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  1. Alpha1A-adrenergic receptor-directed autoimmunity induces left ventricular damage and diastolic dysfunction in rats.

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    Katrin Wenzel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Agonistic autoantibodies to the alpha(1-adrenergic receptor occur in nearly half of patients with refractory hypertension; however, their relevance is uncertain. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We immunized Lewis rats with the second extracellular-loop peptides of the human alpha(1A-adrenergic receptor and maintained them for one year. Alpha(1A-adrenergic antibodies (alpha(1A-AR-AB were monitored with a neonatal cardiomyocyte contraction assay by ELISA, and by ERK1/2 phosphorylation in human alpha(1A-adrenergic receptor transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells. The rats were followed with radiotelemetric blood pressure measurements and echocardiography. At 12 months, the left ventricles of immunized rats had greater wall thickness than control rats. The fractional shortening and dp/dt(max demonstrated preserved systolic function. A decreased E/A ratio in immunized rats indicated a diastolic dysfunction. Invasive hemodynamics revealed increased left ventricular end-diastolic pressures and decreased dp/dt(min. Mean diameter of cardiomyocytes showed hypertrophy in immunized rats. Long-term blood pressure values and heart rates were not different. Genes encoding sarcomeric proteins, collagens, extracellular matrix proteins, calcium regulating proteins, and proteins of energy metabolism in immunized rat hearts were upregulated, compared to controls. Furthermore, fibrosis was present in immunized hearts, but not in control hearts. A subset of immunized and control rats was infused with angiotensin (Ang II. The stressor raised blood pressure to a greater degree and led to more cardiac fibrosis in immunized, than in control rats. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We show that alpha(1A-AR-AB cause diastolic dysfunction independent of hypertension, and can increase the sensitivity to Ang II. We suggest that alpha(1A-AR-AB could contribute to cardiovascular endorgan damage.

  2. [Autoimmune hepatitis induced by isotretionine].

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    Guzman Rojas, Patricia; Gallegos Lopez, Roxana; Ciliotta Chehade, Alessandra; Scavino, Yolanda; Morales, Alejandro; Tagle, Martín

    2016-01-01

    We describe a case of a teenage patient with the diagnosis of drug induced autoimmune hepatitis. The patient is a 16 years old female, with the past medical history of Hashimoto’s hypothyroidism controlled with levothyroxine, who started treatment with Isotretionin (®Accutane) 20 mg q/12 hours for a total of 3 months for the treatment of severe acne. The physical examination was within normal limits and the results of the laboratory exams are: Baseline values of ALT 28 U/L, AST 28 U/L. Three months later: AST 756 U/L, ALT 1199U/L, alkaline phosphatase 114 U/L, with normal bilirrubin levels throughout the process. The serology studies were negative for all viral hepatitis; ANA titers were positive (1/160) and igG levels were also elevated. A liver biopsy was performed, and was compatible with the diagnosis of autoimmune hepatitis. Corticosteroid therapy was started with Prednisone 40 mg per day one week after stopping the treatment with isotretionin, observing an improvement in the laboratory values. We describe this case and review the world literature since there are no reported cases of Isotretinoin-induced autoimmune hepatitis. PMID:27131947

  3. Propylthiouracil-induced autoimmune disease

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    Santosh Paiaulla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperthyroidism is a condition characterized by excessive production of thyroid hormones. Propylthiouracil (PTU is commonly used as first line drug in the management of hyperthyroidism. This is a case report of 24-year-old female, a known case of hyperthyroidism since 4 years, who came with a history of fever and myalgia since 3 days and dyspnea with coughing out of blood since 1 day. Patient was taking PTU (100 mg per day since 4 years for hyperthyroidism. Patient was immediately intubated for type-II respiratory failure. Diagnosed to be having PTU-induced autoimmune disease. PTU was stopped and treated with methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide. Clinical features improved over a period of 8 days and discharged home successfully. Having a high suspicion for the onset of autoimmune disease in hyperthyroidism patients who are on PTU therapy and timely treatment with immunosuppressants and supportive care along with the withdrawal of the drug can make a difference in morbidity and mortality.

  4. Azathioprine-induced fever in autoimmune hepatitis

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    Tawfik Khoury; Ollech, Jacob E; Shmuel Chen; Meir Mizrahi; Meir Shalit

    2013-01-01

    Underdiagnosis of drug-induced fever leads to extensive investigation and prolongation of hospitalization, and may lead to multiple unnecessary invasive procedures and a wrong diagnosis. Azathioprine is a widely used immunosuppressive drug. We report a case of a 53-year-old female patient diagnosed with autoimmune hepatitis treated with azathioprine, who presented to the emergency room with a 6-wk history of fever and chills without other associated symptoms. Since the patient’s fever ...

  5. Requirements for innate immune pathways in environmentally induced autoimmunity.

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    Pollard, Kenneth Michael; Kono, Dwight H

    2013-01-01

    There is substantial evidence that environmental triggers in combination with genetic and stochastic factors play an important role in spontaneous autoimmune disease. Although the specific environmental agents and how they promote autoimmunity remain largely unknown, in part because of diverse etiologies, environmentally induced autoimmune models can provide insights into potential mechanisms. Studies of idiopathic and environmentally induced systemic autoimmunity show that they are mediated by common adaptive immune response genes. By contrast, although the innate immune system is indispensable for autoimmunity, there are clear differences in the molecular and cellular innate components that mediate specific systemic autoimmune diseases, suggesting distinct autoimmune-promoting pathways. Some of these differences may be related to the bifurcation of toll-like receptor signaling that distinguishes interferon regulatory factor 7-mediated type I interferon production from nuclear factor-κB-driven proinflammatory cytokine expression. Accordingly, idiopathic and pristane-induced systemic autoimmunity require both type I interferon and proinflammatory cytokines whereas the less aggressive mercury-induced autoimmunity, although dependent on nucleic acid-binding toll-like receptors, does not require type I interferon but needs proinflammatory cytokines. Scavenger receptors and the inflammasome may contribute to silica-induced autoimmunity. Greater understanding of the innate mechanisms responsible for idiopathic and environmentally induced autoimmunity should yield new information into the processes that instigate and drive systemic autoimmunity. PMID:23557436

  6. Drug-Induced Bullous Sweet Syndrome with Multiple Autoimmune Features

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Sweet syndrome (SS) (Acute Febrile Neutrophilic Dermatosis) has been reported in association with autoimmune phenomena including relapsing polychondritis, drug-induced lupus, and the development of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs). However, a combination of these autoimmune features has not been reported. Herein, we report a case of drug-induced bullous SS with ocular and mucosal involvement, glomerulonephritis, and multiple autoimmune features including clinical polychondritis w...

  7. Drug-Induced Bullous Sweet Syndrome with Multiple Autoimmune Features

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    Jared J. Lund

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Sweet syndrome (SS (Acute Febrile Neutrophilic Dermatosis has been reported in association with autoimmune phenomena including relapsing polychondritis, drug-induced lupus, and the development of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs. However, a combination of these autoimmune features has not been reported. Herein, we report a case of drug-induced bullous SS with ocular and mucosal involvement, glomerulonephritis, and multiple autoimmune features including clinical polychondritis with antitype II collagen antibodies, ANCAs, antinuclear (HEp-2, and antihistone antibodies in a patient on hydralazine and carbamazepine.

  8. Activation-Induced Cell Death in T Cells and Autoimmunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JianZhang; XuemeiXu; YongLiu

    2004-01-01

    Activation-induced cell death (AICD), which results from the interaction between Fas and Fas ligand, is responsible for maintaining tolerance to self-antigen. A defect in AICD may lead to development of autoimmunity. During the last several years, much progress has been made in understanding the mechanism(s) of AICD and its potential role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. In this review, we summarize the most recent progress on the regulation of the susceptibility of T cells to AICD and its possible involvement in autoimmune diseases.

  9. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 in autoimmune diseases.

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    Deng, Wei; Feng, Xuebing; Li, Xia; Wang, Dandan; Sun, Lingyun

    2016-05-01

    Autoimmune disorders are a complicated and varied group of diseases arising from inappropriate immune responses. Recent studies have demonstrated that ongoing inflammatory and immune responses are associated with increased oxygen consumption, a process resulting in localized tissue hypoxia within inflammatory lesions ("inflammatory hypoxia"), in which hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1), an oxygen-sensitive transcription factor that allows adaptation to hypoxia environments, has been shown to play an important function. HIF-1 is a regulator of angiogenesis and immune system. Besides, HIF-1-mediated metabolic shift and fibrosis may also play crucial roles in some autoimmune disorders. Firstly, we briefly summarize the role of HIF-1 in angiogenesis, immune responses and fibrosis. Secondly, we will show the major recent findings demonstrating a role for HIF-1 signaling in autoimmune disorders, including rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, psoriasis, systemic sclerosis and multiple sclerosis. The growing evidences may prompt HIF-1 to be a new target for treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:27071377

  10. [Autoimmunization induced by interferon alpha therapy in chronic hepatitis C].

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    Rocca, Pierre; Codes, Liana; Chevallier, Michèle; Trépo, Christian; Zoulim, Fabien

    2004-11-01

    We report the case of a 56 year-old woman with post-transfusion chronic hepatitis C who presented with a severe ALT flare up associated with a rapid progression of liver fibrosis during interferon alpha 2b therapy. Several hypotheses were considered to explain the etiology of this ALT flare: there was no viral super infection by other hepatotropic viruses, no toxic hepatitis, no metabolic disease, and no other specific liver diseases could be identified. HLA typing showed a specific profile A1 B8 DR3 (risk factor of auto-immunization during interferon alpha therapy) with antinuclear antibodies and anti smooth muscle antibodies. This case suggests that auto-immunization induced by interferon alpha should be investigated in case of ALT flare that is not followed by an HCV breakthrough. PMID:15657545

  11. Azathioprine Induced Pancreatitis in a Patient with Co-Existing Autoimmune Pancreatitis and Hepatitis

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    Preethi GK Venkatesh

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Context Azathioprine induced pancreatitis usually runs a benign self limited course with rapid disappearance of signs and symptoms upon with drawl of the drug. Azathioprine is used in treating relapses in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis and maintenance of remission in autoimmune hepatitis. Acute pancreatitis complicated by symptomatic pseudocysts requiring drainage is not usually associated with drug induced pancreatitis. The risk of azathioprine use in patients with underlying disease of pancreas including autoimmune pancreatitis is unclear. Case report We report here a case of an African American patient with co-existing autoimmune pancreatitis and autoimmune hepatitis who developed azathioprine induced acute pancreatitis complicated by a large symptomatic pseudocyst compressing the duodenum requiring a cystoduodenostomy. Conclusions Future studies to investigate the risk of azathioprine induced pancreatitis in the presence of underlying disease of the pancreas including autoimmune pancreatitis are required to further understand the safety of azathioprine in this sub group of patients.

  12. Regulation of Adenosine Deaminase on Induced Mouse Experimental Autoimmune Uveitis.

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    Liang, Dongchun; Zuo, Aijun; Zhao, Ronglan; Shao, Hui; Kaplan, Henry J; Sun, Deming

    2016-03-15

    Adenosine is an important regulator of the immune response, and adenosine deaminase (ADA) inhibits this regulatory effect by converting adenosine into functionally inactive molecules. Studies showed that adenosine receptor agonists can be anti- or proinflammatory. Clarification of the mechanisms that cause these opposing effects should provide a better guide for therapeutic intervention. In this study, we investigated the effect of ADA on the development of experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) induced by immunizing EAU-prone mice with a known uveitogenic peptide, IRBP1-20. Our results showed that the effective time to administer a single dose of ADA to suppress induction of EAU was 8-14 d postimmunization, shortly before EAU expression; however, ADA treatment at other time points exacerbated disease. ADA preferentially inhibited Th17 responses, and this effect was γδ T cell dependent. Our results demonstrated that the existing immune status strongly influences the anti- or proinflammatory effects of ADA. Our observations should help to improve the design of ADA- and adenosine receptor-targeted therapies. PMID:26856700

  13. Azathioprine Induced Pancreatitis in a Patient with Co-Existing Autoimmune Pancreatitis and Hepatitis

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    Preethi GK Venkatesh; Udayakumar Navaneethan

    2011-01-01

    Context Azathioprine induced pancreatitis usually runs a benign self limited course with rapid disappearance of signs and symptoms upon with drawl of the drug. Azathioprine is used in treating relapses in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis and maintenance of remission in autoimmune hepatitis. Acute pancreatitis complicated by symptomatic pseudocysts requiring drainage is not usually associated with drug induced pancreatitis. The risk of azathioprine use in patients with underlying disease ...

  14. Left hemisphere predominance of pilocarpine-induced rat epileptiform discharges

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    Liu Yansu; Lei Lei; Lai Yongxiu; Xia Yang; Yao Dezhong

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background The left cerebral hemisphere predominance in human focal epilepsy has been observed in a few studies, however, there is no related systematic study in epileptic animal on hemisphere predominance. The main goal of this paper is to observe if the epileptiform discharges (EDs) of Pilocarpine-induced epileptic rats could present difference between left hemisphere and right hemisphere or not. Methods The electrocorticogram (ECoG) and electrohippocampogram (EHG) from Pilocarpine...

  15. Presumed Isotretinoin-Induced, Concomitant Autoimmune Thyroid Disease and Ocular Myasthenia Gravis: A Case Report

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    Huseyin Gursoy

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There are many adverse effects that have been described for isotretinoin. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a possible association of oral isotretinoin intake with autoimmune thyroiditis and ocular myasthenia gravis (OMG. Case Presentation: A 19-year-old Caucasian male, who had used oral isotretinoin for severe acne disease for the previous six months, was referred to our clinic. He had a three-week history of diplopia and variable bilateral ptosis. Physical examination showed moderate periorbital edema and limitations of up- and down-gaze in the left eye. Laboratory findings and thyroid ultrasound were consistent with autoimmune thyroiditis. Antithyroid therapy did not relieve the clinical symptoms. Concomitant OMG was suspected. Variable ptosis and a positive response to oral prednisolone of 40 mg/day and pyridostigmine of 360 mg/day supported the diagnosis of concomitant autoimmune thyroiditis and OMG. Conclusion: Autoimmune disorders may be triggered by oral isotretinoin treatment. Clinicians prescribing isotretinoin should be aware of the possible association between isotretinoin intake and concomitant autoimmune thyroiditis and OMG.

  16. Acute exacerbation of autoimmune hepatitis induced by Twinrix

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Antal Csepregi; Gerhard Treiber; Christoph R(o)cken; Peter Malfertheiner

    2005-01-01

    We report on a 26-year-old man who presented with severe jaundice and elevated serum liver enzyme activities after having received a dose of Twinrix(○R). In his past medical history, jaundice or abnormal liver function tests were never recorded. Following admission, an elevated immunoglobulin G level and antinuclear antibodies at a titer of 320 with a homogenous pattern were found. Histology of a liver biopsy showed marked bridging liver fibrosis and a chronic inflammation, compatible with autoimmune hepatitis. Treatment was started with budesonide and ursodeoxycholic acid,and led to complete normalization of the pathological liver function tests. We believe that Twinrix(○R) led to an acute exacerbation of an unrecognized autoimmune hepatitis in our patient. The pathogenesis remains to be clarified. It is tempting to speculate that inactivated hepatitis A virus and/or recombinant surface antigen of the hepatitis B virus -as seen in patients with chronic hepatitis C and unrecognized autoimmune hepatitis who were treated with interferon alpha-might have been responsible for disease exacerbation.

  17. Autoimmunity in connection with a metal implant: a case of autoimmune/autoinflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants.

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    Loyo, Esthela; Jara, Luis J; López, Persio David; Puig, Ana Carolina

    2013-04-01

    Autoimmune/autoinflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA) has been recently proposed by Shoenfeld and Agmon-Levin as a new entity that comprises several conditions: the macrophagic-myofasciitis syndrome, the Gulf War syndrome, silicosis and post-vaccination phenomena, autoimmunity related to infectious fragments, hormones, aluminum, silicone, squalene oil, and pristane. We report the case of a 23-year-old woman who developed serial episodes of high fever, extreme fatigue, transient thrombocytopenia, multiple cervical adenopathies, hepatosplenomegaly, anemia, neutropenia, severe proteinuria and urine sediment abnormalities, elevated serum ferritin levels, and transient low positive antinuclear antibodies 1 year after she had a nickel-titanium chin implant for cosmetic reasons. The clinical picture simulated a variety of probable diseases: systemic lupus erythematosus, Kikuchi-Fujimoto syndrome, adult onset Still's disease, antiphospholipid syndrome, and hemophagocytic syndrome, among others, so she underwent an extensive medical investigation including two lymph node biopsies. She received treatment accordingly with steroids, methotrexate, and mofetil mycophenolate, with initial improvement of her symptoms, which recurred every time the dose was reduced. Two and a half years later the patient decided to retire the chin implant and afterwards all her systemic symptoms have disappeared. She remains in good health, without recurrence of any symptom and off medications until today. Albeit this patient fulfills proposed major ASIA criteria, to our knowledge it would be the first description of systemic features of autoinflammation in connection with a metal implant. PMID:26000140

  18. Autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA) 2013: Unveiling the pathogenic, clinical and diagnostic aspects.

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    Perricone, Carlo; Colafrancesco, Serena; Mazor, Roei D; Soriano, Alessandra; Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2013-12-01

    In 2011 a new syndrome termed 'ASIA Autoimmune/Inflammatory Syndrome Induced by Adjuvants' was defined pointing to summarize for the first time the spectrum of immune-mediated diseases triggered by an adjuvant stimulus such as chronic exposure to silicone, tetramethylpentadecane, pristane, aluminum and other adjuvants, as well as infectious components, that also may have an adjuvant effect. All these environmental factors have been found to induce autoimmunity by themselves both in animal models and in humans: for instance, silicone was associated with siliconosis, aluminum hydroxide with post-vaccination phenomena and macrophagic myofasciitis syndrome. Several mechanisms have been hypothesized to be involved in the onset of adjuvant-induced autoimmunity; a genetic favorable background plays a key role in the appearance on such vaccine-related diseases and also justifies the rarity of these phenomena. This paper will focus on protean facets which are part of ASIA, focusing on the roles and mechanisms of action of different adjuvants which lead to the autoimmune/inflammatory response. The data herein illustrate the critical role of environmental factors in the induction of autoimmunity. Indeed, it is the interplay of genetic susceptibility and environment that is the major player for the initiation of breach of tolerance. PMID:24238833

  19. Induced Foxp3+ regulatory T cells: a potential new weapon to treat autoimmune and inflammatory diseases?

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    Qin Lan; Huimin Fan; Valerie Quesniaux; Bernhard Ryffel; Zhongmin Liu; Song Guo Zheng

    2012-01-01

    Foxp3+ T regulatory cells (Tregs) consisting of natural and induced Treg subsets play a crucial role in the maintenance of immune homeostasis against self-antigen.The actions designed to correct defects in numbers or functions of Tregs may be therapeutic in the treatment of autoimmune diseases.While recent studies demonstrated that natural Tregs are instable and dysfunctional in the inflammatory condition,induced Tregs (iTregs) may have a different feature.Here we review the progress of iTregs,particularly focus on their stability and function in the established autoimmune diseases.The advantage of iTregs as therapeutics used under inflammatory conditions is highlighted.Proper generation and manipulation of iTregs used for cellular therapy may provide a promise for the treatment of many autoimmune and inflammatory diseases.

  20. Subclinical Hypothyroidism and the Effect of Autoimmunity on the Echocardiography Indices of Left Ventricular Function, Lipid Profile, and Inflammatory Markers

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    Zohreh Moossavi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Subclinical hypothyroidism (Sch is the most frequent thyroid disease. The relationship between overt hypothyroidism and cardiovascular diseases has been well documented, but conflicting data have remained regarding Sch. Objectives: The present study aimed to assess the effect of Sch on increasing the risk of cardiovascular involvement considering the autoimmune subset. Patients and Methods: This case-control study was conducted on thirty patients with Sch and 30 healthy controls. Serum levels of thyroperoxidase antibody (TPOab, lipids, hsCRP, homocysteine, and ferritin were measured. Besides, conventional echocardiographic study and tissue Doppler imaging (including strain rate indices was done to evaluate Left Ventricular (LV systolic function. Results: The results showed a significant difference between the Sch patients and the controls regarding the serum level of triglyceride (117.43 ± 63.51 mg/dL vs. 86.86 ± 41.57, P = 0.031, echocardiographic parameters (longitudinal systolic strain rate [SRs: -1.006 ± 0.4 vs. -1.26 ± 0.16, P = 0.002; SRl: -1.43 ± 0.27 vs. -1.68 ± 0.29, P = 0.001], and Sm of septal mitral annulus (6.90 ± 0.6 vs. 7.43 ± 0.8, P = 0.006]. However, no significant difference was observed between the two groups regarding the serum levels of the inflammatory markers. Moreover, a significant correlation was found between TSH and Sm (r = -0.36, P = 0.005 and longitudinal systolic strain rate (SRs: r = 0.42, P < 0.001; SRl: r = 0.40, P = 0.001. Systolic strain rate was significantly lower in the TPOab positive patients (-0.99 ± 0.18 vs. -1.15 ± 0.25, P = 0.047. Conclusions: The clear association between Sch and subclinical LV systolic dysfunction which was more evident in the subgroup of patients with circulating anti-thyroid antibodies would remind a greater emphasis for considering the subgroup of TPOab positive patients for directing toward hormone replacement.

  1. Role of Peritoneal Macrophages in Cytomegalovirus-induced Acceleration of Autoimmune Diabetes in BB-rats

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    Jan-Luuk Hillebrands

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: As one of the natural perturbants, infection with cytomegalovirus (CMV is believed to play a role in the development of Type I diabetes. Using the DP-BB rat model for autoimmune diabetes, we here report about possible mechanisms responsible for R(atCMV-induced accelerated onset of diabetes.

  2. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase deficiency causes organ-specific autoimmune disease.

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    Koji Hase

    Full Text Available Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID expressed by germinal center B cells is a central regulator of somatic hypermutation (SHM and class switch recombination (CSR. Humans with AID mutations develop not only the autosomal recessive form of hyper-IgM syndrome (HIGM2 associated with B cell hyperplasia, but also autoimmune disorders by unknown mechanisms. We report here that AID-/- mice spontaneously develop tertiary lymphoid organs (TLOs in non-lymphoid tissues including the stomach at around 6 months of age. At a later stage, AID-/- mice develop a severe gastritis characterized by loss of gastric glands and epithelial hyperplasia. The disease development was not attenuated even under germ-free (GF conditions. Gastric autoantigen -specific serum IgM was elevated in AID-/- mice, and the serum levels correlated with the gastritis pathological score. Adoptive transfer experiments suggest that autoimmune CD4+ T cells mediate gastritis development as terminal effector cells. These results suggest that abnormal B-cell expansion due to AID deficiency can drive B-cell autoimmunity, and in turn promote TLO formation, which ultimately leads to the propagation of organ-specific autoimmune effector CD4+ T cells. Thus, AID plays an important role in the containment of autoimmune diseases by negative regulation of autoreactive B cells.

  3. Promoting tolerance to proteolipid protein-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis through targeting dendritic cells

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    Stern, Joel N. H.; Keskin, Derin B.; Kato, Zenichiro; Waldner, Hanspeter; Schallenberg, Sonja; Anderson, Ana; von Boehmer, Harald; Kretschmer, Karsten; Strominger, Jack L.

    2010-01-01

    In T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases, self-reactive T cells with known antigen specificity appear to be particularly promising targets for antigen-specific induction of tolerance without compromising desired protective host immune responses. Several lines of evidence suggest that delivery of antigens to antigen-presenting dendritic cells (DCs) in the steady state (i.e., to immature DCs) may represent a suitable approach to induce antigen-specific T-cell tolerance peripherally. Here, we repo...

  4. Identification of antigenic proteins associated with trichloroethylene-induced autoimmune disease by serological proteome analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although many studies indicated that trichloroethylene (TCE) could induce autoimmune diseases and some protein adducts were detected, the proteins were not identified and mechanisms remain unknown. To screen and identify autoantigens which might be involved in TCE-induced autoimmune diseases, three groups of sera were collected from healthy donors (I), patients suffering from TCE-induced exfoliative dermatitis (ED) (II), and the healed ones (III). Serological proteome analysis (SERPA) was performed with total proteins of TCE-treated L-02 liver cells as antigen sources and immunoglobins of the above sera as probes. Highly immunogenic spots (2-fold or above increase compared with group I) in group II and III were submitted to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) and tandem mass spectrometry sequencing. Western blot analysis was followed using commercial antibodies and individual serum. Six proteins were identified. Among them, Enoyl Coenzyme A hydratase peroxisoma 1 and lactate dehydrogenase B only showed stronger immunogenicity for group II sera, while Purine nucleoside phosphorylase, ribosomal protein P0 and proteasome activator subunit1 isoform1 also showed stronger immunogenicity for group III sera. Noteworthy, NM23 reacted only with group II sera. Western blot analysis of NM23 expression indicated that all of the individual serum of group II showed immune activity, which confirmed the validity of SERPA result. These findings revealed that there exist autoantibodies in group II and III sera. Besides, autoantibodies of the two stages of disease course were different. These autoantigens might serve as biomarkers to elucidate mechanisms underlying TCE toxicity and are helpful for diagnosis, therapy and prognosis of TCE-induced autoimmune diseases.

  5. Blockade of Extracellular ATP Effect by Oxidized ATP Effectively Mitigated Induced Mouse Experimental Autoimmune Uveitis (EAU)

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    Zhao, Ronglan; Liang, Dongchun; Sun, Deming

    2016-01-01

    Various pathological conditions are accompanied by ATP release from the intracellular to the extracellular compartment. Extracellular ATP (eATP) functions as a signaling molecule by activating purinergic P2 purine receptors. The key P2 receptor involved in inflammation was identified as P2X7R. Recent studies have shown that P2X7R signaling is required to trigger the Th1/Th17 immune response, and oxidized ATP (oxATP) effectively blocks P2X7R activation. In this study we investigated the effect of oxATP on mouse experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU). Our results demonstrated that induced EAU in B6 mice was almost completely abolished by the administration of small doses of oxATP, and the Th17 response, but not the Th1 response, was significantly weakened in the treated mice. Mechanistic studies showed that the therapeutic effects involve the functional change of a number of immune cells, including dendritic cells (DCs), T cells, and regulatory T cells. OxATP not only directly inhibits the T cell response; it also suppresses T cell activation by altering the function of DCs and Foxp3+ T cell. Our results demonstrated that inhibition of P2X7R activation effectively exempts excessive autoimmune inflammation, which may indicate a possible therapeutic use in the treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:27196432

  6. Induced autoimmunity against gonadal proteins affects gonadal development in juvenile zebrafish.

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    Christopher Presslauer

    Full Text Available A method to mitigate or possibly eliminate reproduction in farmed fish is highly demanded. The existing approaches have certain applicative limitations. So far, no immunization strategies affecting gonadal development in juvenile animals have been developed. We hypothesized that autoimmune mechanisms, occurring spontaneously in a number of diseases, could be induced by targeted immunization. We have asked whether the immunization against specific targets in a juvenile zebrafish gonad will produce an autoimmune response, and, consequently, disturbance in gonadal development. Gonadal soma-derived factor (Gsdf, growth differentiation factor (Gdf9, and lymphocyte antigen 75 (Cd205/Ly75, all essential for early gonad development, were targeted with 5 immunization tests. Zebrafish (n = 329 were injected at 6 weeks post fertilization, a booster injection was applied 15 days later, and fish were sampled at 30 days. We localized transcripts encoding targeted proteins by in situ hybridization, quantified expression of immune-, apoptosis-, and gonad-related genes with quantitative real-time PCR, and performed gonadal histology and whole-mount immunohistochemistry for Bcl2-interacting-killer (Bik pro-apoptotic protein. The treatments resulted in an autoimmune reaction, gonad developmental retardation, intensive apoptosis, cell atresia, and disturbed transcript production. Testes were remarkably underdeveloped after anti-Gsdf treatments. Anti-Gdf9 treatments promoted apoptosis in testes and abnormal development of ovaries. Anti-Cd205 treatment stimulated a strong immune response in both sexes, resulting in oocyte atresia and strong apoptosis in supporting somatic cells. The effect of immunization was FSH-independent. Furthermore, immunization against germ cell proteins disturbed somatic supporting cell development. This is the first report to demonstrate that targeted autoimmunity can disturb gonadal development in a juvenile fish. It shows a

  7. Induced Autoimmunity against Gonadal Proteins Affects Gonadal Development in Juvenile Zebrafish

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    Presslauer, Christopher; Nagasawa, Kazue; Dahle, Dalia; Babiak, Joanna; Fernandes, Jorge M. O.; Babiak, Igor

    2014-01-01

    A method to mitigate or possibly eliminate reproduction in farmed fish is highly demanded. The existing approaches have certain applicative limitations. So far, no immunization strategies affecting gonadal development in juvenile animals have been developed. We hypothesized that autoimmune mechanisms, occurring spontaneously in a number of diseases, could be induced by targeted immunization. We have asked whether the immunization against specific targets in a juvenile zebrafish gonad will produce an autoimmune response, and, consequently, disturbance in gonadal development. Gonadal soma-derived factor (Gsdf), growth differentiation factor (Gdf9), and lymphocyte antigen 75 (Cd205/Ly75), all essential for early gonad development, were targeted with 5 immunization tests. Zebrafish (n = 329) were injected at 6 weeks post fertilization, a booster injection was applied 15 days later, and fish were sampled at 30 days. We localized transcripts encoding targeted proteins by in situ hybridization, quantified expression of immune-, apoptosis-, and gonad-related genes with quantitative real-time PCR, and performed gonadal histology and whole-mount immunohistochemistry for Bcl2-interacting-killer (Bik) pro-apoptotic protein. The treatments resulted in an autoimmune reaction, gonad developmental retardation, intensive apoptosis, cell atresia, and disturbed transcript production. Testes were remarkably underdeveloped after anti-Gsdf treatments. Anti-Gdf9 treatments promoted apoptosis in testes and abnormal development of ovaries. Anti-Cd205 treatment stimulated a strong immune response in both sexes, resulting in oocyte atresia and strong apoptosis in supporting somatic cells. The effect of immunization was FSH-independent. Furthermore, immunization against germ cell proteins disturbed somatic supporting cell development. This is the first report to demonstrate that targeted autoimmunity can disturb gonadal development in a juvenile fish. It shows a straightforward potential

  8. Keep-Left Behavior Induced by Asymmetrically Profiled Walls

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    Oliveira, C. L. N.; Vieira, A. P.; Helbing, D.; Andrade, J. S.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2016-01-01

    We show, computationally and analytically, that asymmetrically shaped walls can organize the flow of pedestrians driven in opposite directions through a corridor. Precisely, a two-lane ordered state emerges in which people always walk on the left-hand side (or right-hand side), controlled by the system's parameters. This effect depends on features of the channel geometry, such as the asymmetry of the profile and the channel width, as well as on the density and the drift velocity of pedestrians, and the intensity of noise. We investigate in detail the influence of these parameters on the flow and discover a crossover between ordered and disordered states. Our results show that an ordered state only appears within a limited range of drift velocities. Moreover, increasing noise may suppress such flow organization, but the flow is always sustained. This is in contrast with the "freezing by heating" phenomenon according to which pedestrians tend to clog in smooth channels for strong noise [Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 1240 (2000)]. Therefore, the ratchetlike effect proposed here acts on the system not only to induce a "keep-left" behavior but also to prevent the freezing by heating clogging phenomenon. Besides pedestrian flow, this new phenomenon has other potential applications in microfluidics systems.

  9. Time-Dependent Progression of Demyelination and Axonal Pathology in MP4-Induced Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Prinz

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS characterized by inflammation, demyelination and axonal pathology. Myelin basic protein/proteolipid protein (MBP-PLP fusion protein MP4 is capable of inducing chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE in susceptible mouse strains mirroring diverse histopathological and immunological hallmarks of MS. Lack of human tissue underscores the importance of animal models to study the pathology of MS.Twenty-two female C57BL/6 (B6 mice were immunized with MP4 and the clinical development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE was observed. Methylene blue-stained semi-thin and ultra-thin sections of the lumbar spinal cord were assessed at the peak of acute EAE, three months (chronic EAE and six months after onset of EAE (long-term EAE. The extent of lesional area and inflammation were analyzed in semi-thin sections on a light microscopic level. The magnitude of demyelination and axonal damage were determined using electron microscopy. Emphasis was put on the ventrolateral tract (VLT of the spinal cord.B6 mice demonstrated increasing demyelination and severe axonal pathology in the course of MP4-induced EAE. Additionally, mitochondrial swelling and a decrease in the nearest neighbor neurofilament distance (NNND as early signs of axonal damage were evident with the onset of EAE. In semi-thin sections we observed the maximum of lesional area in the chronic state of EAE while inflammation was found to a similar extent in acute and chronic EAE. In contrast to the well-established myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG model, disease stages of MP4-induced EAE could not be distinguished by assessing the extent of parenchymal edema or the grade of inflammation.Our results complement our previous ultrastructural studies of B6 EAE models and suggest that B6 mice immunized with different antigens constitute useful instruments to study the diverse

  10. Endogenous interleukin (IL)-17A promotes pristane-induced systemic autoimmunity and lupus nephritis induced by pristane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, S A; Odobasic, D; Khouri, M B; Steinmetz, O M; Yang, Y; Holdsworth, S R; Kitching, A R

    2014-06-01

    Interleukin (IL)-17A is increased both in serum and in kidney biopsies from patients with lupus nephritis, but direct evidence of pathogenicity is less well established. Administration of pristane to genetically intact mice results in the production of autoantibodies and proliferative glomerulonephritis, resembling human lupus nephritis. These studies sought to define the role of IL-17A in experimental lupus induced by pristane administration. Pristane was administered to wild-type (WT) and IL-17A(-/-) mice. Local and systemic immune responses were assessed after 6 days and 8 weeks, and autoimmunity, glomerular inflammation and renal injury were measured at 7 months. IL-17A production increased significantly 6 days after pristane injection, with innate immune cells, neutrophils (Ly6G(+)) and macrophages (F4/80(+)) being the predominant source of IL-17A. After 8 weeks, while systemic IL-17A was still readily detected in WT mice, the levels of proinflammatory cytokines, interferon (IFN)-γ and tumour necrosis factor (TNF) were diminished in the absence of endogenous IL-17A. Seven months after pristane treatment humoral autoimmunity was diminished in the absence of IL-17A, with decreased levels of immunoglobulin (Ig)G and anti-dsDNA antibodies. Renal inflammation and injury was less in the absence of IL-17A. Compared to WT mice, glomerular IgG, complement deposition, glomerular CD4(+) T cells and intrarenal expression of T helper type 1 (Th1)-associated proinflammatory mediators were decreased in IL-17A(-/-) mice. WT mice developed progressive proteinuria, but functional and histological renal injury was attenuated in the absence of IL-17A. Therefore, IL-17A is required for the full development of autoimmunity and lupus nephritis in experimental SLE, and early in the development of autoimmunity, innate immune cells produce IL-17A. PMID:24528105

  11. A Tandem Repeat in Decay Accelerating Factor 1 Is Associated with Severity of Murine Mercury-Induced Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M. Cauvi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Decay accelerating factor (DAF, a complement-regulatory protein, protects cells from bystander complement-mediated lysis and negatively regulates T cells. Reduced expression of DAF occurs in several systemic autoimmune diseases including systemic lupus erythematosus, and DAF deficiency exacerbates disease in several autoimmune models, including murine mercury-induced autoimmunity (mHgIA. Daf1, located within Hmr1, a chromosome 1 locus associated in DBA/2 mice with resistance to mHgIA, could be a candidate. Here we show that reduced Daf1 transcription in lupus-prone mice was not associated with a reduction in the Daf1 transcription factor SP1. Studies of NZB mice congenic for the mHgIA-resistant DBA/2 Hmr1 locus suggested that Daf1 expression was controlled by the host genome and not the Hmr1 locus. A unique pentanucleotide repeat variant in the second intron of Daf1 in DBA/2 mice was identified and shown in F2 intercrosses to be associated with less severe disease; however, analysis of Hmr1 congenics indicated that this most likely reflected the presence of autoimmunity-predisposing genetic variants within the Hmr1 locus or that Daf1 expression is mediated by the tandem repeat in epistasis with other genetic variants present in autoimmune-prone mice. These studies argue that the effect of DAF on autoimmunity is complex and may require multiple genetic elements.

  12. Mouse Models of Multiple Sclerosis: Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis and Theiler’s Virus-Induced Demyelinating Disease

    OpenAIRE

    McCarthy, Derrick P.; Richards, Maureen H.; Miller, Stephen D.

    2012-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and Theiler’s Murine Encephalitis Virus-Induced Demyelinating Disease (TMEV-IDD) are two clinically relevant murine models of multiple sclerosis (MS). Like MS, both are characterized by mononuclear cell infiltration into the CNS and demyelination. EAE is induced by either the administration of myelin protein or peptide in adjuvant or by the adoptive transfer of encephalitogenic T cell blasts into naïve recipients. The relative merits of each of ...

  13. Synthetic Marijuana Induced Acute Nonischemic Left Ventricular Dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Moustafa Elsheshtawy; Priatharsini Sriganesh; Vasudev Virparia; Falgun Patel; Ashok Khanna

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic marijuana is an uptrending designer drug currently widely spread in the US. We report a case of acute deterioration of nonischemic left ventricular dysfunction after exposure to synthetic marijuana. This case illustrates the importance of history taking in cardiac patients and identifies a negative cardiovascular effect of synthetic marijuana known as K2, not yet well detected by urine toxicology screening tools.

  14. Exercise-Induced Right Ventricular Outflow Tract Tachycardia in a Patient with Isolated Left Ventricular Noncompaction

    OpenAIRE

    Mehmet Eren; Erkan İlhan; Ahmet Taha Alper; Tolga Sinan Güvenç

    2011-01-01

    Isolated left ventricular noncompaction is a hereditary cardiomyopathy in which a variety of supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias could be observed. We report a patient with exercise-induced ventricular tachycardia with left bundle branch block morphology that had characteristics of an idiopathic ventricular tachycardia who was subsequently diagnosed as left ventricular noncompaction. Successful remission of arrhythmia was ensured after the introduction of oral beta-blocker therapy.

  15. Synthetic Marijuana Induced Acute Nonischemic Left Ventricular Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moustafa Elsheshtawy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic marijuana is an uptrending designer drug currently widely spread in the US. We report a case of acute deterioration of nonischemic left ventricular dysfunction after exposure to synthetic marijuana. This case illustrates the importance of history taking in cardiac patients and identifies a negative cardiovascular effect of synthetic marijuana known as K2, not yet well detected by urine toxicology screening tools.

  16. Synthetic Marijuana Induced Acute Nonischemic Left Ventricular Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsheshtawy, Moustafa; Sriganesh, Priatharsini; Virparia, Vasudev; Patel, Falgun; Khanna, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic marijuana is an uptrending designer drug currently widely spread in the US. We report a case of acute deterioration of nonischemic left ventricular dysfunction after exposure to synthetic marijuana. This case illustrates the importance of history taking in cardiac patients and identifies a negative cardiovascular effect of synthetic marijuana known as K2, not yet well detected by urine toxicology screening tools. PMID:27119030

  17. DIABETOGENIC T CELLS INDUCE AUTOIMMUNE DIABETES IN BALB/c MICE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-lei Zou; Zeng-yu Zhao; Yun-yang Wang; Zhi-qiang Su; Ming Xiang

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the role of T cell and its subsets in the induction of insulitis and type 1 diabetes meilitus(T1DM) in BALB/c mice.Methods Autoimmune diabetes mellitus was developed by intraperitoneal injection of 40 mg/kg streptozotocin(STZ) daily for 5 consecutive days in BALB/c mice as sources of donor cells. Spleen cells from diabetic mice were then cultured for 7 days in the stimulation of interleukin-2 ( IL-2 ) to harvest diabetogenic T cells, which were subsequently transferred into normal BALB/c mice recipients. MTr, ELISA, and HE staining were used to analyze the lymphocyte proliferation, cytokine (IL-2, interferon-γ, IL-4, and IL-10) levels, and pathological changes in pancreatic islets.Results As few as 3 × 106 diabetogenic T cells successfully induced diabetes meilitus in recipients pretreated with STZ twice, whereas transfer of equal amount of normal splenocytes, T cell-depleted diabetogenie splenocytes, or diabetogenic CD4+ T cells alone in recipients receiving STZ twice pretreatment was proved not to induce diabetes mellitus either. A markedly increased lymphocyte proliferation, high levels of interferon-γ and IL-2 in the supematants of diabetogenie T cells were observed. In addition, a markedly enhanced lymphocyte proliferation, a high level of interferon-γ secretion in serum, and numerous lymphocytes infiltration in pancreatic islets were detected in the diabetic mice induced by diabetogenic T cells transfer.Conclusions A novel T1DM murine model is established in STZ-pretreated BALB/c mice by adoptive transfer of diabetogenic T cells. CD4M+ T cells with interferon-γ may promote the onset of diabetes mellitus.

  18. Enhanced expression of constitutive and inducible forms of nitric oxide synthase in autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S; Moon, C; Wie, M B; Kim, H; Tanuma, N; Matsumoto, Y; Shin, T

    2000-06-01

    To elucidate the role of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in the pathogenesis of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), we analyzed the expression of constitutive neuronal NOS (nNOS), endothelial NOS (eNOS), and inducible NOS (iNOS) in the spinal cords of rats with EAE. We further examined the structural interaction between apoptotic cells and spinal cord cells including neurons and astrocytes, which are potent cell types of nitric oxide (NO) production in the brain. Western blot analysis showed that three forms of NOS significantly increased in the spinal cords of rats at the peak stage of EAE, while small amounts of these enzymes were identified in the spinal cords of rats without EAE. Immunohistochemical study showed that the expression of either nNOS or eNOS increased in the brain cells including neurons and astrocytes during the peak and recovery stages of EAE, while the expression of iNOS was found mainly in the inflammatory macrophages in the perivascular EAE lesions. Double labeling showed that apoptotic cells had intimate contacts with either neurons or astrocytes, which are major cell types to express nNOS and eNOS constitutively. Our results suggest that the three NOS may play an important role in the recovery of EAE. PMID:14612615

  19. Suppression of inflammatory responses during MOG-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis is regulated by AKT3 signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Tsiperson, Vladislav; Gruber, Ross C; Goldberg, Michael; Jordan, Ayana; Weinger, Jason G.; Macian, Fernando; Shafit-Zagardo, Bridget

    2013-01-01

    AKT3, a member of the serine/threonine kinase AKT family, is involved in a variety of biological processes. AKT3 is expressed in immune cells, and is the major AKT isoform in the CNS representing 30% of the total AKT expressed in spinal cord, and 50% in the brain. Myelin-oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a mouse model in which lymphocytes and monocytes enter the CNS, resulting in inflammation, demyelination, and axonal injury. We hyp...

  20. Gene Expression in the Spinal Cord in Female Lewis Rats with Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis Induced with Myelin Basic Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Inglis, Hayley R.; Judith M. Greer; Pamela A. McCombe

    2012-01-01

    Background Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the best available model of multiple sclerosis, can be induced in different animal strains using immunization with central nervous system antigens. EAE is associated with inflammation and demyelination of the nervous system. Micro-array can be used to investigate gene expression and biological pathways that are altered during disease. There are few studies of the changes in gene expression in EAE, and these have mostly been done in a...

  1. The innate immune response affects the development of the autoimmune response in Theiler’s virus- induced demyelinating disease

    OpenAIRE

    Olson, Julie K.; Miller, Stephen D.

    2009-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a human CNS autoimmune demyelinating disease. Epidemiological evidence has suggested a role for virus infection in the initiation and/or exacerbation of MS. Theiler’s murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV)- induced demyelinating disease serves as a relevant mouse model for MS. TMEV- infected mice develop a demyelinating disease with clinical symptoms beginning around 35 days post infection which is associated with development of myelin- specific, PLP139–151, CD4+ T c...

  2. Characterization of Polyclonal Antibody Induced by Autoantibody TPO (Thyroidperoxidase) From Autoimmune Thyroid Disease (AITD) Serum with ELISA and Western Blotting

    OpenAIRE

    Maulidya Aulia Fiqriyana; Aulanni'am Aulanni'am; Anna Roosdiana

    2013-01-01

    Autoantibody TPO is a potential marker for early detection of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD). Autoantibody TPO has a specifity and a sensitivity ranging from 82% to100% in comparison to other AITD serology markers. Concentration of autoantibody TPO in sera had a positive correlation with activities of chronic AITD. This research have been conducted to investigate the characteristic of polyclonal antibody TPO induced by autoantibody TPO from serum of AITD patients. The autoantibody TPO was ...

  3. Development of Autoimmune Overt Hypothyroidism Is Highly Associated With Live Births and Induced Abortions but Only in Premenopausal Women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carle, Allan; Pedersen, Inge Buelow; Knudsen, Nils;

    2014-01-01

    . Design, Setting, and Subjects: In a population study, we included Danish women with new autoimmune overt hypothyroidism not diagnosed within the first year after a pregnancy (n = 117; median age 53.0 y) and age-andregion-matched euthyroid controls from the same population (n = 468). Main Outcome Measures......: In conditional multivariate logistic regression models, we analyzed the associations between the development of autoimmune hypothyroidism and age at menarche/menopause, years of menstruations, pregnancies, spontaneous and induced abortions, live births, and years on oral contraceptives and...... postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy, also taking various possible confounders into account. Results: In multivariate regression models with no event as reference, the odds ratios (ORs) for hypothyroidism [95% confidence interval (CI)] after one/two/three or more live births were 1.72 (0.56-5.32)/3.12 (1...

  4. Invariant Natural Killer T (iNKT Cells Prevent Autoimmunity, but Induce Pulmonary Inflammation in Cystic Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanna Siegmann

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Inflammation is a major and critical component of the lung pathology in the hereditary disease cystic fibrosis. The molecular mechanisms of chronic inflammation in cystic fibrosis require definition. Methods: We used several genetic mouse models to test a role of iNKT cells and ceramide in pulmonary inflammation of cystic fibrosis mice. Inflammation was determined by the pulmonary cytokine profil and the abundance of inflammatory cells in the lung. Results: Here we provide a new concept how inflammation in the lung of individuals with cystic fibrosis is initiated. We show that in cystic fibrosis mice the mutation in the Cftr gene provokes a significant up-regulation of iNKT cells in the lung. Accumulation of iNKT cells serves to control autoimmune disease, which is triggered by a ceramide-mediated induction of cell death in CF organs. Autoimmunity becomes in particular overt in cystic fibrosis mice lacking iNKT cells and although suppression of the autoimmune response by iNKT cells is beneficial, IL-17+ iNKT cells attract macrophages and neutrophils to CF lungs resulting in chronic inflammation. Genetic deletion of iNKT cells in cystic fibrosis mice prevents inflammation in CF lungs. Conclusion: Our data demonstrate an important function of iNKT cells in the chronic inflammation affecting cystic fibrosis lungs. iNKT cells suppress the auto-immune response induced by ceramide-mediated death of epithelial cells in CF lungs, but also induce a chronic pulmonary inflammation.

  5. Generation and characterization of integration-free induced pluripotent stem cells from patients with autoimmune disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Mi-Young; Lee, Mi-Ok; Jeon, Hyejin; Seol, Binna; Kim, Jung Hwa; Chang, Jae-Suk; Cho, Yee Sook

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (AIDs), a heterogeneous group of immune-mediated disorders, are a major and growing health problem. Although AIDs are currently treated primarily with anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive drugs, the use of stem cell transplantation in patients with AIDs is becoming increasingly common. However, stem cell transplantation therapy has limitations, including a shortage of available stem cells and immune rejection of cells from nonautologous sources. Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology, which allows the generation of patient-specific pluripotent stem cells, could offer an alternative source for clinical applications of stem cell therapies in AID patients. We used nonintegrating oriP/EBNA-1-based episomal vectors to reprogram dermal fibroblasts from patients with AIDs such as ankylosing spondylitis (AS), Sjögren's syndrome (SS) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The pluripotency and multilineage differentiation capacity of each patient-specific iPSC line was validated. The safety of these iPSCs for use in stem cell transplantation is indicated by the fact that all AID-specific iPSCs are integrated transgene free. Finally, all AID-specific iPSCs derived in this study could be differentiated into cells of hematopoietic and mesenchymal lineages in vitro as shown by flow cytometric analysis and induction of terminal differentiation potential. Our results demonstrate the successful generation of integration-free iPSCs from patients with AS, SS and SLE. These findings support the possibility of using iPSC technology in autologous and allogeneic cell replacement therapy for various AIDs, including AS, SS and SLE. PMID:27174201

  6. Autoimmune Hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diagnosed? A health care provider will make a diagnosis of autoimmune hepatitis based on symptoms, a physical exam, blood tests, ... 2. A health care provider will make a diagnosis of autoimmune hepatitis based on symptoms, a physical exam, blood tests, ...

  7. Metabolites of MDMA induce oxidative stress and contractile dysfunction in adult rat left ventricular myocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Shenouda, Sylvia K.; Varner, Kurt J.; Carvalho, Felix; Lucchesi, Pamela A.

    2009-01-01

    Repeated administration of MDMA (ecstasy) produces eccentric left ventricular (LV) dilation and diastolic dysfunction. While the mechanism(s) underlying this toxicity are unknown; oxidative stress plays an important role. MDMA is metabolized into redox cycling metabolites that produce superoxide. In this study, we demonstrated that metabolites of MDMA induce oxidative stress and contractile dysfunction in adult rat left ventricular myocytes. Metabolites of MDMA used in this study included: al...

  8. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia induced by anti-PD-1 therapy in metastatic melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Benjamin Y; Micklethwaite, Kenneth P; Swaminathan, Sanjay; Kefford, Richard F; Carlino, Matteo S

    2016-04-01

    We report the occurrence of autoimmune hemolytic anemia in a patient receiving the anti-PD-1 monoclonal antibody, nivolumab, for metastatic melanoma in the presence of known red cell alloantibodies, despite having received prior ipilimumab without evidence of hemolysis. The patient had a history of multiple red cell alloantibodies and a positive direct antiglobulin test, identified at the time of a prior transfusion, which occurred before treatment with ipilimumab. The patient developed symptomatic warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia after four cycles of treatment with nivolumab. Clinical improvement was noted following cessation of the drug and treatment with corticosteroids. Given that there was no prior history of hemolysis, even during treatment with ipilimumab, we hypothesize that anti-PD-1 therapy disrupted peripheral tolerance, unmasking an underlying autoimmune predisposition. PMID:26795275

  9. Resistance to Streptozotocin-Induced Autoimmune Diabetes in Absence of Complement C3: Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells Play a Role

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Xiaogang; Liu, Huanhai; He, Bin; Fu, Zhiren

    2013-01-01

    The contribution of complement to the development of autoimmune diabetes has been proposed recently. The underlying mechanisms, however, remain poorly understood. We hypothesize that myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), which act as regulators in autoimmunity, play a role in resistance to diabetes in absence of complement C3. Indeed, MDSC number was increased significantly in STZ-treated C3−/− mice. These cells highly expressed arginase I and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Import...

  10. Autoimmune pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-Guang Fan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the autoimmune pancreatitis was introduced in 1995, it has been recognized as a form of chronic pancreatitis, which is always associated with autoimmune manifestations. As the improvement of technical and instrumental made in ultrasonography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, the diagnoses of autoimmune pancreatitis is no longer such difficult. Even though the treatment of autoimmune pancreatitis is available with a conservative therapy, there are many points that are still unclearly. These have stimulated widespread interest in this disease from gastroenterologists, endoscopists, pathologists, and prevalent research. The present article provides with our better understanding of the diagnosis and treatment of autoimmune pancreatitis.

  11. Autoimmune pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-Guang Fan

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Since the autoimmune pancreatitis was introduced in 1995, it has been recognized as a form of chronic pancreatitis, which is always associated with autoimmune manifestations. As the improvement of technical and instrumental made in ultrasonography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, the diagnoses of autoimmune pancreatitis is no longer such difficult. Even though the treatment of autoimmune pancreatitis is available with a conservative therapy, there are many points that are still unclearly. These have stimulated widespread interest in this disease from gastroenterologists, endoscopists, pathologists, and prevalent research. The present article provides with our better understanding of the diagnosis and treatment of autoimmune pancreatitis.

  12. Trimetazidine protects against smoking-induced left ventricular remodeling via attenuating oxidative stress, apoptosis, and inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Zhou

    Full Text Available Trimetazidine, a piperazine derivative used as an anti-anginal agent, improves myocardial glucose utilization through inhibition of fatty acid metabolism. The present study was designed to investigate whether trimetazidine has the protective effects against smoking-induced left ventricular remodeling in rats. In this study, Wistar rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: smoking group (exposed to cigarette smoke, trimetazidine group (exposed to cigarette smoke and treated with trimetazidine, and control group. The echocardiographic and morphometric data indicated that trimetazidine has protective effects against smoking-induced left ventricular remodeling. Oxidative stress was evaluated by detecting malondialdehyde, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase in the supernatant of left ventricular tissue. Cardiomyocyte apoptotic rate was determined by flow cytometry with Annexin V/PI staining. Gene expression and serum levels of inflammatory markers, including interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α, were deteced by quantitative real-time PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Our results suggested that trimetazidine could significantly reduce smoking-induced oxidative stress, apoptosis, and inflammation. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that trimetazidine protects against smoking-induced left ventricular remodeling via attenuating oxidative stress, apoptosis, and inflammation.

  13. Human adjuvant disease: remission of silicone induced autoimmune disease after explanation of breast augmentation.

    OpenAIRE

    Kaiser, W; Biesenbach, G; Stuby, U; Grafinger, P; Zazgornik, J.

    1990-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases following silicone or paraffin implantation are rarely encountered complications of plastic surgery. A 42 year old woman is presented who developed clinical and immunological features of systemic lupus erythematosus 11 years after silicone augmentation. After explanation antinuclear antibody titres decreased from 1/1280 to 1/160, C4 complement fraction and the previously raised angiotensin converting enzyme normalised in step with clinical improvement. It is important that...

  14. Repulsive Guidance Molecule-a Is Involved in Th17-Cell-Induced Neurodegeneration in Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shogo Tanabe

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by inflammation, demyelination, and neurodegeneration in the CNS. Although it is important to prevent neurodegeneration for alleviating neurological disability, the molecular mechanism of neurodegeneration remains largely unknown. Here, we report that repulsive guidance molecule-a (RGMa, known to regulate axonal growth, is associated with neurodegeneration in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, a mouse model of MS. RGMa is highly expressed in interleukin-17-producing CD4+ T cells (Th17 cells. We induced EAE by adoptive transfer of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG-specific Th17 cells and then inhibited RGMa with a neutralizing antibody. Inhibition of RGMa improves EAE scores and reduces neuronal degeneration without altering immune or glial responses. Th17 cells induce cultured cortical neuron death through RGMa-neogenin and Akt dephosphorylation. Our results demonstrate that RGMa is involved in Th17-cell-mediated neurodegeneration and that RGMa-specific antibody may have a therapeutic effect in MS.

  15. Silica, Silicosis, and Autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Kenneth Michael

    2016-01-01

    Inhalation of dust containing crystalline silica is associated with a number of acute and chronic diseases including systemic autoimmune diseases. Evidence for the link with autoimmune disease comes from epidemiological studies linking occupational exposure to crystalline silica dust with the systemic autoimmune diseases systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Although little is known regarding the mechanism by which silica exposure leads to systemic autoimmune disease, there is a voluminous literature on silica exposure and silicosis that may help identify immune processes that precede development of autoimmunity. The pathophysiology of silicosis consists of deposition of silica particles in the alveoli of the lung. Ingestion of these particles by macrophages initiates an inflammatory response, which stimulates fibroblasts to proliferate and produce collagen. Silica particles are encased by collagen leading to fibrosis and the nodular lesions characteristic of the disease. The steps in the development of silicosis, including acute and chronic inflammation and fibrosis, have different molecular and cellular requirements, suggesting that silica-induced inflammation and fibrosis may be mechanistically separate. Significantly, it is unclear whether silica-induced inflammation and fibrosis contribute similarly to the development of autoimmunity. Nonetheless, the findings from human and animal model studies are consistent with an autoimmune pathogenesis that begins with activation of the innate immune system leading to proinflammatory cytokine production, pulmonary inflammation leading to activation of adaptive immunity, breaking of tolerance, and autoantibodies and tissue damage. The variable frequency of these immunological features following silica exposure suggests substantial genetic involvement and gene/environment interaction in silica-induced autoimmunity. However, numerous questions remain unanswered. PMID:27014276

  16. Silica, Silicosis and Autoimmunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Michael Pollard

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Inhalation of dust containing crystalline silica is associated with a number of acute and chronic diseases including systemic autoimmune diseases. Evidence for the link with autoimmune disease comes from epidemiological studies linking occupational exposure to crystalline silica dust with the systemic autoimmune diseases SLE, SSc and RA. Although little is known regarding the mechanism by which silica exposure leads to systemic autoimmune disease, there is a voluminous literature on silica exposure and silicosis that may help identify immune processes that precede development of autoimmunity. The pathophysiology of silicosis consists of deposition of silica particles in the alveoli of the lung. Ingestion of these particles by macrophages initiates an inflammatory response which stimulates fibroblasts to proliferate and produce collagen. Silica particles are encased by collagen leading to fibrosis and the nodular lesions characteristic of the disease. The steps in the development of silicosis, including acute and chronic inflammation and fibrosis, have different molecular and cellular requirements suggesting that silica-induced inflammation and fibrosis may be mechanistically separate. Significantly, it is unclear whether silica-induced inflammation and fibrosis contribute similarly to the development of autoimmunity. Nonetheless, the findings from human and animal model studies are consistent with an autoimmune pathogenesis that begins with activation of the innate immune system leading to proinflammatory cytokine production, pulmonary inflammation leading to activation of adaptive immunity, breaking of tolerance, autoantibodies and tissue damage. The variable frequency of these immunological features following silica exposure suggests substantial genetic involvement and gene/environment interaction in silica-induced autoimmunity. However numerous questions remain unanswered.

  17. Anatomy and Physiology of Left Ventricular Suction Induced by Rotary Blood Pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamonsen, Robert Francis; Lim, Einly; Moloney, John; Lovell, Nigel Hamilton; Rosenfeldt, Franklin L

    2015-08-01

    This study in five large greyhound dogs implanted with a VentrAssist left ventricular assist device focused on identification of the precise site and physiological changes induced by or underlying the complication of left ventricular suction. Pressure sensors were placed in left and right atria, proximal and distal left ventricle, and proximal aorta while dual perivascular and tubing ultrasonic flow meters measured blood flow in the aortic root and pump outlet cannula. When suction occurred, end-systolic pressure gradients between proximal and distal regions of the left ventricle on the order of 40-160 mm Hg indicated an occlusive process of variable intensity in the distal ventricle. A variable negative flow difference between end systole and end diastole (0.5-3.4 L/min) was observed. This was presumably mediated by variable apposition of the free and septal walls of the ventricle at the pump inlet cannula orifice which lasted approximately 100 ms. This apposition, by inducing an end-systolic flow deficit, terminated the suction process by relieving the imbalance between pump requirement and delivery from the right ventricle. Immediately preceding this event, however, unnaturally low end-systolic pressures occurred in the left atrium and proximal left ventricle which in four dogs lasted for 80-120 ms. In one dog, however, this collapse progressed to a new level and remained at approximately -5 mm Hg across four heart beats at which point suction was relieved by manual reduction in pump speed. Because these pressures were associated with a pulmonary capillary wedge pressure of -5 mm Hg as well, they indicate total collapse of the entire pulmonary venous system, left atrium, and left ventricle which persisted until pump flow requirement was relieved by reducing pump speed. We suggest that this collapse caused the whole vascular region from pulmonary capillaries to distal left ventricle to behave as a Starling resistance which further reduced right

  18. Antigen-specific tolerance induced by IL-10 gene modified immature dendritic cells in experimental autoimmune myocarditis in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wei-min; LI Yue; LIU Wei; GAO Cheng; ZHOU Bao-guo; YANG Shu-sen; WANG Zheng; ZHANG Rui-hong; GAN Run-tao; KONG Yi-hui

    2006-01-01

    Background Experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) in rats is a T-cell-mediated disorder. The initiation and maintenance of autoimmune responses in EAM depend on the maturation state of dendritic cells. IL-10 is a pleiotrophic immunomodulatory cytokine that functions at different levels of the immune response, so it has emerged as a promising therapeutic factor for the treatment of autoimmune/inflammatory diseases. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that IL-10 gene modified bone marrow-derived immature dendritic cells (iDCs) ameliorate EAM and to explore the underlying mechanisms.Methods EAM was induced using the methods of cardiac myosin immunization on day 0 and day 7. Immature and mature bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) were generated without or with the stimulation by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and the phenotype was analyzed by flow cytometry. Some of the iDCs were transfected by pcDNA3-IL-10 plasmid. 2 × 106/per rat mature DC (mDC), immature DC (iDC), pcDNA3 transfected iDC,pcDNA3-IL-10 transfected iDC or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) were injected intravenously for treatment 5 days after the first immunization. On day 21, HE staining was performed to detect the myocardial inflammation and T lymphocyte proliferation assay was used to determine the effects of IL-10 gene transfected iDC on autoreactive T cell proliferation. Expression of IκB, the inhibitor of NF-κB pathway, was determined by Western blot. Results BMDCs generated in a medium supplemented with granulocyte-macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) were relatively immature, as determined by flow cytometry. However, stimulation with LPS induced these cells to become mature (m)DCs with higher levels of surface major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-Ⅱ and costimulatory molecules. Intravenous administration of iDCs, especially pcDNA3-IL-10 transfected iDC,ameliorated the histopathological severity of the myosin induced-EAM, and the effect was lost after the DCs

  19. Hsp65-producing Lactococcus lactis prevents experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in mice by inducing CD4+LAP+ regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende, Rafael M; Oliveira, Rafael P; Medeiros, Samara R; Gomes-Santos, Ana C; Alves, Andrea C; Loli, Flávia G; Guimarães, Mauro A F; Amaral, Sylvia S; da Cunha, André P; Weiner, Howard L; Azevedo, Vasco; Miyoshi, Anderson; Faria, Ana M C

    2013-02-01

    Heat shock proteins (Hsps) participate in the cellular response to stress and they are hiperexpressed in inflammatory conditions. They are also known to play a major role in immune modulation, controlling, for instance, autoimmune responses. In this study, we showed that oral administration of a recombinant Lactococcus lactis strain that produces and releases LPS-free Hsp65 prevented the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in C57BL/6 mice. This was confirmed by the reduced inflammatory cell infiltrate and absence of injury signs in the spinal cord. The effect was associated with reduced IL-17 and increased IL-10 production in mesenteric lymph node and spleen cell cultures. Hsp65-producing-L. lactis-fed mice had a remarkable increase in the number of natural and inducible CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells and CD4+LAP+ (Latency-associated peptide) Tregs - which express the membrane-bound TGF-β - in spleen, inguinal and mesenteric lymph nodes as well as in spinal cord. Moreover, many Tregs co-expressed Foxp3 and LAP. In vivo depletion of LAP+ cells abrogated the effect of Hsp65-producing L. lactis in EAE prevention and worsened disease in medium-fed mice. Thus, Hsp65-L.lactis seems to boost this critical regulatory circuit involved in controlling EAE development in mice. PMID:22939403

  20. Autoimmunity in Rheumatic Diseases Is Induced by Microbial Infections via Crossreactivity or Molecular Mimicry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taha Rashid

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A general consensus supports fundamental roles for both genetic and environmental, mainly microbial, factors in the development of autoimmune diseases. One form of autoimmune rheumatic diseases is confined to a group of nonpyogenic conditions which are usually preceded by or associated with either explicit or occult infections. A previous history of clinical pharyngitis, gastroenteritis/urethritis, or tick-borne skin manifestation can be obtained from patients with rheumatic fever, reactive arthritis, or Lyme disease, respectively, whilst, other rheumatic diseases like rheumatoid arthritis (RA, ankylosing spondylitis (AS, and Crohn’s disease (CD are usually lacking such an association with a noticeable microbial infection. A great amount of data supports the notion that RA is most likely caused by Proteus asymptomatic urinary tract infections, whilst AS and CD are caused by subclinical bowel infections with Klebsiella microbes. Molecular mimicry is the main pathogenetic mechanism that can explain these forms of microbe-disease associations, where the causative microbes can initiate the disease with consequent productions of antibacterial and crossreactive autoantibodies which have a great impact in the propagation and the development of these diseases.

  1. Trimetazidine Protects against Smoking-Induced Left Ventricular Remodeling via Attenuating Oxidative Stress, Apoptosis, and Inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Xiang; Li, Chao; Xu, Weiting; CHEN, JIANCHANG

    2012-01-01

    Trimetazidine, a piperazine derivative used as an anti-anginal agent, improves myocardial glucose utilization through inhibition of fatty acid metabolism. The present study was designed to investigate whether trimetazidine has the protective effects against smoking-induced left ventricular remodeling in rats. In this study, Wistar rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: smoking group (exposed to cigarette smoke), trimetazidine group (exposed to cigarette smoke and treated with trimetazidine...

  2. Cathodal tDCS over the left prefrontal cortex diminishes choice-induced preference change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengarelli, Flavia; Spoglianti, Silvia; Avenanti, Alessio; di Pellegrino, Giuseppe

    2015-05-01

    In everyday life, people often find themselves facing difficult decisions between options that are equally attractive. Cognitive dissonance theory states that after making a difficult choice between 2 equally preferred options, individuals no longer find the alternatives similarly desirable. Rather, they often change their existing preferences to align more closely with the choice they have just made. Despite the relevance of cognitive dissonance in modulating behavior, little is known about the brain processes crucially involved in choice-induced preference change. In the present study, we applied cathodal transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) with the aim of downregulating the activity of the left or the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) during a revised version of Brehm's (in 1956. Post-decision changes in the desirability of alternatives. J Abnorm Soc Psychol. 52:384-389) free-choice paradigm. We found that cathodal tDCS over the left, but not over the right, DLPFC caused a reduction of the typical behavior-induced preference change relative to sham stimulation. Our findings highlight the role of prefrontal cortex in cognitive dissonance and provide evidence that left DLPFC plays a necessary role in the implementation of choice-induced preference change. PMID:24275827

  3. Metabolomics analysis reveals insights into biochemical mechanisms of mental stress-induced left ventricular dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Stephen H.; Matson, Wayne R.; Velazquez, Eric J.; Samad, Zainab; Williams, Redford B.; Sharma, Swati; Thomas, Beena; Wilson, Jennifer L.; O'Connor, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Mental stress induced left ventricular dysfunction (LVD) has been associated with a greater risk of adverse events in coronary heart disease (CHD) patients independent of conventional risk indicators. The underlying biochemical mechanisms of this cardiovascular condition are poorly understood. Our objective was to use metabolomics technology to identify biochemical changes that co-occur with mental stress-induced LVD in patients with clinically stable CHD. Participants were adult CHD patients who were recruited for mental stress-induced myocardial ischemia screening. For this study, we randomly selected 30 patients representing the extremes of the mental stress-induced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) change distribution; 15 who showed LVD (i.e. LVEF reduction ≥5) and 15 who showed a normal left ventricular response (NLVR; i.e. a LVEF increase of ≥5) to three mental stressors. An electrochemistry based metabolomics platform was used to profile pre- and post-stress serum samples yielding data for 22 known compounds, primarily within the tyrosine, tryptophan, purine and methionine pathways. There were significant stress-induced changes in several compounds. A comparison between the NLVR and LVD groups showed significant effects for kynurenine (p = .036, N-acetylserotonin (p = .054), uric acid (p = .015), tyrosine (p = .019) and a trend for methionine (p = .065); the NLVR group showed a significantly greater stress-induced reduction in all of those compounds compared to the LVD group. Many of these biochemicals have been implicated in other stress-related phenomena and are plausible candidates for mechanisms underlying LVD in response to mental stress. PMID:25983674

  4. The paracrine effect of mesenchymal human stem cells restored hearing in β-tubulin induced autoimmune sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, T J; Du, Xiaoping; Zhou, Bin

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the activities of hASCs (Human Adipose tissue Derived Stem Cells) on experimental autoimmune hearing loss (EAHL) and how human stem cells regenerated mouse cochlea cells. We have restored hearing in 19 years old white female with autoimmune hearing loss with autologous adipose tissue derived stem cells and we wish to understand the mechanism of restoration of hearing in animal model. BALB/c mice underwent to develop EAHL; mice with EAHL were given hASCs intraperitoneally once a week for 6 consecutive weeks. ABR were examined over time. The helper type 1 autoreactive responses and T-reg cells were examined. H&E staining or immunostaining with APC conjugated anti-HLA-ABC antibody were conducted. The organ of Corti, stria vascularis, spira ligament and spiral ganglion in stem cell group are normal. In control group, without receiving stem cells, the organ of Corti is replaced by a single layer of cells, atrophy of stria vascularis. Systemic infusion of hASCs significantly improved hearing function and protected hair cells in established EAHL. The hASCs decreased the proliferation of antigen specific Th1/Th17 cells and induced the production of anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin10 in splenocytes. They also induced the generation of antigen specific CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+)T-reg cells. The experiment showed the restoration is due to the paracrine activities of human stem cells, since there are newly regenerated mice spiral ganglion cells, not human mesenchymal stem cells derived tissue given by intraperitoneally. PMID:26235980

  5. Enterocolitis induced by autoimmune targeting of enteric glial cells: A possible mechanism in Crohn's disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornet, Anne; Savidge, Tor C.; Cabarrocas, Julie; Deng, Wen-Lin; Colombel, Jean-Frederic; Lassmann, Hans; Desreumaux, Pierre; Liblau, Roland S.

    2001-11-01

    Early pathological manifestations of Crohn's disease (CD) include vascular disruption, T cell infiltration of nerve plexi, neuronal degeneration, and induction of T helper 1 cytokine responses. This study demonstrates that disruption of the enteric glial cell network in CD patients represents another early pathological feature that may be modeled after CD8+ T cell-mediated autoimmune targeting of enteric glia in double transgenic mice. Mice expressing a viral neoself antigen in astrocytes and enteric glia were crossed with specific T cell receptor transgenic mice, resulting in apoptotic depletion of enteric glia to levels comparable in CD patients. Intestinal and mesenteric T cell infiltration, vasculitis, T helper 1 cytokine production, and fulminant bowel inflammation were characteristic hallmarks of disease progression. Immune-mediated damage to enteric glia therefore may participate in the initiation and/or the progression of human inflammatory bowel disease.

  6. Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Some examples of CAM are herbal products, chiropractic , acupuncture , and hypnosis . If you have an autoimmune disease, ... Toll-Free: 877-226-4267 National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, NIH, HHS Phone: ...

  7. Ctla-4 modulates the differentiation of inducible Foxp3+ Treg cells but IL-10 mediates their function in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Verhagen

    Full Text Available In vitro induced Foxp3+ T regulatory (iTreg cells form a novel and promising target for therapeutic tolerance induction. However, the potential of these cells as a target for the treatment of various immune diseases, as well as the factors involved in their development and function, remain debated. Here, we demonstrate in a myelin basic protein (MBP-specific murine model of CNS autoimmune disease that adoptive transfer of antigen-specific iTreg cells ameliorates disease progression. Moreover, we show that the co-stimulatory molecule CTLA-4 mediates in vitro differentiation of iTreg cells. Finally, we demonstrate that the secreted, immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10 controls the ability of antigen-specific iTreg cells to suppress autoimmune disease. Overall, we conclude that antigen-specific iTreg cells, which depend on various immune regulatory molecules for their differentiation and function, represent a major target for effective immunotherapy of autoimmune disease.

  8. Intracerebroventricular administration of TNF-like weak inducer of apoptosis induces depression-like behavior and cognitive dysfunction in non-autoimmune mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jing; Chen, Christopher Holden; Stock, Ariel; Doerner, Jessica; Gulinello, Maria; Putterman, Chaim

    2016-05-01

    Fn14, the sole known signaling receptor for the TNF family member TWEAK, is inducibly expressed in the central nervous system (CNS) in endothelial cells, astrocytes, microglia, and neurons. There is increasing recognition of the importance of the TWEAK/Fn14 pathway in autoimmune neurologic conditions, including experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and neuropsychiatric lupus. Previously, we had found that Fn14 knockout lupus-prone MRL/lpr mice display significantly attenuated neuropsychiatric manifestations. To investigate whether this improvement in disease is secondary to inhibition of TWEAK/Fn14 signaling within the CNS or the periphery, and determine whether TWEAK-mediated neuropsychiatric effects are strain dependent, we performed intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of Fc-TWEAK or an isotype matched control protein to C57Bl6/J non-autoimmune mice. We found that Fc-TWEAK injected C57Bl6/J mice developed significant depression-like behavior and cognitive dysfunction. Inflammatory mediators associated with lupus brain disease, including CCL2, C3, and iNOS, were significantly elevated in the brains of Fc-TWEAK treated mice. Furthermore, Fc-TWEAK directly increased blood brain barrier (BBB) permeability, as demonstrated by increased IgG deposition in the brain and reduced aquaporin-4 expression. Finally, Fc-TWEAK increased apoptotic cell death in the cortex and hippocampus. In conclusion, TWEAK can contribute to lupus-associated neurobehavioral deficits including depression and cognitive dysfunction by acting within the CNS to enhance production of inflammatory mediators, promote disruption of the BBB, and induce apoptosis in resident brain cells. Our study provides further support that the TWEAK/Fn14 signaling pathway may be a potential therapeutic target for inflammatory diseases involving the CNS. PMID:26721417

  9. [Autoimmune encephalitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davydovskaya, M V; Boyko, A N; Beliaeva, I A; Martynov, M Yu; Gusev, E I

    2015-01-01

    The authors consider the issues related to pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis and treatment of autoimmune encephalitis. It has been demonstrated that the development of autoimmune encephalitis can be associated with the oncologic process or be of idiopathic character. The pathogenesis of autoimmune encephalitis is caused by the production of antibodies that directly or indirectly (via T-cell mechanism) damage exo-and/or endocellular structures of the nerve cells. The presence of antobodies to endocellular structures of neurons in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with autoimmune encephalitis in the vast majority of cases (> 95%) indicates the concomitant oncologic process, the presence of antibodies to membranes or neuronal synapses can be not associated with the oncologic process. Along with complex examination, including neuroimaging, EEG, cerebrospinal fluid and antibodies, the diagnostic algorithm in autoimmune encephalitis should include the search for the nidus of cancer. The treatment algorithm in autoimmune encephalitis included the combined immunosupressive therapy, plasmapheresis, immunoglobulines, cytostatics as well as treatment of the oncologic process. PMID:26322363

  10. Prolonged left ventricular dysfunction occurs in patients with coronary artery disease after both dobutamine and exercise induced myocardial ischaemia

    OpenAIRE

    BARNES, E; Baker, C; Dutka, D.; Rimoldi, O; Rinaldi, C.; Nihoyannopoulos, P; Camici, P; Hall, R

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To determine whether pharmacological stress leads to prolonged but reversible left ventricular dysfunction in patients with coronary artery disease, similar to that seen after exercise.
DESIGN—A randomised crossover study of recovery time of systolic and diastolic left ventricular function after exercise and dobutamine induced ischaemia.
SUBJECTS—10 patients with stable angina, angiographically proven coronary artery disease, and normal left ventricular function.
INTERVENTIONS—Tread...

  11. Mercury-induced renal autoimmunity: changes in RT6+ T-lymphocytes of susceptible and resistant rats.

    OpenAIRE

    Kosuda, L L; Greiner, D. L.; Bigazzi, P E

    1993-01-01

    The repeated administration of mercury to rats of the Brown Norway (BN) inbred strain results in a self-limiting production of autoantibodies to renal antigens (e.g., laminin) and autoimmune glomerulonephritis. In contrast, rats of the Lewis (LEW) strain do not develop renal autoimmunity after mercury treatment. Suppressor T-cells and/or the idiotype-anti-idiotype network have been implicated in the control of autoimmunity in susceptible (BN) rats as well as the "resistant" state of nonsuscep...

  12. High Prevalence of Neutrophil Cytoplasmic Autoantibodies in Infants with Food Protein-Induced Proctitis/Proctocolitis: Autoimmunity Involvement?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alena Sekerkova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Food protein-induced proctitis/proctocolitis (FPIP is the most common noninfectious colitis in children in the first year of life. Along with the overall clinical symptoms, diarrhoea and rectal bleeding are the main manifestations of the disease. There is no routine noninvasive test that would be specific for this type of colitis. The aim of our study was to find a noninvasive laboratory test or tests that may be helpful in differential diagnosis of food protein-induced proctitis/proctocolitis. Methods. ANA, ANCA, ASCA, a-EMA, a-tTg, specific IgE, total IgE, IgG, IgA, IgM, and concentration of serum calprotectin were measured in a group of 25 patients with colitis and 18 children with other diagnoses. Results. Atypical-pANCA antibodies of IgG isotype were detected in the sera of 24 patients by the method of indirect immunofluorescence, and 5 patients showed also the positivity of IgA isotype. In control samples these autoantibodies were not detected. Other autoantibodies were not demonstrated in either patient or control group. Conclusions. Of the parameters tested in noninfectious colitis, atypical-pANCA on ethanol-fixed granulocytes appears to be a suitable serological marker of food protein-induced proctitis/proctocolitis and suggests a possible involvement of an autoimmune mechanisms in the pathogenesis of this disease.

  13. Amelioration of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in C57BL/6 mice by photobiomodulation induced by 670 nm light.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamaldeen A Muili

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The approved immunomodulatory agents for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS are only partially effective. It is thought that the combination of immunomodulatory and neuroprotective strategies is necessary to prevent or reverse disease progression. Irradiation with far red/near infrared light, termed photobiomodulation, is a therapeutic approach for inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases. Data suggests that near-infrared light functions through neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory mechanisms. We sought to investigate the clinical effect of photobiomodulation in the Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE model of multiple sclerosis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The clinical effect of photobiomodulation induced by 670 nm light was investigated in the C57BL/6 mouse model of EAE. Disease was induced with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG according to standard laboratory protocol. Mice received 670 nm light or no light treatment (sham administered as suppression and treatment protocols. 670 nm light reduced disease severity with both protocols compared to sham treated mice. Disease amelioration was associated with down-regulation of proinflammatory cytokines (interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α and up-regulation of anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-4, IL-10 in vitro and in vivo. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These studies document the therapeutic potential of photobiomodulation with 670 nm light in the EAE model, in part through modulation of the immune response.

  14. TNF-Like Weak Inducer of Apoptosis Aggravates Left Ventricular Dysfunction after Myocardial Infarction in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Uwe Jarr

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. TNF-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK has recently been shown to be potentially involved in adverse cardiac remodeling. However, neither the exact role of TWEAK itself nor of its receptor Fn14 in this setting is known. Aim of the Study. To analyze the effects of sTWEAK on myocardial function and gene expression in response to experimental myocardial infarction in mice. Results. TWEAK directly suppressed the expression of PGC-1α and genes of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS in cardiomyocytes. Systemic sTWEAK application after MI resulted in reduced left ventricular function and increased mortality without changes in interstitial fibrosis or infarct size. Molecular analysis revealed decreased phosphorylation of PI3K/Akt and ERK1/2 pathways associated with reduced expression of PGC-1α and PPARα. Likewise, expression of OXPHOS genes such as atp5O, cycs, cox5b, and ndufb5 was also reduced. Fn14 -/- mice showed significantly improved left ventricular function and PGC-1α levels after MI compared to their respective WT littermates (Fn14 +/+. Finally, inhibition of intrinsic TWEAK with anti-TWEAK antibodies resulted in improved left ventricular function and survival. Conclusions. TWEAK exerted maladaptive effects in mice after myocardial infarction most likely via direct effects on cardiomyocytes. Analysis of the potential mechanisms revealed that TWEAK reduced metabolic adaptations to increased cardiac workload by inhibition of PGC-1α.

  15. Autoimmune synaptopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisp, Sarah J; Kullmann, Dimitri M; Vincent, Angela

    2016-02-01

    Autoantibodies targeting proteins at the neuromuscular junction are known to cause several distinct myasthenic syndromes. Recently, autoantibodies targeting neurotransmitter receptors and associated proteins have also emerged as a cause of severe, but potentially treatable, diseases of the CNS. Here, we review the clinical evidence as well as in vitro and in vivo experimental evidence that autoantibodies account for myasthenic syndromes and autoimmune disorders of the CNS by disrupting the functional or structural integrity of synapses. Studying neurological and psychiatric diseases of autoimmune origin may provide new insights into the cellular and circuit mechanisms underlying a broad range of CNS disorders. PMID:26806629

  16. Autoimmun hypophysitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Therese; Hagen, Claus

    2010-01-01

    Autoimmune hypophysitis (AH) - often referred to as lymphocytic hypophysitis - is a rare disease that affects the pituitary gland and causes inflammation. The disease enlarges the pituitary gland and the clinical presentations are lack of pituitary function and headaches. AH is mostly seen in women...... during pregnancy or postpartum, but also occurs in males and children. AH is often associated with other autoimmune diseases, most frequently with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The symptoms are caused by enlargement of the pituitary gland and disturbances of the hormone function. Treatment is either...

  17. Autoimmune disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    2005164 Optimal cut-point of glutamic acid decar-boxylase antibody (GAD-Ab) for differentiating two subtypes of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA). LI Xia(李霞), et al. Dept Endocrinol, 2nd Xiangya Hosp, Central South Univ, Changsha, 410011. Chin J Diabetes, 2005;13(1) :34-38. Objective: To investigate the optimal cut-point of glutamate decarboxylase antibody (GAD-Ab) for differentiating two subtypes of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (I. ADA). Methods: The frequency

  18. Gene expression in the spinal cord in female lewis rats with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis induced with myelin basic protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayley R Inglis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, the best available model of multiple sclerosis, can be induced in different animal strains using immunization with central nervous system antigens. EAE is associated with inflammation and demyelination of the nervous system. Micro-array can be used to investigate gene expression and biological pathways that are altered during disease. There are few studies of the changes in gene expression in EAE, and these have mostly been done in a chronic mouse EAE model. EAE induced in the Lewis with myelin basic protein (MBP-EAE is well characterised, making it an ideal candidate for the analysis of gene expression in this disease model. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: MBP-EAE was induced in female Lewis rats by inoculation with MBP and adjuvants. Total RNA was extracted from the spinal cords and used for micro-array analysis using AffimetrixGeneChip Rat Exon 1.0 ST Arrays. Gene expression in the spinal cords was compared between healthy female rats and female rats with MBP-EAE. Gene expression in the spinal cord of rats with MBP-EAE differed from that in the spinal cord of normal rats, and there was regulation of pathways involved with immune function and nervous system function. For selected genes the change in expression was confirmed with real-time PCR. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: EAE leads to modulation of gene expression in the spinal cord. We have identified the genes that are most significantly regulated in MBP-EAE in the Lewis rat and produced a profile of gene expression in the spinal cord at the peak of disease.

  19. Autoimmun pankreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjordside, Eva; Novovic, Srdan; Schmidt, Palle Nordblad;

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare inflammatory disease. AIP has characteristic histology, serology and imaging findings. Two types of AIP exist, type 1, which is a part of the systemic immunoglobulin G4-related disease, and type 2, which is only localized to the pancreas. Patients with type 1...

  20. MuSK induced experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis does not require IgG1 antibody to MuSK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küçükerden, Melike; Huda, Ruksana; Tüzün, Erdem; Yılmaz, Abdullah; Skriapa, Lamprini; Trakas, Nikos; Strait, Richard T; Finkelman, Fred D; Kabadayı, Sevil; Zisimopoulou, Paraskevi; Tzartos, Socrates; Christadoss, Premkumar

    2016-06-15

    Sera of myasthenia gravis (MG) patients with muscle-specific receptor kinase-antibody (MuSK-Ab) predominantly display the non-complement fixing IgG4 isotype. Similarly, mouse IgG1, which is the analog of human IgG4, is the predominant isotype in mice with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) induced by MuSK immunization. The present study was performed to determine whether IgG1 anti-MuSK antibody is required for immunized mice to develop EAMG. Results demonstrated a significant correlation between clinical severity of EAMG and levels of MuSK-binding IgG1+, IgG2+ and IgG3+ peripheral blood B cells in MuSK-immunized wild-type (WT) mice. Moreover, MuSK-immunized IgG1 knockout (KO) and WT mice showed similar EAMG severity, serum MuSK-Ab levels, muscle acetylcholine receptor concentrations, neuromuscular junction immunoglobulin and complement deposit ratios. IgG1 and IgG3 were the predominant anti-MuSK isotypes in WT and IgG1 KO mice, respectively. These observations demonstrate that non-IgG1 isotypes can mediate MuSK-EAMG pathogenesis. PMID:27235354

  1. Endogenous IRBP can be dispensable for generation of natural CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells that protect from IRBP-induced retinal autoimmunity

    OpenAIRE

    Grajewski, Rafael S.; Silver, Phyllis B.; Agarwal, Rajeev K.; Shao-bo SU; Chan, Chi-Chao; Liou, Gregory I.; Caspi, Rachel R.

    2006-01-01

    Susceptibility to experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU), a model for human uveitis induced in mice with the retinal antigen interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein (IRBP), is controlled by “natural” CD4+CD25+ regulatory T (T reg) cells. To examine whether endogenous expression of IRBP is necessary to generate these T reg cells, we studied responses of IRBP knockout (KO) versus wild-type (WT) mice. Unexpectedly, not only WT but also IRBP KO mice immunized with a uveitogenic regimen of IRBP...

  2. Intranasal vaccination with proinsulin DNA induces regulatory CD4+ T cells that prevent experimental autoimmune diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Every, Alison L; Kramer, David R; Mannering, Stuart I; Lew, Andrew M; Harrison, Leonard C

    2006-04-15

    Insulin, an autoantigen in type 1 diabetes, when administered mucosally to diabetes-prone NOD mice induces regulatory T cells (T(reg)) that protect against diabetes. Compared with protein, Ag encoded as DNA has potential advantages as a therapeutic agent. We found that intranasal vaccination of NOD mice with plasmid DNA encoding mouse proinsulin II-induced CD4+ T(reg) that suppressed diabetes development, both after adoptive cotransfer with "diabetogenic" spleen cells and after transfer into NOD mice given cyclophosphamide to accelerate diabetes onset. In contrast to prototypic CD4+ CD25+ T(reg), CD4+ T(reg) induced by proinsulin DNA were both CD25+ and CD25- and not defined by markers such as glucocorticoid-induced TNFR-related protein (GITR), CD103, or Foxp3. Intriguingly, despite induction of T(reg) and reduced islet inflammation, diabetes incidence in proinsulin DNA-treated mice was unchanged. However, diabetes was prevented when DNA vaccination was performed under the cover of CD40 ligand blockade, known to prevent priming of CTL by mucosal Ag. Thus, intranasal vaccination with proinsulin DNA has therapeutic potential to prevent diabetes, as demonstrated by induction of protective T(reg), but further modifications are required to improve its efficacy, which could be compromised by concomitant induction of pathogenic immunity. PMID:16585551

  3. Preventative effects of the flowers of Inula britannica on autoimmune diabetes in C57BL/KsJ mice induced by multiple low doses of streptozotocin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Takao; Song, Qing-Hua; Hong, Tie; Kitamura, Hajime; Cyong, Jong-Chol

    2002-06-01

    We have reported that an aqueous extract from the flowers of Inula britannica L. subsp. japonica Kitam. (IB) prevented immunologically induced experimental hepatitis in mice and suggested that the antihepatitic effect of IB is due to inhibition of IFN-gamma production. We then investigated the effects of IB on diabetes in mice induced by multiple low doses of streptozotocin (MLDSTZ), which is a mouse model for IFN-gamma-dependent autoimmune diabetes. C57BL/KsJ mice (male, 7 weeks) were provided with IB extract (500 mg/ kg/ day) in drinking water ad libitum, starting 7 days before the first STZ injection. Autoimmune diabetes was induced by MLDSTZ (40 mg/kg/day for 5 daily doses, i.p.). The IB treatment significantly suppressed the increase of blood glucose levels. Histological analysis of the pancreas showed that the degree of insulitis and destruction of beta-cells were reduced by IB treatment. The IFN-gamma production from stimulated splenic T lymphocytes was inhibited by the IB treatment. Moreover, the proportion of IFN-gamma-producing cells in the CD4(+) population, which was increased by MLDSTZ, was significantly decreased by the IB treatment. These results suggest that IB has a preventative effect on autoimmune diabetes by regulating cytokine production. PMID:12112297

  4. Long pentraxin PTX3 exacerbates pressure overload-induced left ventricular dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Suzuki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Left ventricular hypertrophy is enhanced by an inflammatory state and stimulation of various cytokines. Pentraxin 3 (PTX3 is rapidly produced in response to inflammatory signals, and high plasma PTX3 levels are seen in patients with heart failure. This study aimed to examine the influence of PTX3 on cardiac hypertrophy and left ventricular dysfunction with respect to pressure overload. METHODS AND RESULTS: PTX3 systemic knockout (PTX3-KO mice, transgenic mice with cardiac-specific overexpression of PTX3 (PTX3-TG, and the respective wild-type (WT littermate mice were subjected to transverse aortic constriction (TAC or a sham operation. Cardiac PTX3 expression increased after TAC in WT mice. In vitro, hydrogen peroxide induced the expression of PTX3 in both cardiac myocytes and cardiac fibroblasts. Recombinant PTX3 phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2 in cardiac fibroblasts. Phosphorylation of cardiac ERK1/2 and nuclear factor kappa-B after TAC was attenuated in the PTX3-KO mice but was enhanced in the PTX3-TG mice compared with WT mice. Interleukin-6 and connective tissue growth factor production was lower in the PTX3-KO mice than in the WT mice, but this was augmented in the PTX3-TG mice than in the WT mice. Echocardiography revealed that adverse remodeling with left ventricular dysfunction, as well as with increased interstitial fibrosis, was enhanced in PTX3-TG mice, while these responses were suppressed in PTX3-KO mice. CONCLUSION: The local inflammatory mediator PTX3 directly modulates the hypertrophic response and ventricular dysfunction following an increased afterload.

  5. Dimethyl sulfoxide inhibits spontaneous diabetes and autoimmune recurrence in non-obese diabetic mice by inducing differentiation of regulatory T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) is caused by the destruction of insulin-producing β cells in pancreatic islets by autoimmune T cells. Islet transplantation has been established as an effective therapeutic strategy for T1D. However, the survival of islet grafts can be disrupted by recurrent autoimmunity. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is a solvent for organic and inorganic substances and an organ-conserving agent used in solid organ transplantations. DMSO also exerts anti-inflammatory, reactive oxygen species scavenger and immunomodulatory effects and therefore exhibits therapeutic potential for the treatment of several human inflammatory diseases. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic potential of DMSO in the inhibition of autoimmunity. We treated an animal model of islet transplantation (NOD mice) with DMSO. The survival of the syngeneic islet grafts was significantly prolonged. The population numbers of CD8, DC and Th1 cells were decreased, and regulatory T (Treg) cell numbers were increased in recipients. The expression levels of IFN-γ and proliferation of T cells were also reduced following DMSO treatment. Furthermore, the differentiation of Treg cells from naive CD4 T cells was significantly increased in the in vitro study. Our results demonstrate for the first time that in vivo DMSO treatment suppresses spontaneous diabetes and autoimmune recurrence in NOD mice by inhibiting the Th1 immune response and inducing the differentiation of Treg cells. - Highlights: • We report a therapeutic potential of DMSO in autoimmune diabetes. • DMSO exhibits an immune modulatory effect. • DMSO treatment increases regulatory T cell differentiation. • The increase in STAT5 signaling pathway explains the effect of DMSO in Tregs

  6. Dimethyl sulfoxide inhibits spontaneous diabetes and autoimmune recurrence in non-obese diabetic mice by inducing differentiation of regulatory T cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Gu-Jiun [Department of Biology and Anatomy, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Sytwu, Huey-Kang [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Yu, Jyh-Cherng [Department of General Surgery, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chen, Yuan-Wu [School of Dentistry, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Kuo, Yu-Liang [Department of Medical Imaging, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan, ROC (China); School of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan, ROC (China); Yu, Chiao-Chi [Department of Biology and Anatomy, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of General Surgery, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chang, Hao-Ming; Chan, De-Chuan [Department of General Surgery, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Huang, Shing-Hwa, E-mail: h610129@gmail.com [Department of Biology and Anatomy, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of General Surgery, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2015-01-15

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) is caused by the destruction of insulin-producing β cells in pancreatic islets by autoimmune T cells. Islet transplantation has been established as an effective therapeutic strategy for T1D. However, the survival of islet grafts can be disrupted by recurrent autoimmunity. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is a solvent for organic and inorganic substances and an organ-conserving agent used in solid organ transplantations. DMSO also exerts anti-inflammatory, reactive oxygen species scavenger and immunomodulatory effects and therefore exhibits therapeutic potential for the treatment of several human inflammatory diseases. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic potential of DMSO in the inhibition of autoimmunity. We treated an animal model of islet transplantation (NOD mice) with DMSO. The survival of the syngeneic islet grafts was significantly prolonged. The population numbers of CD8, DC and Th1 cells were decreased, and regulatory T (Treg) cell numbers were increased in recipients. The expression levels of IFN-γ and proliferation of T cells were also reduced following DMSO treatment. Furthermore, the differentiation of Treg cells from naive CD4 T cells was significantly increased in the in vitro study. Our results demonstrate for the first time that in vivo DMSO treatment suppresses spontaneous diabetes and autoimmune recurrence in NOD mice by inhibiting the Th1 immune response and inducing the differentiation of Treg cells. - Highlights: • We report a therapeutic potential of DMSO in autoimmune diabetes. • DMSO exhibits an immune modulatory effect. • DMSO treatment increases regulatory T cell differentiation. • The increase in STAT5 signaling pathway explains the effect of DMSO in Tregs.

  7. Redefining strategies to introduce tolerance inducing cellular therapy in humans to combat autoimmunity and transplantation reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja eTen Brinke

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Clinical translation of tolerance-inducing cell therapies requires a novel approach focused on innovative networks, patient involvement and, foremost, a fundamental paradigm shift in thinking from both Academia, Industry and Regulatory Agencies. Tolerance-inducing cell products differ essentially from conventional drugs. They are personalized and target interactive immunological networks to shift the balance towards tolerance. The human cell products are often absent or fundamentally different in animals. This creates important limitations of pre-clinical animal testing for safety and efficacy of these products and calls for novel translational approaches, which require the combined efforts of the different parties involved. Dedicated international and multidisciplinary consortia that focus on clinical translation are of utmost importance. They can help inform and educate regulatory policy makers on the unique requirements for these cell products, ranging from preclinical studies in animals to in vitro human studies. In addition, they can promote reliable immunomonitoring tools. The development of tolerance-inducing cell products requires not only bench-to-bedside but also reverse translation, from bedside back to the bench.

  8. Enzymic excision of ultraviolet-induced cytosine hydrates from left-handed DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultraviolet irradiation of DNA produces a variety of pyrimidine modifications. These include cytosine hydrate (5,6-dihydro-6-hydroxycytosine), released as a free base by E. coli endonuclease III. The enzymic excision of cytosine hydrate by this purified enzyme was investigated by assaying release of labeled photoproduct from DNA into the ethanol-soluble fraction. Ultraviolet-irradiated poly(dG-dC):poly(dG-dC), radio-labeled in cytosines, was used as substrate. Shifts between the right-handed B-conformation and the left-handed Z-conformation were effected by heating the polymer in the presence of either Ni[II] or Co[II]. Conformational states were determined by ultraviolet circular dichroism. Rates of enzymic cytosine hydrate release did not differ between the different substrate conformations, B-DNA and Z-DNA. Irradiation of left-handed poly(dG-dC):poly(dG-dC) resulted in cytosine hydrate formation. Therefore, neither formation nor enzymic excision of ultraviolet-induced cytosine hydrates are substantially affected by the DNA conformational state. Cytosine hydrates are most likely to occur in alternating purine:pyrimidine sequences. Such segments can adopt the Z-conformation as a result of reactions with chemical carcinogens, the presence of metal ions, or negative superhelicity. These results indicate repair of cytosine hydrates to be likely, regardless of the DNA conformational state

  9. Natriuretic peptides in the monitoring of anthracycline induced reduction in left ventricular ejection fraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugaard, Gedske; Lassen, Ulrik; Bie, Peter; Pedersen, Erling Bjerregaard; Jensen, Kaare Troels; Abildgaard, Ulrik; Hesse, Birger; Kjaer, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The use of anthracyclines in treatment of cancer is limited by cardiotoxicity of these compounds and may lead to heart failure. Therefore monitoring of cardiac function is necessary during therapy. AIM: We evaluated the value of natriuretic peptides (N-terminal pro-atrial natriuretic...... peptide (N-ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP)) for monitoring and predicting anthracycline induced cardiotoxicity using radionuclide left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) measurements as reference. METHODS AND RESULTS: A total of 107 consecutive patients receiving anthracycline as part of their...... chemotherapy for malignant disease were studied. Plasma concentrations of the peptides were measured by radioimmunoassay and EF by radionuclide cardiography. For reduced EF values, i.e. below 0.50 a fairly strong correlation was found between N-ANP or BNP and EF. Of 48 patients with serial EF and peptide...

  10. In vivo left ventricular function and collagen expression in aldosterone/salt-induced hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Gil, J F; Delcayre, C; Robert, V; Wassef, M; Trouve, P; Mougenot, N; Charlemagne, D; Lechat, P

    1998-12-01

    Cardiac fibrosis is linked to aldosterone-induced hypertension, but the effects on in vivo left ventricular (LV) function are not established. We studied the relations between in vivo LV function and aldosterone/salt cardiac fibrosis. Adult guinea pigs (GPs) were treated for 3 months with an aldosterone infusion and high-salt diet. This treatment induced arterial hypertension (+35%) and moderate LV hypertrophy (LVH; +60%) without right ventricular (RV) hypertrophy. Echo-Doppler LV assessment demonstrated unaltered cardiac output, stroke volume, or LV relaxation. Type I collagen messenger RNA (mRNA) was significantly increased in both ventricles (LV, +48%; RV, +77%) and accompanied by a significant increase in total collagen deposition (LV, from 0.52% in controls to 4.4% in treated GPs; RV, from 0.82 to 5.5% in treated GPs). Plasma norepinephrine levels increased 2.6-fold (p < 0.01) and correlated with the increase in collagen deposition in both ventricles. Collagen content was not correlated with hypertension or LVH. We conclude that aldosterone administration induces cardiac collagen accumulation and a sympathetic stimulation, which might preserve systolic and diastolic function. PMID:9869498

  11. Autoimmune Encephalitis

    OpenAIRE

    Leypoldt, Frank; Wandinger, Klaus-Peter; Bien, Christian G; Dalmau, Josep

    2013-01-01

    The term autoimmune encephalitis is used to describe a group of disorders characterised by symptoms of limbic and extra-limbic dysfunction occurring in association with antibodies against synaptic antigens and proteins localised on the neuronal cell surface. In recent years there has been a rapidly expanding knowledge of these syndromes resulting in a shift in clinical paradigms and new insights into pathogenic mechanisms. Since many patients respond well to immunosuppressive treatment, the r...

  12. Autoimmun pankreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjordside, Eva; Novovic, Srdan; Schmidt, Palle Nordblad;

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare inflammatory disease. AIP has characteristic histology, serology and imaging findings. Two types of AIP exist, type 1, which is a part of the systemic immunoglobulin G4-related disease, and type 2, which is only localized to the pancreas. Patients with type 1...... are predominantly older men, have involvement of other organs and more often experience relapse than patients with type 2. Both types respond well to steroid treatment. The most important differential diagnose is pancreatic cancer....

  13. Resistance to Streptozotocin-Induced Autoimmune Diabetes in Absence of Complement C3: Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells Play a Role.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaogang Gao

    Full Text Available The contribution of complement to the development of autoimmune diabetes has been proposed recently. The underlying mechanisms, however, remain poorly understood. We hypothesize that myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC, which act as regulators in autoimmunity, play a role in resistance to diabetes in absence of complement C3. Indeed, MDSC number was increased significantly in STZ-treated C3-/- mice. These cells highly expressed arginase I and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS. Importantly, depletion of MDSC led to the occurrence of overt diabetes in C3-/- mice after STZ. Furthermore, C3-/- MDSC actively suppressed diabetogenic T cell proliferation and prevented/delayed the development of diabetes in arginase and/or iNOS-dependent manner. Both Tregs and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β are crucial for MDSC induction in STZ-treated C3-/- mice as depletion of Tregs or blocking TGF-β bioactivity dramatically decreased MDSC number. These findings indicate that MDSC are implicated in resistance to STZ-induced diabetes in the absence of complement C3, which may be helpful for understanding of mechanisms underlying preventive effects of complement deficiency on autoimmune diseases.

  14. Axonal damage in myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein peptide-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in a C57BL/6 mouse model may be not secondary to inflammatory demyelination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Boting Gao; Juan Chen; Qiong Wang; Wei Wang; Zhouping Tang

    2011-01-01

    The present study established a chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis model in C57BL/6 mice induced by myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein peptides and complete Freund's adjuvant. Onset latency was 12 days, with an incidence rate of 100%. Neuropathological characteristics included perivascular inflammatory cell infiltration, demyelination, neuronal degeneration, and axonal damage within cerebral and myelic white matter. Electron microscopy revealed swollen mitochondria, complete organ disappearance, and fused or broken myelin sheath structure, which were accompanied by myelin sheath reconstruction. Moreover, axonal damage was not consistent with demyelination distribution, and severity of axonal damage did not correlate with demyelination. Results suggested that axonal damage in an experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis model is not secondary to inflammatory demyelination.

  15. Nuclear antigen expression by ultraviolet light irradiation - a contribution to the UV-induced autoimmunity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review is given about nuclear antigen expression due to UVB, UVA, and PUVA. UVB alters DNA resulting in strong immunogenic UVDNA and complementary antibodies. Antibodies to UVDNA cross react with double-stranded DNA. UVDNA plays a (hypothetical) role in the induction of cutaneous lesions in lupus erythematosus (LE). Investigations about SS-A/Ro expression due to UVB seem to be more important under this view. Antibodies against SS-A/Ro are related to an increased photosensitivity in LE. PUVA and UVA are able to induce antinuclear antibodies of unknown specificity. It is likely that PUVA enhances SS-A/Ro expression in vitro. The results are discussed in sense of LE photobiology and unwanted side effects of photo(chemo)therapy in psoriasis. (author)

  16. Prevention of airway hyperresponsiveness induced by left ventricular dysfunction in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petak Ferenc

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effectiveness of strategies for treatment of the altered static lung volume and against the development of bronchial hyperreactivity (BHR following a left ventricular dysfunction (LVD induced by myocardial ischaemia was investigated in a rat model of sustained postcapillary pulmonary hypertension. Methods Airway resistance (Raw was identified from the respiratory system input impedance (Zrs in four groups of rats. End-expiratory lung volume (EELV was determined plethysmographically, and Zrs was measured under baseline conditions and following iv infusions of 2, 6 or 18 μg/kg/min methacholine. Sham surgery was performed in the rats in Group C, while the left interventricular coronary artery was ligated and Zrs and its changes following identical methacholine challenges were reassessed in the same rats 8 weeks later, during which no treatment was applied (Group I, or the animals were treated daily with a combination of an angiotensin enzyme converter inhibitor and a diuretic (enalapril and furosemide, Group IE, or a calcium channel blocker (diltiazem, Group ID. The equivalent dose of methacholine causing a 100% increase in Raw (ED50 was determined in each group. Diastolic pulmonary arterial pressure (PapD was assessed by introducing a catheter into the pulmonary artery. Results The sustained presence of a LVD increased PapD in all groups of rats, with variable but significant elevations in Groups I (p = 0.004, ID (p = 0.013 and IE (p = 0.006. A LVD for 8 weeks induced no changes in baseline Raw but elevated the EELV independently of the treatments. In Group I, BHR consistently developed following the LVD, with a significant decrease in ED50 from 10.0 ± 2.5 to 6.9 ± 2.5 μg/kg/min (p = 0.006. The BHR was completely abolished in both Groups ID and IE, with no changes in ED50 (9.5 ± 3.6 vs. 10.7 ± 4.7, p = 0.33 and 10.6 ± 2.1 vs. 9.8 ± 3.5 μg/kg/min p = 0.56, respectively

  17. Copaiba Oil Suppresses Inflammatory Cytokines in Splenocytes of C57Bl/6 Mice Induced with Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE)

    OpenAIRE

    Débora S. Dias; Lívia B. A. Fontes; Antônio E.M. Crotti; Beatriz J. V. Aarestrup; Aarestrup, Fernando M; Ademar A. da Silva Filho; José O. A. Corrêa

    2014-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a murine autoimmune disease used to study multiple sclerosis. We have investigated the immunomodulatory effects of copaiba oil (100, 50 and 25 µg/mL) on NO, H2O2, TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-17 production in cultured cells from EAE-mice. Copaiba oil (100 µg/mL) inhibited H2O2, NO, IFN-γ TNF-α and IL-17 production spontaneously or after ConA and MOG35–55 stimulation. It is suggested that copaiba oil acts on the mechanism of development of EAE by IFN-γ...

  18. Autoimmune liver disease panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liver disease test panel - autoimmune ... Autoimmune disorders are a possible cause of liver disease. The most common of these diseases are autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cirrhosis. This group of tests helps your health care provider ...

  19. Heart failure-inducible gene therapy targeting protein phosphatase 1 prevents progressive left ventricular remodeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosuke Miyazaki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The targeting of Ca(2+ cycling has emerged as a potential therapy for the treatment of severe heart failure. These approaches include gene therapy directed at overexpressing sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR Ca(2+ ATPase, or ablation of phospholamban (PLN and associated protein phosphatase 1 (PP1 protein complexes. We previously reported that PP1β, one of the PP1 catalytic subunits, predominantly suppresses Ca(2+ uptake in the SR among the three PP1 isoforms, thereby contributing to Ca(2+ downregulation in failing hearts. In the present study, we investigated whether heart-failure-inducible PP1β-inhibition by adeno-associated viral-9 (AAV9 vector mediated gene therapy is beneficial for preventing disease progression in genetic cardiomyopathic mice. METHODS: We created an adeno-associated virus 9 (AAV9 vector encoding PP1β short-hairpin RNA (shRNA or negative control (NC shRNA. A heart failure inducible gene expression system was employed using the B-type natriuretic protein (BNP promoter conjugated to emerald-green fluorescence protein (EmGFP and the shRNA sequence. AAV9 vectors (AAV9-BNP-EmGFP-PP1βshRNA and AAV9-BNP-EmGFP-NCshRNA were injected into the tail vein (2×10(11 GC/mouse of muscle LIM protein deficient mice (MLPKO, followed by serial analysis of echocardiography, hemodynamic measurement, biochemical and histological analysis at 3 months. RESULTS: In the MLPKO mice, BNP promoter activity was shown to be increased by detecting both EmGFP expression and the induced reduction of PP1β by 25% in the myocardium. Inducible PP1βshRNA delivery preferentially ameliorated left ventricular diastolic function and mitigated adverse ventricular remodeling. PLN phosphorylation was significantly augmented in the AAV9-BNP-EmGFP-PP1βshRNA injected hearts compared with the AAV9-BNP-EmGFP-NCshRNA group. Furthermore, BNP production was reduced, and cardiac interstitial fibrosis was abrogated at 3 months. CONCLUSION: Heart failure-inducible

  20. In vivo evidence for CD4+ and CD8+ suppressor T cells in vaccination-induced suppression of murine experimental autoimmune thyroiditis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In several experimental autoimmune diseases, including experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT), vaccination with attenuated autoantigen-specific T cells has provided protection against subsequent induction of disease. However, the mechanism(s) of vaccination-induced suppression remains to be clarified. Since the authors have previously shown that suppression generated by pretreatment with mouse thyroglobulin (MTg) or thyroid-stimulating hormone in EAT is mediated by CD4+, not CD8+, suppressor T cells, they examined the role of T cell subsets in vaccination-induced suppression of EAT. Mice were vaccinated with irradiated, MTg-primed, and MTg-activated spleen cells and then challenged. Pretreatment with these cells suppressed EAT induced by immunization with MTg and adjuvant, but not by adoptive transfer of thyroiditogenic cells, suggesting a mechanism of afferent suppression. The activation of suppressor mechanisms did not require CD8+ cells, since mice depleted of CD8+ cells before vaccination showed reduced EAT comparable to control vaccinated mice. Furthermore, depletion of either the CD4+ or the CD8+ subset after vaccination did not significantly abrogate suppression. However, suppression was eliminated by the depletion of both CD4+ and CD8+ cells in vaccinated mice. These results provide evidence for the cooperative effects of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in vaccination-induced suppression of EAT

  1. Update in Endocrine Autoimmunity

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Mark S.

    2008-01-01

    Context: The endocrine system is a common target in pathogenic autoimmune responses, and there has been recent progress in our understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of autoimmune endocrine diseases.

  2. In-vivo treatment with 5-azacytidine causes degeneration of central lymphatic organs and induces autoimmune disease in the chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauenstein, K.; Csordas, A.; Krömer, G.; Dietrich, H.; Wick, G.

    1991-01-01

    In-vitro evidence suggests that DNA methylation may be involved in the development of forbidden immune responses that can result in autoimmune disease. In the present study we examined in-vivo effects of 5-azacytidine (5-azaC), a substance that inhibits DNA methylation, on the immune system and the occurrence of a spontaneous autoimmune disease in the chicken model. We found that (1) treatment of young normal chickens with 1.0 mg/kg 5-azaC on 7 consecutive days caused a rapid degeneration of the central lymphoid organs thymus and bursa; (2) this regimen with 5-azaC apparently inhibited B cell maturation, as the frequency of cytoplasmic Ig+ plasma cells in the bone marrow was found to be significantly reduced, whereas the total number of bone marrow cells was unchanged; and (3) a chronic low-dose (0.5 and 1.0 mg/kg) application of 5-azaC through 6 weeks was found to significantly enhance the spontaneous autoimmune thyroiditis in newly hatched chickens of the Cornell C strain, as determined by anti-thyroglobulin autoantibody titres and histological analysis of thyroid gland infiltration. The possible implications of these data for the generation of pathogenic autoimmune responses are discussed. Images Fig. 1 PMID:1726865

  3. Prevalence of exercise-induced left ventricular outflow tract obstruction in symptomatic patients with non-obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shah, J S

    2008-10-01

    Resting left ventricular outflow tract obstruction (LVOTO) occurs in 25% of patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and is an important cause of symptoms and disease progression. The prevalence and clinical significance of exercise induced LVOTO in patients with symptomatic non-obstructive HCM is uncertain.

  4. Modification of the FoxP3 transcription factor principally affects inducible T regulatory cells in a model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Verhagen

    Full Text Available T regulatory (Treg cells expressing the transcription factor FoxP3 play a key role in protection against autoimmune disease. GFP-FoxP3 reporter mice have been used widely to study the induction, function and stability of both thymically- and peripherally-induced Treg cells. The N-terminal modification of FoxP3, however, affects its interaction with transcriptional co-factors; this can alter Treg cell development and function in certain self-antigen specific animal models. Interestingly, Treg cell function can be negatively or positively affected, depending on the nature of the model. In this study, we focused on the effect of the GFP-FoxP3 reporter on Treg cell development and function in the Tg4 mouse model. In this model, T cells express a transgenic T cell receptor (TCR specific for the Myelin Basic Protein (MBP peptide Ac1-9, making the animals susceptible to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, a disease akin to multiple sclerosis in humans. Unlike diabetes-susceptible mice, Tg4 FoxP3(gfp mice did not develop spontaneous autoimmune disease and did not demonstrate augmented susceptibility to induced disease. Concurrently, thymic generation of natural Treg cells was not negatively affected. The induction of FoxP3 expression in naive peripheral T cells was, however, significantly impaired as a result of the transgene. This study shows that the requirements for the interaction of FoxP3 with co-factors, which governs its regulatory ability, differ not only between natural and inducible Treg cells but also between animal models of diseases such as diabetes and EAE.

  5. [Effect of diltiazem on cold-induced left ventricular dysfunction in patients with systemic sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, R H; Marrero, G; Chwojnik, A; Martínez Martínez, J A; Maldonado Cocco, J; Rodrigué, S; Casabé, H

    1997-01-01

    Patients with systemic sclerosis (SS) have cardiac dysfunction induced by cold exposure. We and others have demonstrated this finding after corporal chilling, suggesting a "coronary Raynaud phenomenon" mediated by intermittent vascular spasm. In this study we evaluated the effect of diltiazem (DTZ) in cardiac dysfunction induced by cold test in patients with SS without clinical evidence of heart disease. Twelve patients with SS were studied. One patient was excluded because he did not fulfill the prescribed treatment. Eleven patients (age of 49.9 +/- 3.8 years and illness duration of 9.3 +/- 4.8 years) were included. Gated equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography was recorded after red blood cells were labeled in vivo using an intravenous injection of stannous pirophosphate followed by 20 mc of 99 Tc (gamma camera with electrocardiographic R wave gating was used). Left ventricular injection fraction (LVEF) was calculated using computer analysis and wall motion abnormalities by visual interpretation. Patients were cooled using a thermic blanket set at 5 degrees centigrade. They were evaluated before and after a period of cooling. After corporal chilling LVEF decreased more than 10% in all of them. DTZ 270 mg a day was administered to the same patients during 48 hs. Basal and cold LVEF were repeated in all patients. The results with and without DTZ were compared by Student's t Test. The basal LVEF with and without DTZ was not different (64.8 +/- 2.6 and 63.1 +/- 1.8). After corporal chilling LVEF decreased (64.8 +/- 2.6 to 54.8 +/- 2.5 p < 0.00001) and reversible abnormalities in wall motion were noticed in patients without DTZ. When they received DTZ neither difference in LVEF (63.1 +/- 1.8 to 62.1 +/- 2.4) nor wall motion abnormalities were observed. We compared the LVEF after chilling (62.1 +/- 2.4 and 54.8 +/- 2.5) and we found an important difference with the use of DTZ (p < 0.005). It can be concluded that in patients with SS and no overt heart disease, DTZ

  6. Planck-scale induced left-right gauge theory at LHC and experimental tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parida, M. K.; Sahoo, Biswonath

    2016-05-01

    Recent measurements at LHC have inspired searches for TeV scale left-right gauge theory originating from grand unified theories. We show that inclusion of Planck-scale induced effects due to dim . 5 operator not only does away with all the additional intermediate symmetries, but also it predicts the minimal set of light Higgs scalars tailored after neutrino masses and dilepton, or trilepton signals. The heavy-light neutrino mixings are predicted from charged fermion mass fits in SO (10) and LFV constraints which lead to new predictions for dilepton or trilepton production signals. Including fine-structure constant matching and two-loop, and threshold effects predict MWR =g2R10 4.3 ± 1.5 ± 0.2 GeV and proton lifetime τp =10 36.15 ± 5.8 ± 0.2 yrs with WR gauge boson coupling g2R = 0.56- 0.57. Predictions on lepton flavour and lepton number violations are accessible to ongoing experiments. Current CMS data on di-electron excess at √{ s} = 8 TeV are found to be consistent with WR gauge boson mass MWR ≥ 1.9- 2.2 TeV which also agrees with the values obtained from dijet resonance production data. We also discuss plausible explanations for diboson production excesses observed at LHC and make predictions expected at √{ s} = 14 TeV.

  7. Suppression of proteoglycan-induced autoimmune arthritis by myeloid-derived suppressor cells generated in vitro from murine bone marrow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlia Kurkó

    Full Text Available Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs are innate immune cells capable of suppressing T-cell responses. We previously reported the presence of MDSCs with a granulocytic phenotype in the synovial fluid (SF of mice with proteoglycan (PG-induced arthritis (PGIA, a T cell-dependent autoimmune model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. However, the limited amount of SF-MDSCs precluded investigations into their therapeutic potential. The goals of this study were to develop an in vitro method for generating MDSCs similar to those found in SF and to reveal the therapeutic effect of such cells in PGIA.Murine bone marrow (BM cells were cultured for 3 days in the presence of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF, interleukin-6 (IL-6, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF. The phenotype of cultured cells was analyzed using flow cytometry, microscopy, and biochemical methods. The suppressor activity of BM-MDSCs was tested upon co-culture with activated T cells. To investigate the therapeutic potential of BM-MDSCs, the cells were injected into SCID mice at the early stage of adoptively transferred PGIA, and their effects on the clinical course of arthritis and PG-specific immune responses were determined.BM cells cultured in the presence of GM-CSF, IL-6, and G-CSF became enriched in MDSC-like cells that showed greater phenotypic heterogeneity than MDSCs present in SF. BM-MDSCs profoundly inhibited both antigen-specific and polyclonal T-cell proliferation primarily via production of nitric oxide. Injection of BM-MDSCs into mice with PGIA ameliorated arthritis and reduced PG-specific T-cell responses and serum antibody levels.Our in vitro enrichment strategy provides a SF-like, but controlled microenvironment for converting BM myeloid precursors into MDSCs that potently suppress both T-cell responses and the progression of arthritis in a mouse model of RA. Our results also suggest that enrichment of BM in MDSCs could improve the

  8. When uncommon and common coalesce: adult onset Still's disease associated with breast augmentation as part of autoimmune syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagan, A; Kogan, M; Shoenfeld, Y; Segal, G

    2016-06-01

    Adult onset Still's disease (AOSD) is an uncommon, multisystemic, auto-inflammatory disorder, while breast augmentation is a very common cosmetic procedure. We describe a case in which these two coalesce, AOSD, manifested with pleuritis and pericarditis, developed after breast mammoplasty. The pathogenetic, missing link, behind the development of AOSD following mammoplasty, is thought to be the autoimmune (auto-inflammatory) syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA). We reviewed other cases of AOSD associated with breast mammoplasty published to date and the literature regarding AOSD and ASIA syndrome. The review is followed by a short debate of whether silicone implants should be explanted in similar, future cases. PMID:25604318

  9. Simulated Microgravity and Recovery-Induced Remodeling of the Left and Right Ventricle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Guohui; Li, Yuheng; Li, Hongxing; Sun, Weijia; Cao, Dengchao; Li, Jianwei; Zhao, Dingsheng; Song, Jinping; Jin, Xiaoyan; Song, Hailin; Yuan, Xinxin; Wu, Xiaorui; Li, Qi; Xu, Qing; Kan, Guanghan; Cao, Hongqing; Ling, Shukuan; Li, Yingxian

    2016-01-01

    Physiological adaptations to microgravity involve alterations in cardiovascular systems. These adaptations result in cardiac remodeling and orthostatic hypotension. However, the response of the left ventricle (LV) and right ventricle (RV) following hindlimb unloading (HU) and hindlimb reloading (HR) is not clear and the underlying mechanism remains to be understood. In this study, three groups of mice were subjected to HU by tail suspension for 28 days. Following this, two groups were allowed to recover for 7 or 14 days. The control group was treated equally, with the exception of tail suspension. Echocardiography was performed to detect the structure and function changes of heart. Compared with the control, the HU group of mice showed reduced LV-EF (ejection fraction), and LV-FS (fractional shortening). However, mice that were allowed to recover for 7 days after HU (HR-7d) showed increased LVIDs (systolic LV internal diameter) and LV Vols (systolic LV volume). Mice that recovered for 14 days (HR-14d) returned to the normal state. In comparison, RV-EF and RV-FS didn't recover to the normal conditions till being reloaded for 14 days. Compared with the control, RVIDd (diastolic RV internal diameter), and RV Vold (diastolic RV volume) were reduced in HU group and recovered to the normal conditions in HR-7d and HR-14d groups, in which groups RVIDs (systolic RV internal diameter) and RV Vols (systolic RV volume) were increased. Histological analysis and cardiac remodeling gene expression results indicated that HU induces left and right ventricular remodeling. Western blot demonstrated that the phosphorylation of HDAC4 and ERK1/2 and the ratio of LC3-II / LC3-I, were increased following HU and recovered following HR in both LV and RV, and the phosphorylation of AMPK was inhibited in both LV and RV following HU, but only restored in LV following HR for 14 days. These results indicate that simulated microgravity leads to cardiac remodeling, and the remodeling changes can

  10. Autoimmune pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Detlefsen, Sönke; Drewes, Asbjørn M

    2009-01-01

    bile duct. Obstructive jaundice is a common symptom at presentation, and pancreatic cancer represents an important clinical differential diagnosis. In late stages of the disease, the normal pancreatic parenchyma is often replaced by large amounts of fibrosis. Histologically, there seem to be two...... AIP responds to steroid treatment, also a trial with steroids, can help to differentiate AIP from pancreatic cancer. OUTLOOK AND DISCUSSION: This review presents the pathological, radiologic and laboratory findings of AIP. Moreover, the treatment and pathogenesis are discussed.......BACKGROUND: Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a relatively newly recognized type of pancreatitis that is characterized by diffuse or focal swelling of the pancreas due to lymphoplasmacytic infiltration and fibrosis of the pancreatic parenchyma. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A PubMed literature search was...

  11. Autoimmune Progesterone Anaphylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hassan Bemanian

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Progesterone induced dermatitis is a rare disorder. It typically occurs in females due to anautoimmune phenomenon to endogenous progesterone production, but can also be caused byexogenous intake of a synthetic progestin. Here in, we present a case of autoimmune progesterone anaphylaxis (AIPA observed in an adolescent female.The patient is an 18-year-old Caucasian female with no significant past medical history and noprior exogenous hormone use, who presented to her primary care physician complaining of cyclic skin eruptions with dyspnea, cough and respiratory distress. She noted that her symptoms occurred monthly, just prior to her menses. An intradermal skin test using 0.1 cml of progesterone was performed. The patient developed a 15mm wheal after 15 minutes, confirming the diagnosis of AIPA.The patient was started on a continuous regimen of an oral conjugated estrogen (0.625mg. The skin eruptions and respiratory symptoms have not returned since the initiation of this therapy.Autoimmune progesterone dermatitis manifests via the occurrence of cyclic skin eruptions.Women with the disorder commonly present with dermatologic lesions in the luteal phase of themenstrual cycle, if there are any other organ involvement in addition to skin (e.g. lung, GI thereaction should be called as autoimmune progesterone anaphylaxis. Diagnosis of AIPA is confirmed by performing a skin allergen test using progesterone.

  12. Pathogenesis of Autoimmune Diseases: A Short Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jithin Jose

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmunity is characterized by the reaction of cells (auto reactive T-lymphocytes or products (autoantibodies of the immune system against the organism’s own antigens (autoantigen. It may be part of the physiological immune response (natural autoimmunity or pathologically induced, which may eventually lead to development of clinical abnormalities (autoimmune disease. Different mechanisms are involved in the induction and progression of autoimmunity. These include genetic or acquired defects in immune tolerance or immune regulatory pathways, molecular mimicry to viral or bacterial protein, an impaired clearance of apoptotic cell material. A A number of diseases have been identified in which there is autoimmunity, due to copious production of autoantibodies and autoreactive cells. The aim of the present article is to review on the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases.

  13. The autoimmune tautology

    OpenAIRE

    Anaya, Juan-Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Although autoimmune diseases exhibit contrasting epidemiological features, pathology, and clinical manifestations, three lines of evidence demonstrate that these diseases share similar immunogenetic mechanisms (that is, autoimmune tautology). First, clinical evidence highlights the co-occurrence of distinct autoimmune diseases within an individual (that is, polyautoimmunity) and within members of a nuclear family (that is, familial autoimmunity). Second, physiopathologic evidence indicates th...

  14. Copaiba oil suppresses inflammatory cytokines in splenocytes of C57Bl/6 mice induced with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Débora S; Fontes, Lívia B A; Crotti, Antônio E M; Aarestrup, Beatriz J V; Aarestrup, Fernando M; da Silva Filho, Ademar A; Corrêa, José O A

    2014-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a murine autoimmune disease used to study multiple sclerosis. We have investigated the immunomodulatory effects of copaiba oil (100, 50 and 25 µg/mL) on NO, H2O2, TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-17 production in cultured cells from EAE-mice. Copaiba oil (100 µg/mL) inhibited H2O2, NO, IFN-γ TNF-α and IL-17 production spontaneously or after ConA and MOG35-55 stimulation. It is suggested that copaiba oil acts on the mechanism of development of EAE by IFN-γ, IL-17 and TNF-α inhibition, modulating the immune response on both Th1 and Th17 cells. PMID:25153880

  15. Copaiba Oil Suppresses Inflammatory Cytokines in Splenocytes of C57Bl/6 Mice Induced with Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora S. Dias

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE is a murine autoimmune disease used to study multiple sclerosis. We have investigated the immunomodulatory effects of copaiba oil (100, 50 and 25 µg/mL on NO, H2O2, TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-17 production in cultured cells from EAE-mice. Copaiba oil (100 µg/mL inhibited H2O2, NO, IFN-γ TNF-α and IL-17 production spontaneously or after ConA and MOG35–55 stimulation. It is suggested that copaiba oil acts on the mechanism of development of EAE by IFN-γ, IL-17 and TNF-α inhibition, modulating the immune response on both Th1 and Th17 cells.

  16. Autoimmune disease-associated variants of extracellular endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 induce altered innate immune responses by human immune cells

    OpenAIRE

    Aldhamen, Yasser A; Pepelyayeva, Yuliya; Rastall, David P. W.; Seregin, Sergey S.; Zervoudi, Efthalia; Koumantou, Despoina; Charles F Aylsworth; Quiroga, Dionisia; Godbehere, Sarah; Georgiadis, Dimitris; Stratikos, Efstratios; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    ERAP1 gene polymorphisms have been linked to several autoimmune diseases; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying these associations are not well understood. Recently, we have demonstrated that ERAP1 regulates key aspects of the innate immune response. Moreover, previous studies show ERAP1 to be ER-localized and secreted during inflammation. Herein, we investigate the possible roles that ERAP1 polymorphic variants may have in modulating innate immune responses of human PBMCs using two ex...

  17. Autoimmune disease-associated variants of extracellular endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 induce altered innate immune responses by human immune cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldhamen, Yasser A; Pepelyayeva, Yuliya; Rastall, David P W; Seregin, Sergey S; Zervoudi, Efthalia; Koumantou, Despoina; Aylsworth, Charles F; Quiroga, Dionisia; Godbehere, Sarah; Georgiadis, Dimitris; Stratikos, Efstratios; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 (ERAP1) gene polymorphisms have been linked to several autoimmune diseases; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying these associations are not well understood. Recently, we demonstrated that ERAP1 regulates key aspects of the innate immune response. Previous studies show ERAP1 to be endoplasmic reticulum-localized and secreted during inflammation. Herein, we investigate the possible roles that ERAP1 polymorphic variants may have in modulating the innate immune responses of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMCs) using two experimental methods: extracellular exposure of hPBMCs to ERAP1 variants and adenovirus (Ad)-based ERAP1 expression. We found that exposure of hPBMCs to ERAP1 variant proteins as well as ERAP1 overexpression by Ad5 vectors increased inflammatory cytokine and chemokine production, and enhanced immune cell activation. Investigating the molecular mechanisms behind these responses revealed that ERAP1 is able to activate innate immunity via multiple pathways, including the NLRP3 (NOD-like receptor, pyrin domain-containing 3) inflammasome. Importantly, these responses varied if autoimmune disease-associated variants of ERAP1 were examined in the assay systems. Unexpectedly, blocking ERAP1 cellular internalization augmented IL-1β production. To our knowledge, this is the first report identifying ERAP1 as being involved in modulating innate responses of human immune cells, a finding that may explain why ERAP1 has been genetically associated with several autoimmune diseases. PMID:25591727

  18. Pressure overload-induced mild cardiac hypertrophy reduces left ventricular transmural differences in mitochondrial respiratory chain activity and increases oxidative stress

    OpenAIRE

    BernardGENY; MichelKINDO; LaurentMONASSIER; FabriceFAVRET

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Increased mechanical stress and contractility characterizes normal left ventricular subendocardium (Endo) but whether Endo mitochondrial respiratory chain complex activities is reduced as compared to subepicardium (Epi) and whether pressure overload-induced left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) might modulate transmural gradients through increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is unknown. Methods: LVH was induced by 6 weeks abdominal aortic banding and cardiac structure...

  19. Left-handers are resistant to drowsiness induced spatial attention bias

    OpenAIRE

    Corinne Bareham; Sophie Scott

    2015-01-01

    Unilateral neglect is a stroke-related disorder that leads to a loss of awareness for contralesional space (typically left inattention following right hemisphere damage). Previous research has revealed that alertness modulates attention in both clinical and healthy populations, but only indirect measures of alertness have been used. Here, continuous EEG using a 128 electrode electrolyte cap was used to monitor alertness as a group of 26 healthy right-handers and 26 healthy left-handers judged...

  20. Type 2 Diabetes Induces Prolonged P-wave Duration without Left Atrial Enlargement

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Bin; Pan, Yilong; Li, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged P-wave duration has been observed in diabetes. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. The aim of this study was to elucidate the possible mechanisms. A rat model of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) was used. P-wave durations were obtained using surface electrocardiography and sizes of the left atrium were determined using echocardiography. Cardiac inward rectifier K+ currents (Ik1), Na+ currents (INa), and action potentials were recorded from isolated left atrial myocytes...

  1. Interferin with thyroid scintigraphy: the effects of interferon alpha induced thyroid gland autoimmunity and dysfunction upon thyroid scintigraphy in patients with the hepatitis C virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The incidence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is increasing. Interferon alpha therapy is often used to treat patients who are HCV positive. Thyroid gland autoimmunity and dysfunction has been reported to occur with variable frequency during INF-alpha therapy in patients with the HCV. This study reviews the scintigraphic findings of thyroid scans in such patients in order to assess for the effects on thyroid scintigraphy. To our knowledge, there has been no comprehensive study of this important occurrence to date. There were a number of patients with the HCV being treated at our institution between 23/09/1996 and 09/08/2000. Some of them received INF-alpha therapy, certain were subsequently diagnosed with thyroid gland autoimmunity and/or dysfunction. Eight were imaged with thyroid scintigraphy and reviewed. The scintigraphic findings in the 8 patients fell into two broad categories; 4 demonstrated changes of Graves' disease, and 3 changes of thyroiditis (1 of these was sub-acute). One hypothyroid patient with anti-thyroglobulin antibodies had normal thyroid scintigraphy. Six patients were found to have antithyroid antibodies. One patient with thyroiditis tested negative to antithyroid antibodies. One patient was not tested for antithyroid antibodies. Interferon alpha induced thyroid gland autoimmunity and/or dysfunction can markedly affect the thyroid scintigraphic findings of patients with the hepatitis C virus. This hitherto undescribed occurrence on thyroid scintigraphy has important practical implications of which Nuclear Medicine Specialists need to be aware in order to correctly interpret thyroid scintigraphy studies in such patients. The clinical presentation and effects on imaging appearances are varied. The Nuclear Medicine Specialist can play a central role in establishing the causal link. Awareness of this occurrence enables the Nuclear Medicine Specialist to add value to the referral. This occurrence will become an increasingly common

  2. Arg deficiency does not influence the course of Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein (MOG35-55)-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Freja Aksel; Hulst, Camilla; Bäckström, Thomas;

    2016-01-01

    Background: Inhibition of Abl kinases has an ameliorating effect on the rodent model for multiple sclerosis, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, and arrests lymphocyte activation. The family of Abl kinases consists of the Abl1/Abl and Abl2/Arg tyrosine kinases. While the Abl kinase has bee...... encephalomyelitis is not dependent on Arg, but Arg plays a role for the number of B cells in immunized mice. This might suggest a novel role for the Arg kinase in B-cell trafficking or regulation. Furthermore, the results suggest that Arg is important for normal embryonic development....

  3. MicroRNA-674-5p/5-LO axis involved in autoimmune reaction of Concanavalin A-induced acute mouse liver injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Kunkai; Wang, Qi; Qi, Luoyang; Hua, Dasong; Tao, Jingjing; Mangan, Connor J; Lou, Yijia; Li, Lanjuan

    2016-09-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis is characterized, in part, by the pathways involving cysteinyl-leukotriene metabolites of arachidonic acid, the dynamics of which remain unclear. Here, we explored post-transcriptional regulation in the 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) pathway of arachidonic acid in a Concanavalin A (Con A) induced mouse model. We found that Con A administration lead to 5-LO overexpression and cysteinyl-leukotriene release in early hepatic injury, which was attenuated by cyclosporin A pretreatment. Subsequent microarray and qRT-PCR analysis further showed that microRNA-674-5p (miR-674-5p) displayed a significant decrease in expression in Con A-damaged liver. Noting that miR-674-5p harbors a potential binding region for 5-LO, we further transfected hepatic cell lines with overexpressing miR-674-5p mimic and discovered a negative regulating effect of miR-674-5p on 5-LO expression in the presence of IL-6 or TNF-α. These findings suggest that miR-674-5p might be a negative regulator in 5-LO mediated autoimmune liver injury, representing a compelling avenue towards future therapeutic interventions. PMID:27313091

  4. Questions and Answers on Autoimmunity and Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... dermatomyositis . What are some of the treatments for autoimmune diseases? Of first importance in treating any autoimmune disease ... being researched. What is the family connection in autoimmune diseases? The ability to develop an autoimmune disease is ...

  5. Preventing and curing citrulline-induced autoimmune arthritis in a humanized mouse model using a Th2-polarizing iNKT cell agonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Kyle M; Rytelewski, Mateusz; Mazzuca, Delfina M; Meilleur, Shannon A; Mannik, Lisa A; Yue, David; Brintnell, William C; Welch, Ian; Cairns, Ewa; Haeryfar, S M Mansour

    2012-07-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are innate lymphocytes with unique reactivity to glycolipid antigens bound to non-polymorphic CD1d molecules. They are capable of rapidly releasing pro- and/or anti-inflammatory cytokines and constitute attractive targets for immunotherapy of a wide range of diseases including autoimmune disorders. In this study, we have explored the beneficial effects of OCH, a Th2-polarizing glycolipid agonist of iNKT cells, in a humanized mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in which citrullinated human proteins are targeted by autoaggressive immune responses in mice expressing an RA susceptibility human leukocyte antigen (HLA) DR4 molecule. We found for the first time that treatment with OCH both prevents and cures citrulline-induced autoimmune arthritis as evidenced by resolved ankle swelling and reversed histopathological changes associated with arthritis. Also importantly, OCH treatment blocked the arthritogenic capacity of citrullinated antigen-experienced splenocytes without compromising their global responsiveness or altering the proportion of splenic naturally occurring CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells. Interestingly, administering the Th1-promoting iNKT cell glycolipid ligand α-C-galactosylceramide into HLA-DR4 transgenic mice increased the incidence of arthritis in these animals and exacerbated their clinical symptoms, strongly suggesting a role for Th1 responses in the pathogenesis of citrulline-induced arthritis. Therefore, our findings indicate a role for Th1-mediated immunopathology in citrulline-induced arthritis and provide the first evidence that iNKT cell manipulation by Th2-skewing glycolipids may be of therapeutic value in this clinically relevant model, a finding that is potentially translatable to human RA. PMID:21912419

  6. Thyroid dysfunction: an autoimmune aspect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Farah Aziz; Al-Jameil, Noura; Khan, Mohammad Fareed; Al-Rashid, May; Tabassum, Hajera

    2015-01-01

    Auto immune thyroid disease (AITD) is the common organ specific autoimmune disorder, Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) and Grave's disease (GD) are its well-known sequelae. It occurs due to loss of tolerance to autoantigens thyroid peroxidase (TPO), thyroglobulin (Tg), thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSH-R) which leads to the infiltration of the gland. T cells in chronic autoimmune thyroiditis (cAIT) induce apoptosis in thyroid follicular cells and cause destruction of the gland. Presences of TPO antibodies are common in HT and GD, while Tg has been reported as an independent predictor of thyroid malignancy. Cytokines are small proteins play an important role in autoimmunity, by stimulating B and T cells. Various cytokines IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, IL-13, IL-14, TNF-α and IFN-γ are found in thyroid follicular cells which enhance inflammatory response with nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandins. PMID:26221205

  7. Type 2 Diabetes Induces Prolonged P-wave Duration without Left Atrial Enlargement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Pan, Yilong; Li, Xiaodong

    2016-04-01

    Prolonged P-wave duration has been observed in diabetes. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. The aim of this study was to elucidate the possible mechanisms. A rat model of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) was used. P-wave durations were obtained using surface electrocardiography and sizes of the left atrium were determined using echocardiography. Cardiac inward rectifier K(+) currents (Ik1), Na(+) currents (INa), and action potentials were recorded from isolated left atrial myocytes using patch clamp techniques. Left atrial tissue specimens were analyzed for total connexin-40 (Cx40) and connexin-43 (Cx43) expression levels on western-blots. Specimens were also analyzed for Cx40 and Cx43 distribution and interstitial fibrosis by immunofluorescent and Masson trichrome staining, respectively. The mean P-wave duration was longer in T2DM rats than in controls; however, the mean left atrial sizes of each group of rats were similar. The densities of Ik1 and INa were unchanged in T2DM rats compared to controls. The action potential duration was longer in T2DM rats, but there was no significant difference in resting membrane potential or action potential amplitude compared to controls. The expression level of Cx40 protein was significantly lower, but Cx43 was unaltered in T2DM rats. However, immunofluorescent labeling of Cx43 showed a significantly enhanced lateralization. Staining showed interstitial fibrosis was greater in T2DM atrial tissue. Prolonged P-wave duration is not dependent on the left atrial size in rats with T2DM. Dysregulation of Cx40 and Cx43 protein expression, as well as fibrosis, might partly account for the prolongation of P-wave duration in T2DM. PMID:27051235

  8. Screening tests for autoimmune-related immunotoxicity.

    OpenAIRE

    Pieters, R; Albers, R

    1999-01-01

    A large number of chemicals induce or exacerbate autoimmune-like diseases in man. Because of the complexity of processes involved, these adverse effects are often if not always missed in standard toxicity testing. To date no validated and generally applicable predictive animal model exists and only a few chemicals have actually been shown to induce adverse autoimmune effects in certain animals. The popliteal lymph node assay (PLNA) is a very promising animal test to (pre)screen for systemic i...

  9. Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find an ENT Doctor Near You Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease Patient Health Information ... with a hearing loss. How Does the Healthy Ear Work? The ear has three main parts: the ...

  10. Autoimmune Autonomic Ganglionopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Accessed 9/2/2015. Autoimmune Autonomic Ganglionopathy Summary. Dysautonomia International . http://www.dysautonomiainternational.org/page.php?ID= ... page Basic Information In Depth Information Basic Information Dysautonomia International offers an information page on Autoimmune autonomic ...

  11. Autoimmun hypophysitis--en differentialdiagnose til hypofyseadenomer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Therese; Hagen, Claus

    2010-01-01

    A 66-year-old man with a headache in the left temporal region which had persisted for eight months is presented. The patient developed polydipsia and polyuria and also suffered from tinnitus, impaired hearing and episodes of double vision. The patient was diagnosed with autoimmune hypophysitis (AH...

  12. ROCK2 signaling is required to induce a subset of T follicular helper cells through opposing effects on STATs in autoimmune settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jonathan M; Chen, Wei; Nyuydzefe, Melanie S; Trzeciak, Alissa; Flynn, Ryan; Tonra, James R; Marusic, Suzana; Blazar, Bruce R; Waksal, Samuel D; Zanin-Zhorov, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Rho-associated kinase 2 (ROCK2) determines the balance between human T helper 17 (TH17) cells and regulatory T (Treg) cells. We investigated its role in the generation of T follicular helper (TFH) cells, which help to generate antibody-producing B cells under normal and autoimmune conditions. Inhibiting ROCK2 in normal human T cells or peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) decreased the number and function of TFH cells induced by activation ex vivo. Moreover, inhibition of ROCK2 activity decreased the abundance of the transcriptional regulator Bcl6 (B cell lymphoma 6) and increased that of Blimp1 by reducing the binding of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and increasing that of STAT5 to the promoters of the genes Bcl6 and PRDM1, respectively. In the MRL/lpr murine model of SLE, oral administration of the selective ROCK2 inhibitor KD025 resulted in a twofold reduction in the numbers of TFH cells and antibody-producing plasma cells in the spleen, as well as a decrease in the size of splenic germinal centers, which are the sites of interaction between TFH cells and B cells. KD025-treated mice showed a substantial improvement in both histological and clinical scores compared to those of untreated mice and had reduced amounts of Bcl6 and phosphorylated STAT3, as well as increased STAT5 phosphorylation. Together, these data suggest that ROCK2 signaling plays a critical role in controlling the development of TFH cells induced by autoimmune conditions through reciprocal regulation of STAT3 and STAT5 activation. PMID:27436361

  13. Variants of tumor necrosis factor-induced protein 3 gene are associated with left ventricular hypertrophy in hypertensive patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Hao; WANG Shu-xia; WANG Xiao-jian; XIN Ying; WANG Hu; SONG Xiao-dong; SUN Kai; WANG Yi-bo; HUI Ru-tai

    2011-01-01

    Background Tumor necrosis factor-induced protein 3 (TNFAIP3) gene has been shown important in cardiac remodeling. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the variants of TNFAIP3 gene are associated with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) in hypertensive patients.Methods Four representatives of all the other single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in TNFAIP3 gene were tested for association with hypertrophy in two independent hypertensive populations (n=2120 and n=324).Results We found that only the tag SNP (rs5029939) was consistently lower in the hypertensives with cardiac hypertrophy than in those without cardiac hypertrophy in the two study populations, indicating a protective effect on LVH (odds ratio (OR) (95% confidence interval (CI))0.58 (0.358-0.863), P=0.035; OR (95% CI)=0.477 (0.225-0.815), P<0.05,respectively). Multiple regression analyses confirmed that the patients with G allele of rs5029939 had less thickness in inter-ventricular septum, left ventricular posterior wall, relative wall thickness and left ventricular mass index than did those with CC allele in the hypertensive patients in both study populations (all P<0.01).Conclusion These findings indicate that the SNP (rs5029939) in the TNFAIP3 gene may serve as a novel protective genetic marker for the development of LVH in patients with hypertension.

  14. CAVEOLIN-3 IS UP-REGULATED IN THE PHYSIOLOGICAL LEFT VENTRICULAR HYPERTROPHY INDUCED BY VOLUNTARY EXERCISE TRAINING IN RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikuo Yokoyama

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Various substances have been introduced in relation with cardiac hypertrophy almost always with controversy in their roles in signal transduction. Those controversies may attribute to the diversity of cardiac hypertrophy. We previously showed that calcineurin was activated in physiological left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH induced by voluntary exercise training, but not in decompensated pressure-overload LVH. In the current study, we advanced our search for the differences between the voluntary exercise-induced LVH and the pressure-overload LVH into several other hypertrophy-related substances including caveolin. Wistar rats were assigned to one of the following three groups: 10 weeks of voluntary exercise (EX, sedentary regimen (SED, and 4 weeks of ascending aortic constriction (AC. The EX rats voluntarily ran 1.6±1.1 km/day in the specially manufactured cages resulting in LVH (24 % increase in left ventricular weight per body weight ratio. Myocardial tissue homogenate of the EX rats revealed different characteristics in signal transduction of hypertrophy from that of the AC. The EX rats had normal sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR Ca2+ATPase mRNA level and normal myosin heavy chain isozyme pattern assessed by RNA protection assay, while AC rats had decreased SR Ca2+ATPase mRNA level and increased beta myosin heavy chain mRNA level. Myocardial caveolin-3 protein levels assessed by Western blotting increased in the EX rats but decreased in the AC rats. The voluntary exercise-induced LVH differed in signal transduction from the decompensated pressure-overload LVH. Caveolin-3 was induced in the voluntary exercise-induced LVH, while it was decreased in the decompensated pressure-overload LVH

  15. Infections and autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Jean-François

    2005-01-01

    The high percentage of disease-discordant pairs of monozygotic twins demonstrates the central role of environmental factors in the etiology of autoimmune diseases. Efforts were first focussed on the search for triggering factors. The study of animal models has clearly shown that infections may trigger autoimmune diseases, as in the case of Coxsackie B4 virus in type I diabetes and the encephalomyocarditis virus in autoimmune myositis, two models in which viruses are thought to act by increasing immunogenicity of autoantigens secondary to local inflammation. The induction of a Guillain-Barré syndrome in rabbits after immunization with a peptide derived from Campylobacter jejuni is explained by mimicry between C. jejuni antigens and peripheral nerve axonal antigens. Other models involve chemical modification of autoantigens, as in the case of iodine-induced autoimmune thyroiditis. These mechanisms have so far only limited clinical counterparts (rheumatic fever, Guillain-Barré syndrome and drug-induced lupus or myasthenia gravis) but one may assume that unknown viruses may be at the origin of a number of chronic autoimmune diseases, such as type I diabetes and multiple sclerosis) as illustrated by the convergent data incriminating IFN-alpha in the pathophysiology of type I diabetes and systemic lupus erythematosus. Perhaps the difficulties met in identifying the etiologic viruses are due to the long lag time between the initial causal infection and onset of clinical disease. More surprisingly, infections may also protect from autoimmune diseases. Western countries are being confronted with a disturbing increase in the incidence of most immune disorders, including autoimmune and allergic diseases, inflammatory bowel diseases, and some lymphocyte malignancies. Converging epidemiological evidence indicates that this increase is linked to improvement of the socio-economic level of these countries, posing the question of the causal relationship and more precisely the

  16. Visually induced self-motion sensation adapts rapidly to left-right reversal of vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oman, C. M.; Bock, O. L.

    1981-01-01

    Three experiments were conducted using 15 adult volunteers with no overt oculomotor or vestibular disorders. In all experiments, left-right vision reversal was achieved using prism goggles, which permitted a binocular field of vision subtending approximately 45 deg horizontally and 28 deg vertically. In all experiments, circularvection (CV) was tested before and immediately after a period of exposure to reversed vision. After one to three hours of active movement while wearing vision-reversing goggles, 10 of 15 (stationary) human subjects viewing a moving stripe display experienced a self-rotation illusion in the same direction as seen stripe motion, rather than in the opposite (normal) direction, demonstrating that the central neural pathways that process visual self-rotation cues can undergo rapid adaptive modification.

  17. Sirolimus for Autoimmune Disease of Blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-22

    Autoimmune Pancytopenia; Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS); Evans Syndrome; Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Anemia, Hemolytic, Autoimmune; Autoimmune Neutropenia; Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic; Inflammatory Bowel Disease; Rheumatoid Arthritis

  18. Deterioration of autoimmune condition associated with repeated injection of dextranomer/hyaluronic acid copolymer: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuto Suda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 6-year-old girl underwent ureterocystoneostomy (UCN because of left flank pain due to delayed onset of ureteral stenosis one and a half years after endoscopic dextranomer/hyaluronic acid copolymer (Deflux injection for the treatment of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR. Histopathological examination indicated chronic inflammation with abundant eosinophils characteristic of a reaction to Deflux. Several autoimmune diseases developed during the treatment for ureteral stenosis. First, 2 weeks prior to the onset of left flank pain, she was diagnosed as having systemic lupus erythematosus. Finally, she died of pulmonary hemorrhage due to thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura 4 months after UCN. The fatal outcome in this case was suspected to be caused by autoimmune syndrome induced by adjuvants, which in this case was the hyaluronic acid polymer injected into the ureteric orifice for the treatment of VUR.

  19. NK cell autoreactivity and autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro ePoggi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidences have pointed out the relevance of Natural Killer (NK cells in organ specific and systemic autoimmune diseases. NK cells bear a plethora of activating and inhibiting receptors that can play a role in regulating reactivity with autologous cells. The activating receptors recognize natural ligands upregulated on virus-infected or stressed or neoplastic cells. Of note, several autoimmune diseases are thought to be linked to viral infections as one of the first event in inducing autoimmunity. Also, it is conceivable that autoimmunity can be triggered when a dysregulation of innate immunity occurs, activating T and B lymphocytes to react with self-components. This would imply that NK cells can play a regulatory role during adaptive immunity; indeed, innate lymphoid cells (ILC, comprising the classical CD56+ NK cells, have a role in maintaining or alterating tissue homeostasis secreting protective and/or proinflammatory cytokines. In addition, NK cells display activating receptors involved in natural cytotoxicity and the activating isoforms of receptors for HLA class I that can interact with healthy host cells and induce damage without any evidence of viral infection or neoplastic-induced alteration. In this context, the interrelationship among ILC, extracellular matrix components and mesenchymal stromal cells can be considered a key point for the control of homeostasis. Herein, we summarize evidences for a role of NK cells in autoimmune diseases and will give a point of view of the interplay between NK cells and self-cells in triggering autoimmunity.

  20. Environmental Basis of Autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floreani, Annarosa; Leung, Patrick S C; Gershwin, M Eric

    2016-06-01

    The three common themes that underlie the induction and perpetuation of autoimmunity are genetic predisposition, environmental factors, and immune regulation. Environmental factors have gained much attention for their role in triggering autoimmunity, with increasing evidence of their influence as demonstrated by epidemiological studies, laboratory research, and animal studies. Environmental factors known to trigger and perpetuate autoimmunity include infections, gut microbiota, as well as physical and environmental agents. To address these issues, we will review major potential mechanisms that underlie autoimmunity including molecular mimicry, epitope spreading, bystander activation, polyclonal activation of B and T cells, infections, and autoinflammatory activation of innate immunity. The association of the gut microbiota on autoimmunity will be particularly highlighted by their interaction with pharmaceutical agents that may lead to organ-specific autoimmunity. Nonetheless, and we will emphasize this point, the precise mechanism of environmental influence on disease pathogenesis remains elusive. PMID:25998909

  1. Overexpression of membrane-bound fas ligand (CD95L) exacerbates autoimmune disease and renal pathology in pristane-induced lupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossaller, Lukas; Rathinam, Vijay A K; Bonegio, Ramon; Chiang, Ping-I; Busto, Patricia; Wespiser, Adam R; Caffrey, Daniel R; Li, Quan-Zhen; Mohan, Chandra; Fitzgerald, Katherine A; Latz, Eicke; Marshak-Rothstein, Ann

    2013-09-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the Fas death receptor or its ligand result in a lymphoproliferative syndrome and exacerbate clinical disease in most lupus-prone strains of mice. One exception is mice injected with 2,6,10,14-tetramethylpentadecane (TMPD), a hydrocarbon oil commonly known as pristane, which induces systemic lupus erythematosus-like disease. Although Fas/Fas ligand (FasL) interactions have been strongly implicated in the activation-induced cell death of both lymphocytes and other APCs, FasL can also trigger the production of proinflammatory cytokines. FasL is a transmembrane protein with a matrix metalloproteinase cleavage site in the ectodomain. Matrix metalloproteinase cleavage inactivates membrane-bound FasL and releases a soluble form reported to have both antagonist and agonist activity. To better understand the impact of FasL cleavage on both the proapoptotic and proinflammatory activity of FasL, its cleavage site was deleted through targeted mutation to produce the deleted cleavage site (ΔCS) mouse line. ΔCS mice express higher levels of membrane-bound FasL than do wild-type mice and fail to release soluble FasL. To determine to what extent FasL promotes inflammation in lupus mice, TMPD-injected FasL-deficient and ΔCS BALB/c mice were compared with control TMPD-injected BALB/c mice. We found that FasL deficiency significantly reduced the early inflammatory exudate induced by TMPD injection. In contrast, ΔCS mice developed a markedly exacerbated disease profile associated with a higher frequency of splenic neutrophils and macrophages, a profound change in anti-nuclear Ab specificity, and markedly increased proteinuria and kidney pathology compared with controls. These results demonstrate that FasL promotes inflammation in TMPD-induced autoimmunity, and its cleavage limits FasL proinflammatory activity. PMID:23918976

  2. Experimental drugs for treatment of autoimmune myocarditis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han Lina; Guo Shuli; Wang Yutang; Yang Liming; Liu Siyu

    2014-01-01

    Objective To review the experimental drugs for the treatment of autoimmune myocarditis.Data sources The literatures published in English about different kinds of experimental drugs based on different therapeutic mechanisms for the treatment of autoimmune myocarditis were obtained from PubMed from 2002 to 2013.Study selection Original articles regarding the experimental drugs for treatment of autoimmune myocarditis were selected.Results This study summarized the effects of the experimental drugs for the treatment of autoimmune myocarditis,such as immunomodulators and immunosuppressants,antibiotics,Chinese medicinal herbs,cardiovascular diseases treatment drugs,etc.These drugs can significantly attenuate autoimmune myocarditis-induced inflammation and fibrosis,alleviate autoimmune myocarditis-triggered overt lymphocyte proliferation,and meanwhile reduce Th1 cytokines (IFN-γ and IL-2) and increase Th2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10).Conclusion This study summarized recent advances in autoimmune myocarditis treatment and further proposes that traditional Chinese medicine and immune regulators will play important roles in the future.

  3. Bistability in autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapin, Nicolas; Mosekilde, Erik; Lund, Ole

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases damage host tissue, which, in turn, may trigger a stronger immune response. Systems characterized by such positive feedback loops can display co-existing stable steady states. In a mathematical model of autoimmune disease, one steady state may correspond to the healthy state and...... another to an autoimmune steady state characterized by widespread tissue damage and immune activation. We show how a triggering event may move the system from the healthy to the autoimmune state and how transient immunosuppressive treatment can move the system back to the healthy state....

  4. Transient reduction of human left ventricular mass in carnitine depletion induced by antibiotics containing pivalic acid.

    OpenAIRE

    Abrahamsson, K.; Mellander, M.; Eriksson, B. O.; Holme, E; Jodal, U.; Jönsson, A.; Lindstedt, S

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To study the effect of induced carnitine depletion on myocardial structure and function. SUBJECTS AND DESIGN--7 healthy adult volunteers given 1200 mg pivmecillinam per day for 7-8 weeks were studied by echocardiography before and after 7-8 weeks of treatment and a 15 months follow up after the treatment period. SETTING--Teaching hospital. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Carnitine concentration in serum, urine, and muscle and echocardiographic measurements. RESULTS--After 7-8 weeks of treat...

  5. Autoimmune liver disease, autoimmunity and liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Marco; Neuberger, James M

    2014-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) represent the three major autoimmune liver diseases (AILD). PBC, PSC, and AIH are all complex disorders in that they result from the effects of multiple genes in combination with as yet unidentified environmental factors. Recent genome-wide association studies have identified numerous risk loci for PBC and PSC that host genes involved in innate or acquired immune responses. These loci may provide a clue as to the immune-based pathogenesis of AILD. Moreover, many significant risk loci for PBC and PSC are also risk loci for other autoimmune disorders, such type I diabetes, multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis, suggesting a shared genetic basis and possibly similar molecular pathways for diverse autoimmune conditions. There is no curative treatment for all three disorders, and a significant number of patients eventually progress to end-stage liver disease requiring liver transplantation (LT). LT in this context has a favourable overall outcome with current patient and graft survival exceeding 80% at 5years. Indications are as for other chronic liver disease although recent data suggest that while lethargy improves after transplantation, the effect is modest and variable so lethargy alone is not an indication. In contrast, pruritus rapidly responds. Cholangiocarcinoma, except under rigorous selection criteria, excludes LT because of the high risk of recurrence. All three conditions may recur after transplantation and are associated with a greater risk of both acute cellular and chronic ductopenic rejection. It is possible that a crosstalk between alloimmune and autoimmune response perpetuate each other. An immunological response toward self- or allo-antigens is well recognised after LT in patients transplanted for non-autoimmune indications and sometimes termed "de novo autoimmune hepatitis". Whether this is part of the spectrum of rejection or an autoimmune

  6. American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Its 25th Anniversary With #25FOR25 Campaign During National Autoimmune Disease Awareness Month AARDA officially kicks of National Autoimmune ... will benefit AARDA. Click here to read more. Autoimmune Disease Awareness Month AARDA and the NCAPG held two ...

  7. Miso (Japanese soybean paste) soup attenuates salt-induced sympathoexcitation and left ventricular dysfunction in mice with chronic pressure overload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Koji; Hirooka, Yoshitaka; Sunagawa, Kenji

    2014-02-01

    The hypothalamic mineralocorticoid receptor (MR)-angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) pathway is activated in mice with chronic pressure overload (CPO). When this activation is combined with high salt intake, it leads to sympathoexcitation, hypertension, and left ventricular (LV) dysfunction. Salt intake is thus an important factor that contributes to heart failure. Miso, a traditional Japanese food made from fermented soybeans, rice, wheat, or oats, can attenuate salt-induced hypertension in rats. However, its effects on CPO mice with salt-induced sympathoexcitation and LV dysfunction are unclear. Here, we investigated whether miso has protective effects in these mice. We also evaluated mechanisms associated with the hypothalamic MR-AT1R pathway. Aortic banding was used to produce CPO, and a sham operation was performed for controls. At 2 weeks after surgery, the mice were given water containing high NaCl levels (0.5%, 1.0%, and 1.5%) for 4 weeks. The high salt loading in CPO mice increased excretion of urinary norepinephrine (uNE), a marker of sympathetic activity, in an NaCl concentration-dependent manner; however, this was not observed in Sham mice. Subsequently, CPO mice were administered 1.0% NaCl water (CPO-H) or miso soup (1.0% NaCl equivalent, CPO-miso). The expression of hypothalamic MR, serum glucocorticoid-induced kinase-1 (SGK-1), and AT1R was higher in the CPO-H mice than in the Sham mice; however, the expression of these proteins was attenuated in the CPO-miso group. Although the CPO-miso mice had higher sodium intake, salt-induced sympathoexcitation was lower in these mice than in the CPO-H group. Our findings indicate that regular intake of miso soup attenuates salt-induced sympathoexcitation in CPO mice via inhibition of the hypothalamic MR-AT1R pathway. PMID:24908908

  8. Ameliorative effects of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells on myelin basic protein-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in Lewis rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Myung-Soon Ko; Hyeong-geun Park; Young-Min Yun; Jeong Chan Ra; Taekyun Shin; Kyoung-Kap Lee

    2011-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells have been previously shown to exert an immunomodulatory function. The present study sought to investigate the effects of multipotential human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAdMSCs) on disease progression and cytokine expression in Lewis rats with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) induced by myelin basic protein. The duration of EAE paralysis in the group treated on day 7 postimmunization with 5 × 106 hAdMSCs was significantly reduced compared with the vehicle-treated controls and the 1 × 106 hAdMSC- treated group. The duration of EAE paralysis in the groups treated with 5 × 106 hAdMSCs on both day 1 and day 7 postimmunization was significantly reduced compared with the vehicle-treated controls and the groups treated with 5 × 106 hAdMSCs on both day 7 and day 10 postimmunization. The mRNA expression of interleukin-10 and indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase was significantly decreased in the hAdMSC-treated group compared with the vehicle-treated group. These findings suggest that the ameliorative effects of hAdMSCs on EAE symptoms operate in a dose- and time-dependent manner and can be mediated in part by the ample production of anti-inflammatory cytokines.

  9. THE AUTOIMMUNE ECOLOGY.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan-Manuel eAnaya

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases (ADs represent a heterogeneous group of disorders that affect specific target organs or multiple organ systems. These conditions share common immunopathogenic mechanisms (i.e., the autoimmune tautology, which explain the clinical similarities they have among them as well as their familial clustering (i.e., coaggregation. As part of the autoimmune tautology, the influence of environmental exposure on the risk of developing ADs is paramount (i.e., the autoimmune ecology. In fact, environment, more than genetics, shapes immune system. Autoimmune ecology is akin to exposome, that is all the exposures - internal and external - across the lifespan, interacting with hereditary factors (both genetics and epigenetics to favor or protect against autoimmunity and its outcomes. Herein we provide an overview of the autoimmune ecology, focusing on the immune response to environmental agents in general, and microbiota, cigarette smoking, alcohol and coffee consumption, socioeconomic status, gender and sex hormones, vitamin D, organic solvents and vaccines in particular. Inclusion of the autoimmune ecology in disease etiology and health will improve the way personalized medicine is currently conceived and applied.

  10. Left ventricular function behavior in patients with inducible ischaemia evaluated with gated SPECT with mibi-Tc 99M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Gated SPECT allows the evaluation of left ventricular function (LVF), both at rest and in the immediate post exercise. However, recent studies in patients with inducible ischemia suggest that LVF in the immediate post exercise does not reflect LVF at rest. Objectives: To assess LVF (ejection fraction EF), end systolic volume (ESV), end diastolic volume (EDV), and motility score (SSPM), both at rest and in the immediate post exercise, in patients with inducible ischemia. Methods: One hundred and four patients were evaluated with the Bruce protocol in which a gated SPECT with Tc99m sestamibi was done. Patients were divided in two groups: G1 (inducible ischemia present) and G2 (control patients) according to the results of the perfusion scans. Results: EF post exercise in G1 was significantly lower than EF at rest (48 ± 1.43 vs 52 ± 1.29; p < 0.01). There were no changes of EF in G2 (62 ± 0.93 vs 61 ± 1.03; p = NS). In G1, ESV post exercise increased significantly compared to ESV at rest (57 ± 3.57 vs 51 ± 2.86; p < 0.01). Again, there were no changes of these parameters in G2 (32 ± 1.44 vs 33 ± 2.05; p = NS). In G1, SSMP increased during the post exercise vs SSMP at rest (4.9 ± 0.6 vs 1.8 ± 0.4; p < 0.01). In G2, SSMP was 0 both post exercise and at rest. Conclusion: Patients with inducible ischemia had a depressed EF, higher end systolic volumes and alterations in motility score immediately post exercise compared to rest images. In contrast, there were no changes of these parameters in control patients. These different results could be explained to the presence of stunned myocardium in ischemic patients. (author)

  11. Olmesartan, an AT1 Antagonist, Attenuates Oxidative Stress, Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Cardiac Inflammatory Mediators in Rats with Heart Failure Induced by Experimental Autoimmune Myocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayakumar Sukumaran, Kenichi Watanabe, Punniyakoti T. Veeraveedu, Narasimman Gurusamy, Meilei Ma, Rajarajan A. Thandavarayan, Arun Prasath Lakshmanan, Ken'ichi Yamaguchi, Kenji Suzuki, Makoto Kodama

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies have demonstrated that angiotensin II has been involved in immune and inflammatory responses which might contribute to the pathogenesis of immune-mediated diseases. Recent evidence suggests that oxidative stress may play a role in myocarditis. Here, we investigated whether olmesartan, an AT1R antagonist protects against experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM by suppression of oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress and inflammatory cytokines. EAM was induced in Lewis rats by immunization with porcine cardiac myosin, were divided into two groups and treated with either olmesartan (10 mg/kg/day or vehicle for a period of 21 days. Myocardial functional parameters measured by hemodynamic and echocardiographic analyses were significantly improved by the treatment with olmesartan compared with those of vehicle-treated rats. Treatment with olmesartan attenuated the myocardial mRNA expressions of proinflammatory cytokines, [Interleukin (IL-1β, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, tumor necrosis factor-α and interferon-γ] and the protein expression of tumor necrosis factor-α compared with that of vehicle-treated rats. Myocardial protein expressions of AT1R, NADPH oxidase subunits (p47phox, p67phox, gp91phox and the expression of markers of oxidative stress (3-nitrotyrosine and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, and the cardiac apoptosis were also significantly decreased by the treatment with olmesartan compared with those of vehicle-treated rats. Furthermore, olmesartan treatment down-regulated the myocardial expressions of glucose regulated protein-78, growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible gene, caspase-12, phospho-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK and phospho-JNK. These findings suggest that olmesartan protects against EAM in rats, at least in part via suppression of oxidative stress, ER stress and inflammatory cytokines.

  12. Autoimmunity and the Gut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew W. Campbell

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases have increased dramatically worldwide since World War II. This is coincidental with the increased production and use of chemicals both in industrial countries and agriculture, as well as the ease of travel from region to region and continent to continent, making the transfer of a pathogen or pathogens from one part of the world to another much easier than ever before. In this review, triggers of autoimmunity are examined, principally environmental. The number of possible environmental triggers is vast and includes chemicals, bacteria, viruses, and molds. Examples of these triggers are given and include the mechanism of action and method by which they bring about autoimmunity.

  13. Autoimmunity in visual loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, Axel; Wong, Sui; Plant, Gordon T

    2016-01-01

    There are a number of autoimmune disorders which can affect visual function. There are a very large number of mechanisms in the visual pathway which could potentially be the targets of autoimmune attack. In practice it is the retina and the anterior visual pathway (optic nerve and chiasm) that are recognised as being affected in autoimmune disorders. Multiple Sclerosis is one of the commonest causes of visual loss in young adults because of the frequency of attacks of optic neuritis in that condition, however the basis of the inflammation in Multiple Sclerosis and the confirmation of autoimmunity is lacking. The immune process is known to be highly unusual in that it is not systemic and confined to the CNS compartment. Previously an enigmatic partner to Multiple Sclerosis, Neuromyelitis Optica is now established to be autoimmune and two antibodies - to Aquaporin4 and to Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein - have been implicated in the pathogenesis. The term Chronic Relapsing Inflammatory Optic Neuropathy is applied to those cases of optic neuritis which require long term immunosuppression and hence are presumed to be autoimmune but where no autoimmune pathogenesis has been confirmed. Optic neuritis occurring post-infection and post vaccination and conditions such as Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and various vasculitides may cause direct autoimmune attack to visual structures or indirect damage through occlusive vasculopathy. Chronic granulomatous disorders such as Sarcoidosis affect vision commonly by a variety of mechanisms, whether and how these are placed in the autoimmune panoply is unknown. As far as the retina is concerned Cancer Associated Retinopathy and Melanoma Associated Retinopathy are well characterised clinically but a candidate autoantibody (recoverin) is only described in the former disorder. Other, usually monophasic, focal retinal inflammatory disorders (Idiopathic Big Blind Spot Syndrome, Acute Zonal Occult Outer Retinopathy and Acute Macular

  14. Dicarbonyl Induced Structural Perturbations Make Histone H1 Highly Immunogenic and Generate an Auto-Immune Response in Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Rouf Mir

    Full Text Available Increased oxidative stress under hyperglycemic conditions, through the interaction of AGEs with RAGE receptors and via activation of interleukin mediated transcription signalling, has been reported in cancer. Proteins modifications are being explored for their roles in the development and progression of cancer and autoantibody response against them is gaining interest as a probe for early detection of the disease. This study has analysed the changes in histone H1 upon modification by methylglyoxal (MG and its implications in auto-immunopathogenesis of cancer. Modified histone showed modifications in the aromatic residues, changed tyrosine microenvironment, intermolecular cross linking and generation of AGEs. It showed masking of hydrophobic patches and a hypsochromic shift in the in ANS specific fluorescence. MG aggressively oxidized histone H1 leading to the accumulation of reactive carbonyls. Far UV CD measurements showed di-carbonyl induced enhancement of the alpha structure and the induction of beta sheet conformation; and thermal denaturation (Tm studies confirmed the thermal stability of the modified histone. FTIR analysis showed amide I band shift, generation of a carboxyethyl group and N-Cα vibrations in the modified histone. LCMS analysis confirmed the formation of Nε-(carboxyethyllysine and electron microscopic studies revealed the amorphous aggregate formation. The modified histone showed altered cooperative binding with DNA. Modified H1 induced high titre antibodies in rabbits and the IgG isolated form sera of rabbits immunized with modified H1 exhibited specific binding with its immunogen in Western Blot analysis. IgG isolated from the sera of patients with lung cancer, prostate cancer, breast cancer and cancer of head and neck region showed better recognition for neo-epitopes on the modified histone, reflecting the presence of circulating autoantibodies in cancer. Since reports suggest a link between AGE-RAGE axis and

  15. Autoimmune Pancreatitis: A Succinct Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Juan Putra; Xiaoying Liu

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis is a rare type of chronic pancreatitis with characteristic clinical, radiologic, and histopathologic findings. Diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis is often challenging due to its low incidence and nonspecific clinical and radiologic findings. Patients with autoimmune pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer share similar clinical presentations, including obstructive jaundice, abdominal pain and weight loss. Due to these overlapping features, autoimmune pancreatitis patients...

  16. Comparative effects of amlodipine and benazepril on Left Atrial Pressure in Dogs with experimentally-induced Mitral Valve Regurgitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzuki Shuji

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the purposes of treatment for dogs with mitral regurgitation (MR is lowering left atrial pressure (LAP. There has been few study of the amlodipine in dogs with MR and amlodipine’s effect on LAP has not been fully evaluated in a quantitative manner because of difficulties in directly measuring LAP. The objective of our study was to compare the short-term effects of amlodipine (0.2 mg/kg PO q12h vs benazepril (0.5 mg/kg PO q12h, on LAP and echocardiographic parameters in five beagle dogs with experimentally-induced MR. LAP of eight dogs that has own control were measured using radiotelemetry system at baseline and again on days 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 of the drug administration. Results Mean LAP decreased significantly after amlodipine (11.20 ± 4.19 mmHg vs 14.61 ± 3.81 mmHg at baseline, p  .05. LAP was lower after 7 days of amlodipine treatment than after 7 days of benazepril treatment. Significant reduction was seen for the first time 4 days after the administration amlodipine. The rate of the maximal area of the regurgitant jet signals to the left atrium area (ARJ/LAA of the amlodipine treatment was significantly lower (p  Conclusions LAP was significantly decreased after amlodipine treatment in dogs with surgically-induced MR but not after benazepril treatment. Although this study did not focus on adverse effects, amlodipine may be an effective drug for helping the patients with acute onset of severe MR, such as rupture of chordae tendinae or end stage patients were the LAP is likely to be elevated. Additional studies in clinical patients with degenerative mitral valve disease and acute chordal rupture are warranted because the blood-pressure lowering effects of amlodipine can decrease renal perfusion and this can further activate the RAAS.

  17. Intestinal barrier dysfunction develops at the onset of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, and can be induced by adoptive transfer of auto-reactive T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrnaz Nouri

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system with a pathogenesis involving a dysfunctional blood-brain barrier and myelin-specific, autoreactive T cells. Although the commensal microbiota seems to affect its pathogenesis, regulation of the interactions between luminal antigens and mucosal immune elements remains unclear. Herein, we investigated whether the intestinal mucosal barrier is also targeted in this disease. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, the prototypic animal model of MS, was induced either by active immunization or by adoptive transfer of autoreactive T cells isolated from these mice. We show increased intestinal permeability, overexpression of the tight junction protein zonulin and alterations in intestinal morphology (increased crypt depth and thickness of the submucosa and muscularis layers. These intestinal manifestations were seen at 7 days (i.e., preceding the onset of neurological symptoms and at 14 days (i.e., at the stage of paralysis after immunization. We also demonstrate an increased infiltration of proinflammatory Th1/Th17 cells and a reduced regulatory T cell number in the gut lamina propria, Peyer's patches and mesenteric lymph nodes. Adoptive transfer to healthy mice of encephalitogenic T cells, isolated from EAE-diseased animals, led to intestinal changes similar to those resulting from the immunization procedure. Our findings show that disruption of intestinal homeostasis is an early and immune-mediated event in EAE. We propose that this intestinal dysfunction may act to support disease progression, and thus represent a potential therapeutic target in MS. In particular, an increased understanding of the regulation of tight junctions at the blood-brain barrier and in the intestinal wall may be crucial for design of future innovative therapies.

  18. Autoimmune liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pietro Invernizzi; Ian R Mackay

    2008-01-01

    The liver was one of the earliest recognized sites among autoimmune diseases yet autoimmune hepatitis,primary biliary cirrhosis,primary sclerosing cholangitis,and their overlap forms,are still problematic in diagnosis and causation.The contributions herein comprise 'pairs of articles' on clinical characteristics,and concepts of etiopathogenesis,for each of the above diseases,together with childhood autoimmune liver disease,overlaps,interpretations of diagnostic serology,and liver transplantation.This issue is timely,since we are witnessing an ever increasing applicability of immunology to a wide variety of chronic diseases,hepatic and non-hepatic,in both developed and developing countries.The 11 invited expert review articles capture the changing features over recent years of the autoimmune liver diseases,the underlying immunomolecular mechanisms of development,the potent albeit still unexplained genetic influences,the expanding repertoire of immunoserological diagnostic markers,and the increasingly effective therapeutic possibilities.

  19. Pressure overload-induced mild cardiac hypertrophy reduces left ventricular transmural differences in mitochondrial respiratory chain activity and increases oxidative stress

    OpenAIRE

    Kindo, Michel; Gerelli, Sébastien; Bouitbir, Jamal; Charles, Anne-Laure; Zoll, Joffrey; Hoang Minh, Tam; Monassier, Laurent; Favret, Fabrice; Piquard, François; Geny, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Increased mechanical stress and contractility characterizes normal left ventricular (LV) subendocardium (Endo) but whether Endo mitochondrial respiratory chain complex activities is reduced as compared to subepicardium (Epi) and whether pressure overload-induced LV hypertrophy (LVH) might modulate transmural gradients through increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is unknown. Methods: LVH was induced by 6 weeks abdominal aortic banding and cardiac structure and function...

  20. Etiopathogenesis of insulin autoimmunity.

    OpenAIRE

    Åke Lenmark; Moustakas, Antonis K; Papadopoulos, George K; Norio Kanatsuna

    2012-01-01

    Autoimmunity against pancreatic islet beta cells is strongly associated with proinsulin, insulin, or both. The insulin autoreactivity is particularly pronounced in children with young age at onset of type 1 diabetes. Possible mechanisms for (pro)insulin autoimmunity may involve beta-cell destruction resulting in proinsulin peptide presentation on HLA-DR-DQ Class II molecules in pancreatic draining lymphnodes. Recent data on proinsulin peptide binding to type 1 diabetes-associated HLA-DQ2 and ...

  1. Histopathological study of time course changes in inter-renal aortic banding-induced left ventricular hypertrophy of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashiyama, Hiroyuki; Sugai, Masaki; Inoue, Hirotaka; Mizuyachi, Kaori; Kushida, Hiroshi; Asano, Satoshi; Kinoshita, Mine

    2007-02-01

    The left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) in response to pressure overload is an important risk factor in cardiac morbidity and mortality. To investigate the time course of histopathological alterations in the LVH in response to pressure overload, histopathological and immunohistochemical examination was performed using the aortic banding-induced mouse LVH model. Five-week-old male CD-1 mice were subjected to the inter-renal aortic banding. Major organs were sampled on 3, 10, 14, 21, 28 or 42 days after banding. Haematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, Masson's trichrome staining and immunohistochemistry for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), alpha-smooth muscle actin (aSMA), ICAM-1, type I collagen and CD31 was performed and microscopically examined. Three days after aortic banding, acute inflammatory changes, such as macrophages/neutrophil infiltration and vascular wall injury were observed on/around the coronary arteries/arterioles of both ventricles. Intense ICAM-1 immunostaining was observed on the endothelium of the coronary arteries/arterioles. After day 10, vascular wall thickening and perivascular fibrosis was induced on the coronary arteries/arterioles. Immunohistochemistry for aSMA and PCNA demonstrated the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells in the media. After day 28, minimal cardiomyocyte hypertrophy was observed at the light microscope level. In the inter-renal aortic banding LVH model, histopathological alterations in early phase were mainly observed on coronary arteries/arterioles. These early phase alterations were thought to be hypertension-related changes in the coronary vasculatures. The cardiomyocyte hypertrophy observed in later phase was minimal at the light microscope level. These evidences would facilitate the understanding of pathophysiology of pressure overload LVH. PMID:17244336

  2. Relative Importance of Aortic Stiffness and Volume as Predictors of Treatment-Induced Improvement in Left Ventricular Mass Index in Dialysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis I Georgianos

    Full Text Available This study aimed to explore the relative contribution of aortic stiffness and volume in treatment-induced change of left ventricular mass in dialysis. Hypertension in Hemodialysis Patients Treated with Atenolol or Lisinopril trial compared the effect of lisinopril versus atenolol in reducing left ventricular mass index; 179 patients with echo measurements of aortic pulse wave velocity and left ventricular mass at baseline were included. In unadjusted analysis, overall reductions of 26.24 g/m2 (95% CI: -49.20, -3.29 and 35.67 g/m2 (95% CI: -63.70, -7.64 in left ventricular mass index were noted from baseline to 6 and 12 months respectively. Volume control emerged as an important determinant of regression of left ventricular mass index due to the following reasons: (i additional control for change in ambulatory systolic blood pressure mitigated the reduction in left ventricular mass index in the statistical model above [6-month visit: -18.6 g/m2 (95% CI: -43.7, 6.5; 12-month visit: -22.1 g/m2 (95% CI: -52.2, 8.0] (ii regression of left ventricular hypertrophy was primarily due to reduction in left ventricular chamber and not wall thickness and (iii adjustment for inferior vena cava diameter (as a proxy for volume removed the effect of time on left ventricular mass index reduction [6-month visit: -6.6 g/m2 (95% CI: (-41.6, 28.4; 12-month visit: 0.6 g/m2 (95% CI: -39.5, 40.7]. In contrast, aortic pulse wave velocity was neither a determinant of baseline left ventricular mass index nor predictor of its reduction. Among dialysis patients, ambulatory systolic pressure, a proxy for volume expansion, but not aortic stiffness is more important predictor of reduction in left ventricular mass index. Improving blood pressure control via adequate volume management appears as an effective strategy to improve left ventricular hypertrophy in dialysis.

  3. CX3CL1 (fractalkine and CX3CR1 expression in myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis: kinetics and cellular origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olsson Tomas

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS. It is associated with local activation of microglia and astroglia, infiltration of activated macrophages and T cells, active degradation of myelin and damage to axons and neurons. The proposed role for CX3CL1 (fractalkine in the control of microglia activation and leukocyte infiltration places this chemokine and its receptor CX3CR1 in a potentially strategic position to control key aspects in the pathological events that are associated with development of brain lesions in MS. In this study, we examine this hypothesis by analyzing the distribution, kinetics, regulation and cellular origin of CX3CL1 and CX3CR1 mRNA expression in the CNS of rats with an experimentally induced MS-like disease, myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG-induced autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE. Methods The expression of CX3CL1 and its receptor CX3CR1 was studied with in situ hybridization histochemical detection of their mRNA with radio labeled cRNA probes in combination with immunohistochemical staining of phenotypic cell markers. Both healthy rat brains and brains from rats with MOG EAE were analyzed. In defined lesional stages of MOG EAE, the number of CX3CR1 mRNA-expressing cells and the intensity of the in situ hybridization signal were determined by image analysis. Data were statistically evaluated by ANOVA, followed by Tukeyprimes multiple comparison test. Results Expression of CX3CL1 mRNA was present within neuronal-like cells located throughout the neuraxis of the healthy rat. Expression of CX3CL1 remained unaltered in the CNS of rats with MOG-induced EAE, with the exception of an induced expression in astrocytes within inflammatory lesions. Notably, the brain vasculature of healthy and encephalitic animals did not exhibit signs of CX3CL1 mRNA expression. The receptor, CX3CR1, was expressed by microglial cells in all regions of the healthy brain

  4. Budesonide in previously untreated autoimmune hepatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegand, J; Schuler, A; Kanzler, S; Lohse, A; Beuers, U; Kreisel, W; Spengler, U; Koletzko, S; Jansen, PLM; Hochhaus, G; Mollmann, HW; Prols, M; Manns, MP

    2005-01-01

    Background: Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a chronic liver disease that is effectively treated with immunosuppressive therapy. Predniso(lo)ne, often in combination with azathioprine, is the basic therapeutic option to induce remission. However, this regimen can cause numerous side effects. The aim of

  5. Pharmacologic Therapies for Rheumatologic and Autoimmune Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bays, Alison M; Gardner, Gregory

    2016-07-01

    Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are commonly prescribed by rheumatologists to reduce disease activity and induce remission in autoimmune conditions such as systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. Steroids are sometimes used in combination with DMARD therapy and should be used at the lowest effective dose for the least amount of time. There are many biologic agents available for use for inflammatory arthritis and other autoimmune conditions. Care should be taken when prescribing and managing DMARDS, steroids and biologic agents medications with a careful eye towards screening for infectious disease, vaccination, bone heath and lab monitoring. PMID:27235612

  6. Estrogens and autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutolo, Maurizio; Capellino, Silvia; Sulli, Alberto; Serioli, Bruno; Secchi, Maria Elena; Villaggio, Barbara; Straub, Rainer H

    2006-11-01

    Sex hormones are implicated in the immune response, with estrogens as enhancers at least of the humoral immunity and androgens and progesterone (and glucocorticoids) as natural immune-suppressors . Several physiological, pathological, and therapeutic conditions may change the serum estrogen milieu and/or peripheral conversion rate, including the menstrual cycle, pregnancy, postpartum period, menopause, being elderly, chronic stress, altered circadian rhythms, inflammatory cytokines, and use of corticosteroids, oral contraceptives, and steroid hormonal replacements, inducing altered androgen/estrogen ratios and related effects. In particular, cortisol and melatonin circadian rhythms are altered, at least in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and partially involve sex hormone circadian synthesis and levels as well. Abnormal regulation of aromatase activity (i.e., increased activity) by inflammatory cytokine production (i.e., TNF-alpha, IL-1, and IL-6) may partially explain the abnormalities of peripheral estrogen synthesis in RA (i.e., increased availability of 17-beta estradiol and possible metabolites in synovial fluids) and in systemic lupus erythematosus, as well as the altered serum sex-hormone levels and ratio (i.e., decreased androgens and DHEAS). In the synovial fluids of RA patients, the increased estrogen concentration is observed in both sexes and is more specifically characterized by the hydroxylated forms, in particular 16alpha-hydroxyestrone, which is a mitogenic and cell proliferative endogenous hormone. Local effects of sex hormones in autoimmune rheumatic diseases seems to consist mainly in modulation of cell proliferation and cytokine production (i.e., TNF-alpha, Il-1, IL-12). In this respect, it is interesting that male patients with RA seem to profit more from anti-TNFalpha strategies than do female patients. PMID:17261796

  7. Autoimmune basal ganglia disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Russell C; Brilot, Fabienne

    2012-11-01

    The basal ganglia are deep nuclei in the brain that include the caudate, putamen, globus pallidus, and substantia nigra. Pathological processes involving the basal ganglia often result in disorders of movement and behavior. A number of different autoimmune disorders predominantly involve the basal ganglia and can result in movement and psychiatric disorders. The classic basal ganglia autoimmune disorder is Sydenham chorea, a poststreptococcal neuropsychiatric disorder. Resurgence in the interest in Sydenham chorea is the result of the descriptions of other poststreptococcal neuropsychiatric disorders including tics and obsessive-compulsive disorder, broadly termed pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infection. Encephalitic processes affecting the basal ganglia are also described including the syndromes basal ganglia encephalitis, encephalitis lethargica, and bilateral striatal necrosis. Last, systemic autoimmune disorders such as systemic lupus erythematosus and antiphospholipid syndrome can result in chorea or parkinsonism. Using paradigms learned from other autoantibody associated disorders, the authors discuss the autoantibody hypothesis and the role of systemic inflammation in autoimmune basal ganglia disorders. Identification of these entities is important as the clinician has an increasing therapeutic repertoire to modulate or suppress the aberrant immune system. PMID:22832771

  8. Autoimmunity and Asbestos Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean C. Pfau

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite a body of evidence supporting an association between asbestos exposure and autoantibodies indicative of systemic autoimmunity, such as antinuclear antibodies (ANA, a strong epidemiological link has never been made to specific autoimmune diseases. This is in contrast with another silicate dust, crystalline silica, for which there is considerable evidence linking exposure to diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Instead, the asbestos literature is heavily focused on cancer, including mesothelioma and pulmonary carcinoma. Possible contributing factors to the absence of a stronger epidemiological association between asbestos and autoimmune disease include (a a lack of statistical power due to relatively small or diffuse exposure cohorts, (b exposure misclassification, (c latency of clinical disease, (d mild or subclinical entities that remain undetected or masked by other pathologies, or (e effects that are specific to certain fiber types, so that analyses on mixed exposures do not reach statistical significance. This review summarizes epidemiological, animal model, and in vitro data related to asbestos exposures and autoimmunity. These combined data help build toward a better understanding of the fiber-associated factors contributing to immune dysfunction that may raise the risk of autoimmunity and the possible contribution to asbestos-related pulmonary disease.

  9. Pain-induced skin autoimmunity

    OpenAIRE

    Odoardi, Francesca; Neuhuber, Winfried; Flügel, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    A recent paper published in Nature reports sensory nerve fibers in the skin that give local immune cells important instructions for the organization of an immune response; in this particular case the cooperation between the nervous and immune systems had disastrous consequences, namely an auto-destruction of the skin.

  10. Hypocarnitinaemia induced by sodium pivalate in the rat is associated with left ventricular dysfunction and impaired energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broderick, Tom L

    2006-01-01

    Carnitine is a naturally occurring compound that is essential in energy metabolism of the mammalian heart. In addition to its essential role in facilitating beta-oxidation, carnitine eliminates excess toxic acyl residues and regulates the mitochondrial acetyl coenzyme A (CoA)/CoA ratio. Thus, it is not surprising that patients with carnitine deficiency syndromes exhibit defects in energy metabolism and in some cases demonstrate left ventricular dysfunction. Pivalic acid is commonly used to create prodrugs, such as pivampicillin and pivmecillinam, to facilitate enteral absorption and increase oral bioavailability. Pivalic acid released from the drug following absorption readily forms an ester with carnitine, which is then excreted as pivaloylcarnitine. Sustained loss of carnitine in the form of this ester induces a state of carnitine deficiency, exemplified by low plasma and tissue carnitine content. This review examines the effects in the rat of short- and long-term sodium pivalate treatment on: (1) cardiac carnitine content; (2) in vitro mechanical function; (3) markers of glycolytic and fatty acid metabolism; and (4) energy substrate metabolism. Treatment with sodium pivalate induces a gradual loss of cardiac carnitine content for up to 12 weeks. Doubling the duration of treatment is not associated with any further decrease in cardiac carnitine content. While heart function following short-term treatment (2 weeks) is normal under aerobic conditions, impaired recovery of function following ischaemia is seen. In contrast, long-term treatment (11-28 weeks) is associated with impaired heart function, which is dependent on workload and substrate availability. Impaired heart function is also associated with reductions in activity of 3-hydroxyacyl CoA dehydrogenase and rates of fatty acid oxidation. However, to maintain adenosine triphosphate production, glucose metabolism, expressed as hexokinase activity and glucose oxidation, is increased in carnitine

  11. Autoimmunity in 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selmi, Carlo

    2016-08-01

    Compared to the clear trend observed in previous years, the number of peer-reviewed articles published during 2015 and retrieved using the "autoimmunity" key word declined by 4 %, while remaining 5 % of immunology articles. On the other hand, a more detailed analysis of the published articles in leading immunology and autoimmunity journals revealed exciting scenarios, with fascinating lines of evidence being supported by convincing data and likely followed by rapid translational or clinical developments. As examples, the study of the microbiome, the development of new serum or other tissue biomarkers, and a more solid understanding of disease pathogenesis and tolerance breakdown mechanisms have been central issues in the past year. Furthermore and similar to the oncology field, progress in the understanding of single autoimmune condition is becoming most specific with psoriatic and rheumatoid arthritis being ideal paradigms with treatment options diverging after decades of common therapies, as illustrated by IL17-targeting approaches. The ultimate result of these advances is towards personalized medicine with an ideal approach being tailored on a single patient, based on a finely tuned definition of the immunogenetics, epigenetics, microbiome, and biomarkers. Finally, experimental reports suggest that cancer-associated immune mechanisms or the role of T and B cell subpopulations should be better understood in autoimmune diseases. While we hailed the 2014 literature in the autoimmunity world as part of an annus mirabilis, we should not be mistaken in the strong stimulus of research in autoimmunity represented by the 2015 articles that will be summarized in this article. PMID:27422713

  12. Turning Left

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    An increasing number of left-wing political figures are holding power in Latin America, raising eyebrows in Washington This is a banner election year in Latin America, with nine countries heading to the polls to select new leaders. But the succession of victories by left-leaning politicians, with more likely in the coming months, is expected to draw mounting concern from the United

  13. Autoimmune Pancreatitis Associated with Retroperitoneal Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohkawa M

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Autoimmune pancreatitis is sometimes associated with other autoimmune diseases. We have presented two cases of autoimmune pancreatitis with retroperitoneal fibrosis and compared our findings with those found in the literature. CASE 1: A 71-year-old male developed anorexia and weight loss. Abdominal ultrasonography (US and computed tomography (CT showed diffuse swelling of the pancreas and the peritoneal soft tissue surrounding the aorta, associated with right hydronephrosis. Endoscopic retrograde pancreatography showed narrowing of the main pancreatic duct. He was diagnosed as having autoimmune pancreatitis associated with retroperitoneal fibrosis and underwent steroid therapy. After 3 weeks, a follow-up CT showed a marked reduction in the size of both the pancreas and retroperitoneal mass. CASE 2: A 62-year-old male was admitted to another hospital complaining of obstructive jaundice. Abdominal CT and US showed swelling of the pancreas. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography demonstrated stenosis of the lower bile duct and narrowing of the main pancreatic duct. With the diagnosis of pancreatic head carcinoma, a choledochojejunostomy and a gastrojejunostomy were performed. Histological examination of the biopsy of the pancreatic mass revealed marked fibrosis with lymphoplasmacytic infiltration. One year later, a retroperitoneal mass was detected on follow-up CT. He was treated with prednisolone for two years. Recurrence of retroperitoneal mass with left hydronephrosis occurred 18 months later. There was no sign of recurrence of the autoimmune pancreatitis. He was again treated with prednisolone, and the retroperitoneal mass was gradually reduced. CONCLUSIONS: A total of 7 cases including the present cases have been reported. All were middle-aged males. Steroid therapy was effective for both the pancreatic and the retroperitoneal masses.

  14. [Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becheur, M; Bouslama, B; Slama, H; Toumi, N E H

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare condition in children which differs from the adult form. It is defined by immune-mediated destruction of red blood cells caused by autoantibodies. Characteristics of the autoantibodies are responsible for the various clinical entities. Classifications of autoimmune hemolytic anemia include warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia, cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia, and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria. For each classification, this review discusses the epidemiology, etiology, clinical presentation, laboratory evaluation, and treatment options. PMID:26575109

  15. T Cell Vaccination as an Immunotherapy for Autoimmune Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JingwuZhang

    2004-01-01

    Immunization with inactivated autoreactive T cells (T cell vaccination) selected from individual's own T cellrepertoire provides a unique in vivo setting for testing immune regulation that is known to involve interactionsof a variety of related surface molecules (1). It induces regulatory immune responses that closely resemble thein vivo situation where the immune system is challenged by clonal activation and expansion of given T cellpopulations in various autoimmune diseases. T cell vaccination provides a powerful means of eliciting naturalreactions of the immune system in response to clonal expansion of T cells, which can used as a therapeuticapproach to suppress or eliminate specific pathogenic autoreactive T cells in autoimmune conditions. Clinicaltrials using T cell vaccination to deplete autoreactive T cells in human autoimmune conditions have begun toreveal the pathologic relevance of various autoimmune T cell populations in the disease processes, providing aunique opportunity to test the autoimmune theories in a clinical setting. Cellular & Molecular Immunology.2004; 1(5):321-327.

  16. The Epidemiologic Evidence Linking Autoimmune Diseases and Psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benros, Michael E; Eaton, William W; Mortensen, Preben B

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes the epidemiologic evidence linking autoimmune diseases and psychosis. The associations between autoimmune diseases and psychosis have been studied for more than a half century, but research has intensified within the last decades, since psychosis has been associated with...... genetic markers of the immune system and with excess autoreactivity and other immune alterations. A range of psychiatric disorders, including psychosis, have been observed to occur more frequently in some autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus and multiple sclerosis. Many autoimmune...... diseases involve multiple organs and general dysfunction of the immune system, which could affect the brain and induce psychiatric symptoms. Most studies have been cross-sectional, observing an increased prevalence of a broad number of autoimmune diseases in people with psychotic disorders. Furthermore...

  17. When the Left is left!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asha J Mathew

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Persistent left superior vena cava is an uncommon vascular anomaly; however it is the most common anomaly of the thoracic venous system. It may be stand alone or associated with other congenital heart diseases and even other extracardiac anomalies. It is due to a lack of regression and adsorption of the left anterior cardinal vein. The persistence of this vessel renders a left subclavian approach for interventions on the right heart a challenge. It may be responsible for arrthymiias. We present a report of a persistent left superior vena cava draining into the coronary sinus with a coexisting normal right superior vena cava. Keeping in mind its widespread implications on cardiac procedures and a causative factor of cardiac disturbances we have considered its course, embryological source and clinical significance.

  18. Autoimmunity in Addison's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín Martorell, P; Roep, B O; Smit, J W A; Martorell, P M

    2002-08-01

    Addison's disease has a low incidence and is most frequently the result of an autoimmune disease in developed countries. Addison's disease can present as an isolated entity or in combination with other autoimmune diseases: Addison's disease can be part of the distinct polyglandular autoimmune syndromes APS I and II. Autoantibodies in patients with isolated Addison's disease are directed against the enzymes involved in steroid synthesis, P45oc21, P45oscc and P45oc17. Addison's disease, both isolated and in the context of APS II, has been associated with the haplotype HLA-A1, -B8 and DR3. The value of the increased expression of these molecules on adrenocortical cells could point towards an infectious pathogenesis. Given the prevalence, up to 80 %, of autoantibodies in Addison's disease as well as the high predictive value for developing the disease when antibodies are present (41% in three years), we advise screening high-risk populations, such as patients with other autoimmune endocrinopathies or their relatives for the presence of these antibodies. The adrenocortical function of patients positive for antibodies should be followed yearly. PMID:12430572

  19. Autoimmunity and Turner's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lleo, Ana; Moroni, Luca; Caliari, Lisa; Invernizzi, Pietro

    2012-05-01

    Turner Syndrome (TS) is a common genetic disorder, affecting female individuals, resulting from the partial or complete absence of one sex chromosome, and occurring in approximately 50 per 100,000 liveborn girls. TS is associated with reduced adult height and with gonadal dysgenesis, leading to insufficient circulating levels of female sex steroids and to infertility. Morbidity and mortality are increased in TS but average intellectual performance is within the normal range. TS is closely associated to the presence of autoantibodies and autoimmune diseases (AID), especially autoimmune thyroiditis and inflammatory bowel disease. Despite the fact that the strong association between TS and AID is well known and has been widely studied, the underlying immunopathogenic mechanism remains partially unexplained. Recent studies have displayed how TS patients do not show an excess of immunogenic risk markers. This is evocative for a higher responsibility of X-chromosome abnormalities in the development of AID, and particularly of X-genes involved in immune response. For instance, the long arm of the X chromosome hosts a MHC-locus, so the loss of that region may lead to a deficiency in immune regulation. Currently no firm guidelines for diagnosis exist. In conclusion, TS is a condition associated with a number of autoimmune manifestations. Individuals with TS need life-long medical attention. As a consequence of these findings, early diagnosis and regular screening for potential associated autoimmune conditions are essential in the medical follow-up of TS patients. PMID:22154619

  20. Autoimmune paediatric liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgina Mieli-Vergani, Diego Vergani

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Liver disorders with a likely autoimmune pathogenesis in childhood include autoimmune hepatitis (AIH, autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis (ASC, and de novo AIH after liver transplantation. AIH is divided into two subtypes according to seropositivity for smooth muscle and/or antinuclear antibody (SMA/ANA, type 1 or liver kidney microsomal antibody (LKM1, type 2. There is a female predominance in both. LKM1 positive patients tend to present more acutely, at a younger age, and commonly have partial IgA deficiency, while duration of symptoms before diagnosis, clinical signs, family history of autoimmunity, presence of associated autoimmune disorders, response to treatment, and long-term prognosis are similar in both groups. The most common type of paediatric sclerosing cholangitis is ASC. The clinical, biochemical, immunological, and histological presentation of ASC is often indistinguishable from that of AIH type 1. In both, there are high IgG, non-organ specific autoantibodies, and interface hepatitis. Diagnosis is made by cholangiography. Children with ASC respond to immunosuppression satisfactorily and similarly to AIH in respect to remission and relapse rates, times to normalization of biochemical parameters, and decreased inflammatory activity on follow up liver biopsies. However, the cholangiopathy can progress. There may be evolution from AIH to ASC over the years, despite treatment. De novo AIH after liver transplantation affects patients not transplanted for autoimmune disorders and is strikingly reminiscent of classical AIH, including elevated titres of serum antibodies, hypergammaglobulinaemia, and histological findings of interface hepatitis, bridging fibrosis, and collapse. Like classical AIH, it responds to treatment with prednisolone and azathioprine. De novo AIH post liver transplantation may derive from interference by calcineurin inhibitors with the intrathymic physiological mechanisms of T-cell maturation and selection. Whether

  1. Autoimmune paediatric liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giorgina Mieli-Vergani; Diego Vergani

    2008-01-01

    Liver disorders with a likely autoimmune pathogenesis in childhood include autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis (ASC),and de novo AIH after liver transplantation.AIH is divided into two subtypes according to seropositivity for smooth muscle and/or antinuclear antibody (SMA/ANA,type 1) or liver kidney microsomal antibody (LKM1,type 2).There is a female predominance in both.LKM1 positive patients tend to present more acutely,at a younger age,and commonly have partial IgA deficiency,while duration of symptoms before diagnosis,clinical signs,family history of autoimmunity, presence of associated autoimmune disorders,response to treatment,and long-term prognosis are similar in both groups. The most common type of paediatric sclerosing cholangitis is ASC.The clinical,biochemical, immunological,and histological presentation of ASC is often indistinguishable from that of AIH type 1.In both,there are high IgG,non-organ specific autoantibodies,and interface hepatitis.Diagnosis is made by cholangiography.Children with ASC respond to immunosuppression satisfactorily and similarly to AIH in respect to remission and relapse rates,times to normalization of biochemical parameters, and decreased inflammatory activity on follow up liver biopsies. However,the cholangiopathy can progress.There may be evolution from AIH to ASC over the years,despite treatment.De novo AIH after liver transplantation affects patients not transplanted for autoimmune disorders and is strikingly reminiscent of classical AIH,including elevated titres of serum antibodies, hypergammaglobulinaemia,and histological findings of interface hepatitis,bridging fibrosis,and collapse.Like classical AIH,it responds to treatment with prednisolone and azathioprine.De novo AIH post liver transplantation may derive from interference by calcineurin inhibitors with the intrathymic physiological mechanisms of T-cell maturation and selection.Whether this condition is a distinct entity or a form of

  2. [Polyglandular autoimmune syndromes : An overview].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komminoth, P

    2016-05-01

    Polyglandular autoimmune syndromes (PGAS), also known as autoimmune polyendocrinopathy syndromes (APS), are a heterogeneous group of rare, genetically caused diseases of the immune system which lead to inflammatory damage of various endocrine glands resulting in malfunctions. In addition, autoimmune diseases of non-endocrine organs may also be found. Early diagnosis of PGAS is often overlooked because of heterogeneous symptoms and the progressive occurrence of the individual diseases. The two most important forms of PGAS are the juvenile and adult types. The juvenile type (PGAS type 1) is caused by mutations in the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene on chromosome 21, exhibits geographic variations in incidence and is defined by the combination of mucocutaneous candidiasis, Addison's disease and hypoparathyroidism. In addition, autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) syndrome and other autoimmune diseases can also occur. The adult form of PGAS (PGAS type 2) is a multigenetic disorder associated with some HLA haplotypes, is more common than the juvenile type, shows female predominance and exhibits the combination of type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroid disease, Addison's disease and other autoimmune disorders. The histological alterations in affected organs of PGAS patients are similar to findings in sporadically occurring autoimmune diseases of these organs but there are no pathognomic fine tissue findings. If patients exhibit autoimmune changes in two different endocrine glands or if there are indications of several autoimmune disorders from the patient history, it is important to consider PGAS and inform the clinicians of this suspicion. PMID:27099223

  3. Partially silencing brain toll-like receptor 4 prevents in part left ventricular remodeling with sympathoinhibition in rats with myocardial infarction-induced heart failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyohiro Ogawa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Left ventricular (LV remodeling and activation of sympathetic nervous system (SNS are cardinal features of heart failure. We previously demonstrated that enhanced central sympathetic outflow is associated with brain toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 probably mediated by brain angiotensin II type 1 receptor in mice with myocardial infarction (MI-induced heart failure. The purpose of the present study was to examine whether silencing brain TLR4 could prevent LV remodeling with sympathoinhibition in MI-induced heart failure. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: MI-induced heart failure model rats were created by ligation of left coronary artery. The expression level of TLR4 in brainstem was significantly higher in MI-induced heart failure treated with intracerebroventricular (ICV injection of hGAPDH-SiRNA than in sham. TLR4 in brainstem was significantly lower in MI-induced heart failure treated with ICV injection of TLR4-SiRNA than in that treated with ICV injection of hGAPDH-SiRNA. Lung weight, urinary norepinephrine excretion, and LV end-diastolic pressure were significantly lower and LV dimension was significantly smaller in MI-induced heart failure treated with TLR4-SiRNA than in that treated with hGAPDH-SiRNA for 2 weeks. CONCLUSIONS: Partially silencing brain TLR4 by ICV injection of TLR4-SiRNA for 2 weeks could in part prevent LV remodeling with sympathoinhibition in rats with MI-induced heart failure. Brain TLR4 has a potential to be a target of the treatment for MI-induced heart failure.

  4. Direct current induced short-term modulation of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex while learning auditory presented nouns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyer Martin

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the contribution of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS to the exploration of memory functions. The aim of the present study was to examine the behavioural effects of right or left-hemisphere frontal direct current delivery while committing to memory auditory presented nouns on short-term learning and subsequent long-term retrieval. Methods Twenty subjects, divided into two groups, performed an episodic verbal memory task during anodal, cathodal and sham current application on the right or left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC. Results Our results imply that only cathodal tDCS elicits behavioural effects on verbal memory performance. In particular, left-sided application of cathodal tDCS impaired short-term verbal learning when compared to the baseline. We did not observe tDCS effects on long-term retrieval. Conclusion Our results imply that the left DLPFC is a crucial area involved in short-term verbal learning mechanisms. However, we found further support that direct current delivery with an intensity of 1.5 mA to the DLPFC during short-term learning does not disrupt longer lasting consolidation processes that are mainly known to be related to mesial temporal lobe areas. In the present study, we have shown that the tDCS technique has the potential to modulate short-term verbal learning mechanism.

  5. Oxidative and nitrosative stress in trichloroethene-mediated autoimmune response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) are implicated in the pathogenesis of several autoimmune diseases. Also, increased lipid peroxidation and protein nitration are reported in systemic autoimmune diseases. Lipid peroxidation-derived aldehydes (LPDAs) such as malondialdehyde (MDA) and 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) are highly reactive and bind proteins covalently, but their potential to elicit an autoimmune response and contribution to disease pathogenesis remain unclear. Similarly, nitration of protein could also contribute to disease pathogenesis. To assess the status of lipid peroxidation and/or RONS, autoimmune-prone female MRL+/+ mice (5-week old) were treated with trichloroethene (TCE), an environmental contaminant known to induce autoimmune response, for 48 weeks (0.5 mg/ml via drinking water), and formation of antibodies to LPDA-protein adducts was followed in the sera of control and TCE-treated mice. TCE treatment led to greater formation of both anti-MDA- and -HNE-protein adduct antibodies and higher serum iNOS and nitrotyrosine levels. The increase in TCE-induced oxidative stress was associated with increases in anti-nuclear-, anti-ssDNA- and anti-dsDNA-antibodies. These findings suggest that TCE exposure not only leads to oxidative/nitrosative stress, but is also associated with induction/exacerbation of autoimmune response in MRL+/+ mice. Further interventional studies are needed to establish a causal role of RONS in TCE-mediated autoimmunity

  6. Update on autoimmune hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andreas Teufel; Peter R Galle; Stephan Kanzler

    2009-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a necroinflammatory liver disease of unknown etiology that occurs in children and adults of all ages. Characteristics are its autoimmune features, hyperglobulinemia (IgG), and the presence of circulating autoantibodies, as well as a response to immunosuppressant drugs. Current treatment consists of prednisone and azathioprine and in most patients this disease has become very treatable. Over the past 2 years, a couple of new insights into the genetic aspects, clinical course and treatment of AIH have been reported, which will be the focus of this review. In particular, we concentrate on genome-wide microsatellite analysis, a novel mouse model of AIH, the evaluation of a large AIH cohort for overlap syndromes,suggested novel criteria for the diagnosis of AIH, and the latest studies on treatment of AIH with budenoside and mycophenolate mofetil.

  7. Gangliosides and autoimmune diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misasi, R; Dionisi, S; Farilla, L; Carabba, B; Lenti, L; Di Mario, U; Dotta, F

    1997-09-01

    Gangliosides are sialic acid-containing glycolipids which are formed by a hydrophobic portion, the ceramide, and a hydrophilic part, i.e. the oligosaccharide chain. First described in neural tissue, several studies have shown that gangliosides are almost ubiquitous molecules expressed in all vertebrate tissues. Within cells, gangliosides are usually associated with plasma membranes, where they can act as receptors for a variety of molecules and have been shown to take part in cell-to-cell interaction and in signal transduction. In addition, gangliosides are expressed in cytosol membranes like those of secretory granules of some endocrine cells (adrenal medulla, pancreatic islets). As far as the role of gangliosides in diseases is concerned, there are some cases in which an aberrant ganglioside expression plays a crucial role in the disease pathogenetic process. These diseases include two major forms of ganglioside storage, namely GM2-gangliosidosis (Tay-Sachs and its beta-hexosaminidase deficiency) and GM1-gangliosidosis (beta-galactosidase deficiency), where the most prominent pathological characteristic is the lysosomal ganglioside accumulation in neurons. Other inflammatory or degenerative diseases both within and outside the nervous system have been shown to be associated with an altered pattern of ganglioside expression in the target organ. Since monoclonal antibodies have been discovered and used in immunology, a large variety of ganglioside antigens has been described both as blood group antigens and as tumour-related antigens. Several studies have also indicated that gangliosides can act not only as antigens, but also as autoantigens. As a matter of fact, auto-antibodies to gangliosides, detected by immunostaining methods performed directly on TLC plates or by ELISA, have been described in several autoimmune disorders such as Guillain-Barré syndrome, multiple sclerosis, lupus erythematosus, Hashimoto's thyroiditis and, last but not least, insulin

  8. MDSC in Autoimmunity

    OpenAIRE

    Cripps, James G.; Gorham, James D.

    2011-01-01

    Myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC) were first described nearly two decades ago. Until recently, however, descriptions of MDSC populations were found almost exclusively in animal models of cancer or in cancer patients. Over the last few years, an increasing number of reports have been published describing populations of myeloid cells with MDSC-like properties in murine models of autoimmune disease. In contrast to the proposed deleterious role of MDSC in cancer - where these cells likely i...

  9. [Diagnostics of autoimmune diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beleznay, Zsuzsanna; Regenass, Stephan

    2008-09-01

    Autoantibodies play a key role in diagnostic laboratories as markers of autoimmune diseases. In addition to their role as markers they mediate diverse effects in vivo. Autoantibodies with protective effect have been described. Natural protective IgM autoantibodies against tumour-antigens of malignant cells or their precursors may contribute to increased survival rates of carcinoma patients. In a mouse model of systemic lupus erythematosus it has been shown that anti-dsDNA IgM autoantibodies protect from glomerular damage. In contrast, a direct pathogenic role of autoantibodies has been well established e.g. in myasthenia gravis or in Goodpasture syndrome. Similarly autoantibodies against SSA Ro52 are detrimental in neonatal lupus erythematosus with congenital heart block. Moreover, putatively protective autoantibodies may become pathogenic during the course of the disease such as the onconeuronal autoantibodies whose pathogenicity depends on their compartmentalisation. In patients with paraneoplastic syndromes tumour cells express proteins that are also naturally present in the brain. Anti-tumour autoantibodies which temporarily suppress tumour growth can provoke an autoimmune attack on neurons once having crossed the blood-brain barrier and cause specific neurological symptoms. Only a restricted number of autoantibodies are useful follow-up markers for the effectiveness of treatment in autoimmune diseases. Certain autoantibodies hold prognostic value and appear years or even decades before the diagnosis of disease such as the antimitochondrial antibodies in primary biliary cirrhosis or anti-citrullinated protein (CCP)-antibodies in rheumatoid arthritis. It is crucial to know whether the autoantibodies in question recognise linear or conformational epitopes in order to choose the appropriate detection methods. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy remains a very useful tool for confirmation of results of commercially available immunoassays and for detection of

  10. [Autoimmune hepatitis and overlap syndrome: therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löhr, H F

    2002-08-21

    Autoimmune Hepatitis (AIH), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) represent acute and chronic inflammatory liver diseases in which immune reactions against host antigens are found to be the major pathological mechanism. Only for AIH there is evidence of an autoimmune etiology and humoral and cellular immune reactions are found directed against various liver cell antigens. By diverse autoantibodies several subgroups of autoimmune hepatitis can be distinguished. A very important disease promoting factor seems to be the genetically determined background for autoimmunity characterized by the HLA haplotype A1, B8 and DR3, respectively DR4. Although the histopathology of AIH shows no pathognomonic features distinguishing this type of hepatitis from virus induced chronic hepatitis there are some distinct characteristic morphological lesions. If untreated the prognosis of AIH is unfavourable but the benefit from immunosuppressive therapy with prednisolone and azathioprin is well established. In the last years there was increasing evidence for an overlap syndrome between AIH and PBC and rarely AIH and PSC. These patients are characterized by PBC characteristic bileduct lesions and oftenly antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA). They also show AIH typical inflammatory hepatic lesions in the periportal areas and portal tracts and oftenly the typical genetical background, the HLA haplotype A1, B8, DR3 or DR4. Most of these patients respond probably to a combination therapy containing prednisolon, azathioprine and ursodesoxycholic acid that leads to the reduction of the inflammatory activity. PMID:12233265

  11. Peptide immunotherapy in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen M Anderton

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We now have potent drugs available to treat the inflammatory component of multiple sclerosis (MS. However, not all patients respond, the drugs are not curative, and the associated risks to beneficial immune surveillance are considerable. A more desirable approach is to specifically target those comparatively rare T lymphocytes that are orchestrating the autoimmune attack. Using the autoantigen itself to instill immune tolerance in those cells remains a holy grail of immunotherapy. Peptide immunotherapy (PIT is highly effective at silencing autoimmune responses in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, and clinical trials of PIT are underway in MS. This review discusses the current paradigms for PIT-induced tolerance in naïve T cells. It highlights the need for better understanding of the mode of action of PIT upon memory and effector T cells that are responsible for driving/sustaining ongoing autoimmune pathology. Recent studies in EAEsuggest genetic and epigenetic changes in these pathogenic T-cell populations in response to PIT. Finally, future challenges to effective translation of PIT to the clinic are considered.

  12. Etiopathogenesis of Insulin Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norio Kanatsuna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmunity against pancreatic islet beta cells is strongly associated with proinsulin, insulin, or both. The insulin autoreactivity is particularly pronounced in children with young age at onset of type 1 diabetes. Possible mechanisms for (proinsulin autoimmunity may involve beta-cell destruction resulting in proinsulin peptide presentation on HLA-DR-DQ Class II molecules in pancreatic draining lymphnodes. Recent data on proinsulin peptide binding to type 1 diabetes-associated HLA-DQ2 and -DQ8 is reviewed and illustrated by molecular modeling. The importance of the cellular immune reaction involving cytotoxic CD8-positive T cells to kill beta cells through Class I MHC is discussed along with speculations of the possible role of B lymphocytes in presenting the proinsulin autoantigen over and over again through insulin-carrying insulin autoantibodies. In contrast to autoantibodies against other islet autoantigens such as GAD65, IA-2, and ZnT8 transporters, it has not been possible yet to standardize the insulin autoantibody test. As islet autoantibodies predict type 1 diabetes, it is imperative to clarify the mechanisms of insulin autoimmunity.

  13. Left-half-body-irradiation induced mouse bone marrow hematopoietic cells DNA damage in non-irradiation area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the DNA damage of mouse bone marrow hematopoietic cells in-non-irradiation area after being irradiated by way of left-half-body. Methods: 6-8 weeks male Kunming strain mice were randomly divided into 4 groups i.e. normal control (NC), total-body-irradiated (TBI), left-half-body-irradiated (LHBI), and total -body-shield-irradiated (TBSI). Half-body-irradiated model were made with two pieces of 5 cm x 8 cm x 16 cm over- lapped lead bricks shielding right-side body and irradiated with 8.0 Gy 60Co γ-ray. The TNF-α, SOD, MDA in mouse serum were measured and the DNA damages of bone marrow hematopoietic cells were observed by comet assay and the frequency of polychromatic erythrocytes micronucleated(fMPCE). Results: In the left-half-body-irradiated condition, The TNF-α and MDA were increased and the SOD was decreased in serum remarkably(compared with NC, P<0.01); In non-irradiation area, the fMPCE and the percentage of bone marrow hematopoietic cells with comet-like tail, were aggravated significantly. Conclusions: Our study suggest that the local irradiation result in the DNA damage of bone marrow hematopoietic cells in non- irradiation area, and the increasing of TNF-α and reactive oxygen or free radicals may play an important role in the damages. (authors)

  14. Autoimmune thyroid disease and other non-endocrine autoimmune diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Todorović-Đilas Ljiljana; Ičin Tijana; Novaković-Paro Jovanka; Bajkin Ivana

    2011-01-01

    Introduction, Autoimmune diseases are chronic conditions initiated by the loss of immunological tolerance to self-antigens. They constitute heterogeneous group of disorders, in which multiple alterations in the immune system result in a spectrum of syndromes that either target specific organs or affect the body systematically. Recent epidemiological studies have shown a possible shift of one autoimmune disease to another or the fact that more than one autoimmune disease may coexist in a...

  15. Nitrosative Stress and Nitrated Proteins in Trichloroethene-Mediated Autoimmunity

    OpenAIRE

    Gangduo Wang; Jianling Wang; Xuemei Luo; Shakeel Ansari, G. A.; M Firoze Khan

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to trichloroethene (TCE), a ubiquitous environmental contaminant, has been linked to a variety of autoimmune diseases (ADs) including SLE, scleroderma and hepatitis. Mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of ADs are largely unknown. Earlier studies from our laboratory in MRL+/+ mice suggested the contribution of oxidative/nitrosative stress in TCE-induced autoimmunity, and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) supplementation provided protection by attenuating oxidative stress. This study was unde...

  16. Mast Cells Contribute to Peripheral Tolerance and Attenuate Autoimmune Vasculitis

    OpenAIRE

    Gan, Poh-Yi; Summers, Shaun A.; Ooi, Joshua D.; O’Sullivan, Kim M.; Tan, Diana S.Y.; Muljadi, Ruth C.M.; Odobasic, Dragana; Kitching, A. Richard; Holdsworth, Stephen R.

    2012-01-01

    Mast cells contribute to the modulation of the immune response, but their role in autoimmune renal disease is not well understood. Here, we induced autoimmunity resulting in focal necrotizing GN by immunizing wild-type or mast cell-deficient (KitW-sh/W-sh) mice with myeloperoxidase. Mast cell-deficient mice exhibited more antimyeloperoxidase CD4+ T cells, enhanced dermal delayed-type hypersensitivity responses to myeloperoxidase, and more severe focal necrotizing GN. Furthermore, the lymph no...

  17. Bioluminescence in vivo imaging of autoimmune encephalomyelitis predicts disease

    OpenAIRE

    Steinman Lawrence; Ho Peggy; Luo Jian; Wyss-Coray Tony

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis is a widely used animal model to understand not only multiple sclerosis but also basic principles of immunity. The disease is scored typically by observing signs of paralysis, which do not always correspond with pathological changes. Methods Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis was induced in transgenic mice expressing an injury responsive luciferase reporter in astrocytes (GFAP-luc). Bioluminescence in the brain and spinal co...

  18. AUTOIMMUNE DISEASE DURING PREGNANCY AND THE MICROCHIMERISM LEGACY OF PREGNANCY

    OpenAIRE

    Kristina M Adams Waldorf; Nelson, J. Lee

    2008-01-01

    Pregnancy has both short-term effects and long-term consequences. For women who have an autoimmune disease and subsequently become pregnant, pregnancy can induce amelioration of the mother’s disease, such as in rheumatoid arthritis, while exacerbating or having no effect on other autoimmune diseases like systemic lupus erythematosus. That pregnancy also leaves a long-term legacy has recently become apparent by the discovery that bi-directional cell trafficking results in persistence of fetal ...

  19. Clinical features and management of autoimmune hepatitis

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a chronic hepatitis of unknown etiology which can progress to cirrhosis. Its clinical manifestations are highly variable and sometimes follow a fluctuating course. Diagnosis is based on characteristic histologic, clinical, biochemical and serological findings. Anti-inflammatory/immunosuppressive treatment frequently induces remission but long-term maintenance therapy is often required. Liver transplantation is generally successful in patients with decompensated c...

  20. Chronic calorie restriction attenuates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    OpenAIRE

    Piccio, Laura; Stark, Jennifer L.; Cross, Anne H.

    2008-01-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) prevents many age-associated diseases and prolongs the lifespan. CR induces multiple metabolic and physiologic modifications, including anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and neuroprotective effects that may be beneficial in multiple sclerosis (MS). The present studies sought to determine whether CR or increased calorie intake alters the course of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the leading animal model for MS. SJL and C57BL/6 mice were subjected to 40% ...

  1. High Dose Cyclophosphamide Treatment for Autoimmune Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Brodsky, Robert A.

    2002-01-01

    High-dose cyclophosphamide (200 mg/kg) was initially developed as a conditioning regimen for allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. Recently, high-dose cyclophosphamide without bone marrow transplantation has been employed as a method to induce durable treatment-free remissions in severe aplastic anemia and a variety of other severe autoimmune disorders. The premise underlying this approach is that high-dose cyclophosphamide is maximally immunosuppressive, but not myeloablative. Early hemato...

  2. Clinical features and management of autoimmune hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Edward L Krawitt

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a chronic hepatitis of unknown etiology which can progress to cirrhosis.Its clinical manifestations are highly variable and sometimes follow a fluctuating course.Diagnosis is based on characteristic histologic,clinical,biochemical and serological findings. Anti-inflammatory/immunosuppressive treatment frequently induces remission but long-term maintenance therapy is often required. Liver transplantation is generally successful in patients with decompensated cirrhosis unresponsive to or intolerant of medical therapy.

  3. Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Francesca Crea; Carla Bizzarri; Marco Cappa

    2011-01-01

    The two major autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATDs) include Graves' disease (GD) and autoimmune thyroiditis (AT); both of which are characterized by infiltration of the thyroid by T and B cells reactive to thyroid antigens, by the production of thyroid autoantibodies and by abnormal thyroid function (hyperthyroidism in GD and hypothyroidism in AT). While the exact etiology of thyroid autoimmunity is not known, it is believed to develop when a combination of genetic susceptibility and environment...

  4. MEF2C silencing attenuates load-induced left ventricular hypertrophy by modulating mTOR/S6K pathway in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Helena M Pereira

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The activation of the members of the myocyte enhancer factor-2 family (MEF2A, B, C and D of transcription factors promotes cardiac hypertrophy and failure. However, the role of its individual components in the pathogenesis of cardiac hypertrophy remains unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we investigated whether MEF2C plays a role in mediating the left ventricular hypertrophy by pressure overload in mice. The knockdown of myocardial MEF2C induced by specific small interfering RNA (siRNA has been shown to attenuate hypertrophy, interstitial fibrosis and the rise of ANP levels in aortic banded mice. We detected that the depletion of MEF2C also results in lowered levels of both PGC-1alpha and mitochondrial DNA in the overloaded left ventricle, associated with enhanced AMP:ATP ratio. Additionally, MEF2C depletion was accompanied by defective activation of S6K in response to pressure overload. Treatment with the amino acid leucine stimulated S6K and suppressed the attenuation of left ventricular hypertrophy and fibrosis in the aforementioned aortic banded mice. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings represent new evidences that MEF2C depletion attenuates the hypertrophic responses to mechanical stress and highlight the potential of MEF2C to be a target for new therapies to cardiac hypertrophy and failure.

  5. The role of autoimmunity in premature ovarian failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahbod Ebrahimi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Premature ovarian failure (POF is a heterogeneous syndrome with several causative factors. Autoimmune mechanisms are involved in pathogenesis of 4-30 % of POF cases. The present review focuses on the role of autoimmunity in the pathophysiology of POF. The evidences for an autoimmune etiology are: demonstration of ovarian autoantibodies, the presence of lymphocytic oophoritis, and association with other autoimmune disorders. Several ovarian antigenic targets have been identified in POF patients. The oocyte seems to be the most often targeted cell. Lymphocytic oophoritis is widely present in POF associated adrenal insufficiency. Addisonۥs disease is one of the most common autoimmune disorders associated with POF. Early detection of this potentially life threatening disease was recommended in several studies. The gold standard for detecting autoimmune POF is ovarian biopsy. This procedure is not recommended due to unknown clinical value, expense, and risks. Several immunoassays have been proposed as substitute diagnostic tools. Nevertheless, there is no clinically proven sensitive and specific serum test to confirm the diagnosis of autoimmune POF or to anticipate the patient’s chance of developing POF or associated diseases. Some authors suggested the possible effects of immuno-modulating therapy on the resumption of ovarian function and fertility in a selected group of autoimmune POF patients. However, in most instances, this treatment fails to reverse the course of the disease. Numerous studies illustrated that standard treatment outcome for infertility is less effective in the presence of ovarian autoimmunity. The antibody-induced damage could be a pathogenic factor. Nevertheless, the precise cause remains obscure.

  6. Autoimmune diseases and myelodysplastic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komrokji, Rami S; Kulasekararaj, Austin; Al Ali, Najla H; Kordasti, Shahram; Bart-Smith, Emily; Craig, Benjamin M; Padron, Eric; Zhang, Ling; Lancet, Jeffrey E; Pinilla-Ibarz, Javier; List, Alan F; Mufti, Ghulam J; Epling-Burnette, Pearlie K

    2016-05-01

    Immune dysregulation and altered T-cell hemostasis play important roles in the pathogenesis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Recent studies suggest an increased risk of MDS among patients with autoimmune diseases. Here, we investigated the prevalence of autoimmune diseases among MDS patients, comparing characteristics and outcomes in those with and without autoimmune diseases. From our study group of 1408 MDS patients, 391 (28%) had autoimmune disease, with hypothyroidism being the most common type, accounting for 44% (n = 171) of patients (12% among all MDS patients analyzed). Other autoimmune diseases with ≥5% prevalence included idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura in 12% (n = 46), rheumatoid arthritis in 10% (n = 41), and psoriasis in 7% (n = 28) of patients. Autoimmune diseases were more common in female MDS patients, those with RA or RCMD WHO subtype, and those who were less dependent on red blood cell transfusion. Median overall survival (OS) was 60 months (95% CI, 50-70) for patients with autoimmune diseases versus 45 months (95% CI, 40-49) for those without (log-rank test, P = 0.006). By multivariate analysis adjusting for revised IPSS and age >60 years, autoimmune diseases were a statistically significant independent factor for OS (HR 0.78; 95% CI, 0.66-0.92; P = 0.004). The rate of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) transformation was 23% (n = 89) in MDS patients with autoimmune disease versus 30% (n = 301) in those without (P = 0.011). Patient groups did not differ in response to azacitidine or lenalidomide treatment. Autoimmune diseases are prevalent among MDS patients. MDS patients with autoimmune diseases have better OS and less AML transformation. Am. J. Hematol. 91:E280-E283, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26875020

  7. Experimental models of autoimmune inflammatory ocular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Gasparin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Ocular inflammation is one of the leading causes of blindness and loss of vision. Human uveitis is a complex and heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by inflammation of intraocular tissues. The eye may be the only organ involved, or uveitis may be part of a systemic disease. A significant number of cases are of unknown etiology and are labeled idiopathic. Animal models have been developed to the study of the physiopathogenesis of autoimmune uveitis due to the difficulty in obtaining human eye inflamed tissues for experiments. Most of those models are induced by injection of specific photoreceptors proteins (e.g., S-antigen, interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein, rhodopsin, recoverin, phosducin. Non-retinal antigens, including melanin-associated proteins and myelin basic protein, are also good inducers of uveitis in animals. Understanding the basic mechanisms and pathogenesis of autoimmune ocular diseases are essential for the development of new treatment approaches and therapeutic agents. The present review describes the main experimental models of autoimmune ocular inflammatory diseases.

  8. Radiation-induced cardiac damage in early left breast cancer patients: Risk factors, biological mechanisms, radiobiology, and dosimetric constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Today there is general awareness of the potential damage to the heart in left-sided (more than in right-sided) breast cancer radiotherapy (RT). Historical changes in tumor and heart doses are presented here along with the impact of different RT techniques and volumes. Individual and pharmacological risk factors are also examined with respect to radiation damage. The biological mechanisms of harm are only partially understood, such as the radiobiology of heart damage due to the presence of various radiosensitive structures and their topographic heterogeneity. Furthermore, individual variability may expose patients to higher or lower risks of late cardiac damage or death. Damage mechanisms and radiobiological characteristics in heart irradiation are presented in relation to dosimetric and biological parameters.

  9. Total lymphoid irradiation in alloimmunity and autoimmunity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strober, S.

    1987-12-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation has been used as an immunosuppressive regimen in autoimmune disease and organ transplantation. The rationale for its use originated from studies of patients with Hodgkin disease, in whom this radiotherapy regimen was noted to induce profound and long-lasting immune suppression and yet was well tolerated, with few long-term side effects. Total lymphoid irradiation is a unique immunosuppressive regimen that produces a selective (and long-lasting) reduction in the number and function of helper T cells and certain subsets of B cells. Conventional immunosuppressive drugs show little selectivity, and their effects are short-lived. The most important aspect of total lymphoid irradiation is the potential for achieving transplantation tolerance and permanent remissions in autoimmune disease in laboratory animals. Attempts are being made to achieve similar goals in humans given total lymphoid irradiation, so that immunosuppressive drugs can be ultimately withdrawn from transplant recipients and patients with lupus nephritis. 28 references.

  10. Mast Cell and Autoimmune Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Yunzhi Xu; Guangjie Chen

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are important in innate immune system. They have been appreciated as potent contributors to allergic reaction. However, increasing evidence implicates the important role of mast cells in autoimmune disease like rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. Here we review the current stage of knowledge about mast cells in autoimmune diseases.

  11. Antinuclear antibodies defining autoimmunity pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Eng M.

    2014-01-01

    Immunofluorescent imaging has been a powerful technique in helping to identify intracellular nuclear and cytoplasmic molecules which are target antigens of autoantibodies in systemic autoimmune disorders. Patterns of staining can be correlated with molecules engaged in specific cellular functions and distributed in distinct cellular domains. Different autoimmune disorders have different profiles of autoantibodies, and immunodiagnostics has become an important adjunct in differential diagnosis...

  12. GILT REQUIRED FOR RTL550-CYS-MOG TO TREAT EXPERIMENTAL AUTOIMMUNE ENCEPHALOMYELITIS

    OpenAIRE

    Burrows, Gregory G.; Meza-Romero, Roberto; Huan, Jianya; Sinha, Sushmita; Mooney, Jeffrey L.; Vandenbark, Arthur A.; Offner, Halina

    2012-01-01

    MHC class II-derived recombinant T cell receptor ligands (RTLs) modulate the behavior of pathogenic T cells and can reverse clinical and histological signs of autoimmune disease in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), and are currently in clinical trials for treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS). To expand the utility of these rationally-designed biologics and explore their mechanism(s) of activity in vivo,...

  13. Oral Tolerance: Therapeutic Implications for Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M. C. Faria

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral tolerance is classically defined as the suppression of immune responses to antigens (Ag that have been administered previously by the oral route. Multiple mechanisms of tolerance are induced by oral Ag. Low doses favor active suppression, whereas higher doses favor clonal anergy/deletion. Oral Ag induces Th2 (IL-4/IL-10 and Th3 (TGF-β regulatory T cells (Tregs plus CD4+CD25+ regulatory cells and LAP+T cells. Induction of oral tolerance is enhanced by IL-4, IL-10, anti-IL-12, TGF-β, cholera toxin B subunit (CTB, Flt-3 ligand, anti-CD40 ligand and continuous feeding of Ag. In addition to oral tolerance, nasal tolerance has also been shown to be effective in suppressing inflammatory conditions with the advantage of a lower dose requirement. Oral and nasal tolerance suppress several animal models of autoimmune diseases including experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE, uveitis, thyroiditis, myasthenia, arthritis and diabetes in the nonobese diabetic (NOD mouse, plus non-autoimmune diseases such as asthma, atherosclerosis, colitis and stroke. Oral tolerance has been tested in human autoimmune diseases including MS, arthritis, uveitis and diabetes and in allergy, contact sensitivity to DNCB, nickel allergy. Positive results have been observed in phase II trials and new trials for arthritis, MS and diabetes are underway. Mucosal tolerance is an attractive approach for treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases because of lack of toxicity, ease of administration over time and Ag-specific mechanism of action. The successful application of oral tolerance for the treatment of human diseases will depend on dose, developing immune markers to assess immunologic effects, route (nasal versus oral, formulation, mucosal adjuvants, combination therapy and early therapy.

  14. Noninvasive low-frequency electromagnetic stimulation of the left stellate ganglion reduces myocardial infarction-induced ventricular arrhythmia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Songyun; Zhou, Xiaoya; Huang, Bing; Wang, Zhuo; Zhou, Liping; Wang, Menglong; Yu, Lilei; Jiang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Noninvasive magnetic stimulation has been widely used in autonomic disorders in the past few decades, but few studies has been done in cardiac diseases. Recently, studies showed that low-frequency electromagnetic field (LF-EMF) might suppress atrial fibrillation by mediating the cardiac autonomic nervous system. In the present study, the effect of LF-EMF stimulation of left stellate ganglion (LSG) on LSG neural activity and ventricular arrhythmia has been studied in an acute myocardium infarction canine model. It is shown that LF-EMF stimulation leads to a reduction both in the neural activity of LSG and in the incidence of ventricular arrhythmia. The obtained results suggested that inhibition of the LSG neural activity might be the causal of the reduction of ventricular arrhythmia since previous studies have shown that LSG hyperactivity may facilitate the incidence of ventricular arrhythmia. LF-EMF stimulation might be a novel noninvasive substitute for the existing implant device-based electrical stimulation or sympathectomy in the treatment of cardiac disorders. PMID:27470078

  15. Endocrine autoimmunity in Turner syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Turner syndrome is caused by numeric and structural abnormalities of the X chromosome. An increased frequency of autoimmunity as well as an elevated incidence of autoantibodies was observed in Turner patients. The aim of this study was to conduct a retrospective analysis of the incidence of autoimmunity in 66 Italian patients affected by Turner syndrome. Methods Sixty-six unselected and consecutive Italian Turner patients were recruited. The association between age, karyotype and the presence of clinical/pre-clinical autoimmune disorders and of autoantibodies was examined. Results Out of the 66 Turner patients, 26 had thyroid autoimmune disorders (39.4%), 14 patients had Hashimoto’s thyroiditis with clinical or subclinical hypothyroidism (21.2%) and 12 patients had circulating anti-thyroid antibodies, echographic pattern of diffuse hypoechogenicity and normal thyroid hormone levels (18.2%). None were affected by Graves’ disease. We analyzed the overall incidence of thyroid autoimmunity within the 3 different age groups 0–9.9, 10–19.9 and 20–29.9 years. No statistically significant difference was observed in the incidence of thyroid autoimmunity within the age-groups (χ2-test p > 0.05). Out of the 66 patients, 31 patients had the 45,X karyotype; within this first group 14 out of 31 patients were affected by autoimmune thyroid disease. A second group of 29 patients included 19 patients with mosaicism, 5 patients with deletions and 5 patients with ring chromosome; out of these 29 patients 7 were affected by autoimmune thyroid disease. A third group included 6 patients with X isochromosome; 5 out of 6 were affected by autoimmune thyroid disease. A statistically significant difference in the frequency of thyroid autoimmunity within the different karyotype groups was observed (χ2-test p = 0.0173). When comparing the X isochromosome group with the pooled group of other karyotypes, of note, the frequency of thyroid autoimmunity was

  16. SOCS, inflammation and autoimmunity

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    Akihiko eYoshimura

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Cytokines play essential roles in innate and adaptive immunity. However, excess cytokines or dysregulation of cytokine signaling can cause a variety of diseases, including allergies, autoimmune diseases, inflammation, and cancer. Most cytokines utilize the so-called Janus kinase-signal transducers and activators of transcription (JAK-STAT pathway. This pathway is negatively regulated by various mechanisms including suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS proteins. SOCS proteins bind to JAK or cytokine receptors, thereby suppressing further signaling events. Especially, SOCS1 and SOCS3 are strong inhibitors of JAK, because these two contain kinase inhibitory region (KIR at the N-terminus. Studies using conditional knockout mice have shown that SOCS proteins are key physiological as well as pathological regulators of immune homeostasis. Recent studies have also demonstrated that SOCS1 and SOCS3 are important regulators of helper T cell differentiation and functions.

  17. Adult autoimmune enteropathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Recent reports have suggested that autoimmune enteropathy involving the small bowel may occur in adults as well as in children. Apparently, the endoscopic and histological changes are similar to celiac disease before treatment, but these are not altered by any form of dietary restriction, including a gluten-free diet. As in celiac disease, histologic changes in gastric and colonic biopsies have also been recorded. Anti enterocyte antibodies detected with immunofluorescent methods have been reported by a few laboratories, but these antibodies appear not to be specific and may simply represent epiphenomena. A widely available, reproducible and quantitative anti-enterocyte antibody assay is needed that could be applied in small bowel disorders that have the histological appearance of celiac disease, but fail to respond to a gluten-free diet.

  18. Nitrosative stress and nitrated proteins in trichloroethene-mediated autoimmunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gangduo Wang

    Full Text Available Exposure to trichloroethene (TCE, a ubiquitous environmental contaminant, has been linked to a variety of autoimmune diseases (ADs including SLE, scleroderma and hepatitis. Mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of ADs are largely unknown. Earlier studies from our laboratory in MRL+/+ mice suggested the contribution of oxidative/nitrosative stress in TCE-induced autoimmunity, and N-acetylcysteine (NAC supplementation provided protection by attenuating oxidative stress. This study was undertaken to further evaluate the contribution of nitrosative stress in TCE-mediated autoimmunity and to identify proteins susceptible to nitrosative stress. Groups of female MRL +/+ mice were given TCE, NAC or TCE + NAC for 6 weeks (TCE, 10 mmol/kg, i.p., every 4th day; NAC, ∼ 250 mg/kg/day via drinking water. TCE exposure led to significant increases in serum anti-nuclear and anti-histone antibodies together with significant induction of iNOS and increased formation of nitrotyrosine (NT in sera and livers. Proteomic analysis identified 14 additional nitrated proteins in the livers of TCE-treated mice. Furthermore, TCE exposure led to decreased GSH levels and increased activation of NF-κB. Remarkably, NAC supplementation not only ameliorated TCE-induced nitrosative stress as evident from decreased iNOS, NT, nitrated proteins, NF-κB p65 activation and increased GSH levels, but also the markers of autoimmunity, as evident from decreased levels of autoantibodies in the sera. These findings provide support to the role of nitrosative stress in TCE-mediated autoimmune response and identify specific nitrated proteins which could have autoimmune potential. Attenuation of TCE-induced autoimmunity in mice by NAC provides an approach for designing therapeutic strategies.

  19. Type 1 diabetes associated autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahaly, George J; Hansen, Martin P

    2016-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus is increasing in prevalence worldwide. The economic costs are considerable given the cardiovascular complications and co-morbidities that it may entail. Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by the loss of insulin-producing pancreatic β-cells. The pathogenesis of T1D is complex and multifactorial and involves a genetic susceptibility that predisposes to abnormal immune responses in the presence of ill-defined environmental insults to the pancreatic islets. Genetic background may affect the risk for autoimmune disease and patients with T1D exhibit an increased risk of other autoimmune disorders such as autoimmune thyroid disease, Addison's disease, autoimmune gastritis, coeliac disease and vitiligo. Approximately 20%-25% of patients with T1D have thyroid antibodies, and up to 50% of such patients progress to clinical autoimmune thyroid disease. Approximately 0.5% of diabetic patients have concomitant Addison's disease and 4% have coeliac disease. The prevalence of autoimmune gastritis and pernicious anemia is 5% to 10% and 2.6% to 4%, respectively. Early detection of antibodies and latent organ-specific dysfunction is advocated to alert physicians to take appropriate action in order to prevent full-blown disease. Patients and family members should be educated to be able to recognize signs and symptoms of underlying disease. PMID:26903475

  20. ARE LEFT HANDED SURGEONS LEFT OUT?

    OpenAIRE

    SriKamkshi Kothandaraman; Balasubramanian Thiagarajan

    2012-01-01

    Being a left-handed surgeon, more specifically a left-handed ENT surgeon, presents a unique pattern of difficulties.This article is an overview of left-handedness and a personal account of the specific difficulties a left-handed ENT surgeon faces.

  1. Influence of left ventricular filling pattern on exercise-induced changes of natriuretic peptides in patients with suspected coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jacob Eifer; Bergeron, S.; Jaffe, A.;

    2008-01-01

    and brain natriuretic peptides (ANP and BNP) with resting and exercise-induced changes of LV systolic function and filling pattern. METHODS: LV function at rest and peak exercise was assessed in 140 patients (mean age 65 years, 78 men) during symptom-limited exercise echocardiography for evaluation......BACKGROUND: Exertional change in brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) has recently been proposed as a biomarker of myocardial ischemia. However, in patients with abnormal left ventricular (LV) filling, BNP is frequently increased. Therefore, we studied the relationship of exertional changes in atrial...... of suspected coronary artery disease. ANP and BNP were measured at rest and 5 min after exercise. RESULTS: ANP and BNP increased with exercise. The increase in BNP was significantly greater in the 65 patients with than in the 76 patients without ischemia [14.7 pg/ml (5.7-19.6) vs. 4.9 pg/ml (2.1-9.2), p

  2. L-Arginine ameliorates cardiac left ventricular oxidative stress by upregulating eNOS and Nrf2 target genes in alloxan-induced hyperglycemic rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramprasath, Tharmarajan; Hamenth Kumar, Palani; Syed Mohamed Puhari, Shanavas; Senthil Murugan, Ponniah; Vasudevan, Varadaraj [Molecular Cardiology Unit, Department of Biochemistry, Center for Excellence in Genomic Sciences, School of Biological Sciences, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai 625 021, Tamilnadu (India); Selvam, Govindan Sadasivam, E-mail: drselvamgsbiochem@rediffmail.com [Molecular Cardiology Unit, Department of Biochemistry, Center for Excellence in Genomic Sciences, School of Biological Sciences, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai 625 021, Tamilnadu (India)

    2012-11-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer L-Arginine treatment reduced the metabolic disturbances in diabetic animals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Antioxidant marker proteins were found high in myocardium by L-arginine treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Elevated antioxidant status, mediates the reduced TBA-reactivity in left ventricle. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer L-Arginine treatment enhanced the Nrf2 and eNOS signaling in left ventricle. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Improved cell survival signaling by arginine, offers a novel tactic for targeting. -- Abstract: Hyperglycemia is independently related with excessive morbidity and mortality in cardiovascular disorders. L-Arginine-nitric oxide (NO) pathway and the involvement of NO in modulating nuclear factor-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) signaling were well established. In the present study we investigated, whether L-arginine supplementation would improve the myocardial antioxidant defense under hyperglycemia through activation of Nrf2 signaling. Diabetes was induced by alloxan monohydrate (90 mg kg{sup -1} body weight) in rats. Both non-diabetic and diabetic group of rats were divided into three subgroups and they were administered either with L-arginine (2.25%) or L-NAME (0.01%) in drinking water for 12 days. Results showed that L-arginine treatment reduced the metabolic disturbances in diabetic rats. Antioxidant enzymes and glutathione levels were found to be increased in heart left ventricles, thereby reduction of lipid peroxidation by L-arginine treatment. Heart histopathological analysis further validates the reversal of typical diabetic characteristics consisting of alterations in myofibers and myofibrillary degeneration. qRT-PCR studies revealed that L-arginine treatment upregulated the transcription of Akt and downregulated NF-{kappa}B. Notably, transcription of eNOS and Nrf2 target genes was also upregulated, which were accompanied by enhanced expression of Nrf2 in left ventricular tissue from diabetic

  3. L-Arginine ameliorates cardiac left ventricular oxidative stress by upregulating eNOS and Nrf2 target genes in alloxan-induced hyperglycemic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► L-Arginine treatment reduced the metabolic disturbances in diabetic animals. ► Antioxidant marker proteins were found high in myocardium by L-arginine treatment. ► Elevated antioxidant status, mediates the reduced TBA-reactivity in left ventricle. ► L-Arginine treatment enhanced the Nrf2 and eNOS signaling in left ventricle. ► Improved cell survival signaling by arginine, offers a novel tactic for targeting. -- Abstract: Hyperglycemia is independently related with excessive morbidity and mortality in cardiovascular disorders. L-Arginine-nitric oxide (NO) pathway and the involvement of NO in modulating nuclear factor-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) signaling were well established. In the present study we investigated, whether L-arginine supplementation would improve the myocardial antioxidant defense under hyperglycemia through activation of Nrf2 signaling. Diabetes was induced by alloxan monohydrate (90 mg kg−1 body weight) in rats. Both non-diabetic and diabetic group of rats were divided into three subgroups and they were administered either with L-arginine (2.25%) or L-NAME (0.01%) in drinking water for 12 days. Results showed that L-arginine treatment reduced the metabolic disturbances in diabetic rats. Antioxidant enzymes and glutathione levels were found to be increased in heart left ventricles, thereby reduction of lipid peroxidation by L-arginine treatment. Heart histopathological analysis further validates the reversal of typical diabetic characteristics consisting of alterations in myofibers and myofibrillary degeneration. qRT-PCR studies revealed that L-arginine treatment upregulated the transcription of Akt and downregulated NF-κB. Notably, transcription of eNOS and Nrf2 target genes was also upregulated, which were accompanied by enhanced expression of Nrf2 in left ventricular tissue from diabetic and control rats. Under these findings, we suggest that targeting of eNOS and Nrf2 signaling by L-arginine supplementation could be

  4. [Autoimmune Associated Encephalitis and Dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Osamu

    2016-04-01

    Antibodies against various neural surface antigens induce cognitive impairments. Anti-VGKC (voltage gated potassium channel) complex antibodies are well known as one of the causative autoantibodies. An anti-VGKC antibody was identified as the autoantibody in acquired neuromyotonia (Isaacs' syndrome), which causes muscle cramps and difficulty in opening the palm of the hands. However, this antibody also tests positive in autoimmune limbic encephalitis, which has a subacute progress and causes poor memory or epilepsy attacks. Typical cases have a distinctive adult-onset, frequent, brief dystonic seizure semiology that predominantly affects the arms and ipsilateral face. It has now been termed faciobrachial dystonic seizures. In recent years, the true target antigens of the anti-VGKC antibody of this VGKC limbic encephalitis have been recognized as leucine rich glioma inactivated protein (LGI)-1 and others. These antibodies to amnesia-related LGI-1 in limbic encephalitis neutralize the LGI-1-ADAM22 (an anchor protein) interaction and reduce synaptic AMPA receptors. There have been reports of limbic encephalitis associated with anti-VGKC complex antibodies mimicking Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Less than 2% of the patients with sporadic CJD (sCJD) develop serum anti-VGKC complex antibodies and, when positive, only at low titres. Low titres of these antibodies occur only rarely in suspected patients with sCJD, and when present, should be interpreted with caution. PMID:27056852

  5. [Autoimmune pancreatitis as an element of autoimmune polyglandular syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyrla, Przemysław; Nowak, Tomasz; Gil, Jerzy; Adamiec, Cezary; Bobula, Mariusz; Saracyn, Marek

    2016-05-26

    Autoimmune pancreatitis constantly belongs to diseases which often causes significant diagnostic problem and often runs out with surgical intervention as considered to be a pancreatic cancer. Important although usually underestimated problems are polyglandular syndromes, which may consist of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) problem as well. This case report is an example of autoimmune polyglandular syndrome (APS), which was connected with the surgical treatment with biliary bypass anastomosis because of the unresectable lesion in the head of pancreas. The definite remission of the pancreatic lesion finally came after a steroid therapy. Differentiation between neoplastic and inflammatory pancreatic tumors very often remains a serious clinical problem. On grounds of imaging and cytopathology exams it is often difficult to decide about the nature of a lesion. The negative result of cytopathological biopsy examination does not finally settle straightforward diagnosis. Diagnostic problems affect also autoimmune pancreatitis. It is worth to undertake attempts to differentiate pancreatic lesions especially in cases of concomitance with other autoimmune polyglandular syndromes. That is because it is connected with completely different treatment and outcome. We should remember about diagnostic criteria of autoimmune pancreatitis. Appropriate diagnosis for patients with AIP gives them a chance to avoid serious surgical resection and possible complications. PMID:27234865

  6. Recombinant TCR ligand induces tolerance to myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein 35-55 peptide and reverses clinical and histological signs of chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in HLA-DR2 transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenbark, Arthur A; Rich, Cathleen; Mooney, Jeff; Zamora, Alex; Wang, Chunhe; Huan, Jianya; Fugger, Lars; Offner, Halina; Jones, Richard; Burrows, Gregory G

    2003-07-01

    In a previous study, we demonstrated that myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)-35-55 peptide could induce severe chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in HLA-DR2(+) transgenic mice lacking all mouse MHC class II genes. We used this model to evaluate clinical efficacy and mechanism of action of a novel recombinant TCR ligand (RTL) comprised of the alpha(1) and beta(1) domains of DR2 (DRB1*1501) covalently linked to the encephalitogenic MOG-35-55 peptide (VG312). We found that the MOG/DR2 VG312 RTL could induce long-term tolerance to MOG-35-55 peptide and reverse clinical and histological signs of EAE in a dose- and peptide-dependent manner. Some mice treated with lower doses of VG312 relapsed after cessation of daily treatment, but the mice could be successfully re-treated with a higher dose of VG312. Treatment with VG312 strongly reduced secretion of Th1 cytokines (TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma) produced in response to MOG-35-55 peptide, and to a lesser degree purified protein derivative and Con A, but had no inhibitory effect on serum Ab levels to MOG-35-55 peptide. Abs specific for both the peptide and MHC moieties of the RTLs were also present after treatment with EAE, but these Abs had only a minor enhancing effect on T cell activation in vitro. These data demonstrate the powerful tolerance-inducing therapeutic effects of VG312 on MOG peptide-induced EAE in transgenic DR2 mice and support the potential of this approach to inhibit myelin Ag-specific responses in multiple sclerosis patients. PMID:12816990

  7. Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease (AIED)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to order. Mention “VEDA” to receive a 15% discount. Paid Advertisement Disclaimer Information on this website is ... treatment of autoimmune inner ear disease. Although drug companies are not directly studying treatments for inner ear ...

  8. Sex differences in autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voskuhl Rhonda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Women are more susceptible to a variety of autoimmune diseases including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, multiple sclerosis (MS, primary biliary cirrhosis, rheumatoid arthritis and Hashimoto's thyroiditis. This increased susceptibility in females compared to males is also present in animal models of autoimmune diseases such as spontaneous SLE in (NZBxNZWF1 and NZM.2328 mice, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE in SJL mice, thyroiditis, Sjogren's syndrome in MRL/Mp-lpr/lpr mice and diabetes in non-obese diabetic mice. Indeed, being female confers a greater risk of developing these diseases than any single genetic or environmental risk factor discovered to date. Understanding how the state of being female so profoundly affects autoimmune disease susceptibility would accomplish two major goals. First, it would lead to an insight into the major pathways of disease pathogenesis and, secondly, it would likely lead to novel treatments which would disrupt such pathways.

  9. Epigenetic alterations underlying autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslani, Saeed; Mahmoudi, Mahdi; Karami, Jafar; Jamshidi, Ahmad Reza; Malekshahi, Zahra; Nicknam, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-03-01

    Recent breakthroughs in genetic explorations have extended our understanding through discovery of genetic patterns subjected to autoimmune diseases (AID). Genetics, on the contrary, has not answered all the conundrums to describe a comprehensive explanation of causal mechanisms of disease etiopathology with regard to the function of environment, sex, or aging. The other side of the coin, epigenetics which is defined by gene manifestation modification without DNA sequence alteration, reportedly has come in to provide new insights towards disease apprehension through bridging the genetics and environmental factors. New investigations in genetic and environmental contributing factors for autoimmunity provide new explanation whereby the interactions between genetic elements and epigenetic modifications signed by environmental agents may be responsible for autoimmune disease initiation and perpetuation. It is aimed through this article to review recent progress attempting to reveal how epigenetics associates with the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. PMID:26761426

  10. Endocrine autoimmunity in Turner syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Grossi, Armando; Crinò, Antonino; Luciano, Rosa; Lombardo, Antonietta; Cappa, Marco; Fierabracci, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    Background Turner syndrome is caused by numeric and structural abnormalities of the X chromosome. An increased frequency of autoimmunity as well as an elevated incidence of autoantibodies was observed in Turner patients. The aim of this study was to conduct a retrospective analysis of the incidence of autoimmunity in 66 Italian patients affected by Turner syndrome. Methods Sixty-six unselected and consecutive Italian Turner patients were recruited. The association between age, karyotype and t...

  11. Gestational Diabetes and Thyroid Autoimmunity

    OpenAIRE

    Fabrizio Monaco; Giorgio Napolitano; Cesidio Giuliani; Ester Vitacolonna; Ines Bucci; Barbara Di Nenno; Annalisa Passante; Annunziata Lapolla; Dominique Cerrone; Fabio Capani

    2012-01-01

    Background. About 10% of pregnancies are complicated by previously unknown impairment of glucose metabolism, which is defined as gestational diabetes. There are little data available on prevalence of thyroid disorders in patients affected by gestational diabetes, and about their postgestational thyroid function and autoimmunity. We therefore investigated pancreatic and thyroid autoimmunity in gestational diabetic patients and in women who had had a previous gestational diabetic pregnancy. Met...

  12. Mercury and autoimmunity: implications for occupational and environmental health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercury (Hg) has long been recognized as a neurotoxicant; however, recent work in animal models has implicated Hg as an immunotoxicant. In particular, Hg has been shown to induce autoimmune disease in susceptible animals with effects including overproduction of specific autoantibodies and pathophysiologic signs of lupus-like disease. However, these effects are only observed at high doses of Hg that are above the levels to which humans would be exposed through contaminated fish consumption. While there is presently no evidence to suggest that Hg induces frank autoimmune disease in humans, a recent epidemiological study has demonstrated a link between occupational Hg exposure and lupus. In our studies, we have tested the hypothesis that Hg does not cause autoimmune disease directly, but rather that it may interact with triggering events, such as genetic predisposition, exposure to antigens, or infection, to exacerbate disease. Treatment of mice that are not susceptible to Hg-induced autoimmune disease with very low doses and short term exposures of inorganic Hg (20-200 μg/kg) exacerbates disease and accelerates mortality in the graft versus host disease model of chronic lupus in C57Bl/6 x DBA/2 mice. Furthermore, low dose Hg exposure increases the severity and prevalence of experimental autoimmune myocarditis (induced by immunization with cardiac myosin peptide in adjuvant) in A/J mice. To test our hypothesis further, we examined sera from Amazonian populations exposed to Hg through small-scale gold mining, with and without current or past malaria infection. We found significantly increased prevalence of antinuclear and antinucleolar antibodies and a positive interaction between Hg and malaria. These results suggest a new model for Hg immunotoxicity, as a co-factor in autoimmune disease, increasing the risks and severity of clinical disease in the presence of other triggering events, either genetic or acquired

  13. Role of Sodium-Hydrogen Exchanger-1 (NHE-1) in the Effect of Exercise on Intermittent Hypoxia-Induced Left Ventricular Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen M, Yu-Chih; Yang, Kun-Ta; Shen, Yan-Jhih; Cheng, Ching-Feng; Tu, Wei-Chia; Chen, Tsung-I

    2015-08-31

    Intermittent hypoxia (IH) occurs frequently in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea and can cause ventricular dysfunction. However, whether myocardial inflammation and sodium-hydrogen exchanger-1 (NHE-1) expression play an important role in IH-induced ventricular dysfunction remains unclear. This study aimed to investigate whether short-term exercise provides a protective effect on IH-induced left ventricular (LV) function impairment. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to 4 groups: control (CON), IH, exercise (EXE) or IH interspersed with EXE (IHEXE). IH rats were exposed to repetitive hypoxia/reoxygenation cycles (2%-6% O₂ for 2-5 s per 75 s, followed by 21% O₂ for 6 h/day) during the light phase for 12 consecutive days. EXE rats were habituated to treadmill running for 5 days, permitted 2 days of rest, and followed by 5 exercise bouts (30 m/min for 60 min on a 2% grade) on consecutive days during the dark phase. IHEXE rats were exposed to IH during the light phase interspersed with exercise programs during the dark phase on the same day. Cardiac function was quantified by echocardiographic evaluation. Myocardial levels of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and NHE-1 were determined. IH rats showed LV dysfunction characterized by lower LV fractional shortening (LVFS%) and LV ejection fraction (LVEF%). LV dysfunction was associated with higher myocardial levels of TNF-α, IL-6 and NHE-1 mRNA and protein. These changes were not observed in IHEXE rats (P > 0.05 for all). EXE rats showed lower levels of NHE-1 protein than CON rats (P 0.05 for all). These data indicated that exercise may provide a protective effect on IH-induced LV dysfunction by attenuating IH-induced myocardial NHE-1 hyperactivity. PMID:26211649

  14. Autoimmune sleep disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silber, Michael H

    2016-01-01

    A number of autoantibodies, some paraneoplastic, are associated with sleep disorders. Morvan syndrome and limbic encephalitis, associated with voltage-gated potassium channel-complex antibodies, principally against CASPR2 and LGI1, can result in profound insomnia and rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD). Patients with aquaporin-4 antibodies and neuromyelitis optica may develop narcolepsy in association with other evidence of hypothalamic dysfunction, sometimes as the initial presentation. Central sleep apnea and central neurogenic hypoventilation are found in patients with anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antibody encephalitis, and obstructive sleep apnea, stridor, and hypoventilation are prominent features of a novel tauopathy associated with IgLON5 antibodies. In addition, paraneoplastic diseases may involve the hypothalamus and cause sleep disorders, particularly narcolepsy and RBD in those with Ma1 and Ma2 antibodies. Patients with antineuronal nuclear autoantibodies type 2 may develop stridor. Several lines of evidence suggest that narcolepsy is an autoimmune disorder. There is a strong relationship with the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) DQB1*06:02 haplotype and polymorphisms in the T-cell receptor alpha locus and purinergic receptor P2Y11 genes. Patients with recent-onset narcolepsy may have high titers of antistreptococcal or other antibodies, although none has yet been shown to be disease-specific but, supporting an immune basis, recent evidence indicates that narcolepsy in children can be precipitated by one type of vaccination against the 2009-2010 H1N1 influenza pandemic. PMID:27112685

  15. Apoptosis of V beta 8.2+ T lymphocytes in the spinal cord during recovery from experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis induced in Lewis rats by inoculation with myelin basic protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCombe, P A; Nickson, I; Tabi, Z; Pender, M P

    1996-07-01

    To study T cell apoptosis during spontaneous recovery from experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), we extracted lymphocytes from the spinal cords of Lewis rats with EAE induced by inoculation with myelin basic protein (MBP) and adjuvants. Using flow cytometry we assessed the numbers of CD5+ and TCR alpha beta + lymphocytes, as well as V beta 8.2+ lymphocytes, which constitute the predominant encephalitogenic MBP-reactive cells in Lewis rats. Rats developed neurological signs of disease 10-12 days after inoculation. The peak of disease was on day 14 after inoculation and was followed by clinical recovery. The numbers of CD5+, TCR alpha beta + and V beta 8.2+ cells obtained from the spinal cord were greatest on day 13. During spontaneous clinical recovery, there was a decline in the numbers of all the cells studied, with a selective loss of V beta 8.2+ cells from the CD5+ and TCR alpha beta + populations. To determine whether the decline in lymphocyte numbers was due to apoptosis, we used simultaneous surface labelling and propidium iodide staining of the DNA of the cells extracted from the spinal cord. From day 14 onwards, there was selective enrichment of V beta 8.2+ cells in the apoptotic population, and the percentage of V beta 8.2+ cells undergoing apoptosis was greater than the percentages of CD5+ and TCR alpha beta + cells undergoing apoptosis. These findings indicate that recovery from acute EAE is associated with the selective apoptosis, in the central nervous system, of these disease-relevant cells. The findings in this study of actively induced EAE are similar to those of our previous study of EAE induced by transfer of encephalitogenic MBP-specific T cells (Z. Tabi et al., Eur. J. Immunol. 24: 2609-2617, 1994) and further support the hypothesis that selective apoptosis of autoreactive T cells in the central nervous system is of primary importance in spontaneous recovery from EAE. PMID:8836965

  16. A rare presentation of hypopituitarism in hepatic overlap syndrome of autoimmune hepatitis and autoimmune cholangitis

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta V; Singh H.; Talapatra P; Ray S

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune cholangitis is the antimitochondrial antibody-negative autoimmune hepatopathy with clinical and histological features similar to that of primary biliary cirrhosis. Autoimmune cholangitis has a predominant cholestatic phase. However, transaminasemia might be dominant in certain patients, indicating associated autoimmune hepatitis. Such an autoimmune hepatopathy has been termed as hepatic overlap syndrome. Due to the autoimmune nature of the disease, associated diseases of other orga...

  17. Effect of beta-blockade on low-dose dobutamine-induced changes in left ventricular function in healthy volunteers: assessment by gated SPET myocardial perfusion scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Everaert, H.; Vanhove, C.; Franken, P.R. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital, Free University of Brussels (AZ VUB), Brussels (Belgium)

    2000-04-01

    Viability studies are often performed in patients receiving beta-blocking agents. However, the intake of beta-blocking agents could influence the identification of viable myocardium when low-dose dobutamine is used to demonstrate inotropic reserve. The aim of this study was to quantify the effect of beta-blockade on global and regional left ventricular function in healthy volunteers using low-dose dobutamine gated single-photon emission tomographic (SPET) myocardial perfusion scintigraphy. Ten subjects were studied once ''on'' and once ''off'' beta-blocker therapy (metoprolol succinate, 100 mg day{sup -1}). On each occasion four consecutive gated SPET acquisitions (of 7 min duration) were recorded after injection of 925 MBq technetium-99m tetrofosmin on a triple-headed camera equipped with focussing (Cardiofocal) collimators. Acquisitions were made at rest (baseline 1 and 2) and 5 min after the beginning of the infusion of 5 and 10 {mu}g kg{sup -1} min{sup -1} dobutamine. Wall thickening (WT) was quantified using a method based on circumferential profile analysis. Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was obtained using the Cedars-Sinai algorithm. Blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) were recorded at the end of each acquisition. At baseline LVEF, WT and systolic BP values under beta-blockade were not significantly different from those obtained in the non-beta-blocked state. The mean HR and diastolic BP at baseline were lower under beta-blockade. Dobutamine administration (at 5 and 10 {mu}g kg{sup -1} min{sup -1}) induced a significant increase in WT, LVEF and systolic BP in all subjects both on and off beta-blockade. The increases in WT, LVEF and systolic BP in the beta-blocked state were less pronounced but not significantly different. HR increased significantly at 10 {mu}g kg{sup -1} min{sup -1} dobutamine without beta-blocker administration, while no increase in HR was observed in the beta-blocked state. Beta

  18. Effect of beta-blockade on low-dose dobutamine-induced changes in left ventricular function in healthy volunteers: assessment by gated SPET myocardial perfusion scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viability studies are often performed in patients receiving beta-blocking agents. However, the intake of beta-blocking agents could influence the identification of viable myocardium when low-dose dobutamine is used to demonstrate inotropic reserve. The aim of this study was to quantify the effect of beta-blockade on global and regional left ventricular function in healthy volunteers using low-dose dobutamine gated single-photon emission tomographic (SPET) myocardial perfusion scintigraphy. Ten subjects were studied once ''on'' and once ''off'' beta-blocker therapy (metoprolol succinate, 100 mg day-1). On each occasion four consecutive gated SPET acquisitions (of 7 min duration) were recorded after injection of 925 MBq technetium-99m tetrofosmin on a triple-headed camera equipped with focussing (Cardiofocal) collimators. Acquisitions were made at rest (baseline 1 and 2) and 5 min after the beginning of the infusion of 5 and 10 μg kg-1 min-1 dobutamine. Wall thickening (WT) was quantified using a method based on circumferential profile analysis. Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was obtained using the Cedars-Sinai algorithm. Blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) were recorded at the end of each acquisition. At baseline LVEF, WT and systolic BP values under beta-blockade were not significantly different from those obtained in the non-beta-blocked state. The mean HR and diastolic BP at baseline were lower under beta-blockade. Dobutamine administration (at 5 and 10 μg kg-1 min-1) induced a significant increase in WT, LVEF and systolic BP in all subjects both on and off beta-blockade. The increases in WT, LVEF and systolic BP in the beta-blocked state were less pronounced but not significantly different. HR increased significantly at 10 μg kg-1 min-1 dobutamine without beta-blocker administration, while no increase in HR was observed in the beta-blocked state. Beta-blocker therapy in healthy subjects attenuates the inotropic and chronotropic myocardial

  19. AUTOIMMUNE EPIDERMAL BLISTERING DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Abreu Velez

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune bullous skin diseases (ABDs are uncommon, potentially fatal diseases of skin and mucous membranes which are associated with deposits of autoantibodies and complement against distinct molecules of the epidermis and dermal/epidermal basement membrane zone (BMZ. These autoantibodies lead to a loss in skin molecular integrity, which manifests clinically as formation of blisters or erosions. In pemphigus vulgaris, loss of adhesion occurs within the epidermis. The pioneering work of Ernst H. Beutner, Ph.D. and Robert E. Jordon, M.D. confirmed the autoimmune nature of these diseases. Walter F. Lever, M.D. contributed significantly to our understanding of the histopathologic features of these diseases. Walter Lever, M.D. and Ken Hashimoto, M.D. contributed electron microscopic studies of these diseases, especially in pemphigus vulgaris and bullous pemphigoid. In bullous pemphigoid (BP, linear IgA bullous dermatosis, epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA and dermatitis herpetiformis (DH, loss of adhesion takes place within or underneath the BMZ. Classic EBA demonstrates extensive skin fragility; DH is commonly associated with gluten-sensitive enteropathy, and manifests clinically with pruritic papulovesicles on the extensor surfaces of the extremities and the lumbosacral area. The clinical spectrum of bullous pemphigoid includes tense blisters, urticarial plaques, and prurigo-like eczematous lesions. Pemphigoid gestationis mostly occurs during the last trimester of pregnancy, and mucous membrane pemphigoid primarily involves the oral mucosa and conjunctivae and leads to scarring. Linear IgA bullous dermatosis manifests with tense blisters in a „cluster of jewels”-like pattern in childhood (chronic bullous disease of childhood and is more clinically heterogeneous in adulthood. Many of the autoantigens in these disorders are known and have been well characterized. ABDs may be influenced by both genetic and exogenous factors. The diagnoses of

  20. Autoimmune hepatitis in association with lymphocytic colitis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cronin, Edmond M

    2012-02-03

    Autoimmune hepatitis is a rare, chronic inflammatory disorder which has been associated with a number of other auto-immune conditions. However, there are no reports in the medical literature of an association with microscopic (lymphocytic) colitis. We report the case of a 53-year-old woman with several autoimmune conditions, including lymphocytic colitis, who presented with an acute hepatitis. On the basis of the clinical features, serology, and histopathology, we diagnosed autoimmune hepatitis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of autoimmune hepatitis in association with lymphocytic colitis, and lends support to the theory of an autoimmune etiology for lymphocytic colitis.

  1. Low dose rapamycin exacerbates autoimmune experimental uveitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zili Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rapamycin, a potent immune modulator, is used to treat transplant rejection and some autoimmune diseases. Uveitis is a potentially severe inflammatory eye disease, and 2 clinical trials of treating uveitis with rapamycin are under way. Unexpectedly, recent research has demonstrated that low dose rapamycin enhances the memory T cell population and function. However, it is unclear how low dose rapamycin influences the immune response in the setting of uveitis. DESIGN AND METHODS: B10.RIII mice were immunized to induce experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU. Ocular inflammation of control and rapamycin-treated mice was compared based on histological change. ELISPOT and T cell proliferation assays were performed to assess splenocyte response to ocular antigen. In addition, we examined the effect of rapamycin on activation-induced cell death (AICD using the MitoCapture assay and Annexin V staining. RESULTS: Administration of low dose rapamycin exacerbated EAU, whereas treating mice with high dose rapamycin attenuated ocular inflammation. The progression of EAU by low dose rapamycin coincided with the increased frequency of antigen-reactive lymphocytes. Lastly, fewer rapamycin-treated T cells underwent AICD, which might contribute to exaggerated ocular inflammation and the uveitogenic immune response. CONCLUSION: These data reveal a paradoxical role for rapamycin in uveitis in a dose-dependent manner. This study has a potentially important clinical implication as rapamycin might cause unwanted consequences dependent on dosing and pharmacokinetics. Thus, more research is needed to further define the mechanism by which low dose rapamycin augments the immune response.

  2. The Role of T Helper (TH)17 Cells as a Double-Edged Sword in the Interplay of Infection and Autoimmunity with a Focus on Xenobiotic-Induced Immunomodulation

    OpenAIRE

    Hemdan, Nasr Y.A.; Abu El-Saad, Ahmed M.; Ulrich Sack

    2013-01-01

    Extensive research in recent years suggests that exposure to xenobiotic stimuli plays a critical role in autoimmunity induction and severity and that the resulting response would be exacerbated in individuals with an infection-aroused immune system. In this context, heavy metals constitute a prominent category of xenobiotic substances, known to alter divergent immune cell responses in accidentally and occupationally exposed individuals, thereby increasing the susceptibility to autoimmunity an...

  3. B-cell survival factors in autoimmune rheumatic disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Sandra A.; Vilas-Boas, Andreia

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune rheumatic disorders have complex etiopathogenetic mechanisms in which B cells play a central role. The importance of factors stimulating B cells, notably the B-cell activating factor (BAFF) and A proliferation inducing ligand (APRIL) axis is now recognized. BAFF and APRIL are cytokines essential for B-cell proliferation and survival from the immature stages to the development of plasma cells. Their levels are increased in some subsets of patients with autoimmune disorders. Several recent biologic drugs have been developed to block this axis, namely belimumab [already licensed for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) treatment], tabalumab, atacicept and blisibimod. Many clinical trials to evaluate the safety and efficacy of these drugs in several autoimmune disorders are ongoing, or have been completed recently. This review updates the information on the use of biologic agents blocking BAFF/APRIL for patients with SLE, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren’s syndrome and myositis. PMID:26288664

  4. T Cell Vaccination as an Immunotherapy for Autoimmune Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingwu Zhang

    2004-01-01

    Immunization with inactivated autoreactive T cells (T cell vaccination) selected from individual's own T cell repertoire provides a unique in vivo setting for testing immune regulation that is known to involve interactions of a variety of related surface molecules (1). It induces regulatory immune responses that closely resemble the in vivo situation where the immune system is challenged by clonal activation and expansion of given T cell populations in various autoimmune diseases. T cell vaccination provides a powerful means of eliciting natural reactions of the immune system in response to clonal expansion of T cells, which can used as a therapeutic approach to suppress or eliminate specific pathogenic autoreactive T cells in autoimmune conditions. Clinical trials using T cell vaccination to deplete autoreactive T cells in human autoimmune conditions have begun to reveal the pathologic relevance of various autoimmune T cell populations in the disease processes, providing a unique opportunity to test the autoimmune theories in a clinical setting. Cellular & Molecular Immunology.2004;1(5):321-327.

  5. Coeliac disease in endocrine diseases of autoimmune origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miśkiewicz, Piotr; Kępczyńska-Nyk, Anna; Bednarczuk, Tomasz

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Coeliac disease (CD, sometimes called gluten-sensitive enteropathy or nontropical sprue) is an inflammatory disorder of the small intestine of autoimmune origin. It occurs in genetically predisposed people and is induced by a gluten protein, which is a component of wheat. The prevalence of histologically confirmed CD is estimated in screening studies of adults in the United States and Europe to be between 0.2% and 1.0%. The results of previous studies have indicated that the prevalence of CD is increased in patients with other autoimmune disorders such as: autoimmune thyroid diseases, type 1 diabetes mellitus, and Addison's disease. A coincidence of the above diseases constitutes autoimmune polyglandular syndrome (APS). The high prevalence of CD in APS is probably due to the common genetic predisposition to the coexistent autoimmune diseases. The majority of adult patients have the atypical or silent type of the disease. This is the main reason why CD so often goes undiagnosed or the diagnosis is delayed. CD, if undiagnosed and untreated, is associated with many medical disorders including haematological (anaemia), metabolical (osteopenia/osteoporosis), obstetric-gynaecological (infertility, spontaneous abortions, late puberty, early menopause), neurological (migraine, ataxia, epilepsy) as well as with an increased risk of malignancy, especially: enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma, small intestine adenocarcinoma, and oesophageal and oropharyngeal carcinomas. Early introduction of a gluten-free diet and lifelong adherence to this treatment decreases the risk of these complications. PMID:22744631

  6. Autoimmunity, environmental exposure and vaccination: is there a link?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the wide clinical experience shows that vaccines are generally safe, concern has been expressed for a causal link between vaccines and autoimmune diseases. Even though the mechanisms of autoimmunity are ill-elucidated, the role of pre-existing risk factors including genetic predisposition and environmental factors is largely accepted. The present study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that vaccines can promote autoimmunity in genetically-prone individuals when simultaneously exposed to a chemical known to induce autoimmune reactions. Female lupus-prone (NZBxNZW) F1 mice were given 1 μg or 10 μg of a hepatitis B vaccine at 2-week intervals in conjunction with 40 μg of mercuric chloride three times per week for 6 weeks. A marked increase in serum IgG levels and a slight increase in anti-nuclear autoantibody (ANA) levels were seen in the mice given 10 μg of the vaccine plus mercuric chloride. No straightforward conclusion can be drawn from these results because of the extreme experimental conditions of this study. Nevertheless, the results tend to support the hypothesis that vaccination could enhance the risk of autoimmunity in genetically susceptible individuals when exposed to certain environmental chemicals

  7. Minocycline effects on the cerebrospinal fluid proteome of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoop, M.P.; Rosenling, T.; Attali, A.; Meesters, R.J.; Stingl, C.; Dekker, L.J.; Aken, H. van; Suidgeest, E.; Hintzen, R.Q.; Tuinstra, T.; Gool, A.J. van; Luider, T.M.; Bischoff, R.

    2012-01-01

    To identify response biomarkers for pharmaceutical treatment of multiple sclerosis, we induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in rats and treated symptomatic animals with minocycline. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples were collected 14 days after EAE induction at the peak of neurolo

  8. Minocycline Effects on the Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteome of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis Rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoop, Marcel P.; Rosenling, Therese; Attali, Amos; Meesters, Roland J. W.; Stingl, Christoph; Dekker, Lennard J.; van Aken, Hans; Suidgeest, Ernst; Hintzen, Rogier Q.; Tuinstra, Tinka; van Gool, Alain; Luider, Theo M.; Bischoff, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    To identify response biomarkers for pharmaceutical treatment of multiple sclerosis, we induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in rats and treated symptomatic animals with minocycline. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples were collected 14 days after EAE induction at the peak of neurolo

  9. Deficiency of Nuclear Factor-κB c-Rel Accelerates the Development of Autoimmune Diabetes in NOD Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Parameswaran; Yui, Mary A; Tomalka, Jeffrey A; Majumdar, Devdoot; Parameswaran, Reshmi; Baltimore, David

    2016-08-01

    The nuclear factor-κB protein c-Rel plays a critical role in controlling autoimmunity. c-Rel-deficient mice are resistant to streptozotocin-induced diabetes, a drug-induced model of autoimmune diabetes. We generated c-Rel-deficient NOD mice to examine the role of c-Rel in the development of spontaneous autoimmune diabetes. We found that both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells from c-Rel-deficient NOD mice showed significantly decreased T-cell receptor-induced IL-2, IFN-γ, and GM-CSF expression. Despite compromised T-cell function, c-Rel deficiency dramatically accelerated insulitis and hyperglycemia in NOD mice along with a substantial reduction in T-regulatory (Treg) cell numbers. Supplementation of isogenic c-Rel-competent Treg cells from prediabetic NOD mice reversed the accelerated diabetes development in c-Rel-deficient NOD mice. The results suggest that c-Rel-dependent Treg cell function is critical in suppressing early-onset autoimmune diabetogenesis in NOD mice. This study provides a novel natural system to study autoimmune diabetes pathogenesis and reveals a previously unknown c-Rel-dependent mechanistic difference between chemically induced and spontaneous diabetogenesis. The study also reveals a unique protective role of c-Rel in autoimmune diabetes, which is distinct from other T-cell-dependent autoimmune diseases such as arthritis and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, where c-Rel promotes autoimmunity. PMID:27217485

  10. Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zen Yoh

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Before the concept of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP was established, this form of pancreatitis had been recognized as lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis or non-alcoholic duct destructive chronic pancreatitis based on unique histological features. With the discovery in 2001 that serum IgG4 concentrations are specifically elevated in AIP patients, this emerging entity has been more widely accepted. Classical cases of AIP are now called type 1 as another distinct subtype (type 2 AIP has been identified. Type 1 AIP, which accounts for 2% of chronic pancreatitis cases, predominantly affects adult males. Patients usually present with obstructive jaundice due to enlargement of the pancreatic head or thickening of the lower bile duct wall. Pancreatic cancer is the leading differential diagnosis for which serological, imaging, and histological examinations need to be considered. Serologically, an elevated level of IgG4 is the most sensitive and specific finding. Imaging features include irregular narrowing of the pancreatic duct, diffuse or focal enlargement of the pancreas, a peri-pancreatic capsule-like rim, and enhancement at the late phase of contrast-enhanced images. Biopsy or surgical specimens show diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration containing many IgG4+ plasma cells, storiform fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis. A dramatic response to steroid therapy is another characteristic, and serological or radiological effects are normally identified within the first 2 or 3 weeks. Type 1 AIP is estimated as a pancreatic manifestation of systemic IgG4-related disease based on the fact that synchronous or metachronous lesions can develop in multiple organs (e.g. bile duct, salivary/lacrimal glands, retroperitoneum, artery, lung, and kidney and those lesions are histologically identical irrespective of the organ of origin. Several potential autoantigens have been identified so far. A Th2-dominant immune reaction and the activation of

  11. Autoimmune pancreatitis. An update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare disease, the pathophysiological understanding of which has been greatly improved over the last years. The most common form, type 1 AIP belongs to the IgG4-related diseases and must be distinguished from type 2 AIP, which is a much rarer entity associated with chronic inflammatory bowel disease. Clinically, there is an overlap with pancreatic cancer. Imaging and further criteria, such as serological and histological parameters are utilized for a differentiation between both entities in order to select the appropriate therapy and to avoid the small but ultimately unnecessary number of pancreatectomies. The diagnostics of AIP are complex, whereby the consensus criteria of the International Association of Pancreatology have become accepted as the parameters for discrimination. These encompass five cardinal criteria and one therapeutic criterion. By applying these criteria AIP can be diagnosed with a sensitivity of 84.9 %, a specificity of 100 % and an accuracy of 93.8 %. The diagnosis of AIP is accomplished by applying several parameters of which two relate to imaging. As for the routine diagnostics of the pancreas these are ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Important for the differential diagnosis is the exclusion of signs of local and remote tumor spread for which CT and MRI are established. The essential diagnostic parameter of histology necessitates sufficient sample material, which cannot usually be acquired by a fine needle biopsy. CT or MRI are the reference standard methods for identification of the optimal puncture site and imaging-assisted (TruCut) biopsy. In patients presenting with unspecific upper abdominal pain, painless jaundice combined with the suspicion of a pancreatic malignancy in imaging but a mismatch of secondary signs of malignancy, AIP should also be considered as a differential diagnosis. As the diagnosis of AIP only partially relies on imaging radiologists also

  12. [Bullous autoimmune disorders in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sárdy, M; Kasperkiewicz, M

    2013-06-01

    We review the pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis, differential diagnosis, and therapy of autoimmune bullous skin diseases of childhood, especially of the most common linear IgA dermatosis. In autoimmune bullous diseases, autoantibodies are formed against different adhesion molecules of the skin. These are not only pathophysiologically relevant, but also serve as basis for diagnosis and follow-up of these diseases. In case an autoimmune bullous disease is suspected, histopathology and immunohistopathology (direct immunofluorescence microscopy) as well as serological tests (indirect immunofluorescence microscopy, ELISA, immunoblot) should be performed. Therapy depends on the diagnosis. In IgA-mediated pathogenesis, dapsone can be successfully used. In IgG-mediated diseases, immunosuppression with corticosteroids and steroid-sparing agents should be initiated, although only local therapy is sufficient to control a self-limiting pemphigus neonatorum. In dermatitis herpetiformis, a life-long gluten-free diet is recommended. PMID:23677541

  13. [Infectious agents and autoimmune diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riebeling-Navarro, C; Madrid-Marina, V; Camarena-Medellín, B E; Peralta-Zaragoza, O; Barrera, R

    1992-01-01

    In this paper the molecular aspects of the relationships between infectious agents and autoimmune diseases, the mechanisms of immune response to infectious agents, and the more recent hypotheses regarding the cause of autoimmune diseases are discussed. The antigens are processed and selected by their immunogenicity, and presented by HLA molecules to the T cell receptor. These events initiate the immune response with the activation and proliferation of T-lymphocytes. Although there are several hypotheses regarding the cause of autoimmune diseases and too many findings against and in favor of them, there is still no conclusive data. All these hypothesis and findings are discussed in the context of the more recent advances. PMID:1615352

  14. Long-Term Preservation of Left Ventricular Systolic Function in Patients With Refractory Angina Pectoris and Inducible Myocardial Ischemia on Optimal Medical Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavich, Massimo; Maranta, Francesco; Fumero, Andrea; Godino, Cosmo; Giannini, Francesco; Oppizzi, Michele; Colombo, Antonio; Fragasso, Gabriele; Margonato, Alberto

    2016-05-15

    Refractory angina pectoris (RAP) represents a clinical condition characterized by frequent episodes of chest pain despite therapy optimization. According to myocardial stunning and myocardial hibernation definitions, RAP should represent the ideal condition for systolic dysfunction development. We aim to investigate the evolution of left ventricular (LV) function in patients with RAP. A retrospective study which encompasses 144 patients with RAP referred to our institution from 1999 to December 2014 was performed. Of them, 88 met the inclusion criteria, and LV function was assessed by echocardiography. All of them had persistent angina episodes on top of optimal medical therapy and evidence of significant inducible myocardial ischemia and no further revascularization options. Nitrates consumption rate, time of angina duration, and the number of angina attacks were evaluated. In the whole population, ejection fraction (EF) was 44% ± 2. EF was significantly lower in patients with previous myocardial infarction (41% ± 1.5 vs 51% ± 1.8, p 5 years (5 years 44% ± 2 [n = 44]; p 0.02). Long-term LV function in patients with RAP is generally preserved. A previous history of myocardial infarction is the only determinant in the development of systolic dysfunction. In conclusion, frequent angina attacks and a long-term history of angina are not apparently associated to worse LV function. PMID:27055755

  15. The role of parvovirus B19 in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity and autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Jonathan R

    2016-04-01

    Human parvovirus B19 is a single-stranded DNA virus which preferentially targets the erythroblasts in the bone marrow. B19 infection commonly causes erythema infectiosum, arthralgia, fetal death, transient aplastic crisis in patients with shortened red cell survival, and persistent infection in people who are immunocompromised. Less common clinical manifestations include atypical skin rashes, neurological syndromes, cardiac syndromes, and various cytopenias. B19 infection has also been associated with development of a variety of different autoimmune diseases, including rheumatological, neurological, neuromuscular, cardiovascular, haematological, nephrological and metabolic. Production of a variety of autoantibodies has been demonstrated to occur during B19 infection and these have been shown to be key to the pathogenesis of the particular disease process in a significant number of cases, for example, production of rheumatoid factor in cases of B19-associated rheumatoid arthritis and production of anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) in patients with B19-associated type 1 diabetes mellitus. B19 infection has also been associated with the development of multiple autoimmune diseases in 12 individuals. Documented mechanisms in B19-associated autoimmunity include molecular mimicry (IgG antibody to B19 proteins has been shown to cross react with a variety of recognised human autoantigens, including collagen II, keratin, angiotensin II type 1 receptor, myelin basic protein, cardiolipin, and platelet membrane glycoprotein IIb/IIIa), B19-induced apoptosis with presentation of self-antigens to T lymphocytes, and the phospholipase activity of the B19 unique VP1 protein. PMID:26644521

  16. Coeliac disease with autoimmune haemolytic anaemia.

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, D. G.

    1984-01-01

    Two patients are described who have developed autoimmune haemolytic anaemia in association with their coeliac disease. Autoimmune haemolytic anaemia may represent an extension of immunological disorders linked with coeliac disease, centred on the histocompatibility antigen B8.

  17. Autoimmune thyroid disorders—An update

    OpenAIRE

    Swain, Manorama; Swain, Truptirekha; Mohanty, Binoy Kumar

    2005-01-01

    Background: Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), a common organ specific autoimmune disorder is seen mostly in women between 30–50 yrs of age. Thyroid autoimmunity can cause several forms of thyroiditis ranging from hypothyroidism (Hashimoto’s thyroiditis) to hyperthyroidism (Graves’Disease). Prevalence rate of autoimmune mediated hypothyroidism is about 0.8 per 100 and 95% among them are women. Graves’ disease is about one tenth as common as hypothyroidism and tends to occur more in younger in...

  18. Regulatory CD8{sup +} T cells induced by exposure to all-trans retinoic acid and TGF-{beta} suppress autoimmune diabetes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishi, Minoru [Department of Internal and Geriatric Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-1 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan); Yasuda, Hisafumi, E-mail: yasuda@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Department of Internal and Geriatric Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-1 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan); Abe, Yasuhisa; Sasaki, Hirotomo; Shimizu, Mami; Arai, Takashi; Okumachi, Yasuyo; Moriyama, Hiroaki; Hara, Kenta; Yokono, Koichi; Nagata, Masao [Department of Internal and Geriatric Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-1 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan)

    2010-03-26

    Antigen-specific regulatory CD4{sup +} T cells have been described but there are few reports on regulatory CD8{sup +} T cells. We generated islet-specific glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunit-related protein (IGRP)-specific regulatory CD8{sup +} T cells from 8.3-NOD transgenic mice. CD8{sup +} T cells from 8.3-NOD splenocytes were cultured with IGRP, splenic dendritic cells (SpDCs), TGF-{beta}, and all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) for 5 days. CD8{sup +} T cells cultured with either IGRP alone or IGRP and SpDCs in the absence of TGF-{beta} and ATRA had low Foxp3{sup +} expression (1.7 {+-} 0.9% and 3.2 {+-} 4.5%, respectively). In contrast, CD8{sup +} T cells induced by exposure to IGRP, SpDCs, TGF-{beta}, and ATRA showed the highest expression of Foxp3{sup +} in IGRP-reactive CD8{sup +} T cells (36.1 {+-} 10.6%), which was approximately 40-fold increase compared with that before induction culture. CD25 expression on CD8{sup +} T cells cultured with IGRP, SpDCs, TGF-{beta}, and ATRA was only 7.42%, whereas CD103 expression was greater than 90%. These CD8{sup +} T cells suppressed the proliferation of diabetogenic CD8{sup +} T cells from 8.3-NOD splenocytes in vitro and completely prevented diabetes onset in NOD-scid mice in cotransfer experiments with diabetogenic splenocytes from NOD mice in vivo. Here we show that exposure to ATRA and TGF-{beta} induces CD8{sup +}Foxp3{sup +} T cells ex vivo, which suppress diabetogenic T cells in vitro and in vivo.

  19. Regulatory CD8+ T cells induced by exposure to all-trans retinoic acid and TGF-β suppress autoimmune diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antigen-specific regulatory CD4+ T cells have been described but there are few reports on regulatory CD8+ T cells. We generated islet-specific glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunit-related protein (IGRP)-specific regulatory CD8+ T cells from 8.3-NOD transgenic mice. CD8+ T cells from 8.3-NOD splenocytes were cultured with IGRP, splenic dendritic cells (SpDCs), TGF-β, and all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) for 5 days. CD8+ T cells cultured with either IGRP alone or IGRP and SpDCs in the absence of TGF-β and ATRA had low Foxp3+ expression (1.7 ± 0.9% and 3.2 ± 4.5%, respectively). In contrast, CD8+ T cells induced by exposure to IGRP, SpDCs, TGF-β, and ATRA showed the highest expression of Foxp3+ in IGRP-reactive CD8+ T cells (36.1 ± 10.6%), which was approximately 40-fold increase compared with that before induction culture. CD25 expression on CD8+ T cells cultured with IGRP, SpDCs, TGF-β, and ATRA was only 7.42%, whereas CD103 expression was greater than 90%. These CD8+ T cells suppressed the proliferation of diabetogenic CD8+ T cells from 8.3-NOD splenocytes in vitro and completely prevented diabetes onset in NOD-scid mice in cotransfer experiments with diabetogenic splenocytes from NOD mice in vivo. Here we show that exposure to ATRA and TGF-β induces CD8+Foxp3+ T cells ex vivo, which suppress diabetogenic T cells in vitro and in vivo.

  20. Ionizing radiation and autoimmunity: Induction of autoimmune disease in mice by high dose fractionated total lymphoid irradiation and its prevention by inoculating normal T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation can functionally alter the immune system and break self-tolerance. High dose (42.5 Gy), fractionated (2.5 Gy 17 times) total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) on mice caused various organ-specific autoimmune diseases, such as gastritis, thyroiditis, and orchitis, depending on the radiation dosages, the extent of lymphoid irradiation, and the genetic background of the mouse strains. Radiation-induced tissue damage is not the primary cause of the autoimmune disease because irradiation of the target organs alone failed to elicit the autoimmunity and shielding of the organs from irradiation was unable to prevent it. In contrast, irradiation of both the thymus and the peripheral lymphoid organs/tissues was required for efficient induction of autoimmune disease by TLI. TLI eliminated the majority of mature thymocytes and the peripheral T cells for 1 mo, and inoculation of spleen cell, thymocyte, or bone marrow cell suspensions (prepared from syngeneic nonirradiated mice) within 2 wk after TLI effectively prevented the autoimmune development. Depletion of T cells from the inocula abrogated the preventive activity. CD4+ T cells mediated the autoimmune prevention but CD8+ T cells did not. CD4+ T cells also appeared to mediate the TLI-induced autoimmune disease because CD4+ T cells from disease-bearing TLI mice adoptively transferred the autoimmune disease to syngeneic naive mice. Taken together, these results indicate that high dose, fractionated ionizing radiation on the lymphoid organs/tissues can cause autoimmune disease by affecting the T cell immune system, rather than the target self-Ags, presumably by altering T cell-dependent control of self-reactive T cells. 62 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs

  1. Autoimmune Skin Diseases in the Dog

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, W M

    1981-01-01

    Diagnoses of autoimmune skin diseases require very careful observation of the skin lesions, and selection of an intact vesicle for histopathological examination. If available, immunofluorescent studies can be very useful in confirming the diagnosis of autoimmune skin disease. Seven autoimmune skin diseases are briefly reviewed. Therapy must be aggressive and owner warned of the guarded prognosis.

  2. Significance of exercise-induced ST segment depression in patients with myocardial infarction involving the left circumflex artery. Evaluation by exercise thallium-201 myocardial single photon emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The significance of exercise-induced ST segment depression in patients with left circumflex artery involvement was investigated by comparing exercise electrocardiography with exercise thallium-201 single photon emission computed tomography (Tl-SPECT) and the wall motion estimated by left ventriculography. Tl-SPECT and exercise electrocardiography were simultaneously performed in 51 patients with left circumflex artery involvement (angina pectoris 30, myocardial infarction 21). In patients with myocardial infarction, exercise-induced ST depression was frequently found in the V2, V3 and V4 leads. In patients with angina pectoris, ST depression was frequently found in the II, III, aVF, V5 and V6 leads. There was no obvious difference in the leads of ST depression in patients with myocardial infarction with ischemia and without ischemia on Tl-SPECT images. In patients with myocardial infarction, the lateral wall motion of the infarcted area evaluated by left ventriculography was more significantly impaired in the patients with ST depression than without ST depression (p<0.01). Exercise-induced ST depression in the precordial leads possibly reflects wall motion abnormality rather than ischemia in the lateral infarcted myocardium. (author)

  3. 自身免疫性脑炎相关癫痫对儿童认知功能影响%Influence of epilepsy induced by autoimmune encephalitis on cognitive function of children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冀景芳

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨自身免疫性脑炎相关癫痫对儿童认知功能的影响。方法选择2010年2月~2014年2月新乡市中心医院(以下简称“我院”)收治的自身免疫性脑炎引发癫痫患儿40例为病例组,序贯选择同期在我院行常规体检的健康儿童40名作为对照组。采用中国韦氏儿童智力量表及Halstead-Reita(H-R)儿童神经心理成套测验检测并比较两组儿童智商(IQ)及脑病损程度(DQ)。同时,收集病例组患儿一般情况,采用Logistic回归分析自身免疫性脑炎引发癫痫患儿智力的影响因素。结果病例组患儿智力主要处于低于平常(32.5%)及边界(40.0豫)水平,而对照组主要为平常(85.0豫)水平;病例组IQ值[(72.7±21.8)分]低于对照组[(98.2±8.7)分],差异有统计学意义(P1,P 1, P 1, P< 0.05). Conclusion Epilepsy induced by autoimmune encephalitis can reduce children's cognitive func-tion, which may be related with frequency of disease development, course of disease and types of antiepileptic drugs.

  4. Multiparametric autoimmune diagnostics: recent advances

    OpenAIRE

    Damoiseaux J

    2016-01-01

    Jan Damoiseaux Central Diagnostic Laboratory, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, the Netherlands Abstract: Autoimmune diagnostics in a routine clinical laboratory is constantly challenged by the discovery of new autoantibodies and technical innovations in the immunoassays applied. These challenges are, in particular, combined in the multiparametric immunoassays. Appropriate positioning of multiparametric immunoassays within the laboratory requires integrated knowledge of the c...

  5. Pancreatic Tuberculosis or Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Ayesha Salahuddin; Muhammad Wasif Saif

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Isolated pancreatic and peripancreatic tuberculosis is a challenging diagnosis due to its rarity and variable presentation. Pancreatic tuberculosis can mimic pancreatic carcinoma. Similarly, autoimmune pancreatitis can appear as a focal lesion resembling pancreatic malignancy. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration provides an effective tool for differentiating between benign and malignant pancreatic lesions. The immune processes involved in immunoglobulin G4 relate...

  6. Mitochondria and left ventricular hypertrophy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haiyan Zhu; Shiwen Wang

    2008-01-01

    @@ Introduction Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is one of the vicious organ damages of essential hypertension.It contributes a lot to high mortality of essential hypertension due to sudden cardiac death,ventricular arrhythmia and heart failure.Many factors involve in the pathogenesis of hypertension-induced LVH including inherited variants as well as environmental factors.

  7. An autosomal locus causing autoimmune disease: Autoimmune polyglandular disease type I assigned to chromosome 21

    OpenAIRE

    Aaltonen, Johanna; Björses, Petra; Sandkuijl, Lodewijk; Perheentupa, Jaakko; Peltonen, Leena Johanna

    1994-01-01

    textabstractAutoimmune polyglandular disease type I (APECED) is an autosomal recessive autoimmune disease characterized by a variable combination of the failure of the endocrine glands. The pathogenesis of this unique autoimmune disease is unknown; unlike many other autoimmune diseases, APECED does not show association to specific HLA haplotypes. Unravelling the APECED locus will identify a novel gene outside the HLA loci influencing the outcome of autoimmune diseases. We have assigned the di...

  8. Cacao polyphenols ameliorate autoimmune myocarditis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zempo, Hirofumi; Suzuki, Jun-Ichi; Watanabe, Ryo; Wakayama, Kouji; Kumagai, Hidetoshi; Ikeda, Yuichi; Akazawa, Hiroshi; Komuro, Issei; Isobe, Mitsuaki

    2016-04-01

    Myocarditis is a clinically severe disease; however, no effective treatment has been established. The aim of this study was to determine whether cacao bean (Theobroma cacao) polyphenols ameliorate autoimmune myocarditis. We used an experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) model in Balb/c mice. Mice with induced EAM were treated with a cacao polyphenol extract (CPE, n=12) or vehicle (n=12). On day 21, hearts were harvested and analyzed. Elevated heart weight to body weight and fibrotic area ratios as well as high cardiac cell infiltration were observed in the vehicle-treated EAM mice. However, these increases were significantly suppressed in the CPE-treated mice. Reverse transcriptase-PCR revealed that mRNA expressions of interleukin (Il)-1β, Il-6, E-selectin, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and collagen type 1 were lower in the CPE group compared with the vehicle group. The mRNA expressions of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase (Nox)2 and Nox4 were increased in the vehicle-treated EAM hearts, although CPE treatment did not significantly suppress the transcription levels. However, compared with vehicle treatment of EAM hearts, CPE treatment significantly suppressed hydrogen peroxide concentrations. Cardiac myeloperoxidase activity, the intensity of dihydroethidium staining and the phosphorylation of nuclear factor-κB p65 were also lower in the CPE group compared with the vehicle group. Our data suggest that CPE ameliorates EAM in mice. CPE is a promising dietary supplement to suppress cardiovascular inflammation and oxidative stress. PMID:26657007

  9. The Role of Pathogenic Autoantibodies in Autoimmunity

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    Merrill J. Rowley

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The serological presence of autoantibodies is diagnostic of autoimmunity, and these autoantibodies may be present for many years before the presentation of autoimmune disease (AID. Although a pathogenic role has been demonstrated for various autoantibodies reactive with cell surface and extracellular autoantigens, studies using monoclonal antibodies (mAb show not all antibodies in the polyclonal response are pathogenic. Differences depend on Fab-mediated diversity in epitope specificity, Fc-mediated effects based on immunoglobulin (Ig class and subclass, activation of complement, and the milieu in which the reaction occurs. These autoantibodies often occur in organ-specific AID and this review illustrates their pathogenic and highly specific effects. The role of autoantibodies associated with intracellular antigens is less clear. In vitro they may inhibit or adversely affect well-defined intracellular biochemical pathways, yet, in vivo they are separated from their autoantigens by multiple cellular barriers. Recent evidence that Ig can traverse cell membranes, interact with intracellular proteins, and induce apoptosis has provided new evidence for a pathogenic role for such autoantibodies. An understanding of how autoantibodies behave in the polyclonal response and their role in pathogenesis of AID may help identify populations of culprit B-cells and selection of treatments that suppress or eliminate them.

  10. Idiopathic Granulomatous Mastitis: An Autoimmune Disease?

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    Fatih Altintoprak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This study aimed to investigate the autoimmune basis of idiopathic granulomatous mastitis (IGM by determining the anti-nuclear antibody (ANA and extractable nuclear antigen (ENA levels of patients diagnosed with IGM. Material and Methods. Twenty-six IGM patients were evaluated. Serum samples were analyzed for autoantibodies by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF using a substrate kit that induced fluorescein-conjugated goat antibodies to human immunoglobulin G (IgG. IIF patterns were read at serum dilutions of 1 : 40 and 1 : 100 for ANA positivity. Using the immunoblot technique, the sera of patients were assayed at dilutions of 1 : 40 and 1 : 100 for human autoantibodies of the IgG class to 15 lines of highly purified ENAs. Results. In the IIF studies for ANA, positivity was identified for four different patterns in the 1 : 40 diluted preparations, for three different patients in the 1 : 100 diluted preparations and only one pattern was identified at the 1 : 320 dilution. In the ENA studies, positivity was identified for four different pattern in the 1 : 40 dilution, and only one pattern was identified at the 1 : 100 dilution. Conclusion. This study was not able to support the eventual existence of an autoimmune basis for IGM.

  11. The role of T helper (TH)17 cells as a double-edged sword in the interplay of infection and autoimmunity with a focus on xenobiotic-induced immunomodulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemdan, Nasr Y A; Abu El-Saad, Ahmed M; Sack, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Extensive research in recent years suggests that exposure to xenobiotic stimuli plays a critical role in autoimmunity induction and severity and that the resulting response would be exacerbated in individuals with an infection-aroused immune system. In this context, heavy metals constitute a prominent category of xenobiotic substances, known to alter divergent immune cell responses in accidentally and occupationally exposed individuals, thereby increasing the susceptibility to autoimmunity and cancer, especially when accompanied by inflammation-triggered persistent sensitization. This perception is learned from experimental models of infection and epidemiologic studies and clearly underscores the interplay of exposure to such immunomodulatory elements with pre- or postexposure infectious events. Further, the TH17 cell subset, known to be associated with a growing list of autoimmune manifestations, may be the "superstar" at the interface of xenobiotic exposure and autoimmunity. In this review, the most recently established links to this nomination are short-listed to create a framework to better understand new insights into TH17's contributions to autoimmunity. PMID:24151516

  12. The Role of T Helper (TH17 Cells as a Double-Edged Sword in the Interplay of Infection and Autoimmunity with a Focus on Xenobiotic-Induced Immunomodulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasr Y. A. Hemdan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Extensive research in recent years suggests that exposure to xenobiotic stimuli plays a critical role in autoimmunity induction and severity and that the resulting response would be exacerbated in individuals with an infection-aroused immune system. In this context, heavy metals constitute a prominent category of xenobiotic substances, known to alter divergent immune cell responses in accidentally and occupationally exposed individuals, thereby increasing the susceptibility to autoimmunity and cancer, especially when accompanied by inflammation-triggered persistent sensitization. This perception is learned from experimental models of infection and epidemiologic studies and clearly underscores the interplay of exposure to such immunomodulatory elements with pre- or postexposure infectious events. Further, the TH17 cell subset, known to be associated with a growing list of autoimmune manifestations, may be the “superstar” at the interface of xenobiotic exposure and autoimmunity. In this review, the most recently established links to this nomination are short-listed to create a framework to better understand new insights into TH17’s contributions to autoimmunity.

  13. Cellular stress and innate inflammation in organ-specific autoimmunity: lessons learned from vitiligo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, John E

    2016-01-01

    For decades, research in autoimmunity has focused primarily on immune contributions to disease. Yet recent studies report elevated levels of reactive oxygen species and abnormal activation of the unfolded protein response in cells targeted by autoimmunity, implicating cellular stress originating from the target tissue as a contributing factor. A better understanding of this contribution may help to answer important lingering questions in organ-specific autoimmunity, as to what factors initiate disease and what directs its tissue specificity. Vitiligo, an autoimmune disease of the skin, has been the focus of translational research for over 30 years, and both melanocyte stress and immune mechanisms have been thought to be mutually exclusive explanations for pathogenesis. Chemical-induced vitiligo is a unique clinical presentation that reflects the importance of environmental influences on autoimmunity, provides insight into a new paradigm linking cell stress to the immune response, and serves as a template for other autoimmune diseases. In this review, I will discuss the evidence for cell stress contributions to a number of autoimmune diseases, the questions that remain, and how vitiligo, an underappreciated example of organ-specific autoimmunity, helps to answer them. PMID:26683142

  14. Thyroid autoimmunity in pregnant Nigerians

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    Oluwatosin O Kayode

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Thyroid autoimmunity is a recognized disorder in pregnancy and is associated with a number of adverse pregnancy outcomes. Aim: This study set out to determine the relationship between pregnancy and thyroid autoimmunity in Nigerian women. Settings and Design: This was an analytical cross-sectional study carried out in a tertiary hospital in South Western Nigeria with a total study population of 108 pregnant and 52 nonpregnant women. Subjects and Methods: Serum thyroid stimulating hormone, free thyroxine and thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPO-Ab were quantitatively determined using enzyme linked immuno-assays. Pregnant women were grouped into three categories ( 28 weeks. The relationship between pregnancy and thyroid autoimmunity was determined using Spearman correlation. Analysis of variance was used in comparison of means, Chi-square test used in analyzing proportions while P ≤ 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: The mean age of the pregnant women was 30.4 ± 6.0 years while the mean gestational age of all pregnant women was 20.6 ± 9.6 weeks. The mean TPO-Ab of 11.58 IU/ml in the pregnant was significantly higher than that of the controls of 7.23 IU/ml (P < 0.001. Out of 108 pregnant women, 27 (25% had elevated TPO-Ab as against about 2% of the nonpregnant women levels P < 0.001. The number of pregnant women with elevated TPO-Ab levels decreased from 33.3% in the first group to 25.6% and 15.2% in the second and third groups. Conclusion: Thyroid autoimmunity expressed by the presence of TPO-Ab is high among pregnant Nigerian women and the frequency of autoimmunity appears to decline with advancing gestational age.

  15. Disfunção ventricular esquerda transitória por cardiomiopatia induzida por estresse Transient left ventricular dysfunction due to stress-induced cardiomyopathy

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    Marcus Vinicius Simões

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Apresenta-se o caso de uma paciente de 71 anos que preencheu os critérios diagnósticos para cardiomiopatia induzida por estresse que foi desencadeada por intenso estresse emocional após atropelamento por bicicleta. O quadro clínico mimetizou o infarto agudo do miocárdio, manifestando-se com dor precordial, supradesnivelamento do segmento ST, seguido por ondas T profundas e prolongamento do intervalo QT, elevação discreta de enzimas cardíacas e cursando com disfunção sistólica apical do ventrículo esquerdo e hipercinesia das porções basais (conferindo o aspecto de "abaloamento apical", mas na ausência de obstrução coronariana subepicárdica. A função ventricular normalizou-se após a segunda semana de evolução.The case presented here is of a 71-yr-old female patient who met the diagnostic criteria for stress-induced cardiomyopathy, which was triggered by intense emotional stress after being hit by a bicycle. The clinical picture mimicked that of an acute myocardial infarction, manifesting as precordial pain, ST-segment depression followed by deep negative T waves and prolonging of the QT interval, slight increase in cardiac enzymes and coursing with transient apical ballooning of the left ventricle and hyperkinesis of the basal walls (conferring the aspect of "apical ballooning", although in the absence of subepicardial coronary obstruction. Ventricular function normalized after the second week of clinical evolution.

  16. Effect of Varying Definitions of Contrast-Induced Acute Kidney Injury and Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction on One-Year Mortality in Patients Having Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyxaras, Stylianos A; Zhang, Yuan; Wolf, Alexander; Schmitz, Thomas; Naber, Christoph K

    2015-08-01

    The prognostic relevance of direct contrast toxicity in patients treated with transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) remains unclear because of the confounding hemodynamic effect of acute left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) impairment on kidney function estimation. In addition, different definitions of contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI) may have different prognostic stratification potential. In the present study, 240 consecutive patients who underwent TAVI were prospectively enrolled. CI-AKI was defined (1) according to the postprocedural creatinine increase of ≥0.3 mg/dl or (2) according to the postprocedural decrease of the creatinine clearance of at least 25%. Primary end point of the study was 1-year all-cause mortality. At a mean follow-up of 1.7 ± 1.4 years, all-cause mortality was significantly higher in the CI-AKI patient group, using both CI-AKI definitions (for (1) and (2) p = 0.025 and p definition (2) was higher (area under the curve 0.704; p definition (1) (area under the curve 0.602; p = 0.037) for the primary end point of 1-year mortality. In conclusion, in a nonselected patient population who underwent TAVI, CI-AKI was confirmed as an independent predictor of clinical outcome. Only the interaction between LVEF and baseline creatinine values was found to determine CI-AKI. Definition of CI-AKI based to creatinine clearance values had higher prognostic accuracy in comparison with the CI-AKI definition based on creatinine absolute value changes. PMID:26026866

  17. Cannabinoids and autoimmune diseases: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katchan, Valeria; David, Paula; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2016-06-01

    Cannabinoids have shown to have a variety effects on body systems. Through CB1 and CB2 receptors, amongst other, they exert an effect by modulating neurotransmitter and cytokine release. Current research in the role of cannabinoids in the immune system shows that they possess immunosuppressive properties. They can inhibit proliferation of leucocytes, induce apoptosis of T cells and macrophages and reduce secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In mice models, they are effective in reducing inflammation in arthritis, multiple sclerosis, have a positive effect on neuropathic pain and in type 1 diabetes mellitus. They are effective as treatment for fibromyalgia and have shown to have anti-fibrotic effect in scleroderma. Studies in human models are scarce and not conclusive and more research is required in this field. Cannabinoids can be therefore promising immunosuppressive and anti-fibrotic agents in the therapy of autoimmune disorders. PMID:26876387

  18. Autoimmune hepatitis as an adverse effect of long-term methotrexate therapy

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    Kamilia Ksouda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Methotrexate (MTX is one of the most commonly used medicines in the treatment of psoriatic arthritis. The drug can produce steatosis and cirrhosis. Autoimmune hepatitis is a rare and serious adverse effect. We describe the case of a 53-year-old woman who developed autoimmune hepatitis after a long-term use of MTX for psoriatic arthritis. Hepatitis was completely resolved 4 months after stopping this drug. The pathophysiologic mechanisms of a drug-induced autoimmunity are unclear and complex. This report confirms the need to monitor liver enzymes carefully in patients using long-term treatment with MTX for psoriasis or rheumatoid arthritis.

  19. The role of environmental factors in autoimmune thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hybenova, Monika; Hrda, Pavlina; Procházková, Jarmila; Stejskal, Vera; Sterzl, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    Environmental factors can play an important role in the development of autoimmune thyroiditis (AT) and other autoimmune diseases. This article reviews the role of heavy metals and infectious agents in AT. Currently, the genes responsible for a metal-induced pathology are known in experimental animals but similar knowledge is lacking in man. Metals such as nickel or mercury induce delayed type T cell hypersensitivity (allergy) which is relatively common, especially in women. T-cell allergy can be studied with the lymphocyte transformation test, LTT-MELISA. It has been found that patients with AT and other autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, psoriasis, systemic lupus erythematosus and atopic eczema, show increased lymphocyte reactivity in vitro to inorganic mercury, nickel and other metals compared to healthy controls. The important source of mercury is dental amalgam. Replacement of amalgam in mercury-allergic subjects resulted in improvement of health in about 70% of patients. Several laboratory parameters such as mercury-specific lymphocyte responses in vitro and anti-thyroid autoantibodies were normalized as well. In contrast, no changes in health and laboratory results were observed in mercury-allergic patients who did not have their amalgams replaced. The same was true for non-allergic patients who underwent amalgam replacement. Infectious agents such as Helicobacter pylori (Hp) may cause chronic inflammation and autoimmune reactivity in susceptible subjects. The results of in vitro experiments performed with lymphocytes from Hp infected patients indicate that Hp can cause immunosuppression which might be eliminated by successful eradication therapy. In conclusion, heavy metals and Hp infection may play an important role in AT. Laboratory tests, such as LTT-MELISA, can help to determine the specific etiological agents causing inflammation in individual patients. The treatment of AT and other autoimmune diseases might be improved if such agents are

  20. N-Acetylcysteine protects against trichloroethene-mediated autoimmunity by attenuating oxidative stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Gangduo; Wang, Jianling; Ma, Huaxian; Ansari, G.A.S.; Khan, M. Firoze, E-mail: mfkhan@utmb.edu

    2013-11-15

    Exposure to trichloroethene (TCE), a ubiquitous environmental contaminant, is known to induce autoimmunity both in humans and animal models. However, mechanisms underlying TCE-mediated autoimmunity remain largely unknown. Previous studies from our laboratory in MRL +/+ mice suggest that oxidative stress may contribute to TCE-induced autoimmune response. The current study was undertaken to further assess the role of oxidative stress in TCE-induced autoimmunity by supplementing with an antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Groups of female MRL +/+ mice were given TCE, NAC or TCE + NAC for 6 weeks (TCE, 10 mmol/kg, i.p., every 4th day; NAC, 250 mg/kg/day through drinking water). TCE exposure led to significant increases in serum levels of anti-nuclear, anti-dsDNA and anti-Sm antibodies. TCE exposure also led to significant induction of anti-malondiadelhyde (MDA)- and anti-hydroxynonenal (HNE)-protein adduct antibodies which were associated with increased ANA in the sera along with increased MDA-/HNE-protein adducts in the livers and kidneys, and increases in protein oxidation (carbonylation) in the sera, livers and kidneys, suggesting an overall increase in oxidative stress. Moreover, TCE exposure also resulted in increased release of IL-17 from splenocytes and increases in IL-17 mRNA expression. Remarkably, NAC supplementation attenuated not only the TCE-induced oxidative stress, IL-17 release and mRNA expression, but also the markers of autoimmunity, as evident from decreased levels of ANA, anti-dsDNA and anti-Sm antibodies in the sera. These results provide further support to a role of oxidative stress in TCE-induced autoimmune response. Attenuation of TCE-induced autoimmunity in mice by NAC provides an approach for preventive and/or therapeutic strategies. - Highlights: • TCE led to increased autoantibodies, supporting its potential to induce autoimmunity. • TCE exposure led to increases in lipid perioxidation and protein carbonyls. • TCE exposure resulted in

  1. Oral Tolerance Induction in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis with Candida utilis Expressing the Immunogenic MOG35-55 Peptide.

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    Christoph Buerth

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is an autoimmune disease that attacks myelinated axons in the central nervous system. Induction of oral tolerance is a potent mechanism to prevent autoimmunity. The food yeast Candida utilis was used to test the therapeutic potential of oral tolerance induction in an animal model of human multiple sclerosis (MS. We constructed a C. utilis strain, which displays a fusion peptide composed of the encephalitogenic MOG35-55 peptide and the C. utilis Gas1 cell wall protein on its surface.By immunizing mice with MOG35-55 peptide experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE was induced in a mouse model. Feeding of mice with C. utilis that expresses MOG35-55 peptide on its surface was started seven days prior to immunization and was continued for ten days. Control animals were treated with wild-type fungus or left untreated. Untreated mice developed first clinical symptoms ten days post immunization (p. i. with an ascending paralysis reaching maximal clinical disability at day 18 to 20 p. i.. Treatment with the wild-type strain demonstrated comparable clinical symptoms. In contrast, oral gavage of MOG35-55-presenting fungus ameliorated the development of EAE. In addition, incidence as well as maximal clinical disease severity were significantly reduced. Interestingly, reduction of disease severity also occurred in animals treated with heat-inactivated C. utilis cells indicating that tolerance induction was independent of fungal viability. Better disease outcome correlated with reduced demyelination and cellular inflammation in the spinal cord, lower T cell proliferation against rechallenge with MOG35-55 and more regulatory T cells in the lymph nodes. Our data demonstrate successful that using the food approved fungus C. utilis presenting the immunogenic MOG35-55 peptide on its surface induced an oral tolerance against this epitope in EAE. Further studies will reveal the nature and extent of an anti-inflammatory environment

  2. Oral Tolerance Induction in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis with Candida utilis Expressing the Immunogenic MOG35-55 Peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heininger, Maximilian K.; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Kieseier, Bernd C.; Ernst, Joachim F.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease that attacks myelinated axons in the central nervous system. Induction of oral tolerance is a potent mechanism to prevent autoimmunity. The food yeast Candida utilis was used to test the therapeutic potential of oral tolerance induction in an animal model of human multiple sclerosis (MS). We constructed a C. utilis strain, which displays a fusion peptide composed of the encephalitogenic MOG35-55 peptide and the C. utilis Gas1 cell wall protein on its surface.By immunizing mice with MOG35-55 peptide experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) was induced in a mouse model. Feeding of mice with C. utilis that expresses MOG35-55 peptide on its surface was started seven days prior to immunization and was continued for ten days. Control animals were treated with wild-type fungus or left untreated. Untreated mice developed first clinical symptoms ten days post immunization (p. i.) with an ascending paralysis reaching maximal clinical disability at day 18 to 20 p. i.. Treatment with the wild-type strain demonstrated comparable clinical symptoms. In contrast, oral gavage of MOG35-55-presenting fungus ameliorated the development of EAE. In addition, incidence as well as maximal clinical disease severity were significantly reduced. Interestingly, reduction of disease severity also occurred in animals treated with heat-inactivated C. utilis cells indicating that tolerance induction was independent of fungal viability. Better disease outcome correlated with reduced demyelination and cellular inflammation in the spinal cord, lower T cell proliferation against rechallenge with MOG35-55 and more regulatory T cells in the lymph nodes. Our data demonstrate successful that using the food approved fungus C. utilis presenting the immunogenic MOG35-55 peptide on its surface induced an oral tolerance against this epitope in EAE. Further studies will reveal the nature and extent of an anti-inflammatory environment established by the

  3. Oral Tolerance Induction in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis with Candida utilis Expressing the Immunogenic MOG35-55 Peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buerth, Christoph; Mausberg, Anne K; Heininger, Maximilian K; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Kieseier, Bernd C; Ernst, Joachim F

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease that attacks myelinated axons in the central nervous system. Induction of oral tolerance is a potent mechanism to prevent autoimmunity. The food yeast Candida utilis was used to test the therapeutic potential of oral tolerance induction in an animal model of human multiple sclerosis (MS). We constructed a C. utilis strain, which displays a fusion peptide composed of the encephalitogenic MOG35-55 peptide and the C. utilis Gas1 cell wall protein on its surface.By immunizing mice with MOG35-55 peptide experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) was induced in a mouse model. Feeding of mice with C. utilis that expresses MOG35-55 peptide on its surface was started seven days prior to immunization and was continued for ten days. Control animals were treated with wild-type fungus or left untreated. Untreated mice developed first clinical symptoms ten days post immunization (p. i.) with an ascending paralysis reaching maximal clinical disability at day 18 to 20 p. i.. Treatment with the wild-type strain demonstrated comparable clinical symptoms. In contrast, oral gavage of MOG35-55-presenting fungus ameliorated the development of EAE. In addition, incidence as well as maximal clinical disease severity were significantly reduced. Interestingly, reduction of disease severity also occurred in animals treated with heat-inactivated C. utilis cells indicating that tolerance induction was independent of fungal viability. Better disease outcome correlated with reduced demyelination and cellular inflammation in the spinal cord, lower T cell proliferation against rechallenge with MOG35-55 and more regulatory T cells in the lymph nodes. Our data demonstrate successful that using the food approved fungus C. utilis presenting the immunogenic MOG35-55 peptide on its surface induced an oral tolerance against this epitope in EAE. Further studies will reveal the nature and extent of an anti-inflammatory environment established by the

  4. Animal Models of Autoimmune Neuropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Soliven, Betty

    2014-01-01

    The peripheral nervous system (PNS) comprises the cranial nerves, the spinal nerves with their roots and rami, dorsal root ganglia neurons, the peripheral nerves, and peripheral components of the autonomic nervous system. Cell-mediated or antibody-mediated immune attack on the PNS results in distinct clinical syndromes, which are classified based on the tempo of illness, PNS component(s) involved, and the culprit antigen(s) identified. Insights into the pathogenesis of autoimmune neuropathy h...

  5. Progranulin antibodies in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurner, Lorenz; Preuss, Klaus-Dieter; Fadle, Natalie; Regitz, Evi; Klemm, Philipp; Zaks, Marina; Kemele, Maria; Hasenfus, Andrea; Csernok, Elena; Gross, Wolfgang L; Pasquali, Jean-Louis; Martin, Thierry; Bohle, Rainer Maria; Pfreundschuh, Michael

    2013-05-01

    Systemic vasculitides constitute a heterogeneous group of diseases. Autoimmunity mediated by B lymphocytes and their humoral effector mechanisms play a major role in ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) as well as in non-ANCA associated primary systemic vasculitides and in the different types of autoimmune connective tissue disorders and rheumatoid arthritis. In order to detect autoantibodies in systemic vasculitides, we screened protein macroarrays of human cDNA expression libraries with sera from patients with ANCA-associated and ANCA-negative primary systemic vasculitides. This approach led to the identification of antibodies against progranulin, a 88 kDA secreted glycoprotein with strong anti-inflammatory activity in the course of disease of giant-cell arteritis/polymyalgia rheumatica (14/65), Takayasu's arteritis (4/13), classical panarteritis nodosa (4/10), Behcet's disease (2/6) and in the course of disease in granulomatosis with polyangiitis (31/75), Churg-Strauss syndrome (7/23) and in microscopic polyangiitis (7/19). In extended screenings the progranulin antibodies were also detected in other autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (39/91) and rheumatoid arthritis (16/44). Progranulin antibodies were detected only in 1 of 97 healthy controls. Anti-progranulin positive patients with systemic vasculitides, systemic lupus erythematosus or rheumatoid arthritis had significant lower progranulin plasma levels, indicating a neutralizing effect. In light of the anti-inflammatory effects of progranulin, progranulin antibodies might exert pro-inflammatory effects thus contributing to the pathogenesis of the respective autoimmune diseases and might serve as a marker for disease activity. This hypothesis is supported by the fact that a positive progranulin antibody status was associated with active disease in granulomatosis with polyangiitis. PMID:23149338

  6. Immunotherapeutic strategies in autoimmune uveitis

    OpenAIRE

    Papotto, Pedro Henrique; Marengo, Eliana Blini; Sardinha, Luiz Roberto; Goldberg, Anna Carla; Rizzo, Luiz Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune uveitis is an organ-specific disorder characterized by irreversible lesions to the eye that predominantly affect people in their most productive years and is among the leading causes of visual deficit and blindness. Currently available therapies are effective in the treatment of a wide spectrum of uveitis, but are often associated with severe side effects. Here, we review ongoing research with promising immunomodulatory therapeutic strategies, describing their specific features, in...

  7. Cystic Lesions in Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Gompertz, Macarena; Morales, Claudia; Aldana, Hernán; Castillo, Jaime; Berger, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) can be chronic or recurrent, but frequently completely reversible after steroid treatment. A cystic lesion in AIP is a rare finding, and it can mimic a pancreatic cystic neoplasm. Difficulties in an exact diagnosis interfere with treatment, and surgery cannot be avoided in some cases. We report the history of a 63-year-old male presenting with jaundice and pruritus. AIP was confirmed by imaging and elevated IgG4 blood levels, and the patient completely recovered ...

  8. Autoimmune hypophysitis or lymphocytic hypophysitis

    OpenAIRE

    Paiva, I; Gomes, L.; C. Ribeiro; Carvalheiro, M; Ruas, A

    2003-01-01

    This entity, due to the pituitary lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate, was described for the first time in 1962. The clinical suspicion relies on a rapidly progressing hypopituitarism, particularly with adrenal involvement, affecting women in the peripartum period or patients with previously recognized autoimmune disease. Diabetes insipidus is also often reported. A sellar mass is found in 80% of cases. The diagnosis is confirmed by histology, due to the absence of a specific serological test. The e...

  9. Historical reflections on autoimmune hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ian R Mackay

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH),initially known as chronic active or active chronic hepatitis (and by various other names),first came under clinical notice in the late 1940s.However,quite likely,chronic active hepatitis (CAH) had been observed prior to this and was attributed to a persistently destructive virus infection of the liver.An earlier (and controversial) designation in 1956 as lupoid hepatitis was derived from associated L.E.cell test positivity and emphasized accompanying multisystem features and immunological aberrations.Young women featured prominently in early descriptions of CAH.AIH was first applied in 1965 as a descriptive term.Disease-characteristic autoantibodies were defined from the early 1960s,notably antinuclear antibody (ANA),smooth muscle antibody (SMA) and liver-kidney microsomal (LKM) antibody.These are still widely used diagnostically but their relationship to pathogenesis is still not evident.A liver and disease specific autoantigen has long been searched for but unsuccessfully.Prolonged immunosuppressive therapy with predisolone and azathioprine in the 1960s proved beneficial and remains standard therapy today.AIH like many other autoimmune diseases is associated with particular HLA alleles especially with the "ancestral" B8,DR3 haplotype,and also with DR4.Looking forwards,AIH is one of the several enigmatic autoimmune diseases that,despite being (relatively) organ specific,are marked by autoimmune reactivities with non-organ-specific autoantigens.New paradigms are needed to explain the occurrence,expressions and pathogenesis of such diseases.

  10. Historical reflections on autoimmune hepatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Mackay, Ian R.

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), initially known as chronic active or active chronic hepatitis (and by various other names), first came under clinical notice in the late 1940s. However, quite likely, chronic active hepatitis (CAH) had been observed prior to this and was attributed to a persistently destructive virus infection of the liver. An earlier (and controversial) designation in 1956 as lupoid hepatitis was derived from associated L.E. cell test positivity and emphasized accompanying multisy...

  11. Dysregulation of T lymphocyte proliferative responses in autoimmunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sydney K Elizer

    Full Text Available T cells are critically dependent on cellular proliferation in order to carry out their effector functions. Autoimmune strains are commonly thought to have uncontrolled T cell proliferation; however, in the murine model of autoimmune diabetes, hypo-proliferation of T cells leading to defective AICD was previously uncovered. We now determine whether lupus prone murine strains are similarly hyporesponsive. Upon extensive characterization of T lymphocyte activation, we have observed a common feature of CD4 T cell activation shared among three autoimmune strains-NOD, MRL, and NZBxNZW F1s. When stimulated with a polyclonal mitogen, CD4 T cells demonstrate arrested cell division and diminished dose responsiveness as compared to the non-autoimmune strain C57BL/6, a phenotype we further traced to a reliance on B cell mediated costimulation, which underscores the success of B cell directed immune therapies in preventing T cell mediated tissue injury. In turn, the diminished proliferative capacity of these CD4 T cells lead to a decreased, but activation appropriate, susceptibility to activation induced cell death. A similar decrement in stimulation response was observed in the CD8 compartment of NOD mice; NOD CD8 T cells were distinguished from lupus prone strains by a diminished dose-responsiveness to anti-CD3 mediated stimulation. This distinction may explain the differential pathogenetic pathways activated in diabetes and lupus prone murine strains.

  12. Mast cells contribute to peripheral tolerance and attenuate autoimmune vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Poh-Yi; Summers, Shaun A; Ooi, Joshua D; O'Sullivan, Kim M; Tan, Diana S Y; Muljadi, Ruth C M; Odobasic, Dragana; Kitching, A Richard; Holdsworth, Stephen R

    2012-12-01

    Mast cells contribute to the modulation of the immune response, but their role in autoimmune renal disease is not well understood. Here, we induced autoimmunity resulting in focal necrotizing GN by immunizing wild-type or mast cell-deficient (Kit(W-sh/W-sh)) mice with myeloperoxidase. Mast cell-deficient mice exhibited more antimyeloperoxidase CD4+ T cells, enhanced dermal delayed-type hypersensitivity responses to myeloperoxidase, and more severe focal necrotizing GN. Furthermore, the lymph nodes draining the sites of immunization had fewer Tregs and reduced production of IL-10 in mice lacking mast cells. Reconstituting these mice with mast cells significantly increased the numbers of Tregs in the lymph nodes and attenuated both autoimmunity and severity of disease. After immunization with myeloperoxidase, mast cells migrated from the skin to the lymph nodes to contact Tregs. In an ex vivo assay, mast cells enhanced Treg suppression through IL-10. Reconstitution of mast cell-deficient mice with IL-10-deficient mast cells led to enhanced autoimmunity to myeloperoxidase and greater disease severity compared with reconstitution with IL-10-intact mast cells. Taken together, these studies establish a role for mast cells in mediating peripheral tolerance to myeloperoxidase, protecting them from the development of focal necrotizing GN in ANCA-associated vasculitis. PMID:23138486

  13. Pancreatic Tuberculosis or Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayesha Salahuddin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Isolated pancreatic and peripancreatic tuberculosis is a challenging diagnosis due to its rarity and variable presentation. Pancreatic tuberculosis can mimic pancreatic carcinoma. Similarly, autoimmune pancreatitis can appear as a focal lesion resembling pancreatic malignancy. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration provides an effective tool for differentiating between benign and malignant pancreatic lesions. The immune processes involved in immunoglobulin G4 related systemic diseases and tuberculosis appear to have some similarities. Case Report. We report a case of a 59-year-old Southeast Asian male who presented with fever, weight loss, and obstructive jaundice. CT scan revealed pancreatic mass and enlarged peripancreatic lymph nodes. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration confirmed the presence of mycobacterium tuberculosis. Patient also had high immunoglobulin G4 levels suggestive of autoimmune pancreatitis. He was started on antituberculosis medications and steroids. Clinically, he responded to treatment. Follow-up imaging showed findings suggestive of chronic pancreatitis. Discussion. Pancreatic tuberculosis and autoimmune pancreatitis can mimic pancreatic malignancy. Accurate diagnosis is imperative as unnecessary surgical intervention can be avoided. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration seems to be the diagnostic test of choice for pancreatic masses. Long-term follow-up is warranted in cases of chronic pancreatitis.

  14. Eae19, a New Locus on Rat Chromosome 15 Regulating Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    OpenAIRE

    Sheng, Jian Rong; Jagodic, Maja; Dahlman, Ingrid; Becanovic, Kristina; Nohra, Rita; Marta, Monica; Iacobaeus, Ellen; Olsson, Tomas; Wallström, Erik

    2005-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) and its animal model, myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (MOG-EAE), share a complex genetic predisposition with contributions from the major histocompatibility complex class II genes and many other genes. Linkage mapping in F2 crosses between the susceptible DA rat strain and the resistant ACI or BN rat strains in various models of autoimmune neuroinflammation have repeatedly displayed suggestive linkage to a region on...

  15. Modeling toxicodynamic effects of trichloroethylene on liver in mouse model of autoimmune hepatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Gilbert, Kathleen M.; Reisfeld, Brad; Zurlinden, Todd; Kreps, Meagan N.; Erickson, Stephen W.; Blossom, Sarah J.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic exposure to industrial solvent and water pollutant trichloroethylene (TCE) in female MRL+/+ mice generates disease similar to human autoimmune hepatitis. The current study was initiated to investigate why TCE-induced autoimmunity targeted the liver. Compared to other tissues the liver has an unusually robust capacity for repair and regeneration. This investigation examined both time-dependent and dose-dependent effects of TCE on hepatoprotective and pro-inflammatory events in liver an...

  16. Psychotic and nonpsychotic mood disorders in autoimmune encephalitis: diagnostic issues and research implications

    OpenAIRE

    Giuseppe Quaranta; Nunzio Bucci; Cristina Toni; Giulio Perugi

    2015-01-01

    Recent research on autoimmune disorders suggests additional links between systemic and central nervous system (CNS) pathophysiology, among which the identification of antibody-induced limbic encephalitis provided the strongest evidence for the potential involvement of autoimmunity in the pathogenesis of severe mood and psychotic symptoms. In these illnesses, psychiatric symptoms predominate in the initial phase of the disorder in up to 70% of the cases, and they often lead patients to early p...

  17. Expression of thyroid stimulating hormone β splice variant in thyroid of mouse with autoimmune thyroiditis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁继红

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the expression of marrowderived thyroid stimulating hormoneβ(TSHβ)splice variant in thyroid of mouse with autoimmune thyroiditis induced by thyroglobulin(Tg)immunization,and to analyze whether TSHβsplice variant participated in the pathological process of autoimmune thyroiditis.Methods Using random number table,forty-eight mice(24 females and 24 males)of 7 to 8 weeks old with body mass 20 to25 g were randomly divided into 4 groups(12 females

  18. Experimental autoimmune uveitis and other animal models of uveitis: An update

    OpenAIRE

    Svati Bansal; Barathi, Veluchamy A.; Daiju Iwata; Rupesh Agrawal

    2015-01-01

    Over the past several decades, animal models of autoimmune uveitis directed at eye-specific antigens (Ags) have been developed. These have allowed researchers to understand the basic mechanisms that lead to these diseases and also recently helped the researchers in translational research for therapeutic interventions. Experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) is an animal disease model of human endogenous uveitis and can be induced in susceptible animals by immunization with retinal Ags. Ever sin...

  19. Effective tumor treatment targeting a melanoma/melanocyte-associated antigen triggers severe ocular autoimmunity

    OpenAIRE

    Douglas C Palmer; Chan, Chi-Chao; Gattinoni, Luca; Wrzesinski, Claudia; Paulos, Chrystal M.; Hinrichs, Christian S.; Powell, Daniel J.; Klebanoff, Christopher A.; Finkelstein, Steven E.; Fariss, Robert N.; Yu, Zhiya; Nussenblatt, Robert B.; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Restifo, Nicholas P

    2008-01-01

    Nonmutated tissue differentiation antigens expressed by tumors are attractive targets for cancer immunotherapy, but the consequences of a highly effective antitumor immune response on self-tissue have not been fully characterized. We found that the infusion of ex vivo expanded adoptively transferred melanoma/melanocyte-specific CD8+ T cells that mediated robust tumor killing also induced autoimmune destruction of melanocytes in the eye. This severe autoimmunity was associated with the up-regu...

  20. Programming of regulatory T cells from pluripotent stem cells and prevention of autoimmunity*

    OpenAIRE

    Haque, Rizwanul; Lei, Fengyang; Xiong, Xiaofang; Bian, Yanqing; Zhao, Baohua; Wu, Yuzhang; Song, Jianxun

    2012-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells are being used to treat autoimmunity and prevent organ rejection; however, Treg cell-based therapies have been hampered by the technical limitation in obtaining a high number of functional Treg cells. Here we show how to generate functional Treg cells from induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, and to determine the potential role of such cells for Treg-based immunotherapy against autoimmunity in a therapeutic setting. Ligation of a Notch ligand and transduction of the...

  1. Use of a xanthine oxidase inhibitor in autoimmune hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shamma, Safa; Eross, Balint; Mclaughlin, Simon

    2013-03-01

    A 62-year-old woman with type 1 autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) failed to sustain remission when steroids were withdrawn from a regimen of steroids and azathioprine (AZA). Thiopurine metabolites revealed elevated 6-MMP (6-methyl mercaptopurine) and low 6-TGN (6-thioguanine nucleotide) consistent with AZA-induced hepatotoxicity. Introducing the xanthine oxidase inhibitor allopurinol led to rapid normalization of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and discontinuation of steroids. PMID:23238820

  2. FOXP3+ Treg Cells and Gender Bias in Autoimmune Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Nie, Jia; Li, Yang Yang; Zheng, Song Guo; Tsun, Andy; Li, Bin

    2015-01-01

    CD4+CD25+ regulatory T (Treg) cells play a pivotal role in the maintenance of immune homeostasis, where the X-linked master transcription factor forkhead box P3 (FOXP3) determines Treg cell development and function. Genetic deficiency of foxp3 induces dysfunction of Treg cells and immuno-dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, and X-linked syndrome in humans. Functionally deficient Treg cells or the development of exTreg cells positively correlate with autoimmune diseases, such as sys...

  3. Total lymphoid irradiation in autoimmune diseases and organ transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Total lymphoid irradiation, a treatment program developed for the management of Hodgkin's disease, induces profound immunologic changes. These effects have been characterized in animal systems and are now beginning to be exploited in humans for the treatment of autoimmune disease and preparation for organ transplantation. A burgeonning new era of clinical research is developing that will require multidisciplinary collaboration in order to realize its ultimate potential

  4. OX40, OX40L and Autoimmunity: a Comprehensive Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Gwilym J; Hirschfield, Gideon M; Lane, Peter J L

    2016-06-01

    The tumour necrosis factor receptor OX40 (CD134) is activated by its cognate ligand OX40L (CD134L, CD252) and functions as a T cell co-stimulatory molecule. OX40-OX40L interactions have been proposed as a potential therapeutic target for treating autoimmunity. OX40 is expressed on activated T cells, and in the mouse at rest on regulatory T cells (Treg). OX40L is found on antigen-presenting cells, activated T cells and others including lymphoid tissue inducer cells, some endothelia and mast cells. Expression of both molecules is increased after antigen presentation occurs and also in response to multiple other pro-inflammatory factors including CD28 ligation, CD40L ligation and interferon-gamma signaling. Their interactions promote T cell survival, promote an effector T cell phenotype, promote T cell memory, tend to reduce regulatory function, increase effector cytokine production and enhance cell mobility. In some circumstances, OX40 agonism may be associated with increased tolerance, although timing with respect to antigenic stimulus is important. Further, recent work has suggested that OX40L blockade may be more effective than OX40 blockade in reducing autoimmunity. This article reviews the expression of OX40 and OX40L in health, the effects of their interactions and insights from their under- or over-expression. We then review OX40 and OX40L expression in human autoimmune disease, identified associations of variations in their genes (TNFRSF4 and TNFSF4, respectively) with autoimmunity, and data from animal models of human diseases. A rationale for blocking OX40-OX40L interaction in human autoimmunity is then presented along with commentary on the one trial of OX40L blockade in human disease conducted to date. Finally, we discuss potential problems with clinical use of OX40-OX40L directed pharmacotherapy. PMID:26215166

  5. Mouse Models and the Pathological Characterization of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis Induced by MOG35-55%实验性自身免疫性脑脊髓炎鼠模型建立及其病理特点

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张健; 曾育琦; 张静; 康德勇; 黄天文; 陈晓春

    2015-01-01

    目的:建立髓鞘少突胶质细胞糖蛋白多肽(MOG35‐55)诱发的实验性自身免疫性脑脊髓炎(EAE)小鼠模型,并观察其病理特点。方法应用M OG35‐55多肽加福氏完全佐剂皮下注射免疫雌性C56BL/6小鼠,观察其临床症状、病理改变及影像学变化。结果模型组小鼠发病时间为免疫后(12±4)d (8~16 d ),发病率83.3%,呈慢性单向过程;H‐E染色模型鼠脊髓白质见大量炎症细胞浸润;罗克沙尔坚牢蓝染色显示,脊髓白质呈片状髓鞘脱失;电镜显示,髓鞘内层呈板层剥脱,轴索肿胀,结构疏松;脊髓M RI检查可见髓内斑片状T2异常高信号。结论慢性EAE模型具有发病率高、死亡率低、模型稳定、重复性高、制作方便的特点,模型病理改变接近多发性硬化(MS),是研究MS较为理想的动物模型。%Objective To establish mouse models of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) induced by peptide myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG35‐55 ) and study their pathological characterization . Methods The female EAE model of C57BL/6 mice (10~12 weeks) were immunized subcutaneously at four sites into the flanks with 300 μg of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein peptide (MOG35‐55 ) with the assistance of Complete Freund's Adjuvant(CFA) and Pertussis toxin (PTX) . We observed the clinical symptoms , histopathologic changes and changes on magnetic resonance scan . Results The experimental group developed the typical symptoms of EAE on (12 ± 4) days after immuniza‐tion with the incidence of 83 .3% and showed a chronic monophasic course . There was a large number of inflammatory cells infiltration and demylination inthe lumbar spinal cord . Electron micrographs demon‐strated a considerable amount of the myelin sheaths displayed loose ,vacuoles and splitting . Intramedul‐lary spinal MRI study showed patchy T2 hyperintensityin EAE mice . Conclusion Our study

  6. Abdominal manifestations of autoimmune disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Immunoglobulin G4-related disease was recognized as a systemic disease since various extrapancreatic lesions were observed in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP). The real etiology and pathogenesis of IgG4-RD is still not clearly understood. Moreover the exact role of IgG4 or IgG4-positive plasma cells in this disease has not yet been elucidated. only some inconsistent biological features such as hypergammaglobulinemia or hypocomplementemia support the autoimmune nature of the disease process. various names have been ascribed to this clinicopathological entity including IgG4-related sclerosing disease, IgG4-related systemic sclerosing disease, IgG4-related disease, IgG4-related autoimmune disease, hyper-IgG4 disease and IgG4-related systemic disease. The extrapancreatic lesions of IgG4-RD also exhibit the same characteristic histologic features including dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate, massive storiform fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis as seen in IgG4-related pancreatitis. Abdominal manifestations include the following organs/systems: Bile ducts: Sclerosing cholangitis; Gallbladder and liver: Acalculous sclerosis cholecytitis with diffuse wall thickening; hepatic inflammatory pseudotumorts; Kidneys: round or wedge-shaped renal cortical nodules, peripheral cortical; lesions, mass like lesions or renal pelvic involvement; Prostate, urethra, seminal vesicle, vas deferens, uterine cervix; Autoimmune prostatitis; Retroperitoneum: Retroperitoneal fibrosis. thin or mildly thick homogeneous soft tissue lesion surrounding the abdominal aorta and its branches but also bulky masses causing hydronephroureterosis; Mesentery: Sclerosing mesenteritis usually involving the root of the mesentery; Bowel: Inflammatory bowel diseases mimicking Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis. various types of sclerosing nodular lesions of the bowel wall; Stomach: Gastritis, gastric ulcers and focal masses mimicking submucosal tumor; omentum: Infiltration mimicking

  7. The Emerging Link Between Autoimmune Disorders and Neuropsychiatric Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kayser, Matthew S; Dalmau, Josep

    2011-01-01

    Abnormal autoimmune activity has been implicated in a number of neuropsychiatric disorders. In this review, the authors discuss a newly recognized class of synaptic autoimmune encephalitides as well as behavioral and cognitive manifestations of systemic autoimmune diseases.

  8. 临床药师参与1例门冬胰岛素诱发自身免疫性低血糖的治疗分析%Clinical Pharmacists'Participation in Drug Treatment Analysis on 1 Case of Insulin Aspart-induced Autoimmune Hypoglycemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于恒彩; 计成

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To provide reference for clinical pharmacists' participation in treatment of drug-induced autoimmune hypo-glycemia. Methods:Clinical pharmacists participated in drug treatment of a case of insulin aspart-induced autoimmune hypoglycemia, analyzed treatment and provided suggestion and pharmaceutical care. Results:Clinical pharmacists' suggestion was accepted and the patient was cured and discharged from the hospital. Conclusion: Clinical pharmacists' participation could help doctors to make safe and effective medication, provide good pharmaceutical care and medication education for patients.%目的:为临床药师参与治疗药物致自身免疫性低血糖提供参考. 方法: 临床药师参与了1例门冬胰岛素诱发自身免疫性低血糖的治疗,分析治疗方案并提出建议,提供药学服务. 结果: 临床药师的建议被采纳,患者病情好转出院. 结论:临床药师能协助医师制定安全、有效的治疗方案,给患者提供良好的药学监护与用药教育.

  9. Human parvovirus B19 and autoimmune diseases. Review of the literature and pathophysiological hypotheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Cyril; François, Catherine; Goëb, Vincent; Duverlie, Gilles

    2015-11-01

    A number of arguments support the role played by PVB19 in autoimmunity, in the broad sense of the term essentially derived from numerous clinical case reports and/or small series over the past 20-30 years in the medical literature. PVB19 can induce a very broad spectrum of autoantibody production, especially including: anti-soluble nuclear antigen antibodies, antiphospholipid antibodies anti-native DNA antibodies, antilymphocyte antibody, anticardiolipin antibodies, antinuclear antibodies and rheumatoid factor. Notably acute PVB19 infection can mimic or stimulate autoimmune systemic diseases as rheumatoid arthritis or systemic lupus erythematosus. However, at the present time, there is no formal scientific evidence demonstrating a direct role of PVB19 in autoimmunity, bearing in mind that there are also no formal arguments against it. Further large studies are needed to understand the eventual role of PVB19 in autoimmune diseases. PMID:26433772

  10. Targeting Homeostatic T Cell Proliferation to Control Beta-Cell Autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignali, Debora; Monti, Paolo

    2016-05-01

    Immunomodulation of the autoreactive T cell response is considered a major strategy to control beta-cell autoimmunity, both in the natural history of type 1 diabetes and in islet transplantation, which can be affected by autoimmunity recurrence. So far, these strategies have had modest results, prompting efforts to define novel cellular and molecular targets to control autoreactive T cell expansion and activation. Novel findings highlighted the important role of the homeostatic cytokine interleukin-7 in inducing proliferation and differentiation of autoreactive T cell clones that causes beta-cell autoimmunity. In this review, we discuss recent evidences and novel findings on the role of IL-7 mediated homeostatic T cell proliferation in the process of beta-cell destruction and evidences of how targeting IL-7 and its receptor could be an innovative and effective strategy to control beta-cell autoimmunity. PMID:26983628

  11. Liver Injury with Features Mimicking Autoimmune Hepatitis following the Use of Black Cohosh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Grace; Kallwitz, Eric R; Wojewoda, Christina; Chennuri, Rohini; Berkes, Jamie; Layden, Thomas J; Cotler, Scott J

    2009-01-01

    There are a growing number of cases detailing acute hepatic necrosis in patients taking black cohosh (Cimicifuga racemosa), an over-the-counter herbal supplement for management of menopausal symptoms. Our aim is to illustrate two cases of liver injury following the use of black cohosh characterized by histopathological features mimicking autoimmune hepatitis. Both patients reported black cohosh use for at least six months and had no evidence of another cause of liver disease. Their liver biopsies showed a component of centrilobular necrosis consistent with severe drug-induced liver injury. In addition, the biopsies showed characteristics of autoimmune-like liver injury with an interface hepatitis dominated by plasma cells. Although serum markers for autoimmune hepatitis were not particularly elevated, both patients responded to corticosteroids, supporting an immune-mediated component to the liver injury. Liver injury following the use of black cohosh should be included in the list of differential diagnoses for chronic hepatitis with features mimicking autoimmune hepatitis. PMID:20130783

  12. Marrow transplantation from tolerant donors to treat and prevent autoimmune diseases in BXSB mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autoimmune-prone BXSB male mice were supralethally irradiated and transplanted with CBA/H bone marrow cells. A complete and long-term chimerism was established when donor mice had been induced to develop tolerance of BXSB male antigens by combined treatment with BXSB male spleen cells and cyclophosphamide. Such chimeras did not express autoimmune phenomena or develop lethal autoimmune manifestations. Nor did the recipient mice develop the wasting syndrome or evidence of persistent immunodeficiencies that have been seen in other strains of autoimmune-resistant mice that had been transplanted with bone marrow cells across major histocompatibility complex barriers following an initial purging of the bone marrow of Thy-1+ cells using anti-Thy-1+C

  13. Immunomodulatory strategies prevent the development of autoimmune emphysema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kraskauskiene Vita

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The presence of anti-endothelial cell antibodies and pathogenic T cells may reflect an autoimmune component in the pathogenesis of emphysema. Whether immune modulatory strategies can protect against the development of emphysema is not known. Methods Sprague Dawley rats were immunized with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC to induce autoimmune emphysema and treated with intrathymic HUVEC-injection and pristane. Measurements of alveolar airspace enlargement, cytokine levels, immuno histochemical, western blot analysis, and T cell repertoire of the lung tissue were performed. Results The immunomodulatory strategies protected lungs against cell death as demonstrated by reduced numbers of TUNEL and active caspase-3 positive cells and reduced levels of active caspase-3, when compared with lungs from HUVEC-immunized rats. Immunomodulatory strategies also suppressed anti-endothelial antibody production and preserved CNTF, IL-1alpha and VEGF levels. The immune deviation effects of the intrathymic HUVEC-injection were associated with an expansion of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells. Pristane treatment decreased the proportion of T cells expressing receptor beta-chain, Vβ16.1 in the lung tissue. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that interventions classically employed to induce central T cell tolerance (thymic inoculation of antigen or to activate innate immune responses (pristane treatment can prevent the development of autoimmune emphysema.

  14. Risk Factors for Autoimmune Diseases Development After Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    OpenAIRE

    Roriz, Mélanie; Landais, Mickael; Desprez, Jonathan; Barbet, Christelle; Azoulay, Elie; Galicier, Lionel; Wynckel, Alain; Baudel, Jean-luc; Provôt, François; Pène, Frédéric; Mira, Jean-Paul; Presne, Claire; Poullin, Pascale; Delmas, Yahsou; Kanouni, Tarik

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Autoimmune thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) can be associated with other autoimmune disorders, but their prevalence following autoimmune TTP remains unknown. To assess the prevalence of autoimmune disorders associated with TTP and to determine risk factors for and the time course of the development of an autoimmune disorder after a TTP episode, we performed a cross sectional study. Two-hundred sixty-one cases of autoimmune TTP were included in the French Reference Center reg...

  15. Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 2 - a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Bănică Diana; Frăţilă Ramona; Sima Alexandra; Vlad Adrian; Timar Romulus

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndromes are characterized by the association of two or more autoimmune diseases. They are classified into two major subtypes, each having its own characteristics. The autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 2 is defined by the presence of at least two of the following diseases: Addison’s disease, type 1 diabetes mellitus and thyroid autoimmune disease. Other autoimmune diseases belonging to the autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 2 are: primary hypogonadism, myast...

  16. Left ventricular mechanical dysfunction in diet-induced obese mice is exacerbated during inotropic stress: a cine DENSE cardiovascular magnetic resonance study

    OpenAIRE

    Haggerty, Christopher M.; Mattingly, Andrea C.; Kramer, Sage P.; Binkley, Cassi M.; Jing, Linyuan; Suever, Jonathan D.; Powell, David K.; Charnigo, Richard J; Epstein, Frederick H.; Fornwalt, Brandon K

    2015-01-01

    Background Obesity is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. There is evidence of impaired left ventricular (LV) function associated with obesity, which may relate to cardiovascular mortality, but some studies have reported no dysfunction. Ventricular function data are generally acquired under resting conditions, which could mask subtle differences and potentially contribute to these contradictory findings. Furthermore, abnormal ventricular mechanics (strains, strain rates, and torsion) ma...

  17. Lighting up left-handed Z-DNA: photoluminescent carbon dots induce DNA B to Z transition and perform DNA logic operations

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Lingyan; Zhao, Andong; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2013-01-01

    Left-handed Z-DNA has been identified as a transient structure occurred during transcription. DNA B-Z transition has attracted much attention because of not only Z-DNA biological importance but also their relation to disease and DNA nanotechnology. Recently, photoluminescent carbon dots, especially highly luminescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots, have attracted much attention on their applications to bioimaging and gene/drug delivery because of carbon dots with low toxicity, highly stable photo...

  18. Severe autoimmune hepatitis triggered by varicella zoster infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Waleed K Al-Hamoudi

    2009-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a chronic disease of unknown etiology that is characterized by the presence of circulatory autoantibodies and inflammatory histological changes in the liver. Although the pathogenesis of AIH is not known, it is thought that,in a genetically predisposed individual, environmental factors such as viruses can trigger the autoimmune process. Herpes simplex virus, Epstein-Barr virus,measles virus, and hepatitis viruses are thought to play a role in the etiology of AIH. Proteins belonging to these viruses may be similar to the amino acid chains of different autoantigens in the liver, this causes immune cross reactions and liver tissue damage. We report a case of severe AIH following varicella zoster infection in a 23-year-old man, and speculate that,based on the molecular mimicry hypothesis, the liver damage was caused by an immune cross reaction to the viral proteins. Varicella-zoster-induced AIH has not been reported previously.

  19. Cardiovascular Involvement in Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Amaya-Amaya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases (AD represent a broad spectrum of chronic conditions that may afflict specific target organs or multiple systems with a significant burden on quality of life. These conditions have common mechanisms including genetic and epigenetics factors, gender disparity, environmental triggers, pathophysiological abnormalities, and certain subphenotypes. Atherosclerosis (AT was once considered to be a degenerative disease that was an inevitable consequence of aging. However, research in the last three decades has shown that AT is not degenerative or inevitable. It is an autoimmune-inflammatory disease associated with infectious and inflammatory factors characterized by lipoprotein metabolism alteration that leads to immune system activation with the consequent proliferation of smooth muscle cells, narrowing arteries, and atheroma formation. Both humoral and cellular immune mechanisms have been proposed to participate in the onset and progression of AT. Several risk factors, known as classic risk factors, have been described. Interestingly, the excessive cardiovascular events observed in patients with ADs are not fully explained by these factors. Several novel risk factors contribute to the development of premature vascular damage. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of how traditional and nontraditional risk factors contribute to pathogenesis of CVD in AD.

  20. Gender and autoimmune comorbidity in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magyari, Melinda; Koch-Henriksen, Nils; Pfleger, Claudia C;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The female preponderance in incidence of multiple sclerosis (MS) calls for investigations into sex differences in comorbidity with other autoimmune diseases (ADs). OBJECTIVES: To determine whether male and female patients with MS have a higher frequency of autoimmune comorbidity than...

  1. Autoimmune Polyendocrinopathy-Candidiasis-Ectodermal Dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Sonal, Choudhary; Michael, McLeod; Daniele, Torchia; Paolo, Romanelli

    2012-01-01

    Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy is a rare autoimmune disorder. The clinical spectrum of symptoms is diverse; the diagnosis relying on the presence of at least two out of the three main conditions defining the syndrome: chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, hypoparathyroidism, and Addison's disease.

  2. Autoimmune Pancreatitis Exhibiting Multiple Mass Lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Shiokawa, Masahiro; Kodama, Yuzo; Hiramatsu, Yukiko; Kurita, Akira; Sawai, Yugo; Uza, Norimitsu; Watanabe, Tomohiro; Chiba, Tsutomu

    2011-01-01

    Our case is a first report of autoimmune pancreatitis with multiple masses within the pancreas which was pathologically diagnosed by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration and treated by steroid. The masses disappeared by steroid therapy. Our case is informative to know that autoimmune pancreatitis sometimes exhibits multiple masses within the pancreas and to diagnose it without unnecessary surgery.

  3. Autoimmune pancreatitis exhibiting multiple mass lesions.

    OpenAIRE

    Shiokawa, Masahiro; Kodama, Yuzo; Hiramatsu, Yukiko; Kurita, Akira; Sawai, Yugo; Uza, Norimitsu; Watanabe, Tomohiro; Chiba, Tsutomu

    2011-01-01

    Our case is a first report of autoimmune pancreatitis with multiple masses within the pancreas which was pathologically diagnosed by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration and treated by steroid. The masses disappeared by steroid therapy. Our case is informative to know that autoimmune pancreatitis sometimes exhibits multiple masses within the pancreas and to diagnose it without unnecessary surgery.

  4. Induction of Autoimmunity to Brain Antigens by Developmental Mercury Exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yubin; Gao, Donghong; Bolivar, Valerie J.; Lawrence, David A.

    2010-01-01

    A.SW mice, which are known to be prone to mercury (Hg)-induced immune nephritis, were assessed for their ability to develop autoimmunity to brain antigens after developmental exposure to Hg. Maternal drinking water containing subclinical doses of 1.25μM methyl Hg (MeHg) or 50μM Hg chloride (HgCl2) were used to evaluate developmental (exposure from gestational day 8 to postnatal day 21) induction of immune responses to brain antigens. Only HgCl2 induced autoantibody production; the HgCl2-expos...

  5. Sex bias in CNS autoimmune disease mediated by androgen control of autoimmune regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Meng-Lei; Bakhru, Pearl; Conley, Bridget; Nelson, Jennifer S; Free, Meghan; Martin, Aaron; Starmer, Joshua; Wilson, Elizabeth M; Su, Maureen A

    2016-01-01

    Male gender is protective against multiple sclerosis and other T-cell-mediated autoimmune diseases. This protection may be due, in part, to higher androgen levels in males. Androgen binds to the androgen receptor (AR) to regulate gene expression, but how androgen protects against autoimmunity is not well understood. Autoimmune regulator (Aire) prevents autoimmunity by promoting self-antigen expression in medullary thymic epithelial cells, such that developing T cells that recognize these self-antigens within the thymus undergo clonal deletion. Here we show that androgen upregulates Aire-mediated thymic tolerance to protect against autoimmunity. Androgen recruits AR to Aire promoter regions, with consequent enhancement of Aire transcription. In mice and humans, thymic Aire expression is higher in males compared with females. Androgen administration and male gender protect against autoimmunity in a multiple sclerosis mouse model in an Aire-dependent manner. Thus, androgen control of an intrathymic Aire-mediated tolerance mechanism contributes to gender differences in autoimmunity. PMID:27072778

  6. Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 2 - a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bănică Diana

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune polyglandular syndromes are characterized by the association of two or more autoimmune diseases. They are classified into two major subtypes, each having its own characteristics. The autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 2 is defined by the presence of at least two of the following diseases: Addison’s disease, type 1 diabetes mellitus and thyroid autoimmune disease. Other autoimmune diseases belonging to the autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 2 are: primary hypogonadism, myasthenia gravis, celiac disease, pernicious anemia, alopecia, vitiligo. We are going to present the case of a patient, aged 40, with diabetes mellitus (probably latent autoimmune diabetes of the adult, chronic autoimmune thyroiditis and celiac disease.

  7. Interferon-¿ regulates oxidative stress during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Espejo, C.; Penkowa, Milena; Saez-Torres, I.;

    2002-01-01

    Neurobiology, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis IFN-d, multiple sclerosis, neurodegeneration, oxidative stress......Neurobiology, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis IFN-d, multiple sclerosis, neurodegeneration, oxidative stress...

  8. Role of soluble Fas ligand in autoimmune diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning-Li Li; Tong Zhou; Dong-Qing Zhang; Hong Nie; Qi-Wen Yu; Ji-Ying Zhang; An-Lun Ma; Bai-Hua Shen; Li Wang; Jun Bai; Xue-Hua Chen

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of soluble Fas ligand in autoimmune diseases.METHODS: RT-PCR was performed to amplify sFasL cDNA from the total RNA extracted from activated human peripheral blood lymphocytes. DNA fragments were cloned into PCR vector. After sequenced, sFasL gene fragments were inserted into pQE-31 vector and expressed in E. Coli M15respectively. Proteins were purified through affinity chromatography column with ligand of 6xHis tag and identified by SDS-PAGE and Western blot. Mice were immunized with sFasL protein and specific anti-serum was harvested 6 wk after immunization. Monoclonal anti-human FasL antibody was made from the immunized mice. Serum level of sFasL in different patients was detected using antiFasL antibodies from the immunized mice.RESULTS: The protein expressed was 24 ku by SDS-PAGE electrophrosis. The protein was specially bound to antihuman FasL antibody by Western blot analysis. The sFasL protein could induce Jurket cell apoptosis in vitro. The concentration of serum sFasL in patients with autoimmune diseases was higher than that in normal individuals. sFasL could reduce arthritis in collagen induced arthritis (CIA)mice model by subcutaneous injection.CONCLUSION: sFasL may be involved in either induction of apoptosis or autoimmune diseases. Furthermore, sFasL may have potential application in treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  9. Hepatitis A vaccine associated with autoimmune hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PA Berry; G Smith-Laing

    2007-01-01

    To describe a case of probable relapsing autoimmune hepatitis associated with vaccination against hepatitis A virus (HAV). A case report and review of literature were written concerning autoimmune hepatitis in association with hepatitis A and other hepatotropic viruses. Soon after the administration of formalin-inactivated hepatitis A vaccine, a man who had recently recovered from an uncharacterized but self-limiting hepatitic illness,experienced a severe deterioration (AST 1687 U/L, INR 1.4). Anti-nuclear antibodies were detectable, and liver biopsy was compatible with autoimmune hepatitis. The observation supports the role of HAV as a trigger of autoimmune hepatitis. Studies in helper T-cell activity and antibody expression against hepatic proteins in the context of hepatitis A infection are summarized, and the concept of molecular mimicry with regard to other forms of viral hepatitis and autoimmunity is briefly explored.

  10. Diagnostic criteria of autoimmune hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberal, Rodrigo; Grant, Charlotte R; Longhi, Maria Serena; Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina; Vergani, Diego

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a chronic immune-mediated liver disorder characterised by female preponderance, elevated transaminase and immunoglobulin G levels, seropositivity for autoantibodies and interface hepatitis. Presentation is highly variable, therefore AIH should be considered during the diagnostic workup of any increase in liver enzyme levels. A set of inclusion and exclusion criteria for the diagnosis of AIH have been established by the International Autoimmune Hepatitis Group (IAIHG). There are two main types of AIH: type 1, positive for anti-nuclear (ANA) and/or anti-smooth muscle antibodies (SMAs) and type 2, defined by the presence of anti-liver kidney microsomal antibody type 1 (LKM-1) and/or anti-liver cytosol type 1 (LC-1) autoantibodies. The central role of autoantibodies in the diagnosis of AIH has led the IAIHG to produce a consensus statement detailing appropriate and effective methods for their detection. Autoantibodies should be tested by indirect immunofluorescence at an initial dilution of 1/40 in adults and 1/10 in children on a freshly prepared rodent substrate that includes kidney, liver and stomach sections to allow for the simultaneous detection of all reactivities relevant to AIH. Anti-LKM-1 is often confused with anti-mitochondrial antibody (AMA) if rodent kidney is used as the sole immunofluorescence substrate. The identification of the molecular targets of anti-LKM-1 and AMA has led to the establishment of immuno-assays based on the use of the recombinant or purified autoantigens. Perinuclear anti-nuclear neutrophil antibody (p-ANNA) is an additional marker of AIH-1; anti soluble liver antigen (SLA) antibodies are specific for autoimmune liver disease, can be present in AIH-1 and AIH-2 and are associated with a more severe clinical course. Anti-SLA are detectable by ELISA or radio-immuno-assays, but not by immunofluorescence. AIH is exquisitely responsive to immunosuppressive treatment, which should be instituted promptly to

  11. Sci—Thur AM: YIS - 01: Dosimetric Analysis of Respiratory Induced Cardiac Intrafraction Motion in Left-sided Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Sherif, O; Xhaferllari, I; Patrick, J [Department of Medical Biophysics, Western University, London Canada (Canada); Department of Physics, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario Canada (Canada); Yu, E [Department of Oncology, Western University, London Canada (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario Canada (Canada); Gaede, S [Department of Medical Biophysics, Western University, London Canada (Canada); Department of Oncology, Western University, London Canada (Canada); Department of Physics, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario Canada (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario Canada (Canada)

    2014-08-15

    Introduction: Long-term cardiac side effects in left-sided breast cancer patients (BREL) after post-operative radiotherapy has become one of the most debated issues in radiation oncology. Through breathing-adapted radiotherapy the volume of the heart exposed to radiation can be significantly reduced by delivering the radiation only at the end of inspiration phase of the respiratory cycle, this is referred to as inspiration gating (IG). The purpose of this study is to quantify the potential reduction in cardiac exposure during IG compared to conventional BREL radiotherapy and to assess the dosimetric impact of cardiac motion due to natural breathing. Methods: 24 BREL patients treated with tangential parallel opposed photon beams were included in this study. All patients received a standard fast helical planning CT (FH-CT) and a 4D-CT. Treatment plans were created on the FH-CT using a clinical treatment planning system. The original treatment plan was then superimposed onto the end of inspiration CT and all 10 phases of the 4D-CT to quantify the dosimetric impact of respiratory motion and IG through 4D dose accumulation. Results: Through IG the mean dose to the heart, left ventricle, and left anterior descending artery (LAD) can be reduced in comparison to the clinical standard BREL treatment by as much as 8.39%, 10.11%, and 13.71% respectively (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Failure to account for respiratory motion can lead to under or overestimation in the calculated DVH for the heart, and it's sub-structures. IG can reduce cardiac exposure especially to the LAD during BREL radiotherapy.

  12. Sci—Thur AM: YIS - 01: Dosimetric Analysis of Respiratory Induced Cardiac Intrafraction Motion in Left-sided Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Long-term cardiac side effects in left-sided breast cancer patients (BREL) after post-operative radiotherapy has become one of the most debated issues in radiation oncology. Through breathing-adapted radiotherapy the volume of the heart exposed to radiation can be significantly reduced by delivering the radiation only at the end of inspiration phase of the respiratory cycle, this is referred to as inspiration gating (IG). The purpose of this study is to quantify the potential reduction in cardiac exposure during IG compared to conventional BREL radiotherapy and to assess the dosimetric impact of cardiac motion due to natural breathing. Methods: 24 BREL patients treated with tangential parallel opposed photon beams were included in this study. All patients received a standard fast helical planning CT (FH-CT) and a 4D-CT. Treatment plans were created on the FH-CT using a clinical treatment planning system. The original treatment plan was then superimposed onto the end of inspiration CT and all 10 phases of the 4D-CT to quantify the dosimetric impact of respiratory motion and IG through 4D dose accumulation. Results: Through IG the mean dose to the heart, left ventricle, and left anterior descending artery (LAD) can be reduced in comparison to the clinical standard BREL treatment by as much as 8.39%, 10.11%, and 13.71% respectively (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Failure to account for respiratory motion can lead to under or overestimation in the calculated DVH for the heart, and it's sub-structures. IG can reduce cardiac exposure especially to the LAD during BREL radiotherapy

  13. Immunization of mice with purified U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (RNP) induces a pattern of antibody specificities characteristic of the anti-Sm and anti-RNP autoimmune response of patients with lupus erythematosus, as measured by monoclonal antibodies.

    OpenAIRE

    Reuter, R; Lührmann, R

    1986-01-01

    Sera of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and related autoimmune diseases often possess anti-Sm and anti-ribonucleoprotein (RNP) autoantibodies that recognize antigenic sites on small nuclear (sn) RNPs containing the snRNAs U1, U2, U4, U5, and U6. Although the major immunoreactive Sm polypeptides B', B, and D are present in snRNPs U1-U6, the RNP-antigenic proteins termed 70 kDa, A, and C are found only in U1 snRNP particles. We have immunized genetically nonautoimmune C57BL/6 mice wi...

  14. Multiparametric autoimmune diagnostics: recent advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damoiseaux J

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Jan Damoiseaux Central Diagnostic Laboratory, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, the Netherlands Abstract: Autoimmune diagnostics in a routine clinical laboratory is constantly challenged by the discovery of new autoantibodies and technical innovations in the immunoassays applied. These challenges are, in particular, combined in the multiparametric immunoassays. Appropriate positioning of multiparametric immunoassays within the laboratory requires integrated knowledge of the clinical performance of the test system for each individual antigen, the conditions prescribed in disease criteria and/or guidelines, and the demands of the clinicians. This review provides a summary of the multiparametric immunoassays available, as well as the applications and restrictions in routine clinical practice. Keywords: autoantibodies, line immunoassay, dot immunoassay, addressable laser bead immunoassay, indirect immunofluorescence

  15. Rett syndrome: An autoimmune disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Felice, Claudio; Leoncini, Silvia; Signorini, Cinzia; Cortelazzo, Alessio; Rovero, Paolo; Durand, Thierry; Ciccoli, Lucia; Papini, Anna Maria; Hayek, Joussef

    2016-04-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a devastating neurodevelopmental disease, previously included into the autistic spectrum disorders, affecting almost exclusively females (frequency 1:10,000). RTT leads to intellective deficit, purposeful hands use loss and late major motor impairment besides featuring breathing disorders, epilepsy and increased risk of sudden death. The condition is caused in up to 95% of the cases by mutations in the X-linked methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene. Our group has shown a number of previously unrecognized features, such as systemic redox imbalance, chronic inflammatory status, respiratory bronchiolitis-associated interstitial lung disease-like lung disease, and erythrocyte morphology changes. While evidence on an intimate involvement of MeCP2 in the immune response is cumulating, we have recently shown a cytokine dysregulation in RTT. Increasing evidence on the relationship between MeCP2 and an immune dysfunction is reported, with, apparently, a link between MECP2 gene polymorphisms and autoimmune diseases, including primary Sjögren's syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and systemic sclerosis. Antineuronal (i.e., brain proteins) antibodies have been shown in RTT. Recently, high levels of anti-N-glucosylation (N-Glc) IgM serum autoantibodies [i.e., anti-CSF114(N-Glc) IgMs] have been detected by our group in a statistically significant number of RTT patients. In the current review, the Authors explore the current evidence, either in favor or against, the presence of an autoimmune component in RTT. PMID:26807990

  16. Immunoadsorption therapy in autoimmune encephalitides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golombeck, Kristin S.; Bien, Corinna; Abu-Tair, Mariam; Brand, Marcus; Bulla-Hellwig, Michael; Lohmann, Hubertus; Münstermann, Dieter; Pavenstädt, Hermann; Thölking, Gerold; Valentin, Rainer; Wiendl, Heinz; Melzer, Nico; Bien, Christian G.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: It was hypothesized that in encephalitides with autoantibodies directed to CNS surface antigens an antibody-removing intervention might speed up recovery. Methods: The outcome of autoimmune encephalitis in 19 patients with antibodies against surface antigens (leucine-rich, glioma inactivated 1 [LGI1], n = 3; contactin-associated protein-2 [CASPR2], n = 4; NMDA receptor [NMDAR], n = 7) and intracellular antigens (glutamic acid decarboxylase [GAD], n = 5) after immunoadsorption in addition to corticosteroid therapy was evaluated retrospectively. Modified Rankin scale (mRS) scores and data on seizures, memory, and antibody titers directly after immunoadsorption (early follow-up) and after a median of 4 months (late follow-up) were compiled. Results: Immediately after immunoadsorption, 9 of 14 patients with antibodies against LGI1, CASPR2, or NMDAR (64%), but none with GAD antibodies, had improved by at least one mRS point. Five of the 7 patients with LGI1 or CASRP2 antibodies had become seizure-free, and 2 patients with NMDAR antibodies had a memory improvement of more than 1 SD of a normal control population. At late follow-up, 12 of 14 patients with surface antibodies had improved (86%), and none of the patients with GAD antibodies. Conclusions: It is suggested that addition of immunoadsorption to immunosuppression therapy in patients with surface antibodies may accelerate recovery. This supports the pathogenic role of surface antibodies. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class IV evidence that immunoadsorption combined with immunosuppression therapy is effective in patients with autoimmune encephalitis with surface antibodies. PMID:26977423

  17. Human autoimmune diseases: a comprehensive update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lifeng; Wang, Fu-Sheng; Gershwin, M Eric

    2015-10-01

    There have been significant advances in our understanding of human autoimmunity that have led to improvements in classification and diagnosis and, most importantly, research advances in new therapies. The importance of autoimmunity and the mechanisms that lead to clinical disease were first recognized about 50 years ago following the pioneering studies of Macfarlane Burnett and his Nobel Prize-winning hypothesis of the 'forbidden clone'. Such pioneering efforts led to a better understanding not only of autoimmunity, but also of lymphoid cell development, thymic education, apoptosis and deletion of autoreactive cells. Contemporary theories suggest that the development of an autoimmune disease requires a genetic predisposition and environmental factors that trigger the immune pathways that lead, ultimately, to tissue destruction. Despite extensive research, there are no genetic tools that can be used clinically to predict the risk of autoimmune disease. Indeed, the concordance of autoimmune disease in identical twins is 12-67%, highlighting not only a role for environmental factors, but also the potential importance of stochastic or epigenetic phenomena. On the other hand, the identification of cytokines and chemokines, and their cognate receptors, has led to novel therapies that block pathological inflammatory responses within the target organ and have greatly improved the therapeutic effect in patients with autoimmune disease, particularly rheumatoid arthritis. Further advances involving the use of multiplex platforms for diagnosis and identification of new therapeutic agents should lead to major breakthroughs within the next decade. PMID:26212387

  18. Defective removal of ribonucleotides from DNA promotes systemic autoimmunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günther, Claudia; Kind, Barbara; Reijns, Martin A.M.; Berndt, Nicole; Martinez-Bueno, Manuel; Wolf, Christine; Tüngler, Victoria; Chara, Osvaldo; Lee, Young Ae; Hübner, Norbert; Bicknell, Louise; Blum, Sophia; Krug, Claudia; Schmidt, Franziska; Kretschmer, Stefanie; Koss, Sarah; Astell, Katy R.; Ramantani, Georgia; Bauerfeind, Anja; Morris, David L.; Cunninghame Graham, Deborah S.; Bubeck, Doryen; Leitch, Andrea; Ralston, Stuart H.; Blackburn, Elizabeth A.; Gahr, Manfred; Witte, Torsten; Vyse, Timothy J.; Melchers, Inga; Mangold, Elisabeth; Nöthen, Markus M.; Aringer, Martin; Kuhn, Annegret; Lüthke, Kirsten; Unger, Leonore; Bley, Annette; Lorenzi, Alice; Isaacs, John D.; Alexopoulou, Dimitra; Conrad, Karsten; Dahl, Andreas; Roers, Axel; Alarcon-Riquelme, Marta E.; Jackson, Andrew P.; Lee-Kirsch, Min Ae

    2014-01-01

    Genome integrity is continuously challenged by the DNA damage that arises during normal cell metabolism. Biallelic mutations in the genes encoding the genome surveillance enzyme ribonuclease H2 (RNase H2) cause Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS), a pediatric disorder that shares features with the autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Here we determined that heterozygous parents of AGS patients exhibit an intermediate autoimmune phenotype and demonstrated a genetic association between rare RNASEH2 sequence variants and SLE. Evaluation of patient cells revealed that SLE- and AGS-associated mutations impair RNase H2 function and result in accumulation of ribonucleotides in genomic DNA. The ensuing chronic low level of DNA damage triggered a DNA damage response characterized by constitutive p53 phosphorylation and senescence. Patient fibroblasts exhibited constitutive upregulation of IFN-stimulated genes and an enhanced type I IFN response to the immunostimulatory nucleic acid polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid and UV light irradiation, linking RNase H2 deficiency to potentiation of innate immune signaling. Moreover, UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer formation was markedly enhanced in ribonucleotide-containing DNA, providing a mechanism for photosensitivity in RNase H2–associated SLE. Collectively, our findings implicate RNase H2 in the pathogenesis of SLE and suggest a role of DNA damage–associated pathways in the initiation of autoimmunity. PMID:25500883

  19. The immunobiology of Campylobacter jejuni: Innate immunity and autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phongsisay, Vongsavanh

    2016-04-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Campylobacter jejuni causes gastroenteritis and Guillain-Barré syndrome in humans. Recent advances in the immunobiology of C. jejuni have been made. This review summarizes C. jejuni-binding innate receptors and highlights the role of innate immunity in autoimmune diseases. This human pathogen produces a variety of glycoconjugates, including human ganglioside-like determinants and multiple activators of Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Furthermore, C. jejuni targets MyD88, NLRP3 inflammasome, TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF), sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectins (Siglecs), macrophage galactose-type lectin (MGL), and immunoglobulin-like receptors (TREM2, LMIR5/CD300b). The roles of these innate receptors and signaling molecules have been extensively studied. MyD88-mediated TLR activation or inflammasome-dependent IL-1β secretion is essential for autoimmune induction. TRIF mediates the production of type I interferons that promote humoral immune responses and immunoglobulin class-switching. Siglec-1 and Siglec-7 interact directly with gangliosides. Siglec-1 activation enhances phagocytosis and inflammatory responses. MGL internalizes GalNAc-containing glycoconjugates. TREM2 is well-known for its role in phagocytosis. LMIR5 recognizes C. jejuni components and endogenous sulfoglycolipids. Several lines of evidence from animal models of autoimmune diseases suggest that simultaneous activation of innate immunity in the presence of autoreactive lymphocytes or antigen mimicry may link C. jejuni to immunopathology. PMID:26709064

  20. Cannabinoids decrease the th17 inflammatory autoimmune phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozela, Ewa; Juknat, Ana; Kaushansky, Nathali; Rimmerman, Neta; Ben-Nun, Avraham; Vogel, Zvi

    2013-12-01

    Cannabinoids, the Cannabis constituents, are known to possess anti-inflammatory properties but the mechanisms involved are not understood. Here we show that the main psychoactive cannabinoid, Δ-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), and the main nonpsychoactive cannabinoid, cannabidiol (CBD), markedly reduce the Th17 phenotype which is known to be increased in inflammatory autoimmune pathologies such as Multiple Sclerosis. We found that reactivation by MOG35-55 of MOG35-55-specific encephalitogenic T cells (cells that induce Experimental Autoimmune Encephalitis when injected to mice) in the presence of spleen derived antigen presenting cells led to a large increase in IL-17 production and secretion. In addition, we found that the cannabinoids CBD and THC dose-dependently (at 0.1-5 μM) suppressed the production and secretion of this cytokine. Moreover, the mRNA and protein of IL-6, a key factor in Th17 induction, were also decreased. Pretreatment with CBD also resulted in increased levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Interestingly, CBD and THC did not affect the levels of TNFα and IFNγ. The downregulation of IL-17 secretion by these cannabinoids does not seem to involve the CB1, CB2, PPARγ, 5-HT1A or TRPV1 receptors. In conclusion, the results show a unique cannabinoid modulation of the autoimmune cytokine milieu combining suppression of the pathogenic IL-17 and IL-6 cytokines along with boosting the expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. PMID:23892791

  1. NK Cell Subtypes as Regulators of Autoimmune Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    As major components of innate immunity, NK cells not only exert cell-mediated cytotoxicity to destroy tumors or infected cells, but also act to regulate the functions of other cells in the immune system by secreting cytokines and chemokines. Thus, NK cells provide surveillance in the early defense against viruses, intracellular bacteria, and cancer cells. However, the effecter function of NK cells must be exquisitely controlled to prevent inadvertent attack against normal “self” cells. In an organ such as the liver, where the distinction between immunotolerance and immune defense against routinely processed pathogens is critical, the plethora of NK cells has a unique role in the maintenance of homeostasis. Once self-tolerance is broken, autoimmune liver disease resulted. NK cells act as a “two-edged weapon” and even play opposite roles with both regulatory and inducer activities in the hepatic environment. That is, NK cells act not only to produce inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, but also to alter the proliferation and activation of associated lymphocytes. However, the precise regulatory mechanisms at work in autoimmune liver diseases remain to be identified. In this review, we focus on recent research with NK cells and their potential role in the development of autoimmune liver disease. PMID:27462349

  2. Bioluminescence in vivo imaging of autoimmune encephalomyelitis predicts disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steinman Lawrence

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis is a widely used animal model to understand not only multiple sclerosis but also basic principles of immunity. The disease is scored typically by observing signs of paralysis, which do not always correspond with pathological changes. Methods Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis was induced in transgenic mice expressing an injury responsive luciferase reporter in astrocytes (GFAP-luc. Bioluminescence in the brain and spinal cord was measured non-invasively in living mice. Mice were sacrificed at different time points to evaluate clinical and pathological changes. The correlation between bioluminescence and clinical and pathological EAE was statistically analyzed by Pearson correlation analysis. Results Bioluminescence from the brain and spinal cord correlates strongly with severity of clinical disease and a number of pathological changes in the brain in EAE. Bioluminescence at early time points also predicts severity of disease. Conclusion These results highlight the potential use of bioluminescence imaging to monitor neuroinflammation for rapid drug screening and immunological studies in EAE and suggest that similar approaches could be applied to other animal models of autoimmune and inflammatory disorders.

  3. Ultraviolet radiation and autoimmune disease: insights from epidemiological research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review examines the epidemiological evidence that suggests ultraviolet radiation (UVR) may play a protective role in three autoimmune diseases: multiple sclerosis, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and rheumatoid arthritis. To date, most of the information has accumulated from population studies that have studied the relationship between geography or climate and autoimmune disease prevalence. An interesting gradient of increasing prevalence with increasing latitude has been observed for at least two of the three diseases. This is most evident for multiple sclerosis, but a similar gradient has been shown for insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in Europe and North America. Seasonal influences on both disease incidence and clinical course and, more recently, analytical studies at the individual level have provided further support for a possible protective role for UVR in some of these diseases but the data are not conclusive. Organ-specific autoimmune diseases involve Th1 cell-mediated immune processes. Recent work in photoimmunology has shown ultraviolet B (UVB) can specifically attenuate these processes through several mechanisms which we discuss. In particular, the possible contribution of an UVR-induced increase in serum vitamin D (1,25(OH)2D3) levels in the beneficial immunomodulation of these diseases is discussed

  4. Molecular diagnosis of autoimmune blistering diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuruta, Daisuke; Dainichi, Teruki; Hamada, Takahiro; Ishii, Norito; Hashimoto, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune bullous diseases are the best-characterized autoimmune skin diseases. Molecular diagnosis of these diseases has become possible due to the identification of their target autoantigens over the past three decades. In this review, we summarize methodology for categorizing autoimmune bullous diseases by means of combinations of direct and indirect immunofluorescence techniques using normal human skin sections, rat bladder sections and COS7 cells transfected with desmocollins 1-3 encoded vectors, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and immunoblotting with normal human epidermal extracts, dermal extracts, purified proteins from cell cultures and recombinant proteins. PMID:23325635

  5. Noonan syndrome associated with cronic autoimmune thyroiditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Valea

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Noonan syndrome is a genetic dominant disease that presents a wide variety of clinical characteristics. Frequently, the syndrome is associated with some autoimmune diseases, especially with chronic autoimmune thyroiditis. We report the case of a 21 years old girl diagnosed with Noonan syndrome and autoimmune thyroiditis relatively late, at the age of 20. The diagnosis was suggested by a cluster of significant clinical elements: facial dysmorphism, short stature, moderate mental retardation. The hormonal profile and karyotype contributed to the final certainty diagnosis. At this moment she is under thyroid substitution treatment.

  6. The urgent need to prevent type 1 autoimmune childhood diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laron, Zvi; Hampe, Christiane S; Shulman, Lester M

    2015-03-01

    Clinical onset of autoimmune Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) develops after an asymptomatic, complex interaction between host genetic and environmental factors lasting several years. The world-wide increase in T1DM incidence with no cure in sight necessitates the identification of the causative environmental factors in order to develop methods for preventing them from participating in the autoimmune process leading to T1DM. Human trials to prevent insulitis or development of T1DM (secondary prevention trials) have not as yet produced satisfactory outcomes despite promising results from T1DM animal models, possibly because the autoimmune response had already progressed too far and could not be stopped or reversed. Primary prevention trials conducted with individuals with increased genetic risk, but without signs of autoimmune response or metabolic abnormalities have also not yet produced any clear benefit. A correlation between month of birth and T1DM implicated seasonal infectious pathogens in the etiology of T1DM. This has prompted a search for those seasonal pathogens including viruses that might lead to onset of T1DM. Many studies investigated immediate viral triggers, e.g., viral infections at the time of clinical onset of T1DM. Fewer studies have investigated virus infections as the initial or early trigger in a cascade of events leading to development of TIDM. Seasonal virus infections of pregnant women may be transmitted in utero and induce the first damage to the developing fetus's beta-cells. The identification of specific pathogenic viruses may enable development for pregestational vaccines to diminish the incidence of childhood T1DM. PMID:25962204

  7. Left-libertarianism and left-hobbesianism

    OpenAIRE

    Gosseries, Axel Auteur 19867 UCL

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides a comparative analysis of the way in which, as well as the extent to which, two key variables potentially allow for the development of more left-wing versions of libertarianism and hobbesianism. It turns out that hobbesianism, while disposing of ways to extend the scope of what should be seen as the “cooperative surplus”, is in trouble when it comes to justifying “equal division” as a general rule to divide up such a surplus. In contrast, libertarianism can meaningfully re...

  8. Left-Handed Connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipson, Alice M.

    1984-01-01

    The following aspects of left-handedness are discussed: etiology and associated learning and developmental disorders; right-brain dominance and how to detect it; adaptations to the physical learning environment; behavior patterns; and teaching techniques. (JW)

  9. Left heart catheterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catheterization - left heart ... to help guide the catheters up into your heart and arteries. Dye will be injected into your ... in the blood vessels that lead to your heart. The catheter is then moved through the aortic ...

  10. Cyclosporine Treatment in a Patient with Concurrent Autoimmune Urticaria and Autoimmune Hepatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Ju, Hye Young; Kim, Hei Sung; Kim, Hyung Ok; Park, Young Min

    2009-01-01

    Patients with autoimmune urticaria show a higher rate of seropositivity for other autoantibodies and often have a history of autoimmune conditions. They also tend to have more severe symptoms and to have a poor response to conventional antihistamine treatment. Autoimmune hepatitis is a chronic inflammatory disorder in which progressive liver injury is thought to be the result of a T-cell-mediated immunologic attack against liver cells in genetically predisposed individuals. While the associat...

  11. The dynamics of effector T cells and Foxp3+ regulatory T cells in the promotion and regulation of autoimmune encephalitis

    OpenAIRE

    Korn, Thomas; Anderson, Ana C.; Bettelli, Estelle; Oukka, Mohamed

    2007-01-01

    The Th1/Th2 paradigm of T helper cell subsets had to be revised when IL-17 producing T cells (Th17) were identified as a distinct T helper cell lineage. Th17 cells are very efficient inducers of tissue inflammation and crucial initiators of organ specific autoimmunity. Whereas Th17 cells promote autoimmune tissue inflammation, Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (T-reg) are necessary and sufficient to prevent autoimmunity throughout the life span of an individual. Here, we review recent findings of how...

  12. Respiratory acoustic impedance in left ventricular failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depeursinge, F B; Feihl, F; Depeursinge, C; Perret, C H

    1989-12-01

    The measurement of respiratory acoustic impedance (Zrs) by forced pseudorandom noise provides a simple means of assessing respiratory mechanics in nonintubated intensive care patients. To characterize the lung mechanical alterations induced by acute vascular congestion of the lung, Zrs was measured in 14 spontaneously breathing patients hospitalized for acute left ventricular failure. The Zrs data in the cardiac patients were compared with those of 48 semirecumbent normal subjects and those of 23 sitting asthmatic patients during allergen-induced bronchospasm. In the patients with acute left ventricular failure, the Zrs abnormalities noted were an excessive frequency dependence of resistance from 10 to 20 Hz and an abnormally low reactance at all frequencies, abnormalities qualitatively similar to those observed in the asthmatic patients but of lesser magnitude. Acute lung vascular congestion modifies the acoustic impedance of the respiratory system. Reflex-induced bronchospasm might be the main mechanism altering respiratory acoustic impedance in acute left ventricular failure. PMID:2582846

  13. Probabilistic Parsing Using Left Corner Language Models

    CERN Document Server

    Manning, C D; Manning, Christopher D.; Carpenter, Bob

    1997-01-01

    We introduce a novel parser based on a probabilistic version of a left-corner parser. The left-corner strategy is attractive because rule probabilities can be conditioned on both top-down goals and bottom-up derivations. We develop the underlying theory and explain how a grammar can be induced from analyzed data. We show that the left-corner approach provides an advantage over simple top-down probabilistic context-free grammars in parsing the Wall Street Journal using a grammar induced from the Penn Treebank. We also conclude that the Penn Treebank provides a fairly weak testbed due to the flatness of its bracketings and to the obvious overgeneration and undergeneration of its induced grammar.

  14. Autoimmune Cytopenias in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni D'Arena

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical course of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL may be complicated at any time by autoimmune phenomena.The most common ones are hematologic disorders, such as autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA and immune thrombocytopenia (ITP. Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA and autoimmune agranulocytosis (AG are, indeed, more rarely seen. However, they are probably underestimated due to the possible misleading presence of cytopenias secondary to leukemic bone marrow involvement or to chemotherapy cytotoxicity. The source of autoantibodies is still uncertain, despite the most convincing data are in favor of the involvement of resting normal B-cells. In general, excluding the specific treatment of underlying CLL, the managementof these complications is not different from that of idiopathic autoimmune cytopenias or of those associated to other causes. Among different therapeutic approaches, monoclonal antibody rituximab, given alone or in combination, has shown to be very effective.

  15. Shaping the spectrum - From autoinflammation to autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedrich, Christian M

    2016-04-01

    Historically, autoimmune-inflammatory disorders were subdivided into autoinflammatory vs. autoimmune diseases. About a decade ago, an immunological continuum was proposed, placing "classical" autoinflammatory disorders, characterized by systemic inflammation in the absence of high-titer autoantibodies or autoreactive T lymphocytes, at the one end, and autoimmune disorders at the other end. We provide an overview of recent developments and observations, filling in some of the gaps and showing strong interconnections between innate and adaptive immune mechanisms, indicating that disorders from both ends of the immunological spectrum indeed share key pathomechanisms. We focus on three exemplary disorders: i) systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis representing "classical" autoinflammatory disorders; ii) psoriasis, a mixed pattern disease; and iii) systemic lupus erythematosus, a prototypical autoimmune disease. We summarize scientific observations suggesting that, depending on disease stages and/or duration, individualized treatment targeting innate or adaptive immune mechanisms in disorders from either end of the immunological spectrum may control disease activity. PMID:26948930

  16. Acute recurrent pancreatitis: An autoimmune disease?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Raffaele Pezzilli

    2008-01-01

    In this review article,we will briefly describe the main characteristics of autoimmune pancreatitis and then we will concentrate on our aim,namely,evaluating the clinical characteristics of patients having recurrence of pain from the disease.In fact,the open question is to evaluate the possible presence of autoimmune pancreatitis in patients with an undefined etiology of acute pancreatitis and for this reason we carried out a search in the literature in order to explore this issue.In cases of recurrent attacks of pain in patients with "idiopathic"pancreatitis,we need to keep in mind the possibility that our patients may have autoimmune pancreatitis.Even though the frequency of this disease seems to be quite low,we believe that in the future,by increasing our knowledge on the subject,we will be able to diagnose an ever-increasing number of patients having acute recurrence of pain from autoimmune pancreatitis.

  17. Automation, consolidation, and integration in autoimmune diagnostics

    OpenAIRE

    Tozzoli, Renato; D’Aurizio, Federica; Villalta, Danilo; Bizzaro, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Over the past two decades, we have witnessed an extraordinary change in autoimmune diagnostics, characterized by the progressive evolution of analytical technologies, the availability of new tests, and the explosive growth of molecular biology and proteomics. Aside from these huge improvements, organizational changes have also occurred which brought about a more modern vision of the autoimmune laboratory. The introduction of automation (for harmonization of testing, reduction of human error, ...

  18. Autoimmune pancreatitis can develop into chronic pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Maruyama, Masahiro; Watanabe, Takayuki; Kanai, Keita; Oguchi, Takaya; Asano, Jumpei; Ito, Tetsuya; Ozaki, Yayoi; Muraki, Takashi; Hamano, Hideaki; ARAKURA, Norikazu; Kawa, Shigeyuki

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) has been recognized as a distinct type of pancreatitis that is possibly caused by autoimmune mechanisms. AIP is characterized by high serum IgG4 and IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration in affected pancreatic tissue. Acute phase AIP responds favorably to corticosteroid therapy and results in the amelioration of clinical findings. However, the long-term prognosis and outcome of AIP remain unclear. We have proposed a working hypothesis that AIP can develop into o...

  19. Large leg ulcers due to autoimmune diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Rozin, Alexander P; Egozi, Dana; Ramon, Yehuda; Toledano, Kohava; Braun-Moscovici, Yolanda; Markovits, Doron; Schapira, Daniel; Bergman, Reuven; Melamed, Yehuda; Ullman, Yehuda; Balbir-Gurman, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Large leg ulcers (LLU) may complicate autoimmune diseases. They pose a therapeutic challenge and are often resistant to treatment. To report three cases of autoimmune diseases complicated with LLU. Case Report Case 1. A 55-year old woman presented with long-standing painful LLU due to mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD). Biopsy from the ulcer edge showed small vessel vasculitis. IV methylprednisolone (MethP) 1 G/day, prednisolone (PR) 1mg/kg, monthly IV cyclophosphamide ...

  20. Pulmonary hypertension in autoimmune rheumatic diseases

    OpenAIRE

    L. Massironi; R. Cossutta; Massarotti, M.; Marasini, B; A. Mantero

    2011-01-01

    Objective. Pulmonary hypertension is a severe and rapidly progressive disease, particularly frequent in patients with rheumatic diseases. The aims of this study were the following: to determine the prevalence of pulmonary hypertension in Italian patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases, and to evaluate if the presence of a rheumatic disease in general, or of a specific autoimmune rheumatic disease, is a risk factor for the development of pulmonary hypertension. Patients and Methods. One hu...

  1. New mechanism revealed for regulation of autoimmunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ A healthy human body is equipped with a powerful immune system for resisting the attack of invading microorganisms. Unfortunately, the system sometimes goes awry and attacks the body itself.Autoimmunity is the failure of an organism to recognize its own constituent parts as"self," resulting in an immune response against its own cells and tissues. A disorder that results from such an aberrant immune response is termed an autoimmune disease.

  2. IL-17 Contributes to Autoimmune Hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余海静; 黄加权; 刘阳; 艾国; 严伟明; 王晓晶; 宁琴

    2010-01-01

    The role of interleukin-17 (IL-17) in autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) was investigated. A mouse model of experimental autoimmune hepatitis was established, and the syngeneic S-100 antigen emulsified in complete Freud's adjuvant was injected intraperitoneally into adult male C57BL/6 mice. The IL-17 expression in serum and the livers of the mice models was detected by using ELISA and immunohistochemistry, respectively. IL-17 neutralizing antibody was used to study the biological effect of IL-17 in the experimental...

  3. Hepatitis A vaccine associated with autoimmune hepatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Berry, PA; Smith-Laing, G

    2007-01-01

    To describe a case of probable relapsing autoimmune hepatitis associated with vaccination against hepatitis A virus (HAV). A case report and review of literature were written concerning autoimmune hepatitis in association with hepatitis A and other hepatotropic viruses. Soon after the administration of formalin-inactivated hepatitis A vaccine, a man who had recently recovered from an uncharacterized but self-limiting hepatitic illness, experienced a severe deterioration (AST 1687 U/L, INR 1.4...

  4. Celiac disease and autoimmune thyroid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ch'ng, Chin Lye; Jones, M Keston; Kingham, Jeremy G C

    2007-10-01

    Celiac disease (CD) or gluten sensitive enteropathy is relatively common in western populations with prevalence around 1%. With the recent availability of sensitive and specific serological testing, many patients who are either asymptomatic or have subtle symptoms can be shown to have CD. Patients with CD have modest increases in risks of malignancy and mortality compared to controls. The mortality among CD patients who comply poorly with a gluten-free diet is greater than in compliant patients. The pattern of presentation of CD has altered over the past three decades. Many cases are now detected in adulthood during investigation of problems as diverse as anemia, osteoporosis, autoimmune disorders, unexplained neurological syndromes, infertility and chronic hypertransaminasemia of uncertain cause. Among autoimmune disorders, increased prevalence of CD has been found in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease, type 1 diabetes mellitus, autoimmune liver diseases and inflammatory bowel disease. Prevalence of CD was noted to be 1% to 19% in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus, 2% to 5% in autoimmune thyroid disorders and 3% to 7% in primary biliary cirrhosis in prospective studies. Conversely, there is also an increased prevalence of immune based disorders among patients with CD. The pathogenesis of co-existent autoimmune thyroid disease and CD is not known, but these conditions share similar HLA haplotypes and are associated with the gene encoding cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen-4. Screening high risk patients for CD, such as those with autoimmune diseases, is a reasonable strategy given the increased prevalence. Treatment of CD with a gluten-free diet should reduce the recognized complications of this disease and provide benefits in both general health and perhaps life expectancy. It also improves glycemic control in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and enhances the absorption of medications for associated hypothyroidism and osteoporosis. It

  5. Treatment of patients with severe autoimmune hepatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Finn Stolze

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a progressive inflammatory diseases of unknown origin that is characterised by a necro-inflammatory and fibrotic process and may result in liver failure or uncompensated liver cirrhosis. Normally AIH is responsive to immunosuppressive therapy, and treatment aims...... and tacrolimus) might salvage patients from transplantation. Mycophenolate mofetil may also improve liver tests and reduce the requirement for corticosteroids. Besides, sirolimus is effective for treatment of de novo autoimmune hepatitis that sometimes develops after liver transplantation. Initial experience...

  6. Vitamin D and autoimmune thyroid diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Kivity, Shaye; Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Zisappl, Michael; Shapira, Yinon; Nagy, Endre V.; Dankó, Katalin; Szekanecz, Zoltan; Langevitz, Pnina; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2011-01-01

    The role of vitamin D as an immune modulator has been emphasized in recent years, and low levels of the hormone were observed in several autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis and systemic lupus erythematosus. Vitamin D mediates its effect though binding to vitamin D receptor (VDR), and activation of VDR-responsive genes. While VDR gene polymorphism was found to associate with autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs), few studies examined levels of vitamin D in these patients and those t...

  7. [Autoimmune diseases in type 1 diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechleitner, Monika; Hoppichler, Friedrich; Kaser, Susanne

    2016-04-01

    According to literature about 30 % of the patients with type 1 diabetes develop further autoimmune diseases. Thyroid dysfunction represents with 15‒30 % the most common disorder, followed by gastritis with 5‒10 %, celiac disease with 4‒9 % and vitiligo with 2‒10 %. Addison's disease seems to be less prevalent. Diagnostic procedures in the course of the comprehensive care for diabetic patients should therefore include screening for further autoimmune diseases. PMID:27052247

  8. Maternal autoimmune thyroid disease and pregnancy complication

    OpenAIRE

    Gudović Aleksandra; Spremović-Radjenović Svetlana; Lazović Gordana; Marinković Jelena; Glišić Andreja; Milićević Srboljub

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aim. Thyroid disorders exert a great impact on pregnancy course and outcome. The aim of the study was to investigate impact of autoimmune thyroid disorders on pregnancy course and outcome, frequency of pregnancy complications and pregnancy loss. Methods. We followed 63 pregnancies prospectively during the period 1985-2007, 28 with hyperthyroid and 15 with hypothyroid autoimmune disorders, and 20 healthy pregnancies. Follow up included clinical, sonographic and laboratory investigat...

  9. Difficult treatment decisions in autoimmune hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Albert; J; Czaja

    2010-01-01

    Treatment decisions in autoimmune hepatitis are complicated by the diversity of its clinical presentations,uncertainties about its natural history,evolving opinions regarding treatment end points,varied nature of refractory disease,and plethora of alternative immu-nosuppressive agents. The goals of this article are to review the difficult treatment decisions and to provide the bases for making sound therapeutic judgments. The English literature on the treatment problems in au-toimmune hepatitis were identif...

  10. [Autoimmunity in pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urboniene, Daiva; Sakalauskas, Raimundas; Sitkauskiene, Brigita

    2005-01-01

    For years, smoking induced inflammatory reaction, comprised mainly of neutrophils and macrophages, has been accepted to be the major component in pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. New developments in molecular and cell biology have provided scientists with new knowledge and understanding of inflammatory processes in lung. Recent reports have underlined the role of autoimmunity and T lymphocytes as a potential important factor, which takes place in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. This article reviews potential mechanism of T cell mediated immune response in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:15827384

  11. Regulatory T-cells and autoimmunity.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ni Choileain, Niamh

    2012-02-03

    Approximately 20% of the population is affected by autoimmune or inflammatory diseases mediated by an abnormal immune response. A characteristic feature of autoimmune disease is the selective targeting of a single cell type, organ or tissue by certain populations of autoreactive T-cells. Examples of such diseases include rheumatoid arthritis, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), all of which are characterized by chronic inflammation, tissue destruction and target organ malfunction. Although strong evidence links most autoimmune diseases to specific genes, considerable controversy prevails regarding the role of regulatory T-cell populations in the disease process. These cells are now also believed to play a key role in mediating transplantation tolerance and inhibiting the induction of tumor immunity. Though the concept of therapeutic immune regulation aimed at treating autoimmune pathology has been validated in many animal models, the development of strategies for the treatment of human autoimmune disorders remains in its infancy. The main obstacles to this include the conflicting findings of different model systems, as well as the contrasting functions of regulatory T-cells and cytokines involved in the development of such disorders. This review examines the role of regulatory T-cells in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity and describes the therapeutic potential of these cells for the prevention of immune-mediated pathologies in the future. Although much remains to be learned about such pathologies, a clearer understanding of the mechanisms by which regulatory T-cells function will undoubtedly lead to exciting new possibilities for immunotherapeutics.

  12. Cellular and subcellular alterations in immune cells induced by chronic, intermittent exposure in vivo to very low doses of ionizing radiation (LDR), and its ameliorating effects on progression of autoimmune disease and mammary tumor growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous studies have shown that low doses of ionizing radiation can enhance immune response and down-regulate tumor incidence. This suggested that low dose ionizing radiation can act as a hormetic agent by modulating antigen-stimulated clonal growth and/or differentiation of immune cells. A mouse model was therefore developed to investigate the enhancing effect of LDR at the cellular and organismic levels. At he cellular level, the author investigated the up-regulating effect of LDR on the proliferative growth of mitogen-stimulated splenocytes and on the modulating influence of LDR on thymocytes undergoing differentiation. At the organismic level, the up-regulating effects of LDR on the resistance to spontaneously occurring mammary tumor and lupus-type autoimmune disease were investigated. (author). 14 refs., 2 tabs

  13. Autoimmune neurologic disorders in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Ming; Gorman, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune neurologic diseases are of major clinical importance in children. Antibody-mediated diseases of the central nervous system are now increasingly recognized in childhood, where the antibodies bind to cell surface epitopes on neuronal or glial proteins, and the patients demonstrate either focal or more generalized clinical signs depending on the extent of brain regions targeted by the antibodies. The antibodies are directed towards ion channels, receptors, and membrane proteins; and the diseases include limbic encephalitis and N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor-antibody encephalitis, among many others. Additionally there are conditions where the wider immune system is implicated. Neurologic features like seizures, movement disorders, autonomic dysfunction, and sleep disorders, with neuroimaging and electrophysiologic features, may indicate a specific antibody-mediated or immune disorder. Often, phenotypic overlap is observed between these conditions, and phenotypic variation seen in children with the same condition. Nevertheless, many patients benefit from immunotherapy with substantial improvement, although huge efforts are still required to optimize the outcome for many patients. In many patients no antibodies have yet been identified, even though they respond to immunotherapies. Here we describe the known antibodies and associated diseases, discuss conditions that are thought to be immune-mediated but have no known immunologic biomarker, and provide guidelines for the investigation and classification of these disorders. PMID:27112693

  14. Transplantation in autoimmune liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marcus Mottershead; James Neuberger

    2008-01-01

    Liver transplantation remains an effective treatment for those with end-stage disease and with intractable liver-related symptoms.The shortage of organs for transplantation has resulted in the need for rationing.A variety of approaches to selection and allocation have been developed and vary from country to country.The shortage of donors has meant that new approaches have to be adopted to make maximal use of the available organs;these include splitting grafts,use of extended criteria livers,livers from nonheart-beating donors and from living donors.Post transplantation, most patients will need life-long immunosuppression,although a small proportion can have immunosuppression successfully withdrawn.Newer immunosuppressive drugs and different strategies may allow a more targeted approach with a reduction in sideeffects and so improve the patient and graft survival.For autoimmune diseases, transplantation is associated with significant improvement in the quality and length of life.Disease may recur after transplantation and may affect patient and graft survival.

  15. [Autoimmune thyroiditis and thyroid cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krátký, Jan; Jiskra, Jan

    2015-10-01

    Association between autoimmune thyroiditis (CLT) and thyroid cancer remains not clear. Although both diseases often occur simultaneously in histological samples, it is not yet clear whether CLT can be regarded as a risk factor for thyroid malignancy. This review focus on the known epidemiological and molecular genetics links between both diseases. Most studies have shown a significant association between thyroid cancer and positive antibodies to thyroglobulin and histological evidence of CLT, as well. Both disorders share some risk factors (greater incidence in women, in areas with adequate supply of iodine and in patients after radiotherapy of the neck) and molecular genetics linkage. For example: RET/PTC rearrangements could be more often found in carcinomas associated with CLT, but this mutation could be found in benign lesions such as CLT, as well. CLT seems to be a positive prognostic factor in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer. It is associated with less invasive forms of tumor, lower occurrence of infiltrated lymphatic nodes and a lower risk of recurrence. PMID:26486481

  16. Artificial Left Ventricle

    CERN Document Server

    Ranjbar, Saeed; Meybodi, Mahmood Emami

    2014-01-01

    This Artificial left ventricle is based on a simple conic assumption shape for left ventricle where its motion is made by attached compressed elastic tubes to its walls which are regarded to electrical points at each nodal .This compressed tubes are playing the role of myofibers in the myocardium of the left ventricle. These elastic tubes have helical shapes and are transacting on these helical bands dynamically. At this invention we give an algorithm of this artificial left ventricle construction that of course the effect of the blood flow in LV is observed with making beneficiary used of sensors to obtain this effecting, something like to lifegates problem. The main problem is to evaluate powers that are interacted between elastic body (left ventricle) and fluid (blood). The main goal of this invention is to show that artificial heart is not just a pump, but mechanical modeling of LV wall and its interaction with blood in it (blood movement modeling) can introduce an artificial heart closed to natural heart...

  17. Markedly enhanced susceptibility to experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis in the absence of decay-accelerating factor protection

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Feng; Kaminski, Henry J.; Conti-Fine, Bianca M.; Wang, Wei(Helmholtz-Institut für Strahlen- und Kernphysik, Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics, Universität Bonn, Bonn, D-53115, Germany); Richmonds, Chelliah; Medof, M. Edward

    2002-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune neuromuscular transmission disorder characterized by loss of acetylcholine receptors (AChR’s) due primarily to the production of anti-AChR autoantibodies. In this study we investigated whether the presence of decay-accelerating factor (DAF or CD55), an intrinsic complement regulator, protects against the development of disease. Experimental autoimmune MG was induced in Daf1–/– mice (devoid of neuromuscular DAF protein) and their Daf1+/+ littermates by i...

  18. Helminth protection against autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice is independent of a type 2 immune shift and requires TGFβ

    OpenAIRE

    Hübner, Marc P.; Shi, Yinghui; Torrero, Marina N.; Mueller, Ellen; Larson, David; Soloviova, Kateryna; Gondorf, Fabian; Hoerauf, Achim (Prof. Dr.); Killoran, Kristin E.; Stocker, J. Thomas; Davies, Stephen J; Tarbell, Kristin V; Mitre, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Leading hypotheses to explain helminth-mediated protection against autoimmunity postulate that type 2 or regulatory immune responses induced by helminth infections in the host limit pathogenic Th1-driven autoimmune responses. We tested these hypotheses by investigating whether infection with the filarial nematode Litomosoides sigmodontis prevents diabetes onset in IL-4-deficient nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice and whether depletion or absence of regulatory T cells, IL-10, or TGFβ alters helminth...

  19. Pathways and gene networks mediating the regulatory effects of cannabidiol, a nonpsychoactive cannabinoid, in autoimmune T cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kozela, Ewa; Juknat, Ana; Gao, Fuying; Kaushansky, Nathali; Coppola, Giovanni; Vogel, Zvi

    2016-01-01

    Background Our previous studies showed that the non-psychoactive cannabinoid, cannabidiol (CBD), ameliorates the clinical symptoms in mouse myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)35-55-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis model of multiple sclerosis (MS) as well as decreases the memory MOG35-55-specific T cell (TMOG) proliferation and cytokine secretion including IL-17, a key autoimmune factor. The mechanisms of these activities are currently poorly understood. Methods Herein, ...

  20. Simulation of 'pathologic' changes in ICG waveforms resulting from superposition of the 'preejection' and ejection waves induced by left ventricular contraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermishkin, V. V.; Kolesnikov, V. A.; Lukoshkova, E. V.; Sonina, R. S.

    2013-04-01

    The impedance cardiography (ICG) is widely used for beat-to-beat noninvasive evaluation of the left ventricular stroke volume and contractility. It implies the correct determination of the ejection start and end points and the amplitudes of certain peaks in the differentiated impedance cardiogram. An accurate identification of ejection onset by ICG is often problematic, especially in the cardiologic patients, due to peculiar waveforms. Using a simple theoretical model, we tested the hypothesis that two major processes are responsible for the formation of impedance systolic wave: (1) the changes in the heart geometry and surrounding vessels produced by ventricular contraction, which occur during the isovolumic phase and precede ejection, and (2) expansion of aorta and adjacent arteries during the ejection phase. The former process initiates the preejection wave WpE and the latter triggers the ejection wave WEj. The model predicts a potential mechanism of generating the abnormal shapes of dZ/dt due to the presence of preejection waves and explains the related errors in ICG time and amplitude parameters. An appropriate decomposition method is a promising way to avoid the masking effects of these waves and a further step to correct determination of the onset of ejection and the corresponding peak amplitudes from 'pathologically shaped' ICG signals.

  1. Uveitis in autoimmune hepatitis: A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Roberto Giulio Romanelli; Giorgio La Villa; Fabio Almerigogna; Francesco Vizzutti; Elena Di Pietro; Valentina Fedi; Paolo Gentilini; Giacomo Laffi

    2006-01-01

    In this case report we describe for the first time an association between autoimmune hepatitis (AIH)and uveitis, without any doubts about other possible etiologies, such as HCV, since all the old reports describe the association of AIH with iridocyclitis before tests for HCV-related hepatitis could be available. A 38-year-old businessman with abnormal liver function tests and hyperemia of the bulbar conjunctiva was admitted to the hospital. Six years before admission,the patient presented with persistent fever, arthralgias,conjunctival hyperemia, leukocytosis and increased ESR, referred to acute rheumatic fever. The presence of systemic diseases, most commonly associated with uveitis, was investigated without results and the patient was then treated with topical corticosteroids. His symptoms resolved. A test for anti-nuclear antibodies was positive, at a titre of 1:320, with a speckled and nucleolar staining pattern. Liver ultrasound showed mild hepatomegaly with an increased echostructure of the liver. Percutaneous liver biopsy was performed under ultrasound assistance. Histological examination showed necroinflammation over the portal, periportal and lobular areas, fibrotic portal tracts, with periportal fibrosis and occasional portal-to-portal bridgings, but intact hepatic architecture. Some hepatocytes showed barely discernible granules of hemosiderin in the lobular area. Bile ductules had not any significant morphological alterations. METAVIR score was A2-F3, according to the modified HAI grading/fibrosis staging. The patient was diagnosed to have AIH with mild activity and fibrosis and was discharged on 25 mg prednisone, entering clinical and biochemical remission, further confirming diagnosis. After discharge the patient continued to have treatment with corticosteroids as an outpatient at a dose of 5 mg. On January 2002 the patient was readmitted to the hospital. A test for anti-nuclear antibodies was positive, at a titre of 1:320, with a speckled and

  2. The Postmodern Left

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niall Lucy

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A certain version of the political left is at one with conservatives in misrepresenting ‘postmodernism’ in order to denounce it. For this ‘left’, which recoils from the left’s historically indivisible association with Marx, the purpose of politics is simply to win government for itself. Our argument here is that, ironically, such a purpose mirrors the very lack of purpose that conservatives define ‘postmodernism’ to represent. Hence the recent call by Clive Hamilton for the left to turn to the churches for moral guidance, in the absence of any meaningful political convictions.

  3. Left paraduodenal hernias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report two cases of left paraduodenal internal hernias located in the fossa of Landzert that were diagnosed by CT. Internal hernias are an infrequent cause of acute abdomen, due to the intestinal sub occlusion they produce. Left paraduodenal hernias are responsible for about 50% of internal hernias. CT makes it possible to demonstrate the group of herniated loops between the stomach, fourth segment of the duodenum, descending colon, and tail of the pancreas. The identification of the loops in an atypical position together with displaced blood vessels (mesenteric vessels) and colon gives concerns on them a typical radiological semiology that makes them easily identifiable. (Author) 9 refs

  4. Helminth Products Protect against Autoimmunity via Innate Type 2 Cytokines IL-5 and IL-33, Which Promote Eosinophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlay, Conor M; Stefanska, Anna M; Walsh, Kevin P; Kelly, Patrick J; Boon, Louis; Lavelle, Ed C; Walsh, Patrick T; Mills, Kingston H G

    2016-01-15

    Epidemiologic studies in humans have demonstrated that infection with helminth parasites is associated with a reduced risk of developing autoimmune diseases. Mechanistic studies in mice have linked the protective effect of helminths on autoimmunity to the suppressive activity of helminth-induced regulatory T cells (Tregs) or Th2 cells. In this study, we demonstrate that treatment of mice with Fasciola hepatica excretory-secretory products (FHES) attenuated the clinical signs of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a mouse model of multiple sclerosis. Protection was associated with a significant reduction in the infiltration of pathogenic Th1 and Th17 cells into the brain. Although FHES enhanced anti-inflammatory cytokine and Th2 responses, protection against EAE was independent of IL-4, IL-10, and Tregs. However, administration of FHES induced production of the type 2 cytokines IL-33 and IL-5, which promoted accumulation of eosinophils. FHES-induced expansion of eosinophils and protection against EAE was lost in IL-33(-/-) mice and upon neutralization of IL-5. Furthermore, transfer of FHES-induced or IL-33-induced eosinophils conferred protection against EAE. In addition, treatment of mice with recombinant IL-33 attenuated autoimmunity, and this was dependent on IL-5. To our knowledge, this study is the first to report a role for helminth-induced IL-5 and IL-33 in protection against autoimmunity. PMID:26673140

  5. Effect of trimetazidine treatment on the transient outward potassium current of the left ventricular myocytes of rats with streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetes mellitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, Yu-luan; He, Li [Department of Cardiology, the Second Affiliated Hospital, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Xiao, Jun [Department of Cardiology, Chongqing Emergency Medical Center, Chongqing (China); Xia, Shuang; Deng, Song-bai [Department of Cardiology, the Second Affiliated Hospital, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Xiu, Yun [Institute of Life Science, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); She, Qiang [Department of Cardiology, the Second Affiliated Hospital, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China)

    2012-02-17

    Cardiovascular complications are a leading cause of mortality in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). The present study was designed to investigate the effects of trimetazidine (TMZ), an anti-angina drug, on transient outward potassium current (I{sub to}) remodeling in ventricular myocytes and the plasma contents of free fatty acid (FFA) and glucose in DM. Sprague-Dawley rats, 8 weeks old and weighing 200-250 g, were randomly divided into three groups of 20 animals each. The control group was injected with vehicle (1 mM citrate buffer), the DM group was injected with 65 mg/kg streptozotocin (STZ) for induction of type 1 DM, and the DM+TMZ group was injected with the same dose of STZ followed by a 4-week treatment with TMZ (60 mg·kg{sup −1}·day{sup −1}). All animals were then euthanized and their hearts excised and subjected to electrophysiological measurements or gene expression analyses. TMZ exposure significantly reversed the increased plasma FFA level in diabetic rats, but failed to change the plasma glucose level. The amplitude of I{sub to} was significantly decreased in left ventricular myocytes from diabetic rats relative to control animals (6.25 ± 1.45 vs 20.72 ± 2.93 pA/pF at +40 mV). The DM-associated I{sub to} reduction was attenuated by TMZ. Moreover, TMZ treatment reversed the increased expression of the channel-forming alpha subunit Kv1.4 and the decreased expression of Kv4.2 and Kv4.3 in diabetic rat hearts. These data demonstrate that TMZ can normalize, or partially normalize, the increased plasma FFA content, the reduced I{sub to} of ventricular myocytes, and the altered expression Kv1.4, Kv4.2, and Kv4.3 in type 1 DM.

  6. Effect of trimetazidine treatment on the transient outward potassium current of the left ventricular myocytes of rats with streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-luan Xiang

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular complications are a leading cause of mortality in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of trimetazidine (TMZ, an anti-angina drug, on transient outward potassium current (Ito remodeling in ventricular myocytes and the plasma contents of free fatty acid (FFA and glucose in DM. Sprague-Dawley rats, 8 weeks old and weighing 200-250 g, were randomly divided into three groups of 20 animals each. The control group was injected with vehicle (1 mM citrate buffer, the DM group was injected with 65 mg/kg streptozotocin (STZ for induction of type 1 DM, and the DM + TMZ group was injected with the same dose of STZ followed by a 4-week treatment with TMZ (60 mg·kg-1·day-1. All animals were then euthanized and their hearts excised and subjected to electrophysiological measurements or gene expression analyses. TMZ exposure significantly reversed the increased plasma FFA level in diabetic rats, but failed to change the plasma glucose level. The amplitude of Ito was significantly decreased in left ventricular myocytes from diabetic rats relative to control animals (6.25 ± 1.45 vs 20.72 ± 2.93 pA/pF at +40 mV. The DM-associated Ito reduction was attenuated by TMZ. Moreover, TMZ treatment reversed the increased expression of the channel-forming alpha subunit Kv1.4 and the decreased expression of Kv4.2 and Kv4.3 in diabetic rat hearts. These data demonstrate that TMZ can normalize, or partially normalize, the increased plasma FFA content, the reduced Ito of ventricular myocytes, and the altered expression Kv1.4, Kv4.2, and Kv4.3 in type 1 DM.

  7. Effect of trimetazidine treatment on the transient outward potassium current of the left ventricular myocytes of rats with streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiovascular complications are a leading cause of mortality in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). The present study was designed to investigate the effects of trimetazidine (TMZ), an anti-angina drug, on transient outward potassium current (Ito) remodeling in ventricular myocytes and the plasma contents of free fatty acid (FFA) and glucose in DM. Sprague-Dawley rats, 8 weeks old and weighing 200-250 g, were randomly divided into three groups of 20 animals each. The control group was injected with vehicle (1 mM citrate buffer), the DM group was injected with 65 mg/kg streptozotocin (STZ) for induction of type 1 DM, and the DM+TMZ group was injected with the same dose of STZ followed by a 4-week treatment with TMZ (60 mg·kg−1·day−1). All animals were then euthanized and their hearts excised and subjected to electrophysiological measurements or gene expression analyses. TMZ exposure significantly reversed the increased plasma FFA level in diabetic rats, but failed to change the plasma glucose level. The amplitude of Ito was significantly decreased in left ventricular myocytes from diabetic rats relative to control animals (6.25 ± 1.45 vs 20.72 ± 2.93 pA/pF at +40 mV). The DM-associated Ito reduction was attenuated by TMZ. Moreover, TMZ treatment reversed the increased expression of the channel-forming alpha subunit Kv1.4 and the decreased expression of Kv4.2 and Kv4.3 in diabetic rat hearts. These data demonstrate that TMZ can normalize, or partially normalize, the increased plasma FFA content, the reduced Ito of ventricular myocytes, and the altered expression Kv1.4, Kv4.2, and Kv4.3 in type 1 DM

  8. Role of IgE in autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjuan, Miguel A; Sagar, Divya; Kolbeck, Roland

    2016-06-01

    There is accumulating evidence to suggest that IgE plays a significant role in autoimmunity. The presence of circulating self-reactive IgE in patients with autoimmune disorders has been long known but, at the same time, largely understudied. However, studies have shown that the increased IgE concentration is not associated with higher prevalence for atopy and allergy in patients with autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus. IgE-mediated mechanisms are conventionally known to facilitate degranulation of mast cells and basophils and promote TH2 immunity, mechanisms that are not only central to mounting an appropriate defense against parasitic worms, noxious substances, toxins, venoms, and environmental irritants but that also trigger exuberant allergic reactions in patients with allergies. More recently, IgE autoantibodies have been recognized to participate in the self-inflicted damaging immune responses that characterize autoimmunity. Such autoimmune responses include direct damage on tissue-containing autoantigens, activation and migration of basophils to lymph nodes, and, as observed most recently, induction of type 1 interferon responses from plasmacytoid dendritic cells. The importance of IgE as a central pathogenic mechanism in autoimmunity has now been clinically validated by the approval of omalizumab, an anti-IgE mAb, for patients with chronic spontaneous urticaria and for the clinical benefit of patients with bullous pemphigoid. In this review we summarize recent reports describing the prevalence of self-reactive IgE and discuss novel findings that incriminate IgE as central in the pathogenesis of inflammatory autoimmune disorders. PMID:27264000

  9. Holmes-Adie syndrome, autoimmune hepatitis and celiac disease: A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Timea Csak; Aniko Folhoffer; Andrea Horvath; Judit Halász; Csaba Diczházi; Zsuzsa Schaff; Ferenc Szalay

    2006-01-01

    A 35-year-old female patient presented with the following symptoms of Holmes-Adie syndrome: photophobia,enlargement of the left pupil unresponsive to light,Achilles areflexia. The pilocarpine test was positive. No tumor or other neurological abnormality was found. She had a 19-year history of autoimmune hepatitis. Flares up were observed following each 3 deliveries. At age of 31she presented with diarrhea and weight loss. Abdominal tumor was detected by ultrasound. The surgically removed tumor was histologically a benign mesenteric multicystic lymphangioma. Simultaneously, celiac disease was diagnosed. Gluten-free diet resulted in a significant improvement of celiac disease, but not of autoimmune hepatitis. Autonomic neuropathy was proven by standard cardiovascular tests. The patient was a homozygous carrier for HLA DQ2 antigen characteristic for celiac disease and heterozygous for HLA DR3 B8 frequent in autoimmune liver diseases. Our novel observation on association of Holmes-Adie syndrome with autoimmune hepatitis and celiac disease is suggestive for a common immunological background for all three entities present in a patient with mesenteric multicystic lymphangioma.

  10. Effect of Associated Autoimmune Diseases on Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Incidence and Metabolic Control in Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is one of the most common chronic diseases developing in childhood. The incidence of the disease in children increases for unknown reasons at a rate from 3 to 5% every year worldwide. The background of T1DM is associated with the autoimmune process of pancreatic beta cell destruction, which leads to absolute insulin deficiency and organ damage. Complex interactions between environmental and genetic factors contribute to the development of T1DM in genetically predisposed patients. The T1DM-inducing autoimmune process can also affect other organs, resulting in development of additional autoimmune diseases in the patient, thereby impeding diabetes control. The most common T1DM comorbidities include autoimmune thyroid diseases, celiac disease, and autoimmune gastritis; additionally, diabetes can be a component of PAS (Polyglandular Autoimmune Syndrome). The aim of this review is to assess the prevalence of T1DM-associated autoimmune diseases in children and adolescents and their impact on the course of T1DM. We also present suggestions concerning screening tests. PMID:27525273

  11.  An autoimmune polyglandular syndrome complicated with celiac disease and autoimmune hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieli-Crimi, Romina; Núñez, Concepción; Estrada, Lourdes; López-Palacios, Natalia

    2016-01-01

     Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome (APS) is a combination of different autoimmune diseases. The close relationship between immune-mediated disorders makes it mandatory to perform serological screening periodically in order to avoid delayed diagnosis of additional autoimmune diseases. We studied a patient with type 1 diabetes (T1D) who later developed an autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD) and was referred to our hospital with a serious condition of his clinical status. The patient was suffering from an advance stage of celiac disease (CD), the delay in its diagnosis and in the establishment of a gluten-free dietled the patient to a severe proteincalorie malnutrition. Later, the patient developed an autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). We consider that clinical deterioration in patients with APS should alert physicians about the possible presence of other immune-mediated diseases. Periodic screening for autoantibodies would help to prevent delayed diagnosis and would improve patient's quality of life. PMID:27236159

  12. Left atrial appendage occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Mirdamadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Left atrial appendage (LAA occlusion is a treatment strategy to prevent blood clot formation in atrial appendage. Although, LAA occlusion usually was done by catheter-based techniques, especially percutaneous trans-luminal mitral commissurotomy (PTMC, it can be done during closed and open mitral valve commissurotomy (CMVC, OMVC and mitral valve replacement (MVR too. Nowadays, PTMC is performed as an optimal management of severe mitral stenosis (MS and many patients currently are treated by PTMC instead of previous surgical methods. One of the most important contraindications of PTMC is presence of clot in LAA. So, each patient who suffers of severe MS is evaluated by Trans-Esophageal Echocardiogram to rule out thrombus in LAA before PTMC. At open heart surgery, replacement of the mitral valve was performed for 49-year-old woman. Also, left atrial appendage occlusion was done during surgery. Immediately after surgery, echocardiography demonstrates an echo imitated the presence of a thrombus in left atrial appendage area, although there was not any evidence of thrombus in pre-pump TEE. We can conclude from this case report that when we suspect of thrombus of left atrial, we should obtain exact history of previous surgery of mitral valve to avoid misdiagnosis clotted LAA, instead of obliterated LAA. Consequently, it can prevent additional evaluations and treatments such as oral anticoagulation and exclusion or postponing surgeries including PTMC.

  13. Left-handed completeness

    OpenAIRE

    Kozen, Dexter; Silva, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    Lecture Notes in Computer Science 7560, 2012 We give a new, significantly shorter proof of the completeness of the left-handed star rule of Kleene algebra. The proof exposes the rich interaction of algebra and coalgebra in the theory of Kleene algebra.

  14. Pregnancy and the risk of autoimmune disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Khashan, Ali S

    2012-01-31

    Autoimmune diseases (AID) predominantly affect women of reproductive age. While basic molecular studies have implicated persisting fetal cells in the mother in some AID, supportive epidemiological evidence is limited. We investigated the effect of vaginal delivery, caesarean section (CS) and induced abortion on the risk of subsequent maternal AID. Using the Danish Civil Registration System (CRS) we identified women who were born between 1960 and 1992. We performed data linkage between the CRS other Danish national registers to identify women who had a pregnancy and those who developed AID. Women were categorised into 4 groups; nulligravida (control group), women who had 1st child by vaginal delivery, whose 1st delivery was by CS and who had abortions. Log-linear Poisson regression with person-years was used for data analysis adjusting for several potential confounders. There were 1,035,639 women aged >14 years and 25,570 developed AID: 43.4% nulligravida, 44.3% had their first pregnancy delivered vaginally, 7.6% CS and 4.1% abortions. The risk of AID was significantly higher in the 1st year after vaginal delivery (RR = 1.1[1.0, 1.2]) and CS (RR = 1.3[1.1, 1.5]) but significantly lower in the 1st year following abortion (RR = 0.7[0.6, 0.9]). These results suggest an association between pregnancy and the risk of subsequent maternal AID. Increased risks of AID after CS may be explained by amplified fetal cell traffic at delivery, while decreased risks after abortion may be due to the transfer of more primitive fetal stem cells. The increased risk of AID in the first year after delivery may also be related to greater testing during pregnancy.

  15. Pregnancy and the risk of autoimmune disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali S Khashan

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases (AID predominantly affect women of reproductive age. While basic molecular studies have implicated persisting fetal cells in the mother in some AID, supportive epidemiological evidence is limited. We investigated the effect of vaginal delivery, caesarean section (CS and induced abortion on the risk of subsequent maternal AID. Using the Danish Civil Registration System (CRS we identified women who were born between 1960 and 1992. We performed data linkage between the CRS other Danish national registers to identify women who had a pregnancy and those who developed AID. Women were categorised into 4 groups; nulligravida (control group, women who had 1st child by vaginal delivery, whose 1st delivery was by CS and who had abortions. Log-linear Poisson regression with person-years was used for data analysis adjusting for several potential confounders. There were 1,035,639 women aged >14 years and 25,570 developed AID: 43.4% nulligravida, 44.3% had their first pregnancy delivered vaginally, 7.6% CS and 4.1% abortions. The risk of AID was significantly higher in the 1st year after vaginal delivery (RR = 1.1[1.0, 1.2] and CS (RR = 1.3[1.1, 1.5] but significantly lower in the 1st year following abortion (RR = 0.7[0.6, 0.9]. These results suggest an association between pregnancy and the risk of subsequent maternal AID. Increased risks of AID after CS may be explained by amplified fetal cell traffic at delivery, while decreased risks after abortion may be due to the transfer of more primitive fetal stem cells. The increased risk of AID in the first year after delivery may also be related to greater testing during pregnancy.

  16. Sclerosing cholecystitis associated with autoimmune pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Terumi Kamisawa; Yuyang Tu; Hitoshi Nakajima; Naoto Egawa; Kouji Tsuruta; Atsutake Okamoto; Shinichirou Horiguchi

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the histopathological and radiological findings of the gallbladder in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP).METHODS: The radiological findings of the gallbladder of 19 AIP patients were retrospectively reviewed.Resected gallbladders of 8 AIP patients were examined histologically and were immunostained with antiIgG4 antibody. Controls consisted of gallbladders resected for symptomatic gallstones (n=10) and those removed during pancreatoduodenectomy for pancreatic carcinoma (n=10), as well as extrahepatic bile ducts and pancreases removed by pancreatoduodenectomy for pancreatic carcinoma (n=10).RESULTS: Thickening of the gallbladder wall was detected by ultrasound and/or computed tomography in 10 patients with AIP (3 severe and 7 moderate);in these patients severe stenosis of the extrahepatic bile duct was also noted. Histologically, thickening of the gallbladder was detected in 6 of 8 (75%) patients with AIP; 4 cases had transmural lymphoplasmacytic infiltration with fibrosis, and 2 cases had mucosal-based lymphoplasmacytic infiltration. Considerable transmural thickening of the extrahepatic bile duct wall with dense fibrosis and diffuse ly rnphoplasmacytic infiltration was detected in 7 patients. Immunohistochemically, severe or moderate infiltration of IgG4-positive plasma cells was detected in the gallbladder, bile duct, and pancreas of all 8 patients, but was not detected in controls.CONCLUSION: Gallbladder wall thickening with fibrosis and abundant infiltration of IgG4-positive plasma cells is frequently detected in patients with AIR We propose the use of a new term, sclerosing cholecystitis, for these cases that are induced by the same mechanism as sclerosing pancreatitis or sclerosing cholangitis in AIP.

  17. Effects of chick type Ⅱ collagen by oral administration on articular lesion and autoimmune function in rats with adjuvaut-induced arthritis%口服鸡Ⅱ型胶原对佐剂型关节炎大鼠关节病变及自身免疫功能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王霞; 魏大鹏; 蔡美英; 赵燕; 张桂蓉

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Oral antigen administration has been extensive used experimentally to induce tolerance of autoantigens, which shed lihght on a potential therapeutic strategy for autoimmune diseases. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the suppressive effect of oral chick type Ⅱcollagen(CⅡ) treatment on rat adjuvant-induced arthritis and explore the mechanism.DESIGN: A randomized controlled trial.SETTING and PARTICIPANTS: The research was conducted in the Department of Immunology, College of Basic Medical Science and Forensic Medicine, Sichuan University. A total of 50 male SD rats of grade two aged 8to 12 months were obtained from Sichuan Institute of Antibiotic Industry, and fed in clean environment.INTERVENTIONS: Forty rats received intradermal injection with 0. 1 mL Freunds complete adjuvant in the left hindfoot to build an animal model of adjuvant-induced arthritis. The rats were then randomly divided into positive treatment control group and 3 C Ⅱ groups of low, intermediate and high doses with 10 in each group, treated via a gastric tube with 25 mg/kg prednisone and 0.01, 0.03 and 25 mg/kg C Ⅱ respectively for 2 consecutive weeks. Another 10 normal rats and another 10 rat models served as the normal control and model groups, respectively, given acetic acid solution instead for 2 weeks.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The occurrence and severity of arthritic lesion and the changes of T cell subsets and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)concentration in peripheral blood were observed in the rats.RESULTS: Feeding of C Ⅱ for 2 weeks could ameliorated adjuvant-induced arthritis, especially in the high-dose group. The percentages of peripheral CD3+, CD4+ and CDS+ T cell subsets in high-dose C Ⅱ group were (84.35 ±3.92) %, (34. 37 ±5.72) % and(31.89 ±9.71)% respectively, significantly different from those of the positive control group(P<0.05-0.01) . The serum TNF-α level also decreased significantly to(1485.0 ± 119.3) ng/L as compared with(1 785.4 ± 119.0) ng/L in the

  18. Hypoplastic left heart syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiagarajan Ravi

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hypoplastic left heart syndrome(HLHS refers to the abnormal development of the left-sided cardiac structures, resulting in obstruction to blood flow from the left ventricular outflow tract. In addition, the syndrome includes underdevelopment of the left ventricle, aorta, and aortic arch, as well as mitral atresia or stenosis. HLHS has been reported to occur in approximately 0.016 to 0.036% of all live births. Newborn infants with the condition generally are born at full term and initially appear healthy. As the arterial duct closes, the systemic perfusion becomes decreased, resulting in hypoxemia, acidosis, and shock. Usually, no heart murmur, or a non-specific heart murmur, may be detected. The second heart sound is loud and single because of aortic atresia. Often the liver is enlarged secondary to congestive heart failure. The embryologic cause of the disease, as in the case of most congenital cardiac defects, is not fully known. The most useful diagnostic modality is the echocardiogram. The syndrome can be diagnosed by fetal echocardiography between 18 and 22 weeks of gestation. Differential diagnosis includes other left-sided obstructive lesions where the systemic circulation is dependent on ductal flow (critical aortic stenosis, coarctation of the aorta, interrupted aortic arch. Children with the syndrome require surgery as neonates, as they have duct-dependent systemic circulation. Currently, there are two major modalities, primary cardiac transplantation or a series of staged functionally univentricular palliations. The treatment chosen is dependent on the preference of the institution, its experience, and also preference. Although survival following initial surgical intervention has improved significantly over the last 20 years, significant mortality and morbidity are present for both surgical strategies. As a result pediatric cardiologists continue to be challenged by discussions with families regarding initial decision

  19. Vitamin D and estrogen synergy in Vdr-expressing CD4(+) T cells is essential to induce Helios(+)FoxP3(+) T cells and prevent autoimmune demyelinating disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanier, Justin A; Nashold, Faye E; Mayne, Christopher G; Nelson, Corwin D; Hayes, Colleen E

    2015-09-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a neurodegenerative disease resulting from an autoimmune attack on the axon-myelin unit. A female MS bias becomes evident after puberty and female incidence has tripled in the last half-century, implicating a female sex hormone interacting with a modifiable environmental factor. These aspects of MS suggest that many female MS cases may be preventable. Mechanistic knowledge of this hormone-environment interaction is needed to devise strategies to reduce female MS risk. We previously demonstrated that vitamin D3 (D3) deficiency increases and D3 supplementation decreases experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) risk in a female-biased manner. We also showed that D3 acts in an estrogen (E2)-dependent manner, since ovariectomy eliminated and E2 restored D3-mediated EAE protection. Here we probed the hypothesis that E2 and D3 interact synergistically within CD4(+) T cells to control T cell fate and prevent demyelinating disease. The E2 increased EAE resistance in wild-type (WT) but not T-Vdr(0) mice lacking Vdr gene function in CD4(+) T cells, so E2 action depended entirely on Vdr(+)CD4(+) T cells. The E2 levels were higher in WT than T-Vdr(0) mice, suggesting the Vdr(+)CD4(+) T cells produced E2 or stimulated its production. The E2 decreased Cyp24a1 and increased Vdr transcripts in T cells, prolonging the calcitriol half-life and increasing calcitriol responsiveness. The E2 also increased CD4(+)Helios(+)FoxP3(+) T regulatory (Treg) cells in a Vdr-dependent manner. Thus, CD4(+) T cells have a cooperative amplification loop involving E2 and calcitriol that promotes CD4(+)Helios(+)FoxP3(+) Treg cell development and is disrupted when the D3 pathway is impaired. The global decline in population D3 status may be undermining a similar cooperative E2-D3 interaction controlling Treg cell differentiation in women, causing a breakdown in T cell self tolerance and a rise in MS incidence. PMID:26298324

  20. Autoimmune diseases in women with Turner's syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kristian T; Rostgaard, Klaus; Bache, Iben;

    2010-01-01

    Danish women with Turner's syndrome followed up for 12,461 person-years between 1980 and 2004. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) of first hospitalization for autoimmune disease and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were used as measures of relative risk. RESULTS: The overall risk of autoimmune...... disease among women with Turner's syndrome was twice that among Danish women in general (SIR 2.1 [95% CI 1.6-2.7]). For autoimmune diseases with a female predominance, the SIR among women with Turner's syndrome was 1.7 (95% CI 1.2-2.4), whereas the SIR for autoimmune diseases with a male predominance...... among these women was 3.9 (95% CI 2.5-5.8). Associations were strongest for Hashimoto thyroiditis (SIR 14.6 [95% CI 6.7-27.1]), a strongly female-predominant condition, and type 1 diabetes mellitus (SIR 4.1 [95% CI 2.5-6.3]). CONCLUSION: Women with Turner's syndrome are at excess risk of autoimmune...

  1. Sniping the scout: Targeting the key molecules in dendritic cell functions for treatment of autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xing; Han, Yanping; Sun, Erwei

    2016-05-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are a power tool for manipulating immune system. They play important roles in the induction of immunity as well as inducing intrathymic and peripheral tolerance. After generated from stem cells in the bone marrow, DCs traffic to the peripheral tissues, where they capture and process antigens, express lymphocyte co-stimulators, migrate to the secondary lymph organs and present the processed antigen to naive T cells to either activate or tolerize them. These processes are modulated subtly and influenced by various factors. Aberrant regulation of the processes may cause autoimmunity. Investigation into the biology of DCs and the molecules and mechanisms that regulate them helps us understanding the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases and reveals numerous steps for pharmacological manipulation. In this review, we made a sketch line of the critical events of DC biology that are potential pharmacologic targets for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:26931618

  2. Induction of regulatory T cells: A role for probiotics and prebiotics to suppress autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Mitesh; Kumar, Prasant; Laddha, Naresh C; Kemp, E Helen

    2016-04-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are comprised of a heterogeneous population of cells that play a vital role in suppressing inflammation and maintaining immune tolerance. Given the crucial role of Tregs in maintaining immune homeostasis, it is probably not surprising that many microbial species and their metabolites have the potential to induce Tregs. There is now great interest in the therapeutic potential of probiotics and prebiotics based strategies for a range of autoimmune disorders. This review will summarise recent findings concerning the role of probiotics and prebiotics in induction of Tregs to ameliorate the autoimmune conditions. In addition, the article is focused to explain the different mechanisms of Treg induction and function by these probiotics and prebiotics, based on the available studies till date. The article further proposes that induction of Tregs by probiotics and prebiotics could lead to the development of new therapeutic approach towards curbing the autoimmune response and as an alternative to detrimental immunosuppressive drugs. PMID:26774011

  3. Differential expression of metallothioneins in the CNS of mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Espejo, C; Carrasco, J; Hidalgo, J;

    2001-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory, demyelinating disease of the CNS. Metallothioneins-I+II are antioxidant proteins induced in the CNS by immobilisation stress, trauma or degenerative diseases which have been postulated to play a neuroprotective role, while the CNS isoform metallothionein......-III has been related to Alzheimer's disease. We have analysed metallothioneins-I-III expression in the CNS of mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Moreover, we have examined the putative role of interferon-gamma, a pro-inflammatory cytokine, in the control of metallothioneins expression...... during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in interferon-gamma receptor knockout mice with two different genetic backgrounds: 129/Sv and C57BL/6x129/Sv.Mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis showed a significant induction of metallothioneins-I+II in the spinal cord white matter, and to...

  4. Toxins Targeting the KV1.3 Channel: Potential Immunomodulators for Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yipeng Zhao

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases are usually accompanied by tissue injury caused by autoantigen-specific T-cells. KV1.3 channels participate in modulating calcium signaling to induce T-cell proliferation, immune activation and cytokine production. Effector memory T (TEM-cells, which play major roles in many autoimmune diseases, are controlled by blocking KV1.3 channels on the membrane. Toxins derived from animal venoms have been found to selectively target a variety of ion channels, including KV1.3. By blocking the KV1.3 channel, these toxins are able to suppress the activation and proliferation of TEM cells and may improve TEM cell-mediated autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis and type I diabetes mellitus.

  5. Heat shock protein 90: a pathophysiological factor and novel treatment target in autoimmune bullous skin diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tukaj, Stefan; Zillikens, Detlef; Kasperkiewicz, Michael

    2015-08-01

    The chaperone heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), a cell stress-inducible molecule that regulates activity of many client proteins responsible for cellular growth, differentiation and apoptosis, has been proposed as an important therapeutic target in patients with malignancies. More recently, its active participation in (auto)immune processes has been recognized as evidenced by amelioration of inflammatory disease pathways through pharmacological inhibition of Hsp90 in rodent models of autoimmune encephalomyelitis, rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. Based on own current research results, this viewpoint essay provides important insights that Hsp90 is also involved as a notable pathophysiological factor in autoimmune blistering dermatoses including epidermolysis bullosa acquisita, bullous pemphigoid and possibly dermatitis herpetiformis. The observed in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo efficacy of anti-Hsp90 treatment in experimental models of autoimmune bullous diseases and its underlying multimodal anti-inflammatory mechanisms of interference with key contributors to autoimmune-mediated blister formation supports the introduction of selective non-toxic Hsp90 inhibitors into the clinical setting for the treatment of patients with these disorders. PMID:25980533

  6. The Effect of CD3-Specific Monoclonal Antibody on Treating Experimental Autoimmune Myasthenia Gravis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruonan Xu; Jianan Wang; Guojiang Chen; Gencheng Han; Renxi Wang; Beffen Shen; Yan Li

    2005-01-01

    CD3-specific monoclonal antibody was the first one used for clinical practice in field of transplantation. Recently,renewed interests have elicited in its capacity to prevent autoimmune diabetes by inducing immune tolerance. In this study, we tested whether this antibody can also be used to treat another kind of autoimmune disease myasthenia gravis (MG) and explored the possible mechanisms. MG is caused by an autoimmune damage mediated by antibody- and complement-mediated destruction of AChR at the neuromuscular junction. We found that administration of CD3-specific antibody (Fab)2 to an animal model with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) (B6 mice received 3 times of AChR/CFA immunization) could not significantly improve the clinical signs and clinical score. When the possible mechanisms were tested, we found that CD3 antibody treatment slightly down-regulated the T-cell response to AChR, modestly up-regulation the muscle strength. And no significant difference in the titers of IgG2b was found between CD3 antibody treated and control groups. These data indicated that CD3-specific antibody was not suitable for treating MG, an antibody- and complementmediated autoimmune disease, after this disease has been established. The role of CD3-specific antibody in treating this kind of disease remains to be determined.

  7. Possible pathomechanism of autoimmune hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prandota, Joseph

    2003-01-01

    The hepatotropic viruses, measles, and herpesviruses as well as different drugs were repeatedly shown to act presumably as a trigger in patients with autoimmune hepatitis (AI-H). On the other hand, it is known that viral infections stimulate interferon production, which inactivates the cytochrome P-450 enzymes involved in the metabolism of several endogenous substances and exogenous environmental agents. Moreover, it was reported that several cytokines, including interferons, as well as transforming growth factor beta1 and human hepatocyte growth factor, which are abundantly produced and released in the body during infections, also downregulated expression of major cytochrome P-450 and/or other biotransformation enzymes. It seems that all these factors, in addition to individual immune response and the nature and amount of the neoantigen(s) produced, impair the equilibrium of bioactivation and detoxication pathways, thus leading to the development of AI-H in a genetically predisposed person continually exposed to harmful environmental factor(s). Possible increased/decreased density of lysine residues at position D-related human leukocyte antigen locus (DR)beta71 of the antigen-binding groove may affect the eventual steroid-sparing effect of this critical amino acid at the cellular level. In addition, some food additives, such as monosodium glutamate (MSG) and/or aspartame regularly consumed in excessive amounts, may eventually disturb the delicate balance between a positively charged amino acid residue at position DRbeta71 (lysine or arginine) and a negatively charged amino acid residue at position P4 on the antigenic peptide (glutamic acid or aspartic acid). This may favor formation of a salt bridge between these amino acid residues within the hypervariable region 3 on the alpha-helix of the DRbeta polypeptide and facilitate autoantigen presentation and CD4 T-helper cell activation. MSG and aspartate may also depress serum concentrations of growth hormone, which

  8. HTLV-1, Immune Response and Autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaresma, Juarez A S; Yoshikawa, Gilberto T; Koyama, Roberta V L; Dias, George A S; Fujihara, Satomi; Fuzii, Hellen T

    2016-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) infection is associated with adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL). Tropical spastic paraparesis/HTLV-1-associated myelopathy (PET/HAM) is involved in the development of autoimmune diseases including Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE), and Sjögren's Syndrome (SS). The development of HTLV-1-driven autoimmunity is hypothesized to rely on molecular mimicry, because virus-like particles can trigger an inflammatory response. However, HTLV-1 modifies the behavior of CD4⁺ T cells on infection and alters their cytokine production. A previous study showed that in patients infected with HTLV-1, the activity of regulatory CD4⁺ T cells and their consequent expression of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines are altered. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms underlying changes in cytokine release leading to the loss of tolerance and development of autoimmunity. PMID:26712781

  9. Association between chronic urticaria and thyroid autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebeci, Filiz; Tanrikut, Ayşenur; Topcu, Elif; Onsun, Nahide; Kurtulmus, Neslihan; Uras, Ahmet R

    2006-01-01

    The association between chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU) and thyroid autoimmunity has most often been suggested in studies investigating thyroid microsomal antibodies, which are less sensitive and specific than anti-thyroperoxidase antibodies, moreover these studies were not case-control studies in large series. By comparing a large patient series presenting with CIU with a large numbered control group we aimed to learn the extent of autoimmune thyroid disease. We compared the frequency of thyroid autoantibodies in 140 patients with CIU with 181 age-and sex-matched volunteers. Thyroid function tests and thyroid autoantibodies were measured by chemiluminescent immunometric assay in study groups. The frequency of thyroid autoantibodies was significantly higher in patients with CIU than that in healthy controls (29.28 %/5.52%; p CIU and thyroid autoimmunity. PMID:16935798

  10. Macrophage activation syndrome in autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deane, Sean; Selmi, Carlo; Teuber, Suzanne S; Gershwin, M Eric

    2010-01-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is a phenomenon characterized by cytopenia, organ dysfunction, and coagulopathy associated with an inappropriate activation of macrophages. Current diagnostic criteria are imprecise, but the syndrome is now recognized as a form of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis that is characteristically associated with autoimmune diatheses. The diagnosis of incipient MAS in patients with autoimmune disease requires a high index of suspicion, as several characteristics of the disorder may be present in the underlying condition or infectious complications associated with the treatment thereof. Proposed treatment regimens include aggressive approaches that require validation in future controlled studies. This review discusses the major aspects of the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of MAS with a focus on the association with autoimmune disease. PMID:20407267

  11. Immunogenetics of autoimmune diseases in Asian Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehra, N K; Kaur, Gurvinder; Kanga, Uma; Tandon, Nikhil

    2002-04-01

    The HLA class II molecules play a critical role in the processing and presentation of specific peptides derived from autoantigens of pancreatic beta cells or gluten for T cell scrutiny in IDDM and CD. In the present study, extended DR3-positive haplotypes associated with autoimmunity in northern Indian patients have been reported. The haplotype A26-B8-DR3 was the most common autoimmunity-favoring haplotype encountered among these patients. This association is, indeed, unique to Indian autoimmune patients, as it replaces the otherwise most commonly associated Caucasian haplotype A1-B8-DR3 (AH8.1) in this population. Further, CD patients revealed 100% association with DQB1*0201 along with DQA*0501 (97%) either in cis or trans configuration. PMID:12021136

  12. Understanding autoimmunity: The ion channel perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    RamaKrishnan, Anantha Maharasi; Sankaranarayanan, Kavitha

    2016-07-01

    Ion channels are integral membrane proteins that orchestrate the passage of ions across the cell membrane and thus regulate various key physiological processes of the living system. The stringently regulated expression and function of these channels hold a pivotal role in the development and execution of various cellular functions. Malfunction of these channels results in debilitating diseases collectively termed channelopathies. In this review, we highlight the role of these proteins in the immune system with special emphasis on the development of autoimmunity. The role of ion channels in various autoimmune diseases is also listed out. This comprehensive review summarizes the ion channels that could be used as molecular targets in the development of new therapeutics against autoimmune disorders. PMID:26854401

  13. Alcoholic Cirrhosis Increases Risk for Autoimmune Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbæk, Lisbet; Vilstrup, Hendrik; Deleuran, Bent;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Alcoholic cirrhosis is associated with hyperactivation and dysregulation of the immune system. In addition to its ability to increase risk for infections, it also may increase the risk for autoimmune diseases. We studied the incidence of autoimmune diseases among patients with...... alcohol-associated cirrhosis vs controls in Denmark. METHODS: We collected data from nationwide health care registries to identify and follow up all citizens of Denmark diagnosed with alcoholic cirrhosis from 1977 through 2010. Each patient was matched with 5 random individuals from the population...... diagnosed with alcoholic cirrhosis, 532 developed an autoimmune disease, yielding an overall increased adjusted incidence rate ratio (aIRR) of 1.36 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.24-1.50). The strongest associations were with Addison's disease (aIRR, 2.47; 95% CI, 1.04-5.85), inflammatory bowel disease (a...

  14. Clinical heterogeneity in autoimmune acute liver failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Norberto C Chavez-Tapia; Julio Martinez-Salgado; Julio Granados; Misael Uribe; Felix I Tellez-Avila

    2007-01-01

    AIM:To describe the outcome and prognosis in a cohort of patients with acute liver failure due to autoimmune hepatitis without liver transplantation.METHODS:A retrospective trial was conducted in 11 patients with acute liver failure due to autoimmune hepatitis who attended the Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran. Demographic,biochemical and severity indexes,and treatment and outcome were assessed.RESULTS: Among the 11 patients, with a median age of 31 years, 72% had inflammatory response syndrome, and six patients received corticosteroids.The mortality rate within four weeks was 56%, and the one-year survival was 27%. In the survivors, severity indexes were lower and 83% received corticosteroids.CONCLUSION:We observed a relatively high survival rate in patients with acute liver failure due to autoimmune hepatitis. This survival rate could be influenced by severity of the disease and/or use of corticosteroids.

  15. Worldwide Incidence of Autoimmune Liver Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Peter; Grønbæk, Lisbet; Vilstrup, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The variation that occurs in the incidence patterns of autoimmune liver diseases may provide insight into the risk factors causing the diseases. We systematically reviewed studies on the incidence of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), primary sclerosing...... England. Most studies of PSC found incidence rates around 1 per 100,000 population per year, but there were no incident cases among 100,000 Alaska natives during the period 1984-2000. The incidence of IAC remains unknown. CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of the autoimmune liver diseases is around 1-2 per 100......,000 population per year for each disease. The variation in incidence over time and place suggests that there are differences in the prevalence of risk factors for the diseases, but the studies used different methods and so it is difficult to draw firm conclusions. We recommend that groups of investigators...

  16. Epidemiology of autoimmune diseases in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eaton, William W.; Rose, N.R.; Kalaydijan, A.;

    2007-01-01

    An epidemiologic study of the autoimmune diseases taken together has not been done heretofore. The National Patient Register of Denmark is used to estimate the population prevalence of 31 possible or probable autoimmune diseases. Record linkage is used to estimate 465 pairwise co-morbidities in...... diseases and weak across diseases. These data confirm the importance of the autoimmune diseases as a group and suggest that common etiopathologies exist among them...... individuals among the 31 diseases, and familial aggregation among sibs, parents and offspring. The prevalence of any of the 31 diseases in the population is more than 5%. Within individuals, there is extensive comorbidity across the 31 diseases. Within families, aggregation is strongest for individual...

  17. Systemic Toll-like receptor stimulation suppresses experimental allergic asthma and autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aude Aumeunier

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Infections may be associated with exacerbation of allergic and autoimmune diseases. Paradoxically, epidemiological and experimental data have shown that some microorganisms can also prevent these pathologies. This observation is at the origin of the hygiene hypothesis according to which the decline of infections in western countries is at the origin of the increased incidence of both Th1-mediated autoimmune diseases and Th2-mediated allergic diseases over the last decades. We have tested whether Toll-like receptor (TLR stimulation can recapitulate the protective effect of infectious agents on allergy and autoimmunity. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Here, we performed a systematic study of the disease-modifying effects of a set of natural or synthetic TLR agonists using two experimental models, ovalbumin (OVA-induced asthma and spontaneous autoimmune diabetes, presenting the same genetic background of the non obese diabetic mouse (NOD that is highly susceptible to both pathologies. In the same models, we also investigated the effect of probiotics. Additionally, we examined the effect of the genetic invalidation of MyD88 on the development of allergic asthma and spontaneous diabetes. We demonstrate that multiple TLR agonists prevent from both allergy and autoimmunity when administered parenterally. Probiotics which stimulate TLRs also protect from these two diseases. The physiological relevance of these findings is further suggested by the major acceleration of OVA-induced asthma in MyD88 invalidated mice. Our results strongly indicate that the TLR-mediated effects involve immunoregulatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL-10 and transforming growth factor (TGF-beta and different subsets of regulatory T cells, notably CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ T cells for TLR4 agonists and NKT cells for TLR3 agonists. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These observations demonstrate that systemic administration of TLR ligands can suppress both allergic and autoimmune responses

  18. Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease- A Clinical Viewpoint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirala Khalessi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in medicine have given us a better insight into a group of disorders known as autoimmune diseases. In particular, advances have occurred in our understanding of the Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease (AIED. In this article, the authors review the different postulated theories in the pathogenesis of this disease. The clinical presentation, the available para-clinical diagnostic tools, and the important differential diagnoses will be summarized. The management methods, including steroid therapy, immunosuppressive medications, other biological agents and intra-tympanic injections, will be addressed. Cochlear implantation as a final solution to the advanced stages of the disease, causing total deafness, will also be discussed.

  19. The immunofluorescence techniques in the diagnosis of endocrine autoimmune diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Betterle, Corrado; Zanchetta, Renato

    2012-01-01

    In the study of autoimmune diseases, the laboratory plays a very important role. We describe the immunofluorescence techniques (direct, indirect, complement-fixing, double) for determining the presence of autoantibodies and their role in the autoimmune endocrine diseases.

  20. The role of epigenetic mechanisms and processes in autoimmune disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greer JM

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Judith M Greer, Pamela A McCombeThe University of Queensland, UQ Centre for Clinical Research, Brisbane, Queensland, AustraliaAbstract: The lack of complete concordance of autoimmune disease in identical twins suggests that nongenetic factors play a major role in determining disease susceptibility. In this review, we consider how epigenetic mechanisms could affect the immune system and effector mechanisms in autoimmunity and/or the target organ of autoimmunity and thus affect the development of autoimmune diseases. We also consider the types of stimuli that lead to epigenetic modifications and how these relate to the epidemiology of autoimmune diseases and the biological pathways operative in different autoimmune diseases. Increasing our knowledge of these epigenetic mechanisms and processes will increase the prospects for controlling or preventing autoimmune diseases in the future through the use of drugs that target the epigenetic pathways.Keywords: twins, concordance, autoimmune disease, nongenetic factors, immune system, epigenetic modifications

  1. Shared genetic origins of allergy and autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waage, J. E.; Kreiner-Møller, E.; Standl, M.;

    2015-01-01

    Parallel increases in allergy and autoimmune disease prevalence in recent time suggest shared, but yet unknown, etiologies. Here, we investigated shared genetic loci and molecular pathways to identify possible shared disease mechanisms between allergy and autoimmune diseases....

  2. Tips for Getting a Proper Diagnosis of an Autoimmune Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tips for Getting a Proper Diagnosis of an Autoimmune Disease Do your own family medical history. Take an ... research points to a genetic component in most autoimmune diseases, you should know the health histories of your ...

  3. Activated farnesoid X receptor attenuates apoptosis and liver injury in autoimmune hepatitis

    OpenAIRE

    LIAN, FAN; Wang, Yu; Xiao, Youjun; WU, XIWEN; Xu, Hanshi; Liang, Liuqin; Yang, Xiuyan

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a chronic inflammatory liver disease associated with interface hepatitis, the presence of autoantibodies, regulatory T-cell dysfunction and raised plasma liver enzyme levels. The present study assessed the hepatoprotective and antiapoptotic role of farnesoid X receptor (FXR) in AIH. A mouse model of AIH was induced by treatment with concanavalin A (ConA). The FXR agonist, chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), was administered to mice exhibiting ConA-induced liver injury ...

  4. Histologic variant form of autoimmune hepatitis with prominent zonal necrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Stanković Ivica; Zlatković Marija; Prokić Dragan; Plamenac Pavle

    2002-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis type 1 in a 8-year old girl is described. The diagnosis was established using International Autoimmune hepatitis group scoring system. In addition to characteristic histologic features of autoimmune hepatitis (periportal hepatitis, piecemeal necrosis and rozettes) prominent centrilobular necrosis was discovered. As an isolate finding in autoimmune hepatitis, this type was described only in five cases. In our unique case centrilobular necrosis is a very important parallel ...

  5. Clues to immune tolerance: The monogenic autoimmune syndromes

    OpenAIRE

    Waterfield, Michael; Anderson, Mark S.

    2010-01-01

    Autoimmune disease affects a significant proportion of the population. The etiology of most autoimmune diseases is largely unknown, but it is thought to be multifactorial with both environmental and genetic influences. Rare monogenic autoimmune diseases, however, offer an invaluable window into potential disease mechanisms. In this review, we will discuss the autoimmune polyglandular syndrome (APS1), the immunedysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked syndrome (IPEX), and autoi...

  6. Achalasia in a Patient with Polyglandular Autoimmune Syndrome Type II

    OpenAIRE

    Amr, Bashar S.; Mamillapalli, Chaitanya

    2015-01-01

    Achalasia is a rare disease characterized by aperistalsis of the esophageal body and failure of the lower esophageal sphincter to relax. The etiology of this disease remains unknown. Polyglandular autoimmune syndrome type II is a well-identified disease characterized by the occurrence of autoimmune Addison's disease in combination with autoimmune thyroid disease and/or type 1 diabetes mellitus. We report a case that suggests autoimmunity and immunogenicity as a probable contributing factor fo...

  7. Induction of autoimmune disease by deletion of CTLA-4 in mice in adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klocke, Katrin; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Holmdahl, Rikard; Wing, Kajsa

    2016-04-26

    Cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) is essential for immunological (self-) tolerance, but due to the early fatality of CTLA-4 KO mice, its specific function in central and peripheral tolerance and in different systemic diseases remains to be determined. Here, we further examined the role of CTLA-4 by abrogating CTLA-4 expression in adult mice and compared the resulting autoimmunity that follows with that produced by congenital CTLA-4 deficiency. We found that conditional deletion of CTLA-4 in adult mice resulted in spontaneous lymphoproliferation, hypergammaglobulinemia, and histologically evident pneumonitis, gastritis, insulitis, and sialadenitis, accompanied by organ-specific autoantibodies. However, in contrast to congenital deficiency, this was not fatal. CTLA-4 deletion induced preferential expansion of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Treg cells. However, T cells from CTLA-4-deficient inducible KO mice were able to adoptively transfer the diseases into T cell-deficient mice. Notably, cell transfer of thymocytes de novo produced myocarditis, otherwise not observed in donor mice depleted in adulthood. Moreover, CTLA-4 deletion in adult mice had opposing impacts on induced autoimmune models. Thus, although CTLA-4-deficient mice had more severe collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), they were protected against peptide-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE); however, onset of protein-induced EAE was only delayed. Collectively, this indicates that CTLA-4 deficiency affects both central and peripheral tolerance and Treg cell-mediated suppression. PMID:27071130

  8. Increased severity of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, chronic macrophage/microglial reactivity, and demyelination in transgenic mice producing tumor necrosis factor-alpha in the central nervous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taupin, V; Renno, T; Bourbonnière, L;

    1997-01-01

    are a target of immune attack. TNF-alpha also regulates macrophage activity which could contribute to autoimmune inflammation. We have expressed TNF-alpha at disease-equivalent levels in the central nervous system of transgenic mice, using a myelin basic protein (MBP) promoter. These mice were normal......Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is an inflammatory cytokine implicated in a number of autoimmune diseases. Apoptotic cell death is induced by TNF-alpha in vitro, and has been suggested as one cause of autoimmune pathology, including autoimmune demyelinating diseases where oligodendrocytes...... and showed no spontaneous pathology, but they developed experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) with greater severity than nontransgenic controls when immunized with MBP in adjuvant. Unlike nontransgenic controls, EAE then progressed to a nonabating demyelinating disease. Macrophage...

  9. Rituximab for autoimmune blistering diseases: recent studies, new insights

    OpenAIRE

    Lunardon, Luisa; Payne, Aimee S.

    2012-01-01

    Rituximab, an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, has been successfully used off-label for treatment of autoimmune blistering diseases. We discuss rituximab mechanisms of action, host factors that may affect response to rituximab, and the efficacy and safety of rituximab in autoimmune blistering diseases, incorporating recent data on the use of rituximab in other autoimmune disease patients.

  10. Impact of autoimmune risk alleles on the immune system

    OpenAIRE

    Ray, John P.; Hacohen, Nir

    2015-01-01

    Genetic analyses of autoimmune diseases have revealed hundreds of disease-associated DNA variants, but the identity and function of the causal variants are understudied and warrant deeper mechanistic studies. Here, we highlight methods for deciphering how alleles that are associated with autoimmune disease alter the human immune system, and suggest strategies for future autoimmune genetic research.

  11. Cytokine Switch and Bystander Suppression of Autoimmune Responses to Multiple Antigens in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis by a Single Recombinant T-Cell Receptor Ligand

    OpenAIRE

    Sinha, Sushmita; Subramanian, Sandhya; Miller, Lisa; Proctor, Thomas M.; Roberts, Chris; Burrows, Gregory G.; Vandenbark, Arthur A.; Offner, Halina

    2009-01-01

    Recombinant T-cell receptor ligands (RTLs) can reverse clinical and histological signs of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in an antigen-specific manner, and are currently in clinical trials for treatment of subjects with multiple sclerosis (MS). Antigen specificity of RTL raises the question as to whether this treatment would be successful in MS patients where target antigens are unknown. Using spinal cord homogenate or combinations of two different peptides to induce disease,...

  12. Warm Autoimmune Haemolytic Anaemia and autoimmune hepatitis in an asymptomatic carrier of hepatitis B virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warm antibody autoimmune haemolytic anaemia, a rare disease (0.2-1 per 100,000 populations), is due to the presence of warm agglutinins that react with protein antigens on the surface of red blood cells causing their premature destruction. Here, we present a case report of a 10 year old girl who came with features of haemolytic anaemia and history of blood transfusion since 3 years. On admission, laboratory test revealed that she had autoimmune hepatitis type 1 and was also an asymptomatic carrier of hepatitis B virus with positive HBs Ag. Steroid therapy resulted in clinical and laboratory remission. Direct antiglobulin test was negative after anaemia resolution, hepatitis B virus antigenemia persisted. To our knowledge, warm antibody autoimmune hemolytic anaemia has not previously been described in association with autoimmune hepatitis and asymptomatic carrier state of hepatitis B virus. (author)

  13. Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria Presenting with a Left Intraventricular Thrombus in a Patient with Prior Thymoma and Aplastic Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Yazan Migdady; Olszewski, Adam J.

    2011-01-01

    We report the case of a 37-year old man presenting with a left ventricular cardiac thrombus in the setting of subclinical paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinura (PNH) developing two years after immunosuppressive therapy for thymoma-associated aplastic anemia. The literature regarding the interplay between autoimmunity and immunosuppression, aplastic anemia, thymoma and the emergence of PNH is reviewed.

  14. Oral mucosal manifestations of autoimmune skin diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Mayson B; Porter, Stephen R; Smoller, Bruce R; Sitaru, Cassian

    2015-10-01

    A group of autoimmune diseases is characterised by autoantibodies against epithelial adhesion structures and/or tissue-tropic lymphocytes driving inflammatory processes resulting in specific pathology at the mucosal surfaces and the skin. The most frequent site of mucosal involvement in autoimmune diseases is the oral cavity. Broadly, these diseases include conditions affecting the cell-cell adhesion causing intra-epithelial blistering and those where autoantibodies or infiltration lymphocytes cause a loss of cell-matrix adhesion or interface inflammation. Clinically, patients present with blistering, erosions and ulcers that may affect the skin as well as further mucosal surfaces of the eyes, nose and genitalia. While the autoimmune disease may be suspected based on clinical manifestations, demonstration of tissue-bound and circulating autoantibodies, or lymphocytic infiltrates, by various methods including histological examination, direct and indirect immunofluorescence microscopy, immunoblotting and quantitative immunoassay is a prerequisite for definitive diagnosis. Given the frequency of oral involvement and the fact that oral mucosa is the initially affected site in many cases, the informed practitioner should be well acquainted with diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of autoimmune dermatosis with oral involvement. This paper reviews the pathogenesis and clinical presentation of these conditions in the oral cavity with a specific emphasis on their differential diagnosis and current management approaches. PMID:26117595

  15. Pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders after streptococcus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maini, Baljeet; Bathla, Manish; Dhanjal, Gurdeep S; Sharma, Prem D

    2012-10-01

    Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcal infection (PANDAS) is a group of disorders recently recognized as a clinical entity. A case of PANDAS is described here, which remitted after 1 month of treatment. Recent Group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus infection should be considered in a child who presents with a sudden explosive onset of tics or obsessive compulsive symptoms. PMID:23372243

  16. Is Tourette's syndrome an autoimmune disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, PJ; Kallenberg, CGM; Korf, J; Minderaa, RB

    2002-01-01

    We provide a review of recent research findings which support the involvement of autoimmunity in childhood-onset tic disorders, in particular the presence of antineuronal autoantibodies, D8/17 B lymphocyte overexpression, a marker of chorea associated with streptococcal infection, and possible benef

  17. Autoimmun synaptisk encefalitis er en underdiagnosticeret sygdomsgruppe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Signe Modvig; Høi-Hansen, Christina Engel; Uldall, Peter;

    2012-01-01

    The term autoimmune synaptic encephalitis (ASE) comprises encephalitides associated with autoantibodies against structures of the neuronal synapse. We review four types of ASE (anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis, anti-α-amine-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionic acid receptor...

  18. Follicular Helper T Cells in Autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherm, Martin G; Ott, Verena B; Daniel, Carolin

    2016-08-01

    The development of multiple disease-relevant autoantibodies is a hallmark of autoimmune diseases. In autoimmune type 1 diabetes (T1D), a variable time frame of autoimmunity precedes the clinically overt disease. The relevance of T follicular helper (TFH) cells for the immune system is increasingly recognized. Their pivotal contribution to antibody production by providing help to germinal center (GC) B cells facilitates the development of a long-lived humoral immunity. Their complex differentiation process, involving various stages and factors like B cell lymphoma 6 (Bcl6), is strictly controlled, as anomalous regulation of TFH cells is connected with immunopathologies. While the adverse effects of a TFH cell-related insufficient humoral immunity are obvious, the role of increased TFH frequencies in autoimmune diseases like T1D is currently highlighted. High levels of autoantigen trigger an excessive induction of TFH cells, consequently resulting in the production of autoantibodies. Therefore, TFH cells might provide promising approaches for novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:27324759

  19. PET Scan and Autoimmune Focal Encephalitis

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2010-01-01

    The value of the PET scan in the diagnosis of autoimmune focal encephalitis is reported in a 22-month-old girl who presented with involuntary movements, hemiparesis, and behavioral changes at Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute for Neuroscience, Japan.

  20. Autophagy and Autoimmunity CrossTalks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhisek eBhattacharya

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy, initially viewed as a conserved bulk-degradation mechanism, has emerged as a central player in a multitude of immune functions. Autophagy is important in host defense against intracellular and extracellular pathogens, metabolic syndromes, immune cell homeostasis, antigen processing and presentation and maintenance of tolerance. The observation that the above processes are implicated in triggering or exacerbating autoimmunity raises the possibility that the autophagy pathway is involved in mediating autoimmune processes, either directly or as a consequence of innate or adaptive functions mediated by the pathway. Genome-wide association studies have shown association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in autophagy related gene 5 (Atg5, and Atg16l1 with susceptibility to systemic lupus erythematous (SLE and Crohn’s disease, respectively. Enhanced expression of Atg5 was also reported in blood of mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, a mouse model of multiple sclerosis (MS, and in T cells isolated from blood or brain tissues from patients with active relapse of MS. This review explores the roles of autophagy pathway in the innate and adaptive immune systems on regulating or mediating the onset, progression or exacerbation of autoimmune processes.

  1. Autoimmune hepatitis in children in Eastern Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vitfell-Pedersen, Joanna; Jørgensen, Marianne Hørby; Müller, Klaus;

    2012-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) in childhood is a progressive chronic inflammatory liver disease. The aim of this study was to compare the clinical and biochemical characteristics of 33 paediatric patients diagnosed as having AIH with earlier described cohorts, and to examine the effect of early...

  2. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia secondary to chicken pox

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham M Ittyachen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA is a rare complication of chicken pox. It is described mainly in children. Even in children it is a rare complication and the long-term prognosis remains to be elucidated. Herein we report an adult, a 23-year-old male who developed AIHA secondary to chicken pox.

  3. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia secondary to chicken pox

    OpenAIRE

    Abraham M Ittyachen; Mohan B Jose; Varghese Abraham

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a rare complication of chicken pox. It is described mainly in children. Even in children it is a rare complication and the long-term prognosis remains to be elucidated. Herein we report an adult, a 23-year-old male who developed AIHA secondary to chicken pox.

  4. Autism and Autoimmune Disease: A Family Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Money, John; And Others

    1971-01-01

    Described in a family in which the youngest boy has early infantile autism, Addison's disease, and moniliasis and two older boys have autoimmune disease with hypoparathyroidism, Addison's disease, moniliasis, and either alopecia totalis or diabetes mellitus, while the oldest boy and parents are symptom free. (KW)

  5. Capillaroscopy in diagnostic of systemic autoimmune diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diagnosis of systemic autoimmune diseases is carried out by combining clinical, paraclinical, imaging and anatomopathological data. However, in many cases is necessary to access other guiding parameters. The capillaroscopy is a technique that consists in the observation of capillary microcirculation in the proximal nail fold hands. The methods used are the videocapillaroscopy (microscopy, stereoscopic)

  6. Neutrosophic Left Almost Semigroup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mumtaz Ali

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we extend the theory of neutrosophy to study left almost semigroup shortly LAsemigroup. We generalize the concepts of LA-semigroup to form that for neutrosophic LA-semigroup. We also extend the ideal theory of LA-semigroup to neutrosophy and discuss different kinds of neutrosophic ideals. We also find some new type of neutrosophic ideal which is related to the strong or pure part of neutrosophy. We have given many examples to illustrate the theory of neutrosophic LA-semigroup and display many properties of neutrosophic LA-semigroup in this paper.

  7. Thalidomide prolongs experimental autoimmune neuritis in Lewis rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, J; Deng, G M; Diab, A; Zwingenberger, K; Bakhiet, M; Link, H

    1998-10-01

    Thalidomide is reported to have immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory effects, which have led to its use in the treatment of a number of immune-mediated disorders, including leprosy, discoid lupus and Behcet's disease, and to prevent immunological rejection phenomena following skin and bone marrow grafts. Experimental autoimmune neuritis (EAN) is a CD4+ T-cell-mediated demyelinating autoimmune disease, which represents an animal model for the study of the immunopathogenesis and immunotherapy of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) in humans. We examined the effect of thalidomide in Lewis rats with EAN, which was induced by immunization with bovine peripheral nerve myelin (BPM) and complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). Thalidomide prolonged clinical EAN when given at a dose of 200 mg/kg/day by gavage. This clinical effect was associated with increased numbers of inflammatory cells in sciatic nerve sections and elevated numbers of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) mRNA-expressing cells among lymph node mononuclear cells from thalidomide-treated EAN rats on day 17 postimmunization, i.e. at the peak of clinical EAN. The finding that thalidomide prolongs clinical EAN is in agreement with the clinical polyneuropathy reported in patients receiving treatment with thalidomide and limits its clinical usefulness. PMID:9790310

  8. Regulatory T and B lymphocytes in a spontaneous autoimmune polyneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, S; Sheng, J R; Abraham, P M; Soliven, B

    2016-04-01

    B7-2(-/-) non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice develop a spontaneous autoimmune polyneuropathy (SAP) that mimics the progressive form of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP). In this study, we focused on the role of regulatory T cells (Tregs ) and regulatory B cells (Bregs ) in SAP. We found that deletion of B7-2 in female NOD mice led to a lower frequency and number of Tregs and Bregs in spleens and lymph nodes. Tregs but not Bregs suppressed antigen-stimulated splenocyte proliferation, whereas Bregs inhibited the T helper type 1 (Th1) cytokine response. Both Tregs and Bregs induced an increase in CD4(+) interleukin (IL)-10(+) cells, although less effectively in the absence of B7-2. Adoptive transfer studies revealed that Tregs , but not Bregs , suppressed SAP, while Bregs attenuated disease severity when given prior to symptom onset. B cell deficiency in B cell-deficient (muMT)/B7-2(-/-) NOD mice prevented the development of SAP, which would indicate that the pathogenic role of B cells predominates over its regulatory role in this model. We conclude that Bregs and Tregs control the immunopathogenesis and progression of SAP in a non-redundant fashion, and that therapies aimed at expansion of Bregs and Tregs may be an effective approach in autoimmune neuropathies. PMID:26671281

  9. The Microbiota Determines Susceptibility to Experimental Autoimmune Uveoretinitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heissigerova, Jarmila; Seidler Stangova, Petra; Klimova, Aneta; Svozilkova, Petra; Hrncir, Tomas; Stepankova, Renata; Kverka, Miloslav; Tlaskalova-Hogenova, Helena; Forrester, John V.

    2016-01-01

    The microbiota is a crucial modulator of the immune system. Here, we evaluated how its absence or reduction modifies the inflammatory response in the murine model of experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU). We induced EAU in germ-free (GF) or conventionally housed (CV) mice and in CV mice treated with a combination of broad-spectrum antibiotics either from the day of EAU induction or from one week prior to induction of disease. The severity of the inflammation was assessed by fundus biomicroscopy or by histology, including immunohistology. The immunophenotyping of T cells in local and distant lymph nodes was performed by flow cytometry. We found that GF mice and mice where the microbiota was reduced one week before EAU induction were protected from severe autoimmune inflammation. GF mice had lower numbers of infiltrating macrophages and significantly less T cell infiltration in the retina than CV mice with EAU. GF mice also had reduced numbers of IFN-γ and IL-17-producing T cells and increased numbers of regulatory T cells in the eye-draining lymph nodes. These data suggest that the presence of microbiota during autoantigen recognition regulates the inflammatory response by influencing the adaptive immune response. PMID:27294159

  10. Encephalopathy Associated with Autoimmune Thyroid Disease: A Potentially Reversible Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inês Correia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune thyroid disease may occasionally associate with unspecific neurological symptoms, which are more commonly insidious, include cognitive or behavioural symptoms, and may associate with tremor, myoclonus, or ataxia. We report a 61-year-old female patient who presented with chronic headache, insidious mood, and cognitive disturbance which evolved in a few months to dementia associated with exuberant limb myoclonus. Diagnostic workup revealed high anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody titers and an inflammatory CSF profile, and it was negative for other possible etiologies. Treatment with steroids induced significant improvement. The diagnosis of encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease is still controversial given the fact that the clinical presentation and diagnostic workup are unspecific, the pathophysiology is still undetermined, and the diagnosis is mostly of exclusion. No direct correlation is found between anti-thyroid antibody titers and clinical presentation, and it is currently speculated that other still unrecognized antibodies may be responsible for this clinical entity. It is extremely important to recognize this entity because it is potentially treatable with immunotherapies. It is also increasingly recognized that clinical improvement with first-line treatment with steroids may be absent or incomplete, and other immunotherapies as immunosuppressants, intravenous immunoglobulin, or plasma exchange must be attempted in the clinical suspicion of EEAT.

  11. Encephalopathy Associated with Autoimmune Thyroid Disease: A Potentially Reversible Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Inês; Marques, Inês B.; Ferreira, Rogério; Sousa, Lívia

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease may occasionally associate with unspecific neurological symptoms, which are more commonly insidious, include cognitive or behavioural symptoms, and may associate with tremor, myoclonus, or ataxia. We report a 61-year-old female patient who presented with chronic headache, insidious mood, and cognitive disturbance which evolved in a few months to dementia associated with exuberant limb myoclonus. Diagnostic workup revealed high anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody titers and an inflammatory CSF profile, and it was negative for other possible etiologies. Treatment with steroids induced significant improvement. The diagnosis of encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease is still controversial given the fact that the clinical presentation and diagnostic workup are unspecific, the pathophysiology is still undetermined, and the diagnosis is mostly of exclusion. No direct correlation is found between anti-thyroid antibody titers and clinical presentation, and it is currently speculated that other still unrecognized antibodies may be responsible for this clinical entity. It is extremely important to recognize this entity because it is potentially treatable with immunotherapies. It is also increasingly recognized that clinical improvement with first-line treatment with steroids may be absent or incomplete, and other immunotherapies as immunosuppressants, intravenous immunoglobulin, or plasma exchange must be attempted in the clinical suspicion of EEAT.

  12. Follicular helper T cell in immunity and autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Mesquita Jr

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The traditional concept that effector T helper (Th responses are mediated by Th1/Th2 cell subtypes has been broadened by the recent demonstration of two new effector T helper cells, the IL-17 producing cells (Th17 and the follicular helper T cells (Tfh. These new subsets have many features in common, such as the ability to produce IL-21 and to express the IL-23 receptor (IL23R, the inducible co-stimulatory molecule ICOS, and the transcription factor c-Maf, all of them essential for expansion and establishment of the final pool of both subsets. Tfh cells differ from Th17 by their ability to home to B cell areas in secondary lymphoid tissue through interactions mediated by the chemokine receptor CXCR5 and its ligand CXCL13. These CXCR5+ CD4+ T cells are considered an effector T cell type specialized in B cell help, with a transcriptional profile distinct from Th1 and Th2 cells. The role of Tfh cells and its primary product, IL-21, on B-cell activation and differentiation is essential for humoral immunity against infectious agents. However, when deregulated, Tfh cells could represent an important mechanism contributing to exacerbated humoral response and autoantibody production in autoimmune diseases. This review highlights the importance of Tfh cells by focusing on their biology and differentiation processes in the context of normal immune response to infectious microorganisms and their role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases.

  13. Genetic Heterogeneity in Latent Autoimmune Diabetes Is Linked to Various Degrees of Autoimmune Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Pettersen, Elin; Skorpen, Frank; Kvaløy, Kirsti; Midthjell, Kristian; Grill, Valdemar

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Previous studies have indicated that the latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) phenotype is heterogeneous and that LADA patients share features of type 1 and type 2 diabetes in various proportions. We tested for association of known type 1 and type 2 diabetes susceptibility genes in LADA subjects and analyzed relationships to a marker of autoimmune activity (titers of anti-GAD) and a phenotypic risk factor of type 2 diabetes (BMI). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Data were assembl...

  14. Imaging combined autoimmune and infectious disease microarrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewart, Tom; Raha, Sandeep; Kus, Dorothy; Tarnopolsky, Mark

    2006-09-01

    Bacterial and viral pathogens are implicated in many severe autoimmune diseases, acting through such mechanisms as molecular mimicry, and superantigen activation of T-cells. For example, Helicobacter pylori, well known cause of stomach ulcers and cancers, is also identified in ischaemic heart disease (mimicry of heat shock protein 65), autoimmune pancreatitis, systemic sclerosis, autoimmune thyroiditis (HLA DRB1*0301 allele susceptibility), and Crohn's disease. Successful antibiotic eradication of H.pylori often accompanies their remission. Yet current diagnostic devices, and test-limiting cost containment, impede recognition of the linkage, delaying both diagnosis and therapeutic intervention until the chronic debilitating stage. We designed a 15 minute low cost 39 antigen microarray assay, combining autoimmune, viral and bacterial antigens1. This enables point-of-care serodiagnosis and cost-effective narrowly targeted concurrent antibiotic and monoclonal anti-T-cell and anti-cytokine immunotherapy. Arrays of 26 pathogen and 13 autoimmune antigens with IgG and IgM dilution series were printed in triplicate on epoxysilane covalent binding slides with Teflon well masks. Sera diluted 1:20 were incubated 10 minutes, washed off, anti-IgG-Cy3 (green) and anti-IgM-Dy647 (red) were incubated for 5 minutes, washed off and the slide was read in an ArrayWoRx(e) scanning CCD imager (Applied Precision, Issaquah, WA). As a preliminary model for the combined infectious disease-autoimmune diagnostic microarray we surveyed 98 unidentified, outdated sera that were discarded after Hepatitis B antibody testing. In these, significant IgG or IgM autoantibody levels were found: dsDNA 5, ssDNA 11, Ro 2, RNP 7, SSB 4, gliadin 2, thyroglobulin 13 cases. Since control sera showed no autoantibodies, the high frequency of anti-DNA and anti-thyroglobulin antibodies found in infected sera lend increased support for linkage of infection to subsequent autoimmune disease. Expansion of the antigen

  15. TAK1 inhibition prevents the development of autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hui; Lu, Jingli; Du, Jiao; Xia, Fei; Wei, Shouguo; Liu, Xiulan; Liu, Tingting; Liu, Yang; Xiang, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β activated kinase-1 (TAK1, Map3k7), a member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAP3K) family, is essential in innate and adaptive immune responses. We postulated that blockade of TAK1 would affect autoimmune diabetes in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. Administration of 5Z-7-oxozeaenol (OZ), a TAK1 inhibitor, decreased the incidence and delayed the onset of autoimmune diabetes in both spontaneous and accelerated (cyclophosphamide-induced) experimental NOD mice. OZ also reduced insulitis, preserved islet function, increased the expression of α1- antitrypsin (AAT), and severely inhibited NF-κB and JNK/AP-1 signaling pathways in immune organs and pancreatic tissues. Importantly, TAK1 inhibition by OZ elicited a Th1 to Th2 cytokine shift, and increased TGF-β1 production in cultured T lymphocytes supernatants. Systemic TAK1 inhibition induced immature DCs with lower expressions of MHC-II and CD86, attenuated DC-mediated T cell proliferation in allogeneic MLR, and production of cytokine IL-12p70 in DCs suspensions. The results indicate that TAK1 inhibition with OZ was associated with a lower frequency of autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice. The net effect of TAK1 inhibition in NOD mice therefore appears to be protective rather than disease-enhancing. Strategies targeting TAK1 specifically in NOD mice might prove useful for the treatment of autoimmune diabetes in general. PMID:26459028

  16. Comparison of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis models induced by two kinds of proteolipid proteins%两种髓鞘蛋白脂质蛋白肽段诱导自身反应性脑脊髓炎实验动物模型的比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张金涛; 朱克; 金香兰; 邢厂羽; 张笑明; 倪建强; 宋春杰; 尹岭

    2005-01-01

    量较免疫前略有下降,60 d时体质量为(16.70±0.46)g.③神经功能评分:两组最高神经功能评分比较无差异(3.86±1.10,3 71±1.05,t=0.49,P=0.628).结论:①髓鞘蛋白脂质蛋白的两种不同抗原肽段,均可以引起中枢神经系统的自身免疫反应.②两种模型虽然同样具有缓解-复发的特点,发作严重程度也无明显差别,但也有其不同点:髓鞘蛋白脂质蛋白178~191组发病早,恢复快,而且体质量变化明显,而髓鞘蛋白脂质蛋白139~151组发病晚,恢复相对较慢,发病期及恢复期体质量变化幅度较小,提示这可能与两种多肽的结构不同有关.%BACKGROUND: Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis has become the most classical animal model for multiple sclerosis. However, the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis model of China presented one-way course of disease. By using proteolipid protein 139-151 and proteolipid protein 178-191, relapse remitting experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis models may be induced in SJL/J mice which were susceptible to immune, which have similar clinical situation, course and histologicallterations to multiple sclerosis.OBJECTIVE: To establish the relapse remitting experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mouse model induced by proteolipid protein, which has similar clinical situation, course and histological alterations to multiple sclerosis.DESIGN: Completely randomized controlled study.SETTING: The centre of Neuro-information, and Neurological Institute,General Hospital of Chinese PLA.MATERIALS: The study was carried out at the Laboratory of Neuro-pathology, General Hospital of Chinese PLA, from February to June 2004.Sixty female SJL/J mice with 8-12 weeks old were selected and randomly divided into proteolipid protein 139-151 group and proteolipid protein-178-191 group with 30 in each.INTERVENTIONS: After injected with proteolipid protein-139-151 or proteolipid protein-178-191, the models of relapse remitting experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

  17. Celiac Disease Autoimmunity in Patients with Autoimmune Diabetes and Thyroid Disease among Chinese Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhiyuan; Zou, Jing; Zhao, Lingling; Cheng, Yan; Cai, Hanqing; Li, Mo; Liu, Edwin; Yu, Liping; Liu, Yu

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of celiac disease autoimmunity or tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies (TGA) amongst patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) in the Chinese population remains unknown. This study examined the rate of celiac disease autoimmunity amongst patients with T1D and AITD in the Chinese population. The study included 178 patients with type 1 diabetes and 119 with AITD where 36 had both T1D and AITD, classified as autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3 variant (APS3v). The study also included 145 patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D), 97 patients with non-autoimmune thyroid disease (NAITD), and 102 healthy controls. Serum islet autoantibodies, thyroid autoantibodies and TGA were measured by radioimmunoassay. TGA positivity was found in 22% of patients with either type 1 diabetes or AITD, much higher than that in patients with T2D (3.4%; pdiseases were present. Routine TGA screening in patients with T1D or AITD will be important to early identify celiac disease autoimmunity for better clinical care of patients. PMID:27427767

  18. Genomics and proteomics: Applications in autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Hueber

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Wolfgang Hueber1,2,3, William H Robinson1,21VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, CA, USA; 2Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA; 3Novartis Institutes of Biomedical Research, Novartis, Basle, SwitzerlandAbstract: Tremendous progress has been made over the past decade in the development and refinement of genomic and proteomic technologies for the identification of novel drug targets and molecular signatures associated with clinically important disease states, disease subsets, or differential responses to therapies. The rapid progress in high-throughput technologies has been preceded and paralleled by the elucidation of cytokine networks, followed by the stepwise clinical development of pathway-specific biological therapies that revolutionized the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Together, these advances provide opportunities for a long-anticipated personalized medicine approach to the treatment of autoimmune disease. The ever-increasing numbers of novel, innovative therapies will need to be harnessed wisely to achieve optimal long-term outcomes in as many patients as possible while complying with the demands of health authorities and health care providers for evidence-based, economically sound prescription of these expensive drugs. Genomic and proteomic profiling of patients with autoimmune diseases holds great promise in two major clinical areas: (1 rapid identification of new targets for the development of innovative therapies and (2 identification of patients who will experience optimal benefit and minimal risk from a specific (targeted therapy. In this review, we attempt to capture important recent developments in the application of genomic and proteomic technologies to translational research by discussing informative examples covering a diversity of autoimmune diseases.Keywords: proteomics, genomics, autoimmune diseases, antigen microarrays, 2-Dih, rheumatoid arthritis

  19. Trauma induced left maxillary sinus dislocation of eyeball-a case report%外伤致左眼球上颌窦脱位1例报告

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈瑜; 刘翠萍; 崔莉萍; 李学华; 朱强

    2013-01-01

    Patient male, 27 year old. Left facial and head trauma for 6 hours, due to motor vehicle accident. Patient state of mind was clear at arrival to hospital. Body temperature: 36C; Pulse: 80 Time/Minute; Breath: 20 Time/Minute; Blood pressure: 120/80 mm Hg. An irregular, horizontal laceration at arch of left eyebrow, approximately 8-10 cm. A laceration on left wing of nose skin, approximately 1 cm. A lacetation also under lower eyelid skin of right eye, approximately 2 cm. Left blepharedema and enophthalmos. Orbital and nasal sinuses CT indications;contusion and laceration of the left frontal lobe of brain; fracture of the left orbital frontal, ethmoid, sphenoid bone, left nasal, maxillary sinus and zygoma with soft tissue contusion and laceration; the left eyeball and optic nerve sunk into the maxillary sinus (See figurel). Diagnosis: ①Multiple orbital fractures ;② Left maxillary sinus dislocation of eyeball;③The left frontal lobe contusion and laceration of brain.

  20. Tiroiditis autoinmune inducida por interferón en pacientes con infección por virus de la hepatitis C. Interferon-induced autoimmune thyroiditis in a patient with hepatitis C virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José L. Pinto

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Se reporta el caso de un varón de 43 años de edad, sin antecedentes patológicos de importancia, que acudió por elevación asintomática de la alanino aminotransferasa (ALT. El paciente negó ser bebedor crónico de alcohol. Se hizo el diagnóstico serológico de infección activa por hepatitis C y la biopsia de hígado reveló inflamación crónica activa. Con estos resultados, se inició tratamiento con interferón-alfa y ribavirina. Durante el tratamiento de 48 semanas, el paciente presentó anticuerpos antitiroideos positivos con variaciones en sus niveles de tirotropina (TSH y hormonas tiroideas. En el seguimiento postratamiento, el paciente continuó con hipertiroidismo por enfermedad de Graves. La tiroiditis autoinmune es una complicación frecuente del uso de interferón en pacientes con hepatitis C. En algunos casos se presenta como hipertiroidismo por enfermedad de Graves. Se debe evaluar la función tiroidea y los anticuerpos antitiroideos antes y durante el tratamiento con interferón.A 43 year old man presented with asymptomatic elevation of alanine aminotransferase (ALT and no relevant past history. The patient denied being a chronic alcohol drinker. Work-up revealed an active hepatitis C, and liver biopsy showed active inflammation. Treatment was started with interferon-alfa and ribavirin. During the 48 weeks of treatment, the patient developed positive thyroid antibodies with varying level of thyrotropin (TSH and thyroid hormones. At follow-up after treatment, the patient continued with hyperthyroidism due to Graves’ disease. Autoimmune thyroiditis is a common complication of using interferon in patients with hepatitis C. In some cases, it is presented as hyperthyroidism because of Graves’ disease. Thyroid function and thyroid antibodies should be evaluated before and during treatment with interferon.

  1. Autoimmune pancreatitis associated with primary sclerosing cholangitis: MR imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eerens, I.; Vanbeckevoort, D.; Van Hoe, L. [University Hospital, Leuven (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology; Vansteenbergen, W. [Dept. of Hepatology, University Hospitals KU, Leuven (Belgium)

    2001-08-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis is a relatively rare type of chronic pancreatitis that may be associated with other autoimmune disorders. The imaging features of this entity may be misleading and suggest the presence of a malignant tumour. We present a case in which MR imaging allowed us to diagnose autoimmune pancreatitis associated with primary sclerosing cholangitis, which is another autoimmune-related disease. Typical MR characteristics of autoimmune pancreatitis include focal or diffuse enlargement of the pancreas, the absence of parenchymal atrophy and significant dilation proximal to the site of stenosis, the absence of peripancreatic spread, the clear demarcation of the lesion and the presence of a peripancreatic rim. (orig.)

  2. Autoimmune pancreatitis associated with primary sclerosing cholangitis: MR imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autoimmune pancreatitis is a relatively rare type of chronic pancreatitis that may be associated with other autoimmune disorders. The imaging features of this entity may be misleading and suggest the presence of a malignant tumour. We present a case in which MR imaging allowed us to diagnose autoimmune pancreatitis associated with primary sclerosing cholangitis, which is another autoimmune-related disease. Typical MR characteristics of autoimmune pancreatitis include focal or diffuse enlargement of the pancreas, the absence of parenchymal atrophy and significant dilation proximal to the site of stenosis, the absence of peripancreatic spread, the clear demarcation of the lesion and the presence of a peripancreatic rim. (orig.)

  3. Induction of Graves' disease in patients with non-autoimmune hyperthyroidism or nontoxic goiter after radioiodine treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thyrotropin receptors antibodies may occur and induce Graves' disease (GD) several months after radioiodine therapy in a small number of patients with non-autoimmune hyperthyroidism or nontoxic goiter. The prevalence of radiation-induced GD is between 0.05% and 5%. The hypothesis of this disease includes induction by autoimmune reaction and others. Detection of the thyroid autoantibodise or of 99mTc pertechnetate scan can forecast the appearance of GD. Antithyroid drugs, again radioiodine therapy and surgery are the treatments. (authors)

  4. Evaluation of autoimmune phenomena in patients with pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagi, Stefano; Rigante, Donato; Lepri, Gemma; Bertini, Federico; Matucci-Cerinic, Marco; Falcini, Fernanda

    2014-12-01

    The pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS) are basically characterized by obsessive-compulsive symptoms and/or tics triggered by group-A beta-hemolytic Streptococcus infections. Poor data are available about the clear definition of PANDAS's autoimmune origin. The aim of our study was to evaluate the prevalence of autoimmune phenomena, including thyroid function abnormalities, specific celiac disease antibodies, and positivity of organ- or nonorgan-specific autoantibodies in a large cohort of Caucasian children and adolescents with PANDAS. Seventy-seven consecutive patients (59 males, 18 females; mean age 6.3±2.5 years, range 2.0-14.5 years) strictly fulfilling the clinical criteria for PANDAS diagnosis were recruited. In all subjects we evaluated serum concentrations of free-T3, free-T4, thyrotropin, and the following auto-antibodies: anti-thyroperoxidase, anti-thyroglobulin, anti-thyrotropin receptor, anti-gliadin, anti-endomysium, anti-tissue transglutaminase, anti-nuclear, anti-smooth muscle, anti-extractable nuclear antigens, anti-phospholipid, plus lupus-like anticoagulant. The results were compared with those obtained from 197 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (130 males, 67 females; mean age 6.8±2.9 years, range 2.3-14.8 years). The frequencies of subclinical (3.8% vs 3.6%) and overt hypothyroidism (1.2% vs 0%), autoimmune thyroiditis (2.46% vs 1.14%), celiac disease (1.2% vs 0.05%), and positivity of organ- and nonorgan-specific autoantibodies (5.1% vs 4.8%) were not statistically significant between patients with PANDAS and controls. Evaluating the overall disease duration, we did not observe any significant difference between patients with (3.4±2.15 years) and without (3.4±2.89 years) autoimmune abnormalities. However, PANDAS patients with autoimmune diseases or positivity for any organ- and nonorgan-specific antibodies showed significantly higher anti-streptolysin O and anti-DNAse B

  5. Dilemmas in autoimmune pancreatitis. Surgical resection or not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmanova, I; Gurlich, R; Janik, V; Szabo, A; Vernerova, Z

    2016-01-01

    Surgical treatment is not commonly recommended in the management of autoimmune pancreatitis. The article describes a dilemma in diagnostics and treatment of a 68-year old man with the mass in the head of the pancreas that mimicked pancreatic cancer and that was diagnosed as a type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis (IgG4-related pancreatitis) after a surgical resection. Diagnosis of the autoimmune pancreatitis is a real clinical challenge, as in the current diagnostic criteria exists some degree of overlap in the findings between autoimmune pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer (indicated by the similarity in radiologic findings, elevation of IgG4, sampling errors in pancreatic biopsy, and the possibility of synchronous autoimmune pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer). Despite the generally accepted corticosteroids as the primary treatment modality in autoimmune pancreatitis, we believe that surgical resection remains necessary in a specific subgroup of patients with autoimmune pancreatitis (Fig. 4, Ref. 37). PMID:27546699

  6. Your Left-Handed Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Roel M. Willems; Francks, Clyde

    2014-01-01

    While most people prefer to use their right hand to brush their teeth, throw a ball, or hold a tennis racket, left-handers prefer to use their left hand. This is the case for around 10% of all people. There was a time (not so long ago) when left-handers were stigmatized (see Glossary) in Western (and other) communities: it was considered a bad sign if you were left-handed, and left-handed children were often forced to write with their right hand. This is nonsensical: there is nothing wrong wi...

  7. Clinical significance of exercise-induced ST segment depression in patients with lateral myocardial infarction involving the left circumflex artery. Evaluation by exercise 99mTc-MIBI myocardial scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to clarify the causes of exercise-induced ST-segment depression in patients with broad lateral old myocardial infraction involving left circumflex branch (LCX) (LCX-OMI) without ischemia on exercise scintigraphy. Twenty one patients (M/F=11/10, age=62±19 years) with myocardial infraction involving LCX (LCX-MI), but without fill-in on exercise and rest MIBI quantitative gated SPECT (QGS), were selected. They were divided into two groups of Group ST(+) (n=11, with significant ST depression (max-2.8±0.4 mm), Group ST (-) (n=10) without ST depression. On 20 SPECT segments of both exercise and rest SPECT, we scored uptake score as defect score (DS) (0=normal to 3=defect) and wall motion as wall motion score (WMS) (0=normal to -5=dyskinesis) and summed DS (TDS) and WMS (TWMS) in LCX region, furthermore, calculated the difference of TWMS (ΔTWMS {exercise-rest}), end diastolic volume (EDV) and ejection fraction (EF) during exercise were compared between the two groups. Group ST(+) showed significantly (p2-4 without ischemia in LCX-MI was observed in patients with broad LCX-MI, low EF, and was related to impaired wall motion in LCX region. ST depression in V2-4 was considered to appear as miller image of ST elevation at postero-inferior wall due to disturbed wall motion on exercise. (author)

  8. Left Artinian Algebraic Algebras

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S. Akbari; M. Arian-Nejad

    2001-01-01

    Let R be a left artinian central F-algebra, T(R) = J(R) + [R, R],and U(R) the group of units of R. As one of our results, we show that, if R is algebraic and char F = 0, then the number of simple components of -R = R/J(R)is greater than or equal to dimF R/T(R). We show that, when char F = 0 or F is uncountable, R is algebraic over F if and only if [R, R] is algebraic over F. As another approach, we prove that R is algebraic over F if and only if the derived subgroup of U(R) is algebraic over F. Also, we present an elementary proof for a special case of an old question due to Jacobson.

  9. Zika virus and neurologic autoimmunity: the putative role of gangliosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Ramirez-Santana, Carolina; Salgado-Castaneda, Ignacio; Chang, Christopher; Ansari, Aftab; Gershwin, M Eric

    2016-01-01

    An increasing number of severe neurological complications associated with Zika virus (ZIKV), chiefly Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and primary microcephaly, have led the World Health Organization to declare a global health emergency. Molecular mimicry between glycolipids and surface molecules of infectious agents explain most of the cases of GBS preceded by infection, while a direct toxicity of ZIKV on neural cells has been raised as the main mechanism by which ZIKV induces microcephaly. Gangliosides are crucial in brain development, and their expression correlates with neurogenesis, synaptogenesis, synaptic transmission, and cell proliferation. Targeting the autoimmune response to gangliosides may represent an underexploited opportunity to examine the increased incidence of neurological complications related to ZIKV infection. PMID:27001187

  10. Protein adducts of malondialdehyde and 4-hydroxynonenal contribute to trichloroethene-mediated autoimmunity via activating Th17 cells: Dose- and time-response studies in female MRL+/+ mice

    OpenAIRE

    WANG, GANGDUO; Wang, Jianling; Fan, Xiuzhen; Ansari, G.A.S.; Khan, M. Firoze

    2011-01-01

    Trichloroethene (TCE), a common occupational and environmental toxicant, is known to induce autoimmunity. Previous studies in our laboratory showed increased oxidative stress in TCE-mediated autoimmunity. To further establish the role of oxidative stress and to investigate the mechanisms of TCE-mediated autoimmunity, dose- and time- response studies were conducted in MRL+/+ mice by treating them with TCE via drinking water at doses of 0.5, 1.0 or 2.0 mg/ml for 12, 24 or 36 weeks. TCE exposure...

  11. Use of autoantigen-loaded phosphatidylserine-liposomes to arrest autoimmunity in type 1 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irma Pujol-Autonell

    Full Text Available The development of new therapies to induce self-tolerance has been an important medical health challenge in type 1 diabetes. An ideal immunotherapy should inhibit the autoimmune attack, avoid systemic side effects and allow β-cell regeneration. Based on the immunomodulatory effects of apoptosis, we hypothesized that apoptotic mimicry can help to restore tolerance lost in autoimmune diabetes.To generate a synthetic antigen-specific immunotherapy based on apoptosis features to specifically reestablish tolerance to β-cells in type 1 diabetes.A central event on the surface of apoptotic cells is the exposure of phosphatidylserine, which provides the main signal for efferocytosis. Therefore, phosphatidylserine-liposomes loaded with insulin peptides were generated to simulate apoptotic cells recognition by antigen presenting cells. The effect of antigen-specific phosphatidylserine-liposomes in the reestablishment of peripheral tolerance was assessed in NOD mice, the spontaneous model of autoimmune diabetes. MHC class II-peptide tetramers were used to analyze the T cell specific response after treatment with phosphatidylserine-liposomes loaded with peptides.We have shown that phosphatidylserine-liposomes loaded with insulin peptides induce tolerogenic dendritic cells and impair autoreactive T cell proliferation. When administered to NOD mice, liposome signal was detected in the pancreas and draining lymph nodes. This immunotherapy arrests the autoimmune aggression, reduces the severity of insulitis and prevents type 1 diabetes by apoptotic mimicry. MHC class II tetramer analysis showed that peptide-loaded phosphatidylserine-liposomes expand antigen-specific CD4+ T cells in vivo. The administration of phosphatidylserine-free liposomes emphasizes the importance of phosphatidylserine in the modulation of antigen-specific CD4+ T cell expansion.We conclude that this innovative immunotherapy based on the use of liposomes constitutes a promising strategy for

  12. Serological Diagnosis of Autoimmune Blistering Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgül Özkesici

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune blistering diseases are a rare diseases, characterized by development of autoantibodies against the structural proteins of the epidermis or dermoepidermal junction, and blisters and erosions on skin and/or mucous membranes clinically. Clinical features are important guiding findings for suspicious of this group of diseases. The diagnosis is achieved by the evaluation together of clinical features, histological and immunological findings. The gold standard in the diagnosis of this group diseases are demonstration of tissue bound and/or circulating autoantibodies. Methods for this purpose are; direct and indirect immunofluorescence, Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA, immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting. The aim of this paper is to review serological diagnostic methods in the diagnosis of autoimmune bullous diseases and to present developments in recent years.

  13. Is Tourette's syndrome an autoimmune disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekstra, P J; Kallenberg, C G M; Korf, J; Minderaa, R B

    2002-01-01

    We provide a review of recent research findings which support the involvement of autoimmunity in childhood-onset tic disorders, in particular the presence of antineuronal autoantibodies, D8/17 B lymphocyte overexpression, a marker of chorea associated with streptococcal infection, and possible beneficial effects of immunomodulatory intervention. One of the most controversial areas in this field is the validity of the proposed PANDAS concept. Some researchers have delineated a putatively unique subgroup of patients, from the spectrum of illness encompassing Tourette's syndrome and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), whose tics and obsessive-compulsive symptoms are shown to arise in response to beta-hemolytic streptococcal infections. They designated it by the term pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS). Herein we additionally present pros and cons concerning the concept of PANDAS. Finally, recommendations for future research directions are given. PMID:12082557

  14. Neuroelectrophysiological studies on neurological autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin-hong LIU

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The neuroelectrophysiological manifestations of four clinical typical neurological autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis (MS, Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS, myasthenia gravis (MG, and polymyositis and dermatomyositis were reviewed in this paper. The diagnostic value of evoked potentials for multiple sclerosis, nerve conduction studies (NCS for Guillain-Barré syndrome, repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS and single-fiber electromyography (SFEMG for myasthenia gravis, and needle electromyography for polymyositis and dermatomyositis were respectively discussed. This review will help to have comprehensive understanding on electrophysiological examinations and their clinical significance in the diagnosis of neurological autoimmune diseases. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.09.004

  15. PANDAS: an autoimmune model of mental disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura del Pilar Cadena Afanador

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available In 1998, the National Institute of Mental Health defined the criteria of diagnosis for the pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infection (PANDAS. Since then there has been investigating the genesis of the autoimmunity caused by this microorganism and its clinical implications, since it has been associated with the obsessive-compulsive disorder, Tourette’s disorder and Sydenham’s chorea and with minor evidence it has been related to of hyperactivity disorder with lack of attention, autistic disorder and anorexia nervosa. The present article is a review on the most important aspects that have been defined up to now in regards to the physiopatlogy, clinical presentation and management of the patients with PANDAS spectrum, since they are a group of diseases in which it will be possible to change the paradigm of treatment in Psychiatry, from being a symptomatic disease to an etiological one.

  16. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome presenting with glomerulonephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanegane, Hirokazu; Vilela, Maria Marluce dos Santos; Wang, Yue; Futatani, Takeshi; Matsukura, Hiroyoshi; Miyawaki, Toshio

    2003-05-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is characterized clinically by chronic non-malignant lymphoproliferation and autoimmunity and is caused by a genetic defect in programmed cell death (apoptosis). Most patients with ALPS have heterozygous mutations in the Fas gene. We describe an 11-year-old Brazilian boy with hepatosplenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, hemolytic anemia, and hypergammaglobulinemia since early infancy. T cell lines from the patient were defective in Fas-mediated apoptosis. He was diagnosed as having ALPS and found to have a novel Fas gene mutation (IVS4+1G>A). In addition, he presented with glomerulonephritis in infancy. An aunt and uncle who had the same Fas mutations also had histories of glomerulonephritis. Although glomerulonephritis is common in Fas-deficient mice, it is infrequent in human ALPS. Corticosteroid therapy ameliorated the glomerulonephritis in our patient, as well as his lymphoproliferation, anemia, and hypergammaglobulinemia. This study suggests that glomerulonephritis is one of the characteristic features of ALPS. PMID:12736807

  17. [Glycosylation of autoantibodies in autoimmunes diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulabchand, R; Batteux, F; Guilpain, P

    2013-12-01

    Protein glycosylation is one of the most common post-translational modifications, involved in the well described protein biosynthesis process. Protein glycosylation seems to play a major role in the pathogenesis of auto-immune diseases. Herein are described the main alterations of autoantibody glycosylation associated with autoimmunes diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, IgA glomerulonephritis, Schoenlein-Henoch purpura, Sjögren's syndrome, systemic scleroderma, systemic lupus erythematosus, myasthenia gravis and granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener). Molecular identification of altered immunoglobulin glycosylation could lead to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of those diseases, might allow an evaluation of their biological activity and could even be a new therapeutic target. PMID:24139501

  18. Common idempotents in compact left topological left semirings

    CERN Document Server

    Saveliev, Denis I

    2010-01-01

    A classical result of topological algebra states that any compact left topological semigroup has an idempotent. We refine this by showing that any compact left topological left semiring has a common, i.e. additive and multiplicative simultaneously, idempotent. As an application, we partially answer a question related to algebraic properties of ultrafilters over natural numbers. Finally, we observe that similar arguments establish the existence of common idempotents in much more general, non-associative universal algebras.

  19. Serological Diagnosis of Autoimmune Blistering Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Birgül Özkesici; Ayşe Akman Karakaş

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune blistering diseases are a rare diseases, characterized by development of autoantibodies against the structural proteins of the epidermis or dermoepidermal junction, and blisters and erosions on skin and/or mucous membranes clinically. Clinical features are important guiding findings for suspicious of this group of diseases. The diagnosis is achieved by the evaluation together of clinical features, histological and immunological findings. The gold standard in the diagnosis of this g...

  20. Dendritic cells and aging: consequences for autoimmunity

    OpenAIRE

    Agrawal, Anshu; Sridharan, Aishwarya; Prakash, Sangeetha; Agrawal, Harsh

    2012-01-01

    The immune system has evolved to mount immune responses against foreign pathogens and to remain silent against self-antigens. A balance between immunity and tolerance is required as any disturbance may result in chronic inflammation or autoimmunity. Dendritic cells (DCs) actively participate in maintaining this balance. Under steady-state conditions, DCs remain in an immature state and do not mount an immune response against circulating self-antigens in the periphery, which maintains a state ...

  1. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia: From lab to bedside

    OpenAIRE

    Chaudhary, R. K.; Sudipta Sekhar Das

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is not an uncommon clinical disorder and requires advanced, efficient immunohematological and transfusion support. Many AIHA patients have underlying disorder and therefore, it is incumbent upon the clinician to investigate these patients in detail, as the underlying condition can be of a serious nature such as lymphoproliferative disorder or connective tissue disorder. Despite advances in transfusion medicine, simple immunohematological test such as direct ...

  2. The Clinical Pictures of Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Packman, Charles H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is characterized by shortened red blood cell survival and a positive Coombs test. The responsible autoantibodies may be either warm reactive or cold reactive. The rate of hemolysis and the severity of the anemia may vary from mild to severe and life-threatening. Diagnosis is made in the laboratory by the findings of anemia, reticulocytosis, a positive Coombs test, and specific serologic tests. The prognosis is generally good but renal failure and death some...

  3. Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Associated with Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Pezzilli, Raffaele; Vecchiarelli, Silvia; Di Marco, Maria Cristina; SERRA, CARLA; Santini, Donatella; Calculli, Lucia; Fabbri, Dario; Rojas Mena, Betzabè; Imbrogno, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP), in contrast to other benign chronic pancreatic diseases, can be cured with immunosuppressant drugs, thus the differentiation of AIP from pancreatic cancer is of particular interest in clinical practice. There is the possibility that some patients with AIP may develop pancreatic cancer, and this possibility contributes to increasing our difficulties in differentiating AIP from pancreatic cancer. We herein report the case of a 70-year-old man in whom pancreatic ad...

  4. THE AUTOIMMUNE CONSTELLATION IN LICHEN AMYLOIDOSIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrese, Elena; Vâţă, D; Ciobanu, Delia; Stătescu, Laura; Solovăstru, Laura Gheucă

    2015-01-01

    Localized cutaneous amyloidosis is a rare disease among white people, being more common in South-Asia, China and South America. The disease is characterized by deposition of amyloid material in the papillary dermis without visceral involvement. Nevertheless, there is a growing list of immune-mediated disorders that have been linked to cutaneous amyloidosis. We present two cases of concomitant occurrence of lichen amyloidosis and autoimmune thyroiditis/atopic dermatitis in two Caucasian women. PMID:26793847

  5. Autoimmune thyroiditis in girls of pubertal age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two hundred twenty five girls with autoimmune thyroiditis aged 11-16 living in Belarus permanently have been examined in 8-10 years after Chernobyl accident. The disease at girls of pubertal age living on the contaminated territories is characterized by more frequent asthenoneurotic symptoms, more marked immunologic changes and higher levels of both antibodies to thyroglobulin and thyrocytes microsome antigens as compared to those from 'clean' regions

  6. Antigen-Experienced CD4lo T Cells Are Linked to Deficient Contraction of the Immune Response in Autoimmune Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Linkes

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Following proper activation, naïve “CD4lo” T cells differentiate into effector T cells with enhanced expression of CD4 -“CD4hi” effectors. Autoimmune diabetes-prone NOD mice display a unique set of antigen-experienced “CD4lo” T cells that persist after primary stimulation. Here, we report that a population of such cells remained after secondary and tertiary TCR stimulation and produced cytokines upon antigenic challenge. However, when NOD blasts were induced in the presence of rIL-15, the number of antigen-experienced “CD4lo” T cells was significantly reduced. Clonal contraction, mediated in part by CD95-dependent activation-induced cell death (AICD, normally regulates the accumulation of “CD4hi” effectors. Interestingly, CD95 expression was dramatically reduced on the AICD-resistant NOD “CD4lo” T cells. Thus, while autoimmune disease has often been attributed to the engagement of robust autoimmunity, we suggest that the inability to effectively contract the immune response distinguishes benign autoimmunity from progressive autoimmune diseases that are characterized by chronic T cell-mediated inflammation.

  7. Pathogenic T cells persist after reversal of autoimmune disease by immunosuppression with regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Eric; Bourges, Dorothée; Gleeson, Paul A; Ang, Desmond K Y; van Driel, Ian R

    2013-05-01

    Autoimmune disease can be prevented with immunosuppressive agents; however, the effectiveness of these treatments in advanced stage of disease and the fate of pathogenic T cells following such treatments are not clear. In this study we demonstrate that a single dose of in vitro-induced Treg cells (iTreg cells) resulted in the functional repair and restitution of stomach tissue that had been severely damaged in advanced autoimmune gastritis. iTreg cells caused depletion or inactivation of autoreactive naïve T cells that were antigen inexperienced, however, autoreactive effector/memory T cells persisted in treated mice, resulting in residual cellular infiltrates within the repaired stomach tissue. The persisting autoreactive T cells were able to rapidly cause autoimmune disease if iTreg cells were removed. Similar data were obtained from mice treated continuously with corticosteroid, in that there was substantial restitution of the gastric mucosa; however, effector T cells persisted and rapidly caused pathology following drug removal. Therefore, iTreg cells or corticosteroid can suppress pathogenic autoreactive cells in advanced autoimmune disease, reversing tissue damage and improving tissue function. However, the persistence of pathogenic T cells represents a disease risk. PMID:23420509

  8. Dimethyl Fumarate Ameliorates Lewis Rat Experimental Autoimmune Neuritis and Mediates Axonal Protection.

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    Kalliopi Pitarokoili

    Full Text Available Dimethyl fumarate is an immunomodulatory and neuroprotective drug, approved recently for the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. In view of the limited therapeutic options for human acute and chronic polyneuritis, we used the animal model of experimental autoimmune neuritis in the Lewis rat to study the effects of dimethyl fumarate on autoimmune inflammation and neuroprotection in the peripheral nervous system.Experimental autoimmune neuritis was induced by immunization with the neuritogenic peptide (amino acids 53-78 of P2 myelin protein. Preventive treatment with dimethyl fumarate given at 45 mg/kg twice daily by oral gavage significantly ameliorated clinical neuritis by reducing demyelination and axonal degeneration in the nerve conduction studies. Histology revealed a significantly lower degree of inflammatory infiltrates in the sciatic nerves. In addition, we detected a reduction of early signs of axonal degeneration through a reduction of amyloid precursor protein expressed in axons of the peripheral nerves. This reduction correlated with an increase of nuclear factor (erythroid derived 2-related factor 2 positive axons, supporting the neuroprotective potential of dimethyl fumarate. Furthermore, nuclear factor (erythroid derived 2-related factor 2 expression in Schwann cells was only rarely detected and there was no increase of Schwann cells death during EAN.We conclude that immunomodulatory and neuroprotective dimethyl fumarate may represent an innovative therapeutic option in human autoimmune neuropathies.

  9. IFN-γ signaling to astrocytes protects from autoimmune mediated neurological disability.

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    Claudia Hindinger

    Full Text Available Demyelination and axonal degeneration are determinants of progressive neurological disability in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS. Cells resident within the central nervous system (CNS are active participants in development, progression and subsequent control of autoimmune disease; however, their individual contributions are not well understood. Astrocytes, the most abundant CNS cell type, are highly sensitive to environmental cues and are implicated in both detrimental and protective outcomes during autoimmune demyelination. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE was induced in transgenic mice expressing signaling defective dominant-negative interferon gamma (IFN-γ receptors on astrocytes to determine the influence of inflammation on astrocyte activity. Inhibition of IFN-γ signaling to astrocytes did not influence disease incidence, onset, initial progression of symptoms, blood brain barrier (BBB integrity or the composition of the acute CNS inflammatory response. Nevertheless, increased demyelination at peak acute disease in the absence of IFN-γ signaling to astrocytes correlated with sustained clinical symptoms. Following peak disease, diminished clinical remission, increased mortality and sustained astrocyte activation within the gray matter demonstrate a critical role of IFN-γ signaling to astrocytes in neuroprotection. Diminished disease remission was associated with escalating demyelination, axonal degeneration and sustained inflammation. The CNS infiltrating leukocyte composition was not altered; however, decreased IL-10 and IL-27 correlated with sustained disease. These data indicate that astrocytes play a critical role in limiting CNS autoimmune disease dependent upon a neuroprotective signaling pathway mediated by engagement of IFN-γ receptors.

  10. Automation, consolidation, and integration in autoimmune diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozzoli, Renato; D'Aurizio, Federica; Villalta, Danilo; Bizzaro, Nicola

    2015-08-01

    Over the past two decades, we have witnessed an extraordinary change in autoimmune diagnostics, characterized by the progressive evolution of analytical technologies, the availability of new tests, and the explosive growth of molecular biology and proteomics. Aside from these huge improvements, organizational changes have also occurred which brought about a more modern vision of the autoimmune laboratory. The introduction of automation (for harmonization of testing, reduction of human error, reduction of handling steps, increase of productivity, decrease of turnaround time, improvement of safety), consolidation (combining different analytical technologies or strategies on one instrument or on one group of connected instruments) and integration (linking analytical instruments or group of instruments with pre- and post-analytical devices) opened a new era in immunodiagnostics. In this article, we review the most important changes that have occurred in autoimmune diagnostics and present some models related to the introduction of automation in the autoimmunology laboratory, such as automated indirect immunofluorescence and changes in the two-step strategy for detection of autoantibodies; automated monoplex immunoassays and reduction of turnaround time; and automated multiplex immunoassays for autoantibody profiling. PMID:26138781

  11. [Vaccinations in patients with autoimmune diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bühler, Silja; Hatz, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    The number of individuals with autoimmune diseases treated with immunosuppressive drugs is increasing steadily. The variety of immunosuppressive drugs and in particular biological therapies is also rising. The autoimmune disease itself as well as the immunosuppressive therapy increases the risk of infection in this population. Particularly the risk of vaccine-preventable infections is elevated. Thus, preventing infections by the means of vaccination is of utmost importance. The Division of Infectious Diseases of the Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute, University of Zurich, performed a literature search on the topic of vaccinations in patients with autoimmune diseases upon request by the Swiss Federal Commission for Vaccination Issues. Overall, data are scarce. The following main points were retrieved from the literature: Inactivated vaccines are safe, but their immunogenicity may be reduced under immunosuppressive therapy. In addition to the generally recommended basic vaccinations, specific vaccinations, such as influenza and pneumococcal vaccination are indicated in these patient groups. Live vaccines are generally contraindicated under immunosuppressive therapy due to safety concerns. However, specific exceptions apply. Furthermore, certain time intervals for the administration of live vaccines after pausing or ceasing an immunosuppressive therapy should be respected. PMID:27268452

  12. Immunotherapy Treatments of Warm Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bainan Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (WAIHA is one of four clinical types of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA, with the characteristics of autoantibodies maximally active at body temperature. It produces a variable anemia—sometimes mild and sometimes severe. With respect to the absence or presence of an underlying condition, WAIHA is either idiopathic (primary or secondary, which determines the treatment strategies in practice. Conventional treatments include immune suppression with corticosteroids and, in some cases, splenectomy. In recent years, the number of clinical studies with monoclonal antibodies and immunosuppressants in the treatment of WAIHA increased as the knowledge of autoimmunity mechanisms extended. This thread of developing new tools of treating WAIHA is well exemplified with the success in using anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, Rituximab. Following this success, other treatment methods based on the immune mechanisms of WAIHA have emerged. We reviewed these newly developed immunotherapy treatments here in order to provide the clinicians with more options in selecting the best therapy for patients with WAIHA, hoping to stimulate researchers to find more novel immunotherapy strategies.

  13. Overlap syndromes among autoimmune liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christian Rust; Ulrich Beuers

    2008-01-01

    The three major immune disorders of the liver are autoimmune hepatitis (AIH),primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC).Variant forms of these diseases are generally called overlap syndromes,although there has been no standardised definition.Patients with overlap syndromes present with both hepatitic and cholestatic serum liver tests and have histological features of AIH and PBC or PSC.The AIH-PBC overlap syndrome is the most common form,affecting almost 10% of adults with AIH or PBC.Single cases of AIH and autoimmune cholangitis (AMA-negative PBC) overlap syndrome have also been reported.The AIH-PSC overlap syndrome is predominantly found in children,adolescents and young adults with AIH or PSC.Interestingly,transitions from one autoimmune to another have also been reported in a minority of patients,especially transitions from PBC to AIH-PBC overlap syndrome.Overlap syndromes show a progressive course towards liver cirrhosis and liver failure without treatment.Therapy for overlap syndromes is empiric,since controlled trials are not available in these rare disorders.Anticholestatic therapy with ursodeoxycholic acid is usually combined with immunosuppressive therapy with corticosteroids and/or azathioprine in both AIH-PBC and AIH-PSC overlap syndromes.In end-stage disease,liver transplantation is the treatment of choice.

  14. The Clinical Diagnosis of Autoimmune Bullous Diseases Sürekli Eğitim

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rıfkiye Küçükoğlu

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The autoimmune bullous diseases were diagnosed on the clinical and histopathological basis, before the introduction of the immunological assays. However, not the clinical features, but the classification of the diseases has recently changed during the immunological development. According to this new classification, pemphigus group diseases include, pemphigus vulgaris, pemphigus vegetans, pemphigus foliaceus, pemphigus erythematosus, endemic pemphigus, IgA pemphigus, pemphigus herpetiformis, paraneoplastic pemphigus, and drug-induced pemphigus. The subepidermal bullous diseases are classified as pemphigoid group diseases, epidermolysis bullosa acquisita, dermatitis herpetiformis, and linear IgA bullous dermatosis. The pemphigoid-group diseases consist of bullous pemphigoid, childhood bullous pemphigoid, localised bullous pemphigoid, drug-induced pemphigoid, anti p200 pemphigoid, pemphigoid gestationes, pemphigoid nodularis, and cicatricial pemphigoid. In this review, the clinical features of the autoimmune bullous diseases are discussed according to the above mentioned classification. (Turkderm 2010; 45 Suppl 1: 16-25

  15. Overexpression of thioredoxin in islets transduced by a lentiviral vector prolongs graft survival in autoimmune diabetic NOD mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sytwu Huey-Kang

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pancreatic islet transplantation is considered an appropriate treatment to achieve insulin independence in type I diabetic patients. However, islet isolation and transplantation-induced oxidative stress and autoimmune-mediated destruction are still the major obstacles to the long-term survival of graft islets in this potential therapy. To protect islet grafts from inflammatory damage and prolong their survival, we transduced islets with an antioxidative gene thioredoxin (TRX using a lentiviral vector before transplantation. We hypothesized that the overexpression of TRX in islets would prolong islet graft survival when transplanted into diabetic non-obese diabetic (NOD mice. Methods Islets were isolated from NOD mice and transduced with lentivirus carrying TRX (Lt-TRX or enhanced green fluorescence protein (Lt-eGFP, respectively. Transduced islets were transplanted under the left kidney capsule of female diabetic NOD mice, and blood glucose concentration was monitored daily after transplantation. The histology of the islet graft was assessed at the end of the study. The protective effect of TRX on islets was investigated. Results The lentiviral vector effectively transduced islets without altering the glucose-stimulating insulin-secretory function of islets. Overexpression of TRX in islets reduced hydrogen peroxide-induced cytotoxicity in vitro. After transplantation into diabetic NOD mice, euglycemia was maintained for significantly longer in Lt-TRX-transduced islets than in Lt-eGFP-transduced islets; the mean graft survival was 18 vs. 6.5 days (n = 9 and 10, respectively, p Conclusion We successfully transduced the TRX gene into islets and demonstrated that these genetically modified grafts are resistant to inflammatory insult and survived longer in diabetic recipients. Our results further support the concept that the reactive oxygen species (ROS scavenger and antiapoptotic functions of TRX are critical to islet survival after

  16. Nonlinear left-handed metamaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Ilya V. Shadrivov; Zharov, Alexander A.; Zharova, Nina A.; Yuri S. Kivshar

    2004-01-01

    We analyze nonlinear properties of microstructured materials with negative refraction, the so-called left-handed metamaterials. We demonstrate that the hysteresis-type dependence of the magnetic permeability on the field intensity allows changing the material properties from left- to right-handed and back. Using the finite-difference time-domain simulations, we study wave transmission through the slab of nonlinear left-handed material, and predict existence of temporal solitons in such materi...

  17. The Effects of Adjuvants on Autoimmune Responses Against Testicular Antigens in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    MUSHA, Muhetaerjiang; Hirai, Shuichi; Naito, Munekazu; Terayama, Hayato; Qu, Ning; Hatayama, Naoyuki; Itoh, Masahiro

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Experimental autoimmune orchitis (EAO) is a model of immunologic male infertility and pathologically characterized by lymphocytic inflammation, which causes breakdown of the testicular immune privilege with spermatogenic disturbance. Generally, murine EAO is induced by immunization with testicular homogenate (TH) from the testes of donor mice + complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) + Bordetella pertussigens (BP), and it has been considered that treatment with these two adjuvants is requir...

  18. Soluble Mannosylated Myelin Peptide Inhibits the Encephalitogenicity of Autoreactive T Cells during Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    OpenAIRE

    Kel, Junda; Oldenampsen, Judith; Luca, Mariken; Drijfhout, Jan Wouter; Koning, Frits; Nagelkerken, Lex

    2007-01-01

    We have previously shown that immunization with a mannosylated myelin peptide in complete adjuvant induces tolerance instead of disease in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a rodent model for multiple sclerosis. In this report we demonstrate that treatment with a soluble mannosylated epitope of proteolipid protein (M-PLP139-151) significantly inhibits disease mediated by autoreactive myelin-specific T cells during EAE. Treatment with M-PLP139-151, applied in different EAE model...

  19. Evaluation of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE)

    OpenAIRE

    Rajendran, Ranjithkumar

    2014-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) exert diverse biological effects by binding and activation of specific fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs). Recent studies on the function of FGF2 in MOG35-55-induced experimental autoimmune encephalitis (EAE) showed that systemic deletion of FGF2 leads to a more severe disease course, increased lymphocyte and macrophage infiltration and decreased remyelination. In the present study the in vivo function of the corresponding receptor Fgfr1 was characteri...

  20. Self-antigen presentation by dendritic cells and lymphoid stroma and its implications for autoimmunity

    OpenAIRE

    Lukacs-Kornek, Veronika; Turley, Shannon J.

    2010-01-01

    The induction and maintenance of T cell tolerance is essential to prevent autoimmunity. A combination of central and peripheral mechanisms acts to control autoreactive T cells. In secondary lymphoid organs, dendritic cells (DCs) presenting self-antigen were thought to play a major role in the induction of peripheral T cell tolerance. Multiple recent studies have demonstrated that DCs are not absolutely essential to induce and maintain tolerance. Furthermore, it has also been recently shown th...