WorldWideScience

Sample records for autoimmune thyroid diseases

  1. Autoimmune thyroid disease and other non-endocrine autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todorović-Đilas Ljiljana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction, Autoimmune diseases are chronic conditions initiated by the loss of immunological tolerance to self-antigens. They constitute heterogeneous group of disorders, in which multiple alterations in the immune system result in a spectrum of syndromes that either target specific organs or affect the body systematically. Recent epidemiological studies have shown a possible shift of one autoimmune disease to another or the fact that more than one autoimmune disease may coexist in a single patient or in the same family. Numerous autoimmune diseases have been shown to coexist frequently with thyroid autoimmune diseases. Autoimmune thyroid disease and other organ specific non-endocrine autoimmune diseases. This part of the study reviews the prevalence of autoimmune thyroid disease coexisting with: pernicious anaemia, vitiligo, celiac disease, autoimmune liver disease, miastenia gravis, alopecia areata and sclerosis multiplex, and several recommendations for screening have been given. Autoimmune thyroid disease and other organ non-specific non-endocrine autoimmune diseases. Special attention is given to the correlation between autoimmune thyroid disease and rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, syndrome Sjögren, systemic sclerosis and mixed connective tissue disease. Conclusions. Screening for autoimmune thyroid diseases should be recommended in everyday clinical practice, in patients with primary organ-specific or organ non-specific autoimmune disease. Other­wise, in patients with primary thyroid autoimmune disease, there is no good reason of seeking for all other autoimmune diseases, although these patients have a greater risk of developing other autoimmune disease. Economic aspects of medicine require further analyzing of these data, from cost/benefit point of view to justified either mandatory screening or medical practitioner judgment.

  2. Autoimmune thyroid disease and chronic urticaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monge, Cecilia; Demarco, Paul; Burman, Kenneth D; Wartofsky, Leonard

    2007-09-01

    We report six cases of autoimmune thyroid disease associated with chronic urticaria and briefly review the literature, including the histopathological nature of such lesions, and their aetiology and pathogenesis. In view of the prevalence of thyroid disease in patients with chronic urticaria, screening measurements of thyrotropin and anti-thyroperoxidase antibodies are recommended, although negative antibodies do not exclude a relationship between urticaria and thyroid autoimmunity. After failure of conventional therapy for urticaria, patients who are apparently clinically euthyroid may be considered for a trial with levothyroxine. Improvement of urticaria was seen with levothyroxine treatment in three of four patients with only marginal abnormalities in thyroid function.

  3. Environmental factors affecting autoimmune thyroid disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safran, M.; Paul, T.L.; Roti, E.; Braverman, L.E.

    1987-06-01

    A number of environmental factors affect the incidence and progression of autoimmune thyroid disease. Exposure to excess iodine, certain drugs, infectious agents and pollutants, and stress have all been implicated.

  4. Evaluation of autoimmune thyroid disease in melasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami Mogaddam, Majid; Iranparvar Alamdari, Manouchehr; Maleki, Nasrollah; Safavi Ardabili, Nastaran; Abedkouhi, Selma

    2015-06-01

    Melasma is one of the most frequently acquired hyperpigmentation disorders clinically characterized by symmetrical brown patches on sun-exposed areas. To date, few studies have been conducted about the relationship between thyroid autoimmun-ity and melasma. To evaluate the thyroid dysfunction and autoimmunity in nonpregnant women with melasma. A total of 70 women with melasma and 70 age-matched healthy women with no history of melasma were enrolled in the study. We studied the thyroid hormone profile in both groups. The statistical analysis was performed using SPSS software. Patients with melasma had 18.5% frequency of thyroid disorders, and 15.7% had positive anti-TPO, while subjects from the control group had a 4.3% frequency of thyroid abnormalities, and only 5.7% had positive anti-TPO. There was a significantly higher prevalence of thyroid dysfunction in women with melasma compared with control group (P = 0.008). This study suggests that there is a relationship between thyroid autoimmunity and melasma. However, to make recommendations on screening for thyroid disease in patients with melasma, future research of good methodological quality is needed.

  5. Recent Advances in Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won Sang Yoo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD includes hyperthyroid Graves disease, hypothyroid autoimmune thyroiditis, and subtle subclinical thyroid dysfunctions. AITD is caused by interactions between genetic and environmental predisposing factors and results in autoimmune deterioration. Data on polymorphisms in the AITD susceptibility genes, related environmental factors, and dysregulation of autoimmune processes have accumulated over time. Over the last decade, there has been progress in the clinical field of AITD with respect to the available diagnostic and therapeutic methods as well as clinical consensus. The updated clinical guidelines allow practitioners to identify the most reasonable and current approaches for proper management. In this review, we focus on recent advances in understanding the genetic and environmental pathogenic mechanisms underlying AITD and introduce the updated set of clinical guidelines for AITD management. We also discuss other aspects of the disease such as management of subclinical thyroid dysfunction, use of levothyroxine plus levotriiodothyronine in the treatment of autoimmune hypothyroidism, risk assessment of long-standing antithyroid drug therapy in recurrent Graves' hyperthyroidism, and future research needs.

  6. Recent Advances in Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Won Sang

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) includes hyperthyroid Graves disease, hypothyroid autoimmune thyroiditis, and subtle subclinical thyroid dysfunctions. AITD is caused by interactions between genetic and environmental predisposing factors and results in autoimmune deterioration. Data on polymorphisms in the AITD susceptibility genes, related environmental factors, and dysregulation of autoimmune processes have accumulated over time. Over the last decade, there has been progress in the clinical field of AITD with respect to the available diagnostic and therapeutic methods as well as clinical consensus. The updated clinical guidelines allow practitioners to identify the most reasonable and current approaches for proper management. In this review, we focus on recent advances in understanding the genetic and environmental pathogenic mechanisms underlying AITD and introduce the updated set of clinical guidelines for AITD management. We also discuss other aspects of the disease such as management of subclinical thyroid dysfunction, use of levothyroxine plus levotriiodothyronine in the treatment of autoimmune hypothyroidism, risk assessment of long-standing antithyroid drug therapy in recurrent Graves' hyperthyroidism, and future research needs. PMID:27586448

  7. The immunogenetics of autoimmune diabetes and autoimmune thyroid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomer, Y; Barbesino, G; Greenberg, D; Davies, T F

    1997-03-01

    Although medical genetics is a well-developed area of interest, relatively little is known about the diseases caused by the combination of many genes. These multiinfluenced diseases include the autoimmune endocrine diseases. Recent advances in the techniques for whole-genome screening have shown a variety of loci that are linked to the development of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, and similar data are likely to be soon generated in autoimmune thyroid disease. Here, the authors survey the current state of genetic knowledge in these two areas and describe the investigative and analytical techniques that are now available. (Trends Endocrinol Metab 1997;8:63-70). (c) 1997, Elsevier Science Inc.

  8. Age impact on autoimmune thyroid disease in females

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoian, Dana; Craciunescu, Mihalea; Timar, Romulus; Schiller, Adalbert; Pater, Liana; Craina, Marius

    2013-10-01

    Thyroid autoimmune disease, a widespread phenomenon in female population, impairs thyroid function during pregnancy. Identifying cases, which will develop hypothyroidism during pregnancy, is crucial in the follow-up process. The study group comprised 108 females, with ages between 20-40 years; with known inactive autoimmune thyroid disease, before pregnancy that became pregnant in the study follow-up period. They were monitored by means of clinical, hormonal and immunological assays. Supplemental therapy with thyroid hormones was used, where needed. Maternal age and level of anti-thyroid antibodies were used to predict thyroid functional impairment.

  9. Family History of Autoimmune Thyroid Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O D Rymar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was estimate the clinical characteristics of Graves' disease (GD and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT in first@degree relatives of persons in families with autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD. Patients: Eighty one patients with AITD of 40 families, mean age (+/@s.d. 41.9 ± 1.8; range 18-73 years. In 10 families (25% AITD traced among siblings, whose average age was 33.6 ± 3.5 years, 29 families (72.5% - of two generations (parent@ descendant 57.4 ± 1.6 and 32.2 ± 1.5 years, p = 0.001, respectively. In one family (2.5% the disease was traced in both parents and their offspring. Results. Among patients with a positive family history for AITD is dominated by a pair of parent - descendant with a diagnosis of hypothyroidism (55%. Preliminary evidence of genetic anticipation in GD and HT. Patients with a family history of AITD ill of GD and HT to 50 years (84%, half - up to 30 years (47%. In familial forms of GD, a decrease in compensated patients for two generations. Among parents and descendant with hypothyroidism, there is a low percentage of persons over the medical euthyroidism (42%.

  10. Challenges in Interpretation of Thyroid Function Tests in Pregnant Women with Autoimmune Thyroid Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulla Feldt-Rasmussen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Physiological changes during gestation are important to be aware of in measurement and interpretation of thyroid function tests in women with autoimmune thyroid diseases. Thyroid autoimmune activity is decreasing in pregnancy. Measurement of serum TSH is the first-line screening variable for thyroid dysfunction also in pregnancy. However, using serum TSH for control of treatment of maternal thyroid autoimmunity infers a risk for compromised foetal development. Peripheral thyroid hormone values are highly different among laboratories, and there is a need for laboratory-specific gestational age-related reference ranges. Equally important, the intraindividual variability of the thyroid hormone measurements is much narrower than the interindividual variation (reflecting the reference interval. The best laboratory assessment of thyroid function is a free thyroid hormone estimate combined with TSH. Measurement of antithyroperoxidase and/or TSH receptor antibodies adds to the differential diagnosis of autoimmune and nonautoimmune thyroid diseases.

  11. [Non-autoimmune thyroiditis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Leonardo F L; Mana, Daniela L; Bruno, Oscar D

    2014-01-01

    The term thyroiditis comprises a group of thyroid diseases characterized by the presence of inflammation, including autoimmune and non-autoimmune entities. It may manifest as an acute illness with severe thyroid pain (subacute thyroiditis and infectious thyroiditis), and conditions in which the inflammation is not clinically evident evolving without pain and presenting primarily thyroid dysfunction and/or goiter (drug-induced thyroiditis and Riedel thyroiditis). The aim of this review is to provide an updated approach on non-autoimmune thyroiditis and its clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic aspects.

  12. Challenges in interpretation of thyroid function tests in pregnant women with autoimmune thyroid disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Bliddal, Sofie; Rasmussen, Åse Krogh;

    2011-01-01

    Physiological changes during gestation are important to be aware of in measurement and interpretation of thyroid function tests in women with autoimmune thyroid diseases. Thyroid autoimmune activity is decreasing in pregnancy. Measurement of serum TSH is the first-line screening variable for thyr......Physiological changes during gestation are important to be aware of in measurement and interpretation of thyroid function tests in women with autoimmune thyroid diseases. Thyroid autoimmune activity is decreasing in pregnancy. Measurement of serum TSH is the first-line screening variable......-related reference ranges. Equally important, the intraindividual variability of the thyroid hormone measurements is much narrower than the interindividual variation (reflecting the reference interval). The best laboratory assessment of thyroid function is a free thyroid hormone estimate combined with TSH...

  13. [Metabolic disorders and nutritional status in autoimmune thyroid diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawicka, Anna; Regulska-Ilow, Bożena; Regulska-Ilow, Bożena

    2015-01-02

    In recent years, the authors of epidemiological studies have documented that autoimmune diseases are a major problem of modern society and are classified as diseases of civilization. Autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATDs) are caused by an abnormal immune response to autoantigens present in the thyroid gland - they often coexist with other autoimmune diseases. The most common dysfunctions of the thyroid gland are hypothyroidism, Graves-Basedow disease and Hashimoto's disease. Hashimoto's thyroiditis can be the main cause of primary hypothyroidism of the thyroid gland. Anthropometric, biochemical and physicochemical parameters are used to assess the nutritional status during the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid diseases. Patients with hypothyroidism are often obese, whereas patients with hyperthyroidism are often afflicted with rapid weight loss. The consequence of obesity is a change of the thyroid hormones' activity; however, weight reduction leads to their normalization. The activity and metabolic rate of thyroid hormones are modifiable. ATDs are associated with abnormalities of glucose metabolism and thus increased risk of developing diabetes mellitus type 1 and type 2. Celiac disease (CD) also increases the risk of developing other autoimmune diseases. Malnutrition or the presence of numerous nutritional deficiencies in a patient's body can be the cause of thyroid disorders. Coexisting deficiencies of such elements as iodine, iron, selenium and zinc may impair the function of the thyroid gland. Other nutrient deficiencies usually observed in patients suffering from ATD are: protein deficiencies, vitamin deficiencies (A, C, B6, B5, B1) and mineral deficiencies (phosphorus, magnesium, potassium, sodium, chromium). Proper diet helps to reduce the symptoms of the disease, maintains a healthy weight and prevents the occurrence of malnutrition. This article presents an overview of selected documented studies and scientific reports on the relationship of metabolic

  14. Thyroid volume in hypothyroidism due to autoimmune disease follows a unimodal distribution: evidence against primary thyroid atrophy and autoimmune thyroiditis being distinct diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlé, Allan; Pedersen, Inge Bülow; Knudsen, Nils

    2009-01-01

    CONTEXT: Primary overt autoimmune hypothyroidism is often divided into primary idiopathic hypothyroidism with thyroid atrophy (Ord's disease) and hypothyroidism with goitre (Hashimoto's disease). OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to characterize the two subtypes of disease. DESIGN...

  15. Reactivity of anti-thyroid antibodies to thyroglobulin tryptic fragments: comparison of autoimmune and non-autoimmune thyroid diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boechat L.H.B.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies concerning the antigenicity of thyroglobulin fragments allow the characterization of the epitopes but do not consider the role of heavier antigenic fragments that could result in vivo from the action of endoproteases. Here we assess the relative importance of the fragments obtained from thyroglobulin by limited proteolysis with trypsin and compare by immunoblotting their reactivity to serum from patients with autoimmune (Graves' disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis and non-autoimmune (subacute thyroiditis disease. The results showed no difference in frequency of recognition of any peptide by sera from patients with autoimmune thyroiditis. In contrast, sera from patients with subacute thyroiditis reacted more frequently with a peptide of 80 kDa. These results suggest the presence of antibody subpopulations directed at fragments produced in vivo by enzymatic cleavage of thyroglobulin. This fragment and antibodies to it may represent markers for subacute thyroiditis.

  16. Dendritic cells and veiled accessory macrophages : hormonal influences and autoimmune thyroid disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.O. Canning (Martha)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractImmune responses to thyroid specific autoantigens form the basis of autoimmune thyroid disease pathogenesis. Two polar forms of autoimmune reactivity of the thyroid gland exist in this disease spectrum: a catabolic form characterized by gradual inflammatory destruction of thyroid parench

  17. Celiac Disease Autoimmunity in Patients with Autoimmune Diabetes and Thyroid Disease among Chinese Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyuan Zhao

    Full Text Available The prevalence of celiac disease autoimmunity or tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies (TGA amongst patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D and autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD in the Chinese population remains unknown. This study examined the rate of celiac disease autoimmunity amongst patients with T1D and AITD in the Chinese population. The study included 178 patients with type 1 diabetes and 119 with AITD where 36 had both T1D and AITD, classified as autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3 variant (APS3v. The study also included 145 patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D, 97 patients with non-autoimmune thyroid disease (NAITD, and 102 healthy controls. Serum islet autoantibodies, thyroid autoantibodies and TGA were measured by radioimmunoassay. TGA positivity was found in 22% of patients with either type 1 diabetes or AITD, much higher than that in patients with T2D (3.4%; p< 0.0001 or NAITD (3.1%; P < 0.0001 or healthy controls (1%; p<0.0001. The patients with APS3v having both T1D and AITD were 36% positive for TGA, significantly higher than patients with T1D alone (p = 0.040 or with AITD alone (p = 0.017. T1D and AITD were found to have a 20% and 30% frequency of overlap respectively at diagnosis. In conclusion, TGA positivity was high in the Chinese population having existing T1D and/or AITD, and even higher when both diseases were present. Routine TGA screening in patients with T1D or AITD will be important to early identify celiac disease autoimmunity for better clinical care of patients.

  18. Ultrasound sonoelastography in the evaluation of thyroiditis and autoimmune thyroid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruchała, Marek; Szmyt, Krzysztof; Sławek, Sylwia; Zybek, Ariadna; Szczepanek-Parulska, Ewelina

    2014-01-01

    Sonoelastography (USE) is a constantly evolving imaging technique used for the noninvasive and objective estimation of tissue stiffness. Several USE methods have been developed, including Quasi-Static or Strain Elastography and Shear Wave Elastography. The utility of USE has been demonstrated in differentiating between malignant and benign thyroid lesions. Recently, USE has been applied in the evaluation of thyroiditis and autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD).Thyroid inflammatory illnesses constitute a diverse group of diseases and may manifest various symptoms. These conditions may share some parallel clinical, biochemical, and ultrasonographic features, which can lead to diagnostic difficulties. USE may be an additional tool, supporting other methods in the diagnosis and treatment monitoring of thyroid diseases, other than thyroid nodular disease.The aim of this article was to analyse and summarise the available literature on the applicability of different elastographic techniques in the diagnosis, differentiation and monitoring of various types of thyroiditis and AITD. Advantages and limitations of this technique are also discussed.

  19. IL-1β and TSH disturb thyroid epithelium integrity in autoimmune thyroid diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebuffat, Sandra A; Kammoun-Krichen, Maha; Charfeddine, Ilhem; Ayadi, Hammadi; Bougacha-Elleuch, Noura; Peraldi-Roux, Sylvie

    2013-03-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β and TNFα are known to affect thyroid function. They stimulate IL-6 secretion and modify epithelium integrity by altering junction proteins. To study the role of cytokines on thyroid epithelia tightness in autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD), we analyzed the expression profiles of junction proteins (ZO-1, Claudin, JAM-A) and cytokines in human thyroid slices and also investigated the effect of IL-1β on the epithelium integrity in primary cultures of human thyrocytes. Junction proteins expression (ZO-1, Claudin, JAM-A) has been analyzed by immunohistochemistry on thyroid slices and by Western blot on membrane proteins extracted from thyrocytes of patients suffering from Graves and Hashimoto diseases. The high expression of junction proteins we found on Graves' disease thyroid slices as well as in cell membrane extracts acknowledges the tightness of thyroid follicular cells in this AITD. In contrast, the reduced expression of JAM and ZO-1 in thyroid cells from patients suffering from Hashimoto thyroiditis is in agreement with the loss of thyroid follicular cell integrity that occurs in this pathology. Concerning the effects on epithelium integrity of TSH and of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β in primary cultures of human thyroid cells, TSH appeared able to modify JAM-A localization but without any change in the expression levels of JAM-A, Claudin and ZO-1. Inversely, IL-1β provoked a decrease in the expression of- and a redistribution of both, Claudin and ZO-1 without modifying the expression and sub-cellular distribution patterns of JAM-A in thyroid cells. These results demonstrate (i) that Hashimoto's- and Graves' diseases display different junction proteins expression patterns with a loss of epithelium integrity in the former and (ii) that IL-1β modifies thyroid epithelial tightness of human thyrocytes by altering the expression and localization of junction proteins. Therefore, IL-1β could play a role in the

  20. Seven newly identified loci for autoimmune thyroid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Jason D; Simmonds, Matthew J; Walker, Neil M; Burren, Oliver; Brand, Oliver J; Guo, Hui; Wallace, Chris; Stevens, Helen; Coleman, Gillian; Franklyn, Jayne A; Todd, John A; Gough, Stephen C L

    2012-12-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), including Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT), is one of the most common of the immune-mediated diseases. To further investigate the genetic determinants of AITD, we conducted an association study using a custom-made single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array, the ImmunoChip. The SNP array contains all known and genotype-able SNPs across 186 distinct susceptibility loci associated with one or more immune-mediated diseases. After stringent quality control, we analysed 103 875 common SNPs (minor allele frequency >0.05) in 2285 GD and 462 HT patients and 9364 controls. We found evidence for seven new AITD risk loci (P < 1.12 × 10(-6); a permutation test derived significance threshold), five at locations previously associated and two at locations awaiting confirmation, with other immune-mediated diseases.

  1. Fetal microchimeric cells in autoimmune thyroid diseases: harmful, beneficial or innocent for the thyroid gland?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepez, Trees; Vandewoestyne, Mado; Deforce, Dieter

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) show a female predominance, with an increased incidence in the years following parturition. Fetal microchimerism has been suggested to play a role in the pathogenesis of AITD. However, only the presence of fetal microchimeric cells in blood and in the thyroid gland of these patients has been proven, but not an actual active role in AITD. Is fetal microchimerism harmful for the thyroid gland by initiating a Graft versus Host reaction (GvHR) or being the target of a Host versus Graft reaction (HvGR)? Is fetal microchimerism beneficial for the thyroid gland by being a part of tissue repair or are fetal cells just innocent bystanders in the process of autoimmunity? This review explores every hypothesis concerning the role of fetal microchimerism in AITD.

  2. Endocrine Ophthalmopathy in Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Pashkovska, N.V.

    2014-01-01

    The article presents modern data about risk factors, mechanisms of development, clinical features of endocrine ophthalmopathy, as well as information regarding current approaches to diagnosis, treatment and prevention of this disease according to the latest global recommendations developed from the position of evidence-based medicine.

  3. Mechanisms in endocrinology: autoimmune thyroid disease: old and new players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effraimidis, Grigoris; Wiersinga, Wilmar M

    2014-06-01

    The last 10 years have seen some progress in understanding the etiology of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD). The female preponderance can now be explained - at least in part - by fetal microchimerism and X-chromosome inactivation. The number of identified susceptibility genes for AITD is increasing (among others now including TSHR, TG, HLA, CTLA4, PTPN22, CD40, FCRL3, IL2RA, and FOXP3), but these genes together probably do not explain more than about 10% of the heritability of AITD. As twin studies indicate that genes contribute for 70% of AITD, it follows that there must be many more loci, each of them contributing a little. While the genetic studies have clarified why various autoimmune diseases so often cluster in the same patient, the molecular mechanism of action of these genetic polymorphisms (frequently located in introns) has hardly been explained. Polymorphisms in AITD susceptibility genes may become helpful in clinical practice, e.g. in assessing risk of recurrent Graves' hyperthyroidism (GH) after a course of antithyroid drugs. Moderate alcohol intake decreases the risk on overt GH and overt Hashimoto's hypothyroidism. Current smokers - as well known - are at increased risk for Graves' disease, but - surprisingly - at diminished risk for Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Low selenium and low vitamin D levels might increase the risk of developing AITD, but data are still inconclusive. Current options for preventive interventions in subjects at risk to develop AITD are very limited.

  4. Interrelation specific autoimmune pathologies of a thyroid gland with inorganic autoimmune rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O V Paramonova

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The problem of a pathology of a thyroid gland at rheumatic diseases, in particular at rheumatoid arthritis, remains actual and to this day. The work purpose was studying antitelogenesis to thyroid hormones at patients with mixt autoimmune pathology. In whey of blood of patients with RA and autothyroid pathology are found out antibodies (AB to Т3 and Т4, their concentration correlates with activity of pathological process. It is shown, that level AB to Т3 and Т4 authentically differs from the maintenance of the given antibodies in whey of blood of healthy faces. Level of antibodies to thyroid hormones can be considered as the criterion predicting development of pathology of a thyroid gland at patients with RA.

  5. [The role of hereditary and environmental factors in autoimmune thyroid diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balázs, Csaba

    2012-07-01

    Autoimmune thyroid diseases are the most common organ-specific autoimmune disorders affecting 5% to 10% of the population in Western countries. The clinical presentation varies from hyperthyroidism in Graves' disease to hypothyroidism in Hashimoto's thyroiditis. While the exact etiology of thyroid autoimmunity is not known, the interaction between genetic susceptibility and environmental factors appears to be of fundamental importance to initiate the process of thyroid autoimmunity. The identified autoimmune thyroid disease susceptibility genes include immune-modulating genes, such as the major histocompatibility complex, and thyroid-specific genes, including TSH receptor, thyroglobulin and thyroid peroxidase. The majority of the anti-TSH-receptor antibodies have a stimulating capacity and are responsible for hyperthyroidism. The anti-thyroglobulin- and anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies belonging to the catalytic type of antibodies destroy the thyrocytes resulting in hypothyroidism. The appearance of anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies precedes the induction of thyroiditis and the manifestation of hypothyroidism. The molecular analysis of thyroglobulin gene polymorphism is important in the mechanism of autoimmune thyroiditis. The autoantigen presentation by major histocompatibility complex molecules is a key point of the autoimmune mechanism. It has been shown that a HLA-DR variant containing arginine at position 74 of the DRβ1 chain confers a strong genetic susceptibility to autoimmune thyroid diseases, Graves' disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis, while glutamine at position DRβ1-74 is protective. Human thyroglobulin 2098 peptide represents a strong and specific DRβ1-Arg74 binder, while a non-binding control peptide, thyroglobulin 2766 fails to induce this response. Moreover, thyroglobulin 2098 stimulated T-cells from individuals who were positive for thyroglobulin antibodies, demonstrating that thyroglobulin 2098 is an immunogenic peptide capable of being

  6. "PREVALENCE OF AUTOANTIBODIES TO THYROID PEROXIDASE AND AUTOIMMUNE THYROID DISEASE IN TYPE I DIABETES MELLITUS"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Moayeri A. Rabbani

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Type I diabetes mellitus (DM is frequently associated with autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD. Association of ATD and type I DM has been described with varying frequencies but there is still debate about the situation in the Iranian population. We investigated the prevalence of anti thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO antibodies and ATD in children and adolescents with type I DM. A total of 145 patients with type I DM were participated in this study. They were screened for anti-TPO antibodies and TSH levels. Signs and symptoms of hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism and the presence of goiter were sought. A group of 50 healthy unrelated girls and boys aged 11-16 years served as controls. Anti-TPO antibodies were found in 34 (23.4% diabetic patients and 1 subject (2% in the control group (P<0.001. Frequency of anti TPO antibodies was significantly higher in girls than boys (P<0.05. We failed to show any significant correlation between thyroid autoimmunity and duration of DM. We found that younger patients at diagnosis are more likely to be anti-TPO negative (P<0.001. Out of 145 diabetic patients, 32 (22% had visible goiter. Subclinical hypothyroidism, hypothyroidism and thyrotoxicosis occurred in 1, 9 and 1 patients, respectively. Visible goiter was found in 2 subjects (4% of the control group, but all of them were euthyroid. In conclusion, the evaluation of thyroid autoimmunity in type I diabetic patients may improve the diagnosis of thyroid disease in early stages. Yearly examination of anti-TPO antibodies allows identifying diabetic patients with thyroid autoimmunity.

  7. Pendrin and NIS antibodies are absent in healthy individuals and are rare in autoimmune thyroid disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, Thomas H; Hegedüs, Laszlo; Weetman, Anthony P;

    2014-01-01

    prevalence than the controls: NISAb: 17% vs 0% (P Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) had NISAb, (P ...OBJECTIVE: Antibodies against thyroglobulin, thyroid peroxidase and the TSH receptor are accepted as pathophysiological and diagnostic biomarkers in autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD). In contrast, the prevalence, aetiology and clinical relevance of autoantibodies against the human sodium...

  8. Autoimmune Thyroid Disease in Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Global Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Cárdenas Roldán

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine the prevalence and impact of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Methods. Eight-hundred patients were included. The association between AITD and RA was analyzed was analyzed by bivariate and multivariate analysis. In addition, a literature review was done focusing on geographical variations. Results. In our cohort the prevalence of AITD was 9.8% while the presence of antibodies was 37.8% for antithyroperoxidase enzyme (TPOAb and 20.8% for antithyroglobulin protein (TgAb. The presence of type 2 diabetes, thrombosis, abnormal body mass index, and a high educational level was positively associated with AITD. The literature review disclosed a geographical variation of AITD in RA ranging from 0.5% to 27%. Autoantibody prevalence ranges from 6% to 31% for TgAb, 5% to 37% for TPOAb, and from 11.4% to 32% for the presence of either of the two. Conclusion. AITD is not uncommon in RA and should be systematically assessed since it is a risk factor for developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease. These results may help to further study the common mechanisms of autoimmune diseases, to improve patients’ outcome, and to define public health policies. An international consensus to accurately diagnose AITD is warranted.

  9. Autoimmune Thyroid Disease in Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Global Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas Roldán, Jorge; Amaya-Amaya, Jenny; Castellanos-de la Hoz, Juan; Giraldo-Villamil, Juliana; Montoya-Ortiz, Gladys; Cruz-Tapias, Paola; Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana; Mantilla, Rubén D.; Anaya, Juan-Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To determine the prevalence and impact of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods. Eight-hundred patients were included. The association between AITD and RA was analyzed was analyzed by bivariate and multivariate analysis. In addition, a literature review was done focusing on geographical variations. Results. In our cohort the prevalence of AITD was 9.8% while the presence of antibodies was 37.8% for antithyroperoxidase enzyme (TPOAb) and 20.8% for antithyroglobulin protein (TgAb). The presence of type 2 diabetes, thrombosis, abnormal body mass index, and a high educational level was positively associated with AITD. The literature review disclosed a geographical variation of AITD in RA ranging from 0.5% to 27%. Autoantibody prevalence ranges from 6% to 31% for TgAb, 5% to 37% for TPOAb, and from 11.4% to 32% for the presence of either of the two. Conclusion. AITD is not uncommon in RA and should be systematically assessed since it is a risk factor for developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease. These results may help to further study the common mechanisms of autoimmune diseases, to improve patients' outcome, and to define public health policies. An international consensus to accurately diagnose AITD is warranted. PMID:23209899

  10. Early manifestations of gastric autoimmunity in patients with juvenile autoimmune thyroid diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segni, Maria; Borrelli, Osvaldo; Pucarelli, Ida; Delle Fave, Gianfranco; Pasquino, Anna Maria; Annibale, Bruno

    2004-10-01

    Juvenile patients affected with autoimmune thyroid disorders showed a 14-21% prevalence of parietal cell antibodies (PCA) reacting against the H+/K+-ATPase of the gastric parietal cells. PCA are the principal immunological markers of atrophic body gastritis (ABG).ABG is characterized by loss of oxyntic glands, achlorhydria, and hypergastrinemia. The aim of this study was to determine whether PCA positivity could be associated with biochemical and histological manifestations of gastric autoimmunity in juvenile patients with autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD). We studied 129 children (96 females and 33 males) with chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis (n = 115) or Graves' disease (n = 14). Mean age at diagnosis of AITD was 9.7 +/- 3.3 yr, and mean age at sampling was 12.3 +/- 3.7 yr. We determined PCA and Helicobacter pylori antibodies, gastrin, and pepsinogen I plasma levels. Gastroscopy with multiple biopsies was carried out in a subgroup of patients with PCA positivity. We found that 30% of children had detectable PCA. Hypergastrinemia was found in 45% of the PCA-positive children (range, 40-675 pg/ml) vs. 12% of PCA-negative children (range, 35-65 pg/ml; P < 0.001). Eighteen patients with PCA positivity underwent gastroscopy; eight of these children had normogastrinemia, which showed no signs of ABG, and 10 children had hypergastrinemia, of whom five had mild to severe ABG. Our study shows that autoimmune gastritis is an early event in juvenile AITD with detectable PCA. Gastrin plasma level is a reliable marker of gastric atrophy.

  11. Prevalence and clinical features of celiac disease in patients with autoimmune thyroiditis: cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Ventura

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder with an average prevalence of 1% in Europe and the United States. Because of strong European ancestry in southern Brazil, this study aimed to evaluate the seroprevalence of celiac disease among autoimmune thyroiditis patients.DESIGN AND SETTING: Cross-sectional study in a public university hospital.METHODS: This cross-sectional prevalence study included autoimmune thyroiditis patients who were tested for anti-endomysial and anti-transglutaminase antibodies between August 2010 and July 2011.RESULTS: Fifty-three patients with autoimmune thyroiditis were included; 92.5% were women, with mean age of 49.0 ± 13.5 years. Five patients (9.3% were serologically positive for celiac disease: three of them (5.6% were reactive for anti-endomysial antibodies and two (3.7% for anti-transglutaminase. None of them exhibited anemia and one presented diarrhea. Endoscopy was performed on two patients: one with normal histology and the other with lymphocytic infiltrate and villous atrophy.CONCLUSION: The prevalence of celiac disease among patients with autoimmune thyroid disease was 9.3%; one patient complained of diarrhea and none presented anemia. Among at-risk populations, like autoimmune thyroiditis patients, the presence of diarrhea or anemia should not be used as a criterion for indicating celiac disease investigation. This must be done for all autoimmune thyroiditis patients because of its high prevalence.

  12. Skin disease and thyroid autoimmunity in atopic South Italian children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedullà, Marcella; Fierro, Vincenzo; Marzuillo, Pierluigi; Capuano, Francesco; Miraglia del Giudice, Emanuele; Ruocco, Eleonora

    2016-01-01

    AIM To verify the prevalence of thyroid autoimmunity (TA) and the possible association between atopy and TA in children affected by skin disease. METHODS Three hundred and twenty-four children consecutively referred due to skin disease symptoms to our Pediatric Department were enrolled. One hundred and eighty-seven were diagnosed with atopic dermatitis (AD), 95 with acute urticaria, 40 with chronic urticaria (CU), and 2 with alopecia areata (AA). According to the work-up for atopy, the children were divided into two groups: Atopics and non-atopics. TA was diagnosed by serum thyroid peroxidase autoantibodies and/or thyroglobulin autoantibodies levels more than twice normal values over a period of two months by immunoassay. RESULTS In all children with skin disease, a significant prevalence of TA in atopics compared with non-atopics (13.67% vs 2.67%, P = 0.0016) and a significant association between TA and atopy (OR = 5.76, 95%CI: 1.71-19.35) were observed. These findings were confirmed as significant in children with AD: TA in atopics was 11.5%, while TA in non-atopics was 2.7% (P = 0.03, OR = 4.68, 95%CI: 1.02-21.38). In addition, atopics with CU showed a significantly higher prevalence of TA (26.9%), but none of the non-atopics showed CU (P = 0.0326). On the other hand, atopics with AA showed a 100% (2 out of 2) prevalence of TA, compared with none of the non-atopics. CONCLUSION In children with skin disease, atopy seems to be associated with an increased risk of TA. PMID:27610344

  13. Thyroid Diseases Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thyroid antibodies – to help differentiate different types of thyroiditis and identify autoimmune thyroid conditions Thyroid peroxidase (TPO) ... can be detected in Graves disease or Hashimoto thyroiditis . It may be especially helpful in early Hashimoto ...

  14. Pertinence of kappa and lambda recombinant antibodies directed against thyroid peroxidase in thyroid autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresson, D; Chardès, T; Chapal, N; Bès, C; Cerutti, M; Devauchelle, G; Bouanani, M; Mani, J C; Péraldi-Roux, S

    2001-01-01

    Forty-one single-chain variable region fragments (scFvs) directed against thyroid peroxidase (TPO) were obtained by phage display libraries constructed from thyroid-infiltrating B cells of Graves' disease patients. Among these scFvs, 24.4% used a Vkappa light chain whereas 75.6% shows a light chain of Vlamda origin. Study of light chain gene usage in the TPO antibody repertoire demonstrated a dominance of the Vkappa 1-39 and Vlambda 1-51 genes. Thyroid peroxidase probing of overlapping peptides covering the amino acid sequences of anti-TPO T2/kappa and T13/lambda variable regions demonstrated a more restricted antigen recognition on T13/lambda than on T2/kappa. These two recombinant antibodies, expressed as whole IgG1 in the baculovirus/insect cell system, inhibited the binding to TPO of serum TPO autoantibodies whatever the light chain. Our study indicates that lambda as well as kappa light chain usage are found in the TPO antibody repertoire of thyroid-infiltrating B cells and are pertinent in the pathogenesis of autoimmune thyroid disease.

  15. Thyroid autoantibodies in autoimmune diseases Anticuerpos antitiroideos en enfermedades autoinmunes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina M. Innocencio

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abnormalities in the thyroid function and thyroid autoantibodies have been frequently described in patients with autoimmune diseases but seldom in antiphospholipid syndrome patients. In order to determine the prevalence of thyroid function and autoimmune abnormalities, we compared serum thyrotropin (TSH, serum free thyroxine (T4 levels, thyroid antithyroglobulin (TgAb and antithyroperoxidase (TPOAb levels of 25 patients with systemic sclerosis, 25 patients with rheumatoid arthritis and 13 patients with antiphospholipid syndrome to a control group of 113 healthy individuals. Evaluation included a thorough clinical examination with particular attention to thyroid disease and a serologic immune profile including rheumatoid factor, antinuclear and anticardiolipin antibody measurements. Subclinical hypothyroidism (4.2Ciertas anormalidades en la función tiroidea y anticuerpos antitiroideos han sido frecuentemente descriptos en pacientes con enfermedades autoinmunes, y más raramente en pacientes con el síndrome antifosfolipídico. Para determinar la prevalencía de anormalidades en la función tiroidea y de autoinmunidad, comparamos los niveles séricos de tirotropina (TSH tiroxina libre en suero (T4 anticuerpos antitiroglobulina (TgAb y antitiroperoxidasa (TPOAb en 25 pacientes con esclerosis sistémica, 25 pacientes con artritis reumatoidea y 13 pacientes con el síndrome antifosfolipídico con un grupo control de 113 individuos aparentemente sanos. La evaluación incluyó un completo examen clínico con particular atención para las enfermedades de la tiroides y una evaluación inmunológica incluyendo dosaje del factor reumatoideo, anticuerpos antinucleares y anticardiolipina. Hipotiroidismo subclínico (4.2

  16. Chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto disease)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto thyroiditis; Chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis; Autoimmune thyroiditis; Chronic autoimmune thyroiditis; Lymphadenoid goiter - Hashimoto; Hypothyroidism - Hashimoto; Type 2 polyglandular autoimmune ...

  17. THE CLINICAL PRESENTATION OF AUTOIMMUNE THYROID DISEASE IN MEN IS ASSOCIATED WITH IL12B GENOTYPE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walsh, John P; Berry, Jemma; Liu, Shu;

    2011-01-01

    hypothesized that IL12B genotype may influence the clinical presentation of autoimmune thyroid disease. Objective.  We tested for differences in IL12B genotype between Graves' disease and Hashimoto's disease. Patients.  We studied a discovery cohort of 203 Australian women and 37 men with autoimmune thyroid......' disease (P=0.005) and Hashimoto's disease (P=0.029). Conclusion.  In men with autoimmune thyroid disease, a common variant located upstream of the IL12B coding region may influence whether patients present with Graves' disease or Hashimoto's disease.......Background.  Common variants in the interleukin 12B (IL12B) gene are associated with predominantly inflammatory (Th1) or antibody-mediated (Th2) immune responses. Since Hashimoto's disease and Graves' disease are thought to arise from mainly Th1 and Th2 immune responses respectively, we...

  18. Autoimmune thyroiditis in antinuclear antibody positive children without rheumatologic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkachaisri Thaschawee

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Children are commonly referred to a pediatric rheumatology center for the laboratory finding of an Anti-nuclear antibody (ANA of undetermined significance. Previous studies regarding adult rheumatology patients have supported an association between ANA and anti-thyroid antibodies, with the prevalence of thyroid antibodies being significantly higher in patients referred to a rheumatology center for an ANA without evidence of connective tissue disease compared to the general population. The purpose of the present study was to determine the frequency of thyroid antibodies in children referred to a pediatric rheumatology center for a positive ANA without evidence of a connective tissue disease. Methods A retrospective chart review was performed on children who were referred to our pediatric rheumatology center between August 2003 and March 2007 for positive ANA with concurrent thyroid antibody and thyroid function tests performed who did not fulfill criteria for a specific connective tissue disease. Laboratory and clinical features were recorded and analyzed. Mean and standard deviation were used to describe continuous data. Chi-square or Fisher's exact tests were used to compare proportions between variables. Results One-hundred and four ANA-positive patients with concurrent thyroid studies were evaluated (88% female, 93% Caucasian, mean age 11.9 ± 4.0 years. Half of patients had an ANA titer ≥ 1:320. The ANA pattern was speckled in 60% of the patients. Thyroid antibodies were detected in 30% of the patients. Anti-Thyroglobulin (ATG was detected in 29% and Anti-thyroid peroxidase (ATPO in 21% of the patients; of these children, 14% had hypothyroidism. ANA pattern and titer were not associated with anti-thyroid antibody positivity. Conclusion Thyroid antibodies associated with chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis, ATG and ATPO, were detected significantly higher in ANA-positive children without a rheumatologic condition (30% as

  19. Expression of tenascin in lymphocytic autoimmune thyroiditis.

    OpenAIRE

    Back, W; Heubner, C; Winter, J.; Bleyl, U

    1997-01-01

    AIMS: To study the distribution of tenascin by immunocytochemistry in autoimmune diseases of the thyroid. METHODS: Thyroids from patients with inflammatory lesions of the thyroid (lymphocytic thyroiditis Hashimoto, Grave's disease, thyroiditis DeQuervain) were studied by immunocytochemistry using antibodies against tenascin, collagen III, and collagen IV. RESULTS: In autoimmune lymphocytic thyroiditis Hashimoto there was a characteristic corona-like staining pattern of tenascin around all act...

  20. [Diagnosis of osteoporosis occurring in autoimmune thyroid gland disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radojković, Ivan; Radojković, Jana; Djurica, Snezana

    2005-10-01

    Osteoporosis or porotic bone is a general, systemic bone disease, which is manifested by fracture as its consequence. The main characteristic of this disease is the loss of bone microarchitecture, bone mass reduction, and its increased fragility. The result, thereof, is susceptibility to fracture. Etiology of osteoporosis is polymorph. Its socio-medical importance is enormous, since there is one osteoporotic fracture every 20 sec. worldwide. Million and six hundred thousand osteoporotic fractures occur annualy throughout the world. Thyroid gland is susceptible to autoimmune reactions that lead to autoimmune diseases, just like many other organs. The autoimmune disorder is a final consequence of a failure, in some instance, within the crucial mechanism of regulation of self tissue tolerance. The main goal is to prove the presence of osteoporosis, its inexpensive and quick diagnostics; to make a distinction among the causes that lead to it. In addition, to indicate the importance of osteoporosis that is caused by normal, metabolic processes which are an inevitable part of ageing. Diagnosis of osteoporosis can be done through laboratory, which is a tiresome, time consuming task. Measurements of BMD could be also performed by using new devices. Osteometers could be constructed on the basis of X-ray photon energy or US. Utilization most contemporary one uses laser beam, and it approximates the distance of additional tissue that also absorbs part of energy changing absorption of the reception unit and thus making the measurement results accurate. In diagnosing BMD by osteometer, one faces with certain difficulties. When axial quantitative CT is used, the value may be falsely lower, because of the loss of energy absorbed by aorta which is often calcified in elderly people. In devices with transversal scanning, of the same nature and technology, a part of the energy is being absorbed by transversal and spinal vertebrals. After the research, one may conclude that the most

  1. Prevalence of macroprolactinaemia in regularly menstruating women with non-toxic goitre or autoimmune thyroid disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewandowski Krzysztof C

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The so called “big-big” prolactin (Prl, also known as macroprolactin is formed by Prl-immunoglobulin (Prl-IgG complexes and may cause elevation of serum Prl concentrations measured by standard assays, potentially leading to unnecessary investigations and/or treatment. In our study, we have endeavoured to assess the prevalence of macroprolactinaemia in euthyroid, regularly menstruating women with thyroid disease, as well as to assess whether autoimmune thyroid disease may result in an increased prevalence of macroprolactinaemia. Material and methods We measured serum Prl in 182 regularly menstruating women aged 32.7 ± 7.5 years (mean ± SD, range 17–46 years who attended endocrine clinic either for investigation of non-toxic goitre (n = 86, age 33.2 ± 7.8 years or with autoimmune thyroid disease (n = 96, age 32.3 ± 7.2 years. Autoimmune thyroid disease was defined as raised titre of at least one anti-thyroid antibody [anti-thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO, anti-thyroglobulin (anti-Tg and/or anti-TSH-receptor (anti-TSH-R antibodies]. All women were clinically and biochemically euthyroid, either without or on treatment with L-thyroxine. In those with raised Prl (i.e., above 530 mIU/l we ruled out the presence of macroprolactinaemia by polyethylene glycol (PEG precipitation method. Results There was no significant age difference between women with and without autoimmune thyroid disease (p = 0.84. Raised Prl concentrations were found in 10 women with thyroid disease (5.5%, and of those a significant macroprolactinaemia (i.e., reduction of Prl concentrations of more than 60% after PEG precipitation was found in 9 subjects (4.94%. There were no differences in the prevalence of macroprolactinaemia between women with autoimmune thyroid disease (4 out of 96, and without autoimmune thyroid disease (5 out of 86, p = 0.75. Conclusions Approximately one out of twenty women with regular menses is likely

  2. Is vitamin D a player or not in the pathophysiology of autoimmune thyroid diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Aurizio, Federica; Villalta, Danilo; Metus, Paolo; Doretto, Paolo; Tozzoli, Renato

    2015-05-01

    1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D is a steroid hormone derived from vitamin D, playing an important role in maintaining an adequate serum level of calcium and phosphorus. It is now clear that vitamin D exerts an endocrine action on the cells of the immune system, generating anti-inflammatory and immunoregulatory effects. The mechanisms underlying the role of vitamin D in autoimmunity are not completely understood. Lower vitamin D levels have been found in several autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, type 1 diabetes mellitus, multiple sclerosis, inflammatory bowel diseases, autoimmune thyroid diseases (i.e. Hashimoto's thyroiditis and Graves' disease) and autoimmune gastritis. Several genetic studies have demonstrated an association between thyroid autoimmunity susceptibility and gene polymorphisms of vitamin D receptor, vitamin D binding protein, 1-alpha-hydroxylase and 25-hydroxylase. Of note, some papers do not confirm this connection. With regard to the role of vitamin D in autoimmune thyroid diseases, available data remain controversial. Only few reports have analyzed the supposed association between autoimmune thyroid diseases and vitamin D concentration with inconclusive results. In our experience, low serum levels of vitamin D do not correlate either with Hashimoto's thyroiditis or with Graves' disease. The inability to achieve an unambiguous conclusion is in part due to the limitations in study design. In fact, most of the studies are cross-sectional surveys with a small number of subjects. In addition, the heterogeneity of the study population, seasonal variation of blood sampling, inter-method analytical variability of vitamin D assays and different definitions of vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency contribute to contradicting results. Therefore, further randomized, controlled, prospective trials are needed in order to demonstrate the causality of vitD in AITD and consequently the role of vitamin D

  3. POSSIBLE ROLE OF PROBIOTIC MICROORGANISMS OF BIFIDOBACTERIUM AND LACTOBACILLUS GENUS IN PATHOGENESIS OF AUTOIMMUNE THYROID DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. P. Kiseleva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available It was revealed, that, in blood samples of the patients with autoimmune thyroid diseases, serum antibodies against cell-free fraction of Bifidobacterium bifidum 791 and Lactobacillus plantarum B-01 were detected, respectively, in 71 and 63% of cases, that being two-fold higher than appropriate frequencies in healthy blood donors. An evidence was obtained that presence of some components specifically reacting with autoantibodies against thyroid peroxidase and thyroglobulin on the surface of the microorganisms cells and competing for binding of these immunoglobulins with thyroid antigens. One may also suggest a presence of bacterial components, interacting with thyroid peroxidase. The data obtained let us suggest that probiotic microorganisms of Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus genus could take part in pathogenesis of autoimmune thyroid diseases, by means of molecular mimicry mechanisms.

  4. Regulatory B and T cell responses in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease and healthy controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Birte

    2016-01-01

    ). HT is primarily a T-cell mediated disease, and whether B cells play a pathogenic role in the pathogenesis is still unclear. Both GD and HT are characterized by infiltration of the thyroid gland by self-reactive T cells and B cells. In the first paper of this thesis, the role of regulatory B cells......Autoimmune diseases occur due to faulty self-tolerance. Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) are classic examples of organ-specific autoimmune diseases. GD is an auto-antibody-mediated disease where autoantibodies are produced against the thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR...... (Bregs) and regulatory T cells (Tregs) were investigated in the context of GD and HT. First, we studied the role of the thyroid self-antigen, thyroglobulin (TG) in healthy donors. The self-antigen TG, but not the foreign recall antigen tetanus toxoid (TT), was able to induce interleukin 10 (IL-10...

  5. An unusual association of three autoimmune disorders: celiac disease, systemic lupus erythematosus and Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccuti, Viera; Perrone, Antonio; D'Introno, Alessia; Campobasso, Anna; Sangineto, Moris; Sabbà, Carlo

    2016-12-01

    Autoimmune disorders are known to be more frequent in women and often associated each others, but it is rare to see multiple autoimmune diseases in a single patient. Recently, the concept of multiple autoimmune syndrome has been introduced to describe patients with at least three autoimmune diseases. We describe a case of a young man with a clinical history of psychiatric symptoms and celiac disease (CD) who was diagnosed to have other two autoimmune disorders: systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis. This case is unusual upon different patterns: the rare combination of the three autoimmune diseases, their appearance in a man and the atypical onset of the diseases with psychiatric symptoms likely to be related either to CD or to SLE.

  6. Selenium status and over-expression of interleukin-15 in celiac disease and autoimmune thyroid diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Velia Stazi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In celiac disease (CD, for its multifactorial nature, the target organs are not limited to the gut, but include thyroid, liver, skin and reproductive and nervous systems. Between the extraintestinal symptoms associated with CD, autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs are more evident, underlining as CD-related autoimmune alterations can be modulated not only by gluten but also by various concurrent endogenous (genetic affinity, over-expression of cytokines and exogenous (environment, nutritional deficiency factors. In their pathogenesis a central role for over-expression of interleukin-15 (IL-15 is shown, by inhibiting apoptosis, leading to the perpetuation of inflammation and tissue destruction. Thyroid is particularly sensitive to selenium deficiency because selenoproteins are significant in biosynthesis and activity of thyroid hormones; besides, some selenoproteins as glutathione peroxidase are involved in inhibiting apoptosis. Thus, selenium malabsorption in CD can be thought as a key factor directly leading to thyroid and intestinal damage. Considering the complexity of this interaction and on the basis of available evidence, the aim of this review is to assess as preventive and therapeutic target the role of IL-15 and selenium in the pathogeneses of both CD and AITD.

  7. Lithium associated autoimmune thyroiditis.

    OpenAIRE

    Shimizu, M; Hirokawa, M.; T. Manabe; Shimozuma, K; Sonoo, H; Harada, T.

    1997-01-01

    A case of autoimmune thyroiditis after long term treatment with lithium is described in a 29 year old Japanese woman with manic depression. Positive serum antithyroglobulin and antimicrosomal antibodies, diffuse goitre, and microscopic chronic thyroiditis, as well as the clinical history of long term lithium treatment were suggestive of lithium associated autoimmune thyroiditis. Microscopically, there was a mild degree of interstitial fibrosis and a moderate degree of lymphocytic infiltration...

  8. Clinical Update in Aspects of the Management of Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duncan J. Topliss

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Aspects of autoimmune thyroid disease updated in this review include: immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4-related thyroid disease (Riedel's thyroiditis, fibrosing variant of Hashimoto's thyroiditis, IgG4-related Hashimoto's thyroiditis, and Graves' disease with elevated IgG4 levels; recent epidemiological studies from China and Denmark indicating that excess iodine increases the incidence of Hashimoto's thyroiditis and hypothyroidism; immunomodulatory agents (ipilimumab, pembrolizumab, nivolumab activate immune response by inhibiting T-cell surface receptors which down-regulate immune response, i.e., cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 and programmed cell death protein 1 pathways; alemtuzumab is a humanised monoclonal antibody to CD52 which causes immune depletion and thyroid autoimmune disease especially Graves' hyperthyroidism; small molecule ligand (SML agonists which activate receptors, SML neutral antagonists, which inhibit receptor activation by agonists, and SML inverse agonists which inhibit receptor activation by agonists and inhibit constitutive agonist independent signaling have been identified. SML antagonism of thyroid-stimulating hormone-receptor stimulatory antibody could treat Graves' hyperthyroidism and Graves' ophthalmopathy; and thyroxine treatment of subclinical hypothyroidism can produce iatrogenic subclinical hyperthyroidism with the risk of atrial fibrillation and osteoporosis. The increased risk of harm from subclinical hyperthyroidism may be stronger than the potential benefit from treatment of subclinical hypothyroidism.

  9. Clinical Update in Aspects of the Management of Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Aspects of autoimmune thyroid disease updated in this review include: immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4)-related thyroid disease (Riedel's thyroiditis, fibrosing variant of Hashimoto's thyroiditis, IgG4-related Hashimoto's thyroiditis, and Graves' disease with elevated IgG4 levels); recent epidemiological studies from China and Denmark indicating that excess iodine increases the incidence of Hashimoto's thyroiditis and hypothyroidism; immunomodulatory agents (ipilimumab, pembrolizumab, nivolumab) activate immune response by inhibiting T-cell surface receptors which down-regulate immune response, i.e., cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 and programmed cell death protein 1 pathways; alemtuzumab is a humanised monoclonal antibody to CD52 which causes immune depletion and thyroid autoimmune disease especially Graves' hyperthyroidism; small molecule ligand (SML) agonists which activate receptors, SML neutral antagonists, which inhibit receptor activation by agonists, and SML inverse agonists which inhibit receptor activation by agonists and inhibit constitutive agonist independent signaling have been identified. SML antagonism of thyroid-stimulating hormone-receptor stimulatory antibody could treat Graves' hyperthyroidism and Graves' ophthalmopathy; and thyroxine treatment of subclinical hypothyroidism can produce iatrogenic subclinical hyperthyroidism with the risk of atrial fibrillation and osteoporosis. The increased risk of harm from subclinical hyperthyroidism may be stronger than the potential benefit from treatment of subclinical hypothyroidism. PMID:28029020

  10. Clinical studies on thyroid diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eskes, S.A.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis focuses on some aspects of thyroid disease: prevention of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), diagnosis of related conditions as autoimmune hypophysitis in autoimmune hypothyroidism (Hashimoto’s disease), and treatment of amiodarone-induced thyrotoxicosis (AIT).

  11. Presumed Isotretinoin-Induced, Concomitant Autoimmune Thyroid Disease and Ocular Myasthenia Gravis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huseyin Gursoy

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There are many adverse effects that have been described for isotretinoin. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a possible association of oral isotretinoin intake with autoimmune thyroiditis and ocular myasthenia gravis (OMG. Case Presentation: A 19-year-old Caucasian male, who had used oral isotretinoin for severe acne disease for the previous six months, was referred to our clinic. He had a three-week history of diplopia and variable bilateral ptosis. Physical examination showed moderate periorbital edema and limitations of up- and down-gaze in the left eye. Laboratory findings and thyroid ultrasound were consistent with autoimmune thyroiditis. Antithyroid therapy did not relieve the clinical symptoms. Concomitant OMG was suspected. Variable ptosis and a positive response to oral prednisolone of 40 mg/day and pyridostigmine of 360 mg/day supported the diagnosis of concomitant autoimmune thyroiditis and OMG. Conclusion: Autoimmune disorders may be triggered by oral isotretinoin treatment. Clinicians prescribing isotretinoin should be aware of the possible association between isotretinoin intake and concomitant autoimmune thyroiditis and OMG.

  12. Encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease in patients with Graves' disease: clinical manifestations, follow-up, and outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Byung I

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease (EAATD is characterized by neurological/psychiatric symptoms, high levels of anti-thyroid antibodies, increased cerebrospinal fluid protein concentration, non-specific electroencephalogram abnormalities, and responsiveness to the corticosteroid treatment in patients with an autoimmune thyroid disease. Almost all EAATD patients are affected by Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT, although fourteen EAATD patients with Graves' disease (GD have been also reported. Methods We have recorded and analyzed the clinical, biological, radiological, and electrophysiological findings and the data on the therapeutic management of all GD patients with EAATD reported so far as well as the clinical outcomes in those followed-up in the long term. Results Twelve of the fourteen patients with EAATD and GD were women. The majority of GD patients with EAATD presented with mild hyperthyroidism at EAATD onset or shortly before it. Active anti-thyroid autoimmunity was detected in all cases. Most of the patients dramatically responded to corticosteroids. The long term clinical outcome was benign but EAATD can relapse, especially at the time of corticosteroid dose tapering or withdrawal. GD and HT patients with EAATD present with a similar clinical, biological, radiological, and electrophysiological picture and require an unaffected EAATD management. Conclusions GD and HT equally represent the possible background condition for the development of EAATD, which should be considered in the differential diagnosis of all patients with encephalopathy of unknown origin and an autoimmune thyroid disease, regardless of the nature of the underlying autoimmune thyroid disease.

  13. Encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease in patients with Graves' disease: clinical manifestations, follow-up, and outcomes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tamagno, Gianluca

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: The encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease (EAATD) is characterized by neurological\\/psychiatric symptoms, high levels of anti-thyroid antibodies, increased cerebrospinal fluid protein concentration, non-specific electroencephalogram abnormalities, and responsiveness to the corticosteroid treatment in patients with an autoimmune thyroid disease. Almost all EAATD patients are affected by Hashimoto\\'s thyroiditis (HT), although fourteen EAATD patients with Graves\\' disease (GD) have been also reported. METHODS: We have recorded and analyzed the clinical, biological, radiological, and electrophysiological findings and the data on the therapeutic management of all GD patients with EAATD reported so far as well as the clinical outcomes in those followed-up in the long term. RESULTS: Twelve of the fourteen patients with EAATD and GD were women. The majority of GD patients with EAATD presented with mild hyperthyroidism at EAATD onset or shortly before it. Active anti-thyroid autoimmunity was detected in all cases. Most of the patients dramatically responded to corticosteroids. The long term clinical outcome was benign but EAATD can relapse, especially at the time of corticosteroid dose tapering or withdrawal. GD and HT patients with EAATD present with a similar clinical, biological, radiological, and electrophysiological picture and require an unaffected EAATD management. CONCLUSIONS: GD and HT equally represent the possible background condition for the development of EAATD, which should be considered in the differential diagnosis of all patients with encephalopathy of unknown origin and an autoimmune thyroid disease, regardless of the nature of the underlying autoimmune thyroid disease.

  14. Encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease in patients with Graves' disease: clinical manifestations, follow-up, and outcomes

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tamagno, Gianluca

    2010-04-28

    Abstract Background The encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease (EAATD) is characterized by neurological\\/psychiatric symptoms, high levels of anti-thyroid antibodies, increased cerebrospinal fluid protein concentration, non-specific electroencephalogram abnormalities, and responsiveness to the corticosteroid treatment in patients with an autoimmune thyroid disease. Almost all EAATD patients are affected by Hashimoto\\'s thyroiditis (HT), although fourteen EAATD patients with Graves\\' disease (GD) have been also reported. Methods We have recorded and analyzed the clinical, biological, radiological, and electrophysiological findings and the data on the therapeutic management of all GD patients with EAATD reported so far as well as the clinical outcomes in those followed-up in the long term. Results Twelve of the fourteen patients with EAATD and GD were women. The majority of GD patients with EAATD presented with mild hyperthyroidism at EAATD onset or shortly before it. Active anti-thyroid autoimmunity was detected in all cases. Most of the patients dramatically responded to corticosteroids. The long term clinical outcome was benign but EAATD can relapse, especially at the time of corticosteroid dose tapering or withdrawal. GD and HT patients with EAATD present with a similar clinical, biological, radiological, and electrophysiological picture and require an unaffected EAATD management. Conclusions GD and HT equally represent the possible background condition for the development of EAATD, which should be considered in the differential diagnosis of all patients with encephalopathy of unknown origin and an autoimmune thyroid disease, regardless of the nature of the underlying autoimmune thyroid disease.

  15. Encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease in patients with Graves' disease: clinical manifestations, follow-up, and outcomes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tamagno, Gianluca

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease (EAATD) is characterized by neurological\\/psychiatric symptoms, high levels of anti-thyroid antibodies, increased cerebrospinal fluid protein concentration, non-specific electroencephalogram abnormalities, and responsiveness to the corticosteroid treatment in patients with an autoimmune thyroid disease. Almost all EAATD patients are affected by Hashimoto\\'s thyroiditis (HT), although fourteen EAATD patients with Graves\\' disease (GD) have been also reported. METHODS: We have recorded and analyzed the clinical, biological, radiological, and electrophysiological findings and the data on the therapeutic management of all GD patients with EAATD reported so far as well as the clinical outcomes in those followed-up in the long term. RESULTS: Twelve of the fourteen patients with EAATD and GD were women. The majority of GD patients with EAATD presented with mild hyperthyroidism at EAATD onset or shortly before it. Active anti-thyroid autoimmunity was detected in all cases. Most of the patients dramatically responded to corticosteroids. The long term clinical outcome was benign but EAATD can relapse, especially at the time of corticosteroid dose tapering or withdrawal. GD and HT patients with EAATD present with a similar clinical, biological, radiological, and electrophysiological picture and require an unaffected EAATD management. CONCLUSIONS: GD and HT equally represent the possible background condition for the development of EAATD, which should be considered in the differential diagnosis of all patients with encephalopathy of unknown origin and an autoimmune thyroid disease, regardless of the nature of the underlying autoimmune thyroid disease.

  16. [Subclinical and manifested hypothyroidism as a consequence of thyroid autoimmune disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milosević, Dragoslav P; Djurica, Snezana; Davidović, Mladen; Stević, Radmila; Rajić, Miodrag; Marković, Natasa

    2005-10-01

    Chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto's disease) is a slowly developing persistent inflamation of the thyroid gland, which frequently leads to hypothyroidism. Some of the up-to-date knowledge about hypothyroidism, both subclinical and manifested, caused by autoimmune disease, was presented. Autoimmune thyroid gland disease can occur at any age, but predominantly affects women after periods of high emotional and physical stress or accidents, as well as during periods of hormonal changes. It can also develop in families, and having an autoimmune disease slightly increases the risk of developing another. This paper showed an increasing incidence of subclinical hypothyroidism (4.17%) in elderly, and, at the same time, the incidence of primary hypothyroidism accounting for 1%. It is very usefull to estimate the stimulated thyrotropin (TSH) response, as well as the value of fast, short time thyroid gland reserves, analyzed by T3 and T4 serum level at 60th minute after TRH stimulation. Treatment of choice for HT (hypothyroidism of any cause) is thyroid hormone replacement. Drug of choice is orally administered levothyroxine sodium, usually for life-time. The standard dose is 1.6-1.8 mcg/kg body weight per day, but is in most cases patient dependent. Elderly patients usually require smaller replacement dose of levothyroxine, sometimes less than 1 mcg/kg body weight per day with coronary dilatator at the same time.

  17. Immunoregulatory T cells, LFA-3 and HLA-DR in autoimmune thyroid diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aml Mohamed Nada

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Several reports have claimed a role for T regulatory cells (Tregs in the pathogenesis of various autoimmune diseases, including autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD. Naturally occurring CD4+ regulatory T cells, the majority of which express CD25, are engaged in dominant control of self-reactive T cells, contributing to the maintenance of immunologic self-tolerance. Their depletion or functional alteration leads to the development of autoimmune diseases. CD8+ Tcells are also claimed to have a suppressive effect on autoimmune diseases. Lymphocyte function antigen-3 and human leucocyte antigen (HLA-DR are involved in antigen presentation, initiation, and maintenance of autoimmune processes. Aim: The aim of the present study was to examine the changes in the expression of T-cell activation markers, namely CD4+ CD25+ and CD8+ in patients with AITD, namely Graves′ disease and Hashimoto′s thyroiditis as well as colloid nodular goitre. HLA-DR, LFA-3, and peripheral total lymphocytic count are also measured. Materials and Methods: We compared the expression of CD4, CD25, and CD8 surface markers in peripheral blood lymphocyte in Graves′ disease and Hashimoto′s thyroiditis as autoimmune thyroid diseases, as well as colloid goitre in comparison with healthy controls. Also, LFA-3 and HLA-DR were measured in the same groups using three-color flow cytometry. Total lymphocytic count in peripheral blood, thyroid function tests, antithyroid antibodies were also included in the laboratory investigations. The total number of participants was 65. All were recruited from endocrine clinics in a tertiary care hospital in the southern region of Saudi Arabia. All participants underwent history taking, clinical examination, laboratory workup, and radiological investigations. Neck ultrasound, technecium pertechnetateψψ thyroid uptake, and fine-needle aspiration and cytology (FNAC of the thyroid were done when indicated. The study was approved by the Hospital

  18. Peripheral blood and intrathyroidal T cell clones from patients with thyroid autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massart, C; Caroff, G; Maugendre, D; Genetet, N; Gibassier, J

    1999-01-01

    For a better understanding of the pathogenesis of thyroid autoimmune diseases, we have studied morphological and functional properties of T clones from peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and from intrathyroidal lymphocytes (ITL) obtained from 3 patients with Graves' disease or 1 Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Investigations were carried out on clones cultured alone or cocultured with autologous thyrocytes. Clonage efficiency ranged from 30% to 33% for PBL and 10% to 36% for ITL. A predominance of CD4-positive clones was observed whatever the origin of the lymphocytes or the autoimmune pathology. Gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) was detected in the majority (17/19) of the clones tested. Intracytoplasmic interleukin (IL-4) was secreted in 7/19 clones and both cytokines were produced in 5/19 clones. In coculture a proliferative response and tumour necrosis factor (TNF-alpha) production were observed with 6 clones (4 from Graves thyrocytes and 2 from thyroiditis). No cytotoxic clone was derived from Graves or thyroiditis tissues. These data demonstrate that the large majority of T clones are principally CD4-T cells; all the clones secreted TNF-alpha and a large majority produced IFN-gamma. Only a few clones produced IL-4 alone or associated with IFN-gamma. Six T clones induced proliferative response and of TNF-alpha secretion in coculture. Further investigations must be performed on these antigen-reactive T clones to analyse their role in the pathogenesis of the human thyroid autoimmune diseases.

  19. Celiac-Associated Autoimmune Thyroid Disease: A Study of 16 Patients with Overt Hypothyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh J Freeman

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous reports have suggested that autoimmune thyroid disorders (including Hashimoto’s or lymphocytic thyroiditis may occur in patients with celiac disease. In this study, the prevalence of thyroid disease was explored in a series of 96 consecutive patients seen with biopsy-defined adult celiac disease (average age 47.3 years. Sixteen celiac patients (average age 58.1 years were detected with hypothyroidism, including four treated with radio-iodine ablation or thyroidectomy for Grave’s disease. In addition to celiac disease, almost half had dermatitis herpetiformis, a small intestinal neoplasm (particularly lymphoma or both. Diagnosis of thyroid disease preceded diagnosis of celiac disease in 13 patients or was made concurrently in two patients. In only one patient was thyroid disease detected after celiac disease was diagnosed. This indicates that thyroid diseases occur more commonly in celiac disease than is currently appreciated, possibly due to shared embryological origins or common immunopathological features, and may be the presenting clinical manifestation in adults especially if there is coexistent dermatitis herpetiformis. Careful monitoring of this subgroup may be warranted because of the frequency of neoplastic intestinal diseases, particularly lymphoma.

  20. Thyroid autoimmunity and polyglandular endocrine syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wémeau, Jean-Louis; Proust-Lemoine, Emmanuelle; Ryndak, Amélie; Vanhove, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Even though autoimmune thyroiditis is considered as the most emblematic type of organ-specific autoimmune disorder of autoimmunity, autoimmune thyroid diseases can be associated with other autoimmune endocrine failures or non-endocrine diseases (namely vitiligo, pernicious anemia, myasthenia gravis, autoimmune gastritis, celiac disease, hepatitis). Thyroid disorders, which are the most frequent expression of adult polyendocrine syndrome type 2, occur concomitantly with or secondarily to insulinodependent diabetes, premature ovarian failure, Addison's disease (Schmidt syndrome, or Carpenter syndrome if associated with diabetes). Testicular failure and hypoparathyroidism are unusual. The disease is polygenic and multifactorial. Disorders of thyroid autoimmunity are, surprisingly, very rare in polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (or APECED) beginning during childhood. They are related to mutations of the AIRE gene that encodes for a transcriptional factor implicated in central and peripheral immune tolerance. Hypothyroidism can also be observed in the very rare IPEX and POEMS syndromes.

  1. Thyrotropin - Binding Inhibiting Immunoglobulin (TBII) in Patients with Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Dae Sung; Ahn, Byeong Cheol; Sohn, Sang Kyun; Lee, Jae Tae; Lee, Kyu Bo [Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-03-15

    In order to evaluate the significance of thyrotropin-binding inhibiting immunoglobulin (TBII) in the patients with autoimmune thyroid diseases, the authors investigated 402 cases of Graves' disease and 230 cases of Hashimoto's thyroiditis comparing 30 cases of normal healthy adult at Kyung Pook University Hospital from February 1993 to August 1994. The TBII was tested by radioimmunoassay and assessed on the dynamic change with the disease course, thyroid functional parameters, and other thyroid autoantibodies; antithyroglobulin antibody(ATAb) and antimicrosomal antibody(AMAb) including thyroglobulin. The serum level of TBII was 40.82 +- 21.651(mean +- SD)% in hyperthyroid Graves' disease and 8.89 +- 14.522% in Hashimoto's thyroiditis and both were significant different from normal control of which was 3.21 +- 2.571%. The frequency of abnormally increased TBII level was 92.2% in hyperthyroid Craves' disease, 46.7% in euthyroid Graves' disease or remission state of hyperthyroidism, and 23.9% in Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The serum levels of increased TBII in Graves' disease were positively correlated with RAIU, serum T3, T4, and FT4, but negatively correlated with serum TSH(each p<0.001). The TBII in Graves' disease had significant positive correlation with serum thyroglobulin and AMAb, but no significant correlation with ATAb. In the Hashimoto's thyroiditis, the serum levels of TBII were positively correlated with RAIU, serum T3, TSH and AMAb, but not significantly correlated with serum T4, FT4, thyroglobulin and ATAb. Therefore serum level of TBII seemed to be a useful mean of assessing the degree of hyperthyroidism in Graves' disease and correlated well with thyroidal stimulation. The serum level of TBII in Hashimoto's thyroiditis is meaningful for the degree of both functional abnormality reflecting either hyperfunction or hypofunction and the immunologic abnormality.

  2. Color Doppler measurement of blood flow in the inferior thyroid artery in patients with autoimmune thyroid diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caruso, Giuseppe; Attard, Marco; Caronia, Aurelio; Lagalla, Roberto

    2000-10-01

    Purpose: The aim of the study is to find out whether the measurement of peak systolic velocity in the inferior thyroid artery (ITA) is a valuable parameter to differentiate autoimmune thyroid diseases (hyper-, normo- or hypofunctional) and to evaluate the efficacy of medical treatment. Material and methods: The ITA of 31 patients (eight with Graves' disease, 23 with subclinical hypothyroidism) was examined with color Doppler and pulsed Doppler. The final diagnosis was obtained by citology and by hormonal and antibodies assays. The patients were monitorized by ultrasound for a period of 8 months. Results: In all the patients with Graves' disease the peak systolic velocity was always over 150 cm/s, while in other autoimmune thyroiditis the peak systolic velocity was within the normal range, and never exceeding 65 cm/s. In the first group, the measurement taken in the ITA showed also the efficacy of the pharmacological treatment earlier and more reliably than the color Doppler pattern obtained in the parenchyma. Conclusions: The color Doppler measurement of the ITA seems to be a promising technique with low-cost and easy approach. In our experience, the color Doppler of the ITA could have a clinical role in the differential diagnosis of diffuse thyroid diseases and in the follow-up of the Graves' disease during medical treatment.

  3. Prevalence of coeliac disease in patients with autoimmune thyroiditis in a Turkish population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sefa Guliter; Fahri Yakaryilmaz; Zubeyde Ozkurt; Reyhan Ersoy; Derya Ucardag; Osman Caglayan; Pinar Atasoy

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the prevalence of coeliac disease in a series of Turkish patients with autoimmune thyroiditis.METHODS: Sera from 136 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed autoimmune thyroiditis and 119 healthy blood donors were tested for IgA tissue transglutaminase antibody with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Endoscopic mucosal biopsy from the second part of duodenum was performed in patients with positive antibody test.RESULTS: Eight patients (5.9%) and one control subject (0.8%) were positive for IgA tissue transglutaminase antibody (OR: 7.38, 95% CI: 0.91-59.85, P = 0.04). Six patients and one control agreed to take biopsies. Histopathological examination revealed changes classified as Marsh ma in one, Marsh n in one, Marsh I in two, and Marsh 0 in two patients with autoimmune throiditis, and Marsh I in one blood donor.CONCLUSION: Turkish patients with autoimmune thyroiditis have an increased risk of coeliac disease and serological screening may be useful for early detection of coeliac disease in these patients. Our findings need to be confirmed in a larger series of patients.

  4. The Frequency of Autoimmune Thyroid Disease in Alopecia Areata and Vitiligo Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulcan Saylam Kurtipek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Many studies demonstrated that alopecia areata (AA and vitiligo are commonly associated with autoimmune thyroid diseases. We aimed to investigate the frequency of thyroid dysfunctions and autoimmunity related with vitiligo and AA. Material and Methods. 200 patients, 92 AA and 108 vitiligo diagnosed, were surveyed retrospectively. The control population was in reference range and from Konya, central Anatolian region of Turkey. Thyroid function tests (free T3, free T4, and TSH and serum thyroid autoantibody (anti-TG, anti-TPO levels were evaluated in all patients. Results. In vitiligo patients, 9 (8.3% had elevated anti-TG levels and 16 (14.8% had elevated anti-TPO, and in 17 patients (15.7% TSH levels were elevated and 3 (2.8% patients had elevated fT4 levels and 5 (4.6% had elevated fT3 levels. Within AA patients, 2 (2.2% had anti-TG elevation and 13 (14.1% had anti-TPO elevation, in 7 patients (7.6% TSH were elevated, and in 1 patient (1.1% fT4 were elevated and 5 (5.4% patients had elevated fT3 levels. Conclusion. In our study, impaired thyroid functions and thyroid autoantibodies in vitiligo and AA patients were identified at lower rates than the previous studies. According to results of this study there is no need for detailed examination in alopecia areata and vitiligo patients without clinical history.

  5. Autoimmune thyroid diseases and Helicobacter pylori: The correlation is present only in Graves's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vincenzo Bassi; Gennaro Marino; Alba Iengo; Olimpia Fattoruso; Crescenzo Santinelli

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the correlation between autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATDs) and the prevalence of Cag-A positive strains of Helicobacter pylori (H.pylon)in stool samples.METHODS:Authors investigated 112 consecutive Caucasian patients (48 females and 4 males with Graves' disease and 54 females and 6 males with Hashimoto's thyroiditis HT),at their first diagnosis of ATDs.Authors tested for H.pylori in stool samples using an amplified enzyme immunoassay and Cag-A in serum samples using an enzyme-linked immunoassay method (ELISA).The results were analyzed using the two-sided Fisher's exact test and the respective odds ratio (OR) was calculated.RESULTS:A marked correlation was found between the presence of H.pylori (P ≤ 0.0001,OR 6.3) and,in particular,Cag-A positive strains (P ≤ 0.005,OR 5.3)in Graves' disease,but not in Hashimoto's thyroiditis,where authors found only a correlation with Cag-A strains (P ≤ 0.005,OR 8.73) but not when H.pylori was present.CONCLUSION:The marked correlation between H.pylori and Cag-A,found in ATDs,could be dependent on the different expression of adhesion molecules in the gastric mucosa.

  6. Estrogen receptor alpha dinucleotide repeat polymorphism in Japanese patients with autoimmune thyroid diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tozaki Teruaki

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs, comprising Graves' disease (GD and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT, appear to develop as a result of complex interactions between predisposing genes and environmental triggers. Susceptibility to AITDs is conferred by genes in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA and genes unlinked to HLA, including the CTLA-4 gene. Recently, an association to some estrogen receptor (ERα genotypes with breast cancer, hypertension, osteoporosis, generalized osteoarthritis, and some autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis has been reported. We have analyzed a dinucleotide (TAn repeat polymorphism lying upstream of the human ERα gene in patients with AITDs and in normal subjects. Results Seventeen different alleles were found in 130 patients with GD, 93 patients with HT, and 190 control subjects. There was no significant difference in the distributions of ERα alleles between patients and controls. Conclusions The present results do not support an association between the ERα gene and AITD in the Japanese population.

  7. Impact of month of birth on the development of autoimmune thyroid disease in the United Kingdom and Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamilton, Alexander; Newby, Paul R; Carr-Smith, Jacqueline D;

    2014-01-01

    CONTEXT: Viral/bacterial infection is proposed as a trigger for the autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD): Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT). Previous studies in European Caucasian AITD subjects found higher birth rates in the autumn/winter, suggesting those born in the autumn/wi...

  8. Effect of steroid replacement on thyroid function and thyroid autoimmunity in Addison′ s disease with primary hypothyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaya Prakash Sahoo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Steroid replacement without thyroxine supplementation normalizes thyroid function test (TFT in some but not all Addison's disease patients with primary hypothyroidism. Both autoimmune and nonautoimmune mechanisms contribute to this improvement in TFT. However, the documentation of the change in thyroid autoimmunity after cortisol replacement is very limited in the literature. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of steroid replacement on TFT and anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody (anti-TPO-Ab titer in Addison's disease with primary hypothyroidism. Materials and Methods: This observational study was conducted in a tertiary care center in South India. Six Addison's disease patients with primary hypothyroidism, who were only on steroid replacement, were included in the study. Low serum cortisol (22 pmol/L and/or hyperpigmentation of skin/mucous membranes was considered as the diagnostic criteria for Addison's disease. Primary hypothyroidism (both overt and subclinical was defined as high thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH with/without low free thyroxine (fT4. TFT and anti-TPO-Ab were performed before and after steroid replacement in all of them. Results: Poststeroid replacement, there was a normalization of TSH in all but one subjects. In overt hypothyroidism patients, fT4 also normalized. The improvement in TFT was not associated with decreasing titer of the anti-TPO-Ab in all six patients. However, there was a significant difference in TSH after steroid replacement compared to the baseline status. Conclusions: The concept of normalization of primary hypothyroidism with cortisol replacement in patients with Addison's disease should be recognized to avoid iatrogenic thyrotoxicosis caused by thyroxine replacement. Both autoimmune and nonautoimmune mechanisms contribute to these alterations.

  9. Same-sex marriage, autoimmune thyroid gland dysfunction and other autoimmune diseases in Denmark 1989-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisch, Morten; Nielsen, Nete Munk; Pedersen, Bo Vestergaard

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases have been little studied in gay men and lesbians. We followed 4.4 million Danes, including 9,615 same-sex married (SSM) persons, for 47 autoimmune diseases in the National Patient Registry between 1989 and 2008. Poisson regression analyses provided first hospitalization rate ratios (RRs) comparing rates between SSM individuals and persons in other marital status categories. SSM individuals experienced no unusual overall risk of autoimmune diseases. However, the risk of autoimmune thyroid dysfunction was increased, notably Hashimoto's thyroiditis (women(SSM), RR = 2.92; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.74-4.55) and Graves' disease (men(SSM), RR = 1.88; 95% CI 1.08-3.01). There was also an excess of primary biliary cirrhosis (women(SSM), RR = 4.09; 95% CI 1.01-10.7), and of psoriasis (men(SSM), RR = 2.48; 95% CI 1.77-3.36), rheumatic fever (men(SSM), RR = 7.55; 95% CI 1.87-19.8), myasthenia gravis (men(SSM), RR = 5.51; 95% CI 1.36-14.4), localized scleroderma (men(SSM), RR = 7.16; 95% CI 1.18-22.6) and pemphigoid (men(SSM), RR = 6.56; 95% CI 1.08-20.6), while Dupuytren's contracture was reduced (men(SSM), RR = 0.64; 95% CI 0.39-0.99). The excess of psoriasis was restricted to same-sex married men with HIV/AIDS (men(SSM), RR = 10.5; 95% CI 6.44-15.9), whereas Graves' disease occurred in excess only among same-sex married men without HIV/AIDS (men(SSM), RR = 1.99; 95% CI 1.12-3.22). Lesbians and immunologically competent gay men in same-sex marriage face no unusual overall risk of autoimmune diseases. However, the observed increased risk of thyroid dysfunction in these lesbians and gay men deserves further study.

  10. Ocular surface and salivary gland involvement in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Pelinsari Lana

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Many reports have indicated an association between thyroid dieases and primary Sjögren’s syndrome (pSS. The aim of our study was to evaluate the outcomes of the tests used for dry eye diagnosis and salivary gland involvement in patients with autoimmune thyroiditis. Methods: Forty-two patients (group 1 with autoimmune thyroid disease and 30 controls (group 2 were selected. Tear film break up time, Schirmer I test, Schirmer II test, ocular staining with 1% rose Bengal and salivary gland cintilography were performed in both groups. Results: Regarding the ocular surface damage observed by Rose Bengal test there was no difference between groups (p=0.77. For tear film break up time the groups did not differ statistically (p=0.46. There was no statistical difference between groups 1 and control in scintigraphy of the salivary gland (p=0.99. A statistical difference between the patients with thyroid disease and the control group was seem only in the Schirmer II test (p=0.0009. Conclusions: No patients fulfilled all criteria for Sjögren’s syndrome. It is possible that it could be underestimated.

  11. STUDY ON THE HETEROGENEITY OF TSH RECEPTOR ANTIBODIFSIN THE PATHOGENESIS OF AUTOIMMUNE THYROID DISEASE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective To investigate the heterogeneity of TSH receptor antibodies of patients with autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD). Methods Six patients with heterogeneous TSH receptor antibodies were selected. The EBV-transformed B cell clones producing monoclonal anti-thyrotropin receptor antibodies were established from those selected patients. Results 125l-TSHbinding inhibiting immunoglobulin (TBII) values of the 6 patients ranged from 51% to 89%. Thyroid stimulating an tibody (TSAb) existed in patients No. 1,2,4,5 and 6 while only patients No. 1,2 and 3 had thyroid stimulation-blocking an tibody (TSBAb). After EBV-transformation of the peripheral B lymphocytes from those patients, we isolated and characterized 5 B cell clones producing the TBII from patient No. 3 and 4 B cell clones producing TSAb from patient No. 6. Conclusion Autoantibodies against the TSH receptor are polyclonal and consist of heterogeneous populations with both stimulatory and in hibi tory effec ts.

  12. Susceptibility Genes in Thyroid Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyuki Ban

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD are complex diseases which are caused by an interaction between susceptibility genes and environmental triggers. Genetic susceptibility in combination with external factors (e.g. dietary iodine is believed to initiate the autoimmune response to thyroid antigens. Abundant epidemiological data, including family and twin studies, point to a strong genetic influence on the development of AITD. Various techniques have been employed to identify the genes contributing to the etiology of AITD, including candidate gene analysis and whole genome screening. These studies have enabled the identification of several loci (genetic regions that are linked with AITD, and in some of these loci, putative AITD susceptibility genes have been identified. Some of these genes/loci are unique to Graves' disease (GD and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT and some are common to both the diseases, indicating that there is a shared genetic susceptibility to GD and HT. The putative GD and HT susceptibility genes include both immune modifying genes (e.g. HLA, CTLA-4 and thyroid specific genes (e.g. TSHR, Tg. Most likely, these loci interact and their interactions may influence disease phenotype and severity.

  13. PREVALENCE OF AUTOANTIBODIES TO THYROID PEROXIDASE AND AUTOIMMUNE THYROID DISEASE IN GIRLS WITH TURNER’S SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Moayeri Z. Oloomi

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Patients with Turner’s syndrome (TS are at an increased risk of developing autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of anti-thyroid peroxidase (anti-Tpo antibodies and ATD in children and adolescent girls with TS. It also assessed the influence of karyotype on the development of thyroid disease. Sixty eight patients with TS were compared with 68 age matched healthy unrelated girls in this study. They were screened for anti-Tpo antibodies, free T4 and TSH levels. Sign and symptoms of hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism and the presence of goiter were also investigated. Anti-Tpo antibodies were found in 18 (26.4% TS patients and 1 (1.4% patient in the control group (P < 0.001, evenly distributed between the karyotypes 45X, 46X, isoXq and mosaicism. Out of 68 TS patients, 8 (11.7% had visible goiter. Subclinical hypothyroidism and hypothyroidism both occurred in 2 patients (5.9%. These patients were characterized by higher levels of anti-Tpo antibodies. Visible goiter was found in 3 (4.4% subjects of the control group, but all of them were euthyroid. We found that younger patients were more likely to be anti-Tpo negative (P < 0.001. Our data demonstrated a high frequency of ATD in a representative sample of Iranian girls with TS which is in accordance with previous observations. Regular follow up assessment of thyroid autoantibodies and thyroid function in patients with TS is recommended for timely diagnosis of thyroid dysfunction and treatment.

  14. Time for the endocrinologists to expand their awareness of and contribution to the diagnosis and management of encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tamagno, Gianluca

    2011-01-01

    Encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease is a rare condition presenting in the setting of autoimmune thyroid disease and characterized by unspecific neurological and\\/or psychiatric symptoms. Bearing in mind the currently prevailing lack of consensus on the most appropriate nomenclature and diagnostic criteria for this condition and the implications that this lack undeniably has on clinical practice, it is obvious that an international and multidisciplinary agreement among clinicians should arrive at the most appropriate definition and terminology of encephalopathy occurring in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease. Concomitantly, efforts must be made to uncover the pathogenetic link between thyroid autoimmunity and the occurrence of encephalopathy.

  15. Time for the endocrinologists to expand their awareness of and contribution to the diagnosis and management of encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tamagno, Gianluca

    2012-02-01

    Encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease is a rare condition presenting in the setting of autoimmune thyroid disease and characterized by unspecific neurological and\\/or psychiatric symptoms. Bearing in mind the currently prevailing lack of consensus on the most appropriate nomenclature and diagnostic criteria for this condition and the implications that this lack undeniably has on clinical practice, it is obvious that an international and multidisciplinary agreement among clinicians should arrive at the most appropriate definition and terminology of encephalopathy occurring in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease. Concomitantly, efforts must be made to uncover the pathogenetic link between thyroid autoimmunity and the occurrence of encephalopathy.

  16. There Is No Elevation of Immunoglobulin E Levels in Albanian Patients with Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatixhe Latifi-Pupovci

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Studies in several ethnic groups reported high incidence of elevated levels of immunoglobulin E (IgE in patients with autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATD, especially in patients with Graves’ disease. Objective. To study association between serum levels of IgE and thyroid stimulating hormone receptor antibodies (TRAb in Albanian patients with ATD. Material and Methods. Study was performed in 40 patients with Graves’ disease, 15 patients with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, and 14 subjects in the control group. The IgE levels were measured by immunoradiometric assay, whereas the TRAb levels were measured by radioreceptor assay. Results. In all groups of subjects the IgE levels were within reference values (<200 kIU/L. Significant difference in mean concentration of IgE was found between two groups of Graves’ disease patients, and those with normal and elevated TRAb levels (22.57 versus 45.03, P<0.05. Positive correlation was found between TRAb and IgE only in Graves’ disease patients (r=0.43, P=0.006. Conclusion. In Albanian patients with ATD there is no elevation of IgE levels. This could be the result of low prevalence of allergic diseases in Albanian population determined by genetic and environmental factors.

  17. Analysis of Associations of Human BAFF Gene Polymorphisms with Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiunn-Diann Lin

    Full Text Available The B-lymphocyte-activating factor (BAFF is associated with B-cell functions, and gene polymorphisms of the BAFF have been linked to autoimmune diseases (AIDs. In this study, we explored possible associations of two BAFF single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, rs1041569 and rs2893321, with autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs in an ethnic Chinese population.In total, 319 Graves' disease (GD, 83 Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT patients, and 369 healthy controls were enrolled. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism and direct sequencing were used to genotype rs2893321 and rs1041569.There was a significant difference in frequencies of the G allele and AG+GG genotype of rs2893321 between the GD and control groups (p = 0.013, odds ratio (OR = 0.76, and p = 0.017, OR = 0.68, respectively and between the AITD and control groups (p = 0.009, OR = 0.76, and, p = 0.014, OR = 0.69, respectively. The AA genotype of rs2893321 was associated with low titers of the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antibody (TSHRAb (p = 0.015 in males but not in females. The AA genotype of rs2893321 was associated with the presence of two different types of thyroid autoantibody (TAb (TSHRAb and Hashimoto's autoantibody (anti-thyroglobulin or anti-microsomal antibody in females and with that of one type in males.rs2893321 may be a susceptible genetic variant for the development of GD and AITDs. Associations of rs2893321 with susceptibility to GD and AITDs and the correlation between rs2893321 and TAb exhibit a dimorphic pattern. Additional studies with larger sample sizes are required to confirm our findings.

  18. Dual-Directional Immunomodulatory Effects of Corbrin Capsule on Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Tianyi; Zhao, Ruxing; Lu, Yiran; Li, Wenjuan; Hou, Xinguo; Sun, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the effects of Corbrin Capsule (CS-C-Q80), a drug derived from Cordyceps sinensis (Berk.) Sacc., on autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD). Methods. 44 Patients with Graves's disease (GD) and 56 patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) were randomly assigned to treatment group (GD-Tx and HT-Tx) or control group (GD-Ct and HT-Ct). The control groups were given methimazole or levothyroxine only while the treatment groups were given Corbrin Capsule (2.0 g tid) besides the same conventional prescriptions as control groups. Thyroid hormones, thyroid antibodies, and T lymphocyte subsets were quantified at baseline and 24 weeks posttreatment. Results. Significant drop of serum anti-TPO-Ab levels was observed in both GD-Tx and HT-Tx groups. Before treatment, GD patients had higher helper T cells compared to cytotoxic T cells, while HT patients suffered from a nearly inverted proportion of helper T/cytotoxic T cells. There was a significant drop of the helper T/cytotoxic T cells ratio in GD-Tx to the median of the normal ranges after Corbrin treatment for 24 weeks, while that in HT-Tx was elevated. Conclusion. Corbrin Capsule could restore the balance between helper T and cytotoxic T cells in both GD and HT patients with dual-directional immunomodulatory effects. And it could significantly reduce the autoantibody levels in both GD and HT. PMID:27721890

  19. Dual-Directional Immunomodulatory Effects of Corbrin Capsule on Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianyi He

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate the effects of Corbrin Capsule (CS-C-Q80, a drug derived from Cordyceps sinensis (Berk. Sacc., on autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD. Methods. 44 Patients with Graves’s disease (GD and 56 patients with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis (HT were randomly assigned to treatment group (GD-Tx and HT-Tx or control group (GD-Ct and HT-Ct. The control groups were given methimazole or levothyroxine only while the treatment groups were given Corbrin Capsule (2.0 g tid besides the same conventional prescriptions as control groups. Thyroid hormones, thyroid antibodies, and T lymphocyte subsets were quantified at baseline and 24 weeks posttreatment. Results. Significant drop of serum anti-TPO-Ab levels was observed in both GD-Tx and HT-Tx groups. Before treatment, GD patients had higher helper T cells compared to cytotoxic T cells, while HT patients suffered from a nearly inverted proportion of helper T/cytotoxic T cells. There was a significant drop of the helper T/cytotoxic T cells ratio in GD-Tx to the median of the normal ranges after Corbrin treatment for 24 weeks, while that in HT-Tx was elevated. Conclusion. Corbrin Capsule could restore the balance between helper T and cytotoxic T cells in both GD and HT patients with dual-directional immunomodulatory effects. And it could significantly reduce the autoantibody levels in both GD and HT.

  20. The Expression and Distribution of S-100 Protein and CD83 in Thyroid Tissues of Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wencan Xu; Shenren Chen; Jiexiong Huang; Zhichao Zheng; Linxing Chen; Wei Zhang

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the expression and distribution of S-100 protein and CD83 in the thyroid tissues of autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATDs), and to study the role of the dendritic cells in the pathogenesis of ATDs,immunohistochemical staining was used on pathological tissues of 20 patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT)and 20 patients with Graves' disease (GD) to check the expression and distribution of S-100 protein and CD83.Compared with control group (20 cases of thyroid follicular adenoma, TFA), the higher expressions of S-100 in HT (139.38±5.92 vs 59.47±11.69) and GD (119.42±14.48 vs 59.47±11.69) were observed respectively (p<0.001). The increased positive expressions of CD83 which is known as a marker of mature and activated DCs in HT (22.58±13.96 vs 5.19±8.08) and GD (29.92±14.43 vs 5.19±8.08) were also found respectively (p<0.001).Serum TPO antibody (TPO-Ab, 67.3 ± 11.6%) and Tg antibody (Tg-Ab, 59.8±10.1%) in HT were higher than that in GD (28.4±5.7%, 23.1±4.9%) and that in TFA (6.1±3.4%, 7.2±4.6%)(p<0.01). Serum TR-Ab in GD(16.3±5.6 U/L) was higher than that in HT (4.8±2.3 U/L) and that in TFA (2.5±1.2 U/L) (p<0.01). Our findings suggest that the high expression of DCs' markers may be related to the pathogenesis of HT and GD.The upregulation of both number and matured functions of DCs, may lead to present more antigens and to produce more auto-antibodies (such as TgAb and TPOAb in HT, TRAb in GD), which may be involved in pathogenesis of the autoimmune thyroid diseases. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004; 1(5):378-382.

  1. Association between STAT4 Gene Polymorphisms and Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases in a Chinese Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Yan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The STAT4 gene encodes a transcriptional factor that transmits signals induced by several key cytokines which play important roles in the development of autoimmune diseases. The aim of this study was to explore the association of STAT4 polymorphism with Graves’ disease (GD and Hashimoto’s thyroiditis (HT. A total of 1048 autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs patients (693 with GD and 355 with HT and 909 age- and gender-matched controls were examined. STAT4 polymorphisms (rs7574865/rs10181656/ rs7572482 were genotyped by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR and ligase detection reaction (LDR. The results indicated that the frequencies of rs7574865 genotypes in patients with GD differed significantly from the controls (p = 0.028, the T allele frequency of GD patients was also significantly higher than the controls (p = 0.020. The genotypes of rs10181656 differed significantly in GD patients from controls (p = 0.012; G allele frequencies were significantly higher in AITD patients than the controls (p = 0.014 and 0.031, respectively. The frequencies of haplotype GC with GD and HT patients were significantly lower than their controls (p = 0.015 and 0.030, respectively. In contrast, the frequencies of haplotype TG with GD and HT patients were significantly higher than their controls (p = 0.016 and 0.048, respectively. These findings strongly suggest that STAT4 rs7574865/rs10181656 polymorphisms increase the risk of AITD in a Chinese population.

  2. {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi thyroid uptake in euthyroid individuals and in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Allan O. [Campinas State University, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, School of Medical Sciences, Campinas (Brazil); Avenida Independencia, Piracicaba, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Zantut-Wittmann, D.E.; Tambascia, M.A. [Campinas State University, Division of Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medical Sciences, Campinas (Brazil); Nogueira, R.O.; Etchebehere, E.C.S.C.; Lima, M.C.L.; Camargo, E.E.; Ramos, C.D. [Campinas State University, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, School of Medical Sciences, Campinas (Brazil)

    2005-06-01

    We investigated the biokinetics of {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi in the thyroid of euthyroid volunteers (EVs) and in patients with autoimmune thyroid diseases and determined the best time interval between {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi injection and calculation of uptake. Forty EVs, 30 patients with Graves' disease (GD), 15 patients with atrophic Hashimoto's thyroiditis (AHT) and 15 patients with hypertrophic Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HHT) underwent {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi thyroid scintigraphy. Dynamic images were acquired for 20 min, and static images were obtained 20 min, 60 min and 120 min post injection. Five-, 20-, 60- and 120-min uptake, time to maximal uptake (T{sub max}) and T{sub 1/2} of tracer clearance were calculated. Thyroid hormones and antibodies were measured. {sup 99m}Tc-pertechnetate uptake was investigated in GD patients. T{sub max} was approximately 5 min in all four groups. The mean T{sub 1/2} value for EVs was similar to the GD value and lower than the HHT and AHT values. The mean ({+-}SD) 5-min uptake was 0.13% ({+-}0.05%) for EVs. The 5-min uptake in GD was higher than that in EVs(P<0.001) and correlated with free thyroxine (r=0.54) and with {sup 99m}Tc-pertechnetate uptake (r=0.68). Uptake in HHT was higher than that in AHT (P=0.0003) and EVs (P=0.002). Uptake in AHT was lower than uptake in EVs (P=0.0001). Five minutes is the optimal time interval between {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi injection and calculation of thyroid uptake. Five-minute uptake differentiates euthyroid individuals from GD patients. There is a high correlation between {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi and {sup 99m}Tc-pertechnetate uptake in GD. The reduced {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi uptake in AHT patients is probably due to glandular destruction and fibrosis. Inflammatory infiltrate and high mitochondrial density in thyrocytes possibly explain the increased uptake in GD and HHT. (orig.)

  3. Clustering of autoimmune thyroid diseases in children and adolescents: a study of 66 families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segni, M; Wood, J; Pucarelli, I; Toscano, V; Toscano, R; Pasquino, A M

    2001-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) are known to be clustered in families, but to what extent this occurs in childhood and adolescence is not well defined. In order to establish the prevalence of AITD in the siblings of affected children and adolescents, we examined 73 siblings from 66 families selected on the basis of a pediatric index patient. Sixty-six families, including a total of 146 offspring, were selected on the basis of diagnosis of chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis (CLT) (n = 55) or Graves' disease (GD) (n = 11). Among the 73 siblings examined, 20 new cases of CLT (27%) were detected. L-Thyroxine therapy was required in 4/20. History of AITD was recorded in 24/66 mothers (36%), and in two fathers. Overall in these families, considering both the index patients and the new patients, 86/141 (61%) children and adolescents were affected with AITD, with a female/male ratio of 3.3:1. Our study confirms that AITD clusters in families with a high prevalence in the siblings of affected children and adolescents. These children should be followed in order to avoid undiagnosed hypothyroidism. Prospective studies are warranted to identify predictive factors for overt thyroid disease.

  4. Identification of Novel Genetic Loci Associated with Thyroid Peroxidase Antibodies and Clinical Thyroid Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Medici (Marco); E. Porcu (Eleonora); G. Pistis (Giorgio); A. Teumer (Alexander); S.J. Brown (Stephen); R.A. Jensen (Richard); R. Rawal (R.); G.L. Roef (Greet); T.S. Plantinga (Theo S.); S.H.H.M. Vermeulen (Sita); J. Lahti (Jari); M.C. Simmonds (Mark); L.L.N. Husemoen (Lise Lotte); R.M. Freathy (Rachel); B.M. Shields (Beverley); D. Pietzner (Diana); R. Nagy (Rebecca); L. Broer (Linda); L. Chaker (Layal); T.I.M. Korevaar (Tim); M.G. Plia (Maria Grazia); C. Sala (Cinzia); U. Völker (Uwe); J.B. Richards (Brent); F.C. Sweep (Fred); C. Gieger (Christian); T. Corre (Tanguy); E. Kajantie (Eero); L. Thuesen (Leif); Y.E. Taes (Youri); W.E. Visser (Wil Edward); A.T. Hattersley (Andrew); J. Kratzsch (Jürgen); A. Hamilton (Amy); W. Li (Wei); G. Homuth (Georg); M. Lobina (Monia); S. Mariotti (Stefano); N. Soranzo (Nicole); M. Cocca (Massimiliano); M. Nauck (Matthias); C. Spielhagen (Christin); H.A. Ross (Alec); A.M. Arnold (Alice); M. van de Bunt (Martijn); S. Liyanarachchi (Sandya); M. Heier (Margit); H.J. Grabe (Hans Jörgen); C. Masciullo (Corrado); T.E. Galesloot (Tessel); E.M. Lim (Ee Mun); G. Reischl (Gunilla); P.J. Leedman (Peter); S. Lai (Sandra); A. Delitala (Alessandro); A. Bremner (Alexandra); D.I.W. Philips (David I.); J.P. Beilby (John); A. Mulas (Antonella); M. Vocale (Matteo); G.R. Abecasis (Gonçalo); T. Forsen (Tom); A. James (Alan); E. Widen (Elisabeth); J. Hui (Jennie); H. Prokisch (Holger); E.E. Rietzschel (Ernst); A. Palotie (Aarno); W. Feddema (Wouter); S.J. Fletcher (Stephen); K. Schramm (Katharina); J.I. Rotter (Jerome); A. Kluttig (Alexander); D. Radke (Dörte); M. Traglia (Michela); G. Surdulescu (Gabriela); H. He (Hao); J.A. Franklyn (Jayne); D. Tiller (Daniel); B. Vaidya (Bijay); T. Meyer (Thorsten); T. Jorgensen (Torben); K. Hagen (Knut); P.C. O'Leary (Peter); E. Wichmann (Eric); A.R. Hermus (Ad); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); T. Ittermann (Till); A. Hofman (Albert); E. Bosi (Emanuele); D. Schlessinger (David); H. Wallaschofski (Henri); N. Pirastu (Nicola); Y.S. Aulchenko (Yurii); A. de la Chapelle (Albert); R.T. Netea-Maier (Romana ); J.E. Gough (Julie); H. Meyer zu Schwabedissen (Henriette); T.M. Frayling (Timothy); J.-M. Kaufman (Jean-Marc); A. Linneberg (Allan); K. Räikkönen (Katri); J.W.A. Smit (Jan); L.A.L.M. Kiemeney (Bart); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); J.P. Walsh (John); C. Meisinger (Christa); M. den Heijer (Martin); T.J. Visser (Theo); T.D. Spector (Timothy); S.G. Wilson (Scott); H. Völzke (Henry); A.R. Cappola (Anne); D. Toniolo (Daniela); S. Sanna (Serena); S. Naitza (Silvia); R.P. Peeters (Robin)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractAutoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) are common, affecting 2-5% of the general population. Individuals with positive thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAbs) have an increased risk of autoimmune hypothyroidism (Hashimoto's thyroiditis), as well as autoimmune hyperthyroidism (Graves' disease)

  5. Identification of novel genetic Loci associated with thyroid peroxidase antibodies and clinical thyroid disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medici, M.; Porcu, E.; Pistis, G.; Teumer, A.; Brown, S.J.; Jensen, R.A.; Rawal, R.; Roef, G.L.; Plantinga, T.S.; Vermeulen, S.; Lahti, J.; Simmonds, M.J.; Husemoen, L.L.; Freathy, R.M.; Shields, B.M.; Pietzner, D.; Nagy, R.; Broer, L.; Chaker, L.; Korevaar, T.I.; Plia, M.G.; Sala, C.; Volker, U.; Richards, J.B.; Sweep, F.C.; Gieger, C.; Corre, T.; Kajantie, E.; Thuesen, B.; Taes, Y.E.; Visser, W.E.; Hattersley, A.T.; Kratzsch, J.; Hamilton, A.; Li, W.; Homuth, G.; Lobina, M.; Mariotti, S.; Soranzo, N.; Cocca, M.; Nauck, M.; Spielhagen, C.; Ross, A.; Arnold, A.; Bunt, M. van de; Liyanarachchi, S.; Heier, M.; Grabe, H.J.; Masciullo, C.; Galesloot, T.E.; Lim, E.M.; Reischl, E.; Leedman, P.J.; Lai, S.; Delitala, A.; Bremner, A.P.; Philips, D.I.; Beilby, J.P.; Mulas, A.; Vocale, M.; Abecasis, G.; Forsen, T.; James, A.; Widen, E.; Hui, J.; Prokisch, H.; Rietzschel, E.E.; Palotie, A.; Feddema, P.; Fletcher, S.J.; Schramm, K.; Rotter, J.I.; Kluttig, A.; Radke, D.; Traglia, M.; Surdulescu, G.L.; He, H.; Franklyn, J.A.; Tiller, D.; Vaidya, B.; Meyer, T.; Jorgensen, T.; Eriksson, J.G.; O'Leary, P.C.; Wichmann, E.; Hermus, A.R.M.M.; Psaty, B.M.; Ittermann, T.; Hofman, A.; Bosi, E.; Schlessinger, D.; Wallaschofski, H.; Pirastu, N.; Aulchenko, Y.S.; Chapelle, A. dela; Netea-Maier, R.T.; Gough, S.C.; Meyer Zu Schwabedissen, H.; Frayling, T.M.; Kaufman, J.M.; Smit, J.W.; Kiemeney, B.

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) are common, affecting 2-5% of the general population. Individuals with positive thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAbs) have an increased risk of autoimmune hypothyroidism (Hashimoto's thyroiditis), as well as autoimmune hyperthyroidism (Graves' disease). As the pos

  6. Activation of Helicobacter pylori causes either autoimmune thyroid diseases or carcinogenesis in the digestive tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astl, J; Šterzl, I

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori has been implicated in stimulation of immune system, development of autoimmune endocrinopathies as autoimmune thyroiditis (AT) and on other hand induction of immunosupresion activates gastric and extra-gastric diseases such as gastric ulcer or cancer. It causes persistent lifelong infection despite local and systemic immune response. Our results indicate that Helicobacter pylori might cause inhibition of the specific cellular immune response in Helicobacter pylori-infected patients with or without autoimmune diseases such as AT. We cannot also declare the carcinogenic effect in oropharynx. However the association of any infection agents and cancerogenesis exists. The adherence of Helicobacter pylori expression and enlargement of benign lymphatic tissue and the high incidence of the DNA of Helicobacter pylori in laryngopharyngeal and oropharyngeal cancer is reality. LTT appears to be a good tool for detection of immune memory cellular response in patients with Helicobacter pylori infection and AT. All these complications of Helicobacter pylori infection can be abrogated by successful eradication of Helicobacter pylori.

  7. 25 Hydroxyvitamin D Deficiency and Its Relationship to Autoimmune Thyroid Disease in the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Muscogiuri

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Low 25(OH vitamin D levels have been associated with several autoimmune diseases and recently with autoimmune thyroiditis (AT. The aim of the study was to investigate the association of AT with low 25(OH vitamin D levels in the elderly. Methods: One hundred sixty-eight elderly subjects (mean age: 81.6 ± 9.4 years were enrolled. Serum levels of 25(OH vitamin D, anti-thyroid peroxidase (TPO-Ab, anti-thyroglobulin (TG-Ab antibodies, free triiodothyronine (FT3, free thyroxine (FT4 and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH were measured. Results: The prevalence of AT was significantly higher in subjects with vitamin D deficiency (25(OH vitamin D < 20 ng/mL when compared with subjects with normal 25(OH vitamin D (25(OH vitamin D ≥ 20 ng/mL levels (28% vs. 8%, respectively, p = 0.002. Patients with AT and vitamin D deficiency had a comparable hormonal profile compared to patients with AT and vitamin D sufficiency in terms of TSH (p = 0.39, FT3 (p = 0.30, FT4 (p = 0.31, TG-Ab (0.44 and TPO-Ab (0.35. Interestingly, a significant correlation between 25(OH vitamin D and TPO-Ab (r = −0.27, p = 0.03 and FT3 (r = 0.35, p = 0.006 has been found in subjects with AT while no correlation was found between 25(OH vitamin D levels and TG-Ab (r = −0.15, p = 0.25, TSH (r = −0.014, p = 0.09 and FT4 (r = 0.13, p = 0.32. Conclusions: These findings suggest that vitamin D deficiency was significantly associated with AT in the elderly. Therefore, the screening for AT should be suggested in subjects with vitamin D deficiency.

  8. 25 Hydroxyvitamin D Deficiency and Its Relationship to Autoimmune Thyroid Disease in the Elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscogiuri, Giovanna; Mari, Daniela; Prolo, Silvia; Fatti, Letizia M.; Cantone, Maria Celeste; Garagnani, Paolo; Arosio, Beatrice; Di Somma, Carolina; Vitale, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Background: Low 25(OH) vitamin D levels have been associated with several autoimmune diseases and recently with autoimmune thyroiditis (AT). The aim of the study was to investigate the association of AT with low 25(OH) vitamin D levels in the elderly. Methods: One hundred sixty-eight elderly subjects (mean age: 81.6 ± 9.4 years) were enrolled. Serum levels of 25(OH) vitamin D, anti-thyroid peroxidase (TPO-Ab), anti-thyroglobulin (TG-Ab) antibodies, free triiodothyronine (FT3), free thyroxine (FT4) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) were measured. Results: The prevalence of AT was significantly higher in subjects with vitamin D deficiency (25(OH) vitamin D < 20 ng/mL) when compared with subjects with normal 25(OH) vitamin D (25(OH) vitamin D ≥ 20 ng/mL) levels (28% vs. 8%, respectively, p = 0.002). Patients with AT and vitamin D deficiency had a comparable hormonal profile compared to patients with AT and vitamin D sufficiency in terms of TSH (p = 0.39), FT3 (p = 0.30), FT4 (p = 0.31), TG-Ab (0.44) and TPO-Ab (0.35). Interestingly, a significant correlation between 25(OH) vitamin D and TPO-Ab (r = −0.27, p = 0.03) and FT3 (r = 0.35, p = 0.006) has been found in subjects with AT while no correlation was found between 25(OH) vitamin D levels and TG-Ab (r = −0.15, p = 0.25), TSH (r = −0.014, p = 0.09) and FT4 (r = 0.13, p = 0.32). Conclusions: These findings suggest that vitamin D deficiency was significantly associated with AT in the elderly. Therefore, the screening for AT should be suggested in subjects with vitamin D deficiency. PMID:27571093

  9. Simultaneous measurement of serum chemokines in autoimmune thyroid diseases: possible role of IP-10 in the inflammatory response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiratsuka, Izumi; Itoh, Mitsuyasu; Yamada, Hiroya; Yamamoto, Keiko; Tomatsu, Eisuke; Makino, Masaki; Hashimoto, Shuji; Suzuki, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs), including Graves' diseases (GD) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT), are the most common autoimmune diseases, and are mainly mediated by T cells that produce cytokines and chemokines in abnormal amounts. Few reports have described the circulating chemokines active in AITDs. Recently, we used a new multiplex immunobead assay to simultaneously measure cytokines and chemokines in small volume serum samples from patients with AITDs. We measured 23 selected serum chemokines in patients with GD (n=45) or HT (n=26), and healthy controls (n=9). GD patients were further classified as either untreated, intractable, or in remission, while HT patients were classified as either hypothyroid or euthyroid. Of the 23 serum chemokines assayed, only the serum level of IP-10 (CXCL10/interferon-γ-inducible protein 10) was elevated, depending on disease activity, in GD or HT compared with healthy controls. However, the serum level of IP-10 was also increased in both untreated GD patients and hypothyroid HT patients, suggesting that levels of this cytokine may not be affected by disease specificity. In conclusion, autoimmune inflammation in patients with AITD is closely related to the level of the serum chemokine, IP-10. Therefore, IP-10 might be a good biomarker for tissue inflammation in the thyroid, but not a useful biomarker for predicting disease specific activity, the progression of AITDs, or responsiveness to treatment because of its independence from thyroid function or disease specificity.

  10. TNFSF4 Gene Variations Are Related to Early-Onset Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases and Hypothyroidism of Hashimoto's Thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Rong-Hua; Wang, Qiong; Yao, Qiu-Ming; Shao, Xiao-Qing; Li, Ling; Wang, Wen; An, Xiao-Fei; Li, Qian; Zhang, Jin-An

    2016-08-20

    The aim of the current study was to examine whether the polymorphism loci of the tumor necrosis factor superfamily member 4 (TNFSF4) gene increase the risk of susceptibility to autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs) in the Han Chinese population, and a case-control study was performed in a set of 1,048 AITDs patients and 909 normal healthy controls in the study. A total of four tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the TNFSF4 region, including rs7514229, rs1234313, rs16845607 and rs3850641, were genotyped using the method of ligase detection reaction. An association between GG genotype of rs3850641 in TNFSF4 gene and AITDs was found (p = 0.046). Additionally, the clinical sub-phenotype analysis revealed a significant association between GG genotype in rs7514229 and AITDs patients who were ≤18 years of age. Furthermore, rs3850641 variant allele G was in strong association with hypothyroidism in Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) (p = 0.018). The polymorphisms of the TNFSF4 gene may contribute to the susceptibility to AITDs pathogenesis.

  11. The Expression and Distribution of S-100 Protein and CD83 in Thyroid Tissues of Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WencanXu; ShenrenChen; JiexiongHuang; ZhichaoZheng; LinxingChen; WeiZhang

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the expression and distribution of S-100 protein and CD83 in the thyroid tissues of autoimmunethyroid diseases (ATDs), and to study the role of the dendritic cells in the pathogenesis of ATDs,immunohistochemical staining was used on pathological tissues of 20 patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT)and 20 patients with Graves' disease (GD) to check the expression and distribution of S-100 protein and CD83.Compared with control group (20 cases of thyroid follicular adenoma, TFA), the higher expressions of S-100 inHT (139.38 _+ 5.92 vs 59.47 + 11.69) and GD (119.42 _+ 14.48 vs 59.47 +_ 11.69) were observed respectively (p <0.001). The increased positive expressions of CD83 which is known as a marker of mature and activated DCs inHT (22.58 + 13.96 vs 5.19 +_ 8.08) and GD (29.92 _+ 14.43 vs 5.19 +_ 8.08) were also found respectively (p < 0.001).Serum TPO antibody (TPO-Ab, 67.3 +_ 11.6%) and Tg antibody (Tg-Ab, 59.8 + 10.1%) in HT were higher thanthat in GD (28.4 +_ 5.7%, 23.1 +_ 4.9%) and that in TFA (6.1 +_ 3.4%, 7.2 + 4.6%) (p < 0.01). Serum TR-Ab in GD(16.3 _+ 5.6 U/L) was higher than that in HT (4.8 +_ 2.3 U/L) and that in TFA (2.5 +_ 1.2 U/L) (p < 0.01). Ourfindings suggest that the high expression of DCs' markers may be related to the pathogenesis of HT and GD.The upregulation of both number and matured functions of DCs, may lead to present more antigens and toproduce more auto-antibodies (such as TgAb and TPOAb in HT, TRAb in GD), which may be involved inpathogenesis of the autoimmune thyroid diseases. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004; 1(5):378-382.

  12. Imbalance of Th17/Treg in Different Subtypes of Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Li

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To clarify the imbalance of Th17/Treg in different subtypes of autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs including Graves' disease(GD, Hashimoto's thyroiditis(HT and Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO. Methods: 47 patients with AITD (including 16 GD, 15 HT, and 16 GO and 12 healthy controls were enrolled in this study. The percentages of Th17 and Treg cells, the ratio of Th17/Treg, as well as their related transcription factors RORγt and Foxp3 mRNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were measured by flow cytometry and real-time quantitative PCR Results: Compared with those in control group, the percentage of CD4+IL-17+T cell(Th17 and the mRNA expression of its transcription factor RORγt were higher in PBMCs of AITDs (P+Foxp3+T (Treg cells and its transcription factor Foxp3 mRNA were significantly decreased in PBMCs of GD (PConclusion: Increased Th17 lymphocytes may play a more important role in the pathogenesis of HT and GO while decreased Treg may be greatly involved in GD.

  13. The thyroid, iodine and autoimmunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Mooij (Petra)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractAn excessive dietary iodine intake has also been described to lead to thyroid autoimmune reactivity: a. in individuals with a preexisting thyroid abnormality, such as an iodine deficient goitre, an excessive dietary iodine intake results in a proportion of the individuals in the developm

  14. The Effect of Ezetimibe/Statin Combination and High-Dose Statin Therapy on Thyroid Autoimmunity in Women with Hashimoto's Thyroiditis and Cardiovascular Disease: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krysiak, R; Szkróbka, W; Okopień, B

    2016-10-01

    Background: Intensive statin therapy was found to reduce thyroid autoimmunity in women with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. No similar data are available for other hypolipidemic agents. Methods: The participants of the study were 16 women with Hashimoto's thyroiditis and coronary artery disease. On the basis of statin tolerance, they were divided into 2 groups. 8 patients who did not tolerate high-dose statin therapy were treated with a statin, the dose of which was reduced by half, together with ezetimibe. The remaining 8 patients tolerating the treatment continued high-dose statin therapy. Plasma lipids, serum levels of thyrotropin, free thyroxine and free triiodothyronine, as well as titers of thyroid peroxidase and thyroglobulin antibodies were measured at the beginning of the study and 6 months later. Results: Replacing high-dose statin therapy with ezetimibe/statin combination therapy increased serum titers of thyroid peroxidase as well as led to an insignificant increase in serum titers of thyroglobulin antibodies. At the end of the study, thyroid peroxidase and thyroglobulin antibody titers were higher in patients receiving the combination therapy than in those treated only with high-dose statin. Conclusions: Our study shows that high-dose statin therapy produces a stronger effect on thyroid autoimmunity than ezetimibe/statin combination therapy.

  15. Quantitative thyroid scintigraphy for the differentiation of Graves' disease and hyperthyroid autoimmune thyroiditis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahlmann, C.O.; Siefker, U.; Lehmann, K.; Harms, E.; Conrad, M.; Meller, J. [Goettingen Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2004-08-01

    The purpose of this study is the evaluation of the TCTUs in the differentiation between AIT and GD in patients with hyperthyroidism. Methods: We determined the TCTUs in 59 patients with untreated hyperthyroid GD and in 51 patients with AIT who had subclinical or manifest hyperthyroidism without medication. Patients with GD were characterized by the presence of hyperthyroidism, decreased echogenicity of the thyroid, elevation of TSH-receptor autoantibodies (TRAb). AIT was defined by a decreased echogenicity of the thyroid, absence of elevated TSH-receptor autoantibodies (TRAb), autoantibodies against the thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO) and spontaneous remission or development of subclinical hypothyroidism within 3 months. Results: Thyroid volumes of patients with AIT were significantly lower than those of patients with GD (p<0.05). TRAb levels were significantly higher in GD-patients (median: 19.5 U/ml; range: 15.3-35 U/ml) than in AIT-patients (median: 1.3 U/ml; range: 0-4.1 U/ml). 73% (38/59) of patients with GD had elevated anti-TPO levels. In these patients anti-TPO levels (median: 768 U/l; range: 83-6397 U/l) were not significantly different from anti-TPO levels of patients with AIT (median: 834 U/l; range: 107-8675 U/l; p=0.17). TCTUs values of patients with AIT were significantly lower (p<0.05; median: 0.9%; range: 0.1-3.2%) than those of patients with GD (median: 5.7%; range: 1.9-28.3%). Conclusion: In our patients quantitative thyroid scintigraphy with {sup 99m}TcO{sub 4}{sup -} offered rapid and reliable differentiation between hyperthyroid GD and AIT. (orig.)

  16. Selenium and autoimmune thyroid diseases%硒与自身免疫性甲状腺疾病

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张方华; 阎胜利

    2008-01-01

    The pathogenesis of autoimmune thyroid diseases is complexity,may relates to the radicalinduced oxidative stress and apoptosis.Selenium is one of the essential trace element to maintain mammals health.It plays an important role in the synthesis,activation,metabolism of thyroid hormone,thyroid antioxidant system and the immune system.The low level of serum selenium can induce or aggravate immune disorder and chronic inflammation in thyroid tissues.A certain amount of selenium Call ameliorate the inflammation in autoimmune thyroid diseases.Supplemental selenium may exploit a new way for treatment of autoimmune thyroid diseases.%自身免疫性甲状腺疾病(AITD)的发病机制十分复杂,可能与自由基诱发的氧化应激和凋亡有关.硒是哺乳动物维持正常功能必需的微量元素之一,其在甲状腺激素的合成、活化、代谢过程及甲状腺抗氧化系统和免疫系统中发挥重要作用.血清硒水平低可以引起或加重甲状腺组织的免疫紊乱与慢性炎性反应,引起AITD.补充一定剂量的硒可能改善AITD患者的炎性反应,为AITD的治疗开辟一条新的途径.

  17. The Roles of the TSH Receptor Antibodies in Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Chang Soon [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1986-09-15

    To evaluate the clinical and pathogenetic roles of TSH receptor antibodies in autoimmune thyroid diseases, TBII were measured by TSH-radioreceptor assay methods in 352 patients with Graves disease, 108 patients with other thyroid diseases and 69 normal persons. The normal range of TBII activity was less than 15%. The frequencies of detectable TBIl in 169 patients with untreated Graves disease, 31 patients with hyperthyroidism under treatment and 70 patients with euthyroidism under treatment were 92.4%, 87.1% and 54.3% respectively. However 12 (21.8%) out of 55 patients who have been in remission more than one year after discontinuation of antithyroid drugs treatment had detectable TBII activities in their sera. In 196 patients with untreated Graves disease, the frequency of TBII increased by increasing size of goiter and the frequency of proptosis was significantly high in patients whose TBII activities were more than 60%. TBll activities were roughly correlated with total T{sub 3},T{sub 4} and free T{sub 4}, index but low gamma{sup 2} value(less than 0.1). In 67 patients with Graves' disease who were positive TB1I before antithyroid drugs treatment, TBII activities began to decrease from the third months and it was converted to negative in 35.8% of patients at 12 months after treatment. There were no significant differences of the declining and disappearing rates of TBII activities between high dose and conventional dose groups. TBII activities were significantly increased initially (2-4 months) and then began to decrease from 5-9 months after {sup 131}I treatment. There were two groups, one whose TBII activities decreased gradually and the other did not change until 12 months after subtotal thyroidectomy. Although preoperative clinical and laboratory findings of both groups were not different, TBII activities of non-decreasing group were significantly higher than those of decreasing group(74.6+18.6% vs 39.2+15.2%; P(0.01). Thirty three(55.9%) out of 59

  18. Characterization of Polyclonal Antibody Induced by Autoantibody TPO (Thyroidperoxidase) From Autoimmune Thyroid Disease (AITD) Serum with ELISA and Western Blotting

    OpenAIRE

    Maulidya Aulia Fiqriyana; Aulanni'am Aulanni'am; Anna Roosdiana

    2013-01-01

    Autoantibody TPO is a potential marker for early detection of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD). Autoantibody TPO has a specifity and a sensitivity ranging from 82% to100% in comparison to other AITD serology markers. Concentration of autoantibody TPO in sera had a positive correlation with activities of chronic AITD. This research have been conducted to investigate the characteristic of polyclonal antibody TPO induced by autoantibody TPO from serum of AITD patients. The autoantibody TPO was ...

  19. Autoimmunity in differentiated thyroid cancer: significance and related clinical problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Rasmussen, Ase Krogh

    2010-01-01

    Coexistence of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) and thyroid autoimmune diseases could represent a mere coincidence due to the frequent occurrence of autoimmunity, but there may also be a pathological and causative link between the two conditions. The coincidence of DTC with Hashimoto's disease...... has been variably reported at between 0.5 and 22.5% and of DTC with Graves' disease between 0 and 9.8%. In this review available evidence for thyroid autoimmunity in DTC is summarized and it is concluded that thyroid cancer does coexist with thyroid autoimmunity, implying that patients treated...... TgAb measurements may be used as a surrogate marker for recurrence of thyroid cancer during the long-term monitoring of DTC patients....

  20. Autoimmunity in differentiated thyroid cancer: significance and related clinical problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Rasmussen, Ase Krogh

    2011-01-01

    Coexistence of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) and thyroid autoimmune diseases could represent a mere coincidence due to the frequent occurrence of autoimmunity, but there may also be a pathological and causative link between the two conditions. The coincidence of DTC with Hashimoto's disease...... has been variably reported at between 0.5 and 22.5% and of DTC with Graves' disease between 0 and 9.8%. In this review available evidence for thyroid autoimmunity in DTC is summarized and it is concluded that thyroid cancer does coexist with thyroid autoimmunity, implying that patients treated...... TgAb measurements may be used as a surrogate marker for recurrence of thyroid cancer during the long-term monitoring of DTC patients....

  1. The chronic autoimmune thyroiditis quality of life selenium trial (CATALYST)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Kristian Hillert; Watt, Torquil; Bjørner, Jakob Bue;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with chronic autoimmune thyroiditis have impaired health-related quality of life. The thyroid gland has a high selenium concentration, and specific selenoprotein enzyme families are crucial to immune function, and catalyze thyroid hormone metabolism and redox processes...... in thyroid cells. Previous randomized controlled trials have found that selenium supplementation decreases thyroid-disease-specific antibody levels. We hypothesize that selenium might be beneficial in the treatment of chronic autoimmune thyroiditis. METHODS/DESIGN: The CATALYST trial is an investigator......-initiated randomized, blinded, multicentre clinical trial of selenium supplementation versus placebo in patients with chronic autoimmune thyroiditis. Inclusion criteria: age ≥18 years; serum thyroid peroxidase antibody level ≥100 IU/ml within the previous 12 months; treatment with levothyroxine and written informed...

  2. Diagnosis and discrimination of autoimmune Graves' disease and Hashimoto's disease using thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor-containing recombinant proteoliposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Hidetaka; Matsuo, Hideaki; Imamura, Koji; Morino, Kazuhiko; Okumura, Katsuzumi; Tsumoto, Kanta; Yoshimura, Tetsuro

    2009-12-01

    Graves' disease (GD) is an autoimmune disease of the thyroid gland caused by autoantibodies against thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR). Currently, the diagnostic test for TSHR autoantibodies is based on an indirect competitive binding assay that measures the ability of TSHR autoantibodies to inhibit the binding of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) to TSHR. Here, we have developed a specific and direct diagnostic method for autoantibodies in GD that incorporates immobilized TSHR-containing recombinant proteoliposomes into an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). To reduce non-specific binding of autoantibodies to recombinant proteoliposomes, we investigated the effect of polyethylene glycol (PEG)-lipid on the binding of commercially available anti-TSHR antibodies (aTSHRAb). The incorporation of PEG-lipids into liposomes decreased non-specific binding, as compared to liposomes that did not contain PEG-lipids, and the addition of blocking reagents further decreased non-specific reactivity. aTSHRAb exhibited higher reactivity towards PEG-modified TSHR recombinant proteoliposomes than PEG-modified liposomes without TSHR (bare liposomes). Importantly, serum autoantibodies from patients with GD, which is associated with hyperthyroidism, exhibited remarkably specific binding to TSHR recombinant proteoliposomes. Serum autoantibodies from patients with Hashimoto's disease (HD), which is associated with hypothyroidism, also reacted specifically with proteoliposomal TSHR. These results suggest that immobilized TSHR recombinant proteoliposomes can serve as a direct diagnostic test for GD and HD. Furthermore, given that there is no competition test currently available for detecting autoantibodies in HD, the combination of TSHR recombinant proteoliposome ELISA and indirect competitive TSHR binding assay might be an effective way to discriminate between GD and HD.

  3. Autoimmune thyroid disease as a risk factor for angioedema in patients with chronic idiopathic urticaria: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruy Felippe Brito Gonçalves Missaka

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: An association between chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU and autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD has been reported. However, there have not been any reports on whether ATD raises the risk of angioedema, which is a more severe clinical presentation of CIU. Thus, the aim of the present study was to evaluate whether the risk of angioedema is increased in patients with CIU and ATD. DESIGN AND SETTING: Case-control study including 115 patients with CIU at a tertiary public institution. METHODS: The patients were evaluated with regard to occurrence of angioedema and presence of ATD, hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism. RESULTS: Angioedema was detected in 70 patients (60.9%. There were 22 cases (19.1% of ATD, 19 (16.5% of hypothyroidism and nine (7.8% of hyperthyroidism. The risk among patients with ATD was 16.2 times greater than among those without this thyroid abnormality (confidence interval, CI = 2.07-126.86. The odds ratio for hypothyroidism was 4.6 (CI = 1.00-21.54 and, for hyperthyroidism, 3.3 (CI = 0.38-28.36. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with CIU and ATD presented greater risk of angioedema, which reinforces the idea that a relationship exists between this allergic condition and thyroid autoimmunity. This finding could imply that such patients require specifically directed therapy.

  4. Autoimmune thyroiditis associated with neuromyelitis optica (NMO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudulagunta, Sreenivasa Rao; Sodalagunta, Mahesh Babu; Khorram, Hadi; Sepehrar, Mona; Gonivada, Jayadevappa; Noroozpour, Zahra; Prasad, Nagendra

    2015-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO or Devic's syndrome) is a rare relapsing demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) that mainly affects the spinal cord and optic nerves and shares many clinical and radiological features with multiple sclerosis. The association of NMO with other autoimmune diseases was reported, but very few reports described association with autoimmune thyroid disease. Early differentiation between NMO and multiple sclerosis is very important as the natural course and treatment regimens differ significantly. We report a case of a 50-year-old woman who was admitted initially with vomiting, hiccups and paraesthesias but was not diagnosed with NMO and presented with a severe progression of the disease. The patient was also diagnosed to have autoimmune thyroiditis with lymphocytic infiltration of the thyroid which progressed from hyperthyroidism to hypothyroidism. NMO diagnosis was established with seropositivity for NMO-IgG and MRI showing longitudinally extensive spinal cord lesions (3 or more spinal segments). In spite of treatment, the response was poor due to lack of early diagnosis and aggressive immunosuppressant therapy.

  5. Autoimmune thyroiditis associated with neuromyelitis optica (NMO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudulagunta, Sreenivasa Rao

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Neuromyelitis optica (NMO or Devic’s syndrome is a rare relapsing demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS that mainly affects the spinal cord and optic nerves and shares many clinical and radiological features with multiple sclerosis. The association of NMO with other autoimmune diseases was reported, but very few reports described association with autoimmune thyroid disease. Early differentiation between NMO and multiple sclerosis is very important as the natural course and treatment regimens differ significantly. We report a case of a 50-year-old woman who was admitted initially with vomiting, hiccups and paraesthesias but was not diagnosed with NMO and presented with a severe progression of the disease. The patient was also diagnosed to have autoimmune thyroiditis with lymphocytic infiltration of the thyroid which progressed from hyperthyroidism to hypothyroidism. NMO diagnosis was established with seropositivity for NMO-IgG and MRI showing longitudinally extensive spinal cord lesions (3 or more spinal segments. In spite of treatment, the response was poor due to lack of early diagnosis and aggressive immunosuppressant therapy.

  6. Autoantibodies in autoimmune thyroid disease promote immune complex formation with self antigens and increase B cell and CD4+ T cell proliferation in response to self antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Hegedüs, Laszlo; Leslie, Robert Graham Quinton

    2004-01-01

    B cells are centrally involved as antigen-presenting cells in certain autoimmune diseases. To establish whether autoantibodies form immune complexes (IC) with self-antigens in autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) and promote B cell uptake of self-antigen, sera from patients with Hashimoto......'s thyroiditis (HT), Graves' disease (GD) and healthy controls were incubated with human thyroglobulin (Tg) before adding normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The deposition of immunoglobulins and C3 fragments on B cells was then assessed. Inclusion of Tg in serum from HT patients promoted B cell capture...

  7. Clinical and Pathological Implications of Concurrent Autoimmune Thyroid Disorders and Papillary Thyroid Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. L. Cunha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cooccurrences of chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis (CLT and thyroid cancer (DTC have been repeatedly reported. Both CLT and DTC, mainly papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC, share some epidemiological and molecular features. In fact, thyroid lymphocytic inflammatory reaction has been observed in association with PTC at variable frequency, although the precise relationship between the two diseases is still debated. It also remains a matter of debate whether the association with a CLT or even an autoimmune disorder could influence the prognosis of PTC. A better understanding about clinical implications of autoimmunity in concurrent thyroid cancer could raise new insights of thyroid cancer immunotherapy. In addition, elucidating the molecular mechanisms involved in autoimmune disease and concurrent cancer allowed us to identify new therapeutic strategies against thyroid cancer. The objective of this article was to review recent literature on the association of these disorders and its potential significance.

  8. Thyroid Disease (for Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Thyroid Disease KidsHealth > For Parents > Thyroid Disease A A ... many other parts of the body. What Is Thyroid Disease? Thyroid disease is when the thyroid gland ...

  9. Thyroid Disease and Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Thyroid Disease KidsHealth > For Teens > Thyroid Disease A A ... other parts of your body. continue What Is Thyroid Disease? Thyroid disease occurs when the thyroid gland ...

  10. The immunopathogenesis of chronic autoimmune thyroiditis one century after hashimoto.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weetman, Anthony P

    2013-01-01

    Hakaru Hashimoto described 4 patients with a hitherto unknown cause for goitre, struma lymphomatosa, a century ago. He was careful to distinguish this from Riedel thyroiditis but it has become clear that fibrosis and atrophy of the thyroid are indeed components of Hashimoto thyroiditis, and in rare cases IgG4-related sclerosing disease may be an outcome. Although the cause of the lymphocytic infiltration was unknown to Hashimoto, we now know through the pioneering studies of N.R. Rose and E. Witebsky [J Immunol 1956;76:417-427] that this condition is the archetype for autoimmune destruction as a disease mechanism. In the last two decades in particular, there has been huge interest in unravelling the genetic basis for this and related autoimmune disorders. The list of polymorphisms associated with autoimmune thyroid disease grows each year, and in the case of vitiligo, which is frequently found in association with thyroid autoimmunity, we know that 27 separate susceptibility loci account for less than 20% of the heritability of this condition. Environmental and existential factors may turn out to be just as complex in number and in interactions. We can thus imagine a 'Swiss cheese' model for the causation of autoimmune thyroid disease, in which the effects of cumulative weaknesses line up - like the holes in slices of cheese - to allow the catastrophic event of autoimmune destruction to occur.

  11. Thyroid nodules and thyroid autoimmunity in the context of environmental pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benvenga, Salvatore; Antonelli, Alessandro; Vita, Roberto

    2015-12-01

    Evidence suggests that in most industrialized countries autoimmune disorders, including chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis, are increasing. This increase parallels the one regarding differentiated thyroid cancer, the increment of which is mainly due to the papillary histotype. A number of studies have pointed to an association between chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis and differentiated thyroid cancer. The upward trend of these two thyroid diseases is sustained by certain environmental factors, such as polluting substances acting as endocrine disrupting chemicals. Herein we will review the experimental and clinical literature that highlights the effects of environmental and occupational exposure to polluting chemicals in the development of autoimmune thyroid disease or differentiated thyroid cancer. Stakeholders, starting from policymarkers, should become more sensitive to the consequences for the thyroid resulting from exposure to EDC. Indeed, the economic burden resulting from such consequences has not been quantified thus far.

  12. Prevalence and clinical significance of nonorgan specific antibodies in patients with autoimmune thyroiditis as predictor markers for rheumatic diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnady, Basant M.; Kamal, Naglaa M.; Shaker, Raneyah H.M.; Soliman, Amal F.; Hasan, Waleed A.; Alghamdi, Hamed A.; Algethami, Mohammed M.; Jajah, Mohamed Bilal

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Autoimmune diseases are considered the 3rd leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the industrialized countries. Autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATDs) are associated with high prevalence of nonorgan-specific autoantibodies, such as antinuclear antibodies (ANA), antidouble-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (anti-dsDNA), antiextractable-nuclear antigens (anti-ENAs), rheumatoid factor (RF), and anticyclic-citrullinated peptides (anti-CCP) whose clinical significance is unknown. We aimed to assess the prevalence of various nonorgan-specific autoantibodies in patients with ATD, and to investigate the possible association between these autoantibodies and occurrence of rheumatic diseases and, if these autoantibodies could be considered as predictor markers for autoimmune rheumatic diseases in the future. This study had 2 phases: phase 1; in which 61 ATD patients free from rheumatic manifestations were assessed for the presence of these nonorgan-specific autoantibodies against healthy 61 control group, followed by 2nd phase longitudinal clinical follow-up in which cases are monitored systematically to establish occurrence and progression of any rheumatic disease in association to these autoantibodies with its influences and prognosis. Regarding ATD patients, ANA, anti-dsDNA, Anti-ENA, and RF were present in a percentage of (50.8%), (18%), (21.3%), and (34.4%), respectively, with statistically significance difference (P < 0.5) rather than controls. Nearly one third of the studied group (32.8%) developed the rheumatic diseases, over 2 years follow-up. It was obvious that those with positive anti-dsDNA had higher risk (2.45 times) to develop rheumatic diseases than those without. There was a statistically significant positive linear relationship between occurrence of disease in months and (age, anti-dsDNA, anti-CCP, RF, and duration of thyroiditis). Anti-dsDNA and RF are the most significant predictors (P < 0.0001). ATD is more associated with rheumatic

  13. Achalasia and thyroid disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad Hassan Emami; Mostafa Raisi; Jaleh Amini; Hamed Daghaghzadeh

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate some possible etiologies of achalasia by screening patients with achalasia for some autoimmune diseases such as thyroid disease.METHODS: We examined 30 known cases of achalasia (20 females, 10 males). Their age ranged 15-70 years.All of them were referred to our institute for treatment.Their sera were evaluated to detect some possible associations with rheumatoid disease, thyroid disease,inflammatory process, anemia, etc.RESULTS: Seven out of 30 patients (23%) had thyroid disease including four patients with hypothyroidism (13.3%), two patients with hyperthyroidism (6.6%),and one had only thyroid nodule but was in euthyroid state (3.3%). Two of these hypothyroid patients had no related clinical symptoms (subclinical) and two had clinical manifestations of hypothyroidism. There were no correlations between the intensity of thyroid diseases and the severity of achalasia symptoms.CONCLUSION: The etiology of achalasia is unknown although autoimmunity has been implicated and is supported by several studies. Thyroid disease presents concomitantly with achalasia in about one fourth of our patients who may have a common etiology.

  14. Population of antithyroid autoantibodies as a source of antibodies of various levels of specificity and functionality: the clinical importance of a phenomenon of combination theory at monitoring of patients with autoimmune diseases of a thyroid gland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A V Andreeva

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The review of literature is dedicated to comparative analysis of pathogenetic and clinicodiagnostic significance of antithyroid autoantibodies (autoAB differing in their specificity (АB to thyroglobulin (anti-TG and АB to thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO, anti-TGPO, and functionality TG- and TPO-antibodies, namely antibodies-proteases in pathogenesis autoimmune diseases thyroid gland and possibility of their use in modern diagnostics of autoimmune thyroid diseases.

  15. Treated Autoimmune Thyroid Disease Is Associated with a Decreased Quality of Life among Young Persons with Type 1 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alena Spirkova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes (T1D in children and adolescents is relatively often accompanied by other immunopathological diseases, autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD or celiac disease (CD. Our aim was to assess whether these conditions are associated with changes in the health-related quality of life (HRQOL in pediatric patients with T1D. In a cross-sectional study we identified eligible 332 patients with T1D aged 8–18 years, of whom 248 (75% together with their parents responded to the PedsQL Generic and Diabetes Modules. Compared to 143 patients without thyroid autoantibodies, 40 patients with a thyroxine-treated AITD scored lower in the overall generic HRQOL (P=0.014, as well as in the overall diabetes-specific HRQOL (P=0.013. After adjustment for age, gender, duration of diabetes, type of diabetes treatment, and diabetes control, this association remained statistically significant for the generic HRQOL (P=0.023. Celiac disease was not associated with a change in the generic or diabetes-specific HRQOL (P=0.07  and   P=0.63, resp.. Parental scores showed no association with AITD or celiac disease, except a marginally significant decrease in the overall generic HRQOL (P=0.039 in the T1D + AITD compared to T1D group. Our study indicates that, in pediatric patients with T1D, concomitant thyroxine-treated AITD is associated with lower quality of life.

  16. Sex differences in autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voskuhl Rhonda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Women are more susceptible to a variety of autoimmune diseases including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, multiple sclerosis (MS, primary biliary cirrhosis, rheumatoid arthritis and Hashimoto's thyroiditis. This increased susceptibility in females compared to males is also present in animal models of autoimmune diseases such as spontaneous SLE in (NZBxNZWF1 and NZM.2328 mice, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE in SJL mice, thyroiditis, Sjogren's syndrome in MRL/Mp-lpr/lpr mice and diabetes in non-obese diabetic mice. Indeed, being female confers a greater risk of developing these diseases than any single genetic or environmental risk factor discovered to date. Understanding how the state of being female so profoundly affects autoimmune disease susceptibility would accomplish two major goals. First, it would lead to an insight into the major pathways of disease pathogenesis and, secondly, it would likely lead to novel treatments which would disrupt such pathways.

  17. Rheumatic and autoimmune thyroid disorders: a causal or casual relationship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourji, Khalil; Gatto, Mariele; Cozzi, Franco; Doria, Andrea; Punzi, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    A number of dysfunctions may affect the thyroid gland leading either to hyper- or hypothyroidism which are mediated by autoimmune mechanisms. Thyroid abnormalities may represent an isolated alteration or they may be the harbinger of forthcoming disorders as is the case of well-characterized polyendocrine syndromes. Also, they may precede or follow the appearance of rheumatic manifestations in patients affected with connective tissue diseases or rheumatoid arthritis. The mechanisms by which autoimmune thyroid disorders may be linked to systemic autoimmune diseases have not been fully unraveled yet, however alterations of common pathways are suggested by shared genetic variants affecting autoantigen presentation and regulation of the immune response. On the other hand, the higher prevalence of autoimmune thyroid disorders over rheumatic diseases compels the chance of a mere causal concomitancy in the same patient. The aim of our paper is to provide an overview of available data on thyroid involvement in different rheumatic diseases and to go over the main rheumatic manifestations in the context of autoimmune thyroid diseases.

  18. Autoimmune liver disease panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liver disease test panel - autoimmune ... Autoimmune disorders are a possible cause of liver disease. The most common of these diseases are autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cirrhosis. This group of tests helps your health care provider ...

  19. Hashimoto's thyroiditis following Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umar, Husaini; Muallima, Nur; Adam, John M F; Sanusi, Harsinen

    2010-01-01

    Both Graves' disease and chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto's thyroiditis) are autoimmune diseases of thyroid gland. Graves' disease is caused by stimulation of TSH receptor located on the thyroid gland by an antibody, which is known as TSH receptor antibody (TRAb). Furthermore, this may lead to hyperplasia and hyperfunction of the thyroid gland. On the contrary, the cause of Hashimoto's thyroiditis is thought due to a TSH stimulation-blocking antibody (TSBAb) which blocks the action of TSH hormone and subsequently brings damage and atrophy to thyroid gland. Approximately 15-20% of patients with Graves' disease had been reported to have spontaneous hypothyroidism resulting from the chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto's disease). Pathogenesis for chronic thyroiditis following anti-thyroid drug treatment in patients with Graves' disease remains unclear. It has been estimated that chronic thyroiditis or Hashimoto's disease, which occurs following the Graves' disease episode is due to extended immune response in Graves' disease. It includes the immune response to endogenous thyroid antigens, i.e. thyroid peroxidase and thyroglobulin, which may enhance lymphocyte infiltration and finally causes Hashimoto's thyroiditis. We report four cases of chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto's disease) in patients who have been previously diagnosed with Graves' hyperthyroidism. In three cases, Hashimoto's thyroiditis occurs in 7 to 25 years after the treatment of Grave's disease; while the other case has it only after few months of Grave's disease treatment. The diagnosis of Hashimoto's disease (chronic thyroiditis) was based on clinical manifestation, high TSHs level, positive thyroid peroxidase antibody and thyroglobulin antibody, and supported by positive results of fine needle aspiration biopsy. Moreover, the result of histopathological test has also confirmed the diagnosis in two cases. All cases have been successfully treated by levothyroxine treatment.

  20. Cytometric evaluation of intracellular IFN-γ and IL-4 levels in thyroid follicular cells from patients with autoimmune thyroid diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bossowski Artur

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent few years is underlined that altered balance of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines play an important role in the pathogenesis of AITD. The aim of this study was to estimate intracellular INF-γ and IL-4 levels in thyroid-infiltrating lymphocytes and thyrocytes isolated from thyroid tissues in 54 adolescent patients aged 8-21 years, with Graves' disease (GD; n = 18, Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT; n = 18 and non-toxic multinodular goiter (NTMG; n = 18. Methods Fresh thyroid tissues were taken on culture medium RPMI -1640, it was mechanically prepared. In next step were added cell activators -12- myristate 13- the acetate (PMA and Ionomycin as well as the inhibitor of transportation of proteins - Breferdin A. They were cultured 24 hours in 50 ml flasks at 37°C in a 5-95% CO2-air water-saturated atmosphere. After that, thyrocytes were identified by mouse mAb directed against human TPO epitope 64 conjugated with rabbit anti-mouse antibodies IgG (Fab'2 labeled by FITC. After incubation at room temperature to each of samples added reagent A fixative the cellular membrane. In next step into the cell suspensions were added reagent B to permeabilization of cellular membrane and specific anti-IL-4-PE or anti-IFN-γ-PE mAbs. Identification of intracellular cytokines in T lymphocytes was performed in the same procedure with application of anti-CD4-PerCP and anti-CD8-PerCP mAbs specific for T lymphocytes. The cells were analyzed in a flow cytometry (Coulter EPICS XL. Results In examined group of patients with GD we observed statistically significant higher mean percentage of cells with phenotype CD4+IL-4 (p Conclusions We conclude that human thyrocytes in autoimmune thyroid disorders could be a source of cytokine production and that their activation influences local interaction with T lymphocytes inflowing to the thyroid gland.

  1. Ocorrência de doenças autoimunes tireoidianas em pacientes com doenças reumáticas Autoimmune thyroid disease in patients with rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Cristina Martins Vicente Robazzi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Anormalidades na função tireoidiana e presença de autoanticorpos da tireoide têm sido frequentemente descritas em pacientes com doenças reumatológicas autoimunes, como síndrome de Sjögren, artrite reumatoide, lúpus eritematoso sistêmico e esclerodermia. São limitados os dados sobre prevalência e características clínicas de tireoidite autoimune em outras doenças reumatológicas, tais como febre reumática e lúpus eritematoso sistêmico juvenil. Os autores revisaram as associações de doenças autoimunes endócrinas e reumáticas, avaliando as diversas faixas etárias e condições clínicas. O levantamento bibliográfico foi realizado por meio de busca por artigos científicos indexados em bancos de dados de ciências da saúde em geral, como Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde (LILACS, Medline/PubMed e Scientific Eletronic Library Online (SciELO. Utilizaram-se os seguintes descritores: "rheumatic autoimmune diseases and autoimmune thyroid diseases", "thyroid disorders and rheumatic diseases", "thyroiditis and rheumatic diseases", "autoimmune diseases and thyroid", e "pediatric rheumatic diseases and autoimmune thyroid diseases". Este estudo mostrou que, apesar de resultados contraditórios na literatura, há maior prevalência da associação entre doenças autoimunes da tireoide e doenças reumáticas, destacando-se a possibilidade de mecanismos patogênicos comuns entre as doenças.Thyroid function abnormalities and thyroid autoantibodies have been frequently described in patients with rheumatologic autoimmune diseases, such as Sjögren's syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and scleroderma. Limited data are available regarding the prevalence and clinical characteristics of autoimmune thyroiditis in other rheumatologic disorders, such as rheumatic fever and juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus. The authors review the association of endocrine autoimmune and rheumatic

  2. Thyroid diseases and pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Grandi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Thyroid diseases and diabetes mellitus are the most common endocrine diseases during pregnancy. Internal Medicine doctors could be involved in the management of pregnant women affected by thyroid diseases, in particular if an Endocrine Unit lacks in the hospital; it is mandatory that they have the skills to cope with these diseases. METHODS In this work authors describe the most common thyroid abnormalities that can occur during pregnancy: hypothyroidism (clinical and subclinical, hyperthyroidism (clinical and sub-clinical, autoimmune thyroiditis (in particular the so called post-partum thyroiditis, nodular diseases and cancer. They discuss moreover the peculiar pathophysiologic mechanisms by which these diseases appear, the diagnostic tools and the therapies, according to their own experience and the more recent international guidelines. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS It is important to evaluate thyroid function tests before and during pregnancy, at 16th and 28th gestational week; it is mandatory to cure also the “sub-clinical” hypothyroidism during pregnancy, when TSH level are higher than 5 μIU/mL; the optimal dose of levo-thyroxine during pregnancy is, average, 30-50% higher than that used before pregnancy; it is not correct to treat mild or sub-clinical hyperthyroidism; propylthyouracil is the best drug to treat hyperthyroidism during pregnancy; the post-partum thyroiditis is generally transient, so that a careful monitoring of thyroid function is advisable, in particular after 9-12 months of therapy; thyroid cancer, if discovered during pregnancy, generally has no negative effects on the outcome of the pregnancy; it would be better to treat surgically thyroid cancer during the last trimester of the pregnancy.

  3. Autoimmune diseases associated with neurofibromatosis type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Arti

    2008-01-01

    Associations of autoimmune diseases with neurofibromatosis type 1 have been rarely described. In the present report, we describe two patients of neurofibromatosis type 1 having an association with vitiligo in one, and alopecia areata and autoimmune thyroiditis in another. The associations of neurofibromatosis type 1 with vitiligo, alopecia areata, and autoimmune thyroiditis have not been reported earlier. Whether these associations reflect a causal relationship with neurofibromatosis type 1 or are coincidental needs to be settled.

  4. Autoimmune disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    2005164 Optimal cut-point of glutamic acid decar-boxylase antibody (GAD-Ab) for differentiating two subtypes of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA). LI Xia(李霞), et al. Dept Endocrinol, 2nd Xiangya Hosp, Central South Univ, Changsha, 410011. Chin J Diabetes, 2005;13(1) :34-38. Objective: To investigate the optimal cut-point of glutamate decarboxylase antibody (GAD-Ab) for differentiating two subtypes of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (I. ADA). Methods: The frequency

  5. Lack of association between estrogen receptor β dinucleotide repeat polymorphism and autoimmune thyroid diseases in Japanese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomita Motowo

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs, such as Graves' disease (GD and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT, appear to develop as a result of complex interactions between predisposing genes and environmental triggers. Susceptibility to AITDs is conferred by genes in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA and genes unlinked to HLA, including the CTLA-4 gene. Recently, estrogen receptor (ER β, located at human chromosome 14q23-24.1, was identifed. We analyzed a dinucleotide (CAn repeat polymorphism located in the flanking region of ERβ gene in patients with AITDs and in normal subjects. High heterozygosity makes this polymorphism a useful marker in the genetic study of disorders affecting female endocrine systems. We also correlated a ERβ gene microsatellite polymorphism with bone mineral density (BMD in the distal radius and biochemical markers of bone turnover in patients with GD in remission. Results Fourteen different alleles were found in 133 patients with GD, 114 patients with HT, and 179 controls subjects. The various alleles were designated as allele*1 through allele*14 according to the number of the repeats, from 18 to 30. There was no significant difference in the distributions of ERβ alleles between patient groups and controls. Although recent study demonstrated a significant relation between a allele*9 in the ERβ gene and BMD in postmenopausal Japanese women, there were no statistically significant interaction between this allele and BMD in the distal radius, nor biochemical markers in patients with GD in remission. Conclusions The present results do not support an association between the ERβ microsatellite marker and AITD in the Japanese population. We also suggest that the ERβ microsatellite polymorphism has at most a minor pathogenic importance in predicting the risk of osteoporosis as a complication of GD.

  6. Multiple SNPs in intron 41 of thyroglobulin gene are associated with autoimmune thyroid disease in the Japanese population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyuki Ban

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The etiology of the autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs, Graves' disease (GD and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT, is largely unknown. However, genetic susceptibility is believed to play a major role. Two whole genome scans from Japan and from the US identified a locus on chromosome 8q24 that showed evidence for linkage with AITD and HT. Recent studies have demonstrated an association between thyroglobulin (Tg polymorphisms and AITD in Caucasians, suggesting that Tg is a susceptibility gene on 8q24. OBJECTIVES: The objective of the study was to refine Tg association with AITD, by analyzing a panel of 25 SNPs across an extended 260 kb region of the Tg. METHODS: We studied 458 Japanese AITD patients (287 GD and 171 HT patients and 221 matched Japanese control subjects in association studies. Case-control association studies were performed using 25 Tg single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs chosen from a database of the Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Database (dbSNP. Haplotype analysis was undertaken using the computer program SNPAlyze version 7.0. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS AND CONCLUSIONS: In total, 5 SNPs revealed association with GD (P<0.05, with the strongest SNP associations at rs2256366 (P = 0.002 and rs2687836 (P = 0.0077, both located in intron 41 of the Tg gene. Because of the strong LD between these two strongest associated variants, we performed the haplotype analysis, and identified a major protective haplotype for GD (P = 0.001. These results suggested that the Tg gene is involved in susceptibility for GD and AITD in the Japanese.

  7. 自身免疫性甲状腺疾病临床研究进展%The Clinical Research Progression of Autoimmune Thyroid Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张铮; 郑旭琴; 杨涛

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) are organ specific autoimmune disease mediated by a group of T cell - mediated, most commonly with Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) , were characterized with hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism. Statistics show that the global AITD prevalence rate is near 5%, those with the expression of anti thyroid antibody positive and asymptomatic subclinical AITD ratio will have a higher incidence rate, especially in women 30 to 40 years of age. The mechanism of inducing autoimmune thyroid disease is very complicated, and the interaction between genetic susceptibility and environmental factors is the key reason of AITD. In addition, the data show that AITD is associated with the occurrence of thyroid tumors, therefore, in time and accurate diagnosis and treatment is necessary. This article will make a brief introduction about the progress of AITD and the idea of inducing the immune tolerance of autoimmune disease.%自身免疫性甲状腺疾病(autoimmune thyroid disease,AITD)是一组T细胞介导器官特异性自身免疫病,临床上以Graves病(Graves'disease,GD)和桥本甲状腺炎(Hashimoto thyroiditis,HT)最为多见,分别以甲状腺功能亢进和甲状腺功能低下为特征。研究统计显示,全球AITD患病率接近5%,仅表现为抗甲状腺抗体阳性而无症状的亚临床AITD的比例会更高,尤其以30至40岁的女性多见。诱发自身免疫攻击甲状腺的机制很复杂,其中,遗传易感性和环境诱发因素是的相互作用认为是导致AITD发病的关键原因。另外,有数据显示, AITD与甲状腺肿瘤发生相关,因此,及时准确的诊治很有必要。本文将就AITD的临床进展及诱导自身免疫病的免疫耐受思路进行简要介绍。

  8. Autoimmune/Inflammatory Syndrome Induced by Adjuvants and Thyroid Autoimmunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watad, Abdulla; David, Paula; Brown, Stav; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2017-01-01

    The autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA), presented by Shoenfeld and Agmon-Levin in 2011, is an entity that incorporates diverse autoimmune conditions induced by the exposure to various adjuvants. Adjuvants are agents that entail the capability to induce immune reactions. Adjuvants are found in many vaccines and used mainly to increase the response to vaccination in the general population. Silicone has also been reported to be able to induce diverse immune reactions. Clinical cases and series of heterogeneous autoimmune conditions including systemic sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and rheumatoid arthritis have been reported to be induced by several adjuvants. However, only a small number of cases of autoimmune thyroid disorder have been included under the umbrella of ASIA syndrome. Indeed, clinical cases of Hashimoto’s thyroiditis and/or subacute thyroiditis were observed after the exposure to vaccines as well as silicone implantation. In our review, we aimed to summarize the current knowledge on ASIA syndrome presented as endocrinopathies, focusing on autoimmune thyroid disorders associated with the various adjuvants. PMID:28167927

  9. Aberrant Levels of Hematopoietic/Neuronal Growth and Differentiation Factors in Euthyroid Women at Risk for Autoimmune Thyroid Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elske T Massolt

    Full Text Available Subjects at risk for major mood disorders have a higher risk to develop autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD and vice-versa, implying a shared pathogenesis. In mood disorder patients, an abnormal profile of hematopoietic/neuronal growth factors is observed, suggesting that growth/differentiation abnormalities of these cell lineages may predispose to mood disorders. The first objective of our study was to investigate whether an aberrant profile of these hematopoietic/neuronal growth factors is also detectable in subjects at risk for AITD. A second objective was to study the inter relationship of these factors with previously determined and published growth factors/cytokines in the same subjects.We studied 64 TPO-Ab-negative females with at least 1 first- or second-degree relative with AITD, 32 of whom did and 32 who did not seroconvert to TPO-Ab positivity in 5-year follow-up. Subjects were compared with 32 healthy controls (HCs. We measured serum levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, Stem Cell Factor (SCF, Insulin-like Growth Factor-Binding Protein 2 (IGFBP-2, Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF and IL-7 at baseline.BDNF was significantly lower (8.2 vs 18.9 ng/ml, P<0.001, while EGF (506.9 vs 307.6 pg/ml, P = 0.003 and IGFBP-2 (388.3 vs 188.5 ng/ml, P = 0.028 were significantly higher in relatives than in HCs. Relatives who seroconverted in the next 5 years had significantly higher levels of SCF than non-seroconverters (26.5 vs 16.7 pg/ml, P = 0.017. In a cluster analysis with the previously published growth factors/cytokines SCF clustered together with IL-1β, IL-6 and CCL-3, of which high levels also preceded seroconversion.Relatives of AITD patients show aberrant serum levels of 4 hematopoietic/neuronal growth factors similar to the aberrancies found in mood disorder patients, suggesting that shared growth and differentiation defects in both the hematopoietic and neuronal system may underlie thyroid autoimmunity and mood disorders. A

  10. Expression of thyroid stimulating hormone β splice variant in thyroid of mouse with autoimmune thyroiditis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁继红

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the expression of marrowderived thyroid stimulating hormoneβ(TSHβ)splice variant in thyroid of mouse with autoimmune thyroiditis induced by thyroglobulin(Tg)immunization,and to analyze whether TSHβsplice variant participated in the pathological process of autoimmune thyroiditis.Methods Using random number table,forty-eight mice(24 females and 24 males)of 7 to 8 weeks old with body mass 20 to25 g were randomly divided into 4 groups(12 females

  11. High Prevalence of Antinuclear Antibodies in Children with Thyroid Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Segni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Antinuclear antibodies (ANA are a hallmark of many autoimmune diseases and can be detected many years before disease onset. Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD are frequently associated with other organ- and non-organ-specific autoimmune disorders. Objectives. To assess the prevalence of ANA in pediatric patients with AITD and their clinical correlations. Methods. Ninety-three consecutive pediatric patients with AITD were enrolled (86 children with chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis and 7 with Graves’ disease. ANA, anti-double DNA (anti-dsDNA antibodies, anti-extractable nuclear antigen (anti-ENA, anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (anti-CCP, and rheumatoid factor (RF was obtained. Signs and symptoms potentially related to rheumatic diseases in children were investigated by a questionnaire. Results. ANA positivity was found in 66/93 children (71%, anti-ENA in 4/93 (4.3%, anti-dsDNA in 1/93 (1.1%, RF in 3/93 (3.2%, and anti-CCP in none. No significant differences were found between the ANA-positive and ANA-negative groups with respect to age, sex, L-thyroxine treatment, or prevalence of other autoimmune diseases. Overall, parental autoimmunity was found in 23%. Conclusions. ANA positivity was demonstrated in 71% of children with AITD. ANA positivity was not related to overt immune-rheumatic diseases. However, because the positivity of ANA can occur even many years before the onset of systemic autoimmune diseases, prospective studies are warranted.

  12. An inflammatory gene-expression fingerprint in monocytes of autoimmune thyroid disease patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Heul-Nieuwenhuijsen (Leonie); R.C. Padmos (Roos); R.C. Drexhage (Roos); H.J. de Wit (Harm); A. Berghout (Arie)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractContext: In monocytes of patients with autoimmune diabetes, we recently identified a gene expression fingerprint of two partly overlapping gene clusters, a PDE4B-associated cluster (consisting of 12 core proinflammatory cytokine/compound genes), a FABP5-associated cluster (three core gen

  13. Vitamin D supplementation reduces thyroid peroxidase antibody levels in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease: An open-labeled randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Chaudhary

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Although Vitamin D deficiency has been linked to autoimmune thyroid disorders (AITD, the impact of Vitamin D supplementation on thyroid autoimmunity is not known. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of Vitamin D supplementation on thyroid autoimmunity (thyroid peroxidase antibody [TPO-Ab] titers in patients with newly diagnosed AITD in a randomized controlled trial. Materials and Methods: One hundred two patients with newly diagnosed AITD (TPO-Ab > 34 kIU/L and/or sonographic evidence of thyroiditis patients were randomized into Group-1 (intervention group and Group-2 (control group. Group-1 received cholecalciferol 60,000 IU weekly and calcium 500 mg/day for 8 weeks; Group-2 received calcium 500 mg/day for 8 weeks. Responders were defined as ≥25% fall in TPO-Ab titers. Individuals with at least 3-month follow-up were analyzed. Trial is registered at ctri.nic.in (CTRI/2015/04/005713. Results: Data from 100 AITD patients (68 with thyroid stimulating hormone [TSH] ≤10 mIU/L, 32 with TSH > 10 mIU/L, 93% having Vitamin D insufficiency, were analyzed. TPO-Ab titers were highest among patients in the lowest 25-hydroxyvitamin D quartile (P = 0.084. At 3 months follow-up, there was significant fall in TPO-Ab in Group-1 (−46.73% as compared to Group-2 (−16.6% (P = 0.028. Sixty-eight percentage patients in Group-1 were responders compared to 44% in Group-2 (P = 0.015. Kaplan–Meier analysis revealed significantly higher response rate in Group-1 (P = 0.012. Significantly greater reduction in TPO-Ab titers was observed in AITD with TSH ≤ 10 mIU/L compared to TSH > 10 mIU/L. Cox regression revealed Group-1 followed by TPO-Ab and free tetraiodothyronine levels to be a good predictor of response to therapy (P = 0.042, 0.069, and 0.074, respectively. Conclusion: Vitamin D supplementation in AITD may have a beneficial effect on autoimmunity as evidence by significant reductions in TPO-Ab titers.

  14. Regulatory B and T cell responses in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease and healthy controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Birte; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2016-01-01

    frequencies of B10 cells. Accordingly, B10 cells may not be confined to one phenotype or subset of B cells. In the third paper, we studied the balance between IL-17-producing CD4+ T cells (Th17 cells) and IL-10-producing CD4+ T cells (Th10 cells) in healthy donors and patients with GD or HT. In HT patients......, we found increased proportions of naïve Th17 cells after stimulation with the thyroid self-antigen thyroid peroxidase (TPO) and the Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (E. coli LPS). The proportions of Th10 cells were similar in healthy donors and in HT patients after antigen-specific stimulation....... After TG stimulation, an increased Th17:Th10 ratio was found in HT patients within the naïve T cell compartment. Taken together, these data indicate that the thyroid self-antigens TG and TPO induced a skewed Th17:Th10 differentiation in HT patients. IL-6 and TGF-β have been reported to be important...

  15. Identifying a Small Molecule Blocking Antigen Presentation in Autoimmune Thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheuk Wun; Menconi, Francesca; Osman, Roman; Mezei, Mihaly; Jacobson, Eric M; Concepcion, Erlinda; David, Chella S; Kastrinsky, David B; Ohlmeyer, Michael; Tomer, Yaron

    2016-02-19

    We previously showed that an HLA-DR variant containing arginine at position 74 of the DRβ1 chain (DRβ1-Arg74) is the specific HLA class II variant conferring risk for autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD). We also identified 5 thyroglobulin (Tg) peptides that bound to DRβ1-Arg74. We hypothesized that blocking the binding of these peptides to DRβ1-Arg74 could block the continuous T-cell activation in thyroiditis needed to maintain the autoimmune response to the thyroid. The aim of the current study was to identify small molecules that can block T-cell activation by Tg peptides presented within DRβ1-Arg74 pockets. We screened a large and diverse library of compounds and identified one compound, cepharanthine that was able to block peptide binding to DRβ1-Arg74. We then showed that Tg.2098 is the dominant peptide when inducing experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT) in NOD mice expressing human DRβ1-Arg74. Furthermore, cepharanthine blocked T-cell activation by thyroglobulin peptides, in particular Tg.2098 in mice that were induced with EAT. For the first time we identified a small molecule that can block Tg peptide binding and presentation to T-cells in autoimmune thyroiditis. If confirmed cepharanthine could potentially have a role in treating human AITD.

  16. Different levels of thyroid autoimmune antibody in four kinds of thyroid diseases%甲状腺自身免疫抗体在四种甲状腺疾病中水平差异的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马建宏; 莫巧璇; 严永智; 陈晓丽; 梁雪冰

    2015-01-01

    目的::观察自身免疫抗体甲状腺球蛋白抗体( TGAb)、抗甲状腺过氧化物酶抗体( TPOAb)和促甲状腺素受体抗体( TRAb)在4种甲状腺疾病中的水平差异。方法:将2012年1月至2014年6月在佛山市中医院内分泌科门诊就诊的506例4种甲状腺疾病患者作为研究对象,定量检测患者血液中TGAb、TPOAb和TRAb抗体水平。结果:桥本甲状腺炎患者血液中TGAb和TPOAb值、阳性率最高,分别为1439.0 IU/mL、87.7%和427.5 IU/mL、97.7%;Graves病患者血液中TRAb值和阳性率最高,为34.44 IU/L和100%;单纯性甲状腺肿及亚急性甲状腺炎患者血液中,甲状腺自身免疫抗体也有不同程度的升高。4种甲状腺疾病患者TGAb、TPOAb和TRAb抗体水平两两比较,除了亚急性甲状腺炎与桥本甲状腺炎患者的TRAb水平外,差异均有统计学意义( P<0.05)。结论:甲状腺自身免疫抗体TGAb、TPOAb和TRAb水平在不同甲状腺疾病中存在差异,结合分析对于甲状腺疾病尤其是自身免疫性甲状腺疾病具有重要的诊断价值。%Objective:To determine the different levels of the thyroid autoimmune antibodies, including thyroglobulin antibody (TGAb) and antithyroid peroxidase antibody (TPOAb) and thyroid stimulating hormone receptor antibody ( TRAb) in four kinds of thyroid diseases. Methods:A total of 506 patients with four kinds of thyroid diseases, who were hospitalized in Department of Endocrinology, Foshan Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine between January 2012 and June 2014, were included as the subjects in the study. The levels of plasma TGAb, TPOAb and TRAb antibodies in all patients were quantitatively determined. Results: The values and positive rates of plasma TGAb and TPOAb in patients with Hashimoto thyroiditis were the highest, which were 1439.0IU/ml, 87.7% and 427.5IU/ml, 97.7%, respectively. The plasma TRAb value and positive rate were the highest in patients with Graves, which

  17. Generalized Vitiligo Associated Autoimmune Diseases in Japanese Patients Their Families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiko Narita

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions: Among Japanese vitiligo patients, there is a subgroup with strong evidence of genetically determined susceptibility to not only vitiligo, but also to autoimmune thyroid disease and other autoimmune disorders.

  18. Auto-immune thyroid disease%自身免疫性甲状腺疾病

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林汉华

    2003-01-01

    @@ 自身免疫性甲状腺病包括慢性淋巴细胞性甲状腺炎(chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis, CLT)和毒性弥漫性甲状腺肿(又称Graves病,GD),是造成小儿甲状腺肿大最常见的原因,其发病率有上升的趋势.近年来随着对该病认识的加深和诊断方法的进步,本病的正确诊断率有所提高.

  19. Research progress in autoimmune thyroid disease dependent nephronia%自身免疫性甲状腺病相关肾病的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    楚能武; 吴庆彬; 章秋

    2009-01-01

    自身免疫性甲状腺病(autoimmune thyroid disease,AITD)包括Graves病、桥本氏甲状腺炎(Hashimoto's thyroiditis)和原发性甲状腺功能减退症(甲减).1976年,O'Regan S报道一例Hashimoto's thyroiditis患者出现蛋白尿、肾病综合征,首次提出AITD相关性肾病[1].其临床表现复杂易误诊,最终可致肾功能衰竭.目前报道病例数较少,下面就近年来逐渐受到关注的AITD相关肾病的临床表现、发病机制及诊断治疗作一综述.

  20. Noonan's Syndrome and Autoimmune Thyroiditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesterhus, Per; Aarskog, Dagfinn

    1973-01-01

    Thyroid abnormalities were studies in seven boys and three girls, 4- to 17-years-old, with Noonan's syndrome, characterized by mental retardation, ocular anomalies (wide spaced eyes, drooped eye lids, or strabismus), heart lesions, characteristics of Turner's syndrome, and normal karyotypes (chromosome arrangement). (MC)

  1. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis with autoimmune thyroiditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer Aggarwal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral Venous Thrombosis ( CVT is a multifactorial condition which is described as idiopathic in 12.5% of patients. Hyperthyroidism has been associated with CVT in many case reports, and increased levels of factor VIII and von Willebrand factor (vWF have been proposed as the possible link in this association, but only few rare case reports have described an association of hypothyroidism with CVT. We report here a case of autoimmune thyroiditis presenting with CVT.

  2. Relation between chronic urticaria and thyroid autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Nabavi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground and Purpose: chronic urticaria is a tormenter and does not have a known etiology. Association between chronic urticaria and thyroid auto-immunity has shown different results. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of Levo-thyroxine on the chronic urticaria and association between chronic urticaria with thyroid auto-immunity.Materials and Methods: In a prospective case-control study, we compared the frequency of thyroid auto antibodies in 60 patients (all females, with exception of six males, ages 15 to 60 years with chronic urticaria and compared with 60 mached age healthy volunteers. All cases with chronic urticaria and control group were normal CBC, antinuclear antibodies, rheumatoid factors, complement, stool exam, liver function test (LFT, kidney function and skin prick test, prior to being referred to us. We performed thyroid auto antibodies, thyroid hormones and IgE antibodies before treating all subjects. Half of them with positive anti-thyroid antibody (n=11, received Levo-thyroxine (100 μg daily for 1 month and the remaining half (n=11 were control group.Results: The frequency of thyroid auto antibodies was significantly higher in patients with chronic urticaria than in healthy control (36.6% vs. 9%; p<0.01.( All patients were euthyroid, however, one was found to have increased anti-thyroid antibody levels with sub clinical hypothyroidism (TSH increased, low T4. Total serum IgE increased in ten cases of patients group (16.6% compared with six control groups (10%. Nine patients (40% had complete response, five patients (30% had partial response and five patients (30% did not show any response to treatment compared with control group, in which complete and partial resolution was 30% and others with no resolution.Conclusion: chronic urticaria may be associated with thyroid disorders (positive anti- thyroid antibodies despite normal thyroid function test. For chronic urticaria despite increase serum IgE level

  3. Association of Chronic Urticaria and / or Angioedema with Thyroid Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Amini

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Auto – immune disorders have been implicated as a cause for chronic uricaria and/ or angioedema and thyroid autoimmunity has been increasingly introduced to be associated with that. This study explores the association of thyroid autoimmunity with chronic urticaria and / or angioedema in Isfahani patients. Methods: Anti – thyroperoxidase (Ani – TPO and anti – thyroglobulin (Anti – Tg antibodies, T4 and TSH were detected in 57 patients with chronic urticaria and / or angioedema and were compared with that of normal subjects without chronic urticaria or other autoimmune diseases. Results: Anti – TPO and Anti – Tg antibodies had been increased in 26 (45.6% and 28 (49% of patients in case group, as compared to 8 (13.2% and 10 (16.7% of subjects in control group, respectively. In total, raised titers of thyroid autoantibodies were found in 34 (60% and 12 (20% of subjects in case and control groups, respectively. Conclusion: Considering the high prevalence of thyroid autoantibodies in patients with chronic urticaria and / or angioedema, these antibodies should be detected in affected patients, specially in young and middle– aged women.

  4. Bistability in autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapin, Nicolas; Mosekilde, Erik; Lund, Ole

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases damage host tissue, which, in turn, may trigger a stronger immune response. Systems characterized by such positive feedback loops can display co-existing stable steady states. In a mathematical model of autoimmune disease, one steady state may correspond to the healthy state...

  5. Autoimmune thyroiditis perdating the presentation of systemic lupus erythematosus: Two cases and a review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhir Rajeev

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases are commonly encountered in dermatology practice. While the association of two autoimmune diseases in the same individual is not unknown, it is relatively rare for the second disease to be suspected based on cutaneous manifestations. We present two such cases wherein cutaneous manifestations were the first clue to the development of lupus erythematosus in a setting of autoimmune thyroiditis. Further, we have reviewed literature on this uncommon occurrence and discuss various aspects of this association.

  6. Twins as a tool for evaluating the influence of genetic susceptibility in thyroid autoimmunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, T H; Hegedüs, L

    2011-01-01

    irrefutable evidence of a genetic component in the aetiology of both Graves' disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis, as well as for harbouring thyroid autoantibodies. Biometric modelling shows that approximately 75% of the total phenotypic variance in autoimmune thyroid disease is due to genetic effects. Despite......By means of large twin cohorts, it has been possible to provide relatively valid and unbiased data regarding the influence of genetic and to some extent epigenetic factors in the aetiology of thyroid autoimmunity. The comparison of concordance rates between monozygotic and dizygotic twins provides...... the well known gender difference in the prevalence of autoimmune thyroid disease, the analyzes suggest that it is the same set of genes that operate in males and females. The lack of complete phenotypic concordance in monozygotic twin pairs indicates that also environmental and/or epigenetic factors...

  7. Autoimmune liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pietro Invernizzi; Ian R Mackay

    2008-01-01

    The liver was one of the earliest recognized sites among autoimmune diseases yet autoimmune hepatitis,primary biliary cirrhosis,primary sclerosing cholangitis,and their overlap forms,are still problematic in diagnosis and causation.The contributions herein comprise 'pairs of articles' on clinical characteristics,and concepts of etiopathogenesis,for each of the above diseases,together with childhood autoimmune liver disease,overlaps,interpretations of diagnostic serology,and liver transplantation.This issue is timely,since we are witnessing an ever increasing applicability of immunology to a wide variety of chronic diseases,hepatic and non-hepatic,in both developed and developing countries.The 11 invited expert review articles capture the changing features over recent years of the autoimmune liver diseases,the underlying immunomolecular mechanisms of development,the potent albeit still unexplained genetic influences,the expanding repertoire of immunoserological diagnostic markers,and the increasingly effective therapeutic possibilities.

  8. Primary biliary cirrhosis--autoimmune hepatitis overlap syndrome associated with dermatomyositis, autoimmune thyroiditis and antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamfil, Cristina; Candrea, Elisabeta; Berki, Emese; Popov, Horațiu I; Radu, Pompilia I; Rednic, Simona

    2015-03-01

    Autoimmune liver diseases may be associated with extrahepatic autoimmune pathology. We report the case of a 52-year old woman who initially presented to the gastroenterology department for extreme fatigue, pale stools, dark urine and pruritus. Laboratory tests showed significant cholestasis and elevation of aminotransferase levels. Immunological tests revealed positive antinuclear (ANA=1:320) and antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA=1:40) with negative anti-smooth muscle and liver kidney microsomal type 1 antibodies. The biopsy was compatible with overlap syndrome type 1. The patient was commenced on immunosuppressive therapy according to standard of care (azathioprine 50mg, ursodeoxycholic acid and prednisone 0.5mg/kg), with moderate biochemical improvement. She subsequently developed proximal symmetrical weakness and cutaneous involvement and was diagnosed with biopsy-proven dermatomyositis. The immunosuppressive regimen was intensified to 150 mg azathioprine. At the three-month follow-up, her symptoms subsided and aminotransferases and muscle enzymes normalized. Upon further investigation the patient was diagnosed with autoimmune thyroiditis and antiphospholipid syndrome. To our knowledge, this is the first case of primary biliary cirrhosis - autoimmune hepatitis overlap syndrome associated with dermatomyositis, autoimmune thyroiditis and antiphospholipid syndrome.

  9. Cytokine production in patients with papillary thyroid cancer and associated autoimmune Hashimoto thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zivancevic-Simonovic, Snezana; Mihaljevic, Olgica; Majstorovic, Ivana; Popovic, Suzana; Markovic, Slavica; Milosevic-Djordjevic, Olivera; Jovanovic, Zorica; Mijatovic-Teodorovic, Ljiljana; Mihajlovic, Dusan; Colic, Miodrag

    2015-08-01

    Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) is the most frequent thyroid autoimmune disease, while papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) is one of the most common endocrine malignancies. A few patients with HT also develop PTC. The aim of this study was to analyze cytokine profiles in patients with PTC accompanied with autoimmune HT in comparison with those in patients with PTC alone or HT alone and healthy subjects. Cytokine levels were determined in supernatants obtained from phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated whole blood cultures in vitro. The concentrations of selected cytokines: Th1-interferon gamma (IFN-γ); Th2-interleukin 4 (IL-4), interleukin 5 (IL-5), interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 10 (IL-10) and interleukin 13 (IL-13); Th9-interleukin 9 (IL-9); and Th17-interleukin 17 (IL-17A) were measured using multiplex cytokine detection systems for human Th1/Th2/Th9/Th17/Th22. We found that PTC patients with HT produced significantly higher concentrations of IL-4, IL-6, IL-9, IL-13 and IFN-γ than PTC patients without HT. In conclusion, autoimmune HT affects the cytokine profile of patients with PTC by stimulating secretion of Th1/Th2/Th9 types of cytokines. Th1/Th2 cytokine ratios in PTC patients with associated autoimmune HT indicate a marked shift toward Th2 immunity.

  10. Gene-gene and gene-sex epistatic interactions of DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B in autoimmune thyroid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Tian-Tian; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Xuan; Song, Rong-Hua; Qin, Qiu; Muhali, Fatuma-Said; Zhou, Jiao-Zhen; Xu, Jian; Zhang, Jin-An

    2016-07-30

    The aim of this study was to investigate the associations of DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) polymorphisms with susceptibility to autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs) and to test gene-gene/gene-sex epistasis interactions. Eight single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B were selected and genotyped by multiplex polymerase chain reaction combined with ligase detection reaction method (PCR-LDR). A total of 685 Graves' disease (GD) patients, 353 Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) patients and 909 healthy controls were included in the final analysis. Epistasis was tested by additive model, multiplicative model and general multifactor dimensionality reduction (general MDR). Rs2424913 (DNMT3B) and rs2228611 (DNMT1) were associated with susceptibility to AITD and GD in the dominant and overdominant model, respectively (rs2424913: P=0.009 for AITD, P=0.0041 for GD; rs2228611: P=0.035 for AITD, P=0.043 for GD). Multiplicative and multiple high dimensional gene-gene or gene-sex interactions were also observed in this study. We have found evidence for a potential role of rs2424913 (DNMT3B) and rs2228611 (DNMT1) in AITD susceptibility and identified novel gene-gene/gene-sex interactions in AITD. Our study may highlight sex and genes of DNMTs family as contributors to the pathogenesis of AITD.

  11. Complicating autoimmune diseases in myasthenia gravis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacu, Aliona; Andersen, Jintana Bunpan; Lisnic, Vitalie; Owe, Jone Furlund; Gilhus, Nils Erik

    2015-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a rare autoimmune disease of skeletal muscle endplates. MG subgroup is relevant for comorbidity, but usually not accounted for. MG patients have an increased risk for complicating autoimmune diseases, most commonly autoimmune thyroid disease, systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. In this review, we present concomitant autoimmune disorders associated with the different MG subgroups, and show how this influences treatment and prognosis. Concomitant MG should always be considered in patients with an autoimmune disorder and developing new neuromuscular weakness, fatigue or respiratory failure. When a second autoimmune disorder is suspected, MG should be included as a differential diagnosis.

  12. Association between thyroid autoimmunity and Helicobacter pylori infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yun Mi; Kim, Tae Yong; Kim, Eui Young; Jang, Eun Kyung; Jeon, Min Ji; Kim, Won Gu; Shong, Young Kee; Kim, Won Bae

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims There have been controversial reports linking Helicobacter pylori infection to autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD). However, data regarding the relationship are limited for Asian populations, which have an extremely high prevalence of H. pylori infection. We performed this study to investigate the association between H. pylori infection and AITD in Koreans. Methods This study involved adults aged 30 to 70 years who had visited a health promotion center. A total of 5,502 subjects were analysed. Thyroid status was assessed by free thyroxine, thyroid stimulating hormone, and anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPO-Ab). Immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies to H. pylori were measured as an indication of H. pylori infection. We compared the prevalence of TPO-Ab in subjects with and without H. pylori infection. Results H. pylori IgG antibodies were found in 2,875 subjects (52.3%), and TPO-Ab were found in 430 (7.8%). Individuals positive for H. pylori Ab were older than those negative for H. pylori Ab (p thyroiditis. PMID:28092700

  13. Headache in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Seby; Hajj-Ali, Rula A

    2014-03-01

    Autoimmune diseases are a group of heterogeneous inflammatory disorders characterized by systemic or localized inflammation, leading to ischemia and tissue destruction. These include disorders like systemic lupus erythematosus and related diseases, systemic vasculitides, and central nervous system (CNS) vasculitis (primary or secondary). Headache is a very common manifestation of CNS involvement of these diseases. Although headache characteristics can be unspecific and often non-diagnostic, it is important to recognize because headache can be the first manifestation of CNS involvement. Prompt recognition and treatment is necessary not only to treat the headache, but also to help prevent serious neurological sequelae that frequently accompany autoimmune diseases. In this review, we discuss headache associated with autoimmune diseases along with important mimics.

  14. Autoimmune diseases and HIV infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virot, Emilie; Duclos, Antoine; Adelaide, Leopold; Miailhes, Patrick; Hot, Arnaud; Ferry, Tristan; Seve, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Abstract To describe the clinical manifestations, treatments, prognosis, and prevalence of autoimmune diseases (ADs) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. All HIV-infected patients managed in the Infectious Diseases Department of the Lyon University Hospitals, France, between January 2003 and December 2013 and presenting an AD were retrospectively included. Thirty-six ADs were found among 5186 HIV-infected patients which represents a prevalence of 0.69% including immune thrombocytopenic purpura (n = 15), inflammatory myositis (IM) (n = 4), sarcoidosis (n = 4), Guillain–Barré syndrome (GBS) (n = 4), myasthenia gravis (n = 2), Graves’ disease (n = 2), and 1 case of each following conditions: systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, autoimmune hepatitis, Hashimoto thyroiditis and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. One patient presented 2 ADs. Thirty patients were known to be HIV-infected when they developed an AD. The AD preceded HIV infection in 2 patients. GBS and HIV infection were diagnosed simultaneously in 3 cases. At AD diagnosis, CD4 T lymphocytes count were higher than 350/mm3 in 63% of patients, between 200 and 350/mm3 in 19% and less than 200/mm3 in 19%. Twenty patients benefited from immunosuppressant treatments, with a good tolerance. ADs during HIV infection are uncommon in this large French cohort. Immune thrombocytopenic purpura, sarcoidosis, IM, and GBS appear to be more frequent than in the general population. Immunosuppressant treatments seem to be effective and well tolerated. PMID:28121924

  15. Sirolimus for Autoimmune Disease of Blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-16

    Autoimmune Pancytopenia; Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS); Evans Syndrome; Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Anemia, Hemolytic, Autoimmune; Autoimmune Neutropenia; Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic; Inflammatory Bowel Disease; Rheumatoid Arthritis

  16. The relative importance of genetic and environmental effects for the early stages of thyroid autoimmunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Pia S; Brix, Thomas H; Iachine, Ivan;

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In euthyroid individuals, autoantibodies to thyroid peroxidase (TPOab) and thyroglobulin (Tgab) are regarded as early markers of thyroid autoimmunity. Family and twin studies suggest that development of thyroid autoantibodies in first-degree relatives of patients with autoimmune thyroid...... disease is under genetic influence. We aimed to estimate the relative importance of genetic and environmental effects for the presence of thyroid autoantibodies in euthyroid subjects. METHODS: A representative sample of healthy twin pairs was identified through the Danish Twin Registry; 1372 individuals...... concordance and intraclass correlations were consistently higher for MZ than for DZ twin pairs indicating genetic influence. Genetic components (with 95% confidence intervals) accounted for 73% (46-89%) of the liability of being thyroid antibody positive. Adjusting for covariates (age, TSH and others...

  17. Association of Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte-Associated Protein 4 (CTLA4) Gene Polymorphisms with Autoimmune Thyroid Disease in Children and Adults: Case-Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Fu-Sung; Wang, Chao-Hung; Huang, Chi-Yu; Lin, Chiung-Ling; Lin, Wen-Shan; Chang, Tzu-Yang; Yang, Horng-Woei; Chen, Wei-Fang; Lien, Ya-Ping; Cheng, Bi-Wen; Lin, Chao-Hsu; Chen, Chia-Ching; Wu, Yi-Lei; Hung, Chen-Mei; Li, Hsin-Jung; Chan, Chon-In; Lee, Yann-Jinn

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), including Graves disease (GD) and Hashimoto disease (HD), is an organ-specific autoimmune disease with a strong genetic component. Although the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA4) polymorphism has been reported to be associated with AITD in adults, few studies have focused on children. The aim of our study was to investigate whether the CTLA4 polymorphisms, including -318C/T (rs5742909), +49A/G (rs231775), and CT60 (rs3087243), were associated with GD and HD in Han Chinese adults and children. We studied 289 adult GD, 265 pediatric GD, 229 pediatric HD patients, and 1058 healthy controls and then compared genotype, allele, carrier, and haplotype frequencies between patients and controls. We found that CTLA4 SNPs +49A/G and CT60 were associated with GD in adults and children. Allele G of +49A/G was significantly associated with GD in adults (odds ratio [OR], 1.50; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.21–1.84; corrected P value [Pc] < 0.001) and children (OR, 1.42; 95% CI, 1.15–1.77; Pc = 0.002). Allele G of CT60 also significantly increased risk of GD in adults (OR, 1.63; 95% CI, 1.27–2.09; Pc < 0.001) and GD in children (OR, 1.58; 95% CI, 1.22–2.04; Pc < 0.001). Significant linkage disequilibrium was found between +49A/G and CT60 in GD and control subjects (D’ = 0.92). Our results showed that CTLA4 was associated with both GD and HD and played an equivalent role in both adult and pediatric GD in Han Chinese population. PMID:27111218

  18. Association of Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte-Associated Protein 4 (CTLA4 Gene Polymorphisms with Autoimmune Thyroid Disease in Children and Adults: Case-Control Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Hsin Ting

    Full Text Available Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD, including Graves disease (GD and Hashimoto disease (HD, is an organ-specific autoimmune disease with a strong genetic component. Although the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA4 polymorphism has been reported to be associated with AITD in adults, few studies have focused on children. The aim of our study was to investigate whether the CTLA4 polymorphisms, including -318C/T (rs5742909, +49A/G (rs231775, and CT60 (rs3087243, were associated with GD and HD in Han Chinese adults and children. We studied 289 adult GD, 265 pediatric GD, 229 pediatric HD patients, and 1058 healthy controls and then compared genotype, allele, carrier, and haplotype frequencies between patients and controls. We found that CTLA4 SNPs +49A/G and CT60 were associated with GD in adults and children. Allele G of +49A/G was significantly associated with GD in adults (odds ratio [OR], 1.50; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.21-1.84; corrected P value [Pc] < 0.001 and children (OR, 1.42; 95% CI, 1.15-1.77; Pc = 0.002. Allele G of CT60 also significantly increased risk of GD in adults (OR, 1.63; 95% CI, 1.27-2.09; Pc < 0.001 and GD in children (OR, 1.58; 95% CI, 1.22-2.04; Pc < 0.001. Significant linkage disequilibrium was found between +49A/G and CT60 in GD and control subjects (D' = 0.92. Our results showed that CTLA4 was associated with both GD and HD and played an equivalent role in both adult and pediatric GD in Han Chinese population.

  19. Epigenomics of autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Bhawna; Hawkins, R David

    2015-03-01

    Autoimmune diseases are complex disorders of largely unknown etiology. Genetic studies have identified a limited number of causal genes from a marginal number of individuals, and demonstrated a high degree of discordance in monozygotic twins. Studies have begun to reveal epigenetic contributions to these diseases, primarily through the study of DNA methylation, but chromatin and non-coding RNA changes are also emerging. Moving forward an integrative analysis of genomic, transcriptomic and epigenomic data, with the latter two coming from specific cell types, will provide an understanding that has been missed from genetics alone. We provide an overview of the current state of the field and vision for deriving the epigenomics of autoimmunity.

  20. Galectin-3 in autoimmunity and autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Felipe L; Gatto, Mariele; Bassi, Nicola; Luisetto, Roberto; Ghirardello, Anna; Punzi, Leonardo; Doria, Andrea

    2015-08-01

    Galectin-3 (gal-3) is a β-galactoside-binding lectin, which regulates cell-cell and extracellular interactions during self/non-self-antigen recognition and cellular activation, proliferation, differentiation, migration and apoptosis. It plays a significant role in cellular and tissue pathophysiology by organizing niches that drive inflammation and immune responses. Gal-3 has some therapeutic potential in several diseases, including chronic inflammatory disorders, cancer and autoimmune diseases. Gal-3 exerts a broad spectrum of functions which differs according to its intra- or extracellular localization. Recombinant gal-3 strategy has been used to identify potential mode of action of gal-3; however, exogenous gal-3 may not reproduce the functions of the endogenous gal-3. Notably, gal-3 induces monocyte-macrophage differentiation, interferes with dendritic cell fate decision, regulates apoptosis on T lymphocytes and inhibits B-lymphocyte differentiation into immunoglobulin secreting plasma cells. Considering the influence of these cell populations in the pathogenesis of several autoimmune diseases, gal-3 seems to play a role in development of autoimmunity. Gal-3 has been suggested as a potential therapeutic agent in patients affected with some autoimmune disorders. However, the precise role of gal-3 in driving the inflammatory process in autoimmune or immune-mediated disorders remains elusive. Here, we reviewed the involvement of gal-3 in cellular and tissue events during autoimmune and immune-mediated inflammatory diseases.

  1. Frequency Of Pancreatic Beta-Cell Autoimmunity Markers In Patients With Autoimmune Thyroid Disease Frecuencia de marcadores de autoinmunidad beta pancreática en pacientes con enfermedad tiroidea autoinmune

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María E. Primo

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available A total of 305 ambulatory patients recruited at the Division of Endocrinology, Hospital de Clínicas, University of Buenos Aires, with autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD were studied to search for associations between autoimmune thyroid disease and presence of serum markers of autoimmune diabetes mellitus. Screening for markers of pancreatic beta-cell autoimmunity was performed by radioligand binding assays (RBA as follows: autoantibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase (GADA and proinsulin (PAA were determined in all sera, whereas autoantibodies to protein tyrosine phosphatase (IA-2A and insulin (IAA were additionally measured in 200 sera randomly selected from the total collection. In addition, every GADA positive serum among the remaining 105 sera was systematically tested for the presence of IA-2A and IAA. In the cohort of 305 AITD patients 22 (7.2% were previously diagnosed as type 1, type 2 or insulin-requiring type 2 diabetics. Ten of these patients presented serum marker positivity specific for β-cell autoantigens and 12 were marker negative. On the other hand, considering the majority of non-diabetic AITD patients (n=283, β-cell marker positivity was detected in 17 individuals (6.0%. The prevalence of autoimmune diabetes markers was much higher in the studied population than in the general population utilized as a control group, and GADA was the most frequent marker.Se investigó la asociación entre enfermedad tiroidea autoinmune y la presencia de marcadores séricos de diabetes mellitus en 305 pacientes ambulatorios con enfermedad tiroidea autoinmune reclutados en la División Endocrinología. La búsqueda de marcadores de autoinmunidad contra las células beta pancreáticas se realizó por la técnica de unión de radioligandos (RBA como se detalla a continuación: se determinaron autoanticuerpos contra la decarboxilasa del ácido glutámico (GADA y proinsulina (PAA en todos los sueros, mientras que los anticuerpos contra la prote

  2. Vitamin D and autoimmune thyroid disease%维生素D与自身免疫性甲状腺疾病

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩钧凌; 孙嘉

    2009-01-01

    近年来较多的研究表明,维生素D具有调节免疫的特性,在一些自身免疫性疾病动物模型中表现出一定的防治作用.自身免疫性甲状腺疾病(AITD)是一种器官特异性自身免疫性疾病.研究证实,维生素D相关基因多态性与AITD相关,如维生素D受体基因、1α-羟化酶(CYP2781)基因、维生素D结合蛋白基因等.AITD患者存在维生素D缺乏,一些研究表明应用维生素D对AITD具有一定的防治作用.维生素D及其类似物防治AITD的可能机制在于它们能够调节AITD患者的细胞因子表达,并对其甲状腺细胞凋亡具有调节作用.因此认为,维生素D及其类似物在AITD的临床应用前景广阔.%In recent years,the role of vitamin D in the immune system has been investigated. The immunomodulatory properties of vitamin D compounds were illustrated by their ability to either prevent or suppress animal models of autoimmune disease. Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) are organ-specific an-toimmune diseases. It was testified that AITD were associated with the polymorphisms of vitamin D related genes, such as vitamin D receptor gene,25-hydroxyvitamin D3-1α-hydroxylase (CYP27B1) gene, vitamin D-binding protein gene, etc. Patients with AITD were coexisted with vitamin D deficiency and vitamin D supple-mentation benefited for the prevention and treatment of AITD. The probable mechanisms of vitamin D and its analogs in AITD maybe include modulating the expression of many cytokines in AITD and regulating apopto-sis of thyroid cells. Thus we postulate that vitamin D and its analogs have a broad prospect in the clinical ap-plication for AITD.

  3. Autoinmunidad tiroidea: Mecanismos patogénicos comunes y distintivos en tiroiditis de Hashimoto y enfermedad de Graves Thyroid Autoimmunity: Common and Distinctive Pathogenic Mechanisms in Hashimoto's Thyroiditis and Graves' Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Astarita

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Las enfermedades tiroideas autoinmunes (ETA son los desórdenes más frecuentes que llevan a la disfunción de la glándula tiroidea. Incluyen varias formas clínicas como Tiroiditis de Hashimoto (TH y Enfermedad de Graves (EG. La relación entre TH y EG ha sido objeto de debate por décadas. Si bien, muy diferentes en su clínica, algunos las consideran los lados opuestos de una misma moneda. En su patogénesis tienen aspectos en común, como la predisposición genética demostrado por la ocurrencia en una misma familia y en un mismo individuo. Sin embargo, diferencias en el microambiente local determinan la diferente expresión fenotípica o el viraje de una a otra patología. El objetivo de esta monografía es investigar similitudes y diferencias entre TH y EG en las distintas etapas que llevan al desarrollo de autoinmunidad. Los autores declaran no poseer conflictos de interés.Autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD is the most common disorder that leads to thyroid gland dysfunction. ATD manifests in various clinical forms, such as Hashimoto's Thyroiditis (HT and Graves' Disease (GD. The relation between HT and GD has been discussed for decades. Even if they greatly differ in their clinical features and treatment, some people believe they are the opposite sides of the same coin. In their pathogenesis, they share some mechanisms, such as genetic susceptibility, shown by the fact that they tend to occur both in the same person and within the same family. However, differences in the local micro-environment can determine the distinct phenotypic expression or the switch from one disease to the other. The aim of this monograph was to investigate similarities and differences between HT and GD at the diverse stages leading to the development of autoimmunity. No financial conflicts of interest exist.

  4. Propylthiouracil-induced autoimmune disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Paiaulla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperthyroidism is a condition characterized by excessive production of thyroid hormones. Propylthiouracil (PTU is commonly used as first line drug in the management of hyperthyroidism. This is a case report of 24-year-old female, a known case of hyperthyroidism since 4 years, who came with a history of fever and myalgia since 3 days and dyspnea with coughing out of blood since 1 day. Patient was taking PTU (100 mg per day since 4 years for hyperthyroidism. Patient was immediately intubated for type-II respiratory failure. Diagnosed to be having PTU-induced autoimmune disease. PTU was stopped and treated with methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide. Clinical features improved over a period of 8 days and discharged home successfully. Having a high suspicion for the onset of autoimmune disease in hyperthyroidism patients who are on PTU therapy and timely treatment with immunosuppressants and supportive care along with the withdrawal of the drug can make a difference in morbidity and mortality.

  5. Pitfalls in cytological diagnosis of autoimmune thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumarasinghe, M P; De Silva, S

    1999-02-01

    The aims of this study are to document pitfalls in cytologic diagnosis of autoimmune thyroiditis (AT) and highlight possible ways to minimize them. One hundred consecutive thyroid aspirates with features diagnostic or suggestive of AT, performed and reported by the first author, were included in the study. Follow-up was traced and cytologic features responsible for indecisiveness were re-assessed in those reported as suggestive of AT. The features were then correlated with the results of serologic and thyroid function tests and clinical features, and an attempt was made to amend the final diagnosis using an integrated approach. Seventy eight were diagnostic and 22 were suggestive of AT. In the latter 22, features responsible for the indecisiveness were: cytologic atypia, in the form of nuclear enlargement, irregularity and grooves and altered chromatin texture, in 14 (64%); nucleoli with suspicion of a coexisting neoplasm in three (13.6%), two of which showed epithelial preponderance, crowding and discohesion; sparse inflammation in four (18%); a predominant lymphoid population without epithelial cells resembling a reactive lymph node in one (4.5%); co-existing toxic features in two (9%); and scanty smears in one (4.5%). Eighteen of the 22 suspected of AT had follow-up. Six had been assessed histologically; three with features suspicious of a neoplasm were diagnosed respectively as a papillary carcinoma (PC), Hurthle cell carcinoma (HCC) and a multinodular goitre (MNG) with degenerate changes. The other three were confirmed as AT; one with cytologic atypia, one with sparse inflammation and the third as cytologically resembling a reactive lymphnode. In ten of the remaining 12, the final diagnosis could be revised following an integrated approach with possible reduction of the indecisiveness. Potential pitfalls are: cytologic atypia occurring in AT; abundance or scarcity of background inflammation; low cell yield; and co-existing toxicity and malignancies. Epithelial

  6. Prevalence of autoantibodies and the risk of autoimmune thyroid disease in children with chronic hepatitis C virus infection treated with interferon-α

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stephan Gehring; Ulrike Kullmer; Sabine Koeppelmann; Patrick Gerner; Philip Wintermeyer; Stefan Wirth

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the prevalence of autoantibodies in chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected children focusing on thyroid autoimmunity.METHODS: We investigated the prevalence of autoantibodies in 123 chronic HCV-infected children before,during and after monotherapy with interferon-alpha (TFN-α) or combined treatment with interferon-α or peginterferon-α and ribavirin. Besides antibodies against smooth muscle (SMA), nuclei (ANA), and liver/kidney microsomes (LKM), the incidence of antithyroid peroxidase antibodies as well as thyroid function parameters (TSH, FT3 and FT4) were determined.RESULTS: We found that 8% of children had autoantibodies before treatment. During treatment,18% of children were found positive for at least one autoantibody; 15.5% of children developed pathologic thyroid values during IFN-α treatment compared to only one child before therapy. Six children had to be substituted while developing laboratory signs of hypothyroidism.CONCLUSION: Our data indicate a strong correlation between interferon-α treatment and autoimmune phenomena, notably the emergence of thyroid antibodies. The fact that some children required hormone replacement underlines the need of close monitoring in particularly those who respond to therapy and have to be treated for more than 6 mo.

  7. Long-term follow-up of seven patients with ophthalmopathy not associated with thyroid autoimmunity: heterogeneity of autoimmune ophthalmopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCorquodale T

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Tom McCorquodale,1 Hooshang Lahooti,1 Bamini Gopinath,2 Jack R Wall11Department of Medicine, Nepean Clinical School, the University of Sydney, Penrith, NSW, Australia; 2Centre for Vision Research, the University of Sydney, Westmead Hospital, Westmead, NSW, AustraliaBackground: Ophthalmopathy is the most common extrathyroidal manifestation of Graves' disease. However, in approximately 5% of cases this autoimmune eye disorder occurs in the apparent absence of Graves' hyperthyroidism: the so-called euthyroid Graves' disease (EGD.Methods: Seven patients with EGD were followed for evidence of thyroid and orbital autoimmunity, for up to 10 years. Calsequestrin and collagen XIII antibodies were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, and TSH-receptor (TSH-r antibodies were measured as TSH-r-binding antibody (TRAb and thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulin (TSI. Eye signs were characterized and quantified as clinical activity score (CAS, NOSPECS classes, Nunery types 1 and 2, and margin-reflex distance (MRD.Results: Calsequestrin antibodies were detected on at least one occasion in three of the seven patients and collagen XIII antibodies were detected one or more times in five patients. In one patient with isolated congestive ophthalmopathy who was studied intensely, collagen XIII antibodies were initially positive and then became negative as the eye disease stabilized, while antibodies targeting calsequestrin were always negative. TRAb was not detected in any patient, but TSI was detected in three patients on one occasion each. Ultrasound abnormalities were found in four of the six patients for whom this was carried out, but there was no clear evidence for thyroiditis in any of these patients. For comparison, 13 patients were studied with typical Graves' ophthalmopathy. There were no significant differences compared to EGD in respect to the prevalence of positive calsequestrin or collagen XIII antibodies, but these patients included more

  8. Complement in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignesh, Pandiarajan; Rawat, Amit; Sharma, Madhubala; Singh, Surjit

    2017-02-01

    The complement system is an ancient and evolutionary conserved element of the innate immune mechanism. It comprises of more than 20 serum proteins most of which are synthesized in the liver. These proteins are synthesized as inactive precursor proteins which are activated by appropriate stimuli. The activated forms of these proteins act as proteases and cleave other components successively in amplification pathways leading to exponential generation of final effectors. Three major pathways of complement pathways have been described, namely the classical, alternative and lectin pathways which are activated by different stimuli. However, all the 3 pathways converge on Complement C3. Cleavage of C3 and C5 successively leads to the production of the membrane attack complex which is final common effector. Excessive and uncontrolled activation of the complement has been implicated in the host of autoimmune diseases. But the complement has also been bemusedly described as the proverbial "double edged sword". On one hand, complement is the final effector of tissue injury in autoimmune diseases and on the other, deficiencies of some components of the complement can result in autoimmune diseases. Currently available tools such as enzyme based immunoassays for functional assessment of complement pathways, flow cytometry, next generation sequencing and proteomics-based approaches provide an exciting opportunity to study this ancient yet mysterious element of innate immunity.

  9. Postpartum Thyroiditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to be an autoimmune disease very similar to Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. In fact, these two disorders cannot be ... from one another on pathology specimens. As in Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, postpartum thyroiditis is associated with the development ...

  10. Thyroid Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... e.g., at regular intervals after thyroid cancer treatment) Thyroid stimulating hormone receptor antibody, Thyroid Stimulating Immunoglobulin TRAb, TSHR Ab, TSI Graves disease When a person has symptoms of hyperthyroidism If a pregnant woman has a known autoimmune ...

  11. Pregnancy and Thyroid Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... preeclampsia—a dangerous rise in blood pressure in late pregnancy thyroid storm—a sudden, severe worsening of symptoms miscarriage premature birth low birth weight If a woman has Graves’ disease ...

  12. Association of functional polymorphisms in promoter regions of IL5, IL6 and IL13 genes with development and prognosis of autoimmune thyroid diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, N; Watanabe, M; Morita, M; Tatusmi, K; Hidaka, Y; Akamizu, T; Iwatani, Y

    2011-03-01

    To clarify the association of genetic producibility of interleukin (IL)-5, IL-6 and IL-13, which are secreted by T helper type 2 (Th2), with the development and prognosis of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), we genotyped IL5-746C/T, IL6-572C/G and IL13-1112C/T polymorphisms, which are functional polymorphisms in the promoter regions of the genes regulating these cytokines. Fifty-seven patients with intractable Graves' disease (GD), 52 with GD in remission, 52 with severe Hashimoto's disease (HD), 56 with mild HD and 91 healthy controls were examined in this study. The IL13-1112T allele, which correlates with higher producibility of IL-13, was more frequent in patients with GD in remission than in those with intractable GD [P=0·009, odds ratio (OR)=3·52]. The IL5-746T allele, which may correlate with lower levels of IL-5, was more frequent in patients with GD in remission than controls (P=0·029, OR=2·00). The IL6-572G allele carriers (CG and GG genotypes), which have higher producibility of IL-6, were more frequent in AITD patients (P=0·033, OR=1·75), especially in GD in remission (P=0·031, OR=2·16) and severe HD (P=0·031, OR=2·16) than in controls. Interestingly, both allele and genotype frequencies of Th2 cytokine genes were similar between GD and HD patients. In conclusion, functional polymorphisms in the genes encoding Th2 cytokines are associated differently with the development and prognosis of AITD from each other.

  13. If this argument is true: Hashimotos disease causes chronic thyroid damage so in diseased elderly population the thyroid volumes must be low-retrospective US study

    OpenAIRE

    Betul Tiryaki Bastug

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hashimoto thyroiditis is part of the spectrum of autoimmune thyroid diseases and is characterized by the destruction of thyroid cells by various cell and antibody-mediated immune processes. It primarily affects middle-aged women but also can occur in men and children. Hashimotos disease typically progresses slowly over years and causes chronic thyroid damage. This has to be thought that in diseased elderly population the thyroid volumes must be low. This paper shows if this argume...

  14. Electrosmog and autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Trevor G; Heil, Trudy J Rumann

    2016-07-13

    Studies in mice have shown that environmental electromagnetic waves tend to suppress the murine immune system with a potency similar to NSAIDs, yet the nature of any Electrosmog effects upon humans remains controversial. Previously, we reported how the human Vitamin-D receptor (VDR) and its ligand, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin-D (1,25-D), are associated with many chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. We have shown how olmesartan, a drug marketed for mild hypertension, acts as a high-affinity partial agonist for the VDR, and that it seems to reverse disease activity resulting from VDR dysfunction. We here report that structural instability of the activated VDR becomes apparent when observing hydrogen bond behavior with molecular dynamics, revealing that the VDR pathway exhibits a susceptibility to Electrosmog. Further, we note that characteristic modes of instability lie in the microwave frequency range, which is currently populated by cellphone and WiFi communication signals, and that the susceptibility is ligand dependent. A case series of 64 patient-reported outcomes subsequent to use of a silver-threaded cap designed to protect the brain and brain stem from microwave Electrosmog resulted in 90 % reporting "definite" or "strong" changes in their disease symptoms. This is much higher than the 3-5 % rate reported for electromagnetic hypersensitivity in a healthy population and suggests that effective control of environmental Electrosmog immunomodulation may soon become necessary for successful therapy of autoimmune disease.

  15. Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Associated With Autoimmune Thyroid Disorders in Iranian Children: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Zamanfar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Type one diabetes mellitus (T1DM is an autoimmune disorder that is yet the most common type of diabetes in children and adolescents. Several genetic risk factors have been associated with T1DM, auto immune thyroiditis and other autoimmune disorder. Among autoimmune disorders, autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD is the most frequent disorder associated with T1DM. Its prevalence varies depending on age, sex and ethnic origin of the subjects and is considerably higher than the general population and increases with duration of T1DM. The aim of this study was to review the prevalence of ATD in Iranian children with T1DM compared with other countries. Evidence Acquisition: We conducted a review on all papers published on the association between autoimmune thyroiditis and T1DM, which was available on Google Scholar, Scientific Information Database (SID, Magiran and Iran Medex databases up to June 2014. Both Persian and English articles were checked. The searched terms were: diabetes mellitus, autoimmune thyroiditis, prevalence, frequency, Iranian children and adolescents. All papers which were done on patients with age under 20 years old and have used Anti-TPO and Anti-TG to evaluate patients were included. Results: Six papers met all the criteria. A total of 736 participants were included in this review. After review of all the papers, the prevalence of Anti-TPO was reported between 8% and 30% and Anti-TG was reported 6.06% to 23.6% in diabetic children in Iran. Conclusions: Autoimmune thyroid disorders are the most prevalent immunological diseases in patients with type 1 diabetes. All these studies have shown a higher prevalence of the disorder in patients with T1DM compared to the Iranian healthy population. Anti-TPO reported between 8% and 30% and Anti-TG reported 6.06% to 23.6% in diabetic children in Iran that was similar to the studies in other countries.

  16. Impacts of pegylated interferon-ribavirin combination treatment on thyroid functions and thyroid autoimmunity in patients with chronic hepatitis C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferhat Yılmaz

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Hepatitis C and interferon may trigger autoimmunity. We aimed to investigate the effects of combination treatment of peginterferon alpha (peg-IFN + ribavirin in patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC on thyroid function tests and thyroid auto antibodies.Materials and Methods: The study included 45 outpatients with proven CHC having normal thyroid functions and previously not treated. The patients received combination of Peg-IFN+ribavirin. Values of fT3, fT4, TSH, antitiroglobu-lin (Anti-Tg and thyroid peroxidase antibody (Anti-TPO were measured at initial, first, third and sixth months of treatment. Frequency of thyroid dysfunction was evaluated according to age and gender of patients.Results: Thyroid dysfunction emerged in 15 (%33.3 of 45 patients at the end of the six month of antiviral treatment. Symptomatic thyroid disease was confirmed in 2 patients. Subclinical hyperthyroidism was determined in four pa-tients (%8.9, and subclinical hypothyroidism in 3 patients (%6.7 at the end of third month.At the end of sixth month; symptomatic hyperthyroidism was observed in one patient (%2.2, subclinical hyperthyroid-ism in six (%13.3 and subclinical hypothyroidism in 7 patients (%15.6, and symptomatic hypothyroidism was deter-mined in one patient (%2.2.At the end of the sixth month of antiviral treatment; Anti-Tg antibodies were positive in 12 patients (%26.7 and anti-TPO in 11 patients (4 male and 7 female (%24.5. No significant relationship was found between thyroid dysfunction and age, gender and ALT levels of patients (p>0.05.Conclusion: Periodic follow-up examinations should be done for thyroid autoimmunity and thyroid functions in CHC patients receiving combination treatment of Peg-INF+ribavirin.

  17. [Hydroxychloroquine for autoimmune diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danza, Álvaro; Graña, Diego; Goñi, Mabel; Vargas, Andrea; Ruiz-Irastorza, Guillermo

    2016-02-01

    Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) is by far the most frequently used antimalarial for the management of Systemic Autoimmune Diseases. It has immunomodulatory, hypolipidemic, hypoglycemic and antithrombotic properties and it diminishes the risk of malignancies. The most important mechanisms to explain the immunomodulatory actions are its ability to reduce inflammatory pathways and Toll-like receptors activation. The safety profile is favorable. In spite of its low frequency, retinal toxicity is potentially severe. In systemic lupus erythematous HCQ therapy reduces activity, the accrual of organ damage, risk of infections and thrombosis and improves the cardiometabolic profile. It contributes to induce lupus nephritis remission, spares steroid use and increases survival rates. In rheumatoid arthritis, it improves cardiometabolic risk and has a favorable effect in joint inflammation. In Sjögren's syndrome, an increased lacrimal quality as well as an improvement in objective and subjective inflammatory markers has been demonstrated with HCQ. In Antiphospholipid Syndrome, HCQ is effective in primary and secondary thrombosis prevention. The effectiveness of the drug in other systemic autoimmune diseases is less established. HCQ therapy may improve dermatological manifestations in Dermatomyositis and may have a positive effects in the treatment of Sarcoidosis and Still disease.

  18. A case control study on psychiatric disorders in Hashimoto disease and euthyroid goitre: not only depressive but also anxiety disorders are associated with thyroid autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carbone Fiora

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To evaluate the association between mood and anxiety disorders in Hashimoto disease and Euthyroid Goitre in a case control study. Methods Cases included 19 subjects with Hashimoto disease in euthyroid phase, 19 subjects with euthyroid goitre, 2 control groups each of 76 subjects matched (4/1 according to age and sex drawn from the data base of a community based sample. Psychiatric diagnoses were formulated using the International Composite Diagnostic Interview Simplified, according to DSM-IV criteria. All subjects underwent a complete thyroid evaluation including physical examination, thyroid echography and measure of serum free T4 (FT4, free T3 (FT3, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH and anti-thyroid peroxidase autoantibodies (anti-TPO. Results: Subjects with Hashimoto disease showed higher frequencies of lifetime Depressive Episode (OR = 6.6, C.L. 95% 1.2–25.7, Generalized Anxiety Disorders (OR = 4,9 Cl 95% 1.5–25.4 and Social Phobia (OR = 20.0, CL 95% 2.3–153.3 whilst no differences were found between subjects with goitre and controls. Conclusion The study seems to confirm that risk for depressive disorders in subjects with thyroiditis is independent of the thyroid function detected by routine tests and indicates that not only mood but also anxiety disorders may be associated with Hashimoto disease.

  19. Evaluation of the 2. generation radio-receptional assay for anti-TSH receptor antibodies (TRAb) in autoimmune thyroid diseases. Comparison with 1. generation and anti-thyroperoxidae antibodies (AbTPO)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giovanella, L.; Ceriani, L.; Garacini, S. [University Hospital Ospedale di Circolo e Fondazione Macchi, Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Lab. of Endocrinology and Thyroid Unit, Varese (Italy)

    2001-03-01

    The detection of autoantibodies to the TSH-receptor (TRAb) by radio-receptor assays (RRA) is widely requested in clinical practice for the diagnostic work-up of Graves' disease and its differentiation from diffuse thyroid autonomy. Additionally, TRAb measurement can be useful during antithyroid drug treatment of Graves' disease to evaluate the risk of relapse after therapy discontinuation. Nevertheless, some patients affected by Graves' disease are TRAb-negative when 1. generation assay is used. In this study the diagnostic performance of a newly developed 2. generation TRAb assay (TRAK human DYNOtest(R), BRAHMS Diagnostica GmbH, Berlin, Germany) was evaluated in 74 untreated patients affected by Graves' disease, in 53 untreated patients affected by Hashimoto's thyroiditis and in 88 patients affected by euthyroid nodular goiter. It was also compared the new TRAb assay with the 1. generation test (TRAK(R) Assay, BRAHMS Diagnostica GmbH, Berlin, Germany) and anti-thyroperoxidase assay (AbTPO DYNOtest(R), BRAHMS GmbH, Berlin). The 2. generation TRAb assay showed the better diagnostic sensitivity in Graves' disease (97%) with respect to the 1. generation assay (85%) and AbTPO assay (64%). The AbTPO assay was positive in 50 of 53 (94%) patients affected by autoimmune thyroiditis. The 1. and 2. generation TRAb assays were positive in 4 (7%) and 7 (13%) of 53 patients affected by autoimmune thyroiditis, respectively. No patients affected by nodular goiter showed positive 1. and 2. generation TRAb assay while AbTPO levels were positive in 8 of 88 patients (specificity 91%). In conclusion, the 2. generation TRAb assay is clearly more sensitive than the 1. generation test and should be used in clinical practice to minimize the incidence of TRAb-negative Graves' disease. Long term prospective studies are needed to evaluate the prognostic role of 2. generation TRAb assay in Graves' disease. The assay of AbTPO is the best marker for

  20. Mucormycosis in systemic autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, Mathieu; Puéchal, Xavier

    2014-07-01

    Mucormycosis is an emerging infection in systemic autoimmune diseases. All published cases of systemic autoimmune diseases complicated by mucormycosis were reviewed. The clinical features, diagnostic procedures and the main principles of treatment were analyzed. Twenty-four cases of mucormycosis have been reported in systemic auto-immune diseases, of which 83% in systemic lupus erythematosus, all occurring during immunosuppressants. In most cases, the infection was disseminated or rhinocerebral and it had mimicked a flare of the underlying connective tissue disease. A fatal outcome was reported in 58.3% of these patients. In conclusion, mucormycosis often mimics a flare of the underlying systemic disease and is associated with a high mortality rate. Systemic lupus erythematosus is by far the most common associated systemic autoimmune disease. A high degree of awareness is warranted to rapidly rule out infection, of which mucormycosis, in immunocompromised patients with systemic autoimmune disease before a disease flare is conclusively diagnosed.

  1. Autoimmune hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2010:chap 88. Read More Autoimmune disorders Chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto disease) Cirrhosis Glomerulonephritis Hemolytic anemia Liver cancer - hepatocellular carcinoma Mesenteric venous thrombosis Type ...

  2. Autoimmune diseases and myelodysplastic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komrokji, Rami S; Kulasekararaj, Austin; Al Ali, Najla H; Kordasti, Shahram; Bart-Smith, Emily; Craig, Benjamin M; Padron, Eric; Zhang, Ling; Lancet, Jeffrey E; Pinilla-Ibarz, Javier; List, Alan F; Mufti, Ghulam J; Epling-Burnette, Pearlie K

    2016-05-01

    Immune dysregulation and altered T-cell hemostasis play important roles in the pathogenesis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Recent studies suggest an increased risk of MDS among patients with autoimmune diseases. Here, we investigated the prevalence of autoimmune diseases among MDS patients, comparing characteristics and outcomes in those with and without autoimmune diseases. From our study group of 1408 MDS patients, 391 (28%) had autoimmune disease, with hypothyroidism being the most common type, accounting for 44% (n = 171) of patients (12% among all MDS patients analyzed). Other autoimmune diseases with ≥5% prevalence included idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura in 12% (n = 46), rheumatoid arthritis in 10% (n = 41), and psoriasis in 7% (n = 28) of patients. Autoimmune diseases were more common in female MDS patients, those with RA or RCMD WHO subtype, and those who were less dependent on red blood cell transfusion. Median overall survival (OS) was 60 months (95% CI, 50-70) for patients with autoimmune diseases versus 45 months (95% CI, 40-49) for those without (log-rank test, P = 0.006). By multivariate analysis adjusting for revised IPSS and age >60 years, autoimmune diseases were a statistically significant independent factor for OS (HR 0.78; 95% CI, 0.66-0.92; P = 0.004). The rate of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) transformation was 23% (n = 89) in MDS patients with autoimmune disease versus 30% (n = 301) in those without (P = 0.011). Patient groups did not differ in response to azacitidine or lenalidomide treatment. Autoimmune diseases are prevalent among MDS patients. MDS patients with autoimmune diseases have better OS and less AML transformation.

  3. The Effect of Vitamin D on Thyroid Autoimmunity in Levothyroxine-Treated Women with Hashimoto's Thyroiditis and Normal Vitamin D Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krysiak, Robert; Szkróbka, Witold; Okopień, Bogusław

    2017-01-10

    Background: Low vitamin D status is associated with autoimmune thyroid disease. Oral vitamin D supplementation was found to reduce titers of thyroid antibodies in levothyroxine-treated women with postpartum thyroiditis and low vitamin D status. Methods: The study included 34 women with Hashimoto's thyroiditis and normal vitamin D status (serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels above 30 ng/mL) who had been treated for at least 6 months with levothyroxine. On the basis of patient preference, women were divided into 2 groups, receiving (n=18) or not receiving (n=16) oral vitamin D preparations (2000 IU daily). Serum levels of thyrotropin, free thyroxine, free triiodothyronine and 25-hydroxyvitamin D, as well as titers of thyroid peroxidase and thyroglobulin antibodies were measured at the beginning of the study and 6 months later. Results: There were no significant differences in baseline values between both study groups. 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels inversely correlated with titers of thyroid antibodies. No changes in hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis activity and thyroid antibody titers were observed in vitamin-naïve patients. Vitamin D increased serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, as well as reduced titers of thyroid antibodies. This effect was more pronounced for thyroid peroxidase than for thyroglobulin antibodies and correlated with their baseline titers. Conclusions: Vitamin D preparations may reduce thyroid autoimmunity in levothyroxine-treated women with Hashimoto's thyroiditis and normal vitamin D status.

  4. Autoimmune Diseases Co-Existing with Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Jadali

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmunity and viral infections are closely associated fields, and viruses have been proposed as a likely aetiological, contributory or triggering factors of systemic autoimmune diseases. Hepatitis C virus seems to be the virus usually associated with the appearance of autoimmune diseases, and the relationship between chronic hepatitis C virus infection and some autoimmune disease has been studied. For some of these disorders their association with hepatitis C virus infection is well recognized while for others it remains probable or weak. Examples of autoimmune phenomena observed in chronic hepatitis C virus infection include rheumatoid arthritis, thyroid disease, cryoglobulinaemia, immune thrombocytopenic purpura, systemic lupus erythematosus and sjogren syndrome. To date, the etiological role and the pathogenetic involvement of the hepatitis C infection remains unknown.The aim of this study is to assess the presence of different autoimmune manifestations of hepatitis C virus infection reported in literature.

  5. Increased carotid IMT in overweight and obese women affected by Hashimoto's thyroiditis: an adiposity and autoimmune linkage?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Guida

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hashimoto's thyroiditis is the most important cause of hypothyroidism. It is a systemic disease that can even affect the cardiovascular system, by accelerating the atherosclerotic process. Aim of this study was to examine whether autoimmune thyroiditis has an effect on the intima-media thickness of the common carotid artery (IMT-CCT, independently of the thyroid function and well-known cardiovascular risk factors. Hashimoto's thyroiditis is a systemic disease. The aim is to examine whether autoimmune thyroiditis and adiposity can effect carotid IMT independently of thyroid hormones and cardiovascular risk factors. Methods A total of 104 obese women (BMI ≥ 25.0 kg/m-2, with FT3 and FT4 serum levels in the normal range and TSH levels Results Of the 104 women, 30 (28.8% were affected by autoimmune thyroiditis. Significantly higher values of IMT-CCT (p Conclusions The present study shows that Hashimoto's thyroiditis is associated to an increased IMT only in overweight and obese, independently of the thyroid function, BMI and cardiovascular risk factors. These results suggest that Hashimoto's thyroiditis is a marker of evolution of the atherosclerosis if combined to adiposity.

  6. Pathogenesis of thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy: does autoimmunity against calsequestrin and collagen XIII play a role?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hooshang Lahooti

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Hooshang Lahooti, Kishan R Parmar, Jack R WallThe Department of Medicine, University of Sydney, Nepean Clinical School, Penrith, NSW, AustraliaAbstract: Thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy (TAO, or thyroid eye disease, is a complex inflammatory disorder of the eye that, as its name implies, is associated with thyroid disease. TAO can be divided into three subtypes: ocular myopathy, congestive myopathy and mixed congestive and myopathic ophthalmopathy. Although the precise pathophysiology of TAO remains unclear it is likely to reflect an autoimmune reaction involving sensitized T-cells and autoantibodies directed against a thyroid and orbital tissue shared antigen. One well studied candidate in this immune reaction is the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSH-r, expressed in the orbital fibroblast and pre adipocyte. In our studies of TAO, we have investigated the nature and significance of antibodies targeting other eye muscle and orbital connective tissue (OCT antigens. Our findings suggest that autoimmunity against the eye muscle antigen calsequestrin and the OCT antigen collagen XIII plays a role in the pathogenesis of TAO. We propose that ocular myopathy and chronic eyelid retraction are due to autoimmunity against skeletal muscle calsequestrin in the extraocular and eyelid muscles, respectively. This may be initiated in the thyroid where calsequestrin expression is upregulated, possibly due to a stimulatory effect of TSH-r antibodies. We also propose that congestive ophthalmopathy results from a reaction against the TSH-r or collagen XIII in orbital fibroblast cell membranes. Further insight into the role of eye muscle and OCT antigens in the pathogenesis of TAO may allow for the development of new therapies to treat the eye disorder and reduce patient morbidity.Keywords: thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy, autoimmunity, t calsequestrin, collagen XIII

  7. Autoantibodies in autoimmune liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sener, Asli Gamze

    2015-11-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis is a chronic hepatitis of unknown etiology characterized by clinical, histological, and immunological features, generally including circulating autoantibodies and a high total serum and/or gamma globulin. Liver-related autoantibodies are very significant for the correct diagnosis and classification of autoimmune liver diseases (AILD), namely autoimmune hepatitis types 1 and 2 (AIH-1 and 2), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), and the sclerosing cholangitis types in adults and children. This article intends to review recent studies that investigate autoantibodies in autoimmune liver diseases from a microbiological perspective.

  8. Brain perfusion abnormalities in patients with euthyroid autoimmune thyroiditis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piga, M.; Serra, A.; Loi, G.L.; Satta, L. [University of Cagliari, Nuclear Medicine - Department of Medical Sciences ' ' M. Aresu' ' , Cagliari (Italy); Deiana, L.; Liberto, M. Di; Mariotti, S. [University of Cagliari, Endocrinology - Department of Medical Sciences ' ' M. Aresu' ' , Cagliari (Italy)

    2004-12-01

    abnormalities in euthyroid HT. These abnormalities are similar to those observed in cases of severe Hashimoto's encephalopathy and may suggest a higher than expected involvement of CNS in thyroid autoimmune disease. (orig.)

  9. Thyroid disease and pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becks, G P; Burrow, G N

    1991-01-01

    Thyroid disease is common in younger women and may be a factor in reproductive dysfunction. This probably only applies to severe cases of hyper- or hypothyroidism. Once adequately treated, neither of these disorders significantly impacts on fertility. The key is to recognize and to treat thyroid disorders in the reproductive-age woman before conception. Thyroxine therapy and even antithyroid drug therapy should be continued during pregnancy as necessary. Pregnancy is a euthyroid state that is normally maintained by complex changes in thyroid physiology. The fetal and neonatal hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid system develops independently, but it may be influenced by thyroid disease in the mother. Early pregnancy is characterized by an increase in maternal T4 secretion stimulated by hCG and an increase in TBG, resulting in the elevated total serum T4 in pregnancy. The debate continues as to whether maternal T4 is important in early or late fetal brain development. If so, the physiologic changes in thyroid hormone secretion and transport in early pregnancy would help to ensure that a sufficient amount of thyroid hormone was available. There is new evidence in human subjects that substantial maternal T4 can cross the placenta during pregnancy, and this may be particularly important when fetal thyroid function is compromised as a result of congenital hypothyroidism. Maternal and fetal/neonatal outcomes in pregnancy are adversely affected if severe hypothyroidism is undiagnosed or inadequately treated. Thyroid function tests should be obtained during gestation in women taking T4 and appropriate dose adjustments should be made for TSH levels outside a normal range. The TSH-receptor blocking antibodies from the mother are a recognized cause of congenital hypothyroidism in the fetus and neonate that can be permanent or transient. If neonatal hypothyroidism is detected through neonatal screening programs, and prompt and adequate T4 replacement therapy is instituted as soon as

  10. Scurfy mice: A model for autoimmune disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godfrey, V.L.

    1993-01-01

    Autoimmune disease-the condition in which the body attacks its own tissue-has been an object of public concern recently. Former President George Bush and his wife Barbara both are afflicted with Graves' disease in which the body's own immune system attakcs the thyroid gland. The safety of breast implants was called into question because of evidence that some recipients had developed autoimmune disorders such a rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and scleroderma. Women, the media pointed out, have a higher-than-average incidence of many autoimmune disorders. These events suggest the need to know more about what makes the immune system work so well and what makes it go awry. At ORNL's Biology Division, progress is being in understanding the underlying causes of immune disease by studying mice having a disease that causes them to be underdeveloped; to have scaly skin, small ears, and large spleens; to open their eyes late; and to die early. These [open quotes]scurfy[close quotes]mice are helping us better understand the role of the thymus gland in autoimmune disease.

  11. Postpartum thyroiditis and autoimmune thyroiditis in women of childbearing age: recent insights and consequences for antenatal and postnatal care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.F. Muller (Alex); H.A. Drexhage (Hemmo); A. Berghout (Arie)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractPostpartum thyroiditis is a syndrome of transient or permanent thyroid dysfunction occurring in the first year after delivery and based on an autoimmune inflammation of the thyroid. The prevalence ranges from 5-7%. We discuss the role of antibodies (especially thyroid p

  12. Thyroid gland diseases in adult patients with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vondra, K; Vrbikova, J; Dvorakova, K

    2005-12-01

    This review concerns the relation between most frequent thyroid gland diseases and diabetes mellitus in adult patients. Special attention is paid to autoimmune thyroiditis, Graves' disease, thyroid autoimmunity in pregnant diabetic women, and iodine metabolism. We focused on mechanisms leading to coexistence of both endocrine disorders, and on distinctions in the prevalence, diagnosis, clinical course and treatment of thyroid diseases in diabetic patients. The prevalence of thyroid diseases in diabetic patients is 2-3 times higher than in nondiabetic subjects; it raises with age, and is strongly influenced by female gender and autoimmune diabetes. Clinical relevance of thyroid diseases, especially in diabetic patients, significantly increases if it is associated with deteriorated function, which always cause a number problems with metabolic compensation of diabetes. Most serious consequences are increased frequency of hypoglycaemia in hypothyroidism and development of potentially life-threatening ketoacidosis in thyrotoxicosis. In spite of that, little attention is paid to the diagnosis of thyroid diseases in diabetics, as they are diagnosed in only about half of the patients. At the end, we provide recommendations for the thyroid disease screening and diagnosis in patients with diabetes mellitus based on our experience.

  13. Update on thyroid eye disease and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erick D Bothun

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Erick D Bothun,1,2 Ryan A Scheurer,1 Andrew R Harrison,1,3 Michael S Lee1,4,51Departments of Ophthalmology, 2Pediatrics, 3Otolaryngology, 4Neurosurgery, and 5Neurology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USAAbstract: Thyroid eye disease is a heterogeneous autoimmune orbital reaction typically manifesting in middle age. The inflammation may parallel or remain isolated from a related inflammatory cascade in the thyroid called Graves’ disease. The orbital manifestations can lead to severe proptosis, dry eyes, strabismus, and optic neuropathy. In this article, we will discuss this unique condition including the ophthalmic findings and management. Keywords: Graves’ disease, thyroid eye disease, proptosis, orbital decompression, enlarged extraocular muscles

  14. Interactions between thyroid disorders and kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopal Basu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There are several interactions between thyroid and kidney functions in each other organ′s disease states. Thyroid hormones affect renal development and physiology. Thyroid hormones have pre-renal and intrinsic renal effects by which they increase the renal blood flow and the glomerular filtration rate (GFR. Hypothyroidism is associated with reduced GFR and hyperthyroidism results in increased GFR as well as increased renin - angiotensin - aldosterone activation. Chronic kidney disease (CKD is characterized by a low T3 syndrome which is now considered a part of an atypical nonthyroidal illness. CKD patients also have increased incidence of primary hypothyroidism and subclinical hypothyroidism. The physiological benefits of a hypothyroid state in CKD, and the risk of CKD progression with hyperthyroidism emphasize on a conservative approach in the treatment of thyroid hormone abnormalities in CKD. Thyroid dysfunction is also associated with glomerulonephritis often by a common autoimmune etiology. Several drugs could affect both thyroid and kidney functions. There are few described interactions between thyroid and renal malignancies. A detailed knowledge of all these interactions is important for both the nephrologists and endocrinologists for optimal management of the patient.

  15. AUTOIMMUNE EPIDERMAL BLISTERING DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Abreu Velez

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune bullous skin diseases (ABDs are uncommon, potentially fatal diseases of skin and mucous membranes which are associated with deposits of autoantibodies and complement against distinct molecules of the epidermis and dermal/epidermal basement membrane zone (BMZ. These autoantibodies lead to a loss in skin molecular integrity, which manifests clinically as formation of blisters or erosions. In pemphigus vulgaris, loss of adhesion occurs within the epidermis. The pioneering work of Ernst H. Beutner, Ph.D. and Robert E. Jordon, M.D. confirmed the autoimmune nature of these diseases. Walter F. Lever, M.D. contributed significantly to our understanding of the histopathologic features of these diseases. Walter Lever, M.D. and Ken Hashimoto, M.D. contributed electron microscopic studies of these diseases, especially in pemphigus vulgaris and bullous pemphigoid. In bullous pemphigoid (BP, linear IgA bullous dermatosis, epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA and dermatitis herpetiformis (DH, loss of adhesion takes place within or underneath the BMZ. Classic EBA demonstrates extensive skin fragility; DH is commonly associated with gluten-sensitive enteropathy, and manifests clinically with pruritic papulovesicles on the extensor surfaces of the extremities and the lumbosacral area. The clinical spectrum of bullous pemphigoid includes tense blisters, urticarial plaques, and prurigo-like eczematous lesions. Pemphigoid gestationis mostly occurs during the last trimester of pregnancy, and mucous membrane pemphigoid primarily involves the oral mucosa and conjunctivae and leads to scarring. Linear IgA bullous dermatosis manifests with tense blisters in a „cluster of jewels”-like pattern in childhood (chronic bullous disease of childhood and is more clinically heterogeneous in adulthood. Many of the autoantigens in these disorders are known and have been well characterized. ABDs may be influenced by both genetic and exogenous factors. The diagnoses of

  16. Epigenetic alterations underlying autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslani, Saeed; Mahmoudi, Mahdi; Karami, Jafar; Jamshidi, Ahmad Reza; Malekshahi, Zahra; Nicknam, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Recent breakthroughs in genetic explorations have extended our understanding through discovery of genetic patterns subjected to autoimmune diseases (AID). Genetics, on the contrary, has not answered all the conundrums to describe a comprehensive explanation of causal mechanisms of disease etiopathology with regard to the function of environment, sex, or aging. The other side of the coin, epigenetics which is defined by gene manifestation modification without DNA sequence alteration, reportedly has come in to provide new insights towards disease apprehension through bridging the genetics and environmental factors. New investigations in genetic and environmental contributing factors for autoimmunity provide new explanation whereby the interactions between genetic elements and epigenetic modifications signed by environmental agents may be responsible for autoimmune disease initiation and perpetuation. It is aimed through this article to review recent progress attempting to reveal how epigenetics associates with the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases.

  17. Gene therapy of experimental autoimmune thyroiditis mice by in vivo administration of plasmid DNA coding for human interleukin-10

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGZhen-Lin; LINBo; YULu-Yang; SHENShui-Xian; ZHULi-Hua; WANGWui-Ping; GUOLi-He

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of interleukin-10 (IL-10) gene on experimental autoimmune thyroiditis mice.METHODS: Mice were immunized to induce autoimmune thyroiditis with porcine thyroglobulin (pTg), and thyroids of mice were injected with IL-10 DNA. On d 28 after immunization with pTg, mRNA expression of IL-10 inthyroid glands was detected and thyroid specimens were histopathological studied. RESULTS: The mRNA expression of IL-10 was detected in thyroid glands on d 7 and 14 after injection of IL-10 plasmid DNA or on COS-7 cells48 h after IL-10 plasmid DNA transfection. In addition, hlL-10 levels in culture media significantly increased 48 hand 72 h after IL-10 plasmid DNA transfection. Infiltration index of lymphocytes (1.1±0.4) in thyroids ofIL-10-treated mice was significantly lower than that of pcDNA3-null-treated mice (2.2±0.5) (P<0.01). Comparedwith pcDNA3-null control mice, IL-10-treated mice had lower levels of serum IFN-γ(P<0.01). CONCLUSION:The direct injection of DNA expression vectors encoding IL-10 into thyroid significantly inhibited development oflymphocytic infiltration of thyroid of autoimmune th,yroiditis mice, and alleviated the progression of this disease.

  18. Hashimoto's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is Hashimoto’s disease? Hashimoto’s disease, also called chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis or autoimmune thyroiditis, is an autoimmune disease. An ... Points to Remember • Hashimoto’s disease, also called chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis or autoimmune thyroiditis, is an autoimmune disease. • Hashimoto’s ...

  19. Introducing Polyautoimmunity: Secondary Autoimmune Diseases No Longer Exist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Rojas-Villarraga

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Similar pathophysiological mechanisms within autoimmune diseases have stimulated searches for common genetic roots. Polyautoimmunity is defined as the presence of more than one autoimmune disease in a single patient. When three or more autoimmune diseases coexist, this condition is called multiple autoimmune syndrome (MAS. We analyzed the presence of polyautoimmunity in 1,083 patients belonging to four autoimmune disease cohorts. Polyautoimmunity was observed in 373 patients (34.4%. Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD and Sjögren's syndrome (SS were the most frequent diseases encountered. Factors significantly associated with polyautoimmunity were female gender and familial autoimmunity. Through a systematic literature review, an updated search was done for all MAS cases (January 2006–September 2011. There were 142 articles retrieved corresponding to 226 cases. Next, we performed a clustering analysis in which AITD followed by systemic lupus erythematosus and SS were the most hierarchical diseases encountered. Our results indicate that coexistence of autoimmune diseases is not uncommon and follows a grouping pattern. Polyautoimmunity is the term proposed for this association of disorders, which encompasses the concept of a common origin for these diseases.

  20. Autoimmune disease and multiple autoantibodies in 42 patients with RASopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaio, Caio R D C; Carvalho, Jozélio F; da Silva, Clovis A; Bueno, Cleonice; Brasil, Amanda S; Pereira, Alexandre C; Jorge, Alexander A L; Malaquias, Alexsandra C; Kim, Chong A; Bertola, Débora R

    2012-05-01

    The association of RASopathies [Noonan syndrome (NS) and Noonan-related syndromes] and autoimmune disorders has been reported sporadically. However, a concomitant evaluation of autoimmune diseases and an assessment of multiple autoantibodies in a large population of patients with molecularly confirmed RASopathy have not been performed. The clinical and laboratory features were analyzed in 42 RASopathy patients, the majority of whom had NS and five individuals had Noonan-related disorders. The following autoantibodies were measured: Anti-nuclear antibodies, anti-double stranded DNA, anti-SS-A/Ro, anti-SS-B/La, anti-Sm, anti-RNP, anti-Scl-70, anti-Jo-1, anti-ribosomal P, IgG and IgM anticardiolipin (aCL), thyroid, anti-smooth muscle, anti-endomysial (AE), anti-liver cytosolic protein type 1 (LC1), anti-parietal cell (APC), anti-mitochondrial (AM) antibodies, anti-liver-kidney microsome type 1 antibodies (LKM-1), and lupus anticoagulant. Six patients (14%) fulfilled the clinical criteria for autoimmune diseases [systemic lupus erythematous, polyendocrinopathy (autoimmune thyroiditis and celiac disease), primary antiphospholipid syndrome (PAPS), autoimmune hepatitis, vitiligo, and autoimmune thyroiditis]. Autoimmune antibodies were observed in 52% of the patients. Remarkably, three (7%) of the patients had specific gastrointestinal and liver autoantibodies without clinical findings. Autoimmune diseases and autoantibodies were frequently present in patients with RASopathies. Until a final conclusion of the real incidence of autoimmunity in Rasopathy is drawn, the physicians should be alerted to the possibility of this association and the need for a fast diagnosis, proper referral to a specialist and ultimately, adequate treatment.

  1. A case of Kearns-Sayre sindrome with autoimmune thyroiditis and complete atrio-ventricular block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berio, A; Piazzi, A

    2006-06-01

    The Kearns-Sayre syndrome, (characterized by its onset before the age of 20 years, chronic ophthalmoplegia, pigmentary retinal degeneration and at least one of the following symptoms: ataxia, heart block and high protein content in the cerebrospinal fluid) is a severe variant of chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia with frequent rearrangements of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). The aim of this paper is to report a sporadic paediatric case of Kearns-Sayre syndrome with mtDNA heteroplasmic deletion, absence of cytochrome c-oxidase in many muscle fibers, autoimmune thyroiditis, complete atrio-ventricular heart block in which the diagnosis of subclinical hypothyroiditis associated with autoimmune thyroid disease was made. The subclinical hypothyroidism, more severe in the presence of thyroid antibodies, may have contributed to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. We hypothesized that in this patient, predisposed by mitochondrial deletion, anti-thyroid antibodies may have interfered with the mitochondrial function of conduction heart system, causing atrio-ventricular heart block. It seems important to study anti-thyroid antibodies in every case of Kearn-Sayre syndrome, specially if cardiac rhythm disturbances are present.

  2. Therapeutic apheresis in autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambauer R

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Rolf Bambauer,1 Reinhard Latza,2 Carolin Bambauer,3 Daniel Burgard,4 Ralf Schiel5 1Institute for Blood Purification, Homburg, 2Laboratorium of Medicine, St Ingbert, 3Main Hospital Darmstadt, Darmstadt, 4Herz Zentrum, Cardiology, Völklingen, 5Inselklinik Heringsdorf GmbH, Seeheilbad Heringsdorf, Germany Abstract: Systemic autoimmune diseases based on an immune pathogenesis produce autoantibodies and circulating immune complexes, which cause inflammation in the tissues of various organs. In most cases, these diseases have a bad prognosis without treatment. Therapeutic apheresis in combination with immunosuppressive therapies has led to a steady increase in survival rates over the last 35 years. Here we provide an overview of the most important pathogenic aspects indicating that therapeutic apheresis can be a supportive therapy in some systemic autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, antiphospholipid syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, and inflammatory eye disease. With the introduction of novel and effective biologic agents, therapeutic apheresis is indicated only in severe cases, such as in rapid progression despite immunosuppressive therapy and/or biologic agents, and in patients with renal involvement, acute generalized vasculitis, thrombocytopenia, leucopenia, pulmonary, cardiac, or cerebral involvement. In mild forms of autoimmune disease, treatment with immunosuppressive therapies and/or biologic agents seems to be sufficient. The prognosis of autoimmune diseases with varying organ manifestations has improved considerably in recent years, due in part to very aggressive therapy schemes. Keywords: therapeutic apheresis, autoimmune diseases, systemic lupus erythematosus, antiphospholipid syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory eye disease

  3. Low birth weight is not associated with thyroid autoimmunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, Thomas Heiberg; Hansen, Pia Skov; Rudbeck, Annette Beck;

    2006-01-01

    .002 (-0.010 to 0.014); P = 0.77]. When restricting the analysis to twin pairs with a within-pair difference in birth weight of 500 g or greater or to twin pairs born 4 wk or more before term, the regression coefficients were almost unchanged. Controlling for potential confounders (sex, zygosity......CONTEXT: Low birth weight has been proposed as a risk factor for the development of antibodies toward thyroid peroxidase (TPOAb) and thyroglobulin (TgAb) in adult life. However, the association could also be due to genetic or environmental factors affecting both birth weight and the development...... of thyroid autoantibodies. The effect of these confounders can be minimized through investigation of twin pairs. OBJECTIVE AND DESIGN: To examine the impact of low birth weight on the development of thyroid autoimmunity, we studied whether within-twin-cohort and within-twin-pair differences in birth weight...

  4. Selenium and Thyroid Disease: From Pathophysiology to Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Ventura

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Selenium is a micronutrient embedded in several proteins. In adults, the thyroid is the organ with the highest amount of selenium per gram of tissue. Selenium levels in the body depend on the characteristics of the population and its diet, geographic area, and soil composition. In the thyroid, selenium is required for the antioxidant function and for the metabolism of thyroid hormones. Methods. We performed a review of the literature on selenium’s role in thyroid function using PubMed/MEDLINE. Results. Regarding thyroid pathology, selenium intake has been particularly associated with autoimmune disorders. The literature suggests that selenium supplementation of patients with autoimmune thyroiditis is associated with a reduction in antithyroperoxidase antibody levels, improved thyroid ultrasound features, and improved quality of life. Selenium supplementation in Graves’ orbitopathy is associated with an improvement of quality of life and eye involvement, as well as delayed progression of ocular disorders. The organic form of selenium seems to be the preferable formulation for supplementation or treatment. Conclusion. Maintaining a physiological concentration of selenium is a prerequisite to prevent thyroid disease and preserve overall health. Supplementation with the organic form is more effective, and patients with autoimmune thyroiditis seem to have benefits in immunological mechanisms. Selenium supplementation proved to be clinically beneficial in patients with mild to moderate Graves’ orbitopathy.

  5. Selenium and Thyroid Disease: From Pathophysiology to Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Mara; Carrilho, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Selenium is a micronutrient embedded in several proteins. In adults, the thyroid is the organ with the highest amount of selenium per gram of tissue. Selenium levels in the body depend on the characteristics of the population and its diet, geographic area, and soil composition. In the thyroid, selenium is required for the antioxidant function and for the metabolism of thyroid hormones. Methods. We performed a review of the literature on selenium's role in thyroid function using PubMed/MEDLINE. Results. Regarding thyroid pathology, selenium intake has been particularly associated with autoimmune disorders. The literature suggests that selenium supplementation of patients with autoimmune thyroiditis is associated with a reduction in antithyroperoxidase antibody levels, improved thyroid ultrasound features, and improved quality of life. Selenium supplementation in Graves' orbitopathy is associated with an improvement of quality of life and eye involvement, as well as delayed progression of ocular disorders. The organic form of selenium seems to be the preferable formulation for supplementation or treatment. Conclusion. Maintaining a physiological concentration of selenium is a prerequisite to prevent thyroid disease and preserve overall health. Supplementation with the organic form is more effective, and patients with autoimmune thyroiditis seem to have benefits in immunological mechanisms. Selenium supplementation proved to be clinically beneficial in patients with mild to moderate Graves' orbitopathy. PMID:28255299

  6. Common mechanisms of autoimmune diseases (the autoimmune tautology).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaya, Juan-Manuel

    2012-09-01

    The fact that autoimmune diseases share subphenotypes, physiopathological mechanisms and genetic factors has been called autoimmune tautology, and indicates that they have a common origin. The autoimmune phenotypes vary depending on the target cell and the affected organ, gender, ancestry, trigger factors and age at onset. Ten shared characteristics supporting this logical theory are herein reviewed.

  7. The Thyro-Gastric syndrome: from thyroid autoimmunity to neuroendocrine gastric tumors

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    THE THYRO-GASTRIC SYNDROME: FROM THYROID AUTOIMMUNITY TO NEUROENDOCRINE GASTRIC TUMORS. In 1849, Prof Addison described a fatal case of anemia, or anemia perniciosa. Dr Biermer expanded this original description in 1872. Nowadays, this pathological condition associating a megaloglastic anemia associated with a metabolic polyneuropathy is recognized as Biermer disease. Biermer anemia or anemia perniciosa and its associated polyneuropathy are the consequence of vitamine B12 malabsorpti...

  8. Significance of (sub) clinical thyroid dysfunction and thyroid autoimmunity before conception and in early pregnancy : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Boogaard, Emmy; Vissenberg, Rosa; Land, Jolande A.; van Wely, Madelon; van der Post, Joris A. M.; Goddijn, Mariette; Bisschop, Peter H.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Thyroid dysfunction and thyroid autoimmunity are prevalent among women of reproductive age and are associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. Preconception or early pregnancy screening for thyroid dysfunction has been proposed but is not widely accepted. We conducted a systematic review

  9. Autoimmune paediatric liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giorgina Mieli-Vergani; Diego Vergani

    2008-01-01

    Liver disorders with a likely autoimmune pathogenesis in childhood include autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis (ASC),and de novo AIH after liver transplantation.AIH is divided into two subtypes according to seropositivity for smooth muscle and/or antinuclear antibody (SMA/ANA,type 1) or liver kidney microsomal antibody (LKM1,type 2).There is a female predominance in both.LKM1 positive patients tend to present more acutely,at a younger age,and commonly have partial IgA deficiency,while duration of symptoms before diagnosis,clinical signs,family history of autoimmunity, presence of associated autoimmune disorders,response to treatment,and long-term prognosis are similar in both groups. The most common type of paediatric sclerosing cholangitis is ASC.The clinical,biochemical, immunological,and histological presentation of ASC is often indistinguishable from that of AIH type 1.In both,there are high IgG,non-organ specific autoantibodies,and interface hepatitis.Diagnosis is made by cholangiography.Children with ASC respond to immunosuppression satisfactorily and similarly to AIH in respect to remission and relapse rates,times to normalization of biochemical parameters, and decreased inflammatory activity on follow up liver biopsies. However,the cholangiopathy can progress.There may be evolution from AIH to ASC over the years,despite treatment.De novo AIH after liver transplantation affects patients not transplanted for autoimmune disorders and is strikingly reminiscent of classical AIH,including elevated titres of serum antibodies, hypergammaglobulinaemia,and histological findings of interface hepatitis,bridging fibrosis,and collapse.Like classical AIH,it responds to treatment with prednisolone and azathioprine.De novo AIH post liver transplantation may derive from interference by calcineurin inhibitors with the intrathymic physiological mechanisms of T-cell maturation and selection.Whether this condition is a distinct entity or a form of

  10. Th17细胞与自身免疫性甲状腺疾病研究进展%Research Progress in the Role of Th17 in Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周玉荣(综述); 赵超; 王加林(审校)

    2015-01-01

    辅助性T细胞17(Th17)是一种新型辅助 T细胞亚群,主要表达白细胞介素17等效应因子,已证实其在自身免疫性疾病中发挥重要的调节作用。随着研究的深入,人们发现 Th17细胞及其细胞因子亦参与了包括弥漫性毒性甲状腺肿、慢性淋巴细胞性甲状腺炎和甲状腺相关眼病在内的自身免疫性甲状腺疾病( AITD)的发病过程。该文就Th17细胞及其细胞因子在AITD发病中的作用研究进展予以综述。%The T helper cells 17(Th17) are a novel helper T cell subset,with interleukin 17(IL-17) as main expression ,have been proved to play an important regulatory role in the development of autoimmune dis-eases.Th17 cells may also contribute to the pathogenesis of autoimmune thyroid disorders(AITD) including diffuse toxic goiter disease,chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis,and thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy.Here is to make a review of the current knowledge regarding IL-17 and Th17 cells roles in the pathogenesis of AITD.

  11. Imaging combined autoimmune and infectious disease microarrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewart, Tom; Raha, Sandeep; Kus, Dorothy; Tarnopolsky, Mark

    2006-09-01

    Bacterial and viral pathogens are implicated in many severe autoimmune diseases, acting through such mechanisms as molecular mimicry, and superantigen activation of T-cells. For example, Helicobacter pylori, well known cause of stomach ulcers and cancers, is also identified in ischaemic heart disease (mimicry of heat shock protein 65), autoimmune pancreatitis, systemic sclerosis, autoimmune thyroiditis (HLA DRB1*0301 allele susceptibility), and Crohn's disease. Successful antibiotic eradication of H.pylori often accompanies their remission. Yet current diagnostic devices, and test-limiting cost containment, impede recognition of the linkage, delaying both diagnosis and therapeutic intervention until the chronic debilitating stage. We designed a 15 minute low cost 39 antigen microarray assay, combining autoimmune, viral and bacterial antigens1. This enables point-of-care serodiagnosis and cost-effective narrowly targeted concurrent antibiotic and monoclonal anti-T-cell and anti-cytokine immunotherapy. Arrays of 26 pathogen and 13 autoimmune antigens with IgG and IgM dilution series were printed in triplicate on epoxysilane covalent binding slides with Teflon well masks. Sera diluted 1:20 were incubated 10 minutes, washed off, anti-IgG-Cy3 (green) and anti-IgM-Dy647 (red) were incubated for 5 minutes, washed off and the slide was read in an ArrayWoRx(e) scanning CCD imager (Applied Precision, Issaquah, WA). As a preliminary model for the combined infectious disease-autoimmune diagnostic microarray we surveyed 98 unidentified, outdated sera that were discarded after Hepatitis B antibody testing. In these, significant IgG or IgM autoantibody levels were found: dsDNA 5, ssDNA 11, Ro 2, RNP 7, SSB 4, gliadin 2, thyroglobulin 13 cases. Since control sera showed no autoantibodies, the high frequency of anti-DNA and anti-thyroglobulin antibodies found in infected sera lend increased support for linkage of infection to subsequent autoimmune disease. Expansion of the antigen

  12. Oral Tolerance: Therapeutic Implications for Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M. C. Faria

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral tolerance is classically defined as the suppression of immune responses to antigens (Ag that have been administered previously by the oral route. Multiple mechanisms of tolerance are induced by oral Ag. Low doses favor active suppression, whereas higher doses favor clonal anergy/deletion. Oral Ag induces Th2 (IL-4/IL-10 and Th3 (TGF-β regulatory T cells (Tregs plus CD4+CD25+ regulatory cells and LAP+T cells. Induction of oral tolerance is enhanced by IL-4, IL-10, anti-IL-12, TGF-β, cholera toxin B subunit (CTB, Flt-3 ligand, anti-CD40 ligand and continuous feeding of Ag. In addition to oral tolerance, nasal tolerance has also been shown to be effective in suppressing inflammatory conditions with the advantage of a lower dose requirement. Oral and nasal tolerance suppress several animal models of autoimmune diseases including experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE, uveitis, thyroiditis, myasthenia, arthritis and diabetes in the nonobese diabetic (NOD mouse, plus non-autoimmune diseases such as asthma, atherosclerosis, colitis and stroke. Oral tolerance has been tested in human autoimmune diseases including MS, arthritis, uveitis and diabetes and in allergy, contact sensitivity to DNCB, nickel allergy. Positive results have been observed in phase II trials and new trials for arthritis, MS and diabetes are underway. Mucosal tolerance is an attractive approach for treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases because of lack of toxicity, ease of administration over time and Ag-specific mechanism of action. The successful application of oral tolerance for the treatment of human diseases will depend on dose, developing immune markers to assess immunologic effects, route (nasal versus oral, formulation, mucosal adjuvants, combination therapy and early therapy.

  13. CMV-hFasL transgenic mice prevent from experimental autoimmune thyroiditis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhen-lin; LIN Bo; YU Lu-yang; GUO Li-he

    2005-01-01

    Background Previous studies showed that the role of Fas ligand (FasL) is not consistent in the pathogenesis of autoimmune thyroiditis. This study was designed to investigate the effects of FasL on the pathogenesis of experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT) using CMV-human FasL (hFasL) transgenic mice. Methods Transgenic mice ubiquitously expressing hFasL were used as an animal model of EAT by injection of porcine thyroglobulin (pTg). Expression of hFasL was detected by RT-PCR and Western blot. The activity of hFasL transgenic thyrocytes killing Jurket cells was determined. CMV-hFasL transgenic mice and wild type (WT) mice were immunized with pTg and killed 28 days later to evaluate the lymphocytic infiltration of their thyroids. The number of CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes from the spleen was detected using FACS. The serum interferon-γ (IFN-γ) concentration was measured by ELISA. Results hFasL expression in the thyroid of CMV-hFasL transgenic mice was confirmed. After co-incubation of Jurket thymocytes with thyroid tissues of CMV-hFasL transgenic mice, the percentage of apoptotic cells in the CMV-hFasL transgenic thyroid group was significantly higher than that of the control WT thyroid group [(23.4±4.3)% vs (6.6±2.5)%, P<0.01]. On day 28 after immunization with pTg, the infiltration index of lymphocytes in thyroids of the CMV-hFasL transgenic mice was significantly lower than that of the WT mice [(1.0±0.5) vs (2.1±0.7), P<0.001]. Moreover, the number of CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes of the spleen and serum IFN-γ concentration were significantly decreased in the CMV-hFasL transgenic mice. Conclusions FasL plays an important role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune thyroiditis. Transgenic mice ubiquitously expressing hFasL may strongly inhibit lymphocytic infiltration of the thyroid of EAT and ameliorate the course of this disease.

  14. Familial clustering of juvenile thyroid autoimmunity: higher risk is conferred by human leukocyte antigen DR3-DQ2 and thyroid peroxidase antibody status in fathers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segni, Maria; Pani, Michael A; Pasquino, Anna Maria; Badenhoop, Klaus

    2002-08-01

    Thyroid autoimmunity is one of the most common immune disorders in females, and its polygenic background remains to be elucidated. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) DQ region of chromosome 6 has been shown to confer susceptibility to thyroid autoimmune disease. The aim of our present investigation was to determine whether the transmission of high risk HLA DQ to patients with thyroid autoimmunity differs when transmission is from fathers as opposed to when transmission is from mothers. We studied 91 juvenile patients with chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis (68 females and 23 males; mean age, 10.5 +/- 3.9 yr), 12 patients with Graves' disease (all females; mean age, 8.8 +/- 4.0 yr), 53 healthy siblings, and their parents for thyroid function, antibodies, ultrasound, and DNA typing for HLA DQ susceptibility alleles. We observed an increased rate of transmission for the DQA1*0501-DQB1*0201 (DQ2) haplotype [35 of 53 transmitted (66%); P = 0.02]. This allele was preferentially transmitted by fathers [21 of 27 (78%); P < 0.004], whereas the maternal DQ2 haplotypes were not transmitted more often than expected. Subsequently, families were stratified as follows according to the parental thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPOAb) status: no parent, only mothers, only fathers, and both parents positive. There was no significant maternal transmission disequilibrium in any subset, but the paternal HLA DQ2 was preferentially transmitted [11 of 14 cases (79%); P = 0.03] in the group of TPOAb-positive mothers, and we observed a similar trend in the group of TPOAb- positive fathers (P = 0.08). Also, the portion of offspring affected by Graves' disease was significantly higher in TPOAb-positive than in TPOAb-negative fathers (P < 0.02). In conclusion, our findings demonstrate a significant effect of paternal HLA DQ alleles as well as antibody status on susceptibility to thyroid autoimmune disease in juvenile patients.

  15. Thyroid diseases and Ramadan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed A Raza

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the month of Ramadan, patients with thyroid diseases, most of the time, do not need treatment adjustments and can fast safely without any health hazards. Patients with hypothyroidism taking thyroxine can take their tablets on an empty stomach at bedtime instead of half an hour before Sehr. Patients with hyperthyroidism, on methimazole/carbimazole can continue their dose in once or twice daily regimes, while those on propylthiouracil need to be switched. Hyperthyroid patients with severe symptoms should start treatment immediately and can avoid fast for few days after a consultation with their religious scholar.

  16. Identification of Novel Genetic Loci Associated with Thyroid Peroxidase Antibodies and Clinical Thyroid Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medici, Marco; Porcu, Eleonora; Pistis, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    , goiter and thyroid cancer were studied. Individuals with a high genetic risk score had, besides an increased risk of TPOAb-positivity (OR: 2.18, 95% CI 1.68-2.81, P = 8.1×10(-8)), a higher risk of increased thyroid-stimulating hormone levels (OR: 1.51, 95% CI 1.26-1.82, P = 2.9×10(-6)), as well......Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) are common, affecting 2-5% of the general population. Individuals with positive thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAbs) have an increased risk of autoimmune hypothyroidism (Hashimoto's thyroiditis), as well as autoimmune hyperthyroidism (Graves' disease.......12-1.39, P = 6.2×10(-5)). The MAGI3 variant was also associated with an increased risk of hypothyroidism (OR: 1.57, 95% CI 1.18-2.10, P = 1.9×10(-3)). This first GWAS meta-analysis for TPOAbs identified five newly associated loci, three of which were also associated with clinical thyroid disease...

  17. CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 ameliorates thyroid damage in autoimmune thyroiditis in NOD.H‑2h⁴ mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Mao, Jinyuan; Han, Cheng; Peng, Shiqiao; Li, Chenyan; Jin, Ting; Fan, Chenling; Shan, Zhongyan; Teng, Weiping

    2016-04-01

    CXC chemokine ligand 12 (CXCL12) and its receptor, CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4), are upregulated in mice with autoimmune thyroid diseases. However, whether this interaction is involved in the pathophysiology of autoimmune thyroiditis (AIT) remains to be elucidated. In the present study, the effects of the CXCR4 antagonist, AMD3100, in an iodine‑induced autoimmune thyroiditis model were investigated. NOD.H‑2h4 mice were randomly separated into a control, AIT and AIT+AMD3100 groups. The mice were fed with 0.05% sodium iodide water for 8 weeks to induce AIT. The AMD3100‑treated mice were administered with the CXCR4 antagonist at a dose of 10 mg/kg intraperitoneally three times a week during the experimental period. The percentages of CD19+interleukin (IL)10+ B cells and CD4+IL10+ T cells, and the mRNA expression levels of IL10 in the splenocytes were reduced in the AIT group, compared with the control group, however, they increased following AMD3100 treatment, compared with the untreated AIT group. The percentages of CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, CD19+ B cells and CD8+ interferon (IFN)γ+ T cells, and the mRNA expression levels of IFNγ increased in the AIT group, compared with the control group, however, these were reduced in the AMD3100 group, compared with the AIT group. The AMD3100‑treated mice also had lower serum thyroglobulin antibody titers and reduced lymphocytic infiltration in the thyroid, compared with the untreated AIT mice. These results suggested that inhibition of this chemokine axis may offer potential as a therapeutic target for the treatment of AIT.

  18. Association between autoimmune pancreatitis and systemic autoimmune diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Viktória Terzin; Imre F(o)ldesi; László Kovács; Gyula Pokorny; Tibor Wittmann; László Czakó

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the association between autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) and systemic autoimmune diseases (SAIDs) by measurement of serum immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4).METHODS:The serum level of IgG4 was measured in 61 patients with SAIDs of different types who had not yet participated in glucocorticosteroid treatment.Patients with an elevated IgG4 level were examined by abdominal ultrasonography (US) and,in some cases,by computer tomography (CT).RESULTS:Elevated serum IgG4 levels (919 ± 996 mg/L) were detected in 17 (28%) of the 61 SAID patients.10 patients had Sj(o)gren's syndrome (SS) (IgG4:590 ±232 mg/L),2 of them in association with Hashimoto's thyroiditis,and 7 patients (IgG4:1388 ± 985.5 mg/L)had systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).The IgG4 level in the SLE patients and that in patients with SS were not significantly different from that in AIP patients (783 ± 522 mg/L).Abdominal US and CT did not reveal any characteristic features of AIP among the SAID patients with an elevated IgG4 level.CONCLUSION:The serum IgG4 level may be elevated in SAIDs without the presence of AIP.The determination of serum IgG4 does not seem to be suitable for the differentiation between IgG4-related diseases and SAIDs.

  19. Autoimmune disease classification by inverse association with SNP alleles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Sirota

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available With multiple genome-wide association studies (GWAS performed across autoimmune diseases, there is a great opportunity to study the homogeneity of genetic architectures across autoimmune disease. Previous approaches have been limited in the scope of their analysis and have failed to properly incorporate the direction of allele-specific disease associations for SNPs. In this work, we refine the notion of a genetic variation profile for a given disease to capture strength of association with multiple SNPs in an allele-specific fashion. We apply this method to compare genetic variation profiles of six autoimmune diseases: multiple sclerosis (MS, ankylosing spondylitis (AS, autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD, rheumatoid arthritis (RA, Crohn's disease (CD, and type 1 diabetes (T1D, as well as five non-autoimmune diseases. We quantify pair-wise relationships between these diseases and find two broad clusters of autoimmune disease where SNPs that make an individual susceptible to one class of autoimmune disease also protect from diseases in the other autoimmune class. We find that RA and AS form one such class, and MS and ATD another. We identify specific SNPs and genes with opposite risk profiles for these two classes. We furthermore explore individual SNPs that play an important role in defining similarities and differences between disease pairs. We present a novel, systematic, cross-platform approach to identify allele-specific relationships between disease pairs based on genetic variation as well as the individual SNPs which drive the relationships. While recognizing similarities between diseases might lead to identifying novel treatment options, detecting differences between diseases previously thought to be similar may point to key novel disease-specific genes and pathways.

  20. Therapeutic apheresis in autoimmune diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bambauer, Rolf; Latza, Reinhard; Bambauer, Carolin; Burgard, Daniel; Schiel, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases based on an immune pathogenesis produce autoantibodies and circulating immune complexes, which cause inflammation in the tissues of various organs. In most cases, these diseases have a bad prognosis without treatment. Therapeutic apheresis in combination with immunosuppressive therapies has led to a steady increase in survival rates over the last 35 years. Here we provide an overview of the most important pathogenic aspects indicating that therapeutic apheresis can be a supportive therapy in some systemic autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, antiphospholipid syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, and inflammatory eye disease. With the introduction of novel and effective biologic agents, therapeutic apheresis is indicated only in severe cases, such as in rapid progression despite immunosuppressive therapy and/or biologic agents, and in patients with renal involvement, acute generalized vasculitis, thrombocytopenia, leucopenia, pulmonary, cardiac, or cerebral involvement. In mild forms of autoimmune disease, treatment with immunosuppressive therapies and/or biologic agents seems to be sufficient. The prognosis of autoimmune diseases with varying organ manifestations has improved considerably in recent years, due in part to very aggressive therapy schemes.

  1. Evaluation of epitopes specificity of antibodies to thyroid peroxidase in autoimmune thyroid disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A V Subkov

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The problem of the human antithyroid peroxidase autoantibodies epitopes heterogeneity diagnosed in case of Graves' disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis has been researched using monoclonal antibodies to thyroid peroxidase. It was shown, that in the competition for the binding sites of thyroid peroxidase and autoantibodies taken from patients with Graves' disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis sera participate 8 mAb to epitopes 1, 70, 82, 88, 2, 3, 77 and 79. The maxima of the binding inhibition has been marked for the conformation epitope mAb 3: in case of Graves' disease it amounts to 60.3 ± 12.7%, in case of Hashimoto's thyroiditis – 61.8 ± 32.2%. Moreover the level of the binding inhibition did not depend on the concentration of Ab to thyroid peroxidase in the sera of patient with Graves' as opposed to the serum of patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Autoantibodies in the serum of the patientswith Hashimoto's thyroiditis inhibited the binding of mAb to epitope 77 much more effectively, than in the serum of the patients with: 36.3 ± 17.2 and 54.3 ± 9.6% (p ≤ 0.05.The obtained results represented the specific reaction of the autoantibodies to the certain thyroid peroxidase molecular patterns which corresponds to the literature data. It is possible to assume that the further research of the competitive interactions with other autoantibodies to monoclonal antibodies, not included in this trial, and widening of the different thyroid diseased patients' serum palette can expose new immunodominant thyroid peroxidase molecular patterns, forming antibodies for different diseases, and enable the development of diagnostics and control of the thyroid functions and applied therapy.

  2. Thyroid uptake of {sup 67}Ga-citrate is associated with thyroid autoimmunity and hypothyroidism in patients with sarcoidosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonelli, Alessandro; Fallahi, Poupak; Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Ferrannini, Ele [University of Pisa and CNR Institute of Clinical Physiology, Metabolism Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, Pisa (Italy); Fazzi, Piera [University of Pisa, Respiratory Pathophysiology Section, Cardiac and Thoracic Department, Pisa (Italy); Grosso, Mariano; Boni, Giuseppe; Mariani, Giuliano [University of Pisa, Regional Center of Nuclear Medicine, Medical School, Pisa (Italy)

    2009-01-15

    To evaluate the association of gallium-67 ({sup 67}Ga)-citrate thyroid uptake with the presence of thyroid disorders in patients with sarcoidosis (S patients). Eighty-four S patients were evaluated by a complete thyroid work-up (neck ultrasound, circulating thyroid hormones and anti-thyroid antibodies, fine-needle aspiration). In S patients with {sup 67}Ga thyroid uptake (respect those without): serum thyroid-stimulating hormone, the titre of anti-thyroid peroxidase (AbTPO) and/or anti-thyroglobulin antibodies (AbTg), and the prevalence of S patients with hypothyroidism or with positive AbTg or AbTPO was significantly higher; a thyroid hypoechoic pattern was more frequent. The prevalence of thyroid nodules was not significantly different between the two groups. Two cases of papillary thyroid cancer were observed in S patients without {sup 67}Ga thyroid uptake, whilst no case in those with {sup 67}Ga thyroid uptake. {sup 67}Ga thyroid uptake is associated with the presence of aggressive autoimmune thyroiditis and hypothyroidism in S patients; thyroid function and ultrasonography should be performed in the presence of {sup 67}Ga thyroid uptake. (orig.)

  3. Signs of a higher prevalence of autoimmune thyroiditis in female offspring of bipolar parents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hillegers, Manon H. J.; Reichart, Catrien G.; Wals, Marjolein; Verhulst, Frank C.; Ormel, Johan; Nolen, Willem A.; Drexhage, Hemmo A.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Studies are inconsistent as to whether patients with bipolar disorder are more frequently affected by autoimmune thyroiditis. Aim: To study the prevalence of autoimmune thyroiditis in offspring of bipolar patients. Method: In 1998 140 children (age 12-21 years) of bipolar parents were ev

  4. Utility of Shear Wave Elastography for Diagnosing Chronic Autoimmune Thyroiditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Fukuhara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to evaluate the utility of shear wave elastography (SWE using acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI for diagnosing chronic autoimmune thyroiditis (CAT and to verify the effect of fibrotic thyroid tissue on shear wave velocity (SWV. The subjects were 229 patients with 253 normal thyroid lobes (controls and 150 CAT lobes. The SWV for CAT (2.47 ± 0.57 m/s was significantly higher than that for controls (1.59 ± 0.41 m/s (P<0.001. The area under the receiver operating characteristics (ROC curve for CAT was 0.899, and the SWV cut-off value was 1.96 m/s. The sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy were 87.4%, 78.7%, and 85.1%, respectively. Levels of anti-thyroperoxidase antibodies and thyroid isthmus thickness were correlated with tissue stiffness in CAT. However, there was no correlation between levels of anti-thyroglobulin antibodies and tissue stiffness. Quantitative SWE is useful for diagnosing CAT, and it is possible that SWE can be used to evaluate the degree of fibrosis in patients with CAT.

  5. Pregnancy and Thyroid Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rise in blood pressure in late pregnancy thyroid storm—a sudden, severe worsening of symptoms miscarriage premature ... rarely Because thyroid hormones are crucial to fetal brain and nervous system development, uncontrolled hypothyroidism—especially during ...

  6. B cell depletion inhibits spontaneous autoimmune thyroiditis in NOD.H-2h4 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shiguang; Dunn, Robert; Kehry, Marilyn R; Braley-Mullen, Helen

    2008-06-01

    B cells are important for the development of most autoimmune diseases. B cell depletion immunotherapy has emerged as an effective treatment for several human autoimmune diseases, although it is unclear whether B cells are necessary for disease induction, autoantibody production, or disease progression. To address the role of B cells in a murine model of spontaneous autoimmune thyroiditis (SAT), B cells were depleted from adult NOD.H-2h4 mice using anti-mouse CD20 mAb. Anti-CD20 depleted most B cells in peripheral blood and cervical lymph nodes and 50-80% of splenic B cells. Flow cytometry analysis showed that marginal zone B cells in the spleen were relatively resistant to depletion by anti-CD20, whereas most follicular and transitional (T2) B cells were depleted after anti-CD20 treatment. When anti-CD20 was administered before development of SAT, development of SAT and anti-mouse thyroglobulin autoantibody responses were reduced. Anti-CD20 also reduced SAT severity and inhibited further increases in anti-mouse thyroglobulin autoantibodies when administered to mice that already had autoantibodies and thyroid inflammation. The results suggest that B cells are necessary for initiation as well as progression or maintenance of SAT in NOD.H-2h4 mice.

  7. An autosomal locus causing autoimmune disease: Autoimmune polyglandular disease type I assigned to chromosome 21

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Aaltonen (Johanna); P. Björses (Petra); L.A. Sandkuijl (Lodewijk); J. Perheentupa (Jaakko); L. Peltonen (Leena Johanna)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractAutoimmune polyglandular disease type I (APECED) is an autosomal recessive autoimmune disease characterized by a variable combination of the failure of the endocrine glands. The pathogenesis of this unique autoimmune disease is unknown; unlike many other autoimmune diseases, APECED does

  8. Autoimmune Skin Diseases in the Dog

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, W. M.

    1981-01-01

    Diagnoses of autoimmune skin diseases require very careful observation of the skin lesions, and selection of an intact vesicle for histopathological examination. If available, immunofluorescent studies can be very useful in confirming the diagnosis of autoimmune skin disease. Seven autoimmune skin diseases are briefly reviewed. Therapy must be aggressive and owner warned of the guarded prognosis.

  9. Autoimmune disease: Conceptual history and contributions of ocular immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margo, Curtis E; Harman, Lynn E

    2016-01-01

    Medical historians identify the mid-20th century as the time when the scientific and medical communities acknowledged the existence of autoimmune disease. Several conditions including sympathetic ophthalmia and endophthalmitis phacoanaphylactica, however, were proposed as autoimmune disorders much earlier. During the first half of the century, autoimmune disease was viewed as biologically implausible. Paul Ehrlich coined the term horror autotoxicus to emphasize that autoimmunity would contradict nature's aversion to self-injury. The discoveries of allergy and anaphylaxis were the first clues that the immune system was capable of self-harm. A major obstacle to comprehending the pathogenesis of autoimmunity was how the immune system distinguishes foreign from self, a process eventually understood in the context of immune tolerance. Investigators of sympathetic ophthalmia and endophthalmitis phacoanaphylactica were positioned to invalidate horror autotoxicus but lacked sufficiently convincing experimental and clinical evidence to accomplish the task. Seminal studies of chronic thyroiditis and a series of clinical laboratory breakthroughs led to the general acceptance of autoimmune disease in the 1950s. The travails encountered by ophthalmic investigators offer insights into the how medical ideas take shape. We review the contributions of ocular immunology to the conceptual development of autoimmune disease and explore the reasons why the concept caught on slowly.

  10. Type of fish consumed and thyroid autoimmunity in pregnancy and postpartum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benvenga, Salvatore; Vigo, Maria Teresa; Metro, Daniela; Granese, Roberta; Vita, Roberto; Le Donne, Maria

    2016-04-01

    Fish consumption or supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids was reported to cure and/or prevent autoimmune and nonautoimmune disorders. Serum positivity for thyroid autoantibodies is a predictive marker of postpartum thyroiditis and postpartum depression. We hypothesized that stable consumption of the omega-3-rich oily fish was associated with a more favorable profile of serum thyroid antibodies throughout pregnancy and early postpartum compared with stable consumption of swordfish, a predator that concentrates pollutants. We prospectively measured serum thyroglobulin antibodies and thyroperoxidase antibodies in pregnancy (first, second trimesters) and postpartum (day 4), in 236 thyroid disease-free, nonsmoker Caucasian women with stable dietary habits. We did not measure thyroid autoantibodies prior to pregnancy. Women were divided into groups A (n = 48; swordfish), B (n = 52; oily fish), C (n = 68; swordfish + other fish, not necessarily oily fish), and D (n = 68; fish other than swordfish and oily fish). Major endpoints were positivity rates and serum concentrations of the two autoantibodies. We resorted to previous studies for the estimated content of fatty acids and microelements in the consumed fish. Positivity rates and serum concentrations of both antibodies were the greatest in group A and the lowest in group B (P fish consumption and serum concentrations of either antibody was direct in group A but inverse in group B. The estimated content of omega-3 fatty acids in fish consumed by group B was the greatest (P fish as a favorable alternative. Because thyroid autoantibodies are markers of autoimmune-related postpartum problems, our data suggest a dietary prophylaxis of such problems.

  11. [Thyroiditis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffet, Camille; Groussin, Lionel

    2013-02-01

    The diagnosis of thyroiditis encompasses a broad spectrum of thyroid disorders. Analysis of signs and symptoms, biochemical changes, neck ultrasound characteristics and radioactive iodine uptake values allows an accurate diagnosis. Recent studies of the whole genome have helped to identify many susceptibility genes for autoimmune thyroiditis. However, none of these genes contribute to a significant increase in risk of developing this thyroiditis. Clinical awareness of the characteristic presentations of exceptional thyroiditis (acute suppurative thyroiditis, Riedel's thyroiditis) is an important issue. Selenium administration seems to be beneficial for reducing the incidence of thyroiditis. Finally, certain drug-induced thyroiditis remains a therapeutic challenge for the physician.

  12. Incidence of vitiligo in children with Graves' disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prindaville Brea

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Limited data are available on the association between vitiligo and autoimmune thyroid disease in pediatric patients. In addition, reported studies of pediatric patients have been based on a population known to have vitiligo and subsequently evaluated for the presence of thyroid function abnormalities. Methods A retrospective chart review was performed on 333 children who had been followed for thyroid disorders by endocrinologists at the Yale Pediatric Thyroid Center over the last 5 years for autoimmune thyroid disease. Demographical and clinical features of patients found to have thyroid disease and vitiligo were recorded. These studies were approved by the Yale Human Investigation Committee. Results Of the total 333 children and adolescents, 9 (2.7% were noted to have vitiligo. Four patients (44% had Graves' disease and 5 patients (66% had Hashimoto's thyroiditis. For patients with Graves' disease and vitiligo, the average age of onset of thyroid disease was young at 4 ± 0.7 years, and the diagnosis of vitiligo usually preceded that of thyroid disease. For children with Hashimoto's thyroiditis and vitiligo, thyroid disease was diagnosed at an average age of 13.25 ± 2.8 years. Conclusion In our population, 4.6% of children with Graves' disease and 2.0% of children with Hashimoto's thyroiditis had vitiligo. Interestingly, when vitiligo presents with Graves' disease, it occurs in younger rather than older children.

  13. 自身免疫性甲状腺疾病患者唾液腺功能研究%Salivary gland function in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张丽霞; 陈金燕; 亓丽丽; 任妍; 苏君梅

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the salivary gland function changes in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease. Methods Thirty five patients with Graves' disease (7 males and 28 females,aged 49.62 ± 11.10y), 15 patients with Hashimoto thyroiditis (5 males and 10 females,aged 45.67 ± 9.85 y )and 35 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects were included in the study. All subjects underwent routine thyroid scintigraphy imaging and salivery gland dynamic imaging. Time - activity curve of bilateral parotids and bilateral submandibulars were obtained by outlining regions of interest (ROI) of these glands,excreting technetium rate (ex%) and excreting technetium time (Tex) of each gland were calculated. Results The excreting technetium function of major salivary glands decreased significantly in Graves' disease patients(P<0.05). The excreting technetium function in major salivary glands of Hashimoto thyroiditis decreased significantly(P<0.05). The time of excreting technetium of major salivary gland was not longer than that of normal controls. The major salivary gland function was not correlated with thyroid technetium uptake rate at 30min in Graves' disease patients (r= -0.1768,-0.2753,-0.2596,-0.1747; P= 0.3331,0.1299,0.1514,0.3388). Conclusion With salivary gland dynamic imaging during routine thyroid scintigraphy, thyroid function parameters and salivary gland function indicators can be obtained simultaneously.%目的 通过在自身免疫性甲状腺疾病患者甲状腺显像过程中加入唾液腺显像,旨在探讨自身免疫性甲状腺疾病患者唾液腺功能的改变,以便指导临床在治疗此类疾病过程中同时关注患者唾液腺功能.方法 选取35 例Graves 病患者,15 例桥本甲状腺炎和同期同年龄唾液腺功能正常者35例.Graves 病及桥本甲状腺炎患者在甲状腺显像同时进行唾液腺显像.在甲状腺显像注射显像剂后常规等待的30min 行唾液腺动态显像,通过勾画ROI,获得

  14. Genes and environment as predisposing factors in autoimmunity: acceleration of spontaneous thyroiditis by dietary iodide in NOD.H2(h4) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolypetri, Panayota; King, Justin; Larijani, Mani; Carayanniotis, George

    2015-01-01

    In the field of autoimmune thyroiditis, NOD.H2(h4) mice have attracted significant and increasing attention since they not only develop spontaneous disease but they present thyroiditis with accelerated incidence and severity if they ingest iodide through their drinking water. This animal model highlights the interplay between genetic and dietary factors in the triggering of autoimmune disease and offers new opportunities to study immunoregulatory parameters influenced by both genes and environment. Here, we review experimental findings with this mouse model of thyroiditis.

  15. Clinical implications of a new TSH-receptor-antibody-assay (DYNOtest {sup trademark} TRAKhuman) in autoimmune thyroid diseases; Klinische Implikationen eines neuen TSH-Rezeptor-Antikoerper-Assays (DYNOtest {sup trademark} TRAKhuman) bei autoimmunen Schilddruesenerkrankungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meller, J.; Schreivogel, I.; Becker, W. [Goettingen Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Nuklearmedizin; Bergmann, A.; Morgenthaler, N. [B.R.A.H.M.S Diagnostica, Berlin (Germany); Huefner, M. [Goettingen Univ. (Germany). Abt. Innere Medizin

    2000-07-01

    Aim: Conventional radioreceptor-antibody-assays (RAAs) fail in the detection of TSH-receptor antibodies (TRAKs) in 10-30% of patients with Graves' disease (GD). The aim of this study was the evaluation of the diagnostic and clinical impact of a new RRA (DYNOtest {sup trademark} TRAKhuman) which uses the human recombinant TSH-Receptor in the diagnosis of autoimmune thyroid disease. Methods: Sera from 142 consecutive patients (GD: n=50, autoimmune thyroiditis/AIT: n=92) and from 55 controls (31 patients without any thyroid disease and 14 with euthyroid goiter) were evaluated both with the DYNOtest {sup trademark} TRAKhuman-assay and a conventional RRA (TRAK-Assay {sup trademark}). Thyroid in vitro parameters and thyroid sonography were performed in all patients. Results: The DYNOtest {sup trademark} TRAK-assay was significantly superior to the conventional RRA in the diagnosis of GD (p<0,00012), especially in those who were treated by thionamides (p<0,003) and in the diagnosis of TRAK-positive patients with AIT (p<0,003). The majority of TRAK-positive AIT-patients suffered from hypothyroidism. One false positive result in patients with euthyroid goiter was found in the TRAK-Assay {sup trademark} as well as in the DYNOtest {sup trademark} TRAKhuman-Assay. Therefore the specifity of the DYNOtest {sup trademark} TRAKhuman was not inferior compared with the conventional assay. Conclusion: The DYNOtest {sup trademark} TRAK-assay is superior in the diagnostic work up of Graves' disease compared with a conventional TRAK-assay and offers an equal specifity. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Bei konventionellen Radiorezeptor-Antikoerper-Assays (RRAs) misslingt der Nachweis von TSH-Rezeptor Antikoerpern (TRAKS) bei 10-30% der immunogenen Hyperthyreosen (IH). Ziel der Studie war es, den diagnostischen und klinischen Stellenwertes eines neuen RRA (DYNOtest {sup trademark} TRAKhuman) bei autoimmunen Schilddruesenerkrankungen zu evaluieren. Methoden: Serumproben von 142

  16. Sonographic decreased echogenicity of thyroid parenchyma in asymptomatic population: Correction with thyroid function and thyroid autoimmune activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ji Yeon; Park, Noh Hyuck; Park, Chan Sub; Lee, Ji Ye [Dept. of Radiology, Myongji Hospital, Seonam University College of Medicine, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Chun, Kyung Ah [Dept. of Radiology, Catholic Kwandong University School of Medicine, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Seong Yoon [Div. of Hematology-Oncology, Dept. of Internal Medicine, Inje University Ilsan Paik Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hee Jin [Dept. of of Radiology, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the correlation between decreased echogenicity of thyroid and thyroid hormones or autoantibodies. From January 2009 to December 2011, 543 patients with decreased parenchymal echogenicity [M:F = 133:410, median age: 42 years (range: 9-82 years)], who did not have solid nodule, symptom or medication related to thyroid and underwent thyroid function test were retrospectively reviewed. Images were classified based on the degree of hypoechogenicity, heterogenicity or thyroid size. 1) Group A: mild decreased echogenicity, group B: marked decreased echogenicity, 2) group Ho: homogeneous echogenicity, group He: heterogeneous echogenicity, 3) group 1: decreased size, group 2: normal size, group 3: increased size. Differences in triiodiothyronyne (T3), free-thyroxine (fT4), thyrotropin (TSH), anti-thyroglobulin antibody (TgAb), thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPOAb), and anti-TSH receptor antibody (TSH-rAb) were evaluated among groups. T3, fT4, and TSH levels differed between groups A and B (p < 0.001, p = 0.001, p < 0.001). TgAb and TPOAb of group B were higher than group A (p = 0.006, p < 0.001). TPOAb of group He was higher than group Ho (p < 0.001). TSH-rAb and TPOAb of group 3 were higher than group 2 (p = 0.017, p < 0.001). The patients with findings of markedly decreased, heterogeneous echogenicity or thyroid enlargement may have abnormal thyroid function and autoantibodies. These may facilitate the physicians' decision to order tests for thyroid function and autoimmune activity.

  17. Spondyloarthropathies in Autoimmune Diseases and Vice Versa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Fernández, Oscar M.; Mantilla, Rubén D.; Cruz-Tapias, Paola; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Alberto; Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana; Anaya, Juan-Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Polyautoimmunity is one of the major clinical characteristics of autoimmune diseases (ADs). The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of ADs in spondyloarthropathies (SpAs) and vice versa. This was a two-phase cross-sectional study. First, we examined the presence of ADs in a cohort of patients with SpAs (N = 148). Second, we searched for the presence of SpAs in a well-defined group of patients with ADs (N = 1077) including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and Sjögren's syndrome (SS). Among patients with SpAs, ankylosing spondylitis was observed in the majority of them (55.6%). There were two patients presenting with SS in the SpA group (1.4%) and 5 patients with autoimmune thyroiditis (3.5%). The global prevalence of ADs in SpAs was 4.86%. In the ADs group, there were 5 patients with SpAs (0.46%). Our results suggest a lack of association between SpAs and ADs. Accordingly, SpAs might correspond more to autoinflammatory diseases rather than to ADs. PMID:22400103

  18. 甲状腺过氧化物酶抗体在自身免疫性甲状腺疾病诊治中的价值及存在问题%The value and controversy of thyroid peroxidase antibody in the diagnosis and treatment of autoimmune thyroid disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范慧; 王广

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPOAb) play an important role in the diagnosis of autoimmune thyroid disease.Chemiluminescence immunoassay (CLIA) is a new method been strongly recommended in recent years.The definition of positive value of TPOAb is inconsistent.The definition of TPOAb positive value is important for exploring the development of autoimmune thyroid disease.TPOAb is significantly increased in Hashimoto's disease and the titer is associated with the degree of infiltration and destruction of thyroid follicular.It is essential to monitor TPOAb in postpartum thyroiditis and early pregnancy.The positive of TPOAb is closely related to the adverse pregnancy outcomes caused by various risk factors.Graves disease combined with Hashimoto's must to be considered.%甲状腺过氧化物酶抗体(TPOAb)在自身免疫性甲状腺疾病(AITD)的诊断中起着不可替代的作用,化学发光免疫分析(CLIA)是近年来大力推广的检测TPOAb的新方法,目前TPOAb正常参考值和医学决定水平数值的界定不一致,确定TPOAb正常参考区间和医学决定水平以及探讨抗体阳性人群的AITD发生发展的规律具有重要意义.桥本甲状腺炎患者的TPOAb显著升高,且TPOAb的浓度与淋巴细胞的浸润程度和甲状腺滤泡破坏程度相关.TPOAb是监测产后甲状腺炎的重要的检测项目,且应于妊娠早期测定.TPOAb阳性与多种原因所致不良妊娠结局有关.当甲亢合并明显升高的TPOAb时要考虑Graves病合并桥本甲状腺炎.

  19. [Biermer's disease and autoimmune hemolytic anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafil, Hatim; Tazi, Illias; Mahmal, Lahoucine

    2012-01-01

    Biermer's disease is an autoimmune atrophic gastritis of the fundus predominantly responsible for a malabsorption of vitamin B12. Despite its association with several autoimmune disorders, few observations have reported an association with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). We report a case of Biermer's disease associated with AIHA in a patient of 66 years old.

  20. Human Cytomegalovirus and Autoimmune Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Halenius

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV represents a prototypic pathogenic member of the β-subgroup of the herpesvirus family. A range of HCMV features like its lytic replication in multiple tissues, the lifelong persistence through periods of latency and intermitting reactivation, the extraordinary large proteome, and extensive manipulation of adaptive and innate immunity make HCMV a high profile candidate for involvement in autoimmune disorders. We surveyed the available literature for reports on HCMV association with onset or exacerbation of autoimmune disease. A causative linkage between HCMV and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, systemic sclerosis (SSc, diabetes mellitus type 1, and rheumatoid arthritis (RA is suggested by the literature. However, a clear association of HCMV seroprevalence and disease could not be established, leaving the question open whether HCMV could play a coresponsible role for onset of disease. For convincing conclusions population-based prospective studies must be performed in the future. Specific immunopathogenic mechanisms by which HCMV could contribute to the course of autoimmune disease have been suggested, for example, molecular mimicry by UL94 in SSc and UL83/pp65 in SLE patients, as well as aggravation of joint inflammation by induction and expansion of CD4+/CD28− T-cells in RA patients. Further studies are needed to validate these findings and to lay the grounds for targeted therapeutic intervention.

  1. Relationship between Clinical and Immunological Features of Thyroid Autoimmunity and Ophthalmopathy during Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack R. Wall

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem. Clinical features of Graves’ hyperthyroidism (GH generally improve during pregnancy and rebound in the postpartum period. It is unclear whether the ophthalmopathy that is associated with GH and, less often, Hashimoto’s thyroiditis (HT changes in parallel with the thyroid associated antibody reactions and clinical features or runs a different course. Method of Study. We retrospectively studied 19 patients with autoimmune thyroid disease over 22 pregnancies: 9 pregnancies with GH and 13 with HT. Ophthalmopathy was defined by NOSPECS class. Results. Thyroid peroxidase (TPO and thyroglobulin (Tg antibody titres decreased during pregnancy and rose in the postpartum period. During pregnancy, 5 patients with GH and 4 patients with HT developed mild ophthalmopathy and two patients with GH and HT developed new upper eyelid retraction (UER. In the postpartum period, eye scores improved in 3 patients with GH and 3 with HT, remained stable in two and 5 patients, respectively, and worsened in 2 patients with GH and one with HT. Conclusions. In patients with mild to moderate eye signs associated with GH and HT, the orbital and thyroid reactions ran different courses during pregnancy. Since no patient had severe ophthalmopathy, we cannot draw definitive conclusions from this preliminary study.

  2. Multiple autoimmune syndrome with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpreet, Singh; Deepak, Jain; Kiran, B

    2016-01-01

    Multiple autoimmune syndrome (MAS) is a condition characterised by three or more autoimmune disorders in a same individual. Familial, immunologic and infectious factors are implicated in the development of MAS. Here we report a case of a 32-year-old woman with co-existence of four auto-immune diseases, namely autoimmune hypothyroidism, Sjögren's syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and celiac disease which leads to the final diagnosis of multiple autoimmune syndrome type 3 with celiac disease. Patients with single autoimmune disorder are at 25% risk of developing other autoimmune disorders. The present case emphasises to clinicians that there is a need for continued surveillance for the development of new autoimmune disease in predisposed patients.

  3. [Autoimmune Diseases of Digestive System].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivashkinl, V T; Sheptulina, A F; Raĭkhelson, K L; Losik, E A; Ivashkin, K V; Okhlobystin, A V; Baranskaia, E K; Polouvektova, E A; Shifrin, O S

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases of digestive system refer to pathological conditions, caused by autoimmune mechanisms, and their etiology remains unknown. This is a group of relatively rare diseases, however, during the last years a marked tendency towards the raise in incidence andprevalence is observed, which led to an increase in number of clinical investigations on etiology, pathogenesis, and, accordingly, development of new diagnostic methods and therapies. Results of such trials shown, for example, that the pathogenesis of chronic cholestatic liver diseases is associated with nuclear receptors function, while the main etiological and pathogenic factor of inflammatory bowel diseases represents gut microbiota. Despite new achievements in autoinmune diseases of digestive system research, therapies are low effective and are accompanied by a huge number of adverse events. The fact that these diseases may lead to malignant tumors is also worth noting. For example, patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis have a 160 times higher risk of cholangiocellular carcinoma, while 10-14% ofpatients with celiac disease may develop malignancies of esophagus, small and large intestine. Thus, these diseases require further investigation with a purpose of more accurate diagnostic methods for the detection of disease at early stages and new effective and safe therapies development.

  4. Control of Her-2 tumor immunity and thyroid autoimmunity by MHC and regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Jennifer B; Kong, Yi-chi M; Meroueh, Chady; Snower, Daniel P; David, Chella S; Ho, Ye-Shih; Wei, Wei-Zen

    2007-07-15

    Immune reactivity to self-antigens in both cancer and autoimmune diseases can be enhanced by systemic immune modulation, posing a challenge in cancer immunotherapy. To distinguish the genetic and immune regulation of tumor immunity versus autoimmunity, immune responses to human ErbB-2 (Her-2) and mouse thyroglobulin (mTg) were tested in transgenic mice expressing Her-2 that is overexpressed in several cancers, and HLA-DRB1*0301 (DR3) that is associated with susceptibility to several human autoimmune diseases, as well as experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT). To induce Her-2 response, mice were electrovaccinated with pE2TM and pGM-CSF encoding the extracellular and transmembrane domains of Her-2 and the murine granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor, respectively. To induce EAT, mice received mTg i.v. with or without lipopolysaccharide. Depletion of regulatory T cells (Treg) with anti-CD25 monoclonal antibody enhanced immune reactivity to Her-2 as well as mTg, showing control of both Her-2 and mTg responses by Treg. When immunized with, Her-2xDR3 and B6xDR3 mice expressing H2(b)xDR3 haplotype developed more profound mTg response and thyroid pathology than Her-2 or B6 mice that expressed the EAT-resistant H2(b) haplotype. In Her-2xDR3 mice, the response to mTg was further amplified when mice were also immunized with pE2TM and pGM-CSF. On the contrary, Her-2 reactivity was comparable whether mice expressed DR3 or not. Therefore, induction of Her-2 immunity was independent of DR3 but development of EAT was dictated by this allele, whereas Tregs control the responses to both self-antigens. These results warrant close monitoring of autoimmunity during cancer immunotherapy, particularly in patients with susceptible MHC class II alleles.

  5. Flavonoids and thyroid disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heide, van der D.; Kastelijn, J.; Schroder-van der Elst, J.P.

    2003-01-01

    The most potent natural plant-derived compounds that can affect thyroid function, thyroid hormone secretion and availability to tissues is the group of flavonoids, i.e. plant pigments. They are present in our daily food, such as vegetables, fruits, grains, nuts, wine, and tea. Epidemiological studie

  6. Epidemiology of autoimmune diseases in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eaton, William W.; Rose, N.R.; Kalaydijan, A.;

    2007-01-01

    An epidemiologic study of the autoimmune diseases taken together has not been done heretofore. The National Patient Register of Denmark is used to estimate the population prevalence of 31 possible or probable autoimmune diseases. Record linkage is used to estimate 465 pairwise co...... diseases and weak across diseases. These data confirm the importance of the autoimmune diseases as a group and suggest that common etiopathologies exist among them...

  7. cDNA immunization of mice with human thyroglobulin generates both humoral and T cell responses: a novel model of thyroid autoimmunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric M Jacobson

    Full Text Available Thyroglobulin (Tg represents one of the largest known self-antigens involved in autoimmunity. Numerous studies have implicated it in triggering and perpetuating the autoimmune response in autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD. Indeed, traditional models of autoimmune thyroid disease, experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT, are generated by immunizing mice with thyroglobulin protein in conjunction with an adjuvant, or by high repeated doses of Tg alone, without adjuvant. These extant models are limited in their experimental flexibility, i.e. the ability to make modifications to the Tg used in immunizations. In this study, we have immunized mice with a plasmid cDNA encoding the full-length human Tg (hTG protein, in order to generate a model of Hashimoto's thyroiditis which is closer to the human disease and does not require adjuvants to breakdown tolerance. Human thyroglobulin cDNA was injected and subsequently electroporated into skeletal muscle using a square wave generator. Following hTg cDNA immunizations, the mice developed both B and T cell responses to Tg, albeit with no evidence of lymphocytic infiltration of the thyroid. This novel model will afford investigators the means to test various hypotheses which were unavailable with the previous EAT models, specifically the effects of hTg sequence variations on the induction of thyroiditis.

  8. Helicobacter pylori infection might be responsible for the interconnection between type 1 diabetes and autoimmune thyroiditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Eshmawy Mervat M

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Higher serological prevalence rates of helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection have been reported in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1DM and autoimmune thyroiditis (AT. Patients with T1DM are at increased risk for developing other autoimmune diseases, most commonly AT. It is unknown whether H. pylori infection could explain the high prevalence of thyroid autoantibodies and AT in T1DM. The aim of the current study was to evaluate anti-thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO and anti-thyroglobulin (anti-Tg autoantibodies in correlation with anti-H. pylori IgG and IgA in young patients with T1DM. Methods Anti-H. Pylori IgG, IgA, anti-TPO and anti-Tg antibodies titers were measured in 162 euthyroid patients with T1DM and 80 healthy controls matched for age, sex and socioeconomic status. Results Seroprevalence of H. pylori was significantly higher in patients with T1DM than in healthy controls; 79% vs. 51.2%, p Conclusion our results support the idea of a connection between H. pylori infection and the occurrence of anti-TPO, anti-Tg autoantibodies and AT in young patients with T1DM. So, H. pylori infection could be considered as an environmental trigger for development of AT in T1DM. Young patients with T1DM should be screened for H. pylori infection.

  9. Autoimmune connective tissue disease: scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Helen; Vincent, Rachel

    Scleroderma is an umbrella term for a spectrum of rare and complex autoimmune connective tissue diseases, the cause and pathogenesis of which is only partially defined. Scleroderma can be divided into two main subgroups--systemic and localized--but the hallmark of both is skin fibrosis. As yet no drug has been found to be effective in reversing the disease process, however early intervention has been shown to give maximum benefit. Due to the chronic nature of the condition a multidisciplinary approach is essential and the nurse's input from an early stage is vital in supporting the patient to manage both their medical treatment and their activities of daily living.

  10. Graves' Disease that Developed Shortly after Surgery for Thyroid Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hea Min Yu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Graves' disease is an autoimmune disorder that may present with various clinical manifestations of hyperthyroidism. Patients with Graves' disease have a greater number of thyroid nodules and a higher incidence of thyroid cancer compared with patients with normal thyroid activity. However, cases in which patients are diagnosed with recurrence of Graves' disease shortly after partial thyroidectomy for thyroid cancer are very rare. Here we report a case of hyperthyroid Graves' disease that occurred after partial thyroidectomy for papillary thyroid cancer. In this case, the patient developed hyperthyroidism 9 months after right hemithyroidectomy, and antithyroglobulin autoantibody and thyroid stimulating hormone receptor stimulating autoantibody were positive. Therefore, we diagnosed Graves' disease on the basis of the laboratory test results and thyroid ultrasonography findings. The patient was treated with and maintained on antithyroid drugs. The mechanism of the recurrence of Graves' disease in this patient is still unclear. The mechanism may have been the improper response of the immune system after partial thyroidectomy. To precisely determine the mechanisms in Graves' disease after partial thyroidectomy, further studies based on a greater number of cases are needed.

  11. ULTRASOUND EVALUATION OF THYROID DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Battula

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available AIMS & OBJECTIVES: 1. To differentiate cystic lesions from solid lesions. 2. The possibility to differentiate the intrinsic thyroid lesions from those arising from adjoining structures. 3. To evaluate the neoplasms and to differentiate benign from malignant lesions by USG characteristics and to correlate with FNAC reports. 4. Role of USG in rapidly growing thyroid lesions: To differentiate haemorrhage into the cystic lesions and rapidly growing malignant tumours. 5. Compare the results of our study with similar studies available in the present literature. MATERIALS & METHODS This study included 75 patients who attended outpatient departments of the Endocrinology, Medical and Surgical Units and also those who were inpatients. RESULTS Broadly pathological conditions of thyroid glands can be divided into nodular and diffuse thyroid diseases. Among Nodular Diseases Majority are benign, only few are malignant. Characteristics of benign lesions are: 1. Well-differentiated margins. 2. Thin complete peripheral sonolucent halo. 3. Coarse peripheral calcifications. Characteristics of malignant nodules are: 1. Ill-defined margins. 2. Thick incomplete peripheral halo. 3. Fine punctuate calcifications. Diffuse Thyroid Diseases 1. Hashimoto’s thyroiditis: Painless diffuse enlargement of thyroid gland usually in women with coarse echotexture and no normal gland tissue. There may be discrete hypoechoic nodules within it with cervical lymphadenopathy. 2. Goitres: a Simple diffuse goitre: Symmetrical enlargement of gland without tenderness or bruit or lymphadenopathy, T3, T4 and TSH are within normal limits and no thyroid autoantibodies in the serum. a Diffuse Toxic goitre: Diffuse enlargement of gland with increased vascularity on colour Doppler study. b Multinodular goitre: Multiple hypoechoic nodule within normal thyroid parenchyma. c Colloid goitre: Present as single or multiple swellings in the thyroid gland. CONCLUSION USG is the fast and cost effective

  12. Identification of novel genetic Loci associated with thyroid peroxidase antibodies and clinical thyroid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medici, Marco; Porcu, Eleonora; Pistis, Giorgio; Teumer, Alexander; Brown, Suzanne J; Jensen, Richard A; Rawal, Rajesh; Roef, Greet L; Plantinga, Theo S; Vermeulen, Sita H; Lahti, Jari; Simmonds, Matthew J; Husemoen, Lise Lotte N; Freathy, Rachel M; Shields, Beverley M; Pietzner, Diana; Nagy, Rebecca; Broer, Linda; Chaker, Layal; Korevaar, Tim I M; Plia, Maria Grazia; Sala, Cinzia; Völker, Uwe; Richards, J Brent; Sweep, Fred C; Gieger, Christian; Corre, Tanguy; Kajantie, Eero; Thuesen, Betina; Taes, Youri E; Visser, W Edward; Hattersley, Andrew T; Kratzsch, Jürgen; Hamilton, Alexander; Li, Wei; Homuth, Georg; Lobina, Monia; Mariotti, Stefano; Soranzo, Nicole; Cocca, Massimiliano; Nauck, Matthias; Spielhagen, Christin; Ross, Alec; Arnold, Alice; van de Bunt, Martijn; Liyanarachchi, Sandya; Heier, Margit; Grabe, Hans Jörgen; Masciullo, Corrado; Galesloot, Tessel E; Lim, Ee M; Reischl, Eva; Leedman, Peter J; Lai, Sandra; Delitala, Alessandro; Bremner, Alexandra P; Philips, David I W; Beilby, John P; Mulas, Antonella; Vocale, Matteo; Abecasis, Goncalo; Forsen, Tom; James, Alan; Widen, Elisabeth; Hui, Jennie; Prokisch, Holger; Rietzschel, Ernst E; Palotie, Aarno; Feddema, Peter; Fletcher, Stephen J; Schramm, Katharina; Rotter, Jerome I; Kluttig, Alexander; Radke, Dörte; Traglia, Michela; Surdulescu, Gabriela L; He, Huiling; Franklyn, Jayne A; Tiller, Daniel; Vaidya, Bijay; de Meyer, Tim; Jørgensen, Torben; Eriksson, Johan G; O'Leary, Peter C; Wichmann, Eric; Hermus, Ad R; Psaty, Bruce M; Ittermann, Till; Hofman, Albert; Bosi, Emanuele; Schlessinger, David; Wallaschofski, Henri; Pirastu, Nicola; Aulchenko, Yurii S; de la Chapelle, Albert; Netea-Maier, Romana T; Gough, Stephen C L; Meyer Zu Schwabedissen, Henriette; Frayling, Timothy M; Kaufman, Jean-Marc; Linneberg, Allan; Räikkönen, Katri; Smit, Johannes W A; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, André G; Walsh, John P; Meisinger, Christa; den Heijer, Martin; Visser, Theo J; Spector, Timothy D; Wilson, Scott G; Völzke, Henry; Cappola, Anne; Toniolo, Daniela; Sanna, Serena; Naitza, Silvia; Peeters, Robin P

    2014-02-01

    Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) are common, affecting 2-5% of the general population. Individuals with positive thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAbs) have an increased risk of autoimmune hypothyroidism (Hashimoto's thyroiditis), as well as autoimmune hyperthyroidism (Graves' disease). As the possible causative genes of TPOAbs and AITD remain largely unknown, we performed GWAS meta-analyses in 18,297 individuals for TPOAb-positivity (1769 TPOAb-positives and 16,528 TPOAb-negatives) and in 12,353 individuals for TPOAb serum levels, with replication in 8,990 individuals. Significant associations (P<5×10(-8)) were detected at TPO-rs11675434, ATXN2-rs653178, and BACH2-rs10944479 for TPOAb-positivity, and at TPO-rs11675434, MAGI3-rs1230666, and KALRN-rs2010099 for TPOAb levels. Individual and combined effects (genetic risk scores) of these variants on (subclinical) hypo- and hyperthyroidism, goiter and thyroid cancer were studied. Individuals with a high genetic risk score had, besides an increased risk of TPOAb-positivity (OR: 2.18, 95% CI 1.68-2.81, P = 8.1×10(-8)), a higher risk of increased thyroid-stimulating hormone levels (OR: 1.51, 95% CI 1.26-1.82, P = 2.9×10(-6)), as well as a decreased risk of goiter (OR: 0.77, 95% CI 0.66-0.89, P = 6.5×10(-4)). The MAGI3 and BACH2 variants were associated with an increased risk of hyperthyroidism, which was replicated in an independent cohort of patients with Graves' disease (OR: 1.37, 95% CI 1.22-1.54, P = 1.2×10(-7) and OR: 1.25, 95% CI 1.12-1.39, P = 6.2×10(-5)). The MAGI3 variant was also associated with an increased risk of hypothyroidism (OR: 1.57, 95% CI 1.18-2.10, P = 1.9×10(-3)). This first GWAS meta-analysis for TPOAbs identified five newly associated loci, three of which were also associated with clinical thyroid disease. With these markers we identified a large subgroup in the general population with a substantially increased risk of TPOAbs. The results provide insight into why

  13. Identification of novel genetic Loci associated with thyroid peroxidase antibodies and clinical thyroid disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Medici

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD are common, affecting 2-5% of the general population. Individuals with positive thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAbs have an increased risk of autoimmune hypothyroidism (Hashimoto's thyroiditis, as well as autoimmune hyperthyroidism (Graves' disease. As the possible causative genes of TPOAbs and AITD remain largely unknown, we performed GWAS meta-analyses in 18,297 individuals for TPOAb-positivity (1769 TPOAb-positives and 16,528 TPOAb-negatives and in 12,353 individuals for TPOAb serum levels, with replication in 8,990 individuals. Significant associations (P<5×10(-8 were detected at TPO-rs11675434, ATXN2-rs653178, and BACH2-rs10944479 for TPOAb-positivity, and at TPO-rs11675434, MAGI3-rs1230666, and KALRN-rs2010099 for TPOAb levels. Individual and combined effects (genetic risk scores of these variants on (subclinical hypo- and hyperthyroidism, goiter and thyroid cancer were studied. Individuals with a high genetic risk score had, besides an increased risk of TPOAb-positivity (OR: 2.18, 95% CI 1.68-2.81, P = 8.1×10(-8, a higher risk of increased thyroid-stimulating hormone levels (OR: 1.51, 95% CI 1.26-1.82, P = 2.9×10(-6, as well as a decreased risk of goiter (OR: 0.77, 95% CI 0.66-0.89, P = 6.5×10(-4. The MAGI3 and BACH2 variants were associated with an increased risk of hyperthyroidism, which was replicated in an independent cohort of patients with Graves' disease (OR: 1.37, 95% CI 1.22-1.54, P = 1.2×10(-7 and OR: 1.25, 95% CI 1.12-1.39, P = 6.2×10(-5. The MAGI3 variant was also associated with an increased risk of hypothyroidism (OR: 1.57, 95% CI 1.18-2.10, P = 1.9×10(-3. This first GWAS meta-analysis for TPOAbs identified five newly associated loci, three of which were also associated with clinical thyroid disease. With these markers we identified a large subgroup in the general population with a substantially increased risk of TPOAbs. The results provide insight into why

  14. Identification of Novel Genetic Loci Associated with Thyroid Peroxidase Antibodies and Clinical Thyroid Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teumer, Alexander; Brown, Suzanne J.; Jensen, Richard A.; Rawal, Rajesh; Roef, Greet L.; Plantinga, Theo S.; Vermeulen, Sita H.; Lahti, Jari; Simmonds, Matthew J.; Husemoen, Lise Lotte N.; Freathy, Rachel M.; Shields, Beverley M.; Pietzner, Diana; Nagy, Rebecca; Broer, Linda; Chaker, Layal; Korevaar, Tim I. M.; Plia, Maria Grazia; Sala, Cinzia; Völker, Uwe; Richards, J. Brent; Sweep, Fred C.; Gieger, Christian; Corre, Tanguy; Kajantie, Eero; Thuesen, Betina; Taes, Youri E.; Visser, W. Edward; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Kratzsch, Jürgen; Hamilton, Alexander; Li, Wei; Homuth, Georg; Lobina, Monia; Mariotti, Stefano; Soranzo, Nicole; Cocca, Massimiliano; Nauck, Matthias; Spielhagen, Christin; Ross, Alec; Arnold, Alice; van de Bunt, Martijn; Liyanarachchi, Sandya; Heier, Margit; Grabe, Hans Jörgen; Masciullo, Corrado; Galesloot, Tessel E.; Lim, Ee M.; Reischl, Eva; Leedman, Peter J.; Lai, Sandra; Delitala, Alessandro; Bremner, Alexandra P.; Philips, David I. W.; Beilby, John P.; Mulas, Antonella; Vocale, Matteo; Abecasis, Goncalo; Forsen, Tom; James, Alan; Widen, Elisabeth; Hui, Jennie; Prokisch, Holger; Rietzschel, Ernst E.; Palotie, Aarno; Feddema, Peter; Fletcher, Stephen J.; Schramm, Katharina; Rotter, Jerome I.; Kluttig, Alexander; Radke, Dörte; Traglia, Michela; Surdulescu, Gabriela L.; He, Huiling; Franklyn, Jayne A.; Tiller, Daniel; Vaidya, Bijay; de Meyer, Tim; Jørgensen, Torben; Eriksson, Johan G.; O'Leary, Peter C.; Wichmann, Eric; Hermus, Ad R.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Ittermann, Till; Hofman, Albert; Bosi, Emanuele; Schlessinger, David; Wallaschofski, Henri; Pirastu, Nicola; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; de la Chapelle, Albert; Netea-Maier, Romana T.; Gough, Stephen C. L.; Meyer zu Schwabedissen, Henriette; Frayling, Timothy M.; Kaufman, Jean-Marc; Linneberg, Allan; Räikkönen, Katri; Smit, Johannes W. A.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, André G.; Walsh, John P.; Meisinger, Christa; den Heijer, Martin; Visser, Theo J.; Spector, Timothy D.; Wilson, Scott G.; Völzke, Henry; Cappola, Anne; Toniolo, Daniela; Sanna, Serena; Naitza, Silvia; Peeters, Robin P.

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) are common, affecting 2-5% of the general population. Individuals with positive thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAbs) have an increased risk of autoimmune hypothyroidism (Hashimoto's thyroiditis), as well as autoimmune hyperthyroidism (Graves' disease). As the possible causative genes of TPOAbs and AITD remain largely unknown, we performed GWAS meta-analyses in 18,297 individuals for TPOAb-positivity (1769 TPOAb-positives and 16,528 TPOAb-negatives) and in 12,353 individuals for TPOAb serum levels, with replication in 8,990 individuals. Significant associations (P<5×10−8) were detected at TPO-rs11675434, ATXN2-rs653178, and BACH2-rs10944479 for TPOAb-positivity, and at TPO-rs11675434, MAGI3-rs1230666, and KALRN-rs2010099 for TPOAb levels. Individual and combined effects (genetic risk scores) of these variants on (subclinical) hypo- and hyperthyroidism, goiter and thyroid cancer were studied. Individuals with a high genetic risk score had, besides an increased risk of TPOAb-positivity (OR: 2.18, 95% CI 1.68–2.81, P = 8.1×10−8), a higher risk of increased thyroid-stimulating hormone levels (OR: 1.51, 95% CI 1.26–1.82, P = 2.9×10−6), as well as a decreased risk of goiter (OR: 0.77, 95% CI 0.66–0.89, P = 6.5×10−4). The MAGI3 and BACH2 variants were associated with an increased risk of hyperthyroidism, which was replicated in an independent cohort of patients with Graves' disease (OR: 1.37, 95% CI 1.22–1.54, P = 1.2×10−7 and OR: 1.25, 95% CI 1.12–1.39, P = 6.2×10−5). The MAGI3 variant was also associated with an increased risk of hypothyroidism (OR: 1.57, 95% CI 1.18–2.10, P = 1.9×10−3). This first GWAS meta-analysis for TPOAbs identified five newly associated loci, three of which were also associated with clinical thyroid disease. With these markers we identified a large subgroup in the general population with a substantially increased risk of TPOAbs. The results provide

  15. The sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor modulator FTY720 prevents iodide-induced autoimmune thyroiditis in non-obese diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morohoshi, Kazuki; Osone, Michiko; Yoshida, Katsumi; Nakagawa, Yoshinori; Hoshikawa, Saeko; Ozaki, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Yurie; Ito, Sadayoshi; Mori, Kouki

    2011-09-01

    FTY720 is an immunomodulator that alters migration and homing of lymphocytes via sphingosine 1-phosphate receptors. This compound has been shown to be effective in suppressing autoimmune diseases in experimental and clinical settings. In the present study, we tested whether FTY720 prevented autoimmune thyroiditis in iodide-treated non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice, a model of Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) in humans. Mice were given 0.05% iodide water for 8 weeks, and this treatment effectively induced thyroiditis. Iodide-treated mice were injected intraperitoneally with either saline or FTY720 during the iodide treatment. FTY720 clearly suppressed the development of thyroiditis and reduced serum anti-thyroglobulin antibody levels. The number of circulating lymphocytes and spleen cells including CD4(+) T cells, CD8(+) T cells, and CD4(+)Foxp3(+) T cells was decreased in FTY720-treated mice. Our results indicate that FTY720 has immunomodulatory effects on iodide-induced autoimmune thyroiditis in NOD mice and may be a potential candidate for use in the prevention of HT.

  16. Refractory disease in autoimmune diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasconcelos, Carlos; Kallenberg, Cees; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2011-01-01

    Refractory disease (RD) definition has different meanings but it is dynamic, according to knowledge and the availability of new drugs. It should be differentiated from severe disease and damage definitions and it must take into account duration of adequate therapy and compliance of the patient. It c

  17. Effect of transgenic overexpression of FLIP on lymphocytes on development and resolution of experimental autoimmune thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yujiang; Sharp, Gordon C; Braley-Mullen, Helen

    2011-09-01

    In our previous studies, resolution of granulomatous experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (G-EAT) was promoted when thyroid epithelial cells were protected from Fas-mediated apoptosis due to transgenic overexpression of FLIP. We hypothesized that if FLIP were overexpressed on lymphocytes, CD4(+) effector cells would be protected from Fas-mediated apoptosis, and resolution would be delayed. To test this hypothesis, we generated transgenic (Tg) mice overexpressing FLIP under the CD2 promoter. Transgenic FLIP was expressed on CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and B cells. Transgenic overexpression of FLIP protected cultured splenocytes from Fas-mediated, but not irradiation-induced, apoptosis in vitro. Unexpectedly, Tg(+) donor cells transferred minimal G-EAT, which was partially overcome by depleting donor CD8(+) T cells. When Tg(+) and Tg(-) donors transferred equivalent disease, G-EAT resolution was delayed in FLIP transgenic mice. However, CD2-FLIP Tg(+) donors often transferred less severe G-EAT, even after depletion of CD8(+) T cells. This influenced the rate of G-EAT resolution, resulting in little difference in G-EAT resolution between groups. Tg(+) mice always had reduced anti-mouse thyroglobulin autoantibody responses, compared with Tg(-) littermates, presumably because of FLIP overexpression on B cells. These results suggest that effects of transgenic FLIP on a particular autoimmune disease vary, depending on what cells express the transgene and whether those cells are effector cells or if they function to modulate disease.

  18. Amplification of autoimmune disease by infection

    OpenAIRE

    Posnett, David N; Yarilin, Dmitry

    2005-01-01

    Reports of infection with certain chronic persistent microbes (herpesviruses or Chlamydiae) in human autoimmune diseases are consistent with the hypothesis that these microbes are reactivated in the setting of immunodeficiency and often target the site of autoimmune inflammation. New experimental animal models demonstrate the principle. A herpesvirus or Chlamydia species can be used to infect mice with induced transient autoimmune diseases. This results in increased disease severity and even ...

  19. Cardiovascular Involvement in Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Amaya-Amaya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases (AD represent a broad spectrum of chronic conditions that may afflict specific target organs or multiple systems with a significant burden on quality of life. These conditions have common mechanisms including genetic and epigenetics factors, gender disparity, environmental triggers, pathophysiological abnormalities, and certain subphenotypes. Atherosclerosis (AT was once considered to be a degenerative disease that was an inevitable consequence of aging. However, research in the last three decades has shown that AT is not degenerative or inevitable. It is an autoimmune-inflammatory disease associated with infectious and inflammatory factors characterized by lipoprotein metabolism alteration that leads to immune system activation with the consequent proliferation of smooth muscle cells, narrowing arteries, and atheroma formation. Both humoral and cellular immune mechanisms have been proposed to participate in the onset and progression of AT. Several risk factors, known as classic risk factors, have been described. Interestingly, the excessive cardiovascular events observed in patients with ADs are not fully explained by these factors. Several novel risk factors contribute to the development of premature vascular damage. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of how traditional and nontraditional risk factors contribute to pathogenesis of CVD in AD.

  20. Production of interleukin (IL)-5 and IL-10 accompanies T helper cell type 1 (Th1) cytokine responses to a major thyroid self-antigen, thyroglobulin, in health and autoimmune thyroid disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus H; Hegedüs, L; Rieneck, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interferon (IFN)-gamma exert detrimental effects in organ-specific autoimmune disease, while both destructive and protective roles have been demonstrated for interleukin (IL)-10, IL-4 and IL-5. We examined the production of these cytokines by peripheral blood....... Release of IFN-gamma, IL-4 and, notably, IL-5 ensued. Both patient groups exhibited increased TNF-alpha, IL-2, IFN-gamma and IL-10 responses, and PBMC from HT patients secreted lower amounts of IL-5 than male, but not female, controls. Enhanced TNF-alpha production by HT cells also occurred...... in the presence of pooled normal sera, indicating a dependency on intrinsic cellular factors. Conversely, higher production of TNF-alpha and IL-5 occurred in the presence of autologous sera than in the presence of pooled normal sera in both patient groups, indicating a dependency on serum constituents. Complement...

  1. Production of interleukin (IL)-5 and IL-10 accompanies T helper cell type 1 (Th1) cytokine responses to a major thyroid self-antigen, thyroglobulin, in health and autoimmune thyroid disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C H; Hegedüs, L; Rieneck, K;

    2007-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interferon (IFN)-gamma exert detrimental effects in organ-specific autoimmune disease, while both destructive and protective roles have been demonstrated for interleukin (IL)-10, IL-4 and IL-5. We examined the production of these cytokines by peripheral bloo......-gamma, IL-5 and IL-10 responses were markedly inhibited by partial denaturation of Tg by boiling. We hypothesize that autoantibodies and complement may promote mixed Th1/Th2 cell cytokine responses by enhancing the uptake of autoantigens by antigen-presenting cells....... appeared to promote the production of IL-2 and particularly IL-5, the levels of which were reduced by neutralization of complement by heat- or zymosan treatment. The production of IFN-gamma and IL-2 of the three groups together correlated directly with the serum anti-Tg activity. Moreover, TNF-alpha, IFN...

  2. Thyroid Autoantibodies in the Cerebrospinal Fluid of Subjects with and without Thyroid Disease: Implications for Hashimoto’s Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Ilias

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Plasma antithyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO and anti-thyroglobulin antibodies (anti-Tg are widely used in the diagnosis of autoimmune thyroiditis. No research has compared anti-TPO and anti-Tg both in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of healthy individuals vis-à-vis patients with thyroid disease. Methods. We measured anti-TPO and anti-Tg antibodies in plasma and CSF in nine subjects (mean age ± SD: 73 ± 6 years with hypothyroidism and nine subjects (mean age ± SD: 73 ± 8 years without thyroid disease. Results. The concentration of anti-TPO autoantibodies in CSF was very low compared to plasma in both subjects with thyroid and without thyroid disease (P=0.007. CSF anti-Tg autoantibodies titers were very low compared to the plasma in subjects with thyroid disease (P=0.004, whereas, in subjects without thyroid disease, this difference did not reach statistical significance (P=0.063. Conclusions. Thyroid autoantibodies levels were low in plasma and CSF; we did not observe any transfer of thyroid autoantibodies from the peripheral blood to the CSF. Therefore, regarding Hashimoto’s encephalopathy, where elevated antithyroid autoantibodies are often measured in blood, it is more likely that thyroiditis and encephalopathy represent nonspecific, but distinct, events of an aggressive immune system.

  3. Antithyroglobulin Antibodies and Antimicrosomal Antibodies in Various Thyroid Diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Gwon Jun; Hong, Key Sak; Choi, Kang Won; Lee, Kyu; Koh, Chang Soon; Lee, Mun Ho; Park, Sung Hoe; Chi, Je Geun; Lee, Sang Kook [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1979-03-15

    The authors investigated the incidence of antithyroglobulin antibodies and antibodies and antimicrosomal antibodies measured by tanned red cell hemagglutination method in subjects suffering from various thyroid disorders. 1) In 15 normal patients, neither suffering from any thyroid diseases nor from any other autoimmune disorders, the antithyroglobulin antibodies were all negative, but the antimicrosomal antibody was positive only in one patient (6.7%). 2) The antithyroglobulin antibodies were positive in 31.5% (34 patients) of 108 patients with various thyroid diseases, and the antimicrosomal antibodies were positive in 37.0% (40 patients). 3) of the 25 patients with Graves' diseases, 7 patients (28.0%) showed positive for the antithyroglobulin antibodies, and 9 (36.0%) for the antimicrosomal antibodies. There was no definite differences in clinical and thyroid functions between the groups with positive and negative results. 4) Both antibodies were positive in 16 (88.9%) and 17 (94.4%) patients respectively among 18 patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis, all of them were diagnosed histologically. 5) Three out of 33 patients with thyroid adenoma showed positive antibodies, and 3 of 16 patients with thyroid carcinoma revealed positive antibodies. 6) TRCH antibodies demonstrated negative results in 2 patients with subacute thyroiditis, but positive in one patient with idiopathic primary myxedema. 7) The number of patients with high titers(>l:802) was 16 for antithyroglobulin antibody, and 62.5% (10 patients) of which was Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Thirteen (65.0) of 20 patients with high titers (>l:802) for antimicrosomal antibody was Hashimoto's thyroiditis. TRCH test is a simple, sensitive method, and has high reliability and reproducibility. The incidences and titers of antithyroglobulin antibody and antimicrosomal antibody are especially high in Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

  4. Autoimmune thyroid disease and CD4~+ CD25~+ regulatory T cell%自身免疫性甲状腺疾病和CD4~+CD25~+调节性T细胞

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侍晓云; 赵勇

    2010-01-01

    自身免疫性甲状腺疾病(AITD)的发生及发展与CD4~+CD25~+调节性T细胞(Treg细胞)的数量和功能密切相关.动物实验证明Treg细胞可抑制AITD的发生.如果清除动物体内的该类细胞,可导致AITD发病或使原有的甲状腺疾病加重,Treg细胞通过抑制效应性T细胞的激活而发挥对AITD的影响作用.无论是胸腺还是外周,不同诱导体系来源的Treg细胞均对AITD有影响作用.%The occurance and development of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD)is related with changes of quantities and function of CD4~+CD25~+ regulatory T(Treg) cells. Different studies indicated that Treg cells can inhibit the development of AITD. Depletion of Treg cells can improve the incidence of AITD or increase the severity of AITD. Treg cells play roles in inhibiting activation of effector T cell. No matter Treg cells or CD4~+ CD25~+ regulatory T cells generated in the periphery can influence the development of AITD.

  5. Thyroid Disease (for Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... symptoms usually disappear within a few days. After treatment for hyperthyroidism, hormone production often slows down to hypothyroid (underactive) levels, so the person needs to take a thyroid hormone replacement tablet each day. This treatment is a lot easier to manage than taking ...

  6. Thyroid Disease and Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... symptoms usually disappear within a few days. After treatment for hyperthyroidism, hormone production often slows down to hypothyroid (underactive) levels, so the person needs to take a thyroid hormone replacement tablet each day. This treatment is a lot easier to manage than taking ...

  7. [Treatment with tacrolimus in autoimmune diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sádaba, B; Azanza, J R; García Quetglas, E; Fernández, V

    2004-01-01

    Tacrolimus is an immunosuppressive drug used most successfully as a primary drug to suppress the rejection of transplants. Tacrolimus may also be useful as a novel therapy for autoimmune disease. There are various reports in the bibliography about the use of tacrolimus in the treatment of some autoimmune diseases: inflammatory bowel disease, autoimmune hepatitis, cutaneous, neurologic, renal, endocrine or eye disease. In this review of more than 130 papers, we discuss the rationale for the use of tacrolimus in autoimmune disease and report the clinical experience with the drug in the management of a variety of autoimmune diseases. But, although there are a lot questions that require future research (dose, duration of treatment, when to begin tacrolimus treatment, how to monitor it, etc.), there is also wide experience with tacrolimus in the treatment of this type of disease.

  8. The chronic autoimmune thyroiditis quality of life selenium trial (CATALYST)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Kristian Hillert; Watt, Torquil; Bjørner, Jakob Bue

    2014-01-01

    . Exclusion criteria: previous diagnosis of toxic nodular goitre, Graves' hyperthyroidism, postpartum thyroiditis, Graves' orbitopathy; previous antithyroid drug treatment, radioiodine therapy or thyroid surgery; immune-modulatory or other medication affecting thyroid function; pregnancy, planned pregnancy...

  9. Ultrasound diagnostics of thyroid diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kharchenko, Vladimir P. [Russian Radiology Research Center, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kotlyarov, Peter M. [Russian Center of Roentgenradiology, Moscow (Russian Federation); Mogutov, Mikhail S.; Sencha, Alexander N.; Patrunov, Yury N.; Belyaev, Denis V. [Yaroslavl Railway Clinic (Russian Federation); Alexandrov, Yury K. [State Medical Academy, Yaroslavl (Russian Federation)

    2010-07-01

    This book is based on the authors' extensive practical experience in the use of modern ultrasound, and other radiological methods, in the diagnosis of thyroid diseases. The authors have analyzed more than 100,000 ultrasound examinations performed between 1995 and 2008 in patients with thyroid and parathyroid disease, as well as many thousands of diagnostic and therapeutic ultrasound-guided minimally invasive procedures. The opening chapters include discussion of current ultrasound techniques, pitfalls, and the specifics of ultrasound examination of the thyroid in children. Detailed attention is then devoted to findings in the normal thyroid and in the presence of diffuse and focal changes. Further chapters focus on such topics as ultrasound examination after thyroid surgery and ultrasound diagnosis of parathyroid disease, recurrent goiter, and neck masses. Ultrasound-guided minimally invasive techniques, such as fine-needle aspiration biopsy, percutaneous laser ablation, and ethanol and glucocorticoid injections, are considered in depth. This up-to-date and richly illustrated book will interest and assist specialists in ultrasound diagnostics, radiologists, endocrinologists, and neck surgeons. (orig.)

  10. Diagnostic value of antithyroid peroxidase antibody for incidental autoimmune thyroiditis based on histopathologic results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rho, Myung Ho; Kim, Dong Wook; Hong, Hyun Pyo; Park, Young Mi; Kwon, Min Jeong; Jung, Soo Jin; Kim, Young Wook; Kang, Taewoo

    2012-12-01

    Detection of antithyroid peroxidase antibody (TPOAb) is widely used in the diagnosis of autoimmune thyroiditis (AIT), but no research has evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of TPOAb detection using histopathologic reference standards. To fill this research gap, this study assessed the diagnostic accuracy of detection of TPOAb and that of other serological markers in asymptomatic patients who had been diagnosed with AIT by histopathologic analysis after thyroid surgery. After review of patient records, 598 patients who had undergone thyroid nodule surgery were enrolled for examination for thyroid parenchyma by a pathologist and classification into no co-existing lymphocytic thyroiditis, Hashimoto thyroiditis, or non-Hashimoto type of lymphocytic thyroiditis (NHLT). The correlation between patient serological data and thyroid parenchyma pathology was analyzed. Statistically significant differences (P lymphocytic thyroiditis and no co-existing lymphocytic thyroiditis groups regarding thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and TPOAb levels. And, TPOAb titer was significantly associated with the degree of inflammation. An abnormal TPOAb titer was found in 86 of the 598 patients (14.4 %) and the specificity of TPOAb detection for AIT diagnosis was found to be 96.9 %. The prevalence of Hashimoto thyroiditis and NHLT in the 560 papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) patients was found to be 7.9 and 17.9 %, respectively. The results indicate that TPOAb titer is associated with the degree of thyroid inflammation and that detection of TPOAb is a very specific means of diagnosing AIT. The results also indicate that the incidence of AIT and PTC coexistence is relatively high.

  11. Rett syndrome: An autoimmune disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Felice, Claudio; Leoncini, Silvia; Signorini, Cinzia; Cortelazzo, Alessio; Rovero, Paolo; Durand, Thierry; Ciccoli, Lucia; Papini, Anna Maria; Hayek, Joussef

    2016-04-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a devastating neurodevelopmental disease, previously included into the autistic spectrum disorders, affecting almost exclusively females (frequency 1:10,000). RTT leads to intellective deficit, purposeful hands use loss and late major motor impairment besides featuring breathing disorders, epilepsy and increased risk of sudden death. The condition is caused in up to 95% of the cases by mutations in the X-linked methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene. Our group has shown a number of previously unrecognized features, such as systemic redox imbalance, chronic inflammatory status, respiratory bronchiolitis-associated interstitial lung disease-like lung disease, and erythrocyte morphology changes. While evidence on an intimate involvement of MeCP2 in the immune response is cumulating, we have recently shown a cytokine dysregulation in RTT. Increasing evidence on the relationship between MeCP2 and an immune dysfunction is reported, with, apparently, a link between MECP2 gene polymorphisms and autoimmune diseases, including primary Sjögren's syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and systemic sclerosis. Antineuronal (i.e., brain proteins) antibodies have been shown in RTT. Recently, high levels of anti-N-glucosylation (N-Glc) IgM serum autoantibodies [i.e., anti-CSF114(N-Glc) IgMs] have been detected by our group in a statistically significant number of RTT patients. In the current review, the Authors explore the current evidence, either in favor or against, the presence of an autoimmune component in RTT.

  12. The effect of Vitamin D treatment on thyroid function and the levels of thyroid autoantibodies, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β in patients with autoimmune thyroiditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fettah Acıbucu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the relationship between autoimmune thyroid disease and vitamin D treatment. Method: Fifty four (54 patients with both vitamin D deficiency and newly diagnosed euthyroid Hashimoto’s thyroiditis (HT were recruited for this study. The patients were given intramuscular administration of cholecalciferol at a dose of 300,000 IU/month for 3 months. At the time of diagnoses and after the treatment of vitamin D, free T3 (FT3, free T4 (FT4, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH, antithyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO, antithyroglobulin (anti-TG, 25 (OH D3, parathormone (PTH, calcium (Ca, phosphorus (P and alkaline phosphatase (ALP levels were measured in all patients; TNF-a, IL-6 and IL-1ß levels were measured in only 43 patients. Results: A statistically significant difference (p˂0.05 was observed between the pre and post treatment FT4, TSH, antiTPO, antiTG, PTH and ALP levels. After the treatment of vitamin D, a statistically significant increase was found in 25 (OH D3 and FT4 levels, and a significant decrease was found in TSH, antiTPO, antiTG, PTH and ALP levels, whereas no significant difference was noted in FT3, Ca, P, TNF- a, IL-6 and IL-1ß levels. Further, levels of vitamin D were not correlated with FT3, FT4, TSH, antiTPO, antiTG, TNF-a, IL-6 and IL-1ß levels (p˃0.05. Conclusions: For patients with both vitamin D deficiency and newly diagnosed HT, treatment of vitamin D had a positive effect on the thyroid antigenicity and thyroid function.

  13. Prognostic factors of the outcomes of subtotal thyroid resection in graves disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A J Tsurkan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The long-term results of subtotal resection of thyroid gland on 82 patients with Graves' disease were studied. There was analysed the influence of three factors on outcome at Graves' disease: volume of a thyroid gland before operation, morphological structure of thyroid tissue and volume of thyroid remnant. Outcomes of subtotal resection of thyroid gland were studied on the basis of thyrotropic hormone level of blood in 3, 6, 12 months, 2 and 3 years after operation. Based on research it has been established that the volume of thyroid gland before operation does not influence to outcome of subtotal resection of thyroid gland with Graves' disease. Morphological changes of removed thyroid tissue in the form of colloidal nodules at patients with Graves' disease statistically significantly raise risk of development of postoperative complications after subtotal resection of thyroid gland. The surgeon defining the volume of thyroid rem-nant durng the operation could be mistaken as towards it's increase so towards it's reduction, with an average deviation about 35%. Various outcomes of subtotal resection of thyroid gland at the same volume of thyroid remnant let us conclude that this out-come depends more on intensity of autoimmune process rather than on the volume of thyroid remnant. According modern views to aetiology and patogenesis of Graves' disease, the optimum volume of operation at Graves' disease is thyroidectomy.

  14. Possible activation of auto-immune thyroiditis from continuous subcutaneous infusion of genapol-containing insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantelau, E

    2000-09-01

    A case of a type 1 diabetic woman with auto-immune thyroiditis is reported, in whom repeated exposure to insulin containing Genapol(R) (polyethylen-polypropylenglycol) over 3 years reproducibly parallels with an increase of serum TSH (thyroid-stimulating hormone) above the normal limit. Previously, adverse effects of Genapol(R) insulin have been related to its intraperitoneal application, and thought to be restricted to anti-insulin-immunity; activating effects on thyroid auto-immunity have been repeatedly disputed. We suggest that Genapol(R) insulin should be replaced by other insulin preparations with a better safety record.

  15. Obesity in autoimmune diseases: not a passive bystander.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versini, Mathilde; Jeandel, Pierre-Yves; Rosenthal, Eric; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2014-09-01

    In the last decades, autoimmune diseases have experienced a dramatic increase in Western countries. The involvement of environmental factors is strongly suspected to explain this rise. Particularly, over the same period, obesity has followed the same outbreak. Since the exciting discovery of the secretory properties of adipose tissue, the relationship between obesity and autoimmunity and the understanding of the underlying mechanisms have become of major interest. Indeed, the fat tissue has been found to produce a wide variety of "adipokines", involved in the regulation of numerous physiological functions, including the immune response. By conducting a systematic literature review, we extracted 329 articles regarding clinical, experimental and pathophysiological data on the relationship between obesity, adipokines - namely leptin, adiponectin, resistin, visfatin - and various immune-mediated conditions, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), multiple sclerosis (MS), type-1 diabetes (T1D), psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA), and thyroid autoimmunity (TAI), especially Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT). The strongest levels of evidence support an increased risk of RA (OR=1.2-3.4), MS (OR=2), psoriasis and PsA (OR=1.48-6.46) in obese subjects. A higher risk of IBD, T1D and TAI is also suggested. Moreover, obesity worsens the course of RA, SLE, IBD, psoriasis and PsA, and impairs the treatment response of RA, IBD, psoriasis and PsA. Extensive clinical data and experimental models demonstrate the involvement of adipokines in the pathogenesis of these autoimmune diseases. Obesity appears to be a major environmental factor contributing to the onset and progression of autoimmune diseases.

  16. Unusual pediatric co-morbility: autoimmune thyroiditis and cortico-resistant nephrotic syndrome in a 6-month-old Italian patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbano, Flavia; Acquafredda, Angelo; Aceto, Gabriella; Penza, Rosa; Cavallo, Luciano

    2012-10-23

    We report on a case of autoimmune thyroiditis in a 6-month-old patient with cortico-resistant nephrotic syndrome. Normal serum levels of thyroid hormons and thyroid-stimulating hormone were detected with high titers of circulant antithyroid antibodies and a dysomogeneous ultrasound appearance of the gland, typical of autoimmune thyroiditis. The research of maternal thyroid antibodies was negative. This is the first case of autoimmune thyroiditis found in such a young patient with pre-existing nephrotic syndrome ever described in literature. This association is random because nephrotic syndrome does not have an autoimmune pathogenesis and the genes involved in autoimmune thyroiditis are not related to those of nephrotic syndrome.

  17. Parkinson's disease: Autoimmunity and neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Virgilio, Armando; Greco, Antonio; Fabbrini, Giovanni; Inghilleri, Maurizio; Rizzo, Maria Ida; Gallo, Andrea; Conte, Michela; Rosato, Chiara; Ciniglio Appiani, Mario; de Vincentiis, Marco

    2016-10-01

    Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disease that causes the death of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. The resulting dopamine deficiency in the basal ganglia leads to a movement disorder that is characterized by classical parkinsonian motor symptoms. Parkinson's disease is recognized as the most common neurodegenerative disorder after Alzheimer's disease. PD ethiopathogenesis remains to be elucidated and has been connected to genetic, environmental and immunologic conditions. The past decade has provided evidence for a significant role of the immune system in PD pathogenesis, either through inflammation or an autoimmune response. Several autoantibodies directed at antigens associated with PD pathogenesis have been identified in PD patients. This immune activation may be the cause of, rather than a response to, the observed neuronal loss. Parkinsonian motor symptoms include bradykinesia, muscular rigidity and resting tremor. The non-motor features include olfactory dysfunction, cognitive impairment, psychiatric symptoms and autonomic dysfunction. Microscopically, the specific degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and the presence of Lewy bodies, which are brain deposits containing a substantial amount of α-synuclein, have been recognized. The progression of Parkinson's disease is characterized by a worsening of motor features; however, as the disease progresses, there is an emergence of complications related to long-term symptomatic treatment. The available therapies for Parkinson's disease only treat the symptoms of the disease. A major goal of Parkinson's disease research is the development of disease-modifying drugs that slow or stop the neurodegenerative process. Drugs that enhance the intracerebral dopamine concentrations or stimulate dopamine receptors remain the mainstay treatment for motor symptoms. Immunomodulatory therapeutic strategies aiming to attenuate PD neurodegeneration have become an attractive option and

  18. Autoimmune hepatitis: a classic autoimmune liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moy, Libia; Levine, Jeremiah

    2014-12-01

    AIH is characterized by chronic inflammation of the liver, interface hepatitis, hypergammaglobulinemia, and production of autoantibodies. Based on the nature of the serum autoantibodies, two types of AIH are recognized: type 1 (AIH-1), positive for ANA and/or anti-smooth muscle antibody, and type 2 (AIH-2), defined by the positivity for anti-liver kidney microsomal type 1 antibody or for anti-liver cytosol type 1 antibody. AIH demonstrates a female preponderance with the female-to-male ratio of 4:1 in AIH-1 and 10:1 in AIH-2. Several genes confer susceptibility to AIH and influence clinical manifestation, response to treatment, and overall prognosis. Most are located within the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region, which is involved in the presentation of antigenic peptides to T cells and thus in the initiation of adaptive immune responses. The strongest associations are found within the HLA-DRB1 locus. In patients with increased genetic susceptibility to AIH, immune responses to liver autoantigens could be triggered by molecular mimicry. Because of molecular mimicry, different environmental agents, drugs, and viruses might produce AIH. In AIH, T cells are numerically and functionally impaired, permitting the perpetuation of effector immune responses with ensuing persistent liver destruction. AIH is rare but highly treatable inflammatory condition of the liver. Subclinical and asymptomatic disease is common. AIH therefore needs to be considered in the differential diagnosis of all patients with elevated liver enzymes. Clinical response to immunosuppressive therapy is characteristic and supports the diagnosis.

  19. A meta-analysis of selenium in the treatment of autoimmune thyroid diseases%硒治疗自身免疫性甲状腺疾病的荟萃分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    房方; 卫红艳; 王坤玲; 朱梅

    2016-01-01

    目的 评价元素硒治疗自身免疫性甲状腺疾病(AITD)的有效性和安全性.方法 通过5个数据库(MEDLINE,Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials,中国期刊全文数据库,中国生物医学文献数据库和维普数据库)检索所有研究元素硒治疗AITD的随机对照试验(RCT).由两名研究者独立筛选文献、提取数据和进行结果的统计分析.将结果数据形式一致的同类临床试验的结果进行荟萃分析,对不能荟萃分析的数据进行描述性分析.共纳入30项RCT,涉及2 963例AITD患者.结果 (1)与对照组相比,硒治疗组桥本甲状腺炎患者甲状腺过氧化物酶抗体(TPOAb)和甲状腺球蛋白抗体(TgAb)水平明显下降[标准化均数差(SMD)=-1.35,95% CI:-1.93~-0.67,P <0.000 01和SMD=-0.92,95% CI:-1.53~-0.31,P<0.01].(2)硒治疗组与对照组相比,Graves病患者促甲状腺激素受体抗体(TRAb)水平降低(均数差=-2.5,95% CI:-2.99~-2.01,P<0.000 01).(3)元素硒可以降低Graves病患者血清游离T3(FT3)和游离T4(FT4)水平(均数差=-1.57,95% CI:-2.56~-0.58,P<0.001和均数差=-3.74,95% CI:-5.65~-1.82,P=0.000 01),但对桥本甲状腺炎患者FT3、FT4和促甲状腺激素的作用不明显(P均>0.05).结论 对AITD患者使用200 μg∥d的元素硒治疗3~12个月,能够有效降低抗甲状腺自身抗体(TPOAb,TgAb和TRAb)的水平,并具有较好的安全性.%Objective To assess the effectiveness and safety of selenium in the treatment of autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD).Methods Five databases (MEDLINE,Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials,CBM,CNKI and VIP) were searched for all randomized controlled trial (RCT) which investigating the effectiveness of selenium in the treatment of AITD.Two authors independently selected studies,extracted data and analyzed the results.Meta-analyses were performed when more than one study with sufficient similarity provided data on an outcome.Thirty RCTs were included involving

  20. Autoimmune diseases in women with Turner's syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kristian T; Rostgaard, Klaus; Bache, Iben;

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In terms of number of X chromosomes, women with Turner's syndrome cytogenetically resemble men. An increased risk of autoimmune diseases has been observed among women with Turner's syndrome. This study was undertaken to investigate whether the autoimmune disease profile in women...... with Turner's syndrome is characterized by diseases with a female or male predominance. METHODS: Using the Danish Cytogenetic Central Register, the Danish National Patient Register, and the Danish Civil Registration System, we estimated relative risk of 46 different autoimmune diseases in a cohort of 798...... Danish women with Turner's syndrome followed up for 12,461 person-years between 1980 and 2004. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) of first hospitalization for autoimmune disease and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were used as measures of relative risk. RESULTS: The overall risk of autoimmune...

  1. Screening for thyroid disease among children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Magdy A. Omar; Moustafa M. Rizk; El-Kafoury, Ahmed A; Doaa Kilany

    2014-01-01

    Altered thyroid hormones have been described in patients with diabetes especially those with poor glycemic control. The aim of this work was to evaluate; the presence of serum anti-thyroid peroxidase (serum anti-TPO) autoantibodies and the prevalence of autoimmune thyroid disease in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Patients and methods: Fifty diabetic children coming for regular follow-up in the diabetes clinic of El-Shatby University Children’s Hospital were enrolled in the study a...

  2. TG-Ab、TPO-Ab定量检测在自身免疫性甲状腺疾病诊断中的作用%The major role of quantitative detection of TG-Ab and TPO-Ab in helping diagnosis in autoimmune thyroid diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张保珍

    2015-01-01

    Obiective To investigate the role of the serum anti thyroglobulin antibody (TG-Ab) and anti thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPO-Ab) in diagnosis of different kinds of autoimmune thyroid diseases. Methods The levels of TG-Ab and TPO-Ab were tested in different kinds of autoimmune thyroid diseases by using electrochemical luminescence methods and then we compared the levels of TG-Ab and TPO-Ab among different groups. Conclusion Different autoimmune thyroid diseases showed different levels of TG-Ab and TPO-Ab significantly. It suggests that quantitative detection of TG-Ab and TPO-Ab can help diagnosis and differential diagnosis.%目的:探讨定量检测血清抗甲状腺球蛋白抗体(TG-Ab)和抗甲状腺过氧化物酶抗体(TPO-Ab)在自身免疫性甲状腺疾病诊断中的作用。方法用电化学发光方法检测不同甲状腺疾病患者血清抗甲状腺球蛋白抗体(TG-Ab)、抗甲状腺过氧化物酶抗体(TPO-Ab)水平,比较不同甲状腺疾病患者及正常对照组之间TG-Ab、TPO-Ab水平的差异。结果血清TG-Ab、TPO-Ab在不同甲状腺自身免疫性疾病中水平不一。结论 TG-Ab、TPO-Ab定量检测可帮助甲状腺自身免疫性疾病的诊断及鉴别诊断。

  3. Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 2 manifested as Hashimoto's thyroiditis and adrenocortical insufficiency, in Turner syndrome woman, with onset following introduction of treatment with recombinant human growth hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyniak-Magierska, Anna; Lasoń, Agnieszka; Smyczyńska, Joanna; Lewiński, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome is a constellation of signs and symptoms of simultaneous insufficiencies of several endocrine glands. Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 2 (APS 2) may be diagnosed when the adrenocortical insufficiency is associated with an autoimmune thyroid disease (Hashimoto's thyroiditis or Graves' disease), and/or insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Turner syndrome is the most common chromosomal disorder in females, caused by complete or partial X chromosome monosomy. We present the case of a 20-year-old woman with Turner syndrome, in whom APS 2 (Hashimoto's thyroiditis and adrenocortical insufficiency) has been diagnosed after introduction of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) therapy. In Turner syndrome, examination of the patient must regularly be conducted in order to diagnose a possible onset of autoimmune diseases; respective treatment must be applied as soon as the diagnosis is established. In particular, therapy of rhGH, used for short stature treatment, may be a trigger factor of adrenal insufficiency. The cortisol level in blood should be assessed before rhGH administration and carefully monitored during the therapy, especially in case of autoimmune thyroid disease coexistence.

  4. Recurrence of autoimmune liver diseases after livertransplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) is the most effective treatmentmodality for end stage liver disease caused by manyetiologies including autoimmune processes. That said,the need for transplantation for autoimmune hepatitis(AIH) and primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), but not forprimary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), has decreasedover the years due to the availability of effective medicaltreatment. Autoimmune liver diseases have superiortransplant outcomes than those of other etiologies. WhileAIH and PBC can recur after LT, recurrence is of limitedclinical significance in most, but not all cases. RecurrentPSC, however, often progresses over years to a stagerequiring re-transplantation. The exact incidence andthe predisposing factors of disease recurrence remaindebated. Better understanding of the pathogenesis andthe risk factors of recurrent autoimmune liver diseasesis required to develop preventive measures. In thisreview, we discuss the current knowledge of incidence,diagnosis, risk factors, clinical course, and treatmentof recurrent autoimmune liver disease (AIH, PBC, PSC)following LT.

  5. 355 Ocular Muscles Myopathy Associated with Autoimmune Thyroiditis. Case Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Camaño, Eugenia; Castrejon-Vázquez, Isabel; Plazola-Hernández, Sara I.; Moguel-Ancheita, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    Background Thyroid-associated orbitopathy is commonly associated with Graves' disease with lid retraction, exophthalmos, and periorbital swelling, but rarely with autoimmune thyroiditis or euthyroid state. We reviewed 3 cases from our hospital whose antibodies to anti-receptor of TSH were normal. Methods Case 1: 60 year-old non-diabetic woman with bilateral glaucoma in treatment, recurrent media otitis and euthyroidism, acute onset of painless diplopia, and lid ptosis in the left eye. MRI of orbit showed increased size of the III right cranial pair and high levels of thyroid autoantibodies (Tab) anti-tiroglobulin (ATG) 115.1, anti-thyroid peroxidase (ATPO) 1751 U/mL. She started oral deflazacort 30 mg each 3 days. Sixty days later, complete remission of eye symptoms correlated with lower auto-antibodies level (ATG 19 ATPO 117). Case 2: 10 year-old girl. At age 8, she had diplopia, lid ptosis and limitations of upper gaze in the left eye. The neurological study discarded ocular myasthenia; with thyroid goitier, and hypothyrodism, she started oral levothyroxin. At age 10 with normal IRM Botulinic toxin was injected, without change. High levels of Tab were found, ATG 2723, ATPO 10.7. She started oral deflazacort 30 mg each 3 days, azathioprin 100 mg, daily. Actually, Tab levels are almost normal, but she remains with ocular alterations. Case 3: 56 year-old woman, Grave´s disease with exophtalmos in 1990, treated with I131 and immunosupression, with good outcome; obesity, hypertension and bilateral glaucoma in treatment. She suddenly presented diplopia and IV pair paresia of the right eye. A year later, ATb were found slightly elevated, ATG 100 years ATPO 227; despite prednisone 50 mg, each 3 days and azathioprin 150 mg/daily treatment, a surgical procedure was required for relieve the ocular symptoms. Results We found only 3 cases previously reported with this type of eye thyroid disease. Is important to note that awareness of this atypical form of orbitopathy

  6. Transplantation in autoimmune liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marcus Mottershead; James Neuberger

    2008-01-01

    Liver transplantation remains an effective treatment for those with end-stage disease and with intractable liver-related symptoms.The shortage of organs for transplantation has resulted in the need for rationing.A variety of approaches to selection and allocation have been developed and vary from country to country.The shortage of donors has meant that new approaches have to be adopted to make maximal use of the available organs;these include splitting grafts,use of extended criteria livers,livers from nonheart-beating donors and from living donors.Post transplantation, most patients will need life-long immunosuppression,although a small proportion can have immunosuppression successfully withdrawn.Newer immunosuppressive drugs and different strategies may allow a more targeted approach with a reduction in sideeffects and so improve the patient and graft survival.For autoimmune diseases, transplantation is associated with significant improvement in the quality and length of life.Disease may recur after transplantation and may affect patient and graft survival.

  7. 成人晚发性自身免疫糖尿病与自身免疫性甲状腺疾病的相关性研究%Correlation study of autoimmune thyroid disease and latent autoimmune diabetes in adults

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄秉文; 方咏红; 卢颖瑜; 郭春花; 王运林

    2015-01-01

    目的 探讨成人晚发性自身免疫糖尿病(LADA)与自身免疫性甲状腺疾病(AITD)的关系,并分析LADA患者发生AITD的危险因素.方法 对80例LADA患者、80例2型糖尿病(T2DM)患者和80例健康对照者进行游离三碘甲腺原氨酸(FT3)、血清游离甲状腺素(FT4)、血清超敏促甲状腺素(uTSH)、甲状腺过氧化物酶抗体(TPO-Ab)、甲状腺球蛋白抗体(TG-Ab)检测.糖尿病患者还进行谷氨酸脱羧酶抗体(GADA)、胰岛素自身抗体(IAA)、胰岛细胞抗体(ICA)检测.采用放免法检测TPO-Ab、TG-Ab、FT3、FT4,直接化学发光法检测uTSH,放射配体法检测GADA、IAA、ICA.随访2年后对以上指标进行复查.结果 (1) LADA患者的基线TG-Ab及TPO-Ab阳性率分别为18.8%、21.3%,均高于T2DM患者的8.8%、13.8%和健康对照者的10.0%、12.5%,差异均有统计学意义(P0.05).(3)高滴度GADA的LADA患者与低滴度的LADA患者比较,随访前后TG-Ab阳性率均较高(25.0%vs 15.4%和32.1%vs 15.4%,P均0.05).(4) Logistic回归分析显示,女性、高滴度GADA、入组时甲状腺自身抗体(TPO-Ab、TG-Ab)阳性是LADA患者未来发生甲状腺功能异常的危险因素.结论 LADA患者,尤其是高滴度GADA者,发生甲状腺自身免疫紊乱的风险高于T2DM及健康对照者;女性、高滴度GADA、甲状腺自身抗体阳性是LADA患者将来发生甲状腺功能异常的危险因素;由于LADA有并发甲状腺功能异常的风险,推荐在LADA患者中常规筛查甲状腺自身抗体.%Objective To investigate the relationship between latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LA-DA) and autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), and to analyze the risk factors for AITD in patients with LADA. Methods Eighty patients of LADA, 80 patients of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and 80 healthy subjects were recruited. Physical examination was performed and sera were sampled for the measurement of thyroid peroxidase anti-body (TPO-Ab), thyroglobulin antibody (TG-Ab), glutamic acid

  8. A systematic review of the incidence and prevalence of autoimmune disease in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marrie, Ruth Ann; Reider, Nadia; Cohen, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    studied, methods of ascertaining comorbidity, and reporting of findings. Based solely on population-based studies, the most prevalent autoimmune comorbidities were psoriasis (7.74%) and thyroid disease (6.44%). Our findings also suggest an increased risk of inflammatory bowel disease, likely uveitis...

  9. Criteria for Environmentally Associated Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, K. Michael; Parks, Christine G.; Germolec, Dori R.; Leung, Patrick S.C.; Selmi, Carlo; Humble, Michael C.; Rose, Noel R.

    2012-01-01

    Increasing evidence supports a role for the environment in the development of autoimmune diseases, as reviewed in the accompanying three papers from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Expert Panel Workshop. An important unresolved issue, however, is the development of criteria for identifying autoimmune disease phenotypes for which the environment plays a causative role, herein referred to as environmentally associated autoimmune diseases. There are several different areas in which such criteria need to be developed, including: 1) identifying the necessary and sufficient data to define environmental risk factors for autoimmune diseases meeting current classification criteria; 2) establishing the existence of and criteria for new environmentally associated autoimmune disorders that do not meet current disease classification criteria; and 3) identifying in clinical practice specific environmental agents that induce autoimmune disease in individual patients. Here we discuss approaches that could be useful for developing criteria in these three areas, as well as factors that should be considered in evaluating the evidence for criteria that can distinguish individuals with such disorders from individuals without such disorders with high sensitivity and specificity. Current studies suggest that multiple lines of complementary evidence will be important and that in many cases there will be clinical, serologic, genetic, epigenetic, and/or other laboratory features that could be incorporated as criteria for environmentally associated autoimmune diseases to improve diagnosis and treatment and possibly allow for preventative strategies in the future. PMID:22771005

  10. Chronic urticaria in patients with autoimmune thyroiditis: Significance of severity of thyroid gland inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Gulec

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is a clear association between autoimmune thyroiditis (AT and chronic urticaria/angioedema (CUA. However, not all patients with AT demonstrate urticaria. Aims: The aim of the study was to investigate in which patients with AT did CUA become a problem. A sensitive inflammation marker, neopterine (NP was used to confirm whether the severity of inflammation in the thyroid gland was responsible for urticaria or not. Methods: Neopterine levels were assessed in patients with AT with urticaria and without urticaria. Furthermore, levels were compared in relation to pre and post levothyroxine treatment. Twenty-seven patients with urticaria (Group 1 and 28 patients without urticaria (Group 2 were enrolled in the study. A course of levothyroxine treatment was given to all patients, and urine neopterine levels before and after the trial were obtained. Results: All patients completed the trial. Mean age in Group 1 and Group 2 was similar (35.70 ± 10.86 years and 38.36 ± 10.38 years, respectively (P=0.358. Pre-treatment urine neopterine levels were significantly higher in Group 1 (P=0.012. Post-treatment levels decreased in each group, as expected. However, the decrease in the neopterine level was insignificant in the patients of Group 2 (P=0.282. In Group 1, a significant decrease in post-treatment neopterine levels (P=0.015 was associated with the remission of urticaria. Conclusion: In patients with CUA and AT, pre-treatment elevated levels of NP, and its decrease with levothyroxine treatment along with symptomatic relief in urticaria, may be evidence of the relationship between the degree of inflammation in thyroid and presence of urticaria.

  11. Epitope recognition patterns of thyroid peroxidase autoantibodies in healthy individuals and patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis*

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus H; Brix, Thomas H; Gardas, Andrzej;

    2008-01-01

    Thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAb) are markers of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), including Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT), but naturally occurring TPOAb are also detectable in healthy, euthyroid individuals. In AITD, circulating TPOAb react mainly with two immunodominant regions (IDR), IDR...

  12. Ethical issues in the management of thyroid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, M Sara

    2014-06-01

    The focus of this article is on clinical ethics issues in the thyroid disease context. Clinical ethics is a subspecialty of bioethics that deals with bedside ethical dilemmas that specifically involve the provider-patient relationship. Such issues include consent and capacity; weighing therapeutic benefits against risks and side-effects; innovative therapies; end of life care; unintended versus intentional harms to patients or patient populations; and healthcare access. This article will review core ethical principles for practice, as well as the moral and legal requirements of informed consent. It will then discuss the range of unique and universal ethical issues and considerations that present in the management of autoimmune thyroid disease and thyroid cancer.

  13. Newborn of mothers affected by autoimmune thyroiditis: the importance of thyroid function monitoring in the first months of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosca Fabio

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background evaluation of thyroid function in neonates born from mothers affected by autoimmune thyroiditis in order to define if a precise follow-up is necessary for these children. The influence of maternal thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPOAb and L-thyroxine therapy during pregnancy on neonatal thyroid function was also investigated. Methods 129 neonates were tested for thyroid function by measurement of free thyroxine (FT4 and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH in 3th day, 15th day and at one month of life. TPOAb were measured in all patients; periodical control of thyroid function were performed until 6 months of life if Ab were positive. Data concerning etiology of maternal hypothyroidism and maternal replacement therapy with L-thyroxine during pregnancy were retrospectively collected. Results 28% neonates showed at least a mild increase of TSH value at the different determinations. In the majority of them, a spontaneous completely normalisation of TSH value was observed within the first month life. L-thyroxine replacement therapy was started in 3 neonates. TPOAb titer and maternal L-thyroxine replacement therapy were not related to alteration of thyroid hormone function in our study population. Conclusions transient mild elevation of serum TSH above the normal reference value for age is frequently observed in the first month of life in infants born from mothers affected by autoimmune thyroiditis. Persistent hyperthyrotropinemia requiring replacement therapy is observed in 2.2% of these neonates. According to our experience, follow-up is recommended in these newborns; the most accurate and not invasive way to carefully monitor these infants after neonatal screening for CH seems to be serum-testing TSH between 2ndand 4th week of life.

  14. Thyroid gland in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miłkowska-Dymanowska, Joanna; Białas, Adam J; Laskowska, Paulina; Górski, Paweł; Piotrowski, Wojciech J

    2017-01-01

    The risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), as well as thyroid diseases increases with age. COPD is a common systemic disease associated with chronic inflammation. Many endocrinological disorders, including thyroid gland diseases are related to systemic inflammation. Epidemiological studies suggest that patients with COPD are at higher risk of thyroid disorders. These associations are not well-studied and thyroid gland diseases are not included on the broadly acknowledged list of COPD comorbidities. They may seriously handicap quality of life of COPD patients. Unfortunately, the diagnosis may be difficult, as many signs are masked by the symptoms of the index disease. The comprehension of the correlation between thyroid gland disorders and COPD may contribute to better care of patients. In this review, we attempt to revise available literature describing existing links between COPD and thyroid diseases.

  15. Clinical analysis on children with diabetes mellitus combined with autoimmune thyroid disease%儿童糖尿病合并自身免疫性甲状腺疾病临床分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨曙晖; 赵奕怀; 沈闲茹; 谢培文

    2012-01-01

    目的:研究儿童糖尿病(diabetes mellitus,DM)合并自身免疫性甲状腺疾病(autoimmune thyroid disease,AITD)患者的临床特征,为该类疾病的治疗提供临床依据.方法:选择37例DM合并AITD儿童,其中1型糖尿病(T1DM)患者27例,2型糖尿病(T2DM)患者10例,并以32例健康体检者为对照组进行比较,分别检测甲状腺过氧化物酶抗体(TPO-Ab)、甲状腺球蛋白抗体(TG-Ab)、促甲状腺激素受体抗体(TR-Ab)的水平,同时检测糖尿病组患者的谷氨酸脱羧酶抗体(GAD-Ab);分析DM与AITD的并发情况.结果:T1DM合并AITD的患者中,桥本氏病占59.3%,Graves病占40.7%;T2DM合并AITD的患者中,桥本氏病占60.0%,Graves病占40.0%;T1DM组任一甲状腺抗体(包括TPO-Ab、TG-Ab和TR-Ab)阳性检出率为44.4%,明显高于T2DM组和对照组(P<0.05);GAD-Ab阳性的T1DM组患者任一甲状腺抗体阳性检测率为52.6%,明显高于GAD-Ab阴性的T1DM患者(P<0.05).结论:不同类型糖尿病对于AITD的分型无明显影响,与T2DM和健康人群比较,T1DM患者更容易并发AITD,其中GAD-Ab阳性的患者并发AITD的比例要高于GAD-Ab阴性的患者.%Objective:To research the clinical characteristics of children with diabetes mellitus (DM) combined with autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), provide a clinical basis for treatment Methods: A total of 37 children with DM combined with AITD were selected, including 27 children with T1DM and 10 children with T2DM; 32 healthy children receiving physical examination were selected as control group, then the results in the two groups were compared. The levels of thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPO - Ab), thyroglobulin antibody (TG -Ab) ,and thyrotropin receptor antibody.(TR - Ab) were detected; the level of glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody (GAD - Ab) was detected during the same period; the complications of DM and AITD were analyzed. Results: Among the children with Tl DM combined with AITD , the proportions of Hashimotos

  16. Evaluation of Thyroid Diseases by Hormonal Analysis in Pediatric Age Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayana A Shah

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Among endocrine disorders commonly encountered in pediatric age group, thyroid diseases are more frequent. Congenital hypothyroidism is one of the major problems in this age with worldwide incidence of 1:3000-4000 live birth and in India it is 1:2500-2800. Objectives: The aim of this study is to know the prevalence of thyroid diseases in newborn and children by hormonal evaluation. Methodology: We have studied 50 children suspected of having signs and symptoms of thyroid diseases. Hormonal evaluation was done by the estimation of serum TSH, T3 and T4. Results: Out of total 50 children, 16 were detected with abnormal hormone level and diagnosed having thyroid diseases. Out of 16 affected children, 4 had congenital hypothyroidism (25%, 6 had subclinical or acquired hypothyroidism (37.5%, 3 had autoimmune thyroiditis (18.75% and 3 had goiter with graves disease (18.75%. Conclusion: Congenital hypothyroidism is one of the major preventable thyroid disease if diagnosed early. Other thyroid diseases commonly seen in pediatric age are subclinical hypothyroidism, autoimmune thyroiditis, goiter and rarely hyperthyroidism. [Natl J Med Res 2013; 3(4.000: 367-370

  17. How pregnancy can affect autoimmune diseases progression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccinni, Marie-Pierre; Lombardelli, Letizia; Logiodice, Federica; Kullolli, Ornela; Parronchi, Paola; Romagnani, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune disorders are characterized by tissue damage, caused by self-reactivity of different effectors mechanisms of the immune system, namely antibodies and T cells. Their occurrence may be associated with genetic and/or environmental predisposition and to some extent, have implications for fertility and obstetrics. The relationship between autoimmunity and reproduction is bidirectional. This review only addresses the impact of pregnancy on autoimmune diseases and not the influence of autoimmunity on pregnancy development. Th17/Th1-type cells are aggressive and pathogenic in many autoimmune disorders and inflammatory diseases. The immunology of pregnancy underlies the role of Th2-type cytokines to maintain the tolerance of the mother towards the fetal semi-allograft. Non-specific factors, including hormonal changes, favor a switch to Th2-type cytokine profile. In pregnancy Th2, Th17/Th2 and Treg cells accumulate in the decidua but may also be present in the mother's circulation and can regulate autoimmune responses influencing the progression of autoimmune diseases.

  18. Unexpected esophageal diseases appeared in thyroid resections

    OpenAIRE

    Ye-huan, Liu; Shi-xu, Lyu; Yi-li, Zhou; Ou-chen, Wang; Xiao-hua, Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Objective In order to avoid the misdiagnosis of thyroid diseases, we need to discuss the clinical features and diagnostic methods of cervical esophageal cancer and Zenker’s diverticulum. Methods The clinical and laboratory data of seven cases were reviewed retrospectively, and in all cases, esophageal-related diseases were misdiagnosed as thyroid diseases preoperatively. Among them, two cases were cervical esophageal cancer metastasized to thyroids but initially, they were misdiagnosed as thy...

  19. [Autoimmune connective tissue diseases and vaccination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Więsik-Szewczyk, Ewa; Jahnz-Różyk, Karina

    2015-12-31

    The idea that infectious agents can induce autoimmune diseases in genetically susceptible subjects has been a matter of discussion for years. Moreover, increased incidence of autoimmune diseases and introduction of prophylactic vaccinations from early childhood suggest that these two trends are linked. In the medical literature and even non-professional media, case reports or events temporally related to vaccination are reported. It raises the issue of vaccination safety. In everyday practice medical professionals, physicians, rheumatologists and other specialists will be asked their opinion of vaccination safety. The decision should be made according to evidence-based medicine and the current state of knowledge. The purpose of this paper is to discuss a potential mechanism which links infections, vaccinations and autoimmunity. We present an overview of published case reports, especially of systemic connective tissue diseases temporally related to vaccination and results from case-nested studies. As yet, no conclusive evidence supports a causal relationship between vaccination and autoimmune diseases. It has to be determined whether the performed studies are sufficiently sensitive to detect the link. The debate is ongoing, and new data may be required to explain the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. We would like to underscore the need for prophylactic vaccination in patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases and to break down the myth that the vaccines are contraindicated in this target group.

  20. Analysis of the Expression of Fas, FasL and Bcl-2 in the Pathogenesis of Autoimmune Thyroid Disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shenren Chen; S.M.Fazle Akbar; Zhichao Zhen; Yiping Luo; Lijuan Deng; Haihua Huang; Linxin Chen; Wei Li

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the expression of apoptosis-related protein (Fas, FasL, and Bcl-2) in the pathogenesis of autoimmune thyroid disorders (ATDs), immunohistochemical staining was performed on 20 Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT), 20 Graves' disease (GD), and 20 thyroid follicular adenoma (TFA, as control). All the cases expressed Fas, mainly on the cell surface and cytoplasm. FasL was found in 17 cases of the TFA. Bcl-2 was detected in 15 cases of HT, 19 of GD and 17 of TFA. In TFA, a moderate Fas expression and a minimal or no FasL expression was detected on follicular cells. In HT, the follicles adjacent to infiltrating lymphocytes showed increased levels of Fas and FasL expression. A weaker staining of Fas and FasL was exhibited on infiltrating lymphocytes than on thyrocytes. In a comparison of GD with HT, thyrocytes and lymphocytes showed similar Fas staining, but for FasL the staining was rather weaker in HT. The expression of Bcl-2 was nearly identical in GD and TFA, but much weaker on the follicular cells in vicinity of lymphocytes and on the lymphocytes located in germinal centers of HT tissues. The expression of Fas, FasL, Bcl-2 in Hashimoto's thyroiditis and Graves' disease were almost same. FasL strong expression and Bcl-2 weak expression on the follicles in HT may induce apoptosis. These results provided evidence for expression of Fas, FasL and Bcl-2 in the pathogenesis of autoimmune thyroid disease. The lymphocytes seem not to be directly engaged in the process via their own FasL, but they may provide some cytokines that, in turn, upregulate Fas and/or FasL expression to induce apoptosis.

  1. Analysis of the Expression of Fas, FasL and Bcl-2 in the Pathogenesis of Autoimmune Thyroid Disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ShenrenChen; S.M.FazleAkbar; ZhichaoZhen; YipingLuo; LijuanDeng; HaihuaHuang; LinxinChen; WeiLi

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the expression of apoptosis-related protein (Fas, FasL, and Bcl-2) in the pathogenesis of autoimmune thyroid disorders (ATDs), immunohistochemical staining was performed on 20 Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT), 20 Graves' disease (GD), and 20 thyroid follicular adenoma (TFA, as control). All the cases expressed Fas, mainly on the cell surface and cytoplasm. FasL was found in 17 cases of the TFA. Bcl-2 was detected in 15 cases of HT, 19 of GD and 17 of TFA. In T FA, a moderate Fas expression and a minimal or no FasL expression was detected on follicular cells. In HT, the follicles adjacent to infiltrating lymphocytes showed increased levels of Fas and FasL expression. A weaker staining of Fas and FasL was exhibited on infiltrating lymphocytes than on thyrocytes. In a comparison of GD with HT, thyrocytes and lymphocytes showed similar Fas staining, but for FasL the staining was rather weaker in HT. The expression of Bcl-2 was nearly identical in GD and TFA, but much weaker on the follicular cells in vicinity of lymphocytes and on the lymphocytes located in germinal centers of HT tissues. The expression of Fas, FasL, Bcl-2 in Hashimoto's thyroiditis and Graves' disease were almost same. FasL strong expression and Bcl-2 weak expression on the follicles in HT may induce apoptosis. These results provided evidence for expression of Fas, FasL and Bcl-2 in the pathogenesis of autoimmune thyroid disease. The lymphocytes seem not to be directly engaged in the process v/a their own FasL, but they may provide some cytokines that, in turn, upregulate Fas and/or FasL expression to induce apoptosis.

  2. The chronic autoimmune thyroiditis quality of life selenium trial (CATALYST)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Kristian Hillert; Watt, Torquil; Bjørner, Jakob Bue;

    2014-01-01

    . Exclusion criteria: previous diagnosis of toxic nodular goitre, Graves' hyperthyroidism, postpartum thyroiditis, Graves' orbitopathy; previous antithyroid drug treatment, radioiodine therapy or thyroid surgery; immune-modulatory or other medication affecting thyroid function; pregnancy, planned pregnancy...... or breastfeeding; allergy towards any intervention or placebo component; intake of selenium supplementation >55 mug/day; inability to read or understand Danish or lack of informed consent. The trial will include 2 x 236 participants. The experimental intervention and control groups will receive 200 mug selenium...

  3. Herbal medicine Gamgungtang down-regulates autoimmunity through induction of TH2 cytokine production by lymphocytes in experimental thyroiditis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa, Eun-Ho; Jin, Un-Ho; Kim, Dong-Soo; Kang, Bong-Seok; Ha, Ki-Tae; Kim, June-Ki; Park, Won-Hwan; Kim, Cheorl-Ho

    2007-02-12

    The crude herbal formulation, Gamgungtang (GGT), has been shown to protect animals against a wide range of spontaneously developing or induced autoimmune diseases. We have previously reported that GGT shows marked down-regulation of several experimental autoimmune diseases. Although very effective at preventing thyroid infiltrates in mice immunized with mouse deglycosylated thyroglobulin and complete Freund's adjuvant and in spontaneous models of thyroiditis, it completely failed to modify experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT) induced in mice immunized with mouse thyroglobulin and lipopolysaccharide. In this study, in an effort to elucidate the mechanisms by which GGT suppresses EAT, and autoimmunity in general, we investigated the in vivo effects of this drug on the Th1/Th2 lymphocyte balance, which is important for the induction or inhibition of autoreactivity. Naive SJL/J mice were treated orally for 5 days with GGT (80 mg/(kg day)). Spleen cells were obtained at various time points during the treatment period and were stimulated in vitro with concanavalin A. Interleukins IL-4, IL-10 and IL-12, transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) cytokine production was evaluated at the protein levels of the cytokines in the medium and mRNA expressions. A significant upregulation of IL-4, IL-10 and TGF-beta was observed following treatment with GGT, which peaked at day 5 (IL-10) or day 10 (IL-4). On the other hand, IL-12 and IFN-gamma production were either unchanged or decreased. It seems therefore that GGT induces in vivo a shift towards Th2 lymphocytes which may be one of the mechanisms of down-regulation of the autoimmune reactivity in EAT. Our observations indicate that down-regulation of TH1 cytokines (especially IL-12) and enhancement of Th2 cytokine production may play an important role in the control of T-cell-mediated autoimmunity. These data may contribute to the design of new immunomodulating treatments for a group of

  4. A study of CD4~+ T lymphocyte infiltration level in the thyroid of experimental autoimmune thyroiditis rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔丝露

    2014-01-01

    Objective To establish an experimental autoimmune thyroiditis(EAT)rat model and to observe pathological change levels of CD4+T lymphocyte infiltration in thyroid tissues under different iodine nutrient conditions.Methods One hundred and thirty-five four weeks old female Lewis rats(body weight about 80 g)were divided into control(NC),model(TG),high iodine-Ⅰ(HⅠ),high iodine and model-Ⅰ(HⅠ+TG),high iodine-Ⅱ(HⅡ),high iodine and model-Ⅱ(HⅡ+TG)groups

  5. Synthetic gene network restoring endogenous pituitary-thyroid feedback control in experimental Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Pratik; Charpin-El Hamri, Ghislaine; Folcher, Marc; Zulewski, Henryk; Fussenegger, Martin

    2016-02-02

    Graves' disease is an autoimmune disorder that causes hyperthyroidism because of autoantibodies that bind to the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) on the thyroid gland, triggering thyroid hormone release. The physiological control of thyroid hormone homeostasis by the feedback loops involving the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis is disrupted by these stimulating autoantibodies. To reset the endogenous thyrotrophic feedback control, we designed a synthetic mammalian gene circuit that maintains thyroid hormone homeostasis by monitoring thyroid hormone levels and coordinating the expression of a thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antagonist (TSHAntag), which competitively inhibits the binding of thyroid-stimulating hormone or the human autoantibody to TSHR. This synthetic control device consists of a synthetic thyroid-sensing receptor (TSR), a yeast Gal4 protein/human thyroid receptor-α fusion, which reversibly triggers expression of the TSHAntag gene from TSR-dependent promoters. In hyperthyroid mice, this synthetic circuit sensed pathological thyroid hormone levels and restored the thyrotrophic feedback control of the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis to euthyroid hormone levels. Therapeutic plug and play gene circuits that restore physiological feedback control in metabolic disorders foster advanced gene- and cell-based therapies.

  6. Acute recurrent pancreatitis: An autoimmune disease?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Raffaele Pezzilli

    2008-01-01

    In this review article,we will briefly describe the main characteristics of autoimmune pancreatitis and then we will concentrate on our aim,namely,evaluating the clinical characteristics of patients having recurrence of pain from the disease.In fact,the open question is to evaluate the possible presence of autoimmune pancreatitis in patients with an undefined etiology of acute pancreatitis and for this reason we carried out a search in the literature in order to explore this issue.In cases of recurrent attacks of pain in patients with "idiopathic"pancreatitis,we need to keep in mind the possibility that our patients may have autoimmune pancreatitis.Even though the frequency of this disease seems to be quite low,we believe that in the future,by increasing our knowledge on the subject,we will be able to diagnose an ever-increasing number of patients having acute recurrence of pain from autoimmune pancreatitis.

  7. Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease- A Clinical Viewpoint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirala Khalessi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in medicine have given us a better insight into a group of disorders known as autoimmune diseases. In particular, advances have occurred in our understanding of the Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease (AIED. In this article, the authors review the different postulated theories in the pathogenesis of this disease. The clinical presentation, the available para-clinical diagnostic tools, and the important differential diagnoses will be summarized. The management methods, including steroid therapy, immunosuppressive medications, other biological agents and intra-tympanic injections, will be addressed. Cochlear implantation as a final solution to the advanced stages of the disease, causing total deafness, will also be discussed.

  8. The Etiopathogenesis of Autoimmune Bullous Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune bullous diseases are rare disorders affecting skin and mucous membranes which are mediated by pathogenic autoantibodies against target antigens whose function is adhesion within the epidermis or adhesion of epidermis to dermis. The pathogenesis of these disorders has been extensively investigated with advanced techniques in recent years. This review focuses on the etiopathogenesis of main autoimmune bullous disorders including pemphigus, bullous pemphigoid, anti-p200 pemphigoid, ci...

  9. Thyroid disease in the pediatric patient: emphasizing imaging with sonography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babcock, Diane S. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2006-04-15

    Thyroid disease does occur in the pediatric patient, and imaging plays an important role in its evaluation. A review is presented of normal development of the thyroid gland, the technique and indications for thyroid sonography, and key imaging features of congenital thyroid disorders (ectopic or absent thyroid, infantile goiter, thyroglossal duct remnants), benign thyroid masses (follicular adenoma, degenerative nodules, colloid and thyroid cysts), malignant masses (follicular, papillary and medullary carcinoma) and diffuse thyroid disease (acute bacterial thyroiditis, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, Grave's disease). (orig.)

  10. PREVELANCE OF ANTI-TPO ANTIBODY IN TYPE-1 DIABETES AND THYROID DYSFUNCTION IN TPO ANTIBODY POSITIVE DIABET ICS

    OpenAIRE

    Ganesan; Josephine Latha

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The appearance of TPO-Abs precedes thyroid dysfunction and increases in autoimmune diseases like type1diabetes. Thyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibodies are one of the major secondary antibodies associated wi th autoimmune thyroid disease and can be used as diagnostic marker. The prevalence of thyroid auto antibodies is increased when patients have non-thyroid autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes and pernicious anemia. Thyroid dysfuncti...

  11. Is autoimmune thyroiditis part of the genetic vulnerability (or an endophenotype) for bipolar disorder?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonk, Ronald; van der Schot, Astrid C.; Kahn, Rene S.; Nolen, Willem A.; Drexhage, Hemmo A.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Both genetic and environmental factors are involved in the etiology of bipolar disorder; however, biological markers for the transmission of the bipolar genotype ("endophenotypes") have not been found. Autoimmune thyroiditis with raised levels of thyroperoxidase antibodies (TPO-Abs) is r

  12. Granuloma Annulare, Autoimmune Thyroiditis, and Lichen Sclerosus in a Woman: Randomness or Significant Association?

    OpenAIRE

    Mariele De Paola; Anastasia Batsikosta; Luca Feci; Mattia Benedetti; Roberta Bilenchi

    2013-01-01

    We report a 60-year-old Caucasian female with a 2-year history of diffused granuloma annulare (GA), who presented for the simultaneous occurrence of genital lichen sclerosus (LS) and autoimmune thyroiditis (AT). In our opinion this combination is not just coincidental but may share similar immunopathological mechanisms.

  13. Granuloma Annulare, Autoimmune Thyroiditis, and Lichen Sclerosus in a Woman: Randomness or Significant Association?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariele De Paola

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a 60-year-old Caucasian female with a 2-year history of diffused granuloma annulare (GA, who presented for the simultaneous occurrence of genital lichen sclerosus (LS and autoimmune thyroiditis (AT. In our opinion this combination is not just coincidental but may share similar immunopathological mechanisms.

  14. Differentiated thyroid carcinoma : A polygenic disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Links, TP; van Tol, KM; te Meerman, GJ; de Vries, EGE

    2001-01-01

    Differentiated thyroid cancer is a rare disease and until recently was considered to be sporadic. However, increasing evidence has been found for a genetic basis of this disease. In approximately 5% of patients the differentiated thyroid cancer is dominantly inherited. Several families with differen

  15. Bullous Skin Diseases: Classical Types of Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Damoiseaux

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The prototypic bullous skin diseases, pemphigus vulgaris, pemphigus foliaceus, and bullous pemphigoid, are characterized by the blister formation in the skin and/or oral mucosa in combination with circulating and deposited autoantibodies reactive with (hemidesmosomes. Koch’s postulates, adapted for autoimmune diseases, were applied on these skin diseases. It appears that all adapted Koch’s postulates are fulfilled, and, therefore, these bullous skin diseases are to be considered classical autoimmune diseases within the wide and expanding spectrum of autoimmune diseases.

  16. Autoimmune liver disease in Noonan Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loddo, Italia; Romano, Claudio; Cutrupi, Maria Concetta; Sciveres, Marco; Riva, Silvia; Salpietro, Annamaria; Ferraù, Valeria; Gallizzi, Romina; Briuglia, Silvana

    2015-03-01

    Noonan Syndrome (NS) is characterized by short stature, typical facial dysmorphology and congenital heart defects. The incidence of NS is estimated to be between 1:1000 and 1:2500 live births. The syndrome is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait. In approximately 50% of cases, the disease is caused by missense mutations in the PTPN11 gene on chromosome 12, resulting in a gain of function of the non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2 protein. Autoimmune Hepatitis (AIH) is a cryptogenic, chronic and progressive necroinflammatory liver disease. Common features of AIH are hypergammaglobulinemia (IgG), presence of circulating autoantibodies, histological picture of interface hepatitis and response to immunosuppressant drugs. Conventional treatment with Prednisone and Azathioprine is effective in most patients. We describe the case of a 6 years-old girl with Noonan Syndrome and Autoimmune Hepatitis type 1. Molecular analysis of PTPN11 gene showed heterozygous mutation c.923A>G (Asn308Ser) in exon 8. Though association between NS and autoimmune disorders is known, this is the second case of association between Noonan Syndrome and Autoimmune Hepatitis type 1 described in literature. In the management of NS, an accurate clinical evaluation would be recommended. When there is a clinical suspicion of autoimmune phenomena, appropriate laboratory tests should be performed with the aim of clarifying whether the immune system is involved in NS. We think that autoimmunity represents a characteristic of NS, even if the etiopathogenesis is still unknown.

  17. Socioeconomic Disparities in the Presentation and Treatment of Graves' Disease and Thyroid Eye Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargason, Caroline W; Chelnis, James G; Barahimi, Behin I; Mawn, Louise A

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid eye disease (TED) is an inflammatory, autoimmune orbitopathy with multifactorial etiology. Clinical presentation of TED spans a range from mild surface irritation to vision threatening compressive optic neuropathy. Potential vision loss underscores the importance of understanding genetic and environmental factors influencing the severity of TED presentation. This review will describe the classic risk factors for TED, outline treatments for Graves' disease (GD) and TED, and describe newer evidence of socioeconomic disparities in TED presentation.

  18. Shared genetic origins of allergy and autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waage, J. E.; Kreiner-Møller, E.; Standl, M.

    2015-01-01

    Parallel increases in allergy and autoimmune disease prevalence in recent time suggest shared, but yet unknown, etiologies. Here, we investigated shared genetic loci and molecular pathways to identify possible shared disease mechanisms between allergy and autoimmune diseases....

  19. Autoimmune thyroid disease in patients of thyroid hormone insensitivity syndrome:5 cases report and literature re-view%甲状腺激素不敏感综合征合并自身免疫性甲状腺疾病5例报道并文献复习

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪宁; 陈欢; 赵真真; 贾会晓; 崔巍; 施秉银

    2016-01-01

    目的:分析甲状腺激素不敏感综合征(THIS)合并自身免疫性甲状腺疾病(AITD)的临床特点。方法回顾性分析2011年9月—2014年4月西安交通大学第一附属医院诊断的5例THIS合并AITD的临床资料,所有患者均进行甲状腺功能、垂体核磁共振、T3抑制试验,明确THIS诊断,并对1例提取外周血DNA进行了TRβ基因突变分析。结果3例患者临床表现为全身代谢缓慢,甲状腺功能检查提示游离T3、T4以及TSH水平明显升高,T3抑制试验提示垂体及外周均对TH抵抗,甲状腺穿刺活检示大量淋巴细胞浸润,滤泡上皮细胞嗜酸性变,吸碘率降低,提示为全身型THIS合并桥本甲状腺炎( HT),给予不同剂量的甲状腺激素治疗后,乏力、畏寒及甲状腺肿大症状均好转;2例患者临床表现为全身代谢加快,游离T3、T4以及TSH水平轻微升高,T3抑制试验提示垂体对TH抵抗,甲状腺穿刺活检活检示滤泡上皮过度增生并淋巴细胞浸润,吸碘率正常,提示垂体型THIS合并HT和GD,仅对症处理后均好转。结论 THIS随病程延长更容易合并AITD,随着患者年龄的增长临床表现及甲状腺功能可能发生变化,临床诊治THIS应考虑合并AITD的可能。%Objective To analyze the clinical features of thyroid hormone insensitive syndrome ( THIS) with autoim-mune thyroid disease ( AITD) .Methods Retrospective analysis of the clinical data of 5 cases of AITD from September 2011 to April 2014 at Xi'an Jiaotong University First Affiliated Hospital, all patients were performed function of thyroid and pituitary magnetic resonance, T 3 inhibition test.DNA beta gene mutation analysis was performed in 1 patients with TR from peripheral blood.Results The clinical manifestations of 3 patients with systemic slow metabolism and thyroid function tests suggest that free T3, T4 and TSH levels were significantly increased, suggesting that the pituitary

  20. Gene expression profiling in autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bovin, Lone Frier; Brynskov, Jørn; Hegedüs, Laszlo;

    2007-01-01

    A central issue in autoimmune disease is whether the underlying inflammation is a repeated stereotypical process or whether disease specific gene expression is involved. To shed light on this, we analysed whether genes previously found to be differentially regulated in rheumatoid arthritis (RA...

  1. Expressions and significances of chemokines MIP-1α,MIP-1β and MCP-1 in autoimmune thyroid disease%趋化因子MIP-1α、MIP-1β、MCP-1在自身免疫性甲状腺疾病中的表达及意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任欣会; 张会娟; 高慧祯

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To explore the role and development of chemokines macrophage inflammatory protein-1α (MIP-1α),macrophage inflammatory protein-1 β (MIP-1 β) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) in adults with autoimmune thyroiditis.Methods:Totally 44 cases of Graves disease(GD),19 cases of hashimoto thyroiditis(HT),14 cases of thyroid adenoma,10 cases of multinodular goiter and 8 cases of surrounding normal tissues were collected.Expressions of chemokines MIP-1 α,MIP-1 β and MCP-1 were determined by immunehistochemical method.Results:Chemokines M IP-1α,MIP-1β and MCP-1 were located in the cytoplasm of the thyroid follicular epithelial cells.Expression levels and scores of chemokines MIP-1α,MIP-1 β and MCP-1 were significantly higher in GD and HT than in multinodular goiter and thyroid normal tissues.Conclusions:Chemokines MIP-1α,MIP-1 β and MCP-1 may participate in the development of the autoimmune thyroid diseases and may become new targets of monitoring and treatment of autoimmune thyroid diseases.%目的:探讨趋化因子巨噬细胞炎性蛋白-1α(macrophage inflammatory protein-1d,MIP-1α)、巨噬细胞炎性蛋白-1β(macrophage inflammatory protein-1β3,MIP-1β)和单核细胞趋化蛋白-1(monocyte chemoattractant protein-1,MCP-1)在自身免疫性甲状腺疾病发生发展中的作用.方法:应用免疫组化方法观察MIP-1α、MIP-1β和MCP-1在44例Graves病(Graves disease,GD)和19例桥本甲状腺炎(hashimoto thyroiditis,HT)、14例甲状腺腺瘤、10例结节性甲状腺肿及8例正常甲状腺组织(取自良性腺瘤周围)中的表达情况.结果:MIP-1α、MIP-1β、MCP-1蛋白定位于甲状腺滤泡上皮细胞质,其在GD、TH组织中的表达阳性率及总评分显著高于结节性甲状腺肿及正常甲状腺组织.结论:MIP-1α、MIP-1β、MCP-1可能参与了自身免疫性甲状腺疾病的发生发展,有可能作为自身免疫性甲状腺疾病监测和治疗的新靶点.

  2. Thyroid Autoimmunity and Gluten-Sensitive Enteropathy in Children with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gafur Doğdu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To determine the seroprevalence of autoimmune thyroiditis and gluten-sensitive enteropathy (GSE in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM and to emphasize the importance of early diagnosis. Patients and Methods: Fifty-five children and adolescents (age ranged 3-18 years with T1DM were included in the study. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c, free T3 (fT3, free T4 (fT4, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH, anti-tiroglobulin (anti-TG, anti-thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO, anti-gliadin IgA and IgG, and anti-endomisyum IgA antibody (antiEMA were investigated. Results: Eight of our cases (14.5% were positive for anti-TPO, 9/55 (16.3% for anti-TG, 8/55 (14.5% for anti-EMA, 8/55 (14.5% for anti-gliadin IgA, and 5/55 (9.0% for anti-gliadin IgG. None of these antibodies were detected in healthy controls. In eight patients, who had positive anti-TPO and anti-TG, thyroid ultrasound results confirmed thyroiditis. Anti-EMA and anti-gliadin IgA were positive in five patients. Four of them were diagnosed with GSE. Conclusion: In patients with T1DM, the seroprevalences of autoimmune thyroiditis and GSE were higher than that in healthy controls. Therefore, regardless of the symptoms of patients, autoimmune thyroiditis and GSE should be investigated in all patients with T1DM. Thus, the most rapid and meaningful method is to investigate the presence of autoantibodies using serological tests. (The Me di cal Bul le tin of Ha se ki 2012; 50: 39-42

  3. Rare thyroid non-neoplastic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacka, Katarzyna; Maciejewski, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Rare diseases are usually defined as entities affecting less than 1 person per 2,000. About 7,000 different rare entities are distinguished and, among them, rare diseases of the thyroid gland. Although not frequent, they can be found in the everyday practice of endocrinologists and should be considered in differential diagnosis. Rare non-neoplastic thyroid diseases will be discussed. Congenital hypothyroidism's frequency is relatively high and its early treatment is of vital importance for neonatal psychomotor development; CH is caused primarily by thyroid dysgenesis (85%) or dyshormonogenesis (10-15%), although secondary defects - hypothalamic and pituitary - can also be found; up to 40% of cases diagnosed on neonatal screening are transient. Inherited abnormalities of thyroid hormone binding proteins (TBG, TBP and albumin) include alterations in their concentration or affinity for iodothyronines, this leads to laboratory test abnormalities, although usually with normal free hormones and clinical euthyroidism. Thyroid hormone resistance is most commonly found in THRB gene mutations and more rarely in THRA mutations; in some cases both genes are unchanged (non-TR RTH). Recently the term 'reduced sensitivity to thyroid hormones' was introduced, which encompass not only iodothyronine receptor defects but also their defective transmembrane transport or metabolism. Rare causes of hyperthyroidism are: activating mutations in TSHR or GNAS genes, pituitary adenomas, differentiated thyroid cancer or gestational trophoblastic disease; congenital hyperthyroidism cases are also seen, although less frequently than CH. Like other organs and tissues, the thyroid can be affected by different inflammatory and infectious processes, including tuberculosis and sarcoidosis. In most of the rare thyroid diseases genetic factors play a key role, many of them can be classified as monogenic disorders. Although there are still some limitations, progress has been made in our understanding of

  4. Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome and autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrowski, Rochella A; Robinson, John A

    2008-02-01

    The arbitrary division between antiphospholipid antibody syndrome and secondary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome has not proven useful. Antiphospholipid antibodies in the absence of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome often occur as epiphenomena in many autoimmune diseases. They are very common in systemic lupus erythematosus. Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome is a significant comorbidity in lupus but is uncommon in Sjögren's syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, scleroderma, and systemic vasculitis. Evidence is growing that antiphospholipid antibodies may have a pathogenic role in pulmonary hypertension and accelerated atherosclerosis of autoimmune diseases.

  5. Management of thyroid eye disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartalena, Luigi; Tanda, Maria Laura [Department of Endocrinology, University of Insubria, Ospedale di Circolo, Viale Borri, 57, 21100 Varese (Italy); Marcocci, Claudio; Pinchera, Aldo [Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, University of Pisa, Pisa (Italy)

    2002-08-01

    Thyroid eye disease (TED) is the most frequent extrathyroidal manifestation of Graves' disease. In most instances it is mild and non-progressive, but in 3%-5% of cases it is severe. Non-severe TED requires only supportive measures, such as eye ointments, sunglasses and prisms. By contrast, severe TED requires aggressive treatment, either medical (high-dose glucocorticoids, orbital radiotherapy) or surgical (orbital decompression). The choice of treatment relies on the assessment of both TED severity and activity. Removal of controllable risk factors, especially cigarette smoking, is important to improve the course and the therapeutic outcome. A coordinated approach to the treatment of hyperthyroidism and TED is also required. Novel promising treatments, to be verified in large series of patients, include somatostatin analogues and cytokine antagonists. (orig.)

  6. [Narcolepsy as an autoimmune disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkanen, Tomi; Vaarala, Outi; Julkunen, Ilkka; Partinen, Markku

    2015-01-01

    Narcolepsy is a sleep disorder of central origin. Hypocretin deficiency is the essential feature of type 1 narcolepsy. The biological background of type 2 narcolepsy (without cataplexy) is less clear. Infections or other external factors are thought to function as triggers of narcolepsy. After the H1N1 vaccination campaign, the incidence of narcolepsy increased clearly in countries where a vaccine boosted with the AS03 adjuvant was used. According to the current view, the increase of narcolepsy in connection with the pandemic vaccine especially in children and adolescents was associated with the virus component of the vaccine, but the adjuvant may also have boosted the development of autoimmune response.

  7. Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis associated with autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zand, Ladan; Fervenza, Fernando C; Nasr, Samih H; Sethi, Sanjeev

    2014-04-01

    Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN) has been classified based on its pathogenesis into immune complex-mediated and complement-mediated MPGN. The immune complex-mediated type is secondary to chronic infections, autoimmune diseases or monoclonal gammopathy. There is a paucity of data on MPGN associated with autoimmune diseases. We reviewed the Mayo Clinic database over a 10-year period and identified 12 patients with MPGN associated with autoimmune diseases, after exclusion of systemic lupus erythematosus. The autoimmune diseases included rheumatoid arthritis, primary Sjögren's syndrome, undifferentiated connective tissue disease, primary sclerosing cholangitis and Graves' disease. Nine of the 12 patients were female, and the mean age was 57.9 years. C4 levels were decreased in nine of 12 patients tested. The serum creatinine at time of renal biopsy was 2.2 ± 1.0 mg/dl and the urinary protein was 2,850 ± 3,543 mg/24 h. Three patients required dialysis at the time of renal biopsy. Renal biopsy showed an MPGN in all cases, with features of cryoglobulins in six cases; immunoglobulin (Ig)M was the dominant Ig, and both subendothelial and mesangial electron dense deposits were noted. Median follow-up was 10.9 months. Serum creatinine and proteinuria improved to 1.6 ± 0.8 mg/dl and 428 ± 677 mg/24 h, respectively, except in 3 patients with end-stage renal disease. In summary, this study describes the clinical features, renal biopsy findings, laboratory evaluation, treatment and prognosis of MPGN associated with autoimmune diseases.

  8. Genomics and proteomics: Applications in autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Hueber

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Wolfgang Hueber1,2,3, William H Robinson1,21VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, CA, USA; 2Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA; 3Novartis Institutes of Biomedical Research, Novartis, Basle, SwitzerlandAbstract: Tremendous progress has been made over the past decade in the development and refinement of genomic and proteomic technologies for the identification of novel drug targets and molecular signatures associated with clinically important disease states, disease subsets, or differential responses to therapies. The rapid progress in high-throughput technologies has been preceded and paralleled by the elucidation of cytokine networks, followed by the stepwise clinical development of pathway-specific biological therapies that revolutionized the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Together, these advances provide opportunities for a long-anticipated personalized medicine approach to the treatment of autoimmune disease. The ever-increasing numbers of novel, innovative therapies will need to be harnessed wisely to achieve optimal long-term outcomes in as many patients as possible while complying with the demands of health authorities and health care providers for evidence-based, economically sound prescription of these expensive drugs. Genomic and proteomic profiling of patients with autoimmune diseases holds great promise in two major clinical areas: (1 rapid identification of new targets for the development of innovative therapies and (2 identification of patients who will experience optimal benefit and minimal risk from a specific (targeted therapy. In this review, we attempt to capture important recent developments in the application of genomic and proteomic technologies to translational research by discussing informative examples covering a diversity of autoimmune diseases.Keywords: proteomics, genomics, autoimmune diseases, antigen microarrays, 2-Dih, rheumatoid arthritis

  9. Effects of low-carbohydrate diet therapy in overweight subject with autoimmune thyroiditis: possible synergism with ChREBP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esposito T

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Teresa Esposito,1,2 Jean Marc Lobaccaro,3 Maria Grazia Esposito,4 Vincenzo Monda,1 Antonietta Messina,1 Giuseppe Paolisso,5 Bruno Varriale,2 Marcellino Monda,1 Giovanni Messina1,6 1Department of Experimental Medicine, Section of Human Physiology and Unit of Dietetics and Sports Medicine, 2Laboratory of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Department of Experimental Medicine, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy; 3UMR, Clermont Université, Centre de Recherche en Nutrition Humaine d’Auvergne, Aubière Cedex, France; 4Complex Surgery Unit, Evangelic Hospital Villa Betania, 5Department of Scienze Mediche, Chirurgiche, Neurologiche, Metaboliche e dell’Invecchiamento, Second University of Naples, Naples, 6Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Foggia, Foggia, Italy Abstract: The thyroid is one of the metabolism regulating glands. Its function is to determine the amount of calories that the body has to burn to maintain normal weight. Thyroiditides are inflammatory processes that mainly result in autoimmune diseases. We have conducted the present study in order to have a clear picture of both autoimmune status and the control of body weight. We have evaluated the amount of either thyroid hormones, or antithyroid, or anti-microsomal, or anti-peroxidase antibodies (Abs in patients with high amounts of Abs. In a diet devoid of carbohydrates (bread, pasta, fruit, and rice, free from goitrogenic food, and based on body mass index, the distribution of body mass and intracellular and extracellular water conducted for 3 weeks gives the following results: patients treated as above showed a significant reduction of antithyroid (-40%, P<0.013, anti-microsomal (-57%, P<0.003, and anti-peroxidase (-44%, P<0,029 Abs. Untreated patients had a significant increase in antithyroid (+9%, P<0.017 and anti-microsomal (+30%, P<0.028 Abs. Even the level of anti-peroxidase Abs increased without reaching statistical significance (+16%, P>0064

  10. Autoimmune thyroid disorder in patient with chronic hepatitis C before treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehr Ali Rahimi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Creating autoantibodies against thyroid in hepatitis C patients who are being treated with interferon is now recognized for several years. Recently, some studies have claimed that prevalence of autoimmune thyroid disorders in Hepatitis C patients is higher when they are not treated by interferon and/or at the beginning of diagnosis, however the area still remained controversial. In order to analyze autoimmune thyroid disorders in Hepatitis C patients who are not still treated by interferon and compare them with the control group this study has been conducted.Methods: A Case-Control study including 86 chronic hepatitis C patients before commencing treatment by interferon and 86 healthy volunteer individuals were examined. Data was collected using demographic and clinical variables questionnaires from both groups. FT4, TSH, Anti TPO and Anti TG examinations carried out in both group. Results: The findings of this study showed increase Anti TPO in 4 cases in 13 case, increased is Anti TG in 5 case, sub clinical hypothyroid, ism sub clinical hyperthyroid in 3 ism and hyperthyroid ism in one case in the case group were observed. There was no significant difference between the case and the control group. Conclusion: We can conclude that there is no relationship between chronic hepatitis C infection and autoimmune thyroid.

  11. A polymorphism within the vitamin D-binding protein gene is associated with Graves' disease but not with Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pani, Michael A; Regulla, Karoline; Segni, Maria; Hofmann, Stefan; Hüfner, Michael; Pasquino, Anna Maria; Usadel, Klaus-H; Badenhoop, Klaus

    2002-06-01

    Graves' disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis are common autoimmune thyroid disorders. Experimentally, 1,25(OH)(2) D(3) prevents Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Vitamin D serum levels in Graves' disease were found to be significantly lower than in nonautoimmune hyperthyroidism. The polymorphic vitamin D-binding protein (DBP) greatly facilitates vitamin D actions, and DBP alleles differ regarding their affinity for 1,25(OH)(2) D(3). Therefore, we investigated polymorphisms of the DBP gene for an association with thyroid autoimmunity. Families with an offspring affected by Graves' disease (95 pedigrees) or by Hashimoto's thyroiditis (92 pedigrees) encompassing 561 individuals of Caucasian origin were genotyped for three DBP polymorphisms [(TAAA)(N) in intron 8; StyI; and HaeIII in exon 11]. Indirect haplotyping and (extended) transmission disequilibrium testing were performed. There was a significant transmission disequilibrium of the intron 8 polymorphism in patients with Graves' disease (P < 0.03) but not of the exon 11 polymorphism. In contrast, neither the intron 8 nor the exon 11 polymorphism was associated with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Maternal and paternal transmission as well as allele frequencies in DQ2(+) and DQ2(-) patients did not differ in either disease. Therefore, allelic variants of the DBP gene confer susceptibility to Graves' disease but not to Hashimoto's thyroiditis in our population. These findings support a role of the vitamin D endocrine system in thyroid autoimmunity.

  12. Autoimmune clustering: sweet syndrome, Hashimoto thyroiditis, and psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Mohammad; Brown, Grace E; Agarwal, Abhishek; Pellowski, Donna; Jacks, Jennifer; Liverett, Hazel K; Vyas, Keyur S

    2011-03-01

    Acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis (AFND; Sweet syndrome) is characterized by a constellation of symptoms and findings: fever, neutrophilia, and tender erythematous skin lesions that typically show an upper dermal infiltrate of mature neutrophils. Whereas some cases are idiopathic, others have been associated with a variety of disorders. In this report, we describe the occurrence of AFND with chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis (Hashimoto thyroiditis) and preexisting psoriasis. This is the first case report of the association of chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis with AFND from the United States and only the third reported in the world's literature. Because the coexistence of these disorders is rare, an underlying common pathogenic mechanism is a possibility. We postulate this to be CD4(+) T-cell dysfunction.

  13. Does thyroid stunning exist? A model with benign thyroid disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabri, O.; Zimny, M.; Schreckenberger, M.; Meyer-Oelmann, A.; Reinartz, P.; Buell, U. [Clinic of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen Univ. of Technology (Germany)

    2000-11-01

    With regard to the treatment of differentiated non-medullary thyroid carcinoma, there is controversy over whether radiation from a diagnostic radioiodine ({sup 131}I) application really does have a suppressive effect on the uptake of subsequent therapeutic {sup 131}I (so-called thyroid stunning). However, inherent difficulties in exact remnant/metastatic tissue volumetry make it difficult to quantify how much diagnostic {sup 131}I is actually absorbed (absorbed energy dose) and hence to decide whether a threshold absorbed dose exists beyond which such stunning would occur. Since in benign thyroid disease the target volume can be readily quantified by ultrasonography, we sought to determine definitely whether stunning of thyroid cells occurs upon a second application of radioiodine 4 days following the first one. We therefore studied 171 consecutive patients with benign thyroid disease (diffuse goitre, Graves' disease, toxic nodular goitre) who received two-step {sup 131}I therapy during a single in-patient stay. For application of both calculated {sup 131}I activities we performed kinetic dosimetry of {sup 131}I uptake, effective half-life and absorbed dose. At the second application, patients showed significant stunning (a 31.7% decrease in {sup 131}I uptake, from 34.7%{+-}15.4% at first application to 23.7%{+-}12.3% at second application, P<0.0005) without a significant difference in effective half-life (4.9{+-}1.3 vs 5.0{+-}1.7 days, P>0.2). ANOVA showed that the extent of stunning was influenced significantly only by the absorbed energy dose at first application (F=13.5, P<0.0005), while first-application {sup 131}I activity, target volume, gender and thyroid function had no influence (all F{<=}0.71, all P>0.4). There was no significant correlation between extent of thyroid stunning and first-application {sup 131}I activity (r=0.07, P>0.3), whereas there was a highly significant correlation between thyroid stunning and first absorbed energy dose (r=0.64, P

  14. Increased genetic risk or protection for canine autoimmune lymphocytic thyroiditis in Giant Schnauzers depends on DLA class II genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbe, M; Sundberg, K; Hansen, I R; Strandberg, E; Nachreiner, R F; Hedhammar, A; Kennedy, L J; Andersson, G; Björnerfeldt, S

    2010-06-01

    Dogs represent an excellent comparative model for autoimmune thyroiditis as several dog breeds develop canine lymphocytic thyroiditis (CLT), which is clinically similar to Hashimoto's thyroiditis in human. We obtained evidence that dog leukocyte antigen (DLA) class II genotype function as either genetic risk factor that predisposes for CLT or as protective factor against the disease. Genetic diversity at their DLA-DRB1, -DQA1, and -DQB1 loci were defined and potential association to major histocompatibility complex II haplotypes and alleles was analyzed. Giant Schnauzers carrying the DLA-DRB1*01201/DQA1*00101/DQB1*00201 haplotype showed an increased risk (odds ratio of 6.5) for developing CLT. The same risk haplotype has, to date, been observed in three different breeds affected by this disease, Giant Schnauzer, Dobermann, and Labrador Retriever, indicating that it is a common genetic risk factor in a variety of breeds affected by this disease. Importantly, protection for development of the disease was found in dogs carrying the DLA-DRB1*01301/DQA1*00301/DQB1*00501 haplotype (odds ratio of 0.3).

  15. Serological Diagnosis of Autoimmune Blistering Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgül Özkesici

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune blistering diseases are a rare diseases, characterized by development of autoantibodies against the structural proteins of the epidermis or dermoepidermal junction, and blisters and erosions on skin and/or mucous membranes clinically. Clinical features are important guiding findings for suspicious of this group of diseases. The diagnosis is achieved by the evaluation together of clinical features, histological and immunological findings. The gold standard in the diagnosis of this group diseases are demonstration of tissue bound and/or circulating autoantibodies. Methods for this purpose are; direct and indirect immunofluorescence, Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA, immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting. The aim of this paper is to review serological diagnostic methods in the diagnosis of autoimmune bullous diseases and to present developments in recent years.

  16. The complement system in systemic autoimmune disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Min; Daha, Mohamed R.; Kallenberg, Cees G. M.

    2010-01-01

    Complement is part of the innate immune system. Its major function is recognition and elimination of pathogens via direct killing and/or stimulation of phagocytosis. Activation of the complement system is, however, also involved in the pathogenesis of the systemic autoimmune diseases. Activation via

  17. Genetic risk factors for autoimmune diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feltkamp, T.E.W.; Aarden, L.A.; Lucas, C.J.; Verweij, C.L.; Vries, R.R.P. de

    1999-01-01

    In most autoimmune diseases multigenic factors play a significant role in pathogenesis. Progress in identifying these genetic factors, many of which are located outside the major histocompatibility complex, was the subject of a recent meeting. Chemicals/CAS: Interleukin-10, 130068-27-8; Transforming

  18. Autoimmune diseases in adults with atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Yuki M F; Egeberg, Alexander; Gislason, Gunnar H

    2016-01-01

    to adult patients with AD. No information about AD severity or degree of tobacco consumption was available. Results from a hospital population of AD patients cannot be generalized to the general population. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest a susceptibility of autoimmune diseases in adult patients with AD...

  19. Long-Term Follow-Up of a Child with Autoimmune Thyroiditis and Recurrent Hyperthyroidism in the Absence of TSH Receptor Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Dunne

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hashitoxicosis is an initial, transient, hyperthyroid phase that rarely affects patients with Hashimoto thyroiditis. We present here an unusual case of a child with Hashimoto thyroiditis and recurrent hyperthyroidism. A 4 yr 6/12 old male was diagnosed by us with autoimmune subclinical hypothyroidism (normal free T4, slightly elevated TSH, and elevated TG antibody titer. Two years and 6/12 later he experienced increased appetite and poor weight gain; a laboratory evaluation revealed suppressed TSH, elevated free T4, and normal TSI titer. In addition, an I123 thyroid uptake was borderline-low. A month later, the free T4 had normalized. After remaining asymptomatic for 3 years, the patient presented again with increased appetite, and he was found with low TSH and high free T4. Within the following 3 months, his free T4 and TSH normalized. At his most recent evaluation, his TSH was normal and the free T4 was borderline-high; the TG antibody titer was still elevated and the TSI titer was negative. To our knowledge, this is the first patient reported with Hashimoto thyroiditis and recurrent hyperthyroidism. This case exemplifies the variability of the manifestations and natural history of Hashimoto thyroiditis and supports the need for a long-term evaluation of patients with autoimmune thyroid disease.

  20. The Etiopathogenesis of Autoimmune Bullous Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şebnem Aktan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune bullous diseases are rare disorders affecting skin and mucous membranes which are mediated by pathogenic autoantibodies against target antigens whose function is adhesion within the epidermis or adhesion of epidermis to dermis. The pathogenesis of these disorders has been extensively investigated with advanced techniques in recent years. This review focuses on the etiopathogenesis of main autoimmune bullous disorders including pemphigus, bullous pemphigoid, anti-p200 pemphigoid, cicatricial pemphigoid, pemphigoid gestationis, dermatitis herpetiformis, linear IgA bullous dermatosis and epidermolysis bullosa acquisita.

  1. Thyroid Disorders and Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Mohamedali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid hormones play a very important role regulating metabolism, development, protein synthesis, and influencing other hormone functions. The two main hormones produced by the thyroid are triiodothyronine (T3 and thyroxine (T4. These hormones can also have significant impact on kidney disease so it is important to consider the physiological association of thyroid dysfunction in relation to chronic kidney disease (CKD. CKD has been known to affect the pituitary-thyroid axis and the peripheral metabolism of thyroid hormones. Low T3 levels are the most common laboratory finding followed by subclinical hypothyroidism in CKD patients. Hyperthyroidism is usually not associated with CKD but has been known to accelerate it. One of the most important links between thyroid disorders and CKD is uremia. Patients who are appropriately treated for thyroid disease have a less chance of developing renal dysfunction. Clinicians need to be very careful in treating patients with low T3 levels who also have an elevation in TSH, as this can lead to a negative nitrogen balance. Thus, clinicians should be well educated on the role of thyroid hormones in relation to CKD so that proper treatment can be delivered to the patient.

  2. Pre-autoimmune thyroid abnormalities in the biobreeding diabetes-prone (BB-DP) rat: a possible relation with the intrathyroid accumulation of dendritic cells and the initiation of the thyroid autoimmune response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J. Simons (Peter); F.G. Delemarre; P.H. Jeucken; H.A. Drexhage (Hemmo)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractThyroid autoimmune reactions start with an accumulation of mainly dendritic cells in the thyroid. There is increasing evidence that, apart from being antigen-presenting cells, they are also able to control the growth and hormone synthesis of neighbouring end

  3. The onset of systemic lupus erythematosus and thyroid dysfunction following graves’ disease - a case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhanga Yuanyuan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Graves’ disease is a multifactorial autoimmune thyroid disease, with the presence of typical circulating autoantibodies that can activate the thyroid hormone receptors, resulting in hyperthyroidism, goiter, and ophthalmopathy. Systemic lupus erythematosus is a multi-systemic autoimmune disease that involves almost all the organs of the human body and is characterized by autoantibodies formation. Several studies have reported that autoimmune thyroid and rheumatic disorders can present an unusual relationship. Case Outline. We report a case of a middle-aged woman who presented with systemic lupus erythematosus one year after being diagnosed with Graves’ disease. Prednisone and cyclophosphamide were administered to control the development of systemic lupus erythematosus. Furthermore, a percutaneous thyroid biopsy was performed for further confirmation of Graves’ disease. Methimazole instead of propylthiouracil was added into the therapeutic scheme. A month later, the patient’s clinical manifestation and laboratory tests got significant improvement, except that new thyr o id dysfunction appeared opposite to the original one. The administration of anti-thyroid drug was discontinued. With a period of decreased administration of prednisone, the patient’s thyroid function gradually got back to normal levels without any levothyroxine replacement. Conclusion. In conclusion, the clinical use of prednisone and antithyroid drugs may result in instability of the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis, and thyroid function should be carefully monitored in such patients.

  4. MicroRNAs in autoimmune rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.D. Sebastiani

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The etiology of autoimmune diseases remains largely unknown. In recent years, besides genetic factors, several studies proposed that the epigenome may hold the key to a better understanding of autoimmunity initiation and perpetuation. More specifically epigenetic regulatory mechanisms comprise DNA methylation, a variety of histone modifications, and microRNA (miRNA activity, all of which act upon gene and protein expression levels. In particular it is well known that epigenetic mechanisms are important for controlling the pattern of gene expression during development, the cell cycle, and the response to biological or environmental changes. In the present review a description of the most frequent epigenetic deregulations, in particular the role of miRNA, in rheumatic autoimmune disorders will be analyzed.

  5. Radioiodine treatment for malignant thyroid disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, Gertrud [Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology

    2006-12-15

    Radioiodine treatment for thyroid disease has been given for half a decade in Sweden. The most common indication for treatment is hyperthyroidism, when iodine uptake is high. The situation in which radioiodine treatment is used in thyroid cancer is less favourable and measures therefore have to be taken to optimize the treatment. Treatment should be performed early in the course of the disease to achieve the highest possible differentiation. Before treatment the iodine and goitrogen intake should be kept low. Stimulation of the thyrocytes by thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) should be high. It is conventionally achieved by thyroid hormone withdrawal rendering the patient hypothyroid, or by the recently available recombinant human TSH (rhTSH) which can be recommended for ablation of the thyroid remnant after thyroidectomy and for treatment of metastases in fragile patients unable to undergo hypothyroidism. Finally, stunning - the negative effect of a prior test dose from radioactive iodine - should be avoided.

  6. Increased prevalence of autoimmune disease in patients with unilateral compared with bilateral moyamoya disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian-Bin; Liu, Yi; Zhou, Liang-Xue; Sun, Hong; He, Min; You, Chao

    2016-05-01

    OBJECT This study explored whether there were differences between the autoimmune disease prevalence rates in unilateral and bilateral moyamoya disease (MMD). METHODS The authors performed a retrospective review of data obtained from the medical records of their hospital, analyzing and comparing the clinical characteristics and prevalence rates of all autoimmune diseases that were associated with unilateral and bilateral MMD in their hospital from January 1995 to October 2014. RESULTS Three hundred sixteen patients with bilateral MMD and 68 with unilateral MMD were identified. The results indicated that patients with unilateral MMD were more likely to be female than were patients with bilateral MMD (67.6% vs 51.3%, p = 0.014, odds ratio [OR] 1.99). Overall, non-autoimmune comorbidities tended to be more prevalent in the unilateral MMD cases than in the bilateral MMD cases (17.6% vs 9.8%, p = 0.063, OR 1.97, chi-square test). Autoimmune thyroid disease and other autoimmune diseases also tended to be more prevalent in the unilateral MMD cases than in the bilateral MMD cases (19.1% vs 10.8%, p = 0.056, OR 1.96 and 8.8% vs 3.5%, p = 0.092, OR 2.77, respectively, chi-square test). The overall autoimmune disease prevalence in the unilateral MMD cases was significantly higher than in the bilateral MMD cases (26.5% vs 13.6%, p = 0.008, OR 2.29, 95% CI 1.22-4.28, chi-square test). Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that autoimmune disease was more likely to be associated with unilateral than with bilateral MMD (p = 0.039, OR 10.91, 95% CI 1.13-105.25). CONCLUSIONS This study indicated a higher overall autoimmune disease prevalence in unilateral than in bilateral MMD. Unilateral MMD may be more associated with autoimmune disease than bilateral MMD. Different pathogenetic mechanisms may underlie moyamoya vessel formation in unilateral and bilateral MMD.

  7. Maternal thyroid autoimmunity during pregnancy and the risk of attention deficit/hyperactivity problems in children: The generation r study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Ghassabian (Akhgar); J.J. Bongers-Schokking (Jacoba J.); Y.B. de Rijke (Yolanda); N.H. van Mil (Nina); V.W.V. Jaddoe (Vincent); S.M.P.F. de Muinck Keizer-Schrama (Sabine); H. Hooijkaas (Herbert); A. Hofman (Albert); W. Visser (Willy); G.C. Roman (Gustavo ); F.C. Verhulst (Frank); H.W. Tiemeier (Henning)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Maternal thyroid status and autoimmunity during pregnancy have been associated with impaired development of the offspring in animal and human studies. Our objective was to examine whether elevated titers of maternal thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAbs) in early pregnancy in

  8. [Membranous nephropathy associated to autoimmune thyroiditis, chronic pancreatitis and suprarrenal insufficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino, J L; Fernández Lucas, M; Teruel, J L; Valer, P; Moreira, V; Arambarri, M; Ortuño, J

    2004-01-01

    A 33 year old female was admitted to the hospital to study aedema and bocio, A nephrotic syndrome was diagnosed and the renal biopsy demonstrated membranous glomerulonephritis, stage II. She was also diagnosed of Hashimoto's autoinmmune thyroiditis: TSH (41.5 uUl/ml), T4 (0.07 ng/dl), antithyroglobuline (1/2560) and antimicrosome (1/6400). Four year latter she was diagnosed of autoinmmune pancreatitis, without evidence of diabetes mellitus or exocrine pancreatic insufficiency. Eight years latter she was diagnosed of primary autoimmune suprarrenal insufficiency: basal cortisol: 2.7 mcg/dl, post ACTH estimulated cortisol: 5.6 mcg/dl, antinuclear antibody (1/160) and antiparietal (1/320). We present a pluriglandular autoimmune syndrome with membranous glomerulonephritis, thyroiditis, pancreatitis and suprarrenal insufficiency. To the best of our knowledge this complex syndrome has not been previously described.

  9. Clinical application of determining serum TPOAb in the diagnosis of autoimmune thyroid diseases%血清甲状腺过氧化物酶抗体在自身免疫性甲状腺疾病诊断中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李跃松; 朱亚妮; 殷政芳; 浦洪波; 陈永伟; 包建东

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨甲状腺过氧化物酶抗体(TPOAb)测定在自身免疫性甲状腺疾病中的应用.方法 用电化学发光法测定130例Graves甲亢患者、117例桥本氏甲状腺炎患者、43例淋巴细胞性甲状腺炎患者、29例亚急性甲状腺炎患者、34例单纯性甲状腺肿患者、24例分化型甲状腺癌患者及63名对照者血清TPOAb的浓度,作出TPOAb诊断自身免疫性甲状腺疾病的受试者工作特征(ROC)曲线,并对各组TPOAb的浓度及阳性率进行比较.结果 ROC曲线下的面积为0.867,在cut-off值为33.51 IU/mL时,TPOAb诊断自身免疫性甲状腺疾病的敏感性为82%,特异性为89%;组间比较显示TPOAb浓度和阳性率在各组间差异有统计学意义(H=170.203,P<0.05;x2=236.593,P<0.05).两两比较显示自身免疫性甲状腺疾病各组与非自身免疫性甲状腺疾病各组间差异有统计学意义(P<0.0024),而自身免疫性甲状腺疾病各组间差异无统计学意义(P >0.002 4).结论 TPOAb的测定在自身免疫性甲状腺疾病的诊断中具有重要临床意义.%Objective To investigate the clinical application of determining serum anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody ( TPOAb ) in patients with autoimmune thyroid diseases. Methods Serum TPOAb were measured by electrochemiluminescence immunoassay in 130 patients with Graves disease, 117 patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis, 43 patients with lymphocytic thyroiditis, 29 patients with subacute thyroiditis, 34 patients with thyroid goiter, 24 patients with thyroid differentiated cancer and 63 controls. The receiver operating characteristic ( ROC) curve was calculated, and the concentrations of serum TPOAb and the positive rate were compared among the groups. Results The area under the ROC curve was 0. 867 ,the cut-off value was 33. 51 lU/mL, and the sensitivity and specificity were 82% and 89% at this cut-off value. The concentrations and positive rate of TPOAb had statistical significance among the groups

  10. Unusual pediatric co-morbility: autoimmune thyroiditis and cortico-resistant nephrotic syndrome in a 6-month-old Italian patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urbano Flavia

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report on a case of autoimmune thyroiditis in a 6-month-old patient with cortico-resistant nephrotic syndrome. Normal serum levels of thyroid hormons and thyroid-stimulating hormone were detected with high titers of circulant antithyroid antibodies and a dysomogeneous ultrasound appearance of the gland, typical of autoimmune thyroiditis. The research of maternal thyroid antibodies was negative. This is the first case of autoimmune thyroiditis found in such a young patient with pre-existing nephrotic syndrome ever described in literature. This association is random because nephrotic syndrome does not have an autoimmune pathogenesis and the genes involved in autoimmune thyroiditis are not related to those of nephrotic syndrome.

  11. Roles of A20 in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Peng, Ling-Long; Wang, Ying; Wang, Jian-Shu; Liu, Jiao; Liu, Meng-Meng; Hu, Jia; Song, Bin; Yang, Hai-Bing

    2016-04-01

    A20 (TNFAIP3), known to inhibit NF-κB function by deubiquitinating-specific NF-κB signaling molecules, has been found in many cell types of the immune system. Recent findings suggest that A20 is essential for the development and functional performance of dendritic cell, B cell, T cell and macrophage. A number of studies further demonstrate that these cells are crucial in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, such as type 1 diabetes, systemic lupus erythematosus, inflammatory bowel disease, ankylosing arthritis, Sjögren's syndrome and rheumatoid arthritis. In this article, we focus on the recent advances on the roles of A20 in autoimmune diseases and discuss the therapeutic significance of these new findings.

  12. Thyroid Autoimmunity is Associated with Decreased Cytotoxicity T Cells in Women with Repeated Implantation Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunyu Huang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid autoimmunity (TAI, which is defined as the presence of autoantibodies against thyroid peroxidase (TPO and/or thyroglobulin (TG, is related to repeated implantation failure (RIF. It is reported that TAI was involved in reproductive failure not only through leading thyroid function abnormality, but it can also be accompanied with immune imbalance. Therefore, this study was designed to investigate the association of thyroid function, immune status and TAI in women with RIF. Blood samples were drawn from 72 women with RIF to evaluate the prevalence of TAI, the thyroid function, the absolute numbers and percentages of lymphocytes. The prevalence of thyroid function abnormality in RIF women with TAI was not significantly different from that in RIF women without TAI (c2 = 0.484, p > 0.05. The absolute number and percentage of T cells, T helper (Th cells, B cells and natural killer (NK cells were not significantly different in RIF women with TAI compared to those without TAI (all p > 0.05. The percentage of T cytotoxicity (Tc cells was significantly decreased in RIF women with TAI compared to those without TAI (p < 0.05. Meanwhile, Th/Tc ratio was significantly increased (p < 0.05. These results indicated that the decreased Tc percentage and increased Th/Tc ratio may be another influential factor of adverse pregnancy outcomes in RIF women with TAI.

  13. The Essential Role of Circulating Thyroglobulin in Maintaining Dominance of Natural Regulatory T Cell Function to Prevent Autoimmune Thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Y M; Brown, N K; Morris, G P; Flynn, J C

    2015-09-01

    Several key findings from the late 1960s to mid-1970s regarding thyroid hormone metabolism and circulating thyroglobulin composition converged with studies pertaining to the role of T lymphocytes in autoimmune thyroiditis. These studies cemented the foundation for subsequent investigations into the existence and antigenic specificity of thymus-derived natural regulatory T cells (nTregs). These nTregs prevented the development of autoimmune thyroiditis, despite the ever-present genetic predisposition, autoantigen (thyroglobulin), and thyroglobulin-reactive T cells. Guided by the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis as a fixed set-point regulator in thyroid hormone metabolism, we used a murine model and compared at key junctures the capacity of circulating thyroglobulin level (raised by thyroid-stimulating hormone or exogenous thyroglobulin administration) to strengthen self-tolerance and resist autoimmune thyroiditis. The findings clearly demonstrated an essential role for raised circulating thyroglobulin levels in maintaining the dominance of nTreg function and inhibiting thyroid autoimmunity. Subsequent identification of thyroglobulin-specific nTregs as CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) in the early 2000s enabled the examination of probable mechanisms of nTreg function. We observed that whenever nTreg function was perturbed by immunotherapeutic measures, opportunistic autoimmune disorders invariably surfaced. This review highlights the step-wise progression of applying insights from endocrinologic and immunologic studies to advance our understanding of the clonal balance between natural regulatory and autoreactive T cells. Moreover, we focus on how tilting the balance in favor of maintaining peripheral tolerance could be achieved. Thus, murine autoimmune thyroiditis has served as a unique model capable of closely simulating natural physiologic conditions.

  14. Radioiodine therapy in benign thyroid diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnema, Steen Joop; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2012-01-01

    from (131)I therapy. The individual radiosensitivity, still poorly defined and impossible to quantify, may be a major determinant of the outcome from (131)I therapy. Above all, the impact of (131)I therapy relies on the iodine-concentrating ability of the thyroid gland. The thyroid (131)I uptake (or......Radioiodine ((131)I) therapy of benign thyroid diseases was introduced 70 yr ago, and the patients treated since then are probably numbered in the millions. Fifty to 90% of hyperthyroid patients are cured within 1 yr after (131)I therapy. With longer follow-up, permanent hypothyroidism seems...... of an exact thyroid dose is error-prone due to imprecise measurement of the (131)I biokinetics, and the importance of internal dosimetric factors, such as the thyroid follicle size, is probably underestimated. Besides these obstacles, several potential confounders interfere with the efficacy of (131)I therapy...

  15. [Vaccinations in patients with autoimmune diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bühler, Silja; Hatz, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    The number of individuals with autoimmune diseases treated with immunosuppressive drugs is increasing steadily. The variety of immunosuppressive drugs and in particular biological therapies is also rising. The autoimmune disease itself as well as the immunosuppressive therapy increases the risk of infection in this population. Particularly the risk of vaccine-preventable infections is elevated. Thus, preventing infections by the means of vaccination is of utmost importance. The Division of Infectious Diseases of the Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute, University of Zurich, performed a literature search on the topic of vaccinations in patients with autoimmune diseases upon request by the Swiss Federal Commission for Vaccination Issues. Overall, data are scarce. The following main points were retrieved from the literature: Inactivated vaccines are safe, but their immunogenicity may be reduced under immunosuppressive therapy. In addition to the generally recommended basic vaccinations, specific vaccinations, such as influenza and pneumococcal vaccination are indicated in these patient groups. Live vaccines are generally contraindicated under immunosuppressive therapy due to safety concerns. However, specific exceptions apply. Furthermore, certain time intervals for the administration of live vaccines after pausing or ceasing an immunosuppressive therapy should be respected.

  16. Alcoholic Cirrhosis Increases Risk for Autoimmune Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbæk, Lisbet; Vilstrup, Hendrik; Deleuran, Bent;

    2015-01-01

    IRR, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.26-1.92), celiac disease (aIRR, 5.12; 95% CI, 2.58-10.16), pernicious anemia (aIRR, 2.35; 95% CI, 1.50-3.68), and psoriasis (aIRR, 4.06; 95% CI, 3.32-4.97). There was no increase in the incidence rate for rheumatoid arthritis (aIRR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.69-1.15); the incidence rate......BACKGROUND & AIMS: Alcoholic cirrhosis is associated with hyperactivation and dysregulation of the immune system. In addition to its ability to increase risk for infections, it also may increase the risk for autoimmune diseases. We studied the incidence of autoimmune diseases among patients...... (controls) of the same sex and age. The incidence rates of various autoimmune diseases were compared between patients with cirrhosis and controls and adjusted for the number of hospitalizations in the previous year (a marker for the frequency of clinical examination). RESULTS: Of the 24,679 patients...

  17. Experimental models of autoimmune inflammatory ocular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Gasparin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Ocular inflammation is one of the leading causes of blindness and loss of vision. Human uveitis is a complex and heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by inflammation of intraocular tissues. The eye may be the only organ involved, or uveitis may be part of a systemic disease. A significant number of cases are of unknown etiology and are labeled idiopathic. Animal models have been developed to the study of the physiopathogenesis of autoimmune uveitis due to the difficulty in obtaining human eye inflamed tissues for experiments. Most of those models are induced by injection of specific photoreceptors proteins (e.g., S-antigen, interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein, rhodopsin, recoverin, phosducin. Non-retinal antigens, including melanin-associated proteins and myelin basic protein, are also good inducers of uveitis in animals. Understanding the basic mechanisms and pathogenesis of autoimmune ocular diseases are essential for the development of new treatment approaches and therapeutic agents. The present review describes the main experimental models of autoimmune ocular inflammatory diseases.

  18. Cirrhosis and autoimmune liver disease: Current understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberal, Rodrigo; Grant, Charlotte R

    2016-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) constitute the classic autoimmune liver diseases (AILDs). While AIH target the hepatocytes, in PBC and PSC the targets of the autoimmune attack are the biliary epithelial cells. Persistent liver injury, associated with chronic AILD, leads to un-resolving inflammation, cell proliferation and the deposition of extracellular matrix proteins by hepatic stellate cells and portal myofibroblasts. Liver cirrhosis, and the resultant loss of normal liver function, inevitably ensues. Patients with cirrhosis have higher risks or morbidity and mortality, and that in the decompensated phase, complications of portal hypertension and/or liver dysfunction lead to rapid deterioration. Accurate diagnosis and monitoring of cirrhosis is, therefore of upmost importance. Liver biopsy is currently the gold standard technique, but highly promising non-invasive methodology is under development. Liver transplantation (LT) is an effective therapeutic option for the management of end-stage liver disease secondary to AIH, PBC and PSC. LT is indicated for AILD patients who have progressed to end-stage chronic liver disease or developed intractable symptoms or hepatic malignancy; in addition, LT may also be indicated for patients presenting with acute liver disease due to AIH who do not respond to steroids. PMID:27729952

  19. Treatment with Myo-Inositol and Selenium Ensures Euthyroidism in Patients with Autoimmune Thyroiditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basciani, Sabrina

    2017-01-01

    Clinical evidences have highlighted the efficacy of myo-inositol and selenium in the treatment of autoimmune thyroiditis. Aim of this study was to further analyze the role of myo-inositol plus selenium (Myo-Ins-Se) in restoring a normal thyroid function of Hashimoto's patients with subclinical hypothyroidism. Eighty-six patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis having thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels between 3 and 6 mIU/L, elevated serum antithyroid peroxidase (TPOAb) and/or antithyroglobulin (TgAb), and normal free thyroxine (fT4) and free triiodothyronine (fT3) levels were enrolled in the study: one hyperthyroid subject with TSH about 0.14 μU/ml was included in this trial as a single case. Patients were assigned to receive Myo-Ins-Se. TSH, TPOAb, and TgAb levels were significantly decreased in patients treated with combined Myo-Ins-Se after 6 months of treatment. In addition, a significant fT3 and fT4 increase, along with an amelioration of their quality of life, was observed. Remarkably, TSH values of the hyperthyroid patient increased from 0.14 μU/ml up to 1.02 μU/ml, showing a complete restoration of TSH values at a normal range. In conclusion, the administration of Myo-Ins-Se is significantly effective in decreasing TSH, TPOAb, and TgAb levels, as well as enhancing thyroid hormones and personal wellbeing, therefore restoring euthyroidism in patients diagnosed with autoimmune thyroiditis. PMID:28293260

  20. Discontinuation of Smoking Increases the Risk for Developing Thyroid Peroxidase Antibodies and/or Thyroglobulin Antibodies: A Prospective Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Effraimidis; J.G.P. Tijssen; W.M. Wiersinga

    2009-01-01

    Context: Autoimmune thyroid disease develops in genetic susceptible subjects, provoked by environmental factors. Little is known of the environment in the early stages of autoimmunity. Objective: We evaluated environmental factors contributing to de novo occurrence of thyroid antibodies. Design: We

  1. Reevaluation of the Thyroid Scan for the Assessment of Pathophysiologic Status of Thyroid Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, In Sook; Nah, Jung Il; Kim, Deog Yoon [Kyunghee University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1991-03-15

    To diagnosis and understand the pathophysiologic status of thyroid disease, not only hormonal measurements but also thyroid scan is believed to have a unique role. Especially in the cases of the change of the thyroid function by thyroiditis, it is emphasized that thyroid scan can be helpful in differential diagnosis, Discordant results of thyroid hormone levels and thyroid scan are found in transient hyperthyroidism, or in transient hypothyroidism. We analysed and reevaluated thyroid scan to look at the importance of thyroid scan. The results are summarised as follows: 1) 80%. of hyperthyroid patients had hyperthyroidism increased RAIU with even density, they are compatible with Graves' disease. 2) 2.1% of hyperthyroid patients had normal or decreased RAIU, which are classified as high iodine turn over genuine hyperthyroidism. 3) 8.5% of hyperthyroid patients had markedly decreased RAIU at both 2 hour and 24 hour, whose pathologic processes are suggested to be heterogenous namely subacute thyroiditis, postpartum thyroiditis, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, and pamless thyroiditis. 4) 45% of hypothyroid patients had increased 24 hr RAIU, 30% of hypothyroid patients were normal, 25%, decreased. In conclusion, thyroid scan should be reevaluated its useful role to asses the pathophysiologic status of thyroid disease. Especially in cases of transient thyrotoxicosis, thyroid scan is essential to diagnose and follow up the disease process.

  2. Neuroelectrophysiological studies on neurological autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin-hong LIU

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The neuroelectrophysiological manifestations of four clinical typical neurological autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis (MS, Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS, myasthenia gravis (MG, and polymyositis and dermatomyositis were reviewed in this paper. The diagnostic value of evoked potentials for multiple sclerosis, nerve conduction studies (NCS for Guillain-Barré syndrome, repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS and single-fiber electromyography (SFEMG for myasthenia gravis, and needle electromyography for polymyositis and dermatomyositis were respectively discussed. This review will help to have comprehensive understanding on electrophysiological examinations and their clinical significance in the diagnosis of neurological autoimmune diseases. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.09.004

  3. Interferon induced thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomer, Yaron; Menconi, Francesca

    2009-12-01

    Interferon-alpha (IFNalpha) is used for the treatment of various disorders, most notable chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. One of the commonest side effects of IFNalpha therapy is thyroiditis, with up to 40% of HCV patients on IFNalpha developing clinical or subclinical disease. In some cases interferon induced thyroiditis (IIT) may result in severe symptomatology necessitating discontinuation of therapy. IIT can manifest as clinical autoimmune thyroiditis, presenting with symptoms of classical Hashimoto's thyroiditis or Graves' disease, or as non-autoimmune thyroiditis. Non-autoimmune thyroiditis can manifest as destructive thyroiditis, with early thyrotoxicosis and later hypothyroidism, or as non-autoimmune hypothyroidism. While the epidemiology and clinical presentation of IIT have been well characterized the mechanisms causing IIT are still poorly understood. It is likely that the hepatitis C virus (HCV) itself plays a role in the disease, as the association between HCV infection and thyroiditis is well established. It is believed that IFNalpha induces thyroiditis by both immune stimulatory effects and by direct effects on the thyroid. Early detection and therapy of this condition are important in order to avoid complications of thyroid disease such as cardiac arrhythmias.

  4. Hashimoto′s encephalopathy and motor neuron disease: A common autoimmune pathogenesis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harzheim Michael

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Hashimoto′s encephalopathy is a rare complication of autoimmune thyroiditis not associated with thyroidal function decline. We report a 50-year-old man presenting with lower motor neuron symptoms evolving over 3 years and changes in behavior associated with attentive and cognitive impairment occurring in the last few months. Memory deficits, emotional instability, marked dysarthria, mild symmetric weakness of the lower extremities, and fasciculations were the most striking clinical features. EEG was diffusely slow, cranial MRI revealed multiple subcortical white matter lesions, CSF protein was slightly elevated, electromyographic recordings showed acute and chronic denervation, and extremely high TPO antibody titers were found in the serum. Hashimoto′s encephalopathy and lower motor neuron disease were diagnosed. As repeated high-dose intravenous methylprednisolone administration followed by oral tapering improved both central nervous system and lower motor neuron symptoms, the question was raised whether there was a common autoimmune pathogenesis of both clinically distinct diseases.

  5. How Does Age at Onset Influence the Outcome of Autoimmune Diseases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel J. Amador-Patarroyo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The age at onset refers to the time period at which an individual experiences the first symptoms of a disease. In autoimmune diseases (ADs, these symptoms can be subtle but are very relevant for diagnosis. They can appear during childhood, adulthood or late in life and may vary depending on the age at onset. Variables like mortality and morbidity and the role of genes will be reviewed with a focus on the major autoimmune disorders, namely, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, rheumatoid arthritis (RA, multiple sclerosis (MS, type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D, Sjögren's syndrome, and autoimmune thyroiditis (AITD. Early age at onset is a worst prognostic factor for some ADs (i.e., SLE and T1D, while for others it does not have a significant influence on the course of disease (i.e., SS or no unanimous consensus exists (i.e., RA and MS.

  6. Autoimmune diseases and fungal infections: immunological mechanisms and therapeutic approaches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jian-zhong

    2009-01-01

    @@ Autoimmune disease represents a breakdown of natural tolerance to autoreactive antigens.Pemphigus and lupus erythematosus are common autoimmune diseases either skin-specific or with predominant skin involvement. During the past decades,much progress has been made in understanding the mechanism of autoimmune diseases and the immunological mechanism in some infectious diseases such as fungal infections. Various novel approaches have been developed in the treatment of these diseases.

  7. Endocrine autoimmunity in Turner syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Turner syndrome is caused by numeric and structural abnormalities of the X chromosome. An increased frequency of autoimmunity as well as an elevated incidence of autoantibodies was observed in Turner patients. The aim of this study was to conduct a retrospective analysis of the incidence of autoimmunity in 66 Italian patients affected by Turner syndrome. Methods Sixty-six unselected and consecutive Italian Turner patients were recruited. The association between age, karyotype and the presence of clinical/pre-clinical autoimmune disorders and of autoantibodies was examined. Results Out of the 66 Turner patients, 26 had thyroid autoimmune disorders (39.4%), 14 patients had Hashimoto’s thyroiditis with clinical or subclinical hypothyroidism (21.2%) and 12 patients had circulating anti-thyroid antibodies, echographic pattern of diffuse hypoechogenicity and normal thyroid hormone levels (18.2%). None were affected by Graves’ disease. We analyzed the overall incidence of thyroid autoimmunity within the 3 different age groups 0–9.9, 10–19.9 and 20–29.9 years. No statistically significant difference was observed in the incidence of thyroid autoimmunity within the age-groups (χ2-test p > 0.05). Out of the 66 patients, 31 patients had the 45,X karyotype; within this first group 14 out of 31 patients were affected by autoimmune thyroid disease. A second group of 29 patients included 19 patients with mosaicism, 5 patients with deletions and 5 patients with ring chromosome; out of these 29 patients 7 were affected by autoimmune thyroid disease. A third group included 6 patients with X isochromosome; 5 out of 6 were affected by autoimmune thyroid disease. A statistically significant difference in the frequency of thyroid autoimmunity within the different karyotype groups was observed (χ2-test p = 0.0173). When comparing the X isochromosome group with the pooled group of other karyotypes, of note, the frequency of thyroid autoimmunity was

  8. Questions and Answers on Autoimmunity and Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Autoimmune Coalition Your Privacy Get Involved Donate Grassroots Fundraising ? Advocate for Change Take our Survey Information List ... Common Thread Coping Tools InFocus Newsletter Questions & Answers Fundraising Grassroots Fundraising Workplace Giving Special Events AARDA on ...

  9. Eye findings and immunological markers in probands and their euthyroid relatives from a single family with multiple cases of thyroid autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ardley Melissa

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ophthalmopathy is a common manifestation of Graves’ disease (GD occurring in up to 50% of patients. Mild eye signs are also common in patients with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. Whilst a genetic predisposition to GD has been demonstrated this is not the case for the ophthalmopathy which often runs a separate course. Objective We determined the prevalences of eye and eyelid signs and positive thyroid and orbital antibody tests in first and second degree relatives from a single family with multiple cases of Graves’ disease, ophthalmopathy and Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. Design The study cohort comprised 16 subjects from the same family, 4 probands namely, 3 with GD and one with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis and hypothyroidism and 12 of their euthyroid first or second degree relatives. We measured antibodies against calsequestrin (CASQ1 and collagen XIII in an enzyme-linked-immunosorbent assays and TSH-Receptor (TSH-R antibodies as i TSH-R binding inhibiting immunoglobulin (TBII and ii thyroid stimulating immunoglobulin (TSI. Eye signs were classified and quantified using the clinical activity score (CAS, NOSPECS classes, Nunery types 1 and 2 and the margin-reflex-distance (MRD as a measure of upper eyelid retraction (UER. Main outcomes Whilst significant ophthalmopathy was uncommon in the relatives, mild eye signs, in particular UER, were demonstrated in about a third of them. The presence of eye signs was moderately, but not significantly, associated with the detection of CASQ1 and collagen XIII antibodies, but not TSH-R antibodies. Conclusion Our study demonstrates a significant prevalence of positive orbital antibody tests and ophthalmopathy in probands with thyroid autoimmunity and their euthyroid relatives, favouring a role of genetic factors in the development of ophthalmopathy in patients with thyroid autoimmunity.

  10. Thyroid Diseases and Treatment in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aynur Aktaş

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of thyroid disease in pregnancy is important for gestational maternal health, obstetric outcome and, subsequent development of child. Pregnancy has pro­found effects on the regulation of thyroid function, and on thyroidal functional disorders, that need to be recognized, carefully evaluated and correctly managed. In women with normal thyroid function there is an increase in thyroxine (T4 and triiodothyronine (T3 production and inhibition of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH in the first trimester of pregnancy,. In the pregnant woman, elevated thyroxine-binding globulin (TGB and concomitant increases in total T4 and T3 levels plateau at 12-14 weeks of pregnancy, and free T4 measurements slowly decrease. The most frequent thyroid disorder in pregnancy is maternal hy­pothyroidism. It is associated with fetal loss, placental abruptions, preeclampsia, preterm delivery and reduced intellectual function in the offspring. Hyperthyroidism dur­ing pregnancy is relatively uncommon, with a prevalence estimated to range between 0.1% and 1%. The most common cause of hyperthyroidism is Graves disease, as this etiology accounts for 85% of clinical hyperthyroid­ism in pregnancy. Another cause of hyperthyroidism is hyperemesis gravidarum. This is common and requires differentiation from Graves disease. There has been much discussion and many publications on the optimal management of pregnant women who are hyperthyroid or hypothyroid. Despite the lack of consensus organiza­tions, which are based on analyses, support screening in all pregnant women in the first trimester for thyroid disease. In this article, we provide information about the current approaches of thyroid dysfunction in pregnancy. J Clin Exp Invest 2016; 7 (1: 120-124

  11. Association of the thyroid stimulating hormone receptor gene (TSHR) with Graves' disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brand, Oliver J; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Simmonds, Matthew J;

    2009-01-01

    Graves' disease (GD) is a common autoimmune disease (AID) that shares many of its susceptibility loci with other AIDs. The thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) represents the primary autoantigen in GD, in which autoantibodies bind to the receptor and mimic its ligand, thyroid stimulating...... hormone, causing the characteristic clinical phenotype. Although early studies investigating the TSHR and GD proved inconclusive, more recently we provided convincing evidence for association of the TSHR region with disease. In the current study, we investigated a combined panel of 98 SNPs, including 70...

  12. Ionizing radiation and autoimmunity: Induction of autoimmune disease in mice by high dose fractionated total lymphoid irradiation and its prevention by inoculating normal T cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakaguchi, N.; Sakaguchi, S. (Stanford Univ. School of Medicine, CA (United States) Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA (United States) PRESTO, JRDC, Institute of Phical and Chemical Research, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)); Miyai, K. (Univ. of California, San Diego, LA Jolla, CA (United States))

    1992-11-01

    Ionizing radiation can functionally alter the immune system and break self-tolerance. High dose (42.5 Gy), fractionated (2.5 Gy 17 times) total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) on mice caused various organ-specific autoimmune diseases, such as gastritis, thyroiditis, and orchitis, depending on the radiation dosages, the extent of lymphoid irradiation, and the genetic background of the mouse strains. Radiation-induced tissue damage is not the primary cause of the autoimmune disease because irradiation of the target organs alone failed to elicit the autoimmunity and shielding of the organs from irradiation was unable to prevent it. In contrast, irradiation of both the thymus and the peripheral lymphoid organs/tissues was required for efficient induction of autoimmune disease by TLI. TLI eliminated the majority of mature thymocytes and the peripheral T cells for 1 mo, and inoculation of spleen cell, thymocyte, or bone marrow cell suspensions (prepared from syngeneic nonirradiated mice) within 2 wk after TLI effectively prevented the autoimmune development. Depletion of T cells from the inocula abrogated the preventive activity. CD4[sup +] T cells mediated the autoimmune prevention but CD8[sup +] T cells did not. CD4[sup +] T cells also appeared to mediate the TLI-induced autoimmune disease because CD4[sup +] T cells from disease-bearing TLI mice adoptively transferred the autoimmune disease to syngeneic naive mice. Taken together, these results indicate that high dose, fractionated ionizing radiation on the lymphoid organs/tissues can cause autoimmune disease by affecting the T cell immune system, rather than the target self-Ags, presumably by altering T cell-dependent control of self-reactive T cells. 62 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Impaired Fertility Associated with Subclinical Hypothyroidism and Thyroid Autoimmunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldthusen, Anne-Dorthe; Pedersen, Palle L; Larsen, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to estimate the significance of TSH, thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPOAb), and mild (subclinical) hypothyroidism in women from The Danish General Suburban Population Study (GESUS) on the number of children born, the number of pregnancies, and the number...... of spontaneous abortions. METHODS: Retrospective cross sectional study of 11254 women participating in GESUS. Data included biochemical measurements and a self-administrated questionnaire. RESULTS: 6.7% had mild (subclinical) hypothyroidism and 9.4% prevalent hypothyroidism. In women with mild hypothyroidism...... with spontaneous abortions. Mild (subclinical) hypothyroidism was associated with a risk of not having children and a risk of not getting pregnant in age-adjusted and multiadjusted models. Prevalent hypothyroidism was not associated with the number of children born, the number of pregnancies, or spontaneous...

  14. Narcolepsy as an autoimmune disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Partinen, Markku; Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek; Plazzi, Giuseppe;

    2014-01-01

    Narcolepsy is a sleep disorder characterised by loss of hypothalamic hypocretin (orexin) neurons. The prevalence of narcolepsy is about 30 per 100 000 people, and typical age at onset is 12-16 years. Narcolepsy is strongly associated with the HLA-DQB1*06:02 genotype, and has been thought...... of as an immune-mediated disease. Other risk genes, such as T-cell-receptor α chain and purinergic receptor subtype 2Y11, are also implicated. Interest in narcolepsy has increased since the epidemiological observations that H1N1 infection and vaccination are potential triggering factors, and an increase...... in the incidence of narcolepsy after the pandemic AS03 adjuvanted H1N1 vaccination in 2010 from Sweden and Finland supports the immune-mediated pathogenesis. Epidemiological observations from studies in China also suggest a role for H1N1 virus infections as a trigger for narcolepsy. Although the pathological...

  15. MHC Genes Linked to Autoimmune Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deitiker, Philip; Atassi, M Zouhair

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (ADs), or autoinflammatoiy diseases, are growing in complexity as diagnoses improve and many factors escalate disease risk. Considerable genetic similarity is found among ADs, and they are frequently associated with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes. However, a given disease may be associated with more than one human leukocyte antigen (HLA) allotype, and a given HLA may be associated with more than one AD. The associations of non-MHC genes with AD present an additional problem, and the situation is further complicated by the role that other factors, such as age, diet, therapeutic drugs, and regional influences, play in disease. This review discusses some of the genetics and biochemistry of HLA-linked AD and inflammation, covering some of the best-studied examples and summarizing indicators for class I- and II-mediated disease. However, the scope of this review limits a detailed discussion of all known ADs.

  16. Stem cell therapy for severe autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marmont Alberto M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Intense immunosuppresion followed by alogenic or autogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a relatively recent procedure which was used for the first time in severe, refractory cases of systemic lupus erythematosus. Currently three agressive procedures are used in the treatment of autoimmune diseases: high dose chemotherapy without stem cell rescue, intense immunosuppression with subsequent infusion of the alogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation combined with or without the selection of CD34+ cells, and the autogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Proof of the graft-versus-leukemia effect observed define SCT as a form of immunotherapy, with additional evidence of an similar Graft-vs-Autoimmunity effect which is suggestive of a cure for autoimmune diseases in this type of therapy. The use of alogenic SCT improved due to its safety compared to autogenic transplantations. In this report, data of multiply sclerosis and systemic lupus erythematosus are reported, with the conclusion that Immunoablation followed by SCT is clearly indicated in such cases.

  17. Overlap syndromes among autoimmune liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christian Rust; Ulrich Beuers

    2008-01-01

    The three major immune disorders of the liver are autoimmune hepatitis (AIH),primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC).Variant forms of these diseases are generally called overlap syndromes,although there has been no standardised definition.Patients with overlap syndromes present with both hepatitic and cholestatic serum liver tests and have histological features of AIH and PBC or PSC.The AIH-PBC overlap syndrome is the most common form,affecting almost 10% of adults with AIH or PBC.Single cases of AIH and autoimmune cholangitis (AMA-negative PBC) overlap syndrome have also been reported.The AIH-PSC overlap syndrome is predominantly found in children,adolescents and young adults with AIH or PSC.Interestingly,transitions from one autoimmune to another have also been reported in a minority of patients,especially transitions from PBC to AIH-PBC overlap syndrome.Overlap syndromes show a progressive course towards liver cirrhosis and liver failure without treatment.Therapy for overlap syndromes is empiric,since controlled trials are not available in these rare disorders.Anticholestatic therapy with ursodeoxycholic acid is usually combined with immunosuppressive therapy with corticosteroids and/or azathioprine in both AIH-PBC and AIH-PSC overlap syndromes.In end-stage disease,liver transplantation is the treatment of choice.

  18. Thyroid disease in pregnancy: (Women's Health Series).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Shema; Geraci, Stephen A; Koch, Christian A

    2013-09-01

    Pregnancy is a state of many hormonal changes that can make interpretation of thyroid function tests difficult. Measuring trimester-specific reference values of thyrotropin and free thyroxine is recommended. Because overt maternal hypothyroidism negatively affects the fetus, timely recognition and treatment are important. Women taking levothyroxine prepregnancy require a ≤50% dose increase during pregnancy. Hyperthyroidism can result from excessive human chorionic gonadotropin or Graves disease. Radioactive scanning should be avoided during pregnancy. Antithyroidal drug therapy should consist of propylthiouracil during the first trimester and methimazole thereafter. If indicated, beta blockers can be administered under obstetrical supervision. Iodine deficiency is a known goitrogen and stimulus for thyroid nodular growth. Thyroid nodules may enlarge, but the incidence of thyroid cancer is not increased during pregnancy. Suspicious nodules should be biopsied and, if necessary, removed during the second trimester; otherwise, follow-up can safely be conducted postpartum. Thyroid-stimulating hormone suppression for any preexisting thyroid cancer or suspicious nodules should achieve free or total T4 in the upper normal range for pregnancy. Postpartum thyroiditis occurs more frequently in antithyroid peroxidase-positive women, who should be screened by measuring serum thyrotropin at 6 to 12 weeks' gestation and at 3 and 6 months postpartum.

  19. Bilateral versus unilateral thyroid eye disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Bahmani Kashkouli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim of this study was to compare demographics, clinical manifestations, associated systemic and ocular factors, severity and activity of patients with unilateral thyroid eye disease (U-TED versus bilateral thyroid eye disease (B-TED. Materials and Methods: In a cross-sectional study, all patients with Graves′ hyperthyroidism and primary hypothyroidism seen in an endocrinology clinic were included from September 2003 to July 2006. Demographics, complete eye examination, severity score (NOSPECS, total eye score, and clinical activity score were recorded and compared in the B-TED and U-TED groups of patients. Results: From 851 patients with thyroid disorders, 303 (35.6% had TED. Thirty-two patients (32/ 303, 10.56% were found to have U-TED. Patients with U-TED (mean age 31.6 ± 11.6 years were significantly younger than patients with B-TED (mean age 37.7 ± 14.7 years. Monovariate analysis (Chi-square and independent sample t-test showed a significantly higher severity score in B-TED (U-TED 4.09±4.05, B-TED: 6.7±6.3; P= 0.002 and more activity score in B-TED (U-TED= 1.03±0.96, B-TED: 1.74±1.6, P= 0.001. However, multivariate analysis did not show any significant difference between the two groups in terms of age, gender, type of thyroid disease, duration of thyroid disease and TED, severity and activity of TED, smoking habit, and presentation of TED before or after the presentation of thyroid disease (0.1thyroid disease, associated findings, and severity and activity of TED.

  20. Management of autoimmune blistering diseases in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, Tess; Venning, Vanessa V

    2011-10-01

    Autoimmune blistering disease (AIBD) in pregnancy raises several complex management issues associated with underlying pathogenesis and treatment options. This article considers the effects of the disease as well as its treatment for both mother and fetus. All AIBDs can occur in pregnancy but are relatively rare. Pemphigoid gestationis is a rare AIBD that is specific to pregnancy. The article considers each AIBD in turn and then looks at treatment options for the group as a whole, as there are many issues common to all.

  1. Measurement of disease severity in cutaneous autoimmune diseases

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The development of disease-specific outcome instruments for several autoimmune skin diseases including cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE), dermatomyositis, vitiligo, pemphigus and alopecia areata has facilitated the objective assessment of disease in clinical trials. Validation of these instruments provides reliable tools to measure disease severity and therapeutic effect in clinical studies. However, the existence of multiple outcome measures for each disease and the lack of uniformity betw...

  2. The complement system in systemic autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Min; Daha, Mohamed R; Kallenberg, Cees G M

    2010-05-01

    Complement is part of the innate immune system. Its major function is recognition and elimination of pathogens via direct killing and/or stimulation of phagocytosis. Activation of the complement system is, however, also involved in the pathogenesis of the systemic autoimmune diseases. Activation via the classical pathway has long been recognized in immune complex-mediated diseases such as cryoglobulinemic vasculitis and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In SLE, the role of complement is somewhat paradoxical. It is involved in autoantibody-initiated tissue damage on the one hand, but, on the other hand, it appears to have protective features as hereditary deficiencies of classical pathway components are associated with an increased risk for SLE. There is increasing evidence that the alternative pathway of complement, even more than the classical pathway, is involved in many systemic autoimmune diseases. This is true for IgA-dominant Henoch Schönlein Purpura, in which additional activation of the lectin pathway contributes to more severe disease. In anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis the complement system was considered not to be involved since immunoglobulin deposition is generally absent in the lesions. However, recent studies, both in human and animal models, demonstrated complement activation via the alternative pathway as a major pathogenic mechanism. Insight into the role of the various pathways of complement in the systemic autoimmune diseases including the vasculitides opens up new ways of treatment by blocking effector pathways of complement. This has been demonstrated for monoclonal antibodies to C5 or C5a in experimental anti-phospholipid antibody syndrome and ANCA-associated vasculitis.

  3. The epidemiologic evidence linking autoimmune diseases and psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benros, Michael E; Eaton, William W; Mortensen, Preben B

    2014-02-15

    This review summarizes the epidemiologic evidence linking autoimmune diseases and psychosis. The associations between autoimmune diseases and psychosis have been studied for more than a half century, but research has intensified within the last decades, since psychosis has been associated with genetic markers of the immune system and with excess autoreactivity and other immune alterations. A range of psychiatric disorders, including psychosis, have been observed to occur more frequently in some autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus and multiple sclerosis. Many autoimmune diseases involve multiple organs and general dysfunction of the immune system, which could affect the brain and induce psychiatric symptoms. Most studies have been cross-sectional, observing an increased prevalence of a broad number of autoimmune diseases in people with psychotic disorders. Furthermore, there is some evidence of associations of psychosis with a family history of autoimmune disorders and vice versa. Additionally, several autoimmune diseases, individually and in aggregate, have been identified as raising the risk for psychotic disorders in longitudinal studies. The associations have been suspected to be caused by inflammation or brain-reactive antibodies associated with the autoimmune diseases. However, the associations could also be caused by shared genetic factors or common etiologic components such as infections. Infections can induce the development of autoimmune diseases and autoantibodies, possibly affecting the brain. Autoimmune diseases and brain-reactive antibodies should be considered by clinicians in the treatment of individuals with psychotic symptoms, and even if the association is not causal, treatment would probably still improve quality of life and survival.

  4. The scope and impact of thyroid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wartofsky, L

    1996-01-01

    Aspects of the incidence and demographics of common thyroid disorders in the US (and elsewhere, to a lesser extent) are reviewed. The impact of healthcare reform and the efforts of managed care organizations to impose cost-effective management for the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid disorders are bringing unusual pressures to bear on both clinical laboratories and practicing endocrinologists. I discuss the potential dangers of utilization of suboptimally focused diagnostic approaches and of the inefficiencies in clinical management by primary-care providers, who often lack sufficient expertise, as opposed to endocrinologists. More than dollars are at stake, and the suboptimal management of common thyroid disorders presents several significant risks. Finally, I propose a general blueprint for the ongoing development of a structure for continuing quality improvement of the laboratory and clinical diagnosis, treatment, and long-term follow-up of patients with thyroid disease.

  5. Cardiovascular Disease and Thyroid Function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, Jens; Selmer, Christian

    2014-01-01

    , a progressively increased risk in people with different levels of reduced TSH to a physiologically 'dose-dependent' effect of thyroid hormones on the heart in overt hyperthyroidism. Heart failure represents an intriguing clinical situation in which triiodothyronine treatment might be beneficial. In conclusion......, subclinical dysthyroid states affect the heart with subsequent changes in morbidity and mortality. Subclinical hyperthyroidism seems a more serious condition than subclinical hypothyroidism, which should affect treatment decision in a more aggressive manner. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.......Thyroid function has a profound effect on the heart, and both all-cause and cardiovascular mortality rates are increased in hyperthyroidism. New-onset atrial fibrillation carries a prolonged risk for the development of hyperthyroidism, suggesting altered availability of thyroid hormones...

  6. PTPN22 gene polymorphisms in autoimmune diseases with special reference to systemic lupus erythematosus disease susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradhan V

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a prototype autoimmune disease. SLE is a result of one or more immune mechanisms, like autoantibody production, complement activation, multiple inflammation and immune complex deposition leading to organ tissue damage. SLE affected patients are susceptible to common and opportunistic infections. There are several reports suggesting that Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection precipitates SLE in patients from endemic areas. Genetic factors and environmental factors also play an important role in the overall susceptibility to SLE pathophysiology. Recently, protein tyrosine phosphatase, non-receptor type 22 (PTPN22 gene, has been found to be associated with several autoimmune diseases like SLE, Grave′s disease and Hashimoto thyroiditis. The missense R620W polymorphism, rs 2476601, in PTPN22 gene at the nucleotide 1858 in codon 620 (620Arg > Trp has been associated with autoimmune diseases. The PTPN22 locus is also found to be responsible for development of pulmonary tuberculosis in certain populations. The PTPN22 1858C/T gene locus will be ideal to look for SLE susceptibility to tuberculosis in the Indian population. In this review, we focus on human PTPN22 gene structure and function as well as the association of PTPN22 gene polymorphisms with SLE susceptibility

  7. Large leg ulcers due to autoimmune diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozin, Alexander P.; Egozi, Dana; Ramon, Yehuda; Toledano, Kohava; Braun-Moscovici, Yolanda; Markovits, Doron; Schapira, Daniel; Bergman, Reuven; Melamed, Yehuda; Ullman, Yehuda; Balbir-Gurman, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Large leg ulcers (LLU) may complicate autoimmune diseases. They pose a therapeutic challenge and are often resistant to treatment. To report three cases of autoimmune diseases complicated with LLU. Case Report Case 1. A 55-year old woman presented with long-standing painful LLU due to mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD). Biopsy from the ulcer edge showed small vessel vasculitis. IV methylprednisolone (MethP) 1 G/day, prednisolone (PR) 1mg/kg, monthly IV cyclophosphamide (CYC), cyclosporine (CyA) 100mg/day, IVIG 125G, ciprofloxacin+IV Iloprost+enoxaparin+aspirin (AAVAA), hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HO), maggot debridement and autologous skin transplantation were performed and the LLU healed. Case 2. A 45-year old women with MCTD developed multiple LLU’s with non-specific inflammation by biopsy. MethP, PR, hydroxychloroquine (HCQ), azathioprine (AZA), CYC, IVIG, AAVAA failed. Treatment for underlying the LLU tibial osteomyelitis and addition of CyA was followed by the LLU healing. Case 3. A 20-year-old man with history of polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) developed painful LLU’s due to small vessel vasculitis (biopsy). MethP, PR 1 mg/kg, CYC, CyA 100 mg/d, AAVAA failed. MRSA sepsis and relapse of systemic PAN developed. IV vancomycin, followed by ciprofloxacin, monthly IVIG (150 g/for 5 days) and infliximab (5 mg/kg) were instituted and the LLU’s healed. Conclusions LLU are extremely resistant to therapy. Combined use of multiple medications and services are needed for healing of LLU due to autoimmune diseases. PMID:21169912

  8. Insights into IL-37, the role in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wang-Dong; Zhao, Yi; Liu, Yi

    2015-12-01

    Autoimmune diseases are characterized by the impaired function and the destruction of tissues that are caused by an immune response in which aberrant antibodies are generated and attack the body's own cells and tissues. Interleukin (IL) -37, a new member of the IL-1 family, broadly reduces innate inflammation as well as acquired immune responses. Recently, studies have shown that expression of IL-37 was abnormal in autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), ankylosing spondylitis (AS), psoriasis, Graves' disease (GD). In addition, functional analysis indicated that IL-37 is negatively involved in the development and pathogenesis of these autoimmune disorders. The strong association of this cytokine with autoimmune diseases promotes us to systematically review what had been published recently on the crucial nature of IL-37 in relation to autoimmune diseases gaining attention for its regulatory capability in these autoimmune disorders.

  9. Lack of association between thyroid autoantibodies and parity in a population study argues against microchimerism as a trigger of thyroid autoimmunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Bülow; Laurberg, Peter; Knudsen, Nils;

    2006-01-01

    Background: Thyroid autoimmunity is more common in females than in males. One possible explanation for this female preponderance may be the effect of oestrogens on the immune system. It has also been suggested that foetal microchimerism involving transfer of foetal cells into maternal tissue during...... circulating thyroid antibodies and previous pregnancy, number of pregnancies, parity and previous abortion. There was no association between thyroid autoantibodies and use of OCs. Women aged 60-65 years receiving HRT now or previously had a lower prevalence of Tg-Ab (univariate. P = 0.01; multivariate, P = 0...

  10. Treating prolactinoma can prevent autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watad, Abdulla; Versini, Mathilde; Jeandel, Pierre-Yves; Amital, Howard; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2015-04-01

    Prolactin (PRL) is a pleiotropic hormone; in addition to a wide variety of endocrine effects, PRL also exhibits immunostimulating effects. Therefore, there is increasing evidence linking PRL with a large number of systemic and organ specific autoimmune diseases. Herein, we report the case of an adolescent girl diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS) occurring in the context of untreated prolactinoma evolving since childhood. This raises the exciting question of the involvement of PRL in the pathogenesis of MS. It is likely that early treatment of hyperprolactinemia in this case would have significantly reduced the risk of developing MS or even prevented its occurrence.

  11. Autoimmune encephalopathy associated with thyroid autoantibodies as the cause of reversible cognitive impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Dobbin Chow

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We herewith describe a patient with acute confusion, expressive aphasia and generalized seizures. A through workup excluded most causes of encephalopathy. He was, however, found to have TSH = 18.6 MIU/ml, T3reverse = 0.44nmol/L, T4 = 0.8ng/dl and Anti-Thyroid-Peroxidase AB titer >1000 IU/ml. Based on the above findings the patient was diagnosed with Hashimoto's encephalopathy and his mental status showed dramatic improvement (MMS 30/30 with high dose prednisone. Hashimoto's encephalopathy is rare disorder of presumed autoimmune origin characterized by cognitive decline, seizures, neuro-psychiatric symptoms, high titers of Anti-Thyroid-Peroxidase AB, and a positive response to steroids.

  12. Identification of chosen apoptotic (TIAR and TIA-1 markers expression in thyroid tissues from adolescents with immune and non-immune thyroid diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Czerwinska

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to estimate sodium iodide symporter (NIS and thyroid peroxidase (TPO expression in thyrocytes from patients with GD and no-toxic multinodular goitre (NTMG in relationship with apoptotic (TIAR and TIA-1 markers. The investigation was performed on thyroid cells isolated from postoperation thyroid tissues from 15 patients aged 12-21 years old with GD and 15 cases aged 13-21 years old with NTMG. Detection of NIS and TPO was performed by immunohistochemistry. Analysis of apoptotic markers in thyroid tissues was performed using antibodies to TIAR and TIA-1 by Western Blot and immunohistochemistry. Identification of proapoptotic TIAR and TIA-1 molecules in the thyroid tissues revealed a higher expression of both proteins in patients with Graves' disease (+++; +, respectively in comparison to patients with NTNG (+; 0. In addition, TIAR expression was detected in three bands [p50, p42, p38 (kDa] and TIA-1 in two bands [p22, p17 (kDa]. using Western Blot test in patients with thyroid autoimmune diseases. In patients with NTNG expression of both apoptotic proteins was lower and identified in single bands: 42 (kDa for TIAR and 17 (kDa for TIA-1. The analysis of expression of NIS and TPO in thyroid follicular cells was higher in patients with Graves' disease in compared to their detection in patients with NTMG. In addition, degree of thyroid antigen expression positive correlated with amount of proapoptotic markers (TIAR, p<0.001; TIA-1, p<0.025 for NIS; TIAR, p<0.012 for TPO. We conclude that elevated expression of NIS and TPO in Graves' disease is associated with higher stimulation and activation of apoptosis in thyroid follicular cells during autoimmune process.

  13. [Assessment of endothelial function in autoimmune diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benhamou, Y; Bellien, J; Armengol, G; Gomez, E; Richard, V; Lévesque, H; Joannidès, R

    2014-08-01

    Numerous autoimmune-inflammatory rheumatic diseases have been associated with accelerated atherosclerosis or other types of vasculopathy leading to an increase in cardiovascular disease incidence. In addition to traditional cardiovascular risk factors, endothelial dysfunction is an important early event in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, contributing to plaque initiation and progression. Endothelial dysfunction is characterized by a shift of the actions of the endothelium toward reduced vasodilation, a proinflammatory and a proadhesive state, and prothrombic properties. Therefore, assessment of endothelial dysfunction targets this vascular phenotype using several biological markers as indicators of endothelial dysfunction. Measurements of soluble adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, VCAM-1, E-selectin), pro-thrombotic factors (thrombomodulin, von Willebrand factor, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1) and inflammatory cytokines are most often performed. Regarding the functional assessment of the endothelium, the flow-mediated dilatation of conduit arteries is a non-invasive method widely used in pathophysiological and interventional studies. In this review, we will briefly review the most relevant information upon endothelial dysfunction mechanisms and explorations. We will summarize the similarities and differences in the biological and functional assessments of the endothelium in different autoimmune diseases.

  14. Idiopathic membranous nephropathy: an autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makker, Sudesh P; Tramontano, Alfonso

    2011-07-01

    For more than 50 years researchers have debated the evidence for an autoimmune basis of human idiopathic membranous nephritis (MN). Work published in the past 2 years has substantially strengthened the belief that MN is indeed an autoimmune disease of the kidney. Autoantibodies of the IgG4 subclass to at least three podocyte membrane proteins including phospholipase A(2)-receptor, aldose reductase, and manganese superoxide dismutase have been detected by immunoblotting in sera as well as in acid eluates prepared from renal biopsy tissue of patients with this disease, using either whole tissue or microdissected glomeruli from frozen sections. In each case the podocyte antigen has been shown to co-localize with the subepithelial glomerular immune deposits in renal tissue of the same patients. It is not certain if any of these podocyte proteins is an inciting/primary autoantigen or whether they are secondary antigens recruited by intermolecular epitope-spreading, initiating from a yet-to-be-discovered autoantigen. Although it is clear that autoantibodies to podocyte membrane proteins are elicited in idiopathic MN and contribute to the formation of the subepithelial deposits, many questions remain concerning the triggers for their development and their contribution toward proteinuria and progression of the disease.

  15. Autoimmune diseases in the TH17 era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Mesquita Jr.

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A new subtype of CD4+ T lymphocytes characterized by the production of interleukin 17, i.e., TH17 cells, has been recently described. This novel T cell subset is distinct from type 1 and type 2 T helper cells. The major feature of this subpopulation is to generate significant amounts of pro-inflammatory cytokines, therefore appearing to be critically involved in protection against infection caused by extracellular microorganisms, and in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases and allergy. The dynamic balance among subsets of T cells is important for the modulation of several steps of the immune response. Disturbances in this balance may cause a shift from normal immunologic physiology to the development of immune-mediated disorders. In autoimmune diseases, the fine balance between the proportion and degree of activation of the various T lymphocyte subsets can contribute to persistent undesirable inflammatory responses and tissue replacement by fibrosis. This review highlights the importance of TH17 cells in this process by providing an update on the biology of these cells and focusing on their biology and differentiation processes in the context of immune-mediated chronic inflammatory diseases.

  16. Pulmonary hypertension in autoimmune rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Massironi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Pulmonary hypertension is a severe and rapidly progressive disease, particularly frequent in patients with rheumatic diseases. The aims of this study were the following: to determine the prevalence of pulmonary hypertension in Italian patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases, and to evaluate if the presence of a rheumatic disease in general, or of a specific autoimmune rheumatic disease, is a risk factor for the development of pulmonary hypertension. Patients and Methods. One hundred and thirteen Italian patients with connective tissue diseases (105 females, 8 males, aged 19 to 83 yrs, entered the study. Fifty-one had systemic sclerosis (SSc: 49 were females, 2 males, aged 34 to 83 yrs; 41 had limited cutaneous SSc, 8 diffuse cutaneous SSc, and 2 SSc sine scleroderma. Thirty-three patients had systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE: all but one were females, their age ranged from 19 to 82 yrs. Twenty-five had rheumatoid arthritis (RA: 21 females, 4 males, aged 26 to 45 yrs. Three females and one male, 51-77 yrs, had mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD. Systolic pulmonary arterial pressure (SPAP was assessed by Doppler echocardiography. Results. Twenty three patients had pulmonary hypertension, which was more frequent in MCTD than in SLE (75% vs 6.1%, p=0.0002 or in AR (20%, p=0.0313. Pulmonary hypertension was more frequent in SSc than in SLE (25.5% vs 6.1%, p=0.0028 and in limited than in diffuse SSc(21.6% vs 3.9%. SPAP was significanly related to age (R=0.35, P=0.0275, with patients with pulmonary hypertension older than patients with normal SPAP (66±13 vs 52±16 yrs, p=0.0003. Conclusions. These data show a significant association between pulmonary hypertension and autoimmune rheumatic diseases. Therefore pulmonary hypertension assessment seems mandatory, at least in MCTD and SSc. However, more studies are needed to clarify the relationship between age and pulmonary hypertension and to verify whether the low prevalence of

  17. Epigenetic modifications and epigenetic based medication implementations of autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Majid; Gharibi, Tohid; Dolati, Sanam; Rostamzadeh, Davood; Aslani, Saeed; Baradaran, Behzad; Younesi, Vahid; Yousefi, Mehdi

    2017-03-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies have documented a number of genetic variants to explain mechanisms underlying autoimmune diseases. However, the precise etiology of autoimmune diseases remains largely unknown. Epigenetic mechanisms like alterations in the post-translational modification of histones and DNA methylation may potentially cause a breakdown of immune tolerance and the perpetuation of autoreactive responses. Recently, several studies both in experimental models and clinical settings proposed that the epigenome may hold the key to a better understanding of autoimmunity initiation and perpetuation. More specifically, data support the impact of epigenetic changes in autoimmune diseases, in some cases based on mechanistical observations. Epigenetic therapy already being employed in hematopoietic malignancies may also be associated with beneficial effects in autoimmune diseases. In this review, we will discuss on what we know and expect about the treatment of autoimmune disease based on epigenetic aberrations.

  18. Infections as risk factor for autoimmune diseases - A nationwide study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Philip Rising; Kragstrup, Tue Wenzel; Deleuran, Bent Winding;

    2016-01-01

    Viruses, bacteria and other infectious pathogens are the major postulated environmental triggers of autoimmunity. In the present nation-wide study we describe the association between infections and 29 autoimmune diseases. We used the Danish Civil Registration System to identify 4.5 million persons...... born between 1945 and 2000. Information on infections and autoimmune diseases was obtained from the Danish Hospital Register. The cohort was followed from 1977 to 2012. Incidence rate ratios for developing an autoimmune disease were estimated using poisson regression. We found an association between...... hospital admission for an infection and 29 autoimmune diseases. This study shows that infections are risk factors for a broad spectrum of autoimmune diseases in a dose-response and temporal manner, in agreement with the hypothesis that infections are an environmental risk factor contributing...

  19. Prevalence of thyroiditis and immunohistochemistry study searching for a morphologic consensus in morphology of autoimmune thyroiditis in a 4613 autopsies series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecchiatti, Stella M P; Lin, Chin Jia; Capelozzi, Vera L; Longatto-Filho, Adhemar; Bisi, Hélio

    2015-07-01

    We sought to verify the prevalence of lymphocytic thyroiditis (LT) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) in autopsy materials. Cases examined between 2003 and 2007 at the Department of Pathology of Faculty of Medicine of São Paulo University were studied. Immunohistochemical analyses were conducted in selected cases to characterize the type of infiltrating mononuclear cells; in addition, we evaluated the frequency of apoptosis by TUNEL assay technique and caspase-3 immunostaining. Significant increase in overall thyroiditis frequency was observed in the present series when compared with the previous report (2.2978% vs. 0.0392%). Thyroiditis was more prevalent among older people. Selected cases of LT and HT (40 cases each) had their infiltrating lymphocytes characterized by immunohistochemical analyses. Both LT and HT showed similar immunostaining patterns for CD4, CD8, CD68, thus supporting a common pathophysiology mechanism and indicating that LT and HT should be considered different presentations of a same condition, that is, autoimmune thyroiditis. Moreover, apoptosis markers strongly evidenced that apoptosis was present in all studied cases. Our results demonstrated an impressive increase in the prevalence of thyroiditis during recent years and our data support that the terminology of autoimmune thyroiditis should be used to designate both LT and HT. This classification would facilitate comparison of prevalence data from different series and studies.

  20. Autoimmun hypophysitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Therese; Hagen, Claus

    2010-01-01

    Autoimmune hypophysitis (AH) - often referred to as lymphocytic hypophysitis - is a rare disease that affects the pituitary gland and causes inflammation. The disease enlarges the pituitary gland and the clinical presentations are lack of pituitary function and headaches. AH is mostly seen in women...... during pregnancy or postpartum, but also occurs in males and children. AH is often associated with other autoimmune diseases, most frequently with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The symptoms are caused by enlargement of the pituitary gland and disturbances of the hormone function. Treatment is either...

  1. Thyroid function and autoimmunity in Danish pregnant women after an iodine fortification program and associations with obstetric outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bliddal, Sofie; Boas, Malene; Hilsted, Linda

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Aberrations in maternal thyroid function and autoimmunity during pregnancy have been associated with negative obstetric outcome. In Denmark, a national iodine fortification program was implemented in the year 2000 with the aim to alleviate the mild-moderate iodine deficiency. Following...... the iodine implementation, there has been an increase in thyroid autoimmunity in the background population. This study investigates the thyroid status of pregnant Danish women following the iodine fortification program, and a possible association with preterm delivery. DESIGN: Historical cohort study of 1278...... randomly selected pregnant Danish women attending the national Down's syndrome screening program. METHODS: The main outcome measures were thyroid status according to laboratory- and gestational-age-specific reference intervals, and association with risk of abnormal obstetric outcome. Antibody...

  2. The thyroxine-containing thyroglobulin peptide (aa 2549-2560) is a target epitope in iodide-accelerated spontaneous autoimmune thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolypetri, Panayota; Carayanniotis, Karen; Rahman, Shofiur; Georghiou, Paris E; Magafa, Vassiliki; Cordopatis, Paul; Carayanniotis, George

    2014-07-01

    Enhanced iodide ingestion is known to accelerate the incidence and severity of spontaneous autoimmune thyroiditis [iodide-accelerated spontaneous autoimmune thyroiditis (ISAT)] in NOD.H2(h4) mice. CD4+ cells are required for the development and maintenance of ISAT, but their target epitopes remain unknown. In this study, we show that the previously identified thyroglobulin (Tg) T cell epitope p2549-2560 containing thyroxine at position 2553 (T4p2553) induces thyroiditis as well as strong specific T and B cell responses in NOD.H2(h4) mice. In ISAT, activated CD4+ T cells specific for T4p2553 are detected before the disease onset in thyroid-draining cervical lymph nodes only in mice placed on an iodide-rich diet and not in age-matched controls. In addition, selective enrichment of CD4+ IFN-γ+ T4p2553-specific cells is observed among cervical lymph node cells and intrathyroidal lymphocytes. T4p2553 was equally detectable on dendritic cells obtained ex vivo from cervical lymph node cells of NaI-fed or control mice, suggesting that the iodide-rich diet contributes to the activation of autoreactive cells rather than the generation of the autoantigenic epitope. Furthermore, spontaneous T4p2553-specific IgG are not detectable within the strong Tg-specific autoantibody response. To our knowledge, these data identify for the first time a Tg T cell epitope as a spontaneous target in ISAT.

  3. Palivizumab Exposure and the Risk of Autoimmune Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haerskjold, Ann; Linder, Marie; Stokholm, Lonny Merete;

    2016-01-01

    children known to be immunologically immature. The long-term effect of palivizumab in terms of autoimmune diseases has not yet been investigated. AIM: Our objective was to investigate whether exposure to palivizumab was associated with the development of autoimmune diseases in children. METHODS...... of autoimmune disease were diagnosed among palivizumab-exposed children during the period of observation. Among the children exposed to palivizumab, one child in Denmark developed inflammatory bowel disease; in Sweden, children developed juvenile arthritis (one child), diabetes mellitus (two children), celiac...... disease (four children), and inflammatory bowel disease (one child). The risk of autoimmune disease was not significantly increased after palivizumab exposure (hazard ratio adjusted for age and country: 1.54; 95 % confidence interval 0.80-2.95). CONCLUSION: The risk of autoimmune disease was not increased...

  4. Virtual touch tissue quantification (VTQ) in the diagnosis of thyroid nodules with coexistent chronic autoimmune Hashimoto's thyroiditis: A preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Ruijun, E-mail: jine_nina@hotmail.com [Department of Ultrasound, Ren Ji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No.1630 Dongfang Road, Shanghai 200127 (China); Li, Fenghua, E-mail: prfenghuali@126.com [Department of Ultrasound, Ren Ji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No.1630 Dongfang Road, Shanghai 200127 (China); Wang, Yan [Department of Ultrasound, Ren Ji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No.1630 Dongfang Road, Shanghai 200127 (China); Ying, Zhiqiang, E-mail: yingzhiqiang@126.com [Departmen of Surgery, Ren Ji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No.1630 Dongfang Road, Shanghai 200127 (China); Zhang, Yun, E-mail: profzhangyun@126.com [Departmen of Surgery, Ren Ji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No.1630 Dongfang Road, Shanghai 200127 (China)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Virtual Touch Tissue Quantification could provide quantitative measurements to estimate tissue stiffness noninvasively. • Severity of Hashimoto's thyroiditis could affect stiffness of extra-nodular thyroid tissue significantly. • Shear wave velocity of malignant nodules significantly higher than that of benign nodules. • Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse imaging is useful in differential diagnosis between malignant/benign thyroid nodules with HT. - Abstract: Objectives: This study aimed at detecting whether Virtual Touch Tissue Quantification (VTQ) could be applied to differentiate between benign and malignant thyroid nodules with chronic autoimmune Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT). Methods: Convenient ultrasound and Virtual Touch Tissue Quantification were performed in 118 patients with 140 thyroid nodules with histology results. The HT group consisted of 46 patients with 58 nodules. The non-HT group consisted of 72 patients with 82 nodules. Results: The stiffness of extra-nodular thyroid tissue could be significantly affected by the severity of chronic autoimmune thyroiditis. The shear wave velocity of thyroid benign nodules and malignant nodules did not significantly differ in the HT group as compared with the non-HT group (benign nodules: 2.13 ± 0.32 m/s vs 1.98 ± 0.48 m/s, P = 0.122; malignant nodules: 3.32 ± 0.77 m/s vs 3.30 ± 0.74 m/s, P = 0.894). In two groups, the shear wave velocity of malignant nodules is significantly higher than that of benign nodules (HT group: 3.32 ± 0.77 m/s vs 2.13 ± 0.32 m/s; non-HT group: 3.30 ± 0.74 m/s vs 1.98 ± 0.48 m/s, P < 0.001). The best cutoff point for shear wave velocity between malignant and benign thyroid nodules was 2.75 m/s. Conclusions: Virtual Touch Tissue Quantification technology could be performed in the differential diagnosis between malignant thyroid nodules and benign thyroid nodules independently from the coexistence of chronic autoimmune thyroiditis.

  5. Psoriasis is not an autoimmune disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Lionel; Baker, Barbara S; Powles, Anne V; Engstrand, Lars

    2015-04-01

    The concept that psoriasis is an autoimmune disease needs to be questioned. The autoimmune label has been based on molecular mimicry between streptococcal and keratin proteins and the existence of homologous peptides between these proteins. However, it is only peripheral blood CD8, and not CD4, T lymphocytes that respond to the homologous peptides. This ignores the fact that it is CD4 T cells which are necessary to initiate psoriasis. Recent studies on skin bacterial microbiota have found a variety of bacteria in both normal skin and psoriatic lesions. In biopsy specimens, the most common phylum was Firmicutes and the most common genus streptococcus in both psoriasis and normal skin. The innate immune system is activated in psoriasis, and recent genetic findings have shown the majority of susceptibility loci are associated with innate immunity. There is a known clinical relationship between both Crohn's disease (CD) and periodontitis, and psoriasis, and patients with psoriasis share mutations in some innate immunity genes with individuals with CD. It is now accepted that CD is due to a breakdown of immune tolerance (dysbiosis) to bacteria in the intestine. These findings suggest that psoriasis is initiated by an abnormal response to bacteria in the skin due to genetic factors.

  6. The Epidemiologic Evidence Linking Autoimmune Diseases and Psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benros, Michael E; Eaton, William W; Mortensen, Preben B

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes the epidemiologic evidence linking autoimmune diseases and psychosis. The associations between autoimmune diseases and psychosis have been studied for more than a half century, but research has intensified within the last decades, since psychosis has been associated...... with genetic markers of the immune system and with excess autoreactivity and other immune alterations. A range of psychiatric disorders, including psychosis, have been observed to occur more frequently in some autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus and multiple sclerosis. Many autoimmune......, there is some evidence of associations of psychosis with a family history of autoimmune disorders and vice versa. Additionally, several autoimmune diseases, individually and in aggregate, have been identified as raising the risk for psychotic disorders in longitudinal studies. The associations have been...

  7. Applications of Next-generation Sequencing in Systemic Autoimmune Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yiyangzi Ma; Na Shi; Mengtao Li; Fei Chen; Haitao Niu

    2015-01-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases are a group of heterogeneous disorders caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Although numerous causal genes have been identified by genome-wide association studies (GWAS), these susceptibility genes are correlated to a relatively low disease risk, indicating that environmental factors also play an important role in the pathogen-esis of disease. The intestinal microbiome, as the main symbiotic ecosystem between the host and host-associated microorganisms, has been demonstrated to regulate the development of the body’s immune system and is likely related to genetic mutations in systemic autoimmune diseases. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology, with high-throughput capacity and accuracy, provides a powerful tool to discover genomic mutations, abnormal transcription and intestinal microbiome identification for autoimmune diseases. In this review, we briefly outlined the applications of NGS in systemic autoimmune diseases. This review may provide a reference for future studies in the pathogenesis of systemic autoimmune diseases.

  8. Pharmacometabolomics-aided Pharmacogenomics in Autoimmune Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsila, Theodora; Konstantinou, Evangelia; Lavda, Ioanna; Malakis, Harilaos; Papantoni, Ioanna; Skondra, Lamprini; Patrinos, George P

    2016-03-01

    Inter-individual variability has been a major hurdle to optimize disease management. Precision medicine holds promise for improving health and healthcare via tailor-made therapeutic strategies. Herein, we outline the paradigm of "pharmacometabolomics-aided pharmacogenomics" in autoimmune diseases. We envisage merging pharmacometabolomic and pharmacogenomic data (to address the interplay of genomic and environmental influences) with information technologies to facilitate data analysis as well as sense- and decision-making on the basis of synergy between artificial and human intelligence. Humans can detect patterns, which computer algorithms may fail to do so, whereas data-intensive and cognitively complex settings and processes limit human ability. We propose that better-informed, rapid and cost-effective omics studies need the implementation of holistic and multidisciplinary approaches.

  9. Pharmacometabolomics-aided Pharmacogenomics in Autoimmune Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodora Katsila

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Inter-individual variability has been a major hurdle to optimize disease management. Precision medicine holds promise for improving health and healthcare via tailor-made therapeutic strategies. Herein, we outline the paradigm of “pharmacometabolomics-aided pharmacogenomics” in autoimmune diseases. We envisage merging pharmacometabolomic and pharmacogenomic data (to address the interplay of genomic and environmental influences with information technologies to facilitate data analysis as well as sense- and decision-making on the basis of synergy between artificial and human intelligence. Humans can detect patterns, which computer algorithms may fail to do so, whereas data-intensive and cognitively complex settings and processes limit human ability. We propose that better-informed, rapid and cost-effective omics studies need the implementation of holistic and multidisciplinary approaches.

  10. Common immunogenetic profile in children with multiple autoimmune diseases: the signature of HLA-DQ pleiotropic genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larizza, Daniela; Calcaterra, Valeria; Klersy, Catherine; Badulli, Carla; Caramagna, Claudia; Ricci, Antonio; Brambilla, Paola; Salvaneschi, Laura; Martinetti, Miryam

    2012-09-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), celiac disease (CD) and autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD) are autoimmune conditions relatively common in paediatric age and frequently occur in association in the same subject. This event is not by chance and requires an explanation. Here, we studied the distribution of HLA-DQ αβ heterodimers in 334 Italian children with T1DM, ATD and CD alone or in association and in 224 Italian healthy controls. In particular, 164 patients had T1DM (133 alone, 20+ATD, 7+CD and 4+CD+ATD), 118 had ATD (110 alone, 8+CD) and 52 had CD (40 alone, 11+ATD and 1+T1DM). 51 patients suffered from multiple autoimmune diseases. The risk for multiple autoimmune diseases was significantly associated with the increased number of HLA-DQ markers of susceptibility for both T1DM (p = 0.003) and CD (p = 0.006). The presence of one or more diabetogenic DQ molecules significantly increased the probability of developing not only T1DM (p autoimmune diseases although with a different risk according to the number and type of susceptible HLA-DQ heterodimers as reported in the algorithm proposed here. It is likely that combinations of DQA1 and DQB1 alleles are the real culprits of the progression towards multiple autoimmune diseases and HLA-DQ genomic typing will improve the capability to predict associated autoimmune diseases in infancy.

  11. Diagnosis and management of thyroid eye disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denniston, Alastair; Dodson, Paul; Reuser, Tristan

    2002-03-01

    Recent advances are helping elucidate the pathogenesis and improve the management of thyroid eye disease. While biochemical investigations and imaging may be supportive, ophthalmological and medical clinical assessments remain the key to the diagnosis and management of this sight-threatening disorder.

  12. Glutamate decreases the secretion of IL-10 by peripheral blood lymphocytes in persons with autoimmune thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvaratskhelia, E; Dabrundashvili, N; Gagua, M; Maisuradze, E; Mikeladze, D

    2008-11-01

    Human T lymphocytes expose ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors, which control immune responses, cell activation, maturation, and death. Several cytokines release during inflammation which identification may have important physiological and clinical implications. Main biological function of IL-10 is limitation and termination of inflammatory responses and the regulation of differentiation and proliferation of several immune cells. Various inflammatory molecules regulated the secretion of IL-8 and IL-10, but the action of glutamate on the biosynthesis of cytokines is unknown. We have found that in peripheral blood lymphocytes glutamate at the concentrations within normal plasma levels (1 x 10(-5) M), as well as at lower concentration (0.3 x 10(-6) M) changes the secretion of immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10, whereas synthesis of proinflammatory chemokine, IL-8 did not changed significantly. Moreover, our results have shown that peripheral blood lymphocytes from patients with autoimmune thyroiditis release less IL-10 at both concentration of glutamate than peripheral blood lymphocytes from healthy persons. These data suggest that glutamate decrease the secretion of IL-10 by peripheral blood lymphocytes, especially in patients with autoimmune thyroiditis that may be responsible for prolongation of inflammation.

  13. Celiac Disease and Autoimmune-Associated Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenia Lauret

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is frequently accompanied by a variety of extradigestive manifestations, thus making it a systemic disease rather than a disease limited to the gastrointestinal tract. This is primarily explained by the fact that CD belongs to the group of autoimmune diseases. The only one with a known etiology is related to a permanent intolerance to gluten. Remarkable breakthroughs have been achieved in the last decades, due to a greater interest in the diagnosis of atypical and asymptomatic patients, which are more frequent in adults. The known presence of several associated diseases provides guidance in the search of oligosymptomatic cases as well as studies performed in relatives of patients with CD. The causes for the onset and manifestation of associated diseases are diverse; some share a similar genetic base, like type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D; others share pathogenic mechanisms, and yet, others are of unknown nature. General practitioners and other specialists must remember that CD may debut with extraintestinal manifestations, and associated illnesses may appear both at the time of diagnosis and throughout the evolution of the disease. The implementation of a gluten-free diet (GFD improves the overall clinical course and influences the evolution of the associated diseases. In some cases, such as iron deficiency anemia, the GFD contributes to its disappearance. In other disorders, like T1D, this allows a better control of the disease. In several other complications and/or associated diseases, an adequate adherence to a GFD may slow down their evolution, especially if implemented during an early stage.

  14. Selected Aspects in the Pathogenesis of Autoimmune Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, György; Huszthy, Peter C; Fossum, Even; Konttinen, Yrjö; Nakken, Britt; Szodoray, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune processes can be found in physiological circumstances. However, they are quenched with properly functioning regulatory mechanisms and do not evolve into full-blown autoimmune diseases. Once developed, autoimmune diseases are characterized by signature clinical features, accompanied by sustained cellular and/or humoral immunological abnormalities. Genetic, environmental, and hormonal defects, as well as a quantitative and qualitative impairment of immunoregulatory functions, have been shown in parallel to the relative dominance of proinflammatory Th17 cells in many of these diseases. In this review we focus on the derailed balance between regulatory and Th17 cells in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. Additionally, we depict a cytokine imbalance, which gives rise to a biased T-cell homeostasis. The assessment of Th17/Treg-cell ratio and the simultaneous quantitation of cytokines, may give a useful diagnostic tool in autoimmune diseases. We also depict the multifaceted role of dendritic cells, serving as antigen presenting cells, contributing to the development of the pathognomonic cytokine signature and promote cellular and humoral autoimmune responses. Finally we describe the function and role of extracellular vesicles in particular autoimmune diseases. Targeting these key players of disease progression in patients with autoimmune diseases by immunomodulating therapy may be beneficial in future therapeutic strategies.

  15. Selected Aspects in the Pathogenesis of Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    György Nagy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune processes can be found in physiological circumstances. However, they are quenched with properly functioning regulatory mechanisms and do not evolve into full-blown autoimmune diseases. Once developed, autoimmune diseases are characterized by signature clinical features, accompanied by sustained cellular and/or humoral immunological abnormalities. Genetic, environmental, and hormonal defects, as well as a quantitative and qualitative impairment of immunoregulatory functions, have been shown in parallel to the relative dominance of proinflammatory Th17 cells in many of these diseases. In this review we focus on the derailed balance between regulatory and Th17 cells in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. Additionally, we depict a cytokine imbalance, which gives rise to a biased T-cell homeostasis. The assessment of Th17/Treg-cell ratio and the simultaneous quantitation of cytokines, may give a useful diagnostic tool in autoimmune diseases. We also depict the multifaceted role of dendritic cells, serving as antigen presenting cells, contributing to the development of the pathognomonic cytokine signature and promote cellular and humoral autoimmune responses. Finally we describe the function and role of extracellular vesicles in particular autoimmune diseases. Targeting these key players of disease progression in patients with autoimmune diseases by immunomodulating therapy may be beneficial in future therapeutic strategies.

  16. Effect of Associated Autoimmune Diseases on Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Incidence and Metabolic Control in Children and Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Krzewska

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM is one of the most common chronic diseases developing in childhood. The incidence of the disease in children increases for unknown reasons at a rate from 3 to 5% every year worldwide. The background of T1DM is associated with the autoimmune process of pancreatic beta cell destruction, which leads to absolute insulin deficiency and organ damage. Complex interactions between environmental and genetic factors contribute to the development of T1DM in genetically predisposed patients. The T1DM-inducing autoimmune process can also affect other organs, resulting in development of additional autoimmune diseases in the patient, thereby impeding diabetes control. The most common T1DM comorbidities include autoimmune thyroid diseases, celiac disease, and autoimmune gastritis; additionally, diabetes can be a component of PAS (Polyglandular Autoimmune Syndrome. The aim of this review is to assess the prevalence of T1DM-associated autoimmune diseases in children and adolescents and their impact on the course of T1DM. We also present suggestions concerning screening tests.

  17. Effect of Associated Autoimmune Diseases on Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Incidence and Metabolic Control in Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is one of the most common chronic diseases developing in childhood. The incidence of the disease in children increases for unknown reasons at a rate from 3 to 5% every year worldwide. The background of T1DM is associated with the autoimmune process of pancreatic beta cell destruction, which leads to absolute insulin deficiency and organ damage. Complex interactions between environmental and genetic factors contribute to the development of T1DM in genetically predisposed patients. The T1DM-inducing autoimmune process can also affect other organs, resulting in development of additional autoimmune diseases in the patient, thereby impeding diabetes control. The most common T1DM comorbidities include autoimmune thyroid diseases, celiac disease, and autoimmune gastritis; additionally, diabetes can be a component of PAS (Polyglandular Autoimmune Syndrome). The aim of this review is to assess the prevalence of T1DM-associated autoimmune diseases in children and adolescents and their impact on the course of T1DM. We also present suggestions concerning screening tests. PMID:27525273

  18. Coumestrol inhibits autoantibody production through modulating Th1 response in experimental autoimmune thyroiditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xuemin; Jin, Qian; Fan, Chenling; Li, Jing; Shan, Zhongyan; Teng, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    Coumestrol is a common phytoestrogen found in plants and Chinese medicinal herbs. Its influences on experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT) were investigated in this study. Female adult CBA/J mice were fed with drinking water containing 1% Tween80 only (Control group), 0.8 mg/l (L group) and 8 mg/l coumestrol (H group) from 6 to 15 weeks of age, respectively. Their serum coumestrol concentrations were determined by high performance liquid chromatography, which were undetectable, 43.70 ± 21.74 ng/ml and 135.07 ± 70.40 ng/ml, respectively. In addition, the mice (n = 14–16/group) were immunized twice with thyroglobulin (Tg) and Freund's adjuvant to induce EAT during the meantime. Although no overt changes in the extent of intrathyroidal mononuclear cell infiltration were shown in the two coumestrol-treated groups as compared with the controls, serum anti-Tg IgG2a, IgG3 and IgG1 titers, ratio of IgG2a to IgG1 and the percentage of T helper (Th)1 cells in the splenocytes were significantly reduced in the L group. Another consistent change was the significantly decreased expression of splenic IFN-γ mRNA after low dose of coumestrol exposure. Uterine weight was also markedly reduced in the mice of L group. These findings suggest that coumestrol treatment may have some beneficial actions against thyroid-specific autoantibody production in the development of autoimmune thyroiditis through suppression of Th1 response due to its anti-estrogenic activity. PMID:27384679

  19. Autoimmunity-Basics and link with periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Gagandeep; Mohindra, Kanika; Singla, Shifali

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune reactions reflect an imbalance between effector and regulatory immune responses, typically develop through stages of initiation and propagation, and often show phases of resolution (indicated by clinical remissions) and exacerbations (indicated by symptomatic flares). The fundamental underlying mechanism of autoimmunity is defective elimination and/or control of self-reactive lymphocytes. Periodontal diseases are characterized by inflammatory conditions that directly affect teeth-supporting structures, which are the major cause of tooth loss. Several studies have demonstrated the involvement of autoimmune responses in periodontal disease. Evidence of involvement of immunopathology has been reported in periodontal disease. Bacteria in the dental plaque induce antibody formation. Autoreactive T-cells, natural killer cells, ANCA, heat shock proteins, autoantibodies, and genetic factors are reported to have an important role in the autoimmune component of periodontal disease. The present review describes the involvement of autoimmune responses in periodontal diseases and also the mechanisms underlying these responses.

  20. Hot topics in autoimmune diseases: perspectives from the 2013 Asian Congress of Autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selmi, Carlo

    2014-08-01

    Our understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms and possible treatments of autoimmune diseases has significantly increased over the past decade. Nonetheless, numerous major issues remain open and such issues span from epidemiology to clinimetrics and from the role of infectious agents to the search for accurate biomarkers in paradigmatic conditions such as systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and spondyloarthropathies. In the case of cardiovascular comorbidities of autoimmune diseases or, more generally, the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, fascinating evidence points to a central role of autoimmunity and metabolic dysfunctions and a possible role of therapies targeting inflammation to ameliorate both conditions. Basic science and translational medicine contribute to identify common mechanisms that underlie different autoimmune diseases, as in the case of tumor necrosis factor alpha, and more recently vitamin D, autoantibodies, T and B regulatory cells, and microRNA. Finally, new therapies are expected to significantly change our approach to autoimmune diseases, as represented by the recent FDA approval of the first oral JAK inhibitor. The present article moves from the major topics that were discussed at the 2013 Asian Congress of Autoimmunity in Hong Kong to illustrate the most recent data from leading journals in autoimmunity and immunology.

  1. Association scan of 14,500 nonsynonymous SNPs in four diseases identifies autoimmunity variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Paul R; Clayton, David G; Cardon, Lon R; Craddock, Nick; Deloukas, Panos; Duncanson, Audrey; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P; McCarthy, Mark I; Ouwehand, Willem H; Samani, Nilesh J; Todd, John A; Donnelly, Peter; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Davison, Dan; Easton, Doug; Evans, David M; Leung, Hin-Tak; Marchini, Jonathan L; Morris, Andrew P; Spencer, Chris C A; Tobin, Martin D; Attwood, Antony P; Boorman, James P; Cant, Barbara; Everson, Ursula; Hussey, Judith M; Jolley, Jennifer D; Knight, Alexandra S; Koch, Kerstin; Meech, Elizabeth; Nutland, Sarah; Prowse, Christopher V; Stevens, Helen E; Taylor, Niall C; Walters, Graham R; Walker, Neil M; Watkins, Nicholas A; Winzer, Thilo; Jones, Richard W; McArdle, Wendy L; Ring, Susan M; Strachan, David P; Pembrey, Marcus; Breen, Gerome; St Clair, David; Caesar, Sian; Gordon-Smith, Katharine; Jones, Lisa; Fraser, Christine; Green, Elaine K; Grozeva, Detelina; Hamshere, Marian L; Holmans, Peter A; Jones, Ian R; Kirov, George; Moskivina, Valentina; Nikolov, Ivan; O'Donovan, Michael C; Owen, Michael J; Collier, David A; Elkin, Amanda; Farmer, Anne; Williamson, Richard; McGuffin, Peter; Young, Allan H; Ferrier, I Nicol; Ball, Stephen G; Balmforth, Anthony J; Barrett, Jennifer H; Bishop, Timothy D; Iles, Mark M; Maqbool, Azhar; Yuldasheva, Nadira; Hall, Alistair S; Braund, Peter S; Dixon, Richard J; Mangino, Massimo; Stevens, Suzanne; Thompson, John R; Bredin, Francesca; Tremelling, Mark; Parkes, Miles; Drummond, Hazel; Lees, Charles W; Nimmo, Elaine R; Satsangi, Jack; Fisher, Sheila A; Forbes, Alastair; Lewis, Cathryn M; Onnie, Clive M; Prescott, Natalie J; Sanderson, Jeremy; Matthew, Christopher G; Barbour, Jamie; Mohiuddin, M Khalid; Todhunter, Catherine E; Mansfield, John C; Ahmad, Tariq; Cummings, Fraser R; Jewell, Derek P; Webster, John; Brown, Morris J; Lathrop, Mark G; Connell, John; Dominiczak, Anna; Marcano, Carolina A Braga; Burke, Beverley; Dobson, Richard; Gungadoo, Johannie; Lee, Kate L; Munroe, Patricia B; Newhouse, Stephen J; Onipinla, Abiodun; Wallace, Chris; Xue, Mingzhan; Caulfield, Mark; Farrall, Martin; Barton, Anne; Bruce, Ian N; Donovan, Hannah; Eyre, Steve; Gilbert, Paul D; Hilder, Samantha L; Hinks, Anne M; John, Sally L; Potter, Catherine; Silman, Alan J; Symmons, Deborah P M; Thomson, Wendy; Worthington, Jane; Dunger, David B; Widmer, Barry; Frayling, Timothy M; Freathy, Rachel M; Lango, Hana; Perry, John R B; Shields, Beverley M; Weedon, Michael N; Hattersley, Andrew T; Hitman, Graham A; Walker, Mark; Elliott, Kate S; Groves, Christopher J; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Rayner, Nigel W; Timpson, Nicolas J; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Newport, Melanie; Sirugo, Giorgio; Lyons, Emily; Vannberg, Fredrik; Hill, Adrian V S; Bradbury, Linda A; Farrar, Claire; Pointon, Jennifer J; Wordsworth, Paul; Brown, Matthew A; Franklyn, Jayne A; Heward, Joanne M; Simmonds, Matthew J; Gough, Stephen C L; Seal, Sheila; Stratton, Michael R; Rahman, Nazneen; Ban, Maria; Goris, An; Sawcer, Stephen J; Compston, Alastair; Conway, David; Jallow, Muminatou; Newport, Melanie; Sirugo, Giorgio; Rockett, Kirk A; Bumpstead, Suzannah J; Chaney, Amy; Downes, Kate; Ghori, Mohammed J R; Gwilliam, Rhian; Hunt, Sarah E; Inouye, Michael; Keniry, Andrew; King, Emma; McGinnis, Ralph; Potter, Simon; Ravindrarajah, Rathi; Whittaker, Pamela; Widden, Claire; Withers, David; Cardin, Niall J; Davison, Dan; Ferreira, Teresa; Pereira-Gale, Joanne; Hallgrimsdo'ttir, Ingeleif B; Howie, Bryan N; Su, Zhan; Teo, Yik Ying; Vukcevic, Damjan; Bentley, David; Brown, Matthew A; Compston, Alastair; Farrall, Martin; Hall, Alistair S; Hattersley, Andrew T; Hill, Adrian V S; Parkes, Miles; Pembrey, Marcus; Stratton, Michael R; Mitchell, Sarah L; Newby, Paul R; Brand, Oliver J; Carr-Smith, Jackie; Pearce, Simon H S; McGinnis, R; Keniry, A; Deloukas, P; Reveille, John D; Zhou, Xiaodong; Sims, Anne-Marie; Dowling, Alison; Taylor, Jacqueline; Doan, Tracy; Davis, John C; Savage, Laurie; Ward, Michael M; Learch, Thomas L; Weisman, Michael H; Brown, Mathew

    2007-11-01

    We have genotyped 14,436 nonsynonymous SNPs (nsSNPs) and 897 major histocompatibility complex (MHC) tag SNPs from 1,000 independent cases of ankylosing spondylitis (AS), autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), multiple sclerosis (MS) and breast cancer (BC). Comparing these data against a common control dataset derived from 1,500 randomly selected healthy British individuals, we report initial association and independent replication in a North American sample of two new loci related to ankylosing spondylitis, ARTS1 and IL23R, and confirmation of the previously reported association of AITD with TSHR and FCRL3. These findings, enabled in part by increased statistical power resulting from the expansion of the control reference group to include individuals from the other disease groups, highlight notable new possibilities for autoimmune regulation and suggest that IL23R may be a common susceptibility factor for the major 'seronegative' diseases.

  2. Thyroid hormones and growth in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarım, Ömer

    2011-01-01

    Thyroid hormones regulate growth by several mechanisms. In addition to their negative feedback effect on the stimulatory hormones thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) and thyrotropin (TSH), thyroid hormones also regulate their receptors in various physiological and pathological conditions. Up-regulation and down-regulation of the thyroid receptors fine-tune the biological effects exerted by the thyroid hormones. Interestingly, the deiodinase enzyme system is another intrinsic regulator of thyroid physiology that adjusts the availability of thyroid hormones to the tissues, which is essential for normal growth and development. Almost all chronic diseases of childhood impair growth and development. Every disease may have a unique mechanism to halt linear growth, but reduced serum concentration or diminished local availability of thyroid hormones seems to be a common pathway. Therefore, the effects of systemic diseases on thyroid physiology must be taken into consideration in the evaluation of growth retardation in affected children.

  3. Autoimmune thyroiditis presenting as interstitial granulomatous dermatitis Dermatite intersticial granulomatosa como apresentação de tireoidite autoimune

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Antunes

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A 54-year-old female presented with recurrent, widespread, erythematous, painful plaques, over a 3-month period. Skin biopsy was compatible with interstitial granulomatous dermatitis. Additional investigation revealed hypothyroidism and positive anti-thyroid antibodies. Normalization of thyroid function and high-potency topical corticosteroids provided only transitory improvement of the dermatosis. Interstitial granulomatous dermatitis is a histologic inflammatory reaction, with variable cutaneous expression. It has been reported in association with several drugs, lymphoproliferative diseases and autoimmune disorders, such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and vasculitis, but association with autoimmune thyroiditis is rare. Optimal therapy for this condition is yet to be established, but topical corticosteroids have been a mainstay of treatment. In most cases, this disease is characterized by flares and remissions.Uma doente de 54 anos foi avaliada por placas eritematosas, dolorosas, disseminadas, recorrentes, com 3 meses de evolução. A biopsia cutânea foi compatível com dermatite intersticial granulomatosa. Os restantes exames laboratoriais revelaram hipotiroidismo e anticorpos anti-tiroideus positivos. Apesar da normalização da função tiroideia e de tratamento com corticóide tópico de alta potência, a dermatose melhorou apenas parcialmente. Dermatite intersticial inflamatória é um diagnóstico histopatológico, com expressão clínica variável. Tem sido associada a vários fármacos, doenças linfoproliferativas e autoimunes, nomeadamente artrite reumatóide, lupus eritematoso sistémico e vasculites, mas a associação com tireoidite autoimune é rara. Até ao momento, não foi definido nenhum tratamento específico, mas os corticóides tópicos são dos fármacos mais utilizados. A doença caracteriza-se por períodos de agravamento e remissão.

  4. Association between thyroid function and gallstone disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Henry V(o)lzke; Daniel M Robinson; Ulrich John

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate those associations using data of the population-based Study of Health in Pomerania.METHODS: A study population of 3 749 residents aged 20-79 years without previously diagnosed thyroid disease was available for analyses. Serum TSH was used to assess thyroid function. Cholelithiasis was defined by either a prior history of cholecystectomy or the presence of gallstones on ultrasound. Logistic regression was performed to analyze independent associations between thyroid function and cholelithiasis.RESULTS: There were 385 persons (10.3%) with low (<0.3 mIU/L), 3 321 persons (88.6%) with normal and 43 persons (1.2%) with high serum TSH levels (>3 mIU/L).The proportion of cholelithiasis among males and females was 14.4% and 25.3%, respectively. Among males, there was an independent relation between high serum TSH and cholelithiasis (OR 3.77; 95%-CI 1.06-13.41; ,P<0.05). zAlso among males, there was a tendency towards an elevated risk of cholelithiasis in persons with low serum TSH (OR 1.40; 95%-CI 0.96-2.02; P = 0.07). In the female population, no such relation was identified.CONCLUSION: There is an association between thyroid and gallstone disease with a gender-specific relation between hypothyroidism and cholelithiasis.

  5. Pervasive Sharing of Genetic Effects in Autoimmune Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cotsapas, Chris; Voight, Benjamin F.; Rossin, Elizabeth; Lage, Kasper; Neale, Benjamin M.; Wallace, Chris; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Barrett, Jeffrey C.; Behrens, Timothy; Cho, Judy; De Jager, Philip L.; Elder, James T.; Graham, Robert R.; Gregersen, Peter; Klareskog, Lars; Siminovitch, Katherine A.; van Heel, David A.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Worthington, Jane; Todd, John A.; Hafler, David A.; Rich, Stephen S.; Daly, Mark J.

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have identified numerous, replicable, genetic associations between common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and risk of common autoimmune and inflammatory (immune-mediated) diseases, some of which are shared between two diseases. Along with epidemiological

  6. Anti-neutrophil cytoplasm autoantibodies (ANCA) in autoimmune liver diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roozendaal, C.; Kallenberg, Cees

    1999-01-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasm antibodies (ANCA) are autoantibodies directed against cytoplasmic constituents of neutrophil granulocytes and monocytes. ANCA have been detected in serum from patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (mainly ulcerative colitis) and autoimmune mediated liver diseases (mainl

  7. B cell epitope spreading: mechanisms and contribution to autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornaby, Caleb; Gibbons, Lauren; Mayhew, Vera; Sloan, Chad S; Welling, Andrew; Poole, Brian D

    2015-01-01

    While a variety of factors act to trigger or initiate autoimmune diseases, the process of epitope spreading is an important contributor in their development. Epitope spreading is a diversification of the epitopes recognized by the immune system. This process happens to both T and B cells, with this review focusing on B cells. Such spreading can progress among multiple epitopes on a single antigen, or from one antigenic molecule to another. Systemic lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis, pemphigus, bullous pemphigoid and other autoimmune diseases, are all influenced by intermolecular and intramolecular B cell epitope spreading. Endocytic processing, antigen presentation, and somatic hypermutation act as molecular mechanisms that assist in driving epitope spreading and broadening the immune response in autoimmune diseases. The purpose of this review is to summarize our current understanding of B cell epitope spreading with regard to autoimmunity, how it contributes during the progression of various autoimmune diseases, and treatment options available.

  8. AUTOIMMUNE BASEMENT MEMBRANE AND SUBEPIDERMAL BLISTERING DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Abreu Velez

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune mucocutaneous blistering diseases (ABDs represent a group of conditions that manifest with blisters on the skin and/or mucous membranes. Bullous pemphigoid (BP is the most common autoimmune mucocutaneous blistering disease. In BP, the location of the blisters is subepidermal and the oral involvement is rare. Variants of BP have been described, including pemphigoid vegetans; however, this disease is not completely characterized. The majority of ABDs have blisters and/or vesicles, that are often pruritic, and manifest autoantibodies to diverse proteins. These proteins include 1 hemidesmosomal plaque proteins(ie, BP230, plectins, 2 transmembrane proteins such as BP180 and α6β4-integrin, which are connected via laminin 332 to type VII collagen and 3 currently uncharacterized 105 kDa and 200 kDa molecules. Other ABDs include drug-induced linear IgA disease, bullous systemic lupus erythematosus (BSLE, dermatitis herpetiformis (DH, cicatricial pemphigoid (CP; also termed mucous membrane pemphigoid, lichen planus pemphigoides (LPP, pemphigoid gestationis (PG, herpes gestationis(HG, chronic bullous dermatosis of childhood (CBDC and the localized forms of CP, such as Brunsting-Perry pemphigoid. The diagnosis of ABDs requires clinical data; skin biopsies (in 10% buffered formalin for hematoxylin and eosin (H&E examination and skin biopsies(in Michel’s transport medium for direct immunofluorescence (DIF. In many ABDs, the histopathologic findings demonstrate a subepidermal vesicle or bulla with a luminal inflammatory infiltrate of neutrophils, eosinophils and/or lymphocytes. In many ABDs, an extensive perivascular and interstitial inflammatory infiltrate is also noted subjacent to the blister in the upper dermis. Normal skin adjacent to an ABD plaque is often excellent for DIF results. Many ABD biopsies reveal autoantibody deposition at the lesional basement membrane zone (BMZ; IgG, IgM, IgA, other immunoglobulins, complement components and

  9. The clinical features of 17 patients with steroid-responsive encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroiditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Hai

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the onset pattern, clinical manifestations, laboratory findings and imaging features of 17 Chinese patients with steroid-responsive encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroiditis (SREAT. Methods The clinical data of 17 SREAT patients were collected. Retrospective analysis of their clinical features, as well as their serum levels of anti-thyroid, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF biochemical indicators, MRI and therapy was performed. Results The initial symptoms of those patients were seizures (4 cases, psychiatric symptoms (4 cases, hypomnesis (4 cases, walking unsteadiness (2 cases, headache (2 cases and dysarthria (1 case. Three cases were acute onset, 5 cases subacute onset and 9 cases chronic onset. The anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody (anti-TPO of 17 cases were significantly increased, average (928.63 ± 406.28 × 10 3 IU/L. The anti?thyroglobulin antibody (anti-TG of 15 cases was increased, average (601.27 ± 1014.12 × 10 3 IU/L. The protein in CSF was mildly increased, average (513.75 ± 283.15 mg/L. The EEG of 5 patients presented slow wave and the EEG of 2 patients showed epileptiform discharge. The brain MRI of 11 patients showed multifocal lesions in frontal lobe, temporal lobe, parietal lobe, basal ganglia, centrum ovale, corpus callosum, thalamus, cerebellum, and brain stem. The findings of clinical immunological index and tumor markers were normal. Besides, the prognosis of 11 patients treated with methylprednisolone and 3 patients treated with dexamethasone were good. Recurrence occurred in 2 patients. Conclusion Basically, the clinical features of Chinese SREAT patients present seizures, hypomnesis and psychiatric symptoms associated with increased anti-thyroid and multifocal lesions in gray and white matter of brain.

  10. Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis and Graves’ Disease in One Patient: The Extremes of Thyroid Dysfunction Associated with Interferon Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. H. Bishay

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune thyroid disease associated with interferon therapy can manifest as destructive thyroiditis, Graves’ Hyperthyroidism, and autoimmune (often subclinical hypothyroidism, the latter persisting in many patients. There are scare reports of a single patient developing extremes of autoimmune thyroid disease activated by the immunomodulatory effects of interferon. A 60-year-old man received 48 weeks of pegylated interferon and ribavirin therapy for chronic HCV. Six months into treatment, he reported fatigue, weight gain, and slowed cognition. Serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH was 58.8 mIU/L [0.27–4.2], fT4 11.1 pmol/L [12–25], and fT3 4.2 pmol/L [2.5–6.0] with elevated anti-TPO (983 IU/mL [<35] and anti-TG (733 U/mL [<80] antibodies. He commenced thyroxine with initial clinical and biochemical resolution but developed symptoms of hyperthyroidism with weight loss and tremor 14 months later. Serum TSH was <0.02 mIU/L, fT4 54.3 pmol/L, and fT3 20.2 pmol/L, with an elevated TSH receptor (TRAb, 4.0 U/L [<1.0], anti-TPO (1,163 IU/mL and anti-TG (114 U/mL antibodies. Technetium scan confirmed Graves’ Disease with bilateral diffuse increased tracer uptake (5.9% [0.5–3.5%]. The patient commenced carbimazole therapy for 6 months. Treatment was ceased following spontaneous clinical and biochemical remission (TSH 3.84 mIU/L, fT4 17pmol/L, fT3 4.5 pmol/L, and TRAb <1 U/L. This raises the need to monitor thyroid function closely in patients both during and following completion of interferon treatment.

  11. Ocular Involvement in Systemic Autoimmune Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generali, Elena; Cantarini, Luca; Selmi, Carlo

    2015-12-01

    Eye involvement represents a common finding in patients with systemic autoimmune diseases, particularly rheumatoid arthritis, Sjogren syndrome, seronegative spondyloarthropathy, and antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis. The eye is a privileged immune site but commensal bacteria are found on the ocular surface. The eye injury may be inflammatory, vascular or infectious, as well as iatrogenic, as in the case of hydroxychloroquine, chloroquine, corticosteroids, and bisphosphonates. Manifestations may affect different components of the eye, with episcleritis involving the episclera, a thin layer of tissue covering the sclera; scleritis being an inflammation of the sclera potentially leading to blindness; keratitis, referring to corneal inflammation frequently associated with scleritis; and uveitis as the inflammation of the uvea, including the iris, ciliary body, and choroid, subdivided into anterior, posterior, or panuveitis. As blindness may result from the eye involvement, clinicians should be aware of the possible manifestations and their management also independent of the ophthalmologist opinion as the therapeutic approach generally points to the underlying diseases. In some cases, the eye involvement may have a diagnostic implication, as for episcleritis in rheumatoid arthritis, or acute anterior uveitis in seronegative spondyloarthritis. Nonetheless, some conditions lack specificity, as in the case of dry eye which affects nearly 30 % of the general population. The aim of this review is to elucidate to non-ophthalmologists the major ocular complications of rheumatic diseases and their specific management and treatment options.

  12. 儿童白癜风与甲状腺功能指标异常及其他免疫性疾病的关系%Abnormality of parameters of thyroid function and incidence of autoimmune diseases in children with vitiligo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨芸; 骆肖群; 傅雯雯

    2009-01-01

    目的 探讨儿童白癜风与甲状腺功能指标异常及其他免疫性疾病的关系.方法 对363例白癜风儿童(男198例,女165例)和93例对照儿童(男55例,女38例)进行甲状腺功能指标的检查.结果 363例白癜风儿童中有43例(11.8%)儿童有不同程度的甲状腺功能指标的异常,93例对照组正常儿童中有4例儿童甲状腺功能指标异常,两者比较差异有统计学意义.白癜风儿童甲状腺功能指标异常发生率明显增高(P<0.05).而43例甲状腺功能异常的白癜风儿童中,寻常型白癜风儿童为39例(13.6%),节段型白癜风儿童为4例(5.3%),寻常型比节段型白癜风儿童甲状腺功能指标异常发生率有明显增高(P<0.05).结论 儿童寻常型白癜风患者的甲状腺功能指标异常的发生率明显增高.%Objective To investigate the abnormality of parameters of thyroid function and incidence of autoimmune diseases in children with vitiligo.Methods A total of 363 children with vitiligo,including 198 males and 165 females were recruited into this study together with 93 normal human controls(55 males and 38 females).The serum levels of free tetraiodothyronine,free triiodothyronine,thyroid stimulating hormone,antithyroperoxidase antibody and thyroglobulin antibody were determined by chemiluminescent immunoassay in these subiects.Results The abnormality of parameters of thyroid function was observed in 43 out of 363(11.8%)patients affected by vitiligo and in 4 out of 93(4.3%)normal human controls;a significant difference was observed between the two groups (P<0.05).Of the 43 patients wim abnormality of parameters of thyroid function,39 were diagnosed as vitiligo vulgaris,4 as segmental vitiligo.A significant increase Was observed in the incidence of abnormality of parameters of thyroid function in patients with vitiligo vulgaris compared with those with segmental vitiligo(P<0.05).Conclusion There is an increase in tbe abnormality of parameters of thyroid

  13. Involvement of dendritic cells in autoimmune diseases in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reed Ann M

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dendritic cells (DCs are professional antigen-presenting cells that are specialized in the uptake of antigens and their transport from peripheral tissues to the lymphoid organs. Over the last decades, the properties of DCs have been intensely studied and much knowledge has been gained about the role of DCs in various diseases and health conditions where the immune system is involved, particularly in cancer and autoimmune disorders. Emerging clues in autoimmune diseases, suggest that dendritic cell dysregulation might be involved in the development of various autoimmune disorders in both adults and children. However, studies investigating a possible contribution of DCs in autoimmune diseases in the pediatric population alone are scanty. The purpose of this review is to give a general overview of the current literature on the relevance of dendritic cells in the most common autoimmune conditions of childhood.

  14. Childhood malignancy and maternal diabetes or other auto-immune disease during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbom, L; Aberg, A; Källén, B

    2002-04-08

    Among 4380 children born in 1987-1997 of women with a diagnosis of diabetes and alive at the age of one, 10 were registered in the Swedish Cancer Registry before the end of 1998. The odds ratio for having a childhood cancer after maternal diabetes, stratified for year of birth, maternal age, parity, multiple birth, and 500 g birth weight class was 2.25 (95%CI 1.22-4.15). Among 5842 children born during the period 1973-1997 whose mothers had other auto-immune diseases (SLE, rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn, ulcerous colitis, multiple sclerosis or thyroiditis), the number of observed childhood cancers (9) was close to that expected (8.5). Maternal diabetes but not other auto-immune diseases may be a risk factor for childhood cancer.

  15. Incidental Thyroid Carcinoma Diagnosed after Total Thyroidectomy for Benign Thyroid Diseases: Incidence and Association with Thyroid Disease Type and Laboratory Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Askitis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Currently, total thyroidectomy (TT is widely used to treat benign thyroid diseases and thyroid carcinoma. The differential diagnosis between benign and malignant thyroid disorders and the potential identification of thyroid microcarcinomas with biochemical markers remain controversial. This retrospective study aimed to estimate the prognostic validity of thyroid autoantibodies, thyroglobulin (Tg, and the thyroid disease type in diagnostic approaches regarding the co-existence of incidental thyroid carcinoma (ITC with benign thyroid diseases. Methods. A cohort of 228 patients was treated with TT for benign thyroid disorders between 2005 and 2010. Thyroid autoantibodies and Tg were preoperatively estimated. Patients were classified according to the preoperative and histologically established diagnoses, and the median values of the biochemical markers were compared between the groups. Results. ITC was detected in 33/228 patients and almost exclusively in the presence of nontoxic thyroid disorders (. There were no statistically significant differences in the median values of the biochemical markers between the benign and malignant groups. There was also no significant association between ITC and chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis. Conclusions. The co-existence of ITC with benign and especially nontoxic thyroid diseases is significant, and treatment of these disorders with TT when indicated can lead to the identification and definitive cure of microcarcinomas. Further studies are required to establish precise markers with prognostic validity for TC diagnosis.

  16. High Prevalence of Infertility among Women with Graves’ Disease and Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Quintino-Moro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To evaluate the prevalence of infertility in women with Graves’ disease (GD or Hashimoto’s thyroiditis (HT and associated factors. Material and Methods. This cross-sectional study was conducted at the Endocrinology Clinic for Thyroid Autoimmune Diseases, with 193 women aged 18–50 years with GD and 66 women aged 18–60 years with HT. The women were interviewed to obtain data on their gynecological and obstetric history and family history of autoimmune diseases. Their medical records were reviewed to determine the characteristics of the disease and to confirm association with other autoimmune diseases. Infertility was defined as 12 months of unprotected sexual intercourse without conception. Results. The prevalence of infertility was 52.3% in GD and 47.0% in HT. Mean age at diagnosis was 36.5 years and 39.2 years, in GD and HT, respectively. The mean number of pregnancies was lower in women who were 35 years old or younger at diagnosis and was always lower following diagnosis of the disease, irrespective of age. The only variable associated with infertility was a shorter time of the disease in HT. Conclusions. The prevalence of infertility was high in women with GD and HT and affected the number of pregnancies in young women.

  17. High Prevalence of Infertility among Women with Graves' Disease and Hashimoto's Thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintino-Moro, Alessandra; Zantut-Wittmann, Denise E; Tambascia, Marcos; Machado, Helymar da Costa; Fernandes, Arlete

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the prevalence of infertility in women with Graves' disease (GD) or Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) and associated factors. Material and Methods. This cross-sectional study was conducted at the Endocrinology Clinic for Thyroid Autoimmune Diseases, with 193 women aged 18-50 years with GD and 66 women aged 18-60 years with HT. The women were interviewed to obtain data on their gynecological and obstetric history and family history of autoimmune diseases. Their medical records were reviewed to determine the characteristics of the disease and to confirm association with other autoimmune diseases. Infertility was defined as 12 months of unprotected sexual intercourse without conception. Results. The prevalence of infertility was 52.3% in GD and 47.0% in HT. Mean age at diagnosis was 36.5 years and 39.2 years, in GD and HT, respectively. The mean number of pregnancies was lower in women who were 35 years old or younger at diagnosis and was always lower following diagnosis of the disease, irrespective of age. The only variable associated with infertility was a shorter time of the disease in HT. Conclusions. The prevalence of infertility was high in women with GD and HT and affected the number of pregnancies in young women.

  18. Juvenile autoimmune hepatitis: Spectrum of the disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giuseppe; Maggiore; Silvia; Nastasio; Marco; Sciveres

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile autoimmune hepatitis(JAIH) is a progressive inflammatory liver disease, affecting mainly young girls, from infancy to late adolescence, characterized by active liver damage, as shown by high serum activity of aminotransferases, by elevated immunoglobulin G levels, high titers of serum non organ-specific andorgan-specific autoantibodies, and by interface hepatitis on liver biopsy. It is a multifactorial disease of unknown etiology in which environmental factors act as a trigger in genetically predisposed individuals. Two types of JAIH are identified according to the autoan-tibody panel detected at diagnosis: AIH-1, characterized by the presence of anti-smooth muscle antibody and/or antinuclear antibody and AIH-2, by anti-liver-kidney microsomal antibody type 1 and/or by the presence of anti-liver cytosol type 1 antibody. Epidemiological distribution, genetic markers, clinical presentation and pattern of serum cytokines differentiate the two types of AIH suggesting possible pathogenetic mechanisms. The most effective therapy for AIH is pharmacological suppression of the immune response. Treatment should be started as soon as the diagnosis is made to avoid severe liver damage and progression of fibrosis. The aim of this review is to outline the most significant and peculiar features of JAIH, based largely on our own personal database and on a review of current literature.

  19. History and milestones of mouse models of autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xinhua; Huang, Qiaoniang; Petersen, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are a group of disorders mediated by self-reactive T cells and/or autoantibodies. Mice, as the most widely used animal for modeling autoimmune disorders, have been extensively used in the investigation of disease pathogenesis as well as in the search for novel therapeutics. Since the first mouse model of multiple sclerosis was established more than 60 years ago, hundreds of mouse models have been established for tens of autoimmune diseases. These mouse models can be divided into three categories based on the approaches used for disease induction. The first one represents the induced models in which autoimmunity is initiated in mice by immunization, adoptive transfer or environmental factors. The second group is formed by the spontaneous models where mice develop autoimmune disorders without further induction. The third group refers to the humanized models in which mice bearing humanized cells, tissues, or genes, develop autoimmune diseases either spontaneously or by induction. This article reviews the history and highlights the milestones of the mouse models of autoimmune diseases.

  20. An autoimmune disease prevented by anti-retroviral drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Beck-Engeser Gabriele B; Eilat Dan; Wabl Matthias

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Both Aicardi-Goutières syndrome, a Mendelian mimic of congenital infection, and the autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus can result from mutations in the gene encoding the enzyme Trex1. In mice, the absence of Trex1 causes severe myocarditis. The enzyme is thought to degrade endogenous retroelements, thus linking them to autoimmune disease. However, inhibition of reverse transcription by the inhibitor zidovudine (AZT) did not ameliorate the disease, weakening th...

  1. [Comorbid autoimmune pathology in patients treated with disease modifying drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharova, Z A; Sizyakina, L P; Belovolova, R A; Megeryan, V A

    2016-01-01

    Because of intensive growth of the prevalence of multiple sclerosis (MS) and other autoimmune diseases (AID) during the last years, the comorbidity of MS and AID is not a rarity. In this literature review, the development of comorbid AID in patients with MS is considered to be the probable complication of disease modifying therapy with drugs of different groups. The authors present the own data on the prevalence of comorbid autoimmune pathology in patients with MS treated with disease modifying drugs.

  2. PI3K inhibitors as potential therapeutics for autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Jennifer; Archer, Sophie; Ward, Stephen

    2014-08-01

    Aberrant overactivation of the immune system can give rise to chronic and persistent self-attack, culminating in autoimmune disease. This is currently managed therapeutically using potent immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory drugs. Class I phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) have been identified as ideal therapeutic targets for autoimmune diseases given their wide-ranging roles in immunological processes. Recent studies into the function of selective PI3K inhibitors in vitro and in vivo have yielded encouraging results, allowing progression into the clinic. Here, we review their recent progress across a range of autoimmune diseases.

  3. Stem cell autograft and allograft in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cata, Angelo; Matarangolo, Angela; Inglese, Michele; Rubino, Rosa; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi

    2016-02-01

    Autoimmune diseases are characterized by an insufficiency of immune tolerance and, although treated with a number of useful drugs, may need more unconventional therapeutic strategies for their more severe presentations. Among such unconventional therapeutic approaches, stem cell autograft and allograft have been used, with the aim of stimulating disease remission by modifying the pathogenic mechanisms that induce anomalous responses against self-antigens. Autologous transplantation is performed with the purpose of retuning autoimmune cells, whereas allogeneic transplantation is performed with the purpose of replacing anomalous immune effectors and mediators. In this article, we comprehensively review up-to-date information on the autoimmune diseases for which the transplantation of stem cells is indicated.

  4. Accounting for chance in the calculus of autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Daniel J

    2010-02-01

    Discussions around the etiology of autoimmune disease routinely focus on the interplay between genes and the environment. In turn, efforts to ameliorate these diseases seek to modify genetic and environmental factors. However, there may be a third element that also accounts for the progression of autoimmunity. This article explores the role of chance, exemplified by the stochastic process of immune repertoire generation, in the evolution of autoimmunity. The presented modeling studies and concepts suggest that chance plays as significant a role as genes or environment. This hypothesis implies that a full understanding of the role of genes and environment will also require investigators to account for stochastic processes in building comprehensive disease models.

  5. T Cell Vaccination as an Immunotherapy for Autoimmune Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JingwuZhang

    2004-01-01

    Immunization with inactivated autoreactive T cells (T cell vaccination) selected from individual's own T cellrepertoire provides a unique in vivo setting for testing immune regulation that is known to involve interactionsof a variety of related surface molecules (1). It induces regulatory immune responses that closely resemble thein vivo situation where the immune system is challenged by clonal activation and expansion of given T cellpopulations in various autoimmune diseases. T cell vaccination provides a powerful means of eliciting naturalreactions of the immune system in response to clonal expansion of T cells, which can used as a therapeuticapproach to suppress or eliminate specific pathogenic autoreactive T cells in autoimmune conditions. Clinicaltrials using T cell vaccination to deplete autoreactive T cells in human autoimmune conditions have begun toreveal the pathologic relevance of various autoimmune T cell populations in the disease processes, providing aunique opportunity to test the autoimmune theories in a clinical setting. Cellular & Molecular Immunology.2004; 1(5):321-327.

  6. Ultrasonography in the diagnosis of Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guihua; Zou, Dazhong; Cai, Haiyun; Liu, Yajun

    2016-06-01

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis is a type of autoimmune thyroid disease with an increasing prevalence in past decades. Its diagnosisis mostly based on ultrasonography. Ultrasonography is a useful and essential tool to make this diagnosis based on the characteristics of the disease. In the differential diagnosis of thyroid nodules, ultrasound-guided fine-needle biopsy is an effective method to distinguish Hashimoto's thyroiditis from other thyroid disorders. One exciting and recent advance is that non-invasive ultrasound-based methods have supplemented fine-needle aspiration to diagnose Hashimoto's thyroiditis under more complex conditions. In this review, we discuss the recent advantages of ultrasonography in the diagnosis of Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

  7. Punction methods of diagnostics and treatment of thyroid diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S. Tolstokorov

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The object of this research is to study the punction methods role under diagnostics and treatment of different thyroid diseases. The authors of this article present treatment methods of 121 patients with different thyroid diseases. The received results allow to draw a conclusion, that punction methods of diagnostics and treatment of thyroid disease can be used as independent methods of treatment and in a complex with other medication remedies

  8. A selective memory deficit caused by autoimmune encephalopathy associated with Hashimoto thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koros, Christos; Economou, Alexandra; Mastorakos, George; Bonakis, Anastasios; Kalfakis, Nikolaos; Papageorgiou, Sokratis G

    2012-09-01

    We report a longstanding selective memory deficit in a euthyroid 45-year-old woman who was being treated with levothyroxine for Hashimoto thyroiditis. The patient had complained of memory problems and deterioration of her concentration skills for about 2 years. Her endocrinologist thought that she was depressed. The patient's physical examination was normal. She scored a full 30 points on the Mini-Mental State Examination, but neuropsychological evaluation showed a significant deficit in her verbal memory. Routine blood tests and cerebrospinal fluid analysis showed only antithyroid peroxidase antibodies. Brain magnetic resonance imaging was normal. Electroencephalogram showed scarce intermittent bilateral multifocal theta waves. We increased the patient's daily dose of levothyroxine and started her on dexamethasone therapy. Five months later, we repeated the entire evaluation and found both her cognitive function and her electroencephalogram to be normal. Autoimmune encephalopathy associated with Hashimoto thyroiditis is already known to present with either stroke-like episodes or diffuse progressive deterioration. Our patient shows that the encephalopathy can present as a chronic selective memory deficit that can spare executive functions and short-term memory. This presentation can be missed or mistaken for depression, but can be diagnosed with a detailed neuropsychological evaluation.

  9. Autoimmune diseases and celiac disease which came first: genotype or gluten?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamanti, Antonella; Capriati, Teresa; Bizzarri, Carla; Ferretti, Francesca; Ancinelli, Monica; Romano, Francesca; Perilli, Alessia; Laureti, Francesca; Locatelli, Mattia

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is associated with several autoimmune diseases (ADs) and, in particular, thyroid autoimmunity (TA) and Type 1 diabetes (T1D). TA and T1D are defined as 'associated conditions' to CD (conditions at increased prevalence in CD but not directly related to gluten ingestion). The diagnosis of CD may precede or follow that of TA/T1D. To date, the available evidence suggests that the common genetic background is the main factor determining the high prevalence of the association. Conversely, no conclusive findings clarify whether extrinsic gluten-related factors (age at the first introduction, concomitant breastfeeding, length of gluten exposure and gluten-free diet) may link CD to the ADs. The aim of this review is to evaluate whether genetic background alone could explain the association between CD and ADs or if gluten-related factors ought to be considered. The pathophysiological links clarifying how the gluten-related factors could predispose to ADs will also be discussed.

  10. Steroid Responsive Xanthomatous Hypophysitis Associated with Autoimmune Thyroiditis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Young Joung

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 36-year-old woman who presented with headache, fever, and amenorrhea. Laboratory analysis revealed hypopituitarism and autoimmune thyroiditis, while a cerebrospinal fluid study suggested concurrent aseptic meningitis. A magnetic resonance image (MRI scan revealed a 1.0×0.9 cm cystic mass enlarging the sella turcica. Surgical resection via an endoscopic transsphenoidal route was performed. The histological finding of the excised tissue revealed foamy histiocytes with vacuolated cytoplasm, supporting the diagnosis of xanthomatous hypophysitis. Although a residual soft lesion was observed on the MRI image postoperatively, the patient's headache and fever improved. Ten months after surgery, the patient complained of visual impairment and headache, and the residual mass had enlarged into the suprasellar area. High dose (500 mg intravenous methylprednisolone was administered for 3 days. During the methylprednisolone pulse therapy, the patient's visual acuity and headache improved. A follow-up MRI taken after methylprednisolone therapy showed a marked mass reduction. Our case supports an autoimmune pathophysiology for xanthomatous hypophysitis and suggests that high dose glucocorticoid therapy as a treatment option.

  11. Thyroid Disease and Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alternative Medicine (CAM) Thyroid Disease and Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) WHAT IS COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE (CAM)? Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) is defined ...

  12. Ultrasonography of various thyroid diseases in children and adolescents: A pictorial essay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Hyun Sook; Lee, Eun Hye; Jeong, Sun Hye; Park, Ji Sang; Lee, Heon [Dept. of Radiology, Bucheon Hospital, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    Thyroid imaging is indicated to evaluate congenital hypothyroidism during newborn screening or in cases of a palpable thyroid mass in children and adolescents. This pictorial essay reviews the ultrasonography (US) of thyroid diseases in children and adolescents, including normal thyroid gland development, imaging features of congenital thyroid disorders (dysgenesis, [aplasia, ectopy, hypoplasia], dyshormonogenesis, transient hypothyroidism, thyroglossal duct cyst), diffuse thyroid disease (Grave's disease, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, and suppurative thyroiditis), and thyroid nodules. The primary imaging modalities for evaluating thyroid diseases are US and radionuclide scintigraphy. Additionally, US can be used to guide aspiration of detected nodules.

  13. The Danish investigation on iodine intake and thyroid disease, DanThyr: status and perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurberg, P.; Jørgensen, T.; Perrild, H.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Denmark was an area of iodine deficiency, and mandatory iodine fortification of table salt and salt in bread (13 p.p.m. iodine) was initiated in 2000/2001. The Danish investigation on iodine intake and thyroid disease (DanThyr) is the monitoring of the iodine fortification program......, and compilation of data from the national registers on the use of thyroid medication, thyroid surgery, and radioiodine therapy. Studies were carried-out in parallel in subcohorts living in areas with differences in iodine content of ground water. Results: The study showed profound effects of even small...... deficiency caused by a 53% higher incidence of spontaneous (presumably autoimmune) hypothyroidism. On the other hand, there were 49% more cases of overt hyperthyroidism in the area with moderate iodine deficiency. The cautious iodine fortification program, aiming at an average increase in iodine intake of 50...

  14. Shaking Out Clues to Autoimmune Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... susceptible people. Immune cells called T helper 17 (Th17) cells help us fight infection, but they’ve also been linked with several autoimmune disorders. Th17 cells, along with other types of helper T ...

  15. Clinical Utility of Serum Interleukin-8 and Interferon-Alpha in Thyroid Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toral P. Kobawala

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Serum interleukin-8 (IL-8 and interferon-alpha (IFN-α levels have been estimated from a total of 88 individuals of which 19 were disease-free healthy individuals, and 69 were patients with thyroid diseases: goitre (N=21, autoimmune diseases (N=16, and carcinomas (N=32. Both IL-8 and IFN-α were significantly higher in all the patients as compared to healthy individuals. Serum IL-8 levels showed significant positive correlation with disease stage in thyroid cancer patients. Higher serum IL-8 levels were associated with advanced disease stage while no significant correlation was observed between serum IFN-α levels and any of the clinicopathological parameters. IL-8 and IFN-α significantly correlated with each other in anaplastic carcinoma patients. Finally concluding, monitoring the serum IL-8 and IFN-α levels can help differentiate patients with thyroid diseases from healthy individuals, and IL-8 seems to have a role in the pathogenesis of thyroid diseases and may represent a target for innovative diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.

  16. Possible Role of Human Herpesvirus 6 as a Trigger of Autoimmune Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Broccolo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6 infection is common and has a worldwide distribution. Recently, HHV-6A and HHV-6B have been reclassified into two distinct species based on different biological features (genetic, antigenic, and cell tropism and disease associations. A role for HHV-6A/B has been proposed in several autoimmune disorders (AD, including multiple sclerosis (MS, autoimmune connective tissue diseases, and Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The focus of this review is to discuss the above-mentioned AD associated with HHV-6 and the mechanisms proposed for HHV-6A/B-induced autoimmunity. HHV-6A/B could trigger autoimmunity by exposing high amounts of normally sequestered cell antigens, through lysis of infected cells. Another potential trigger is represented by molecular mimicry, with the synthesis of viral proteins that resemble cellular molecules, as a mechanism of immune escape. The virus could also induce aberrant expression of histocompatibility molecules thereby promoting the presentation of autoantigens. CD46-HHV-6A/B interaction is a new attractive mechanism proposed: HHV-6A/B (especially HHV-6A could participate in neuroinflammation in the context of MS by promoting inflammatory processes through CD46 binding. Although HHV-6A/B has the ability to trigger all the above-mentioned mechanisms, more studies are required to fully elucidate the possible role of HHV-6A/B as a trigger of AD.

  17. [Congenital atrioventricular block and maternal autoimmune diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herreman, G; Sauvaget, F; Généreau, T; Galezowski, N

    1990-01-01

    Congenital heart block is rare; it is acquired in utero, definitive and, more often than not, complete. It can be diagnosed by the appearance of fetal bradycardia around the 23rd week of gestation, during ultrasonographic monitoring of pregnancy. Heart block is usually associated with the presence of anti-Ro and/or anti-La antibodies in the mother's serum. These maternal immunological abnormalities can be isolated or associated with an autoimmune disease, usually systemic lupus erythematosus, but also Sjögren's syndrome, or more rarely still, an as yet unclassified connective tissue disease. Anti-Ro and anti-La antibodies cross the placental barrier and react with a fetal heart, leading to acute fetal myocarditis by the 17th week of gestation. When severe, it is lethal, otherwise it can result in degeneration and endocardial fibroelastosis, disrupting conduction and leading to congenital heart block. The ideal treatment would be prevention with corticosteroids. When the mother is Ro or La antibody-positive before pregnancy, elimination of these circulating antibodies can be attempted by treatment with 0.5 mg/kg body wt/d of prednisolone for 3 months. If the treatment is successful, corticotherapy can be prescribed early in the pregnancy to try to protect the fetus. However, there is not always a relationship between maternal anti-Ro antibodies and fetal heart block. If the Ro/La antibody-positive woman is already pregnant, but before her 17th week, it is possible to prescribe dexamethasone, which crosses the placenta and remains active, sometimes in association with plasmapheresis.

  18. High prevalence of thyroid dysfunction and autoimmune thyroiditis in adolescents after elimination of iodine deficiency in the Eastern Black Sea Region of Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastemir, Mehmet; Emral, Rifat; Erdogan, Gurbuz; Gullu, Sevim

    2006-12-01

    In the present study we evaluated the effects of iodine intake on the prevalence of thyroid dysfunction, autoimmunity, and goiter in two regions with different iodine status after two years of iodization in Turkey. In total 1733 adolescent subjects were enrolled into the study (993 from an iodine-sufficient area--the Eastern Black Sea Region (group 1) and 740 from an iodine-deficient area--Middle Anatolia (group 2)). We measured free thyroxine (FT(4)), thyrotropin (TSH), antithyroid peroxidase antibodies (Anti-TPO), antithyroglobulin antibodies (Anti-Tg), and urinary iodine (UI), and examined the thyroid gland by ultrasound. Median urinary iodine excretion was found to be significantly different in group 1 and group 2 (139 micro/l vs 61micro/l, p 0.05). The percentage of anti-Tg positive subjects was found to be 17.6% in group 1 and 6.4% in group 2; that of anti-TPO positive subjects was 4.3% in group 1 and 1.5% in group 2. The prevalence of antithyroid antibody (anti-Tg and/or anti-TPO) positivity was significantly higher in group 1 than in group 2 (18.52% vs 6.62%; p iodine supplementation in Turkey has resulted in the elimination of iodine deficiency in the Eastern Black Sea Region, and this has been accompanied by an increase in the prevalence of autoimmune thyroiditis and thyroid dysfunction.

  19. Vitamin D in systemic and organ-specific autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Theodor, Emanuel; Segal, Ramit Maoz; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2013-10-01

    Lately, vitamin D has been linked with metabolic and immunological processes, which established its role as an essential component of human health preservation. Vitamin D has been defined as natural immune modulators, and upon activation of its receptors (VDRs), it regulates calcium metabolism, cellular growth, proliferation and apoptosis, and other immunological functions. Epidemiological data underline a strong correlation between poor vitamin D status and higher risk for chronic inflammatory illnesses of various etiologies, including autoimmune diseases. Epidemiological, genetic, and basic studies indicated a potential role of vitamin D in the pathogenesis of certain systemic and organ-specific autoimmune diseases. These studies demonstrate correlation between low vitamin D and prevalence of diseases. In addition, VDRs' polymorphisms observed in some of these autoimmune diseases may further support a plausible pathogenic link. Notably, for some autoimmune disease, no correlation with vitamin D levels could be confirmed. Thus, in the current review we present the body of evidence regarding the plausible roles of vitamin D and VDR's polymorphism in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. We summarize the data regarding systemic (i.e., systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, etc.) and organ-specific (i.e., multiple sclerosis, diabetes mellitus, primary biliary cirrhosis, etc.) autoimmune diseases, in which low level of vitamin D was found comparing to healthy subjects. In addition, we discuss the correlations between vitamin D levels and clinical manifestations and/or activity of diseases. In this context, we address the rational for vitamin D supplementation in patients suffering from autoimmune diseases. Further studies addressing the mechanisms by which vitamin D affects autoimmunity and the proper supplementation required are needed.

  20. Autoimmune diseases and severe infections as risk factors for schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benros, Michael E; Nielsen, Philip R; Nordentoft, Merete;

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases have been associated with an increased risk of schizophrenia. It has been suggested that brain-reactive autoantibodies are part of the mechanisms behind this association. Furthermore, an increased permeability of the blood-brain barrier has been observed during periods...... of infection and inflammation. The authors therefore investigated whether autoimmune diseases combined with exposures to severe infections may increase the risk of schizophrenia...

  1. Increased interleukin-4-positive lymphocytes in patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis and concurrent non-endocrine autoimmune disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santaguida, M G; Nardo, S; Del Duca, S C; Lococo, E; Virili, C; Gargano, L; Lenti, L; Centanni, M

    2011-08-01

    A prevalent T helper type 1 (Th1) subset of lymphocytes has been described in Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT), but whether a similar polarization may characterize HT when associated with non-endocrine autoimmune disorders (NEAD) is not known. The aim of the present study was to analyse the intracellular Th1 and Th2 distinctive cytokines in patients with isolated HT or associated with non-endocrine autoimmune disorders. Intracellular cytokine expression was assessed in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) of 68 out-patients (females = 55; males = 13; median age = 6 years) with HT : 33 had isolated HT and 35 had a concurrent NEAD. The percentage of interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-2 Th1- and IL-4 Th2-positive cells was measured by flow cytometric analysis. We found an increased percentage of IL-2-positive cells in all patients, without differences between patients with isolated HT or associated with NEAD. IFN-γ(+) cells were also increased in both groups, but the median percentage of those with isolated HT was lower than in patients with HT+NEAD (19·0 versus 29·9%; P = 0·0082). An increased number of IL-4-positive cells was observed in three of 33 (9·1%) patients with isolated HT and in 25 of 35 patients with NEAD [71%; P lymphocytes characterizes patients with autoimmune thyroiditis who have associated non-endocrine autoimmune disorders. These findings may represent an initial tool to detect patients with autoimmune thyroiditis in which additional non-endocrine autoimmune disorders may be awaited.

  2. [Autoimmune diseases in type 1A diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira-Hermosillo, Aldo; Molina-Ayala, Mario Antonio

    2015-08-01

    Type 1A diabetes (DM1A) is an autoimmune disease that comprises 10% of patients with diabetes mellitus. Its frequency is gradually increasing in countries like Mexico. Patients with DM1A commonly have hypothyroidism, Addison disease, celiac disease and less common diseases such as polyglandular syndrome. These diseases are related to susceptibility genes such as HLA, CTLA-4 and PTPN22, which induce central and peripheral immunologic tolerance. This review article emphasizes the importance of searching other autoimmune diseases in patients with DM1A, to improve their prognosis and quality of life.

  3. Clinical progression of autoimmune thyroiditis in children and adolescents treated at the Instituto Nacional de Salud del Niño

    OpenAIRE

    Núñez Almache, Oswaldo; Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Federico Villarreal, Lima, Perú; Servicio de Endocrinología, Instituto Nacional de Salud del Niño, Lima, Perú; Del Aguila Villar, Carlos; Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Federico Villarreal, Lima, Perú; Servicio de Endocrinología, Instituto Nacional de Salud del Niño, Lima, Perú; Chavez Tejada, Eliana; Servicio de Endocrinología, Instituto Nacional de Salud del Niño (INSN), Lima; Espinoza Robles, Oscar; Servicio de Endocrinología, Instituto Nacional de Salud del Niño, Lima, Perú; Pinto Ibárcena, Paola; Servicio de Endocrinología, Instituto Nacional de Salud del Niño (INSN), Lima; Calagua Quispe, Martha; Servicio de Endocrinología, Instituto Nacional de Salud del Niño, Lima, Perú; De los Santos La Torre, Miguel; Servicio de Endocrinología, Instituto Nacional de Salud del Niño (INSN), Lima

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Autoimmune thyroiditis is the most common cause of hypothyroidism in children. Clinical diagnosis depends on biochemical condition and monitoring is essential to adopt therapeutic measures and ensure proper growth and development. Objective. To describe the clinical progression of autoimmune thyroiditis in children and adolescents. Design. Retrospective, longitudinal series of cases study. Setting. Department of Endocrinology, Instituto Nacional de Salud del Niño, Lima, Peru (a ...

  4. Involvement of endocrine system in a patient affected by glycogen storage disease 1b: speculation on the role of autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melis, Daniela; Della Casa, Roberto; Balivo, Francesca; Minopoli, Giorgia; Rossi, Alessandro; Salerno, Mariacarolina; Andria, Generoso; Parenti, Giancarlo

    2014-03-19

    Glycogen storage disease type 1b (GSD1b) is an inherited metabolic defect of glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis due to mutations of the SLC37A4 gene and to defective transport of glucose-6-phosphate. The clinical presentation of GSD1b is characterized by hepatomegaly, failure to thrive, fasting hypoglycemia, and dyslipidemia. Patients affected by GSD1b also show neutropenia and/or neutrophil dysfunction that cause increased susceptibility to recurrent bacterial infections. GSD1b patients are also at risk for inflammatory bowel disease. Occasional reports suggesting an increased risk of autoimmune disorders in GSD1b patients, have been published. These complications affect the clinical outcome of the patients. Here we describe the occurrence of autoimmune endocrine disorders including thyroiditis and growth hormone deficiency, in a patient affected by GSD1b. This case further supports the association between GSD1b and autoimmune diseases.

  5. Use of the immunomodulative influence of low-level laser radiation in the treatment of an autoimmune thyroiditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailov, V. A.; Alexandrova, O. A.; Denisov, I. N.

    2000-06-01

    Use of LLLT for 42 patients with an autoimmune thyroiditis has shown that the helper function of lymphocytes has decreased, the suppressive activity has increased, the quantity of B-lymphocytes has decreased and the immunoregulative index has been normalized. The effect of LLLT application was active about 4 months in 78 percent of the patients. Soft semiconductor laser was used. The radiation was in the IR range of spectrum, wavelength - 890 nm. The technique included cutaneous irradiation of the thymus projection zones, vascular junction and thyroid gland. The total doze was made 2.42 J/cm2.

  6. Relationship between prolactin and thyroid diseases%催乳素与甲状腺疾病

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑海兰; 任安

    2010-01-01

    催乳素(PRL)在哺乳动物的生长、繁殖及免疫调节中起重要作用.甲状腺疾病与高PRL血症关系密切,PRL可能参与了这些疾病的发生、发展.自身免疫性甲状腺疾病时,PRL可通过刺激辅助性T细胞分泌多种细胞因子而促进甲状腺自身抗体的产生.甲状腺功能减退时,雌激素、促甲状腺激素释放激素(TRH)及垂体血管活性肠肽(VIP)水平可能影响了PRL的分泌.甲状腺癌时PRL可能作为抗细胞凋亡因子或有丝分裂原而发挥作用.%Prolactin (PRL) plays an important role in growth, reproduction and immune regulation in mammal. PRL may be involved in the development of thyroid diseases, since that thyroid diseases are related with hyperprolactinemia. In autoimmune thyroid diseases, hyperprolactinemia can stimulate helper T cells secreting a variety of cytokines to produce lots of thyroid autoantibodies. In hypothyroidism, estrogen, thyrotropin releasing hormone(TRH) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) may affect the secretion of PRL. In thyroid cancer, prolactin may act as an anti-apoptotic factor or mitogen.

  7. Type 1 diabetes associated autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahaly, George J; Hansen, Martin P

    2016-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus is increasing in prevalence worldwide. The economic costs are considerable given the cardiovascular complications and co-morbidities that it may entail. Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by the loss of insulin-producing pancreatic β-cells. The pathogenesis of T1D is complex and multifactorial and involves a genetic susceptibility that predisposes to abnormal immune responses in the presence of ill-defined environmental insults to the pancreatic islets. Genetic background may affect the risk for autoimmune disease and patients with T1D exhibit an increased risk of other autoimmune disorders such as autoimmune thyroid disease, Addison's disease, autoimmune gastritis, coeliac disease and vitiligo. Approximately 20%-25% of patients with T1D have thyroid antibodies, and up to 50% of such patients progress to clinical autoimmune thyroid disease. Approximately 0.5% of diabetic patients have concomitant Addison's disease and 4% have coeliac disease. The prevalence of autoimmune gastritis and pernicious anemia is 5% to 10% and 2.6% to 4%, respectively. Early detection of antibodies and latent organ-specific dysfunction is advocated to alert physicians t