.; Ellison, T. J. P.; Lee, S. Y.; Rinckel, T.; Schwandt, P.; Sperisen, F.; Stephenson, E. J.; von Przewoski, B.; Ohmori, C.; Minty, M. G.; Russell, A. D.

    1997-04-01

    In a recent experiment with a stored 104.1 MeV vertically polarized proton beam at the IUCF Cooler Ring, we depolarized the beam using an rf solenoid with a magnetic field of about 1.3\\cdot10-3T\\cdotm. We observed the two expected rf depolarizing resonances centered around the protons' 1.5 MHz circulation frequency as in previous experiments. Near each of these resonances, we also found synchrotron sidebands which are caused by the proton's energy oscillations. The strengths and widths of the synchrotron resonances were quite different for the sidebands above and below the circulation frequency.

  15. The chaotic property in the autoionization of Rydberg lithium atom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Hui; Li Hong-Yun; Gao Song; Zhang Yan-Hui; Jia Zheng-Mao; Lin Sheng-Lu

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents theoretical computations of the ionization rate of Rydberg lithium atom above the classical ionization threshold using semiclassical approximation. The yielded random pulse trains of the escape electrons are recorded as a function of emission time such that they can be related to the terms of the recurrence periods of the photoabsorption. This fact illustrates that it is ionic core scattering processes which give rise to chaos in autoionization dynamics and this is verified by comparison of our results with the hydrogen atom situation. In order to reveal the chaotic properties in detail, the sensitive dependence of the ionization rate upon the scaled energy is discussed for different scaled energies. This approach provides a simple explanation for the chaotic character in autoionization decay of Rydberg alkali-metal atoms.

  16. Observation of thermoacoustic shock waves in a resonance tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biwa, Tetsushi; Sobata, Kazuya; Otake, Shota; Yazaki, Taichi

    2014-09-01

    This paper reports thermally induced shock waves observed in an acoustic resonance tube. Self-sustained oscillations of a gas column were created by imposing an axial temperature gradient on the short stack of plates installed in the resonance tube filled with air at atmospheric pressure. The tube length and axial position of the stack were examined so as to make the acoustic amplitude of the gas oscillations maximum. The periodic shock wave was observed when the acoustic pressure amplitude reached 8.3 kPa at the fundamental frequency. Measurements of the acoustic intensity show that the energy absorption in the stack region with the temperature gradient tends to prevent the nonlinear excitation of harmonic oscillations, which explains why the shock waves had been unfavorable in the resonance tube thermoacoustic systems.

  17. Observation of Two New Xi(-)(b) Baryon Resonances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Bettler, M. -O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjornstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carson, L.; Akiba, K. Carvalho; Casanova Mohr, R. C. M.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S. -F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Vidal, X. Cid; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A. C.; Torres, M. Cruz; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C. -T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Deleage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Domenico, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suarez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. -M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Faerber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garcia Pardinas, J.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gastaldi, U.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, U.; Geraci, A.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Giani, S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Goebel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Gandara, M. Grabalosa; Graciani Diaz, R.; Cardoso, L. A. Granado; Grauges, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griftith, P.; Grillo, L.; Gruenberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Hess, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; Van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J. -P.; Lefevre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrancois, J.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lowdon, P.; Lucchesi, D.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Benito, C. Mann; Marino, P.; Maerki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martinelli, M.; Santos, D. Martinez; Vidal, F. Martinez; Martin Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M. -N.; Moggi, N.; Rodriguez, J. Molina; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Morda, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. -B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Mueller, K.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obratsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B. K.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Altarelli, M. Pepe; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Pesen, E.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilar, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Navarro, A. Puig; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Perez, P. Rodriguez; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M. -H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sepp, I.; Sena, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Sheychenko, V.; Shires, A.; Coutinho, R. Silva; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skillicorn, I.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Sterpka, F.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; Van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Todd, J.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Garcia, M. Ubeda; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Gomez, R. Vazquez; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vazquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Barbosa, J. V. V. B. Viana; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voss, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Wraldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilschut, H. W.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyae, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.

    2015-01-01

    Two structures are observed close to the kinematic threshold in the Xi(0)(b)pi(-) mass spectrum in a sample of proton-proton collision data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb(-1), recorded by the LEICb experiment. In the quark model, two baryonic resonances with quark content bds a

  18. Observation of Antiferromagnetic Resonance in an Organic Superconductor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torrance, J. B.; Pedersen, H. J.; Bechgaard, K.

    1982-01-01

    Anomalous microwave absorption has been observed in the organic superconductor TMTSF2AsF6 (TMTSF: tetramethyltetraselenafulvalene) below its metal-nonmetal transition near 12 K. This absorption is unambiguously identified as antiferromagnetic resonance by the excellent agreement between a spin...

  19. Electron-impact excitation of the (n - 1)d{sup 9} ns{sup 2}np autoionizing states of cadmium (n = 5) and zinc (n = 4)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Predojevic, B [Institute of Physics, PO Box 57, 11001, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Sevic, D [Institute of Physics, PO Box 57, 11001, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Pejcev, V [Institute of Physics, PO Box 57, 11001, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Marinkovic, B P [Institute of Physics, PO Box 57, 11001, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Filipovic, D M [Institute of Physics, PO Box 57, 11001, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2003-06-14

    Electron-impact excitation of the 5{sup 3}P{sub 1} (12.062 eV) and 5{sup 1}P{sub 1} (12.810 eV) 4d{sup 9}5s{sup 2}5p autoionizing states of Cd has been experimentally investigated at incident electron energies (E{sub 0}) from 15 to 60 eV and scattering angles ({theta}) up to 40 deg. (at E{sub 0} = 40 eV, {theta} = 2 deg. -150 deg.). The absolute differential cross sections (DCSs) at E{sub 0} = 40 eV were determined through normalization to the optical oscillator strengths. These DCSs were extrapolated to 0 deg. and 180 deg. and numerically integrated to yield integral, momentum transfer and viscosity cross sections. Energy-loss spectra for Cd were recorded from 11 to 18 eV, and 22 autoionizing states were identified at different impact energies. Electron-impact excitation of the 3d{sup 9}4s{sup 2}4p autoionizing states was observed in energy-loss spectra of Zn at E{sub 0} = 20, 60, 80 and 100 eV ({theta} up to 10 deg.). The DCSs for Cd could not be compared with other results, because there are no available data in literature. The autoionizing energy levels and line widths are in good agreement with existing experimental and calculated values.

  20. Observation of decoherence in a carbon nanotube mechanical resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Ben H.; Singh, Vibhor; Venstra, Warner J.; Meerwaldt, Harold B.; Steele, Gary A.

    2014-12-01

    In physical systems, decoherence can arise from both dissipative and dephasing processes. In mechanical resonators, the driven frequency response measures a combination of both, whereas time-domain techniques such as ringdown measurements can separate the two. Here we report the first observation of the mechanical ringdown of a carbon nanotube mechanical resonator. Comparing the mechanical quality factor obtained from frequency- and time-domain measurements, we find a spectral quality factor four times smaller than that measured in ringdown, demonstrating dephasing-induced decoherence of the nanomechanical motion. This decoherence is seen to arise at high driving amplitudes, pointing to a nonlinear dephasing mechanism. Our results highlight the importance of time-domain techniques for understanding dissipation in nanomechanical resonators, and the relevance of decoherence mechanisms in nanotube mechanics.

  1. Observation of the resonant character of the Z(4430)(-) state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, S; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Counts, I; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dalseno, J; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dujany, G; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farley, N; Farry, S; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Fu, J; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gavardi, L; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianelle, A; Giani', S; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jezabek, M; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kelsey, M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Klaver, S; Kochebina, O; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Langhans, B; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lowdon, P; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Manzali, M; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martinez Vidal, F; Martins Tostes, D

    2014-06-01

    Resonant structures in B^{0}→ψ^{'}π^{-}K^{+} decays are analyzed by performing a four-dimensional fit of the decay amplitude, using pp collision data corresponding to 3  fb^{-1} collected with the LHCb detector. The data cannot be described with K^{+}π^{-} resonances alone, which is confirmed with a model-independent approach. A highly significant Z(4430)^{-}→ψ^{'}π^{-} component is required, thus confirming the existence of this state. The observed evolution of the Z(4430)^{-} amplitude with the ψ^{'}π^{-} mass establishes the resonant nature of this particle. The mass and width measurements are substantially improved. The spin parity is determined unambiguously to be 1^{+}.

  2. Observation of decoherence in a carbon nanotube mechanical resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Ben H; Singh, Vibhor; Venstra, Warner J; Meerwaldt, Harold B; Steele, Gary A

    2014-12-19

    In physical systems, decoherence can arise from both dissipative and dephasing processes. In mechanical resonators, the driven frequency response measures a combination of both, whereas time-domain techniques such as ringdown measurements can separate the two. Here we report the first observation of the mechanical ringdown of a carbon nanotube mechanical resonator. Comparing the mechanical quality factor obtained from frequency- and time-domain measurements, we find a spectral quality factor four times smaller than that measured in ringdown, demonstrating dephasing-induced decoherence of the nanomechanical motion. This decoherence is seen to arise at high driving amplitudes, pointing to a nonlinear dephasing mechanism. Our results highlight the importance of time-domain techniques for understanding dissipation in nanomechanical resonators, and the relevance of decoherence mechanisms in nanotube mechanics.

  3. Observation of the resonant character of the $Z(4430)^-$ state

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassen, Rolf; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Balagura, Vladislav; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Bauer, Thomas; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Belogurov, Sergey; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Bizzeti, Andrea; Bjørnstad, Pål Marius; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borgia, Alessandra; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Brambach, Tobias; van den Brand, Johannes; Bressieux, Joël; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Brown, Henry; Bursche, Albert; Busetto, Giovanni; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Camboni, Alessandro; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carranza-Mejia, Hector; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Ciba, Krzystof; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Counts, Ian; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pascal; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gaspar, Clara; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Giani', Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, Vladimir; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gordon, Hamish; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Hampson, Thomas; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; Hartmann, Thomas; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Hunt, Philip; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jaton, Pierre; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jezabek, Marek; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kaballo, Michael; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Klaver, Suzanne; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Korolev, Mikhail; Kozlinskiy, Alexandr; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; La Thi, Viet Nga; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lambert, Robert W; Lanciotti, Elisa; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Leo, Sabato; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Liu, Guoming; Lohn, Stefan; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lopez-March, Neus; Lowdon, Peter; Lu, Haiting; Lucchesi, Donatella; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Machefert, Frederic; Machikhiliyan, Irina V; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Malde, Sneha; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manzali, Matteo; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Märki, Raphael; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martens, Aurelien; Martín Sánchez, Alexandra; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; McSkelly, Ben; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Merk, Marcel; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Moggi, Niccolò; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monteil, Stephane; Moran, Dermot; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Katharina; Muresan, Raluca; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nicol, Michelle; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Oggero, Serena; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Orlandea, Marius; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Arantza; Pal, Bilas Kanti; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Parkes, Christopher; Parkinson, Christopher John; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pazos Alvarez, Antonio; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perez Trigo, Eliseo; Perret, Pascal; Perrin-Terrin, Mathieu; Pescatore, Luca; Pesen, Erhan; Petridis, Konstantin; Petrolini, Alessandro; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Powell, Andrew; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rakotomiaramanana, Barinjaka; Rama, Matteo; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Alexander; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Roa Romero, Diego; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruffini, Fabrizio; Ruiz, Hugo; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Sabatino, Giovanni; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sapunov, Matvey; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Savrie, Mauro; Savrina, Darya; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Seco, Marcos; Semennikov, Alexander; Senderowska, Katarzyna; Sepp, Indrek; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Anthony; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Sparkes, Ailsa; Spinella, Franco; Spradlin, Patrick; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Sascha; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Stroili, Roberto; Subbiah, Vijay Kartik; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szilard, Daniela; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ubeda Garcia, Mario; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; Voss, Helge; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wiedner, Dirk; Wilkinson, Guy; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wu, Suzhi; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Wen Chao; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zvyagin, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Resonant structures in $B^0\\to\\psi'\\pi^-K^+$ decays are analyzed by performing a four-dimensional fit of the decay amplitude, using $pp$ collision data corresponding to $\\rm 3 fb^{-1}$ collected with the LHCb detector. The data cannot be described with $K^+\\pi^-$ resonances alone, which is confirmed with a model-independent approach. A highly significant $Z(4430)^-\\to\\psi'\\pi^-$ component is required, thus confirming the existence of this state. The observed evolution of the $Z(4430)^-$ amplitude with the $\\psi'\\pi^-$ mass establishes the resonant nature of this particle. The mass and width measurements are substantially improved. The spin-parity is determined unambiguously to be $1^+$.

  4. Observation of Wakefields and Resonances in Coherent Synchrotron Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Billinghurst, B E; Baribeau, C; Batten, T; Dallin, L; May, T E; Vogt, J M; Wurtz, W A; Warnock, R; Bizzizero, D A; Kramer, S

    2015-01-01

    We report on high resolution measurements of resonances in the spectrum of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) at the Canadian Light Source (CLS). The resonances permeate the spectrum at wavenumber intervals of $0.074 ~\\textrm{cm}^{-1}$, and are highly stable under changes in the machine setup (energy, bucket filling pattern, CSR in bursting or continuous mode). Analogous resonances were predicted long ago in an idealized theory as eigenmodes of a smooth toroidal vacuum chamber driven by a bunched beam moving on a circular orbit. A corollary of peaks in the spectrum is the presence of pulses in the wakefield of the bunch at well defined spatial intervals. Through experiments and further calculations we elucidate the resonance and wakefield mechanisms in the CLS vacuum chamber, which has a fluted form much different from a smooth torus. The wakefield is observed directly in the 30-110 GHz range by RF diodes, and indirectly by an interferometer in the THz range. The wake pulse sequence found by diodes is less ...

  5. Observation of vibrational overtones by single molecule resonant photodissociation

    CERN Document Server

    Khanyile, Ncamiso B; Brown, Kenneth R

    2015-01-01

    Coulomb crystals composed of atomic ions and molecular ions are an ideal system for performing high-precision spectroscopy with applications in astrochemistry and fundamental physics. Here we show that this same system can be coupled with a broadband laser to discover new molecular transitions. We use three-ion chains of Ca$^{+}$ and CaH$^{+}$ to observe vibrational transitions via resonance enhanced multiphoton dissociation detected by Ca$^{+}$ fluorescence. Based on theoretical calculations, we assign the observed peaks to the transition from the ground vibrational state, $\

  6. Observing atomic collapse resonances in artificial nuclei on graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Wong, Dillon; Shytov, Andrey V; Brar, Victor W; Choi, Sangkook; Wu, Qiong; Tsai, Hsin-Zon; Regan, William; Zettl, Alex; Kawakami, Roland K; Louie, Steven G; Levitov, Leonid S; Crommie, Michael F

    2013-05-10

    Relativistic quantum mechanics predicts that when the charge of a superheavy atomic nucleus surpasses a certain threshold, the resulting strong Coulomb field causes an unusual atomic collapse state; this state exhibits an electron wave function component that falls toward the nucleus, as well as a positron component that escapes to infinity. In graphene, where charge carriers behave as massless relativistic particles, it has been predicted that highly charged impurities should exhibit resonances corresponding to these atomic collapse states. We have observed the formation of such resonances around artificial nuclei (clusters of charged calcium dimers) fabricated on gated graphene devices via atomic manipulation with a scanning tunneling microscope. The energy and spatial dependence of the atomic collapse state measured with scanning tunneling microscopy revealed unexpected behavior when occupied by electrons.

  7. Formation of inner-shell autoionizing CO+ states below the CO++ threshold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osipov, Timur; Weber, Thorsten; Rescigno, Thomas N; Lee, Sun; Orel, Ann; Schoffler, Markus; Sturm, Felix; Schossler, S.; Lenz, U.; Havermeier, T.; Kuhnel, M.; Jahnke, Till; Williams, J. B.; Ray, D.; Landers, Alan; Dorner, Reinhard; Belkacem, Ali

    2009-12-27

    We report a kinematically complete experiment on the production of CO{sup +} autoionizing states following photoionization of carbon monoxide below its vertical double ionization threshold. Momentum imaging spectroscopy is used to measure the energies and body-frame angular distributions of both photo- and autoionization electrons, as well as the kinetic energy release (KER) of the atomic ions. This data, in combination with ab initio theoretical calculations, provides insight into the nature of the cation states produced and their subsequent dissociation into autoionizing atomic (O*) fragments.

  8. Observation of two new Ξ(b)(-) baryon resonances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bertolin, A; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Brook, N H; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Capriotti, L; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casanova Mohr, R C M; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Cogoni, V; Cojocariu, L; Collazuol, G; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Counts, I; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Crocombe, A C; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dalseno, J; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Dean, C-T; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dey, B; Di Canto, A; Di Domenico, A; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dujany, G; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H-M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farley, N; Farry, S; Fay, R; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fol, P; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Fu, J; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; García Pardiñas, J; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gastaldi, U; Gauld, R; Gavardi, L; Gazzoni, G; Geraci, A; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianelle, A; Gianì, S; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graverini, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hess, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Karodia, S; Kelsey, M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Kochebina, O; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Langhans, B; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Likhomanenko, T; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lowdon, P; Lucchesi, D; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Malinin, A; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mapelli, A; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J

    2015-02-13

    Two structures are observed close to the kinematic threshold in the Ξ(b)(0)π(-) mass spectrum in a sample of proton-proton collision data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0  fb(-1), recorded by the LHCb experiment. In the quark model, two baryonic resonances with quark content bds are expected in this mass region: the spin-parity J(P)=(1/2)(+) and J(P)=(3/2)(+) states, denoted Ξ(b)('-) and Ξ(b)(*-). Interpreting the structures as these resonances, we measure the mass differences and the width of the heavier state to be m(Ξ(b)('-))-m(Ξ(b)(0))-m(π(-))=3.653±0.018±0.006  MeV/c(2), m(Ξ(b)(*-))-m(Ξ(b)(0))-m(π(-))=23.96±0.12±0.06  MeV/c(2), Γ(Ξ(b)(*-))=1.65±0.31±0.10  MeV, where the first and second uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. The width of the lighter state is consistent with zero, and we place an upper limit of Γ(Ξ(b)('-))<0.08  MeV at 95% confidence level. Relative production rates of these states are also reported.

  9. Observation of two new $\\Xi_b^-$ baryon resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassen, Rolf; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Belogurov, Sergey; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Bizzeti, Andrea; Bjørnstad, Pål Marius; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borgia, Alessandra; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casanova Mohr, Raimon; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Counts, Ian; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew Christopher; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pascal; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Domenico, Antonio; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fol, Philip; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gastaldi, Ugo; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Geraci, Angelo; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, V.V.; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Hampson, Thomas; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jaton, Pierre; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Karodia, Sarah; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Korolev, Mikhail; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; La Thi, Viet Nga; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lambert, Robert W; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Lohn, Stefan; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lowdon, Peter; Lucchesi, Donatella; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Machefert, Frederic; Machikhiliyan, Irina V; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Mapelli, Alessandro; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Märki, Raphael; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; McSkelly, Ben; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Merk, Marcel; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Moggi, Niccolò; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Katharina; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nicol, Michelle; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Orlandea, Marius; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Otto, Adam; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Arantza; Pal, Bilas Kanti; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parkes, Christopher; Parkinson, Christopher John; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Pescatore, Luca; Pesen, Erhan; Petridis, Konstantin; Petrolini, Alessandro; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rakotomiaramanana, Barinjaka; Rama, Matteo; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz, Hugo; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sepp, Indrek; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skillicorn, Ian; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Anthony; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Sterpka, Christopher Francis; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Stroili, Roberto; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Todd, Jacob; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ubeda Garcia, Mario; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viana Barbosa, Joao Vitor; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Whitehead, Mark; Wiedner, Dirk; Wilkinson, Guy; Wilkinson, Michael; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Wilschut, Hans; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Wen Chao; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Two structures are observed close to the kinematic threshold in the $\\Xi_b^0\\pi^-$ mass spectrum in a sample of proton-proton collision data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb$^{-1}$ recorded by the LHCb experiment. In the quark model, two baryonic resonances with quark content $bds$ are expected in this mass region: the spin-parity $J^P = \\frac{1}{2}^+$ and $J^P=\\frac{3}{2}^+$ states, denoted $\\Xi_b^{\\prime -}$ and $\\Xi_b^{*-}$. Interpreting the structures as these resonances, we measure the mass differences and the width of the heavier state to be \\begin{eqnarray*} m(\\Xi_b^{\\prime -}) - m(\\Xi_b^0) - m(\\pi^{-}) &=& 3.653 \\pm 0.018 \\pm 0.006~{\\rm MeV}/c^2, \\\\ m(\\Xi_b^{*-}) - m(\\Xi_b^0) - m(\\pi^{-}) &=& 23.96 \\pm 0.12\\pm 0.06~{\\rm MeV}/c^2, \\\\ \\Gamma(\\Xi_b^{*-}) &=& 1.65 \\pm 0.31 \\pm 0.10~{\\rm MeV}, \\end{eqnarray*} where the first and second uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. The width of the lighter state is consistent with zero, and we place ...

  10. Observation of superconductivity in hydrogen sulfide from nuclear resonant scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troyan, Ivan; Gavriliuk, Alexander; Rüffer, Rudolf; Chumakov, Alexander; Mironovich, Anna; Lyubutin, Igor; Perekalin, Dmitry; Drozdov, Alexander P; Eremets, Mikhail I

    2016-03-18

    High-temperature superconductivity remains a focus of experimental and theoretical research. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been reported to be superconducting at high pressures and with a high transition temperature. We report on the direct observation of the expulsion of the magnetic field in H2S compressed to 153 gigapascals. A thin (119)Sn film placed inside the H2S sample was used as a sensor of the magnetic field. The magnetic field on the (119)Sn sensor was monitored by nuclear resonance scattering of synchrotron radiation. Our results demonstrate that an external static magnetic field of about 0.7 tesla is expelled from the volume of (119)Sn foil as a result of the shielding by the H2S sample at temperatures between 4.7 K and approximately 140 K, revealing a superconducting state of H2S.

  11. Observation of orbiting resonances in He(3S1) + NH3 Penning ionization

    OpenAIRE

    Jankunas, Justin; Jachymski, Krzysztof; Hapka, Michal; Osterwalder, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Resonances are among the clearest quantum mechanical signatures of scattering processes. Previously, shape resonances and Feshbach resonances have been observed in inelastic and reactive collisions involving atoms or diatomic molecules. Structure in the integral cross section has been observed in a handful of elastic collisions involving polyatomic molecules. The present paper presents the observation of shape resonances in the reactive scattering of a polyatomic molecule, NH3. A merged-beam ...

  12. Out-of-plane (e , 2 e) measurements on He autoionizing levels at 80, 150, and 488 eV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, N. L. S.; Kim, B. N.; Weaver, C. M.; Deharak, B. A.; Bartschat, K.

    2016-05-01

    We report out-of-scattering-plane (e , 2 e) measurements on helium 2 l 2l' autoionizing levels for 80, 150, and 488 eV incident electron energies, and scattering angles 60°, 39. 2°, and 20. 5°, respectively. The kinematics are the same in all cases: ejected electrons are detected in a plane that contains the momentum transfer direction and is perpendicular to the scattering plane, and the momentum transfer is 2.1 a.u.. The 80 eV results complete our sets of measurements at low, intermediate, and high, incident energies. The results are presented as (e , 2 e) angular distributions energy-integrated over each level, and are compared with our theory calculated for 488 eV incident electron energy. The 150 eV and 488 eV experiments are characterized by recoil peaks appropriate to each autoionizing level. However, for the 80 eV angular distributions, these recoil peaks are largely absent for all levels, including the 3 P level observed at this energy. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grants Nos. PHY-0855040 (NLSM), PHY-1402899 (BAdH), and PHY-1212450 (KB).

  13. Observation and characterization of mode splitting in microsphere resonators in aquatic environment

    CERN Document Server

    Woosung, Kim; Zhu, Jiangang; Yang, Lan

    2011-01-01

    Whispering gallery mode (WGM) optical resonators utilizing resonance shift (RS) and mode splitting (MS) techniques have emerged as highly sensitive platforms for label-free detection of nano-scale objects. RS method has been demonstrated in various resonators in air and liquid. MS in microsphere resonators has not been achieved in aqueous environment up to date, despite its demonstration in microtoroid resonators. Here, we demonstrate scatterer-induced MS of WGMs in microsphere resonators in water. We determine the size range of particles that induces MS in a microsphere in water as a function of resonator mode volume and quality factor. The results are confirmed by the experimental observations.

  14. Observation of resonant interactions among surface gravity waves

    CERN Document Server

    Bonnefoy, F; Michel, G; Semin, B; Humbert, T; Aumaître, S; Berhanu, M; Falcon, E

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally study resonant interactions of oblique surface gravity waves in a large basin. Our results strongly extend previous experimental results performed mainly for perpendicular or collinear wave trains. We generate two oblique waves crossing at an acute angle, while we control their frequency ratio, steepnesses and directions. These mother waves mutually interact and give birth to a resonant wave whose properties (growth rate, resonant response curve and phase locking) are fully characterized. All our experimental results are found in good quantitative agreement with four-wave interaction theory with no fitting parameter. Off-resonance experiments are also reported and the relevant theoretical analysis is conducted and validated.

  15. Observation of snake resonances at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, M.; Ahrens, L.; Alekseev, I. G.; Alessi, J.; Courant, E.; Drees, A.; Fischer, W.; Gardner, C.; Gill, R.; Glenn, J.; Huang, H.; Litvinenko, V.; Luccio, A.; Luo, Y.; Pilat, F.; MacKay, W. W.; Makdisi, Y.; Marusic, A.; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Ptitsyn, V.; Roser, T.; Svirida, D.; Satogata, T.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S. Y.

    2011-05-01

    The Siberian snakes are powerful tools in preserving polarization in high energy accelerators has been demonstrated at the Brookhaven Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Equipped with two full Siberian snakes in each ring, polarization is preserved during acceleration from injection to 100 GeV. However, the Siberian snakes also introduce a new set of depolarization resonances, i.e. snake resonances as first discoverd by Lee and Tepikian [1]. The intrinsic spin resonances above 100 GeV are about a factor of two stronger than those below 100 GeV which raises the challenge to preserve the polarization up to 250 GeV. In 2009, polarized protons collided for the first time at the RHIC design store energy of 250 GeV. This paper presents the experimental measurements of snake resonances at RHIC. The plan for avoiding these resonanances is also presented.

  16. Two-step laser optogalvanic spectroscopy of high J momentum 4dnd and 4dng autoionizing states of strontium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimoyiannis, A.; Bolovinos, A.; Tsekeris, P. (Ioannina Univ. (Greece). Atomic and Molecular Physics Lab.); Camus, P. (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 91 - Orsay (France). Lab. Aime Cotton)

    1993-01-01

    We have measured the energies of about two hundred even parity J=3-5 autoionizing 4 dnd and 4 dng Rydberg states of strontium (Sr) using an optogalvanic method. These states are reached by a two-step dye laser excitation from the 4d 5s metastables through the 4d 5p [sup 3]P[sub 2], [sup 1]F[sub 3], [sup 3]F[sub 4] intermediates. The 4d 5s are populated in a d.c. glow discharge through a Sr heated cell. The electronic configuration of the observed J=3, 4 states is deduced from the Lu-Fano plots of their quantum defect values and the spectral characteristics of the corresponding transitions. (orig.).

  17. Further observations on resonance cones in non-Maxwellian plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiemann, H.; Singh, N.

    1983-01-01

    Results on the angular distribution of the electrostatic potential of a pulsating point charge in a warm magnetized plasma permeated by an electron beam are presented. The theoretical formulation for a finite magnetic field is given, and the solution of the resonance cone dispersion relation is presented. Numerical results on the angular distribution of the potential are shown, and the propagation of waves outside the resonance cones is described. It is demonstrated that with the inclusions of a finite magnetic field, the field patterns of a point charge are qualitatively similar to those obtained for a uniaxial plasma. The Cerenkov radiation occurs at angles much smaller than the cold-cone angle, even with the finite magnetic field. When the beam velocity is well above the thermal velocity of the background electrons, a characteristic wave propagation occurs between the cold-cone angles.

  18. LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Excitation of the (2p2)1D and (2s2p)1P autoionizing states of helium by 200 eV electron impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godunov, A. L.; McGuire, J. H.; Schipakov, V. S.; Crowe, A.

    2002-06-01

    We report full second Born calculations with inclusion of post-collision interactions for excitation of the (2p2)1D and (2s2p)1P autoionizing states of helium by 200 eV electron impact. The calculations are compared to (e, 2e) measurements of McDonald and Crowe (McDonald D G and Crowe A 1993 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 26 2887-97) and Lower and Weigold (Lower J and Weigold E 1990 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 23 2819-45). It is shown that post-collision interactions or Coulomb interactions in the final state between the scattered particle, the ejected electron and the recoil ion have a strong influence on both the direct ionization and resonance profiles around the binary lobe. The second-order terms in the amplitude of double electron excitation also play an observable role under these kinematic conditions. Reasonable agreement is found between the full-scale calculations and the experimental data.

  19. Resonance ionization scheme development for europium

    CERN Document Server

    Chrysalidis, K; Fedosseev, V N; Marsh, B A; Naubereit, P; Rothe, S; Seiffert, C; Kron, T; Wendt, K

    2017-01-01

    Odd-parity autoionizing states of europium have been investigated by resonance ionization spectroscopy via two-step, two-resonance excitations. The aim of this work was to establish ionization schemes specifically suited for europium ion beam production using the ISOLDE Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source (RILIS). 13 new RILIS-compatible ionization schemes are proposed. The scheme development was the first application of the Photo Ionization Spectroscopy Apparatus (PISA) which has recently been integrated into the RILIS setup.

  20. EFFECT OF EXCITATION-AUTOIONIZATION IN NON-LOCAL THERMODYNAMIC EQUILIBRIUM PLASMAS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Ze-qing; Zhang Ben-ai; Qiu Yu-bo

    2000-01-01

    Based on the detailed configuration accounting model, the authros havedeveloped a method to calculate the rate of excitation-autoionization(EA) in the average atom model and used it in the rate equations. Thenumerical results show that EA effect is signifficant in hightemperature low density plasma and can cause an additional ionization upto 15% of an ionization stage.

  1. Electron-impact excitation-autoionization of helium in the S-wave limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horner, Daniel A.; McCurdy, C. William; Rescigno, Thomas N.

    2004-10-01

    Excitation of the autoionizing states of helium by electron impact is shown in calculations in the s-wave limit to leave a clear signature in the singly differential cross section for the (e,2e) process. It is suggested that such behavior should be seen generally in (e,2e) experiments on atoms that measure the single differential cross section.

  2. Decay of autoionizing states in time-dependent density functional and reduced density matrix functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapoor, Varun; Brics, Martins; Bauer, Dieter [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Rostock, 18051 Rostock (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Autoionizing states are inaccessible to time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) using known, adiabatic Kohn-Sham (KS) potentials. We determine the exact KS potential for a numerically exactly solvable model Helium atom interacting with a laser field that is populating an autoionizing state. The exact single-particle density of the population in the autoionizing state corresponds to that of the energetically lowest quasi-stationary state in the exact KS potential. We describe how this exact potential controls the decay by a barrier whose height and width allows for the density to tunnel out and decay with the same rate as in the ab initio time-dependent Schroedinger calculation. However, devising a useful exchange-correlation potential that is capable of governing such a scenario in general and in more complex systems is hopeless. As an improvement over TDDFT, time-dependent reduced density matrix functional theory has been proposed. We are able to obtain for the above described autoionization process the exact time-dependent natural orbitals (i.e., the eigenfunctions of the exact, time-dependent one-body reduced density matrix) and study the potentials that appear in the equations of motion for the natural orbitals and the structure of the two-body density matrix expanded in them.

  3. Observation of generalized optomechanical coupling and cooling on cavity resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Sawadsky, Andreas; Nia, Ramon Moghadas; Tarabrin, Sergey P; Khalili, Farid Ya; Hammerer, Klemens; Schnabel, Roman

    2014-01-01

    Optomechanical coupling between a light field and the motion of a cavity mirror via radiation pressure plays an important role for the exploration of macroscopic quantum physics and for the detection of gravitational waves (GWs). It has been used to cool mechanical oscillators into their quantum ground states and has been considered to boost the sensitivity of GW detectors, e.g. via the optical spring effect. Here, we present the experimental characterization of generalized, that is, dispersive and dissipative optomechanical coupling, with a macroscopic (1.5mm)^2-sized silicon nitride (SiN) membrane in a cavity-enhanced Michelson-type interferometer. We report for the first time strong optomechanical cooling based on dissipative coupling, even on cavity resonance, in excellent agreement with theory. Our result will allow for new experimental regimes in macroscopic quantum physics and GW detection.

  4. Observation of narrow isotopic optical magnetic resonances in individual emission spectral lines of neon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saprykin, E G [Institute of Automation and Electrometry, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Sorokin, V A; Shalagin, A M [Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-31

    Narrow resonances are observed in the course of recording the individual emission lines of the glow discharge in the mixture of isotopes {sup 20}Ne and {sup 22}Ne, depending on the strength of the longitudinal magnetic field. The position of resonances in the magnetic scale corresponds to the compensation of the isotopic shift for certain spectral lines due to the Zeeman effect. It is found that the contrast of the resonances is higher for the transitions between the highly excited energy levels, and the resonances themselves are formed in the zone of longitudinal spatial nonuniformity of the magnetic field. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  5. Observation of the antiferromagnetic resonance of multi-sublattice modes in KCuF 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Qingfan; Li, Liangsheng; Mino, Michinobu; Yamada, Isao; Yamazaki, Hitoshi

    2006-05-01

    We report antiferromagnetic resonance measurements of KCuF 3 at various frequencies from 3.8 to 10 GHz at 4.2 K. A second antiferromagnetic resonance absorption mode is observed in the [1 0 0] p direction and equivalent directions, where [ ] p represents an axis in a unit cell of the perovskite structure. Using the eight-sublattice model proposed by Yamada and Kato [J. Phys. Soc. Japan 63 (1994) 289], the numerical calculation for the antiferromagnetic resonance indicates that this second absorption mode comes from one of the resonance modes of the eight-sublattice system.

  6. Observation of Efimov resonances in a mixture with extreme mass imbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, R; Ulmanis, J; Häfner, S; Repp, M; Arias, A; Kuhnle, E D; Weidemüller, M

    2014-06-27

    We observe two consecutive heteronuclear Efimov resonances in an ultracold Li-Cs mixture by measuring three-body loss coefficients as a function of magnetic field near a Feshbach resonance. The first resonance is detected at a scattering length of a_((0))=-320(10)a_((0)), corresponding to ∼7(∼3) times the Li-Cs (Cs-Cs) van der Waals range. The second resonance appears at 5.8(1.0)a_((0)), close to the unitarity-limited regime at the sample temperature of 450 nK. Indication of a third resonance is found in the atom loss spectra. The scaling of the resonance positions is close to the predicted universal scaling value of 4.9 for zero temperature. Deviations from universality might be caused by finite-range and temperature effects, as well as magnetic field-dependent Cs-Cs interactions.

  7. Observation of a surface lattice resonance in a fractal arrangement of gold nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Ting Lee; Segerink, Frans B; Dikken, Dirk Jan; Herek, Jennifer L

    2015-01-01

    The collective response of closely spaced metal particles in non-periodic arrangements has the potential to provide a beneficial angular and frequency dependence in sensing applications. In this paper, we investigate the optical response of a Sierpinski fractal arrangement of gold nanoparticles and show that it supports a collective resonance similar to the surface lattice resonances that exist in periodic arrangements of plasmonic resonators. Using back focal plane microscopy, we observe the leakage of radiation out of a surface lattice resonance that is efficiently excited when the wavenumber of the incident light matches a strong Fourier component of the fractal structure. The efficient coupling between localized surface plasmons leads to a collective resonance and a Fano-like feature in the scattering spectrum. Our experimental observations are supported by numerical simulations based on the coupled-dipole approximation and finite-difference time-domain methods. This work presents a first step towards the...

  8. Appropriate observables for investigating narrow resonances in kaon photoproduction off a proton

    CERN Document Server

    Mart, T

    2011-01-01

    The existence of non-strange partner of pentaquark, the J^p = 1/2^+ narrow resonance, has been investigated by utilizing kaon photoproduction off a proton. It is found that the corresponding mass is 1650 MeV and the appropriate observables for investigating this resonance are the recoiled hyperon polarization, the beam-recoil double polarization C_x, and differential cross section at backward angles. Future kaon photoproduction experiments at low energies should focus on these observables.

  9. Power active filter control based on a resonant disturbance observer

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos Fuentes, German A.; Cortés Romero, John Alexander; Zou, Zhixiang; Costa Castelló, Ramon; Zhou, Keliang

    2015-01-01

    Active filters are power electronics devices used to eliminate harmonics from the distribution network. This article presents an active disturbance rejection control scheme for active filters. The controller is based on a linear disturbance observer combined with a disturbance rejection scheme. The parameter tuning is based on a combined pole placement and an optimal estimation based on Kalman-Bucy filter. Proposed scheme is validated through simulation and experimental work in an active filter.

  10. Relativistic decay widths of autoionization processes: The relativistic FanoADC-Stieltjes method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasshauer, Elke; Kolorenč, Přemysl; Pernpointner, Markus

    2015-04-01

    Electronic decay processes of ionized systems are, for example, the Auger decay or the Interatomic/ Intermolecular Coulombic Decay. In both processes, an energetically low lying vacancy is filled by an electron of an energetically higher lying orbital and a secondary electron is instantaneously emitted to the continuum. Whether or not such a process occurs depends both on the energetic accessibility and the corresponding lifetime compared to the lifetime of competing decay mechanisms. We present a realization of the non-relativistically established FanoADC-Stieltjes method for the description of autoionization decay widths including relativistic effects. This procedure, being based on the Algebraic Diagrammatic Construction (ADC), was adapted to the relativistic framework and implemented into the relativistic quantum chemistry program package Dirac. It is, in contrast to other existing relativistic atomic codes, not limited to the description of autoionization lifetimes in spherically symmetric systems, but is instead also applicable to molecules and clusters. We employ this method to the Auger processes following the Kr3d-1, Xe4d-1, and Rn5d-1 ionization. Based on the results, we show a pronounced influence of mainly scalar-relativistic effects on the decay widths of autoionization processes.

  11. Observation of double pygmy resonances in $^{195,196}$Pt and enhanced astrophysical reaction rates

    CERN Document Server

    Giacoppo, F; Eriksen, T K; Görgen, A; Guttormsen, M; Hagen, T W; Larsen, A C; Kheswa, B V; Klintefjord, M; Koehler, P E; Nyhus, H T; Renstr\\om, T; Sahin, E; Siem, S; Tornyi, T G

    2014-01-01

    Our measurements of $^{195,196}$Pt $\\gamma$-strength functions show a double-humped enhancement in the $E_{\\gamma}= 4-8$ MeV region. For the first time, the detailed shape of these resonances is revealed for excitation energies in the quasicontinuum. We demonstrate that the corresponding neutron-capture cross sections and astrophysical reaction rates are increased by up to a factor of 2 when these newly observed pygmy resonances are included. These results lend credence to theoretical predictions of enhanced reaction rates due to such pygmy resonances and hence are important for a better understanding of r-process nucleosynthesis.

  12. Observation of broad p-wave Feshbach resonances in ultracold $^{85}$Rb-$^{87}$Rb mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, Shen; Shen, Chuyang; Wu, Yewei; Tey, Meng Khoon; You, Li; Gao, Bo

    2016-01-01

    We observe new Feshbach resonances in ultracold mixtures of $^{85}$Rb and $^{87}$Rb atoms in the $^{85}$Rb$|2, +2\\rangle$+$^{87}$Rb$|1, +1\\rangle$ and $^{85}$Rb$|2, -2\\rangle$+$^{87}$Rb$|1, -1\\rangle$ scattering channels. The positions and properties of the resonances are predicted and characterized using the semi-analytic multichannel quantum-defect theory by Gao. Of particular interest, a number of broad entrance-channel dominated p-wave resonances are identified, implicating exciting opportunities for studying a variety of p-wave interaction dominated physics.

  13. Observation of soliton-induced resonant radiation due to three-wave mixing

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, B; Guo, H R; Zeng, X L; Chen, X F; Chung, H P; Chen, Y H; Bache, M

    2016-01-01

    We show experimental proof that three-wave mixing can lead to formation of resonant radiation when interacting with a temporal soliton. This constitutes a new class of resonant waves, and due to the parametric nature of the three-wave mixing nonlinearity, the resonant radiation frequencies are widely tunable over broad ranges in the visible and mid-IR. The experiment is conducted in a periodically poled lithium niobate crystal, where a femtosecond self-defocusing soliton is excited in the near-IR, and resonant radiation due to the sum- and difference-frequency generation quadratic nonlinear terms are observed in the near- and mid-IR, respectively. Their spectral positions are widely tunable by changing the poling pitch and are in perfect agreement with theoretical calculations.

  14. Observation of the stimulated coherent diffraction radiation in an open resonator at LUCX facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aryshev, A., E-mail: alar@post.kek.jp [KEK: High Energy Accelerator Research Organization,1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Araki, S.; Fukuda, M. [KEK: High Energy Accelerator Research Organization,1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Karataev, P. [John Adams Institute at Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham, Surrey TW20 0EX (United Kingdom); Konkov, A.; Naumenko, G.; Potylitsyn, A. [Tomsk Polytechnic University, Institute of Physics and Technology, Lenin ave. 30, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Sakaue, K. [Waseda University, 3-4-1, Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Sukhikh, L. [Tomsk Polytechnic University, Institute of Physics and Technology, Lenin ave. 30, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Terunuma, N. [KEK: High Energy Accelerator Research Organization,1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Verigin, D. [Tomsk Polytechnic University, Institute of Physics and Technology, Lenin ave. 30, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Urakawa, J. [KEK: High Energy Accelerator Research Organization,1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2014-11-01

    We present an initial test of a new type of a pre-bunched beam pumped free electron maser based on Stimulated Coherent Diffraction Radiation (SCDR) generated in an open resonator. A fast Schottky Barrier Diode (time response <1ns) has enabled us to investigate the properties of the radiation stored in the cavity as well as the intrinsic properties of the cavity itself. We observed a turn-by-turn SCDR generated by a multibunch beam. When the cavity length was exactly a half of the bunch spacing a clear resonance was observed. Moreover, turn-by-turn measurements revealed the cavity quality factor of 72.88, which was rather high for an open resonator in the wavelength range of 3–5 mm. An exponential growth of the photon intensity as a function of the number of bunches was also demonstrated.

  15. Calculation of autoionization positions and widths with applications to Penning ionization reactions. [Miller golden rule formula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isaacson, A.D.

    1978-08-01

    Using an approximate evaluation of Miller's golden rule formula to calculate autoionization widths which allows for the consideration only of L/sup 2/ functions, the positions and lifetimes of the lowest /sup 1/,/sup 3/P autoionizing states of He have been obtained to reasonable accuracy. This method has been extended to molecular problems, and the ab initio configuration interaction potential energy and width surfaces for the He(2/sup 3/S) + H/sub 2/ system have been obtained. Quantum mechanical close-coupling calculations of ionization cross sections using the complex V* - (i/2) GAMMA-potential have yielded rate constants in good agreement with the experimental results of Lindinger, et al. The potential energy surface of the He(2/sup 1/S) + H/sub 2/ system has also been obtained and exhibits not only a high degree of anisotropy, but also contains a relative maximum for a perpendicular (C/sub 2//sub v/) approach which appears to arise from s-p hybridization of the outer He orbital. However, similar ab initio calculations on the He(2/sup 1/S) + Ar system do not show such anomalous structure. In addition, the complex poles of the S-matrix (Siegert eigenvalues) were calculated for several autoionizing states of He and H/sup -/, with encouraging results even for quite modest basis sets. This method was extended to molecular problems, and results obtained for the He(2/sup 3/S) + H and He(2/sup 1/S) + H systems. 75 references.

  16. Experimental observation of the linewidth narrowing of electromagnetically induced transparency resonance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Wang; Shujing Li; Jingqin Yao; Jie Ma; Feng Peng; Gang Jiang; Hai Wang

    2005-01-01

    @@ We report an experimental observation of the variation in linewidth of the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) resonance in a three-level A-type system for several laser bandwidths in a Rb vapor cell, with and without a buffer gas. It is found, using narrow bandwidth (about 20 kHz) diode laser for both coupling and probe beams, that the linewidth of the EIT resonance can be significantly narrowed in the Rb vapor cell with the buffer gas. The results are in good qualitative agreement with a simple theoretical calculation.

  17. ABC Effect in Basic Double-Pionic Fusion --- Observation of a new resonance?

    CERN Document Server

    Adlarson, P; Augustyniak, W; Baru, V; Bashkanov, M; Bergmann, F S; Berlowski, M; Bhatt, H; Brinkmann, K -T; Buescher, M; Calen, H; Clement, H; Coderre, D; Czerwinski, E; Doroshkevich, E; Ekstrom, C; Engels, R; Erven, W; Eyrich, W; Fedorets, P; Foehl, K; Fransson, K; Goldenbaum, F; Goslawski, P; Grigoryev, K; Grishina, V; Gullstrom, C -O; Hampe, J; Hanhart, C; Heijkenskj, L; Hejny, V; Hinterberger, F; Hodana, M; Hoistad, B; Jacewicz, M; Janusz, M; Jany, A; Jany, B R; Jarczyk, L; Jaus, J; Johansson, T; Kamys, B; Kemmerling, G; Khakimova, O; Khoukaz, A; Kistryn, S; Klaja, J; Kleines, H; Klos, B; Kren, F; Krzemien, W; Kulessa, P; Kullander, S; Kupsc, A; Lalwani, K; Lorentz, B; Magiera, A; Maier, R; Marciniewski, P; Marianski, B; Mikirtychiants, M; Moskal, P; Morsch, H -P; Nandi, B K; Ohm, H; Passfeld, A; Pauly, C; del Rio, E Perez; Petukhov, Y; Piskunov, N; Plucinski, P; Podkopal, P; Povtoreyko, A; Prasuhn, D; Pricking, A; Pysz, K; Rausmann, T; Redmer, C F; Ritman, J; Roy, A; Ruber, R J M Y; Rudy, Z; Schadmand, S; Schmidt, A; Schroeder, W; Sefzick, T; Serdyuk, V; Shah, N; Siemaszko, M; Siudak, R; Skorodko, T; Skurzok, M; Smyrski, J; Sopov, V; Stassen, R; Stepaniak, J; Sterzenbach, G; Stockhorst, H; Stroeher, H; Szczurek, A; Taeschner, A; Tolba, T; Trzcinski, A; Varma, R; Vlasov, P; Wagner, G J; Weglorz, W; Winnemoeller, A; Wirzba, A; Wolke, M; Wronska, A; Wuestner, P; Wurm, P; Yurev, L; Zabierowski, J; Zielinski, M J; Zipper, W; Zlomanczuk, J; Zupranski, P

    2011-01-01

    We report on a high-statistics measurement of the basic double pionic fusion reaction $pn \\to d\\pi^0\\pi^0$ over the energy region of the so-called ABC effect, a pronounced low-mass enhancement in the $\\pi\\pi$-invariant mass spectrum. The measurements were performed with the WASA detector setup at COSY. The data reveal the ABC effect to be associated with a Lorentzian shaped energy dependence in the integral cross section. The observables are consistent with a resonance with $I(J^P) =0(3^+)$ in both $pn$ and $\\Delta\\Delta$ systems. Necessary further tests of the resonance interpretation are discussed.

  18. Resonances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    an impetus or drive to that account: change, innovation, rupture, or discontinuity. Resonances: Historical Essays on Continuity and Change explores the historiographical question of the modes of interrelation between these motifs in historical narratives. The essays in the collection attempt to realize...... theoretical consciousness through historical narrative ‘in practice’, by discussing selected historical topics from Western cultural history, within the disciplines of history, literature, visual arts, musicology, archaeology, philosophy, and theology. The title Resonances indicates the overall perspective...

  19. Resonance vibrations of the Ross Ice Shelf and observations of persistent atmospheric waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Oleg A.; Zabotin, Nikolay A.

    2016-10-01

    Recently reported lidar observations have revealed a persistent wave activity in the Antarctic middle and upper atmosphere that has no counterpart in observations at midlatitude and low-latitude locations. The unusual wave activity suggests a geographically specific source of atmospheric waves with periods of 3-10 h. Here we investigate theoretically the hypothesis that the unusual atmospheric wave activity in Antarctica is generated by the fundamental and low-order modes of vibrations of the Ross Ice Shelf (RIS). Simple models are developed to describe basic physical properties of resonant vibrations of large ice shelves and their coupling to the atmosphere. Dispersion relation of the long surface waves, which propagate in the floating ice sheet and are responsible for its low-order resonances, is found to be similar to the dispersion relation of infragravity waves in the ice-free ocean. The phase speed of the surface waves and the resonant frequencies determine the periods and wave vectors of atmospheric waves that are generated by the RIS resonant oscillations. The altitude-dependent vertical wavelengths and the periods of the acoustic-gravity waves in the atmosphere are shown to be sensitive to the physical parameters of the RIS, which can be difficult to measure by other means. Predicted properties of the atmospheric waves prove to be in a remarkable agreement with the key features of the observed persistent wave activity.

  20. A comparison of field-line resonances observed at the Goose Bay and Wick radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Provan

    Full Text Available Previous observations with the Goose Bay HF coherent-scatter radar have revealed structured spectral peaks at ultra-low frequencies. The frequencies of these spectral peaks have been demonstrated to be extremely consistent from day to day. The stability of these spectral peaks can be seen as evidence for the existence of global magnetospheric cavity modes whose resonant frequencies are independent of latitude. Field-line resonances occur when successive harmonics of the eigenfrequency of the magnetospheric cavity or waveguide match either the first harmonic eigenfrequency of the geomagnetic field lines or higher harmonics of this frequency. Power spectra observed at the SABRE VHF coherent-scatter radar at Wick, Scotland, during night and early morning are revealed to show similarly clearly structured spectral peaks. These spectral peaks are the result of local field-line resonances due to Alfvén waves standing on magnetospheric field lines. A comparison of the spectra observed by the Goose Bay and Wick radars demonstrate that the frequencies of the field-line resonances are, on average, almost identical, despite the different latitudinal ranges covered by the two radars. Possible explanations for the similarity of the signatures on the two radar systems are discussed.

  1. Vibration Mode Observation of Piezoelectric Disk-type Resonator by High Frequency Laser Doppler Vibrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Takeshi; Esashi, Masayoshi; Harada, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Shuji

    For future mobile phones based on cognitive radio technology, a compact multi-band RF front-end architecture is strongly required and an integrated multi-band RF filter bank is a key component in it. Contour-mode resonators are receiving increased attention for a multi-band filter solution, because its resonant frequency is mainly determined by its size and shape, which are defined by lithography. However, spurious responses including flexural vibration are also excited due to its thin structure. To improve resonator performance and suppress spurious modes, visual observation with a laser probe system is very effective. In this paper, we have prototyped a mechanically-coupled disk-array filter, which consists of a Si disk and 2 disk-type resonators of higher-order wine-glass mode, and observed its vibration modes using a high-frequency laser-Doppler vibrometer (UHF-120, Polytec, Inc.). As a result, it was confirmed that higher order wine-glass mode vibration included a compound displacement, and that its out-of-plane vibration amplitude was much smaller than other flexural spurious modes. The observed vibration modes were compared with FEM (Finite Element Method) simulation results. In addition, it was also confirmed that the fabrication error, e.g. miss-alignment, induced asymmetric vibration.

  2. The observation of unusual resonance channels in the electron attachment to mixed argon-oxygen clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foltin, M.; Grill, V.; Märk, T. D.

    1992-01-01

    An additional electron attachment resonance peak, not observable in pure oxygen cluster anions, has been found at an energy of about 11.5 eV for both the stoichiometric Ar m(O 2) n- and the nonstoichiometric Ar m(O 2) n-1 O - cluster anions (produced by electron attachment to mixed argon-oxygen clusters). Two possible competing mechanisms are proposed to explain the appearance of these resonance peaks, i.e. the multiple-collision electron-scavenging mechanism and the core-excited resonance attachment mechanism. From the peak-width analysis it follows that in Ar m(O 2) 2- the first mechanism is dominant, while in Ar m(O 2) n-1 O - the second mechanism seems to be the only one occurring.

  3. Precision spectroscopy with COMPASS and the observation of a new iso-vector resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Stephan

    2014-06-01

    We report on the results of a novel partial-wave analysis based on 50 ṡ 106 events from the reaction π- + p → π-π-π+ + precoil at 190 GeV/c incoming beam momentum using the COMPASS spectrometer. A separated analysis in bins of m3π and four-momentum transfer t' reveals the interference of resonant and non-resonant particle production and allows their spectral separation. Besides well known resonances we observe a new iso-vector meson a1(1420) at a mass of 1420 MeV/c2 in the f0(980)π final state only, the origin of which is unclear. We have also examined the structure of the 0++ππ-isobar in the JPC = 0-+, 1++, 2-+ three pion waves. This clearly reveals the various 0++ππ-isobar components and its correlation to the decay of light mesons.

  4. Observation of orbital resonance Hall effect in (TMTSF)2ClO4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kaya; Satsukawa, H; Yamada, J; Terashima, T; Uji, S

    2014-03-21

    We report the observation of a Hall effect driven by orbital resonance in the quasi-1-dimensional (q1D) organic conductor (TMTSF)2ClO4. Although a conventional Hall effect is not expected in this class of materials due to their reduced dimensionality, we observed a prominent Hall response at certain orientations of the magnetic field B corresponding to lattice vectors of the constituent molecular chains, known as the magic angles (MAs). We show that this Hall effect can be understood as the response of conducting planes generated by an effective locking of the orbital motion of the charge carriers to the MA driven by an electron-trajectory resonance. This phenomenon supports a class of theories describing the rich behavior of MA phenomena in q1D materials based on altered dimensionality. Furthermore, we observed that the effective carrier density of the conducting planes is exponentially suppressed in large B, which indicates possible density wave formation.

  5. Observation of {Delta}n=1 dielectronic recombination resonances of boronlike argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zong, W. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Atomic Phys.; DeWitt, D.R. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Atomic Phys.; Schuch, R. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Atomic Phys.; Gao, H. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Atomic Phys.; Asp, S. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Atomic Phys.; Justiniano, E. [East Carolina Univ., Greenville, NC (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1996-02-01

    We report here an observation of {Delta}n=1 dielectronic recombination resonances of boron-like argon in the energy region 140-195 eV. With the cooler`s electron beam as a target, a resolution of approximately 0.6 eV FWHM was obtained in the observed energy range. The energies of the doubly excited states were estimated with a Hartree-Fock calculation, which indicates that the observed resonances are from Ar{sup 13+}(1s{sup 2}2s{sup 2}2p) to Ar{sup 12+}(1s{sup 2}2s{sup 2}3l3l`) and Ar{sup 12+}(1s{sup 2}2s2p3l3l`) transitions. (orig.).

  6. Improved efficiency of selective photoionization of palladium isotopes via autoionizing Rydberg states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Clayton R.; Kobayashi, Tohru; Midorikawa, Katsumi

    2017-01-01

    Odd-mass-selective ionization of palladium for purposes of resource recycling and management of long-lived fission products can be achieved by exploiting transition selection rules in a well-established three-step excitation process. In this conventional scheme, circularly polarized lasers of the same handedness excite isotopes via two intermediate 2D5/2 core states, and a third laser is then used for ionization via autoionizing Rydberg states. We propose an alternative excitation scheme via intermediate 2D3/2 core states before the autoionizing Rydberg state, improving ionization efficiency by over 130 times. We confirm high selectivity and measure odd-mass isotopes of >99.7(3)% of the total ionized product. We have identified and measured the relative ionization efficiency of the series of Rydberg states that converge to upper ionization limit of the 4 d 9(2D3/2) level, and identify the most efficient excitation is via the Rydberg state at 67668.18(10) cm-1.

  7. Investigation of odd-parity Rydberg states of Eu I with autoionization detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao Ying; Dai Chang-Jian; Qin Wen-Jie

    2009-01-01

    Isolated-core-excitation (ICE) scheme and autoionization detection are employed to study the bound Rydberg states of europium atom. The high-lying states with odd parity have been measured using the autoionization detection method with three different excitation paths via 4f~76s6p[~8P_(5/2)], 4f~76s6p[~8P_(7/2)]and 4f~76s6p[~8P_(9/2)]intermediate states, s respectively. In this paper the spectra of bound Rydberg states of Eu atom are reported, which cover the energy regions from 36000 cm~(-1) to 38250 cm~(-1) and from 38900 cm~(-1) to 39500 cm~(-1). The study provides the information about level energy, the possible J values and relative line intensity as well as the effective principal quantum number n~* for these states. This work not only confirms the previous results of many states, but also discovers 11 new Rydberg states of Eu atom.

  8. Observations of Traveling Crossflow Resonant Triad Interactions on a Swept Wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppink, Jenna L.; Wlezien, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Experimental evidence indicates the presence of a triad resonance interaction between traveling crossflow modes in a swept wing flow. Results indicate that this interaction occurs when the stationary and traveling crossflow modes have similar and relatively low amplitudes (approx.1% to 6% of the total freestream velocity). The resonant interaction occurs at instability amplitudes well below those typically known to cause transition, yet transition is observed to occur just downstream of the resonance. In each case, two primary linearly unstable traveling crossflow modes are nonlinearly coupled to a higher frequency linearly stable mode at the sum of their frequencies. The higher-frequency mode is linearly stable and presumed to exist as a consequence of the interaction of the two primary modes. Autoand cross-bicoherence are used to determine the extent of phase-matching between the modes, and wavenumber matching confirms the triad resonant nature of the interaction. The bicoherence results indicate a spectral broadening mechanism and the potential path to early transition. The implications for laminar flow control in swept wing flows are significant. Even if stationary crossflow modes remain subcritical, traveling crossflow interactions can lead to early transition.

  9. Observation of a resonance in $B^+ \\to K^+ \\mu^+\\mu^-$ decays at low recoil

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, R; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Cowie, E; Craik, D C; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gorbounov, P; Gordon, H; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hess, M; Hicheur, A; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Maratas, J; Marconi, U; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Martynov, A; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M -N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palczewski, T; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Roberts, D A; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M -H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Van Dijk, M; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-01-01

    A broad peaking structure is observed in the dimuon spectrum of $B^+ \\to K^+ \\mu^+\\mu^-$ decays in the kinematic region where the kaon has a low recoil against the dimuon system. The structure is consistent with interference between the $B^+ \\to K^+ \\mu^+\\mu^-$ decay and a resonance and has a statistical significance exceeding six standard deviations. The mean and width of the resonance are measured to be $4191^{+9}_{-8}\\mathrm{\\,Me\\kern -0.1em V/}c^2$ and $65^{+22}_{-16}\\mathrm{\\,Me\\kern -0.1em V/}c^2$, respectively, where the uncertainties include statistical and systematic contributions. These measurements are compatible with the properties of the $\\psi(4160)$ meson. First observations of both the decay $B^+ \\to \\psi(4160) K^+$ and the subsequent decay $\\psi(4160) \\to \\mu^+\\mu^-$ are reported. The resonant decay and the interference contribution make up 20% of the yield for dimuon masses above 3770  MeV/c2. This contribution is larger than theoretical estimates.

  10. Observation of high-lying resonances in the H sup minus ion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, P.G. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA) New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (USA). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy)

    1990-05-01

    This dissertation reports the observation of several series of resonances, for which both electrons are in excited states, in the photodetachment cross section of H{sup {minus}}. These {sup 1}P doubly-excited states interfere with the continuum in which they are embedded, and appear as dips in the production cross section of excited neutral hydrogen. The experiment was performed by intersecting an 800 MeV H{sup {minus}} beam with a (266 nm) laser beam at varying angles; the relativistic Doppler shift then tuned'' the photon energy in the barycentric frame. The process was observed by using a magnet strong enough the strip the electrons from the excited hydrogen atoms in selected states n and detecting the resulting protons, which allowed the isolation of the individual n channels. Three resonances are clearly visible in each channel. The data support recent theoretical calculations for the positions of doubly-excited {sup 1}P resonances, and verify a new Rydberg-like formula for the modified Coulomb potential.

  11. Observation of Fano resonance and classical analog of electromagnetically induced transparency in toroidal metamaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Song; Yang, Helin [College of Physical Science and Technology, Central China Normal University, Wuhan (China); Cong, Lonqing; Singh, Ranjan [Division of Physics and Applied Physics, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (Singapore); Centre for Disruptive Photonic Technologies, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (Singapore); Gao, Fei [Division of Physics and Applied Physics, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (Singapore)

    2016-05-15

    Toroidal multipoles have recently been explored in various scientific communities, ranging from atomic and molecular physics, electrodynamics, and solid-state physics to biology. Here we experimentally and numerically demonstrate a three-dimensional toroidal metamaterial where two different toroidal dipoles along orthogonal directions have been observed. The chosen toroidal metamaterial also simultaneously supports Fano resonance and the classical analog of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) phenomena in the transmission spectra that originate from the electric-toroidal dipole and electric-magnetic dipole destructive interference. The intriguing properties of the toroidal resonances may open up avenues for applications in toroidal moments generator, sensing and slow-light devices. (copyright 2016 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  12. Observation of vacuum-enhanced electron spin resonance of levitated nanodiamonds

    CERN Document Server

    Hoang, Thai M; Bang, Jaehoon; Li, Tongcang

    2015-01-01

    Electron spins of diamond nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers are important quantum resources for nanoscale sensing and quantum information. Combining such NV spin systems with levitated optomechanical resonators will provide a hybrid quantum system for many novel applications. Here we optically levitate a nanodiamond and demonstrate electron spin control of its built-in NV centers in low vacuum. We observe that the strength of electron spin resonance (ESR) is enhanced when the air pressure is reduced. To better understand this novel system, we also investigate the effects of trap power and measure the absolute internal temperature of levitated nanodiamonds with ESR after calibration of the strain effect. Our results show that optical levitation of nanodiamonds in vacuum not only can improve the mechanical quality of its oscillation, but also enhance the ESR contrast, which pave the way towards a novel levitated spin-optomechanical system for studying macroscopic quantum mechanics. The results also indicate potenti...

  13. Observation of vacuum-enhanced electron spin resonance of optically levitated nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tongcang; Hoang, Thai; Ahn, Jonghoon; Bang, Jaehoon

    Electron spins of diamond nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers are important quantum resources for nanoscale sensing and quantum information. Combining such NV spin systems with levitated optomechanical resonators will provide a hybrid quantum system for many novel applications. Here we optically levitate a nanodiamond and demonstrate electron spin control of its built-in NV centers in low vacuum. We observe that the strength of electron spin resonance (ESR) is enhanced when the air pressure is reduced. To better understand this novel system, we also investigate the effects of trap power and measure the absolute internal temperature of levitated nanodiamonds with ESR after calibration of the strain effect. Our results show that optical levitation of nanodiamonds in vacuum not only can improve the mechanical quality of its oscillation, but also enhance the ESR contrast, which pave the way towards a novel levitated spin-optomechanical system for studying macroscopic quantum mechanics. The results also indicate potential applications of NV centers in gas sensing.

  14. Electron-impact excitation of the (2p2) 1D and (2s2p) 1Po autoionizing states of helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sise, Omer; Dogan, Mevlut; Okur, Ibrahim; Crowe, Albert

    2011-08-01

    An experimental study of the excitation of the (2p2) 1D and (2s2p) 1Po autoionizing states of helium by 250-eV electron impact is presented. The ejected-electron angular distributions and energy spectra are measured in coincidence with the corresponding scattered electrons for a scattering angle of -13∘ and for a range of ejected-electron angles in both the forward and backward directions. Resonance profiles are analyzed in terms of the Shore-Balashov parametrization to obtain the resonance asymmetry Aμ and yield Bμ parameters and the direct ionization cross section f. The spectra and their parameters are compared to the previous measurements of Lower and Weigold [J. Phys. B.JPAPEH0953-407510.1088/0953-4075/23/16/023 23, 2819 (1990)] and McDonald and Crowe [J. Phys. BJPAPEH0953-407510.1088/0953-4075/26/17/021 26, 2887 (1993)]. Comparison is also made with the recent theoretical triply differential cross-section calculations based on the first and second Born approximations. In general, good qualitative agreement is found between the experimental results. Some differences are found at the forward and backward directions. These differences in the shape and magnitude of the cross sections are attributed to the different incoming electron energies used in the experiments. The second Born approximation with inclusion of the three-body Coulomb interaction in the final state agrees reasonably well with experiments in the binary region. However, the 1Po resonance yield parameter Bμ is significantly overestimated at the recoil region, giving a relatively large recoil peak, in contradiction to the experiment. There is also a discrepancy between the two theories available for the 1D resonance yield parameter Bμ in this region. Remaining discrepancies between theories and experiments are also discussed.

  15. Electron emission following collective autoionization of He nanodroplets irradiated by intense XUV pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ovcharenko, Yevheniy; Moeller, Thomas [Technische Universitaet Berlin (Germany); Lyamayev, Viktor; Katzy, Raphael; LaForge, Aaron; Stienkemeier, Frank [Universitaet Freiburg (Germany); Devetta, Michele; Piseri, Paolo [University of Milan (Italy); Plekan, Oksana; Richter, Robert; Finetti, Paola; Prince, Kevin; Callegari, Carlo [Sincrotrone Trieste (Italy); O' Keeffe, Patrick; Coreno, Marcello [CNR-IMIP Rome (Italy); Mazza, Tommaso [European XFEL GmbH (Germany); Di Fraia, Michele [University of Trieste (Italy); Brauer, Nils-Benedict; Drabbels, Marcel [EPFL Lausanne (Switzerland); Stranges, Stefano [University of Rome ' ' Sapienza' ' (Italy)

    2013-07-01

    The narrow bandwidth and tunability of FERMI rate at Elettra seeded FEL (Free Electron Laser) open new areas in the study of ultrafast radiation-matter interaction. Using this unique source with high-brilliance femtosecond XUV-pulses, photoelectron spectroscopy of He-nanodroplets has been performed by velocity map imaging technique in the photon energy range 20-27 eV. The electron spectra show that ionization occurs not only by a direct process at photon energies above the ionization potential (IP) but also below the threshold. It was found that electron spectra below IP strongly depend on the total energy absorbed by nanodroplets and give evidence for a collective autoionization process with energy transfer between neighboring atoms.

  16. Electromagnetically induced transparency in systems with degenerate autoionizing levels in \\Lambda-configuration

    CERN Document Server

    Dinh, T Bui; Long, V Cao; Peřina, J

    2013-01-01

    We discuss a \\Lambda-like model of atomic levels involving two autoionizing (AI) states of the same energy. The system is irradiated by two external electromagnetic fields (strong -- driving and weak -- probing ones). For such a system containing degenerate AI levels we derive the analytical formula describing the medium susceptibility. We show that the presence of the second AI level lead to the additional electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) window appearance. We show that the characteristic of this window can be manipulated by changes of the parameters describing the interactions of AI levels with other ones. This is a new mechanism which leads to additional transparency windows in EIT model, that differs from the mechanism, where a bigger number of Zeeman sublevels is taken into account.

  17. Semiclassical Calculations of Autoionization Rate for Lithium Atoms in Parallel Electric and Magnetic Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Sheng-Lu; ZHOU Hui; XU Xue-You; JIA Zheng-Mao; DENG Shan-Hong

    2008-01-01

    @@ By using a semiclassical method, we present theoretical computations of the ionization rate of Rydberg lithium atoms in parallel electric and magnetic fields with different scaled energies above the classical saddle point.The yielded irregular pulse trains of the escape electrons are recorded as a function of emission time, which allows for relating themselves to the terms of the recurrence periods of the photoabsorption.This fact turns to illustrate the dynamic mechanism how the electron pulses are stochastically generated.Comparing our computations with previous investigation results, we can deduce that the complicated chaos under consideration here consists of two kinds of self-similar fractal structures which correspond to the contributions of the applied magnetic field and the core scattering events.Furthermore, the effect of the magnetic field plays a major role in the profile of the autoionization rate curves, while the contribution of the core scattering is critical for specifying the positions of the pulse peaks.

  18. Precision spectroscopy with COMPASS and the observation of a new iso-vector resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Stephan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We report on the results of a novel partial-wave analysis based on 50 ⋅ 106 events from the reaction π− + p → π−π−π+ + precoil at 190 GeV/c incoming beam momentum using the COMPASS spectrometer. A separated analysis in bins of m3π and four-momentum transfer t′ reveals the interference of resonant and non-resonant particle production and allows their spectral separation. Besides well known resonances we observe a new iso-vector meson a1(1420 at a mass of 1420 MeV/c2 in the f0(980π final state only, the origin of which is unclear. We have also examined the structure of the 0++ππ-isobar in the JPC = 0−+, 1++, 2−+ three pion waves. This clearly reveals the various 0++ππ-isobar components and its correlation to the decay of light mesons.

  19. Observation of ferromagnetic resonance in strontium ruthenate (SrRuO3)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langner, Matthew C.; Kantner, Colleen L.S.; Chu, Y.H.; Martin, Lane M.; Yu, Pu; Ramesh, R.; Orenstein, Joe

    2008-12-03

    We report the observation of ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) in SrRuO3 using the time-resolved magnetooptical Kerr effect. The FMR oscillations in the time-domain appear in response to a sudden, optically induced change in the direction of easy-axis anistropy. The high FMR frequency, 250 GHz, and large Gilbert damping parameter, alpha ~;; 1, are consistent with strong spin-orbit coupling. We find that the parameters associated with the magnetization dynamics, including alpha, have a non-monotonic temperature dependence, suggestive of a link to the anomalous Hall effect.

  20. Observation of bilaminar zone in magnetic resonance images of temporomandibular joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nah, Soo Kyung [Pusan National Univ. College of Dentistry, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-12-15

    To observe the relationship of bilaminar zone of temporomandibular joint retrodical tissues to the disc condition. The upper and lower stratum of bilaminar zone were identified on magnetic resonance open mouth images of 148 joints from 74 parents with disc displacements. Both strata sere identifiable in 105 joints which had disc displacement without reduction but 12 of 35 had hyalinized posterior attachment where the disc was. The 8 joints which had partial disc displacement without reduction showed identifiable lower stratum at the reducing site which was medial. Disruption or no identification of lower stratum which corresponds to the condylar portion of posterior attachment may be the sign of disc displacement without reduction.

  1. Physics of orbital degree of freedom - resonant X-ray scattering for observation of orbital ordering

    CERN Document Server

    Hirota, K

    2003-01-01

    Orbital degree of freedom plays very important roles in electric and magnetic properties in strongly correlated electron systems. The method for measurement of orbital ordering, however, has been limited so far. Recently it has been pointed out that the resonant X-ray scattering (RXS) technique is a very powerful tool to observe the ordering. In ths paper, the principle of RXS and the recent development are described after the general introduction of orbital degree of freedom. Finally the future in orbital physics will be discussed. (author)

  2. Antisymmetric Couplings Enable Direct Observation of Chirality in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    King, Jonathan P; Blanchard, John W

    2016-01-01

    Here we demonstrate that a term in the nuclear spin Hamiltonian, the antisymmetric \\textit{J}-coupling, is fundamentally connected to molecular chirality. We propose and simulate a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiment to observe this interaction and differentiate between enantiomers without adding any additional chiral agent to the sample. The antisymmetric \\textit{J}-coupling may be observed in the presence of molecular orientation by an external electric field. The opposite parity of the antisymmetric coupling tensor and the molecular electric dipole moment yields a sign change of the observed coupling between enantiomers. We show how this sign change influences the phase of the NMR spectrum and may be used to discriminate between enantiomers.

  3. Observer variation for radiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging of occult hip fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collin, David; Dunker, Dennis; Goethlin, Jan H (Dept. of Radiology, Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital, Moelndal (Sweden)), email: david.collin@vgregion.se; Geijer, Mats (Center for Medical Imaging and Physiology, Skaane Univ. Hospital, Lund Univ., Lund (Sweden))

    2011-10-15

    Background Conventional radiography is insufficient for diagnosis in a small but not unimportant number of hip fractures, and secondary imaging with computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is warranted. There are no convincing observer variation studies performed for conventional radiography or CT in occult fractures, and no large materials for MRI. Purpose To assess observer variation in radiography, CT and MRI of suspected occult, non-displaced hip fractures, and to evaluate to what extent observer experience or patient age may influence observer performance. Material and Methods A total of 375 patients after hip trauma where radiography was followed by CT or MRI to evaluate a suspected occult hip fracture were collected retrospectively from two imaging centers. After scoring by three observers with varying degrees of radiologic experience, observer variation was assessed by using linear weighted kappa statistics. Results For radiography, agreements between the three observers were moderate to substantial for intra capsular fractures, with kappa values in the ranges of 0.56-0.66. Kappa values were substantial for extracapsular fractures, in the ranges of 0.69-0.72. With increasing professional experience, fewer fractures were classified as equivocal at radiography. For CT and MRI, observer agreements were similar and almost perfect, with kappa values in the ranges of 0.85-0.97 and 0.93-0.97. Conclusion There were almost perfect observer agreements for CT and MRI in diagnosing non-displaced, occult hip fractures. Observer agreements for radiography were moderate to substantial, and observer experience influenced agreement only at radiography

  4. Resonant x-ray scattering in perovskite manganite superlattice. Observation of 'orbital superlattice'

    CERN Document Server

    Kiyama, T; Ohsumi, H; Murakami, Y; Wakabayashi, Y; Izumi, M; Kawasaki, M; Tokura, Y

    2003-01-01

    We report the results of resonant X-ray scattering (RXS) measurement of superlattices which consist of La sub 0 sub . sub 4 sub 5 Sr sub 0 sub . sub 5 sub 5 MnO sub 3 and La sub 0 sub . sub 6 sub 0 Sr sub 0 sub . sub 4 sub 0 MnO sub 3 multilayers. An interference technique made it possible to observe RXS reflections from ferro-type orbital ordering in the superlattices. RXS can reveal the local circumstances around specific atoms in materials regulated atomically. In this experiment, we observed that the superlattice is actually composed of two kinds of layers with different lattice distortion states, presenting 'orbital superlattices', in which layers with different orbital states are stacked alternately in an atomic scale. (author)

  5. Contextual modulation of motor resonance during the observation of everyday actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoruso, Lucia; Urgesi, Cosimo

    2016-07-01

    Neuroimaging studies on action observation suggest that context plays a key role in coding high-level components of motor behavior, including the short-term and the end-goal of an action. However, little is known about the possible role of context in shaping lower-levels of action processing such as reading action kinematics and simulating muscular activity. Here, we combined single-pulse TMS and motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) recording to explore whether top-down contextual information is capable of modulating low-level motor representations. We recorded MEPs from FDI and FCR muscles while participants watched videos about everyday actions embedded in congruent, incongruent or ambiguous contexts. Videos were interrupted before action ending, and participants were requested to predict the course of the observed action. A contextual modulation of corticospinal excitability was observed only for the FDI muscle, which is specifically involved in the execution of reaching-to-grasping movements, and whose corticospinal pathway is influenced by the observation of the very same movements. This modulation was reflected in a selective decrease of corticospinal excitability during the observation of actions embedded in incongruent as compared to congruent and ambiguous contexts. These findings indicate that motor resonance is not an entirely automatic process, but it can be modulated by high-level contextual representations.

  6. Nonlinear magneto-optical resonances for systems with J~100 observed in K2 molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Auzinsh, M; Fescenko, I; Kalvans, L; Tamanis, M

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of an experimental as well as theoretical study of nonlinear magneto-optical resonances in diatomic potassium molecules in the electronic ground state with large values of the angular momentum quantum number J~100. At zero magnetic field, the absorption transitions are suppressed because of population trapping in the ground state due to Zeeman coherences between magnetic sublevels of this state along with depopulation pumping. The destruction of such coherences in an external magnetic field was used to study the resonances in this work. K2 molecules were formed in a glass cell filled with potassium metal at a temperature above 150^{\\circ}C. The cell was placed in an oven and was located in a homogeneous magnetic field B, which was scanned from zero to 0.7 T. Q-type and R-type transitions were excited with a tunable, single-mode diode laser at a wavelength of 661 nm. Well pronounced nonlinear Hanle effect signals were observed in the intensities of the linearly polarized components of th...

  7. Coordinated observation of field line resonance in the mid-tail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Zheng

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Standing Alfvén waves of 1.1 mHz (~15 min in period were observed by the Cluster satellites in the mid-tail during 06:00-07:00 UT on 8 August 2003. Pulsations with the same frequency were also observed at several ground stations near Cluster's footpoint. The standing wave properties were determined from the electric and magnetic field measurements of Cluster. Data from the ground magnetometers indicated a latitudinal amplitude and phase structure consistent with the driven field line resonance (FLR at 1.1 mHz. Simultaneously, quasi-periodic oscillations at different frequencies were observed in the post-midnight/early morning sector by GOES 12 (l0≈8.7, Polar (l0≈11-14 and Geotail (l0≈9.8. The 8 August 2003 event yields rare and interesting datasets. It provides, for the first time, coordinated in situ and ground-based observations of a very low frequency FLR in the mid-tail on stretched field lines.

  8. Observation of Time-Invariant Coherence in a Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Quantum Simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Isabela A; Souza, Alexandre M; Bromley, Thomas R; Cianciaruso, Marco; Marx, Raimund; Sarthour, Roberto S; Oliveira, Ivan S; Lo Franco, Rosario; Glaser, Steffen J; deAzevedo, Eduardo R; Soares-Pinto, Diogo O; Adesso, Gerardo

    2016-10-14

    The ability to live in coherent superpositions is a signature trait of quantum systems and constitutes an irreplaceable resource for quantum-enhanced technologies. However, decoherence effects usually destroy quantum superpositions. It was recently predicted that, in a composite quantum system exposed to dephasing noise, quantum coherence in a transversal reference basis can stay protected for an indefinite time. This can occur for a class of quantum states independently of the measure used to quantify coherence, and it requires no control on the system during the dynamics. Here, such an invariant coherence phenomenon is observed experimentally in two different setups based on nuclear magnetic resonance at room temperature, realizing an effective quantum simulator of two- and four-qubit spin systems. Our study further reveals a novel interplay between coherence and various forms of correlations, and it highlights the natural resilience of quantum effects in complex systems.

  9. Direct Observation of the E_ Resonant State in GaAs1-xBix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberi, Kirstin; Beaton, Daniel A.; Mascarenhas, Angelo

    2015-12-15

    Bismuth-derived resonant states with T2 symmetry are detected in the valence band of GaAs1-xBix using electromodulated reflectance. A doublet is located 42 meV below the valence band edge of GaAs that is split by local strain around isolated Bi impurity atoms. A transition associated with a singlet is also observed just above the GaAs spin orbit split-off band. These states move deeper into the valence band with increasing Bi concentration but at a much slower rate than the well-known giant upward movement of the valence band edge in GaAs1-xBix. Our results provide key new insights for clarifying the mechanisms by which isovalent impurities alter the bandstructure of the host semiconductor.

  10. Horizontal shear wave scattering from a nonwelded interface observed by magnetic resonance elastography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papazoglou, S.; Hamhaber, U.; Braun, J.; Sack, I.

    2007-02-01

    A method based on magnetic resonance elastography is presented that allows measuring the weldedness of interfaces between soft tissue layers. The technique exploits the dependence of shear wave scattering at elastic interfaces on the frequency of vibration. Experiments were performed on gel phantoms including differently welded interfaces. Plane wave excitation parallel to the planar interface with corresponding motion sensitization enabled the observation of only shear-horizontal (SH) wave scattering. Spatio-temporal filtering was applied to calculate scattering coefficients from the amplitudes of the incident, transmitted and reflected SH-waves in the vicinity of the interface. The results illustrate that acoustic wave scattering in soft tissues is largely dependent on the connectivity of interfaces, which is potentially interesting for imaging tissue mechanics in medicine and biology.

  11. Observation of repulsive Fermi polarons in a resonant mixture of ultracold ${}^6$Li atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Scazza, F; Massignan, P; Recati, A; Amico, A; Burchianti, A; Fort, C; Inguscio, M; Zaccanti, M; Roati, G

    2016-01-01

    We employ radio-frequency spectroscopy to investigate a polarized spin-mixture of ultracold ${}^6$Li atoms close to a broad Feshbach scattering resonance. Focusing on the regime of strong repulsive interactions, we observe well-defined coherent quasiparticles even for unitarity-limited interactions. We characterize the many-body system by extracting the key properties of repulsive Fermi polarons: the energy $E_+$, the effective mass $m^*$, the residue $Z$ and the decay rate $\\Gamma$. Above a critical interaction, $E_+$ is found to exceed the Fermi energy of the bath while $m^*$ diverges and even turns negative. Such findings reveal that the paramagnetic Fermi liquid state becomes thermodynamically unstable towards an energetically favored ferromagnetic phase.

  12. Observation of thermal spin-transfer torque via ferromagnetic resonance in magnetic tunnel junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaohui; Bai, Lihui; Chen, Xiaobin; Guo, Hong; Fan, X. L.; Xue, D. S.; Houssameddine, D.; Hu, C.-M.

    2016-08-01

    The thermal spin-transfer torque (TSTT) in magnetic tunneling junctions (MTJs) was systematically studied using electrical detection of ferromagnetic resonance (FMR). Evidence for the existence of TSTT in MTJs is observed. A temperature difference was applied across an MTJ acting as a TSTT on the free layer of the MTJ. The FMR of the free layer was then excited by a microwave current and electrically detected as a dc voltage. We found that the FMR line shape was changed by the TSTT, indicated by the ratio of dispersive and Lorentz components of the FMR spectra (D /L ). D /L increases by increasing the temperature difference. In addition, we analyze the magnetization orientation dependence of TSTT and provide solid evidence that this dependence differs from the magnetization orientation dependence of spin-transfer torque driven by a dc bias.

  13. Observing random walks of atoms in buffer gas through resonant light absorption

    CERN Document Server

    Aoki, Kenichiro

    2016-01-01

    Using resonant light absorption, random walk motions of rubidium atoms in nitrogen buffer gas are observed directly. The transmitted light intensity through atomic vapor is measured and its spectrum is obtained, down to orders of magnitude below the shot noise level to detect fluctuations caused by atomic motions. To understand the measured spectra, the spectrum for atoms performing random walks in a gaussian light beam is computed and its analytical form is obtained. The spectrum has $1/f^2$ ($f$: frequency) behavior at higher frequencies, crossing over to a different, but well defined behavior at lower frequencies. The properties of this theoretical spectrum agree excellently with the measured spectrum. This understanding also enables us to obtain the diffusion constant, the photon cross section of atoms in buffer gas and the atomic number density, from a single spectral measurement. We further discuss other possible applications of our experimental method and analysis.

  14. Observation of Robust Quantum Resonance Peaks in an Atom Optics Kicked Rotor with Amplitude Noise

    CERN Document Server

    Sadgrove, M; Mullins, T; Parkins, S; Leonhardt, R; Sadgrove, Mark; Hilliard, Andrew; Mullins, Terry; Parkins, Scott; Leonhardt, Rainer

    2004-01-01

    The effect of pulse train noise on the energy peaks at quantum resonance seen in the Atom Optics Kicked Rotor is investigated experimentally. Quantum resonance peaks in the late time energy of the atoms were found to be completely robust against noise applied to the kicking amplitude but even small levels of noise on the kicking period lead to destruction of the quantum resonance peak. The robustness of low energy levels to either side of the resonance peak to amplitude noise and their comparative susceptibility to period noise is explained in terms of a recurrence of classically stable dynamics which occurs near quantum resonance.

  15. Learning by observing: the effect of multiple sessions of action-observation training on the spontaneous movement tempo and motor resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagravinese, Giovanna; Bisio, Ambra; Ruggeri, Piero; Bove, Marco; Avanzino, Laura

    2017-02-01

    The present study was designed to explore the changes in motor performance and motor resonance after multiple sessions of action observation (AO) training. Subjects were exposed to the observation of a video showing finger tapping movements executed at 3Hz, a frequency higher than the spontaneous one (2Hz) for four consecutive days. Motor performance and motor resonance were tested before the AO training on the first day, and on the last day. Results showed that multiple sessions of AO training induced a shift of the speed of execution of finger tapping movements toward the observed one and a change in motor resonance. Before the 3Hz-AO training cortical excitability was highest during the observation of the 2Hz video. This motor resonance effect was lost after one single session of 3Hz-AO training whereas after multiple sessions of 3Hz-AO training cortical excitability was highest during the observation of the 3Hz video. Our study shows for the first time that multiple sessions of AO training are able not only to induce performance gains but also to change the way by which the observer's motor system recognizes a certain movement as belonging to the individual motor repertoire. These results may encourage the development of novel rehabilitative protocols based on multiple sessions of action observation aimed to regain a correct movement when its spontaneous speed is modified by pathologies or to modify the innate temporal properties of certain movements.

  16. Observation of a photoinduced, resonant tunneling effect in a carbon nanotube–silicon heterojunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Aramo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A significant resonant tunneling effect has been observed under the 2.4 V junction threshold in a large area, carbon nanotube–silicon (CNT–Si heterojunction obtained by growing a continuous layer of multiwall carbon nanotubes on an n-doped silicon substrate. The multiwall carbon nanostructures were grown by a chemical vapor deposition (CVD technique on a 60 nm thick, silicon nitride layer, deposited on an n-type Si substrate. The heterojunction characteristics were intensively studied on different substrates, resulting in high photoresponsivity with a large reverse photocurrent plateau. In this paper, we report on the photoresponsivity characteristics of the device, the heterojunction threshold and the tunnel-like effect observed as a function of applied voltage and excitation wavelength. The experiments are performed in the near-ultraviolet to near-infrared wavelength range. The high conversion efficiency of light radiation into photoelectrons observed with the presented layout allows the device to be used as a large area photodetector with very low, intrinsic dark current and noise.

  17. Observation of pseudoscalar and tensor resonances in $J/\\psi\\rightarrow \\gamma \\phi \\phi$

    CERN Document Server

    Ablikim, M; Ai, X C; Albayrak, O; Albrecht, M; Ambrose, D J; Amoroso, A; An, F F; An, Q; Bai, J Z; Ferroli, R Baldini; Ban, Y; Bennett, D W; Bennett, J V; Bertani, M; Bettoni, D; Bian, J M; Bianchi, F; Boger, E; Boyko, I; Briere, R A; Cai, H; Cai, X; Cakir, O; Calcaterra, A; Cao, G F; Cetin, S A; Chang, J F; Chelkov, G; Chen, G; Chen, H S; Chen, H Y; Chen, J C; Chen, M L; Chen, S J; Chen, X; Chen, X R; Chen, Y B; Cheng, H P; Chu, X K; Cibinetto, G; Dai, H L; Dai, J P; Dbeyssi, A; Dedovich, D; Deng, Z Y; Denig, A; Denysenko, I; Destefanis, M; De Mori, F; Ding, Y; Dong, C; Dong, J; Dong, L Y; Dong, M Y; Dou, Z L; Du, S X; Duan, P F; Fan, J Z; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fang, X; Fang, Y; Farinelli, R; Fava, L; Fedorov, O; Feldbauer, F; Felici, G; Feng, C Q; Fioravanti, E; Fritsch, M; Fu, C D; Gao, Q; Gao, X L; Gao, X Y; Gao, Y; Gao, Z; Garzia, I; Goetzen, K; Gong, L; Gong, W X; Gradl, W; Greco, M; Gu, M H; Gu, Y T; Guan, Y H; Guo, A Q; Guo, L B; Guo, Y; Guo, Y P; Haddadi, Z; Hafner, A; Han, S; Hao, X Q; Harris, F A; He, K L; Held, T; Heng, Y K; Hou, Z L; Hu, C; Hu, H M; Hu, J F; Hu, T; Hu, Y; Huang, G S; Huang, J S; Huang, X T; Huang, Y; Hussain, T; Ji, Q; Ji, Q P; Ji, X B; Ji, X L; Jiang, L W; Jiang, X S; Jiang, X Y; Jiao, J B; Jiao, Z; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Johansson, T; Julin, A; Nayestanaki, N Kalantar; Kang, X L; Kang, X S; Kavatsyuk, M; Ke, B C; Kiese, P; Kliemt, R; Kloss, B; Kolcu, O B; Kopf, B; Kornicer, M; Kupsc, A; Kühn, W; Lange, J S; Lara, M; Larin, P; Leng, C; Li, C; Li, Cheng; Li, D M; Li, F; Li, F Y; Li, G; Li, H B; Li, J C; Li, Jin; Li, K; Li, Lei; Li, P R; Li, Q Y; Li, T; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Liang, Y F; Liang, Y T; Liao, G R; Lin, D X; Liu, B J; Liu, C X; Liu, D; Liu, F H; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H B; Liu, H H; Liu, H M; Liu, J; Liu, J B; Liu, J P; Liu, J Y; Liu, K; Liu, K Y; Liu, L D; Liu, P L; Liu, Q; Liu, S B; Liu, X; Liu, Y B; Liu, Z A; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H; Lou, X C; Lu, H J; Lu, J G; Lu, Y; Lu, Y P; Luo, C L; Luo, M X; Luo, T; Luo, X L; Lyu, X R; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, L L; Ma, Q M; Ma, T; Ma, X N; Ma, X Y; Ma, Y M; Maas, F E; Maggiora, M; Mao, Y J; Mao, Z P; Marcello, S; Messchendorp, J G; Min, J; Mitchell, R E; Mo, X H; Mo, Y J; Morales, C Morales; Muchnoi, N Yu; Muramatsu, H; Nefedov, Y; Nerling, F; Nikolaev, I B; Ning, Z; Nisar, S; Niu, S L; Niu, X Y; Olsen, S L; Ouyang, Q; Pacetti, S; Pan, Y; Patteri, P; Pelizaeus, M; Peng, H P; Peters, K; Pettersson, J; Ping, J L; Ping, R G; Poling, R; Prasad, V; Qi, H R; Qi, M; Qian, S; Qiao, C F; Qin, L Q; Qin, N; Qin, X S; Qin, Z H; Qiu, J F; Rashid, K H; Redmer, C F; Ripka, M; Rong, G; Rosner, Ch; Ruan, X D; Santoro, V; Sarantsev, A; Savrié, M; Schoenning, K; Schumann, S; Shan, W; Shao, M; Shen, C P; Shen, P X; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Song, W M; Song, X Y; Sosio, S; Spataro, S; Sun, G X; Sun, J F; Sun, S S; Sun, Y J; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Sun, Z T; Tang, C J; Tang, X; Tapan, I; Thorndike, E H; Tiemens, M; Ullrich, M; Uman, I; Varner, G S; Wang, B; Wang, B L; Wang, D; Wang, D Y; Wang, K; Wang, L L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, S G; Wang, W; Wang, W P; Wang, X F; Wang, Y D; Wang, Y F; Wang, Y Q; Wang, Z; Wang, Z G; Wang, Z H; Wang, Z Y; Weber, T; Wei, D H; Wei, J B; Weidenkaff, P; Wen, S P; Wiedner, U; Wolke, M; Wu, L H; Wu, Z; Xia, L; Xia, L G; Xia, Y; Xiao, D; Xiao, H; Xiao, Z J; Xie, Y G; Xiu, Q L; Xu, G F; Xu, L; Xu, Q J; Xu, Q N; Xu, X P; Yan, L; Yan, W B; Yan, W C; Yan, Y H; Yang, H J; Yang, H X; Yang, L; Yang, Y X; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Yin, J H; Yu, B X; Yu, C X; Yu, J S; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, W L; Yuan, Y; Yuncu, A; Zafar, A A; Zallo, A; Zeng, Y; Zeng, Z; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J J; Zhang, J L; Zhang, J Q; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, J Z; Zhang, K; Zhang, L; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y H; Zhang, Y N; Zhang, Y T; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Z H; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Zhao, G; Zhao, J W; Zhao, J Y; Zhao, J Z; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M G; Zhao, Q; Zhao, Q W; Zhao, S J; Zhao, T C; Zhao, Y B; Zhao, Z G; Zhemchugov, A; Zheng, B; Zheng, J P; Zheng, W J; Zheng, Y H; Zhong, B; Zhou, L; Zhou, X; Zhou, X K; Zhou, X R; Zhou, X Y; Zhu, K; Zhu, K J; Zhu, S; Zhu, S H; Zhu, X L; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, J; Zotti, L; Zou, B S; Zou, J H

    2016-01-01

    Based on a sample of $(1310.6 \\pm 10.5) \\times 10^{6}$ $J/\\psi$ events collected with the BESIII detector operating at the BEPCII storage ring, a partial wave analysis of the decay $J/\\psi\\rightarrow \\gamma \\phi \\phi$ is performed in order to study the intermediate states. Results of the partial wave analysis show that the structures are predominantly $0^{-+}$ states. The existence of the $\\eta(2225)$ is confirmed, and its resonance parameters are measured. Two additional pseudoscalar states, the $\\eta(2100)$ with a mass of $2050_{-24}^{+30}{}_{-26}^{+75}$ MeV/$c^{2}$ and a width of $250_{-30}^{+36}{}_{-164}^{+181}$ MeV/$c^{2}$ and the $X(2500)$ with a mass of $2470_{-19}^{+15}{}_{-23}^{+101}$ MeV/$c^{2}$ and a width of $230_{-35}^{+64}{}_{-33}^{+56}$ MeV/$c^{2}$, are observed. In addition to these three pseudoscalar states, the scalar state $f_0(2100)$, and three tensor states, the $f_2(2010)$, $f_2(2300)$ and $f_2(2340)$, are observed in the process $J/\\psi\\rightarrow \\gamma \\phi\\phi$. The product branching...

  18. Observation of pseudoscalar and tensor resonances in J /ψ →γ ϕ ϕ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ai, X. C.; Albayrak, O.; Albrecht, M.; Ambrose, D. J.; Amoroso, A.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; Baldini Ferroli, R.; Ban, Y.; Bennett, D. W.; Bennett, J. V.; Bertani, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bian, J. M.; Bianchi, F.; Boger, E.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X.; Chen, X. R.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, X. K.; Cibinetto, G.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dbeyssi, A.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; de Mori, F.; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Dou, Z. L.; Du, S. X.; Duan, P. F.; Fan, J. Z.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fang, X.; Fang, Y.; Farinelli, R.; Fava, L.; Fedorov, O.; Feldbauer, F.; Felici, G.; Feng, C. Q.; Fioravanti, E.; Fritsch, M.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, Q.; Gao, X. L.; Gao, X. Y.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Z.; Garzia, I.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, L.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, Y.; Guo, Y. P.; Haddadi, Z.; Hafner, A.; Han, S.; Hao, X. Q.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Hu, Y.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, Y.; Hussain, T.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, L. W.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiang, X. Y.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Johansson, T.; Julin, A.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X. L.; Kang, X. S.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Ke, B. C.; Kiese, P.; Kliemt, R.; Kloss, B.; Kolcu, O. B.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kupsc, A.; Kühn, W.; Lange, J. S.; Lara, M.; Larin, P.; Leng, C.; Li, C.; Li, Cheng; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, F. Y.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, J. C.; Li, Jin; Li, K.; Li, K.; Li, Lei; Li, P. R.; Li, Q. Y.; Li, T.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Lin, D. X.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, D.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. B.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, J. Y.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, L. D.; Liu, P. L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Lou, X. C.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lyu, X. R.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. N.; Ma, X. Y.; Ma, Y. M.; Maas, F. E.; Maggiora, M.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Marcello, S.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Mo, Y. J.; Morales Morales, C.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Muramatsu, H.; Nefedov, Y.; Nerling, F.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, S. L.; Niu, X. Y.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Pan, Y.; Patteri, P.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Pettersson, J.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Prasad, V.; Qi, H. R.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, L. Q.; Qin, N.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Redmer, C. F.; Ripka, M.; Rong, G.; Rosner, Ch.; Ruan, X. D.; Santoro, V.; Sarantsev, A.; Savrié, M.; Schoenning, K.; Schumann, S.; Shan, W.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, P. X.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Song, W. M.; Song, X. Y.; Sosio, S.; Spataro, S.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Thorndike, E. H.; Tiemens, M.; Ullrich, M.; Uman, I.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B.; Wang, B. L.; Wang, D.; Wang, D. Y.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, W.; Wang, W. P.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. H.; Wang, Z. Y.; Weber, T.; Wei, D. H.; Wei, J. B.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wolke, M.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L.; Xia, L. G.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xiao, H.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, L.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, Q. N.; Xu, X. P.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, W. C.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. J.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, L.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yin, J. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, J. S.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Yuncu, A.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zeng, Z.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J. J.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. N.; Zhang, Y. T.; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, J. Y.; Zhao, J. Z.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, W. J.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, X.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhou, X. Y.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S.; Zhu, S. H.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zotti, L.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.; Besiii Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    Based on a sample of (1310.6 ±10.5 )×106 J /ψ events collected with the BESIII detector operating at the BEPCII storage ring, a partial wave analysis of the decay J /ψ →γ ϕ ϕ is performed in order to study the intermediate states. Results of the partial wave analysis show that the structures are predominantly 0-+ states. The existence of the η (2225 ) is confirmed, and its resonance parameters are measured. Two additional pseudoscalar states, the η (2100 ) with a mass of 2050-24-26 +30 +75 MeV /c2 and a width of 250-30-164 +36 +181 MeV /c2 and the X (2500 ) with a mass of 2470-19-23 +15 +101 MeV /c2 and a width of 230-35-33 +64 +56 MeV /c2 , are observed. In addition to these three pseudoscalar states, the scalar state f0(2100 ), and three tensor states, the f2(2010 ), f2(2300 ) and f2(2340 ), are observed in the process J /ψ →γ ϕ ϕ . The product branching fractions B (J /ψ →γ X )×B (X →ϕ ϕ ) are reported.

  19. Coherent and incoherent processes in resonant photoemission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnuson, M.; Karis, O.; Weinelt, M. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    In this contribution the authors present the distinction between coherent and incoherent processes in resonant photoemission. As a first step they determine whether an autoionization process is photoemission-like or Auger-like. The discussion is based on measurements for a weakly bonded adsorption system, Ar/Pt(111). This type of system is well adapted to investigate these effects since it yields distinctly shifted spectral features depending on the nature of the process. After this, the question of resonance photoemission in metallic systems is addressed. This is done in connection with measurements at the 2p edges for Ni metal. Ni has been one of the prototype systems for resonant photoemission. The resonances have been discussed in connection with the strong correlation and d-band localization effects in this system. Based on the results some general comments about the appearance of resonant effects in metallic systems are made.

  20. Constraining nova observables: direct measurements of resonance strengths in 33S(p,\\gamma)34Cl

    CERN Document Server

    Fallis, J; Bertone, P F; Bishop, S; Buchmann, L; Chen, A A; Christian, G; Clark, J A; D'Auria, J M; Davids, B; Deibel, C M; Fulton, B R; Greife, U; Guo, B; Hager, U; Herlitzius, C; Hutcheon, D A; José, J; Laird, A M; Li, E T; Li, Z H; Lian, G; Liu, W P; Martin, L; Nelson, K; Ottewell, D; Parker, P D; Reeve, S; Rojas, A; Ruiz, C; Setoodehnia, K; Sjue, S; Vockenhuber, C; Wang, Y B; Wrede, C

    2013-01-01

    The 33S(p,\\gamma)34Cl reaction is important for constraining predictions of certain isotopic abundances in oxygen-neon novae. Models currently predict as much as 150 times the solar abundance of 33S in oxygen-neon nova ejecta. This overproduction factor may, however, vary by orders of magnitude due to uncertainties in the 33S(p,\\gamma)34Cl reaction rate at nova peak temperatures. Depending on this rate, 33S could potentially be used as a diagnostic tool for classifying certain types of presolar grains. Better knowledge of the 33S(p,\\gamma)34Cl rate would also aid in interpreting nova observations over the S-Ca mass region and contribute to the firm establishment of the maximum endpoint of nova nucleosynthesis. Additionally, the total S elemental abundance which is affected by this reaction has been proposed as a thermometer to study the peak temperatures of novae. Previously, the 33S(p,\\gamma)34Cl reaction rate had only been studied directly down to resonance energies of 432 keV. However, for nova peak temper...

  1. Observation of microarray DNA hybridization using surface plasmon resonance phase-shift interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shean-Jen; Tsou, C.-Y.; Chen, Y.-K.; Su, Y.-T.

    2004-06-01

    Surface plasmon resonance phase-shift interferometry (SPR-PSI) is a novel technique which combines SPR and modified Mach-Zehnder phase-shifting interferometry to measure the spatial phase variation caused by biomolecular interactions upon a sensing chip. The SPR-PSI imaging system offers high resolution and high-throughout screening capabilities for microarray DNA hybridization without the need for additional labeling, and provides valuable real-time quantitative information. Current SPR-PSI imaging systems measure the spatial phase variation caused by tiny biomolecular changes on the sensing interface by means of a five-step phase reconstruction algorithm and a novel multichannel least mean squares (MLMS) phase unwrapping algorithm. The SPR-PSI imaging system has an enhanced detection limit of 2.5 × 10-7 refraction index change, a long-term phase stability of π/100 in 30 minutes, and a spatial phase resolution of π/500 with a lateral resolution of 10μm. This study successfully demonstrates the kinetic and label-free observation of 5-mer DNA microarray hybridization.

  2. New observations concerning the interpretation of magnetic resonance spectroscopy of meningioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yue, Qiang [University of Tsukuba, Department of Neurosurgery, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Tsukuba Science City, Ibaraki (Japan); West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Huaxi MR Research Center, Department of Radiology, Chengdu (China); Isobe, Tomonori [Kitasato University, Department of Medical Technology, School of Allied Health Sciences, Minato (Japan); Shibata, Yasushi; Kawamura, Hiraku; Yamamoto, Youhei; Takano, Shingo; Matsumura, Akira [University of Tsukuba, Department of Neurosurgery, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Tsukuba Science City, Ibaraki (Japan); Anno, Izumi [University of Tsukuba, Department of Radiology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Tsukuba (Japan)

    2008-12-15

    This study was aimed to clarify some ambiguities in the interpretation of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) of meningiomas. The cases of 31 meningioma patients (27 benign and 4 nonbenign meningiomas) that underwent single-voxel 1H-MRS (PRESS sequence, TR/TE = 2,000 ms/68, 136, 272 ms) were retrospectively analyzed. To verify the findings of in-vivo study, phantoms were measured, and pathological sections of 11 patients were reviewed. All meningiomas demonstrated increased choline and decreased creatine, except for a lipomatous meningioma that only displayed a prominent lipid (Lip) peak. Alanine (Ala) and lactate (Lac) coexisted in eight cases, indicating an alternative pathway of energy metabolism in meningiomas. They partially overlapped with each other and demonstrated a triplet-like spectral pattern, which was consistent with phantom study. Glutamine/glutamate (Glx) was helpful for the recognition of meningioma when Ala was absent. N-acetyl compounds(NACs) were observed in nine cases whose voxels were completely limited within the tumors, indicating that meningiomas might have endogenous NACs. Lac was indicative of an aggressive meningioma, although not always a nonbenign one. Lip not only represented micronecrosis in nonbenign meningiomas, but also reflected microcystic changes or fatty degeneration in benign meningiomas. 1H-MRS reflects some distinctive biochemical and pathological changes of meningiomas that might be misinterpreted. (orig.)

  3. Direct nuclear magnetic resonance observation of odorant binding to mouse odorant receptor MOR244-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Jessica L; Jeerage, Kavita M; Bruno, Thomas J

    2016-06-01

    Mammals are able to perceive and differentiate a great number of structurally diverse odorants through the odorant's interaction with odorant receptors (ORs), proteins found within the cell membrane of olfactory sensory neurons. The natural gas industry has used human olfactory sensitivity to sulfur compounds (thiols, sulfides, etc.) to increase the safety of fuel gas transport, storage, and use through the odorization of this product. In the United States, mixtures of sulfur compounds are used, but the major constituent of odorant packages is 2-methylpropane-2-thiol, also known as tert-butyl mercaptan. It has been fundamentally challenging to understand olfaction and odorization due to the low affinity of odorous ligands to the ORs and the difficulty in expressing a sufficient number of OR proteins. Here, we directly observed the binding of tert-butyl mercaptan and another odiferous compound, cis-cyclooctene, to mouse OR MOR244-3 on living cells by saturation transfer difference (STD) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. This effort lays the groundwork for resolving molecular mechanisms responsible for ligand binding and resulting signaling, which in turn will lead to a clearer understanding of odorant recognition and competition.

  4. Energy calibration issues in nuclear resonant vibrational spectroscopy: observing small spectral shifts and making fast calibrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongxin; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Dong, Weibing; Huang, Songping D

    2013-09-01

    The conventional energy calibration for nuclear resonant vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) is usually long. Meanwhile, taking NRVS samples out of the cryostat increases the chance of sample damage, which makes it impossible to carry out an energy calibration during one NRVS measurement. In this study, by manipulating the 14.4 keV beam through the main measurement chamber without moving out the NRVS sample, two alternative calibration procedures have been proposed and established: (i) an in situ calibration procedure, which measures the main NRVS sample at stage A and the calibration sample at stage B simultaneously, and calibrates the energies for observing extremely small spectral shifts; for example, the 0.3 meV energy shift between the 100%-(57)Fe-enriched [Fe4S4Cl4](=) and 10%-(57)Fe and 90%-(54)Fe labeled [Fe4S4Cl4](=) has been well resolved; (ii) a quick-switching energy calibration procedure, which reduces each calibration time from 3-4 h to about 30 min. Although the quick-switching calibration is not in situ, it is suitable for normal NRVS measurements.

  5. Multi-resonance orbital model applied to high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations observed in Sgr A*

    CERN Document Server

    Kotrlova, Andrea; Torok, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    The multi-resonance orbital model of high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (HF QPOs) enables precise determination of the black hole dimensionless spin a if observed set of oscillations demonstrates three (or more) commensurable frequencies. The black hole spin is related to the frequency ratio only, while its mass M is related to the frequency magnitude. The model is applied to the triple frequency set of HF QPOs observed in Sgr A* source with frequency ratio 3:2:1. Acceptable versions of the multi-resonance model are determined by the restrictions on the Sgr A* supermassive black hole mass. Among the best candidates the version of strong resonances related to the black hole "magic" spin a=0.983 belongs. However, the version demonstrating the best agreement with the mass restrictions predicts spin a=0.980.

  6. Attosecond dynamics through a Fano resonance: Monitoring the birth of a photoelectron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruson, V.; Barreau, L.; Jiménez-Galan, Á.; Risoud, F.; Caillat, J.; Maquet, A.; Carré, B.; Lepetit, F.; Hergott, J.-F.; Ruchon, T.; Argenti, L.; Taïeb, R.; Martín, F.; Salières, P.

    2016-11-01

    The dynamics of quantum systems are encoded in the amplitude and phase of wave packets. However, the rapidity of electron dynamics on the attosecond scale has precluded the complete characterization of electron wave packets in the time domain. Using spectrally resolved electron interferometry, we were able to measure the amplitude and phase of a photoelectron wave packet created through a Fano autoionizing resonance in helium. In our setup, replicas obtained by two-photon transitions interfere with reference wave packets that are formed through smooth continua, allowing the full temporal reconstruction, purely from experimental data, of the resonant wave packet released in the continuum. In turn, this resolves the buildup of the autoionizing resonance on an attosecond time scale. Our results, in excellent agreement with ab initio time-dependent calculations, raise prospects for detailed investigations of ultrafast photoemission dynamics governed by electron correlation, as well as coherent control over structured electron wave packets.

  7. Theoretical Analysis of Ionic Autoionization Spectra of Lanthanum in the Energy Region of 90650-91500 cm-1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张新峰; 彭永伦; 钟志萍; 屈一至; 孙玮; 夏丹; 薛平; 许祥源

    2003-01-01

    Eigenquantum defects μα and transformation matrix Uiα of La+ are calculated from the first principles by relativistic multichannel theory, and dipole matrix elements Dα axe obtained by fitting the experimental spectra.With these parameters, ionic autoionization spectra of lanthanum via an intermediate state (Xe)5d6d 1P1 of La+in the energy region of 90650-91500 cm -1 are calculated within the framework of multichannel quantum defect theory. Our calculated spectra are in general agreement with the experimental data.

  8. Low-energy resonances in the 22Ne(p,γ23Na reaction directly observed at LUNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cavanna Francesca

    2015-01-01

    A study of this reaction has been carried out at the Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics (LUNA, in the Gran Sasso National Laboratory, using a windowless gas target and two high-purity germanium detectors. Several resonances have been observed for the first time in a direct experiment.

  9. Experimental observation of the antiferromagnetic resonance linewidth in KCuF3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L.; Shi, Q.; Mino, M.; Yamazaki, H.; Yamada, I.

    2005-05-01

    We report the results of antiferromagnetic resonance (AFMR) measurements conducted on KCuF3 at various frequencies from 3.8 to 10.6 GHz at 4.2 K. The resonance linewidth is first found to depend on the frequency, i.e., the lower the frequency the greater the resonance linewidth, no matter whether the AFMR field is forced on the easy axis or uneasy axis. Moreover, a linewidth peak seems to exist for H\\parallel [100]_{p} at about 4 GHz. Based on the model of Yamada and Kato (1994 J. Phys. Soc. Japan 63 289) and considering the Laudau-Lifshitz damping term, the result of numerical calculation for the resonance linewidth is in good agreement with the data of AFMR experiments.

  10. Thermal Transition of Ribonuclease A Observed Using Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫永彬; 罗雪春; 周海梦; 张日清

    2001-01-01

    The thermal transition of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A (RNase A) was investigated using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Significant resonance overlap in the large native protein limits accurate assignments in the 1H NMR spectrum. This study proposes extending the investigation of large proteins by dynamic analysis. Comparison of the traditional method and the correlation coefficient method suggests successful application of spectrum image analysis in dynamic protein studies by NMR.

  11. Spectral signatures of the ionospheric Alfvén resonator to be observed by low-Earth orbit satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surkov, V. V.; Pilipenko, V. A.

    2016-03-01

    Interference of an incident and reflected Alfvén pulses propagating inside the ionospheric Alfvén resonator (IAR) is studied on the basis of a simple one-dimensional model. Particular emphasis has been placed on the analysis of spectral features of ultralow frequency (˜1-15 Hz) electric perturbations recently observed by Communications/Navigation Outage Forecasting System satellite. This "fingerprint" multiband spectral structure was observed when satellite descended in the terminator vicinity. Among factors affecting spectral structure the satellite position and distance from the IAR boundaries are most significant. It is concluded that the observed spectrograms exhibit modulation with "period" depending on propagation delay time of reflected Alfvén pulses in such a way that this effect can mask a spectral resonance structure resulted from excitation of IAR eigenmodes. The proposed interference effect is capable to produce a spectral pattern resembling a fingerprint which is compatible with the satellite observations.

  12. Reflecting on mirror mechanisms: motor resonance effects during action observation only present with low-intensity transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loporto, Michela; Holmes, Paul S; Wright, David J; McAllister, Craig J

    2013-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) studies indicate that the observation of other people's actions influences the excitability of the observer's motor system. Motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitudes typically increase in muscles which would be active during the execution of the observed action. This 'motor resonance' effect is thought to result from activity in mirror neuron regions, which enhance the excitability of the primary motor cortex (M1) via cortico-cortical pathways. The importance of TMS intensity has not yet been recognised in this area of research. Low-intensity TMS predominately activates corticospinal neurons indirectly, whereas high-intensity TMS can directly activate corticospinal axons. This indicates that motor resonance effects should be more prominent when using low-intensity TMS. A related issue is that TMS is typically applied over a single optimal scalp position (OSP) to simultaneously elicit MEPs from several muscles. Whether this confounds results, due to differences in the manner that TMS activates spatially separate cortical representations, has not yet been explored. In the current study, MEP amplitudes, resulting from single-pulse TMS applied over M1, were recorded from the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) and abductor digiti minimi (ADM) muscles during the observation of simple finger abductions. We tested if the TMS intensity (110% vs. 130% resting motor threshold) or stimulating position (FDI-OSP vs. ADM-OSP) influenced the magnitude of the motor resonance effects. Results showed that the MEP facilitation recorded in the FDI muscle during the observation of index-finger abductions was only detected using low-intensity TMS. In contrast, changes in the OSP had a negligible effect on the presence of motor resonance effects in either the FDI or ADM muscles. These findings support the hypothesis that MN activity enhances M1 excitability via cortico-cortical pathways and highlight a methodological framework by which the neural

  13. Reflecting on mirror mechanisms: motor resonance effects during action observation only present with low-intensity transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela Loporto

    Full Text Available Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS studies indicate that the observation of other people's actions influences the excitability of the observer's motor system. Motor evoked potential (MEP amplitudes typically increase in muscles which would be active during the execution of the observed action. This 'motor resonance' effect is thought to result from activity in mirror neuron regions, which enhance the excitability of the primary motor cortex (M1 via cortico-cortical pathways. The importance of TMS intensity has not yet been recognised in this area of research. Low-intensity TMS predominately activates corticospinal neurons indirectly, whereas high-intensity TMS can directly activate corticospinal axons. This indicates that motor resonance effects should be more prominent when using low-intensity TMS. A related issue is that TMS is typically applied over a single optimal scalp position (OSP to simultaneously elicit MEPs from several muscles. Whether this confounds results, due to differences in the manner that TMS activates spatially separate cortical representations, has not yet been explored. In the current study, MEP amplitudes, resulting from single-pulse TMS applied over M1, were recorded from the first dorsal interosseous (FDI and abductor digiti minimi (ADM muscles during the observation of simple finger abductions. We tested if the TMS intensity (110% vs. 130% resting motor threshold or stimulating position (FDI-OSP vs. ADM-OSP influenced the magnitude of the motor resonance effects. Results showed that the MEP facilitation recorded in the FDI muscle during the observation of index-finger abductions was only detected using low-intensity TMS. In contrast, changes in the OSP had a negligible effect on the presence of motor resonance effects in either the FDI or ADM muscles. These findings support the hypothesis that MN activity enhances M1 excitability via cortico-cortical pathways and highlight a methodological framework by which the

  14. Magneto-optic transmittance modulation observed in a hybrid graphene–split ring resonator terahertz metasurface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanotto, Simone; Pitanti, Alessandro [NEST, Istituto Nanoscienze–CNR and Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza San Silvestro 12, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Lange, Christoph; Maag, Thomas; Huber, Rupert [Department of Physics, University of Regensburg, 93040 Regensburg (Germany); Miseikis, Vaidotas; Coletti, Camilla [CNI@NEST, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, P.za S. Silvestro 12, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Degl' Innocenti, Riccardo [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J. J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Baldacci, Lorenzo [Scuola Superiore Sant' Anna, Institute of Life Sciences, P.za Martiri della Libertà 33, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Tredicucci, Alessandro [NEST, Istituto Nanoscienze-CNR and Dipartimento di Fisica “E. Fermi,” Università di Pisa, L.go Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy)

    2015-09-21

    By placing a material in close vicinity of a resonant optical element, its intrinsic optical response can be tuned, possibly to a wide extent. Here, we show that a graphene monolayer, spaced a few tenths of nanometers from a split ring resonator metasurface, exhibits a magneto-optical response which is strongly influenced by the presence of the metasurface itself. This hybrid system holds promises in view of thin optical modulators, polarization rotators, and nonreciprocal devices, in the technologically relevant terahertz spectral range. Moreover, it could be chosen as the playground for investigating the cavity electrodynamics of Dirac fermions in the quantum regime.

  15. Anomalous effect in Schumann resonance phenomena observed in Japan, possibly associated with the Chi-chi earthquake in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hayakawa

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The Schumann resonance phenomenon has been monitored at Nakatsugawa (near Nagoya in Japan since the beginning of 1999, and due to the occurance of a severe earthquake (so-called Chi-chi earthquake on 21 September 1999 in Taiwan we have examined our Schumann resonance data at Nakatsugawa during the entire year of 1999. We have found a very anomalous effect in the Schumann resonance, possibly associated with two large land earthquakes (one is the Chi-chi earthquake and another one on 2 November 1999 (Chia-yi earthquake with a magnitude again greater than 6.0. Conspicuous effects are observed for the larger Chi-chi earthquake, so that we summarize the characteristics for this event. The anomaly is characterized mainly by the unusual increase in amplitude of the fourth Schumann resonance mode and a significant frequency shift of its peak frequency (~1.0Hz from the conventional value on the By magnetic field component which is sensitive to the waves propagating in the NS meridian plane. Anomalous Schumann resonance signals appeared from about one week to a few days before the main shock. Secondly, the goniometric estimation of the arrival angle of the anomalous signal is found to coincide with the Taiwan azimuth (the unresolved dual direction indicates toward South America. Also, the pulsed signals, such as the Q-bursts, were simultaneously observed with the "carrier" frequency around the peak frequency of the fourth Schumann resonance mode. The anomaly for the second event for the Chia-yi earthquake on 2 November had much in common. But, most likely due to a small magnitude, the anomaly appears one day before and lasts until one day after the main shock, with the enhancement at the fourth Schumann resonance mode being smaller in amplitude than the case of the Chi-chi earthquake. Yet, the other characteristics, including the goniometric direction finding result, frequency shift, etc., are nearly the same. Although the emphasis of

  16. Observation of increased ion cyclotron resonance signal duration through electric field perturbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Nathan K; Bruce, James E

    2005-09-15

    Ion motion in Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS) is complex and the subject of ongoing theoretical and experimental studies. Two predominant pathways for the loss of ICR signals are thought to include damping of cyclotron motion, in which ions lose kinetic energy and radially damp toward the center of the ICR cell, and dephasing of ion coherence, in which ions of like cyclotron frequency become distributed out of phase at similar cyclotron radii. Both mechanisms result in the loss of induced ion image current in FTICR-MS measurements and are normally inseparable during time-domain signal analysis. For conventional ICR measurements which take advantage of ion ensembles, maximization of the ion population size and density can produce the desired effect of increasing phase coherence of ions during cyclotron motion. However, this approach also presents the risk of coalescence of ion packets of similar frequencies. In general, ICR researchers in the past have lacked the tools necessary to distinguish or independently control dephasing and damping mechanisms for ICR signal loss. Nonetheless, the ability to impart greater phase coherence of ions in ICR measurements will allow significant advances in FTICR-MS research by improving the current understanding of ICR signal loss contributions of dephasing and damping of ion ensembles, increasing overall time-domain signal length, and possibly, resulting in more routine ultrahigh resolution measurements. The results presented here demonstrate the ability to employ a high density electron beam to perturb electric fields within the ICR cell during detection of cyclotron motion, in an approach we call electron-promoted ion coherence (EPIC). As such, EPIC reduces ICR signal degradation through loss of phase coherence, and much longer time-domain signals can be obtained. Our results demonstrate that time-domain signals can be extended by more than a factor of 4 with the implementation of EPIC, as

  17. Birth of a resonant attosecond wavepacket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argenti, L.; Gruson, V.; Barreau, L.; Jimenez-Galan, A.; Risoud, F.; Caillat, J.; Maquet, A.; Carre, B.; Lepetit, F.; Hergott, J.-F.; Ruchon, T.; Taieb, R.; Martin, F.; Salieres, P.

    2016-05-01

    Both amplitude and phase are needed to characterize the dynamics of a wavepacket. However, such characterization is difficult when both attosecond and femtosecond timescales are involved, as it is the case for broadband photoionization to a continuum encompassing autoionizing states. Here we demonstrate that Rainbow RABBIT, a new attosecond interferometry, allows the measurement of amplitude and phase of a photoelectron wavepacket created through a Fano resonance with unprecedented precision. In the experiment, a tunable attosecond pulse train is combined with the fundamental laser pulse to induce two-photon transitions in helium via an intermediate autoionizing state. From the energy and time-delay resolved signal, we fully reconstruct the resonant electron wavepacket as it builds up in the continuum. Measurements accurately match the predictions of a new time-resolved multi-photon resonant model, known to reproduce ab initio calculations. This agreement confirms the potential of Rainbow RABBIT to investigate photoemission delays in ultrafast processes governed by electron correlation, as well as to control structured electron wavepackets. now at Univ. Central Florida, Orlando, FL (USA).

  18. Resonant Enhancement of Coherent Phonons in Carbon Nanotubes Observed with Sub-10fs Time Resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanagi K.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Using wavelength-resolved pump-probe spectroscopy with a sub-10-fs laser, we investigated resonant enhancement of radial breathing mode and G-mode coherent phonons in carbon nanotubes (CNTs, and successfully distinguished the electronic states of CNTs with different chiralities.

  19. Near-field observation of spatial phase shifts associated with Goos-Hänschen and Surface Plasmon Resonance effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, J; Segerink, F B; Korterik, J P; Offerhaus, H L

    2008-02-04

    We report the near-field observation of the phase shifts associated with total internal reflection on a glass-air interface and surface plasmon resonance on a glass-gold-air system. The phase of the evanescent waves on glass and gold surfaces, as a function of incident angle, is measured using a phase-sensitive Photon Scanning Tunneling Microscope (PSTM) and shows a good agreement with theory.

  20. Delayed Double Resonance Between Quadrupolar Levels: Observation of a Nuclear Spin Emission Signal in s-Triazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manallah, B.

    1986-02-01

    A delayed double resonance experiment was carried out using a Robinson-type continuous wave spectrometer. The sample chosen was s-triazine at liquid helium temperature, where the relaxation times are of the order of ten hours. Line pairings between the two Nitrogen-14 NQR sites were confirmed. Emission signals from ν- transitions were observed after successively saturating first the ν- line and then the ν+ line. The results are understood in terms of a simple model of spin population dynamics.

  1. Mirror Observation of Finger Action Enhances Activity in Anterior Intraparietal Sulcus: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    OpenAIRE

    Numata, Kenji; Murayama, Takashi; Takasugi, Jun; Monma, Masahiko; Oga, Masaru

    2013-01-01

    Mirror therapy can be used to promote recovery from paralysis in patients with post-stroke hemiplegia, There are a lot of reports that mirror-image observation of the unilateral moving hand enhanced the excitability of the primary motor area (M1) ipsilateral to the moving hand in healthy subjects. but the neural mechanisms underlying its therapeutic effects are currently unclear. To investigate this issue, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to measure activity in brain regions rela...

  2. Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy of Europium: The First Application of the PISA at ISOLDE-RILIS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2099873; Marsh, Bruce Alan

    The following work has been carried out at the radioactive ion beam facility ISOLDE at CERN. A compact atomic beam unit named PISA (Photo Ionization Spectroscopy Apparatus) has been implemented as a recent addition to the laboratory of the Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source (RILIS). The scope of this thesis work was to demonstrate different applications of the PISA, using the existing and highly developed laser setup of the RILIS installation. In a demonstration of the suitability of PISA for ionization scheme development, a new ionization scheme for Europium has been developed. This resulted in the observation of several new autoionizing states and Rydberg series. Through the analysis of the observed Rydberg resonances a refined value of $45734.33(3)(3)$ cm$^{-1}$ for the ionization potential of the europium atom has been determined. In addition this thesis reports on the feasibility of the use of the PISA as a RILIS performance monitoring device during laser ion source operations. Finally the present wor...

  3. Antiferromagnetic coupling between martensitic twin variants observed by magnetic resonance in Ni-Mn-Sn-Co films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golub, V. O.; Lvov, V. A.; Aseguinolaza, I.; Salyuk, O.; Popadiuk, D.; Kharlan, Y.; Kakazei, G. N.; Araujo, J. P.; Barandiaran, J. M.; Chernenko, V. A.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic properties of N i46.0M n36.8S n11.4C o5.8/MgO (001 ) epitaxial thin film, which undergo a martensitic phase transformation from cubic austenitic phase to a twinned orthorhombic martensitic phase at 270 K, were studied by the magnetic resonance at the microwave frequency of 9.45 GHz. It was found that the single resonance line observed in the austenite splits into three lines in the martensitic phase. A theoretical approach was developed to show that the additional resonance lines are caused by the weak antiferromagnetic coupling of the ferromagnetic twin components across twin boundaries. Fitting of the experimental resonance lines to model gives an effective field of antiferromagnetic coupling of about 1.5 kOe, which is two or three orders of magnitude lower than in the conventional antiferromagnetic solids because the number of magnetic ions interacting antiferromagnetically through the twin boundary is much less than the total number of magnetic ions in the twin. This feature shows a strong resemblance between the submicron twinned martensite and artificial antiferromagnetic superlattices, whereby providing a distinctive insight into magnetism of the studied magnetic shape memory material.

  4. Observation of Kondo resonance in rare-earth hexaborides using high resolution photoemission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maiti, Kalobaran; Patil, Swapnil; Adhikary, Ganesh [Department of Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai 400005 (India); Balakrishnan, Geetha, E-mail: kbmaiti@tifr.res.in [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

    2011-01-01

    We studied the electronic structure of rare earth hexaborides, CeB{sub 6}, PrB{sub 6} and NdB{sub 6} using state-of-the-art high resolution photoemission spectroscopy. CeB{sub 6} is a dense Kondo system. PrB{sub 6} and NdB{sub 6} are antiferromagnetic (Neel temperature {approx}7 K), known to be stable moment systems and do not exhibit Kondo effect. Photoemission spectra exhibit distinct signature of surface and bulk electronic structures of these compounds. The energy position of the surface feature is not influenced by the 4f density of states. High resolution spectra of CeB{sub 6} reveal multiple Kondo resonance features in the bulk spectra due to various photoemission final states. Interestingly, high resolution photoemission spectra of antiferromagnetic PrB{sub 6} also exhibit a sharp feature at the Fermi level that shows temperature dependence similar to the Kondo resonance features.

  5. Quasi-Resonance Effects Observed in The 1994 Northridge Earthquake, and Others

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, Edward G.; Thomas P. Fischer

    1998-01-01

    Sine-beat phenomena have been found in the 1994 Northridge earthquake records, and they are capable of producing time-history responses and damaging quasi-resonance effects in structures. Linear, single DOF (degree of freedom) oscillators, in lieu of nonlinear, multiple DOF systems, have been found adequate to discuss the failures of tall circuit breakers during the 1971 San Fernando and the 1989 Loma Prieta quakes in California. The use of sine-beat excitation for seismic-shaking-table tests...

  6. Double-hump resonance structure of the cross sections for electron impact ionization of Ar5+

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Configuration-average distorted-wave calculations are carried out for electron-impact ionization of Ar5+. Both direct ionization and the indirect excitation autoionization processes are included in our calculations. Our theoretical values are in quite reasonable agreement with the experimental data. The indirect processes contribute up to 50% to the total ionization cross sections. The possible origin of double-hump resonance structure of the cross sections is demonstrated and the contributions of metastable states are also taken into account.

  7. Analysis and modeling of Fano resonances using equivalent circuit elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Bo; Li, Rujiang; Fu, Jiahui; Wu, Qun; Zhang, Kuang; Chen, Wan; Wang, Zhefei; Ma, Ruyu

    2016-08-22

    Fano resonance presents an asymmetric line shape formed by an interference of a continuum coupled with a discrete autoionized state. In this paper, we show several simple circuits for Fano resonances from the stable-input impedance mechanism, where the elements consisting of inductors and capacitors are formulated for various resonant modes, and the resistor represents the damping of the oscillators. By tuning the pole-zero of the input impedance, a simple circuit with only three passive components e.g. two inductors and one capacitor, can exhibit asymmetric resonance with arbitrary Q-factors flexiblely. Meanwhile, four passive components can exhibit various resonances including the Lorentz-like and reversely electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) formations. Our work not only provides an intuitive understanding of Fano resonances, but also pave the way to realize Fano resonaces using simple circuit elements.

  8. Analysis and modeling of Fano resonances using equivalent circuit elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Bo; Li, Rujiang; Fu, Jiahui; Wu, Qun; Zhang, Kuang; Chen, Wan; Wang, Zhefei; Ma, Ruyu

    2016-08-01

    Fano resonance presents an asymmetric line shape formed by an interference of a continuum coupled with a discrete autoionized state. In this paper, we show several simple circuits for Fano resonances from the stable-input impedance mechanism, where the elements consisting of inductors and capacitors are formulated for various resonant modes, and the resistor represents the damping of the oscillators. By tuning the pole-zero of the input impedance, a simple circuit with only three passive components e.g. two inductors and one capacitor, can exhibit asymmetric resonance with arbitrary Q-factors flexiblely. Meanwhile, four passive components can exhibit various resonances including the Lorentz-like and reversely electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) formations. Our work not only provides an intuitive understanding of Fano resonances, but also pave the way to realize Fano resonaces using simple circuit elements.

  9. Quasi-Resonance Effects Observed in The 1994 Northridge Earthquake, and Others

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward G. Fischer

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Sine-beat phenomena have been found in the 1994 Northridge earthquake records, and they are capable of producing time-history responses and damaging quasi-resonance effects in structures. Linear, single DOF (degree of freedom oscillators, in lieu of nonlinear, multiple DOF systems, have been found adequate to discuss the failures of tall circuit breakers during the 1971 San Fernando and the 1989 Loma Prieta quakes in California. The use of sine-beat excitation for seismic-shaking-table tests of equipment continues to be a conservative simulation of earthquakes.

  10. Universal dimer in a collisionally opaque medium: experimental observables and Efimov resonances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machtey, Olga; Kessler, David A; Khaykovich, Lev

    2012-03-30

    A universal dimer is subject to secondary collisions with atoms when formed in a cloud of ultracold atoms via three-body recombination. We show that in a collisionally opaque medium, the value of the scattering length that results in the maximum number of secondary collisions may not correspond to the Efimov resonance at the atom-dimer threshold and thus cannot be automatically associated with it. This result explains a number of controversies in recent experimental results on universal three-body states and supports the emerging evidence for the significant finite range corrections to the first excited Efimov energy level.

  11. The stereo-dynamics of collisional autoionization of ammonia by helium and neon metastable excited atoms through molecular beam experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falcinelli, Stefano, E-mail: stefano.falcinelli@unipg.it; Vecchiocattivi, Franco [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Perugia, Via G. Duranti 93, 06125 Perugia (Italy); Bartocci, Alessio; Cavalli, Simonetta; Pirani, Fernando [Department of Chemistry, Biology, and Biotechnology, University of Perugia, Via Elce di sotto 8, 06123 Perugia (Italy)

    2015-10-28

    A combined analysis of both new (energy spectra of emitted electrons) and previously published (ionization cross sections) experimental data, measured under the same conditions and concerning electronically excited lighter noble gas –NH{sub 3} collisional autoionization processes, is carried out. Such an analysis, performed by exploiting a formulation of the full potential energy surface both in the real and imaginary parts, provides direct information on energetics, structure, and lifetime of the intermediate collision complex over all the configuration space. The marked anisotropy in the attraction of the real part, driving the approach of reagents, and the selective role of the imaginary component, associated to the charge transfer coupling between entrance and exit channels, suggests that reactive events occur almost exclusively in the molecular hemisphere containing the nitrogen lone pair. Crucial details on the stereo-dynamics of elementary collisional autoionization processes are then obtained, in which the open shell nature of the disclosed ionic core of metastable atom plays a crucial role. The same analysis also suggests that the strength of the attraction and the anisotropy of the interaction increases regularly along the series Ne{sup *}({sup 3}P), He{sup *}({sup 3}S), He{sup *}({sup 1}S)–NH{sub 3}. These findings can be ascribed to the strong rise of the metastable atom electronic polarizability (deformability) along the series. The obtained results can stimulate state of the art ab initio calculations focused on specific features of the transition state (energetics, structure, lifetime, etc.) which can be crucial for a further improvement of the adopted treatment and to better understand the nature of the leading interaction components which are the same responsible for the formation of the intermolecular halogen and hydrogen bond.

  12. The stereo-dynamics of collisional autoionization of ammonia by helium and neon metastable excited atoms through molecular beam experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcinelli, Stefano; Bartocci, Alessio; Cavalli, Simonetta; Pirani, Fernando; Vecchiocattivi, Franco

    2015-10-28

    A combined analysis of both new (energy spectra of emitted electrons) and previously published (ionization cross sections) experimental data, measured under the same conditions and concerning electronically excited lighter noble gas -NH3 collisional autoionization processes, is carried out. Such an analysis, performed by exploiting a formulation of the full potential energy surface both in the real and imaginary parts, provides direct information on energetics, structure, and lifetime of the intermediate collision complex over all the configuration space. The marked anisotropy in the attraction of the real part, driving the approach of reagents, and the selective role of the imaginary component, associated to the charge transfer coupling between entrance and exit channels, suggests that reactive events occur almost exclusively in the molecular hemisphere containing the nitrogen lone pair. Crucial details on the stereo-dynamics of elementary collisional autoionization processes are then obtained, in which the open shell nature of the disclosed ionic core of metastable atom plays a crucial role. The same analysis also suggests that the strength of the attraction and the anisotropy of the interaction increases regularly along the series Ne*((3)P), He*((3)S), He*((1)S)-NH3. These findings can be ascribed to the strong rise of the metastable atom electronic polarizability (deformability) along the series. The obtained results can stimulate state of the art ab initio calculations focused on specific features of the transition state (energetics, structure, lifetime, etc.) which can be crucial for a further improvement of the adopted treatment and to better understand the nature of the leading interaction components which are the same responsible for the formation of the intermolecular halogen and hydrogen bond.

  13. Observation of optical domino modes in arrays of non-resonant plasmonic nanoantennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinev, Ivan S.; Samusev, Anton K.; Voroshilov, Pavel M.; Mukhin, Ivan S.; Denisyuk, Andrey I.; Guzhva, Mikhail E.; Belov, Pavel A.; Simovski, Constantin R.

    2014-09-01

    Domino modes are highly-confined collectivemodes that were first predicted for a periodic arrangement of metallic parallelepipeds in far-infrared region. The main feature of domino modes is the advantageous distribution of the local electric field, which is concentrated between metallic elements (hot spots), while its penetration depth in metal is much smaller than the skin-depth. Therefore, arrays of non-resonant plasmonic nanoantennas exhibiting domino modes can be employed as broadband light trapping coatings for thin-film solar cells. However, until now in the excitation of such modes was demonstrated only in numerical simulations. Here, we for the first time demonstrate experimentally the excitation of optical domino modes in arrays of non-resonant plasmonic nanoantennas. We characterize the nanoantenna arrays produced by means of electron beam lithography both experimentally using an aperture-type near-field scanning optical microscope and numerically. The proof of domino modes concept for plasmonic arrays of nanoantennas in the visible spectral region opens new pathways for development of low-absorptive structures for effective focusing of light at the nanoscale.

  14. Asymmetric Orbital Distribution near Mean Motion Resonance: Application to Planets Observed by Kepler and Radial Velocities

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Ji-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Many multiple-planet systems have been found by the Kepler transit survey and various radial velocity (RV) surveys. Kepler planets show an asymmetric feature, namely, there are small but significant deficits/excesses of planet pairs with orbital period spacing slightly narrow/wide of the exact resonance, particularly near the first order mean motion resonance (MMR), such as 2:1 and 3:2 MMR. Similarly, if not exactly the same, an asymmetric feature (pileup wide of 2:1 MMR) is also seen in RV planets, but only for massive ones. We analytically and numerically study planets' orbital evolutions near and in the MMR. We find that their orbital period ratios could be asymmetrically distributed around the MMR center regardless of dissipation. In the case of no dissipation, Kepler planets' asymmetric orbital distribution could be partly reproduced for 3:2 MMR but not for 2:1 MMR, implying that dissipation might be more important to the latter. The pileup of massive RV planets just wide of 2:1 MMR is found to be consis...

  15. Measurement of the np→npπ0π0 reaction in search for the recently observed d⁎(2380 resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Adlarson

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Exclusive measurements of the quasi-free np→npπ0π0 reaction have been performed by means of dp collisions at Td=2.27 GeV using the WASA detector setup at COSY. Total and differential cross sections have been obtained covering the energy region s=(2.35–2.46 GeV, which includes the region of the ABC effect and its associated d⁎(2380 resonance. Adding the d⁎ resonance amplitude to that for the conventional processes leads to a reasonable description of the data. The observed resonance effect in the total cross section is in agreement with the predictions of Fäldt and Wilkin as well with those of Albadajedo and Oset. The ABC effect, i.e. the low-mass enhancement in the π0π0-invariant mass spectrum, is found to be very modest – if present at all, which might pose a problem to some of its interpretations.

  16. Conical intersection seam and bound resonances embedded in continuum observed in the photodissociation of thioanisole-d3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Songhee; Lim, Jeong Sik; Yoon, Jun-Ho; Lee, Jeongmook; Kim, So-Yeon; Kim, Sang Kyu

    2014-02-07

    Herein, the multi-dimensional nature of the conical intersection seam has been experimentally revealed in the photodissociation reaction of thioanisole-d3 (C6H5SCD3) excited on S1, giving C6H5S·(Ã or X̃]) +·CD3 products. The translational energy distribution of the nascent·CD3 fragment, reflecting the relative yields of the C6H5S·(Ã) and C6H5S·(X̃) products, was measured at each S1 vibronic band using the velocity map ion imaging technique. Direct access of the reactant flux to the conical intersection seam leads to the increase of the nonadiabatic transition probability resulting in sharp resonances in the X̃/ÃC6H5S·product branching ratio at several distinct S1 vibronic bands. The nature of the S1 vibronic bands associated with such dynamic resonances was clarified by the mass-analyzed threshold ionization spectroscopy. The bound state embedded in continuum generated by the conical intersection is observed as a distinct dynamic resonance, revealing the nature of the nuclear motion responsible for the nonadiabatic coupling of two potential energy surfaces at the conical intersection. The multi-dimensional facets of the conical intersection seam in terms of its detailed structure and dynamic role are discussed with the aid of theoretical calculations.

  17. Observation of intermolecular double-quantum coherence signal dips in nuclear magnetic resonance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shen Gui-Ping; Cai Cong-Bo; Cai Shu-Hui; Chen Zhong

    2011-01-01

    The correlated spectroscopy revamped by asymmetric Z-gradient echo detection (CRAZED) sequence is modified to investigate intermolecular double-quantum coherence nuclear magnetic resonance signal dips in highly polarized spin systems.It is found that the occurrence of intermolecular double-quantum coherence signal dips is related to sample geometry,field inhomogeneity and dipolar correlation distance.If the field inhomogeneity is refocused,the signal dip occurs at a fixed position whenever the dipolar correlation distance approaches the sample dimension.However,the position is shifted when the field inhomogeneity exists.Experiments and simulations are performed to validate our theoretic analysis.These signal features may offer a unique way to investigate porous structures and may find applications in biomedicine and material science.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine: technical and clinical observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modic, M.T.; Weinstein, M.A.; Pavlicek, W.; Boumphrey, F.; Starnes, D.; Duchesneau, P.M.

    1983-12-01

    Seventy-two patients were examined to determine the clinical potential for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spine. MRI using different pulse sequences was compared with plain radiography, high-resolution computed tomography, and myelography. There were 35 normal patients; pathologic conditions studied included canal stenosis, herniated disk, metastatic tumor, neurofibroma, trauma, Chiari malformation, syringomyelia, arteriovenous malformation, and rheumatoid arthritis. MRI provided sharply defined anatomic delineation and tissue characterization. It was diagnostic in syringomyelia and Chiari malformation and was useful in the evaluation of trauma and spinal canal block from any cause. MRI was sensitive to degenerative disk disease and infection. The spin-echo technique, with three pulse sequence variations, seems very promising. A short echo time (TE) produces the best signal-to-noise ratio and spatial resolution. Lengthening the TE enhances differentiation of various tissues by their signal intensity, whil the combined increase of TE and recovery time (TR) produces selective enhancement of the cerebrospinal fluid signal intensity.

  19. Laser resonance ionization scheme development for tellurium and germanium at the dual Ti:Sa–Dye ISOLDE RILIS

    CERN Document Server

    Day Goodacre, T.; Fedosseev, V.N.; Forster, L.; Marsh, B.A.; Rossel, R.E.; Rothe, S.; Veinhard, M.

    2016-01-01

    The resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) is the principal ion source of the ISOLDE radioactive beam facility based at CERN. Using the method of in-source laser resonance ionization spectroscopy, a transition to a new autoionizing state of tellurium was discovered and applied as part of a three-step, three-resonance, photo-ionization scheme. In a second study, a three-step, two-resonance, photo-ionization scheme for germanium was developed and the ionization efficiency was measured at ISOLDE. This work increases the range of ISOLDE RILIS ionized beams to 31 elements. Details of the spectroscopy studies are described and the new ionization schemes are summarized.

  20. Laser resonance ionization scheme development for tellurium and germanium at the dual Ti:Sa–Dye ISOLDE RILIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day Goodacre, T., E-mail: thomas.day.goodacre@cern.ch [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Fedorov, D. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, 188350 Gatchina (Russian Federation); Fedosseev, V.N.; Forster, L.; Marsh, B.A. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Rossel, R.E. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Institut für Physik, Johannes Gutenberg Universität, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Faculty of Design, Computer Science and Media, Hochschule RheinMain, Wiesbaden (Germany); Rothe, S.; Veinhard, M. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2016-09-11

    The resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) is the principal ion source of the ISOLDE radioactive beam facility based at CERN. Using the method of in-source laser resonance ionization spectroscopy, a transition to a new autoionizing state of tellurium was discovered and applied as part of a three-step, three-resonance, photo-ionization scheme. In a second study, a three-step, two-resonance, photo-ionization scheme for germanium was developed and the ionization efficiency was measured at ISOLDE. This work increases the range of ISOLDE RILIS ionized beams to 31 elements. Details of the spectroscopy studies are described and the new ionization schemes are summarized.

  1. Laser resonance ionization scheme development for tellurium and germanium at the dual Ti:Sa-Dye ISOLDE RILIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day Goodacre, T.; Fedorov, D.; Fedosseev, V. N.; Forster, L.; Marsh, B. A.; Rossel, R. E.; Rothe, S.; Veinhard, M.

    2016-09-01

    The resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) is the principal ion source of the ISOLDE radioactive beam facility based at CERN. Using the method of in-source laser resonance ionization spectroscopy, a transition to a new autoionizing state of tellurium was discovered and applied as part of a three-step, three-resonance, photo-ionization scheme. In a second study, a three-step, two-resonance, photo-ionization scheme for germanium was developed and the ionization efficiency was measured at ISOLDE. This work increases the range of ISOLDE RILIS ionized beams to 31 elements. Details of the spectroscopy studies are described and the new ionization schemes are summarized.

  2. Observation of Scattering Resonances in the Penning Ionization of NH$_3$ by He($^3$S$_1$) at Low Collision Energies

    CERN Document Server

    Jankunas, Justin; Hapka, Michal; Osterwalder, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    A merged-beam study of the gas phase He($^3$S$_1$) + NH$_3$ Penning ionization reaction dynamics in the collision energy range 3.3 $\\mu$eV $<$ E $<$ 10 meV is presented. In this energy range the reaction rate is governed by long-range attraction. Shape resonances are observed at collision energies of 1.8 meV and 7.3 meV and are assigned to $\\ell$=15,16 and $\\ell$=20,21 partial waves, respectively. The experimental results are well reproduced by theoretical calculations with the short-range reaction probability $P_{sr}=0.035$.

  3. Observations of a free-energy source for intense electrostatic waves. [in upper atmosphere near upper hybrid resonance frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurth, W. S.; Frank, L. A.; Gurnett, D. A.; Burek, B. G.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.

    1980-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in understanding intense electrostatic waves near the upper hybrid resonance frequency in terms of the theory of multiharmonic cyclotron emission using a classical loss-cone distribution function as a model. Recent observations by Hawkeye 1 and GEOS 1 have verified the existence of loss-cone distributions in association with the intense electrostatic wave events, however, other observations by Hawkeye and ISEE have indicated that loss cones are not always observable during the wave events, and in fact other forms of free energy may also be responsible for the instability. Now, for the first time, a positively sloped feature in the perpendicular distribution function has been uniquely identified with intense electrostatic wave activity. Correspondingly, we suggest that the theory is flexible under substantial modifications of the model distribution function.

  4. Direct observation of nonlinear coupling in wave turbulence at the surface of water and relevance of approximate resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubourg, Quentin; Mordant, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    energy cascade is clearly observed consistently with previous measurements. A large amount of data permits us to use higher order statistical tools to investigate directly the resonant interactions. We observe a strong presence of triadic interactions in our system, confirming the foundations of the weak wave turbulence theory. A significant part of these interactions are non-local and enable coupling between capillary and gravity waves. We also emphasize the role of approximate resonances that are made possible by the nonlinear spectral widening. The quasi-resonances increase significantly the number of wave interactions and in particular open the possibility of observing 3-wave coupling among gravity waves although 3-wave exact resonances are prohibited. These effects are being currently investigated in a larger size experiment using a 13m in diameter wave flume. Our observation raise the question of the importance of these approximate resonances of gravity waves in energy transfers both in the theory and in the ocean.

  5. Neurometabolic abnormalities in schizophrenia and depression observed with magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 7 T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osuch, Elizabeth A.; Schaefer, Betsy; Rajakumar, Nagalingam; Neufeld, Richard W. J.; Théberge, Jean; Williamson, Peter C.

    2017-01-01

    Background Examining neurometabolic abnormalities in critical brain areas in schizophrenia and major depressive disorder (MDD) may help guide future pharmacological interventions including glutamate-modulating treatments. Aims To measure metabolite concentrations within the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and thalamus of people with schizophrenia and people with MDD. Methods Spectra were acquired from 16 volunteers with schizophrenia, 17 with MDD and 18 healthy controls using magnetic resonance spectroscopy on a 7 Tesla scanner. Results In the thalamus, there were lower glycine concentrations in the schizophrenia group relative to control (P=0.017) and MDD groups (P=0.012), and higher glutamine concentrations relative to healthy controls (P=0.009). In the thalamus and the ACC, the MDD group had lower myo-inositol concentrations than the control (P=0.014, P=0.009, respectively) and schizophrenia (P=0.004, P=0.002, respectively) groups. Conclusion These results support the glutamatergic theory of schizophrenia and indicate a potential glycine deficiency in the thalamus. In addition, reduced myo-inositol concentrations in MDD suggest its involvement in the disorder. Declaration of interest None. Copyright and usage © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2017. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) license.

  6. Chaos control of the micro-electro-mechanical resonator by using adaptive dynamic surface technology with extended state observer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaohua Luo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses chaos control of the micro-electro- mechanical resonator by using adaptive dynamic surface technology with extended state observer. To reveal the mechanism of the micro- electro-mechanical resonator, the phase diagrams and corresponding time histories are given to research the nonlinear dynamics and chaotic behavior, and Homoclinic and heteroclinic chaos which relate closely with the appearance of chaos are presented based on the potential function. To eliminate the effect of chaos, an adaptive dynamic surface control scheme with extended state observer is designed to convert random motion into regular motion without precise system model parameters and measured variables. Putting tracking differentiator into chaos controller solves the ‘explosion of complexity’ of backstepping and poor precision of the first-order filters. Meanwhile, to obtain high performance, a neural network with adaptive law is employed to approximate unknown nonlinear function in the process of controller design. The boundedness of all the signals of the closed-loop system is proved in theoretical analysis. Finally, numerical simulations are executed and extensive results illustrate effectiveness and robustness of the proposed scheme.

  7. Chaos control of the micro-electro-mechanical resonator by using adaptive dynamic surface technology with extended state observer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Shaohua; Sun, Quanping; Cheng, Wei

    2016-04-01

    This paper addresses chaos control of the micro-electro- mechanical resonator by using adaptive dynamic surface technology with extended state observer. To reveal the mechanism of the micro- electro-mechanical resonator, the phase diagrams and corresponding time histories are given to research the nonlinear dynamics and chaotic behavior, and Homoclinic and heteroclinic chaos which relate closely with the appearance of chaos are presented based on the potential function. To eliminate the effect of chaos, an adaptive dynamic surface control scheme with extended state observer is designed to convert random motion into regular motion without precise system model parameters and measured variables. Putting tracking differentiator into chaos controller solves the `explosion of complexity' of backstepping and poor precision of the first-order filters. Meanwhile, to obtain high performance, a neural network with adaptive law is employed to approximate unknown nonlinear function in the process of controller design. The boundedness of all the signals of the closed-loop system is proved in theoretical analysis. Finally, numerical simulations are executed and extensive results illustrate effectiveness and robustness of the proposed scheme.

  8. Suppression and Enhancement in Parametric Two-Photon Resonant Nondegenerate Four-Wave Mixing via Quantum Interference

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Jiang; MI Xin; YU Zu-He; JIANG Qian; ZUO Zhan-Chun; WANG Yan-Bang; WU Ling-An; FU Pan-Ming

    2004-01-01

    @@ Quantum interference may lead to suppression and enhancement of the two-photon resonant nondegenerate fourwave mixing signal in a cascade four-level system. Such phenomena are demonstrated in Ba through inducing atomic coherence between the ground state 6s2 and the doubly excited autoionizing Rydberg state 6pnd. This method can be used as a new spectroscopic tool for measuring the transition dipole moment between two highly excited atomic states.

  9. Metal atom and ion layers observed by a frequency-tunable resonance scattering lidar in the midlatitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejiri, Mitsumu K.; Nakamura, Takuji; Kawahara, Takuya D.; Tsuno, Katsuhiko; Abo, Makoto; Nishiyama, Takanori; Tsuda, Takuo; Wada, Satoshi; Ogawa, Takayo

    2016-07-01

    The National Institute of Polar Research (NIPR) is leading a six year prioritized project of the Antarctic research observations since 2010. One of the sub-project is entitled the global environmental change revealed through the Antarctic middle and upper atmosphere. Profiling dynamical parameters such as temperature and wind, as well as minor constituents is the key component of observations in this project, together with a long term observations using existent various instruments in Syowa, the Antarctica (69S). As a part of the sub-project, we are developing a new resonance lidar system with multiple wavelengths and plan to install and operate it at Syowa, Antarctica. The lidar will observe temperature profiles and variations of minor constituents such as Fe, K, Ca+, and aurorally excited N2+. The lidar system is being developed with trial and error in test observations of the metal atom and ion density and the MLT temperature profiles. The lidar will be installed at Syowa in Antarctica by the 58th Japan Antarctic Research Expedition (JARE 58). In this presentation, we will report current status of the system developments and discuss results of the test observations.

  10. Observation of Pseudoscalar and Axial Vector Resonances in pi- p -> K+ K- pi0 n at 18 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G.S. Adams; T. Adams; Z. Bar-Yam; J.M. Bishop; V.A. Bodyagin; D.S. Brown; N.M. Cason; S.U. Chung; J.P. Cummings; K. Danyo; A.I. Demianov; S. Denisov; V. Dorofeev; J.P. Dowd; P. Eugenio; X.L. Fan; A.M. Gribushin; R.W. Hackenburg; M. Hayek; J. Hu; E.I. Ivanov; D. Joffe; I. Kachaev; W. Kern; E. King; O.L. Kodolova; V.L. Korotkikh; M.A. Kostin; Joachim Kuhn; V. Lipaev; J.M. Losecco; M. Lu; J.J. Manak; J. Napolitano; M. Nozar; C. Olchanski; A.I. Ostrovidov; T.K. Pedlar; A. Popov; D. Ryabchikov; A.H. Sanjari; L.I. Sarycheva; K.K. Seth; N. Shenhav; X. Shen; W.D. Shephard; N.B. Sinev; D.L. Stienike; S.A. Taegar; D.R. Thompson; A. Tomaradze; I.N. Vardanyan; D.P. Weygand; D. White; H.J. Willutzki; A.A. Yershov

    2001-09-01

    The number of pseudoscalar mesons in the mass range from 1400 to 1500 MeV/c{sup 2} has been a subject of considerable interest for many years, with several experiments having presented evidence for two closely spaced states. A new measurement of the reaction {pi}{sup -} p {yields} K{sup +} K{sup -} {pi}{sup 0}n has been made at a beam energy of 18 GeV. A partial wave analysis of the K{sup +} K{sup -} {pi}{sup 0} system shows evidence for three pseudoscalar resonances, {eta}(1295), {eta}(1416), and {eta}(1485), as well as two axial vectors, f{sub 1}(1285), and f{sub 1}(1420). Their observed masses, widths and decay properties are reported. No signal was observed for C(1480), an I{sub G} J{sup PC} = 1{sup +} 1{sup --} state previously reported in {phi}{pi}{sup 0} decay.

  11. Observation of new satellites in Cs-Ar system using resonance ionization spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nayfeh, M.H.; Hurst, G.S.; Payne, M.G.; Young, J.P.

    1978-07-31

    The absorption line shape of Cs-Ar system is recorded using two-photon ionization of the system with Cs(7P) as an intermediate state. New satellite structures in the wings of Cs(7P) are observed which were not resolved in previous absorption measurements. Also the absolute absorption cross section in the blue wing is measured.

  12. Observation of strongly forbidden solid effect dynamic nuclear polarization transitions via electron-electron double resonance detected NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Albert A; Corzilius, Björn; Haze, Olesya; Swager, Timothy M; Griffin, Robert G

    2013-12-01

    We present electron paramagnetic resonance experiments for which solid effect dynamic nuclear polarization transitions were observed indirectly via polarization loss on the electron. This use of indirect observation allows characterization of the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) process close to the electron. Frequency profiles of the electron-detected solid effect obtained using trityl radical showed intense saturation of the electron at the usual solid effect condition, which involves a single electron and nucleus. However, higher order solid effect transitions involving two, three, or four nuclei were also observed with surprising intensity, although these transitions did not lead to bulk nuclear polarization--suggesting that higher order transitions are important primarily in the transfer of polarization to nuclei nearby the electron. Similar results were obtained for the SA-BDPA radical where strong electron-nuclear couplings produced splittings in the spectrum of the indirectly observed solid effect conditions. Observation of high order solid effect transitions supports recent studies of the solid effect, and suggests that a multi-spin solid effect mechanism may play a major role in polarization transfer via DNP.

  13. Observation of strongly forbidden solid effect dynamic nuclear polarization transitions via electron-electron double resonance detected NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Albert A.; Corzilius, Björn; Haze, Olesya; Swager, Timothy M.; Griffin, Robert G., E-mail: rgg@mit.edu [Department of Chemistry and Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2013-12-07

    We present electron paramagnetic resonance experiments for which solid effect dynamic nuclear polarization transitions were observed indirectly via polarization loss on the electron. This use of indirect observation allows characterization of the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) process close to the electron. Frequency profiles of the electron-detected solid effect obtained using trityl radical showed intense saturation of the electron at the usual solid effect condition, which involves a single electron and nucleus. However, higher order solid effect transitions involving two, three, or four nuclei were also observed with surprising intensity, although these transitions did not lead to bulk nuclear polarization—suggesting that higher order transitions are important primarily in the transfer of polarization to nuclei nearby the electron. Similar results were obtained for the SA-BDPA radical where strong electron-nuclear couplings produced splittings in the spectrum of the indirectly observed solid effect conditions. Observation of high order solid effect transitions supports recent studies of the solid effect, and suggests that a multi-spin solid effect mechanism may play a major role in polarization transfer via DNP.

  14. Observation of an Exotic S = -2, Q = -2 Baryon Resonance in Proton-Proton Collisions at the CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Alt, C; Baatar, B; Barna, D; Bartke, Jerzy; Behler, M; Betev, L; Bialkowska, H; Billmeier, A; Blume, C; Boimska, B; Botje, M; Bracinik, J; Bramm, R; Brun, R; Buncic, P; Cerny, V; Christakoglou, P; Chvala, O; Cramer, J G; Csató, P; Darmenov, N; Dimitrov, A; Dinkelaker, P; Eckardt, V; Farantatos, G; Filip, P; Flierl, D; Fodor, Z; Foka, P; Freund, P; Friese, V; Gál, J; Gazdzicki, M; Georgopoulos, G; Gladysz-Dziadus, E; Hegyi, S; Höhne, C; Kadija, K; Karev, A; Kniege, S; Kolesnikov, V I; Kollegger, T; Korus, R; Kowalski, M; Kraus, I; Kreps, M; Van Leeuwen, M; Lévai, Peter; Litov, L; Makariev, M; Malakhov, A I; Markert, C; Mateev, M; Mayes, B W; Melkumov, G L; Meurer, C; Mischke, A; Mitrovski, M; Molnár, J; Mrówczynski, S; Pálla, G; Panagiotou, A D; Panayotov, D; Perl, K; Petridis, A; Pikna, M; Pinsky, L; Pühlhofer, F; Reid, J G; Renfordt, R E; Retyk, W; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rybczynski, M; Rybicki, A; Sandoval, A; Sann, H; Schmitz, N; Seyboth, P; Siklér, F; Sitár, B; Skrzypczak, E; Stefanek, G; Stock, R; Ströbele, H; Susa, T; Szentpétery, I; Sziklai, J; Trainor, T A; Varga, D; Vassiliou, Maria; Veres, G I; Vesztergombi, G; Vranic, D; Wetzler, A; Wlodarczyk, Z; Yoo, I K; Zaranek, J; Zimányi, J

    2004-01-01

    Results of resonance searches in the Xi- pi-, Xi- pi+, antiXi+ pi- and antiXi+ pi+ invariant mass spectra in proton-proton collisions at sqrt{s}=17.2 GeV are presented. Evidence is shown for the existence of a narrow Xi- pi- baryon resonance with mass of 1.862+/-0.002 GeV/c^2 and width below the detector resolution of about 0.018 GeV/c^2. The significance is estimated to be 4.0 sigma. This state is a candidate for the hypothetical exotic Xi_(3/2)^-- baryon with S = -2, I = 3/2 and a quark content of (d s d s ubar). At the same mass a peak is observed in the Xi- pi+ spectrum which is a candidate for the Xi_(3/2)^0 member of this isospin quartet with a quark content of (d s u s dbar). The corresponding antibaryon spectra also show enhancements at the same invariant mass.

  15. Localized surface plasmon resonances dominated giant lateral photovoltaic effect observed in ZnO/Ag/Si nanostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ke; Wang, Hui; Gan, Zhikai; Zhou, Peiqi; Mei, Chunlian; Huang, Xu; Xia, Yuxing

    2016-03-01

    We report substantially enlarged lateral photovoltaic effect (LPE) in the ZnO/Ag/Si nanostructures. The maximum LPE sensitivity (55.05 mv/mm) obtained in this structure is about seven times larger than that observed in the control sample (7.88 mv/mm) of ZnO/Si. We attribute this phenomenon to the strong localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) induced by nano Ag semicontinuous films. Quite different from the traditional LPE in PN junction type structures, in which light-generated carriers contributed to LPE merely depends on direct excitation of light in semiconductor, this work firstly demonstrates that, by introducing a super thin metal Ag in the interface between two different kinds of semiconductors, the nanoscale Ag embedded in the interface will produce strong resonance of localized field, causing extra intraband excitation, interband excitation and an enhanced direct excitation. As a consequence, these LSPRs dominated contributions harvest much more carriers, giving rise to a greatly enhanced LPE. In particular, this LSPRs-driven mechanism constitutes a sharp contrast to the traditional LPE operation mechanism. This work suggests a brand new LSPRs approach for tailoring LPE-based devices and also opens avenues of research within current photoelectric sensors area.

  16. Myocardial feature tracking reduces observer-dependence in low-dose dobutamine stress cardiovascular magnetic resonance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Schuster

    Full Text Available To determine whether quantitative wall motion assessment by CMR myocardial feature tracking (CMR-FT would reduce the impact of observer experience as compared to visual analysis in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM.15 consecutive patients with ICM referred for assessment of hibernating myocardium were studied at 3 Tesla using SSFP cine images at rest and during low dose dobutamine stress (5 and 10 μg/kg/min of dobutamine. Conventional visual, qualitative analysis was performed independently and blinded by an experienced and an inexperienced reader, followed by post-processing of the same images by CMR-FT to quantify subendocardial and subepicardial circumferential (Eccendo and Eccepi and radial (Err strain. Receiver operator characteristics (ROC were assessed for each strain parameter and operator to detect the presence of inotropic reserve as visually defined by the experienced observer.141 segments with wall motion abnormalities at rest were eligible for the analysis. Visual scoring of wall motion at rest and during dobutamine was significantly different between the experienced and the inexperienced observer (p0.05. Eccendo was the most accurate (AUC of 0.76, 10 μg/kg/min of dobutamine parameter. Diagnostic accuracy was worse for resting strain with differences between operators for Eccendo and Eccepi (p0.05.Whilst visual analysis remains highly dependent on operator experience, quantitative CMR-FT analysis of myocardial wall mechanics during DS-CMR provides diagnostic accuracy for the detection of inotropic reserve regardless of operator experience and hence may improve diagnostic robustness of low-dose DS-CMR in clinical practice.

  17. Observation of KsKs resonances in deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, T; Adamczyk, L; Adamus, M; Adler, V; Aghuzumtsyan, G; Antonioli, P; Antonov, A; Arneodo, M; Bailey, D S; Bamberger, A; Barakbaev, A N; Barbagli, G; Barbi, M; Bari, G; Barreiro, F; Bartsch, D; Basile, M; Bauerdick, L A T; Behrens, U; Bell, M; Bellagamba, L; Benen, A; Bertolin, A; Bhadra, S; Bloch, I; Bodmann, B; Bold, T; Boos, E G; Borras, K; Boscherini, D; Brock, I; Brook, N H; Brugnera, R; Brümmer, N; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Bussey, P J; Butterworth, J M; Bylsma, B; Caldwell, A; Capua, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carli, T; Carlin, R; Catterall, C D; Chekanov, S; Chiochia, V; Chwastowski, J; Ciborowski, J; Ciesielski, R; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Cloth, P; Cole, J E; Collins-Tooth, C; Contin, A; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Coppola, N; Cormack, C; Corradi, M; Corriveau, F; Cottrell, A; D'Agostini, Giulio; Dal Corso, F; Danilov, P; Dannheim, D; De Pasquale, S; Dementiev, R K; Derrick, M; Deshpande, Abhay A; Devenish, R C E; Dhawan, S; Dolgoshein, B A; Doyle, A T; Drews, G; Durkin, L S; Dusini, S; Eisenberg, Y; Ermolov, P F; Eskreys, Andrzej; Ferrando, J; Ferrero, M I; Figiel, J; Filges, D; Foster, B; Foudas, C; Fourletov, S; Fourletova, J; Fricke, U; Fusayasu, T; Gabareen, A; Gallo, E; Garfagnini, A; Geiser, A; Genta, C; Gialas, I; Giusti, P; Gladilin, L K; Gladkov, D; Glasman, C; Gliga, S; Goers, S; Golubkov, Yu A; Goncalo, R; González, O; Göttlicher, P; Grabowska-Bold, I; Grijpink, S; Grzelak, G; Gutsche, O; Gwenlan, C; Haas, T; Hain, W; Hall-Wilton, R; Hamatsu, R; Hamilton, J; Hanlon, S; Hart, J C; Hartmann, H; Hartner, G; Hartner, G F; Heaphy, E A; Heath, G P; Heath, H F; Helbich, M; Heusch, C A; Hilger, E; Hillert, S; Hirose, T; Hochman, D; Holm, U; Iacobucci, G; Iga, Y; Inuzuka, M; Irrgang, P; Jakob, H P; Jones, T W; Kagawa, S; Kahle, B; Kaji, H; Kananov, S; Kappes, A; Kataoka, Y; Yamazaki, M; Katkov, I I; Katz, U F; Kcira, D; Khein, L A; Kim, J Y; Kim, Y K; Kind, O; Kisielewska, D; Kitamura, S; Klimek, K; Koffeman, E; Kohno, T; Kooijman, P; Koop, T; Korzhav, I A; Kotanski, A; Kötz, U; Kowal, A M; Kowal, M; Kowalski, H; Kowalski, T; Krakauer, D; Kramberger, G; Kreisel, A; Krumnack, N; Kuze, M; Kuzmin, V A; Labarga, L; Labes, H; Lainesse, J; Lammers, S; Lee, J H; Lee, S W; Lelas, D; Levchenko, B B; Levman, G M; Levy, A; Li, L; Lightwood, M S; Lim, H; Lim, I T; Limentani, S; Ling, T Y; Liu, X; Löhr, B; Lohrmann, E; Loizides, J H; Long, K R; Longhin, A; Lukina, O Yu; Lupi, A; Luzniak, P; Maddox, E; Magill, S; Mankel, R; Margotti, A; Marini, G; Martin, J F; Mastroberardino, A; Matsuzawa, K; Mattingly, M C K; McCubbin, N A; Mellado, B; Melzer-Pellmann, I A; Menary, S R; Metlica, F; Meyer, U; Milite, M; Mirea, A; Monaco, V; Montanari, A; Moritz, M; Musgrave, B; Nagano, K; Nania, R; Nguyen, C N; Nigro, A; Ning, Y; Nishimura, T; Notz, D; Nowak, R J; Oh, B Y; Olkiewicz, K; Pac, M Y; Padhi, S; Paganis, S; Palmonari, F; Parenti, A; Park, I H; Patel, S; Paul, E; Pavel, N; Pawlak, J M; Pelfer, P G; Pellegrino, A; Pesci, A; Petrucci, M C; Piotrzkowski, K; Plucinsky, P P; Pokrovskiy, N S; Polini, A; Posocco, M; Proskuryakov, A S; Przybycien, M B; Rautenberg, J; Raval, A; Reeder, D D; Ren, Z; Renner, R; Repond, J; Riveline, U; Karshon, M; Robins, S; Rodrigues, E; Rosin, M; Rurua, L; Ruspa, M; Sacchi, R; Salehi, H; Sartorelli, G; Savin, A A; Saxon, D H; Schagen, S; Schioppa, M; Schlenstedt, S; Schmidke, W B; Schneekloth, U; Sciulli, F; Scott, J; Selonke, F; Shcheglova, L M; Skillicorn, I O; Slominski, W; Smith, W H; Soares, M; Solano, A; Son, D; Sosnovtsev, V V; Stairs, D G; Stanco, L; Standage, J; Stifutkin, A; Stoesslein, U; Stonjek, S; Stopa, P; Straub, P B; Suchkov, S; Susinno, G; Suszycki, L; Sutton, M R; Sztuk, J; Szuba, D; Szuba, J; Tandler, J; Tapper, A D; Tapper, R J; Tassi, E; Tawara, T; Terron, J; Tiecke, H G; Tokushuku, K; Tsurugai, T; Turcato, M; Tymieniecka, T; Ukleja, A; Ukleja, J; Vázquez, M; Velthuis, J J; Vlasov, N N; Voss, K C; Walczak, R; Walsh, R; Wang, M; Weber, A; Wessoleck, H; West, B J; Whitmore, J J; Wick, K; Wiggers, L; Wills, H H; Wing, M; Wolf, G; Yamada, S; Yamashita, T; Yoshida, R; Youngman, C; Zawiejski, L; Zeuner, W; Zhautykov, B O; Zichichi, A; Ziegler, A; Zotkin, S A; De Wolf, E; Del Peso, J

    2004-01-01

    Inclusive KsKs production in deep inelastic ep scattering at HERA has been studied with the ZEUS detector using an integrated luminosity of 120 pb-1. Two states are observed at masses of 1537 (+9)(-8) MeV and 1726 +- 7 MeV, as well as an enhancement around 1300 MeV. The state at 1537 MeV is consistent with the well established f2'(1525). The state at 1726 MeV may be the glueball candidate f0(1710).

  18. Observation of two resonant structures in $e^+ e^- \\to \\pi^+ \\pi^- h_c$

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2016-01-01

    The cross sections of $e^{+}e^{-}\\to\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}h_c$ at center-of-mass energies from 3.896 to 4.600 GeV are measured using data samples collected with the BESIII detector operating at the Beijing Electron Positron Collider. The cross sections are found to be of the same order of magnitude as those of $e^{+}e^{-}\\to\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}J/\\psi$ and $e^{+}e^{-}\\to\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}\\psi(2S)$, but the line shape is inconsistent with the $Y$ states observed in the latter two modes. Two structures are observed in the $e^{+}e^{-}\\to\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}h_c$ cross sections around 4.22 and 4.39 GeV/$c^{2}$, which we call $Y(4220)$ and $Y(4390)$, respectively. A fit with a coherent sum of two Breit-Wigner functions results in a mass of $(4218.4\\pm4.0\\pm0.9)$ MeV/$c^{2}$ and a width of $(66.0\\pm9.0\\pm0.4)$ MeV for the $Y(4220)$, and a mass of $(4391.6\\pm6.3\\pm1.0)$ MeV/$c^{2}$ and a width of $(139.5\\pm16.1\\pm0.6)$ MeV for the $Y(4390)$, where the first uncertainties are statistical and the second ones systematic.

  19. Autoionization study of the Argon 2p satellites excited near the argon 2s threshold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, H.; Glans, P.; Hemmers, O. [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    The dynamics of near-threshold photoionization is a complex phenomenon in which the many-electron character of the wavefunctions plays an important role. According to generalized time-independent resonant scattering theory, the transition matrix element from an initial state to a final state is the summation of the amplitudes of direct photoionization and an indirect term in which intermediate states are involved and the resonant behavior is embedded. Studies of the interference effects of intermediate states have been explored in the cases where the direct term is negligible. In the present work, electron time-of-flight spectra of the Ar 2p satellites were measured at two angles (magic and 0{degrees}) in the dipole plane with the exciting photon energy tuned in the vicinity of the Ar 2s threshold. For excitation far below or above the 2s threshold, the 2p satellites spectrum is dominated by 3p to np shakeup contributions upon the ionization of a 2p electron.

  20. Rocket observation of atomic oxygen and night airglow: Measurement of concentration with an improved resonance fluorescence technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kita

    Full Text Available An improved resonant fluorescence instrument for measuring atomic oxygen concentration was developed to avoid the Doppler effect and the aerodynamic shock effect due to the supersonic motion of a rocket. The shock effect is reduced by adopting a sharp wedge-shaped housing and by scanning of the detector field of view to change the distance between the scattering volume and the surface of the housing. The scanning enables us to determine absolute values of atomic oxygen concentration from relative variation of the scattered light signal due to the self-absorption. The instrument was calibrated in the laboratory, and the numerical simulation reproduced the calibration result. Using the instrument, the altitude profile of atomic oxygen concentration was observed by a rocket experiment at Uchinoura (31°N on 28 January 1992. The data obtained from the rocket experiment were not perfectly free from the shock effect, but errors due to the effect were reduced by the data analysis procedure. The observed maximum concentration was 3.8× 1011 cm–3 at altitudes around 94 km. The systematic error is estimated to be less than ±0.7×1011 cm–3 and the relative random error is less than±0.07× 1011 cm–3at the same altitudes. The altitude profile of the OI 557.7-nm airglow was also observed in the same rocket experiment. The maximum volume emission rate was found to be 150 photons cm–3 s–1 at 94 km. The observed altitude profiles are compared with the MSIS model and other in situ observations.

  1. Quadrupole moments in chiral material DyFe3(BO3)4 observed by resonant x-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Hiroshi; Usui, Tomoyasu; Joly, Yves; Suzuki, Motohiro; Wakabayashi, Yusuke; Kimura, Tsuyoshi; Tanaka, Yoshikazu

    2016-04-01

    By means of circularly polarized x rays at the Dy L3 and Fe K absorption edges, the chiral structure of the electric quadrupole was investigated for a single crystal of DyFe3(BO3)4, in which both Dy and Fe ions exhibit a spiral arrangement. The integrated intensity of the resonant x-ray diffraction of space-group forbidden reflections 004 and 005 is interpreted within the electric dipole transitions from Dy 2 p3/2 to 5 d and Fe 1 s to 4 p , respectively. We have confirmed that the handedness of the crystal observed at Dy L3 and Fe K edges is consistent with that observed at Dy M5 edge reported in a previous study. The electric quadrupole moments of Dy 5 d and Fe 4 p are derived by analyzing the azimuth scans of the diffracted intensity. The temperature profiles of the integrated intensity of 004 at the Dy L3 and the Fe K edges are similar to those of Dy-O and Fe-O bond lengths, while the temperature dependence at the Dy M5 edge does not match the bond-length behavior. The results indicate that the helix chiral orientations of quadrupole moments due to Dy 5 d and Fe 4 p electrons are more strongly coupled to the ligands states than Dy 4 f electrons.

  2. Influence of the gender on cerebral vascular diameters observed during the magnetic resonance angiographic examination of willis circle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Stefani

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study evaluated the calibers and anatomic configurations based on the Magnetic Resonance analysis (MRA, assaying the cerebral vascular territories and sex-linked variations. A randomized sample of 30 angiographic examinations in adult patients of both sexes was obtained and components of the circle of Willis were identified. Branch diameters were measured on a transversal cut 5mm from the vessel origin in a typical angiographic frontal incidence. For the comparative statistical analysis, tests were divided in the groups considering the patients' sex and age. The classical Circle of Willis configuration was oberved in only 15 samples (50%. Greater calibers were observed in the arteries of the posterior circulation and multiple linear regression analysis established that the caliber of the posterior circulation was influenced by an independent variable related to the gender. Additional variations included unilateral and bilateral fetal and hypoplasic Posterior communicating arteries. In the anterior cerebral artery (ACA, the presence of an accessory developed ACA, an ACA giving branches to the distal portion of the two hemispheres and a third median ACA the variants were observed. Gender influenced the variations on internal diameters of posterior circulation vessels, with larger measurements in men.

  3. Morning sector drift-bounce resonance driven ULF waves observed in artificially-induced HF radar backscatter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. J. Baddeley

    Full Text Available HF radar backscatter, which has been artificially-induced by a high power RF facility such as the EISCAT heater at Tromsø, has provided coherent radar ionospheric electric field data of unprecedented temporal resolution and accuracy. Here such data are used to investigate ULF wave processes observed by both the CUTLASS HF radars and the EISCAT UHF radar. Data from the SP-UK-OUCH experiment have revealed small-scale (high azimuthal wave number, m -45 waves, predominantly in the morning sector, thought to be brought about by the drift-bounce resonance processes. Conjugate observations from the Polar CAM-MICE instrument indicate the presence of a non-Maxwellian ion distribution function. Further statistical analysis has been undertaken, using the Polar TIMAS instrument, to reveal the prevalence and magnitude of the non-Maxwellian energetic particle populations thought to be responsible for generating these wave types.

    Key words. Ionosphere (active experiments; wave-particle interactions Magnetospheric physics (MHD waves and instabilities

  4. Mirror observation of finger action enhances activity in anterior intraparietal sulcus: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numata, Kenji; Murayama, Takashi; Takasugi, Jun; Monma, Masahiko; Oga, Masaru

    2013-01-01

    Mirror therapy can be used to promote recovery from paralysis in patients with post-stroke hemiplegia, There are a lot of reports that mirror-image observation of the unilateral moving hand enhanced the excitability of the primary motor area (M1) ipsilateral to the moving hand in healthy subjects. but the neural mechanisms underlying its therapeutic effects are currently unclear. To investigate this issue, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to measure activity in brain regions related to visual information processing during mirror image movement observation. Thirteen healthy subjects performed a finger-thumb opposition task with the left and right hands separately, with or without access to mirror observation. In the mirror condition, one hand was reflected in a mirror placed above the abdomen in the MRI scanner. In the masked mirror condition, subjects performed the same task but with the mirror obscured. In both conditions, the other hand was held at rest behind the mirror. A between-task comparison (mirror versus masked mirror) revealed significant activation in the ipsilateral hemisphere in the anterior intraparietal sulcus (aIP) while performing all tasks, regardless of which hand was used. The right aIP was significantly activated while moving the right hand. In contrast, in the left aIP, a small number of voxels showed a tendency toward activation during both left and right hand movement. The enhancement of ipsilateral aIP activity by the mirror image observation of finger action suggests that bimodal aIP neurons can be activated by visual information. We propose that activation in the M1 ipsilateral to the moving hand can be induced by information passing through the ventral premotor area from the aIP.

  5. New Kind of Magneto-Optical Resonance Observed in the Organic Metal α-\\(BEDT-TTF\\)2KHg\\(SCN\\)4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardavan, A.; Schrama, J. M.; Blundell, S. J.; Singleton, J.; Hayes, W.; Kurmoo, M.; Day, P.; Goy, P.

    1998-07-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a mechanism for a new kind of magnetic resonance, the Fermi-surface traversal resonance (FTR). This is caused by the periodic traversal of carriers across quasi-one-dimensional (Q1D) sections of Fermi surface (FS) in an external magnetic field. Owing to the warping of the Q1D Fermi sheets, the real space velocities of the carriers oscillate as they cross the FS, generating resonances in the high frequency conductivity of the material. The results contain information about the FS, including the direction and harmonic content of the warping components. Using a rotating resonant-cavity system, FTRs have been observed in α-\\(BEDT-TTF\\)2KHg\\(SCN\\)4.

  6. A new kind of magnetic resonance observed in the organic molecular metal α-(BEDT-TTF) 2KHg(SCN) 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardavan, A.; Schrama, J. M.; Semeno, A.; Blundell, S. J.; Singleton, J.; Goy, P.; Kurmoo, M.; Day, P.

    1998-12-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a mechanism for a new kind of magnetic resonance, the Fermi-surface traversal resonance (FTR). This is caused by the periodic traversal of carriers across quasi-one-dimensional (Q1D) sections of Fermi surface (FS) in an external magnetic field. Owing to the warping of the Q1D Fermi sheets, the real space velocities of the carriers oscillate as they cross the FS, generating resonances in the high frequency conductivity of the material. The results contain information about the FS, including the direction and harmonic content of the warping components. Using a rotating resonant-cavity system, FTRs have been observed in α-(BEDT-TTF) 2KHg(SCN) 4.

  7. Observation of free electron cyclotron resonance in NaAlSi3O8 feldspar: Direct determination of the effective electron mass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poolton, N.R.J.; Nicholis, J.E.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.;

    2001-01-01

    We report the first observation of cyclotron resonances in alkali feldspars, using highly sensitive optical detection methods. In Na-feldspar (NaAlSi3O8). a near isotropic effective electron mass value of m(c)(*) = 0.79m, has been determined. The significance of this measurement in terms of the o......We report the first observation of cyclotron resonances in alkali feldspars, using highly sensitive optical detection methods. In Na-feldspar (NaAlSi3O8). a near isotropic effective electron mass value of m(c)(*) = 0.79m, has been determined. The significance of this measurement in terms...

  8. Modulation of attosecond beating in resonant two-photon ionization

    CERN Document Server

    Galán, Álvaro J; Martín, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of the photoelectron attosecond beating at the basis of RABBIT (Reconstruction of Attosecond Beating By Interference of Two-photon transitions) in the presence of autoionizing states. We show that, as a harmonic traverses a resonance, its sidebands exhibit a peaked phase shift as well as a modulation of the beating frequency itself. Furthermore, the beating between two resonant paths persists even when the pump and the probe pulses do not overlap, thus providing a sensitive non-holographic interferometric means to reconstruct coherent metastable wave packets. We characterize these phenomena quantitatively with a general finite-pulse analytical model that accounts for the effect of both intermediate and final resonances on two-photon processes, at a negligible computational cost. The model predictions are in excellent agreement with those of accurate ab initio calculations for the helium atom in the region of the N=2 doubly excited states.

  9. Exploring the neutron dripline two neutrons at a time: The first observations of the 26O and 16Be ground state resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Kohley, Z; Lunderberg, E; DeYoung, P A; Attanayake, H; Bauman, T; Bazin, D; Brown, B A; Christian, G; Divaratne, D; Grimes, S M; Haagsma, A; Finck, J E; Frank, N; Luther, B; Mosby, S; Nagi, T; Peaslee, G F; Peters, W A; Schiller, A; Smith, J K; Snyder, J; Strongman, M J; Thoennessen, M; Volya, A

    2012-01-01

    The two-neutron unbound ground state resonances of $^{26}$O and $^{16}$Be were populated using one-proton knockout reactions from $^{27}$F and $^{17}$B beams. A coincidence measurement of 3-body system (fragment + n + n) allowed for the decay energy of the unbound nuclei to be reconstructed. A low energy resonance, $<$ 200 keV, was observed for the first time in the $^{24}$O + n + n system and assigned to the ground state of $^{26}$O. The $^{16}$Be ground state resonance was observed at 1.35 MeV. The 3-body correlations of the $^{14}$Be + n + n system were compared to simulations of a phase-space, sequential, and dineutron decay. The strong correlations in the n-n system from the experimental data could only be reproduced by the dineutron decay simulation providing the first evidence for a dineutron-like decay.

  10. Measuring distances within unfolded biopolymers using fluorescence resonance energy transfer: The effect of polymer chain dynamics on the observed fluorescence resonance energy transfer efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, Dmitrii E.; Plaxco, Kevin W.

    2009-01-01

    Recent years have seen a number of investigations in which distances within unfolded proteins, polypeptides, and other biopolymers are probed via fluorescence resonance energy transfer, a method that relies on the strong distance dependence of energy transfer between a pair of dyes attached to the molecule of interest. In order to interpret the results of such experiments it is commonly assumed that intramolecular diffusion is negligible during the excited state lifetime. Here we explore the conditions under which this “frozen chain” approximation fails, leading to significantly underestimated donor-acceptor distances, and describe a means of correcting for polymer dynamics in order to estimate these distances more accurately. PMID:19725638

  11. Observation of activation status of motor-related cortex of patients with acute ischemic stroke through functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ziqian Chen; Hui Xiao; Ping Ni; Gennian Qian; Shangwen Xu; Xizhang Yang; Youqiang Ye; Jinhua Chen; Biyun Zhang

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: About more than three fourth of patients with stroke have motor dysfunction at different degrees, especially hand motor dysfunction. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) provides very reliable visible evidence for studying central mechanism of motor dysfunction after stroke, and has guiding and applicable value for clinical therapy.OBJECTIVE: To observe the activation of motor-related cortex of patients with acute ischemic stroke with functional magnetic resonance imaging, and analyze the relationship between brain function reconstruction and motor restoration after stroke.DESIGN: A contrast observation.SETTING: Medical Imaging Center, Fuzhou General Hospital of Nanjing Military Area Command of Chinese PLA.PARTICIPANTS: Nine patients with acute ischemic stroke who suffered from motor dysfunction and received the treatment in the Fuzhou General Hospital of Nanjing Military Area Command of Chinese PLA between August and December 2005 were recruited, serving as experimental group. The involved patients including 5 male and 4 female, aged 16 to 87 years, all met the diagnostic criteria of cerebrovascular disease revised by The Fourth National Conference on Cerebrovascular Disease, mainly presenting paralysis in clinic, and underwent fMRI. Another 9 right handed persons matched in age and gender who simultaneously received healthy body examination were recruited, serving as control group. All the subjects were informed of the detected items.METHODS: ①Muscular strength of patients of the experimental group was evaluated according to Brunnstrom grading muscular strength (Grade Ⅰ -Ⅵ). ② Passive finger to finger motion was used as the mission (alternate style of quiescence, left hand motion and quiescence, right hand motion was repeated 3 times, serving as 1 sequence, 20 s per block and 20 s time interval. The whole process of scanning was 260 s), and subjects of 2 groups were given Bold-fMRI examination with GE1.5T double gradient 16-channel

  12. Observation of Rydberg Series in Sodium Vapour by Two-Photon Resonant Nondegenerate Four-Wave Mixing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王延帮; 姜谦; 李隆; 米辛; 俞祖和; 傅盘铭

    2001-01-01

    We apply two-photon resonant nondegenerate four-wave mixing with a resonant intermediate state for the obser- vation of Rydberg states in sodium vapour. The broadening and shift of the sodium 3S- 11D transition perturbed by argon are investigated. This technique can achieve Doppler-free resolution of narrow spectral structures of Rydberg levels if lasers with narrow bandwidths are employed.

  13. The intra-observer reproducibility of cardiovascular magnetic resonance myocardial feature tracking strain assessment is independent of field strength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuster, Andreas, E-mail: andreas_schuster@gmx.net [Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, King' s College London British Heart Foundation BHF Centre of Excellence, National Institute of Health Research NIHR Biomedical Research Centre at Guy' s and St. Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, Wellcome Trust and Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council EPSRC Medical Engineering Centre, The Rayne Institute, St. Thomas' Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Department of Cardiology and Pulmonology and Heart Research Centre, Georg-August-University, Göttingen (Germany); Morton, Geraint, E-mail: geraint.morton@kcl.ac.uk [Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, King' s College London British Heart Foundation BHF Centre of Excellence, National Institute of Health Research NIHR Biomedical Research Centre at Guy' s and St. Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, Wellcome Trust and Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council EPSRC Medical Engineering Centre, The Rayne Institute, St. Thomas' Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Hussain, Shazia T., E-mail: shazia.1.hussain@kcl.ac.uk [Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, King' s College London British Heart Foundation BHF Centre of Excellence, National Institute of Health Research NIHR Biomedical Research Centre at Guy' s and St. Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, Wellcome Trust and Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council EPSRC Medical Engineering Centre, The Rayne Institute, St. Thomas' Hospital, London (United Kingdom); and others

    2013-02-15

    Background: Cardiovascular magnetic resonance myocardial feature tracking (CMR-FT) is a promising novel method for quantification of myocardial wall mechanics from standard steady-state free precession (SSFP) images. We sought to determine whether magnetic field strength affects the intra-observer reproducibility of CMR-FT strain analysis. Methods: We studied 2 groups, each consisting of 10 healthy subjects, at 1.5 T or 3 T Analysis was performed at baseline and after 4 weeks using dedicated CMR-FT prototype software (Tomtec, Germany) to analyze standard SSFP cine images. Right ventricular (RV) and left ventricular (LV) longitudinal strain (Ell{sub RV} and Ell{sub LV}) and LV long-axis radial strain (Err{sub LAX}) were derived from the 4-chamber cine, and LV short-axis circumferential and radial strains (Ecc{sub SAX}, Err{sub SAX}) from the short-axis orientation. Strain parameters were assessed together with LV ejection fraction (EF) and volumes. Intra-observer reproducibility was determined by comparing the first and the second analysis in both groups. Results: In all volunteers resting strain parameters were successfully derived from the SSFP images. There was no difference in strain parameters, volumes and EF between field strengths (p > 0.05). In general Ecc{sub SAX} was the most reproducible strain parameter as determined by the coefficient of variation (CV) at 1.5 T (CV 13.3% and 46% global and segmental respectively) and 3 T (CV 17.2% and 31.1% global and segmental respectively). The least reproducible parameter was Ell{sub RV} (CV 1.5 T 28.7% and 53.2%; 3 T 43.5% and 63.3% global and segmental respectively). Conclusions: CMR-FT results are similar with reasonable intra-observer reproducibility in different groups of volunteers at 1.5 T and 3 T. CMR-FT is a promising novel technique and our data indicate that results might be transferable between field strengths. However there is a considerable amount of segmental variability indicating that further

  14. Separated resonances in simultaneous capture and excitation of S/sup 15+/ in H/sub 2/ observed by K-x-ray--K-x-ray coincidences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, M.; Justiniano, E.; Schuch, R.; Mokler, P.H.; Reusch, S.

    1987-04-27

    We have measured cross sections for the correlated emission of two K x rays following the collision of hydrogenlike sulfur ions with H/sub 2/ in the energy range between 70 and 160 MeV. The observation of the two correlated x rays is interpreted as a resonant capture of a target electron accompanied by simultaneous excitation of the projectile in the collision (RTE). By our distinguishing between K..cap alpha.. and K..beta.. lines, contributions from KLL and KLn (ngreater than or equal toM) resonances could be determined independently.

  15. Atomic and molecular complex resonances from real eigenvalues using standard (hermitian) electronic structure calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Landau, Arie; Kaprálová-Žďánská, Petra Ruth; Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2015-01-01

    Complex eigenvalues, resonances, play an important role in large variety of fields in physics and chemistry. For example, in cold molecular collision experiments and electron scattering experiments, autoionizing and pre-dissociative metastable resonances are generated. However, the computation of complex resonance eigenvalues is difficult, since it requires severe modifications of standard electronic structure codes and methods. Here we show how resonance eigenvalues, positions and widths, can be calculated using the standard, widely used, electronic-structure packages. Our method enables the calculations of the complex resonance eigenvalues by using analytical continuation procedures (such as Pad\\'{e}). The key point in our approach is the existence of narrow analytical passages from the real axis to the complex energy plane. In fact, the existence of these analytical passages relies on using finite basis sets. These passages become narrower as the basis set becomes more complete, whereas in the exact limit,...

  16. Direct numerical simulation of pore-scale flow in a bead pack: Comparison with magnetic resonance imaging observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaofan; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Perkins, William A.; Vogt, Sarah J.; Codd, Sarah L.; Seymour, Joseph D.; McKinley, Matthew I.

    2013-04-01

    A significant body of current research is aimed at developing methods for numerical simulation of flow and transport in porous media that explicitly resolve complex pore and solid geometries, and at utilizing such models to study the relationships between fundamental pore-scale processes and macroscopic manifestations at larger (i.e., Darcy) scales. A number of different numerical methods for pore-scale simulation have been developed, and have been extensively tested and validated for simplified geometries. However, validation of pore-scale simulations of fluid velocity for complex, three-dimensional (3D) pore geometries that are representative of natural porous media is challenging due to our limited ability to measure pore-scale velocity in such systems. Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offer the opportunity to measure not only the pore geometry, but also local fluid velocities under steady-state flow conditions in 3D and with high spatial resolution. In this paper, we present a 3D velocity field measured at sub-pore resolution (tens of micrometers) over a centimeter-scale 3D domain using MRI methods. We have utilized the measured pore geometry to perform 3D simulations of Navier-Stokes flow over the same domain using direct numerical simulation techniques. We present a comparison of the numerical simulation results with the measured velocity field. It is shown that the numerical results match the observed velocity patterns well overall except for a variance and small systematic scaling which can be attributed to the known experimental uncertainty in the MRI measurements. The comparisons presented here provide strong validation of the pore-scale simulation methods and new insights for interpretation of uncertainty in MRI measurements of pore-scale velocity. This study also provides a potential benchmark for future comparison of other pore-scale simulation methods. 2012 Elsevier Science.

  17. Effects of autoionization in electron loss from helium-like highly charged ions in collisions with photons and fast atomic particles

    CERN Document Server

    Lyashchenko, K N; Voitkiv, A B

    2016-01-01

    We study theoretically single electron loss from helium-like highly charged ions involving excitation and decay of autoionizing states of the ion. Electron loss is caused by either photo absorption or the interaction with a fast atomic particle (a bare nucleus, a neutral atom, an electron). The interactions with the photon field and the fast particles are taken into account in the first order of perturbation theory. Two initial states of the ion are considered: $1s^2$ and $(1s2s)_{J=0}$. We analyze in detail how the shape of the emission pattern depends on the atomic number $Z_{I}$ of the ion discussing, in particular, the inter-relation between electron loss via photo absorption and due to the impact of atomic particles in collisions at modest relativistic and extreme relativistic energies. According to our results, in electron loss from the $1s^2$ state autoionization may substantially influence the shape of the emission spectra only up to $Z_{I} \\approx 35-40$. A much more prominent role is played by autoi...

  18. Observation of a resonance-like structure in the pi^+- psi' mass distribution in exclusive B-->K pi^+- psi' decays

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, K; Aihara, H; Arinstein, K; Aso, T; Aulchenko, V; Aushev, T; Aziz, T; Bahinipati, S; Bakich, A M; Balagura, V; Ban, Y; Banerjee, S; Barberio, E; Bay, A; Bedny, I; Belous, K S; Bhardwaj, V; Bitenc, U; Blyth, S; Bondar, A; Bozek, A; Bracko, M; Brodzicka, J; Browder, T E; Chang, M C; Chang, P; Chao, Y; Chen, A; Chen, K F; Chen, W T; Cheon, B G; Chiang, C C; Chistov, R; Cho, I S; Choi, S K; Choi, Y; Choi, Y K; Cole, S; Dalseno, J; Danilov, M; Das, A; Dash, M; Dragic, J; Drutskoy, A; Eidelman, S; Epifanov, D; Fratina, S; Fujii, H; Fujikawa, M; Gabyshev, N; Garmash, A; Go, A; Gokhroo, G; Goldenzweig, P; Golob, B; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Guler, H; Ha, H; Haba, J; Hara, K; Hara, T; Hasegawa, Y; Hastings, N C; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; Hazumi, M; Heffernan, D; Higuchi, T; Hinz, L; Hoedlmoser, H; Hokuue, T; Horii, Y; Hoshi, Y; Hoshina, K; Hou, S; Hou, W S; Hsiung, Y B; Hyun, H J; Igarashi, Y; Iijima, T; Ikado, K; Inami, K; Ishikawa, A; Ishino, H; Itoh, R; Iwabuchi, M; Iwasaki, M; Iwasaki, Y; Jacoby, C; Joshi, N J; Kaga, M; Kah, D H; Kaji, H; Kajiwara, S; Kakuno, H; Kang, J H; Kapusta, P; Kataoka, S U; Katayama, N; Kawai, H; Kawasaki, T; Kibayashi, A; Kichimi, H; Kim, H J; Kim, H O; Kim, J H; Kim, S K; Kim, Y J; Kinoshita, K; Korpar, S; Kozakai, Y; Krizan, P; Krokovny, P; Kumar, R; Kurihara, E; Kusaka, A; Kuzmin, A; Kwon, Y J; Lange, J S; Leder, G; Lee, J; Lee, J S; Lee, M J; Lee, S E; Lesiak, T; Li, J; Limosani, A; Lin, S W; Liu, Y; Liventsev, D; MacNaughton, J; Majumder, G; Mandl, F; Marlow, D; Matsumura, T; Matyja, A; McOnie, S; Medvedeva, T; Mikami, Y; Mitaroff, W A; Miyabayashi, K; Miyake, H; Miyata, H; Miyazaki, Y; Mizuk, R; Moloney, G R; Mori, T; Müller, J; Murakami, A; Nagamine, T; Nagasaka, Y; Nakahama, Y; Nakamura, I; Nakano, E; Nakao, M; Nakayama, H; Nakazawa, H; Natkaniec, Z; Neichi, K; Nishida, S; Nishimura, K; Nishio, Y; Nishizawa, I; Nitoh, O; Noguchi, S; Nozaki, T; Ogawa, A; Ogawa, S; Ohshima, T; Okuno, S; Olsen, S L; Ono, S; Ostrowicz, W; Ozaki, H; Pakhlov, P; Pakhlova, G; Palka, H; Park, C W; Park, H; Park, K S; Parslow, N; Peak, L S; Pernicka, M; Pestotnik, R; Peters, M; Piilonen, L E; Poluektov, A; Rorie, J; Rózanska, M; Sahoo, H; Sakai, Y; Sakamoto, H; Sakaue, H; Sarangi, T R; Satoyama, N; Sayeed, K; Schietinger, T; Schneider, O; Schonmeier, P; Schümann, J; Schwanda, C; Schwartz, A J; Seidl, R; Sekiya, A; Senyo, K; Sevior, M E; Shang, L; Shapkin, M; Shen, C P; Shibuya, H; Shinomiya, S; Shiu, J G; Shwartz, B; Singh, J B; Sokolov, A; Solovieva, E; Somov, A; Stanic, S; Staric, M; Stypula, J; Sugiyama, A; Sumisawa, K; Sumiyoshi, T; Suzuki, S; Suzuki, S Y; Tajima, O; Takasaki, F; Tamai, K; Tamura, N; Tanaka, M; Taniguchi, N; Taylor, G N; Teramoto, Y; Tikhomirov, I; Trabelsi, K; Tse, Y F; Tsuboyama, T; Uchida, K; Uchida, Y; Uehara, S; Ueno, K; Uglov, T; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Urquijo, P; Ushiroda, Y; Usov, Yu; Varner, G; Varvell, K E; Vervink, K; Villa, S; Vinokurova, A; Wang, C C; Wang, C H; Wang, J; Wang, M Z; Wang, P; Wang, X L; Watanabe, M; Watanabe, Y; Wedd, R; Wicht, J; Widhalm, L; Wiechczynski, J; Won, E; Yabsley, B D; Yamaguchi, A; Yamamoto, H; Yamaoka, M; Yamashita, Y; Yamauchi, M; Yuan, C Z; Yusa, Y; Zhang, C C; Zhang, L M; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V; Zhulanov, V; Zupanc, A; Zwahlen, N

    2007-01-01

    A distinct peak is observed in the pi^+/- psi' invariant mass distribution near 4.43 GeV in B->K pi^+/- psi' decays. A fit using a Breit Wigner resonance shape yields a peak mass and width of 4433+-4(stat)+-1(syst) MeV and Gamma = 44^+17_-13(stat) ^+30_-11 MeV. The product branching fraction is determined to be Bf(B-->KZ(4430))xBf(Z(4430)-->pi^+psi') = (4.1+-1.0(stat)+-1.3(syst))x10^{-5), where Z(4430) is used to designate the observed structure. The statistical significance of the observed peak is greater than 7sigma. These results are obtained from a 605 fb-1 data sample that contains 657 million BBbar pairs collected near the Upsilon(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric energy e+e- collider.

  19. Modelling observed decay-less oscillations as resonantly enhanced Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices from transverse MHD waves and their seismological application

    CERN Document Server

    Antolin, Patrick; Van Doorsselaere, Tom; Yokoyama, Takaaki

    2016-01-01

    In the highly structured solar corona, resonant absorption is an unavoidable mechanism of energy transfer from global transverse MHD waves to local azimuthal Alfv\\'en waves. Due to its localised nature, a direct detection of this mechanism is extremely difficult. Yet, it is the leading theory explaining the observed fast damping of the global transverse waves. However, at odds with this theoretical prediction, recent observations indicate that in the low amplitude regime such transverse MHD waves can also appear decay-less, a yet unsolved phenomenon. Recent numerical work has shown that Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities (KHI) often accompany transverse MHD waves. In this work, we combine 3D MHD simulations and forward modelling to show that for currently achieved spatial resolution and observed small amplitudes, an apparent decay-less oscillation is obtained. This effect results from the combination of periodic brightenings produced by the KHI and the coherent motion of the KHI vortices amplified by resonant abs...

  20. Observations on some acoustic methods used in studying the elastic properties of metals. [resonant frequency measurements on metal beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velceanu, C. I.

    1974-01-01

    An experimental setup is reported that permits very accurate measurements of the resonance frequencies of long cylindrical beams fixed in the middle and whose size can vary within wide limits. It also permits measurement of the width of the resonance curve. It is shown that the Poisson effect can be brought to light for relatively long beams and for relatively short beams. Poisson ratio, values obtained with this method argue in favor of using the low frequency region for determining elastic constants of solids.

  1. Phytate Hydrolysis in Rat Gastrointestinal Tracts, as Observed by 31P Fourier Transform Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Wise, Alan; Richards, Colin P.; Trimble, Mary L.

    1983-01-01

    Phytate hydrolysis was followed through rat gastrointestinal tracts by 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. No phytate hydrolysis products were detected in the diet, stomach, or small intestine. It was concluded that cecal bacteria were responsible for phytate hydrolysis, which continued in the colon and fecal pellet.

  2. Observation of resonance fluorescence and the Mollow triplet from a coherently driven site-controlled quantum dot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Unsleber, Sebastian; Maier, Sebastian; McCutcheon, Dara;

    2015-01-01

    Resonant excitation of solid state quantum emitters has the potential to deterministically excite a localized exciton while ensuring a maximally coherent emission. In this work, we demonstrate the coherent coupling of an exciton localized in a lithographically positioned, site-controlled semicond...

  3. The dielectronic satellites to the 2s-3p Ne-like krypton resonance lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khakhalin, S.Ya. (MISDC, NPO ' ' VNIIFTRI' ' , Mendeleevo (Russian Federation)); Dyakin, V.M. (MISDC, NPO ' ' VNIIFTRI' ' , Mendeleevo (Russian Federation)); Faenov, A.Ya. (MISDC, NPO ' ' VNIIFTRI' ' , Mendeleevo (Russian Federation)); Fiedorowicz, H. (Inst. of Optoelectronics, Warsaw (Poland)); Bartnik, A. (Inst. of Optoelectronics, Warsaw (Poland)); Parys, P. (Inst. of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland)); Nilsen, J. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States)); Osterheld, A. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States))

    1994-08-01

    We present an analysis of dielectronic satellite spectra of 2p[sup 6]-2s2p[sup 6]3p Ne-like krypton resonance lines. The satellite structure was registered with high (better than [lambda]/[Delta][lambda] > 3500) spectral resolution in the emission of a laser irradiated gas puff target. We perform an unambiguous identification of satellite lines caused by radiative transitions from autoionizing states of sodium-like krypton ions. A total of about 20 spectral features are identified, most of them for the first time. Very good agreement between the satellite structure calculations and experimental emission spectra is obtained. (orig.).

  4. Resonance effects in near-threshold electron-impact excitation of the 143.4 nm line in the Pb+formula specific-use="simple-math">+formula-> ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomonai, Anna N.; Hutych, Yuriy I.; Gomonai, Aleksandr I.

    2017-02-01

    Electron-impact excitation of the resonance transition 6 s 26 d 2 D 3/2 → 6 s 26 p 2 P o 1/2 (143.4 nm) in the Pb+ ion within the (6-100) eV energy range is studied spectroscopically using a crossed-beam technique. The observed distinct structure in the energy dependence of the effective excitation cross section (including the energy region above the ion ionization potential) is primarily due to the decay of atomic and ionic autoionizing states, produced mainly by excitation of an electron from the subvalence 5 d 10 shell, to the resonance levels (directly or via the cascade transitions). The absolute cross section value for the line under investigation was determined by normalizing the experimental curve at the electron beam energy of 100 eV to the theoretical data obtained by the Van-Regemorter formula and found to be (0.5 ± 0.3) × 10-16 cm2.

  5. Coupling of ultrathin tapered fibers with high-Q microsphere resonators at cryogenic temperatures and observation of phase-shift transition from undercoupling to overcoupling

    CERN Document Server

    Fujiwara, Masazumi; Tanaka, Akira; Toubaru, Kiyota; Zhao, Hong-Quan; Takeuchi, Shigeki; 10.1364/OE.20.019545

    2012-01-01

    We cooled ultrathin tapered fibers to cryogenic temperatures and controllably coupled them with high-Q microsphere resonators at a wavelength close to the optical transition of diamond nitrogen vacancy centers. The 310-nm-diameter tapered fibers were stably nanopositioned close to the microspheres with a positioning stability of approximately 10 nm over a temperature range of 7-28 K. A cavity-induced phase shift was observed in this temperature range, demonstrating a discrete transition from undercoupling to overcoupling.

  6. Initial Design Calculations for a Detection System that will Observe Resonant Excitation of the 680 keV state in 238U

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruet, J; Hagmann, C

    2007-01-26

    We present calculations and design considerations for a detection system that could be used to observe nuclear resonance fluorescence in {sup 238}U. This is intended as part of an experiment in which a nearly monochromatic beam of light incident on a thin foil of natural uranium resonantly populates the state at 680 keV in {sup 238}U. The beam of light is generated via Compton upscattering of laser light incident on a beam of relativistic electrons. This light source has excellent energy and angular resolution. In the current design study we suppose photons emitted following de-excitation of excited nuclei to be observed by a segmented array of BGO crystals. Monte Carlo calculations are used to inform estimates for the design and performance of this detector system. We find that each detector in this array should be shielded by about 2 cm of lead. The signal to background ratio for each of the BGO crystals is larger than ten. The probability that a single detector observes a resonant photon during a single pulse of the light source is near unity.

  7. Observation of a $J^{PC} = 1^{-+}$ exotic resonance in diffractive dissociation of 190 GeV/c $\\pi^{-}$ into $\\pi^- \\pi^- \\pi^+$

    CERN Document Server

    Alekseev, M; Alexandrov, Yu; Alexeev, G D; Amoroso, A; Austregisilio, A; Badelek, B; Balestra, F; Ball, J; Barth, J; Baum, G; Bedfer, Y; Bernhard, J; Bertini, R; Bettinelli, M; Birsa, R; Bisplinghoff, J; Bordalo, P; Bradamante, F; Bravar, A; Bressan, A; Brona, G; Burtin, E; Bussa, M P; Chapiro, A; Chiosso, M; Chung, S U; Cicuttin, A; Colantoni, M; Crespo, M L; Dalla Torre, S; Dafni, T; Das, S; Dasgupta, S S; Denisov, O Yu; Dhara, L; Diaz, V; Dinkelbach, A M; Donskov, S V; Doshita, N; Duic, V; Dunnweber, W; Efremov, A; Eversheim, P D; Eyrich, W; Faessler, M; Ferrero, A; Finger, M; Finger, M., jr; Fischer, H; Franco, C; Friedrich, J M; Garfagnini, R; Gautheron, F; Gavrichtchouk, O P; Gazda, R; Gerassimov, S; Geyer, R; Giorgi, M; Gobbo, B; Goertz, S; Grabmuller, S; Grajek, O A; Grasso, A; Grube, B; Gushterski, R; Guskov, A; Haas, F; von Harrach, D; Hasegawa, T; Heckmann, J; Heinsius, F H; Hermann, R; Herrmann, F; Hess, C; Hinterberger, F; Horikawa, N; Hoppner, Ch; d'Hose, N; Ilgner, C; Ishimoto, S; Ivanov, O; Ivanshin, Yu; Iwata, T; Jahn, R; Jasinski, P; Jegou, G; Joosten, R; Kabuss, E; Kang, D; Ketzer, B; Khaustov, G V; Khokhlov, Yu.A; Kisselev, Yu; Klein, F; Klimaszewski, K; Koblitz, S; Koivuniemi, J H; Kolosov, V N; Komissarov, E V; Kondo, K; Konigsmann, Kay; Konopka, R; Konorov, I; Konstantinov, V F; Korzenev, A; Kotzinian, A M; Kouznetsov, O; Kowalik, K; Kramer, M; Kral, A; Kroumchtein, Z V; Kuhn, R; Kunne, F; Kurek, K; Lauser, L; Le Goff, J M; Lednev, A A; Lehmann, A; Levorato, S; Lichtenstadt, J; Liska, T; Maggiora, A; Maggiora, M; Magnon, A; Mallot, G K; Mann, A; Marchand, C; Marroncle, J; Martin, A; Marzec, J; Massmann, F; Matsuda, T; Meyer, W; Michigami, T; Mikhailov, Yu.V; Moinester, M A; Mutter, A; Nagaytsev, A; Nagel, T; Nassalski, J; Negrini, S; Nerling, F; Neubert, S; Neyret, D; Nikolaenko, V I; Olshevsky, A G; Ostrick, M; Padee, A; Panknin, R; Panzieri, D; Parsamyan, B; Paul, S; Pawlukiewicz-Kaminska, B; Perevalova, E; Pesaro, G; Peshekhonov, D V; Piragino, G; Platchkov, S; Pochodzalla, J; Polak, J; Polyakov, V A; Pontecorvo, G; Pretz, J; Quintans, C; Rajotte, J.-F; Ramos, S; Rapatsky, V; Reicherz, G; Reggiani, D; Richter, A; Robinet, F; Rocco, E; Rondio, E; Ryabchikov, D I; Samoylenko, V D; Sandacz, A; Santos, H; Sapozhnikov, M G; Sarkar, S; Savin, Igor A; Sbrizza, G; Schiavon, P; Schill, C; Schmitt, L; Schopferer, S; Schroder, W; Shevchenko, O Yu; Siebert, H.-W; Silva, L; Sinha, L; Sissakian, A N; Slunecka, M; Smirnov, G I; Sosio, S; Sozzi, F; Srnka, A; Stolarski, M; Sulc, M; Sulej, R; Takekawa, S; Tessaro, S; Tessarotto, F; Teufel, A; Tkatchev, L G; Uman, I; Venugopal, G; Virius, M; Vlassov, N V; Vossen, A; Weitzel, Q; Windmolders, R; Wislicki, W; Wollny, H; Zaremba, K; Zavertyaev, M; Zemlyanichkina, E; Ziembicki, M; Zhao, J; Zhuravlev, N; Zvyagin, A

    2010-01-01

    The COMPASS experiment at the CERN SPS has studied the diffractive dissociation of negative pions into the pi- pi- pi+ final state using a 190 GeV/c pion beam hitting a lead target. A partial wave analysis has been performed on a sample of 420000 events taken at values of the squared 4-momentum transfer t' between 0.1 and 1 GeV^2/c^2. The well-known resonances a1(1260), a2(1320), and pi2(1670) are clearly observed. In addition, the data show a significant natural parity exchange production of a resonance with spin-exotic quantum numbers J^PC = 1-+ at 1.66 GeV/c^2 decaying to rho pi. The resonant nature of this wave is evident from the mass-dependent phase differences to the J^PC = 2-+ and 1++ waves. From a mass-dependent fit a resonance mass of 1660 +- 10+0-64 MeV/c^2 and a width of 269+-21+42-64 MeV/c^2 is deduced.

  8. Multiquark resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, A.; Pilloni, A.; Polosa, A. D.

    2017-01-01

    Multiquark resonances are undoubtedly experimentally observed. The number of states and the amount of details on their properties have been growing over the years. It is very recent the discovery of two pentaquarks and the confirmation of four tetraquarks, two of which had not been observed before. We mainly review the theoretical understanding of this sector of particle physics phenomenology and present some considerations attempting a coherent description of the so called X and Z resonances. The prominent problems plaguing theoretical models, like the absence of selection rules limiting the number of states predicted, motivate new directions in model building. Data are reviewed going through all of the observed resonances with particular attention to their common features and the purpose of providing a starting point to further research.

  9. Multiquark Resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Esposito, A.; Polosa, A.D.

    2016-01-01

    Multiquark resonances are undoubtedly experimentally observed. The number of states and the amount of details on their properties has been growing over the years. It is very recent the discovery of two pentaquarks and the confirmation of four tetraquarks, two of which had not been observed before. We mainly review the theoretical understanding of this sector of particle physics phenomenology and present some considerations attempting a coherent description of the so called X and Z resonances. The prominent problems plaguing theoretical models, like the absence of selection rules limiting the number of states predicted, motivate new directions in model building. Data are reviewed going through all of the observed resonances with particular attention to their common features and the purpose of providing a starting point to further research.

  10. 'Slow'- and 'fast'-light in a single ring-resonator circuit: theory, experimental observations, and sensing applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uranus, H.P.; Zhuang, L.; Roeloffzen, C.G.H.; Hoekstra, H.J.W.M.

    2007-01-01

    Transfer matrix method (TMM) was used to study the phenomena of ‘slow’- and ‘fast’-light in a single two-port ring-resonator (TPRR) circuit theoretically. Their classifications into ‘slow’- and ‘fast’-light with negative and positive group velocity (v_g), where ‘slow’ means |v_g|

  11. Metabolic abnormalities in skeletal muscle of patients receiving zidovudine therapy observed by 31P in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    OpenAIRE

    Sinnwell, T M; Sivakumar, K.; Soueidan, S; Jay, C; Frank, J.A.; McLaughlin, A C; Dalakas, M C

    1995-01-01

    Patients on long-term zidovudine (AZT) therapy experience muscle fatigue and weakness attributed to AZT-induced mitochondrial toxicity in skeletal muscle. To determine if the clinico-pathological abnormalities in these patients correspond to abnormal muscle energy metabolism, we used 31P in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy to follow phosphorylated metabolites during exercise. We studied 19 normal volunteers, 6 HIV-positive patients never treated with AZT, and 9 HIV-positive patients who h...

  12. Near 3:2 and 2:1 mean motion resonance formation in the systems observed by Kepler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Su; Ji, Jianghui, E-mail: wangsu@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: jijh@pmo.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Planetary Sciences, Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2014-11-01

    The Kepler mission has released ∼4229 transiting planet candidates. There are approximately 222 candidate systems with three planets. Among them, the period ratios of planet pairs near 1.5 and 2.0 reveal that two peaks exist for which the proportions of the candidate systems are ∼7.0% and 18.0%, respectively. In this work, we study the formation of mean motion resonance (MMR) systems, particularly for the planetary configurations near 3:2 and 2:1 MMRs, and we concentrate on the interplay between the resonant configuration and the combination of stellar accretion rate, stellar magnetic field, speed of migration, and additional planets. We perform more than 1000 runs by assuming a system with a solar-like star and three surrounding planets. From the statistical results, we find that under the formation scenario, the proportions near 1.5 and 2.0 can reach 14.5% and 26.0%, respectively. In addition, M-dot =0.1×10{sup −8} M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1} is propitious toward the formation of 3:2 resonance, whereas M-dot =2×10{sup −8} M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1} contributes to the formation of 2:1 resonance. The speed-reduction factor of type I migration f {sub 1} ≥ 0.3 facilitates 3:2 MMRs, whereas f {sub 1} ≥ 0.1 facilitates 2:1 MMRs. If additional planets are present in orbits within the innermost or beyond the outermost planet in a three-planet system, 3:2:1 MMRs can be formed, but the original systems trapped in 4:2:1 MMRs are not affected by the supposed planets. In summary, we conclude that this formation scenario will provide a likely explanation for Kepler candidates involved in 2:1 and 3:2 MMRs.

  13. Anomalous ELF phenomena in the Schumann resonance band as observed at Moshiri (Japan in possible association with an earthquake in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hayakawa

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The ELF observation at Moshiri (geographic coordinates: 44.29° N, 142.21° E in Hokkaido, Japan, was used to find anomalous phenomena in the Schumann resonance band, possibly associated with a large earthquake (magnitude of 7.8 in Taiwan on 26 December 2006. The Schumann resonance signal (fundamental (n=1, 8 Hz; 2nd harmonic, 14 Hz, 3rd harmonic, 20 Hz, 4th, 26 Hz etc. is known to be supported by electromagnetic radiation from the global thunderstorms, and the anomaly in this paper is characterized by an increase in intensity at frequencies from the third to fourth Schumann resonance modes mainly in the BEW component with a minor corresponding increase in the BNS component also. Spectral modification takes place only in the interval of 21:00 UT±1 h, which corresponds to the global lightning activity concentrated in America. While distortions were absent in other lightning-active UT intervals, in particular, around 08:00 UT±1 h (Asian thunderstorms and around 15±1 h (African lightning activity. The anomaly occurred on 23 December three days prior to the main shock. The results observed were explained in terms of ELF radio wave perturbation caused by the lower ionospheric depression around the earthquake epicenter. The difference in the path lengths between the direct radio wave from an active global thunderstorm center and the wave scattered from the non-uniformity above Taiwan causes interference at higher resonance modes, which is successful in explaining the observational data.

  14. Time-dependent renormalized natural orbital theory applied to the two-electron spin-singlet case: ground state, linear response, and autoionization

    CERN Document Server

    Brics, M

    2013-01-01

    Favorably scaling numerical time-dependent many-electron techniques such as time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) with adiabatic exchange-correlation potentials typically fail in capturing highly correlated electron dynamics. We propose a method based on natural orbitals, i.e., the eigenfunctions of the one-body reduced density matrix, that is almost as inexpensive numerically as adiabatic TDDFT, but which is capable of describing correlated phenomena such as doubly excited states, autoionization, Fano profiles in the photoelectron spectra, and strong-field ionization in general. Equations of motion (EOM) for natural orbitals and their occupation numbers have been derived earlier. We show that by using renormalized natural orbitals (RNO) both can be combined into one equation governed by a hermitian effective Hamiltonian. We specialize on the two-electron spin-singlet system, known as being a "worst case" testing ground for TDDFT, and employ the widely used, numerically exactly solvable, one-dimens...

  15. High spatial and temporal resolution observations of an impulse-driven field line resonance in radar backscatter artificially generated with the Tromsø heater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. K. Yeoman

    Full Text Available The CUTLASS Finland HF radar has been operated in conjunction with the EISCAT Tromsø RF ionospheric heater facility to examine a ULF wave characteristic of the development of a field line resonance (FLR driven by a cavity mode caused by a magnetospheric impulse. When the heater is on, striating the ionosphere with field-aligned ionospheric electron density irregularities, a large enough radar target is generated to allow post-integration over only 1 second. When combined with 15 km range gates, this gives radar measurements of a naturally occurring ULF wave at a far better temporal and spatial resolution than has been achieved previously. The time-dependent signature of the ULF wave has been examined as it evolves from a large-scale cavity resonance, through a transient where the wave period was latitude-dependent and the oscillation had the characteristics of freely ringing field lines, and finally to a very narrow, small-scale local field line resonance. The resonance width of the FLR is only 60 km and this is compared with previous observations and theory. The FLR wave signature is strongly attenuated in the ground magnetometer data. The characterisation of the impulse driven FLR was only achieved very crudely with the ground magnetometer data and, in fact, an accurate determination of the properties of the cavity and field line resonant systems challenges the currently available limitations of ionospheric radar techniques. The combination of the latest ionospheric radars and facilities such as the Tromsø ionospheric heater can result in a powerful new tool for geophysical research.

  16. Observation of overlapping spin-1 and spin-3 $\\overline{D}^0 K^-$ resonances at mass $2.86 {\\rm GeV}/c^2$

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassen, Rolf; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Belogurov, Sergey; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Bizzeti, Andrea; Bjørnstad, Pål Marius; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borgia, Alessandra; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Brambach, Tobias; van den Brand, Johannes; Bressieux, Joël; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Brown, Henry; Bursche, Albert; Busetto, Giovanni; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Ciba, Krzystof; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Counts, Ian; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pascal; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gaspar, Clara; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gavrilov, Gennadii; Geraci, Angelo; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, Vladimir; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Hampson, Thomas; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Hunt, Philip; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jaton, Pierre; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kaballo, Michael; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Karodia, Sarah; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Korolev, Mikhail; Kozlinskiy, Alexandr; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; La Thi, Viet Nga; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lambert, Robert W; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Leo, Sabato; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Lohn, Stefan; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lopez-March, Neus; Lowdon, Peter; Lu, Haiting; Lucchesi, Donatella; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Machefert, Frederic; Machikhiliyan, Irina V; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Mapelli, Alessandro; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Märki, Raphael; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martens, Aurelien; Martín Sánchez, Alexandra; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; McSkelly, Ben; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Merk, Marcel; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Moggi, Niccolò; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Katharina; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nicol, Michelle; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Oggero, Serena; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Orlandea, Marius; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Arantza; Pal, Bilas Kanti; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parkes, Christopher; Parkinson, Christopher John; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pazos Alvarez, Antonio; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perez Trigo, Eliseo; Perret, Pascal; Perrin-Terrin, Mathieu; Pescatore, Luca; Pesen, Erhan; Petridis, Konstantin; Petrolini, Alessandro; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rakotomiaramanana, Barinjaka; Rama, Matteo; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Roa Romero, Diego; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruffini, Fabrizio; Ruiz, Hugo; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrie, Mauro; Savrina, Darya; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Seco, Marcos; Semennikov, Alexander; Sepp, Indrek; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Anthony; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Sparkes, Ailsa; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Stroili, Roberto; Subbiah, Vijay Kartik; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szilard, Daniela; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ubeda Garcia, Mario; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; Voss, Helge; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wiedner, Dirk; Wilkinson, Guy; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wu, Suzhi; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Wen Chao; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zvyagin, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    The resonant substructure of $B_s^0 \\rightarrow \\overline{D}^0 K^- \\pi^+$ decays is studied using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $3.0\\,{\\rm fb}^{-1}$ of $pp$ collision data recorded by the LHCb detector. An excess at $m(\\overline{D}^0 K^-) \\approx 2.86 {\\rm GeV}/c^2$ is found to be an admixture of spin-1 and spin-3 resonances. Therefore the $D^*_{sJ}(2860)^-$ state previously observed in inclusive $e^+e^- \\rightarrow \\overline{D}^0 K^- X$ and $pp \\rightarrow \\overline{D}^0 K^- X$ processes consists of at least two particles. This is the first observation of a heavy flavoured spin-3 resonance, and the first time that any spin-3 particle has been seen to be produced in $B$ decays. The masses and widths of the new states and of the $D^*_{s2}(2573)^-$ meson are measured, giving the most precise determinations to date.

  17. Observation of overlapping spin-1 and spin-3 D0K- resonances at mass 2.86 GeV/c2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Counts, I; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dalseno, J; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dujany, G; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H-M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farley, N; Farry, S; Fay, Rf; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Fu, J; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; García Pardiñas, J; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gavardi, L; Gavrilov, G; Geraci, A; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianelle, A; Gianì, S; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Karodia, S; Kelsey, M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Kochebina, O; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Langhans, B; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Likhomanenko, T; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lowdon, P; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Malinin, A; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mapelli, A; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A

    2014-10-17

    The resonant substructure of B(s)(0) → D(0)K(-)π(+) decays is studied using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb(-1) of pp collision data recorded by the LHCb detector. An excess at m(D(0)K(-))≈ 2.86 GeV/c(2) is found to be an admixture of spin-1 and spin-3 resonances. Therefore, the D(sJ)*(2860)(-) state previously observed in inclusive e(+)e(-) → D(0)K(-)X and pp → D(0)K(-)X processes consists of at least two particles. This is the first observation of a heavy flavored spin-3 resonance, and the first time that any spin-3 particle has been seen to be produced in B decays. The masses and widths of the new states and of the D(s2)*(2573)(-) meson are measured, giving the most precise determinations to date.

  18. Observer variation factor on advanced method for accurate, robust, and efficient spectral fitting of java based magnetic resonance user interface for MRS data analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Suk Jun [Dept. of Biomedical Laboratory Science, College of Health Science, Cheongju University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Seung Man [Dept. of Radiological Science, College of Health Science, Gimcheon University, Gimcheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    The purpose of this study was examined the measurement error factor on AMARES of jMRUI method for magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) quantitative analysis by skilled and unskilled observer method and identified the reason of independent observers. The Point-resolved spectroscopy sequence was used to acquired magnetic resonance spectroscopy data of 10 weeks male Sprague-Dawley rat liver. The methylene protons ((-CH2-)n) of 1.3 ppm and water proton (H2O) of 4.7 ppm ratio was calculated by LCModel software for using the reference data. The seven unskilled observers were calculated total lipid (methylene/water) using the jMRUI AMARES technique twice every 1 week, and we conducted interclass correlation coefficient (ICC) statistical analysis by SPSS software. The inter-observer reliability (ICC) of Cronbach's alpha value was less than 0.1. The average value of seven observer's total lipid (0.096±0.038) was 50% higher than LCModel reference value. The jMRUI AMARES analysis method is need to minimize the presence of the residual metabolite by identified metabolite MRS profile in order to obtain the same results as the LCModel.

  19. Observation of Two Resonant Structures in e+e- to pi+ pi- psi(2S) via Initial State Radiation at Belle

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, X L; Shen, C P; Wang, P; Adachi, I; Aihara, H; Aushev, T; Bakich, A M; Barberio, E; Bedny, I; Bhardwaj, V; Bitenc, U; Blyth, S; Bondar, A; Bozek, A; Bracko, M; Brodzicka, J; Browder, T E; Chang, P; Chen, A; Chen, K F; Cheon, B G; Chiang, C C; Chistov, R; Cho, I S; Choi, S K; Choi, Y; Dalseno, J; Danilov, M; Dash, M; Drutskoy, A; Eidelman, S; Gabyshev, N; Go, A; Gokhroo, G; Ha, H; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; Hazumi, M; Heffernan, D; Hoshi, Y; Hou, W S; Hyun, H J; Iijima, T; Inami, K; Ishikawa, A; Ishino, H; Itoh, R; Iwasaki, Y; Kah, D H; Kang, J H; Kawai, H; Kawasaki, T; Kichimi, H; Kim, H O; Kim, S K; Kim, Y J; Kinoshita, K; Korpar, S; Krizan, P; Krokovny, P; Kumar, R; Kuo, C C; Kuzmin, A; Lange, J S; Lee, J S; Lee, M J; Lee, S E; Lesiak, T; Limosani, A; Lin, S W; Liu, Y; Liventsev, D; Mandl, F; McOnie, S; Medvedeva, T; Miyabayashi, K; Miyake, H; Miyata, H; Mizuk, R; Mori, T; Nakano, E; Nakao, M; Nakazawa, H; Natkaniec, Z; Nishida, S; Nitoh, O; Noguchi, S; Ogawa, S; Ohshima, T; Okuno, S; Olsen, S L; Ozaki, H; Pakhlov, P; Pakhlova, G; Palka, H; Park, C W; Park, H; Park, K S; Pestotnik, R; Piilonen, L E; Sahoo, H; Sakai, Y; Schneider, O; Sekiya, A; Sevior, M E; Shapkin, M; Shibuya, H; Shiu, J G; Singh, J B; Sokolov, A; Somov, A; Stanic, S; Staric, M; Sumiyoshi, T; Takasaki, F; Tamai, K; Tanaka, M; Taylor, G N; Teramoto, Y; Tikhomirov, I; Uehara, S; Ueno, K; Uglov, T; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Urquijo, P; Varner, G; Villa, S; Vinokurova, A; Wang, C C; Wang, C H; Watanabe, Y; Won, E; Yabsley, B D; Yamaguchi, A; Yamashita, Y; Yamauchi, M; Zhang, C C; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V; Zhulanov, V; Zupanc, A

    2007-01-01

    The cross section for e+e- to pi+ pi- psi(2S) between threshold and \\sqrt{s}=5.5 GeV is measured using 673 fb^{-1} of data on and off the \\Upsilon(4S) resonance collected with the Belle detector at KEKB. Two resonant structures are observed in the pi+ pi- psi(2S) invariant mass distribution, one at 4361\\pm 9\\pm 9 MeV/c^2 with a width of 74\\pm 15\\pm 10 MeV/c^2, and another at 4664\\pm 11\\pm 5 MeV/c^2 with a width of 48\\pm 15\\pm 3 MeV/c^2, if the mass spectrum is parameterized with the coherent sum of two Breit-Wigner functions. These values do not match those of any of the known charmonium states.

  20. Autostereogram resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavey, Sean; Rae, Katherine; Murray, Adam; Courtial, Johannes

    2012-09-01

    Autostereograms, or "Magic Eye" pictures, are repeating patterns designed to give the illusion of depth. Here we discuss optical resonators that create light patterns which, when viewed from a suitable position by a monocular observer, are autostereograms of the three-dimensional shape of one of the mirror surfaces.

  1. Measurement of the np → npπ0π0 reaction in search for the recently observed d*(2380) resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adlarson, P.; Augustyniak, W.; Bardan, W.; Bashkanov, M.; Bergmann, F. S.; Berłowski, M.; Bhatt, H.; Bondar, A.; Büscher, M.; Calén, H.; Ciepał, I.; Clement, H.; Coderre, D.; Czerwiński, E.; Demmich, K.; Doroshkevich, E.; Engels, R.; Erven, A.; Erven, W.; Eyrich, W.; Fedorets, P.; Föhl, K.; Fransson, K.; Goldenbaum, F.; Goslawski, P.; Goswami, A.; Grigoryev, K.; Gullström, C.-O.; Hauenstein, F.; Heijkenskjöld, L.; Hejny, V.; Höistad, B.; Hüsken, N.; Jarczyk, L.; Johansson, T.; Kamys, B.; Kemmerling, G.; Khan, F. A.; Khoukaz, A.; Kirillov, D. A.; Kistryn, S.; Kleines, H.; Kłos, B.; Krzemień, W.; Kulessa, P.; Kupść, A.; Kuzmin, A.; Lalwani, K.; Lersch, D.; Lorentz, B.; Magiera, A.; Maier, R.; Marciniewski, P.; Mariański, B.; Mikirtychiants, M.; Morsch, H.-P.; Moskal, P.; Ohm, H.; Ozerianska, I.; Perez del Rio, E.; Piskunov, N. M.; Podkopał, P.; Prasuhn, D.; Pricking, A.; Pszczel, D.; Pysz, K.; Pyszniak, A.; Ritman, J.; Roy, A.; Rudy, Z.; Sawant, S.; Schadmand, S.; Sefzick, T.; Serdyuk, V.; Shwartz, B.; Siudak, R.; Skorodko, T.; Skurzok, M.; Smyrski, J.; Sopov, V.; Stassen, R.; Stepaniak, J.; Stephan, E.; Sterzenbach, G.; Stockhorst, H.; Ströher, H.; Szczurek, A.; Täschner, A.; Trzciński, A.; Varma, R.; Wagner, G. J.; Wolke, M.; Wrońska, A.; Wüstner, P.; Wurm, P.; Yamamoto, A.; Zabierowski, J.; Zieliński, M. J.; Zink, A.; Złomańczuk, J.; Żuprański, P.; Żurek, M.

    2015-04-01

    Exclusive measurements of the quasi-free np → npπ0π0 reaction have been performed by means of dp collisions at Td = 2.27 GeV using the WASA detector setup at COSY. Total and differential cross sections have been obtained covering the energy region √{ s} = (2.35- 2.46) GeV, which includes the region of the ABC effect and its associated d* (2380) resonance. Adding the d* resonance amplitude to that for the conventional processes leads to a reasonable description of the data. The observed resonance effect in the total cross section is in agreement with the predictions of Fäldt and Wilkin as well with those of Albadajedo and Oset. The ABC effect, i.e. the low-mass enhancement in the π0π0-invariant mass spectrum, is found to be very modest - if present at all, which might pose a problem to some of its interpretations.

  2. Measurement of the $np \\to np\\pi^0\\pi^0$ Reaction in Search for the Recently Observed $d^*(2380)$ Resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Adlarson, P; Bardan, W; Bashkanov, M; Bergmann, F S; Berłowski, M; Bhatt, H; Bondar, A; Büscher, M; Calén, H; Ciepał, I; Clement, H; Coderre, D; Czerwiński, E; Demmich, K; Doroshkevich, E; Engels, R; Erven, A; Erven, W; Eyrich, W; Fedorets, P; Föhl, K; Fransson, K; Goldenbaum, F; Goslawski, P; Goswami, A; Grigoryev, K; Gullström, C --O; Hauenstein, F; Heijkenskjöld, L; Hejny, V; Höistad, B; Hüsken, N; Jarczyk, L; Johansson, T; Kamys, B; Kemmerling, G; Khan, F A; Khoukaz, A; Kirillov, D A; Kistryn, S; Kleines, H; Kłos, B; Krzemień, W; Kulessa, P; Kupść, A; Kuzmin, A; Lalwani, K; Lersch, D; Lorentz, B; Magiera, A; Maier, R; Marciniewski, P; Mariański, B; Mikirtychiants, M; Morsch, H --P; Moskal, P; Ohm, H; Ozerianska, I; del Rio, E Perez; Piskunov, N M; Podkopał, P; Prasuhn, D; Pricking, A; Pszczel, D; Pysz, K; Pyszniak, A; Ritman, J; Roy, A; Rudy, Z; Sawant, S; Schadmand, S; Sefzick, T; Serdyuk, V; Shwartz, B; Siudak, R; Skorodko, T; Skurzok, M; Smyrski, J; Sopov, V; Stassen, R; Stepaniak, J; Stephan, E; Sterzenbach, G; Stockhorst, H; Ströher, H; Szczurek, A; Täschner, A; Trzciński, A; Varma, R; Wagner, G J; Wolke, M; Wrońska, A; Wüstner, P; Wurm, P; Yamamoto, A; Zabierowski, J; Zieliński, M J; Zink, A; Złomańczuk, J; Żuprański, P; Żurek, M

    2014-01-01

    Exclusive measurements of the quasi-free $np \\to np\\pi^0\\pi^0$ reaction have been performed by means of $dp$ collisions at $T_d$ = 2.27 GeV using the WASA detector setup at COSY. Total and differential cross sections have been obtained covering the energy region $\\sqrt s$ = (2.35 - 2.46) GeV, which includes the region of the ABC effect and its associated $d^*(2380)$ resonance. Adding the $d^*$ resonance amplitude to that for the conventional processes leads to a reasonable description of the data. The observed resonance effect in the total cross section is in agreement with the predictions of F\\"aldt and Wilkin as well Albadajedo and Oset. The ABC effect, {\\it i.e.} the low-mass enhancement in the $\\pi^0\\pi^0$-invariant mass spectrum, is found to be very modest - if present at all, which might pose a problem to some of its interpretations.

  3. Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patell, Hilla

    2016-01-01

    In order to achieve the goal of observation, preparation of the adult, the observer, is necessary. This preparation, says Hilla Patell, requires us to "have an appreciation of the significance of the child's spontaneous activities and a more thorough understanding of the child's needs." She discusses the growth of both the desire to…

  4. Doorway-state analysis of the fine structure in the giant quadrupole resonance in 208Pb observed in inelastic electron scatteredrefid="FN1">†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winchenbach, J.; Pingel, K.; Holzwarth, G.; Kühner, G.; Richter, A.

    1983-11-01

    The fine structure observed in high resolution inelastic electron scattering data obtained at DALINAC for 208Pb in the excitation energy range of the giant quadrupole resonance (GQR) has been analysed under the assumption that the measured strongly fragmented E2 strength distribution is due to the coupling of one or two doorway states to a large number of more complicated states. The coupling matrix elements derived from the analysis allow the determination of the escape and spreading widths Γ ↑ and Γ ↓, the excitation energies Ed, the energy shifts ΔEd, and their energy dependence, for the underlying doorways.

  5. Attosecond time delay in the photoionization of Mn in the $3p \\rightarrow 3d$ giant resonance region

    CERN Document Server

    Dolmatov, V K; Deshmukh, P C; Manson, S T

    2014-01-01

    The dramatic effect of the $3p \\rightarrow 3d$ giant autoionization resonance on time delay of photoemission from the $3d$ and $4s$ valence subshells of the Mn atom is unraveled. Strong sensitivity of the time delay of the $4s$ photoemission to the final-state term of the ion-remainder [${\\rm Mn^{+}}(4s^{1},$$^{5}S)$ vs. ${\\rm Mn^{+}}(4s^{1},$$^{7}S)$] is discovered. The features of time delay uncovered in Mn photoionization are expected to be general properties of transition-metal atoms and ions. The "spin-polarized" random phase approximation with exchange was employed in the study.

  6. Observation of a resonance in the K$_s$p decay channel at a mass of 1765 MeV/c$^2$

    CERN Document Server

    Adamovich, M I; Barberis, D; Beck, M; Bérat, C; Beusch, W; Boss, M; Brons, S; Brückner, W; Buénerd, M; Busch, C; Büscher, C; Charignon, F; Chauvin, J; Chudakov, E A; Dersch, U; Dropmann, F; Engelfried, J; Faller, F; Fournier, A; Gerassimov, S G; Godbersen, M; Grafstr"om, P; Haller, T; Heidrich, M; Hubbard, E; Hurst, R B; Königsmann, K C; Konorov, I; Keller, N; Martens, K; Martin, P; Masciocchi, S; Michaels, R; Müller, U; Neeb, H; Newbold, D; Newsom, C; Paul, S; Pochodzalla, J; Potashnikova, I K; Povh, B; Ren, Z; Epherre-Rey-Campagnolle, Marcelle; Rosner, G; Rossi, L; Rudolph, H; Scheel, C; Schmitt, L; Siebert, H W; Simon, A; Smith, V; Thilmann, O; Trombini, A; Vesin, E; Volkemer, B; Vorwalter, K; Walcher, T; W"alder, G; Werding, R; Wittmann, E; Zavertyaev, M V; Alexandrov, Yu.A.; Haller, Th.; Martin, Ph.; Walcher, Th.

    2007-01-01

    We report on the observation of a K$_s$p resonance signal at a mass of 1765$\\pm$5 MeV/c$^2$, with intrinsic width $\\Gamma = 108\\pm 22$ MeV/c$^2$, produced inclusively in $\\Sigma^-$-nucleus interactions at 340 GeV/c in the hyperon beam experiment WA89 at CERN. The signal was observed in the kinematic region $x_F>0.7$, in this region its production cross section rises approximately linearly with $(1-x_F)$, reaching $BR(X\\to K_S p)\\cdot d\\sigma /dx_F = (5.2\\pm 2.3) \\mu b $ per nucleon at $x_F=0.8$. The hard \\xf spectrum suggests the presence of a strong leading particle effect in the production and hence the identification as a $\\Sigma^{*+}$ state. No corresponding peaks were observed in the $K^- p$ and $\\Lambda \\pi^{\\pm}$ mass spectra.

  7. Water entry for the black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia L.) seeds observed by dedicated micro-magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Mika; Kano, Hiromi

    2016-07-01

    Water entry at germination for black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia L.) seeds which are known as hard seeds with impermeable seed coat to water, was examined using micro-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The MRI apparatus equipped with a low-field (1 T; Tesla) permanent magnet was used, which is open access, easy maintenance, operable and transportable. The excellent point of the apparatus is that T 1-enhancement of water signals absorbed in dry seeds against steeping free water is stronger than the apparatuses with high-field superconducting magnets, which enabled clear detection of water entry. Water hardly penetrated into the seeds for more than 8 h but approximately 60 % of seeds germinated by incubating on wet filter papers for several days. Hot water treatments above 75 °C for 3 min effectively induced water gap; scarification was 70 % at 100 °C and 75 °C, declined to 15 % at 50 °C and decreased further at room temperature. Water entered into the scarified seeds exclusively through the lens, spread along the dorsal side of the seeds and reached the hypocotyl, whereas water migrated slowly through hilum side to radicle within 3 h.

  8. Radiofrequency ablation of small liver malignancies under magnetic resonance guidance: progress in targeting and preliminary observations with temperature monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terraz, Sylvain; Cernicanu, Alexandru; Lepetit-Coiffe, Matthieu; Viallon, Magalie; Salomir, Rares; Becker, Christoph D. [University Hospitals of Geneva, Department of Radiology, Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Mentha, Gilles [University Hospitals of Geneva, Department of Visceral Surgery and Transplantation, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2010-04-15

    To evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of magnetic resonance (MR)-guided radiofrequency (RF) ablation for small liver tumours with poor conspicuity on both contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (US) and computed tomography (CT), using fast navigation and temperature monitoring. Sixteen malignant liver nodules (long-axis diameter, 0.6-2.4 cm) were treated with multipolar RF ablation on a 1.5-T wide-bore MR system in ten patients. Targeting was performed interactively, using a fast steady-state free precession sequence. Real-time MR-based temperature mapping was performed, using gradient echo-echo planar imaging (GRE-EPI) and hardware filtering. MR-specific treatment data were recorded. The mean follow-up time was 19 {+-} 7 months. Correct placement of RF electrodes was obtained in all procedures (image update, <500 ms; mean targeting time, 21 {+-} 11 min). MR thermometry was available for 14 of 16 nodules (88%) with an accuracy of 1.6 C in a non-heated region. No correlation was found between the size of the lethal thermal dose and the ablation zone at follow-up imaging. The primary and secondary effectiveness rates were 100% and 91%, respectively. RF ablation of small liver tumours can be planned, targeted, monitored and controlled with MR imaging within acceptable procedure times. Temperature mapping is technically feasible, but the clinical benefit remains to be proven. (orig.)

  9. Observation of J/ψp resonances consistent with pentaquark states in Λb→J/ψpK- decays at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    It has now been over 50 years since the inception of the quark model. The original papers by Gell-Mann and Zweig included the description of the now well known three-quark baryons and quark-antiquark mesons. They also included the possibility of "exotic" hadrons, such as mesons containing two quarks and two antiquarks (tetraquarks), or four quarks and an antiquark (pentaquarks). There is no clear reason why such exotic combinations of quarks should not exist. Indeed, in recent years strong tetraquark candidates have been discovered. However, until recently the observation of any lasting pentaquark candidates had eluded all searches. Using the LHCb Run 1 dataset, two J/ψp resonances consistent with pentaquark states have been observed in Λb→J/ψpK- decays. I will describe a full amplitude analysis which was performed in order to be most sensitive to the underlying physics and best study the resonant nature of these states. These states are overwhelmingly significant, and mark the first convincing observati...

  10. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Observation of α-Synuclein Membrane Interaction by Monitoring the Acetylation Reactivity of Its Lysine Side Chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung Ho; Ying, Jinfa; Bax, Ad

    2016-09-06

    The interaction between α-synuclein (αS) protein and lipid membranes is key to its role in synaptic vesicle homeostasis and plays a role in initiating fibril formation, which is implicated in Parkinson's disease. The natural state of αS inside the cell is generally believed to be intrinsically disordered, but chemical cross-linking experiments provided evidence of a tetrameric arrangement, which was reported to be rich in α-helical secondary structure based on circular dichroism (CD). Cross-linking relies on chemical modification of the protein's Lys C(ε) amino groups, commonly by glutaraldehyde, or by disuccinimidyl glutarate (DSG), with the latter agent preferred for cellular assays. We used ultra-high-resolution homonuclear decoupled nuclear magnetic resonance experiments to probe the reactivity of the 15 αS Lys residues toward N-succinimidyl acetate, effectively half the DSG cross-linker, which results in acetylation of Lys. The intensities of both side chain and backbone amide signals of acetylated Lys residues provide direct information about the reactivity, showing a difference of a factor of 2.5 between the most reactive (K6) and the least reactive (K102) residue. The presence of phospholipid vesicles decreases reactivity of most Lys residues by up to an order of magnitude at high lipid:protein stoichiometries (500:1), but only weakly at low ratios. The decrease in Lys reactivity is found to be impacted by lipid composition, even for vesicles that yield similar αS CD signatures. Our data provide new insight into the αS-bilayer interaction, including the pivotal state in which the available lipid surface is limited. Protection of Lys C(ε) amino groups by αS-bilayer interaction will strongly impact quantitative interpretation of DSG cross-linking experiments.

  11. Observation of a Change in Bend of an RNA Kissing Complex Using the Angular Dependence of Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Rahmanseresht, Sheema; Gamari, Ben D; Goldner, Lori S

    2014-01-01

    We report on the observation of a change in the bend angle of an RNA kissing complex upon Rop binding using single-molecular-pair FRET. The angular relationship between the dyes, rather than the distance between them, is shown to be responsible for the observed change in energy transfer. It has long been thought that Rop increases the bend angle of the R1inv-R2inv complex upon binding, but this has never been directly observed. In contrast, we find an increase in FRET upon the addition of Rop that is shown via modeling to be consistent with a decrease in the bend angle of the complex of $-15^{\\circ}\\pm7^{\\circ}$. The model predicts FRET from dye trajectories generated using molecular dynamics simulations of Cy3 and Cy5 attached to $5'$ terminal cytosine or guanosine on RNA. While FRET is commonly used to observe global changes in molecular structure attributed to changes in the distance between dyes, it is rarely, if ever, used to elucidate angular changes. Subtle global changes in molecular structure upon bi...

  12. Cross-sections, spin observables, and helicity amplitudes of the {pi}{sup +}d{r_reversible}pp reaction at the isobar resonance and below

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dortmans, P.J.; Canton, L.; Amos, K.

    1997-06-01

    We have calculated the {pi}{sup +}d{r_reversible} pp reaction cross sections and spin observables from threshold to the {Delta} resonance by considering three types of mechanisms; the impulse (absorption) mechanism, {Delta} rescattering and s-wave {pi} N rescattering. The effect of final state interactions have been included also. While traditionally the first two mechanisms have been included within a sound theoretical basis, the {pi}N s-wave rescattering generally has been treated phenomenologically using a {pi}{pi}NN coupling constant fitted to the low-energy pion-nucleon data. Herein, we treat the isovector component of such a pion rescattering process as being mediated by the {rho}--exchange. Also, in those absorption mechanisms where the pion enters directly without rescattering, we employ a phenomenological cut-off scaling governed by the nucleon coordinates, since at the pion-nucleon vertex the nucleon itself may be off mass shell. Th energy dependence of the total cross section is well explained by the combined effects of the three mechanisms, but we find that this observable is not sensitive enough to give useful insight into fine details of the reaction. We calculated the spin observables of {pi}{sup +}d{r_reversible} pp at a variety of energies spanning the {Delta} resonance, finding such sensitivity to fine details of the calculation that we cannot obtain a complete agreement with the vast experimental data base. A better understanding of the importance of the various aspects of the reaction was obtained when the calculated helicity amplitudes were compared with those extracted via phase-shift-analyses of the {pi}{sup +}d{r_reversible} pp reaction data. (authors). 29 refs., 1 tab., 9 figs.

  13. Observation of $J/\\psi$ p resonances consistent with pentaquark states in$\\wedge_ b^0$ → $J/\\psi K^−p$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00400750

    The observation of structures consistent with charmonium-pentaquark states decaying to $J/\\psi p$ in $\\wedge_b^0$ → $J/\\psi K^−p$ decays is presented. The data sample analyzed corresponds to an integrated luminosity of $3 fb^−1$ acquired with the LHCb detector from 7 and 8 TeV $pp$ collisions. An amplitude analysis was performed which utilized all six kinematic degrees of freedom in the decay. It was shown that adequate descriptions of the data are unattainable with only $K^−p$ resonances in the amplitude model. For satisfactory fits of the data, it was found to be necessary to include two $J/\\psi p$ resonances, with each having significances of over 9 standard deviations. One has a mass of $4449.8 \\pm1.7\\pm2.2 MeV$ and a width of $39\\pm5\\pm16 MeV$, while the second is broader, with a mass of $4380 \\pm8\\pm29 MeV$ and a width of $205\\pm18\\pm87 MeV$. The $J^P$ assignments could not be uniquely determined, though there is a preference for one to have spin 3/2 and the other spin 5/2 with an opposite parit...

  14. Observation of $J/\\psi p$ resonances consistent with pentaquark states in ${\\Lambda_b^0\\to J/\\psi K^-p}$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassi, Guido; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Bel, Lennaert; Bellee, Violaine; Belloli, Nicoletta; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Billoir, Pierre; Bird, Thomas; Birnkraut, Alex; Bizzeti, Andrea; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Braun, Svende; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dall'Occo, Elena; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Demmer, Moritz; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Ruscio, Francesco; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dufour, Laurent; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferrari, Fabio; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fohl, Klaus; Fol, Philip; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Geraci, Angelo; Gerick, David; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Girard, Olivier Göran; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, V.V.; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadavizadeh, Thomas; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Humair, Thibaud; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Karodia, Sarah; Kecke, Matthieu; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Kenzie, Matthew; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Kozeiha, Mohamad; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Krzemien, Wojciech; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kuonen, Axel Kevin; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Liu, Xuesong; Loh, David; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lucio Martinez, Miriam; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Lusardi, Nicola; Lusiani, Alberto; Machefert, Frederic; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Maguire, Kevin; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manning, Peter Michael; Mapelli, Alessandro; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martin, Morgan; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathad, Abhijit; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mauri, Andrea; Maurin, Brice; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Melnychuk, Dmytro; Merk, Marcel; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Mitzel, Dominik Stefan; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monroy, Ignacio Alberto; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Janine; Müller, Katharina; Müller, Vanessa; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nandi, Anita; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Ninci, Daniele; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Osorio Rodrigues, Bruno; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Otto, Adam; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Aranzazu; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Pappenheimer, Cheryl; Parkes, Christopher; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Pescatore, Luca; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrolini, Alessandro; Petruzzo, Marco; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Piucci, Alessio; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Poikela, Tuomas; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Quagliani, Renato; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rama, Matteo; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Lopez, Jairo Alexis; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Ronayne, John William; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santimaria, Marco; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmelzer, Timon; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schubiger, Maxime; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Siddi, Benedetto Gianluca; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skillicorn, Ian; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Iwan Thomas; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Stefkova, Slavorima; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Tayduganov, Andrey; Tekampe, Tobias; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Todd, Jacob; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Trabelsi, Karim; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Weiden, Andreas; Whitehead, Mark; Wilkinson, Guy; Wilkinson, Michael; Williams, Mark Richard James; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Williams, Timothy; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yu, Jiesheng; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Observations of exotic structures in the $J/\\psi p$ channel, that we refer to as pentaquark-charmonium states, in $\\Lambda_b^0\\to J/\\psi K^- p$ decays are presented. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 3/fb acquired with the LHCb detector from 7 and 8 TeV pp collisions. An amplitude analysis is performed on the three-body final-state that reproduces the two-body mass and angular distributions. To obtain a satisfactory fit of the structures seen in the $J/\\psi p$ mass spectrum, it is necessary to include two Breit-Wigner amplitudes that each describe a resonant state. The significance of each of these resonances is more than 9 standard deviations. One has a mass of $4380\\pm 8\\pm 29$ MeV and a width of $205\\pm 18\\pm 86$ MeV, while the second is narrower, with a mass of $4449.8\\pm 1.7\\pm 2.5$ MeV and a width of $39\\pm 5\\pm 19$ MeV. The preferred $J^P$ assignments are of opposite parity, with one state having spin 3/2 and the other 5/2.

  15. Observation of J/ψp Resonances Consistent with Pentaquark States in Λ_{b}^{0}→J/ψK^{-}p Decays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassi, G; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; d'Argent, P; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Bel, L J; Bellee, V; Belloli, N; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bertolin, A; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Billoir, P; Bird, T; Birnkraut, A; Bizzeti, A; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Braun, S; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Brook, N H; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Capriotti, L; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carniti, P; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cavallero, G; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Cogoni, V; Cojocariu, L; Collazuol, G; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Crocombe, A; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dall'Occo, E; Dalseno, J; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Simone, P; Dean, C-T; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Demmer, M; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dey, B; Di Canto, A; Di Ruscio, F; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dufour, L; Dujany, G; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farley, N; Farry, S; Fay, R; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferrari, F; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fohl, K; Fol, P; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Fu, J; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; García Pardiñas, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gavardi, L; Gazzoni, G; Geraci, A; Gerick, D; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianelle, A; Gianì, S; Gibson, V; Girard, O G; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graverini, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadavizadeh, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Humair, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Karodia, S; Kecke, M; Kelsey, M; Kenyon, I R; Kenzie, M; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Kochebina, O; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Kozeiha, M; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Krzemien, W; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kuonen, A K; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Langhans, B; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Likhomanenko, T; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Liu, X; Loh, D; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lucchesi, D; Lucio Martinez, M; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Lusardi, N; Lusiani, A; Machefert, F; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Maguire, K; Malde, S; Malinin, A; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Manning, P; Mapelli, A

    2015-08-14

    Observations of exotic structures in the J/ψp channel, which we refer to as charmonium-pentaquark states, in Λ_{b}^{0}→J/ψK^{-}p decays are presented. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb^{-1} acquired with the LHCb detector from 7 and 8 TeV pp collisions. An amplitude analysis of the three-body final state reproduces the two-body mass and angular distributions. To obtain a satisfactory fit of the structures seen in the J/ψp mass spectrum, it is necessary to include two Breit-Wigner amplitudes that each describe a resonant state. The significance of each of these resonances is more than 9 standard deviations. One has a mass of 4380±8±29 MeV and a width of 205±18±86 MeV, while the second is narrower, with a mass of 4449.8±1.7±2.5 MeV and a width of 39±5±19 MeV. The preferred J^{P} assignments are of opposite parity, with one state having spin 3/2 and the other 5/2.

  16. LHCb- Observation of $J/\\psi p$ resonances consitent with pentaquark staes in $\\Lambda^0_b \\to J/\\psi K^-p$ decays

    CERN Multimedia

    Adeva Andany, Bernardo

    2015-01-01

    The observation of exotic structures in the $J/\\psi p$ channel, refered to as pentaquark-charmonium states, in the decay $\\Lambda^0_b \\rightarrow J/\\psi K^- p$, are presented. An amplitude analysis is performed on the three-body final state that reproduces the two-body mass and angular distributions. To obtain a satisfactory fit of the structures seen in the $J/\\psi p$ mass spectrum, it is necessary to include two Breit-Wigner amplitudes that each describe a resonant state. The significance of each of these resonances is more than 9 standard deviations. One has a mass of 4380 $\\pm$ 8 $\\pm$ 29 MeV and a width of 205 $\\pm$ 18 $\\pm$ 86 MeV, while the second is narrower, with a mass of 4449.8 $\\pm$ 1.7 $\\pm$ 2.5 MeV and a width of 39 $\\pm$ 5 $\\pm$ 19. The preferred $J^P$ assignments are of opposite parity, with one state having spin 3/2 and the other 5/2.

  17. Effects of radiation damping on photorecombination of C4 + ions for the KLL resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuan-Ying; Wu, Yong; Qu, Yi-Zhi; Wang, Jian-Guo

    2016-10-01

    A numerical method based on Zabaydullin and Dubau's work [O. Zabaydullin and J. Dubau, J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 45, 115002 (2012), 10.1088/0953-4075/45/11/115002] has been developed to calculate the Cauchy principal value integral in scattering matrices and obtain photorecombination (PR) cross sections of low-lying resonances according to Davies and Seaton's theory [J. Phys. B 2, 757 (1969), 10.1088/0022-3700/2/7/304], in which radiation damping is included. The Dirac R -matrix method is employed to secure the dipole matrix. Using this method, PR cross sections of C4 + for the KLL resonance are acquired, and compared with available experimental measurements and other close-coupling theoretical results. It is shown that our damped cross sections reproduce the experimental data and are in agreement with other theoretical results. Meanwhile, radiation damping can reduce the PR cross section for the 1 s 2 p22P resonance (corresponding to two levels [(1s2p1 /2) 12 p3 /2] 1 /2 and [1s (2p3/22)2] 3 /2 by three orders of magnitude. The unresolved and underestimated resonances 1 s 2 p24P , 1 s 2 s 2 p 4P , and 1 s 2 p22P in the undamped Breit-Pauli R -matrix calculations [H. L. Zhang et al., J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 32, 1459 (1999), 10.1088/0953-4075/32/6/010] are corrected. Besides, dielectronic recombination cross sections of C4 + for the KLL resonance are also presented for comparison using the relativistic configuration-interaction (RCI) method implemented in flexible atomic code (fac), which show radiation damping has pronounced influences on 1 s 2 p22P due to much larger radiative rates compared with autoionization rates. Furthermore, radiative and autoionization rates for the intermediate states [(1s2p1 /2) 12 p3 /2] 1 /2 and [1s (2p3/22)2] 3 /2 of the He-like ions with 6 ≤Z ≤83 are calculated using fac, scaling laws of which are checked. Autoionization rates comply with the Zeff0 scaling law for Z ≥32 , which is caused by relativistic effects.

  18. First observation of angle-dependent Stark cyclotron resonance in bulk crystals: High-electric-field interlayer magnetotransport in a layered organic conductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumagai, A.; Konoike, T.; Uchida, K. [Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan); Osada, T., E-mail: osada@issp.u-tokyo.ac.j [Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan)

    2010-06-01

    We report a novel angle-dependent magnetotransport phenomenon in layered conductors under strong interlayer electric fields. Interlayer conduction shows the Stark cyclotron resonance (SCR) when electron orbital motion becomes periodic in k-space. The SCR amplitude oscillates depending on magnetic field orientations. The conventional angle-dependent magnetoresistance oscillation (AMRO) switches to the angle-dependent SCR in high electric fields. We predict angle-dependent SCR due to electron orbital motion in layered conductors with coherent interlayer coupling. In addition, we demonstrate the expected switching from conventional AMRO to angle-dependent SCR in high electric fields using an organic conductor {alpha}-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}NH{sub 4}Hg(SCN){sub 4}. This is the first observation of the SCR with orbital origin in bulk crystals.

  19. Observation of a hole-size-dependent energy shift of the surface-plasmon resonance in Ni antidot thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, H.; Akinoglu, E. M.; Fumagalli, P., E-mail: paul.fumagalli@fu-berlin.de [Institut für Experimentalphysik, Freie Universität Berlin, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Caballero, B.; García-Martín, A. [IMM-Instituto de Microelectrónica de Madrid (CNM-CSIC), Isaac Newton 8, PTM, Tres Cantos, E-28760 Madrid (Spain); Papaioannou, E. Th. [Fachbereich Physik and Landesforschungszentrum OPTIMAS, Technische Universität Kaiserslautern, 67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Cuevas, J. C. [Departamento de Física Teórica de la Materia Condensada and Condensed Matter Physics Center (IFIMAC), Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Giersig, M. [Institut für Experimentalphysik, Freie Universität Berlin, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin, Institute of Nanoarchitectures for Energy Conversion, 14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-04-13

    A combined experimental and theoretical study of the magneto-optic properties of a series of nickel antidot thin films is presented. The hole diameter varies from 869 down to 636 nm, while the lattice periodicity is fixed at 920 nm. This results in an overall increase of the polar Kerr rotation with decreasing hole diameter due to the increasing surface coverage with nickel. In addition, at photon energies of 2.7 and 3.3 eV, where surface-plasmon excitations are expected, we observe distinct features in the polar Kerr rotation not present in continuous nickel films. The spectral position of the peaks exhibits a red shift with decreasing hole size. This is explained within the context of an effective medium theory by a change in the effective dielectric function of the Ni thin films.

  20. Doubly excited 2s2p 1,3p1 resonances in photoionization of helium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wan Jian-Jie; Dong Chen-Zhong

    2009-01-01

    The multi-configuration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) method is implemented to study doubly excited 2s2p 1,3P1 resonances of the helium atom and the interference between photoionization and photoexcitation autoionization processes.In order to reproduce the total photoionization sprectra,the excited energies from the ground ls2 1 S0 state to the doubly excited 2s2p 1'3P1 states and the relevant Auger decay rates and widths are calculated in detail. Furthermore,the interference profile determined by the so-called Fano parameters q and p2 is also reproduced. Good agreement is found between the present results and other available theoretical and experimental results. This indeed shows a promising way to investigate the Fano resonances in photoionization of atoms within the MCDF scheme,although there are some discrepancies in the present calculations of the 2s2p 3P1 state.

  1. In-Source Laser Resonance Ionization at ISOL Facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Marsh, Bruce; Feddosseev, Valentin

    Resonance ionization laser ion source development has been carried out at two radioactive ion beam facilities: ISOLDE (CERN, Switzerland) and the IGISOL facility (Jyvaskyla, Finland). The scope of the Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source has been extended to 27 elements with the development of new three-step ionization schemes for Sb, Sc, Dy, Y and Au. The efficiencies were determined to be in the range of 2 - 20 %. Additionally, a new two-step ionization scheme has been developed for bismuth in an off-line atomic beam unit. The scheme relies on ionization via a strong and broad auto-ionizing resonance at an energy of 63196.79 cm$^{−1}$. This scheme may offer an improvement over the existing RILIS efficiency and will be more convenient for use during resonance ionization spectroscopy of Bi isotopes. The RILIS can be used as a spectroscopic tool to probe features such as the hyperfine structures and the isotope-shifts of radioisotopes with low production rates. By coupling a laser scanning process that dire...

  2. First observation and measurement of the resonant structure of the lambda_b->lambda_c pi-pi+pi- decay mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azzurri, P.; Barria, P.; Ciocci, M.A.; Donati, S.; Vataga, E.

    2009-12-01

    The authors present the first observation of the {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decay using data from an integrated luminosity of approximately 2.4 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. They also present the first observation of the resonant decays {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Sigma}{sub c}(2455){sup 0} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Sigma}{sub c}(2455){sup ++}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}(2595){sup +}{pi}{sup -} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}(2625){sup +}{pi}{sup -} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, and measure their relative branching ratios.

  3. Observer agreement in the reporting of knee and lumbar spine magnetic resonance (MR) imaging examinations: Selectively trained MR radiographers and consultant radiologists compared with an index radiologist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brealey, S., E-mail: stephen.brealey@york.ac.uk [Department of Health Sciences, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Piper, K., E-mail: keith.piper@canterbury.ac.uk [Department of Allied Health Professions, Canterbury Christ Church University, Canterbury, Kent CT1 1QU (United Kingdom); King, D., E-mail: david.g.king@york.nhs.uk [York Hospital, Wigginton Road, York YO31 8HE (United Kingdom); Bland, M., E-mail: martin.bland@york.ac.uk [Department of Health Sciences, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Caddick, J., E-mail: Julie.Caddick@york.nhs.uk [York Hospital, Wigginton Road, York YO31 8HE (United Kingdom); Campbell, P., E-mail: peter.campbell@york.nhs.uk [York Hospital, Wigginton Road, York YO31 8HE (United Kingdom); Gibbon, A., E-mail: anthony.j.gibbon@york.nhs.uk [York Hospital, Wigginton Road, York YO31 8HE (United Kingdom); Highland, A., E-mail: Adrian.Highland@sth.nhs.uk [Sheffield Teaching Hospitals, Herries Road, Sheffield S5 7AU (United Kingdom); Jenkins, N., E-mail: neil.jenkins@york.nhs.uk [York Hospital, Wigginton Road, York YO31 8HE (United Kingdom); Petty, D., E-mail: daniel.petty@york.nhs.uk [York Hospital, Wigginton Road, York YO31 8HE (United Kingdom); Warren, D., E-mail: david.warren@york.nhs.uk [York Hospital, Wigginton Road, York YO31 8HE (United Kingdom)

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: To assess agreement between trained radiographers and consultant radiologists compared with an index radiologist when reporting on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations of the knee and lumbar spine and to examine the subsequent effect of discordant reports on patient management and outcome. Methods: At York Hospital two MR radiographers, two consultant radiologists and an index radiologist reported on a prospective, random sample of 326 MRI examinations. The radiographers reported in clinical practice conditions and the radiologists during clinical practice. An independent consultant radiologist compared these reports with the index radiologist report for agreement. Orthopaedic surgeons then assessed whether the discordance between reports was clinically important. Results: Overall observer agreement with the index radiologist was comparable between observers and ranged from 54% to 58%; for the knee it was 46–57% and for the lumbar spine was 56–66%. There was a very small observed difference of 0.6% (95% CI −11.9 to 13.0) in mean agreement between the radiographers and radiologists (P = 0.860). For the knee, lumbar spine and overall, radiographers’ discordant reports, when compared with the index radiologist, were less likely to have a clinically important effect on patient outcome than the radiologists’ discordant reports. Less than 10% of observer's reports were sufficiently discordant with the index radiologist's reports to be clinically important. Conclusion: Carefully selected MR radiographers with postgraduate education and training reported in clinical practice conditions on specific MRI examinations of the knee and lumbar spine to a level of agreement comparable with non-musculoskeletal consultant radiologists.

  4. Observation of double resonant laser induced transitions in the $v = n - l - 1 = 2$ metastable cascade of antiprotonic helium-4 atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Hayano, R S; Tamura, H; Torii, H A; Hori, Masaki; Maas, F E; Morita, N; Kumakura, M; Sugai, I; Hartmann, F J; Daniel, H; Von Egidy, T; Ketzer, B; Pohl, R; Horváth, D; Eades, John; Widmann, E; Yamazaki, T

    1997-01-01

    A new laser-induced resonant transition in the $v=n-l-1=2$ metastable cascade of antiprotonic $^4$He atoms has been found by using a double resonance technique. This was done by setting the first laser to the already known 470.724 nm resonance ($(n,l)=(37,34)\\rightarrow (36,33)$), while the $(38,35)\\rightarrow (37,34)$ transition was searched for with the second laser. The resonant transition was found at wavelength of 529.622$\\pm$0.003 nm, showing excellent agreement with a recent prediction of Korobov.

  5. BeppoSAX Observations of the X-Ray Pulsar MAXI J1409-619 in Low State: Discovery of Cyclotron Resonance Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlandini, Mauro; Frontera, Filippo; Masetti, Nicola; Sguera, Vito; Sidoli, Lara

    2012-04-01

    The transient 500 s X-ray pulsar MAXI J1409-619 was discovered by the slit cameras aboard Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image (MAXI) on 2010 October 17, and soon after accurately localized by Swift. We found that the source position was serendipitously observed in 2000 during BeppoSAX observations of the Galactic plane. Two sources are clearly detected in the Medium-Energy Concentrator Spectrometer (MECS): one is consistent with the position of IGR J14043-6148 and the other one with that of MAXI J1409-619. We report on the analysis of this archival BeppoSAX/MECS observation integrated with newly analyzed observation from ASCA and a set of high-energy observations obtained from the offset fields of the BeppoSAX/PDS instrument. For the ON-source observation, the 1.8-100 keV spectrum is fit by an absorbed power law with a photon index Γ = 0.87+0.29 -0.19, corresponding to 2-10 and 15-100 keV unabsorbed fluxes of 2.7 × 10-12 and 4 × 10-11 erg cm-2 s-1, respectively, and a 2-10 keV luminosity of 7 × 1034 erg s-1 for a 15 kpc distance. For a PDS offset field observation, performed about one year later and showing a 15-100 keV flux of 7 × 10-11 erg cm-2 s-1, we clearly pinpoint three spectral absorption features at 44, 73, and 128 keV, resolved both in the spectral fit and in the Crab ratio. We interpret these not harmonically spaced features as due to cyclotron resonances. The fundamental energy of 44 ± 3 keV corresponds to a magnetic field strength at the neutron star surface of 3.8 × 1012(1 + z) G, where z is the gravitational redshift. We discuss the nature of the source in the light of its possible counterpart.

  6. BeppoSAX OBSERVATIONS OF THE X-RAY PULSAR MAXI J1409-619 IN LOW STATE: DISCOVERY OF CYCLOTRON RESONANCE FEATURES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlandini, Mauro; Frontera, Filippo; Masetti, Nicola; Sguera, Vito [INAF/Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica (IASF) Bologna, via Gobetti 101, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Sidoli, Lara [INAF/Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica (IASF) Milano, via Bassini 15, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2012-04-01

    The transient 500 s X-ray pulsar MAXI J1409-619 was discovered by the slit cameras aboard Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image (MAXI) on 2010 October 17, and soon after accurately localized by Swift. We found that the source position was serendipitously observed in 2000 during BeppoSAX observations of the Galactic plane. Two sources are clearly detected in the Medium-Energy Concentrator Spectrometer (MECS): one is consistent with the position of IGR J14043-6148 and the other one with that of MAXI J1409-619. We report on the analysis of this archival BeppoSAX/MECS observation integrated with newly analyzed observation from ASCA and a set of high-energy observations obtained from the offset fields of the BeppoSAX/PDS instrument. For the ON-source observation, the 1.8-100 keV spectrum is fit by an absorbed power law with a photon index {Gamma} = 0.87{sup +0.29}{sub -0.19}, corresponding to 2-10 and 15-100 keV unabsorbed fluxes of 2.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -12} and 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, respectively, and a 2-10 keV luminosity of 7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 34} erg s{sup -1} for a 15 kpc distance. For a PDS offset field observation, performed about one year later and showing a 15-100 keV flux of 7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, we clearly pinpoint three spectral absorption features at 44, 73, and 128 keV, resolved both in the spectral fit and in the Crab ratio. We interpret these not harmonically spaced features as due to cyclotron resonances. The fundamental energy of 44 {+-} 3 keV corresponds to a magnetic field strength at the neutron star surface of 3.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12}(1 + z) G, where z is the gravitational redshift. We discuss the nature of the source in the light of its possible counterpart.

  7. Observation of vanadyl porphyrins and sulfur-containing vanadyl porphyrins in a petroleum asphaltene by atmospheric pressure photonionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Kuangnan; Mennito, Anthony S; Edwards, Kathleen E; Ferrughelli, Dave T

    2008-07-01

    Vanadyl (VO) porphyrins and sulfur-containing vanadyl (VOS) porphyrins of a wide carbon number range (C(26) to C(52)) and Z-number range (-28 to -54) were detected and identified in a petroleum asphaltene by atmospheric pressure photonionization (APPI) and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS). APPI provides soft ionization of asphaltene molecules (including VO and VOS porphyrins), generating primarily molecular ions (M(+.)). The ultra-high mass resolving power (m/Delta m(FWHM) approximately 500 K) of FTICR-MS enabled resolution and positive identification of elemental formulae for the entire family of VO and VOS porphyrins in a complicated asphaltene matrix. Deocophylerythro-etioporphyrin (DPEP) is found to be the most prevalent structure, followed by etioporphyrins (etio)- and rhodo (benzo)-DPEP. The characteristic Z-distribution of VO porphyrins suggests benzene and naphthene increment in the growth of porphyrin ring structures. Bimodal carbon number distributions of VO porphyrins suggest possible different origins of low and high molecular weight species. To our knowledge, the observation of VOS porphyrins in a petroleum product has not previously been reported. The work is also the first direct identification of the entire vanadyl porphyrin family by ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry without chromatographic separation or demetallation.

  8. Observation of second-order hyper-Raman generation in LiNbO3 whispering-gallery mode disk resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Simons, Matt T

    2011-01-01

    In this manuscript we report experimental demonstration of nonlinear frequency conversion at several optical frequencies in a whispering-gallery mode resonator (WGMR). Due to the enhancement of nonlinear interactions inside a WGMR, interaction of a 1064 nm pump field with a LiNbO3 disk produced a weak, but measurable non-phase matched 532 nm second harmonic field at room temperature (>100C below the phase-matching temperature), for pump powers of a few tens of mW. For higher pump powers, we observed the generation of four additional fields at 545 nm, 559 nm, 573 nm, and 587 nm. The relative spectral shift between two consecutive fields corresponds to a 455 cm^-1 vibrational mode in LiNbO3 crystal. Our preliminary analysis indicates that these fields are the result of a multi-phonon hyper-Raman scattering, in which two photons of the pump field are converted into one photon of a higher-frequency field and one or several optical phonons.

  9. Observation of second-order hyper-Raman generation in LiNbO3 whispering-gallery mode disk resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Matt T; Novikova, Irina

    2011-08-15

    In this Letter we report experimental demonstration of nonlinear frequency conversion at several optical frequencies in a whispering-gallery mode resonator (WGMR). Because of the enhancement of nonlinear interactions inside a WGMR, interaction of a 1064 nm pump field with a LiNbO(3) disk produced a weak but measurable non-phase-matched 532 nm second-harmonic field at room temperature (>100 °C below the phase-matching temperature) for pump powers of a few tens of milliwatts. For higher pump powers, we observed the generation of four additional fields at 545, 559, 573, and 587 nm. The relative spectral shift between two consecutive fields corresponds to a 455 cm(-1) vibrational mode in LiNbO(3) crystal. Our preliminary analysis indicates that these fields are the result of a multiphonon hyper-Raman scattering in which two photons of the pump field are converted into one photon of a higher-frequency field and one or several optical phonons.

  10. Subpicosecond oxygen trapping in the heme pocket of the oxygen sensor FixL observed by time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruglik, Sergei G; Jasaitis, Audrius; Hola, Klara; Yamashita, Taku; Liebl, Ursula; Martin, Jean-Louis; Vos, Marten H

    2007-05-01

    Dissociation of oxygen from the heme domain of the bacterial oxygen sensor protein FixL constitutes the first step in hypoxia-induced signaling. In the present study, the photodissociation of the heme-O2 bond was used to synchronize this event, and time-resolved resonance Raman (TR(3)) spectroscopy with subpicosecond time resolution was implemented to characterize the heme configuration of the primary photoproduct. TR(3) measurements on heme-oxycomplexes are highly challenging and have not yet been reported. Whereas in all other known six-coordinated heme protein complexes with diatomic ligands, including the oxymyoglobin reported here, heme iron out-of-plane motion (doming) occurs faster than 1 ps after iron-ligand bond breaking; surprisingly, no sizeable doming is observed in the oxycomplex of the Bradyrhizobium japonicum FixL sensor domain (FixLH). This assessment is deduced from the absence of the iron-histidine band around 217 cm(-1) as early as 0.5 ps. We suggest that efficient ultrafast oxygen rebinding to the heme occurs on the femtosecond time scale, thus hindering heme doming. Comparing WT oxy-FixLH, mutant proteins FixLH-R220H and FixLH-R220Q, the respective carbonmonoxy-complexes, and oxymyoglobin, we show that a hydrogen bond of the terminal oxygen atom with the residue in position 220 is responsible for the observed behavior; in WT FixL this residue is arginine, crucially implicated in signal transmission. We propose that the rigid O2 configuration imposed by this residue, in combination with the hydrophobic and constrained properties of the distal cavity, keep dissociated oxygen in place. These results uncover the origin of the "oxygen cage" properties of this oxygen sensor protein.

  11. The resonant body transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Dana; Bhave, Sunil A

    2010-04-14

    This paper introduces the resonant body transistor (RBT), a silicon-based dielectrically transduced nanoelectromechanical (NEM) resonator embedding a sense transistor directly into the resonator body. Combining the benefits of FET sensing with the frequency scaling capabilities and high quality factors (Q) of internal dielectrically transduced bar resonators, the resonant body transistor achieves >10 GHz frequencies and can be integrated into a standard CMOS process for on-chip clock generation, high-Q microwave circuits, fundamental quantum-state preparation and observation, and high-sensitivity measurements. An 11.7 GHz bulk-mode RBT is demonstrated with a quality factor Q of 1830, marking the highest frequency acoustic resonance measured to date on a silicon wafer.

  12. Magnetic resonance arthrography including ABER view in diagnosing partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff: Accuracy, and inter- and intra-observer agreements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Joon-Yong; Jee, Won-Hee; Chun, Ho Jong; Ahn, Myeong Im (Dept. of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, School of Medicine, Catholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea)), e-mail: whjee@catholic.ac.kr; Kim, Yang-Soo (Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, School of Medicine, Catholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea))

    2010-03-15

    Background: Partial-thickness tear of the rotator cuff is a common cause of shoulder pain. Magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography has been described as a useful measure to diagnose rotator cuff abnormalities. Purpose: To determine the reliability and accuracy of MR arthrography with abduction and external rotation (ABER) view for the diagnosis of partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff. Material and Methods: Among patients who underwent MR arthrographies, 22 patients (12 men, 10 women; mean age 45 years) who had either partial-thickness tear or normal tendon on arthroscopy were included. MR images were independently scored by two observers for partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff. Interobserver and intraobserver agreements for detection of partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff were calculated by using kappa coefficients. The differences in areas under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were assessed with a univariate Z-score test. Differences in sensitivity and specificity for interpretations based on different imaging series were tested for significance using the McNemar statistic. Results: Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of each reader on MR imaging without ABER view were 83%, 90%, and 86%, and 83%, 80%, and 82%, respectively, whereas on overall interpretation including ABER view, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of each reader were 92%, 70%, and 82%, and 92%, 80%, and 86%, respectively. Including ABER view, interobserver agreement for partial-thickness tear increased from kappa=0.55 to kappa=0.68. Likewise, intraobserver agreements increased from kappa=0.79 and 0.53 to kappa=0.81 and 0.70 for each reader, respectively. The areas under the ROC curves for each reader were 0.96 and 0.90, which were not significantly different. Conclusion: Including ABER view in routine sequences of MR arthrography increases the sensitivity, and inter- and intraobserver agreements for detecting partial-thickness tear of rotator cuff

  13. Magnetic resonance observation of cartilage repair tissue (MOCART) for the evaluation of autologous chondrocyte transplantation: Determination of interobserver variability and correlation to clinical outcome after 2 years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marlovits, Stefan [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: stefan.marlovits@meduniwien.ac.at; Singer, Philipp [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Zeller, Philip [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Mandl, Irena [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Haller, Joerg [Department of Radiology, Hanusch Hospital, Heinrich-Collin-Strasse, A-1140 Vienna (Austria); Trattnig, Siegfried [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2006-01-15

    In an observational study, the validity and reliability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the assessment of autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) in the knee joint was determined. Two years after implantation, high-resolution MRI was used to analyze the repair tissue with nine pertinent variables. A complete filling of the defect was found in 61.5%, and a complete integration of the border zone to the adjacent cartilage in 76.9%. An intact subchondral lamina was present in 84.6% and an intact subchondral bone was present in 61.5%. Isointense signal intensities of the repair tissue compared to the adjacent native cartilage were seen in 92.3%. To evaluate interobserver variability, a reliability analysis with the determination of the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was calculated. An 'almost perfect' agreement, with an ICC value >0.81, was calculated in 8 of 9 variables. The clinical outcome after 2 years showed the visual analog score (VAS) at 2.62 (S.D. {+-}0.65). The values for the knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS) subgroups were 68.29 ({+-}23.90) for pain, 62.09 ({+-}14.62) for symptoms, 75.45 ({+-}21.91) for ADL function, 52.69 ({+-}28.77) for sport and 70.19 ({+-}22.41) for knee-related quality of life. The clinical scores were correlated with the MRI variables. A statistically significant correlation was found for the variables 'filling of the defect,' 'structure of the repair tissue,' 'changes in the subchondral bone,' and 'signal intensities of the repair issue'. High resolution MRI and well-defined MRI variables are a reliable, reproducible and accurate tool for assessing cartilage repair tissue.

  14. In vivo intracellular oxygen dynamics in murine brain glioma and immunotherapeutic response of cytotoxic T cells observed by fluorine-19 magnetic resonance imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Zhong

    Full Text Available Noninvasive biomarkers of anti-tumoral efficacy are of great importance to the development of therapeutic agents. Tumor oxygenation has been shown to be an important indicator of therapeutic response. We report the use of intracellular labeling of tumor cells with perfluorocarbon (PFC molecules, combined with quantitative ¹⁹F spin-lattice relaxation rate (R₁ measurements, to assay tumor cell oxygen dynamics in situ. In a murine central nervous system (CNS GL261 glioma model, we visualized the impact of Pmel-1 cytotoxic T cell immunotherapy, delivered intravenously, on intracellular tumor oxygen levels. GL261 glioma cells were labeled ex vivo with PFC and inoculated into the mouse striatum. The R₁ of ¹⁹F labeled cells was measured using localized single-voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and the absolute intracellular partial pressure of oxygen (pO₂ was ascertained. Three days after tumor implantation, mice were treated with 2×10⁷ cytotoxic T cells intravenously. At day five, a transient spike in pO₂ was observed indicating an influx of T cells into the CNS and putative tumor cell apoptosis. Immunohistochemistry and quantitative flow cytometry analysis confirmed that the pO₂ was causally related to the T cells infiltration. Surprisingly, the pO₂ spike was detected even though few (∼4×10⁴ T cells actually ingress into the CNS and with minimal tumor shrinkage. These results indicate the high sensitivity of this approach and its utility as a non-invasive surrogate biomarker of anti-cancer immunotherapeutic response in preclinical models.

  15. Absolute vacuum ultraviolet photoabsorption cross section studies of atomic and molecular species: Techniques and observational data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, D. L.; Wu, C. Y. R.

    1990-01-01

    Absorption of a high energy photon (greater than 6 eV) by an isolated molecule results in the formation of highly excited quasi-discrete or continuum states which evolve through a wide range of direct and indirect photochemical processes. These are: photoionization and autoionization, photodissociation and predissociation, and fluorescence. The ultimate goal is to understand the dynamics of the excitation and decay processes and to quantitatively measure the absolute partial cross sections for all processes which occur in photoabsorption. Typical experimental techniques and the status of observational results of particular interest to solar system observations are presented.

  16. Detection of occult endoleaks after endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm using magnetic resonance imaging with a blood pool contrast agent: preliminary observations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, Sandra; Prokop, M.; Verhagen, H.J.; Adriaensen, M.E.; Moll, F.L.; Bartels, L.W.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether blood pool contrast agent-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can visualize endoleaks that are occult on computed tomography (CT) in patients with nonshrinking aneurysms after endovascular aneurysm repair. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Written informed consent was obta

  17. Long-range protein electron transfer observed at the single-molecule level: In situ mapping of redox-gated tunneling resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Qijin; Farver, O; Ulstrup, Jens

    2005-01-01

    on the redox potential. Maximum resonance appears around the equilibrium redox potential of azurin with an on/off current ratio of approximate to 9. Simulation analyses, based on a two-step interfacial ET model for the scanning tunneling microscopy redox process, were performed and provide quantitative...

  18. Photothermal resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method for detecting photo-thermal absorbance of a material utilising a mechanically temperature sensitive resonator (20) and a sample being arrange in thermal communication with the temperature sensitive resonator. The present invention further relates to an ap......The present invention relates to a method for detecting photo-thermal absorbance of a material utilising a mechanically temperature sensitive resonator (20) and a sample being arrange in thermal communication with the temperature sensitive resonator. The present invention further relates...... to an apparatus for detecting photo-thermal absorbance of a sample....

  19. Evolutionary outcomes for pairs of planets undergoing orbital migration and circularization: second order resonances and observed period ratios in Kepler's planetary systems

    CERN Document Server

    Xiang-Gruess, M

    2015-01-01

    In order to study the origin of the architectures of low mass planetary systems, we perform numerical surveys of the evolution of pairs of coplanar planets in the mass range $(1-4)\\ \\rmn{M}_{\\oplus}.$ These evolve for up to $2\\times10^7 \\rmn{yr}$ under a range of orbital migration torques and circularization rates assumed to arise through interaction with a protoplanetary disc. Near the inner disc boundary, significant variations of viscosity, interaction with density waves or with the stellar magnetic field could occur and halt migration, but allow ircularization to continue. This was modelled by modifying the migration and circularization rates. Runs terminated without an extended period of circularization in the absence of migration torques gave rise to either a collision, or a system close to a resonance. These were mostly first order with a few $\\%$ terminating in second order resonances. Both planetary eccentricities were small $< 0.1$ and all resonant angles liberated. This type of survey produced o...

  20. 云南地区观测的舒曼谐振背景变化特征%Background features of Schumann resonance observed in Yunnan, southwestern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    欧阳新艳; 张学民; 申旭辉; 苗园青

    2013-01-01

    本文利用云南地区永胜台观测的地磁南北和东西分量开展舒曼谐振的背景变化特征分析.通过提取舒曼谐振各阶频率和功率谱密度的小时均值,分析了前三阶舒曼谐振频率和功率谱密度在分点和至点前后的周日变化特征.舒曼谐振功率谱密度的周日变化与亚洲、非洲和美洲三大闪电活动中心的活跃时段以及观测站相对于三大闪电活动中心的方位密切相关.舒曼谐振频率的周日变化特征更复杂.各阶功率谱密度和频率在夏至和秋分前后的变化幅度比春分和冬至前后大.从2011年舒曼谐振频率和功率谱密度日中值的年变化图中发现,谐振频率随季节变化的特征不明显,而功率谱密度的年度变化曲线呈半周期正弦波形态,以7月份为轴对称分布.功率谱密度的季节变化特征与闪电活动的季节变化特征相一致.南北和东西分量得到的前三阶谐振频率,第一阶约稳定在7.5 Hz.而随着阶数增加,南北分量得到的谐振频率比东西分量约大0.5 Hz.高阶谐振频率发生偏移的原因目前还不清楚.%Abstract This paper presents.the background features of Schumann resonance (SR) observed at Yongsheng observatory in Yunnan,southwestern China.Through obtaining the hourly average of the frequency and power spectral density (PSD) of the lowest three SR modes,we analyzed diurnal variation of SR frequency and PSD both in BNs and BEw components around equinoxes and solstices.Diurnal variation of SR PSD is found to be related to the dominant intervals of Asian,African and American thunderstorm centers and the relative position of the observatory to three thunderstorm centers.Diurnal variation of SR frequency is more complicated.SR frequency and PSD at the lowest three modes around summer solstice and autumn equinox are more changeablethan that in spring equinox and winter solstice.The daily median of SR peak frequency in 2011shows that seasonal variation

  1. Nonlinear resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Rajasekar, Shanmuganathan

    2016-01-01

    This introductory text presents the basic aspects and most important features of various types of resonances and anti-resonances in dynamical systems. In particular, for each resonance, it covers the theoretical concepts, illustrates them with case studies, and reviews the available information on mechanisms, characterization, numerical simulations, experimental realizations, possible quantum analogues, applications and significant advances made over the years. Resonances are one of the most fundamental phenomena exhibited by nonlinear systems and refer to specific realizations of maximum response of a system due to the ability of that system to store and transfer energy received from an external forcing source. Resonances are of particular importance in physical, engineering and biological systems - they can prove to be advantageous in many applications, while leading to instability and even disasters in others. The book is self-contained, providing the details of mathematical derivations and techniques invo...

  2. Resonance poles and threshold energies for hadron physical problems by a model-independent universal algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Tripolt, Ralf-Arno; Wambach, Jochen; Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2016-01-01

    We show how complex resonance poles and threshold energies for systems in hadron physics can be accurately obtained by using a method based on the Pad\\'{e}-approximant which was recently developed for the calculation of resonance poles for atomic and molecular auto-ionization systems. The main advantage of this method is the ability to calculate the resonance poles and threshold energies from \\emph{real} spectral data. In order to demonstrate the capabilities of this method we apply it here to an analytical model as well as to experimental data for the squared modulus of the vector pion form factor, the S0 partial wave amplitude for $\\pi\\pi$ scattering and the cross section ratio $R(s)$ for $e^+e^-$ collisions. The extracted values for the resonance poles of the $\\rho(770)$ and the $f_0(500)$ or $\\sigma$ meson are in very good agreement with the literature. When the data are noisy the prediction of decay thresholds proves to be less accurate but feasible.

  3. Changes observed in multiparametric prostate magnetic resonance imaging characteristics correlate with histopathological development of chronic granulomatous prostatitis after intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guerin therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Jennifer K; Walton-Diaz, Annerleim; Rais-Bahrami, Soroush; Merino, Maria J; Turkbey, Baris; Choyke, Peter L; Pinto, Peter A

    2014-01-01

    Administration of Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) has been shown to cause granulomatous prostatitis, a rare inflammatory process that can be mistaken for prostate cancer. We present a case of a 78-year-old man on active surveillance for prostate cancer with a subsequent diagnosis of high-grade urothelial carcinoma. After intravesical BCG therapy, he developed chronic granulomatous prostatitis. We present serial magnetic resonance imaging and biopsy data demonstrating the time interval between BCG administration and the manifestation of chronic granulomatous prostatitis.

  4. Observation of narrow baryon resonance decaying into $pK^0_s$ in pA-interactions at $70 GeV/c$ with SVD-2 setup

    CERN Document Server

    Aleev, A; Ardashev, E; Balandin, V; Basiladze, Sergei G; Berezhnev, S; Bogdanova, G A; Boguslavsky, M; Egorov, N; Ejov, V; Ermakov, G; Ermolov, P; Furmanec, N; Golovnia, S; Golubkov, S; Gorkov, A; Gorokhov, S; Gramenitsky, I; Grishin, N; Grishkevich, Ya; Karmanov, D; Kholodenko, A; Kiriakov, A; Kosarev, I; Kouzmine, N; Kozlov, V; Kozlov, Yu; Kokoulina, E; Korotkov, N V; Kramarenko, V; Kubarovsky, A; Kurchaninov, L L; Kuzmin, V; Kuznetsov, E; Lanshikov, G; Larichev, A; Leflat, A; Levitsky, M; Lyutov, S; Maiorov, S; Merkin, M; Minaenko, A A; Mitrofanov, G Ya; Moiseev, A; Murzin, V; Nikitin, V; Nomokonov, V P; Oleinik, A; Orfanitsky, S V; Parakhin, V; Petrov, V; Pilavova, L; Pleskach, A; Popov, V; Riadovikov, V; Rudenko, R; Rufanov, I; Senko, V; Shafranov, M; Shalanda, N A; Sidorov, A; Soldatov, M; Tikhonova, L A; Topuria, T; Tsyupa, Yu; Vasilev, M; Vischnevskaya, A; Volkov, V; Vorobev, A; Voronin, A; Yakimchuk, V; Yukaev, A I; Zakamsky, L; Zapolskii, V N; Zhidkov, N; Zmushko, V V; Zotkin, S A; Zotkin, D S; Zverev, E

    2004-01-01

    SVD-2 experiment data have been analyzed to search for an exotic baryon state, the $\\Theta^+$-baryon, in a $pK^0_s$ decay mode at $70 GeV/c$ on IHEP accelerator. The reaction $pA \\to pK^0_s+X$ with a limited multiplicity was used in the analysis. The $pK^0_s$ invariant mass spectrum shows a resonant structure with $M=1526\\pm3(stat.)\\pm 3(syst.) MeV/c^2$ and $\\Gamma < 24 MeV/c^2$. The statistical significance of this peak was estimated to be of $5.6 \\sigma$. The mass and width of the resonance is compatible with the recently reported $\\Theta^+$- baryon with positive strangeness which was predicted as an exotic pentaquark ($uudd\\bar{s}$) baryon state. The total cross section for $\\Theta^+$ production in pN-interactions for $X_F\\ge 0$ was estimated to be $(30\\div120) \\mu b$ and no essential deviation from A-dependence for inelastic events $(\\sim A^{0.7})$ was found.

  5. In vitro observation of the molecular interaction between NodD and its inducer naringenin as monitored by fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fengqing Li; Bihe Hou; Lei Chen; Zhujun Yao; Guofan Hong

    2008-01-01

    At initial stages in the Rhizobium legume symbiosis, most nodulation genes are controlled by NodD protein and plant inducers. Some genetic studies and other reports have suggested that NodD may be activated by its direct interaction with plant inducers. However, there has been no molecular evidence of such an inducing interaction. In this paper, we used fluorescence resonance energy transfer technique to see whether such an interaction exists between NodD and its activator, naringenin, in vitro. The tetracysteine motif (Cys-Cys-Pro-Gly-Cys-Cys) was genetically inserted into NodD to label NodD with 4′,5′-bis(1,3,2-dithioarsolan-2-yl) fluorescein (FlAsH). Naringenin was labeled with fluorescein by chemical linking. In the fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments in vitro, the fluorescence intensity of one acceptor, NodD(90R6)-FlAsH, increased by 13%. This suggests that NodD may directly interact with inducer naringenin in vitro and that the reaction centre is likely near hinge region 1 of NodD.

  6. One of the closest planet pairs to the 3:2 Mean Motion Resonance, confirmed with K2 observations and Transit Timing Variations: EPIC201505350

    CERN Document Server

    Armstrong, David J; Barros, Susana C C; Demangeon, Olivier; McCormac, James; Osborn, Hugh P; Lillo-Box, Jorge; Santerne, Alexandre; Tsantaki, Maria; Almenara, José-Manuel; Barrado, David; Boisse, Isabelle; Bonomo, Aldo S; Bouchy, François; Brown, David J A; Bruno, Giovanni; Cerda, Javiera Rey; Courcol, Bastien; Deleuil, Magali; Díaz, Rodrigo F; Doyle, Amanda P; Hébrard, Guillaume; Kirk, James; Lam, Kristine W F; Pollacco, Don L; Rajpurohit, Arvind; Spake, Jessica; Walker, Simon R

    2015-01-01

    The K2 mission has recently begun to discover new and diverse planetary systems. In December 2014 Campaign 1 data from the mission was released, providing high-precision photometry for ~22000 objects over an 80 day timespan. We searched these data with the aim of detecting further important new objects. Our search through two separate pipelines led to the independent discovery of EPIC201505350, a two-planet system of Neptune sized objects (4.2 and 7.2 $R_\\oplus$), orbiting a K dwarf extremely close to the 3:2 mean motion resonance. The two planets each show transits, sometimes simultaneously due to their proximity to resonance and alignment of conjunctions. We obtain further ground based photometry of the larger planet with the NITES telescope, demonstrating the presence of large transit timing variations (TTVs) of over an hour. These TTVs allows us to confirm the planetary nature of the system, and place a limit on the mass of the outer planet of $386M_\\oplus$.

  7. Inter- and intra-observer agreement of BI-RADS-based subjective visual estimation of amount of fibroglandular breast tissue with magnetic resonance imaging: comparison to automated quantitative assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wengert, G.J.; Helbich, T.H.; Woitek, R.; Kapetas, P.; Clauser, P.; Baltzer, P.A. [Medical University of Vienna/ Vienna General Hospital, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Division of Molecular and Gender Imaging, Vienna (Austria); Vogl, W.D. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Computational Imaging Research Lab, Wien (Austria); Weber, M. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Division of General and Pediatric Radiology, Wien (Austria); Meyer-Baese, A. [State University of Florida, Department of Scientific Computing in Medicine, Tallahassee, FL (United States); Pinker, Katja [Medical University of Vienna/ Vienna General Hospital, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Division of Molecular and Gender Imaging, Vienna (Austria); State University of Florida, Department of Scientific Computing in Medicine, Tallahassee, FL (United States); Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging and Therapy Services, New York City, NY (United States)

    2016-11-15

    To evaluate the inter-/intra-observer agreement of BI-RADS-based subjective visual estimation of the amount of fibroglandular tissue (FGT) with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and to investigate whether FGT assessment benefits from an automated, observer-independent, quantitative MRI measurement by comparing both approaches. Eighty women with no imaging abnormalities (BI-RADS 1 and 2) were included in this institutional review board (IRB)-approved prospective study. All women underwent un-enhanced breast MRI. Four radiologists independently assessed FGT with MRI by subjective visual estimation according to BI-RADS. Automated observer-independent quantitative measurement of FGT with MRI was performed using a previously described measurement system. Inter-/intra-observer agreements of qualitative and quantitative FGT measurements were assessed using Cohen's kappa (k). Inexperienced readers achieved moderate inter-/intra-observer agreement and experienced readers a substantial inter- and perfect intra-observer agreement for subjective visual estimation of FGT. Practice and experience reduced observer-dependency. Automated observer-independent quantitative measurement of FGT was successfully performed and revealed only fair to moderate agreement (k = 0.209-0.497) with subjective visual estimations of FGT. Subjective visual estimation of FGT with MRI shows moderate intra-/inter-observer agreement, which can be improved by practice and experience. Automated observer-independent quantitative measurements of FGT are necessary to allow a standardized risk evaluation. (orig.)

  8. Measurement of the pn→ppπ0π- reaction in search for the recently observed resonance structure in dπ0π0 and dπ+π- systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adlarson, P.; Augustyniak, W.; Bardan, W.; Bashkanov, M.; Bergmann, F. S.; Berłowski, M.; Bhatt, H.; Büscher, M.; Calén, H.; Ciepał, I.; Clement, H.; Coderre, D.; Czerwiński, E.; Demmich, K.; Doroshkevich, E.; Engels, R.; Erven, W.; Eyrich, W.; Fedorets, P.; Föhl, K.; Fransson, K.; Goldenbaum, F.; Goslawski, P.; Goswami, A.; Grigoryev, K.; Gullström, C.-O.; Hauenstein, F.; Heijkenskjöld, L.; Hejny, V.; Hinterberger, F.; Hodana, M.; Höistad, B.; Jany, A.; Jany, B. R.; Jarczyk, L.; Johansson, T.; Kamys, B.; Kemmerling, G.; Khan, F. A.; Khoukaz, A.; Kirillov, D. A.; Kistryn, S.; Klaja, J.; Kleines, H.; Kłos, B.; Krapp, M.; Krzemień, W.; Kulessa, P.; Kupść, A.; Lalwani, K.; Lersch, D.; Li, L.; Lorentz, B.; Magiera, A.; Maier, R.; Marciniewski, P.; Mariański, B.; Mikirtychiants, M.; Morsch, H.-P.; Moskal, P.; Nandi, B. K.; Ohm, H.; Ozerianska, I.; Perez del Rio, E.; Piskunov, N. M.; Pluciński, P.; Podkopał, P.; Prasuhn, D.; Pricking, A.; Pszczel, D.; Pysz, K.; Pyszniak, A.; Redmer, C. F.; Ritman, J.; Roy, A.; Rudy, Z.; Sawant, S.; Schmidt, A.; Schadmand, S.; Sefzick, T.; Serdyuk, V.; Shah, N.; Siemaszko, M.; Siudak, R.; Skorodko, T.; Skurzok, M.; Smyrski, J.; Sopov, V.; Stassen, R.; Stepaniak, J.; Stephan, E.; Sterzenbach, G.; Stockhorst, H.; Ströher, H.; Szczurek, A.; Tolba, T.; Trzciński, A.; Varma, R.; Wagner, G. J.; Węglorz, W.; Wolke, M.; Wrońska, A.; Wüstner, P.; Wurm, P.; Yamamoto, A.; Yuan, X.; Zabierowski, J.; Zheng, C.; Zieliński, M. J.; Zipper, W.; Złomańczuk, J.; Żuprański, P.; Żurek, M.

    2013-11-01

    Exclusive measurements of the quasifree pn→ppπ0π- reaction have been performed by means of pd collisions at Tp = 1.2 GeV using the wide angle shower apparatus (WASA) detector setup at the cooler synchrotron COSY (Institut für Kernphysik, Jülich). Total and differential cross sections have been obtained covering the energy region s = (2.35-2.46) GeV, which includes the region of the ABC effect and its associated resonance structure. No ABC effect, i.e., low-mass enhancement is found in the π0π--invariant mass spectrum, in agreement with the constraint from Bose statistics that the isovector pion pair can not be in relative s wave. At the upper end of the covered energy region t-channel processes for Roper, Δ(1600) and ΔΔ excitations provide a reasonable description of the data, but at low energies the measured cross sections are much larger than predicted by such processes. Adding a resonance amplitude for the resonance at m = 2.37 GeV with Γ = 70 MeV and I(JP)=0(3+) observed recently in pn→dπ0π0 and pn→dπ+π- reactions leads to an agreement with the data also at low energies.

  9. Measurement of the $pn \\to pp\\pi^0\\pi^-$ Reaction in Search for the Recently Observed Resonance Structure in $d\\pi^0\\pi^0$ and $d\\pi^+\\pi^-$ systems

    CERN Document Server

    Adlarson, P; Bardan, W; Bashkanov, M; Bergmann, F S; Berłowski, M; Bhatt, H; Büscher, M; Calén, H; Ciepał, I; Clement, H; Coderre, D; Czerwiński, E; Demmich, K; Doroshkevich, E; Engels, R; Erven, W; Eyrich, W; Fedorets, P; Föhl, K; Fransson, K; Goldenbaum, F; Goslawski, P; Goswami, A; Grigoryev, K; Gullström, C --O; Hauenstein, F; Heijkenskjöld, L; Hejny, V; Hinterberger, F; Hodana, M; Höistad, B; Jany, A; Jany, B R; Jarczyk, L; Johansson, T; Kamys, B; Kemmerling, G; Khan, F A; Khoukaz, A; Kirillov, D A; Kistryn, S; Klaja, J; Kleines, H; Kłos, B; Krapp, M; Krzemień, W; Kulessa, P; Kupść, A; Lalwani, K; Lersch, D; Li, L; Lorentz, B; Magiera, A; Maier, R; Marciniewski, P; Mariański, B; Mikirtychiants, M; Morsch, H --P; Moskal, P; Nandi, B K; Ohm, H; Ozerianska, I; del Rio, E Perez; Piskunov, N M; Pluciński, P; Podkopał, P; Prasuhn, D; Pricking, A; Pszczel, D; Pysz, K; Pyszniak, A; Redmer, C F; Ritman, J; Roy, A; Rudy, Z; Sawant, S; Schmidt, A; Schadmand, S; Sefzick, T; Serdyuk, V; Shah, N; Siemaszko, M; Siudak, R; Skorodko, T; Skurzok, M; Smyrski, J; Sopov, V; Stassen, R; Stepaniak, J; Stephan, E; Sterzenbach, G; Stockhorst, H; Ströher, H; Szczurek, A; Tolba, T; Trzciński, A; Varma, R; Wagner, G J; Węglorz, W; Wolke, M; Wro{ń}ska, A; Wüstner, P; Wurm, P; Yamamoto, A; Yuan, X; Zabierowski, J; Zheng, C; Zieliński, M J; Zipper, W; Złomańczuk, J; {Ż}uprański, P; {Ż}urek, M

    2013-01-01

    Exclusive measurements of the quasi-free $pn \\to pp\\pi^0\\pi^-$ reaction have been performed by means of $pd$ collisions at $T_p$ = 1.2 GeV using the WASA detector setup at COSY. Total and differential cross sections have been obtained covering the energy region $\\sqrt s$ = (2.35 - 2.46) GeV, which includes the region of the ABC effect and its associated resonance structure. No ABC effect, {\\it i.e.} low-mass enhancement is found in the $\\pi^0\\pi^-$-invariant mass spectrum -- in agreement with the constraint from Bose statistics that the isovector pion pair can not be in relative s-wave. At the upper end of the covered energy region $t$-channel processes for Roper, $\\Delta(1600)$ and $\\Delta\\Delta$ excitations provide a reasonable description of the data, but at low energies the measured cross sections are much larger than predicted by such processes. Adding a resonance amplitude for the resonance at $m$=~2.37 GeV with $\\Gamma$ =~70 MeV and $I(J^P)=~0(3^+)$ observed recently in $pn \\to d\\pi^0\\pi^0$ and $pn \\to...

  10. Initial observations using a novel "cine" magnetic resonance imaging technique to detect changes in abdominal motion caused by encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Benjamin; Summers, Angela; Fenner, John; Gillott, Richard; Hutchinson, Charles E; Spencer, Paul A; Wilkie, Martin; Hurst, Helen; Herrick, Sarah; Brenchley, Paul; Augustine, Titus; Bardhan, Karna D

    2011-01-01

    Encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS) is an uncommon complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD), with high mortality and morbidity. The peritoneum thickens, dysfunctions, and forms a cocoon that progressively "strangulates" the small intestine, causing malnutrition, ischemia, and infarction. There is as yet no reliable noninvasive means of diagnosis, but recent developments in image analysis of cine magnetic resonance imaging for the recognition of adhesions offers a way forward. We used this protocol before surgery in 3 patients with suspected EPS. Image analysis revealed patterns of abdominal movement that were markedly different from the patterns in healthy volunteers. The volunteers showed marked movement throughout the abdomen; in contrast, movement in EPS patients was restricted to just below the diaphragm. This clear difference provides early "proof of principle" of the approach that we have developed.

  11. First observation of the beta decay of neutron-rich $^{218}Bi$ by the pulsed-release technique and resonant laser ionization

    CERN Document Server

    De Witte, H; Borzov, I N; Caurier, E; Cederkäll, J; De Smet, A; Eckhaudt, S; Fedorov, D V; Fedosseev, V; Franchoo, S; Górska, M; Grawe, H; Huber, G; Huyse, M; Janas, Z; Köster, U; Kurcewicz, W; Kurpeta, J; Plochocki, A; Van Duppen, P; Van de Vel, K; Weissman, L

    2004-01-01

    The neutron-rich isotope /sup 218/Bi has been produced in proton- induced spallation of a uranium carbide target at the ISOLDE facility at CERN, extracted from the ion source by the pulsed-release technique and resonant laser ionization, and its beta decay is studied for the first time. A half-life of 33(1)s was measured and is discussed in the self-consistent continuum-quasi particle-random- phase approximation framework that includes Gamow-Teller and first- forbidden transitions. A level scheme was constructed for /sup 218 /Po, and a deexcitation pattern of stretched E2 transitions 8/sup +/ to 6/sup +/ to 4/sup +/ to 2/sup +/ to 0/sup +/ to the ground state is suggested. Shell-model calculations based on the Kuo-Herling interaction reproduce the experimental results satisfactorily. (28 refs).

  12. A new observational approach to investigate the heliospheric interstellar wind interface - The study of extreme and far ultraviolet resonantly scattered solar radiation from neon, oxygen, carbon and nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowyer, Stuart; Fahr, Hans J.

    1990-01-01

    One of the outstanding uncertainties in the understanding of the heliosphere concerns the character of the interaction between the outflowing solar wind and the interstellar medium. A new possibility for obtaining information on this topic is suggested. The cosmically abundant elements neon, oxygen, carbon, and nitrogen will be affected differently at their interface passage depending upon the character of this region. Consequently, the distribution of these atoms and their ions will vary within the inner heliosphere. The study of resonantly scattered solar radiation from these species will then provide information on the nature of the interface. A preliminary evaluation of this approach has been carried out, and the results are encouraging. The relevant lines to be studied are in the extreme and far ulraviolet. The existing data in these bands are reviewed; unfortunately, past instrumentation has had insufficient resolution and sensitivity to provide useful information. The capabilities of future approved missions with capabilities in this area are evaluated.

  13. Resonating Statements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjelholt, Morten; Jensen, Tina Blegind

    2015-01-01

    IT projects are often complex arrangements of technological components, social actions, and organizational transformation that are difficult to manage in practice. This paper takes an analytical discourse perspective to explore the process of legitimizing IT projects. We introduce the concept...... of resonating statements to highlight how central actors navigate in various discourses over time. Particularly, the statements and actions of an IT project manager are portrayed to show how individuals can legitimize actions by connecting statements to historically produced discourses. The case study...... of an IT project in a Danish local government spans a two-year time period and demonstrates a double-loop legitimization process. First, resonating statements are produced to localize a national IT initiative to support the specificity of a local government discourse. Second, the resonating statements are used...

  14. Orbital resonances around black holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brink, Jeandrew; Geyer, Marisa; Hinderer, Tanja

    2015-02-27

    We compute the length and time scales associated with resonant orbits around Kerr black holes for all orbital and spin parameters. Resonance-induced effects are potentially observable when the Event Horizon Telescope resolves the inner structure of Sgr A*, when space-based gravitational wave detectors record phase shifts in the waveform during the resonant passage of a compact object spiraling into the black hole, or in the frequencies of quasiperiodic oscillations for accreting black holes. The onset of geodesic chaos for non-Kerr spacetimes should occur at the resonance locations quantified here.

  15. Advances in magnetic resonance 6

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 6 focuses on the theoretical and practical aspects of applying magnetic resonance methods to various problems in physical chemistry, emphasizing the different aspects of the exegesis of these problems. This book discusses the gas phase magnetic resonance of electronically excited molecules; techniques for observing excited electronic states; NMR studies in liquids at high pressure; and effect of pressure on self-diffusion in liquids. The nuclear magnetic resonance investigations of organic free radicals; measurement of proton coupling constants by NMR; an

  16. Baryon Resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Oset, E; Sun, Bao Xi; Vacas, M J Vicente; Ramos, A; Gonzalez, P; Vijande, J; Torres, A Martinez; Khemchandani, K

    2009-01-01

    In this talk I show recent results on how many excited baryon resonances appear as systems of one meson and one baryon, or two mesons and one baryon, with the mesons being either pseudoscalar or vectors. Connection with experiment is made including a discussion on old predictions and recent results for the photoproduction of the $\\Lambda(1405)$ resonance, as well as the prediction of one $1/2^+$ baryon state around 1920 MeV which might have been seen in the $\\gamma p \\to K^+ \\Lambda$ reaction.

  17. Baryon Resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oset, E. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica and IFIC, Centro Mixto Universidad de Valencia-CSIC, Institutos de Investigacion de Paterna, Aptdo. 22085, 46071 Valencia (Spain); Sarkar, S. [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1/AF, Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Sun Baoxi [Institute of Theoretical Physics, College of Applied Sciences, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Vicente Vacas, M.J. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica and IFIC, Centro Mixto Universidad de Valencia-CSIC, Institutos de Investigacion de Paterna, Aptdo. 22085, 46071 Valencia (Spain); Ramos, A. [Departament d' Estructura i Constituents de la Materia and Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Gonzalez, P. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica and IFIC, Centro Mixto Universidad de Valencia-CSIC, Institutos de Investigacion de Paterna, Aptdo. 22085, 46071 Valencia (Spain); Vijande, J. [Departamento de Fisica Atomica Molecular y Nuclear and IFIC, Centro Mixto Universidad de Valencia-CSIC, Institutos de Investigacion de Paterna, Aptdo. 22085, 46071 Valencia (Spain); Martinez Torres, A. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica and IFIC, Centro Mixto Universidad de Valencia-CSIC, Institutos de Investigacion de Paterna, Aptdo. 22085, 46071 Valencia (Spain); Khemchandani, K. [Centro de Fisica Computacional, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade de Coimbra, P-3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal)

    2010-04-01

    In this talk I show recent results on how many excited baryon resonances appear as systems of one meson and one baryon, or two mesons and one baryon, with the mesons being either pseudoscalar or vectors. Connection with experiment is made including a discussion on old predictions and recent results for the photoproduction of the {lambda}(1405) resonance, as well as the prediction of one 1/2{sup +} baryon state around 1920 MeV which might have been seen in the {gamma}p{yields}K{sup +}{lambda} reaction.

  18. Neuroaesthetic Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Anthony Lewis

    2013-01-01

    sessions are achieved via adaptive action-analyzed activities. These interactive virtual environments are designed to empower patients’ creative and/or playful expressions via digital feedback stimuli. Unconscious self- pushing of limits result from innate distractive mechanisms offered by the alternative...... the unencumbered motion-to-computer-generated activities - ‘Music Making’, ‘Painting’, ‘Robotic’ and ‘Video Game’ control. A focus of this position paper is to highlight how Aesthetic Resonance, in this context, relates to the growing body of research on Neuroaesthetics to evolve Neuroaesthetic Resonance....

  19. DISSIPATIVE DIVERGENCE OF RESONANT ORBITS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batygin, Konstantin [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Morbidelli, Alessandro, E-mail: kbatygin@gps.caltech.edu [Departement Cassiopee, Universite de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, Observatoire de la Cote d' Azur, F-06304 Nice (France)

    2013-01-01

    A considerable fraction of multi-planet systems discovered by the observational surveys of extrasolar planets reside in mild proximity to first-order mean-motion resonances. However, the relative remoteness of such systems from nominal resonant period ratios (e.g., 2:1, 3:2, and 4:3) has been interpreted as evidence for lack of resonant interactions. Here, we show that a slow divergence away from exact commensurability is a natural outcome of dissipative evolution and demonstrate that libration of critical angles can be maintained tens of percent away from nominal resonance. We construct an analytical theory for the long-term dynamical evolution of dissipated resonant planetary pairs and confirm our calculations numerically. Collectively, our results suggest that a significant fraction of the near-commensurate extrasolar planets are in fact resonant and have undergone significant dissipative evolution.

  20. Dissipative Divergence of Resonant Orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Batygin, Konstantin

    2012-01-01

    A considerable fraction of multi-planet systems discovered by the observational surveys of extrasolar planets reside in mild proximity to first-order mean motion resonances. However, the relative remoteness of such systems from nominal resonant period ratios (e.g. 2:1, 3:2, 4:3) has been interpreted as evidence for lack of resonant interactions. Here we show that a slow divergence away from exact commensurability is a natural outcome of dissipative evolution and demonstrate that libration of critical angles can be maintained tens of percent away from nominal resonance. We construct an analytical theory for the long-term dynamical evolution of dissipated resonant planetary pairs and confirm our calculations numerically. Collectively, our results suggest that a significant fraction of the near-commensurate extrasolar planets are in fact resonant and have undergone significant dissipative evolution.

  1. BeppoSAX observations of the X-ray pulsar MAXI J1409-619 in low state: discovery of cyclotron resonance features

    CERN Document Server

    Orlandini, Mauro; Masetti, Nicola; Frontera, Filippo

    2010-01-01

    The transient 500 s X-ray pulsar MAXI J1409-619 was discovered by the slit cameras aboard MAXI on 17 October 2010, and soon after accurately localized by Swift. We found that the source position was observed in 2000 during a BeppoSAX campaign of observations of the Galactic plane. Two sources are clearly detected in the MECS: one consistent with the position of IGR J14043-6148 and one consistent with the position of MAXI J1409-619. We report on the analysis of this archival BeppoSAX observation, integrated with a set of new high-energy observations obtained from the offset fields of the PDS instrument. For the ON-source observation, the 1.8-100 keV spectrum is fit by an absorbed power law with a photon index Gamma = 0.87_{-0.19}^{+0.29}, corresponding to 2-10 and 15-100 keV unabsorbed fluxes of 2.7E-12 and 4E-11 erg/cm2/s, respectively, and a 2-10 keV luminosity of 7E34 erg/s for a 15 kpc distance. For the offset field PDS observation we clearly pinpoint five absorption features harmonically spaced, resolved ...

  2. Complex-scaled equation-of-motion coupled-cluster method with single and double substitutions for autoionizing excited states: theory, implementation, and examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravaya, Ksenia B; Zuev, Dmitry; Epifanovsky, Evgeny; Krylov, Anna I

    2013-03-28

    Theory and implementation of complex-scaled variant of equation-of-motion coupled-cluster method for excitation energies with single and double substitutions (EOM-EE-CCSD) is presented. The complex-scaling formalism extends the EOM-EE-CCSD model to resonance states, i.e., excited states that are metastable with respect to electron ejection. The method is applied to Feshbach resonances in atomic systems (He, H(-), and Be). The dependence of the results on one-electron basis set is quantified and analyzed. Energy decomposition and wave function analysis reveal that the origin of the dependence is in electron correlation, which is essential for the lifetime of Feshbach resonances. It is found that one-electron basis should be sufficiently flexible to describe radial and angular electron correlation in a balanced fashion and at different values of the scaling parameter, θ. Standard basis sets that are optimized for not-complex-scaled calculations (θ = 0) are not sufficiently flexible to describe the θ-dependence of the wave functions even when heavily augmented by additional sets.

  3. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Enterography and Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasonography in Crohn’s Disease: An Observational Comparison Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkens, Rune; Peters, David A.; Nielsen, Agnete H.; Hovgaard, Valeriya P.; Glerup, Henning; Krogh, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    Purpose e Cross-sectional imaging methods are important for objective evaluationof small intestinal inflammationinCrohn’sdisease(CD).The primary aim was to compare relative parameters of intestinal perfusion between contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance enterography (DCE-MRE) in CD. Furthermore, we aimed at testing the repeatability of regions of interest (ROIs) for CEUS. Methods This prospective study included 25 patients: 12 females (age: 37, range: 19–66) with moderate to severe CD and a bowel wall thickness>3mm evaluated with DCE-MRE and CEUS. CEUS bolus injection was performed twice for repeatability and analyzed in VueBox®. Correlations between modalities were described with Spearman’s rho, limits of agreement(LoA) and intraclass correlation coefficient(ICC). ROIrepeatability for CEUS was assessed. Results s The correlation between modalities was good and very good for bowel wall thickness (ICC=0.71, P<0.001) and length of the inflamed segment (ICC=0.89, P<0.001). Moderate-weak correlations were found for the time-intensity curve parameters: peak intensity (r=0.59, P=0.006), maximum wash-in-rate (r=0.62, P=0.004), and wash-in perfusion index (r=0.47, P=0.036). Best CEUS repeatability for peak enhancement was a mean difference of 0.73 dB (95% CI: 0.17 to 1.28, P=0.01) and 95% LoA from −3.8 to 5.3 dB. Good quality of curve fit improved LoA to −2.3 to 2.8 dB. Conclusion The relative perfusion of small intestinal CD assessed with DCE-MRE and CEUS shows only a moderate correlation. Applying strict criteria for ROIs is important and allows for good CEUS repeatability PMID:28286879

  4. Hadronic Resonances from STAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wada Masayuki

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The results of resonance particle productions (ρ0, ω, K*, ϕ, Σ*, and Λ* measured by the STAR collaboration at RHIC from various colliding systems and energies are presented. Measured mass, width, 〈pT〉, and yield of those resonances are reviewed. No significant mass shifts or width broadening beyond the experiment uncertainties are observed. New measurements of ϕ and ω from leptonic decay channels are presented. The yields from leptonic decay channels are compared with the measurements from hadronic decay channels and the two results are consistent with each other.

  5. Split-ball resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Kuznetsov, Arseniy I; Fu, Yuan Hsing; Viswanathan, Vignesh; Rahmani, Mohsen; Valuckas, Vytautas; Kivshar, Yuri; Pickard, Daniel S; Lukiyanchuk, Boris

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a new concept of split-ball resonator and demonstrate a strong omnidirectional magnetic dipole response for both gold and silver spherical plasmonic nanoparticles with nanometer-scale cuts. Tunability of the magnetic dipole resonance throughout the visible spectral range is demonstrated by a change of the depth and width of the nanoscale cut. We realize this novel concept experimentally by employing the laser-induced transfer method to produce near-perfect spheres and helium ion beam milling to make cuts with the nanometer resolution. Due to high quality of the spherical particle shape, governed by strong surface tension forces during the laser transfer process, and the clean, straight side walls of the cut made by helium ion milling, magnetic resonance is observed at 600 nm in gold and at 565 nm in silver nanoparticles. Structuring arbitrary features on the surface of ideal spherical resonators with nanoscale dimensions provides new ways of engineering hybrid resonant modes and ultra-high near-f...

  6. Observation of alpha particle loss from JET plasmas during ion cyclotron resonance frequency heating using a thin foil Faraday cup detector array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darrow, D. S. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Cecil, F. E. [Physics Department, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Kiptily, V.; Fullard, K.; Horton, A. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Euratom/CCFE Fusion Assoc., Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Murari, A. [Consorzio RFX-Associazione EURATOM ENEA per la Fusione, I-35127 Padova (Italy); Collaboration: JET EFDA Contributors

    2010-10-15

    The loss of MeV alpha particles from JET plasmas has been measured with a set of thin foil Faraday cup detectors during third harmonic heating of helium neutral beam ions. Tail temperatures of {approx}2 MeV have been observed, with radial scrape off lengths of a few centimeters. Operational experience from this system indicates that such detectors are potentially feasible for future large tokamaks, but careful attention to screening rf and MHD induced noise is essential.

  7. Parametric resonance in neutrino oscillations in matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E Kh Akhmedov

    2000-01-01

    Neutrino oscillations in matter can exhibit a specific resonance enhancement - parametric resonance, which is different from the MSW resonance. Oscillations of atmospheric and solar neutrinos inside the earth can undergo parametric enhancement when neutrino trajectories cross the core of the earth. In this paper we review the parametric resonance of neutrino oscillations in matter. In particular, physical interpretation of the effect and the prospects of its experimental observation in oscillations of solar and atmospheric neutrinos in the earth are discussed.

  8. Slope tunable Fano resonances in asymmetric embedded microring resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gencheng; Dai, Tingge; Jiang, Jianfei; Yu, Hui; Hao, Yinlei; Wang, Yuehai; Li, Yubo; Jiang, Xiaoqing; Yang, Jianyi

    2017-02-01

    An asymmetric embedded microring resonant system is proposed and fabricated on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) to achieve slope tunable Fano resonances. The Fano resonances originate from the nonlinear phase shift produced by adding an inner ring coupling with the outer ring. The slope of the Fano resonance can be well tuned to be ultra-high by controlling the microheaters to adjust the phase condition. Experimentally, we observe Fano resonance with a maximum extinction ratio of about 40 dB, and the slope can be tuned from -35 dB nm-1 to -93 dB nm-1, which shows good agreement with the theoretical analysis. This device could find potential applications in ultra-high sensitivity sensing systems.

  9. The systematic radial downflow in the transition region of the quiet sun from limb-to-limb observations of the C IV resonance lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottman, Gary J.; Hassler, Donald D.; Jones, Michael D.; Orrall, Frank Q.

    1990-08-01

    This paper presents absolute velocities of C IV 1548, 1550 nm measured as a function of position along the solar equator, which was free of both active regions and coronal holes, and uniformly representative of the quiet sun. These observations were made with moderate spatial resolution (18 arcsec) using an EUV spectrometer dedicated to measuring absolute wavelengths (velocities) by direct comparison with a platinum spectrum generated on board the sounding rocket. On the assumption that systematic horizontal motions cancel statistically so that the line-of-sight velocities approach zero at the limb, a net radial downflow of 7.5 + or - 1.0 km/sec was found. The assumption was tested using the wavelength reference and found to be valid within the absolute accuracy of the rest wavelengths of the C IV lines.

  10. Two-photon finite-pulse model for resonant transitions in attosecond experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Galán, Álvaro Jiménez; Argenti, Luca

    2015-01-01

    We present an analytical model capable of describing two-photon ionization of atoms with attosecond pulses in the presence of intermediate and final isolated autoionizing states. The model is based on the finite-pulse formulation of second-order time-dependent perturbation theory. It approximates the intermediate and final states with Fano's theory for resonant continua, and it depends on a small set of atomic parameters that can either be obtained from separate \\emph{ab initio} calculations, or be extracted from few selected experiments. We use the model to compute the two-photon resonant photoelectron spectrum of helium below the N=2 threshold for the RABITT (Reconstruction of Attosecond Beating by Interference of Two-photon Transitions) pump-probe scheme, in which an XUV attosecond pulse train is used in association to a weak IR probe, obtaining results in quantitative agreement with those from accurate \\emph{ab initio} simulations. In particular, we show that: i) Use of finite pulses results in a homogene...

  11. Longitudial observation of dynamic changes in cortical function and white matter fibrous structure of patients with visual pathway lesions by blood oxygenation level dependent-functional magnetic resonance imaging combined with diffusion tensor imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is initially used for visual cortex location.However, the application of fMRI in investigating the development of visual pathway lesions needs to be further observed.OBJECTIVE: This study is to longitudially observe the dynamic changes in cortical function and white matter fibrous structure of patients with visual pathway lesions by blood oxygenation level dependent-functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD-fMRI) combined with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and to analyze the characteristics of brain function and structural recombination at convalescent period of lesions.DESIGN: Randomized controlled observation.SETTING: Department of Radiology, the General Hospital of Nanjing Military Area Command of Chinese PLA.PARTICIPANTS: Eight patients with unilateral or bilateral visual disorder caused by visual pathway lesions,who admitted to Department of Radiology, the General Hospital of Nanjing Military Area Command of Chinese PLA from January to September 2006 were involved, and served as experimental subjects. The patients, 6 males and 2 females, were aged 16 - 67 years. They had visual disorder confirmed by clinical examination, i.e. visual pathway lesion, which was further diagnosed by MR or CT. Another 12 subjects generally matching to those patients of experimental group in gender, age and sight, who received health examination in synchronization were involved and served as controls. The subjects had no history of eye diseases. Their binocular visual acuity (or corrected visual acuity) was over 1.0. Both routine examination of ophthalmology and examination of fundus were normal. Informed consents of detected items were obtained from all the subjects.METHODS: Signa Excite HD 1.5T magnetic resonance imaging system with 16 passages (GE Company,USA) and coil with 8 passages were used; brain functional stimulus apparatus (SAV-8800. Meide Company) was used for showing experimental mission. At the early stage

  12. Single spin magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrachtrup, Jörg; Finkler, Amit

    2016-08-01

    Different approaches have improved the sensitivity of either electron or nuclear magnetic resonance to the single spin level. For optical detection it has essentially become routine to observe a single electron spin or nuclear spin. Typically, the systems in use are carefully designed to allow for single spin detection and manipulation, and of those systems, diamond spin defects rank very high, being so robust that they can be addressed, read out and coherently controlled even under ambient conditions and in a versatile set of nanostructures. This renders them as a new type of sensor, which has been shown to detect single electron and nuclear spins among other quantities like force, pressure and temperature. Adapting pulse sequences from classic NMR and EPR, and combined with high resolution optical microscopy, proximity to the target sample and nanoscale size, the diamond sensors have the potential to constitute a new class of magnetic resonance detectors with single spin sensitivity. As diamond sensors can be operated under ambient conditions, they offer potential application across a multitude of disciplines. Here we review the different existing techniques for magnetic resonance, with a focus on diamond defect spin sensors, showing their potential as versatile sensors for ultra-sensitive magnetic resonance with nanoscale spatial resolution.

  13. Electromagnetic properties of baryon resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Tiator, Lothar

    2012-01-01

    Longitudinal and transverse transition form factors for most of the four-star nucleon resonances have been obtained from high-quality cross section data and polarization observables measured at MAMI, ELSA, BATES, GRAAL and CEBAF. As an application, we further show how the transition form factors can be used to obtain empirical transverse charge densities. Contour plots of the thus derived densities are shown and compared for the Roper and S11 nucleon resonances.

  14. Resonant circuit model for efficient metamaterial absorber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellier, Alexandre; Teperik, Tatiana V; de Lustrac, André

    2013-11-04

    The resonant absorption in a planar metamaterial is studied theoretically. We present a simple physical model describing this phenomenon in terms of equivalent resonant circuit. We discuss the role of radiative and dissipative damping of resonant mode supported by a metamaterial in the formation of absorption spectra. We show that the results of rigorous calculations of Maxwell equations can be fully retrieved with simple model describing the system in terms of equivalent resonant circuit. This simple model allows us to explain the total absorption effect observed in the system on a common physical ground by referring it to the impedance matching condition at the resonance.

  15. Resonance Raman Optical Activity and Surface Enhanced Resonance Raman Optical Activity analysis of Cytochrome C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Christian; Abdali, Salim; White, Peter C.

    2007-01-01

    to resonance enhanced skeletal porphyrin vibrations, more pronounced than any contribution from the protein back-bone. Combining the intrinsic resonance enhancement of cytochrome c with surface plasmon enhancement by colloidal silver particles, the Surface Enhanced Resonance Raman Scattering (SERRS) and Chiral......, while some disparities were observed between the resonance ROA and ChERS spectra. The difference can be ascribed perturbations of the physical properties of the protein upon adhesion to the surface of the silver colloids....

  16. From Autonomous Coherence Resonance to Periodically Driven Stochastic Resonance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Zhou-Jian; LI Peng-Fei; HU Gang

    2007-01-01

    In periodically driven nonlinear stochastic systems,noise may play a role of enhancing the output periodic signal (termed as stochastic resonance or SR).While in autonomous excitable systems,noise may play a role of increasing coherent motion(termed as coherence resonance or CR).So far the topics of SR and CR have been investigated separately as two major fields of studying the active roles of noise in nonlinear systems.We find that these two topics are closely related to each other.Specifically,SR occurs in such periodically driven systems that the corresponding autonomous systems show CR.The SR with sensitive frequency dependence can be observed when the corresponding autonomous system shows CR with finite characteristic frequency.Moreover,'resonant noise' and 'resonant frequency' of SR coincide with those of CR.

  17. Experiments with Helmholtz Resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Presents experiments that use Helmholtz resonators and have been designed for a sophomore-level course in oscillations and waves. Discusses the theory of the Helmholtz resonator and resonance curves. (JRH)

  18. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... usually given through an IV in the arm. MRI Research Programs at FDA Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) ...

  19. Regenerative feedback resonant circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. Mark; Kelly, James F.; McCloy, John S.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2014-09-02

    A regenerative feedback resonant circuit for measuring a transient response in a loop is disclosed. The circuit includes an amplifier for generating a signal in the loop. The circuit further includes a resonator having a resonant cavity and a material located within the cavity. The signal sent into the resonator produces a resonant frequency. A variation of the resonant frequency due to perturbations in electromagnetic properties of the material is measured.

  20. Observation by resonant angle-resolved photoemission of a critical thickness for 2-dimensional electron gas formation in SrTiO{sub 3} embedded in GdTiO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemšák, S. [Department of Physics, University of California, 1 Shields Ave, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Rd., Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Peter-Grünberg-Institut PGI-6, Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Conti, G.; Palsson, G. K.; Conlon, C.; Fadley, C. S. [Department of Physics, University of California, 1 Shields Ave, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Rd., Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Cho, S.; Rault, J. E.; Avila, J.; Asensio, M.-C. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L' Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, 91192 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Jackson, C. A.; Moetakef, P.; Janotti, A.; Bjaalie, L.; Himmetoglu, B.; Van de Walle, C. G.; Stemmer, S. [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-5050 (United States); Balents, L. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-9530 (United States); Schneider, C. M. [Peter-Grünberg-Institut PGI-6, Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2015-12-07

    For certain conditions of layer thickness, the interface between GdTiO{sub 3} (GTO) and SrTiO{sub 3} (STO) in multilayer samples has been found to form a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) with very interesting properties including high mobilities and ferromagnetism. We have here studied two trilayer samples of the form [2 nm GTO/1.0 or 1.5 unit cells STO/10 nm GTO] as grown on (001) (LaAlO{sub 3}){sub 0.3}(Sr{sub 2}AlTaO{sub 6}){sub 0.7}, with the STO layer thicknesses being at what has been suggested is the critical thickness for 2DEG formation. We have studied these with Ti-resonant angle-resolved and angle-integrated photoemission and find that the spectral feature in the spectra associated with the 2DEG is present in the 1.5 unit cell sample, but not in the 1.0 unit cell sample. We also observe through core-level spectra additional states in Ti and Sr, with the strength of a low-binding-energy state for Sr being associated with the appearance of the 2DEG, and we suggest it to have an origin in final-state core-hole screening.

  1. Nested Trampoline Resonators for Optomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Weaver, Matthew J; Luna, Fernando; Buters, Frank M; Eerkens, Hedwig J; Welker, Gesa; Perock, Blaise; Heeck, Kier; de Man, Sven; Bouwmeester, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Two major challenges in the development of optomechanical devices are achieving a low mechanical and optical loss rate and vibration isolation from the environment. We address both issues by fabricating novel trampoline resonators made from low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) Si$_3$N$_4$ with a distributed bragg reflector (DBR) mirror. We construct a nested double resonator structure that generates approximately 80 dB of mechanical isolation from the mounting surface, eliminating the strong mounting dependence of the quality factor observed with single resonators. With the consistency provided by this isolation scheme we reliably fabricate devices with mechanical quality factors of around 400,000 at room temperature. In addition these devices were used to form optical cavities with finesse up to 181,000 $\\pm$ 1,000. These promising parameters will enable experiments in the quantum regime with macroscopic mechanical resonators.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of hemochromatosis arthropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eustace, S. [Dept. of Radiology, Deaconess Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Buff, B. [Dept. of Radiology, Deaconess Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); McCarthy, C. [The Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Mater Hospital, Dublin (Ireland); MacMathuana, P. [The Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Mater Hospital, Dublin (Ireland); Gilligan, P. [The Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Mater Hospital, Dublin (Ireland); Ennis, J.T. [The Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Mater Hospital, Dublin (Ireland)

    1994-10-01

    This study was undertaken to compare plain film radiography and magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of hemochromatosis arthropathy of the knees of ten patients with a biopsy-proven diagnosis. Both modalities enabled visualisation of bony degenerative changes; magnetic resonance imaging enabled additional visualization of deformity of both cartilage and menisci. Magnetic resonance imaging failed reliably to confirm the presence of intra-articular iron in the patients studied. No correlation was observed between synovial fluid magnetic resonance signal values, corresponding serum ferritin levels, or the severity of the observed degenerative changes. (orig.)

  3. Measurement of global and local resonance terms

    CERN Document Server

    Tomás, R; Calaga, R; Fischer, W; Franchi, A; Rumolo, Giovanni

    2005-01-01

    Recently, resonance driving terms were successfully measured in the CERN SPS and the BNL RHIC from the Fourier spectrum of beam position monitor (BPM) data. Based on these measurements a new analysis has been derived to extract truly local observables from BPM data. These local observables are called local resonance terms since they share some similarities with the global resonance terms. In this paper we derive these local terms analytically and present experimental measurements of sextupolar global and local resonance terms in RHIC. Nondestructive measurements of these terms using ac dipoles are also presented.

  4. Observation of cyclotron resonance and electron-phonon coupling in surface states of the bulk-insulating topological insulator Cu0.02Bi2Se3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Liang [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). The Inst. of Quantum Matter; Tse, Wang-Kong [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Morris, C. M. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). The Inst. of Quantum Matter; Brahlek, M. [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Koirala, N. [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Oh, S. [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Armitage, N. P. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). The Inst. of Quantum Matter

    2015-02-05

    We have utilized magneto-optical time-domain spectroscopy to investigate the low frequency optical response of topological insulator Cu0.02Bi2Se3 and Bi2Se3 films. With both field and frequency depedence, such experiments give sufficient information to measure the mobility and carrier density of multiple conduction channels simultaneously. We observe sharp cyclotron resonances (CRs) in both samples. The small amount of Cu substitution into the Cu0.02Bi2Se3 induces a true bulk insulator with only a single conduction channel with total sheet carrier density 4.9 x 1012/cm2 and mobility as large as 4000 cm2/V s. This is consistent with pure topological surface state (TSSs) conduction with a chemical potential 150 meV above the Dirac point. Hence, a true topological insulator with an insulating bulk is realized. The CR broadens at high fields, an e ect that we attribute to an electron-phonon interaction. This assignment is supported by an extended Drude model analysis on the zero field data. In contrast to Cu0.02Bi2Se3, two charge channels were observed in normal Bi2Se3 films. We demonstrate a method to distinguish between the dominant TSSs and trivial bulk/2DEG states. The dominant channel exhibits a CR with a carrier density of ~2.0 x 1013/cm2 and mobility ~3200 cm2/V s, consistent with TSSs with a chemical potential ~350meV above the Dirac point.

  5. Spectrally resolved resonant propulsion of dielectric microspheres

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Yangcheng; Limberopoulos, Nicholaos I; Urbas, Augustine M; Astratov, Vasily N

    2015-01-01

    Use of resonant light forces opens up a unique approach to high-volume sorting of microspherical resonators with much higher uniformity of resonances compared to that in coupled-cavity structures obtained by the best semiconductor technologies. In this work, the spectral response of the propulsion forces exerted on polystyrene microspheres near tapered microfibers is directly observed. The measurements are based on the control of the detuning between the tunable laser and internal resonances in each sphere with accuracy higher than the width of the resonances. The measured spectral shape of the propulsion forces correlates well with the whispering-gallery mode resonances in the microspheres. The existence of a stable radial trap for the microspheres propelled along the taper is demonstrated. The giant force peaks observed for 20-{\\mu}m spheres are found to be in a good agreement with a model calculation demonstrating an efficient use of the light momentum for propelling the microspheres.

  6. Fano resonances from gradient-index metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yadong; Li, Sucheng; Hou, Bo; Chen, Huanyang

    2016-01-27

    Fano resonances - resonant scattering features with a characteristic asymmetric profile - have generated much interest, due to their extensive and valuable applications in chemical or biological sensors, new types of optical switches, lasers and nonlinear optics. They have been observed in a wide variety of resonant optical systems, including photonic crystals, metamaterials, metallic gratings and nanostructures. In this work, a waveguide structure is designed by employing gradient-index metamaterials, supporting strong Fano resonances with extremely sharp spectra. As the changes in the transmission spectrum originate from the interaction of guided modes from different channels, instead of resonance structures or metamolecules, the Fano resonances can be observed for both transverse electric and transverse magnetic polarizations. These findings are verified by fine agreement with analytical calculations and experimental results at microwave, as well as simulated results at near infrared frequencies.

  7. Stark-induced resonances in the photoionization of hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glab, W.L.; Nayfeh, M.H.

    1985-01-01

    We report the first observation of electric-field-induced resonances in the multistep photoionization of hydrogen. Asymmetric profiles having blue wings are observed near the photoionization limit resulting from tunneling across the Stark-Coulomb combined potential (shape resonance). We measured the dependence of the spacing of the resonances on the electric field strength.

  8. Pressure effects in multiple resonant multiphoton transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maïnos, C.; Le Duff, Y.; Castex, M. C.; Boursey, E.

    1989-02-01

    Although the rotational structure of a multiphoton process generally remains unaltered over a large range of gas pressure, this is not the case when multiple resonances are present. The rotational structure observed through intermediate rotational levels in a multiphoton process depends strongly on the resonance conditions. We show, for the NO molecule, that this structure changes drastically when the resonance conditions are modified by intermolecular collisions.

  9. Tunable coplanar waveguide resonator with nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周渝; 郏涛; 翟计全; 汪橙; 钟先茜; 曹志敏; 孙国柱; 康琳; 吴培亨

    2015-01-01

    A tunable superconducting half-wavelength coplanar waveguide resonator (CPWR) with Nb parallel nanowires ∼300 nm in width embedded in the center conductor was designed, fabricated, and measured. The frequency shift and the amplitude attenuation of the resonance peak under irradiation of 404-nm pulse laser were observed with different light powers at 4.2 K. The RF power supplied to such a CPWR can serve as current bias, which will affect the light response of the resonator.

  10. Polarization effects in recoil-induced resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazebnyi, D. B.; Brazhnikov, D. V.; Taichenachev, A. V.; Yudin, V. I.

    2017-01-01

    The effect of the field polarization on the amplitude of recoil-induced resonances (RIRs) is considered for laser-cooled free atoms and for atoms in a working magneto-optical trap (MOT). For all closed dipole transitions, explicit analytical expressions are obtained for the polarization dependence of the resonance amplitudes within a perturbation theory. Optimal polarization conditions are found for the observation of resonances.

  11. High-Grade Glioma Radiation Therapy Target Volumes and Patterns of Failure Obtained From Magnetic Resonance Imaging and {sup 18}F-FDOPA Positron Emission Tomography Delineations From Multiple Observers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosztyla, Robert, E-mail: rkosztyla@bccancer.bc.ca [Department of Medical Physics, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Chan, Elisa K.; Hsu, Fred [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Wilson, Don [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Functional Imaging, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Ma, Roy; Cheung, Arthur [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Zhang, Susan [Department of Medical Physics, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Functional Imaging, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Moiseenko, Vitali [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Benard, Francois [Department of Functional Imaging, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Nichol, Alan [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to compare recurrent tumor locations after radiation therapy with pretreatment delineations of high-grade gliomas from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and 3,4-dihydroxy-6-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-L-phenylalanine ({sup 18}F-FDOPA) positron emission tomography (PET) using contours delineated by multiple observers. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients with newly diagnosed high-grade gliomas underwent computed tomography (CT), gadolinium contrast-enhanced MRI, and {sup 18}F-FDOPA PET/CT. The image sets (CT, MRI, and PET/CT) were registered, and 5 observers contoured gross tumor volumes (GTVs) using MRI and PET. Consensus contours were obtained by simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE). Interobserver variability was quantified by the percentage of volume overlap. Recurrent tumor locations after radiation therapy were contoured by each observer using CT or MRI. Consensus recurrence contours were obtained with STAPLE. Results: The mean interobserver volume overlap for PET GTVs (42% ± 22%) and MRI GTVs (41% ± 22%) was not significantly different (P=.67). The mean consensus volume was significantly larger for PET GTVs (58.6 ± 52.4 cm{sup 3}) than for MRI GTVs (30.8 ± 26.0 cm{sup 3}, P=.003). More than 95% of the consensus recurrence volume was within the 95% isodose surface for 11 of 12 (92%) cases with recurrent tumor imaging. Ten (91%) of these cases extended beyond the PET GTV, and 9 (82%) were contained within a 2-cm margin on the MRI GTV. One recurrence (8%) was located outside the 95% isodose surface. Conclusions: High-grade glioma contours obtained with {sup 18}F-FDOPA PET had similar interobserver agreement to volumes obtained with MRI. Although PET-based consensus target volumes were larger than MRI-based volumes, treatment planning using PET-based volumes may not have yielded better treatment outcomes, given that all but 1 recurrence extended beyond the PET GTV and most were contained by a 2-cm

  12. THz parallel-plate waveguides with resonant cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reichel, Kimberly S.; Astley, Victoria; Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof;

    2015-01-01

    We characterize the terahertz resonance due to a cavity inside aparallel-plate waveguide, and discuss its use for refractive index sensing. Insidethe waveguide, we observe a broadband field enhancement associated with thisnarrowband resonance. © 2015 OSA....

  13. Phase-controlled Fano resonance by the nanoscale optomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jian-Qi; Xia, Keyu; Dai, Zhi-Ping; Yang, Wen; Gong, Shangqing; Feng, Mang

    2014-01-01

    Observation of the Fano line shapes is essential to understand properties of the Fano resonance in different physical systems. We explore a tunable Fano resonance by tuning the phase shift in a Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) based on a single-mode nano-optomechanical cavity. The Fano resonance is resulted from the optomechanically induced transparency caused by a nano-mechanical resonator and can be tuned by applying an optomechanical MZI. By tuning the phase shift in one arm of the MZI, we can observe the periodically varying line shapes of the Fano resonance, which represents an elaborate manipulation of the Fano resonance in the nanoscale optomechanics.

  14. Demonstration of sharp multiple Fano resonances in optical metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moritake, Yuto; Kanamori, Yoshiaki; Hane, Kazuhiro

    2016-05-01

    We experimentally demonstrated multiple Fano resonances in optical metamaterials. By combination of two different sized asymmetric-double-bar (ADB) structures, triple Fano resonance was observed in the near-infrared region. In addition to Fano resonance due to anti-phase modes in isolated ADB structures, an anti-phase mode due to coupling among different sized ADBs was observed. Dependence of characteristics of resonances on size difference was also investigated. At specific conditions of size difference, quality factors of three Fano resonances were improved compared with ADB metamaterials consisting of one kind of ADBs. The results will help to realize applications using metamaterial resonators with multiple functionalities and high performance.

  15. Chemical Principles Revisited. Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuarrie, Donald A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses how to interpret nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra and how to use them to determine molecular structures. This discussion is limited to spectra that are a result of observation of only the protons in a molecule. This type is called proton magnetic resonance (PMR) spectra. (CW)

  16. Effect of Systematic Resonance on DBD Device

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Abnormal phenomena that discharge performance declines with the increase in the frequency of power supply have been observed in many DBD devices. DBD systematic resonance formed by transformer leakage induction and equivalent capacitance of the dielectric layer is a key factor causing such abnormal phenomena. Therefore, the parameters of a DBD device should be optimized to avoid resonance damage and improve DBD discharge characteristics.

  17. Phonon-Josephson resonances in atomtronic circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidasyuk, Y. M.; Prikhodko, O. O.; Weyrauch, M.

    2016-09-01

    We study the resonant excitation of sound modes from Josephson oscillations in Bose-Einstein condensates. From the simulations for various setups using the Gross-Pitaevskii mean-field equations and Josephson equations we observe additional tunneling currents induced by resonant phonons. The proposed experiment may be used for spectroscopy of phonons as well as other low-energy collective excitations in Bose-Einstein condensates. We also argue that the observed effect may mask the observation of Shapiro resonances if not carefully controlled.

  18. Composite spin-1 resonances at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Low, Matthew; Wang, Lian-Tao

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the signal of composite spin-1 resonances at the LHC. Motivated by the possible observation of a diboson resonance in the 8 TeV LHC data, we demonstrate that vector resonances from composite Higgs models are able to describe the data. We pay particular attention to the role played by fermion partial compositeness, which is a common feature in composite Higgs models. The parameter space that is both able to account for the diboson excess and passes electroweak precision and flavor tests is explored. Finally, we make projections for signals of such resonances at the 13 TeV run of the LHC.

  19. Subinertial canyon resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Allan J.; Van Gorder, Stephen

    2016-04-01

    Near the bottom of a narrow canyon currents that oscillate back and forth along the bottom slope hx in a stratified ocean of buoyancy frequency N do so with a natural internal gravitational frequency Nhx. From May 2012 to May 2013 Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler measurements were made at 715 m depth in the deep narrow part of the DeSoto Canyon south of Pensacola, Florida, in water with 2π/Nhx ≈ 2.5 days. Above the canyon the flow follows the large-scale isobaths, but beneath the canyon rim the current oscillates along the canyon axis with 2-3 day periodicity, and is much stronger than and uncorrelated with the overlying flow. A simple theoretical model explains the resonant response. Published observations from the Hudson and Gully canyons suggest that the strong subinertial current oscillations observed in these canyons occur close to the relevant local frequency Nhx, consistent with the proposed simple model physics.

  20. Resonances in the System of Pi+PI- -- Mesons from the Reaction NP->NPPI+PI- at PN=5.20gev/C: Search, Results of Direct Observations, Interpretation

    CERN Document Server

    Troyan, Yu A; Pechenov, V N; Troyan, A Y; Belyaev, A V; Jerusalimov, A P; Aracelian, S G; Troyan, Yu.A.

    2002-01-01

    10 resonances were found in the mass spectrum of PI+PI- -system based on 66075 events from the reaction NP->NPPI+PI- In NP-Interactions at PN=(5.20+/-0.16)GEV/C in the 1-M HBC of LHE JINR by using the criterion cos(teta)[C.M.C.]PI>0 these masses are the following: (347+/-12), (418+/-6), (511+/-12), (610+/-5), (678+/-17), (757+/-5), (880+/-12), (987+/-12), (1133+/-15), and (1285+/-22)MEV/C^2; their excess above background is 2.9, 5.2, 3.5, 1.4, 2.0, 8.5, 4.8, 3.8, 5.2, and 6.0 S.D., respectively. The experimental widths of the resonances vary within the region from 16 to 94MEV/C^2. Such effects were not found in PI-PI0-combinations from the reaction NP->PPPI-PI0 . Therefore, it is necessary to attribute the value of isotpoic spin I=0 to the resonances found in the mass spectrum of the PI+PI- -system. The spin was estimated for the most statistically provided resonances at masses of 418, 511 and 757MEV/C^2. We determine with a high degree of confidence that J=0 for the resonances at MR=757MEV/C^2 and MR=418MEV/...

  1. Resonance and Neck Length for a Spherical Resonator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Corning

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between the neck length of a spherical resonator and its period of fundamental resonance was investigated. This was done by measuring the frequency of fundamental resonance of the resonator at 6 different neck lengths. It was found that its resonance resembled Helmholtz resonance but was not that of ideal Helmholtz resonance.

  2. Visuomotor resonance in autism spectrum disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina eBecchio

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available When we observe the actions performed by others, our motor system ‘resonates' along with that of the observed agent. Is a similar visuomotor resonant response observed in autism spectrum disorders (ASD? Studies investigating action observation in ASD have yielded inconsistent findings. In this perspective article we examine behavioral and neuroscientific evidence in favor of visuomotor resonance in ASD, and consider the possible role of action-perception coupling in social cognition. We distinguish between different aspects of visuomotor resonance and conclude that while some aspects may be preserved in ASD, abnormalities exist in the way individuals with ASD convert visual information from observed actions into a program for motor execution. Such abnormalities, we surmise, may contribute to but also depend on the difficulties that individuals with ASD encounter during social interaction.

  3. REMPI Spectroscopy of HfF

    CERN Document Server

    Loh, Huanqian; Yahn, Tyler S; Looser, Herbert; Field, Robert W; Cornell, Eric A

    2012-01-01

    The spectrum of electronic states at 30000--33000 cm$^{-1}$ in hafnium fluoride has been studied using (1+1) resonance-enhanced multi-photon ionization (REMPI) and (1+1$'$) REMPI. Six $\\Omega' = 3/2$ and ten $\\Pi_{1/2}$ vibronic bands have been characterized. We report the molecular constants for these bands and estimate the electronic energies of the excited states using a correction derived from the observed isotope shifts. When either of two closely spaced $\\Pi_{1/2}$ electronic states is used as an intermediate state to access autoionizing Rydberg levels, qualitatively distinct autoionization spectra are observed. The intermediate state-specificity of the autoionization spectra bodes well for the possibility of using a selected $\\Pi_{1/2}$ state as an intermediate state to create ionic HfF$^+$ in various selected quantum states, an important requirement for our electron electric dipole moment (eEDM) search in HfF$^+$.

  4. Integral resonator gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcheglov, Kirill V. (Inventor); Challoner, A. Dorian (Inventor); Hayworth, Ken J. (Inventor); Wiberg, Dean V. (Inventor); Yee, Karl Y. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention discloses an inertial sensor having an integral resonator. A typical sensor comprises a planar mechanical resonator for sensing motion of the inertial sensor and a case for housing the resonator. The resonator and a wall of the case are defined through an etching process. A typical method of producing the resonator includes etching a baseplate, bonding a wafer to the etched baseplate, through etching the wafer to form a planar mechanical resonator and the wall of the case and bonding an end cap wafer to the wall to complete the case.

  5. Resonances in the System of Pi+Pi- -- Mesons from the Reaction np->npPi+Pi- at Pn=5.20GeV/c: Search, Results of Direct Observations, Interpretation

    OpenAIRE

    Troyan, Yu. A.; Plekhanov, E. B.; Pechenov, V. N.; Troyan, A. Yu.; Beljaev, A. V.; Jerusalimov, A. P.; Aracelian, S. G.

    2004-01-01

    Ten resonances were found in the mass spectrum of pi+pi- -system from the reaction np->nppi+pi- in np-interactions at Pn=5.20 GeV/c in the 1-m HBC of LHE JINR by using the criterion cos(teta)[c.m.c.] p>0. Such effects were not found in pi-pi0 - combinations from the reaction np->pppi-pi0. Therefore, it is necessary to attribute the value of isotopic spin I = 0 to the resonances found in the mass spectrum of the pi+pi- -system. The spin was estimated for the most statistically provided resonan...

  6. Autoionization of water: does it really occur?

    CERN Document Server

    Artemov, V G; Sysoev, N N; Volkov, A A

    2015-01-01

    The ionization constant of water Kw is currently determined on the proton conductivity sigma1 which is measured at frequencies lower than 10^7 Hz. Here, we develop the idea that the high frequency conductivity sigma2 (~10^11 Hz), rather than sigma1 represents a net proton dynamics in water, to evaluate the actual concentration c of H3O+ and OH- ions from sigma2. We find c to be not dependent on temperature to conclude that i) water electrodynamics is due to a proton exchange between H3O+ (or OH-) ions and neutral H2O molecules rather than spontaneous ionization of H2O molecules, ii) the common Kw (or pH) reflects the thermoactivation of the H3O+ and OH- ions from the potential of their interaction, iii) the lifetime of a target water molecule does not exceed parts of nanosecond.

  7. Acoustic Resonance between Ground and Thermosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Matsumura

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Ultra-low frequency acoustic waves called "acoustic gravity waves" or "infrasounds" are theoretically expected to resonate between the ground and the thermosphere. This resonance is a very important phenomenon causing the coupling of the solid Earth, neutral atmosphere, and ionospheric plasma. This acoustic resonance, however, has not been confirmed by direct observations. In this study, atmospheric perturbations on the ground and ionospheric disturbances were observed and compared with each other to confirm the existence of resonance. Atmospheric perturbations were observed with a barometer, and ionospheric disturbances were observed using the HF Doppler method. An end point of resonance is in the ionosphere, where conductivity is high and the dynamo effect occurs. Thus, geomagnetic observation is also useful, so the geomagnetic data were compared with other data. Power spectral density was calculated and averaged for each month. Peaks appeared at the theoretically expected resonance frequencies in the pressure and HF Doppler data. The frequencies of the peaks varied with the seasons. This is probably because the vertical temperature profile of the atmosphere varies with the seasons, as does the reflection height of infrasounds. These results indicate that acoustic resonance occurs frequently.

  8. Holographic Kondo and Fano Resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Erdmenger, Johanna; O'Bannon, Andy; Papadimitriou, Ioannis; Probst, Jonas; Wu, Jackson M S

    2016-01-01

    We use holography to study a $(1+1)$-dimensional Conformal Field Theory (CFT) coupled to an impurity. The CFT is an $SU(N)$ gauge theory at large $N$, with strong gauge interactions. The impurity is an $SU(N)$ spin. We trigger an impurity Renormalization Group (RG) flow via a Kondo coupling. The Kondo effect occurs only below the critical temperature of a large-$N$ mean-field transition. We show that at all temperatures $T$, spectral functions of certain bosonic operators exhibit a Fano resonance, which in the low-$T$ phase is a large-$N$ manifestation of the Kondo resonance. Such Fano resonances are characteristic features of RG flows between $(0+1)$-dimensional fixed points, and are thus distinct from those observed for example in quantum dots.

  9. Prevalence, Patterns, and Clinical Predictors of Left Ventricular Late Gadolinium Enhancement in Patients Undergoing Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Prior to Pulmonary Vein Antral Isolation for Atrial Fibrillation: A Cross-Sectional Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nance, John W; Khurram, Irfan M; Nazarian, Saman; DeWire, Jane; Calkins, Hugh; Zimmerman, Stefan L

    2015-09-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging is increasingly used to evaluate patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) before pulmonary vein antral isolation (PVAI). The purpose of this study was to assess the incidence and pattern of left ventricular (LV) late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) in patients undergoing CMR before PVAI and compare the clinical and demographic differences of patients with and without LV LGE. Clinical and demographic data on 62 patients (mean age 61 ± 7.9, 69% male) undergoing CMR before PVAI for AF were collected. Two observers, masked to clinical histories, independently recorded the prevalence, extent (number of myocardial segments), and pattern (subendocardial, midmyocardial, or subepicardial) of LV LGE in each patient. Clinical and demographic predictors of LV LGE were determined using logistic regression. Twenty-three patients (37%) demonstrated LV LGE affecting a mean of 3.0 ± 2.1 myocardial segments. There was no difference in LV ejection fraction between patients with and without LGE, and most (65%) patients with LGE had normal wall motion. Only age (P = 0.04) and a history of congestive heart failure (P = .03) were statistically significant independent predictors of LGE. The most common LGE pattern was midmyocardial, seen in 17 of 23 (74%) patients. Only 4 of 23 (17%) patients had LGE in an "expected" pattern based on clinical history. Of the remaining 19 patients, 4 had known congestive heart failure, 5 nonischemic cardiomyopathy, 4 known coronary artery disease, and 2 prior aortic valve replacement. Six of 23 (26%) patients had no known coronary artery, valvular, or myocardial disease. There is a high prevalence of unexpected LV scar in patients undergoing CMR before PVAI for AF, with most patients demonstrating a nonischemic pattern of LV LGE and no wall motion abnormalities (ie, subclinical disease). The high prevalence of unexpected LGE in these patients may argue for CMR as the modality of choice for imaging

  10. 健康男性直肠周围筋膜的CT和MRI影像学观察%Observation on computed tomographic and magnetic resonance images of perirectal fasciae of healthy men

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张策; 成官迅; 李国新; 钟世镇

    2012-01-01

    目的 阐明健康男性直肠周围筋膜和神经的CT和MRI影像特点.方法 观察健康成年男性的CT和MRI影像资料各10例、男性尸体骨盆标本MRI扫描影像5例.结果 直肠固有筋膜和骶前筋膜显示为环形直肠系膜后外侧的联合层;此联合层于S5椎体水平增厚为直肠骶骨筋膜.Denonvilliers筋膜是联合层在直肠系膜前面的延续.下腹下丛为联合层后外侧,联系直肠、膀胱和盆侧壁的网孔结构.直肠周围筋膜的MRI T2影像较T1和CT影像更清晰.结论 直肠固有筋膜和骶前筋膜在MRI T2影像中为连续、清晰的联合层,在指导直肠癌的影像学评估方面具有潜在的临床价值.%Objective To explore iconography of computed tomography( CT )and magnetic resonance imaging( MRI )of perirectal fasciae and autonomic nerves of healthy subjects. Methods CT and MRI images of 10 healthy male were collected. Five healthy male cadaveric pelvises underwent MRI examination. Images were reviewed. Results Rectal proper fascia and presacral fascia were combined single layer covering annular mesorectum from posterolateral aspect. The combined layer was bolded at the level of the fifth sacral vertebra that indicated rectosacral fascia. Denonvilliers fascia was continuation of the combined layer and covered the mesorectum from anterior aspect. Inferior hypogastric plexus was a mesh posterolateral to the combined layer and linked rectum and bladder to lateral wall of pelvis. Perirectal fasciae were observed more clearly on T2 weighed MRI images than on Tl images or CT images. Conclusion Rectal proper fascia and presacral fascia were continued and clear combined layer on T2 MRI images, which may play potential roles on iconographic evaluation of rectal caner. .

  11. Sample-size resonance, ferromagnetic resonance and magneto-permittivity resonance in multiferroic nano-BiFeO3/paraffin composites at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Li, Zhenyu; Jiang, Jia; An, Taiyu; Qin, Hongwei; Hu, Jifan

    2017-01-01

    In the present work, we demonstrate that ferromagnetic resonance and magneto-permittivity resonance can be observed in appropriate microwave frequencies at room temperature for multiferroic nano-BiFeO3/paraffin composite sample with an appropriate sample-thickness (such as 2 mm). Ferromagnetic resonance originates from the room-temperature weak ferromagnetism of nano-BiFeO3. The observed magneto-permittivity resonance in multiferroic nano-BiFeO3 is connected with the dynamic magnetoelectric coupling through Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) magnetoelectric interaction or the combination of magnetostriction and piezoelectric effects. In addition, we experimentally observed the resonance of negative imaginary permeability for nano BiFeO3/paraffin toroidal samples with longer sample thicknesses D=3.7 and 4.9 mm. Such resonance of negative imaginary permeability belongs to sample-size resonance.

  12. Resonances in the system of pi sup +pi sup - mesons from np -> np pi sup +pi- reaction at P sub n = 5.20 GeV/c search, results of direct observations, interpretation

    CERN Document Server

    Troyan, Yu A; Belyaev, A V; Ierusalimov, A P; Pechenov, V N; Plekhanov, E B; Troyan, A Y

    2002-01-01

    Ten resonances were found in the mass spectrum of the pi sup +pi sup - system based on 66075 events from the reaction np -> np pi sup +pi sup - in np interactions at P sub n = (5.20 +- 0.16) GeV/c in the 1-m HBC of JINR's LHE by using the criterion cos THETA* p > 0. These masses are the following: (347 +- 12), (418 +- 6), (511 +- 12), (610 +- 5), (678 +- 17), (757 +- 5), (880 +- 12), (987 +-12), (1133 +- 15), and (1285 +- 22) MeV/c sup 2; their excess above background is 2.9, 5.2, 3.5, 1.4, 2.0, 8.5, 4.8, 3.8, 5.2, and 6.0 S.D., respectively. The experimental widths of the resonances vary within the region from 16 to 94 MeV/c sup 2. Such effects were not found in pi sup -pi sup 0 combinations from the reaction np -> pp pi sup -pi 0. Therefore, it is necessary to attribute the value of isotopic spin I = 0 to the resonances found in the mass spectrum of the pi sup +pi- system. The spin was estimated for the most statistically provided resonances at masses of 418, 511 and 757 MeV/c sup 2. We determine with a hig...

  13. Resonances in the System of \\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}-Mesons from np\\to np\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-} Reaction at P_{n}=5.20 GeV\\/c Search, Results of Direct Observations, Interpretation

    CERN Document Server

    Troyan, Yu A; Pechenov, V N; Troyan, Yu A; Belyaev, A V; Jerusalimov, A P; Arakelian, S G

    2002-01-01

    Ten resonances were found in the mass spectrum of \\pi^{+}\\pi^{-} system based on 66075 events from np\\to np\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-} reaction in np-interactions at P_{n}=(5.20\\pm0.16) GeV/c in the one-meter hydrogen bubble chamber of the LHE (JINR) by using the criterion cos\\Theta^{*}p>0. These masses are the following: (347\\pm12), (418\\pm6), (511\\pm12), (610\\pm5), (678\\pm17), (757\\pm5), (880\\pm12), (987\\pm12), (1133\\pm15), and (1285\\pm22) MeV/c^{2}; their excesses above the background are 2.9, 5.2, 3.5, 1.4, 2.0, 8.5, 4.8, 3.8, 5.2, and 6.0 standard deviations, respectively. The experimental widths of the resonances vary within the region from 16 to 94 MeV/c^{2}. Such effects were not found in \\pi^{-}\\pi^{0} combinations from np\\to pp\\pi^{-}\\pi^0 reaction. Therefore, it is necessary to attribute the value of isotopic spin I=0 to the resonances found in the mass spectrum of the \\pi^{+}\\pi^{-} system. The spin was estimated for the most statistically provided resonances at masses of 418, 511 and 757 MeV/c^{2}. We determi...

  14. Resonances in the system of pi sup +pi sup - -mesons from np->np pi sup +pi sup - reaction at P sub n =5.20 GeV/c search, results of direct observations, interpretation

    CERN Document Server

    Troyan, Yu A; Belyaev, A V; Ierusalimov, A P; Pechenov, V N; Plekhanov, E B; Troyan, A Y

    2002-01-01

    Ten resonances were found in the mass spectrum of a pi sup +pi sup - system based on 66075 events from np->np pi sup +pi sup - reaction in np-interactions at P sub n =(5.20+-0.16)GeV/c in the one-meter hydrogen bubble chamber of the LHE (JINR) by using the criterion cos THETA* p>0. These masses are the following: (347+-12), (418+-6), (511+-12), (610+-5), (678+-17), (757+-5), (880+-12), (987+-12), (1133+-15), and (1285+-22) MeV/c sup 2; their excesses above the background are 2.9, 5.2, 3.5, 1.4, 2.0, 8.5, 4.8, 3.8, 5.2, and 6.0 standard deviations, respectively. The experimental widths of the resonances vary within the region from 16 to 94 MeV/c sup 2. Such effects were not found in pi sup -pi sup 0 combinations from np->pp pi sup -pi sup 0 reaction. Therefore, it is necessary to attribute the value of isotopic spin I=0 to the resonances found in the mass spectrum of the pi sup +pi sup - system. The spin was estimated for the most statistically provided resonances at masses of 418, 511 and 757 MeV/c sup 2. We ...

  15. Noise from Two-Level Systems in Superconducting Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neill, C.; Barends, R.; Chen, Y.; Chiaro, B.; Jeffrey, E.; Kelly, J.; Mariantoni, M.; Megrant, A.; Mutus, J.; Ohya, S.; Sank, D.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; White, T.; Cleland, A. N.; Martinis, J. M.

    2013-03-01

    Two-level systems (TLSs) present in amorphous dielectrics and surface interfaces are a significant source of decoherence in superconducting qubits. Linear microwave resonators offer a valuable instrument for characterizing the strongly power-dependent response of these TLSs. Using quarter-wavelength coplanar waveguide resonators, we monitored the microwave response of the resonator at a single near-resonant frequency versus time at varying microwave drive powers. We observe a time dependent variation of the resonator's internal dissipation and resonance frequency. The amplitude of these variations saturates with power in a manner similar to loss from TLSs. These results provide a means for quantifying the number and distribution of TLSs.

  16. Resonance, Multi-resonance, and Reverse-resonance Induced by Multiplicative Dichotomous Noise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A constant-potential system driven by multiplicative dichotomous noise and subject to an input oscillatory signal is investigated. Two phenomena of stochastic resonance are observed. One is the response as a function of the noise's parameters; the other is that as a function of the input signal frequency. A phenomenon of multi-resonance (there are three or four peaks) is found for the response as a function of a parameter of the noise. A phenomenon of reverse-resonance is found, for which the response of the system to the signal can be weakened by the presence of the noise (there is an optimal minimum). These results help in studies of the systems with multiplicative dichotomous noise, such as the semiconductor, the proteins motor, the chemical reaction, and so on.

  17. Spin coupling and resonance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zielinski, M.L.; van Lenthe, J.H.

    2008-01-01

    The resonating block localize wave function (RBLW) method is introduced, a resonating modification of the block localized wave functions introduced by Mo et al. [Mo, Y.; Peyerimhoff, S. D. J. Chem. Phys. 1998, 109, 1687].This approach allows the evaluation of resonance energies following Pauling’s r

  18. Controlling Parametric Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galeazzi, Roberto; Pettersen, Kristin Ytterstad

    2012-01-01

    Parametric resonance is a resonant phenomenon which takes place in systems characterized by periodic variations of some parameters. While seen as a threatening condition, whose onset can drive a system into instability, this chapter advocates that parametric resonance may become an advantage if t...

  19. Fano resonances in dielectric, metallic and metamaterial photonic structures

    CERN Document Server

    Markos, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We investigate numerically Fano resonances excited in periodic arrays of dielectric, metallic and left-handed cylinders. Of particular interest are Fano resonances excited in the linear array of cylin- ders. We analyze spatial distribution and symmetry of electromagnetic field and discuss the relation between observed Fano resonances and frequency spectra of two-dimensional arrays of cylinders.

  20. Composite Resonator Surface Emitting Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FISCHER,ARTHUR J.; CHOQUETTE,KENT D.; CHOW,WENG W.; ALLERMAN,ANDREW A.; GEIB,KENT M.

    2000-05-01

    The authors have developed electrically-injected coupled-resonator vertical-cavity lasers and have studied their novel properties. These monolithically grown coupled-cavity structures have been fabricated with either one active and one passive cavity or with two active cavities. All devices use a selectively oxidized current aperture in the lower cavity, while a proton implant was used in the active-active structures to confine current in the top active cavity. They have demonstrated optical modulation from active-passive devices where the modulation arises from dynamic changes in the coupling between the active and passive cavities. The laser intensity can be modulated by either forward or reverse biasing the passive cavity. They have also observed Q-switched pulses from active-passive devices with pulses as short as 150 ps. A rate equation approach is used to model the Q-switched operation yielding good agreement between the experimental and theoretical pulseshape. They have designed and demonstrated the operation of active-active devices which la.se simultaneously at both longitudinal cavity resonances. Extremely large bistable regions have also been observed in the light-current curves for active-active coupled resonator devices. This bistability can be used for high contrast switching with contrast ratios as high as 100:1. Coupled-resonator vertical-cavity lasers have shown enhanced mode selectivity which has allowed devices to lase with fundamental-mode output powers as high as 5.2 mW.

  1. Ovenized microelectromechanical system (MEMS) resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Roy H; Wojciechowski, Kenneth; Kim, Bongsang

    2014-03-11

    An ovenized micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) resonator including: a substantially thermally isolated mechanical resonator cavity; a mechanical oscillator coupled to the mechanical resonator cavity; and a heating element formed on the mechanical resonator cavity.

  2. Proximity to Intrinsic Depolarizing Resonances with a Partial Siberian Snake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandell, D. A.; Alexeeva, L. V.; Anferov, V. A.; Blinov, B. B.; Chu, C. M.; Caussyn, D. D.; Courant, E. D.; Gladycheva, S. E.; Hu, S.; Krisch, A. D.; Nurushev, T. S.; Phelps, R. A.; Ratner, L. G.; Varzar, S. M.; Wong, V. K.; Derbenev, Ya. S.; Lee, S. Y.; Rinckel, T.; Schwandt, P.; Sperisen, F.; Stephenson, E. J.; von Przewoski, B.; Baiod, R.; Russell, A. D.; Ohmori, C.; Sato, H.

    1996-05-01

    Partial Siberian snakes are effective in overcoming imperfection depolarizing resonances, but they may also change the crossing energy for intrinsic depolarizing resonances. We experimentally investigated the effect of a partial Siberian snake near intrinsic depolarizing resonances with stored 140 MeV and 160 MeV polarized proton beams. Using various partial Siberian snake strengths up to 30%, depolarization was observed; this may be due to a change in the spin precession frequency which moves the energy of nearby intrinsic depolarizing resonances.

  3. Magnetic resonance energy and topological resonance energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aihara, Jun-Ichi

    2016-04-28

    Ring-current diamagnetism of a polycyclic π-system is closely associated with thermodynamic stability due to the individual circuits. Magnetic resonance energy (MRE), derived from the ring-current diamagnetic susceptibility, was explored in conjunction with graph-theoretically defined topological resonance energy (TRE). For many aromatic molecules, MRE is highly correlative with TRE with a correlation coefficient of 0.996. For all π-systems studied, MRE has the same sign as TRE. The only trouble with MRE may be that some antiaromatic and non-alternant species exhibit unusually large MRE-to-TRE ratios. This kind of difficulty can in principle be overcome by prior geometry-optimisation or by changing spin multiplicity. Apart from the semi-empirical resonance-theory resonance energy, MRE is considered as the first aromatic stabilisation energy (ASE) defined without referring to any hypothetical polyene reference.

  4. Coupling Bright and Dark Plasmonic Lattice Resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez, S R K; Maes, B; Janssen, O T A; Vecchi, G; Rivas, J Gomez

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate the coupling of bright and dark Surface Lattice Resonances (SLRs), which are collective Fano resonances in 2D plasmonic crystals. As a result of this coupling, a frequency stop-gap in the dispersion relation of SLRs is observed. The different field symmetries of the low and high frequency SLR bands lead to pronounced differences in their coupling to free space radiation. Standing waves of very narrow spectral width compared to localized surface plasmon resonances are formed at the high frequency band edge, while subradiant damping onsets at the low frequency band edge leading the resonance into darkness. We introduce a coupled oscillator analog to the plasmonic crystal, which serves to elucidate the physics of the coupled plasmonic resonances and to estimate very high quality factors (Q>700) for SLRs, which are the highest known for any 2D plasmonic crystal.

  5. Quantifying resonant and near-resonant interactions in rotating turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    di Leoni, P Clark

    2016-01-01

    Nonlinear triadic interactions are at the heart of our understanding of turbulence. In flows where waves are present modes must not only be in a triad to interact, but their frequencies must also satisfy an extra condition: the interactions that dominate the energy transfer are expected to be resonant. We derive equations that allow direct measurement of the actual degree of resonance of each triad in a turbulent flow. We then apply the method to the case of rotating turbulence, where eddies coexist with inertial waves. We show that for a range of wave numbers, resonant and near-resonant triads are dominant, the latter allowing a transfer of net energy towards two-dimensional modes that would be inaccessible otherwise. The results are in good agreement with approximations often done in theories of rotating turbulence, and with the mechanism of parametric instability proposed to explain the development of anisotropy in such flows. We also observe that, at least for the moderate Rossby numbers studied here, mar...

  6. Observing participating observation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    2011-01-01

    Current methodology concerning participating observation in general leaves the act of observation unobserved. Approaching participating observation from systems theory offers fundamental new insights into the topic. Observation is always participation. There is no way to escape becoming...... as the idea of the naïve observer becomes a void. Not recognizing and observing oneself as observer and co-producer of empirical data simply leaves the process of observation as the major unobserved absorber of contingency in data production based on participating observation....

  7. Observing participating observation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    2010-01-01

    Current methodology concerning participating observation in general leaves the act of observation unobserved. Approaching participating observation from systems theory offers fundamental new insights into the topic. Observation is always participation. There is no way to escape becoming...... as the idea of the naïve observer becomes a void. Not recognizing and observing oneself as observer and co-producer of empirical data simply leaves the process of observation as the major unobserved absorber of contingency in data production based on participating observation....

  8. Baryon Spectroscopy and Resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Edwards

    2011-12-01

    A short review of current efforts to determine the highly excited state spectrum of QCD, and in particular baryons, using lattice QCD techniques is presented. The determination of the highly excited spectrum of QCD is a major theoretical and experimental challenge. The experimental investigation of the excited baryon spectrum has been a long-standing element of the hadronic-physics program, an important component of which is the search for so-called 'missing resonances', baryonic states predicted by the quark model based on three constituent quarks but which have not yet been observed experimentally. Should such states not be found, it may indicate that the baryon spectrum can be modeled with fewer effective degrees of freedom, such as in quark-diquark models. In the past decade, there has been an extensive program to collect data on electromagnetic production of one and two mesons at Jefferson Lab, MIT-Bates, LEGS, MAMI, ELSA, and GRAAL. To analyze these data, and thereby refine our knowledge of the baryon spectrum, a variety of physics analysis models have been developed at Bonn, George Washington University, Jefferson Laboratory and Mainz. To provide a theoretical determination and interpretation of the spectrum, ab initio computations within lattice QCD have been used. Historically, the calculation of the masses of the lowest-lying states, for both baryons and mesons, has been a benchmark calculation of this discretized, finite-volume computational approach, where the aim is well-understood control over the various systematic errors that enter into a calculation; for a recent review. However, there is now increasing effort aimed at calculating the excited states of the theory, with several groups presenting investigations of the low-lying excited baryon spectrum, using a variety of discretizations, numbers of quark flavors, interpolating operators, and fitting methodologies. Some aspects of these calculations remain unresolved and are the subject of

  9. Dynamically generated resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Oset, E; Sarkar, S; Sun, Bao Xi; Vacas, M J Vicente; González, P; Vijande, J; Jido, D; Sekihara, T; Torres, A Martinez; Khemchandani, K

    2009-01-01

    In this talk I report on recent work related to the dynamical generation of baryonic resonances, some made up from pseudoscalar meson-baryon, others from vector meson-baryon and a third type from two meson-one baryon systems. We can establish a correspondence with known baryonic resonances, reinforcing conclusions previously drawn and bringing new light on the nature of some baryonic resonances of higher mass.

  10. A transmission calibration method for superconducting resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Cataldo, Giuseppe; Barrentine, Emily M; Brown, Ari D; Moseley, Samuel H; U-Yen, Kongpop

    2014-01-01

    A method is proposed and experimentally explored for \\textit{in-situ} calibration of complex transmission data for superconducting microwave resonators. This cryogenic calibration method accounts for the instrumental transmission response between the vector network analyzer reference plane and the device calibration plane. Once calibrated, the observed resonator response was modeled in detail by two approaches. The first, a phenomenological model based on physically realizable rational functions, enables the extraction of multiple resonance frequencies and widths for coupled resonators without explicit specification of the circuit network. In the second, an ABCD-matrix representation for the distributed transmission line circuit is used to model the observed response from the characteristic impedance and propagation constant. When used in conjunction with electromagnetic simulations, the kinetic inductance fraction can be determined with this method with an accuracy of 2%. Datasets for superconducting microst...

  11. Resonance in a Cone-Topped Tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angus Cheng-Huan Chia

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between ratio of the upper opening diameter of a cone-topped cylinder to the cylinder diameter,and the ratio of the length of the air column to resonant period was examined. Plastic cones with upper openings ranging from 1.3 cm to 3.6 cm and tuning forks with frequencies ranging from 261.6 Hz to 523.3 Hz were used. The transition from a standing wave in a cylindrical column to a Helmholtz-type resonance in a resonant cavity with a narrow opening was observed.

  12. Quantum Stochastic Resonance in Electron Shelving

    CERN Document Server

    Huelga, S F

    2000-01-01

    Stochastic resonance shows that under some circumstances noise can enhance the response of a system to a periodic force. While this effect has been extensively investigated theoretically and demonstrated experimentally in classical systems, there is complete lack of experimental evidence within the purely quantum mechanical domain. Here we demonstrate that stochastic resonance can be exhibited in a single ion and would be experimentally observable using well mastered experimental techniques. We discuss the use of this scheme for the detection of the frequency difference of two lasers to demonstrate that stochastic resonance may have applications in precision measurements at the quantum limit.

  13. Electron paramagnetic resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Al'tshuler, S A

    2013-01-01

    Electron Paramagnetic Resonance is a comprehensive text on the field of electron paramagnetic resonance, covering both the theoretical background and the results of experiment. This book is composed of eight chapters that cover theoretical materials and experimental data on ionic crystals, since these are the materials that have been most extensively studied by the methods of paramagnetic resonance. The opening chapters provide an introduction to the basic principles of electron paramagnetic resonance and the methods of its measurement. The next chapters are devoted to the theory of spectra an

  14. Observation of the 2p{sub 3/2}-2s{sub 1/2} radiative transition in Li-like uranium using the resonant coherent excitation in Si-crystal.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ananyeva, Alena [Goethe Universitaet Frankfurt am Main (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Azuma, Toshiyuki; Nakano, Yuji [Tokyo Metropolitan University (Japan); RIKEN, Tokyo (Japan); Braeuning, Harald; Braeuning-Demian, Angela; Dimopoulou, Christina; Kleffner, Carl; Steck, Markus [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Dauvergne, Denis [IPNL - Institut de Physique Nucleaire de' Lyon (France); Kanai, Yasuyuki [RIKEN, Tokyo (Japan); Pivovarov, Yuri [National ResearchTomsk Polytechnic University (Russian Federation); Suda, Shintaro [Tokyo Metropolitan University (Japan); Yamazaki, Yasunori [RIKEN, Tokyo (Japan); University of Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-07-01

    Taking advantage of the cooled, relativistic ion beams delivered by the Experimental Storage Ring (ESR) at GSI, Darmstadt the energy of the 1s{sup 2}2p{sub 3/2}- 1s{sup 2}2s{sub 1/2} transition in Li-like U ions was measured by using the resonant excitation of ions in a Si-crystal in channelling conditions. The excitation of the projectile traversing a solid target with an ordered structure is induced with great probability by the periodic potential defined by the atoms of the crystal lattice when the oscillation frequency of the crystal field fits the energy difference between two levels of the ion. The resonant character of the process enables the determination of transition energy with high precision. The present scheme is quite universal being applicable for various ions and for a wide range of transition energies in the field of atomic as well as nuclear physics.

  15. Split ring resonator resonance assisted terahertz antennas

    CERN Document Server

    Galal, Hossam; Vitiello, Miriam S

    2016-01-01

    We report on the computational development of novel architectures of low impedance broadband antennas, for efficient detection of Terahertz (THz) frequency beams. The conceived Split Ring Resonator Resonance Assisted (SRR RA) antennas are based on both a capacitive and inductive scheme, exploiting a 200 Ohm and 400 Ohm impedance, respectively. Moreover, the impedance is tunable by varying the coupling parameters in the exploited geometry, allowing for better matching with the detector circuit for maximum power extraction. Our simulation results have been obtained by assuming a 1.5 THz operation frequency.

  16. Massive identification of asteroids in three-body resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Evgeny A.; Shevchenko, Ivan I.

    2013-01-01

    An essential role in the asteroidal dynamics is played by the mean motion resonances. Two-body planet-asteroid resonances are widely known, due to the Kirkwood gaps. Besides, so-called three-body mean motion resonances exist, in which an asteroid and two planets participate. Identification of asteroids in three-body (namely, Jupiter-Saturn-asteroid) resonances was initially accomplished by Nesvorný and Morbidelli (Nesvorný D., Morbidelli, A. [1998]. Astron. J. 116, 3029-3037), who, by means of visual analysis of the time behaviour of resonant arguments, found 255 asteroids to reside in such resonances. We develop specialized algorithms and software for massive automatic identification of asteroids in the three-body, as well as two-body, resonances of arbitrary order, by means of automatic analysis of the time behaviour of resonant arguments. In the computation of orbits, all essential perturbations are taken into account. We integrate the asteroidal orbits on the time interval of 100,000 yr and identify main-belt asteroids in the three-body Jupiter-Saturn-asteroid resonances up to the 6th order inclusive, and in the two-body Jupiter-asteroid resonances up to the 9th order inclusive, in the set of ˜250,000 objects from the "Asteroids - Dynamic Site" (AstDyS) database. The percentages of resonant objects, including extrapolations for higher-order resonances, are determined. In particular, the observed fraction of pure-resonant asteroids (those exhibiting resonant libration on the whole interval of integration) in the three-body resonances up to the 6th order inclusive is ≈0.9% of the whole set; and, using a higher-order extrapolation, the actual total fraction of pure-resonant asteroids in the three-body resonances of all orders is estimated as ≈1.1% of the whole set.

  17. Hadron scattering, resonances, and QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briceno, Raul [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-12-01

    The non-perturbative nature of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) has historically left a gap in our understanding of the connection between the fundamental theory of the strong interactions and the rich structure of experimentally observed phenomena. For the simplest properties of stable hadrons, this is now circumvented with the use of lattice QCD (LQCD). In this talk I discuss a path towards a rigorous determination of few-hadron observables from LQCD. I illustrate the power of the methodology by presenting recently determined scattering amplitudes in the light-meson sector and their resonance content.

  18. Resonance and Fractal Geometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broer, Henk W.

    2012-01-01

    The phenomenon of resonance will be dealt with from the viewpoint of dynamical systems depending on parameters and their bifurcations. Resonance phenomena are associated to open subsets in the parameter space, while their complement corresponds to quasi-periodicity and chaos. The latter phenomena oc

  19. Progress Toward Understanding Baryon Resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Crede, Volker

    2013-01-01

    The composite nature of baryons manifests itself in the existence of a rich spectrum of excited states, in particular in the important mass region 1-2 GeV for the light-flavoured baryons. The properties of these resonances can be identified by systematic investigations using electromagnetic and strong probes, primarily with beams of electrons, photons, and pions. After decades of research, the fundamental degrees of freedom underlying the baryon excitation spectrum are still poorly understood. The search for hitherto undiscovered but predicted resonances continues at many laboratories around the world. Recent results from photo- and electroproduction experiments provide intriguing indications for new states and shed light on the structure of some of the known nucleon excitations. The continuing study of available data sets with consideration of new observables and improved analysis tools have also called into question some of the earlier findings in baryon spectroscopy. Other breakthrough measurements have be...

  20. Fundamentals of nanomechanical resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Schmid, Silvan; Roukes, Michael Lee

    2016-01-01

    This authoritative book introduces and summarizes the latest models and skills required to design and optimize nanomechanical resonators, taking a top-down approach that uses macroscopic formulas to model the devices. The authors cover the electrical and mechanical aspects of nano electromechanical system (NEMS) devices. The introduced mechanical models are also key to the understanding and optimization of nanomechanical resonators used e.g. in optomechanics. Five comprehensive chapters address: The eigenmodes derived for the most common continuum mechanical structures used as nanomechanical resonators; The main sources of energy loss in nanomechanical resonators; The responsiveness of micro and nanomechanical resonators to mass, forces, and temperature; The most common underlying physical transduction mechanisms; The measurement basics, including amplitude and frequency noise. The applied approach found in this book is appropriate for engineering students and researchers working with micro and nanomechanical...

  1. Monolithic MACS micro resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann-Horn, J. A.; Jacquinot, J.-F.; Ginefri, J. C.; Bonhomme, C.; Sakellariou, D.

    2016-10-01

    Magic Angle Coil Spinning (MACS) aids improving the intrinsically low NMR sensitivity of heterogeneous microscopic samples. We report on the design and testing of a new type of monolithic 2D MACS resonators to overcome known limitations of conventional micro coils. The resonators' conductors were printed on dielectric substrate and tuned without utilizing lumped element capacitors. Self-resonance conditions have been computed by a hybrid FEM-MoM technique. Preliminary results reported here indicate robust mechanical stability, reduced eddy currents heating and negligible susceptibility effects. The gain in B1 /√{ P } is in agreement with the NMR sensitivity enhancement according to the principle of reciprocity. A sensitivity enhancement larger than 3 has been achieved in a monolithic micro resonator inside a standard 4 mm rotor at 500 MHz. These 2D resonators could offer higher performance micro-detection and ease of use of heterogeneous microscopic substances such as biomedical samples, microscopic specimens and thin film materials.

  2. Neutrino Production of Resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Paschos, E A; Yu, J Y; Paschos, Emmanuel A.; Sakuda, Makoto; Yu, Ji--Young

    2004-01-01

    We take a fresh look at the analysis of resonance production by neutrinos. We consider three resonances $P_{33}, P_{11}$ and $S_{11}$ with a detailed discussion of their form factors. The article presents results for free proton and neutron targets and discusses the corrections which appear on nuclear targets. The Pauli suppression factor is derived in the Fermi gas model and shown to apply to resonance production. The importance of the various resonances is demonstrated with numerical calculations. The $\\Delta$-resonance is described by two formfactors and its differential cross sections are compared with experimental data. The article is self-contained and could be helpful to readers who wish to reproduce and use these cross sections.

  3. Nucleon Resonance Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Burkert, Volker D

    2016-01-01

    Recent results of meson photo-production at the existing electron machines with polarized real photon beams and the measurement of polarization observables of the final state baryons have provided high precision data that led to the discovery of new excited nucleon and $\\Delta$ states using multi-channel partial wave analyses procedures. The internal structure of several prominent excited states has been revealed employing meson electroproduction processes. On the theoretical front, lattice QCD is now predicting the baryon spectrum with very similar characteristics as the constituent quark model, and continuum QCD, such as is represented in the Dyson-Schwinger Equations approach and in light front relativistic quark models, describes the non-perturbative behavior of resonance excitations at photon virtuality of $Q^2 > 1.5GeV^2$. In this talk I discuss the need to continue a vigorous program of nucleon spectroscopy and the study of the internal structure of excited states as a way to reveal the effective degre...

  4. Nucleon Resonance Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkert, Volker D.

    2016-10-01

    Recent results of meson photo-production at the existing electron machines with polarized real photon beams and the measurement of polarization observables of the final state baryons have provided high precision data that led to the discovery of new excited nucleon and Δ states using multi-channel partial wave analyses procedures. The internal structure of several prominent excited states has been revealed employing meson electroproduction processes. On the theoretical front, lattice QCD is now predicting the baryon spectrum with very similar characteristics as the constituent quark model, and continuum QCD, such as is represented in the Dyson-Schwinger equations approach and in light front relativistic quark models, describes the non-perturbative behavior of resonance excitations at photon virtuality of Q^2 > 1.5 GeV^2. In this talk I discuss the need to continue a vigorous program of nucleon spectroscopy and the study of the internal structure of excited states as a way to reveal the effective degrees of freedom underlying the excited states and their dependence on the distance scale probed.

  5. Resonant seismic emission of subsurface objects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korneev, Valeri A.

    2009-04-15

    Numerical modeling results and field data indicate that some contrasting subsurface objects (such as tunnels, caves, pipes, filled pits, and fluid-filled fractures) are capable of generating durable resonant oscillations after trapping seismic energy. These oscillations consist of surface types of circumferential waves that repeatedly propagate around the object. The resonant emission of such trapped energy occurs primarily in the form of shear body waves that can be detected by remotely placed receivers. Resonant emission reveals itself in the form of sharp resonant peaks for the late parts of the records, when all strong direct and primary reflected waves are gone. These peaks were observed in field data for a buried barrel filled with water, in 2D finite-difference modeling results, and in the exact canonical solution for a fluid-filled sphere. A computed animation for the diffraction of a plane wave upon a low-velocity elastic sphere confirms the generation of resonances by durable surface waves. Resonant emission has characteristic quasi-hyperbolic traveltime patterns on shot gathers. The inversion of these patterns can be performed in the frequency domain after muting the strong direct and primary scattered waves. Subsurface objects can be detected and imaged at a single resonance frequency without an accurate knowledge of source trigger time. The imaging of subsurface objects requires information about the shear velocity distribution in an embedding medium, which can be done interactively during inversion.

  6. Vibrational resonance in the Morse oscillator

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Abirami; S Rajasekar; M A F Sanjuan

    2013-07-01

    The occurrence of vibrational resonance is investigated in both classical and quantum mechanical Morse oscillators driven by a biharmonic force. The biharmonic force consists of two forces of widely different frequencies and with $ \\gg $. In the damped and biharmonically driven classical Morse oscillator, by applying a theoretical approach, an analytical expression is obtained for the response amplitude at the low-frequency . Conditions are identified on the parameters for the occurrence of resonance. The system shows only one resonance and moreover at resonance the response amplitude is 1/ where is the coefficient of linear damping. When the amplitude of the high-frequency force is varied after resonance the response amplitude does not decay to zero but approaches a nonzero limiting value. It is observed that vibrational resonance occurs when the sinusoidal force is replaced by a square-wave force. The occurrence of resonance and antiresonance of transition probability of quantum mechanical Morse oscillator is also reported in the presence of the biharmonic external field.

  7. Dynamics and Transit Variations of Resonant Exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesvorný, David; Vokrouhlický, David

    2016-06-01

    Transit timing variations (TTVs) are deviations of the measured midtransit times from the exact periodicity. One of the most interesting causes of TTVs is the gravitational interaction between planets. Here we consider a case of two planets in a mean motion resonance (orbital periods in a ratio of small integers). This case is important because the resonant interaction can amplify the TTV effect and allow planets to be detected more easily. We develop an analytic model of the resonant dynamics valid for small orbital eccentricities and use it to derive the principal TTV terms. We find that a resonant system should show TTV terms with two basic periods (and their harmonics). The resonant TTV period is proportional (m/M *)-2/3, where m and M * are the planetary and stellar masses. For m = 10-4 M *, for example, the TTV period exceeds the orbital period by about two orders of magnitude. The amplitude of the resonant TTV terms scales linearly with the libration amplitude. The ratio of the TTV amplitudes of two resonant planets is inversely proportional to the ratio of their masses. These and other relationships discussed in the main text can be used to aid the interpretation of TTV observations.

  8. Resonance Radiation and Excited Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Allan C. G.; Zemansky, Mark W.

    2009-06-01

    1. Introduction; 2. Physical and chemical effects connected with resonance radiation; 3. Absorption lines and measurements of the lifetime of the resonance state; 4. Collision processes involving excited atoms; 5. The polarization of resonance radiation; Appendix; Index.

  9. Resonance decay effect on conserved number fluctuations in a hadron resonance gas model

    CERN Document Server

    Mishra, D K; Netrakanti, P K; Mohanty, A K

    2016-01-01

    We study the effect of charged secondaries coming from resonance decay on the net-baryon, net-charge and net-strangeness fluctuations in high energy heavy-ion collisions within the hadron resonance gas (HRG) model. We emphasize the importance of including weak decays along with other resonance decays in the HRG, while comparing with the experimental observables. The effect of kinematic cuts on resonances and primordial particles on the conserved number fluctuations are also studied. The HRG model calculations with the inclusion of resonance decays and kinematical cuts are compared with the recent experimental data from STAR and PHENIX experiments. We find a good agreement between our model calculations and the experimental measurements for both net-proton and net-charge distributions.

  10. Effect of resonance decay on conserved number fluctuations in a hadron resonance gas model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, D. K.; Garg, P.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Mohanty, A. K.

    2016-07-01

    We study the effect of charged secondaries coming from resonance decay on the net-baryon, net-charge, and net-strangeness fluctuations in high-energy heavy-ion collisions within the hadron resonance gas (HRG) model. We emphasize the importance of including weak decays along with other resonance decays in the HRG, while comparing with the experimental observables. The effect of kinematic cuts on resonances and primordial particles on the conserved number fluctuations are also studied. The HRG model calculations with the inclusion of resonance decays and kinematical cuts are compared with the recent experimental data from STAR and PHENIX experiments. We find good agreement between our model calculations and the experimental measurements for both net-proton and net-charge distributions.

  11. Advances in magnetic resonance 10

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 10, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains three chapters that examine superoperators in magnetic resonance; ultrasonically modulated paramagnetic resonance; and the utility of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron-nuclear double-resonance (ENDOR) techniques for studying low-frequency modes of atomic fluctuations and their significance for understanding the mechanism of structural phase transitions in solids.

  12. Enhanced energy storage in chaotic optical resonators

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Changxu

    2013-05-05

    Chaos is a phenomenon that occurs in many aspects of contemporary science. In classical dynamics, chaos is defined as a hypersensitivity to initial conditions. The presence of chaos is often unwanted, as it introduces unpredictability, which makes it difficult to predict or explain experimental results. Conversely, we demonstrate here how chaos can be used to enhance the ability of an optical resonator to store energy. We combine analytic theory with ab initio simulations and experiments in photonic-crystal resonators to show that a chaotic resonator can store six times more energy than its classical counterpart of the same volume. We explain the observed increase by considering the equipartition of energy among all degrees of freedom of the chaotic resonator (that is, the cavity modes) and discover a convergence of their lifetimes towards a single value. A compelling illustration of the theory is provided by enhanced absorption in deformed polystyrene microspheres. © 2013 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  13. Quantum Effect in Mesoscopic Open Electron Resonator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Zhan-Yuan; ZHANG Xiao-Hong; HAN Ying-Hui

    2008-01-01

    The open electron resonator is a mesoscopic device that has attracted considerable attention due to its remarkable behavior: conductance oscillations. In this paper, using an improved quantum theory to mesoscopic circuits developed recently by Li and Chen, the mesoscopic electron resonator is quantized based on the fundamental fact that the electric charge takes discrete value. With presentation transformation and unitary transformation, the Schrodinger equation becomes an standard Mathieu equation. Then, the detailed energy spectrum and wave functions in the system are obtained, which will be helpful to the observation of other characters of electron resonator. The average of currents and square of the current are calculated, the results show the existence of the current fluctuation, which causes the noise in the circuits, the influence of inductance to the noise is discussed. With the results achieved, the stability characters of mesoscopic electron resonator are studied firstly, these works would be benefit to the design and control of integrate circuit.

  14. Critical coupling in plasmonic resonator arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balci, Sinan; Kocabas, Coskun; Aydinli, Atilla

    2011-08-01

    We report critical coupling of electromagnetic waves to plasmonic cavity arrays fabricated on Moiré surfaces. Dark field plasmon microscopy imaging and polarization dependent spectroscopic reflection measurements reveal the critical coupling conditions of the cavities. The critical coupling conditions depend on the superperiod of the Moiré surface, which also defines the coupling between the cavities. Complete transfer of the incident power can be achieved for traveling wave plasmonic resonators, which have a relatively short superperiod. When the superperiod of the resonators increases, the coupled resonators become isolated standing wave resonators in which complete transfer of the incident power is not possible. Analytical and finite difference time domain calculations support the experimental observations.

  15. Sigma photoproduction in the resonance region

    CERN Document Server

    Janssen, S; Debruyne, D; Van Cauteren, T

    2002-01-01

    A study of p(gamma,K)Sigma processes in an isobar model at tree level is reported. By comparing model calculations to the published SAPHIR data, we explore the possible role of different isospin I=1/2 (N*) and I=3/2 (Delta*) resonances in the reaction dynamics. In our analysis, the inclusion of the ``missing'' D_{13}(1895) resonance does only slightly improve the global description of the Sigma photoproduction data. More convincing signals for the presence of such a ``missing'' resonance emerged in the analysis of the isospin related p(gamma,K+)Lambda reaction. Various implementations of the nonresonant part of the Sigma photoproduction amplitude are presented. The sensitivity of the computed observables and extracted resonance parameters to the uncertainties inherent to the treatment of the nonresonant (background) diagrams are discussed.

  16. Observer's observables. Residual diffeomorphisms

    CERN Document Server

    Duch, Paweł; Świeżewski, Jedrzej

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the fate of diffeomorphisms when the radial gauge is imposed in canonical general relativity. As shown elsewhere, the radial gauge is closely related to the observer's observables. These observables are invariant under a large subgroup of diffeomorphisms which results in their usefulness for canonical general relativity. There are, however, some diffeomorphisms, called residual diffeomorphisms, which might be "observed" by the observer as they do not preserve her observables. The present paper is devoted to the analysis of these diffeomorphisms in the case of the spatial and spacetime radial gauges. Although the residual diffeomorphisms do not form a subgroup of all diffeomorphisms, we show that their induced action in the phase space does form a group. We find the generators of the induced transformations and compute the structure functions of the algebras they form. The obtained algebras are deformations of the algebra of the Euclidean group and the algebra of the Poincar\\'e group in the spat...

  17. Tunable multiwalled nanotube resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettl, Alex K.; Jensen, Kenneth J.; Girit, Caglar; Mickelson, William E.; Grossman, Jeffrey C.

    2011-03-29

    A tunable nanoscale resonator has potential applications in precise mass, force, position, and frequency measurement. One embodiment of this device consists of a specially prepared multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) suspended between a metal electrode and a mobile, piezoelectrically controlled contact. By harnessing a unique telescoping ability of MWNTs, one may controllably slide an inner nanotube core from its outer nanotube casing, effectively changing its length and thereby changing the tuning of its resonance frequency. Resonant energy transfer may be used with a nanoresonator to detect molecules at a specific target oscillation frequency, without the use of a chemical label, to provide label-free chemical species detection.

  18. Spin Resonance Strength Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courant, E. D.

    2009-08-01

    In calculating the strengths of depolarizing resonances it may be convenient to reformulate the equations of spin motion in a coordinate system based on the actual trajectory of the particle, as introduced by Kondratenko, rather than the conventional one based on a reference orbit. It is shown that resonance strengths calculated by the conventional and the revised formalisms are identical. Resonances induced by radiofrequency dipoles or solenoids are also treated; with rf dipoles it is essential to consider not only the direct effect of the dipole but also the contribution from oscillations induced by it.

  19. Spin resonance strength calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courant,E.D.

    2008-10-06

    In calculating the strengths of depolarizing resonances it may be convenient to reformulate the equations of spin motion in a coordinate system based on the actual trajectory of the particle, as introduced by Kondratenko, rather than the conventional one based on a reference orbit. It is shown that resonance strengths calculated by the conventional and the revised formalisms are identical. Resonances induced by radiofrequency dipoles or solenoids are also treated; with rf dipoles it is essential to consider not only the direct effect of the dipole but also the contribution from oscillations induced by it.

  20. Resonant power converters

    CERN Document Server

    Kazimierczuk, Marian K

    2012-01-01

    This book is devoted to resonant energy conversion in power electronics. It is a practical, systematic guide to the analysis and design of various dc-dc resonant inverters, high-frequency rectifiers, and dc-dc resonant converters that are building blocks of many of today's high-frequency energy processors. Designed to function as both a superior senior-to-graduate level textbook for electrical engineering courses and a valuable professional reference for practicing engineers, it provides students and engineers with a solid grasp of existing high-frequency technology, while acquainting them wit

  1. Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (MRFM) system, developed by ARL, is the world's most sensitive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic analysis tool,...

  2. Magnetodielectric effect of Mn–Zn ferrite at resonant frequency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pengfei, Pan; Ning, Zhang, E-mail: zhangning@njnu.edu.cn

    2016-10-15

    The dielectric properties and the magnetodielectric effect in Mn–Zn ferrite at resonant frequency have been studied in this paper. Dimensional-resonance-induced abnormal dielectric spectrum was observed at f≈1 MHz. The relatively large magnetodielectric ratio of 4500% in a magnetic field of 3.5 kOe was achieved from the Mn–Zn ferrite sample with the initial permeability of 15 K at resonant frequency at room temperature. Theoretical analysis suggests that the large MD effect at resonant frequency is attributed to the enhanced magnetostriction effect. - Highlights: • Dimensional resonance was measured in dielectric spectrum at f≈1 MHz. • The MD ratio of 4500% was induced by H = 3.5 kOe at resonant frequency. • The magnetostriction effect leads to the large MD effect at resonant frequency.

  3. Traces of a triboson resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Collins, J. H.; Lombardo, S.

    2016-09-01

    We show that the relatively small but coincident excesses observed around 2 TeV in the ATLAS Run 1 and Run 2 hadronic diboson searches — when a cut on the number of tracks in the fat jets is not applied — and the null results of all remaining high-mass diboson searches are compatible with the decay of a triboson resonance R into WZ plus an extra particle X. These decays can take place via new neutral ( Y 0) or charged ( Y ±) particles, namely R → Y 0 W, with Y 0 → ZX, or R → Y ± Z, with Y ± → WX. An obvious candidate for such intermediate particle is a neutral one Y 0, given a 3 .9 σ excess found at 650 GeV by the CMS Collaboration in searches for intermediate mass diboson resonances decaying to ZV, with V = W, Z. We discuss discovery strategies for triboson resonances with small modifications of existing hadronic searches.

  4. eta Photoproduction and N* resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, Ki-Seok; Hosaka, Atsushi; Kim, Hyun-Chul

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the eta photoproduction from the nucleon using the effective Lagrangian approach at tree level. We focus on the nucleon resonance N*(1675) of possibly exotic nature, which was reported by the GRAAL, Tohoku LNS and CB-ELSA examining its spin and parity theoretically. In addition, we consider six nucleon resonances, D_{13}(1520), S_{11}(1535), S_{11}(1650), D_{15}(1675), P_{11}(1710), P_{13}(1720) as well as possible background contributions. We calculate the differential cross sections and beam asymmetries for the neutron and proton targets. They indicate that there is isospin asymmetry which can be interpreted as the large difference in the the transition photon couplings: mu_{gamma p p*} << mu_{gamma n n*}. Moreover, we find that the spin-1/2 state is preferred in order to reproduce the experimental data, although its parity remains undetermined. This observation implies that the new resonance may be identified as a non-strangeness member of the baryon antidecuplet.

  5. Traces of a triboson resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Aguilar-Saavedra, J A; Lombardo, S

    2016-01-01

    We show that the relatively small but coincident excesses observed around 2 TeV in the ATLAS Run 1 and Run 2 hadronic diboson searches --- when a cut on the number of tracks in the fat jets is not applied --- and the null results of all remaining high-mass diboson searches are compatible with the decay of a triboson resonance $R$ into $WZ$ plus an extra particle $X$. These decays can take place via new neutral ($Y^0$) or charged ($Y^\\pm$) particles, namely $R \\to Y^0 \\, W$, with $Y^0 \\to Z X$, or $R \\to Y^\\pm Z$, with $Y^\\pm \\to W X$. An obvious candidate for such intermediate particle is a neutral one $Y^0$, given a $3.9\\sigma$ excess found at 650 GeV by the CMS Collaboration in searches for intermediate mass diboson resonances decaying to $ZV$, with $V=W,Z$. We discuss discovery strategies for triboson resonances with small modifications of existing hadronic searches.

  6. Diphoton resonance confronts dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Soo-Min; Kang, Yoo-Jin; Lee, Hyun Min

    2016-07-01

    As an interpretation of the 750 GeV diphoton excesses recently reported by both ATLAS and CMS collaborations, we consider a simple extension of the Standard Model with a Dirac fermion dark matter where a singlet complex scalar field mediates between dark matter and SM particles via effective couplings to SM gauge bosons and/or Higgs-portal. In this model, we can accommodate the diphoton events through the direct and/or cascade decays of pseudo-scalar and real scalar partners of the complex scalar field. We show that mono-jet searches and gamma-ray observations are complementary in constraining the region where the width of the diphoton resonance can be enhanced due to the couplings of the resonance to dark matter and the correct relic density is obtained. In the case of cascade decay of the resonance, the effective couplings of singlet scalars can be smaller, but the model is still testable by the future discrimination between single photon and photon-jet at the LHC as well as the gamma-ray searches for the cascade annihilation of dark matter.

  7. Diphoton resonance confronts dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, Soo-Min; Lee, Hyun Min

    2016-01-01

    As an interpretation of the 750 GeV diphoton excesses recently reported by both ATLAS and CMS collaborations, we consider a simple extension of the Standard Model with a Dirac fermion dark matter where a singlet complex scalar field mediates between dark matter and SM particles via effective couplings to SM gauge bosons and/or Higgs-portal. In this model, we can accommodate the diphoton events through the direct and/or cascade decays of pseudo-scalar and real scalar partners of the complex scalar field. We show that mono-jet searches and gamma-ray observations are complementary in constraining the region where the width of the diphoton resonance can be enhanced due to the couplings of the resonance to dark matter and the correct relic density is obtained. In the case of cascade decay of the resonance, the effective couplings of singlet scalars can be smaller, but the model is still testable by the future discrimination between single photon and photon-jet at the LHC as well as the gamma-ray searches for the c...

  8. 4d → 4f resonance in photoabsorption of cerium ion Ce3+ and endohedral cerium in fullerene complex {\\rm{Ce}}@{{{\\rm{C}}}_{82}}^{+}

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrange-Kashenock, G.

    2016-09-01

    cage decreases the autoionizing giant 4d\\to 4f resonance lifetime for endohedral cerium in {{Ce}}@{{{{C}}}82}+ due to the opening of additional decay channels involving electrons of the fullerene shell, which cannot be accounted as a static potential. From consideration of the two-step model, it is clear that these processes are important. However, they lead only to broadening of the resonance. The dramatic reduction in the integrated oscillator strength in the cerium 4d resonance region can only occur when additional processes besides photoionization come into play.

  9. Resonant Diphoton Phenomenology Simplified

    CERN Document Server

    Panico, Giuliano; Wulzer, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    A framework is proposed to describe resonant diphoton phenomenology at hadron colliders in full generality. It can be employed for a comprehensive model-independent interpretation of the experimental data. Within the general framework, few benchmark scenarios are defined as representative of the various phenomenological options and/or of motivated new physics scenarios. Their usage is illustrated by performing a characterization of the 750 GeV excess, based on a recast of available experimental results. We also perform an assessment of which properties of the resonance could be inferred, after discovery, by a careful experimental study of the diphoton distributions. These include the spin J of the new particle and its dominant production mode. Partial information on its CP-parity can also be obtained, but only for J >= 2. The complete determination of the resonance CP properties requires studying the pattern of the initial state radiation that accompanies the resonance production.

  10. Resonances in QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutz, Matthias F. M.; Lange, Jens Sören; Pennington, Michael; Bettoni, Diego; Brambilla, Nora; Crede, Volker; Eidelman, Simon; Gillitzer, Albrecht; Gradl, Wolfgang; Lang, Christian B.; Metag, Volker; Nakano, Takashi; Nieves, Juan; Neubert, Sebastian; Oka, Makoto; Olsen, Stephen L.; Pappagallo, Marco; Paul, Stephan; Pelizäus, Marc; Pilloni, Alessandro; Prencipe, Elisabetta; Ritman, Jim; Ryan, Sinead; Thoma, Ulrike; Uwer, Ulrich; Weise, Wolfram

    2016-04-01

    We report on the EMMI Rapid Reaction Task Force meeting 'Resonances in QCD', which took place at GSI October 12-14, 2015 (Fig.~1). A group of 26 people met to discuss the physics of resonances in QCD. The aim of the meeting was defined by the following three key questions; what is needed to understand the physics of resonances in QCD?; where does QCD lead us to expect resonances with exotic quantum numbers?; and what experimental efforts are required to arrive at a coherent picture? For light mesons and baryons only those with up, down and strange quark content were considered. For heavy-light and heavy-heavy meson systems, those with charm quarks were the focus.This document summarizes the discussions by the participants, which in turn led to the coherent conclusions we present here.

  11. Resonant Thermoelectric Nanophotonics

    CERN Document Server

    Mauser, Kelly W; Kim, Seyoon; Fleischman, Dagny; Atwater, Harry A

    2016-01-01

    Photodetectors are typically based on photocurrent generation from electron-hole pairs in semiconductor structures and on bolometry for wavelengths that are below bandgap absorption. In both cases, resonant plasmonic and nanophotonic structures have been successfully used to enhance performance. In this work, we demonstrate subwavelength thermoelectric nanostructures designed for resonant spectrally selective absorption, which creates large enough localized temperature gradients to generate easily measureable thermoelectric voltages. We show that such structures are tunable and are capable of highly wavelength specific detection, with an input power responsivity of up to 119 V/W (referenced to incident illumination), and response times of nearly 3 kHz, by combining resonant absorption and thermoelectric junctions within a single structure, yielding a bandgap-independent photodetection mechanism. We report results for both resonant nanophotonic bismuth telluride-antimony telluride structures and chromel-alumel...

  12. Resonance Production in Jet

    CERN Document Server

    Markert, Christina

    2007-01-01

    Hadronic resonances with short life times and strong coupling to the dense medium may exhibit mass shifts and width broadening as signatures of chiral symmetry restoration at the phase transition between hadronic and partonic matter. Resonances with different lifetimes are also used to extract information about the time evolution and temperature of the expanding hadronic medium. In order to collect information about the early stage (at the phase transition) of a heavy-ion collision, resonances and decay particles which are unaffected by the hadronic medium have to be used. We explore a possible new technique to extract signals from the early stage through the selection of resonances from jets. A first attempt of this analysis, using the reconstructed $\\phi$(1020) from 200 GeV Au+Au collisions in STAR, is presented.

  13. Triple-resonant transducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Stephen C

    2012-06-01

    A detailed analysis is presented of two novel multiple-resonant transducers which produce a wider transmit response than that of a conventional Tonpilz-type transducer. These multi-resonant transducers are Tonpilz-type longitudinal vibrators that produce three coupled resonances and are referred to as triple-resonant transducers (TRTs). One of these designs is a mechanical series arrangement of a tail mass, piezoelectric ceramic stack, central mass, compliant spring, second central mass, second compliant spring, and a piston-radiating head mass. The other TRT design is a mechanical series arrangement of a tail mass, piezoelectric ceramic stack, central mass, compliant spring, and head mass with a quarter-wave matching layer of poly(methyl methacrylate) on the head mass. Several prototype transducer element designs were fabricated that demonstrated proof-of-concept.

  14. Magnetic Resonance Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert H. Morris

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic Resonance finds countless applications, from spectroscopy to imaging, routinely in almost all research and medical institutions across the globe. It is also becoming more frequently used for specific applications in which the whole instrument and system is designed for a dedicated application. With beginnings in borehole logging for the petro-chemical industry Magnetic Resonance sensors have been applied to fields as varied as online process monitoring for food manufacture and medical point of care diagnostics. This great diversity is seeing exciting developments in magnetic resonance sensing technology published in application specific journals where they are often not seen by the wider sensor community. It is clear that there is enormous interest in magnetic resonance sensors which represents a significant growth area. The aim of this special edition of Sensors was to address the wide distribution of relevant articles by providing a forum to disseminate cutting edge research in this field in a single open source publication.[...

  15. Resonances in QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Matthias F. M.; Lange, Jens Sören; Pennington, Michael; Bettoni, Diego; Brambilla, Nora; Crede, Volker; Eidelman, Simon; Gillitzer, Albrecht; Gradl, Wolfgang; Lang, Christian B.; Metag, Volker; Nakano, Takashi; Nieves, Juan; Neubert, Sebastian; Oka, Makoto; Olsen, Stephen L.; Pappagallo, Marco; Paul, Stephan; Pelizäus, Marc; Pilloni, Alessandro; Prencipe, Elisabetta; Ritman, Jim; Ryan, Sinead; Thoma, Ulrike; Uwer, Ulrich; Weise, Wolfram

    2016-04-01

    We report on the EMMI Rapid Reaction Task Force meeting 'Resonances in QCD', which took place at GSI October 12-14, 2015. A group of 26 people met to discuss the physics of resonances in QCD. The aim of the meeting was defined by the following three key questions: What is needed to understand the physics of resonances in QCD? Where does QCD lead us to expect resonances with exotic quantum numbers? What experimental efforts are required to arrive at a coherent picture? For light mesons and baryons only those with up, down and strange quark content were considered. For heavy-light and heavy-heavy meson systems, those with charm quarks were the focus. This document summarizes the discussions by the participants, which in turn led to the coherent conclusions we present here.

  16. Resonances in QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Lutz, Matthias F M; Pennington, Michael; Bettoni, Diego; Brambilla, Nora; Crede, Volker; Eidelman, Simon; Gillitzer, Albrecht; Gradl, Wolfgang; Lang, Christian B; Metag, Volker; Nieves, Juan; Neubert, Sebastian; Oka, Makoto; Olsen, Steve L; Pappagallo, Marco; Paul, Stephan; Pelizäus, Marc; Pilloni, Alessandro; Prencipe, Elisabetta; Ritman, Jim; Ryan, Sinead; Thoma, Ulrike; Uwer, Ulrich; Weise, Wolfram

    2015-01-01

    We report on the EMMI Rapid Reaction Task Force meeting 'Resonances in QCD', which took place at GSI October 12-14, 2015. A group of 26 people met to discuss the physics of resonances in QCD. The aim of the meeting was defined by the following three key questions: What is needed to understand the physics of resonances in QCD? Where does QCD lead us to expect resonances with exotic quantum numbers? What experimental efforts are required to arrive at a coherent picture? For light mesons and baryons only those with ${\\it up}$, ${\\it down}$ and ${\\it strange}$ quark content were considered. For heavy-light and heavy-heavy meson systems, those with ${\\it charm}$ quarks were the focus. This document summarizes the discussions by the participants, which in turn led to the coherent conclusions we present here.

  17. Lattices of dielectric resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Trubin, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    This book provides the analytical theory of complex systems composed of a large number of high-Q dielectric resonators. Spherical and cylindrical dielectric resonators with inferior and also whispering gallery oscillations allocated in various lattices are considered. A new approach to S-matrix parameter calculations based on perturbation theory of Maxwell equations, developed for a number of high-Q dielectric bodies, is introduced. All physical relationships are obtained in analytical form and are suitable for further computations. Essential attention is given to a new unified formalism of the description of scattering processes. The general scattering task for coupled eigen oscillations of the whole system of dielectric resonators is described. The equations for the  expansion coefficients are explained in an applicable way. The temporal Green functions for the dielectric resonator are presented. The scattering process of short pulses in dielectric filter structures, dielectric antennas  and lattices of d...

  18. Piezoelectric MEMS resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Piazza, Gianluca

    2017-01-01

    This book introduces piezoelectric microelectromechanical (pMEMS) resonators to a broad audience by reviewing design techniques including use of finite element modeling, testing and qualification of resonators, and fabrication and large scale manufacturing techniques to help inspire future research and entrepreneurial activities in pMEMS. The authors discuss the most exciting developments in the area of materials and devices for the making of piezoelectric MEMS resonators, and offer direct examples of the technical challenges that need to be overcome in order to commercialize these types of devices. Some of the topics covered include: Widely-used piezoelectric materials, as well as materials in which there is emerging interest Principle of operation and design approaches for the making of flexural, contour-mode, thickness-mode, and shear-mode piezoelectric resonators, and examples of practical implementation of these devices Large scale manufacturing approaches, with a focus on the practical aspects associate...

  19. Perspective on resonances of metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Li; Huang, Lirong

    2015-07-27

    Electromagnetic resonance as the most important characteristic of metamaterials enables lots of exotic phenomena, such as invisible, negative refraction, man-made magnetism, etc. Conventional LC-resonance circuit model as the most authoritative and classic model is good at explaining and predicting the fundamental resonance wavelength of a metamaterial, while feels hard for high-order resonances, especially for resonance intensity (strength of resonance, determining on the performance and efficiency of metamaterial-based devices). In present work, via an easy-to-understand mass-spring model, we present a different and comprehensive insight for the resonance mechanism of metamaterials, through which both the resonance wavelengths (including the fundamental and high-order resonance wavelengths) and resonance intensities of metamaterials can be better understood. This developed theory has been well verified by different-material and different-structure resonators. This perspective will provide a broader space for exploring novel optical devices based on metamaterials (or metasurfaces).

  20. Resonant Orbital Dynamics in LEO Region: Space Debris in Focus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Sampaio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing number of objects orbiting the earth justifies the great attention and interest in the observation, spacecraft protection, and collision avoidance. These studies involve different disturbances and resonances in the orbital motions of these objects distributed by the distinct altitudes. In this work, objects in resonant orbital motions are studied in low earth orbits. Using the two-line elements (TLE of the NORAD, resonant angles and resonant periods associated with real motions are described, providing more accurate information to develop an analytical model that describes a certain resonance. The time behaviors of the semimajor axis, eccentricity, and inclination of some space debris are studied. Possible irregular motions are observed by the frequency analysis and by the presence of different resonant angles describing the orbital dynamics of these objects.

  1. Geometric Stochastic Resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Pulak Kumar; Savel'ev, Sergey E; Nori, Franco

    2015-01-01

    A Brownian particle moving across a porous membrane subject to an oscillating force exhibits stochastic resonance with properties which strongly depend on the geometry of the confining cavities on the two sides of the membrane. Such a manifestation of stochastic resonance requires neither energetic nor entropic barriers, and can thus be regarded as a purely geometric effect. The magnitude of this effect is sensitive to the geometry of both the cavities and the pores, thus leading to distinctive optimal synchronization conditions.

  2. Hexagonal quartz resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Roswell D. M.

    1982-01-01

    A generally flat, relatively thin AT-cut piezoelectric resonator element structured to minimize the force-frequency effect when mounted and energized in a housing. The resonator is in the form of an equilateral hexagon with the X crystallographic axis of the crystal passing through one set of opposing corners with mounting being effected at an adjacent set of corners respectively .+-.60.degree. away from the X axis which thereby results in a substantially zero frequency shift of the operating frequency.

  3. Resonant dielectric metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loui, Hung; Carroll, James; Clem, Paul G; Sinclair, Michael B

    2014-12-02

    A resonant dielectric metamaterial comprises a first and a second set of dielectric scattering particles (e.g., spheres) having different permittivities arranged in a cubic array. The array can be an ordered or randomized array of particles. The resonant dielectric metamaterials are low-loss 3D isotropic materials with negative permittivity and permeability. Such isotropic double negative materials offer polarization and direction independent electromagnetic wave propagation.

  4. Three-neutron resonance trajectories for realistic interaction models

    CERN Document Server

    Lazauskas, R

    2005-01-01

    Three-neutron resonances are searched using realistic nucleon-nucleon interaction models. Resonance pole trajectories were explored by artificially binding three-neutron and then gradually removing additional interaction. The final pole positions for three-neutron states up to $|J|$=5/2 finish in the fourth energy quadrant with Re(E)$\\leqslant0$ before additional interaction is removed. This study shows that realistic nucleon-nucleon interaction models exclude possible existence of observable three-neutron resonances.

  5. Acoustic resonance for nonmetallic mine detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kercel, S.W.

    1998-04-01

    The feasibility of acoustic resonance for detection of plastic mines was investigated by researchers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Instrumentation and Controls Division under an internally funded program. The data reported in this paper suggest that acoustic resonance is not a practical method for mine detection. Representative small plastic anti-personnel mines were tested, and were found to not exhibit detectable acoustic resonances. Also, non-metal objects known to have strong acoustic resonances were tested with a variety of excitation techniques, and no practical non-contact method of exciting a consistently detectable resonance in a buried object was discovered. Some of the experimental data developed in this work may be useful to other researchers seeking a method to detect buried plastic mines. A number of excitation methods and their pitfalls are discussed. Excitation methods that were investigated include swept acoustic, chopped acoustic, wavelet acoustic, and mechanical shaking. Under very contrived conditions, a weak response that could be attributed to acoustic resonance was observed, but it does not appear to be practical as a mine detection feature. Transfer properties of soil were investigated. Impulse responses of several representative plastic mines were investigated. Acoustic leakage coupling, and its implications as a disruptive mechanism were investigated.

  6. How the $\\gamma \\gamma$ Resonance Stole Christmas

    CERN Document Server

    Craig, Nathaniel; Kilic, Can; Thomas, Scott

    2015-01-01

    The experimental and theoretical implications of heavy di-gauge boson resonances that couple to, or are comprised of, new charged and strongly interacting matter are investigated. Observation and measurement of ratios of the resonant di-gauge boson channels $WW$, $ZZ$, $\\gamma \\gamma$, $Z \\gamma$, and $gg$ in the form of di-jets, provide a rather direct -- and for some ratios a rather robust -- probe of the gauge representations of the new matter. For a spin-zero resonance with the quantum numbers of the vacuum, the ratios of resonant $WW$ and $ZZ$ to $\\gamma \\gamma$ channels, as well as the longitudinal versus transverse polarization fractions in the $WW$ and $ZZ$ channels, provide extraordinarily sensitive probes for possible mixing with the Higgs boson, while di-Higgs and di-top resonant channels, $hh$ and $tt$, provide somewhat less sensitivity. We present a survey of possible underlying models for di-gauge boson resonances by considering various limits for the mass of the new charged and strongly interac...

  7. Integrated plasmonic refractometric sensor using Fano resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherif, S. M.; Zografopoulos, D. C.; Shahada, L. A.; Beccherelli, R.; Swillam, M.

    2017-02-01

    We propose a plasmonic refractometric sensor that is based on Fano resonances excited in a resonant rectangular cavity coupled to a metal-insulator-metal bus waveguide. The properties of the resonances are controlled by varying the dimensions of the rectangular resonator and the observed Fano profile stems from the multimode interference of resonant cavity modes. We theoretically investigate the device’s performance as a highly sensitive refractometric plasmonic sensor which operates on gases, water and organic solvent solutions with tens of femtoliters of analyte. The sensor is studied in a wide operational range (0.7-2.7 μm) covering the entire near infrared spectral range, and is characterized by large sensitivity, which reaches 1550 nm RIU-1, and sensitivity per unit volume higher than 107 nm (RIU · nl)-1 at the resonant wavelength of 1.55 μm. The proposed plasmonic structure is very promising for integrated sensing applications owing to its small footprint and surprisingly simple layout.

  8. A Separable Insertion Method to Calculate Atomic and Molecular Resonances on a FE-DVR Grid using Exterior Complex Scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeln, Brant Anthony

    The study of metastable electronic resonances, anion or neutral states of finite lifetime, in molecules is an important area of research where currently no theoretical technique is generally applicable. The role of theory is to calculate both the position and width, which is proportional to the inverse of the lifetime, of these resonances and how they vary with respect to nuclear geometry in order to generate potential energy surfaces. These surfaces are the basis of time-dependent models of the molecular dynamics where the system moves towards vibrational excitation or fragmentation. Three fundamental electronic processes that can be modeled this way are dissociative electronic attachment, vibrational excitation through electronic impact and autoionization. Currently, experimental investigation into these processes is being preformed on polyatomic molecules while theoreticians continue their fifty-year-old search for robust methods to calculate them. The separable insertion method, investigated in this thesis, seeks to tackle the problem of calculating metastable resonances by using existing quantum chemistry tools along with a grid-based method employing exterior complex scaling (ECS). Modern quantum chemistry methods are extremely efficient at calculating ground and (bound) excited electronic states of atoms and molecules by utilizing Gaussian basis functions. These functions provide both a numerically fast and analytic solution to the necessary two-electron, six-dimensional integrals required in structure calculations. However, these computer programs, based on analytic Gaussian basis sets, cannot construct solutions that are not square-integrable, such as resonance wavefunctions. ECS, on the other hand, can formally calculate resonance solutions by rotating the asymptotic electronic coordinates into the complex plane. The complex Siegert energies for resonances, Eres = ER - iGamma/2 where ER is the real-valued position of the resonance and Gamma is the width

  9. Electronic phase separation in La sub 1 sub . sub 2 Sr sub 1 sub . sub 8 Mn sub 2 O sub 7 observed by sup 5 sup 5 Mn nuclear magnetic resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Shimizu, K; Renard, J P; Pevcolevschi, A

    2003-01-01

    A single crystal of perovskite bilayer manganite La sub 1 sub . sub 2 Sr sub 1 sub . sub 8 Mn sub 2 O sub 7 has been studied by the sup 5 sup 5 Mn NMR technique. The observed spectra at 4.2 K in zero external magnetic field are broad and spread in the frequency range 310-480 MHz. The shape of the spectrum depends strongly on the rf radiation field for exciting and refocusing a spin-echo signal. In external magnetic fields up to 1.75 T, signals arising from both metallic and insulating phases are observed, which is an evidence of the electronic phase separation. (author)

  10. Not-so-resonant, resonant absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunel, F.

    1987-07-01

    When an intense electromagnetic wave is incident obliquely on a sharply bounded overdense plasma, strong energy absorption can be accounted for by the electrons that are dragged into the vacuum and sent back into the plasma with velocities v~=vosc. This mechanism is more efficient than usual resonant absorption for vosc/ω>L, with L being the density gradient length. In the very high-intensity CO2-laser-target interaction, this mechanism may account for most of the energy absorption.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging; Imagerie par resonance magnetique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontanel, F. [Centre Hospitalier, 40 - Mont-de -Marsan (France); Clerc, T. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 76 - Rouen (France); Theolier, S. [Hospice Civils de Lyon, 69 - Lyon (France); Verdenet, J. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 25 - Besancon (France)

    1997-04-01

    The last improvements in nuclear magnetic resonance imaging are detailed here, society by society with an expose of their different devices. In the future the different technological evolutions will be on a faster acquisition, allowing to reduce the examination time, on the development of a more acute cardiac imaging, of a functional neuro-imaging and an interactive imaging for intervention. With the contrast products, staying a longer time in the vascular area, the angiography will find its place. Finally, the studies on magnetic fields should allow to increase the volume to examine. (N.C.).

  12. Hyperbolic Resonances of Metasurface Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Keene, David

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new class of optical resonator structures featuring one or two metasurface reflectors or metacavities and predict that such resonators support novel hyperbolic resonances. As an example of such resonances we introduce hyperbolic Tamm plasmons (HTPs) and hyperbolic Fabry-Perot resonances (HFPs). The hyperbolic optical modes feature low-loss incident power re-distribution over TM and TE polarization output channels, clover-leaf anisotropic dispersion, and other unique properties which are tunable and are useful for multiple applications.

  13. Overview of baryon resonances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Downie E.J.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The quest to understand the physics of any system cannot be said to be complete as long as one cannot predict and fully understand its resonance spectrum. Despite this, due to the experimental challenge of the required double polarization measurements and the difficulty in achieving unambiguous, model-independent extraction and interpretation of the nucleon resonance spectrum of many broad and overlapping resonances, understanding of the structure and dynamics of the nucleon has suffered. The recent improvement in statistical quality and kinematic range of the data made available by such full-solid-angle systems as the CB and TAPS constellation at MAMI, coupled with the high flux polarized photon beam provided by the Glasgow Photon Tagger, and the excellent properties of the Mainz Frozen Spin Target, when paired with new developments in Partial Wave Analysis (PWA methodology make this a very exciting and fruitful time in nucleon resonance studies. Here the recent influx of data and PWA developments are summarized, and the requirements for a complete, unambiguous PWA solution over the first and second resonance region are briefly reviewed.

  14. The Resonant Transneptunian Populations

    CERN Document Server

    Gladman, B; Petit, J-M; Kavelaars, J; Jones, R L; Parker, J Wm; Van Laerhoven, C; Nicholson, P; Rousselot, P; Bieryla, A; Ashby, M L N

    2012-01-01

    The transneptunian objects (TNOs) trapped in mean-motion resonances with Neptune were likely emplaced there during planet migration late in the giant-planet formation process. We perform detailed modelling of the resonant objects detected in the Canada-France Ecliptic Plane Survey (CFEPS) in order to provide population estimates and, for some resonances, constrain the complex internal orbital element distribution. Detection biases play a critical role because phase relationships with Neptune make object discovery more likely at certain longitudes. This paper discusses the 3:2, 5:2, 2:1, 3:1, 5:1, 4:3, 5:3, 7:3, 5:4, and 7:4 mean-motion resonances, all of which had CFEPS detections, along with our upper limit on 1:1 Neptune Trojans (which is consistent with their small population estimated elsewhere). For the plutinos (TNOs in the 3:2 resonance) we refine the orbital element distribution given in Kavelaars et al. (2009) and show that steep H-magnitude distributions (N(H) proportional to 10aH, with a=0.8-0.9) a...

  15. Spin-orbit ferromagnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Andrew

    2013-03-01

    In conventional magnetic resonance techniques the magnitude and direction of the oscillatory magnetic field are (at least approximately) known. This oscillatory field is used to probe the properties of a spin ensemble. Here, I will describe experiments that do the inverse. I will discuss how we use a magnetic resonance technique to map out the current-induced effective magnetic fields in the ferromagnetic semiconductors (Ga,Mn)As and (Ga,Mn)(As,P). These current-induced fields have their origin in the spin-orbit interaction. Effective magnetic fields are observed with symmetries which resemble the Dresselhaus and Rashba spin-orbit interactions and which depend on the diagonal and off-diagonal strain respectively. Ferromagnetic semiconductor materials of different strains, annealing conditions and concentrations are studied and the results compared with theoretical calculations. Our original study measured the rectification voltage coming from the product of the oscillatory magnetoresistance, during magnetisation precession, and the alternating current. More recently we have developed an impedance matching technique which enables us to extract microwave voltages from these high resistance (10 k Ω) samples. In this way we measure the microwave voltage coming from the product of the oscillating magneto-resistance and a direct current. The direct current is observed to affect the magnetisation precession, indicating that anti-damping as well as field-like torques can originate from the spin-orbit interaction.

  16. Low frequency wave resonance in fringing reef environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pomeroy, A.W.M.; van Dongeren, A.; Lowe, R.J.; Van Thiel de Vries, J.S.M.; Roelvink, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Low frequency wave resonance has been postulated to enhance damage to coral reef protected coastlines during storm events. This paper uses the numerical model XBeach to examine the dynamics that contribute to resonance that have been previously observed on a fringing reef on Guam during tropical sto

  17. Self-detecting gate-tunable nanotube paddle resonators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witkamp, B.; Poot, M.; Pathangi, H.; Hüttel, A.K.; Van der Zant, H.S.J.

    2008-01-01

    We have fabricated suspended metal paddle resonators with carbon nanotubes functioning as self-detecting torsional springs. We observe gate-tunable resonances that either tune to higher or to lower frequencies when increasing the dc voltage on the back gate. We attribute the former modes to flexural

  18. Temperature dependence of ferromagnetic resonance measurements in nanostructured line arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raposo V.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We report the effect of temperature on the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR spectra of nanostructured line arrays. Different temperature dependences are observed for permalloy an nickel based samples. The qualitative features of the temperature dependence of the resonance field and linewidth can be described by the usual expression of slow relaxing linewidth mechanism and Bloch equation.

  19. Molecular structure and motion in zero field magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarvie, T.P.

    1989-10-01

    Zero field magnetic resonance is well suited for the determination of molecular structure and the study of motion in disordered materials. Experiments performed in zero applied magnetic field avoid the anisotropic broadening in high field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. As a result, molecular structure and subtle effects of motion are more readily observed.

  20. Fabrication of resonant micro cantilevers with integrated transparent fluidic channel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Faheem; Schmid, Silvan; Davis, Zachary James

    2011-01-01

    be visually observed through the transparent fluidic channel. The resonant frequency of the cantilever is changed by the fluid inside the channel, due to the change in mass. The shift in the resonant frequency can be translated into a density of the fluid or into the presence of macro/micro molecules...

  1. Calibration of the ALLEGRO resonant detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHugh, Martin P [Department of Physics, Loyola University, New Orleans, Louisiana 70118 (United States); Johnson, Warren W [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Hamilton, William O [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Hanson, Jonathan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Heng, Ik Siong [University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); McNeese, Daniel [Department of Physics, Loyola University, New Orleans, Louisiana 70118 (United States); Miller, Phillip [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Nettles, Damon [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Weaver, Jordan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Zhang Ping [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States)

    2005-09-21

    We describe a method for calibrating the ALLEGRO resonant detector. The resulting response function can be used to transform the observed data backwards to gravitational strain data. These data are the input to a cross-correlation analysis to search for stochastic gravitational waves.

  2. 口腔用金属材料的磁共振伪影的检测%Primary Observation by Measuring Magnetic Resonance Artifacts Caused by Metallic Dental Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    解春; 俞立英; 周艺; 林江

    2001-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the existence and extent of magnetic resonance(MR) artifacts caused by frequently used metallic dental materials and to compare the influence of different MRI sequences on artifacts. Methods A total of 22 kinds and 25 metallic dental samples were tested with 1.5 T MR imager and gradient-echo sequence. Spin-echo and fast spin-echo were added to parts of these samples. Results Of all the 25 metallic dental samples, 11 including gold, amalgam, and silver point did not produce artifact. Titanium alloy and porcelain product fused in metal had mild artifacts. Whereas the remaining 12 samples such as the retention pin and pivot pin showed severe artifacts. Artifacts produced by retention pin, nickel chromium crown and so on were less severe on fast spin-echo. Conclusions Attention should be paid to some of the metallic dental materials, which could cause severe MR artifacts and image degradation, when undergoing face,jaw and head MR examination. Artifacts can be alleviated by using proper metallic materials or choosing proper imaging sequence and parameters.%目的检测口腔内常用金属材料在磁共振检查时是否产生伪影和伪影的严重程度;并比较不同检查序列 对伪影的影响。方法对22种25件口腔内常用金属材料做了磁共振成像测试,磁共振仪磁感应强度为1.5 T,所 用序列是梯度回波,部分材料加做自旋回波和快速自旋回波。结果铸金片、银汞合金、银尖等11件试样无伪影; 钛合金和金属烤瓷成品有轻度伪影;牙用固位钉、椿钉12件试样有严重伪影。牙用固位钉、镍铬合金冠等材料在 快速自旋回波图像上伪影减轻。结论部分口腔内金属材料会引起严重伪影,影响图像质量,所以在做口腔颌面 部和脑部磁共振成像时,须引起重视。通过合理选择金属材料,合理选择成像序列和参数可以减轻伪影。

  3. Resonance vector mode locking

    CERN Document Server

    Kolpakov, Stanislav A; Loika, Yuri; Tarasov, Nikita; Kalashnikov, Vladimir; Agrawal, Govind P

    2015-01-01

    A mode locked fibre laser as a source of ultra-stable pulse train has revolutionised a wide range of fundamental and applied research areas by offering high peak powers, high repetition rates, femtosecond range pulse widths and a narrow linewidth. However, further progress in linewidth narrowing seems to be limited by the complexity of the carrier-envelope phase control. Here for the first time we demonstrate experimentally and theoretically a new mechanism of resonance vector self-mode locking where tuning in-cavity birefringence leads to excitation of the longitudinal modes sidebands accompanied by the resonance phase locking of sidebands with the adjacent longitudinal modes. An additional resonance with acoustic phonons provides the repetition rate tunability and linewidth narrowing down to Hz range that drastically reduces the complexity of the carrier-envelope phase control and so will open the way to advance lasers in the context of applications in metrology, spectroscopy, microwave photonics, astronomy...

  4. Quartz resonator processing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Roswell D. M.

    1983-01-01

    Disclosed is a single chamber ultra-high vacuum processing system for the oduction of hermetically sealed quartz resonators wherein electrode metallization and sealing are carried out along with cleaning and bake-out without any air exposure between the processing steps. The system includes a common vacuum chamber in which is located a rotatable wheel-like member which is adapted to move a plurality of individual component sets of a flat pack resonator unit past discretely located processing stations in said chamber whereupon electrode deposition takes place followed by the placement of ceramic covers over a frame containing a resonator element and then to a sealing stage where a pair of hydraulic rams including heating elements effect a metallized bonding of the covers to the frame.

  5. Magnetodielectric effect of Mn-Zn ferrite at resonant frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pengfei, Pan; Ning, Zhang

    2016-10-01

    The dielectric properties and the magnetodielectric effect in Mn-Zn ferrite at resonant frequency have been studied in this paper. Dimensional-resonance-induced abnormal dielectric spectrum was observed at f≈1 MHz. The relatively large magnetodielectric ratio of 4500% in a magnetic field of 3.5 kOe was achieved from the Mn-Zn ferrite sample with the initial permeability of 15 K at resonant frequency at room temperature. Theoretical analysis suggests that the large MD effect at resonant frequency is attributed to the enhanced magnetostriction effect.

  6. AN ATTRIBUTION OF CAVITATION RESONANCE: VOLUMETRIC OSCILLATIONS OF CLOUD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZUO Zhi-gang; LI Sheng-cai; LIU Shu-hong; LI Shuang; CHEN Hui

    2009-01-01

    In order to further verify the proposed theory of cavitation resonance, as well as to proceed the investigations into microscopic level, a series of studies are being carried out on the Warwick venturi. The analysis of the oscillation characteristics of the cavitation resonance has conclusively verified the macro-mechanism proposed through previous studies on other cavitating flows by the authors. The initial observations using high-speed photographic approach have revealed a new attribution of cavitation resonance. That is, the volumetric oscillation of cavitation cloud is associated with the cavitation resonance, which is a collective behaviour of the bubbles in the cloud.

  7. Competing Turing and Faraday Instabilities in Longitudinally Modulated Passive Resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copie, François; Conforti, Matteo; Kudlinski, Alexandre; Mussot, Arnaud; Trillo, Stefano

    2016-04-08

    We experimentally investigate the interplay of Turing (modulational) and Faraday (parametric) instabilities in a bistable passive nonlinear resonator. The Faraday branch is induced via parametric resonance owing to a periodic modulation of the resonator dispersion. We show that the bistable switching dynamics is dramatically affected by the competition between the two instability mechanisms, which dictates two completely novel scenarios. At low detunings from resonance, switching occurs between the stable stationary lower branch and the Faraday-unstable upper branch, whereas at high detunings we observe the crossover between the Turing and Faraday periodic structures. The results are well explained in terms of the universal Lugiato-Lefever model.

  8. Reconfigurable optical routers based on Coupled Resonator Induced Transparency resonances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancinelli, M; Bettotti, P; Fedeli, J M; Pavesi, L

    2012-10-08

    The interferometric coupling of pairs of resonators in a resonator sequence generates coupled ring induced transparency (CRIT) resonances. These have quality factors an order of magnitude greater than those of single resonators. We show that it is possible to engineer CRIT resonances in tapered SCISSOR (Side Coupled Integrated Space Sequence of Resonator) to realize fast and efficient reconfigurable optical switches and routers handling several channels while keeping single channel addressing capabilities. Tapered SCISSORs are fabricated in silicon-on-insulator technology. Furthermore, tapered SCISSORs show multiple-channel switching behavior that can be exploited in DWDM applications.

  9. Acoustic Fano resonators

    KAUST Repository

    Amin, Muhammad

    2014-07-01

    The resonances with asymmetric Fano line-shapes were originally discovered in the context of quantum mechanics (U. Fano, Phys. Rev., 124, 1866-1878, 1961). Quantum Fano resonances were generated from destructive interference of a discrete state with a continuum one. During the last decade this concept has been applied in plasmonics where the interference between a narrowband polariton and a broader one has been used to generate electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) (M. Rahmani, et al., Laser Photon. Rev., 7, 329-349, 2013).

  10. Pygmy resonances and nucleosynthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Tsoneva, Nadia

    2014-01-01

    A microscopic theoretical approach based on a self-consistent density functional theory for the nuclear ground state and QRPA formalism extended with multi-phonon degrees of freedom for the nuclear excited states is implemented in investigations of new low-energy modes called pygmy resonances. Advantage of the method is the unified description of low-energy multiphonon excitations, pygmy resonances and core polarization effects. This is found of crucial importance for the understanding of the fine structure of nuclear response functions at low energies. Aspects of the precise knowledge of nuclear response functions around the neutron threshold are discussed in a connection to nucleosynthesis.

  11. Nanoantenna using mechanical resonance

    KAUST Repository

    Chang Hwa Lee,

    2010-11-01

    Nanoantenna using mechanical resonance vibration is made from an indium tin oxide (ITO) coated vertically aligned nanorod array. Only this structure works as a radio with demodulator without any electrical circuit using field emission phenomenon. A top-down fabrication method of an ITO coated nanorod array is proposed using a modified UV lithography. The received radio frequency and the resonance frequency of nanoantenna can be controlled by the fabrication condition through the height of a nanorod array. The modulated signals are received successfully with the transmission carrier wave frequency (248MHz) and the proposed nanoantenna is expected to be used in communication system for ultra small scale sensor. ©2010 IEEE.

  12. Excitation and tuning of Fano-like cavity plasmon resonances in dielectric-metal core-shell resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Ping; Wan, Mingjie; Wu, Wenyang; Chen, Zhuo; Wang, Zhenlin

    2016-05-01

    Fano resonances have been realized in plasmonic systems and have found intriguing applications, in which, however, precisely controlled symmetry breaking or particular arrangement of multiple constituents is usually involved. Although simple core-shell type architectures composed of a spherical dielectric core and a concentric metallic shell layer have been proposed as good candidates that support inherent Fano resonances, these theoretical predictions have rarely seen any detailed experimental investigation. Here, we report on the experimental investigation of the magnetic and electric-based multipolar plasmonic Fano resonances in the dielectric-metal core-shell resonators that are formed by wrapping a nearly perfect metal shell layer around a dielectric sphere. We demonstrate that these Fano resonances originate from the interference between the Mie cavity and sphere plasmon resonances. Moreover, we present that the variation on either the dielectric core size or core refractive index allows for easily tuning the observed Fano resonances over a wide spectral range. Our findings are supported by excellent agreement with analytical calculations, and offer unprecedented opportunities for realizing ultrasensitive bio-sensors, lasing and nonlinear optical devices.Fano resonances have been realized in plasmonic systems and have found intriguing applications, in which, however, precisely controlled symmetry breaking or particular arrangement of multiple constituents is usually involved. Although simple core-shell type architectures composed of a spherical dielectric core and a concentric metallic shell layer have been proposed as good candidates that support inherent Fano resonances, these theoretical predictions have rarely seen any detailed experimental investigation. Here, we report on the experimental investigation of the magnetic and electric-based multipolar plasmonic Fano resonances in the dielectric-metal core-shell resonators that are formed by wrapping a

  13. High Quality Factor Fano-Resonant All-Dielectric Metamaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Yuanmu; Briggs, Dayrl P; Valentine, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Fano-resonant plasmonic metamaterials and nanostructures have become a major focus of the nanophotonics fields over the past several years due their ability to produce high quality factor (Q-factor) resonances. The origin of such resonances is the interference between a broad and narrow resonance, ultimately allowing suppression of radiative damping. However, Fano-resonant plasmonic structures still suffer non-radiative damping due to Ohmic loss, ultimately limiting the achievable Q-factors to values less than 10. Here, we report experimental demonstration of Fano-resonant silicon-based metamaterials that have a response that mimics the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) found in atomic systems. Due to extremely low absorption loss, a record-high Q-factor of 306 was experimentally observed. Furthermore, the unit cell of the metamaterial was designed with a feed-gap which results in strong local field enhancement in the surrounding medium resulting in strong light-matter interaction. This allows th...

  14. Electromagnetically induced transparency with large delay-bandwidth product induced by magnetic resonance near field coupling to electric resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hai-ming; Liu, Shao-bin, E-mail: lsb@nuaa.edu.cn; Liu, Si-yuan; Zhang, Hai-feng; Bian, Bo-rui; Kong, Xiang-kun [Key Laboratory of Radar Imaging and Microwave Photonics, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Wang, Shen-yun [Research Center of Applied Electromagnetics, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044 (China)

    2015-03-16

    In this paper, we numerically and experimentally demonstrate electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT)-like spectral response with magnetic resonance near field coupling to electric resonance. Six split-ring resonators and a cut wire are chosen as the bright and dark resonator, respectively. An EIT-like transmission peak located between two dips can be observed with incident magnetic field excitation. A large delay bandwidth product (0.39) is obtained, which has potential application in quantum optics and communications. The experimental results are in good agreement with simulated results.

  15. Electron-electron double resonance (ELDOR) with a loop-gap resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, James S.; Yin, Jun-Jie; Froncisz, W.; Feix, Jimmy B.

    Electron-electron double-resonance (ELDOR) experiments on nitroxide-radical-spin-labeled liposomes have been performed using a loop-gap resonator. The signal-to-noise ratio expressed on a molarity basis is 20-fold over the best that has been achieved using a bimodal cavity. This improvement permits ELDOR experiments on spin-labeled plasma membranes of intact cells, as illustrated by a prototype experiment on red blood cells labeled with stearic acid spin label. Moreover, 20 times greater pumping energy density at the sample is achievable for a given incident pump power, permitting ELDOR experiments on less readily saturated systems. Pump and observing frequencies are introduced directly into the loop-gap resonator, which has a relatively low Q, and the pump electron paramagnetic resonance signal is isolated from the receiver using a high Q trap microwave filter.

  16. Holonomy invariance, orbital resonances, and kilohertz QPOs

    CERN Document Server

    Abramowicz, M A; Kluzniak, W; Thampan, A V; Wallinder, F

    2002-01-01

    Quantized orbital structures are typical for many aspects of classical gravity (Newton's as well as Einstein's). The astronomical phenomenon of orbital resonances is a well-known example. Recently, Rothman, Ellis and Murugan (2001) discussed quantized orbital structures in the novel context of a holonomy invariance of parallel transport in Schwarzschild geometry. We present here yet another example of quantization of orbits, reflecting both orbital resonances and holonomy invariance. This strong-gravity effect may already have been directly observed as the puzzling kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in the X-ray emission from a few accreting galactic black holes and several neutron stars.

  17. Polarization-selective resonant photonic crystal photodetector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jin-Kyu; Seo, Min-Kyo; Hwang, In-Kag; Kim, Sung-Bock; Lee, Yong-Hee

    2008-11-01

    Resonance-assisted photonic crystal (PhC) slab photodetectors are demonstrated by utilizing six 7-nm-thick InGaAsP quantum wells. In order to encourage efficient photon coupling into the slab from the vertical direction, a coupled-dipole-cavity-array PhC structure is employed. Inheriting the characteristics of the dipole mode, this resonant detector is highly polarization selective and shows a 22-nm-wide spectral width. The maximum responsivity of 0.28A/W, which is >20 times larger than that of the identical detector without the pattern, is observed near 1.56μm.

  18. Advances in magnetic and optical resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Warren, Warren S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance contains three articles which review quite fundamentally different aspects of coherent spectroscopy. An enormous variety of effects can be observed when optical and spin resonances are coupled, usually by a combination of radio frequency and laser irradiation. The first article reviews these effects and pays particular attention to developing a theoretical framework which is as similar as possible for the optical and spin cases. Subsequent articles examine deuterium relaxation in molecular solids, and the spatiotemporal growth of multiple spin coheren

  19. Magnetic resonance of phase transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Owens, Frank J; Farach, Horacio A

    1979-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance of Phase Transitions shows how the effects of phase transitions are manifested in the magnetic resonance data. The book discusses the basic concepts of structural phase and magnetic resonance; various types of magnetic resonances and their underlying principles; and the radiofrequency methods of nuclear magnetic resonance. The text also describes quadrupole methods; the microwave technique of electron spin resonance; and the Mössbauer effect. Phase transitions in various systems such as fluids, liquid crystals, and crystals, including paramagnets and ferroelectrics, are also

  20. Resonant filtered fiber amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Laurila, Marko; Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present our recent result on utilizing resonant/bandgap fiber designs to achieve high performance ytterbium doped fiber amplifers for achieving diffraction limited beam quality in large mode area fibers, robust bending performance and gain shaping for long wavelength operation...

  1. Resonant MEMS tunable VCSEL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ansbæk, Thor; Chung, Il-Sug; Semenova, Elizaveta;

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate how resonant excitation of a microelectro-mechanical system can be used to increase the tuning range of a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser two-fold by enabling both blue- and red-shifting of the wavelength. In this way a short-cavity design enabling wide tuning range can be r...

  2. Neutron resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunsing, F

    2005-06-15

    The present document has been written in order to obtain the diploma 'Habilitation a Diriger des Recherches'. Since this diploma is indispensable to supervise thesis students, I had the intention to write a document that can be useful for someone starting in the field of neutron resonance spectroscopy. Although the here described topics are already described elsewhere, and often in more detail, it seemed useful to have most of the relevant information in a single document. A general introduction places the topic of neutron-nucleus interaction in a nuclear physics context. The large variations of several orders of magnitude in neutron-induced reaction cross sections are explained in terms of nuclear level excitations. The random character of the resonances make nuclear model calculation predictions impossible. Then several fields in physics where neutron-induced reactions are important and to which I have contributed in some way or another, are mentioned in a first synthetic chapter. They concern topics like parity nonconservation in certain neutron resonances, stellar nucleosynthesis by neutron capture, and data for nuclear energy applications. The latter item is especially important for the transmutation of nuclear waste and for alternative fuel cycles. Nuclear data libraries are also briefly mentioned. A second chapter details the R-matrix theory. This formalism is the foundation of the description of the neutron-nucleus interaction and is present in all fields of neutron resonance spectroscopy. (author)

  3. Electrically detected ferromagnetic resonance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goennenwein, S.T.B.; Schink, S.W.; Brandlmaier, A.; Boger, A.; Opel, M.; Gross, R.; Keizer, R.S.; Klapwijk, T.M.; Gupta, A.; Huebl, H.; Bihler, C.; Brandt, M.S.

    2007-01-01

    We study the magnetoresistance properties of thin ferromagnetic CrO2 and Fe3O4 films under microwave irradiation. Both the sheet resistance ρ and the Hall voltage VHall characteristically change when a ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) occurs in the film. The electrically detected ferromagnetic resonanc

  4. Simulation of quartz resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinmann, M.; Radius, R.; Mohr, R.

    Quartz resonators are suitable as novel sensor elements in the field of profilometry and three dimensional measurement techniques. This application requires a tailoring of the oscillator circuit which is performed by a network analysis program. The equivalent network parameters are computed by a finite element analysis. The mechanical loading of the quartz is modeled by a viscous damping approach.

  5. Resonant scanning mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, John; Newman, Mike; Gutierrez, Homero; Hoffman, Charlie; Quakenbush, Tim; Waldeck, Dan; Leone, Christopher; Ostaszewski, Miro

    2014-10-01

    Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. developed a Resonant Scanning Mechanism (RSM) capable of combining a 250- Hz resonant scan about one axis with a two-hertz triangular scan about the orthogonal axis. The RSM enables a rapid, high-density scan over a significant field of regard (FOR) while minimizing size, weight, and power requirements. The azimuth scan axis is bearing mounted allowing for 30° of mechanical travel, while the resonant elevation axis is flexure and spring mounted with five degrees of mechanical travel. Pointing-knowledge error during quiescent static pointing at room temperature across the full range is better than 100 μrad RMS per axis. The compact design of the RSM, roughly the size of a soda can, makes it an ideal mechanism for use on low-altitude aircraft and unmanned aerial vehicles. Unique aspects of the opto-mechanical design include i) resonant springs which allow for a high-frequency scan axis with low power consumption; and ii) an independent lower-frequency scan axis allowing for a wide FOR. The pointing control system operates each axis independently and employs i) a position loop for the azimuth axis; and ii) a unique combination of parallel frequency and amplitude control loops for the elevation axis. All control and pointing algorithms are hosted on a 200-MHz microcontroller with 516 KB of RAM on a compact 3"×4" digital controller, also of Ball design.

  6. Folded waveguide resonator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    A waveguide resonator comprising a number of side walls defining a cavity enclosed by said sidewalls defining the cavity; and two or more conductive plates extending into the cavity, each conductive plate having a first side and a second side opposite the first side, and wherein the conductive...

  7. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  8. Wireless ferroelectric resonating sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viikari, Ville; Seppa, Heikki; Mattila, Tomi; Alastalo, Ari

    2010-04-01

    This paper presents a passive wireless resonating sensor that is based on a ferroelectric varactor. The sensor replies with its data at an intermodulation frequency when a reader device illuminates it at 2 closely located frequencies. The paper derives a theoretical equation for the response of such a sensor, verifies the theory by simulations, and demonstrates a temperature sensor based on a ferroelectric varactor.

  9. Simplified Limits on New LHC Resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Simmons, Elizabeth H; Ittisamai, Pawin; Mohan, Kirtimaan

    2016-01-01

    If an excess potentially heralding new physics is noticed in collider data, it would be useful to be able to compare the data with entire classes of models at once. This talk discusses a method that applies when the new physics corresponds to the production and decay of a single, relatively narrow, s-channel resonance. A simplifed model of the resonance allows us to convert an estimated signal cross section into model-independent bounds on the product of the branching ratios corresponding to production and decay. This quickly reveals whether a given class of models could possibly produce a signal of the observed size. We will describe how to apply our analysis framework to cases of current experimental interest, including resonances decaying to dibosons, diphotons, dileptons, or dijets.

  10. Mie resonances in inhomogeneous atomic clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Bachelard, Romain; Kaiser, Robin; Piovella, Nicola

    2011-01-01

    Despite the quantum nature of the process, collective scattering by dense cold samples of two-level atoms can be interpreted classically describing the sample as a macroscopic object with a complex refractive index. We demonstrate that Mie resonances can be easily observable in the cooperative scattering by tuning the frequency of the incident laser field or the atomic number. The solution of the scattering problem is obtained for spherical atomic clouds who have the parabolic density characteristic of BECs, and the cooperative radiation pressure force calculated exhibits resonances in the cloud displacement for dense clouds. Reminescent to uniform clouds which show a complex structure of narrow peaks, these densities show resonances, yet under the form of quite regular and contrasted oscillations.

  11. Squeezing of light via reflection from a silicon micromechanical resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Safavi-Naeini, Amir H; Hill, Jeff T; Chan, Jasper; Aspelmeyer, Markus; Painter, Oskar

    2013-01-01

    We present the measurement of squeezed light generation using an engineered optomechanical system fabricated from a silicon microchip and composed of a micromechanical resonator coupled to a nanophotonic cavity. Laser light is used to measure the fluctuations in the position of the mechanical resonator at a measurement rate comparable to the free dynamics of the mechanical resonator, and greater than its thermal decoherence rate. By approaching the strong continuous measurement regime we observe, through homodyne detection, non-trivial modifications of the reflected light's vacuum fluctuation spectrum. In spite of the mechanical resonator's highly excited thermal state ($10,000$ phonons), we observe squeezing at the level of $4.5 \\pm 0.5%$ below that of shot-noise over a few MHz bandwidth around the mechanical resonance frequency of 28 MHz. This squeezing is interpreted as an unambiguous quantum signature of radiation pressure shot-noise.

  12. Atomic excitation and recombination in external fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nayfeh, M.H.; Clark, C.W.

    1985-01-01

    This volume offers a timely look at Rydberg states of atoms in external fields and dielectronic recombination. Each topic provides authoritative coverage, presents a fresh account of a flourishing field of current atomic physics and introduces new opportunities for discovery and development. Topics considered include electron-atom scattering in external fields; observations of regular and irregular motion as exemplified by the quadratic zeeman effect and other systems; Rydberg atoms in external fields and the Coulomb geometry; crossed-field effects in the absorption spectrum of lithium in a magnetic field; precise studies of static electric field ionization; widths and shapes of stark resonances in sodium above the saddle point; studies of electric field effects and barium autoionizing resonances; autoionization and dielectronic recombination in plasma electric microfields; dielectronic recombination measurements on multicharged ions; merged beam studies of dielectronic recombination; Rydberg atoms and dielectronic recombination in astrophysics; and observations on dielectronic recombination.

  13. Effective resonant stability of Mercury

    CERN Document Server

    Sansottera, M; Lemaître, A

    2015-01-01

    Mercury is the unique known planet that is situated in a 3:2 spin-orbit resonance nowadays. Observations and models converge to the same conclusion: the planet is presently deeply trapped in the resonance and situated at the Cassini state $1$, or very close to it. We investigate the complete non-linear stability of this equilibrium, with respect to several physical parameters, in the framework of Birkhoff normal form and Nekhoroshev stability theory. We use the same approach adopted for the 1:1 spin-orbit case with a peculiar attention to the role of Mercury's non negligible eccentricity. The selected parameters are the polar moment of inertia, the Mercury's inclination and eccentricity and the precession rates of the perihelion and node. Our study produces a bound to both the latitudinal and longitudinal librations (of 0.1 radians) for a long but finite time (greatly exceeding the age of the solar system). This is the so-called effective stability time. Our conclusion is that Mercury, placed inside the 3:2 s...

  14. Scattering by coupled resonating elements in air

    CERN Document Server

    Krynkin, Anton; Chong, Alvin Y B; Taherzadeh, Shahram; Attenborough, Keith

    2011-01-01

    Scattering by (a) a single composite scatterer consisting of a concentric arrangement of an outer N-slit rigid cylinder and an inner cylinder which is either rigid or in the form of a thin elastic shell and (b) by a finite periodic array of these scatterers in air has been investigated analytically and through laboratory experiments. The composite scatterer forms a system of coupled resonators and gives rise to multiple low frequency resonances. The corresponding analytical model employs polar angle dependent boundary conditions on the surface of the N-slit cylinder. The solution inside the slits assumes plane waves. It is shown also that in the low-frequency range the N-slit rigid cylinder can be replaced by an equivalent fluid layer. Further approximations suggest a simple square root dependence of the resonant frequencies on the number of slits and this is confirmed by data. The observed resonant phenomena are associated with Helmholtz-like behaviour of the resonator for which the radius and width of the o...

  15. Simplified limits on resonances at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chivukula, R. Sekhar; Ittisamai, Pawin; Mohan, Kirtimaan; Simmons, Elizabeth H.

    2016-11-01

    In the earliest stages of evaluating new collider data, especially if a small excess may be present, it would be useful to have a method for comparing the data with entire classes of models, to get an immediate sense of which classes could conceivably be relevant. In this paper, we propose a method that applies when the new physics invoked to explain the excess corresponds to the production and decay of a single, relatively narrow, s -channel resonance. A simplifed model of the resonance allows us to convert an estimated signal cross section into general bounds on the product of the branching ratios corresponding to the dominant production and decay modes. This quickly reveals whether a given class of models could possibly produce a signal of the required size at the LHC. Our work sets up a general framework, outlines how it operates for resonances with different numbers of production and decay modes, and analyzes cases of current experimental interest, including resonances decaying to dibosons, diphotons, dileptons, or dijets. If the LHC experiments were to report their searches for new resonances beyond the standard model in the simplified limits variable ζ defined in this paper, that would make it far easier to avoid blind alleys and home in on the most likely candidate models to explain any observed excesses.

  16. Terahertz molecular resonance of cancer DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheon, Hwayeong; Yang, Hee-Jin; Lee, Sang-Hun; Kim, Young A.; Son, Joo-Hiuk

    2016-11-01

    Carcinogenesis involves the chemical and structural alteration of biomolecules in cells. Aberrant methylation of DNA is a well-known carcinogenic mechanism and a common chemical modification of DNA. Terahertz waves can directly observe changes in DNA because the characteristic energies lie in the same frequency region. In addition, terahertz energy levels are not high enough to damage DNA by ionization. Here, we present terahertz molecular resonance fingerprints of DNA methylation in cancer DNA. Methylated cytidine, a nucleoside, has terahertz characteristic energies that give rise to the molecular resonance of methylation in DNA. Molecular resonance is monitored in aqueous solutions of genomic DNA from cancer cell lines using a terahertz time-domain spectroscopic technique. Resonance signals can be quantified to identify the types of cancer cells with a certain degree of DNA methylation. These measurements reveal the existence of molecular resonance fingerprints of cancer DNAs in the terahertz region, which can be utilized for the early diagnosis of cancer cells at the molecular level.

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety What is MRI and how does it ... and MRI Breast-feeding and MRI What is MRI and how does it work? Magnetic resonance imaging, ...

  18. Sensing Based on Fano-Type Resonance Response of All-Dielectric Metamaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Semouchkina

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A new sensing approach utilizing Mie resonances in metamaterial arrays composed of dielectric resonators is proposed. These arrays were found to exhibit specific, extremely high-Q factor (up to 15,000 resonances at frequencies corresponding to the lower edge of the array second transmission band. The observed resonances possessed with features typical for Fano resonances (FRs, which were initially revealed in atomic processes and recently detected in macro-structures, where they resulted from interference between local resonances and a continuum of background waves. Our studies demonstrate that frequencies and strength of Fano-type resonances in all-dielectric arrays are defined by interaction between local Mie resonances and Fabry-Perot oscillations of Bloch eigenmodes that makes possible controlling the resonance responses by changing array arrangements. The opportunity for obtaining high-Q responses in compact arrays is investigated and promising designs for sensing the dielectric properties of analytes in the ambient are proposed.

  19. Resonant photothermal IR spectroscopy of picogram samples with microstring resonator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yamada, Shoko; Schmid, Silvan; Boisen, Anja

    2013-01-01

    Here, we report a demonstration of resonant photothermal IR spectroscopy using microstrings in mid-infrared region providing rapid identification of picogram samples. In our microelectromechanical resonant photothermal IR spectroscopy system, samples are deposited directly on microstrings using...... an in-situ sampling method and the resonance frequency of the string is measured optically. Resonance frequency shifts, proportional to the absorbed heat, are recorded in real time as monochromatic infrared light is being scanned over the mid-infrared range. These resonant photothermal IR spectroscopy...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful ... of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical ...

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head ... limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  2. Highly sensitive surface plasmon resonance chemical sensor based on Goos-Hanchen effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xiaobo; Hesselink, Lambertus

    2006-08-01

    The resonance enhanced Goos-Hanchen shifts at attenuated total internal reflection enables the possibility for highly sensitive surface plasmon resonance sensor. The observed giant displacements result from the singular phase retardation at the resonance where the phase is continuous but changes dramatically. The phenomenon is proposed for chemical sensing and the superior sensitivity is demonstrated.

  3. Stochastic and coherence resonance in an in silico neural model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Alan W L; Bardakjian, Berj L

    2004-05-01

    We show that it is possible for chaotic systems to display the main features of stochastic and coherence resonance. In particular, a model of coupled nonlinear oscillators which emulates the transmembrane voltage activities in CA3 neurons, operating in a chaotic regime and in the presence of noise, can exhibit coherence resonance and stochastic resonance. Certain firing frequencies become more "rhythmic" for some optimal values of noise intensity. The effect of noise in different coupling pathways is investigated. We found that the effect of coherence resonance and stochastic resonance are more prominent if noise is presented in either electric field or gap junction coupling pathways. Frequency sensitivity of the model is investigated as a preliminary step in illustrating the principles of possible epileptic seizure control strategies using "chaos control" concepts. Significant effects of stochastic resonance are observed in the 4-8 Hz range. Weaker effects can be found in the 1-4 Hz and 8-10 Hz ranges whereas 0.5 Hz does not exhibit any resonance phenomenon. Our results suggest that: (a) Stochastic resonance could enhance the intrinsic 4-8 Hz rhythms in CA3 neurons more prominently via field coupling pathways. It could also help explain why some reported seizure control strategies using pulse-trains would only be effective at 0.5 Hz. (b) Stochastic resonance-like behavior can occur in the gamma range only if noise is presented via chemical synaptic pathways.

  4. Characterizing coupled MEMS resonators with an electrical resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Guowei; Choubey, Bhaskar

    2016-10-01

    Rapid development in micro/nano fabrication has enabled the shrinking of MEMS devices and the ability to fabricate them in large arrays. However, process variations and device mismatch have also raised testability issues in the MEMS industry. MEMS resonators have been coupled to simplify the characterization of the fabrication process and device performance using their collective behaviour. Perturbation analysis using eigenvalues can therefore be applied to extract the system matrix of coupled resonators. We propose a new way of perturbation analysis by coupling an electrical resonator to an array of MEMS resonators. The electrical resonator is simple in structure and easy to readout. It can also precisely control the amount of perturbation based on two available techniques. Coupling between MEMS resonators and electrical resonator opens a new window for process characterization, device testing, material characterization, as well as large sensors array actuation.

  5. A resonance mechanism of earthquakes

    CERN Document Server

    Flambaum, V V

    2015-01-01

    It had been observed in [1] that there are periodic 4-6 hours pulses of ? 200 ?Hz seismogravita- tional oscillations ( SGO ) before 95 % of powerful earthquakes. We explain this by beating between an oscillation eigenmode of a whole tectonic plate and a local eigenmode of an active zone which tranfers the oscillation energy from the tectonic plate to the active zone causing the eathrquake. Oscillation frequencies of the plate and ones of the active zone are tuned to a resonance by an additional pressure applied to the active zone due to collision of neighboring plates or convection in the upper mantia (plume). Corresponding theory may be used for short-term prediction of the earthquakes and tsunami.

  6. Resonant magnetic fields from inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Byrnes, Christian T; Jain, Rajeev Kumar; Urban, Federico R

    2012-01-01

    We propose a novel scenario to generate primordial magnetic fields during inflation induced by an oscillating coupling of the electromagnetic field to the inflaton. This resonant mechanism has two key advantages over previous proposals. First of all, it generates a narrow band of magnetic fields at any required wavelength, thereby allaying the usual problem of a strongly blue spectrum and its associated backreaction. Secondly, it avoids the need for a strong coupling as the coupling is oscillating rather than growing or decaying exponentially. Despite these major advantages, we find that the backreaction is still far too large during inflation if the generated magnetic fields are required to have a strength of ${\\cal O}(10^{-15}\\, \\Gauss)$ today on observationally interesting scales. We provide a more general no-go argument, proving that this problem will apply to any model in which the magnetic fields are generated on subhorizon scales and freeze after horizon crossing.

  7. On the nonlinear resonances and dynamic pull-in of electrostatically actuated resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsaleem, Fadi M.; Younis, Mohammad I.; Ouakad, Hassen M.

    2009-04-01

    We present modeling, analysis and experimental investigation for nonlinear resonances and the dynamic pull-in instability in electrostatically actuated resonators. These phenomena are induced by exciting a microstructure with nonlinear forcing composed of a dc parallel-plate electrostatic load superimposed on an ac harmonic load. Nonlinear phenomena are investigated experimentally and theoretically including primary resonance, superharmonic and subharmonic resonances, dynamic pull-in and the escape-from-potential-well phenomenon. As a case study, a capacitive sensor made up of two cantilever beams with a proof mass attached to their tips is studied. A nonlinear spring-mass-damper model is utilized accounting for squeeze-film damping and the parallel-plate electrostatic force. Long-time integration and a global dynamic analysis are conducted using a finite-difference method combined with the Floquet theory to capture periodic orbits and analyze their stability. The domains of attraction (basins of attraction) for data points on the frequency-response curve are calculated numerically. Dover cliff integrity curves are calculated and the erosion of the safe basin of attraction is investigated as the frequency of excitation is swept passing primary resonance and dynamic pull-in. Conclusions are presented regarding the safety and integrity of MEMS resonators based on the simulated basin of attraction and the observed experimental data.

  8. RESONANT CAVITY EXCITATION SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, W.R.; Kerns, Q.A.; Riedel, J.

    1959-01-13

    An apparatus is presented for exciting a cavity resonator with a minimum of difficulty and, more specifically describes a sub-exciter and an amplifier type pre-exciter for the high-frequency cxcitation of large cavities. Instead of applying full voltage to the main oscillator, a sub-excitation voltage is initially used to establish a base level of oscillation in the cavity. A portion of the cavity encrgy is coupled to the input of the pre-exciter where it is amplified and fed back into the cavity when the pre-exciter is energized. After the voltage in the cavity resonator has reached maximum value under excitation by the pre-exciter, full voltage is applied to the oscillator and the pre-exciter is tunned off. The cavity is then excited to the maximum high voltage value of radio frequency by the oscillator.

  9. Parallel Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Uecker, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The main disadvantage of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) are its long scan times and, in consequence, its sensitivity to motion. Exploiting the complementary information from multiple receive coils, parallel imaging is able to recover images from under-sampled k-space data and to accelerate the measurement. Because parallel magnetic resonance imaging can be used to accelerate basically any imaging sequence it has many important applications. Parallel imaging brought a fundamental shift in image reconstruction: Image reconstruction changed from a simple direct Fourier transform to the solution of an ill-conditioned inverse problem. This work gives an overview of image reconstruction from the perspective of inverse problems. After introducing basic concepts such as regularization, discretization, and iterative reconstruction, advanced topics are discussed including algorithms for auto-calibration, the connection to approximation theory, and the combination with compressed sensing.

  10. Resonant SIMP dark matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Min Choi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We consider a resonant SIMP dark matter in models with two singlet complex scalar fields charged under a local dark U(1D. After the U(1D is broken down to a Z5 discrete subgroup, the lighter scalar field becomes a SIMP dark matter which has the enhanced 3→2 annihilation cross section near the resonance of the heavier scalar field. Bounds on the SIMP self-scattering cross section and the relic density can be fulfilled at the same time for perturbative couplings of SIMP. A small gauge kinetic mixing between the SM hypercharge and dark gauge bosons can be used to make SIMP dark matter in kinetic equilibrium with the SM during freeze-out.

  11. Cross Resonant Optical Antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagioni, P.; Huang, J. S.; Duò, L.; Finazzi, M.; Hecht, B.

    2009-06-01

    We propose a novel cross resonant optical antenna consisting of two perpendicular nanosized gold dipole antennas with a common feed gap. We demonstrate that the cross antenna is able to convert propagating fields of any polarization state into correspondingly polarized, localized, and enhanced fields and vice versa. The cross antenna structure therefore opens the road towards the control of light-matter interactions based on polarized light as well as the analysis of polarized fields on the nanometer scale.

  12. Resonance Enhanced Tunneling

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumoto, S; Matsumoto, Sh.

    2000-01-01

    Time evolution of tunneling in thermal medium is examined using the real-time semiclassical formalism previously developed. Effect of anharmonic terms in the potential well is shown to give a new mechanism of resonance enhanced tunneling. If the friction from environment is small enough, this mechanism may give a very large enhancement for the tunneling rate. The case of the asymmetric wine bottle potential is worked out in detail.

  13. Cross resonant optical antenna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagioni, P; Huang, J S; Duò, L; Finazzi, M; Hecht, B

    2009-06-26

    We propose a novel cross resonant optical antenna consisting of two perpendicular nanosized gold dipole antennas with a common feed gap. We demonstrate that the cross antenna is able to convert propagating fields of any polarization state into correspondingly polarized, localized, and enhanced fields and vice versa. The cross antenna structure therefore opens the road towards the control of light-matter interactions based on polarized light as well as the analysis of polarized fields on the nanometer scale.

  14. Resonance propagation in heavy-ion scattering

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bijoy Kundu; B K Jain

    2001-06-01

    The formalism developed earlier by us for the propagation of a resonance in the nuclear medium in proton–nucleus collisions has been modified to the case of vector boson production in heavy-ion collisions. The formalism includes coherently the contribution to the observed di-lepton production from the decay of a vector boson inside as well as outside the nuclear medium. The medium modification of the boson is incorporated through an energy dependent optical potential. The calculated invariant mass distributions are presented for the -meson production using optical potentials estimated within the VDM and the resonance model. The shift in the invariant mass distribution is found to be small. To achieve the mass shift (of about 200 MeV towards lower mass) as indicated in the high energy heavy-ion collision experiments, an unusually strong optical potential of about -120 MeV is required. We also observe that, for not so heavy nuclear systems and/or for fast moving resonances, the shape, magnitude and peak position of the invariant mass distribution is substantially different if the contributions from the resonance decay inside and outside are summedup at the amplitude level (coherently) or at the cross section level (incoherently).

  15. Stochastic Resonance in Protein Folding Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davtyan, Aram; Platkov, Max; Gruebele, Martin; Papoian, Garegin A

    2016-05-04

    Although protein folding reactions are usually studied under static external conditions, it is likely that proteins fold in a locally fluctuating cellular environment in vivo. To mimic such behavior in in vitro experiments, the local temperature of the solvent can be modulated either harmonically or using correlated noise. In this study, coarse-grained molecular simulations are used to investigate these possibilities, and it is found that both periodic and correlated random fluctuations of the environment can indeed accelerate folding kinetics if the characteristic frequencies of the applied fluctuations are commensurate with the internal timescale of the folding reaction; this is consistent with the phenomenon of stochastic resonance observed in many other condensed-matter processes. To test this theoretical prediction, the folding dynamics of phosphoglycerate kinase under harmonic temperature fluctuations are experimentally probed using Förster resonance energy transfer fluorescence measurements. To analyze these experiments, a combination of theoretical approaches is developed, including stochastic simulations of folding kinetics and an analytical mean-field kinetic theory. The experimental observations are consistent with the theoretical predictions of stochastic resonance in phosphoglycerate kinase folding. When combined with an alternative experiment on the protein VlsE using a power spectrum analysis, elaborated in Dave et al., ChemPhysChem 2016, 10.1002/cphc.201501041, the overall data overwhelmingly point to the experimental confirmation of stochastic resonance in protein folding dynamics.

  16. LMO dielectronic resonances in highly charged bismuth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiga, Joseph; Gillaspy, John; Podpaly, Yuri; Ralchenko, Yuri

    2016-05-01

    Dielectronic resonances from high-Z elements are important for the analysis of high temperature plasmas. Thus, the extreme ultraviolet spectra of highly charged bismuth were measured using the NIST electron beam ion trap (EBIT) at beam energies ranging from 8.7 keV to 9.2 keV. The measured intensity ratios between forbidden magnetic-dipole lines in Bi64+ and Bi63+ show strong resonance features. The experimental data were compared to theoretical predictions from a large-scale collisional-radiative model with the code NOMAD, and good agreement was found that allowed the identification of observed resonance features as the LMO inner-shell dielectronic resonances. It is common practice in EBIT experiments that ions are periodically dumped from the trap and replaced. However, in this particular experiment, the contents of the trap were not dumped for the duration of each 10 minute sampling. The effects of trap stability were studied and a small but noticeable shift in beam energy over time was observed. Potential explanations for this are considered.

  17. Stationary and dispersive features in resonant inelastic soft X-ray scattering at the Ge 3p resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glover, C.J. [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Schmitt, T. [SLS, Paul Scherrer Institut, PSI West, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Mattesini, M. [Departamento de Fisica de la Tierra, Astronomia y Astrofisica I, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 (Spain); Adell, M.; Ilver, L.; Kanski, J. [Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden); Kjeldgaard, L. [MAX-lab, Lund University, P.O. Box 118, SE-22100 Lund (Sweden); Agaker, M. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, Uppsala University, PO Box 530, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Martensson, N. [MAX-lab, Lund University, P.O. Box 118, SE-22100 Lund (Sweden); Department of Physics and Materials Science, Uppsala University, PO Box 530, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Ahuja, R.; Nordgren, J. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, Uppsala University, PO Box 530, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Rubensson, J.-E. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, Uppsala University, PO Box 530, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden)], E-mail: jan-erik.rubensson@fysik.uu.se

    2009-07-15

    Resonant inelastic soft X-ray scattering at the 3p resonances in crystalline Ge is presented. Both stationary and dispersive features are observed in a wide energy range above as well as below the ionization limits. These observations are in agreement with theoretical predictions based on a two-step model where the initially excited electron has no influence on the emission step. Excess population of states in the conduction band is found, and discussed in terms of attosecond electron dynamics.

  18. Injection-controlled laser resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, J.J.

    1995-07-18

    A new injection-controlled laser resonator incorporates self-filtering and self-imaging characteristics with an efficient injection scheme. A low-divergence laser signal is injected into the resonator, which enables the injection signal to be converted to the desired resonator modes before the main laser pulse starts. This injection technique and resonator design enable the laser cavity to improve the quality of the injection signal through self-filtering before the main laser pulse starts. The self-imaging property of the present resonator reduces the cavity induced diffraction effects and, in turn, improves the laser beam quality. 5 figs.

  19. Experimental investigation of energy localization in line-defect resonator based on silicon locally resonant phononic crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wanli; Feng, Duan; Xu, Dehui; Xiong, Bin; Wang, Yuelin

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, energy localization in line-defect resonator based on locally resonant phononic crystal (PnC) is experimentally studied. The defected resonator is realized by creating line defects on a two-dimension (2-D) silicon PnC. The silicon resonator was fabricated by micro machining process and tested by a combination of the fluid coupling method and Laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV). Acoustic waves with frequency range from 7.19 MHz to 7.50 MHz are trapped in the cavity, and the corresponding resonant modes are observed in-situ. The measured quality (Q) factor of the resonator, which is 427 at its resonant frequency of 7.3 MHz, is smaller than the simulated ones (666 and 5135). The experimental results agree well with the simulation results that frequencies of the trapped acoustic waves of are mostly in the range of the phononic bandgaps. The locally resonant based PnC resonator in paper with 17 dB magnitude amplification, which is normalized with respect to the transmission of a freestanding silicon slab in the same frequency range, has great potential in energy harvesting or sound concentration.

  20. Persistence, resistance, resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsadka, Maayan

    Sound cannot travel in a vacuum, physically or socially. The ways in which sound operates are a result of acoustic properties, and the ways by which it is considered to be music are a result of social constructions. Therefore, music is always political, regardless of its content: the way it is performed and composed; the choice of instrumentation, notation, tuning; the medium of its distribution; its inherent hierarchy and power dynamics, and more. My compositional praxis makes me less interested in defining a relationship between music and politics than I am in erasing---or at least blurring---the borders between them. In this paper I discuss the aesthetics of resonance and echo in their metaphorical, physical, social, and musical manifestations. Also discussed is a political aesthetic of resonance, manifested through protest chants. I transcribe and analyze common protest chants from around the world, categorizing and unifying them as universal crowd-mobilizing rhythms. These ideas are explored musically in three pieces. Sumud: Rhetoric of Resistance in Three Movements, for two pianos and two percussion players, is a musical interpretation of the political/social concept of sumud, an Arabic word that literally means "steadfastness" and represents Palestinian non-violent resistance. The piece is based on common protest rhythms and uses the acoustic properties inherent to the instruments. The second piece, Three Piano Studies, extends some of the musical ideas and techniques used in Sumud, and explores the acoustic properties and resonance of the piano. The final set of pieces is part of my Critical Mess Music Project. These are site-specific musical works that attempt to blur the boundaries between audience, performers and composer, in part by including people without traditional musical training in the process of music making. These pieces use the natural structure and resonance of an environment, in this case, locations on the UCSC campus, and offer an active

  1. The hunt for the dynamical resonances in chemical reaction dynamics: a perspective on historical advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Angyang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical background and basic definition of the resonances in chemical reaction dynamics have been introduced in this article. The historical breakthrough in the experimental search for the reaction resonances has been reviewed in this report, with an emphasis on the crossed molecular beam apparatus. The research of the chemical reaction resonances has attracted many scientists’ attention from 80s of last century. The chemical reaction resonances in the F+H2 reaction were firstly observed by the researchers of the Chinese Academy of Sciences in 2006. Besides, the partial wave resonances in the chemical reactions have been observed for the first time in 2010.

  2. Parametric Resonance in Dynamical Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Nijmeijer, Henk

    2012-01-01

    Parametric Resonance in Dynamical Systems discusses the phenomenon of parametric resonance and its occurrence in mechanical systems,vehicles, motorcycles, aircraft and marine craft, and micro-electro-mechanical systems. The contributors provide an introduction to the root causes of this phenomenon and its mathematical equivalent, the Mathieu-Hill equation. Also included is a discussion of how parametric resonance occurs on ships and offshore systems and its frequency in mechanical and electrical systems. This book also: Presents the theory and principles behind parametric resonance Provides a unique collection of the different fields where parametric resonance appears including ships and offshore structures, automotive vehicles and mechanical systems Discusses ways to combat, cope with and prevent parametric resonance including passive design measures and active control methods Parametric Resonance in Dynamical Systems is ideal for researchers and mechanical engineers working in application fields such as MEM...

  3. Probing Mechanical Resonances in Cantilevered Coiled Carbon Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Deepika; Dickel, Doyl; Behlow, Herbert; Pillai, Balu; Yang, Keqin; Skove, Malcolm; Serkiz, Steven; Rao, Apparao; Clemson University Team; Savannah River National Laboratory Team

    2013-03-01

    Helically coiled carbon nanowires (CCNW) and nanotubes are promising elements for use in MEMS/NEMS devices and nanorobotics, as nano-inductors and sensors, and for impact protection (e.g. Bell et al. 2007 IEEE International Conference, J. Appl. Phys. 100, 064309 (2006)). Understanding and characterizing their mechanical resonance behavior is essential for the reliability in applications. In this study, we have electrically actuated an individual CCNW in a diving-board cantilever configuration inside a scanning electron microscope, and electrically detected its mechanical resonance modes. By oscillation at low frequency we confirmed the induced-charge actuation mechanism. Among the modes we observed, some appeared to have both axial and lateral components. We also observed closely spaced resonance modes which we attribute to the splitting of degenerate modes, consistent with our COMSOL simulations. We suggest that the helical morphology facilitates inter-mode coupling that results in the observed complex resonance behavior.

  4. A resonant chain of four transiting, sub-Neptune planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Sean M.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Migaszewski, Cezary; Ford, Eric B.; Petigura, Erik; Isaacson, Howard

    2016-05-01

    Surveys have revealed many multi-planet systems containing super-Earths and Neptunes in orbits of a few days to a few months. There is debate whether in situ assembly or inward migration is the dominant mechanism of the formation of such planetary systems. Simulations suggest that migration creates tightly packed systems with planets whose orbital periods may be expressed as ratios of small integers (resonances), often in a many-planet series (chain). In the hundreds of multi-planet systems of sub-Neptunes, more planet pairs are observed near resonances than would generally be expected, but no individual system has hitherto been identified that must have been formed by migration. Proximity to resonance enables the detection of planets perturbing each other. Here we report transit timing variations of the four planets in the Kepler-223 system, model these variations as resonant-angle librations, and compute the long-term stability of the resonant chain. The architecture of Kepler-223 is too finely tuned to have been formed by scattering, and our numerical simulations demonstrate that its properties are natural outcomes of the migration hypothesis. Similar systems could be destabilized by any of several mechanisms, contributing to the observed orbital-period distribution, where many planets are not in resonances. Planetesimal interactions in particular are thought to be responsible for establishing the current orbits of the four giant planets in the Solar System by disrupting a theoretical initial resonant chain similar to that observed in Kepler-223.

  5. A resonant chain of four transiting, sub-Neptune planets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Sean M; Fabrycky, Daniel C; Migaszewski, Cezary; Ford, Eric B; Petigura, Erik; Isaacson, Howard

    2016-05-26

    Surveys have revealed many multi-planet systems containing super-Earths and Neptunes in orbits of a few days to a few months. There is debate whether in situ assembly or inward migration is the dominant mechanism of the formation of such planetary systems. Simulations suggest that migration creates tightly packed systems with planets whose orbital periods may be expressed as ratios of small integers (resonances), often in a many-planet series (chain). In the hundreds of multi-planet systems of sub-Neptunes, more planet pairs are observed near resonances than would generally be expected, but no individual system has hitherto been identified that must have been formed by migration. Proximity to resonance enables the detection of planets perturbing each other. Here we report transit timing variations of the four planets in the Kepler-223 system, model these variations as resonant-angle librations, and compute the long-term stability of the resonant chain. The architecture of Kepler-223 is too finely tuned to have been formed by scattering, and our numerical simulations demonstrate that its properties are natural outcomes of the migration hypothesis. Similar systems could be destabilized by any of several mechanisms, contributing to the observed orbital-period distribution, where many planets are not in resonances. Planetesimal interactions in particular are thought to be responsible for establishing the current orbits of the four giant planets in the Solar System by disrupting a theoretical initial resonant chain similar to that observed in Kepler-223.

  6. Torque-mixing magnetic resonance spectroscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losby, Joseph; Fani Sani, Fatemeh; Grandmont, Dylan T.; Diao, Zhu; Belov, Miro; Burgess, Jacob A.; Compton, Shawn R.; Hiebert, Wayne K.; Vick, Doug; Mohammad, Kaveh; Salimi, Elham; Bridges, Gregory E.; Thomson, Douglas J.; Freeman, Mark R.

    2016-10-01

    An optomechanical platform for magnetic resonance spectroscopy will be presented. The method relies on frequency mixing of orthogonal RF fields to yield a torque amplitude (arising from the transverse component of a precessing dipole moment, in analogy to magnetic resonance detection by electromagnetic induction) on a miniaturized resonant mechanical torsion sensor. In contrast to induction, the method is fully broadband and allows for simultaneous observation of the equilibrium net magnetic moment alongside the associated magnetization dynamics. To illustrate the method, comprehensive electron spin resonance spectra of a mesoscopic, single-crystal YIG disk at room temperature will be presented, along with situations where torque spectroscopy can offer complimentary information to existing magnetic resonance detection techniques. The authors are very grateful for support from NSERC, CRC, AITF, and NINT. Reference: Science 350, 798 (2015).

  7. Exploration of Horizontal Intrinsic Spin Resonances in the AGS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fanglei; Lee, S. Y.; Ahrens, Leif A.; Bai, Mei; Brown, Kevin; Courant, Ernest D.; Glenn, Joseph W.; Huang, Haixin; Luccio, Alfredo; Mackay, William W.; Ptitsyn, Vadim; Roser, Thomas; Tepikian, Steven; Tsoupas, Nicholaos; Wood, Jeff; Yip, Yin; Okamura, Masahiro; Takano, Junpei

    2006-04-01

    Siberian snakes have been employed to overcome spin resonances during polarized proton acceleration. Considering limited space in the AGS, strong partial snakes that rotate the spin by less than 180 degrees can be used to avoid the spin imperfection and intrinsic resonances in low energy accelerators. However, the tilt of spin away from the vertical direction may become sensitive to horizontal betatron motion which can also cause spin depolarization. These resonances, called horizontal intrinsic spin resonances, have been observed in simulations. Preliminary measurements with beam were also carried out in AGS 2005 polarized proton run. During the AGS 2006 run, we plan to explore the details about the horizontal intrinsics resonances further. This paper describes the experimental methods and the latest results.

  8. Tunable sub-gap radiation detection with superconducting resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupré, O.; Benoît, A.; Calvo, M.; Catalano, A.; Goupy, J.; Hoarau, C.; Klein, T.; Le Calvez, K.; Sacépé, B.; Monfardini, A.; Levy-Bertrand, F.

    2017-04-01

    We have fabricated planar amorphous indium oxide superconducting resonators ({T}{{c}}∼ 2.8 K) that are sensitive to frequency-selective radiation in the range of 7–10 GHz. Those values lay far below twice the superconducting gap that is worth about 200 GHz. The photon detection consists in a shift of the fundamental resonance frequency. We show that the detected frequency can be adjusted by modulating the total length of the superconducting resonator. We attribute those observations to the excitation of higher-order resonance modes. The coupling between the fundamental lumped and the higher order distributed resonance is due to the kinetic inductance nonlinearity with current. These devices, that we have called sub-gap kinetic inductance detectors, are to be distinguished from the standard kinetic inductance detectors in which quasi-particles are generated when incident light breaks down Cooper pairs.

  9. Positron-molecule interactions: resonant attachment, annihilation, and bound states

    CERN Document Server

    Gribakin, G F; Surko, C M; 10.1103/RevModPhys.82.2557

    2010-01-01

    This article presents an overview of current understanding of the interaction of low-energy positrons with molecules with emphasis on resonances, positron attachment and annihilation. Annihilation rates measured as a function of positron energy reveal the presence of vibrational Feshbach resonances (VFR) for many polyatomic molecules. These resonances lead to strong enhancement of the annihilation rates. They also provide evidence that positrons bind to many molecular species. A quantitative theory of VFR-mediated attachment to small molecules is presented. It is tested successfully for selected molecules (e.g., methyl halides and methanol) where all modes couple to the positron continuum. Combination and overtone resonances are observed and their role is elucidated. In larger molecules, annihilation rates from VFR far exceed those explicable on the basis of single-mode resonances. These enhancements increase rapidly with the number of vibrational degrees of freedom. While the details are as yet unclear, intr...

  10. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy as a diagnostic modality for carcinoma thyroid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Nikhil [Department of Surgery, Maulana Azad Medical College, Lok Nayak Hospital, New Delhi (India)], E-mail: nikhil_ms26@yahoo.co.in; Kakar, Arun K. [Department of Surgery, Maulana Azad Medical College, Lok Nayak Hospital, New Delhi (India); Chowdhury, Veena [Department of Radiodiagnosis, Maulana Azad Medical College, Lok Nayak Hospital, New Delhi (India); Gulati, Praveen [MR Centre, A-23 Green Park, New Delhi (India); Shankar, L. Ravi [Department of Radioiodine Uptake and Imaging, Institute of Nucler Medicine and Allied Sciences (INMAS), Timarpur, New Delhi (India); Vindal, Anubhav [Department of Surgery, Maulana Azad Medical College, Lok Nayak Hospital, New Delhi (India)

    2007-12-15

    Aim: The aim of this study was to observe the findings of magnetic resonance spectroscopy of solitary thyroid nodules and its correlation with histopathology. Materials and methods: In this study, magnetic resonance spectroscopy was carried out on 26 patients having solitary thyroid nodules. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was performed on a 1.5 T super conductive system with gradient strength of 33 mTs. Fine needle aspiration cytology was done after MRS. All 26 patients underwent surgery either because of cytopathologically proven malignancy or because of cosmetic reasons. Findings of magnetic resonance spectroscopy were compared with histopathology of thyroid specimens. Results and conclusion: It was seen that presence or absence of choline peak correlates very well with presence or absence of malignant foci with in the nodule (sensitivity = 100%; specificity = 88.88%). These results indicate that magnetic resonance spectroscopy may prove to be an useful diagnostic modality for carcinoma thyroid.

  11. Observing Atomic Collapse Resonances in Artificial Nuclei on Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-07

    N. M. R. Peres, K. S. Novoselov , A. K. Geim, The electronic properties of graphene. Rev. Mod. Phys. 81, 109 (2009). doi:10.1103/RevModPhys.81.109...12. K. S. Novoselov et al., Two-dimensional gas of massless Dirac fermions in graphene. Nature 438, 197 (2005). doi:10.1038/nature04233 Medline 13. Y

  12. Resonant diffraction of synchrotron radiation: New possibilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovchinnikova, E. N.; Mukhamedzhanov, E. Kh.

    2016-09-01

    Resonant diffraction of synchrotron radiation (SR) is a modern method of studying the structure and properties of condensed matter that can be implemented on third-generation synchrotrons. This method allows one to investigate local properties of media (including magnetic and electronic ones) and observe thermal vibrations, defects, and orbital and charge orderings. A brief review of the advance provided by SR resonant diffraction is presented, and the capabilities of this method for analyzing phase transitions are considered in more detail by the example of potassium dihydrogen phosphate and rubidium dihydrogen phosphate crystals. It is shown that the investigation of the temperature dependence of forbidden reflections not only makes it possible to observe the transition from para- to ferroelectric phase, but also gives information about the proton distribution at hydrogen bonds.

  13. Coherent Dark Resonances in Atomic Barium

    CERN Document Server

    Dammalapati, U; Jungmann, K; Willmann, L

    2007-01-01

    The observation of dark-resonances in the two-electron atom barium and their influence on optical cooling is reported. In heavy alkali earth atoms, i.e. barium or radium, optical cooling can be achieved using n^1S_0-n^1P_1 transitions and optical repumping from the low lying n^1D_2 and n^3D_{1,2} states to which the atoms decay with a high branching ratio. The cooling and repumping transition have a common upper state. This leads to dark resonances and hence make optical cooling less inefficient. The experimental observations can be accurately modelled by the optical Bloch equations. Comparison with experimental results allows us to extract relevant parameters for effective laser cooling of barium.

  14. High-frequency micromechanical columnar resonators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Kehrbusch, Elena A Ilin, Peter Bozek, Bernhard Radzio and Egbert Oesterschulze

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available High-frequency silicon columnar microresonators are fabricated using a simple but effective technological scheme. An optimized fabrication scheme was invented to obtain mechanically protected microcolumns with lateral dimensions controlled on a scale of at least 1 μm. In this paper, we investigate the influence of the environmental conditions on the mechanical resonator properties. At ambient conditions, we observed a frequency stability δf/f of less than 10−6 during 5 h of operation at almost constant temperature. However, varying the temperature shifts the frequency by approximately −173 Hz °C− 1. In accordance with a viscous damping model of the ambient gas, we perceived that the quality factor of the first flexural mode decreased with the inverse of the square root of pressure. However, in the low-pressure regime, a linear dependence was observed. We also investigated the influence of the type of the immersing gas on the resonant frequency.

  15. Nonlinear Resonance of Mechanically Excited Sessile Drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chun-Ti; Daniel, Susan; Steen, Paul

    2013-11-01

    The spectrum of frequencies and mode shapes for an inviscid drop on a planar substrate have recently been documented. For vertical excitation, zonal modes respond to the driving frequency harmonically and non-zonal modes subharmonically, consistent with the prior literature. In this study, we report observations from the regime of nonlinear response. Here, zonals can respond non-harmonically, both sub- and super-harmonic responses are reported. The principal challenge to generating and observing superharmonic resonances of higher zonal modes is a mode-mixing behavior. However, using a simple visual simulation based on the ray-tracing technique, the individual contributions to the mixed resonance behavior can be extracted. In summary, results from experiment and theory show that the zonal modes, which respond harmonically and can mix with non-zonal modes without interfering with one another in the linear regime, tend to respond sub- or superharmonically and compete with non-zonal modes in the nonlinear regime.

  16. Nanometrology using localized surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Claus; Lindstedt, Daniel N.; Laurberg, Asger V.;

    2013-01-01

    A novel optical characterization technique called localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) spectroscopy is presented. LSPR spectroscopy exploits light excited surface plasmons, which are collective coherent electron oscillations at a metal/dielectric interface. The LSPR can be observed in a tra......A novel optical characterization technique called localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) spectroscopy is presented. LSPR spectroscopy exploits light excited surface plasmons, which are collective coherent electron oscillations at a metal/dielectric interface. The LSPR can be observed...... in a transmission spectrum and it is very sensitive to the constituent materials as well as both lateral and vertical dimensions of the structures. This makes LSPR spectroscopy interesting for a number of applications including nanometrology. Like scatterometry, LSPR spectroscopy requires test structures...

  17. Resonance frequency analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv K Gupta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Initial stability at the placement and development of osseointegration are two major issues for implant survival. Implant stability is a mechanical phenomenon which is related to the local bone quality and quantity, type of implant, and placement technique used. The application of a simple, clinically applicable, non-invasive test to assess implant stability and osseointegration is considered highly desirable. Resonance frequency analysis (RFA is one of such techniques which is most frequently used now days. The aim of this paper was to review and analyze critically the current available literature in the field of RFA, and to also discuss based on scientific evidence, the prognostic value of RFA to detect implants at risk of failure. A search was made using the PubMed database to find all the literature published on "Resonance frequency analysis for implant stability" till date. Articles discussed in vivo or in vitro studies comparing RFA with other methods of implant stability measurement and articles discussing its reliability were thoroughly reviewed and discussed. A limited number of clinical reports were found. Various studies have demonstrated the feasibility and predictability of the technique. However, most of these articles are based on retrospective data or uncontrolled cases. Randomized, prospective, parallel-armed longitudinal human trials are based on short-term results and long-term follow up are still scarce in this field. Nonetheless, from available literature, it may be concluded that RFA technique evaluates implant stability as a function of stiffness of the implant bone interface and is influenced by factors such as bone type, exposed implant height above the alveolar crest. Resonance frequency analysis could serve as a non-invasive diagnostic tool for detecting the implant stability of dental implants during the healing stages and in subsequent routine follow up care after treatment. Future studies, preferably randomized

  18. Electroexcitation of nucleon resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inna Aznauryan, Volker D. Burkert

    2012-01-01

    We review recent progress in the investigation of the electroexcitation of nucleon resonances, both in experiment and in theory. The most accurate results have been obtained for the electroexcitation amplitudes of the four lowest excited states, which have been measured in a range of Q2 up to 8 and 4.5 GeV2 for the Delta(1232)P33, N(1535)S11 and N(1440)P11, N(1520)D13, respectively. These results have been confronted with calculations based on lattice QCD, large-Nc relations, perturbative QCD (pQCD), and QCD-inspired models. The amplitudes for the Delta(1232) indicate large pion-cloud contributions at low Q2 and don't show any sign of approaching the pQCD regime for Q2<7 GeV2. Measured for the first time, the electroexcitation amplitudes of the Roper resonance, N(1440)P11, provide strong evidence for this state as a predominantly radial excitation of a three-quark (3q) ground state, with additional non-3-quark contributions needed to describe the low Q2 behavior of the amplitudes. The longitudinal transition amplitude for the N(1535)S11 was determined and has become a challenge for quark models. Explanations may require large meson-cloud contributions or alternative representations of this state. The N(1520)D13 clearly shows the rapid changeover from helicity-3/2 dominance at the real photon point to helicity-1/2 dominance at Q2 > 0.5 GeV2, confirming a long-standing prediction of the constituent quark model. The interpretation of the moments of resonance transition form factors in terms of transition transverse charge distributions in infinite momentum frame is presented.

  19. Resonance frequency in ferromagnetic superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu Rongke; Huang Andong [School of Science, Shenyang University of Technology, Shenyang 110870 (China); Li Da; Zhang Zhidong, E-mail: rkqiu@163.com [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research and International Centre for Materials Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2011-10-19

    The resonance frequency in two-layer and three-layer ferromagnetic superlattices is studied, using the Callen's Green function method, the Tyablikov decoupling approximation and the Anderson-Callen decoupling approximation. The effects of interlayer exchange coupling, anisotropy, external magnetic field and temperature on the resonance frequency are investigated. It is found that the resonance frequencies increase with increasing external magnetic field. In a parameter region of the asymmetric system, each sublayer corresponds to its own resonance frequency. The anisotropy of a sublayer affects only the resonance frequency corresponding to this sublayer. The stronger the anisotropy, the higher is the resonance frequency. The interlayer exchange coupling affects only the resonance frequencies belonging to the sublayers connected by it. The stronger the interlayer exchange coupling, the higher are the resonance frequencies. All the resonance frequencies decrease as the reduced temperature increases. The results direct the method to enhance and adjust the resonance frequency of magnetic multilayered materials with a wide band.

  20. Search for resonant $\\widetilde\

    CERN Document Server

    Abdallah, J; Adam, W; Adzic, P; Albrecht, T; Alderweireld, T; Alemany-Fernandez, R; Allmendinger, T; Allport, P P; Amaldi, Ugo; Amapane, N; Amato, S; Anashkin, E; Andreazza, A; Andringa, S; Anjos, N; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Ask, S; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Ballestrero, A; Bambade, P; Barbier, R; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G; Baroncelli, A; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Behrmann, A; Ben-Haim, E; Benekos, N C; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Bérat, C; Berggren, M; Berntzon, L; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Besson, N; Bloch, D; Blom, M; Bluj, M; Bonesini, M; Boonekamp, M; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Botner, O; Bouquet, B; Bowcock, T J V; Boyko, I; Bracko, M; Brenner, R; Brodet, E; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buschmann, P; Calvi, M; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Carena, F; Castro, N; Cavallo, F R; Chapkin, M M; Charpentier, P; Checchia, P; Chierici, R; Shlyapnikov, P; Chudoba, J; Chung, S U; Cieslik, K; Collins, P; Contri, R; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Costa, M J; Crawley, B; Crennell, D J; Cuevas-Maestro, J; D'Hondt, J; Dalmau, J; Da Silva, T; Da Silva, W; Della Ricca, G; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Clercq, C; De Lotto, B; De Maria, N; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Simone, A; Doroba, K; Drees, J; Dris, M; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ellert, M; Elsing, M; Espirito-Santo, M C; Fanourakis, G K; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, Michael; Fernández, J; Ferrer, A; Ferro, F; Flagmeyer, U; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Gandelman, M; García, C; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Geralis, T; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gómez-Ceballos, G; Gonçalves, P; Graziani, E; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Guy, J; Haag, C; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hamilton, K; Hansen, J; Haug, S; Hauler, F; Hedberg, V; Hennecke, M; Herr, H; Hoffman, J; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Houlden, M A; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jeans, D; Johansson, E K; Johansson, P D; Jonsson, P; Joram, C; Jungermann, L; Kapusta, F; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Kernel, G; Kersevan, Borut P; Kiiskinen, A P; King, B T; Kjaer, N J; Kluit, P; Kokkinias, P; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Krumshtein, Z; Kucharczyk, M; Lamsa, J; Leder, G; Ledroit, F; Leinonen, L; Leitner, R; Lemonne, J; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Liebig, W; Liko, D; Lipniacka, A; Lopes, J H; López, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J; Malek, A; Maltezos, S; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Masik, J; Mastroyiannopoulos, N; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Mazzucato, F; Mazzucato, M; McNulty, R; Meroni, C; Meyer, W T; Migliore, E; Mitaroff, W A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Moch, M; Mönig, K; Monge, R; Montenegro, J; Moraes, D; Moreno, S; Morettini, P; Müller, U; Münich, K; Mulders, M; Mundim, L M; Murray, W; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Myklebust, T; Nassiakou, M; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Nawrocki, K; Nicolaidou, R; Nikolenko, M; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Oyanguren, A; Paganoni, M; Paiano, S; Palacios, J P; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Parzefall, U; Passeri, A; Passon, O; Peralta, L; Perepelitsa, V F; Perrotta, A; Petrolini, A; Piedra, J; Pieri, L; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Piotto, E; Podobnik, T; Poireau, V; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Rames, J; Ramler, L; Read, A; Rebecchi, P; Rehn, J; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Richard, F; Rídky, J; Rivero, M; Rodríguez, D; Romero, A; Ronchese, P; Rosenberg, E I; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ryabtchikov, D; Sadovskii, A; Salmi, L; Salt, J; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schwickerath, U; Segar, A; Sekulin, R L; Siebel, M; Sissakian, A N; Smadja, G; Smirnova, O G; Sokolov, A; Sopczak, A; Sosnowski, R; Spassoff, Tz; Stanitzki, M; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Szumlak, T; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Taffard, A C; Tegenfeldt, F; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Tobin, M; Todorovova, S; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortosa, P; Travnicek, P; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Trochimczuk, M; Troncon, C; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyapkin, P; Tzamarias, S; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; van Dam, P; Van Eldik, J; Van Lysebetten, A; Van Remortel, N; Van Vulpen, I B; Vegni, G; Veloso, F; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verdier, P; Verzi, V; Vilanova, D; Vitale, L; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Washbrook, A J; Weiser, C; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wilkinson, G; Winter, M; Witek, M; Yushchenko, O P; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zimin, N I; Zinchenko, A I; Zupan, M

    2003-01-01

    Searches for resonant ~nu production in e+e collisions under the assumption that R-parity is not conserved and that the dominant R-parity violating coupling is lambda121 or lambda131 used data recorded by DELPHI in 1997 to 2000 at centre-of-mass energies of 183 to 208 GeV. No deviation from the Standard Model was obs erved. Upper limits are given for the lambda121 and lamdba131 couplings as a function of the sneutrino mass and total width. The limits are especially stringent for sneutrino masses equal to the centre-of-mass energies with the highest integrated luminosities recorded.