WorldWideScience

Sample records for autoimmune thyroid diseases

  1. [Autoimmune thyroid disease and other non-endocrine autoimmune diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilas, Ljiljana Todorović; Icin, Tijana; Paro, Jovanka Novaković; Bajkin, Ivana

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are chronic conditions initiated by the loss of immunological tolerance to self-antigens. They constitute heterogeneous group of disorders, in which multiple alterations in the immune system result in a spectrum of syndromes that either target specific organs or affect the body systematically. Recent epidemiological studies have shown a possible shift of one autoimmune disease to another or the fact that more than one autoimmune disease may coexist in a single patient or in the same family. Numerous autoimmune diseases have been shown to coexist frequently with thyroid autoimmune diseases. AUTOIMMNUNE THYROID DISEASE AND OTHER ORGAN SPECIFIC NON-ENDOCRINE AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES: This part of the study reviews the prevalence of autoimmune thyroid disease coexisting with: pernicious anaemia, vitiligo, celiac disease, autoimmune liver disease, miastenia gravis, alopecia areata and sclerosis multiplex, and several recommendations for screening have been given. AUTOIMMUNE THYROID DISEASE AND OTHER ORGAN NON-SPECIFIC NON-ENDOCRINE AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES: Special attention is given to the correlation between autoimmune thyroid disease and rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, syndrome Sjögren, systemic sclerosis and mixed connective tissue disease. Screening for autoimmune thyroid diseases should be recommended in everyday clinical practice, in patients with primary organ-specific or organ non-specific autoimmune disease. Otherwise, in patients with primary thyroid autoimmune disease, there is no good reason of seeking for all other autoimmune diseases, although these patients have a greater risk of developing other autoimmune disease. Economic aspects of medicine require further analyzing of these data, from cost/benefit point of view to justified either mandatory screening or medical practitioner judgment.

  2. Recent advances in understanding autoimmune thyroid disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bliddal, Sofie; Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) is often observed together with other autoimmune diseases. The coexistence of two or more autoimmune diseases in the same patient is referred to as polyautoimmunity, and AITD is the autoimmune disease most frequently involved. The occurrence of polyautoimmunity has...... led to the hypothesis that the affected patients suffer from a generalized dysregulation of their immune system. The present review summarizes recent discoveries unravelling the immunological mechanisms involved in autoimmunity, ranging from natural autoimmunity to disease-specific autoimmunity...

  3. [Autoimmune diseases of the thyroid gland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allelein, S; Feldkamp, J; Schott, M

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases of the thyroid gland are considered to be the most frequent cause of thyroid gland disorders. Autoimmune thyroid diseases consist of two subgroups: autoimmune thyroiditis (AIT) and Graves' disease. The AIT is the most common human autoimmune disease. Infiltration of the thyroid gland with cytotoxic T‑cells can lead to an initial thyrotoxicosis und during the course to hypothyroidism due to destruction of the thyroid gland. Substitution with Levothyroxine is indicated for manifest hypothyroidism and subclinical hypothyroidism with increased thyroid antibodies with the intention of normalizing the serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). Graves' disease is characterized by the appearance of stimulating TSH receptor antibodies leading to hyperthyroidism. Endocrine ophthalmopathy may also occur. Ablative therapy with radioiodine therapy or thyroidectomy is administered to patients with Graves' disease without remission after at least 1 year of antithyroid drug therapy.

  4. Encephalopathy Associated With Autoimmune Thyroid Disease

    OpenAIRE

    li A. Raouf; Gianluca Tamagno

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATDs) are immune-endocrine disorders affecting the thyroid gland and, eventually, also a number of other systemic targets, including the brain and the nervous system. Encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease (EAATD) is a rare, heterogeneous condition arising from the background of an ATD. It is characterised by neurological and/or psychiatric symptoms with acute or sub-acute onset, and virtually any neurological or psychiatric symptom can appear. ...

  5. Celiac disease and autoimmune thyroid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ch'ng, Chin Lye; Jones, M Keston; Kingham, Jeremy G C

    2007-10-01

    Celiac disease (CD) or gluten sensitive enteropathy is relatively common in western populations with prevalence around 1%. With the recent availability of sensitive and specific serological testing, many patients who are either asymptomatic or have subtle symptoms can be shown to have CD. Patients with CD have modest increases in risks of malignancy and mortality compared to controls. The mortality among CD patients who comply poorly with a gluten-free diet is greater than in compliant patients. The pattern of presentation of CD has altered over the past three decades. Many cases are now detected in adulthood during investigation of problems as diverse as anemia, osteoporosis, autoimmune disorders, unexplained neurological syndromes, infertility and chronic hypertransaminasemia of uncertain cause. Among autoimmune disorders, increased prevalence of CD has been found in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease, type 1 diabetes mellitus, autoimmune liver diseases and inflammatory bowel disease. Prevalence of CD was noted to be 1% to 19% in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus, 2% to 5% in autoimmune thyroid disorders and 3% to 7% in primary biliary cirrhosis in prospective studies. Conversely, there is also an increased prevalence of immune based disorders among patients with CD. The pathogenesis of co-existent autoimmune thyroid disease and CD is not known, but these conditions share similar HLA haplotypes and are associated with the gene encoding cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen-4. Screening high risk patients for CD, such as those with autoimmune diseases, is a reasonable strategy given the increased prevalence. Treatment of CD with a gluten-free diet should reduce the recognized complications of this disease and provide benefits in both general health and perhaps life expectancy. It also improves glycemic control in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and enhances the absorption of medications for associated hypothyroidism and osteoporosis. It

  6. Autoimmune Abnormalities of Postpartum Thyroid Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bari, Flavia; Granese, Roberta; Le Donne, Maria; Vita, Roberto; Benvenga, Salvatore

    2017-01-01

    The year following parturition is a critical time for the de novo appearance or exacerbation of autoimmune diseases, including autoimmune thyroid disease. The vast majority of postpartum thyroid disease consists of postpartum thyroiditis (PPT) and the minority by Graves' disease and non-autoimmune thyroiditis. PPT has a worldwide prevalence ranging from 1 to 22% and averaging 5% based on a review published in 2012. Several factors confer risk for the development of PPT. Typically, the clinical course of PPT is characterized by three phases: thyrotoxic, hypothyroid, and euthyroid phase. Approximately half of PPT women will have permanent hypothyroidism. The best humoral marker for predictivity, already during the first trimester of gestation, is considered positivity for thyroperoxidase autoantibodies (TPOAb), though only one-third to half of such TPOAb-positive pregnant women will develop PPT. Nutraceuticals (such as selenium) or omega-3-fatty acid supplements seem to have a role in prevention of PPT. In a recent study on pregnant women with stable dietary habits, we found that the fish consumers had lower rates of positivity (and lower serum levels) of both TPOAb and thyroglobulin Ab compared to meat eaters. Finally, we remind the reader of other diseases that can be observed in the postpartum period, either autoimmune or non-autoimmune, thyroid or non-thyroid.

  7. The environment and autoimmune thyroid diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prummel, Mark F.; Strieder, Thea; Wiersinga, Wilmar M.

    2004-01-01

    Genetic factors play an important role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) and it has been calculated that 80% of the susceptibility to develop Graves' disease is attributable to genes. The concordance rate for AITD among monozygotic twins is, however, well below I and

  8. [Autoimmune thyroid diseases complicated with reversible changes of thyroid function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajita, Y; Ochi, Y

    1999-08-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease (AID) with reversible thyroid dysfunction was classified mainly by etiology. Hashimoto thyroiditis itself, pregnancy, cytokine therapy and various drugs, iodine-rich food and AID with TSH receptor antibody (TRAb) were main items. Silent or painless thyroiditis which was termed destructive thyroiditis occurs without clear cause or after adrenectomy for Cushing syndrome. Abnormal human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) rarely causes transient thyrotoxicosis at early phase of pregnancy and postpartum thyroiditis which has similar symptom as silent thyroiditis is relatively common disorders. Thyroid dysfunction of patients with both TRAb (TSAb and TSBAb) is pathophysiologically unknown and the detection of both antibodies in a patient serum is difficult methodologically. We developed the highly sensitive TSAb assay by patients' IgG precipitated by high concentration PEG (22.5%) using porcine thyroid cell. This assay is also useful for detection of the coexistence cases of TSAb and TSBAb.

  9. Encephalopathy Associated With Autoimmune Thyroid Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    li A. Raouf

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATDs are immune-endocrine disorders affecting the thyroid gland and, eventually, also a number of other systemic targets, including the brain and the nervous system. Encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease (EAATD is a rare, heterogeneous condition arising from the background of an ATD. It is characterised by neurological and/or psychiatric symptoms with acute or sub-acute onset, and virtually any neurological or psychiatric symptom can appear. However, EAATD often presents with confusion, altered consciousness, seizures, or myoclonus. The majority of cases are associated with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, but a number of patients with Graves’ disease have also been described. EAATD is likely an immune-mediated disorder. Its exact prevalence has not been precisely elucidated, with an increasing number of cases reported in the last few years. Most EAATD patients respond in a dramatic manner to corticosteroids. However, the immunosuppressive treatment may require a long course (up to 12 months. The increasing number of EAATD cases reported in the literature demonstrates a growing interest of the scientific community about this condition, which still requires a better definition of its pathophysiology, the diagnostic criteria, and the most appropriate management, including the long-term follow-up of patients. The current clinical evidence about EAATD is mostly based on the report of single cases or small cohort studies. In this review, we present the current knowledge about EAATD, with a dedicated focus to the clinical management of the patients from a diagnostic and therapeutic perspective.

  10. New Genetic Insights from Autoimmune Thyroid Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry F. Davies

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs (Graves’ disease and Hashimoto’s thyroiditis are complex genetic diseases which most likely have more than 20 genes contributing to the clinical phenotypes. To date, the genes known to be contributing fall into two categories: immune regulatory genes (including HLA, CTLA4, PTPN22, CD40, CD25, and FCRL3 and thyroid-specific genes (TG and TSHR. However, none of these genes contribute more than a 4-fold increase in risk of developing one of these diseases, and none of the polymorphisms discovered is essential for disease development. Hence, it appears that a variety of different gene interactions can combine to cause the same clinical disease pattern, but the contributing genes may differ from patient to patient and from population to population. Furthermore, this possible mechanism leaves open the powerful influence of the environment and epigenetic modifications of gene expression. For the clinician, this means that genetic profiling of such patients is unlikely to be fruitful in the near future.

  11. Thyroid autoantibodies in autoimmune diseases Anticuerpos antitiroideos en enfermedades autoinmunes

    OpenAIRE

    Regina M. Innocencio; João H. Romaldini; Laura S. Ward

    2004-01-01

    Abnormalities in the thyroid function and thyroid autoantibodies have been frequently described in patients with autoimmune diseases but seldom in antiphospholipid syndrome patients. In order to determine the prevalence of thyroid function and autoimmune abnormalities, we compared serum thyrotropin (TSH, serum free thyroxine (T4) levels, thyroid antithyroglobulin (TgAb) and antithyroperoxidase (TPOAb) levels of 25 patients with systemic sclerosis, 25 patients with rheumatoid arthritis and 13 ...

  12. Challenges in interpretation of thyroid function tests in pregnant women with autoimmune thyroid disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Bliddal, Sofie; Rasmussen, Åse Krogh

    2011-01-01

    Physiological changes during gestation are important to be aware of in measurement and interpretation of thyroid function tests in women with autoimmune thyroid diseases. Thyroid autoimmune activity is decreasing in pregnancy. Measurement of serum TSH is the first-line screening variable....... Measurement of antithyroperoxidase and/or TSH receptor antibodies adds to the differential diagnosis of autoimmune and nonautoimmune thyroid diseases....... for thyroid dysfunction also in pregnancy. However, using serum TSH for control of treatment of maternal thyroid autoimmunity infers a risk for compromised foetal development. Peripheral thyroid hormone values are highly different among laboratories, and there is a need for laboratory-specific gestational age...

  13. Serum BAFF and thyroid autoantibodies in autoimmune thyroid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jiunn-Diann; Wang, Yuan-Hung; Fang, Wen-Fang; Hsiao, Chia-Jung; Chagnaadorj, Amarzaya; Lin, Yuh-Feng; Tang, Kam-Tsun; Cheng, Chao-Wen

    2016-11-01

    This study investigated the association of serum B-lymphocyte activating factor (BAFF) levels with autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) in a Chinese population. We enrolled 221 patients with AITD [170 patients with Graves' disease (GD), 51 patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT)], and 124 healthy controls. Serum BAFF levels, thyroid function and thyroid autoantibody (TAb) levels, including of thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antibody (TSHRAb), anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody (Anti-TPO Ab), and antithyroglobulin antibody (ATA), were measured at baseline. Serum BAFF levels were higher in the GD, HT, and AITD groups than in the control group. Significant correlations were observed between BAFF and TSHRAb levels (r=0.238, p=0.018), between BAFF and Anti-TPO Ab levels (p=0.038), and between BAFF and ATA titers (p=0.025) in women but not in men. In addition, serum BAFF levels were significantly associated with free thyroxine (r=0.430, p=0.004) and TSHRAb (r=0.495, p=0.001) levels in women with active GD but not in those with inactive GD. Serum BAFF levels are increased in GD, HT, and AITD. The correlation between serum BAFF and TAb levels exhibits a dimorphic pattern, particularly in active GD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Age impact on autoimmune thyroid disease in females

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoian, Dana; Craciunescu, Mihalea; Timar, Romulus; Schiller, Adalbert; Pater, Liana; Craina, Marius

    2013-10-01

    Thyroid autoimmune disease, a widespread phenomenon in female population, impairs thyroid function during pregnancy. Identifying cases, which will develop hypothyroidism during pregnancy, is crucial in the follow-up process. The study group comprised 108 females, with ages between 20-40 years; with known inactive autoimmune thyroid disease, before pregnancy that became pregnant in the study follow-up period. They were monitored by means of clinical, hormonal and immunological assays. Supplemental therapy with thyroid hormones was used, where needed. Maternal age and level of anti-thyroid antibodies were used to predict thyroid functional impairment.

  15. Dendritic cells in autoimmune thyroid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabel, P J; Voorbij, H A; van der Gaag, R D; Wiersinga, W M; de Haan, M; Drexhage, H A

    1987-01-01

    Dendritic cells form a morphologically distinct class of cells characterized by shape, reniform nucleus, absent to weak acid-phosphatase activity and strong Class II MHC determinant positivity. Functionally they are the most efficient cells in antigen presentation to T-lymphocytes which indicates their role in the initiation of an immune response. Using immunehistochemical techniques we studied the presence of dendritic cells in normal Wistar rat and human thyroids, in thyroids of BBW rats developing thyroid autoimmunity and in Graves' goitres. Dendritic cells could be identified in all thyroids studied and were positioned underneath the thyrocytes in between the follicles. Skin dendritic cells travel via lymphatics to draining lymph nodes, thus forming an antigen presenting cell system. It is likely that a similar cell system exists on the level of the thyroid for dendritic cells have also been detected in thyroid draining lymph nodes. In normal thyroid tissue of both human and rat dendritic cells were relatively scarce. During the initial phases of the thyroid autoimmune response in the BBW rat (before the appearance of Tg-antibodies in the circulation) numbers of thyroid dendritic cells increased. Intrathyroidal T-helper cells, B-cells or plasma cells could not be found. The thyroid draining lymph node contained large numbers of plasma cells. During the later stages of the thyroid autoimmune response in the BB/W rat (after the appearance of Tg-antibodies in the circulation) and in Graves' goitres dendritic cells were not only present in high number, but 20-30% were seen in contact with now-present intrathyroidal T-helper lymphocytes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Challenges in interpretation of thyroid function tests in pregnant women with autoimmune thyroid disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Bliddal, Sofie; Rasmussen, Åse Krogh

    2011-01-01

    Physiological changes during gestation are important to be aware of in measurement and interpretation of thyroid function tests in women with autoimmune thyroid diseases. Thyroid autoimmune activity is decreasing in pregnancy. Measurement of serum TSH is the first-line screening variable for thyr......Physiological changes during gestation are important to be aware of in measurement and interpretation of thyroid function tests in women with autoimmune thyroid diseases. Thyroid autoimmune activity is decreasing in pregnancy. Measurement of serum TSH is the first-line screening variable...

  17. Is selenium supplementation in autoimmune thyroid diseases justified?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Kristian H.; Bonnema, Steen; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review provides an appraisal of recent evidence for or against selenium supplementation in patients with autoimmune thyroid diseases, and discusses possible effect mechanisms. RECENT FINDINGS: Epidemiological data suggest an increased prevalence of autoimmune thyroid...... diseases under conditions of low dietary selenium intake. Two systematic reviews have evaluated controlled trials among patients with autoimmune thyroiditis and report that selenium supplementation decreases circulating thyroid autoantibodies. The immunomodulatory effects of selenium might involve reducing...... supplementation in the standard treatment of patients with autoimmune thyroiditis or Graves’ disease. However, correction of moderate to severe selenium deficiency may offer benefits in preventing, as well as treating, these disorders. Molecular mechanisms have been proposed, but further studies are needed....

  18. Challenges in Interpretation of Thyroid Function Tests in Pregnant Women with Autoimmune Thyroid Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulla Feldt-Rasmussen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Physiological changes during gestation are important to be aware of in measurement and interpretation of thyroid function tests in women with autoimmune thyroid diseases. Thyroid autoimmune activity is decreasing in pregnancy. Measurement of serum TSH is the first-line screening variable for thyroid dysfunction also in pregnancy. However, using serum TSH for control of treatment of maternal thyroid autoimmunity infers a risk for compromised foetal development. Peripheral thyroid hormone values are highly different among laboratories, and there is a need for laboratory-specific gestational age-related reference ranges. Equally important, the intraindividual variability of the thyroid hormone measurements is much narrower than the interindividual variation (reflecting the reference interval. The best laboratory assessment of thyroid function is a free thyroid hormone estimate combined with TSH. Measurement of antithyroperoxidase and/or TSH receptor antibodies adds to the differential diagnosis of autoimmune and nonautoimmune thyroid diseases.

  19. [Maternal autoimmune thyroid disease: relevance for the newborn].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temboury Molina, M Carmen; Rivero Martín, M José; de Juan Ruiz, Jesús; Ares Segura, Susana

    2015-04-08

    Autoimmune thyroid disease is amongst the most frequent endocrine disorders during pregnancy. It is associated with an increase in perinatal morbidity, congenital defects, neurological damage, fetal and neonatal thyroid dysfunction. Maternal thyroid hormones play a key role in child neurodevelopment. We aimed to evaluate the thyroid function and the clinical course of neonates born from mothers with autoimmune thyroid disease during the first months of life in order to define the follow-up. We monitored thyroid function and clinical status during the first months in 81 newborns of mothers with autoimmune thyroid disease; 16 had Graves disease and 65 autoimmune thyroiditis. A percentage of 4.93 newborns had congenital defects, and 8.64% neonates showed an increase in thyrotropin (TSH) (>9.5 μUI/mL 2 times) and required thyroxin within the first month of life. A 85.7% of these showed a negative newborn screening (due to a later increase of TSH). A higher TSH value in the newborn was related to an older age of the mother, higher levels of thyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibody during pregnancy and lower birth weight. A higher free thyroxine (FT4) value in the newborn was related to fewer days of life and mothers with Graves disease. We recommend the evaluation of TSH, T4 and TPO antibodies before 10 weeks in all pregnant women with follow-up if maternal thyroid autoimmunity or disorders is detected. It is also recommended to test children's serum TSH and FT4 at 48 h of life in newborns of mothers with autoimmune thyroid disease and repeat them between the 2nd and 4th week in children with TSH>6 μUI/mL. Careful endocrine follow-up is advised in pregnant women and children if hyperthyroidism is detected. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Autoimmune thyroid disease and celiac disease in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansaldi, Nicoletta; Palmas, Tiziana; Corrias, Andrea; Barbato, Maria; D'Altiglia, Mario Rocco; Campanozzi, Angelo; Baldassarre, Mariella; Rea, Francesco; Pluvio, Rosanna; Bonamico, Margherita; Lazzari, Rosanna; Corrao, Giovanni

    2003-07-01

    Celiac disease (CD) may be associated with other immunologic disorders in adults and children. Previous studies linking CD and autoimmune thyroid disease in children have included very few patients with limited biochemical and immunologic screening tests. The aim of this multicenter study was to establish the prevalence of autoimmune thyroid involvement in a large series of pediatric patients with CD. Five hundred seventy-three consecutive pediatric patients were enrolled from clinics in Torino, Bologna, Foggia, Rome (two clinics), Naples, and Bari. Three hundred forty-three patients with CD were studied, 230 girls and 113 boys (median age, 8.5 years). Two hundred fifty-six of the patients with CD (median age, 9 years) had been following a gluten-free diet for 3 months to 16 years; 87 patients were untreated (median age, 6.2 years). The diagnosis of CD was made using the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) criteria. A control group of 230 subjects (median age, 8.3 years) was enrolled. Serum free triiodothyronine, free thyroxine, and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), antithyroperoxidase, antithyroglobulin, anti-TSH receptor antibodies, and thyroid echographic pattern were considered. Autoimmune thyroid disease was found in 90 of 343 (26.2%) patients with CD (62 on a gluten-free diet) and in 20 (10%) of the control subjects (P = 0.001). Fifty-four (15.7%) patients with CD and autoimmune markers had normal thyroid function (euthyroidism) as did 12 (6.0%) of the control subjects; hypothyroidism was observed in 28 (8.1%) patients with CD and in 7 (3.5%) of the control subjects. Hyperthyroidism was diagnosed in four patients with CD and in none of the control subjects with autoimmune markers. An abnormal echographic pattern was seen in 37 patients with CD (16.8%) and only in 1 (1.6%) of the control subjects (P = 0.002). The high frequency of autoimmune thyroid disease found among patients with CD, even those on a gluten

  1. Fibromyalgia and chronic widespread pain in autoimmune thyroid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Jowairiyya; Tagoe, Clement E

    2014-07-01

    Fibromyalgia and chronic widespread pain syndromes are among the commonest diseases seen in rheumatology practice. Despite advances in the management of these conditions, they remain significant causes of morbidity and disability. Autoimmune thyroid disease is the most prevalent autoimmune disorder, affecting about 10 % of the population, and is a recognized cause of fibromyalgia and chronic widespread pain. Recent reports are shedding light on the mechanisms of pain generation in autoimmune thyroid disease-associated pain syndromes including the role of inflammatory mediators, small-fiber polyneuropathy, and central sensitization. The gradual elucidation of these pain pathways is allowing the rational use of pharmacotherapy in the management of chronic widespread pain in autoimmune thyroid disease. This review looks at the current understanding of the prevalence of pain syndromes in autoimmune thyroid disease, their likely causes, present appreciation of the pathogenesis of chronic widespread pain, and how our knowledge can be used to find lasting and effective treatments for the pain syndromes associated with autoimmune thyroid disease.

  2. Prevalence of coeliac disease in patients with thyroid autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentino, R; Savastano, S; Tommaselli, A P; Dorato, M; Scarpitta, M T; Gigante, M; Micillo, M; Paparo, F; Petrone, E; Lombardi, G; Troncone, R

    1999-01-01

    The occurrence of autoimmune thyroid disorders among patients with coeliac disease (CD) is well documented, but the exact prevalence of CD among patients with autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATD) is as yet unclear. We screened 150 newly diagnosed patients with ATD by serum endomysial antibody detection (EmA). In 5 subjects (3.3%) EmA positivity was found; all underwent jejunal biopsy. On gluten-free diet an excellent clinical and histological response was recorded with an improvement of hypothyroidism and reduction of the thyroxine dosage. Our data suggest a significant high prevalence (3.3%) of CD in patients with ATD, in particular with Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

  3. [Metabolic disorders and nutritional status in autoimmune thyroid diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawicka, Anna; Regulska-Ilow, Bożena; Regulska-Ilow, Bożena

    2015-01-02

    In recent years, the authors of epidemiological studies have documented that autoimmune diseases are a major problem of modern society and are classified as diseases of civilization. Autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATDs) are caused by an abnormal immune response to autoantigens present in the thyroid gland - they often coexist with other autoimmune diseases. The most common dysfunctions of the thyroid gland are hypothyroidism, Graves-Basedow disease and Hashimoto's disease. Hashimoto's thyroiditis can be the main cause of primary hypothyroidism of the thyroid gland. Anthropometric, biochemical and physicochemical parameters are used to assess the nutritional status during the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid diseases. Patients with hypothyroidism are often obese, whereas patients with hyperthyroidism are often afflicted with rapid weight loss. The consequence of obesity is a change of the thyroid hormones' activity; however, weight reduction leads to their normalization. The activity and metabolic rate of thyroid hormones are modifiable. ATDs are associated with abnormalities of glucose metabolism and thus increased risk of developing diabetes mellitus type 1 and type 2. Celiac disease (CD) also increases the risk of developing other autoimmune diseases. Malnutrition or the presence of numerous nutritional deficiencies in a patient's body can be the cause of thyroid disorders. Coexisting deficiencies of such elements as iodine, iron, selenium and zinc may impair the function of the thyroid gland. Other nutrient deficiencies usually observed in patients suffering from ATD are: protein deficiencies, vitamin deficiencies (A, C, B6, B5, B1) and mineral deficiencies (phosphorus, magnesium, potassium, sodium, chromium). Proper diet helps to reduce the symptoms of the disease, maintains a healthy weight and prevents the occurrence of malnutrition. This article presents an overview of selected documented studies and scientific reports on the relationship of metabolic

  4. Metabolic disorders and nutritional status in autoimmune thyroid diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kawicka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the authors of epidemiological studies have documented that autoimmune diseases are a major problem of modern society and are classified as diseases of civilization. Autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATDs are caused by an abnormal immune response to autoantigens present in the thyroid gland – they often coexist with other autoimmune diseases. The most common dysfunctions of the thyroid gland are hypothyroidism, Graves-Basedow disease and Hashimoto’s disease. Hashimoto’s thyroiditis can be the main cause of primary hypothyroidism of the thyroid gland. Anthropometric, biochemical and physicochemical parameters are used to assess the nutritional status during the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid diseases. Patients with hypothyroidism are often obese, whereas patients with hyperthyroidism are often afflicted with rapid weight loss. The consequence of obesity is a change of the thyroid hormones’ activity; however, weight reduction leads to their normalization. The activity and metabolic rate of thyroid hormones are modifiable. ATDs are associated with abnormalities of glucose metabolism and thus increased risk of developing diabetes mellitus type 1 and type 2. Celiac disease (CD also increases the risk of developing other autoimmune diseases. Malnutrition or the presence of numerous nutritional deficiencies in a patient’s body can be the cause of thyroid disorders. Coexisting deficiencies of such elements as iodine, iron, selenium and zinc may impair the function of the thyroid gland. Other nutrient deficiencies usually observed in patients suffering from ATD are: protein deficiencies, vitamin deficiencies (A, C, B6, B5, B1 and mineral deficiencies (phosphorus, magnesium, potassium, sodium, chromium. Proper diet helps to reduce the symptoms of the disease, maintains a healthy weight and prevents the occurrence of malnutrition. This article presents an overview of selected documented studies and scientific reports on the

  5. Challenges in interpretation of thyroid function tests in pregnant women with autoimmune thyroid disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Bliddal, Sofie; Rasmussen, Åse Krogh

    2011-01-01

    Physiological changes during gestation are important to be aware of in measurement and interpretation of thyroid function tests in women with autoimmune thyroid diseases. Thyroid autoimmune activity is decreasing in pregnancy. Measurement of serum TSH is the first-line screening variable...... for thyroid dysfunction also in pregnancy. However, using serum TSH for control of treatment of maternal thyroid autoimmunity infers a risk for compromised foetal development. Peripheral thyroid hormone values are highly different among laboratories, and there is a need for laboratory-specific gestational age......-related reference ranges. Equally important, the intraindividual variability of the thyroid hormone measurements is much narrower than the interindividual variation (reflecting the reference interval). The best laboratory assessment of thyroid function is a free thyroid hormone estimate combined with TSH...

  6. Associated Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... celiac disease are type 1 diabetes and autoimmune thyroid disease. The tendency to develop autoimmune diseases is believed ... confusion, weight loss, and coma (if left untreated). Thyroid Disease There are two common forms of autoimmune thyroid ...

  7. Celiac Disease Autoimmunity in Patients with Autoimmune Diabetes and Thyroid Disease among Chinese Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyuan Zhao

    Full Text Available The prevalence of celiac disease autoimmunity or tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies (TGA amongst patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D and autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD in the Chinese population remains unknown. This study examined the rate of celiac disease autoimmunity amongst patients with T1D and AITD in the Chinese population. The study included 178 patients with type 1 diabetes and 119 with AITD where 36 had both T1D and AITD, classified as autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3 variant (APS3v. The study also included 145 patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D, 97 patients with non-autoimmune thyroid disease (NAITD, and 102 healthy controls. Serum islet autoantibodies, thyroid autoantibodies and TGA were measured by radioimmunoassay. TGA positivity was found in 22% of patients with either type 1 diabetes or AITD, much higher than that in patients with T2D (3.4%; p< 0.0001 or NAITD (3.1%; P < 0.0001 or healthy controls (1%; p<0.0001. The patients with APS3v having both T1D and AITD were 36% positive for TGA, significantly higher than patients with T1D alone (p = 0.040 or with AITD alone (p = 0.017. T1D and AITD were found to have a 20% and 30% frequency of overlap respectively at diagnosis. In conclusion, TGA positivity was high in the Chinese population having existing T1D and/or AITD, and even higher when both diseases were present. Routine TGA screening in patients with T1D or AITD will be important to early identify celiac disease autoimmunity for better clinical care of patients.

  8. Thyroid volume in hypothyroidism due to autoimmune disease follows a unimodal distribution: evidence against primary thyroid atrophy and autoimmune thyroiditis being distinct diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlé, Allan; Pedersen, Inge Bülow; Knudsen, Nils

    2009-01-01

    CONTEXT: Primary overt autoimmune hypothyroidism is often divided into primary idiopathic hypothyroidism with thyroid atrophy (Ord's disease) and hypothyroidism with goitre (Hashimoto's disease). OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to characterize the two subtypes of disease. DESIGN...... program including thyroid ultrasonography and measurements of thyroid autoantibodies. Of the 144 patients investigated (58% of all invited), 139 were compared with 556 sex-, age-, and region-matched controls from the cohort. RESULTS: Patients had lower median (11.6 ml vs. 13.5 ml, P = 0.001) and a more...... dispersed distribution of thyroid volumes compared with controls (P thyroid volume showed a Gaussian distribution in both males and females with no bimodal pattern. Nearly all patients had measurable thyroid autoantibodies, but with increasing thyroid volume (quartile I, II, III, and IV...

  9. Sarcoidosis and Thyroid Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piera Fazzi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Most of the studies have shown a higher risk for subclinical and clinical hypothyroidism, antithyroid autoantibodies [overall antithyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAb], and in general, thyroid autoimmunity, overall in the female gender in patients with sarcoidosis (S. A significantly higher prevalence of clinical hypothyroidism and Graves’ disease was also described in female S patients with respect to controls. Gallium-67 (Ga-67 scyntigraphy in S patients, in the case of thyroid uptake, suggests the presence of aggressive autoimmune thyroiditis and hypothyroidism. For this reason, ultrasonography and thyroid function should be done in the case of Ga-67 thyroid uptake. In conclusion, thyroid function, TPOAb measurement, and ultrasonography should be done to assess the clinical profile in female S patients, and the ones at high risk (female individuals, with TPOAb positivity, and hypoechoic and small thyroid should have periodically thyroid function evaluations and suitable treatments.

  10. Seven newly identified loci for autoimmune thyroid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Jason D; Simmonds, Matthew J; Walker, Neil M; Burren, Oliver; Brand, Oliver J; Guo, Hui; Wallace, Chris; Stevens, Helen; Coleman, Gillian; Franklyn, Jayne A; Todd, John A; Gough, Stephen C L

    2012-12-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), including Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT), is one of the most common of the immune-mediated diseases. To further investigate the genetic determinants of AITD, we conducted an association study using a custom-made single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array, the ImmunoChip. The SNP array contains all known and genotype-able SNPs across 186 distinct susceptibility loci associated with one or more immune-mediated diseases. After stringent quality control, we analysed 103 875 common SNPs (minor allele frequency >0.05) in 2285 GD and 462 HT patients and 9364 controls. We found evidence for seven new AITD risk loci (P test derived significance threshold), five at locations previously associated and two at locations awaiting confirmation, with other immune-mediated diseases.

  11. Fetal microchimeric cells in autoimmune thyroid diseases: harmful, beneficial or innocent for the thyroid gland?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepez, Trees; Vandewoestyne, Mado; Deforce, Dieter

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) show a female predominance, with an increased incidence in the years following parturition. Fetal microchimerism has been suggested to play a role in the pathogenesis of AITD. However, only the presence of fetal microchimeric cells in blood and in the thyroid gland of these patients has been proven, but not an actual active role in AITD. Is fetal microchimerism harmful for the thyroid gland by initiating a Graft versus Host reaction (GvHR) or being the target of a Host versus Graft reaction (HvGR)? Is fetal microchimerism beneficial for the thyroid gland by being a part of tissue repair or are fetal cells just innocent bystanders in the process of autoimmunity? This review explores every hypothesis concerning the role of fetal microchimerism in AITD.

  12. Effects of latent toxoplasmosis on autoimmune thyroid diseases in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaňková, Šárka; Procházková, Lucie; Flegr, Jaroslav; Calda, Pavel; Springer, Drahomíra; Potluková, Eliška

    2014-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis, one of the most common zoonotic diseases worldwide, can induce various hormonal and behavioural alterations in infected hosts, and its most common form, latent toxoplasmosis, influences the course of pregnancy. Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) belong to the well-defined risk factors for adverse pregnancy outcomes. The aim of this study was to investigate whether there is a link between latent toxoplasmosis and maternal AITD in pregnancy. Cross-sectional study in 1248 consecutive pregnant women in the 9-12th gestational weeks. Serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), thyroperoxidase antibodies (TPOAb), and free thyroxine (FT4) were assessed by chemiluminescence; the Toxoplasma status was detected by the complement fixation test (CFT) and anti-Toxoplasma IgG enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Overall, 22.5% of the women were positive for latent toxoplasmosis and 14.7% were screened positive for AITD. Women with latent toxoplasmosis had more often highly elevated TPOAb than the Toxoplasma-negative ones (p = 0.004), and latent toxoplasmosis was associated with decrease in serum TSH levels (p = 0.049). Moreover, we found a positive correlation between FT4 and the index of positivity for anti-Toxoplasma IgG antibodies (p = 0.033), which was even stronger in the TPOAb-positive Toxoplasma-positive women, (p = 0.014), as well as a positive correlation between FT4 and log2 CFT (p = 0.009). Latent toxoplasmosis was associated with a mild increase in thyroid hormone production in pregnancy. The observed Toxoplasma-associated changes in the parameters of AITD are mild and do not seem to be clinically relevant; however, they could provide new clues to the complex pathogenesis of autoimmune thyroid diseases.

  13. Pathogenesis of thyroid autoimmune disease: the role of cellular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Leví, Ana Maria; Marazuela, Mónica

    2016-10-01

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) and Graves' disease (GD) are two very common organ-specific autoimmune diseases which are characterized by circulating antibodies and lymphocyte infiltration. Although humoral and cellular mechanisms have been classically considered separately in the pathogenesis of autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD), recent research suggests a close reciprocal relationship between these two immune pathways. Several B- and T-cell activation pathways through antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and cytokine production lead to specific differentiation of T helper (Th) and T regulatory (Treg) cells. This review will focus on the cellular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of AITD. Specifically, it will provide reasons for discarding the traditional simplistic dichotomous view of the T helper type 1 and 2 pathways (Th1/Th2) and will focus on the role of the recently characterized T cells, Treg and Th17 lymphocytes, as well as B lymphocytes and APCs, especially dendritic cells (DCs). Copyright © 2016 SEEN. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Interrelation specific autoimmune pathologies of a thyroid gland with inorganic autoimmune rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O V Paramonova

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The problem of a pathology of a thyroid gland at rheumatic diseases, in particular at rheumatoid arthritis, remains actual and to this day. The work purpose was studying antitelogenesis to thyroid hormones at patients with mixt autoimmune pathology. In whey of blood of patients with RA and autothyroid pathology are found out antibodies (AB to Т3 and Т4, their concentration correlates with activity of pathological process. It is shown, that level AB to Т3 and Т4 authentically differs from the maintenance of the given antibodies in whey of blood of healthy faces. Level of antibodies to thyroid hormones can be considered as the criterion predicting development of pathology of a thyroid gland at patients with RA.

  15. [Pernicious anemia and autoimmune thyroid diseases in elderly people].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velarde-Mayol, Cristina; de la Hoz-García, Benito; del Cañizo-Fernández-Roldán, Carlos; Hernández-López, Alba Marina; Loza-Candia, Isabel; Cardona-Hernández, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATD), and pernicious anemia (PA) in particular, are common in elderly people. The relationship between both of these is currently being discussed. The objective of this study is to determine the correlation between ATD and PA in elderly people, and if there are other associated factors affecting this relationship. The factors studied to analyse this association were social-health variables, autoimmune comorbidity (type 1 diabetes and other autoimmune diseases), the taking of drugs that alter vitamin B12 levels (Metformin and protein bomb inhibitors), and the chronological order in which both diseases appear in this population. A logistic regression analysis was performed to determine which of the described variables could have an on both diseases. The prevalence was 8.2% for ATD and 3.3% for PA, with a progressive increase in the annual incidence in the past 10 years from 7.1 to 12.7 cases per 1,000 persons>65 years for ATI, and from 1.6 to 7.4 cases for PA. PA was found in 18.6% of the patients with ATD, and the 45% of PA presented with ATD, mainly in women (RR=6.0). The average time in diagnosing the second disease was about 8 years. When there was a third autoimmune disease the likelihood of ATD and PA increased fourfold. Patients with ATD and consuming drugs which were affecting the absorption of vitamin B12 had double the probability of developing a PA compared with those who were not taking medications. The results of this study confirm the association between ATI and AP among people 65 or older, also a progressive increase in the incidence of these diseases. Copyright © 2014 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. Pendrin and NIS antibodies are absent in healthy individuals and are rare in autoimmune thyroid disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, Thomas H; Hegedüs, Laszlo; Weetman, Anthony P

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Antibodies against thyroglobulin, thyroid peroxidase and the TSH receptor are accepted as pathophysiological and diagnostic biomarkers in autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD). In contrast, the prevalence, aetiology and clinical relevance of autoantibodies against the human sodium...... prevalence than the controls: NISAb: 17% vs 0% (P disease (GD) and 14% (5/37) of patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) had NISAb, (P

  17. Are patients with autoimmune thyroid disease and autoimmune gastritis at risk of gastric neuroendocrine neoplasms type 1?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandraki, Krystallenia I; Nikolaou, Argiro; Thomas, Dimitrios; Syriou, Vassiliki; Korkolopoulou, Penelope; Sougioultzis, Stavros; Kaltsas, Gregory

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of autoimmune gastritis, enterochromaffin-like cell (ECL-cell) hyperplasia and gastric neuroendocrine neoplasms type 1 (GNEN1) in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease. Prospective observational study in a single institutional study. One hundred and twenty patients with autoimmune thyroid disease were consecutively recruited from the Endocrine Unit. Upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopy (UGE) and biochemical parameters for autoimmune thyroid disease and autoimmune gastritis were assessed at recruitment and annually thereafter in patients with a mean follow-up of 37·5 ± 14·4 months. Autoimmune gastritis was defined by the presence of antiparietal cell antibodies (APCA) and histological confirmation after UGE. Serum gastrin and chromogranin Α were also measured. One hundred and eleven patients had Hashimoto's thyroiditis and nine Graves' disease. Autoimmune gastritis was identified in 40 (38 with Hashimoto's thyroiditis and two with Graves' disease) patients all of whom had increased levels of gastrin and chromogranin Α; Helicobacter pylori infection was histologically identified in 15 of 40 (37·5%) patients. Six patients had isolated nodular ECL-cell hyperplasia and one mixed nodular and linear ECL-cell hyperplasia [7 of 40 (17·5%)]. Only increased gastrin (P = 0·03) levels predicted the presence ECL-cell hyperplasia. A GNEN1 developed in one patient with nodular ECL-cell hyperplasia after 39 months of follow-up. Concomitant autoimmune gastritis was found in 33·3% of patients with autoimmune thyroid disease, 17·5% of whom had ECL-cell hyperplasia that evolved to GNEN1 in one (2·5%). Larger studies with longer follow-up are needed to define the incidence of GNEN1 in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease and ECL-cell hyperplasia and potential implications. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Celiac autoimmunity in autoimmune thyroid disease is highly prevalent with a questionable impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharat Rakeshkumar Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The prevalence of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD is 10–12% in the general population worldwide. Among various disorders co-existing with AITD, the concomitance of celiac disease (CD with AITD results in poor absorption of thyroid medications and results in higher doses of the same. Institution of gluten-free diet (GFD in this cohort helps reduce medication doses. Aim: To screen patients with AITD for the presence of celiac autoimmunity (CA. Materials and Methods: A total of 280 consecutive patients with AITD attending the thyroid Out-patient Department of a tertiary care hospital were screened for the presence of tissue transglutaminase antibodies (immunoglobulin A tissue transglutaminase. Those with a positive titer (but < 10 times the upper limit of normal underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and duodenal mucosal biopsy for the diagnosis of CD, followed by institution of GFD in confirmed cases. Results: Of a total of 280 (182 females and 98 males patients with AITD screened, 24 (8.6% turned out to be positive for CA. Of 24 (8.6%, 15 (8.24% females and 9 (9.18% males were positive for CA. There was no statistically significant difference in the thyroxine doses required for normalization of thyroid function and the weight of the patients in CA positive and CA negative patients. Conclusions: The prevalence of CD in patients with AITD is much greater than in the general population. This forms the basis for screening patients with AITD for presence of CD.

  19. Functional TSH receptor antibodies in children with autoimmune thyroid diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stożek, Karolina; Bossowski, Artur; Ziora, Katarzyna; Bossowska, Anna; Mrugacz, Małgorzata; Noczyńska, Anna; Walczak, Mieczysław; Petriczko, Elżbieta; Pyrżak, Beata; Kucharska, Anna; Szalecki, Mieczysław; Diana, Tanja; Kahaly, George J

    2018-03-01

    The diagnostic value of the level of TSH receptor antibodies (TSHR-Ab) in the population of children with autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs) is still unknown. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the prevalence of TSHR-Ab in a paediatric cohort with AITD and healthy controls. A total of 240 serum samples were obtained from 205 patients with AITD, type 1 diabetes (T1D), juvenile arthritis (JA), and healthy controls (C). TSHR stimulating (TSI) and -blocking (TBI) immunoglobulins were measured in cell-based bioassays using CHO cells expressing a chimeric TSHR and a c-AMP response-element-dependent luciferase. TSI was reported as percentage of specimen-to-reference ratio (cutoff 140SRR%). Blocking activity was defined as percent inhibition of luciferase expression relative to induction with bovine TSH alone (40% inhibition). C as well as children with JA and T1D were both TSI and TBI negative. In contrast, children with Graves' disease (GD) were positive for TSI in 47/53 samples (88.7%) while those with thyroidal and orbital GD showed TSI positivity in 95.8% (23/24 samples). Serum TSI levels were SRR% 320 ± 157 and 417 ± 135 in GD and GD + orbitopathy, respectively (p = .02). Children with Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) were TSI positive in 4/83 (4.8%) samples, including two with orbital involvement. TSI levels were increased in HT children with vs. those without eye disease (SRR% 177 vs. 51, p TSI is prevalent in children with GD while the highest serum TSI levels were noted in children with AITD and orbitopathy.

  20. The Impact of Thyroid Autoimmunity on Thyroid Function in 12-year-old Children With Celiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norström, Fredrik; van der Pals, Maria; Myléus, Anna; Hammarroth, Solveig; Högberg, Lotta; Isaksson, Anders; Ivarsson, Anneli; Carlsson, Annelie

    2018-01-25

    Celiac disease (CD) is associated with thyroid autoimmunity and other autoimmune diseases. However, data are lacking regarding the relationship between thyroid autoimmunity and thyroid function, especially in regard to CD. Our aim was to investigate the impact of thyroid autoimmunity on thyroid function in 12-year-old children with CD compared to their healthy peers. A case-referent study was conducted as part of a CD screening of 12-year-olds. Our study included 335 children with CD and 1,695 randomly selected referents. Thyroid autoimmunity was assessed with antibodies against thyroid peroxidase (TPOAb). Thyroid function was assessed with thyroid stimulating hormone and free thyroxine. TPOAb positivity significantly increased the risk of developing hypothyroidism in all children. The odds ratios (with 95% confidence intervals) were: 5.3 (2.7-11) in healthy 12-year-olds, 10 (3.2-32) in screening-detected CD cases, 19 (2.6-135) in previously diagnosed CD cases, and 12 (4.4-32) in all CD cases together. Among children with TPOAb positivity, hypothyroidism was significantly more common (odds ratio 3.1; 95% CI 1.03-9.6) in children with CD (10/19) than in children without CD (12/46). The risk of thyroid dysfunction due to thyroid autoimmunity is larger for those with CD than their healthy peers. Our study indicate that a gluten-free diet does not reduce the risk of thyroid dysfunction. Further studies are required for improved understanding of the role of the gluten-free diet for the risk of autoimmune diseases in children with CD.

  1. Skin findings in autoimmune and nonautoimmune thyroid disease with respect to thyroid functional status and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takir, Mümtaz; Özlü, Emin; Köstek, Osman; Türkoğlu, Zafer; Mutlu, Hasan Hüseyin; Uzunçakmak, Tuğba Kevser; Akdeniz, Necmettin; Karadağ, Ayşe Serap

    2017-06-12

    Thyroid disorders are associated with a wide variety of skin disorders that respond to treatment of hormone imbalance in most cases and thus are of vital importance to dermatologists. This study aimed to evaluate skin findings associated with autoimmune and nonautoimmune thyroid disease with respect to thyroid functional status and healthy controls. A total of 300 consecutive patients with either autoimmune (n = 173) or nonautoimmune (n = 127) thyroid disease and 100 healthy control subjects were included in this cross-sectional study. Data on patient demographics, thyroid function tests, and skin findings were recorded for patient and control groups. Compared to control subjects, patients had higher proportions in populations with alopecia (P respect to controls, autoimmune etiology, and thyroid functional status.

  2. A new combination of multiple autoimmune syndrome? Coexistence of vitiligo, autoimmune thyroid disease and ulcerative colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firdevs Topal

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of three or more autoimmune disorders in one patient defines multiple autoimmune syndrome. The pathogenesis of multiple autoimmune syndrome is not known yet and environmental triggers and genetic susceptibility have been suggested to be involved. Herein, we report a 47-year-old woman who had Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, vitiligo and newly diagnosed ulcerative colitis. Diagnosis of ulcerative colitis was confirmed with histopathologic examination. This case presents a new combination of multiple autoimmune syndrome.

  3. Prevalence and clinical features of celiac disease in patients with autoimmune thyroiditis: cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Aline; Ronsoni, Marcelo Fernando; Shiozawa, Maria Beatriz Cacese; Dantas-Corrêa, Esther Buzaglo; Canalli, Maria Heloisa Busi da Silva; Schiavon, Leonardo de Lucca; Narciso-Schiavon, Janaína Luz

    2014-12-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder with an average prevalence of 1% in Europe and the United States. Because of strong European ancestry in southern Brazil, this study aimed to evaluate the seroprevalence of celiac disease among autoimmune thyroiditis patients. Cross-sectional study in a public university hospital. This cross-sectional prevalence study included autoimmune thyroiditis patients who were tested for anti-endomysial and anti-transglutaminase antibodies between August 2010 and July 2011. Fifty-three patients with autoimmune thyroiditis were included; 92.5% were women, with mean age of 49.0 ± 13.5 years. Five patients (9.3%) were serologically positive for celiac disease: three of them (5.6%) were reactive for anti-endomysial antibodies and two (3.7%) for anti-transglutaminase. None of them exhibited anemia and one presented diarrhea. Endoscopy was performed on two patients: one with normal histology and the other with lymphocytic infiltrate and villous atrophy. The prevalence of celiac disease among patients with autoimmune thyroid disease was 9.3%; one patient complained of diarrhea and none presented anemia. Among at-risk populations, like autoimmune thyroiditis patients, the presence of diarrhea or anemia should not be used as a criterion for indicating celiac disease investigation. This must be done for all autoimmune thyroiditis patients because of its high prevalence.

  4. Prevalence and clinical features of celiac disease in patients with autoimmune thyroiditis: cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Ventura

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder with an average prevalence of 1% in Europe and the United States. Because of strong European ancestry in southern Brazil, this study aimed to evaluate the seroprevalence of celiac disease among autoimmune thyroiditis patients.DESIGN AND SETTING: Cross-sectional study in a public university hospital.METHODS: This cross-sectional prevalence study included autoimmune thyroiditis patients who were tested for anti-endomysial and anti-transglutaminase antibodies between August 2010 and July 2011.RESULTS: Fifty-three patients with autoimmune thyroiditis were included; 92.5% were women, with mean age of 49.0 ± 13.5 years. Five patients (9.3% were serologically positive for celiac disease: three of them (5.6% were reactive for anti-endomysial antibodies and two (3.7% for anti-transglutaminase. None of them exhibited anemia and one presented diarrhea. Endoscopy was performed on two patients: one with normal histology and the other with lymphocytic infiltrate and villous atrophy.CONCLUSION: The prevalence of celiac disease among patients with autoimmune thyroid disease was 9.3%; one patient complained of diarrhea and none presented anemia. Among at-risk populations, like autoimmune thyroiditis patients, the presence of diarrhea or anemia should not be used as a criterion for indicating celiac disease investigation. This must be done for all autoimmune thyroiditis patients because of its high prevalence.

  5. Thyroid autoantibodies in autoimmune diseases Anticuerpos antitiroideos en enfermedades autoinmunes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina M. Innocencio

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abnormalities in the thyroid function and thyroid autoantibodies have been frequently described in patients with autoimmune diseases but seldom in antiphospholipid syndrome patients. In order to determine the prevalence of thyroid function and autoimmune abnormalities, we compared serum thyrotropin (TSH, serum free thyroxine (T4 levels, thyroid antithyroglobulin (TgAb and antithyroperoxidase (TPOAb levels of 25 patients with systemic sclerosis, 25 patients with rheumatoid arthritis and 13 patients with antiphospholipid syndrome to a control group of 113 healthy individuals. Evaluation included a thorough clinical examination with particular attention to thyroid disease and a serologic immune profile including rheumatoid factor, antinuclear and anticardiolipin antibody measurements. Subclinical hypothyroidism (4.2Ciertas anormalidades en la función tiroidea y anticuerpos antitiroideos han sido frecuentemente descriptos en pacientes con enfermedades autoinmunes, y más raramente en pacientes con el síndrome antifosfolipídico. Para determinar la prevalencía de anormalidades en la función tiroidea y de autoinmunidad, comparamos los niveles séricos de tirotropina (TSH tiroxina libre en suero (T4 anticuerpos antitiroglobulina (TgAb y antitiroperoxidasa (TPOAb en 25 pacientes con esclerosis sistémica, 25 pacientes con artritis reumatoidea y 13 pacientes con el síndrome antifosfolipídico con un grupo control de 113 individuos aparentemente sanos. La evaluación incluyó un completo examen clínico con particular atención para las enfermedades de la tiroides y una evaluación inmunológica incluyendo dosaje del factor reumatoideo, anticuerpos antinucleares y anticardiolipina. Hipotiroidismo subclínico (4.2

  6. THE CLINICAL PRESENTATION OF AUTOIMMUNE THYROID DISEASE IN MEN IS ASSOCIATED WITH IL12B GENOTYPE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walsh, John P; Berry, Jemma; Liu, Shu

    2011-01-01

    hypothesized that IL12B genotype may influence the clinical presentation of autoimmune thyroid disease. Objective.  We tested for differences in IL12B genotype between Graves' disease and Hashimoto's disease. Patients.  We studied a discovery cohort of 203 Australian women and 37 men with autoimmune thyroid.......034). This result was confirmed in the European males (MAF 24% and 41%; P=0.013). On combined analysis of Australian, European and Chinese men (N=285), the difference was highly significant (MAF 23% and 45%; P=3x10(-5) ). In 233 males without thyroid disease, the MAF was 34%, significantly different from Graves......' disease (P=0.005) and Hashimoto's disease (P=0.029). Conclusion.  In men with autoimmune thyroid disease, a common variant located upstream of the IL12B coding region may influence whether patients present with Graves' disease or Hashimoto's disease....

  7. [Autoimmune thyroiditis and thyroid cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krátký, Jan; Jiskra, Jan

    2015-10-01

    Association between autoimmune thyroiditis (CLT) and thyroid cancer remains not clear. Although both diseases often occur simultaneously in histological samples, it is not yet clear whether CLT can be regarded as a risk factor for thyroid malignancy. This review focus on the known epidemiological and molecular genetics links between both diseases. Most studies have shown a significant association between thyroid cancer and positive antibodies to thyroglobulin and histological evidence of CLT, as well. Both disorders share some risk factors (greater incidence in women, in areas with adequate supply of iodine and in patients after radiotherapy of the neck) and molecular genetics linkage. For example: RET/PTC rearrangements could be more often found in carcinomas associated with CLT, but this mutation could be found in benign lesions such as CLT, as well. CLT seems to be a positive prognostic factor in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer. It is associated with less invasive forms of tumor, lower occurrence of infiltrated lymphatic nodes and a lower risk of recurrence.

  8. Absence of cross-reactivity to myeloperoxidase of anti-thyroid microsomal antibodies in patients with autoimmune thyroid diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freire, BA; Paula, ID; Paula, F; Kallenberg, GGM; Limburg, PC; Queluz, TT

    Background: Thyroperoxidase is the major antigen of the thyroid microsomal antibodies (TMA) detected in autoimmune thyroid diseases. Its amino acid sequence has 44% homology with myeloperoxidase (MPO), an enzyme present in the primary granules of neutrophils and one of the major antineutrophil

  9. Recombinant Protein Production from TPO Gen Cloning and Expression for Early Detection of Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulanni'am, Aulanni'am; Kinasih Wuragil, Dyah; Wahono Soeatmadji, Djoko; Zulkarnain; Marhendra, Agung Pramana W.

    2018-01-01

    Autoimmune Thyroid Disease (AITD) is an autoimmune disease that has many clinical symptoms but is difficult to detect at the onset of disease progression. Most thyroid autoimmune disease patients are positive with high titre of thyroid autoantibodies, especially thyroid peroxidase (TPO). The detection AITD are still needed because these tests are extremely high cost and have not regularly been performed in most of clinical laboratories. In the past, we have explored the autoimmune disease marker and it has been developed as source of polyclonal antibodies from patient origin. In the current study, we develop recombinant protein which resulted from cloning and expression of TPO gene from normal person and AITD patients. This work flows involves: DNA isolation and PCR to obtain TPO gene from human blood, insertion of TPO gene to plasmid and transformation to E. coli BL21, Bacterial culture to obtain protein product, protein purification and product analysis. This products can use for application to immunochromatography based test. This work could achieved with the goal of producing autoimmune markers with a guaranteed quality, sensitive, specific and economically. So with the collaboration with industries these devices could be used for early detection. Keywords: recombinant protein, TPO gene, Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD)ction of the diseases in the community.

  10. Autoimmune thyroiditis in antinuclear antibody positive children without rheumatologic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkachaisri Thaschawee

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Children are commonly referred to a pediatric rheumatology center for the laboratory finding of an Anti-nuclear antibody (ANA of undetermined significance. Previous studies regarding adult rheumatology patients have supported an association between ANA and anti-thyroid antibodies, with the prevalence of thyroid antibodies being significantly higher in patients referred to a rheumatology center for an ANA without evidence of connective tissue disease compared to the general population. The purpose of the present study was to determine the frequency of thyroid antibodies in children referred to a pediatric rheumatology center for a positive ANA without evidence of a connective tissue disease. Methods A retrospective chart review was performed on children who were referred to our pediatric rheumatology center between August 2003 and March 2007 for positive ANA with concurrent thyroid antibody and thyroid function tests performed who did not fulfill criteria for a specific connective tissue disease. Laboratory and clinical features were recorded and analyzed. Mean and standard deviation were used to describe continuous data. Chi-square or Fisher's exact tests were used to compare proportions between variables. Results One-hundred and four ANA-positive patients with concurrent thyroid studies were evaluated (88% female, 93% Caucasian, mean age 11.9 ± 4.0 years. Half of patients had an ANA titer ≥ 1:320. The ANA pattern was speckled in 60% of the patients. Thyroid antibodies were detected in 30% of the patients. Anti-Thyroglobulin (ATG was detected in 29% and Anti-thyroid peroxidase (ATPO in 21% of the patients; of these children, 14% had hypothyroidism. ANA pattern and titer were not associated with anti-thyroid antibody positivity. Conclusion Thyroid antibodies associated with chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis, ATG and ATPO, were detected significantly higher in ANA-positive children without a rheumatologic condition (30% as

  11. Rheumatologic Manifestations in Iranian Patients with Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hezarkhani, Sharabeh; Aghaei, Mehrdad; Shamekhi, Maryam; Nomali, Mahin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATDs) are the most common endocrine diseases which result in rheumatologic manifestations. Some studies have shown association between rheumatologic disorders and ATDs. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess the frequency of rheumatologic manifestations in patients with ATDs. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional descriptive study during 2010 to 2011, 65 patients with ATDs referred to the Rheumatology clinic of 5 Azar Hospital in Gorgan (North of Iran) were studied via systematic random sampling and patients with positive antithyroid peroxides (anti-TPO) were included in the study. These patients were examined by a rheumatologist for diagnosis of rheumatologic manifestations and tested for serum levels of TSH, Free T3 and T4, Anti-Nuclear Antibodies (ANAs) and Rheumatoid Factor (RF). SPSS software (version 16) and descriptive statistics were used for data analysis. Results: Nine males (14.8%) and 56 females (86.2%) with mean age of 38.81±1.44 years were studied. Overall, Rheumatologic manifestations were seen in 86.2 % (n=56). In this study, the most frequent rheumatologic manifestations were Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (36.1%) and Osteoarthritis (23%). Reynaud’s phenomenon (RP) (10.7%), Discopathy (8.9%), Fibromyalgia (5.3%), Myopathy (3.6%), Rheumatoid arthritis (3.6%) and trigger finger (3.6%) were other manifestations, respectively. Conclusion: In this region, there is a high frequency of rheumatologic manifestations in patients with ATDs. Thus, initial evaluation and regular checkings are recommended. PMID:25478383

  12. Regulatory B and T cell responses in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease and healthy controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Birte

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases occur due to faulty self-tolerance. Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) are classic examples of organ-specific autoimmune diseases. GD is an auto-antibody-mediated disease where autoantibodies are produced against the thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR......). HT is primarily a T-cell mediated disease, and whether B cells play a pathogenic role in the pathogenesis is still unclear. Both GD and HT are characterized by infiltration of the thyroid gland by self-reactive T cells and B cells. In the first paper of this thesis, the role of regulatory B cells...... (Bregs) and regulatory T cells (Tregs) were investigated in the context of GD and HT. First, we studied the role of the thyroid self-antigen, thyroglobulin (TG) in healthy donors. The self-antigen TG, but not the foreign recall antigen tetanus toxoid (TT), was able to induce interleukin 10 (IL-10...

  13. [Simultaneous presentation of autoimmune thyroiditis and celiac disease in an adult].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubiella, J; Bustamante, J; Sans, M; Ramírez, A; Feu, F; Piqué, J M

    1998-11-01

    Celiac disease may be associated with other underlying autoimmune diseases. Among these, thyroid disease has been described in around 10% of the cases with hypothyroidism being the most frequently reported. Clinical suspicion of thyroid involvement in patients with celiac disease is difficult since the symptomatology is scarce or is masked by the picture of malabsorption. Nonetheless, its detection is important since it is not solved by gluten free diet and its correction requires specific treatment. Thyroid function studies, in addition to determination of antithyroglobulin and antimicrosomal antibodies, should be considered in celiac patients refractory to conventional dietetic treatment. We herein present the case of a 65-year-old woman who consulted for a malabsorption syndrome in whom celiac disease of the adult was simultaneously presented with hyperthyroidism secondary to autoimmune thyroiditis.

  14. A mechanistic linkage between oral lichen planus and autoimmune thyroid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robledo-Sierra, Jairo; Landin-Wilhelmsen, Kerstin; Filipsson Nyström, Helena; Eggertsen, Robert; Larsson, Lena; Dafar, Amal; Warfvinge, Gunnar; Mattsson, Ulf; Jontell, Mats

    2018-03-02

    To determine the levels of antithyroid antibodies and thyroid hormones in the sera of patients with oral lichen planus (OLP), and to quantify the expression of thyroid proteins in OLP lesions. Venous blood samples were drawn from 110 patients with OLP who had no history of thyroid disease or levothyroxine supplementation (OLP+/LT 4 -). A random population sample of 657 healthy subjects was used as the control group. Two additional groups were used as comparators. Immunohistochemical and qPCR analyses were performed on tissue specimens collected from the patients with OLP and thyroid disease and healthy subjects. No association was found between the presence of antithyroid antibodies and OLP. More patients in the OLP+/LT 4 - group showed high levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone and low levels of free thyroxine than were seen in the control group. Thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor was more highly expressed in the OLP lesions of patients with thyroid disease than in the healthy oral mucosa. A significant number of patients with OLP who are not previously diagnosed with thyroid disease have thyroid parameters that are compatible with hypothyroidism. The expression of thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor in OLP lesions suggests that mechanisms related to autoimmune thyroid disease are involved in the aetiology of OLP. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Selenium status and over-expression of interleukin-15 in celiac disease and autoimmune thyroid diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Velia Stazi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In celiac disease (CD, for its multifactorial nature, the target organs are not limited to the gut, but include thyroid, liver, skin and reproductive and nervous systems. Between the extraintestinal symptoms associated with CD, autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs are more evident, underlining as CD-related autoimmune alterations can be modulated not only by gluten but also by various concurrent endogenous (genetic affinity, over-expression of cytokines and exogenous (environment, nutritional deficiency factors. In their pathogenesis a central role for over-expression of interleukin-15 (IL-15 is shown, by inhibiting apoptosis, leading to the perpetuation of inflammation and tissue destruction. Thyroid is particularly sensitive to selenium deficiency because selenoproteins are significant in biosynthesis and activity of thyroid hormones; besides, some selenoproteins as glutathione peroxidase are involved in inhibiting apoptosis. Thus, selenium malabsorption in CD can be thought as a key factor directly leading to thyroid and intestinal damage. Considering the complexity of this interaction and on the basis of available evidence, the aim of this review is to assess as preventive and therapeutic target the role of IL-15 and selenium in the pathogeneses of both CD and AITD.

  16. Myasthenia Gravis Associated With Autoimmune Thyroid Disease: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an acquired autoimmune disorder causing skeletal muscle fatigue and weakness. This is a report of one woman and her daughter presenting with myasthenia and gravis and Grave\\'s disease. It highlights possible hereditary component of this condition which has not been commonly reported in ...

  17. Autoimmune thyroid disease elicited by NY-ESO-1 vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vita, Roberto; Guarneri, Fabrizio; Agah, Ravin; Benvenga, Salvatore

    2014-02-01

    Immunotherapies and targeted therapies are frequently associated with thyroid dysfunction, which is in contrast with the rare thyroid abnormalities induced by cytotoxic agents. Immunotherapy with NY-ESO-1, a tumor-associated antigen expressed by a number of malignancies, was reported to trigger hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism in two HLA-A2 patients with ovarian cancer. We describe now a case of Graves' disease triggered by NY-ESO-1 in a HLA-A2-negative woman. A 32-year-old woman with a synovial sarcoma received radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and finally NY-ESO-1 vaccine. The patient was found to have HLA A11/A33(19), B13/B56(22), Cw3/-. One month after the beginning of immunotherapy, thyroid dysfunction was clinically suspected and Graves' disease was biochemically confirmed. Fearful of the antithyroid drugs' side effects, the patient was treated with a beta-blocker (propranolol, 80-20 mg/day). As hyperthyroidism progressively worsened, the patient underwent total thyroidectomy. We hypothesized that NY-ESO-1 shared partial homology with thyroid autoantigens (the so-called molecular mimicry mechanism) and that at least one pair of homologous sequences contained amino acid sequence binding motifs to a restricted number of HLA molecules. We used BLAST software to search amino acid sequence homologies between NY-ESO-1 and thyroid autoantigens (thyrotropin receptor [TSH-R], thyroperoxidase, and thyroglobulin), and the HLA ligand/motif database to look for HLA/T-cell receptor binding motifs in the regions of NY-ESO-1 and thyroid autoantigens that were homologous. We found 15 epitopic regions of NY-ESO-1 homologous to 15 regions of thyroid autoantigens, some of which epitopic: 5 of TSH-R, 8 of thyroglobulin, and 2 of thyroperoxidase. These homologous sequences contain binding motifs belonging to several HLA class I antigens, including HLA A2 and the patient's A11 and A33. Genetically predisposed patients who receive NY-ESO-1 vaccination are at risk to develop thyroid

  18. The role of monocytes and monocyte-derived dendritic cells in type 1 diabetes mellitus and autoimmune thyroid disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.K. Lam-Tse

    2003-01-01

    textabstractType 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1) and autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) are organ specific autoimmune diseases in which the immune system is directed against the ß cells and the thyrocytes respectively. The etio-pathogenesis of organ-specific or endocrine autoimmune diseases is complex,

  19. The clinical value of detection of serum TGAb and TPOAb level in autoimmune thyroid diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min Xiaoxia; Huang Xingming

    2008-01-01

    To study the clinical value of serum TGAb and TPOAb levels in the diagnosis of patients with autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD), the serum levels of TGAb and TPOAb in 175 patients with AITD and 64 non-AITD patients and 57 health controls were measured by RIA. The results showed that the serum levels of TGAb and TPOAb in AITD patients with GD and HT were significantly higher than that of control group (P 0.05). The detection of serum TGAb and TPOAb levels may have clinical value in the diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of autoimmune thyroid diseases. (authors)

  20. Presumed Isotretinoin-Induced, Concomitant Autoimmune Thyroid Disease and Ocular Myasthenia Gravis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huseyin Gursoy

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There are many adverse effects that have been described for isotretinoin. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a possible association of oral isotretinoin intake with autoimmune thyroiditis and ocular myasthenia gravis (OMG. Case Presentation: A 19-year-old Caucasian male, who had used oral isotretinoin for severe acne disease for the previous six months, was referred to our clinic. He had a three-week history of diplopia and variable bilateral ptosis. Physical examination showed moderate periorbital edema and limitations of up- and down-gaze in the left eye. Laboratory findings and thyroid ultrasound were consistent with autoimmune thyroiditis. Antithyroid therapy did not relieve the clinical symptoms. Concomitant OMG was suspected. Variable ptosis and a positive response to oral prednisolone of 40 mg/day and pyridostigmine of 360 mg/day supported the diagnosis of concomitant autoimmune thyroiditis and OMG. Conclusion: Autoimmune disorders may be triggered by oral isotretinoin treatment. Clinicians prescribing isotretinoin should be aware of the possible association between isotretinoin intake and concomitant autoimmune thyroiditis and OMG.

  1. Encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease in patients with Graves' disease: clinical manifestations, follow-up, and outcomes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tamagno, Gianluca

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease (EAATD) is characterized by neurological\\/psychiatric symptoms, high levels of anti-thyroid antibodies, increased cerebrospinal fluid protein concentration, non-specific electroencephalogram abnormalities, and responsiveness to the corticosteroid treatment in patients with an autoimmune thyroid disease. Almost all EAATD patients are affected by Hashimoto\\'s thyroiditis (HT), although fourteen EAATD patients with Graves\\' disease (GD) have been also reported. METHODS: We have recorded and analyzed the clinical, biological, radiological, and electrophysiological findings and the data on the therapeutic management of all GD patients with EAATD reported so far as well as the clinical outcomes in those followed-up in the long term. RESULTS: Twelve of the fourteen patients with EAATD and GD were women. The majority of GD patients with EAATD presented with mild hyperthyroidism at EAATD onset or shortly before it. Active anti-thyroid autoimmunity was detected in all cases. Most of the patients dramatically responded to corticosteroids. The long term clinical outcome was benign but EAATD can relapse, especially at the time of corticosteroid dose tapering or withdrawal. GD and HT patients with EAATD present with a similar clinical, biological, radiological, and electrophysiological picture and require an unaffected EAATD management. CONCLUSIONS: GD and HT equally represent the possible background condition for the development of EAATD, which should be considered in the differential diagnosis of all patients with encephalopathy of unknown origin and an autoimmune thyroid disease, regardless of the nature of the underlying autoimmune thyroid disease.

  2. Encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease in patients with Graves' disease: clinical manifestations, follow-up, and outcomes

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tamagno, Gianluca

    2010-04-28

    Abstract Background The encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease (EAATD) is characterized by neurological\\/psychiatric symptoms, high levels of anti-thyroid antibodies, increased cerebrospinal fluid protein concentration, non-specific electroencephalogram abnormalities, and responsiveness to the corticosteroid treatment in patients with an autoimmune thyroid disease. Almost all EAATD patients are affected by Hashimoto\\'s thyroiditis (HT), although fourteen EAATD patients with Graves\\' disease (GD) have been also reported. Methods We have recorded and analyzed the clinical, biological, radiological, and electrophysiological findings and the data on the therapeutic management of all GD patients with EAATD reported so far as well as the clinical outcomes in those followed-up in the long term. Results Twelve of the fourteen patients with EAATD and GD were women. The majority of GD patients with EAATD presented with mild hyperthyroidism at EAATD onset or shortly before it. Active anti-thyroid autoimmunity was detected in all cases. Most of the patients dramatically responded to corticosteroids. The long term clinical outcome was benign but EAATD can relapse, especially at the time of corticosteroid dose tapering or withdrawal. GD and HT patients with EAATD present with a similar clinical, biological, radiological, and electrophysiological picture and require an unaffected EAATD management. Conclusions GD and HT equally represent the possible background condition for the development of EAATD, which should be considered in the differential diagnosis of all patients with encephalopathy of unknown origin and an autoimmune thyroid disease, regardless of the nature of the underlying autoimmune thyroid disease.

  3. Encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease in patients with Graves' disease: clinical manifestations, follow-up, and outcomes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tamagno, Gianluca

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: The encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease (EAATD) is characterized by neurological\\/psychiatric symptoms, high levels of anti-thyroid antibodies, increased cerebrospinal fluid protein concentration, non-specific electroencephalogram abnormalities, and responsiveness to the corticosteroid treatment in patients with an autoimmune thyroid disease. Almost all EAATD patients are affected by Hashimoto\\'s thyroiditis (HT), although fourteen EAATD patients with Graves\\' disease (GD) have been also reported. METHODS: We have recorded and analyzed the clinical, biological, radiological, and electrophysiological findings and the data on the therapeutic management of all GD patients with EAATD reported so far as well as the clinical outcomes in those followed-up in the long term. RESULTS: Twelve of the fourteen patients with EAATD and GD were women. The majority of GD patients with EAATD presented with mild hyperthyroidism at EAATD onset or shortly before it. Active anti-thyroid autoimmunity was detected in all cases. Most of the patients dramatically responded to corticosteroids. The long term clinical outcome was benign but EAATD can relapse, especially at the time of corticosteroid dose tapering or withdrawal. GD and HT patients with EAATD present with a similar clinical, biological, radiological, and electrophysiological picture and require an unaffected EAATD management. CONCLUSIONS: GD and HT equally represent the possible background condition for the development of EAATD, which should be considered in the differential diagnosis of all patients with encephalopathy of unknown origin and an autoimmune thyroid disease, regardless of the nature of the underlying autoimmune thyroid disease.

  4. Clinical studies on thyroid diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eskes, S.A.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis focuses on some aspects of thyroid disease: prevention of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), diagnosis of related conditions as autoimmune hypophysitis in autoimmune hypothyroidism (Hashimoto’s disease), and treatment of amiodarone-induced thyrotoxicosis (AIT).

  5. Clinical Review 160: Postpartum autoimmune thyroid disease: the potential role of fetal microchimerism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Takao; Davies, Terry F

    2003-07-01

    Fetal microchimerism is defined as the presence of fetal cells in maternal tissues established during pregnancy. Immune suppression of maternal immunity during pregnancy by the placenta may play an important role in allowing the establishment of such fetal microchimerism. However, peripheral blood fetal microchimerism that persists in the postpartum period is considered a natural event and implies the induction of tolerance during pregnancy. Identification of fetal cells that persist preferentially in maternal tissues subject to autoimmunity, such as skin and thyroid, has also suggested the possible immune modulation of the autoimmune response at the target tissue by fetal cells. Accumulating evidence suggests that fetal immune cells may be reactive to maternal antigens and, therefore, have the capacity to trigger graft vs. host reactions. This would provide a mechanism for the initiation and/or exacerbation of autoimmune disease. The course and severity of autoimmune thyroid disease have long been known to be profoundly influenced by pregnancy, with disease suppression prepartum and exacerbation postpartum. However, the precise mechanisms involved have not been fully understood. Here we have reviewed recent information on the possible role of fetal microchimerism in autoimmune thyroid disease, focusing on the immunological consequences of intrathyroidal fetal cells and their contribution to postpartum exacerbations.

  6. [Subclinical and manifested hypothyroidism as a consequence of thyroid autoimmune disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milosević, Dragoslav P; Djurica, Snezana; Davidović, Mladen; Stević, Radmila; Rajić, Miodrag; Marković, Natasa

    2005-10-01

    Chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto's disease) is a slowly developing persistent inflamation of the thyroid gland, which frequently leads to hypothyroidism. Some of the up-to-date knowledge about hypothyroidism, both subclinical and manifested, caused by autoimmune disease, was presented. Autoimmune thyroid gland disease can occur at any age, but predominantly affects women after periods of high emotional and physical stress or accidents, as well as during periods of hormonal changes. It can also develop in families, and having an autoimmune disease slightly increases the risk of developing another. This paper showed an increasing incidence of subclinical hypothyroidism (4.17%) in elderly, and, at the same time, the incidence of primary hypothyroidism accounting for 1%. It is very usefull to estimate the stimulated thyrotropin (TSH) response, as well as the value of fast, short time thyroid gland reserves, analyzed by T3 and T4 serum level at 60th minute after TRH stimulation. Treatment of choice for HT (hypothyroidism of any cause) is thyroid hormone replacement. Drug of choice is orally administered levothyroxine sodium, usually for life-time. The standard dose is 1.6-1.8 mcg/kg body weight per day, but is in most cases patient dependent. Elderly patients usually require smaller replacement dose of levothyroxine, sometimes less than 1 mcg/kg body weight per day with coronary dilatator at the same time.

  7. Thyroid Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your thyroid gland does not make enough thyroid hormones Thyroid cancer Thyroid nodules - lumps in the thyroid gland Thyroiditis - swelling of the thyroid To diagnose thyroid diseases, doctors use a medical history, physical exam, and thyroid tests. They sometimes also ...

  8. Autoimmune thyroid disease in a cohort of Malaysian SLE patients: frequency, clinical and immunological associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, S G; Choy, C H

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD) has been associated with other systemic autoimmune diseases. To date, there is limited data on thyroid disorders and autoimmune thyroid disease in Malaysia. The frequency of ATD among 189 systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients was 6.3%, with 2.6% in the hyperthyroid group and 3.7% in the hypothyroid group. Hypothyroidism developed at a much younger mean age (24.3 years), suggesting that SLE might be a predisposing factor for the development of Hashimoto's thyroiditis. There was a higher rate of thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPO) positivity compared with anti-thyroglobulin antibody (Tg) in the hyperthyroid subgroup. This study also demonstrated a greater proportion of ATD patients who demonstrated high titres (≥ 1:6400) of TPO compared with high titres of Tg. Although there was an association between ATD and the presence of anti-Ro/SSA and/or anti-La/SSB antibodies, the absence of sicca symptoms and negative Schirmer's tests suggest a lack of association with secondary Sjogren's syndrome. A novel association between ATD and antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) was detected in our cohort. Hence we propose that patients affected by APS be routinely screened for ATD. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Peripheral blood and intrathyroidal T cell clones from patients with thyroid autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massart, C; Caroff, G; Maugendre, D; Genetet, N; Gibassier, J

    1999-01-01

    For a better understanding of the pathogenesis of thyroid autoimmune diseases, we have studied morphological and functional properties of T clones from peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and from intrathyroidal lymphocytes (ITL) obtained from 3 patients with Graves' disease or 1 Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Investigations were carried out on clones cultured alone or cocultured with autologous thyrocytes. Clonage efficiency ranged from 30% to 33% for PBL and 10% to 36% for ITL. A predominance of CD4-positive clones was observed whatever the origin of the lymphocytes or the autoimmune pathology. Gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) was detected in the majority (17/19) of the clones tested. Intracytoplasmic interleukin (IL-4) was secreted in 7/19 clones and both cytokines were produced in 5/19 clones. In coculture a proliferative response and tumour necrosis factor (TNF-alpha) production were observed with 6 clones (4 from Graves thyrocytes and 2 from thyroiditis). No cytotoxic clone was derived from Graves or thyroiditis tissues. These data demonstrate that the large majority of T clones are principally CD4-T cells; all the clones secreted TNF-alpha and a large majority produced IFN-gamma. Only a few clones produced IL-4 alone or associated with IFN-gamma. Six T clones induced proliferative response and of TNF-alpha secretion in coculture. Further investigations must be performed on these antigen-reactive T clones to analyse their role in the pathogenesis of the human thyroid autoimmune diseases.

  10. Increased fetal abortion rate in autoimmune thyroid disease is related to circulating TPO autoantibodies in an autoimmune thyroiditis animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yin Lau; Ng, Hang Pong; Lau, Kam Shing; Liu, Wei Min; O, Wai Sum; Yeung, William S B; Kung, Annie W C

    2009-05-01

    To determine the fertility and abortion rates in a mouse model of autoimmune thyroiditis and its relationship with circulating anti-thyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibody. Experimental animal study. University research laboratory. C57bl/6 mice. Female C57bl/6 mice immunized with recombinant mouse TPO (rmTPO) in complete Freund adjuvant (CFA) or glutathione-S-transferase (GST-CFA) were allowed to mate. The pregnant mice were killed on day 14 of pregnancy for assessment of fetal development. The effects of TPO antibody on preimplantation embryo development and implantation rate were also studied. Litter size, resorption rate, preimplantation embryo development, and implantation rate. All of the mice immunized with rmTPO-CFA possessed anti-TPO antibody. They had reduced litter size and increased incidence of resorbed fetus compared with the control. Higher serum TSH levels, but not T(4) levels, were demonstrated after rmTPO-CFA immunization. Anti-TPO antibody bound to preimplantation embryos. Treatment of the embryos with the antibody marginally decreased the formation of 3/4-cell embryos but had no effect on the subsequent development and implantation compared with the nonimmune control sera. Autoimmune thyroiditis is associated with reduced fertility and higher incidence of fetal loss. The anti-TPO antibody may affect post-implantation embryo development, leading to fetal loss.

  11. Individualized Follow-up of Pregnant Women with Asymptomatic Autoimmune Thyroid Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Stoian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Maternal hormones are essential for the normal fetal development during pregnancy. Autoimmune thyroid disease is a frequent pathology in our iodine replete region. The aim of this study is to evaluate the occurrence of subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH in cases with known autoimmune thyroid disease, which were in a euthyroid state prior to pregnancy, and to assess the association between supplemental treatments administered and the outcome of the pregnancy. The study is a prospective interventional controlled study. The two cohorts comprise the interventional group, consisting of 109 pregnant women with known autoimmune asymptomatic thyroid disease, without any levothyroxine (LT4 treatment and an aged-matched control group, with an unknown thyroid disease. After the pregnancy, a monthly evaluation of TSH, FT3, and FT4 was performed. Offspring evaluation was made at birth time. 88.8% of the women developed SCH in the first four weeks of pregnancy. Average LT4 doses increased as the pregnancy progressed. The monthly adjustment was 12.5 or 25 μg. All SCH cases developed in the first trimester of pregnancy. There was no significant difference regarding the gestational week, weight, or length at birth between the interventional group and controls, when TSH values were in the optimal range, during the whole pregnancy. Premature birth was described in one case in the interventional group.

  12. Color Doppler measurement of blood flow in the inferior thyroid artery in patients with autoimmune thyroid diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caruso, Giuseppe; Attard, Marco; Caronia, Aurelio; Lagalla, Roberto

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the study is to find out whether the measurement of peak systolic velocity in the inferior thyroid artery (ITA) is a valuable parameter to differentiate autoimmune thyroid diseases (hyper-, normo- or hypofunctional) and to evaluate the efficacy of medical treatment. Material and methods: The ITA of 31 patients (eight with Graves' disease, 23 with subclinical hypothyroidism) was examined with color Doppler and pulsed Doppler. The final diagnosis was obtained by citology and by hormonal and antibodies assays. The patients were monitorized by ultrasound for a period of 8 months. Results: In all the patients with Graves' disease the peak systolic velocity was always over 150 cm/s, while in other autoimmune thyroiditis the peak systolic velocity was within the normal range, and never exceeding 65 cm/s. In the first group, the measurement taken in the ITA showed also the efficacy of the pharmacological treatment earlier and more reliably than the color Doppler pattern obtained in the parenchyma. Conclusions: The color Doppler measurement of the ITA seems to be a promising technique with low-cost and easy approach. In our experience, the color Doppler of the ITA could have a clinical role in the differential diagnosis of diffuse thyroid diseases and in the follow-up of the Graves' disease during medical treatment

  13. Thyrotropin - Binding Inhibiting Immunoglobulin (TBII) in Patients with Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Dae Sung; Ahn, Byeong Cheol; Sohn, Sang Kyun; Lee, Jae Tae; Lee, Kyu Bo

    1996-01-01

    In order to evaluate the significance of thyrotropin-binding inhibiting immunoglobulin (TBII) in the patients with autoimmune thyroid diseases, the authors investigated 402 cases of Graves' disease and 230 cases of Hashimoto's thyroiditis comparing 30 cases of normal healthy adult at Kyung Pook University Hospital from February 1993 to August 1994. The TBII was tested by radioimmunoassay and assessed on the dynamic change with the disease course, thyroid functional parameters, and other thyroid autoantibodies; antithyroglobulin antibody(ATAb) and antimicrosomal antibody(AMAb) including thyroglobulin. The serum level of TBII was 40.82 ± 21.651(mean ± SD)% in hyperthyroid Graves' disease and 8.89 ± 14.522% in Hashimoto's thyroiditis and both were significant different from normal control of which was 3.21 ± 2.571%. The frequency of abnormally increased TBII level was 92.2% in hyperthyroid Craves' disease, 46.7% in euthyroid Graves' disease or remission state of hyperthyroidism, and 23.9% in Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The serum levels of increased TBII in Graves' disease were positively correlated with RAIU, serum T3, T4, and FT4, but negatively correlated with serum TSH(each p<0.001). The TBII in Graves' disease had significant positive correlation with serum thyroglobulin and AMAb, but no significant correlation with ATAb. In the Hashimoto's thyroiditis, the serum levels of TBII were positively correlated with RAIU, serum T3, TSH and AMAb, but not significantly correlated with serum T4, FT4, thyroglobulin and ATAb. Therefore serum level of TBII seemed to be a useful mean of assessing the degree of hyperthyroidism in Graves' disease and correlated well with thyroidal stimulation. The serum level of TBII in Hashimoto's thyroiditis is meaningful for the degree of both functional abnormality reflecting either hyperfunction or hypofunction and the immunologic abnormality.

  14. VITILIGO AND THE PREVALENCE OF AUTOIMMUNE THYROID DISEASE AND DIABETIS MELLITUS IN VITILIGO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melathil Sadanandan Sadeep

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Vitiligo is an acquired pigmentary disorder characterised by the development of white macules related to the selective loss of melanocytes residing in the interfollicular epidermis and occasionally in the hair follicles as well. Exact aetiology of vitiligo is not known. A convergence theory, which states that stress, infection, mutations, autoimmunity, accumulation of toxic compounds, altered cellular environment and impaired melanocyte migration or proliferation- all can contribute to development of vitiligo. However, most favoured hypothesis is autoimmune because vitiligo is frequently associated with other disorders, which have an autoimmune origin such as Autoimmune Thyroid Disease (AITD and Diabetes Mellitus (DM. Recent studies suggest that vitiligo is not just a cutaneous disorder, but a systemic disorder of the pigmentary system. MATERIALS AND METHODS This is a hospital-based one year cross-sectional study of all vitiligo patients attending the outpatient wing of a tertiary care centre in Kerala. Patients were included after getting the written consent and those patients who had under gone thyroid surgery and on drugs that can interfere with thyroid function were excluded. RESULTS After meeting the criteria, only 122 patients out of 61,750 outpatients (0.19% were included in this study. The youngest participant was 4 years, while the eldest was 69 years old. Most common age group- 10-19 years. 56.6% were females. Duration of disease was less than 2 years in 61.8%. Majority (36.9% patients were students. A personal history of thyroid disease was obtained in 12.29%. 55.7% had positive family history of diseases like diabetes, thyroid disease, vitiligo and rheumatoid arthritis. Among the diseases noted in family members, diabetes was the commonest accounting for 32%. Though vitiligo vulgaris was common, percentage of focal and acrofacial vitiligo was higher than other studies. Vitiligo vulgaris was more commonly seen among females

  15. The diagnostic value of Th1/Th2 cell cytokine and thyroid autoantibody on autoimmune thyroid diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Xuemin; Qin Mingxiu; Zhao Yan

    2008-01-01

    To study the diagnostic value of Th1/Th2 cell cytokine and thyroid autoantibody in autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD), 28 patients with Graves' disease (GD), 15 patients with hyperthyroidism and thyroiditis (GDIII), 13 patients with Hashimoto's hyperthyroidism (HTL), 21 patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis(HT)and 20 healthy subjects were enrolled in this study. The serum concentrations of Th1 cytokine (IFN-γ) and Th2 cytokine (IL-4) were determined by ELISA. The serum levels of thyrotropin receptor antibodies (TRAb), thyroglobulin antibodies (TGAb) and thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAb) were measured by RIA. The relationship between the serum levels of IFN-γ, IL-4 and TRAb, TGAb and TPOAb were analyzed. The results showed that IFN-γ levels from higher to lower in different groups were in the order of HT, HTL, GDIII, GD and the IL-4 were GD, GDIII, HTL, HT, respectively. There was significant difference in the IFN-γ (P<0.05) and IL-4 levels (P<0.01) between GDIII and HTL groups. There was no significant difference in TGAb and TPOAb between GDIII and HTL groups. In HT group, IFN-γ levels was positively correlated with TGAb and TPOAb (r=0.67,0.54,P<0.01). In GD group, IL-4 was positively correlated with TRAb (r =0.71,P<0.01). The imbalance of Th1/Th2 cell cytokine reflects pathologic change and abnormality of immune function in AITD patients. The detection of Th1/Th2 cell cytokine combined with thyroid autoantibody may be regarded as an indicator in the diagnosis of autoimmune thyroid diseases. (authors)

  16. The Frequency of Autoimmune Thyroid Disease in Alopecia Areata and Vitiligo Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulcan Saylam Kurtipek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Many studies demonstrated that alopecia areata (AA and vitiligo are commonly associated with autoimmune thyroid diseases. We aimed to investigate the frequency of thyroid dysfunctions and autoimmunity related with vitiligo and AA. Material and Methods. 200 patients, 92 AA and 108 vitiligo diagnosed, were surveyed retrospectively. The control population was in reference range and from Konya, central Anatolian region of Turkey. Thyroid function tests (free T3, free T4, and TSH and serum thyroid autoantibody (anti-TG, anti-TPO levels were evaluated in all patients. Results. In vitiligo patients, 9 (8.3% had elevated anti-TG levels and 16 (14.8% had elevated anti-TPO, and in 17 patients (15.7% TSH levels were elevated and 3 (2.8% patients had elevated fT4 levels and 5 (4.6% had elevated fT3 levels. Within AA patients, 2 (2.2% had anti-TG elevation and 13 (14.1% had anti-TPO elevation, in 7 patients (7.6% TSH were elevated, and in 1 patient (1.1% fT4 were elevated and 5 (5.4% patients had elevated fT3 levels. Conclusion. In our study, impaired thyroid functions and thyroid autoantibodies in vitiligo and AA patients were identified at lower rates than the previous studies. According to results of this study there is no need for detailed examination in alopecia areata and vitiligo patients without clinical history.

  17. Estrogen receptor alpha dinucleotide repeat polymorphism in Japanese patients with autoimmune thyroid diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tozaki Teruaki

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs, comprising Graves' disease (GD and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT, appear to develop as a result of complex interactions between predisposing genes and environmental triggers. Susceptibility to AITDs is conferred by genes in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA and genes unlinked to HLA, including the CTLA-4 gene. Recently, an association to some estrogen receptor (ERα genotypes with breast cancer, hypertension, osteoporosis, generalized osteoarthritis, and some autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis has been reported. We have analyzed a dinucleotide (TAn repeat polymorphism lying upstream of the human ERα gene in patients with AITDs and in normal subjects. Results Seventeen different alleles were found in 130 patients with GD, 93 patients with HT, and 190 control subjects. There was no significant difference in the distributions of ERα alleles between patients and controls. Conclusions The present results do not support an association between the ERα gene and AITD in the Japanese population.

  18. [AUTOIMMUNE REACTIONS IN PATIENTS WITH DISEASES OF A THYROID GLAND].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saidova, F Kh; Shakhsuvarov, O M; Guseynov, R G; Akhmedova, L M; Aslanova, Zh B

    2015-11-01

    A state of autoimmunity was studied in 25 patients, suffering diffuse toxic goiter (DTG), and in 20--in nodular euthyroid goiter (NEG) before and after the operation. The level of circulating immune complexes, quantity of cytotoxic lymphocytes, the subpopulation index, the apoptosis marker were determined. There was established, that in NEG autoimmune disorders have occurred rarer and were less severe, than in DTG.

  19. Increased prevalence of antibodies to enteropathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica virulence proteins in relatives of patients with autoimmune thyroid disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strieder, T. G. A.; Wenzel, B. E.; Prummel, M. F.; Tijssen, J. G. P.; Wiersinga, W. M.

    2003-01-01

    Infections have been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of autoimmune diseases, and Yersinia enterocolitica (YE) might play a role in the development of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD). Clinical evidence in support of this hypothesis has been inconclusive. We reasoned that looking earlier

  20. Polymorphisms in the TNFA and IL6 genes represent risk factors for autoimmune thyroid disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecília Durães

    Full Text Available Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD comprises diseases including Hashimoto's thyroiditis and Graves' disease, both characterized by reactivity to autoantigens causing, respectively, inflammatory destruction and autoimmune stimulation of the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor. AITD is the most common thyroid disease and the leading form of autoimmune disease in women. Cytokines are key regulators of the immune and inflammatory responses; therefore, genetic variants at cytokine-encoding genes are potential risk factors for AITD.Polymorphisms in the IL6-174 G/C (rs1800795, TNFA-308 G/A (rs1800629, IL1B-511 C/T (rs16944, and IFNGR1-56 T/C (rs2234711 genes were assessed in a case-control study comprising 420 Hashimoto's thyroiditis patients, 111 Graves' disease patients and 735 unrelated controls from Portugal. Genetic variants were discriminated by real-time PCR using TaqMan SNP genotyping assays.A significant association was found between the allele A in TNFA-308 G/A and Hashimoto's thyroiditis, both in the dominant (OR = 1.82, CI = 1.37-2.43, p-value = 4.4×10(-5 and log-additive (OR = 1.64, CI = 1.28-2.10, p-value = 8.2×10(-5 models. The allele C in IL6-174 G/C is also associated with Hashimoto's thyroiditis, however, only retained significance after multiple testing correction in the log-additive model (OR = 1.28, CI = 1.06-1.54, p-value = 8.9×10(-3. The group with Graves' disease also registered a higher frequency of the allele A in TNFA-308 G/A compared with controls both in the dominant (OR = 1.85, CI = 1.19-2.87, p-value = 7.0×10(-3 and log-additive (OR = 1.69, CI = 1.17-2.44, p-value = 6.6×10(-3 models. The risk for Hashimoto's thyroiditis and Graves' disease increases with the number of risk alleles (OR for two risk alleles is, respectively, 2.27 and 2.59.This study reports significant associations of genetic variants in TNFA and IL6 with the risk for AITD, highlighting the

  1. Effect of steroid replacement on thyroid function and thyroid autoimmunity in Addison′ s disease with primary hypothyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaya Prakash Sahoo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Steroid replacement without thyroxine supplementation normalizes thyroid function test (TFT in some but not all Addison's disease patients with primary hypothyroidism. Both autoimmune and nonautoimmune mechanisms contribute to this improvement in TFT. However, the documentation of the change in thyroid autoimmunity after cortisol replacement is very limited in the literature. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of steroid replacement on TFT and anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody (anti-TPO-Ab titer in Addison's disease with primary hypothyroidism. Materials and Methods: This observational study was conducted in a tertiary care center in South India. Six Addison's disease patients with primary hypothyroidism, who were only on steroid replacement, were included in the study. Low serum cortisol (22 pmol/L and/or hyperpigmentation of skin/mucous membranes was considered as the diagnostic criteria for Addison's disease. Primary hypothyroidism (both overt and subclinical was defined as high thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH with/without low free thyroxine (fT4. TFT and anti-TPO-Ab were performed before and after steroid replacement in all of them. Results: Poststeroid replacement, there was a normalization of TSH in all but one subjects. In overt hypothyroidism patients, fT4 also normalized. The improvement in TFT was not associated with decreasing titer of the anti-TPO-Ab in all six patients. However, there was a significant difference in TSH after steroid replacement compared to the baseline status. Conclusions: The concept of normalization of primary hypothyroidism with cortisol replacement in patients with Addison's disease should be recognized to avoid iatrogenic thyrotoxicosis caused by thyroxine replacement. Both autoimmune and nonautoimmune mechanisms contribute to these alterations.

  2. Same-sex marriage, autoimmune thyroid gland dysfunction and other autoimmune diseases in Denmark 1989-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisch, Morten; Nielsen, Nete Munk; Pedersen, Bo Vestergaard

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases have been little studied in gay men and lesbians. We followed 4.4 million Danes, including 9,615 same-sex married (SSM) persons, for 47 autoimmune diseases in the National Patient Registry between 1989 and 2008. Poisson regression analyses provided first hospitalization rate ratios (RRs) comparing rates between SSM individuals and persons in other marital status categories. SSM individuals experienced no unusual overall risk of autoimmune diseases. However, the risk of autoimmune thyroid dysfunction was increased, notably Hashimoto's thyroiditis (women(SSM), RR = 2.92; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.74-4.55) and Graves' disease (men(SSM), RR = 1.88; 95% CI 1.08-3.01). There was also an excess of primary biliary cirrhosis (women(SSM), RR = 4.09; 95% CI 1.01-10.7), and of psoriasis (men(SSM), RR = 2.48; 95% CI 1.77-3.36), rheumatic fever (men(SSM), RR = 7.55; 95% CI 1.87-19.8), myasthenia gravis (men(SSM), RR = 5.51; 95% CI 1.36-14.4), localized scleroderma (men(SSM), RR = 7.16; 95% CI 1.18-22.6) and pemphigoid (men(SSM), RR = 6.56; 95% CI 1.08-20.6), while Dupuytren's contracture was reduced (men(SSM), RR = 0.64; 95% CI 0.39-0.99). The excess of psoriasis was restricted to same-sex married men with HIV/AIDS (men(SSM), RR = 10.5; 95% CI 6.44-15.9), whereas Graves' disease occurred in excess only among same-sex married men without HIV/AIDS (men(SSM), RR = 1.99; 95% CI 1.12-3.22). Lesbians and immunologically competent gay men in same-sex marriage face no unusual overall risk of autoimmune diseases. However, the observed increased risk of thyroid dysfunction in these lesbians and gay men deserves further study.

  3. Vitiligo and Autoimmune Thyroid Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enke Baldini

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Vitiligo represents the most common cause of acquired skin, hair, and oral depigmentation, affecting 0.5–1% of the population worldwide. It is clinically characterized by the appearance of disfiguring circumscribed skin macules following melanocyte destruction by autoreactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Patients affected by vitiligo usually show a poorer quality of life and are more likely to suffer from depressive symptoms, particularly evident in dark-skinned individuals. Although vitiligo is a non-fatal disease, exposure of affected skin to UV light increases the chance of skin irritation and predisposes to skin cancer. In addition, vitiligo has been associated with other rare systemic disorders due to the presence of melanocytes in other body districts, such as in eyes, auditory, nervous, and cardiac tissues, where melanocytes are thought to have roles different from that played in the skin. Several pathogenetic models have been proposed to explain vitiligo onset and progression, but clinical and experimental findings point mainly to the autoimmune hypothesis as the most qualified one. In this context, it is of relevance the strong association of vitiligo with other autoimmune diseases, in particular with autoimmune thyroid disorders, such as Hashimoto thyroiditis and Graves’ disease. In this review, after a brief overview of vitiligo and its pathogenesis, we will describe the clinical association between vitiligo and autoimmune thyroid disorders and discuss the possible underlying molecular mechanism(s.

  4. Ocular surface and salivary gland involvement in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Pelinsari Lana

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Many reports have indicated an association between thyroid dieases and primary Sjögren’s syndrome (pSS. The aim of our study was to evaluate the outcomes of the tests used for dry eye diagnosis and salivary gland involvement in patients with autoimmune thyroiditis. Methods: Forty-two patients (group 1 with autoimmune thyroid disease and 30 controls (group 2 were selected. Tear film break up time, Schirmer I test, Schirmer II test, ocular staining with 1% rose Bengal and salivary gland cintilography were performed in both groups. Results: Regarding the ocular surface damage observed by Rose Bengal test there was no difference between groups (p=0.77. For tear film break up time the groups did not differ statistically (p=0.46. There was no statistical difference between groups 1 and control in scintigraphy of the salivary gland (p=0.99. A statistical difference between the patients with thyroid disease and the control group was seem only in the Schirmer II test (p=0.0009. Conclusions: No patients fulfilled all criteria for Sjögren’s syndrome. It is possible that it could be underestimated.

  5. Prevalence of autoimmune thyroiditis in children with celiac disease and effect of gluten withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meloni, Antonella; Mandas, Chiara; Jores, Rita Désirée; Congia, Mauro

    2009-07-01

    To study the prevalence of autoimmune thyroiditis (AT) in Sardinian children with celiac disease (CD) and the effects of a gluten-free diet (GFD) on thyroid function. Children with biopsy-proven CD (n = 324; female:male 2:1; mean age, 6.6 years) followed from 1 to 15 years, were retrospectively evaluated for AT at onset of CD and during GFD. Serum thyroid peroxidase and thyroglobulin antibodies (AbTPO, AbTG), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), free thyroxine (FT4), free triiodothyronine (FT3), and thyroid ultrasonography were considered. Age-matched Sardinian schoolchildren (n = 8040), previously evaluated for antithyroid antibodies and thyroid function, were used as controls. Thirty-four patients with CD (10.5%) developed AT (female:male 4,5:1; mean age, 10.5 years), 11 at onset of CD and 23 during GFD, with a higher prevalence than controls (P = 2.9(-13)). Twenty-eight patients were euthyroid and 6 hypothyroid. AbTPO and/or AbTG persisted elevated for 2 to 9 years despite the GFD in 9 of 11 patients with AT at onset of CD. AT is strongly associated with CD in Sardinian children, has an age of onset of 10.5 years, and appears to be gluten-independent. In children with CD with AT, the female:male bias reported in adult AT is present before puberty.

  6. Autoimmune Thyroiditis and Myasthenia Gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Lopomo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases (AIDs are the result of specific immune responses directed against structures of the self. In normal conditions, the molecules recognized as “self” are tolerated by immune system, but when the self-tolerance is lost, the immune system could react against molecules from the body, causing the loss of self-tolerance, and subsequently the onset of AID that differs for organ target and etiology. Autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD is caused by the development of autoimmunity against thyroid antigens and comprises Hashimoto’s thyroiditis and Graves disease. They are frequently associated with other organ or non-organ specific AIDs, such as myasthenia gravis (MG. In fact, ATD seems to be the most associated pathology to MG. The etiology of both diseases is multifactorial and it is due to genetic and environmental factors, and each of them has specific characteristics. The two pathologies show many commonalities, such as the organ-specificity with a clear pathogenic effect of antibodies, the pathological mechanisms, such as deregulation of the immune system and the implication of the genetic predisposition. They also show some differences, such as the mode of action of the antibodies and therapies. In this review that focuses on ATD and MG, the common features and the differences between the two diseases are discussed.

  7. Autoimmune Thyroiditis and Myasthenia Gravis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopomo, Angela; Berrih-Aknin, Sonia

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (AIDs) are the result of specific immune responses directed against structures of the self. In normal conditions, the molecules recognized as “self” are tolerated by immune system, but when the self-tolerance is lost, the immune system could react against molecules from the body, causing the loss of self-tolerance, and subsequently the onset of AID that differs for organ target and etiology. Autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD) is caused by the development of autoimmunity against thyroid antigens and comprises Hashimoto’s thyroiditis and Graves disease. They are frequently associated with other organ or non-organ specific AIDs, such as myasthenia gravis (MG). In fact, ATD seems to be the most associated pathology to MG. The etiology of both diseases is multifactorial and it is due to genetic and environmental factors, and each of them has specific characteristics. The two pathologies show many commonalities, such as the organ-specificity with a clear pathogenic effect of antibodies, the pathological mechanisms, such as deregulation of the immune system and the implication of the genetic predisposition. They also show some differences, such as the mode of action of the antibodies and therapies. In this review that focuses on ATD and MG, the common features and the differences between the two diseases are discussed. PMID:28751878

  8. The influence of cyclosporin A on experimental autoimmune thyroid disease in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGregor, A.M.; Rennie, D.P.; Weetman, A.P.; Hassman, R.A.; Foord, S.M.; Dieguez, C.; Hall, R.

    1983-01-01

    Female PVG/c rats, thymectomised on weaning and given 4 courses of whole body irradiation to a total dose of 1000 rads, developed experimental autoimmune thyroid disease (EAITD) as assessed by histological evidence of thyroiditis and circulating levels of antithyroglobulin antibodies. Hypothyroidism resulted. Induction of the disease was associated with a highly significant fall in T lymphocyte numbers. Eight weeks after their last dose of irradiation the animals commenced treatment with cyclosporin A (10 mg/kg rat/day, intragastrically) and were treated for varying time intervals thereafter. The reversal of the T lymphocyte helper: suppressor ratio on cyclosporin A therapy was associated with a significant improvement in the disease process. The alterations in the T cell subsets and in the disease lasted only as long as the drug was administered and thereafter reverted towards that seen in the control groups of animals receiving no treatment

  9. Thyroid Autoimmunity in Girls with Turner Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkowska-Sędek, Ewelina; Borowiec, Ada; Kucharska, Anna; Chacewicz, Karolina; Rumińska, Małgorzata; Demkow, Urszula; Pyrżak, Beata

    2017-01-01

    Turner syndrome is associated with increased incidence of autoimmune diseases, especially those of the thyroid gland. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of thyroid autoimmunity among pediatric patients with Turner syndrome. The study was retrospective and included 41 girls with Turner syndrome aged 6-18 years. Free thyroxine (FT4), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), anti-thyroid peroxidase (TPO-Ab) antibodies, anti-thyroglobulin (TG-Ab) antibodies, and karyotype were investigated. The correlation between karyotype and incidence of thyroid autoimmunity was also examined. Eleven patients (26.8%) were positive for TPO-Ab and/or TG-Ab. Three girls from that subgroup were euthyroid, 5 had subclinical hypothyroidism, and 3 were diagnosed with overt hypothyroidism. Out of these 11 patients affected by thyroid autoimmunity, 6 girls had mosaic karyotype with X-isochromosome (n = 4) or with deletions (n = 2), and 5 had the 45,X karyotype. The study findings confirmed a high incidence of thyroid autoimmunity in girls with Turner syndrome, but we failed to observe an association between the incidence of thyroid autoimmunity and karyotype. We conclude that it is important to monitor thyroid function in patients with Turner syndrome because they are prone to develop hypothyroidism.

  10. Time for the endocrinologists to expand their awareness of and contribution to the diagnosis and management of encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tamagno, Gianluca

    2012-02-01

    Encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease is a rare condition presenting in the setting of autoimmune thyroid disease and characterized by unspecific neurological and\\/or psychiatric symptoms. Bearing in mind the currently prevailing lack of consensus on the most appropriate nomenclature and diagnostic criteria for this condition and the implications that this lack undeniably has on clinical practice, it is obvious that an international and multidisciplinary agreement among clinicians should arrive at the most appropriate definition and terminology of encephalopathy occurring in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease. Concomitantly, efforts must be made to uncover the pathogenetic link between thyroid autoimmunity and the occurrence of encephalopathy.

  11. Time for the endocrinologists to expand their awareness of and contribution to the diagnosis and management of encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tamagno, Gianluca

    2011-01-01

    Encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease is a rare condition presenting in the setting of autoimmune thyroid disease and characterized by unspecific neurological and\\/or psychiatric symptoms. Bearing in mind the currently prevailing lack of consensus on the most appropriate nomenclature and diagnostic criteria for this condition and the implications that this lack undeniably has on clinical practice, it is obvious that an international and multidisciplinary agreement among clinicians should arrive at the most appropriate definition and terminology of encephalopathy occurring in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease. Concomitantly, efforts must be made to uncover the pathogenetic link between thyroid autoimmunity and the occurrence of encephalopathy.

  12. B Cell Activating Factor (BAFF) and BAFF Receptor Expression in Autoimmune and Nonautoimmune Thyroid Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campi, Irene; Tosi, Delfina; Rossi, Stefania; Vannucchi, Guia; Covelli, Danila; Colombo, Federico; Trombetta, Elena; Porretti, Laura; Vicentini, Leonardo; Cantoni, Gianmaria; Currò, Nicola; Beck-Peccoz, Paolo; Bulfamante, Gaetano; Salvi, Mario

    2015-09-01

    The B cell activating factor (BAFF) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor family, which controls the survival/proliferation of B cells and is involved in the pathogenesis of a number of autoimmune diseases. The objective of the present study was to investigate the expression of BAFF and BAFF receptor (BAFF-R) in the thyroid tissue of patients affected with autoimmune thyroid disorders (AITD) or multinodular goiter (MNG) compared with those with normal thyroids. Immunohistochemistry was performed using a panel of antibodies against BAFF, BAFF-R, CD3, CD4, CD8, CD20, CD34, CD79a, CD1a, CD68, and CD163 on the thyroid sections of 27 patients affected with Graves' disease (GD), 23 with Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT), 16 with nontoxic nodular goiter (NTG), and 15 with toxic nodular goiter (TG), submitted to total thyroidectomy between 2000 and 2011. The overall BAFF-R expression in thyrocytes was weak and not different in AITD and MNG. Conversely, a stronger BAFF expression was observed in MNG compared with AITD. BAFF and BAFF-R expression in the infiltrating lymphocytes was higher in AITD compared with MNG. Interestingly, in lymphocytes of follicular-like structures observed in HT, BAFF and BAFF-R were localized in the germinal center or in the mantle, respectively. This study shows that BAFF and BAFF-R are expressed in the thyrocytes derived from patients with either AITD or MNG, in addition to the expected expression of BAFF and its receptor in the infiltrating immune cells of GD and HT. These findings suggest a possible involvement of BAFF and its receptors in the pathophysiology of AITD.

  13. Autoimmune and Neoplastic Thyroid Diseases Associated with Hepatitis C Chronic Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poupak Fallahi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Frequently, patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV chronic infection have high levels of serum anti-thyroperoxidase and/or anti-thyroglobulin autoantibodies, ultrasonographic signs of chronic autoimmune thyroiditis, and subclinical hypothyroidism, in female gender versus healthy controls, or hepatitis B virus infected patients. In patients with “HCV-associated mixed cryoglobulinemia” (MC + HCV, a higher prevalence of thyroid autoimmune disorders was shown not only compared to controls, but also versus HCV patients without cryoglobulinemia. Patients with MC + HCV or HCV chronic infection show a higher prevalence of papillary thyroid cancer than controls, in particular in patients with autoimmune thyroiditis. Patients with HCV chronic infection, or with MC + HCV, in presence of autoimmune thyroiditis, show higher serum levels of T-helper (Th1 (C-X-C motif ligand 10 (CXCL10 chemokine, but normal levels of Th2 (C-C motif ligand 2 chemokine, than patients without thyroiditis. HCV thyroid infection could act by upregulating CXCL10 gene expression and secretion in thyrocytes recruiting Th1 lymphocytes that secrete interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α. These cytokines might induce a further CXCL10 secretion by thyrocytes, thus perpetuating the immune cascade, which may lead to the appearance of autoimmune thyroid disorders in genetically predisposed subjects. A careful monitoring of thyroid function, particularly where nodules occur, is recommended in HCV patients.

  14. Analysis of Associations of Human BAFF Gene Polymorphisms with Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiunn-Diann Lin

    Full Text Available The B-lymphocyte-activating factor (BAFF is associated with B-cell functions, and gene polymorphisms of the BAFF have been linked to autoimmune diseases (AIDs. In this study, we explored possible associations of two BAFF single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, rs1041569 and rs2893321, with autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs in an ethnic Chinese population.In total, 319 Graves' disease (GD, 83 Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT patients, and 369 healthy controls were enrolled. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism and direct sequencing were used to genotype rs2893321 and rs1041569.There was a significant difference in frequencies of the G allele and AG+GG genotype of rs2893321 between the GD and control groups (p = 0.013, odds ratio (OR = 0.76, and p = 0.017, OR = 0.68, respectively and between the AITD and control groups (p = 0.009, OR = 0.76, and, p = 0.014, OR = 0.69, respectively. The AA genotype of rs2893321 was associated with low titers of the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antibody (TSHRAb (p = 0.015 in males but not in females. The AA genotype of rs2893321 was associated with the presence of two different types of thyroid autoantibody (TAb (TSHRAb and Hashimoto's autoantibody (anti-thyroglobulin or anti-microsomal antibody in females and with that of one type in males.rs2893321 may be a susceptible genetic variant for the development of GD and AITDs. Associations of rs2893321 with susceptibility to GD and AITDs and the correlation between rs2893321 and TAb exhibit a dimorphic pattern. Additional studies with larger sample sizes are required to confirm our findings.

  15. There Is No Elevation of Immunoglobulin E Levels in Albanian Patients with Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatixhe Latifi-Pupovci

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Studies in several ethnic groups reported high incidence of elevated levels of immunoglobulin E (IgE in patients with autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATD, especially in patients with Graves’ disease. Objective. To study association between serum levels of IgE and thyroid stimulating hormone receptor antibodies (TRAb in Albanian patients with ATD. Material and Methods. Study was performed in 40 patients with Graves’ disease, 15 patients with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, and 14 subjects in the control group. The IgE levels were measured by immunoradiometric assay, whereas the TRAb levels were measured by radioreceptor assay. Results. In all groups of subjects the IgE levels were within reference values (<200 kIU/L. Significant difference in mean concentration of IgE was found between two groups of Graves’ disease patients, and those with normal and elevated TRAb levels (22.57 versus 45.03, P<0.05. Positive correlation was found between TRAb and IgE only in Graves’ disease patients (r=0.43, P=0.006. Conclusion. In Albanian patients with ATD there is no elevation of IgE levels. This could be the result of low prevalence of allergic diseases in Albanian population determined by genetic and environmental factors.

  16. Dual-Directional Immunomodulatory Effects of Corbrin Capsule on Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianyi He

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate the effects of Corbrin Capsule (CS-C-Q80, a drug derived from Cordyceps sinensis (Berk. Sacc., on autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD. Methods. 44 Patients with Graves’s disease (GD and 56 patients with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis (HT were randomly assigned to treatment group (GD-Tx and HT-Tx or control group (GD-Ct and HT-Ct. The control groups were given methimazole or levothyroxine only while the treatment groups were given Corbrin Capsule (2.0 g tid besides the same conventional prescriptions as control groups. Thyroid hormones, thyroid antibodies, and T lymphocyte subsets were quantified at baseline and 24 weeks posttreatment. Results. Significant drop of serum anti-TPO-Ab levels was observed in both GD-Tx and HT-Tx groups. Before treatment, GD patients had higher helper T cells compared to cytotoxic T cells, while HT patients suffered from a nearly inverted proportion of helper T/cytotoxic T cells. There was a significant drop of the helper T/cytotoxic T cells ratio in GD-Tx to the median of the normal ranges after Corbrin treatment for 24 weeks, while that in HT-Tx was elevated. Conclusion. Corbrin Capsule could restore the balance between helper T and cytotoxic T cells in both GD and HT patients with dual-directional immunomodulatory effects. And it could significantly reduce the autoantibody levels in both GD and HT.

  17. Breaking Tolerance to Thyroid Antigens: Changing Concepts in Thyroid Autoimmunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapoport, Basil

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid autoimmunity involves loss of tolerance to thyroid proteins in genetically susceptible individuals in association with environmental factors. In central tolerance, intrathymic autoantigen presentation deletes immature T cells with high affinity for autoantigen-derived peptides. Regulatory T cells provide an alternative mechanism to silence autoimmune T cells in the periphery. The TSH receptor (TSHR), thyroid peroxidase (TPO), and thyroglobulin (Tg) have unusual properties (“immunogenicity”) that contribute to breaking tolerance, including size, abundance, membrane association, glycosylation, and polymorphisms. Insight into loss of tolerance to thyroid proteins comes from spontaneous and induced animal models: 1) intrathymic expression controls self-tolerance to the TSHR, not TPO or Tg; 2) regulatory T cells are not involved in TSHR self-tolerance and instead control the balance between Graves' disease and thyroiditis; 3) breaking TSHR tolerance involves contributions from major histocompatibility complex molecules (humans and induced mouse models), TSHR polymorphism(s) (humans), and alternative splicing (mice); 4) loss of tolerance to Tg before TPO indicates that greater Tg immunogenicity vs TPO dominates central tolerance expectations; 5) tolerance is induced by thyroid autoantigen administration before autoimmunity is established; 6) interferon-α therapy for hepatitis C infection enhances thyroid autoimmunity in patients with intact immunity; Graves' disease developing after T-cell depletion reflects reconstitution autoimmunity; and 7) most environmental factors (including excess iodine) “reveal,” but do not induce, thyroid autoimmunity. Micro-organisms likely exert their effects via bystander stimulation. Finally, no single mechanism explains the loss of tolerance to thyroid proteins. The goal of inducing self-tolerance to prevent autoimmune thyroid disease will require accurate prediction of at-risk individuals together with an antigen

  18. Association between STAT4 Gene Polymorphisms and Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases in a Chinese Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Yan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The STAT4 gene encodes a transcriptional factor that transmits signals induced by several key cytokines which play important roles in the development of autoimmune diseases. The aim of this study was to explore the association of STAT4 polymorphism with Graves’ disease (GD and Hashimoto’s thyroiditis (HT. A total of 1048 autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs patients (693 with GD and 355 with HT and 909 age- and gender-matched controls were examined. STAT4 polymorphisms (rs7574865/rs10181656/ rs7572482 were genotyped by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR and ligase detection reaction (LDR. The results indicated that the frequencies of rs7574865 genotypes in patients with GD differed significantly from the controls (p = 0.028, the T allele frequency of GD patients was also significantly higher than the controls (p = 0.020. The genotypes of rs10181656 differed significantly in GD patients from controls (p = 0.012; G allele frequencies were significantly higher in AITD patients than the controls (p = 0.014 and 0.031, respectively. The frequencies of haplotype GC with GD and HT patients were significantly lower than their controls (p = 0.015 and 0.030, respectively. In contrast, the frequencies of haplotype TG with GD and HT patients were significantly higher than their controls (p = 0.016 and 0.048, respectively. These findings strongly suggest that STAT4 rs7574865/rs10181656 polymorphisms increase the risk of AITD in a Chinese population.

  19. HUBUNGAN ANTARA ASUPAN KAPSUL IODIUM DAN KEJADIAN AUTOIMMUNE THYROID DISEASE (AITD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Wibowo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Iodine is the main component in the synthesis of thyroid hormones. Therefore,adequate iodine consumption is important for thyroid hormone production. Iodineinterference with TSH system can be as the limiting factor for thyroid hormonesproduction. Magelang district knows as IDD area had program to supply intakeiodine from iodine capsule and iodinated salt. In endemic Iodine Deficiencydisorders (IDD area, intake iodine was taken from iodine capsule and iodinatedsalt. Iodine stored at thyroglobulin. Post-translational modification of thyroglobulinby iodine has immunological consequences such that increased AutoimmuneThyroid Disease (AITD. Tiroglobulin and Thyroidperoxidase antibodies arethe main factor of production of AITD. A study was to asses the descriptionbetween iodine intake and tiroglobulin and thyroidperoxidase antibodies causedAITD. The study was conducted at Magelang district and the respondents arechildbearing age woman. Samples were collected to measured TPO antibody andThyroglobulin antibody. Magelang district is one of the IDD areas received capsuleiodine distributed to prevent new IDD cases. Most all of respondent consumediodine capsule 1-2 capsule/year. The result showed that all respondent haveTPO and Thyroglobulin antibodies. 23% respondent has positive thyroglobulinand 47% positive TPO antibody. Statistical analysis showed that Iodine capsuleintake is one of predesposition factor of AITD. The results showed that intake ofhigh concentration iodine capsule had immunological consequences. Over doseof iodine can increased incident of AITD. Thyroglobulin and TPO antibodies thatfound in all respondents with consume high concentration iodine capsule.

  20. Long-term clinical significance of thyroid autoimmunity in children with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassio, Alessandra; Ricci, Giampaolo; Baronio, Federico; Miniaci, Angela; Bal, Milva; Bigucci, Barbara; Conti, Veronica; Cicognani, Alessandro

    2010-02-01

    To evaluate the long-term outcome of thyroid function and autoimmunity in a large series of children with celiac disease. This longitudinal, retrospective study (duration of follow-up, 8.9 +/- 4.0 years) was conducted at the Pediatric Department, University of Bologna, Italy. One hundred thirty-five consecutive patients diagnosed between June 1990 and December 2004 and followed on a gluten-free diet were examined. Inclusion criteria were good dietary compliance and duration of follow-up for at least 3 years. Of 101 patients who never showed positive antithyroid titers during the follow-up, 86 remained euthyroid; 15 showed high thyroid-stimulating hormone values at diagnosis that normalized in 11 cases after 12 to 18 months of gluten withdrawal. Of 31 patients with persistently positive antibody titers, 23 (74%) remained consistently euthyroid during the follow-up and 8 (26%) had a subclinical hypothyroidism. The prevalence of cases with positive antibodies was similar in children with growth retardation or gastroenterological symptoms at diagnosis and different durations of gluten exposure. The presence of antithyroid antibodies in children with celiac disease has a low predictive value for the development of thyroid hypofunction during the indicated surveillance period. Longer follow-up is needed. Copyright 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Aberrant Levels of Hematopoietic/Neuronal Growth and Differentiation Factors in Euthyroid Women at Risk for Autoimmune Thyroid Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Massolt, Elske T.; Effraimidis, Grigoris; Korevaar, Tim I. M.; Wiersinga, Wilmar M.; Visser, W. Edward; Peeters, Robin P.; Drexhage, Hemmo A.

    2016-01-01

    Subjects at risk for major mood disorders have a higher risk to develop autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) and vice-versa, implying a shared pathogenesis. In mood disorder patients, an abnormal profile of hematopoietic/neuronal growth factors is observed, suggesting that growth/differentiation

  2. Technetium-99m thyroid scan; does it have a diagnostic aid in sub-clinical auto-immune thyroid disease in systemic lupus erythematosus patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, A; Alkemary, A; Abdo, M; Salama, M

    2016-02-01

    Technetium-99m (Tc-99m) thyroid scintigraphy is a well known diagnostic tool that shows the entire gland in a single image. We aimed to evaluate its additive diagnostic value in subclinical autoimmune thyroid disease (S-AITD) in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. We investigated 100 systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients without overt thyroid involvement (eight men and 92 women; mean age 40±6.5 years) and 50 age and sex matched controls. All were subjected to thyroid evaluation using anti-thyroglobulin (anti-TG) and anti-thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO) antibodies; hormones (FT3; FT4 and TSH) and Tc-99m thyroid scintigraphy. 14/100 (14%) and none (0%) were positive for S-AITD in SLE and control groups, respectively (P = 0.0001). They were classified by thyroid scintigraphy and hormonal profile into 2/14 Hashimoto; 10/14 atrophic thyroiditis and 2/14 Graves' disease. Anti-TPO was elevated in 12 SLE cases, while anti-TG was elevated in only 2/14 (P = 0.0001). Thyroid scintigraphy showed statistically significant associations with FT4, TSH and anti-TPO. Tc-99m thyroid scintigraphy may have an additional diagnostic role in S-AITD among SLE patients, with an impact on patient management. This potential needs to be further evaluated in a larger series on a multicenter basis. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Risk factors for and prevalence of thyroid disorders in a cross-sectional study among healthy female relatives of patients with autoimmune thyroid disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strieder, Thea G. A.; Prummel, Mark F.; Tijssen, Jan G. P.; Endert, Eric; Wiersinga, Wilmar M.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) is a common disorder especially in women, and both genetic and environmental factors are involved in its pathogenesis. We wanted to gain more insight into the contribution of various environmental factors. Therefore, we started a large prospective cohort

  4. Genetics Home Reference: autoimmune Addison disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of each kidney. It is classified as an autoimmune disorder because it results from a malfunctioning immune system ... disease or their family members can have another autoimmune disorder, most commonly autoimmune thyroid disease or type 1 ...

  5. Diagnostic significance of serum concentrations of soluble Fas ligand (sFasL) in children with autoimmune thyroid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikos, Hanna; Mikos, Marcin; Niedziela, Marek

    2017-05-01

    The aim of the study was to assess serum levels of sFasL as a marker of thyroid dysfunction in children with autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD). The group comprised 45 newly diagnosed children with Hashimoto's thyroiditis and Graves' disease versus euthyroid control group: 11 with hypothyroidism (10 girls and 1 boy, aged 12.2 ± 1.9 years), 19 children with hyperthyroidism (15 girls and 4 boys, aged 12.4 ± 4.9 years) and 15 healthy subjects (7 girls and 8 boys, aged 10.5 ± 4.8 years). Thyroid function (TSH, fT4, fT3), autoimmune (ATG, ATPO, TRAb) and anthropometric (weight, height, BMI, BMI-SDS, Cole index) parameters were evaluated. sFasL concentration was measured by ELISA. Nonparametric statistical test and ROC analysis were performed to assess the data. We found no significant differences in serum concentrations of sFasL between boys and girls in the studied groups. Significantly higher sFasL levels (median 0.26 ng/ml) were identified in children with hypothyroidism compared with the control group (median 0.06 ng/ml, p autoimmune thyroid disease.

  6. Imbalance of Th17/Treg in Different Subtypes of Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Li

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To clarify the imbalance of Th17/Treg in different subtypes of autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs including Graves' disease(GD, Hashimoto's thyroiditis(HT and Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO. Methods: 47 patients with AITD (including 16 GD, 15 HT, and 16 GO and 12 healthy controls were enrolled in this study. The percentages of Th17 and Treg cells, the ratio of Th17/Treg, as well as their related transcription factors RORγt and Foxp3 mRNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were measured by flow cytometry and real-time quantitative PCR Results: Compared with those in control group, the percentage of CD4+IL-17+T cell(Th17 and the mRNA expression of its transcription factor RORγt were higher in PBMCs of AITDs (P+Foxp3+T (Treg cells and its transcription factor Foxp3 mRNA were significantly decreased in PBMCs of GD (PConclusion: Increased Th17 lymphocytes may play a more important role in the pathogenesis of HT and GO while decreased Treg may be greatly involved in GD.

  7. Type 1 diabetes mellitus associated with autoimmune thyroid disease, celiac disease and familial Mediterranean fever: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baş, Firdevs; Kabataş-Eryilmaz, Sema; Günöz, Hülya; Darendeliler, Feyza; Küçükemre, Banu; Bundak, Rüveyde; Saka, Nurçin

    2009-01-01

    It is known that type 1 diabetes mellitus (type 1 DM) may be associated with other autoimmune diseases. Recently, a patient with an association of type 1 DM and familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) was reported in the medical literature. A 10.5-year-old boy was brought to our clinic with complaints of polydipsia, polyuria and weight loss and was diagnosed as diabetic ketoacidosis due to autoimmune type 1 DM. Insulin therapy was started. Elevated thyroid antibodies associated with diffuse goiter and hypothyroidism led to the diagnosis of autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD), and elevated antiendomysial antibodies and abnormal intestinal biopsy findings led to the diagnosis of celiac disease (CD). L-thyroxine therapy and gluten-free diet were initiated accordingly. At the third-year of follow-up, acute attacks of fever, abdominal pain and chest pain developed. Laboratory investigations, which were normal between the attacks, revealed elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate, fibrinogen, white blood cell count and pleural effusion on chest X-ray during the attacks. Molecular analysis for FMF revealed compound heterozygous M694I and V726A. The patient responded well to colchicine therapy started at a dose of 1.5 mg/day. We present the second patient with type 1 DM associated with FMF who also had ATD and CD.

  8. [Smoking and chronic autoimmune thyroiditis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzoianu, Ioana Cristina; Arghir, Oana Cristina; Circo, E

    2010-01-01

    The chronic autoimmune thyroiditis are heterogeneous entities by the functional, lesional and evolutive point of view. Ethiopathogenic factors involved in chronic autoimmune thyroiditis are genetical factors, combines with environmental factors, hormonal factors, infectious factors etc. The exact role of smoking on the autoimmune mechanism is unclear, but smoking is known to have an antithyroid effect. Our study tries to estimate the influence of smoking on serum levels of antithyroid peroxidase antibodies and antithyroglobulin antibodies, in a group of patients with various clinical forms of chronic autoimmune thyroiditis. We studied a group consists of 310 patients with chronic autoimmune thyroiditis, hospitalised in the Endocrinology Department of Constanta County Hospital, between January 2006 - December 2009. We detected serum values of antithyroidperoxidase antibodies and antithyroglobulin antibodies of our patients. We also followed the age, sex and presence of smoking in our study group. For statistical processing of the data we use Student's t-test. In our study group 24.28% of patients were smokers. Serum levels of antithyroid peroxidase antibodies were significantly increased (p < 0.001) in the smokers patients, compared with the nonsmokers patients. Serum levels of antithyroglobulin antibodies were significantly increased (p < 0.01) in smokers patients, compared with those who were nonsmokers. Smoking increased the serum levels of antithyroid antibodies in patients with chronic autoimmune thyroiditis.

  9. No causal relationship between Yersinia enterocolitica infection and autoimmune thyroid disease: evidence from a prospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Effraimidis, G.; Tijssen, J. G. P.; Strieder, T. G. A.; Wiersinga, W. M.

    2011-01-01

    P>The objective of this study was to evaluate prospectively the relationship between Yersinia enterocolitica (YE) infection and the development of overt autoimmune hypo- or hyperthyroidism (study A) and the de novo occurrence of thyroid antibodies (study B). This was a prospective cohort study of

  10. Dental amalgam implantation and thyroid autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisakol, G

    2014-01-01

    Mercury was heavily studied as a factor in the autoimmune processes. We aimed to observe whether mercury of amalgam is associated with Hashimoto disease. 363 patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis and 365 control subjects were included in to the study. Amalgam fillings were checked by the physician. 363 (49.9 %) patients and 365 (50.1 %) healthy controls were included into the study. Hashimoto's thyroiditis was diagnosed with thyroid hormones, antithyroid antibody levels, and ultrasonographic findings. Control subjects were selected from patients with no known autoimmune diseases. They were controlled with ultrasonography, as well as antibody titers. None of them had Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Sex distribution of the study population was following: 319 (87.9 %) female, 44 (12.1 %) male in the patient group and 277 (75.9 %) male and 88 (24.1 %) female in healthy control subjects, respectively. Mean free T4 values for Hashimoto's thyroiditis and healthy control group were 15.30±0.76, 17.30±0.96 pmol/L and mean TSH values for Hashimoto's thyroiditis and healthy control group were 9.29±20.79, 1.20±0.32 uIU/ml. Frequency of dental amalgam implantation in patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis was not statistically significantly different from healthy controls (p=186) (t=-1.324) CONCLUSIONS: Some studies identified mercury of amalgam as responsible for autoimmune thyroiditis. We studied whether amalgam fillings are more frequent in Hashimoto's thyroiditis patients and whether it is a causative factor for Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Statistical analysis revealed that there is no relation of amalgam with Hashimoto's thyroiditis (Tab. 1, Ref. 34).

  11. [Thymoma and autoimmune diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamilloux, Y; Frih, H; Bernard, C; Broussolle, C; Petiot, P; Girard, N; Sève, P

    2018-01-01

    The association between thymoma and autoimmunity is well known. Besides myasthenia gravis, which is found in 15 to 20% of patients with thymoma, other autoimmune diseases have been reported: erythroblastopenia, systemic lupus erythematosus, inflammatory myopathies, thyroid disorders, Isaac's syndrome or Good's syndrome. More anecdotally, Morvan's syndrome, limbic encephalitis, other autoimmune cytopenias, autoimmune hepatitis, and bullous skin diseases (pemphigus, lichen) have been reported. Autoimmune diseases occur most often before thymectomy, but they can be discovered at the time of surgery or later. Two situations require the systematic investigation of a thymoma: the occurrence of myasthenia gravis or autoimmune erythroblastopenia. Nevertheless, the late onset of systemic lupus erythematosus or the association of several autoimmune manifestations should lead to look for a thymoma. Neither the characteristics of the patients nor the pathological data can predict the occurrence of an autoimmune disease after thymectomy. Thus, thymectomy usefulness in the course of the autoimmune disease, except myasthenia gravis, has not been demonstrated. This seems to indicate the preponderant role of self-reactive T lymphocytes distributed in the peripheral immune system prior to surgery. Given the high infectious morbidity in patients with thymoma, immunoglobulin replacement therapy should be considered in patients with hypogammaglobulinemia who receive immunosuppressive therapy, even in the absence of prior infection. Copyright © 2017 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Autoimmunity in differentiated thyroid cancer: significance and related clinical problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Rasmussen, Ase Krogh

    2011-01-01

    Coexistence of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) and thyroid autoimmune diseases could represent a mere coincidence due to the frequent occurrence of autoimmunity, but there may also be a pathological and causative link between the two conditions. The coincidence of DTC with Hashimoto's disease...... has been variably reported at between 0.5 and 22.5% and of DTC with Graves' disease between 0 and 9.8%. In this review available evidence for thyroid autoimmunity in DTC is summarized and it is concluded that thyroid cancer does coexist with thyroid autoimmunity, implying that patients treated...... TgAb measurements may be used as a surrogate marker for recurrence of thyroid cancer during the long-term monitoring of DTC patients....

  13. Autoimmunity in differentiated thyroid cancer: significance and related clinical problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Rasmussen, Ase Krogh

    2010-01-01

    Coexistence of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) and thyroid autoimmune diseases could represent a mere coincidence due to the frequent occurrence of autoimmunity, but there may also be a pathological and causative link between the two conditions. The coincidence of DTC with Hashimoto's disease...... has been variably reported at between 0.5 and 22.5% and of DTC with Graves' disease between 0 and 9.8%. In this review available evidence for thyroid autoimmunity in DTC is summarized and it is concluded that thyroid cancer does coexist with thyroid autoimmunity, implying that patients treated...... TgAb measurements may be used as a surrogate marker for recurrence of thyroid cancer during the long-term monitoring of DTC patients....

  14. Polymorphisms and expression of toll-like receptors in autoimmune thyroid diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Naoya; Katsumata, Yuka; Watanabe, Mikio; Ishido, Naoko; Manabe, Yu; Watanabe, Ayano; Masutani, Ryota; Hidaka, Yoh; Iwatani, Yoshinori

    2017-05-01

    Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto's disease (HD) are autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs). Prognosis of AITDs varies in each patient. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are pattern-recognition receptors that activate signaling pathways involved in the production of proinflammatory cytokines. UNC93B1 is a transcription factor of TLR7 and TLR9. In this study, we examined the association of TLR expression and TLR and UNC93B1 polymorphisms with the development and prognosis of AITDs. The ratio of intracellular TLR7 (iTLR7) and iTLR9 intensities in B cells was lower in patients with GD in remission than in patients with intractable GD (p = 0.0007). The frequency of G allele of TLR7 rs3853839 G/C polymorphism was significantly higher in male patients with GD and intractable GD than in control subjects (p = 0.0062 and 0.0173, respectively). The frequencies of T allele of TLR9 rs187084 C/T polymorphism and C allele of TLR9 rs352140 C/T polymorphism were significantly higher in patients with intractable GD who had GG genotype of TLR7 rs3853839 polymorphism, which is associated with higher TLR7 expression, than in patients with GD in remission (p = 0.0334 and 0.0023, respectively). The frequencies of AA genotype and A allele of UNC93B1 rs308328 polymorphism were significantly higher in patients with GD than in patients with HD (p = 0.0406 and 0.0316, respectively). These results suggested that the ratio of iTLR7 and iTLR9 intensities was associated with the development and intractability of GD and that TLR7 and UNC93B1 polymorphisms were associated with the development of GD.

  15. Understanding Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What are they? Points To Remember About Autoimmune Diseases Autoimmune diseases refer to problems with the immune system, ... Infectious Diseases Website: https://www.niaid.nih.gov/diseases-conditions/autoimmune-diseases American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association Website: https:// ...

  16. Autoimmune liver disease and concomitant extrahepatic autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratori, Paolo; Fabbri, Angela; Lalanne, Claudine; Lenzi, Marco; Muratori, Luigi

    2015-10-01

    To assess the frequency and clinical impact of associated extrahepatic autoimmune diseases (EAD) on autoimmune liver diseases (ALD). We investigated 608 patients with ALD (327 autoimmune hepatitis - AIH and 281 primary biliary cirrhosis - PBC) for concomitant EAD. In both AIH and PBC, we observed a high prevalence of EAD (29.9 and 42.3%, respectively); both diseases showed a significant association with autoimmune thyroid disease, followed by autoimmune skin disease, celiac disease, and vasculitis in AIH patients and sicca syndrome, CREST syndrome, and celiac disease in PBC patients. At diagnosis, AIH patients with concurrent EAD were more often asymptomatic than patients with isolated AIH (Pautoimmune thyroid disease. In the light of our results, all patients with an EAD should be assessed for the concomitant presence of an asymptomatic ALD.

  17. Thyroid Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for several months or longer, a condition called amenorrhea . If your body's immune system causes thyroid disease, ... at all for several months or longer (called amenorrhea). How does thyroid disease affect pregnancy? Pregnancy-related ...

  18. Thyroid autoimmunity in bipolar disorder: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbuti, Margherita; Carvalho, André F; Köhler, Cristiano A; Murru, Andrea; Verdolini, Norma; Guiso, Giovanni; Samalin, Ludovic; Maes, Michael; Stubbs, Brendon; Perugi, Giulio; Vieta, Eduard; Pacchiarotti, Isabella

    2017-10-15

    Accumulating evidence points to the pathophysiological relevance between immune dysfunction and mood disorders. High rates of thyroid dysfunction have been found in patients with bipolar disorder (BD), compared to the general population. A systematic review of the relationship between BD and thyroid autoimmunity was performed. Pubmed, EMBASE and PsycINFO databases were searched up till January 28th, 2017. This review has been conducted according to the PRISMA statements. Observational studies clearly reporting data among BD patients and the frequency of autoimmune thyroid pathologies were included. 11 original studies met inclusion criteria out of 340 titles first returned from the global search. There is evidence of increased prevalence of circulating thyroid autoantibodies in depressed and mixed BD patients, while there is no evidence showing a positive relationship between BD and specific autoimmune thyroid diseases. There is a controversy about the influence of lithium exposure on circulating thyroid autoantibodies, even if most of studies seem not to support this association. A study conducted on bipolar twins suggests that autoimmune thyroiditis is related to the genetic vulnerability to develop BD rather than to the disease process itself. Females are more likely to develop thyroid autoimmunity. The samples, study design and outcomes were heterogeneous. Thyroid autoimmunity has been suggested to be an independent risk factor for bipolar disorder with no clear association with lithium exposure and it might serve as an endophenotype for BD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Detection of the involvement of salivary glands in autoimmune diseases of thyroid gland by using Ttc-99m MIBI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniz Söylemez ¹

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to determine the involvement in the salivary glands of the patients with Graves’ Disease, Hashimoto Thyroiditis and controls by detecting the changes of Tc-99m Methoxyisobutylisonitrile (Tc-99m MIBI uptake. Material and Methods: The study was conducted between January 2008 and December 2009. 19 patients with Graves’ disease (6 men, 13 women, 28 Hashimoto Thyroiditis patients (5 men, 23 women and 11 euthyroid controls (4 men, 7 women were evaluated retrospectively. Uptake values of parotid and submandibular glands were calculated by drawing elliptical ROIs (region of interest and using the formula for uptake calculation. Result: In all three groups, in parotis glands, a statistical significant difference between Tc-99m MIBI uptake was not detected. The Tc-99m MIBI upateke values in submandibular glands were statistically different among patients with Graves’Disease, Hashimoto Thyroiditis, as well as in Control group (p<0.05. Conclusion: We concluded that the different uptake values of Tc-99m-MIBI in submandibular glands in Graves disease and Hashimoto thyroiditis as compared to the control group patient would be results of the histopathological features, such as autoimmunity, high mitochondria number and inflammatory reaction. [J Contemp Med 2017; 7(1.000: 67-73

  20. Autoantibodies in autoimmune thyroid disease promote immune complex formation with self antigens and increase B cell and CD4+ T cell proliferation in response to self antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Hegedüs, Laszlo; Leslie, Robert Graham Quinton

    2004-01-01

    B cells are centrally involved as antigen-presenting cells in certain autoimmune diseases. To establish whether autoantibodies form immune complexes (IC) with self-antigens in autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) and promote B cell uptake of self-antigen, sera from patients with Hashimoto......'s thyroiditis (HT), Graves' disease (GD) and healthy controls were incubated with human thyroglobulin (Tg) before adding normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The deposition of immunoglobulins and C3 fragments on B cells was then assessed. Inclusion of Tg in serum from HT patients promoted B cell capture...

  1. Pathogenesis of infertility and recurrent pregnancy loss in thyroid autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twig, Gilad; Shina, Avi; Amital, Howard; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2012-05-01

    Thyroid autoimmunity is the most prevalent autoimmune state that affects up to 4% of women during the age of fertility. A growing body of clinical studies links thyroid autoimmunity as a cause of infertility and adverse pregnancy outcomes that includes miscarriage or preterm deliveries. Importantly, these adverse effects are persistent in euthyroid women. In the current review we elaborate on the pathogenesis that underlies infertility and increased pregnancy loss among women with autoimmune thyroid disease. Such mechanisms include thyroid autoantibodies that exert their effect in a TSH-dependent but also in a TSH-independent manner. The later includes quantitative and qualitative changes in the profile of endometrial T cells with reduced secretion of IL-4 and IL-10 along with hypersecretion of interferon-γ. Polyclonal B cells activation is 2-3 time more frequent in thyroid autoimmunity and is associated with increased titers of non-organ specific autoantibodies. Hyperactivity and Increased migration of cytotoxic natural killer cells that alter the immune and hormonal response of the uterus is up to 40% more common in women with thyroid autoimmunity. Lack of vitamin D was suggested as a predisposing factor to autoimmune diseases, and was shown to be reduced in patients with thyroid autoimmunity. In turn, its deficiency is also linked to infertility and pregnancy loss, suggesting a potential interplay with thyroid autoimmunity in the context of infertility. In addition, thyroid autoantibodies were also suggested to alter fertility by targeting zona pellucida, human chorionic gonadotropin receptors and other placental antigens. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Thyroid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falk, S.

    1990-01-01

    Presenting a multidisciplinary approach to the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid disease, this volume provides a comprehensive picture of current thyroid medicine and surgery. The book integrates the perspectives of the many disciplines that deal with the clinical manifestations of thyroid disorders. Adding to the clinical usefulness of the book is the state-of-the-art coverage of many recent developments in thyroidology, including the use of highly sensitive two-site TSH immunoradionetric measurements to diagnose thyroid activity; thyroglobulin assays in thyroid cancer and other diseases; new diagnostic applications of MRI and CT; treatment with radionuclides and chemotherapy; new developments in thyroid immunology, pathology, and management of hyperthyroidism; suppressive treatment with thyroid hormone; and management of Graves' ophthalmopathy. The book also covers all aspects of thyroid surgery, including surgical treatment of hyperthyroidism; papillary, follicular, and other carcinomas; thyroidectomy; and prevention and management of complications

  3. Psoriasis as an autoimmune disease

    OpenAIRE

    Agnieszka Owczarczyk-Saczonek; Waldemar Placek

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays it is known that psoriasis belongs to the group of autoimmune diseases and may coexist with other diseases in this group. Most often patients have psoriatic arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, autoimmune thyroid diseases and multiple sclerosis. The coexistence of these disorders can be a diagnostic and therapeutic problem (there is controversy over the use of corticosteroids). The common pathogenesis is still not explained. We know that the loss of immunotole...

  4. Thyroid nodules and thyroid autoimmunity in the context of environmental pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benvenga, Salvatore; Antonelli, Alessandro; Vita, Roberto

    2015-12-01

    Evidence suggests that in most industrialized countries autoimmune disorders, including chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis, are increasing. This increase parallels the one regarding differentiated thyroid cancer, the increment of which is mainly due to the papillary histotype. A number of studies have pointed to an association between chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis and differentiated thyroid cancer. The upward trend of these two thyroid diseases is sustained by certain environmental factors, such as polluting substances acting as endocrine disrupting chemicals. Herein we will review the experimental and clinical literature that highlights the effects of environmental and occupational exposure to polluting chemicals in the development of autoimmune thyroid disease or differentiated thyroid cancer. Stakeholders, starting from policymarkers, should become more sensitive to the consequences for the thyroid resulting from exposure to EDC. Indeed, the economic burden resulting from such consequences has not been quantified thus far.

  5. Environmental Issues in Thyroid Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Fallahi, Poupak; Antonelli, Alessandro; Benvenga, Salvatore

    2017-01-01

    Environmental factors are determinant for the appearance of autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) in susceptible subjects. Increased iodine intake, selenium, and vitamin D deficiency, exposure to radiation, from nuclear fallout or due to medical radiation, are environmental factors increasing AITD. Cigarette smoking is associated with Graves' disease and Graves' ophthalmopathy, while it decreases the risk of hypothyroidism and thyroid autoimmunity. Viral infections are important environmental factors in the pathogenesis of AITD, too, particularly human parvovirus B19 (EVB19) and hepatitis C virus. Among the many chemical contaminants, halogenated organochlorines and pesticides variably disrupt thyroid function. Polychlorinated biphenyls and their metabolites and polybrominated diethyl ethers bind to thyroid transport proteins, such as transthyretin, displace thyroxine, and disrupt thyroid function. Among drugs, interferon- and iodine-containing drugs have been associated with AITD. Moreover intestinal dysbiosis causes autoimmune thyroiditis. To reduce the risk to populations and also in each patient, it is necessary to comprehend the association between environmental agents and thyroid dysfunction.

  6. Treated Autoimmune Thyroid Disease Is Associated with a Decreased Quality of Life among Young Persons with Type 1 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alena Spirkova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes (T1D in children and adolescents is relatively often accompanied by other immunopathological diseases, autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD or celiac disease (CD. Our aim was to assess whether these conditions are associated with changes in the health-related quality of life (HRQOL in pediatric patients with T1D. In a cross-sectional study we identified eligible 332 patients with T1D aged 8–18 years, of whom 248 (75% together with their parents responded to the PedsQL Generic and Diabetes Modules. Compared to 143 patients without thyroid autoantibodies, 40 patients with a thyroxine-treated AITD scored lower in the overall generic HRQOL (P=0.014, as well as in the overall diabetes-specific HRQOL (P=0.013. After adjustment for age, gender, duration of diabetes, type of diabetes treatment, and diabetes control, this association remained statistically significant for the generic HRQOL (P=0.023. Celiac disease was not associated with a change in the generic or diabetes-specific HRQOL (P=0.07  and   P=0.63, resp.. Parental scores showed no association with AITD or celiac disease, except a marginally significant decrease in the overall generic HRQOL (P=0.039 in the T1D + AITD compared to T1D group. Our study indicates that, in pediatric patients with T1D, concomitant thyroxine-treated AITD is associated with lower quality of life.

  7. [Thymoma and autoimmune thyroiditis. A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkane, A; Bellamy, J; Leroy-Terquem, E; Levy, R

    2003-09-01

    We report an association between a thymus tumor and autoimmune thyroiditis. This association is probably related to loss of immune control secondary to loss of thymus integrity. A 48-year-old woman was hospitalized for thoracic pain. Her past history included thyroiditis treated by L-thyroxin for two years. The chest x-ray demonstrated a mediastinal opacity which was confirmed by computed tomography. Surgical resection was performed and histological analysis of the surgical specimen confirmed the diagnosis of lympho-epithelial thymoma. Thyroid immunity tests demonstrated the presence of anti-peroxidase antibodies confirming the diagnosis of Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Chest x-ray and CT-scan are indicated in patients with autoimmune thyroiditis to search for a thymic mass. Conversely, search for autoimmune thyroiditis is warranted in patients with an identified thymic mass.

  8. Autoimmune liver disease panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liver disease test panel - autoimmune ... Autoimmune disorders are a possible cause of liver disease. The most common of these diseases are autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cholangitis (formerly called primary biliary cirrhosis). This group of tests ...

  9. Genetic susceptibility to autoimmune thyroid diseases in a Chinese Han population: Role of vitamin D receptor gene polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Shuai; He, Shuang-tao; Jiang, Wen-juan; Xiao, Ling; Li, Dan-feng; Xu, Jian; Shi, Xiao-hong; Zhang, Jin-an

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies have found that some immune-related genes were associated with autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs). A couple of studies have explored the association between vitamin D (1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3) receptor (VDR) gene polymorphisms and susceptibility to AITDs in different populations and found conflicting results. This case-control study was designed to evaluate the role of polymorphisms of VDR gene in the predisposition of AITDs in a Chinese Han population. A total of 417 patients with Graves' disease (GD), 250 patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) and 301 healthy subjects were enrolled. The Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer (MALDI-TOF-MS) Platform was applied to detect four SNPs (rs1544410, rs2228570, rs731236 and rs7975232) in the VDR gene. In the rs7975232 allele A frequency showed a significant increase in GD patients (30.34% vs. 25.42% in controls; P=0.041, OR=1.278, 95%CI=1.010-1.617). However, no relationship was found between clinical phenotypes and the four SNPs. This result suggests that the VDR gene may be one susceptibility gene which contributes to the risk of GD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Autoantibodies in autoimmune thyroid disease promote immune complex formation with self antigens and increase B cell and CD4+ T cell proliferation in response to self antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Hegedüs, Laszlo; Leslie, Robert Graham Quinton

    2004-01-01

    B cells are centrally involved as antigen-presenting cells in certain autoimmune diseases. To establish whether autoantibodies form immune complexes (IC) with self-antigens in autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) and promote B cell uptake of self-antigen, sera from patients with Hashimoto's thyroidi......B cells are centrally involved as antigen-presenting cells in certain autoimmune diseases. To establish whether autoantibodies form immune complexes (IC) with self-antigens in autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) and promote B cell uptake of self-antigen, sera from patients with Hashimoto......'s thyroiditis (HT), Graves' disease (GD) and healthy controls were incubated with human thyroglobulin (Tg) before adding normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The deposition of immunoglobulins and C3 fragments on B cells was then assessed. Inclusion of Tg in serum from HT patients promoted B cell capture...... of Tg by boiling reduced the proliferative responses. The data indicate that anti-Tg antibodies associated with AITD facilitate the formation of complement-activating Tg/anti-Tg complexes, binding of IC to B cells, and the subsequent proliferation of B and T cell subsets. This represents a novel...

  11. Thyroid diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noma, Koji

    1992-01-01

    This chapter reviews the correlation between thyroid disease, other than cancer, and radiation in the literature. Radiation-induced thyroid disturbance is discussed in the context of external and internal irradiation. External irradiation of 10 to 40 Gy may lower thyroid function several months or years later. Oral administration of I-131 is widely given to patients with Basedow's disease; it may also lower thyroid function with increasing radiation doses. When giving 70 Gy or more of I-131, hypothyroidism has been reported to occur in 20-30% and at least 10%. Thyroiditis induced with internal I-131 irradiation has also been reported, but no data is available concerning external irradiation-induced thyroiditis. The incidence of nodular goiter was found to be several ten times higher with external irradiation than internal irradiation. Thyroid disturbance is correlated with A-bomb survivors. A-bomb radiation can be divided into early radiation within one minute after A-bombing and the subsequent residual radiation. Nodular goiter was significantly more frequent in the exposed group than the non-exposed group; it increased with increasing radiation doses and younger age (20 years or less) at the time of exposure. The incidence of decrease in thyroid function was higher with increasing radiation doses. However, in the case of Nagasaki, the incidence of hypothyroidism was significantly higher in the low-dose exposed group, especially A-bomb survivors aged 10-39 at the time of exposure and women. (N.K.)

  12. Cytometric evaluation of intracellular IFN-γ and IL-4 levels in thyroid follicular cells from patients with autoimmune thyroid diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bossowski Artur

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent few years is underlined that altered balance of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines play an important role in the pathogenesis of AITD. The aim of this study was to estimate intracellular INF-γ and IL-4 levels in thyroid-infiltrating lymphocytes and thyrocytes isolated from thyroid tissues in 54 adolescent patients aged 8-21 years, with Graves' disease (GD; n = 18, Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT; n = 18 and non-toxic multinodular goiter (NTMG; n = 18. Methods Fresh thyroid tissues were taken on culture medium RPMI -1640, it was mechanically prepared. In next step were added cell activators -12- myristate 13- the acetate (PMA and Ionomycin as well as the inhibitor of transportation of proteins - Breferdin A. They were cultured 24 hours in 50 ml flasks at 37°C in a 5-95% CO2-air water-saturated atmosphere. After that, thyrocytes were identified by mouse mAb directed against human TPO epitope 64 conjugated with rabbit anti-mouse antibodies IgG (Fab'2 labeled by FITC. After incubation at room temperature to each of samples added reagent A fixative the cellular membrane. In next step into the cell suspensions were added reagent B to permeabilization of cellular membrane and specific anti-IL-4-PE or anti-IFN-γ-PE mAbs. Identification of intracellular cytokines in T lymphocytes was performed in the same procedure with application of anti-CD4-PerCP and anti-CD8-PerCP mAbs specific for T lymphocytes. The cells were analyzed in a flow cytometry (Coulter EPICS XL. Results In examined group of patients with GD we observed statistically significant higher mean percentage of cells with phenotype CD4+IL-4 (p Conclusions We conclude that human thyrocytes in autoimmune thyroid disorders could be a source of cytokine production and that their activation influences local interaction with T lymphocytes inflowing to the thyroid gland.

  13. Fibromyalgia in patients with thyroid autoimmunity: prevalence and relationship with disease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haliloglu, Sema; Ekinci, Bilge; Uzkeser, Hulya; Sevimli, Hakan; Carlioglu, Ayse; Macit, Pinar Mazlum

    2017-07-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a syndrome characterised by chronic musculoskeletal pain, tenderness and other somatic symptoms. The prevalence of FM is approximately 2-7% in the general global population and is 30-40% in the population of Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) with a structural pathology. In 2010, new classification criteria for FM were proposed, as an alternative to the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) 1990 criteria. The objectives of the present study were to identify the prevalence of FM in the HT population and evaluate the associated features by using the new diagnostic criteria. The study group included 79 consecutive patients with HT with or without FM. Recorded data included age, gender, laboratory parameters, sociodemographic features and clinical findings, presence of somatic symptoms, and disease activity indices. The prevalence of FM in patients with HT was 62%. Antithyroid peroxidase antibody (TPOAb) positivity, duration of disease, and waist circumference were significantly associated with concomitant FM (p = 0.000, p = 0.000, and p = 0.015, respectively). A strong positive correlation was noted between fibromyalgia impact questionnaire (FIQ) scores and disease duration, age, values of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and TPOAb, waist circumference and marital status. TPOAb was found to be independent of body mass index, age and TSH. Concomitant FM is a common clinical problem in HT and its recognition is important for the optimal management of the disease. The new set of diagnostic criteria for FM reinforces this situation. Consideration of the FM component in the management of HT increases the likelihood of treatment success.

  14. Ocorrência de doenças autoimunes tireoidianas em pacientes com doenças reumáticas Autoimmune thyroid disease in patients with rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Cristina Martins Vicente Robazzi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Anormalidades na função tireoidiana e presença de autoanticorpos da tireoide têm sido frequentemente descritas em pacientes com doenças reumatológicas autoimunes, como síndrome de Sjögren, artrite reumatoide, lúpus eritematoso sistêmico e esclerodermia. São limitados os dados sobre prevalência e características clínicas de tireoidite autoimune em outras doenças reumatológicas, tais como febre reumática e lúpus eritematoso sistêmico juvenil. Os autores revisaram as associações de doenças autoimunes endócrinas e reumáticas, avaliando as diversas faixas etárias e condições clínicas. O levantamento bibliográfico foi realizado por meio de busca por artigos científicos indexados em bancos de dados de ciências da saúde em geral, como Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde (LILACS, Medline/PubMed e Scientific Eletronic Library Online (SciELO. Utilizaram-se os seguintes descritores: "rheumatic autoimmune diseases and autoimmune thyroid diseases", "thyroid disorders and rheumatic diseases", "thyroiditis and rheumatic diseases", "autoimmune diseases and thyroid", e "pediatric rheumatic diseases and autoimmune thyroid diseases". Este estudo mostrou que, apesar de resultados contraditórios na literatura, há maior prevalência da associação entre doenças autoimunes da tireoide e doenças reumáticas, destacando-se a possibilidade de mecanismos patogênicos comuns entre as doenças.Thyroid function abnormalities and thyroid autoantibodies have been frequently described in patients with rheumatologic autoimmune diseases, such as Sjögren's syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and scleroderma. Limited data are available regarding the prevalence and clinical characteristics of autoimmune thyroiditis in other rheumatologic disorders, such as rheumatic fever and juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus. The authors review the association of endocrine autoimmune and rheumatic

  15. HISTOPATHOLOGIC PATTERN OF THYROID DISEASE B ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2003-10-01

    Oct 1, 2003 ... The major risk factor predisposing to thyroid cancer is exposure to ionizing radiation, particularly during the first two decades of life. Certain thyroid diseases such as nodular colloid goiter and autoimmune thyroid diseases (Hashimoto's thyroiditis) have been implicated as predisposing factors. Unlike the ...

  16. Thyroid peroxidase forms thionamide-sensitive homodimers: relevance for immunomodulation of thyroid autoimmunity

    OpenAIRE

    McDonald, David O.; Pearce, Simon H. S.

    2009-01-01

    Thyroid peroxidase (TPO) is the key enzyme in thyroid hormone production and a universal autoantigen in Graves? and other autoimmune thyroid diseases. We wished to explore the expression of TPO and whether it was affected by thionamide antithyroid drugs. We studied recombinant TPO, stably expressed by a Chinese hamster ovary cell line (CHO-TPO) and transiently expressed TPO-enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) and -FLAG fusion proteins. Immunoblotting of CHO-TPO cell extracts showed high...

  17. Polymorphisms of ST2-IL18R1-IL18RAP gene cluster: a new risk for autoimmune thyroid diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X; Zhu, Y F; Li, D M; Qin, Q; Wang, Q; Muhali, F S; Jiang, W J; Zhang, J A

    2016-02-01

    Interleukin 33 (IL33) / ST2 pathway and ST2-interlukin18 receptor1-interlukin18 receptor accessory protein (ST2-IL18R1-IL18RAP) gene cluster have been involved in many autoimmune diseases but few report in autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD). In this study, we investigated whether polymorphisms of IL33, ST2, IL18R1, and IL18RAP are associated with Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT), two major forms of AITD, among a Chinese population. A total of 11 SNPs were explored in a case-control study including 417 patients with GD, 250 HT patients and 301 controls, including rs1929992, rs10975519, rs10208293, rs6543116, rs1041973, rs3732127, rs11465597, rs1035130, rs2293225, rs1035127, rs917997 of IL 33, ST2-IL18R1-IL18RAP gene cluster. Genotyping of these SNPs was performed using matrix-assisted laser desorption / ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometer (MALDI-TOF-MS) platform from Sequenom. The frequencies of allele A and AA+AG genotype of rs6543116 (ST2) in HT patients were significantly increased compared with those of the controls (P = 0.029/0.021, OR = 1.31/1.62). And in another SNP rs917997, AA+AG genotype presented an increased frequency in HT subjects compared with controls (P = 0.046, OR = 1.53). Furthermore, the haplotype GAGCCCG from ST2-IL18R1-IL18RAP gene cluster (rs6543116, rs1041973, rs1035130, rs3732127, rs1035127, rs2293225, rs917997) was associated with increased susceptibility to GD with an OR of 2.03 (P = 0.022, 95% CI = 1.07-3.86). Some SNPs of ST2-IL18R1-IL18RAP gene cluster might increase the risk of susceptibility of HT and GD in Chinese Han population. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Lack of association between estrogen receptor β dinucleotide repeat polymorphism and autoimmune thyroid diseases in Japanese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomita Motowo

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs, such as Graves' disease (GD and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT, appear to develop as a result of complex interactions between predisposing genes and environmental triggers. Susceptibility to AITDs is conferred by genes in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA and genes unlinked to HLA, including the CTLA-4 gene. Recently, estrogen receptor (ER β, located at human chromosome 14q23-24.1, was identifed. We analyzed a dinucleotide (CAn repeat polymorphism located in the flanking region of ERβ gene in patients with AITDs and in normal subjects. High heterozygosity makes this polymorphism a useful marker in the genetic study of disorders affecting female endocrine systems. We also correlated a ERβ gene microsatellite polymorphism with bone mineral density (BMD in the distal radius and biochemical markers of bone turnover in patients with GD in remission. Results Fourteen different alleles were found in 133 patients with GD, 114 patients with HT, and 179 controls subjects. The various alleles were designated as allele*1 through allele*14 according to the number of the repeats, from 18 to 30. There was no significant difference in the distributions of ERβ alleles between patient groups and controls. Although recent study demonstrated a significant relation between a allele*9 in the ERβ gene and BMD in postmenopausal Japanese women, there were no statistically significant interaction between this allele and BMD in the distal radius, nor biochemical markers in patients with GD in remission. Conclusions The present results do not support an association between the ERβ microsatellite marker and AITD in the Japanese population. We also suggest that the ERβ microsatellite polymorphism has at most a minor pathogenic importance in predicting the risk of osteoporosis as a complication of GD.

  19. Pregnancy and Thyroid Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... thyroid medicines made with animal thyroid, such as Armour Thyroid, but is not useful for your baby’s ... the American Thyroid Association for the diagnosis and management of thyroid disease during pregnancy and the postpartum. ...

  20. Comparison of Autoimmune Thyroid Disease in Patients With Progressive and Stable Vitiligo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdanpanah, Mohammad Javad; Seyedi Noghabi, Seyed Ali; Taghavi, Morteza; Afzal Aghaee, Monavar; Zabolinejad, Naghmeh

    2016-01-01

    Activity of vitiligo has not been considered as a patient selection criteria in previous studies; we decided to compare the presence of elevated thyroid auto-antibodies in patients with progressive and stable vitiligo. Seventy-two patients with vitiligo were examined for thyroid problems and were divided into 2 groups of stable and progressive vitiligo according to their history and physical examination. Anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies (anti-TPO antibodies), thyroxine (T4), and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels were assessed for all patients. Elevated levels of anti-TPO antibodies were observed in 43.7% of the patients with stable vitiligo and in 37.5% of patients with progressive vitiligo, which was not statistically significant (P = .315). This study not only confirmed thyroid dysfunction in patients with vitiligo but also showed that there was no difference in thyroid dysfunction and anti-TPO antibody levels in the subgroups of patients with stable or progressive vitiligo. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Association between autoimmune thyroiditis and depressive disorder in psychiatric outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degner, Detlef; Haust, Merle; Meller, Johannes; Rüther, Eckart; Reulbach, Udo

    2015-02-01

    Thyroid diseases are often associated with psychiatric disorders. The prevalence of autoimmune thyroiditis in the general population is estimated to be at about 5-14 %. A clinical study was conducted to evaluate the association between autoimmune thyroiditis and depression in psychiatric outpatients. Fifty-two patients with depression and nineteen patients with schizophrenia (serving as control group), attending a psychiatric outpatient unit, were included. In addition to the measurement of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), free triiodothyronine, free thyroxine, antithyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO) antibodies, and anti-thyroglobulin antibodies, ultrasound examination of the thyroid gland was performed. The proportion of pathologically increased anti-TPO levels in patients with depression was high. Furthermore, the distribution of pathologically increased anti-TPO levels was significantly (χ (2) = 5.5; p = 0.019) different between patients with depression (32.7 %) and patients with schizophrenia (5.3 %). In a gender- and age-adjusted logistic regression, the odds ratio of uni- or bipolar patients with depression for an autoimmune thyroiditis was ten times higher (95 % CI = 1.2-85.3) when compared with schizophrenia patients. TSH basal level did not differ between patients with depression and patients with schizophrenia. Our study demonstrates a strong association between anti-TPO levels, which are considered to be of diagnostic value for autoimmune thyroiditis (in combination with a hypoechoic thyroid in ultrasonography) with uni- or bipolar depression. It should be noted that the routinely measured TSH level is not sufficient in itself to diagnose this relevant autoimmune comorbidity.

  2. Chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto disease)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... common in people with a family history of thyroid disease. In very rare cases, the disease may be ... syndrome - Hashimoto; PGA II - Hashimoto Images Endocrine glands Thyroid enlargement - scintiscan Hashimoto's disease (chronic thyroiditis) Thyroid gland References Amino N, Lazarus ...

  3. Aberrant Levels of Hematopoietic/Neuronal Growth and Differentiation Factors in Euthyroid Women at Risk for Autoimmune Thyroid Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elske T Massolt

    Full Text Available Subjects at risk for major mood disorders have a higher risk to develop autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD and vice-versa, implying a shared pathogenesis. In mood disorder patients, an abnormal profile of hematopoietic/neuronal growth factors is observed, suggesting that growth/differentiation abnormalities of these cell lineages may predispose to mood disorders. The first objective of our study was to investigate whether an aberrant profile of these hematopoietic/neuronal growth factors is also detectable in subjects at risk for AITD. A second objective was to study the inter relationship of these factors with previously determined and published growth factors/cytokines in the same subjects.We studied 64 TPO-Ab-negative females with at least 1 first- or second-degree relative with AITD, 32 of whom did and 32 who did not seroconvert to TPO-Ab positivity in 5-year follow-up. Subjects were compared with 32 healthy controls (HCs. We measured serum levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, Stem Cell Factor (SCF, Insulin-like Growth Factor-Binding Protein 2 (IGFBP-2, Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF and IL-7 at baseline.BDNF was significantly lower (8.2 vs 18.9 ng/ml, P<0.001, while EGF (506.9 vs 307.6 pg/ml, P = 0.003 and IGFBP-2 (388.3 vs 188.5 ng/ml, P = 0.028 were significantly higher in relatives than in HCs. Relatives who seroconverted in the next 5 years had significantly higher levels of SCF than non-seroconverters (26.5 vs 16.7 pg/ml, P = 0.017. In a cluster analysis with the previously published growth factors/cytokines SCF clustered together with IL-1β, IL-6 and CCL-3, of which high levels also preceded seroconversion.Relatives of AITD patients show aberrant serum levels of 4 hematopoietic/neuronal growth factors similar to the aberrancies found in mood disorder patients, suggesting that shared growth and differentiation defects in both the hematopoietic and neuronal system may underlie thyroid autoimmunity and mood disorders. A

  4. Regulatory B and T cell responses in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease and healthy controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Birte; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2016-01-01

    , we found increased proportions of naïve Th17 cells after stimulation with the thyroid self-antigen thyroid peroxidase (TPO) and the Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (E. coli LPS). The proportions of Th10 cells were similar in healthy donors and in HT patients after antigen-specific stimulation...... for human Th17 differentiation and, accordingly, HT patients showed higher baseline production of IL-6 and TGF-β1 than healthy donors. Moreover, the baseline expression of mRNA encoding the transcription factor Forkhead box protein 3 (FOXP3) was similar in HT patients and healthy donors, but HT patients...

  5. Generalized Vitiligo Associated Autoimmune Diseases in Japanese Patients Their Families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiko Narita

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions: Among Japanese vitiligo patients, there is a subgroup with strong evidence of genetically determined susceptibility to not only vitiligo, but also to autoimmune thyroid disease and other autoimmune disorders.

  6. Thyroid Autoimmune Antibodies and Major Depressive Disorder in Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fam, Johnson; Rush, A John; Burt, Tal; Chan, Edwin Sy; Siddiqui, Fahad J; Assam, Pryseley N; Lai, Oi Fah; Chan, Herng Nieng; Ng, Beng Yeong; Khoo, Daphne H

    2015-08-01

    Anti-thyroid antibodies are associated with extra-thyroid diseases such as Graves' ophthalmopathy and Hashimoto's encephalopathy. Some evidence suggests that anti-thyroid antibodies are also associated with depression. Interleukin (IL)-17 appears to play an important role in autoimmune thyroid disease. This study investigated whether specific thyroid autoantibodies and IL-17 distinguished persons with depression from non-depressed controls. Forty-seven adult females with non-psychotic, current major depressive disorder and 80 healthy female controls participated in this study. Thyroid peroxidase antibodies, thyroglobulin antibodies, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor antibodies, free T3 and T4, TSH and IL-17 were measured from the serum. Measurements were repeated to assess test-retest reliability. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to estimate discriminatory values of the measurements. Differences between groups and associations between the clinical and biochemical assessments were analysed. Median TSH receptor antibody concentration was significantly higher in the depressed than control group (P depression severity scores (r = 0.33, P depression severity scores. Thyroid function and other thyroid autoantibodies were not associated with depression severity. TSH receptor antibodies might be a biomarker of immune dysfunction in depression.

  7. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-γ in Thyroid Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Martina Ferrari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor- (PPAR- γ expression has been shown in thyroid tissue from patients with thyroiditis or Graves’ disease and furthermore in the orbital tissue of patients with Graves’ ophthalmopathy (GO, such as in extraocular muscle cells. An increasing body of evidence shows the importance of the (C-X-C motif receptor 3 (CXCR3 and cognate chemokines (C-X-C motif ligand (CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11, in the T helper 1 immune response and in inflammatory diseases such as thyroid autoimmune disorders. PPAR-γ agonists show a strong inhibitory effect on the expression and release of CXCR3 chemokines, in vitro, in various kinds of cells, such as thyrocytes, and in orbital fibroblasts, preadipocytes, and myoblasts from patients with GO. Recently, it has been demonstrated that rosiglitazone is involved in a higher risk of heart failure, stroke, and all-cause mortality in old patients. On the contrary, pioglitazone has not shown these effects until now; this favors pioglitazone for a possible use in patients with thyroid autoimmunity. However, further studies are ongoing to explore the use of new PPAR-γ agonists in the treatment of thyroid autoimmune disorders.

  8. Association between thyroid autoimmunity and recurrent angioedema in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagol, Hacer Ilbilge Ertoy; Yilmaz, Ozlem; Topal, Erdem; Bideci, Aysun; Bakirtas, Arzu

    2015-01-01

    The association between thyroid autoimmunity (TA) and idiopathic isolated angioedema (or angioedema without urticaria) has not been evaluated in either children or in adults up until now. We, therefore, aimed to investigate underlying or concomitant TA and/or autoimmune thyroid disease in children diagnosed with recurrent idiopathic angioedema. Children who were consecutively diagnosed with recurrent idiopathic histaminergic acquired angioedema (IH-AAE) between January 2011 and January 2014 constituted the case group. A standard diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm was applied to all the patients with recurrent IH-AAE. Thyroid autoantibodies and thyroid function tests were measured in all the patients with recurrent IH-AAE and in healthy control groups. Prophylaxis with an antihistamine was started for patients with frequently recurrent IH-AAE. Eighty consecutive children with recurrent IH-AAE (49 boys; median age, 8.3 years) and 80 healthy children (39 boys; median, 8 years) were enrolled in this prospective, case-control study (p > 0.05 for age and sex). The IH-AAE group was significantly different than the control group with respect to TA (13.7% versus 2.5%, respectively; p = 0.009) but was similar with respect to autoimmune thyroid disease (3.7% versus 0%, respectively; p = 0.2). The median follow-up of the recurrent IH-AAE group was 34 months (range, 12-45 months). Patients with recurrent IH-AAE with and those without TA were not different with respect to either the need or the duration of antihistamine prophylaxis (p > 0.05 for both). Recurrent IH-AAE may be related to or associated with TA and/or autoimmune thyroid diseases in some children. However, exploring to see whether this association is a causal link or just an epiphenomenon deserves further investigation and longer follow-ups.

  9. Celiac disease and endocrine autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahaly, George J; Schuppan, Detlef

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a small-intestinal inflammatory disease that is triggered by the ingestion of the storage proteins (gluten) of wheat, barley and rye. Endocrine autoimmunity is prevalent in patients with CD and their relatives. The genes that predispose to endocrine autoimmune diseases, e.g. type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroid diseases, and Addison's disease, i.e. DR3-DQ2 and DR4-DQ8, are also the major genetic determinants of CD, which is the best understood HLA-linked disease. Thus, up to 30% of first-degree relatives both of patients with CD and/or endocrine autoimmunity are affected by the other disease. In CD, certain gluten proteins bind with high affinity to HLA-DQ2 or -DQ8 in the small-intestinal mucosa, to activate gluten-specific T cells which are instrumental in the destruction of the resorptive villi. Here, the autoantigen tissue transglutaminase increases the T cell response by generating deamidated gluten peptides that bind more strongly to DQ2 or DQ8. Classical symptoms such as diarrhea and consequences of malabsorption like anemia and osteoporosis are often absent in patients with (screening-detected) CD, but this absence does not significantly affect these patients' incidence of endocrine autoimmunity. Moreover, once autoimmunity is established, a gluten-free diet is not able to induce remission. However, ongoing studies attempt to address how far a gluten-free diet may prevent or retard the development of CD and endocrine autoimmunity in children at risk. The close relationship between CD and endocrine autoimmunity warrants a broader immune genetic and endocrine screening of CD patients and their relatives. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. SEQUENCE SIMILARITY BETWEEN THYROID SELF-PROTEIN AND HEPATITIS C VIRUS POLYPROTEIN: possible triggering mechanism of autoimmune thyroiditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maristella de Araújo Carvalho SOUSA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background - Exposure to viral antigens that share amino acid sequence similar with self- antigens might trigger autoimmune diseases in genetically predisposed individuals, and the molecular mimicry theory suggests that epitope mimicry between the virus and human proteins can activate autoimmune disease. Objective - The purpose of this study is to explore the possible sequence similarity between the amino acid sequences of thyroid self-protein and hepatitis C virus proteins, using databanks of proteins and immunogenic peptides, to explain autoimmune thyroid disease. Methods - Were performed the comparisons between the amino acid sequence of the hepatitis C virus polyprotein and thyroid self-protein human, available in the database of National Center for Biotechnology Information on Basic Local Alignment Search Tool. Results - The sequence similarity was related each hepatitis C virus genotype to each thyroid antigen. The similarities between the thyroid and the viral peptides ranged from 21.0 % (31 identical residues out of 147 amino acid in the sequence to 71.0% (5 identical residues out of 7 amino acid in the sequence. Conclusion - Bioinformatics data, suggest a possible pathogenic link between hepatitis C virus and autoimmune thyroid disease. Through of molecular mimicry is observed that sequences similarities between viral polyproteins and self-proteins thyroid could be a mechanism of induction of crossover immune response to self-antigens, with a breakdown of self-tolerance, resulting in autoimmune thyroid disease.

  11. AIRE-mutations and autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruserud, Øyvind; Oftedal, Bergithe E; Wolff, Anette B; Husebye, Eystein S

    2016-12-01

    The gene causing the severe organ-specific autoimmune disease autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type-1 (APS-1) was identified in 1997 and named autoimmune regulator (AIRE). AIRE plays a key role in shaping central immunological tolerance by facilitating negative selection of T cells in the thymus, building the thymic microarchitecture, and inducing a specific subset of regulatory T cells. So far, about 100 mutations have been identified. Recent advances suggest that certain mutations located in the SAND and PHD1 domains exert a dominant negative effect on wild type AIRE resulting in milder seemingly common forms of autoimmune diseases, including pernicious anemia, vitiligo and autoimmune thyroid disease. These findings indicate that AIRE also contribute to autoimmunity in more common organ-specific autoimmune disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Interaction of HLA-DRB1* alleles and CTLA4 (+49 AG) gene polymorphism in Autoimmune Thyroid Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramgopal, Sivanadham; Rathika, Chinniah; Padma, Malini Ravi; Murali, Vijayan; Arun, Kannan; Kamaludeen, Mohamed Nainar; Balakrishnan, Karuppiah

    2018-02-05

    Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases (AITDs), including Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) and Graves' disease (GD), arise by the complex interaction of genes and environmental factors. The aim of present study was to study the susceptible associations of HLA-DRB1* alleles and CTLA4 +49 AG polymorphism in AITD in south India. AITD patients (n=235; HT=180; GD=55) and age/sex matched healthy controls (n, 235) were enrolled to type HLA-DRB1* alleles and 'CTLA4 +49 AG' by PCR-SSP and PCR-RFLP methods respectively. Analysis revealed CTLA4 +49 'GG' genotype was increased significantly in patients (PL: p=8.7×10 -8 ; HT: p=9.3×10 -6 ; GD: p=0.006). Decreased frequencies of 'AA' genotype was observed in patients (PL: p=9.4×10 -6 ; HT: p=0.008; GD: p=9.0×10 -6 ). Increased frequencies were observed for HLA alleles DRB1*12 (PL: p=1.42×10 -10 ; HT: p=5.75×10 -8 ; GD: p=0.002) and DRB1*11 (PL: p=0.0025; HT: p=0.013) in patients. Decreased frequencies for alleles DRB1*10 (PL: p=0.00002; HT: p=0.018; GD: p=1.63×10 -5 ) and DRB1*03 (PL: p=0.003; HT: p=0.003) were observed, suggesting a protective association. Combinatorial/Synergistic analysis have revealed an increased frequencies for 'DRB1*11+AG' (PL: p=0.022), 'DRB1*12+AG' (PL: p=6.1×10 -5 ; HT: p=0.0001), 'DRB1*04+GG' (PL: p=0.003; HT: p=0.008), 'DRB1*07+GG' (PL: p=0.009; HT: p=0.014) and 'DRB1*12+GG' (PL: p=0.005; HT: p=0.005) in patients. However, the combinations such as 'DRB1*10+AA' (PL: p=1.8×10 -6 ; HT: p=0.003) and 'DRB1*15+AA' (PL: p=0.006; GD: p=0.011) were decreased in patients showing a protective association. The 'GG/G' of CTLA4 +49AG SNP, HLA-DRB1*11/-DRB1*12 (DR5) alleles and the combinations of DRB1*11/DRB1*12 alleles with AG/GG genotype and DRB1*04/07/12 alleles with GG genotype may act as synergistic manner to confer the strong susceptibility to AITD in south India. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Bistability in autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapin, Nicolas; Mosekilde, Erik; Lund, Ole

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases damage host tissue, which, in turn, may trigger a stronger immune response. Systems characterized by such positive feedback loops can display co-existing stable steady states. In a mathematical model of autoimmune disease, one steady state may correspond to the healthy state...... and another to an autoimmune steady state characterized by widespread tissue damage and immune activation. We show how a triggering event may move the system from the healthy to the autoimmune state and how transient immunosuppressive treatment can move the system back to the healthy state....

  14. Autoimmune thyroiditis perdating the presentation of systemic lupus erythematosus: Two cases and a review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhir Rajeev

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases are commonly encountered in dermatology practice. While the association of two autoimmune diseases in the same individual is not unknown, it is relatively rare for the second disease to be suspected based on cutaneous manifestations. We present two such cases wherein cutaneous manifestations were the first clue to the development of lupus erythematosus in a setting of autoimmune thyroiditis. Further, we have reviewed literature on this uncommon occurrence and discuss various aspects of this association.

  15. Endocrine autoimmune disease: genetics become complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiebolt, Janneke; Koeleman, Bobby P C; van Haeften, Timon W

    2010-12-01

    The endocrine system is a frequent target in pathogenic autoimmune responses. Type 1 diabetes and autoimmune thyroid disease are the prevailing examples. When several diseases cluster together in one individual, the phenomenon is called autoimmune polyglandular syndrome. Progress has been made in understanding the genetic factors involved in endocrine autoimmune diseases. Studies on monogenic autoimmune diseases such as autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1, immunodysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked and primary immune deficiencies helped uncover the role of key regulators in the preservation of immune tolerance. Alleles of the major histocompatibility complex have been known to contribute to the susceptibility to most forms of autoimmunity for more than 3 decades. Furthermore, sequencing studies revealed three non-major histocompatibility complex loci and some disease specific loci, which control T lymphocyte activation or signalling. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have enabled acceleration in the identification of novel (non-HLA) loci and hence other relevant immune response pathways. Interestingly, several loci are shared between autoimmune diseases, and surprisingly some work in opposite direction. This means that the same allele which predisposes to a certain autoimmune disease can be protective in another. Well powered GWAS in type 1 diabetes has led to the uncovering of a significant number of risk variants with modest effect. These studies showed that the innate immune system may also play a role in addition to the adaptive immune system. It is anticipated that next generation sequencing techniques will uncover other (rare) variants. For other autoimmune disease (such as autoimmune thyroid disease) GWAS are clearly needed. © 2010 The Authors. European Journal of Clinical Investigation © 2010 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  16. Primary biliary cirrhosis--autoimmune hepatitis overlap syndrome associated with dermatomyositis, autoimmune thyroiditis and antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamfil, Cristina; Candrea, Elisabeta; Berki, Emese; Popov, Horațiu I; Radu, Pompilia I; Rednic, Simona

    2015-03-01

    Autoimmune liver diseases may be associated with extrahepatic autoimmune pathology. We report the case of a 52-year old woman who initially presented to the gastroenterology department for extreme fatigue, pale stools, dark urine and pruritus. Laboratory tests showed significant cholestasis and elevation of aminotransferase levels. Immunological tests revealed positive antinuclear (ANA=1:320) and antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA=1:40) with negative anti-smooth muscle and liver kidney microsomal type 1 antibodies. The biopsy was compatible with overlap syndrome type 1. The patient was commenced on immunosuppressive therapy according to standard of care (azathioprine 50mg, ursodeoxycholic acid and prednisone 0.5mg/kg), with moderate biochemical improvement. She subsequently developed proximal symmetrical weakness and cutaneous involvement and was diagnosed with biopsy-proven dermatomyositis. The immunosuppressive regimen was intensified to 150 mg azathioprine. At the three-month follow-up, her symptoms subsided and aminotransferases and muscle enzymes normalized. Upon further investigation the patient was diagnosed with autoimmune thyroiditis and antiphospholipid syndrome. To our knowledge, this is the first case of primary biliary cirrhosis - autoimmune hepatitis overlap syndrome associated with dermatomyositis, autoimmune thyroiditis and antiphospholipid syndrome.

  17. Gene expression profiling in autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bovin, Lone Frier; Brynskov, Jørn; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2007-01-01

    ) patients and healthy individuals were specific for the arthritic process or likewise altered in other chronic inflammatory diseases such as chronic autoimmune thyroiditis (Hashimoto's thyroiditis, HT) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Using qPCR for 18 RA-discriminative genes, there were no significant......A central issue in autoimmune disease is whether the underlying inflammation is a repeated stereotypical process or whether disease specific gene expression is involved. To shed light on this, we analysed whether genes previously found to be differentially regulated in rheumatoid arthritis (RA...... immunoinflammatory diseases, but only if accompanied by pronounced systemic manifestations. This suggests that at least some of the genes activated in RA are predominantly or solely related to general and disease-nonspecific autoimmune processes...

  18. Eosinophils in Autoimmune Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diny, Nicola L; Rose, Noel R; Čiháková, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    Eosinophils are multifunctional granulocytes that contribute to initiation and modulation of inflammation. Their role in asthma and parasitic infections has long been recognized. Growing evidence now reveals a role for eosinophils in autoimmune diseases. In this review, we summarize the function of eosinophils in inflammatory bowel diseases, neuromyelitis optica, bullous pemphigoid, autoimmune myocarditis, primary biliary cirrhosis, eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis, and other autoimmune diseases. Clinical studies, eosinophil-targeted therapies, and experimental models have contributed to our understanding of the regulation and function of eosinophils in these diseases. By examining the role of eosinophils in autoimmune diseases of different organs, we can identify common pathogenic mechanisms. These include degranulation of cytotoxic granule proteins, induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, release of proteases degrading extracellular matrix, immune modulation through cytokines, antigen presentation, and prothrombotic functions. The association of eosinophilic diseases with autoimmune diseases is also examined, showing a possible increase in autoimmune diseases in patients with eosinophilic esophagitis, hypereosinophilic syndrome, and non-allergic asthma. Finally, we summarize key future research needs.

  19. Eosinophils in Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Čiháková

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophils are multifunctional granulocytes that contribute to initiation and modulation of inflammation. Their role in asthma and parasitic infections has long been recognized. Growing evidence now reveals a role for eosinophils in autoimmune diseases. In this review, we summarize the function of eosinophils in inflammatory bowel diseases, neuromyelitis optica, bullous pemphigoid, autoimmune myocarditis, primary biliary cirrhosis, eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis, and other autoimmune diseases. Clinical studies, eosinophil-targeted therapies, and experimental models have contributed to our understanding of the regulation and function of eosinophils in these diseases. By examining the role of eosinophils in autoimmune diseases of different organs, we can identify common pathogenic mechanisms. These include degranulation of cytotoxic granule proteins, induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, release of proteases degrading extracellular matrix, immune modulation through cytokines, antigen presentation, and prothrombotic functions. The association of eosinophilic diseases with autoimmune diseases is also examined, showing a possible increase in autoimmune diseases in patients with eosinophilic esophagitis, hypereosinophilic syndrome, and non-allergic asthma. Finally, we summarize key future research needs.

  20. The chronic autoimmune thyroiditis quality of life selenium trial (CATALYST)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Kristian Hillert; Watt, Torquil; Bjørner, Jakob Bue

    2014-01-01

    Patients with chronic autoimmune thyroiditis have impaired health-related quality of life. The thyroid gland has a high selenium concentration, and specific selenoprotein enzyme families are crucial to immune function, and catalyze thyroid hormone metabolism and redox processes in thyroid cells......-enriched yeast or matching placebo tablets daily for 12 months. The experimental supplement will be SelenoPrecise(R). The primary outcome is thyroid-related quality of life assessed by the Thyroid Patient-Reported Outcome (ThyPRO) questionnaire. Secondary outcomes include serum thyroid peroxidase antibody...

  1. American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... List Common Thread Women & Autoimmunity Diagnosis Tips Coping Tools Support Groups Education Modules Caregivers Patient/Caregiver Relationship The Male Caregiver AD Knowledge Base Autoimmune Disease List Common ...

  2. Increased Incidence of Thyroid Dysfunction and Autoimmunity in Patients with Vernal Keratoconjunctivitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Stagi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hormones may play a role in the pathophysiology of vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC. An increased incidence of thyroid autoantibodies was recently observed in VKC, although there were no data on thyroid function. Two hundred and eighty-eight patients (202 males, 86 females; range 5.5 to 16.9 years with VKC were evaluated and compared with 188 normal age- and sex-matched subjects. In all subjects, serum concentrations of free T4, TSH, thyroperoxidase, thyroglobulin, and TSHr autoantibodies were evaluated. In VKC, the family history of thyroid diseases showed no significant differences compared to the controls (9.4 versus 8.6%, whereas the family history of autoimmune diseases was significantly higher (13.2% versus 6.3%; P<0.05. Subclinical hypothyroidism was diagnosed in 6.6% (versus 1.6% of the controls; P<0.05 and overt hypothyroidism in 0.7% (versus 0.0% of the controls; P=NS. Finally, 5.2% of patients were positive for thyroid autoantibodies, which were significantly higher with respect to the controls (0.5%, P<0.05. In the patients positive for thyroid autoantibodies, 80% showed a sonography pattern that suggested autoimmune thyroiditis. Thyroid function and autoimmunity abnormalities are frequently present in children with VKC. Children with VKC should be screened for thyroid function and evaluated for thyroid autoimmunity.

  3. Complicating autoimmune diseases in myasthenia gravis: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacu, Aliona; Andersen, Jintana Bunpan; Lisnic, Vitalie; Owe, Jone Furlund; Gilhus, Nils Erik

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a rare autoimmune disease of skeletal muscle endplates. MG subgroup is relevant for comorbidity, but usually not accounted for. MG patients have an increased risk for complicating autoimmune diseases, most commonly autoimmune thyroid disease, systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. In this review, we present concomitant autoimmune disorders associated with the different MG subgroups, and show how this influences treatment and prognosis. Concomitant MG should always be considered in patients with an autoimmune disorder and developing new neuromuscular weakness, fatigue or respiratory failure. When a second autoimmune disorder is suspected, MG should be included as a differential diagnosis. PMID:25915571

  4. The Study on the Thyroid Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Mun Ho

    1982-01-01

    Several recent advances in our knowledge of thyroid physiology have broad application to the diagnosis and management of thyroid disorders. For in the thyroid, more than other end-ocrine organs, pathophysiology can be translated directly into the diagnosis and management of thyroid disease. Graves' disease is a syndrome including goiter with hyperthyroidism, exophthalmos and dermatopathy. The pathogenesis of Graves' disease is not yet clearly identified, but various autoantibodies to the thyroid gland and immunapathalogic studied indicate that autoimmune processes are involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. The diagnosis and management of Graves' disease are largely dependent on radionuclide technique as radioimmunoassay, radioactive iodine therapy and so on. Several laboratory tests are also developed to determine the remission of this disease including TRH stimulation test, T 3 , suppression test and detection of thyroid stimulating immunoglobulins. Autoimmune thyroiditis is almost certainly a primary immunologic disease and the incidence tends to increase recently, mainly due to the application of biopsy technique is thyroid diseases. Thyroid nodules have been a great challenge to physicians because of the possibility of malignancy. But recently, cytologic examination of thyroid aspirate provides a very simple and also reliable diagnostic method in patients with thyroid nodules. In 163 patients with thyroid nodules, only 19.3% was revealed to be malignant. Therefore cytologic examination of thyroid aspirate and thyroid biopsy should be included in the diagnosis of nodular patients prior to surgical intervention. In this paper, a comprehensive review is presented on the pathogenesis, clinical features, laboratory findings and therapeutic modalities of various thyroid diseases on the basis of over 80 researches performed during the past 20 years at radioisotope clinic, Seoul National University Hospital.

  5. Sirolimus for Autoimmune Disease of Blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-02

    Autoimmune Pancytopenia; Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS); Evans Syndrome; Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Anemia, Hemolytic, Autoimmune; Autoimmune Neutropenia; Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic; Inflammatory Bowel Disease; Rheumatoid Arthritis

  6. Epigenetics and Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero-Ronderos, Paula; Montoya-Ortiz, Gladis

    2012-01-01

    Epigenetics is defined as the study of all inheritable and potentially reversible changes in genome function that do not alter the nucleotide sequence within the DNA. Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation, histone modification, nucleosome positioning, and microRNAs (miRNAs) are essential to carry out key functions in the regulation of gene expression. Therefore, the epigenetic mechanisms are a window to understanding the possible mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of complex diseases such as autoimmune diseases. It is noteworthy that autoimmune diseases do not have the same epidemiology, pathology, or symptoms but do have a common origin that can be explained by the sharing of immunogenetic mechanisms. Currently, epigenetic research is looking for disruption in one or more epigenetic mechanisms to provide new insights into autoimmune diseases. The identification of cell-specific targets of epigenetic deregulation will serve us as clinical markers for diagnosis, disease progression, and therapy approaches. PMID:22536485

  7. Headache in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Seby; Hajj-Ali, Rula A

    2014-03-01

    Autoimmune diseases are a group of heterogeneous inflammatory disorders characterized by systemic or localized inflammation, leading to ischemia and tissue destruction. These include disorders like systemic lupus erythematosus and related diseases, systemic vasculitides, and central nervous system (CNS) vasculitis (primary or secondary). Headache is a very common manifestation of CNS involvement of these diseases. Although headache characteristics can be unspecific and often non-diagnostic, it is important to recognize because headache can be the first manifestation of CNS involvement. Prompt recognition and treatment is necessary not only to treat the headache, but also to help prevent serious neurological sequelae that frequently accompany autoimmune diseases. In this review, we discuss headache associated with autoimmune diseases along with important mimics. © 2014 American Headache Society.

  8. Pili Annulati Coincident with Alopecia Areata, Autoimmune Thyroid Disease, and Primary IgA Deficiency: Case Report and Considerations on the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Castelli

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Pili annulati is a rare autosomal dominant hair disorder clinically characterized by a pattern of alternating bright and dark bands of the hair, the bright bands appearing dark if observed by transmitted light. This pattern is due to the periodic occurrence of air-filled cavities along the hair cortex which scatter and reflect the light while precluding its transmission. A susceptibility region, including a possibly responsible Frizzled gene, has been mapped to the telomeric region of chromosome 12q, although a specific mutation has not been identified. The condition has sometimes been observed in concurrence with alopecia areata, and in this paper we report a case in whom the concomitant severe alopecia areata was associated with autoimmune thyroid disease and primary IgA deficiency – a quadruple complex which, to our knowledge, has never been previously described. The occurrence of multiple immune disorders in the same patient affected by pili annulati could represent a key to understanding the high prevalence of alopecia areata in this condition. Specifically, in individuals predisposed to autoimmune disease, the molecular alterations that cause the anatomical changes of pili annulati could prompt the immune response against the hair root that underlies alopecia areata.

  9. Towards a further understanding of prenatal thyroid theory of homosexuality: Autoimmune thyroiditis, polycystic ovary syndrome, autism and low birth weight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman Sabuncuoglu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Research into the neurobiological origins of same-sex attraction is inconclusive. A recent theory of homosexuality posited that maternal thyroid dysfunction during pregnancy is associated with an increased rate of homosexual orientation in offspring. Relevant studies from the prenatal thyroid model perspective were reviewed, the major findings of which are as follows: i An increased prevalence of Hashimoto’s disease in lesbian women suggests a maternal and even familial presence of the same autoimmune thyroid disease. Female-tomale transsexuals and lesbian women were also reported to have higher rates of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS. Over the last several years, reports suggesting a strong link between PCOS and thyroid autoimmunity have accumulated. ii The increased risk of autism spectrum disorders (ASD in the offspring of mothers with thyroid autoimmunity in pregnancy and the association between ASD and gender dysphoria indicate a link between maternal thyroid dysfunction and gender dysphoria/same-sex attraction in the offspring. iii The high risk of miscarriage and retarded fetal growth in pregnancies of mothers who give birth to homosexual offspring can be explained by the impact of maternal thyroid dysfunction during pregnancy. This perspective review highlights relevant research findings and integrates them into the prenatal thyroid model of homosexuality. A better understanding of the mechanisms involved in the generation of same-sex orientation will contribute to the betterment of individual lives, as well as of society.

  10. Identification of Novel Genetic Loci Associated with Thyroid Peroxidase Antibodies and Clinical Thyroid Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medici, Marco; Porcu, Eleonora; Pistis, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) are common, affecting 2-5% of the general population. Individuals with positive thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAbs) have an increased risk of autoimmune hypothyroidism (Hashimoto's thyroiditis), as well as autoimmune hyperthyroidism (Graves' disease.......12-1.39, P = 6.2×10(-5)). The MAGI3 variant was also associated with an increased risk of hypothyroidism (OR: 1.57, 95% CI 1.18-2.10, P = 1.9×10(-3)). This first GWAS meta-analysis for TPOAbs identified five newly associated loci, three of which were also associated with clinical thyroid disease....... With these markers we identified a large subgroup in the general population with a substantially increased risk of TPOAbs. The results provide insight into why individuals with thyroid autoimmunity do or do not eventually develop thyroid disease, and these markers may therefore predict which TPOAb...

  11. Kaleidoscope of autoimmune diseases in HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roszkiewicz, Justyna; Smolewska, Elzbieta

    2016-11-01

    Within the last 30 years, the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has changed its status from inevitably fatal to chronic disorder with limited impact on life span. However, this breakthrough was mainly the effect of introduction of the aggressive antiviral treatment, which has led to the clinically significant increase in CD4+ cell count, resulting in fewer cases of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and improved management of opportunistic infections occurring in the course of the disease. The occurrence of a particular autoimmune disease depends on degree of immunosuppression of the HIV-positive patient. In 2002, four stages of autoimmunity were proposed in patients infected by HIV, based on the absolute CD4+ cell count, feature of AIDS as well as on the presence of autoimmune diseases. Spectrum of autoimmune diseases associated with HIV infection seems to be unexpectedly wide, involving several organs, such as lungs (sarcoidosis), thyroid gland (Graves' disease), liver (autoimmune hepatitis), connective tissue (systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, polyarteritis nodosa and other types of vasculitis, antiphospholipid syndrome) or hematopoietic system (autoimmune cytopenias). This paper contains the state of art on possible coincidences between HIV infection and a differential types of autoimmune diseases, including the potential mechanisms of this phenomenon. As the clinical manifestations of autoimmunization often mimic those inscribed in the course of HIV infection, health care providers should be aware of this rare but potentially deadly association and actively seek for its symptoms in their patients.

  12. Thyroid Autoimmunity and Function after Treatment with Biological Antirheumatic Agents in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bliddal, Sofie; Dinsen, Stina; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla

    2017-01-01

    With the increased pro-inflammatory response in both rheumatoid arthritis and thyroid autoimmune diseases, treatment with biological antirheumatic agents (BAAs) of the former may affect the course of the latter. In hepatitis C and cancer patients, treatment with biological agents substantially...... increases the risk of developing thyroid autoimmunity. As the use of BAAs in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis is increasing, this review aimed to investigate if such use affected thyroid status in rheumatoid arthritis patients. We conducted a systematic literature search and included six studies...

  13. Psoriasis as an autoimmune disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Owczarczyk-Saczonek

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays it is known that psoriasis belongs to the group of autoimmune diseases and may coexist with other diseases in this group. Most often patients have psoriatic arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, autoimmune thyroid diseases and multiple sclerosis. The coexistence of these disorders can be a diagnostic and therapeutic problem (there is controversy over the use of corticosteroids. The common pathogenesis is still not explained. We know that the loss of immunotolerance leads to formation of autoreactive Th1 and Th17 lymphocytes which recognize self-antigens and lead to their destruction in the target organ. Some features of immune mechanisms, observed in psoriasis, suggest its autoimmune background. In psoriasis the main role is played by the activation of the axis IL-12/Th1/IFN- and Th17/Il-23. Il-12 probably acts on naive T cells and the Th1 response is initiated. Il-23 maintains the Th1-mediated inflammatory reaction, stimulates maturation and effects of Th17, and maintains a certain amount of memory cells. We also observe dysfunction of Treg cells, which are responsible for the destruction of autoreactive lymphocytes. In addition, psoriatic keratinocytes have increased resistance to apoptosis, which eliminate damaged cells so that they cannot be recognized as a foreign antigen. However, researchers have suggested that initially the polyclonal activation of T lymphocytes is induced by superantigens (e.g. streptococcal M protein, peptidoglycan or skin trauma (Koebner phenomenon, whereas in the later phase self-antigens in the epidermis are recognized by autoreactive T cells (keratin K 17, HPV 5 proteins L1, Pso p27, leading to autoimmunity.

  14. Galectin-3 in autoimmunity and autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Felipe L; Gatto, Mariele; Bassi, Nicola; Luisetto, Roberto; Ghirardello, Anna; Punzi, Leonardo; Doria, Andrea

    2015-08-01

    Galectin-3 (gal-3) is a β-galactoside-binding lectin, which regulates cell-cell and extracellular interactions during self/non-self-antigen recognition and cellular activation, proliferation, differentiation, migration and apoptosis. It plays a significant role in cellular and tissue pathophysiology by organizing niches that drive inflammation and immune responses. Gal-3 has some therapeutic potential in several diseases, including chronic inflammatory disorders, cancer and autoimmune diseases. Gal-3 exerts a broad spectrum of functions which differs according to its intra- or extracellular localization. Recombinant gal-3 strategy has been used to identify potential mode of action of gal-3; however, exogenous gal-3 may not reproduce the functions of the endogenous gal-3. Notably, gal-3 induces monocyte-macrophage differentiation, interferes with dendritic cell fate decision, regulates apoptosis on T lymphocytes and inhibits B-lymphocyte differentiation into immunoglobulin secreting plasma cells. Considering the influence of these cell populations in the pathogenesis of several autoimmune diseases, gal-3 seems to play a role in development of autoimmunity. Gal-3 has been suggested as a potential therapeutic agent in patients affected with some autoimmune disorders. However, the precise role of gal-3 in driving the inflammatory process in autoimmune or immune-mediated disorders remains elusive. Here, we reviewed the involvement of gal-3 in cellular and tissue events during autoimmune and immune-mediated inflammatory diseases. © 2015 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  15. Localized granuloma annulare and autoimmune thyroiditis in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This presentation is a further evidence that GA and autoimmune thyroiditis may be associated. Key Words: Granuloma annulare, Autoimmune thyroiditis. Résumé L'association d'un granulome annulaire (GA) et auto-immunité de la thyroidite a été documenté dans la litterature au cours des 13 cas précédents. Toutefois, la ...

  16. Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases in Patients Treated with Alemtuzumab for Multiple Sclerosis: An Example of Selective Anti-TSH-Receptor Immune Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Rotondi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Alemtuzumab, a humanized anti-CD52 monoclonal antibody, is approved for the treatment of active relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS. Alemtuzumab induces a rapid and prolonged depletion of lymphocytes from the circulation, which results in a profound immuno-suppression status followed by an immune reconstitution phase. Secondary to reconstitution autoimmune diseases represent the most common side effect of Alemtuzumab treatment. Among them, Graves’ disease (GD is the most frequent one with an estimated prevalence ranging from 16.7 to 41.0% of MS patients receiving Alemtuzumab. Thyrotropin (TSH receptor (R-reactive B cells are typically observed in GD and eventually present this autoantigen to T-cells, which, in turn, secrete several pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Given that reconstitution autoimmunity is more frequently characterized by autoantibody-mediated diseases rather than by destructive Th1-mediated disorders, it is not surprising that GD is the most commonly reported side effect of Alemtuzumab treatment in patients with MS. On the other hand, immune reconstitution GD was not observed in a large series of patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with Alemtuzumab. This negative finding supports the view that patients with MS are intrinsically more at risk for developing Alemtuzumab-related thyroid dysfunctions and in particular of GD. From a clinical point of view, Alemtuzumab-induced GD is characterized by a surprisingly high rate of remission, both spontaneous and after antithyroid drugs, as well as by a spontaneous shift to hypothyroidism, which is supposed to result from a change from stimulating to blocking TSH-receptor antibodies. These immune and clinical peculiarities support the concept that antithyroid drugs should be the first-line treatment in Alemtuzumab-induced Graves’ hyperthyroidism.

  17. Autoimmune liver disease 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratori, Paolo; Granito, Alessandro; Pappas, Georgios; Muratori, Luigi; Lenzi, Marco; Bianchi, Francesco B

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune liver disease (ALD) includes a spectrum of diseases which comprises both cholestatic and hepatitic forms: autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and the so called "overlap" syndromes where hepatitic and cholestatic damage coexists. All these diseases are characterized by an extremely high heterogeneity of presentation, varying from asymptomatic, acute (as in a subset of AIH) or chronic (with aspecific symptoms such as fatigue and myalgia in AIH or fatigue and pruritus in PBC and PSC). The detection and characterization of non organ specific autoantibodies plays a major role in the diagnostic approach of autoimmune liver disease; anti nuclear reactivities (ANA) and anti smooth muscle antibodies (SMA) mark type 1 AIH, liver kidney microsomal antibody type 1 (LKM1) and liver cytosol type 1 (LC1) are the serological markers of type 2 AIH; antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA) are associated with PBC, while no specific marker is found in PSC, since anticytoplasmic neutrophil antibodies with perinuclear pattern (atypical p-ANCA or p-ANNA) are also detected in a substantial proportion of type 1 AIH cases. Treatment options rely on immunosoppressive therapy (steroids and azathioprine) in AIH and on ursodeoxycholic acid in cholestatic conditions; in all these diseases liver transplantation remains the only therapeutical approach for the end stage of liver disease.

  18. Thyroid Function Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyperthyroid patient, the most likely diagnosis is autoimmune thyroid disease. THYROGLOBULIN Thyroglobulin (Tg) is a protein produced by ... Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Thyroid Disease FNA Biopsy of Thyroid Nodules Goiter Graves’ Disease ...

  19. Thyroid autoantibodies and thyroid function in subjects exposed to Chernobyl fallout during childhood: evidence for a transient radiation-induced elevation of serum thyroid antibodies without an increase in thyroid autoimmune disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agate, Laura; Mariotti, Stefano; Elisei, Rossella

    2008-01-01

    An increase in the prevalence of thyroid autoantibodies (ATAs) was reported 6-8 yr after the Chernobyl accident in radiation-exposed children and adolescents.......An increase in the prevalence of thyroid autoantibodies (ATAs) was reported 6-8 yr after the Chernobyl accident in radiation-exposed children and adolescents....

  20. The first childhood case with coexisting Hashimoto thyroiditis, vitiligo and autoimmune hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Melikşah; Savaş-Erdeve, Şenay; Özbay-Hoşnut, Ferda; Kurnaz, Erdal; Çetinkaya, Semra; Aycan, Zehra

    2016-01-01

    Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) is the most common pediatric autoimmune endocrine disorder. It results in autoimmune-mediated thyroid gland destruction and is an organ-specific, typical autoimmune disease. The presence of antithyroid antibodies and the typical pattern on ultrasonography indicate the diagnosis. It is also frequently seen together with other autoimmune disorders including type 1 insulin-dependent diabetes, celiac disease, alopecia and vitiligo. Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a chronic type of liver injury with an immune etiology that can frequently cause end-stage liver disease if left untreated. Autoimmune hepatitis patients may present with hepatitis, and the laboratory tests in the absence of other etiology usually reveal a positive immune serology together with elevated immunoglobulins and abnormal liver histology. It is interesting that HT and AIH are rarely seen together although both have an autoimmune etiology. 14-year-old male who was being followed-up for vitiligo presented with symptoms of a swelling at the neck and fatigue. He was diagnosed with HT after the tests and the liver enzymes were found to be high. The patient was also diagnosed with AIH after tests revealed that the liver enzyme elevation had continued for longer than six months. The thyroid functions and liver enzymes returned to normal and the symptoms decreased after sodium L-thyroxine replacement together with steroid and azathioprine treatment. We present this case as we believe it is the first pediatric patient diagnosed with HT, AIH and vitiligo.

  1. Association of CTLA-4 gene A/G polymorphism in Japanese type 1 diabetic patients with younger age of onset and autoimmune thyroid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takara, M; Komiya, I; Kinjo, Y; Tomoyose, T; Yamashiro, S; Akamine, H; Masuda, M; Takasu, N

    2000-07-01

    We studied the association between type 1 diabetes with autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) and A/G allele polymorphism in exon 1 of the CTLA-4 gene in a Japanese population. We studied 74 Japanese type 1 diabetic patients with or without AITD and 107 normal subjects to identify the association between CTLA-4 polymorphism and type 1 diabetes using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. The frequency of the CTLA-4 G allele differed significantly between the type 1 diabetic patients (61%) and the normal control subjects (48%) (P = 0.016). The difference in the CTLA-4 G allele became greater between patients with a younger age of onset of type 1 diabetes (age at onset frequency of the CTLA-4 G allele did not differ between type 1 diabetic patients with younger and older age of onset (64% vs. 57%). The G allele frequencies in the patients with younger-onset type 1 diabetes and AITD increased more than in the control patients (P = 0.025). These differences reflected a significant increase in the frequency of G/G genotype--that is, 54% in those with younger-onset type 1 diabetes and AITD, 39% in those without AITD, and 28% in control subjects. An association was detected between the CTLA-4 gene polymorphism and younger-onset type 1 diabetes with AITD. The G variant was suggested to be genetically linked to AITD-associated type 1 diabetes of younger onset in this apanese population. The defect in these patients presumably lies in a T-cell-mediated autoimmune mechanism.

  2. Coherent Somatic Mutation in Autoimmune Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Kenneth Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background Many aspects of autoimmune disease are not well understood, including the specificities of autoimmune targets, and patterns of co-morbidity and cross-heritability across diseases. Prior work has provided evidence that somatic mutation caused by gene conversion and deletion at segmentally duplicated loci is relevant to several diseases. Simple tandem repeat (STR) sequence is highly mutable, both somatically and in the germ-line, and somatic STR mutations are observed under inflammation. Results Protein-coding genes spanning STRs having markers of mutability, including germ-line variability, high total length, repeat count and/or repeat similarity, are evaluated in the context of autoimmunity. For the initiation of autoimmune disease, antigens whose autoantibodies are the first observed in a disease, termed primary autoantigens, are informative. Three primary autoantigens, thyroid peroxidase (TPO), phogrin (PTPRN2) and filaggrin (FLG), include STRs that are among the eleven longest STRs spanned by protein-coding genes. This association of primary autoantigens with long STR sequence is highly significant (). Long STRs occur within twenty genes that are associated with sixteen common autoimmune diseases and atherosclerosis. The repeat within the TTC34 gene is an outlier in terms of length and a link with systemic lupus erythematosus is proposed. Conclusions The results support the hypothesis that many autoimmune diseases are triggered by immune responses to proteins whose DNA sequence mutates somatically in a coherent, consistent fashion. Other autoimmune diseases may be caused by coherent somatic mutations in immune cells. The coherent somatic mutation hypothesis has the potential to be a comprehensive explanation for the initiation of many autoimmune diseases. PMID:24988487

  3. [Autoimmune blistering diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvert-Lehembre, S; Joly, P

    2014-03-01

    Autoimmune blistering diseases are characterized by the production of pathogenic autoantibodies that are responsible for the formation of epidermal blisters. Major advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of these disorders have allowed the development of new therapeutic agents. Recent epidemiologic data showed that bullous pemphigoid mainly affects elderly patients. Bullous pemphigoid is often associated with degenerative neurologic disorders. A major increase in the incidence of bullous pemphigoid has been observed in France. Treatment of bullous pemphigoid is mainly based on superpotent topical corticosteroids. The role of desmosomal proteins has been demonstrated in the initiation, propagation and persistence of the autoimmune response in pemphigus. Several studies have shown a correlation between anti-desmoglein antibody titers and disease activity. Pemphigus susceptibility genes have been identified. Oral corticosteroids remain the mainstay of pemphigus treatment. Dramatic and long-lasting improvement has been recently obtained with rituximab in recalcitrant types of pemphigus. Other autoimmune junctional blistering diseases are rare entities, whose prognosis can be severe. Their diagnosis has been improved by the use of new immunological assays and immunoelectronic microscopy. Immunosupressants are widely used in severe types in order to prevent mucosal sequelae. Copyright © 2013 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Psychosis: an autoimmune disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Diwani, Adam A J; Pollak, Thomas A; Irani, Sarosh R; Lennox, Belinda R

    2017-11-01

    Psychotic disorders are common and disabling. Overlaps in clinical course in addition to epidemiological and genetic associations raise the possibility that autoimmune mechanisms may underlie some psychoses, potentially offering novel therapeutic approaches. Several immune loci including the major histocompatibility complex and B-cell markers CD19 and CD20 achieve genome-wide significance in schizophrenia. Emerging evidence suggests a potential role via neurodevelopment in addition to classical immune pathways. Additionally, lymphocyte biology is increasingly investigated. Some reports note raised peripheral CD19 + and reduced CD3 + lymphocyte counts, with altered CD4 : CD8 ratios in acute psychosis. Also, post-mortem studies have found CD3 + and CD20 + lymphocyte infiltration in brain regions that are of functional relevance to psychosis. More specifically, the recent paradigm of neuronal surface antibody-mediated (NSAb) central nervous system disease provides an antigen-specific model linking adaptive autoimmunity to psychopathology. NSAbs bind extracellular epitopes of signalling molecules that are classically implicated in psychosis such as NMDA and GABA receptors. This interaction may cause circuit dysfunction leading to psychosis among other neurological features in patients with autoimmune encephalitis. The detection of these cases is crucial as autoimmune encephalitis is ameliorated by commonly available immunotherapies. Meanwhile, the prevalence and relevance of these antibodies in people with isolated psychotic disorders is an area of emerging scientific and clinical interest. Collaborative efforts to achieve larger sample sizes, comparison of assay platforms, and placebo-controlled randomized clinical trials are now needed to establish an autoimmune contribution to psychosis. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Long-term follow-up of seven patients with ophthalmopathy not associated with thyroid autoimmunity: heterogeneity of autoimmune ophthalmopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCorquodale T

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Tom McCorquodale,1 Hooshang Lahooti,1 Bamini Gopinath,2 Jack R Wall11Department of Medicine, Nepean Clinical School, the University of Sydney, Penrith, NSW, Australia; 2Centre for Vision Research, the University of Sydney, Westmead Hospital, Westmead, NSW, AustraliaBackground: Ophthalmopathy is the most common extrathyroidal manifestation of Graves' disease. However, in approximately 5% of cases this autoimmune eye disorder occurs in the apparent absence of Graves' hyperthyroidism: the so-called euthyroid Graves' disease (EGD.Methods: Seven patients with EGD were followed for evidence of thyroid and orbital autoimmunity, for up to 10 years. Calsequestrin and collagen XIII antibodies were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, and TSH-receptor (TSH-r antibodies were measured as TSH-r-binding antibody (TRAb and thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulin (TSI. Eye signs were characterized and quantified as clinical activity score (CAS, NOSPECS classes, Nunery types 1 and 2, and margin-reflex distance (MRD.Results: Calsequestrin antibodies were detected on at least one occasion in three of the seven patients and collagen XIII antibodies were detected one or more times in five patients. In one patient with isolated congestive ophthalmopathy who was studied intensely, collagen XIII antibodies were initially positive and then became negative as the eye disease stabilized, while antibodies targeting calsequestrin were always negative. TRAb was not detected in any patient, but TSI was detected in three patients on one occasion each. Ultrasound abnormalities were found in four of the six patients for whom this was carried out, but there was no clear evidence for thyroiditis in any of these patients. For comparison, 13 patients were studied with typical Graves' ophthalmopathy. There were no significant differences compared to EGD in respect to the prevalence of positive calsequestrin or collagen XIII antibodies, but these patients included more

  6. Familial Autoimmune Thyroid Disease as a Risk Factor for Regression in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A CPEA Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molloy, Cynthia A.; Morrow, Ardythe L.; Meinzen-Derr, Jareen; Dawson, Geraldine; Bernier, Raphael; Dunn, Michelle; Hyman, Susan L.; McMahon, William M.; Goudie-Nice, Julie; Hepburn, Susan; Minshew, Nancy; Rogers, Sally; Sigman, Marian; Spence, M. Anne; Tager-Flusberg, Helen; Volkmar, Fred R.; Lord, Catherine

    2006-01-01

    A multicenter study of 308 children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) was conducted through the Collaborative Programs of Excellence in Autism (CPEA), sponsored by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, to compare the family history of autoimmune disorders in children with ASD with and without a history of regression. A…

  7. Thyroiditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Thyroid Disease FNA Biopsy of Thyroid Nodules Goiter Graves’ Disease ... Cancer Nuclear Radiation & the Thyroid Older Patients and Thyroid Disease Papillary & Follicular Thyroid Cancer Postpartum Thyroiditis Pregnancy and ...

  8. Steroid responsive encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroiditis following ipilimumab therapy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carl, David; Grüllich, Carsten; Hering, Steffen; Schabet, Martin

    2015-07-26

    Ipilimumab is a cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 receptor antibody used for immunotherapy in cancer. Several immune-related adverse events are known. Steroid responsive encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroiditis is an autoimmune encephalopathy associated with Hashimoto's Disease and elevated serum levels of the related antibodies (anti-thyroid-peroxidase antibody or anti-thyroglobulin antibody). Our case implies that steroid responsive encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroiditis may be another previously unreported side effect of ipilimumab therapy. We report the case of a 64 years old caucasian patient with prostatic cancer who received ipilimumab therapy in a clinical trial. He presented with aphasia, tremor and ataxia, myocloni, hallucinations, anxiety and agitation in turns with somnolence. Cranial nerves, deep tendon reflexes, motor and sensory functions were normal. Electroencephalography showed background slowing but no epileptic discharges. Brain magnetic resonance imaging was normal and showed no signs of hypophysitis. Cerebrospinal fluid findings ruled out infection and neoplastic meningitis. Anti-thyroid antibodies (anti-thyroid-peroxidase antibody and anti-thyroglobulin antibody) were heavily increased. Assuming steroid responsive encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroiditis the patient was treated with 1,000 mg methylprednisolone i.v. for 3 days and continued with 1 mg/kg orally. On the 3rd day of treatment the patient's condition started to improve. Within the next few days he gradually returned to his previous state, and electroencephalography eventually showed only slight slowing. Seven months later the patient's condition was stable, and anti-thyroid antibodies were no more detectable. Steroid responsive encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroiditis may be a hitherto unrecognized complication of ipililumab treatment and should be taken into consideration in patients developing central nervous

  9. Thyroid disease: thyroid function tests and interpretation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diseases of the thyroid are among the most prevalent of medical conditions, especially in women, but the symptoms can be relatively nonspecific or mild. For this reason, clinicians have been placing increased reliance on the laboratory for assistance in the diagnosis of thyroid disorders. In the 1950s, only one thyroid test ...

  10. Associations between Systemic Sclerosis and Thyroid Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poupak Fallahi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We have reviewed scientific literature about the association of systemic sclerosis (SSc and thyroid disorders. A high incidence, and prevalence, of new cases of autoimmune thyroiditis (AT and/or hypothyroidism have been shown in sclerodermic patients (overall in the female gender. An association among a Th1 immune-predominance, low vitamin D levels, and AT have been also shown in SSc patients. Cases of Graves’ disease (GD have been described in SSc patients, too, according with the higher prevalence of thyroid autoimmunity. It has been also shown a higher prevalence of papillary thyroid cancer (PTC, in association with AT, in SSc patients. However, in order to confirm results about GD and thyroid cancer, studies in larger number of patients with SSc are needed. During the follow-up of SSc patients it would be appropriate to monitor carefully their thyroid status. The abovementioned data strongly suggest a periodic thyroid function follow-up in female SSc patients [showing a borderline high (although in the normal range thyroid-stimulating hormone level, antithyroid peroxidase antibody positivity, and a small thyroid with a hypoechoic pattern], and, when necessary, appropriate treatments. In conclusion, most of the studies show an association among SSc, AT, and hypothyroidism, such as an increased prevalence of TC overall in SSc patients with AT. Only few cases of GD have been also described in SSc.

  11. Low birth weight is not associated with thyroid autoimmunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, Thomas Heiberg; Hansen, Pia Skov; Rudbeck, Annette Beck

    2006-01-01

    CONTEXT: Low birth weight has been proposed as a risk factor for the development of antibodies toward thyroid peroxidase (TPOAb) and thyroglobulin (TgAb) in adult life. However, the association could also be due to genetic or environmental factors affecting both birth weight and the development...... of thyroid autoantibodies. The effect of these confounders can be minimized through investigation of twin pairs. OBJECTIVE AND DESIGN: To examine the impact of low birth weight on the development of thyroid autoimmunity, we studied whether within-twin-cohort and within-twin-pair differences in birth weight......, gestational age, TSH, and smoking) did not change the findings of nonsignificant regression coefficients. CONCLUSION: Low birth weight per se has no evident role in the etiology of thyroid autoimmunity....

  12. Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Associated With Autoimmune Thyroid Disorders in Iranian Children: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Zamanfar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Type one diabetes mellitus (T1DM is an autoimmune disorder that is yet the most common type of diabetes in children and adolescents. Several genetic risk factors have been associated with T1DM, auto immune thyroiditis and other autoimmune disorder. Among autoimmune disorders, autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD is the most frequent disorder associated with T1DM. Its prevalence varies depending on age, sex and ethnic origin of the subjects and is considerably higher than the general population and increases with duration of T1DM. The aim of this study was to review the prevalence of ATD in Iranian children with T1DM compared with other countries. Evidence Acquisition: We conducted a review on all papers published on the association between autoimmune thyroiditis and T1DM, which was available on Google Scholar, Scientific Information Database (SID, Magiran and Iran Medex databases up to June 2014. Both Persian and English articles were checked. The searched terms were: diabetes mellitus, autoimmune thyroiditis, prevalence, frequency, Iranian children and adolescents. All papers which were done on patients with age under 20 years old and have used Anti-TPO and Anti-TG to evaluate patients were included. Results: Six papers met all the criteria. A total of 736 participants were included in this review. After review of all the papers, the prevalence of Anti-TPO was reported between 8% and 30% and Anti-TG was reported 6.06% to 23.6% in diabetic children in Iran. Conclusions: Autoimmune thyroid disorders are the most prevalent immunological diseases in patients with type 1 diabetes. All these studies have shown a higher prevalence of the disorder in patients with T1DM compared to the Iranian healthy population. Anti-TPO reported between 8% and 30% and Anti-TG reported 6.06% to 23.6% in diabetic children in Iran that was similar to the studies in other countries.

  13. B Cells in Autoimmune Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Hampe, Christiane S.

    2012-01-01

    The role of B cells in autoimmune diseases involves different cellular functions, including the well-established secretion of autoantibodies, autoantigen presentation and ensuing reciprocal interactions with T cells, secretion of inflammatory cytokines, and the generation of ectopic germinal centers. Through these mechanisms B cells are involved both in autoimmune diseases that are traditionally viewed as antibody mediated and also in autoimmune diseases that are commonly classified as T cell...

  14. Hyposalivation in autoimmune diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Maeshima, Etsuko; Furukawa, Kanako; Maeshima, Shinichiro; Koshiba, Hiroya; Sakamoto, Wataru

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated the prevalence of dry mouth among patients with autoimmune diseases other than Sj?gren?s syndrome. One hundred and forty-four patients, excluding patients with primary Sj?gren?s syndrome, were enrolled in this study. The volume of saliva secreted was measured with the screening technique for estimation of salivary flow, which uses a filter paper for diagnosing dry mouth. Disturbed salivary secretion was observed in 84 (58.3?%) of the 144 patients. In the case of patients ...

  15. Autoimmune Thyroiditis: Clinical Course Features and Principles of Differential Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.Ye. Bobyryova

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Constant increase in the incidence of autoimmune thyroiditis (AIT in different regions of Ukraine puts this problem in actual number that determines the need to identify features of the clinical course of AIT, the principles of differentiated treatment depending on the nature of the metabolic changes and taking into account regional differences in thyroid pathology, particularly AIT. The paper presents data on the study of features of clinical course and complex treatment of AIT.

  16. Thyroid diseases and cerebrovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Squizzato, A.; Gerdes, V. E. A.; Brandjes, D. P. M.; Büller, H. R.; Stam, J.

    2005-01-01

    Background and Purpose-Acute cerebral ischemia has been described in different diseases of the thyroid gland, and not only as a result of thyrotoxic atrial fibrillation and cardioembolic stroke. The purpose of this review is to summarize the studies on the relationship between thyroid diseases and

  17. Coeliac disease and autoimmune disease-genetic overlap and screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundin, Knut E A; Wijmenga, Cisca

    2015-09-01

    Coeliac disease is a treatable, gluten-induced disease that often occurs concurrently with other autoimmune diseases. In genetic studies since 2007, a partial genetic overlap between these diseases has been revealed and further insights into the pathophysiology of coeliac disease and autoimmunity have been gained. However, genetic screening is not sensitive and specific enough to accurately predict disease development. The current method to diagnose individuals with coeliac disease is serological testing for the presence of autoantibodies whilst the patient is on a regular, gluten-containing diet, followed by gastroduodenoscopy with duodenal biopsy. Serological test results can also predict the probability of coeliac disease development, even if asymptomatic. In patients with autoimmune diseases known to occur alongside coeliac disease (particularly type 1 diabetes mellitus or thyroid disorders), disease screening-and subsequent treatment if coeliac disease is detected-could have beneficial effects on progression or potential complications of both diseases, owing to the effectiveness of gluten-free dietary interventions in coeliac disease. However, whether diagnosis of coeliac disease and subsequent dietary treatment can prevent autoimmune diseases is debated. In this Review, the genetic and immunological features of coeliac disease, overlap with other autoimmune diseases and implications for current screening strategies will be discussed.

  18. Stress proteins, autoimmunity, and autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winfield, J B; Jarjour, W N

    1991-01-01

    At birth, the immune system is biased toward recognition of microbial antigens in order to protect the host from infection. Recent data suggest that an important initial line of defense in this regard involves autologous stress proteins, especially conserved peptides of hsp60, which are presented to T cells bearing gamma delta receptors by relatively nonpolymorphic class lb molecules. Natural antibodies may represent a parallel B cell mechanism. Through an evolving process of "physiological" autoreactivity and selection by immunodominant stress proteins common to all prokaryotes, B and T cell repertoires expand during life to meet the continuing challenge of infection. Because stress proteins of bacteria are homologous with stress proteins of the host, there exists in genetically susceptible individuals a constant risk of autoimmune disease due to failure of mechanisms for self-nonself discrimination. That stress proteins actually play a role in autoimmune processes is supported by a growing body of evidence which, collectively, suggests that autoreactivity in chronic inflammatory arthritis involves, at least initially, gamma delta cells which recognize epitopes of the stress protein hsp60. Alternate mechanisms for T cell stimulation by stress proteins undoubtedly also exist, e.g., molecular mimicry of the DR beta third hypervariable region susceptibility locus for rheumatoid arthritis by a DnaJ stress protein epitope in gram-negative bacteria. While there still is confusion with respect to the most relevant stress protein epitopes, a central role for stress proteins in the etiology of arthritis appears likely. Furthermore, insight derived from the work thus far in adjuvant-induced arthritis already is stimulating analyses of related phenomena in autoimmune diseases other than those involving joints. Only limited data are available in the area of humoral autoimmunity to stress proteins. Autoantibodies to a number of stress proteins have been identified in SLE and

  19. The relationship between benign paroxysmal positional vertigo and thyroid autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Kamran; Yildirim, Tekin; Borekci, Hasan; Akin, Ibrahim; Aydin, Reha; Ozkiris, Mahmut

    2015-08-01

    Although there have been few studies concerning BPPV and thyroid autoimmunity and a positive relation was found between them, this study didn't find any relation between BPPV and thyroid autoimmunity. IT is thought that further large-scale studies must be done to clarify the relation. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) consists of ∼ 20% of vestibular disorders. Self-limited rotatory nystagmus with positional vertigo are the main findings of BPPV. Although canalolithiasis theory was confirmed by demonstrating freely floating debris in the endolymph of the posterior semicircular channel in following studies, currently, the etiology hasn't been explained totally. This study investigated the relation of BPPV and thyroid autoimmunity evaluated via measurement of serum thyroid autoantibodies. Fifty patients (37 female, 13 male) with BPPV (BPPV group), 52 patients (40 female, 12 male) with non-BPPV vertigo (non-BPPV group) and 60 otherwise normal control (38 female, 22 male) samples were enrolled in the study. All samples of BPPV, non-BPPV groups and controls had undergone a cochleovestibular test following thorough ENT examination. After blood samples were drawn from each subject, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPO-Ab) and anti-thyroglobulin antibody (TG-Ab) levels were measured accordingly. In the study, eight patients of the BPPV group (16%) had a high thyroid antibody level. In the non-BPPV group, six patients (11.5%) had elevated thyroid antibodies. In the control group, 15 patients (25%) had elevated thyroid antibodies. TSH values of all subjects were detected to be within normal range. No statistical difference was found between the groups with respect to TG-Ab and TPO-Ab values (p-values = 0.729 and 0.812, respectively).

  20. Autoimmune diseases and myelodysplastic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komrokji, Rami S; Kulasekararaj, Austin; Al Ali, Najla H; Kordasti, Shahram; Bart-Smith, Emily; Craig, Benjamin M; Padron, Eric; Zhang, Ling; Lancet, Jeffrey E; Pinilla-Ibarz, Javier; List, Alan F; Mufti, Ghulam J; Epling-Burnette, Pearlie K

    2016-05-01

    Immune dysregulation and altered T-cell hemostasis play important roles in the pathogenesis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Recent studies suggest an increased risk of MDS among patients with autoimmune diseases. Here, we investigated the prevalence of autoimmune diseases among MDS patients, comparing characteristics and outcomes in those with and without autoimmune diseases. From our study group of 1408 MDS patients, 391 (28%) had autoimmune disease, with hypothyroidism being the most common type, accounting for 44% (n = 171) of patients (12% among all MDS patients analyzed). Other autoimmune diseases with ≥5% prevalence included idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura in 12% (n = 46), rheumatoid arthritis in 10% (n = 41), and psoriasis in 7% (n = 28) of patients. Autoimmune diseases were more common in female MDS patients, those with RA or RCMD WHO subtype, and those who were less dependent on red blood cell transfusion. Median overall survival (OS) was 60 months (95% CI, 50-70) for patients with autoimmune diseases versus 45 months (95% CI, 40-49) for those without (log-rank test, P = 0.006). By multivariate analysis adjusting for revised IPSS and age >60 years, autoimmune diseases were a statistically significant independent factor for OS (HR 0.78; 95% CI, 0.66-0.92; P = 0.004). The rate of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) transformation was 23% (n = 89) in MDS patients with autoimmune disease versus 30% (n = 301) in those without (P = 0.011). Patient groups did not differ in response to azacitidine or lenalidomide treatment. Autoimmune diseases are prevalent among MDS patients. MDS patients with autoimmune diseases have better OS and less AML transformation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Demonstration of innate immune responses in the thyroid gland: potential to sense danger and a possible trigger for autoimmune reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Akira; Yamazaki, Kazuko; Hara, Takeshi; Akama, Takeshi; Yoshihara, Aya; Sue, Mariko; Tanigawa, Kazunari; Wu, Huhehasi; Ishido, Yuko; Takeshita, Fumihiko; Ishii, Norihisa; Sato, Kanji; Suzuki, Koichi

    2013-04-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease is an archetypal organ-specific autoimmune disorder that is characterized by the production of thyroid autoantibodies and lymphocytic infiltration into the thyroid. However, the underlying mechanisms by which specific thyroid antibodies are produced are largely unknown. Recent studies have shown that innate immune responses affect both the phenotype and the severity of autoimmune reactions. Moreover, it appears that even non-immune cells, including thyroid cells, have an ability to launch such responses. The aim of this study was to conduct a more detailed analysis of innate immune responses of the thyroid upon stimulation with various "non-self" and "self" factors that might contribute to the initiation of autoimmune reactions. We used rat thyroid FRTL-5 cells, human thyroid cells, and mice to investigate the effects of various pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), and iodide on gene expression and function that were related to innate immune responses. RT-PCR analysis showed that both rat and human thyroid cells expressed mRNAs for Toll-like receptors (TLRs) that sensed PAMPs. Stimulation of thyrocytes with TLR ligands resulted in activation of the interferon-beta (IFN-β) promoter and the nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB)-dependent promoter. As a result, pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and type I interferons were produced. Similar activation was observed when thyroid cells were stimulated with double-stranded DNA, one of the typical DAMPs. In addition to these PAMPs and DAMPs, treatment of thyroid cells with high concentrations of iodide increased mRNA expression of various cytokines. We show that thyroid cells express functional sensors for exogenous and endogenous dangers, and that they are capable of launching innate immune responses without the assistance of immune cells. Such responses may relate to the development of thyroiditis

  2. Helicobacter pylori and autoimmune disease: Cause or bystander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyk, Daniel S; Koutsoumpas, Andreas L; Mytilinaiou, Maria G; Rigopoulou, Eirini I; Sakkas, Lazaros I; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the main cause of chronic gastritis and a major risk factor for gastric cancer. This pathogen has also been considered a potential trigger of gastric autoimmunity, and in particular of autoimmune gastritis. However, a considerable number of reports have attempted to link H. pylori infection with the development of extra-gastrointestinal autoimmune disorders, affecting organs not immediately relevant to the stomach. This review discusses the current evidence in support or against the role of H. pylori as a potential trigger of autoimmune rheumatic and skin diseases, as well as organ specific autoimmune diseases. We discuss epidemiological, serological, immunological and experimental evidence associating this pathogen with autoimmune diseases. Although over one hundred autoimmune diseases have been investigated in relation to H. pylori, we discuss a select number of papers with a larger literature base, and include Sjögrens syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, vasculitides, autoimmune skin conditions, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, autoimmune thyroid disease, multiple sclerosis, neuromyelitis optica and autoimmune liver diseases. Specific mention is given to those studies reporting an association of anti-H. pylori antibodies with the presence of autoimmune disease-specific clinical parameters, as well as those failing to find such associations. We also provide helpful hints for future research. PMID:24574735

  3. Evaluation of the 2. generation radio-receptional assay for anti-TSH receptor antibodies (TRAb) in autoimmune thyroid diseases. Comparison with 1. generation and anti-thyroperoxidae antibodies (AbTPO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giovanella, L.; Ceriani, L.; Garacini, S.

    2001-01-01

    The detection of autoantibodies to the TSH-receptor (TRAb) by radio-receptor assays (RRA) is widely requested in clinical practice for the diagnostic work-up of Graves' disease and its differentiation from diffuse thyroid autonomy. Additionally, TRAb measurement can be useful during antithyroid drug treatment of Graves' disease to evaluate the risk of relapse after therapy discontinuation. Nevertheless, some patients affected by Graves' disease are TRAb-negative when 1. generation assay is used. In this study the diagnostic performance of a newly developed 2. generation TRAb assay (TRAK human DYNOtest(R), BRAHMS Diagnostica GmbH, Berlin, Germany) was evaluated in 74 untreated patients affected by Graves' disease, in 53 untreated patients affected by Hashimoto's thyroiditis and in 88 patients affected by euthyroid nodular goiter. It was also compared the new TRAb assay with the 1. generation test (TRAK(R) Assay, BRAHMS Diagnostica GmbH, Berlin, Germany) and anti-thyroperoxidase assay (AbTPO DYNOtest(R), BRAHMS GmbH, Berlin). The 2. generation TRAb assay showed the better diagnostic sensitivity in Graves' disease (97%) with respect to the 1. generation assay (85%) and AbTPO assay (64%). The AbTPO assay was positive in 50 of 53 (94%) patients affected by autoimmune thyroiditis. The 1. and 2. generation TRAb assays were positive in 4 (7%) and 7 (13%) of 53 patients affected by autoimmune thyroiditis, respectively. No patients affected by nodular goiter showed positive 1. and 2. generation TRAb assay while AbTPO levels were positive in 8 of 88 patients (specificity 91%). In conclusion, the 2. generation TRAb assay is clearly more sensitive than the 1. generation test and should be used in clinical practice to minimize the incidence of TRAb-negative Graves' disease. Long term prospective studies are needed to evaluate the prognostic role of 2. generation TRAb assay in Graves' disease. The assay of AbTPO is the best marker for autoimmune thyroiditis but is clearly less

  4. Autoimmune thyroiditis goitrogenic. Aspects of clinical and laboratorial diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, H.F.Z. da.

    1986-01-01

    To asses the accuracy achieved by the A.C.A.T. and other clinical and laboratorial criterion in the diagnoses of T.A.I.B. we investigated twenty patients with goiter and antimicrossomal antibodies titres of 1/1.600 or more. Analysing the parameters useful in the diagnosis, we found a significant correlation between the antimicrossomal antibodies titres and the basal TSH concentration, an elevated basal TSH and an exaggerated response to TRH independent of the patient clinical status reflecting in the majority of the cases a state of subclinical hypotyroidism; an irregular appearance of the radioisotope thyroid scan and a positive response to a perchlorate discharge test. We conclude that from the parameters useful in the T.A.I.B. diagnosis, the A.C.A.T. detection mainly the antimicrossomal antibodies, is an excellent tool to detect patients with a clinical suspect of thyroid auto-immune disease and when we found high tires in a patient with goiter and an elevated basal TSH concentration we can suggest T.A.I.B. diagnosis. (author)

  5. Localized granuloma annulare and autoimmune thyroiditis in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The association of granuloma annulare (GA) and autoimmune thyroiditis has been documented in the literature in 13 previous cases. However, the pathogenesis of GA remains obscure. Possible pathogenetic factors suggested include: humoral and delayed type hypersensitivity, vascular damage, metabolic disorder, or, ...

  6. The Effect of Vitamin D on Thyroid Autoimmunity in Levothyroxine-Treated Women with Hashimoto's Thyroiditis and Normal Vitamin D Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krysiak, Robert; Szkróbka, Witold; Okopień, Bogusław

    2017-04-01

    Background: Low vitamin D status is associated with autoimmune thyroid disease. Oral vitamin D supplementation was found to reduce titers of thyroid antibodies in levothyroxine-treated women with postpartum thyroiditis and low vitamin D status. Methods: The study included 34 women with Hashimoto's thyroiditis and normal vitamin D status (serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels above 30 ng/mL) who had been treated for at least 6 months with levothyroxine. On the basis of patient preference, women were divided into 2 groups, receiving (n=18) or not receiving (n=16) oral vitamin D preparations (2000 IU daily). Serum levels of thyrotropin, free thyroxine, free triiodothyronine and 25-hydroxyvitamin D, as well as titers of thyroid peroxidase and thyroglobulin antibodies were measured at the beginning of the study and 6 months later. Results: There were no significant differences in baseline values between both study groups. 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels inversely correlated with titers of thyroid antibodies. No changes in hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis activity and thyroid antibody titers were observed in vitamin-naïve patients. Vitamin D increased serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, as well as reduced titers of thyroid antibodies. This effect was more pronounced for thyroid peroxidase than for thyroglobulin antibodies and correlated with their baseline titers. Conclusions: Vitamin D preparations may reduce thyroid autoimmunity in levothyroxine-treated women with Hashimoto's thyroiditis and normal vitamin D status. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. [Treatment of autoimmune hepatic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueverov, A O

    2004-01-01

    The immunosuppresive drugs, primarily glucocorticosteroids, serve as the basis for the pathogenetic treatment of autoimmune diseases of the liver. In autoimmune hepatitis, immunosuppressive therapy induces and maintains persistent remission in most patients while in primary biliary cirrhosis and primary sclerosing cholangitis, its capacities are substantially limited. Ursodeoxycholic acid is used as the basic drug in predominantly occurring intrahepatic cholestasis. The treatment of cross autoimmune syndromes generally requires the choice of a combination of drugs.

  8. Oxidative Stress and Immune System in Vitiligo and Thyroid Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colucci, Roberta; Dragoni, Federica

    2015-01-01

    Vitiligo is an acquired dermatological disease frequently associated with autoimmune thyroid disorders. Several theories have been proposed so far to unravel the complex vitiligo pathogenesis. Currently, the autocytotoxic and the autoimmune theories are the most accredited hypothesis, since they are sustained by several important clinical and experimental evidences. A growing body of evidences shows that autoimmunity and oxidative stress strictly interact to finally determine melanocyte loss. In this scenario, associated thyroid autoimmunity might play an active and important role in triggering and maintaining the depigmentation process of vitiligo. PMID:25838868

  9. Postpartum thyroiditis and autoimmune thyroiditis in women of childbearing age: recent insights and consequences for antenatal and postnatal care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.F. Muller (Alex); H.A. Drexhage (Hemmo); A. Berghout (Arie)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractPostpartum thyroiditis is a syndrome of transient or permanent thyroid dysfunction occurring in the first year after delivery and based on an autoimmune inflammation of the thyroid. The prevalence ranges from 5-7%. We discuss the role of antibodies (especially thyroid

  10. Tc-99m-interleukin-2 scintigraphy in normal subjects and in patients with autoimmune thyroid diseases : a feasibility study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chianelli, M.; Mather, S. J.; Grossman, A.; Sobnak, R.; Fritzberg, A.; Britton, K. E.; Signore, A.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Radiolabelled interleukin-2 is a radiopharmaceutical used for the study of chronic inflammatory processes. I-123-labelled interleukin-2 has successfully been used in a large number of patients affected by several immune-mediated diseases. I-123, however, is expensive and not readily

  11. AUTOIMMUNE EPIDERMAL BLISTERING DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Abreu Velez

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune bullous skin diseases (ABDs are uncommon, potentially fatal diseases of skin and mucous membranes which are associated with deposits of autoantibodies and complement against distinct molecules of the epidermis and dermal/epidermal basement membrane zone (BMZ. These autoantibodies lead to a loss in skin molecular integrity, which manifests clinically as formation of blisters or erosions. In pemphigus vulgaris, loss of adhesion occurs within the epidermis. The pioneering work of Ernst H. Beutner, Ph.D. and Robert E. Jordon, M.D. confirmed the autoimmune nature of these diseases. Walter F. Lever, M.D. contributed significantly to our understanding of the histopathologic features of these diseases. Walter Lever, M.D. and Ken Hashimoto, M.D. contributed electron microscopic studies of these diseases, especially in pemphigus vulgaris and bullous pemphigoid. In bullous pemphigoid (BP, linear IgA bullous dermatosis, epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA and dermatitis herpetiformis (DH, loss of adhesion takes place within or underneath the BMZ. Classic EBA demonstrates extensive skin fragility; DH is commonly associated with gluten-sensitive enteropathy, and manifests clinically with pruritic papulovesicles on the extensor surfaces of the extremities and the lumbosacral area. The clinical spectrum of bullous pemphigoid includes tense blisters, urticarial plaques, and prurigo-like eczematous lesions. Pemphigoid gestationis mostly occurs during the last trimester of pregnancy, and mucous membrane pemphigoid primarily involves the oral mucosa and conjunctivae and leads to scarring. Linear IgA bullous dermatosis manifests with tense blisters in a „cluster of jewels”-like pattern in childhood (chronic bullous disease of childhood and is more clinically heterogeneous in adulthood. Many of the autoantigens in these disorders are known and have been well characterized. ABDs may be influenced by both genetic and exogenous factors. The diagnoses of

  12. Epigenetic alterations underlying autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslani, Saeed; Mahmoudi, Mahdi; Karami, Jafar; Jamshidi, Ahmad Reza; Malekshahi, Zahra; Nicknam, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Recent breakthroughs in genetic explorations have extended our understanding through discovery of genetic patterns subjected to autoimmune diseases (AID). Genetics, on the contrary, has not answered all the conundrums to describe a comprehensive explanation of causal mechanisms of disease etiopathology with regard to the function of environment, sex, or aging. The other side of the coin, epigenetics which is defined by gene manifestation modification without DNA sequence alteration, reportedly has come in to provide new insights towards disease apprehension through bridging the genetics and environmental factors. New investigations in genetic and environmental contributing factors for autoimmunity provide new explanation whereby the interactions between genetic elements and epigenetic modifications signed by environmental agents may be responsible for autoimmune disease initiation and perpetuation. It is aimed through this article to review recent progress attempting to reveal how epigenetics associates with the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases.

  13. Thyroid Disease in the Older Patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Older Patients and Thyroid Disease Older Patients and Thyroid Disease DEFINITION: WHAT DO THE FOLLOWING PATIENTS OVER THE ... Nodules in Children and Adolescents Older Patients and Thyroid Disease Resources Older Patients and Thyroid Disease Brochure PDF ...

  14. Cell-mediated immunity and postpartum thyroid dysfunction: a possibility for the prediction of disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpens, J. L.; de Hann-Meulman, M.; Vader, H. L.; Pop, V. J.; Wiersinga, W. M.; Drexhage, H. A.

    1998-01-01

    Postpartum (pp) thyroid dysfunction (PPTD) is thought to be caused by an autoimmune (AI) destruction of thyroid follicles during the pp period. The chronic thyroid AI process [already present in pregnancy, as shown by the positivity for thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPO-Ab)] becomes overt disease

  15. Tie-2 is overexpressed by monocytes in autoimmune thyroid disorders and participates in their recruitment to the thyroid gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa-Vega, Nicté; Alfonso-Pérez, Manuel; Cuesta-Mateos, Carlos; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Moreno-Otero, Ricardo; González-Amaro, Roberto; Marazuela, Mónica

    2009-07-01

    The angiopoietin/Tie system seems to have an important role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases. Although Tie-2 is mainly expressed by endothelium, it is also detected in monocytes, which participate in the development of angiogenic and inflammatory phenomena. The aim was to study the expression and function of Tie-2 and their ligands, angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1) and Ang-2, in thyroid glands and monocytes from patients with autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD). We studied the expression of Tie-2, Ang-1, and Ang-2 by immunohistochemical techniques in surgical thyroid tissues from 17 patients with Graves' disease, 8 with Hashimoto's thyroiditis, and 3 healthy glands. In addition, we explored the expression and function of Tie-2 in peripheral blood monocytes from 17 patients with Graves' disease, 11 with Hashimoto's thyroiditis, and 14 healthy controls. We found that the expression of Ang-1, Ang-2, and Tie-2 was up-regulated in thyroid glands from AITD patients. Flow cytometry, immunofluorescence, ELISA, and RT-PCR analyses confirmed the synthesis and release of Ang-1, Ang-2, and Tie-2 by thyroid follicular cells (TFC) from AITD patients. In addition, these patients showed increased levels of Tie-2(+) monocytes in the peripheral blood, which exhibited an enhanced chemotactic response to Ang-2 or autologous TFC. Our data suggest that the Ang/Tie-2 system, through the participation of blood vessels, inflammatory cells, and TFC, may have an important role in the recruitment of monocytes to the thyroid gland and the pathogenesis of the tissue damage seen in AITD.

  16. Selenium levels in patients with autoimmune thyroiditis and controls in lower Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimmer, I; Hartmann, T; Brustbauer, R; Minear, G; Dam, K

    2014-09-01

    Autoimmune thyroiditis (AIT) is one of the most common autoimmune diseases; genetic as well as environmental factors contribute to its pathogenesis. The thyroid is the organ with the highest selenium content per unit weight. Selenium status appears to have an impact on the development of thyroid pathologies. We investigated a possible difference of selenium serum levels as a marker of nutritional selenium supply between patients with AIT in central Lower Austria and a matched group of healthy persons living in the same region. Selenium serum levels in the patients with AIT were 98.0 ± 15.6 μg/l. A significant difference to the matched group of normal persons, whose selenium serum levels were 103.2 ± 12.4 μg/l, could not be detected by the t-test (p>0.05). We considered the serum selenium levels to be indicators of selenium supply (by alimentation). A serum level of 120-160 μg/l of selenium represents the normal range. According to this, most patients and control persons showed mild to moderate selenium deficiency (80-120 μg/l selenium). Although our data present slightly higher selenium levels in normal persons than in patients with AIT, this weak and statistically insignificant trend is not sufficient to support the conclusion of a link between inadequate selenium supply and autoimmune thyroid disease. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. Introducing Polyautoimmunity: Secondary Autoimmune Diseases No Longer Exist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana; Amaya-Amaya, Jenny; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Alberto; Mantilla, Rubén D.; Anaya, Juan-Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Similar pathophysiological mechanisms within autoimmune diseases have stimulated searches for common genetic roots. Polyautoimmunity is defined as the presence of more than one autoimmune disease in a single patient. When three or more autoimmune diseases coexist, this condition is called multiple autoimmune syndrome (MAS). We analyzed the presence of polyautoimmunity in 1,083 patients belonging to four autoimmune disease cohorts. Polyautoimmunity was observed in 373 patients (34.4%). Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) and Sjögren's syndrome (SS) were the most frequent diseases encountered. Factors significantly associated with polyautoimmunity were female gender and familial autoimmunity. Through a systematic literature review, an updated search was done for all MAS cases (January 2006–September 2011). There were 142 articles retrieved corresponding to 226 cases. Next, we performed a clustering analysis in which AITD followed by systemic lupus erythematosus and SS were the most hierarchical diseases encountered. Our results indicate that coexistence of autoimmune diseases is not uncommon and follows a grouping pattern. Polyautoimmunity is the term proposed for this association of disorders, which encompasses the concept of a common origin for these diseases. PMID:22454759

  18. Transfer of experimental autoimmune thyroiditis with T cell clones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romball, C.G.; Weigle, W.O.

    1987-01-01

    We have investigated three T lymphocyte clones isolated from CBA/CaJ mice primed with mouse thyroid extract (MTE) in adjuvant. All three clones are L3T4+, Ig-, and Lyt2- and proliferate to MTE, mouse thyroglobulin (MTG) and rat thyroid extract. Clones A7 and B7 transfer thyroiditis to irradiated (475 rad) syngeneic mice, but not to normal recipients. The thyroid lesion induced by the B7 clone is characterized by the infiltration of both mononuclear and polymorphonuclear cells. The thyroiditis is transient in that lesions are apparent 7 and 14 days after transfer, but thyroids return to normal by day 21. Clone B7 showed helper activity for trinitrophenyl-keyhole limpet hemocyanin-primed B cells in vitro when stimulated with trinitrophenyl-MTG and also stimulated the production of anti-MTG antibody in recipient mice. Clone A7 induced thyroid lesions characterized by infiltration of the thyroid with mononuclear cells, with virtually no polymorphonuclear cell infiltration. This clone has shown no helper activity following stimulation with trinitrophenyl-MTG. The third clone (D2) proliferates to and shows helper activity to MTG, but fails to transfer thyroiditis to syngeneic, irradiated mice. On continuous culture, clone B7 lost its surface Thy. The loss of Thy appears unrelated to the ability to transfer thyroiditis since subclones of B7 with markedly different percentages of Thy+ cells transferred disease equally well

  19. A case of Kearns-Sayre sindrome with autoimmune thyroiditis and complete atrio-ventricular block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berio, A; Piazzi, A

    2006-06-01

    The Kearns-Sayre syndrome, (characterized by its onset before the age of 20 years, chronic ophthalmoplegia, pigmentary retinal degeneration and at least one of the following symptoms: ataxia, heart block and high protein content in the cerebrospinal fluid) is a severe variant of chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia with frequent rearrangements of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). The aim of this paper is to report a sporadic paediatric case of Kearns-Sayre syndrome with mtDNA heteroplasmic deletion, absence of cytochrome c-oxidase in many muscle fibers, autoimmune thyroiditis, complete atrio-ventricular heart block in which the diagnosis of subclinical hypothyroiditis associated with autoimmune thyroid disease was made. The subclinical hypothyroidism, more severe in the presence of thyroid antibodies, may have contributed to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. We hypothesized that in this patient, predisposed by mitochondrial deletion, anti-thyroid antibodies may have interfered with the mitochondrial function of conduction heart system, causing atrio-ventricular heart block. It seems important to study anti-thyroid antibodies in every case of Kearn-Sayre syndrome, specially if cardiac rhythm disturbances are present.

  20. AUTOIMMUNE DISEASE DURING PREGNANCY AND THE MICROCHIMERISM LEGACY OF PREGNANCY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams Waldorf, Kristina M.; Nelson, J. Lee

    2009-01-01

    Pregnancy has both short-term effects and long-term consequences. For women who have an autoimmune disease and subsequently become pregnant, pregnancy can induce amelioration of the mother’s disease, such as in rheumatoid arthritis, while exacerbating or having no effect on other autoimmune diseases like systemic lupus erythematosus. That pregnancy also leaves a long-term legacy has recently become apparent by the discovery that bi-directional cell trafficking results in persistence of fetal cells in the mother and of maternal cells in her offspring for decades after birth. The long-term persistence of a small number of cells (or DNA) from a genetically disparate individual is referred to as microchimerism. While microchimerism is common in healthy individuals and is likely to have health benefits, microchimerism has been implicated in some autoimmune diseases such as systemic sclerosis. In this paper, we will first discuss short-term effects of pregnancy on women with autoimmune disease. Pregnancy-associated changes will be reviewed for selected autoimmune diseases including rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and autoimmune thyroid disease. The pregnancy-induced amelioration of rheumatoid arthritis presents a window of opportunity for insights into both immunological mechanisms of fetal-maternal tolerance and pathogenic mechanisms in autoimmunity. A mechanistic hypothesis for the pregnancy-induced amelioration of rheumatoid arthritis will be described. We will then discuss the legacy of maternal-fetal cell transfer from the perspective of autoimmune diseases. Fetal and maternal microchimerism will be reviewed with a focus on systemic sclerosis (scleroderma), autoimmune thyroid disease, neonatal lupus and type I diabetes mellitus. PMID:18716941

  1. Clinical And Pathological Implications Of Concurrent Autoimmune Thyroid Disorders And Papillary Thyroid Cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Cunha, L L; Ferreira, R C; Marcello, M A; Vassallo, J; Ward, L S

    2011-01-01

    Cooccurrences of chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis (CLT) and thyroid cancer (DTC) have been repeatedly reported. Both CLT and DTC, mainly papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), share some epidemiological and molecular features. In fact, thyroid lymphocytic inflammatory reaction has been observed in association with PTC at variable frequency, although the precise relationship between the two diseases is still debated. It also remains a matter of debate whether the association with a CLT or even an a...

  2. Interactions between thyroid disorders and kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopal Basu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There are several interactions between thyroid and kidney functions in each other organ′s disease states. Thyroid hormones affect renal development and physiology. Thyroid hormones have pre-renal and intrinsic renal effects by which they increase the renal blood flow and the glomerular filtration rate (GFR. Hypothyroidism is associated with reduced GFR and hyperthyroidism results in increased GFR as well as increased renin - angiotensin - aldosterone activation. Chronic kidney disease (CKD is characterized by a low T3 syndrome which is now considered a part of an atypical nonthyroidal illness. CKD patients also have increased incidence of primary hypothyroidism and subclinical hypothyroidism. The physiological benefits of a hypothyroid state in CKD, and the risk of CKD progression with hyperthyroidism emphasize on a conservative approach in the treatment of thyroid hormone abnormalities in CKD. Thyroid dysfunction is also associated with glomerulonephritis often by a common autoimmune etiology. Several drugs could affect both thyroid and kidney functions. There are few described interactions between thyroid and renal malignancies. A detailed knowledge of all these interactions is important for both the nephrologists and endocrinologists for optimal management of the patient.

  3. Significance of (sub) clinical thyroid dysfunction and thyroid autoimmunity before conception and in early pregnancy : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Boogaard, Emmy; Vissenberg, Rosa; Land, Jolande A.; van Wely, Madelon; van der Post, Joris A. M.; Goddijn, Mariette; Bisschop, Peter H.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Thyroid dysfunction and thyroid autoimmunity are prevalent among women of reproductive age and are associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. Preconception or early pregnancy screening for thyroid dysfunction has been proposed but is not widely accepted. We conducted a systematic review

  4. Oral Tolerance: Therapeutic Implications for Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M. C. Faria

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral tolerance is classically defined as the suppression of immune responses to antigens (Ag that have been administered previously by the oral route. Multiple mechanisms of tolerance are induced by oral Ag. Low doses favor active suppression, whereas higher doses favor clonal anergy/deletion. Oral Ag induces Th2 (IL-4/IL-10 and Th3 (TGF-β regulatory T cells (Tregs plus CD4+CD25+ regulatory cells and LAP+T cells. Induction of oral tolerance is enhanced by IL-4, IL-10, anti-IL-12, TGF-β, cholera toxin B subunit (CTB, Flt-3 ligand, anti-CD40 ligand and continuous feeding of Ag. In addition to oral tolerance, nasal tolerance has also been shown to be effective in suppressing inflammatory conditions with the advantage of a lower dose requirement. Oral and nasal tolerance suppress several animal models of autoimmune diseases including experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE, uveitis, thyroiditis, myasthenia, arthritis and diabetes in the nonobese diabetic (NOD mouse, plus non-autoimmune diseases such as asthma, atherosclerosis, colitis and stroke. Oral tolerance has been tested in human autoimmune diseases including MS, arthritis, uveitis and diabetes and in allergy, contact sensitivity to DNCB, nickel allergy. Positive results have been observed in phase II trials and new trials for arthritis, MS and diabetes are underway. Mucosal tolerance is an attractive approach for treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases because of lack of toxicity, ease of administration over time and Ag-specific mechanism of action. The successful application of oral tolerance for the treatment of human diseases will depend on dose, developing immune markers to assess immunologic effects, route (nasal versus oral, formulation, mucosal adjuvants, combination therapy and early therapy.

  5. Auto-immune thyroid dysfunction induced by tyrosine kinase inhibitors in a patient with recurrent chordoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eroukhmanoff, Juliette; Castinetti, Frederic; Penel, Nicolas; Salas, Sebastien

    2016-08-24

    While hypothyroidism has frequently been reported with the use of TKIs, the thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) suppressing effect of TKIs is rare, except for thyroiditis. We describe a case with progressive recurrent chordoma who initially became hyperthyroid in a context of autoimmunity under sorafenib treatment and later under imatinib treatment. A 57-year-old man with lumbar chordoma began daily treatment of 800 mg sorafenib. He did not have any other medication or recent iodinated-contrast exposure and his family history was negative for thyroid and autoimmune disease. There was no history of neck pain, irradiation or trauma, recent fever or viral illness. Pre-treatment TSH was normal. After 18 weeks of treatment, the patient presented hyperthyroidism with positive anti-TSH receptor antibodies. More surprisingly, Graves' disease recurred during treatment with imatinib. The fact that Graves' disease occurred after two different TKIs suggests that it could be a rare but important class effect. Anti-TSH receptor antibodies should be systematically measured when TSH decreases in order to avoid the erroneous diagnosis of transient hyperthyroidism due to thyroiditis.

  6. How do autoimmune diseases cluster in families? A systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background A primary characteristic of complex genetic diseases is that affected individuals tend to cluster in families (that is, familial aggregation). Aggregation of the same autoimmune condition, also referred to as familial autoimmune disease, has been extensively evaluated. However, aggregation of diverse autoimmune diseases, also known as familial autoimmunity, has been overlooked. Therefore, a systematic review and meta-analysis were performed aimed at gathering evidence about this topic. Methods Familial autoimmunity was investigated in five major autoimmune diseases, namely, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, autoimmune thyroid disease, multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes mellitus. Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) guidelines were followed. Articles were searched in Pubmed and Embase databases. Results Out of a total of 61 articles, 44 were selected for final analysis. Familial autoimmunity was found in all the autoimmune diseases investigated. Aggregation of autoimmune thyroid disease, followed by systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis, was the most encountered. Conclusions Familial autoimmunity is a frequently seen condition. Further study of familial autoimmunity will help to decipher the common mechanisms of autoimmunity. PMID:23497011

  7. Is autoimmune thyroid dysfunction a risk factor for gestational diabetes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual Corrales, Eider; Andrada, Patricia; Aubá, María; Ruiz Zambrana, Alvaro; Guillén Grima, Francisco; Salvador, Javier; Escalada, Javier; Galofré, Juan C

    2014-01-01

    Some recent studies have related autoimmune thyroid dysfunction and gestational diabetes (GD). The common factor for both conditions could be the existence of pro-inflammatory homeostasis. The study objective was therefore to assess whether the presence of antithyroid antibodies is related to the occurrence of GD. Fifty-six pregnant women with serum TSH levels ≥ 2.5 mU/mL during the first trimester were retrospectively studied. Antithyroid antibodies were measured, and an O'Sullivan test was performed. GD was diagnosed based on the criteria of the Spanish Group on Diabetes and Pregnancy. Positive antithyroid antibodies were found in 21 (37.50%) women. GD was diagnosed in 15 patients, 6 of whom (10.71%) had positive antibodies, while 9 (16.07%) had negative antibodies. Data were analyzed using exact logistic regression by LogXact-8 Cytel; no statistically significant differences were found between GD patients with positive and negative autoimmunity (OR = 1.15 [95%CI = 0.28-4.51]; P=1.00). The presence of thyroid autoimmunity in women with TSH above the recommended values at the beginning of pregnancy is not associated to development of GD. However, GD prevalence was higher in these patients as compared to the Spanish general population, suggesting the need for closer monitoring in pregnant women with TSH levels ≥ 2.5 mU/mL. Copyright © 2013 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Genetics Home Reference: Hashimoto thyroiditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for This Page Dong YH, Fu DG. Autoimmune thyroid disease: mechanism, genetics and current knowledge. Eur Rev Med ... Tomer Y. Cutting edge: the etiology of autoimmune thyroid diseases. Clin Rev Allergy Immunol. 2011 Oct;41(2): ...

  9. Production of interleukin (IL)-5 and IL-10 accompanies T helper cell type 1 (Th1) cytokine responses to a major thyroid self-antigen, thyroglobulin, in health and autoimmune thyroid disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C H; Hegedüs, L; Rieneck, K

    2007-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interferon (IFN)-gamma exert detrimental effects in organ-specific autoimmune disease, while both destructive and protective roles have been demonstrated for interleukin (IL)-10, IL-4 and IL-5. We examined the production of these cytokines by peripheral blood...

  10. Characteristic of thyroid diseases in participants of Chernobyl accident clean-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afanas'jeva, N.Yi.

    1996-01-01

    The study involved 309 liquidators of the accident at the Chernobyl Atomic Power Plant (192 patients were investigated in 1990-1991 and 117 in 1992-1994). Nodular goiter and autoimmune thyroiditis (diffuse and nodular forms) against the background of thyroid hyperplasia occupy the leading place among the thyroid diseases in these patients. Thyroid cancer developed mainly in those liquidators who stayed in the zone of the accident during 'iodine' period. The incidence of thyroid pathology (mainly that autoimmune character and thyroid cancer) have increased in the participants of the Chernobyl accident clean-up recently

  11. Unusual association of thyroiditis, Addison's disease, ovarian failure and celiac disease in a young woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentino, R; Savastano, S; Tommaselli, A P; Dorato, M; Scarpitta, M T; Gigante, M; Lombardi, G; Troncone, R

    1999-05-01

    The coexistence of autoimmune endocrine diseases, particularly autoimmune thyroid disease and celiac disease (CD), has recently been reported. We here present a 23-year-old woman with a diagnosis of hypothyroidism due to Hashimoto's thyroiditis, autoimmune Addison's disease, and kariotypically normal spontaneous premature ovarian failure. Considering the close association between autoimmune diseases and CD, we decided to search for IgA anti-endomysium antibodies (EmA) in the serum. The positivity of EmA and the presence of total villous atrophy at jejunal biopsy allowed the diagnosis of CD. On a gluten-free diet the patient showed a marked clinical improvement accompanied, over a 3-month period, by a progressive decrease in the need for thyroid and adrenal replacement therapies. After 6 months, serum EmA became negative and after 12 months a new jejunal biopsy showed complete mucosal recovery. After 18 months on gluten-free diet, the anti-thyroid antibodies titre decreased significantly, and we could discontinue thyroid substitutive therapy. This case emphasizes the association between autoimmune polyglandular disease and CD; the precocious identification of these cases is clinically relevant not only for the high risk of complications (e.g. lymphoma) inherent to untreated CD, but also because CD is one of the causes for the failure of substitute hormonal therapy in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease.

  12. Cardiovascular disease biomarkers across autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahearn, Joseph; Shields, Kelly J; Liu, Chau-Ching; Manzi, Susan

    2015-11-01

    Cardiovascular disease is increasingly recognized as a major cause of premature mortality among those with autoimmune disorders. There is an urgent need to identify those patients with autoimmune disease who are at risk for CVD so as to optimize therapeutic intervention and ultimately prevention. Accurate identification, monitoring and stratification of such patients will depend upon a panel of biomarkers of cardiovascular disease. This review will discuss some of the most recent biomarkers of cardiovascular diseases in autoimmune disease, including lipid oxidation, imaging biomarkers to characterize coronary calcium, plaque, and intima media thickness, biomarkers of inflammation and activated complement, genetic markers, endothelial biomarkers, and antiphospholipid antibodies. Clinical implementation of these biomarkers will not only enhance patient care but also likely accelerate the pharmaceutical pipeline for targeted intervention to reduce or eliminate cardiovascular disease in the setting of autoimmunity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Interleukin-12 promotes activation of effector cells that induce a severe destructive granulomatous form of murine experimental autoimmune thyroiditis.

    OpenAIRE

    Braley-Mullen, H.; Sharp, G. C.; Tang, H.; Chen, K.; Kyriakos, M.; Bickel, J. T.

    1998-01-01

    Granulomatous inflammatory lesions are a major histopathological feature of a wide spectrum of human infectious and autoimmune diseases. Experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT) with granulomatous histopathological features can be induced by mouse thyroglobulin (MTg)-sensitized spleen cells activated in vitro with MTg and anti-interleukin-2 receptor (anti-IL-2R), anti-IL-2, or anti-interferon-gamma (anti-IFN-gamma) monoclonal antibody (MAb). These studies suggested that IFN-gamma-producing T...

  14. Thyroid disease in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrou, Panayota; Raptis, Sotirios A; Dimitriadis, George

    2011-09-01

    Several changes in thyroid hormone secretion, metabolism, and action occur with the increase in age. Aging is often associated with a decrease in serum thyroid stimulating hormone and T3 levels, whereas serum free T4 levels usually remain unchanged. The prevalence of thyroid dysfunction is higher in the elderly as compared to the younger population. In elderly individuals the non-specific clinical manifestations of thyroid hormone excess or deprivation can cause confusion in the clinical setup; while some of the symptoms of thyroid disease are similar to those in younger patients, it is not uncommon for both hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism to be manifested in subtle ways in older patients, often mimicking symptoms of aging or masquerading as diseases of the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, or nervous system. In addition, diagnosis of thyroid disorders is commonly complicated, due to chronic, non-thyroidal illness or medication therapy. Early diagnosis and treatment of overt thyroid disorders is crucial, since these disorders are associated with increased morbidity and mortality in the elderly, usually due to common coexistent diseases such as diminished cardiovascular reserve. Treatment of subclinical thyroid disease should also be considered, based on a combination of age, symptoms and risk factors in the individual patients. In addition, both prevalence and aggressiveness of thyroid cancer increase with age. This review summarizes the changes of thyroid function, as well as the clinical manifestations and treatment of thyroid disorders with advancing age. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Demographic and clinical features of autoimmune thyroid disorder in Japanese patients with systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toki, Sayaka; Motegi, Sei-ichiro; Yamada, Kazuya; Uchiyama, Akihiko; Ishikawa, Osamu

    2014-12-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disorders (AITD) are characterized by the impairment of the thyroid gland as a result of systemic or organ-specific autoimmune disorders, and the presence of antithyroid autoantibodies, such as antithyroglobulin antibody (AbTg) and antithyroid peroxidase antibody (AbTPO). Several studies have reported the association of AITD with systemic sclerosis (SSc). However, none of those studies analyzed the association between AITD and skin sclerosis in SSc patients. The aim of this study was to examine the demographic and clinical features of SSc patients with AITD treated in our department. Of a total of 210 SSc patients, we identified 30 with AITD (14.3%), including 29 with Hashimoto's disease (13.8%) and one patient with Graves' disease (0.5%), indicating that hypothyroidism was more common among SSc patients with AITD. All patients with AITD were female, and anticentromere antibody positivity, the complication of Sjögren's syndrome, severe facial skin sclerosis and atrophy of the thyroid gland were significantly prevalent in SSc patients with AITD. SSc patients with such clinical features may be at high risk of AITD and require regular follow up of thyroid function including ultrasonography and the examination of serum hormone levels to start an early treatment. © 2014 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  16. Signs of a higher prevalence of autoimmune thyroiditis in female offspring of bipolar parents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hillegers, Manon H. J.; Reichart, Catrien G.; Wals, Marjolein; Verhulst, Frank C.; Ormel, Johan; Nolen, Willem A.; Drexhage, Hemmo A.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Studies are inconsistent as to whether patients with bipolar disorder are more frequently affected by autoimmune thyroiditis. Aim: To study the prevalence of autoimmune thyroiditis in offspring of bipolar patients. Method: In 1998 140 children (age 12-21 years) of bipolar parents were

  17. Utility of Shear Wave Elastography for Diagnosing Chronic Autoimmune Thyroiditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Fukuhara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to evaluate the utility of shear wave elastography (SWE using acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI for diagnosing chronic autoimmune thyroiditis (CAT and to verify the effect of fibrotic thyroid tissue on shear wave velocity (SWV. The subjects were 229 patients with 253 normal thyroid lobes (controls and 150 CAT lobes. The SWV for CAT (2.47 ± 0.57 m/s was significantly higher than that for controls (1.59 ± 0.41 m/s (P<0.001. The area under the receiver operating characteristics (ROC curve for CAT was 0.899, and the SWV cut-off value was 1.96 m/s. The sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy were 87.4%, 78.7%, and 85.1%, respectively. Levels of anti-thyroperoxidase antibodies and thyroid isthmus thickness were correlated with tissue stiffness in CAT. However, there was no correlation between levels of anti-thyroglobulin antibodies and tissue stiffness. Quantitative SWE is useful for diagnosing CAT, and it is possible that SWE can be used to evaluate the degree of fibrosis in patients with CAT.

  18. Autoimmune disease classification by inverse association with SNP alleles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Sirota

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available With multiple genome-wide association studies (GWAS performed across autoimmune diseases, there is a great opportunity to study the homogeneity of genetic architectures across autoimmune disease. Previous approaches have been limited in the scope of their analysis and have failed to properly incorporate the direction of allele-specific disease associations for SNPs. In this work, we refine the notion of a genetic variation profile for a given disease to capture strength of association with multiple SNPs in an allele-specific fashion. We apply this method to compare genetic variation profiles of six autoimmune diseases: multiple sclerosis (MS, ankylosing spondylitis (AS, autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD, rheumatoid arthritis (RA, Crohn's disease (CD, and type 1 diabetes (T1D, as well as five non-autoimmune diseases. We quantify pair-wise relationships between these diseases and find two broad clusters of autoimmune disease where SNPs that make an individual susceptible to one class of autoimmune disease also protect from diseases in the other autoimmune class. We find that RA and AS form one such class, and MS and ATD another. We identify specific SNPs and genes with opposite risk profiles for these two classes. We furthermore explore individual SNPs that play an important role in defining similarities and differences between disease pairs. We present a novel, systematic, cross-platform approach to identify allele-specific relationships between disease pairs based on genetic variation as well as the individual SNPs which drive the relationships. While recognizing similarities between diseases might lead to identifying novel treatment options, detecting differences between diseases previously thought to be similar may point to key novel disease-specific genes and pathways.

  19. Celiac Disease and Thyroid Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... metabolism to significantly increase. This is called hyperthyroidism. Hashimoto’s disease and Grave’s Disease are two common causes ... the dietitian? Celiac Disease and Thyroid Conditions | continued Hashimoto’s Disease (Also called Chronic Lymphocytic Thyroiditis) •Your body’s ...

  20. Acquired ichthyosis in a child with autoimmune thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazzelli, Valeria; Larizza, Daniela; Muzio, Francesca; Fornara, Luisa; Calcaterra, Valeria; Vassallo, Camilla; Scaglia, Francesca; Borroni, Giovanna

    2010-01-01

    Acquired ichthyosis is a rare cutaneous disorder characterized by dry, rough skin with prominent scaling, that involves symmetrically the trunk and limbs and especially on the extensor surfaces. It appears most commonly in adults in association with malignant, autoimmune, metabolic, endocrine, and infectious diseases. We describe a child with acquired ichthyosis in whom an autoimmune hypothyroidism was detected; furthermore, replacement therapy with L-thyroxine resulted in complete remission of ichthyosis.

  1. Thyroid uptake of {sup 67}Ga-citrate is associated with thyroid autoimmunity and hypothyroidism in patients with sarcoidosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonelli, Alessandro; Fallahi, Poupak; Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Ferrannini, Ele [University of Pisa and CNR Institute of Clinical Physiology, Metabolism Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, Pisa (Italy); Fazzi, Piera [University of Pisa, Respiratory Pathophysiology Section, Cardiac and Thoracic Department, Pisa (Italy); Grosso, Mariano; Boni, Giuseppe; Mariani, Giuliano [University of Pisa, Regional Center of Nuclear Medicine, Medical School, Pisa (Italy)

    2009-01-15

    To evaluate the association of gallium-67 ({sup 67}Ga)-citrate thyroid uptake with the presence of thyroid disorders in patients with sarcoidosis (S patients). Eighty-four S patients were evaluated by a complete thyroid work-up (neck ultrasound, circulating thyroid hormones and anti-thyroid antibodies, fine-needle aspiration). In S patients with {sup 67}Ga thyroid uptake (respect those without): serum thyroid-stimulating hormone, the titre of anti-thyroid peroxidase (AbTPO) and/or anti-thyroglobulin antibodies (AbTg), and the prevalence of S patients with hypothyroidism or with positive AbTg or AbTPO was significantly higher; a thyroid hypoechoic pattern was more frequent. The prevalence of thyroid nodules was not significantly different between the two groups. Two cases of papillary thyroid cancer were observed in S patients without {sup 67}Ga thyroid uptake, whilst no case in those with {sup 67}Ga thyroid uptake. {sup 67}Ga thyroid uptake is associated with the presence of aggressive autoimmune thyroiditis and hypothyroidism in S patients; thyroid function and ultrasonography should be performed in the presence of {sup 67}Ga thyroid uptake. (orig.)

  2. Serum Anti-TPO and TPO Gene Polymorphism as a Predictive Factor for Hidden Autoimmune Thyroiditis in Patient with Bronchial Asthma and Allergic Rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Shabrawy, Reham M; Atta, Amal H; Rashad, Nearmeen M

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid peroxidase (TPO) is the key enzyme in the biosynthesis of thyroid hormones T3 and T4. Autoimmune thyroiditis is a common disorder affecting 10% of population worldwide. A key feature of autoimmune thyroiditis is the presence of anti TPO antibodies, and some mutation of the TPO gene. Association between autoimmune thyroiditis and other autoimmune disorders has been reported but little is known about association with allergic diseases. In this study, we aimed to evaluate frequency of hidden autoimmune thyroiditis among allergic patient and examine possible relationship between anti-TPO levels and polymorphism at the TPO gene A2173/C exon 12 and different types of allergens. The study included 50 adult Egyptian patients with allergic rhinitis and /or bronchial asthma and 50 controls. For each subject, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), thyroxin 4 (T4) and Triiodothyronine (T3) hormones were measured. Anti-thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO) level was detected by ELISA; and TPO gene polymorphism 2173A>C exon 12 was analyzed using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). Skin prick test was done to assess allergic response in patients. Serum levels of T3, T4 and TSH did not show any statistical significant difference between patients and groups. However, mean serum anti-TPO level was statistically higher in patients than controls, and correlated positively with body mass index, age, diastolic blood pressure, suggesting higher prevalence of hidden autoimmune thyroiditis in allergic patients than in control group. 2173A>C Genotyping revealed that the frequency of C allele is increased in the patient group. C allele represents a risk factor with odds ratio of 2.37 (1.035-5.44) and a significant P value TPO 2173A>C polymorphism may be considered as a risk factor for developing autoimmune thyroiditis in patients with allergic rhinitis and asthma and that these patients should regularly be checked for hidden thyroiditis. Copyright© by the Egyptian Association of

  3. Hemophagocytosis in Cutaneous Autoimmune Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerl, Katrin; Wolf, Ingrid H; Cerroni, Lorenzo; Wolf, Peter; French, Lars E; Kerl, Helmut

    2015-07-01

    The significance of the histological visualization of hemophagocytosis in tissues depends on the context, varying from a nonspecific phenomenon to a characteristic or diagnostic feature for certain disease entities. Hemophagocytosis is also one of the key features of macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) (hemophagocytic syndrome) a potentially life-threatening complication of underlying conditions such as infections, malignancy, and autoimmune disorders. Clinical manifestations of MAS are high fever, pancytopenia, liver dysfunction, and coagulopathy. These clinical symptoms are due to an abnormal activation of the immune system in a strong association with the cytokine milieu. The diagnosis of MAS may be easily missed; it is usually detected in the bone marrow, lymph node, liver, and spleen. Only few reports exist in the literature with histological description of cutaneous hemophagocytosis as a sign for MAS in patients with lymphoma and infection. In this report, the authors present the clinicopathological and immunohistochemical features of 3 patients with cutaneous hemophagocytosis, specifically erythrophagocytosis, associated with autoimmune disease, and discuss the relevance of these findings. The authors report 3 patients who developed cutaneous hemophagocytosis during the course of an underlying autoimmune disorder. One patient suffered from dermatomyositis, the other 2 patients from systemic lupus erythematosus, whereby one of them was a 3-month old girl with neonatal lupus erythematosus. The patient with dermatomyositis developed MAS according to the current diagnostic criteria. Although the 2 other patients had an acute flare of their autoimmune disease with histological signs of cutaneous hemophagocytosis, they did not fulfill the complete criteria for a diagnosis of MAS. Histiocyte proliferation and activation with increase of cytokines could be demonstrated by immunohistology. This report is the first to describe hemophagocytosis in cutaneous biopsies

  4. An autosomal locus causing autoimmune disease: Autoimmune polyglandular disease type I assigned to chromosome 21

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Aaltonen (Johanna); P. Björses (Petra); L.A. Sandkuijl (Lodewijk); J. Perheentupa (Jaakko); L. Peltonen (Leena Johanna)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractAutoimmune polyglandular disease type I (APECED) is an autosomal recessive autoimmune disease characterized by a variable combination of the failure of the endocrine glands. The pathogenesis of this unique autoimmune disease is unknown; unlike many other autoimmune diseases, APECED does

  5. Leaky gut and autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasano, Alessio

    2012-02-01

    Autoimmune diseases are characterized by tissue damage and loss of function due to an immune response that is directed against specific organs. This review is focused on the role of impaired intestinal barrier function on autoimmune pathogenesis. Together with the gut-associated lymphoid tissue and the neuroendocrine network, the intestinal epithelial barrier, with its intercellular tight junctions, controls the equilibrium between tolerance and immunity to non-self antigens. Zonulin is the only physiologic modulator of intercellular tight junctions described so far that is involved in trafficking of macromolecules and, therefore, in tolerance/immune response balance. When the zonulin pathway is deregulated in genetically susceptible individuals, autoimmune disorders can occur. This new paradigm subverts traditional theories underlying the development of these diseases and suggests that these processes can be arrested if the interplay between genes and environmental triggers is prevented by re-establishing the zonulin-dependent intestinal barrier function. Both animal models and recent clinical evidence support this new paradigm and provide the rationale for innovative approaches to prevent and treat autoimmune diseases.

  6. Thyroid disorders in Brazilian patients with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Kotze, Lorete Maria; Nisihara, Renato Mitsunori; da Rosa Utiyama, Shirley Ramos; Piovezan, Gislaine Custodio; Kotze, Luiz Roberto

    2006-01-01

    Patients with celiac disease (CD) can develop a gluten related autoimmune disorder that affects not only the small intestine but other tissues as well. An increased prevalence of autoimmune diseases has been reported, particularly autoimmune thyroiditis. The aim of this study was to characterize thyroid disorders in patients with CD. Fifty-two patients with CD (43 female, 9 male; mean age, 41.1 years) were studied. Nine were on a gluten-free diet (GFD). They were divided into four groups: Group 1, without thyroid involvement (n=30); Groups 2A-C, with thyroid involvement (n=22); Group 2A, subclinical hypothyroidism (n=11); Group 2B, clinical hypothyroidism (n=10); and Group 2C, other thyroid disorders (n=1). CD was confirmed by serologic and histologic criteria. Thyroid involvement was detected by measurement of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and anti-thyroperoxidase antibodies (anti-TPO). Increased levels of TSH and/or anti-TPO levels were detected in Groups 2A (21.1%) and 2B (19.2%). The patients of Group 2B presented clinical symptoms of hypothyroidism before the diagnosis of CD, and 5 of these patients were receiving levothyroxine. One woman (Group 2C; 1.92%) had a medullary carcinoma. There was statistical significance between the age when thyroid disease was diagnosed (current age) and the age of CD diagnosis between Groups 1 and 2B. Patients with thyroid involvement presented associated diseases such as diabetes mellitus (2), Down's syndrome (2), ulcerative colitis (1), and dermatitis herpetiformis (2). Our findings demonstrated an increased prevalence of thyroid disorders (hypothyroidism, 19.2%; and subclinical hypothyroidism, 21.2%), and other associated diseases in celiac patients, even on a GFD, increasing with the age of the patients. Screening for associated diseases is recommended for patients with CD, independent of age at diagnosis or treatment duration.

  7. Oversecretion of soluble CTLA-4 in various autoimmune diseases overlapping celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesce, Giampaola; Auricchio, Renata; Bagnasco, Marcello; Saverino, Daniele

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the levels of soluble CTLA-4 (sCTLA-4) in sera of celiac disease (CD) patients with overlapping autoimmune diseases (OAD; diabetes mellitus, autoimmune thyroid diseases, inflammatory bowel diseases, and autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes). Sera from Italian patients with CD were obtained and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to measure sCTLA-4. Consistently high serum sCTLA-4 levels were observed in CD (13.20 ng/mL, pautoimmune disease (namely, CD and OAD) versus patients with CD alone. Previously, the potential genetic associations of several CTLA-4 polymorphisms to susceptibility to autoimmune diseases have been described, although the relationship between CTLA-4 polymorphisms and the ability to produce the soluble form is not fully clarified. CTLA-4 is a strong actor in the adaptive response: our data give supportive evidence of the common background of autoimmune diseases.

  8. Beneficial effect of testosterone in the treatment of chronic autoimmune thyroiditis in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, S.A.; Young, P.R.; Penhale, W.J.

    1986-01-01

    Early thymectomy and sublethal irradiation of normal rats consistently induces a sex-dependent chronic autoimmune thyroiditis. Females are much more susceptible to this autoimmune disorder than are males. The possible therapeutic effects of testosterone (Te) on established autoimmune thyroiditis has been investigated in this model. The pathologic condition of the gland before treatment was monitored by a thyroid grafting and extirpation techniques. Te administration by either parenteral injection or implantation caused significant regression of established thyroiditis. Repeated doses of Te ester in oil were found to be more effective than powdered free-Te given by implantation, and frequently produced complete resolution of chronic lesions involving the entire gland. In these thyroids, there was reappearance of normal thyroid architecture and complete absence of mononuclear cellular infiltration. However, no inhibitory effect on serum autoantibody production to thyroglobulin was noted with any form of Te treatment. These observations strengthen the concept that cellular rather than humoral mechanisms are involved in the pathogenesis of thyroiditis.

  9. Helminth Immunomodulation in Autoimmune Disease

    OpenAIRE

    John J. Miles; John J. Miles; John J. Miles; John J. Miles; Taylor B. Smallwood; Paul R. Giacomin; Alex Loukas; Jason P. Mulvenna; Jason P. Mulvenna; Jason P. Mulvenna; Richard J. Clark

    2017-01-01

    Helminths have evolved to become experts at subverting immune surveillance. Through potent and persistent immune tempering, helminths can remain undetected in human tissues for decades. Redirecting the immunomodulating “talents” of helminths to treat inflammatory human diseases is receiving intensive interest. Here, we review therapies using live parasitic worms, worm secretions, and worm-derived synthetic molecules to treat autoimmune disease. We review helminth therapy in both mouse models ...

  10. Autoimmune diseases and reproductive aging

    OpenAIRE

    Bove, Riley

    2013-01-01

    As the population ages, more individuals with autoimmune diseases are experiencing reproductive senescence. Understanding the impact of menopause and age-related androgen decline on disease onset and course, as well as the potential for hormonal interventions, is critically important. In men, lupus erythematosis (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and multiple sclerosis (MS) are associated with lower androgen levels. However, the impact of age-related declines in testosterone, as well as of tes...

  11. Autoimmune diseases and pregnancy: analysis of a series of cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Vânia; Mesquita, Alexandra; Capela, Carlos

    2015-06-04

    An autoimmune disease is characterized by tissue damage, caused by self-reactivity of different effector mechanisms of the immune system, namely antibodies and T cells. All autoimmune diseases, to some extent, have implications for fertility and obstetrics. Currently, due to available treatments and specialised care for pregnant women with autoimmune disease, the prognosis for both mother and child has improved significantly. However these pregnancies are always high risk. The purpose of this study is to analyse the fertility/pregnancy process of women with systemic and organ-specific autoimmune diseases and assess pathological and treatment implications. The authors performed an analysis of the clinical records and relevant obstetric history of five patients representing five distinct autoimmune pathological scenarios, selected from Autoimmune Disease Consultation at the Hospital of Braga, and reviewed the literature. The five clinical cases are the following: Case 1-28 years old with systemic lupus erythematosus, and clinical remission of the disease, under medication with hydroxychloroquine, prednisolone and acetylsalicylic acid, with incomplete miscarriage at 7 weeks of gestation without signs of thrombosis. Case 2-44 years old with history of two late miscarriages, a single preterm delivery (33 weeks) and multiple thrombotic events over the years, was diagnosed with antiphospholipid syndrome after acute myocardial infarction. Case 3-31 years old with polymyositis, treated with azathioprine for 3 years with complete remission of the disease, took the informed decision to get pregnant after medical consultation and full weaning from azathioprine, and gave birth to a healthy term new-born. Case 4-38 years old pregnant woman developed Behcet's syndrome during the final 15 weeks of gestation and with disease exacerbation after delivery. Case 5-36 years old with autoimmune thyroiditis diagnosed during her first pregnancy, with difficult control over the thyroid

  12. Relationships between thyroid function and autoimmunity with metabolic derangement at the onset of type 1 diabetes: a cross-sectional and longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsamo, C; Zucchini, S; Maltoni, G; Rollo, A; Martini, A L; Mazzanti, L; Pession, A; Cassio, A

    2015-06-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1DM) is an autoimmune disease often associated with thyroid abnormalities. We investigated the correlation between thyroid function and metabolic derangement at onset and the influence of autoimmunity on thyroid function at onset and subsequently. We evaluated 152 patients diagnosed with T1DM between 2000 and 2012 at onset and during a mean follow-up of 5.45 ± 2.8 years. Thyroid function at onset was correlated with metabolic derangement (degree of acidosis, metabolic control and adrenal function) and compared with that of 78 healthy children. Follow-up consisted of regular evaluation of thyroid function and autoimmunity. Thyroid hormonal pattern was not influenced at onset by thyroid autoimmunity, but only by metabolic derangement: pH and base excess in fact were significantly lower in patients with impaired thyroid function (p thyroid function at onset showed a reduced conversion from FT4 to FT3 compared to nondiabetic children (FT3/FT4 0.3 ± 0.4 in the control group, 0.24 ± 0.4 in diabetic patients, p Thyroid abnormalities related to metabolic derangement disappeared during follow-up. Patients with thyroid antibodies at T1DM onset were at higher risk to require levothyroxine treatment during follow-up (p Thyroid function at T1DM onset is mainly influenced by metabolic derangement, irrespective of thyroid autoimmunity. Antithyroid antibodies evaluation at T1DM onset may be helpful to define which patients are at higher risk of developing hypothyroidism.

  13. Thyroid diseases and Ramadan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed A Raza

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the month of Ramadan, patients with thyroid diseases, most of the time, do not need treatment adjustments and can fast safely without any health hazards. Patients with hypothyroidism taking thyroxine can take their tablets on an empty stomach at bedtime instead of half an hour before Sehr. Patients with hyperthyroidism, on methimazole/carbimazole can continue their dose in once or twice daily regimes, while those on propylthiouracil need to be switched. Hyperthyroid patients with severe symptoms should start treatment immediately and can avoid fast for few days after a consultation with their religious scholar.

  14. Sonographic decreased echogenicity of thyroid parenchyma in asymptomatic population: Correction with thyroid function and thyroid autoimmune activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ji Yeon; Park, Noh Hyuck; Park, Chan Sub; Lee, Ji Ye [Dept. of Radiology, Myongji Hospital, Seonam University College of Medicine, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Chun, Kyung Ah [Dept. of Radiology, Catholic Kwandong University School of Medicine, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Seong Yoon [Div. of Hematology-Oncology, Dept. of Internal Medicine, Inje University Ilsan Paik Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hee Jin [Dept. of of Radiology, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the correlation between decreased echogenicity of thyroid and thyroid hormones or autoantibodies. From January 2009 to December 2011, 543 patients with decreased parenchymal echogenicity [M:F = 133:410, median age: 42 years (range: 9-82 years)], who did not have solid nodule, symptom or medication related to thyroid and underwent thyroid function test were retrospectively reviewed. Images were classified based on the degree of hypoechogenicity, heterogenicity or thyroid size. 1) Group A: mild decreased echogenicity, group B: marked decreased echogenicity, 2) group Ho: homogeneous echogenicity, group He: heterogeneous echogenicity, 3) group 1: decreased size, group 2: normal size, group 3: increased size. Differences in triiodiothyronyne (T3), free-thyroxine (fT4), thyrotropin (TSH), anti-thyroglobulin antibody (TgAb), thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPOAb), and anti-TSH receptor antibody (TSH-rAb) were evaluated among groups. T3, fT4, and TSH levels differed between groups A and B (p < 0.001, p = 0.001, p < 0.001). TgAb and TPOAb of group B were higher than group A (p = 0.006, p < 0.001). TPOAb of group He was higher than group Ho (p < 0.001). TSH-rAb and TPOAb of group 3 were higher than group 2 (p = 0.017, p < 0.001). The patients with findings of markedly decreased, heterogeneous echogenicity or thyroid enlargement may have abnormal thyroid function and autoantibodies. These may facilitate the physicians' decision to order tests for thyroid function and autoimmune activity.

  15. Antithyroid Antibodies and Thyroid Function in Pediatric Patients with Celiac Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kalyoncu, Derya; Urganci, Nafiye

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of autoimmune thyroid disease, persistence of antithyroid antibodies, effect of gluten-free diet, and long-term outcome of thyroid function in pediatric patients with celiac disease (CD). Methods. 67 patients with CD aged from 1 year to 16 years were screened for thyroid antithyroperoxidase, antithyroglobulin and anti-TSH receptor antibodies, serum free triiodothyronine, free thyroxine, and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) at diagno...

  16. Multiple autoimmune syndrome with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpreet, Singh; Deepak, Jain; Kiran, B

    Multiple autoimmune syndrome (MAS) is a condition characterised by three or more autoimmune disorders in a same individual. Familial, immunologic and infectious factors are implicated in the development of MAS. Here we report a case of a 32-year-old woman with co-existence of four auto-immune diseases, namely autoimmune hypothyroidism, Sjögren's syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and celiac disease which leads to the final diagnosis of multiple autoimmune syndrome type 3 with celiac disease. Patients with single autoimmune disorder are at 25% risk of developing other autoimmune disorders. The present case emphasises to clinicians that there is a need for continued surveillance for the development of new autoimmune disease in predisposed patients.

  17. Human Cytomegalovirus and Autoimmune Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) represents a prototypic pathogenic member of the β-subgroup of the herpesvirus family. A range of HCMV features like its lytic replication in multiple tissues, the lifelong persistence through periods of latency and intermitting reactivation, the extraordinary large proteome, and extensive manipulation of adaptive and innate immunity make HCMV a high profile candidate for involvement in autoimmune disorders. We surveyed the available literature for reports on HCMV association with onset or exacerbation of autoimmune disease. A causative linkage between HCMV and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), systemic sclerosis (SSc), diabetes mellitus type 1, and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is suggested by the literature. However, a clear association of HCMV seroprevalence and disease could not be established, leaving the question open whether HCMV could play a coresponsible role for onset of disease. For convincing conclusions population-based prospective studies must be performed in the future. Specific immunopathogenic mechanisms by which HCMV could contribute to the course of autoimmune disease have been suggested, for example, molecular mimicry by UL94 in SSc and UL83/pp65 in SLE patients, as well as aggravation of joint inflammation by induction and expansion of CD4+/CD28− T-cells in RA patients. Further studies are needed to validate these findings and to lay the grounds for targeted therapeutic intervention. PMID:24967373

  18. Apoptotic study in Graves disease treated with thyroid arterial embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Wei; Gao Bulang; Yi Genfa

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate apoptosis in the thyroid of Graves disease (GD) induced by thyroid arterial embolization. Forty one patients with clinically and laboratorily ascertained GD were treated with thyroid arterial embolization and followed up for 3-54 months following embolization. Prior to embolization and at 1, 3, 6, 12 and 36 months following embolization, thyroid autoimmune antibodies were tested respectively, including thyroid stimulating antibody (TSAb), thyroglobulin antibody (TGAb) and thyroid microsomal antibody (TMAb). Thyroid biopsy was performed under the guidance of computed tomography for immunohistochemistry examination using semi-quantity analysis. The positive staining of Fas and FasL was mostly in the cytoplasma and cell membrane, the positive expression of Bax was mainly in the cytoplasma, and no positive expression of P53 was detected in the thyroid cells before embolization. After arterial embolziation, the positive cell number and staining degree of these genes were both greater than before embolization. The treatment method of thyroid arterial embolization can effectively enhance the positive expression of pro-apoptotic genes of Fas, FasL, Bax, Bcl-2 and P53 in GD thyroid, thus promoting apoptosis of GD thyroid and helping restore the thyroid size and function to normal conditions. (author)

  19. Celiac disease and other autoimmune diseases in patients with collagenous colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigren, Lina; Tysk, Curt; Ström, Magnus; Kilander, Anders F; Hjortswang, Henrik; Bohr, Johan; Benoni, Cecilia; Larson, Lasse; Sjöberg, Klas

    2013-08-01

    Collagenous colitis (CC) is associated with autoimmune disorders. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between CC and autoimmune disorders in a Swedish multicenter study. Patients with CC answered questionnaires about demographic data and disease activity. The patient's files were scrutinized for information about autoimmune diseases. A total number of 116 CC patients were included; 92 women, 24 men, median age 62 years (IQR 55-73). In total, 30.2% had one or more autoimmune disorder. Most common were celiac disease (CeD; 12.9%) and autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD, 10.3%), but they also had Sjögren's syndrome (3.4%), diabetes mellitus (1.7%) and conditions in skin and joints (6.0%). Patients with associated autoimmune disease had more often nocturnal stools. The majority of the patients with associated CeD or ATD got these diagnoses before the colitis diagnosis. Autoimmune disorders occurred in one-third of these patients, especially CeD. In classic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), liver disease is described in contrast to CC where no cases occurred. Instead, CeD was prevalent, a condition not reported in classic IBD. Patients with an associated autoimmune disease had more symptoms. Patients with CC and CeD had an earlier onset of their colitis. The majority of the patients with both CC and CeD were smokers. Associated autoimmune disease should be contemplated in the follow-up of these patients.

  20. A patient-specific model of the negative-feedback control of the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis in autoimmune (Hashimoto's) thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandiyan, Balamurugan; Merrill, Stephen J; Benvenga, Salvatore

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of modelling the negative-feedback control mechanism of the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis in autoimmune (Hashimoto's) thyroiditis is to describe the clinical course of euthyroidism, subclinical hypothyroidism and overt hypothyroidism for patients. Thyroid hormone thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) levels are controlled by negative-feedback control through thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). T4, like other hormones, can be bound or unbound; the unbound T4 (FT4) is used as a marker for hypothyroidism. Autoimmune thyroiditis is a disease in which the thyroid-infiltrating lymphocytes attack autoantigens in follicle cells, destroying them over a long time. To describe the operation of the feedback control, we developed a mathematical model involving four clinical variables: TSH, FT4, anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies and the thyroid gland's functional size. The first three variables are regularly measured while the last variable is determined through relationships between the other three variables. The problem of two different time scales for circulating hormones and thyroid damage is addressed using singular perturbation theory. Analysis of the mathematical model establishes stability and conditions under which the diseased state can maintain the slow movement toward diseased state equilibrium. Although we have used four variables in modelling the feedback control through the HPT axis, the predicted clinical course given any set of parameters is shown to depend on the steady-state levels of TSH and FT4. This observation makes possible the development of the clinical charts based only on the levels of TSH, time and potential steady-state values. To validate the model predictions, a dataset obtained from a Sicilian adult population has been employed. © The Authors 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications. All rights reserved.

  1. Vitamin D and autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Potrokhova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The review discusses the effect of vitamin D on the tolerogenic modulation of an immune response, its relationship to cells of the monocyte-macrophage series, including dendritic cells, monocytes, and macrophages, in the context of the impact of the expression of anti-inflammatory proinflammatory cytokines in some autoimmune diseases (rheumatoid arthritis, systemic scleroderma, multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes mellitus, systemic lupus erythematosus, and Crohn`s disease. It discusses the role of vitamin D in the development of innate and adaptive immunity. Despite some conflicting evidence, the immune regulatory function of vitamin D is generally directed toward inhibition of the components of innate and acquired immunity, which are responsible for the induction of autoimmune reactions; in this connection there are a growing number of publications devoted to the issues of vitamin D supplementation in patients with autoimmune diseases, the preventive effect of vitamin D intake on the risk of an abnormality and that of therapeutic doses of the vitamin on its course. The maintenance of the threshold value for serum 25(OHD3 at least 30 ng/ml, which is achieved by the intake of about 2000 IU of vitamin D, is shown to be required for its immune regulatory function. The data given raise the question as to whether it is necessity to revise the Russian recommended daily dietary allowances for vitamin D through its infant food fortification.

  2. Helminth Immunomodulation in Autoimmune Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallwood, Taylor B; Giacomin, Paul R; Loukas, Alex; Mulvenna, Jason P; Clark, Richard J; Miles, John J

    2017-01-01

    Helminths have evolved to become experts at subverting immune surveillance. Through potent and persistent immune tempering, helminths can remain undetected in human tissues for decades. Redirecting the immunomodulating "talents" of helminths to treat inflammatory human diseases is receiving intensive interest. Here, we review therapies using live parasitic worms, worm secretions, and worm-derived synthetic molecules to treat autoimmune disease. We review helminth therapy in both mouse models and clinical trials and discuss what is known on mechanisms of action. We also highlight current progress in characterizing promising new immunomodulatory molecules found in excretory/secretory products of helminths and their potential use as immunotherapies for acute and chronic inflammatory diseases.

  3. Bone involvement in clusters of autoimmune diseases: just a complication?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Francesca; Franzese, Adriana; Iafusco, Dario; del Puente, Antonio; Esposito, Antonella; Prisco, Francesco; Troncone, Riccardo; Valerio, Giuliana

    2010-02-01

    Bone loss, described in individual groups of patients with Type 1 diabetes (T1D), autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD) or celiac disease (CD) is usually viewed as a complication of these diseases. There is increasing evidence that alterations in the immune system may directly affect bone mass. Clustering of autoimmune diseases in the same individual might predispose to higher risk of osteopenia due to imbalance in immune regulation. The aim of this study was to evaluate bone involvement in clusters of the most common autoimmune diseases (T1D, ATD and CD) in children. The study was performed at a tertiary care center for the care of pediatric diabetes. One-hundred-two patients with T1D alone or associated with ATD and/or CD were studied; 13 patients had cluster of three autoimmune diseases. Amplitude-dependent speed of sound (AD-SoS) was measured by phalangeal quantitative ultrasound and expressed as standard deviation score (SDS). AD-SoS SDS diseases. Poor compliance to gluten-free diet increased osteopenia to 18.8% in patients with T1D and CD and 80% in patients with three autoimmune disorders. No difference among groups was found with regard to gluco-metabolic control, calcium metabolism, thyroid function. In conclusion bone impairment in multiple autoimmune diseases might be considered not only a complication due to endocrine or nutritional mechanisms, but also a consequence of an immunoregulatory imbalance. Alterations of homeostatic mechanisms might explain an imbalance of osteoclast activity leading to osteopenia. (c) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Gene expression profiling in autoimmune diseases: chronic inflammation or disease specific patterns?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bovin, Lone Frier; Brynskov, Jørn; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2007-01-01

    A central issue in autoimmune disease is whether the underlying inflammation is a repeated stereotypical process or whether disease specific gene expression is involved. To shed light on this, we analysed whether genes previously found to be differentially regulated in rheumatoid arthritis (RA......) patients and healthy individuals were specific for the arthritic process or likewise altered in other chronic inflammatory diseases such as chronic autoimmune thyroiditis (Hashimoto's thyroiditis, HT) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Using qPCR for 18 RA-discriminative genes, there were no significant...... immunoinflammatory diseases, but only if accompanied by pronounced systemic manifestations. This suggests that at least some of the genes activated in RA are predominantly or solely related to general and disease-nonspecific autoimmune processes....

  5. Thyroid dysfunction and rheumatic diseases.

    OpenAIRE

    Delamere, J P; Scott, D L; Felix-Davies, D D

    1982-01-01

    Musculoskeletal symptoms developing during the treatment of thyroid disease were studied in 150 patients; 17 developed a symptom complex of early morning stiffness together with shoulder girdle pain and weakness; similar symptoms were seen in only 3 of 100 controls. A prospective study of 16 patients with recent onset rheumatoid arthritis followed during the first 6 months of penicillamine therapy showed no changes in thyroid function tests. It is suggested that changing or abnormal thyroid s...

  6. THYROID FUNCTION Quitting smoking-transient risk of autoimmune hypothyroidism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersinga, Wilmar M.

    2012-01-01

    Smoking is a risk factor for Graves disease. However, Carle et al. have demonstrated that individuals have a transient increased risk of developing overt autoimmune hypothyroidism in the first 2 years after quitting smoking. The mechanisms involved in these two opposing effects of smoking on the

  7. The Footprints of Poly-Autoimmunity: Evidence for Common Biological Factors Involved in Multiple Sclerosis and Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perga, Simona; Martire, Serena; Montarolo, Francesca; Giordani, Ilaria; Spadaro, Michela; Bono, Gabriele; Corvisieri, Stefania; Messuti, Ilaria; Panzica, Giancarlo; Orlandi, Fabio; Bertolotto, Antonio

    2018-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are a diverse group of chronic disorders and affect a multitude of organs and systems. However, the existence of common pathophysiological mechanisms is hypothesized and reports of shared risk are emerging as well. In this regard, patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) have been shown to have an increased susceptibility to develop chronic autoimmune thyroid diseases, in particular Hashimoto’s thyroiditis (HT), suggesting an autoimmune predisposition. However, studies comparing such different pathologies of autoimmune origin are still missing till date. In the present study, we sought to investigate mechanisms which may lead to the frequent coexistence of MS and HT by analyzing several factors related to the pathogenesis of MS and HT in patients affected by one or both diseases, as well as in healthy donors. In particular, we analyzed peripheral blood mononuclear cell gene-expression levels of common candidate genes such as TNFAIP3, NR4A family, BACH2, FOXP3, and PDCD5, in addition to the regulatory T cell (Treg) percentage and the 25-hydroxy vitamin D serum levels. Our findings support the plausibility of the existence of common deregulated mechanisms shared by MS and HT, such as BACH2/PDCD5-FOXP3 pathways and Tregs. Although the biological implications of these data need to be further investigated, we have highlighted the relevance of studies comparing different autoimmune pathologies for the understanding of the core concepts of autoimmunity. PMID:29527211

  8. The Footprints of Poly-Autoimmunity: Evidence for Common Biological Factors Involved in Multiple Sclerosis and Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Perga

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases are a diverse group of chronic disorders and affect a multitude of organs and systems. However, the existence of common pathophysiological mechanisms is hypothesized and reports of shared risk are emerging as well. In this regard, patients with multiple sclerosis (MS have been shown to have an increased susceptibility to develop chronic autoimmune thyroid diseases, in particular Hashimoto’s thyroiditis (HT, suggesting an autoimmune predisposition. However, studies comparing such different pathologies of autoimmune origin are still missing till date. In the present study, we sought to investigate mechanisms which may lead to the frequent coexistence of MS and HT by analyzing several factors related to the pathogenesis of MS and HT in patients affected by one or both diseases, as well as in healthy donors. In particular, we analyzed peripheral blood mononuclear cell gene-expression levels of common candidate genes such as TNFAIP3, NR4A family, BACH2, FOXP3, and PDCD5, in addition to the regulatory T cell (Treg percentage and the 25-hydroxy vitamin D serum levels. Our findings support the plausibility of the existence of common deregulated mechanisms shared by MS and HT, such as BACH2/PDCD5-FOXP3 pathways and Tregs. Although the biological implications of these data need to be further investigated, we have highlighted the relevance of studies comparing different autoimmune pathologies for the understanding of the core concepts of autoimmunity.

  9. Production of interleukin (IL)-5 and IL-10 accompanies T helper cell type 1 (Th1) cytokine responses to a major thyroid self-antigen, thyroglobulin, in health and autoimmune thyroid disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus H; Hegedüs, L; Rieneck, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interferon (IFN)-gamma exert detrimental effects in organ-specific autoimmune disease, while both destructive and protective roles have been demonstrated for interleukin (IL)-10, IL-4 and IL-5. We examined the production of these cytokines by peripheral bloo......-gamma, IL-5 and IL-10 responses were markedly inhibited by partial denaturation of Tg by boiling. We hypothesize that autoantibodies and complement may promote mixed Th1/Th2 cell cytokine responses by enhancing the uptake of autoantigens by antigen-presenting cells...

  10. Production of interleukin (IL)-5 and IL-10 accompanies T helper cell type 1 (Th1) cytokine responses to a major thyroid self-antigen, thyroglobulin, in health and autoimmune thyroid disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C H; Hegedüs, L; Rieneck, K

    2007-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interferon (IFN)-gamma exert detrimental effects in organ-specific autoimmune disease, while both destructive and protective roles have been demonstrated for interleukin (IL)-10, IL-4 and IL-5. We examined the production of these cytokines by peripheral bloo......-gamma, IL-5 and IL-10 responses were markedly inhibited by partial denaturation of Tg by boiling. We hypothesize that autoantibodies and complement may promote mixed Th1/Th2 cell cytokine responses by enhancing the uptake of autoantigens by antigen-presenting cells....

  11. Is thyroid autoimmunity per se a determinant of quality of life in patients with autoimmune hypothyroidism?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Watt, T; Hegedüs, Laszlo; Bjorner, J B

    2012-01-01

    hypothyroidism were analyzed in relation to thyroid volume, thyroid function and markers of thyroid autoimmunity. Based on a classical QoL framework, we hypothesized that physiological dysfunction caused specific physical and psychological symptoms, which affected functioning and well-being, and consequently...... with several QoL outcomes: Goitre Symptoms (p = 0.024), Depressivity (p = 0.004), Anxiety (p = 0.004), Emotional Susceptibility (p = 0.005) and Impaired Social Life (p = 0.047). In the multivariate model, the TPOAb level was related to Goitre Symptoms (r = 0.17, p = 0.019), Depressivity (r = 0.24, p = 0.......001), and Anxiety (r = 0.23, p = 0.002), but no longer to Emotional Susceptibility or Impaired Social Life, indicating that the effect on these were mediated through an effect on the symptom scales (i.e. Goitre Symptoms, Depressivity and Anxiety). CONCLUSION: Health-related QoL, evaluated with state-of-the-art Qo...

  12. Vitamin D in autoimmune liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyk, Daniel S; Orfanidou, Timoklia; Invernizzi, Pietro; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P; Lenzi, Marco

    2013-11-01

    The development of autoimmune disease is based on the interaction of genetic susceptibility and environmental causes. Environmental factors include infectious and non-infectious agents, with some of these factors being implicated in several autoimmune diseases. Vitamin D is now believed to play a role in the development (or prevention) of several autoimmune diseases, based on its immunomodulatory properties. As well, the increasing incidence of autoimmune disease as one moves away from the equator, may be due to the lack of sunlight, which is crucial for the maintenance of normal vitamin D levels. A deficiency in vitamin D levels or vitamin D receptors is commonly indicated in autoimmune diseases, with multiple sclerosis (MS) being one of the best-studied and well-known examples. However, the role of vitamin D in other autoimmune diseases is not well defined, including autoimmune liver diseases such as primary biliary cirrhosis, autoimmune hepatitis, and primary sclerosing cholangitis. This review will examine the role of vitamin D as an immunomodulator, followed by a comparison of vitamin D in MS versus autoimmune liver disease. From this comparison, it will become clear that vitamin D likely plays a role in the development of autoimmune liver disease, but this area requires further investigation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. High frequency of positive anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies (ATPO) in adult subjects without known thyroid disease, Santiago de Chile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanas, Alejandra; Letelier, Carolina; Caamano, Edgardo; Massardo, Teresa; Gonzalez, Patricio; Araya, Veronica

    2010-01-01

    Background: Anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies have a pathogenic role in Hashimoto thyroiditis. Between 10 and 19% of individuals without thyroid disease, have positive titers of these antibodies. Aim: To study the frequency of positive titers of anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies in healthy individuals. Material and Methods: A blood sample, to measure anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) by chemiluminescence assay, was obtained from 67 women and 62 men aged 45 ± 14 years, without a personal or familiar history of thyroid diseases and normal thyroid palpation. The cutoff point of the manufacturer to consider positive a titer of anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies was set at 35 IU/ml. Results: Twenty-eight women and 28 men had positive antibody titers (43% of the sample). Subjects in the upper tercile of anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody titers had a higher TSH than those in the second tercile, although within normal limits (1.73 ± 0.74 and 1.37 ± 0.59 mlU/L, respectively p = 0.02) Conclusions: Forty three percent of the studied subjects without personal or familial history of thyroid diseases had positive titers of anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies. Further prospective studies should evaluate whether this observation discloses an increase in thyroid autoimmune disease in a population with increased iodine intake

  14. Epigenetics as biomarkers in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haijing; Liao, Jieyue; Li, Qianwen; Yang, Ming; Zhao, Ming; Lu, Qianjin

    2018-03-21

    Autoimmune diseases are immune system disorders in which immune cells cannot distinguish self-antigens from foreign ones. The current criteria for autoimmune disease diagnosis are based on clinical manifestations and laboratory tests. However, none of these markers shows both high sensitivity and specificity. In addition, some autoimmune diseases, for example, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), are highly heterogeneous and often exhibit various manifestations. On the other hand, certain autoimmune diseases, such as Sjogren's syndrome versus SLE, share similar symptoms and autoantibodies, which also causes difficulties in diagnosis. Therefore, biomarkers that have both high sensitivity and high specificity for diagnosis, reflect disease activity and predict drug response are necessary. An increasing number of publications have proposed the abnormal epigenetic modifications as biomarkers of autoimmune diseases. Therefore, this review will comprehensively summarize the epigenetic progress in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disorders and unearth potential biomarkers that might be appropriate for disease diagnosis and prediction. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Thyroid disease in pregnancy in 2011: Thyroid function--effects on mother and baby unraveled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weetman, Anthony P

    2011-12-06

    The complex relationship between pregnancy and thyroid function, and its clinical effect on mother and baby, continued to stimulate research in 2011. Key advances were made on three important issues: how long maternal thyroid function affects fetal thyroid hormone levels; whether thyroid autoimmunity affects pregnancy outcome; and the prevalence of permanent hypothyroidism after postpartum thyroiditis.

  16. Refractory disease in autoimmune diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasconcelos, Carlos; Kallenberg, Cees; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    Refractory disease (RD) definition has different meanings but it is dynamic, according to knowledge and the availability of new drugs. It should be differentiated from severe disease and damage definitions and it must take into account duration of adequate therapy and compliance of the patient. It

  17. Cardiovascular Involvement in Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya-Amaya, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (AD) represent a broad spectrum of chronic conditions that may afflict specific target organs or multiple systems with a significant burden on quality of life. These conditions have common mechanisms including genetic and epigenetics factors, gender disparity, environmental triggers, pathophysiological abnormalities, and certain subphenotypes. Atherosclerosis (AT) was once considered to be a degenerative disease that was an inevitable consequence of aging. However, research in the last three decades has shown that AT is not degenerative or inevitable. It is an autoimmune-inflammatory disease associated with infectious and inflammatory factors characterized by lipoprotein metabolism alteration that leads to immune system activation with the consequent proliferation of smooth muscle cells, narrowing arteries, and atheroma formation. Both humoral and cellular immune mechanisms have been proposed to participate in the onset and progression of AT. Several risk factors, known as classic risk factors, have been described. Interestingly, the excessive cardiovascular events observed in patients with ADs are not fully explained by these factors. Several novel risk factors contribute to the development of premature vascular damage. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of how traditional and nontraditional risk factors contribute to pathogenesis of CVD in AD. PMID:25177690

  18. The clinical values of serum TRAb by RIA in the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Wenzhen; Li Hong; Gao Yongdi

    2001-01-01

    The TRAb content of the thyroid diseases 758 cases (including the first visit thyroidism group 166 cases; the thyroidism group with normal thyroid function by medicine treatment 198 cases, the group with abnormal thyroid function by medicine treatment 86 cases, the group with lower thyroid function 24 cases, the group with normal thyroid function by 131 I treatment 104 cases, the subacute thyroiditis group 48 cases, the simple goiter group 52 cases, the primary hypothyroidism group 80 cases) and the normal control group 62 cases are detected. The results show that the values of TRAb are much higher in the groups with normal or abnormal thyroid function by medicine treatment, the group with lower thyroid function, the group with 131 I treatment and the group with primary hypothyroidism than that of control group (P 0.05). The differential of the TRAb average and positive rate is obvious between the groups with normal and abnormal thyroid function by medicine treatment (P 131 I treatment (P < 0.01). The TRAb levels in serum are higher in the patients with thyroidism and primary hypo-thyroidism, and the TRAb levels are normal in the patients with subacute thyroiditis and simple goiter. So, TRAb is a auxiliary index in the diagnosis of thyroidism and hypo-thyroidism and also a differential diagnosis index about the thyroidism and subacute thyroiditis. At the same time, TRAb is an important index in evaluating the autoimmune monitoring function of the body, and stopping the use of thyroid medicine

  19. Flavonoids and thyroid disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heide, van der D.; Kastelijn, J.; Schroder-van der Elst, J.P.

    2003-01-01

    The most potent natural plant-derived compounds that can affect thyroid function, thyroid hormone secretion and availability to tissues is the group of flavonoids, i.e. plant pigments. They are present in our daily food, such as vegetables, fruits, grains, nuts, wine, and tea. Epidemiological

  20. Helminth Immunomodulation in Autoimmune Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J. Miles

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Helminths have evolved to become experts at subverting immune surveillance. Through potent and persistent immune tempering, helminths can remain undetected in human tissues for decades. Redirecting the immunomodulating “talents” of helminths to treat inflammatory human diseases is receiving intensive interest. Here, we review therapies using live parasitic worms, worm secretions, and worm-derived synthetic molecules to treat autoimmune disease. We review helminth therapy in both mouse models and clinical trials and discuss what is known on mechanisms of action. We also highlight current progress in characterizing promising new immunomodulatory molecules found in excretory/secretory products of helminths and their potential use as immunotherapies for acute and chronic inflammatory diseases.

  1. Rheumatic Disease Autoantibodies in Autoimmune Liver Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utiyama, Shirley R R; Zenatti, Katiane B; Nóbrega, Heloisa A J; Soares, Juliana Z C; Skare, Thelma L; Matsubara, Caroline; Muzzilo, Dominique A; Nisihara, Renato M

    2016-08-01

    Autoimmune liver diseases (ALDs) are known to be associated with systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases (SARDs) and their autoantibodies. We aimed to study the prevalence of SARDs and related autoantibodies, as well as their prognostic implications in a group of patients with ALDs. This was a cross-sectional study. Sixty patients with ALDs (38.3% with autoimmune hepatitis; 11.7% with primary biliary cirrhosis; 25% with primary sclerosing cholangitis and 25% with overlap syndrome) were studied for the presence of SARDs and their autoantibodies. There was autoimmune rheumatic disease in 20% of the studied sample. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) were the commonest (11.6% and 5%, respectively). Antinuclear antibodies (ANAs) were present in 35% of the patients, followed by anti-Ro (20.0%); anti-nucleosome (18.3%); rheumatoid factor (10%) anti-CCP (8.3%); anti-RNP (8.3%); anti-ds-DNA (6.6%); anti-La (3.3%); anti-Sm (3.3%), anti-ribosomal P (3.3%). Anti-Ro (p = 0.0004), anti-La (p = 0.03), anti-RNP (p = 0.04) and anti-Sm (p = 0.03) were commonly found in patients with SARD, but not anti-DNA, anti-nucleosome and anti-ribosomal P. No differences were found in liver function tests regarding to the presence of autoantibodies. There was a high prevalence of SARD and their autoantibodies in ALD patients. Anti-Ro, anti-La, anti-RNP and anti-Sm positivity points to an association with systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases. The presence of autoantibodies was not related to liver function tests.

  2. Autoimmune diseases in adults with atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Yuki M F; Egeberg, Alexander; Gislason, Gunnar H.

    2017-01-01

    Background: An increased susceptibility to autoimmune disease has been shown in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD), but data remain scarce and inconsistent. Objective: We examined the co-occurrence of selected autoimmune diseases in adult patients with AD. Methods: Nationwide health registers...... were used. Adult patients with a hospital diagnosis of AD in Denmark between 1997 and 2012 were included as cases (n = 8112) and matched with controls (n = 40,560). The occurrence of autoimmune diseases was compared in the 2 groups. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios. Results: AD...... was significantly associated with 11 of 22 examined autoimmune diseases. In addition, AD was associated with having multiple autoimmune comorbidities. Patients with a history of smoking had a significantly higher occurrence of autoimmune comorbidities compared to nonsmokers. Limitations: This study was limited...

  3. Association of the thyroid stimulating hormone receptor gene (TSHR) with Graves' disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brand, Oliver J; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Simmonds, Matthew J

    2009-01-01

    Graves' disease (GD) is a common autoimmune disease (AID) that shares many of its susceptibility loci with other AIDs. The thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) represents the primary autoantigen in GD, in which autoantibodies bind to the receptor and mimic its ligand, thyroid stimulating h...

  4. Identification of novel genetic Loci associated with thyroid peroxidase antibodies and clinical thyroid disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Medici

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD are common, affecting 2-5% of the general population. Individuals with positive thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAbs have an increased risk of autoimmune hypothyroidism (Hashimoto's thyroiditis, as well as autoimmune hyperthyroidism (Graves' disease. As the possible causative genes of TPOAbs and AITD remain largely unknown, we performed GWAS meta-analyses in 18,297 individuals for TPOAb-positivity (1769 TPOAb-positives and 16,528 TPOAb-negatives and in 12,353 individuals for TPOAb serum levels, with replication in 8,990 individuals. Significant associations (P<5×10(-8 were detected at TPO-rs11675434, ATXN2-rs653178, and BACH2-rs10944479 for TPOAb-positivity, and at TPO-rs11675434, MAGI3-rs1230666, and KALRN-rs2010099 for TPOAb levels. Individual and combined effects (genetic risk scores of these variants on (subclinical hypo- and hyperthyroidism, goiter and thyroid cancer were studied. Individuals with a high genetic risk score had, besides an increased risk of TPOAb-positivity (OR: 2.18, 95% CI 1.68-2.81, P = 8.1×10(-8, a higher risk of increased thyroid-stimulating hormone levels (OR: 1.51, 95% CI 1.26-1.82, P = 2.9×10(-6, as well as a decreased risk of goiter (OR: 0.77, 95% CI 0.66-0.89, P = 6.5×10(-4. The MAGI3 and BACH2 variants were associated with an increased risk of hyperthyroidism, which was replicated in an independent cohort of patients with Graves' disease (OR: 1.37, 95% CI 1.22-1.54, P = 1.2×10(-7 and OR: 1.25, 95% CI 1.12-1.39, P = 6.2×10(-5. The MAGI3 variant was also associated with an increased risk of hypothyroidism (OR: 1.57, 95% CI 1.18-2.10, P = 1.9×10(-3. This first GWAS meta-analysis for TPOAbs identified five newly associated loci, three of which were also associated with clinical thyroid disease. With these markers we identified a large subgroup in the general population with a substantially increased risk of TPOAbs. The results provide insight into why

  5. Are individuals with an autoimmune disease at higher risk of a second autoimmune disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somers, Emily C; Thomas, Sara L; Smeeth, Liam; Hall, Andrew J

    2009-03-15

    Limited evidence suggests that autoimmune diseases tend to co-occur, although data are needed to determine whether individuals with an existing autoimmune disorder are at increased risk of a second disorder. The authors conducted a series of population-based cohort studies, utilizing the United Kingdom General Practice Research Database, to assess intraindividual risks of coexistence of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), autoimmune thyroiditis (AIT), multiple sclerosis (MS), and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) during 1990-1999. Sex-specific age- and calendar-period standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated for development of a second autoimmune disease among index populations including 22,888 RA, 26,198 AIT, 4,332 MS, and 6,170 IDDM patients compared with the general population. Among those with IDDM, adjusted AIT rates were higher than expected for both males (SIR = 646.0, 95% confidence interval (CI): 466, 873) and females (SIR = 409.6, 95% CI: 343, 485), as were RA rates for females (SIR = 181.6, 95% CI: 136, 238). Coexistence of AIT and RA was also shown for either disease sequence (sex-specific SIRs = 130.4-162.0). However, point estimates suggested an inverse relation between RA and MS, irrespective of diagnostic sequence. This study demonstrates coexistence of RA, AIT, and IDDM at higher than expected rates but reduced comorbidity between RA and MS.

  6. Autoimmune hepatitis: a classic autoimmune liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moy, Libia; Levine, Jeremiah

    2014-12-01

    AIH is characterized by chronic inflammation of the liver, interface hepatitis, hypergammaglobulinemia, and production of autoantibodies. Based on the nature of the serum autoantibodies, two types of AIH are recognized: type 1 (AIH-1), positive for ANA and/or anti-smooth muscle antibody, and type 2 (AIH-2), defined by the positivity for anti-liver kidney microsomal type 1 antibody or for anti-liver cytosol type 1 antibody. AIH demonstrates a female preponderance with the female-to-male ratio of 4:1 in AIH-1 and 10:1 in AIH-2. Several genes confer susceptibility to AIH and influence clinical manifestation, response to treatment, and overall prognosis. Most are located within the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region, which is involved in the presentation of antigenic peptides to T cells and thus in the initiation of adaptive immune responses. The strongest associations are found within the HLA-DRB1 locus. In patients with increased genetic susceptibility to AIH, immune responses to liver autoantigens could be triggered by molecular mimicry. Because of molecular mimicry, different environmental agents, drugs, and viruses might produce AIH. In AIH, T cells are numerically and functionally impaired, permitting the perpetuation of effector immune responses with ensuing persistent liver destruction. AIH is rare but highly treatable inflammatory condition of the liver. Subclinical and asymptomatic disease is common. AIH therefore needs to be considered in the differential diagnosis of all patients with elevated liver enzymes. Clinical response to immunosuppressive therapy is characteristic and supports the diagnosis. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Thyroid Diseases Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Iron-binding Capacity (TIBC, UIBC) Trichomonas Testing Triglycerides Troponin Tryptase Tumor Markers Uric Acid Urinalysis Urine ... a very important role in controlling the body's metabolism . It does this by producing thyroid hormones , primarily ...

  8. Autoimmune diseases in women with Turner's syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kristian T; Rostgaard, Klaus; Bache, Iben

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In terms of number of X chromosomes, women with Turner's syndrome cytogenetically resemble men. An increased risk of autoimmune diseases has been observed among women with Turner's syndrome. This study was undertaken to investigate whether the autoimmune disease profile in women with T...

  9. Indirect thyroid lymphography in the thyroid diseases diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kradinov, A.I.; Fesenko, V.P.; Kabalich, A.K.

    1981-01-01

    Indirect thyroid lymphography with water-soluble radiographic agents has been applied. This method allows contrast lymph microvessels of the thyroid gland, providing the detection of volume formations of 0.3 to 0.4 cm and more in diameter. 232 patients with different thyroid diseases were examined. Different rate of the water-soluble contrast agent resolution in diffuse toxic and nodular goiter, thyroid cancer, chronic thyroiditis is of great importance in differential diagnosis of these diseases. This method provides necessary information on the organs inner structure, its topography and size [ru

  10. Vitamin D Levels in Patients with Autoimmune Thyroiditis with Diminished Thyroid Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.V. Povoroznyuk

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The study examined vitamin D levels in 75 patients with autoimmune thyroiditis (AIT with diminished thyroid function. The objective of the study — to determine the content of 25(OHD in patients with overt and subclinical hypothyroidism on the background of AIT. Materials and Methods. 75 patients (59 women and 16 men and 25 apparently healthy subjects (matched for age and sex were followed. The levels of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH, free thyroxine (fT4, free triiodothyronine (fT3, antibodies to thyroid peroxidase (TPO, and the content of 25(OHD in the blood serum were determined. Results. Patients with AІT were divided according to the levels of TSH and thyroid hormones into the group with subclinical (n = 21 and overt (n = 54 hypothyroidism. TSH level was significantly higher in the group with subclinical (6.80 ± 1.84 mcU/ml and overt hypothyroidism (11.38 ± 2.16 mcU/ml compared with the control group (2.11 ± 0.37 mcU/ml (p < 0.05. The level of antibodies to TPO was 312.83 ± 7.19 U/ml in subclinical hypothyroidism and 546.29 ± 9.81 U/ml — in overt hypothyroidism. 25(OHD level in blood serum was significantly lower in subclinical (18.8 ± 1.2 nmol/l and overt hypothyroidism (21.7 ± 1.3 nmol/l compared with the control group (27.3 ± 1.4 nmol/l (p < 0.05. Highly reliable negative correlation was established between the level of TSH, antibodies to TPO and vitamin D (p < 0.001. Also highly reliable positive correlation was established between the levels of serum 25(OHD and fT4 content (p < 0.001, between TSH and TPO antibody levels (p < 0.05. Conclusions. Vitamin D deficiency is combined with the presence of AIT with diminished thyroid function (in subclinical and overt hypothyroidism. Further studies are needed to determine vitamin D deficiency as a causal factor of AIT.

  11. pattern of subclinical thyroid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ijaz, A.; Marri, M.H.; Qureshi, A.H.; Qamar, M.A.; Ali, N.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the prevalence of subclinical thyroid disease (SCTD) in local population visiting a hospital laboratory for thyroid function tests. Design: It was a hospital - based study carried in consecutive patients who reported for thyroid function tests in the hospital laboratory. Place and duration of study: The study was conducted in combined military Hospital, Quetta during June 1999 to September 2000. Subject and methods: Serum samples of 917 patients living in Quetta and its surrounding were analysed for thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) free thyroxin (FT4), and total tri-iodothyronine (T3) concentration using chemiluminescence technique on hormone auto analyser (LIA-Mat - Sangtech Germany). Results: Out of 917 patients, 287 (23%) were found to be having SCTD while overt thyroid disease was found in 288 (31%) patients. Prevalence of sub-clinical hypothyroidism (SCO) and sub-clinical hyperthyroidism (sce) was found to be almost equal with a profound female preponderance in both the groups. SCO was more common in children (<12 years of age). Conclusion: Almost every fourth patient reporting for thyroid function tests was diagnosed as having SCTD - a disease entity that is still not well known and that poses diagnostic and management problems for the pathologists and clinicians. (author)

  12. Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders without and with autoimmune diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Bingjun; Zhong, Yi; Wang, Yanqiang; Dai, Yongqiang; Qiu, Wei; Zhang, Lei; Li, Haiyan; Lu, Zhengqi

    2014-01-01

    Background Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) can coexist with non-organ-specific or organ-specific autoimmune diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the features between NMOSD without and with autoimmune diseases, and NMOSD with non-organ-specific and organ-specific autoimmune diseases. Methods One hundred and fifty five NMOSD patients without autoimmune diseases (n = 115) and with autoimmune diseases (n = 40) were enrolled. NMOSD with autoimmune diseases ...

  13. Evaluation of diffuse thyroid diseases and thyroid nodules by CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Kyoko; Imanishi, Yoshimasa; Nakaji, Shunsuke; Shinagawa, Toshihito

    2007-01-01

    Imanishi et al. have previously reported that the changes in CT values reveal not only the change in iodine concentration in thyroid follicles, but also represent secondary changes in follicular content and follicular cells and/or interstitial structures. Thus, we performed thyroid CT without contrast material in 138 controls, 417 cases with diffuse thyroid diseases, and 279 cases with thyroid nodules, and evaluated the CT images based on the relation between the change in CT values and pathological changes. In 89% of the controls and 43% of patients with diffuse thyroid diseases, the thyroid CT revealed diffuse high density. In contrast, the 94% of thyroids that demonstrated diffuse low density were from patients with diffuse thyroid diseases. Eighty-four percent of malignant nodules and 64% of benign nodules had inhomogeneous densities, and only 26% of benign thyroid nodules had homogeneous density. However, 71% of nodules that showed high and low densities with regular and clear borders, and 82% of nodules that showed papillary proliferation in a cyst pattern were benign. Although only 58% of nodules with calcification were malignant, 66% of nodules with calcification in the central portion, and 86% of nodules with calcification of a disseminated and convergent pattern in distribution were malignant. Sixty-two percent of thyroids that surrounded nodules had chronic thyroiditis, hypoplasia and/or adenomatous goiter. Thus, unclear borders between a nodule and the surrounding thyroid tissue did not increase the possibility of malignancy. However, the unclear and/or lobulated border between a nodule and extra thyroid tissue increased the possibility of malignancy. We concluded that thyroid CT without contrast material is useful for the diagnosis of thyroid diseases. (author)

  14. Monogenic autoimmune diseases of the endocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew B; Hattersley, Andrew T; Flanagan, Sarah E

    2016-10-01

    The most common endocrine diseases, type 1 diabetes, hyperthyroidism, and hypothyroidism, are the result of autoimmunity. Clustering of autoimmune endocrinopathies can result from polygenic predisposition, or more rarely, may present as part of a wider syndrome due to a mutation within one of seven genes. These monogenic autoimmune diseases show highly variable phenotypes both within and between families with the same mutations. The average age of onset of the monogenic forms of autoimmune endocrine disease is younger than that of the common polygenic forms, and this feature combined with the manifestation of other autoimmune diseases, specific hallmark features, or both, can inform clinicians as to the relevance of genetic testing. A genetic diagnosis can guide medical management, give an insight into prognosis, inform families of recurrence risk, and facilitate prenatal diagnoses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Autoimmune diseases in a Nigerian woman--a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talabi, O A; Owolabi, M O; Osotimehin, B O

    2003-12-01

    Autoimmune diseases (AD) are conditions in which there is the development of antibodies against self cells/ organs. AD could either be organ-specific or non-organ specific (systemic) in clinical presentation. Commonly reported ADs includes: Myasthenia gravis, Hashimoto thyroiditis, Guillian-Barre syndrome, vitiligo, type 1 diabetes mellitus, Graves diseases, Goodpastures syndrome, pemphigus, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosis, Addisons disease, multiple sclerosis, pernicious anaemia, autoimmune haemolytic anaemia, chronic active hepatitis, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. There is paucity of locally documented information on the occurrence of AD in same patient in our environment. We therefore report the case of a 66 year old woman who presented at the University College Hospital (UCH), Ibadan, with a spectrum of the AD, Vitiligo, rheumatoid arthritis, myasthenia gravis, impaired glucose tolerance.

  16. Thyroid diseases after Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagataki, Shigenobu

    1993-01-01

    Radioactive iodine is released at every atomic-bomb testings and nuclear plants accidents and radioactive iodine is taken up by thyroid glands (internal radiation). In addition to the internal radiation, radioactive fallout causes the external radiation and thyroid glands are known to be sensitive to the external radiation. Furthermore, patients with radiation-induced thyroid disease can survive for a long time regardless of the treatment. The survey of thyroid diseases, therefore, is very sensitive and reliable ways to investigate the effects of radiation caused by atomic bomb explosion, testing and various types of nuclear plants' accidents. Our group from Nagasaki University was asked to investigate the thyroid diseases and jointed to the Sasakawa Project. In order to investigate the effects of radiation on thyroid disease, it is essential 1) to make a correct diagnosis in each subject, 2) to calculate a correct radiation dose in each subject and finally, 3) to find out the correlation between the radiation dose and thyroid diseases including age-, sex- and area-matched controls. We have established 5 centers (1 in Russia, 2 in Belarus, 2 in Ukraine) and supplied the most valuable ultrasonography instruments, commercial kits for the determination of serum free T 4 and TSH level and for the autoantibodies, instrument for urinary iodine measurements, syringers, tubes, refrigerators, etc. We visit each center often and asked people at centers to come to Japan for training. Protocol of investigation is essentially the same as that in Nagasaki, and we are planning to investigate more than 50,000 children within 5 years. We are hoping to show a definite conclusion in the near future. Recent articles are also discussed. (author)

  17. Thyroid disease in the pediatric patient: emphasizing imaging with sonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babcock, Diane S.

    2006-01-01

    Thyroid disease does occur in the pediatric patient, and imaging plays an important role in its evaluation. A review is presented of normal development of the thyroid gland, the technique and indications for thyroid sonography, and key imaging features of congenital thyroid disorders (ectopic or absent thyroid, infantile goiter, thyroglossal duct remnants), benign thyroid masses (follicular adenoma, degenerative nodules, colloid and thyroid cysts), malignant masses (follicular, papillary and medullary carcinoma) and diffuse thyroid disease (acute bacterial thyroiditis, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, Grave's disease). (orig.)

  18. Functional state of reproductive system in pubertal girls having autoimmune thyroiditis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonova, T.A.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose of the present work is to study the condition of reproductive system in pubertal girls with autoimmune thyroiditis (AT), exposed to radiation as a result of the Chernobyl accident, and to study various clinical symptoms of AT in relation to peculiarities of natural course of the disease, age and absorbed thyroid dose. We performed complex clinical investigation of 225 girls from Belarus with AT aged 11-16. We revealed, that girls with AT irradiated at the age of 0-3 had significant changes in gonadotrophic hormones levels in blood serum in lutein phase at the age of 13-14 in comparison with control groups. In spite of the fact that mainly the meaning investigated hormones were in the range of age norm, at the age of 15-16 among girls being irradiated greater percent of increased meaning of factor LG/FSG is revealed. Girls with AT had symptoms of dysfunction in sensitivity of target organs (ovaries and uterus) receptors. At the age of 15-16 among girls with AT, exposed to radiation, direct dependencies are established between the level of absorbed thyroid doze and meaning of LG and prolactin

  19. Thyroid Autoantibodies in the Cerebrospinal Fluid of Subjects with and without Thyroid Disease: Implications for Hashimoto’s Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Ilias

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Plasma antithyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO and anti-thyroglobulin antibodies (anti-Tg are widely used in the diagnosis of autoimmune thyroiditis. No research has compared anti-TPO and anti-Tg both in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of healthy individuals vis-à-vis patients with thyroid disease. Methods. We measured anti-TPO and anti-Tg antibodies in plasma and CSF in nine subjects (mean age ± SD: 73 ± 6 years with hypothyroidism and nine subjects (mean age ± SD: 73 ± 8 years without thyroid disease. Results. The concentration of anti-TPO autoantibodies in CSF was very low compared to plasma in both subjects with thyroid and without thyroid disease (P=0.007. CSF anti-Tg autoantibodies titers were very low compared to the plasma in subjects with thyroid disease (P=0.004, whereas, in subjects without thyroid disease, this difference did not reach statistical significance (P=0.063. Conclusions. Thyroid autoantibodies levels were low in plasma and CSF; we did not observe any transfer of thyroid autoantibodies from the peripheral blood to the CSF. Therefore, regarding Hashimoto’s encephalopathy, where elevated antithyroid autoantibodies are often measured in blood, it is more likely that thyroiditis and encephalopathy represent nonspecific, but distinct, events of an aggressive immune system.

  20. Antithyroglobulin Antibodies and Antimicrosomal Antibodies in Various Thyroid Diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Gwon Jun; Hong, Key Sak; Choi, Kang Won; Lee, Kyu; Koh, Chang Soon; Lee, Mun Ho; Park, Sung Hoe; Chi, Je Geun; Lee, Sang Kook

    1979-01-01

    The authors investigated the incidence of antithyroglobulin antibodies and antibodies and antimicrosomal antibodies measured by tanned red cell hemagglutination method in subjects suffering from various thyroid disorders. 1) In 15 normal patients, neither suffering from any thyroid diseases nor from any other autoimmune disorders, the antithyroglobulin antibodies were all negative, but the antimicrosomal antibody was positive only in one patient (6.7%). 2) The antithyroglobulin antibodies were positive in 31.5% (34 patients) of 108 patients with various thyroid diseases, and the antimicrosomal antibodies were positive in 37.0% (40 patients). 3) of the 25 patients with Graves' diseases, 7 patients (28.0%) showed positive for the antithyroglobulin antibodies, and 9 (36.0%) for the antimicrosomal antibodies. There was no definite differences in clinical and thyroid functions between the groups with positive and negative results. 4) Both antibodies were positive in 16 (88.9%) and 17 (94.4%) patients respectively among 18 patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis, all of them were diagnosed histologically. 5) Three out of 33 patients with thyroid adenoma showed positive antibodies, and 3 of 16 patients with thyroid carcinoma revealed positive antibodies. 6) TRCH antibodies demonstrated negative results in 2 patients with subacute thyroiditis, but positive in one patient with idiopathic primary myxedema. 7) The number of patients with high titers(>l:802) was 16 for antithyroglobulin antibody, and 62.5% (10 patients) of which was Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Thirteen (65.0) of 20 patients with high titers (>l:802) for antimicrosomal antibody was Hashimoto's thyroiditis. TRCH test is a simple, sensitive method, and has high reliability and reproducibility. The incidences and titers of antithyroglobulin antibody and antimicrosomal antibody are especially high in Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

  1. Criteria for Environmentally Associated Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, K. Michael; Parks, Christine G.; Germolec, Dori R.; Leung, Patrick S.C.; Selmi, Carlo; Humble, Michael C.; Rose, Noel R.

    2012-01-01

    Increasing evidence supports a role for the environment in the development of autoimmune diseases, as reviewed in the accompanying three papers from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Expert Panel Workshop. An important unresolved issue, however, is the development of criteria for identifying autoimmune disease phenotypes for which the environment plays a causative role, herein referred to as environmentally associated autoimmune diseases. There are several different areas in which such criteria need to be developed, including: 1) identifying the necessary and sufficient data to define environmental risk factors for autoimmune diseases meeting current classification criteria; 2) establishing the existence of and criteria for new environmentally associated autoimmune disorders that do not meet current disease classification criteria; and 3) identifying in clinical practice specific environmental agents that induce autoimmune disease in individual patients. Here we discuss approaches that could be useful for developing criteria in these three areas, as well as factors that should be considered in evaluating the evidence for criteria that can distinguish individuals with such disorders from individuals without such disorders with high sensitivity and specificity. Current studies suggest that multiple lines of complementary evidence will be important and that in many cases there will be clinical, serologic, genetic, epigenetic, and/or other laboratory features that could be incorporated as criteria for environmentally associated autoimmune diseases to improve diagnosis and treatment and possibly allow for preventative strategies in the future. PMID:22771005

  2. Multiplex autoantibody detection for autoimmune liver diseases and autoimmune gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderlocht, Joris; van der Cruys, Mart; Stals, Frans; Bakker-Jonges, Liesbeth; Damoiseaux, Jan

    2017-09-01

    Autoantibody detection for autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and autoimmune gastritis (AIG) is traditionally performed by IIF on a combination of tissues. Multiplex line/dot blots (LIA/DIA) offer multiple advantages, i.e. automation, objective reading, no interfering reactivities, no coincidental findings. In the current study we evaluated automated DIA (D-Tek) for detecting autoantibodies related to autoimmune diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. We tested samples of the Dutch EQC program and compared the results with the consensus of the participating labs. For the autoimmune liver diseases and AIG, respectively, 64 and 36 samples were tested. For anti-mitochondrial and anti-smooth muscle antibodies a concordance rate of 97% and 88% was observed, respectively. The concordance rate for anti-parietal cell antibodies was 92% when samples without EQC consensus (n=15) were excluded. For antibodies against intrinsic factor a concordance of 96% was observed. For all these antibodies discrepancies were identified that relate to the different test characteristics and the preponderance of IIF utilizing labs in the EQC program. In conclusion, we observed good agreement of the tested DIA blots with the consensus results of the Dutch EQC program. Taken together with the logistic advantages these blots are a good alternative for autoantibody detection in the respective diseases. A large prospective multicenter study is warranted to position these novel tests further in the whole spectrum of assays for the detection of these antibodies in a routine autoimmune laboratory. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Chronic urticaria in patients with autoimmune thyroiditis: Significance of severity of thyroid gland inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Gulec

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is a clear association between autoimmune thyroiditis (AT and chronic urticaria/angioedema (CUA. However, not all patients with AT demonstrate urticaria. Aims: The aim of the study was to investigate in which patients with AT did CUA become a problem. A sensitive inflammation marker, neopterine (NP was used to confirm whether the severity of inflammation in the thyroid gland was responsible for urticaria or not. Methods: Neopterine levels were assessed in patients with AT with urticaria and without urticaria. Furthermore, levels were compared in relation to pre and post levothyroxine treatment. Twenty-seven patients with urticaria (Group 1 and 28 patients without urticaria (Group 2 were enrolled in the study. A course of levothyroxine treatment was given to all patients, and urine neopterine levels before and after the trial were obtained. Results: All patients completed the trial. Mean age in Group 1 and Group 2 was similar (35.70 ± 10.86 years and 38.36 ± 10.38 years, respectively (P=0.358. Pre-treatment urine neopterine levels were significantly higher in Group 1 (P=0.012. Post-treatment levels decreased in each group, as expected. However, the decrease in the neopterine level was insignificant in the patients of Group 2 (P=0.282. In Group 1, a significant decrease in post-treatment neopterine levels (P=0.015 was associated with the remission of urticaria. Conclusion: In patients with CUA and AT, pre-treatment elevated levels of NP, and its decrease with levothyroxine treatment along with symptomatic relief in urticaria, may be evidence of the relationship between the degree of inflammation in thyroid and presence of urticaria.

  4. Ultrasound diagnostics of thyroid diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kharchenko, Vladimir P. [Russian Radiology Research Center, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kotlyarov, Peter M. [Russian Center of Roentgenradiology, Moscow (Russian Federation); Mogutov, Mikhail S.; Sencha, Alexander N.; Patrunov, Yury N.; Belyaev, Denis V. [Yaroslavl Railway Clinic (Russian Federation); Alexandrov, Yury K. [State Medical Academy, Yaroslavl (Russian Federation)

    2010-07-01

    This book is based on the authors' extensive practical experience in the use of modern ultrasound, and other radiological methods, in the diagnosis of thyroid diseases. The authors have analyzed more than 100,000 ultrasound examinations performed between 1995 and 2008 in patients with thyroid and parathyroid disease, as well as many thousands of diagnostic and therapeutic ultrasound-guided minimally invasive procedures. The opening chapters include discussion of current ultrasound techniques, pitfalls, and the specifics of ultrasound examination of the thyroid in children. Detailed attention is then devoted to findings in the normal thyroid and in the presence of diffuse and focal changes. Further chapters focus on such topics as ultrasound examination after thyroid surgery and ultrasound diagnosis of parathyroid disease, recurrent goiter, and neck masses. Ultrasound-guided minimally invasive techniques, such as fine-needle aspiration biopsy, percutaneous laser ablation, and ethanol and glucocorticoid injections, are considered in depth. This up-to-date and richly illustrated book will interest and assist specialists in ultrasound diagnostics, radiologists, endocrinologists, and neck surgeons. (orig.)

  5. Ultrasound diagnostics of thyroid diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharchenko, Vladimir P.; Kotlyarov, Peter M.; Mogutov, Mikhail S.; Sencha, Alexander N.; Patrunov, Yury N.; Belyaev, Denis V.; Alexandrov, Yury K.

    2010-01-01

    This book is based on the authors' extensive practical experience in the use of modern ultrasound, and other radiological methods, in the diagnosis of thyroid diseases. The authors have analyzed more than 100,000 ultrasound examinations performed between 1995 and 2008 in patients with thyroid and parathyroid disease, as well as many thousands of diagnostic and therapeutic ultrasound-guided minimally invasive procedures. The opening chapters include discussion of current ultrasound techniques, pitfalls, and the specifics of ultrasound examination of the thyroid in children. Detailed attention is then devoted to findings in the normal thyroid and in the presence of diffuse and focal changes. Further chapters focus on such topics as ultrasound examination after thyroid surgery and ultrasound diagnosis of parathyroid disease, recurrent goiter, and neck masses. Ultrasound-guided minimally invasive techniques, such as fine-needle aspiration biopsy, percutaneous laser ablation, and ethanol and glucocorticoid injections, are considered in depth. This up-to-date and richly illustrated book will interest and assist specialists in ultrasound diagnostics, radiologists, endocrinologists, and neck surgeons. (orig.)

  6. Th17 Response and Inflammatory Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janelle C. Waite

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The proinflammatory activity of T helper 17 (Th17 cells can be beneficial to the host during infection. However, uncontrolled or inappropriate Th17 activation has been linked to several autoimmune and autoinflammatory pathologies. Indeed, preclinical and clinical data show that Th17 cells are associated with several autoimmune diseases such as arthritis, multiple sclerosis, psoriasis, and lupus. Furthermore, targeting the interleukin-17 (IL-17 pathway has attenuated disease severity in preclinical models of autoimmune diseases. Interestingly, a recent report brings to light a potential role for Th17 cells in the autoinflammatory disorder adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD. Whether Th17 cells are the cause or are directly involved in AOSD remains to be shown. In this paper, we discuss the biology of Th17 cells, their role in autoimmune disease development, and in AOSD in particular, as well as the growing interest of the pharmaceutical industry in their use as therapeutic targets.

  7. Prognostic factors of the outcomes of subtotal thyroid resection in graves disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A J Tsurkan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The long-term results of subtotal resection of thyroid gland on 82 patients with Graves' disease were studied. There was analysed the influence of three factors on outcome at Graves' disease: volume of a thyroid gland before operation, morphological structure of thyroid tissue and volume of thyroid remnant. Outcomes of subtotal resection of thyroid gland were studied on the basis of thyrotropic hormone level of blood in 3, 6, 12 months, 2 and 3 years after operation. Based on research it has been established that the volume of thyroid gland before operation does not influence to outcome of subtotal resection of thyroid gland with Graves' disease. Morphological changes of removed thyroid tissue in the form of colloidal nodules at patients with Graves' disease statistically significantly raise risk of development of postoperative complications after subtotal resection of thyroid gland. The surgeon defining the volume of thyroid rem-nant durng the operation could be mistaken as towards it's increase so towards it's reduction, with an average deviation about 35%. Various outcomes of subtotal resection of thyroid gland at the same volume of thyroid remnant let us conclude that this out-come depends more on intensity of autoimmune process rather than on the volume of thyroid remnant. According modern views to aetiology and patogenesis of Graves' disease, the optimum volume of operation at Graves' disease is thyroidectomy.

  8. [Thyroid diseases in sub-Saharan Africa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidibé, El Hassane

    2007-01-01

    hyperthyroidism has tripled, now accounting for 18.5% of all such operations. This disorder is found today in subjects older than 50 years, mainly from rural areas, and caused most often by Graves disease (25 of 51 cases). Graves disease in young women can cause serious problems during pregnancy; in such cases assessment of the minimal effective dose of antithyroid agents is essential. Carbimazole leads to remission in 61% of cases of Graves disease. Hypothyroidism can be auto-immune and often in patent forms because of insufficient screening in Africa: 24 cases in Dakar (1984) and 37 others noticed by us (1998). Single-nodule tumors were assessed in 89 patients in Khartoum: they were found to be simple goiters in 72% of cases, follicular adenoma in 13.5%, cancer in 13.5% (with 6 of the 12 cases follicular, 5 papillary, and 1 anaplastic). The sex ratio for thyroid cancer in Ouagadougou is 0.22, thus mainly women. It affects mainly women in their 30s. Thyroid cancer at Ibadan was found to be papillary carcinoma in 45.3% of cases; follicular forms were seen in 44.5% and this series includes 5% of medullary cancers (7 cases), with a mean age of 34 years. Already 4 other cases from Francophone sub-Saharan Africa have been noticed. Iodine deficiency is suggested to play a role because follicular cancer in southern Africa accounts for up to 55% of thyroid cancers. Thyroid cancers in Algeria are associated with low socioeconomic status and characterized by a high prevalence of cancers discovered at an advanced stage and of anaplastic carcinomas. Oral potassium iodate is recommended: 30 mg of iodate a month or 8 mg every two weeks. Iodized oil has been recommended by some authors, as well as a combination of iodine and sugar, and the iodation of drinking water; these are in addition to the proposed methods of opening up areas by new infrastructure). In conclusion, thyroid disease is due predominantly to iodine deficiency and goitrogenic products, but we also note the increasing emergence

  9. Coeliac disease and autoimmune disease-genetic overlap and screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lundin, Knut E. A.; Wijmenga, Cisca

    Coeliac disease is a treatable, gluten-induced disease that often occurs concurrently with other autoimmune diseases. In genetic studies since 2007, a partial genetic overlap between these diseases has been revealed and further insights into the pathophysiology of coeliac disease and autoimmunity

  10. Updates on GMSCs treatment for autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Feng; Liu, Zhong-Min; Zheng, Song Guo

    2018-02-20

    Autoimmune disease is a refractory disease. Accumulating Evidence has revealed that the manipulation of mesenchymal stem cells may have the potential to control or even treat autoimmune diseases. Human gingiva-derived mesenchymal stem cells (GMSCs) are emerging as a new line of mesenchymal stem cells that have displayed some potential advantages in controlling and treating autoimmune diseases. In this review, we briefly update the current understanding on the biology of GMSCs and their effects on preventing and treating autoimmune diseases. The availability of gingival mesenchymal stem cells (GMSCs), together with their potent capacity of multi-directional differentiation and inflammatory modulation, making GMSCs an ideal subtype of MSCs in treating autoimmune disease. Our and other studies have launched the earliest appraisal on GMSCs and carried out a lot of biological researches. The clinical trial of GMSCs on patients with autoimmune diseases will further approve their therapeutic effects, as well as its cellular and molecular mechanisms. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  11. The role of the autoimmunity laboratory in autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SS Hasson

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory testing is of great value when evaluating a patient with a suspected autoimmune disease. The results can confirm a diagnosis, estimate disease severity, aid in assessing prognosis and are useful to follow disease activity. Components of the laboratory exam include complete blood count with differential, comprehensive metabolic panel, inflammatory markers, autoantibodies, and flow cytometry. Currently, autoimmunity laboratories are very vibrant owing to the constant and increasing availability of new tests, mainly due to the detection of new autoantibodies. The main characteristic that differentiates the autoimmunity laboratory from other laboratories is the use of immunoassays such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, as basic techniques which determines antibodies (autoantibodies and not antigens. For this reason, immunoassay techniques must employ antigens as reagents. However, over the last few years, a significant trend at autoimmunity laboratories has been the gradual replacement of immunofluorescence microscopy by immunoassay. Nowadays the revolution of new technology has taken place significantly, for examples; recombinant DNA technology has allowed the production of large quantities of antigens for autoantibody analysis. Flow cytometry for the analysis of microsphere-based immunoassays allows the simultaneous measurement of several autoantibodies. In the same way, autoantigen microarrays provide a practical means to analyse biological fluids in the search for a high number of autoantibodies. We are now at the beginning of an era of multiplexed analysis, with a high capacity of autoantibody specificities. The future tendency in this field will include immunoassays with greater analytical sensitivity, specificity, simultaneous multiplexed capability, the use of protein microarrays, and the use of other technologies such as microfluidics.

  12. Auto-immune thyroid dysfunction induced by tyrosine kinase inhibitors in a patient with recurrent chordoma

    OpenAIRE

    Eroukhmanoff, Juliette; Castinetti, Frederic; Penel, Nicolas; Salas, Sebastien

    2016-01-01

    Background While hypothyroidism has frequently been reported with the use of TKIs, the thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) suppressing effect of TKIs is rare, except for thyroiditis. We describe a case with progressive recurrent chordoma who initially became hyperthyroid in a context of autoimmunity under sorafenib treatment and later under imatinib treatment. Case presentation A 57-year-old man with lumbar chordoma began daily treatment of 800?mg sorafenib. He did not have any other medication...

  13. Vitiligo and overt thyroid diseases: A nationwide population-based study in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jung Min; Lee, June Hyunkyung; Yun, Jae Seung; Han, Byeol; Han, Tae Young

    2017-05-01

    Associations between vitiligo and thyroid diseases have been reported repeatedly. We investigated the associations between vitiligo and overt autoimmune thyroid diseases and thyroid cancer using the Korean National Health Insurance claims database. We defined patients with vitiligo as those whose records showed ≥4 physician contacts between 2009 and 2013 in which vitiligo was the principal diagnosis. We also established an age- and sex-matched control group without vitiligo (2 per 1 vitiligo patient). The outcomes of interest were concurrent Graves disease and Hashimoto thyroiditis (the patients were taking relevant thyroid medications) and thyroid cancer. The study enrolled 73,336 vitiligo patients and 146,672 controls. Patients with vitiligo were at increased risks of Graves disease (odds ratio [OR] 2.610 [95% confidence interval {CI} 2.319-02.938]), Hashimoto thyroiditis (OR 1.609 [95% CI 1.437-1.802]), and thyroid cancer (OR 1.127 [95% CI 1.022-1.242]), compared with the controls. The associations were consistently stronger in males and younger patients. Individual clinical information was not available, and the homogeneous population may limit the generalizability of the results. Vitiligo was significantly associated with overt autoimmune thyroid diseases and overt thyroid cancer. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Antinuclear antibodies in autoimmune and allergic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grygiel-Górniak, Bogna; Rogacka, Natalia; Rogacki, Michał; Puszczewicz, Mariusz

    2017-01-01

    Antinuclear antibodies (ANA) are primarily significant in the diagnosis of systemic connective tissue diseases. The relationship between their occurrence in allergic diseases is poorly documented. However, the mechanism of allergic and autoimmune diseases has a common thread. In both cases, an increased production of IgE antibodies and presence of ANA in selected disease entities is observed. Equally important is the activation of basophils secreting proinflammatory factors and affecting the differentiation of TH17 lymphocytes. Both autoimmune and allergic diseases have complex multi-pathogenesis and often occur in genetically predisposed individuals. The presence of antinuclear antibodies was confirmed in many systemic connective tissue diseases and some allergic diseases. Examples include atopic dermatitis, non-allergic asthma, and pollen allergy. Co-occurring allergic and autoimmune disorders induce further search for mechanisms involved in the aetiopathogenesis of both groups of diseases.

  15. Epidemiology of autoimmune diseases in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eaton, William W.; Rose, N.R.; Kalaydijan, A.

    2007-01-01

    An epidemiologic study of the autoimmune diseases taken together has not been done heretofore. The National Patient Register of Denmark is used to estimate the population prevalence of 31 possible or probable autoimmune diseases. Record linkage is used to estimate 465 pairwise co...... diseases and weak across diseases. These data confirm the importance of the autoimmune diseases as a group and suggest that common etiopathologies exist among them......-morbidities in individuals among the 31 diseases, and familial aggregation among sibs, parents and offspring. The prevalence of any of the 31 diseases in the population is more than 5%. Within individuals, there is extensive comorbidity across the 31 diseases. Within families, aggregation is strongest for individual...

  16. Clinical aspects of autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldblatt, Fiona; O'Neill, Sean G

    2013-08-31

    Multisystem autoimmune rheumatic diseases are heterogeneous rare disorders associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Efforts to create international consensus within the past decade have resulted in the publication of new classification or nomenclature criteria for several autoimmune rheumatic diseases, specifically for systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjögren's syndrome, and the systemic vasculitides. Substantial progress has been made in the formulation of new criteria in systemic sclerosis and idiopathic inflammatory myositis. Although the autoimmune rheumatic diseases share many common features and clinical presentations, differentiation between the diseases is crucial because of important distinctions in clinical course, appropriate drugs, and prognoses. We review some of the dilemmas in the diagnosis of these autoimmune rheumatic diseases, and focus on the importance of new classification criteria, clinical assessment, and interpretation of autoimmune serology. In this era of improvement of mortality rates for patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases, we pay particular attention to the effect of leading complications, specifically cardiovascular manifestations and cancer, and we update epidemiology and prognosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. APPEARANCE OF AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES IN PATIENTS WITH ENDOMETRIOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Slabe

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. Endometriosis is a comon, complex gynecological syndrom defined as the growth of endometrial glands and stroma in an extra-uterine location. It affects 5 – 20 % of women of reproductive age.1 Nowadays, prevailing opinion about endometriosis is based on presumption, that endometriosis is a result of changed immune system, according to autoimmune theory.2, 3 Characteristics of autoimmune disease that are also found in endometriosis are female preponderance, multiorgan involvement, family occurence, possible genetic basis, response to hormonal manipulation, tissue damage, polyclonal B lymphocite activation, immunological abnormalities in T lymphocite and B lymphocite function and associated autoimmune disease. Women with endometriosis are more frequently affected by asthma, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjögren syndrom and Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. Autoimmune disease is characterized by the production of autoantibodies against components of apoptotic cells. Anti-endometrial antibodies of IgG and IgM classes could be detected in 60 % of endometriosis patients. They show reactivity in glandular epithelium and stroma. Anti-endothelial antibodies specifically react with vascular endothelium and might be with anti-endometrial antibodies partially responsible for failure of implantation leading to infertility, wich is common in endometriosis patients. Anti-nuclear antibodies are frequent serological findings in patients with autoimmune disease, and could be detected in 29–47 % of women with endometriosis.4 Generation of anti-nuclear antibodies is a risk factor for development of other autoimmune disease in women of reproductive age. Studies have shown conflicting results on the presence of anti-ovarian antibodies in the serum of endometriosis patients and in the peritoneal fluid. Their presence is one of the possible causes of infertility. Conclusions. Ethiopathogenesis of endometriosis still remains uncelar but

  18. Immuno-neuro-endocrine networks: A study on the inflammatory state of circulating monocytes and CD4+ T cells in psychiatric and endocrine autoimmune disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.C. Drexhage (Roos)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis deals with immune aspects of bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, autoimmune thyroid disease and type 1 diabetes mellitus and therefore we give a short introduction to each disease.

  19. Epitope recognition patterns of thyroid peroxidase autoantibodies in healthy individuals and patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis*

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus H; Brix, Thomas H; Gardas, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    Thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAb) are markers of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), including Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT), but naturally occurring TPOAb are also detectable in healthy, euthyroid individuals. In AITD, circulating TPOAb react mainly with two immunodominant regions (IDR), IDR...

  20. Pregnancy and autoimmune connective tissue diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marder, Wendy; Littlejohn, Emily A

    2016-01-01

    The autoimmune connective tissue diseases predominantly affect women and often occur during the reproductive years. Thus, specialized issues in pregnancy planning and management are commonly encountered in this patient population. This chapter provides a current overview of pregnancy as a risk factor for onset of autoimmune disease, considerations related to the course of pregnancy in several autoimmune connective tissue diseases, and disease management and medication issues before and during pregnancy and the postpartum period. A major theme that has emerged across these inflammatory diseases is that active maternal disease during pregnancy is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes, and that maternal and fetal health can be optimized when conception is planned during times of inactive disease and through maintaining treatment regimens compatible with pregnancy. PMID:27421217

  1. Autoimmune connective tissue diseases and vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Więsik-Szewczyk

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The idea that infectious agents can induce autoimmune diseases in genetically susceptible subjects has been a matter of discussion for years. Moreover, increased incidence of autoimmune diseases and introduction of prophylactic vaccinations from early childhood suggest that these two trends are linked. In the medical literature and even non-professional media, case reports or events temporally related to vaccination are reported. It raises the issue of vaccination safety. In everyday practice medical professionals, physicians, rheumatologists and other specialists will be asked their opinion of vaccination safety. The decision should be made according to evidence-based medicine and the current state of knowledge. The purpose of this paper is to discuss a potential mechanism which links infections, vaccinations and autoimmunity. We present an overview of published case reports, especially of systemic connective tissue diseases temporally related to vaccination and results from case-nested studies. As yet, no conclusive evidence supports a causal relationship between vaccination and autoimmune diseases. It has to be determined whether the performed studies are sufficiently Epsteinasensitive to detect the link. The debate is ongoing, and new data may be required to explain the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. We would like to underscore the need for prophylactic vaccination in patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases and to break down the myth that the vaccines are contraindicated in this target group.

  2. Radiation damage to thyroid gland may be the reason of increase in frequency of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and other hematological diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinogradova, Yu.E.; Shinkarkina, A.P.; Poverennyj, A.M.

    1999-01-01

    Distribution of autoimmune thyroidities in the patients with diseases of blood system was investigated. Attribute of autoimmune thyroidities was revealed by the detection of antimicrosomal antibodies. It was established that the autoimmune thyroidities are more often in patients with various hematological diseases than in control group. It is supposed that the increase in frequency of some hematological diseases in residents suffered from the Chernobyl accident can be defined not only by the influence of the radiation on blood system, but also can be connected with damage to thyroid glands [ru

  3. Increased risk of thyroid diseases in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: A nationwide population-based Study in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Jae-Seung; Bae, Jung Min; Kim, Ki-Jo; Jung, Yu Seok; Kim, Gyong Moon; Kim, Hyung-Rae; Lee, Jun-Seok; Ko, Seung-Hyun; Cha, Seon-Ah; Ahn, Yu-Bae

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the association between autoimmune thyroid disease and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) using nationwide insurance claims data for the entire Korean population. Claims data for the period 2009-2013 were retrieved from the National Health Insurance System database. SLE and thyroid disease were identified using the International Classification of Diseases codes and medication information. Logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate the association between SLE and thyroid disease. The study used records from 17,495 patients with SLE and 52,485 age- and sex-matched control subjects. A greater prevalence of Graves' disease (0.94% vs. 0.46%, P risk of both autoimmune thyroid disease and thyroid cancer (Graves' disease: odds ratio [OR] 2.07, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.70-2.53; Hashimoto's thyroiditis: OR 3.42, 95% CI 3.00-3.91; thyroid cancer: OR 1.40, 95% CI 1.22-1.60). Age- and sex- stratified analyses revealed that the risk of autoimmune thyroid disease in SLE patients was increased for all age groups and the female group. An association between thyroid cancer and SLE was identified only in the 20- to 59-year-old age group and in the female group. Using a large population-based study, we demonstrated that patients with SLE are at a greater risk of developing thyroid disease than matched control individuals.

  4. Nodular thyroid disease and thyroid malignancy: Experience at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To review the profile of thyroid disease in patients with goitre presenting to the Department of Surgery at Polokwane Mankweng Hospital Complex (PMHC), Limpopo, SA, to characterise the pattern of malignancy in patients with goitre, and to determine the most common thyroid cancer. Method. A 6-year retrospective study ...

  5. Autoimmune diseases and infections: controversial issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baio, P; Brucato, A; Buskila, D; Gershwin, M E; Giacomazzi, D; Lopez, L R; Luzzati, R; Matsuura, E; Selmi, C; Sarzi-Puttini, P; Atzeni, F

    2008-01-01

    The etiology and pathogenesis of certain types of disease remain controversial and stand like a bridge that crosses infectious, autoimmune and autoinflammatory pathways. Infection, for example, may initiate a disease, although it is the genetic regulation in the host, the interplay between virus or bacteria persistence and autoimmunity that produces the later phases of disease, the antigenic determinants responsible for inducing autoimmune disease, and the pathogenetic effector mechanisms. Infections agents cause pericarditis, but in 85% of cases it is "idiopathic". It has also been shown that persistent Clamydia pneumoniae, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Helicobacter pylori infections cause host immunity and promote atherogenesis. A number of infectious agents have been suggested as potential triggers for primary biliary cirrhosis. Infections and vaccinations have also been linked to the pathogenesis of fibromyalgia syndrome, a common, chronic syndrome of widespread pain. Many factors are also responsible for fever of unknown origin such as: infections, autoimmunity disease, etc. However, it is difficult to determine a direct correlation between the infections agents in such a large group of diseases. The aim of this review is to analyze some of the controversies about the role of infections in autoimmune diseases.

  6. Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease- A Clinical Viewpoint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirala Khalessi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in medicine have given us a better insight into a group of disorders known as autoimmune diseases. In particular, advances have occurred in our understanding of the Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease (AIED. In this article, the authors review the different postulated theories in the pathogenesis of this disease. The clinical presentation, the available para-clinical diagnostic tools, and the important differential diagnoses will be summarized. The management methods, including steroid therapy, immunosuppressive medications, other biological agents and intra-tympanic injections, will be addressed. Cochlear implantation as a final solution to the advanced stages of the disease, causing total deafness, will also be discussed.

  7. Is autoimmune thyroiditis part of the genetic vulnerability (or an endophenotype) for bipolar disorder?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonk, Ronald; van der Schot, Astrid C.; Kahn, Rene S.; Nolen, Willem A.; Drexhage, Hemmo A.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Both genetic and environmental factors are involved in the etiology of bipolar disorder; however, biological markers for the transmission of the bipolar genotype ("endophenotypes") have not been found. Autoimmune thyroiditis with raised levels of thyroperoxidase antibodies (TPO-Abs) is

  8. Twins as a tool for evaluating the influence of genetic susceptibility in thyroid autoimmunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, T H; Hegedüs, L

    2011-01-01

    By means of large twin cohorts, it has been possible to provide relatively valid and unbiased data regarding the influence of genetic and to some extent epigenetic factors in the aetiology of thyroid autoimmunity. The comparison of concordance rates between monozygotic and dizygotic twins provide...

  9. M. paratuberculosis Heat Shock Protein 65 and Human Diseases: Bridging Infection and Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coad Thomas Dow

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP is the known infectious cause of Johne’s disease, an enteric inflammatory disease mostly studied in ruminant animals. MAP has also been implicated in the very similar Crohn’s disease of humans as well as sarcoidosis. Recently, MAP has been associated with juvenile sarcoidosis (Blau syndrome, autoimmune diabetes, autoimmune thyroiditis, and multiple sclerosis. While it is intuitive to implicate MAP in granulomatous diseases where the microbe participates in the granuloma, it is more difficult to assign a role for MAP in diseases where autoantibodies are a primary feature. MAP may trigger autoimmune antibodies via its heat shock proteins. Mycobacterial heat shock protein 65 (HSP65 is an immunodominant protein that shares sequential and conformational elements with several human host proteins. This molecular mimicry is the proposed etiopathology by which MAP stimulates autoantibodies associated with autoimmune (type 1 diabetes, autoimmune (Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, and multiple sclerosis. This paper proposes that MAP is a source of mycobacterial HSP65 and acts as a trigger of autoimmune disease.

  10. Menopause in patients with autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammaritano, Lisa R

    2012-05-01

    Menopause represents a time of significant clinical and hormonal change. Given the incompletely understood interrelationship between gonadal hormones and the immune system, it is possible that menopause may affect, or be affected by, the presence of autoimmune disease. Menopause has significant effects on a number of organ systems including the cardiovascular, skeletal, central nervous and genitourinary systems. Premature ovarian failure is related to autoimmune factors in a proportion of cases, but is not generally associated with systemic autoimmune disorders unless secondary to treatment with alkylating agents such as cyclophosphamide. Gonadal hormones have been suggested to relate to both onset and activity in certain autoimmune diseases. For patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, disease activity is lower, and damage accrual higher, in the postmenopausal years, but the mechanisms responsible may relate to age, duration of disease, menopause changes, long-term effects of therapy, or some combination of these factors. Early menopause is a risk factor for rheumatoid arthritis, and post-menopausal status in RA is associated with greater damage and disability. Systemic sclerosis and giant cell arteritis may also be adversely affected by onset of menopause. Importantly, autoimmune disease and menopause may have an additive effect on risk for common comorbidities such as cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Screen-detected gallstone disease and autoimmune diseases - A cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabanzadeh, Daniel Mønsted; Linneberg, Allan; Skaaby, Tea; Sørensen, Lars Tue; Jørgensen, Torben

    2018-01-31

    Gallstone disease is highly prevalent and is associated with systemic inflammation. To determine whether screen-detected gallstones or cholecystectomy are associated with the occurrence of autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases and the most common subgroups thereof. A cohort study of three randomly selected general population samples from Copenhagen was performed. Participants (n = 5928) were examined in the period 1982-1992, underwent abdominal ultrasound examination to detect gallstone disease, and followed through national registers until December 2014 (median 24.7 years) for occurrence of immunological diseases. Multivariable Cox regression analyses were performed. Gallstone disease was identified in 10% (591/5928) of participants, of whom 6.8% had gallstones and 3.2% had cholecystectomy at baseline. Gallstone disease was associated with incidence of autoimmune diseases (12.9% versus 7.92%; hazard ratio 1.46; 95% confidence interval [CI], [1.11;1.91]), diabetes mellitus type 1 (5.95% versus 3.67%; 1.53; [1.02;2.30]), and autoimmune thyroid disease (3.70% versus 1.59%; 2.06; [1.26;3.38]). Rheumatoid arthritis, autoinflammatory diseases, or any subgroups thereof were not associated. In a large general population sample, screen-detected gallstone disease was associated with the development of autoimmune diseases during long-term follow-up. Future research efforts are needed to further explore common disease mechanisms. Copyright © 2018 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Thyroid-specific questions on work ability showed known-groups validity among Danes with thyroid diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nexo, Mette A.; Watt, Torquil; Bonnema, Steen Joop

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: We aimed to identify the best approach to work ability assessment in patients with thyroid disease by evaluating the factor structure, measurement equivalence, known-groups validity, and predictive validity of a broad set of work ability items. METHODS: Based on the literature...... and interviews with thyroid patients, 24 work ability items were selected from previous questionnaires, revised, or developed anew. Items were tested among 632 patients with thyroid disease (non-toxic goiter, toxic nodular goiter, Graves' disease (with or without orbitopathy), autoimmune hypothyroidism......-to-head comparisons of relative validity in distinguishing known groups. RESULTS: Although all work ability items loaded on a common factor, the optimal factor solution included five factors: role physical, role emotional, thyroid-specific limitations, work limitations (without disease attribution), and work...

  13. Impact of positive thyroid autoimmunity on pregnant women with subclinical hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Tinoco, Cristina; Rodríguez-Mengual, Amparo; Lara-Barea, Almudena; Barcala, Julia; Larrán, Laura; Saez-Benito, Ana; Aguilar-Diosdado, Manuel

    2018-03-01

    The impact of subclinical hypothyroidism (SH) and thyroid autoimmunity on obstetric and perinatal complications continues to be a matter of interest and highly controversial. To assess the impact of SH and autoimmunity in early pregnancy on the obstetric and perinatal complications in our population. A retrospective cohort study in 435 women with SH (TSH ranging from 3.86 and 10 μIU/mL and normal FT4 values) in the first trimester of pregnancy. Epidemiological and clinical parameters were analyzed and were related to obstetric and perinatal complications based on the presence of autoimmunity (thyroid peroxidase antibodies [TPO] > 34 IU/mL). Mean age was 31.3 years (SD 5.2). Seventeen percent of patients had positive TPO antibodies. Presence of positive autoimmunity was associated to a family history of hypothyroidism (P=.04) and a higher chance of miscarriage (P=.009). In the multivariate analysis, positive TPO antibodies were associated to a 10.25-fold higher risk of miscarriage. No statistically significant associations were found with all other obstetric and perinatal complications. In our region, pregnant women with SH and thyroid autoimmunity had a higher risk of miscarriage but not of other obstetric and perinatal complications. Copyright © 2017 SEEN y SED. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Comorbid autoimmune diseases in patients with vitiligo: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Liza; Zarbo, Allison; Isedeh, Prescilia; Jacobsen, Gordon; Lim, Henry W; Hamzavi, Iltefat

    2016-02-01

    Few large-scale studies have quantified the burden of comorbid autoimmune diseases in patients with vitiligo. We sought to determine the prevalence of comorbid autoimmune diseases in patients with vitiligo. We conducted a manual chart review on a cohort of 1873 patients with vitiligo seen between January 2002 and October 2012 at the Henry Ford Health System in Detroit, MI. Patients were excluded if they had fewer than 2 dermatology notes (N = 595) or if they were never given a diagnosis of vitiligo by a dermatologist (N = 180). Of 1098 patients with vitiligo, nearly 20% had at least 1 comorbid autoimmune disease. Compared with the general US population, we found a higher prevalence of thyroid disease (12.9%, P vitiligo. We observed a high prevalence of comorbid autoimmune diseases in patients with vitiligo and report several new associations. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Binding of immunoglobulin G from patients with autoimmune thyroid diseases to solubilized guinea pig fat cell membranes crosslinked with 125I-TSH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, Yasuhiro; Konishi, Junji; Misaki, Takashi; Kasagi, Kanji; Endo, Keigo; Torizuka, Kanji; Kuma, Kanji.

    1986-01-01

    Binding of immunoglobulin G (IgG) to Triton-solubilized fat cell membranes crosslinked with 125 I-TSH was studied by an indirect immunoprecipitation method. Guinea pig fat cell membranes (FCM) containing TSH receptors with an association constant of 1.92 x 10 9 M -1 were first reacted with 125 I-TSH, then treated with a crosslinker, dissuccinimidyl suberate. The dissociation of 125 I-TSH from the crosslinked 125 I-TSH-FCM complexes due to the addition of 100 mU/ml unlabeled TSH was 9.0 %, while it was 33 % without the treatment. To the Triton-solubilized FCM crosslinked with 125 I-TSH, 50 μg each of IgG from 20 normal controls, 20 patients with Graves' disease and 20 with Hashimoto's disease was added and precipitation was effected by adding antihuman IgG. In patients with Graves' disease, 125 I-TSH-FCM complexes immunoprecipitated ranged from 1.10 to 4.18 % with an average of 2.4 ± 0.99 (S. D.) % which was significantly higher than those in normal controls (1.6 ± 0.29 %). The values in the patients with Hashimoto's disease averaged 1.7 ± 0.53 (S. D.) which did not differ significantly from those of controls. The value did not correlate with either TSH-binding inhibiting activities or titers of anti-microsomal antibodies. These data suggest the presence of TSH-receptor antibodies which react with antigens other than TSH-binding sites in the patients with Graves' disease. (author)

  16. Thyrotoxic thyroiditis after radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blitzer, J.B.; Paolozzi, F.P.; Gottlieb, A.J.; Zamkoff, K.W.; Chung, C.T.

    1985-01-01

    Exposure of the thyroid gland to ionizing radiation has been associated with a variety of abnormalities. Among these are tardive hypothyroidism and an increased risk of developing thyroid nodules and cancer. Although acute thyroiditis has been known to complicate radioactive iodine 131 therapy, it has rarely been associated with external beam irradiation. Thyrotoxic painless thyroiditis developed in two patients after mantle-field irradiation for Hodgkin's disease

  17. Chronic exposure in vivo to thyrotropin receptor stimulating monoclonal antibodies sustains high thyroxine levels and thyroid hyperplasia in thyroid autoimmunity-prone HLA-DRB1*0301 transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Jeffrey C; Gilbert, Jacqueline A; Meroueh, Chady; Snower, Daniel P; David, Chella S; Kong, Yi-chi M; Banga, J Paul

    2007-10-01

    We have examined the induction of autoimmunity and the maintenance of sustained hyperthyroidism in autoimmunity-prone human leucocyte antigen (HLA) DR3 transgenic non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice following chronic stimulation of the thyrotropin receptor (TSHR) by monoclonal thyroid-stimulating autoantibodies (TSAbs). Animals received weekly injections over the course of 9 weeks of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with strong thyroid-stimulating properties. Administration of the mAbs KSAb1 (IgG2b) or KSAb2 (IgG2a), which have similar stimulating properties but different TSH-binding blocking activity, resulted in significantly elevated serum thyroxine (T(4)) levels and thyroid hyperplasia. After the first injection, an initial surge then fall in serum T(4) levels was followed by sustained elevated levels with subsequent injections for at least 63 days. Examination of KSAb1 and KSAb2 serum bioactivity showed that the accumulation of the TSAbs in serum was related to their subclass half-lives. The thyroid glands were enlarged and histological examination showed hyperplastic follicles, with minimal accompanying thyroid inflammation. Our results show that chronic in vivo administration of mAbs with strong thyroid-stimulating activity resulted in elevated T(4) levels, suggesting persistent stimulation without receptor desensitization, giving a potential explanation for the sustained hyperthyroid status in patients with Graves' disease. Moreover, despite the presence of HLA disease susceptibility alleles and the autoimmune prone NOD background genes, chronic stimulation of the thyroid gland did not lead to immune cell-mediated follicular destruction, suggesting the persistence of immunoregulatory influences to suppress autoimmunity.

  18. Thymoma associated with autoimmune diseases: 85 cases and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, C; Frih, H; Pasquet, F; Kerever, S; Jamilloux, Y; Tronc, F; Guibert, B; Isaac, S; Devouassoux, M; Chalabreysse, L; Broussolle, C; Petiot, P; Girard, N; Sève, P

    2016-01-01

    To describe the clinical features, treatment, and outcome of autoimmune diseases (AD) in a cohort of patients with thymoma. Pathological records from three university hospitals, between 2005 and 2011, were reviewed to identify patients with thymoma. Patients with thymoma and AD were compared with patients with thymoma without AD. 47/85 (55%) cases of thymoma had AD, including myasthenia gravis (MG) (n=33), Hashimoto's thyroiditis (n=4), Isaac's syndrome (n=3), Morvan syndrome (n=2), pure red cell aplasia (n=2), systemic lupus (n=2), lichen planus (n=2), and one case of each following conditions: aplastic anemia, autoimmune hemolytic anemia, Good's syndrome, pemphigus, autoimmune hepatitis, Graves' disease, limbic encephalitis, and inflammatory myopathy. Six patients (7%) presented at least 2 ADs. The median duration of follow-up after surgery was 60 months (40-78 months). In 32 patients, the diagnosis of AD preceded the diagnosis of thymoma, in 9 patients, thymoma was diagnosed at the same time as the AD and 7 patients had been operated on when they developed an AD. We found a significative difference on the Masaoka stage between the MG patients and the patients who present another AD (p=0.028). No risk factor for developing an AD after thymectomy was identified. We describe here the long-term follow-up of a large series of AD related to thymoma. Our results confirm previous data concerning AD occurrence in patients with thymoma and suggest that preexisting autoimmunity is not a risk factor for developing autoimmune manifestations after thymectomy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Thyroid gland in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miłkowska-Dymanowska, Joanna; Białas, Adam J; Laskowska, Paulina; Górski, Paweł; Piotrowski, Wojciech J

    2017-01-01

    The risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), as well as thyroid diseases increases with age. COPD is a common systemic disease associated with chronic inflammation. Many endocrinological disorders, including thyroid gland diseases are related to systemic inflammation. Epidemiological studies suggest that patients with COPD are at higher risk of thyroid disorders. These associations are not well-studied and thyroid gland diseases are not included on the broadly acknowledged list of COPD comorbidities. They may seriously handicap quality of life of COPD patients. Unfortunately, the diagnosis may be difficult, as many signs are masked by the symptoms of the index disease. The comprehension of the correlation between thyroid gland disorders and COPD may contribute to better care of patients. In this review, we attempt to revise available literature describing existing links between COPD and thyroid diseases.

  20. Premature atherosclerosis in systemic autoimmune diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuw, Karina de

    2008-01-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and Wegener’s granulomatosis (WG) are associated with a significantly increased prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) compared to age- and sex-matched controls. Many risk factors are involved in the pathogenesis of

  1. Shared genetic origins of allergy and autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waage, J. E.; Kreiner-Møller, E.; Standl, M.

    2015-01-01

    Parallel increases in allergy and autoimmune disease prevalence in recent time suggest shared, but yet unknown, etiologies. Here, we investigated shared genetic loci and molecular pathways to identify possible shared disease mechanisms between allergy and autoimmune diseases....

  2. Bullous Skin Diseases: Classical Types of Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Damoiseaux

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The prototypic bullous skin diseases, pemphigus vulgaris, pemphigus foliaceus, and bullous pemphigoid, are characterized by the blister formation in the skin and/or oral mucosa in combination with circulating and deposited autoantibodies reactive with (hemidesmosomes. Koch’s postulates, adapted for autoimmune diseases, were applied on these skin diseases. It appears that all adapted Koch’s postulates are fulfilled, and, therefore, these bullous skin diseases are to be considered classical autoimmune diseases within the wide and expanding spectrum of autoimmune diseases.

  3. Immunosensors for Biomarker Detection in Autoimmune Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuezhu; Zambrano, Amarayca; Lin, Zuan-Tao; Xing, Yikun; Rippy, Justin; Wu, Tianfu

    2017-04-01

    Autoimmune diseases occur when the immune system generates proinflammatory molecules and autoantibodies that mistakenly attack their own body. Traditional diagnosis of autoimmune disease is primarily based on physician assessment combined with core laboratory tests. However, these tests are not sensitive enough to detect early molecular events, and quite often, it is too late to control these autoimmune diseases and reverse tissue damage when conventional tests show positivity for disease. It is fortunate that during the past decade, research in nanotechnology has provided enormous opportunities for the development of ultrasensitive biosensors in detecting early biomarkers with high sensitivity. Biosensors consist of a biorecognition element and a transducer which are able to facilitate an accurate detection of proinflammatory molecules, autoantibodies and other disease-causing molecules. Apparently, novel biosensors could be superior to traditional metrics in assessing the drug efficacy in clinical trials, especially when specific biomarkers are indicative of the pathogenesis of disease. Furthermore, the portability of a biosensor enables the development of point-of-care devices. In this review, various types of biomolecule sensing systems, including electrochemical, optical and mechanical sensors, and their applications and future potentials in autoimmune disease treatment were discussed.

  4. Thyroid Disease and Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bloodstream, resulting in hyperthyroidism . ("Hyper" is from the Greek, meaning "over" or "above.") Hyperthyroidism causes the body ... fatigue, difficulty sleeping, a fast heartbeat, irregular menstrual periods in girls, and muscle weakness. Graves disease , an ...

  5. Thyroid Disease (for Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bloodstream, resulting in hyperthyroidism . ("Hyper" is from the Greek, meaning "over" or "above.") Hyperthyroidism causes the body ... fatigue, difficulty sleeping, a fast heartbeat, irregular menstrual periods in girls, and muscle weakness. Graves disease , an ...

  6. Synthetic gene network restoring endogenous pituitary–thyroid feedback control in experimental Graves’ disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Pratik; Charpin-El Hamri, Ghislaine; Folcher, Marc; Zulewski, Henryk; Fussenegger, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Graves’ disease is an autoimmune disorder that causes hyperthyroidism because of autoantibodies that bind to the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) on the thyroid gland, triggering thyroid hormone release. The physiological control of thyroid hormone homeostasis by the feedback loops involving the hypothalamus–pituitary–thyroid axis is disrupted by these stimulating autoantibodies. To reset the endogenous thyrotrophic feedback control, we designed a synthetic mammalian gene circuit that maintains thyroid hormone homeostasis by monitoring thyroid hormone levels and coordinating the expression of a thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antagonist (TSHAntag), which competitively inhibits the binding of thyroid-stimulating hormone or the human autoantibody to TSHR. This synthetic control device consists of a synthetic thyroid-sensing receptor (TSR), a yeast Gal4 protein/human thyroid receptor-α fusion, which reversibly triggers expression of the TSHAntag gene from TSR-dependent promoters. In hyperthyroid mice, this synthetic circuit sensed pathological thyroid hormone levels and restored the thyrotrophic feedback control of the hypothalamus–pituitary–thyroid axis to euthyroid hormone levels. Therapeutic plug and play gene circuits that restore physiological feedback control in metabolic disorders foster advanced gene- and cell-based therapies. PMID:26787873

  7. AIDBD: AUTOIMMUNE AND INFLAMMATORY DISEASES BIOMARKER DATABASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulwinder Singh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the major challenges facing the healthcare industry is how to personalize, or tailor healthcare products and services to individuals’ unique genetic and biomarker make-ups. Biomarkers provide information about normal or patho-physiological processes to detect or define disease progression or to predict or quantify therapeutic responses. Once these footprints have been identified and measured, they can then be used to personalize or tailor treatment plans, products and services to each individual’s unique makeup and background. Autoimmune and Inflammatory Diseases Biomarker Database (AIDBD is one of the first efforts to build an easily accessible and comprehensive literature-derived database covering information on known autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, biomarkers and available medications. It allows users to link autoimmune and inflammatory diseases to protein or gene biomarkers through its user interface. Currently, AIDBD integrates 206 biomarkers for 21 autoimmune and inflammatory diseases and data on 516 launched drugs for the treatment these diseases. The database is freely accessible at http://www.aidbd.in/.

  8. The influence of thyroid autoimmunity on embryo quality in women undergoing assisted reproductive technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrisani, A; Sabbadin, C; Marin, L; Ragazzi, E; Dessole, F; Armanini, D; Donà, G; Bordin, L; Ambrosini, G

    2018-02-20

    The influence of thyroid autoimmunity in assisted reproductive technology (ART) outcome in euthyroid women is still controversial. In this study, we retrospectively evaluated embryo quality in 123 euthyroid women undergoing ART with or without thyroid autoantibodies (TAA). Embryo quality was assessed in 119 embryos of 29 infertile patients with TAA and in 394 embryos of 94 infertile patients without TAA. Our results showed not statistically significant differences in age, body mass index, anti-Müllerian hormone, follicle stimulating hormone, free triiodothyronine, and free thyroxine levels between cases and controls. Thyroid stimulating hormone was within the normal range, but significantly higher in TAA patients compared with the controls (2.4 ± 0.8 vs. 2 ± 0.9 mIU/L, respectively, p women with at least one autoantibody (p women undergoing ART even when thyroid function is normal.

  9. Atherogenic index and coronarian risk – comparative assessment regarding the particularities of chronic autoimmune thyroiditis presence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seceleanu Mihaela

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Assessment of autoimmune cause hypothyroidism and dyslipidemia involvement in the apparition of major vascular complications. Methods: A total of 152 patients were investigated appreciating in comparison to a healthy control lot the hormone serum level, the presence of antimicrosomal thyroid antibodies and the serum levels of lipids. Atherogenic index and coronarian risk were calculated and correlated with the incidence of coronarian and cerebral vascular accidents. Results: Among the patients with goiter it was noted a high incidence of a subclinical hypothyroidism (31,58%. Thyroid autoimmunity was involved in 94,4% of the patients with clinical hypothyroidism, in 93,7 % with subclinical hypothyroidism and 100% in the patients with thyrotoxicosis. Low serum level of HDL-cholesterol was identified in 66,6% of patients with clinical hypothyroidism and 64,5% patients with subclinical hypothyroidism. The assessment of atherogenic index and coronarian risk was significantly higher (p<0,01 in patients with hypothyroidism in comparison to healthy control subjects. The incidence of vascular accidents was significantly higher (p<0,01 among the hypothyroid patients ( 19,7%/ 10,8%, of masculine gender (12,7% where the main cause of hypothyroidism was autoimmunity. Conclusions: The atherogenic index and coronarian risk were higher in patients with hypothyroidism associated to thyroid autoimmunity resulting in an increased probability in producing vascular accidents

  10. Genomics and proteomics: Applications in autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Hueber

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Wolfgang Hueber1,2,3, William H Robinson1,21VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, CA, USA; 2Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA; 3Novartis Institutes of Biomedical Research, Novartis, Basle, SwitzerlandAbstract: Tremendous progress has been made over the past decade in the development and refinement of genomic and proteomic technologies for the identification of novel drug targets and molecular signatures associated with clinically important disease states, disease subsets, or differential responses to therapies. The rapid progress in high-throughput technologies has been preceded and paralleled by the elucidation of cytokine networks, followed by the stepwise clinical development of pathway-specific biological therapies that revolutionized the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Together, these advances provide opportunities for a long-anticipated personalized medicine approach to the treatment of autoimmune disease. The ever-increasing numbers of novel, innovative therapies will need to be harnessed wisely to achieve optimal long-term outcomes in as many patients as possible while complying with the demands of health authorities and health care providers for evidence-based, economically sound prescription of these expensive drugs. Genomic and proteomic profiling of patients with autoimmune diseases holds great promise in two major clinical areas: (1 rapid identification of new targets for the development of innovative therapies and (2 identification of patients who will experience optimal benefit and minimal risk from a specific (targeted therapy. In this review, we attempt to capture important recent developments in the application of genomic and proteomic technologies to translational research by discussing informative examples covering a diversity of autoimmune diseases.Keywords: proteomics, genomics, autoimmune diseases, antigen microarrays, 2-Dih, rheumatoid arthritis

  11. Recent tendency in diagnosis of thyroid diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, Kiyoshi; Ito, Hiroshi; Tatsuno, Ikuro

    1979-01-01

    Various new approaches have been recently investigated in diagnosis of thyroid diseases with the progress of nuclear medicine. sup(99m)TcO 4 - has become a routinely used radiopharmaceutical in thyroid scan. sup(99m)TcO 4 - thyroid uptake was evaluated by using thyroid-t-high ratio. 123 I thyroid scan is more valuable than 131 I scan because of its short half time and low radiation exposure. We use 123 I particulary in functional analysis of thyroid hot nodule. 201 Tl scans were performed in patients with cold nodule. All thyroid cancer patients showed 201 Tl positive accumulation in thyroid nodule. However, even in benign diseases 201 Tl was accumulated. 201 Tl scan will be most effectively used in detecting the metastatic lesions from thyroid cancer. Serum rT 3 concentration in various diseases was evaluated by RIA method. Serum TBG concentration in various diseases was evaluated by RIA method and T 4 /TBG ratio was evaluated. Serum anti-thyroglobulin antibody titer in thyroid diseases was evaluated by RIA method. It was more objective than widely used tanned red cell hemagglutinin method. (author)

  12. Effects of low-carbohydrate diet therapy in overweight subject with autoimmune thyroiditis: possible synergism with ChREBP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esposito T

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Teresa Esposito,1,2 Jean Marc Lobaccaro,3 Maria Grazia Esposito,4 Vincenzo Monda,1 Antonietta Messina,1 Giuseppe Paolisso,5 Bruno Varriale,2 Marcellino Monda,1 Giovanni Messina1,6 1Department of Experimental Medicine, Section of Human Physiology and Unit of Dietetics and Sports Medicine, 2Laboratory of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Department of Experimental Medicine, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy; 3UMR, Clermont Université, Centre de Recherche en Nutrition Humaine d’Auvergne, Aubière Cedex, France; 4Complex Surgery Unit, Evangelic Hospital Villa Betania, 5Department of Scienze Mediche, Chirurgiche, Neurologiche, Metaboliche e dell’Invecchiamento, Second University of Naples, Naples, 6Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Foggia, Foggia, Italy Abstract: The thyroid is one of the metabolism regulating glands. Its function is to determine the amount of calories that the body has to burn to maintain normal weight. Thyroiditides are inflammatory processes that mainly result in autoimmune diseases. We have conducted the present study in order to have a clear picture of both autoimmune status and the control of body weight. We have evaluated the amount of either thyroid hormones, or antithyroid, or anti-microsomal, or anti-peroxidase antibodies (Abs in patients with high amounts of Abs. In a diet devoid of carbohydrates (bread, pasta, fruit, and rice, free from goitrogenic food, and based on body mass index, the distribution of body mass and intracellular and extracellular water conducted for 3 weeks gives the following results: patients treated as above showed a significant reduction of antithyroid (-40%, P<0.013, anti-microsomal (-57%, P<0.003, and anti-peroxidase (-44%, P<0,029 Abs. Untreated patients had a significant increase in antithyroid (+9%, P<0.017 and anti-microsomal (+30%, P<0.028 Abs. Even the level of anti-peroxidase Abs increased without reaching statistical significance (+16%, P>0064

  13. Inflammatory Bowel Disease and the Risk of Autoimmune Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J Claire; Furlano, Raoul I; Jick, Susan S; Meier, Christoph R

    2016-02-01

    An increased risk of autoimmune disease has been reported in patients with inflammatory bowel disease [IBD]. Using data from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink [CPRD], this study set out to further examine this relationship. Patients with a first-time IBD diagnosis were randomly matched to an equal-sized IBD-free comparison group. Incidence rates for new-onset autoimmune diseases were estimated. A nested case-control analysis comprising IBD patients was conducted, using conditional logistic regression to assess whether IBD severity, duration, or treatment influences the risk of developing autoimmune diseases. During follow-up, 1069 IBD and 585 IBD-free patients developed an incident autoimmune disease. An increased incidence of autoimmune disease was observed in IBD patients (incidence rate [IR] 9.65, 95% confidence interval [CI] 9.09-10.24) compared with the non-IBD comparison group [IR 5.22, 95% CI 4.82-5.66]. In IBD patients, increased disease severity was associated with an increased risk of autoimmune disease development (odds ratio [OR] 1.62, 95% CI 1.28-2.05). Current antibiotic use was also associated with an increased risk [adjusted OR 1.72, 95% CI 1.07-2.78]. A reduced risk of incident autoimmune diseases was observed for current long-term users of aminosalicylates [adjusted OR 0.72, 95% CI 0.57-0.91]. Individuals with IBD had an increased risk of developing an autoimmune disease. Increased disease severity and current antibiotic use were associated with an increased relative risk of developing additional autoimmune diseases in IBD patients. Long-term current aminosalicylate use was associated with a reduced risk. Copyright © 2015 European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. High prevalence of thyroid disease and role of salivary gland scintigraphy in patients with xerostomia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Ji Hoon; Lee, Chang Hee; Son, Seung Hyun; Jeong, Ju Hye; Jeong, Shin Young; Lee, Sang Woo; Lee, Jae Tae; Ahn, Byeong Cheol

    2017-01-01

    Although Sjös syndrome (SS) is the most common disease causing xerostomia, autoimmune thyroid diseases can also affect the salivary glands. The aim of our study was to estimate the prevalence of thyroid diseases (TD) in subjects with symptoms of xerostomia and evaluate the efficacy of salivary gland scintigraphy (SGS) in the detection of TD in patients with SS and without SS. We retrospectively reviewed the SGS findings of 173 subjects (men:women, 29:144) with symptoms of xerostomia. Ejection fractions (EF) in the parotid and submandibular glands were calculated. Thyroid disease was diagnosed on the basis of the results of the visual assessment of tracer uptake in the thyroid gland on SGS images as well as serological thyroid function tests. Based on the American-European Criteria, 94 patients were diagnosed with SS. Hashimoto's thyroiditis was diagnosed in 63 patients, subacute thyroiditis in 23, subclinical hypothyroidism in five, and Graves' disease in one. There were significant differences in the EF values of the parotid and submandibular glands between patients with TD and those with undetermined diagnoses. More than half of patients with xerostomia exhibited TD. Thyroid assessment by SGS is feasible, and SGS appears to be useful for the patients with xerostomia caused by TD. SGS may be the first imaging modality capable of evaluating both salivary gland function and thyroid gland status in patients with xerostomia. This strategy would make the requirement for additional workup for thyroid disease

  15. High prevalence of thyroid disease and role of salivary gland scintigraphy in patients with xerostomia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Ji Hoon; Lee, Chang Hee; Son, Seung Hyun; Jeong, Ju Hye; Jeong, Shin Young; Lee, Sang Woo; Lee, Jae Tae; Ahn, Byeong Cheol [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine/Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    Although Sjös syndrome (SS) is the most common disease causing xerostomia, autoimmune thyroid diseases can also affect the salivary glands. The aim of our study was to estimate the prevalence of thyroid diseases (TD) in subjects with symptoms of xerostomia and evaluate the efficacy of salivary gland scintigraphy (SGS) in the detection of TD in patients with SS and without SS. We retrospectively reviewed the SGS findings of 173 subjects (men:women, 29:144) with symptoms of xerostomia. Ejection fractions (EF) in the parotid and submandibular glands were calculated. Thyroid disease was diagnosed on the basis of the results of the visual assessment of tracer uptake in the thyroid gland on SGS images as well as serological thyroid function tests. Based on the American-European Criteria, 94 patients were diagnosed with SS. Hashimoto's thyroiditis was diagnosed in 63 patients, subacute thyroiditis in 23, subclinical hypothyroidism in five, and Graves' disease in one. There were significant differences in the EF values of the parotid and submandibular glands between patients with TD and those with undetermined diagnoses. More than half of patients with xerostomia exhibited TD. Thyroid assessment by SGS is feasible, and SGS appears to be useful for the patients with xerostomia caused by TD. SGS may be the first imaging modality capable of evaluating both salivary gland function and thyroid gland status in patients with xerostomia. This strategy would make the requirement for additional workup for thyroid disease.

  16. Study of autoimmune thyroid disorder in atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima, (2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noma, Koji; Sasaki, Hideo; Ito, Chikako; Mito, Kazuyo; Kato, Masashi; Egusa, Gengi; Hara, Hitoshi

    1986-11-01

    To elucidate sequential changes of thyroid function in persons seropositive for anti-thyroid antibodies, thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) test was performed in 31 patients with asymptomatic autoimmune thyroiditis (AAT), 13 patients with struma (S), and 28 normal subjects. On the basis of basal TSH values, 26 of the AAT patients were classified as grade I, 4 as grade II, and 2 as grade III; and 8 of the S patients as grade I, 4 as grade II, and one as grade III. One patient with grade I AAT developed subclinical hypothyroidism (SHT). All grade III AAT and S patients were considered to have SHT. S patients were more likely than AAT patients to develop SHT. Regarding serum levels of total T4, total T3, total cholesterol, triglyceride, and lactic dehydrogenase, there was no significant correlation between grade I group and grade II + III group. Although the basal TSH value may be a somewhat important indicator for predicting thyroid function, abnormal basal TSH value returned to normal several years later even in the case of patients with increased value. There was no evidence that autoimmune thyroid disorder is frequent in A-bomb survivors exposed within 2,000 m from ground zero. (Namekawa, K.).

  17. Thyroid disease and the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danzi, Sara; Klein, Irwin

    2014-06-01

    Thyroid hormones, specifically triiodothyronine (T3), have significant effects on the heart and cardiovascular system. Hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, subclinical thyroid disease, and low T3 syndrome each cause cardiac and cardiovascular abnormalities through both genomic and nongenomic effects on cardiac myocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells. In compromised health, such as occurs in heart disease, alterations in thyroid hormone metabolism may further impair cardiac and cardiovascular function. Diagnosis and treatment of cardiac disease may benefit from including analysis of thyroid hormone status, including serum total T3 levels. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Interactions between thyroid disorders and kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Gopal Basu; Anjali Mohapatra

    2012-01-01

    There are several interactions between thyroid and kidney functions in each other organ's disease states. Thyroid hormones affect renal development and physiology. Thyroid hormones have pre-renal and intrinsic renal effects by which they increase the renal blood flow and the glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Hypothyroidism is associated with reduced GFR and hyperthyroidism results in increased GFR as well as increased renin – angiotensin – aldosterone activation. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) ...

  19. Celiac disease in autoimmune cholestatic liver disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volta, Umberto; Rodrigo, Luis; Granito, Alessandro; Petrolini, Nunzio; Muratori, Paolo; Muratori, Luigi; Linares, Antonio; Veronesi, Lorenza; Fuentes, Dolores; Zauli, Daniela; Bianchi, Francesco B

    2002-10-01

    In this study, serological screening for celiac disease (CD) was performed in patients with autoimmune cholestasis to define the prevalence of such an association and to evaluate the impact of gluten withdrawal on liver disease associated with gluten sensitive enteropathy. Immunoglobulin A endomysial, human and guinea pig tissue transglutaminase antibodies, and immunoglobulin A and G gliadin antibodies were sought in 255 patients with primary biliary cirrhosis, autoimmune cholangitis, and primary sclerosing cholangitis. Immunoglobulin A endomysial and human tissue transglutaminase antibodies were positive in nine patients (seven primary biliary cirrhosis, one autoimmune cholangitis, and one primary sclerosing cholangitis), whose duodenal biopsy results showed villous atrophy consistent with CD. Two of these patients had a malabsorption syndrome, and one had iron-deficiency anemia. Clinical and biochemical signs of cholestasis did not improve after gluten withdrawal in the three patients with severe liver disease. A longer follow-up of the six celiac patients with mild liver damage is needed to clarify whether gluten restriction can contribute to slow down the progression of liver disease. The high prevalence of CD (3.5%) in autoimmune cholestasis suggests that serological screening for CD should be routinely performed in such patients by immunoglobulin A endomysial or human tissue transglutaminase antibodies.

  20. Study of cytokines microenvironment during autoimmune diseases ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    22, IL-23, TNF-α and TGF-β) were determined. We used the immunoenzymatic technology to assess the titer of cytokines. We found that there was no significant variation of TNF-α level in normal controls and autoimmune diseases ...

  1. Systemic autoimmune disease and Raynaud's phenomonen.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kallenberg, Cornelis

    1982-01-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases (AID) are clinically characterized by the involvement of multiple organ systems in the desease process, and immunologically by immune responsiveness against "self". The constitute a heterogenous group of disorders wich are presented to the clinician in a wide variety of

  2. Pre-autoimmune thyroid abnormalities in the biobreeding diabetes-prone (BB-DP) rat: a possible relation with the intrathyroid accumulation of dendritic cells and the initiation of the thyroid autoimmune response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J. Simons (Peter); F.G. Delemarre; P.H. Jeucken; H.A. Drexhage (Hemmo)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractThyroid autoimmune reactions start with an accumulation of mainly dendritic cells in the thyroid. There is increasing evidence that, apart from being antigen-presenting cells, they are also able to control the growth and hormone synthesis of neighbouring

  3. MicroRNAs in autoimmune rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.D. Sebastiani

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The etiology of autoimmune diseases remains largely unknown. In recent years, besides genetic factors, several studies proposed that the epigenome may hold the key to a better understanding of autoimmunity initiation and perpetuation. More specifically epigenetic regulatory mechanisms comprise DNA methylation, a variety of histone modifications, and microRNA (miRNA activity, all of which act upon gene and protein expression levels. In particular it is well known that epigenetic mechanisms are important for controlling the pattern of gene expression during development, the cell cycle, and the response to biological or environmental changes. In the present review a description of the most frequent epigenetic deregulations, in particular the role of miRNA, in rheumatic autoimmune disorders will be analyzed.

  4. Eating Disorders, Autoimmune, and Autoinflammatory Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerwas, Stephanie; Larsen, Janne Tidselbak; Petersen, Liselotte; Thornton, Laura M; Quaranta, Michela; Koch, Susanne Vinkel; Pisetsky, David; Mortensen, Preben Bo; Bulik, Cynthia M

    2017-12-01

    Identifying factors associated with risk for eating disorders is important for clarifying etiology and for enhancing early detection of eating disorders in primary care. We hypothesized that autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases would be associated with eating disorders in children and adolescents and that family history of these illnesses would be associated with eating disorders in probands. In this large, nationwide, population-based cohort study of all children and adolescents born in Denmark between 1989 and 2006 and managed until 2012, Danish medical registers captured all inpatient and outpatient diagnoses of eating disorders and autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases. The study population included 930 977 individuals (48.7% girls). Cox proportional hazards regression models and logistic regression were applied to evaluate associations. We found significantly higher hazards of eating disorders for children and adolescents with autoimmune or autoinflammatory diseases: 36% higher hazard for anorexia nervosa, 73% for bulimia nervosa, and 72% for an eating disorder not otherwise specified. The association was particularly strong in boys. Parental autoimmune or autoinflammatory disease history was associated with significantly increased odds for anorexia nervosa (odds ratio [OR] = 1.13, confidence interval [CI] = 1.01-1.25), bulimia nervosa (OR = 1.29; CI = 1.08-1.55) and for an eating disorder not otherwise specified (OR = 1.27; CI = 1.13-1.44). Autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases are associated with increased risk for eating disorders. Ultimately, understanding the role of immune system disturbance for the etiology and pathogenesis of eating disorders could point toward novel treatment targets. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  5. Thyroid Disease and Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alternative Medicine in Thyroid Disease Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Thyroid Disease (CAM) WHAT IS COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE (CAM)? Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) is defined ...

  6. Anti-cytokine autoantibodies in autoimmune diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappellano, Giuseppe; Orilieri, Elisabetta; Woldetsadik, Abiy D; Boggio, Elena; Soluri, Maria F; Comi, Cristoforo; Sblattero, Daniele; Chiocchetti, Annalisa; Dianzani, Umberto

    2012-01-01

    An overview of the current literature is showing that autoantibodies (AutoAbs) against cytokines are produced in several pathological conditions, including autoimmune diseases, but can also be detected in healthy individuals. In autoimmune diseases, these AutoAbs may also be prognostic markers, either negative (such as AutoAbs to IL-8 and IL-1α in rheumatoid arthritis) or positive (such as AutoAbs to IL-6 in systemic sclerosis and those to osteopontin in rheumatoid arthritis). They may have neutralizing activity and influence the course of the physiological and pathological immune responses. High levels of AutoAbs against cytokines may even lead to immunodeficiency, such as those to IL-17 in autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type I or those to IFN-γ in mycobacterial infections. Their role in human therapy may be exploited not only through passive immunization but also through vaccination, which may improve the costs for long lasting treatments of autoimmune diseases. Detection and quantification of these AutoAbs can be profoundly influenced by the technique used and standardization of these methods is needed to increase the value of their analysis. PMID:23885320

  7. Long-Term Follow-Up of a Child with Autoimmune Thyroiditis and Recurrent Hyperthyroidism in the Absence of TSH Receptor Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Dunne

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hashitoxicosis is an initial, transient, hyperthyroid phase that rarely affects patients with Hashimoto thyroiditis. We present here an unusual case of a child with Hashimoto thyroiditis and recurrent hyperthyroidism. A 4 yr 6/12 old male was diagnosed by us with autoimmune subclinical hypothyroidism (normal free T4, slightly elevated TSH, and elevated TG antibody titer. Two years and 6/12 later he experienced increased appetite and poor weight gain; a laboratory evaluation revealed suppressed TSH, elevated free T4, and normal TSI titer. In addition, an I123 thyroid uptake was borderline-low. A month later, the free T4 had normalized. After remaining asymptomatic for 3 years, the patient presented again with increased appetite, and he was found with low TSH and high free T4. Within the following 3 months, his free T4 and TSH normalized. At his most recent evaluation, his TSH was normal and the free T4 was borderline-high; the TG antibody titer was still elevated and the TSI titer was negative. To our knowledge, this is the first patient reported with Hashimoto thyroiditis and recurrent hyperthyroidism. This case exemplifies the variability of the manifestations and natural history of Hashimoto thyroiditis and supports the need for a long-term evaluation of patients with autoimmune thyroid disease.

  8. Characteristics of mouse adipose tissue-derived stem cells and therapeutic comparisons between syngeneic and allogeneic adipose tissue-derived stem cell transplantation in experimental autoimmune thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eun Wha; Shin, Il Seob; Park, So Young; Yoon, Eun Ji; Kang, Sung Keun; Ra, Jeong Chan; Hong, Sung Hwa

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we found that the intravenous administration of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells was a promising therapeutic option for autoimmune thyroiditis even when the cells were transplanted into a xenogeneic model without an immunosuppressant. Therefore, we explored the comparison between the therapeutic effects of syngeneic and allogeneic adipose tissue-derived stem cells on an experimental autoimmune thyroiditis mouse model. Experimental autoimmune thyroiditis was induced in C57BL/6 mice by immunization with porcine thyroglobulin. Adipose tissue-derived stem cells derived from C57BL/6 mice (syngeneic) or BALB/c mice (allogeneic) or saline as a vehicle control were administered intravenously four times weekly. Blood and tissue samples were collected 1 week after the last transplantation. Adipose tissue-derived stem cells from mice were able to differentiate into multiple lineages in vitro; however, mouse adipose tissue-derived stem cells did not have immunophenotypes identical to those from humans. Syngeneic and allogeneic administrations of adipose tissue-derived stem cells reduced thyroglobulin autoantibodies and the inflammatory immune response, protected against lymphocyte infiltration into the thyroid, and restored the Th1/Th2 balance without any adverse effects. However, different humoral immune responses were observed for infused cells from different stem cell sources. The strongest humoral immune response was induced by xenogeneic transplantation, followed by allogeneic and syngeneic administration, in that order. The stem cells were mostly found in the spleen, not the thyroid. This migration might be because the stem cells primarily function in systemic immune modulation, due to being given prior to disease induction. In this study, we confirmed that there were equal effects of adipose tissue-derived stem cells in treating autoimmune thyroiditis between syngeneic and allogeneic transplantations.

  9. [Membranous nephropathy associated to autoimmune thyroiditis, chronic pancreatitis and suprarrenal insufficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino, J L; Fernández Lucas, M; Teruel, J L; Valer, P; Moreira, V; Arambarri, M; Ortuño, J

    2004-01-01

    A 33 year old female was admitted to the hospital to study aedema and bocio, A nephrotic syndrome was diagnosed and the renal biopsy demonstrated membranous glomerulonephritis, stage II. She was also diagnosed of Hashimoto's autoinmmune thyroiditis: TSH (41.5 uUl/ml), T4 (0.07 ng/dl), antithyroglobuline (1/2560) and antimicrosome (1/6400). Four year latter she was diagnosed of autoinmmune pancreatitis, without evidence of diabetes mellitus or exocrine pancreatic insufficiency. Eight years latter she was diagnosed of primary autoimmune suprarrenal insufficiency: basal cortisol: 2.7 mcg/dl, post ACTH estimulated cortisol: 5.6 mcg/dl, antinuclear antibody (1/160) and antiparietal (1/320). We present a pluriglandular autoimmune syndrome with membranous glomerulonephritis, thyroiditis, pancreatitis and suprarrenal insufficiency. To the best of our knowledge this complex syndrome has not been previously described.

  10. The new era of autoimmune disease research

    OpenAIRE

    Koike, Takao

    2011-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies have advanced our understanding of genetic factors that underlie systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a multifactorial autoimmune disease characterized by various clinical manifestations. SLE also has an environmental component, which can trigger or exacerbate the disease. Despite extensive efforts aimed at elucidating the cellular and biological abnormalities that arise in the immune system of patients with SLE, its pathology remains unclear. Lee and col...

  11. Population Risk Factors in the Genesis of Bone Metabolism Didorders in Patients with Autoimmune Thyroiditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.V. Pankiv

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents population risk factors involved in the genesis of bone metabolism disorders in patients with autoimmune thyroiditis (AIT. The results of the study of bone mineral density in patients with AIT are provided. The importance of population risk factors (female sex, menopause in women, weight deficit, age in the genesis of osteopenia and/or osteoporosis in patients with AIT has been studied.

  12. Increased prevalence of autoimmune disease in patients with unilateral compared with bilateral moyamoya disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian-Bin; Liu, Yi; Zhou, Liang-Xue; Sun, Hong; He, Min; You, Chao

    2016-05-01

    OBJECT This study explored whether there were differences between the autoimmune disease prevalence rates in unilateral and bilateral moyamoya disease (MMD). METHODS The authors performed a retrospective review of data obtained from the medical records of their hospital, analyzing and comparing the clinical characteristics and prevalence rates of all autoimmune diseases that were associated with unilateral and bilateral MMD in their hospital from January 1995 to October 2014. RESULTS Three hundred sixteen patients with bilateral MMD and 68 with unilateral MMD were identified. The results indicated that patients with unilateral MMD were more likely to be female than were patients with bilateral MMD (67.6% vs 51.3%, p = 0.014, odds ratio [OR] 1.99). Overall, non-autoimmune comorbidities tended to be more prevalent in the unilateral MMD cases than in the bilateral MMD cases (17.6% vs 9.8%, p = 0.063, OR 1.97, chi-square test). Autoimmune thyroid disease and other autoimmune diseases also tended to be more prevalent in the unilateral MMD cases than in the bilateral MMD cases (19.1% vs 10.8%, p = 0.056, OR 1.96 and 8.8% vs 3.5%, p = 0.092, OR 2.77, respectively, chi-square test). The overall autoimmune disease prevalence in the unilateral MMD cases was significantly higher than in the bilateral MMD cases (26.5% vs 13.6%, p = 0.008, OR 2.29, 95% CI 1.22-4.28, chi-square test). Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that autoimmune disease was more likely to be associated with unilateral than with bilateral MMD (p = 0.039, OR 10.91, 95% CI 1.13-105.25). CONCLUSIONS This study indicated a higher overall autoimmune disease prevalence in unilateral than in bilateral MMD. Unilateral MMD may be more associated with autoimmune disease than bilateral MMD. Different pathogenetic mechanisms may underlie moyamoya vessel formation in unilateral and bilateral MMD.

  13. Resilience in women with autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Manuel; Rodriguez, Yhojan; Pacheco, Yovana; Zapata, Elizabeth; Monsalve, Diana M; Mantilla, Rubén D; Rodríguez-Jimenez, Monica; Ramírez-Santana, Carolina; Molano-González, Nicolás; Anaya, Juan-Manuel

    2017-12-28

    To evaluate the relationship between resilience and clinical outcomes in patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases. Focus groups, individual interviews, and chart reviews were done to collect data on 188 women with autoimmune rheumatic diseases, namely rheumatoid arthritis (n=51), systemic lupus erythematosus (n=70), systemic sclerosis (n=35), and Sjögren's syndrome (n=32). Demographic, clinical, and laboratory variables were assessed including disease activity by patient reported outcomes. Resilience was evaluated by using the Brief Resilience Scale. Bivariate, multiple linear regression, and classification and regression trees were used to analyse data. Resilience was influenced by age, duration of disease, and socioeconomic status. Lower resilience scores were observed in younger patients (50years) had higher resilience scores regardless of socioeconomic status. There was no influence of disease activity on resilience. A particular behaviour was observed in systemic sclerosis in which patients with high socioeconomic status and regular physical activity had higher resilience scores. Resilience in patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases is a continuum process influenced by age and socioeconomic status. The ways in which these variables along with exercise influence resilience deserve further investigation. Copyright © 2017 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Unusual pediatric co-morbility: autoimmune thyroiditis and cortico-resistant nephrotic syndrome in a 6-month-old Italian patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urbano Flavia

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report on a case of autoimmune thyroiditis in a 6-month-old patient with cortico-resistant nephrotic syndrome. Normal serum levels of thyroid hormons and thyroid-stimulating hormone were detected with high titers of circulant antithyroid antibodies and a dysomogeneous ultrasound appearance of the gland, typical of autoimmune thyroiditis. The research of maternal thyroid antibodies was negative. This is the first case of autoimmune thyroiditis found in such a young patient with pre-existing nephrotic syndrome ever described in literature. This association is random because nephrotic syndrome does not have an autoimmune pathogenesis and the genes involved in autoimmune thyroiditis are not related to those of nephrotic syndrome.

  15. Robotic Surgery for Thyroid Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jandee; Chung, Woong Youn

    2013-01-01

    Robotic surgery is an innovation in thyroid surgery that may compensate for the drawbacks of conventional endoscopic surgery. A surgical robot provides strong advantages, including three-dimensional imaging, motion scaling, tremor elimination, and additional degrees of freedom. We review here recent adaptations, experience and applications of robotics in thyroid surgery. Robotic thyroid surgeries include thyroid lobectomy, total thyroidectomy, central compartment neck dissection, and radical ...

  16. Thyroid Autoimmunity is Associated with Decreased Cytotoxicity T Cells in Women with Repeated Implantation Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunyu Huang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid autoimmunity (TAI, which is defined as the presence of autoantibodies against thyroid peroxidase (TPO and/or thyroglobulin (TG, is related to repeated implantation failure (RIF. It is reported that TAI was involved in reproductive failure not only through leading thyroid function abnormality, but it can also be accompanied with immune imbalance. Therefore, this study was designed to investigate the association of thyroid function, immune status and TAI in women with RIF. Blood samples were drawn from 72 women with RIF to evaluate the prevalence of TAI, the thyroid function, the absolute numbers and percentages of lymphocytes. The prevalence of thyroid function abnormality in RIF women with TAI was not significantly different from that in RIF women without TAI (c2 = 0.484, p > 0.05. The absolute number and percentage of T cells, T helper (Th cells, B cells and natural killer (NK cells were not significantly different in RIF women with TAI compared to those without TAI (all p > 0.05. The percentage of T cytotoxicity (Tc cells was significantly decreased in RIF women with TAI compared to those without TAI (p < 0.05. Meanwhile, Th/Tc ratio was significantly increased (p < 0.05. These results indicated that the decreased Tc percentage and increased Th/Tc ratio may be another influential factor of adverse pregnancy outcomes in RIF women with TAI.

  17. Effect of sodium selenite on thyroid gland functioning and efficacy of chemotherapy in tuberculosis patients with a concomitant diabetes mellitus and autoimmune thyroiditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.L. Matveyeva

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In 40 tuberculosis patients with diabetes mellitus and autoimmune thyroiditis ultrasonic research of thyroid structure and measurement of levels of free thyroxine, thyroid stimulating hormone, antibodies to thyroglobulin and peroxidase and selenium in the serum of blood were conducted by immune-enzyme method at the beginning and at the end of the phase of intensive chemotherapy depending on the prescribing of sodium selenite. Efficacy of antituberculosis chemotherapy was estimated by general clinical, bacteriological and X-ray criteria. Autoimmune thyroiditis with the phenomena of subclinical hypothyroidism is diagnosed for all investigational persons. Prescribing of sodium selenite during the phase of intensive chemotherapy promotes the recovery of thyroid function. Rates of intoxication symptoms elimination, abacillation reduction and healing of the cavities at the end of intensive phase of chemotherapy were for certain higher in the group of patients with prescribing of sodium selenite.

  18. [Glycosylation of autoantibodies in autoimmunes diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulabchand, R; Batteux, F; Guilpain, P

    2013-12-01

    Protein glycosylation is one of the most common post-translational modifications, involved in the well described protein biosynthesis process. Protein glycosylation seems to play a major role in the pathogenesis of auto-immune diseases. Herein are described the main alterations of autoantibody glycosylation associated with autoimmunes diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, IgA glomerulonephritis, Schoenlein-Henoch purpura, Sjögren's syndrome, systemic scleroderma, systemic lupus erythematosus, myasthenia gravis and granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener). Molecular identification of altered immunoglobulin glycosylation could lead to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of those diseases, might allow an evaluation of their biological activity and could even be a new therapeutic target. Copyright © 2013 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Management of thyroid eye disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartalena, Luigi; Tanda, Maria Laura; Marcocci, Claudio; Pinchera, Aldo

    2002-01-01

    Thyroid eye disease (TED) is the most frequent extrathyroidal manifestation of Graves' disease. In most instances it is mild and non-progressive, but in 3%-5% of cases it is severe. Non-severe TED requires only supportive measures, such as eye ointments, sunglasses and prisms. By contrast, severe TED requires aggressive treatment, either medical (high-dose glucocorticoids, orbital radiotherapy) or surgical (orbital decompression). The choice of treatment relies on the assessment of both TED severity and activity. Removal of controllable risk factors, especially cigarette smoking, is important to improve the course and the therapeutic outcome. A coordinated approach to the treatment of hyperthyroidism and TED is also required. Novel promising treatments, to be verified in large series of patients, include somatostatin analogues and cytokine antagonists. (orig.)

  20. Study of the immune response to thyroglobulin through a model of experimental autoimmune thyroiditis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos Castro, M. dos.

    1981-01-01

    The cellular and humoral immune response to thyroglobulin of different species was studied in guinea pigs. The experiments described suggested that the immune system can be activated against self-determinants. Human and pork thyroglobulin were able to induce the experimental thyroiditis as well as some immune responses, such as in vitro proliferative response, delayed hypersensitivity and antibodies. Although guinea pig thyroglobulin was unable to induce specific T-lymphocyte proliferation in vitro, delayed hypersensitivity response and antibodies, it was very efficient in inducing the autoimmune thyroiditis. On the contrary, bovine thyroglobulin did not induce experimental autoimmune thyroiditis despite producing good responses as determined by similar in vitro proliferative response, delayed hypersensitivity and on the humoral level. These results suggest that the assays utilised were not able to evaluate the relevant immune response to genesis of the thyroiditis. The determinant selection mechanisms operating in these immune responses are probably selecting determinants not responsible for self-recognition in vivo. It was suggested that the macrophage could be the cell responsible for the presentation of these determinants to the lymphocyte in an immunogenic form. (Author) [pt

  1. Immunofluorescence of Autoimmune Bullous Diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diercks, Gilles F; Pas, Hendri H; Jonkman, Marcel F

    Autoimmmune bullous diseases of skin and mucosa are uncommon, disabling, and potentially lethal diseases. For a quick and reliable diagnosis immunofluorescence is essential. This article describes two variants of immunofluorescence. The direct method uses a skin or mucosal biopsy of the patient to

  2. Autoimmune diseases involving skin and intestinal mucosa are more frequent in adolescents and young adults suffering from atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipriani, Francesca; Marzatico, Alice; Ricci, Giampaolo

    2017-12-01

    Evidence has emerged about the relationship between atopic dermatitis (AD) and autoimmune diseases, but the underlying mechanism of this association is complex and still unclear. Recent epidemiological data from the published work suggest a positive correlation. The aim of this review is to analyze the frequency of co-occurrence of AD and autoimmune diseases. Our systematic review included 22 articles from PubMed describing the reciprocal association between AD and autoimmune diseases. Although not all the studies achieved statistically significant results, patients suffering from autoimmune diseases involving skin and intestinal mucosa, such as vitiligo, alopecia areata, celiac disease and inflammatory bowel diseases, showed a higher risk to have AD as comorbidity. In contrast, patients with rheumatological autoimmune disorders did not show a significant correlation with AD. By analyzing the occurrence of autoimmune disorders in patients with AD, we confirmed a positive correlation between AD and autoimmune diseases involving skin and intestinal mucosa, but also with systemic lupus erythematosus, while the association between AD and type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroiditis and rheumatoid arthritis showed conflicting results. Further investigations are need to explain the mechanism underlying the observed comorbidity between AD and autoimmune diseases and to develop targeted prevention strategies and treatment. © 2017 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  3. liver cirrhosis from autoimmune hepatitis in a nigerian woman

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    like autoimmune thyroiditis, celiac disease and ulcerative colitis, with about 25% having cirrhosis at ... to immunosuppressive therapy. Keywords: Autoimmune hepatitis, Autoimmune liver disease, Chronic liver disease, Nigeria ... who is also exposed to environmental triggering factors.2,5,8 Subsequently, the autoimmune.

  4. Alcoholic Cirrhosis Increases Risk for Autoimmune Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbæk, Lisbet; Vilstrup, Hendrik; Deleuran, Bent

    2015-01-01

    IRR, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.26-1.92), celiac disease (aIRR, 5.12; 95% CI, 2.58-10.16), pernicious anemia (aIRR, 2.35; 95% CI, 1.50-3.68), and psoriasis (aIRR, 4.06; 95% CI, 3.32-4.97). There was no increase in the incidence rate for rheumatoid arthritis (aIRR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.69-1.15); the incidence rate......BACKGROUND & AIMS: Alcoholic cirrhosis is associated with hyperactivation and dysregulation of the immune system. In addition to its ability to increase risk for infections, it also may increase the risk for autoimmune diseases. We studied the incidence of autoimmune diseases among patients...... (controls) of the same sex and age. The incidence rates of various autoimmune diseases were compared between patients with cirrhosis and controls and adjusted for the number of hospitalizations in the previous year (a marker for the frequency of clinical examination). RESULTS: Of the 24,679 patients...

  5. Experimental models of autoimmune inflammatory ocular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Gasparin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Ocular inflammation is one of the leading causes of blindness and loss of vision. Human uveitis is a complex and heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by inflammation of intraocular tissues. The eye may be the only organ involved, or uveitis may be part of a systemic disease. A significant number of cases are of unknown etiology and are labeled idiopathic. Animal models have been developed to the study of the physiopathogenesis of autoimmune uveitis due to the difficulty in obtaining human eye inflamed tissues for experiments. Most of those models are induced by injection of specific photoreceptors proteins (e.g., S-antigen, interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein, rhodopsin, recoverin, phosducin. Non-retinal antigens, including melanin-associated proteins and myelin basic protein, are also good inducers of uveitis in animals. Understanding the basic mechanisms and pathogenesis of autoimmune ocular diseases are essential for the development of new treatment approaches and therapeutic agents. The present review describes the main experimental models of autoimmune ocular inflammatory diseases.

  6. Association of schizophrenia and autoimmune diseases: linkage of Danish national registers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eaton, William W.; Byrne, Majella; Ewald, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Individuals with schizophrenia and their relatives tend to have either higher or lower than expected prevalences of autoimmune disorders, especially rheumatoid arthritis, celiac disease, autoimmune thyroid diseases, and type 1 diabetes. The purpose of the study was to estimate...... of schizophrenia patients than among parents of comparison subjects (adjusted incidence rate ratios ranging from 1.3 to 3.8). Thyrotoxicosis, celiac disease, acquired hemolytic anemia, interstitial cystitis, and Sjogren's syndrome had higher prevalence rates among patients with schizophrenia than among comparison...... the association of schizophrenia with these disorders as well as a range of other autoimmune diseases in a single large epidemiologic study. METHOD: The Danish Psychiatric Register, the National Patient Register, and a register with socioeconomic information were linked to form a data file that included all 7...

  7. Neuroelectrophysiological studies on neurological autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin-hong LIU

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The neuroelectrophysiological manifestations of four clinical typical neurological autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis (MS, Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS, myasthenia gravis (MG, and polymyositis and dermatomyositis were reviewed in this paper. The diagnostic value of evoked potentials for multiple sclerosis, nerve conduction studies (NCS for Guillain-Barré syndrome, repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS and single-fiber electromyography (SFEMG for myasthenia gravis, and needle electromyography for polymyositis and dermatomyositis were respectively discussed. This review will help to have comprehensive understanding on electrophysiological examinations and their clinical significance in the diagnosis of neurological autoimmune diseases. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.09.004

  8. Eating disorders, autoimmune, and autoinflammatory disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zerwas, Stephanie; Larsen, Janne Tidselbak; Petersen, Liselotte

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Identifying factors associated with risk for eating disorders is important for clarifying etiology and for enhancing early detection of eating disorders in primary care. We hypothesized that autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases would be associated with eating disorders in children...... and adolescents and that family history of these illnesses would be associated with eating disorders in probands. METHODS: In this large, nationwide, population-based cohort study of all children and adolescents born in Denmark between 1989 and 2006 and managed until 2012, Danish medical registers captured all...... inpatient and outpatient diagnoses of eating disorders and autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases. The study population included 930 977 individuals (48.7% girls). Cox proportional hazards regression models and logistic regression were applied to evaluate associations. RESULTS: We found significantly...

  9. Comparative analysis of HLA II allele and genotype frequency distribution in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and autoimmune thyroiditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Aleksandrovna Repina

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To compare HLA II allele and genotype frequency distribution in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM and autoimmune thyroiditis (AIT with that in isolated T1DM.Materials and Methods. A total of 92 T1DM patients were subdivided into two groups. The first group comprised 54 patients with established AIT comorbidity or elevation of anti-thyroid autoantibodies (ATA. Patients with isolated T1DM (ATA-negative formed the second group. HLA-genotyping was performed by multiprimer PCR set for the three following genes: DRB1, DQA1 and DQВ1.Results. Prevalence of alleles DRB1*01, *03(017, *04, *07, *11 and genotypes 01/03, 01/04, 03/04 tends to be higher among patients with AIT comorbidity. The comorbidity group was also characterized by the trend towards higher prevalence of “marker/marker” and “marker/non-marker” combinations favouring the former variant. Conversely, ATA-negative patients exhibited trend for higher prevalence of “non-marker/non-marker” combination.Conclusion. Statistically insignificant difference between HLA II alleles and genotypes in the two studied groups suggests that primary genetic factors are common in these two diseases. Plausibly, genes other than DRB1, DQA1 and DQВ1 determine the localization of the autoimmune process.

  10. Correlation between serum lead and thyroid diseases: papillary thyroid carcinoma, nodular goiter, and thyroid adenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Li, Xiang; Liu, Jie; Jin, Langping; Yang, Fan; Wang, Junbo; Wang, Ouchen; Gao, Ying

    2017-10-01

    Studies have showed that lead was associated with human health. However, the effects of lead on thyroid functions are inconsistent, and studies based on Chinese population are fragmentary. To evaluate the correlation between lead and thyroid functions of Chinese with different thyroid diseases, we conducted a hospital-based study. Ninety-six papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), 10 nodular goiter (NG), and 7 thyroid adenoma (TA) patients were recruited from the First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, China. Serum triiodothyronine (T3), free triiodothyronine (FT3), free thyroxin (FT4), and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) were evaluated with chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay. Serum lead was assessed with ICP-MASS. Partial correlation was used to explore the correlations of serum lead and thyroid diseases. Compared to PTC, the level of lead was significantly higher in TA, and lower in NG (p lead was negatively correlated with TSH (r s  =  - 0.27, p lead at quartile4 (r s  = 0.61, p lead and FT3 or FT4 in any group. The results suggested that lead might have different etiological roles in these three thyroid diseases.

  11. Autoimmun hypophysitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Therese; Hagen, Claus

    2010-01-01

    during pregnancy or postpartum, but also occurs in males and children. AH is often associated with other autoimmune diseases, most frequently with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The symptoms are caused by enlargement of the pituitary gland and disturbances of the hormone function. Treatment is either...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: Graves disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tomer Y. Cutting edge: the etiology of autoimmune thyroid diseases. Clin Rev Allergy Immunol. 2011 Oct;41(2): ... The search for the genetic contribution to autoimmune thyroid disease: the never ending story? Brief Funct Genomics. 2011 ...

  13. Infections as risk factor for autoimmune diseases - A nationwide study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Philip Rising; Kragstrup, Tue Wenzel; Deleuran, Bent Winding

    2016-01-01

    Viruses, bacteria and other infectious pathogens are the major postulated environmental triggers of autoimmunity. In the present nation-wide study we describe the association between infections and 29 autoimmune diseases. We used the Danish Civil Registration System to identify 4.5 million persons...... to the etiology of autoimmune diseases together with genetic factors....... born between 1945 and 2000. Information on infections and autoimmune diseases was obtained from the Danish Hospital Register. The cohort was followed from 1977 to 2012. Incidence rate ratios for developing an autoimmune disease were estimated using poisson regression. We found an association between...

  14. Clinical implications of shared genetics and pathogenesis in autoimmune diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhernakova, Alexandra; Withoff, Sebo; Wijmenga, Cisca

    2013-01-01

    Many endocrine diseases, including type 1 diabetes mellitus, Graves disease, Addison disease and Hashimoto disease, originate as an autoimmune reaction that affects disease-specific target organs. These autoimmune diseases are characterized by the development of specific autoantibodies and by the

  15. Infections as risk factor for autoimmune diseases - A nationwide study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Philip Rising; Kragstrup, Tue Wenzel; Deleuran, Bent Winding; Benros, Michael Eriksen

    2016-11-01

    Viruses, bacteria and other infectious pathogens are the major postulated environmental triggers of autoimmunity. In the present nation-wide study we describe the association between infections and 29 autoimmune diseases. We used the Danish Civil Registration System to identify 4.5 million persons born between 1945 and 2000. Information on infections and autoimmune diseases was obtained from the Danish Hospital Register. The cohort was followed from 1977 to 2012. Incidence rate ratios for developing an autoimmune disease were estimated using poisson regression. We found an association between hospital admission for an infection and 29 autoimmune diseases. This study shows that infections are risk factors for a broad spectrum of autoimmune diseases in a dose-response and temporal manner, in agreement with the hypothesis that infections are an environmental risk factor contributing to the etiology of autoimmune diseases together with genetic factors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Impaired Fertility Associated with Subclinical Hypothyroidism and Thyroid Autoimmunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldthusen, Anne-Dorthe; Pedersen, Palle L; Larsen, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to estimate the significance of TSH, thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPOAb), and mild (subclinical) hypothyroidism in women from The Danish General Suburban Population Study (GESUS) on the number of children born, the number of pregnancies, and the number...... of spontaneous abortions. METHODS: Retrospective cross sectional study of 11254 women participating in GESUS. Data included biochemical measurements and a self-administrated questionnaire. RESULTS: 6.7% had mild (subclinical) hypothyroidism and 9.4% prevalent hypothyroidism. In women with mild hypothyroidism...... with spontaneous abortions. Mild (subclinical) hypothyroidism was associated with a risk of not having children and a risk of not getting pregnant in age-adjusted and multiadjusted models. Prevalent hypothyroidism was not associated with the number of children born, the number of pregnancies, or spontaneous...

  17. Thyroid Disorders and Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Mohamedali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid hormones play a very important role regulating metabolism, development, protein synthesis, and influencing other hormone functions. The two main hormones produced by the thyroid are triiodothyronine (T3 and thyroxine (T4. These hormones can also have significant impact on kidney disease so it is important to consider the physiological association of thyroid dysfunction in relation to chronic kidney disease (CKD. CKD has been known to affect the pituitary-thyroid axis and the peripheral metabolism of thyroid hormones. Low T3 levels are the most common laboratory finding followed by subclinical hypothyroidism in CKD patients. Hyperthyroidism is usually not associated with CKD but has been known to accelerate it. One of the most important links between thyroid disorders and CKD is uremia. Patients who are appropriately treated for thyroid disease have a less chance of developing renal dysfunction. Clinicians need to be very careful in treating patients with low T3 levels who also have an elevation in TSH, as this can lead to a negative nitrogen balance. Thus, clinicians should be well educated on the role of thyroid hormones in relation to CKD so that proper treatment can be delivered to the patient.

  18. Thyroid-specific questions on work ability showed known-groups validity among Danes with thyroid diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nexo, Mette Andersen; Watt, Torquil; Bonnema, Steen Joop; Hegedüs, Laszlo; Rasmussen, Åse Krogh; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Bjorner, Jakob Bue

    2015-07-01

    We aimed to identify the best approach to work ability assessment in patients with thyroid disease by evaluating the factor structure, measurement equivalence, known-groups validity, and predictive validity of a broad set of work ability items. Based on the literature and interviews with thyroid patients, 24 work ability items were selected from previous questionnaires, revised, or developed anew. Items were tested among 632 patients with thyroid disease (non-toxic goiter, toxic nodular goiter, Graves' disease (with or without orbitopathy), autoimmune hypothyroidism, and other thyroid diseases), 391 of which had participated in a study 5 years previously. Responses to select items were compared to general population data. We used confirmatory factor analyses for categorical data, logistic regression analyses and tests of differential item function, and head-to-head comparisons of relative validity in distinguishing known groups. Although all work ability items loaded on a common factor, the optimal factor solution included five factors: role physical, role emotional, thyroid-specific limitations, work limitations (without disease attribution), and work performance. The scale on thyroid-specific limitations showed the most power in distinguishing clinical groups and time since diagnosis. A global single item proved useful for comparisons with the general population, and a thyroid-specific item predicted labor market exclusion within the next 5 years (OR 5.0, 95 % CI 2.7-9.1). Items on work limitations with attribution to thyroid disease were most effective in detecting impact on work ability and showed good predictive validity. Generic work ability items remain useful for general population comparisons.

  19. Insufficient documentation for clinical efficacy of selenium supplementation in chronic autoimmune thyroiditis, based on a systematic review and meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Kristian Hillert; Wichman, Johanna Eva Märta; Bonnema, Steen Joop

    2017-01-01

    By a systematic review and meta-analysis to investigate clinically relevant effects of selenium supplementation in patients with chronic autoimmune thyroiditis. Controlled trials in adults (≥18 years) with autoimmune thyroiditis, comparing selenium with or without levothyroxine substitution, vers...... or health-related quality of life, are warranted before determining the relevance of selenium supplementation in autoimmune thyroiditis.......By a systematic review and meta-analysis to investigate clinically relevant effects of selenium supplementation in patients with chronic autoimmune thyroiditis. Controlled trials in adults (≥18 years) with autoimmune thyroiditis, comparing selenium with or without levothyroxine substitution, versus......, or improvements in health-related quality of life or thyroid echogenicity (ultrasound), between levothyroxine substitution-untreated patients assigned to selenium supplementation or placebo. Three trials found some improvement in wellbeing in patients receiving levothyroxine substitution, but could...

  20. Radioiodine treatment for malignant thyroid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, Gertrud

    2006-01-01

    Radioiodine treatment for thyroid disease has been given for half a decade in Sweden. The most common indication for treatment is hyperthyroidism, when iodine uptake is high. The situation in which radioiodine treatment is used in thyroid cancer is less favourable and measures therefore have to be taken to optimize the treatment. Treatment should be performed early in the course of the disease to achieve the highest possible differentiation. Before treatment the iodine and goitrogen intake should be kept low. Stimulation of the thyrocytes by thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) should be high. It is conventionally achieved by thyroid hormone withdrawal rendering the patient hypothyroid, or by the recently available recombinant human TSH (rhTSH) which can be recommended for ablation of the thyroid remnant after thyroidectomy and for treatment of metastases in fragile patients unable to undergo hypothyroidism. Finally, stunning - the negative effect of a prior test dose from radioactive iodine - should be avoided

  1. Ionizing radiation and autoimmunity: Induction of autoimmune disease in mice by high dose fractionated total lymphoid irradiation and its prevention by inoculating normal T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakaguchi, N.; Sakaguchi, S.; Miyai, K.

    1992-01-01

    Ionizing radiation can functionally alter the immune system and break self-tolerance. High dose (42.5 Gy), fractionated (2.5 Gy 17 times) total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) on mice caused various organ-specific autoimmune diseases, such as gastritis, thyroiditis, and orchitis, depending on the radiation dosages, the extent of lymphoid irradiation, and the genetic background of the mouse strains. Radiation-induced tissue damage is not the primary cause of the autoimmune disease because irradiation of the target organs alone failed to elicit the autoimmunity and shielding of the organs from irradiation was unable to prevent it. In contrast, irradiation of both the thymus and the peripheral lymphoid organs/tissues was required for efficient induction of autoimmune disease by TLI. TLI eliminated the majority of mature thymocytes and the peripheral T cells for 1 mo, and inoculation of spleen cell, thymocyte, or bone marrow cell suspensions (prepared from syngeneic nonirradiated mice) within 2 wk after TLI effectively prevented the autoimmune development. Depletion of T cells from the inocula abrogated the preventive activity. CD4 + T cells mediated the autoimmune prevention but CD8 + T cells did not. CD4 + T cells also appeared to mediate the TLI-induced autoimmune disease because CD4 + T cells from disease-bearing TLI mice adoptively transferred the autoimmune disease to syngeneic naive mice. Taken together, these results indicate that high dose, fractionated ionizing radiation on the lymphoid organs/tissues can cause autoimmune disease by affecting the T cell immune system, rather than the target self-Ags, presumably by altering T cell-dependent control of self-reactive T cells. 62 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs

  2. How Does Age at Onset Influence the Outcome of Autoimmune Diseases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel J. Amador-Patarroyo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The age at onset refers to the time period at which an individual experiences the first symptoms of a disease. In autoimmune diseases (ADs, these symptoms can be subtle but are very relevant for diagnosis. They can appear during childhood, adulthood or late in life and may vary depending on the age at onset. Variables like mortality and morbidity and the role of genes will be reviewed with a focus on the major autoimmune disorders, namely, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, rheumatoid arthritis (RA, multiple sclerosis (MS, type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D, Sjögren's syndrome, and autoimmune thyroiditis (AITD. Early age at onset is a worst prognostic factor for some ADs (i.e., SLE and T1D, while for others it does not have a significant influence on the course of disease (i.e., SS or no unanimous consensus exists (i.e., RA and MS.

  3. Pregnancy outcomes with thyroxine replacement for subclinical hypothyroidism: Role of thyroid autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthukrishnan Jayaraman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study pregnancy outcomes in relation to thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPOAb status with optimum thyroxine replacement for subclinical hypothyroidism. Materials and Methods: Ninety-eight women with subclinical hypothyroidism were followed up until the end of their pregnancy. TPO antibody status was performed for 59 women (positive 20, negative 39. Levothyroxine was supplemented to maintain TSH between 0.3-3 mIU/l in all patients, irrespective of TPOAb status. Pregnancy outcomes were noted as pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH, antepartum or postpartum hemorrhage, preterm delivery, and spontaneous abortion. Outcomes were compared between 3 groups as per TPO antibody status (positive, negative, and undetermined, which were matched for age and gestational period. Results: Thyroid autoimmunity was noted in 34% of women screened for TPO antibody. A total of 11 adverse pregnancy outcomes were recorded (4 spontaneous abortions, 4 preterm deliveries, 3 PIH with no significant difference between the groups. Conclusion: Adverse pregnancy outcomes were not different in the 3 groups with adequate thyroxine replacement for pregnant women with subclinical hypothyroidism targeting TSH in euthyroid range, irrespective of thyroid autoimmunity status.

  4. Excess iodine promotes apoptosis of thyroid follicular epithelial cells by inducing autophagy suppression and is associated with Hashimoto thyroiditis disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chengcheng; Wu, Fei; Mao, Chaoming; Wang, Xuefeng; Zheng, Tingting; Bu, Ling; Mou, Xiao; Zhou, Yuepeng; Yuan, Guoyue; Wang, Shengjun; Xiao, Yichuan

    2016-12-01

    The incidence of the autoimmune thyroid disease Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) has increased in recent years, and increasing evidence supports the contribution of excess iodine intake to thyroid disease. In this study, we examined the status of autophagy and apoptosis in thyroid tissues obtained from patients with HT, and we determined the effects of excessive iodine on the autophagy and apoptosis of thyroid follicular cells (TFCs) in an attempt to elucidate the effects of excess iodine on HT development. Our results showed decreases in the autophagy-related protein LC3B-II, and increases in caspase-3 were observed in thyroid tissues from HT patients. Interestingly, the suppression of autophagy activity in TFCs was induced by excess iodine in vitro, and this process is mediated through transforming growth factor-β1 downregulation and activation of the Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. In addition, excess iodine induced autophagy suppression and enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and apoptosis of TFCs, which could be rescued by the activation of autophagy. Taken together, our results demonstrated that excess iodine contributed to autophagy suppression and apoptosis of TFCs, which could be important factors predisposing to increased risk of HT development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Interventions in patients with thyroid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sisson, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    Because sodium iodide I 131 was the first radiopharmaceutical available for clinical use, and because thyroid hormonogenesis is dependent on iodide, the earliest tests in nuclear medicine were aimed at the diagnosis of thyroid diseases. Two types of the early thyroid tests required intervention - pharamacologic manipulation of the patient - to express diagnostic information: (1) the suppression test in which thyroid hormone was given, and (2) the stimulation test wherein thyrotropin (TSH) was injected. As happens in the evolution of medical practice, newer procedures replace the old, and both the suppression and stimulation tests of thyroid function now are rarely used; the data sought can usually be obtained by other safer or more accurate procedures. However, a suppression test or a stimulation test may still be of indispensible value in certain patients

  6. Genetic variation associated with cardiovascular risk in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrotti, Pedro P; Aterido, Adrià; Fernández-Nebro, Antonio; Cañete, Juan D; Ferrándiz, Carlos; Tornero, Jesús; Gisbert, Javier P; Domènech, Eugeni; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Benjamín; Gomollón, Fernando; García-Planella, Esther; Fernández, Emilia; Sanmartí, Raimon; Gratacós, Jordi; Martínez-Taboada, Víctor Manuel; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Luís; Palau, Núria; Tortosa, Raül; Corbeto, Mireia L; Lasanta, María L; Marsal, Sara; Julià, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases have a higher prevalence of cardiovascular events compared to the general population. The objective of this study was to investigate the genetic basis of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in autoimmunity. We analyzed genome-wide genotyping data from 6,485 patients from six autoimmune diseases that are associated with a high socio-economic impact. First, for each disease, we tested the association of established CVD risk loci. Second, we analyzed the association of autoimmune disease susceptibility loci with CVD. Finally, to identify genetic patterns associated with CVD risk, we applied the cross-phenotype meta-analysis approach (CPMA) on the genome-wide data. A total of 17 established CVD risk loci were significantly associated with CVD in the autoimmune patient cohorts. From these, four loci were found to have significantly different genetic effects across autoimmune diseases. Six autoimmune susceptibility loci were also found to be associated with CVD risk. Genome-wide CPMA analysis identified 10 genetic clusters strongly associated with CVD risk across all autoimmune diseases. Two of these clusters are highly enriched in pathways previously associated with autoimmune disease etiology (TNFα and IFNγ cytokine pathways). The results of this study support the presence of specific genetic variation associated with the increase of CVD risk observed in autoimmunity.

  7. Genetic variation associated with cardiovascular risk in autoimmune diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro P Perrotti

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases have a higher prevalence of cardiovascular events compared to the general population. The objective of this study was to investigate the genetic basis of cardiovascular disease (CVD risk in autoimmunity. We analyzed genome-wide genotyping data from 6,485 patients from six autoimmune diseases that are associated with a high socio-economic impact. First, for each disease, we tested the association of established CVD risk loci. Second, we analyzed the association of autoimmune disease susceptibility loci with CVD. Finally, to identify genetic patterns associated with CVD risk, we applied the cross-phenotype meta-analysis approach (CPMA on the genome-wide data. A total of 17 established CVD risk loci were significantly associated with CVD in the autoimmune patient cohorts. From these, four loci were found to have significantly different genetic effects across autoimmune diseases. Six autoimmune susceptibility loci were also found to be associated with CVD risk. Genome-wide CPMA analysis identified 10 genetic clusters strongly associated with CVD risk across all autoimmune diseases. Two of these clusters are highly enriched in pathways previously associated with autoimmune disease etiology (TNFα and IFNγ cytokine pathways. The results of this study support the presence of specific genetic variation associated with the increase of CVD risk observed in autoimmunity.

  8. Autoimmune Hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with type 1 autoimmune hepatitis commonly have other autoimmune disorders, such as celiac disease, an autoimmune disease in ... 2 can also have any of the above autoimmune disorders. What are the symptoms of autoimmune hepatitis? The ...

  9. EAMJ Jan. Thyroid.indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-01-01

    Jan 1, 2009 ... age-related population because thyroid diseases significantly affect fertility rate and autoimmune thyroid disease tend to remit during pregnancy. (2,4). Numerous hormonal changes and metabolic demands occur in pregnancy, resulting in complex changes in maternal thyroid function, yet normal.

  10. Autoimmune Disease in Children and Adolescents with Psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blegvad, Christoffer; Egeberg, Alexander; Tind Nielsen, Tilde E.

    2017-01-01

    Psoriasis is an immune-mediated inflammatory disease, which, in studies among adults, have been shown to cluster with autoimmune disease. The aim of this cross-sectional register study was to examine possible associations between 9 pre-selected autoimmune diseases and psoriasis in children...... arthritis (adjusted OR 6.61; 2.75-15.87) and vitiligo (adjusted OR 4.76; 1.71-13.20) showed strong associations with psoriasis. In addition to increased risk of selected autoimmune diseases, the presence of psoriasis was associated with increased risk of multiple concurrent autoimmune diseases compared...

  11. Stimulation of Thyroid Function by Human Chorionic Gonadotropin During Pregnancy: A Risk Factor for Thyroid Disease and a Mechanism for Known Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korevaar, Tim I M; de Rijke, Yolanda B; Chaker, Layal; Medici, Marco; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Steegers, Eric A P; Visser, Theo J; Peeters, Robin P

    2017-03-01

    Thyroid autoimmunity is a major risk factor for gestational thyroid disease, and recently various other risk factors have been identified, including maternal age, body mass index (BMI) and parity. Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is an important determinant of gestational thyroid function, yet it is unknown to what extent differences in hCG concentration affect the risk for thyroid disease. We have recently shown that thyroperoxidase antibody positivity impairs the thyroidal response to hCG stimulation, which may suggest that this is a mechanism through which thyroid autoimmunity acts as a risk factor for thyroid disease. The purpose of this study is to determine whether hCG is a risk factor for thyroid disease entities and whether recently identified risk factors for thyroid disease may influence the thyroidal response to hCG stimulation. Human chorionic gonadotropin, thyrotropin (TSH), and free thyroxine (FT4) were measured in 5435 pregnant women participating in a prospective cohort. The association of hCG with thyroid disease entities, and the association of known risk factors with thyroidal response to hCG stimulation were studied using multivariable linear regression models. Higher hCG concentrations were associated with a higher risk of subclinical and overt hyperthyroidism. Lower hCG concentrations were associated with a higher risk of hypothyroxinemia. In contrast, hCG concentrations were not associated with subclinical hypothyroidism. Further analyses showed that in women with hypothyroxinemia, high hCG concentrations still suppressed TSH. However, in women with subclinical hypothyroidism, high hCG concentrations were not associated with higher FT4. Higher BMI, male fetal sex, and maternal parity >2 were associated with a lower thyroidal response to hCG stimulation. Human chorionic gonadotropin is associated with the risk of (subclinical) hyperthyroidism and hypothyroxinemia, but not with the risk of (subclinical) hypothyroidism. Women with

  12. A Case of Autoimmune Polyglandular Syndrome (APS) Type II with Hypothyroidism, Hypoadrenalism, and Celiac Disease - A Rare Combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhotia, Manoj; Pahadia, Hans Raj; Kumar, Harish; Singh, Jagdish; Tak, Sandeep

    2015-04-01

    Autoimmune Polyglandular syndrome (APS) are rare condition characterised by presence of immune dysfunction of two or more endocrine glands and other non-endocrine organs. APS is divided into 2 major subtypes based on age of presentation, pattern of disease combinations and mode of inheritance. APS 1(juvenile) usually manifest in early adolescence or in infancy. It is characterised by multiple endocrinal deficiency with mucocutaneous candidiasis and ectodermal dystrophy. Of the endocrine diseases, hypoparathyroidism form an important component followed by Addison's disease, type 1A diabetes, hypogonadism and thyroid disease. On the other hand APS II usually manifest in 3rd or 4th decade of life with female preponderance. Endocrine diseases commonly include autoimmune thyroid disease (graves or autoimmune thyroiditis), type 1A diabetes, and Addison's disease. Hypoparathyroidism is of rare occurrence and there is no mucocutaneous candidiasis. We report here a case of APS type II in a 29-year-old male who initially presented with hypothyroidism, which was soon followed by Addison's disease. The involvement of thyroid gland preceding the involvement of adrenal is of rare occurrence. The patient also had celiac disease which makes the combination further uncommon.

  13. Selenium Supplementation Significantly Reduces Thyroid Autoantibody Levels in Patients with Chronic Autoimmune Thyroiditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wichman, Johanna Eva Märta; Winther, Kristian Hillert; Bonnema, Steen Joop

    2016-01-01

    3366 records. Controlled trials in adults (≥18 years of age) with AIT, comparing selenium with or without levothyroxine (LT4), versus placebo and/or LT4, were eligible. Assessed outcomes were serum thyroid peroxidase (TPOAb) and thyroglobulin (TgAb) autoantibody levels, and immunomodulatory effects...

  14. Tic disorder probably associated with steroid responsive encephalopathy with autoimmune thyroiditis (SREAT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saygi, Semra; Ozkale, Yasemin; Erol, Ilknur

    2014-10-01

    Steroid responsive encephalopathy with autoimmune thyroiditis (SREAT), a rare disorder in individuals of all age groups, including children, is characterized by high titers of anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies. The present report concerns a previously healthy 12-y-old boy who presented with motor tics. The patient underwent an extensive work-up to identify the underlying etiologies and risk factors predisposing him to tic disorder. Based on the clinical and laboratory results, a diagnosis of SREAT was made. Although some studies have reported associated behavioral and cognitive changes, myoclonus, seizures, pyramidal tract dysfunction, psychosis, and coma. The authors describe a case of tic disorder, probably due to SREAT, as well as its course of treatment.

  15. Autoimmune encephalopathy associated with thyroid autoantibodies as the cause of reversible cognitive impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Dobbin Chow

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We herewith describe a patient with acute confusion, expressive aphasia and generalized seizures. A through workup excluded most causes of encephalopathy. He was, however, found to have TSH = 18.6 MIU/ml, T3reverse = 0.44nmol/L, T4 = 0.8ng/dl and Anti-Thyroid-Peroxidase AB titer >1000 IU/ml. Based on the above findings the patient was diagnosed with Hashimoto's encephalopathy and his mental status showed dramatic improvement (MMS 30/30 with high dose prednisone. Hashimoto's encephalopathy is rare disorder of presumed autoimmune origin characterized by cognitive decline, seizures, neuro-psychiatric symptoms, high titers of Anti-Thyroid-Peroxidase AB, and a positive response to steroids.

  16. Reevaluation of the Thyroid Scan for the Assessment of Pathophysiologic Status of Thyroid Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, In Sook; Nah, Jung Il; Kim, Deog Yoon

    1991-01-01

    To diagnosis and understand the pathophysiologic status of thyroid disease, not only hormonal measurements but also thyroid scan is believed to have a unique role. Especially in the cases of the change of the thyroid function by thyroiditis, it is emphasized that thyroid scan can be helpful in differential diagnosis, Discordant results of thyroid hormone levels and thyroid scan are found in transient hyperthyroidism, or in transient hypothyroidism. We analysed and reevaluated thyroid scan to look at the importance of thyroid scan. The results are summarised as follows: 1) 80%. of hyperthyroid patients had hyperthyroidism increased RAIU with even density, they are compatible with Graves' disease. 2) 2.1% of hyperthyroid patients had normal or decreased RAIU, which are classified as high iodine turn over genuine hyperthyroidism. 3) 8.5% of hyperthyroid patients had markedly decreased RAIU at both 2 hour and 24 hour, whose pathologic processes are suggested to be heterogenous namely subacute thyroiditis, postpartum thyroiditis, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, and pamless thyroiditis. 4) 45% of hypothyroid patients had increased 24 hr RAIU, 30% of hypothyroid patients were normal, 25%, decreased. In conclusion, thyroid scan should be reevaluated its useful role to asses the pathophysiologic status of thyroid disease. Especially in cases of transient thyrotoxicosis, thyroid scan is essential to diagnose and follow up the disease process.

  17. Role of extracellular vesicles in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turpin, Delphine; Truchetet, Marie-Elise; Faustin, Benjamin; Augusto, Jean-François; Contin-Bordes, Cécile; Brisson, Alain; Blanco, Patrick; Duffau, Pierre

    2016-02-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) consist of exosomes released upon fusion of multivesicular bodies with the cell plasma membrane and microparticles shed directly from the cell membrane of many cell types. EVs can mediate cell-cell communication and are involved in many processes including inflammation, immune signaling, angiogenesis, stress response, senescence, proliferation, and cell differentiation. Accumulating evidence reveals that EVs act in the establishment, maintenance and modulation of autoimmune processes among several others involved in cancer and cardiovascular complications. EVs could also present biomedical applications, as disease biomarkers and therapeutic targets or agents for drug delivery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Autoimmun hypophysitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Therese; Hagen, Claus

    2010-01-01

    during pregnancy or postpartum, but also occurs in males and children. AH is often associated with other autoimmune diseases, most frequently with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The symptoms are caused by enlargement of the pituitary gland and disturbances of the hormone function. Treatment is either......Autoimmune hypophysitis (AH) - often referred to as lymphocytic hypophysitis - is a rare disease that affects the pituitary gland and causes inflammation. The disease enlarges the pituitary gland and the clinical presentations are lack of pituitary function and headaches. AH is mostly seen in women...

  19. Autoimmun hypophysitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Therese; Hagen, Claus

    2010-01-01

    during pregnancy or postpartum, but also occurs in males and children. AH is often associated with other autoimmune diseases, most frequently with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The symptoms are caused by enlargement of the pituitary gland and disturbances of the hormone function. Treatment is either......Autoimmune hypophysitis (AH) - often referred to as lymphocytic hypophysitis - is a rare disease that affects the pituitary gland and causes inflammation. The disease enlarges the pituitary gland and the clinical presentations are lack of pituitary function and headaches. AH is mostly seen in women...... immunosuppressive treatment or surgery....

  20. Imaging B lymphocytes in autoimmune inflammatory diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iodice, V.; Lauri, C.; Capriotti, G.; Lagana', B.; Germano, V.; D’Amelio, R.; Picchianti Diamanti, A.

    2014-01-01

    B cells arise from stem cells precursor and develop through a tightly regulated and selective process that lead to the generation of different B cell populations such as transitional, mature, memory and plasma cells. These B cell subsets can be identified using flow cytometry by the expression of specific surface antigens. The growing knowledge of the pivotal role played by B cells in the development and progression of autoimmune diseases combined with the advances in monoclonal antibody technology, led in the last years to the generation of different biological agents targeting B cells. In this context, nuclear medicine can offer the possibility to use a panel of biologic radiopharmaceuticals for molecular imaging of inflammatory diseases. Radiopharmaceuticals bind to their targets with high affinity and specificity and have an excellent imaging diagnostic potential for the evaluation of disease activity, selection and monitoring of immune therapies. Several molecules have been radiolabelled for the imaging of T lymphocytes whereas, by now, the anti CD20 rituximab is the only biological therapy targeting B cells that demonstrated to be efficiently radiolabelled and used to detect inflammation in autoimmune patients

  1. Autoimmune diseases in the TH17 era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Mesquita Jr.

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A new subtype of CD4+ T lymphocytes characterized by the production of interleukin 17, i.e., TH17 cells, has been recently described. This novel T cell subset is distinct from type 1 and type 2 T helper cells. The major feature of this subpopulation is to generate significant amounts of pro-inflammatory cytokines, therefore appearing to be critically involved in protection against infection caused by extracellular microorganisms, and in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases and allergy. The dynamic balance among subsets of T cells is important for the modulation of several steps of the immune response. Disturbances in this balance may cause a shift from normal immunologic physiology to the development of immune-mediated disorders. In autoimmune diseases, the fine balance between the proportion and degree of activation of the various T lymphocyte subsets can contribute to persistent undesirable inflammatory responses and tissue replacement by fibrosis. This review highlights the importance of TH17 cells in this process by providing an update on the biology of these cells and focusing on their biology and differentiation processes in the context of immune-mediated chronic inflammatory diseases.

  2. [Assessment of endothelial function in autoimmune diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benhamou, Y; Bellien, J; Armengol, G; Gomez, E; Richard, V; Lévesque, H; Joannidès, R

    2014-08-01

    Numerous autoimmune-inflammatory rheumatic diseases have been associated with accelerated atherosclerosis or other types of vasculopathy leading to an increase in cardiovascular disease incidence. In addition to traditional cardiovascular risk factors, endothelial dysfunction is an important early event in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, contributing to plaque initiation and progression. Endothelial dysfunction is characterized by a shift of the actions of the endothelium toward reduced vasodilation, a proinflammatory and a proadhesive state, and prothrombic properties. Therefore, assessment of endothelial dysfunction targets this vascular phenotype using several biological markers as indicators of endothelial dysfunction. Measurements of soluble adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, VCAM-1, E-selectin), pro-thrombotic factors (thrombomodulin, von Willebrand factor, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1) and inflammatory cytokines are most often performed. Regarding the functional assessment of the endothelium, the flow-mediated dilatation of conduit arteries is a non-invasive method widely used in pathophysiological and interventional studies. In this review, we will briefly review the most relevant information upon endothelial dysfunction mechanisms and explorations. We will summarize the similarities and differences in the biological and functional assessments of the endothelium in different autoimmune diseases. Copyright © 2013 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. The MicroRNA-21 in Autoimmune Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaowen; Wan, Xiaochun; Ruan, Qingguo

    2016-06-03

    MicroRNA-21 (miR-21) is an oncomiR and significantly upregulated in a wide range of cancers. It is strongly involved in apoptosis and oncogenesis, since most of its reported targets are tumor suppressors. Recently, miR-21 was found to be correlated with the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases and may play an essential role in regulating autoimmune responses. In particular, miR-21 promotes Th17 cell differentiation, which mediates the development of multiple autoimmune diseases. In this article, we review the current research on the mechanisms that regulate miR-21 expression, the potential of miR-21 as a diagnostic biomarker for autoimmune disease and the mechanisms by which miR-21 promotes the development of autoimmune disease. We also discussed the therapeutic potential of targeting miR-21 in treating patients with autoimmune disease.

  4. Management of Microvascular Complications in Secondary Diabetes Associated with Autoimmune Diseases — Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nemes-Nagy Enikő

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The association of multiple autoimmune diseases may represent the main focus of physicians treating patients with such pathology presenting no comorbidities of different etiology. However, autoimmune diseases and side effects of drugs may lead to development of silent health-threatening diseases that should be identified promptly. We present the case of an elderly, obese, Caucasian female patient suffering of autoimmune thyroiditis, rheumatoid arthritis, and psoriasis, who developed arterial hypertension and insulin-treated secondary diabetes mellitus (due to long-term oral corticotherapy with microvascular end-organ changes. Retinal imaging for capillary anomalies identified mild non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy with apparent diabetic macular edema and hypertensive retinopathy. Laboratory investigations looking for further vascular risk factors revealed zinc deficiency, elevated serum homocysteine levels, and constantly high C-reactive protein concentration. Attention should be payed to the proper investigation of patients with autoimmune diseases, targeting the early diagnosis of microvasculopathies due to autoimmune diseases or possible medication side effects, in order to prevent end-organ damage.

  5. Cardiovascular Disease and Thyroid Function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, Jens; Selmer, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid function has a profound effect on the heart, and both all-cause and cardiovascular mortality rates are increased in hyperthyroidism. New-onset atrial fibrillation carries a prolonged risk for the development of hyperthyroidism, suggesting altered availability of thyroid hormones at the ce......Thyroid function has a profound effect on the heart, and both all-cause and cardiovascular mortality rates are increased in hyperthyroidism. New-onset atrial fibrillation carries a prolonged risk for the development of hyperthyroidism, suggesting altered availability of thyroid hormones...... at the cellular level. Subclinical hyperthyroidism is associated with increased left ventricular mass of the heart, which reverts after obtaining euthyroidism. Mortality and risk of major cardiovascular events are increased. Subclinical hypothyroidism is also associated with subtle changes in the heart, e.g. its...

  6. Evaluation of diffuse thyroid diseases by computed tomography and 123I thyroidal uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurihara, Yoshiko; Imanishi, Yoshimasa; Ehara, Norishige

    1991-01-01

    Understanding the iodine kinetics in the thyroid is useful for the diagnosis of a patient with diffuse thyroid disease. In this study, 9 controls and 50 patients with diffuse thyroid diseases, we evaluated diffuse thyroid diseases with 123 I thyroidal uptake and volume, iodine concentration, and net iodine content measured by computed tomography. There was no significant correlation between volume, iodine concentration, and net iodine content of the thyroid and 123 I thyroidal uptake. The thyroid volume in Graves' and Hashimoto's diseases was significantly larger than that in the control group. The thyroid iodine concentration in Graves' and Hashimoto's diseases was significantly smaller than that in the control group. The thyroid net iodine content in Hashimoto's disease was significantly smaller than that in the control group. Although most of the patients with Graves' disease had more increased radioiodine thyroidal uptake than the control group, there was no significant difference between them in the mean of the thyroid net iodine content. But the variance of net iodine contents in the former was significantly larger than that in the latter. The thyroid net iodine content was very low in all patients with very high thyroglobulin hemaggrugated antibody (TGHA) value although it was nearly normal in some patients with normal TGHA value. It was suggested that iodine concentration and net iodine content might be determined not only by iodine uptake but also by release and/or leakage of iodine compounds from the thyroid, which might depend on some antithyroid antibodies. (author)

  7. Moving towards a molecular taxonomy of autoimmune rheumatic diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barturen, Guillermo; Beretta, Lorenzo; Cervera, Ricard; van Vollenhoven, Ronald; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E.

    2018-01-01

    Autoimmune rheumatic diseases pose many problems that have, in general, already been solved in the field of cancer. The heterogeneity of each disease, the clinical similarities and differences between different autoimmune rheumatic diseases and the large number of patients that remain without a

  8. Thyroid Diseases and Treatment in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aynur Aktaş

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of thyroid disease in pregnancy is important for gestational maternal health, obstetric outcome and, subsequent development of child. Pregnancy has pro­found effects on the regulation of thyroid function, and on thyroidal functional disorders, that need to be recognized, carefully evaluated and correctly managed. In women with normal thyroid function there is an increase in thyroxine (T4 and triiodothyronine (T3 production and inhibition of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH in the first trimester of pregnancy,. In the pregnant woman, elevated thyroxine-binding globulin (TGB and concomitant increases in total T4 and T3 levels plateau at 12-14 weeks of pregnancy, and free T4 measurements slowly decrease. The most frequent thyroid disorder in pregnancy is maternal hy­pothyroidism. It is associated with fetal loss, placental abruptions, preeclampsia, preterm delivery and reduced intellectual function in the offspring. Hyperthyroidism dur­ing pregnancy is relatively uncommon, with a prevalence estimated to range between 0.1% and 1%. The most common cause of hyperthyroidism is Graves disease, as this etiology accounts for 85% of clinical hyperthyroid­ism in pregnancy. Another cause of hyperthyroidism is hyperemesis gravidarum. This is common and requires differentiation from Graves disease. There has been much discussion and many publications on the optimal management of pregnant women who are hyperthyroid or hypothyroid. Despite the lack of consensus organiza­tions, which are based on analyses, support screening in all pregnant women in the first trimester for thyroid disease. In this article, we provide information about the current approaches of thyroid dysfunction in pregnancy. J Clin Exp Invest 2016; 7 (1: 120-124

  9. Diagnosis and Management of Pediatric Autoimmune Liver Disease : ESPGHAN Hepatology Committee Position Statement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina; Vergani, Diego; Baumann, Ulrich; Czubkowski, Piotr; Debray, Dominique; Dezsofi, Antal; Fischler, Björn; Gupte, Girish; Hierro, Loreto; Indolfi, Giuseppe; Jahnel, Jörg; Smets, Françoise; Verkade, Henkjan J; Hadžić, Nedim

    Paediatric autoimmune liver disease is characterised by inflammatory liver histology, circulating autoantibodies and increased levels of IgG, in the absence of a known etiology. Three conditions have a likely autoimmune pathogenesis: autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis

  10. The Epidemiologic Evidence Linking Autoimmune Diseases and Psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benros, Michael E; Eaton, William W; Mortensen, Preben B

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes the epidemiologic evidence linking autoimmune diseases and psychosis. The associations between autoimmune diseases and psychosis have been studied for more than a half century, but research has intensified within the last decades, since psychosis has been associated...... with genetic markers of the immune system and with excess autoreactivity and other immune alterations. A range of psychiatric disorders, including psychosis, have been observed to occur more frequently in some autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus and multiple sclerosis. Many autoimmune......, there is some evidence of associations of psychosis with a family history of autoimmune disorders and vice versa. Additionally, several autoimmune diseases, individually and in aggregate, have been identified as raising the risk for psychotic disorders in longitudinal studies. The associations have been...

  11. Psoriasis is not an autoimmune disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Lionel; Baker, Barbara S; Powles, Anne V; Engstrand, Lars

    2015-04-01

    The concept that psoriasis is an autoimmune disease needs to be questioned. The autoimmune label has been based on molecular mimicry between streptococcal and keratin proteins and the existence of homologous peptides between these proteins. However, it is only peripheral blood CD8, and not CD4, T lymphocytes that respond to the homologous peptides. This ignores the fact that it is CD4 T cells which are necessary to initiate psoriasis. Recent studies on skin bacterial microbiota have found a variety of bacteria in both normal skin and psoriatic lesions. In biopsy specimens, the most common phylum was Firmicutes and the most common genus streptococcus in both psoriasis and normal skin. The innate immune system is activated in psoriasis, and recent genetic findings have shown the majority of susceptibility loci are associated with innate immunity. There is a known clinical relationship between both Crohn's disease (CD) and periodontitis, and psoriasis, and patients with psoriasis share mutations in some innate immunity genes with individuals with CD. It is now accepted that CD is due to a breakdown of immune tolerance (dysbiosis) to bacteria in the intestine. These findings suggest that psoriasis is initiated by an abnormal response to bacteria in the skin due to genetic factors. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Virtual touch tissue quantification (VTQ) in the diagnosis of thyroid nodules with coexistent chronic autoimmune Hashimoto's thyroiditis: A preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Ruijun; Li, Fenghua; Wang, Yan; Ying, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Virtual Touch Tissue Quantification could provide quantitative measurements to estimate tissue stiffness noninvasively. • Severity of Hashimoto's thyroiditis could affect stiffness of extra-nodular thyroid tissue significantly. • Shear wave velocity of malignant nodules significantly higher than that of benign nodules. • Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse imaging is useful in differential diagnosis between malignant/benign thyroid nodules with HT. - Abstract: Objectives: This study aimed at detecting whether Virtual Touch Tissue Quantification (VTQ) could be applied to differentiate between benign and malignant thyroid nodules with chronic autoimmune Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT). Methods: Convenient ultrasound and Virtual Touch Tissue Quantification were performed in 118 patients with 140 thyroid nodules with histology results. The HT group consisted of 46 patients with 58 nodules. The non-HT group consisted of 72 patients with 82 nodules. Results: The stiffness of extra-nodular thyroid tissue could be significantly affected by the severity of chronic autoimmune thyroiditis. The shear wave velocity of thyroid benign nodules and malignant nodules did not significantly differ in the HT group as compared with the non-HT group (benign nodules: 2.13 ± 0.32 m/s vs 1.98 ± 0.48 m/s, P = 0.122; malignant nodules: 3.32 ± 0.77 m/s vs 3.30 ± 0.74 m/s, P = 0.894). In two groups, the shear wave velocity of malignant nodules is significantly higher than that of benign nodules (HT group: 3.32 ± 0.77 m/s vs 2.13 ± 0.32 m/s; non-HT group: 3.30 ± 0.74 m/s vs 1.98 ± 0.48 m/s, P < 0.001). The best cutoff point for shear wave velocity between malignant and benign thyroid nodules was 2.75 m/s. Conclusions: Virtual Touch Tissue Quantification technology could be performed in the differential diagnosis between malignant thyroid nodules and benign thyroid nodules independently from the coexistence of chronic autoimmune thyroiditis

  13. Shaking Out Clues to Autoimmune Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... into how an immune cell involved in several autoimmune disorders is regulated. Among their findings was a potential ... but they’ve also been linked with several autoimmune disorders. Th17 cells, along with other types of helper ...

  14. Targeting thyroid diseases with TSH receptor analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galofré, Juan C; Chacón, Ana M; Latif, Rauf

    2013-12-01

    The thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor (TSHR) is a major regulator of thyroid function and growth, and is the key antigen in several pathological conditions including hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism, and thyroid tumors. Various effective treatment strategies are currently available for many of these clinical conditions such as antithyroid drugs or radioiodine therapy, but they are not devoid of side effects. In addition, treatment of complications of Graves' disease such as Graves' ophthalmopathy is often difficult and unsatisfactory using current methods. Recent advances in basic research on both in vitro and in vivo models have suggested that TSH analogs could be used for diagnosis and treatment of some of the thyroid diseases. The advent of high-throughput screening methods has resulted in a group of TSH analogs called small molecules, which have the potential to be developed as promising drugs. Small molecules are low molecular weight compounds with agonist, antagonist and, in some cases, inverse agonist activity on TSHR. This short review will focus on current advances in development of TSH analogs and their potential clinical applications. Rapid advances in this field may lead to the conduct of clinical trials of small molecules related to TSHR for the management of Graves' disease, thyroid cancer, and thyroid-related osteoporosis in the coming years. Copyright © 2012 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. Interaction of pregnancy and autoimmune rheumatic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Østensen, Monika; Villiger, Peter M; Förger, Frauke

    2012-05-01

    During pregnancy, the fetus represents a natural allograft that is not normally rejected. While the maternal immune system retains the ability to respond to foreign antigens, tolerance mechanisms are up-regulated to protect the fetus from immunologic attacks by the mother. The profound immunologic adaptations during and after pregnancy do influence maternal autoimmune rheumatic diseases in several ways. One is triggering the onset of a rheumatic disease in the post partum period, the other influencing disease activity of established rheumatic disease. The review will discuss the mechanisms of increased susceptibility of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in the first year post partum with a specific emphasis on the role of fetal cells or antigens persisting in the maternal circulation (so called microchimerism). Furthermore, the different influences of pregnancy on established rheumatic diseases will be highlighted. A marked beneficial effect of pregnancy is observed on RA whereas several other rheumatic diseases as ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) show either no particular effect or an aggravation of symptoms during pregnancy. Differences emerging in regard to modulation of disease symptoms during pregnancy seem related to response to hormones, the type of cytokine profile and immune response prevailing as well as further downstream interactions of molecular pathways that are important in disease pathogenesis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Pharmacometabolomics-aided Pharmacogenomics in Autoimmune Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodora Katsila

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Inter-individual variability has been a major hurdle to optimize disease management. Precision medicine holds promise for improving health and healthcare via tailor-made therapeutic strategies. Herein, we outline the paradigm of “pharmacometabolomics-aided pharmacogenomics” in autoimmune diseases. We envisage merging pharmacometabolomic and pharmacogenomic data (to address the interplay of genomic and environmental influences with information technologies to facilitate data analysis as well as sense- and decision-making on the basis of synergy between artificial and human intelligence. Humans can detect patterns, which computer algorithms may fail to do so, whereas data-intensive and cognitively complex settings and processes limit human ability. We propose that better-informed, rapid and cost-effective omics studies need the implementation of holistic and multidisciplinary approaches.

  17. Endocrine autoimmune diseases and female infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Aritro; Kushnir, Vitaly A; Barad, David H; Gleicher, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    An increasing body of evidence suggests that immune-mediated processes affect female reproductive success at multiple levels. Crosstalk between endocrine and immune systems regulates a large number of biological processes that affect target tissues, and this crosstalk involves gene expression, cytokine and/or lymphokine release and hormone action. In addition, endocrine-immune interactions have a major role in the implantation process of the fetal (paternally derived) semi-allograft, which requires a reprogramming process of the maternal immune system from rejection to temporary tolerance for the length of gestation. Usually, the female immune system is supportive of all of these processes and, therefore, facilitates reproductive success. Abnormalities of the female immune system, including autoimmunity, potentially interfere at multiple levels. The relevance of the immune system to female infertility is increasingly recognized by investigators, but clinically is often not adequately considered and is, therefore, underestimated. This Review summarizes the effect of individual autoimmune endocrine diseases on female fertility, and points towards selected developments expected in the near future.

  18. Subclinical Hypothyroidism and Thyroid Autoimmunity Are Not Associated With Fecundity, Pregnancy Loss, or Live Birth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plowden, Torie C.; Schisterman, Enrique F.; Sjaarda, Lindsey A.; Zarek, Shvetha M.; Perkins, Neil J.; Silver, Robert; Galai, Noya; DeCherney, Alan H.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Prior studies examining associations between subclinical hypothyroidism and antithyroid antibodies with early pregnancy loss and live birth suggest mixed results and time to pregnancy (TTP) has not been studied in this patient population. Objective: This study sought to examine associations of prepregnancy TSH concentrations and thyroid autoimmunity with TTP, pregnancy loss, and live birth among women with proven fecundity and a history of pregnancy loss. Design and Setting: This was a prospective cohort study from a large, randomized controlled trial that took place at four medical centers in the United States. Patients or Other Participants: Healthy women, ages 18–40 y, who were actively attempting to conceive and had one or two prior pregnancy losses and no history of infertility were eligible for the study. Intervention: There were no interventions. Main Outcome Measure: TTP, pregnancy loss, and live birth. Results: Women with TSH ≥ 2.5 mIU/L did not have an increased risk of pregnancy loss (risk ratio, 1.07; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.81–1.41) or a decrease in live birth rate (risk ratio, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.88–1.07) or TTP (fecundability odds ratio, 1.09; 95% CI, 0.90–1.31) compared with women with TSH pregnancy loss, TSH levels ≥ 2.5 mIU/L or the presence of antithyroid antibodies were not associated with fecundity, pregnancy loss, or live birth. Thus, women with subclinical hypothyroidism or thyroid autoimmunity can be reassured that their chances of conceiving and achieving a live birth are likely unaffected by marginal thyroid dysfunction. PMID:27023447

  19. Impaired hapten sensitization in patients with autoimmune disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsgaard, N; Engkilde, K; Menné, T

    2011-01-01

    An inverse relation between contact allergy and autoimmune diseases is suggested from epidemiological studies. The aim of this study was to investigate susceptibility and reactivity in patients with psoriasis, patients with diabetes and healthy controls in an experimental sensitization study. We...... in individuals with autoimmune diseases such as psoriasis....

  20. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for autoimmune diseases.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gratwohl, A.; Passweg, J.R.; Bocelli-Tyndall, C.; Fassas, A.; Laar, J.M. van; Farge, D.; Andolina, M.; Arnold, R.; Carreras, E.; Finke, J.; Kotter, I.; Kozak, T.; Lisukov, I.; Lowenberg, B.; Marmont, A.; Moore, J.; Saccardi, R.; Snowden, J.A.; Hoogen, F.H.J. van den; Wulffraat, N.M.; Zhao, X.; Tyndall, A.

    2005-01-01

    Experimental data and early phase I/II studies suggest that high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) can arrest progression of severe autoimmune diseases. We have evaluated the toxicity and disease response in 473 patients with severe autoimmune

  1. Selected Aspects in the Pathogenesis of Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    György Nagy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune processes can be found in physiological circumstances. However, they are quenched with properly functioning regulatory mechanisms and do not evolve into full-blown autoimmune diseases. Once developed, autoimmune diseases are characterized by signature clinical features, accompanied by sustained cellular and/or humoral immunological abnormalities. Genetic, environmental, and hormonal defects, as well as a quantitative and qualitative impairment of immunoregulatory functions, have been shown in parallel to the relative dominance of proinflammatory Th17 cells in many of these diseases. In this review we focus on the derailed balance between regulatory and Th17 cells in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. Additionally, we depict a cytokine imbalance, which gives rise to a biased T-cell homeostasis. The assessment of Th17/Treg-cell ratio and the simultaneous quantitation of cytokines, may give a useful diagnostic tool in autoimmune diseases. We also depict the multifaceted role of dendritic cells, serving as antigen presenting cells, contributing to the development of the pathognomonic cytokine signature and promote cellular and humoral autoimmune responses. Finally we describe the function and role of extracellular vesicles in particular autoimmune diseases. Targeting these key players of disease progression in patients with autoimmune diseases by immunomodulating therapy may be beneficial in future therapeutic strategies.

  2. Skin Manifestations Associated with Autoimmune Liver Diseases: a Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terziroli Beretta-Piccoli, Benedetta; Invernizzi, Pietro; Gershwin, M Eric; Mainetti, Carlo

    2017-12-01

    Autoimmune liver diseases, which include mainly autoimmune hepatitis, primary biliary cholangitis, primary sclerosing cholangitis, and the variant syndromes, are often associated with extrahepatic autoimmune diseases. However, the association with cutaneous diseases is less well described. In the present article, we provide a systematic literature review on skin manifestations linked to each of these four autoimmune liver diseases, excluding skin manifestations of systemic diseases. The association of autoimmune hepatitis with vitiligo is well known, with a particular striking association with type 2 autoimmune hepatitis, a condition occurring almost entirely in children and adolescents, much rarer and more aggressive than type 1 autoimmune hepatitis; probable associations are also identified with alopecia areata, psoriasis, and pyoderma gangrenosum. Primary biliary cholangitis is not linked to lichen planus as previously assumed, but to vitiligo, psoriasis and the very rare amicrobial pustulosis of the folds. The proposed diagnostic criteria for this latter condition include the presence of anti-mitochondrial autoantibodies, the serological hallmark of primary biliary cholangitis. The very strong association of primary sclerosing cholangitis with inflammatory bowel diseases hampers the search for an association with skin diseases, since inflammatory bowel diseases have a strong association with various dermatological condition, including neutrophilic dermatoses and erythema nodosum. Nevertheless, a probable association of primary sclerosing cholangitis with psoriasis is identified in this review. Variant syndromes, also called overlap syndromes, are likely associated with vitiligo as well, which is not surprising, since autoimmune hepatitis is a feature of these conditions and they may share regions of the MHC.

  3. Augmentation of transfer of experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT) in mice by irradiation of recipients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, W.V.; Kyriakos, M.; Sharp, G.C.; Braley-Mullen, H.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT) can be adoptively transferred to normal syngeneic recipients using spleen cells from susceptible strains of mice primed in vivo with mouse thyroglobulin (MTg) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) following in vitro activation of spleen cells by culture with MTg. Irradiation of recipient animals markedly augments the severity of thyroiditis induced in this system. Irradiation of recipients does not alter the time course of the development of thyroiditis, nor does it alter the requirement for both in vivo priming and in vitro activation of spleen cells for the development of EAT. Spleen cells from EAT-resistant strains of mice (e.g., Balb/c) do not induce EAT in irradiated recipients. Irradiated recipients develop significant levels of anti-MTg antibodies while unirradiated recipients have little detectable antibody response. The augmenting effect of irradiation can be substantially reversed by transferring naive spleen cells to recipients prior to the transfer of MTg/LPS-primed in vitro-activated spleen cells. In addition athymic CBA/Tufts nude mice develop more severe EAT than CBA/Tufts nude/+ littermates following transfer of activated CBA/J spleen cells. These data suggest that natural suppressor cells may regulate the development of EAT at the effector cell level

  4. A study of autoimmune thyroid disorder in atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima, (3)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noma, Koji; Sasaki, Hideo (National Kure Hospital, Hiroshima (Japan)); Ito, Chikako; Mito, Kazuyo; Kato, Masafumi; Egusa, Genji; Hara, Hitoshi

    1989-01-01

    To determine sequential changes in thyroid function after developing asymptomatic autoimmune thyroiditis (AAT) in A-bomb survivors, initial findings of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) test were compared with those 2 years after developing AAT (n=22) and struma (S) (n=12). According to Bastenie's classification, AAT or S patients were clinically staged into three grades. Among 17 patients who had initially had AAT I, one each developed Grade II and III two years later. Initial Grade II turned to Grade I at 2 years in 2 of 4 AAT patients and in 2 of 3 S patients. In both the AAT and S groups, Grade III remained unchanged two years later. There was no significant change in basal or peak thyroid stimulating hormone level between patients with Grade I and those with Grade II or III in both the AAT and S groups. There were no sequential changes in total and free T4, total and free T3, total cholesterol, triglyceride, and lactic dehydrogenase. The TRH test is unlikely to reflect the development of hypothyroidism. (N.K.).

  5. Steroid-Responsive Encephalopathy Associated with Autoimmune Thyroiditis Presenting with Fever and Confusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiranthi Kongala Liyanage

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Steroid-Responsive Encephalopathy Associated with Autoimmune Thyroiditis (SREAT is a diagnostic conundrum as it may present with a myriad of nonspecific clinical features and laboratory and neuroimaging investigations are not diagnostic. We report a case of a 65-year-old female who presented with an acute febrile illness associated with headache and confusion, tangential thoughts, and loose association. Based on neutrophil leukocytosis in the full blood count and elevated inflammatory markers, she was commenced on empirical intravenous antibiotics suspecting meningoencephalitis. Further evaluation found a very high titer of both anti-thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO antibodies and anti-thyroid globulin antibodies. She was clinically and biochemically euthyroid. EEG showed right sided frontal intermittent rhythmic delta activity (FIRDA. Cranial MRI revealed age related cerebral atrophy and nonspecific periventricular white matter changes. A diagnosis of SREAT was made and she was treated with intravenous methylprednisolone followed by oral prednisolone. Her condition improved dramatically within 48 hours of starting steroids. SREAT is a diagnosis of exclusion in patients with a central nervous system disorder. There are no specific clinical features or investigative findings. Elevated anti-TPO antibodies are considered a hallmark of SREAT and steroid responsiveness supports the diagnosis. Prompt diagnosis and treatment reverses the neurological dysfunction in most cases.

  6. Long-term follow-up of 106 multiple sclerosis patients undergoing interferon-beta 1a or 1b therapy: predictive factors of thyroid disease development and duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caraccio, N; Dardano, A; Manfredonia, F; Manca, L; Pasquali, L; Iudice, A; Murri, L; Ferrannini, E; Monzani, F

    2005-07-01

    Conflicting data have been reported on the association between interferon (IFN)-beta therapy of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and thyroid disease development. The goals of this study are as follows: to assess the actual occurrence of thyroid dysfunction and autoimmunity during long-term IFN-beta therapy; to establish the possible presence of predictive factors for thyroid dysfunction development and duration; and to suggest an effective follow-up protocol for patients receiving long-term IFN-beta therapy. A total of 106 MS patients (76 women) underwent IFN-beta 1a or 1b therapy for up to 84 months (median, 42 months). Thyroid function and autoimmunity were assessed at baseline and every 3-6 months throughout the treatment course. Baseline thyroid autoimmunity was detected in 8.5% of patients and hypothyroidism in 2.8%. Thyroid dysfunction (80% hypothyroidism, 92% subclinical, 56% transient) developed in 24% (68% with autoimmunity) of patients and autoimmunity in 22.7% (45.5% with dysfunction), without significant differences between the two cytokines; 68% of dysfunctions occurred within the first year. Autoimmunity emerged as the only predictive factor for dysfunction development (relative risk, 8.9), whereas sustained disease was significantly associated with male gender (P < 0.003). Both incident thyroid autoimmunity and dysfunction frequently occur in MS patients during IFN-beta therapy, particularly within the first year of treatment. Thyroid dysfunction is generally subclinical and transient in over than half of cases; preexisting or incident autoimmunity emerged as the only significant predictive factor for thyroid dysfunction development. Thyroid function and autoimmunity assessment is mandatory within the first year of IFN-beta therapy; thereafter, serum TSH measurement only in patients with thyroid disease could be sufficient.

  7. Identification of chosen apoptotic (TIAR and TIA-1) markers expression in thyroid tissues from adolescents with immune and non-immune thyroid diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bossowski, A.; Czarnocka, B.; Lyczkowska, A.; Bardadin, K.; Czerwinska, J.; Moniuszko, A.; Dadan, J.; Bossowska, A.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate sodium iodide symporter (NIS) and thyroid peroxidase (TPO) expression in thyrocytes from patients with GD and no-toxic multi nodular goitre (NTMG) in relationship with apoptotic (TIAR and TIA-1) markers. The investigation was performed on thyroid cells isolated from post operation thyroid tissues from 15 patients aged 12-21 years old with GD and 15 cases aged 13-21 years old with NTMG. Detection of NIS and TPO was performed by immunohistochemistry. Analysis of apoptotic markers in thyroid tissues was performed using antibodies to TIAR and TIA-1 by Western Blot and immunohistochemistry. Identification of pro apoptotic TIAR and TIA-1 molecules in the thyroid tissues revealed a higher expression of both proteins in patients with Graves' disease (+++; +, respectively) in comparison to patients with NTNG (+; 0). In addition, TIAR expression was detected in three bands [p50, p42, p38 (kDa)] and TIA-1 in two bands [p22, p17 (kDa)]. using Western Blot test in patients with thyroid autoimmune diseases. In patients with NTNG expression of both apoptotic proteins was lower and identified in single bands: 42 (kDa) for TIAR and 17 (kDa) for TIA-1. The analysis of expression of NIS and TPO in thyroid follicular cells was higher in patients with Graves' disease in compared to their detection in patients with NTMG. In addition, degree of thyroid antigen expression positive correlated with amount of pro apoptotic markers (TIAR, p<0.001; TIA-1, p<0.025 for NIS; TIAR, p<0.012 for TPO). We conclude that elevated expression of NIS and TPO in Graves' disease is associated with higher stimulation and activation of apoptosis in thyroid follicular cells during autoimmune process. (authors)

  8. The Effects of Alpha Interferon on the Development of Autoimmune Thyroiditis in the NOD H2h4 Mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yael Oppenheim

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Alpha interferon (αIFN therapy is known to induce thyroid autoimmunity in up to 40% of patients. The mechanism is unknown, but Th1 switching has been hypothesized. The aim of our study was to examine whether αIFN accelerated the development of thyroiditis in genetically susceptible mice. We took advantage of NOD-H2h4, a genetically susceptible animal model, which develops thyroiditis when fed a high iodine diet. Six to eight week old male NOD H2h4 mice were injected with mouse αIFN (200 units or with saline three times a week for 8 weeks. All mice drank iodinated water (0.15%. Mice were sacrificed after 8 weeks of injection. Their thyroids were examined for histology and blood was tested for antithyroglobulin antibody levels. T4 and glucose levels were also assessed. In the IFN-injected group, 6/13 (46.2% developed thyroiditis and/or thyroid antibodies while in the saline-injected group, only 4/13 (30.8% developed thyroiditis and/or thyroid antibodies (p=0.4. The grade of thyroiditis was not different amongst the two groups. None of the mice developed clinical thyroiditis or diabetes mellitus. Our results showed that αIFN treatment did not accelerate thyroiditis in this mouse model. This may imply that αIFN induces thyroiditis in a non-genetically dependent manner, and this would not be detected in a genetically susceptible mouse model if the effect were small. Alternatively, it is possible that αIFN did not induce thyroiditis in mice because, unlike in humans, in mice αIFN does not induce Th1 switching.

  9. Effect of Associated Autoimmune Diseases on Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Incidence and Metabolic Control in Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is one of the most common chronic diseases developing in childhood. The incidence of the disease in children increases for unknown reasons at a rate from 3 to 5% every year worldwide. The background of T1DM is associated with the autoimmune process of pancreatic beta cell destruction, which leads to absolute insulin deficiency and organ damage. Complex interactions between environmental and genetic factors contribute to the development of T1DM in genetically predisposed patients. The T1DM-inducing autoimmune process can also affect other organs, resulting in development of additional autoimmune diseases in the patient, thereby impeding diabetes control. The most common T1DM comorbidities include autoimmune thyroid diseases, celiac disease, and autoimmune gastritis; additionally, diabetes can be a component of PAS (Polyglandular Autoimmune Syndrome). The aim of this review is to assess the prevalence of T1DM-associated autoimmune diseases in children and adolescents and their impact on the course of T1DM. We also present suggestions concerning screening tests. PMID:27525273

  10. Effect of Associated Autoimmune Diseases on Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Incidence and Metabolic Control in Children and Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Krzewska

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM is one of the most common chronic diseases developing in childhood. The incidence of the disease in children increases for unknown reasons at a rate from 3 to 5% every year worldwide. The background of T1DM is associated with the autoimmune process of pancreatic beta cell destruction, which leads to absolute insulin deficiency and organ damage. Complex interactions between environmental and genetic factors contribute to the development of T1DM in genetically predisposed patients. The T1DM-inducing autoimmune process can also affect other organs, resulting in development of additional autoimmune diseases in the patient, thereby impeding diabetes control. The most common T1DM comorbidities include autoimmune thyroid diseases, celiac disease, and autoimmune gastritis; additionally, diabetes can be a component of PAS (Polyglandular Autoimmune Syndrome. The aim of this review is to assess the prevalence of T1DM-associated autoimmune diseases in children and adolescents and their impact on the course of T1DM. We also present suggestions concerning screening tests.

  11. Psoriasis and Hashimoto's thyroiditis in a child with down syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilal Gokalp

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Down syndrome (DS, or trisomy 21, is the most common chromosomal disorder. DS has been associated with autoimmune diseases including autoimmune thyroiditis, Type 1 diabetes mellitus, celiac disease, autoimmune chronic active hepatitis, alopecia, vitiligo, hypoparathyroidism, psoriasis, and psoriatic arthritis. To our knowledge, we herein report the first concurrence of psoriasis and Hashimoto's thyroiditis in an individual with DS, emphasizing the predisposition of DS individuals to autoimmune diseases.

  12. [DIO2, TPO, CYP1A1 AND CYP1A2 gene polymorphism in women with thyroid disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochetova, O V; Gaynullina, M K; Viktorova, T V

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of polymorphisms of genes CYP1A1 (2454A > G,-3798T> C); CYP1A2 (-163C > A,-2467delT); TPO (2173A > C, 769G > T); DIO2 (274A > G) in women from the oil organic synthesis plant and the control group with thyroid disease (autoimmune thyroiditis and nodular goiter) has been performed. Molecular genetic markers of predisposition to the development of thyroid disease are: GG genotype and allele G gene DIO2 (274A > G), CT and CC genotypes of the gene CYP1A1 (-3798T > C), associated with the development of nodular goiter, and DD genotypes TD CYP1A2 gene (-2467delT), associated with the development of autoimmune thyroiditis. There was shown an association of polymorphic variants of the gene DIO2 (274A > G) with elevated levels of antibodies to TPO and TPO gene (2173A > C) with elevated levels of free T4.

  13. Comorbidity of autoimmune thyroid disorders and psychiatric disorders during the postpartum period : A Danish nationwide register based cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergink, V.; Pop, V.J.M.; Nielsen, P.R.; Agerbo, E.; Munk-Olsen, T.; Liu, X.

    2018-01-01

    The postpartum period is well-known risk period for the first onset of autoimmune thyroid disorders (AITDs) as well as first onset of psychiatric disorders. These two disorders are some of the most prevalent medical conditions postpartum, often misdiagnosed and disabling if left untreated. Our study

  14. Autoimmune diseases in Adult Life after Childhood Cancer in Scandinavia (ALiCCS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmqvist, Anna Sällfors; Olsen, Jørgen H; Mellemkjaer, Lene; Garwicz, Stanislaw; Hjorth, Lars; Moëll, Christian; Månsson, Bengt; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Hasle, Henrik; Winther, Jeanette Falck

    2016-09-01

    The pattern of autoimmune diseases in childhood cancer survivors has not been investigated previously. We estimated the risk for an autoimmune disease after childhood cancer in a large, population-based setting with outcome measures from comprehensive, nationwide health registries. From the national cancer registries of Denmark, Iceland and Sweden, we identified 20 361 1-year survivors of cancer diagnosed before the age of 20 between the start of cancer registration in the 1940s and 1950s through 2008; 125 794 comparison subjects, matched by age, gender and country, were selected from national population registers. Study subjects were linked to the national hospital registers. Standardised hospitalisation rate ratios (SHRRs) and absolute excess risks (AERs) were calculated. Childhood cancer survivors had a significantly increased SHRR of 1.4 (95% CI 1.3 to 1.5) of all autoimmune diseases combined, corresponding to an AER of 67 per 100 000 person-years. The SHRRs were significantly increased for autoimmune haemolytic anaemia (16.3), Addison's disease (13.9), polyarteritis nodosa (5.8), chronic rheumatic heart disease (4.5), localised scleroderma (3.6), idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (3.4), Hashimoto's thyroiditis (3.1), pernicious anaemia (2.7), sarcoidosis (2.2), Sjögren's syndrome (2.0) and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (1.6). The SHRRs for any autoimmune disease were significantly increased after leukaemia (SHRR 1.6), Hodgkin's lymphoma (1.6), renal tumours (1.6) and central nervous system neoplasms (1.4). Childhood cancer survivors are at increased risk for certain types of autoimmune diseases. These findings underscore the need for prolonged follow-up of these survivors. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  15. HLA and non-HLA genes and familial predisposition to autoimmune diseases in families with a child affected by type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkkola, Anna; Laine, Antti-Pekka; Karhunen, Markku; Härkönen, Taina; Ryhänen, Samppa J; Ilonen, Jorma; Knip, Mikael

    2017-01-01

    Genetic predisposition could be assumed to be causing clustering of autoimmunity in individuals and families. We tested whether HLA and non-HLA loci associate with such clustering of autoimmunity. We included 1,745 children with type 1 diabetes from the Finnish Pediatric Diabetes Register. Data on personal or family history of autoimmune diseases were collected with a structured questionnaire and, for a subset, with a detailed search for celiac disease and autoimmune thyroid disease. Children with multiple autoimmune diseases or with multiple affected first- or second-degree relatives were identified. We analysed type 1 diabetes related HLA class II haplotypes and genotyped 41 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) outside the HLA region. The HLA-DR4-DQ8 haplotype was associated with having type 1 diabetes only whereas the HLA-DR3-DQ2 haplotype was more common in children with multiple autoimmune diseases. Children with multiple autoimmune diseases showed nominal association with RGS1 (rs2816316), and children coming from an autoimmune family with rs11711054 (CCR3-CCR5). In multivariate analyses, the overall effect of non-HLA SNPs on both phenotypes was evident, associations with RGS1 and CCR3-CCR5 region were confirmed and additional associations were implicated: NRP1, FUT2, and CD69 for children with multiple autoimmune diseases. In conclusion, HLA-DR3-DQ2 haplotype and some non-HLA SNPs contribute to the clustering of autoimmune diseases in children with type 1 diabetes and in their families.

  16. Autoimmune thyroiditis presenting as interstitial granulomatous dermatitis Dermatite intersticial granulomatosa como apresentação de tireoidite autoimune

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Antunes

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A 54-year-old female presented with recurrent, widespread, erythematous, painful plaques, over a 3-month period. Skin biopsy was compatible with interstitial granulomatous dermatitis. Additional investigation revealed hypothyroidism and positive anti-thyroid antibodies. Normalization of thyroid function and high-potency topical corticosteroids provided only transitory improvement of the dermatosis. Interstitial granulomatous dermatitis is a histologic inflammatory reaction, with variable cutaneous expression. It has been reported in association with several drugs, lymphoproliferative diseases and autoimmune disorders, such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and vasculitis, but association with autoimmune thyroiditis is rare. Optimal therapy for this condition is yet to be established, but topical corticosteroids have been a mainstay of treatment. In most cases, this disease is characterized by flares and remissions.Uma doente de 54 anos foi avaliada por placas eritematosas, dolorosas, disseminadas, recorrentes, com 3 meses de evolução. A biopsia cutânea foi compatível com dermatite intersticial granulomatosa. Os restantes exames laboratoriais revelaram hipotiroidismo e anticorpos anti-tiroideus positivos. Apesar da normalização da função tiroideia e de tratamento com corticóide tópico de alta potência, a dermatose melhorou apenas parcialmente. Dermatite intersticial inflamatória é um diagnóstico histopatológico, com expressão clínica variável. Tem sido associada a vários fármacos, doenças linfoproliferativas e autoimunes, nomeadamente artrite reumatóide, lupus eritematoso sistémico e vasculites, mas a associação com tireoidite autoimune é rara. Até ao momento, não foi definido nenhum tratamento específico, mas os corticóides tópicos são dos fármacos mais utilizados. A doença caracteriza-se por períodos de agravamento e remissão.

  17. The clinical features of 17 patients with steroid-responsive encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroiditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Hai

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the onset pattern, clinical manifestations, laboratory findings and imaging features of 17 Chinese patients with steroid-responsive encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroiditis (SREAT. Methods The clinical data of 17 SREAT patients were collected. Retrospective analysis of their clinical features, as well as their serum levels of anti-thyroid, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF biochemical indicators, MRI and therapy was performed. Results The initial symptoms of those patients were seizures (4 cases, psychiatric symptoms (4 cases, hypomnesis (4 cases, walking unsteadiness (2 cases, headache (2 cases and dysarthria (1 case. Three cases were acute onset, 5 cases subacute onset and 9 cases chronic onset. The anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody (anti-TPO of 17 cases were significantly increased, average (928.63 ± 406.28 × 10 3 IU/L. The anti?thyroglobulin antibody (anti-TG of 15 cases was increased, average (601.27 ± 1014.12 × 10 3 IU/L. The protein in CSF was mildly increased, average (513.75 ± 283.15 mg/L. The EEG of 5 patients presented slow wave and the EEG of 2 patients showed epileptiform discharge. The brain MRI of 11 patients showed multifocal lesions in frontal lobe, temporal lobe, parietal lobe, basal ganglia, centrum ovale, corpus callosum, thalamus, cerebellum, and brain stem. The findings of clinical immunological index and tumor markers were normal. Besides, the prognosis of 11 patients treated with methylprednisolone and 3 patients treated with dexamethasone were good. Recurrence occurred in 2 patients. Conclusion Basically, the clinical features of Chinese SREAT patients present seizures, hypomnesis and psychiatric symptoms associated with increased anti-thyroid and multifocal lesions in gray and white matter of brain.

  18. Anti-neutrophil cytoplasm autoantibodies (ANCA) in autoimmune liver diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roozendaal, C.; Kallenberg, Cees

    1999-01-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasm antibodies (ANCA) are autoantibodies directed against cytoplasmic constituents of neutrophil granulocytes and monocytes. ANCA have been detected in serum from patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (mainly ulcerative colitis) and autoimmune mediated liver diseases

  19. Affective cycling in thyroid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tapp, A.

    1988-01-01

    Depression in an elderly man with primary recurrent unipolar depression responded to radioactive iodine treatment of a thyrotoxic nodule, without the addition of psychotropic medications. Two months later, manic symptoms developed concomitant with the termination of the hyperthyroid state secondary to the radioactive iodine treatment. Clinical implications of these findings in relation to the possible mechanism of action of thyroid hormones on affective cycling are discussed

  20. Genome-wide Pleiotropy Between Parkinson Disease and Autoimmune Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witoelar, Aree; Jansen, Iris E; Wang, Yunpeng; Desikan, Rahul S; Gibbs, J Raphael; Blauwendraat, Cornelis; Thompson, Wesley K; Hernandez, Dena G; Djurovic, Srdjan; Schork, Andrew J; Bettella, Francesco; Ellinghaus, David; Franke, Andre; Lie, Benedicte A; McEvoy, Linda K; Karlsen, Tom H; Lesage, Suzanne; Morris, Huw R; Brice, Alexis; Wood, Nicholas W; Heutink, Peter; Hardy, John; Singleton, Andrew B; Dale, Anders M; Gasser, Thomas; Andreassen, Ole A; Sharma, Manu

    2017-07-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and pathway analyses supported long-standing observations of an association between immune-mediated diseases and Parkinson disease (PD). The post-GWAS era provides an opportunity for cross-phenotype analyses between different complex phenotypes. To test the hypothesis that there are common genetic risk variants conveying risk of both PD and autoimmune diseases (ie, pleiotropy) and to identify new shared genetic variants and their pathways by applying a novel statistical framework in a genome-wide approach. Using the conjunction false discovery rate method, this study analyzed GWAS data from a selection of archetypal autoimmune diseases among 138 511 individuals of European ancestry and systemically investigated pleiotropy between PD and type 1 diabetes, Crohn disease, ulcerative colitis, rheumatoid arthritis, celiac disease, psoriasis, and multiple sclerosis. NeuroX data (6927 PD cases and 6108 controls) were used for replication. The study investigated the biological correlation between the top loci through protein-protein interaction and changes in the gene expression and methylation levels. The dates of the analysis were June 10, 2015, to March 4, 2017. The primary outcome was a list of novel loci and their pathways involved in PD and autoimmune diseases. Genome-wide conjunctional analysis identified 17 novel loci at false discovery rate less than 0.05 with overlap between PD and autoimmune diseases, including known PD loci adjacent to GAK, HLA-DRB5, LRRK2, and MAPT for rheumatoid arthritis, ulcerative colitis and Crohn disease. Replication confirmed the involvement of HLA, LRRK2, MAPT, TRIM10, and SETD1A in PD. Among the novel genes discovered, WNT3, KANSL1, CRHR1, BOLA2, and GUCY1A3 are within a protein-protein interaction network with known PD genes. A subset of novel loci was significantly associated with changes in methylation or expression levels of adjacent genes. The study findings provide novel mechanistic

  1. Resveratrol Role in Autoimmune Disease-A Mini-Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Ana Lígia de Brito; Monteiro, Valter Vinicius Silva; Navegantes-Lima, Kely Campos; Reis, Jordano Ferreira; Gomes, Rafaelli de Souza; Rodrigues, Dávila Valentina Silva; Gaspar, Silvia Letícia de França; Monteiro, Marta Chagas

    2017-12-01

    Autoimmune diseases are still considered to be pressing concerns due the fact that they are leaders in death and disability causes worldwide. Resveratrol is a polyphenol derived from a variety of foods and beverages, including red grapes and red wine. Anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antiaging properties of resveratrol have been reported, and in some animal and human studies this compound reduced and ameliorated the progression of autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, psoriasis, inflammatory bowel disease, and type 1 diabetes mellitus. Thus, this review aims to summarize and critically analyze the role of resveratrol in the modulation of several organ-specific or systemic autoimmune diseases.

  2. AIRE variations in Addison's disease and autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes (APS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøe Wolff, A S; Oftedal, B; Johansson, S

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune Addison's disease (AAD) is often associated with other components in autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes (APS). Whereas APS I is caused by mutations in the AIRE gene, the susceptibility genes for AAD and APS II are unclear. In the present study, we investigated whether polymorphisms...

  3. Dapsone in the management of autoimmune bullous diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piette, Evan W; Werth, Victoria P

    2012-05-01

    Dapsone is used in the treatment of autoimmune bullous diseases (AIBD), a group of disorders resulting from autoimmunity directed against basement membrane and/or intercellular adhesion molecules on cutaneous and mucosal surfaces. This review summarizes the limited published data evaluating dapsone as a therapy for AIBD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Dapsone in the management of the autoimmune bullous diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piette, Evan W.

    2013-01-01

    Synopsis Dapsone is occasionally used in the treatment of the autoimmune bullous diseases, a group of disorders resulting from autoimmunity directed against basement membrane and/or intercellular adhesion molecules on cutaneous and mucosal surfaces. This review will summarize the limited published data evaluating dapsone as a therapy for the AIBD. PMID:22560144

  5. Prevalence of thyroid disorders in untreated adult celiac disease patients and effect of gluten withdrawal: an Italian multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sategna-Guidetti, C; Volta, U; Ciacci, C; Usai, P; Carlino, A; De Franceschi, L; Camera, A; Pelli, A; Brossa, C

    2001-03-01

    Many afflictions have been associated with celiac disease, but chance associations may exists. The aim of this study was to establish, by means of a multicenter prospective study, the prevalence of thyroid impairment among adult patients with newly diagnosed celiac disease and to evaluate the effect of a 1-yr gluten withdrawal on thyroid function. A total of 241 consecutive untreated patients and 212 controls were enrolled. In 128 subjects a thorough assessment, including intestinal biopsy, was repeated within 1 yr of dietary treatment. Thyroid function was assayed by measuring the levels of TSH, free T3, free T4, thyroperoxidase, and thyroid microsome antibodies. Thyroid disease was 3-fold higher in patients than in controls (p Hypothyroidism, diagnosed in 31 patients (12.9%) and nine controls (4.2%), was subclinical in 29 patients and of nonautoimmune origin in 21. There was no difference regarding hyperthyroidism, whereas autoimmune thyroid disease with euthyroidism was present in 39 patients (16.2%) and eight controls (3.8%). In most patients who strictly followed a 1-yr gluten withdrawal (as confirmed by intestinal mucosa recovery), there was a normalization of subclinical hypothyroidism. Twenty-five percent of patients with euthyroid autoimmune disease shifted toward either a subclinical hyperthyroidism or subclinical hypothyroidism; in these subjects, dietary compliance was poor. In addition, 5.5% of patients whose thyroid function was normal while untreated developed some degree of thyroid dysfunction 1 yr later. The greater frequency of thyroid disease among celiac disease patients justifies a thyroid functional assessment. In distinct cases, gluten withdrawal may single-handedly reverse the abnormality.

  6. Lack of association between thyroid autoantibodies and parity in a population study argues against microchimerism as a trigger of thyroid autoimmunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Bülow; Laurberg, Peter; Knudsen, Nils

    2006-01-01

    Background: Thyroid autoimmunity is more common in females than in males. One possible explanation for this female preponderance may be the effect of oestrogens on the immune system. It has also been suggested that foetal microchimerism involving transfer of foetal cells into maternal tissue during...... pregnancy may play an important role. Objective: We investigated the association between the presence of circulating thyroid autoantibodies and previous pregnancy. parity and the use of oral contraceptives (OCs) and hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in a population cohort. Methods: We examined 3 712 women...

  7. Graves' disease: thyroid function and immunologic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gossage, A.A.; Crawley, J.C.; Copping, S.; Hinge, D.; Himsworth, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    Patients with Graves' disease were studied for two years during and after a twelve-month course of treatment. Disease activity was determined by repeated measurements of thyroidal uptake of [/sup 99m/Tc]pertechnetate during tri-iodothyronine administration. These in-vivo measurements of thyroid stimulation were compared with the results of in-vitro assays of Graves, immunoglobulin (TSH binding inhibitory activity--TBIA). There was no correlation between the thyroid uptake and TBIA on diagnosis. Pertechnetate uptake and TBIA both declined during the twelve months of antithyroid therapy. TBIA was detectable in sera from 19 of the 27 patients at diagnosis; in 11 of these 19 patients there was a good correlation (p less than 0.05) throughout the course of their disease between the laboratory assay of the Graves, immunoglobulin and the thyroid uptake. Probability of recurrence can be assessed but sustained remission of Graves' disease after treatment cannot be predicted from either measurement alone or in combination

  8. Hodgkin's disease: thyroid dysfunction following external irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, K.; Shimaoka, K.

    1981-01-01

    The thyroid gland is commonly included in the field of radiation therapy for patients with malignant lymphoma and with head and neck tumors. The radiation dose for malignant diseases varies considerably depending on the purpose of treatment and the institutional policies. A substantial number of these patients are developing subclinical and clinical hypothyroidism. The risk of developing hypothyroidism after a moderate radiation dose of 2000 to 4500 rads has been reported to be 10 to 20 percent. In addition, subclinical hypothyroidism is induced further in one third of the patients. There are also suggestions that external irradiation of the thyroid gland in patients with malignant lymphomas, as well as internal irradiation with radioiodine of the normal and hyperthyroid human thyroid glands, would induce elevations of serum antithyroid autoantibody titers. However, only a few cases of Graves disease following irradiation to the thyroid gland have been reported. We encountered a young woman who received radiation therapy to the mantle field for her Hodgkin's disease and developed hypothyroxinemia without overt signs and symptoms of hypothyroidism, followed by appearance of nodular goiter and then full-blown Graves disease

  9. Thyroid diseases among atomic bombs survivors in Nagasaki, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, Naokata; Toyama, Kyoko; Ochi, Yoshimichi; Morimoto, Isao; Izumi, Motomori; Nagataki, Shigenobu.

    1986-01-01

    This is an interim report of the population-based study on the incidence of thyroid diseases in Nagasaki prefecture. Included in this study were 885 patients receiving detailed examination for suspected thyroid disease, consisting of 575 exposed persons (Group I) and 310 non-exposed persons (Group II). Thyroid diseases occurred in 157 (27 %) of Group I and in 65 (21 %) of Group II. According to the type of thyroid disease, thyroid cancer, thyroid adenoma, non-toxic uninodular and multinodular goiters were more common in Group I than Group II. The incidence of hypothyroidism was higher in Group I than Group II; however, the incidence of Graves' disease or chronic thyroiditis did not differ in the two groups. A trend toward a slightly higher incidence of thyroid cyst was observed in Group I than Group II. (Namekawa, K.)

  10. Autoimmune diseases and infections as risk factors for schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benros, Michael E; Mortensen, Preben B; Eaton, William W

    2012-01-01

    Immunological hypotheses have become increasingly prominent when studying the etiology of schizophrenia. Autoimmune diseases, and especially the number of infections requiring hospitalization, have been identified as significant risk factors for schizophrenia in a dose-response relationship, which....... However, the findings could also be an epiphenomenon and not causal, due to, for instance, common genetic vulnerability, which could be supported by the observations of an increased prevalence of autoimmune diseases and infections in parents of patients with schizophrenia. Nevertheless, autoimmune...... diseases and infections should be considered in the treatment of individuals with schizophrenia symptoms, and further research is needed of the immune system's possible contributing pathogenic factors in the etiology of schizophrenia....

  11. Triggers and drivers of autoimmunity: lessons from coeliac disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollid, Ludvig M.; Jabri, Bana

    2013-01-01

    Preface Coeliac disease, an inflammatory disease of the small intestine, shares key features with autoimmune disorders, such as susceptibility genes, presence of autoantibodies and T cell-mediated destruction of specific cells. Strikingly, however, continuous exposure to the exogenous dietary antigen gluten and gluten-specific adaptive immunity are required to maintain immunopathology. These observations challenge the notion that autoimmunity requires adaptive immune activation towards self-antigens. Using coeliac disease as an example, we propose that other exogenous factors might be identified as drivers of autoimmune processes, in particular when evidence for T cells with specificity for self-antigens is lacking. PMID:23493116

  12. Associations Between Autoimmune Diseases and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Philip Finn Rising; Benros, Michael Eriksen; Dalsgaard, Søren

    2017-01-01

    attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). METHOD: A cohort was formed of all singletons born in Denmark from 1990 to 2007, resulting in a study population of 983,680 individuals followed from 1995 to 2012. Information on autoimmune diseases was obtained from the Danish National Hospital Register......OBJECTIVE: Recent studies have suggested that autoimmune diseases and immune activation play a part in the pathogenesis of different neurodevelopmental disorders. This study investigated the association between a personal history and a family history of autoimmune disease and the risk of developing...

  13. Prevalence of Celiac Disease in Children with Autoimmune Hepatitis and vice versa

    OpenAIRE

    Najafi, Mehri; Sadjadei, Nooshin; Eftekhari, Kambiz; Khodadad, Ahmad; Motamed, Farzaneh; Fallahi, Gholam-Hossain; Farahmand, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder in which the risk of autoimmune liver disease is high. Autoimmune hepatitis is a chronic and progressive entity and the risk of its being associated with other autoimmune disorders such as celiac disease is high also. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of celiac disease in patients with autoimmune hepatitis and vice versa. Methods: In a cross-sectional study children with autoimmune hepatitis underwent serological screenin...

  14. Atypical Celiac Disease Resistant to Thyroxine Replacement

    OpenAIRE

    Oguzhan Aksu

    2014-01-01

    Celiac disease, an immune-mediated enteropathy that develops in susceptible individuals upon ingestion of gluten containing diet, is closely associated with other autoimmune endocrine disorders, particularly autoimmune thyroid disease. Celiac disease and hypothyroidism ( especially due to Hashimoto disease) cooccurence is frequently mentioned in the literature. The relationship between celiac disease and autoimmune thyroid disease was first described three decades ago. Patients usually have...

  15. Thyroid function and autoimmunity in Danish pregnant women after an iodine fortification program and associations with obstetric outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bliddal, Sofie; Boas, Malene; Hilsted, Linda

    2015-01-01

    -positivity was defined as an antibody-level (thyroid peroxidase and/or thyroglobulin antibodies) above 60 U/ml. RESULTS: Establishing laboratory-specific gestational-age-dependent reference intervals, we found a prevalence of maternal thyroid dysfunction of 10%-15.8% by use of the cut-off suggested by the American...... randomly selected pregnant Danish women attending the national Down's syndrome screening program. METHODS: The main outcome measures were thyroid status according to laboratory- and gestational-age-specific reference intervals, and association with risk of abnormal obstetric outcome. Antibody...... of the Danish iodine fortification program, the prevalence of thyroid dysfunction and autoimmunity in Danish pregnant women is high - even higher by use of pre-established reference intervals from international consensus guidelines. However, no associations were found with abnormal obstetric outcome. Large...

  16. Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome with Hashimoto thyroiditis in a 9-year-old girl: an autoimmune disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yun-Jin; Cheon, Chong Kun; Yeon, Gyu Min; Kim, Young Mi; Nam, Sang Ook

    2014-05-01

    Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome (MRS) is a rare disorder of unknown cause. The classical triad of MRS is orofacial edema, recurrent facial paralysis, and a fissured tongue. We present a 9-year-old girl with a recurrent peripheral facial paralysis. She experienced the first episode of a peripheral facial paralysis on the same side without orofacial swelling and lingua plicata 1 year ago. She was diagnosed with Hashimoto thyroiditis 9 months earlier, as confirmed by an endocrinologic investigation. While the patient was hospitalized with recurrent facial paralysis, we found that serum levels of free thyroxine (1.3 ng/dL) and thyrotropin (0.4 uIU/mL) were within normal range, but the level of antithyroperoxidase antibodies (772.0 IU/mL) was very increased. She had been taking an oral prednisolone orally for 2 weeks. At the 1-month follow-up, the patient's symptoms had completely disappeared. The possible correlation between MRS and autoimmune disorders has been documented in only one report, which described an adult with autoimmune thyroiditis (Hashimoto thyroiditis) and MRS. We suggest that the co-occurrence of MRS and Hashimoto thyroiditis is not coincidental but linked to autoimmunity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Autoimmune diseases, bipolar disorder, and non-affective psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, William W; Pedersen, Marianne G; Nielsen, Philip R; Mortensen, Preben Bo

    2010-09-01

    Clinic-based studies of immune function, as well as comorbidity of autoimmune diseases, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia, suggest a possible autoimmune etiology. Studies of non-affective psychosis and schizophrenia suggest common etiologies. The objective was to determine the degree to which 30 different autoimmune diseases are antecedent risk factors for bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and non-affective psychosis. A cohort of 3.57 million births in Denmark was linked to the Psychiatric Case Register and the National Hospital Register. There were 20,317 cases of schizophrenia, 39,076 cases of non-affective psychosis, and 9,920 cases of bipolar disorder. As in prior studies, there was a range of autoimmune diseases which predicted raised risk of schizophrenia in individuals who had a history of autoimmune diseases, and also raised risk in persons whose first-degree relatives had an onset of autoimmune disease prior to onset of schizophrenia in the case. These relationships also existed for the broader category of non-affective psychosis. Only pernicious anemia in the family was associated with raised risk for bipolar disorder (relative risk: 1.7), suggesting a small role for genetic linkage. A history of Guillain-Barré syndrome, Crohn's disease, and autoimmune hepatitis in the individual was associated with raised risk of bipolar disorder. The familial relationship of schizophrenia to a range of autoimmune diseases extends to non-affective psychosis, but not to bipolar disorder. The data suggest that autoimmune processes precede onset of schizophrenia, but also non-affective psychosis and bipolar disorder. © 2010 John Wiley and Sons A/S.

  18. Thyroid hormone receptors in health and disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boelen, A.; Kwakkel, J.; Fliers, E.

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid hormones (TH) play a key role in energy homeostasis throughout life. Thyroid hormone production and secretion by the thyroid gland is regulated via the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT)-axis. Thyroid hormone has to be transported into the cell, where it can bind to the thyroid hormone

  19. Beta-cell, thyroid, gastric, adrenal and coeliac autoimmunity and HLA-DQ types in type 1 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    De block, C E M; De leeuw, I H; Vertommen, J J F; Rooman, R P A; Du Caju, M V L; Van Campenhout, C M; Weyler, J J; Winnock, F; Van Autreve, J; Gorus, F K

    2001-01-01

    The autoimmune attack in type 1 diabetes is not only targeted to β cells. We assessed the prevalence of thyroid peroxidase (aTPO), parietal cell (PCA), antiadrenal (AAA) and endomysial antibodies (EmA-IgA), and of overt autoimmune disease in type 1 diabetes, in relation to gender, age, duration of disease, age at onset, β-cell antibody status (ICA, GADA, IA2A) and HLA-DQ type. Sera from 399 type 1 diabetic patients (M/F: 188/211; mean age: 26 ± 16 years; duration: 9 ± 8 years) were tested for ICA, PCA, AAA and EmA-IgA by indirect immunofluorescence, and for IA2A (tyrosine phosphatase antibodies), GADA (glutamic acid decarboxylase-65 antibodies) and aTPO by radiobinding assays. The prevalence rates were: GADA 70%; IA2A, 44%; ICA, 39%; aTPO, 22%; PCA, 18%; EmA-IgA, 2%; and AAA, 1%. aTPO status was determined by female gender (β = − 1·15, P = 0·002), age (β = 0·02, P = 0·01) and GADA + (β = 1·06, P = 0·02), but not by HLA-DQ type or IA2A status. Dysthyroidism (P < 0·0001) was more frequent in aTPO + subjects. PCA status was determined by age (β = 0·03, P = 0·002). We also observed an association between PCA + and GADA + (OR = 1·9, P = 0·049), aTPO + (OR = 1·9, P = 0·04) and HLA DQA1*0501-DQB1*0301 status (OR = 2·4, P = 0·045). Iron deficiency anaemia (OR = 3·0, P = 0·003) and pernicious anaemia (OR = 40, P < 0·0001) were more frequent in PCA + subjects. EmA-IgA + was linked to HLA DQA1*0501-DQB1*0201 + (OR = 7·5, P = 0·039), and coeliac disease was found in three patients. No patient had Addison's disease. In conclusion, GADA but not IA2A indicate the presence of thyrogastric autoimmunity in type 1 diabetes. aTPO have a female preponderance, PCA are weakly associated with HLA DQA1*0501-DQB1*0301 and EmA-IgA + with HLA DQA1*0501-DQB1*0201. PMID:11703366

  20. Thyroid status in chronic liver diseases in an endemic area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryabchikov, A.V.

    1989-01-01

    Iodine absorptive thyroid function, the levels of T 3 , T 4 and TSH by means of radioimmunoassay and thyroid scanning were determined and performed in 132 patients with chronic liver diseases. All patients lived in a goiterendemic area with higher prevalence of liver diseases. Functional thyroid disorders were revealed in all the patients: hypofunction in 85.6 %, hyperfunction in 14.4 %. Structural and morphological and anatomic thyroid changes were detected in 91.6 %

  1. Outbreak of autoimmune disease in silicosis linked to artificial stone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtraichman, O; Blanc, P D; Ollech, J E; Fridel, L; Fuks, L; Fireman, E; Kramer, M R

    2015-08-01

    There is a well-established association between inhalational exposure to silica and autoimmune disease. We recently observed an outbreak of silica-related autoimmune disease among synthetic stone construction workers with silicosis referred for lung transplantation assessment. To characterize the rheumatologic complications in silicosis within these highly exposed, clinically well-characterized patients. We systematically reviewed data from all cases of silicosis due to synthetic stone dust referred to our pulmonary institute for lung transplant assessment, which represents the national centre for all such referrals. In addition to silicosis-specific data, we extracted data relevant to the clinical and serological manifestations of autoimmune diseases present in these patients. Of 40 patients in our advanced silicosis national data, we identified nine (23%) with findings consistent with various autoimmune diseases. Among these nine, three also had findings consistent with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. Based on an expected autoimmune disease prevalence of 3% (based on the upper-end estimate for this group of diseases in European international data), the proportion of disease in our group represents a >7-fold excess (prevalence ratio 7.5; 99% confidence interval 2.6-16.7). These cases underscore the strong link between silicosis and multiple distinct syndromes of autoimmune diseases. Vigilance is warranted for the recognition of autoimmune complications in persons with known silicosis; so too is consideration of the occupational exposure history in persons presenting with manifestations of autoimmune disease. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Strong association between myotonic dystrophy type 2 and autoimmune diseases.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tieleman, A.A.; Broeder, A. den; Logt, A. van de; Engelen, B.G.M. van

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) is a dominantly inherited multisystem disorder, characterised by progressive proximal weakness, myotonia, cataracts and cardiac conduction abnormalities. Our clinical impression of an association between DM2 and autoimmune diseases or autoantibody

  3. Pathological evaluation of thyroid glands in Graves'