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  1. Alpha1A-adrenergic receptor-directed autoimmunity induces left ventricular damage and diastolic dysfunction in rats.

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    Katrin Wenzel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Agonistic autoantibodies to the alpha(1-adrenergic receptor occur in nearly half of patients with refractory hypertension; however, their relevance is uncertain. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We immunized Lewis rats with the second extracellular-loop peptides of the human alpha(1A-adrenergic receptor and maintained them for one year. Alpha(1A-adrenergic antibodies (alpha(1A-AR-AB were monitored with a neonatal cardiomyocyte contraction assay by ELISA, and by ERK1/2 phosphorylation in human alpha(1A-adrenergic receptor transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells. The rats were followed with radiotelemetric blood pressure measurements and echocardiography. At 12 months, the left ventricles of immunized rats had greater wall thickness than control rats. The fractional shortening and dp/dt(max demonstrated preserved systolic function. A decreased E/A ratio in immunized rats indicated a diastolic dysfunction. Invasive hemodynamics revealed increased left ventricular end-diastolic pressures and decreased dp/dt(min. Mean diameter of cardiomyocytes showed hypertrophy in immunized rats. Long-term blood pressure values and heart rates were not different. Genes encoding sarcomeric proteins, collagens, extracellular matrix proteins, calcium regulating proteins, and proteins of energy metabolism in immunized rat hearts were upregulated, compared to controls. Furthermore, fibrosis was present in immunized hearts, but not in control hearts. A subset of immunized and control rats was infused with angiotensin (Ang II. The stressor raised blood pressure to a greater degree and led to more cardiac fibrosis in immunized, than in control rats. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We show that alpha(1A-AR-AB cause diastolic dysfunction independent of hypertension, and can increase the sensitivity to Ang II. We suggest that alpha(1A-AR-AB could contribute to cardiovascular endorgan damage.

  2. [Drug-induced autoimmune hemolytic anemia].

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    Homberg, J C

    1999-04-03

    AUTOANTIBODY PRODUCTION: The production of autoantibodies can only occur if immune tolerance is circumvented. Thus drug-induced autoimmune hemolytic anemia requires that the drug have an effect on both autoantigens and on the immune system. AN EXAMPLE, METHYLDOPA: Methyldopa is a hypotensive agent which induces major production of anti-Rh IgG anti-erythrocyte autoantibodies, anti-nuclear antibodies and anti-actin antibodies. These autoantibodies generally appear 6 months after treatment onset and are observed in 20% of treated patients. Hemolysis is however exceptional and is only clinically or biologically perceptible in 1 to 2% of the patients who become immunized. Induced lupus has been reported as have been several dozen cases of drug-induced hepatitis with anti-actin autoantibodies. DRUGS INDUCING HEMOLYTIC ANEMIA: Besides methyldopa, other drugs known to induce hemolytic anemia include levodopa used for Parkinson's disease, mefenamic acid, a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug, interferon-alpha, used in chronic viral hepatitis, cyclosporin used for the prevention of graft rejection and the treatment of certain autoimmune diseases, and fludarabin, used in chronic lymphoid leukemia. If there is no clinical or biological expression, the drug can be continued, excepting fludarabin where regular controls are needed. If hemolytic anemia is patent, the drug must be discontinued, transfusion and corticosteroid therapy should be envisaged.

  3. A minimum number of autoimmune T cells to induce autoimmunity?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bosch, A.J.T.; Bolinger, B.; Keck, S.; Štěpánek, Ondřej; Ozga, A.J.; Galati-Fournier, V.; Stein, J.V.; Palmer, E.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 316, jaro (2017), s. 21-31 ISSN 0008-8749 R&D Projects: GA ČR GJ16-09208Y Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : T cell * Tolerance * Autoimmunity Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Immunology Impact factor: 3.172, year: 2016

  4. Alpha-Methyldopa-Induced Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia in the Third Trimester of Pregnancy

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    Charalampos Grigoriadis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-methyldopa has been demonstrated to be safe for use during pregnancy and is now used to treat gestational hypertension. In pregnancy, alpha-methyldopa-induced autoimmune hemolytic anemia does not have typical features and the severity of symptoms ranges from mild fatigue to dyspnea, respiratory failure, and death if left untreated. A case of alpha-methyldopa-induced autoimmune hemolytic anemia in a 36-year-old gravida 2, para 1 woman at 37+6 weeks of gestation is reported herein along with the differential diagnostic procedure and the potential risks to the mother and the fetus.

  5. Gold- and silver-induced murine autoimmunity--requirement for cytokines and CD28 in murine heavy metal-induced autoimmunity.

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    Havarinasab, S; Pollard, K M; Hultman, P

    2009-03-01

    Treatment with gold in the form of aurothiomaleate, silver or mercury (Hg) in genetically susceptible mouse strains (H-2(s)) induces a systemic autoimmune condition characterized by anti-nuclear antibodies targeting the 34-kDa nucleolar protein fibrillarin, as well as lymphoproliferation and systemic immune-complex (IC) deposits. In this study we have examined the effect of single-gene deletions for interferon (IFN)-gamma, interleukin (IL)-4, IL-6 or CD28 in B10.S (H-2(s)) mice on heavy metal-induced autoimmunity. Targeting of the genes for IFN-gamma, IL-6 or CD28 abrogated the development of both anti-fibrillarin antibodies (AFA) and IC deposits using a modest dose of Hg (130 microg Hg/kg body weight/day). Deletion of IL-4 severely reduced the IgG1 AFA induced by all three metals, left the total IgG AFA response intact, but abrogated the Hg-induced systemic IC deposits. In conclusion, intact IFN-gamma and CD28 genes are necessary for induction of AFA with all three metals and systemic IC deposits using Hg, while lack of IL-4 distinctly skews the metal-induced AFA response towards T helper type 1. In a previous study using a higher dose of Hg (415 microg Hg/kg body weight/day), IC deposits were preserved in IL-4(-/-) and IL-6(-/-) mice, and also AFA in the latter mice. Therefore, the attenuated autoimmunity following loss of IL-4 and IL-6 is dose-dependent, as higher doses of Hg are able to override the attenuation observed using lower doses.

  6. Interleukin-35 induces regulatory B cells that suppress autoimmune disease.

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    Wang, Ren-Xi; Yu, Cheng-Rong; Dambuza, Ivy M; Mahdi, Rashid M; Dolinska, Monika B; Sergeev, Yuri V; Wingfield, Paul T; Kim, Sung-Hye; Egwuagu, Charles E

    2014-06-01

    Interleukin-10 (IL-10)-producing regulatory B (Breg) cells suppress autoimmune disease, and increased numbers of Breg cells prevent host defense to infection and promote tumor growth and metastasis by converting resting CD4(+) T cells to regulatory T (Treg) cells. The mechanisms mediating the induction and development of Breg cells remain unclear. Here we show that IL-35 induces Breg cells and promotes their conversion to a Breg subset that produces IL-35 as well as IL-10. Treatment of mice with IL-35 conferred protection from experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU), and mice lacking IL-35 (p35 knockout (KO) mice) or defective in IL-35 signaling (IL-12Rβ2 KO mice) produced less Breg cells endogenously or after treatment with IL-35 and developed severe uveitis. Adoptive transfer of Breg cells induced by recombinant IL-35 suppressed EAU when transferred to mice with established disease, inhibiting pathogenic T helper type 17 (TH17) and TH1 cells while promoting Treg cell expansion. In B cells, IL-35 activates STAT1 and STAT3 through the IL-35 receptor comprising the IL-12Rβ2 and IL-27Rα subunits. As IL-35 also induced the conversion of human B cells into Breg cells, these findings suggest that IL-35 may be used to induce autologous Breg and IL-35(+) Breg cells and treat autoimmune and inflammatory disease.

  7. Collagen-Induced Arthritis: A model for Murine Autoimmune Arthritis

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    Pietrosimone, K. M.; Jin, M.; Poston, B.; Liu, P.

    2015-01-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is a common autoimmune animal model used to study rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The development of CIA involves infiltration of macrophages and neutrophils into the joint, as well as T and B cell responses to type II collagen. In murine CIA, genetically susceptible mice (DBA/1J) are immunized with a type II bovine collagen emulsion in complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA), and receive a boost of type II bovine collagen in incomplete Freund’s adjuvant (IFA) 21 days aft...

  8. Vitiligo: How do oxidative stress-induced autoantigens trigger autoimmunity?

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    Xie, Heng; Zhou, Fubo; Liu, Ling; Zhu, Guannan; Li, Qiang; Li, Chunying; Gao, Tianwen

    2016-01-01

    Vitiligo is a common depigmentation disorder characterized by a loss of functional melanocytes and melanin from epidermis, in which the autoantigens and subsequent autoimmunity caused by oxidative stress play significant roles according to hypotheses. Various factors lead to reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction in the melanocytes of vitiligo: the exogenous and endogenous stimuli that cause ROS production, low levels of enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants, disturbed antioxidant pathways and polymorphisms of ROS-associated genes. These factors synergistically contribute to the accumulation of ROS in melanocytes, finally leading to melanocyte damage and the production of autoantigens through the following ways: apoptosis, accumulation of misfolded peptides and cytokines induced by endoplasmic reticulum stress as well as the sustained unfolded protein response, and an 'eat me' signal for phagocytic cells triggered by calreticulin. Subsequently, autoantigens presentation and dendritic cells maturation occurred mediated by the release of antigen-containing exosomes, adenosine triphosphate and melanosomal autophagy. With the involvement of inducible heat shock protein 70, cellular immunity targeting autoantigens takes the essential place in the destruction of melanocytes, which eventually results in vitiligo. Several treatments, such as narrow band ultraviolet, quercetin and α-melanophore-stimulating hormone, are reported to be able to lower ROS thereby achieving repigmentation in vitiligo. In therapies targeting autoimmunity, restore of regulatory T cells is absorbing attention, in which narrow band ultraviolet also plays a role. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Antituberculosis Drug-Induced Liver Injury with Autoimmune Features: Facing Diagnostic and Treatment Challenges

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    Maria Adriana Rangel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors present a case report of antituberculosis drug-induced liver injury that offered diagnostic challenges (namely, the possibility of drug-induced autoimmune hepatitis and treatment difficulties.

  10. Associated Autoimmune Diseases

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    ... celiac disease are type 1 diabetes and autoimmune thyroid disease. The tendency to develop autoimmune diseases is believed ... confusion, weight loss, and coma (if left untreated). Thyroid Disease There are two common forms of autoimmune thyroid ...

  11. Collagen-Induced Arthritis: A model for Murine Autoimmune Arthritis.

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    Pietrosimone, K M; Jin, M; Poston, B; Liu, P

    2015-10-20

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is a common autoimmune animal model used to study rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The development of CIA involves infiltration of macrophages and neutrophils into the joint, as well as T and B cell responses to type II collagen. In murine CIA, genetically susceptible mice (DBA/1J) are immunized with a type II bovine collagen emulsion in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA), and receive a boost of type II bovine collagen in incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA) 21 days after the first injection. These mice typically develop disease 26 to 35 days after the initial injection. C57BL/6J mice are resistant to arthritis induced by type II bovine collagen, but can develop arthritis when immunized with type II chicken collagen in CFA, and receive a boost of type II chicken collagen in IFA 21 days after the first injection. The concentration of heat-killed Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37RA (MT) in CFA also differs for each strain. DBA/1J mice develop arthritis with 1 mg/ml MT, while C57BL/6J mice require and 3-4 mg/ml MT in order to develop arthritis. CIA develops slowly in C57BL/6J mice and cases of arthritis are mild when compared to DBA/1J mice. This protocol describes immunization of DBA/1J mice with type II bovine collagen and the immunization of C57BL/6J mice with type II chicken collagen.

  12. Silicosis and Silica-Induced Autoimmunity in the Diversity Outbred Mouse

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    Jessica M. Mayeux

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have confidently linked occupational crystalline silica exposure to autoimmunity, but pathogenic mechanisms and role of genetic predisposition remain poorly defined. Although studies of single inbred strains have yielded insights, understanding the relationships between lung pathology, silica-induced autoimmunity, and genetic predisposition will require examination of a broad spectrum of responses and susceptibilities. We defined the characteristics of silicosis and autoimmunity and their relationships using the genetically heterogeneous diversity outbred (DO mouse population and determined the suitability of this model for investigating silica-induced autoimmunity. Clinically relevant lung and autoimmune phenotypes were assessed 12 weeks after a transoral dose of 0, 5, or 10 mg crystalline silica in large cohorts of DO mice. Data were further analyzed for correlations, hierarchical clustering, and sex effects. DO mice exhibited a wide range of responses to silica, including mild to severe silicosis and importantly silica-induced systemic autoimmunity. Strikingly, about half of PBS controls were anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA positive, however, few had disease-associated specificities, whereas most ANAs in silica-exposed mice showed anti-ENA5 reactivity. Correlation and hierarchical clustering showed close association of silicosis, lung biomarkers, and anti-ENA5, while other autoimmune characteristics, such as ANA and glomerulonephritis, clustered separately. Silica-exposed males had more lung inflammation, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cells, IL-6, and autoantibodies. DO mice are susceptible to both silicosis and silica-induced autoimmunity and show substantial individual variations reflecting their genetic diverseness and the importance of predisposition particularly for autoimmunity. This model provides a new tool for deciphering the relationship between silica exposure, genes, and disease.

  13. Presumed Isotretinoin-Induced, Concomitant Autoimmune Thyroid Disease and Ocular Myasthenia Gravis: A Case Report

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    Huseyin Gursoy

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There are many adverse effects that have been described for isotretinoin. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a possible association of oral isotretinoin intake with autoimmune thyroiditis and ocular myasthenia gravis (OMG. Case Presentation: A 19-year-old Caucasian male, who had used oral isotretinoin for severe acne disease for the previous six months, was referred to our clinic. He had a three-week history of diplopia and variable bilateral ptosis. Physical examination showed moderate periorbital edema and limitations of up- and down-gaze in the left eye. Laboratory findings and thyroid ultrasound were consistent with autoimmune thyroiditis. Antithyroid therapy did not relieve the clinical symptoms. Concomitant OMG was suspected. Variable ptosis and a positive response to oral prednisolone of 40 mg/day and pyridostigmine of 360 mg/day supported the diagnosis of concomitant autoimmune thyroiditis and OMG. Conclusion: Autoimmune disorders may be triggered by oral isotretinoin treatment. Clinicians prescribing isotretinoin should be aware of the possible association between isotretinoin intake and concomitant autoimmune thyroiditis and OMG.

  14. Irregular antibodies in no hemolytic autoimmune diseases are able to induce erythrophagocytosis.

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    López-Díaz, Paola Ester; Ruiz-Olivera, María Del Rocío; Hernández-Osorio, Luis Alberto; Vargas-Arzola, Jaime; Valle-Jiménez, Xareni; Aguilar-Ruiz, Sergio Roberto; Torres-Aguilar, Honorio

    2017-02-01

    Irregular antibodies are produced by alloimmunization because of pregnancies or blood transfusions. They are called "irregular" due to target erythrocyte antigens from "rare blood systems," those different from the ABO system. Irregular antibodies have been widely investigated in immunohematology since their presence in blood donors may lead to difficulties in blood typing and in blood cross-matching, or to induce hemolytic transfusion reactions. Nevertheless, their incidence and participation in the physiopathology of autoimmune diseases have not been thoroughly studied. In this work, we analyzed the presence and pro-hemolytic capabilities of irregular antibodies in patients with different autoimmune diseases lacking signs of hemolytic anemia, in comparison with healthy multiparous women. Five of 141 autoimmune patients (3.5 %) and two of 77 multiparous women (2.6 %) were positive. Although frequency was relatively low and similar in both populations, the targeted antigens were Kell (k, Kp b , Js b ) and Luth (Lu b ) in multiparous women, and the same plus Duffy (Fy a ), Kidd (Jk a ) and MNS (M, s) in autoimmune patients. Irregular antibodies from autoimmune patients did not induce complement-mediated hemolysis (intravascular), but they were able to induce macrophages-mediated phagocytosis (extravascular hemolysis) in vitro. It is the first approach exploring the presence of irregular antibodies associated with the loss of immune tolerance and demonstrating their hemolytic potential in autoimmune patients without hemolytic manifestations. The presence of irregular antibodies targeted to Duffy (Fya), Kidd (Jka) and MNS (M, s) antigens only in autoimmune patients suggests a loss of immune tolerance to these erythrocyte antigens.

  15. Autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (Shoenfeld's syndrome) - An update.

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    Watad, A; Quaresma, M; Brown, S; Cohen Tervaert, J W; Rodríguez-Pint, I; Cervera, R; Perricone, C; Shoenfeld, Y

    2017-06-01

    Autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA) has been widely described in many studies conducted thus far. The syndrome incorporates five immune-mediated conditions, all associated with previous exposure to various agents such as vaccines, silicone implants and several others. The emergence of ASIA syndrome is associated with individual genetic predisposition, for instance those carrying HLA-DRB1*01 or HLA-DRB4 and results from exposure to external or endogenous factors triggering autoimmunity. Such factors have been demonstrated as able to induce autoimmunity in both animal models and humans via a variety of proposed mechanisms. In recent years, physicians have become more aware of the existence of ASIA syndrome and the relationship between adjuvants exposure and autoimmunity and more cases are being reported. Accordingly, we have created a registry that includes at present more than 300 ASIA syndrome cases that have been reported by different physicians worldwide, describing various autoimmune conditions induced by diverse adjuvants. In this review, we have summarized the updated literature on ASIA syndrome and the knowledge accumulated since 2013 in order to elucidate the association between the exposure to various adjuvant agents and its possible clinical manifestations. Furthermore, we especially referred to the relationship between ASIA syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and antiphospholipid syndrome (APS).

  16. Evidence Refuting the Existence of Autoimmune/Autoinflammatory Syndrome Induced by Adjuvants (ASIA)

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    Ameratunga, Rohan; Gillis, David; Gold, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune/autoinflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA) was described in 2011. Over time the condition and its triggers have broadened to include several autoimmune disorders, the macrophagic myofasciitis syndrome, the Gulf war syndrome, the sick building syndrome, siliconosis......, and the chronic fatigue syndrome. The aluminum-containing adjuvants in the hepatitis B vaccine and the human papillomavirus vaccine in particular have been stated to be the major causes of the disorder. Here, we review the specificity of the diagnostic criteria for ASIA. We also examine relevant human data...... pharmacoepidemiological study, in contrast to case series of ASIA, patients receiving aluminum-containing allergen IT preparations were shown to have a lower incidence of autoimmune disease. In another clinical trial, there were no increases in exacerbations in a cohort of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus...

  17. Autoimmune diseases induced by biological agents. A review of 12,731 cases (BIOGEAS Registry).

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    Pérez-De-Lis, Marta; Retamozo, Soledad; Flores-Chávez, Alejandra; Kostov, Belchin; Perez-Alvarez, Roberto; Brito-Zerón, Pilar; Ramos-Casals, Manuel

    2017-11-01

    Biological drugs are therapies designed to target a specific molecule of the immune system that have been linked with the development of autoimmune diseases. Areas covered: The BIOGEAS Registry currently collects information about nearly 13,000 reported cases of autoimmune diseases developed in patients exposed to biologics, including more than 50 different systemic and organ-specific autoimmune disorders, of which psoriasis (n=6375), inflammatory bowel disease (n=845), demyelinating CNS disease (n=803), interstitial lung disease (n=519) and lupus (n=369) were the most frequently reported. The main biologics involved were anti-TNF agents in 9133 cases (adalimumab in 4154, infliximab in 3078 and etanercept in 1681), immune checkpoint inhibitors in 913 (ipilimumab in 524 and nivolumab in 225), B-cell targeted therapies in 741 (rituximab in 678), and growth factor inhibitors in 549 cases (bevacizumab in 544). Even though targeting a particular immune molecule may be associated with an excellent clinical response in most patients, an unexpected autoimmune disease may arise in around 8 out of 10,000 exposed patients. Expert opinion: Following the increased use of biologics, the number and diversity of induced autoimmune diseases is increasing exponentially. Management of these disorders will be an increasing clinical challenge in the daily practice in the next years.

  18. Induction of autoimmunity through bystander effects. Lessons from immunological disorders induced by heavy metals.

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    Fournié, G J; Mas, M; Cautain, B; Savignac, M; Subra, J F; Pelletier, L; Saoudi, A; Lagrange, D; Calise, M; Druet, P

    2001-05-01

    Autoreactive T cells exist in healthy individuals and represent a potential reservoir of pathogenic effectors which, when stimulated by microbial adjuvants, could trigger an autoimmune disease. Experimental studies have indicated that xenobiotics, well defined from a chemical point of view, could promote the differentiation of autoreactive T cells towards a pathogenic pathway. It is therefore theoretically possible that compounds present in vaccines such as thiomersal or aluminium hydroxyde can trigger autoimmune reactions through bystander effects. Mercury and gold in rodents can induce immunological disorders with autoimmune reactions. In vitro, both activate signal transduction pathways that result in the expression of cytokines, particularly of IL-4 and IFNgamma. In a suitable microenvironment heavy metals could therefore favour the activation of autoreactive T cells. In that respect, genetic background is of major importance. Genome-wide searches in the rat have shown that overlapping chromosomal regions control the immunological disorders induced by gold salt treatment, the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and the CD45RC(high)/CD45RC(low)CD4(+)T cells balance. The identification and functional characterization of genes controlling these phenotypes may shed light on key regulatory mechanisms of immune responses. This should help to improve efficacy and safety of vaccines. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  19. Loss of Roquin induces early death and immune deregulation but not autoimmunity

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    Bertossi, Arianna; Aichinger, Martin; Sansonetti, Paola; Lech, Maciej; Neff, Frauke; Pal, Martin; Wunderlich, F. Thomas; Anders, Hans-Joachim; Klein, Ludger

    2011-01-01

    The substitution of one amino acid in the Roquin protein by the sanroque mutation induces a dramatic autoimmune syndrome in mice. This is believed to occur through ectopic expression of inducible T cell co-stimulator (ICOS) and unrestrained differentiation of follicular T helper cells, which induce spontaneous germinal center reactions to self-antigens. In this study, we demonstrate that tissue-specific ablation of Roquin in T or B cells, in the entire hematopoietic system, or in epithelial cells of transplanted thymi did not cause autoimmunity. Loss of Roquin induced elevated expression of ICOS through T cell–intrinsic and –extrinsic mechanisms, which itself was not sufficient to break self-tolerance. Instead, ablation of Roquin in the hematopoietic system caused defined changes in immune homeostasis, including the expansion of macrophages, eosinophils, and T cell subsets, most dramatically CD8 effector–like T cells, through cell-autonomous and nonautonomous mechanisms. Germline Roquin deficiency led to perinatal lethality, which was partially rescued on the genetic background of an outbred strain. However, not even complete absence of Roquin resulted in overt self-reactivity, suggesting that the sanroque mutation induces autoimmunity through an as yet unknown mechanism. PMID:21844204

  20. Autoimmune Syndrome Induced by Adjuvants (ASIA after Silicone Breast Augmentation Surgery

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    Daniel Nunes e Silva, MD

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Summary:. Generally, the main complications of silicone implantation are local symptoms. However, some patients develop late-onset systemic symptoms often associated with a rare form of hyperactive immune response, as part of a syndrome known as autoimmune syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA. Reported cases of ASIA have shown resolution with explantation, but not with immunomodulatory therapy. In this report, we described a case of a previously healthy 23-year-old woman, who has undergone silicone breast implant augmentation, for aesthetic reasons, and developed localized cutaneous impairment 3 years postsurgery. She received a diagnosis of ASIA with a new presentation: Lupus-like manifestation through localized cutaneous impairment. This patient’s symptoms were managed without the need for surgical intervention, which has not been previously reported, because the patient did not want an explantation for aesthetic reasons. The patient was started on hydroxychloroquine, 400 mg per day, and remains asymptomatic after 2 years of treatment. The exact predisposition to ASIA is still unknown. Without implant explantation and with immunomodulatory treatment, this patient’s condition substantially improved. Based on our current understanding of this disease, it might not be prudent to indicate breast augmentation with silicone implants in patients with documented autoimmune reaction to an adjuvant, an established autoimmune condition, or genetic predisposition. However, if a patient does develop silicone-induced ASIA, explantation is no longer the only successfully reported option, as these symptoms can be managed with immune suppression.

  1. [Ischemic stroke induced by a left atrial myxoma].

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    Hatayama, Sayaka; Ogata, Toshiyasu; Okawa, Masakazu; Higashi, Toshio; Inoue, Tooru; Takano, Koichi; Minematsu, Noritoshi; Tashiro, Tadashi; Sakata, Noriyuki

    2012-10-01

    We reported a case of ischemic stroke induced by a left atrial myxoma. A 76-year-old man was found unconscious and transferred to the emergency ward in our hospital. He experienced consciousness disturbance, motor dominant aphasia, and severe right hemiparesis. His neurological and radiological findings indicated that he had ischemic stroke and was eligible to undergo intravenous thrombolysis. Alteplase was administrated 155 min after the onset of stroke. Intracerebral hemorrhage was not seen 24h after thrombolysis. A tumor in the left atrium was detected on transthoracic echocardiography, and this finding suggested that the tumor was a myxoma. Although cardiac surgery was scheduled, hemorrhagic transformation was found on day 11, which made us postpone the surgery. After the hemorrhage was disappeared, the tumor was resected by open-heart surgery and it was confirmed to be a myxoma. Neither his neurological symptom nor intracerebral hemorrhage was not deteriorated after the operation. Thrombolytic treatment seemed a safe option for ischemic stroke caused by left atrial myxoma. However, we should carefully monitor the extent of anticoagulation therapy because hemorrhagic transformation might alter the timing of surgery for tumor resection.

  2. Predictors of the left ventricular dysfunction induced by ventricular arrhythmia

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    А. І. Vytryhovskiy

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The most powerful predictor of life-threatening arrhythmia risk is a combination of low heart rate variability with low ejection fraction (EF of the left ventricle. Aim. To identify predictors of left ventricle dysfunction which is induced by ventricular arrhythmia. Materials and methods. To diagnose structural changes of left ventricular functional capacity and reserves in patients with previous myocardial infarction and patients with high and very high cardiovascular risk by SCORE scale and for establishment the relationship between morphological heart changes and pathological phenomenon of heart turbulence echocardiography and study of heart rate turbulence variability were performed. 603 patients were selected for the research. All patients were divided into groups: group 1 – patients with coronary heart disease, but without associated risk factors, such as smoking, obesity, metabolic syndrome; group 2 – patients who smoke tobacco more than 2 years (very high cardiovascular risk by scale SCORE; group 3 – patients with metabolic syndrome without coronary heart disease or arterial hypertension (very high cardiovascular risk by scale SCORE. The control group consisted of 149 persons. Results. The feature of structural changes in patients with myocardial infarction and in patients with a high cardiovascular risk by SCORE with heart rate turbulence compared with cases without НRT is considerably thickening of the left interventricular septum in systole. Based on this, it can be argued that the emergence of ventricular arrhythmia and accordingly phenomenon of heart rate turbulence in patients with existing cardiovascular diseases and risk factors has both morphological and functional character. Significant difference of echocardioscopy parameters in patients with postinfarction cardiosclerosis and risk factors by the SCORE system was established by index of intraventricular septum thickness in systole, and in persons with high risk – in

  3. Interleukin-17 contributes to the pathogenesis of autoimmune hepatitis through inducing hepatic interleukin-6 expression.

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    Li Zhao

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available T helper cells that produce IL-17 (Th17 cells have recently been identified as the third distinct subset of effector T cells. Emerging data suggests that Th17 cells play an important role in the pathogenesis of many liver diseases by regulating innate immunity, adaptive immunity, and autoimmunity. In this study, we examine the role and mechanism of Th17 cells in the pathogenesis of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH. The serum levels of IL-17 and IL-23, as well as the frequency of IL-17+ cells in the liver, were significantly elevated in patients with AIH, compared to other chronic hepatitis and healthy controls. The hepatic expressions of IL-17, IL-23, ROR-γt, IL-6 and IL-1β in patients with AIH were also significantly increased and were associated with increased inflammation and fibrosis. IL-17 induces IL-6 expression via the MAPK signaling pathway in hepatocytes, which, in turn, may further stimulate Th17 cells and forms a positive feedback loop. In conclusion, Th17 cells are key effector T cells that regulate the pathogenesis of AIH, via induction of MAPK dependent hepatic IL-6 expression. Blocking the signaling pathway and interrupting the positive feedback loop are potential therapeutic targets for autoimmune hepatitis.

  4. Aromatase inhibitors induced autoimmune disorders in patients with breast cancer: A review

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    George Zarkavelis

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE is characterized by particular cutaneous manifestations such as non-scaring plaques mainly in sunlight exposed parts of the body along with specific serum autoantibodies (i.e. antinuclear antibodies (ANA, Ro/SSa, La/SSb. It is considered either idiopathic or drug induced. The role of chemotherapeutic agents in causing SCLE has been investigated with the taxanes being the most common anticancer agents. However, recent data emerging point toward antiestrogen therapies as a causative factor not only for SCLE but also for a variety of autoimmune disorders. This is a report of a case of a 42 year old woman who developed clinical manifestations of SCLE after letrozole treatment in whom remission of the cutaneous manifestations was noticed upon discontinuation of the drug. In addition, an extensive review of the English literature has been performed regarding the association of antiestrogen therapy with autoimmune disorders. In conclusion, Oncologists should be aware of the potential development of autoimmune reactions in breast cancer patients treated with aromatase inhibitors.

  5. Blockade of Extracellular ATP Effect by Oxidized ATP Effectively Mitigated Induced Mouse Experimental Autoimmune Uveitis (EAU.

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    Ronglan Zhao

    Full Text Available Various pathological conditions are accompanied by ATP release from the intracellular to the extracellular compartment. Extracellular ATP (eATP functions as a signaling molecule by activating purinergic P2 purine receptors. The key P2 receptor involved in inflammation was identified as P2X7R. Recent studies have shown that P2X7R signaling is required to trigger the Th1/Th17 immune response, and oxidized ATP (oxATP effectively blocks P2X7R activation. In this study we investigated the effect of oxATP on mouse experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU. Our results demonstrated that induced EAU in B6 mice was almost completely abolished by the administration of small doses of oxATP, and the Th17 response, but not the Th1 response, was significantly weakened in the treated mice. Mechanistic studies showed that the therapeutic effects involve the functional change of a number of immune cells, including dendritic cells (DCs, T cells, and regulatory T cells. OxATP not only directly inhibits the T cell response; it also suppresses T cell activation by altering the function of DCs and Foxp3+ T cell. Our results demonstrated that inhibition of P2X7R activation effectively exempts excessive autoimmune inflammation, which may indicate a possible therapeutic use in the treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  6. Interleukin-12 promotes activation of effector cells that induce a severe destructive granulomatous form of murine experimental autoimmune thyroiditis.

    OpenAIRE

    Braley-Mullen, H.; Sharp, G. C.; Tang, H.; Chen, K.; Kyriakos, M.; Bickel, J. T.

    1998-01-01

    Granulomatous inflammatory lesions are a major histopathological feature of a wide spectrum of human infectious and autoimmune diseases. Experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT) with granulomatous histopathological features can be induced by mouse thyroglobulin (MTg)-sensitized spleen cells activated in vitro with MTg and anti-interleukin-2 receptor (anti-IL-2R), anti-IL-2, or anti-interferon-gamma (anti-IFN-gamma) monoclonal antibody (MAb). These studies suggested that IFN-gamma-producing T...

  7. Autoimmune Hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with type 1 autoimmune hepatitis commonly have other autoimmune disorders, such as celiac disease, an autoimmune disease in ... 2 can also have any of the above autoimmune disorders. What are the symptoms of autoimmune hepatitis? The ...

  8. Hapten-Induced Contact Hypersensitivity, Autoimmune Reactions, and Tumor Regression: Plausibility of Mediating Antitumor Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan A. Erkes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Haptens are small molecule irritants that bind to proteins and elicit an immune response. Haptens have been commonly used to study allergic contact dermatitis (ACD using animal contact hypersensitivity (CHS models. However, extensive research into contact hypersensitivity has offered a confusing and intriguing mechanism of allergic reactions occurring in the skin. The abilities of haptens to induce such reactions have been frequently utilized to study the mechanisms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD to induce autoimmune-like responses such as autoimmune hemolytic anemia and to elicit viral wart and tumor regression. Hapten-induced tumor regression has been studied since the mid-1900s and relies on four major concepts: (1 ex vivo haptenation, (2 in situ haptenation, (3 epifocal hapten application, and (4 antigen-hapten conjugate injection. Each of these approaches elicits unique responses in mice and humans. The present review attempts to provide a critical appraisal of the hapten-mediated tumor treatments and offers insights for future development of the field.

  9. Arg deficiency does not influence the course of Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein (MOG35-55)-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Freja Aksel; Hulst, Camilla; Bäckström, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Background: Inhibition of Abl kinases has an ameliorating effect on the rodent model for multiple sclerosis, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, and arrests lymphocyte activation. The family of Abl kinases consists of the Abl1/Abl and Abl2/Arg tyrosine kinases. While the Abl kinase has been...... extensively studied in immune activation, roles for Arg are incompletely characterized. To investigate the role for Arg in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, we studied disease development in Arg-/- mice. Methods: Arg-/- and Arg+/+ mice were generated from breeding of Arg+/- mice on the C57BL/6...... skewing in the frequency of born Arg-/- mice. Loss of Arg function did not affect development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, but reduced the number of splenic B-cells in Arg-/- mice following immunization with MOG peptide. Conclusions: Development of MOG-induced experimental autoimmune...

  10. Dose-response study of thimerosal-induced murine systemic autoimmunity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Havarinasab, S.; Lambertsson, L.; Qvarnstroem, J.; Hultman, P.

    2004-01-01

    The organic compound ethylmercurithiosalicylate (thimerosal), which is primarily present in the tissues as ethylmercury, has caused illness and several deaths due to erroneous handling when used as a disinfectant or as a preservative in medical preparations. Lately, possible health effects of thimerosal in childhood vaccines have been much discussed. Thimerosal is a well-known sensitizing agent, although usually of no clinical relevance. In rare cases, thimerosal has caused systemic immune reactions including acrodynia. We have studied if thimerosal might induce the systemic autoimmune condition observed in genetically susceptible mice after exposure to inorganic mercury. A.SW mice were exposed to 1.25-40 mg thimerosal/l drinking water for 70 days. Antinucleolar antibodies, targeting the 34-kDa protein fibrillarin, developed in a dose-related pattern and first appeared after 10 days in the two highest dose groups. The lowest observed adverse effect level (LOAEL) for antifibrillarin antibodies was 2.5 mg thimerosal/l, corresponding to an absorbed dose of 147 μg Hg/kg bw and a concentration of 21 and 1.9 μg Hg/g in the kidney and lymph nodes, respectively. The same LOAEL was found for tissue immune-complex deposits. The total serum concentration of IgE, IgG1, and IgG2a showed a significant dose-related increase in thimerosal-treated mice, with a LOAEL of 5 mg thimerosal/l for IgG1 and IgE, and 20 mg thimerosal/l for IgG2a. The polyclonal B-cell activation showed a significant dose-response relationship with a LOAEL of 10 mg thimerosal/l. Therefore, thimerosal induces in genetically susceptible mice a systemic autoimmune syndrome very similar to that seen after treatment with inorganic mercury, although a higher absorbed dose of Hg is needed using thimerosal. The autoimmune syndrome induced by thimerosal is different from the weaker and more restricted autoimmune reaction observed after treatment with an equipotent dose of methylmercury

  11. Human amylin induces CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells in the protection from autoimmune diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Xi; Qiao, Yong-Chao; Li, Wan; Zou, Xia; Chen, Yin-Ling; Shen, Jian; Liao, Qin-Yuan; Zhang, Qiu-Jin; He, Lan; Zhao, Hai-Lu

    2018-02-01

    Autoimmune diabetes is a disorder of immune homeostasis that leads to targeted insulin-secreting islet β cell destruction characterized by insulitis. Human amylin (hA) is an important neuroendocrine hormone co-secreted with insulin by pancreatic β cells. Here, we report hA immune-modulatory action through inducing regulatory T cells. We ex vivo-treated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMCs) with hA for 24 h and counted CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Treg) using flow cytometry. Diabetic status was monitored and splenic Treg were measured in non-obese diabetic (NOD) male mice. NOD mice were intraperitoneally injected once daily with hA (n = 25) or solvent for control (n = 25) for 7 months continuously. Spleen tissues were collected at the end of intervention and processed for flow cytometry and Western blot. We found a 2.9-fold (p < 0.05) increase of CD4+Foxp3+ Treg in hPBMCs treated with 10 nmol/L hA compared with negative control. Incidence of diabetes in hA-treated NOD mice decreased 44% (p = 0.045) in the 6th month and 57% (p = 0.0002) in the 7th month. Meanwhile, the hA treatment induced a 1.5-fold increase of CD4+Foxp3+ Treg from mouse splenocytes (p = 0.0013). Expression of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4) were upregulated in hA-treated mice. Human amylin might protect against autoimmune diabetes via the induction of CD4+Foxp3+ Treg, which suggests a novel approach to improve autoimmune conditions.

  12. Mercuric chloride-induced autoimmunity in the brown Norway rat. Cellular kinetics and major histocompatibility complex antigen expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aten, J.; Bosman, C. B.; Rozing, J.; Stijnen, T.; Hoedemaeker, P. J.; Weening, J. J.

    1988-01-01

    HgCl2 induces an autoimmune syndrome in Brown Norway rats that involves synthesis of anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) antibodies and development of nephritis with high proteinuria. HgCl2-induced changes in the composition of leukocyte populations and in the expression of MHC antigens in

  13. Endogenous interleukin (IL)-17A promotes pristane-induced systemic autoimmunity and lupus nephritis induced by pristane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, S A; Odobasic, D; Khouri, M B; Steinmetz, O M; Yang, Y; Holdsworth, S R; Kitching, A R

    2014-06-01

    Interleukin (IL)-17A is increased both in serum and in kidney biopsies from patients with lupus nephritis, but direct evidence of pathogenicity is less well established. Administration of pristane to genetically intact mice results in the production of autoantibodies and proliferative glomerulonephritis, resembling human lupus nephritis. These studies sought to define the role of IL-17A in experimental lupus induced by pristane administration. Pristane was administered to wild-type (WT) and IL-17A(-/-) mice. Local and systemic immune responses were assessed after 6 days and 8 weeks, and autoimmunity, glomerular inflammation and renal injury were measured at 7 months. IL-17A production increased significantly 6 days after pristane injection, with innate immune cells, neutrophils (Ly6G(+)) and macrophages (F4/80(+)) being the predominant source of IL-17A. After 8 weeks, while systemic IL-17A was still readily detected in WT mice, the levels of proinflammatory cytokines, interferon (IFN)-γ and tumour necrosis factor (TNF) were diminished in the absence of endogenous IL-17A. Seven months after pristane treatment humoral autoimmunity was diminished in the absence of IL-17A, with decreased levels of immunoglobulin (Ig)G and anti-dsDNA antibodies. Renal inflammation and injury was less in the absence of IL-17A. Compared to WT mice, glomerular IgG, complement deposition, glomerular CD4(+) T cells and intrarenal expression of T helper type 1 (Th1)-associated proinflammatory mediators were decreased in IL-17A(-/-) mice. WT mice developed progressive proteinuria, but functional and histological renal injury was attenuated in the absence of IL-17A. Therefore, IL-17A is required for the full development of autoimmunity and lupus nephritis in experimental SLE, and early in the development of autoimmunity, innate immune cells produce IL-17A. © 2014 British Society for Immunology.

  14. Epitope-Specific Tolerance Modes Differentially Specify Susceptibility to Proteolipid Protein-Induced Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Immunization with myelin components can elicit experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE. EAE susceptibility varies between mouse strains, depending on the antigen employed. BL/6 mice are largely resistant to EAE induction with proteolipid protein (PLP, probably a reflection of antigen-specific tolerance. However, the extent and mechanism(s of tolerance to PLP remain unclear. Here, we identified three PLP epitopes in PLP-deficient BL/6 mice. PLP-sufficient mice did not respond against two of these, whereas tolerance was “leaky” for an epitope with weak predicted MHCII binding, and only this epitope was encephalitogenic. In TCR transgenic mice, the “EAE-susceptibility-associated” epitope was “ignored” by specific CD4 T cells, whereas the “resistance-associated” epitope induced clonal deletion and Treg induction in the thymus. Central tolerance was autoimmune regulator dependent and required expression and presentation of PLP by thymic epithelial cells (TECs. TEC-specific ablation of PLP revealed that peripheral tolerance, mediated by dendritic cells through recessive tolerance mechanisms (deletion and anergy, could largely compensate for a lack of central tolerance. However, adoptive EAE was exacerbated in mice lacking PLP in TECs, pointing toward a non-redundant role of the thymus in dominant tolerance to PLP. Our findings reveal multiple layers of tolerance to a central nervous system autoantigen that vary among epitopes and thereby specify disease susceptibility. Understanding how different modalities of tolerance apply to distinct T cell epitopes of a target in autoimmunity has implications for antigen-specific strategies to therapeutically interfere with unwanted immune reactions against self.

  15. A Tandem Repeat in Decay Accelerating Factor 1 Is Associated with Severity of Murine Mercury-Induced Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M. Cauvi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Decay accelerating factor (DAF, a complement-regulatory protein, protects cells from bystander complement-mediated lysis and negatively regulates T cells. Reduced expression of DAF occurs in several systemic autoimmune diseases including systemic lupus erythematosus, and DAF deficiency exacerbates disease in several autoimmune models, including murine mercury-induced autoimmunity (mHgIA. Daf1, located within Hmr1, a chromosome 1 locus associated in DBA/2 mice with resistance to mHgIA, could be a candidate. Here we show that reduced Daf1 transcription in lupus-prone mice was not associated with a reduction in the Daf1 transcription factor SP1. Studies of NZB mice congenic for the mHgIA-resistant DBA/2 Hmr1 locus suggested that Daf1 expression was controlled by the host genome and not the Hmr1 locus. A unique pentanucleotide repeat variant in the second intron of Daf1 in DBA/2 mice was identified and shown in F2 intercrosses to be associated with less severe disease; however, analysis of Hmr1 congenics indicated that this most likely reflected the presence of autoimmunity-predisposing genetic variants within the Hmr1 locus or that Daf1 expression is mediated by the tandem repeat in epistasis with other genetic variants present in autoimmune-prone mice. These studies argue that the effect of DAF on autoimmunity is complex and may require multiple genetic elements.

  16. Genetic disassociation of autoimmunity and resistance to costimulation blockade-induced transplantation tolerance in nonobese diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Todd; Markees, Thomas G; Serreze, David V; Pierce, Melissa A; Marron, Michele P; Wicker, Linda S; Peterson, Laurence B; Shultz, Leonard D; Mordes, John P; Rossini, Aldo A; Greiner, Dale L

    2003-07-01

    Curing type 1 diabetes by islet transplantation requires overcoming both allorejection and recurrent autoimmunity. This has been achieved with systemic immunosuppression, but tolerance induction would be preferable. Most islet allotransplant tolerance induction protocols have been tested in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice, and most have failed. Failure has been attributed to the underlying autoimmunity, assuming that autoimmunity and resistance to transplantation tolerance have a common basis. Out of concern that NOD biology could be misleading in this regard, we tested the hypothesis that autoimmunity and resistance to transplantation tolerance in NOD mice are distinct phenotypes. Unexpectedly, we observed that (NOD x C57BL/6)F(1) mice, which have no diabetes, nonetheless resist prolongation of skin allografts by costimulation blockade. Further analyses revealed that the F(1) mice shared the dendritic cell maturation defects and abnormal CD4(+) T cell responses of the NOD but had lost its defects in macrophage maturation and NK cell activity. We conclude that resistance to allograft tolerance induction in the NOD mouse is not a direct consequence of overt autoimmunity and that autoimmunity and resistance to costimulation blockade-induced transplantation tolerance phenotypes in NOD mice can be dissociated genetically. The outcomes of tolerance induction protocols tested in NOD mice may not accurately predict outcomes in human subjects.

  17. Induced KCNQ1 autoimmunity accelerates cardiac repolarization in rabbits: potential significance in arrhythmogenesis and antiarrhythmic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin; Maguy, Ange; Duverger, James Elber; Vigneault, Patrick; Comtois, Philippe; Shi, Yanfen; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Thomas, Dierk; Nattel, Stanley

    2014-11-01

    Autoantibodies directed against various cardiac receptors have been implicated in cardiomyopathy and heart rhythm disturbances. In a previous study among patients with dilated cardiomyopathy, autoantibodies targeting the cardiac voltage-gated KCNQ1 K(+) channel were associated with shortened corrected QT intervals (QTc). However, the electrophysiologic actions of KCNQ1 autoimmunity have not been assessed experimentally in a direct fashion. The purpose of this study was to investigate the cardiac electrophysiologic effects of KCNQ1 autoantibody production induced by vaccination in a rabbit model. Rabbits were immunized with KCNQ1 channel peptide. ECG recordings were obtained during a 1-month follow-up period. Rabbits then underwent in vivo electrophysiologic study, after which cardiomyocytes were isolated for analysis of slow delayed rectifier current (IKs) and action potential properties via patch-clamp. KCNQ1-immunized rabbits exhibited shortening of QTc compared to sham-immunized controls. Reduced ventricular effective refractory periods and increased susceptibility to ventricular tachyarrhythmia induction were noted in KCNQ1-immunized rabbits upon programmed ventricular stimulation. Action potential durations were shortened in cardiomyocytes isolated from KCNQ1-immunized rabbits compared to the sham group. IKs step and tail current densities were enhanced after KCNQ1 immunization. Functional and structural changes of the heart were not observed. The potential therapeutic significance of KCNQ1 immunization was then explored in a dofetilide-induced long QT rabbit model. KCNQ1 immunization prevented dofetilide-induced QTc prolongation and attenuated long QT-related arrhythmias. Induction of KCNQ1 autoimmunity accelerates cardiac repolarization and increases susceptibility to ventricular tachyarrhythmia induction through IKs enhancement. On the other hand, vaccination against KCNQ1 ameliorates drug-induced QTc prolongation and might be useful therapeutically to

  18. Novel biomarkers of mercury-induced autoimmune dysfunction: a Cross-sectional study in Amazonian Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motts, Jonathan A.; Shirley, Devon L.; Silbergeld, Ellen K.; Nyland, Jennifer F.

    2014-01-01

    Mercury is an ubiquitous environmental contaminant, causing both neurotoxicity and immunotoxicity. Given its ability to amalgamate gold, mercury is frequently used in small-scale artisanal gold mining. We have previously reported that elevated serum titers of antinuclear autoantibodies (ANA) are associated with mercury exposures of miners in gold mining. The goal of this project was to identify novel serum biomarkers of mercury-induced immunotoxicity and autoimmune dysregulation. We conducted an analysis of serum samples from a cross-sectional epidemiological study on miners working in Amazonian Brazil. In proteomic screening analyses, samples were stratified based on mercury concentrations and ANA titer and a subset of serum samples (N=12) were profiled using Immune Response Biomarker Profiling ProtoArray protein microarray for elevated autoantibodies. Of the up-regulated autoantibodies in the mercury-exposed cohort, potential target autoantibodies were selected based on relevance to pro-inflammatory and macrophage activation pathways. ELISAs were developed to test the entire sample cohort (N=371) for serum titers to the highest of these autoantibodies (anti-glutathione S-transferase alpha, GSTA1) identified in the high mercury/high ANA group. We found positive associations between elevated mercury exposure and up-regulated serum titers of 3760 autoantibodies as identified by ProtoArray. Autoantibodies identified as potential novel biomarkers of mercury-induced immunotoxicity include antibodies to the following proteins: GSTA1, tumor necrosis factor ligand superfamily member 13, linker for activation of T cells, signal peptide peptidase like 2B, stimulated by retinoic acid 13, and interferon induced transmembrane protein. ELISA analyses confirmed that mercury-exposed gold miners had significantly higher serum titers of anti-GSTA1 autoantibody [unadjusted odds ratio = 89.6; 95% confidence interval: 27.2, 294.6] compared to emerald miners (referent population

  19. Proteome Dynamics in Biobanked Horse Peripheral Blood Derived Lymphocytes (PBL) with Induced Autoimmune Uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauck, Stefanie M; Lepper, Marlen F; Hertl, Michael; Sekundo, Walter; Deeg, Cornelia A

    2017-10-01

    Equine recurrent uveitis is the only spontaneous model for recurrent autoimmune uveitis in humans, where T cells target retinal proteins. Differences between normal and autoaggressive lymphocytes were identified in this study by analyzing peripheral blood derived lymphocytes (PBL) proteomes from the same case with interphotoreceptor retinoid binding protein induced uveitis sampled before (Day 0), during (Day 15), and after uveitic attack (Day 23). Relative protein abundances of PBL were investigated in a quantitative, label-free differential proteome analysis in cells that were kept frozen for 14 years since the initial experiment. Quantitative data could be acquired for 2632 proteins at all three time points. Profound changes (≥2-fold change) in PBL protein abundance were observed when comparing Day 0 with 15, representing acute inflammation (1070 regulated proteins) and Day 0 with 23 (cessation; 1571 regulated). Significant differences applied to proteins with functions in integrin signaling during active uveitis, involving "Erk and pi-3 kinase are necessary for collagen binding in corneal epithelia," "integrins in angiogenesis," and "integrin-linked kinase signaling" pathways. In contrast, at cessation of uveitic attack, significantly changed proteins belonged to pathways of "nongenotropic androgen signaling," "classical complement pathway," and "Amb2 integrin signaling." Several members of respective pathways were earlier shown to be changed in naturally occurring uveitis, underscoring the significance of these findings here and proofing the value of the induced model in mimicking spontaneous autoimmune uveitis. All MS data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange consortium via the PRIDE partner repository (dataset identifier PXD005580). © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. RAE-1 expression is induced during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and is correlated with microglia cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djelloul, Mehdi; Popa, Natalia; Pelletier, Florence; Raguénez, Gilda; Boucraut, José

    2016-11-01

    Retinoic acid early induced transcript-1 (RAE-1) glycoproteins are ligands of the activating immune receptor NKG2D. They are known as stress molecules induced in pathological conditions. We previously reported that progenitor cells express RAE-1 in physiological conditions and we described a correlation between RAE-1 expression and cell proliferation. In addition, we showed that Raet1 transcripts are induced in the spinal cord of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mice. EAE is a model for multiple sclerosis which is accompanied by microglia proliferation and activation, recruitment of immune cells and neurogenesis. We herein studied the time course expression of the two members of the Raet1 gene family present in C57BL/6 mice, namely Raet1d and Raet1e, in the spinal cord during EAE. We report that Raet1d and Raet1e genes are induced early upon EAE onset and reach a maximal expression at the peak of the pathology. We show that myeloid cells, i.e. macrophages as well as microglia, are cellular sources of Raet1 transcripts. We also demonstrate that only Raet1d expression is induced in microglia, whereas macrophages expressed both Raet1d and Raet1e. Furthermore, we investigated the dynamics of RAE-1 expression in microglia cultures. RAE-1 induction correlated with cell proliferation but not with M1/M2 phenotypic orientation. We finally demonstrate that macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) is a major factor controlling RAE-1 expression in microglia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase and Aberrant Germinal Center Selection in the Development of Humoral Autoimmunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaheen, Ahmad; Martin, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Humoral immunity, which is the branch of the immune system governed by B cells, protects the body from extracellular pathogens through the secretion of immunoglobulins. Given the unpredictability of exogenous antigens, B cells must be accommodating to numerous genetic alterations to mold immunoglobulin specificity to recognize offending pathogens. Abnormalities in this process leave the host susceptible to permanent pathological modifications and in particular humoral autoimmunities in which secreted immunoglobulins mistake host proteins as pathogenic targets. Underlying the development of self-reactive immunoglobulins is activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), a mutagenic enzyme responsible for modifying the specificity of B cells by producing point mutations at the immunoglobulin gene locus. Ideally, these mutations result in an increased affinity for exogenous antigens. However, in pathological scenarios, these mutations produce or enhance a B cell's ability to target the host. AID-induced mutations occur in the germinal center microenvironment of peripheral lymphoid tissue, where pathogenic B-cell clones must evade overwhelming selection pressures to be released systemically. Recent research has revealed numerous genes and pathways responsible for eliminating self-reactive clones within the germinal center. On the basis of these studies, this review aims to clarify the link between AID and the generation of pathogenic immunoglobulins. Furthermore, it describes the selective pressures that pathogenic B cells must bypass within the germinal center to secrete immunoglobulins that ultimately result in disease. PMID:21281778

  2. Experimental autoimmune keratitis induced in rats by anti-cornea T-cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, C.; Mor, F.; Kipp, J. B.; de Vos, A. F.; van der Gaag, R.; Cohen, I. R.

    1999-01-01

    Idiopathic inflammation of the cornea, keratitis, has been proposed to result from an autoimmune process, but thus far no convenient animal model of keratitis exists. An attempt was made to establish an animal model for keratitis, to investigate possible autoimmune mechanisms. T-cell lines were

  3. Differential RNA Expression Profile of Skeletal Muscle Induced by Experimental Autoimmune Myasthenia Gravis in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Kaminski

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The differential susceptibility of skeletal muscle by myasthenia gravis (MG is not well understood. We utilized RNA expression profiling of extraocular muscle (EOM, diaphragm (DIA, and extensor digitorum (EDL of rats with experimental autoimmune MG (EAMG to evaluate the hypothesis that muscles respond differentially to injury produced by EAMG. EAMG was induced in female Lewis rats by immunization with acetylcholine receptor purified from the electric organ of the Torpedo. Six weeks later after rats had developed weakness and serum antibodies directed against the AChR, animals underwent euthanasia and RNA profiling performed on DIA, EDL, and EOM. Profiling results were validated by qPCR. Across the three muscles between the experiment and control groups, three hundred and fifty-nine probes (1.16% with greater than 2 fold changes in expression in 7 of 9 series pairwise comparisons from 31,090 probes were identified with approximately two-thirds being increased. The three muscles shared 16 genes with increased expression and 6 reduced expression. Functional annotation demonstrated that these common expression changes fell predominantly into categories of metabolism, stress response, and signaling. Evaluation of specific gene function indicated that EAMG led to a change to oxidative metabolism. Genes related to muscle regeneration and suppression of immune response were activated. Evidence of a differential immune response among muscles was not evident. Each muscle had a distinct RNA profile but with commonality in gene categories expressed that are focused on muscle repair, moderation of inflammation, and oxidative metabolism.

  4. Serum Neuroinflammatory Disease-Induced Central Nervous System Proteins Predict Clinical Onset of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itay Raphael

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available There is an urgent need in multiple sclerosis (MS patients to develop biomarkers and laboratory tests to improve early diagnosis, predict clinical relapses, and optimize treatment responses. In healthy individuals, the transport of proteins across the blood–brain barrier (BBB is tightly regulated, whereas, in MS, central nervous system (CNS inflammation results in damage to neuronal tissues, disruption of BBB integrity, and potential release of neuroinflammatory disease-induced CNS proteins (NDICPs into CSF and serum. Therefore, changes in serum NDICP abundance could serve as biomarkers of MS. Here, we sought to determine if changes in serum NDICPs are detectable prior to clinical onset of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE and, therefore, enable prediction of disease onset. Importantly, we show in longitudinal serum specimens from individual mice with EAE that pre-onset expression waves of synapsin-2, glutamine synthetase, enolase-2, and synaptotagmin-1 enable the prediction of clinical disease with high sensitivity and specificity. Moreover, we observed differences in serum NDICPs between active and passive immunization in EAE, suggesting hitherto not appreciated differences for disease induction mechanisms. Our studies provide the first evidence for enabling the prediction of clinical disease using serum NDICPs. The results provide proof-of-concept for the development of high-confidence serum NDICP expression waves and protein biomarker candidates for MS.

  5. The influence of genetic predisposition and autoimmune hepatitis inducing antigens in disease development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardtke-Wolenski, Matthias; Dywicki, Janine; Fischer, Katja; Hapke, Martin; Sievers, Maren; Schlue, Jerome; Anderson, Mark S; Taubert, Richard; Noyan, Fatih; Manns, Michael P; Jaeckel, Elmar

    2017-03-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is defined as a chronic liver inflammation with loss of tolerance against hepatocytes. The etiology and pathophysiology of AIH are still poorly understood because reliable animal models are limited. Therefore, we recently introduced a model of experimental murine AIH by a self-limited adenoviral infection with the AIH type 2 antigen formiminotransferase cyclodeaminase (FTCD). We could demonstrate that break of humoral tolerance towards liver specific autoantigens like FTCD and cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) is not dependent on the genetic background. However, the development of AIH in autoantibody positive animals is determined by genetic background genes. We could also show that the break of humoral tolerance is necessary but not sufficient for the development of AIH. In contrast the break of tolerance against the ubiquitously expressed nuclear antigens (ANAs) is strictly dependent on genetic predisposition. Priming with the UGA suppressor tRNA-associated protein (soluble liver antigen; SLA) is a strong inducer of ANA reactivity, but not sufficient to cause AIH development thereby questioning the importance of anti-SLA immune response as an important driver in AIH. Monogenetic mutations such as Aire-deficiency can cause AIH in otherwise genetically resistant strains. The results have important implications for our understanding of the pathophysiology of AIH development and for the interpretation of humoral antibody responses in AIH. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Left Ventricular Systolic Dysfunction Induced by Ventricular Ectopy: a Novel Model for PVC-induced Cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huizar, Jose F.; Kaszala, Karoly; Potfay, Jonathan; Minisi, Anthony J.; Lesnefsky, Edward J.; Abbate, Antonio; Mezzaroma, Eleonora; Chen, Qun; Kukreja, Rakesh C.; Hoke, Nicholas N.; Thacker, Leroy R.; Ellenbogen, Kenneth A.; Wood, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) commonly coexist with cardiomyopathy. Recently, PVCs have been identified as possible cause of cardiomyopathy. We developed a PVC-induced cardiomyopathy animal model using a novel premature pacing algorithm to assess timeframe and reversibility of this cardiomyopathy and examine the associated histopathological abnormalities. Methods and Results Thirteen mongrel dogs were implanted with a specially programmed pacemaker capable of simulating ventricular extrasystoles. Animals were randomly assigned to either 12 weeks of bigeminal PVCs (n=7) or no PVCs (control, n=6). Continuous 24-hr Holter corroborated ventricular bigeminy in the PVC group (PVC 49.8% vs. control PVC group developed cardiomyopathy with a significant reduction in left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (PVC 39.7±5.4% vs. control 60.7±3.8%, PPVC 33.3±3.5mm vs. control 23.7±3.6mm, PPVC group. PVC-induced cardiomyopathy was resolved within 2-4 weeks after discontinuation of PVCs. No inflammation, fibrosis, or changes in apoptosis and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation were observed with PVC-induced cardiomyopathy. Conclusions This novel PVC animal model demonstrates that frequent PVCs alone can induce a reversible form of cardiomyopathy in otherwise structurally normal hearts. PVC-induced CM lacks gross histopathological and mitochondrial abnormalities seen in other canine models of CM. PMID:21576277

  7. Bioinformatics analysis of the factors controlling type I IFN gene expression in autoimmune disease and virus-induced immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di eFeng

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and Sjögren's syndrome (SS display increased levels of type I IFN-induced genes. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDCs are natural interferon producing cells and considered to be a primary source of IFN-α in these two diseases. Differential expression patterns of type I IFN inducible transcripts can be found in different immune cell subsets and in patients with both active and inactive autoimmune disease. A type I IFN gene signature generally consists of three groups of IFN-induced genes - those regulated in response to virus-induced type I IFN, those regulated by the IFN-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular-regulated kinase (MAPK/ERK pathway, and those by the IFN-induced phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI-3K pathway. These three groups of type I IFN-regulated genes control important cellular processes such as apoptosis, survival, adhesion, and chemotaxis, that when dysregulated, contribute to autoimmunity. With the recent generation of large datasets in the public domain from next-generation sequencing and DNA microarray experiments, one can perform detailed analyses of cell type-specific gene signatures as well as identify distinct transcription factors that differentially regulate these gene signatures. We have performed bioinformatics analysis of data in the public domain and experimental data from our lab to gain insight into the regulation of type I IFN gene expression. We have found that the genetic landscape of the IFNA and IFNB genes are occupied by transcription factors, such as insulators CTCF and cohesin, that negatively regulate transcription, as well as IRF5 and IRF7, that positively and distinctly regulate IFNA subtypes. A detailed understanding of the factors controlling type I IFN gene transcription will significantly aid in the identification and development of new therapeutic strategies targeting the IFN pathway in autoimmune disease.

  8. Immune cell-derived c3 is required for autoimmune diabetes induced by multiple low doses of streptozotocin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Marvin; Yin, Na; Murphy, Barbara; Medof, M Edward; Segerer, Stephan; Heeger, Peter S; Schröppel, Bernd

    2010-09-01

    The complement system contributes to autoimmune injury, but its involvement in promoting the development of autoimmune diabetes is unknown. In this study, our goal was to ascertain the role of complement C3 in autoimmune diabetes. Susceptibility to diabetes development after multiple low-dose streptozotocin treatment in wild-type (WT) and C3-deficient mice was analyzed. Bone marrow chimeras, luminex, and quantitative reverse transcription PCR assays were performed to evaluate the phenotypic and immunologic impact of C3 in the development of this diabetes model. Coincident with the induced elevations in blood glucose levels, we documented alternative pathway complement component gene expression within the islets of the diabetic WT mice. When we repeated the experiments with C3-deficient mice, we observed complete resistance to disease, as assessed by the absence of histologic insulitis and the absence of T-cell reactivity to islet antigens. Studies of WT chimeras bearing C3-deficient bone marrow cells showed that bone marrow cell-derived C3, and not serum C3, is involved in the induction of diabetes in this model. The data reveal a key role for immune cell-derived C3 in the pathogenesis of murine multiple low-dose streptozotocin-induced diabetes and support the concept that immune cell mediated diabetes is in part complement-dependent.

  9. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia induced by anti-PD-1 therapy in metastatic melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Benjamin Y; Micklethwaite, Kenneth P; Swaminathan, Sanjay; Kefford, Richard F; Carlino, Matteo S

    2016-04-01

    We report the occurrence of autoimmune hemolytic anemia in a patient receiving the anti-PD-1 monoclonal antibody, nivolumab, for metastatic melanoma in the presence of known red cell alloantibodies, despite having received prior ipilimumab without evidence of hemolysis. The patient had a history of multiple red cell alloantibodies and a positive direct antiglobulin test, identified at the time of a prior transfusion, which occurred before treatment with ipilimumab. The patient developed symptomatic warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia after four cycles of treatment with nivolumab. Clinical improvement was noted following cessation of the drug and treatment with corticosteroids. Given that there was no prior history of hemolysis, even during treatment with ipilimumab, we hypothesize that anti-PD-1 therapy disrupted peripheral tolerance, unmasking an underlying autoimmune predisposition.

  10. Insulin autoimmune syndrome induced by methimazole in a Korean girl with Graves' disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Hee Lee

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypoglycemia was detected in a 15-year-old girl due to loss of consciousness. She was diagnosed with Graves' disease and was being treated with methimazole for the past 4 months. A paradoxically increased insulin levels was found when she suffered from the hypoglycemic episode. An imaging study showed no mass lesion in the pancreas, and insulin antibodies were found in the serum. She was diagnosed with insulin autoimmune syndrome. Her HLA typing was performed, and it revealed HLA-DRB1 *04:06. The patient was treated with a corticosteroid for 2 months. After discontinuing the steroid, the insulin antibody titer decreased dramatically, and she did not have any episode of hypoglycemia since. This is the first report of insulin autoimmune syndrome in a Korean girl, and we have revealed the connection between HLA type and insulin autoimmune syndrome in Korea.

  11. Maturation, reactivity and therapy induced changes of memory T-cells in rheumatic autoimmune diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fritsch, R.D.E.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis covers different aspects of CD4+T-cells (maturational pathway, auto-reactive potential and differential reaction to glucocorticoid-therapy) in two auto-immune diseases: systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and Rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Immunological memory is important for an adequate

  12. Infections that induce autoimmune diabetes in BBDR rats modulate CD4(+)CD25(+) T cell populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zipris, D; Hillebrands, JL; Welsh, RM; Rozing, J; Xie, JX; Mordes, JP; Greiner, DL; Rossini, AA

    2003-01-01

    Viruses are believed to contribute to the pathogenesis of autoimmune type 1A diabetes in humans. This pathogenic process can be modeled in the BBDR rat, which develops pancreatic insulitis and type 1A-like diabetes after infection with Kilham's rat virus (RV). The mechanism is unknown, but does not

  13. Development of Autoimmune Overt Hypothyroidism Is Highly Associated With Live Births and Induced Abortions but Only in Premenopausal Women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carle, Allan; Pedersen, Inge Buelow; Knudsen, Nils

    2014-01-01

    replacement therapy, also taking various possible confounders into account. Results: In multivariate regression models with no event as reference, the odds ratios (ORs) for hypothyroidism [95% confidence interval (CI)] after one/two/three or more live births were 1.72 (0.56-5.32)/3.12 (1.14-8.48)/4.51 (1......: In conditional multivariate logistic regression models, we analyzed the associations between the development of autoimmune hypothyroidism and age at menarche/menopause, years of menstruations, pregnancies, spontaneous and induced abortions, live births, and years on oral contraceptives and postmenopausal hormone...

  14. Autoimmune disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000816.htm Autoimmune disorders To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. An autoimmune disorder occurs when the body's immune system attacks and ...

  15. AUTOIMMUNE HEPATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusri Dianne Jurnalis

    2010-05-01

    ; Aetiopathogenesis; Lymphocyte disease; Cellular immune attack; Histocompatibility lymphocyte antigen, Immunosuppressive therapy, Cyclosporine, transplantasi hatiAbstractAutoimmune hepatitis is a severe and inflammatory disease of the liver of unknown etiology carrying high morbidity and mortality. All ages and genders are concerned with a peak of incidence in girls in prepubertal age, even if the diseaseTINJAUAN PUSTAKA2has been diagnosed as early as 6 months. Autoimmune hepatitis may be classified in two major subgroups on a presence of a specific set of autoantibodies: smooth muscle antibody (SMA mostly with anti-actin specificity and/or by antinuclear antibody (ANA in type 1 and liver-kidney microsome antibody (LKM1 and/or the anti-liver cytosol in type 2. The histological hallmark is “interface hepatitis”, with a mononuclear cell infiltrate in the portal tracts, variable degrees of necrosis, and progressive fibrosis. The disease follows a chronic but fluctuating course usually progressing to cirrhosis and liver failure.The most frequent type onset is similar to that of an acute viral hepatitis with acute liver failure in some patients; about a third of patients have an insidious onset with progressive fatigue and jaundice while 10-15% are asymptomatic and are accidentally discovered by the finding of hepatomegaly and/or an increase of serum aminotransferase activity. There is a female predominance in both. LKM1-positive patients tend to present more acutely, at a younger age, and commonly have immunoglobulin A (IgA deficiency, while duration of symptoms before diagnosis, clinical signs, family history of autoimmunity, presence of associated autoimmune disorders, response to treatment and long-term prognosis are similar in both groups.Corticosteroids alone or in conjunction with azathioprine are the treatment of choice inducing remission in over 90% of patients. An alternative therapeutic strategy is cyclosporine. Withdrawal of immunosuppression is associated with high risk

  16. Protective effects of Punica granatum (pomegranate) peel extract on concanavalin A-induced autoimmune hepatitis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tingting; Men, Ruoting; Hu, Mingxing; Fan, Xiaoli; Yang, Xiaoxue; Huang, Xiaojun; Ye, Tinghong; Yang, Li

    2018-04-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a chronic inflammatory liver disease of an unknown etiology, glucocorticoid therapy is currently recognized as an effective treatment for AIH, but conventional application and patient compliance are both hindered by its side effects. The exploration of the AIH pathogenesis and the searching for the new candidate drugs that exert potential activity and low toxicity are urgently needed. Pomegranate peel extract (PoPx) is a natural extract of Punica granatum and has been reported to have anti-inflammatory and antioxidative properties. The present study aimed to clarify the effect of PoPx on the concanavalin A (ConA)-induced autoimmune hepatitis in a mouse model that is well established at 12h after tail vein injection with a dose of 20 mg/kg of ConA. C57BL/6 female mice were pretreated with PoPx (250 mg/kg, once daily for 3 days) followed by a ConA challenge. Pretreatment with PoPx significantly alleviated ConA-induced liver injury by down-regulating the levels of plasma alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST) and cytokine, including TNF-α, interferon (IFN) -γ and interleukin (IL)-6. Moreover, liver hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining displayed a lighter inflammatory infiltration around the portal area in the PoPx-pretreated mice. In addition, the flow cytometry (FCM) data showed that the immune response in the liver was died down in the PoPx-pretreated condition. Specially, pretreatment with PoPx reduced the infiltration of activated CD4 + and CD8 + T cells in the liver. Taken together, these findings contributed to a better understanding of the actions of PoPx against acute AIH and indicated that PoPx might be a potential compound in treating T cell-mediated autoimmune liver injury. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Galectin-3 in autoimmunity and autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Felipe L; Gatto, Mariele; Bassi, Nicola; Luisetto, Roberto; Ghirardello, Anna; Punzi, Leonardo; Doria, Andrea

    2015-08-01

    Galectin-3 (gal-3) is a β-galactoside-binding lectin, which regulates cell-cell and extracellular interactions during self/non-self-antigen recognition and cellular activation, proliferation, differentiation, migration and apoptosis. It plays a significant role in cellular and tissue pathophysiology by organizing niches that drive inflammation and immune responses. Gal-3 has some therapeutic potential in several diseases, including chronic inflammatory disorders, cancer and autoimmune diseases. Gal-3 exerts a broad spectrum of functions which differs according to its intra- or extracellular localization. Recombinant gal-3 strategy has been used to identify potential mode of action of gal-3; however, exogenous gal-3 may not reproduce the functions of the endogenous gal-3. Notably, gal-3 induces monocyte-macrophage differentiation, interferes with dendritic cell fate decision, regulates apoptosis on T lymphocytes and inhibits B-lymphocyte differentiation into immunoglobulin secreting plasma cells. Considering the influence of these cell populations in the pathogenesis of several autoimmune diseases, gal-3 seems to play a role in development of autoimmunity. Gal-3 has been suggested as a potential therapeutic agent in patients affected with some autoimmune disorders. However, the precise role of gal-3 in driving the inflammatory process in autoimmune or immune-mediated disorders remains elusive. Here, we reviewed the involvement of gal-3 in cellular and tissue events during autoimmune and immune-mediated inflammatory diseases. © 2015 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  18. Auto-immune thyroid dysfunction induced by tyrosine kinase inhibitors in a patient with recurrent chordoma

    OpenAIRE

    Eroukhmanoff, Juliette; Castinetti, Frederic; Penel, Nicolas; Salas, Sebastien

    2016-01-01

    Background While hypothyroidism has frequently been reported with the use of TKIs, the thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) suppressing effect of TKIs is rare, except for thyroiditis. We describe a case with progressive recurrent chordoma who initially became hyperthyroid in a context of autoimmunity under sorafenib treatment and later under imatinib treatment. Case presentation A 57-year-old man with lumbar chordoma began daily treatment of 800?mg sorafenib. He did not have any other medication...

  19. The lactic acid bacterium Pediococcus acidilactici suppresses autoimmune encephalomyelitis by inducing IL-10-producing regulatory T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazushiro Takata

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Certain intestinal microflora are thought to regulate the systemic immune response. Lactic acid bacteria are one of the most studied bacteria in terms of their beneficial effects on health and autoimmune diseases; one of which is Multiple sclerosis (MS which affects the central nervous system. We investigated whether the lactic acid bacterium Pediococcus acidilactici, which comprises human commensal bacteria, has beneficial effects on experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, an animal model of MS. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: P. acidilactici R037 was orally administered to EAE mice to investigate the effects of R037. R037 treatment suppressed clinical EAE severity as prophylaxis and therapy. The antigen-specific production of inflammatory cytokines was inhibited in R037-treated mice. A significant increase in the number of CD4(+ Interleukin (IL-10-producing cells was observed in the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs and spleens isolated from R037-treated naive mice, while no increase was observed in the number of these cells in the lamina propria. Because only a slight increase in the CD4(+Foxp3(+ cells was observed in MLNs, R037 may primarily induce Foxp3(- IL10-producing T regulatory type 1 (Tr1 cells in MLNs, which contribute to the beneficial effect of R037 on EAE. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: An orally administered single strain of P. acidilactici R037 ameliorates EAE by inducing IL10-producing Tr1 cells. Our findings indicate the therapeutic potential of the oral administration of R037 for treating multiple sclerosis.

  20. Repulsive Guidance Molecule-a Is Involved in Th17-Cell-Induced Neurodegeneration in Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shogo Tanabe

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by inflammation, demyelination, and neurodegeneration in the CNS. Although it is important to prevent neurodegeneration for alleviating neurological disability, the molecular mechanism of neurodegeneration remains largely unknown. Here, we report that repulsive guidance molecule-a (RGMa, known to regulate axonal growth, is associated with neurodegeneration in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, a mouse model of MS. RGMa is highly expressed in interleukin-17-producing CD4+ T cells (Th17 cells. We induced EAE by adoptive transfer of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG-specific Th17 cells and then inhibited RGMa with a neutralizing antibody. Inhibition of RGMa improves EAE scores and reduces neuronal degeneration without altering immune or glial responses. Th17 cells induce cultured cortical neuron death through RGMa-neogenin and Akt dephosphorylation. Our results demonstrate that RGMa is involved in Th17-cell-mediated neurodegeneration and that RGMa-specific antibody may have a therapeutic effect in MS.

  1. Anatomy and Physiology of Left Ventricular Suction Induced by Rotary Blood Pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamonsen, Robert Francis; Lim, Einly; Moloney, John; Lovell, Nigel Hamilton; Rosenfeldt, Franklin L

    2015-08-01

    This study in five large greyhound dogs implanted with a VentrAssist left ventricular assist device focused on identification of the precise site and physiological changes induced by or underlying the complication of left ventricular suction. Pressure sensors were placed in left and right atria, proximal and distal left ventricle, and proximal aorta while dual perivascular and tubing ultrasonic flow meters measured blood flow in the aortic root and pump outlet cannula. When suction occurred, end-systolic pressure gradients between proximal and distal regions of the left ventricle on the order of 40-160 mm Hg indicated an occlusive process of variable intensity in the distal ventricle. A variable negative flow difference between end systole and end diastole (0.5-3.4 L/min) was observed. This was presumably mediated by variable apposition of the free and septal walls of the ventricle at the pump inlet cannula orifice which lasted approximately 100 ms. This apposition, by inducing an end-systolic flow deficit, terminated the suction process by relieving the imbalance between pump requirement and delivery from the right ventricle. Immediately preceding this event, however, unnaturally low end-systolic pressures occurred in the left atrium and proximal left ventricle which in four dogs lasted for 80-120 ms. In one dog, however, this collapse progressed to a new level and remained at approximately -5 mm Hg across four heart beats at which point suction was relieved by manual reduction in pump speed. Because these pressures were associated with a pulmonary capillary wedge pressure of -5 mm Hg as well, they indicate total collapse of the entire pulmonary venous system, left atrium, and left ventricle which persisted until pump flow requirement was relieved by reducing pump speed. We suggest that this collapse caused the whole vascular region from pulmonary capillaries to distal left ventricle to behave as a Starling resistance which further reduced right

  2. Comparison of the human gastric microbiota in hypochlorhydric states arising as a result of Helicobacter pylori-induced atrophic gastritis, autoimmune atrophic gastritis and proton pump inhibitor use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Bryony N; Ijaz, Umer Z; D'Amore, Rosalinda; Burkitt, Michael D; Eccles, Richard; Lenzi, Luca; Duckworth, Carrie A; Moore, Andrew R; Tiszlavicz, Laszlo; Varro, Andrea; Hall, Neil; Pritchard, D Mark

    2017-11-01

    Several conditions associated with reduced gastric acid secretion confer an altered risk of developing a gastric malignancy. Helicobacter pylori-induced atrophic gastritis predisposes to gastric adenocarcinoma, autoimmune atrophic gastritis is a precursor of type I gastric neuroendocrine tumours, whereas proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use does not affect stomach cancer risk. We hypothesised that each of these conditions was associated with specific alterations in the gastric microbiota and that this influenced subsequent tumour risk. 95 patients (in groups representing normal stomach, PPI treated, H. pylori gastritis, H. pylori-induced atrophic gastritis and autoimmune atrophic gastritis) were selected from a cohort of 1400. RNA extracted from gastric corpus biopsies was analysed using 16S rRNA sequencing (MiSeq). Samples from normal stomachs and patients treated with PPIs demonstrated similarly high microbial diversity. Patients with autoimmune atrophic gastritis also exhibited relatively high microbial diversity, but with samples dominated by Streptococcus. H. pylori colonisation was associated with decreased microbial diversity and reduced complexity of co-occurrence networks. H. pylori-induced atrophic gastritis resulted in lower bacterial abundances and diversity, whereas autoimmune atrophic gastritis resulted in greater bacterial abundance and equally high diversity compared to normal stomachs. Pathway analysis suggested that glucose-6-phospahte1-dehydrogenase and D-lactate dehydrogenase were over represented in H. pylori-induced atrophic gastritis versus autoimmune atrophic gastritis, and that both these groups showed increases in fumarate reductase. Autoimmune and H. pylori-induced atrophic gastritis were associated with different gastric microbial profiles. PPI treated patients showed relatively few alterations in the gastric microbiota compared to healthy subjects.

  3. Comparison of the human gastric microbiota in hypochlorhydric states arising as a result of Helicobacter pylori-induced atrophic gastritis, autoimmune atrophic gastritis and proton pump inhibitor use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eccles, Richard; Duckworth, Carrie A.; Varro, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Several conditions associated with reduced gastric acid secretion confer an altered risk of developing a gastric malignancy. Helicobacter pylori-induced atrophic gastritis predisposes to gastric adenocarcinoma, autoimmune atrophic gastritis is a precursor of type I gastric neuroendocrine tumours, whereas proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use does not affect stomach cancer risk. We hypothesised that each of these conditions was associated with specific alterations in the gastric microbiota and that this influenced subsequent tumour risk. 95 patients (in groups representing normal stomach, PPI treated, H. pylori gastritis, H. pylori-induced atrophic gastritis and autoimmune atrophic gastritis) were selected from a cohort of 1400. RNA extracted from gastric corpus biopsies was analysed using 16S rRNA sequencing (MiSeq). Samples from normal stomachs and patients treated with PPIs demonstrated similarly high microbial diversity. Patients with autoimmune atrophic gastritis also exhibited relatively high microbial diversity, but with samples dominated by Streptococcus. H. pylori colonisation was associated with decreased microbial diversity and reduced complexity of co-occurrence networks. H. pylori-induced atrophic gastritis resulted in lower bacterial abundances and diversity, whereas autoimmune atrophic gastritis resulted in greater bacterial abundance and equally high diversity compared to normal stomachs. Pathway analysis suggested that glucose-6-phospahte1-dehydrogenase and D-lactate dehydrogenase were over represented in H. pylori-induced atrophic gastritis versus autoimmune atrophic gastritis, and that both these groups showed increases in fumarate reductase. Autoimmune and H. pylori-induced atrophic gastritis were associated with different gastric microbial profiles. PPI treated patients showed relatively few alterations in the gastric microbiota compared to healthy subjects. PMID:29095917

  4. Comparison of the human gastric microbiota in hypochlorhydric states arising as a result of Helicobacter pylori-induced atrophic gastritis, autoimmune atrophic gastritis and proton pump inhibitor use.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryony N Parsons

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Several conditions associated with reduced gastric acid secretion confer an altered risk of developing a gastric malignancy. Helicobacter pylori-induced atrophic gastritis predisposes to gastric adenocarcinoma, autoimmune atrophic gastritis is a precursor of type I gastric neuroendocrine tumours, whereas proton pump inhibitor (PPI use does not affect stomach cancer risk. We hypothesised that each of these conditions was associated with specific alterations in the gastric microbiota and that this influenced subsequent tumour risk. 95 patients (in groups representing normal stomach, PPI treated, H. pylori gastritis, H. pylori-induced atrophic gastritis and autoimmune atrophic gastritis were selected from a cohort of 1400. RNA extracted from gastric corpus biopsies was analysed using 16S rRNA sequencing (MiSeq. Samples from normal stomachs and patients treated with PPIs demonstrated similarly high microbial diversity. Patients with autoimmune atrophic gastritis also exhibited relatively high microbial diversity, but with samples dominated by Streptococcus. H. pylori colonisation was associated with decreased microbial diversity and reduced complexity of co-occurrence networks. H. pylori-induced atrophic gastritis resulted in lower bacterial abundances and diversity, whereas autoimmune atrophic gastritis resulted in greater bacterial abundance and equally high diversity compared to normal stomachs. Pathway analysis suggested that glucose-6-phospahte1-dehydrogenase and D-lactate dehydrogenase were over represented in H. pylori-induced atrophic gastritis versus autoimmune atrophic gastritis, and that both these groups showed increases in fumarate reductase. Autoimmune and H. pylori-induced atrophic gastritis were associated with different gastric microbial profiles. PPI treated patients showed relatively few alterations in the gastric microbiota compared to healthy subjects.

  5. Vaccines, adjuvants and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Luísa Eça; Baker, Britain; Perricone, Carlo; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2015-10-01

    Vaccines and autoimmunity are linked fields. Vaccine efficacy is based on whether host immune response against an antigen can elicit a memory T-cell response over time. Although the described side effects thus far have been mostly transient and acute, vaccines are able to elicit the immune system towards an autoimmune reaction. The diagnosis of a definite autoimmune disease and the occurrence of fatal outcome post-vaccination have been less frequently reported. Since vaccines are given to previously healthy hosts, who may have never developed the disease had they not been immunized, adverse events should be carefully accessed and evaluated even if they represent a limited number of occurrences. In this review of the literature, there is evidence of vaccine-induced autoimmunity and adjuvant-induced autoimmunity in both experimental models as well as human patients. Adjuvants and infectious agents may exert their immune-enhancing effects through various functional activities, encompassed by the adjuvant effect. These mechanisms are shared by different conditions triggered by adjuvants leading to the autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA syndrome). In conclusion, there are several case reports of autoimmune diseases following vaccines, however, due to the limited number of cases, the different classifications of symptoms and the long latency period of the diseases, every attempt for an epidemiological study has so far failed to deliver a connection. Despite this, efforts to unveil the connection between the triggering of the immune system by adjuvants and the development of autoimmune conditions should be undertaken. Vaccinomics is a field that may bring to light novel customized, personalized treatment approaches in the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Hsp65-producing Lactococcus lactis prevents experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in mice by inducing CD4+LAP+ regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende, Rafael M; Oliveira, Rafael P; Medeiros, Samara R; Gomes-Santos, Ana C; Alves, Andrea C; Loli, Flávia G; Guimarães, Mauro A F; Amaral, Sylvia S; da Cunha, André P; Weiner, Howard L; Azevedo, Vasco; Miyoshi, Anderson; Faria, Ana M C

    2013-02-01

    Heat shock proteins (Hsps) participate in the cellular response to stress and they are hiperexpressed in inflammatory conditions. They are also known to play a major role in immune modulation, controlling, for instance, autoimmune responses. In this study, we showed that oral administration of a recombinant Lactococcus lactis strain that produces and releases LPS-free Hsp65 prevented the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in C57BL/6 mice. This was confirmed by the reduced inflammatory cell infiltrate and absence of injury signs in the spinal cord. The effect was associated with reduced IL-17 and increased IL-10 production in mesenteric lymph node and spleen cell cultures. Hsp65-producing-L. lactis-fed mice had a remarkable increase in the number of natural and inducible CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells and CD4+LAP+ (Latency-associated peptide) Tregs - which express the membrane-bound TGF-β - in spleen, inguinal and mesenteric lymph nodes as well as in spinal cord. Moreover, many Tregs co-expressed Foxp3 and LAP. In vivo depletion of LAP+ cells abrogated the effect of Hsp65-producing L. lactis in EAE prevention and worsened disease in medium-fed mice. Thus, Hsp65-L.lactis seems to boost this critical regulatory circuit involved in controlling EAE development in mice. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Hsp65-producing Lactococcus lactis prevents experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in mice by inducing CD4+LAP+ regulatory T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende, Rafael M.; Oliveira, Rafael P.; Medeiros, Samara R.; Gomes-Santos, Ana C.; Alves, Andrea C.; Loli, Flávia G.; Guimarães, Mauro A.F.; Amaral, Sylvia S.; da Cunha, André P.; Weiner, Howard L.; Azevedo, Vasco; Miyoshi, Anderson; Faria, Ana M.C.

    2013-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (Hsps) participate in the cellular response to stress and they are hiperexpressed in inflammatory conditions. They are also known to play a major role in immune modulation, controlling, for instance, autoimmune responses. In this study, we showed that oral administration of a recombinant Lactococcus lactis strain that produces and releases LPS-free Hsp65 prevented the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in C57BL/6 mice. This was confirmed by the reduced inflammatory cell infiltrate and absence of injury signs in the spinal cord. The effect was associated with reduced IL-17 and increased IL-10 production in mesenteric lymph node and spleen cell cultures. Hsp65-producing-L. lactis-fed mice had a remarkable increase in the number of natural and inducible CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells and CD4+LAP+ (Latency-associated peptide) Tregs - which express the membrane-bound TGF-β - in spleen, inguinal and mesenteric lymph nodes as well as in spinal cord. Moreover, many Tregs co-expressed Foxp3 and LAP. In vivo depletion of LAP+ cells abrogated the effect of Hsp65-producing L. lactis in EAE prevention and worsened disease in medium-fed mice. Thus, Hsp65-L.lactis seems to boost this critical regulatory circuit involved in controlling EAE development in mice. PMID:22939403

  8. In vivo treatment with a MHC class I-restricted blocking peptide can prevent virus-induced autoimmune diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Herrath, M G; Coon, B; Lewicki, H; Mazarguil, H; Gairin, J E; Oldstone, M B

    1998-11-01

    We tested the in vivo potential of a MHC class I-restricted blocking peptide to sufficiently lower an anti-viral CTL response for preventing virus-induced CTL-mediated autoimmune diabetes (insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM)) in vivo without affecting systemic viral clearance. By designing and screening several peptides with high binding affinities to MHC class I H-2Db for best efficiency in blocking killing of target cells by lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) and other viral CTL, we identified the peptide for this study. In vitro, it selectively lowered CTL killing restricted to the Db allele, which correlated directly with the affinity of the respective epitopes. Expression of the blocking peptide in the target cell lowered recognition of all Db-restricted LCMV epitopes. In addition, in vitro expansion of LCMV memory CTL was prevented, resulting in decreased IFN-gamma secretion. In vivo, a 2-wk treatment with this peptide lowered the LCMV Db-restricted CTL response by over threefold without affecting viral clearance. However, the CTL reduction by the peptide treatment was sufficient to prevent LCMV-induced IDDM in rat insulin promoter-LCMV-glycoprotein transgenic mice. Following LCMV infection, these mice develop IDDM, which depends on Db-restricted anti-self (viral) CTL. Precursor numbers of splenic LCMV-CTL in peptide-treated mice were reduced, but their cytokine profile was not altered, indicating that the peptide did not induce regulatory cells. Further, non-LCMV-CTL recognizing the blocking peptide secreted IFN-gamma and did not protect from IDDM. This study demonstrates that in vivo treatment with a MHC class I blocking peptide can prevent autoimmune disease by directly affecting expansion of autoreactive CTL.

  9. Autoimmunity in Rheumatic Diseases Is Induced by Microbial Infections via Crossreactivity or Molecular Mimicry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taha Rashid

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A general consensus supports fundamental roles for both genetic and environmental, mainly microbial, factors in the development of autoimmune diseases. One form of autoimmune rheumatic diseases is confined to a group of nonpyogenic conditions which are usually preceded by or associated with either explicit or occult infections. A previous history of clinical pharyngitis, gastroenteritis/urethritis, or tick-borne skin manifestation can be obtained from patients with rheumatic fever, reactive arthritis, or Lyme disease, respectively, whilst, other rheumatic diseases like rheumatoid arthritis (RA, ankylosing spondylitis (AS, and Crohn’s disease (CD are usually lacking such an association with a noticeable microbial infection. A great amount of data supports the notion that RA is most likely caused by Proteus asymptomatic urinary tract infections, whilst AS and CD are caused by subclinical bowel infections with Klebsiella microbes. Molecular mimicry is the main pathogenetic mechanism that can explain these forms of microbe-disease associations, where the causative microbes can initiate the disease with consequent productions of antibacterial and crossreactive autoantibodies which have a great impact in the propagation and the development of these diseases.

  10. Intestinal microbiota sustains inflammation and autoimmunity induced by hypomorphic RAG defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigoni, Rosita; Fontana, Elena; Guglielmetti, Simone; Fosso, Bruno; D’Erchia, Anna Maria; Maina, Virginia; Taverniti, Valentina; Castiello, Maria Carmina; Mantero, Stefano; Pacchiana, Giovanni; Musio, Silvia; Pedotti, Rosetta; Selmi, Carlo; Mora, J. Rodrigo; Pesole, Graziano; Vezzoni, Paolo; Poliani, Pietro Luigi; Grassi, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Omenn syndrome (OS) is caused by hypomorphic Rag mutations and characterized by a profound immunodeficiency associated with autoimmune-like manifestations. Both in humans and mice, OS is mediated by oligoclonal activated T and B cells. The role of microbial signals in disease pathogenesis is debated. Here, we show that Rag2R229Q knock-in mice developed an inflammatory bowel disease affecting both the small bowel and colon. Lymphocytes were sufficient for disease induction, as intestinal CD4 T cells with a Th1/Th17 phenotype reproduced the pathological picture when transplanted into immunocompromised hosts. Moreover, oral tolerance was impaired in Rag2R229Q mice, and transfer of wild-type (WT) regulatory T cells ameliorated bowel inflammation. Mucosal immunoglobulin A (IgA) deficiency in the gut resulted in enhanced absorption of microbial products and altered composition of commensal communities. The Rag2R229Q microbiota further contributed to the immunopathology because its transplant into WT recipients promoted Th1/Th17 immune response. Consistently, long-term dosing of broad-spectrum antibiotics (ABXs) in Rag2R229Q mice ameliorated intestinal and systemic autoimmunity by diminishing the frequency of mucosal and circulating gut-tropic CCR9+ Th1 and Th17 T cells. Remarkably, serum hyper-IgE, a hallmark of the disease, was also normalized by ABX treatment. These results indicate that intestinal microbes may play a critical role in the distinctive immune dysregulation of OS. PMID:26926994

  11. Auto-immune thyroid dysfunction induced by tyrosine kinase inhibitors in a patient with recurrent chordoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eroukhmanoff, Juliette; Castinetti, Frederic; Penel, Nicolas; Salas, Sebastien

    2016-08-24

    While hypothyroidism has frequently been reported with the use of TKIs, the thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) suppressing effect of TKIs is rare, except for thyroiditis. We describe a case with progressive recurrent chordoma who initially became hyperthyroid in a context of autoimmunity under sorafenib treatment and later under imatinib treatment. A 57-year-old man with lumbar chordoma began daily treatment of 800 mg sorafenib. He did not have any other medication or recent iodinated-contrast exposure and his family history was negative for thyroid and autoimmune disease. There was no history of neck pain, irradiation or trauma, recent fever or viral illness. Pre-treatment TSH was normal. After 18 weeks of treatment, the patient presented hyperthyroidism with positive anti-TSH receptor antibodies. More surprisingly, Graves' disease recurred during treatment with imatinib. The fact that Graves' disease occurred after two different TKIs suggests that it could be a rare but important class effect. Anti-TSH receptor antibodies should be systematically measured when TSH decreases in order to avoid the erroneous diagnosis of transient hyperthyroidism due to thyroiditis.

  12. Left Ventricular Assist Device Thrombosis-Amiodarone-Induced Hyperthyroidism: Causal Link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajapreyar, Indranee; Acharya, Deepak; Tallaj, José; Hornbuckle, Lauren; Sharpton, Jessica; Joly, Joanna; Pamboukian, Salpy

    2018-03-05

    Ventricular arrhythmias occurs in 20-50% of patients supported with left ventricular assist devices (LVAD). Ventricular arrhythmias are well tolerated with LVAD support but long-term consequences include worsening right ventricular function. Management of ventricular arrhythmias in LVAD patients includes use of antiarrhythmic agents or ablation. Amiodarone has been used a first-line agent to treat ventricular arrhythmias post-LVAD implantation. Chronic treatment with amiodarone for arrhythmias can result in hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism in 5-10% of patients. Hyperthyroidism is known to cause endothelial dysfunction, alterations in coagulation, and fibrinolytic pathways favoring hypercoagulable state. We describe two cases of left ventricular assist device (LVAD) thrombosis potentiated by amiodarone-induced hyperthyroidism (AIT) and discuss pathophysiological mechanisms for hypercoagulable state induced by hyperthyroidism.

  13. [Treatment of autoimmune hepatic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueverov, A O

    2004-01-01

    The immunosuppresive drugs, primarily glucocorticosteroids, serve as the basis for the pathogenetic treatment of autoimmune diseases of the liver. In autoimmune hepatitis, immunosuppressive therapy induces and maintains persistent remission in most patients while in primary biliary cirrhosis and primary sclerosing cholangitis, its capacities are substantially limited. Ursodeoxycholic acid is used as the basic drug in predominantly occurring intrahepatic cholestasis. The treatment of cross autoimmune syndromes generally requires the choice of a combination of drugs.

  14. Cathodal tDCS over the left prefrontal cortex diminishes choice-induced preference change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengarelli, Flavia; Spoglianti, Silvia; Avenanti, Alessio; di Pellegrino, Giuseppe

    2015-05-01

    In everyday life, people often find themselves facing difficult decisions between options that are equally attractive. Cognitive dissonance theory states that after making a difficult choice between 2 equally preferred options, individuals no longer find the alternatives similarly desirable. Rather, they often change their existing preferences to align more closely with the choice they have just made. Despite the relevance of cognitive dissonance in modulating behavior, little is known about the brain processes crucially involved in choice-induced preference change. In the present study, we applied cathodal transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) with the aim of downregulating the activity of the left or the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) during a revised version of Brehm's (in 1956. Post-decision changes in the desirability of alternatives. J Abnorm Soc Psychol. 52:384-389) free-choice paradigm. We found that cathodal tDCS over the left, but not over the right, DLPFC caused a reduction of the typical behavior-induced preference change relative to sham stimulation. Our findings highlight the role of prefrontal cortex in cognitive dissonance and provide evidence that left DLPFC plays a necessary role in the implementation of choice-induced preference change. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Transgenic expression of soluble human CD5 enhances experimentally-induced autoimmune and anti-tumoral immune responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Fenutría

    Full Text Available CD5 is a lymphoid-specific transmembrane glycoprotein constitutively expressed on thymocytes and mature T and B1a lymphocytes. Current data support the view that CD5 is a negative regulator of antigen-specific receptor-mediated signaling in these cells, and that this would likely be achieved through interaction with CD5 ligand/s (CD5L of still undefined nature expressed on immune or accessory cells. To determine the functional consequence of loss of CD5/CD5L interaction in vivo, a new transgenic mouse line was generated (shCD5EμTg, expressing a circulating soluble form of human CD5 (shCD5 as a decoy to impair membrane-bound CD5 function. These shCD5EμTg mice showed an enhanced response to autologous antigens, as deduced from the presentation of more severe forms of experimentally inducible autoimmune disease (collagen-induced arthritis, CIA; and experimental autoimmune encephalitis, EAE, as well as an increased anti-tumoral response in non-orthotopic cancer models (B16 melanoma. This enhancement of the immune response was in agreement with the finding of significantly reduced proportions of spleen and lymph node Treg cells (CD4+CD25+FoxP3+, and of peritoneal IL-10-producing and CD5+ B cells, as well as an increased proportion of spleen NKT cells in shCD5EμTg mice. Similar changes in lymphocyte subpopulations were observed in wild-type mice following repeated administration of exogenous recombinant shCD5 protein. These data reveal the relevant role played by CD5/CD5L interactions on the homeostasis of some functionally relevant lymphocyte subpopulations and the modulation of immune responses to autologous antigens.

  16. The paracrine effect of mesenchymal human stem cells restored hearing in β-tubulin induced autoimmune sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, T J; Du, Xiaoping; Zhou, Bin

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the activities of hASCs (Human Adipose tissue Derived Stem Cells) on experimental autoimmune hearing loss (EAHL) and how human stem cells regenerated mouse cochlea cells. We have restored hearing in 19 years old white female with autoimmune hearing loss with autologous adipose tissue derived stem cells and we wish to understand the mechanism of restoration of hearing in animal model. BALB/c mice underwent to develop EAHL; mice with EAHL were given hASCs intraperitoneally once a week for 6 consecutive weeks. ABR were examined over time. The helper type 1 autoreactive responses and T-reg cells were examined. H&E staining or immunostaining with APC conjugated anti-HLA-ABC antibody were conducted. The organ of Corti, stria vascularis, spira ligament and spiral ganglion in stem cell group are normal. In control group, without receiving stem cells, the organ of Corti is replaced by a single layer of cells, atrophy of stria vascularis. Systemic infusion of hASCs significantly improved hearing function and protected hair cells in established EAHL. The hASCs decreased the proliferation of antigen specific Th1/Th17 cells and induced the production of anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin10 in splenocytes. They also induced the generation of antigen specific CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+)T-reg cells. The experiment showed the restoration is due to the paracrine activities of human stem cells, since there are newly regenerated mice spiral ganglion cells, not human mesenchymal stem cells derived tissue given by intraperitoneally. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Chronic caffeine treatment attenuates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis induced by guinea pig spinal cord homogenates in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guo Qian; Chen, Yan Yan; Wang, Xin Shi; Wu, Sai Zhen; Yang, Hui Min; Xu, Hui Qin; He, Jin Cai; Wang, Xiao Tong; Chen, Jiang Fan; Zheng, Rong Yuan

    2010-01-14

    Dysfunction of adenosinergic systems has been implicated in the development of multiple sclerosis in humans and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in animals. Caffeine, a non-selective antagonist of adenosine receptors, has been shown to provide protection against myelin oligodendroglia glycoprotein (MOG)-induced EAE in mice. In this study, we showed that chronic caffeine similarly imparts neuroprotection against EAE induced in rats by guinea pig spinal cord homogenates (GPSCH). GPSCH-induced EAE is characterized by extensive tissue inflammation with a typical chronic disease course. We showed that caffeine decreases the incidence of EAE and attenuates EAE pathology at behavioral, histological (inflammatory cell infiltration and demyelination) and neurochemical (expression of inflammatory cytokines) levels. The attenuation of GPSCH-induced pathology by chronic caffeine treatment was observed at doses of 10 and 30 mg/kg and during both peak and recovery phases of EAE. Furthermore, it was showed that chronic treatment with caffeine up-regulated A1 receptor and TGF-beta mRNAs and suppressed interferon-gamma mRNA in EAE rats. Together with previous reports, our data demonstrates that chronic treatment with caffeine exerts a neuroprotective effect against EAE, possibly through an A(1) receptor-mediated shift from Th1 to Th2 cell function, and provides a neurobiological basis for epidemiological investigation into the possible relationship between caffeine consumption and development of multiple sclerosis in humans.

  18. TNF blockade induces a dysregulated type I interferon response without autoimmunity in paradoxical psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Curdin; Di Domizio, Jeremy; Mylonas, Alessio; Belkhodja, Cyrine; Demaria, Olivier; Navarini, Alexander A; Lapointe, Anne-Karine; French, Lars E; Vernez, Maxime; Gilliet, Michel

    2018-01-02

    Although anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) agents are highly effective in the treatment of psoriasis, 2-5% of treated patients develop psoriasis-like skin lesions called paradoxical psoriasis. The pathogenesis of this side effect and its distinction from classical psoriasis remain unknown. Here we show that skin lesions from patients with paradoxical psoriasis are characterized by a selective overexpression of type I interferons, dermal accumulation of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC), and reduced T-cell numbers, when compared to classical psoriasis. Anti-TNF treatment prolongs type I interferon production by pDCs through inhibition of their maturation. The resulting type I interferon overexpression is responsible for the skin phenotype of paradoxical psoriasis, which, unlike classical psoriasis, is independent of T cells. These findings indicate that paradoxical psoriasis represents an ongoing overactive innate inflammatory process, driven by pDC-derived type I interferon that does not lead to T-cell autoimmunity.

  19. Mental stress-induced left ventricular dysfunction and adverse outcome in ischemic heart disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Julia L; Boyle, Stephen H; Samad, Zainab; Babyak, Michael A; Wilson, Jennifer L; Kuhn, Cynthia; Becker, Richard C; Ortel, Thomas L; Williams, Redford B; Rogers, Joseph G; O'Connor, Christopher M; Velazquez, Eric J; Jiang, Wei

    2017-04-01

    Aims Mental stress-induced myocardial ischemia (MSIMI) occurs in up to 70% of patients with clinically stable ischemic heart disease and is associated with increased risk of adverse prognosis. We aimed to examine the prognostic value of indices of MSIMI and exercise stress-induced myocardial ischemia (ESIMI) in a population of ischemic heart disease patients that was not confined by having a recent positive physical stress test. Methods and results The Responses of Mental Stress Induced Myocardial Ischemia to Escitalopram Treatment (REMIT) study enrolled 310 subjects who underwent mental and exercise stress testing and were followed annually for a median of four years. Study endpoints included time to first and total rate of major adverse cardiovascular events, defined as all-cause mortality and hospitalizations for cardiovascular causes. Cox and negative binomial regression adjusting for age, sex, resting left ventricular ejection fraction, and heart failure status were used to examine associations of indices of MSIMI and ESIMI with study endpoints. The continuous variable of mental stress-induced left ventricular ejection fraction change was significantly associated with both endpoints (all p values stress, patients had a 5% increase in the probability of a major adverse cardiovascular event at the median follow-up time and a 20% increase in the number of major adverse cardiovascular events endured over the follow-up period of six years. Indices of ESIMI did not predict endpoints ( ps > 0.05). Conclusion In patients with stable ischemic heart disease, mental, but not exercise, stress-induced left ventricular ejection fraction change significantly predicts risk of future adverse cardiovascular events.

  20. Ctla-4 modulates the differentiation of inducible Foxp3+ Treg cells but IL-10 mediates their function in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Verhagen

    Full Text Available In vitro induced Foxp3+ T regulatory (iTreg cells form a novel and promising target for therapeutic tolerance induction. However, the potential of these cells as a target for the treatment of various immune diseases, as well as the factors involved in their development and function, remain debated. Here, we demonstrate in a myelin basic protein (MBP-specific murine model of CNS autoimmune disease that adoptive transfer of antigen-specific iTreg cells ameliorates disease progression. Moreover, we show that the co-stimulatory molecule CTLA-4 mediates in vitro differentiation of iTreg cells. Finally, we demonstrate that the secreted, immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10 controls the ability of antigen-specific iTreg cells to suppress autoimmune disease. Overall, we conclude that antigen-specific iTreg cells, which depend on various immune regulatory molecules for their differentiation and function, represent a major target for effective immunotherapy of autoimmune disease.

  1. Ctla-4 modulates the differentiation of inducible Foxp3+ Treg cells but IL-10 mediates their function in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhagen, Johan; Gabryšová, Leona; Shepard, Ella R; Wraith, David C

    2014-01-01

    In vitro induced Foxp3+ T regulatory (iTreg) cells form a novel and promising target for therapeutic tolerance induction. However, the potential of these cells as a target for the treatment of various immune diseases, as well as the factors involved in their development and function, remain debated. Here, we demonstrate in a myelin basic protein (MBP)-specific murine model of CNS autoimmune disease that adoptive transfer of antigen-specific iTreg cells ameliorates disease progression. Moreover, we show that the co-stimulatory molecule CTLA-4 mediates in vitro differentiation of iTreg cells. Finally, we demonstrate that the secreted, immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10 controls the ability of antigen-specific iTreg cells to suppress autoimmune disease. Overall, we conclude that antigen-specific iTreg cells, which depend on various immune regulatory molecules for their differentiation and function, represent a major target for effective immunotherapy of autoimmune disease.

  2. Targeted delivery of antigen to intestinal dendritic cells induces oral tolerance and prevents autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yulin; Wu, Jie; Wang, Jiajia; Zhang, Wenjing; Xu, Bohui; Xu, Xiaojun; Zong, Li

    2018-03-15

    The intestinal immune system is an ideal target to induce immune tolerance physiologically. However, the efficiency of oral protein antigen delivery is limited by degradation of the antigen in the gastrointestinal tract and poor uptake by antigen-presenting cells. Gut dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen-presenting cells that are prone to inducing antigen-specific immune tolerance. In this study, we delivered the antigen heat shock protein 65-6×P277 (H6P) directly to the gut DCs of NOD mice through oral vaccination with H6P-loaded targeting nanoparticles (NPs), and investigated the ability of this antigen to induce immune tolerance to prevent autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice. A targeting NP delivery system was developed to encapsulate H6P, and the ability of this system to protect and facilitate H6P delivery to gut DCs was assessed. NOD mice were immunised with H6P-loaded targeting NPs orally once a week for 7 weeks and the onset of diabetes was assessed by monitoring blood glucose levels. H6P-loaded targeting NPs protected the encapsulated H6P from degradation in the gastrointestinal tract environment and significantly increased the uptake of H6P by DCs in the gut Peyer's patches (4.1 times higher uptake compared with the control H6P solution group). Oral vaccination with H6P-loaded targeting NPs induced antigen-specific T cell tolerance and prevented diabetes in 100% of NOD mice. Immune deviation (T helper [Th]1 to Th2) and CD4 + CD25 + FOXP3 + regulatory T cells were found to participate in the induction of immune tolerance. In this study, we successfully induced antigen-specific T cell tolerance and prevented the onset of diabetes in NOD mice. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt at delivering antigen to gut DCs using targeting NPs to induce T cell tolerance.

  3. Different Mechanisms of Inflammation Induced in Virus and Autoimmune-Mediated Models of Multiple Sclerosis in C57BL6 Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhinoy Kishore

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the human central nervous system (CNS. Neurotropic demyelinating strain of MHV (MHV-A59 or its isogenic recombinant strain RSA59 induces MS-like disease in mice mediated by microglia, along with a small population of T cells. The mechanism of demyelination is at least in part due to microglia-mediated myelin stripping, with some direct axonal injury. Immunization with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG induces experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, a mainly CD4+ T-cell-mediated disease, although CD8+ T cells may play a significant role in demyelination. It is possible that both autoimmune and nonimmune mechanisms such as direct viral toxicity may induce MS. Our study directly compares CNS pathology in autoimmune and viral-induced MS models. Mice with viral-induced and EAE demyelinating diseases demonstrated similar patterns and distributions of demyelination that accumulated over the course of the disease. However, significant differences in acute inflammation were noted. Inflammation was restricted mainly to white matter at all times in EAE, whereas inflammation initially largely involved gray matter in acute MHV-induced disease and then is subsequently localized only in white matter in the chronic disease phase. The presence of dual mechanisms of demyelination may be responsible for the failure of immunosuppression to promote long-term remission in many MS patients.

  4. Novel pathogenic epitopes of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein induce experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in C57BL/6 mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delarasse, Cecile; Smith, Paul; Baker, David; Amor, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), a minor protein of the central nervous system myelin, is recognized as a potential target in multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica. The extracellular domain of MOG is commonly used in a wide range of mouse strains and other animals to induce experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an autoimmune animal model of multiple sclerosis, because it is a target for antibody-mediated attack. Previous studies, using selected peptides, have indicated that MOG35–55 peptide is an encephalitogenic epitope in C57BL/6 (H-2b) mice. A more systematic analysis of both T-cell and B-cell responses following immunization of C57BL/6 mice with either recombinant extracellular mouse MOG protein (1–116) or with overlapping peptides spanning the whole sequence of MOG, before assessment of responses to 15 mer and 23 mer peptides was undertaken. The studies identified T-cell responses within the MOG35–55 (extracellular domain) but also two new immunogenic and encephalitogenic T-cell epitopes within residues MOG113–127, MOG120–134 (localized in the transmembrane region) and MOG183–197 (in the second hydrophobic MOG domain). In addition, residue MOG113–127 was found to be a B-cell epitope, suggesting that this may be a useful adjunct for the induction of EAE as well as for immunological studies in C57BL/6 mice, which are increasingly being used to study immune function through the use of transgenic and gene knockout technology. PMID:23876060

  5. Loop-induced decays of Higgs boson in the left-right twin Higgs model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao-Bei, Liu; Xue-Lei, Wang; Yao-Bein, Liu; Xue-Lei, Wang

    2009-01-01

    We analyze the loop-induced decays of the Higgs boson into pairs of gluons and photons in the left-right twin Higgs model. The study shows that the deviation of the partial widths for these decays relative to their Standard Model (SM) values scales with 1/f 2 , where f ∼ TeV is the symmetry breaking scale in the model. For the mass mixing parameter M equals 150 GeV, the LHC and a linear e + e - collider would be sensitive to the deviation in Γ(H → gg) for f ≤ 770(660) GeV at the 1(2) σ level. So the Higgs boson processes at the LHC can be a sensitive probe for the left-right twin Higgs model. (authors)

  6. Autoimmune gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulnigg-Dabsch, Stefanie

    2016-10-01

    Autoimmune gastritis is a chronic inflammatory disease with destruction of parietal cells of the corpus and fundus of the stomach. The known consequence is vitamin B12 deficiency and, consequently, pernicious anemia. However, loss of parietal cells reduces secretion of gastric acid which is also required for absorption of inorganic iron; thus, iron deficiency is commonly found in patients with autoimmune gastritis. This usually precedes vitamin B12 deficiency and is found mainly in young women. Patients with chronic iron deficiency, especially those refractory to oral iron therapy, should therefore be evaluated for the presence of autoimmune gastritis.

  7. Stress-induced alterations of left-right electrodermal activity coupling indexed by pointwise transinformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Světlák, M; Bob, P; Roman, R; Ježek, S; Damborská, A; Chládek, J; Shaw, D J; Kukleta, M

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we tested the hypothesis that experimental stress induces a specific change of left-right electrodermal activity (EDA) coupling pattern, as indexed by pointwise transinformation (PTI). Further, we hypothesized that this change is associated with scores on psychometric measures of the chronic stress-related psychopathology. Ninety-nine university students underwent bilateral measurement of EDA during rest and stress-inducing Stroop test and completed a battery of self-report measures of chronic stress-related psychopathology. A significant decrease in the mean PTI value was the prevalent response to the stress conditions. No association between chronic stress and PTI was found. Raw scores of psychometric measures of stress-related psychopathology had no effect on either the resting levels of PTI or the amount of stress-induced PTI change. In summary, acute stress alters the level of coupling pattern of cortico-autonomic influences on the left and right sympathetic pathways to the palmar sweat glands. Different results obtained using the PTI, EDA laterality coefficient, and skin conductance level also show that the PTI algorithm represents a new analytical approach to EDA asymmetry description.

  8. Respiration Induced Heart Motion and Indications of Gated Delivery for Left-Sided Breast Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi, X. Sharon; Hu, Angela; Wang Kai; Newman, Francis; Crosby, Marcus; Hu Bin; White, Julia; Li, X. Allen

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate respiration-induced heart motion for left-sided breast irradiation using a four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) technique and to determine novel indications to assess heart motion and identify breast patients who may benefit from a gated treatment. Methods and Materials: Images of 4DCT acquired during free breathing for 20 left-sided breast cancer patients, who underwent whole breast irradiation with or without regional nodal irradiation, were analyzed retrospectively. Dose distributions were reconstructed in the phases of 0%, 20%, and 50%. The intrafractional heart displacement was measured in three selected transverse CT slices using D LAD (the distance from left ascending aorta to a fixed line [connecting middle point of sternum and the body] drawn on each slice) and maximum heart depth (MHD, the distance of the forefront of the heart to the line). Linear regression analysis was used to correlate these indices with mean heart dose and heart dose volume at different breathing phases. Results: Respiration-induced heart displacement resulted in observable variations in dose delivered to the heart. During a normal free-breathing cycle, heart-induced motion D LAD and MHD changed up to 9 and 11 mm respectively, resulting in up to 38% and 39% increases of mean doses and V 25.2 for the heart. MHD and D LAD were positively correlated with mean heart dose and heart dose volume. Respiratory-adapted gated treatment may better spare heart and ipsilateral-lung compared with the conventional non-gated plan in a subset of patients with large D LAD or MHD variations. Conclusion: Proposed indices offer novel assessment of heart displacement based on 4DCT images. MHD and D LAD can be used independently or jointly as selection criteria for respiratory gating procedure before treatment planning. Patients with great intrafractional MHD variations or tumor(s) close to the diaphragm may particularly benefit from the gated treatment.

  9. Amelioration of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in C57BL/6 mice by photobiomodulation induced by 670 nm light.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamaldeen A Muili

    Full Text Available The approved immunomodulatory agents for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS are only partially effective. It is thought that the combination of immunomodulatory and neuroprotective strategies is necessary to prevent or reverse disease progression. Irradiation with far red/near infrared light, termed photobiomodulation, is a therapeutic approach for inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases. Data suggests that near-infrared light functions through neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory mechanisms. We sought to investigate the clinical effect of photobiomodulation in the Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE model of multiple sclerosis.The clinical effect of photobiomodulation induced by 670 nm light was investigated in the C57BL/6 mouse model of EAE. Disease was induced with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG according to standard laboratory protocol. Mice received 670 nm light or no light treatment (sham administered as suppression and treatment protocols. 670 nm light reduced disease severity with both protocols compared to sham treated mice. Disease amelioration was associated with down-regulation of proinflammatory cytokines (interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α and up-regulation of anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-4, IL-10 in vitro and in vivo.These studies document the therapeutic potential of photobiomodulation with 670 nm light in the EAE model, in part through modulation of the immune response.

  10. Autoimmune pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davorin Dajčman

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Autoimmune pancreatitis is a recently described type of pancreatitis of presumed autoimmune etiology. Autoimmune pancreatitis is often misdiagnosed as pancreatic cancer difficult, since their clinical presentations are often similar. The concept of autoimmune pancreatitis was first published in 1961. Since then, autoimmune pancreatitis has often been treated not as an independent clinical entity but rather as a manifestation of systemic disease. The overall prevalence and incidence of the disease have yet to be determined, but three series have reported the prevalence as between 5 and 6 % of all patients with chronic pancreatitis. Patient vary widely in age, but most are older than 50 years. Patients with autoimmune pancreatitis usually complain of the painless jaundice, mild abdominal pain and weight loss. There is no laboratory hallmark of the disease, even if cholestatic profiles of liver dysfunction with only mild elevation of amylase and lipase levels have been reported.Conclusions: Proposed diagnostic criteria contains: (1 radiologic imaging, diffuse enlargement of the pancreas and diffusely irregular narrowing of the main pancreatic duct, (2 laboratory data, elevated levels of serum ã-globulin and/or IgG, specially IgG4, or the presence of autoantibodies and (3 histopathologic examination, fibrotic change with dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltration in the pancreas. For correct diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis, criterion 1 must be present with criterion 2 and/or 3. Autoimmune pancreatitis is frequently associated with rheumatoid arthritis, Sjogren’s syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, tubulointersticial nephritis, primary sclerosing cholangitis and idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis. Pancreatic biopsy using an endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy is the most important diagnostic method today. Treatment with corticosteroids leads to the and resolution of pancreatic inflamation, obstruction and

  11. TNF-Like Weak Inducer of Apoptosis Aggravates Left Ventricular Dysfunction after Myocardial Infarction in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Uwe Jarr

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. TNF-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK has recently been shown to be potentially involved in adverse cardiac remodeling. However, neither the exact role of TWEAK itself nor of its receptor Fn14 in this setting is known. Aim of the Study. To analyze the effects of sTWEAK on myocardial function and gene expression in response to experimental myocardial infarction in mice. Results. TWEAK directly suppressed the expression of PGC-1α and genes of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS in cardiomyocytes. Systemic sTWEAK application after MI resulted in reduced left ventricular function and increased mortality without changes in interstitial fibrosis or infarct size. Molecular analysis revealed decreased phosphorylation of PI3K/Akt and ERK1/2 pathways associated with reduced expression of PGC-1α and PPARα. Likewise, expression of OXPHOS genes such as atp5O, cycs, cox5b, and ndufb5 was also reduced. Fn14 -/- mice showed significantly improved left ventricular function and PGC-1α levels after MI compared to their respective WT littermates (Fn14 +/+. Finally, inhibition of intrinsic TWEAK with anti-TWEAK antibodies resulted in improved left ventricular function and survival. Conclusions. TWEAK exerted maladaptive effects in mice after myocardial infarction most likely via direct effects on cardiomyocytes. Analysis of the potential mechanisms revealed that TWEAK reduced metabolic adaptations to increased cardiac workload by inhibition of PGC-1α.

  12. Illusory movements induced by tendon vibration in right- and left-handed people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tidoni, Emmanuele; Fusco, Gabriele; Leonardis, Daniele; Frisoli, Antonio; Bergamasco, Massimo; Aglioti, Salvatore Maria

    2015-02-01

    Frequency-specific vibratory stimulation of peripheral tendons induces an illusion of limb movement that may be useful for restoring proprioceptive information in people with sensorimotor disability. This potential application may be limited by inter- and intra-subject variability in the susceptibility to such an illusion, which may depend on a variety of factors. To explore the influence of stimulation parameters and participants' handedness on the movement illusion, we vibrated the right and left tendon of the biceps brachii in a group of right- and left-handed people with five stimulation frequencies (from 40 to 120 Hz in step of 20 Hz). We found that all participants reported the expected illusion of elbow extension, especially after 40 and 60 Hz. Left-handers exhibited less variability in reporting the illusion compared to right-handers across the different stimulation frequencies. Moreover, the stimulation of the non-dominant arm elicited a more vivid illusion with faster onset relative to the stimulation of the dominant arm, an effect that was independent from participants' handedness. Overall, our data show that stimulation frequency, handedness and arm dominance influence the tendon vibration movement illusion. The results are discussed in reference to their relevance in linking motor awareness, improving current devices for motor ability recovery after brain or spinal damage and developing prosthetics and virtual embodiment systems.

  13. Fluid loading and norepinephrine infusion mask the left ventricular preload decrease induced by pleural effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wemmelund, Kristian Borup; Ringgård, Viktor Kromann; Vistisen, Simon Tilma; Hyldebrandt, Janus Adler; Sloth, Erik; Juhl-Olsen, Peter

    2017-09-11

    Pleural effusion (PLE) may lead to low blood pressure and reduced cardiac output. Low blood pressure and reduced cardiac output are often treated with fluid loading and vasopressors. This study aimed to determine the impact of fluid loading and norepinephrine infusion on physiologic determinants of cardiac function obtained by ultrasonography during PLE. In this randomised, blinded, controlled laboratory study, 30 piglets (21.9 ± 1.3 kg) had bilateral PLE (75 mL/kg) induced. Subsequently, the piglets were randomised to intervention as follows: fluid loading (80 mL/kg/h for 1.5 h, n = 12), norepinephrine infusion (0.01, 0.03, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3 μg/kg/min (15 min each, n = 12)) or control (n = 6). Main outcome was left ventricular preload measured as left ventricular end-diastolic area. Secondary endpoints included contractility and afterload as well as global measures of circulation. All endpoints were assessed with echocardiography and invasive pressure-flow measurements. PLE decreased left ventricular end-diastolic area, mean arterial pressure and cardiac output (p values  0.05) to baseline. Left ventricular contractility increased with norepinephrine infusion (p = 0.002), but was not affected by fluid loading (p = 0.903). Afterload increased in both active groups (p values > 0.001). Overall, inferior vena cava distensibility remained unchanged during intervention (p values ≥ 0.085). Evacuation of PLE caused numerical increases in left ventricular end-diastolic area, but only significantly so in controls (p = 0.006). PLE significantly reduced left ventricular preload. Both fluid and norepinephrine treatment reverted this effect and normalised global haemodynamic parameters. Inferior vena cava distensibility remained unchanged. The haemodynamic significance of PLE may be underestimated during fluid or norepinephrine administration, potentially masking the presence of PLE.

  14. Homeostatic T Cell Expansion to Induce Anti-Tumor Autoimmunity in Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baccala, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    ... that (a) homeostatic T-cell proliferation consistently elicits anti-tumor responses; (b) irradiation is more effective than Tcell depletion by antibodies in inducing anti-tumor responses mediated by homeostatic T-cell proliferation...

  15. Evaluation of docosahexaenoic acid in a dog model of hypertension induced left ventricular hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, William C; Cox, James W; Asemu, Girma; O'Connell, Kelly A; Dabkowski, Erinne R; Xu, Wenhong; Ribeiro, Rogerio F; Shekar, Kadambari C; Hoag, Stephen W; Rastogi, Sharad; Sabbah, Hani N; Daneault, Caroline; des Rosiers, Christine

    2013-12-01

    Marine n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids alter cardiac phospholipids and prevent cardiac pathology in rodents subjected to pressure overload. This approach has not been evaluated in humans or large animals with hypertension-induced pathological hypertrophy. We evaluated docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in old female dogs with hypertension caused by 16 weeks of aldosterone infusion. Aldosterone-induced hypertension resulted in concentric left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and impaired diastolic function in placebo-treated dogs. DHA supplementation increased DHA and depleted arachidonic acid in cardiac phospholipids, but did not improve LV parameters compared to placebo. Surprisingly, DHA significantly increased serum aldosterone concentration and blood pressure compared to placebo. Cardiac mitochondrial yield was decreased in placebo-treated hypertensive dogs compared to normal animals, which was prevented by DHA. Extensive analysis of mitochondrial function found no differences between DHA and placebo groups. In conclusion, DHA did not favorably impact mitochondrial or LV function in aldosterone hypertensive dogs.

  16. Remission of chronic anthracycline-induced heart failure with support from a continuous-flow left ventricular assist device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nadeem; Husain, Syed Arman; Husain, Syed Iman; Khalaf, Natalia; George, Joggy; Raissi, Farshad; Segura, Ana Maria; Kar, Biswajit; Bogaev, Roberta C; Frazier, O H

    2012-01-01

    We report the case of a patient who had chronic anthracycline-induced cardiomyopathy that was reversed after treatment with a left ventricular assist device. A 29-year-old woman had undergone anthracycline-based chemotherapy as a teenager in 1991 and 1992 and received a diagnosis of dilated cardiomyopathy 10 years later. Optimal medical therapy had initially controlled the symptoms of heart failure. However, in June 2006, the symptoms worsened to New York Heart Association functional class IV status. We implanted a continuous-flow left ventricular assist device as a bridge to cardiac transplantation; of note, a left ventricular core biopsy at that time showed no replacement fibrosis. The patient's clinical status improved thereafter, enabling left ventricular assist device ex-plantation after 17 months. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the use of left ventricular assist device support to reverse chronic anthracycline-induced heart failure.

  17. Gene expression in the spinal cord in female lewis rats with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis induced with myelin basic protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayley R Inglis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, the best available model of multiple sclerosis, can be induced in different animal strains using immunization with central nervous system antigens. EAE is associated with inflammation and demyelination of the nervous system. Micro-array can be used to investigate gene expression and biological pathways that are altered during disease. There are few studies of the changes in gene expression in EAE, and these have mostly been done in a chronic mouse EAE model. EAE induced in the Lewis with myelin basic protein (MBP-EAE is well characterised, making it an ideal candidate for the analysis of gene expression in this disease model. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: MBP-EAE was induced in female Lewis rats by inoculation with MBP and adjuvants. Total RNA was extracted from the spinal cords and used for micro-array analysis using AffimetrixGeneChip Rat Exon 1.0 ST Arrays. Gene expression in the spinal cords was compared between healthy female rats and female rats with MBP-EAE. Gene expression in the spinal cord of rats with MBP-EAE differed from that in the spinal cord of normal rats, and there was regulation of pathways involved with immune function and nervous system function. For selected genes the change in expression was confirmed with real-time PCR. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: EAE leads to modulation of gene expression in the spinal cord. We have identified the genes that are most significantly regulated in MBP-EAE in the Lewis rat and produced a profile of gene expression in the spinal cord at the peak of disease.

  18. Coronary arteriography and left ventriculography during spontaneous and exercise-induced ST segment elevation in patients with variant angina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Y.; Ozaki, M.; Ogawa, H.; Naito, H.; Yoshino, F.; Katayama, K.; Fujii, T.; Matsuzaki, M.; Kusukawa, R.

    1983-01-01

    The present study is an angiographic demonstration of coronary artery spasm during both spontaneous and exercise-induced angina in three patients with variant angina. In each case, clinical, ECG, coronary angiographic, and left ventriculographic observations were made at rest, during spontaneous angina, and during exercise-induced angina. The character of chest pain was similar during spontaneous and exercise-induced episodes. ST segment elevation was present in the anterior ECG leads during both episodes. The left anterior descending coronary artery became partially or totally obstructed during both types of attacks. When coronary spasm was demonstrated during both types of attacks, left ventriculography disclosed akinetic or dyskinetic wall motion in the area supplied by the involved artery. In those patients with reproducible exercise-induced ST segment elevation and chest pain, thallium-201 scintigraphy showed areas of reversible anteroseptal hypoperfusion. Thus in selected patients exercise-induced attacks of angina were similar to spontaneous episodes

  19. Prognostic value of exercise-induced left ventricular systolic dysfunction in hypertensive patients without coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prada-Delgado, Oscar; Barge-Caballero, Eduardo; Peteiro, Jesús; Bouzas-Mosquera, Alberto; Estévez-Loureiro, Rodrigo; Barge-Caballero, Gonzalo; López-Pérez, Manuel; Vázquez-González, Nicolás; Castro-Beiras, Alfonso

    2015-02-01

    We sought to assess the prognostic value of exercise-induced left ventricular systolic dysfunction in hypertensive patients with normal resting echocardiography and absence of coronary artery disease. From our database of patients referred for treadmill exercise echocardiography, we identified 93 hypertensive patients with preserved resting left ventricular ejection fraction (≥ 50%), no evidence of structural heart disease, and absence of coronary artery disease on angiography. Overall, 39 patients developed exercise-induced left ventricular systolic dysfunction (defined as a decrease in left ventricular ejection fraction below 50% at peak exercise) and 54 exhibited a normal left ventricular ejection fraction response to exercise. The mean follow-up was 6.1 (3.7) years. End points were all-cause mortality, cardiac death, heart failure, and the composite event of cardiac death or heart failure. Patients who developed exercise-induced left ventricular systolic dysfunction were at higher risk of death from any cause (hazard ratio=3.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-10.3), cardiac death (hazard ratio=5.6; 95%CI, 1.1-29.4), heart failure (hazard ratio=8.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.8-44.2), and the composite end point (hazard ratio=5.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.7-19.0). In the multivariate analysis, exercise-induced left ventricular systolic dysfunction remained an independent predictor of both heart failure (hazard ratio=6.9; 95% CI, 1.3-37.4) and the composite event of cardiac death or heart failure (hazard ratio=4.5; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-16.0). In hypertensive patients with preserved resting left ventricular ejection fraction and absence of coronary artery disease, exercise-induced left ventricular systolic dysfunction is a strong predictor of cardiac events and may represent early hypertensive heart disease. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Autoimmune hair loss induced by alloantigen in C57BL/6 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Zhi-ping; Matsui, Shinobu; Li, Ai-li; Katsuda, Shogo; Yamaguchi, Nobuo

    2003-02-01

    Exponentially growing Meth-A cells expressing H-2K(d).D (d) antigen were found to induce alopecia when injected intraperitoneally into normal C57BL/6 mice, which express the H-2K(b).D (b) antigen. However, the capacity to induce alopecia disappeared when Meth-A cells were treated with K252a, which inhibits protein kinases. Histologically, skin in affected areas showed dense mononuclear cell infiltration and a focal foreign-body giant-cell reaction in hair follicles. The subtyping of lymphocytes in peripheral blood demonstrated a significant difference between normal mice and Meth-A cell-injected mice. To further examine the mechanism by which the alloantigen induces alopecia, lymphocytes isolated from the peripheral blood of normal C57BL/6 mice were cultured in medium containing Meth-A cell homogenate, phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and recombinant mouse interleukin-2 (rm IL-2), and intravenously injected into normal C57BL/6 mice. The adoptive transfer of the lymphocytes induced alopecia in a similar way. These findings suggest that the protein kinase-modulated alloantigen induces alopecia by disturbing the immunological homeostasis, and that lymphokine-activated killer cells play an important role in induction of alopecia by cross-reacting with hair follicles.

  1. The Rat Diabetes Susceptibility Locus Iddm4 And At Least One Additional Gene Are Required For Autoimmune Diabetes Induced By Viral Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Blankenhorn, Elizabeth P.; Rodemich, Lucy; Martin-Fernandez, Cristina; Leif, Jean; Greiner, Dale L.; Mordes, John P.

    2005-01-01

    BBDR rats develop autoimmune diabetes mellitus only after challenge with environmental perturbants. These include polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly I:C, a ligand of toll-like receptor 3), agents that deplete regulatory T cell populations (Tregs), and a non-beta-cell-cytopathic parvovirus (Kilham rat virus, KRV). The dominant diabetes susceptibility locus Iddm4 is required for diabetes induced by treatment with poly I:C plus Treg depletion. Iddm4 is penetrant in congenic heterozygote rats ...

  2. Oral insulin treatment suppresses virus-induced antigen-specific destruction of beta cells and prevents autoimmune diabetes in transgenic mice.

    OpenAIRE

    von Herrath, M G; Dyrberg, T; Oldstone, M B

    1996-01-01

    Oral administration of self-antigens has been proposed as a therapy to prevent and treat autoimmune diseases. Here we report that oral treatment with insulin prevents virus-induced insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) in a transgenic (tg) mouse model. Such mice express the viral nucleoprotein (NP) of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) under control of the rat insulin promoter in their pancreatic beta cells and < 2% spontaneously develop diabetes. However, 2 mo after challenge wit...

  3. The Calcium-Induced Regulation in the Molecular and Transcriptional Circuitry of Human Inflammatory Response and Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo R. de Seabra Rodrigues Dias

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts (RASFs are fundamental effector cells in RA driving the joint inflammation and deformities. Celastrol is a natural compound that exhibits a potent anti-arthritic effect promoting endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress mediated by intracellular calcium (Ca2+ mobilization. Ca2+ is a second messenger regulating a variety of cellular processes. We hypothesized that the compound, celastrol, affecting cytosolic Ca2+ mobilization could serve as a novel strategy to combat RA. To address this issue, celastrol was used as a molecular tool to assay the inflammatory gene expression profile regulated by Ca2+. We confirmed that celastrol treatment mobilized cytosolic Ca2+ in patient-derived RASFs. It was found that 23 genes out of 370 were manipulated by Ca2+ mobilization using an inflammatory and autoimmunity PCR array following independent quantitative PCR validation. Most of the identified genes were downregulated and categorized into five groups corresponding to their cellular responses participating in RA pathogenesis. Accordingly, a signaling network map demonstrating the possible molecular circuitry connecting the functions of the products of these genes was generated based on literature review. In addition, a bioinformatics analysis revealed that celastrol-induced Ca2+ mobilization gene expression profile showed a novel mode of action compared with three FDA-approved rheumatic drugs (methotrexate, rituximab and tocilizumab. To the best of our knowledge, this is a pioneer work charting the Ca2+ signaling network on the regulation of RA-associated inflammatory gene expression.

  4. MuSK induced experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis does not require IgG1 antibody to MuSK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küçükerden, Melike; Huda, Ruksana; Tüzün, Erdem; Yılmaz, Abdullah; Skriapa, Lamprini; Trakas, Nikos; Strait, Richard T; Finkelman, Fred D; Kabadayı, Sevil; Zisimopoulou, Paraskevi; Tzartos, Socrates; Christadoss, Premkumar

    2016-06-15

    Sera of myasthenia gravis (MG) patients with muscle-specific receptor kinase-antibody (MuSK-Ab) predominantly display the non-complement fixing IgG4 isotype. Similarly, mouse IgG1, which is the analog of human IgG4, is the predominant isotype in mice with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) induced by MuSK immunization. The present study was performed to determine whether IgG1 anti-MuSK antibody is required for immunized mice to develop EAMG. Results demonstrated a significant correlation between clinical severity of EAMG and levels of MuSK-binding IgG1+, IgG2+ and IgG3+ peripheral blood B cells in MuSK-immunized wild-type (WT) mice. Moreover, MuSK-immunized IgG1 knockout (KO) and WT mice showed similar EAMG severity, serum MuSK-Ab levels, muscle acetylcholine receptor concentrations, neuromuscular junction immunoglobulin and complement deposit ratios. IgG1 and IgG3 were the predominant anti-MuSK isotypes in WT and IgG1 KO mice, respectively. These observations demonstrate that non-IgG1 isotypes can mediate MuSK-EAMG pathogenesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Preventative effects of the flowers of Inula britannica on autoimmune diabetes in C57BL/KsJ mice induced by multiple low doses of streptozotocin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Takao; Song, Qing-Hua; Hong, Tie; Kitamura, Hajime; Cyong, Jong-Chol

    2002-06-01

    We have reported that an aqueous extract from the flowers of Inula britannica L. subsp. japonica Kitam. (IB) prevented immunologically induced experimental hepatitis in mice and suggested that the antihepatitic effect of IB is due to inhibition of IFN-gamma production. We then investigated the effects of IB on diabetes in mice induced by multiple low doses of streptozotocin (MLDSTZ), which is a mouse model for IFN-gamma-dependent autoimmune diabetes. C57BL/KsJ mice (male, 7 weeks) were provided with IB extract (500 mg/ kg/ day) in drinking water ad libitum, starting 7 days before the first STZ injection. Autoimmune diabetes was induced by MLDSTZ (40 mg/kg/day for 5 daily doses, i.p.). The IB treatment significantly suppressed the increase of blood glucose levels. Histological analysis of the pancreas showed that the degree of insulitis and destruction of beta-cells were reduced by IB treatment. The IFN-gamma production from stimulated splenic T lymphocytes was inhibited by the IB treatment. Moreover, the proportion of IFN-gamma-producing cells in the CD4(+) population, which was increased by MLDSTZ, was significantly decreased by the IB treatment. These results suggest that IB has a preventative effect on autoimmune diabetes by regulating cytokine production. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Understanding Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What are they? Points To Remember About Autoimmune Diseases Autoimmune diseases refer to problems with the immune system, ... Infectious Diseases Website: https://www.niaid.nih.gov/diseases-conditions/autoimmune-diseases American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association Website: https:// ...

  7. Prognosis of type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis after corticosteroid therapy-induced remission in terms of relapse and diabetes mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Miyazawa

    Full Text Available Relapse and diabetes mellitus (DM are major problems for the prognosis of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP. We examined the prognosis of type 1 AIP after corticosteroid therapy (CST-induced remission in terms of relapse and DM.The study enrolled 82 patients diagnosed with type 1 AIP who achieved remission with CST. We retrospectively evaluated the relapse rate in terms of the administration period of CST, clinical factors associated with relapse, and the temporal change in glucose tolerance.During follow-up, 32 patients (39.0% experienced relapse. There was no significant clinical factor that could predict relapse before beginning CST. AIP patients who ceased CST within 2 or 3 years experienced significantly earlier relapse than those who had the continuance of CST (p = 0.050 or p = 0.020. Of the 37 DM patients, 15 patients (40.5% had pre-existing DM, 17 (45.9% showed new-onset DM, and 5 (13.5% developed CST-induced DM. Patients with new-onset DM were significantly more likely to show improvement (p = 0.008 than those with pre-existing DM.It was difficult to predict relapse of AIP based on clinical parameters before beginning CST. Relapse was likely to occur within 3 years after the beginning of CST and maintenance of CST for at least 3 years reduced the risk of relapse. The early initiation of CST for AIP with impaired glucose tolerance is desirable because pre-existing DM is refractory to CST.

  8. Lymphopenia-induced proliferation in Aire-deficient mice helps to explain their autoimmunity and differences from human patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai eKisand

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Studies on autoimmune polyendocrinopathy candidiasis ectodermal dystrophy (APECED and its mouse model – both caused by mutant AIRE – have greatly advanced the under-standing of thymic processes that generate a self-tolerant T-cell repertoire. Much is now known about the molecular mechanisms by which AIRE induces tissue-specific antigen expression in thymic epithelium, and how this leads to negative selection of autoreactive thymocytes. However, we still do not understand the processes that lead to the activation of any infrequent naïve auto-reactive T-cells exported by AIRE-deficient thymi. Also, the striking phenotypic differences between APECED and its mouse models have puzzled researchers for years. The aim of this review is to suggest explanations for some of these unanswered questions, based on a fresh view of published experiments. We bring evidence that autoreactive T-cells can be activated by prolonged neonatal lymphopenia that naturally develops in young Aire-deficient mice due to delayed export of mature thymocytes. Lymphopenia induced proliferation (LIP fills the empty space favoring autoreactive T cells. This leads to lymphocyte infiltration in similar tissues as seen in day 3 thymectomised animals. LIP turns uncontrolled in Aire–/– crosses with other model mice with defects in genes responsible for anergy induction and Treg responsiveness, or defects in TCR signaling in combination with impaired function of homeostatic cytokines. In APECED patients LIP is probably not among the factors that participate in naïve autoreactive T cell activation as humans are born with more mature immune system in comparison to mice. We suggest that human AIRE-deficiency presents with different phenotype due to additional precipitating factors on top of deficient negative selection of tissue-specific thymocytes.

  9. Autoimmun hypophysitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Therese; Hagen, Claus

    2010-01-01

    during pregnancy or postpartum, but also occurs in males and children. AH is often associated with other autoimmune diseases, most frequently with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The symptoms are caused by enlargement of the pituitary gland and disturbances of the hormone function. Treatment is either......Autoimmune hypophysitis (AH) - often referred to as lymphocytic hypophysitis - is a rare disease that affects the pituitary gland and causes inflammation. The disease enlarges the pituitary gland and the clinical presentations are lack of pituitary function and headaches. AH is mostly seen in women...

  10. Autoimmun hypophysitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Therese; Hagen, Claus

    2010-01-01

    during pregnancy or postpartum, but also occurs in males and children. AH is often associated with other autoimmune diseases, most frequently with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The symptoms are caused by enlargement of the pituitary gland and disturbances of the hormone function. Treatment is either......Autoimmune hypophysitis (AH) - often referred to as lymphocytic hypophysitis - is a rare disease that affects the pituitary gland and causes inflammation. The disease enlarges the pituitary gland and the clinical presentations are lack of pituitary function and headaches. AH is mostly seen in women...... immunosuppressive treatment or surgery....

  11. Dimethyl sulfoxide inhibits spontaneous diabetes and autoimmune recurrence in non-obese diabetic mice by inducing differentiation of regulatory T cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Gu-Jiun [Department of Biology and Anatomy, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Sytwu, Huey-Kang [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Yu, Jyh-Cherng [Department of General Surgery, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chen, Yuan-Wu [School of Dentistry, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Kuo, Yu-Liang [Department of Medical Imaging, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan, ROC (China); School of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan, ROC (China); Yu, Chiao-Chi [Department of Biology and Anatomy, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of General Surgery, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chang, Hao-Ming; Chan, De-Chuan [Department of General Surgery, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Huang, Shing-Hwa, E-mail: h610129@gmail.com [Department of Biology and Anatomy, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of General Surgery, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2015-01-15

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) is caused by the destruction of insulin-producing β cells in pancreatic islets by autoimmune T cells. Islet transplantation has been established as an effective therapeutic strategy for T1D. However, the survival of islet grafts can be disrupted by recurrent autoimmunity. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is a solvent for organic and inorganic substances and an organ-conserving agent used in solid organ transplantations. DMSO also exerts anti-inflammatory, reactive oxygen species scavenger and immunomodulatory effects and therefore exhibits therapeutic potential for the treatment of several human inflammatory diseases. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic potential of DMSO in the inhibition of autoimmunity. We treated an animal model of islet transplantation (NOD mice) with DMSO. The survival of the syngeneic islet grafts was significantly prolonged. The population numbers of CD8, DC and Th1 cells were decreased, and regulatory T (Treg) cell numbers were increased in recipients. The expression levels of IFN-γ and proliferation of T cells were also reduced following DMSO treatment. Furthermore, the differentiation of Treg cells from naive CD4 T cells was significantly increased in the in vitro study. Our results demonstrate for the first time that in vivo DMSO treatment suppresses spontaneous diabetes and autoimmune recurrence in NOD mice by inhibiting the Th1 immune response and inducing the differentiation of Treg cells. - Highlights: • We report a therapeutic potential of DMSO in autoimmune diabetes. • DMSO exhibits an immune modulatory effect. • DMSO treatment increases regulatory T cell differentiation. • The increase in STAT5 signaling pathway explains the effect of DMSO in Tregs.

  12. Correlation between left ventricular filling and ischemic extent during exercise-induced myocardial ischemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Akitada; Yokota, Mitsuhiro; Iwase, Mitsunori

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine how the extent of exercise-induced myocardial ischemia influence left ventricular filling. Twenty-two consecutive patients with effort angina, consisting of 16 with single vessel disease and 6 with double vessel disease, underwent exercise studies in lying and sitting positions. Extent score (ES) and severity score (SS) were calculated on polar map prepared from early exercise Tl-201 myocardial SPECT images to determine ischemic extent. Pulmonary arterial wedge pressure (PAWP), as obtained at exercise in lying position, correlated significantly well with both ES (r=0.75, p<0.001) and SS (r=0.61, p<0.01). There was, however, no significant correlation between the other hemodynamic parameters, such as heart rate, systolic pressure, rate-pressure product, cardiac index and stroke index, and both ES and SS. Either increased PAWP or ischemic extent was not dependent on the number of diseased vessels. In conclusion, the extent of increased left ventricular filling did not correlate with the number of diseased vessels, but correlated positively with ischemic extent. (N.K.)

  13. Striking volume intolerance is induced by mimicking arterial baroreflex failure in normal left ventricular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funakoshi, Kouta; Hosokawa, Kazuya; Kishi, Takuya; Ide, Tomomi; Sunagawa, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    Patients with heart failure and preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) are supersensitive to volume overload, and a striking increase in left atrial pressure (LAP) often occurs transiently and is rapidly resolved by intravascular volume reduction. The arterial baroreflex is a powerful regulator of intravascular stressed blood volume. We examined whether arterial baroreflex failure (FAIL) mimicked by constant carotid sinus pressure (CSP) causes a striking increase in LAP and systemic arterial pressure (AP) by volume loading in rats with normal left ventricular (LV) function. In anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats, we isolated bilateral carotid sinuses and controlled CSP by a servo-controlled piston pump. We mimicked the normal arterial baroreflex by matching CSP to instantaneous AP and FAIL by maintaining CSP at a constant value regardless of AP. We infused dextran stepwise (infused volume [Vi]) until LAP reached 15 mm Hg and obtained the LAP-Vi relationship. We estimated the critical Vi as the Vi at which LAP reached 20 mm Hg. In FAIL, critical Vi decreased markedly from 19.4 ± 1.6 mL/kg to 15.6 ± 1.6 mL/kg (P baroreflex system we recently developed could fully restore the physiologic volume intolerance in the absence of native arterial baroreflex. Arterial baroreflex failure induces striking volume intolerance in the absence of LV dysfunction and may play an important role in the pathogenesis of acute heart failure, especially in states of HFpEF. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Deletion of Interleukin-6 Attenuates Pressure Overload-Induced Left Ventricular Hypertrophy and Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzal, Muhammad R.; Samanta, Anweshan; Xuan, Yu-Ting; Girgis, Magdy; Elias, Harold K; Zhu, Yanqing; Davani, Arash; Yang, Yanjuan; Chen, Xing; Ye, Sheng; Wang, Ou-Li; Chen, Lei; Hauptman, Jeryl; Vincent, Robert J.; Dawn, Buddhadeb

    2016-01-01

    Rationale The role of interleukin (IL)-6 in the pathogenesis of cardiac myocyte hypertrophy remains controversial. Objective To conclusively determine whether IL-6 signaling is essential for the development of pressure overload-induced left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy, and to elucidate the underlying molecular pathways. Methods and Results Wild-type (WT) and IL-6 knockout (IL-6−/−) mice underwent sham surgery or transverse aortic constriction (TAC) to induce pressure overload. Serial echocardiograms and terminal hemodynamic studies revealed attenuated LV hypertrophy and superior preservation of LV function in IL-6−/− mice after TAC. The extents of LV remodeling, fibrosis, and apoptosis were reduced in IL-6−/− hearts after TAC. Transcriptional and protein assays of myocardial tissue identified CaMKII and STAT3 activation as important underlying mechanisms during cardiac hypertrophy induced by TAC. The involvement of these pathways in myocyte hypertrophy was verified in isolated cardiac myocytes from WT and IL-6−/− mice exposed to pro-hypertrophy agents. Furthermore, overexpression of CaMKII in H9c2 cells increased STAT3 phosphorylation, and exposure of H9c2 cells to IL-6 resulted in STAT3 activation that was attenuated by CaMKII inhibition. Together these results identify the importance of CaMKII-dependent activation of STAT3 during cardiac myocyte hypertrophy via IL-6 signaling. Conclusions Genetic deletion of IL-6 attenuates TAC-induced LV hypertrophy and dysfunction, indicating a critical role played by IL-6 in the pathogenesis of LV hypertrophy in response to pressure overload. CaMKII plays an important role in IL-6-induced STAT3 activation and consequent cardiac myocyte hypertrophy. These findings may have significant therapeutic implications for LV hypertrophy and failure in patients with hypertension. PMID:27126808

  15. Natriuretic peptides in the monitoring of anthracycline induced reduction in left ventricular ejection fraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugaard, Gedske; Lassen, Ulrik; Bie, Peter

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The use of anthracyclines in treatment of cancer is limited by cardiotoxicity of these compounds and may lead to heart failure. Therefore monitoring of cardiac function is necessary during therapy. AIM: We evaluated the value of natriuretic peptides (N-terminal pro-atrial natriuretic...... peptide (N-ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP)) for monitoring and predicting anthracycline induced cardiotoxicity using radionuclide left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) measurements as reference. METHODS AND RESULTS: A total of 107 consecutive patients receiving anthracycline as part...... of their chemotherapy for malignant disease were studied. Plasma concentrations of the peptides were measured by radioimmunoassay and EF by radionuclide cardiography. For reduced EF values, i.e. below 0.50 a fairly strong correlation was found between N-ANP or BNP and EF. Of 48 patients with serial EF and peptide...

  16. Stress proteins, autoimmunity, and autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winfield, J B; Jarjour, W N

    1991-01-01

    At birth, the immune system is biased toward recognition of microbial antigens in order to protect the host from infection. Recent data suggest that an important initial line of defense in this regard involves autologous stress proteins, especially conserved peptides of hsp60, which are presented to T cells bearing gamma delta receptors by relatively nonpolymorphic class lb molecules. Natural antibodies may represent a parallel B cell mechanism. Through an evolving process of "physiological" autoreactivity and selection by immunodominant stress proteins common to all prokaryotes, B and T cell repertoires expand during life to meet the continuing challenge of infection. Because stress proteins of bacteria are homologous with stress proteins of the host, there exists in genetically susceptible individuals a constant risk of autoimmune disease due to failure of mechanisms for self-nonself discrimination. That stress proteins actually play a role in autoimmune processes is supported by a growing body of evidence which, collectively, suggests that autoreactivity in chronic inflammatory arthritis involves, at least initially, gamma delta cells which recognize epitopes of the stress protein hsp60. Alternate mechanisms for T cell stimulation by stress proteins undoubtedly also exist, e.g., molecular mimicry of the DR beta third hypervariable region susceptibility locus for rheumatoid arthritis by a DnaJ stress protein epitope in gram-negative bacteria. While there still is confusion with respect to the most relevant stress protein epitopes, a central role for stress proteins in the etiology of arthritis appears likely. Furthermore, insight derived from the work thus far in adjuvant-induced arthritis already is stimulating analyses of related phenomena in autoimmune diseases other than those involving joints. Only limited data are available in the area of humoral autoimmunity to stress proteins. Autoantibodies to a number of stress proteins have been identified in SLE and

  17. Autoimmun hypophysitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Therese; Hagen, Claus

    2010-01-01

    during pregnancy or postpartum, but also occurs in males and children. AH is often associated with other autoimmune diseases, most frequently with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The symptoms are caused by enlargement of the pituitary gland and disturbances of the hormone function. Treatment is either...

  18. Autoimmune sialadenitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guntinas-Lichius, O.; Vissink, A.; Ihrler, S.

    Using the European-American classification criteria the diagnosis of autoimmune sialadenitis in Sjogren's syndrome can generally be easily established or excluded. In addition, sonography performed by the ENT physician is helpful in diagnosing and especially in follow-up screening for MALT

  19. Adipose tissue ATGL modifies the cardiac lipidome in pressure-overload-induced left ventricular failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janek Salatzki

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Adipose tissue lipolysis occurs during the development of heart failure as a consequence of chronic adrenergic stimulation. However, the impact of enhanced adipose triacylglycerol hydrolysis mediated by adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL on cardiac function is unclear. To investigate the role of adipose tissue lipolysis during heart failure, we generated mice with tissue-specific deletion of ATGL (atATGL-KO. atATGL-KO mice were subjected to transverse aortic constriction (TAC to induce pressure-mediated cardiac failure. The cardiac mouse lipidome and the human plasma lipidome from healthy controls (n = 10 and patients with systolic heart failure (HFrEF, n = 13 were analyzed by MS-based shotgun lipidomics. TAC-induced increases in left ventricular mass (LVM and diastolic LV inner diameter were significantly attenuated in atATGL-KO mice compared to wild type (wt -mice. More importantly, atATGL-KO mice were protected against TAC-induced systolic LV failure. Perturbation of lipolysis in the adipose tissue of atATGL-KO mice resulted in the prevention of the major cardiac lipidome changes observed after TAC in wt-mice. Profound changes occurred in the lipid class of phosphatidylethanolamines (PE in which multiple PE-species were markedly induced in failing wt-hearts, which was attenuated in atATGL-KO hearts. Moreover, selected heart failure-induced PE species in mouse hearts were also induced in plasma samples from patients with chronic heart failure. TAC-induced cardiac PE induction resulted in decreased PC/ PE-species ratios associated with increased apoptotic marker expression in failing wt-hearts, a process absent in atATGL-KO hearts. Perturbation of adipose tissue lipolysis by ATGL-deficiency ameliorated pressure-induced heart failure and the potentially deleterious cardiac lipidome changes that accompany this pathological process, namely the induction of specific PE species. Non-cardiac ATGL-mediated modulation of the cardiac lipidome may play an

  20. Nuclear antigen expression by ultraviolet light irradiation - a contribution to the UV-induced autoimmunity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wollina, U.

    1986-01-01

    A review is given about nuclear antigen expression due to UVB, UVA, and PUVA. UVB alters DNA resulting in strong immunogenic UVDNA and complementary antibodies. Antibodies to UVDNA cross react with double-stranded DNA. UVDNA plays a (hypothetical) role in the induction of cutaneous lesions in lupus erythematosus (LE). Investigations about SS-A/Ro expression due to UVB seem to be more important under this view. Antibodies against SS-A/Ro are related to an increased photosensitivity in LE. PUVA and UVA are able to induce antinuclear antibodies of unknown specificity. It is likely that PUVA enhances SS-A/Ro expression in vitro. The results are discussed in sense of LE photobiology and unwanted side effects of photo(chemo)therapy in psoriasis. (author)

  1. [Expression of Ki-67 and estrogen receptor in the uterus of mice with autoimmune premature ovarian failure induced by peptide zona pellucida 3].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Huihua; Fu, Xiafei; Ren, Xuwen; Chen, Xiazhu; Zhang, Dongmei; He, Yuanli

    2015-07-01

    To investigate the histomorphology and the expressions of the proliferation marker Ki-67 and estrogen receptor in the uterus of mice with autoimmune premature ovarian failure (POF) induced by zona pellucida 3 peptide (pZP3). Autoimmune POP models were established in 20 female BALB/c mice (7-8 weeks old) by immunization with pZP3 and another 20 mice served as the control group. The POP models were verified by vaginal cytology, serum sex hormones, ovary histomorphology and ZP3 antibody immunohistochemistry. The histomorphology and expressions of Ki-67, estrogen receptor α and estrogen receptor β in the uterus of the mice were detected. Autoimmune POP models were established successfully in 80% of the mice at 8 weeks after the immunization. Compared with those in the control group, the mice in the model group showed a smaller volume of the uterus, thinner endometrium and a reduced number of glands. The luminal epithelial cells, glandular epithelial cells and stromal cells in the uterus of the model mice all presented with a lower expression of Ki-67 than those in the control group, and Ki-67 translocation from the nuclei to the cytoplasm was found in the model group. The luminal epithelial cells, glandular epithelial cells and stromal cells showed positive ERα immunoreactivity in the model group but not in the control group. No obvious ERβ expression was found in the uterus in either of the groups. pZP3 can induce autoimmune POP, cause suppressed proliferation of the endometrial epithelial cells and stromal cells, and reduce the cellular expression of ERα in the uterus of mice.

  2. Nickel-induced allergy and contact dermatitis: does it induce autoimmunity and cutaneous sclerosis? An experimental study in Brown Norway rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mogairen, Sultan M; Meo, Sultan Ayoub; Al-Arfaj, Abdurhman S; Hamdani, Muhammad; Husain, Sufia; Al-Mohimed, Bandar; Adam, M; Al-Hammad, A; El Rab, Mohammed O Gad

    2010-07-01

    Nickel sensitization is a growing problem and the most common cause of allergic contact dermatitis. The aim of this study was to investigate whether nickel chloride can induce autoimmunity and cutaneous sclerosis in immunosensitive rats. Nickel chloride, in a dose of 4.5 mg in 0.2 ml NS, was administered by the oral and subcutaneous routes to 20 Brown Norway rats. Autoantibodies (ANA, anti-RNP, anti-SCL70 and anti-centromere) were measured and compared in pre- and post-challenge serum samples. Histological studies were also performed in skin biopsies obtained from six positively responding rats and compared with an equal number of control rats at the 14th week post-challenge. Serum ANA was high in a significant number of rats in both the oral (P nickel-treated groups (P = 0.02), while the anti-SCL70 was high in a significant number of rats in only the orally nickel-treated group (P = 0.04). Histologically, subcutaneous and oral nickel-treated groups showed sclerodermic features of the skin (P = 0.22, P = 0.5), respectively. It may be concluded that nickel chloride can induce scleroderma-related autoantibodies and cutaneous sclerosis. More prolonged duration of exposure is probably associated with greater risk. This is the first study showing the potential risk of nickel in triggering the development of cutaneous sclerosis in susceptible hosts.

  3. Prevention of airway hyperresponsiveness induced by left ventricular dysfunction in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petak Ferenc

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effectiveness of strategies for treatment of the altered static lung volume and against the development of bronchial hyperreactivity (BHR following a left ventricular dysfunction (LVD induced by myocardial ischaemia was investigated in a rat model of sustained postcapillary pulmonary hypertension. Methods Airway resistance (Raw was identified from the respiratory system input impedance (Zrs in four groups of rats. End-expiratory lung volume (EELV was determined plethysmographically, and Zrs was measured under baseline conditions and following iv infusions of 2, 6 or 18 μg/kg/min methacholine. Sham surgery was performed in the rats in Group C, while the left interventricular coronary artery was ligated and Zrs and its changes following identical methacholine challenges were reassessed in the same rats 8 weeks later, during which no treatment was applied (Group I, or the animals were treated daily with a combination of an angiotensin enzyme converter inhibitor and a diuretic (enalapril and furosemide, Group IE, or a calcium channel blocker (diltiazem, Group ID. The equivalent dose of methacholine causing a 100% increase in Raw (ED50 was determined in each group. Diastolic pulmonary arterial pressure (PapD was assessed by introducing a catheter into the pulmonary artery. Results The sustained presence of a LVD increased PapD in all groups of rats, with variable but significant elevations in Groups I (p = 0.004, ID (p = 0.013 and IE (p = 0.006. A LVD for 8 weeks induced no changes in baseline Raw but elevated the EELV independently of the treatments. In Group I, BHR consistently developed following the LVD, with a significant decrease in ED50 from 10.0 ± 2.5 to 6.9 ± 2.5 μg/kg/min (p = 0.006. The BHR was completely abolished in both Groups ID and IE, with no changes in ED50 (9.5 ± 3.6 vs. 10.7 ± 4.7, p = 0.33 and 10.6 ± 2.1 vs. 9.8 ± 3.5 μg/kg/min p = 0.56, respectively

  4. [Autoimmune channelopathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, M; Delrieu, J; Astudillo, L

    2011-12-01

    Autoimmune channelopathies are rare neuromuscular diseases that have been characterized clinically for several decades but for which the evidence of associated antibodies has only been recently demonstrated. Ion channels have an important role of activation, inhibition and regulation in neuromuscular transmission. Myasthenia gravis, generally associated with the presence of anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody, is the best-known channelopathy. Other anti-channel antibodies, including voltage-dependent, are associated with several neurological diseases, as illustrated by anti-voltage-gated calcium channels found in Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome and paraneoplastic cerebellar ataxia, and anti-voltage-gated potassium channels found in neuromyotonia, Morvan's syndrome and limbic encephalitis. The treatment of autoimmune channelopathies is logically based on corticosteroids, immunosuppressant drugs, intravenous immunoglobulins and plasmapheresis. Copyright © 2011 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Autoimmun pankreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjordside, Eva; Novovic, Srdan; Schmidt, Palle Nordblad

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare inflammatory disease. AIP has characteristic histology, serology and imaging findings. Two types of AIP exist, type 1, which is a part of the systemic immunoglobulin G4-related disease, and type 2, which is only localized to the pancreas. Patients with type...... are predominantly older men, have involvement of other organs and more often experience relapse than patients with type 2. Both types respond well to steroid treatment. The most important differential diagnose is pancreatic cancer....

  6. AIRE-mutations and autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruserud, Øyvind; Oftedal, Bergithe E; Wolff, Anette B; Husebye, Eystein S

    2016-12-01

    The gene causing the severe organ-specific autoimmune disease autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type-1 (APS-1) was identified in 1997 and named autoimmune regulator (AIRE). AIRE plays a key role in shaping central immunological tolerance by facilitating negative selection of T cells in the thymus, building the thymic microarchitecture, and inducing a specific subset of regulatory T cells. So far, about 100 mutations have been identified. Recent advances suggest that certain mutations located in the SAND and PHD1 domains exert a dominant negative effect on wild type AIRE resulting in milder seemingly common forms of autoimmune diseases, including pernicious anemia, vitiligo and autoimmune thyroid disease. These findings indicate that AIRE also contribute to autoimmunity in more common organ-specific autoimmune disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. In vivo evidence for CD4+ and CD8+ suppressor T cells in vaccination-induced suppression of murine experimental autoimmune thyroiditis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, J.C.; Kong, Y.C.

    1991-01-01

    In several experimental autoimmune diseases, including experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT), vaccination with attenuated autoantigen-specific T cells has provided protection against subsequent induction of disease. However, the mechanism(s) of vaccination-induced suppression remains to be clarified. Since the authors have previously shown that suppression generated by pretreatment with mouse thyroglobulin (MTg) or thyroid-stimulating hormone in EAT is mediated by CD4+, not CD8+, suppressor T cells, they examined the role of T cell subsets in vaccination-induced suppression of EAT. Mice were vaccinated with irradiated, MTg-primed, and MTg-activated spleen cells and then challenged. Pretreatment with these cells suppressed EAT induced by immunization with MTg and adjuvant, but not by adoptive transfer of thyroiditogenic cells, suggesting a mechanism of afferent suppression. The activation of suppressor mechanisms did not require CD8+ cells, since mice depleted of CD8+ cells before vaccination showed reduced EAT comparable to control vaccinated mice. Furthermore, depletion of either the CD4+ or the CD8+ subset after vaccination did not significantly abrogate suppression. However, suppression was eliminated by the depletion of both CD4+ and CD8+ cells in vaccinated mice. These results provide evidence for the cooperative effects of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in vaccination-induced suppression of EAT

  8. Modification of the FoxP3 transcription factor principally affects inducible T regulatory cells in a model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Verhagen

    Full Text Available T regulatory (Treg cells expressing the transcription factor FoxP3 play a key role in protection against autoimmune disease. GFP-FoxP3 reporter mice have been used widely to study the induction, function and stability of both thymically- and peripherally-induced Treg cells. The N-terminal modification of FoxP3, however, affects its interaction with transcriptional co-factors; this can alter Treg cell development and function in certain self-antigen specific animal models. Interestingly, Treg cell function can be negatively or positively affected, depending on the nature of the model. In this study, we focused on the effect of the GFP-FoxP3 reporter on Treg cell development and function in the Tg4 mouse model. In this model, T cells express a transgenic T cell receptor (TCR specific for the Myelin Basic Protein (MBP peptide Ac1-9, making the animals susceptible to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, a disease akin to multiple sclerosis in humans. Unlike diabetes-susceptible mice, Tg4 FoxP3(gfp mice did not develop spontaneous autoimmune disease and did not demonstrate augmented susceptibility to induced disease. Concurrently, thymic generation of natural Treg cells was not negatively affected. The induction of FoxP3 expression in naive peripheral T cells was, however, significantly impaired as a result of the transgene. This study shows that the requirements for the interaction of FoxP3 with co-factors, which governs its regulatory ability, differ not only between natural and inducible Treg cells but also between animal models of diseases such as diabetes and EAE.

  9. Resetting microbiota by Lactobacillus reuteri inhibits T reg deficiency–induced autoimmunity via adenosine A2A receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Thomas K.; Tian, Xiangjun; Luo, Meng; Zhou, Jain; Tatevian, Nina; Molina, Jose G.; Blackburn, Michael R.; Gomez, Thomas H.

    2017-01-01

    Regulatory T (T reg) cell deficiency causes lethal, CD4+ T cell–driven autoimmune diseases. Stem cell transplantation is used to treat these diseases, but this procedure is limited by the availability of a suitable donor. The intestinal microbiota drives host immune homeostasis by regulating the differentiation and expansion of T reg, Th1, and Th2 cells. It is currently unclear if T reg cell deficiency–mediated autoimmune disorders can be treated by targeting the enteric microbiota. Here, we demonstrate that Foxp3+ T reg cell deficiency results in gut microbial dysbiosis and autoimmunity over the lifespan of scurfy (SF) mouse. Remodeling microbiota with Lactobacillus reuteri prolonged survival and reduced multiorgan inflammation in SF mice. L. reuteri changed the metabolomic profile disrupted by T reg cell deficiency, and a major effect was to restore levels of the purine metabolite inosine. Feeding inosine itself prolonged life and inhibited multiorgan inflammation by reducing Th1/Th2 cells and their associated cytokines. Mechanistically, the inhibition of inosine on the differentiation of Th1 and Th2 cells in vitro depended on adenosine A2A receptors, which were also required for the efficacy of inosine and of L. reuteri in vivo. These results reveal that the microbiota–inosine–A2A receptor axis might represent a potential avenue for combatting autoimmune diseases mediated by T reg cell dysfunction. PMID:27994068

  10. Prevalence of exercise-induced left ventricular outflow tract obstruction in symptomatic patients with non-obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shah, J S

    2008-10-01

    Resting left ventricular outflow tract obstruction (LVOTO) occurs in 25% of patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and is an important cause of symptoms and disease progression. The prevalence and clinical significance of exercise induced LVOTO in patients with symptomatic non-obstructive HCM is uncertain.

  11. Inducible tertiary lymphoid structures, autoimmunity, and exocrine dysfunction in a novel model of salivary gland inflammation in C57BL/6 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bombardieri, Michele; Barone, Francesca; Lucchesi, Davide; Nayar, Saba; van den Berg, Wim B; Proctor, Gordon; Buckley, Christopher D; Pitzalis, Costantino

    2012-10-01

    Salivary glands in patients with Sjögren's syndrome (SS) develop ectopic lymphoid structures (ELS) characterized by B/T cell compartmentalization, the formation of high endothelial venules, follicular dendritic cell networks, functional B cell activation with expression of activation-induced cytidine deaminase, as well as local differentiation of autoreactive plasma cells. The mechanisms that trigger ELS formation, autoimmunity, and exocrine dysfunction in SS are largely unknown. In this article, we present a novel model of inducible ectopic lymphoid tissue formation, breach of humoral self-tolerance, and salivary hypofunction after delivery of a replication-deficient adenovirus-5 in submandibular glands of C57BL/6 mice through retrograde excretory duct cannulation. In this model, inflammation rapidly and consistently evolves from diffuse infiltration toward the development of SS-like periductal lymphoid aggregates within 2 wk from AdV delivery. These infiltrates progressively acquire ELS features and support functional GL7(+)/activation-induced cytidine deaminase(+) germinal centers. Formation of ELS is preceded by ectopic expression of lymphoid chemokines CXCL13, CCL19, and lymphotoxin-β, and is associated with development of anti-nuclear Abs in up to 75% of mice. Finally, reduction in salivary flow was observed over 3 wk post-AdV infection, consistent with exocrine gland dysfunction as a consequence of the inflammatory response. This novel model has the potential to unravel the cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate ELS formation and their role in exocrine dysfunction and autoimmunity in SS.

  12. Autoimmune liver disease panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liver disease test panel - autoimmune ... Autoimmune disorders are a possible cause of liver disease. The most common of these diseases are autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cholangitis (formerly called primary biliary cirrhosis). This group of tests ...

  13. Update in Endocrine Autoimmunity

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Mark S.

    2008-01-01

    Context: The endocrine system is a common target in pathogenic autoimmune responses, and there has been recent progress in our understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of autoimmune endocrine diseases.

  14. Left Ventricular Thrombus as a Complication of Clozapine-Induced Cardiomyopathy: A Case Report and Brief Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Shahbaz A; Malik, Sarah; Dowsley, Taylor F; Singh, Balwinder

    2015-01-01

    A 48-year-old male with history of schizoaffective disorder on clozapine presented with chest pain, dyspnea, and new left bundle branch block. He underwent coronary angiography, which revealed no atherosclerosis. The patient's workup was unrevealing for a cause for the cardiomyopathy and thus it was thought that clozapine was the offending agent. The patient was taken off clozapine and started on guideline directed heart failure therapy. During the course of hospitalization, he was also discovered to have a left ventricular (LV) thrombus for which he received anticoagulation. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of clozapine-induced cardiomyopathy complicated by a LV thrombus.

  15. Left Ventricular Thrombus as a Complication of Clozapine-Induced Cardiomyopathy: A Case Report and Brief Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahbaz A. Malik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 48-year-old male with history of schizoaffective disorder on clozapine presented with chest pain, dyspnea, and new left bundle branch block. He underwent coronary angiography, which revealed no atherosclerosis. The patient’s workup was unrevealing for a cause for the cardiomyopathy and thus it was thought that clozapine was the offending agent. The patient was taken off clozapine and started on guideline directed heart failure therapy. During the course of hospitalization, he was also discovered to have a left ventricular (LV thrombus for which he received anticoagulation. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of clozapine-induced cardiomyopathy complicated by a LV thrombus.

  16. A Case of Cough-induced Ventricular Tachycardia in a Patient with a Left Ventricular Assist Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruckdeschel, Emily Sue; Wolfel, Eugene; Nguyen, Duy Thai

    2016-03-01

    In this case, the patient's ventricular tachycardia (VT) was specifically induced by coughing, which has not previously been described. Decreasing the rotational speed of the left ventricular assist device (LVAD) and increasing preload by stopping the patient's nitrates and reducing diuretic dose allowed improved filling of the left ventricle (LV) and increased LV volumes. When coughing recurred, the effects on the LV cavity were less pronounced and thus VT was reduced. Although ventricular arrhythmias are common after LVAD placement, this is a unique case in which VT was caused by coughing, which is ordinarily not considered arrhythmogenic. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Copaiba Oil Suppresses Inflammatory Cytokines in Splenocytes of C57Bl/6 Mice Induced with Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora S. Dias

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE is a murine autoimmune disease used to study multiple sclerosis. We have investigated the immunomodulatory effects of copaiba oil (100, 50 and 25 µg/mL on NO, H2O2, TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-17 production in cultured cells from EAE-mice. Copaiba oil (100 µg/mL inhibited H2O2, NO, IFN-γ TNF-α and IL-17 production spontaneously or after ConA and MOG35–55 stimulation. It is suggested that copaiba oil acts on the mechanism of development of EAE by IFN-γ, IL-17 and TNF-α inhibition, modulating the immune response on both Th1 and Th17 cells.

  18. Inducible tertiary lymphoid structures, autoimmunity and exocrine dysfunction in a novel model of salivary gland inflammation in C57BL/6 mice§

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bombardieri, Michele; Barone, Francesca; Lucchesi, Davide; Nayar, Saba; van den Berg, Wim B; Proctor, Gordon; Buckley, Christopher D; Pitzalis, Costantino

    2012-01-01

    Salivary glands in patients with Sjögren’s syndrome (SS) develop ectopic lymphoid structures (ELS) characterized by B/T cell compartmentalization, the formation of high endothelial venules (HEV), follicular dendritic cell networks (FDCs), functional B cell activation with expression of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) as well as local differentiation of autoreactive plasma cells. The mechanisms triggering ELS formation, autoimmunity and exocrine dysfunction in SS are largely unknown. Here we present a novel model of inducible ectopic lymphoid tissue formation, breach of humoral self-tolerance and salivary hypofunction following delivery of a replication-deficient adenovirus-5 (AdV5) in submandibular glands of C57BL/6 mice through retrograde excretory duct cannulation. In this model, inflammation rapidly and consistently evolves from diffuse infiltration towards the development of SS-like periductal lymphoid aggregates within 2 weeks from AdV delivery. These infiltrates progressively acquire ELS features and support functional GL7+/AID+ germinal centers. Formation of ELS is preceded by ectopic expression of lymphoid chemokines CXCL13, CCL19 and lymphotoxin-β and is associated with development of anti-nuclear antibodies in up to 75% of mice. Finally, reduction in salivary flow was observed over 3 weeks post AdV infection consistent with exocrine gland dysfunction as a consequence of the inflammatory response. This novel model has the potential to unravel the cellular and molecular mechanisms regulating ELS formation and their role in exocrine dysfunction and autoimmunity in SS. PMID:22942425

  19. Exercise-induced changes in left ventricular global longitudinal strain in asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, Agnieszka K; Dobrowolski, Piotr P; Klisiewicz, Anna; Hoffman, Piotr

    2017-01-01

    The management of patients with asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis (ASAS) is still under discussion. Therefore, it is advisable to search for the parameters of early damage to left ventricular (LV) function. The aim of the study was to assess exercise-induced changes in LV global longitudinal strain (GLS) in ASAS. The ASAS group consisted of 50 patients (26 women and 24 men, aged 38.4 ± 18.1 years) meeting the echocardiographic criteria of severe aortic stenosis (AVA 4 m/s, mean aortic gradient > 40 mm Hg), with normal LV ejection fraction (LVEF ≥ 55%) and sinus rhythm on electrocardiogram, and without significant concomitant valvular heart diseases. The control group consisted of 21 people matched for age and sex. Echocardiographic examinations and echocardiographic stress tests with the assessment of GLS using the speckle tracking imaging were performed. The ASAS group was characterised by statistically significantly higher LV mass index (LVMI) and higher LVEF. GLS values at rest in both groups were within normal limits but were significantly higher in the control group (-18.9 ± 2.4% vs. -20.7 ± 1.7%, p = 0.006). An increase in GLS at peak exercise in both groups was observed, lower in the ASAS group (the difference was not statistically significant: -0.8 ± 3.0% vs. -2.2 ± 3.1%, p = 0.086). Changes in GLS during exercise (ΔGLS) did not correlate with the parameters of the severity of aortic stenosis. In the multivariate model, LVMI proved to be a factor associated with GLS at rest and during exercise. In patients with ASAS, GLS is a non-invasive marker of an early stage of LV myocardial damage associated with myocardial hypertrophy. An increase in GLS during exercise in the ASAS group, smaller than in the control group, indicates a preserved functional reserve of the LV myocardium but smaller than in healthy individuals. The assessment of the clinical usefulness of exercise-induced changes in GLS requires further research.

  20. Celiac disease and endocrine autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahaly, George J; Schuppan, Detlef

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a small-intestinal inflammatory disease that is triggered by the ingestion of the storage proteins (gluten) of wheat, barley and rye. Endocrine autoimmunity is prevalent in patients with CD and their relatives. The genes that predispose to endocrine autoimmune diseases, e.g. type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroid diseases, and Addison's disease, i.e. DR3-DQ2 and DR4-DQ8, are also the major genetic determinants of CD, which is the best understood HLA-linked disease. Thus, up to 30% of first-degree relatives both of patients with CD and/or endocrine autoimmunity are affected by the other disease. In CD, certain gluten proteins bind with high affinity to HLA-DQ2 or -DQ8 in the small-intestinal mucosa, to activate gluten-specific T cells which are instrumental in the destruction of the resorptive villi. Here, the autoantigen tissue transglutaminase increases the T cell response by generating deamidated gluten peptides that bind more strongly to DQ2 or DQ8. Classical symptoms such as diarrhea and consequences of malabsorption like anemia and osteoporosis are often absent in patients with (screening-detected) CD, but this absence does not significantly affect these patients' incidence of endocrine autoimmunity. Moreover, once autoimmunity is established, a gluten-free diet is not able to induce remission. However, ongoing studies attempt to address how far a gluten-free diet may prevent or retard the development of CD and endocrine autoimmunity in children at risk. The close relationship between CD and endocrine autoimmunity warrants a broader immune genetic and endocrine screening of CD patients and their relatives. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia following immunization with the hepatitis B vaccine: another angle of the 'autoimmune (auto-inflammatory) syndrome induced by adjuvants' (ASIA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Zafrir, Yaron; Kivity, Shaye; Balofsky, Ari; Amital, Howard; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2014-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to gather information regarding demographic and clinical characteristics of patients diagnosed with either fibromyalgia (FM) or chronic fatigue (CFS) following hepatitis B vaccination (HBVv) and furthermore to apply the recently suggested criteria of autoimmune (auto-inflammatory) syndromes induced by adjuvants (ASIA), in the aim of identifying common characteristics that may suggest an association between fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue and HBV vaccination. Medical records of 19 patients with CFS and/or fibromyalgia following HBVv immunization were analyzed. All of which were immunized during 1990-2008 in different centers in the USA. All medical records were evaluated for demographics, medical history, the number of vaccine doses, as well as immediate and long term post-immunization adverse events and clinical manifestations. In addition, available blood tests, imaging results, treatments and outcomes were analyzed. ASIA criteria were applied to all patients. The mean age of patients was 28.6 ± 11 years, of which 68.4 % were females. 21.05 % had either personal or familial background of autoimmune disease. The mean latency period from the last dose of HBVv to onset of symptoms was 38.6 ± 79.4 days, ranging from days to a year. Eight (42.1 %) patients continued with the immunization program despite experiencing adverse events. Manifestations that were commonly reported included neurological manifestations (84.2 %), musculoskeletal (78.9 %), psychiatric (63.1 %), fatigue (63.1 %), gastrointestinal complains (58 %) and mucocutaneous manifestations (36.8 %). Autoantibodies were detected in 71 % of patients tested. All patients fulfilled the ASIA criteria. This study suggests that in some cases CFS and FM can be temporally related to immunization, as part of ASIA syndrome. The appearance of adverse event during immunization, the presence of autoimmune susceptibility and higher titers of autoantibodies all can be suggested as risk

  2. Atorvastatin can ameliorate left atrial stunning induced by radiofrequency ablation for atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ruiqin; Yang, Yingtao; Cui, Wei; Yin, Hongning; Zheng, Hongmei; Zhang, Jidong; You, Ling

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this study was to study the functional changes of the left atrium after radiofrequency ablation treatment for atrial fibrillation and the therapeutic effect of atorvastatin. Fifty-eight patients undergoing radiofrequency ablation for atrial fibrillation were randomly divided into non-atorvastatin group and atorvastatin group. Patients in the atorvastatin group were treated with atorvastatin 20 mg p.o. per night in addition to the conventional treatment of atrial fibrillation; patients in the non-atorvastatin group received conventional treatment of atrial fibrillation only. Echocardiography was performed before radiofrequency ablation operation and 1 week, 2 weeks, 3 weeks, and 4 weeks after operation. Two-dimensional ultrasound speckle tracking imaging system was used to measure the structural indexes of the left atrium. Results indicated that there was no significant change for indexes representing the structural status of the left atrium within a month after radiofrequency ablation (P > 0.05); however, there were significant changes for indexes representing the functional status of the left atrium. There were also significant changes in indexes reflecting left atrial strain status: the S and SRs of atorvastatin group were higher than those of non-atorvastatin group (P radiofrequency ablation of atrial fibrillation.

  3. Stellate Cell Activation and Imbalanced Expression of TGF-β1/TGF-β3 in Acute Autoimmune Liver Lesions Induced by ConA in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liyun Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study the pathogenic feature of liver injury, activation of hepatic stellate cells, and dynamic expression of TGF-β1/TGF-β3 to reveal their role in liver injury induced by ConA. Methods. Mice were randomly divided into control group and ConA treatment group. ConA (20 mg/kg was injected through vena caudalis in ConA treatment group; the controls received the same volume of saline injection. After injection for 2 h, 8 h, 24 h, and 48 h, animals were terminated. Blood, liver, and spleen were harvested. Liver function and histopathology were studied. α-SMA, vimentin, TGF-β1, and TGF-β3 were detected. Results. After ConA injection, liver damage started to increase. Expression of α-SMA, vimentin, TGF-β1, and TGF-β3 was significantly enhanced; all above indicators reached peak at 8 h; but from 24 h after ConA injection, TGF-β3 expression began to decline, while the TGF-β1/TGF-β3 ratio at 48 h was significantly lower than control. Conclusion. (1 Autoimmune liver injury induced by ConA showed time-based features, in which the most serious liver lesions happened at 8 h after ConA injection. (2 Early activation of HSC and imbalance expression of TGF-β1 and TGF-β3 existed in ConA-induced acute autoimmune liver injury, which may be associated with liver dysfunction and the mechanisms of progression to fibrosis.

  4. Fluid loading and norepinephrine infusion mask the left ventricular preload decrease induced by pleural effusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wemmelund, Kristian Borup; Ringgård, Viktor Kromann; Vistisen, Simon Tilma

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pleural effusion (PLE) may lead to low blood pressure and reduced cardiac output. Low blood pressure and reduced cardiac output are often treated with fluid loading and vasopressors. This study aimed to determine the impact of fluid loading and norepinephrine infusion on physiologic......, n = 12), norepinephrine infusion (0.01, 0.03, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3 μg/kg/min (15 min each, n = 12)) or control (n = 6). Main outcome was left ventricular preload measured as left ventricular end-diastolic area. Secondary endpoints included contractility and afterload as well as global measures...... of circulation. All endpoints were assessed with echocardiography and invasive pressure-flow measurements. RESULTS: PLE decreased left ventricular end-diastolic area, mean arterial pressure and cardiac output (p values infusion (0.05 μg/kg/min) restored...

  5. Autoimmune Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Shounak; Takahashi, Naoki; Chari, Suresh T

    2017-07-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a chronic fibroinflammatory disease of the pancreas that belongs to the spectrum of immunoglobulin G-subclass4-related diseases (IgG4-RD) and typically presents with obstructive jaundice. Idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP) is a closely related but distinct disease that mimics AIP radiologically but manifests clinically most commonly as recurrent acute pancreatitis in young individuals with concurrent inflammatory bowel disease. IgG4 levels are often elevated in AIP and normal in IDCP. Histologically, lymphoplasmacytic acinar inflammation and storiform fibrosis are seen in both. In addition, the histologic hallmark of IDCP is the granulocyte epithelial lesion: intraluminal and intraepithelial neutrophils in medium-sized and small ducts with or without granulocytic acinar inflammation often associated with destruction of ductal architecture. Initial treatment of both AIP and IDCP is with oral corticosteroids for duration of 4 weeks followed by a gradual taper. Relapses are common in AIP and relatively uncommon in IDCP, a relatively rare disease for which the natural history is not well understood. For patients with relapsing AIP, treatment with immunomodulators and more recently rituximab has been recommended. Although rare instances of pancreaticobiliary malignancy has been reported in patients with AIP, overall the lifetime risk of developing pancreatic cancer does not appear to be elevated.

  6. Excitability changes in the left primary motor cortex innervating the hand muscles induced during speech about hand or leg movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onmyoji, Yusuke; Kubota, Shinji; Hirano, Masato; Tanaka, Megumi; Morishita, Takuya; Uehara, Kazumasa; Funase, Kozo

    2015-05-06

    In the present study, we used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to investigate the changes in the excitability of the left primary motor cortex (M1) innervating the hand muscles and in short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) during speech describing hand or leg movements. In experiment 1, we investigated the effects of the contents of speech on the amplitude of the motor evoked potentials (MEPs) induced during reading aloud and silent reading. In experiment 2, we repeated experiment 1 with an additional condition, the non-vocal oral movement (No-Voc OM) condition, and investigated the change in SICI induced in each condition using the paired TMS paradigm. The MEP observed in the reading aloud and No-Voc OM conditions exhibited significantly greater amplitudes than those seen in the silent reading conditions, irrespective of the content of the sentences spoken by the subjects or the timing of the TMS. There were no significant differences in SICI between the experimental conditions. Our findings suggest that the increased excitability of the left M1 hand area detected during speech was mainly caused by speech-related oral movements and the activation of language processing-related brain functions. The increased left M1 excitability was probably also mediated by neural mechanisms other than reduced SICI; i.e., disinhibition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Autoimmunity and Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizzaro, Nicola; Antico, Antonio; Villalta, Danilo

    2018-01-01

    Alterations in the immune response of patients with autoimmune diseases may predispose to malignancies, and a link between chronic autoimmune gastritis and gastric cancer has been reported in many studies. Intestinal metaplasia with dysplasia of the gastric corpus-fundus mucosa and hyperplasia of chromaffin cells, which are typical features of late-stage autoimmune gastritis, are considered precursor lesions. Autoimmune gastritis has been associated with the development of two types of gastric neoplasms: intestinal type and type I gastric carcinoid. Here, we review the association of autoimmune gastritis with gastric cancer and other autoimmune features present in gastric neoplasms. PMID:29373557

  8. Autoimmunity and Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Bizzaro

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Alterations in the immune response of patients with autoimmune diseases may predispose to malignancies, and a link between chronic autoimmune gastritis and gastric cancer has been reported in many studies. Intestinal metaplasia with dysplasia of the gastric corpus-fundus mucosa and hyperplasia of chromaffin cells, which are typical features of late-stage autoimmune gastritis, are considered precursor lesions. Autoimmune gastritis has been associated with the development of two types of gastric neoplasms: intestinal type and type I gastric carcinoid. Here, we review the association of autoimmune gastritis with gastric cancer and other autoimmune features present in gastric neoplasms.

  9. Preventive effects of andrographolide on the development of diabetes in autoimmune diabetic NOD mice by inducing immune tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chengliang; Gui, Ling; Xu, Yanjiao; Wu, Tao; Liu, Dong

    2013-08-01

    Andrographolide, an active component in traditional anti-diabetic herbal plants, is a diterpenoid lactone isolated from Andrographis paniculata because of its potent anti-inflammatory and hypoglycemic effects. However, the effect of andrographolide on the development of diabetes in autoimmune non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice remains unknown. This study aimed to investigate the protective effects of andrographolide on the development of autoimmune diabetes and clarify the underlying mechanism. NOD mice were randomly divided into four groups and administered with water and andrographolide at 50, 100, and 150mg/kg body weight for four weeks. ICR mice were also selected as the control group. Oral glucose tolerance and histopathological insulitis were examined. Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokine secretion was determined by ELISA. The transcriptional profiles of T-bet, GATA3, and RORγt in the pancreatic lymphatic node samples derived from the NOD mice were detected by RT-PCR. After four weeks of oral supplementation, andrographolide significantly inhibited insulitis, delayed the onset, and suppressed the development of diabetes in 30-week-old NOD mice in a dose dependent manner. This protective status was correlated with a substantially decreased production of interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-2, increased IL-10 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, and a reduced IL-17. Andrographolide also increased GATA3 mRNA expression but decreased T-bet and RORγt mRNA expressions. Our results suggested that andrographolide prevented type 1 diabetes by maintaining Th1/Th2/Th17 homeostasis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Pulmonary hypertension secondary to left-heart failure involves peroxynitrite-induced downregulation of PTEN in the lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, Yazhini; Selvendiran, Karuppaiyah; Naidu, Shan K; Meduru, Sarath; Citro, Lucas A; Bognár, Balázs; Khan, Mahmood; Kálai, Tamás; Hideg, Kálmán; Kuppusamy, Periannan; Sai-Sudhakar, Chittoor B

    2013-03-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) that occurs after left-heart failure (LHF), classified as Group 2 PH, involves progressive pulmonary vascular remodeling induced by smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation. However, mechanisms involved in the activation of SMCs remain unknown. The objective of this study was to determine the involvement of peroxynitrite and phosphatase-and-tensin homolog on chromosome 10 (PTEN) in vascular SMC proliferation and remodeling in the LHF-induced PH (LHF-PH). LHF was induced by permanent ligation of left anterior descending coronary artery in rats for 4 weeks. MRI, ultrasound, and hemodynamic measurements were performed to confirm LHF and PH. Histopathology, Western blot, and real-time polymerase chain reaction analyses were used to identify key molecular signatures. Therapeutic intervention was demonstrated using an antiproliferative compound, HO-3867. LHF-PH was confirmed by significant elevation of pulmonary artery pressure (mean pulmonary artery pressure/mm Hg: 35.9±1.8 versus 14.8±2.0, control; Ppulmonary artery pressure to 22.6±0.8 mm Hg (Prats when compared with control. In vitro studies using human pulmonary artery SMCs implicated peroxynitrite-mediated downregulation of PTEN expression as a key mechanism of SMC proliferation. The results further established that HO-3867 attenuated LHF-PH by decreasing oxidative stress and increasing PTEN expression in the lung. In conclusion, peroxynitrite and peroxynitrite-mediated PTEN inactivation seem to be key mediators of lung microvascular remodeling associated with PH secondary to LHF.

  11. Differentiation of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy from left ventricular hypertrophy induced by essential hypertension using magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doyoshita, Hiroko; Murakami, Eiji; Takekoshi, Noboru; Matsui, Shinobu; Nakato, Hideaki; Enyama, Hiroto

    1988-03-01

    To examine the efficacy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in diagnosing hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), 16 patients with HCM and 14 hypertensives with left ventricular hypertrophy (LDH) were studied using a 0.5 Tesla Siemens MRI apparatus equipped with cardiac gating. In HCM, left ventricular hypertrophy was localized to the septal wall in four, to the apical wall in two, to both the septal and apical walls in two, and to the apical and inferior walls in one, and it was diffuse in seven patients. In hypertensives, LVH was localized to the septal wall in three, to both the septal and anterior walls in two, to the free wall in one, and it was diffuse in eight patients. The distribution of the hypertrophic portion was nearly equal in both groups. The thickest portion of the left ventricular wall was 24.6 +- 4.8 mm in HCM and 21.6 +- 5.4 mm in hypertension, and there was no significant difference between them. The T/sub 2/ relaxation time of the hypertrophic portion was 52.2 +- 4.8 msec in HCM and 45.3 +- 6.1 msec in hypertension, and there was a significant difference between them (p < 0.01). However, there were no significant differences between the T/sub 2/ relaxation times of the hypertrophic and non-hypertrophic protions in both groups. In conclusion, it may be difficult to differentiate HCM from hypertension based on the distribution of hypertrophic portions, but measurements of the T/sub 2/ relaxation times may be useful for making the differential diagnosis.

  12. Left ventricular assist device as bridge to recovery for anthracycline-induced terminal heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appel, Jon M; Sander, Kåre; Hansen, Peter B; Møller, Jacob E; Krarup-Hansen, Anders; Gustafsson, Finn

    2012-01-01

    Anthracycline treatments are hampered by dose-related cardiotoxicity, frequently leading to heart failure (HF) with a very poor prognosis. The authors report a case of a 19-year-old man developing HF after anthracycline treatment for Ewing sarcoma. Despite medical treatment, his condition deteriorated to terminal HF, leading to implantation of a mechanical left ventricular assist device (LVAD). His heart function recovered, allowing explantation of the device 14 months after implantation. Heart transplantation is often contraindicated in the first years after treatment for cancers, and LVAD as "bridge to recovery" may be warranted in similar patients. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Autoimmunity and Gastric Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Nicola Bizzaro; Antonio Antico; Danilo Villalta

    2018-01-01

    Alterations in the immune response of patients with autoimmune diseases may predispose to malignancies, and a link between chronic autoimmune gastritis and gastric cancer has been reported in many studies. Intestinal metaplasia with dysplasia of the gastric corpus-fundus mucosa and hyperplasia of chromaffin cells, which are typical features of late-stage autoimmune gastritis, are considered precursor lesions. Autoimmune gastritis has been associated with the development of two types of gastri...

  14. CD4+Foxp3+CD25+/- Tregs characterize liver tissue specimens of patients suffering from drug-induced autoimmune hepatitis: A clinical-pathological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Li-Mei; Wang, Shu-Hua; Yang, Kun; Brigstock, David R; Sun, Li; Gao, Run-Ping

    2018-02-19

    The diagnosis of drug-induced autoimmune hepatitis (DIAIH) and its differentiation from idiopathic autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is challenging. This study aimed to differentiate DIAIH from AIH by comparing the biochemical changes, histological features, and frequencies of CD4 + Foxp3 + CD25 +/- regulatory T cells (Tregs) in liver tissues or peripheral blood lymphocytes. A total of 15 DIAIH patients and 24 AIH patients who underwent liver biopsies at initial presentation were enrolled in this study. The liver histological changes were assessed by HE staining. The phenotypic recognition and distribution of CD4 + Foxp3 + CD25 +/- Tregs in liver tissues were evaluated by single/double immunostains in serial sections. The CD4 + Foxp3 + CD25 +/- Tregs in peripheral blood were analyzed by flow cytometry. The median values of ALT and AST were 404.50 U/L and 454.10 U/L in DIAIH patients and 309.50 U/L and 315.00 U/L in AIH patients, respectively. More importantly, for the first time we found that patients with DIAIH had higher levels of serum ALT and AST, more severe degree of lobular inflammation, higher frequencies of zone 3 necrosis and higher number of lobular CD4 + Foxp3 + CD25 - Tregs compared with AIH (P < 0.05). Furthermore, there were positive correlations in DIAIH between the degree of lobular inflammation and either the AST/ALT level or the number of lobular CD4 + Foxp3 + CD25 - Tregs (P < 0.05). However, the frequency of peripheral blood CD4 + Foxp3 + CD25 +/- Tregs were not significantly different between DIAIH and AIH. The differences of ALT, AST and the number of lobular CD4 + Foxp3 + CD25 - Tregs between patients with DIAIH and those with AIH are clinically helpful in differentiating these two diseases in their early stage. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebman, Howard A; Weitz, Ilene C

    2017-03-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is an acquired autoimmune disorder resulting in the production of antibodies directed against red blood cell antigens causing shortened erythrocyte survival. The disorders can present as a primary disorder (idiopathic) or secondary to other autoimmune disorders, malignancies, or infections. Treatment involves immune modulation with corticosteroids and other agents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Autoimmun hypophysitis--en differentialdiagnose til hypofyseadenomer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Therese; Hagen, Claus

    2010-01-01

    A 66-year-old man with a headache in the left temporal region which had persisted for eight months is presented. The patient developed polydipsia and polyuria and also suffered from tinnitus, impaired hearing and episodes of double vision. The patient was diagnosed with autoimmune hypophysitis (AH...

  17. Low tidal volume ventilation ameliorates left ventricular dysfunction in mechanically ventilated rats following LPS-induced lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherpanath, Thomas G V; Smeding, Lonneke; Hirsch, Alexander; Lagrand, Wim K; Schultz, Marcus J; Groeneveld, A B Johan

    2015-10-07

    High tidal volume ventilation has shown to cause ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI), possibly contributing to concomitant extrapulmonary organ dysfunction. The present study examined whether left ventricular (LV) function is dependent on tidal volume size and whether this effect is augmented during lipopolysaccharide(LPS)-induced lung injury. Twenty male Wistar rats were sedated, paralyzed and then randomized in four groups receiving mechanical ventilation with tidal volumes of 6 ml/kg or 19 ml/kg with or without intrapulmonary administration of LPS. A conductance catheter was placed in the left ventricle to generate pressure-volume loops, which were also obtained within a few seconds of vena cava occlusion to obtain relatively load-independent LV systolic and diastolic function parameters. The end-systolic elastance / effective arterial elastance (Ees/Ea) ratio was used as the primary parameter of LV systolic function with the end-diastolic elastance (Eed) as primary LV diastolic function. Ees/Ea decreased over time in rats receiving LPS (p = 0.045) and high tidal volume ventilation (p = 0.007), with a lower Ees/Ea in the rats with high tidal volume ventilation plus LPS compared to the other groups (p tidal volume ventilation without LPS (p = 0.223). A significant interaction (p tidal ventilation and LPS for Ees/Ea and Eed, and all rats receiving high tidal volume ventilation plus LPS died before the end of the experiment. Low tidal volume ventilation ameliorated LV systolic and diastolic dysfunction while preventing death following LPS-induced lung injury in mechanically ventilated rats. Our data advocates the use of low tidal volumes, not only to avoid VILI, but to avert ventilator-induced myocardial dysfunction as well.

  18. Benefits of Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy in an Asynchronous Heart Failure Model Induced by Left Bundle Branch Ablation and Rapid Pacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingfeng; Nie, Zhenning; Chen, Haiyan; Shu, Xianhong; Yang, Zhaohua; Yao, Ruiming; Su, Yangang; Ge, Junbo

    2017-12-11

    It is now well recognized that heart failure (HF) patients with left bundle branch block (LBBB) derive substantial clinical benefits from cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), and LBBB has become one of the important predictors for CRT response. The conventional tachypacing-induced HF model has several major limitations, including absence of stable LBBB and rapid reversal of left ventricular (LV) dysfunction after cessation of pacing. Hence, it is essential to establish an optimal model of chronic HF with isolated LBBB for studying CRT benefits. In the present study, a canine model of asynchronous HF induced by left bundle branch (LBB) ablation and 4 weeks of rapid right ventricular (RV) pacing is established. The RV and right atrial (RA) pacing electrodes via the jugular vein approach, together with an epicardial LV pacing electrode, were implanted for CRT performance. Presented here are the detailed protocols of radiofrequency (RF) catheter ablation, pacing leads implantation, and rapid pacing strategy. Intracardiac and surface electrograms during operation were also provided for a better understanding of LBB ablation. Two-dimensional speckle tracking imaging and aortic velocity time integral (aVTI) were acquired to validate the chronic stable HF model with LV asynchrony and CRT benefits. By coordinating ventricular activation and contraction, CRT uniformed the LV mechanical work and restored LV pump function, which was followed by reversal of LV dilation. Moreover, the histopathological study revealed a significant restoration of cardiomyocyte diameter and collagen volume fraction (CVF) after CRT performance, indicating a histologic and cellular reverse remodeling elicited by CRT. In this report, we described a feasible and valid method to develop a chronic asynchronous HF model, which was suitable for studying structural and biologic reverse remodeling following CRT.

  19. High-Frequency Electroencephalographic Activity in Left Temporal Area Is Associated with Pleasant Emotion Induced by Video Clips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jukka Kortelainen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent findings suggest that specific neural correlates for the key elements of basic emotions do exist and can be identified by neuroimaging techniques. In this paper, electroencephalogram (EEG is used to explore the markers for video-induced emotions. The problem is approached from a classifier perspective: the features that perform best in classifying person’s valence and arousal while watching video clips with audiovisual emotional content are searched from a large feature set constructed from the EEG spectral powers of single channels as well as power differences between specific channel pairs. The feature selection is carried out using a sequential forward floating search method and is done separately for the classification of valence and arousal, both derived from the emotional keyword that the subject had chosen after seeing the clips. The proposed classifier-based approach reveals a clear association between the increased high-frequency (15–32 Hz activity in the left temporal area and the clips described as “pleasant” in the valence and “medium arousal” in the arousal scale. These clips represent the emotional keywords amusement and joy/happiness. The finding suggests the occurrence of a specific neural activation during video-induced pleasant emotion and the possibility to detect this from the left temporal area using EEG.

  20. Can the exploration of left space be induced implicitly in unilateral neglect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wansard, Murielle; Bartolomeo, Paolo; Vanderaspoilden, Valérie; Geurten, Marie; Meulemans, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to explore the ability of neglect patients to detect and exploit the predictive value of a cue to respond more quickly and accurately to targets on their contralesional side in a Posner spatial cueing task. The majority of the cues (i.e. 80%) were invalid, indicating that the target would appear on the opposite side, although patients were not informed of this bias. Our results demonstrate that some neglect patients were able to extract the cue's predictability and use it to orient faster toward the left. This cueing effect was present even in patients who were subsequently unable to describe the predictive character of the cues, and thus was not modulated by reportable awareness of the cue-target relation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Development of nonfibrotic left ventricular hypertrophy in an ANG II-induced chronic ovine hypertension model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klatt, Niklas; Scherschel, Katharina; Schad, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    setting. Therefore, the aim of this study was to establish a minimally invasive ovine hypertension model using chronic angiotensin II (ANG II) treatment and to characterize its effects on cardiac remodeling after 8 weeks. Sheep were implanted with osmotic minipumps filled with either vehicle control (n...... = 7) or ANG II (n = 9) for 8 weeks. Mean arterial blood pressure in the ANG II-treated group increased from 87.4 ± 5.3 to 111.8 ± 6.9 mmHg (P = 0.00013). Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging showed an increase in left ventricular mass from 112 ± 12.6 g to 131 ± 18.7 g after 7 weeks (P = 0...... any differences in epicardial conduction velocity and heterogeneity. These data demonstrate that chronic ANG II treatment using osmotic minipumps presents a reliable, minimally invasive approach to establish hypertension and nonfibrotic LVH in sheep....

  2. Sub-aortic obstruction of left ventricular outflow tract secondary to benfluorex-induced endocardial fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Szymanski

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Patients exposed to benfluorex have an increased risk of restrictive organic valvular heart disease. Aortic and mitral regurgitations caused by fibrotic valve disease are the most common features observed in exposure to fenfluramine derivatives in general and benfluorex in particular. We report here, for the first time to our knowledge, a well-documented case in which obstructive sub-aortic endocardium fibrosis within the left ventricular outflow tract is related with exposure to a drug that modifies the metabolism of serotonin. It now remains to be established whether extensive fibrosis of the myocardium in addition to well-documented valvular fibrosis may develop in patients exposed to amphetamine-derived drugs affecting the serotonin system.

  3. Left-Ventricular Energetics in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension-Induced Right-Ventricular Hypertrophic Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, June-Chiew; Guild, Sarah-Jane; Pham, Toan; Nisbet, Linley; Tran, Kenneth; Taberner, Andrew J; Loiselle, Denis S

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) alters the geometries of both ventricles of the heart. While the right ventricle (RV) hypertrophies, the left ventricle (LV) atrophies. Multiple lines of clinical and experimental evidence lead us to hypothesize that the impaired stroke volume and systolic pressure of the LV are a direct consequence of the effect of pressure overload in the RV, and that atrophy in the LV plays only a minor role. In this study, we tested this hypothesis by examining the mechanoenergetic response of the atrophied LV to RV hypertrophy in rats treated with monocrotaline. Experiments were performed across multiple-scales: the whole-heart in vivo and ex vivo , and its trabeculae in vitro . Under the in vivo state where the RV was pressure-overloaded, we measured reduced systemic blood pressure and LV ventricular pressure. In contrast, under both ex vivo and in vitro conditions, where the effect of RV pressure overload was circumvented, we found that LV was capable of developing normal systolic pressure and stress. Nevertheless, LV atrophy played a minor role in that LV stroke volume remained lower, thereby contributing to lower LV mechanical work output. Concomitantly lower oxygen consumption and change of enthalpy were observed, and hence LV energy efficiency was unchanged. Our internally consistent findings between working-heart and trabecula experiments explain the rapid improvement of LV systolic function observed in patients with chronic pulmonary hypertension following surgical relief of RV pressure overload.

  4. Gene expression profiling of anti-CTLA4-treated metastatic melanoma in patients with treatment-induced autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresler, Scott C; Min, Le; Rodig, Scott J; Walls, Andrew C; Xu, Shuyun; Geng, Songmei; Hodi, F Stephen; Murphy, George F; Lian, Christine G

    2017-02-01

    Ipilimumab (IPI) is a monoclonal antibody that targets the inhibitory CTLA4 receptor of T cells, enhancing T-cell-driven antitumor responses. IPI therapy in metastatic melanoma results in significant improvement in disease-free and overall survival, although after initial responses disease progression generally ensues. Identification of specific responses in tissue where melanoma tumor cells are subjected to IPI-driven immune attack may reveal mechanisms of treatment efficacy or resistance, permitting refinement of targeted therapeutic approaches. We used NanoString digital barcoding chemistry to identify changes in the transcriptome of metastatic melanoma cells before and after IPI treatment using two comprehensive panels containing a total of 1330 unique genes. Only patients who developed autoimmune disorders following treatment, signifying a robust immune response, were included. Despite evidence of an enhanced immune response, most patients eventually exhibited disease progression. Overall, data from five pre-IPI tumors and four post-IPI tumor samples (from three patients) permitted identification of several candidate genes that showed increased expression based on normalized counts after therapy. These included TTK (~3.1-fold, P=1.18e-4), which encodes a dual-specificity protein tyrosine kinase, a known cell cycle regulator, and BIRC5 (~3.0-fold, P=9.36e-4), which encodes the antiapoptotic protein survivin. Both TTK (MPS1) and survivin are targetable proteins against which a number of pharmacologic agents have been developed. CDK1, which encodes a protein tyrosine kinase known to phosphorylate survivin, was also upregulated (~3.2-fold, P=2.80-3). Tumor cell expression of TTK and survivin proteins was confirmed using immunohistochemistry in an expanded patient cohort. Differences in gene expression for several commonly encountered immune antigens, such as CD3, CD4, CD8, and CTLA4, were not statistically significant, likely reflecting the long length of time

  5. Sirolimus for Autoimmune Disease of Blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-02

    Autoimmune Pancytopenia; Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS); Evans Syndrome; Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Anemia, Hemolytic, Autoimmune; Autoimmune Neutropenia; Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic; Inflammatory Bowel Disease; Rheumatoid Arthritis

  6. Glatiramer acetate (copaxone modulates platelet activation and inhibits thrombin-induced calcium influx: possible role of copaxone in targeting platelets during autoimmune neuroinflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah C Starossom

    Full Text Available Glatiramer acetate (GA, Copaxone, Copolymer-1 is an FDA approved drug for the treatment of MS and it is very effective in suppressing neuroinflammation in experimental autoimmune encephalitis (EAE, an animal model of MS. Although this drug was designed to inhibit pathogenic T cells, the exact mechanism of EAE/MS suppression by GA is still not well understood. Previously we presented evidence that platelets become activated and promote neuroinflammation in EAE, suggesting a possible pathogenic role of platelets in MS and EAE. We hypothesized that GA could inhibit neuroinflammation by affecting not only immune cells but also platelets.We investigated the effect of GA on the activation of human platelets in vitro: calcium influx, platelet aggregation and expression of activation markers. Our results in human platelets were confirmed by in-vitro and in-vivo studies of modulation of functions of platelets in mouse model. We found that GA inhibited thrombin-induced calcium influx in human and mouse platelets. GA also decreased thrombin-induced CD31, CD62P, CD63, and active form of αIIbβ3 integrin surface expression and formation of platelet aggregates for both mouse and human platelets, and prolonged the bleeding time in mice by 2.7-fold. In addition, we found that GA decreased the extent of macrophage activation induced by co-culture of macrophages with platelets.GA inhibited the activation of platelets, which suggests a new mechanism of GA action in suppression of EAE/MS by targeting platelets and possibly preventing their interaction with immune cells such as macrophages. Furthermore, the reduction in platelet activation by GA may have additional cardiovascular benefits to prevent thrombosis.

  7. Autoimmunity and inflammation are independent of class II transactivator type PIV-dependent class II major histocompatibility complex expression in peripheral tissues during collagen-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldburger, Jean-Marc; Palmer, Gaby; Seemayer, Christian; Lamacchia, Celine; Finckh, Axel; Christofilopoulos, Panayiotis; Baeten, Dominique; Reith, Walter; Gabay, Cem

    2011-11-01

    To determine the regulation of class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) expression in fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) in order to investigate their role as nonprofessional antigen-presenting cells in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Expression of class II MHC, class II MHC transactivator (CIITA), and Ciita isoforms PI, PIII, and PIV was examined by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry, and flow cytometry in human synovial tissues, arthritic mouse joints, and human and murine FLS. CIA was induced in mice in which isoform PIV of Ciita was knocked out (PIV(-/-) ), in PIV(-/-) mice transgenic for CIITA in the thymus (K14 CIITA), and in their control littermates. HLA-DRA, total CIITA, and CIITA PIII messenger RNA levels were significantly increased in synovial tissue samples from patients with rheumatoid arthritis compared with the levels in tissue from patients with osteoarthritis. Human FLS expressed surface class II MHC via CIITA PIII and PIV, while class II MHC expression in murine FLS was entirely mediated by PIV. Mice with a targeted deletion of CIITA PIV lack CD4+ T cells and were protected against CIA. The expression of CIITA was restored in the thymus of PIV(-/-) K14 CIITA-transgenic mice, which had a normal CD4+ T cell repertoire and normal surface levels of class II MHC on professional antigen-presenting cells, but did not induce class II MHC on FLS. Synovial inflammation and immune responses against type II collagen were similar in PIV(-/-) K14 CIITA-transgenic mice and control mice with CIA, but bone erosion was significantly reduced in the absence of PIV. Overexpression of class II MHC is tightly correlated with CIITA expression in arthritic synovium and in FLS. Selective targeting of Ciita PIV in peripheral tissues abrogates class II MHC expression by murine FLS but does not protect against inflammation and autoimmune responses in CIA. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  8. Considerations in cardio-oncology: Multiple mobile left-sided cardiac thrombi in chemotherapy-induced cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamishima, Toshinori; Matsushita, Kenichi; Morikubo, Hiromu; Isaka, Aoi; Matsushita, Noriko; Endo, Hidehito; Kubota, Hiroshi; Sakata, Konomi; Satoh, Toru; Yoshino, Hideaki

    2017-07-01

    With advances in cancer chemotherapy, the importance of the new clinical discipline of cardio-oncology, which is concerned with the cardiac effects of chemotherapy, is increasing. Herein we describe the case of a 48-year-old woman with a history of breast cancer who presented with symptoms of heart failure due to chemotherapy-induced cardiomyopathy. Treatment for the patient's breast cancer had included surgery and chemotherapy with anthracyclines and trastuzumab. Echocardiography revealed multiple mobile thrombi in the left ventricle and atrium. In addition, brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed small acute cerebral infarctions due to embolization. Given the high risk of re-embolization, surgical thrombectomy was performed. Thus far, there are no standardized therapeutic guidelines for left-sided cardiac thrombi and the optimal treatment remains contentious. Although this patient was managed successfully with surgical thrombectomy, patients should be managed individually, taking into consideration embolization, bleeding, and surgical risks. With further improvements in cancer chemotherapy, there may be an increase in the incidence of complications such as multiple cardiac thrombi. From the cardio-oncology standpoint, we propose close interactions between cardiologists and oncologists for the optimal care of cancer patients. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparative effect of carperitide and furosemide on left atrial pressure in dogs with experimentally induced mitral valve regurgitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, S; Fukushima, R; Yamamoto, Y; Ishikawa, T; Hamabe, L; Kim, S; Yoshiyuki, R; Fukayama, T; Machida, N; Tanaka, R

    2013-01-01

    The effects of carperitide on left atrial pressure (LAP) in dogs with mitral valve disease (mitral regurgitation, MR) have not been documented. The objective was to compare the short-term effects of carperitide versus furosemide on LAP and neurohumoral factors in MR dogs. Six healthy Beagle dogs weighing 9.8-12.6 kg (2 males and 4 females; aged 3 years) were used. Experimental, randomized, cross-over, and interventional study. Carperitide 0.1 μg/kg/min or furosemide 0.17 mg/kg/h (1 mg/kg/6 h) was administered to dogs with surgically induced MR for 6 hours, and after a 14 day wash-out period, the other drug was administered. LAP, plasma renin activity, plasma aldosterone, and echocardiographic variables were measured. Left atrial pressure was decreased similarly after the administration of carperitide 0.1 μg/kg/min and furosemide 0.17 mg/kg/h (1 mg/kg/6 h) compared with baseline in dogs with MR (Baseline 14.75 ± 3.74 mmHg, carperitide 10.24 ± 4.97 mmHg, P dogs with acute MR caused by experimental chordal rupture. Carperitide can have additional benefits from the viewpoint of minimal activation of neurohumoral factors in the treatment of dogs with MR. Additional studies in dogs with spontaneous disease are warranted. Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  10. Transient left ventricular apical ballooning and exercise induced hypertension during treadmill exercise testing: is there a common hypersympathetic mechanism?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oh Jae K

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To describe two cases of Takotsubo like myocardial contractile pattern during exercise stress test secondary to hypertensive response. Background Treadmill exercise testing is known to cause sympathetic stimulation, leading to increased levels of catecholamine, resulting in alteration in vascular tone. Hypertensive response during exercise testing can cause abnormal consequences, resulting in false positive results. Cases We present the cases of two patients experiencing apical and basal akinesis during exercise stress echocardiography, in whom normal wall motion response was observed on subsequent pharmacologic stress testing. The first patient developed transient left ventricular (LV apical akinesis during exercise stress echocardiography. Due to high suspicion that this abnormality might be secondary to hypertensive response, pharmacologic stress testing was performed after three days, which was completely normal and showed no such wall motion abnormality. Qualitative assessment of myocardial perfusion using contrast was also performed, which showed good myocardial blood flow, indicating low probability for significant obstructive coronary artery disease. The second patient developed LV basal akinesis as a result of hypertensive response during exercise testing. Coronary angiogram was not performed in either patient due to low suspicion for coronary artery disease, and subsequently negative stress studies. Results Transient stress induced cardiomyopathy can develop secondary to hypertensive response during exercise stress testing. Conclusion These cases provide supporting evidence to the hyper-sympathetic theory of left ventricular ballooning syndrome.

  11. Deterioration of autoimmune condition associated with repeated injection of dextranomer/hyaluronic acid copolymer: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuto Suda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 6-year-old girl underwent ureterocystoneostomy (UCN because of left flank pain due to delayed onset of ureteral stenosis one and a half years after endoscopic dextranomer/hyaluronic acid copolymer (Deflux injection for the treatment of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR. Histopathological examination indicated chronic inflammation with abundant eosinophils characteristic of a reaction to Deflux. Several autoimmune diseases developed during the treatment for ureteral stenosis. First, 2 weeks prior to the onset of left flank pain, she was diagnosed as having systemic lupus erythematosus. Finally, she died of pulmonary hemorrhage due to thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura 4 months after UCN. The fatal outcome in this case was suspected to be caused by autoimmune syndrome induced by adjuvants, which in this case was the hyaluronic acid polymer injected into the ureteric orifice for the treatment of VUR.

  12. Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia With Chronic Fatigue After HPV Vaccination as Part of the “Autoimmune/Auto-inflammatory Syndrome Induced by Adjuvants”

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    Lucija Tomljenovic PhD

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 14-year-old girl who developed postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS with chronic fatigue 2 months following Gardasil vaccination. The patient suffered from persistent headaches, dizziness, recurrent syncope, poor motor coordination, weakness, fatigue, myalgias, numbness, tachycardia, dyspnea, visual disturbances, phonophobia, cognitive impairment, insomnia, gastrointestinal disturbances, and a weight loss of 20 pounds. The psychiatric evaluation ruled out the possibility that her symptoms were psychogenic or related to anxiety disorders. Furthermore, the patient tested positive for ANA (1:1280, lupus anticoagulant, and antiphospholipid. On clinical examination she presented livedo reticularis and was diagnosed with Raynaud’s syndrome. This case fulfills the criteria for the autoimmune/auto-inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA. Because human papillomavirus vaccination is universally recommended to teenagers and because POTS frequently results in long-term disabilities (as was the case in our patient, a thorough follow-up of patients who present with relevant complaints after vaccination is strongly recommended.

  13. Criteria for Environmentally Associated Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, K. Michael; Parks, Christine G.; Germolec, Dori R.; Leung, Patrick S.C.; Selmi, Carlo; Humble, Michael C.; Rose, Noel R.

    2012-01-01

    Increasing evidence supports a role for the environment in the development of autoimmune diseases, as reviewed in the accompanying three papers from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Expert Panel Workshop. An important unresolved issue, however, is the development of criteria for identifying autoimmune disease phenotypes for which the environment plays a causative role, herein referred to as environmentally associated autoimmune diseases. There are several different areas in which such criteria need to be developed, including: 1) identifying the necessary and sufficient data to define environmental risk factors for autoimmune diseases meeting current classification criteria; 2) establishing the existence of and criteria for new environmentally associated autoimmune disorders that do not meet current disease classification criteria; and 3) identifying in clinical practice specific environmental agents that induce autoimmune disease in individual patients. Here we discuss approaches that could be useful for developing criteria in these three areas, as well as factors that should be considered in evaluating the evidence for criteria that can distinguish individuals with such disorders from individuals without such disorders with high sensitivity and specificity. Current studies suggest that multiple lines of complementary evidence will be important and that in many cases there will be clinical, serologic, genetic, epigenetic, and/or other laboratory features that could be incorporated as criteria for environmentally associated autoimmune diseases to improve diagnosis and treatment and possibly allow for preventative strategies in the future. PMID:22771005

  14. Significance of dipyridamole-induced transient dilation of the left ventricle during thallium-201 scintigraphy in suspected coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chouraqui, P.; Rodrigues, E.A.; Berman, D.S.; Maddahi, J.

    1990-01-01

    The occurrence and significance of transient dilation of the left ventricle during dipyridamole stress-redistribution thallium-201 scintigraphy was studied in 73 patients who underwent both dipyridamole thallium-201 study and coronary angiography. Transient dilation ratio was calculated from planar anterior images by dividing the computer-derived left ventricular area on the initial image by that of the 4-hour image. In 11 patients with normal coronary arteriograms or less than 50% coronary stenosis, the transient dilation ratio was 0.98 +/- 0.046. An abnormal transient dilation ratio was defined as greater than or equal to 1.12, representing greater than or equal to 3 standard deviations above the mean normal value. When the 15 patients with an abnormal ratio were compared with the 58 with a normal ratio, the former group had a significantly higher frequency of 3 critical (greater than or equal to 90%) coronary stenoses (33 vs 5%), higher prevalence of collaterals (67 vs 24%), more extensive myocardial reversible defects by planar (71 vs 10%) or by single-photon emission computed tomography (87.5 vs 35%) imaging and a higher incidence of dipyridamole-induced anginal chest pain (53 vs 22%). No significant difference between the 2 groups was noted with respect to age, gender, prior myocardial infarction, single or double critical coronary stenosis, dipyridamole-induced ischemic electrocardiographic response and increased lung uptake. An abnormal transient dilation ratio of greater than or equal to 1.12 was a specific marker of multivessel (87%) or 3-vessel (85%) critical coronary artery disease

  15. High Prevalence of Neutrophil Cytoplasmic Autoantibodies in Infants with Food Protein-Induced Proctitis/Proctocolitis: Autoimmunity Involvement?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sekerková, A.; Fuchs, M.; Cecrdlová, E.; Šváchová, V.; Kralová Lesná, I.; Stříž, I.; Tlaskalová-Hogenová, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 2015, September 2015 (2015), s. 902863 ISSN 2314-8861 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NT13483 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : INDUCED ENTEROCOLITIS SYNDROME * INFLAMMATORY-BOWEL-DISEASE * BREAST-FED INFANTS Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.812, year: 2015

  16. Radiation induced cardiotoxicity in left sided breast cancer - Where do we stand?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Alice Kingsley

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the commonest cancer in women, with around a million new cases diagnosed each year worldwide. Adjuvant radiotherapy (RT is an important component of therapy for many women with early-stage breast cancer. With improving survival rates following breast cancer, patients are increasingly likely to die of other causes. As a result, long-term adverse effects of treatment are of major concern. To determine which treatment is optimal, clinician need to be aware of long-term risks and benefits of adjuvant therapies. An awareness of the potential cardiotoxicity of RT led to the application of improved RT techniques that minimize the irradiation to the heart. Although new techniques, including intensity-modulated RT combined with free breathing gating and helical tomotherapy may further reduce radiation-induced cardiac toxicities, the most important factors in limiting cardiac radiation are associated with the techniques used and the skill of the radiation oncologist.

  17. [Thymoma and autoimmune diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamilloux, Y; Frih, H; Bernard, C; Broussolle, C; Petiot, P; Girard, N; Sève, P

    2018-01-01

    The association between thymoma and autoimmunity is well known. Besides myasthenia gravis, which is found in 15 to 20% of patients with thymoma, other autoimmune diseases have been reported: erythroblastopenia, systemic lupus erythematosus, inflammatory myopathies, thyroid disorders, Isaac's syndrome or Good's syndrome. More anecdotally, Morvan's syndrome, limbic encephalitis, other autoimmune cytopenias, autoimmune hepatitis, and bullous skin diseases (pemphigus, lichen) have been reported. Autoimmune diseases occur most often before thymectomy, but they can be discovered at the time of surgery or later. Two situations require the systematic investigation of a thymoma: the occurrence of myasthenia gravis or autoimmune erythroblastopenia. Nevertheless, the late onset of systemic lupus erythematosus or the association of several autoimmune manifestations should lead to look for a thymoma. Neither the characteristics of the patients nor the pathological data can predict the occurrence of an autoimmune disease after thymectomy. Thus, thymectomy usefulness in the course of the autoimmune disease, except myasthenia gravis, has not been demonstrated. This seems to indicate the preponderant role of self-reactive T lymphocytes distributed in the peripheral immune system prior to surgery. Given the high infectious morbidity in patients with thymoma, immunoglobulin replacement therapy should be considered in patients with hypogammaglobulinemia who receive immunosuppressive therapy, even in the absence of prior infection. Copyright © 2017 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Bistability in autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapin, Nicolas; Mosekilde, Erik; Lund, Ole

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases damage host tissue, which, in turn, may trigger a stronger immune response. Systems characterized by such positive feedback loops can display co-existing stable steady states. In a mathematical model of autoimmune disease, one steady state may correspond to the healthy state...... and another to an autoimmune steady state characterized by widespread tissue damage and immune activation. We show how a triggering event may move the system from the healthy to the autoimmune state and how transient immunosuppressive treatment can move the system back to the healthy state....

  19. Autoimmune channelopathies in paraneoplastic neurological syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joubert, Bastien; Honnorat, Jérôme

    2015-10-01

    Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes and autoimmune encephalitides are immune neurological disorders occurring or not in association with a cancer. They are thought to be due to an autoimmune reaction against neuronal antigens ectopically expressed by the underlying tumour or by cross-reaction with an unknown infectious agent. In some instances, paraneoplastic neurological syndromes and autoimmune encephalitides are related to an antibody-induced dysfunction of ion channels, a situation that can be labelled as autoimmune channelopathies. Such functional alterations of ion channels are caused by the specific fixation of an autoantibody upon its target, implying that autoimmune channelopathies are usually highly responsive to immuno-modulatory treatments. Over the recent years, numerous autoantibodies corresponding to various neurological syndromes have been discovered and their mechanisms of action partially deciphered. Autoantibodies in neurological autoimmune channelopathies may target either directly ion channels or proteins associated to ion channels and induce channel dysfunction by various mechanisms generally leading to the reduction of synaptic expression of the considered channel. The discovery of those mechanisms of action has provided insights on the regulation of the synaptic expression of the altered channels as well as the putative roles of some of their functional subdomains. Interestingly, patients' autoantibodies themselves can be used as specific tools in order to study the functions of ion channels. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane channels and transporters in cancers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Clinical significance of exercise-induced left ventricular wall motion abnormality occurring at a low heart rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimchi, A.; Rozanski, A.; Fletcher, C.; Maddahi, J.; Swan, H.J.; Berman, D.S.

    1987-10-01

    We studied the relationship between the heart rate at the time of onset of exercise-induced wall motion abnormality and the severity of coronary artery disease in 89 patients who underwent exercise equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography as part of their evaluation for coronary artery disease. Segmental wall motion was scored with a five-point system (3 = normal; -1 = dyskinesis); a decrease of one score defined the onset of wall motion abnormality. The onset of wall motion abnormality at less than or equal to 70% of maximal predicted heart rate had 100% predictive accuracy for coronary artery disease and higher sensitivity than the onset of ischemic ST segment depression at similar heart rate during exercise: 36% (25 of 69 patients with coronary disease) vs 19% (13 of 69 patients), p = 0.01. Wall motion abnormality occurring at less than or equal to 70% of maximal predicted heart rate was present in 49% of patients (23 of 47) with critical stenosis (greater than or equal to 90% luminal diameter narrowing), and in only 5% of patients (2 of 42) without such severe stenosis, p less than 0.001. The sensitivity of exercise-induced wall motion abnormality occurring at a low heart rate for the presence of severe coronary artery disease was similar to that of a deterioration in wall motion by more than two scores during exercise (49% vs 53%) or an absolute decrease of greater than or equal to 5% in exercise left ventricular ejection fraction (49% vs 45%).

  1. Clinical significance of exercise-induced left ventricular wall motion abnormality occurring at a low heart rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimchi, A.; Rozanski, A.; Fletcher, C.; Maddahi, J.; Swan, H.J.; Berman, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    We studied the relationship between the heart rate at the time of onset of exercise-induced wall motion abnormality and the severity of coronary artery disease in 89 patients who underwent exercise equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography as part of their evaluation for coronary artery disease. Segmental wall motion was scored with a five-point system (3 = normal; -1 = dyskinesis); a decrease of one score defined the onset of wall motion abnormality. The onset of wall motion abnormality at less than or equal to 70% of maximal predicted heart rate had 100% predictive accuracy for coronary artery disease and higher sensitivity than the onset of ischemic ST segment depression at similar heart rate during exercise: 36% (25 of 69 patients with coronary disease) vs 19% (13 of 69 patients), p = 0.01. Wall motion abnormality occurring at less than or equal to 70% of maximal predicted heart rate was present in 49% of patients (23 of 47) with critical stenosis (greater than or equal to 90% luminal diameter narrowing), and in only 5% of patients (2 of 42) without such severe stenosis, p less than 0.001. The sensitivity of exercise-induced wall motion abnormality occurring at a low heart rate for the presence of severe coronary artery disease was similar to that of a deterioration in wall motion by more than two scores during exercise (49% vs 53%) or an absolute decrease of greater than or equal to 5% in exercise left ventricular ejection fraction (49% vs 45%)

  2. Human LT-alpha-mediated resistance to autoimmune diabetes is induced in NOD, but not NOD-scid, mice and abrogated by IL-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyaguchi, S; Satoh, J; Takahashi, K; Sakata, Y; Nakazawa, T; Miyazaki, J; Toyota, T

    2001-01-01

    Systemic administration of human lymphotoxin-alpha (hLT-alpha) made NOD mice resistant not only to spontaneous autoimmune type 1 diabetes mellitus but also to cyclophosphamide (CY)-induced diabetes and diabetes transfer by diabetic NOD spleen cells (triple resistance). In this study we analyzed the mechanisms of hLT-alpha-induced resistance, focusing on (1) hLT-alpha-induced resistance in the pancreatic beta cell, (2) CY-resistant suppressor cells, (3) suppression of induction or function of effector cells for beta cell destruction, or (4) others. To examine the first possibility in vitro, a NOD-derived beta cell line (MIN6N) was pretreated with hLT-alpha and then mixed with diabetic NOD spleen cells and MIN6N cell viability was measured. Treatment with hLT-alpha did not protect MIN6N cells but rather enhanced cytotoxicity. Next NOD-scid mice were pretreated with hLT-alpha and then transferred with diabetic NOD spleen. All the recipients developed diabetes. These results excluded the first possibility. The second possibility was also excluded by a cotransfer experiment, in which diabetic NOD spleen cells were cotransferred to NOD-scid mice with nontreated or hLT-alpha-treated nondiabetic NOD spleens. There was no significant difference in diabetes incidence between the two groups. To observe the third possibility, spleen cells of hLT-alpha-treated triple-resistant NOD mice were transferred to NOD-scid mice. Diabetes developed in the recipients, although the onset of diabetes was slightly delayed. Finally, hLT-alpha-treated triple-resistant NOD mice developed diabetes 1 week after daily IL-12 treatment. In summary, hLT-alpha administration made NOD mice resistant to effector cells for beta cell destruction. This resistance was induced in NOD, but not in NOD-scid, mice, indicating that lymphocytes were obligatory for the resistance. However, it was not mediated by transferable suppressor cells. Because effector cells were present in hLT-alpha-treated NOD spleen and

  3. Left-handed helical preference in an achiral peptide chain is induced by an L-amino acid in an N-terminal type II β-turn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Poli, Matteo; De Zotti, Marta; Raftery, James; Aguilar, Juan A; Morris, Gareth A; Clayden, Jonathan

    2013-03-15

    Oligomers of the achiral amino acid Aib adopt helical conformations in which the screw-sense may be controlled by a single N-terminal residue. Using crystallographic and NMR techniques, we show that the left- or right-handed sense of helical induction arises from the nature of the β-turn at the N terminus: the tertiary amino acid L-Val induces a left-handed type II β-turn in both the solid state and in solution, while the corresponding quaternary amino acid L-α-methylvaline induces a right-handed type III β-turn.

  4. Impact of diabetes on treatment-induced changes in left ventricular structure and function in hypertensive patients with left ventricular hypertrophy. The LIFE study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerdts, E; Okin, P M; Omvik, P

    2009-01-01

    in diabetic and non-diabetic groups during treatment (33/18 vs. 28/16mmHg (ns)), diabetes was associated with higher prevalence of persistent LVH (47 vs. 39%, pdiabetes independently predicted less LV mass reduction and less improvement in stress-corrected LV midwall......BACKGROUND AND AIM: Diabetes is associated with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) and impaired systolic function in hypertensive patients, but less is known about its impact on LVH regression and functional improvement during antihypertensive treatment. METHODS AND RESULTS: We performed annual...... echocardiography in 730 non-diabetic and 93 diabetic patients (aged 55-80 years) with hypertension and electrocardiographic LVH during 4.8-year losartan- or atenolol-based treatment in the Losartan Intervention For Endpoint reduction in hypertension (LIFE) study. Baseline mean blood pressure (BP) and LV mass did...

  5. Sodium salicylate-induced amelioration of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in Lewis rats is associated with the suppression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Changjong; Ahn, Meejung; Jee, Youngheun; Heo, Seungdam; Kim, Seungjoon; Kim, Hyungmin; Sim, Ki-Bum; Koh, Chang-Sung; Shin, Young-Gyun; Shin, Taekyun

    2004-02-12

    We studied the effects of oral administration of sodium salicylate on the expression of the pro-inflammatory mediators, nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase- (COX-) 1 and 2, in rats with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Sodium salicylate (200 mg/kg) was administered orally for 13 days after the induction of EAE by immunization with guinea pig myelin basic protein and complete Freund's adjuvant. The onset (P<0.0001) and severity (P<0.05) of EAE paralysis in salicylate-treated animals were delayed and suppressed significantly compared with vehicle-treated controls. Western blot analysis showed that expression of COX-2 and iNOS, but not COX-1, decreased significantly in the spinal cords of salicylate-treated rats compared with vehicle-treated controls (P<0.05) and this finding was paralleled by immunohistochemical observations. These results suggest that the amelioration by salicylate of paralysis in rats with EAE is mediated in part by the suppression of COX and iNOS.

  6. American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... List Common Thread Women & Autoimmunity Diagnosis Tips Coping Tools Support Groups Education Modules Caregivers Patient/Caregiver Relationship The Male Caregiver AD Knowledge Base Autoimmune Disease List Common ...

  7. THE AUTOIMMUNE ECOLOGY.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan-Manuel eAnaya

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases (ADs represent a heterogeneous group of disorders that affect specific target organs or multiple organ systems. These conditions share common immunopathogenic mechanisms (i.e., the autoimmune tautology, which explain the clinical similarities they have among them as well as their familial clustering (i.e., coaggregation. As part of the autoimmune tautology, the influence of environmental exposure on the risk of developing ADs is paramount (i.e., the autoimmune ecology. In fact, environment, more than genetics, shapes immune system. Autoimmune ecology is akin to exposome, that is all the exposures - internal and external - across the lifespan, interacting with hereditary factors (both genetics and epigenetics to favor or protect against autoimmunity and its outcomes. Herein we provide an overview of the autoimmune ecology, focusing on the immune response to environmental agents in general, and microbiota, cigarette smoking, alcohol and coffee consumption, socioeconomic status, gender and sex hormones, vitamin D, organic solvents and vaccines in particular. Inclusion of the autoimmune ecology in disease etiology and health will improve the way personalized medicine is currently conceived and applied.

  8. Update in endocrine autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark S

    2008-10-01

    The endocrine system is a common target in pathogenic autoimmune responses, and there has been recent progress in our understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of autoimmune endocrine diseases. Rapid progress has recently been made in our understanding of the genetic factors involved in endocrine autoimmune diseases. Studies on monogenic autoimmune diseases that include endocrine phenotypes like autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1 and immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked have helped reveal the role of key regulators in the maintenance of immune tolerance. Highly powered genetic studies have found and confirmed many new genes outside of the established role of the human leukocyte antigen locus with these diseases, and indicate an essential role of immune response pathways in these diseases. Progress has also been made in identifying new autoantigens and the development of new animal models for the study of endocrine autoimmunity. Finally, although hormone replacement therapy is still likely to be a mainstay of treatment in these disorders, there are new agents being tested for potentially treating and reversing the underlying autoimmune process. Although autoimmune endocrine disorders are complex in etiology, these recent advances should help contribute to improved outcomes for patients with, or at risk for, these disorders.

  9. Citrullinated myelin basic protein induces experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in Lewis rats through a diverse T cell repertoire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, L; Sun, D; Whitaker, J N

    1998-08-01

    An increased proportion of citrullinated MBP (MBP-C8) occurs in the brains of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. In this study, MBP-C8 from guinea pig (GP) brains was isolated and found encephalitogenic in Lewis rats upon immunization. An encephalitogenic T cell line selected with MBP-C8 preferentially reacted with MBP-C8 over unmodified MBP. This T cell line responded weakly to the dominant encephalitogenic epitope, GP-MBP peptide 70-88, and did not display restricted TCR beta-chain usage (such as Vbeta88.2). The distinctive features of MBP-C8 were also demonstrated by its ability to reinduce active EAE in 70% of rats which had recovered from unmodified MBP induced EAE. These findings raise the possibility that citrullinated MBP may elicit a different pathogenic T cell repertoire for the recurrent phases of inflammatory demyelination.

  10. Dicarbonyl Induced Structural Perturbations Make Histone H1 Highly Immunogenic and Generate an Auto-Immune Response in Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Rouf Mir

    Full Text Available Increased oxidative stress under hyperglycemic conditions, through the interaction of AGEs with RAGE receptors and via activation of interleukin mediated transcription signalling, has been reported in cancer. Proteins modifications are being explored for their roles in the development and progression of cancer and autoantibody response against them is gaining interest as a probe for early detection of the disease. This study has analysed the changes in histone H1 upon modification by methylglyoxal (MG and its implications in auto-immunopathogenesis of cancer. Modified histone showed modifications in the aromatic residues, changed tyrosine microenvironment, intermolecular cross linking and generation of AGEs. It showed masking of hydrophobic patches and a hypsochromic shift in the in ANS specific fluorescence. MG aggressively oxidized histone H1 leading to the accumulation of reactive carbonyls. Far UV CD measurements showed di-carbonyl induced enhancement of the alpha structure and the induction of beta sheet conformation; and thermal denaturation (Tm studies confirmed the thermal stability of the modified histone. FTIR analysis showed amide I band shift, generation of a carboxyethyl group and N-Cα vibrations in the modified histone. LCMS analysis confirmed the formation of Nε-(carboxyethyllysine and electron microscopic studies revealed the amorphous aggregate formation. The modified histone showed altered cooperative binding with DNA. Modified H1 induced high titre antibodies in rabbits and the IgG isolated form sera of rabbits immunized with modified H1 exhibited specific binding with its immunogen in Western Blot analysis. IgG isolated from the sera of patients with lung cancer, prostate cancer, breast cancer and cancer of head and neck region showed better recognition for neo-epitopes on the modified histone, reflecting the presence of circulating autoantibodies in cancer. Since reports suggest a link between AGE-RAGE axis and

  11. Dendritic Cell-Specific Deletion of β-Catenin Results in Fewer Regulatory T-Cells without Exacerbating Autoimmune Collagen-Induced Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, C Henrique; Ober-Blöbaum, Julia L; Brouwers-Haspels, Inge; Asmawidjaja, Patrick S; Mus, Adriana M C; Razawy, Wida; Molendijk, Marlieke; Clausen, Björn E; Lubberts, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen presenting cells that have the dual ability to stimulate immunity and maintain tolerance. However, the signalling pathways mediating tolerogenic DC function in vivo remain largely unknown. The β-catenin pathway has been suggested to promote a regulatory DC phenotype. The aim of this study was to unravel the role of β-catenin signalling to control DC function in the autoimmune collagen-induced arthritis model (CIA). Deletion of β-catenin specifically in DCs was achieved by crossing conditional knockout mice with a CD11c-Cre transgenic mouse line. Bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) were generated and used to study the maturation profile of these cells in response to a TLR2 or TLR4 ligand stimulation. CIA was induced by intra-dermal immunization with 100 μg chicken type II collagen in complete Freund's adjuvant on days 0 and 21. CIA incidence and severity was monitored macroscopically and by histology. The T cell profile as well as their cytokine production were analysed by flow cytometry. Lack of β-catenin specifically in DCs did not affect the spontaneous, TLR2- or TLR4-induced maturation and activation of BMDCs or their cytokine production. Moreover, no effect on the incidence and severity of CIA was observed in mice lacking β-catenin in CD11c+ cells. A decreased frequency of splenic CD3+CD8+ T cells and of regulatory T cells (Tregs) (CD4+CD25highFoxP3+), but no changes in the frequency of splenic Th17 (CCR6+CXCR3-CCR4+), Th2 (CCR6-CXCR3-CCR4+) and Th1 (CCR6-CXCR3+CCR4-) cells were observed in these mice under CIA condition. Furthermore, the expression of IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-22, IL-4 or IFNγ was also not affected. Our data indicate that ablation of β-catenin expression in DCs did not alter the course and severity of CIA. We conclude that although deletion of β-catenin resulted in a lower frequency of Tregs, this decrease was not sufficient to aggravate the onset and severity of CIA.

  12. Dendritic Cell-Specific Deletion of β-Catenin Results in Fewer Regulatory T-Cells without Exacerbating Autoimmune Collagen-Induced Arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Henrique Alves

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are professional antigen presenting cells that have the dual ability to stimulate immunity and maintain tolerance. However, the signalling pathways mediating tolerogenic DC function in vivo remain largely unknown. The β-catenin pathway has been suggested to promote a regulatory DC phenotype. The aim of this study was to unravel the role of β-catenin signalling to control DC function in the autoimmune collagen-induced arthritis model (CIA. Deletion of β-catenin specifically in DCs was achieved by crossing conditional knockout mice with a CD11c-Cre transgenic mouse line. Bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs were generated and used to study the maturation profile of these cells in response to a TLR2 or TLR4 ligand stimulation. CIA was induced by intra-dermal immunization with 100 μg chicken type II collagen in complete Freund's adjuvant on days 0 and 21. CIA incidence and severity was monitored macroscopically and by histology. The T cell profile as well as their cytokine production were analysed by flow cytometry. Lack of β-catenin specifically in DCs did not affect the spontaneous, TLR2- or TLR4-induced maturation and activation of BMDCs or their cytokine production. Moreover, no effect on the incidence and severity of CIA was observed in mice lacking β-catenin in CD11c+ cells. A decreased frequency of splenic CD3+CD8+ T cells and of regulatory T cells (Tregs (CD4+CD25highFoxP3+, but no changes in the frequency of splenic Th17 (CCR6+CXCR3-CCR4+, Th2 (CCR6-CXCR3-CCR4+ and Th1 (CCR6-CXCR3+CCR4- cells were observed in these mice under CIA condition. Furthermore, the expression of IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-22, IL-4 or IFNγ was also not affected. Our data indicate that ablation of β-catenin expression in DCs did not alter the course and severity of CIA. We conclude that although deletion of β-catenin resulted in a lower frequency of Tregs, this decrease was not sufficient to aggravate the onset and severity of CIA.

  13. Comparative effects of amlodipine and benazepril on Left Atrial Pressure in Dogs with experimentally-induced Mitral Valve Regurgitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzuki Shuji

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the purposes of treatment for dogs with mitral regurgitation (MR is lowering left atrial pressure (LAP. There has been few study of the amlodipine in dogs with MR and amlodipine’s effect on LAP has not been fully evaluated in a quantitative manner because of difficulties in directly measuring LAP. The objective of our study was to compare the short-term effects of amlodipine (0.2 mg/kg PO q12h vs benazepril (0.5 mg/kg PO q12h, on LAP and echocardiographic parameters in five beagle dogs with experimentally-induced MR. LAP of eight dogs that has own control were measured using radiotelemetry system at baseline and again on days 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 of the drug administration. Results Mean LAP decreased significantly after amlodipine (11.20 ± 4.19 mmHg vs 14.61 ± 3.81 mmHg at baseline, p  .05. LAP was lower after 7 days of amlodipine treatment than after 7 days of benazepril treatment. Significant reduction was seen for the first time 4 days after the administration amlodipine. The rate of the maximal area of the regurgitant jet signals to the left atrium area (ARJ/LAA of the amlodipine treatment was significantly lower (p  Conclusions LAP was significantly decreased after amlodipine treatment in dogs with surgically-induced MR but not after benazepril treatment. Although this study did not focus on adverse effects, amlodipine may be an effective drug for helping the patients with acute onset of severe MR, such as rupture of chordae tendinae or end stage patients were the LAP is likely to be elevated. Additional studies in clinical patients with degenerative mitral valve disease and acute chordal rupture are warranted because the blood-pressure lowering effects of amlodipine can decrease renal perfusion and this can further activate the RAAS.

  14. Serum microRNA profiles in patients with chronic hepatitis B, chronic hepatitis C, primary biliary cirrhosis, autoimmune hepatitis, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, or drug-induced liver injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaura, Yu; Tatsumi, Naoyuki; Takagi, Shingo; Tokumitsu, Shinsaku; Fukami, Tatsuki; Tajiri, Kazuto; Minemura, Masami; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi; Nakajima, Miki

    2017-12-01

    Some blood biomarkers or histological examination by liver biopsy are used for the diagnosis of liver diseases in clinics. However, conventional blood biomarkers show poor specificity and sensitivity, and liver biopsy is highly invasiveness. Therefore, to overcome such disadvantages, specific/sensitive and noninvasive options are desirable. In recent years, circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) have been acknowledged for their potential as disease markers. Actually, several miRNAs have been reported to be biomarker candidates of liver diseases. However, these earlier studies were performed for one disease. Therefore, the specificity as biomarkers was not guaranteed, because they didn't study for the other types of liver injury. In this study, we examined if circulating miRNA could distinguish different types of liver diseases. Serum miRNA profiles in 28 patients with chronic hepatitis B, chronic hepatitis C, primary biliary cirrhosis, autoimmune hepatitis, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis or drug-induced liver injury as well as 4 control subjects were determined by TaqMan MicroRNA Array analysis. Principal component analysis (PCA) of selected miRNAs was performed. We identified 37 miRNAs whose levels were significantly different between any of the groups. Although individual miRNAs could not distinguish different types of liver diseases, probably because of similar liver pathology, their profiling by PCA could classify different liver disease groups. The profiling of the selected miRNAs can be useful to distinguish different types of liver diseases. Copyright © 2017 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Intestinal barrier dysfunction develops at the onset of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, and can be induced by adoptive transfer of auto-reactive T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrnaz Nouri

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system with a pathogenesis involving a dysfunctional blood-brain barrier and myelin-specific, autoreactive T cells. Although the commensal microbiota seems to affect its pathogenesis, regulation of the interactions between luminal antigens and mucosal immune elements remains unclear. Herein, we investigated whether the intestinal mucosal barrier is also targeted in this disease. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, the prototypic animal model of MS, was induced either by active immunization or by adoptive transfer of autoreactive T cells isolated from these mice. We show increased intestinal permeability, overexpression of the tight junction protein zonulin and alterations in intestinal morphology (increased crypt depth and thickness of the submucosa and muscularis layers. These intestinal manifestations were seen at 7 days (i.e., preceding the onset of neurological symptoms and at 14 days (i.e., at the stage of paralysis after immunization. We also demonstrate an increased infiltration of proinflammatory Th1/Th17 cells and a reduced regulatory T cell number in the gut lamina propria, Peyer's patches and mesenteric lymph nodes. Adoptive transfer to healthy mice of encephalitogenic T cells, isolated from EAE-diseased animals, led to intestinal changes similar to those resulting from the immunization procedure. Our findings show that disruption of intestinal homeostasis is an early and immune-mediated event in EAE. We propose that this intestinal dysfunction may act to support disease progression, and thus represent a potential therapeutic target in MS. In particular, an increased understanding of the regulation of tight junctions at the blood-brain barrier and in the intestinal wall may be crucial for design of future innovative therapies.

  16. Intestinal Barrier Dysfunction Develops at the Onset of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis, and Can Be Induced by Adoptive Transfer of Auto-Reactive T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouri, Mehrnaz; Bredberg, Anders; Weström, Björn; Lavasani, Shahram

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system with a pathogenesis involving a dysfunctional blood-brain barrier and myelin-specific, autoreactive T cells. Although the commensal microbiota seems to affect its pathogenesis, regulation of the interactions between luminal antigens and mucosal immune elements remains unclear. Herein, we investigated whether the intestinal mucosal barrier is also targeted in this disease. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the prototypic animal model of MS, was induced either by active immunization or by adoptive transfer of autoreactive T cells isolated from these mice. We show increased intestinal permeability, overexpression of the tight junction protein zonulin and alterations in intestinal morphology (increased crypt depth and thickness of the submucosa and muscularis layers). These intestinal manifestations were seen at 7 days (i.e., preceding the onset of neurological symptoms) and at 14 days (i.e., at the stage of paralysis) after immunization. We also demonstrate an increased infiltration of proinflammatory Th1/Th17 cells and a reduced regulatory T cell number in the gut lamina propria, Peyer's patches and mesenteric lymph nodes. Adoptive transfer to healthy mice of encephalitogenic T cells, isolated from EAE-diseased animals, led to intestinal changes similar to those resulting from the immunization procedure. Our findings show that disruption of intestinal homeostasis is an early and immune-mediated event in EAE. We propose that this intestinal dysfunction may act to support disease progression, and thus represent a potential therapeutic target in MS. In particular, an increased understanding of the regulation of tight junctions at the blood-brain barrier and in the intestinal wall may be crucial for design of future innovative therapies. PMID:25184418

  17. Autoimmune connective tissue diseases and vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Więsik-Szewczyk

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The idea that infectious agents can induce autoimmune diseases in genetically susceptible subjects has been a matter of discussion for years. Moreover, increased incidence of autoimmune diseases and introduction of prophylactic vaccinations from early childhood suggest that these two trends are linked. In the medical literature and even non-professional media, case reports or events temporally related to vaccination are reported. It raises the issue of vaccination safety. In everyday practice medical professionals, physicians, rheumatologists and other specialists will be asked their opinion of vaccination safety. The decision should be made according to evidence-based medicine and the current state of knowledge. The purpose of this paper is to discuss a potential mechanism which links infections, vaccinations and autoimmunity. We present an overview of published case reports, especially of systemic connective tissue diseases temporally related to vaccination and results from case-nested studies. As yet, no conclusive evidence supports a causal relationship between vaccination and autoimmune diseases. It has to be determined whether the performed studies are sufficiently Epsteinasensitive to detect the link. The debate is ongoing, and new data may be required to explain the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. We would like to underscore the need for prophylactic vaccination in patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases and to break down the myth that the vaccines are contraindicated in this target group.

  18. The effect of left frontal transcranial direct-current stimulation on propranolol-induced fear memory acquisition and consolidation deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasehi, Mohammad; Khani-Abyaneh, Mozhgan; Ebrahimi-Ghiri, Mohaddeseh; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza

    2017-07-28

    Accumulating evidence supports the efficacy of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in modulating numerous cognitive functions. Despite the fact that tDCS has been used for the enhancement of memory and cognition, very few animal studies have addressed its impact on the modulation of fear memory. This study was designed to determine whether pre/post-training frontal tDCS application would alter fear memory acquisition and/or consolidation deficits induced by propranolol in NMRI mice. Results indicated that administration of β1-adrenoceptor blocker propranolol (0.1mg/kg) impaired fear memory retrieval. Pre/post-training application of anodal tDCS when propranolol was administered prior to training reversed contextual memory retrieval whereas only the anodal application prior to training could induce the same result in the auditory test. Meanwhile, anodal stimulation had no effect on fear memories by itself. Moreover, regardless of when cathode was applied and propranolol administered, their combination restored contextual memory retrieval, while only cathodal stimulation prior to training facilitated the contextual memory retrieval. Also, auditory memory retrieval was restored when cathodal stimulation and propranolol occurred prior to training but it was abolished when stimulation occurred after training and propranolol was administered prior to training. Collectively, our findings show that tDCS applied on the left frontal cortex of mice affects fear memory performance. This alteration seems to be task-dependent and varies depending on the nature and timing of the stimulation. In certain conditions, tDCS reverses the effect of propranolol. These results provide initial evidence to support the timely use of tDCS for the modulation of fear-related memories. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Cardiogenic Shock due to Psychosis-Induced Inverted Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy Bridged-to-Recovery with a Percutaneous Left Ventricular Assist Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Korabathina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inverted Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, a less common variant in the spectrum of stress-induced cardiomyopathy, is increasingly being reported. This report describes an acute psychiatric illness leading to the onset of this syndrome. The patient presented here developed cardiogenic shock but successfully recovered with the use of a percutaneous left ventricular assist device.

  20. Altered Left Ventricular Geometry and Torsional Mechanics in High Altitude-Induced Pulmonary Hypertension: A Three-Dimensional Echocardiographic Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Boeck, Bart W; Toma, Aurel; Kiencke, Stephanie; Dehnert, Christoph; Zügel, Stefanie; Siebenmann, Christoph; Auinger, Katja; Buser, Peter T; Maggiorini, Marco; Kaufmann, Beat A

    2018-03-01

    Changes in left ventricular (LV) torsion have been related to LV geometry in patients with concomitant long-standing myocardial disease or pulmonary hypertension (PH). We evaluated the effect of acute high altitude-induced isolated PH on LV geometry, volumes, systolic function, and torsional mechanics. Twenty-three volunteers were prospectively studied at low altitude and after the second (D3) and third night (D4) at high altitude (4,559 m). LV ejection fraction, multidirectional strains and torsion, LV volumes, sphericity, and eccentricity were derived by speckle-tracking on three-dimensional echocardiographic data sets. Pulmonary pressure was estimated from the transtricuspid pressure gradient (TRPG), LV preload from end-diastolic LV volume, and transmitral over mitral annular E velocity (E/e'). At high altitude, oxygen saturation decreased by 15%-20%, heart rate and cardiac index increased by 15%-20%, and TRPG increased from 21 ± 2 to 37 ± 9 mm Hg (P geometry and torsional mechanics. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Echocardiography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Coeliac disease and autoimmune disease-genetic overlap and screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lundin, Knut E. A.; Wijmenga, Cisca

    Coeliac disease is a treatable, gluten-induced disease that often occurs concurrently with other autoimmune diseases. In genetic studies since 2007, a partial genetic overlap between these diseases has been revealed and further insights into the pathophysiology of coeliac disease and autoimmunity

  2. Psoriasis and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sticherling, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Psoriasis is one of the most common chronic inflammatory human skin diseases. Though clinically well characterized, the exact etiological and pathogenic mechanisms are still not known in detail. Current knowledge indicates distinct overlap to other inflammatory as well as autoimmune disorders. However, the one or more relevant autoantigens could not be characterized so-far. On the other side, several autoimmune diseases were shown to be associated with psoriasis. In addition, serological autoimmune phenomena, namely diverse circulating specific autoantibodies could be demonstrated in the past. A matter of current debate is if psoriasis is a primary autoimmune disease or secondarily evolving into autoimmunity as seen in other chronic inflammatory diseases. Related to this aspect is the concept of autoinflammation versus autoimmunity where psoriasis shares mechanisms of both entities. Though T-cells remain among the most important cellular players in the pathogenesis of psoriasis and current therapeutic strategies successfully target these cells or their products irrespective of these concepts, autoimmunity if relevant will add to the treatment armamentarium by using protective and prophylactic antigen-specific modalities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Psoriasis as an autoimmune disease

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    Agnieszka Owczarczyk-Saczonek

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays it is known that psoriasis belongs to the group of autoimmune diseases and may coexist with other diseases in this group. Most often patients have psoriatic arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, autoimmune thyroid diseases and multiple sclerosis. The coexistence of these disorders can be a diagnostic and therapeutic problem (there is controversy over the use of corticosteroids. The common pathogenesis is still not explained. We know that the loss of immunotolerance leads to formation of autoreactive Th1 and Th17 lymphocytes which recognize self-antigens and lead to their destruction in the target organ. Some features of immune mechanisms, observed in psoriasis, suggest its autoimmune background. In psoriasis the main role is played by the activation of the axis IL-12/Th1/IFN- and Th17/Il-23. Il-12 probably acts on naive T cells and the Th1 response is initiated. Il-23 maintains the Th1-mediated inflammatory reaction, stimulates maturation and effects of Th17, and maintains a certain amount of memory cells. We also observe dysfunction of Treg cells, which are responsible for the destruction of autoreactive lymphocytes. In addition, psoriatic keratinocytes have increased resistance to apoptosis, which eliminate damaged cells so that they cannot be recognized as a foreign antigen. However, researchers have suggested that initially the polyclonal activation of T lymphocytes is induced by superantigens (e.g. streptococcal M protein, peptidoglycan or skin trauma (Koebner phenomenon, whereas in the later phase self-antigens in the epidermis are recognized by autoreactive T cells (keratin K 17, HPV 5 proteins L1, Pso p27, leading to autoimmunity.

  4. Diastolic compliance and exercise-induced left ventricular diastolic volume changes in patients with coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, W.; Varma, V.; Wasserman, A.; Katz, R.; Reba, R.; Ross, A.

    1983-01-01

    This study consists of 46 consecutive patients who had supine resting and exercise multigated (MUGA) blood pool studies. All patients had angio-graphically important coronary stenosis in at least one major vessel. Thirty-five out of 46 patients with coronary artery disease increased left ventricular end diastolic volume with a supine exercise. The remaining eleven patients dit not dilate the left ventricle. Those patients, who were able to increase their end diastolic volume during exercise, had better compliance of the left ventricle manifested by lower end diastolic pressures, whereas, patients with poor left ventricular compliance were unable to volume expand during supine exercise

  5. CX3CL1 (fractalkine and CX3CR1 expression in myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis: kinetics and cellular origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olsson Tomas

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS. It is associated with local activation of microglia and astroglia, infiltration of activated macrophages and T cells, active degradation of myelin and damage to axons and neurons. The proposed role for CX3CL1 (fractalkine in the control of microglia activation and leukocyte infiltration places this chemokine and its receptor CX3CR1 in a potentially strategic position to control key aspects in the pathological events that are associated with development of brain lesions in MS. In this study, we examine this hypothesis by analyzing the distribution, kinetics, regulation and cellular origin of CX3CL1 and CX3CR1 mRNA expression in the CNS of rats with an experimentally induced MS-like disease, myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG-induced autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE. Methods The expression of CX3CL1 and its receptor CX3CR1 was studied with in situ hybridization histochemical detection of their mRNA with radio labeled cRNA probes in combination with immunohistochemical staining of phenotypic cell markers. Both healthy rat brains and brains from rats with MOG EAE were analyzed. In defined lesional stages of MOG EAE, the number of CX3CR1 mRNA-expressing cells and the intensity of the in situ hybridization signal were determined by image analysis. Data were statistically evaluated by ANOVA, followed by Tukeyprimes multiple comparison test. Results Expression of CX3CL1 mRNA was present within neuronal-like cells located throughout the neuraxis of the healthy rat. Expression of CX3CL1 remained unaltered in the CNS of rats with MOG-induced EAE, with the exception of an induced expression in astrocytes within inflammatory lesions. Notably, the brain vasculature of healthy and encephalitic animals did not exhibit signs of CX3CL1 mRNA expression. The receptor, CX3CR1, was expressed by microglial cells in all regions of the healthy brain

  6. Structural and topographical changes of calreticulin induced by INF-gamma and food antigen gliadin in colorectal carcinoma cell lines as a possible mechanism of autoimmune response induction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sánchez, Daniel; Jelínková, Lenka; Cinová, Jana; Šilerová, Marcela; Pekáriková, Aneta; Bezouška, Karel; Tučková, Ludmila; Tlaskalová, Helena

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 39, - (2009), s. 699-699 ISSN 0014-2980. [European Congress of Immunology /2./. 13.09.2009-16.09.2009, Berlin] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : colorectal carcinoma * autoimmune diseases * INF-gamma Subject RIV: EC - Immunology

  7. Eosinophils in Autoimmune Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diny, Nicola L; Rose, Noel R; Čiháková, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    Eosinophils are multifunctional granulocytes that contribute to initiation and modulation of inflammation. Their role in asthma and parasitic infections has long been recognized. Growing evidence now reveals a role for eosinophils in autoimmune diseases. In this review, we summarize the function of eosinophils in inflammatory bowel diseases, neuromyelitis optica, bullous pemphigoid, autoimmune myocarditis, primary biliary cirrhosis, eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis, and other autoimmune diseases. Clinical studies, eosinophil-targeted therapies, and experimental models have contributed to our understanding of the regulation and function of eosinophils in these diseases. By examining the role of eosinophils in autoimmune diseases of different organs, we can identify common pathogenic mechanisms. These include degranulation of cytotoxic granule proteins, induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, release of proteases degrading extracellular matrix, immune modulation through cytokines, antigen presentation, and prothrombotic functions. The association of eosinophilic diseases with autoimmune diseases is also examined, showing a possible increase in autoimmune diseases in patients with eosinophilic esophagitis, hypereosinophilic syndrome, and non-allergic asthma. Finally, we summarize key future research needs.

  8. Prolactin and Autoimmunity

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    Vânia Vieira Borba

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The great asymmetry of autoimmune diseases between genders represents one of the most enigmatic observations among the mosaic of autoimmunity. Sex hormones are believed to play a crucial role on this dimorphism. The higher prevalence of autoimmunity among women at childbearing ages, disease onset/relapses during pregnancy, and post-partum are some of the arguments that support this hypothesis. Certainly, motherhood represents one of the most remarkable challenges for the immune system, which not only has to allow for the conceptus, but also has to deal with complex endocrine alterations. Hormonal homeostasis is known to exert a crucial influence in achieving a competent and healthy immune system. Prolactin (PRL has a bioactive function acting as a hormone and a cytokine. It interferes with immune system modulation, mainly inhibiting the negative selection of autoreactive B lymphocytes. Likewise, hyperprolactinemia has been described in relation to the pathogenesis and activity of several autoimmune disorders. Dopamine is an effective inhibitor of PRL secretion due to either a direct influence on the hypophysis or stimulation of postsynaptic dopamine receptors in the hypothalamus, arousing the release of the PRL inhibitory factor. Hence, dopamine agonists have proven to offer clinical benefits among autoimmune patients and represent a promising therapy to be explored. In this review, we attempt to provide a critical overview of the link between PRL, autoimmune diseases, and motherhood.

  9. Eosinophils in Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Čiháková

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophils are multifunctional granulocytes that contribute to initiation and modulation of inflammation. Their role in asthma and parasitic infections has long been recognized. Growing evidence now reveals a role for eosinophils in autoimmune diseases. In this review, we summarize the function of eosinophils in inflammatory bowel diseases, neuromyelitis optica, bullous pemphigoid, autoimmune myocarditis, primary biliary cirrhosis, eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis, and other autoimmune diseases. Clinical studies, eosinophil-targeted therapies, and experimental models have contributed to our understanding of the regulation and function of eosinophils in these diseases. By examining the role of eosinophils in autoimmune diseases of different organs, we can identify common pathogenic mechanisms. These include degranulation of cytotoxic granule proteins, induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, release of proteases degrading extracellular matrix, immune modulation through cytokines, antigen presentation, and prothrombotic functions. The association of eosinophilic diseases with autoimmune diseases is also examined, showing a possible increase in autoimmune diseases in patients with eosinophilic esophagitis, hypereosinophilic syndrome, and non-allergic asthma. Finally, we summarize key future research needs.

  10. Cardiac energy metabolic alterations in pressure overload–induced left and right heart failure (2013 Grover Conference Series)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopaschuk, Gary D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pressure overload of the heart, such as seen with pulmonary hypertension and/or systemic hypertension, can result in cardiac hypertrophy and the eventual development of heart failure. The development of hypertrophy and heart failure is accompanied by numerous molecular changes in the heart, including alterations in cardiac energy metabolism. Under normal conditions, the high energy (adenosine triphosphate [ATP]) demands of the heart are primarily provided by the mitochondrial oxidation of fatty acids, carbohydrates (glucose and lactate), and ketones. In contrast, the hypertrophied failing heart is energy deficient because of its inability to produce adequate amounts of ATP. This can be attributed to a reduction in mitochondrial oxidative metabolism, with the heart becoming more reliant on glycolysis as a source of ATP production. If glycolysis is uncoupled from glucose oxidation, a decrease in cardiac efficiency can occur, which can contribute to the severity of heart failure due to pressure-overload hypertrophy. These metabolic changes are accompanied by alterations in the enzymes that are involved in the regulation of fatty acid and carbohydrate metabolism. It is now becoming clear that optimizing both energy production and the source of energy production are potential targets for pharmacological intervention aimed at improving cardiac function in the hypertrophied failing heart. In this review, we will focus on what alterations in energy metabolism occur in pressure overload induced left and right heart failure. We will also discuss potential targets and pharmacological approaches that can be used to treat heart failure occurring secondary to pulmonary hypertension and/or systemic hypertension. PMID:25992268

  11. Segmental vitiligo with segmental morphea: An autoimmune link?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pravesh Yadav

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An 18-year old girl with segmental vitiligo involving the left side of the trunk and left upper limb with segmental morphea involving the right side of trunk and right upper limb without any deeper involvement is illustrated. There was no history of preceding drug intake, vaccination, trauma, radiation therapy, infection, or hormonal therapy. Family history of stable vitiligo in her brother and a history of type II diabetes mellitus in the father were elicited. Screening for autoimmune diseases and antithyroid antibody was negative. An autoimmune link explaining the co-occurrence has been proposed. Cutaneous mosiacism could explain the presence of both the pathologies in a segmental distribution.

  12. Type 1 diabetes and polyglandular autoimmune syndrome: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Martin P; Matheis, Nina; Kahaly, George J

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disorder caused by inflammatory destruction of the pancreatic tissue. The etiopathogenesis and characteristics of the pathologic process of pancreatic destruction are well described. In addition, the putative susceptibility genes for T1D as a monoglandular disease and the relation to polyglandular autoimmune syndrome (PAS) have also been well explored. The incidence of T1D has steadily increased in most parts of the world, especially in industrialized nations. T1D is frequently associated with autoimmune endocrine and non-endocrine diseases and patients with T1D are at a higher risk for developing several glandular autoimmune diseases. Familial clustering is observed, which suggests that there is a genetic predisposition. Various hypotheses pertaining to viral- and bacterial-induced pancreatic autoimmunity have been proposed, however a definitive delineation of the autoimmune pathomechanism is still lacking. In patients with PAS, pancreatic and endocrine autoantigens either colocalize on one antigen-presenting cell or are expressed on two/various target cells sharing a common amino acid, which facilitates binding to and activation of T cells. The most prevalent PAS phenotype is the adult type 3 variant or PAS type III, which encompasses T1D and autoimmune thyroid disease. This review discusses the findings of recent studies showing noticeable differences in the genetic background and clinical phenotype of T1D either as an isolated autoimmune endocrinopathy or within the scope of polyglandular autoimmune syndrome. PMID:25685279

  13. Antinuclear antibodies in autoimmune and allergic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grygiel-Górniak, Bogna; Rogacka, Natalia; Rogacki, Michał; Puszczewicz, Mariusz

    2017-01-01

    Antinuclear antibodies (ANA) are primarily significant in the diagnosis of systemic connective tissue diseases. The relationship between their occurrence in allergic diseases is poorly documented. However, the mechanism of allergic and autoimmune diseases has a common thread. In both cases, an increased production of IgE antibodies and presence of ANA in selected disease entities is observed. Equally important is the activation of basophils secreting proinflammatory factors and affecting the differentiation of TH17 lymphocytes. Both autoimmune and allergic diseases have complex multi-pathogenesis and often occur in genetically predisposed individuals. The presence of antinuclear antibodies was confirmed in many systemic connective tissue diseases and some allergic diseases. Examples include atopic dermatitis, non-allergic asthma, and pollen allergy. Co-occurring allergic and autoimmune disorders induce further search for mechanisms involved in the aetiopathogenesis of both groups of diseases.

  14. Dendritic cells and aging: consequences for autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Anshu; Sridharan, Aishwarya; Prakash, Sangeetha; Agrawal, Harsh

    2012-01-01

    The immune system has evolved to mount immune responses against foreign pathogens and to remain silent against self-antigens. A balance between immunity and tolerance is required as any disturbance may result in chronic inflammation or autoimmunity. Dendritic cells (DCs) actively participate in maintaining this balance. Under steady-state conditions, DCs remain in an immature state and do not mount an immune response against circulating self-antigens in the periphery, which maintains a state of tolerance. By contrast, foreign antigens result in DC maturation and DC-induced T-cell activation. Inappropriate maturation of DCs due to infections or tissue injury may cause alterations in the balance between the tolerogenic and immunogenic functions of DCs and instigate the development of autoimmune diseases. This article provides an overview of the effects of advancing age on DC functions and their implications in autoimmunity.

  15. Autoimmune diseases and infections: controversial issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baio, P; Brucato, A; Buskila, D; Gershwin, M E; Giacomazzi, D; Lopez, L R; Luzzati, R; Matsuura, E; Selmi, C; Sarzi-Puttini, P; Atzeni, F

    2008-01-01

    The etiology and pathogenesis of certain types of disease remain controversial and stand like a bridge that crosses infectious, autoimmune and autoinflammatory pathways. Infection, for example, may initiate a disease, although it is the genetic regulation in the host, the interplay between virus or bacteria persistence and autoimmunity that produces the later phases of disease, the antigenic determinants responsible for inducing autoimmune disease, and the pathogenetic effector mechanisms. Infections agents cause pericarditis, but in 85% of cases it is "idiopathic". It has also been shown that persistent Clamydia pneumoniae, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Helicobacter pylori infections cause host immunity and promote atherogenesis. A number of infectious agents have been suggested as potential triggers for primary biliary cirrhosis. Infections and vaccinations have also been linked to the pathogenesis of fibromyalgia syndrome, a common, chronic syndrome of widespread pain. Many factors are also responsible for fever of unknown origin such as: infections, autoimmunity disease, etc. However, it is difficult to determine a direct correlation between the infections agents in such a large group of diseases. The aim of this review is to analyze some of the controversies about the role of infections in autoimmune diseases.

  16. Autoimmune gastritis: Pathologist's viewpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coati, Irene; Fassan, Matteo; Farinati, Fabio; Graham, David Y; Genta, Robert M; Rugge, Massimo

    2015-11-14

    Western countries are seeing a constant decline in the incidence of Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis, coupled with a rising epidemiological and clinical impact of autoimmune gastritis. This latter gastropathy is due to autoimmune aggression targeting parietal cells through a complex interaction of auto-antibodies against the parietal cell proton pump and intrinsic factor, and sensitized T cells. Given the specific target of this aggression, autoimmune gastritis is typically restricted to the gastric corpus-fundus mucosa. In advanced cases, the oxyntic epithelia are replaced by atrophic (and metaplastic) mucosa, creating the phenotypic background in which both gastric neuroendocrine tumors and (intestinal-type) adenocarcinomas may develop. Despite improvements in our understanding of the phenotypic changes or cascades occurring in this autoimmune setting, no reliable biomarkers are available for identifying patients at higher risk of developing a gastric neoplasm. The standardization of autoimmune gastritis histology reports and classifications in diagnostic practice is a prerequisite for implementing definitive secondary prevention strategies based on multidisciplinary diagnostic approaches integrating endoscopy, serology, histology and molecular profiling.

  17. Nutrition, geoepidemiology, and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selmi, Carlo; Tsuneyama, Koichi

    2010-03-01

    As well represented by the impaired immune function of malnourished individuals encountered in developing countries and the incidence of specific diseases following local nutrient deficiencies, nutrition and immunity have been linked to each other for centuries while the specific connection between dietary factors and autoimmunity onset or modulation is a more recent acquisition. Autoimmune diseases manifest limited prevalence rates in developing countries while numerous immunity-related claims have been proposed in the field of functional foods. Nevertheless, over the past years multiple lines of evidence have supported a major role for specific dietary factors (including vitamin D, vitamin A, selenium, zinc, omega-3 fatty acids, probiotics, and flavanols) in determining the immune responses involved in infections, allergies, and autoimmune diseases. Interestingly, the link between nutrition and autoimmunity may well contribute to the geoepidemiology observed for numerous conditions. In general terms, most data that will be discussed herein were obtained in experimental or animal models while human data from real-life clinical settings or randomized clinical trials remain largely unsatisfactory. Our current knowledge on the beneficial impact of nutrition on autoimmunity prompts us to encourage the search for evidence-based nutrition to support the everyday diet choices of patients. 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of streptozotocin-induced diabetes on left ventricular function in adult rats: an in vivo Pinhole Gated SPECT study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weytjens Caroline

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies have suggested that diabetes mellitus (DM may cause left ventricular (LV dysfunction directly resulting in increased susceptibility to heart failure. Using pinhole collimators and advances in data processing, gated SPECT was recently adapted to image the rat heart. The present study was aimed to assess this new imaging technique for quantifying LV function and remodeling from the Streptozotocin (STZ rat model compared to controls. Methods Twenty one rats were randomly assigned to control or diabetic group. Six months after the induction of diabetes by STZ, Pinhole 99 m Tc-sestamibi gated SPECT was performed for determining rat LV volumes and function. Post-mortem histopathologic analysis was performed to evaluate the determinant of LV remodeling in this model. Results After six months, the normalized to body weight LV End-systolic volume was significantly different in diabetic rats compared to controls (0.46 ± 0.02 vs 0.33 ± 0.03 μL/g; p = 0.01. The normalized LV End-diastolic volume was also different in both groups (1.51 ± 0.03 vs 0.88 ± 0.05 μL/g; p = 0.001 and the normalized stroke volume was significantly higher in STZ-rats (1.05 ± 0.02 vs 0.54 ± 0.06 μL/g; p = 0.001. The muscular fibers were thinner at histology in the diabetic rats (0.44 ± 0.07 vs 0.32 ± 0.06 AU; p = 0.01. Conclusion Pinhole 99 m Tc-sestamibi gated SPECT can successfully be applied for the evaluation of cardiac function and remodeling in STZ-induced diabetic rats. In this model, LV volumes were significantly changed compared to a control population, leading to a LV dysfunction. These findings were consistent with the histopathological abnormalities. Finally, these data further suggest the presence of diabetes cardiomyopathy.

  19. Collagen-induced arthritis in nonhuman primates: multiple epitopes of type II collagen can induce autoimmune-mediated arthritis in outbred cynomolgus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimozuru, Y; Yamane, S; Fujimoto, K; Terao, K; Honjo, S; Nagai, Y; Sawitzke, A D; Terato, K

    1998-03-01

    To define which regions of the type II collagen (CII) molecule result in anticollagen antibody production and the subsequent development of autoantibodies in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) nonhuman primate model. Male and female cynomolgus monkeys (2-6 of each sex per group) were immunized with either chicken (Ch), human, or monkey (Mk) CII, or with cyanogen bromide (CB)-generated peptide fragments of ChCII emulsified in Freund's complete adjuvant. Monkeys were observed for the development of arthritis, and sera were collected and analyzed for anticollagen antibody specificity by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Overt arthritis developed in all groups of monkeys immunized with intact CII and with all major CB peptide fragments of ChCII except CB8. Onset and severity of arthritis correlated best with serum anti-MkCII antibody levels. The levels of IgG autoantibody to MkCII were a result of the cross-reactivity rate of anti-heterologous CII antibodies with MkCII, which was based on the genetic background of individual monkeys rather than on sex differences. CII from several species and disparate regions of the CII molecule were able to induce autoantibody-mediated arthritis in outbred cynomolgus monkeys. The strong anti-MkCII response suggests that epitope spreading or induction of broad-based CII cross-reactivity occurred in these animals. Autoantibody levels to MkCII were higher in CIA-susceptible monkeys than in resistant monkeys, despite comparable antibody levels in response to the various immunizations of CII. These results closely parallel the type of anticollagen responses found in sera from rheumatoid arthritis patients. Perhaps this can be accounted for by similar major histocompatibility complex heterogenicity associated with an outbred population, or maybe this is a primate-specific pattern of reactivity to CII.

  20. Immunomodulatory Effect of Agave tequilana Evaluated on an Autoimmunity Like-SLE Model Induced in Balb/c Mice with Pristane.

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    Gutiérrez Nava, Zúlima Jannette; Jiménez-Aparicio, Antonio Ruperto; Herrera-Ruiz, Maribel Lucila; Jiménez-Ferrer, Enrique

    2017-05-25

    In this work, the immunomodulatory activity of the acetone extract and the fructans obtained from Agave tequilana were evaluated, on the systemic autoimmunity type-SLE model generated by the administration of 2,6,10,14-tetramethylpentadecane (TMPD, also known as pristane) on Balb/c female mice. The systemic autoimmunity type-SLE was observed seven months after the application of TMPD, in which the animals from the negative control group (animals with damage and without any other treatment) developed articular inflammation, proteinuria, an increment of the antinuclear antibody titters and tissue pro-inflammatory cytokines levels (IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α e IFN-γ) as well as the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. The administration of the different treatments and the extracts of A. tequilana , provoked the decrease of: articular inflammation, the development of proteinuria, ssDNA/dsDNA antinuclear antibody titters and cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-10. The phytochemical analysis of the acetone extract identified the presence of the following compounds: β-sitosterol glycoside; 3,7,11,15-tetramethyl-2-hexadecen-1-ol (phytol); octadecadienoic acid-2,3-dihydroxypropyl ester; stigmasta-3,5-dien-7-one; cycloartenone and cycloartenol. Therefore, A. tequilana contains active compounds with the capacity to modify the evolution of the systemic autoimmunity type-SLE on a murine model.

  1. Immunomodulatory Effect of Agave tequilana Evaluated on an Autoimmunity Like-SLE Model Induced in Balb/c Mice with Pristane

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    Zúlima Jannette Gutiérrez Nava

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the immunomodulatory activity of the acetone extract and the fructans obtained from Agave tequilana were evaluated, on the systemic autoimmunity type-SLE model generated by the administration of 2,6,10,14-tetramethylpentadecane (TMPD, also known as pristane on Balb/c female mice. The systemic autoimmunity type-SLE was observed seven months after the application of TMPD, in which the animals from the negative control group (animals with damage and without any other treatment developed articular inflammation, proteinuria, an increment of the antinuclear antibody titters and tissue pro-inflammatory cytokines levels (IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α e IFN-γ as well as the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. The administration of the different treatments and the extracts of A. tequilana, provoked the decrease of: articular inflammation, the development of proteinuria, ssDNA/dsDNA antinuclear antibody titters and cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-10. The phytochemical analysis of the acetone extract identified the presence of the following compounds: β-sitosterol glycoside; 3,7,11,15-tetramethyl-2-hexadecen-1-ol (phytol; octadecadienoic acid-2,3-dihydroxypropyl ester; stigmasta-3,5-dien-7-one; cycloartenone and cycloartenol. Therefore, A. tequilana contains active compounds with the capacity to modify the evolution of the systemic autoimmunity type-SLE on a murine model.

  2. [Autoimmune thyroid disease and other non-endocrine autoimmune diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilas, Ljiljana Todorović; Icin, Tijana; Paro, Jovanka Novaković; Bajkin, Ivana

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are chronic conditions initiated by the loss of immunological tolerance to self-antigens. They constitute heterogeneous group of disorders, in which multiple alterations in the immune system result in a spectrum of syndromes that either target specific organs or affect the body systematically. Recent epidemiological studies have shown a possible shift of one autoimmune disease to another or the fact that more than one autoimmune disease may coexist in a single patient or in the same family. Numerous autoimmune diseases have been shown to coexist frequently with thyroid autoimmune diseases. AUTOIMMNUNE THYROID DISEASE AND OTHER ORGAN SPECIFIC NON-ENDOCRINE AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES: This part of the study reviews the prevalence of autoimmune thyroid disease coexisting with: pernicious anaemia, vitiligo, celiac disease, autoimmune liver disease, miastenia gravis, alopecia areata and sclerosis multiplex, and several recommendations for screening have been given. AUTOIMMUNE THYROID DISEASE AND OTHER ORGAN NON-SPECIFIC NON-ENDOCRINE AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES: Special attention is given to the correlation between autoimmune thyroid disease and rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, syndrome Sjögren, systemic sclerosis and mixed connective tissue disease. Screening for autoimmune thyroid diseases should be recommended in everyday clinical practice, in patients with primary organ-specific or organ non-specific autoimmune disease. Otherwise, in patients with primary thyroid autoimmune disease, there is no good reason of seeking for all other autoimmune diseases, although these patients have a greater risk of developing other autoimmune disease. Economic aspects of medicine require further analyzing of these data, from cost/benefit point of view to justified either mandatory screening or medical practitioner judgment.

  3. Epigenetics and Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero-Ronderos, Paula; Montoya-Ortiz, Gladis

    2012-01-01

    Epigenetics is defined as the study of all inheritable and potentially reversible changes in genome function that do not alter the nucleotide sequence within the DNA. Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation, histone modification, nucleosome positioning, and microRNAs (miRNAs) are essential to carry out key functions in the regulation of gene expression. Therefore, the epigenetic mechanisms are a window to understanding the possible mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of complex diseases such as autoimmune diseases. It is noteworthy that autoimmune diseases do not have the same epidemiology, pathology, or symptoms but do have a common origin that can be explained by the sharing of immunogenetic mechanisms. Currently, epigenetic research is looking for disruption in one or more epigenetic mechanisms to provide new insights into autoimmune diseases. The identification of cell-specific targets of epigenetic deregulation will serve us as clinical markers for diagnosis, disease progression, and therapy approaches. PMID:22536485

  4. Headache in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Seby; Hajj-Ali, Rula A

    2014-03-01

    Autoimmune diseases are a group of heterogeneous inflammatory disorders characterized by systemic or localized inflammation, leading to ischemia and tissue destruction. These include disorders like systemic lupus erythematosus and related diseases, systemic vasculitides, and central nervous system (CNS) vasculitis (primary or secondary). Headache is a very common manifestation of CNS involvement of these diseases. Although headache characteristics can be unspecific and often non-diagnostic, it is important to recognize because headache can be the first manifestation of CNS involvement. Prompt recognition and treatment is necessary not only to treat the headache, but also to help prevent serious neurological sequelae that frequently accompany autoimmune diseases. In this review, we discuss headache associated with autoimmune diseases along with important mimics. © 2014 American Headache Society.

  5. Immunoglobulin E-Mediated Autoimmunity

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    Marcus Maurer

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The study of autoimmunity mediated by immunoglobulin E (IgE autoantibodies, which may be termed autoallergy, is in its infancy. It is now recognized that systemic lupus erythematosus, bullous pemphigoid (BP, and chronic urticaria, both spontaneous and inducible, are most likely to be mediated, at least in part, by IgE autoantibodies. The situation in other conditions, such as autoimmune uveitis, rheumatoid arthritis, hyperthyroid Graves’ disease, autoimmune pancreatitis, and even asthma, is far less clear but evidence for autoallergy is accumulating. To be certain of an autoallergic mechanism, it is necessary to identify both IgE autoantibodies and their targets as has been done with the transmembrane protein BP180 and the intracellular protein BP230 in BP and IL-24 in chronic spontaneous urticaria. Also, IgE-targeted therapies, such as anti-IgE, must have been shown to be of benefit to patients as has been done with both of these conditions. This comprehensive review of the literature on IgE-mediated autoallergy focuses on three related questions. What do we know about the prevalence of IgE autoantibodies and their targets in different diseases? What do we know about the relevance of IgE autoantibodies in different diseases? What do we know about the cellular and molecular effects of IgE autoantibodies? In addition to providing answers to these questions, based on a broad review of the literature, we outline the current gaps of knowledge in our understanding of IgE autoantibodies and describe approaches to address them.

  6. Bell's palsy and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, A; Gallo, A; Fusconi, M; Marinelli, C; Macri, G F; de Vincentiis, M

    2012-12-01

    To review our current knowledge of the etiopathogenesis of Bell's palsy, including viral infection or autoimmunity, and to discuss disease pathogenesis with respect to pharmacotherapy. Relevant publications on the etiopathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis and histopathology of Bell's palsy from 1975 to 2012 were analysed. Bell's palsy is an idiopathic peripheral nerve palsy involving the facial nerve. It accounts for 60 to 75% of all cases of unilateral facial paralysis. The annual incidence of Bell's palsy is 15 to 30 per 100,000 people. The peak incidence occurs between the second and fourth decades (15 to 45 years). The aetiology of Bell's palsy is unknown but viral infection or autoimmune disease has been postulated as possible pathomechanisms. Bell's palsy may be caused when latent herpes viruses (herpes simplex, herpes zoster) are reactivated from cranial nerve ganglia. A cell-mediated autoimmune mechanism against a myelin basic protein has been suggested for the pathogenesis of Bell's palsy. Bell's palsy may be an autoimmune demyelinating cranial neuritis, and in most cases, it is a mononeuritic variant of Guillain-Barré syndrome, a neurologic disorder with recognised cell-mediated immunity against peripheral nerve myelin antigens. In Bell's palsy and GBS, a viral infection or the reactivation of a latent virus may provoke an autoimmune reaction against peripheral nerve myelin components, leading to the demyelination of cranial nerves, especially the facial nerve. Given the safety profile of acyclovir, valacyclovir, and short-course oral corticosteroids, patients who present within three days of the onset of symptoms should be offered combination therapy. However it seems logical that in fact, steroids exert their beneficial effect via immunosuppressive action, as is the case in some other autoimmune disorders. It is to be hoped that (monoclonal) antibodies and/or T-cell immunotherapy might provide more specific treatment guidelines in the

  7. [Treatment and results of therapy in autoimmune hemolytic anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasić, J; Macukanović, L; Pavlović, M; Koraćević, S; Govedarević, N; Kitić, Lj; Tijanić, I; Bakić, M

    1994-01-01

    Basic principles in the therapy of idiopathic autoimmune hemolytic anemia induced by warm antibody were glucocorticoides and splenectomy. Immunosupresive drugs, plasmaferesis and intravenous high doses gamma globulin therapy are also useful. In secundary autoimmune hemolytic anemia induced by warm antibody we treated basic illness. During the period of 1990-1992 we treated 21 patients with primary autoimmune hemolytic anemia and 6 patients with secondary /4 CLL and 2 Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma/. Complete remission we found as a normalisation of reticulocites and hemoglobin level respectively. Complete remission by corticoides we got in 14/21 patients, partial response in 2/21 respectively. Complete response by splenectomy we got in 2/3 splenoctomized patients (idiopathic type). For successful treatment secondary hemolytic anemias we treated primary diseases (CLL and malignant lymphoma) and we got in 4/6 patients complete remission. Our results were standard in both type of autoimmune hemolytic anaemias induced by warm antibody.

  8. Direct current induced short-term modulation of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex while learning auditory presented nouns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyer Martin

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the contribution of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS to the exploration of memory functions. The aim of the present study was to examine the behavioural effects of right or left-hemisphere frontal direct current delivery while committing to memory auditory presented nouns on short-term learning and subsequent long-term retrieval. Methods Twenty subjects, divided into two groups, performed an episodic verbal memory task during anodal, cathodal and sham current application on the right or left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC. Results Our results imply that only cathodal tDCS elicits behavioural effects on verbal memory performance. In particular, left-sided application of cathodal tDCS impaired short-term verbal learning when compared to the baseline. We did not observe tDCS effects on long-term retrieval. Conclusion Our results imply that the left DLPFC is a crucial area involved in short-term verbal learning mechanisms. However, we found further support that direct current delivery with an intensity of 1.5 mA to the DLPFC during short-term learning does not disrupt longer lasting consolidation processes that are mainly known to be related to mesial temporal lobe areas. In the present study, we have shown that the tDCS technique has the potential to modulate short-term verbal learning mechanism.

  9. Depletion of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells exacerbates sodium iodide-induced experimental autoimmune thyroiditis in human leucocyte antigen DR3 (DRB1*0301) transgenic class II-knock-out non-obese diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, J C; Meroueh, C; Snower, D P; David, C S; Kong, Y M

    2007-03-01

    Both genetic and environmental factors contribute to autoimmune disease development. Previously, we evaluated genetic factors in a humanized mouse model of Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) by immunizing human leucocyte antigen DR3 (HLA-DR3) and HLA-DQ8 transgenic class II-knock-out non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. DR3+ mice were susceptible to experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT) induction by both mouse thyroglobulin (mTg) and human (h) Tg, while DQ8+ mice were weakly susceptible only to hTg. As one environmental factor associated with HT and tested in non-transgenic models is increased sodium iodide (NaI) intake, we examined the susceptibility of DR3+ and/or DQ8+ mice to NaI-induced disease. Mice were treated for 8 weeks with NaI in the drinking water. At 0 x 05% NaI, 23% of DR3+, 0% of DQ8+ and 20% of DR3+DQ8+ mice had thyroid destruction. No spleen cell proliferation to mTg was observed. Most mice had undetectable anti-mTg antibodies, but those with low antibody levels usually had thyroiditis. At 0.3% NaI, a higher percentage of DR3+ and DR3+DQ8+ mice developed destructive thyroiditis, but it was not statistically significant. However, when DR3+ mice had been depleted of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells prior to NaI treatment, destructive thyroiditis (68%) and serum anti-mTg antibodies were exacerbated further. The presence of DQ8 molecules does not alter the susceptibility of DR3+DQ8+ mice to NaI-induced thyroiditis, similar to earlier findings with mTg-induced EAT. Susceptibility of DR3+ mice to NaI-induced EAT, in both the presence and absence of regulatory T cells, demonstrates the usefulness of HLA class II transgenic mice in evaluating the roles of environmental factors and immune dysregulation in autoimmune thyroid disease.

  10. A sudden onset of a pseudo-neurological syndrome after HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvated vaccine: might it be an autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA) presenting as a somatoform disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poddighe, Dimitri; Castelli, Lucia; Marseglia, Gian Luigi; Bruni, Paola

    2014-12-01

    In last centuries, vaccines reduced the incidence of several infectious diseases. In last decades, some vaccines aimed at preventing also some cancers, where viruses play a causative role. However, several adverse events have been described after vaccines, but a causal relationship has been established only in a minority of cases. Here, we describe a pseudo-neurological syndrome occurred shortly after the administration of the bivalent HPV vaccine. Some autoimmune disorders, including neurological demyelinating diseases, have been reported after HPV vaccines, but the patient showed no organic lesions. The patient was diagnosed as having a functional somatoform syndrome, which was supposed to be autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA), seen the temporal link with vaccination and the presence of anti-phospholipid autoantibodies. Immunological mechanisms of vaccines-and of adjuvants-have not been completely elucidated yet, and although there is no evidence of statistical association with many post-vaccination events, a causal link with vaccine cannot be excluded in some individuals.

  11. Psychosis: an autoimmune disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Diwani, Adam A J; Pollak, Thomas A; Irani, Sarosh R; Lennox, Belinda R

    2017-11-01

    Psychotic disorders are common and disabling. Overlaps in clinical course in addition to epidemiological and genetic associations raise the possibility that autoimmune mechanisms may underlie some psychoses, potentially offering novel therapeutic approaches. Several immune loci including the major histocompatibility complex and B-cell markers CD19 and CD20 achieve genome-wide significance in schizophrenia. Emerging evidence suggests a potential role via neurodevelopment in addition to classical immune pathways. Additionally, lymphocyte biology is increasingly investigated. Some reports note raised peripheral CD19 + and reduced CD3 + lymphocyte counts, with altered CD4 : CD8 ratios in acute psychosis. Also, post-mortem studies have found CD3 + and CD20 + lymphocyte infiltration in brain regions that are of functional relevance to psychosis. More specifically, the recent paradigm of neuronal surface antibody-mediated (NSAb) central nervous system disease provides an antigen-specific model linking adaptive autoimmunity to psychopathology. NSAbs bind extracellular epitopes of signalling molecules that are classically implicated in psychosis such as NMDA and GABA receptors. This interaction may cause circuit dysfunction leading to psychosis among other neurological features in patients with autoimmune encephalitis. The detection of these cases is crucial as autoimmune encephalitis is ameliorated by commonly available immunotherapies. Meanwhile, the prevalence and relevance of these antibodies in people with isolated psychotic disorders is an area of emerging scientific and clinical interest. Collaborative efforts to achieve larger sample sizes, comparison of assay platforms, and placebo-controlled randomized clinical trials are now needed to establish an autoimmune contribution to psychosis. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. AUTOIMMUNE DISEASE DURING PREGNANCY AND THE MICROCHIMERISM LEGACY OF PREGNANCY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams Waldorf, Kristina M.; Nelson, J. Lee

    2009-01-01

    Pregnancy has both short-term effects and long-term consequences. For women who have an autoimmune disease and subsequently become pregnant, pregnancy can induce amelioration of the mother’s disease, such as in rheumatoid arthritis, while exacerbating or having no effect on other autoimmune diseases like systemic lupus erythematosus. That pregnancy also leaves a long-term legacy has recently become apparent by the discovery that bi-directional cell trafficking results in persistence of fetal cells in the mother and of maternal cells in her offspring for decades after birth. The long-term persistence of a small number of cells (or DNA) from a genetically disparate individual is referred to as microchimerism. While microchimerism is common in healthy individuals and is likely to have health benefits, microchimerism has been implicated in some autoimmune diseases such as systemic sclerosis. In this paper, we will first discuss short-term effects of pregnancy on women with autoimmune disease. Pregnancy-associated changes will be reviewed for selected autoimmune diseases including rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and autoimmune thyroid disease. The pregnancy-induced amelioration of rheumatoid arthritis presents a window of opportunity for insights into both immunological mechanisms of fetal-maternal tolerance and pathogenic mechanisms in autoimmunity. A mechanistic hypothesis for the pregnancy-induced amelioration of rheumatoid arthritis will be described. We will then discuss the legacy of maternal-fetal cell transfer from the perspective of autoimmune diseases. Fetal and maternal microchimerism will be reviewed with a focus on systemic sclerosis (scleroderma), autoimmune thyroid disease, neonatal lupus and type I diabetes mellitus. PMID:18716941

  13. [Polyglandular autoimmune syndromes : An overview].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komminoth, P

    2016-05-01

    Polyglandular autoimmune syndromes (PGAS), also known as autoimmune polyendocrinopathy syndromes (APS), are a heterogeneous group of rare, genetically caused diseases of the immune system which lead to inflammatory damage of various endocrine glands resulting in malfunctions. In addition, autoimmune diseases of non-endocrine organs may also be found. Early diagnosis of PGAS is often overlooked because of heterogeneous symptoms and the progressive occurrence of the individual diseases. The two most important forms of PGAS are the juvenile and adult types. The juvenile type (PGAS type 1) is caused by mutations in the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene on chromosome 21, exhibits geographic variations in incidence and is defined by the combination of mucocutaneous candidiasis, Addison's disease and hypoparathyroidism. In addition, autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) syndrome and other autoimmune diseases can also occur. The adult form of PGAS (PGAS type 2) is a multigenetic disorder associated with some HLA haplotypes, is more common than the juvenile type, shows female predominance and exhibits the combination of type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroid disease, Addison's disease and other autoimmune disorders. The histological alterations in affected organs of PGAS patients are similar to findings in sporadically occurring autoimmune diseases of these organs but there are no pathognomic fine tissue findings. If patients exhibit autoimmune changes in two different endocrine glands or if there are indications of several autoimmune disorders from the patient history, it is important to consider PGAS and inform the clinicians of this suspicion.

  14. Autoimmun hypophysitis--en differentialdiagnose til hypofyseadenomer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Therese; Hagen, Claus

    2010-01-01

    A 66-year-old man with a headache in the left temporal region which had persisted for eight months is presented. The patient developed polydipsia and polyuria and also suffered from tinnitus, impaired hearing and episodes of double vision. The patient was diagnosed with autoimmune hypophysitis (A......) in 2007. This case story displays the importance of knowing AH, as it is an important differential diagnosis to pituitary gland adenomas and to diseases in the hypothalamus because it can be treated medically as opposed to surgically....

  15. TNF RECEPTOR 2 AND DISEASE: Autoimmunity and Regenerative Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Louise Faustman

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The regulatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF exerts its effects through two receptors: TNFR1 and TNFR2. Defects in TNFR2 signaling are evident in a variety of autoimmune diseases. One new treatment strategy for autoimmune disease is selective destruction of autoreactive T cells by administration of TNF, TNF inducers, or TNFR2 agonism. A related strategy is to rely on TNFR2 agonism to induce T regulatory cells (Tregs that suppress cytotoxic T cells. Targeting TNFR2 as a treatment strategy is likely superior to TNFR1 because of its more limited cellular distribution on T cells, subsets of neurons, and a few other cell types, whereas TNFR1 is expressed throughout the body. This review focuses on TNFR2 expression, structure, and signaling; TNFR2 signaling in autoimmune disease and treatment strategies targeting TNFR2 in autoimmunity and the potential for TNFR2 to facilitate end organ regeneration.

  16. Electroencephalographic and fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography correlates in anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor autoimmune encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probasco, John C; Benavides, David R; Ciarallo, Anthony; Sanin, Beatriz Wills; Wabulya, Angela; Bergey, Gregory K; Kaplan, Peter W

    2014-01-01

    Anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (anti-NMDAR) autoimmune encephalitis is an increasingly recognized cause of limbic encephalitis (LE). Prolonged LE and limbic status epilepticus (LSE) share many features. The ability to distinguish between the two is crucial in directing appropriate therapy because of the potential iatrogenesis associated with immunosuppression and anesthetic-induced coma. A 34-year-old woman with recurrent LE developed behavioral changes, global aphasia, and repetitive focal and generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Because asymmetric rhythmic delta patterns recurred on electroencephalography (EEG) despite treatment with nonsedating antiepileptic drugs followed by anesthetic-induced coma, an investigation to distinguish LSE from LE was undertaken. Implanted limbic/temporal lobe depth electrodes revealed no epileptiform activity. Brain single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) showed no hyperperfusion, and brain fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) showed hypermetabolism in the left frontal, temporal, and parietal cortices. Anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor autoimmune encephalitis was diagnosed based detection of anti-NMDAR antibody in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). With chronic immunosuppression, the resolution of brain FDG-PET abnormalities paralleled clinical improvement. This case of anti-NMDAR autoimmune encephalitis illustrates the challenges of distinguishing prolonged LE from LSE. We discuss the parallels between these two conditions and propose a management paradigm to optimize evaluation and treatment.

  17. Adaptive immunity in autoimmune hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhi, Maria Serena; Ma, Yun; Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina; Vergani, Diego

    2010-01-01

    The histological lesion of interface hepatitis, with its dense portal cell infiltrate consisting of lymphocytes, monocytes/macrophages and plasma cells, was the first to suggest an autoaggressive cellular immune attack in the pathogenesis of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). Immunohistochemical studies, focused on the phenotype of inflammatory cells infiltrating the liver parenchyma, have shown a predominance of alphabeta-T cells. Amongst these cells, the majority have been CD4 helper/inducers, while a sizeable minority have consisted of CD8 cytotoxic/suppressors. Lymphocytes on non-T cell lineage included natural killer cells, monocytes/macrophages and B lymphocytes. For autoimmunity to arise, the self-antigenic peptide, embraced by an human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II molecule, must be presented to an uncommitted T helper (T(H)0) lymphocyte by professional antigen-presenting cells. Once activated and according to the presence in the milieu of interleukin 12 (IL-12) or IL-4, T(H)0 lymphocytes can differentiate into T(H)1 cells, which are pivotal to macrophage activation; enhance HLA class I expression, rendering liver cells vulnerable to CD8 T-cell attack; and induce HLA class II expression on hepatocytes; or they can differentiate into T(H)2 cells, which produce IL-4, IL-10 and IL-13, cytokines favouring autoantibody production by B lymphocytes. Autoantigen recognition is tightly controlled by regulatory mechanisms, such as those exerted by CD4+CD25(high) regulatory T cells. Numerical and functional regulatory T cell impairment characterises AIH and permits the perpetuation of effector immune responses with ensuing persistent liver destruction. Advances in the study of autoreactive T cells stem mostly from AIH type 2, where the main autoantigen, cytochrome P450IID6 (CYP2D6), is known to enable characterisation of antigen-specific immune responses. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Recent advances in understanding autoimmune thyroid disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bliddal, Sofie; Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) is often observed together with other autoimmune diseases. The coexistence of two or more autoimmune diseases in the same patient is referred to as polyautoimmunity, and AITD is the autoimmune disease most frequently involved. The occurrence of polyautoimmunity has...... led to the hypothesis that the affected patients suffer from a generalized dysregulation of their immune system. The present review summarizes recent discoveries unravelling the immunological mechanisms involved in autoimmunity, ranging from natural autoimmunity to disease-specific autoimmunity...

  19. Inhibition of myeloperoxidase by N-acetyl lysyltyrosylcysteine amide reduces experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis-induced injury and promotes oligodendrocyte regeneration and neurogenesis in a murine model of progressive multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guoliang; Zheng, Shikan; Zhang, Hao

    2018-02-07

    It is known that oxidative stress produced by proinflammatory myeloid cells plays an important role in demyelination and neuronal injury in progressive multiple sclerosis (MS). Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is a pro-oxidative enzyme released from myeloid cells during inflammation. It has been shown that MPO-dependent oxidative stress plays important roles in inducing tissue injury in many inflammatory diseases. In this report, we treated NOD experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mice, a murine model of progressive MS, with N-acetyl lysyltyrosylcysteine amide (KYC), a novel specific MPO inhibitor. Our data showed that KYC treatment not only attenuated MPO-mediated oxidative stress but also reduced demyelination and axonal injury in NOD EAE mice. More importantly, we found that KYC treatment increased oligodendrocyte regeneration and neurogenesis in NOD EAE mice. Taken together, our data suggests that targeting MPO should be a good therapeutic approach for reducing oxidative injury and preserving neuronal function in progressive MS patients.

  20. Sarcoidosis and Thyroid Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piera Fazzi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Most of the studies have shown a higher risk for subclinical and clinical hypothyroidism, antithyroid autoantibodies [overall antithyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAb], and in general, thyroid autoimmunity, overall in the female gender in patients with sarcoidosis (S. A significantly higher prevalence of clinical hypothyroidism and Graves’ disease was also described in female S patients with respect to controls. Gallium-67 (Ga-67 scyntigraphy in S patients, in the case of thyroid uptake, suggests the presence of aggressive autoimmune thyroiditis and hypothyroidism. For this reason, ultrasonography and thyroid function should be done in the case of Ga-67 thyroid uptake. In conclusion, thyroid function, TPOAb measurement, and ultrasonography should be done to assess the clinical profile in female S patients, and the ones at high risk (female individuals, with TPOAb positivity, and hypoechoic and small thyroid should have periodically thyroid function evaluations and suitable treatments.

  1. Gangliosides and autoimmune diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misasi, R; Dionisi, S; Farilla, L; Carabba, B; Lenti, L; Di Mario, U; Dotta, F

    1997-09-01

    Gangliosides are sialic acid-containing glycolipids which are formed by a hydrophobic portion, the ceramide, and a hydrophilic part, i.e. the oligosaccharide chain. First described in neural tissue, several studies have shown that gangliosides are almost ubiquitous molecules expressed in all vertebrate tissues. Within cells, gangliosides are usually associated with plasma membranes, where they can act as receptors for a variety of molecules and have been shown to take part in cell-to-cell interaction and in signal transduction. In addition, gangliosides are expressed in cytosol membranes like those of secretory granules of some endocrine cells (adrenal medulla, pancreatic islets). As far as the role of gangliosides in diseases is concerned, there are some cases in which an aberrant ganglioside expression plays a crucial role in the disease pathogenetic process. These diseases include two major forms of ganglioside storage, namely GM2-gangliosidosis (Tay-Sachs and its beta-hexosaminidase deficiency) and GM1-gangliosidosis (beta-galactosidase deficiency), where the most prominent pathological characteristic is the lysosomal ganglioside accumulation in neurons. Other inflammatory or degenerative diseases both within and outside the nervous system have been shown to be associated with an altered pattern of ganglioside expression in the target organ. Since monoclonal antibodies have been discovered and used in immunology, a large variety of ganglioside antigens has been described both as blood group antigens and as tumour-related antigens. Several studies have also indicated that gangliosides can act not only as antigens, but also as autoantigens. As a matter of fact, auto-antibodies to gangliosides, detected by immunostaining methods performed directly on TLC plates or by ELISA, have been described in several autoimmune disorders such as Guillain-Barré syndrome, multiple sclerosis, lupus erythematosus, Hashimoto's thyroiditis and, last but not least, insulin

  2. Dementia mimicking a sudden cognitive and behavioral change induced by left globus pallidus infarction: review of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Su Hyun; Park, Kee Hyung; Sung, Young Hee; Lee, Yeoung Bae; Park, Hyun Mi; Shin, Dong Jin

    2008-09-15

    Recently there has been increasing interest in the non-motor functions of the globus pallidus, and especially its role in cognitive processing. We experienced two patients with acute cognitive and behavior changes after globus pallidus infarctions. Examination of both revealed inattention, decreased verbal fluency, emotional blunting, and amnesia. There were no other sensory or motor symptoms. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed focal acute cerebral infarction in the left globus pallidus. Neuropsychological assessment revealed decreased frontal executive function, with verbal memory disturbance. These cases suggest that strategic infarction dementia can result from a single globus pallidus lesion.

  3. Left ventricular deformation at rest predicts exercise-induced elevation in pulmonary artery wedge pressure in patients with unexplained dyspnoea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, Tor; Santos, Mário; Rivero, Jose

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: Impaired left ventricular (LV) deformation despite preserved LV ejection fraction (LVEF) is common and predicts outcomes in heart failure with preserved LVEF. We hypothesized that impaired LV deformation at rest is a marker of impaired cardiac systolic and diastolic reserve, and aimed...... referred for evaluation of dyspnoea. All patients underwent rest echocardiography followed by right heart catheterization and cardiopulmonary exercise testing with concomitant invasive haemodynamic monitoring. The LS, CS and CS/LS ratio were measured by two-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography...

  4. Mechanism of action and efficacy of RX-111, a thieno[2,3-c]pyridine derivative and small molecule inhibitor of protein interaction with glycosaminoglycans (SMIGs), in delayed-type hypersensitivity, TNBS-induced colitis and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Nicholas; Koppel, Juraj; Zsila, Ferenc; Juhas, Stefan; Il'kova, Gabriela; Kogan, Faina Yurgenzon; Lahmy, Orly; Wildbaum, Gizi; Karin, Nathan; Zhuk, Regina; Gregor, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Elucidate the mechanism of action of the small molecule inhibitor of protein binding to glycosaminoglycans, RX-111 and assay its anti-inflammatory activity in animal models of inflammatory disease. The glycosaminoglycan, heparin, was used in the mechanism of action study of RX-111. Human T lymphocytes and umbilical vein endothelial cells were used to assay the in vitro activity of RX-111. Mouse and rat models of disease were used to assay the anti-inflammatory activity of RX-111 in vivo. Circular dichroism and UV/Vis absorption spectroscopy were used to study the binding of RX-111 to the glycosaminoglycan, heparin. T lymphocyte rolling on endothelial cells under shear flow was used to assay RX-111 activity in vitro. Delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) and tri-nitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis in mice and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in rats were used to assay anti-inflammatory activity of RX-111 in vivo. RX-111 was shown to bind directly to heparin. It inhibited leukocyte rolling on endothelial cells under shear flow and reduced inflammation in the mouse model of DTH. RX-111 was efficacious in the mouse model of inflammatory bowel disease, TNBS-induced colitis and the rat model of multiple sclerosis, EAE. RX-111 exercises its broad spectrum anti-inflammatory activity by a singular mechanism of action, inhibition of protein binding to the cell surface GAG, heparan sulfate. RX-111 and related thieno[2,3-c]pyridine derivatives are potential therapeutics for the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases.

  5. Association between autoimmune disease and cutaneous melanoma with regard to melanoma prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottoni, U; Paolino, G; Ambrifi, M; Didona, D; Albanesi, M; Clerico, R; Lido, P; Brachini, A; Corsetti, P; Richetta, A G; Cantisani, C; Calvieri, S

    2015-04-01

    An association between autoimmune disease and malignant melanoma (MM) has often been reported in the literature as a positive prognostic factor for MM. Consequently, we evaluated the influence of different autoimmune diseases on the prognosis of MM. To evaluate the prognosis of patients with MM who also had an autoimmune disorder, whether tumour-associated, paraneoplastic or drug-induced. Autoimmune diseases were classified and analysed as tumour-associated, paraneoplastic or drug-induced. Patients were enrolled according to their clinicopathological features and matched with control groups. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to estimate disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS), and log-rank test was used to evaluate differences between the survival curves. In total, 49 patients with MM and tumour-associated autoimmune disease were included in our analysis. No case of paraneoplastic autoimmune disease was detected. The survival analyses showed a range of results, from a worsening of DFS and OS to a lack of any difference. In a second analysis, we separately analysed patients who developed autoimmune disorders after starting adjuvant therapy with interferon-α; we did not find significant differences between these patients and the untreated patients. Autoimmune disease, whether tumour-associated or drug-induced, was not associated with better prognosis in patients with MM. The results suggest that the reported relationship between autoimmunity and MM may be a result of individual variation in sensitivity to the autoimmune disease, the tumour or the treatments. © 2014 British Association of Dermatologists.

  6. Thymoma and autoimmunity

    OpenAIRE

    Shelly, Shahar; Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Altman, Arie; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2011-01-01

    The thymus is a central lymphatic organ that is responsible for many immunological functions, including the production of mature, functional T cells and the induction of self-tolerance. Benign or malignant tumors may originate from the thymus gland, with thymoma being the most common and accounting for 50% of anterior mediastinal tumors. Malignancies linked to thymoma include the loss of self-tolerance and the presence of autoimmunity. In this review, we compiled the current scientific eviden...

  7. Autoimmune liver disease 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratori, Paolo; Granito, Alessandro; Pappas, Georgios; Muratori, Luigi; Lenzi, Marco; Bianchi, Francesco B

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune liver disease (ALD) includes a spectrum of diseases which comprises both cholestatic and hepatitic forms: autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and the so called "overlap" syndromes where hepatitic and cholestatic damage coexists. All these diseases are characterized by an extremely high heterogeneity of presentation, varying from asymptomatic, acute (as in a subset of AIH) or chronic (with aspecific symptoms such as fatigue and myalgia in AIH or fatigue and pruritus in PBC and PSC). The detection and characterization of non organ specific autoantibodies plays a major role in the diagnostic approach of autoimmune liver disease; anti nuclear reactivities (ANA) and anti smooth muscle antibodies (SMA) mark type 1 AIH, liver kidney microsomal antibody type 1 (LKM1) and liver cytosol type 1 (LC1) are the serological markers of type 2 AIH; antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA) are associated with PBC, while no specific marker is found in PSC, since anticytoplasmic neutrophil antibodies with perinuclear pattern (atypical p-ANCA or p-ANNA) are also detected in a substantial proportion of type 1 AIH cases. Treatment options rely on immunosoppressive therapy (steroids and azathioprine) in AIH and on ursodeoxycholic acid in cholestatic conditions; in all these diseases liver transplantation remains the only therapeutical approach for the end stage of liver disease.

  8. [Autoimmune blistering diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvert-Lehembre, S; Joly, P

    2014-03-01

    Autoimmune blistering diseases are characterized by the production of pathogenic autoantibodies that are responsible for the formation of epidermal blisters. Major advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of these disorders have allowed the development of new therapeutic agents. Recent epidemiologic data showed that bullous pemphigoid mainly affects elderly patients. Bullous pemphigoid is often associated with degenerative neurologic disorders. A major increase in the incidence of bullous pemphigoid has been observed in France. Treatment of bullous pemphigoid is mainly based on superpotent topical corticosteroids. The role of desmosomal proteins has been demonstrated in the initiation, propagation and persistence of the autoimmune response in pemphigus. Several studies have shown a correlation between anti-desmoglein antibody titers and disease activity. Pemphigus susceptibility genes have been identified. Oral corticosteroids remain the mainstay of pemphigus treatment. Dramatic and long-lasting improvement has been recently obtained with rituximab in recalcitrant types of pemphigus. Other autoimmune junctional blistering diseases are rare entities, whose prognosis can be severe. Their diagnosis has been improved by the use of new immunological assays and immunoelectronic microscopy. Immunosupressants are widely used in severe types in order to prevent mucosal sequelae. Copyright © 2013 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Thymoma and autoimmunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelly, Shahar; Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Altman, Arie; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2011-01-01

    The thymus is a central lymphatic organ that is responsible for many immunological functions, including the production of mature, functional T cells and the induction of self-tolerance. Benign or malignant tumors may originate from the thymus gland, with thymoma being the most common and accounting for 50% of anterior mediastinal tumors. Malignancies linked to thymoma include the loss of self-tolerance and the presence of autoimmunity. In this review, we compiled the current scientific evidence detailing the various interactions between thymoma and autoimmune diseases, including myasthenia gravis, systemic lupus erythematosus, inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion, pure red cell aplasia, pernicious anemia, pemphigus and autoimmune thyroid diseases. In recent years, several mechanisms have been proposed to explain these interactions. Most are based on the assumption that the ‘sick' thymus, like the ‘normal' thymus, can generate mature T cells; however, the T cells generated by the sick thymus are impaired and thus may exert cellular autoreactivity. Here, we present several theories that may shed light on the loss of self-tolerance associated with this epithelial tumor of the thymus. PMID:21317916

  10. An Immunogenic Peptide, T2 Induces Interstitial Cystitis/Painful Bladder Syndrome: an Autoimmune Mouse Model for Interstitial Cystitis/Painful Bladder Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Ihsan, Awais Ullah; Cao, Yanfang; Khan, Farhan Ullah; Cheng, Yijie; Han, Lei; Zhou, Xiaohui

    2017-12-01

    The exact pathophysiology of interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome is unknown; however, autoimmunity is a valid theory. We developed an autoimmune chronic cystitis model by administration of the medium dose of immunogenic peptide T2. Sixty female C57BL/6 mice were divided into six groups. The control group was not treated with any reagent. CFA group was injected with CFA + normal saline, homogenate group with bladder homogenate + CFA, low-dose group with low dose of T2 peptide + CFA, medium dose group with the medium dose of T2 peptide + CFA, and high-dose group with the high dose of T2 peptide + CFA. Micturition habits, withdrawal frequencies of mice, and bladders weight were measured for each group. Hematoxylin and eosin staining and toluidine blue staining were used to investigate bladder inflammation and mast cells accumulation, respectively. T cells infiltration in the bladder tissues and serum TNF-α level were measured by using immunohistochemistry and ELISA, respectively. Mice immunized with the medium dose of T2 peptide (0.225 mg/ml) were extremely sensitive to the applied force, showed greater urine frequencies, and higher bladder weights. Histologic examination revealed severe edema and inflammation in bladder tissues of medium-dose group. Extensive infiltration of T cells in bladder tissues, elevated TNF-α, and increased mast cells accumulation were observed in medium-dose group as compared to that in other groups. EAC mice model established by injecting the medium dose of T2 (0.225 mg/ml) mimics all the symptoms and pathophysiologic characteristics of IC/PBS. We believe that this model can help us to investigate the pathogenesis of IC/PBS.

  11. B Cells in Autoimmune Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Hampe, Christiane S.

    2012-01-01

    The role of B cells in autoimmune diseases involves different cellular functions, including the well-established secretion of autoantibodies, autoantigen presentation and ensuing reciprocal interactions with T cells, secretion of inflammatory cytokines, and the generation of ectopic germinal centers. Through these mechanisms B cells are involved both in autoimmune diseases that are traditionally viewed as antibody mediated and also in autoimmune diseases that are commonly classified as T cell...

  12. Neurotransmission to parasympathetic cardiac vagal neurons in the brain stem is altered with left ventricular hypertrophy-induced heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauley, Edmund; Wang, Xin; Dyavanapalli, Jhansi; Sun, Ke; Garrott, Kara; Kuzmiak-Glancy, Sarah; Kay, Matthew W; Mendelowitz, David

    2015-10-01

    Hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy, and heart failure (HF) are widespread and debilitating cardiovascular diseases that affect nearly 23 million people worldwide. A distinctive hallmark of these cardiovascular diseases is autonomic imbalance, with increased sympathetic activity and decreased parasympathetic vagal tone. Recent device-based approaches, such as implantable vagal stimulators that stimulate a multitude of visceral sensory and motor fibers in the vagus nerve, are being evaluated as new therapeutic approaches for these and other diseases. However, little is known about how parasympathetic activity to the heart is altered with these diseases, and this lack of knowledge is an obstacle in the goal of devising selective interventions that can target and selectively restore parasympathetic activity to the heart. To identify the changes that occur within the brain stem to diminish the parasympathetic cardiac activity, left ventricular hypertrophy was elicited in rats by aortic pressure overload using a transaortic constriction approach. Cardiac vagal neurons (CVNs) in the brain stem that generate parasympathetic activity to the heart were identified with a retrograde tracer and studied using patch-clamp electrophysiological recordings in vitro. Animals with left cardiac hypertrophy had diminished excitation of CVNs, which was mediated both by an augmented frequency of spontaneous inhibitory GABAergic neurotransmission (with no alteration of inhibitory glycinergic activity) as well as a diminished amplitude and frequency of excitatory neurotransmission to CVNs. Opportunities to alter these network pathways and neurotransmitter receptors provide future targets of intervention in the goal to restore parasympathetic activity and autonomic balance to the heart in cardiac hypertrophy and other cardiovascular diseases. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  13. Breaking Tolerance to Thyroid Antigens: Changing Concepts in Thyroid Autoimmunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapoport, Basil

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid autoimmunity involves loss of tolerance to thyroid proteins in genetically susceptible individuals in association with environmental factors. In central tolerance, intrathymic autoantigen presentation deletes immature T cells with high affinity for autoantigen-derived peptides. Regulatory T cells provide an alternative mechanism to silence autoimmune T cells in the periphery. The TSH receptor (TSHR), thyroid peroxidase (TPO), and thyroglobulin (Tg) have unusual properties (“immunogenicity”) that contribute to breaking tolerance, including size, abundance, membrane association, glycosylation, and polymorphisms. Insight into loss of tolerance to thyroid proteins comes from spontaneous and induced animal models: 1) intrathymic expression controls self-tolerance to the TSHR, not TPO or Tg; 2) regulatory T cells are not involved in TSHR self-tolerance and instead control the balance between Graves' disease and thyroiditis; 3) breaking TSHR tolerance involves contributions from major histocompatibility complex molecules (humans and induced mouse models), TSHR polymorphism(s) (humans), and alternative splicing (mice); 4) loss of tolerance to Tg before TPO indicates that greater Tg immunogenicity vs TPO dominates central tolerance expectations; 5) tolerance is induced by thyroid autoantigen administration before autoimmunity is established; 6) interferon-α therapy for hepatitis C infection enhances thyroid autoimmunity in patients with intact immunity; Graves' disease developing after T-cell depletion reflects reconstitution autoimmunity; and 7) most environmental factors (including excess iodine) “reveal,” but do not induce, thyroid autoimmunity. Micro-organisms likely exert their effects via bystander stimulation. Finally, no single mechanism explains the loss of tolerance to thyroid proteins. The goal of inducing self-tolerance to prevent autoimmune thyroid disease will require accurate prediction of at-risk individuals together with an antigen

  14. [Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becheur, M; Bouslama, B; Slama, H; Toumi, N E H

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare condition in children which differs from the adult form. It is defined by immune-mediated destruction of red blood cells caused by autoantibodies. Characteristics of the autoantibodies are responsible for the various clinical entities. Classifications of autoimmune hemolytic anemia include warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia, cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia, and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria. For each classification, this review discusses the epidemiology, etiology, clinical presentation, laboratory evaluation, and treatment options. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of amiodarone-induced hyperthyroidism on left ventricular outflow obstruction after septal myectomy for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokorney, Sean D; Stone, Neil J; Passman, Rod; Oyer, David; Rigolin, Vera H; Bonow, Robert O

    2010-12-01

    Patients with obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy who undergo septal myectomy are at risk for developing postoperative atrial fibrillation. Amiodarone is effective in treating this arrhythmia but is associated with multiple adverse effects, often with delayed onset. A novel case is described of a patient who developed type 2 amiodarone-induced hyperthyroidism that presented as recurrence of outflow obstruction after septal myectomy. The patient's symptoms and echocardiographic findings of outflow obstruction resolved substantially with the treatment of the amiodarone-induced hyperthyroidism. Amiodarone-induced hyperthyroidism of delayed onset can be a subtle diagnosis, requiring a high index of suspicion. In conclusion, recognition of this diagnosis in patients with recurrence of outflow obstruction by symptoms and cardiac imaging after septal myectomy may avoid unnecessary repeat surgical intervention. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE-Induced Elevated Expression of the E1 Isoform of Methyl CpG Binding Protein 2 (MeCP2E1: Implications in Multiple Sclerosis (MS-Induced Neurological Disability and Associated Myelin Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Khorshid Ahmad

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic neurological disease characterized by the destruction of central nervous system (CNS myelin. At present, there is no cure for MS due to the inability to repair damaged myelin. Although the neurotrophin brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF has a beneficial role in myelin repair, these effects may be hampered by the over-expression of a transcriptional repressor isoform of methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2 called MeCP2E1. We hypothesize that following experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE-induced myelin damage, the immune system induction of the pathogenic MeCP2E1 isoform hampers the myelin repair process by repressing BDNF expression. Using an EAE model of MS, we identify the temporal gene and protein expression changes of MeCP2E1, MeCP2E2 and BDNF. The expression changes of these key biological targets were then correlated with the temporal changes in neurological disability scores (NDS over the entire disease course. Our results indicate that MeCP2E1 mRNA levels are elevated in EAE animals relative to naïve control (NC and active control (AC animals during all time points of disease progression. Our results suggest that the EAE-induced elevations in MeCP2E1 expression contribute to the repressed BDNF production in the spinal cord (SC. The sub-optimal levels of BDNF result in sustained NDS and associated myelin damage throughout the entire disease course. Conversely, we observed no significant differences in the expression patterns displayed for the MeCP2E2 isoform amongst our experimental groups. However, our results demonstrate that baseline protein expression ratios between the MeCP2E1 versus MeCP2E2 isoforms in the SC are higher than those identified within the dorsal root ganglia (DRG. Thus, the DRG represents a more conducive environment than that of the SC for BDNF production and transport to the CNS to assist in myelin repair. Henceforth, the sub-optimal BDNF levels we report in the SC

  17. Autoimmune Hepatitis: A Review with emphasis on its histomorphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SV Pradhan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune hepatitis is a chronic inflammatory disorder characterized by periportal inflammation, hypergammaglobulinemia with elevated autoantibodies, and a dramatic response to immunosuppression. Various environmental and genetic influences can trigger the immune mediated destruction of the liver. A plethora of clinical presentations can be seen ranging from chronic indolent disease to fulminant hepatic failure. Autoimmune hepatitis does not have a pathognomonic feature, and its laboratory, serologic, and histologic manifestations are found in acute and chronic liver disease of diverse causes. Difficulties in distinguishing toxic, drug-related, virus-induced, and autoimmune causes of severe acute liver injury can result in misclassification. Our paper discusses autoimmune hepatitis, giving a detailed overview of its clinical presentation, immunopathogenesis, emphasis on histomorphological changes and the diagnostic criteria.Journal of Pathology of Nepal (2012 Vol. 2, 317-323DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jpn.v2i4.6887

  18. Experimental models of autoimmune inflammatory ocular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Gasparin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Ocular inflammation is one of the leading causes of blindness and loss of vision. Human uveitis is a complex and heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by inflammation of intraocular tissues. The eye may be the only organ involved, or uveitis may be part of a systemic disease. A significant number of cases are of unknown etiology and are labeled idiopathic. Animal models have been developed to the study of the physiopathogenesis of autoimmune uveitis due to the difficulty in obtaining human eye inflamed tissues for experiments. Most of those models are induced by injection of specific photoreceptors proteins (e.g., S-antigen, interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein, rhodopsin, recoverin, phosducin. Non-retinal antigens, including melanin-associated proteins and myelin basic protein, are also good inducers of uveitis in animals. Understanding the basic mechanisms and pathogenesis of autoimmune ocular diseases are essential for the development of new treatment approaches and therapeutic agents. The present review describes the main experimental models of autoimmune ocular inflammatory diseases.

  19. Genetics Home Reference: autoimmune Addison disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of each kidney. It is classified as an autoimmune disorder because it results from a malfunctioning immune system ... disease or their family members can have another autoimmune disorder, most commonly autoimmune thyroid disease or type 1 ...

  20. A Case of Peripheral Ulcerative Keratitis Associated with Autoimmune Hepatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamoon Eshraghi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To describe a case of peripheral ulcerative keratitis in the setting of autoimmune hepatitis and possible overlap syndrome with primary sclerosing cholangitis. Case Report. A 48-year-old African American female with autoimmune hepatitis with possible overlap syndrome with primary sclerosing cholangitis presented with tearing, irritation, and injection of the left eye that was determined to be peripheral ulcerative keratitis. The patient was treated with topical and systemic steroids, immunosuppressant drugs (azathioprine and mycophenolate mofetil, a biologic (rituximab, and surgery (conjunctival resection, and the peripheral ulcerative keratitis epithelialized but ultimately led to corneal perforation. Conclusion. In this unique case, a patient with peripheral ulcerative keratitis who underwent treatment ultimately had a corneal perforation. This case may suggest a possible relationship between autoimmune hepatitis and peripheral ulcerative keratitis.

  1. Biomimetic Nanosponges for Treating Antibody-Mediated Autoimmune Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yao; Fang, Ronnie H; Zhang, Liangfang

    2018-04-18

    Autoimmune diseases are characterized by overactive immunity, where the body's defense system launches an attack against itself. If left unchecked, this can result in the destruction of healthy tissue and significantly affect patient well-being. In the case of type II autoimmune hypersensitivities, autoreactive antibodies attack the host's own cells or extracellular matrix. Current clinical treatment modalities for managing this class of disease are generally nonspecific and face considerable limitations. In this Topical Review, we cover emerging therapeutic strategies, with an emphasis on novel nanomedicine platforms. Specifically, the use of biomimetic cell membrane-coated nanosponges that are capable of specifically binding and neutralizing pathological antibodies will be explored. There is significant untapped potential in the application of nanotechnology for the treatment of autoimmune diseases, and continued development along this line may help to eventually change the clinical landscape.

  2. [Keratitis - Infectious or Autoimmune?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messmer, E M

    2016-07-01

    Histopathological evaluation of ocular tissues is important in differentiating between infectious and autoimmune disease. Inflammation, necrosis and keratolysis are common to most forms of keratitis. Histopathology can be of great help in identifying the causative organism, establishing a final diagnosis and/or managing the patient with herpes simplex virus keratitis, mycotic keratitis, acanthamoeba keratitis or microsporidia keratoconjunctivitis. Important pathogenetic knowledge with therapeutic relevance has been gained from histopathological studies in nummular keratitis after epidemic keratoconjunctivitis and atopic keratoconjunctivitis. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Rakhi

    2015-06-01

    Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is defined as the destruction of circulating red blood cells (RBCs) in the setting of anti-RBC autoantibodies that optimally react at 37°C. The pathophysiology of disease involves phagocytosis of autoantibody-coated RBCs in the spleen and complement-mediated hemolysis. Thus far, treatment is aimed at decreasing autoantibody production with immunosuppression or reducing phagocytosis of affected cells in the spleen. The role of complement inhibitors in warm AIHA has not been explored. This article addresses the diagnosis, etiology, and treatment of warm AIHA and highlights the role of complement in disease pathology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Hyposalivation in autoimmune diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Maeshima, Etsuko; Furukawa, Kanako; Maeshima, Shinichiro; Koshiba, Hiroya; Sakamoto, Wataru

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated the prevalence of dry mouth among patients with autoimmune diseases other than Sj?gren?s syndrome. One hundred and forty-four patients, excluding patients with primary Sj?gren?s syndrome, were enrolled in this study. The volume of saliva secreted was measured with the screening technique for estimation of salivary flow, which uses a filter paper for diagnosing dry mouth. Disturbed salivary secretion was observed in 84 (58.3?%) of the 144 patients. In the case of patients ...

  5. Autoimmune diseases and myelodysplastic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komrokji, Rami S; Kulasekararaj, Austin; Al Ali, Najla H; Kordasti, Shahram; Bart-Smith, Emily; Craig, Benjamin M; Padron, Eric; Zhang, Ling; Lancet, Jeffrey E; Pinilla-Ibarz, Javier; List, Alan F; Mufti, Ghulam J; Epling-Burnette, Pearlie K

    2016-05-01

    Immune dysregulation and altered T-cell hemostasis play important roles in the pathogenesis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Recent studies suggest an increased risk of MDS among patients with autoimmune diseases. Here, we investigated the prevalence of autoimmune diseases among MDS patients, comparing characteristics and outcomes in those with and without autoimmune diseases. From our study group of 1408 MDS patients, 391 (28%) had autoimmune disease, with hypothyroidism being the most common type, accounting for 44% (n = 171) of patients (12% among all MDS patients analyzed). Other autoimmune diseases with ≥5% prevalence included idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura in 12% (n = 46), rheumatoid arthritis in 10% (n = 41), and psoriasis in 7% (n = 28) of patients. Autoimmune diseases were more common in female MDS patients, those with RA or RCMD WHO subtype, and those who were less dependent on red blood cell transfusion. Median overall survival (OS) was 60 months (95% CI, 50-70) for patients with autoimmune diseases versus 45 months (95% CI, 40-49) for those without (log-rank test, P = 0.006). By multivariate analysis adjusting for revised IPSS and age >60 years, autoimmune diseases were a statistically significant independent factor for OS (HR 0.78; 95% CI, 0.66-0.92; P = 0.004). The rate of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) transformation was 23% (n = 89) in MDS patients with autoimmune disease versus 30% (n = 301) in those without (P = 0.011). Patient groups did not differ in response to azacitidine or lenalidomide treatment. Autoimmune diseases are prevalent among MDS patients. MDS patients with autoimmune diseases have better OS and less AML transformation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. The mechanisms behind helminth's immunomodulation in autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashi, Tomer; Bizzaro, Giorgia; Ben-Ami Shor, Dana; Blank, Miri; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2015-02-01

    The incidence of autoimmune diseases has risen throughout the last half a century, mostly in the industrialized world. Helminths and their derivatives were found to have a protective role in autoimmunity and inflammatory conditions, as they manipulate the immune network, attenuating the host's cellular and humoral responses. Indeed, various helminth species used in several human and animal models were shown to limit inflammatory activity in a variety of diseases including inflammatory bowel disease, multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes, and rheumatoid arthritis. Our review will focus on the main mechanisms by which helminths and their secreted molecules modulate the host's immune system. The main pathways induce a shift from Th1 to Th2 phenotype, accelerate T regulatory and B regulatory phenotypes, and attenuate the levels of the inflammatory cytokines, leading to a tolerable scenario. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Total lymphoid irradiation in alloimmunity and autoimmunity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strober, S.

    1987-12-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation has been used as an immunosuppressive regimen in autoimmune disease and organ transplantation. The rationale for its use originated from studies of patients with Hodgkin disease, in whom this radiotherapy regimen was noted to induce profound and long-lasting immune suppression and yet was well tolerated, with few long-term side effects. Total lymphoid irradiation is a unique immunosuppressive regimen that produces a selective (and long-lasting) reduction in the number and function of helper T cells and certain subsets of B cells. Conventional immunosuppressive drugs show little selectivity, and their effects are short-lived. The most important aspect of total lymphoid irradiation is the potential for achieving transplantation tolerance and permanent remissions in autoimmune disease in laboratory animals. Attempts are being made to achieve similar goals in humans given total lymphoid irradiation, so that immunosuppressive drugs can be ultimately withdrawn from transplant recipients and patients with lupus nephritis. 28 references.

  8. Autoimmune liver disease and concomitant extrahepatic autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratori, Paolo; Fabbri, Angela; Lalanne, Claudine; Lenzi, Marco; Muratori, Luigi

    2015-10-01

    To assess the frequency and clinical impact of associated extrahepatic autoimmune diseases (EAD) on autoimmune liver diseases (ALD). We investigated 608 patients with ALD (327 autoimmune hepatitis - AIH and 281 primary biliary cirrhosis - PBC) for concomitant EAD. In both AIH and PBC, we observed a high prevalence of EAD (29.9 and 42.3%, respectively); both diseases showed a significant association with autoimmune thyroid disease, followed by autoimmune skin disease, celiac disease, and vasculitis in AIH patients and sicca syndrome, CREST syndrome, and celiac disease in PBC patients. At diagnosis, AIH patients with concurrent EAD were more often asymptomatic than patients with isolated AIH (Pautoimmune thyroid disease. In the light of our results, all patients with an EAD should be assessed for the concomitant presence of an asymptomatic ALD.

  9. Anatomy of Mixing-Induced CP Asymmetries in Left-Right-Symmetric Models with Spontaneous CP Violation

    CERN Document Server

    Ball, Patricia; Matias, J.; Ball, Patricia

    2000-01-01

    We investigate the pattern of CP violation in K, B_d and B_s mixing in a symmetrical SU(2)_R x SU(2)_L x U(1) model with spontaneous CP violation. We calculate the phases of the left and right quark mixing matrices beyond the small phase approximation and perform a careful analysis of all relevant restrictions on the model's parameters from Delta m_K, Delta m_B, epsilon, epsilon'/epsilon and the CP asymmetry in B->J/psi K_S. We find that, with current experimental data, the mass of the right-handed charged gauge boson, M2, is restricted to be in the range 2.75 to 13 TeV and the mass of the flavour-changing neutral Higgs boson, MH, in 10.2 to 14.6 TeV. This means in particular that the decoupling limit M2, MH -> infinity is already excluded by experiment. We also find that the model favours opposite signs of epsilon and sin 2beta and is excluded if sin 2beta > 0.1.

  10. Sagittal Plane Kinematic Gait Analysis in C57BL/6 Mice Subjected to MOG35-55 Induced Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiander, Maximillian Dj; Chedrawe, Matthew Aj; Lamport, Anna-Claire; Akay, Turgay; Robertson, George S

    2017-11-04

    Kinematic gait analysis in the sagittal plane has frequently been used to characterize motor deficits in multiple sclerosis (MS). We describe the application of these techniques to identify gait deficits in a mouse model of MS, known as experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Paralysis and motor deficits in mice subjected to EAE are typically assessed using a clinical scoring scale. However, this scale yields only ordinal data that provides little information about the precise nature of the motor deficits. EAE disease severity has also been assessed by rotarod performance, which provides a measure of general motor coordination. By contrast, kinematic gait analysis of the hind limb in the sagittal plane generates highly precise information about how movement is impaired. To perform this procedure, reflective markers are placed on a hind limb to detect joint movement while a mouse is walking on a treadmill. Motion analysis software is used to measure movement of the markers during walking. Kinematic gait parameters are then derived from the resultant data. We show how these gait parameters can be used to quantify impaired movements of the hip, knee, and ankle joints in EAE. These techniques may be used to better understand disease mechanisms and identify potential treatments for MS and other neurodegenerative disorders that impair mobility.

  11. Oral Tolerance: Therapeutic Implications for Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M. C. Faria

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral tolerance is classically defined as the suppression of immune responses to antigens (Ag that have been administered previously by the oral route. Multiple mechanisms of tolerance are induced by oral Ag. Low doses favor active suppression, whereas higher doses favor clonal anergy/deletion. Oral Ag induces Th2 (IL-4/IL-10 and Th3 (TGF-β regulatory T cells (Tregs plus CD4+CD25+ regulatory cells and LAP+T cells. Induction of oral tolerance is enhanced by IL-4, IL-10, anti-IL-12, TGF-β, cholera toxin B subunit (CTB, Flt-3 ligand, anti-CD40 ligand and continuous feeding of Ag. In addition to oral tolerance, nasal tolerance has also been shown to be effective in suppressing inflammatory conditions with the advantage of a lower dose requirement. Oral and nasal tolerance suppress several animal models of autoimmune diseases including experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE, uveitis, thyroiditis, myasthenia, arthritis and diabetes in the nonobese diabetic (NOD mouse, plus non-autoimmune diseases such as asthma, atherosclerosis, colitis and stroke. Oral tolerance has been tested in human autoimmune diseases including MS, arthritis, uveitis and diabetes and in allergy, contact sensitivity to DNCB, nickel allergy. Positive results have been observed in phase II trials and new trials for arthritis, MS and diabetes are underway. Mucosal tolerance is an attractive approach for treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases because of lack of toxicity, ease of administration over time and Ag-specific mechanism of action. The successful application of oral tolerance for the treatment of human diseases will depend on dose, developing immune markers to assess immunologic effects, route (nasal versus oral, formulation, mucosal adjuvants, combination therapy and early therapy.

  12. Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy candidiasis ectodermal dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisand, Kai; Peterson, Pärt

    2015-07-01

    Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy candidiasis ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene. This review focuses on the clinical and immunological features of APECED, summarizes the current knowledge on the function of AIRE and discusses the importance of autoantibodies in disease diagnosis and prognosis. Additionally, we review the outcome of recent immunomodulatory treatments in APECED patients.

  13. Is Tolerance Broken in Autoimmunity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dama Laxminarayana

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases are classified into about 80 different types based on their specificity related to system, organ and/or tissue. About 5% of the western population is affected by this anomaly, but its worldwide incidence is unknown. Autoimmune diseases are heterogeneous in nature and clinical manifestations range from benign disorders to life-threatening conditions. Autoimmunity strikes at any stage of life, but age and/or gender also play role in onset of some of these anomalies. The autoimmune pathogenesis is initiated by the origination of autoantigens, which leads to the development of autoantibodies followed by auto-immunogenicity and the ultimate onset of autoimmunity. There is a lack of suitable therapies to treat autoimmune diseases, because mechanisms involved in the onset of these anomalies were poorly understood. Present therapies are limited to symptomatic treatment and come with severe side effects. Here, I described the molecular mechanisms and cellular events involved in the initiation of autoimmunity and proposed better strategies to modulate such molecular and cellular anomalies, which will help in preventing and/or controlling autoimmune pathogenesis and ultimately aid in enhancing the quality of life.

  14. Lighting up left-handed Z-DNA: photoluminescent carbon dots induce DNA B to Z transition and perform DNA logic operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Lingyan; Zhao, Andong; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2013-09-01

    Left-handed Z-DNA has been identified as a transient structure occurred during transcription. DNA B-Z transition has attracted much attention because of not only Z-DNA biological importance but also their relation to disease and DNA nanotechnology. Recently, photoluminescent carbon dots, especially highly luminescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots, have attracted much attention on their applications to bioimaging and gene/drug delivery because of carbon dots with low toxicity, highly stable photoluminescence and controllable surface function. However, it is still unknown whether carbon dots can influence DNA conformation or structural transition, such as B-Z transition. Herein, based on our previous series work on DNA interactions with carbon nanotubes, we report the first example that photoluminescent carbon dots can induce right-handed B-DNA to left-handed Z-DNA under physiological salt conditions with sequence and conformation selectivity. Further studies indicate that carbon dots would bind to DNA major groove with GC preference. Inspired by carbon dots lighting up Z-DNA and DNA nanotechnology, several types of DNA logic gates have been designed and constructed based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer between photoluminescent carbon dots and DNA intercalators.

  15. Current topics in autoimmune hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratori, Luigi; Muratori, Paolo; Granito, Alessandro; Pappas, Giorgios; Cassani, Fabio; Lenzi, Marco

    2010-11-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis is a chronic liver disease of unknown aetiology characterized by interface hepatitis, hypergammaglobulinaemia and circulating autoantibodies. In the last decade a number of advancements have been made in the field of clinical and basic research: the simplified diagnostic criteria, the complete response defined as normalization of transaminase levels, the molecular identification of the antigenic targets of anti-liver cytosol antibody type 1 and anti-soluble liver antigen, the detection of anti-actin antibodies, the description of de novo autoimmune hepatitis after liver transplantation for non-autoimmune liver diseases, the characterization of autoimmune hepatitis with overlapping features of primary biliary cirrhosis or primary sclerosing cholangitis, the preliminary experience with novel treatment strategies based on cyclosporine, mycophenolate mofetil and budesonide, the role played by "impaired" regulatory T cells and the development of novel animal models of autoimmune hepatitis. Copyright © 2010 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Recalcitrant hypocalcaemia in autoimmune enteropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyer, Myfanwy; Fairchild, Jan; Moore, David; Moore, Lynette; Henning, Paul; Tham, Elaine

    2014-12-01

    Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy candidiasis ectodermal dystrophy syndrome is a monogenic disorder associated with autoimmune destruction of both endocrine and nonendocrine tissues. The classic triad includes candidiasis, hypoparathyroidism, and Addison disease. Up to 25% of patients with autoimmune polyendocrinopathy candidiasis ectodermal dystrophy syndrome also have gastrointestinal manifestations, which can have an impact on the management of other aspects of the disease. The management of the case discussed was challenging because of the complex interplay between the manifestations and treatment of his hypoparathyroidism, Addison disease, and autoimmune enteropathy. Attempts at management of hypocalcemia were largely unsuccessful until the introduction of immunosuppressive therapy for autoimmune enteropathy. This case supports early consideration of immunosuppression in this condition. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  17. Autoimmune comorbidity in achalasia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Hernández, Fernanda; Furuzawa-Carballeda, Janette; Hernández-Molina, Gabriela; Alejandro-Medrano, Edgar; Núñez-Álvarez, Carlos A; Hernández-Ramírez, Diego F; Azamar-Llamas, Daniel; Olivares-Martínez, Elizabeth; Breña, Blanca; Palacios, Axel; Valdovinos, Miguel A; Coss-Adame, Enrique; Ramos-Ávalos, Bárbara; Torres-Landa, Samuel; Hernández-Ávila, Axel A; Flores-Nájera, Athenea; Torres-Villalobos, Gonzalo

    2018-01-01

    Idiopathic achalasia is a rare esophageal motor disorder. The disease state manifests local and systemic inflammation, and it appears that an autoimmune component and specific autoantibodies participate in the pathogenesis. The study aims to determine the prevalence of autoimmune and chronic inflammatory diseases in patients with achalasia and compare the results with those from patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). It was a cross-sectional and included 114 patients with idiopathic achalasia and 114 age-matched and sex-matched control patients with GERD. Data on the presence of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, the time of presentation, and any family history of autoimmune disease were obtained from the hospital's medical records. Seventy three (64%) were female patients (mean age: 42.3 ± 15.5; median disease duration: 12 months). We identified the presence of autoimmune disease in 19 patients with achalasia (16.7%), hypothyroidism was the main diagnosis, and it was present in 52.6% of patients compared with 4.2% in controls. Thirteen of the 19 achalasia patients (68.4%) with autoimmune disease had history of familial autoimmunity. We identified 11 achalasia (9.6%) and 5 GERD patients (4.16%) with an inflammatory condition. Compared with the GERD, the achalasia group was 3.8 times more likely to have an autoimmune disease (95% CI: 1.47-9.83), 3.0 times more likely to have thyroidopathies (95% CI: 1.00-9.03), and 3.02 times more likely to suffer from any chronic inflammatory disease (95% CI: 1.65-6.20). The non-negligible number of patients with autoimmune diseases identified among the patients with idiopathic achalasia supports the hypothesis that achalasia has an autoimmune component. © 2017 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  18. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound induces angiogenesis and ameliorates left ventricular dysfunction in a porcine model of chronic myocardial ischemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichiro Hanawa

    Full Text Available Although a significant progress has been made in the management of ischemic heart disease (IHD, the number of severe IHD patients is increasing. Thus, it is crucial to develop new, non-invasive therapeutic strategies. In the present study, we aimed to develop low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS therapy for the treatment of IHD.We first confirmed that in cultured human endothelial cells, LIPUS significantly up-regulated mRNA expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF with a peak at 32-cycle (P<0.05. Then, we examined the in vivo effects of LIPUS in a porcine model of chronic myocardial ischemia with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF (n = 28. The heart was treated with either sham (n = 14 or LIPUS (32-cycle with 193 mW/cm2 for 20 min, n = 14 at 3 different short axis levels. Four weeks after the treatment, LVEF was significantly improved in the LIPUS group (46±4 to 57±5%, P<0.05 without any adverse effects, whereas it remained unchanged in the sham group (46±5 to 47±6%, P = 0.33. Capillary density in the ischemic region was significantly increased in the LIPUS group compared with the control group (1084±175 vs. 858±151/mm2, P<0.05. Regional myocardial blood flow was also significantly improved in the LIPUS group (0.78±0.2 to 1.39±0.4 ml/min/g, P<0.05, but not in the control group (0.84±0.3 to 0.97±0.4 ml/min/g. Western blot analysis showed that VEGF, eNOS and bFGF were all significantly up-regulated only in the LIPUS group.These results suggest that the LIPUS therapy is promising as a new, non-invasive therapy for IHD.

  19. Nitrosative stress and nitrated proteins in trichloroethene-mediated autoimmunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gangduo Wang

    Full Text Available Exposure to trichloroethene (TCE, a ubiquitous environmental contaminant, has been linked to a variety of autoimmune diseases (ADs including SLE, scleroderma and hepatitis. Mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of ADs are largely unknown. Earlier studies from our laboratory in MRL+/+ mice suggested the contribution of oxidative/nitrosative stress in TCE-induced autoimmunity, and N-acetylcysteine (NAC supplementation provided protection by attenuating oxidative stress. This study was undertaken to further evaluate the contribution of nitrosative stress in TCE-mediated autoimmunity and to identify proteins susceptible to nitrosative stress. Groups of female MRL +/+ mice were given TCE, NAC or TCE + NAC for 6 weeks (TCE, 10 mmol/kg, i.p., every 4th day; NAC, ∼ 250 mg/kg/day via drinking water. TCE exposure led to significant increases in serum anti-nuclear and anti-histone antibodies together with significant induction of iNOS and increased formation of nitrotyrosine (NT in sera and livers. Proteomic analysis identified 14 additional nitrated proteins in the livers of TCE-treated mice. Furthermore, TCE exposure led to decreased GSH levels and increased activation of NF-κB. Remarkably, NAC supplementation not only ameliorated TCE-induced nitrosative stress as evident from decreased iNOS, NT, nitrated proteins, NF-κB p65 activation and increased GSH levels, but also the markers of autoimmunity, as evident from decreased levels of autoantibodies in the sera. These findings provide support to the role of nitrosative stress in TCE-mediated autoimmune response and identify specific nitrated proteins which could have autoimmune potential. Attenuation of TCE-induced autoimmunity in mice by NAC provides an approach for designing therapeutic strategies.

  20. L-Arginine ameliorates cardiac left ventricular oxidative stress by upregulating eNOS and Nrf2 target genes in alloxan-induced hyperglycemic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramprasath, Tharmarajan; Hamenth Kumar, Palani; Syed Mohamed Puhari, Shanavas; Senthil Murugan, Ponniah; Vasudevan, Varadaraj; Selvam, Govindan Sadasivam

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► L-Arginine treatment reduced the metabolic disturbances in diabetic animals. ► Antioxidant marker proteins were found high in myocardium by L-arginine treatment. ► Elevated antioxidant status, mediates the reduced TBA-reactivity in left ventricle. ► L-Arginine treatment enhanced the Nrf2 and eNOS signaling in left ventricle. ► Improved cell survival signaling by arginine, offers a novel tactic for targeting. -- Abstract: Hyperglycemia is independently related with excessive morbidity and mortality in cardiovascular disorders. L-Arginine-nitric oxide (NO) pathway and the involvement of NO in modulating nuclear factor-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) signaling were well established. In the present study we investigated, whether L-arginine supplementation would improve the myocardial antioxidant defense under hyperglycemia through activation of Nrf2 signaling. Diabetes was induced by alloxan monohydrate (90 mg kg −1 body weight) in rats. Both non-diabetic and diabetic group of rats were divided into three subgroups and they were administered either with L-arginine (2.25%) or L-NAME (0.01%) in drinking water for 12 days. Results showed that L-arginine treatment reduced the metabolic disturbances in diabetic rats. Antioxidant enzymes and glutathione levels were found to be increased in heart left ventricles, thereby reduction of lipid peroxidation by L-arginine treatment. Heart histopathological analysis further validates the reversal of typical diabetic characteristics consisting of alterations in myofibers and myofibrillary degeneration. qRT-PCR studies revealed that L-arginine treatment upregulated the transcription of Akt and downregulated NF-κB. Notably, transcription of eNOS and Nrf2 target genes was also upregulated, which were accompanied by enhanced expression of Nrf2 in left ventricular tissue from diabetic and control rats. Under these findings, we suggest that targeting of eNOS and Nrf2 signaling by L-arginine supplementation could be

  1. L-Arginine ameliorates cardiac left ventricular oxidative stress by upregulating eNOS and Nrf2 target genes in alloxan-induced hyperglycemic rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramprasath, Tharmarajan; Hamenth Kumar, Palani; Syed Mohamed Puhari, Shanavas; Senthil Murugan, Ponniah; Vasudevan, Varadaraj [Molecular Cardiology Unit, Department of Biochemistry, Center for Excellence in Genomic Sciences, School of Biological Sciences, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai 625 021, Tamilnadu (India); Selvam, Govindan Sadasivam, E-mail: drselvamgsbiochem@rediffmail.com [Molecular Cardiology Unit, Department of Biochemistry, Center for Excellence in Genomic Sciences, School of Biological Sciences, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai 625 021, Tamilnadu (India)

    2012-11-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer L-Arginine treatment reduced the metabolic disturbances in diabetic animals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Antioxidant marker proteins were found high in myocardium by L-arginine treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Elevated antioxidant status, mediates the reduced TBA-reactivity in left ventricle. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer L-Arginine treatment enhanced the Nrf2 and eNOS signaling in left ventricle. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Improved cell survival signaling by arginine, offers a novel tactic for targeting. -- Abstract: Hyperglycemia is independently related with excessive morbidity and mortality in cardiovascular disorders. L-Arginine-nitric oxide (NO) pathway and the involvement of NO in modulating nuclear factor-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) signaling were well established. In the present study we investigated, whether L-arginine supplementation would improve the myocardial antioxidant defense under hyperglycemia through activation of Nrf2 signaling. Diabetes was induced by alloxan monohydrate (90 mg kg{sup -1} body weight) in rats. Both non-diabetic and diabetic group of rats were divided into three subgroups and they were administered either with L-arginine (2.25%) or L-NAME (0.01%) in drinking water for 12 days. Results showed that L-arginine treatment reduced the metabolic disturbances in diabetic rats. Antioxidant enzymes and glutathione levels were found to be increased in heart left ventricles, thereby reduction of lipid peroxidation by L-arginine treatment. Heart histopathological analysis further validates the reversal of typical diabetic characteristics consisting of alterations in myofibers and myofibrillary degeneration. qRT-PCR studies revealed that L-arginine treatment upregulated the transcription of Akt and downregulated NF-{kappa}B. Notably, transcription of eNOS and Nrf2 target genes was also upregulated, which were accompanied by enhanced expression of Nrf2 in left ventricular tissue from diabetic

  2. Autoimmune process in CNS under Cs-137 inner irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisyany, N.I.; Liubich, L.D.

    1996-01-01

    Autoimmune hypothesis as to the development of radiation-induced brain injuries stands high among the concepts of the CNS post-radiation damage pathogenesis. To study the changes occurring in a living organism affected by a small-dose radiation due to incorporated radionuclides as well as to create adequate models are of critical importance in the post-Chernobyl period. The effects of chronic small-dose inner radiation on the development of autoimmune responses were evaluated by determining the level of the CNS proteins and protein-induced antibodies to the CNS components. (author)

  3. Autoimmune premature ovarian failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Komorowska

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Premature ovarian failure (POF, also termed as primary ovarian insufficiency (POI, is a highly heterogenous condition affecting 0.5-3.0% of women in childbearing age. These young women comprise quite a formidable group with unique physical and psychological needs that require special attention. Premature ovarian senescence (POS in all of its forms evolves insidiously as a basically asymptomatic process, leading to complete loss of ovarian function, and POI/POF diagnoses are currently made at relatively late stages. Well-known and well-documented risk factors exist, and the presence or suspicion of autoimmune disorder should be regarded as an important one. Premature ovarian failure is to some degree predictable in its occurrence and should be considered while encountering young women with loss of menstrual regularity, especially when there is a concomitant dysfunction in the immune system.

  4. Selfie: Autoimmunity, boon or bane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahsan, Haseeb

    2017-01-01

    The immune system provides protection to tissues damaged by infectious microrganisms or physical damage. In autoimmune diseases, the immune system recognizes and attacks its own tissues, i.e., self-destruction. Various agents such as genetic factors and environmental triggers are thought to play a major role in the development of autoimmune diseases. A common feature of all autoimmune diseases is the presence of autoantibodies and inflammation, including mononuclear phagocytes, autoreactive T lymphocytes, and autoantibody producing B cells (plasma cells). It has long been known that B cells produce autoantibodies and, thereby, contribute to the pathogenesis of many autoimmune diseases. Autoimmune diseases can be classified as organ-specific or non-organ specific depending on whether the autoimmune response is directed against a particular tissue or against widespread antigens as in chronic inflammatory autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Both SLE and RA are characterized by the presence of autoantibodies which play a major role in their etiopathogenesis. SLE is characterized by circulating antibodies and immune complex deposition that can trigger an inflammatory damage in organs. RA is a progressive inflammatory disease in which T cells, B cells, and pro-inflammatory cytokines play a key role in its pathophysiology.

  5. IgA deficiency and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Karmtej; Chang, Christopher; Gershwin, M Eric

    2014-02-01

    IgA is the most abundant immunoglobulin in the human body, and performs a very specialized role which involves mucosal immunity, development of tolerance and protection against infection. IgA is the key immunoglobulin in the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts, which provide the most intimate interface between the environment and self. Normal levels of IgA are based on early studies consisting of only small numbers of patients. The international consensus definition of IgA deficiency is a level of 0.07g/l after the age of four years in the absence of IgG and IgM deficiencies. The epidemiology of IgA deficiency reveals interesting variances between geographical regions - the incidence in Caucasians being much higher than that in Asians. IgA deficiency has also been found to co-exist with autoimmune diseases, allergies and malignancies. The association with autoimmunity is particularly interesting because it suggests a common genetic linkage that could potentially also explain the diversity in geoepidemiology. Both MHC and non-MHC associations have been described and the 8.1 haplotype has been significantly associated with autoimmunity in IgA deficiency patients over controls. Non-MHC genetic associations include IFIH1 and CLEC16A. The mutations leading to IgA deficiency have not been defined, but in some cases of IgA deficiency it has been suggested that the pathogenesis involves a failure in switched memory B cells that can lead to this cohort experiencing an increased incidence of recurrent bacterial infections or autoimmune diseases. Attempts to investigate the role of cytokines that can induce IgA synthesis in cells of patients with IgA deficiency, such as IL21 or the combination of CD40L/anti-CD40, IL-4 and IL10, are underway. © 2013.

  6. Ventricular Fibrillation-Induced Cardiac Arrest Results in Regional Cardiac Injury Preferentially in Left Anterior Descending Coronary Artery Territory in Piglet Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giridhar Kaliki Venkata

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Decreased cardiac function after resuscitation from cardiac arrest (CA results from global ischemia of the myocardium. In the evolution of postarrest myocardial dysfunction, preferential involvement of any coronary arterial territory is not known. We hypothesized that there is no preferential involvement of any coronary artery during electrical induced ventricular fibrillation (VF in piglet model. Design. Prospective, randomized controlled study. Methods. 12 piglets were randomized to baseline and electrical induced VF. After 5 min, the animals were resuscitated according to AHA PALS guidelines. After return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC, animals were observed for an additional 4 hours prior to cardiac MRI. Data (mean ± SD was analyzed using unpaired t-test; p value ≤ 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results. Segmental wall motion (mm; baseline versus postarrest group in segment 7 (left anterior descending (LAD was 4.68±0.54 versus 3.31±0.64, p=0.0026. In segment 13, it was 3.82±0.96 versus 2.58±0.82, p=0.02. In segment 14, it was 2.42±0.44 versus 1.29±0.99, p=0.028. Conclusion. Postarrest myocardial dysfunction resulted in segmental wall motion defects in the LAD territory. There were no perfusion defects in the involved segments.

  7. Mercury and autoimmunity: implications for occupational and environmental health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silbergeld, Ellen K.; Silva, Ines A.; Nyland, Jennifer F.

    2005-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) has long been recognized as a neurotoxicant; however, recent work in animal models has implicated Hg as an immunotoxicant. In particular, Hg has been shown to induce autoimmune disease in susceptible animals with effects including overproduction of specific autoantibodies and pathophysiologic signs of lupus-like disease. However, these effects are only observed at high doses of Hg that are above the levels to which humans would be exposed through contaminated fish consumption. While there is presently no evidence to suggest that Hg induces frank autoimmune disease in humans, a recent epidemiological study has demonstrated a link between occupational Hg exposure and lupus. In our studies, we have tested the hypothesis that Hg does not cause autoimmune disease directly, but rather that it may interact with triggering events, such as genetic predisposition, exposure to antigens, or infection, to exacerbate disease. Treatment of mice that are not susceptible to Hg-induced autoimmune disease with very low doses and short term exposures of inorganic Hg (20-200 μg/kg) exacerbates disease and accelerates mortality in the graft versus host disease model of chronic lupus in C57Bl/6 x DBA/2 mice. Furthermore, low dose Hg exposure increases the severity and prevalence of experimental autoimmune myocarditis (induced by immunization with cardiac myosin peptide in adjuvant) in A/J mice. To test our hypothesis further, we examined sera from Amazonian populations exposed to Hg through small-scale gold mining, with and without current or past malaria infection. We found significantly increased prevalence of antinuclear and antinucleolar antibodies and a positive interaction between Hg and malaria. These results suggest a new model for Hg immunotoxicity, as a co-factor in autoimmune disease, increasing the risks and severity of clinical disease in the presence of other triggering events, either genetic or acquired

  8. The Fos-Related Antigen 1–JUNB/Activator Protein 1 Transcription Complex, a Downstream Target of Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3, Induces T Helper 17 Differentiation and Promotes Experimental Autoimmune Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Mee Moon

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Dysfunction of T helper 17 (Th17 cells leads to chronic inflammatory disorders. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 orchestrates the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and pathogenic cell differentiation from interleukin (IL-17-producing Th17 cells. However, the pathways mediated by STAT3 signaling are not fully understood. Here, we observed that Fos-related antigen 1 (FRA1 and JUNB are directly involved in STAT3 binding to sites in the promoters of Fosl1 and Junb. Promoter binding increased expression of IL-17 and the development of Th17 cells. Overexpression of Fra1 and Junb in mice resulted in susceptibility to collagen-induced arthritis and an increase in Th17 cell numbers and inflammatory cytokine production. In patients with rheumatoid arthritis, FRA1 and JUNB were colocalized with STAT3 in the inflamed synovium. These observations suggest that FRA1 and JUNB are associated closely with STAT3 activation, and that this activation leads to Th17 cell differentiation in autoimmune diseases and inflammation.

  9. ARE LEFT HANDED SURGEONS LEFT OUT?

    OpenAIRE

    SriKamkshi Kothandaraman; Balasubramanian Thiagarajan

    2012-01-01

    Being a left-handed surgeon, more specifically a left-handed ENT surgeon, presents a unique pattern of difficulties.This article is an overview of left-handedness and a personal account of the specific difficulties a left-handed ENT surgeon faces.

  10. Effect of beta-blockade on low-dose dobutamine-induced changes in left ventricular function in healthy volunteers: assessment by gated SPET myocardial perfusion scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Everaert, H.; Vanhove, C.; Franken, P.R. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital, Free University of Brussels (AZ VUB), Brussels (Belgium)

    2000-04-01

    Viability studies are often performed in patients receiving beta-blocking agents. However, the intake of beta-blocking agents could influence the identification of viable myocardium when low-dose dobutamine is used to demonstrate inotropic reserve. The aim of this study was to quantify the effect of beta-blockade on global and regional left ventricular function in healthy volunteers using low-dose dobutamine gated single-photon emission tomographic (SPET) myocardial perfusion scintigraphy. Ten subjects were studied once ''on'' and once ''off'' beta-blocker therapy (metoprolol succinate, 100 mg day{sup -1}). On each occasion four consecutive gated SPET acquisitions (of 7 min duration) were recorded after injection of 925 MBq technetium-99m tetrofosmin on a triple-headed camera equipped with focussing (Cardiofocal) collimators. Acquisitions were made at rest (baseline 1 and 2) and 5 min after the beginning of the infusion of 5 and 10 {mu}g kg{sup -1} min{sup -1} dobutamine. Wall thickening (WT) was quantified using a method based on circumferential profile analysis. Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was obtained using the Cedars-Sinai algorithm. Blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) were recorded at the end of each acquisition. At baseline LVEF, WT and systolic BP values under beta-blockade were not significantly different from those obtained in the non-beta-blocked state. The mean HR and diastolic BP at baseline were lower under beta-blockade. Dobutamine administration (at 5 and 10 {mu}g kg{sup -1} min{sup -1}) induced a significant increase in WT, LVEF and systolic BP in all subjects both on and off beta-blockade. The increases in WT, LVEF and systolic BP in the beta-blocked state were less pronounced but not significantly different. HR increased significantly at 10 {mu}g kg{sup -1} min{sup -1} dobutamine without beta-blocker administration, while no increase in HR was observed in the beta-blocked state. Beta

  11. Epigenetic alterations underlying autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslani, Saeed; Mahmoudi, Mahdi; Karami, Jafar; Jamshidi, Ahmad Reza; Malekshahi, Zahra; Nicknam, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Recent breakthroughs in genetic explorations have extended our understanding through discovery of genetic patterns subjected to autoimmune diseases (AID). Genetics, on the contrary, has not answered all the conundrums to describe a comprehensive explanation of causal mechanisms of disease etiopathology with regard to the function of environment, sex, or aging. The other side of the coin, epigenetics which is defined by gene manifestation modification without DNA sequence alteration, reportedly has come in to provide new insights towards disease apprehension through bridging the genetics and environmental factors. New investigations in genetic and environmental contributing factors for autoimmunity provide new explanation whereby the interactions between genetic elements and epigenetic modifications signed by environmental agents may be responsible for autoimmune disease initiation and perpetuation. It is aimed through this article to review recent progress attempting to reveal how epigenetics associates with the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases.

  12. [Stress and auto-immunity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delévaux, I; Chamoux, A; Aumaître, O

    2013-08-01

    The etiology of auto-immune disorders is multifactorial. Stress is probably a participating factor. Indeed, a high proportion of patients with auto-immune diseases report uncommon stress before disease onset or disease flare. The biological consequences of stress are increasingly well understood. Glucocorticoids and catecholamines released by hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis during stress will alter the balance Th1/Th2 and the balance Th17/Treg. Stress impairs cellular immunity, decreases immune tolerance and stimulates humoral immunity exposing individuals to autoimmune disease among others. The treatment for autoimmune disease should include stress management. Copyright © 2012 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Psoriasis as an autoimmune disease

    OpenAIRE

    Agnieszka Owczarczyk-Saczonek; Waldemar Placek

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays it is known that psoriasis belongs to the group of autoimmune diseases and may coexist with other diseases in this group. Most often patients have psoriatic arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, autoimmune thyroid diseases and multiple sclerosis. The coexistence of these disorders can be a diagnostic and therapeutic problem (there is controversy over the use of corticosteroids). The common pathogenesis is still not explained. We know that the loss of immunotole...

  14. [Smoking and chronic autoimmune thyroiditis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzoianu, Ioana Cristina; Arghir, Oana Cristina; Circo, E

    2010-01-01

    The chronic autoimmune thyroiditis are heterogeneous entities by the functional, lesional and evolutive point of view. Ethiopathogenic factors involved in chronic autoimmune thyroiditis are genetical factors, combines with environmental factors, hormonal factors, infectious factors etc. The exact role of smoking on the autoimmune mechanism is unclear, but smoking is known to have an antithyroid effect. Our study tries to estimate the influence of smoking on serum levels of antithyroid peroxidase antibodies and antithyroglobulin antibodies, in a group of patients with various clinical forms of chronic autoimmune thyroiditis. We studied a group consists of 310 patients with chronic autoimmune thyroiditis, hospitalised in the Endocrinology Department of Constanta County Hospital, between January 2006 - December 2009. We detected serum values of antithyroidperoxidase antibodies and antithyroglobulin antibodies of our patients. We also followed the age, sex and presence of smoking in our study group. For statistical processing of the data we use Student's t-test. In our study group 24.28% of patients were smokers. Serum levels of antithyroid peroxidase antibodies were significantly increased (p < 0.001) in the smokers patients, compared with the nonsmokers patients. Serum levels of antithyroglobulin antibodies were significantly increased (p < 0.01) in smokers patients, compared with those who were nonsmokers. Smoking increased the serum levels of antithyroid antibodies in patients with chronic autoimmune thyroiditis.

  15. Blueberry Phenolics Reduce Gastrointestinal Infection of Patients with Cerebral Venous Thrombosis by Improving Depressant-Induced Autoimmune Disorder via miR-155-Mediated Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ning; Meng, Hao; Liu, Tianyi; Feng, Yingli; Qi, Yuan; Zhang, Donghuan; Wang, Honglei

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) often causes human depression, whereas depression-induced low immunity makes the patients susceptible to gastrointestinal infection. Blueberry possesses antidepressant properties which may improve autoimmunity and reduce gastrointestinal infection. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) performs antidepressant function and can be regulated by miR-155, which may be affected by blueberry. To explore the possible molecular mechanism, blueberry compounds were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Activity of compounds was tested by using HT22 cells. The present study tested 124 patients with CVT-induced mild-to-moderate depressive symptoms (Center for Epidemiologic Studies—Depression Scale [CES-D] ≥16) and gastrointestinal infection. Patients were randomly assigned to blueberry extract group (BG, received 10 mg blueberry extract daily) and placebo group (PG, received 10 mg placebo daily). After 3 months, depression, gastrointestinal infection and lipid profiles were investigated. Serum miR-155 and BDNF were measured using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and or Western Blot. Blueberry treatment improved depressive symptoms and lipid profiles, and also reduced gastrointestinal infection in the BG group (P blueberry extracts were the main phenolic acids with 0.18, 0.85, 0.26, 0.72, 0.66, 0.4,1, and 1.92 mg/g of gentisic acid, chlorogenic acid, [2]-epicatechin, p-coumaric acid, benzoic acid, p-anisic acid, and quercetin in blueberry extracts, respectively. Phenolics in blueberry are possible causal agents in improving antidepressant activity and reducing gastrointestinal infection. Administration of blueberry increased BDNF expression and miR-155. Blueberry cannot affect BDNF level when miR-155 is overexpressed or inhibited. Phenolics from blueberry reduced gastrointestinal infection of patients with CVT by improving antidepressant activity via upregulation of miR-155-mediated BDNF. PMID:29230173

  16. Interferon-gamma regulates oxidative stress during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Espejo, Carmen; Penkowa, Milena; Sáez-Torres, Irene

    2002-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an induced inflammatory and demyelinating disease of the central nervous system which shares many clinical and pathological features with and is considered the animal model of multiple sclerosis. There is extensive evidence that EAE is a Th1...

  17. Left ventricular dilatation and pulmonary thallium uptake after single-photon emission computer tomography using thallium-201 during adenosine-induced coronary hyperemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskandrian, A.S.; Heo, J.; Nguyen, T.; Lyons, E.; Paugh, E.

    1990-01-01

    This study examined the implications of left ventricular (LV) dilatation and increased pulmonary thallium uptake during adenosine-induced coronary hyperemia. The lung-to-heart thallium ratio in the initial images was significantly higher in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) than normal subjects; 0.48 +/- 0.16 in 3-vessel disease (n = 16), 0.43 +/- 0.10 in 2-vessel disease (n = 20), 0.43 +/- 0.08 in 1-vessel disease (n = 16) and 0.36 +/- 0.05 in normal subjects (n = 7) (p less than 0.001, 0.09 and 0.06, respectively). There was a significant correlation between the severity and the extent of the perfusion abnormality (determined from the polar maps) and the lung-to-heart thallium ratio (r = 0.51 and 0.52, respectively, p less than 0.0002). There was also a significant correlation between lung thallium washout and lung-to-heart thallium ratio (r = 0.42, p = 0.0009) and peak heart rate (r = -0.49, p less than 0.0001). The LV dilatation was mostly due to an increase in cavity dimension (30% increase) and to a lesser extent (6% increase) due to increase in LV size. (The cavity dimensions were measured from the short-axis slices at the midventricular level in the initial and delayed images). The dilation was seen in patients with CAD but not in the normal subjects. These changes correlated with the extent and severity of the thallium perfusion abnormality. Thus, adenosine-induced coronary hyperemia may cause LV dilation and increased lung thallium uptake on the basis of subendocardial ischemia

  18. Magnitude and Time Course of Changes Induced by Continuous-Flow Left Ventricular Assist Device Unloading in Chronic Heart Failure: Insights into Cardiac Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drakos, Stavros G.; Wever-Pinzon, Omar; Selzman, Craig H.; Gilbert, Edward M.; Alharethi, Rami; Reid, Bruce B.; Saidi, Abdulfattah; Diakos, Nikolaos A.; Stoker, Sandi; Davis, Erin S.; Movsesian, Matthew; Li, Dean Y.; Stehlik, Josef; Kfoury, Abdallah G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To prospectively investigate the longitudinal effects of continuous-flow left ventricular assist device (LVAD) unloading on myocardial structure and systolic and diastolic function. Background The magnitude, timeline and sustainability of changes induced by continuous-flow LVAD on the structure and function of the failing human heart are unknown. Methods Eighty consecutive patients with clinical characteristics consistent with chronic heart failure requiring implantation of a continuous-flow LVAD were prospectively enrolled. Serial echocardiograms (1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 9 and 12 months) and right heart catheterizations were performed after LVAD implant. Cardiac recovery was assessed on the basis of improvement in systolic and diastolic function indices on echocardiography that were sustained during LVAD turn-down studies. Results After 6 months of LVAD unloading, 34% of patients had a relative LVEF increase above 50% and 19% of patients, both ischemic and nonischemic, achieved an LVEF≥40%. LV systolic function improved as early as 30 days, the greatest degree of improvement was achieved by 6 months of mechanical unloading and persisted over the 1- year follow up. LV diastolic function parameters also improved as early as 30 days post LVAD unloading and this improvement persisted over time. LV end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes decreased as early as 30 days post LVAD unloading (113 vs. 77ml/m2, p<0.01 and 92 vs. 60ml/m2, p<0.01, respectively). LV mass decreased as early as 30 days post LVAD unloading (114 vs. 95g/m2, p<0.05) and continued to do so over the 1-year follow-up but did not reach values below the normal reference range suggesting no atrophic remodeling after prolonged LVAD unloading. Conclusion Continuous-flow LVAD unloading induced in a subset of patients, both ischemic and nonischemic, early improvement in myocardial structure and systolic and diastolic function that was largely completed within 6 months, with no evidence of subsequent

  19. Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) Supplementation Induces Changes in Cardiac miRNA Expression, Reduces Oxidative Stress and Left Ventricular Mass, and Improves Diastolic Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Bruna L B; Arruda, Fernanda C O; Reis, Patrícia P; Felix, Tainara F; Santos, Priscila P; Rafacho, Bruna P; Gonçalves, Andrea F; Claro, Renan T; Azevedo, Paula S; Polegato, Bertha F; Okoshi, Katashi; Fernandes, Ana A H; Paiva, Sergio A R; Zornoff, Leonardo A M; Minicucci, Marcos F

    2015-11-19

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of tomato supplementation on the normal rat heart and the role of oxidative stress in this scenario. Male Wistar rats were assigned to two groups: a control group (C; n = 16), in which animals received a control diet + 0.5 mL of corn oil/kg body weight/day, and a tomato group (T; n = 16), in which animals received a control diet supplemented with tomato +0.5 mL of corn oil/kg body weight/day. After three months, morphological, functional, and biochemical analyses were performed. Animals supplemented with tomato had a smaller left atrium diameter and myocyte cross-sectional area (CSA) compared to the control group (C group: 474 (415-539); T group: 273 (258-297) µm²; p = 0.004). Diastolic function was improved in rats supplemented with tomato. In addition, lipid hydroperoxide was lower (C group: 267 ± 46.7; T group: 219 ± 23.0 nmol/g; p = 0.039) in the myocardium of rats supplemented with tomato. Tomato intake was also associated with up-regulation of miR-107 and miR-486 and down-regulation of miR-350 and miR-872. In conclusion, tomato supplementation induces changes in miRNA expression and reduces oxidative stress. In addition, these alterations may be responsible for CSA reduction and diastolic function improvement.

  20. Exercise-induced cardiac remodeling in non-elite endurance athletes: Comparison of 2-tiered and 4-tiered classification of left ventricular hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trachsel, Lukas D; Ryffel, Christoph P; De Marchi, Stefano; Seiler, Christian; Brugger, Nicolas; Eser, Prisca; Wilhelm, Matthias

    2018-01-01

    Long-term endurance sport practice leads to eccentric left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). We aimed to compare the new 4-tiered classification (4TC) for LVH with the established 2-tiered classification (2TC) in a cohort of normotensive non-elite endurance athletes. Male participants of a 10-mile race were recruited and included when blood pressure (BP) was normal (athletes recruited, 174 were included. Mean age was 41.6±7.5 years. Forty-two (24%) athletes had LVH. Allocation in the 2TC was: 32 (76%) eccentric LVH and 10 (24%) concentric LVH. Using the 4TC 12 were reclassified to concentric LVH, and 2 to eccentric LVH, resulting in 22 (52%) eccentric LVH (7 non-dilated, 15 dilated), and 20 (48%) concentric LVH (all non-dilated). Based on the 2TC, markers of endurance training did not differ between eccentric and concentric LVH. Based on the 4TC, athletes with eccentric LVH had more cumulative training hours and faster race times, with highest values thereof in athletes with eccentric dilated LVH. In our cohort of normotensive endurance athletes, the new 4TC demonstrated a superior discrimination of exercise-induced LVH patterns, compared to the established 2TC, most likely because it takes three-dimensional information of the ventricular geometry into account.

  1. Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Supplementation Induces Changes in Cardiac miRNA Expression, Reduces Oxidative Stress and Left Ventricular Mass, and Improves Diastolic Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna L. B. Pereira

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of tomato supplementation on the normal rat heart and the role of oxidative stress in this scenario. Male Wistar rats were assigned to two groups: a control group (C; n = 16, in which animals received a control diet + 0.5 mL of corn oil/kg body weight/day, and a tomato group (T; n = 16, in which animals received a control diet supplemented with tomato +0.5 mL of corn oil/kg body weight/day. After three months, morphological, functional, and biochemical analyses were performed. Animals supplemented with tomato had a smaller left atrium diameter and myocyte cross-sectional area (CSA compared to the control group (C group: 474 (415–539; T group: 273 (258–297 µm2; p = 0.004. Diastolic function was improved in rats supplemented with tomato. In addition, lipid hydroperoxide was lower (C group: 267 ± 46.7; T group: 219 ± 23.0 nmol/g; p = 0.039 in the myocardium of rats supplemented with tomato. Tomato intake was also associated with up-regulation of miR-107 and miR-486 and down-regulation of miR-350 and miR-872. In conclusion, tomato supplementation induces changes in miRNA expression and reduces oxidative stress. In addition, these alterations may be responsible for CSA reduction and diastolic function improvement.

  2. Speech-induced striatal dopamine release is left lateralized and coupled to functional striatal circuits in healthy humans: A combined PET, fMRI and DTI study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonyan, Kristina; Herscovitch, Peter; Horwitz, Barry

    2013-01-01

    Considerable progress has been recently made in understanding the brain mechanisms underlying speech and language control. However, the neurochemical underpinnings of normal speech production remain largely unknown. We investigated the extent of striatal endogenous dopamine release and its influences on the organization of functional striatal speech networks during production of meaningful English sentences using a combination of positron emission tomography (PET) with the dopamine D2/D3 receptor radioligand [11C]raclopride and functional MRI (fMRI). In addition, we used diffusion tensor tractography (DTI) to examine the extent of dopaminergic modulatory influences on striatal structural network organization. We found that, during sentence production, endogenous dopamine was released in the ventromedial portion of the dorsal striatum, in its both associative and sensorimotor functional divisions. In the associative striatum, speech-induced dopamine release established a significant relationship with neural activity and influenced the left-hemispheric lateralization of striatal functional networks. In contrast, there were no significant effects of endogenous dopamine release on the lateralization of striatal structural networks. Our data provide the first evidence for endogenous dopamine release in the dorsal striatum during normal speaking and point to the possible mechanisms behind the modulatory influences of dopamine on the organization of functional brain circuits controlling normal human speech. PMID:23277111

  3. Prolonged stimulation of a brainstem raphe region attenuates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Pernille M.; Sloley, Stephanie S.; Vitores, Alberto A.

    2017-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS), a neuroinflammatory disease, has few treatment options, none entirely adequate. We studied whether prolonged electrical microstimulation of a hindbrain region (the nucleus raphe magnus) can attenuate experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, a murine model of MS induced ...

  4. AUTOIMMUNE EPIDERMAL BLISTERING DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Abreu Velez

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune bullous skin diseases (ABDs are uncommon, potentially fatal diseases of skin and mucous membranes which are associated with deposits of autoantibodies and complement against distinct molecules of the epidermis and dermal/epidermal basement membrane zone (BMZ. These autoantibodies lead to a loss in skin molecular integrity, which manifests clinically as formation of blisters or erosions. In pemphigus vulgaris, loss of adhesion occurs within the epidermis. The pioneering work of Ernst H. Beutner, Ph.D. and Robert E. Jordon, M.D. confirmed the autoimmune nature of these diseases. Walter F. Lever, M.D. contributed significantly to our understanding of the histopathologic features of these diseases. Walter Lever, M.D. and Ken Hashimoto, M.D. contributed electron microscopic studies of these diseases, especially in pemphigus vulgaris and bullous pemphigoid. In bullous pemphigoid (BP, linear IgA bullous dermatosis, epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA and dermatitis herpetiformis (DH, loss of adhesion takes place within or underneath the BMZ. Classic EBA demonstrates extensive skin fragility; DH is commonly associated with gluten-sensitive enteropathy, and manifests clinically with pruritic papulovesicles on the extensor surfaces of the extremities and the lumbosacral area. The clinical spectrum of bullous pemphigoid includes tense blisters, urticarial plaques, and prurigo-like eczematous lesions. Pemphigoid gestationis mostly occurs during the last trimester of pregnancy, and mucous membrane pemphigoid primarily involves the oral mucosa and conjunctivae and leads to scarring. Linear IgA bullous dermatosis manifests with tense blisters in a „cluster of jewels”-like pattern in childhood (chronic bullous disease of childhood and is more clinically heterogeneous in adulthood. Many of the autoantigens in these disorders are known and have been well characterized. ABDs may be influenced by both genetic and exogenous factors. The diagnoses of

  5. Coeliac disease and autoimmune disease-genetic overlap and screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundin, Knut E A; Wijmenga, Cisca

    2015-09-01

    Coeliac disease is a treatable, gluten-induced disease that often occurs concurrently with other autoimmune diseases. In genetic studies since 2007, a partial genetic overlap between these diseases has been revealed and further insights into the pathophysiology of coeliac disease and autoimmunity have been gained. However, genetic screening is not sensitive and specific enough to accurately predict disease development. The current method to diagnose individuals with coeliac disease is serological testing for the presence of autoantibodies whilst the patient is on a regular, gluten-containing diet, followed by gastroduodenoscopy with duodenal biopsy. Serological test results can also predict the probability of coeliac disease development, even if asymptomatic. In patients with autoimmune diseases known to occur alongside coeliac disease (particularly type 1 diabetes mellitus or thyroid disorders), disease screening-and subsequent treatment if coeliac disease is detected-could have beneficial effects on progression or potential complications of both diseases, owing to the effectiveness of gluten-free dietary interventions in coeliac disease. However, whether diagnosis of coeliac disease and subsequent dietary treatment can prevent autoimmune diseases is debated. In this Review, the genetic and immunological features of coeliac disease, overlap with other autoimmune diseases and implications for current screening strategies will be discussed.

  6. Autoimmunity-Basics and link with periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Gagandeep; Mohindra, Kanika; Singla, Shifali

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune reactions reflect an imbalance between effector and regulatory immune responses, typically develop through stages of initiation and propagation, and often show phases of resolution (indicated by clinical remissions) and exacerbations (indicated by symptomatic flares). The fundamental underlying mechanism of autoimmunity is defective elimination and/or control of self-reactive lymphocytes. Periodontal diseases are characterized by inflammatory conditions that directly affect teeth-supporting structures, which are the major cause of tooth loss. Several studies have demonstrated the involvement of autoimmune responses in periodontal disease. Evidence of involvement of immunopathology has been reported in periodontal disease. Bacteria in the dental plaque induce antibody formation. Autoreactive T-cells, natural killer cells, ANCA, heat shock proteins, autoantibodies, and genetic factors are reported to have an important role in the autoimmune component of periodontal disease. The present review describes the involvement of autoimmune responses in periodontal diseases and also the mechanisms underlying these responses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Autoimmunity, environmental exposure and vaccination: is there a link?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravel, G.; Christ, M.; Horand, F.; Descotes, J.

    2004-01-01

    Although the wide clinical experience shows that vaccines are generally safe, concern has been expressed for a causal link between vaccines and autoimmune diseases. Even though the mechanisms of autoimmunity are ill-elucidated, the role of pre-existing risk factors including genetic predisposition and environmental factors is largely accepted. The present study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that vaccines can promote autoimmunity in genetically-prone individuals when simultaneously exposed to a chemical known to induce autoimmune reactions. Female lupus-prone (NZBxNZW) F 1 mice were given 1 μg or 10 μg of a hepatitis B vaccine at 2-week intervals in conjunction with 40 μg of mercuric chloride three times per week for 6 weeks. A marked increase in serum IgG levels and a slight increase in anti-nuclear autoantibody (ANA) levels were seen in the mice given 10 μg of the vaccine plus mercuric chloride. No straightforward conclusion can be drawn from these results because of the extreme experimental conditions of this study. Nevertheless, the results tend to support the hypothesis that vaccination could enhance the risk of autoimmunity in genetically susceptible individuals when exposed to certain environmental chemicals

  8. NMR and molecular dynamics studies of an autoimmune myelin basic protein peptide and its antagonist : structural implications for the MHC II (I-Au)–peptide complex from docking calculations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tzakos, A.G.; Fuchs, P.; van Nuland, N.A.J.; Troganis, A.; Tselios, T.; Deraos, S.; Gerothanassis, I.P.; Bonvin, A.M.J.J.

    2004-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis can be induced in susceptible animals by immunodominant determinants of myelin basic protein (MBP). To characterize the molecular features of antigenic sites important for designing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis suppressing molecules, we report

  9. Clostridium butyricum CGMCC0313.1 Protects against Autoimmune Diabetes by Modulating Intestinal Immune Homeostasis and Inducing Pancreatic Regulatory T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingling Jia

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent evidence indicates that indigenous Clostridium species induce colonic regulatory T cells (Tregs, and gut lymphocytes are able to migrate to pancreatic islets in an inflammatory environment. Thus, we speculate that supplementation with the well-characterized probiotics Clostridium butyricum CGMCC0313.1 (CB0313.1 may induce pancreatic Tregs and consequently inhibit the diabetes incidence in non-obese diabetic (NOD mice. CB0313.1 was administered daily to female NOD mice from 3 to 45 weeks of age. The control group received an equal volume of sterile water. Fasting glucose was measured twice a week. Pyrosequencing of the gut microbiota and flow cytometry of mesenteric lymph node (MLN, pancreatic lymph node (PLN, pancreatic and splenic immune cells were performed to investigate the effect of CB0313.1 treatment. Early oral administration of CB0313.1 mitigated insulitis, delayed the onset of diabetes, and improved energy metabolic dysfunction. Protection may involve increased Tregs, rebalanced Th1/Th2/Th17 cells and changes to a less proinflammatory immunological milieu in the gut, PLN, and pancreas. An increase of α4β7+ (the gut homing receptor Tregs in the PLN suggests that the mechanism may involve increased migration of gut-primed Tregs to the pancreas. Furthermore, 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed that CB0313.1 enhanced the Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio, enriched Clostridium-subgroups and butyrate-producing bacteria subgroups. Our results provide the basis for future clinical investigations in preventing type 1 diabetes by oral CB0313.1 administration.

  10. Regulatory CD8{sup +} T cells induced by exposure to all-trans retinoic acid and TGF-{beta} suppress autoimmune diabetes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishi, Minoru [Department of Internal and Geriatric Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-1 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan); Yasuda, Hisafumi, E-mail: yasuda@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Department of Internal and Geriatric Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-1 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan); Abe, Yasuhisa; Sasaki, Hirotomo; Shimizu, Mami; Arai, Takashi; Okumachi, Yasuyo; Moriyama, Hiroaki; Hara, Kenta; Yokono, Koichi; Nagata, Masao [Department of Internal and Geriatric Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-1 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan)

    2010-03-26

    Antigen-specific regulatory CD4{sup +} T cells have been described but there are few reports on regulatory CD8{sup +} T cells. We generated islet-specific glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunit-related protein (IGRP)-specific regulatory CD8{sup +} T cells from 8.3-NOD transgenic mice. CD8{sup +} T cells from 8.3-NOD splenocytes were cultured with IGRP, splenic dendritic cells (SpDCs), TGF-{beta}, and all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) for 5 days. CD8{sup +} T cells cultured with either IGRP alone or IGRP and SpDCs in the absence of TGF-{beta} and ATRA had low Foxp3{sup +} expression (1.7 {+-} 0.9% and 3.2 {+-} 4.5%, respectively). In contrast, CD8{sup +} T cells induced by exposure to IGRP, SpDCs, TGF-{beta}, and ATRA showed the highest expression of Foxp3{sup +} in IGRP-reactive CD8{sup +} T cells (36.1 {+-} 10.6%), which was approximately 40-fold increase compared with that before induction culture. CD25 expression on CD8{sup +} T cells cultured with IGRP, SpDCs, TGF-{beta}, and ATRA was only 7.42%, whereas CD103 expression was greater than 90%. These CD8{sup +} T cells suppressed the proliferation of diabetogenic CD8{sup +} T cells from 8.3-NOD splenocytes in vitro and completely prevented diabetes onset in NOD-scid mice in cotransfer experiments with diabetogenic splenocytes from NOD mice in vivo. Here we show that exposure to ATRA and TGF-{beta} induces CD8{sup +}Foxp3{sup +} T cells ex vivo, which suppress diabetogenic T cells in vitro and in vivo.

  11. Regulatory CD8+ T cells induced by exposure to all-trans retinoic acid and TGF-β suppress autoimmune diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishi, Minoru; Yasuda, Hisafumi; Abe, Yasuhisa; Sasaki, Hirotomo; Shimizu, Mami; Arai, Takashi; Okumachi, Yasuyo; Moriyama, Hiroaki; Hara, Kenta; Yokono, Koichi; Nagata, Masao

    2010-01-01

    Antigen-specific regulatory CD4 + T cells have been described but there are few reports on regulatory CD8 + T cells. We generated islet-specific glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunit-related protein (IGRP)-specific regulatory CD8 + T cells from 8.3-NOD transgenic mice. CD8 + T cells from 8.3-NOD splenocytes were cultured with IGRP, splenic dendritic cells (SpDCs), TGF-β, and all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) for 5 days. CD8 + T cells cultured with either IGRP alone or IGRP and SpDCs in the absence of TGF-β and ATRA had low Foxp3 + expression (1.7 ± 0.9% and 3.2 ± 4.5%, respectively). In contrast, CD8 + T cells induced by exposure to IGRP, SpDCs, TGF-β, and ATRA showed the highest expression of Foxp3 + in IGRP-reactive CD8 + T cells (36.1 ± 10.6%), which was approximately 40-fold increase compared with that before induction culture. CD25 expression on CD8 + T cells cultured with IGRP, SpDCs, TGF-β, and ATRA was only 7.42%, whereas CD103 expression was greater than 90%. These CD8 + T cells suppressed the proliferation of diabetogenic CD8 + T cells from 8.3-NOD splenocytes in vitro and completely prevented diabetes onset in NOD-scid mice in cotransfer experiments with diabetogenic splenocytes from NOD mice in vivo. Here we show that exposure to ATRA and TGF-β induces CD8 + Foxp3 + T cells ex vivo, which suppress diabetogenic T cells in vitro and in vivo.

  12. Autoimmune hepatitis in association with lymphocytic colitis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cronin, Edmond M

    2012-02-03

    Autoimmune hepatitis is a rare, chronic inflammatory disorder which has been associated with a number of other auto-immune conditions. However, there are no reports in the medical literature of an association with microscopic (lymphocytic) colitis. We report the case of a 53-year-old woman with several autoimmune conditions, including lymphocytic colitis, who presented with an acute hepatitis. On the basis of the clinical features, serology, and histopathology, we diagnosed autoimmune hepatitis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of autoimmune hepatitis in association with lymphocytic colitis, and lends support to the theory of an autoimmune etiology for lymphocytic colitis.

  13. Effect of TACI Signaling on Humoral Immunity and Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Transmembrane activator and calcium-modulating cyclophilin ligand interactor (TACI is one of the receptors of B cell activating factor of the tumor necrosis factor family (BAFF and a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL. TACI is a regulator in the immune responses. TACI inhibits B cell expansion and promotes the differentiation and survival of plasma cells. The mechanisms underlying these effects probably involve changed expressions of some crucial molecules, such as B lymphocyte induced maturation protein-1 (Blimp-1 and inducible T-cell costimulator ligand (ICOSL in B cells and/or plasma cells. However, abnormal TACI signaling may relate to autoimmune disorders. Common variable immune deficiency (CVID patients with heterozygous mutations in TACI alleles increase susceptibility to autoimmune diseases. Taci−/− mice and BAFF transgenic mice both develop signs of human SLE. These findings that indicate inappropriate levels of TACI signaling may disrupt immune system balance, thereby promoting the development of autoimmune diseases. In this review, we summarize the basic characteristics of the TACI ligands BAFF and APRIL, and detail the research findings on the role of TACI in humoral immunity. We also discuss the possible mechanisms underlying the susceptibility of CVID patients with TACI mutations to autoimmune diseases and the role of TACI in the pathogenesis of SLE.

  14. The first childhood case with coexisting Hashimoto thyroiditis, vitiligo and autoimmune hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Melikşah; Savaş-Erdeve, Şenay; Özbay-Hoşnut, Ferda; Kurnaz, Erdal; Çetinkaya, Semra; Aycan, Zehra

    2016-01-01

    Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) is the most common pediatric autoimmune endocrine disorder. It results in autoimmune-mediated thyroid gland destruction and is an organ-specific, typical autoimmune disease. The presence of antithyroid antibodies and the typical pattern on ultrasonography indicate the diagnosis. It is also frequently seen together with other autoimmune disorders including type 1 insulin-dependent diabetes, celiac disease, alopecia and vitiligo. Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a chronic type of liver injury with an immune etiology that can frequently cause end-stage liver disease if left untreated. Autoimmune hepatitis patients may present with hepatitis, and the laboratory tests in the absence of other etiology usually reveal a positive immune serology together with elevated immunoglobulins and abnormal liver histology. It is interesting that HT and AIH are rarely seen together although both have an autoimmune etiology. 14-year-old male who was being followed-up for vitiligo presented with symptoms of a swelling at the neck and fatigue. He was diagnosed with HT after the tests and the liver enzymes were found to be high. The patient was also diagnosed with AIH after tests revealed that the liver enzyme elevation had continued for longer than six months. The thyroid functions and liver enzymes returned to normal and the symptoms decreased after sodium L-thyroxine replacement together with steroid and azathioprine treatment. We present this case as we believe it is the first pediatric patient diagnosed with HT, AIH and vitiligo.

  15. Significance of exercise-induced ST segment depression in patients with myocardial infarction involving the left circumflex artery. Evaluation by exercise thallium-201 myocardial single photon emission computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koitabashi, Norimichi; Toyama, Takuji; Hoshizaki, Hiroshi [Gunma Prefectural Cardiovascular Center, Maebashi (Japan)] [and others

    2000-04-01

    The significance of exercise-induced ST segment depression in patients with left circumflex artery involvement was investigated by comparing exercise electrocardiography with exercise thallium-201 single photon emission computed tomography (Tl-SPECT) and the wall motion estimated by left ventriculography. Tl-SPECT and exercise electrocardiography were simultaneously performed in 51 patients with left circumflex artery involvement (angina pectoris 30, myocardial infarction 21). In patients with myocardial infarction, exercise-induced ST depression was frequently found in the V{sub 2}, V{sub 3} and V{sub 4} leads. In patients with angina pectoris, ST depression was frequently found in the II, III, aV{sub F}, V{sub 5} and V{sub 6} leads. There was no obvious difference in the leads of ST depression in patients with myocardial infarction with ischemia and without ischemia on Tl-SPECT images. In patients with myocardial infarction, the lateral wall motion of the infarcted area evaluated by left ventriculography was more significantly impaired in the patients with ST depression than without ST depression (p<0.01). Exercise-induced ST depression in the precordial leads possibly reflects wall motion abnormality rather than ischemia in the lateral infarcted myocardium. (author)

  16. Significance of exercise-induced ST segment depression in patients with myocardial infarction involving the left circumflex artery. Evaluation by exercise thallium-201 myocardial single photon emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koitabashi, Norimichi; Toyama, Takuji; Hoshizaki, Hiroshi

    2000-01-01

    The significance of exercise-induced ST segment depression in patients with left circumflex artery involvement was investigated by comparing exercise electrocardiography with exercise thallium-201 single photon emission computed tomography (Tl-SPECT) and the wall motion estimated by left ventriculography. Tl-SPECT and exercise electrocardiography were simultaneously performed in 51 patients with left circumflex artery involvement (angina pectoris 30, myocardial infarction 21). In patients with myocardial infarction, exercise-induced ST depression was frequently found in the V 2 , V 3 and V 4 leads. In patients with angina pectoris, ST depression was frequently found in the II, III, aV F , V 5 and V 6 leads. There was no obvious difference in the leads of ST depression in patients with myocardial infarction with ischemia and without ischemia on Tl-SPECT images. In patients with myocardial infarction, the lateral wall motion of the infarcted area evaluated by left ventriculography was more significantly impaired in the patients with ST depression than without ST depression (p<0.01). Exercise-induced ST depression in the precordial leads possibly reflects wall motion abnormality rather than ischemia in the lateral infarcted myocardium. (author)

  17. Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zen, Yoh; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P; Kawa, Shigeyuki

    2011-12-07

    Before the concept of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) was established, this form of pancreatitis had been recognized as lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis or non-alcoholic duct destructive chronic pancreatitis based on unique histological features. With the discovery in 2001 that serum IgG4 concentrations are specifically elevated in AIP patients, this emerging entity has been more widely accepted. Classical cases of AIP are now called type 1 as another distinct subtype (type 2 AIP) has been identified. Type 1 AIP, which accounts for 2% of chronic pancreatitis cases, predominantly affects adult males. Patients usually present with obstructive jaundice due to enlargement of the pancreatic head or thickening of the lower bile duct wall. Pancreatic cancer is the leading differential diagnosis for which serological, imaging, and histological examinations need to be considered. Serologically, an elevated level of IgG4 is the most sensitive and specific finding. Imaging features include irregular narrowing of the pancreatic duct, diffuse or focal enlargement of the pancreas, a peri-pancreatic capsule-like rim, and enhancement at the late phase of contrast-enhanced images. Biopsy or surgical specimens show diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration containing many IgG4+ plasma cells, storiform fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis. A dramatic response to steroid therapy is another characteristic, and serological or radiological effects are normally identified within the first 2 or 3 weeks. Type 1 AIP is estimated as a pancreatic manifestation of systemic IgG4-related disease based on the fact that synchronous or metachronous lesions can develop in multiple organs (e.g. bile duct, salivary/lacrimal glands, retroperitoneum, artery, lung, and kidney) and those lesions are histologically identical irrespective of the organ of origin. Several potential autoantigens have been identified so far. A Th2-dominant immune reaction and the activation of regulatory T-cells are assumed

  18. Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zen Yoh

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Before the concept of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP was established, this form of pancreatitis had been recognized as lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis or non-alcoholic duct destructive chronic pancreatitis based on unique histological features. With the discovery in 2001 that serum IgG4 concentrations are specifically elevated in AIP patients, this emerging entity has been more widely accepted. Classical cases of AIP are now called type 1 as another distinct subtype (type 2 AIP has been identified. Type 1 AIP, which accounts for 2% of chronic pancreatitis cases, predominantly affects adult males. Patients usually present with obstructive jaundice due to enlargement of the pancreatic head or thickening of the lower bile duct wall. Pancreatic cancer is the leading differential diagnosis for which serological, imaging, and histological examinations need to be considered. Serologically, an elevated level of IgG4 is the most sensitive and specific finding. Imaging features include irregular narrowing of the pancreatic duct, diffuse or focal enlargement of the pancreas, a peri-pancreatic capsule-like rim, and enhancement at the late phase of contrast-enhanced images. Biopsy or surgical specimens show diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration containing many IgG4+ plasma cells, storiform fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis. A dramatic response to steroid therapy is another characteristic, and serological or radiological effects are normally identified within the first 2 or 3 weeks. Type 1 AIP is estimated as a pancreatic manifestation of systemic IgG4-related disease based on the fact that synchronous or metachronous lesions can develop in multiple organs (e.g. bile duct, salivary/lacrimal glands, retroperitoneum, artery, lung, and kidney and those lesions are histologically identical irrespective of the organ of origin. Several potential autoantigens have been identified so far. A Th2-dominant immune reaction and the activation of

  19. Autoimmune pancreatitis. An update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helmberger, T.

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare disease, the pathophysiological understanding of which has been greatly improved over the last years. The most common form, type 1 AIP belongs to the IgG4-related diseases and must be distinguished from type 2 AIP, which is a much rarer entity associated with chronic inflammatory bowel disease. Clinically, there is an overlap with pancreatic cancer. Imaging and further criteria, such as serological and histological parameters are utilized for a differentiation between both entities in order to select the appropriate therapy and to avoid the small but ultimately unnecessary number of pancreatectomies. The diagnostics of AIP are complex, whereby the consensus criteria of the International Association of Pancreatology have become accepted as the parameters for discrimination. These encompass five cardinal criteria and one therapeutic criterion. By applying these criteria AIP can be diagnosed with a sensitivity of 84.9 %, a specificity of 100 % and an accuracy of 93.8 %. The diagnosis of AIP is accomplished by applying several parameters of which two relate to imaging. As for the routine diagnostics of the pancreas these are ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Important for the differential diagnosis is the exclusion of signs of local and remote tumor spread for which CT and MRI are established. The essential diagnostic parameter of histology necessitates sufficient sample material, which cannot usually be acquired by a fine needle biopsy. CT or MRI are the reference standard methods for identification of the optimal puncture site and imaging-assisted (TruCut) biopsy. In patients presenting with unspecific upper abdominal pain, painless jaundice combined with the suspicion of a pancreatic malignancy in imaging but a mismatch of secondary signs of malignancy, AIP should also be considered as a differential diagnosis. As the diagnosis of AIP only partially relies on imaging radiologists also

  20. The Role of T Helper (TH17 Cells as a Double-Edged Sword in the Interplay of Infection and Autoimmunity with a Focus on Xenobiotic-Induced Immunomodulation

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    Nasr Y. A. Hemdan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Extensive research in recent years suggests that exposure to xenobiotic stimuli plays a critical role in autoimmunity induction and severity and that the resulting response would be exacerbated in individuals with an infection-aroused immune system. In this context, heavy metals constitute a prominent category of xenobiotic substances, known to alter divergent immune cell responses in accidentally and occupationally exposed individuals, thereby increasing the susceptibility to autoimmunity and cancer, especially when accompanied by inflammation-triggered persistent sensitization. This perception is learned from experimental models of infection and epidemiologic studies and clearly underscores the interplay of exposure to such immunomodulatory elements with pre- or postexposure infectious events. Further, the TH17 cell subset, known to be associated with a growing list of autoimmune manifestations, may be the “superstar” at the interface of xenobiotic exposure and autoimmunity. In this review, the most recently established links to this nomination are short-listed to create a framework to better understand new insights into TH17’s contributions to autoimmunity.

  1. Enalaprilato na prevenção da hipertrofia ventricular esquerda induzida pelo isoproterenol Enalaprilat prevents the left ventricular hypertrophy induced by isoproterenol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo A. S. Costa

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar se o enalaprilato, droga inibidora da enzima de conversão da angiotensina I, previne a hipertrofia ventricular esquerda (HVE induzida pelo isoproterenol. MÉTODOS: Foram divididos em 4 grupos, 72 ratos Wistar-EPM: CON controle; ENA, tratados com enalaprilato (1mg/kg via subcutânea (sc por 8 dias; ISO, tratados com isoproterenol (0,3mg/kg via sc/8 dias e ENA+ISO, tratados simultaneamente com ambas as drogas. Em 10 animais de cada grupo foram determinadas a freqüência cardíaca (FC e a pressão arterial (PA e verificado o peso de ventrículo esquerdo (VE. Em 8 animais de cada grupo, fragmento do VE foi corado com hematoxilina-eosina e picro-sírius e preparado para estudo morfométrico e ultra-estrutural, respectivamente, com microscópio de luz e eletrônico. RESULTADOS: Nos grupos estudados (CON, ENA, ISO e ISO+ENA não ocorreram variações na PA. Os grupos ISO e ISO+ENA exibiram aumentos significantes na FC. O grupo ISO apresentou aumento significativo do peso do VE (PU= 0,821g e PS= 0,204g, quando comparado ao grupo CON. O grupo ENA não exibiu modificação de peso do VE quando comparado ao grupo CON (PU= 0,590g e PS= 0,139g. No grupo ENA+ISO (PU= 0,737g e PS= 0,177g constatou-se diferença de peso ao ser comparado aos grupos ISO e CON. A análise morfométrica e ultra-estrutural mostraram que o ISO induziu hipertrofia dos cardiomiócitos e aumento do tecido conjuntivo com depósito de fibras colágenas do tipo I. O enalaprilato associado com isoproterenol atenuou importantemente aquela manifestação. CONCLUSÃO: O enalaprilato inibiu a ação do isoproterenol sobre os cardiomiócitos, evitando parcialmente, na dose utilizada, a HVE e diminuindo também a quantidade de fibras colágenas.PURPOSE: To evaluate whether the enalaprilat, angiotensin I enzyme conversion inhibitor, could prevent the left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH induced by isoproterenol. METHODS: Seventy two adult Wistar-EPM rats were divided into four

  2. Ionizing radiation and autoimmunity: Induction of autoimmune disease in mice by high dose fractionated total lymphoid irradiation and its prevention by inoculating normal T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakaguchi, N.; Sakaguchi, S.; Miyai, K.

    1992-01-01

    Ionizing radiation can functionally alter the immune system and break self-tolerance. High dose (42.5 Gy), fractionated (2.5 Gy 17 times) total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) on mice caused various organ-specific autoimmune diseases, such as gastritis, thyroiditis, and orchitis, depending on the radiation dosages, the extent of lymphoid irradiation, and the genetic background of the mouse strains. Radiation-induced tissue damage is not the primary cause of the autoimmune disease because irradiation of the target organs alone failed to elicit the autoimmunity and shielding of the organs from irradiation was unable to prevent it. In contrast, irradiation of both the thymus and the peripheral lymphoid organs/tissues was required for efficient induction of autoimmune disease by TLI. TLI eliminated the majority of mature thymocytes and the peripheral T cells for 1 mo, and inoculation of spleen cell, thymocyte, or bone marrow cell suspensions (prepared from syngeneic nonirradiated mice) within 2 wk after TLI effectively prevented the autoimmune development. Depletion of T cells from the inocula abrogated the preventive activity. CD4 + T cells mediated the autoimmune prevention but CD8 + T cells did not. CD4 + T cells also appeared to mediate the TLI-induced autoimmune disease because CD4 + T cells from disease-bearing TLI mice adoptively transferred the autoimmune disease to syngeneic naive mice. Taken together, these results indicate that high dose, fractionated ionizing radiation on the lymphoid organs/tissues can cause autoimmune disease by affecting the T cell immune system, rather than the target self-Ags, presumably by altering T cell-dependent control of self-reactive T cells. 62 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs

  3. Shaking Out Clues to Autoimmune Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... into how an immune cell involved in several autoimmune disorders is regulated. Among their findings was a potential ... but they’ve also been linked with several autoimmune disorders. Th17 cells, along with other types of helper ...

  4. Multiple autoimmune syndrome with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpreet, Singh; Deepak, Jain; Kiran, B

    Multiple autoimmune syndrome (MAS) is a condition characterised by three or more autoimmune disorders in a same individual. Familial, immunologic and infectious factors are implicated in the development of MAS. Here we report a case of a 32-year-old woman with co-existence of four auto-immune diseases, namely autoimmune hypothyroidism, Sjögren's syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and celiac disease which leads to the final diagnosis of multiple autoimmune syndrome type 3 with celiac disease. Patients with single autoimmune disorder are at 25% risk of developing other autoimmune disorders. The present case emphasises to clinicians that there is a need for continued surveillance for the development of new autoimmune disease in predisposed patients.

  5. [Therapeutic options for autoimmune encephalomyelitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisow, N; Prüss, H; Paul, F

    2013-04-01

    Autoantibodies to neuronal tissue are becoming increasingly more important in the evaluation and classification of several neurological diseases, e.g. neuromyelitis optica, paraneoplastic syndromes of the central nervous system (CNS), stiff person syndrome or autoimmune epilepsy. As these disorders are rare, no evidence-based recommendations for therapy are available. Currently, immunomodulating or immunosuppressive drugs are administered in most cases. In paraneoplastic syndromes treatment of the underlying cancer is of considerable importance. This overview summarizes current experiences and recommendations in the treatment of autoimmune neurological disorders.

  6. Disfunção ventricular esquerda transitória por cardiomiopatia induzida por estresse Transient left ventricular dysfunction due to stress-induced cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Vinicius Simões

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Apresenta-se o caso de uma paciente de 71 anos que preencheu os critérios diagnósticos para cardiomiopatia induzida por estresse que foi desencadeada por intenso estresse emocional após atropelamento por bicicleta. O quadro clínico mimetizou o infarto agudo do miocárdio, manifestando-se com dor precordial, supradesnivelamento do segmento ST, seguido por ondas T profundas e prolongamento do intervalo QT, elevação discreta de enzimas cardíacas e cursando com disfunção sistólica apical do ventrículo esquerdo e hipercinesia das porções basais (conferindo o aspecto de "abaloamento apical", mas na ausência de obstrução coronariana subepicárdica. A função ventricular normalizou-se após a segunda semana de evolução.The case presented here is of a 71-yr-old female patient who met the diagnostic criteria for stress-induced cardiomyopathy, which was triggered by intense emotional stress after being hit by a bicycle. The clinical picture mimicked that of an acute myocardial infarction, manifesting as precordial pain, ST-segment depression followed by deep negative T waves and prolonging of the QT interval, slight increase in cardiac enzymes and coursing with transient apical ballooning of the left ventricle and hyperkinesis of the basal walls (conferring the aspect of "apical ballooning", although in the absence of subepicardial coronary obstruction. Ventricular function normalized after the second week of clinical evolution.

  7. An autosomal locus causing autoimmune disease: Autoimmune polyglandular disease type I assigned to chromosome 21

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Aaltonen (Johanna); P. Björses (Petra); L.A. Sandkuijl (Lodewijk); J. Perheentupa (Jaakko); L. Peltonen (Leena Johanna)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractAutoimmune polyglandular disease type I (APECED) is an autosomal recessive autoimmune disease characterized by a variable combination of the failure of the endocrine glands. The pathogenesis of this unique autoimmune disease is unknown; unlike many other autoimmune diseases, APECED does

  8. Multiplex autoantibody detection for autoimmune liver diseases and autoimmune gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderlocht, Joris; van der Cruys, Mart; Stals, Frans; Bakker-Jonges, Liesbeth; Damoiseaux, Jan

    2017-09-01

    Autoantibody detection for autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and autoimmune gastritis (AIG) is traditionally performed by IIF on a combination of tissues. Multiplex line/dot blots (LIA/DIA) offer multiple advantages, i.e. automation, objective reading, no interfering reactivities, no coincidental findings. In the current study we evaluated automated DIA (D-Tek) for detecting autoantibodies related to autoimmune diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. We tested samples of the Dutch EQC program and compared the results with the consensus of the participating labs. For the autoimmune liver diseases and AIG, respectively, 64 and 36 samples were tested. For anti-mitochondrial and anti-smooth muscle antibodies a concordance rate of 97% and 88% was observed, respectively. The concordance rate for anti-parietal cell antibodies was 92% when samples without EQC consensus (n=15) were excluded. For antibodies against intrinsic factor a concordance of 96% was observed. For all these antibodies discrepancies were identified that relate to the different test characteristics and the preponderance of IIF utilizing labs in the EQC program. In conclusion, we observed good agreement of the tested DIA blots with the consensus results of the Dutch EQC program. Taken together with the logistic advantages these blots are a good alternative for autoantibody detection in the respective diseases. A large prospective multicenter study is warranted to position these novel tests further in the whole spectrum of assays for the detection of these antibodies in a routine autoimmune laboratory. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Cellular stress and innate inflammation in organ-specific autoimmunity: lessons learned from vitiligo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, John E.

    2015-01-01

    Summary For decades, research in autoimmunity has focused primarily on immune contributions to disease. Yet recent studies report elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and abnormal activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) in cells targeted by autoimmunity, implicating cellular stress originating from the target tissue as a contributing factor. A better understanding of this contribution may help to answer important lingering questions in organ-specific autoimmunity, like what factors initiate disease, and what directs its tissue specificity. Vitiligo, an autoimmune disease of the skin, has been the focus of translational research for over 30 years, and both melanocyte stress and immune mechanisms have been thought to be mutually exclusive explanations for pathogenesis. Chemical-induced vitiligo is a unique clinical presentation that reflects the importance of environmental influences on autoimmunity, provides insight into a new paradigm linking cell stress to the immune response, and serves as a template for other autoimmune diseases. In this review I will discuss the evidence for cell stress contributions to a number of autoimmune diseases, the questions that remain, and how vitiligo, an underappreciated example of organ-specific autoimmunity, helps to answer them. PMID:26683142

  10. Co-Occurrence of Chronic Spontaneous Urticaria with Immunoglobulin A Deficiency and Autoimmune Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frossi, Barbara; De Carli, Stefano; Bossi, Fleur; Pucillo, Carlo; De Carli, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) A deficiency is a primary immunodeficiency in which autoimmunity is frequently observed. Thirty to fifty percent of patients with spontaneous chronic urticaria have autoantibodies that are able to cross-link FcεRI on mast cells and basophils. We investigated whether spontaneous chronic urticaria in patients with IgA deficiency meets the criteria for autoimmunity. Four patients were screened for positivity to a skin prick test and an autologous serum skin test and for the presence of other autoimmune diseases. Patient sera were tested for the ability to activate basophils and mast cells in vitro by measuring surface CD63 expression and β-hexosaminidase release, respectively. The autologous serum test was positive in all patients, and patient sera were found to induce CD63 upregulation on basophils and degranulation of an LAD2 mast cell line. Moreover, all patients were affected by other autoimmune disorders. For the first time, these data point out chronic autoimmune urticaria in subjects with an IgA deficiency and confirm that different autoimmune disorders are common among patients with an IgA deficiency. Patients with chronic autoimmune spontaneous urticaria should be screened for IgA deficiency, especially if they are affected by other autoimmune disorders. Thus, spontaneous urticaria could mirror more complex systemic diseases, such as immune deficiency. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia: transfusion challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barros MM

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Melca M O Barros, Dante M Langhi Jr, José O Bordin Department of Clinical and Experimental Oncology, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil Abstract: Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA is defined as the increased destruction of red blood cells (RBCs in the presence of anti-RBC autoantibodies and/or complement. Classification of AIHA is based on the optimal auto-RBC antibody reactivity temperatures and includes warm, cold-reactive, mixed AIHA, and drug-induced AIHA subtypes. AIHA is a rare disease, and recommendations for transfusion are based mainly on results from retrospective data and relatively small cohort studies, including heterogeneous patient samples or single case reports. In this article, we will review the challenges and solutions to safely transfuse AIHA patients. We will reflect on the indication for transfusion in AIHA and the difficulty in the accomplishment of immunohematological procedures for the selection of the safest and most compatible RBC units. Keywords: hemolytic anemia, RBC autoantibodies, autoimmunity, hemolysis, direct ­antiglobulin test

  12. The Role of Pathogenic Autoantibodies in Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merrill J. Rowley

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The serological presence of autoantibodies is diagnostic of autoimmunity, and these autoantibodies may be present for many years before the presentation of autoimmune disease (AID. Although a pathogenic role has been demonstrated for various autoantibodies reactive with cell surface and extracellular autoantigens, studies using monoclonal antibodies (mAb show not all antibodies in the polyclonal response are pathogenic. Differences depend on Fab-mediated diversity in epitope specificity, Fc-mediated effects based on immunoglobulin (Ig class and subclass, activation of complement, and the milieu in which the reaction occurs. These autoantibodies often occur in organ-specific AID and this review illustrates their pathogenic and highly specific effects. The role of autoantibodies associated with intracellular antigens is less clear. In vitro they may inhibit or adversely affect well-defined intracellular biochemical pathways, yet, in vivo they are separated from their autoantigens by multiple cellular barriers. Recent evidence that Ig can traverse cell membranes, interact with intracellular proteins, and induce apoptosis has provided new evidence for a pathogenic role for such autoantibodies. An understanding of how autoantibodies behave in the polyclonal response and their role in pathogenesis of AID may help identify populations of culprit B-cells and selection of treatments that suppress or eliminate them.

  13. Cacao polyphenols ameliorate autoimmune myocarditis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zempo, Hirofumi; Suzuki, Jun-ichi; Watanabe, Ryo; Wakayama, Kouji; Kumagai, Hidetoshi; Ikeda, Yuichi; Akazawa, Hiroshi; Komuro, Issei; Isobe, Mitsuaki

    2016-04-01

    Myocarditis is a clinically severe disease; however, no effective treatment has been established. The aim of this study was to determine whether cacao bean (Theobroma cacao) polyphenols ameliorate autoimmune myocarditis. We used an experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) model in Balb/c mice. Mice with induced EAM were treated with a cacao polyphenol extract (CPE, n=12) or vehicle (n=12). On day 21, hearts were harvested and analyzed. Elevated heart weight to body weight and fibrotic area ratios as well as high cardiac cell infiltration were observed in the vehicle-treated EAM mice. However, these increases were significantly suppressed in the CPE-treated mice. Reverse transcriptase-PCR revealed that mRNA expressions of interleukin (Il)-1β, Il-6, E-selectin, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and collagen type 1 were lower in the CPE group compared with the vehicle group. The mRNA expressions of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase (Nox)2 and Nox4 were increased in the vehicle-treated EAM hearts, although CPE treatment did not significantly suppress the transcription levels. However, compared with vehicle treatment of EAM hearts, CPE treatment significantly suppressed hydrogen peroxide concentrations. Cardiac myeloperoxidase activity, the intensity of dihydroethidium staining and the phosphorylation of nuclear factor-κB p65 were also lower in the CPE group compared with the vehicle group. Our data suggest that CPE ameliorates EAM in mice. CPE is a promising dietary supplement to suppress cardiovascular inflammation and oxidative stress.

  14. Antibodies to actin in autoimmune haemolytic anaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritzmann Mathias

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In autoimmune haemolytic anaemia (AIHA, autoreactive antibodies directed against red blood cells are up-regulated, leading to erythrocyte death. Mycoplasma suis infections in pigs induce AIHA of both the warm and cold types. The aim of this study was to identify the target autoantigens of warm autoreactive IgG antibodies. Sera from experimentally M. suis-infected pigs were screened for autoreactivity. Results Actin-reactive antibodies were found in the sera of 95% of all animals tested. The reactivity was species-specific, i.e. reactivity with porcine actin was significantly higher than with rabbit actin. Sera of animals previously immunised with the M. suis adhesion protein MSG1 showed reactivity with actin prior to infection with M. suis indicating that molecular mimicry is involved in the specific autoreactive mechanism. A potentially cross-reactive epitope was detected. Conclusions This is the first report of autoreactive anti-actin antibodies involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune haemolytic anaemia.

  15. Regulatory dendritic cells in autoimmunity: A comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Juan; Cao, Xuetao

    2015-09-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen-presenting cells (APC) with significant phenotypic heterogeneity and functional plasticity. DCs play crucial roles in initiating effective adaptive immune responses for elimination of invading pathogens and also in inducing immune tolerance toward harmless components to maintain immune homeostasis. The regulatory capacity of DCs depends on their immature state and distinct subsets, yet not restricted to the immature state and one specialized subset. The tolerogenicity of DC is controlled by a complex network of environmental signals and cellular intrinsic mechanisms. Regulatory DCs play an important role in the maintenance of immunological tolerance via the induction of T cell unresponsiveness or apoptosis, and generation of regulatory T cells. DCs play essential roles in driving autoimmunity via promoting the activation of effector T cells such as T helper 1 and T helper 17 cells, and/or suppressing the generation of regulatory T cells. Besides, a breakdown of DCs-mediated tolerance due to abnormal environmental signals or breakdown of intrinsic regulatory mechanisms is closely linked with the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. Novel immunotherapy taking advantage of the tolerogenic potential of regulatory DCs is being developed for treatment of autoimmune diseases. In this review, we will describe the current understanding on the generation of regulatory DC and the role of regulatory DCs in promoting tolerogenic immune responses and suppressing autoimmune responses. The emerging roles of DCs dysfunction in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases and the potential application of regulatory DCs in the treatment of autoimmune diseases will also be discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Rebooting autoimmunity with autologous HSCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowden, John A

    2016-01-07

    Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is increasingly used for severe autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, but the mechanisms involved have yet to be elucidated. In this issue of Blood, Delemarre et al report their findings in both animal and human models which provide insights into restoration of functionality and diversity within the regulatory T-cell (Treg) compartment following HSCT.

  17. Vitiligo and Autoimmune Thyroid Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enke Baldini

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Vitiligo represents the most common cause of acquired skin, hair, and oral depigmentation, affecting 0.5–1% of the population worldwide. It is clinically characterized by the appearance of disfiguring circumscribed skin macules following melanocyte destruction by autoreactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Patients affected by vitiligo usually show a poorer quality of life and are more likely to suffer from depressive symptoms, particularly evident in dark-skinned individuals. Although vitiligo is a non-fatal disease, exposure of affected skin to UV light increases the chance of skin irritation and predisposes to skin cancer. In addition, vitiligo has been associated with other rare systemic disorders due to the presence of melanocytes in other body districts, such as in eyes, auditory, nervous, and cardiac tissues, where melanocytes are thought to have roles different from that played in the skin. Several pathogenetic models have been proposed to explain vitiligo onset and progression, but clinical and experimental findings point mainly to the autoimmune hypothesis as the most qualified one. In this context, it is of relevance the strong association of vitiligo with other autoimmune diseases, in particular with autoimmune thyroid disorders, such as Hashimoto thyroiditis and Graves’ disease. In this review, after a brief overview of vitiligo and its pathogenesis, we will describe the clinical association between vitiligo and autoimmune thyroid disorders and discuss the possible underlying molecular mechanism(s.

  18. Polyglandular autoimmune syndrome type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proust-Lemoine, Emmanuelle; Saugier-Veber, Pascale; Wémeau, Jean-Louis

    2012-12-01

    Polyglandular Autoimmune Syndrom type 1 (PAS-1) or Autoimmune PolyEndocrinopathy Candidiasis-Ectodermal-Dystrophy (APECED) is a rare recessive autosomal disease related to Autoimmune Regulator (AIRE) gene mutations. AIRE is mainly implicated in central and peripheric immune tolerance. Diagnosis was classically based on presence of at least two out of three "majors" criterions of Whitaker's triad (candidiasis, autoimmune hypoparathyroidism and adrenal insufficiency). Presence of one criterion was sufficient when a sibling was previously diagnosed. However, some atypic or poorly symptomatic variants do not correspond to these criterions. As a matter of fact, digestive (malabsorption, pernicious anemia, hepatitis), cutaneous (alopecia, vitiligo, enamel dysplasia) or ophtalmological (keratitis) components could prevail. In these cases, diagnosis could be made by molecular genetics. Prognosis is influenced by genetic (AIRE mutations, HLA), hormonal and environmental (infections) factors. Potentially letal components (hepatitis and severe malabsorption) could be treated by immunosuppressors. Candidiasis and other infections should be carefully screened and treated before beginning those therapies, in order to avoid severe systemic infections. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Leaky gut and autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasano, Alessio

    2012-02-01

    Autoimmune diseases are characterized by tissue damage and loss of function due to an immune response that is directed against specific organs. This review is focused on the role of impaired intestinal barrier function on autoimmune pathogenesis. Together with the gut-associated lymphoid tissue and the neuroendocrine network, the intestinal epithelial barrier, with its intercellular tight junctions, controls the equilibrium between tolerance and immunity to non-self antigens. Zonulin is the only physiologic modulator of intercellular tight junctions described so far that is involved in trafficking of macromolecules and, therefore, in tolerance/immune response balance. When the zonulin pathway is deregulated in genetically susceptible individuals, autoimmune disorders can occur. This new paradigm subverts traditional theories underlying the development of these diseases and suggests that these processes can be arrested if the interplay between genes and environmental triggers is prevented by re-establishing the zonulin-dependent intestinal barrier function. Both animal models and recent clinical evidence support this new paradigm and provide the rationale for innovative approaches to prevent and treat autoimmune diseases.

  20. Hemophagocytosis in Cutaneous Autoimmune Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerl, Katrin; Wolf, Ingrid H; Cerroni, Lorenzo; Wolf, Peter; French, Lars E; Kerl, Helmut

    2015-07-01

    The significance of the histological visualization of hemophagocytosis in tissues depends on the context, varying from a nonspecific phenomenon to a characteristic or diagnostic feature for certain disease entities. Hemophagocytosis is also one of the key features of macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) (hemophagocytic syndrome) a potentially life-threatening complication of underlying conditions such as infections, malignancy, and autoimmune disorders. Clinical manifestations of MAS are high fever, pancytopenia, liver dysfunction, and coagulopathy. These clinical symptoms are due to an abnormal activation of the immune system in a strong association with the cytokine milieu. The diagnosis of MAS may be easily missed; it is usually detected in the bone marrow, lymph node, liver, and spleen. Only few reports exist in the literature with histological description of cutaneous hemophagocytosis as a sign for MAS in patients with lymphoma and infection. In this report, the authors present the clinicopathological and immunohistochemical features of 3 patients with cutaneous hemophagocytosis, specifically erythrophagocytosis, associated with autoimmune disease, and discuss the relevance of these findings. The authors report 3 patients who developed cutaneous hemophagocytosis during the course of an underlying autoimmune disorder. One patient suffered from dermatomyositis, the other 2 patients from systemic lupus erythematosus, whereby one of them was a 3-month old girl with neonatal lupus erythematosus. The patient with dermatomyositis developed MAS according to the current diagnostic criteria. Although the 2 other patients had an acute flare of their autoimmune disease with histological signs of cutaneous hemophagocytosis, they did not fulfill the complete criteria for a diagnosis of MAS. Histiocyte proliferation and activation with increase of cytokines could be demonstrated by immunohistology. This report is the first to describe hemophagocytosis in cutaneous biopsies

  1. [Type 2 autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes (APS-2)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vialettes, Bernard; Dubois-Leonardon, Noémie

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes (APS-2) are the most frequent disorders associating several organ-specific autoimmune diseases. Their high prevalence is due to the fact that the main manifestations of APS-2, such as thyroidal autoimmunity, type 1 diabetes, autoimmune gastric atrophy and vitiligo, are common diseases. APS-2 represents a clinical model that can serve to help unravel the mechanisms underlying autoimmunity. Diagnosis of APS-2 is a challenge for the clinician, especially in poorly symptomatic forms, and may require systematic screening based on measurement of autoantibodies and functional markers.

  2. Mechanism of action and efficacy of RX-111, a thieno[2,3-c]pyridine derivative and small molecule inhibitor of protein interaction with glycosaminoglycans (SMIGs), in delayed-type hypersensitivity, TNBS-induced colitis and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Harris, N.; Koppel, J.; Zsila, F.; Juhás, Štefan; Ilková, G.; Kogan, F. Y.; Lahmy, O.; Wildbaum, G.; Karin, N.; Zhuk, R.; Gregor, P.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 65, č. 4 (2016), s. 285-294 ISSN 1023-3830 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : small molecule drug * glycosaminoglycan * heparin binding protein * heparan sulfate * inflammation * autoimmune disease Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.659, year: 2016

  3. N-Acetylcysteine protects against trichloroethene-mediated autoimmunity by attenuating oxidative stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Gangduo; Wang, Jianling; Ma, Huaxian; Ansari, G.A.S.; Khan, M. Firoze, E-mail: mfkhan@utmb.edu

    2013-11-15

    Exposure to trichloroethene (TCE), a ubiquitous environmental contaminant, is known to induce autoimmunity both in humans and animal models. However, mechanisms underlying TCE-mediated autoimmunity remain largely unknown. Previous studies from our laboratory in MRL +/+ mice suggest that oxidative stress may contribute to TCE-induced autoimmune response. The current study was undertaken to further assess the role of oxidative stress in TCE-induced autoimmunity by supplementing with an antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Groups of female MRL +/+ mice were given TCE, NAC or TCE + NAC for 6 weeks (TCE, 10 mmol/kg, i.p., every 4th day; NAC, 250 mg/kg/day through drinking water). TCE exposure led to significant increases in serum levels of anti-nuclear, anti-dsDNA and anti-Sm antibodies. TCE exposure also led to significant induction of anti-malondiadelhyde (MDA)- and anti-hydroxynonenal (HNE)-protein adduct antibodies which were associated with increased ANA in the sera along with increased MDA-/HNE-protein adducts in the livers and kidneys, and increases in protein oxidation (carbonylation) in the sera, livers and kidneys, suggesting an overall increase in oxidative stress. Moreover, TCE exposure also resulted in increased release of IL-17 from splenocytes and increases in IL-17 mRNA expression. Remarkably, NAC supplementation attenuated not only the TCE-induced oxidative stress, IL-17 release and mRNA expression, but also the markers of autoimmunity, as evident from decreased levels of ANA, anti-dsDNA and anti-Sm antibodies in the sera. These results provide further support to a role of oxidative stress in TCE-induced autoimmune response. Attenuation of TCE-induced autoimmunity in mice by NAC provides an approach for preventive and/or therapeutic strategies. - Highlights: • TCE led to increased autoantibodies, supporting its potential to induce autoimmunity. • TCE exposure led to increases in lipid perioxidation and protein carbonyls. • TCE exposure resulted in

  4. Diminished regulatory T cells in cutaneous lesions of thymoma-associated multi-organ autoimmunity: a newly described paraneoplastic autoimmune disorder with fatal clinical course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanafusa, T; Azukizawa, H; Kitaba, S; Murota, H; Umegaki, N; Terao, M; Sano, S; Nakagiri, T; Okumura, M; Katayama, I

    2011-01-01

    Thymoma-associated multi-organ autoimmunity is a rare, autoimmune disease that causes colitis, liver dysfunction and cutaneous graft-versus-host (GVH)-like skin damage. This paraneoplastic autoimmune disorder may be due to inadequate T cell selection in the tumour environment of the thymus. Although sporadic case reports have revealed its clinical features, little is known about its pathological mechanism. By comparing the skin-infiltrating T cell subsets with those of GVH disease (GVHD) and other inflammatory skin diseases, we sought to elucidate the pathological mechanism of thymoma-associated multi-organ autoimmunity. Histopathological and immunohistochemical analysis of skin biopsies was performed for three patients with thymoma-associated multi-organ autoimmunity. Histopathological findings of thymoma-associated multi-organ autoimmunity were indistinguishable from those of patients with acute GVHD, although the aetiologies of these diseases are completely different. The frequency of regulatory T cells (Tregs) is reduced in cutaneous lesions and CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes that massively infiltrate into the epidermis of patients with thymoma-associated multi-organ autoimmunity. Additionally, the ratio of T helper type 17 (Th17) cells to CD4+ cells in patients with thymoma-associated multi-organ autoimmunity and acute GVHD was higher than that in healthy controls, but similar to that in psoriasis vulgaris patients. Similarity of the skin-infiltrating T cell subsets with those of acute GVHD suggested that skin damage in patients with thymoma-associated multi-organ autoimmunity might be induced by self-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes under the diminished suppressive capacity of Tregs. PMID:21985362

  5. The role of the autoimmunity laboratory in autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SS Hasson

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory testing is of great value when evaluating a patient with a suspected autoimmune disease. The results can confirm a diagnosis, estimate disease severity, aid in assessing prognosis and are useful to follow disease activity. Components of the laboratory exam include complete blood count with differential, comprehensive metabolic panel, inflammatory markers, autoantibodies, and flow cytometry. Currently, autoimmunity laboratories are very vibrant owing to the constant and increasing availability of new tests, mainly due to the detection of new autoantibodies. The main characteristic that differentiates the autoimmunity laboratory from other laboratories is the use of immunoassays such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, as basic techniques which determines antibodies (autoantibodies and not antigens. For this reason, immunoassay techniques must employ antigens as reagents. However, over the last few years, a significant trend at autoimmunity laboratories has been the gradual replacement of immunofluorescence microscopy by immunoassay. Nowadays the revolution of new technology has taken place significantly, for examples; recombinant DNA technology has allowed the production of large quantities of antigens for autoantibody analysis. Flow cytometry for the analysis of microsphere-based immunoassays allows the simultaneous measurement of several autoantibodies. In the same way, autoantigen microarrays provide a practical means to analyse biological fluids in the search for a high number of autoantibodies. We are now at the beginning of an era of multiplexed analysis, with a high capacity of autoantibody specificities. The future tendency in this field will include immunoassays with greater analytical sensitivity, specificity, simultaneous multiplexed capability, the use of protein microarrays, and the use of other technologies such as microfluidics.

  6. Autoimmunity in dengue pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Wen Wan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue is one of the most important vector-borne viral diseases. With climate change and the convenience of travel, dengue is spreading beyond its usual tropical and subtropical boundaries. Infection with dengue virus (DENV causes diseases ranging widely in severity, from self-limited dengue fever to life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. Vascular leakage, thrombocytopenia, and hemorrhage are the major clinical manifestations associated with severe DENV infection, yet the mechanisms remain unclear. Besides the direct effects of the virus, immunopathogenesis is also involved in the development of dengue disease. Antibody-dependent enhancement increases the efficiency of virus infection and may suppress type I interferon-mediated antiviral responses. Aberrant activation of T cells and overproduction of soluble factors cause an increase in vascular permeability. DENV-induced autoantibodies against endothelial cells, platelets, and coagulatory molecules lead to their abnormal activation or dysfunction. Molecular mimicry between DENV proteins and host proteins may explain the cross-reactivity of DENV-induced autoantibodies. Although no licensed dengue vaccine is yet available, several vaccine candidates are under development. For the development of a safe and effective dengue vaccine, the immunopathogenic complications of dengue disease need to be considered.

  7. Modeling toxicodynamic effects of trichloroethylene on liver in mouse model of autoimmune hepatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Gilbert, Kathleen M.; Reisfeld, Brad; Zurlinden, Todd; Kreps, Meagan N.; Erickson, Stephen W.; Blossom, Sarah J.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic exposure to industrial solvent and water pollutant trichloroethylene (TCE) in female MRL+/+ mice generates disease similar to human autoimmune hepatitis. The current study was initiated to investigate why TCE-induced autoimmunity targeted the liver. Compared to other tissues the liver has an unusually robust capacity for repair and regeneration. This investigation examined both time-dependent and dose-dependent effects of TCE on hepatoprotective and pro-inflammatory events in liver an...

  8. Immunomodulation of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by helminth ova immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewell, Diane; Qing, Zhu; Reinke, Emily; Elliot, David; Weinstock, Joel; Sandor, Matyas; Fabry, Zsuzsa

    2003-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an animal model for multiple sclerosis (MS) characterized by chronic inflammatory demyelination of the central nervous system (CNS). The pathology of EAE involves autoimmune CD4(+) T(h)1 cells. There is a striking inverse correlation between the occurrence of parasitic and autoimmune diseases. We demonstrate that in mice with Schistosoma mansoni ova immunization, the severity of EAE is reduced as measured by decreased clinical scores and CNS cellular infiltrates. Disease suppression is associated with immune deviation in the periphery and the CNS, demonstrated by decreased IFN-gamma and increased IL-4, transforming growth factor-beta and IL-10 levels in the periphery, and increased frequency of IL-4 producing neuroantigen-specific T cells in the brain. S. mansoni helminth ova treatment influenced the course of EAE in wild-type mice, but not in STAT6-deficient animals. This indicates that STAT6 plays a critical role in regulating the ameliorating effect of S. mansoni ova treatment on the autoimmune response, and provides the direct link between helminth treatment, T(h)2 environment and improved EAE. As some intestinal helminthic infections induce minimal pathology, they might offer a safe and inexpensive therapy to prevent and/or ameliorate MS.

  9. Association of autoimmune hepatitis and multiple sclerosis: a coincidence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Sofia Mendes Oliveira

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune hepatitis is a chronic liver inflammation resulting from deregulation of immune tolerance mechanisms. Multiple sclerosis is also an inflammatory disease in which the insulating covers of nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord are damaged. Here we present a case of an 18 year old female with multiple sclerosis was treated with glatiramer acetate and with interferon beta 1a at our hospital. Seven months after initiating treatment, liver dysfunction occurred. Clinical and laboratory findings were suggestive of drug-induced hepatitis, which led to discontinuation of treatment with interferon. Facing a new episode of acute hepatitis one year later, she was subjected to a liver biopsy, and the analysis of autoantibodies was positive for smooth muscle antibodies. Given the diagnosis of autoimmune hepatitis she started therapy with prednisolone and azathioprine, with good clinical and analytical response. Besides, the demyelinating lesions of multiple sclerosis became lower. In conclusion, there are only a few cases that describe the association of autoimmune hepatitis with multiple sclerosis, and there is a chance both diseases have the same autoimmune inflammatory origin.

  10. Dysregulation of T lymphocyte proliferative responses in autoimmunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sydney K Elizer

    Full Text Available T cells are critically dependent on cellular proliferation in order to carry out their effector functions. Autoimmune strains are commonly thought to have uncontrolled T cell proliferation; however, in the murine model of autoimmune diabetes, hypo-proliferation of T cells leading to defective AICD was previously uncovered. We now determine whether lupus prone murine strains are similarly hyporesponsive. Upon extensive characterization of T lymphocyte activation, we have observed a common feature of CD4 T cell activation shared among three autoimmune strains-NOD, MRL, and NZBxNZW F1s. When stimulated with a polyclonal mitogen, CD4 T cells demonstrate arrested cell division and diminished dose responsiveness as compared to the non-autoimmune strain C57BL/6, a phenotype we further traced to a reliance on B cell mediated costimulation, which underscores the success of B cell directed immune therapies in preventing T cell mediated tissue injury. In turn, the diminished proliferative capacity of these CD4 T cells lead to a decreased, but activation appropriate, susceptibility to activation induced cell death. A similar decrement in stimulation response was observed in the CD8 compartment of NOD mice; NOD CD8 T cells were distinguished from lupus prone strains by a diminished dose-responsiveness to anti-CD3 mediated stimulation. This distinction may explain the differential pathogenetic pathways activated in diabetes and lupus prone murine strains.

  11. Management strategies for autoimmune pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamisawa, Terumi; Takuma, Kensuke; Hara, Seiichi; Tabata, Taku; Kuruma, Sawako; Inaba, Yoshihiko; Gopalakrishna, Rajesh; Egawa, Naoto; Itokawa, Fumihide; Itoi, Takao

    2011-10-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a newly developed concept for a peculiar type of pancreatitis, and at present is recognized as a pancreatic lesion reflecting IgG4-related systemic disease. It is of utmost importance to differentiate AIP from pancreatic cancer to avoid unnecessary surgery. The current management strategies for AIP, including its clinical features, diagnostic criteria, clinical subtypes, steroid therapy and prognosis are discussed, based on our 66 AIP cases and papers searched in PubMed from 1992 to March 2011, using the term 'autoimmune pancreatitis'. A new clinicopathological entity, an 'IgG4-related sclerosing disease' is also mentioned. AIP should be considered in the differential diagnosis in elderly male patients presented with obstructive jaundice and pancreatic mass. Steroids are a standard therapy for AIP, but their regimen including maintenance therapy should be evaluated in prospective trials.

  12. [Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollak, Felipe; Vásquez, Tatiana

    2012-11-01

    Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults (LADA) is the term used to describe adults who have a slowly progressive form of diabetes mellitus (DM) of autoimmune etiology, but that may be treated initially without insulin. Although it shares some immunological and genetic aspects with type 1 DM, it affects an age group that is typically affected by type 2 DM. Therefore, it could be considered an intermediate type. Diagnosis is based on clinical and laboratory criteria: age of onset, initial response to oral hypoglycemic agents and the presence of specific antibodies for diabetes. Although the definitive treatment is insulin, glitazones may be useful in early stages of the disease. Currently, its management represents a challenge for the physician, including specialists, and it is a form of DM to keep in mind.

  13. Autoimmune encephalitis and sleep disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan HUANG

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Research shows that autoimmune encephalitis is associated with sleep disorders. Paraneoplastic neurological syndrome (PNS with Ma2 antibodies can cause sleep disorders, particularly narcolepsy and rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD. Limbic encephalitis (LE and Morvan syndrome, associated with voltage - gated potassium channel (VGKC-complex antibodies, which include leucine-rich glioma-inactivated 1 (LGI1 antibody and contactin-associated protein 2 (Caspr2, can result in profound insomnia and other sleep disorders. Central neurogenic hypoventilation are found in patients with anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor encephalitis, whereas obstructive sleep apnea (OSA, stridor and parasomnia are prominent features of encephalopathy associated with IgLON5 antibodies. Sleep disorders are cardinal manifestations in patients with autoimmune encephalitis. Immunotherapy possiblely can improve clinical symptoms and prognosis in a positive way. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2017.10.004

  14. Vitamin D in autoimmune liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyk, Daniel S; Orfanidou, Timoklia; Invernizzi, Pietro; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P; Lenzi, Marco

    2013-11-01

    The development of autoimmune disease is based on the interaction of genetic susceptibility and environmental causes. Environmental factors include infectious and non-infectious agents, with some of these factors being implicated in several autoimmune diseases. Vitamin D is now believed to play a role in the development (or prevention) of several autoimmune diseases, based on its immunomodulatory properties. As well, the increasing incidence of autoimmune disease as one moves away from the equator, may be due to the lack of sunlight, which is crucial for the maintenance of normal vitamin D levels. A deficiency in vitamin D levels or vitamin D receptors is commonly indicated in autoimmune diseases, with multiple sclerosis (MS) being one of the best-studied and well-known examples. However, the role of vitamin D in other autoimmune diseases is not well defined, including autoimmune liver diseases such as primary biliary cirrhosis, autoimmune hepatitis, and primary sclerosing cholangitis. This review will examine the role of vitamin D as an immunomodulator, followed by a comparison of vitamin D in MS versus autoimmune liver disease. From this comparison, it will become clear that vitamin D likely plays a role in the development of autoimmune liver disease, but this area requires further investigation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Helminth Immunomodulation in Autoimmune Disease

    OpenAIRE

    John J. Miles; John J. Miles; John J. Miles; John J. Miles; Taylor B. Smallwood; Paul R. Giacomin; Alex Loukas; Jason P. Mulvenna; Jason P. Mulvenna; Jason P. Mulvenna; Richard J. Clark

    2017-01-01

    Helminths have evolved to become experts at subverting immune surveillance. Through potent and persistent immune tempering, helminths can remain undetected in human tissues for decades. Redirecting the immunomodulating “talents” of helminths to treat inflammatory human diseases is receiving intensive interest. Here, we review therapies using live parasitic worms, worm secretions, and worm-derived synthetic molecules to treat autoimmune disease. We review helminth therapy in both mouse models ...

  16. Autoimmune diseases and reproductive aging

    OpenAIRE

    Bove, Riley

    2013-01-01

    As the population ages, more individuals with autoimmune diseases are experiencing reproductive senescence. Understanding the impact of menopause and age-related androgen decline on disease onset and course, as well as the potential for hormonal interventions, is critically important. In men, lupus erythematosis (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and multiple sclerosis (MS) are associated with lower androgen levels. However, the impact of age-related declines in testosterone, as well as of tes...

  17. Autoimmune Thyroiditis and Myasthenia Gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Lopomo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases (AIDs are the result of specific immune responses directed against structures of the self. In normal conditions, the molecules recognized as “self” are tolerated by immune system, but when the self-tolerance is lost, the immune system could react against molecules from the body, causing the loss of self-tolerance, and subsequently the onset of AID that differs for organ target and etiology. Autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD is caused by the development of autoimmunity against thyroid antigens and comprises Hashimoto’s thyroiditis and Graves disease. They are frequently associated with other organ or non-organ specific AIDs, such as myasthenia gravis (MG. In fact, ATD seems to be the most associated pathology to MG. The etiology of both diseases is multifactorial and it is due to genetic and environmental factors, and each of them has specific characteristics. The two pathologies show many commonalities, such as the organ-specificity with a clear pathogenic effect of antibodies, the pathological mechanisms, such as deregulation of the immune system and the implication of the genetic predisposition. They also show some differences, such as the mode of action of the antibodies and therapies. In this review that focuses on ATD and MG, the common features and the differences between the two diseases are discussed.

  18. Vitamin D and autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Potrokhova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The review discusses the effect of vitamin D on the tolerogenic modulation of an immune response, its relationship to cells of the monocyte-macrophage series, including dendritic cells, monocytes, and macrophages, in the context of the impact of the expression of anti-inflammatory proinflammatory cytokines in some autoimmune diseases (rheumatoid arthritis, systemic scleroderma, multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes mellitus, systemic lupus erythematosus, and Crohn`s disease. It discusses the role of vitamin D in the development of innate and adaptive immunity. Despite some conflicting evidence, the immune regulatory function of vitamin D is generally directed toward inhibition of the components of innate and acquired immunity, which are responsible for the induction of autoimmune reactions; in this connection there are a growing number of publications devoted to the issues of vitamin D supplementation in patients with autoimmune diseases, the preventive effect of vitamin D intake on the risk of an abnormality and that of therapeutic doses of the vitamin on its course. The maintenance of the threshold value for serum 25(OHD3 at least 30 ng/ml, which is achieved by the intake of about 2000 IU of vitamin D, is shown to be required for its immune regulatory function. The data given raise the question as to whether it is necessity to revise the Russian recommended daily dietary allowances for vitamin D through its infant food fortification.

  19. Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome and thrombocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atquet, V; Lienart, F; Vaes, M

    2015-12-01

    We describe a woman aged 37  years, affected with Hashimoto's thyroiditis, detected since the age of 17, with gonadic insufficiency with anti-ovarian antibodies since the age of 22  years and Addison's disease since 24  years old. At that moment, the diagnosis of autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome (APS) was made. Concomitant to this diagnosis, thrombocytosis was detected and aetiological assessment revealed an atrophy of the spleen. Differential diagnoses of APS and hyposplenism will be discussed. We will look at a possible association between these two pathologies. Indeed, asplenism is found in approximately 20% of adults affected by type 1 APS, also called auto-immune polyendocrinopathy candidiasis ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) syndrome. The most likely aetiology for this atrophy of the spleen is a destruction of auto-immunological origin. However, in our patient, the search for a mutation of the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene proved negative. This mutation is commonly, but not systematically, present in type 1 APS. A type 2 APS should then be considered.

  20. Stochastic Effects in Autoimmune Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Fatehi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Among various possible causes of autoimmune disease, an important role is played by infections that can result in a breakdown of immune tolerance, primarily through the mechanism of “molecular mimicry”. In this paper we propose and analyse a stochastic model of immune response to a viral infection and subsequent autoimmunity, with account for the populations of T cells with different activation thresholds, regulatory T cells, and cytokines. We show analytically and numerically how stochasticity can result in sustained oscillations around deterministically stable steady states, and we also investigate stochastic dynamics in the regime of bi-stability. These results provide a possible explanation for experimentally observed variations in the progression of autoimmune disease. Computations of the variance of stochastic fluctuations provide practically important insights into how the size of these fluctuations depends on various biological parameters, and this also gives a headway for comparison with experimental data on variation in the observed numbers of T cells and organ cells affected by infection.

  1. Autoimmune Thyroiditis and Myasthenia Gravis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopomo, Angela; Berrih-Aknin, Sonia

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (AIDs) are the result of specific immune responses directed against structures of the self. In normal conditions, the molecules recognized as “self” are tolerated by immune system, but when the self-tolerance is lost, the immune system could react against molecules from the body, causing the loss of self-tolerance, and subsequently the onset of AID that differs for organ target and etiology. Autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD) is caused by the development of autoimmunity against thyroid antigens and comprises Hashimoto’s thyroiditis and Graves disease. They are frequently associated with other organ or non-organ specific AIDs, such as myasthenia gravis (MG). In fact, ATD seems to be the most associated pathology to MG. The etiology of both diseases is multifactorial and it is due to genetic and environmental factors, and each of them has specific characteristics. The two pathologies show many commonalities, such as the organ-specificity with a clear pathogenic effect of antibodies, the pathological mechanisms, such as deregulation of the immune system and the implication of the genetic predisposition. They also show some differences, such as the mode of action of the antibodies and therapies. In this review that focuses on ATD and MG, the common features and the differences between the two diseases are discussed. PMID:28751878

  2. Human Cytomegalovirus and Autoimmune Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) represents a prototypic pathogenic member of the β-subgroup of the herpesvirus family. A range of HCMV features like its lytic replication in multiple tissues, the lifelong persistence through periods of latency and intermitting reactivation, the extraordinary large proteome, and extensive manipulation of adaptive and innate immunity make HCMV a high profile candidate for involvement in autoimmune disorders. We surveyed the available literature for reports on HCMV association with onset or exacerbation of autoimmune disease. A causative linkage between HCMV and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), systemic sclerosis (SSc), diabetes mellitus type 1, and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is suggested by the literature. However, a clear association of HCMV seroprevalence and disease could not be established, leaving the question open whether HCMV could play a coresponsible role for onset of disease. For convincing conclusions population-based prospective studies must be performed in the future. Specific immunopathogenic mechanisms by which HCMV could contribute to the course of autoimmune disease have been suggested, for example, molecular mimicry by UL94 in SSc and UL83/pp65 in SLE patients, as well as aggravation of joint inflammation by induction and expansion of CD4+/CD28− T-cells in RA patients. Further studies are needed to validate these findings and to lay the grounds for targeted therapeutic intervention. PMID:24967373

  3. Right-handed and left-handed G-quadruplexes have the same DNA sequence: distinct conformations induced by an organic small molecule and potassium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Boshi; Huang, Jinguo; Chen, Yuqi; Wang, Yafen; Xue, Tianrui; Xu, GuoHua; Wang, Shaoru; Zhou, Xiang

    2016-08-21

    Herein, we report two distinct G-quadruplex conformations of the same G-rich oligonucleotide, regulated by a small molecule. This is the first report in which both right- and left-handed G-quadruplex conformations have been obtained from the same sequence. We discriminated these two distinct conformations and investigated their kinetics and thermodynamics.

  4. Epigenetics as biomarkers in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haijing; Liao, Jieyue; Li, Qianwen; Yang, Ming; Zhao, Ming; Lu, Qianjin

    2018-03-21

    Autoimmune diseases are immune system disorders in which immune cells cannot distinguish self-antigens from foreign ones. The current criteria for autoimmune disease diagnosis are based on clinical manifestations and laboratory tests. However, none of these markers shows both high sensitivity and specificity. In addition, some autoimmune diseases, for example, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), are highly heterogeneous and often exhibit various manifestations. On the other hand, certain autoimmune diseases, such as Sjogren's syndrome versus SLE, share similar symptoms and autoantibodies, which also causes difficulties in diagnosis. Therefore, biomarkers that have both high sensitivity and high specificity for diagnosis, reflect disease activity and predict drug response are necessary. An increasing number of publications have proposed the abnormal epigenetic modifications as biomarkers of autoimmune diseases. Therefore, this review will comprehensively summarize the epigenetic progress in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disorders and unearth potential biomarkers that might be appropriate for disease diagnosis and prediction. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Autoimmune diseases in adults with atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Yuki M F; Egeberg, Alexander; Gislason, Gunnar H.

    2017-01-01

    Background: An increased susceptibility to autoimmune disease has been shown in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD), but data remain scarce and inconsistent. Objective: We examined the co-occurrence of selected autoimmune diseases in adult patients with AD. Methods: Nationwide health registers...... were used. Adult patients with a hospital diagnosis of AD in Denmark between 1997 and 2012 were included as cases (n = 8112) and matched with controls (n = 40,560). The occurrence of autoimmune diseases was compared in the 2 groups. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios. Results: AD...... was significantly associated with 11 of 22 examined autoimmune diseases. In addition, AD was associated with having multiple autoimmune comorbidities. Patients with a history of smoking had a significantly higher occurrence of autoimmune comorbidities compared to nonsmokers. Limitations: This study was limited...

  6. [Pulmonary arterial hypertension: a flavor of autoimmunity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perros, Frédéric; Humbert, Marc; Cohen-Kaminsky, Sylvia

    2013-01-01

    It is admitted that autoimmunity results from a combination of risks such as genetic background, environmental triggers, and stochastic events. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) shares with the so-called prototypic autoimmune diseases, genetic risk factors, female predominance and sex hormone influence, association with other chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, defects in regulatory T cells function, and presence of autoantibodies. Case reports have been published indicating the beneficial effect of some immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory therapies in PAH, supporting the potential role of immune mechanisms in the pathophysiology of the disease. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge on autoimmune mechanisms operating in PAH, especially mounting a local autoimmune response inside the pulmonary tissue, namely pulmonary lymphoid neogenesis. A better understanding of the role of autoimmunity in pulmonary vascular remodelling may help develop targeted immunomodulatory strategies in PAH. © 2013 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  7. Microbiota and Autoimmunity: exploring new avenues

    OpenAIRE

    Yurkovetskiy, Leonid; Pickard, Joseph M.; Chervonsky, Alexander V.

    2015-01-01

    Given the recognized role of the commensal microbiota in regulating host immunity to pathogens, it is not surprising that microbiota are also capable of regulating autoimmune responses. The underlying mechanisms of autoimmune regulation by the microbiota are just beginning to emerge. Here, we discuss possible pressure points towards the development of autoimmune diseases that can be influenced by the microbiota. Besides acting on the adaptive and innate arms of the immune response, the microb...

  8. Severe autoimmune hemolytic anemia with renal neoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Emily C; Parikh, Sahil P; Bhattacharyya, Nishith

    2014-02-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a type of hemolytic anemia characterized by autoantibodies directed against red blood cells shortening their survival. When autoimmune hemolytic anemia is secondary to a paraneoplastic process, severe anemia can occur leading to significant morbidity and even mortality. Here we discuss the literature and present the case of a child with autoimmune hemolytic anemia from a paraneoplastic syndrome secondary to a renal tumor.

  9. Recurrent Oral Inflammation in Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Pac, Malgorzata; Olczak-Kowalczyk, Dorota; Wolska-Kuśnierz, Beata; Piątosa, Barbara; Górska, Renata; Bernatowska, Ewa

    2014-01-01

    Abstract   Background and aim: Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a disorder of abnormal lymphocyte survival caused by dysregulation of the Fas apoptotic pathway. In ALPS defective lymphocyte apoptosis manifests as a chronic, nonmalignant lymphadenopathy and/or splenomegaly/hepatosplenomegaly, expansion of double negative T cell (DNTC) – CD4-CD8-TCRαβ+ T cells, autoimmune cytopenias and other autoimmune diseases.  Patients demonstrate oral lesions which have not yet been repo...

  10. Role of Complement in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Berentsen, Sigbj?rn

    2015-01-01

    Summary The classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemias and the complement system are reviewed. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm antibody type, complement-mediated cell lysis is clinically relevant in a proportion of the patients but is hardly essential for hemolysis in most patients. Cold antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemias (primary cold agglutinin disease, secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) are entirely complement-mediated disorder...

  11. Diagnosing autoimmune pancreatitis with the Unifying-Autoimmune-Pancreatitis-Criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Alexander; Michaely, Henrik; Rückert, Felix; Weiss, Christel; Ströbel, Philipp; Belle, Sebastian; Hirth, Michael; Wilhelm, Torsten J; Haas, Stephan L; Jesenofsky, Ralf; Schönberg, Stefan; Marx, Alexander; Singer, Manfred V; Ebert, Matthias P; Pfützer, Roland H; Löhr, J Matthias

    We had developed the Unifying-Autoimmune-Pancreatitis-Criteria (U-AIP) to diagnose autoimmune pancreatitis (AiP) within the M-ANNHEIM classification of chronic pancreatitis. In 2011, International-Consensus-Diagnostic-Criteria (ICDC) to diagnose AiP have been published. We had applied the U-AIP long before the ICDC were available. The aims of the study were, first, to describe patients with AiP diagnosed by the U-AIP; second, to compare diagnostic accuracies of the U-AIP and other diagnostic systems; third, to evaluate the clinical applicability of the U-AIP. From 1998 until 2008, we identified patients with AiP using U-AIP, Japanese-, Korean-, Asian-, Mayo-HISORt-, Revised-Mayo-HISORt- and Italian-criteria. We retrospectively verified the diagnosis by ICDC and Revised-Japanese-2011-criteria, compared diagnostic accuracies of all systems and evaluated all criteria in consecutive patients with pancreatitis (2009 until 2010, Pancreas-Outpatient-Clinic-Cohort, n = 84). We retrospectively validated our diagnostic approach in consecutive patients with a pancreatic lesion requiring surgery (Surgical-Cohort, n = 98). Overall, we identified 21 patients with AiP. Unifying-Autoimmune-Pancreatitis-Criteria and ICDC presented the highest diagnostic accuracies (each 98.8%), highest Youden indices (each 0.95238), and highest proportions of diagnosed patients (each n = 20/21, U-AIP/ICDC vs. other diagnostic systems, p Pancreatitis-Criteria revealed a satisfactory clinical applicability and offered an additional approach to diagnose AiP. Copyright © 2017 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Role of Respirable Saudi Arabian Sand and Pyridostigmine in the Gulf War syndrome: An Autoimmune Adjuvant Disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sopori, Mohan

    2002-01-01

    In the Lewis rat, inhalation of silica (SL) in realistic doses for 6 wk exacerbated the Mycobacterium- induced autoimmune adjuvant disease and impaired the humoral as well as cellular immune responses...

  13. A new combination of multiple autoimmune syndrome? Coexistence of vitiligo, autoimmune thyroid disease and ulcerative colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firdevs Topal

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of three or more autoimmune disorders in one patient defines multiple autoimmune syndrome. The pathogenesis of multiple autoimmune syndrome is not known yet and environmental triggers and genetic susceptibility have been suggested to be involved. Herein, we report a 47-year-old woman who had Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, vitiligo and newly diagnosed ulcerative colitis. Diagnosis of ulcerative colitis was confirmed with histopathologic examination. This case presents a new combination of multiple autoimmune syndrome.

  14. Dynamic expression profiles of MMPs/TIMPs and collagen deposition in mechanically unloaded rat heart: implications for left ventricular assist device support-induced cardiac alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Xu, Yu-Xian; Du, Xiao-Jie; Sun, Quan-Ge; Tian, Ying-Jun

    2013-09-01

    Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) ameliorate heart failure by reducing preload and afterload. However, extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition after application of LVADs is not clearly defined. The purpose of the present study was to investigate ECM remodeling after mechanical unloading in a rat heart transplant model. Sixty male Lewis rats were subjected to abdominal heterotopic heart transplantation, and the transplanted hearts were pressure- and volume-unloaded. The age- and weight- matched male Lewis rats who had undergone open thoracic surgeries were used as the control. Left ventricle ECM accumulation and the expression/activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases (TIMPs) were measured on the third, seventh, and fourteenth days after transplantation/sham surgery. Compared with the control group, myocardial ECM deposition significantly increased on the seventh and fourteenth days after heart transplantation (P < 0.05) and peaked on the 14th day. The gelatinase activity as well as mRNA expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 significantly increased after transplantation (P < 0.05). Both mRNA and protein levels of TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 significantly increased compared with those of the control group. Mechanical unloading may lead to adverse remodeling of the ECM of the left ventricle. The underlying mechanism may due to the imbalance of the MMP/TIMP system, especially the remarkable upregulation of TIMPs in the pressure and volume unloaded heart.

  15. Phenotypic expression of autoimmune autistic disorder (AAD): a major subset of autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vijendra K

    2009-01-01

    Autism causes incapacitating neurologic problems in children that last a lifetime. The author of this article previously hypothesized that autism may be caused by autoimmunity to the brain, possibly triggered by a viral infection. This article is a summary of laboratory findings to date plus new data in support of an autoimmune pathogenesis for autism. Autoimmune markers were analyzed in the sera of autistic and normal children, but the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of some autistic children was also analyzed. Laboratory procedures included enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and protein immunoblotting assay. Autoimmunity was demonstrated by the presence of brain autoantibodies, abnormal viral serology, brain and viral antibodies in CSF, a positive correlation between brain autoantibodies and viral serology, elevated levels of proinflammatory cytokines and acute-phase reactants, and a positive response to immunotherapy. Many autistic children harbored brain myelin basic protein autoantibodies and elevated levels of antibodies to measles virus and measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine. Measles might be etiologically linked to autism because measles and MMR antibodies (a viral marker) correlated positively to brain autoantibodies (an autoimmune marker)--salient features that characterize autoimmune pathology in autism. Autistic children also showed elevated levels of acute-phase reactants--a marker of systemic inflammation. The scientific evidence is quite credible for our autoimmune hypothesis, leading to the identification of autoimmune autistic disorder (AAD) as a major subset of autism. AAD can be identified by immune tests to determine immune problems before administering immunotherapy. The author has advanced a speculative neuroautoimmune (NAI) model for autism, in which virus-induced autoimmunity is a key player. The latter should be targeted by immunotherapy to help children with autism.

  16. Alterations of the autoimmune regulator transcription factor and failure of central tolerance: APECED as a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Vera; Giardino, Giuliana; Capalbo, Donatella; Palamaro, Loredana; Romano, Rosa; Santamaria, Francesca; Maio, Filomena; Salerno, Mariacarolina; Vajro, Pietro; Pignata, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Self-nonself discrimination plays a key role in inducing a productive immunity and in preventing autoimmune reactions. Central tolerance within the thymus and peripheral tolerance in peripheral lymphoid organs lead to immunologic nonresponsiveness against self-components. The central tolerance represents the mechanism by which T cells binding with high avidity to self-antigens are eliminated through the so-called negative selection. Thymic medullary epithelial cells and medullary dendritic cells play a key role in this process, through the expression of a large number of tissue-specific self-antigens involving the transcription factor autoimmune regulator (AIRE). Mutations of AIRE result in autoimmune polyendocrinopathy candidiasis ectodermal dystrophy, a rare autosomal recessive disease (OMIM 240300), which is the paradigm of a genetically determined failure of central tolerance and autoimmunity. This review focuses on recent advances in the molecular mechanisms of central tolerance, their alterations and clinical implication.

  17. Liver Injury with Features Mimicking Autoimmune Hepatitis following the Use of Black Cohosh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Grace; Kallwitz, Eric R; Wojewoda, Christina; Chennuri, Rohini; Berkes, Jamie; Layden, Thomas J; Cotler, Scott J

    2009-01-01

    There are a growing number of cases detailing acute hepatic necrosis in patients taking black cohosh (Cimicifuga racemosa), an over-the-counter herbal supplement for management of menopausal symptoms. Our aim is to illustrate two cases of liver injury following the use of black cohosh characterized by histopathological features mimicking autoimmune hepatitis. Both patients reported black cohosh use for at least six months and had no evidence of another cause of liver disease. Their liver biopsies showed a component of centrilobular necrosis consistent with severe drug-induced liver injury. In addition, the biopsies showed characteristics of autoimmune-like liver injury with an interface hepatitis dominated by plasma cells. Although serum markers for autoimmune hepatitis were not particularly elevated, both patients responded to corticosteroids, supporting an immune-mediated component to the liver injury. Liver injury following the use of black cohosh should be included in the list of differential diagnoses for chronic hepatitis with features mimicking autoimmune hepatitis.

  18. Immunomodulatory strategies prevent the development of autoimmune emphysema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kraskauskiene Vita

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The presence of anti-endothelial cell antibodies and pathogenic T cells may reflect an autoimmune component in the pathogenesis of emphysema. Whether immune modulatory strategies can protect against the development of emphysema is not known. Methods Sprague Dawley rats were immunized with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC to induce autoimmune emphysema and treated with intrathymic HUVEC-injection and pristane. Measurements of alveolar airspace enlargement, cytokine levels, immuno histochemical, western blot analysis, and T cell repertoire of the lung tissue were performed. Results The immunomodulatory strategies protected lungs against cell death as demonstrated by reduced numbers of TUNEL and active caspase-3 positive cells and reduced levels of active caspase-3, when compared with lungs from HUVEC-immunized rats. Immunomodulatory strategies also suppressed anti-endothelial antibody production and preserved CNTF, IL-1alpha and VEGF levels. The immune deviation effects of the intrathymic HUVEC-injection were associated with an expansion of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells. Pristane treatment decreased the proportion of T cells expressing receptor beta-chain, Vβ16.1 in the lung tissue. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that interventions classically employed to induce central T cell tolerance (thymic inoculation of antigen or to activate innate immune responses (pristane treatment can prevent the development of autoimmune emphysema.

  19. Therapeutic effects of cisplatin on rat experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Bo; Schluesener, Hermann J

    2006-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a prototypic Th1-mediated autoimmune inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS), and serves as a model for the human demyelinating disease, multiple sclerosis. Cisplatin is a drug widely used in the treatment of a variety of human neoplasias, such as advanced bladder carcinoma, adrenal cortex carcinoma, breast cancer, head and neck or lung carcinoma. Cisplatin binds to DNA and interferes with cellular repair and other mechanism, which eventually result into cell death. It is known that cisplatin can induce immunosuppressive effects through inhibition of T cell activity. Therefore we analyzed the anti-inflammatory effects of cisplatin in a rat EAE model. EAE was induced in male LEW rats by immunizing with a synthetic peptide of guinea pig myelin basic protein. The development of EAE and neurological signs were evaluated by a standard protocol. Immunohistochemistry was applied to show immune cell infiltration into the CNS. Early treatment of EAE rats with cisplatin effectively ameliorated the development of disease and provided a significant protective effect compared to control rats. Further, histological analysis demonstrated that the formation of the typical perivascular cuffs and brain infiltration of monocytes and lymphocytes were complete absent in cisplatin treated rats, while abundant T cell infiltration was seen in the CNS of EAE rats. Our data show that cisplatin has protective effects in EAE, indicating that cisplatin could be a candidate in the treatment of human CNS autoimmunity.

  20. Autoimmune atrophic gastritis: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minalyan A

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Artem Minalyan,1 Jihane N Benhammou,1 Aida Artashesyan,1 Michael S Lewis,2 Joseph R Pisegna1 1Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Parenteral Nutrition, 2Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, Los Angeles, CA, USA Abstract: At present there is no universally accepted classification for gastritis. The first successful classification (The Sydney System that is still commonly used by medical professionals was first introduced by Misiewicz et al in Sydney in 1990. In fact, it was the first detailed classification after the discovery of Helicobacter pylori by Warren and Marshall in 1982. In 1994, the Updated Sydney System was proposed during the International Workshop on the Histopathology of Gastritis followed by the publication in The American Journal of Surgical Pathology by Dixon et al. Using the new classification, distinction between atrophic and nonatrophic gastritis was revised, and the visual scale grading was incorporated. According to the Updated Sydney System Classification, atrophic gastritis is categorized into multifocal (H. pylori, environmental factors, specific diet and corpus-predominant (autoimmune. Since metaplasia is a key histological characteristic in patients with atrophic gastritis, it has been recommended to use the word “metaplastic” in both variants of atrophic gastritis: autoimmune metaplastic atrophic gastritis (AMAG and environmental metaplastic atrophic gastritis. Although there are many overlaps in the course of the disease and distinction between those two entities may be challenging, the aim of this review article was to describe the etiology, epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, clinical manifestations and treatment in patients with AMAG. However, it is important to mention that H. pylori is the most common etiologic factor for the development of gastritis in the world. Keywords: autoimmune gastritis, pernicious anemia, gastric carcinoid

  1. Time course and cellular localization of interleukin-10 mRNA and protein expression in autoimmune inflammation of the rat central nervous system.

    OpenAIRE

    Jander, S.; Pohl, J.; D'Urso, D.; Gillen, C.; Stoll, G.

    1998-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis of the Lewis rat is a T-cell-mediated autoimmune disease of the central nervous system characterized by a self-limiting monophasic course. In this study, we analyzed the expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-10 at the mRNA and protein level in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis actively induced with the encephalitogenic 68-86 peptide of guinea pig myelin basic protein. Semiquantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase ch...

  2. Helminth Immunomodulation in Autoimmune Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallwood, Taylor B; Giacomin, Paul R; Loukas, Alex; Mulvenna, Jason P; Clark, Richard J; Miles, John J

    2017-01-01

    Helminths have evolved to become experts at subverting immune surveillance. Through potent and persistent immune tempering, helminths can remain undetected in human tissues for decades. Redirecting the immunomodulating "talents" of helminths to treat inflammatory human diseases is receiving intensive interest. Here, we review therapies using live parasitic worms, worm secretions, and worm-derived synthetic molecules to treat autoimmune disease. We review helminth therapy in both mouse models and clinical trials and discuss what is known on mechanisms of action. We also highlight current progress in characterizing promising new immunomodulatory molecules found in excretory/secretory products of helminths and their potential use as immunotherapies for acute and chronic inflammatory diseases.

  3. Endocrine autoimmune disease: genetics become complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiebolt, Janneke; Koeleman, Bobby P C; van Haeften, Timon W

    2010-12-01

    The endocrine system is a frequent target in pathogenic autoimmune responses. Type 1 diabetes and autoimmune thyroid disease are the prevailing examples. When several diseases cluster together in one individual, the phenomenon is called autoimmune polyglandular syndrome. Progress has been made in understanding the genetic factors involved in endocrine autoimmune diseases. Studies on monogenic autoimmune diseases such as autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1, immunodysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked and primary immune deficiencies helped uncover the role of key regulators in the preservation of immune tolerance. Alleles of the major histocompatibility complex have been known to contribute to the susceptibility to most forms of autoimmunity for more than 3 decades. Furthermore, sequencing studies revealed three non-major histocompatibility complex loci and some disease specific loci, which control T lymphocyte activation or signalling. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have enabled acceleration in the identification of novel (non-HLA) loci and hence other relevant immune response pathways. Interestingly, several loci are shared between autoimmune diseases, and surprisingly some work in opposite direction. This means that the same allele which predisposes to a certain autoimmune disease can be protective in another. Well powered GWAS in type 1 diabetes has led to the uncovering of a significant number of risk variants with modest effect. These studies showed that the innate immune system may also play a role in addition to the adaptive immune system. It is anticipated that next generation sequencing techniques will uncover other (rare) variants. For other autoimmune disease (such as autoimmune thyroid disease) GWAS are clearly needed. © 2010 The Authors. European Journal of Clinical Investigation © 2010 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  4. An Animal Model Using Metallic Ions to Produce Autoimmune Nephritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxana Ramírez-Sandoval

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune nephritis triggered by metallic ions was assessed in a Long-Evans rat model. The parameters evaluated included antinuclear autoantibody production, kidney damage mediated by immune complexes detected by immunofluorescence, and renal function tested by retention of nitrogen waste products and proteinuria. To accomplish our goal, the animals were treated with the following ionic metals: HgCl2, CuSO4, AgNO3, and Pb(NO32. A group without ionic metals was used as the control. The results of the present investigation demonstrated that metallic ions triggered antinuclear antibody production in 60% of animals, some of them with anti-DNA specificity. Furthermore, all animals treated with heavy metals developed toxic glomerulonephritis with immune complex deposition along the mesangium and membranes. These phenomena were accompanied by proteinuria and increased concentrations of urea. Based on these results, we conclude that metallic ions may induce experimental autoimmune nephritis.

  5. Increased polyamines alter chromatin and stabilize autoantigens in autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wesley H. Brooks

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Polyamines are small cations with unique combinations of charge and length that give them many putative interactions in cells. Polyamines are essential since they are involved in replication, transcription, translation, and stabilization of macro-molecular complexes. However, polyamine synthesis competes with cellular methylation for S-adenosylmethionine, the methyl donor. Also, polyamine degradation can generate reactive molecules like acrolein. Therefore, polyamine levels are tightly controlled. This control may be compromised in autoimmune diseases since elevated polyamine levels are seen in autoimmune diseases. Here a hypothesis is presented explaining how polyamines can stabilize autoantigens. In addition, the hypothesis explains how polyamines can inappropriately activate enzymes involved in NETosis, a process in which chromatin is modified and extruded from cells as extracellular traps that bind pathogens during an immune response. This polyamine-induced enzymatic activity can lead to an increase in NETosis resulting in release of autoantigenic material and tissue damage.

  6. Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders without and with autoimmune diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Bingjun; Zhong, Yi; Wang, Yanqiang; Dai, Yongqiang; Qiu, Wei; Zhang, Lei; Li, Haiyan; Lu, Zhengqi

    2014-01-01

    Background Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) can coexist with non-organ-specific or organ-specific autoimmune diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the features between NMOSD without and with autoimmune diseases, and NMOSD with non-organ-specific and organ-specific autoimmune diseases. Methods One hundred and fifty five NMOSD patients without autoimmune diseases (n = 115) and with autoimmune diseases (n = 40) were enrolled. NMOSD with autoimmune diseases ...

  7. Autoimmune regulator (AIRE) contributes to Dectin-1-induced TNF-α production and complexes with caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 9 (CARD9), spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk), and Dectin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedroza, Luis A; Kumar, Vipul; Sanborn, Keri B; Mace, Emily M; Niinikoski, Harri; Nadeau, Kari; Vasconcelos, Dewton de Moraes; Perez, Elena; Jyonouchi, Soma; Jyonouchi, Harumi; Banerjee, Pinaki P; Ruuskanen, Olli; Condino-Neto, Antonio; Orange, Jordan S

    2012-02-01

    Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) syndrome is a complex immunologic disease caused by mutation of the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene. Autoimmunity in patients with APECED syndrome has been shown to result from deficiency of AIRE function in transcriptional regulation of thymic peripheral tissue antigens, which leads to defective T-cell negative selection. Candidal susceptibility in patients with APECED syndrome is thought to result from aberrant adaptive immunity. To determine whether AIRE could function in anticandidal innate immune signaling, we investigated an extrathymic role for AIRE in the immune recognition of β-glucan through the Dectin-1 pathway, which is required for defense against Candida species. Innate immune signaling through the Dectin-1 pathway was assessed in both PBMCs from patients with APECED syndrome and a monocytic cell line. Subcellular localization of AIRE was assessed by using confocal microscopy. PBMCs from patients with APECED syndrome had reduced TNF-α responses after Dectin-1 ligation but in part used a Raf-1-mediated pathway to preserve function. In the THP-1 human monocytic cell line, reducing AIRE expression resulted in significantly decreased TNF-α release after Dectin-1 ligation. AIRE formed a transient complex with the known Dectin-1 pathway components phosphorylated spleen tyrosine kinase and caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 9 after receptor ligation and localized with Dectin-1 at the cell membrane. AIRE can participate in the Dectin-1 signaling pathway, indicating a novel extrathymic role for AIRE and a defect that likely contributes to fungal susceptibility in patients with APECED syndrome. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Interferon-¿ regulates oxidative stress during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Espejo, C.; Penkowa, Milena; Saez-Torres, I.

    2002-01-01

    Neurobiology, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis IFN-d, multiple sclerosis, neurodegeneration, oxidative stress......Neurobiology, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis IFN-d, multiple sclerosis, neurodegeneration, oxidative stress...

  9. Kaleidoscope of autoimmune diseases in HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roszkiewicz, Justyna; Smolewska, Elzbieta

    2016-11-01

    Within the last 30 years, the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has changed its status from inevitably fatal to chronic disorder with limited impact on life span. However, this breakthrough was mainly the effect of introduction of the aggressive antiviral treatment, which has led to the clinically significant increase in CD4+ cell count, resulting in fewer cases of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and improved management of opportunistic infections occurring in the course of the disease. The occurrence of a particular autoimmune disease depends on degree of immunosuppression of the HIV-positive patient. In 2002, four stages of autoimmunity were proposed in patients infected by HIV, based on the absolute CD4+ cell count, feature of AIDS as well as on the presence of autoimmune diseases. Spectrum of autoimmune diseases associated with HIV infection seems to be unexpectedly wide, involving several organs, such as lungs (sarcoidosis), thyroid gland (Graves' disease), liver (autoimmune hepatitis), connective tissue (systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, polyarteritis nodosa and other types of vasculitis, antiphospholipid syndrome) or hematopoietic system (autoimmune cytopenias). This paper contains the state of art on possible coincidences between HIV infection and a differential types of autoimmune diseases, including the potential mechanisms of this phenomenon. As the clinical manifestations of autoimmunization often mimic those inscribed in the course of HIV infection, health care providers should be aware of this rare but potentially deadly association and actively seek for its symptoms in their patients.

  10. Gender and autoimmune comorbidity in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magyari, Melinda; Koch-Henriksen, Nils; Pfleger, Claudia C

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The female preponderance in incidence of multiple sclerosis (MS) calls for investigations into sex differences in comorbidity with other autoimmune diseases (ADs). OBJECTIVES: To determine whether male and female patients with MS have a higher frequency of autoimmune comorbidity than...

  11. Autoimmune hepatitis and juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deen, M. E. J.; Porta, G.; Fiorot, F. J.; Campos, L. M. A.; Sallum, A. M. E.; Silva, C. A. A.

    Juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE) and autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) are both autoimmune disorders that are rare in children and have a widespread clinical manifestation. A few case reports have shown a JSLE-AIH associated disorder. To our knowledge, this is the first study that

  12. Autoimmune diseases in women with Turner's syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kristian T; Rostgaard, Klaus; Bache, Iben

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In terms of number of X chromosomes, women with Turner's syndrome cytogenetically resemble men. An increased risk of autoimmune diseases has been observed among women with Turner's syndrome. This study was undertaken to investigate whether the autoimmune disease profile in women with T...

  13. Cardiovascular Involvement in Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya-Amaya, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (AD) represent a broad spectrum of chronic conditions that may afflict specific target organs or multiple systems with a significant burden on quality of life. These conditions have common mechanisms including genetic and epigenetics factors, gender disparity, environmental triggers, pathophysiological abnormalities, and certain subphenotypes. Atherosclerosis (AT) was once considered to be a degenerative disease that was an inevitable consequence of aging. However, research in the last three decades has shown that AT is not degenerative or inevitable. It is an autoimmune-inflammatory disease associated with infectious and inflammatory factors characterized by lipoprotein metabolism alteration that leads to immune system activation with the consequent proliferation of smooth muscle cells, narrowing arteries, and atheroma formation. Both humoral and cellular immune mechanisms have been proposed to participate in the onset and progression of AT. Several risk factors, known as classic risk factors, have been described. Interestingly, the excessive cardiovascular events observed in patients with ADs are not fully explained by these factors. Several novel risk factors contribute to the development of premature vascular damage. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of how traditional and nontraditional risk factors contribute to pathogenesis of CVD in AD. PMID:25177690

  14. Cystic Lesions in Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macarena Gompertz

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP can be chronic or recurrent, but frequently completely reversible after steroid treatment. A cystic lesion in AIP is a rare finding, and it can mimic a pancreatic cystic neoplasm. Difficulties in an exact diagnosis interfere with treatment, and surgery cannot be avoided in some cases. We report the history of a 63-year-old male presenting with jaundice and pruritus. AIP was confirmed by imaging and elevated IgG4 blood levels, and the patient completely recovered after corticosteroid therapy. One year later, he presented with a recurrent episode of AIP with elevated IgG4 levels, accompanied by the appearance of multiple intrapancreatic cystic lesions. All but 1 of these cysts disappeared after steroid treatment, but the remaining cyst in the pancreatic head was even somewhat larger 1 year later. Pancreatoduodenectomy was finally performed. Histology showed the wall of the cystic lesion to be fibrotic; the surrounding pancreatic tissue presented fibrosis, atrophy and lymphoplasmacytic infiltration by IgG4-positive cells, without malignant elements. Our case illustrates the rare possibility that cystic lesions can be part of AIP. These pseudocysts appear in the pancreatic segments involved in the autoimmune disease and can be a consequence of the local inflammation or related to ductal strictures. Steroid treatment should be initiated, after which these cysts can completely disappear with recovery from AIP. Surgical intervention may be necessary in some exceptional cases.

  15. Autoimmunity, infectious immunity, and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Eiji; Kobayashi, Kazuko; Matsunami, Yukana; Shen, Lianhua; Quan, Nanhu; Makarova, Marina; Suchkov, Sergey V; Ayada, Kiyoshi; Oguma, Keiji; Lopez, Luis R

    2009-11-01

    Vascular inflammation is common in certain systemic autoimmune diseases and contributes to the oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) and oxLDL/beta2-glycoprotein I (beta2GPI) complex formation. These complexes have been implicated as proatherogenic autoantigens that participate in the development of atherosclerotic disease. We have demonstrated that the in vitro macrophage uptake of oxLDL/beta2GPI complexes increases in the presence of IgG anti-beta2GPI antibodies and that IgG immune complexes containing oxLDL/beta2GPI upregulate the expression of both scavenger and Fcgamma receptors to activate beta2GPI specific T cells. Some persistent infections may cause immune responses that promote atherogenesis. Cellular immunity (Th1) against Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) derived heat shock protein 60 (Hp-HSP60) cross-reacts with endogenous HSP60 to cause cardiovascular disease likely by molecular mimicry. Infectious cellular response may be proatherogenic,while the humoral response (antibody production) maybe protective. We review the recent progress in our understanding of autoimmunity and infectious immunity that promote atherosclerosis.

  16. Warm antibody autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalfa, Theodosia A

    2016-12-02

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a rare and heterogeneous disease that affects 1 to 3/100 000 patients per year. AIHA caused by warm autoantibodies (w-AIHA), ie, antibodies that react with their antigens on the red blood cell optimally at 37°C, is the most common type, comprising ∼70% to 80% of all adult cases and ∼50% of pediatric cases. About half of the w-AIHA cases are called primary because no specific etiology can be found, whereas the rest are secondary to other recognizable underlying disorders. This review will focus on the postulated immunopathogenetic mechanisms in idiopathic and secondary w-AIHA and report on the rare cases of direct antiglobulin test-negative AIHA, which are even more likely to be fatal because of inherent characteristics of the causative antibodies, as well as because of delays in diagnosis and initiation of appropriate treatment. Then, the characteristics of w-AIHA associated with genetically defined immune dysregulation disorders and special considerations on its management will be discussed. Finally, the standard treatment options and newer therapeutic approaches for this chronic autoimmune blood disorder will be reviewed. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology. All rights reserved.

  17. Monogenic autoimmune diseases of the endocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew B; Hattersley, Andrew T; Flanagan, Sarah E

    2016-10-01

    The most common endocrine diseases, type 1 diabetes, hyperthyroidism, and hypothyroidism, are the result of autoimmunity. Clustering of autoimmune endocrinopathies can result from polygenic predisposition, or more rarely, may present as part of a wider syndrome due to a mutation within one of seven genes. These monogenic autoimmune diseases show highly variable phenotypes both within and between families with the same mutations. The average age of onset of the monogenic forms of autoimmune endocrine disease is younger than that of the common polygenic forms, and this feature combined with the manifestation of other autoimmune diseases, specific hallmark features, or both, can inform clinicians as to the relevance of genetic testing. A genetic diagnosis can guide medical management, give an insight into prognosis, inform families of recurrence risk, and facilitate prenatal diagnoses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Reversing dobutamine-induced tachycardia using ivabradine increases stroke volume with neutral effect on cardiac energetics in left ventricular post-ischaemia dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakkehaug, J P; Naesheim, T; Torgersen Engstad, E; Kildal, A B; Myrmel, T; How, O-J

    2016-10-01

    Compensatory tachycardia can potentially be deleterious in acute heart failure. In this study, we tested a therapeutic strategy of combined inotropic support (dobutamine) and selective heart rate (HR) reduction through administration of ivabradine. In an open-chest pig model (n = 12) with left ventricular (LV) post-ischaemia dysfunction, cardiac function was assessed by LV pressure catheter and sonometric crystals. Coronary flow and blood samples from the coronary sinus were used to measure myocardial oxygen consumption (MVO2 ). LV energetics was assessed by comparing MVO2 with cardiac work at a wide range of workloads. In the post-ischaemia heart, dobutamine (5 μg kg(-1)  min(-1) ) increased cardiac output (CO) by increasing HR from 102 ± 21 to 131 ± 16 bpm (beats per min; P efficiency. Similar findings on efficiency and LV function were also seen using an ex vivo working mouse heart protocol. A combined infusion of dobutamine and ivabradine had a neutral effect on post-ischaemia LV efficiency and increased left ventricular output without an increase in HR. © 2016 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Comorbidity of autoimmune thyroid disorders and psychiatric disorders during the postpartum period : A Danish nationwide register based cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergink, V.; Pop, V.J.M.; Nielsen, P.R.; Agerbo, E.; Munk-Olsen, T.; Liu, X.

    2018-01-01

    The postpartum period is well-known risk period for the first onset of autoimmune thyroid disorders (AITDs) as well as first onset of psychiatric disorders. These two disorders are some of the most prevalent medical conditions postpartum, often misdiagnosed and disabling if left untreated. Our study

  20. Therapeutic applications of nanomedicine in autoimmune diseases: from immunosuppression to tolerance induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharagozloo, Marjan; Majewski, Slawomir; Foldvari, Marianna

    2015-05-01

    Autoimmune diseases are chronic, destructive diseases that can cause functional disability and multiple organ failure. Despite significant advances in the range of therapeutic agents, especially biologicals, limitations of the routes of administration, requirement for frequent long-term dosing and inadequate targeting options often lead to suboptimal effects, systemic adverse reactions and patient non-compliance. Nanotechnology offers promising strategies to improve and optimize autoimmune disease treatment with the ability to overcome many of the limitations common to the current immunosuppressive and biological therapies. Here we focus on nanomedicine-based delivery strategies of biological immunomodulatory agents for the treatment of autoimmune disorders including psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematous, scleroderma, multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes. This comprehensive review details the concepts and clinical potential of novel nanomedicine approaches for inducing immunosuppression and immunological tolerance in autoimmune diseases in order to modulate aberrant and pathologic immune responses. The treatment of autoimmune diseases remains a significant challenge. The authors here provided a comprehensive review, focusing on the current status and potential of nanomedicine-based delivery strategies of immunomodulatory agents for the treatment of autoimmune disorders including psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematous, scleroderma, multiple sclerosis, and type 1 diabetes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Left atrial volume index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Mikael K; Dahl, Jordi S; Henriksen, Jan Erik

    2013-01-01

    To determine the prognostic importance of left atrial (LA) dilatation in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and no history of cardiovascular disease.......To determine the prognostic importance of left atrial (LA) dilatation in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and no history of cardiovascular disease....

  2. Bioluminescence in vivo imaging of autoimmune encephalomyelitis predicts disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steinman Lawrence

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis is a widely used animal model to understand not only multiple sclerosis but also basic principles of immunity. The disease is scored typically by observing signs of paralysis, which do not always correspond with pathological changes. Methods Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis was induced in transgenic mice expressing an injury responsive luciferase reporter in astrocytes (GFAP-luc. Bioluminescence in the brain and spinal cord was measured non-invasively in living mice. Mice were sacrificed at different time points to evaluate clinical and pathological changes. The correlation between bioluminescence and clinical and pathological EAE was statistically analyzed by Pearson correlation analysis. Results Bioluminescence from the brain and spinal cord correlates strongly with severity of clinical disease and a number of pathological changes in the brain in EAE. Bioluminescence at early time points also predicts severity of disease. Conclusion These results highlight the potential use of bioluminescence imaging to monitor neuroinflammation for rapid drug screening and immunological studies in EAE and suggest that similar approaches could be applied to other animal models of autoimmune and inflammatory disorders.

  3. The immunobiology of Campylobacter jejuni: Innate immunity and autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phongsisay, Vongsavanh

    2016-04-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Campylobacter jejuni causes gastroenteritis and Guillain-Barré syndrome in humans. Recent advances in the immunobiology of C. jejuni have been made. This review summarizes C. jejuni-binding innate receptors and highlights the role of innate immunity in autoimmune diseases. This human pathogen produces a variety of glycoconjugates, including human ganglioside-like determinants and multiple activators of Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Furthermore, C. jejuni targets MyD88, NLRP3 inflammasome, TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF), sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectins (Siglecs), macrophage galactose-type lectin (MGL), and immunoglobulin-like receptors (TREM2, LMIR5/CD300b). The roles of these innate receptors and signaling molecules have been extensively studied. MyD88-mediated TLR activation or inflammasome-dependent IL-1β secretion is essential for autoimmune induction. TRIF mediates the production of type I interferons that promote humoral immune responses and immunoglobulin class-switching. Siglec-1 and Siglec-7 interact directly with gangliosides. Siglec-1 activation enhances phagocytosis and inflammatory responses. MGL internalizes GalNAc-containing glycoconjugates. TREM2 is well-known for its role in phagocytosis. LMIR5 recognizes C. jejuni components and endogenous sulfoglycolipids. Several lines of evidence from animal models of autoimmune diseases suggest that simultaneous activation of innate immunity in the presence of autoreactive lymphocytes or antigen mimicry may link C. jejuni to immunopathology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. Addressing parents' concerns: do vaccines cause allergic or autoimmune diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offit, Paul A; Hackett, Charles J

    2003-03-01

    Anecdotal case reports and uncontrolled observational studies in the medical literature claim that vaccines cause chronic diseases such as asthma, multiple sclerosis, chronic arthritis, and diabetes. Several biological mechanisms have been proposed to explain how vaccines might cause allergic or autoimmune diseases. For example, allergic diseases might be caused by prevention of early childhood infections (the "hygiene hypothesis"), causing a prolongation of immunoglobulin E-promoting T-helper cell type 2-type responses. However, vaccines do not prevent most common childhood infections, and large well-controlled epidemiologic studies do not support the hypothesis that vaccines cause allergies. Autoimmune diseases might occur after immunization because proteins on microbial pathogens are similar to human proteins ("molecular mimicry") and could induce immune responses that damage human cells. However, wild-type viruses and bacteria are much better adapted to growth in humans than vaccines and much more likely to stimulate potentially damaging self-reactive lymphocytes. Consistent with critical differences between natural infection and immunization, well-controlled epidemiologic studies do not support the hypothesis that vaccines cause autoimmunity. Flaws in proposed biological mechanisms that explain how vaccines might cause chronic diseases are consistent with the findings of many well-controlled large epidemiologic studies that fail to show a causal relationship.

  5. Helminth Immunomodulation in Autoimmune Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J. Miles

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Helminths have evolved to become experts at subverting immune surveillance. Through potent and persistent immune tempering, helminths can remain undetected in human tissues for decades. Redirecting the immunomodulating “talents” of helminths to treat inflammatory human diseases is receiving intensive interest. Here, we review therapies using live parasitic worms, worm secretions, and worm-derived synthetic molecules to treat autoimmune disease. We review helminth therapy in both mouse models and clinical trials and discuss what is known on mechanisms of action. We also highlight current progress in characterizing promising new immunomodulatory molecules found in excretory/secretory products of helminths and their potential use as immunotherapies for acute and chronic inflammatory diseases.

  6. Experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis may occur in the context of a polarized Th1- or Th2-type immune response in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saoudi, A; Bernard, I; Hoedemaekers, A

    1999-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) is a T cell-dependent, Ab-mediated autoimmune disease induced in rats by a single immunization with acetylcholine receptor (AChR). Although polarized Th1 responses have been shown to be crucial for the development of mouse EAMG, the role of Th cell...

  7. Rac-Induced Left Ventricular Dilation in Thyroxin-Treated ZmRacD Transgenic Mice: Role of Cardiomyocyte Apoptosis and Myocardial Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnakish, Mohammad T.; Hassona, Mohamed D. H.; Alhaj, Mazin A.; Moldovan, Leni; Janssen, Paul M. L.; Khan, Mahmood; Hassanain, Hamdy H.

    2012-01-01

    The pathways inducing the critical transition from compensated hypertrophy to cardiac dilation and failure remain poorly understood. The goal of our study is to determine the role of Rac-induced signaling in this transition process. Our previous results showed that Thyroxin (T4) treatment resulted in increased myocardial Rac expression in wild-type mice and a higher level of expression in Zea maize RacD (ZmRacD) transgenic mice. Our current results showed that T4 treatment induced physiologic cardiac hypertrophy in wild-type mice, as demonstrated by echocardiography and histopathology analyses. This was associated with significant increases in myocardial Rac-GTP, superoxide and ERK1/2 activities. Conversely, echocardiography and histopathology analyses showed that T4 treatment induced dilated cardiomyopathy along with compensatory cardiac hypertrophy in ZmRacD mice. These were linked with further increases in myocardial Rac-GTP, superoxide and ERK1/2 activities. Additionally, there were significant increases in caspase-8 expression and caspase-3 activity. However, there was a significant decrease in p38-MAPK activity. Interestingly, inhibition of myocardial Rac-GTP activity and superoxide generation with pravastatin and carvedilol, respectively, attenuated all functional, structural, and molecular changes associated with the T4-induced cardiomyopathy in ZmRacD mice except the compensatory cardiac hypertrophy. Taken together, T4-induced ZmRacD is a novel mouse model of dilated cardiomyopathy that shares many characteristics with the human disease phenotype. To our knowledge, this is the first study to show graded Rac-mediated O2·− results in cardiac phenotype shift in-vivo. Moreover, Rac-mediated O2·− generation, cardiomyocyte apoptosis, and myocardial fibrosis seem to play a pivotal role in the transition from cardiac hypertrophy to cardiac dilation and failure. Targeting Rac signaling could represent valuable therapeutic strategy not only in saving the

  8. Pemphigus autoimmunity: Hypotheses and realities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grando, Sergei A

    2011-01-01

    The goal of contemporary research in pemphigus vulgaris and pemphigus foliaceus is to achieve and maintain clinical remission without corticosteroids. Recent advances of knowledge on pemphigus autoimmunity scrutinize old dogmas, resolve controversies, and open novel perspectives for treatment. Elucidation of intimate mechanisms of keratinocyte detachment and death in pemphigus has challenged the monopathogenic explanation of disease immunopathology. Over 50 organ-specific and non-organ-specific antigens can be targeted by pemphigus autoimmunity, including desmosomal cadherins and other adhesion molecules, PERP cholinergic and other cell membrane (CM) receptors, and mitochondrial proteins. The initial insult is sustained by the autoantibodies to the cell membrane receptor antigens triggering the intracellular signaling by Src, epidermal growth factor receptor kinase, protein kinases A and C, phospholipase C, mTOR, p38 MAPK, JNK, other tyrosine kinases, and calmodulin that cause basal cell shrinkage and ripping desmosomes off the CM. Autoantibodies synergize with effectors of apoptotic and oncotic pathways, serine proteases, and inflammatory cytokines to overcome the natural resistance and activate the cell death program in keratinocytes. The process of keratinocyte shrinkage/detachment and death via apoptosis/oncosis has been termed apoptolysis to emphasize that it is triggered by the same signal effectors and mediated by the same cell death enzymes. The natural course of pemphigus has improved due to a substantial progress in developing of the steroid-sparing therapies combining the immunosuppressive and direct anti-acantholytic effects. Further elucidation of the molecular mechanisms mediating immune dysregulation and apoptolysis in pemphigus should improve our understanding of disease pathogenesis and facilitate development of steroid-free treatment of patients. PMID:21939410

  9. BAFF-driven autoimmunity requires CD19 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairfax, Kirsten A; Tsantikos, Evelyn; Figgett, William A; Vincent, Fabien B; Quah, Pin Shie; LePage, Mélanie; Hibbs, Margaret L; Mackay, Fabienne

    2015-08-01

    B cell activating factor of the tumor necrosis factor family (BAFF or BLyS) is a critical factor for B cell survival and maturation. BAFF-transgenic (BAFF-Tg) mice develop autoimmunity that resembles systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in a T cell-independent but MyD88-dependent manner, implicating toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling. The specific B cell subtypes that make pro-inflammatory autoantibodies in BAFF-Tg mice are TLR-activated innate B cells known as marginal zone (MZ) and B1 B cells. These cells infiltrate the salivary glands and kidneys of diseased BAFF-Tg mice. However, loss of B1a or MZ B cells does not protect BAFF-Tg mice against disease, suggesting that B1b B cells might be the important pathogenic B cell subset. To test this hypothesis, we have generated BAFF-Tg mice that retained follicular B cells, but are deficient in B1a, B1b and MZ B cells, by crossing BAFF-Tg mice to CD19-deficient mice (BTg-CD19(-/-)). The BTg-CD19(-/-) mice did not produce autoantibodies and were protected from splenomegaly, kidney pathology and all signs of autoimmunity. This work suggests that B1b B cells, rather than MZ or B1a B cells, are sufficient and possibly required for the development of autoimmunity. Loss of the majority of innate-like B cells was able to protect BAFF-Tg mice from developing disease, so we can now conclude that autoimmunity induced by excessive BAFF production requires B1b B cells and CD19 signaling. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Understanding Autoimmunity of Vitiligo and Alopecia Areata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rork, Jillian F.; Rashighi, Mehdi; Harris, John E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Vitiligo and alopecia areata are common, disfiguring skin diseases. Treatment options are limited and include non-targeted approaches such as corticosteroids, topical calcineurin inhibitors, narrow band UVB phototherapy, and other immune-modifying agents. The purpose of this article is to review shared, novel mechanisms between vitiligo and alopecia areata, as well as discuss how they inform the development of future targeted treatments. Recent findings Vitiligo and alopecia areata are both autoimmune diseases, and striking similarities in pathogenesis have been identified at the level of both the innate and adaptive immune system. Increased reactive oxygen species and high cellular stress level have been suggested as the initiating trigger of the innate immune system in both diseases, and genome-wide association studies have implicated risk alleles that influence both innate and adaptive immunity. Most importantly, mechanistic studies in mouse models of vitiligo and alopecia areata have specifically implicated an IFN-γ-driven immune response, including IFN-γ, IFN-γ-induced chemokines, and cytotoxic CD8+ T cells as the main drivers of disease pathogenesis. These recent discoveries may reveal an effective strategy to develop new treatments, and several proof-of-concept clinical studies support this hypothesis. Summary The identification of IFN-γ-driven immune signaling pathways has enabled discoveries of potential new treatments for vitiligo and alopecia areata, and supports initiation of larger clinical trials. PMID:27191524

  11. Presence of Autoimmune Antibody in Chikungunya Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wirach Maek-a-nantawat

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Chikungunya infection has recently re-emerged as an important arthropod-borne disease in Thailand. Recently, Southern Thailand was identified as a potentially endemic area for the chikungunya virus. Here, we report a case of severe musculoskeletal complication, presenting with muscle weakness and swelling of the limbs. During the investigation to exclude autoimmune muscular inflammation, high titers of antinuclear antibody were detected. This is the report of autoimmunity detection associated with an arbovirus infection. The symptoms can mimic autoimmune polymyositis disease, and the condition requires close monitoring before deciding to embark upon prolonged specific treatment with immunomodulators.

  12. Spontaneous non-obstructive nephropleural fistula with an autoimmune disorder causing massive urinothorax: a rare association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aeron, Ruchir; Goel, Sunny; Goel, Apul; Kumar, Vikas

    2017-09-25

    Urinothorax, an unusual and rare cause of pleural effusion, is usually secondary to urinary obstruction and abdominal trauma. We describe an uncommon case of left-sided urinothorax in a 35-year-old man with diabetes and hypothyroidism associated with an autoimmune disorder without obvious obstructive uropathy. Workup revealed pancytopenia, mild proteinuria, positive anti-nuclear and anti-dsDNA antibodies suggestive of probable systemic lupus erythematosus. Contrast-enhanced CT-chest and abdomen showed hepatosplenomegaly with bilateral renal abscesses and a fistulous connection between left superior calyx and left the pleural cavity. Patient was initially managed by intravenous antibiotics, intercostal tube drainage and ipsilateral double-J stent placement. The definitive management in the form of closure of nephropleural fistula was achieved with sclerotherapy using 0.1% povidone-iodine instillation, while oral steroids were started for the probable autoimmune disorder. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of spontaneous non-obstructive nephropleural fistula associated with an autoimmune disorder, managed by minimally invasive methods. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  13. liver cirrhosis from autoimmune hepatitis in a nigerian woman

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    like autoimmune thyroiditis, celiac disease and ulcerative colitis, with about 25% having cirrhosis at ... to immunosuppressive therapy. Keywords: Autoimmune hepatitis, Autoimmune liver disease, Chronic liver disease, Nigeria ... who is also exposed to environmental triggering factors.2,5,8 Subsequently, the autoimmune.

  14. Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 and NALP5, parathyroid autoantigen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alimohammadi, Mohammad; Bjorklund, Peyman; Hallgren, Asa; Pontynen, Nora; Szinnai, Gabor; Shikama, Noriko; Keller, Marcel P.; Ekwall, Olov; Kinkel, Sarah A.; Husebye, Eystein S.; Gustafsson, Jan; Rorsman, Fredrik; Peltonen, Leena; Betterle, Corrado; Perheentupa, Jaakko; Akerstrom, Goran; Westin, Gunnar; Scott, Hamish S.; Hollaender, Georg A.; Kampe, Olle

    2008-01-01

    Background: Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS-1) is a multiorgan autoimmune disorder caused by mutations in AIRE, the autoimmune regulator gene. Though recent studies concerning AIRE deficiency have begun to elucidate the molecular pathogenesis of organ-specific autoimmunity in patients

  15. The autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy or autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lankisch, Tim O; Jaeckel, Elmar; Strassburg, Christian P

    2009-08-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndromes are rare autoimmune endocrinopathies that are associated with nonendocrine autoimmunopathies. Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED), also named autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1 (APS-1), is distinguished from autoimmune polyglandular syndrome 2 (APS-2). Major disease components of APECED are adrenal insufficiency, hypoparathyroidism, and candidiasis. The diagnosis is established by the presence of two out of the three components. Minor clinical features include autoimmune hepatitis, which occurs in up to 20% of APECED patients, and ranges from a mild to a fulminant course. The disease mostly affects juvenile patients from Sardegna, Italy, Finland, and Iran (Iranian Jews), but it also occurs in other ethnic groups. The AIRE gene responsible for APECED is expressed in cells involved in induction and maintenance of immune tolerance. Genetic alterations of the single gene are associated with APECED. Because a specific therapy is not currently available, treatment consists of hormone replacement and caring for clinical symptoms. Copyright Thieme Medical Publishers.

  16. T-cell exhaustion, co-stimulation and clinical outcome in autoimmunity and infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, Eoin F; Lee, James C; Jayne, David R W; Lyons, Paul A; Smith, Kenneth G C

    2015-07-30

    The clinical course of autoimmune and infectious disease varies greatly, even between individuals with the same condition. An understanding of the molecular basis for this heterogeneity could lead to significant improvements in both monitoring and treatment. During chronic infection the process of T-cell exhaustion inhibits the immune response, facilitating viral persistence. Here we show that a transcriptional signature reflecting CD8 T-cell exhaustion is associated with poor clearance of chronic viral infection, but conversely predicts better prognosis in multiple autoimmune diseases. The development of CD8 T-cell exhaustion during chronic infection is driven both by persistence of antigen and by a lack of accessory 'help' signals. In autoimmunity, we find that where evidence of CD4 T-cell co-stimulation is pronounced, that of CD8 T-cell exhaustion is reduced. We can reproduce the exhaustion signature by modifying the balance of persistent stimulation of T-cell antigen receptors and specific CD2-induced co-stimulation provided to human CD8 T cells in vitro, suggesting that each process plays a role in dictating outcome in autoimmune disease. The 'non-exhausted' T-cell state driven by CD2-induced co-stimulation is reduced by signals through the exhaustion-associated inhibitory receptor PD-1, suggesting that induction of exhaustion may be a therapeutic strategy in autoimmune and inflammatory disease. Using expression of optimal surrogate markers of co-stimulation/exhaustion signatures in independent data sets, we confirm an association with good clinical outcome or response to therapy in infection (hepatitis C virus) and vaccination (yellow fever, malaria, influenza), but poor outcome in autoimmune and inflammatory disease (type 1 diabetes, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis, systemic lupus erythematosus, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and dengue haemorrhagic fever). Thus, T-cell exhaustion plays a central role in determining outcome in

  17. Deregulation of Fas ligand expression as a novel cause of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome-like disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabhani, Schafiq; Ginzel, Sebastian; Miskin, Hagit; Revel-Vilk, Shoshana; Harlev, Dan; Fleckenstein, Bernhard; Hönscheid, Andrea; Oommen, Prasad T; Kuhlen, Michaela; Thiele, Ralf; Laws, Hans-Jürgen; Borkhardt, Arndt; Stepensky, Polina; Fischer, Ute

    2015-09-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome is frequently caused by mutations in genes involved in the Fas death receptor pathway, but for 20-30% of patients the genetic defect is unknown. We observed that treatment of healthy T cells with interleukin-12 induces upregulation of Fas ligand and Fas ligand-dependent apoptosis. Consistently, interleukin-12 could not induce apoptosis in Fas ligand-deficient T cells from patients with autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome. We hypothesized that defects in the interleukin-12 signaling pathway may cause a similar phenotype as that caused by mutations of the Fas ligand gene. To test this, we analyzed 20 patients with autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome of unknown cause by whole-exome sequencing. We identified a homozygous nonsense mutation (c.698G>A, p.R212*) in the interleukin-12/interleukin-23 receptor-component IL12RB1 in one of these patients. The mutation led to IL12RB1 protein truncation and loss of cell surface expression. Interleukin-12 and -23 signaling was completely abrogated as demonstrated by deficient STAT4 phosphorylation and interferon γ production. Interleukin-12-mediated expression of membrane-bound and soluble Fas ligand was lacking and basal expression was much lower than in healthy controls. The patient presented with the classical symptoms of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome: chronic non-malignant, non-infectious lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, hepatomegaly, elevated numbers of double-negative T cells, autoimmune cytopenias, and increased levels of vitamin B12 and interleukin-10. Sanger sequencing and whole-exome sequencing excluded the presence of germline or somatic mutations in genes known to be associated with the autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome. Our data suggest that deficient regulation of Fas ligand expression by regulators such as the interleukin-12 signaling pathway may be an alternative cause of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome-like disease. Copyright© Ferrata Storti

  18. Cyclosporine Treatment in a Patient with Concurrent Autoimmune Urticaria and Autoimmune Hepatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Ju, Hye Young; Kim, Hei Sung; Kim, Hyung Ok; Park, Young Min

    2009-01-01

    Patients with autoimmune urticaria show a higher rate of seropositivity for other autoantibodies and often have a history of autoimmune conditions. They also tend to have more severe symptoms and to have a poor response to conventional antihistamine treatment. Autoimmune hepatitis is a chronic inflammatory disorder in which progressive liver injury is thought to be the result of a T-cell-mediated immunologic attack against liver cells in genetically predisposed individuals. While the associat...

  19. Expression of the Autoimmune Regulator Gene and Its Relevance to the Mechanisms of Central and Peripheral Tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Perniola, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    The autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS-1) is a monogenic disease due to pathogenic variants occurring in the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene. Its related protein, AIRE, activates the transcription of genes encoding for tissue-specific antigens (TsAgs) in a subset of medullary thymic epithelial cells: the presentation of TsAgs to the maturating thymocytes induces the apoptosis of the autoreactive clones and constitutes the main form of central tolerance. Dysregulation of thymic AIR...

  20. Left heart catheterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catheterization - left heart ... to help guide the catheters up into your heart and arteries. Dye (sometimes called "contrast") will be ... in the blood vessels that lead to your heart. The catheter is then moved through the aortic ...

  1. [Autoimmune diseases of the thyroid gland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allelein, S; Feldkamp, J; Schott, M

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases of the thyroid gland are considered to be the most frequent cause of thyroid gland disorders. Autoimmune thyroid diseases consist of two subgroups: autoimmune thyroiditis (AIT) and Graves' disease. The AIT is the most common human autoimmune disease. Infiltration of the thyroid gland with cytotoxic T‑cells can lead to an initial thyrotoxicosis und during the course to hypothyroidism due to destruction of the thyroid gland. Substitution with Levothyroxine is indicated for manifest hypothyroidism and subclinical hypothyroidism with increased thyroid antibodies with the intention of normalizing the serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). Graves' disease is characterized by the appearance of stimulating TSH receptor antibodies leading to hyperthyroidism. Endocrine ophthalmopathy may also occur. Ablative therapy with radioiodine therapy or thyroidectomy is administered to patients with Graves' disease without remission after at least 1 year of antithyroid drug therapy.

  2. Autoimmune pancreatitis : Diagnostic and immunological aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. van Heerde (Marianne)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractAutoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is the pancreatic manifestation of a systemic fibro- inflammatory disease, characterized by infiltration with lymphoplasmacytic cells and extensive fibrosis, which leads to morphological changes (swelling, mass forming) and organ dysfunction. Often, but

  3. Role of Complement in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn

    2015-01-01

    Summary The classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemias and the complement system are reviewed. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm antibody type, complement-mediated cell lysis is clinically relevant in a proportion of the patients but is hardly essential for hemolysis in most patients. Cold antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemias (primary cold agglutinin disease, secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) are entirely complement-mediated disorders. In cold agglutinin disease, efficient therapies have been developed in order to target the pathogenic B-cell clone, but complement modulation remains promising in some clinical situations. No established therapy exists for secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria, and the possibility of therapeutic complement inhibition is interesting. Currently, complement modulation is not clinically documented in any autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The most relevant candidate drugs and possible target levels of action are discussed. PMID:26696798

  4. Th17 Response and Inflammatory Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janelle C. Waite

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The proinflammatory activity of T helper 17 (Th17 cells can be beneficial to the host during infection. However, uncontrolled or inappropriate Th17 activation has been linked to several autoimmune and autoinflammatory pathologies. Indeed, preclinical and clinical data show that Th17 cells are associated with several autoimmune diseases such as arthritis, multiple sclerosis, psoriasis, and lupus. Furthermore, targeting the interleukin-17 (IL-17 pathway has attenuated disease severity in preclinical models of autoimmune diseases. Interestingly, a recent report brings to light a potential role for Th17 cells in the autoinflammatory disorder adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD. Whether Th17 cells are the cause or are directly involved in AOSD remains to be shown. In this paper, we discuss the biology of Th17 cells, their role in autoimmune disease development, and in AOSD in particular, as well as the growing interest of the pharmaceutical industry in their use as therapeutic targets.

  5. Autoimmune Cytopenias in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni D'Arena

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical course of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL may be complicated at any time by autoimmune phenomena.The most common ones are hematologic disorders, such as autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA and immune thrombocytopenia (ITP. Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA and autoimmune agranulocytosis (AG are, indeed, more rarely seen. However, they are probably underestimated due to the possible misleading presence of cytopenias secondary to leukemic bone marrow involvement or to chemotherapy cytotoxicity. The source of autoantibodies is still uncertain, despite the most convincing data are in favor of the involvement of resting normal B-cells. In general, excluding the specific treatment of underlying CLL, the managementof these complications is not different from that of idiopathic autoimmune cytopenias or of those associated to other causes. Among different therapeutic approaches, monoclonal antibody rituximab, given alone or in combination, has shown to be very effective.

  6. Autoimmune hepatitis: an uncommon presentation of thymoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendogni, Paolo; Rosso, Lorenzo; Tosi, Davide; Palleschi, Alessandro; Righi, Ilaria; Minonzio, Francesca; Fusco, Nicola; Nosotti, Mario

    2016-11-11

    In a substantial proportion of patients with thymoma, many different types of paraneoplastic syndromes are observed. The association between thymoma and autoimmune liver diseases, however, has been found in very few cases. We report the case of a 31-year-old man affected by autoimmune hepatitis associated with myasthenia gravis and thymoma, successfully treated with extended thymectomy. The patient is free from neoplastic and hepatic disease 4 years after surgery. Eighteen months after thymectomy, an exacerbation of hepatitis was successfully treated with steroids. To the authors' knowledge, only 7 cases of myasthenia gravis associated with thymoma and autoimmune hepatitis have been reported in the English-language literature. The exact role of thymoma in immune-mediated hepatitis is unclear. It seems likely that thymoma-associated T-cell abnormalities, due to the presence of thymoma, may have a role in the development of this rare clinical triad of autoimmune hepatitis, thymoma and myasthenia gravis.

  7. Role of Complement in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn

    2015-09-01

    The classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemias and the complement system are reviewed. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm antibody type, complement-mediated cell lysis is clinically relevant in a proportion of the patients but is hardly essential for hemolysis in most patients. Cold antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemias (primary cold agglutinin disease, secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) are entirely complement-mediated disorders. In cold agglutinin disease, efficient therapies have been developed in order to target the pathogenic B-cell clone, but complement modulation remains promising in some clinical situations. No established therapy exists for secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria, and the possibility of therapeutic complement inhibition is interesting. Currently, complement modulation is not clinically documented in any autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The most relevant candidate drugs and possible target levels of action are discussed.

  8. Cardiovascular disease biomarkers across autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahearn, Joseph; Shields, Kelly J; Liu, Chau-Ching; Manzi, Susan

    2015-11-01

    Cardiovascular disease is increasingly recognized as a major cause of premature mortality among those with autoimmune disorders. There is an urgent need to identify those patients with autoimmune disease who are at risk for CVD so as to optimize therapeutic intervention and ultimately prevention. Accurate identification, monitoring and stratification of such patients will depend upon a panel of biomarkers of cardiovascular disease. This review will discuss some of the most recent biomarkers of cardiovascular diseases in autoimmune disease, including lipid oxidation, imaging biomarkers to characterize coronary calcium, plaque, and intima media thickness, biomarkers of inflammation and activated complement, genetic markers, endothelial biomarkers, and antiphospholipid antibodies. Clinical implementation of these biomarkers will not only enhance patient care but also likely accelerate the pharmaceutical pipeline for targeted intervention to reduce or eliminate cardiovascular disease in the setting of autoimmunity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of trimetazidine treatment on the transient outward potassium current of the left ventricular myocytes of rats with streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetes mellitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, Yu-luan; He, Li [Department of Cardiology, the Second Affiliated Hospital, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Xiao, Jun [Department of Cardiology, Chongqing Emergency Medical Center, Chongqing (China); Xia, Shuang; Deng, Song-bai [Department of Cardiology, the Second Affiliated Hospital, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Xiu, Yun [Institute of Life Science, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); She, Qiang [Department of Cardiology, the Second Affiliated Hospital, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China)

    2012-02-17

    Cardiovascular complications are a leading cause of mortality in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). The present study was designed to investigate the effects of trimetazidine (TMZ), an anti-angina drug, on transient outward potassium current (I{sub to}) remodeling in ventricular myocytes and the plasma contents of free fatty acid (FFA) and glucose in DM. Sprague-Dawley rats, 8 weeks old and weighing 200-250 g, were randomly divided into three groups of 20 animals each. The control group was injected with vehicle (1 mM citrate buffer), the DM group was injected with 65 mg/kg streptozotocin (STZ) for induction of type 1 DM, and the DM+TMZ group was injected with the same dose of STZ followed by a 4-week treatment with TMZ (60 mg·kg{sup −1}·day{sup −1}). All animals were then euthanized and their hearts excised and subjected to electrophysiological measurements or gene expression analyses. TMZ exposure significantly reversed the increased plasma FFA level in diabetic rats, but failed to change the plasma glucose level. The amplitude of I{sub to} was significantly decreased in left ventricular myocytes from diabetic rats relative to control animals (6.25 ± 1.45 vs 20.72 ± 2.93 pA/pF at +40 mV). The DM-associated I{sub to} reduction was attenuated by TMZ. Moreover, TMZ treatment reversed the increased expression of the channel-forming alpha subunit Kv1.4 and the decreased expression of Kv4.2 and Kv4.3 in diabetic rat hearts. These data demonstrate that TMZ can normalize, or partially normalize, the increased plasma FFA content, the reduced I{sub to} of ventricular myocytes, and the altered expression Kv1.4, Kv4.2, and Kv4.3 in type 1 DM.

  10. Effect of trimetazidine treatment on the transient outward potassium current of the left ventricular myocytes of rats with streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiang, Yu-luan; He, Li; Xiao, Jun; Xia, Shuang; Deng, Song-bai; Xiu, Yun; She, Qiang

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular complications are a leading cause of mortality in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). The present study was designed to investigate the effects of trimetazidine (TMZ), an anti-angina drug, on transient outward potassium current (I to ) remodeling in ventricular myocytes and the plasma contents of free fatty acid (FFA) and glucose in DM. Sprague-Dawley rats, 8 weeks old and weighing 200-250 g, were randomly divided into three groups of 20 animals each. The control group was injected with vehicle (1 mM citrate buffer), the DM group was injected with 65 mg/kg streptozotocin (STZ) for induction of type 1 DM, and the DM+TMZ group was injected with the same dose of STZ followed by a 4-week treatment with TMZ (60 mg·kg −1 ·day −1 ). All animals were then euthanized and their hearts excised and subjected to electrophysiological measurements or gene expression analyses. TMZ exposure significantly reversed the increased plasma FFA level in diabetic rats, but failed to change the plasma glucose level. The amplitude of I to was significantly decreased in left ventricular myocytes from diabetic rats relative to control animals (6.25 ± 1.45 vs 20.72 ± 2.93 pA/pF at +40 mV). The DM-associated I to reduction was attenuated by TMZ. Moreover, TMZ treatment reversed the increased expression of the channel-forming alpha subunit Kv1.4 and the decreased expression of Kv4.2 and Kv4.3 in diabetic rat hearts. These data demonstrate that TMZ can normalize, or partially normalize, the increased plasma FFA content, the reduced I to of ventricular myocytes, and the altered expression Kv1.4, Kv4.2, and Kv4.3 in type 1 DM

  11. Exquisite peptide specificity of oral tolerance in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, N H; Gienapp, I E; Cox, K L; Whitacre, C C

    1995-08-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), induced in Lewis rats by injection of myelin basic protein (MBP) and adjuvant, is a T cell-mediated autoimmune disease. Earlier studies from our laboratory have shown that oral administration of guinea pig MBP before encephalitogenic challenge induces T cell anergy and results in the suppression of clinical signs and CNS histopathologic changes of EAE. In contrast, oral administration of rat MBP did not confer a similar degree of protection. This study was undertaken to determine the tolerogenicity of the synthetic peptide 68-88 derived from guinea pig (GP) MBP and rat MBP. These peptides differ by a single amino acid at position 80. Lewis rats fed GP 68-88 were protected from EAE induced with GP 68-88 or rat 68-88. In contrast, feeding rats 68-88 did not protect the animals from challenge with either peptide. Measurement of the frequency of peptide-reactive Th1 cells showed results consistent with the clinical picture. The in vitro proliferative response was significantly suppressed following oral administration of either whole GP MBP, the GP peptide, or the rat peptide, irrespective of clinical status. These results extend our earlier observation at the whole molecule level that GP but not rat MBP confers oral tolerance. These findings suggest that small structural differences at the amino acid level can produce dramatic differences in clinical outcome, with important implications for the design of multiple sclerosis clinical trials.

  12. Treatment of patients with severe autoimmune hepatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Finn Stolze

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a progressive inflammatory diseases of unknown origin that is characterised by a necro-inflammatory and fibrotic process and may result in liver failure or uncompensated liver cirrhosis. Normally AIH is responsive to immunosuppressive therapy, and treatment aims...... and tacrolimus) might salvage patients from transplantation. Mycophenolate mofetil may also improve liver tests and reduce the requirement for corticosteroids. Besides, sirolimus is effective for treatment of de novo autoimmune hepatitis that sometimes develops after liver transplantation. Initial experience...

  13. Coherent Somatic Mutation in Autoimmune Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Kenneth Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background Many aspects of autoimmune disease are not well understood, including the specificities of autoimmune targets, and patterns of co-morbidity and cross-heritability across diseases. Prior work has provided evidence that somatic mutation caused by gene conversion and deletion at segmentally duplicated loci is relevant to several diseases. Simple tandem repeat (STR) sequence is highly mutable, both somatically and in the germ-line, and somatic STR mutations are observed under inflammation. Results Protein-coding genes spanning STRs having markers of mutability, including germ-line variability, high total length, repeat count and/or repeat similarity, are evaluated in the context of autoimmunity. For the initiation of autoimmune disease, antigens whose autoantibodies are the first observed in a disease, termed primary autoantigens, are informative. Three primary autoantigens, thyroid peroxidase (TPO), phogrin (PTPRN2) and filaggrin (FLG), include STRs that are among the eleven longest STRs spanned by protein-coding genes. This association of primary autoantigens with long STR sequence is highly significant (). Long STRs occur within twenty genes that are associated with sixteen common autoimmune diseases and atherosclerosis. The repeat within the TTC34 gene is an outlier in terms of length and a link with systemic lupus erythematosus is proposed. Conclusions The results support the hypothesis that many autoimmune diseases are triggered by immune responses to proteins whose DNA sequence mutates somatically in a coherent, consistent fashion. Other autoimmune diseases may be caused by coherent somatic mutations in immune cells. The coherent somatic mutation hypothesis has the potential to be a comprehensive explanation for the initiation of many autoimmune diseases. PMID:24988487

  14. Encephalopathy Associated With Autoimmune Thyroid Disease

    OpenAIRE

    li A. Raouf; Gianluca Tamagno

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATDs) are immune-endocrine disorders affecting the thyroid gland and, eventually, also a number of other systemic targets, including the brain and the nervous system. Encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease (EAATD) is a rare, heterogeneous condition arising from the background of an ATD. It is characterised by neurological and/or psychiatric symptoms with acute or sub-acute onset, and virtually any neurological or psychiatric symptom can appear. ...

  15. Automation, consolidation, and integration in autoimmune diagnostics

    OpenAIRE

    Tozzoli, Renato; D?Aurizio, Federica; Villalta, Danilo; Bizzaro, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Over the past two decades, we have witnessed an extraordinary change in autoimmune diagnostics, characterized by the progressive evolution of analytical technologies, the availability of new tests, and the explosive growth of molecular biology and proteomics. Aside from these huge improvements, organizational changes have also occurred which brought about a more modern vision of the autoimmune laboratory. The introduction of automation (for harmonization of testing, reduction of human error, ...

  16. Humanized in vivo Model for Autoimmune Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-07

    guinea - pig polyclonal anti-insulin (1:100 dilution, Abcam Ab7842-500, Cambridge, MA) and a secondary goat anti- guinea - pig Alexa-fluor 568 (1:100 dilu...which is reported to accelerate experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (a mouse model of multiple sclerosis). Our reasoning was that, as T cells...HL, Sobel RA, Kuchroo VK. IL-10 is critical in the regulation of autoimmune encephalomyelitis as demonstrated by studies of IL-10- and IL-4

  17. Celiac disease and autoimmune thyroid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ch'ng, Chin Lye; Jones, M Keston; Kingham, Jeremy G C

    2007-10-01

    Celiac disease (CD) or gluten sensitive enteropathy is relatively common in western populations with prevalence around 1%. With the recent availability of sensitive and specific serological testing, many patients who are either asymptomatic or have subtle symptoms can be shown to have CD. Patients with CD have modest increases in risks of malignancy and mortality compared to controls. The mortality among CD patients who comply poorly with a gluten-free diet is greater than in compliant patients. The pattern of presentation of CD has altered over the past three decades. Many cases are now detected in adulthood during investigation of problems as diverse as anemia, osteoporosis, autoimmune disorders, unexplained neurological syndromes, infertility and chronic hypertransaminasemia of uncertain cause. Among autoimmune disorders, increased prevalence of CD has been found in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease, type 1 diabetes mellitus, autoimmune liver diseases and inflammatory bowel disease. Prevalence of CD was noted to be 1% to 19% in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus, 2% to 5% in autoimmune thyroid disorders and 3% to 7% in primary biliary cirrhosis in prospective studies. Conversely, there is also an increased prevalence of immune based disorders among patients with CD. The pathogenesis of co-existent autoimmune thyroid disease and CD is not known, but these conditions share similar HLA haplotypes and are associated with the gene encoding cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen-4. Screening high risk patients for CD, such as those with autoimmune diseases, is a reasonable strategy given the increased prevalence. Treatment of CD with a gluten-free diet should reduce the recognized complications of this disease and provide benefits in both general health and perhaps life expectancy. It also improves glycemic control in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and enhances the absorption of medications for associated hypothyroidism and osteoporosis. It

  18. Updates on GMSCs treatment for autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Feng; Liu, Zhong-Min; Zheng, Song Guo

    2018-02-20

    Autoimmune disease is a refractory disease. Accumulating Evidence has revealed that the manipulation of mesenchymal stem cells may have the potential to control or even treat autoimmune diseases. Human gingiva-derived mesenchymal stem cells (GMSCs) are emerging as a new line of mesenchymal stem cells that have displayed some potential advantages in controlling and treating autoimmune diseases. In this review, we briefly update the current understanding on the biology of GMSCs and their effects on preventing and treating autoimmune diseases. The availability of gingival mesenchymal stem cells (GMSCs), together with their potent capacity of multi-directional differentiation and inflammatory modulation, making GMSCs an ideal subtype of MSCs in treating autoimmune disease. Our and other studies have launched the earliest appraisal on GMSCs and carried out a lot of biological researches. The clinical trial of GMSCs on patients with autoimmune diseases will further approve their therapeutic effects, as well as its cellular and molecular mechanisms. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  19. Autoimmune cytopenias related to common variable immunodeficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlasta Petric

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Common variable immunodeficiency disorders are characterised by defective antibody production leading to recurrent infections. Noninfective complications are a consequence of autoimmunity, granuloma and polyclonal lymphoid infiltration. We often detect autoimmune cytopenias before primary immunodefciency is confirmed. Patients and methods: We report a case of 39-year old man with recurrent respiratory infections, autoimmune thrombocytopenia and haemolytic anemia who had common varible immunodeficiency confirmed. He had a lack of serum IgG, IgA and IgM, bronchiectasis, lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, hepatic granuloma, autoimmune gastritis with B12 deficiency and Evans syndrome. We treated autoimmune cytopenias with methylprednisolon and cyclosporine. After substitution therapy with intravenous immunoglobulin the frequency of espiratory infections decreased. Occurrence of diarrhea is suspected for enteropathy, however, hystologic identification is required. Because of patologically changed gastric mucosa and signs of polyclonal lymphoid infiltration, the patient is at high risk for malignancy and the outcome of the disease remains unpredictable. Conclusions: Generally, we discover common variable immunodeficiency at management of noninfective complications, in wich intravenous immunoglobulin are not effective. Autoimmune cytopenias and some other complications are successfully treated with glucocorticoids. Careful monitorig of these patients is important because of a high risk for malignancy.

  20. Clinical aspects of autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldblatt, Fiona; O'Neill, Sean G

    2013-08-31

    Multisystem autoimmune rheumatic diseases are heterogeneous rare disorders associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Efforts to create international consensus within the past decade have resulted in the publication of new classification or nomenclature criteria for several autoimmune rheumatic diseases, specifically for systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjögren's syndrome, and the systemic vasculitides. Substantial progress has been made in the formulation of new criteria in systemic sclerosis and idiopathic inflammatory myositis. Although the autoimmune rheumatic diseases share many common features and clinical presentations, differentiation between the diseases is crucial because of important distinctions in clinical course, appropriate drugs, and prognoses. We review some of the dilemmas in the diagnosis of these autoimmune rheumatic diseases, and focus on the importance of new classification criteria, clinical assessment, and interpretation of autoimmune serology. In this era of improvement of mortality rates for patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases, we pay particular attention to the effect of leading complications, specifically cardiovascular manifestations and cancer, and we update epidemiology and prognosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Thyroid Autoimmunity in Girls with Turner Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkowska-Sędek, Ewelina; Borowiec, Ada; Kucharska, Anna; Chacewicz, Karolina; Rumińska, Małgorzata; Demkow, Urszula; Pyrżak, Beata

    2017-01-01

    Turner syndrome is associated with increased incidence of autoimmune diseases, especially those of the thyroid gland. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of thyroid autoimmunity among pediatric patients with Turner syndrome. The study was retrospective and included 41 girls with Turner syndrome aged 6-18 years. Free thyroxine (FT4), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), anti-thyroid peroxidase (TPO-Ab) antibodies, anti-thyroglobulin (TG-Ab) antibodies, and karyotype were investigated. The correlation between karyotype and incidence of thyroid autoimmunity was also examined. Eleven patients (26.8%) were positive for TPO-Ab and/or TG-Ab. Three girls from that subgroup were euthyroid, 5 had subclinical hypothyroidism, and 3 were diagnosed with overt hypothyroidism. Out of these 11 patients affected by thyroid autoimmunity, 6 girls had mosaic karyotype with X-isochromosome (n = 4) or with deletions (n = 2), and 5 had the 45,X karyotype. The study findings confirmed a high incidence of thyroid autoimmunity in girls with Turner syndrome, but we failed to observe an association between the incidence of thyroid autoimmunity and karyotype. We conclude that it is important to monitor thyroid function in patients with Turner syndrome because they are prone to develop hypothyroidism.

  2. Regulatory T-cells and autoimmunity.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ni Choileain, Niamh

    2012-02-03

    Approximately 20% of the population is affected by autoimmune or inflammatory diseases mediated by an abnormal immune response. A characteristic feature of autoimmune disease is the selective targeting of a single cell type, organ or tissue by certain populations of autoreactive T-cells. Examples of such diseases include rheumatoid arthritis, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), all of which are characterized by chronic inflammation, tissue destruction and target organ malfunction. Although strong evidence links most autoimmune diseases to specific genes, considerable controversy prevails regarding the role of regulatory T-cell populations in the disease process. These cells are now also believed to play a key role in mediating transplantation tolerance and inhibiting the induction of tumor immunity. Though the concept of therapeutic immune regulation aimed at treating autoimmune pathology has been validated in many animal models, the development of strategies for the treatment of human autoimmune disorders remains in its infancy. The main obstacles to this include the conflicting findings of different model systems, as well as the contrasting functions of regulatory T-cells and cytokines involved in the development of such disorders. This review examines the role of regulatory T-cells in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity and describes the therapeutic potential of these cells for the prevention of immune-mediated pathologies in the future. Although much remains to be learned about such pathologies, a clearer understanding of the mechanisms by which regulatory T-cells function will undoubtedly lead to exciting new possibilities for immunotherapeutics.

  3. Genetic variants of CC chemokine genes in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ockinger, J; Stridh, P; Beyeen, A D

    2010-01-01

    regulating neuroinflammation we used a rat model of MS, myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), and carried out a linkage analysis in an advanced intercross line (AIL). We thereby redefine the Eae18b locus to a 0.88 Mb region, including a cluster...

  4. Induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in Dark Agouti rats without adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stosic-Grujicic, S; Ramic, Z; Bumbasirevic, V; Harhaji, L; Mostarica-Stojkovic, M

    2004-04-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a well-recognized model for multiple sclerosis (MS) in humans. However, adjuvants used with encephalitogens to induce EAE produce non-specific effects interfering with the mechanisms involved in the autoimmune response to the central nervous system (CNS) tissue. It is therefore important to establish a more suitable model of EAE for analysis of autoimmune phenomena resembling those operative in MS. Here we report that EAE can be induced regularly in Dark Agouti (DA) strain of rats with spinal cord tissue without any adjuvant, as judged by both clinical and histological parameters. The incidence and severity of EAE depended on the origin of the encephalitogen, the rat versus guinea pig spinal cord homogenate being more efficient. Furthermore, EAE could be reinduced in animals which had recovered from disease that had been induced actively with encephalitogen alone, suggesting the role of adjuvant-generated non-specific mechanisms in resistance to reinduction of EAE. Thus, EAE induced in DA rats with encephalitogen alone provides a reproducible model for defining pathogenically relevant events in CNS autoimmunity devoid of the potentially misleading effects of adjuvants.

  5. Reduced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis after intranasal and oral administration of recombinant lactobacilli expressing myelin antigens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.B.M. Maassen (Kitty); J.D. Laman (Jon); C. van Holten-Neelen; L. Hoogteijling (L.); L. Groenewegen (Lizet); L. Visser (Lizette); M.M. Schellekens (M.); W.G. Boersma (Wim); H.J.H.M. Claassen (Eric)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractOral administration of autoantigens is a safe and convenient way to induce peripheral T-cell tolerance in autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis (MS). To increase the efficacy of oral tolerance induction and obviate the need for large-scale purification of human myelin proteins, we

  6. Reduced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis after intranasal and oral administration of recombinant lactobacilli expressing meyelin antigens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maassen, C.B.M.; Holten-Neelen, van J.C.P.A.; Groenewegen, L.; Hoogteijling, L.; Visser, L.; Boersma, W.J.A.

    2003-01-01

    Oral administration of autoantigens is a safe and convenient way to induce peripheral T-cell tolerance in autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis (MS). To increase the efficacy of oral tolerance induction and obviate the need for large-scale purification of human myelin proteins, we use

  7. [Autoimmune thyroiditis and thyroid cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krátký, Jan; Jiskra, Jan

    2015-10-01

    Association between autoimmune thyroiditis (CLT) and thyroid cancer remains not clear. Although both diseases often occur simultaneously in histological samples, it is not yet clear whether CLT can be regarded as a risk factor for thyroid malignancy. This review focus on the known epidemiological and molecular genetics links between both diseases. Most studies have shown a significant association between thyroid cancer and positive antibodies to thyroglobulin and histological evidence of CLT, as well. Both disorders share some risk factors (greater incidence in women, in areas with adequate supply of iodine and in patients after radiotherapy of the neck) and molecular genetics linkage. For example: RET/PTC rearrangements could be more often found in carcinomas associated with CLT, but this mutation could be found in benign lesions such as CLT, as well. CLT seems to be a positive prognostic factor in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer. It is associated with less invasive forms of tumor, lower occurrence of infiltrated lymphatic nodes and a lower risk of recurrence.

  8. Influence of left ventricular filling pattern on exercise-induced changes of natriuretic peptides in patients with suspected coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jacob Eifer; Bergeron, S.; Jaffe, A.

    2008-01-01

    of suspected coronary artery disease. ANP and BNP were measured at rest and 5 min after exercise. RESULTS: ANP and BNP increased with exercise. The increase in BNP was significantly greater in the 65 patients with than in the 76 patients without ischemia [14.7 pg/ml (5.7-19.6) vs. 4.9 pg/ml (2.1-9.2), p... index (beta=0.23, pcoronary artery disease, exertional changes of BNP are related not only to ischemia...... and brain natriuretic peptides (ANP and BNP) with resting and exercise-induced changes of LV systolic function and filling pattern. METHODS: LV function at rest and peak exercise was assessed in 140 patients (mean age 65 years, 78 men) during symptom-limited exercise echocardiography for evaluation...

  9. Effect of Associated Autoimmune Diseases on Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Incidence and Metabolic Control in Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is one of the most common chronic diseases developing in childhood. The incidence of the disease in children increases for unknown reasons at a rate from 3 to 5% every year worldwide. The background of T1DM is associated with the autoimmune process of pancreatic beta cell destruction, which leads to absolute insulin deficiency and organ damage. Complex interactions between environmental and genetic factors contribute to the development of T1DM in genetically predisposed patients. The T1DM-inducing autoimmune process can also affect other organs, resulting in development of additional autoimmune diseases in the patient, thereby impeding diabetes control. The most common T1DM comorbidities include autoimmune thyroid diseases, celiac disease, and autoimmune gastritis; additionally, diabetes can be a component of PAS (Polyglandular Autoimmune Syndrome). The aim of this review is to assess the prevalence of T1DM-associated autoimmune diseases in children and adolescents and their impact on the course of T1DM. We also present suggestions concerning screening tests. PMID:27525273

  10. Effect of Associated Autoimmune Diseases on Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Incidence and Metabolic Control in Children and Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Krzewska

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM is one of the most common chronic diseases developing in childhood. The incidence of the disease in children increases for unknown reasons at a rate from 3 to 5% every year worldwide. The background of T1DM is associated with the autoimmune process of pancreatic beta cell destruction, which leads to absolute insulin deficiency and organ damage. Complex interactions between environmental and genetic factors contribute to the development of T1DM in genetically predisposed patients. The T1DM-inducing autoimmune process can also affect other organs, resulting in development of additional autoimmune diseases in the patient, thereby impeding diabetes control. The most common T1DM comorbidities include autoimmune thyroid diseases, celiac disease, and autoimmune gastritis; additionally, diabetes can be a component of PAS (Polyglandular Autoimmune Syndrome. The aim of this review is to assess the prevalence of T1DM-associated autoimmune diseases in children and adolescents and their impact on the course of T1DM. We also present suggestions concerning screening tests.

  11. A rare cause of cytopenia in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus: Autoimmune myelofibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cansu, Döndü Üsküdar; Teke, Hava Üsküdar; Korkmaz, Cengiz

    2017-01-01

    Hematological abnormalities are very common in the course of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Myelofibrosis is a bone marrow disorder in which there is excessive fibrous tissue formation in the bone marrow. Various benign and malignant disorders can cause or be associated with a diffuse increase in the bone marrow reticular tissue. Some diseases such as infections, neoplasms, and autoimmune diseases may also induce bone marrow fibrosis (secondary myelofibrosis). Cytopenia from autoimmune myelofibrosis (AIMF) in SLE is a rare condition. Here we present a case of AIMF associated with SLE and aim to emphasize on the other cause of cytopenia in SLE. PMID:28293461

  12. Dietary naringenin supplementation attenuates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by modulating autoimmune inflammatory responses in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autoimmune disease is prevalent in humans. Since conventional therapies have limited efficacy and often come with significant side effects, nutrition may provide an alternative and complementary approach to improving the autoimmune disorders. Naringenin, a flavonoid found in citrus fruits, has been ...

  13. Analysis of the autoimmune regulator gene in patients with autoimmune non-APECED polyendocrinopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Alessia; Gianchecchi, Elena; Palombi, Melania; Luciano, Rosa; Di Carlo, Pierluigi; Crinò, Antonino; Cappa, Marco; Fierabracci, Alessandra

    2013-09-01

    The pathogenesis of autoimmunity was derived from a complex interaction of genetic and environmental factors. Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy is a rare autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene. AIRE gene variants and, in particular, heterozygous loss-of-function mutations were also discovered in organ-specific autoimmune disorders, possibly contributing to their etiopathogenesis. It was suggested that even predisposition to develop certain autoimmune conditions may be derived from AIRE gene polymorphisms including S278R and intronic IVS9+6 G>A. In this study we unravel the hypothesis on whether AIRE gene variants may predispose individuals to associated autoimmune conditions in 41 Italian patients affected by non-APECED autoimmune polyendocrinopathies. We could not detect any heterozygous mutations of the AIRE gene. Although a trend of association was observed, heterozygous polymorphisms S278R and IVS9+6 G>A were detected in patients without statistically significant prevalence than in controls. Their putative contribution to autoimmune polyendocrinopathies and their predictive value in clinical strategies of disease development could be unravelled by analysing a larger sample of diseased patients and healthy individuals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Autoimmunity, Not a Developmental Defect, is the Cause for Subfertility of Autoimmune Regulator (Aire) Deficient Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kekäläinen, E; Pöntynen, N; Meri, S; Arstila, T P; Jarva, H

    2015-05-01

    Autoimmune regulator's (AIRE) best characterized role is in the generation immunological tolerance, but it is also involved in many other processes such as spermatogenesis. Loss-of-function mutations in AIRE cause a disease called autoimmune polyendocrinopathy, candidiasis and ectodermal dystrophy (APECED; also called autoimmune polyendocrinopathy syndrome type 1, APS-1) that is dominated by various autoimmune manifestations, mainly endocrinopathies. Both patients with APECED and Aire(-/-) mice suffer from varying levels of infertility, but it is not clear if it is a result of an autoimmune tissue damage or more of a developmental defect. In this study, we wanted to resolve whether or not the reduced fertility of Aire(-/-) mice is dependent on the adaptive immune system and therefore a manifestation of autoimmunity in these mice. We generated lymphopenic mice without Aire expression that were devoid of the autoimmune manifestations previously reported in immunocompetent Aire(-/-) mice. These Aire(-/-) Rag1(-/-) mice regained full fertility. This confirms that the development of infertility in Aire(-/-) mice requires a functional adaptive immune system. We also show that only the male Aire(-/-) mice are subfertile, whereas Aire(-/-) females produce litters normally. Moreover, the male subfertility can be adoptively transferred with lymphocytes from Aire(-/-) donor mice to previously fertile lymphopenic Aire(-/-) recipients. Our data show that subfertility in Aire(-/-) mice is dependent on a functional adaptive immune system thus confirming its autoimmune aetiology. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Fluoxetine promotes remission in acute experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xi-qiu; Qiu, Guang; Liu, Xiao-jia; Liu, Shan; Wu, Yongming; Wang, Xinyu; Lu, Tianming

    2012-01-01

    This study was carried out to clarify the effects of the antidepressant fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, for its potential use in autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis in a rat model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). The rat EAE model was induced by subcutaneous injection of guinea pig spinal cord homogenate. Rats received fluoxetine via daily intragastric administration, starting 2 weeks prior to immune induction (fluoxetine pretreatment). Clinical scores and pathological changes in EAE rats were analyzed. Changes in serum cytokine levels were assessed by ELISA. Fluoxetine pretreatment significantly promoted remission in EAE. Histologically, fluoxetine-induced neuroprotection was accompanied by reductions in inflammatory foci and in the degree of demyelination in the spinal cord of EAE rats. The increase in serum IFN-γ in the EAE model was also suppressed by fluoxetine administration. These findings suggest that the prophylactic use of fluoxetine can relieve symptoms during remission in the acute EAE model, and these neuroprotective effects are associated with its anti-inflammatory effects. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Pregnancy and the risk of autoimmune disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Khashan, Ali S

    2012-01-31

    Autoimmune diseases (AID) predominantly affect women of reproductive age. While basic molecular studies have implicated persisting fetal cells in the mother in some AID, supportive epidemiological evidence is limited. We investigated the effect of vaginal delivery, caesarean section (CS) and induced abortion on the risk of subsequent maternal AID. Using the Danish Civil Registration System (CRS) we identified women who were born between 1960 and 1992. We performed data linkage between the CRS other Danish national registers to identify women who had a pregnancy and those who developed AID. Women were categorised into 4 groups; nulligravida (control group), women who had 1st child by vaginal delivery, whose 1st delivery was by CS and who had abortions. Log-linear Poisson regression with person-years was used for data analysis adjusting for several potential confounders. There were 1,035,639 women aged >14 years and 25,570 developed AID: 43.4% nulligravida, 44.3% had their first pregnancy delivered vaginally, 7.6% CS and 4.1% abortions. The risk of AID was significantly higher in the 1st year after vaginal delivery (RR = 1.1[1.0, 1.2]) and CS (RR = 1.3[1.1, 1.5]) but significantly lower in the 1st year following abortion (RR = 0.7[0.6, 0.9]). These results suggest an association between pregnancy and the risk of subsequent maternal AID. Increased risks of AID after CS may be explained by amplified fetal cell traffic at delivery, while decreased risks after abortion may be due to the transfer of more primitive fetal stem cells. The increased risk of AID in the first year after delivery may also be related to greater testing during pregnancy.

  17. Pregnancy and the risk of autoimmune disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali S Khashan

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases (AID predominantly affect women of reproductive age. While basic molecular studies have implicated persisting fetal cells in the mother in some AID, supportive epidemiological evidence is limited. We investigated the effect of vaginal delivery, caesarean section (CS and induced abortion on the risk of subsequent maternal AID. Using the Danish Civil Registration System (CRS we identified women who were born between 1960 and 1992. We performed data linkage between the CRS other Danish national registers to identify women who had a pregnancy and those who developed AID. Women were categorised into 4 groups; nulligravida (control group, women who had 1st child by vaginal delivery, whose 1st delivery was by CS and who had abortions. Log-linear Poisson regression with person-years was used for data analysis adjusting for several potential confounders. There were 1,035,639 women aged >14 years and 25,570 developed AID: 43.4% nulligravida, 44.3% had their first pregnancy delivered vaginally, 7.6% CS and 4.1% abortions. The risk of AID was significantly higher in the 1st year after vaginal delivery (RR = 1.1[1.0, 1.2] and CS (RR = 1.3[1.1, 1.5] but significantly lower in the 1st year following abortion (RR = 0.7[0.6, 0.9]. These results suggest an association between pregnancy and the risk of subsequent maternal AID. Increased risks of AID after CS may be explained by amplified fetal cell traffic at delivery, while decreased risks after abortion may be due to the transfer of more primitive fetal stem cells. The increased risk of AID in the first year after delivery may also be related to greater testing during pregnancy.

  18. [Recurrent left atrial myxoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Martínez, Francisco L; Lagomasino Hidalgo, Alvaro; Mirabal Rodríguez, Roger; López Bermúdez, Félix H; López Bernal, Omaida J

    2003-01-01

    Primary cardiac tumors are rare. Mixomas are the most common among them; 75% are located in the left atrium, 20% in the right atrium, and the rest in the ventricles. The seldom appear in atrio-ventricular valves. Recidivant mixoma are also rare, appearing in 1-5% of all patients that have undergone surgical treatment of a mixoma. In this paper we present our experience with a female patient, who 8 years after having been operated of a left atrial mixoma, began with symptoms of mild heart failure. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed recurrence of the tumor, and was therefore subjected to a second open-heart surgery from which she recovered without complications.

  19. Beneficial effect of testosterone in the treatment of chronic autoimmune thyroiditis in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, S.A.; Young, P.R.; Penhale, W.J.

    1986-01-01

    Early thymectomy and sublethal irradiation of normal rats consistently induces a sex-dependent chronic autoimmune thyroiditis. Females are much more susceptible to this autoimmune disorder than are males. The possible therapeutic effects of testosterone (Te) on established autoimmune thyroiditis has been investigated in this model. The pathologic condition of the gland before treatment was monitored by a thyroid grafting and extirpation techniques. Te administration by either parenteral injection or implantation caused significant regression of established thyroiditis. Repeated doses of Te ester in oil were found to be more effective than powdered free-Te given by implantation, and frequently produced complete resolution of chronic lesions involving the entire gland. In these thyroids, there was reappearance of normal thyroid architecture and complete absence of mononuclear cellular infiltration. However, no inhibitory effect on serum autoantibody production to thyroglobulin was noted with any form of Te treatment. These observations strengthen the concept that cellular rather than humoral mechanisms are involved in the pathogenesis of thyroiditis.

  20. Clinical Significance of Autoantibodies to P53 Protein in Patients with Autoimmune Liver Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Himoto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the p53 gene leading to conformational changes in the p53 protein have been well established in many human cancers. Conformational changes and/or cellular accumulation of the protein may induce an immune response, resulting in circulating autoantibodies to p53, which have been documented in several types of cancers. Although rarely associated with autoimmune disease, a few reports have documented titres of anti-p53 autoantibodies in patients with autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cirrhosis. The clinical relevance of circulating autoantibodies to p53, therefore, remains unclear. Accordingly, this study aimed to examine the prevalence and clinical relevance of anti-p53 autoantibodies in patients with selected autoimmune liver diseases.

  1. Development of Spontaneous Autoimmune Peripheral Polyneuropathy in B7-2–Deficient Nod Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomon, Benoît; Rhee, Lesley; Bour-Jordan, Helene; Hsin, Honor; Montag, Anthony; Soliven, Betty; Arcella, Jennifer; Girvin, Ann M.; Miller, Stephen D.; Bluestone, Jeffrey A.

    2001-01-01

    An increasing number of studies have documented the central role of T cell costimulation in autoimmunity. Here we show that the autoimmune diabetes-prone nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse strain, deficient in B7-2 costimulation, is protected from diabetes but develops a spontaneous autoimmune peripheral polyneuropathy. All the female and one third of the male mice exhibited limb paralysis with histologic and electrophysiologic evidence of severe demyelination in the peripheral nerves beginning at 20 wk of age. No central nervous system lesions were apparent. The peripheral nerve tissue was infiltrated with dendritic cells, CD4+, and CD8+ T cells. Finally, CD4+ T cells isolated from affected animals induced the disease in NOD.SCID mice. Thus, the B7-2–deficient NOD mouse constitutes the first model of a spontaneous autoimmune disease of the peripheral nervous system, which has many similarities to the human disease, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). This model demonstrates that NOD mice have “cryptic” autoimmune defects that can polarize toward the nervous tissue after the selective disruption of CD28/B7-2 costimulatory pathway. PMID:11535635

  2. Autoimmune and Neoplastic Thyroid Diseases Associated with Hepatitis C Chronic Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poupak Fallahi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Frequently, patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV chronic infection have high levels of serum anti-thyroperoxidase and/or anti-thyroglobulin autoantibodies, ultrasonographic signs of chronic autoimmune thyroiditis, and subclinical hypothyroidism, in female gender versus healthy controls, or hepatitis B virus infected patients. In patients with “HCV-associated mixed cryoglobulinemia” (MC + HCV, a higher prevalence of thyroid autoimmune disorders was shown not only compared to controls, but also versus HCV patients without cryoglobulinemia. Patients with MC + HCV or HCV chronic infection show a higher prevalence of papillary thyroid cancer than controls, in particular in patients with autoimmune thyroiditis. Patients with HCV chronic infection, or with MC + HCV, in presence of autoimmune thyroiditis, show higher serum levels of T-helper (Th1 (C-X-C motif ligand 10 (CXCL10 chemokine, but normal levels of Th2 (C-C motif ligand 2 chemokine, than patients without thyroiditis. HCV thyroid infection could act by upregulating CXCL10 gene expression and secretion in thyrocytes recruiting Th1 lymphocytes that secrete interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α. These cytokines might induce a further CXCL10 secretion by thyrocytes, thus perpetuating the immune cascade, which may lead to the appearance of autoimmune thyroid disorders in genetically predisposed subjects. A careful monitoring of thyroid function, particularly where nodules occur, is recommended in HCV patients.

  3. Complicating autoimmune diseases in myasthenia gravis: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacu, Aliona; Andersen, Jintana Bunpan; Lisnic, Vitalie; Owe, Jone Furlund; Gilhus, Nils Erik

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a rare autoimmune disease of skeletal muscle endplates. MG subgroup is relevant for comorbidity, but usually not accounted for. MG patients have an increased risk for complicating autoimmune diseases, most commonly autoimmune thyroid disease, systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. In this review, we present concomitant autoimmune disorders associated with the different MG subgroups, and show how this influences treatment and prognosis. Concomitant MG should always be considered in patients with an autoimmune disorder and developing new neuromuscular weakness, fatigue or respiratory failure. When a second autoimmune disorder is suspected, MG should be included as a differential diagnosis. PMID:25915571

  4. Menopause in patients with autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammaritano, Lisa R

    2012-05-01

    Menopause represents a time of significant clinical and hormonal change. Given the incompletely understood interrelationship between gonadal hormones and the immune system, it is possible that menopause may affect, or be affected by, the presence of autoimmune disease. Menopause has significant effects on a number of organ systems including the cardiovascular, skeletal, central nervous and genitourinary systems. Premature ovarian failure is related to autoimmune factors in a proportion of cases, but is not generally associated with systemic autoimmune disorders unless secondary to treatment with alkylating agents such as cyclophosphamide. Gonadal hormones have been suggested to relate to both onset and activity in certain autoimmune diseases. For patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, disease activity is lower, and damage accrual higher, in the postmenopausal years, but the mechanisms responsible may relate to age, duration of disease, menopause changes, long-term effects of therapy, or some combination of these factors. Early menopause is a risk factor for rheumatoid arthritis, and post-menopausal status in RA is associated with greater damage and disability. Systemic sclerosis and giant cell arteritis may also be adversely affected by onset of menopause. Importantly, autoimmune disease and menopause may have an additive effect on risk for common comorbidities such as cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Autoimmune hepatitis in Italy: the Bologna experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratori, Paolo; Granito, Alessandro; Quarneti, Chiara; Ferri, Silvia; Menichella, Rita; Cassani, Fabio; Pappas, Georgios; Bianchi, Francesco B; Lenzi, Marco; Muratori, Luigi

    2009-06-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis affects mainly women. It is subdivided into type 1 and type 2 according to the autoantibody profile and without immunosuppression usually evolves to cirrhosis and end-stage liver failure. We evaluated clinical, biochemical, immunological and genetic features and treatment response of 163 consecutive Italian patients with autoimmune hepatitis. At diagnosis, type 1 autoimmune hepatitis showed more inflamed liver histology and more pronounced cholestasis, whereas type 2 was more common in children. Male and female patients shared similar clinical, biochemical and immunological features. Of 89 patients with 5-year follow-up or longer, 23 patients irrespective of presenting clinical, biochemical and immunological features achieved complete remission (normal transaminases and gammaglobulin levels) which was maintained with minimal steroid dosage; attempt at treatment withdrawal led to disease exacerbation. Complete responders had more often HLA DRB1*0401 (p = 0.011) and their risk of disease progression was lower (p < 0.0001). Type 1 and type 2 autoimmune hepatitis is one and the same disease. Autoimmune hepatitis has similar features in male and female patients. HLA DRB1*0401 positive patients are more likely to achieve complete remission. Continuous low-dose steroids are necessary to maintain remission, significantly reducing the risk of disease progression.

  6. Upper gastrointestinal symptoms in autoimmune gastritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carabotti, Marilia; Lahner, Edith; Esposito, Gianluca; Sacchi, Maria Carlotta; Severi, Carola; Annibale, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Autoimmune gastritis is often suspected for its hematologic findings, and rarely the diagnosis is made for the presence of gastrointestinal symptoms. Aims of this cross-sectional study were to assess in a large cohort of patients affected by autoimmune gastritis the occurrence and the pattern of gastrointestinal symptoms and to evaluate whether symptomatic patients are characterized by specific clinical features. Gastrointestinal symptoms of 379 consecutive autoimmune gastritis patients were systematically assessed and classified following Rome III Criteria. Association between symptoms and anemia pattern, positivity to gastric autoantibodies, Helicobacter pylori infection, and concomitant autoimmune disease were evaluated. In total, 70.2% of patients were female, median age 55 years (range 17–83). Pernicious anemia (53.6%), iron deficiency anemia (34.8%), gastric autoantibodies (68.8%), and autoimmune disorders (41.7%) were present. However, 56.7% of patients complained of gastrointestinal symptoms, 69.8% of them had exclusively upper symptoms, 15.8% only lower and 14.4% concomitant upper and lower symptoms. Dyspepsia, subtype postprandial distress syndrome was the most represented, being present in 60.2% of symptomatic patients. Univariate and multivariate analyses showed that age gastritis is associated in almost 60% of cases with gastrointestinal symptoms, in particular dyspepsia. Dyspepsia is strictly related to younger age, no smoking, and absence of anemia. PMID:28072728

  7. Autoimmune gastritis: Pathologist’s viewpoint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coati, Irene; Fassan, Matteo; Farinati, Fabio; Graham, David Y; Genta, Robert M; Rugge, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Western countries are seeing a constant decline in the incidence of Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis, coupled with a rising epidemiological and clinical impact of autoimmune gastritis. This latter gastropathy is due to autoimmune aggression targeting parietal cells through a complex interaction of auto-antibodies against the parietal cell proton pump and intrinsic factor, and sensitized T cells. Given the specific target of this aggression, autoimmune gastritis is typically restricted to the gastric corpus-fundus mucosa. In advanced cases, the oxyntic epithelia are replaced by atrophic (and metaplastic) mucosa, creating the phenotypic background in which both gastric neuroendocrine tumors and (intestinal-type) adenocarcinomas may develop. Despite improvements in our understanding of the phenotypic changes or cascades occurring in this autoimmune setting, no reliable biomarkers are available for identifying patients at higher risk of developing a gastric neoplasm. The standardization of autoimmune gastritis histology reports and classifications in diagnostic practice is a prerequisite for implementing definitive secondary prevention strategies based on multidisciplinary diagnostic approaches integrating endoscopy, serology, histology and molecular profiling. PMID:26576102

  8. Autoimmune Abnormalities of Postpartum Thyroid Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bari, Flavia; Granese, Roberta; Le Donne, Maria; Vita, Roberto; Benvenga, Salvatore

    2017-01-01

    The year following parturition is a critical time for the de novo appearance or exacerbation of autoimmune diseases, including autoimmune thyroid disease. The vast majority of postpartum thyroid disease consists of postpartum thyroiditis (PPT) and the minority by Graves' disease and non-autoimmune thyroiditis. PPT has a worldwide prevalence ranging from 1 to 22% and averaging 5% based on a review published in 2012. Several factors confer risk for the development of PPT. Typically, the clinical course of PPT is characterized by three phases: thyrotoxic, hypothyroid, and euthyroid phase. Approximately half of PPT women will have permanent hypothyroidism. The best humoral marker for predictivity, already during the first trimester of gestation, is considered positivity for thyroperoxidase autoantibodies (TPOAb), though only one-third to half of such TPOAb-positive pregnant women will develop PPT. Nutraceuticals (such as selenium) or omega-3-fatty acid supplements seem to have a role in prevention of PPT. In a recent study on pregnant women with stable dietary habits, we found that the fish consumers had lower rates of positivity (and lower serum levels) of both TPOAb and thyroglobulin Ab compared to meat eaters. Finally, we remind the reader of other diseases that can be observed in the postpartum period, either autoimmune or non-autoimmune, thyroid or non-thyroid.

  9. Left atrial appendage occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Mirdamadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Left atrial appendage (LAA occlusion is a treatment strategy to prevent blood clot formation in atrial appendage. Although, LAA occlusion usually was done by catheter-based techniques, especially percutaneous trans-luminal mitral commissurotomy (PTMC, it can be done during closed and open mitral valve commissurotomy (CMVC, OMVC and mitral valve replacement (MVR too. Nowadays, PTMC is performed as an optimal management of severe mitral stenosis (MS and many patients currently are treated by PTMC instead of previous surgical methods. One of the most important contraindications of PTMC is presence of clot in LAA. So, each patient who suffers of severe MS is evaluated by Trans-Esophageal Echocardiogram to rule out thrombus in LAA before PTMC. At open heart surgery, replacement of the mitral valve was performed for 49-year-old woman. Also, left atrial appendage occlusion was done during surgery. Immediately after surgery, echocardiography demonstrates an echo imitated the presence of a thrombus in left atrial appendage area, although there was not any evidence of thrombus in pre-pump TEE. We can conclude from this case report that when we suspect of thrombus of left atrial, we should obtain exact history of previous surgery of mitral valve to avoid misdiagnosis clotted LAA, instead of obliterated LAA. Consequently, it can prevent additional evaluations and treatments such as oral anticoagulation and exclusion or postponing surgeries including PTMC.

  10. Cellular and Humoral Autoimmunity Directed at Bile Duct Epithelia in Murine Biliary Atresia

    OpenAIRE

    Mack, Cara L.; Tucker, Rebecca M.; Lu, Brandy R.; Sokol, Ronald J.; Fontenot, Andrew P.; Ueno, Yoshiyuki; Gill, Ronald G.

    2006-01-01

    Biliary atresia is an inflammatory fibrosclerosing lesion of the bile ducts that leads to biliary cirrhosis and is the most frequent indication for liver transplantation in children. The pathogenesis of biliary atresia is not known; one theory is that of a virus-induced, subsequent autoimmune-mediated injury of bile ducts. The aim of this study was to determine whether autoreactive T cells and autoantibodies specific to bile duct epithelia are present in the rotavirus (RRV)- induced murine mo...

  11. Multiple left ventricular aneurysms in a young female.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raval, Abhishek P; Shukla, Anand; Garg, Rajiv; Rana, Yashpal; Shah, Komal

    2016-02-01

    Multiple left ventricular aneurysms (LVAs) are rare, especially in a young female. A 29-year-old woman presented vague symptoms. Multiple LVAs were revealed and confirmed on different imaging modalities, including chest radiography, echocardiography, contrast ventriculography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Detailed work-up for probable etiologies including ischemic, infectious, inflammatory and autoimmune causes was negative. In the absence of angina, decompensated congestive heart failure, arrhythmias and embolism, the patient was managed conservatively, with excellent mid-term outcome. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  12. Hypoplastic left heart syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiagarajan Ravi

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hypoplastic left heart syndrome(HLHS refers to the abnormal development of the left-sided cardiac structures, resulting in obstruction to blood flow from the left ventricular outflow tract. In addition, the syndrome includes underdevelopment of the left ventricle, aorta, and aortic arch, as well as mitral atresia or stenosis. HLHS has been reported to occur in approximately 0.016 to 0.036% of all live births. Newborn infants with the condition generally are born at full term and initially appear healthy. As the arterial duct closes, the systemic perfusion becomes decreased, resulting in hypoxemia, acidosis, and shock. Usually, no heart murmur, or a non-specific heart murmur, may be detected. The second heart sound is loud and single because of aortic atresia. Often the liver is enlarged secondary to congestive heart failure. The embryologic cause of the disease, as in the case of most congenital cardiac defects, is not fully known. The most useful diagnostic modality is the echocardiogram. The syndrome can be diagnosed by fetal echocardiography between 18 and 22 weeks of gestation. Differential diagnosis includes other left-sided obstructive lesions where the systemic circulation is dependent on ductal flow (critical aortic stenosis, coarctation of the aorta, interrupted aortic arch. Children with the syndrome require surgery as neonates, as they have duct-dependent systemic circulation. Currently, there are two major modalities, primary cardiac transplantation or a series of staged functionally univentricular palliations. The treatment chosen is dependent on the preference of the institution, its experience, and also preference. Although survival following initial surgical intervention has improved significantly over the last 20 years, significant mortality and morbidity are present for both surgical strategies. As a result pediatric cardiologists continue to be challenged by discussions with families regarding initial decision

  13. Interferon-gamma regulates oxidative stress during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Espejo, Carmen; Penkowa, Milena; Sáez-Torres, Irene

    2002-01-01

    . Here we analyze the role of IFN-gamma during EAE by using both IFN-gamma receptor-knockout (IFN-gamma R(-/-)) and wild-type mice, both strains immunized with peptide 40-55 from rat myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein. The levels of oxidative stress were determined through the analysis......Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an induced inflammatory and demyelinating disease of the central nervous system which shares many clinical and pathological features with and is considered the animal model of multiple sclerosis. There is extensive evidence that EAE is a Th1...... disease eliciting secretion of proinflammatory cytokines like IFN-gamma or TNF-alpha, and it has been suggested that cytokine-induced oxidative stress could have a role in EAE neuropathology. However, the individual roles of these and other cytokines in the pathogenesis of the disease are still uncertain...

  14. Diagnosis and Management of Pediatric Autoimmune Liver Disease : ESPGHAN Hepatology Committee Position Statement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina; Vergani, Diego; Baumann, Ulrich; Czubkowski, Piotr; Debray, Dominique; Dezsofi, Antal; Fischler, Björn; Gupte, Girish; Hierro, Loreto; Indolfi, Giuseppe; Jahnel, Jörg; Smets, Françoise; Verkade, Henkjan J; Hadžić, Nedim

    Paediatric autoimmune liver disease is characterised by inflammatory liver histology, circulating autoantibodies and increased levels of IgG, in the absence of a known etiology. Three conditions have a likely autoimmune pathogenesis: autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis

  15. Epidemiology of autoimmune diseases in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eaton, William W.; Rose, N.R.; Kalaydijan, A.

    2007-01-01

    An epidemiologic study of the autoimmune diseases taken together has not been done heretofore. The National Patient Register of Denmark is used to estimate the population prevalence of 31 possible or probable autoimmune diseases. Record linkage is used to estimate 465 pairwise co...... diseases and weak across diseases. These data confirm the importance of the autoimmune diseases as a group and suggest that common etiopathologies exist among them......-morbidities in individuals among the 31 diseases, and familial aggregation among sibs, parents and offspring. The prevalence of any of the 31 diseases in the population is more than 5%. Within individuals, there is extensive comorbidity across the 31 diseases. Within families, aggregation is strongest for individual...

  16. Pregnancy and autoimmune connective tissue diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marder, Wendy; Littlejohn, Emily A

    2016-01-01

    The autoimmune connective tissue diseases predominantly affect women and often occur during the reproductive years. Thus, specialized issues in pregnancy planning and management are commonly encountered in this patient population. This chapter provides a current overview of pregnancy as a risk factor for onset of autoimmune disease, considerations related to the course of pregnancy in several autoimmune connective tissue diseases, and disease management and medication issues before and during pregnancy and the postpartum period. A major theme that has emerged across these inflammatory diseases is that active maternal disease during pregnancy is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes, and that maternal and fetal health can be optimized when conception is planned during times of inactive disease and through maintaining treatment regimens compatible with pregnancy. PMID:27421217

  17. MicroRNAs in autoimmune rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.D. Sebastiani

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The etiology of autoimmune diseases remains largely unknown. In recent years, besides genetic factors, several studies proposed that the epigenome may hold the key to a better understanding of autoimmunity initiation and perpetuation. More specifically epigenetic regulatory mechanisms comprise DNA methylation, a variety of histone modifications, and microRNA (miRNA activity, all of which act upon gene and protein expression levels. In particular it is well known that epigenetic mechanisms are important for controlling the pattern of gene expression during development, the cell cycle, and the response to biological or environmental changes. In the present review a description of the most frequent epigenetic deregulations, in particular the role of miRNA, in rheumatic autoimmune disorders will be analyzed.

  18. Gene expression profiling in autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bovin, Lone Frier; Brynskov, Jørn; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2007-01-01

    ) patients and healthy individuals were specific for the arthritic process or likewise altered in other chronic inflammatory diseases such as chronic autoimmune thyroiditis (Hashimoto's thyroiditis, HT) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Using qPCR for 18 RA-discriminative genes, there were no significant......A central issue in autoimmune disease is whether the underlying inflammation is a repeated stereotypical process or whether disease specific gene expression is involved. To shed light on this, we analysed whether genes previously found to be differentially regulated in rheumatoid arthritis (RA...... immunoinflammatory diseases, but only if accompanied by pronounced systemic manifestations. This suggests that at least some of the genes activated in RA are predominantly or solely related to general and disease-nonspecific autoimmune processes...

  19. HTLV-1, Immune Response and Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juarez A S Quaresma

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1 infection is associated with adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL. Tropical spastic paraparesis/HTLV-1-associated myelopathy (PET/HAM is involved in the development of autoimmune diseases including Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA, Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE, and Sjögren’s Syndrome (SS. The development of HTLV-1-driven autoimmunity is hypothesized to rely on molecular mimicry, because virus-like particles can trigger an inflammatory response. However, HTLV-1 modifies the behavior of CD4+ T cells on infection and alters their cytokine production. A previous study showed that in patients infected with HTLV-1, the activity of regulatory CD4+ T cells and their consequent expression of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines are altered. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms underlying changes in cytokine release leading to the loss of tolerance and development of autoimmunity.

  20. The clinical extremes of autoimmune cholangitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Campos

    Full Text Available Autoimmune cholangitis (AIC was first described in 1987 as immunocholangitis in three women who presented with signs and symptoms of primary biliary cholangitis (PBC, but who were antimitochondrial (AMA negative and antinuclear antibodies (ANA positive, and responded to immunosuppressive therapy with azathioprine and prednisolone (1. AIC is a rare chronic cholestatic inflammatory disease characterized by the presence of high ANA or smooth muscle antibodies (SMA but AMA seronegativity. Histologically, AIC exhibits bile duct injury (2. In terms of therapeutics, in addition to response to ursodeoxycholic acid, a prompt response to corticosteroids has also been reported in earlier stages, distinguishing it from PBC. Herein the authors describe two cases with mixed signs of PBC and autoimmune hepatitis (AIH. The diagnostic differentiation between these diseases (AIC, PBC and AIH is essential because of the different therapeutic strategies. Our cases highlight the importance of clinician awareness of the autoimmune spectrum of liver diseases.

  1. [Thymoma and autoimmune thyroiditis. A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkane, A; Bellamy, J; Leroy-Terquem, E; Levy, R

    2003-09-01

    We report an association between a thymus tumor and autoimmune thyroiditis. This association is probably related to loss of immune control secondary to loss of thymus integrity. A 48-year-old woman was hospitalized for thoracic pain. Her past history included thyroiditis treated by L-thyroxin for two years. The chest x-ray demonstrated a mediastinal opacity which was confirmed by computed tomography. Surgical resection was performed and histological analysis of the surgical specimen confirmed the diagnosis of lympho-epithelial thymoma. Thyroid immunity tests demonstrated the presence of anti-peroxidase antibodies confirming the diagnosis of Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Chest x-ray and CT-scan are indicated in patients with autoimmune thyroiditis to search for a thymic mass. Conversely, search for autoimmune thyroiditis is warranted in patients with an identified thymic mass.

  2. A case of autoimmune progesterone dermatitis in an adolescent female.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakarla, Nirupama; Zurawin, Robert K

    2006-04-01

    Progesterone-induced dermatitis is a rare disorder. It typically occurs in females due to an autoimmune phenomenon to endogenous progesterone production, but can also be caused by exogenous intake of a synthetic progestin. Here, we present a case of autoimmune progesterone dermatitis (AIPD) seen in an adolescent female. The patient is a 15-year-old Caucasian female with no significant past medical history and no prior exogenous hormone use, who presented to her primary care physician complaining of cyclic skin eruptions. She noted that her dermatologic symptoms occurred monthly, just prior to her menses. An intradermal skin test using 0.1 cc of progesterone was performed. The patient immediately developed a wheal, confirming the diagnosis of AIPD. The patient was begun on a continuous regimen of an oral contraceptive pill with 30 micrograms of ethinyl estradiol and 0.15 mg of levonorgestrel. The skin eruptions have not returned since the initiation of this therapy. Autoimmune progesterone dermatitis manifests via the occurrence of cyclic skin eruptions. Women with the disorder commonly present with dermatologic lesions in the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. Diagnosis of AIPD is confirmed by performing a skin allergen test using progesterone. Due to its rarity, AIPD should be considered a diagnosis of exclusion. In cases believed to be due to an endogenous production of progesterone, several methods of therapy have been attempted. The ultimate goal of therapy is the suppression of ovulation, which will prevent endogenous hormone production as progesterone is only produced in ovulatory cycles. Currently, the first-line choice of therapy is a combination oral contraceptive. If this treatment is ineffective, patients have been treated with danazol, gonadotropin releasing hormone analogs, tamoxifen, and oophorectomy with varying success.

  3. Different response to glucocorticoid therapy in autoimmune diseases of CNS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanojević Željka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Th17 cells and interleukin (IL-17, their signature cytokine, have the main role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases of the central nervous system such as multiple sclerosis and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE. The effect of glucocorticoids (GC on expression and production of IL-17 has not been thoroughly tested yet. Also, the site of action of GC is not precisely defined. This paper presents the main results of the Doctoral thesis devoted to studies of GC on the production of IL-17 in the model of EAE, induced in susceptible laboratory animals. Methylprednisolone (MP, a synthetic glucocorticoid, inhibit in vitro production of IL-17 in mitogen-stimulated lymph node cells (LNC as well as in myelin basic protein (MBP-stimulated draining LNC in dose- dependent manner. However, under the same conditions inhibitory effect of the MP on production and expression of the genes for IFN-γ, a cytokine that TH1 cells generate, is significantly more pronounced. Interestingly, when we analyzed effects of MP applied in vivo in EAE, the same phenomenon was observed: the proportion of IFN-γ producing, but not all of IL-17 cells were reduced in cells isolated from MP treated rats in comparison to control rats which indicates that MP achieves its effects not only in the peripheral lymphoid tissues, but also in target tissue. Different sensitivities of Th1 and Th17 cells that are major cellular sources of IFN-γ or IL-17 in the effect of the GC has been observed in other animal models and in human disease. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the relative resistance of Th17 cells on the operation of GC is very important for the development of new strategies in the treatment of those forms of autoimmune and chronic diseases that are resistant to the effect of glucocorticoids.

  4. [Successful treatment of surgically induced necrotizing sclerokeratitis (SINS) with systemic immunosuppresive agents and amniotic membrane grafting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero-Coma, M; Franco-Benito, M; García-Ruiz-de-Morales, J M; Alonso-Orcajo, N; Del Barrio-Manso, I

    2009-11-01

    We report the case of a 74-year-old female who developed a necrotizing sclerokeratitis affecting her left eye after uncomplicated cataract surgery. She had no previous history of systemic autoimmune disease. Histopathology of the lesion revealed necrotic granulomatosis with an increased number of plasma cells. Surgically induced necrotizing sclerokeratitis (SINS) is a serious entity which requires prompt and aggressive therapy to prevent its potential devastating ocular consequences. Conjunctival resection and amniotic membrane grafting may be necessary to temporarily interrupt local immunologic events in severe cases. However, associated systemic immunomodulatory therapy seems to be mandatory (Arch Soc Esp Oftalmol 2009; 84: 577-580).

  5. Mutant HSP70 Reverses Autoimmune Depigmentation in Vitiligo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosenson, Jeffrey A.; Zloza, Andrew; Nieland, John D.; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth; Eby, Jonathan M.; Huelsmann, Erica J.; Kumar, Previn; Denman, Cecele J.; Lacek, Andrew T.; Kohlhapp, Frederick J.; Alamiri, Ahmad; Hughes, Tasha; Bines, Steven D.; Kaufman, Howard L.; Overbeck, Andreas; Mehrotra, Shikhar; Hernandez, Claudia; Nishimura, Michael I.; Guevara-Patino, Jose A.; Le Poole, I. Caroline

    2013-01-01

    Vitiligo is an autoimmune disease characterized by destruction of melanocytes, leaving 0.5% of the population with progressive depigmentation. Current treatments offer limited efficacy. We report that modified inducible heat shock protein 70 (HSP70i) prevents T cell–mediated depigmentation. HSP70i is the molecular link between stress and the resultant immune response. We previously showed that HSP70i induces an inflammatory dendritic cell (DC) phenotype and is necessary for depigmentation in vitiligo mouse models. Here, we observed a similar DC inflammatory phenotype in vitiligo patients. In a mouse model of depigmentation, DNA vaccination with a melanocyte antigen and the carboxyl terminus of HSP70i was sufficient to drive autoimmunity. Mutational analysis of the HSP70i substrate-binding domain established the peptide QPGVLIQVYEG as invaluable for DC activation, and mutant HSP70i could not induce depigmentation. Moreover, mutant HSP70iQ435A bound human DCs and reduced their activation, as well as induced a shift from inflammatory to tolerogenic DCs in mice. HSP70iQ435A-encoding DNA applied months before spontaneous depigmentation prevented vitiligo in mice expressing a transgenic, melanocyte-reactive T cell receptor. Furthermore, use of HSP70iQ435A therapeutically in a different, rapidly depigmenting model after loss of differentiated melanocytes resulted in 76% recovery of pigmentation. Treatment also prevented relevant T cells from populating mouse skin. In addition, ex vivo treatment of human skin averted the disease-related shift from quiescent to effector T cell phenotype. Thus, HSP70iQ435A DNA delivery may offer potent treatment opportunities for vitiligo. PMID:23447019

  6. Human neutrophils in auto-immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieblemont, Nathalie; Wright, Helen L; Edwards, Steven W; Witko-Sarsat, Véronique

    2016-04-01

    Human neutrophils have great capacity to cause tissue damage in inflammatory diseases via their inappropriate activation to release reactive oxygen species (ROS), proteases and other tissue-damaging molecules. Furthermore, activated neutrophils can release a wide variety of cytokines and chemokines that can regulate almost every element of the immune system. In addition to these important immuno-regulatory processes, activated neutrophils can also release, expose or generate neoepitopes that have the potential to break immune tolerance and result in the generation of autoantibodies, that characterise a number of human auto-immune diseases. For example, in vasculitis, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) that are directed against proteinase 3 or myeloperoxidase are neutrophil-derived autoantigens and activated neutrophils are the main effector cells of vascular damage. In other auto-immune diseases, these neutrophil-derived neoepitopes may arise from a number of processes that include release of granule enzymes and ROS, changes in the properties of components of their plasma membrane as a result of activation or apoptosis, and via the release of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs). NETs are extracellular structures that contain chromatin that is decorated with granule enzymes (including citrullinated proteins) that can act as neo-epitopes to generate auto-immunity. This review therefore describes the processes that can result in neutrophil-mediated auto-immunity, and the role of neutrophils in the molecular pathologies of auto-immune diseases such as vasculitis, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We discuss the potential role of NETs in these processes and some of the debate in the literature regarding the role of this phenomenon in microbial killing, cell death and auto-immunity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Safety of vaccine adjuvants: focus on autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Laan, Jan Willem; Gould, Sarah; Tanir, Jennifer Y

    2015-03-24

    Questions have been recently raised regarding the safety of vaccine adjuvants, particularly in relation to autoimmunity or autoimmune disease(s)/disorder(s) (AID). The International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI) Health and Environmental Sciences Institute (HESI) formed a scientific committee and convened a 2-day workshop, consisting of technical experts from around the world representing academia, government regulatory agencies, and industry, to investigate and openly discuss the issues around adjuvant safety in vaccines. The types of adjuvants considered included oil-in-water emulsions and toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists. The state of science around the use of animal models and biomarkers for the evaluation and prediction of AID were also discussed. Following extensive literature reviews by the HESI committee, and presentations by experts at the workshop, several key points were identified, including the value of animal models used to study autoimmunity and AID toward studying novel vaccine adjuvants; whether there is scientific evidence indicating an intrinsic risk of autoimmunity and AID with adjuvants, or a higher risk resulting from the mechanism of action; and if there is compelling clinical data linking adjuvants and AID. The tripartite group of experts concluded that there is no compelling evidence supporting the association of vaccine adjuvants with autoimmunity signals. Additionally, it is recommended that future research on the potential effects of vaccine adjuvants on AID should consider carefully the experimental design in animal models particularly if they are to be used in any risk assessment, as an improper design and model could result in misleading information. Finally, studies on the mechanistic aspects and potential biomarkers related to adjuvants and autoimmunity phenomena could be developed. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Increased severity of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, chronic macrophage/microglial reactivity, and demyelination in transgenic mice producing tumor necrosis factor-alpha in the central nervous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taupin, V; Renno, T; Bourbonnière, L

    1997-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is an inflammatory cytokine implicated in a number of autoimmune diseases. Apoptotic cell death is induced by TNF-alpha in vitro, and has been suggested as one cause of autoimmune pathology, including autoimmune demyelinating diseases where oligodendrocytes...... are a target of immune attack. TNF-alpha also regulates macrophage activity which could contribute to autoimmune inflammation. We have expressed TNF-alpha at disease-equivalent levels in the central nervous system of transgenic mice, using a myelin basic protein (MBP) promoter. These mice were normal...... and showed no spontaneous pathology, but they developed experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) with greater severity than nontransgenic controls when immunized with MBP in adjuvant. Unlike nontransgenic controls, EAE then progressed to a nonabating demyelinating disease. Macrophage...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions APECED Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy Printable PDF Open All Close All ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy ( APECED ) is an inherited condition that ...

  10. Shared genetic origins of allergy and autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waage, J. E.; Kreiner-Møller, E.; Standl, M.

    2015-01-01

    Parallel increases in allergy and autoimmune disease prevalence in recent time suggest shared, but yet unknown, etiologies. Here, we investigated shared genetic loci and molecular pathways to identify possible shared disease mechanisms between allergy and autoimmune diseases....

  11. Generalized Vitiligo Associated Autoimmune Diseases in Japanese Patients Their Families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiko Narita

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions: Among Japanese vitiligo patients, there is a subgroup with strong evidence of genetically determined susceptibility to not only vitiligo, but also to autoimmune thyroid disease and other autoimmune disorders.

  12. Complement inhibitors to treat IgM-mediated autoimmune hemolysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, Diana; Zeerleder, Sacha

    2015-01-01

    Complement activation in autoimmune hemolytic anemia may exacerbate extravascular hemolysis and may occasionally result in intravascular hemolysis. IgM autoantibodies as characteristically found in cold autoantibody autoimmune hemolytic anemia, in cold agglutinin disease but also in a considerable

  13. The role of epigenetic mechanisms and processes in autoimmune disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greer JM

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Judith M Greer, Pamela A McCombeThe University of Queensland, UQ Centre for Clinical Research, Brisbane, Queensland, AustraliaAbstract: The lack of complete concordance of autoimmune disease in identical twins suggests that nongenetic factors play a major role in determining disease susceptibility. In this review, we consider how epigenetic mechanisms could affect the immune system and effector mechanisms in autoimmunity and/or the target organ of autoimmunity and thus affect the development of autoimmune diseases. We also consider the types of stimuli that lead to epigenetic modifications and how these relate to the epidemiology of autoimmune diseases and the biological pathways operative in different autoimmune diseases. Increasing our knowledge of these epigenetic mechanisms and processes will increase the prospects for controlling or preventing autoimmune diseases in the future through the use of drugs that target the epigenetic pathways.Keywords: twins, concordance, autoimmune disease, nongenetic factors, immune system, epigenetic modifications

  14. [Ludwig van Beethoven: an autoimmune deafness?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, P J

    1995-01-01

    The author reminds us of the great moments of Beethoven's life and of the different stages of his deafness onset, until to last instants. The post-mortem examination, performed by doctor Wagner, and the scientific studies of the remains, during the exhumations, are reported. Beethoven's deafness was clearly a sensorineural impairment and the previously suggested prevalent hypotheses are discussed. A new theory is emphasized, based on modern studies about autoimmune sensorineural hearing losses in relation with chronic inflammatory bowel ailment. Conclusion is that Beethoven's deafness was probably owing to a primary autoimmune degeneration of the organ of Corti, giving rise to atrophy of the auditory nerve.

  15. Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease- A Clinical Viewpoint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirala Khalessi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in medicine have given us a better insight into a group of disorders known as autoimmune diseases. In particular, advances have occurred in our understanding of the Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease (AIED. In this article, the authors review the different postulated theories in the pathogenesis of this disease. The clinical presentation, the available para-clinical diagnostic tools, and the important differential diagnoses will be summarized. The management methods, including steroid therapy, immunosuppressive medications, other biological agents and intra-tympanic injections, will be addressed. Cochlear implantation as a final solution to the advanced stages of the disease, causing total deafness, will also be discussed.

  16. Diagnosis and classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, Garrett F; Tuscano, Emily T; Tuscano, Joseph M

    2014-01-01

    Uncompensated autoantibody-mediated red blood cell (RBC) consumption is the hallmark of