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Sample records for autoimmune thyroid disease

  1. Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Francesca Crea; Carla Bizzarri; Marco Cappa

    2011-01-01

    The two major autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATDs) include Graves' disease (GD) and autoimmune thyroiditis (AT); both of which are characterized by infiltration of the thyroid by T and B cells reactive to thyroid antigens, by the production of thyroid autoantibodies and by abnormal thyroid function (hyperthyroidism in GD and hypothyroidism in AT). While the exact etiology of thyroid autoimmunity is not known, it is believed to develop when a combination of genetic susceptibility and environment...

  2. Celiac disease and autoimmune thyroid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ch'ng, Chin Lye; Jones, M Keston; Kingham, Jeremy G C

    2007-10-01

    Celiac disease (CD) or gluten sensitive enteropathy is relatively common in western populations with prevalence around 1%. With the recent availability of sensitive and specific serological testing, many patients who are either asymptomatic or have subtle symptoms can be shown to have CD. Patients with CD have modest increases in risks of malignancy and mortality compared to controls. The mortality among CD patients who comply poorly with a gluten-free diet is greater than in compliant patients. The pattern of presentation of CD has altered over the past three decades. Many cases are now detected in adulthood during investigation of problems as diverse as anemia, osteoporosis, autoimmune disorders, unexplained neurological syndromes, infertility and chronic hypertransaminasemia of uncertain cause. Among autoimmune disorders, increased prevalence of CD has been found in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease, type 1 diabetes mellitus, autoimmune liver diseases and inflammatory bowel disease. Prevalence of CD was noted to be 1% to 19% in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus, 2% to 5% in autoimmune thyroid disorders and 3% to 7% in primary biliary cirrhosis in prospective studies. Conversely, there is also an increased prevalence of immune based disorders among patients with CD. The pathogenesis of co-existent autoimmune thyroid disease and CD is not known, but these conditions share similar HLA haplotypes and are associated with the gene encoding cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen-4. Screening high risk patients for CD, such as those with autoimmune diseases, is a reasonable strategy given the increased prevalence. Treatment of CD with a gluten-free diet should reduce the recognized complications of this disease and provide benefits in both general health and perhaps life expectancy. It also improves glycemic control in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and enhances the absorption of medications for associated hypothyroidism and osteoporosis. It

  3. Vitamin D and autoimmune thyroid diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Kivity, Shaye; Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Zisappl, Michael; Shapira, Yinon; Nagy, Endre V.; Dankó, Katalin; Szekanecz, Zoltan; Langevitz, Pnina; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2011-01-01

    The role of vitamin D as an immune modulator has been emphasized in recent years, and low levels of the hormone were observed in several autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis and systemic lupus erythematosus. Vitamin D mediates its effect though binding to vitamin D receptor (VDR), and activation of VDR-responsive genes. While VDR gene polymorphism was found to associate with autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs), few studies examined levels of vitamin D in these patients and those t...

  4. Encephalopathy Associated With Autoimmune Thyroid Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    li A. Raouf

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATDs are immune-endocrine disorders affecting the thyroid gland and, eventually, also a number of other systemic targets, including the brain and the nervous system. Encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease (EAATD is a rare, heterogeneous condition arising from the background of an ATD. It is characterised by neurological and/or psychiatric symptoms with acute or sub-acute onset, and virtually any neurological or psychiatric symptom can appear. However, EAATD often presents with confusion, altered consciousness, seizures, or myoclonus. The majority of cases are associated with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, but a number of patients with Graves’ disease have also been described. EAATD is likely an immune-mediated disorder. Its exact prevalence has not been precisely elucidated, with an increasing number of cases reported in the last few years. Most EAATD patients respond in a dramatic manner to corticosteroids. However, the immunosuppressive treatment may require a long course (up to 12 months. The increasing number of EAATD cases reported in the literature demonstrates a growing interest of the scientific community about this condition, which still requires a better definition of its pathophysiology, the diagnostic criteria, and the most appropriate management, including the long-term follow-up of patients. The current clinical evidence about EAATD is mostly based on the report of single cases or small cohort studies. In this review, we present the current knowledge about EAATD, with a dedicated focus to the clinical management of the patients from a diagnostic and therapeutic perspective.

  5. Autoimmune thyroid disease and other non-endocrine autoimmune diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Todorović-Đilas Ljiljana; Ičin Tijana; Novaković-Paro Jovanka; Bajkin Ivana

    2011-01-01

    Introduction, Autoimmune diseases are chronic conditions initiated by the loss of immunological tolerance to self-antigens. They constitute heterogeneous group of disorders, in which multiple alterations in the immune system result in a spectrum of syndromes that either target specific organs or affect the body systematically. Recent epidemiological studies have shown a possible shift of one autoimmune disease to another or the fact that more than one autoimmune disease may coexist in a...

  6. Challenges in Interpretation of Thyroid Function Tests in Pregnant Women with Autoimmune Thyroid Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Katharina Main; Linda Hilsted; Malene Boas; Anne-Sofie Bliddal Mortensen; Åse Krogh Rasmussen; Ulla Feldt-Rasmussen

    2011-01-01

    Physiological changes during gestation are important to be aware of in measurement and interpretation of thyroid function tests in women with autoimmune thyroid diseases. Thyroid autoimmune activity is decreasing in pregnancy. Measurement of serum TSH is the first-line screening variable for thyroid dysfunction also in pregnancy. However, using serum TSH for control of treatment of maternal thyroid autoimmunity infers a risk for compromised foetal development. Peripheral thyroid hormone value...

  7. Maternal autoimmune thyroid disease and pregnancy complication

    OpenAIRE

    Gudović Aleksandra; Spremović-Radjenović Svetlana; Lazović Gordana; Marinković Jelena; Glišić Andreja; Milićević Srboljub

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aim. Thyroid disorders exert a great impact on pregnancy course and outcome. The aim of the study was to investigate impact of autoimmune thyroid disorders on pregnancy course and outcome, frequency of pregnancy complications and pregnancy loss. Methods. We followed 63 pregnancies prospectively during the period 1985-2007, 28 with hyperthyroid and 15 with hypothyroid autoimmune disorders, and 20 healthy pregnancies. Follow up included clinical, sonographic and laboratory investigat...

  8. Thyroid autoantibodies in autoimmune diseases Anticuerpos antitiroideos en enfermedades autoinmunes

    OpenAIRE

    Regina M. Innocencio; João H. Romaldini; Ward, Laura S.

    2004-01-01

    Abnormalities in the thyroid function and thyroid autoantibodies have been frequently described in patients with autoimmune diseases but seldom in antiphospholipid syndrome patients. In order to determine the prevalence of thyroid function and autoimmune abnormalities, we compared serum thyrotropin (TSH, serum free thyroxine (T4) levels, thyroid antithyroglobulin (TgAb) and antithyroperoxidase (TPOAb) levels of 25 patients with systemic sclerosis, 25 patients with rheumatoid arthritis and 13 ...

  9. Challenges in interpretation of thyroid function tests in pregnant women with autoimmune thyroid disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Bliddal, Sofie; Rasmussen, Åse Krogh; Boas, Malene; Hilsted, Linda; Main, Katharina

    2011-01-01

    Physiological changes during gestation are important to be aware of in measurement and interpretation of thyroid function tests in women with autoimmune thyroid diseases. Thyroid autoimmune activity is decreasing in pregnancy. Measurement of serum TSH is the first-line screening variable for thyr....... Measurement of antithyroperoxidase and/or TSH receptor antibodies adds to the differential diagnosis of autoimmune and nonautoimmune thyroid diseases.......Physiological changes during gestation are important to be aware of in measurement and interpretation of thyroid function tests in women with autoimmune thyroid diseases. Thyroid autoimmune activity is decreasing in pregnancy. Measurement of serum TSH is the first-line screening variable for...... thyroid dysfunction also in pregnancy. However, using serum TSH for control of treatment of maternal thyroid autoimmunity infers a risk for compromised foetal development. Peripheral thyroid hormone values are highly different among laboratories, and there is a need for laboratory-specific gestational age...

  10. Age impact on autoimmune thyroid disease in females

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoian, Dana; Craciunescu, Mihalea; Timar, Romulus; Schiller, Adalbert; Pater, Liana; Craina, Marius

    2013-10-01

    Thyroid autoimmune disease, a widespread phenomenon in female population, impairs thyroid function during pregnancy. Identifying cases, which will develop hypothyroidism during pregnancy, is crucial in the follow-up process. The study group comprised 108 females, with ages between 20-40 years; with known inactive autoimmune thyroid disease, before pregnancy that became pregnant in the study follow-up period. They were monitored by means of clinical, hormonal and immunological assays. Supplemental therapy with thyroid hormones was used, where needed. Maternal age and level of anti-thyroid antibodies were used to predict thyroid functional impairment.

  11. Challenges in interpretation of thyroid function tests in pregnant women with autoimmune thyroid disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Bliddal, Sofie; Rasmussen, Åse Krogh;

    2011-01-01

    Physiological changes during gestation are important to be aware of in measurement and interpretation of thyroid function tests in women with autoimmune thyroid diseases. Thyroid autoimmune activity is decreasing in pregnancy. Measurement of serum TSH is the first-line screening variable for...... thyroid dysfunction also in pregnancy. However, using serum TSH for control of treatment of maternal thyroid autoimmunity infers a risk for compromised foetal development. Peripheral thyroid hormone values are highly different among laboratories, and there is a need for laboratory-specific gestational age......-related reference ranges. Equally important, the intraindividual variability of the thyroid hormone measurements is much narrower than the interindividual variation (reflecting the reference interval). The best laboratory assessment of thyroid function is a free thyroid hormone estimate combined with TSH...

  12. Celiac Disease Autoimmunity in Patients with Autoimmune Diabetes and Thyroid Disease among Chinese Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhiyuan; Zou, Jing; Zhao, Lingling; Cheng, Yan; Cai, Hanqing; Li, Mo; Liu, Edwin; Yu, Liping; Liu, Yu

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of celiac disease autoimmunity or tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies (TGA) amongst patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) in the Chinese population remains unknown. This study examined the rate of celiac disease autoimmunity amongst patients with T1D and AITD in the Chinese population. The study included 178 patients with type 1 diabetes and 119 with AITD where 36 had both T1D and AITD, classified as autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3 variant (APS3v). The study also included 145 patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D), 97 patients with non-autoimmune thyroid disease (NAITD), and 102 healthy controls. Serum islet autoantibodies, thyroid autoantibodies and TGA were measured by radioimmunoassay. TGA positivity was found in 22% of patients with either type 1 diabetes or AITD, much higher than that in patients with T2D (3.4%; pdiseases were present. Routine TGA screening in patients with T1D or AITD will be important to early identify celiac disease autoimmunity for better clinical care of patients. PMID:27427767

  13. Celiac Disease and Autoimmune Thyroid Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ch’ng, Chin Lye; Jones, M Keston; Kingham, Jeremy G. C.

    2007-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) or gluten sensitive enteropathy is relatively common in western populations with prevalence around 1%. With the recent availability of sensitive and specific serological testing, many patients who are either asymptomatic or have subtle symptoms can be shown to have CD. Patients with CD have modest increases in risks of malignancy and mortality compared to controls. The mortality among CD patients who comply poorly with a gluten-free diet is greater than in compliant patien...

  14. Thyroid volume in hypothyroidism due to autoimmune disease follows a unimodal distribution: evidence against primary thyroid atrophy and autoimmune thyroiditis being distinct diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlé, Allan; Pedersen, Inge Bülow; Knudsen, Nils;

    2009-01-01

    CONTEXT: Primary overt autoimmune hypothyroidism is often divided into primary idiopathic hypothyroidism with thyroid atrophy (Ord's disease) and hypothyroidism with goitre (Hashimoto's disease). OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to characterize the two subtypes of disease. DESIGN AND...... SETTING: This was a population-based study identifying patients newly diagnosed with overt autoimmune hypothyroidism. PATIENTS: We prospectively identified all patients with incident overt autoimmune hypothyroidism in a Danish population cohort, and 247 patients were invited to join a comprehensive...... before hypothyroidism was diagnosed. CONCLUSIONS: In primary autoimmune hypothyroidism, thyroid volume follows a normal distribution. Cases with thyroid atrophy and goiter are only extremes within this distribution and do not represent separate disorders. However, patients with low vs. high thyroid...

  15. [Assessment of association between autoimmune thyroid disease and chronic urticaria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feibelmann, Taciana C M; Gonçalves, Fabrícia Torres; Daud, Mariana Salomão; Jorge, André de Sousa; Mantese, Sônia A O; Jorge, Paulo Tannús

    2007-10-01

    Several studies found a higher prevalence of Autoimmune Thyroid Disease (ATD) in patients with Chronic Urticaria (CU). This relationship may be due to the possible autoimmune etiology in up to one third of the cases of Chronic Idiopathic Urticaria (CIU). However, the frequency of ATD ranged from 1.14% to 28.6%. The study began by determining whether there is an association between ATD and CU, in a population seen at the same clinic. We compared the frequency of anti-thyroid antibodies and thyroid dysfunction in 49 patients with CIU (group 1) and 112 controls (group 2). In order to support the result found, we studied the prevalence of CIU in 60 patients with ATD (group 3) and compared with 29 patients who had non-immune thyroid disease (NITD) (group 4). We did not find a statistical difference for the presence of anti-thyroid antibodies or thyroid dysfunction between groups 1 and 2 (12.24% x 9.82% and 12.24% x 7.14%, respectively). The same occurred for the presence of CIU among groups 3 and 4 (3.33% x 3.44%). In our study it was not possible to demonstrate a relationship between ATD and CIU, which means that different populations may present a higher or lower degree of association between these illnesses. PMID:18157382

  16. Autoimmune thyroid disease with myasthenia gravis in a 28-year-old male: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Masood, Imran; Yasir, Mir; Aiman, Aiffa; Kudyar, R P

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Graves' disease and myasthenia gravis are both auto-immune diseases and the coexistence of these two diseases is rare but well recognized. Myasthenia gravis is more frequent in patients with thyroid disease. Case presentation Here we present a case of 28-year-old male patient having Auto-immune thyroid disease (Graves' disease) with concomitant myasthenia gravis. Conclusion In conclusion, we report that the coexistence of Myasthenia Gravis with Autoimmune thyroid disease might ha...

  17. Encephalopathy Associated with Autoimmune Thyroid Disease: A Potentially Reversible Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inês Correia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune thyroid disease may occasionally associate with unspecific neurological symptoms, which are more commonly insidious, include cognitive or behavioural symptoms, and may associate with tremor, myoclonus, or ataxia. We report a 61-year-old female patient who presented with chronic headache, insidious mood, and cognitive disturbance which evolved in a few months to dementia associated with exuberant limb myoclonus. Diagnostic workup revealed high anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody titers and an inflammatory CSF profile, and it was negative for other possible etiologies. Treatment with steroids induced significant improvement. The diagnosis of encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease is still controversial given the fact that the clinical presentation and diagnostic workup are unspecific, the pathophysiology is still undetermined, and the diagnosis is mostly of exclusion. No direct correlation is found between anti-thyroid antibody titers and clinical presentation, and it is currently speculated that other still unrecognized antibodies may be responsible for this clinical entity. It is extremely important to recognize this entity because it is potentially treatable with immunotherapies. It is also increasingly recognized that clinical improvement with first-line treatment with steroids may be absent or incomplete, and other immunotherapies as immunosuppressants, intravenous immunoglobulin, or plasma exchange must be attempted in the clinical suspicion of EEAT.

  18. Encephalopathy Associated with Autoimmune Thyroid Disease: A Potentially Reversible Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Inês; Marques, Inês B.; Ferreira, Rogério; Sousa, Lívia

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease may occasionally associate with unspecific neurological symptoms, which are more commonly insidious, include cognitive or behavioural symptoms, and may associate with tremor, myoclonus, or ataxia. We report a 61-year-old female patient who presented with chronic headache, insidious mood, and cognitive disturbance which evolved in a few months to dementia associated with exuberant limb myoclonus. Diagnostic workup revealed high anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody titers and an inflammatory CSF profile, and it was negative for other possible etiologies. Treatment with steroids induced significant improvement. The diagnosis of encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease is still controversial given the fact that the clinical presentation and diagnostic workup are unspecific, the pathophysiology is still undetermined, and the diagnosis is mostly of exclusion. No direct correlation is found between anti-thyroid antibody titers and clinical presentation, and it is currently speculated that other still unrecognized antibodies may be responsible for this clinical entity. It is extremely important to recognize this entity because it is potentially treatable with immunotherapies. It is also increasingly recognized that clinical improvement with first-line treatment with steroids may be absent or incomplete, and other immunotherapies as immunosuppressants, intravenous immunoglobulin, or plasma exchange must be attempted in the clinical suspicion of EEAT.

  19. Vitamin D and autoimmune thyroid diseases: facts and unresolved questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizzaro, Giorgia; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2015-02-01

    Vitamin D deficiency (levels lower than 20 ng/ml) is becoming a global health problem, since it is increasingly represented even among healthy subjects. Vitamin D, as an environmental factor, is involved in many biological processes, like perception of chronic pain and response to infections. In recent years, evidence has emerged pointing to an involvement of vitamin D in the development of many autoimmune diseases, and a severe vitamin D deficiency has been especially demonstrated in patients affected with autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD). Low levels of vitamin D were found associated with antithyroid antibody presence, abnormal thyroid function, increased thyroid volume, increased TSH levels, and adverse pregnancy outcome in women with AITD. Vitamin D mediates its effect through binding to vitamin D receptor (VDR), which is harbored on many human immune cells, and in this way is able to modulate immune cells activity, triggering both innate and adaptive immune responses. As VDR gene polymorphisms were found to associate with AITD, the evidence links vitamin D deficiency to AITD either through gene polymorphism or by environmental factors (lack of dietary uptake and sun exposure). Vitamin D supplementation may be offered to AITD patients, but further research is needed to define whether it should be introduced in clinical practice. PMID:25407646

  20. Frequency of autoimmune thyroid disease in chronic urticaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the frequency of autoimmune thyroid disease in diagnosed cases of chronic urticaria (CU) and the association between hypothyroidism and chronic urticaria if any. Study Design: Non-interventional, descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Physiology, Dow University of Health Sciences, Karachi, from December 2004 to January 2006. Methodology: The patients were selected from Department of Dermatology and Medical Units of Civil Hospital, Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre, the Aga Khan Hospital and community clinics. A total number of 60 patients were enrolled in this study. In all patients, serum antithyroid autoantibodies (anti thyroglobulin and anti microsomal/thyroperoxidase), thyroid profile (serum TSH, T3 and FT4), complete blood count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and IgE levels were carried out. The proportions were compared using chi-square test with significance at p < 0.05. Results: Forty seven (78%) patients were found to have chronic urticaria (history and laboratory reports). Out of 47 patients with diagnosis of CU, elevated titres of anti thyroglobulin (TGA) and anti microsomal antibodies (TMA) were found to be present in 20 (42.6%) and 27 (57.4%) patients respectively. Serum TSH level (thyroid stimulating hormone) was increased and T3, FT4 were decreased in 20 (42.6%) patients (p < 0.001). A total number of 20 (42.5%) patients were found to be hypothyroid with chronic urticaria of greater than 6 weeks duration. Conclusion: This study shows a statistically significant association between hypothyroidism and chronic urticaria. Full thyroid profile (serum thyroid autoantibodies, serum TSH, T3 and FT4) is highly recommended in patients with diagnosis of chronic urticaria. (author)

  1. Celiac autoimmunity in autoimmune thyroid disease is highly prevalent with a questionable impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Bharat Rakeshkumar; Joshi, Ameya S.; Varthakavi, Premlata K.; Chadha, Manoj D.; Bhagwat, Nikhil M.; Pawal, Pratibha S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The prevalence of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) is 10–12% in the general population worldwide. Among various disorders co-existing with AITD, the concomitance of celiac disease (CD) with AITD results in poor absorption of thyroid medications and results in higher doses of the same. Institution of gluten-free diet (GFD) in this cohort helps reduce medication doses. Aim: To screen patients with AITD for the presence of celiac autoimmunity (CA). Materials and Methods: A total of 280 consecutive patients with AITD attending the thyroid Out-patient Department of a tertiary care hospital were screened for the presence of tissue transglutaminase antibodies (immunoglobulin A tissue transglutaminase). Those with a positive titer (but duodenal mucosal biopsy for the diagnosis of CD, followed by institution of GFD in confirmed cases. Results: Of a total of 280 (182 females and 98 males) patients with AITD screened, 24 (8.6%) turned out to be positive for CA. Of 24 (8.6%), 15 (8.24%) females and 9 (9.18%) males were positive for CA. There was no statistically significant difference in the thyroxine doses required for normalization of thyroid function and the weight of the patients in CA positive and CA negative patients. Conclusions: The prevalence of CD in patients with AITD is much greater than in the general population. This forms the basis for screening patients with AITD for presence of CD. PMID:26904476

  2. Autoimmune Thyroid Disease in Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Global Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas Roldán, Jorge; Amaya-Amaya, Jenny; Castellanos-de la Hoz, Juan; Giraldo-Villamil, Juliana; Montoya-Ortiz, Gladys; Cruz-Tapias, Paola; Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana; Mantilla, Rubén D.; Anaya, Juan-Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To determine the prevalence and impact of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods. Eight-hundred patients were included. The association between AITD and RA was analyzed was analyzed by bivariate and multivariate analysis. In addition, a literature review was done focusing on geographical variations. Results. In our cohort the prevalence of AITD was 9.8% while the presence of antibodies was 37.8% for antithyroperoxidase enzyme (TPOAb) and 20.8% for antithyroglobulin protein (TgAb). The presence of type 2 diabetes, thrombosis, abnormal body mass index, and a high educational level was positively associated with AITD. The literature review disclosed a geographical variation of AITD in RA ranging from 0.5% to 27%. Autoantibody prevalence ranges from 6% to 31% for TgAb, 5% to 37% for TPOAb, and from 11.4% to 32% for the presence of either of the two. Conclusion. AITD is not uncommon in RA and should be systematically assessed since it is a risk factor for developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease. These results may help to further study the common mechanisms of autoimmune diseases, to improve patients' outcome, and to define public health policies. An international consensus to accurately diagnose AITD is warranted. PMID:23209899

  3. Thyroid autoantibodies in autoimmune diseases Anticuerpos antitiroideos en enfermedades autoinmunes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina M. Innocencio

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abnormalities in the thyroid function and thyroid autoantibodies have been frequently described in patients with autoimmune diseases but seldom in antiphospholipid syndrome patients. In order to determine the prevalence of thyroid function and autoimmune abnormalities, we compared serum thyrotropin (TSH, serum free thyroxine (T4 levels, thyroid antithyroglobulin (TgAb and antithyroperoxidase (TPOAb levels of 25 patients with systemic sclerosis, 25 patients with rheumatoid arthritis and 13 patients with antiphospholipid syndrome to a control group of 113 healthy individuals. Evaluation included a thorough clinical examination with particular attention to thyroid disease and a serologic immune profile including rheumatoid factor, antinuclear and anticardiolipin antibody measurements. Subclinical hypothyroidism (4.2Ciertas anormalidades en la función tiroidea y anticuerpos antitiroideos han sido frecuentemente descriptos en pacientes con enfermedades autoinmunes, y más raramente en pacientes con el síndrome antifosfolipídico. Para determinar la prevalencía de anormalidades en la función tiroidea y de autoinmunidad, comparamos los niveles séricos de tirotropina (TSH tiroxina libre en suero (T4 anticuerpos antitiroglobulina (TgAb y antitiroperoxidasa (TPOAb en 25 pacientes con esclerosis sistémica, 25 pacientes con artritis reumatoidea y 13 pacientes con el síndrome antifosfolipídico con un grupo control de 113 individuos aparentemente sanos. La evaluación incluyó un completo examen clínico con particular atención para las enfermedades de la tiroides y una evaluación inmunológica incluyendo dosaje del factor reumatoideo, anticuerpos antinucleares y anticardiolipina. Hipotiroidismo subclínico (4.2

  4. Thyroid dysfunction: an autoimmune aspect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Farah Aziz; Al-Jameil, Noura; Khan, Mohammad Fareed; Al-Rashid, May; Tabassum, Hajera

    2015-01-01

    Auto immune thyroid disease (AITD) is the common organ specific autoimmune disorder, Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) and Grave's disease (GD) are its well-known sequelae. It occurs due to loss of tolerance to autoantigens thyroid peroxidase (TPO), thyroglobulin (Tg), thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSH-R) which leads to the infiltration of the gland. T cells in chronic autoimmune thyroiditis (cAIT) induce apoptosis in thyroid follicular cells and cause destruction of the gland. Presences of TPO antibodies are common in HT and GD, while Tg has been reported as an independent predictor of thyroid malignancy. Cytokines are small proteins play an important role in autoimmunity, by stimulating B and T cells. Various cytokines IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, IL-13, IL-14, TNF-α and IFN-γ are found in thyroid follicular cells which enhance inflammatory response with nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandins. PMID:26221205

  5. Autoimmune thyroid disorders—An update

    OpenAIRE

    Swain, Manorama; Swain, Truptirekha; Mohanty, Binoy Kumar

    2005-01-01

    Background: Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), a common organ specific autoimmune disorder is seen mostly in women between 30–50 yrs of age. Thyroid autoimmunity can cause several forms of thyroiditis ranging from hypothyroidism (Hashimoto’s thyroiditis) to hyperthyroidism (Graves’Disease). Prevalence rate of autoimmune mediated hypothyroidism is about 0.8 per 100 and 95% among them are women. Graves’ disease is about one tenth as common as hypothyroidism and tends to occur more in younger in...

  6. Co-occurrence of autoimmune thyroid disease in a multiple sclerosis cohort

    OpenAIRE

    Sloka, JS; Phillips, Pryse-WEM; Stefanelli, M.; Joyce, C.

    2005-01-01

    Background Multiple sclerosis (MS), Hashimoto's disease and Graves' disease are autoimmune diseases that may share similar pathogenic mechanisms. The co-occurrence rates and demographic characteristics of Graves' disease and Hashimoto's disease (HT) in our MS population are compared with the general population. Methods The prevalence of thyroid disease in our MS patients was determined by chart review and survey. Previous diagnosis of thyroid disease, age at diagnosis, treatment used, and abo...

  7. Prevalence of thyroid autoimmunity in children with celiac disease compared to healthy 12-year olds.

    OpenAIRE

    vanderPals, Maria; Ivarsson, Anneli; Norström, Fredrik; Högberg, Lotta; Svensson, Johan; Carlsson, Annelie

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Studies have suggested a correlation between untreated celiac disease and risk for other autoimmune diseases. We investigated the prevalence of thyroid autoimmunity in 12-year-old children (i) with symptomatic celiac disease diagnosed and treated with a gluten-free diet, (ii) with screening-detected untreated celiac disease, and (iii) without celiac disease. Methods. Blood samples from 12632 children were collected. All celiac disease cases, previously diagnosed and newly screenin...

  8. Prevalence of Thyroid Autoimmunity in Children with Celiac Disease Compared to Healthy 12-Year Olds

    OpenAIRE

    Maria van der Pals; Anneli Ivarsson; Fredrik Norström; Lotta Högberg; Johan Svensson; Annelie Carlsson

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Studies have suggested a correlation between untreated celiac disease and risk for other autoimmune diseases. We investigated the prevalence of thyroid autoimmunity in 12-year-old children (i) with symptomatic celiac disease diagnosed and treated with a gluten-free diet, (ii) with screening-detected untreated celiac disease, and (iii) without celiac disease. Methods. Blood samples from 12632 children were collected. All celiac disease cases, previously diagnosed and newly screenin...

  9. Mixed connective tissue disease associated with autoimmune hepatitis and thyroiditis.

    OpenAIRE

    Tomsic, M.; Ferlan-Marolt, V.; Kveder, T; Hojker, S; Rozman, B.

    1992-01-01

    The case is reported of a 27 year old woman who had mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) associated with chronic active hepatitis and thyroiditis. Although hepatomegaly is sometimes observed in MCTD, only four cases of MCTD and chronic active hepatitis have been described. It is thought that this is the first report of an association between MCTD, chronic active hepatitis and thyroiditis.

  10. [Autoimmune thyroiditis and thyroid cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krátký, Jan; Jiskra, Jan

    2015-10-01

    Association between autoimmune thyroiditis (CLT) and thyroid cancer remains not clear. Although both diseases often occur simultaneously in histological samples, it is not yet clear whether CLT can be regarded as a risk factor for thyroid malignancy. This review focus on the known epidemiological and molecular genetics links between both diseases. Most studies have shown a significant association between thyroid cancer and positive antibodies to thyroglobulin and histological evidence of CLT, as well. Both disorders share some risk factors (greater incidence in women, in areas with adequate supply of iodine and in patients after radiotherapy of the neck) and molecular genetics linkage. For example: RET/PTC rearrangements could be more often found in carcinomas associated with CLT, but this mutation could be found in benign lesions such as CLT, as well. CLT seems to be a positive prognostic factor in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer. It is associated with less invasive forms of tumor, lower occurrence of infiltrated lymphatic nodes and a lower risk of recurrence. PMID:26486481

  11. Rheumatologic Manifestations in Iranian Patients with Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hezarkhani, Sharabeh; Aghaei, Mehrdad; Shamekhi, Maryam; Nomali, Mahin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATDs) are the most common endocrine diseases which result in rheumatologic manifestations. Some studies have shown association between rheumatologic disorders and ATDs. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess the frequency of rheumatologic manifestations in patients with ATDs. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional descriptive study during 2010 to 2011, 65 patients with ATDs referred to the Rheumatology clinic of 5 Azar Hospital in Gorgan (North of Iran) were studied via systematic random sampling and patients with positive antithyroid peroxides (anti-TPO) were included in the study. These patients were examined by a rheumatologist for diagnosis of rheumatologic manifestations and tested for serum levels of TSH, Free T3 and T4, Anti-Nuclear Antibodies (ANAs) and Rheumatoid Factor (RF). SPSS software (version 16) and descriptive statistics were used for data analysis. Results: Nine males (14.8%) and 56 females (86.2%) with mean age of 38.81±1.44 years were studied. Overall, Rheumatologic manifestations were seen in 86.2 % (n=56). In this study, the most frequent rheumatologic manifestations were Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (36.1%) and Osteoarthritis (23%). Reynaud’s phenomenon (RP) (10.7%), Discopathy (8.9%), Fibromyalgia (5.3%), Myopathy (3.6%), Rheumatoid arthritis (3.6%) and trigger finger (3.6%) were other manifestations, respectively. Conclusion: In this region, there is a high frequency of rheumatologic manifestations in patients with ATDs. Thus, initial evaluation and regular checkings are recommended. PMID:25478383

  12. Autoimmune thyroiditis in antinuclear antibody positive children without rheumatologic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkachaisri Thaschawee

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Children are commonly referred to a pediatric rheumatology center for the laboratory finding of an Anti-nuclear antibody (ANA of undetermined significance. Previous studies regarding adult rheumatology patients have supported an association between ANA and anti-thyroid antibodies, with the prevalence of thyroid antibodies being significantly higher in patients referred to a rheumatology center for an ANA without evidence of connective tissue disease compared to the general population. The purpose of the present study was to determine the frequency of thyroid antibodies in children referred to a pediatric rheumatology center for a positive ANA without evidence of a connective tissue disease. Methods A retrospective chart review was performed on children who were referred to our pediatric rheumatology center between August 2003 and March 2007 for positive ANA with concurrent thyroid antibody and thyroid function tests performed who did not fulfill criteria for a specific connective tissue disease. Laboratory and clinical features were recorded and analyzed. Mean and standard deviation were used to describe continuous data. Chi-square or Fisher's exact tests were used to compare proportions between variables. Results One-hundred and four ANA-positive patients with concurrent thyroid studies were evaluated (88% female, 93% Caucasian, mean age 11.9 ± 4.0 years. Half of patients had an ANA titer ≥ 1:320. The ANA pattern was speckled in 60% of the patients. Thyroid antibodies were detected in 30% of the patients. Anti-Thyroglobulin (ATG was detected in 29% and Anti-thyroid peroxidase (ATPO in 21% of the patients; of these children, 14% had hypothyroidism. ANA pattern and titer were not associated with anti-thyroid antibody positivity. Conclusion Thyroid antibodies associated with chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis, ATG and ATPO, were detected significantly higher in ANA-positive children without a rheumatologic condition (30% as

  13. An unusual association of three autoimmune disorders: celiac disease, systemic lupus erythematosus and Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccuti, Viera; Perrone, Antonio; D'Introno, Alessia; Campobasso, Anna; Sangineto, Moris; Sabbà, Carlo

    2016-12-01

    Autoimmune disorders are known to be more frequent in women and often associated each others, but it is rare to see multiple autoimmune diseases in a single patient. Recently, the concept of multiple autoimmune syndrome has been introduced to describe patients with at least three autoimmune diseases. We describe a case of a young man with a clinical history of psychiatric symptoms and celiac disease (CD) who was diagnosed to have other two autoimmune disorders: systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis. This case is unusual upon different patterns: the rare combination of the three autoimmune diseases, their appearance in a man and the atypical onset of the diseases with psychiatric symptoms likely to be related either to CD or to SLE. PMID:27383232

  14. Is vitamin D a player or not in the pathophysiology of autoimmune thyroid diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Aurizio, Federica; Villalta, Danilo; Metus, Paolo; Doretto, Paolo; Tozzoli, Renato

    2015-05-01

    1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D is a steroid hormone derived from vitamin D, playing an important role in maintaining an adequate serum level of calcium and phosphorus. It is now clear that vitamin D exerts an endocrine action on the cells of the immune system, generating anti-inflammatory and immunoregulatory effects. The mechanisms underlying the role of vitamin D in autoimmunity are not completely understood. Lower vitamin D levels have been found in several autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, type 1 diabetes mellitus, multiple sclerosis, inflammatory bowel diseases, autoimmune thyroid diseases (i.e. Hashimoto's thyroiditis and Graves' disease) and autoimmune gastritis. Several genetic studies have demonstrated an association between thyroid autoimmunity susceptibility and gene polymorphisms of vitamin D receptor, vitamin D binding protein, 1-alpha-hydroxylase and 25-hydroxylase. Of note, some papers do not confirm this connection. With regard to the role of vitamin D in autoimmune thyroid diseases, available data remain controversial. Only few reports have analyzed the supposed association between autoimmune thyroid diseases and vitamin D concentration with inconclusive results. In our experience, low serum levels of vitamin D do not correlate either with Hashimoto's thyroiditis or with Graves' disease. The inability to achieve an unambiguous conclusion is in part due to the limitations in study design. In fact, most of the studies are cross-sectional surveys with a small number of subjects. In addition, the heterogeneity of the study population, seasonal variation of blood sampling, inter-method analytical variability of vitamin D assays and different definitions of vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency contribute to contradicting results. Therefore, further randomized, controlled, prospective trials are needed in order to demonstrate the causality of vitD in AITD and consequently the role of vitamin D

  15. Prevalence of macroprolactinaemia in regularly menstruating women with non-toxic goitre or autoimmune thyroid disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewandowski Krzysztof C

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The so called “big-big” prolactin (Prl, also known as macroprolactin is formed by Prl-immunoglobulin (Prl-IgG complexes and may cause elevation of serum Prl concentrations measured by standard assays, potentially leading to unnecessary investigations and/or treatment. In our study, we have endeavoured to assess the prevalence of macroprolactinaemia in euthyroid, regularly menstruating women with thyroid disease, as well as to assess whether autoimmune thyroid disease may result in an increased prevalence of macroprolactinaemia. Material and methods We measured serum Prl in 182 regularly menstruating women aged 32.7 ± 7.5 years (mean ± SD, range 17–46 years who attended endocrine clinic either for investigation of non-toxic goitre (n = 86, age 33.2 ± 7.8 years or with autoimmune thyroid disease (n = 96, age 32.3 ± 7.2 years. Autoimmune thyroid disease was defined as raised titre of at least one anti-thyroid antibody [anti-thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO, anti-thyroglobulin (anti-Tg and/or anti-TSH-receptor (anti-TSH-R antibodies]. All women were clinically and biochemically euthyroid, either without or on treatment with L-thyroxine. In those with raised Prl (i.e., above 530 mIU/l we ruled out the presence of macroprolactinaemia by polyethylene glycol (PEG precipitation method. Results There was no significant age difference between women with and without autoimmune thyroid disease (p = 0.84. Raised Prl concentrations were found in 10 women with thyroid disease (5.5%, and of those a significant macroprolactinaemia (i.e., reduction of Prl concentrations of more than 60% after PEG precipitation was found in 9 subjects (4.94%. There were no differences in the prevalence of macroprolactinaemia between women with autoimmune thyroid disease (4 out of 96, and without autoimmune thyroid disease (5 out of 86, p = 0.75. Conclusions Approximately one out of twenty women with regular menses is likely

  16. POSSIBLE ROLE OF PROBIOTIC MICROORGANISMS OF BIFIDOBACTERIUM AND LACTOBACILLUS GENUS IN PATHOGENESIS OF AUTOIMMUNE THYROID DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. P. Kiseleva

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available It was revealed, that, in blood samples of the patients with autoimmune thyroid diseases, serum antibodies against cell-free fraction of Bifidobacterium bifidum 791 and Lactobacillus plantarum B-01 were detected, respectively, in 71 and 63% of cases, that being two-fold higher than appropriate frequencies in healthy blood donors. An evidence was obtained that presence of some components specifically reacting with autoantibodies against thyroid peroxidase and thyroglobulin on the surface of the microorganisms cells and competing for binding of these immunoglobulins with thyroid antigens. One may also suggest a presence of bacterial components, interacting with thyroid peroxidase. The data obtained let us suggest that probiotic microorganisms of Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus genus could take part in pathogenesis of autoimmune thyroid diseases, by means of molecular mimicry mechanisms.

  17. Iodine Excess as an Environmental Risk Factor for Autoimmune Thyroid Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuqian Luo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The global effort to prevent iodine deficiency disorders through iodine supplementation, such as universal salt iodization, has achieved impressive progress during the last few decades. However, iodine excess, due to extensive environmental iodine exposure in addition to poor monitoring, is currently a more frequent occurrence than iodine deficiency. Iodine excess is a precipitating environmental factor in the development of autoimmune thyroid disease. Excessive amounts of iodide have been linked to the development of autoimmune thyroiditis in humans and animals, while intrathyroidal depletion of iodine prevents disease in animal strains susceptible to severe thyroiditis. Although the mechanisms by which iodide induces thyroiditis are still unclear, several mechanisms have been proposed: (1 excess iodine induces the production of cytokines and chemokines that can recruit immunocompetent cells to the thyroid; (2 processing excess iodine in thyroid epithelial cells may result in elevated levels of oxidative stress, leading to harmful lipid oxidation and thyroid tissue injuries; and (3 iodine incorporation in the protein chain of thyroglobulin may augment the antigenicity of this molecule. This review will summarize the current knowledge regarding excess iodide as an environmental toxicant and relate it to the development of autoimmune thyroid disease.

  18. Selenium status and over-expression of interleukin-15 in celiac disease and autoimmune thyroid diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Velia Stazi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In celiac disease (CD, for its multifactorial nature, the target organs are not limited to the gut, but include thyroid, liver, skin and reproductive and nervous systems. Between the extraintestinal symptoms associated with CD, autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs are more evident, underlining as CD-related autoimmune alterations can be modulated not only by gluten but also by various concurrent endogenous (genetic affinity, over-expression of cytokines and exogenous (environment, nutritional deficiency factors. In their pathogenesis a central role for over-expression of interleukin-15 (IL-15 is shown, by inhibiting apoptosis, leading to the perpetuation of inflammation and tissue destruction. Thyroid is particularly sensitive to selenium deficiency because selenoproteins are significant in biosynthesis and activity of thyroid hormones; besides, some selenoproteins as glutathione peroxidase are involved in inhibiting apoptosis. Thus, selenium malabsorption in CD can be thought as a key factor directly leading to thyroid and intestinal damage. Considering the complexity of this interaction and on the basis of available evidence, the aim of this review is to assess as preventive and therapeutic target the role of IL-15 and selenium in the pathogeneses of both CD and AITD.

  19. Prevalence of macroprolactinaemia in regularly menstruating women with non-toxic goitre or autoimmune thyroid disease

    OpenAIRE

    Lewandowski Krzysztof C; Gąsior-Perczak Danuta; Kowalska Aldona; Lewiński Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The so called “big-big” prolactin (Prl), also known as macroprolactin is formed by Prl-immunoglobulin (Prl-IgG) complexes and may cause elevation of serum Prl concentrations measured by standard assays, potentially leading to unnecessary investigations and/or treatment. In our study, we have endeavoured to assess the prevalence of macroprolactinaemia in euthyroid, regularly menstruating women with thyroid disease, as well as to assess whether autoimmune thyroid disease may...

  20. The clinical value of detection of serum TGAb and TPOAb level in autoimmune thyroid diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the clinical value of serum TGAb and TPOAb levels in the diagnosis of patients with autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD), the serum levels of TGAb and TPOAb in 175 patients with AITD and 64 non-AITD patients and 57 health controls were measured by RIA. The results showed that the serum levels of TGAb and TPOAb in AITD patients with GD and HT were significantly higher than that of control group (P0.05). The detection of serum TGAb and TPOAb levels may have clinical value in the diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of autoimmune thyroid diseases. (authors)

  1. Recognition by recombinant autoimmune thyroid disease-derived Fab fragments of a dominant conformational epitope on human thyroid peroxidase.

    OpenAIRE

    Portolano, S; Chazenbalk, G D; Seto, P; Hutchison, J S; Rapoport, B.; McLachlan, S M

    1992-01-01

    To characterize the nature of thyroid peroxidase (TPO) autoantibodies present in the sera of patients with autoimmune thyroid disease, we cloned three IgG1/kappa Fab fragments which bind 125I-TPO. This was accomplished by the molecular cloning and expression in bacteria of IgG gene fragments from B cells infiltrating the thyroid of a patient with Graves' disease. The three Fab fragments (SP2, SP4, and SP5) are coded for by a common heavy chain (VH1, D, JH3) and three related, but different, l...

  2. Presumed Isotretinoin-Induced, Concomitant Autoimmune Thyroid Disease and Ocular Myasthenia Gravis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huseyin Gursoy

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There are many adverse effects that have been described for isotretinoin. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a possible association of oral isotretinoin intake with autoimmune thyroiditis and ocular myasthenia gravis (OMG. Case Presentation: A 19-year-old Caucasian male, who had used oral isotretinoin for severe acne disease for the previous six months, was referred to our clinic. He had a three-week history of diplopia and variable bilateral ptosis. Physical examination showed moderate periorbital edema and limitations of up- and down-gaze in the left eye. Laboratory findings and thyroid ultrasound were consistent with autoimmune thyroiditis. Antithyroid therapy did not relieve the clinical symptoms. Concomitant OMG was suspected. Variable ptosis and a positive response to oral prednisolone of 40 mg/day and pyridostigmine of 360 mg/day supported the diagnosis of concomitant autoimmune thyroiditis and OMG. Conclusion: Autoimmune disorders may be triggered by oral isotretinoin treatment. Clinicians prescribing isotretinoin should be aware of the possible association between isotretinoin intake and concomitant autoimmune thyroiditis and OMG.

  3. Encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease in patients with Graves' disease: clinical manifestations, follow-up, and outcomes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tamagno, Gianluca

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: The encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease (EAATD) is characterized by neurological\\/psychiatric symptoms, high levels of anti-thyroid antibodies, increased cerebrospinal fluid protein concentration, non-specific electroencephalogram abnormalities, and responsiveness to the corticosteroid treatment in patients with an autoimmune thyroid disease. Almost all EAATD patients are affected by Hashimoto\\'s thyroiditis (HT), although fourteen EAATD patients with Graves\\' disease (GD) have been also reported. METHODS: We have recorded and analyzed the clinical, biological, radiological, and electrophysiological findings and the data on the therapeutic management of all GD patients with EAATD reported so far as well as the clinical outcomes in those followed-up in the long term. RESULTS: Twelve of the fourteen patients with EAATD and GD were women. The majority of GD patients with EAATD presented with mild hyperthyroidism at EAATD onset or shortly before it. Active anti-thyroid autoimmunity was detected in all cases. Most of the patients dramatically responded to corticosteroids. The long term clinical outcome was benign but EAATD can relapse, especially at the time of corticosteroid dose tapering or withdrawal. GD and HT patients with EAATD present with a similar clinical, biological, radiological, and electrophysiological picture and require an unaffected EAATD management. CONCLUSIONS: GD and HT equally represent the possible background condition for the development of EAATD, which should be considered in the differential diagnosis of all patients with encephalopathy of unknown origin and an autoimmune thyroid disease, regardless of the nature of the underlying autoimmune thyroid disease.

  4. Encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease in patients with Graves' disease: clinical manifestations, follow-up, and outcomes

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tamagno, Gianluca

    2010-04-28

    Abstract Background The encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease (EAATD) is characterized by neurological\\/psychiatric symptoms, high levels of anti-thyroid antibodies, increased cerebrospinal fluid protein concentration, non-specific electroencephalogram abnormalities, and responsiveness to the corticosteroid treatment in patients with an autoimmune thyroid disease. Almost all EAATD patients are affected by Hashimoto\\'s thyroiditis (HT), although fourteen EAATD patients with Graves\\' disease (GD) have been also reported. Methods We have recorded and analyzed the clinical, biological, radiological, and electrophysiological findings and the data on the therapeutic management of all GD patients with EAATD reported so far as well as the clinical outcomes in those followed-up in the long term. Results Twelve of the fourteen patients with EAATD and GD were women. The majority of GD patients with EAATD presented with mild hyperthyroidism at EAATD onset or shortly before it. Active anti-thyroid autoimmunity was detected in all cases. Most of the patients dramatically responded to corticosteroids. The long term clinical outcome was benign but EAATD can relapse, especially at the time of corticosteroid dose tapering or withdrawal. GD and HT patients with EAATD present with a similar clinical, biological, radiological, and electrophysiological picture and require an unaffected EAATD management. Conclusions GD and HT equally represent the possible background condition for the development of EAATD, which should be considered in the differential diagnosis of all patients with encephalopathy of unknown origin and an autoimmune thyroid disease, regardless of the nature of the underlying autoimmune thyroid disease.

  5. Encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease in patients with Graves' disease: clinical manifestations, follow-up, and outcomes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tamagno, Gianluca

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease (EAATD) is characterized by neurological\\/psychiatric symptoms, high levels of anti-thyroid antibodies, increased cerebrospinal fluid protein concentration, non-specific electroencephalogram abnormalities, and responsiveness to the corticosteroid treatment in patients with an autoimmune thyroid disease. Almost all EAATD patients are affected by Hashimoto\\'s thyroiditis (HT), although fourteen EAATD patients with Graves\\' disease (GD) have been also reported. METHODS: We have recorded and analyzed the clinical, biological, radiological, and electrophysiological findings and the data on the therapeutic management of all GD patients with EAATD reported so far as well as the clinical outcomes in those followed-up in the long term. RESULTS: Twelve of the fourteen patients with EAATD and GD were women. The majority of GD patients with EAATD presented with mild hyperthyroidism at EAATD onset or shortly before it. Active anti-thyroid autoimmunity was detected in all cases. Most of the patients dramatically responded to corticosteroids. The long term clinical outcome was benign but EAATD can relapse, especially at the time of corticosteroid dose tapering or withdrawal. GD and HT patients with EAATD present with a similar clinical, biological, radiological, and electrophysiological picture and require an unaffected EAATD management. CONCLUSIONS: GD and HT equally represent the possible background condition for the development of EAATD, which should be considered in the differential diagnosis of all patients with encephalopathy of unknown origin and an autoimmune thyroid disease, regardless of the nature of the underlying autoimmune thyroid disease.

  6. THE CLINICAL PRESENTATION OF AUTOIMMUNE THYROID DISEASE IN MEN IS ASSOCIATED WITH IL12B GENOTYPE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walsh, John P; Berry, Jemma; Liu, Shu; Panicker, Vijay; Dayan, Colin M; Brix, Thomas H; Hegedüs, Laszlo; Hou, Peng; Shi, Bingyin; Morahan, Grant

    2011-01-01

    Background.  Common variants in the interleukin 12B (IL12B) gene are associated with predominantly inflammatory (Th1) or antibody-mediated (Th2) immune responses. Since Hashimoto's disease and Graves' disease are thought to arise from mainly Th1 and Th2 immune responses respectively, we...... hypothesized that IL12B genotype may influence the clinical presentation of autoimmune thyroid disease. Objective.  We tested for differences in IL12B genotype between Graves' disease and Hashimoto's disease. Patients.  We studied a discovery cohort of 203 Australian women and 37 men with autoimmune thyroid...... cohort, rs41292470 and rs3212227 genotypes did not differ significantly between Hashimoto's disease and Graves' disease. In Australian males (but not females), rs6887695 genotype differed between Hashimoto's disease and Graves' disease, with a minor allele frequency (MAF) of 14% and 41% respectively (P=0...

  7. Clinical studies on thyroid diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Fliers, E.; Wiersinga, W.M.; Eskes, S.A.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis focuses on some aspects of thyroid disease: prevention of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), diagnosis of related conditions as autoimmune hypophysitis in autoimmune hypothyroidism (Hashimoto’s disease), and treatment of amiodarone-induced thyrotoxicosis (AIT).

  8. Peripheral blood and intrathyroidal T cell clones from patients with thyroid autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massart, C; Caroff, G; Maugendre, D; Genetet, N; Gibassier, J

    1999-01-01

    For a better understanding of the pathogenesis of thyroid autoimmune diseases, we have studied morphological and functional properties of T clones from peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and from intrathyroidal lymphocytes (ITL) obtained from 3 patients with Graves' disease or 1 Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Investigations were carried out on clones cultured alone or cocultured with autologous thyrocytes. Clonage efficiency ranged from 30% to 33% for PBL and 10% to 36% for ITL. A predominance of CD4-positive clones was observed whatever the origin of the lymphocytes or the autoimmune pathology. Gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) was detected in the majority (17/19) of the clones tested. Intracytoplasmic interleukin (IL-4) was secreted in 7/19 clones and both cytokines were produced in 5/19 clones. In coculture a proliferative response and tumour necrosis factor (TNF-alpha) production were observed with 6 clones (4 from Graves thyrocytes and 2 from thyroiditis). No cytotoxic clone was derived from Graves or thyroiditis tissues. These data demonstrate that the large majority of T clones are principally CD4-T cells; all the clones secreted TNF-alpha and a large majority produced IFN-gamma. Only a few clones produced IL-4 alone or associated with IFN-gamma. Six T clones induced proliferative response and of TNF-alpha secretion in coculture. Further investigations must be performed on these antigen-reactive T clones to analyse their role in the pathogenesis of the human thyroid autoimmune diseases. PMID:10739333

  9. Circulating activated T cell subsets in autoimmune thyroid diseases: differences between untreated and treated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, H; Okugawa, T; Itoh, M

    1991-11-01

    To investigate the relationships between lymphocyte subsets and thyroid function, peripheral blood lymphocytes were analysed with cell surface antigens of activated (HLA-DR+) T, helper T (CD4+ 2H4-, CD4+ 4B4+) and suppressor-inducer T (CD4+ 2H4+, CD4+ 4B4-) cells subsets in 56 patients with Graves' disease, 16 patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis, 7 patients with typical subacute thyroiditis and 2 patients with the thyrotoxic phase of autoimmune thyroiditis. Both patients with Graves' disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis had increased percentages of HLA-DR+ T (Ia+ CD3+) cells as well as HLA-DR+ helper-inducer T (Ia+ CD4+) cells, which seemed to be independent of treatments. The percentage of HLA-DR+ suppressor-cytotoxic T (Ia+ CD8+) cells was increased in euthyroid or hypothyroid patients with Graves' disease following treatment, but was normal in hyperthyroid patients. The percentages of Ia+ CD4+ cells and Ia+ CD8+ were also increased in patients with thyroiditis, whereas these abnormal values normalized in the remission phase. These findings suggest that an increase in Ia+ CD4+ cells characteristically occurs during immune system activation in patients with hyperthyroid Graves' disease, Hashimoto's thyroiditis and the thyrotoxic phase of subacute thyroiditis, whereas the activated CD8+ cells in Graves' disease are induced by antithyroidal therapy. PMID:1684685

  10. [Pathogenesis of thyroid eye disease - does autoimmunity against the TSH receptor explain all cases?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Jack R; Lahooti, Hooshang

    2011-01-01

    Thyroid associated ophthalmopathy, or thyroid eye disease (TED), is a complex inflammatory disorder of the eye that, as its name implies, is usually associated with thyroid disease. Clinical observation supports the existence of three main TED subtypes, namely ocular myopathy, congestive myopathy, and mixed congestive and myopathic ophthalmopathy. Although the precise pathophysiology of TED remains unclear, it is likely to reflect an autoimmune reaction involving sensitised T lymphocytes and autoantibodies directed against a specific orbital or thyroid-and-orbital shared antigen(s). One well-studied candidate in this immune reaction is the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR), which is also expressed in the orbital fibroblast and preadipocyte. Most patients with ophthalmopathy have associated Graves' disease, 10% have Hashimoto's thyroiditis in which the eye changes are often mild and expressed mainly as upper eyelid retraction (UER), and 10% have no apparent associated thyroid disease - so-called "euthyroid Graves' disease". Ophthalmopathy can also occur in some patients with transient thyroiditis, thyroid cancer, and Graves' disease many years after treatment of the hyperthyroidism - situations where TSHR antibodies are not expected to be present, suggesting that the relationship between TSHR antibodies and the eye disorder has not been established for all cases. In our studies of TED we have investigated the nature and significance of antibodies targeting other eye muscle and orbital connective tissue (OCT) antigens, in particular the calcium binding protein calsequestrin (CASQ1) and the orbital fibroblast membrane antigen collagen XIII. Our working hypotheses for the pathogenesis of TED are: i) the initial reaction in the orbit is antibody and T lymphocyte targeting of the TSHR in the OCT compartment, and ii) the associated extra ocular and upper eyelid muscle inflammation reflects either autoimmunity against primary skeletal muscle antigens such as CASQ

  11. Thyrotropin - Binding Inhibiting Immunoglobulin (TBII) in Patients with Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to evaluate the significance of thyrotropin-binding inhibiting immunoglobulin (TBII) in the patients with autoimmune thyroid diseases, the authors investigated 402 cases of Graves' disease and 230 cases of Hashimoto's thyroiditis comparing 30 cases of normal healthy adult at Kyung Pook University Hospital from February 1993 to August 1994. The TBII was tested by radioimmunoassay and assessed on the dynamic change with the disease course, thyroid functional parameters, and other thyroid autoantibodies; antithyroglobulin antibody(ATAb) and antimicrosomal antibody(AMAb) including thyroglobulin. The serum level of TBII was 40.82 ± 21.651(mean ± SD)% in hyperthyroid Graves' disease and 8.89 ± 14.522% in Hashimoto's thyroiditis and both were significant different from normal control of which was 3.21 ± 2.571%. The frequency of abnormally increased TBII level was 92.2% in hyperthyroid Craves' disease, 46.7% in euthyroid Graves' disease or remission state of hyperthyroidism, and 23.9% in Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The serum levels of increased TBII in Graves' disease were positively correlated with RAIU, serum T3, T4, and FT4, but negatively correlated with serum TSH(each p<0.001). The TBII in Graves' disease had significant positive correlation with serum thyroglobulin and AMAb, but no significant correlation with ATAb. In the Hashimoto's thyroiditis, the serum levels of TBII were positively correlated with RAIU, serum T3, TSH and AMAb, but not significantly correlated with serum T4, FT4, thyroglobulin and ATAb. Therefore serum level of TBII seemed to be a useful mean of assessing the degree of hyperthyroidism in Graves' disease and correlated well with thyroidal stimulation. The serum level of TBII in Hashimoto's thyroiditis is meaningful for the degree of both functional abnormality reflecting either hyperfunction or hypofunction and the immunologic abnormality.

  12. Prevalence of coeliac disease in patients with autoimmune thyroiditis in a Turkish population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sefa Guliter; Fahri Yakaryilmaz; Zubeyde Ozkurt; Reyhan Ersoy; Derya Ucardag; Osman Caglayan; Pinar Atasoy

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the prevalence of coeliac disease in a series of Turkish patients with autoimmune thyroiditis.METHODS: Sera from 136 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed autoimmune thyroiditis and 119 healthy blood donors were tested for IgA tissue transglutaminase antibody with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Endoscopic mucosal biopsy from the second part of duodenum was performed in patients with positive antibody test.RESULTS: Eight patients (5.9%) and one control subject (0.8%) were positive for IgA tissue transglutaminase antibody (OR: 7.38, 95% CI: 0.91-59.85, P = 0.04). Six patients and one control agreed to take biopsies. Histopathological examination revealed changes classified as Marsh ma in one, Marsh n in one, Marsh I in two, and Marsh 0 in two patients with autoimmune throiditis, and Marsh I in one blood donor.CONCLUSION: Turkish patients with autoimmune thyroiditis have an increased risk of coeliac disease and serological screening may be useful for early detection of coeliac disease in these patients. Our findings need to be confirmed in a larger series of patients.

  13. Color Doppler measurement of blood flow in the inferior thyroid artery in patients with autoimmune thyroid diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The aim of the study is to find out whether the measurement of peak systolic velocity in the inferior thyroid artery (ITA) is a valuable parameter to differentiate autoimmune thyroid diseases (hyper-, normo- or hypofunctional) and to evaluate the efficacy of medical treatment. Material and methods: The ITA of 31 patients (eight with Graves' disease, 23 with subclinical hypothyroidism) was examined with color Doppler and pulsed Doppler. The final diagnosis was obtained by citology and by hormonal and antibodies assays. The patients were monitorized by ultrasound for a period of 8 months. Results: In all the patients with Graves' disease the peak systolic velocity was always over 150 cm/s, while in other autoimmune thyroiditis the peak systolic velocity was within the normal range, and never exceeding 65 cm/s. In the first group, the measurement taken in the ITA showed also the efficacy of the pharmacological treatment earlier and more reliably than the color Doppler pattern obtained in the parenchyma. Conclusions: The color Doppler measurement of the ITA seems to be a promising technique with low-cost and easy approach. In our experience, the color Doppler of the ITA could have a clinical role in the differential diagnosis of diffuse thyroid diseases and in the follow-up of the Graves' disease during medical treatment

  14. Estrogen receptor alpha dinucleotide repeat polymorphism in Japanese patients with autoimmune thyroid diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tozaki Teruaki

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs, comprising Graves' disease (GD and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT, appear to develop as a result of complex interactions between predisposing genes and environmental triggers. Susceptibility to AITDs is conferred by genes in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA and genes unlinked to HLA, including the CTLA-4 gene. Recently, an association to some estrogen receptor (ERα genotypes with breast cancer, hypertension, osteoporosis, generalized osteoarthritis, and some autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis has been reported. We have analyzed a dinucleotide (TAn repeat polymorphism lying upstream of the human ERα gene in patients with AITDs and in normal subjects. Results Seventeen different alleles were found in 130 patients with GD, 93 patients with HT, and 190 control subjects. There was no significant difference in the distributions of ERα alleles between patients and controls. Conclusions The present results do not support an association between the ERα gene and AITD in the Japanese population.

  15. The diagnostic value of Th1/Th2 cell cytokine and thyroid autoantibody on autoimmune thyroid diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the diagnostic value of Th1/Th2 cell cytokine and thyroid autoantibody in autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD), 28 patients with Graves' disease (GD), 15 patients with hyperthyroidism and thyroiditis (GDIII), 13 patients with Hashimoto's hyperthyroidism (HTL), 21 patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis(HT)and 20 healthy subjects were enrolled in this study. The serum concentrations of Th1 cytokine (IFN-γ) and Th2 cytokine (IL-4) were determined by ELISA. The serum levels of thyrotropin receptor antibodies (TRAb), thyroglobulin antibodies (TGAb) and thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAb) were measured by RIA. The relationship between the serum levels of IFN-γ, IL-4 and TRAb, TGAb and TPOAb were analyzed. The results showed that IFN-γ levels from higher to lower in different groups were in the order of HT, HTL, GDIII, GD and the IL-4 were GD, GDIII, HTL, HT, respectively. There was significant difference in the IFN-γ (P<0.05) and IL-4 levels (P<0.01) between GDIII and HTL groups. There was no significant difference in TGAb and TPOAb between GDIII and HTL groups. In HT group, IFN-γ levels was positively correlated with TGAb and TPOAb (r=0.67,0.54,P<0.01). In GD group, IL-4 was positively correlated with TRAb (r =0.71,P<0.01). The imbalance of Th1/Th2 cell cytokine reflects pathologic change and abnormality of immune function in AITD patients. The detection of Th1/Th2 cell cytokine combined with thyroid autoantibody may be regarded as an indicator in the diagnosis of autoimmune thyroid diseases. (authors)

  16. Same-sex marriage, autoimmune thyroid gland dysfunction and other autoimmune diseases in Denmark 1989-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisch, Morten; Nielsen, Nete Munk; Pedersen, Bo Vestergaard

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases have been little studied in gay men and lesbians. We followed 4.4 million Danes, including 9,615 same-sex married (SSM) persons, for 47 autoimmune diseases in the National Patient Registry between 1989 and 2008. Poisson regression analyses provided first hospitalization rate ratios (RRs) comparing rates between SSM individuals and persons in other marital status categories. SSM individuals experienced no unusual overall risk of autoimmune diseases. However, the risk of autoimmune thyroid dysfunction was increased, notably Hashimoto's thyroiditis (women(SSM), RR = 2.92; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.74-4.55) and Graves' disease (men(SSM), RR = 1.88; 95% CI 1.08-3.01). There was also an excess of primary biliary cirrhosis (women(SSM), RR = 4.09; 95% CI 1.01-10.7), and of psoriasis (men(SSM), RR = 2.48; 95% CI 1.77-3.36), rheumatic fever (men(SSM), RR = 7.55; 95% CI 1.87-19.8), myasthenia gravis (men(SSM), RR = 5.51; 95% CI 1.36-14.4), localized scleroderma (men(SSM), RR = 7.16; 95% CI 1.18-22.6) and pemphigoid (men(SSM), RR = 6.56; 95% CI 1.08-20.6), while Dupuytren's contracture was reduced (men(SSM), RR = 0.64; 95% CI 0.39-0.99). The excess of psoriasis was restricted to same-sex married men with HIV/AIDS (men(SSM), RR = 10.5; 95% CI 6.44-15.9), whereas Graves' disease occurred in excess only among same-sex married men without HIV/AIDS (men(SSM), RR = 1.99; 95% CI 1.12-3.22). Lesbians and immunologically competent gay men in same-sex marriage face no unusual overall risk of autoimmune diseases. However, the observed increased risk of thyroid dysfunction in these lesbians and gay men deserves further study. PMID:24306355

  17. Effect of steroid replacement on thyroid function and thyroid autoimmunity in Addison′ s disease with primary hypothyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaya Prakash Sahoo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Steroid replacement without thyroxine supplementation normalizes thyroid function test (TFT in some but not all Addison's disease patients with primary hypothyroidism. Both autoimmune and nonautoimmune mechanisms contribute to this improvement in TFT. However, the documentation of the change in thyroid autoimmunity after cortisol replacement is very limited in the literature. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of steroid replacement on TFT and anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody (anti-TPO-Ab titer in Addison's disease with primary hypothyroidism. Materials and Methods: This observational study was conducted in a tertiary care center in South India. Six Addison's disease patients with primary hypothyroidism, who were only on steroid replacement, were included in the study. Low serum cortisol (22 pmol/L and/or hyperpigmentation of skin/mucous membranes was considered as the diagnostic criteria for Addison's disease. Primary hypothyroidism (both overt and subclinical was defined as high thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH with/without low free thyroxine (fT4. TFT and anti-TPO-Ab were performed before and after steroid replacement in all of them. Results: Poststeroid replacement, there was a normalization of TSH in all but one subjects. In overt hypothyroidism patients, fT4 also normalized. The improvement in TFT was not associated with decreasing titer of the anti-TPO-Ab in all six patients. However, there was a significant difference in TSH after steroid replacement compared to the baseline status. Conclusions: The concept of normalization of primary hypothyroidism with cortisol replacement in patients with Addison's disease should be recognized to avoid iatrogenic thyrotoxicosis caused by thyroxine replacement. Both autoimmune and nonautoimmune mechanisms contribute to these alterations.

  18. Study on serum thyroid peroxidase antibody levels in autoimmune thyroid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the clinical significance of changes of serum thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPO-Ab) in patients with hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism and simple goiter. Methods: Serum TPO-Ab, TMA,TGA and FT3, FT4, TSH levels were measured with radioimmunoassay(RIA) in 69 patients with hyperthyroidism, 53 patients with hypothyroidism, 45 patients with simple goiter and 20 controls. Results: The positive rate of thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPO-Ab) (82%-92.5%) was higher than that of thyroidglobulim antibody(TGA) (44.2%) and thyroid microsome antibody(TMA) (60.4-69.8%) in all patients with AICD. Conclusion: TPO-Ab could be taken as an important indicator in assessment of treatment and prognosis in patients with auto- immune thyroid diseases. (authors)

  19. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) in Korean patients with Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Huh, Kap Bum; Lee, Hyun Chul; Kim, Hyeon Man; Lee, Hye Ree; Hong, Chein Soo; Lee, Sang Yong; Choi, Heung Jai; Park, Kiil; Kim, Choon Kyu

    1986-01-01

    In previous studies, there has been evidence of different allelic associations with a particular disease among various ethnic groups. The present study was done to investigate the associations between HLA and autoimmune thyroid diseases in the Korean. We found no association between Graves’ disease and HLA-B8 or -B35. However, increased frequencies of HLA-A11 and -DRw8, and the decreased frequencies of HLA-A10 and B12 were found in patients with Graves’ disease. In the cases of Hashimoto’s di...

  20. Pendrin and NIS antibodies are absent in healthy individuals and are rare in autoimmune thyroid disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, Thomas H; Hegedüs, Laszlo; Weetman, Anthony P;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Antibodies against thyroglobulin, thyroid peroxidase and the TSH receptor are accepted as pathophysiological and diagnostic biomarkers in autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD). In contrast, the prevalence, aetiology and clinical relevance of autoantibodies against the human sodium-iodine s......OBJECTIVE: Antibodies against thyroglobulin, thyroid peroxidase and the TSH receptor are accepted as pathophysiological and diagnostic biomarkers in autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD). In contrast, the prevalence, aetiology and clinical relevance of autoantibodies against the human sodium......-iodine symporter (NISAb) and pendrin (PenAb) remain unclear. The objectives of the study were to investigate the presence of NISAb and PenAb in Danish twins, with and without AITD, to study whether the published variations in NISAb and PenAb frequencies were related to differences in methodology or study...... populations, and to evaluate whether the presence of NISAb or PenAb most likely results from genetic or nongenetic factors. METHODS: Sera from 93 patients with AITD and 230 healthy controls were evaluated for NISAb and PenAb using radioligand binding assays (RBA). RESULTS: Patients with AITD had a higher...

  1. Ocular surface and salivary gland involvement in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Pelinsari Lana

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Many reports have indicated an association between thyroid dieases and primary Sjögren’s syndrome (pSS. The aim of our study was to evaluate the outcomes of the tests used for dry eye diagnosis and salivary gland involvement in patients with autoimmune thyroiditis. Methods: Forty-two patients (group 1 with autoimmune thyroid disease and 30 controls (group 2 were selected. Tear film break up time, Schirmer I test, Schirmer II test, ocular staining with 1% rose Bengal and salivary gland cintilography were performed in both groups. Results: Regarding the ocular surface damage observed by Rose Bengal test there was no difference between groups (p=0.77. For tear film break up time the groups did not differ statistically (p=0.46. There was no statistical difference between groups 1 and control in scintigraphy of the salivary gland (p=0.99. A statistical difference between the patients with thyroid disease and the control group was seem only in the Schirmer II test (p=0.0009. Conclusions: No patients fulfilled all criteria for Sjögren’s syndrome. It is possible that it could be underestimated.

  2. Association between chronic urticaria and thyroid autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebeci, Filiz; Tanrikut, Ayşenur; Topcu, Elif; Onsun, Nahide; Kurtulmus, Neslihan; Uras, Ahmet R

    2006-01-01

    The association between chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU) and thyroid autoimmunity has most often been suggested in studies investigating thyroid microsomal antibodies, which are less sensitive and specific than anti-thyroperoxidase antibodies, moreover these studies were not case-control studies in large series. By comparing a large patient series presenting with CIU with a large numbered control group we aimed to learn the extent of autoimmune thyroid disease. We compared the frequency of thyroid autoantibodies in 140 patients with CIU with 181 age-and sex-matched volunteers. Thyroid function tests and thyroid autoantibodies were measured by chemiluminescent immunometric assay in study groups. The frequency of thyroid autoantibodies was significantly higher in patients with CIU than that in healthy controls (29.28 %/5.52%; p CIU and thyroid autoimmunity. PMID:16935798

  3. The influence of cyclosporin A on experimental autoimmune thyroid disease in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Female PVG/c rats, thymectomised on weaning and given 4 courses of whole body irradiation to a total dose of 1000 rads, developed experimental autoimmune thyroid disease (EAITD) as assessed by histological evidence of thyroiditis and circulating levels of antithyroglobulin antibodies. Hypothyroidism resulted. Induction of the disease was associated with a highly significant fall in T lymphocyte numbers. Eight weeks after their last dose of irradiation the animals commenced treatment with cyclosporin A (10 mg/kg rat/day, intragastrically) and were treated for varying time intervals thereafter. The reversal of the T lymphocyte helper: suppressor ratio on cyclosporin A therapy was associated with a significant improvement in the disease process. The alterations in the T cell subsets and in the disease lasted only as long as the drug was administered and thereafter reverted towards that seen in the control groups of animals receiving no treatment

  4. 99mTc-sestamibi thyroid uptake in euthyroid individuals and in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the biokinetics of 99mTc-sestamibi in the thyroid of euthyroid volunteers (EVs) and in patients with autoimmune thyroid diseases and determined the best time interval between 99mTc-sestamibi injection and calculation of uptake. Forty EVs, 30 patients with Graves' disease (GD), 15 patients with atrophic Hashimoto's thyroiditis (AHT) and 15 patients with hypertrophic Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HHT) underwent 99mTc-sestamibi thyroid scintigraphy. Dynamic images were acquired for 20 min, and static images were obtained 20 min, 60 min and 120 min post injection. Five-, 20-, 60- and 120-min uptake, time to maximal uptake (Tmax) and T1/2 of tracer clearance were calculated. Thyroid hormones and antibodies were measured. 99mTc-pertechnetate uptake was investigated in GD patients. Tmax was approximately 5 min in all four groups. The mean T1/2 value for EVs was similar to the GD value and lower than the HHT and AHT values. The mean (±SD) 5-min uptake was 0.13% (±0.05%) for EVs. The 5-min uptake in GD was higher than that in EVs(P99mTc-pertechnetate uptake (r=0.68). Uptake in HHT was higher than that in AHT (P=0.0003) and EVs (P=0.002). Uptake in AHT was lower than uptake in EVs (P=0.0001). Five minutes is the optimal time interval between 99mTc-sestamibi injection and calculation of thyroid uptake. Five-minute uptake differentiates euthyroid individuals from GD patients. There is a high correlation between 99mTc-sestamibi and 99mTc-pertechnetate uptake in GD. The reduced 99mTc-sestamibi uptake in AHT patients is probably due to glandular destruction and fibrosis. Inflammatory infiltrate and high mitochondrial density in thyrocytes possibly explain the increased uptake in GD and HHT. (orig.)

  5. Time for the endocrinologists to expand their awareness of and contribution to the diagnosis and management of encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tamagno, Gianluca

    2012-02-01

    Encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease is a rare condition presenting in the setting of autoimmune thyroid disease and characterized by unspecific neurological and\\/or psychiatric symptoms. Bearing in mind the currently prevailing lack of consensus on the most appropriate nomenclature and diagnostic criteria for this condition and the implications that this lack undeniably has on clinical practice, it is obvious that an international and multidisciplinary agreement among clinicians should arrive at the most appropriate definition and terminology of encephalopathy occurring in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease. Concomitantly, efforts must be made to uncover the pathogenetic link between thyroid autoimmunity and the occurrence of encephalopathy.

  6. Time for the endocrinologists to expand their awareness of and contribution to the diagnosis and management of encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tamagno, Gianluca

    2011-01-01

    Encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease is a rare condition presenting in the setting of autoimmune thyroid disease and characterized by unspecific neurological and\\/or psychiatric symptoms. Bearing in mind the currently prevailing lack of consensus on the most appropriate nomenclature and diagnostic criteria for this condition and the implications that this lack undeniably has on clinical practice, it is obvious that an international and multidisciplinary agreement among clinicians should arrive at the most appropriate definition and terminology of encephalopathy occurring in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease. Concomitantly, efforts must be made to uncover the pathogenetic link between thyroid autoimmunity and the occurrence of encephalopathy.

  7. Noonan syndrome associated with cronic autoimmune thyroiditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Valea

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Noonan syndrome is a genetic dominant disease that presents a wide variety of clinical characteristics. Frequently, the syndrome is associated with some autoimmune diseases, especially with chronic autoimmune thyroiditis. We report the case of a 21 years old girl diagnosed with Noonan syndrome and autoimmune thyroiditis relatively late, at the age of 20. The diagnosis was suggested by a cluster of significant clinical elements: facial dysmorphism, short stature, moderate mental retardation. The hormonal profile and karyotype contributed to the final certainty diagnosis. At this moment she is under thyroid substitution treatment.

  8. PREVALENCE OF AUTOANTIBODIES TO THYROID PEROXIDASE AND AUTOIMMUNE THYROID DISEASE IN GIRLS WITH TURNER’S SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Moayeri Z. Oloomi

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Patients with Turner’s syndrome (TS are at an increased risk of developing autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of anti-thyroid peroxidase (anti-Tpo antibodies and ATD in children and adolescent girls with TS. It also assessed the influence of karyotype on the development of thyroid disease. Sixty eight patients with TS were compared with 68 age matched healthy unrelated girls in this study. They were screened for anti-Tpo antibodies, free T4 and TSH levels. Sign and symptoms of hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism and the presence of goiter were also investigated. Anti-Tpo antibodies were found in 18 (26.4% TS patients and 1 (1.4% patient in the control group (P < 0.001, evenly distributed between the karyotypes 45X, 46X, isoXq and mosaicism. Out of 68 TS patients, 8 (11.7% had visible goiter. Subclinical hypothyroidism and hypothyroidism both occurred in 2 patients (5.9%. These patients were characterized by higher levels of anti-Tpo antibodies. Visible goiter was found in 3 (4.4% subjects of the control group, but all of them were euthyroid. We found that younger patients were more likely to be anti-Tpo negative (P < 0.001. Our data demonstrated a high frequency of ATD in a representative sample of Iranian girls with TS which is in accordance with previous observations. Regular follow up assessment of thyroid autoantibodies and thyroid function in patients with TS is recommended for timely diagnosis of thyroid dysfunction and treatment.

  9. There Is No Elevation of Immunoglobulin E Levels in Albanian Patients with Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gacaferri-Lumezi, Besa; Lokaj-Berisha, Violeta

    2014-01-01

    Background. Studies in several ethnic groups reported high incidence of elevated levels of immunoglobulin E (IgE) in patients with autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATD), especially in patients with Graves' disease. Objective. To study association between serum levels of IgE and thyroid stimulating hormone receptor antibodies (TRAb) in Albanian patients with ATD. Material and Methods. Study was performed in 40 patients with Graves' disease, 15 patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis, and 14 subjects in the control group. The IgE levels were measured by immunoradiometric assay, whereas the TRAb levels were measured by radioreceptor assay. Results. In all groups of subjects the IgE levels were within reference values (<200 kIU/L). Significant difference in mean concentration of IgE was found between two groups of Graves' disease patients, and those with normal and elevated TRAb levels (22.57 versus 45.03, P < 0.05). Positive correlation was found between TRAb and IgE only in Graves' disease patients (r = 0.43, P = 0.006). Conclusion. In Albanian patients with ATD there is no elevation of IgE levels. This could be the result of low prevalence of allergic diseases in Albanian population determined by genetic and environmental factors. PMID:24959371

  10. Susceptibility to thyroid autoimmune disease: molecular analysis of HLA-D region genes identifies new markers for goitrous Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badenhoop, K; Schwarz, G; Walfish, P G; Drummond, V; Usadel, K H; Bottazzo, G F

    1990-11-01

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis has been shown to be associated with the HLA-specificities DR4 and DR5. Since former association studies yielded variable results, we used novel molecular typing methods to assess predisposing immunogenetic factors. Gene analysis of the HLA-DR-DQ and tumor necrosis factor region was performed in a group of Hashimoto's thyroiditis patients and randomly chosen controls using standards and nomenclature of the 10th International Histocompatibility Workshop. Genomic DNA of patients and controls was analyzed using a cDNA probe of the DQB1 gene. The resulting restriction fragment patterns allowed the determination of newly defined DQw-types 1-9. We find the strongest relative risk conferred by DQw7 (RR = 4.7), that is observed in 36 of 64 patients (56%) and only 21 of 98 controls (21%) (P corr less than 0.002). Comparison of DNA sequence variation in the DQB1 gene, that is found predominantly in Hashimoto's thyroiditis patients, indicates that codons 45 and 57 are critical features in DQw7 which distinguish it from other DQw specificities. The adjacent DQA1 genes also display a significant association with Hashimoto's thyroiditis (DQA1*0201/*0301 heterozygotes were found in 37% of patients and 15% controls, P less than 0.03). No significant association could be found with polymorphisms of the tumor necrosis factor gene. These results provide a new basis for the concept of genetic susceptibility in Hashimoto's thyroiditis and will help to elucidate the underlying autoimmune mechanisms that lead to disease at the functional level. PMID:1977755

  11. Gestational Diabetes and Thyroid Autoimmunity

    OpenAIRE

    Fabrizio Monaco; Giorgio Napolitano; Cesidio Giuliani; Ester Vitacolonna; Ines Bucci; Barbara Di Nenno; Annalisa Passante; Annunziata Lapolla; Dominique Cerrone; Fabio Capani

    2012-01-01

    Background. About 10% of pregnancies are complicated by previously unknown impairment of glucose metabolism, which is defined as gestational diabetes. There are little data available on prevalence of thyroid disorders in patients affected by gestational diabetes, and about their postgestational thyroid function and autoimmunity. We therefore investigated pancreatic and thyroid autoimmunity in gestational diabetic patients and in women who had had a previous gestational diabetic pregnancy. Met...

  12. Identification of Novel Genetic Loci Associated with Thyroid Peroxidase Antibodies and Clinical Thyroid Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medici, Marco; Porcu, Eleonora; Pistis, Giorgio;

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) are common, affecting 2-5% of the general population. Individuals with positive thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAbs) have an increased risk of autoimmune hypothyroidism (Hashimoto's thyroiditis), as well as autoimmune hyperthyroidism (Graves' disease). As the ...

  13. Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Some examples of CAM are herbal products, chiropractic , acupuncture , and hypnosis . If you have an autoimmune disease, ... Toll-Free: 877-226-4267 National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, NIH, HHS Phone: ...

  14. Low 25 (OH) vitamin D levels are associated with autoimmune thyroid disease in polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscogiuri, Giovanna; Palomba, Stefano; Caggiano, Mario; Tafuri, Domenico; Colao, Annamaria; Orio, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    Low 25(OH) vitamin D levels have been associated with several autoimmune diseases and recently with autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD). The aim of the study was to investigate the association of AITD with 25(OH) vitamin D levels in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Fifty women with PCOS were consecutively enrolled and underwent routine health checkups, which included measurements of 25(OH) vitamin D, anti-thyroid peroxidase (TPO-Ab), anti-thyreoglobulin (TG-Ab) antibodies, FT3, FT4, and TSH. Selecting 50 nmol/L as cut-off point, low 25(OH) vitamin D levels were detected in 23 of 50 patients (46 %). AITD was diagnosed when TPO-Ab levels exceeding 80 U/ml and/or TG-Ab levels exceeding 70 U/ml. AITD was detected in 12 of 50 patients (24 %). The levels of 25(OH) vitamin D were significantly lower in women with PCOS and AITD when compared with women with PCOS and without AITD (p = 0.02). In women with AITD no correlation was found between 25(OH) vitamin D and TG-Ab (r = 0.48; p = 0.16), TPO-Ab (r = 0.43; p = 0.21), TSH (r = 0.38; p = 0.27), FT3 (r = -0.40; p = 0.25) and FT4 levels (r = -0.54; p = 0.10). These findings suggest that low levels of 25(OH) vitamin D were significantly associated with AITD in women with PCOS. PMID:26433740

  15. Quantitative thyroid scintigraphy for the differentiation of Graves' disease and hyperthyroid autoimmune thyroiditis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is the evaluation of the TCTUs in the differentiation between AIT and GD in patients with hyperthyroidism. Methods: We determined the TCTUs in 59 patients with untreated hyperthyroid GD and in 51 patients with AIT who had subclinical or manifest hyperthyroidism without medication. Patients with GD were characterized by the presence of hyperthyroidism, decreased echogenicity of the thyroid, elevation of TSH-receptor autoantibodies (TRAb). AIT was defined by a decreased echogenicity of the thyroid, absence of elevated TSH-receptor autoantibodies (TRAb), autoantibodies against the thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO) and spontaneous remission or development of subclinical hypothyroidism within 3 months. Results: Thyroid volumes of patients with AIT were significantly lower than those of patients with GD (p99mTcO4- offered rapid and reliable differentiation between hyperthyroid GD and AIT. (orig.)

  16. Autoantibodies in autoimmune thyroid disease promote immune complex formation with self antigens and increase B cell and CD4+ T cell proliferation in response to self antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Hegedüs, Laszlo; Leslie, Robert Graham Quinton

    2004-01-01

    B cells are centrally involved as antigen-presenting cells in certain autoimmune diseases. To establish whether autoantibodies form immune complexes (IC) with self-antigens in autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) and promote B cell uptake of self-antigen, sera from patients with Hashimoto's thyroidi......B cells are centrally involved as antigen-presenting cells in certain autoimmune diseases. To establish whether autoantibodies form immune complexes (IC) with self-antigens in autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) and promote B cell uptake of self-antigen, sera from patients with Hashimoto...

  17. The Roles of the TSH Receptor Antibodies in Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the clinical and pathogenetic roles of TSH receptor antibodies in autoimmune thyroid diseases, TBII were measured by TSH-radioreceptor assay methods in 352 patients with Graves disease, 108 patients with other thyroid diseases and 69 normal persons. The normal range of TBII activity was less than 15%. The frequencies of detectable TBIl in 169 patients with untreated Graves disease, 31 patients with hyperthyroidism under treatment and 70 patients with euthyroidism under treatment were 92.4%, 87.1% and 54.3% respectively. However 12 (21.8%) out of 55 patients who have been in remission more than one year after discontinuation of antithyroid drugs treatment had detectable TBII activities in their sera. In 196 patients with untreated Graves disease, the frequency of TBII increased by increasing size of goiter and the frequency of proptosis was significantly high in patients whose TBII activities were more than 60%. TBll activities were roughly correlated with total T3,T4 and free T4, index but low γ2 value(less than 0.1). In 67 patients with Graves' disease who were positive TB1I before antithyroid drugs treatment, TBII activities began to decrease from the third months and it was converted to negative in 35.8% of patients at 12 months after treatment. There were no significant differences of the declining and disappearing rates of TBII activities between high dose and conventional dose groups. TBII activities were significantly increased initially (2-4 months) and then began to decrease from 5-9 months after 131I treatment. There were two groups, one whose TBII activities decreased gradually and the other did not change until 12 months after subtotal thyroidectomy. Although preoperative clinical and laboratory findings of both groups were not different, TBII activities of non-decreasing group were significantly higher than those of decreasing group(74.6+18.6% vs 39.2+15.2%; P(0.01). Thirty three(55.9%) out of 59 patients with Graves disease relapsed

  18. Clinical implications of a new TSH-receptor-antibody-assay (DYNOtest trademark TRAKhuman) in autoimmune thyroid diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: Conventional radioreceptor-antibody-assays (RAAs) fail in the detection of TSH-receptor antibodies (TRAKs) in 10-30% of patients with Graves' disease (GD). The aim of this study was the evaluation of the diagnostic and clinical impact of a new RRA (DYNOtest trademark TRAKhuman) which uses the human recombinant TSH-Receptor in the diagnosis of autoimmune thyroid disease. Methods: Sera from 142 consecutive patients (GD: n=50, autoimmune thyroiditis/AIT: n=92) and from 55 controls (31 patients without any thyroid disease and 14 with euthyroid goiter) were evaluated both with the DYNOtest trademark TRAKhuman-assay and a conventional RRA (TRAK-Assay trademark). Thyroid in vitro parameters and thyroid sonography were performed in all patients. Results: The DYNOtest trademark TRAK-assay was significantly superior to the conventional RRA in the diagnosis of GD (ptrademark as well as in the DYNOtest trademark TRAKhuman-Assay. Therefore the specifity of the DYNOtest trademark TRAKhuman was not inferior compared with the conventional assay. Conclusion: The DYNOtest trademark TRAK-assay is superior in the diagnostic work up of Graves' disease compared with a conventional TRAK-assay and offers an equal specifity. (orig.)

  19. Autoimmunity in differentiated thyroid cancer: significance and related clinical problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Rasmussen, Ase Krogh

    2011-01-01

    autoimmune thyroid diseases should have a careful follow-up. Furthermore, the presence of thyroglobulin antibodies (TgAb) in patients with DTC may limit the use of serum thyroglobulin as a tumor marker due to methodological problems in the determination of serum thyroglobulin. However, in such cases serial......Coexistence of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) and thyroid autoimmune diseases could represent a mere coincidence due to the frequent occurrence of autoimmunity, but there may also be a pathological and causative link between the two conditions. The coincidence of DTC with Hashimoto's disease...... has been variably reported at between 0.5 and 22.5% and of DTC with Graves' disease between 0 and 9.8%. In this review available evidence for thyroid autoimmunity in DTC is summarized and it is concluded that thyroid cancer does coexist with thyroid autoimmunity, implying that patients treated for...

  20. Autoimmunity in differentiated thyroid cancer: significance and related clinical problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Rasmussen, Ase Krogh

    2010-01-01

    autoimmune thyroid diseases should have a careful follow-up. Furthermore, the presence of thyroglobulin antibodies (TgAb) in patients with DTC may limit the use of serum thyroglobulin as a tumor marker due to methodological problems in the determination of serum thyroglobulin. However, in such cases serial......Coexistence of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) and thyroid autoimmune diseases could represent a mere coincidence due to the frequent occurrence of autoimmunity, but there may also be a pathological and causative link between the two conditions. The coincidence of DTC with Hashimoto's disease...... has been variably reported at between 0.5 and 22.5% and of DTC with Graves' disease between 0 and 9.8%. In this review available evidence for thyroid autoimmunity in DTC is summarized and it is concluded that thyroid cancer does coexist with thyroid autoimmunity, implying that patients treated for...

  1. Regulatory B and T cell responses in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Birte

    2016-02-01

    Autoimmune diseases occur due to faulty self-tolerance. Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) are classic examples of organ-specific autoimmune diseases. GD is an auto-antibody-mediated disease where autoantibodies are produced against the thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR). HT is primarily a T-cell mediated disease, and whether B cells play a pathogenic role in the pathogenesis is still unclear. Both GD and HT are characterized by infiltration of the thyroid gland by self-reactive T cells and B cells. In the first paper of this thesis, the role of regulatory B cells (Bregs) and regulatory T cells (Tregs) were investigated in the context of GD and HT. First, we studied the role of the thyroid self-antigen, thyroglobulin (TG) in healthy donors. The self-antigen TG, but not the foreign recall antigen tetanus toxoid (TT), was able to induce interleukin 10 (IL-10) secretion by B cells and CD4+ T cells. These IL-10 producing B cells (B10 cells) from healthy donors were enriched with the CD5+ and CD24hi phenotype. In addition, TG was able to induce IL-6 production by B cells. In contrast, TT induced production of Th1-type pro-inflammatory cytokines including interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) and IL-2. In the second paper, the frequency and phenotype of B10 was investigated in healthy donors and patients with GD or HT.  The frequencies of B10 cells were similar in the three groups, irrespective of whether IL-10 was induced by a combination of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and ionomycin, by CpG oligodeoxynucletodies (ODN) 2006, or by TG. Several phenotypes have been associated with B10 cells such as CD5+, CD25+, TIM-1+, CD24hiCD38hi and CD27+CD43+. We found that larger proportions of B10 cells in patients with GD or HT were CD25+ and TIM-1+ than B10 cells in healthy donors. In healthy donors, B10 cells were CD24hiCD38-, whereas for HT patients these cells were primarily CD24intCD38int. For GD patients, we found lower proportions of B10 cells

  2. Localization of the discontinous immunodominant region recognized by human anti-thyroperoxidase autoantibodies in autoimmune thyroid diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Bresson, Damien; Cerutti, Martine; Devauchelle, Gerard; Pugnière, Martine; Roquet, Françoise; Bès, Cédric; Bossard, Carine; Chardès, Thierry; Péraldi-Roux, Sylvie

    2003-01-01

    The discontinuous immunodominant region (IDR) recognized by autoantibodies directed against the thyroperoxidase (TPO) molecule, a major autoantigen in autoimmune thyroid diseases, has not yet been completely localized. By using peptide phage-displayed technology, we identified three critical motifs, LXPEXD, QSYP, and EX(E/D)PPV, within selected mimotopes which interacted with the human recombinant anti-TPO autoantibody (aAb) T13, derived from an antibody phage-displayed library obtained from ...

  3. Characterization of Polyclonal Antibody Induced by Autoantibody TPO (Thyroidperoxidase) From Autoimmune Thyroid Disease (AITD) Serum with ELISA and Western Blotting

    OpenAIRE

    Maulidya Aulia Fiqriyana; Aulanni'am Aulanni'am; Anna Roosdiana

    2013-01-01

    Autoantibody TPO is a potential marker for early detection of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD). Autoantibody TPO has a specifity and a sensitivity ranging from 82% to100% in comparison to other AITD serology markers. Concentration of autoantibody TPO in sera had a positive correlation with activities of chronic AITD. This research have been conducted to investigate the characteristic of polyclonal antibody TPO induced by autoantibody TPO from serum of AITD patients. The autoantibody TPO was ...

  4. Thyroid autoimmunity in pregnant Nigerians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluwatosin O Kayode

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Thyroid autoimmunity is a recognized disorder in pregnancy and is associated with a number of adverse pregnancy outcomes. Aim: This study set out to determine the relationship between pregnancy and thyroid autoimmunity in Nigerian women. Settings and Design: This was an analytical cross-sectional study carried out in a tertiary hospital in South Western Nigeria with a total study population of 108 pregnant and 52 nonpregnant women. Subjects and Methods: Serum thyroid stimulating hormone, free thyroxine and thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPO-Ab were quantitatively determined using enzyme linked immuno-assays. Pregnant women were grouped into three categories ( 28 weeks. The relationship between pregnancy and thyroid autoimmunity was determined using Spearman correlation. Analysis of variance was used in comparison of means, Chi-square test used in analyzing proportions while P ≤ 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: The mean age of the pregnant women was 30.4 ± 6.0 years while the mean gestational age of all pregnant women was 20.6 ± 9.6 weeks. The mean TPO-Ab of 11.58 IU/ml in the pregnant was significantly higher than that of the controls of 7.23 IU/ml (P < 0.001. Out of 108 pregnant women, 27 (25% had elevated TPO-Ab as against about 2% of the nonpregnant women levels P < 0.001. The number of pregnant women with elevated TPO-Ab levels decreased from 33.3% in the first group to 25.6% and 15.2% in the second and third groups. Conclusion: Thyroid autoimmunity expressed by the presence of TPO-Ab is high among pregnant Nigerian women and the frequency of autoimmunity appears to decline with advancing gestational age.

  5. 351 Prevalence of Thyroid Peroxidase Autoantibodies (ANTI-TPO) in Women with Autoimmune Connective Tissue Diseases (ACTD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, Georgios; Vakaloudi, Anastasia; Koutsika, Eirene; Anastasiou, Ekarerini; Koteli, Asimoula

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic autoimmune thyroiditis, manifested by positive test for antithyroid antibodies, is common in the general population, occurring in 10 to 20 percent of women. The aim of the study was to determine whether Anti-TPO is more prevalent in women with ACTD, compared to the general population. Methods Anti-TPO was determined in 290 women diagnosed with ACTD based on ACR (American College of Rheumatology) criteria and in 50 healthy women (control group). Among ACTD patients, 121 were diagnosed with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), 44 Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE), 43 Sjοgren's Syndrome (SS), 42 Systemic Scleroderma (SScl) and 40 Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA). Anti-TPO was measured by Chemiluminescent Microparticle Immunoassay (CMIA) on Architect i2000SR (ABBOT Laboratories). Results The prevalence of Anti-TPO in separate groups of patients had as follow: RA 28.93%, SLE 29.55%, SS 27.91%, SScl 23.81%, PsA 30% and control group 12%. Conclusions ACTD and thyroid autoimmune diseases often overlap with each other. Increased Anti-TPO may be most common among women patients with ACTD. On the other hand, these systemic diseases are often present in Hasimoto's thyroiditis subjects. Therefore it is clinically important to screen women patients with ACTD for the co-existence of thyroid disorders.

  6. Diagnosis and discrimination of autoimmune Graves' disease and Hashimoto's disease using thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor-containing recombinant proteoliposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Hidetaka; Matsuo, Hideaki; Imamura, Koji; Morino, Kazuhiko; Okumura, Katsuzumi; Tsumoto, Kanta; Yoshimura, Tetsuro

    2009-12-01

    Graves' disease (GD) is an autoimmune disease of the thyroid gland caused by autoantibodies against thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR). Currently, the diagnostic test for TSHR autoantibodies is based on an indirect competitive binding assay that measures the ability of TSHR autoantibodies to inhibit the binding of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) to TSHR. Here, we have developed a specific and direct diagnostic method for autoantibodies in GD that incorporates immobilized TSHR-containing recombinant proteoliposomes into an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). To reduce non-specific binding of autoantibodies to recombinant proteoliposomes, we investigated the effect of polyethylene glycol (PEG)-lipid on the binding of commercially available anti-TSHR antibodies (aTSHRAb). The incorporation of PEG-lipids into liposomes decreased non-specific binding, as compared to liposomes that did not contain PEG-lipids, and the addition of blocking reagents further decreased non-specific reactivity. aTSHRAb exhibited higher reactivity towards PEG-modified TSHR recombinant proteoliposomes than PEG-modified liposomes without TSHR (bare liposomes). Importantly, serum autoantibodies from patients with GD, which is associated with hyperthyroidism, exhibited remarkably specific binding to TSHR recombinant proteoliposomes. Serum autoantibodies from patients with Hashimoto's disease (HD), which is associated with hypothyroidism, also reacted specifically with proteoliposomal TSHR. These results suggest that immobilized TSHR recombinant proteoliposomes can serve as a direct diagnostic test for GD and HD. Furthermore, given that there is no competition test currently available for detecting autoantibodies in HD, the combination of TSHR recombinant proteoliposome ELISA and indirect competitive TSHR binding assay might be an effective way to discriminate between GD and HD. PMID:19914592

  7. Studies on thyroglobulin-specific suppressor T cell function in autoimmune thyroid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    T cell regulation of the generation of thyroglobulin plaque-forming cells (Tg PFC) and protein A plaque-forming cells (Prot A PFC) was investigated using lymphocytes from patients with autoimmune thyroid disease. T and B cell mixed cultures (T-B MC) were carried out without mitogenic or antigenic stimulation to identify physiological T cell effects in the system. Tg PFC were found in 8 (44%) of 18 patients who had high titers of thyroglobulin antibody in their sera. Tg-specific and nonspecific immunoregulation by T cells from patients and normal subjects was studied using B cells from these eight patients in the T-B MC system. Remarkably lower values of Tg PFC induction compared to Prot A PFC induction were found after T cell addition. Normal T cells inhibited Tg PFC induction, but patient T cells did not, while the same extent of helper effects were found on Prot A PFC induction by the addition of patient and normal T cells. Irradiation (1500 rads) of T cells from patients and normal subjects significantly enhanced both Tg PFC and Prot A PFC induction. Thus, Tg-specific suppressor T cells are present in all normal subjects as part of the radiosensitive suppressor T cell subset. The increase in Tg-PFC caused by irradiation-induced inhibition of Tg-specific suppressor T cell function was significantly greater in normal subjects than in patients. Histamine type 2 receptor-bearing T cells inhibited Prot A PFC induction, but not Tg PFC induction, in the autologous T-B MC system. No Tg PFC were induced from normal B cells in any combination with untreated T cells, irradiated T cells, or histamine type 2 receptor-negative T cells from patients or normal subjects

  8. Autoimmune thyroiditis in girls of pubertal age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two hundred twenty five girls with autoimmune thyroiditis aged 11-16 living in Belarus permanently have been examined in 8-10 years after Chernobyl accident. The disease at girls of pubertal age living on the contaminated territories is characterized by more frequent asthenoneurotic symptoms, more marked immunologic changes and higher levels of both antibodies to thyroglobulin and thyrocytes microsome antigens as compared to those from 'clean' regions

  9. Thyroid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Presenting a multidisciplinary approach to the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid disease, this volume provides a comprehensive picture of current thyroid medicine and surgery. The book integrates the perspectives of the many disciplines that deal with the clinical manifestations of thyroid disorders. Adding to the clinical usefulness of the book is the state-of-the-art coverage of many recent developments in thyroidology, including the use of highly sensitive two-site TSH immunoradionetric measurements to diagnose thyroid activity; thyroglobulin assays in thyroid cancer and other diseases; new diagnostic applications of MRI and CT; treatment with radionuclides and chemotherapy; new developments in thyroid immunology, pathology, and management of hyperthyroidism; suppressive treatment with thyroid hormone; and management of Graves' ophthalmopathy. The book also covers all aspects of thyroid surgery, including surgical treatment of hyperthyroidism; papillary, follicular, and other carcinomas; thyroidectomy; and prevention and management of complications

  10. Autoimmune liver disease panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liver disease test panel - autoimmune ... Autoimmune disorders are a possible cause of liver disease. The most common of these diseases are autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cirrhosis. This group of tests helps your health care provider ...

  11. Sex differences in autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voskuhl Rhonda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Women are more susceptible to a variety of autoimmune diseases including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, multiple sclerosis (MS, primary biliary cirrhosis, rheumatoid arthritis and Hashimoto's thyroiditis. This increased susceptibility in females compared to males is also present in animal models of autoimmune diseases such as spontaneous SLE in (NZBxNZWF1 and NZM.2328 mice, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE in SJL mice, thyroiditis, Sjogren's syndrome in MRL/Mp-lpr/lpr mice and diabetes in non-obese diabetic mice. Indeed, being female confers a greater risk of developing these diseases than any single genetic or environmental risk factor discovered to date. Understanding how the state of being female so profoundly affects autoimmune disease susceptibility would accomplish two major goals. First, it would lead to an insight into the major pathways of disease pathogenesis and, secondly, it would likely lead to novel treatments which would disrupt such pathways.

  12. Treated Autoimmune Thyroid Disease Is Associated with a Decreased Quality of Life among Young Persons with Type 1 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alena Spirkova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes (T1D in children and adolescents is relatively often accompanied by other immunopathological diseases, autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD or celiac disease (CD. Our aim was to assess whether these conditions are associated with changes in the health-related quality of life (HRQOL in pediatric patients with T1D. In a cross-sectional study we identified eligible 332 patients with T1D aged 8–18 years, of whom 248 (75% together with their parents responded to the PedsQL Generic and Diabetes Modules. Compared to 143 patients without thyroid autoantibodies, 40 patients with a thyroxine-treated AITD scored lower in the overall generic HRQOL (P=0.014, as well as in the overall diabetes-specific HRQOL (P=0.013. After adjustment for age, gender, duration of diabetes, type of diabetes treatment, and diabetes control, this association remained statistically significant for the generic HRQOL (P=0.023. Celiac disease was not associated with a change in the generic or diabetes-specific HRQOL (P=0.07  and   P=0.63, resp.. Parental scores showed no association with AITD or celiac disease, except a marginally significant decrease in the overall generic HRQOL (P=0.039 in the T1D + AITD compared to T1D group. Our study indicates that, in pediatric patients with T1D, concomitant thyroxine-treated AITD is associated with lower quality of life.

  13. Population of antithyroid autoantibodies as a source of antibodies of various levels of specificity and functionality: the clinical importance of a phenomenon of combination theory at monitoring of patients with autoimmune diseases of a thyroid gland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A V Andreeva

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The review of literature is dedicated to comparative analysis of pathogenetic and clinicodiagnostic significance of antithyroid autoantibodies (autoAB differing in their specificity (АB to thyroglobulin (anti-TG and АB to thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO, anti-TGPO, and functionality TG- and TPO-antibodies, namely antibodies-proteases in pathogenesis autoimmune diseases thyroid gland and possibility of their use in modern diagnostics of autoimmune thyroid diseases.

  14. STUDY ON THE HETEROGENEITY OF TSH RECEPTOR ANTIBODIES IN THE PATHOGENESIS OF AUTOIMMUNE THYROID DISEASE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈春荣; 陈名道; 邓侠兴; 李凤英; 唐金凤; 陈家伦

    2000-01-01

    ffeSllm6 Objectif Pour studier l' heterogdneite des anticorps du rdcepteur 7SH chez ies ~lades AITD (autoimmunethyroid disease). ANthaes Six malades aunt des anticorps heterogdnes du rdcepteur TSH out ate selectional. Chez cesmalades out did dtablis des clones des cellules B hiV-transfonha. theultats to valeur de TBll (124TSH binding inhibitingimmunoglobulin ) vane de 51 % d 89% chez ces malades. gb (thyroid stimulating anti~) existe chef ies malades M 1,2,4, 5 et 6 alors que seuls ies ma ladeS M 1, 2 et 3 ...

  15. [Current protease-antibody-based serodiagnostic tools and their use in the diagnosis of autoimmune thyroid diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaeva, M A; Bogatyreva, Z I; Andreeva, A; Suchkova, E N; Korotkova, A A; Baĭsugurov, M A; Ivanova, E V; Notkins, A; Vinnitskiĭ, L I; Pal'tsev, M A; Suchkov, S V

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of the investigation was to comparatively study the possible clinicodiagnostic and clinicoprognostic value of thyroglobulin (TG) autoantibodies (anti-TG autoAB) and thyroid peroxidase (TPO) (anti-TPO autoAB) with proteolytic activity (protease-AB) and to develop additional clinicoimmunological criteria for working out a protease-AB-based laboratory serodiagnosis protocol. Sera from 240 patients with autoimmune thyroiditis (AIT), 124 with diffuse toxic goiter (DTG), and 172 with other thyroid diseases were studied. Serum from 40 clinically healthy donors served as a control. Sera were screened for anti-TG and anti-TPO autoAB by enzyme immunoassay and/or radioimmunoassay. Nonspecific proteolytic activity was determined, by incubating a highly purified AB IgG-isotype solution with nonspecific substrate (such as BSA-FITS or thyoredoxine/Trx), followed by the measurement of relative fluorescence shifts at a wavelength of 470 nm. The blood samples taken from patients with AIT or DTG and the highly purified anti-TG or anti-TRO autoAB of IgG isotype were incubated with appropriate human substrates to determine AG-specific proteolytic activity. Proteolysis products were detected by PAAG electrophoresis. An association was found between the rise in the frequency of protease AB, their catalytic activity, a tendency toward autoAB between themselves, and the degree of thyroid tissue degradation in AIT and DTG; some specific features of a serological pattern were noted in diferent dorms of AIT and DTG. For example, the prevailing autoABs have been shown to be TG-specific in AIT and TPO-specific proteases in DTG; also, the detectable catalytic activity of both autoAB in AIT is an order of magnitude higher than that in DTG. No protease ABs have been recorded in other forms of thyroid diseases in which antithyroid autoABs are also frequently detected. The screening procedure for protease AB may be considered as a highly sensitive and specific indicator test in the

  16. Achalasia and thyroid disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad Hassan Emami; Mostafa Raisi; Jaleh Amini; Hamed Daghaghzadeh

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate some possible etiologies of achalasia by screening patients with achalasia for some autoimmune diseases such as thyroid disease.METHODS: We examined 30 known cases of achalasia (20 females, 10 males). Their age ranged 15-70 years.All of them were referred to our institute for treatment.Their sera were evaluated to detect some possible associations with rheumatoid disease, thyroid disease,inflammatory process, anemia, etc.RESULTS: Seven out of 30 patients (23%) had thyroid disease including four patients with hypothyroidism (13.3%), two patients with hyperthyroidism (6.6%),and one had only thyroid nodule but was in euthyroid state (3.3%). Two of these hypothyroid patients had no related clinical symptoms (subclinical) and two had clinical manifestations of hypothyroidism. There were no correlations between the intensity of thyroid diseases and the severity of achalasia symptoms.CONCLUSION: The etiology of achalasia is unknown although autoimmunity has been implicated and is supported by several studies. Thyroid disease presents concomitantly with achalasia in about one fourth of our patients who may have a common etiology.

  17. Autoimmune disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    2005164 Optimal cut-point of glutamic acid decar-boxylase antibody (GAD-Ab) for differentiating two subtypes of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA). LI Xia(李霞), et al. Dept Endocrinol, 2nd Xiangya Hosp, Central South Univ, Changsha, 410011. Chin J Diabetes, 2005;13(1) :34-38. Objective: To investigate the optimal cut-point of glutamate decarboxylase antibody (GAD-Ab) for differentiating two subtypes of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (I. ADA). Methods: The frequency

  18. Thyroid diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This chapter reviews the correlation between thyroid disease, other than cancer, and radiation in the literature. Radiation-induced thyroid disturbance is discussed in the context of external and internal irradiation. External irradiation of 10 to 40 Gy may lower thyroid function several months or years later. Oral administration of I-131 is widely given to patients with Basedow's disease; it may also lower thyroid function with increasing radiation doses. When giving 70 Gy or more of I-131, hypothyroidism has been reported to occur in 20-30% and at least 10%. Thyroiditis induced with internal I-131 irradiation has also been reported, but no data is available concerning external irradiation-induced thyroiditis. The incidence of nodular goiter was found to be several ten times higher with external irradiation than internal irradiation. Thyroid disturbance is correlated with A-bomb survivors. A-bomb radiation can be divided into early radiation within one minute after A-bombing and the subsequent residual radiation. Nodular goiter was significantly more frequent in the exposed group than the non-exposed group; it increased with increasing radiation doses and younger age (20 years or less) at the time of exposure. The incidence of decrease in thyroid function was higher with increasing radiation doses. However, in the case of Nagasaki, the incidence of hypothyroidism was significantly higher in the low-dose exposed group, especially A-bomb survivors aged 10-39 at the time of exposure and women. (N.K.)

  19. Allosuppressor T lymphocytes abolish migration inhibition factor production in autoimmune thyroid disease: evidence from radiosensitivity experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ability of normal T lymphocytes to abolish the production of migration inhibition factor by antigen-sensitized T lymphocytes of Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) in response to thyroid antigen has been studied by a modified migration inhibition factor test using isolated T lymphocytes alone. The production of migration inhibition factor was consistently abolished when normal T lymphocytes were mixed with GD or HT T lymphocytes in various ratios (1:9, 2:8, 5:5) as reported previously (Okita et al., 1980b). However, prior in-vitro irradiation (1000 rad) of the normal T lymphocytes resulted in loss of their ability to abolish migration inhibition factor production by the antigen-sensitized T lymphocytes of GD and HT. The effect is consistent with the radiosensitivity of suppressor T lymphocytes and indicates that the effect of normal T lymphocytes on GD and HT T lymphocytes is one of allosuppression. The results support the view that there is a defect in suppressor T cell function in GD and HT. (author)

  20. Cytometric evaluation of intracellular IFN-γ and IL-4 levels in thyroid follicular cells from patients with autoimmune thyroid diseases

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    Bossowski Artur

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent few years is underlined that altered balance of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines play an important role in the pathogenesis of AITD. The aim of this study was to estimate intracellular INF-γ and IL-4 levels in thyroid-infiltrating lymphocytes and thyrocytes isolated from thyroid tissues in 54 adolescent patients aged 8-21 years, with Graves' disease (GD; n = 18, Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT; n = 18 and non-toxic multinodular goiter (NTMG; n = 18. Methods Fresh thyroid tissues were taken on culture medium RPMI -1640, it was mechanically prepared. In next step were added cell activators -12- myristate 13- the acetate (PMA and Ionomycin as well as the inhibitor of transportation of proteins - Breferdin A. They were cultured 24 hours in 50 ml flasks at 37°C in a 5-95% CO2-air water-saturated atmosphere. After that, thyrocytes were identified by mouse mAb directed against human TPO epitope 64 conjugated with rabbit anti-mouse antibodies IgG (Fab'2 labeled by FITC. After incubation at room temperature to each of samples added reagent A fixative the cellular membrane. In next step into the cell suspensions were added reagent B to permeabilization of cellular membrane and specific anti-IL-4-PE or anti-IFN-γ-PE mAbs. Identification of intracellular cytokines in T lymphocytes was performed in the same procedure with application of anti-CD4-PerCP and anti-CD8-PerCP mAbs specific for T lymphocytes. The cells were analyzed in a flow cytometry (Coulter EPICS XL. Results In examined group of patients with GD we observed statistically significant higher mean percentage of cells with phenotype CD4+IL-4 (p Conclusions We conclude that human thyrocytes in autoimmune thyroid disorders could be a source of cytokine production and that their activation influences local interaction with T lymphocytes inflowing to the thyroid gland.

  1. Hashimoto's thyroiditis following Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umar, Husaini; Muallima, Nur; Adam, John M F; Sanusi, Harsinen

    2010-01-01

    Both Graves' disease and chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto's thyroiditis) are autoimmune diseases of thyroid gland. Graves' disease is caused by stimulation of TSH receptor located on the thyroid gland by an antibody, which is known as TSH receptor antibody (TRAb). Furthermore, this may lead to hyperplasia and hyperfunction of the thyroid gland. On the contrary, the cause of Hashimoto's thyroiditis is thought due to a TSH stimulation-blocking antibody (TSBAb) which blocks the action of TSH hormone and subsequently brings damage and atrophy to thyroid gland. Approximately 15-20% of patients with Graves' disease had been reported to have spontaneous hypothyroidism resulting from the chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto's disease). Pathogenesis for chronic thyroiditis following anti-thyroid drug treatment in patients with Graves' disease remains unclear. It has been estimated that chronic thyroiditis or Hashimoto's disease, which occurs following the Graves' disease episode is due to extended immune response in Graves' disease. It includes the immune response to endogenous thyroid antigens, i.e. thyroid peroxidase and thyroglobulin, which may enhance lymphocyte infiltration and finally causes Hashimoto's thyroiditis. We report four cases of chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto's disease) in patients who have been previously diagnosed with Graves' hyperthyroidism. In three cases, Hashimoto's thyroiditis occurs in 7 to 25 years after the treatment of Grave's disease; while the other case has it only after few months of Grave's disease treatment. The diagnosis of Hashimoto's disease (chronic thyroiditis) was based on clinical manifestation, high TSHs level, positive thyroid peroxidase antibody and thyroglobulin antibody, and supported by positive results of fine needle aspiration biopsy. Moreover, the result of histopathological test has also confirmed the diagnosis in two cases. All cases have been successfully treated by levothyroxine treatment. PMID:20305330

  2. Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find an ENT Doctor Near You Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease Patient Health Information ... with a hearing loss. How Does the Healthy Ear Work? The ear has three main parts: the ...

  3. Thyroid diseases and pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Grandi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Thyroid diseases and diabetes mellitus are the most common endocrine diseases during pregnancy. Internal Medicine doctors could be involved in the management of pregnant women affected by thyroid diseases, in particular if an Endocrine Unit lacks in the hospital; it is mandatory that they have the skills to cope with these diseases. METHODS In this work authors describe the most common thyroid abnormalities that can occur during pregnancy: hypothyroidism (clinical and subclinical, hyperthyroidism (clinical and sub-clinical, autoimmune thyroiditis (in particular the so called post-partum thyroiditis, nodular diseases and cancer. They discuss moreover the peculiar pathophysiologic mechanisms by which these diseases appear, the diagnostic tools and the therapies, according to their own experience and the more recent international guidelines. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS It is important to evaluate thyroid function tests before and during pregnancy, at 16th and 28th gestational week; it is mandatory to cure also the “sub-clinical” hypothyroidism during pregnancy, when TSH level are higher than 5 μIU/mL; the optimal dose of levo-thyroxine during pregnancy is, average, 30-50% higher than that used before pregnancy; it is not correct to treat mild or sub-clinical hyperthyroidism; propylthyouracil is the best drug to treat hyperthyroidism during pregnancy; the post-partum thyroiditis is generally transient, so that a careful monitoring of thyroid function is advisable, in particular after 9-12 months of therapy; thyroid cancer, if discovered during pregnancy, generally has no negative effects on the outcome of the pregnancy; it would be better to treat surgically thyroid cancer during the last trimester of the pregnancy.

  4. Thyroid peroxidase forms thionamide-sensitive homodimers: relevance for immunomodulation of thyroid autoimmunity

    OpenAIRE

    McDonald, David O.; Pearce, Simon H S

    2009-01-01

    Thyroid peroxidase (TPO) is the key enzyme in thyroid hormone production and a universal autoantigen in Graves’ and other autoimmune thyroid diseases. We wished to explore the expression of TPO and whether it was affected by thionamide antithyroid drugs. We studied recombinant TPO, stably expressed by a Chinese hamster ovary cell line (CHO-TPO) and transiently expressed TPO-enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) and -FLAG fusion proteins. Immunoblotting of CHO-TPO cell extracts showed high...

  5. Aberrant Levels of Hematopoietic/Neuronal Growth and Differentiation Factors in Euthyroid Women at Risk for Autoimmune Thyroid Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elske T Massolt

    Full Text Available Subjects at risk for major mood disorders have a higher risk to develop autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD and vice-versa, implying a shared pathogenesis. In mood disorder patients, an abnormal profile of hematopoietic/neuronal growth factors is observed, suggesting that growth/differentiation abnormalities of these cell lineages may predispose to mood disorders. The first objective of our study was to investigate whether an aberrant profile of these hematopoietic/neuronal growth factors is also detectable in subjects at risk for AITD. A second objective was to study the inter relationship of these factors with previously determined and published growth factors/cytokines in the same subjects.We studied 64 TPO-Ab-negative females with at least 1 first- or second-degree relative with AITD, 32 of whom did and 32 who did not seroconvert to TPO-Ab positivity in 5-year follow-up. Subjects were compared with 32 healthy controls (HCs. We measured serum levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, Stem Cell Factor (SCF, Insulin-like Growth Factor-Binding Protein 2 (IGFBP-2, Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF and IL-7 at baseline.BDNF was significantly lower (8.2 vs 18.9 ng/ml, P<0.001, while EGF (506.9 vs 307.6 pg/ml, P = 0.003 and IGFBP-2 (388.3 vs 188.5 ng/ml, P = 0.028 were significantly higher in relatives than in HCs. Relatives who seroconverted in the next 5 years had significantly higher levels of SCF than non-seroconverters (26.5 vs 16.7 pg/ml, P = 0.017. In a cluster analysis with the previously published growth factors/cytokines SCF clustered together with IL-1β, IL-6 and CCL-3, of which high levels also preceded seroconversion.Relatives of AITD patients show aberrant serum levels of 4 hematopoietic/neuronal growth factors similar to the aberrancies found in mood disorder patients, suggesting that shared growth and differentiation defects in both the hematopoietic and neuronal system may underlie thyroid autoimmunity and mood disorders. A

  6. 351 Prevalence of Thyroid Peroxidase Autoantibodies (ANTI-TPO) in Women with Autoimmune Connective Tissue Diseases (ACTD)

    OpenAIRE

    Papadopoulos, Georgios; Vakaloudi, Anastasia; Koutsika, Eirene; Anastasiou, Ekarerini; Koteli, Asimoula

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic autoimmune thyroiditis, manifested by positive test for antithyroid antibodies, is common in the general population, occurring in 10 to 20 percent of women. The aim of the study was to determine whether Anti-TPO is more prevalent in women with ACTD, compared to the general population. Methods Anti-TPO was determined in 290 women diagnosed with ACTD based on ACR (American College of Rheumatology) criteria and in 50 healthy women (control group). Among ACTD patients, 121 were...

  7. Aberrant Levels of Hematopoietic/Neuronal Growth and Differentiation Factors in Euthyroid Women at Risk for Autoimmune Thyroid Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massolt, Elske T.; Effraimidis, Grigoris; Korevaar, Tim I. M.; Wiersinga, Wilmar M.; Visser, W. Edward; Peeters, Robin P.; Drexhage, Hemmo A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Subjects at risk for major mood disorders have a higher risk to develop autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) and vice-versa, implying a shared pathogenesis. In mood disorder patients, an abnormal profile of hematopoietic/neuronal growth factors is observed, suggesting that growth/differentiation abnormalities of these cell lineages may predispose to mood disorders. The first objective of our study was to investigate whether an aberrant profile of these hematopoietic/neuronal growth factors is also detectable in subjects at risk for AITD. A second objective was to study the inter relationship of these factors with previously determined and published growth factors/cytokines in the same subjects. Methods We studied 64 TPO-Ab-negative females with at least 1 first- or second-degree relative with AITD, 32 of whom did and 32 who did not seroconvert to TPO-Ab positivity in 5-year follow-up. Subjects were compared with 32 healthy controls (HCs). We measured serum levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), Stem Cell Factor (SCF), Insulin-like Growth Factor-Binding Protein 2 (IGFBP-2), Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) and IL-7 at baseline. Results BDNF was significantly lower (8.2 vs 18.9 ng/ml, PTPO-Ab seroconversion in the next 5 years. PMID:27092550

  8. Association of Interleukin-1B and Interleukin-4 Gene Variants with Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases in Tunisian Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaaber, Ines; Mestiri, Souhir; Hammedi, Hounayda; Marmouch, Hela; Mahjoub, Silvia; Tensaout, Besma Bel Hadj Jrad; Said, Khaled

    2016-05-01

    Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) including Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) are complex genetic diseases. Cytokines IL-1B and IL-4 play a role in the pathogenesis of AITD. This study was conducted on Tunisian patients with GD or HT to investigate the association of IL-1B and IL-4 gene polymorphisms with the risk and the prognosis of AITD. A total of 358 healthy controls and 341 patients with AITDs (249 HT and 92 GD) were genotyped for IL-1B+3953C/T and IL-4 intron 3 VNTR polymorphisms. A significant association was found between IL-1B+3953C/T polymorphism and GD or HT, both in the dominant and additive models. The IL-1B+3953T allele was associated with GD (p = 0.0003, OR = 1.93, CI = 1.34-2.78) and HT (p = 0.009, OR = 1.43, CI = 1.09-1.88). The IL-4 VNTR polymorphism was associated only with HT risk both in additive (p = 0.03, OR = 0.31, CI = 0.11-0.86) and recessive (p = 0.03, OR = 3.04, CI = 1.13-8.17) models. No significant association was found between IL-1B+3953C/T polymorphism and change in the serum concentrations of TSH and FT4 in GD and HT patients. In HT patients, the IL-1B+3953T allele (p = 0.009, OR = 0.42, CI = 0.22-0.83) and the IL-1B+3953T/T genotype (p = 0.03, OR = 0.21, CI = 0.04-1.07) were more frequent in the absence than in the presence of an anti-TPO antibody. The proportion of HT patients with the P1P2 genotype of the IL-4 gene was significantly higher in the absence than in the presence of the anti-TPO antibody (p = 0.04, OR = 0.39, CI = 0.17-0.89). These preliminary results suggest that IL-1B and IL-4 gene polymorphisms may be associated with GD and HT susceptibility and may represent prognostic factors for predicting the severity of HT. PMID:27100882

  9. Expression of thyroid stimulating hormone β splice variant in thyroid of mouse with autoimmune thyroiditis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁继红

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the expression of marrowderived thyroid stimulating hormoneβ(TSHβ)splice variant in thyroid of mouse with autoimmune thyroiditis induced by thyroglobulin(Tg)immunization,and to analyze whether TSHβsplice variant participated in the pathological process of autoimmune thyroiditis.Methods Using random number table,forty-eight mice(24 females and 24 males)of 7 to 8 weeks old with body mass 20 to25 g were randomly divided into 4 groups(12 females

  10. Etiopathogenetic factors, thyroid functions and thyroid autoimmunity in melasma patients

    OpenAIRE

    Çakmak, Seray Külcü; Özcan, Nimet; Kılıç, Arzu; Koparal, Suha; Artüz, Ferda; ÇAKMAK, Atıl; Köse, Kenan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Melasma is a common chronic, acquired pigmentation disorder with a significant impact on the quality of life of patients. Aim To investigate the etiopathogenetic factors, thyroid functions and thyroid autoimmunity in patients with melasma. Material and methods Forty-five women with melasma and 45 age-matched healthy women were included in the study group. A detailed history was taken from the patients including triggering factors of melasma. Serum free triiodothyronine (FT3), fre...

  11. [Autoimmune diseases in type 1 diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechleitner, Monika; Hoppichler, Friedrich; Kaser, Susanne

    2016-04-01

    According to literature about 30 % of the patients with type 1 diabetes develop further autoimmune diseases. Thyroid dysfunction represents with 15‒30 % the most common disorder, followed by gastritis with 5‒10 %, celiac disease with 4‒9 % and vitiligo with 2‒10 %. Addison's disease seems to be less prevalent. Diagnostic procedures in the course of the comprehensive care for diabetic patients should therefore include screening for further autoimmune diseases. PMID:27052247

  12. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-γ in Thyroid Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Martina Ferrari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor- (PPAR- γ expression has been shown in thyroid tissue from patients with thyroiditis or Graves’ disease and furthermore in the orbital tissue of patients with Graves’ ophthalmopathy (GO, such as in extraocular muscle cells. An increasing body of evidence shows the importance of the (C-X-C motif receptor 3 (CXCR3 and cognate chemokines (C-X-C motif ligand (CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11, in the T helper 1 immune response and in inflammatory diseases such as thyroid autoimmune disorders. PPAR-γ agonists show a strong inhibitory effect on the expression and release of CXCR3 chemokines, in vitro, in various kinds of cells, such as thyrocytes, and in orbital fibroblasts, preadipocytes, and myoblasts from patients with GO. Recently, it has been demonstrated that rosiglitazone is involved in a higher risk of heart failure, stroke, and all-cause mortality in old patients. On the contrary, pioglitazone has not shown these effects until now; this favors pioglitazone for a possible use in patients with thyroid autoimmunity. However, further studies are ongoing to explore the use of new PPAR-γ agonists in the treatment of thyroid autoimmune disorders.

  13. Effect of Levothyroxine Treatment on Clinical Symptoms in Hypothyroid Patients with Chronic Urticaria and Thyroid Autoimmunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do Hun; Sung, Nam Hee

    2016-01-01

    Background Thyroid autoimmunity has been increasingly reported to be associated with chronic urticaria (CU), and the possible clinical benefit of thyroid hormone or anti-thyroid drugs in some CU patients with autoimmune thyroid disease has been studied. However, the effect of thyroid hormone or anti-thyroid drugs on clinical symptoms of CU remains unclear. Objective We investigated the clinical response of urticaria to the treatment of thyroid dysfunction. Methods Medical records of patients with CU evaluated for thyroid autoimmunity and thyroid function were collected and reviewed. Results Of 184 patients with CU, 43 patients (23.4%) had thyroid autoantibodies and 26 patients (14.1%) had thyroid dysfunction. While none of the five patients with Graves' disease showed any improvement of urticaria after treatment with anti-thyroid drugs, two of the 10 patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis showed improved urticaria after being treated with levothyroxine. Conclusion Although levothyroxine treatment was effective in a minority of patients with CU, there may be a causal relationship between CU and thyroid autoimmunity. PMID:27081267

  14. Etiopathogenetic factors, thyroid functions and thyroid autoimmunity in melasma patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özcan, Nimet; Kılıç, Arzu; Koparal, Suha; Artüz, Ferda; Çakmak, Atıl; Köse, Kenan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Melasma is a common chronic, acquired pigmentation disorder with a significant impact on the quality of life of patients. Aim To investigate the etiopathogenetic factors, thyroid functions and thyroid autoimmunity in patients with melasma. Material and methods Forty-five women with melasma and 45 age-matched healthy women were included in the study group. A detailed history was taken from the patients including triggering factors of melasma. Serum free triiodothyronine (FT3), free thyroxine (FT4), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), anti-thyroglobulin (AbTG) and anti-thyroid peroxidase (Ab-TPO) were measured and thyroid ultrasonography was performed for each subject. Results In 26.7% of patients, pregnancy, in 17.8%, oral contraceptive use and in 13.3%, intense sunlight exposure were the triggering factors. 17.8% of patients had a family history of melasma. FT4, TSH and AbTG levels were significantly higher in the patient group. Conclusions The results suggest that a combination of factors including pregnancy, oral contraceptive use, sunlight and genetic factors often trigger melasma. Thyroid hormones and thyroid autoimmunity may also play a role in the pathogenesis which needs to be proven by further studies. PMID:26759539

  15. Bistability in autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapin, Nicolas; Mosekilde, Erik; Lund, Ole

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases damage host tissue, which, in turn, may trigger a stronger immune response. Systems characterized by such positive feedback loops can display co-existing stable steady states. In a mathematical model of autoimmune disease, one steady state may correspond to the healthy state and...... another to an autoimmune steady state characterized by widespread tissue damage and immune activation. We show how a triggering event may move the system from the healthy to the autoimmune state and how transient immunosuppressive treatment can move the system back to the healthy state....

  16. Infections and autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Jean-François

    2005-01-01

    The high percentage of disease-discordant pairs of monozygotic twins demonstrates the central role of environmental factors in the etiology of autoimmune diseases. Efforts were first focussed on the search for triggering factors. The study of animal models has clearly shown that infections may trigger autoimmune diseases, as in the case of Coxsackie B4 virus in type I diabetes and the encephalomyocarditis virus in autoimmune myositis, two models in which viruses are thought to act by increasing immunogenicity of autoantigens secondary to local inflammation. The induction of a Guillain-Barré syndrome in rabbits after immunization with a peptide derived from Campylobacter jejuni is explained by mimicry between C. jejuni antigens and peripheral nerve axonal antigens. Other models involve chemical modification of autoantigens, as in the case of iodine-induced autoimmune thyroiditis. These mechanisms have so far only limited clinical counterparts (rheumatic fever, Guillain-Barré syndrome and drug-induced lupus or myasthenia gravis) but one may assume that unknown viruses may be at the origin of a number of chronic autoimmune diseases, such as type I diabetes and multiple sclerosis) as illustrated by the convergent data incriminating IFN-alpha in the pathophysiology of type I diabetes and systemic lupus erythematosus. Perhaps the difficulties met in identifying the etiologic viruses are due to the long lag time between the initial causal infection and onset of clinical disease. More surprisingly, infections may also protect from autoimmune diseases. Western countries are being confronted with a disturbing increase in the incidence of most immune disorders, including autoimmune and allergic diseases, inflammatory bowel diseases, and some lymphocyte malignancies. Converging epidemiological evidence indicates that this increase is linked to improvement of the socio-economic level of these countries, posing the question of the causal relationship and more precisely the

  17. Questions and Answers on Autoimmunity and Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... dermatomyositis . What are some of the treatments for autoimmune diseases? Of first importance in treating any autoimmune disease ... being researched. What is the family connection in autoimmune diseases? The ability to develop an autoimmune disease is ...

  18. Thyroid Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2030: The Unexpected Burden of Thyroid, Liver, and Pancreas Cancers in the United States . Cancer Research; 74(11): ... 2030: The Unexpected Burden of Thyroid, Liver, and Pancreas Cancers in the United States . Cancer Research; 74(11): ...

  19. Noonan's Syndrome and Autoimmune Thyroiditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesterhus, Per; Aarskog, Dagfinn

    1973-01-01

    Thyroid abnormalities were studies in seven boys and three girls, 4- to 17-years-old, with Noonan's syndrome, characterized by mental retardation, ocular anomalies (wide spaced eyes, drooped eye lids, or strabismus), heart lesions, characteristics of Turner's syndrome, and normal karyotypes (chromosome arrangement). (MC)

  20. American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Its 25th Anniversary With #25FOR25 Campaign During National Autoimmune Disease Awareness Month AARDA officially kicks of National Autoimmune ... will benefit AARDA. Click here to read more. Autoimmune Disease Awareness Month AARDA and the NCAPG held two ...

  1. Autoimmune liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pietro Invernizzi; Ian R Mackay

    2008-01-01

    The liver was one of the earliest recognized sites among autoimmune diseases yet autoimmune hepatitis,primary biliary cirrhosis,primary sclerosing cholangitis,and their overlap forms,are still problematic in diagnosis and causation.The contributions herein comprise 'pairs of articles' on clinical characteristics,and concepts of etiopathogenesis,for each of the above diseases,together with childhood autoimmune liver disease,overlaps,interpretations of diagnostic serology,and liver transplantation.This issue is timely,since we are witnessing an ever increasing applicability of immunology to a wide variety of chronic diseases,hepatic and non-hepatic,in both developed and developing countries.The 11 invited expert review articles capture the changing features over recent years of the autoimmune liver diseases,the underlying immunomolecular mechanisms of development,the potent albeit still unexplained genetic influences,the expanding repertoire of immunoserological diagnostic markers,and the increasingly effective therapeutic possibilities.

  2. Thyroid Diseases Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Thyroid Diseases Share this page: Was this page helpful? ... a health practitioner will usually order to detect thyroid dysfunction is a test for thyroid stimulating hormone ( ...

  3. Human T-Cell Clones from Autoimmune Thyroid Glands: Specific Recognition of Autologous Thyroid Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londei, Marco; Bottazzo, G. Franco; Feldmann, Marc

    1985-04-01

    The thyroid glands of patients with autoimmune diseases such as Graves' disease and certain forms of goiter contain infiltrating activated T lymphocytes and, unlike cells of normal glands, the epithelial follicular cells strongly express histocompatability antigens of the HLA-DR type. In a study of such autoimmune disorders, the infiltrating T cells from the thyroid glands of two patients with Graves' disease were cloned in mitogen-free interleukin-2 (T-cell growth factor). The clones were expanded and their specificity was tested. Three types of clones were found. One group, of T4 phenotype, specifically recognized autologous thyroid cells. Another, also of T4 phenotype, recognized autologous thyroid or blood cells and thus responded positively in the autologous mixed lymphocyte reaction. Other clones derived from cells that were activated in vivo were of no known specificity. These clones provide a model of a human autoimmune disease and their analysis should clarify mechanisms of pathogenesis and provide clues to abrogating these undesirable immune responses.

  4. Sirolimus for Autoimmune Disease of Blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-22

    Autoimmune Pancytopenia; Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS); Evans Syndrome; Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Anemia, Hemolytic, Autoimmune; Autoimmune Neutropenia; Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic; Inflammatory Bowel Disease; Rheumatoid Arthritis

  5. Autoimmunity in Addison's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín Martorell, P; Roep, B O; Smit, J W A; Martorell, P M

    2002-08-01

    Addison's disease has a low incidence and is most frequently the result of an autoimmune disease in developed countries. Addison's disease can present as an isolated entity or in combination with other autoimmune diseases: Addison's disease can be part of the distinct polyglandular autoimmune syndromes APS I and II. Autoantibodies in patients with isolated Addison's disease are directed against the enzymes involved in steroid synthesis, P45oc21, P45oscc and P45oc17. Addison's disease, both isolated and in the context of APS II, has been associated with the haplotype HLA-A1, -B8 and DR3. The value of the increased expression of these molecules on adrenocortical cells could point towards an infectious pathogenesis. Given the prevalence, up to 80 %, of autoantibodies in Addison's disease as well as the high predictive value for developing the disease when antibodies are present (41% in three years), we advise screening high-risk populations, such as patients with other autoimmune endocrinopathies or their relatives for the presence of these antibodies. The adrenocortical function of patients positive for antibodies should be followed yearly. PMID:12430572

  6. Comprehensive analysis of cytokine gene polymorphisms defines the association of IL-12 gene with ophthalmopthy in Korean children with autoimmune thyroid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jung-Pil; Cho, Won-Kyoung; Baek, In-Cheol; Choi, Eun-Jeong; Shin, Dong-Hwan; Suh, Byung-Kyu; Kim, Tai-Gyu

    2016-05-01

    In early onset autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) showing a strong genetic tendency, cytokines have been suggested to play a critical role in the development of AITD. To directly compare the influences of several cytokine gene polymorphisms, 25 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 17 cytokine genes were analyzed on 104 Korean children with AITD [Hashimoto's disease (HD) = 44, Graves' disease (GD) = 60 (thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy (TAO) = 29, non-TAO = 31)] and 192 controls. Compared with healthy controls, any significant association with polymorphisms of cytokine genes was not found in HD and GD. Among GD patients, non-TAO group only showed significant associations with IL-12 C allele (rs3212227: A > C) (76.6% vs. 51.6%, OR = 0.3 [0.15-0.71], Pc = 0.007). Particularly, the frequency of IL-12C allele was significantly lower in the non-TAO group than in the TAO group (82.8% vs. 51.6%, Pc = 0.018). Our comprehensive analysis of cytokine gene polymorphisms suggests that IL-12 gene may play impact on specific pathogenesis of ophthalmopathy in Korean children with AITD. PMID:26850223

  7. Long-term follow-up of seven patients with ophthalmopathy not associated with thyroid autoimmunity: heterogeneity of autoimmune ophthalmopathy

    OpenAIRE

    McCorquodale, Tom; Lahooti, Hooshang; Gopinath, Bamini; Wall, Jack R

    2012-01-01

    Background Ophthalmopathy is the most common extrathyroidal manifestation of Graves’ disease. However, in approximately 5% of cases this autoimmune eye disorder occurs in the apparent absence of Graves’ hyperthyroidism: the so-called euthyroid Graves’ disease (EGD). Methods Seven patients with EGD were followed for evidence of thyroid and orbital autoimmunity, for up to 10 years. Calsequestrin and collagen XIII antibodies were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and TSH-rec...

  8. Pregnancy and Thyroid Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Organizations (PDF, 269 KB). Alternate Language URL Pregnancy and Thyroid Disease Page Content On this page: ... responds by decreasing TSH production. [ Top ] How does pregnancy normally affect thyroid function? Two pregnancy-related hormones— ...

  9. The Study on the Thyroid Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Mun Ho [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1982-09-15

    Several recent advances in our knowledge of thyroid physiology have broad application to the diagnosis and management of thyroid disorders. For in the thyroid, more than other end-ocrine organs, pathophysiology can be translated directly into the diagnosis and management of thyroid disease. Graves' disease is a syndrome including goiter with hyperthyroidism, exophthalmos and dermatopathy. The pathogenesis of Graves' disease is not yet clearly identified, but various autoantibodies to the thyroid gland and immunapathalogic studied indicate that autoimmune processes are involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. The diagnosis and management of Graves' disease are largely dependent on radionuclide technique as radioimmunoassay, radioactive iodine therapy and so on. Several laboratory tests are also developed to determine the remission of this disease including TRH stimulation test, T{sub 3}, suppression test and detection of thyroid stimulating immunoglobulins. Autoimmune thyroiditis is almost certainly a primary immunologic disease and the incidence tends to increase recently, mainly due to the application of biopsy technique is thyroid diseases. Thyroid nodules have been a great challenge to physicians because of the possibility of malignancy. But recently, cytologic examination of thyroid aspirate provides a very simple and also reliable diagnostic method in patients with thyroid nodules. In 163 patients with thyroid nodules, only 19.3% was revealed to be malignant. Therefore cytologic examination of thyroid aspirate and thyroid biopsy should be included in the diagnosis of nodular patients prior to surgical intervention. In this paper, a comprehensive review is presented on the pathogenesis, clinical features, laboratory findings and therapeutic modalities of various thyroid diseases on the basis of over 80 researches performed during the past 20 years at radioisotope clinic, Seoul National University Hospital.

  10. The Study on the Thyroid Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several recent advances in our knowledge of thyroid physiology have broad application to the diagnosis and management of thyroid disorders. For in the thyroid, more than other end-ocrine organs, pathophysiology can be translated directly into the diagnosis and management of thyroid disease. Graves' disease is a syndrome including goiter with hyperthyroidism, exophthalmos and dermatopathy. The pathogenesis of Graves' disease is not yet clearly identified, but various autoantibodies to the thyroid gland and immunapathalogic studied indicate that autoimmune processes are involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. The diagnosis and management of Graves' disease are largely dependent on radionuclide technique as radioimmunoassay, radioactive iodine therapy and so on. Several laboratory tests are also developed to determine the remission of this disease including TRH stimulation test, T3, suppression test and detection of thyroid stimulating immunoglobulins. Autoimmune thyroiditis is almost certainly a primary immunologic disease and the incidence tends to increase recently, mainly due to the application of biopsy technique is thyroid diseases. Thyroid nodules have been a great challenge to physicians because of the possibility of malignancy. But recently, cytologic examination of thyroid aspirate provides a very simple and also reliable diagnostic method in patients with thyroid nodules. In 163 patients with thyroid nodules, only 19.3% was revealed to be malignant. Therefore cytologic examination of thyroid aspirate and thyroid biopsy should be included in the diagnosis of nodular patients prior to surgical intervention. In this paper, a comprehensive review is presented on the pathogenesis, clinical features, laboratory findings and therapeutic modalities of various thyroid diseases on the basis of over 80 researches performed during the past 20 years at radioisotope clinic, Seoul National University Hospital.

  11. The role of environmental factors in autoimmune thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hybenova, Monika; Hrda, Pavlina; Procházková, Jarmila; Stejskal, Vera; Sterzl, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    Environmental factors can play an important role in the development of autoimmune thyroiditis (AT) and other autoimmune diseases. This article reviews the role of heavy metals and infectious agents in AT. Currently, the genes responsible for a metal-induced pathology are known in experimental animals but similar knowledge is lacking in man. Metals such as nickel or mercury induce delayed type T cell hypersensitivity (allergy) which is relatively common, especially in women. T-cell allergy can be studied with the lymphocyte transformation test, LTT-MELISA. It has been found that patients with AT and other autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, psoriasis, systemic lupus erythematosus and atopic eczema, show increased lymphocyte reactivity in vitro to inorganic mercury, nickel and other metals compared to healthy controls. The important source of mercury is dental amalgam. Replacement of amalgam in mercury-allergic subjects resulted in improvement of health in about 70% of patients. Several laboratory parameters such as mercury-specific lymphocyte responses in vitro and anti-thyroid autoantibodies were normalized as well. In contrast, no changes in health and laboratory results were observed in mercury-allergic patients who did not have their amalgams replaced. The same was true for non-allergic patients who underwent amalgam replacement. Infectious agents such as Helicobacter pylori (Hp) may cause chronic inflammation and autoimmune reactivity in susceptible subjects. The results of in vitro experiments performed with lymphocytes from Hp infected patients indicate that Hp can cause immunosuppression which might be eliminated by successful eradication therapy. In conclusion, heavy metals and Hp infection may play an important role in AT. Laboratory tests, such as LTT-MELISA, can help to determine the specific etiological agents causing inflammation in individual patients. The treatment of AT and other autoimmune diseases might be improved if such agents are

  12. Increased Incidence of Thyroid Dysfunction and Autoimmunity in Patients with Vernal Keratoconjunctivitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Stagi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hormones may play a role in the pathophysiology of vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC. An increased incidence of thyroid autoantibodies was recently observed in VKC, although there were no data on thyroid function. Two hundred and eighty-eight patients (202 males, 86 females; range 5.5 to 16.9 years with VKC were evaluated and compared with 188 normal age- and sex-matched subjects. In all subjects, serum concentrations of free T4, TSH, thyroperoxidase, thyroglobulin, and TSHr autoantibodies were evaluated. In VKC, the family history of thyroid diseases showed no significant differences compared to the controls (9.4 versus 8.6%, whereas the family history of autoimmune diseases was significantly higher (13.2% versus 6.3%; P<0.05. Subclinical hypothyroidism was diagnosed in 6.6% (versus 1.6% of the controls; P<0.05 and overt hypothyroidism in 0.7% (versus 0.0% of the controls; P=NS. Finally, 5.2% of patients were positive for thyroid autoantibodies, which were significantly higher with respect to the controls (0.5%, P<0.05. In the patients positive for thyroid autoantibodies, 80% showed a sonography pattern that suggested autoimmune thyroiditis. Thyroid function and autoimmunity abnormalities are frequently present in children with VKC. Children with VKC should be screened for thyroid function and evaluated for thyroid autoimmunity.

  13. Thyroid Disease Definitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Thyroid Disease Definitions KidsHealth > For Teens > Thyroid Disease Definitions Print A A A Text Size ... sweat, mucous, and tears. goiter: This is a thyroid gland that is enlarged to the point that ...

  14. Association of Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte-Associated Protein 4 (CTLA4) Gene Polymorphisms with Autoimmune Thyroid Disease in Children and Adults: Case-Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Fu-Sung; Wang, Chao-Hung; Huang, Chi-Yu; Lin, Chiung-Ling; Lin, Wen-Shan; Chang, Tzu-Yang; Yang, Horng-Woei; Chen, Wei-Fang; Lien, Ya-Ping; Cheng, Bi-Wen; Lin, Chao-Hsu; Chen, Chia-Ching; Wu, Yi-Lei; Hung, Chen-Mei; Li, Hsin-Jung; Chan, Chon-In; Lee, Yann-Jinn

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), including Graves disease (GD) and Hashimoto disease (HD), is an organ-specific autoimmune disease with a strong genetic component. Although the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA4) polymorphism has been reported to be associated with AITD in adults, few studies have focused on children. The aim of our study was to investigate whether the CTLA4 polymorphisms, including -318C/T (rs5742909), +49A/G (rs231775), and CT60 (rs3087243), were associated with GD and HD in Han Chinese adults and children. We studied 289 adult GD, 265 pediatric GD, 229 pediatric HD patients, and 1058 healthy controls and then compared genotype, allele, carrier, and haplotype frequencies between patients and controls. We found that CTLA4 SNPs +49A/G and CT60 were associated with GD in adults and children. Allele G of +49A/G was significantly associated with GD in adults (odds ratio [OR], 1.50; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.21–1.84; corrected P value [Pc] < 0.001) and children (OR, 1.42; 95% CI, 1.15–1.77; Pc = 0.002). Allele G of CT60 also significantly increased risk of GD in adults (OR, 1.63; 95% CI, 1.27–2.09; Pc < 0.001) and GD in children (OR, 1.58; 95% CI, 1.22–2.04; Pc < 0.001). Significant linkage disequilibrium was found between +49A/G and CT60 in GD and control subjects (D’ = 0.92). Our results showed that CTLA4 was associated with both GD and HD and played an equivalent role in both adult and pediatric GD in Han Chinese population. PMID:27111218

  15. The relative importance of genetic and environmental effects for the early stages of thyroid autoimmunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Pia S; Brix, Thomas H; Iachine, Ivan;

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In euthyroid individuals, autoantibodies to thyroid peroxidase (TPOab) and thyroglobulin (Tgab) are regarded as early markers of thyroid autoimmunity. Family and twin studies suggest that development of thyroid autoantibodies in first-degree relatives of patients with autoimmune thyroid...... disease is under genetic influence. We aimed to estimate the relative importance of genetic and environmental effects for the presence of thyroid autoantibodies in euthyroid subjects. METHODS: A representative sample of healthy twin pairs was identified through the Danish Twin Registry; 1372 individuals...... concordance and intraclass correlations were consistently higher for MZ than for DZ twin pairs indicating genetic influence. Genetic components (with 95% confidence intervals) accounted for 73% (46-89%) of the liability of being thyroid antibody positive. Adjusting for covariates (age, TSH and others), the...

  16. [Diagnostics of autoimmune diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beleznay, Zsuzsanna; Regenass, Stephan

    2008-09-01

    Autoantibodies play a key role in diagnostic laboratories as markers of autoimmune diseases. In addition to their role as markers they mediate diverse effects in vivo. Autoantibodies with protective effect have been described. Natural protective IgM autoantibodies against tumour-antigens of malignant cells or their precursors may contribute to increased survival rates of carcinoma patients. In a mouse model of systemic lupus erythematosus it has been shown that anti-dsDNA IgM autoantibodies protect from glomerular damage. In contrast, a direct pathogenic role of autoantibodies has been well established e.g. in myasthenia gravis or in Goodpasture syndrome. Similarly autoantibodies against SSA Ro52 are detrimental in neonatal lupus erythematosus with congenital heart block. Moreover, putatively protective autoantibodies may become pathogenic during the course of the disease such as the onconeuronal autoantibodies whose pathogenicity depends on their compartmentalisation. In patients with paraneoplastic syndromes tumour cells express proteins that are also naturally present in the brain. Anti-tumour autoantibodies which temporarily suppress tumour growth can provoke an autoimmune attack on neurons once having crossed the blood-brain barrier and cause specific neurological symptoms. Only a restricted number of autoantibodies are useful follow-up markers for the effectiveness of treatment in autoimmune diseases. Certain autoantibodies hold prognostic value and appear years or even decades before the diagnosis of disease such as the antimitochondrial antibodies in primary biliary cirrhosis or anti-citrullinated protein (CCP)-antibodies in rheumatoid arthritis. It is crucial to know whether the autoantibodies in question recognise linear or conformational epitopes in order to choose the appropriate detection methods. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy remains a very useful tool for confirmation of results of commercially available immunoassays and for detection of

  17. Autoimmune liver disease, autoimmunity and liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Marco; Neuberger, James M

    2014-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) represent the three major autoimmune liver diseases (AILD). PBC, PSC, and AIH are all complex disorders in that they result from the effects of multiple genes in combination with as yet unidentified environmental factors. Recent genome-wide association studies have identified numerous risk loci for PBC and PSC that host genes involved in innate or acquired immune responses. These loci may provide a clue as to the immune-based pathogenesis of AILD. Moreover, many significant risk loci for PBC and PSC are also risk loci for other autoimmune disorders, such type I diabetes, multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis, suggesting a shared genetic basis and possibly similar molecular pathways for diverse autoimmune conditions. There is no curative treatment for all three disorders, and a significant number of patients eventually progress to end-stage liver disease requiring liver transplantation (LT). LT in this context has a favourable overall outcome with current patient and graft survival exceeding 80% at 5years. Indications are as for other chronic liver disease although recent data suggest that while lethargy improves after transplantation, the effect is modest and variable so lethargy alone is not an indication. In contrast, pruritus rapidly responds. Cholangiocarcinoma, except under rigorous selection criteria, excludes LT because of the high risk of recurrence. All three conditions may recur after transplantation and are associated with a greater risk of both acute cellular and chronic ductopenic rejection. It is possible that a crosstalk between alloimmune and autoimmune response perpetuate each other. An immunological response toward self- or allo-antigens is well recognised after LT in patients transplanted for non-autoimmune indications and sometimes termed "de novo autoimmune hepatitis". Whether this is part of the spectrum of rejection or an autoimmune

  18. Frequency Of Pancreatic Beta-Cell Autoimmunity Markers In Patients With Autoimmune Thyroid Disease Frecuencia de marcadores de autoinmunidad beta pancreática en pacientes con enfermedad tiroidea autoinmune

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María E. Primo

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available A total of 305 ambulatory patients recruited at the Division of Endocrinology, Hospital de Clínicas, University of Buenos Aires, with autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD were studied to search for associations between autoimmune thyroid disease and presence of serum markers of autoimmune diabetes mellitus. Screening for markers of pancreatic beta-cell autoimmunity was performed by radioligand binding assays (RBA as follows: autoantibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase (GADA and proinsulin (PAA were determined in all sera, whereas autoantibodies to protein tyrosine phosphatase (IA-2A and insulin (IAA were additionally measured in 200 sera randomly selected from the total collection. In addition, every GADA positive serum among the remaining 105 sera was systematically tested for the presence of IA-2A and IAA. In the cohort of 305 AITD patients 22 (7.2% were previously diagnosed as type 1, type 2 or insulin-requiring type 2 diabetics. Ten of these patients presented serum marker positivity specific for β-cell autoantigens and 12 were marker negative. On the other hand, considering the majority of non-diabetic AITD patients (n=283, β-cell marker positivity was detected in 17 individuals (6.0%. The prevalence of autoimmune diabetes markers was much higher in the studied population than in the general population utilized as a control group, and GADA was the most frequent marker.Se investigó la asociación entre enfermedad tiroidea autoinmune y la presencia de marcadores séricos de diabetes mellitus en 305 pacientes ambulatorios con enfermedad tiroidea autoinmune reclutados en la División Endocrinología. La búsqueda de marcadores de autoinmunidad contra las células beta pancreáticas se realizó por la técnica de unión de radioligandos (RBA como se detalla a continuación: se determinaron autoanticuerpos contra la decarboxilasa del ácido glutámico (GADA y proinsulina (PAA en todos los sueros, mientras que los anticuerpos contra la prote

  19. Propylthiouracil-induced autoimmune disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Paiaulla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperthyroidism is a condition characterized by excessive production of thyroid hormones. Propylthiouracil (PTU is commonly used as first line drug in the management of hyperthyroidism. This is a case report of 24-year-old female, a known case of hyperthyroidism since 4 years, who came with a history of fever and myalgia since 3 days and dyspnea with coughing out of blood since 1 day. Patient was taking PTU (100 mg per day since 4 years for hyperthyroidism. Patient was immediately intubated for type-II respiratory failure. Diagnosed to be having PTU-induced autoimmune disease. PTU was stopped and treated with methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide. Clinical features improved over a period of 8 days and discharged home successfully. Having a high suspicion for the onset of autoimmune disease in hyperthyroidism patients who are on PTU therapy and timely treatment with immunosuppressants and supportive care along with the withdrawal of the drug can make a difference in morbidity and mortality.

  20. Autoinmunidad tiroidea: Mecanismos patogénicos comunes y distintivos en tiroiditis de Hashimoto y enfermedad de Graves Thyroid Autoimmunity: Common and Distinctive Pathogenic Mechanisms in Hashimoto's Thyroiditis and Graves' Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Astarita

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Las enfermedades tiroideas autoinmunes (ETA son los desórdenes más frecuentes que llevan a la disfunción de la glándula tiroidea. Incluyen varias formas clínicas como Tiroiditis de Hashimoto (TH y Enfermedad de Graves (EG. La relación entre TH y EG ha sido objeto de debate por décadas. Si bien, muy diferentes en su clínica, algunos las consideran los lados opuestos de una misma moneda. En su patogénesis tienen aspectos en común, como la predisposición genética demostrado por la ocurrencia en una misma familia y en un mismo individuo. Sin embargo, diferencias en el microambiente local determinan la diferente expresión fenotípica o el viraje de una a otra patología. El objetivo de esta monografía es investigar similitudes y diferencias entre TH y EG en las distintas etapas que llevan al desarrollo de autoinmunidad. Los autores declaran no poseer conflictos de interés.Autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD is the most common disorder that leads to thyroid gland dysfunction. ATD manifests in various clinical forms, such as Hashimoto's Thyroiditis (HT and Graves' Disease (GD. The relation between HT and GD has been discussed for decades. Even if they greatly differ in their clinical features and treatment, some people believe they are the opposite sides of the same coin. In their pathogenesis, they share some mechanisms, such as genetic susceptibility, shown by the fact that they tend to occur both in the same person and within the same family. However, differences in the local micro-environment can determine the distinct phenotypic expression or the switch from one disease to the other. The aim of this monograph was to investigate similarities and differences between HT and GD at the diverse stages leading to the development of autoimmunity. No financial conflicts of interest exist.

  1. Thyroid autoantibodies and thyroid function in subjects exposed to Chernobyl fallout during childhood: evidence for a transient radiation-induced elevation of serum thyroid antibodies without an increase in thyroid autoimmune disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agate, Laura; Mariotti, Stefano; Elisei, Rossella;

    2008-01-01

    An increase in the prevalence of thyroid autoantibodies (ATAs) was reported 6-8 yr after the Chernobyl accident in radiation-exposed children and adolescents.......An increase in the prevalence of thyroid autoantibodies (ATAs) was reported 6-8 yr after the Chernobyl accident in radiation-exposed children and adolescents....

  2. Familial Autoimmune Thyroid Disease as a Risk Factor for Regression in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A CPEA Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molloy, Cynthia A.; Morrow, Ardythe L.; Meinzen-Derr, Jareen; Dawson, Geraldine; Bernier, Raphael; Dunn, Michelle; Hyman, Susan L.; McMahon, William M.; Goudie-Nice, Julie; Hepburn, Susan; Minshew, Nancy; Rogers, Sally; Sigman, Marian; Spence, M. Anne; Tager-Flusberg, Helen; Volkmar, Fred R.; Lord, Catherine

    2006-01-01

    A multicenter study of 308 children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) was conducted through the Collaborative Programs of Excellence in Autism (CPEA), sponsored by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, to compare the family history of autoimmune disorders in children with ASD with and without a history of regression. A…

  3. Prevalence of autoantibodies and the risk of autoimmune thyroid disease in children with chronic hepatitis C virus infection treated with interferon-α

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stephan Gehring; Ulrike Kullmer; Sabine Koeppelmann; Patrick Gerner; Philip Wintermeyer; Stefan Wirth

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the prevalence of autoantibodies in chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected children focusing on thyroid autoimmunity.METHODS: We investigated the prevalence of autoantibodies in 123 chronic HCV-infected children before,during and after monotherapy with interferon-alpha (TFN-α) or combined treatment with interferon-α or peginterferon-α and ribavirin. Besides antibodies against smooth muscle (SMA), nuclei (ANA), and liver/kidney microsomes (LKM), the incidence of antithyroid peroxidase antibodies as well as thyroid function parameters (TSH, FT3 and FT4) were determined.RESULTS: We found that 8% of children had autoantibodies before treatment. During treatment,18% of children were found positive for at least one autoantibody; 15.5% of children developed pathologic thyroid values during IFN-α treatment compared to only one child before therapy. Six children had to be substituted while developing laboratory signs of hypothyroidism.CONCLUSION: Our data indicate a strong correlation between interferon-α treatment and autoimmune phenomena, notably the emergence of thyroid antibodies. The fact that some children required hormone replacement underlines the need of close monitoring in particularly those who respond to therapy and have to be treated for more than 6 mo.

  4. Long-term follow-up of seven patients with ophthalmopathy not associated with thyroid autoimmunity: heterogeneity of autoimmune ophthalmopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCorquodale T

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Tom McCorquodale,1 Hooshang Lahooti,1 Bamini Gopinath,2 Jack R Wall11Department of Medicine, Nepean Clinical School, the University of Sydney, Penrith, NSW, Australia; 2Centre for Vision Research, the University of Sydney, Westmead Hospital, Westmead, NSW, AustraliaBackground: Ophthalmopathy is the most common extrathyroidal manifestation of Graves' disease. However, in approximately 5% of cases this autoimmune eye disorder occurs in the apparent absence of Graves' hyperthyroidism: the so-called euthyroid Graves' disease (EGD.Methods: Seven patients with EGD were followed for evidence of thyroid and orbital autoimmunity, for up to 10 years. Calsequestrin and collagen XIII antibodies were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, and TSH-receptor (TSH-r antibodies were measured as TSH-r-binding antibody (TRAb and thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulin (TSI. Eye signs were characterized and quantified as clinical activity score (CAS, NOSPECS classes, Nunery types 1 and 2, and margin-reflex distance (MRD.Results: Calsequestrin antibodies were detected on at least one occasion in three of the seven patients and collagen XIII antibodies were detected one or more times in five patients. In one patient with isolated congestive ophthalmopathy who was studied intensely, collagen XIII antibodies were initially positive and then became negative as the eye disease stabilized, while antibodies targeting calsequestrin were always negative. TRAb was not detected in any patient, but TSI was detected in three patients on one occasion each. Ultrasound abnormalities were found in four of the six patients for whom this was carried out, but there was no clear evidence for thyroiditis in any of these patients. For comparison, 13 patients were studied with typical Graves' ophthalmopathy. There were no significant differences compared to EGD in respect to the prevalence of positive calsequestrin or collagen XIII antibodies, but these patients included more

  5. Autoimmune diseases and myelodysplastic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komrokji, Rami S; Kulasekararaj, Austin; Al Ali, Najla H; Kordasti, Shahram; Bart-Smith, Emily; Craig, Benjamin M; Padron, Eric; Zhang, Ling; Lancet, Jeffrey E; Pinilla-Ibarz, Javier; List, Alan F; Mufti, Ghulam J; Epling-Burnette, Pearlie K

    2016-05-01

    Immune dysregulation and altered T-cell hemostasis play important roles in the pathogenesis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Recent studies suggest an increased risk of MDS among patients with autoimmune diseases. Here, we investigated the prevalence of autoimmune diseases among MDS patients, comparing characteristics and outcomes in those with and without autoimmune diseases. From our study group of 1408 MDS patients, 391 (28%) had autoimmune disease, with hypothyroidism being the most common type, accounting for 44% (n = 171) of patients (12% among all MDS patients analyzed). Other autoimmune diseases with ≥5% prevalence included idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura in 12% (n = 46), rheumatoid arthritis in 10% (n = 41), and psoriasis in 7% (n = 28) of patients. Autoimmune diseases were more common in female MDS patients, those with RA or RCMD WHO subtype, and those who were less dependent on red blood cell transfusion. Median overall survival (OS) was 60 months (95% CI, 50-70) for patients with autoimmune diseases versus 45 months (95% CI, 40-49) for those without (log-rank test, P = 0.006). By multivariate analysis adjusting for revised IPSS and age >60 years, autoimmune diseases were a statistically significant independent factor for OS (HR 0.78; 95% CI, 0.66-0.92; P = 0.004). The rate of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) transformation was 23% (n = 89) in MDS patients with autoimmune disease versus 30% (n = 301) in those without (P = 0.011). Patient groups did not differ in response to azacitidine or lenalidomide treatment. Autoimmune diseases are prevalent among MDS patients. MDS patients with autoimmune diseases have better OS and less AML transformation. Am. J. Hematol. 91:E280-E283, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26875020

  6. Solar Radiation and Vitamin D: Mitigating Environmental Factors in Autoimmune Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Schwalfenberg, Gerry K.

    2012-01-01

    This paper looks at the environmental role of vitamin D and solar radiation as risk reduction factors in autoimmune disease. Five diseases are considered: multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, autoimmune disease of the thyroid, and inflammatory bowel disease. Clinical relevant studies and factors that may indicate evidence that autoimmune disease is a vitamin D-sensitive disease are presented. Studies that have resulted in prevention or amelioration of some autoimmune dis...

  7. Autoimmune diseases in women with Turner's syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kristian T; Rostgaard, Klaus; Bache, Iben;

    2010-01-01

    Danish women with Turner's syndrome followed up for 12,461 person-years between 1980 and 2004. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) of first hospitalization for autoimmune disease and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were used as measures of relative risk. RESULTS: The overall risk of autoimmune...... disease among women with Turner's syndrome was twice that among Danish women in general (SIR 2.1 [95% CI 1.6-2.7]). For autoimmune diseases with a female predominance, the SIR among women with Turner's syndrome was 1.7 (95% CI 1.2-2.4), whereas the SIR for autoimmune diseases with a male predominance...... among these women was 3.9 (95% CI 2.5-5.8). Associations were strongest for Hashimoto thyroiditis (SIR 14.6 [95% CI 6.7-27.1]), a strongly female-predominant condition, and type 1 diabetes mellitus (SIR 4.1 [95% CI 2.5-6.3]). CONCLUSION: Women with Turner's syndrome are at excess risk of autoimmune...

  8. Interferin with thyroid scintigraphy: the effects of interferon alpha induced thyroid gland autoimmunity and dysfunction upon thyroid scintigraphy in patients with the hepatitis C virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The incidence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is increasing. Interferon alpha therapy is often used to treat patients who are HCV positive. Thyroid gland autoimmunity and dysfunction has been reported to occur with variable frequency during INF-alpha therapy in patients with the HCV. This study reviews the scintigraphic findings of thyroid scans in such patients in order to assess for the effects on thyroid scintigraphy. To our knowledge, there has been no comprehensive study of this important occurrence to date. There were a number of patients with the HCV being treated at our institution between 23/09/1996 and 09/08/2000. Some of them received INF-alpha therapy, certain were subsequently diagnosed with thyroid gland autoimmunity and/or dysfunction. Eight were imaged with thyroid scintigraphy and reviewed. The scintigraphic findings in the 8 patients fell into two broad categories; 4 demonstrated changes of Graves' disease, and 3 changes of thyroiditis (1 of these was sub-acute). One hypothyroid patient with anti-thyroglobulin antibodies had normal thyroid scintigraphy. Six patients were found to have antithyroid antibodies. One patient with thyroiditis tested negative to antithyroid antibodies. One patient was not tested for antithyroid antibodies. Interferon alpha induced thyroid gland autoimmunity and/or dysfunction can markedly affect the thyroid scintigraphic findings of patients with the hepatitis C virus. This hitherto undescribed occurrence on thyroid scintigraphy has important practical implications of which Nuclear Medicine Specialists need to be aware in order to correctly interpret thyroid scintigraphy studies in such patients. The clinical presentation and effects on imaging appearances are varied. The Nuclear Medicine Specialist can play a central role in establishing the causal link. Awareness of this occurrence enables the Nuclear Medicine Specialist to add value to the referral. This occurrence will become an increasingly common

  9. Mast Cell and Autoimmune Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Yunzhi Xu; Guangjie Chen

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are important in innate immune system. They have been appreciated as potent contributors to allergic reaction. However, increasing evidence implicates the important role of mast cells in autoimmune disease like rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. Here we review the current stage of knowledge about mast cells in autoimmune diseases.

  10.  An autoimmune polyglandular syndrome complicated with celiac disease and autoimmune hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieli-Crimi, Romina; Núñez, Concepción; Estrada, Lourdes; López-Palacios, Natalia

    2016-01-01

     Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome (APS) is a combination of different autoimmune diseases. The close relationship between immune-mediated disorders makes it mandatory to perform serological screening periodically in order to avoid delayed diagnosis of additional autoimmune diseases. We studied a patient with type 1 diabetes (T1D) who later developed an autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD) and was referred to our hospital with a serious condition of his clinical status. The patient was suffering from an advance stage of celiac disease (CD), the delay in its diagnosis and in the establishment of a gluten-free dietled the patient to a severe proteincalorie malnutrition. Later, the patient developed an autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). We consider that clinical deterioration in patients with APS should alert physicians about the possible presence of other immune-mediated diseases. Periodic screening for autoantibodies would help to prevent delayed diagnosis and would improve patient's quality of life. PMID:27236159

  11. Does TSH Trigger the Anti-thyroid Autoimmune Processes? Observation on a Large Cohort of Naive Patients with Thyroid Hemiagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczepanek-Parulska, Ewelina; Zybek-Kocik, Ariadna; Woliński, Kosma; Czarnocka, Barbara; Ruchała, Marek

    2016-08-01

    Thyroid hemiagenesis (THA) is a rare abnormality characterized by the absence of one thyroid lobe. Elevated thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) level and higher incidence of thyroid diseases were reported in THA. The aim of the study is to evaluate the thyroid autoimmunity incidence in patients with THA and influence of higher than average TSH level on thyroid volume (TV) and its change with age. The study included a group of naive patients with THA and a control group of subjects with bilobate thyroid. All patients underwent clinical examination, thyroid ultrasound, scintiscan and laboratory tests. In the studied and control group the presence of thyroid autoantibodies (TAb) was evaluated. The THA group consisted of 65 patients. In THA group 53.85 % of patients were positive for TAb. Patients with positive TAb were older (46.0 ± 18.3 years) than those with negative (35.0 ± 19.8 years); p = 0.02. The incidence of TAb was lower in controls (13.85 %, p volume and median TSH level were higher in patients with THA when compared to controls (13.60 vs 8.20 ml, p < 0.0001; 3.23 vs 1.48 µU/ml, p < 0.0001, respectively). Patients with THA constitute an in vivo model of long-term thyroid TSH overstimulation. Further studies are needed to reveal, whether TSH overstimulation may be the trigger for thyroid autoimmunity. PMID:26975391

  12. Evaluation of the 2. generation radio-receptional assay for anti-TSH receptor antibodies (TRAb) in autoimmune thyroid diseases. Comparison with 1. generation and anti-thyroperoxidae antibodies (AbTPO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The detection of autoantibodies to the TSH-receptor (TRAb) by radio-receptor assays (RRA) is widely requested in clinical practice for the diagnostic work-up of Graves' disease and its differentiation from diffuse thyroid autonomy. Additionally, TRAb measurement can be useful during antithyroid drug treatment of Graves' disease to evaluate the risk of relapse after therapy discontinuation. Nevertheless, some patients affected by Graves' disease are TRAb-negative when 1. generation assay is used. In this study the diagnostic performance of a newly developed 2. generation TRAb assay (TRAK human DYNOtest(R), BRAHMS Diagnostica GmbH, Berlin, Germany) was evaluated in 74 untreated patients affected by Graves' disease, in 53 untreated patients affected by Hashimoto's thyroiditis and in 88 patients affected by euthyroid nodular goiter. It was also compared the new TRAb assay with the 1. generation test (TRAK(R) Assay, BRAHMS Diagnostica GmbH, Berlin, Germany) and anti-thyroperoxidase assay (AbTPO DYNOtest(R), BRAHMS GmbH, Berlin). The 2. generation TRAb assay showed the better diagnostic sensitivity in Graves' disease (97%) with respect to the 1. generation assay (85%) and AbTPO assay (64%). The AbTPO assay was positive in 50 of 53 (94%) patients affected by autoimmune thyroiditis. The 1. and 2. generation TRAb assays were positive in 4 (7%) and 7 (13%) of 53 patients affected by autoimmune thyroiditis, respectively. No patients affected by nodular goiter showed positive 1. and 2. generation TRAb assay while AbTPO levels were positive in 8 of 88 patients (specificity 91%). In conclusion, the 2. generation TRAb assay is clearly more sensitive than the 1. generation test and should be used in clinical practice to minimize the incidence of TRAb-negative Graves' disease. Long term prospective studies are needed to evaluate the prognostic role of 2. generation TRAb assay in Graves' disease. The assay of AbTPO is the best marker for autoimmune thyroiditis but is clearly less

  13. Autoimmune vitiligo in rheumatic disease in the mestizo Mexican population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avalos-Díaz, Esperanza; Pérez-Pérez, Elena; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Mayra; Pacheco-Tovar, María-Guadalupe; Herrera-Esparza, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Vitiligo is a chronic disease characterized by the dysfunction or destruction of melanocytes with secondary depigmentation. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of vitiligo associated with autoimmune rheumatic diseases. The clinical records from a 10-year database of patients with rheumatic diseases and associated vitiligo was analysed, with one group of patients having autoimmune rheumatic disease and another non-autoimmune rheumatic disease. Available serum samples were used to assess the anti-melanocyte antibodies. A total of 5,251 individual clinical files were archived in the last 10 years, and these patients underwent multiple rheumatology consultations, with 0.3% of the group presenting with vitiligo. The prevalence of vitiligo in the autoimmune rheumatic disease group was 0.672%, which was mainly associated with lupus and arthritis. However, patients with more than one autoimmune disease had an increased relative risk to develop vitiligo, and anti-melanocyte antibodies were positive in 92% of these patients. By contrast, the prevalence was 0.082% in the group that lacked autoimmune rheumatic disease and had negative autoantibodies. In conclusion, the association between vitiligo and autoimmune rheumatic diseases was relatively low. However, the relative risk increased when there were other autoimmune comorbidities, such as thyroiditis or celiac disease. Therefore, the presence of multiple autoimmune syndromes should be suspected. PMID:27446537

  14. AUTOIMMUNE EPIDERMAL BLISTERING DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Abreu Velez

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune bullous skin diseases (ABDs are uncommon, potentially fatal diseases of skin and mucous membranes which are associated with deposits of autoantibodies and complement against distinct molecules of the epidermis and dermal/epidermal basement membrane zone (BMZ. These autoantibodies lead to a loss in skin molecular integrity, which manifests clinically as formation of blisters or erosions. In pemphigus vulgaris, loss of adhesion occurs within the epidermis. The pioneering work of Ernst H. Beutner, Ph.D. and Robert E. Jordon, M.D. confirmed the autoimmune nature of these diseases. Walter F. Lever, M.D. contributed significantly to our understanding of the histopathologic features of these diseases. Walter Lever, M.D. and Ken Hashimoto, M.D. contributed electron microscopic studies of these diseases, especially in pemphigus vulgaris and bullous pemphigoid. In bullous pemphigoid (BP, linear IgA bullous dermatosis, epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA and dermatitis herpetiformis (DH, loss of adhesion takes place within or underneath the BMZ. Classic EBA demonstrates extensive skin fragility; DH is commonly associated with gluten-sensitive enteropathy, and manifests clinically with pruritic papulovesicles on the extensor surfaces of the extremities and the lumbosacral area. The clinical spectrum of bullous pemphigoid includes tense blisters, urticarial plaques, and prurigo-like eczematous lesions. Pemphigoid gestationis mostly occurs during the last trimester of pregnancy, and mucous membrane pemphigoid primarily involves the oral mucosa and conjunctivae and leads to scarring. Linear IgA bullous dermatosis manifests with tense blisters in a „cluster of jewels”-like pattern in childhood (chronic bullous disease of childhood and is more clinically heterogeneous in adulthood. Many of the autoantigens in these disorders are known and have been well characterized. ABDs may be influenced by both genetic and exogenous factors. The diagnoses of

  15. Epigenetic alterations underlying autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslani, Saeed; Mahmoudi, Mahdi; Karami, Jafar; Jamshidi, Ahmad Reza; Malekshahi, Zahra; Nicknam, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-03-01

    Recent breakthroughs in genetic explorations have extended our understanding through discovery of genetic patterns subjected to autoimmune diseases (AID). Genetics, on the contrary, has not answered all the conundrums to describe a comprehensive explanation of causal mechanisms of disease etiopathology with regard to the function of environment, sex, or aging. The other side of the coin, epigenetics which is defined by gene manifestation modification without DNA sequence alteration, reportedly has come in to provide new insights towards disease apprehension through bridging the genetics and environmental factors. New investigations in genetic and environmental contributing factors for autoimmunity provide new explanation whereby the interactions between genetic elements and epigenetic modifications signed by environmental agents may be responsible for autoimmune disease initiation and perpetuation. It is aimed through this article to review recent progress attempting to reveal how epigenetics associates with the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. PMID:26761426

  16. Clinical case seminar in pediatric thyroid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szinnai, G; Léger, J; Bauer, A J; Pearce, E N; Ramos, H E; Canalli, M H; Onigata, K; Elisei, R; Radetti, G; Polak, M; Van Vliet, G; Deladoëy, J

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric thyroid diseases cover a large spectrum of congenital and acquired forms, ranging from congenital primary or central hypothyroidism, autoimmune thyroid disease, iodine deficiency, rare genetic defects of thyroid hormone action, metabolism and cell membrane transport to benign nodules and malignant tumors. The previous 15 papers of the textbook Paediatric Thyroidology gave a systematic overview of the current knowledge and guidelines on all these diseases. In this final paper, the authors collected a series of patient histories from their clinics illustrating frequently encountered clinical problems and providing key learning points and references to each case. Although not fully comprehensive, it aims at providing relevant clinical knowledge on thyroid diseases of the neonate, the child, and the adolescent. PMID:25231455

  17. Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease (AIED)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to order. Mention “VEDA” to receive a 15% discount. Paid Advertisement Disclaimer Information on this website is ... treatment of autoimmune inner ear disease. Although drug companies are not directly studying treatments for inner ear ...

  18. Autoimmune thyroiditis goitrogenic. Aspects of clinical and laboratorial diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To asses the accuracy achieved by the A.C.A.T. and other clinical and laboratorial criterion in the diagnoses of T.A.I.B. we investigated twenty patients with goiter and antimicrossomal antibodies titres of 1/1.600 or more. Analysing the parameters useful in the diagnosis, we found a significant correlation between the antimicrossomal antibodies titres and the basal TSH concentration, an elevated basal TSH and an exaggerated response to TRH independent of the patient clinical status reflecting in the majority of the cases a state of subclinical hypotyroidism; an irregular appearance of the radioisotope thyroid scan and a positive response to a perchlorate discharge test. We conclude that from the parameters useful in the T.A.I.B. diagnosis, the A.C.A.T. detection mainly the antimicrossomal antibodies, is an excellent tool to detect patients with a clinical suspect of thyroid auto-immune disease and when we found high tires in a patient with goiter and an elevated basal TSH concentration we can suggest T.A.I.B. diagnosis. (author)

  19. Epidemiology of thyroid diseases in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthonia Okeoghene Ogbera

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Thyroid disorders are common endocrine disorders encountered in the African continent. Environmental and nutritional factors are often implicated in the occurrence of some thyroid disorders that occur in this part of the world. This is a narrative review that seeks to document the pattern, prevalence, and management of thyroid disorders in the continent. Materials and Methods: The search engine used for this review were PubMed and Google scholar. All available articles on thyroid disorders from the sub-African continent, published until May 2011, were included. Results: Iodine deficiency disorders (IDD which top the list of thyroid disorders and remain the commonest cause of thyroid disorders in the continent is often affected not only by the iodine status in the region but sometimes also by selenium deficiency and thiocyanate toxicity. The reported prevalence rates of endemic goiter range from 1% to 90% depending on the area of study with myxedematous cretinism still a prominent feature of IDD in only a few regions of the continent. The extent of autoimmune thyroid disorders remains unknown because of underdiagnosis and underreporting but the few available studies note a prevalence rate of 1.2% to 9.9% of which Graves diseases is the commonest of these groups of disorders. Rarer causes of thyroid dysfunction such as thyroid tuberculosis and amiodarone related causes are also documented in this review. The onset of new thyroid diseases following amiodarone usage was documented in 27.6% of persons treated for arrhythmia. Reports on thyroid malignancies (CA in Africa abound and differentiated thyroid malignancies are noted to occur more commonly than the other forms of thyroid CA. The documented prevalence rates of thyroid CA in the African continent are as follows (papillary: 6.7-72.1%, follicular: 4.9-68%, anaplastic: 5-21.4%, and medullary: 2.6%-13.8%. For the differentiated thyroid CA, there is a changing trend toward the more

  20. Pathogenesis of thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy: does autoimmunity against calsequestrin and collagen XIII play a role?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hooshang Lahooti

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Hooshang Lahooti, Kishan R Parmar, Jack R WallThe Department of Medicine, University of Sydney, Nepean Clinical School, Penrith, NSW, AustraliaAbstract: Thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy (TAO, or thyroid eye disease, is a complex inflammatory disorder of the eye that, as its name implies, is associated with thyroid disease. TAO can be divided into three subtypes: ocular myopathy, congestive myopathy and mixed congestive and myopathic ophthalmopathy. Although the precise pathophysiology of TAO remains unclear it is likely to reflect an autoimmune reaction involving sensitized T-cells and autoantibodies directed against a thyroid and orbital tissue shared antigen. One well studied candidate in this immune reaction is the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSH-r, expressed in the orbital fibroblast and pre adipocyte. In our studies of TAO, we have investigated the nature and significance of antibodies targeting other eye muscle and orbital connective tissue (OCT antigens. Our findings suggest that autoimmunity against the eye muscle antigen calsequestrin and the OCT antigen collagen XIII plays a role in the pathogenesis of TAO. We propose that ocular myopathy and chronic eyelid retraction are due to autoimmunity against skeletal muscle calsequestrin in the extraocular and eyelid muscles, respectively. This may be initiated in the thyroid where calsequestrin expression is upregulated, possibly due to a stimulatory effect of TSH-r antibodies. We also propose that congestive ophthalmopathy results from a reaction against the TSH-r or collagen XIII in orbital fibroblast cell membranes. Further insight into the role of eye muscle and OCT antigens in the pathogenesis of TAO may allow for the development of new therapies to treat the eye disorder and reduce patient morbidity.Keywords: thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy, autoimmunity, t calsequestrin, collagen XIII

  1. Solar Radiation and Vitamin D: Mitigating Environmental Factors in Autoimmune Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerry K. Schwalfenberg

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper looks at the environmental role of vitamin D and solar radiation as risk reduction factors in autoimmune disease. Five diseases are considered: multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, autoimmune disease of the thyroid, and inflammatory bowel disease. Clinical relevant studies and factors that may indicate evidence that autoimmune disease is a vitamin D-sensitive disease are presented. Studies that have resulted in prevention or amelioration of some autoimmune disease are discussed. An example of the utility of supplementing vitamin D in an unusual autoimmune disease, idiopathic thrombocytic purpura, is presented.

  2. Estrogens and autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutolo, Maurizio; Capellino, Silvia; Sulli, Alberto; Serioli, Bruno; Secchi, Maria Elena; Villaggio, Barbara; Straub, Rainer H

    2006-11-01

    Sex hormones are implicated in the immune response, with estrogens as enhancers at least of the humoral immunity and androgens and progesterone (and glucocorticoids) as natural immune-suppressors . Several physiological, pathological, and therapeutic conditions may change the serum estrogen milieu and/or peripheral conversion rate, including the menstrual cycle, pregnancy, postpartum period, menopause, being elderly, chronic stress, altered circadian rhythms, inflammatory cytokines, and use of corticosteroids, oral contraceptives, and steroid hormonal replacements, inducing altered androgen/estrogen ratios and related effects. In particular, cortisol and melatonin circadian rhythms are altered, at least in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and partially involve sex hormone circadian synthesis and levels as well. Abnormal regulation of aromatase activity (i.e., increased activity) by inflammatory cytokine production (i.e., TNF-alpha, IL-1, and IL-6) may partially explain the abnormalities of peripheral estrogen synthesis in RA (i.e., increased availability of 17-beta estradiol and possible metabolites in synovial fluids) and in systemic lupus erythematosus, as well as the altered serum sex-hormone levels and ratio (i.e., decreased androgens and DHEAS). In the synovial fluids of RA patients, the increased estrogen concentration is observed in both sexes and is more specifically characterized by the hydroxylated forms, in particular 16alpha-hydroxyestrone, which is a mitogenic and cell proliferative endogenous hormone. Local effects of sex hormones in autoimmune rheumatic diseases seems to consist mainly in modulation of cell proliferation and cytokine production (i.e., TNF-alpha, Il-1, IL-12). In this respect, it is interesting that male patients with RA seem to profit more from anti-TNFalpha strategies than do female patients. PMID:17261796

  3. Coeliac disease in endocrine diseases of autoimmune origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miśkiewicz, Piotr; Kępczyńska-Nyk, Anna; Bednarczuk, Tomasz

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Coeliac disease (CD, sometimes called gluten-sensitive enteropathy or nontropical sprue) is an inflammatory disorder of the small intestine of autoimmune origin. It occurs in genetically predisposed people and is induced by a gluten protein, which is a component of wheat. The prevalence of histologically confirmed CD is estimated in screening studies of adults in the United States and Europe to be between 0.2% and 1.0%. The results of previous studies have indicated that the prevalence of CD is increased in patients with other autoimmune disorders such as: autoimmune thyroid diseases, type 1 diabetes mellitus, and Addison's disease. A coincidence of the above diseases constitutes autoimmune polyglandular syndrome (APS). The high prevalence of CD in APS is probably due to the common genetic predisposition to the coexistent autoimmune diseases. The majority of adult patients have the atypical or silent type of the disease. This is the main reason why CD so often goes undiagnosed or the diagnosis is delayed. CD, if undiagnosed and untreated, is associated with many medical disorders including haematological (anaemia), metabolical (osteopenia/osteoporosis), obstetric-gynaecological (infertility, spontaneous abortions, late puberty, early menopause), neurological (migraine, ataxia, epilepsy) as well as with an increased risk of malignancy, especially: enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma, small intestine adenocarcinoma, and oesophageal and oropharyngeal carcinomas. Early introduction of a gluten-free diet and lifelong adherence to this treatment decreases the risk of these complications. PMID:22744631

  4. Autoimmune paediatric liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgina Mieli-Vergani, Diego Vergani

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Liver disorders with a likely autoimmune pathogenesis in childhood include autoimmune hepatitis (AIH, autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis (ASC, and de novo AIH after liver transplantation. AIH is divided into two subtypes according to seropositivity for smooth muscle and/or antinuclear antibody (SMA/ANA, type 1 or liver kidney microsomal antibody (LKM1, type 2. There is a female predominance in both. LKM1 positive patients tend to present more acutely, at a younger age, and commonly have partial IgA deficiency, while duration of symptoms before diagnosis, clinical signs, family history of autoimmunity, presence of associated autoimmune disorders, response to treatment, and long-term prognosis are similar in both groups. The most common type of paediatric sclerosing cholangitis is ASC. The clinical, biochemical, immunological, and histological presentation of ASC is often indistinguishable from that of AIH type 1. In both, there are high IgG, non-organ specific autoantibodies, and interface hepatitis. Diagnosis is made by cholangiography. Children with ASC respond to immunosuppression satisfactorily and similarly to AIH in respect to remission and relapse rates, times to normalization of biochemical parameters, and decreased inflammatory activity on follow up liver biopsies. However, the cholangiopathy can progress. There may be evolution from AIH to ASC over the years, despite treatment. De novo AIH after liver transplantation affects patients not transplanted for autoimmune disorders and is strikingly reminiscent of classical AIH, including elevated titres of serum antibodies, hypergammaglobulinaemia, and histological findings of interface hepatitis, bridging fibrosis, and collapse. Like classical AIH, it responds to treatment with prednisolone and azathioprine. De novo AIH post liver transplantation may derive from interference by calcineurin inhibitors with the intrathymic physiological mechanisms of T-cell maturation and selection. Whether

  5. Autoimmune paediatric liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giorgina Mieli-Vergani; Diego Vergani

    2008-01-01

    Liver disorders with a likely autoimmune pathogenesis in childhood include autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis (ASC),and de novo AIH after liver transplantation.AIH is divided into two subtypes according to seropositivity for smooth muscle and/or antinuclear antibody (SMA/ANA,type 1) or liver kidney microsomal antibody (LKM1,type 2).There is a female predominance in both.LKM1 positive patients tend to present more acutely,at a younger age,and commonly have partial IgA deficiency,while duration of symptoms before diagnosis,clinical signs,family history of autoimmunity, presence of associated autoimmune disorders,response to treatment,and long-term prognosis are similar in both groups. The most common type of paediatric sclerosing cholangitis is ASC.The clinical,biochemical, immunological,and histological presentation of ASC is often indistinguishable from that of AIH type 1.In both,there are high IgG,non-organ specific autoantibodies,and interface hepatitis.Diagnosis is made by cholangiography.Children with ASC respond to immunosuppression satisfactorily and similarly to AIH in respect to remission and relapse rates,times to normalization of biochemical parameters, and decreased inflammatory activity on follow up liver biopsies. However,the cholangiopathy can progress.There may be evolution from AIH to ASC over the years,despite treatment.De novo AIH after liver transplantation affects patients not transplanted for autoimmune disorders and is strikingly reminiscent of classical AIH,including elevated titres of serum antibodies, hypergammaglobulinaemia,and histological findings of interface hepatitis,bridging fibrosis,and collapse.Like classical AIH,it responds to treatment with prednisolone and azathioprine.De novo AIH post liver transplantation may derive from interference by calcineurin inhibitors with the intrathymic physiological mechanisms of T-cell maturation and selection.Whether this condition is a distinct entity or a form of

  6. Postpartum thyroiditis and autoimmune thyroiditis in women of childbearing age: recent insights and consequences for antenatal and postnatal care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.F. Muller (Alex); H.A. Drexhage (Hemmo); A. Berghout (Arie)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractPostpartum thyroiditis is a syndrome of transient or permanent thyroid dysfunction occurring in the first year after delivery and based on an autoimmune inflammation of the thyroid. The prevalence ranges from 5-7%. We discuss the role of antibodies (especially thyroid p

  7. Imaging combined autoimmune and infectious disease microarrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewart, Tom; Raha, Sandeep; Kus, Dorothy; Tarnopolsky, Mark

    2006-09-01

    Bacterial and viral pathogens are implicated in many severe autoimmune diseases, acting through such mechanisms as molecular mimicry, and superantigen activation of T-cells. For example, Helicobacter pylori, well known cause of stomach ulcers and cancers, is also identified in ischaemic heart disease (mimicry of heat shock protein 65), autoimmune pancreatitis, systemic sclerosis, autoimmune thyroiditis (HLA DRB1*0301 allele susceptibility), and Crohn's disease. Successful antibiotic eradication of H.pylori often accompanies their remission. Yet current diagnostic devices, and test-limiting cost containment, impede recognition of the linkage, delaying both diagnosis and therapeutic intervention until the chronic debilitating stage. We designed a 15 minute low cost 39 antigen microarray assay, combining autoimmune, viral and bacterial antigens1. This enables point-of-care serodiagnosis and cost-effective narrowly targeted concurrent antibiotic and monoclonal anti-T-cell and anti-cytokine immunotherapy. Arrays of 26 pathogen and 13 autoimmune antigens with IgG and IgM dilution series were printed in triplicate on epoxysilane covalent binding slides with Teflon well masks. Sera diluted 1:20 were incubated 10 minutes, washed off, anti-IgG-Cy3 (green) and anti-IgM-Dy647 (red) were incubated for 5 minutes, washed off and the slide was read in an ArrayWoRx(e) scanning CCD imager (Applied Precision, Issaquah, WA). As a preliminary model for the combined infectious disease-autoimmune diagnostic microarray we surveyed 98 unidentified, outdated sera that were discarded after Hepatitis B antibody testing. In these, significant IgG or IgM autoantibody levels were found: dsDNA 5, ssDNA 11, Ro 2, RNP 7, SSB 4, gliadin 2, thyroglobulin 13 cases. Since control sera showed no autoantibodies, the high frequency of anti-DNA and anti-thyroglobulin antibodies found in infected sera lend increased support for linkage of infection to subsequent autoimmune disease. Expansion of the antigen

  8. [Infectious agents and autoimmune diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riebeling-Navarro, C; Madrid-Marina, V; Camarena-Medellín, B E; Peralta-Zaragoza, O; Barrera, R

    1992-01-01

    In this paper the molecular aspects of the relationships between infectious agents and autoimmune diseases, the mechanisms of immune response to infectious agents, and the more recent hypotheses regarding the cause of autoimmune diseases are discussed. The antigens are processed and selected by their immunogenicity, and presented by HLA molecules to the T cell receptor. These events initiate the immune response with the activation and proliferation of T-lymphocytes. Although there are several hypotheses regarding the cause of autoimmune diseases and too many findings against and in favor of them, there is still no conclusive data. All these hypothesis and findings are discussed in the context of the more recent advances. PMID:1615352

  9. Oral Tolerance: Therapeutic Implications for Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M. C. Faria

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral tolerance is classically defined as the suppression of immune responses to antigens (Ag that have been administered previously by the oral route. Multiple mechanisms of tolerance are induced by oral Ag. Low doses favor active suppression, whereas higher doses favor clonal anergy/deletion. Oral Ag induces Th2 (IL-4/IL-10 and Th3 (TGF-β regulatory T cells (Tregs plus CD4+CD25+ regulatory cells and LAP+T cells. Induction of oral tolerance is enhanced by IL-4, IL-10, anti-IL-12, TGF-β, cholera toxin B subunit (CTB, Flt-3 ligand, anti-CD40 ligand and continuous feeding of Ag. In addition to oral tolerance, nasal tolerance has also been shown to be effective in suppressing inflammatory conditions with the advantage of a lower dose requirement. Oral and nasal tolerance suppress several animal models of autoimmune diseases including experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE, uveitis, thyroiditis, myasthenia, arthritis and diabetes in the nonobese diabetic (NOD mouse, plus non-autoimmune diseases such as asthma, atherosclerosis, colitis and stroke. Oral tolerance has been tested in human autoimmune diseases including MS, arthritis, uveitis and diabetes and in allergy, contact sensitivity to DNCB, nickel allergy. Positive results have been observed in phase II trials and new trials for arthritis, MS and diabetes are underway. Mucosal tolerance is an attractive approach for treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases because of lack of toxicity, ease of administration over time and Ag-specific mechanism of action. The successful application of oral tolerance for the treatment of human diseases will depend on dose, developing immune markers to assess immunologic effects, route (nasal versus oral, formulation, mucosal adjuvants, combination therapy and early therapy.

  10. Oxidative Stress and Immune System in Vitiligo and Thyroid Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Roberta Colucci; Federica Dragoni; Silvia Moretti

    2015-01-01

    Vitiligo is an acquired dermatological disease frequently associated with autoimmune thyroid disorders. Several theories have been proposed so far to unravel the complex vitiligo pathogenesis. Currently, the autocytotoxic and the autoimmune theories are the most accredited hypothesis, since they are sustained by several important clinical and experimental evidences. A growing body of evidences shows that autoimmunity and oxidative stress strictly interact to finally determine melanocyte loss....

  11. Selenium levels in patients with autoimmune thyroiditis and controls in lower Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimmer, I; Hartmann, T; Brustbauer, R; Minear, G; Dam, K

    2014-09-01

    Autoimmune thyroiditis (AIT) is one of the most common autoimmune diseases; genetic as well as environmental factors contribute to its pathogenesis. The thyroid is the organ with the highest selenium content per unit weight. Selenium status appears to have an impact on the development of thyroid pathologies. We investigated a possible difference of selenium serum levels as a marker of nutritional selenium supply between patients with AIT in central Lower Austria and a matched group of healthy persons living in the same region. Selenium serum levels in the patients with AIT were 98.0 ± 15.6 μg/l. A significant difference to the matched group of normal persons, whose selenium serum levels were 103.2 ± 12.4 μg/l, could not be detected by the t-test (p>0.05). We considered the serum selenium levels to be indicators of selenium supply (by alimentation). A serum level of 120-160 μg/l of selenium represents the normal range. According to this, most patients and control persons showed mild to moderate selenium deficiency (80-120 μg/l selenium). Although our data present slightly higher selenium levels in normal persons than in patients with AIT, this weak and statistically insignificant trend is not sufficient to support the conclusion of a link between inadequate selenium supply and autoimmune thyroid disease. PMID:24977659

  12. Gene therapy of experimental autoimmune thyroiditis mice by in vivo administration of plasmid DNA coding for human interleukin-10

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGZhen-Lin; LINBo; YULu-Yang; SHENShui-Xian; ZHULi-Hua; WANGWui-Ping; GUOLi-He

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of interleukin-10 (IL-10) gene on experimental autoimmune thyroiditis mice.METHODS: Mice were immunized to induce autoimmune thyroiditis with porcine thyroglobulin (pTg), and thyroids of mice were injected with IL-10 DNA. On d 28 after immunization with pTg, mRNA expression of IL-10 inthyroid glands was detected and thyroid specimens were histopathological studied. RESULTS: The mRNA expression of IL-10 was detected in thyroid glands on d 7 and 14 after injection of IL-10 plasmid DNA or on COS-7 cells48 h after IL-10 plasmid DNA transfection. In addition, hlL-10 levels in culture media significantly increased 48 hand 72 h after IL-10 plasmid DNA transfection. Infiltration index of lymphocytes (1.1±0.4) in thyroids ofIL-10-treated mice was significantly lower than that of pcDNA3-null-treated mice (2.2±0.5) (P<0.01). Comparedwith pcDNA3-null control mice, IL-10-treated mice had lower levels of serum IFN-γ(P<0.01). CONCLUSION:The direct injection of DNA expression vectors encoding IL-10 into thyroid significantly inhibited development oflymphocytic infiltration of thyroid of autoimmune th,yroiditis mice, and alleviated the progression of this disease.

  13. Diagnostics of thyroid diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recommendations of the Thyroid Section of the Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Endokrinologie have been established with a view to diagnostic practice; they help to define the most appropriate diagnostic procedure in consideration of its diagnostic value, necessity, expenditure in terms of time and cost, and the hazard involved. Methodological progress and recent scientific findings have been considered as well as economic aspects and the available technical facilities. The decision on what method to apply in thyroid diagnostics and therapy should be based on a specific anamnesis and a detailed physical examination. The measured data must be compatible with the patient's symptoms and with unambiguously established clinical signs. In a progressively structured diagnostic procedure, one should always start with the simple, non-invasive in vitro techniques. Functional diagnostics of thyroid diseases is supplemented by thyroid scintiscanning with short-lived radionuclides and by thyroid cytology. Experience and precise knowledge help to save funds and reduce the radiation doses applied. Of course, uncertain diagnoses and untypical findings necessitate a wider application of diagnostic means than clinically more or less validated diagnoses. (orig./MG)

  14. Coeliac disease with autoimmune haemolytic anaemia.

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, D. G.

    1984-01-01

    Two patients are described who have developed autoimmune haemolytic anaemia in association with their coeliac disease. Autoimmune haemolytic anaemia may represent an extension of immunological disorders linked with coeliac disease, centred on the histocompatibility antigen B8.

  15. Low birth weight is not associated with thyroid autoimmunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, Thomas Heiberg; Hansen, Pia Skov; Rudbeck, Annette Beck;

    2006-01-01

    Ab [beta = 0.002 (-0.010 to 0.014); P = 0.77]. When restricting the analysis to twin pairs with a within-pair difference in birth weight of 500 g or greater or to twin pairs born 4 wk or more before term, the regression coefficients were almost unchanged. Controlling for potential confounders (sex......CONTEXT: Low birth weight has been proposed as a risk factor for the development of antibodies toward thyroid peroxidase (TPOAb) and thyroglobulin (TgAb) in adult life. However, the association could also be due to genetic or environmental factors affecting both birth weight and the development of...... thyroid autoantibodies. The effect of these confounders can be minimized through investigation of twin pairs. OBJECTIVE AND DESIGN: To examine the impact of low birth weight on the development of thyroid autoimmunity, we studied whether within-twin-cohort and within-twin-pair differences in birth weight...

  16. Autoimmune Skin Diseases in the Dog

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, W M

    1981-01-01

    Diagnoses of autoimmune skin diseases require very careful observation of the skin lesions, and selection of an intact vesicle for histopathological examination. If available, immunofluorescent studies can be very useful in confirming the diagnosis of autoimmune skin disease. Seven autoimmune skin diseases are briefly reviewed. Therapy must be aggressive and owner warned of the guarded prognosis.

  17. Progranulin antibodies in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurner, Lorenz; Preuss, Klaus-Dieter; Fadle, Natalie; Regitz, Evi; Klemm, Philipp; Zaks, Marina; Kemele, Maria; Hasenfus, Andrea; Csernok, Elena; Gross, Wolfgang L; Pasquali, Jean-Louis; Martin, Thierry; Bohle, Rainer Maria; Pfreundschuh, Michael

    2013-05-01

    Systemic vasculitides constitute a heterogeneous group of diseases. Autoimmunity mediated by B lymphocytes and their humoral effector mechanisms play a major role in ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) as well as in non-ANCA associated primary systemic vasculitides and in the different types of autoimmune connective tissue disorders and rheumatoid arthritis. In order to detect autoantibodies in systemic vasculitides, we screened protein macroarrays of human cDNA expression libraries with sera from patients with ANCA-associated and ANCA-negative primary systemic vasculitides. This approach led to the identification of antibodies against progranulin, a 88 kDA secreted glycoprotein with strong anti-inflammatory activity in the course of disease of giant-cell arteritis/polymyalgia rheumatica (14/65), Takayasu's arteritis (4/13), classical panarteritis nodosa (4/10), Behcet's disease (2/6) and in the course of disease in granulomatosis with polyangiitis (31/75), Churg-Strauss syndrome (7/23) and in microscopic polyangiitis (7/19). In extended screenings the progranulin antibodies were also detected in other autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (39/91) and rheumatoid arthritis (16/44). Progranulin antibodies were detected only in 1 of 97 healthy controls. Anti-progranulin positive patients with systemic vasculitides, systemic lupus erythematosus or rheumatoid arthritis had significant lower progranulin plasma levels, indicating a neutralizing effect. In light of the anti-inflammatory effects of progranulin, progranulin antibodies might exert pro-inflammatory effects thus contributing to the pathogenesis of the respective autoimmune diseases and might serve as a marker for disease activity. This hypothesis is supported by the fact that a positive progranulin antibody status was associated with active disease in granulomatosis with polyangiitis. PMID:23149338

  18. An autosomal locus causing autoimmune disease: Autoimmune polyglandular disease type I assigned to chromosome 21

    OpenAIRE

    Aaltonen, Johanna; Björses, Petra; Sandkuijl, Lodewijk; Perheentupa, Jaakko; Peltonen, Leena Johanna

    1994-01-01

    textabstractAutoimmune polyglandular disease type I (APECED) is an autosomal recessive autoimmune disease characterized by a variable combination of the failure of the endocrine glands. The pathogenesis of this unique autoimmune disease is unknown; unlike many other autoimmune diseases, APECED does not show association to specific HLA haplotypes. Unravelling the APECED locus will identify a novel gene outside the HLA loci influencing the outcome of autoimmune diseases. We have assigned the di...

  19. CMV-hFasL transgenic mice prevent from experimental autoimmune thyroiditis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhen-lin; LIN Bo; YU Lu-yang; GUO Li-he

    2005-01-01

    Background Previous studies showed that the role of Fas ligand (FasL) is not consistent in the pathogenesis of autoimmune thyroiditis. This study was designed to investigate the effects of FasL on the pathogenesis of experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT) using CMV-human FasL (hFasL) transgenic mice. Methods Transgenic mice ubiquitously expressing hFasL were used as an animal model of EAT by injection of porcine thyroglobulin (pTg). Expression of hFasL was detected by RT-PCR and Western blot. The activity of hFasL transgenic thyrocytes killing Jurket cells was determined. CMV-hFasL transgenic mice and wild type (WT) mice were immunized with pTg and killed 28 days later to evaluate the lymphocytic infiltration of their thyroids. The number of CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes from the spleen was detected using FACS. The serum interferon-γ (IFN-γ) concentration was measured by ELISA. Results hFasL expression in the thyroid of CMV-hFasL transgenic mice was confirmed. After co-incubation of Jurket thymocytes with thyroid tissues of CMV-hFasL transgenic mice, the percentage of apoptotic cells in the CMV-hFasL transgenic thyroid group was significantly higher than that of the control WT thyroid group [(23.4±4.3)% vs (6.6±2.5)%, P<0.01]. On day 28 after immunization with pTg, the infiltration index of lymphocytes in thyroids of the CMV-hFasL transgenic mice was significantly lower than that of the WT mice [(1.0±0.5) vs (2.1±0.7), P<0.001]. Moreover, the number of CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes of the spleen and serum IFN-γ concentration were significantly decreased in the CMV-hFasL transgenic mice. Conclusions FasL plays an important role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune thyroiditis. Transgenic mice ubiquitously expressing hFasL may strongly inhibit lymphocytic infiltration of the thyroid of EAT and ameliorate the course of this disease.

  20. Chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto disease)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... determine thyroid function include: Free T4 test Serum TSH T3 Thyroid autoantibodies Imaging studies are generally not ... signs of mild thyroid failure (such as elevated TSH). This condition is also known as subclinical hypothyroidism. ...

  1. CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 ameliorates thyroid damage in autoimmune thyroiditis in NOD.H‑2h4 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Mao, Jinyuan; Han, Cheng; Peng, Shiqiao; Li, Chenyan; Jin, Ting; Fan, Chenling; Shan, Zhongyan; Teng, Weiping

    2016-04-01

    CXC chemokine ligand 12 (CXCL12) and its receptor, CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4), are upregulated in mice with autoimmune thyroid diseases. However, whether this interaction is involved in the pathophysiology of autoimmune thyroiditis (AIT) remains to be elucidated. In the present study, the effects of the CXCR4 antagonist, AMD3100, in an iodine‑induced autoimmune thyroiditis model were investigated. NOD.H‑2h4 mice were randomly separated into a control, AIT and AIT+AMD3100 groups. The mice were fed with 0.05% sodium iodide water for 8 weeks to induce AIT. The AMD3100‑treated mice were administered with the CXCR4 antagonist at a dose of 10 mg/kg intraperitoneally three times a week during the experimental period. The percentages of CD19+interleukin (IL)10+ B cells and CD4+IL10+ T cells, and the mRNA expression levels of IL10 in the splenocytes were reduced in the AIT group, compared with the control group, however, they increased following AMD3100 treatment, compared with the untreated AIT group. The percentages of CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, CD19+ B cells and CD8+ interferon (IFN)γ+ T cells, and the mRNA expression levels of IFNγ increased in the AIT group, compared with the control group, however, these were reduced in the AMD3100 group, compared with the AIT group. The AMD3100‑treated mice also had lower serum thyroglobulin antibody titers and reduced lymphocytic infiltration in the thyroid, compared with the untreated AIT mice. These results suggested that inhibition of this chemokine axis may offer potential as a therapeutic target for the treatment of AIT. PMID:26935473

  2. Spondyloarthropathies in Autoimmune Diseases and Vice Versa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar M. Pérez-Fernández

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyautoimmunity is one of the major clinical characteristics of autoimmune diseases (ADs. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of ADs in spondyloarthropathies (SpAs and vice versa. This was a two-phase cross-sectional study. First, we examined the presence of ADs in a cohort of patients with SpAs (N=148. Second, we searched for the presence of SpAs in a well-defined group of patients with ADs (N=1077 including rheumatoid arthritis (RA, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, and Sjögren’s syndrome (SS. Among patients with SpAs, ankylosing spondylitis was observed in the majority of them (55.6%. There were two patients presenting with SS in the SpA group (1.4% and 5 patients with autoimmune thyroiditis (3.5%. The global prevalence of ADs in SpAs was 4.86%. In the ADs group, there were 5 patients with SpAs (0.46%. Our results suggest a lack of association between SpAs and ADs. Accordingly, SpAs might correspond more to autoinflammatory diseases rather than to ADs.

  3. Hormonal change and cytokine mRNA expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells during the development of canine autoimmune thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, E-W; Shin, I-S; Bhang, D-H; Lee, D-H; Bae, B-K; Kang, M-S; Kim, D-Y; Hwang, C-Y; Lee, C-W; Youn, H-Y

    2006-10-01

    To elucidate the hormonal change and alteration in cytokine expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) during the early stage of autoimmune thyroiditis, we have developed a canine model of this disease, in which normal dogs were immunized with bovine thyroglobulin (Tg) and/or canine thyroid extract. Serum samples were collected weekly, anti-canine Tg antibody was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and total T4 levels by radioimmunoassay. We also assayed T lymphocyte proliferation in response to Tg, as well as measuring cytokine mRNA by semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). All six dogs immunized with bovine Tg had both canine Tg autoantibody and anti-T4 antibody. When the sample from the highest TgAA titre time-point was compared with baseline the expression of mRNA encoding the Th1-type cytokine such as interferon (IFN)-gamma, interleukin (IL)-18 and IL-15 was increased during the development of autoimmune thyroiditis. Expression of the Th2-type cytokine, IL-6 showed minimal change and IL-4 expression was not detected in any of the samples. Expression of the T suppressive cytokine, IL-10 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta was increased in the presence of antigen stimulation. These findings suggest that, although autoimmune thyroiditis is an organ-specific autoimmune disease, systemic cytokine mRNA expression is also changed. PMID:16968404

  4. Gene expression profiling in autoimmune diseases: chronic inflammation or disease specific patterns?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bovin, Lone Frier; Brynskov, Jørn; Hegedüs, Laszlo;

    2007-01-01

    ) patients and healthy individuals were specific for the arthritic process or likewise altered in other chronic inflammatory diseases such as chronic autoimmune thyroiditis (Hashimoto's thyroiditis, HT) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Using qPCR for 18 RA-discriminative genes, there were no significant......A central issue in autoimmune disease is whether the underlying inflammation is a repeated stereotypical process or whether disease specific gene expression is involved. To shed light on this, we analysed whether genes previously found to be differentially regulated in rheumatoid arthritis (RA...... immunoinflammatory diseases, but only if accompanied by pronounced systemic manifestations. This suggests that at least some of the genes activated in RA are predominantly or solely related to general and disease-nonspecific autoimmune processes....

  5. Childbirths and risk of female predominant and other autoimmune diseases in a population-based Danish cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kristian Tore; Pedersen, Bo Vestergaard; Nielsen, Nete Munk;

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the possible biological role of pregnancy on the risk of autoimmune diseases we assessed associations between reproductive history and subsequent risk of autoimmune diseases characterized by female predominance and other autoimmune diseases. Our study cohort comprised 4.6 million Danes.......14-1.24), erythema nodosum (1.15; 1.01-1.32), psoriasis (1.08; 1.01-1.15), sarcoidosis (1.17; 1.06-1.28) and systemic lupus erythematosus (0.83; 0.74-0.93). Especially the one-year postpartum period was associated with an increased risk of Hashimoto thyroiditis, Graves' disease and sarcoidosis. Overall, parity was...... associated with an 11% increased risk of female predominant autoimmune diseases. Pregnancies resulting in liveborn children therefore seem to contribute only little to the general female predominance in autoimmune diseases. However, for a number of autoimmune diseases; especially autoimmune thyroid diseases...

  6. Thyroid diseases and Ramadan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed A Raza

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the month of Ramadan, patients with thyroid diseases, most of the time, do not need treatment adjustments and can fast safely without any health hazards. Patients with hypothyroidism taking thyroxine can take their tablets on an empty stomach at bedtime instead of half an hour before Sehr. Patients with hyperthyroidism, on methimazole/carbimazole can continue their dose in once or twice daily regimes, while those on propylthiouracil need to be switched. Hyperthyroid patients with severe symptoms should start treatment immediately and can avoid fast for few days after a consultation with their religious scholar.

  7. Thyroid uptake of {sup 67}Ga-citrate is associated with thyroid autoimmunity and hypothyroidism in patients with sarcoidosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonelli, Alessandro; Fallahi, Poupak; Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Ferrannini, Ele [University of Pisa and CNR Institute of Clinical Physiology, Metabolism Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, Pisa (Italy); Fazzi, Piera [University of Pisa, Respiratory Pathophysiology Section, Cardiac and Thoracic Department, Pisa (Italy); Grosso, Mariano; Boni, Giuseppe; Mariani, Giuliano [University of Pisa, Regional Center of Nuclear Medicine, Medical School, Pisa (Italy)

    2009-01-15

    To evaluate the association of gallium-67 ({sup 67}Ga)-citrate thyroid uptake with the presence of thyroid disorders in patients with sarcoidosis (S patients). Eighty-four S patients were evaluated by a complete thyroid work-up (neck ultrasound, circulating thyroid hormones and anti-thyroid antibodies, fine-needle aspiration). In S patients with {sup 67}Ga thyroid uptake (respect those without): serum thyroid-stimulating hormone, the titre of anti-thyroid peroxidase (AbTPO) and/or anti-thyroglobulin antibodies (AbTg), and the prevalence of S patients with hypothyroidism or with positive AbTg or AbTPO was significantly higher; a thyroid hypoechoic pattern was more frequent. The prevalence of thyroid nodules was not significantly different between the two groups. Two cases of papillary thyroid cancer were observed in S patients without {sup 67}Ga thyroid uptake, whilst no case in those with {sup 67}Ga thyroid uptake. {sup 67}Ga thyroid uptake is associated with the presence of aggressive autoimmune thyroiditis and hypothyroidism in S patients; thyroid function and ultrasonography should be performed in the presence of {sup 67}Ga thyroid uptake. (orig.)

  8. Production of interleukin (IL)-5 and IL-10 accompanies T helper cell type 1 (Th1) cytokine responses to a major thyroid self-antigen, thyroglobulin, in health and autoimmune thyroid disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus H; Hegedüs, L; Rieneck, Klaus;

    2007-01-01

    mononuclear cells (PBMC) from patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT), Graves' disease (GD) and healthy controls, upon exposure to a thyroid self-antigen, human thyroglobulin (Tg), in the presence of autologous serum. Initially, TNF-alpha and IL-2 were produced in all three groups, accompanied by IL-10....... Release of IFN-gamma, IL-4 and, notably, IL-5 ensued. Both patient groups exhibited increased TNF-alpha, IL-2, IFN-gamma and IL-10 responses, and PBMC from HT patients secreted lower amounts of IL-5 than male, but not female, controls. Enhanced TNF-alpha production by HT cells also occurred......-gamma, IL-5 and IL-10 responses were markedly inhibited by partial denaturation of Tg by boiling. We hypothesize that autoantibodies and complement may promote mixed Th1/Th2 cell cytokine responses by enhancing the uptake of autoantigens by antigen-presenting cells...

  9. Production of interleukin (IL)-5 and IL-10 accompanies T helper cell type 1 (Th1) cytokine responses to a major thyroid self-antigen, thyroglobulin, in health and autoimmune thyroid disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C H; Hegedüs, L; Rieneck, K;

    2007-01-01

    mononuclear cells (PBMC) from patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT), Graves' disease (GD) and healthy controls, upon exposure to a thyroid self-antigen, human thyroglobulin (Tg), in the presence of autologous serum. Initially, TNF-alpha and IL-2 were produced in all three groups, accompanied by IL-10....... Release of IFN-gamma, IL-4 and, notably, IL-5 ensued. Both patient groups exhibited increased TNF-alpha, IL-2, IFN-gamma and IL-10 responses, and PBMC from HT patients secreted lower amounts of IL-5 than male, but not female, controls. Enhanced TNF-alpha production by HT cells also occurred......-gamma, IL-5 and IL-10 responses were markedly inhibited by partial denaturation of Tg by boiling. We hypothesize that autoantibodies and complement may promote mixed Th1/Th2 cell cytokine responses by enhancing the uptake of autoantigens by antigen-presenting cells....

  10. Antithyroid Antibodies and Thyroid Function in Pediatric Patients with Celiac Disease

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of autoimmune thyroid disease, persistence of antithyroid antibodies, effect of gluten-free diet, and long-term outcome of thyroid function in pediatric patients with celiac disease (CD). Methods. 67 patients with CD aged from 1 year to 16 years were screened for thyroid antithyroperoxidase, antithyroglobulin and anti-TSH receptor antibodies, serum free triiodothyronine, free thyroxine, and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) at diagno...

  11. Clinical implications of a new TSH-receptor-antibody-assay (DYNOtest {sup trademark} TRAKhuman) in autoimmune thyroid diseases; Klinische Implikationen eines neuen TSH-Rezeptor-Antikoerper-Assays (DYNOtest {sup trademark} TRAKhuman) bei autoimmunen Schilddruesenerkrankungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meller, J.; Schreivogel, I.; Becker, W. [Goettingen Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Nuklearmedizin; Bergmann, A.; Morgenthaler, N. [B.R.A.H.M.S Diagnostica, Berlin (Germany); Huefner, M. [Goettingen Univ. (Germany). Abt. Innere Medizin

    2000-07-01

    Aim: Conventional radioreceptor-antibody-assays (RAAs) fail in the detection of TSH-receptor antibodies (TRAKs) in 10-30% of patients with Graves' disease (GD). The aim of this study was the evaluation of the diagnostic and clinical impact of a new RRA (DYNOtest {sup trademark} TRAKhuman) which uses the human recombinant TSH-Receptor in the diagnosis of autoimmune thyroid disease. Methods: Sera from 142 consecutive patients (GD: n=50, autoimmune thyroiditis/AIT: n=92) and from 55 controls (31 patients without any thyroid disease and 14 with euthyroid goiter) were evaluated both with the DYNOtest {sup trademark} TRAKhuman-assay and a conventional RRA (TRAK-Assay {sup trademark}). Thyroid in vitro parameters and thyroid sonography were performed in all patients. Results: The DYNOtest {sup trademark} TRAK-assay was significantly superior to the conventional RRA in the diagnosis of GD (p<0,00012), especially in those who were treated by thionamides (p<0,003) and in the diagnosis of TRAK-positive patients with AIT (p<0,003). The majority of TRAK-positive AIT-patients suffered from hypothyroidism. One false positive result in patients with euthyroid goiter was found in the TRAK-Assay {sup trademark} as well as in the DYNOtest {sup trademark} TRAKhuman-Assay. Therefore the specifity of the DYNOtest {sup trademark} TRAKhuman was not inferior compared with the conventional assay. Conclusion: The DYNOtest {sup trademark} TRAK-assay is superior in the diagnostic work up of Graves' disease compared with a conventional TRAK-assay and offers an equal specifity. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Bei konventionellen Radiorezeptor-Antikoerper-Assays (RRAs) misslingt der Nachweis von TSH-Rezeptor Antikoerpern (TRAKS) bei 10-30% der immunogenen Hyperthyreosen (IH). Ziel der Studie war es, den diagnostischen und klinischen Stellenwertes eines neuen RRA (DYNOtest {sup trademark} TRAKhuman) bei autoimmunen Schilddruesenerkrankungen zu evaluieren. Methoden: Serumproben von 142

  12. Cardiovascular Involvement in Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Amaya-Amaya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases (AD represent a broad spectrum of chronic conditions that may afflict specific target organs or multiple systems with a significant burden on quality of life. These conditions have common mechanisms including genetic and epigenetics factors, gender disparity, environmental triggers, pathophysiological abnormalities, and certain subphenotypes. Atherosclerosis (AT was once considered to be a degenerative disease that was an inevitable consequence of aging. However, research in the last three decades has shown that AT is not degenerative or inevitable. It is an autoimmune-inflammatory disease associated with infectious and inflammatory factors characterized by lipoprotein metabolism alteration that leads to immune system activation with the consequent proliferation of smooth muscle cells, narrowing arteries, and atheroma formation. Both humoral and cellular immune mechanisms have been proposed to participate in the onset and progression of AT. Several risk factors, known as classic risk factors, have been described. Interestingly, the excessive cardiovascular events observed in patients with ADs are not fully explained by these factors. Several novel risk factors contribute to the development of premature vascular damage. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of how traditional and nontraditional risk factors contribute to pathogenesis of CVD in AD.

  13. Does thyroidectomy, radioactive iodine therapy, or antithyroid drug treatment alter reactivity of patients` T cells to epitopes of thyrotropin receptor in autoimmune thyroid diseases?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soliman, M.; Kaplan, E.; Abdel-Latif, A. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-01

    The effect of treatment on thyroid antibody production and T cell reactivity to thyroid antigens was studied in 15 patients with Graves` disease (GD) before and after thyroidectomy, 19 patients with GD before and after radioactive iodine (RAI) therapy, and 9 patients maintained euthyroid on antithyroid drugs (ATD). In GD patients, the responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and TSH receptor (TSHR)-specific T cell lines to recombinant human TSHR extracellular domain, thyroglobulin, and TSHR peptides were examined on the day of surgery or RAI therapy (day 0) and also 6-8 weeks and 3-6 months thereafter. Reactivity to TSHR peptides before surgery was heterogeneous and spanned the entire extracellular domain. Six to 8 weeks after subtotal thyroidectomy, the number of patients` PBMC responding to any peptide and the average number of recognized peptides decreased. A further decrease in the T cell reactivity to TSHR peptides was observed 3-6 months after surgery. The responses of PBMC from Graves` patients before RAI therapy were less than those in the presurgical group. Six to 8 weeks after RAI therapy, the number of patients responding to any peptide and the average number of recognized peptides increased. Three to 6 months after RAI, T cell responses to TSHR peptides were less than those 6-8 weeks after RAI therapy, but still higher than the values on day 0. Responses of PBMC from patients with GD, maintained euthyroid on ATD, were lower than those before surgery or RAI therapy. The reactivity of T cell lines in different groups reflected a pattern similar to PBMC after treatment. TSHR antibody and microsomal antibody levels decreased after surgery, but increased after RAI therapy. The difference in the number of recognized peptides by patients` PBMC before RAI and surgery may reflect the effect of long term therapy with ATD in the patients before RAI vs. the shorter period in patients before surgery. 38 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Does thyroidectomy, radioactive iodine therapy, or antithyroid drug treatment alter reactivity of patients' T cells to epitopes of thyrotropin receptor in autoimmune thyroid diseases?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of treatment on thyroid antibody production and T cell reactivity to thyroid antigens was studied in 15 patients with Graves' disease (GD) before and after thyroidectomy, 19 patients with GD before and after radioactive iodine (RAI) therapy, and 9 patients maintained euthyroid on antithyroid drugs (ATD). In GD patients, the responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and TSH receptor (TSHR)-specific T cell lines to recombinant human TSHR extracellular domain, thyroglobulin, and TSHR peptides were examined on the day of surgery or RAI therapy (day 0) and also 6-8 weeks and 3-6 months thereafter. Reactivity to TSHR peptides before surgery was heterogeneous and spanned the entire extracellular domain. Six to 8 weeks after subtotal thyroidectomy, the number of patients' PBMC responding to any peptide and the average number of recognized peptides decreased. A further decrease in the T cell reactivity to TSHR peptides was observed 3-6 months after surgery. The responses of PBMC from Graves' patients before RAI therapy were less than those in the presurgical group. Six to 8 weeks after RAI therapy, the number of patients responding to any peptide and the average number of recognized peptides increased. Three to 6 months after RAI, T cell responses to TSHR peptides were less than those 6-8 weeks after RAI therapy, but still higher than the values on day 0. Responses of PBMC from patients with GD, maintained euthyroid on ATD, were lower than those before surgery or RAI therapy. The reactivity of T cell lines in different groups reflected a pattern similar to PBMC after treatment. TSHR antibody and microsomal antibody levels decreased after surgery, but increased after RAI therapy. The difference in the number of recognized peptides by patients' PBMC before RAI and surgery may reflect the effect of long term therapy with ATD in the patients before RAI vs. the shorter period in patients before surgery. 38 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs

  15. Type of fish consumed and thyroid autoimmunity in pregnancy and postpartum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benvenga, Salvatore; Vigo, Maria Teresa; Metro, Daniela; Granese, Roberta; Vita, Roberto; Le Donne, Maria

    2016-04-01

    Fish consumption or supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids was reported to cure and/or prevent autoimmune and nonautoimmune disorders. Serum positivity for thyroid autoantibodies is a predictive marker of postpartum thyroiditis and postpartum depression. We hypothesized that stable consumption of the omega-3-rich oily fish was associated with a more favorable profile of serum thyroid antibodies throughout pregnancy and early postpartum compared with stable consumption of swordfish, a predator that concentrates pollutants. We prospectively measured serum thyroglobulin antibodies and thyroperoxidase antibodies in pregnancy (first, second trimesters) and postpartum (day 4), in 236 thyroid disease-free, nonsmoker Caucasian women with stable dietary habits. We did not measure thyroid autoantibodies prior to pregnancy. Women were divided into groups A (n = 48; swordfish), B (n = 52; oily fish), C (n = 68; swordfish + other fish, not necessarily oily fish), and D (n = 68; fish other than swordfish and oily fish). Major endpoints were positivity rates and serum concentrations of the two autoantibodies. We resorted to previous studies for the estimated content of fatty acids and microelements in the consumed fish. Positivity rates and serum concentrations of both antibodies were the greatest in group A and the lowest in group B (P postpartum problems, our data suggest a dietary prophylaxis of such problems. PMID:26306774

  16. Rett syndrome: An autoimmune disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Felice, Claudio; Leoncini, Silvia; Signorini, Cinzia; Cortelazzo, Alessio; Rovero, Paolo; Durand, Thierry; Ciccoli, Lucia; Papini, Anna Maria; Hayek, Joussef

    2016-04-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a devastating neurodevelopmental disease, previously included into the autistic spectrum disorders, affecting almost exclusively females (frequency 1:10,000). RTT leads to intellective deficit, purposeful hands use loss and late major motor impairment besides featuring breathing disorders, epilepsy and increased risk of sudden death. The condition is caused in up to 95% of the cases by mutations in the X-linked methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene. Our group has shown a number of previously unrecognized features, such as systemic redox imbalance, chronic inflammatory status, respiratory bronchiolitis-associated interstitial lung disease-like lung disease, and erythrocyte morphology changes. While evidence on an intimate involvement of MeCP2 in the immune response is cumulating, we have recently shown a cytokine dysregulation in RTT. Increasing evidence on the relationship between MeCP2 and an immune dysfunction is reported, with, apparently, a link between MECP2 gene polymorphisms and autoimmune diseases, including primary Sjögren's syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and systemic sclerosis. Antineuronal (i.e., brain proteins) antibodies have been shown in RTT. Recently, high levels of anti-N-glucosylation (N-Glc) IgM serum autoantibodies [i.e., anti-CSF114(N-Glc) IgMs] have been detected by our group in a statistically significant number of RTT patients. In the current review, the Authors explore the current evidence, either in favor or against, the presence of an autoimmune component in RTT. PMID:26807990

  17. Pathogenesis of Autoimmune Diseases: A Short Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jithin Jose

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmunity is characterized by the reaction of cells (auto reactive T-lymphocytes or products (autoantibodies of the immune system against the organism’s own antigens (autoantigen. It may be part of the physiological immune response (natural autoimmunity or pathologically induced, which may eventually lead to development of clinical abnormalities (autoimmune disease. Different mechanisms are involved in the induction and progression of autoimmunity. These include genetic or acquired defects in immune tolerance or immune regulatory pathways, molecular mimicry to viral or bacterial protein, an impaired clearance of apoptotic cell material. A A number of diseases have been identified in which there is autoimmunity, due to copious production of autoantibodies and autoreactive cells. The aim of the present article is to review on the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases.

  18. Helicobacter pylori infection might be responsible for the interconnection between type 1 diabetes and autoimmune thyroiditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Eshmawy Mervat M

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Higher serological prevalence rates of helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection have been reported in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1DM and autoimmune thyroiditis (AT. Patients with T1DM are at increased risk for developing other autoimmune diseases, most commonly AT. It is unknown whether H. pylori infection could explain the high prevalence of thyroid autoantibodies and AT in T1DM. The aim of the current study was to evaluate anti-thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO and anti-thyroglobulin (anti-Tg autoantibodies in correlation with anti-H. pylori IgG and IgA in young patients with T1DM. Methods Anti-H. Pylori IgG, IgA, anti-TPO and anti-Tg antibodies titers were measured in 162 euthyroid patients with T1DM and 80 healthy controls matched for age, sex and socioeconomic status. Results Seroprevalence of H. pylori was significantly higher in patients with T1DM than in healthy controls; 79% vs. 51.2%, p Conclusion our results support the idea of a connection between H. pylori infection and the occurrence of anti-TPO, anti-Tg autoantibodies and AT in young patients with T1DM. So, H. pylori infection could be considered as an environmental trigger for development of AT in T1DM. Young patients with T1DM should be screened for H. pylori infection.

  19. cDNA immunization of mice with human thyroglobulin generates both humoral and T cell responses: a novel model of thyroid autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Eric M; Concepcion, Erlinda; Ho, Kenneth; Kopp, Peter; Vono Toniolo, Jussara; Tomer, Yaron

    2011-01-01

    Thyroglobulin (Tg) represents one of the largest known self-antigens involved in autoimmunity. Numerous studies have implicated it in triggering and perpetuating the autoimmune response in autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD). Indeed, traditional models of autoimmune thyroid disease, experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT), are generated by immunizing mice with thyroglobulin protein in conjunction with an adjuvant, or by high repeated doses of Tg alone, without adjuvant. These extant models are limited in their experimental flexibility, i.e. the ability to make modifications to the Tg used in immunizations. In this study, we have immunized mice with a plasmid cDNA encoding the full-length human Tg (hTG) protein, in order to generate a model of Hashimoto's thyroiditis which is closer to the human disease and does not require adjuvants to breakdown tolerance. Human thyroglobulin cDNA was injected and subsequently electroporated into skeletal muscle using a square wave generator. Following hTg cDNA immunizations, the mice developed both B and T cell responses to Tg, albeit with no evidence of lymphocytic infiltration of the thyroid. This novel model will afford investigators the means to test various hypotheses which were unavailable with the previous EAT models, specifically the effects of hTg sequence variations on the induction of thyroiditis. PMID:21559421

  20. High frequency of positive anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies (ATPO) in adult subjects without known thyroid disease, Santiago de Chile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies have a pathogenic role in Hashimoto thyroiditis. Between 10 and 19% of individuals without thyroid disease, have positive titers of these antibodies. Aim: To study the frequency of positive titers of anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies in healthy individuals. Material and Methods: A blood sample, to measure anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) by chemiluminescence assay, was obtained from 67 women and 62 men aged 45 ± 14 years, without a personal or familiar history of thyroid diseases and normal thyroid palpation. The cutoff point of the manufacturer to consider positive a titer of anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies was set at 35 IU/ml. Results: Twenty-eight women and 28 men had positive antibody titers (43% of the sample). Subjects in the upper tercile of anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody titers had a higher TSH than those in the second tercile, although within normal limits (1.73 ± 0.74 and 1.37 ± 0.59 mlU/L, respectively p = 0.02) Conclusions: Forty three percent of the studied subjects without personal or familial history of thyroid diseases had positive titers of anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies. Further prospective studies should evaluate whether this observation discloses an increase in thyroid autoimmune disease in a population with increased iodine intake

  1. Pulmonary hypertension in autoimmune rheumatic diseases

    OpenAIRE

    L. Massironi; R. Cossutta; Massarotti, M.; Marasini, B; A. Mantero

    2011-01-01

    Objective. Pulmonary hypertension is a severe and rapidly progressive disease, particularly frequent in patients with rheumatic diseases. The aims of this study were the following: to determine the prevalence of pulmonary hypertension in Italian patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases, and to evaluate if the presence of a rheumatic disease in general, or of a specific autoimmune rheumatic disease, is a risk factor for the development of pulmonary hypertension. Patients and Methods. One hu...

  2. Transplantation in autoimmune liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marcus Mottershead; James Neuberger

    2008-01-01

    Liver transplantation remains an effective treatment for those with end-stage disease and with intractable liver-related symptoms.The shortage of organs for transplantation has resulted in the need for rationing.A variety of approaches to selection and allocation have been developed and vary from country to country.The shortage of donors has meant that new approaches have to be adopted to make maximal use of the available organs;these include splitting grafts,use of extended criteria livers,livers from nonheart-beating donors and from living donors.Post transplantation, most patients will need life-long immunosuppression,although a small proportion can have immunosuppression successfully withdrawn.Newer immunosuppressive drugs and different strategies may allow a more targeted approach with a reduction in sideeffects and so improve the patient and graft survival.For autoimmune diseases, transplantation is associated with significant improvement in the quality and length of life.Disease may recur after transplantation and may affect patient and graft survival.

  3. Molecular diagnosis of autoimmune blistering diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuruta, Daisuke; Dainichi, Teruki; Hamada, Takahiro; Ishii, Norito; Hashimoto, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune bullous diseases are the best-characterized autoimmune skin diseases. Molecular diagnosis of these diseases has become possible due to the identification of their target autoantigens over the past three decades. In this review, we summarize methodology for categorizing autoimmune bullous diseases by means of combinations of direct and indirect immunofluorescence techniques using normal human skin sections, rat bladder sections and COS7 cells transfected with desmocollins 1-3 encoded vectors, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and immunoblotting with normal human epidermal extracts, dermal extracts, purified proteins from cell cultures and recombinant proteins. PMID:23325635

  4. Clinical significance of combined determination of serum TPO-Ab and TGA levels and T lymphocyte subsets in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the possible relationship between serum thyroglobulin antibody, thyroid peroxidase antibody levels and the development of AITD. Methods: Thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPO-Ab) level was determined with electrochemilu-minescence assay, the thyroglobulin antibody (TGA) was detected by radiolmmunoassay and peripheral T-cells subsets were examined with monoclonal antibody technic in 87 patients with hyperthyroidism, 83 patients with hypothyroidism and 80 controls. Results: The thyroid peroxidase antibody and thyroglobulin antibody levels in AITD patients (including both hyper and hypothyroid patients) were significantly higher than those in the controls (P<0.01). Conclusion: It is proposed that increase of TPO-Ab and TGA is the cause of the development of AITD. (authors)

  5. A case of severe autoimmune hepatitis associated with Graves' disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samia Abdulla Bokhari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Graves' disease is a common condition and is known to have a wide range of effects on a variety of organs. Hepatic dysfunction ranging from mild to severe due to direct effect of high circulating thyroid hormones as well as a deleterious effect of antithyroid medications (methimazole and propylthiouracil has been well - documented in literature. However, severe autoimmune hepatitis (AIH associated with Graves' disease is rare and limited to few case reports only. A 38-year-old woman presented with abdominal pain and yellowish discolouration of conjunctivae. On investigation, she was found to have Graves' disease and AIH. The liver histopathology showed typical features of AIH. She responded excellently to glucocorticoid therapy with normalisation of thyroid function and liver histology. The case is discussed with relevant literature review.

  6. Autoimmune diseases in Adult Life after Childhood Cancer in Scandinavia (ALiCCS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmqvist, Anna Sällfors; Olsen, Jørgen H.; Mellemkjaer, Lene;

    2015-01-01

    all autoimmune diseases combined, corresponding to an AER of 67 per 100 000 person-years. The SHRRs were significantly increased for autoimmune haemolytic anaemia (16.3), Addison's disease (13.9), polyarteritis nodosa (5.8), chronic rheumatic heart disease (4.5), localised scleroderma (3......OBJECTIVES: The pattern of autoimmune diseases in childhood cancer survivors has not been investigated previously. We estimated the risk for an autoimmune disease after childhood cancer in a large, population-based setting with outcome measures from comprehensive, nationwide health registries.......6), idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (3.4), Hashimoto's thyroiditis (3.1), pernicious anaemia (2.7), sarcoidosis (2.2), Sjögren's syndrome (2.0) and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (1.6). The SHRRs for any autoimmune disease were significantly increased after leukaemia (SHRR 1.6), Hodgkin's lymphoma (1...

  7. Identification of novel genetic Loci associated with thyroid peroxidase antibodies and clinical thyroid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medici, Marco; Porcu, Eleonora; Pistis, Giorgio; Teumer, Alexander; Brown, Suzanne J; Jensen, Richard A; Rawal, Rajesh; Roef, Greet L; Plantinga, Theo S; Vermeulen, Sita H; Lahti, Jari; Simmonds, Matthew J; Husemoen, Lise Lotte N; Freathy, Rachel M; Shields, Beverley M; Pietzner, Diana; Nagy, Rebecca; Broer, Linda; Chaker, Layal; Korevaar, Tim I M; Plia, Maria Grazia; Sala, Cinzia; Völker, Uwe; Richards, J Brent; Sweep, Fred C; Gieger, Christian; Corre, Tanguy; Kajantie, Eero; Thuesen, Betina; Taes, Youri E; Visser, W Edward; Hattersley, Andrew T; Kratzsch, Jürgen; Hamilton, Alexander; Li, Wei; Homuth, Georg; Lobina, Monia; Mariotti, Stefano; Soranzo, Nicole; Cocca, Massimiliano; Nauck, Matthias; Spielhagen, Christin; Ross, Alec; Arnold, Alice; van de Bunt, Martijn; Liyanarachchi, Sandya; Heier, Margit; Grabe, Hans Jörgen; Masciullo, Corrado; Galesloot, Tessel E; Lim, Ee M; Reischl, Eva; Leedman, Peter J; Lai, Sandra; Delitala, Alessandro; Bremner, Alexandra P; Philips, David I W; Beilby, John P; Mulas, Antonella; Vocale, Matteo; Abecasis, Goncalo; Forsen, Tom; James, Alan; Widen, Elisabeth; Hui, Jennie; Prokisch, Holger; Rietzschel, Ernst E; Palotie, Aarno; Feddema, Peter; Fletcher, Stephen J; Schramm, Katharina; Rotter, Jerome I; Kluttig, Alexander; Radke, Dörte; Traglia, Michela; Surdulescu, Gabriela L; He, Huiling; Franklyn, Jayne A; Tiller, Daniel; Vaidya, Bijay; de Meyer, Tim; Jørgensen, Torben; Eriksson, Johan G; O'Leary, Peter C; Wichmann, Eric; Hermus, Ad R; Psaty, Bruce M; Ittermann, Till; Hofman, Albert; Bosi, Emanuele; Schlessinger, David; Wallaschofski, Henri; Pirastu, Nicola; Aulchenko, Yurii S; de la Chapelle, Albert; Netea-Maier, Romana T; Gough, Stephen C L; Meyer Zu Schwabedissen, Henriette; Frayling, Timothy M; Kaufman, Jean-Marc; Linneberg, Allan; Räikkönen, Katri; Smit, Johannes W A; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, André G; Walsh, John P; Meisinger, Christa; den Heijer, Martin; Visser, Theo J; Spector, Timothy D; Wilson, Scott G; Völzke, Henry; Cappola, Anne; Toniolo, Daniela; Sanna, Serena; Naitza, Silvia; Peeters, Robin P

    2014-02-01

    Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) are common, affecting 2-5% of the general population. Individuals with positive thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAbs) have an increased risk of autoimmune hypothyroidism (Hashimoto's thyroiditis), as well as autoimmune hyperthyroidism (Graves' disease). As the possible causative genes of TPOAbs and AITD remain largely unknown, we performed GWAS meta-analyses in 18,297 individuals for TPOAb-positivity (1769 TPOAb-positives and 16,528 TPOAb-negatives) and in 12,353 individuals for TPOAb serum levels, with replication in 8,990 individuals. Significant associations (P<5×10(-8)) were detected at TPO-rs11675434, ATXN2-rs653178, and BACH2-rs10944479 for TPOAb-positivity, and at TPO-rs11675434, MAGI3-rs1230666, and KALRN-rs2010099 for TPOAb levels. Individual and combined effects (genetic risk scores) of these variants on (subclinical) hypo- and hyperthyroidism, goiter and thyroid cancer were studied. Individuals with a high genetic risk score had, besides an increased risk of TPOAb-positivity (OR: 2.18, 95% CI 1.68-2.81, P = 8.1×10(-8)), a higher risk of increased thyroid-stimulating hormone levels (OR: 1.51, 95% CI 1.26-1.82, P = 2.9×10(-6)), as well as a decreased risk of goiter (OR: 0.77, 95% CI 0.66-0.89, P = 6.5×10(-4)). The MAGI3 and BACH2 variants were associated with an increased risk of hyperthyroidism, which was replicated in an independent cohort of patients with Graves' disease (OR: 1.37, 95% CI 1.22-1.54, P = 1.2×10(-7) and OR: 1.25, 95% CI 1.12-1.39, P = 6.2×10(-5)). The MAGI3 variant was also associated with an increased risk of hypothyroidism (OR: 1.57, 95% CI 1.18-2.10, P = 1.9×10(-3)). This first GWAS meta-analysis for TPOAbs identified five newly associated loci, three of which were also associated with clinical thyroid disease. With these markers we identified a large subgroup in the general population with a substantially increased risk of TPOAbs. The results provide insight into why

  8. Identification of novel genetic Loci associated with thyroid peroxidase antibodies and clinical thyroid disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Medici

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD are common, affecting 2-5% of the general population. Individuals with positive thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAbs have an increased risk of autoimmune hypothyroidism (Hashimoto's thyroiditis, as well as autoimmune hyperthyroidism (Graves' disease. As the possible causative genes of TPOAbs and AITD remain largely unknown, we performed GWAS meta-analyses in 18,297 individuals for TPOAb-positivity (1769 TPOAb-positives and 16,528 TPOAb-negatives and in 12,353 individuals for TPOAb serum levels, with replication in 8,990 individuals. Significant associations (P<5×10(-8 were detected at TPO-rs11675434, ATXN2-rs653178, and BACH2-rs10944479 for TPOAb-positivity, and at TPO-rs11675434, MAGI3-rs1230666, and KALRN-rs2010099 for TPOAb levels. Individual and combined effects (genetic risk scores of these variants on (subclinical hypo- and hyperthyroidism, goiter and thyroid cancer were studied. Individuals with a high genetic risk score had, besides an increased risk of TPOAb-positivity (OR: 2.18, 95% CI 1.68-2.81, P = 8.1×10(-8, a higher risk of increased thyroid-stimulating hormone levels (OR: 1.51, 95% CI 1.26-1.82, P = 2.9×10(-6, as well as a decreased risk of goiter (OR: 0.77, 95% CI 0.66-0.89, P = 6.5×10(-4. The MAGI3 and BACH2 variants were associated with an increased risk of hyperthyroidism, which was replicated in an independent cohort of patients with Graves' disease (OR: 1.37, 95% CI 1.22-1.54, P = 1.2×10(-7 and OR: 1.25, 95% CI 1.12-1.39, P = 6.2×10(-5. The MAGI3 variant was also associated with an increased risk of hypothyroidism (OR: 1.57, 95% CI 1.18-2.10, P = 1.9×10(-3. This first GWAS meta-analysis for TPOAbs identified five newly associated loci, three of which were also associated with clinical thyroid disease. With these markers we identified a large subgroup in the general population with a substantially increased risk of TPOAbs. The results provide insight into why

  9. Possible Role of Human Herpesvirus 6 as a Trigger of Autoimmune Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Francesco Broccolo; Lisa Fusetti; Luca Ceccherini-Nelli

    2013-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) infection is common and has a worldwide distribution. Recently, HHV-6A and HHV-6B have been reclassified into two distinct species based on different biological features (genetic, antigenic, and cell tropism) and disease associations. A role for HHV-6A/B has been proposed in several autoimmune disorders (AD), including multiple sclerosis (MS), autoimmune connective tissue diseases, and Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The focus of this review is to discuss the above-mentio...

  10. Thyroid Disease and Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... thyroid absorbs the radioactive substance. Next, a special camera measures where the radioactive substance is taken up ... Nemours Foundation, iStock, Getty Images, Corbis, Veer, Science Photo Library, Science Source Images, Shutterstock, and Clipart.com

  11. Thyroid Disease (for Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... thyroid absorbs the radioactive substance. Then a special camera measures where the radioactive substance is taken up ... Nemours Foundation, iStock, Getty Images, Corbis, Veer, Science Photo Library, Science Source Images, Shutterstock, and Clipart.com

  12. Large leg ulcers due to autoimmune diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Rozin, Alexander P; Egozi, Dana; Ramon, Yehuda; Toledano, Kohava; Braun-Moscovici, Yolanda; Markovits, Doron; Schapira, Daniel; Bergman, Reuven; Melamed, Yehuda; Ullman, Yehuda; Balbir-Gurman, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Large leg ulcers (LLU) may complicate autoimmune diseases. They pose a therapeutic challenge and are often resistant to treatment. To report three cases of autoimmune diseases complicated with LLU. Case Report Case 1. A 55-year old woman presented with long-standing painful LLU due to mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD). Biopsy from the ulcer edge showed small vessel vasculitis. IV methylprednisolone (MethP) 1 G/day, prednisolone (PR) 1mg/kg, monthly IV cyclophosphamide ...

  13. Human autoimmune diseases: a comprehensive update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lifeng; Wang, Fu-Sheng; Gershwin, M Eric

    2015-10-01

    There have been significant advances in our understanding of human autoimmunity that have led to improvements in classification and diagnosis and, most importantly, research advances in new therapies. The importance of autoimmunity and the mechanisms that lead to clinical disease were first recognized about 50 years ago following the pioneering studies of Macfarlane Burnett and his Nobel Prize-winning hypothesis of the 'forbidden clone'. Such pioneering efforts led to a better understanding not only of autoimmunity, but also of lymphoid cell development, thymic education, apoptosis and deletion of autoreactive cells. Contemporary theories suggest that the development of an autoimmune disease requires a genetic predisposition and environmental factors that trigger the immune pathways that lead, ultimately, to tissue destruction. Despite extensive research, there are no genetic tools that can be used clinically to predict the risk of autoimmune disease. Indeed, the concordance of autoimmune disease in identical twins is 12-67%, highlighting not only a role for environmental factors, but also the potential importance of stochastic or epigenetic phenomena. On the other hand, the identification of cytokines and chemokines, and their cognate receptors, has led to novel therapies that block pathological inflammatory responses within the target organ and have greatly improved the therapeutic effect in patients with autoimmune disease, particularly rheumatoid arthritis. Further advances involving the use of multiplex platforms for diagnosis and identification of new therapeutic agents should lead to major breakthroughs within the next decade. PMID:26212387

  14. Association of schizophrenia and autoimmune diseases: linkage of Danish national registers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eaton, William W.; Byrne, Majella; Ewald, Henrik;

    2006-01-01

    ,704 persons in Denmark diagnosed with schizophrenia from 1981 to 1998 and their parents along with a sample of matched comparison subjects and their parents. The data linkage required that the autoimmune disease occur before the diagnosis of schizophrenia. RESULTS: A history of any autoimmune disease was......OBJECTIVE: Individuals with schizophrenia and their relatives tend to have either higher or lower than expected prevalences of autoimmune disorders, especially rheumatoid arthritis, celiac disease, autoimmune thyroid diseases, and type 1 diabetes. The purpose of the study was to estimate the...... association of schizophrenia with these disorders as well as a range of other autoimmune diseases in a single large epidemiologic study. METHOD: The Danish Psychiatric Register, the National Patient Register, and a register with socioeconomic information were linked to form a data file that included all 7...

  15. Indirect thyroid lymphography in the thyroid diseases diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indirect thyroid lymphography with water-soluble radiographic agents has been applied. This method allows contrast lymph microvessels of the thyroid gland, providing the detection of volume formations of 0.3 to 0.4 cm and more in diameter. 232 patients with different thyroid diseases were examined. Different rate of the water-soluble contrast agent resolution in diffuse toxic and nodular goiter, thyroid cancer, chronic thyroiditis is of great importance in differential diagnosis of these diseases. This method provides necessary information on the organs inner structure, its topography and size

  16. Thyroid diseases after Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive iodine is released at every atomic-bomb testings and nuclear plants accidents and radioactive iodine is taken up by thyroid glands (internal radiation). In addition to the internal radiation, radioactive fallout causes the external radiation and thyroid glands are known to be sensitive to the external radiation. Furthermore, patients with radiation-induced thyroid disease can survive for a long time regardless of the treatment. The survey of thyroid diseases, therefore, is very sensitive and reliable ways to investigate the effects of radiation caused by atomic bomb explosion, testing and various types of nuclear plants' accidents. Our group from Nagasaki University was asked to investigate the thyroid diseases and jointed to the Sasakawa Project. In order to investigate the effects of radiation on thyroid disease, it is essential 1) to make a correct diagnosis in each subject, 2) to calculate a correct radiation dose in each subject and finally, 3) to find out the correlation between the radiation dose and thyroid diseases including age-, sex- and area-matched controls. We have established 5 centers (1 in Russia, 2 in Belarus, 2 in Ukraine) and supplied the most valuable ultrasonography instruments, commercial kits for the determination of serum free T4 and TSH level and for the autoantibodies, instrument for urinary iodine measurements, syringers, tubes, refrigerators, etc. We visit each center often and asked people at centers to come to Japan for training. Protocol of investigation is essentially the same as that in Nagasaki, and we are planning to investigate more than 50,000 children within 5 years. We are hoping to show a definite conclusion in the near future. Recent articles are also discussed. (author)

  17. The effects of female sex steroids on the development of autoimmune thyroiditis in thymectomized and irradiated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Female PVG/c strain rats are more susceptible to induction of autoimmune thyroiditis initiated by thymectomy and irradiation (Tx-X) than similarly treated males. Pre-pubertal ovariectomy further augmented susceptibility. Administration of oestrogen or progesterone to groups of 4 weeks old ovariectomized Tx-X animals over a period of 15 weeks significantly altered induction of this condition. Oestrogen administered repeatedly at dose levels of 1 μg and 10 μg/100 g body weight resulted in partial suppression of thyroiditis with a corresponding change in the incidence of antibodies to thyroglobulin. Oestrogen administered by a single implantation had a suppressive effect on the development of autoimmunity in ovariectomized Tx-X females. Oestrogen given by either of these procedures also reduced the incidence of thyroiditis and autoantibody induction in orchidectomized male Tx-X rats. In contrast, repeated administration of progesterone at a dose of 250 mg and 1,500 μg/100 g body weight appeared to augment levels of autoimmunity. It is concluded that the differential susceptibility to the induction of autoimmunity by thymectomy and irradiation is the direct consequence of sex hormonal influences. The higher incidence of the disease in the female would appear to be determined by the balance between the activity of oestrogen and progesterone which would further appear to have antagonistic influences in this particular situation. (UK)

  18. Epidemiology of autoimmune diseases in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eaton, William W.; Rose, N.R.; Kalaydijan, A.;

    2007-01-01

    An epidemiologic study of the autoimmune diseases taken together has not been done heretofore. The National Patient Register of Denmark is used to estimate the population prevalence of 31 possible or probable autoimmune diseases. Record linkage is used to estimate 465 pairwise co-morbidities in...... diseases and weak across diseases. These data confirm the importance of the autoimmune diseases as a group and suggest that common etiopathologies exist among them...... individuals among the 31 diseases, and familial aggregation among sibs, parents and offspring. The prevalence of any of the 31 diseases in the population is more than 5%. Within individuals, there is extensive comorbidity across the 31 diseases. Within families, aggregation is strongest for individual...

  19. Thyroid disease in the pediatric patient: emphasizing imaging with sonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thyroid disease does occur in the pediatric patient, and imaging plays an important role in its evaluation. A review is presented of normal development of the thyroid gland, the technique and indications for thyroid sonography, and key imaging features of congenital thyroid disorders (ectopic or absent thyroid, infantile goiter, thyroglossal duct remnants), benign thyroid masses (follicular adenoma, degenerative nodules, colloid and thyroid cysts), malignant masses (follicular, papillary and medullary carcinoma) and diffuse thyroid disease (acute bacterial thyroiditis, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, Grave's disease). (orig.)

  20. DYSMICROBISM, INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE AND THYROIDITIS: ANALYSIS OF THE LITERATURE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasello, G; Tralongo, P; Amoroso, F; Damiani, P; Sinagra, E; Noto, M; Arculeo, V M; Jurjus Zein, R; Saad, W; Jurjus, A; Gerbino, A; Leone, A

    2015-01-01

    The human body is colonized by a large number of microbes that are collectively referred to as the microbiota. They interact with the hosting organism and some do contribute to the physiological maintenance of the general good health thru regulation of some metabolic processes while some others are essential for the synthesis of vitamins and short-chain fatty acids. The abnormal variation, in the quality and/or quantity of individual bacterial species residing in the gastro-intestinal tract, is called “dysmicrobism”. The immune system of the host will respond to these changes at the intestinal mucosa level which could lead to Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD). This inflammatory immune response could subsequently extend to other organs and systems outside the digestive tract such as the thyroid, culminating in thyroiditis. The goal of the present study is to review and analyze data reported in the literature about thyroiditis associated with inflammatory bowel diseases such as Ulcerative Colitis (UC) and Crohn’s Disease (CD). It was reported that similarities of some molecular bacterial components with molecular components of the host are considered among the factors causing IBD through an autoimmune reaction which could involve other non-immune cell types. The axis dysmicrobism-IBD-autoimmune reaction will be investigated as a possible etiopathogenic mechanism to Autoimmune Thyroiditis. If such is the case, then the employment of specific probiotic strains may represent a useful approach to moderate the immune system. PMID:26122213

  1. Ultrasound diagnostics of thyroid diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kharchenko, Vladimir P. [Russian Radiology Research Center, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kotlyarov, Peter M. [Russian Center of Roentgenradiology, Moscow (Russian Federation); Mogutov, Mikhail S.; Sencha, Alexander N.; Patrunov, Yury N.; Belyaev, Denis V. [Yaroslavl Railway Clinic (Russian Federation); Alexandrov, Yury K. [State Medical Academy, Yaroslavl (Russian Federation)

    2010-07-01

    This book is based on the authors' extensive practical experience in the use of modern ultrasound, and other radiological methods, in the diagnosis of thyroid diseases. The authors have analyzed more than 100,000 ultrasound examinations performed between 1995 and 2008 in patients with thyroid and parathyroid disease, as well as many thousands of diagnostic and therapeutic ultrasound-guided minimally invasive procedures. The opening chapters include discussion of current ultrasound techniques, pitfalls, and the specifics of ultrasound examination of the thyroid in children. Detailed attention is then devoted to findings in the normal thyroid and in the presence of diffuse and focal changes. Further chapters focus on such topics as ultrasound examination after thyroid surgery and ultrasound diagnosis of parathyroid disease, recurrent goiter, and neck masses. Ultrasound-guided minimally invasive techniques, such as fine-needle aspiration biopsy, percutaneous laser ablation, and ethanol and glucocorticoid injections, are considered in depth. This up-to-date and richly illustrated book will interest and assist specialists in ultrasound diagnostics, radiologists, endocrinologists, and neck surgeons. (orig.)

  2. Ultrasound diagnostics of thyroid diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book is based on the authors' extensive practical experience in the use of modern ultrasound, and other radiological methods, in the diagnosis of thyroid diseases. The authors have analyzed more than 100,000 ultrasound examinations performed between 1995 and 2008 in patients with thyroid and parathyroid disease, as well as many thousands of diagnostic and therapeutic ultrasound-guided minimally invasive procedures. The opening chapters include discussion of current ultrasound techniques, pitfalls, and the specifics of ultrasound examination of the thyroid in children. Detailed attention is then devoted to findings in the normal thyroid and in the presence of diffuse and focal changes. Further chapters focus on such topics as ultrasound examination after thyroid surgery and ultrasound diagnosis of parathyroid disease, recurrent goiter, and neck masses. Ultrasound-guided minimally invasive techniques, such as fine-needle aspiration biopsy, percutaneous laser ablation, and ethanol and glucocorticoid injections, are considered in depth. This up-to-date and richly illustrated book will interest and assist specialists in ultrasound diagnostics, radiologists, endocrinologists, and neck surgeons. (orig.)

  3. The Emerging Link Between Autoimmune Disorders and Neuropsychiatric Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kayser, Matthew S; Dalmau, Josep

    2011-01-01

    Abnormal autoimmune activity has been implicated in a number of neuropsychiatric disorders. In this review, the authors discuss a newly recognized class of synaptic autoimmune encephalitides as well as behavioral and cognitive manifestations of systemic autoimmune diseases.

  4. 2012 European Thyroid Association Guidelines for the Management of Familial and Persistent Sporadic Non-Autoimmune Hyperthyroidism Caused by Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone Receptor Germline Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschke, R.; Niedziela, M.; Vaidya, B.; Persani, L.; Rapoport, B.; Leclere, J.

    2012-01-01

    All cases of familial thyrotoxicosis with absence of evidence of autoimmunity and all children with persistent isolated neonatal hyperthyroidism should be evaluated for familial non-autoimmune autosomal dominant hyperthyroidism (FNAH) or persistent sporadic non-autoimmune hyperthyroidism (PSNAH). First, all index patients should be analysed for the presence/absence of a thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor (TSHR) germline mutation, and if they display a TSHR germline mutation, all other family members including asymptomatic and euthyroid family members should also be analysed. A functional characterization of all new TSHR mutations is necessary. Appropriate ablative therapy is recommended to avoid relapses of hyperthyroidism and its consequences, especially in children. Therefore, in children the diagnosis of FNAH or PSNAH needs to be established as early as possible in the presence of the clinical hallmarks of the disease. PMID:24783013

  5. Autism and Autoimmune Disease: A Family Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Money, John; And Others

    1971-01-01

    Described in a family in which the youngest boy has early infantile autism, Addison's disease, and moniliasis and two older boys have autoimmune disease with hypoparathyroidism, Addison's disease, moniliasis, and either alopecia totalis or diabetes mellitus, while the oldest boy and parents are symptom free. (KW)

  6. Acute recurrent pancreatitis: An autoimmune disease?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Raffaele Pezzilli

    2008-01-01

    In this review article,we will briefly describe the main characteristics of autoimmune pancreatitis and then we will concentrate on our aim,namely,evaluating the clinical characteristics of patients having recurrence of pain from the disease.In fact,the open question is to evaluate the possible presence of autoimmune pancreatitis in patients with an undefined etiology of acute pancreatitis and for this reason we carried out a search in the literature in order to explore this issue.In cases of recurrent attacks of pain in patients with "idiopathic"pancreatitis,we need to keep in mind the possibility that our patients may have autoimmune pancreatitis.Even though the frequency of this disease seems to be quite low,we believe that in the future,by increasing our knowledge on the subject,we will be able to diagnose an ever-increasing number of patients having acute recurrence of pain from autoimmune pancreatitis.

  7. Immuno-neuro-endocrine networks: A study on the inflammatory state of circulating monocytes and CD4+ T cells in psychiatric and endocrine autoimmune disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.C. Drexhage (Roos)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis deals with immune aspects of bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, autoimmune thyroid disease and type 1 diabetes mellitus and therefore we give a short introduction to each disease.

  8. The diagnosis of thyroid diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recommendations of the thyroid section of the Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Endokrinologie take account of practical requirements and serve as a basis for assessing the indications of the various diagnostic methods in view of their value, expenditure, and hazards. Progress in methodology and recent scientific findings have been taken into account as well as economic aspects and the available equipment. In spite of all the possibilities offered by modern laboratory diagnosis, the diagnosis and theory of thyroid diseases should always depend on a special anamnesis and a physical examination of the patient. The measured values must agree with the patient's complaints and with clinical findings. In diagnoses involving several steps, one should always start with simple in-vitro techniques in order to spare the patient stress. Functional diagnosis of thyroid diseases are supplemented by thyroid scintiscanning with short-lived radionuclides and by thyroid cytology. Experience and precise knowledge help to 'save expense and radiation'. Of course, uncertain diagnoses and untypical findings require a more extensive use of diagnostic means than diagnosis that are more or less clinically proved. (orig.)

  9. Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease- A Clinical Viewpoint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirala Khalessi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in medicine have given us a better insight into a group of disorders known as autoimmune diseases. In particular, advances have occurred in our understanding of the Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease (AIED. In this article, the authors review the different postulated theories in the pathogenesis of this disease. The clinical presentation, the available para-clinical diagnostic tools, and the important differential diagnoses will be summarized. The management methods, including steroid therapy, immunosuppressive medications, other biological agents and intra-tympanic injections, will be addressed. Cochlear implantation as a final solution to the advanced stages of the disease, causing total deafness, will also be discussed.

  10. The chronic autoimmune thyroiditis quality of life selenium trial (CATALYST)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Kristian Hillert; Watt, Torquil; Bjørner, Jakob Bue;

    2014-01-01

    -enriched yeast or matching placebo tablets daily for 12 months. The experimental supplement will be SelenoPrecise(R). The primary outcome is thyroid-related quality of life assessed by the Thyroid Patient-Reported Outcome (ThyPRO) questionnaire. Secondary outcomes include serum thyroid peroxidase antibody....... Exclusion criteria: previous diagnosis of toxic nodular goitre, Graves' hyperthyroidism, postpartum thyroiditis, Graves' orbitopathy; previous antithyroid drug treatment, radioiodine therapy or thyroid surgery; immune-modulatory or other medication affecting thyroid function; pregnancy, planned pregnancy or...

  11. Alcoholic Cirrhosis Increases Risk for Autoimmune Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbæk, Lisbet; Vilstrup, Hendrik; Deleuran, Bent;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Alcoholic cirrhosis is associated with hyperactivation and dysregulation of the immune system. In addition to its ability to increase risk for infections, it also may increase the risk for autoimmune diseases. We studied the incidence of autoimmune diseases among patients with...... alcohol-associated cirrhosis vs controls in Denmark. METHODS: We collected data from nationwide health care registries to identify and follow up all citizens of Denmark diagnosed with alcoholic cirrhosis from 1977 through 2010. Each patient was matched with 5 random individuals from the population...... diagnosed with alcoholic cirrhosis, 532 developed an autoimmune disease, yielding an overall increased adjusted incidence rate ratio (aIRR) of 1.36 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.24-1.50). The strongest associations were with Addison's disease (aIRR, 2.47; 95% CI, 1.04-5.85), inflammatory bowel disease (a...

  12. Worldwide Incidence of Autoimmune Liver Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Peter; Grønbæk, Lisbet; Vilstrup, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The variation that occurs in the incidence patterns of autoimmune liver diseases may provide insight into the risk factors causing the diseases. We systematically reviewed studies on the incidence of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), primary sclerosing...... England. Most studies of PSC found incidence rates around 1 per 100,000 population per year, but there were no incident cases among 100,000 Alaska natives during the period 1984-2000. The incidence of IAC remains unknown. CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of the autoimmune liver diseases is around 1-2 per 100......,000 population per year for each disease. The variation in incidence over time and place suggests that there are differences in the prevalence of risk factors for the diseases, but the studies used different methods and so it is difficult to draw firm conclusions. We recommend that groups of investigators...

  13. Screening for thyroid disease among children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Omar, Magdy A; Moustafa M. Rizk; Ahmed A. El-Kafoury; Doaa Kilany

    2014-01-01

    Altered thyroid hormones have been described in patients with diabetes especially those with poor glycemic control. The aim of this work was to evaluate; the presence of serum anti-thyroid peroxidase (serum anti-TPO) autoantibodies and the prevalence of autoimmune thyroid disease in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Patients and methods: Fifty diabetic children coming for regular follow-up in the diabetes clinic of El-Shatby University Children’s Hospital were enrolled in the study a...

  14. NK cell autoreactivity and autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro ePoggi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidences have pointed out the relevance of Natural Killer (NK cells in organ specific and systemic autoimmune diseases. NK cells bear a plethora of activating and inhibiting receptors that can play a role in regulating reactivity with autologous cells. The activating receptors recognize natural ligands upregulated on virus-infected or stressed or neoplastic cells. Of note, several autoimmune diseases are thought to be linked to viral infections as one of the first event in inducing autoimmunity. Also, it is conceivable that autoimmunity can be triggered when a dysregulation of innate immunity occurs, activating T and B lymphocytes to react with self-components. This would imply that NK cells can play a regulatory role during adaptive immunity; indeed, innate lymphoid cells (ILC, comprising the classical CD56+ NK cells, have a role in maintaining or alterating tissue homeostasis secreting protective and/or proinflammatory cytokines. In addition, NK cells display activating receptors involved in natural cytotoxicity and the activating isoforms of receptors for HLA class I that can interact with healthy host cells and induce damage without any evidence of viral infection or neoplastic-induced alteration. In this context, the interrelationship among ILC, extracellular matrix components and mesenchymal stromal cells can be considered a key point for the control of homeostasis. Herein, we summarize evidences for a role of NK cells in autoimmune diseases and will give a point of view of the interplay between NK cells and self-cells in triggering autoimmunity.

  15. Addison disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or fungal infections Hemorrhage into the adrenal glands Tumors Risk factors for the autoimmune type of Addison disease include other autoimmune diseases : Swelling (inflammation) of the thyroid gland that often results in reduced thyroid function ( chronic ...

  16. Graves’ Disease and Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma in a Patient with Active Sarcoidosis

    OpenAIRE

    Şefika Burçak Polat; Mükremin Er; Eda Demir Önal; Reyhan Ersoy; Bekir Çakır

    2012-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic granulomatous disease of unknown etiology. In most cases, mediastinal lymph nodes and lung parenchyma are involved. In addition, the eyes, skin, abdominal organs, central nervous system or the joints might be involved during the course of the disease. Sarcoidosis has been found to be related with other autoimmune diseases such as thyroiditis. In this report, we present the case of a patient in whom hyperthroidism was found and Graves’ disease and papillary thyroid ca...

  17. Chronic urticaria in patients with autoimmune thyroiditis: Significance of severity of thyroid gland inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Gulec

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is a clear association between autoimmune thyroiditis (AT and chronic urticaria/angioedema (CUA. However, not all patients with AT demonstrate urticaria. Aims: The aim of the study was to investigate in which patients with AT did CUA become a problem. A sensitive inflammation marker, neopterine (NP was used to confirm whether the severity of inflammation in the thyroid gland was responsible for urticaria or not. Methods: Neopterine levels were assessed in patients with AT with urticaria and without urticaria. Furthermore, levels were compared in relation to pre and post levothyroxine treatment. Twenty-seven patients with urticaria (Group 1 and 28 patients without urticaria (Group 2 were enrolled in the study. A course of levothyroxine treatment was given to all patients, and urine neopterine levels before and after the trial were obtained. Results: All patients completed the trial. Mean age in Group 1 and Group 2 was similar (35.70 ± 10.86 years and 38.36 ± 10.38 years, respectively (P=0.358. Pre-treatment urine neopterine levels were significantly higher in Group 1 (P=0.012. Post-treatment levels decreased in each group, as expected. However, the decrease in the neopterine level was insignificant in the patients of Group 2 (P=0.282. In Group 1, a significant decrease in post-treatment neopterine levels (P=0.015 was associated with the remission of urticaria. Conclusion: In patients with CUA and AT, pre-treatment elevated levels of NP, and its decrease with levothyroxine treatment along with symptomatic relief in urticaria, may be evidence of the relationship between the degree of inflammation in thyroid and presence of urticaria.

  18. Cardiovascular disease in autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollan, Ivana; Meroni, Pier Luigi; Ahearn, Joseph M; Cohen Tervaert, J W; Curran, Sam; Goodyear, Carl S; Hestad, Knut A; Kahaleh, Bashar; Riggio, Marcello; Shields, Kelly; Wasko, Mary C

    2013-08-01

    Various autoimmune rheumatic diseases (ARDs), including rheumatoid arthritis, spondyloarthritis, vasculitis and systemic lupus erythematosus, are associated with premature atherosclerosis. However, premature atherosclerosis has not been uniformly observed in systemic sclerosis. Furthermore, although experimental models of atherosclerosis support the role of antiphospholipid antibodies in atherosclerosis, there is no clear evidence of premature atherosclerosis in antiphospholipid syndrome (APA). Ischemic events in APA are more likely to be caused by pro-thrombotic state than by enhanced atherosclerosis. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) in ARDs is caused by traditional and non-traditional risk factors. Besides other factors, inflammation and immunologic abnormalities, the quantity and quality of lipoproteins, hypertension, insulin resistance/hyperglycemia, obesity and underweight, presence of platelets bearing complement protein C4d, reduced number and function of endothelial progenitor cells, apoptosis of endothelial cells, epigenetic mechanisms, renal disease, periodontal disease, depression, hyperuricemia, hypothyroidism, sleep apnea and vitamin D deficiency may contribute to the premature CVD. Although most research has focused on systemic inflammation, vascular inflammation may play a crucial role in the premature CVD in ARDs. It may be involved in the development and destabilization of both atherosclerotic lesions and of aortic aneurysms (a known complication of ARDs). Inflammation in subintimal vascular and perivascular layers appears to frequently occur in CVD, with a higher frequency in ARD than in non-ARD patients. It is possible that this inflammation is caused by infections and/or autoimmunity, which might have consequences for treatment. Importantly, drugs targeting immunologic factors participating in the subintimal inflammation (e.g., T- and B-cells) might have a protective effect on CVD. Interestingly, vasa vasorum and cardiovascular adipose tissue may

  19. Thyroid diseases in a school population with thyromegaly.

    OpenAIRE

    Jaksić, J; Dumić, M; B Filipović; Ille, J.; Cvijetić, M; Gjurić, G

    1994-01-01

    A survey of 5462 schoolchildren was conducted for signs of thyroid disease in the seaside region of Sibenik, Croatia. In this region, salt is regularly iodised with 0.01% potassium iodide. Thyromegaly was found in 152 children (2.8%). The most common disorder was simple goitre, which was established in 126 of these, 12 boys and 114 girls (combined prevalence of 2.3%, and of 0.45% in boys and 4.07% in girls). Juvenile autoimmune thyroiditis was found in 19 of the children (prevalence 0.35%), w...

  20. Management of strabismus in thyroid eye disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrad, R

    2015-02-01

    Thyroid eye disease is an auto-immune condition characterised by an acute inflammatory phase followed by a fibrotic phase, which sometimes leads to restricted eye movements and diplopia. Medical treatment with systemic steroids with or without orbital radiotherapy and immunosuppression can control the inflammatory response. Strabismus surgery should be carried out only after the inflammation is no longer active and after any decompression surgery. Surgery comprises recession of tight muscles using adjustable sutures so as to maximise the area of binocular single vision. There is debate as to whether adjustable sutures should be used for the inferior rectus muscle. Patients should be encouraged to have realistic expectations, as binocular single vision may not be achievable in all directions of gaze and lid retraction may be made worse by surgery. PMID:25523204

  1. Diagnosis of thyroid diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recommendations of the thyroid section of the Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Endokrinologie take account mostly of practical diagnostic aspects; they will form a framework for a precise indication of various diagnostic procedures, taking into account the diagnostic value and necessity as well as expenditure and risk. Methodological progress was taken into account as well as recent scientific findings, economic aspects, and available possibilities. Experience and precise knowledge can help to 'save radiation and money'. Of course, nuclear diagnosis and atypical findings will lead to a wider use of diagnostic means than a diagnosis that is more or less clinically assured. (orig./MG) 891 MG/orig.- 892 MKO

  2. Management of thyroid disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Premawardhana, L D K E; Lazarus, J H

    2006-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease is the predominant form of thyroid dysfunction in the developed world. Although its precise cause is currently unclear, principles of management have been established. There is a vigorous debate about the management of the increasingly commonly recognised subclinical forms of thyroid dysfunction despite recent recommendations. Nodular thyroid disease and thyroid carcinoma have received wide attention. The effects of drugs and pregnancy on thyroid function have also ...

  3. Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 2 - a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bănică Diana

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune polyglandular syndromes are characterized by the association of two or more autoimmune diseases. They are classified into two major subtypes, each having its own characteristics. The autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 2 is defined by the presence of at least two of the following diseases: Addison’s disease, type 1 diabetes mellitus and thyroid autoimmune disease. Other autoimmune diseases belonging to the autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 2 are: primary hypogonadism, myasthenia gravis, celiac disease, pernicious anemia, alopecia, vitiligo. We are going to present the case of a patient, aged 40, with diabetes mellitus (probably latent autoimmune diabetes of the adult, chronic autoimmune thyroiditis and celiac disease.

  4. Shared genetic origins of allergy and autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waage, J. E.; Kreiner-Møller, E.; Standl, M.;

    2015-01-01

    Parallel increases in allergy and autoimmune disease prevalence in recent time suggest shared, but yet unknown, etiologies. Here, we investigated shared genetic loci and molecular pathways to identify possible shared disease mechanisms between allergy and autoimmune diseases....

  5. Radiation damage to thyroid gland may be the reason of increase in frequency of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and other hematological diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Distribution of autoimmune thyroidities in the patients with diseases of blood system was investigated. Attribute of autoimmune thyroidities was revealed by the detection of antimicrosomal antibodies. It was established that the autoimmune thyroidities are more often in patients with various hematological diseases than in control group. It is supposed that the increase in frequency of some hematological diseases in residents suffered from the Chernobyl accident can be defined not only by the influence of the radiation on blood system, but also can be connected with damage to thyroid glands

  6. Thyroid function in children and adolescents after combined therapy of Hodgkin disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. I. Feoktistov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid diseases, especially hypothyroidism, are among the most frequent endocrine complications in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma whohave received neck irradiation. Thyroid function was evaluated in 34 patients (11 males and 23 females after combined chemo radiotherapyof Hodgkin lymphoma according to modified DAL-HD-90M and GPOH-HD-2002 protocols. The median age was 15.9 years (range 5–18 years, the median time from the end of therapy was 1.08 years (range 1 month–4.9 years. 33 patients received radiotherapy to the neck region: 12 children — 20 Gy, 9 — 25 Gy, 10 — 30 Gy, 2 — 35 Gy. These patients were investigated by clinical examination, thyroid ultrasound and thyroid function tests. Thyroid abnormalities were detected in 4 of 21 patients who received 20–25 Gy (1 case of autoimmune thyroiditis and 3 cases of subclinical hypothyroidism and in 3 of 12 patients who received 30–35 Gy (2 cases of autoimmune thyroiditis and 1 case of subclinical hypothyroidism. Autoimmune thyroiditis also developed in patient who received only 35 Gy mediastinum irradiation. Age, sex, follow-up time, irradiation dose were not significant factors in the thyroid dysfunction development. Thyroid examination must be obligatory part of the follow-up examination of patients with Hodgkin lymphoma.

  7. Thyroid function in children and adolescents after combined therapy of Hodgkin disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. I. Feoktistov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid diseases, especially hypothyroidism, are among the most frequent endocrine complications in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma whohave received neck irradiation. Thyroid function was evaluated in 34 patients (11 males and 23 females after combined chemo radiotherapyof Hodgkin lymphoma according to modified DAL-HD-90M and GPOH-HD-2002 protocols. The median age was 15.9 years (range 5–18 years, the median time from the end of therapy was 1.08 years (range 1 month–4.9 years. 33 patients received radiotherapy to the neck region: 12 children — 20 Gy, 9 — 25 Gy, 10 — 30 Gy, 2 — 35 Gy. These patients were investigated by clinical examination, thyroid ultrasound and thyroid function tests. Thyroid abnormalities were detected in 4 of 21 patients who received 20–25 Gy (1 case of autoimmune thyroiditis and 3 cases of subclinical hypothyroidism and in 3 of 12 patients who received 30–35 Gy (2 cases of autoimmune thyroiditis and 1 case of subclinical hypothyroidism. Autoimmune thyroiditis also developed in patient who received only 35 Gy mediastinum irradiation. Age, sex, follow-up time, irradiation dose were not significant factors in the thyroid dysfunction development. Thyroid examination must be obligatory part of the follow-up examination of patients with Hodgkin lymphoma.

  8. A case control study on psychiatric disorders in Hashimoto disease and euthyroid goitre: not only depressive but also anxiety disorders are associated with thyroid autoimmunity

    OpenAIRE

    Carbone Fiora; Marci Anna; Murru Andrea; Carpiniello Bernardo; Hardoy Maria; Carta Mauro; Deiana Luca; Cadeddu Mariangela; Mariotti Stefano

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Objective To evaluate the association between mood and anxiety disorders in Hashimoto disease and Euthyroid Goitre in a case control study. Methods Cases included 19 subjects with Hashimoto disease in euthyroid phase, 19 subjects with euthyroid goitre, 2 control groups each of 76 subjects matched (4/1) according to age and sex drawn from the data base of a community based sample. Psychiatric diagnoses were formulated using the International Composite Diagnostic Interview Simplified, ...

  9. The clinical features of 17 patients with steroid-responsive encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroiditis

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Hai; Jia, Jian-ping; XU Er-he; XUE Xiao-fan; DA Yu-wei

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the onset pattern, clinical manifestations, laboratory findings and imaging features of 17 Chinese patients with steroid-responsive encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroiditis (SREAT). Methods The clinical data of 17 SREAT patients were collected. Retrospective analysis of their clinical features, as well as their serum levels of anti-thyroid, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biochemical indicators, MRI and therapy was performed. Results The initial symptoms of th...

  10. Chronic Granulomatous Disease as a Risk Factor for Autoimmune Disease

    OpenAIRE

    De Ravin, Suk See; Naumann, Nora; Cowen, Edward W.; Friend, Julia; Hilligoss, Dianne; Marquesen, Martha; Balow, James E.; Karyl S. Barron; Turner, Maria L.; Gallin, John I.; Malech, Harry L.

    2008-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is characterized by recurrent infections and granuloma formation. In addition, we have observed a number of diverse autoimmune conditions in our CGD population, suggesting that patients with CGD are at an elevated risk for development of autoimmune (AI) disorders. In this report, we describe antiphospholipid syndrome (aPL), recurrent pericardial effusion, juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), IgA nephropathy, cutaneous lupus erythematosus, and autoimmune pul...

  11. Binding of immunoglobulin G from patients with autoimmune thyroid diseases to solubilized guinea pig fat cell membranes crosslinked with 125I-TSH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binding of immunoglobulin G (IgG) to Triton-solubilized fat cell membranes crosslinked with 125I-TSH was studied by an indirect immunoprecipitation method. Guinea pig fat cell membranes (FCM) containing TSH receptors with an association constant of 1.92 x 109 M-1 were first reacted with 125I-TSH, then treated with a crosslinker, dissuccinimidyl suberate. The dissociation of 125I-TSH from the crosslinked 125I-TSH-FCM complexes due to the addition of 100 mU/ml unlabeled TSH was 9.0 %, while it was 33 % without the treatment. To the Triton-solubilized FCM crosslinked with 125I-TSH, 50 μg each of IgG from 20 normal controls, 20 patients with Graves' disease and 20 with Hashimoto's disease was added and precipitation was effected by adding antihuman IgG. In patients with Graves' disease, 125I-TSH-FCM complexes immunoprecipitated ranged from 1.10 to 4.18 % with an average of 2.4 ± 0.99 (S. D.) % which was significantly higher than those in normal controls (1.6 ± 0.29 %). The values in the patients with Hashimoto's disease averaged 1.7 ± 0.53 (S. D.) which did not differ significantly from those of controls. The value did not correlate with either TSH-binding inhibiting activities or titers of anti-microsomal antibodies. These data suggest the presence of TSH-receptor antibodies which react with antigens other than TSH-binding sites in the patients with Graves' disease. (author)

  12. Macrophage activation syndrome in autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deane, Sean; Selmi, Carlo; Teuber, Suzanne S; Gershwin, M Eric

    2010-01-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is a phenomenon characterized by cytopenia, organ dysfunction, and coagulopathy associated with an inappropriate activation of macrophages. Current diagnostic criteria are imprecise, but the syndrome is now recognized as a form of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis that is characteristically associated with autoimmune diatheses. The diagnosis of incipient MAS in patients with autoimmune disease requires a high index of suspicion, as several characteristics of the disorder may be present in the underlying condition or infectious complications associated with the treatment thereof. Proposed treatment regimens include aggressive approaches that require validation in future controlled studies. This review discusses the major aspects of the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of MAS with a focus on the association with autoimmune disease. PMID:20407267

  13. Genomics and proteomics: Applications in autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Hueber

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Wolfgang Hueber1,2,3, William H Robinson1,21VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, CA, USA; 2Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA; 3Novartis Institutes of Biomedical Research, Novartis, Basle, SwitzerlandAbstract: Tremendous progress has been made over the past decade in the development and refinement of genomic and proteomic technologies for the identification of novel drug targets and molecular signatures associated with clinically important disease states, disease subsets, or differential responses to therapies. The rapid progress in high-throughput technologies has been preceded and paralleled by the elucidation of cytokine networks, followed by the stepwise clinical development of pathway-specific biological therapies that revolutionized the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Together, these advances provide opportunities for a long-anticipated personalized medicine approach to the treatment of autoimmune disease. The ever-increasing numbers of novel, innovative therapies will need to be harnessed wisely to achieve optimal long-term outcomes in as many patients as possible while complying with the demands of health authorities and health care providers for evidence-based, economically sound prescription of these expensive drugs. Genomic and proteomic profiling of patients with autoimmune diseases holds great promise in two major clinical areas: (1 rapid identification of new targets for the development of innovative therapies and (2 identification of patients who will experience optimal benefit and minimal risk from a specific (targeted therapy. In this review, we attempt to capture important recent developments in the application of genomic and proteomic technologies to translational research by discussing informative examples covering a diversity of autoimmune diseases.Keywords: proteomics, genomics, autoimmune diseases, antigen microarrays, 2-Dih, rheumatoid arthritis

  14. Epitope recognition patterns of thyroid peroxidase autoantibodies in healthy individuals and patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis*

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus H; Brix, Thomas H; Gardas, Andrzej;

    2008-01-01

    Thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAb) are markers of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), including Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT), but naturally occurring TPOAb are also detectable in healthy, euthyroid individuals. In AITD, circulating TPOAb react mainly with two immunodominant regions (IDR), IDR...

  15. Analysis of the Expression of Fas, FasL and Bcl-2 in the Pathogenesis of Autoimmune Thyroid Disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shenren Chen; S.M.Fazle Akbar; Zhichao Zhen; Yiping Luo; Lijuan Deng; Haihua Huang; Linxin Chen; Wei Li

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the expression of apoptosis-related protein (Fas, FasL, and Bcl-2) in the pathogenesis of autoimmune thyroid disorders (ATDs), immunohistochemical staining was performed on 20 Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT), 20 Graves' disease (GD), and 20 thyroid follicular adenoma (TFA, as control). All the cases expressed Fas, mainly on the cell surface and cytoplasm. FasL was found in 17 cases of the TFA. Bcl-2 was detected in 15 cases of HT, 19 of GD and 17 of TFA. In TFA, a moderate Fas expression and a minimal or no FasL expression was detected on follicular cells. In HT, the follicles adjacent to infiltrating lymphocytes showed increased levels of Fas and FasL expression. A weaker staining of Fas and FasL was exhibited on infiltrating lymphocytes than on thyrocytes. In a comparison of GD with HT, thyrocytes and lymphocytes showed similar Fas staining, but for FasL the staining was rather weaker in HT. The expression of Bcl-2 was nearly identical in GD and TFA, but much weaker on the follicular cells in vicinity of lymphocytes and on the lymphocytes located in germinal centers of HT tissues. The expression of Fas, FasL, Bcl-2 in Hashimoto's thyroiditis and Graves' disease were almost same. FasL strong expression and Bcl-2 weak expression on the follicles in HT may induce apoptosis. These results provided evidence for expression of Fas, FasL and Bcl-2 in the pathogenesis of autoimmune thyroid disease. The lymphocytes seem not to be directly engaged in the process via their own FasL, but they may provide some cytokines that, in turn, upregulate Fas and/or FasL expression to induce apoptosis.

  16. Serological Diagnosis of Autoimmune Blistering Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Birgül Özkesici; Ayşe Akman Karakaş

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune blistering diseases are a rare diseases, characterized by development of autoantibodies against the structural proteins of the epidermis or dermoepidermal junction, and blisters and erosions on skin and/or mucous membranes clinically. Clinical features are important guiding findings for suspicious of this group of diseases. The diagnosis is achieved by the evaluation together of clinical features, histological and immunological findings. The gold standard in the diagnosis of this g...

  17. Zinc metabolism in thyroid disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Nishi, Y.; Kawate, R.; Usui, T

    1980-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the zinc metabolism in adults of both sexes with thyroid disease. Plasma and erythrocyte zinc concentration and urinary zinc excretion were investigated. The mean concentration of plasma zinc in hypothyroid patients and in euthyroid patients, previously either hyperthyroid or hypothyroid, was lower than that of control subjects, whereas no statistically significant differences were observed in plasma zinc values between hyperthyroid patients and control sub...

  18. Serological Diagnosis of Autoimmune Blistering Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgül Özkesici

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune blistering diseases are a rare diseases, characterized by development of autoantibodies against the structural proteins of the epidermis or dermoepidermal junction, and blisters and erosions on skin and/or mucous membranes clinically. Clinical features are important guiding findings for suspicious of this group of diseases. The diagnosis is achieved by the evaluation together of clinical features, histological and immunological findings. The gold standard in the diagnosis of this group diseases are demonstration of tissue bound and/or circulating autoantibodies. Methods for this purpose are; direct and indirect immunofluorescence, Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA, immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting. The aim of this paper is to review serological diagnostic methods in the diagnosis of autoimmune bullous diseases and to present developments in recent years.

  19. Oral mucosal manifestations of autoimmune skin diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Mayson B; Porter, Stephen R; Smoller, Bruce R; Sitaru, Cassian

    2015-10-01

    A group of autoimmune diseases is characterised by autoantibodies against epithelial adhesion structures and/or tissue-tropic lymphocytes driving inflammatory processes resulting in specific pathology at the mucosal surfaces and the skin. The most frequent site of mucosal involvement in autoimmune diseases is the oral cavity. Broadly, these diseases include conditions affecting the cell-cell adhesion causing intra-epithelial blistering and those where autoantibodies or infiltration lymphocytes cause a loss of cell-matrix adhesion or interface inflammation. Clinically, patients present with blistering, erosions and ulcers that may affect the skin as well as further mucosal surfaces of the eyes, nose and genitalia. While the autoimmune disease may be suspected based on clinical manifestations, demonstration of tissue-bound and circulating autoantibodies, or lymphocytic infiltrates, by various methods including histological examination, direct and indirect immunofluorescence microscopy, immunoblotting and quantitative immunoassay is a prerequisite for definitive diagnosis. Given the frequency of oral involvement and the fact that oral mucosa is the initially affected site in many cases, the informed practitioner should be well acquainted with diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of autoimmune dermatosis with oral involvement. This paper reviews the pathogenesis and clinical presentation of these conditions in the oral cavity with a specific emphasis on their differential diagnosis and current management approaches. PMID:26117595

  20. Capillaroscopy in diagnostic of systemic autoimmune diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diagnosis of systemic autoimmune diseases is carried out by combining clinical, paraclinical, imaging and anatomopathological data. However, in many cases is necessary to access other guiding parameters. The capillaroscopy is a technique that consists in the observation of capillary microcirculation in the proximal nail fold hands. The methods used are the videocapillaroscopy (microscopy, stereoscopic)

  1. The immunofluorescence techniques in the diagnosis of endocrine autoimmune diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Betterle, Corrado; Zanchetta, Renato

    2012-01-01

    In the study of autoimmune diseases, the laboratory plays a very important role. We describe the immunofluorescence techniques (direct, indirect, complement-fixing, double) for determining the presence of autoantibodies and their role in the autoimmune endocrine diseases.

  2. Tips for Getting a Proper Diagnosis of an Autoimmune Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tips for Getting a Proper Diagnosis of an Autoimmune Disease Do your own family medical history. Take an ... research points to a genetic component in most autoimmune diseases, you should know the health histories of your ...

  3. A study of CD4~+ T lymphocyte infiltration level in the thyroid of experimental autoimmune thyroiditis rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔丝露

    2014-01-01

    Objective To establish an experimental autoimmune thyroiditis(EAT)rat model and to observe pathological change levels of CD4+T lymphocyte infiltration in thyroid tissues under different iodine nutrient conditions.Methods One hundred and thirty-five four weeks old female Lewis rats(body weight about 80 g)were divided into control(NC),model(TG),high iodine-Ⅰ(HⅠ),high iodine and model-Ⅰ(HⅠ+TG),high iodine-Ⅱ(HⅡ),high iodine and model-Ⅱ(HⅡ+TG)groups

  4. Evaluation of Thyroid Diseases by Hormonal Analysis in Pediatric Age Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayana A Shah

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Among endocrine disorders commonly encountered in pediatric age group, thyroid diseases are more frequent. Congenital hypothyroidism is one of the major problems in this age with worldwide incidence of 1:3000-4000 live birth and in India it is 1:2500-2800. Objectives: The aim of this study is to know the prevalence of thyroid diseases in newborn and children by hormonal evaluation. Methodology: We have studied 50 children suspected of having signs and symptoms of thyroid diseases. Hormonal evaluation was done by the estimation of serum TSH, T3 and T4. Results: Out of total 50 children, 16 were detected with abnormal hormone level and diagnosed having thyroid diseases. Out of 16 affected children, 4 had congenital hypothyroidism (25%, 6 had subclinical or acquired hypothyroidism (37.5%, 3 had autoimmune thyroiditis (18.75% and 3 had goiter with graves disease (18.75%. Conclusion: Congenital hypothyroidism is one of the major preventable thyroid disease if diagnosed early. Other thyroid diseases commonly seen in pediatric age are subclinical hypothyroidism, autoimmune thyroiditis, goiter and rarely hyperthyroidism. [Natl J Med Res 2013; 3(4.000: 367-370

  5. Anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies: Its effect on thyroid gland and breast tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Sabitha Kandi; Pragna Rao

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid peroxidase (TPO) is a key enzyme in the synthesis of thyroid hormone. TPO is involved in thyroid hormone synthesis (organification and coupling reactions). TPO is a major antigen corresponding to thyroid-microsomal autoantibodies. Anti-TPO auto antibodies are very important to diagnose autoimmune thyroid diseases and also in estimating its clinical course. Autoimmune thyroid disease is detected mostly by measuring circulating antibodies to thyroglobulin which is uncommon measurement o...

  6. Twins as a tool for evaluating the influence of genetic susceptibility in thyroid autoimmunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, T H; Hegedüs, L

    2011-01-01

    By means of large twin cohorts, it has been possible to provide relatively valid and unbiased data regarding the influence of genetic and to some extent epigenetic factors in the aetiology of thyroid autoimmunity. The comparison of concordance rates between monozygotic and dizygotic twins provide...

  7. Rituximab for autoimmune blistering diseases: recent studies, new insights

    OpenAIRE

    Lunardon, Luisa; Payne, Aimee S.

    2012-01-01

    Rituximab, an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, has been successfully used off-label for treatment of autoimmune blistering diseases. We discuss rituximab mechanisms of action, host factors that may affect response to rituximab, and the efficacy and safety of rituximab in autoimmune blistering diseases, incorporating recent data on the use of rituximab in other autoimmune disease patients.

  8. Prognostic Significance of Subclinical Atherosclerosis of Arteries for Cardiovascular Risk Identification in Patients with Autoimmune Thyroiditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazakova Т.А.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation is to study the state of arteries of elastic and muscular type in patients with autoimmune thyroiditis and subclinical hypothyroidism to reveal potential factors of cardiovascular risk. Materials and Methods. There have been studied three groups of patients, each group consisting of 29 females: 1st — control group, with no abnormalities, 2nd — with autoimmune thyroiditis and euthyroid status, 3rd — with autoimmune thyroiditis and subclinical hypothyroidism. There have been estimated hormonal status (ТТГ, Т4, Т3, antibody level to thyroglobulin and thyroid peroxydase, endothelial function and arterial stiffness. Results. In subclinical hypothyroidism there is significant decrease of endothelial function of brachial artery, with normal indices of non-endothelium dependent vasodilation; arterial wall stiffness and endothelial dysfunction increase, that is determined by a number of factors including the levels of T3, T4, thyrotropic hormone, lipid profile, and arterial pressure. The level of systemic arterial pressure can be of great concern in the increase of arterial stiffness if there are no marked changes of lipid spectrum. The obtained data indicate the negative effect of even minimal thyroid function on vessel condition that can contribute to the increase of cardiovascular risk along with lipid spectrum disorders in this group of patients.

  9. Signs of autoimmune thyroiditis in children and juveniles affected by the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The content of antibodies to human thyroid microsomal antigen was investigated to evaluate the possible appearance of autoimmune thyroiditis in children and juveniles living in the areas of Kaluga region affected by the Chernobyl accident. The percentage of positive sera varied from 4.8% to 1.2% over seven years. There is a significant difference in the frequency of antibody appearance between persons affected by radioactive iodine and those not affected. A greater quantity of the positive sera was recorded in the area with highest level of radioactive contamination. It is suggested that the elevated rate of autoimmune thyroiditis signs in children and juveniles is one of the consequences of the Chernobyl accident. (Author)

  10. [Glycosylation of autoantibodies in autoimmunes diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulabchand, R; Batteux, F; Guilpain, P

    2013-12-01

    Protein glycosylation is one of the most common post-translational modifications, involved in the well described protein biosynthesis process. Protein glycosylation seems to play a major role in the pathogenesis of auto-immune diseases. Herein are described the main alterations of autoantibody glycosylation associated with autoimmunes diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, IgA glomerulonephritis, Schoenlein-Henoch purpura, Sjögren's syndrome, systemic scleroderma, systemic lupus erythematosus, myasthenia gravis and granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener). Molecular identification of altered immunoglobulin glycosylation could lead to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of those diseases, might allow an evaluation of their biological activity and could even be a new therapeutic target. PMID:24139501

  11. Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 2 - a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Bănică Diana; Frăţilă Ramona; Sima Alexandra; Vlad Adrian; Timar Romulus

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndromes are characterized by the association of two or more autoimmune diseases. They are classified into two major subtypes, each having its own characteristics. The autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 2 is defined by the presence of at least two of the following diseases: Addison’s disease, type 1 diabetes mellitus and thyroid autoimmune disease. Other autoimmune diseases belonging to the autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 2 are: primary hypogonadism, myast...

  12. PREVELANCE OF ANTI-TPO ANTIBODY IN TYPE-1 DIABETES AND THYROID DYSFUNCTION IN TPO ANTIBODY POSITIVE DIABET ICS

    OpenAIRE

    Ganesan; Josephine Latha

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The appearance of TPO-Abs precedes thyroid dysfunction and increases in autoimmune diseases like type1diabetes. Thyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibodies are one of the major secondary antibodies associated wi th autoimmune thyroid disease and can be used as diagnostic marker. The prevalence of thyroid auto antibodies is increased when patients have non-thyroid autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes and pernicious anemia. Thyroid dysfuncti...

  13. [Vaccinations in patients with autoimmune diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bühler, Silja; Hatz, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    The number of individuals with autoimmune diseases treated with immunosuppressive drugs is increasing steadily. The variety of immunosuppressive drugs and in particular biological therapies is also rising. The autoimmune disease itself as well as the immunosuppressive therapy increases the risk of infection in this population. Particularly the risk of vaccine-preventable infections is elevated. Thus, preventing infections by the means of vaccination is of utmost importance. The Division of Infectious Diseases of the Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute, University of Zurich, performed a literature search on the topic of vaccinations in patients with autoimmune diseases upon request by the Swiss Federal Commission for Vaccination Issues. Overall, data are scarce. The following main points were retrieved from the literature: Inactivated vaccines are safe, but their immunogenicity may be reduced under immunosuppressive therapy. In addition to the generally recommended basic vaccinations, specific vaccinations, such as influenza and pneumococcal vaccination are indicated in these patient groups. Live vaccines are generally contraindicated under immunosuppressive therapy due to safety concerns. However, specific exceptions apply. Furthermore, certain time intervals for the administration of live vaccines after pausing or ceasing an immunosuppressive therapy should be respected. PMID:27268452

  14. Experimental models of autoimmune inflammatory ocular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Gasparin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Ocular inflammation is one of the leading causes of blindness and loss of vision. Human uveitis is a complex and heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by inflammation of intraocular tissues. The eye may be the only organ involved, or uveitis may be part of a systemic disease. A significant number of cases are of unknown etiology and are labeled idiopathic. Animal models have been developed to the study of the physiopathogenesis of autoimmune uveitis due to the difficulty in obtaining human eye inflamed tissues for experiments. Most of those models are induced by injection of specific photoreceptors proteins (e.g., S-antigen, interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein, rhodopsin, recoverin, phosducin. Non-retinal antigens, including melanin-associated proteins and myelin basic protein, are also good inducers of uveitis in animals. Understanding the basic mechanisms and pathogenesis of autoimmune ocular diseases are essential for the development of new treatment approaches and therapeutic agents. The present review describes the main experimental models of autoimmune ocular inflammatory diseases.

  15. Thyroid disease in the pediatric patient: emphasizing imaging with sonography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babcock, Diane S. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2006-04-15

    Thyroid disease does occur in the pediatric patient, and imaging plays an important role in its evaluation. A review is presented of normal development of the thyroid gland, the technique and indications for thyroid sonography, and key imaging features of congenital thyroid disorders (ectopic or absent thyroid, infantile goiter, thyroglossal duct remnants), benign thyroid masses (follicular adenoma, degenerative nodules, colloid and thyroid cysts), malignant masses (follicular, papillary and medullary carcinoma) and diffuse thyroid disease (acute bacterial thyroiditis, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, Grave's disease). (orig.)

  16. Neuroelectrophysiological studies on neurological autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin-hong LIU

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The neuroelectrophysiological manifestations of four clinical typical neurological autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis (MS, Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS, myasthenia gravis (MG, and polymyositis and dermatomyositis were reviewed in this paper. The diagnostic value of evoked potentials for multiple sclerosis, nerve conduction studies (NCS for Guillain-Barré syndrome, repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS and single-fiber electromyography (SFEMG for myasthenia gravis, and needle electromyography for polymyositis and dermatomyositis were respectively discussed. This review will help to have comprehensive understanding on electrophysiological examinations and their clinical significance in the diagnosis of neurological autoimmune diseases. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.09.004

  17. Atherogenic index and coronarian risk – comparative assessment regarding the particularities of chronic autoimmune thyroiditis presence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seceleanu Mihaela

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Assessment of autoimmune cause hypothyroidism and dyslipidemia involvement in the apparition of major vascular complications. Methods: A total of 152 patients were investigated appreciating in comparison to a healthy control lot the hormone serum level, the presence of antimicrosomal thyroid antibodies and the serum levels of lipids. Atherogenic index and coronarian risk were calculated and correlated with the incidence of coronarian and cerebral vascular accidents. Results: Among the patients with goiter it was noted a high incidence of a subclinical hypothyroidism (31,58%. Thyroid autoimmunity was involved in 94,4% of the patients with clinical hypothyroidism, in 93,7 % with subclinical hypothyroidism and 100% in the patients with thyrotoxicosis. Low serum level of HDL-cholesterol was identified in 66,6% of patients with clinical hypothyroidism and 64,5% patients with subclinical hypothyroidism. The assessment of atherogenic index and coronarian risk was significantly higher (p<0,01 in patients with hypothyroidism in comparison to healthy control subjects. The incidence of vascular accidents was significantly higher (p<0,01 among the hypothyroid patients ( 19,7%/ 10,8%, of masculine gender (12,7% where the main cause of hypothyroidism was autoimmunity. Conclusions: The atherogenic index and coronarian risk were higher in patients with hypothyroidism associated to thyroid autoimmunity resulting in an increased probability in producing vascular accidents

  18. New approach for diagnosis of thyroid diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Computerization development leads to the creation of a new information technology and expert systems. Expert system is a computer program that models analytical assessment of an expert in a certain field and uses for this purpose the available knowledge followed by the procedure of making a logical conclusion. Simple expert systems may be built by the question-answer principle. The procedure of making diagnosis with the help of an expert system was performed by a number of sequential steps. At first, while studying cytologic preparation the user answers in the interactive mode the 35 questions concerning qualitative characteristics of pathologic changes in thyroid tissue cells. These questions are expected to be answered yes/no. For example, nuclear structure/presence of nuclear invagination: yes/no. The answers will be automatically introduced to the X-matrixes in a certain row and column. Then, the software in the real-time mode performs the automatic comparison of the obtained X-matrix by turns with 6 standard matrixes (S-matrixes) that have been constructed by analogy (in the same format). S-matrixes characterize the main forms of thyroid pathology: papillary and follicular cancer, follicular adenoma, autoimmune thyroiditis, nodular colloid and diffuse toxic goiter. Standard matrices were formed taking into account generally accepted standards and weighting coefficient of the significance of each feature for certain nosology. Weighting coefficients were determined by means of expert evaluation. The software recorded the coincidence of xij X-matrix elements with the corresponding sij elements of each S-matrix. After that, the probability of a disease for each of six nosologic forms (diagnostic index) calculates using deduced by us formula, taking into account the weighting coefficient of the significance of a concrete qualitative parameter for each nosologic form. When all the elements of X-matrix and a concrete S-matrix coincided, diagnostic index

  19. Differentiated thyroid carcinoma : A polygenic disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Links, TP; van Tol, KM; te Meerman, GJ; de Vries, EGE

    2001-01-01

    Differentiated thyroid cancer is a rare disease and until recently was considered to be sporadic. However, increasing evidence has been found for a genetic basis of this disease. In approximately 5% of patients the differentiated thyroid cancer is dominantly inherited. Several families with differen

  20. In vitro radioassays for thyroid diseases analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some technical aspects of the current and less current tests for thyroid function evaluation and for immunological and cancerous thyroid diseases, were reviewed. This large review was done to confirm that at present, nearly all the parameters playing a role in thyroid disease are measured by RIA technique with an acceptable precision and specificity. It is now possible to study a particular problem of thyroid with a particular assay. The review was illustrated by a certain number of precision profile which are, in our opinion, one of the most important informations to have before adopting a technique. It allows to appreciate what can be obtained -and cannot be obtained- as a reliable response

  1. Antigenic Challenge in the Etiology of Autoimmune Disease in Women

    OpenAIRE

    Mary A M Rogers; Levine, Deborah A.; Blumberg, Neil; Fisher, Gwenith G.; Kabeto, Mohammed; Kenneth M. Langa

    2011-01-01

    Infection has long been implicated as a trigger for autoimmune disease. Other antigenic challenges include receipt of allogeneic tissue or blood resulting in immunomodulation. We investigated antigenic challenges as possible risk factors for autoimmune disease in women using the Health and Retirement Study, a nationally representative longitudinal study, linked to Medicare files, years 1991–2007. The prevalence of autoimmune disease (rheumatoid arthritis, Hashimoto’s disease, Graves’ disease,...

  2. Autoimmune diseases and fungal infections: immunological mechanisms and therapeutic approaches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jian-zhong

    2009-01-01

    @@ Autoimmune disease represents a breakdown of natural tolerance to autoreactive antigens.Pemphigus and lupus erythematosus are common autoimmune diseases either skin-specific or with predominant skin involvement. During the past decades,much progress has been made in understanding the mechanism of autoimmune diseases and the immunological mechanism in some infectious diseases such as fungal infections. Various novel approaches have been developed in the treatment of these diseases.

  3. A study of autoimmune thyroid disorder in atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To elucidate sequential changes of thyroid function in persons seropositive for anti-thyroid antibodies, thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) test was performed in 31 patients with asymptomatic autoimmune thyroiditis (AAT), 13 patients with struma (S), and 28 normal subjects. On the basis of basal TSH values, 26 of the AAT patients were classified as grade I, 4 as grade II, and 2 as grade III; and 8 of the S patients as grade I, 4 as grade II, and one as grade III. One patient with grade I AAT developed subclinical hypothyroidism (SHT). All grade III AAT and S patients were considered to have SHT. S patients were more likely than AAT patients to develop SHT. Regarding serum levels of total T4, total T3, total cholesterol, triglyceride, and lactic dehydrogenase, there was no significant correlation between grade I group and grade II + III group. Although the basal TSH value may be a somewhat important indicator for predicting thyroid function, abnormal basal TSH value returned to normal several years later even in the case of patients with increased value. There was no evidence that autoimmune thyroid disorder is frequent in A-bomb survivors exposed within 2,000 m from ground zero. (Namekawa, K.)

  4. Overlap syndromes among autoimmune liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christian Rust; Ulrich Beuers

    2008-01-01

    The three major immune disorders of the liver are autoimmune hepatitis (AIH),primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC).Variant forms of these diseases are generally called overlap syndromes,although there has been no standardised definition.Patients with overlap syndromes present with both hepatitic and cholestatic serum liver tests and have histological features of AIH and PBC or PSC.The AIH-PBC overlap syndrome is the most common form,affecting almost 10% of adults with AIH or PBC.Single cases of AIH and autoimmune cholangitis (AMA-negative PBC) overlap syndrome have also been reported.The AIH-PSC overlap syndrome is predominantly found in children,adolescents and young adults with AIH or PSC.Interestingly,transitions from one autoimmune to another have also been reported in a minority of patients,especially transitions from PBC to AIH-PBC overlap syndrome.Overlap syndromes show a progressive course towards liver cirrhosis and liver failure without treatment.Therapy for overlap syndromes is empiric,since controlled trials are not available in these rare disorders.Anticholestatic therapy with ursodeoxycholic acid is usually combined with immunosuppressive therapy with corticosteroids and/or azathioprine in both AIH-PBC and AIH-PSC overlap syndromes.In end-stage disease,liver transplantation is the treatment of choice.

  5. Management of thyroid eye disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thyroid eye disease (TED) is the most frequent extrathyroidal manifestation of Graves' disease. In most instances it is mild and non-progressive, but in 3%-5% of cases it is severe. Non-severe TED requires only supportive measures, such as eye ointments, sunglasses and prisms. By contrast, severe TED requires aggressive treatment, either medical (high-dose glucocorticoids, orbital radiotherapy) or surgical (orbital decompression). The choice of treatment relies on the assessment of both TED severity and activity. Removal of controllable risk factors, especially cigarette smoking, is important to improve the course and the therapeutic outcome. A coordinated approach to the treatment of hyperthyroidism and TED is also required. Novel promising treatments, to be verified in large series of patients, include somatostatin analogues and cytokine antagonists. (orig.)

  6. Celiac Disease and Thyroid Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... illnesses, so it is important to get a TSH thyroid test if you experience any of the ... Function •It is recommended that people have their TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone) measured once a year. This ...

  7. Genetics of autoimmune diseases: a multistep process.

    OpenAIRE

    Johannesson, Martina; Hultqvist, Malin; Holmdahl, Rikard

    2006-01-01

    It has so far been difficult to identify genes behind polygenic autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), multiple sclerosis (MS), and type I diabetes (T1D). With proper animal models, some of the complexity behind these diseases can be reduced. The use of linkage analysis and positional cloning of genes in animal models for RA resulted in the identification of one of the genes regulating severity of arthritis in rats and mice, the Ncf1 gene. The Ncf1 gene encodes for the Ncf1 pr...

  8. Robotic Surgery for Thyroid Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jandee; Chung, Woong Youn

    2013-01-01

    Robotic surgery is an innovation in thyroid surgery that may compensate for the drawbacks of conventional endoscopic surgery. A surgical robot provides strong advantages, including three-dimensional imaging, motion scaling, tremor elimination, and additional degrees of freedom. We review here recent adaptations, experience and applications of robotics in thyroid surgery. Robotic thyroid surgeries include thyroid lobectomy, total thyroidectomy, central compartment neck dissection, and radical ...

  9. Long-Term Follow-Up of a Child with Autoimmune Thyroiditis and Recurrent Hyperthyroidism in the Absence of TSH Receptor Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Dunne

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hashitoxicosis is an initial, transient, hyperthyroid phase that rarely affects patients with Hashimoto thyroiditis. We present here an unusual case of a child with Hashimoto thyroiditis and recurrent hyperthyroidism. A 4 yr 6/12 old male was diagnosed by us with autoimmune subclinical hypothyroidism (normal free T4, slightly elevated TSH, and elevated TG antibody titer. Two years and 6/12 later he experienced increased appetite and poor weight gain; a laboratory evaluation revealed suppressed TSH, elevated free T4, and normal TSI titer. In addition, an I123 thyroid uptake was borderline-low. A month later, the free T4 had normalized. After remaining asymptomatic for 3 years, the patient presented again with increased appetite, and he was found with low TSH and high free T4. Within the following 3 months, his free T4 and TSH normalized. At his most recent evaluation, his TSH was normal and the free T4 was borderline-high; the TG antibody titer was still elevated and the TSI titer was negative. To our knowledge, this is the first patient reported with Hashimoto thyroiditis and recurrent hyperthyroidism. This case exemplifies the variability of the manifestations and natural history of Hashimoto thyroiditis and supports the need for a long-term evaluation of patients with autoimmune thyroid disease.

  10. Ovarian autoimmune disease: clinical concepts and animal models

    OpenAIRE

    Warren, Bryce D; Kinsey, William K; McGinnis, Lynda K; Christenson, Lane K.; Jasti, Susmita; Stevens, Anne M.; Petroff, Brian K.; Petroff, Margaret G.

    2014-01-01

    The ovary is not an immunologically privileged organ, but a breakdown in tolerogenic mechanisms for ovary-specific antigens has disastrous consequences on fertility in women, and this is replicated in murine models of autoimmune disease. Isolated ovarian autoimmune disease is rare in women, likely due to the severity of the disease and the inability to transmit genetic information conferring the ovarian disease across generations. Nonetheless, autoimmune oophoritis is often observed in associ...

  11. How Does Age at Onset Influence the Outcome of Autoimmune Diseases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel J. Amador-Patarroyo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The age at onset refers to the time period at which an individual experiences the first symptoms of a disease. In autoimmune diseases (ADs, these symptoms can be subtle but are very relevant for diagnosis. They can appear during childhood, adulthood or late in life and may vary depending on the age at onset. Variables like mortality and morbidity and the role of genes will be reviewed with a focus on the major autoimmune disorders, namely, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, rheumatoid arthritis (RA, multiple sclerosis (MS, type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D, Sjögren's syndrome, and autoimmune thyroiditis (AITD. Early age at onset is a worst prognostic factor for some ADs (i.e., SLE and T1D, while for others it does not have a significant influence on the course of disease (i.e., SS or no unanimous consensus exists (i.e., RA and MS.

  12. Sex bias in CNS autoimmune disease mediated by androgen control of autoimmune regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Meng-Lei; Bakhru, Pearl; Conley, Bridget; Nelson, Jennifer S; Free, Meghan; Martin, Aaron; Starmer, Joshua; Wilson, Elizabeth M; Su, Maureen A

    2016-01-01

    Male gender is protective against multiple sclerosis and other T-cell-mediated autoimmune diseases. This protection may be due, in part, to higher androgen levels in males. Androgen binds to the androgen receptor (AR) to regulate gene expression, but how androgen protects against autoimmunity is not well understood. Autoimmune regulator (Aire) prevents autoimmunity by promoting self-antigen expression in medullary thymic epithelial cells, such that developing T cells that recognize these self-antigens within the thymus undergo clonal deletion. Here we show that androgen upregulates Aire-mediated thymic tolerance to protect against autoimmunity. Androgen recruits AR to Aire promoter regions, with consequent enhancement of Aire transcription. In mice and humans, thymic Aire expression is higher in males compared with females. Androgen administration and male gender protect against autoimmunity in a multiple sclerosis mouse model in an Aire-dependent manner. Thus, androgen control of an intrathymic Aire-mediated tolerance mechanism contributes to gender differences in autoimmunity. PMID:27072778

  13. Ionizing radiation and autoimmunity: Induction of autoimmune disease in mice by high dose fractionated total lymphoid irradiation and its prevention by inoculating normal T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation can functionally alter the immune system and break self-tolerance. High dose (42.5 Gy), fractionated (2.5 Gy 17 times) total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) on mice caused various organ-specific autoimmune diseases, such as gastritis, thyroiditis, and orchitis, depending on the radiation dosages, the extent of lymphoid irradiation, and the genetic background of the mouse strains. Radiation-induced tissue damage is not the primary cause of the autoimmune disease because irradiation of the target organs alone failed to elicit the autoimmunity and shielding of the organs from irradiation was unable to prevent it. In contrast, irradiation of both the thymus and the peripheral lymphoid organs/tissues was required for efficient induction of autoimmune disease by TLI. TLI eliminated the majority of mature thymocytes and the peripheral T cells for 1 mo, and inoculation of spleen cell, thymocyte, or bone marrow cell suspensions (prepared from syngeneic nonirradiated mice) within 2 wk after TLI effectively prevented the autoimmune development. Depletion of T cells from the inocula abrogated the preventive activity. CD4+ T cells mediated the autoimmune prevention but CD8+ T cells did not. CD4+ T cells also appeared to mediate the TLI-induced autoimmune disease because CD4+ T cells from disease-bearing TLI mice adoptively transferred the autoimmune disease to syngeneic naive mice. Taken together, these results indicate that high dose, fractionated ionizing radiation on the lymphoid organs/tissues can cause autoimmune disease by affecting the T cell immune system, rather than the target self-Ags, presumably by altering T cell-dependent control of self-reactive T cells. 62 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs

  14. Unusual pediatric co-morbility: autoimmune thyroiditis and cortico-resistant nephrotic syndrome in a 6-month-old Italian patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urbano Flavia

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report on a case of autoimmune thyroiditis in a 6-month-old patient with cortico-resistant nephrotic syndrome. Normal serum levels of thyroid hormons and thyroid-stimulating hormone were detected with high titers of circulant antithyroid antibodies and a dysomogeneous ultrasound appearance of the gland, typical of autoimmune thyroiditis. The research of maternal thyroid antibodies was negative. This is the first case of autoimmune thyroiditis found in such a young patient with pre-existing nephrotic syndrome ever described in literature. This association is random because nephrotic syndrome does not have an autoimmune pathogenesis and the genes involved in autoimmune thyroiditis are not related to those of nephrotic syndrome.

  15. Thyroid Autoimmunity is Associated with Decreased Cytotoxicity T Cells in Women with Repeated Implantation Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunyu Huang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid autoimmunity (TAI, which is defined as the presence of autoantibodies against thyroid peroxidase (TPO and/or thyroglobulin (TG, is related to repeated implantation failure (RIF. It is reported that TAI was involved in reproductive failure not only through leading thyroid function abnormality, but it can also be accompanied with immune imbalance. Therefore, this study was designed to investigate the association of thyroid function, immune status and TAI in women with RIF. Blood samples were drawn from 72 women with RIF to evaluate the prevalence of TAI, the thyroid function, the absolute numbers and percentages of lymphocytes. The prevalence of thyroid function abnormality in RIF women with TAI was not significantly different from that in RIF women without TAI (c2 = 0.484, p > 0.05. The absolute number and percentage of T cells, T helper (Th cells, B cells and natural killer (NK cells were not significantly different in RIF women with TAI compared to those without TAI (all p > 0.05. The percentage of T cytotoxicity (Tc cells was significantly decreased in RIF women with TAI compared to those without TAI (p < 0.05. Meanwhile, Th/Tc ratio was significantly increased (p < 0.05. These results indicated that the decreased Tc percentage and increased Th/Tc ratio may be another influential factor of adverse pregnancy outcomes in RIF women with TAI.

  16. Does thyroid stunning exist? A model with benign thyroid disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabri, O.; Zimny, M.; Schreckenberger, M.; Meyer-Oelmann, A.; Reinartz, P.; Buell, U. [Clinic of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen Univ. of Technology (Germany)

    2000-11-01

    With regard to the treatment of differentiated non-medullary thyroid carcinoma, there is controversy over whether radiation from a diagnostic radioiodine ({sup 131}I) application really does have a suppressive effect on the uptake of subsequent therapeutic {sup 131}I (so-called thyroid stunning). However, inherent difficulties in exact remnant/metastatic tissue volumetry make it difficult to quantify how much diagnostic {sup 131}I is actually absorbed (absorbed energy dose) and hence to decide whether a threshold absorbed dose exists beyond which such stunning would occur. Since in benign thyroid disease the target volume can be readily quantified by ultrasonography, we sought to determine definitely whether stunning of thyroid cells occurs upon a second application of radioiodine 4 days following the first one. We therefore studied 171 consecutive patients with benign thyroid disease (diffuse goitre, Graves' disease, toxic nodular goitre) who received two-step {sup 131}I therapy during a single in-patient stay. For application of both calculated {sup 131}I activities we performed kinetic dosimetry of {sup 131}I uptake, effective half-life and absorbed dose. At the second application, patients showed significant stunning (a 31.7% decrease in {sup 131}I uptake, from 34.7%{+-}15.4% at first application to 23.7%{+-}12.3% at second application, P<0.0005) without a significant difference in effective half-life (4.9{+-}1.3 vs 5.0{+-}1.7 days, P>0.2). ANOVA showed that the extent of stunning was influenced significantly only by the absorbed energy dose at first application (F=13.5, P<0.0005), while first-application {sup 131}I activity, target volume, gender and thyroid function had no influence (all F{<=}0.71, all P>0.4). There was no significant correlation between extent of thyroid stunning and first-application {sup 131}I activity (r=0.07, P>0.3), whereas there was a highly significant correlation between thyroid stunning and first absorbed energy dose (r=0.64, P

  17. Does thyroid stunning exist? A model with benign thyroid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With regard to the treatment of differentiated non-medullary thyroid carcinoma, there is controversy over whether radiation from a diagnostic radioiodine (131I) application really does have a suppressive effect on the uptake of subsequent therapeutic 131I (so-called thyroid stunning). However, inherent difficulties in exact remnant/metastatic tissue volumetry make it difficult to quantify how much diagnostic 131I is actually absorbed (absorbed energy dose) and hence to decide whether a threshold absorbed dose exists beyond which such stunning would occur. Since in benign thyroid disease the target volume can be readily quantified by ultrasonography, we sought to determine definitely whether stunning of thyroid cells occurs upon a second application of radioiodine 4 days following the first one. We therefore studied 171 consecutive patients with benign thyroid disease (diffuse goitre, Graves' disease, toxic nodular goitre) who received two-step 131I therapy during a single in-patient stay. For application of both calculated 131I activities we performed kinetic dosimetry of 131I uptake, effective half-life and absorbed dose. At the second application, patients showed significant stunning (a 31.7% decrease in 131I uptake, from 34.7%±15.4% at first application to 23.7%±12.3% at second application, P0.2). ANOVA showed that the extent of stunning was influenced significantly only by the absorbed energy dose at first application (F=13.5, P131I activity, target volume, gender and thyroid function had no influence (all F≤0.71, all P>0.4). There was no significant correlation between extent of thyroid stunning and first-application 131I activity (r=0.07, P>0.3), whereas there was a highly significant correlation between thyroid stunning and first absorbed energy dose (r=0.64, P<0.00005), the latter correlation fitting a logarithmic model best. Multivariate factor analysis also revealed first absorbed energy dose to be the only decisive stunning factor. In conclusion, our

  18. Study of the immune response to thyroglobulin through a model of experimental autoimmune thyroiditis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cellular and humoral immune response to thyroglobulin of different species was studied in guinea pigs. The experiments described suggested that the immune system can be activated against self-determinants. Human and pork thyroglobulin were able to induce the experimental thyroiditis as well as some immune responses, such as in vitro proliferative response, delayed hypersensitivity and antibodies. Although guinea pig thyroglobulin was unable to induce specific T-lymphocyte proliferation in vitro, delayed hypersensitivity response and antibodies, it was very efficient in inducing the autoimmune thyroiditis. On the contrary, bovine thyroglobulin did not induce experimental autoimmune thyroiditis despite producing good responses as determined by similar in vitro proliferative response, delayed hypersensitivity and on the humoral level. These results suggest that the assays utilised were not able to evaluate the relevant immune response to genesis of the thyroiditis. The determinant selection mechanisms operating in these immune responses are probably selecting determinants not responsible for self-recognition in vivo. It was suggested that the macrophage could be the cell responsible for the presentation of these determinants to the lymphocyte in an immunogenic form. (Author)

  19. Sex Differences in Autoimmune Disease from a Pathological Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Fairweather, DeLisa; Frisancho-Kiss, Sylvia; Rose, Noel R.

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases affect ∼8% of the population, 78% of whom are women. The reason for the high prevalence in women is unclear. Women are known to respond to infection, vaccination, and trauma with increased antibody production and a more T helper (Th)2-predominant immune response, whereas a Th1 response and inflammation are usually more severe in men. This review discusses the distribution of autoimmune diseases based on sex and age, showing that autoimmune diseases progress from an acute p...

  20. Autoimmune diseases in the TH17 era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Mesquita Jr.

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A new subtype of CD4+ T lymphocytes characterized by the production of interleukin 17, i.e., TH17 cells, has been recently described. This novel T cell subset is distinct from type 1 and type 2 T helper cells. The major feature of this subpopulation is to generate significant amounts of pro-inflammatory cytokines, therefore appearing to be critically involved in protection against infection caused by extracellular microorganisms, and in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases and allergy. The dynamic balance among subsets of T cells is important for the modulation of several steps of the immune response. Disturbances in this balance may cause a shift from normal immunologic physiology to the development of immune-mediated disorders. In autoimmune diseases, the fine balance between the proportion and degree of activation of the various T lymphocyte subsets can contribute to persistent undesirable inflammatory responses and tissue replacement by fibrosis. This review highlights the importance of TH17 cells in this process by providing an update on the biology of these cells and focusing on their biology and differentiation processes in the context of immune-mediated chronic inflammatory diseases.

  1. Imaging B lymphocytes in autoimmune inflammatory diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    B cells arise from stem cells precursor and develop through a tightly regulated and selective process that lead to the generation of different B cell populations such as transitional, mature, memory and plasma cells. These B cell subsets can be identified using flow cytometry by the expression of specific surface antigens. The growing knowledge of the pivotal role played by B cells in the development and progression of autoimmune diseases combined with the advances in monoclonal antibody technology, led in the last years to the generation of different biological agents targeting B cells. In this context, nuclear medicine can offer the possibility to use a panel of biologic radiopharmaceuticals for molecular imaging of inflammatory diseases. Radiopharmaceuticals bind to their targets with high affinity and specificity and have an excellent imaging diagnostic potential for the evaluation of disease activity, selection and monitoring of immune therapies. Several molecules have been radiolabelled for the imaging of T lymphocytes whereas, by now, the anti CD20 rituximab is the only biological therapy targeting B cells that demonstrated to be efficiently radiolabelled and used to detect inflammation in autoimmune patients

  2. Pulmonary hypertension in autoimmune rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Massironi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Pulmonary hypertension is a severe and rapidly progressive disease, particularly frequent in patients with rheumatic diseases. The aims of this study were the following: to determine the prevalence of pulmonary hypertension in Italian patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases, and to evaluate if the presence of a rheumatic disease in general, or of a specific autoimmune rheumatic disease, is a risk factor for the development of pulmonary hypertension. Patients and Methods. One hundred and thirteen Italian patients with connective tissue diseases (105 females, 8 males, aged 19 to 83 yrs, entered the study. Fifty-one had systemic sclerosis (SSc: 49 were females, 2 males, aged 34 to 83 yrs; 41 had limited cutaneous SSc, 8 diffuse cutaneous SSc, and 2 SSc sine scleroderma. Thirty-three patients had systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE: all but one were females, their age ranged from 19 to 82 yrs. Twenty-five had rheumatoid arthritis (RA: 21 females, 4 males, aged 26 to 45 yrs. Three females and one male, 51-77 yrs, had mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD. Systolic pulmonary arterial pressure (SPAP was assessed by Doppler echocardiography. Results. Twenty three patients had pulmonary hypertension, which was more frequent in MCTD than in SLE (75% vs 6.1%, p=0.0002 or in AR (20%, p=0.0313. Pulmonary hypertension was more frequent in SSc than in SLE (25.5% vs 6.1%, p=0.0028 and in limited than in diffuse SSc(21.6% vs 3.9%. SPAP was significanly related to age (R=0.35, P=0.0275, with patients with pulmonary hypertension older than patients with normal SPAP (66±13 vs 52±16 yrs, p=0.0003. Conclusions. These data show a significant association between pulmonary hypertension and autoimmune rheumatic diseases. Therefore pulmonary hypertension assessment seems mandatory, at least in MCTD and SSc. However, more studies are needed to clarify the relationship between age and pulmonary hypertension and to verify whether the low prevalence of

  3. Thyroid Disorders and Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Mohamedali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid hormones play a very important role regulating metabolism, development, protein synthesis, and influencing other hormone functions. The two main hormones produced by the thyroid are triiodothyronine (T3 and thyroxine (T4. These hormones can also have significant impact on kidney disease so it is important to consider the physiological association of thyroid dysfunction in relation to chronic kidney disease (CKD. CKD has been known to affect the pituitary-thyroid axis and the peripheral metabolism of thyroid hormones. Low T3 levels are the most common laboratory finding followed by subclinical hypothyroidism in CKD patients. Hyperthyroidism is usually not associated with CKD but has been known to accelerate it. One of the most important links between thyroid disorders and CKD is uremia. Patients who are appropriately treated for thyroid disease have a less chance of developing renal dysfunction. Clinicians need to be very careful in treating patients with low T3 levels who also have an elevation in TSH, as this can lead to a negative nitrogen balance. Thus, clinicians should be well educated on the role of thyroid hormones in relation to CKD so that proper treatment can be delivered to the patient.

  4. Thyroid function and autoimmunity in Danish pregnant women after an iodine fortification program and associations with obstetric outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bliddal, Sofie; Boas, Malene; Hilsted, Linda;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Aberrations in maternal thyroid function and autoimmunity during pregnancy have been associated with negative obstetric outcome. In Denmark, a national iodine fortification program was implemented in the year 2000 with the aim to alleviate the mild-moderate iodine deficiency. Following...... outcome. Large randomized controlled trials are needed to clarify the benefit of treating slight aberrations in pregnant women's thyroid function.......OBJECTIVE: Aberrations in maternal thyroid function and autoimmunity during pregnancy have been associated with negative obstetric outcome. In Denmark, a national iodine fortification program was implemented in the year 2000 with the aim to alleviate the mild-moderate iodine deficiency. Following...

  5. PTPN22 gene polymorphisms in autoimmune diseases with special reference to systemic lupus erythematosus disease susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradhan V

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a prototype autoimmune disease. SLE is a result of one or more immune mechanisms, like autoantibody production, complement activation, multiple inflammation and immune complex deposition leading to organ tissue damage. SLE affected patients are susceptible to common and opportunistic infections. There are several reports suggesting that Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection precipitates SLE in patients from endemic areas. Genetic factors and environmental factors also play an important role in the overall susceptibility to SLE pathophysiology. Recently, protein tyrosine phosphatase, non-receptor type 22 (PTPN22 gene, has been found to be associated with several autoimmune diseases like SLE, Grave′s disease and Hashimoto thyroiditis. The missense R620W polymorphism, rs 2476601, in PTPN22 gene at the nucleotide 1858 in codon 620 (620Arg > Trp has been associated with autoimmune diseases. The PTPN22 locus is also found to be responsible for development of pulmonary tuberculosis in certain populations. The PTPN22 1858C/T gene locus will be ideal to look for SLE susceptibility to tuberculosis in the Indian population. In this review, we focus on human PTPN22 gene structure and function as well as the association of PTPN22 gene polymorphisms with SLE susceptibility

  6. Radioiodine treatment for malignant thyroid disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, Gertrud [Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology

    2006-12-15

    Radioiodine treatment for thyroid disease has been given for half a decade in Sweden. The most common indication for treatment is hyperthyroidism, when iodine uptake is high. The situation in which radioiodine treatment is used in thyroid cancer is less favourable and measures therefore have to be taken to optimize the treatment. Treatment should be performed early in the course of the disease to achieve the highest possible differentiation. Before treatment the iodine and goitrogen intake should be kept low. Stimulation of the thyrocytes by thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) should be high. It is conventionally achieved by thyroid hormone withdrawal rendering the patient hypothyroid, or by the recently available recombinant human TSH (rhTSH) which can be recommended for ablation of the thyroid remnant after thyroidectomy and for treatment of metastases in fragile patients unable to undergo hypothyroidism. Finally, stunning - the negative effect of a prior test dose from radioactive iodine - should be avoided.

  7. Endocrine autoimmunity in Turner syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Turner syndrome is caused by numeric and structural abnormalities of the X chromosome. An increased frequency of autoimmunity as well as an elevated incidence of autoantibodies was observed in Turner patients. The aim of this study was to conduct a retrospective analysis of the incidence of autoimmunity in 66 Italian patients affected by Turner syndrome. Methods Sixty-six unselected and consecutive Italian Turner patients were recruited. The association between age, karyotype and the presence of clinical/pre-clinical autoimmune disorders and of autoantibodies was examined. Results Out of the 66 Turner patients, 26 had thyroid autoimmune disorders (39.4%), 14 patients had Hashimoto’s thyroiditis with clinical or subclinical hypothyroidism (21.2%) and 12 patients had circulating anti-thyroid antibodies, echographic pattern of diffuse hypoechogenicity and normal thyroid hormone levels (18.2%). None were affected by Graves’ disease. We analyzed the overall incidence of thyroid autoimmunity within the 3 different age groups 0–9.9, 10–19.9 and 20–29.9 years. No statistically significant difference was observed in the incidence of thyroid autoimmunity within the age-groups (χ2-test p > 0.05). Out of the 66 patients, 31 patients had the 45,X karyotype; within this first group 14 out of 31 patients were affected by autoimmune thyroid disease. A second group of 29 patients included 19 patients with mosaicism, 5 patients with deletions and 5 patients with ring chromosome; out of these 29 patients 7 were affected by autoimmune thyroid disease. A third group included 6 patients with X isochromosome; 5 out of 6 were affected by autoimmune thyroid disease. A statistically significant difference in the frequency of thyroid autoimmunity within the different karyotype groups was observed (χ2-test p = 0.0173). When comparing the X isochromosome group with the pooled group of other karyotypes, of note, the frequency of thyroid autoimmunity was

  8. Radiotherapeutic management of thyroid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Outcomes of radiotherapy were analyzed in 19 patients with malignant lymphoma of the thyroid gland. Seventeen patients had stage I or II disease and two had stage IV disease. The male to female ratio was 2 : 17. Six patients were treated with radiotherapy alone and 13 were treated with combined-modality therapy. Patients were treated with 40 to 50 Gy megavoltage irradiation to the whole neck or to the neck and upper mediastinum. Combined modality therapy was used except for patients with low-grade lymphoma or for patients more than 70 years old. Chemotherapy consisted of CHOP or VEMP. Cause-specific survival was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. The 5-year cause-specific survival rate was 72.7% overall, and was 81.6% for patients with stage I or II disease. There were no treatment failures among patients who received radiation therapy alone. Therefore, combined-modality therapy may be unnecessary for patients with low-grade lymphoma of clinical stages I or II. (author)

  9. Thyroid diseases during pregnancy: a number of important issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krassas, Gerasimos; Karras, Spyridon N; Pontikides, Nikolaos

    2015-01-01

    The most common thyroid diseases during pregnancy are hyper- and hypothyroidism and their variants including isolated hypothyroxinemia (hypo-T4), autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) and different types of goiter. AITD represents the main cause of hypothyroidism during pregnancy ranging in prevalence between 5 and 20% with an average of 7.8%. The incidence of isolated hypo-T4 is about 150 times higher compared to congenital hypothyroidism. Prevalence of Graves' disease (GD) ranges between 0.1% and 1% and the Transient Gestational Hyperthyroidism Syndrome between 1 and 3%. Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) is a sensitive marker of thyroid dysfunction during pregnancy. Normal values have been modified recently with a downward shift. Thus, the upper normal range is now considered to be 2.5 mUI/mL in the first trimester and 3.0 mUI/mL for the remainder of pregnancy. Most studies have shown that children born to women with hypothyroidism during gestation had significantly lower scores in neuropsychological tests related to intelligence, attention, language, reading ability, school performance and visual motor performance. However, some studies have not confirmed these findings. On the other hand, multiple retrospective studies have shown that the risks of maternal and fetal/neonatal complications are directly related to the duration and inadequate control of maternal thyrotoxicosis. The latter is associated with a risk of spontaneous abortion, congestive heart failure, thyrotoxic storm, preeclampsia, preterm delivery, low birth weight and stillbirth. Despite the lack of consensus among professional organizations, recent studies, which are based on sophisticated analyses, support universal screening in all pregnant women in the first trimester for thyroid diseases. PMID:25885104

  10. Impaired Fertility Associated with Subclinical Hypothyroidism and Thyroid Autoimmunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldthusen, Anne-Dorthe; Pedersen, Palle L; Larsen, Jacob;

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to estimate the significance of TSH, thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPOAb), and mild (subclinical) hypothyroidism in women from The Danish General Suburban Population Study (GESUS) on the number of children born, the number of pregnancies, and the number of...... spontaneous abortions. METHODS: Retrospective cross sectional study of 11254 women participating in GESUS. Data included biochemical measurements and a self-administrated questionnaire. RESULTS: 6.7% had mild (subclinical) hypothyroidism and 9.4% prevalent hypothyroidism. In women with mild hypothyroidism...... spontaneous abortions. Mild (subclinical) hypothyroidism was associated with a risk of not having children and a risk of not getting pregnant in age-adjusted and multiadjusted models. Prevalent hypothyroidism was not associated with the number of children born, the number of pregnancies, or spontaneous...

  11. Hashimoto's Thyroiditis and Graves' Disease in One Patient: The Extremes of Thyroid Dysfunction Associated with Interferon Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishay, R H; Chen, R C Y

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease associated with interferon therapy can manifest as destructive thyroiditis, Graves' Hyperthyroidism, and autoimmune (often subclinical) hypothyroidism, the latter persisting in many patients. There are scare reports of a single patient developing extremes of autoimmune thyroid disease activated by the immunomodulatory effects of interferon. A 60-year-old man received 48 weeks of pegylated interferon and ribavirin therapy for chronic HCV. Six months into treatment, he reported fatigue, weight gain, and slowed cognition. Serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) was 58.8 mIU/L [0.27-4.2], fT4 11.1 pmol/L [12-25], and fT3 4.2 pmol/L [2.5-6.0] with elevated anti-TPO (983 IU/mL [antibodies. He commenced thyroxine with initial clinical and biochemical resolution but developed symptoms of hyperthyroidism with weight loss and tremor 14 months later. Serum TSH was TSH receptor (TRAb, 4.0 U/L [antibodies. Technetium scan confirmed Graves' Disease with bilateral diffuse increased tracer uptake (5.9% [0.5-3.5%]). The patient commenced carbimazole therapy for 6 months. Treatment was ceased following spontaneous clinical and biochemical remission (TSH 3.84 mIU/L, fT4 17pmol/L, fT3 4.5 pmol/L, and TRAb <1 U/L). This raises the need to monitor thyroid function closely in patients both during and following completion of interferon treatment. PMID:27042364

  12. Applications of Next-generation Sequencing in Systemic Autoimmune Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yiyangzi Ma; Na Shi; Mengtao Li; Fei Chen; Haitao Niu

    2015-01-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases are a group of heterogeneous disorders caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Although numerous causal genes have been identified by genome-wide association studies (GWAS), these susceptibility genes are correlated to a relatively low disease risk, indicating that environmental factors also play an important role in the pathogen-esis of disease. The intestinal microbiome, as the main symbiotic ecosystem between the host and host-associated microorganisms, has been demonstrated to regulate the development of the body’s immune system and is likely related to genetic mutations in systemic autoimmune diseases. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology, with high-throughput capacity and accuracy, provides a powerful tool to discover genomic mutations, abnormal transcription and intestinal microbiome identification for autoimmune diseases. In this review, we briefly outlined the applications of NGS in systemic autoimmune diseases. This review may provide a reference for future studies in the pathogenesis of systemic autoimmune diseases.

  13. Pharmacometabolomics-aided Pharmacogenomics in Autoimmune Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodora Katsila

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Inter-individual variability has been a major hurdle to optimize disease management. Precision medicine holds promise for improving health and healthcare via tailor-made therapeutic strategies. Herein, we outline the paradigm of “pharmacometabolomics-aided pharmacogenomics” in autoimmune diseases. We envisage merging pharmacometabolomic and pharmacogenomic data (to address the interplay of genomic and environmental influences with information technologies to facilitate data analysis as well as sense- and decision-making on the basis of synergy between artificial and human intelligence. Humans can detect patterns, which computer algorithms may fail to do so, whereas data-intensive and cognitively complex settings and processes limit human ability. We propose that better-informed, rapid and cost-effective omics studies need the implementation of holistic and multidisciplinary approaches.

  14. Gene expression profiling in autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bovin, Lone Frier; Brynskov, Jørn; Hegedüs, Laszlo;

    2007-01-01

    A central issue in autoimmune disease is whether the underlying inflammation is a repeated stereotypical process or whether disease specific gene expression is involved. To shed light on this, we analysed whether genes previously found to be differentially regulated in rheumatoid arthritis (RA...... differences in peripheral blood mononuclear cell (MNC) gene expression patterns between 15 newly diagnosed HT patients and 15 matched healthy controls. However, the MNC expression levels of five genes were significantly upregulated in 25 IBD patients, compared to 18 matched healthy controls (CD14, FACL2, FCN1......, RNASE2, VNN2). There was concordance in the directional change for all genes between IBD and RA patients, i.e. increased expression compared to controls. These data show that one third of the genes significantly upregulated in MNC from RA patients were upregulated in patients with other chronic...

  15. G raves’ disease – anti-thyroid autoantibodies and function thyroid status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Introduction: Hyperthyroidism is an autoimmune disease in the pathogenesis of which a key role play the antibodies against the thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TRAb). The aim of this study is to analyze the immune and hormonal status in patients with Graves' disease, who are on thyreostatic therapy and in remission. Materials and methods: 67 patients were studied - 11 men and 56 women - with Graves' disease, mean age 49.7 years (range - 20-76 ). Of these, 55 were on thyreostatic therapy (two subgroups: 27 - treated up to 24 months , and 28 with relapsed disease ) and 12 were in remission up to a year. Patient's condition is assessed as a complex of clinical, biochemical, including hormonal, immune status and ultrasonography of the thyroid gland. We examined thyroid stimulating hormone, free thyroxine, free triiodothyronine, antityreoperoxidase antibodies (Anti-TPO) and TRAb. The patients on therapy are: in hyperthyroidism - 10/ 14 with subclinical hyperthyroidism - 9/8, euthyroid - 7/6 and with subclinical hypothyroidism - 1/0. Results: The patients with hyperthyroidism ( 43.6% ) in both thyreostatic therapy groups have a significantly higher average values of TRAb. The patients with subclinical hyperthyroidism and relapse showed higher levels of TRAb in comparison with those undergoing therapy to 24 months after diagnosing. The values of TRAb in the euthyroid patients in both groups of treatment were 1,5 IU / l. The Anti-TPO values were increased in 78.2% of the patients on therapy and 55.5% of those in remission. Conclusion: With the decrease of thyroid hormones during treatment of Hyperthyroidism the levels of TRAb and Anti-TPO decrease. The TRAb values are useful for the monitoring the effect of the thyreostatic treatment, determining the therapeutic approach in patients with a sustained reduction of TRAb in the course thyreostatic therapy and particularly for relapse

  16. Spontaneous autoimmune thyroiditis in obese strain chickens: a genetic analysis of target organ abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study the authors investigated the genetic background of primary abnormalities found in the thyroid gland of Obese strain (OS) chickens with spontaneous autoimmune thyroiditis (SAT), i.e., susceptibility to passively transferred antibodies to thyroglobulin (TgAb) and incomplete suppression of iodine uptake by thyroxine (T4). Several crosses between the B15/B15 subline of OS chickens and the inbred CB line (B12/B12) were done and the progeny was analyzed for thyroiditis after injection of OS serum containing high titers of TgAb. It was found that passive transfer of TgAb increased the lymphoid infiltration in the thyroids of OS chickens, but had no effect on CB birds. A genetic analysis of backcrosses revealed that this trait is, in the case of simple Mendelian inheritance, encoded by at least three recessive genes. The thyroidal 131I uptake of these crosses under T4 was also determined and they found that this trait is most probably encoded by only one recessive gene

  17. Radioiodine therapy in benign thyroid diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnema, Steen Joop; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2012-01-01

    Radioiodine ((131)I) therapy of benign thyroid diseases was introduced 70 yr ago, and the patients treated since then are probably numbered in the millions. Fifty to 90% of hyperthyroid patients are cured within 1 yr after (131)I therapy. With longer follow-up, permanent hypothyroidism seems...... of an exact thyroid dose is error-prone due to imprecise measurement of the (131)I biokinetics, and the importance of internal dosimetric factors, such as the thyroid follicle size, is probably underestimated. Besides these obstacles, several potential confounders interfere with the efficacy of (131...... predicts the outcome from (131)I therapy. The individual radiosensitivity, still poorly defined and impossible to quantify, may be a major determinant of the outcome from (131)I therapy. Above all, the impact of (131)I therapy relies on the iodine-concentrating ability of the thyroid gland. The thyroid...

  18. Interventions in patients with thyroid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because sodium iodide I 131 was the first radiopharmaceutical available for clinical use, and because thyroid hormonogenesis is dependent on iodide, the earliest tests in nuclear medicine were aimed at the diagnosis of thyroid diseases. Two types of the early thyroid tests required intervention - pharamacologic manipulation of the patient - to express diagnostic information: (1) the suppression test in which thyroid hormone was given, and (2) the stimulation test wherein thyrotropin (TSH) was injected. As happens in the evolution of medical practice, newer procedures replace the old, and both the suppression and stimulation tests of thyroid function now are rarely used; the data sought can usually be obtained by other safer or more accurate procedures. However, a suppression test or a stimulation test may still be of indispensible value in certain patients

  19. Eye findings and immunological markers in probands and their euthyroid relatives from a single family with multiple cases of thyroid autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ardley Melissa

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ophthalmopathy is a common manifestation of Graves’ disease (GD occurring in up to 50% of patients. Mild eye signs are also common in patients with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. Whilst a genetic predisposition to GD has been demonstrated this is not the case for the ophthalmopathy which often runs a separate course. Objective We determined the prevalences of eye and eyelid signs and positive thyroid and orbital antibody tests in first and second degree relatives from a single family with multiple cases of Graves’ disease, ophthalmopathy and Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. Design The study cohort comprised 16 subjects from the same family, 4 probands namely, 3 with GD and one with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis and hypothyroidism and 12 of their euthyroid first or second degree relatives. We measured antibodies against calsequestrin (CASQ1 and collagen XIII in an enzyme-linked-immunosorbent assays and TSH-Receptor (TSH-R antibodies as i TSH-R binding inhibiting immunoglobulin (TBII and ii thyroid stimulating immunoglobulin (TSI. Eye signs were classified and quantified using the clinical activity score (CAS, NOSPECS classes, Nunery types 1 and 2 and the margin-reflex-distance (MRD as a measure of upper eyelid retraction (UER. Main outcomes Whilst significant ophthalmopathy was uncommon in the relatives, mild eye signs, in particular UER, were demonstrated in about a third of them. The presence of eye signs was moderately, but not significantly, associated with the detection of CASQ1 and collagen XIII antibodies, but not TSH-R antibodies. Conclusion Our study demonstrates a significant prevalence of positive orbital antibody tests and ophthalmopathy in probands with thyroid autoimmunity and their euthyroid relatives, favouring a role of genetic factors in the development of ophthalmopathy in patients with thyroid autoimmunity.

  20. Trends of thyroid function and autoimmunity to 5 years after the introduction of mandatory iodization in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tammaro, A; Pigliacelli, F; Fumarola, A; Persechino, S

    2016-05-01

    Background. Mandatory iodine fortification of salt was introduced in Italy in 2005. The purpose of our study is to estimate the trend of thyroid diseases in Italy before and after mandatory iodization in Italy. Methods. 7976 patients (6802 females; 1174 males) were examined between 2003 and 2010. We divided the patients into categories according to their clinical diagnosis. Later, we evaluated for each patient if there was the positivity for antibodies anti TPO. Finally, we collected data about TSH values of all patients who did not use therapy for thyroid disease at the time of the examination. To evaluate the differences percentages for categorical variables, χ2-Pearson test was used; to evaluate the percentage differences of TSH values we used the Kruskal-Wallis test. Values were considered statistically significant at p < 0.05. Results. We considered diagnosis of "toxic adenoma / goiter", diagnosis of "Graves' disease" and diagnosis of "hyperthyroidism / thyrotoxicosis" before and after the introduction of mandatory iodization in Italy, to demonstrate the possible presence of iodine-induced hyperthyroidism. Diagnosis of toxic adenoma / goiter before 2005 were 3.7%, while after 2005 they were reduced to 3.1%. Diagnosis of Graves' disease before 2005 were 2.4%, and they remained unchanged after 2005. Finally, diagnosis of hyperthyroidism / thyrotoxicosis decreased from 2.5% to 2.1%. Comparing these results, there were no significant differences (P = 0.261) between the percentages of diagnosis of hyperthyroidism before and after the introduction of mandatory iodization. We considered diagnosis of Hashimoto's thyroiditis before and after 2005 to demonstrate a link between the administration of iodine and thyroid autoimmunity. Prevalence of Hashimoto's thyroiditis between 2003 and 2005 was 37%; prevalence between 2006 and 2010 dropped to 34.7%. This small difference has a borderline statistical significance (P = 0.049). Stratifying TSH values from year to year, we

  1. Vitiligo vulgaris and autoimmune diseases in Japan: A report from vitiligo clinic in Kyoto University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanioka, Miki; Yamamoto, Yosuke; Katoh, Mayumi; Takahashi, Kenzo; Miyachi, Yoshiki

    2009-01-01

    We reviewed the causes of "loss of skin color" in 144 patients, who visited Vitiligo Clinic of Kyoto University Hospital between April 2005 and August 2008. The numbers of patients with generalized and segmental Vitiligo vulgaris were 98 (68.1%) and 26 (18.1%), respectively. Small numbers of the patients suffered from Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease, piebaldism, congenital albinism, Hypomelanosis of Ito, post-inflammatory hypopigmentation, white leaf-shaped macules associated with tuberous sclerosis and nevus hypopigmentosus. One forth of the patients with generalized vitiligo had complications, while no complications were found in the patients with segmental vitiligo. Among the complications, autoimmune diseases dominated 43% (10 of 23 cases). Autoimmune thyroid diseases explained for the most of the complicated autoimmune diseases and were associated with 7.4% of the patients with generalized vitiligo. Minor autoimmune complications include myasthenia gravis, Sjogren syndrome and autoimmune nephritis. Reflecting the condition that our clinic is located in a university hospital, vitiligo patients with end-stage non-melanoma cancers of internal organs accounted for 8.4% of the patients of generalized vitiligo. PMID:20046588

  2. Autoimmun hypophysitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Therese; Hagen, Claus

    2010-01-01

    Autoimmune hypophysitis (AH) - often referred to as lymphocytic hypophysitis - is a rare disease that affects the pituitary gland and causes inflammation. The disease enlarges the pituitary gland and the clinical presentations are lack of pituitary function and headaches. AH is mostly seen in women...... during pregnancy or postpartum, but also occurs in males and children. AH is often associated with other autoimmune diseases, most frequently with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The symptoms are caused by enlargement of the pituitary gland and disturbances of the hormone function. Treatment is either...

  3. A strong association between thyrotropin receptor-blocking antibody-positive atrophic autoimmune thyroiditis and HLA-DR8 and HLA-DQB1 0302 in Koreans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Bo Youn; Chung, Jae Hoon; Lee, Hong Kyu; Koh, Chang-Soon; Lee, Jung-Bin (Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)); Shong, Young Kee (Univ. of Ulsan College of Medicine Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)); Han, Hoon (Catholic Univ. Medical College, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)); Chang, Youn Bok (Hallym Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of))

    1993-09-01

    The authors investigated whether the associations between HLA alleles of patients with autoimmune hypothyroidism varied according to the presence or absence of TSH receptor-blocking antibody (TRBab). They analyzed the HLA-A, -B, -C, and -DR antigens by serotyping and the DQA1 and DQB1 genes using both enzymatic DNA amplification and sequence-specific oligonucleotide hybridizations. The patient population consisted of 47 Korean patients with atrophic autoimmune thyroiditis and 62 patients with goitrous autoimmune thyroiditis. The antigen frequency of HLA-DR8 was significantly increased in 23 atrophic autoimmune thyroiditis patients that were positive for TSH binding inhibitor immunoglobulin (TBII) compared to 136 controls [52% vs. 16%; x[sup 2] = 13.1; Pc (corrected P value) = 0.003]. This relative risk was 5.7; the etiological fraction was 0.43. HLA-DQB1*0302 was also increased in patients with TBII-positive atrophic autoimmune thyroiditis (24% vs. 7%; x[sup 2] = 11.2; Pc = 0.012; relative risk = 4.4; etiological fraction = 0.19). No specific DR antigens or DQB1 alleles were increased in either TBII-negative atrophic autoimmune thyroidities or goitrous autoimmune thyroiditis. A significant decrease in the frequency of HLA-DR6 antigen was observed in both TBII-positive atrophic antoimmune thyroiditis (0% vs. 32%; x[sup 2] = 8.4; Pc = 0.03) and goitrous autoimmune thyroiditis (0% vs. 32%; x[sup 2] = 23.2; Pc < 0.001) patients. The frequency of the HLC-Cwl antigen was significantly increased in all patient groups. The authors conclude that TRBab-positive atrophic autoimmune thyroiditis is immunogenetically different from both goitrous autoimmune thyroiditis and TRBab-negative atrophic autoimmune thyroiditis. It is possible that HLA-DR8 and/or DQB1*0302 may be related to the susceptibility genes involved in the production of TRBab in Koreans. 32 refs., 5 tabs.

  4. Pregnancy outcomes with thyroxine replacement for subclinical hypothyroidism: Role of thyroid autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthukrishnan Jayaraman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study pregnancy outcomes in relation to thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPOAb status with optimum thyroxine replacement for subclinical hypothyroidism. Materials and Methods: Ninety-eight women with subclinical hypothyroidism were followed up until the end of their pregnancy. TPO antibody status was performed for 59 women (positive 20, negative 39. Levothyroxine was supplemented to maintain TSH between 0.3-3 mIU/l in all patients, irrespective of TPOAb status. Pregnancy outcomes were noted as pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH, antepartum or postpartum hemorrhage, preterm delivery, and spontaneous abortion. Outcomes were compared between 3 groups as per TPO antibody status (positive, negative, and undetermined, which were matched for age and gestational period. Results: Thyroid autoimmunity was noted in 34% of women screened for TPO antibody. A total of 11 adverse pregnancy outcomes were recorded (4 spontaneous abortions, 4 preterm deliveries, 3 PIH with no significant difference between the groups. Conclusion: Adverse pregnancy outcomes were not different in the 3 groups with adequate thyroxine replacement for pregnant women with subclinical hypothyroidism targeting TSH in euthyroid range, irrespective of thyroid autoimmunity status.

  5. Selected Aspects in the Pathogenesis of Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    György Nagy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune processes can be found in physiological circumstances. However, they are quenched with properly functioning regulatory mechanisms and do not evolve into full-blown autoimmune diseases. Once developed, autoimmune diseases are characterized by signature clinical features, accompanied by sustained cellular and/or humoral immunological abnormalities. Genetic, environmental, and hormonal defects, as well as a quantitative and qualitative impairment of immunoregulatory functions, have been shown in parallel to the relative dominance of proinflammatory Th17 cells in many of these diseases. In this review we focus on the derailed balance between regulatory and Th17 cells in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. Additionally, we depict a cytokine imbalance, which gives rise to a biased T-cell homeostasis. The assessment of Th17/Treg-cell ratio and the simultaneous quantitation of cytokines, may give a useful diagnostic tool in autoimmune diseases. We also depict the multifaceted role of dendritic cells, serving as antigen presenting cells, contributing to the development of the pathognomonic cytokine signature and promote cellular and humoral autoimmune responses. Finally we describe the function and role of extracellular vesicles in particular autoimmune diseases. Targeting these key players of disease progression in patients with autoimmune diseases by immunomodulating therapy may be beneficial in future therapeutic strategies.

  6. Biological and clinical aspects of autoimmune inner ear disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Griffith, A J

    1992-01-01

    The clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management of autoimmune inner ear disease are reviewed. Recent studies indicating an autoimmune etiology and pathogenesis are discussed, along with a comparative analysis of several promising new animal models. Further studies to define the natural history, pathogenesis, and diagnosis of the disease are suggested.

  7. Cardiovascular Disease and Thyroid Function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, Jens; Selmer, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid function has a profound effect on the heart, and both all-cause and cardiovascular mortality rates are increased in hyperthyroidism. New-onset atrial fibrillation carries a prolonged risk for the development of hyperthyroidism, suggesting altered availability of thyroid hormones at the ce......Thyroid function has a profound effect on the heart, and both all-cause and cardiovascular mortality rates are increased in hyperthyroidism. New-onset atrial fibrillation carries a prolonged risk for the development of hyperthyroidism, suggesting altered availability of thyroid hormones...... at the cellular level. Subclinical hyperthyroidism is associated with increased left ventricular mass of the heart, which reverts after obtaining euthyroidism. Mortality and risk of major cardiovascular events are increased. Subclinical hypothyroidism is also associated with subtle changes in the heart, e.g. its...

  8. The Epidemiologic Evidence Linking Autoimmune Diseases and Psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benros, Michael E; Eaton, William W; Mortensen, Preben B

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes the epidemiologic evidence linking autoimmune diseases and psychosis. The associations between autoimmune diseases and psychosis have been studied for more than a half century, but research has intensified within the last decades, since psychosis has been associated with...... genetic markers of the immune system and with excess autoreactivity and other immune alterations. A range of psychiatric disorders, including psychosis, have been observed to occur more frequently in some autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus and multiple sclerosis. Many autoimmune...... diseases involve multiple organs and general dysfunction of the immune system, which could affect the brain and induce psychiatric symptoms. Most studies have been cross-sectional, observing an increased prevalence of a broad number of autoimmune diseases in people with psychotic disorders. Furthermore...

  9. Association of the thyroid stimulating hormone receptor gene (TSHR) with Graves' disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brand, Oliver J; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Simmonds, Matthew J;

    2009-01-01

    Graves' disease (GD) is a common autoimmune disease (AID) that shares many of its susceptibility loci with other AIDs. The thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) represents the primary autoantigen in GD, in which autoantibodies bind to the receptor and mimic its ligand, thyroid stimulating...... hormone, causing the characteristic clinical phenotype. Although early studies investigating the TSHR and GD proved inconclusive, more recently we provided convincing evidence for association of the TSHR region with disease. In the current study, we investigated a combined panel of 98 SNPs, including 70...

  10. Reevaluation of the Thyroid Scan for the Assessment of Pathophysiologic Status of Thyroid Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, In Sook; Nah, Jung Il; Kim, Deog Yoon [Kyunghee University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1991-03-15

    To diagnosis and understand the pathophysiologic status of thyroid disease, not only hormonal measurements but also thyroid scan is believed to have a unique role. Especially in the cases of the change of the thyroid function by thyroiditis, it is emphasized that thyroid scan can be helpful in differential diagnosis, Discordant results of thyroid hormone levels and thyroid scan are found in transient hyperthyroidism, or in transient hypothyroidism. We analysed and reevaluated thyroid scan to look at the importance of thyroid scan. The results are summarised as follows: 1) 80%. of hyperthyroid patients had hyperthyroidism increased RAIU with even density, they are compatible with Graves' disease. 2) 2.1% of hyperthyroid patients had normal or decreased RAIU, which are classified as high iodine turn over genuine hyperthyroidism. 3) 8.5% of hyperthyroid patients had markedly decreased RAIU at both 2 hour and 24 hour, whose pathologic processes are suggested to be heterogenous namely subacute thyroiditis, postpartum thyroiditis, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, and pamless thyroiditis. 4) 45% of hypothyroid patients had increased 24 hr RAIU, 30% of hypothyroid patients were normal, 25%, decreased. In conclusion, thyroid scan should be reevaluated its useful role to asses the pathophysiologic status of thyroid disease. Especially in cases of transient thyrotoxicosis, thyroid scan is essential to diagnose and follow up the disease process.

  11. Long-term follow-up of seven patients with ophthalmopathy not associated with thyroid autoimmunity: heterogeneity of autoimmune ophthalmopathy

    OpenAIRE

    McCorquodale T; Lahooti H; Gopinath B; Wall JR

    2012-01-01

    Tom McCorquodale,1 Hooshang Lahooti,1 Bamini Gopinath,2 Jack R Wall11Department of Medicine, Nepean Clinical School, the University of Sydney, Penrith, NSW, Australia; 2Centre for Vision Research, the University of Sydney, Westmead Hospital, Westmead, NSW, AustraliaBackground: Ophthalmopathy is the most common extrathyroidal manifestation of Graves' disease. However, in approximately 5% of cases this autoimmune eye disorder occurs in the apparent absence of Graves' hyperthyroi...

  12. Thyroid Diseases and Treatment in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aynur Aktaş

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of thyroid disease in pregnancy is important for gestational maternal health, obstetric outcome and, subsequent development of child. Pregnancy has pro­found effects on the regulation of thyroid function, and on thyroidal functional disorders, that need to be recognized, carefully evaluated and correctly managed. In women with normal thyroid function there is an increase in thyroxine (T4 and triiodothyronine (T3 production and inhibition of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH in the first trimester of pregnancy,. In the pregnant woman, elevated thyroxine-binding globulin (TGB and concomitant increases in total T4 and T3 levels plateau at 12-14 weeks of pregnancy, and free T4 measurements slowly decrease. The most frequent thyroid disorder in pregnancy is maternal hy­pothyroidism. It is associated with fetal loss, placental abruptions, preeclampsia, preterm delivery and reduced intellectual function in the offspring. Hyperthyroidism dur­ing pregnancy is relatively uncommon, with a prevalence estimated to range between 0.1% and 1%. The most common cause of hyperthyroidism is Graves disease, as this etiology accounts for 85% of clinical hyperthyroid­ism in pregnancy. Another cause of hyperthyroidism is hyperemesis gravidarum. This is common and requires differentiation from Graves disease. There has been much discussion and many publications on the optimal management of pregnant women who are hyperthyroid or hypothyroid. Despite the lack of consensus organiza­tions, which are based on analyses, support screening in all pregnant women in the first trimester for thyroid disease. In this article, we provide information about the current approaches of thyroid dysfunction in pregnancy. J Clin Exp Invest 2016; 7 (1: 120-124

  13. Anti-neutrophil cytoplasm autoantibodies (ANCA) in autoimmune liver diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roozendaal, C.; Kallenberg, Cees

    1999-01-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasm antibodies (ANCA) are autoantibodies directed against cytoplasmic constituents of neutrophil granulocytes and monocytes. ANCA have been detected in serum from patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (mainly ulcerative colitis) and autoimmune mediated liver diseases (mainl

  14. Autoimmune encephalopathy associated with thyroid autoantibodies as the cause of reversible cognitive impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Dobbin Chow

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We herewith describe a patient with acute confusion, expressive aphasia and generalized seizures. A through workup excluded most causes of encephalopathy. He was, however, found to have TSH = 18.6 MIU/ml, T3reverse = 0.44nmol/L, T4 = 0.8ng/dl and Anti-Thyroid-Peroxidase AB titer >1000 IU/ml. Based on the above findings the patient was diagnosed with Hashimoto's encephalopathy and his mental status showed dramatic improvement (MMS 30/30 with high dose prednisone. Hashimoto's encephalopathy is rare disorder of presumed autoimmune origin characterized by cognitive decline, seizures, neuro-psychiatric symptoms, high titers of Anti-Thyroid-Peroxidase AB, and a positive response to steroids.

  15. Effect of Associated Autoimmune Diseases on Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Incidence and Metabolic Control in Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is one of the most common chronic diseases developing in childhood. The incidence of the disease in children increases for unknown reasons at a rate from 3 to 5% every year worldwide. The background of T1DM is associated with the autoimmune process of pancreatic beta cell destruction, which leads to absolute insulin deficiency and organ damage. Complex interactions between environmental and genetic factors contribute to the development of T1DM in genetically predisposed patients. The T1DM-inducing autoimmune process can also affect other organs, resulting in development of additional autoimmune diseases in the patient, thereby impeding diabetes control. The most common T1DM comorbidities include autoimmune thyroid diseases, celiac disease, and autoimmune gastritis; additionally, diabetes can be a component of PAS (Polyglandular Autoimmune Syndrome). The aim of this review is to assess the prevalence of T1DM-associated autoimmune diseases in children and adolescents and their impact on the course of T1DM. We also present suggestions concerning screening tests. PMID:27525273

  16. Ocular Involvement in Systemic Autoimmune Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generali, Elena; Cantarini, Luca; Selmi, Carlo

    2015-12-01

    Eye involvement represents a common finding in patients with systemic autoimmune diseases, particularly rheumatoid arthritis, Sjogren syndrome, seronegative spondyloarthropathy, and antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis. The eye is a privileged immune site but commensal bacteria are found on the ocular surface. The eye injury may be inflammatory, vascular or infectious, as well as iatrogenic, as in the case of hydroxychloroquine, chloroquine, corticosteroids, and bisphosphonates. Manifestations may affect different components of the eye, with episcleritis involving the episclera, a thin layer of tissue covering the sclera; scleritis being an inflammation of the sclera potentially leading to blindness; keratitis, referring to corneal inflammation frequently associated with scleritis; and uveitis as the inflammation of the uvea, including the iris, ciliary body, and choroid, subdivided into anterior, posterior, or panuveitis. As blindness may result from the eye involvement, clinicians should be aware of the possible manifestations and their management also independent of the ophthalmologist opinion as the therapeutic approach generally points to the underlying diseases. In some cases, the eye involvement may have a diagnostic implication, as for episcleritis in rheumatoid arthritis, or acute anterior uveitis in seronegative spondyloarthritis. Nonetheless, some conditions lack specificity, as in the case of dry eye which affects nearly 30 % of the general population. The aim of this review is to elucidate to non-ophthalmologists the major ocular complications of rheumatic diseases and their specific management and treatment options. PMID:26494481

  17. Involvement of dendritic cells in autoimmune diseases in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reed Ann M

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dendritic cells (DCs are professional antigen-presenting cells that are specialized in the uptake of antigens and their transport from peripheral tissues to the lymphoid organs. Over the last decades, the properties of DCs have been intensely studied and much knowledge has been gained about the role of DCs in various diseases and health conditions where the immune system is involved, particularly in cancer and autoimmune disorders. Emerging clues in autoimmune diseases, suggest that dendritic cell dysregulation might be involved in the development of various autoimmune disorders in both adults and children. However, studies investigating a possible contribution of DCs in autoimmune diseases in the pediatric population alone are scanty. The purpose of this review is to give a general overview of the current literature on the relevance of dendritic cells in the most common autoimmune conditions of childhood.

  18. Parallel Aspects of the Microenvironment in Cancer and Autoimmune Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahat, Michal A.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer and autoimmune diseases are fundamentally different pathological conditions. In cancer, the immune response is suppressed and unable to eradicate the transformed self-cells, while in autoimmune diseases it is hyperactivated against a self-antigen, leading to tissue injury. Yet, mechanistically, similarities in the triggering of the immune responses can be observed. In this review, we highlight some parallel aspects of the microenvironment in cancer and autoimmune diseases, especially hypoxia, and the role of macrophages, neutrophils, and their interaction. Macrophages, owing to their plastic mode of activation, can generate a pro- or antitumoral microenvironment. Similarly, in autoimmune diseases, macrophages tip the Th1/Th2 balance via various effector cytokines. The contribution of neutrophils, an additional plastic innate immune cell population, to the microenvironment and disease progression is recently gaining more prominence in both cancer and autoimmune diseases, as they can secrete cytokines, chemokines, and reactive oxygen species (ROS), as well as acquire an enhanced ability to produce neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) that are now considered important initiators of autoimmune diseases. Understanding the contribution of macrophages and neutrophils to the cancerous or autoimmune microenvironment, as well as the role their interaction and cooperation play, may help identify new targets and improve therapeutic strategies. PMID:26997761

  19.  Molecular mimicry in the etiology of autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Lis

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available  There are currently more than 80 different autoimmune diseases, affecting approximately 100 million people worldwide. The etiology of most autoimmune diseases is unknown. The highest incidence of these diseases is in the developed countries and they are more common in women than in men. Among the most often listed factors responsible for the onset of autoimmunity are genetic predisposition and the phenomenon known as molecular mimicry. The latter stems from a similarity between microbial antigens and antigens present in the human body (self antigens. It is believed that such homology is responsible for the production of auto-antibodies and in consequence attack of the immune system against host tissues and organs. However, the main molecular factors responsible for these diseases in most cases remain unknown. While pathogenesis of many autoimmune diseases indicates the presence of molecular mimicry, at the same time the similarities between the own and foreign structures do not always result in autoimmunity. Therefore, prediction of such crucial homology responsible for the development of autoimmune disease is extremely difficult. In this paper we present examples of autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes, multiple sclerosis, reactive arthritis and the potential contribution of micro-organisms to the mechanism of molecular mimicry.

  20. AIRE variations in Addison's disease and autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes (APS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøe Wolff, A S; Oftedal, B; Johansson, S; Bruland, O; Løvås, K; Meager, A; Pedersen, Carsten; Husebye, E S; Knappskog, P M

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune Addison's disease (AAD) is often associated with other components in autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes (APS). Whereas APS I is caused by mutations in the AIRE gene, the susceptibility genes for AAD and APS II are unclear. In the present study, we investigated whether polymorphisms or...

  1. Juvenile autoimmune hepatitis: Spectrum of the disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giuseppe; Maggiore; Silvia; Nastasio; Marco; Sciveres

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile autoimmune hepatitis(JAIH) is a progressive inflammatory liver disease, affecting mainly young girls, from infancy to late adolescence, characterized by active liver damage, as shown by high serum activity of aminotransferases, by elevated immunoglobulin G levels, high titers of serum non organ-specific andorgan-specific autoantibodies, and by interface hepatitis on liver biopsy. It is a multifactorial disease of unknown etiology in which environmental factors act as a trigger in genetically predisposed individuals. Two types of JAIH are identified according to the autoan-tibody panel detected at diagnosis: AIH-1, characterized by the presence of anti-smooth muscle antibody and/or antinuclear antibody and AIH-2, by anti-liver-kidney microsomal antibody type 1 and/or by the presence of anti-liver cytosol type 1 antibody. Epidemiological distribution, genetic markers, clinical presentation and pattern of serum cytokines differentiate the two types of AIH suggesting possible pathogenetic mechanisms. The most effective therapy for AIH is pharmacological suppression of the immune response. Treatment should be started as soon as the diagnosis is made to avoid severe liver damage and progression of fibrosis. The aim of this review is to outline the most significant and peculiar features of JAIH, based largely on our own personal database and on a review of current literature.

  2. Evaluation of effect of isoflavone on thyroid economy & autoimmunity in oophorectomised women: A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Mittal, Niti; Hota, Debasish; Dutta, Pinaki; Bhansali, Anil; Suri, Vanita; Aggarwal, Neelam; Marwah, R.K.; Chakrabarti, Amitava

    2011-01-01

    Background and objectives: The potential of soy isoflavones to interfere with thyroid function has been reported. However, there are limited data regarding their effect on thyroid function and autoimmunity in surgical menopausal women. The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of isoflavones on thyroid function and autoimmunity, menopausal symptoms, serum follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and estradiol levels in oophorectomised women. Methods: A randomized, double blind, placebo-control...

  3. AUTOIMMUNE DISEASE DURING PREGNANCY AND THE MICROCHIMERISM LEGACY OF PREGNANCY

    OpenAIRE

    Kristina M Adams Waldorf; Nelson, J. Lee

    2008-01-01

    Pregnancy has both short-term effects and long-term consequences. For women who have an autoimmune disease and subsequently become pregnant, pregnancy can induce amelioration of the mother’s disease, such as in rheumatoid arthritis, while exacerbating or having no effect on other autoimmune diseases like systemic lupus erythematosus. That pregnancy also leaves a long-term legacy has recently become apparent by the discovery that bi-directional cell trafficking results in persistence of fetal ...

  4. Virtual touch tissue quantification (VTQ) in the diagnosis of thyroid nodules with coexistent chronic autoimmune Hashimoto's thyroiditis: A preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Virtual Touch Tissue Quantification could provide quantitative measurements to estimate tissue stiffness noninvasively. • Severity of Hashimoto's thyroiditis could affect stiffness of extra-nodular thyroid tissue significantly. • Shear wave velocity of malignant nodules significantly higher than that of benign nodules. • Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse imaging is useful in differential diagnosis between malignant/benign thyroid nodules with HT. - Abstract: Objectives: This study aimed at detecting whether Virtual Touch Tissue Quantification (VTQ) could be applied to differentiate between benign and malignant thyroid nodules with chronic autoimmune Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT). Methods: Convenient ultrasound and Virtual Touch Tissue Quantification were performed in 118 patients with 140 thyroid nodules with histology results. The HT group consisted of 46 patients with 58 nodules. The non-HT group consisted of 72 patients with 82 nodules. Results: The stiffness of extra-nodular thyroid tissue could be significantly affected by the severity of chronic autoimmune thyroiditis. The shear wave velocity of thyroid benign nodules and malignant nodules did not significantly differ in the HT group as compared with the non-HT group (benign nodules: 2.13 ± 0.32 m/s vs 1.98 ± 0.48 m/s, P = 0.122; malignant nodules: 3.32 ± 0.77 m/s vs 3.30 ± 0.74 m/s, P = 0.894). In two groups, the shear wave velocity of malignant nodules is significantly higher than that of benign nodules (HT group: 3.32 ± 0.77 m/s vs 2.13 ± 0.32 m/s; non-HT group: 3.30 ± 0.74 m/s vs 1.98 ± 0.48 m/s, P < 0.001). The best cutoff point for shear wave velocity between malignant and benign thyroid nodules was 2.75 m/s. Conclusions: Virtual Touch Tissue Quantification technology could be performed in the differential diagnosis between malignant thyroid nodules and benign thyroid nodules independently from the coexistence of chronic autoimmune thyroiditis

  5. Virtual touch tissue quantification (VTQ) in the diagnosis of thyroid nodules with coexistent chronic autoimmune Hashimoto's thyroiditis: A preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Ruijun, E-mail: jine_nina@hotmail.com [Department of Ultrasound, Ren Ji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No.1630 Dongfang Road, Shanghai 200127 (China); Li, Fenghua, E-mail: prfenghuali@126.com [Department of Ultrasound, Ren Ji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No.1630 Dongfang Road, Shanghai 200127 (China); Wang, Yan [Department of Ultrasound, Ren Ji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No.1630 Dongfang Road, Shanghai 200127 (China); Ying, Zhiqiang, E-mail: yingzhiqiang@126.com [Departmen of Surgery, Ren Ji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No.1630 Dongfang Road, Shanghai 200127 (China); Zhang, Yun, E-mail: profzhangyun@126.com [Departmen of Surgery, Ren Ji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No.1630 Dongfang Road, Shanghai 200127 (China)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Virtual Touch Tissue Quantification could provide quantitative measurements to estimate tissue stiffness noninvasively. • Severity of Hashimoto's thyroiditis could affect stiffness of extra-nodular thyroid tissue significantly. • Shear wave velocity of malignant nodules significantly higher than that of benign nodules. • Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse imaging is useful in differential diagnosis between malignant/benign thyroid nodules with HT. - Abstract: Objectives: This study aimed at detecting whether Virtual Touch Tissue Quantification (VTQ) could be applied to differentiate between benign and malignant thyroid nodules with chronic autoimmune Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT). Methods: Convenient ultrasound and Virtual Touch Tissue Quantification were performed in 118 patients with 140 thyroid nodules with histology results. The HT group consisted of 46 patients with 58 nodules. The non-HT group consisted of 72 patients with 82 nodules. Results: The stiffness of extra-nodular thyroid tissue could be significantly affected by the severity of chronic autoimmune thyroiditis. The shear wave velocity of thyroid benign nodules and malignant nodules did not significantly differ in the HT group as compared with the non-HT group (benign nodules: 2.13 ± 0.32 m/s vs 1.98 ± 0.48 m/s, P = 0.122; malignant nodules: 3.32 ± 0.77 m/s vs 3.30 ± 0.74 m/s, P = 0.894). In two groups, the shear wave velocity of malignant nodules is significantly higher than that of benign nodules (HT group: 3.32 ± 0.77 m/s vs 2.13 ± 0.32 m/s; non-HT group: 3.30 ± 0.74 m/s vs 1.98 ± 0.48 m/s, P < 0.001). The best cutoff point for shear wave velocity between malignant and benign thyroid nodules was 2.75 m/s. Conclusions: Virtual Touch Tissue Quantification technology could be performed in the differential diagnosis between malignant thyroid nodules and benign thyroid nodules independently from the coexistence of chronic autoimmune thyroiditis.

  6. Induction of Graves' disease in patients with non-autoimmune hyperthyroidism or nontoxic goiter after radioiodine treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thyrotropin receptors antibodies may occur and induce Graves' disease (GD) several months after radioiodine therapy in a small number of patients with non-autoimmune hyperthyroidism or nontoxic goiter. The prevalence of radiation-induced GD is between 0.05% and 5%. The hypothesis of this disease includes induction by autoimmune reaction and others. Detection of the thyroid autoantibodise or of 99mTc pertechnetate scan can forecast the appearance of GD. Antithyroid drugs, again radioiodine therapy and surgery are the treatments. (authors)

  7. Prevalence of Celiac Disease in Children with Autoimmune Hepatitis and vice versa

    OpenAIRE

    Najafi, Mehri; Sadjadei, Nooshin; Eftekhari, Kambiz; Khodadad, Ahmad; Motamed, Farzaneh; Fallahi, Gholam-Hossain; Farahmand, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder in which the risk of autoimmune liver disease is high. Autoimmune hepatitis is a chronic and progressive entity and the risk of its being associated with other autoimmune disorders such as celiac disease is high also. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of celiac disease in patients with autoimmune hepatitis and vice versa. Methods: In a cross-sectional study children with autoimmune hepatitis underwent serological screenin...

  8. Identification of chosen apoptotic (TIAR and TIA-1) markers expression in thyroid tissues from adolescents with immune and non-immune thyroid diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to estimate sodium iodide symporter (NIS) and thyroid peroxidase (TPO) expression in thyrocytes from patients with GD and no-toxic multi nodular goitre (NTMG) in relationship with apoptotic (TIAR and TIA-1) markers. The investigation was performed on thyroid cells isolated from post operation thyroid tissues from 15 patients aged 12-21 years old with GD and 15 cases aged 13-21 years old with NTMG. Detection of NIS and TPO was performed by immunohistochemistry. Analysis of apoptotic markers in thyroid tissues was performed using antibodies to TIAR and TIA-1 by Western Blot and immunohistochemistry. Identification of pro apoptotic TIAR and TIA-1 molecules in the thyroid tissues revealed a higher expression of both proteins in patients with Graves' disease (+++; +, respectively) in comparison to patients with NTNG (+; 0). In addition, TIAR expression was detected in three bands [p50, p42, p38 (kDa)] and TIA-1 in two bands [p22, p17 (kDa)]. using Western Blot test in patients with thyroid autoimmune diseases. In patients with NTNG expression of both apoptotic proteins was lower and identified in single bands: 42 (kDa) for TIAR and 17 (kDa) for TIA-1. The analysis of expression of NIS and TPO in thyroid follicular cells was higher in patients with Graves' disease in compared to their detection in patients with NTMG. In addition, degree of thyroid antigen expression positive correlated with amount of pro apoptotic markers (TIAR, p<0.001; TIA-1, p<0.025 for NIS; TIAR, p<0.012 for TPO). We conclude that elevated expression of NIS and TPO in Graves' disease is associated with higher stimulation and activation of apoptosis in thyroid follicular cells during autoimmune process. (authors)

  9. T Cell Vaccination as an Immunotherapy for Autoimmune Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JingwuZhang

    2004-01-01

    Immunization with inactivated autoreactive T cells (T cell vaccination) selected from individual's own T cellrepertoire provides a unique in vivo setting for testing immune regulation that is known to involve interactionsof a variety of related surface molecules (1). It induces regulatory immune responses that closely resemble thein vivo situation where the immune system is challenged by clonal activation and expansion of given T cellpopulations in various autoimmune diseases. T cell vaccination provides a powerful means of eliciting naturalreactions of the immune system in response to clonal expansion of T cells, which can used as a therapeuticapproach to suppress or eliminate specific pathogenic autoreactive T cells in autoimmune conditions. Clinicaltrials using T cell vaccination to deplete autoreactive T cells in human autoimmune conditions have begun toreveal the pathologic relevance of various autoimmune T cell populations in the disease processes, providing aunique opportunity to test the autoimmune theories in a clinical setting. Cellular & Molecular Immunology.2004; 1(5):321-327.

  10. A study of autoimmune thyroid disorder in atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima, (3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine sequential changes in thyroid function after developing asymptomatic autoimmune thyroiditis (AAT) in A-bomb survivors, initial findings of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) test were compared with those 2 years after developing AAT (n=22) and struma (S) (n=12). According to Bastenie's classification, AAT or S patients were clinically staged into three grades. Among 17 patients who had initially had AAT I, one each developed Grade II and III two years later. Initial Grade II turned to Grade I at 2 years in 2 of 4 AAT patients and in 2 of 3 S patients. In both the AAT and S groups, Grade III remained unchanged two years later. There was no significant change in basal or peak thyroid stimulating hormone level between patients with Grade I and those with Grade II or III in both the AAT and S groups. There were no sequential changes in total and free T4, total and free T3, total cholesterol, triglyceride, and lactic dehydrogenase. The TRH test is unlikely to reflect the development of hypothyroidism. (N.K.)

  11. DNA methylation perspectives in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bao; Hu, Lei; Luo, Zhi-Ying; Chen, Xiao-Ping; Zhou, Hong-Hao; Zhang, Wei

    2016-03-01

    DNA methylation is now widely recognized as being critical to maintain the function of immune cells. Recent studies suggest that aberrant DNA methylation levels not only can result in immune cells autoreactivity in vitro, but also are related to autoimmunity in vivo. Environmental factors and genetic polymorphisms cause abnormal methylation, which affects the expression of certain immune-related genes, being becoming hot spot of explaining the mechanism of autoimmune diseases. This paper reviews the importance of abnormal methylation during the development of common autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes, aiming at a better understanding of the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases and providing new ideas for the treatment of these diseases. PMID:26821302

  12. Autoimmune thyroiditis presenting as interstitial granulomatous dermatitis Dermatite intersticial granulomatosa como apresentação de tireoidite autoimune

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Antunes

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A 54-year-old female presented with recurrent, widespread, erythematous, painful plaques, over a 3-month period. Skin biopsy was compatible with interstitial granulomatous dermatitis. Additional investigation revealed hypothyroidism and positive anti-thyroid antibodies. Normalization of thyroid function and high-potency topical corticosteroids provided only transitory improvement of the dermatosis. Interstitial granulomatous dermatitis is a histologic inflammatory reaction, with variable cutaneous expression. It has been reported in association with several drugs, lymphoproliferative diseases and autoimmune disorders, such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and vasculitis, but association with autoimmune thyroiditis is rare. Optimal therapy for this condition is yet to be established, but topical corticosteroids have been a mainstay of treatment. In most cases, this disease is characterized by flares and remissions.Uma doente de 54 anos foi avaliada por placas eritematosas, dolorosas, disseminadas, recorrentes, com 3 meses de evolução. A biopsia cutânea foi compatível com dermatite intersticial granulomatosa. Os restantes exames laboratoriais revelaram hipotiroidismo e anticorpos anti-tiroideus positivos. Apesar da normalização da função tiroideia e de tratamento com corticóide tópico de alta potência, a dermatose melhorou apenas parcialmente. Dermatite intersticial inflamatória é um diagnóstico histopatológico, com expressão clínica variável. Tem sido associada a vários fármacos, doenças linfoproliferativas e autoimunes, nomeadamente artrite reumatóide, lupus eritematoso sistémico e vasculites, mas a associação com tireoidite autoimune é rara. Até ao momento, não foi definido nenhum tratamento específico, mas os corticóides tópicos são dos fármacos mais utilizados. A doença caracteriza-se por períodos de agravamento e remissão.

  13. The Effects of Alpha Interferon on the Development of Autoimmune Thyroiditis in the NOD H2h4 Mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yael Oppenheim

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Alpha interferon (αIFN therapy is known to induce thyroid autoimmunity in up to 40% of patients. The mechanism is unknown, but Th1 switching has been hypothesized. The aim of our study was to examine whether αIFN accelerated the development of thyroiditis in genetically susceptible mice. We took advantage of NOD-H2h4, a genetically susceptible animal model, which develops thyroiditis when fed a high iodine diet. Six to eight week old male NOD H2h4 mice were injected with mouse αIFN (200 units or with saline three times a week for 8 weeks. All mice drank iodinated water (0.15%. Mice were sacrificed after 8 weeks of injection. Their thyroids were examined for histology and blood was tested for antithyroglobulin antibody levels. T4 and glucose levels were also assessed. In the IFN-injected group, 6/13 (46.2% developed thyroiditis and/or thyroid antibodies while in the saline-injected group, only 4/13 (30.8% developed thyroiditis and/or thyroid antibodies (p=0.4. The grade of thyroiditis was not different amongst the two groups. None of the mice developed clinical thyroiditis or diabetes mellitus. Our results showed that αIFN treatment did not accelerate thyroiditis in this mouse model. This may imply that αIFN induces thyroiditis in a non-genetically dependent manner, and this would not be detected in a genetically susceptible mouse model if the effect were small. Alternatively, it is possible that αIFN did not induce thyroiditis in mice because, unlike in humans, in mice αIFN does not induce Th1 switching.

  14. Autoimmune diseases and severe infections as risk factors for schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benros, Michael E; Nielsen, Philip R; Nordentoft, Merete;

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases have been associated with an increased risk of schizophrenia. It has been suggested that brain-reactive autoantibodies are part of the mechanisms behind this association. Furthermore, an increased permeability of the blood-brain barrier has been observed during periods of...... infection and inflammation. The authors therefore investigated whether autoimmune diseases combined with exposures to severe infections may increase the risk of schizophrenia...

  15. Autoimmune diseases in pregnancy: maternal and fetal outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Pavithra M. Vengetesh; Shripad Hebbar; Lavanya Rai

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to assess the impact of autoimmune connective tissue disorders on the outcomes of pregnancy and the influence of treatment on pregnancy. Methods: Thirty-seven antenatal patients with autoimmune connective tissue diseases, comprising of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE), primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS), Mixed Connective Tissue Diseases (MCTD), ankylosing spondylitis and Takayasu arteritis were analysed. Results: Multigravidas con...

  16. Achalasia in a Patient with Polyglandular Autoimmune Syndrome Type II

    OpenAIRE

    Amr, Bashar S.; Mamillapalli, Chaitanya

    2015-01-01

    Achalasia is a rare disease characterized by aperistalsis of the esophageal body and failure of the lower esophageal sphincter to relax. The etiology of this disease remains unknown. Polyglandular autoimmune syndrome type II is a well-identified disease characterized by the occurrence of autoimmune Addison's disease in combination with autoimmune thyroid disease and/or type 1 diabetes mellitus. We report a case that suggests autoimmunity and immunogenicity as a probable contributing factor fo...

  17. The clinical features of 17 patients with steroid-responsive encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroiditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Hai

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the onset pattern, clinical manifestations, laboratory findings and imaging features of 17 Chinese patients with steroid-responsive encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroiditis (SREAT. Methods The clinical data of 17 SREAT patients were collected. Retrospective analysis of their clinical features, as well as their serum levels of anti-thyroid, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF biochemical indicators, MRI and therapy was performed. Results The initial symptoms of those patients were seizures (4 cases, psychiatric symptoms (4 cases, hypomnesis (4 cases, walking unsteadiness (2 cases, headache (2 cases and dysarthria (1 case. Three cases were acute onset, 5 cases subacute onset and 9 cases chronic onset. The anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody (anti-TPO of 17 cases were significantly increased, average (928.63 ± 406.28 × 10 3 IU/L. The anti?thyroglobulin antibody (anti-TG of 15 cases was increased, average (601.27 ± 1014.12 × 10 3 IU/L. The protein in CSF was mildly increased, average (513.75 ± 283.15 mg/L. The EEG of 5 patients presented slow wave and the EEG of 2 patients showed epileptiform discharge. The brain MRI of 11 patients showed multifocal lesions in frontal lobe, temporal lobe, parietal lobe, basal ganglia, centrum ovale, corpus callosum, thalamus, cerebellum, and brain stem. The findings of clinical immunological index and tumor markers were normal. Besides, the prognosis of 11 patients treated with methylprednisolone and 3 patients treated with dexamethasone were good. Recurrence occurred in 2 patients. Conclusion Basically, the clinical features of Chinese SREAT patients present seizures, hypomnesis and psychiatric symptoms associated with increased anti-thyroid and multifocal lesions in gray and white matter of brain.

  18. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Wei; Feng, Xuebing; Li, Xia; Wang, Dandan; Sun, Lingyun

    2016-05-01

    Autoimmune disorders are a complicated and varied group of diseases arising from inappropriate immune responses. Recent studies have demonstrated that ongoing inflammatory and immune responses are associated with increased oxygen consumption, a process resulting in localized tissue hypoxia within inflammatory lesions ("inflammatory hypoxia"), in which hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1), an oxygen-sensitive transcription factor that allows adaptation to hypoxia environments, has been shown to play an important function. HIF-1 is a regulator of angiogenesis and immune system. Besides, HIF-1-mediated metabolic shift and fibrosis may also play crucial roles in some autoimmune disorders. Firstly, we briefly summarize the role of HIF-1 in angiogenesis, immune responses and fibrosis. Secondly, we will show the major recent findings demonstrating a role for HIF-1 signaling in autoimmune disorders, including rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, psoriasis, systemic sclerosis and multiple sclerosis. The growing evidences may prompt HIF-1 to be a new target for treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:27071377

  19. Pregnancy and the risk of autoimmune disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Khashan, Ali S

    2012-01-31

    Autoimmune diseases (AID) predominantly affect women of reproductive age. While basic molecular studies have implicated persisting fetal cells in the mother in some AID, supportive epidemiological evidence is limited. We investigated the effect of vaginal delivery, caesarean section (CS) and induced abortion on the risk of subsequent maternal AID. Using the Danish Civil Registration System (CRS) we identified women who were born between 1960 and 1992. We performed data linkage between the CRS other Danish national registers to identify women who had a pregnancy and those who developed AID. Women were categorised into 4 groups; nulligravida (control group), women who had 1st child by vaginal delivery, whose 1st delivery was by CS and who had abortions. Log-linear Poisson regression with person-years was used for data analysis adjusting for several potential confounders. There were 1,035,639 women aged >14 years and 25,570 developed AID: 43.4% nulligravida, 44.3% had their first pregnancy delivered vaginally, 7.6% CS and 4.1% abortions. The risk of AID was significantly higher in the 1st year after vaginal delivery (RR = 1.1[1.0, 1.2]) and CS (RR = 1.3[1.1, 1.5]) but significantly lower in the 1st year following abortion (RR = 0.7[0.6, 0.9]). These results suggest an association between pregnancy and the risk of subsequent maternal AID. Increased risks of AID after CS may be explained by amplified fetal cell traffic at delivery, while decreased risks after abortion may be due to the transfer of more primitive fetal stem cells. The increased risk of AID in the first year after delivery may also be related to greater testing during pregnancy.

  20. Pregnancy and the risk of autoimmune disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali S Khashan

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases (AID predominantly affect women of reproductive age. While basic molecular studies have implicated persisting fetal cells in the mother in some AID, supportive epidemiological evidence is limited. We investigated the effect of vaginal delivery, caesarean section (CS and induced abortion on the risk of subsequent maternal AID. Using the Danish Civil Registration System (CRS we identified women who were born between 1960 and 1992. We performed data linkage between the CRS other Danish national registers to identify women who had a pregnancy and those who developed AID. Women were categorised into 4 groups; nulligravida (control group, women who had 1st child by vaginal delivery, whose 1st delivery was by CS and who had abortions. Log-linear Poisson regression with person-years was used for data analysis adjusting for several potential confounders. There were 1,035,639 women aged >14 years and 25,570 developed AID: 43.4% nulligravida, 44.3% had their first pregnancy delivered vaginally, 7.6% CS and 4.1% abortions. The risk of AID was significantly higher in the 1st year after vaginal delivery (RR = 1.1[1.0, 1.2] and CS (RR = 1.3[1.1, 1.5] but significantly lower in the 1st year following abortion (RR = 0.7[0.6, 0.9]. These results suggest an association between pregnancy and the risk of subsequent maternal AID. Increased risks of AID after CS may be explained by amplified fetal cell traffic at delivery, while decreased risks after abortion may be due to the transfer of more primitive fetal stem cells. The increased risk of AID in the first year after delivery may also be related to greater testing during pregnancy.

  1. Self-reactive CD4+ T cells and B cells in the blood in health and autoimmune disease: increased frequency of thyroglobulin-reactive cells in Graves' disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus H; Moeller, Ane Christine; Hegedüs, Laszlo;

    2006-01-01

    with autoimmune thyroiditis. In Hashimoto's thyroiditis, B cells bound increased amounts of thyroglobulin in a complement- and autoantibody-dependent manner, and the thyroglobulin-elicited proliferation of CD4(+) T cells and B cells was complement dependent. Increased proportions of Tg-responsive CD4......(+) T cells and B cells were found in patients with Graves' disease. Notably, both patient groups and healthy controls exhibited higher proliferative responses to thyroglobulin than to a foreign recall antigen, tetanus toxoid. Our results suggest that self-tolerance can be broken by exposure of...... circulating lymphocytes to high local concentrations of self-antigen, and that complement plays a role in the maintenance of autoimmune processes, at least in Hashimoto's thyroiditis....

  2. 儿童白癜风与甲状腺功能指标异常及其他免疫性疾病的关系%Abnormality of parameters of thyroid function and incidence of autoimmune diseases in children with vitiligo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨芸; 骆肖群; 傅雯雯

    2009-01-01

    目的 探讨儿童白癜风与甲状腺功能指标异常及其他免疫性疾病的关系.方法 对363例白癜风儿童(男198例,女165例)和93例对照儿童(男55例,女38例)进行甲状腺功能指标的检查.结果 363例白癜风儿童中有43例(11.8%)儿童有不同程度的甲状腺功能指标的异常,93例对照组正常儿童中有4例儿童甲状腺功能指标异常,两者比较差异有统计学意义.白癜风儿童甲状腺功能指标异常发生率明显增高(P<0.05).而43例甲状腺功能异常的白癜风儿童中,寻常型白癜风儿童为39例(13.6%),节段型白癜风儿童为4例(5.3%),寻常型比节段型白癜风儿童甲状腺功能指标异常发生率有明显增高(P<0.05).结论 儿童寻常型白癜风患者的甲状腺功能指标异常的发生率明显增高.%Objective To investigate the abnormality of parameters of thyroid function and incidence of autoimmune diseases in children with vitiligo.Methods A total of 363 children with vitiligo,including 198 males and 165 females were recruited into this study together with 93 normal human controls(55 males and 38 females).The serum levels of free tetraiodothyronine,free triiodothyronine,thyroid stimulating hormone,antithyroperoxidase antibody and thyroglobulin antibody were determined by chemiluminescent immunoassay in these subiects.Results The abnormality of parameters of thyroid function was observed in 43 out of 363(11.8%)patients affected by vitiligo and in 4 out of 93(4.3%)normal human controls;a significant difference was observed between the two groups (P<0.05).Of the 43 patients wim abnormality of parameters of thyroid function,39 were diagnosed as vitiligo vulgaris,4 as segmental vitiligo.A significant increase Was observed in the incidence of abnormality of parameters of thyroid function in patients with vitiligo vulgaris compared with those with segmental vitiligo(P<0.05).Conclusion There is an increase in tbe abnormality of parameters of thyroid

  3. Immunogenetics of autoimmune diseases in Asian Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehra, N K; Kaur, Gurvinder; Kanga, Uma; Tandon, Nikhil

    2002-04-01

    The HLA class II molecules play a critical role in the processing and presentation of specific peptides derived from autoantigens of pancreatic beta cells or gluten for T cell scrutiny in IDDM and CD. In the present study, extended DR3-positive haplotypes associated with autoimmunity in northern Indian patients have been reported. The haplotype A26-B8-DR3 was the most common autoimmunity-favoring haplotype encountered among these patients. This association is, indeed, unique to Indian autoimmune patients, as it replaces the otherwise most commonly associated Caucasian haplotype A1-B8-DR3 (AH8.1) in this population. Further, CD patients revealed 100% association with DQB1*0201 along with DQA*0501 (97%) either in cis or trans configuration. PMID:12021136

  4. Thyroid Disease and Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Donate Thyroid Disease and Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) WHAT IS A THYROID NODULE? The term ... type of evaluation. WHAT IS COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE (CAM)? Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) is defined ...

  5. The role of octreoscan in thyroid eye disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krassas, G E; Kahaly, G J

    1999-05-01

    Until recently there was no imaging technique available which could demonstrate pathological changes in orbital tissues and could be regarded as a reliable measure of inflammation in thyroid eye disease (TED). Pentetreotide (a synthetic derivative of somatostatin) labelled with 111In has been used to localize tumours which possess surface or membrane receptors for somatostatin in vivo using a gamma camera (1). This technique visualizes somatostatin receptors in endocrine-related tumours in vivo and predicts the inhibitory effect of the somatostatin analogue octreotide on hormone secretion by the tumours (1). By applying 111In-DTPA-d-Phe octreotide scintigraphy (octreoscan), accumulation of the radionuclide was also detected in both the thyroid and orbit of patients with Graves' disease (2-4). If peak activity in the orbit 5h after injection of radiolabelled octreotide is set at 100%, a decrease to 40+/-4% is found at 24h, significantly different from the decrease in blood pool radioactivity, which is 15+/-4% at 24h. Accumulation of the radionuclide is most probably due to the presence in the orbital tissue of activated lymphocytes bearing somatostatin receptors (5). Alternative explanations are binding to receptors on other cell types (e.g. myoblasts, fibroblasts or endothelial cells) or local blood pooling due to venous stasis by the autoimmune orbital inflammation. PMID:10229898

  6. Autoimmune disease: A role for new anti-viral therapies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyfus, David H

    2011-12-01

    Many chronic human diseases may have an underlying autoimmune mechanism. In this review, the author presents a case of autoimmune CIU (chronic idiopathic urticaria) in stable remission after therapy with a retroviral integrase inhibitor, raltegravir (Isentress). Previous reports located using the search terms "autoimmunity" and "anti-viral" and related topics in the pubmed data-base are reviewed suggesting that novel anti-viral agents such as retroviral integrase inhibitors, gene silencing therapies and eventually vaccines may provide new options for anti-viral therapy of autoimmune diseases. Cited epidemiologic and experimental evidence suggests that increased replication of epigenomic viral pathogens such as Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) in chronic human autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus Erythematosus (SLE), and multiple sclerosis (MS) may activate endogenous human retroviruses (HERV) as a pathologic mechanism. Memory B cells are the reservoir of infection of EBV and also express endogenous retroviruses, thus depletion of memory b-lymphocytes by monoclonal antibodies (Rituximab) may have therapeutic anti-viral effects in addition to effects on B-lymphocyte presentation of both EBV and HERV superantigens. Other novel anti-viral therapies of chronic autoimmune diseases, such as retroviral integrase inhibitors, could be effective, although not without risk. PMID:21871974

  7. Cytokines and Cytokine Profiles in Human Autoimmune Diseases and Animal Models of Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manfred Kunz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The precise pathomechanisms of human autoimmune diseases are still poorly understood. However, a deepened understanding of these is urgently needed to improve disease prevention and early detection and guide more specific treatment approaches. In recent years, many new genes and signalling pathways involved in autoimmunity with often overlapping patterns between different disease entities have been detected. Major contributions were made by experiments using DNA microarray technology, which has been used for the analysis of gene expression patterns in chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, among which were rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, psoriasis, systemic sclerosis, multiple sclerosis, and type-1 diabetes. In systemic lupus erythematosus, a so-called interferon signature has been identified. In psoriasis, researchers found a particular immune signalling cluster. Moreover the identification of a new subset of inflammatory T cells, so-called Th17 T cells, secreting interleukin (IL-17 as one of their major cytokines and the identification of the IL-23/IL-17 axis of inflammation regulation, have significantly improved our understanding of autoimmune diseases. Since a plethora of new treatment approaches using antibodies or small molecule inhibitors specifically targeting cytokines, cellular receptors, or signalling mechanisms has emerged in recent years, more individualized treatment for affected patients may be within reach in the future.

  8. Association between thyroid function and gallstone disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Henry V(o)lzke; Daniel M Robinson; Ulrich John

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate those associations using data of the population-based Study of Health in Pomerania.METHODS: A study population of 3 749 residents aged 20-79 years without previously diagnosed thyroid disease was available for analyses. Serum TSH was used to assess thyroid function. Cholelithiasis was defined by either a prior history of cholecystectomy or the presence of gallstones on ultrasound. Logistic regression was performed to analyze independent associations between thyroid function and cholelithiasis.RESULTS: There were 385 persons (10.3%) with low (<0.3 mIU/L), 3 321 persons (88.6%) with normal and 43 persons (1.2%) with high serum TSH levels (>3 mIU/L).The proportion of cholelithiasis among males and females was 14.4% and 25.3%, respectively. Among males, there was an independent relation between high serum TSH and cholelithiasis (OR 3.77; 95%-CI 1.06-13.41; ,P<0.05). zAlso among males, there was a tendency towards an elevated risk of cholelithiasis in persons with low serum TSH (OR 1.40; 95%-CI 0.96-2.02; P = 0.07). In the female population, no such relation was identified.CONCLUSION: There is an association between thyroid and gallstone disease with a gender-specific relation between hypothyroidism and cholelithiasis.

  9. Antilipide antibodies cofactor in syphilis, Lyme borreliosis and autoimmune diseases

    OpenAIRE

    B Voicechovskaya; J Zabek

    2003-01-01

    Objective. To study (32 glycoprotein 1 contribution to frequency of aCL in pts with autoimmune and some infectious diseases. Methods. Antibodies to different phospholipids were tested by immune-enzyme method (IEM) in serum of 92 pts: 20 of them had systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 15 Sjogren’s disease (SD), 20 rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 20 syphilis and 17 Lyme disease (LD). Pts with syphilis and LD did not have clinical signs of autoimmune disease. Stimulation of aCL test in IEM was perfor...

  10. The role of melatonin in autoimmune and atopic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.R. Calvo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin is the main secretory product synthesized and secreted by the pineal gland during the night. Melatonin is a pleitropic molecule with a wide distribution within phylogenetically distant organisms and has a great functional versatility, including the regulation of circadian and seasonal rhythms and antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. It also possesses the capacity to modulate immune responses by regulation of the TH1/TH2 balance and cytokine production. Immune system eradicates infecting organisms without serious injury to host tissues, but sometimes these responses are inadequately controlled, giving rise to called hypersensitivity diseases, or inappropriately targeted to host tissues, causing the autoimmune diseases. In clinical medicine, the hypersensitivity diseases include the allergic or atopic diseases and the hallmarks of these diseases are the activation of TH2 cells and the production of IgE antibody. Regarding autoimmunity, at the present time we know that the key events in the development of autoimmunity are a failure or breakdown of the mechanisms normally responsible for maintaining self-tolerance in B lymphocytes, T lymphocytes, or both, the recognition of self-antigens by autoreactive lymphocytes, the activation of these cells to proliferate and differentiate into effector cells, and the tissue injury caused by the effector cells and their products. Melatonin treatment has been investigated in atopic diseases, in several animal models of autoimmune diseases, and has been also evaluated in clinical autoimmune diseases. This review summarizes the role of melatonin in atopic diseases (atopic dermatitis and asthma and in several autoimmune diseases, such as arthritis rheumatoid, multiple sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, type 1 diabetes mellitus, and inflammatory bowel diseases.

  11. Is Tourette's syndrome an autoimmune disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, PJ; Kallenberg, CGM; Korf, J; Minderaa, RB

    2002-01-01

    We provide a review of recent research findings which support the involvement of autoimmunity in childhood-onset tic disorders, in particular the presence of antineuronal autoantibodies, D8/17 B lymphocyte overexpression, a marker of chorea associated with streptococcal infection, and possible benef

  12. Bioluminescence in vivo imaging of autoimmune encephalomyelitis predicts disease

    OpenAIRE

    Steinman Lawrence; Ho Peggy; Luo Jian; Wyss-Coray Tony

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis is a widely used animal model to understand not only multiple sclerosis but also basic principles of immunity. The disease is scored typically by observing signs of paralysis, which do not always correspond with pathological changes. Methods Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis was induced in transgenic mice expressing an injury responsive luciferase reporter in astrocytes (GFAP-luc). Bioluminescence in the brain and spinal co...

  13. Type 1 diabetes associated autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahaly, George J; Hansen, Martin P

    2016-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus is increasing in prevalence worldwide. The economic costs are considerable given the cardiovascular complications and co-morbidities that it may entail. Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by the loss of insulin-producing pancreatic β-cells. The pathogenesis of T1D is complex and multifactorial and involves a genetic susceptibility that predisposes to abnormal immune responses in the presence of ill-defined environmental insults to the pancreatic islets. Genetic background may affect the risk for autoimmune disease and patients with T1D exhibit an increased risk of other autoimmune disorders such as autoimmune thyroid disease, Addison's disease, autoimmune gastritis, coeliac disease and vitiligo. Approximately 20%-25% of patients with T1D have thyroid antibodies, and up to 50% of such patients progress to clinical autoimmune thyroid disease. Approximately 0.5% of diabetic patients have concomitant Addison's disease and 4% have coeliac disease. The prevalence of autoimmune gastritis and pernicious anemia is 5% to 10% and 2.6% to 4%, respectively. Early detection of antibodies and latent organ-specific dysfunction is advocated to alert physicians to take appropriate action in order to prevent full-blown disease. Patients and family members should be educated to be able to recognize signs and symptoms of underlying disease. PMID:26903475

  14. Disease: H00081 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ria R. Autoimmune thyroid disease: new models of cell death in autoimmunity. Nat ...hyroid autoimmune disease in animal models. Thyroid 11:427-36 (2001) PMID:15135604 (autoantigen) Scofield RH. Autoantibodies as predictors of disease. Lancet 363:1544-6 (2004) ...

  15. Is Tourette's syndrome an autoimmune disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekstra, P J; Kallenberg, C G M; Korf, J; Minderaa, R B

    2002-01-01

    We provide a review of recent research findings which support the involvement of autoimmunity in childhood-onset tic disorders, in particular the presence of antineuronal autoantibodies, D8/17 B lymphocyte overexpression, a marker of chorea associated with streptococcal infection, and possible beneficial effects of immunomodulatory intervention. One of the most controversial areas in this field is the validity of the proposed PANDAS concept. Some researchers have delineated a putatively unique subgroup of patients, from the spectrum of illness encompassing Tourette's syndrome and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), whose tics and obsessive-compulsive symptoms are shown to arise in response to beta-hemolytic streptococcal infections. They designated it by the term pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS). Herein we additionally present pros and cons concerning the concept of PANDAS. Finally, recommendations for future research directions are given. PMID:12082557

  16. Interferon Type I Driven Immune Activation in Generalized Autoimmune Diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Z. Brkić (Zana)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis describes research performed on several generalized autoimmune diseases with the main focus on primary Sjögren’s syndrome. Interferon type I has been implicated in the pathogenesis of these diseases and will be introduced in this chapter together with other important immune f

  17. Collection of hematopoietic stem cells from patients with autoimmune diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burt, RK; Fassas, A; Snowden, JA; Kozak, T; Wulffraat, NM; Nash, RA; Dunbar, CE; Arnold, R; Prentice, G; Bingham, S; Marmont, AM; McSweeney, PA; van Laar, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    We reviewed data from 24 transplant centers in Asia, Australia, Europe, and North America to determine the outcomes of stem cell collection including methods used, cell yields, effects on disease activity, and complications in patients with autoimmune diseases. Twenty-one unprimed bone marrow harves

  18. DNA-abzymes in autoimmune diseases in clinic and experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T E Naumova

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA-abzymes enzymes in autoimmune diseases in clinic and experiment T.E. Naumova, O.M. Durova, A.G. Gabibov, Z.S. Alekberova, S. V. Suchkov DNA-hydrolyzing autoantibodies (AAB or DNA-abzymes can be found in autoimmune diseases in clinic and experiment. Technology of serum express screening for presence of DNA abzymes is described. Comparative study of DNA-hydrolising activity in patients with different forms of systemic and organ-specific autoimmune diseases was performed. Blood of clinically healthy donors was usually free of IgG DNA-abzymes. DNA-abzymes were most often revealed in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and rheumatoid arthritis (RA less often in patients with organ-specific forms of autoimmune disturbances. The results of the study confirm the hypothesis of autoimmune origin of IgG DNA abzymes and demonstrate the possibility to use them in clinical practice for monitoring to disease activity in SLE and RA.

  19. Autoimmune Disease in First-Degree Relatives and Spouses of Individuals With Celiac Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emilsson, Louise; Wijmenga, Cisca; Murray, Joseph A.; Ludvigsson, Jonas F.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: First-degree relatives of individuals with celiac disease are at increased risk for this disorder, but little is known about their risk for other autoimmune diseases. We assessed the risk of nonceliac autoimmune disease in first-degree relatives and spouses of people with celiac d

  20. Thyroid scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PET scan Skin nodules Thyroid cancer Thyroid cancer - medullary carcinoma Thyroid cancer - papillary carcinoma Toxic nodular goiter ... Topics Hyperthyroidism Hypothyroidism Nuclear Scans Thyroid Cancer Thyroid Diseases Thyroid Tests Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A. ...

  1. In vivo evidence for CD4+ and CD8+ suppressor T cells in vaccination-induced suppression of murine experimental autoimmune thyroiditis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In several experimental autoimmune diseases, including experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT), vaccination with attenuated autoantigen-specific T cells has provided protection against subsequent induction of disease. However, the mechanism(s) of vaccination-induced suppression remains to be clarified. Since the authors have previously shown that suppression generated by pretreatment with mouse thyroglobulin (MTg) or thyroid-stimulating hormone in EAT is mediated by CD4+, not CD8+, suppressor T cells, they examined the role of T cell subsets in vaccination-induced suppression of EAT. Mice were vaccinated with irradiated, MTg-primed, and MTg-activated spleen cells and then challenged. Pretreatment with these cells suppressed EAT induced by immunization with MTg and adjuvant, but not by adoptive transfer of thyroiditogenic cells, suggesting a mechanism of afferent suppression. The activation of suppressor mechanisms did not require CD8+ cells, since mice depleted of CD8+ cells before vaccination showed reduced EAT comparable to control vaccinated mice. Furthermore, depletion of either the CD4+ or the CD8+ subset after vaccination did not significantly abrogate suppression. However, suppression was eliminated by the depletion of both CD4+ and CD8+ cells in vaccinated mice. These results provide evidence for the cooperative effects of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in vaccination-induced suppression of EAT

  2. Review on thymoma and thymoma-associated autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue-min LI

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Thymic carcinomas are tumors of the anterior mediastinum derived from the epithelial cells of the thymus gland. Malignancies linked to thymoma lead to the loss of self-tolerance leading to autoimmune diseases, including myasthenia gravis, pure red cell aplastic anemia, systemic lupus erythematosus and pemphigus etc. In recent years, three main mechanisms have been proposed to elucidate these interactions, such as immature T cell theory, tumor-gene theory and the combination mechanism of cellular and humoral immunity. In fact, the resection of the thymoma is beneficial to many patients of thymoma related autoimmune diseases. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2014.08.16

  3. Allergen-specific immunotherapy and risk of autoimmune disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linneberg, Allan; Madsen, Flemming; Skaaby, Tea

    2012-01-01

    After 100 years of experience with allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT), an issue that is still unresolved is whether SIT can act as a trigger of, or as a risk factor for, autoimmune disease. We searched the literature for evidence on this topic.......After 100 years of experience with allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT), an issue that is still unresolved is whether SIT can act as a trigger of, or as a risk factor for, autoimmune disease. We searched the literature for evidence on this topic....

  4. [Polyglandular autoimmune syndromes : An overview].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komminoth, P

    2016-05-01

    Polyglandular autoimmune syndromes (PGAS), also known as autoimmune polyendocrinopathy syndromes (APS), are a heterogeneous group of rare, genetically caused diseases of the immune system which lead to inflammatory damage of various endocrine glands resulting in malfunctions. In addition, autoimmune diseases of non-endocrine organs may also be found. Early diagnosis of PGAS is often overlooked because of heterogeneous symptoms and the progressive occurrence of the individual diseases. The two most important forms of PGAS are the juvenile and adult types. The juvenile type (PGAS type 1) is caused by mutations in the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene on chromosome 21, exhibits geographic variations in incidence and is defined by the combination of mucocutaneous candidiasis, Addison's disease and hypoparathyroidism. In addition, autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) syndrome and other autoimmune diseases can also occur. The adult form of PGAS (PGAS type 2) is a multigenetic disorder associated with some HLA haplotypes, is more common than the juvenile type, shows female predominance and exhibits the combination of type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroid disease, Addison's disease and other autoimmune disorders. The histological alterations in affected organs of PGAS patients are similar to findings in sporadically occurring autoimmune diseases of these organs but there are no pathognomic fine tissue findings. If patients exhibit autoimmune changes in two different endocrine glands or if there are indications of several autoimmune disorders from the patient history, it is important to consider PGAS and inform the clinicians of this suspicion. PMID:27099223

  5. Diagnostics, therapy and ecology of thyroid diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topical problems concerning diagnostics, therapy and ecology of thyroid diseases were discussed on an international level at this symposium. As the problems are mostly medical in nature, the symposium started with papers on the anatomy, physiology, and pathology of the thyroid, followed by lectures on dose calculation and dose/effect relationships. Particular attention is paid to the distinction between external radiation exposure and incorporation of radioactive materials, especially iodine. Another section of the symposium was dedicated to the establishment of radiation hazards. The symposium ended with a discussion of the value of diagnostic and therapeutical procedures. The extensive discussions between experts from different nations and different fields of science have surely helped to deepen the knowledge on radiation effects. (orig./MG)

  6. Punction methods of diagnostics and treatment of thyroid diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S. Tolstokorov

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The object of this research is to study the punction methods role under diagnostics and treatment of different thyroid diseases. The authors of this article present treatment methods of 121 patients with different thyroid diseases. The received results allow to draw a conclusion, that punction methods of diagnostics and treatment of thyroid disease can be used as independent methods of treatment and in a complex with other medication remedies

  7. In-vivo treatment with 5-azacytidine causes degeneration of central lymphatic organs and induces autoimmune disease in the chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauenstein, K.; Csordas, A.; Krömer, G.; Dietrich, H.; Wick, G.

    1991-01-01

    In-vitro evidence suggests that DNA methylation may be involved in the development of forbidden immune responses that can result in autoimmune disease. In the present study we examined in-vivo effects of 5-azacytidine (5-azaC), a substance that inhibits DNA methylation, on the immune system and the occurrence of a spontaneous autoimmune disease in the chicken model. We found that (1) treatment of young normal chickens with 1.0 mg/kg 5-azaC on 7 consecutive days caused a rapid degeneration of the central lymphoid organs thymus and bursa; (2) this regimen with 5-azaC apparently inhibited B cell maturation, as the frequency of cytoplasmic Ig+ plasma cells in the bone marrow was found to be significantly reduced, whereas the total number of bone marrow cells was unchanged; and (3) a chronic low-dose (0.5 and 1.0 mg/kg) application of 5-azaC through 6 weeks was found to significantly enhance the spontaneous autoimmune thyroiditis in newly hatched chickens of the Cornell C strain, as determined by anti-thyroglobulin autoantibody titres and histological analysis of thyroid gland infiltration. The possible implications of these data for the generation of pathogenic autoimmune responses are discussed. Images Fig. 1 PMID:1726865

  8. Idiopathic Granulomatous Mastitis: An Autoimmune Disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Altintoprak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This study aimed to investigate the autoimmune basis of idiopathic granulomatous mastitis (IGM by determining the anti-nuclear antibody (ANA and extractable nuclear antigen (ENA levels of patients diagnosed with IGM. Material and Methods. Twenty-six IGM patients were evaluated. Serum samples were analyzed for autoantibodies by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF using a substrate kit that induced fluorescein-conjugated goat antibodies to human immunoglobulin G (IgG. IIF patterns were read at serum dilutions of 1 : 40 and 1 : 100 for ANA positivity. Using the immunoblot technique, the sera of patients were assayed at dilutions of 1 : 40 and 1 : 100 for human autoantibodies of the IgG class to 15 lines of highly purified ENAs. Results. In the IIF studies for ANA, positivity was identified for four different patterns in the 1 : 40 diluted preparations, for three different patients in the 1 : 100 diluted preparations and only one pattern was identified at the 1 : 320 dilution. In the ENA studies, positivity was identified for four different pattern in the 1 : 40 dilution, and only one pattern was identified at the 1 : 100 dilution. Conclusion. This study was not able to support the eventual existence of an autoimmune basis for IGM.

  9. Explanation of diagnostic criteria for radiation thyroid diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    National occupational health standard-Diagnostic Criteria for Radiation Thyroid Diseases has been approved and issued by the Ministry of Health. Based on the extensive research of literature, this standard was enacted according to the relevant laws and regulations. It is mainly used for diagnosis of thyroid diseases caused by occupational radiation, and it also can serve as a guide to diagnose thyroid disease induced by medical radiation. To implement this standard, and to diagnose and treat the radiation thyroid diseases patient correctly and timely, the contents of this standard were interpreted in this article. (authors)

  10. Clinical aspects of indirect immunofluorescence for autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanadan, Alireza; Saghazadeh, Amene; Jahanzad, Issa; Rezaei, Nima

    2015-05-01

    Because the most common term used in conversations considering autoimmunity is autoantibodies, it is well-expected that the indirect immunofluorescence assay, which detects antibodies directed against various antigens, is one of our most impressive techniques for investigating autoimmune diseases (AIDs). Roughly speaking, the current literature corroborates that this immunopathologic investigation means that autoantibodies detection makes a considerable contribution to both diagnostic and prognostic aspects of AIDs in the clinical setting. However, it varies between different AIDs, autoantibodies, ethnicities or detection methodologies. Directly focusing on the indirect immunofluorescence assay, we present evidence to support this multidimensional variation regarding the subject via reviewing briefly the best-investigated autoantibodies in the well-documented AIDs, including vasculitis, inflammatory bowel disease, scleroderma, autoimmune hepatitis, primary biliary cirrhosis, systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjögren's syndrome. PMID:25786676

  11. HLA-G Molecules in Autoimmune Diseases and Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Roberta; Bortolotti, Daria; Bolzani, Silvia; Fainardi, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G molecule, a non-classical HLA-Ib molecule, is less polymorphic when compared to classical HLA class I molecules. Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) was first detected on cytotrophoblast cells at the feto-maternal interface but its expression is prevalent during viral infections and several autoimmune diseases. HLA-G gene is characterized by polymorphisms at the 3′ un-translated region and 5′ upstream regulatory region that regulate its expression and are associated with autoimmune diseases and viral infection susceptibility, creating an unbalanced and pathologic environment. This review focuses on the role of HLA-G genetic polymorphisms, mRNA, and protein expression in autoimmune conditions and viral infections. PMID:25477881

  12. Urticarial vasculitis: an autoimmune disorder following therapy for Hodgkin's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, D K; Ware, R E

    1995-09-01

    Immunological abnormalities have been described in patients with Hodgkin's disease, both associated with the malignancy itself and occurring secondary to therapy. These abnormalities often manifest as an immunodeficiency state, but can also present as immune dysregulation and autoimmune disease. We report two young patients with Hodgkin's disease who, following successful therapy, developed urticarial vasculitis (UV), a form of cutaneous autoimmune vasculitis. Both patients also had systemic symptoms including fever, an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate and serum copper, and abnormal in vitro studies of lymphocyte enumeration and proliferation. Distinguishing UV from recurrent Hodgkin's disease was especially difficult in one patient, and was possible only by lymph node biopsy. One patient has responded well to immunosuppressive therapy, while the other, who has more profound immune dysfunction, has developed a chronic autoimmune disorder. UV may thus occur in patients after therapy for Hodgkin's disease; we hypothesize that immune dysregulation, either associated with the malignancy or resulting from therapy, is important in the pathogenesis of this autoimmune process. PMID:7623731

  13. Toll-Like Receptor Pathways in Autoimmune Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ji-Qing; Szodoray, Peter; Zeher, Margit

    2016-02-01

    Autoimmune diseases are a family of chronic systemic inflammatory disorders, characterized by the dysregulation of the immune system which finally results in the break of tolerance to self-antigen. Several studies suggest that Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play an essential role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. TLRs belong to the family of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that recognize a wide range of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). TLRs are type I transmembrane proteins and located on various cellular membranes. Two main groups have been classified based on their location; the extracelluar group referred to the ones located on the plasma membrane while the intracellular group all located in endosomal compartments responsible for the recognition of nucleic acids. They are released by the host cells and trigger various intracellular pathways which results in the production of proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, as well as the expression of co-stimulatory molecules to protect against invading microorganisms. In particular, TLR pathway-associated proteins, such as IRAK, TRAF, and SOCS, are often dysregulated in this group of diseases. TLR-associated gene expression profile analysis together with single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assessment could be important to explain the pathomechanism driving autoimmune diseases. In this review, we summarize recent findings on TLR pathway regulation in various autoimmune diseases, including Sjögren's syndrome (SS), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), multiple sclerosis (MS), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic sclerosis (SSc), and psoriasis. PMID:25687121

  14. Modulation by Melatonin of the Pathogenesis of Inflammatory Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huey-Kang Sytwu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin is the major secretory product of the pineal gland during the night and has multiple activities including the regulation of circadian and seasonal rhythms, and antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. It also possesses the ability to modulate immune responses by regulation of the T helper 1/2 balance and cytokine production. Autoimmune diseases, which result from the activation of immune cells by autoantigens released from normal tissues, affect around 5% of the population. Activation of autoantigen-specific immune cells leads to subsequent damage of target tissues by these activated cells. Melatonin therapy has been investigated in several animal models of autoimmune disease, where it has a beneficial effect in a number of models excepting rheumatoid arthritis, and has been evaluated in clinical autoimmune diseases including rheumatoid arthritis and ulcerative colitis. This review summarizes and highlights the role and the modulatory effects of melatonin in several inflammatory autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes mellitus, and inflammatory bowel disease.

  15. T Cell Vaccination as an Immunotherapy for Autoimmune Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingwu Zhang

    2004-01-01

    Immunization with inactivated autoreactive T cells (T cell vaccination) selected from individual's own T cell repertoire provides a unique in vivo setting for testing immune regulation that is known to involve interactions of a variety of related surface molecules (1). It induces regulatory immune responses that closely resemble the in vivo situation where the immune system is challenged by clonal activation and expansion of given T cell populations in various autoimmune diseases. T cell vaccination provides a powerful means of eliciting natural reactions of the immune system in response to clonal expansion of T cells, which can used as a therapeutic approach to suppress or eliminate specific pathogenic autoreactive T cells in autoimmune conditions. Clinical trials using T cell vaccination to deplete autoreactive T cells in human autoimmune conditions have begun to reveal the pathologic relevance of various autoimmune T cell populations in the disease processes, providing a unique opportunity to test the autoimmune theories in a clinical setting. Cellular & Molecular Immunology.2004;1(5):321-327.

  16. Immunoglobulin G4-related disease: autoimmune pancreatitis and extrapancreatic manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Alvarenga Fernandes

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present a case of immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4-related disease with pancreatic and extrapancreatic involvement, including the biliary and renal systems. Given the importance of imaging methods for the diagnosis of IgG4-related disease and its differentiation from pancreatic adenocarcinoma, we emphasize important abdominal computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings related to this recently recognized systemic autoimmune disease.

  17. Application of latent variable models to autoimmune diseases clinimetry

    OpenAIRE

    Molano González, Nicolás

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Clinical manifestations of autoimmune diseases often are presented as presence or absence of certain symptoms, which in the clinical context can be associated with disease severity. Classical measures like number of symptoms present have been used to assess the severity of disease, nevertheless this score does not reflect particular aspects of each symptom in the severity manifestation. In this setting latent variable models are a natural choice to address the pro...

  18. Autoimmune disease and risk for Parkinson disease A population-based case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rugbjerg, K.; Friis, S.; Ritz, B.;

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Inflammatory mediators are increased in autoimmune diseases and may activate microglia and might cause an inflammatory state and degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the brain. Thus, we evaluated whether having an autoimmune disease increases the risk for developing Parkinson disease...... among inhabitants of Denmark who were alive at the date of the patient's diagnosis. The main exposure measure was a hospital diagnosis of 1 of 32 selected autoimmune diseases recorded 5 or more years before the index date in the files of the Danish Hospital Register. Results: We observed no overall...... association between a diagnosis of autoimmune disease and risk for subsequent PD (odds ratio 0.96, 95% confidence interval 0.85-1.08). In a subgroup of patients with autoimmune diseases with systemic involvement, primarily rheumatoid arthritis, we saw a decrease in risk for PD of 30%. Conclusions: Our results...

  19. Importância da ecogenicidade da tireóide no diagnóstico da tireoidite crônica auto-imune Value of thyroid echogenicity in the diagnosis of chronic autoimmune thyroiditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Bianchini Höfling

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A tireoidite crônica auto-imune é, atualmente, a principal causa de hipotireoidismo e seu diagnóstico baseia-se nas manifestações clínico-laboratoriais. O marcador laboratorial mais importante é a presença de anticorpos antitireoglobulina e antiperoxidase, sendo este último o teste mais sensível. A biópsia aspirativa apresenta alta sensibilidade e especificidade, porém, é um método invasivo e, por isso, reservado para quando há presença de nódulo ou bócio de crescimento rápido. A cintilografia é desnecessária para o diagnóstico, já que apresenta baixa sensibilidade e especificidade. A ultra-sonografia, tanto ao modo B como ao dúplex-Doppler colorido, evoluiu de forma muito rápida e tornou-se um método simples, não-invasivo, reprodutível e com alta sensibilidade para o diagnóstico da tireoidite crônica auto-imune. Ao modo B, a ecogenicidade é um parâmetro de extrema importância, já que, além de apresentar alta correlação com o quadro citopatológico, também apresenta alta sensibilidade para o diagnóstico da tireoidite crônica auto-imune. Embora este parâmetro não seja específico da tireoidite crônica auto-imune, pois também pode estar presente na doença de Graves, na tireoidite pós-parto e na tireoidite subaguda, tais desordens podem ser facilmente diferenciadas tanto pelo quadro clínico-laboratorial quanto pelo dúplex-Doppler colorido. Assim, este artigo tem o objetivo de revisar a importância do estudo da ecogenicidade no diagnóstico da tireoidite crônica auto-imune.Chronic autoimmune thyroiditis is currently considered as the main cause for hypothyroidism and its diagnosis is based on clinical manifestations and laboratory tests results. The most significant laboratory marker for this disease is the presence of anti-thyroperoxidase and anti-thyroglobulin antibodies, the latter being the most sensitive one. Aspiration biopsy shows high sensitivity and specificity but, considering the

  20. Ultrasonography of various thyroid diseases in children and adolescents: A pictorial essay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Hyun Sook; Lee, Eun Hye; Jeong, Sun Hye; Park, Ji Sang; Lee, Heon [Dept. of Radiology, Bucheon Hospital, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    Thyroid imaging is indicated to evaluate congenital hypothyroidism during newborn screening or in cases of a palpable thyroid mass in children and adolescents. This pictorial essay reviews the ultrasonography (US) of thyroid diseases in children and adolescents, including normal thyroid gland development, imaging features of congenital thyroid disorders (dysgenesis, [aplasia, ectopy, hypoplasia], dyshormonogenesis, transient hypothyroidism, thyroglossal duct cyst), diffuse thyroid disease (Grave's disease, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, and suppurative thyroiditis), and thyroid nodules. The primary imaging modalities for evaluating thyroid diseases are US and radionuclide scintigraphy. Additionally, US can be used to guide aspiration of detected nodules.

  1. Ultrasonography of various thyroid diseases in children and adolescents: A pictorial essay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thyroid imaging is indicated to evaluate congenital hypothyroidism during newborn screening or in cases of a palpable thyroid mass in children and adolescents. This pictorial essay reviews the ultrasonography (US) of thyroid diseases in children and adolescents, including normal thyroid gland development, imaging features of congenital thyroid disorders (dysgenesis, [aplasia, ectopy, hypoplasia], dyshormonogenesis, transient hypothyroidism, thyroglossal duct cyst), diffuse thyroid disease (Grave's disease, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, and suppurative thyroiditis), and thyroid nodules. The primary imaging modalities for evaluating thyroid diseases are US and radionuclide scintigraphy. Additionally, US can be used to guide aspiration of detected nodules.

  2. Toward molecular pathogenesis of an autoimmune disease: Refined genetic mapping of autoimmune polyglandular disease type I (APECED)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaltonen, J.; Bjoerses, P.; Peltonen, L. [National Public Health Institute, Helsinki (Finland)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Autoimmune reactions encoupled to many human diseases are still only partially understood. Unravelling the molecular pathogenesis of inherited diseases with a strong autoimmune component in their clinical expression could help to dissect individual components in the molecular background of abnormal immune response. One such genetic disorder is autosomal recessive autoimmune polyglandular disease type I (PGD I), also known as autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED, MIM 240300). The disease is especially enriched in the genetically isolated population of Finland and we have assigned the APECED locus to human chromosome 21q22.3 in 14 Finnish families by linkage analyses. The best positional lod score of 6.49 was observed with marker D21S49. Based on the history of the Finns, the gene pool of this population clearly demonstrates the consequences of a founder effect and consequent isolation. In the Finnish population, we can take advantage of linkage disequilibrium and allelic association studies to more precisely define the critical DNA region for our disease gene of interest than would be possible by linkage analyses alone. We are now able to define the chromosomal region of interest between two flanking markers locating 1 cM apart. Linkage disequilibrium is observed with three of the markers used in the analyses and this suggests a distance of less than 500 kb to the disease locus, well approachable with molecular cloning techniques. Overlapping YAC and cosmid clones spanning our region of interest will facilitate the cloning of APECED gene in the near future.

  3. PECULIARITIES OF THE CYTOKINE PROFILE OF PATIENTS WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS IN COMBINATION WITH AUTOIMMUNE THYROIDITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Kravchun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Study objective: study of the nature of changes in the immune system of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM in combination with autoimmune thyroiditis (AIT and without it; comparative analysis of similar indicators of patients with type 1 DM in combination with AIT and without it.Materials and methods. 104 patients at the age of 22 to 62 y.o. (57 women and 47 men took part in the study. They were divided into 4 groups (type 2 DM, type 2 DM and AIT, type 1 DM, type 1 DM and AIT. Groups of patients who were examined regarding the state of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, indicators of the T-cell link of the immune system, concentration of interleukin 4 (IL-4, IL-6, interferon-gamma, and leptin level, were comparable regarding their sex, age, duration of disease.Results. Unidirectional relationship between body mass index (BMI, amount of CD4 +-, CD8+- lymphocytes, level of leptin, IL-4, IL-6 concentrations and BMI and immunoregulatory index of patients with type 2 DM both with AIT and without it was determined. Patients with type 2 DM displayed decreasing activity of the T-cell link of the immune system and increasing of the concentration of pro-inflammatory cytokines irrespectively of the availability of accompanying AIT, which evidenced primary development of autoimmune processes. At the same time, positivecorrelating relationship between the level of leptin and BMI and immunoregulatory index of patients with type 2 DM both with AIT and without it was revealed (r = 0.83; р < 0.005; r = 0.77; р < 0.01; r = 0.9; р < 0.001, and r = 0.53; р < 0.05 respectively, which demonstrates autoimmune directivity of immune system disorders in combination with metabolic shifts.Conclusion. For the purpose of performance of simultaneous correction of metabolic and immunological disorders of patients with type 2 DM, it is necessary to determine immunological indicators (of the CD+- range of lymphocytes. The latter is caused with higher

  4. PECULIARITIES OF THE CYTOKINE PROFILE OF PATIENTS WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS IN COMBINATION WITH AUTOIMMUNE THYROIDITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Kravchun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Study objective: study of the nature of changes in the immune system of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM in combination with autoimmune thyroiditis (AIT and without it; comparative analysis of similar indicators of patients with type 1 DM in combination with AIT and without it.Materials and methods. 104 patients at the age of 22 to 62 y.o. (57 women and 47 men took part in the study. They were divided into 4 groups (type 2 DM, type 2 DM and AIT, type 1 DM, type 1 DM and AIT. Groups of patients who were examined regarding the state of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, indicators of the T-cell link of the immune system, concentration of interleukin 4 (IL-4, IL-6, interferon-gamma, and leptin level, were comparable regarding their sex, age, duration of disease.Results. Unidirectional relationship between body mass index (BMI, amount of CD4 +-, CD8+- lymphocytes, level of leptin, IL-4, IL-6 concentrations and BMI and immunoregulatory index of patients with type 2 DM both with AIT and without it was determined. Patients with type 2 DM displayed decreasing activity of the T-cell link of the immune system and increasing of the concentration of pro-inflammatory cytokines irrespectively of the availability of accompanying AIT, which evidenced primary development of autoimmune processes. At the same time, positivecorrelating relationship between the level of leptin and BMI and immunoregulatory index of patients with type 2 DM both with AIT and without it was revealed (r = 0.83; р < 0.005; r = 0.77; р < 0.01; r = 0.9; р < 0.001, and r = 0.53; р < 0.05 respectively, which demonstrates autoimmune directivity of immune system disorders in combination with metabolic shifts.Conclusion. For the purpose of performance of simultaneous correction of metabolic and immunological disorders of patients with type 2 DM, it is necessary to determine immunological indicators (of the CD+- range of lymphocytes. The latter is caused with higher

  5. Cannabinoids and autoimmune diseases: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katchan, Valeria; David, Paula; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2016-06-01

    Cannabinoids have shown to have a variety effects on body systems. Through CB1 and CB2 receptors, amongst other, they exert an effect by modulating neurotransmitter and cytokine release. Current research in the role of cannabinoids in the immune system shows that they possess immunosuppressive properties. They can inhibit proliferation of leucocytes, induce apoptosis of T cells and macrophages and reduce secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In mice models, they are effective in reducing inflammation in arthritis, multiple sclerosis, have a positive effect on neuropathic pain and in type 1 diabetes mellitus. They are effective as treatment for fibromyalgia and have shown to have anti-fibrotic effect in scleroderma. Studies in human models are scarce and not conclusive and more research is required in this field. Cannabinoids can be therefore promising immunosuppressive and anti-fibrotic agents in the therapy of autoimmune disorders. PMID:26876387

  6. The role of parvovirus B19 in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity and autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Jonathan R

    2016-04-01

    Human parvovirus B19 is a single-stranded DNA virus which preferentially targets the erythroblasts in the bone marrow. B19 infection commonly causes erythema infectiosum, arthralgia, fetal death, transient aplastic crisis in patients with shortened red cell survival, and persistent infection in people who are immunocompromised. Less common clinical manifestations include atypical skin rashes, neurological syndromes, cardiac syndromes, and various cytopenias. B19 infection has also been associated with development of a variety of different autoimmune diseases, including rheumatological, neurological, neuromuscular, cardiovascular, haematological, nephrological and metabolic. Production of a variety of autoantibodies has been demonstrated to occur during B19 infection and these have been shown to be key to the pathogenesis of the particular disease process in a significant number of cases, for example, production of rheumatoid factor in cases of B19-associated rheumatoid arthritis and production of anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) in patients with B19-associated type 1 diabetes mellitus. B19 infection has also been associated with the development of multiple autoimmune diseases in 12 individuals. Documented mechanisms in B19-associated autoimmunity include molecular mimicry (IgG antibody to B19 proteins has been shown to cross react with a variety of recognised human autoantigens, including collagen II, keratin, angiotensin II type 1 receptor, myelin basic protein, cardiolipin, and platelet membrane glycoprotein IIb/IIIa), B19-induced apoptosis with presentation of self-antigens to T lymphocytes, and the phospholipase activity of the B19 unique VP1 protein. PMID:26644521

  7. Anti-cytokine vaccines and the immunotherapy of autoimmune diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Wraith, David C

    2006-01-01

    Three papers in this issue of the European Journal of Immunology describe the use of cytokine vaccines to prevent autoimmune disease in experimental animals. The vaccines are based on interleukin 17 (IL-17), a cytokine that has recently been shown to play a central role in inflammation.

  8. Allergen-specific immunotherapy and risk of autoimmune disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linneberg, Allan; Madsen, Flemming; Skaaby, Tea

    2012-01-01

    After 100 years of experience with allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT), an issue that is still unresolved is whether SIT can act as a trigger of, or as a risk factor for, autoimmune disease. We searched the literature for evidence on this topic....

  9. Glassy Dynamics in the Adaptive Immune Response Prevents Autoimmune Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jun; Deem, Michael

    2006-03-01

    The immune system normally protects the human host against death by infection. However, when an immune response is mistakenly directed at self antigens, autoimmune disease can occur. We describe a model of protein evolution to simulate the dynamics of the adaptive immune response to antigens. Computer simulations of the dynamics of antibody evolution show that different evolutionary mechanisms, namely gene segment swapping and point mutation, lead to different evolved antibody binding affinities. Although a combination of gene segment swapping and point mutation can yield a greater affinity to a specific antigen than point mutation alone, the antibodies so evolved are highly cross-reactive and would cause autoimmune disease, and this is not the chosen dynamics of the immune system. We suggest that in the immune system a balance has evolved between binding affinity and specificity in the mechanism for searching the amino acid sequence space of antibodies. Our model predicts that chronic infection may lead to autoimmune disease as well due to cross-reactivity and suggests a broad distribution for the time of onset of autoimmune disease due to chronic exposure. The slow search of antibody sequence space by point mutation leads to the broad of distribution times.

  10. Undifferentiated CTD: a wide spectrum of autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosca, Marta; Tani, Chiara; Carli, Linda; Bombardieri, Stefano

    2012-02-01

    The existence of systemic autoimmune diseases not fulfilling classification criteria for defined connective tissue diseases (CTDs) is a common clinical experience. These conditions have been variably defined as incomplete lupus erythematosus, early undifferentiated connective tissue diseases and undifferentiated connective tissue diseases (UCTDs). However, the definition of UCTD includes a wide spectrum of diseases ranging from 'organ-dominant' conditions (e.g., idhiopatic non-specific interstitial pneumonia) to simplified conditions (stable UCTD), to early CTDs or mild forms of CTDs. In the present article, the literature data on undifferentiated diseases and their clinical spectrum as well as the importance of the definition of new classificative criteria are discussed. PMID:22424194

  11. [Application of iodine metabolism analysis methods in thyroid diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jian-hua; Qiu, Ling

    2013-08-01

    The main physiological role of iodine in the body is to synthesize thyroid hormone. Both iodine deficiency and iodine excess can lead to severe thyroid diseases. While its role in thyroid diseases has increasingly been recognized, few relevant platforms and techniques for iodine detection have been available in China. This paper summarizes the advantages and disadvantages of currently iodine detection methods including direct titration, arsenic cerium catalytic spectrophotometry, chromatography with pulsed amperometry, colorimetry based on automatic biochemistry, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, so as to optimize the iodine nutrition for patients with thyroid diseases. PMID:23987480

  12. Ocular myasthenia gravis coincident with thyroid ophthalmopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaman A

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Graves' disease and myasthenia gravis are both auto-immune diseases and the coexistence of these two diseases is well recognized. Myasthenia gravis is more frequent in patients with thyroid disease. Here we present a case of thyroid ophthalmopathy and ocular myasthenia.

  13. Ocular myasthenia gravis coincident with thyroid ophthalmopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Yaman A; Yaman H

    2003-01-01

    Graves' disease and myasthenia gravis are both auto-immune diseases and the coexistence of these two diseases is well recognized. Myasthenia gravis is more frequent in patients with thyroid disease. Here we present a case of thyroid ophthalmopathy and ocular myasthenia.

  14. Contribution of MicroRNAs to autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garo, Lucien P; Murugaiyan, Gopal

    2016-05-01

    MicroRNAs are a class of evolutionarily conserved, short non-coding RNAs that post-transcriptionally modulate the expression of multiple target genes. They are implicated in almost every biological process, including pathways involved in immune homeostasis, such as immune cell development, central and peripheral tolerance, and T helper cell differentiation. Alterations in miRNA expression and function can lead to major dysfunction of the immune system and mediate susceptibility to autoimmune disease. Here, we discuss the role of miRNAs in the maintenance of immune tolerance to self-antigens and the gain or loss of miRNA functions on tissue inflammation and autoimmunity. PMID:26943802

  15. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis: another autoimmune disease associated with sarcoidosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boerner, Eda Burcu; Costabel, Ulrich; Wessendorf, Thomas Ernst; Theegarten, Dirk; Hetzel, Martin; Drent, Marjolein; Bonella, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare lung disease characterized by the accumulation of surfactant phospholipids and lipoproteins within the alveoli.  Here we report on a female patient who was diagnosed with autoimmune PAP and successfully treated with whole lung lavage (WLL). 15 months after PAP diagnosis the patient developed marked fatigue. Additional tests revealed the diagnosis of sarcoidosis. We can only speculate that PAP and sarcoidosis in our patient are linked to each other based on the fact that other autoimmune disorders have also been associated with sarcoidosis. PMID:27055841

  16. Cytokine Status, Thyroid Autoantibodies and Their Dynamic Changes During the Treatment of Graves' Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V V Lazanovich

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available It has been found during the research that the changes of Th1 and Th2 marker cytokine content in Graves Disease are dynamic and are directly correlated not only with the severity of autoimmune thyrotoxicosis, but also with the method of treatment used and duration of Thiamazole therapy. The beginning of autoimmune thyrotoxicosis shows the largest amounts of both pro-inflammatory (IL-1a, IL-8, IFN-γ and anti-inflammatory (IL-10 cytokines which are significantly reduced during Thiamazole therapy, with the exception of the cases of severe disease course. Thyroid resection does not result in immunologic remission either, which is confirmed by persisting high serum levels of IL-1a, IL-8, IFN-γ, IL-10 and TSH antibodies in the severe GBD group. Among the unfavorable prognostic factors for recurrent disease are high serum levels of TSH antibodies, IL-1a and IFN-γ during pre-surgery period.

  17. Induction of Regulatory t Cells by Low Dose il2 in Autoimmune and Inflammatory Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-18

    Rheumatoid Arthritis; Ankylosing Spondylitis; Systemic Lupus Erythematosus; Psoriasis; Behcet's Disease; Wegener's Granulomatosis; Takayasu's Disease; Crohn's Disease; Ulcerative Colitis; Autoimmune Hepatitis; Sclerosing Cholangitis

  18. Are human endogenous retroviruses triggers of autoimmune diseases?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nexø, Bjørn A; Villesen, Palle; Nissen, Kari K;

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases encompass a plethora of conditions in which the immune system attacks its own tissue, identifying them as foreign. Multiple factors are thought to contribute to the development of immune response to self, including differences in genotypes, hormonal milieu, and environmental...... factors. Viruses including human endogenous retroviruses have long been linked to the occurrence of autoimmunity, but never proven to be causative factors. Endogenous viruses are retroviral sequences embedded in the host germline DNA and transmitted vertically through successive generations in a Mendelian...... antigens is reported for multiple sclerosis. We speculate the possibility that recombinants or mixed viral particles are formed and that the resulting viruses stimulate the innate immune system, thereby initiating the autoimmune response....

  19. [Auto-immune liver diseases and their treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, J; Thorens, J; Pache, I; Troillet, F X; Moradpour, D; Gonvers, J J

    2005-01-19

    There are three main types of auto-immune liver disease, auto-immune hepatitis, primary biliary cirrhosis and primary sclerosing cholangitis. In the case of auto-immune hepatitis, prednisone therapy, with or without azathioprine, can improve quality of life and halt progression to cirrhosis. If there is no response or if the therapy is poorly tolerated, mycophenolate mofetil or cyclosporin should be considered. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), at a dosage of 13 to 15 mg/kg/day slows the progression of fibrosis in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis. Pruritus may be treated with cholestyramine, rifampicin or opiate antagonists. Ursodeoxycholic acid at a dosage of 20 to 30 mg/kg/day will slow the evolution of fibrosis. PMID:15770819

  20. Antithyroid antibodies and thyroid function in pediatric patients with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyoncu, Derya; Urganci, Nafiye

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of autoimmune thyroid disease, persistence of antithyroid antibodies, effect of gluten-free diet, and long-term outcome of thyroid function in pediatric patients with celiac disease (CD). Methods. 67 patients with CD aged from 1 year to 16 years were screened for thyroid antithyroperoxidase, antithyroglobulin and anti-TSH receptor antibodies, serum free triiodothyronine, free thyroxine, and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) at diagnosis and during follow-up. Results. None of the patients had antithyroid antibodies at diagnosis. Antithyroid antibodies became positive in 16.4% of the patients (11/67) 2 to 3 years after the diagnosis of CD. Clinical hypothyroidism was observed only in 3 of 11 CD patients with positive antithyroid antibodies (27.2%). The antithyroid antibodies positive and negative patients did not differ significantly according to compliance to GFD (P > 0.05). A statistically significant difference was observed only in age, in which the patients with positive antithyroid antibodies were younger than the patients with negative antithyroid antibodies (P = 0.004). None of the patients had any change in their thyroid function and antibody profile during their follow-up. Conclusion. Antithyroid antibodies were detected in younger pediatric patients with CD and the prevalence of antithyroid antibodies did not correlate with the duration of gluten intake. PMID:25788942

  1. Ultraviolet radiation and autoimmune disease: insights from epidemiological research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review examines the epidemiological evidence that suggests ultraviolet radiation (UVR) may play a protective role in three autoimmune diseases: multiple sclerosis, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and rheumatoid arthritis. To date, most of the information has accumulated from population studies that have studied the relationship between geography or climate and autoimmune disease prevalence. An interesting gradient of increasing prevalence with increasing latitude has been observed for at least two of the three diseases. This is most evident for multiple sclerosis, but a similar gradient has been shown for insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in Europe and North America. Seasonal influences on both disease incidence and clinical course and, more recently, analytical studies at the individual level have provided further support for a possible protective role for UVR in some of these diseases but the data are not conclusive. Organ-specific autoimmune diseases involve Th1 cell-mediated immune processes. Recent work in photoimmunology has shown ultraviolet B (UVB) can specifically attenuate these processes through several mechanisms which we discuss. In particular, the possible contribution of an UVR-induced increase in serum vitamin D (1,25(OH)2D3) levels in the beneficial immunomodulation of these diseases is discussed

  2. P-Glycoprotein and Drug Resistance in Systemic Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Picchianti-Diamanti

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, rheumatoid arthritis (RA and psoriatic arthritis (PsA are chronic inflammatory disorders of unknown etiology characterized by a wide range of abnormalities of the immune system that may compromise the function of several organs, such as kidney, heart, joints, brain and skin. Corticosteroids (CCS, synthetic and biologic immunosuppressive agents have demonstrated the capacity to improve the course of autoimmune diseases. However, a significant number of patients do not respond or develop resistance to these therapies over time. P-glycoprotein (P-gp is a transmembrane protein that pumps several drugs out of the cell, including CCS and immunosuppressants; thus, its over-expression or hyper-function has been proposed as a possible mechanism of drug resistance in patients with autoimmune disorders. Recently, different authors have demonstrated that P-gp inhibitors, such as cyclosporine A (CsA and its analogue Tacrolimus, are able to reduce P-gp expression and or function in SLE, RA and PsA patients. These observations suggest that P-gp antagonists could be adopted to revert drug resistance and improve disease outcome. The complex inter-relationship among drug resistance, P-gp expression and autoimmunity still remains elusive.

  3. Symptoms and Signs Associated with Postpartum Thyroiditis

    OpenAIRE

    Maureen Groer; Cecilia Jevitt

    2014-01-01

    Background. Postpartum thyroiditis (PPT) is a common triphasic autoimmune disease in women with thyroid peroxidase (TPO) autoantibodies. This study evaluated women's thyroid disease symptoms, physical findings, stress levels, and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels across six postpartum months in three groups, TPO negative, TPO positive, and PPT positive women. Methods. Women were recruited in midpregnancy (n = 631) and TPO status was determined which then was used to form the three post...

  4. Endogenous retroviruses are associated with autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nexø, Bjørn A; Jensen, Sara B; Hansen, Bettina;

    2016-01-01

    transmission is called vertical. Viral variants of importance for development of disease must be more frequent among diseased persons than among healthy individuals. Multiple sclerosis, diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis are all associated with sets of endogenouos retroviruses but not the same sets. If a virus...... grows and this contributes to disease, one should be able to alleviate disease with antiretroviral drugs. We call for clinical trials to elucidate this issue....

  5. [Hypokalemic paralysis revealing Sjögren's syndrome associated with auto-immune thyroiditis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baaj, Mohamed; Safi, Somaya; Hassikou, Hassna; Tabache, Fatima; Mouden, Karim; Hadri, Larbi

    2010-02-01

    We report a case of 36-year-old woman, admitted for hypotonic tetraparesis. Laboratory tests revealed severe hypokalaemia, acidosis, hyperchloremia and alkaline urinary pH allowing the diagnosis of distal tubular acidosis. Additional investigations led to the diagnosis of primary Sjögren's syndrome associated with Hashimoto's thyroïditis. The evolution was favorable under potassium citrate alkalinisation, the corticosteroid therapy and hormonal substitution. Based on this observation, the pathogenesis of distal tubular acidosis during auto-immune diseases (Sjögren's syndrome, monoclonal hypergammaglobulinemia, hypothyroidism) was discussed as well as its consequences and management. PMID:19836323

  6. A 20 year history of clinical and genetic study of thyroid autoimmunity in a Tunisian multigenerational family: Evidence for gene interaction☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougacha-Elleuch, Noura; Charfi, Nadia; Kharrat, Najla; Ayadi, Fatma; Maalej, Abdellatif; Chabchoub, Ghazi; Rebai, Ahmed; Kammoun-Krichen, Maha; Belguith-Maalej, Salima; Abid, Mohamed; Mnif, Mouna; Ayadi, Hammadi

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD), which include Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT), Graves' disease (GD) and primary idiopathic myxoedema (PIM), are recognized by their clinical and genetic heterogeneity. In this study, we have carried on a global approach gathering 20 year genetic and clinical data on a Tunisian multigenerational family (Akr). Our purpose was search for a combined genotype involved in AITD susceptibility using 33 gene polymorphisms. The Akr pedigree is composed of more than 400 members distributed on 10 generations. Clinical follow-up was performed by appreciation of the thyroid gland and measurement of both thyroid hormone and auto antibody levels. We used FBAT software to test for association between gene polymorphisms and AITDs. Clinical follow-up has showed that the number of AITD patients has increased from 25 to 78 subjects subdivided on 51 cases of GD, 22 PIM and 5 HT. Concerning genetic analysis, our study has revealed new gene association when compared with our previous analysis (considering single genes). Thus, PTPN22, TG and VDR gene polymorphisms have became associated with p-values ranging from 4.6  10− 2 to 4  10− 3 when considered with other genes on the same chromosome; giving evidence for gene interaction. The most significant association was found with the MHC region (p = 7.15 10− 4). Moreover, and among gene polymorphisms explored, our analysis has identified some of them as AITD biomarkers. Indeed, PDS gene polymorphisms were associated with either exophthalmia or goiter (p-values from 10− 2 to 10− 3). In conclusion, our study gives evidence for gene interaction in AITD development confirming genetic complexity of these diseases. PMID:25606390

  7. A 20 year history of clinical and genetic study of thyroid autoimmunity in a Tunisian multigenerational family: Evidence for gene interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noura Bougacha-Elleuch

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD, which include Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT, Graves' disease (GD and primary idiopathic myxoedema (PIM, are recognized by their clinical and genetic heterogeneity. In this study, we have carried on a global approach gathering 20 year genetic and clinical data on a Tunisian multigenerational family (Akr. Our purpose was search for a combined genotype involved in AITD susceptibility using 33 gene polymorphisms. The Akr pedigree is composed of more than 400 members distributed on 10 generations. Clinical follow-up was performed by appreciation of the thyroid gland and measurement of both thyroid hormone and auto antibody levels. We used FBAT software to test for association between gene polymorphisms and AITDs. Clinical follow-up has showed that the number of AITD patients has increased from 25 to 78 subjects subdivided on 51 cases of GD, 22 PIM and 5 HT. Concerning genetic analysis, our study has revealed new gene association when compared with our previous analysis (considering single genes. Thus, PTPN22, TG and VDR gene polymorphisms have became associated with p-values ranging from 4.6   10−2 to 4   10−3 when considered with other genes on the same chromosome; giving evidence for gene interaction. The most significant association was found with the MHC region (p = 7.15 10−4. Moreover, and among gene polymorphisms explored, our analysis has identified some of them as AITD biomarkers. Indeed, PDS gene polymorphisms were associated with either exophthalmia or goiter (p-values from 10−2 to 10−3. In conclusion, our study gives evidence for gene interaction in AITD development confirming genetic complexity of these diseases.

  8. Low Serum Hepcidin in Patients with Autoimmune Liver Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Lyberopoulou, Aggeliki; Chachami, Georgia; Gatselis, Nikolaos K.; Kyratzopoulou, Eleni; Saitis, Asterios; Gabeta, Stella; Eliades, Petros; Paraskeva, Efrosini; Zachou, Kalliopi; Koukoulis, George K.; Mamalaki, Avgi; Dalekos, George N; Simos, George

    2015-01-01

    Hepcidin, a liver hormone, is important for both innate immunity and iron metabolism regulation. As dysfunction of the hepcidin pathway may contribute to liver pathology, we analysed liver hepcidin mRNA and serum hepcidin in patients with chronic liver diseases. Hepcidin mRNA levels were determined in liver biopsies obtained from 126 patients with HCV (n = 21), HBV (n = 23), autoimmune cholestatic disease (primary biliary cirrhosis and primary sclerosing cholangitis; PBC/PSC; n = 34), autoimm...

  9. Total lymphoid irradiation in autoimmune diseases and organ transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Total lymphoid irradiation, a treatment program developed for the management of Hodgkin's disease, induces profound immunologic changes. These effects have been characterized in animal systems and are now beginning to be exploited in humans for the treatment of autoimmune disease and preparation for organ transplantation. A burgeonning new era of clinical research is developing that will require multidisciplinary collaboration in order to realize its ultimate potential

  10. Radiosensitivity of peripheral blood lymphocytes in autoimmune disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proliferation of peripheral blood lymphocytes, cultured with Con A, can be inhibited by ionizing radiation. Lymphocytes from patients with conditions associated with autoimmunity, such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and polymyositis, are more radiosensitive than those from healthy volunteers or patients with conditions not associated with autoimmunity. Nuclear material isolated from the lymphocytes of patients with autoimmune diseases is, on average, lighter in density than the nuclear material from most healthy controls. This difference in density is not related to increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation but the degree of post-irradiation change in density (lightening) is proportional to the initial density, i.e. more dense nuclear material always shows a greater upward shift after radiation. The recovery of pre-irradiation density of nuclear material, 1 h after radiation exposure, taken as an indication of DNA repair, correlates with the radiosensitivity of lymphocyte proliferation (Con A response); failure to return to pre-irradiation density being associated with increased sensitivity of proliferative response. These results require extension but, taken with previously reported studied of the effects of DNA methylating agents, support the idea that DNA damage and its defective repair could be important in the aetio-pathogenesis of autoimmune disease. (author)

  11. Refractive surgery in systemic and autoimmune disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majed AlKharashi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with underlying systemic disease represent challenging treatment dilemma to the refractive surgeon. The refractive error in this patient population is accompanied by a systemic disease that may have an ocular or even a corneal component. The literature is rather sparse about the use of laser refractive surgery (LRS and such procedure is not approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA in this patient population. Patients with collagen vascular disease, diabetes mellitus (DM, allergic and atopic disease, or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV are never ideal for LRS. Patients with uncontrolled systemic disease or ocular involvement of the disease should not undergo LRS. However, a patient with well-controlled and mild disease, no ocular involvement, and not on multidrug regimen may be a suitable candidate if they meet stringent criteria. There is a need for a large, multicenter, controlled trial to address the safety and efficacy of LRS in patients with systemic disease before such technology can be widely adopted by the refractive surgery community.

  12. Determination of autoantibodies to annexin XI in systemic autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, C S; Levantino, G; Houen, Gunnar;

    2000-01-01

    Annexin XI, a calcyclin-associated protein, has been shown to be identical to a 56,000 Da antigen recognized by antibodies found in sera from patients suffering from systemic autoimmune diseases. In this work hexahistidine-tagged recombinant annexin XI (His6- rAnn XI) was used as antigen in ELISA...... experiments for determination of autoantibodies to annexin XI in sera of patients with systemic rheumatic autoimmune diseases. Immunoblotting with HeLa cell extract and with His6-rAnn XI as antigen was used for confirmation of positive ELISA results. We found eleven anti-annexin XI positive sera (3.9%) out of...... 282 sera from patients with systemic rheumatic diseases. The highest number of annexin XI positive sera were found in primary antiphospholipid syndrome (3/17), and in subacute lupus erythematosus (1/6), while lower frequencies of positive sera were found in patients with systemic sclerosis (5...

  13. Presence of Autoimmune Diseases in Alopecia Areata Patients and Their Families and Its Effect on Prognosis

    OpenAIRE

    Hatice Ergün Duman; Afet Akdağ Köse; Halim İşsever

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to investigate the role of autoimmunity in the etiopathogenesis of alopecia areata (AA) and the effects of the coexisting autoimmune diseases on the prognosis of AA. Methods: The records of 134 AA patients diagnosed in the dermatology and venereology outpatient clinic were retrospectively analyzed for the history of concomitant autoimmune disease and the family history for autoimmune diseases. Results: Of the 134 patients, 79 were males, 55 were females. The rate of ...

  14. Autoimmune thyroiditis with severe hypothyroidism resistant to the treatment with high peroral doses of thyroxine: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payer, J; Sladekova, K; Kinova, S; Cesnakova, Z; Killinger, Z; Krizko, M; Klimes, I; Langer, P

    2000-12-01

    Female patient (42 yr) suffered from autoimmune thyroiditis resulting in severe hypothyroidism. She was treated for several years by district physician with the dose of 150 microg L-thyroxine daily. Since the level of TSH was repeatedly very high and no improvement of clinical signs has been observed, she was referred to the Medical Faculty Hospital. Thyroid ultrasound showed remarkable diffuse hypoechogenicity, thyroid scintigraphy showed enlarged thyroid with low 99mTc uptake, TRH test was normal, thin needle biopsy supported autoimmune thyroiditis. X-ray examination showed normal sella turcica and no changes in the pituitary were observed with computer tomography. In spite of increasing the dose of peroral L-thyroxine to 300 microg/d and later to 500 microg/d the clinical status and TSH level did not improve. The patient was originally suspected from malabsorption of thyroxine. However, the test with a large single peroral dose (1000 microg) of L-thyroxine showed a rapid decrease of TSH level (from 126 to 75 mU/l) and increase of total T4 level (from 18 to 64 nmol/l) within 4 hr. Later the patient has been treated with intravenous L-thyroxine (500 microg every 3-4 days for 4 weeks) which resulted in the decrease of TSH level to 10 mU/l and increase of T4 level to 80-100 nmol/l. After that it was concluded that the problem is a poor compliance of the patient who apparently does not actually take the medication, although she always claimed that she is doing so. Referring to some similar cases described in the literature the case was classified as thyroxine pseudomalabsorption. In spite that this problem has been explained to her and her relatives, she refused to take any medication and is consistently neglecting all invitations to further examinations. PMID:11137979

  15. Treatment of Subepidermal Autoimmune Bullous Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Ekin Şavk

    2011-01-01

    The common therapeutic goal for all subepidermal bullous diseases is to prevent inflammation and production of pathogenic autoantibodies and/or to facilitate the elimination of these antibodies. Diseases included in this group are the pemphigoids, linear IgA dermatosis, epidermolysis bullosa acquisita, dermatitis herpetiformis and bullous systemic erythematosus. Corticosteroids are the most commonly used systemic medication. Other alternatives include dapsone, various antibiotics and nicotina...

  16. Anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies: Its effect on thyroid gland and breast tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabitha Kandi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid peroxidase (TPO is a key enzyme in the synthesis of thyroid hormone. TPO is involved in thyroid hormone synthesis (organification and coupling reactions. TPO is a major antigen corresponding to thyroid-microsomal autoantibodies. Anti-TPO auto antibodies are very important to diagnose autoimmune thyroid diseases and also in estimating its clinical course. Autoimmune thyroid disease is detected mostly by measuring circulating antibodies to thyroglobulin which is uncommon measurement of antibodies to TPO that gives reliable information about autoimmune thyroid disease. Eighty percent of Grave′s disease patients have high levels of antiTPO antibodies. About 4% of subclinical hypothyroid patients with positive TPO antibodies develop clinical hypothyroidism. There is always a controversy on the relationship between breast cancer and thyroid disorders. As these tissues, i.e., breast and thyroid, originate embryologically from the same type of cells, hypothyroid/hyperthyroid females are more prone to develop benign or malignant breast tumors. The studies on breast cancer patients indicate increased thyroid disorders in breast cancer patients, most commonly Hashimoto′s thyroiditis accounts to increased thyroid disorders in these patients. This is independent of hormonal receptor status of the patient. These findings suggest the usefulness of screening for thyroid disease in any patient with breast cancer.

  17. Autoimmune diseases in pregnancy: maternal and fetal outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavithra M. Vengetesh

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to assess the impact of autoimmune connective tissue disorders on the outcomes of pregnancy and the influence of treatment on pregnancy. Methods: Thirty-seven antenatal patients with autoimmune connective tissue diseases, comprising of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE, primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS, Mixed Connective Tissue Diseases (MCTD, ankylosing spondylitis and Takayasu arteritis were analysed. Results: Multigravidas constituted 89.4% and were associated with bad obstetric history. Before diagnosis and treatment, serious maternal complications of eclampsia and thromboembolism were observed in patients with SLE and APS. The live birth rates were 9% and 2.4% respectively in patients with SLE and APS. With appropriate treatment- aspirin, heparin and immunosuppressant, the live birth rates were raised to 70% in SLE and 100% in APS patients. Investigation for autoimmune disease in recurrent pregnancy loss is important. A rare association between MCTD and congenital anomaly - Rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata was observed. Preeclampsia, gestational diabetes, fetal growth restriction and preterm labour were the common complications noted. Conclusions: Active disease at onset of pregnancy, presence of Anti-ds DNA antibodies and secondary APS were strong predictors of poor pregnancy outcomes among patients with SLE. Vigilant monitoring during pregnancy is required for favourable outcomes. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2015; 4(1.000: 9-14

  18. Treatment of Subepidermal Autoimmune Bullous Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekin Şavk

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The common therapeutic goal for all subepidermal bullous diseases is to prevent inflammation and production of pathogenic autoantibodies and/or to facilitate the elimination of these antibodies. Diseases included in this group are the pemphigoids, linear IgA dermatosis, epidermolysis bullosa acquisita, dermatitis herpetiformis and bullous systemic erythematosus. Corticosteroids are the most commonly used systemic medication. Other alternatives include dapsone, various antibiotics and nicotinamide, azathioprine, cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, cycloporine, mycophenolate mofetil, IV immunoglobulins and plasmapheresis. Rapid reepithelialization and prevention of secondary infections are provided by local hygenic measures including antiseptic baths and wound care.

  19. Tight Junctions, Intestinal Permeability, and Autoimmunity Celiac Disease and Type 1 Diabetes Paradigms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Jeroen; Rozing, Jan; Sapone, Anna; Lammers, Karen; Fasano, Alessio; Fromm, M; Schulzke, JD

    2009-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are characterized by tissue damage and loss of function due to an immune response that is directed against specific organs. This review is focused on celiac disease (CD), an autoimmune enteropathy, and type I diabetes (TID), a hyperglycosaemia caused by a destructive autoimmune p

  20. Report of a case of papillary thyroid carcinoma in association with Hashimoto's thyroiditis

    OpenAIRE

    Chukwudi Onyeaghana Okani; Benjamin Otene; Terhemba Nyaga; Joseph Ngbea; Agaba Eke; Felix Edegbe; Daniel Anyiam

    2015-01-01

    Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) is an autoimmune disease, known to be the most common cause of hypothyroidism in nonendemic goitrous areas. It is usually characterized by symmetric, painless, and diffused but sometimes localized swelling of the thyroid gland with features of hypothyroidism. Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), on the other hand, is the most common yet less aggressive form of thyroid cancer, especially in iodine-deficient areas. The coexistence of the two diseases is possible but not...

  1. Metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) uptake in Parkinson's disease also decreases at thyroid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decreased cardiac metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) uptake was reported in Parkinson's disease and this contributes to the differential diagnosis between Parkinson's disease and other forms of parkinsonism such as multiple system atrophy. However, decreased MIBG uptake of the thyroid has not been demonstrated. The objective of this study was to compare MIBG uptake of the thyroid among Parkinson's disease, multiple system atrophy and controls. Twenty-six patients with Parkinson's disease, 11 patients with multiple system atrophy and 14 controls were examined in this study. Planar images were taken 15 minutes (early images) and 3 hours (late images) after intravenous injection of 111 MBq 123I-MIBG. MIBG uptake of the thyroid on early images decreased significantly in Parkinson's disease compared to controls (p<0.0001) and multiple system atrophy (p=0.018). MIBG uptake of the thyroid on early images decreased significantly also in multiple system atrophy compared to controls (p=0.027). On late images, thyroid uptake differed significantly only between Parkinson's disease and controls (p=0.010). Our study is the first to demonstrate decreased MIBG uptake of the thyroid in Parkinson's disease. Sympathetic nervous denervation of Parkinson's disease occurred not only in the heart but also in the thyroid. (author)

  2. Radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid diseases: Graves' disease - current aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioiodine therapy is a reliable and cost-effective alternative to medical treatment of Graves' hyperthyroidism. Current recommendations favour a risk-adapted therapeutic procedure. Medical treatment is preferred in patients with a low risk of relapse which are characterised by the combination of female gender, age of onset above 40 years, thyroid volume below 40 ml and TSH-receptor antibodies below 10 U/l. Because of the poor remission rate with medical treatment in patients at less than 40 years of age, male gender, thyroid volume above 40 ml and TSH receptor antibodies above 10 U/l, it is suggested that definitive treatment with radioiodine or surgery should be considered soon after disease presentation. Analysis of cost-effectiveness clearly favour ablative radioiodine treatment. Ablative treatment is even more favourable in terms of early resumption of a normal life style of the hyperthyroid patient. Recent publications suggest further an adaptation of the tissue-absorbed dose to the pre-treatment thyroid volume using Marinelli's formula to achieve thyroid ablation with a single radioiodine treatment. (orig.)

  3. Genetics Home Reference: autoimmune Addison disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is the most common form in developed countries, accounting for up to 90 percent of cases. Related ... disease ClinicalTrials.gov (1 link) ClinicalTrials.gov Scientific articles on PubMed (1 link) PubMed Sources for This ...

  4. Phenomics in Autoimmune and Inflammatory Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-18

    Healthy Volunteer; Rheumatoid Arthritis; Ankylosing Spondylitis; Systemic Lupus Erythematosus/Antiphospholipid Syndrome; FMF; Cryopyrin-Associated Periodic Syndromes /TNF-receptor Associated Periodic Syndrome; Vasculitis; Uveitis; Myositis; Crohn's Disease; Ulcerative Rectocolitis; Type 1 Diabetes; Unclassified IAD Knee and/or Hip Arthritis, Muscular Dystrophy

  5. The effect of L-thyroxine treatment on chronic idiopathic urticaria and autoimmune thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magen, Eli; Mishal, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroiditis (AT) is more prevalent in patients with chronic idiopathic urticaria CIU) than in the general population. Previous small studies without any controlled comparison reported that CIU remits in patients with CIU and AT treated with L-thyroxine. To determine whether l-thyroxine treatment can improve the clinical course of CIU in patients with the co-occurrence of AT and CIU. A total of 749 patients with CIU were retrospectively studied. Clinical and laboratory evaluation and classification of chronic urticaria were performed according to the EAACI/GA(2)LEN/EDF/WAO guidelines. After L-thyroxine treatment for 53 ± 19 days, euthyroidism was restored in all subjects. Urticaria activity score (UAS) was evaluated at baseline and after three and six months. The control group consisted of matched 44 euthyroid subjects with CIU. A total of 44 (5.9%) patients were diagnosed to have hypothyroidism related to AT. Autologous serum skin test (ASST) was found to be positive in 17 (38.6%) of them. There was no statistically significant difference in baseline UAS, between the ASST+ (3.94 ± 1.52) and the ASST- (3.63 ± 1.42; P = 0.27) hypothyroid subjects and the euthyroid CIU controls (3.73 ± 1.74). During the L-thyroxine treatment, a significant reduction of UAS was observed in both hypothyroid ASST+ and ASST- subjects. However, the mean UAS after three and six months of L-thyroxine treatment remained not significantly different from that in control euthyroid subjects with CIU. L-Thyroxine treatment has no effect on the course of CIU in patients with CIU and AT. PMID:22182385

  6. Regulatory T cells and B cells: implication on autoimmune diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Ping; Zheng, Song Guo

    2013-01-01

    The regulatory T (Treg) cells play an important role in the maintenance of homeostasis and the prevention of autoimmune diseases. Although most studies are focusing on the role of Treg cells in T cells and T cells-mediated diseases, these cells also directly affect B cells and other non-T cells. This manuscript updates the role of Treg cells on the B cells and B cell-mediated diseases. In addition, the mechanisms whereby Treg cells suppress B cell responses have been discussed.

  7. [Autoimmunity in pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urboniene, Daiva; Sakalauskas, Raimundas; Sitkauskiene, Brigita

    2005-01-01

    For years, smoking induced inflammatory reaction, comprised mainly of neutrophils and macrophages, has been accepted to be the major component in pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. New developments in molecular and cell biology have provided scientists with new knowledge and understanding of inflammatory processes in lung. Recent reports have underlined the role of autoimmunity and T lymphocytes as a potential important factor, which takes place in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. This article reviews potential mechanism of T cell mediated immune response in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:15827384

  8. Association between Autoimmune Rheumatic Diseases and the Risk of Dementia

    OpenAIRE

    Kang Lu; Hao-Kuang Wang; Chih-Ching Yeh; Chih-Yuan Huang; Pi-Shan Sung; Liang-Chao Wang; Chih-Hsin Muo; Fung-Chang Sung; Han-Jung Chen; Ying-Chun Li; Li-Ching Chang; Kuen-Jer Tsai

    2014-01-01

    Aim. Autoimmune rheumatic diseases (ARD) are characterized by systemic inflammation and may affect multiple organs and cause vascular events such as ischemic stroke and acute myocardial infarction. However, the association between ARD and increased risk of dementia is uncertain. This is a retrospective cohort study to investigate and compare the risk of dementia between patients clinically diagnosed with ARD and non-ARD patients during a 5-year follow-up period. Methods. Data were obtained fr...

  9. PEG Minocycline-Liposomes Ameliorate CNS Autoimmune Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Hu; Josbert Metselaar; Li-Hong Ben; Cravens, Petra D.; Mahendra P Singh; Frohman, Elliot M.; Eagar, Todd N.; Racke, Michael K.; Kieseier, Bernd C.; Olaf Stüve

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Minocycline is an oral tetracycline derivative with good bioavailability in the central nervous system (CNS). Minocycline, a potent inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, attenuates disease activity in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS). Potential adverse effects associated with long-term daily minocycline therapy in human patients are concerning. Here, we investigated whether less frequent treatment with long-circul...

  10. Emerging role of Interleukin-22 in autoimmune diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Hai-Feng; Li, Xiang-Pei; Zheng, Song Guo; Ye, Dong-Qing

    2012-01-01

    Interleukin-22 (IL-22) is an IL-10 family cytokine member that was recently discovered to be mainly produced by Th17 cells. Previous studies have indicated the importance of IL-22 in host defense against Gram-negative bacterial organisms (in gut and lung). Recently, there is emerging evidence that IL-22 is involved in the development and pathogenesis of several autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), multiple sclerosis (MS), Sjögren’s syndro...

  11. Peripheral Nervous System Manifestations in Systemic Autoimmune Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Cojocaru, Inimioara Mihaela; COJOCARU, Manole; SILOSI, Isabela; VRABIE, Camelia Doina

    2014-01-01

    The peripheral nervous system refers to parts of the nervous system outside the brain and spinal cord. Systemic autoimmune diseases can affect both the central and peripheral nervous systems in a myriad of ways and through a heterogeneous number of mechanisms leading to many different clinical manifestations. As a result, neurological complications of these disorders can result in significant morbidity and mortality. The most common complication of peripheral nervous system (PNS) involvement ...

  12. Antiviral TRIMs: Friend or Foe in Autoimmune and Autoinflammatory Disease?

    OpenAIRE

    Jefferies, Caroline A; Wynne, Claire; Higgs, Rowan

    2011-01-01

    The concept that viral sensing systems, via their ability to drive pro-inflammatory cytokine and interferon production, contribute to the development of autoimmune and autoinflammatory disease is supported by a wide range of clinical and experimental observations. Recently, the tripartite motif-containing proteins (TRIMs) have emerged as having key roles in antiviral immunity — either as viral restriction factors or as regulators of pathways downstream of viral RNA and DNA sensors, and the in...

  13. FOXP3+ Treg Cells and Gender Bias in Autoimmune Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Nie, Jia; Li, Yang Yang; Zheng, Song Guo; Tsun, Andy; Li, Bin

    2015-01-01

    CD4+CD25+ regulatory T (Treg) cells play a pivotal role in the maintenance of immune homeostasis, where the X-linked master transcription factor forkhead box P3 (FOXP3) determines Treg cell development and function. Genetic deficiency of foxp3 induces dysfunction of Treg cells and immuno-dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, and X-linked syndrome in humans. Functionally deficient Treg cells or the development of exTreg cells positively correlate with autoimmune diseases, such as sys...

  14. Role of soluble Fas ligand in autoimmune diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning-Li Li; Tong Zhou; Dong-Qing Zhang; Hong Nie; Qi-Wen Yu; Ji-Ying Zhang; An-Lun Ma; Bai-Hua Shen; Li Wang; Jun Bai; Xue-Hua Chen

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of soluble Fas ligand in autoimmune diseases.METHODS: RT-PCR was performed to amplify sFasL cDNA from the total RNA extracted from activated human peripheral blood lymphocytes. DNA fragments were cloned into PCR vector. After sequenced, sFasL gene fragments were inserted into pQE-31 vector and expressed in E. Coli M15respectively. Proteins were purified through affinity chromatography column with ligand of 6xHis tag and identified by SDS-PAGE and Western blot. Mice were immunized with sFasL protein and specific anti-serum was harvested 6 wk after immunization. Monoclonal anti-human FasL antibody was made from the immunized mice. Serum level of sFasL in different patients was detected using antiFasL antibodies from the immunized mice.RESULTS: The protein expressed was 24 ku by SDS-PAGE electrophrosis. The protein was specially bound to antihuman FasL antibody by Western blot analysis. The sFasL protein could induce Jurket cell apoptosis in vitro. The concentration of serum sFasL in patients with autoimmune diseases was higher than that in normal individuals. sFasL could reduce arthritis in collagen induced arthritis (CIA)mice model by subcutaneous injection.CONCLUSION: sFasL may be involved in either induction of apoptosis or autoimmune diseases. Furthermore, sFasL may have potential application in treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  15. Bartonella henselae Infection: An Uncommon Mimicker of Autoimmune Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Maritsi, Despoina N.; Diagoras Zarganis; Zoi Metaxa; Georgia Papaioannou; George Vartzelis

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of a seven-year-old immunocompetent female patient who developed systemic symptoms mimicking an autoimmune rather than an infectious disease. The patient presented with rash, biquotidian fever, night sweats, and arthralgias. There was no antecedent history of cat contact. Investigations showed increased inflammatory markers, leukocytosis, thrombocytosis, hypercalcemia, and raised angiotensin-converting enzyme. Interferon-gamma releasing assay for tuberculosis infection was n...

  16. Thyroid nodule

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2016:chap 14. Read More Chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto disease) Laryngeal nerve damage Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) II Thyroid cancer Thyroid cancer - medullary carcinoma Thyroid gland removal Patient Instructions Thyroid gland ...

  17. Interferon regulatory factor 5 in human autoimmunity and murine models of autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eames, Hayley L; Corbin, Alastair L; Udalova, Irina A

    2016-01-01

    Interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) has been demonstrated as a key transcription factor of the immune system, playing important roles in modulating inflammatory immune responses in numerous cell types including dendritic cells, macrophages, and B cells. As well as driving the expression of type I interferon in antiviral responses, IRF5 is also crucial for driving macrophages toward a proinflammatory phenotype by regulating cytokine and chemokine expression and modulating B-cell maturity and antibody production. This review highlights the functional importance of IRF5 in a disease setting, by discussing polymorphic mutations at the human Irf5 locus that lead to susceptibility to systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and inflammatory bowel disease. In concordance with this, we also discuss lessons in IRF5 functionality learned from murine in vivo models of autoimmune disease and inflammation and hypothesize that modulation of IRF5 activity and expression could provide potential therapeutic benefits in the clinic. PMID:26207886

  18. Associations between thyroid dysfunction and chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dănciulescu Miulescu Rucsandra

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims. The interactions between kidney and thyroid functions are well established: thyroid hormones are necessary for the maintenance of electrolyte and water homeostasis and kidney is involved in the regulation of thyroid hormones metabolism. The aim of our study was to estimate the prevalence of thyroid dysfunction in patients with diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease (CKD. Material and Method. 23 patients with diabetes mellitus and CKD in pre-dialysis phase were recruited for this study. All subjects were investigated with thyroid ultrasound and laboratory tests to determine thyroid function, including: serum triiodothyronine (T3, free thyroxine (free T4, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH and antithyroid peroxidase antibodies (ATPO. Results were compared with the same measurements in 21 patients with diabetes mellitus but without CKD. Results. The prevalence of goiter (52.17% vs. 19.04%, p<0.05, subclinical hypothyroidism (23.80% vs. 9.52%, p<0.05, hypothyroidism (8.69% vs. 4.76 %, p<0.05 and low T3 syndrome (23.80% vs. 0.00% p<0.05 were significant high in diabetic patients with CKD compared with patients with diabetes mellitus but without CKD. Conclusions. We observed high prevalence of thyroid morphology abnormalities and thyroid function disorders in diabetic patients with CKD. Low T3 syndrome and subclinical hypothyroidism are the most frequently thyroid function disorders in CKD patients.

  19. NK Cell Subtypes as Regulators of Autoimmune Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    As major components of innate immunity, NK cells not only exert cell-mediated cytotoxicity to destroy tumors or infected cells, but also act to regulate the functions of other cells in the immune system by secreting cytokines and chemokines. Thus, NK cells provide surveillance in the early defense against viruses, intracellular bacteria, and cancer cells. However, the effecter function of NK cells must be exquisitely controlled to prevent inadvertent attack against normal “self” cells. In an organ such as the liver, where the distinction between immunotolerance and immune defense against routinely processed pathogens is critical, the plethora of NK cells has a unique role in the maintenance of homeostasis. Once self-tolerance is broken, autoimmune liver disease resulted. NK cells act as a “two-edged weapon” and even play opposite roles with both regulatory and inducer activities in the hepatic environment. That is, NK cells act not only to produce inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, but also to alter the proliferation and activation of associated lymphocytes. However, the precise regulatory mechanisms at work in autoimmune liver diseases remain to be identified. In this review, we focus on recent research with NK cells and their potential role in the development of autoimmune liver disease. PMID:27462349

  20. Bioluminescence in vivo imaging of autoimmune encephalomyelitis predicts disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steinman Lawrence

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis is a widely used animal model to understand not only multiple sclerosis but also basic principles of immunity. The disease is scored typically by observing signs of paralysis, which do not always correspond with pathological changes. Methods Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis was induced in transgenic mice expressing an injury responsive luciferase reporter in astrocytes (GFAP-luc. Bioluminescence in the brain and spinal cord was measured non-invasively in living mice. Mice were sacrificed at different time points to evaluate clinical and pathological changes. The correlation between bioluminescence and clinical and pathological EAE was statistically analyzed by Pearson correlation analysis. Results Bioluminescence from the brain and spinal cord correlates strongly with severity of clinical disease and a number of pathological changes in the brain in EAE. Bioluminescence at early time points also predicts severity of disease. Conclusion These results highlight the potential use of bioluminescence imaging to monitor neuroinflammation for rapid drug screening and immunological studies in EAE and suggest that similar approaches could be applied to other animal models of autoimmune and inflammatory disorders.

  1. Association of Addison's disease with autoimmune disorders--a long-term observation of 180 patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Kasperlik-Zaluska, A. A.; Migdalska, B.; Czarnocka, B; Drac-Kaniewska, J.; Niegowska, E.; Czech, W.

    1991-01-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the frequency of autoimmune disorders in Addison's disease. We have observed 180 patients (113 females, 67 males, aged 9-74 years) for 1 to 26 years. Tuberculosis was noted in 54 patients. Autoimmune disorders were found in 80 patients (44%); however, 125 (69%) patients were believed to have an autoimmune origin of adrenocortical insufficiency. In 20 patients two or more autoimmune disorders were found to coexist with Addison's disease.

  2. Graves’ thyrotoxicosis following Hashimoto’s thyroiditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troisi A

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A Troisi,1 P Novati,1 L Sali,1 M Colzani,1 G Monti,1 C Cardillo,3 M Tesauro21Division of Internal Medicine, Saronno Hospital, Italy; 2Department of Internal Medicine, Tor Vergata Clinical Center, University of Rome, Rome, Italy; 3Department of Internal Medicine, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, ItalyAbstract: Autoimmune thyroid disease traditionally includes chronic thyroiditis, autoimmune hyperthyroidism (Graves’ disease, and primary nongoitrous myxedema, and these diseases have a common syndrome-sharing pathophysiology. Here we report a rare case of simultaneous occurrence of thyrotoxicosis linked to Graves’ disease and chronic hypothyroidism due to Hashimoto’s thyroiditis.Keywords: Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, Graves’ disease, autoimmune thyroid disorders

  3. Immuno diagnosis of thyroid diseases in children exposed to radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Immune status has been studied in 200 children with different thyroid diseases. A marked deficiency of immunity T-link, considerable variations, depending on the type of thyroid pathology, on interferon content in blood, tumor necrosis factor and interleukin-1 have been revealed. 1 tab, 14 refs

  4. Epidemiology of thyroid diseases of dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarlett, J M

    1994-05-01

    Data regarding the epidemiology of the thyroid diseases in companion animals are sparse. Published studies providing information regarding the epidemiology of canine hypothyroidism and thyroid neoplasia and feline hyperthyroidism are summarized. Future studies should seek to refine diagnoses, include control animals for comparison, and target the elucidation of causes that may lead to preventative recommendations. PMID:8053107

  5. Anaplastic Thyroid Carcinoma Following Radioactive Iodine Therapy for Graves' Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sun Hwa; Kim, Hee Young; Jung, Kwang Yoon; Choi, Dong Seop; Kim, Sin Gon

    2013-01-01

    Radioactive iodine (RAI) therapy has been used as a treatment option for Graves' disease, and it has been widely accepted to be safe. On the other hand, some evidence suggests that RAI therapy is possibly associated with a small increased risk of thyroid cancer. Herein, we report a rare case of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) associated with Graves' disease, following RAI treatment. A 42-year-old woman had been diagnosed with Graves' disease and although she was treated with an antithyroid...

  6. A population study of the association between thyroid autoantibodies in serum and abnormalities in thyroid function and structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, I.B.; Laurberg, P.; Knudsen, N.; Jorgensen, T.; Perrild, H.; Ovesen, Lars; Rasmussen, Lone Banke

    2005-01-01

    autoantibodies in serum and abnormalities in thyroid function and structure, and to study the thyroid volume in subjects with subclinical autoimmune hypothyroidism. Design A population study including 4649 randomly selected subjects. Measurements Blood tests were used to analyse for thyroid peroxidase......Objective Patients with autoimmune overt hypothyroidism may present with goitrous Hashimoto's disease or autoimmune atrophic thyroiditis. Little is known about the prevalence of subclinical autoimmune hypothyroidism. The aims of this study were to evaluate the association between thyroid...... autoantibodies (TPO-Ab), thyroglobulin autoantibodies (Tg-Ab), TSH, fT3 and fT4. Results Thyroid volume was categorized as small (<6.6 ml) in 4.7%, normal (6.6-14.9 ml) in 60.4% and large (> 14.9 ml) in 34.9% of participants. Thyroid nodules were found in 29.7%. Serum TSH was low (<0.4 mIU/l) in 4.7%, normal (0...

  7. The immunobiology of Campylobacter jejuni: Innate immunity and autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phongsisay, Vongsavanh

    2016-04-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Campylobacter jejuni causes gastroenteritis and Guillain-Barré syndrome in humans. Recent advances in the immunobiology of C. jejuni have been made. This review summarizes C. jejuni-binding innate receptors and highlights the role of innate immunity in autoimmune diseases. This human pathogen produces a variety of glycoconjugates, including human ganglioside-like determinants and multiple activators of Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Furthermore, C. jejuni targets MyD88, NLRP3 inflammasome, TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF), sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectins (Siglecs), macrophage galactose-type lectin (MGL), and immunoglobulin-like receptors (TREM2, LMIR5/CD300b). The roles of these innate receptors and signaling molecules have been extensively studied. MyD88-mediated TLR activation or inflammasome-dependent IL-1β secretion is essential for autoimmune induction. TRIF mediates the production of type I interferons that promote humoral immune responses and immunoglobulin class-switching. Siglec-1 and Siglec-7 interact directly with gangliosides. Siglec-1 activation enhances phagocytosis and inflammatory responses. MGL internalizes GalNAc-containing glycoconjugates. TREM2 is well-known for its role in phagocytosis. LMIR5 recognizes C. jejuni components and endogenous sulfoglycolipids. Several lines of evidence from animal models of autoimmune diseases suggest that simultaneous activation of innate immunity in the presence of autoreactive lymphocytes or antigen mimicry may link C. jejuni to immunopathology. PMID:26709064

  8. Risk Factors for Autoimmune Diseases Development After Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    OpenAIRE

    Roriz, Mélanie; Landais, Mickael; Desprez, Jonathan; Barbet, Christelle; Azoulay, Elie; Galicier, Lionel; Wynckel, Alain; Baudel, Jean-luc; Provôt, François; Pène, Frédéric; Mira, Jean-Paul; Presne, Claire; Poullin, Pascale; Delmas, Yahsou; Kanouni, Tarik

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Autoimmune thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) can be associated with other autoimmune disorders, but their prevalence following autoimmune TTP remains unknown. To assess the prevalence of autoimmune disorders associated with TTP and to determine risk factors for and the time course of the development of an autoimmune disorder after a TTP episode, we performed a cross sectional study. Two-hundred sixty-one cases of autoimmune TTP were included in the French Reference Center reg...

  9. The rs1990760 polymorphism within the IFIH1 locus is not associated with Graves' disease, Hashimoto's thyroiditis and Addison's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seidl Christian

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Three genes have been confirmed as major joint susceptibility genes for endocrine autoimmune disease:human leukocyte antigen class II, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 and protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 22. Recent studies showed that a genetic variation within the interferon induced helicase domain 1 (IFIH1 locus (rs1990760 polymorphism is an additional risk factor in type 1 diabetes and Graves' disease (GD. Methods The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of the rs1990760 polymorphism within the IFIH1 gene in German patients with GD (n = 258, Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT, n = 106, Addison's disease (AD, n = 195 and healthy controls (HC, n = 227 as well as in 55 GD families (165 individuals, German and 100 HT families (300 individuals, Italian. Furthermore, the interaction between rs1990760 polymorphism with human leukocyte antigen (HLA risk haplotype DQ2(DQA*0501-DQB*0201, the risk haplotypes DQ2/DQ8 (DQA*0301-DQB*0302 and the status of thyroglobulin antibody (TgAb, thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPOAb and TSH receptor antibody (TRAb in patients and families were analysed. Results No significant differences were found between the allele and genotype frequencies for rs1990760 IFIH1 polymorphism in patients with GD, HT, AD and HC. Also no differences were observed when stratifying the IFIH1 rs1990760 polymorphism for gender, presence or absence of thyroid antibodies (GD:TRAb and HT:TPOAb/TgAb and HLA risk haplotypes (DQ2:for GD and HT, DQ2/DQ8:for AD. Furthermore the transmission analysis in GD and HT families revealed no differences in alleles transmission for rs1990760 IFIH1 from parents with or without HLA risk haplotype DQ2 to the affected offspring. In contrast, by dividing the HT parents according to the presence or absence of thyroid Ab titers, mothers and fathers both positive for TPOAb/TgAb overtransmitted the allele A of IFIH1 rs1990760 to their HT affected offspring (61.8% vs 38.2%;p = 0

  10. Serum IgG Subclasses in Autoimmune Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Haoze; Ping LI; Wu, Di; Xu, Dong; Hou, Yong; Qian WANG; Li, Mengtao; Li, Yongzhe; Zeng, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Fengchun; Shi, Qun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To characterize serum IgG subclass levels in several autoimmune diseases, including primary Sjogren syndrome (pSS), systemic sclerosis (SSc), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). We aimed to analyze serum IgG subclass distribution and to test whether serum IgG4 levels are elevated in these diseases. Serum IgG subclass levels from 102 pSS, 102 SSc, 100 SLE, and 59 PBC patients, as well as 40 healthy controls (HCs), were measured using the immunoneph...

  11. Absence of autoantibodies connected to autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type I and II and Addison's disease in girls and women with Turner syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kämpe Olle

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A disturbance in the immune system has been described in Turner syndrome (45,X, with an association to low levels of IgG and IgM and decreased levels of T- and B-lymphocytes. Also different autoimmune diseases have been connected to Turner syndrome (45,X, thyroiditis being the most common. Other autoimmune diseases seen are inflammatory bowel disease, insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, Addison's disease, rheumatoid arthritis, myasthenia gravis, vitiligo, alopecia, pernicious anaemia and hypoparathyroidism, but the association to Turner syndrome is not definite. Besides the typical features of Turner syndrome (short stature, failure to enter puberty spontaneously and infertility due to ovarian insufficiency ear problems are common. Otitis media and a progressive sensorineural hearing disorder are commonly seen. In the normal population there are known inner ear disorders related to autoimmune diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate patients with Turner syndrome regarding autoantibodies connected to the autoimmune disorders; autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type I and II and Addison's disease, to screen for overlapping profile of autoantibodies. Blood samples from 110 Turner patients (7–65 years were investigated using in vitro transcription, translation and immunoprecipitation techniques regarding autoantibodies connected to autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type I and II and Addison's disease (21-hydroxylase, 17α-hydroxylase, side-chain cleavage enzyme, aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase, tyrosine hydroxylase and tryptophan hydroxylase. Results The autoantibodies investigated were not overrepresented among the Turner patients. Conclusion The autoimmune disorders associated with Turner syndrome do not seem to be of the same origin as Addison's disease, the type I or II autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome.

  12. Long-Term Follow-Up of a Child with Autoimmune Thyroiditis and Recurrent Hyperthyroidism in the Absence of TSH Receptor Antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Dunne, Christopher; De Luca, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Hashitoxicosis is an initial, transient, hyperthyroid phase that rarely affects patients with Hashimoto thyroiditis. We present here an unusual case of a child with Hashimoto thyroiditis and recurrent hyperthyroidism. A 4 yr 6/12 old male was diagnosed by us with autoimmune subclinical hypothyroidism (normal free T4, slightly elevated TSH, and elevated TG antibody titer). Two years and 6/12 later he experienced increased appetite and poor weight gain; a laboratory evaluation revealed suppress...

  13. An Observation of Ultrasonographic Findings in Thyroid Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors analyzed ultrasonographically the total 45 cases of thyroid disease verified by historical diagnosis, functional diagnosis, and morphological diagnosis at the Department of Radiology, Busan National University Hospital from June to September 1982. The results obtained were as follows: 1. In the sex distribution female was 38 cases (84.4%), and male 7 cases (15.6%). The second, third, and fourth decades of age (78.0%) were most prevalent. 2. Among the total 45 cases thyroid adenoma was 24 cases (53.3%), nodular hyperplasia cases (17.7%), thyroid carcinoma 7 cases (15.6%), diffuse hyperplsia 3 cases (6.7%), Hashimoto's thyroiditis 1 cases (2.2%), subacute thyroiditis 1 cases (2.2%), tuberculous thyroiditis 1 case (2.2%) in orders. 3. On ultrasonogram, total 24 cases of thyroid adenoma showed a single nodule in 24 cases (100.0%), smooth outer margin in 23 cases (95.8%), capsular echo in 23 cases (95.8%), pure cystic nodule in 4 cases (16.7%), and increased echogenicity in 17 cases (85.0%) among the 20 cases exclude that pure cystic nodules. 4. Total 7 cases of thyroid carcinoma showed no capsular echo in 4 cases (57.1%), irregular outer margin in 4 case (57.1%), no pure cystic nodule in all cases, and enlargement of metastatic lymphnode in 4 cases (57.1%). 5. Total 8 cases of nodular hyperplasia showed enlargement of thyroid gland and multiple nodule in 8 cases (100.0%), and increased echogenicity in 7 cases (87.5%). 6. Total 3 cases of diffuse hyperplasia showed enlargement of thyroid gland and increased echogenicity in 3 cases (100.0%). 7. Total 3 cases of thyroiditis showed decreased echogenicity in 3 cases (100.0%) and enlargement of thyroid gland in 2 cases (66.7%). 8. The cold area visualized on radionuclide scan could be differentiated from a solid mass and cystic one by ultrasonogram.

  14. Inflammatory glycoproteins in cardiometabolic disorders, autoimmune diseases and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connelly, Margery A; Gruppen, Eke G; Otvos, James D; Dullaart, Robin P F

    2016-08-01

    The physiological function initially attributed to the oligosaccharide moieties or glycans on inflammatory glycoproteins was to improve protein stability. However, it is now clear that glycans play a prominent role in glycoprotein structure and function and in some cases contribute to disease states. In fact, glycan processing contributes to pathogenicity not only in autoimmune disorders but also in atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, diabetes and malignancy. While most clinical laboratory tests measure circulating levels of inflammatory proteins, newly developed diagnostic and prognostic tests are harvesting the information that can be gleaned by measuring the amount or structure of the attached glycans, which may be unique to individuals as well as various diseases. As such, these newer glycan-based tests may provide future means for more personalized approaches to patient stratification and improved patient care. Here we will discuss recent progress in high-throughput laboratory methods for glycomics (i.e. the study of glycan structures) and glycoprotein quantification by methods such as mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. We will also review the clinical utility of glycoprotein and glycan measurements in the prediction of common low-grade inflammatory disorders including cardiovascular disease, diabetes and cancer, as well as for monitoring autoimmune disease activity. PMID:27312321

  15. Thyroid and menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Ghianda, S; Tonacchera, M; Vitti, P

    2014-06-01

    Thyroid dysfunction is common in the general population especially in women. All thyroid diseases are in fact more common in women than in men and may interfere with the reproductive system. Thyroid function and the gonadal axes are related throughout the woman's fertile period. The relationship between the two glands is mutual. In particular, thyroid hormones affect the reproductive function both directly and indirectly through several actions. Studies on the relationship between menopause and thyroid function are few and do not allow to clarify whether menopause has an effect on the thyroid regardless of aging. With aging, the main changes regarding thyroid physiology and function are: a reduction of thyroid iodine uptake, free thyroxine and free triiodothyronine synthesis and catabolism of free thyroxine while reverse triiodothyronine increases; the level of thyroid stimulating hormone remains normal with sometimes a tendency to higher limits. These changes are present in both sexes without distinction between males and females. The complexity of the relationships can be summarized in three aspects: thyroid status does not influence significantly the climacteric syndrome; menopause may modify the clinical expression of some thyroid diseases, particularly the autoimmune ones; thyroid function is not directly involved in the pathogenesis of the complications of menopause. However, coronary atherosclerosis and osteoporosis may be aggravated in the presence of hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism. The effects of postmenopausal estrogen replacement on thyroxine requirements in women with hypothyroidism should be considered. PMID:23998691

  16. P15: The expression of Tc17 cells in thymoma accompany with autoimmune diseases or autoimmune disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Background Thymoma is thymic epithelial cell tumor. Studies have shown that thymoma associated with autoimmune disorders and possible mechanisms of autoimmune diseases is the central immune tolerance and peripheral tolerance obstacles have resulted in the breaking of the autoimmune response activation and immune tolerance. Tc17 cells and Th17 cells have been shown play an important role in tumor and autoimmune diseases’ development process. This study test the distribution of Tc17cells in thymoma and the expression of RORγt in thymus of thymoma patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) or other autoimmune diseases, the frequency of Th17/Tc17 in PBMCs, to explore the expression of Th17/Tc17 cells in thymoma accompany with autoimmune diseases or autoimmune disorders. Methods In this study, grouped as follows: (I) thymoma non gravis group (Tm groups); (II) thymoma with MG group thymoma with MG (MG group); (III) thymoma with MG associated with other autoimmune diseases group or anti- nuclear antibodies abnormal elevation of the group (AD group), to analyze the basic differences between the groups. In this study, we examined the RT-PCR to detect RORγt in the thymoma tissue, immunohistochemical double staining method to detect Tc17 cells expression and localization in the thymoma tissue distribution expression Th17/Tc17 in PBMCs by flow cytometry [Interleukin (IL)-17-producing CD8+ cells as Thl7 cells and IL-17-producing CD4+ cells as Tcl7 cells], analysis of differential expression of three in each group thymoma; and explore of Th17/Tc17 expression. Results (I) Tm groups and AD group serum CD8+ cells was statistically significant (PTc17 cells in MG/AD group was significantly higher than that in Tm, was statistically significant (PTc17 cells have risen trend in Tm groups and MG/AD group. Conclusions (I) CD8+ cells, CD4+/CD8+ T ratio, immunoglobulin, CRP and complement C3 levels can be used as indicators of evaluation of the role of the immune status of patients with

  17. Graves’ Disease and Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma in a Patient with Active Sarcoidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şefika Burçak Polat

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoidosis is a systemic granulomatous disease of unknown etiology. In most cases, mediastinal lymph nodes and lung parenchyma are involved. In addition, the eyes, skin, abdominal organs, central nervous system or the joints might be involved during the course of the disease. Sarcoidosis has been found to be related with other autoimmune diseases such as thyroiditis. In this report, we present the case of a patient in whom hyperthroidism was found and Graves’ disease and papillary thyroid carcinoma were diagnosed while being investigated with a preliminary diagnosis of sarcoidosis. A 50-year-old male patient was admitted to our chest diseases clinic with the complaints of cough with colorless sputum, joint pain, weakness, weight loss (36 kgs, palpitations, tremor of the hands and pain in the right eye. Mediastinal lympadenopathy was detected on CT scan. Laboratory tests demonstrated hypercalcemia and low levels of parathyroid hormone (PTH. Eye examination revealed uveitis. Bronchoscopy was planned to confirm the diagnosis of sarcoidosis. Thyroid function test was performed and the patient turned out to have hyperthyroidism with high free T4 and low TSH levels. TSH receptor antibody titer was 71 U/L (0- 14 U/L. Ultrasonographic examination demonstrated enlarged thyroid gland and heterogeneous parenchyma with increased blood flow pattern. 4- and 24-hour radioiodine uptakes were 30% and 60%, respectively and scintigraphy findings were compatible with diffuse toxic goiter. On Hertel exophthalmometer, the measurements of the right and left eye were 23 and 24 mm, respectively. The diagnosis of Graves’ disease was made and thionamide therapy was started. Since active ophthalmopathy was present and the patient did not want to receive medical therapy for a long time, surgery was the best option for definitive therapy. The patient was prepared for the surgery with lugol solution (3x10 drops daily and after eutyroidism was achieved, bilateral total

  18. Thyroid dysfunction after mantle irradiation of Hodgkin's disease patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thyroid dysfunction can develop in patients with Hodgkin's disease who are treated with mantle irradiation. During the period 1970-89, the records of 320 patients who received mantle irradiation and who had thyroid function tests (TFT) were retrospectively reviewed. The median age was 30 years (range, 7-69 years). The median mantle and thyroid dose was 36 Gy (range, 30-40 Gy) and 39.8 Gy (range, 32-65 Gy), respectively. Overall thyroid dysfunction was present in 39% of the patients. Clinical hypothyroidism was seen in 10% and biochemical hypothyroidism was noted in 25%. Hyperthyroidism was found in 4% of patients. Thyroid nodules had developed in six patients (2%), of which those in four patients were malignant. Age, sex, histological subtype, stage of disease, dose, Iymphangiogram and treatment with chemotherapy were not significant factors in the development of thyroid dysfunction. The narrow dose range prevented adequate analysis of dose effect. The results indicate that the incidence of thyroid abnormalities is high enough to warrant regular TFT assessment with pre-irradiation levels and follow-up testing for life because the development of abnormalities can occur many years later. Thyroid examination should form part of the routine follow-up examination and any abnormality should be promptly investigated. Copyright (1998) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  19. Nuclear Medicine in Thyroid Diseases in Pediatric and Adolescent Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilge Volkan-Salancı

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Both benign and malignant diseases of the thyroid are rare in the pediatric and adolescent population, except congenital hypothyroidism. Nuclear medicine plays a major role, both in the diagnosis and therapy of thyroid pathologies. Use of radioactivity in pediatric population is strictly controlled due to possible side effects such as secondary cancers; therefore, management of pediatric patients requires detailed literature knowledge. This article aims to overview current algorithms in the management of thyroid diseases and use of radionuclide therapy in pediatric and adolescent population.

  20. The Effect of Subclinical Maternal Thyroid Dysfunction and Autoimmunity on Intrauterine Growth Restriction: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Zhao; Xiaowen, Zhang; Baomin, Chen; Aihua, Liu; Yingying, Zhou; Weiping, Teng; Zhongyan, Shan

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between maternal subclinical thyroid dysfunction and autoimmunity with the risk for intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR).Design is a systematic review and meta-analysis.A literature search was conducted using PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane database. A combination of 2 key words was used to search for the eligible studies: one indexed thyroid dysfunction or antithyroid antibodies; and the other one indexed the adverse neonatal outcomes of pregnancy, such as IUGR, small for gestational age, fetal growth restriction, or low birth weight.Two reviewers selected the studies, and eligible studies met the following criteria: prospective cohort studies or case control studies, studies of maternal thyroid dysfunction and positive antithyroid antibodies as the exposure of interest, and studies of IUGR or small for gestational age as the outcome of interest.Data were recorded, including data from maternal thyroid disorders and IUGR, and compared with a reference group.There were 22 individual data from the 13 cohort articles. Among these, 7 were focused on subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH), 4 on subclinical hyperthyroidism, 7 on positivity for thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPOAb), and 4 on isolated hypothyroxinemia. Meta-analysis showed that there was no effect of subclinical hyperthyroidism (odds ratio (OR) = 0.98; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.40-2.41), TPOAb positivity (OR = 1.57; 95% CI, 0.77-3.18), or isolated hypothyroxinemia (OR = 1.05, 95% CI: 0.37-2.92) on IUGR. However, SCH is associated with IUGR (OR = 1.54; 95% CI, 1.06-2.25).SCH is associated with IUGR; however, subclinical hyperthyroidism, TPOAb positivity, or isolated hypothyroxinemia do not affect the risk of IUGR. PMID:27175703

  1. Markers of autoimmune liver diseases in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umit Secil Demirdal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Osteoporosis is a common complication of chronic liver diseases. However, there is limited information about autoimmune liver diseases as a factor of secondary osteoporosis. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the autoantibodies of autoimmune liver diseases in patients with osteoporosis. METHODS: One hundred fifty female patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis were included. Bone mineral density was measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. We analysized autoantibodies including antinuclear antibodies, liver membrane antibodies, anti-liver/kidney microsomal autoantibodies1, liver-specific protein, antismooth muscle antibodies, and anti-mitochondrial antibodies by indirect immunofluorescence. Serum was assayed for the levels of aminotransferases. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 63,13±8,6 years. The mean values of L1-L4 T-scores and femur total T-scores were -3,08±0,58 and -1,53±0,81, respectively. Among the 150 patients with osteoporosis, 14 (9.3% were antinuclear antibodies, four (2.7% were liver membrane antibodies, three (2.0% were anti-liver/kidney microsomal autoantibodies1, and two (1.3% were liver-specific protein positive. None of the patients had anti-mitochondrial antibodies or smooth muscle antibodies positivity. The mean values of levels of aminotransferases were within normal range. CONCLUSIONS: The presence of liver membrane antibodies, liver-specific protein, and anti-liver/kidney microsomal autoantibodies1 has permitted us to see that there may be some suspicious clues of autoimmune liver diseases in patients with osteoporosis as a secondary risk factor. On the other hand, there is a need for comprehensive studies with a larger sample size and studies designed to compare the results with a normal population to understand the clinical importance of our findings.

  2. Is there a Common Genetic Basis for Autoimmune Diseases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan-Manuel Anaya

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases (ADs represent a diverse collection of diseases in terms of their demographic profile and primary clinical manifestations. The commonality between them however, is the damage to tissues and organs that arises from the response to self-antigens. The presence of shared pathophysiological mechanisms within ADs has stimulated searches for common genetic roots to these diseases. Two approaches have been undertaken to sustain the “common genetic origin” theory of ADs. Firstly, a clinical genetic analysis showed that autoimmunity aggregates within families of probands diagnosed with primary Sjögren's (pSS syndrome or type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D. A literature review supported the establishment of a familiar cluster of ADs depending upon the proband's disease phenotype. Secondly, in a same and well-defined population, a large genetic association study indicated that a number of polymorphic genes (i.e. HLA-DRB1, TNF and PTPN22 influence the susceptibility for acquiring different ADs. Likewise, association and linkage studies in different populations have revealed that several susceptibility loci overlap in ADs, and clinical studies have shown that frequent clustering of several ADs occurs. Thus, the genetic factors for ADs consist of two types: those which are common to many ADs (acting in epistatic pleitropy and those that are specific to a given disorder. Their identification and functional characterization will allow us to predict their effect as well as to indicate potential new therapeutic interventions. Both autoimmunity family history and the co-occurrence of ADs in affected probands should be considered when performing genetic association and linkage studies.

  3. Pervasive sharing of genetic effects in autoimmune disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Cotsapas

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association (GWA studies have identified numerous, replicable, genetic associations between common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and risk of common autoimmune and inflammatory (immune-mediated diseases, some of which are shared between two diseases. Along with epidemiological and clinical evidence, this suggests that some genetic risk factors may be shared across diseases-as is the case with alleles in the Major Histocompatibility Locus. In this work we evaluate the extent of this sharing for 107 immune disease-risk SNPs in seven diseases: celiac disease, Crohn's disease, multiple sclerosis, psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and type 1 diabetes. We have developed a novel statistic for Cross Phenotype Meta-Analysis (CPMA which detects association of a SNP to multiple, but not necessarily all, phenotypes. With it, we find evidence that 47/107 (44% immune-mediated disease risk SNPs are associated to multiple-but not all-immune-mediated diseases (SNP-wise P(CPMA<0.01. We also show that distinct groups of interacting proteins are encoded near SNPs which predispose to the same subsets of diseases; we propose these as the mechanistic basis of shared disease risk. We are thus able to leverage genetic data across diseases to construct biological hypotheses about the underlying mechanism of pathogenesis.

  4. Nuclear medicine and thyroid disease - part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Part 1 of this article discussed the anatomy, physiology and basic pathology of the thyroid gland. Techniques of thyroid scanning and a few clinical examples are shown part II Copyright (2005) The Australian and New Zealand Society Of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  5. Localized granuloma annulare and autoimmune thyroid disease. Are they associated?

    OpenAIRE

    Moran, J; Lamb, J.

    1995-01-01

    This case report identifies a temporal relationship between the diagnosis of localized granuloma annulare and the subsequent development of primary hypothyroidism in a previously healthy 10-year-old girl. We suspect these disorders are associated, but any association between them requires further study.

  6. Clustering of autoimmune diseases in patients with rosacea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeberg, Alexander; Hansen, Peter Riis; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rosacea is a common inflammatory skin condition that shares genetic risk loci with autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and celiac disease. A recent genomewide association study identified 90 genetic regions associated with T1DM, celiac disease, multiple sclerosis......, and/or rheumatoid arthritis, respectively. However, a possible association with rosacea was not investigated. OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the association between rosacea and T1DM, celiac disease, multiple sclerosis, and rheumatoid arthritis, respectively. METHODS: We performed a population-based case......-control study. A total of 6759 patients with rosacea were identified and matched with 33,795 control subjects on age, sex, and calendar time. We used conditional logistic regression to calculate crude and adjusted odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). RESULTS: After adjustment for smoking and...

  7. Assessment of the Effects of Low-Level Laser Therapy on the Thyroid Vascularization of Patients with Autoimmune Hypothyroidism by Color Doppler Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höfling, Danilo Bianchini; Chavantes, Maria Cristina; Juliano, Adriana G.; Cerri, Giovanni G.; Knobel, Meyer; Yoshimura, Elisabeth M.; Chammas, Maria Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Background. Chronic autoimmune thyroiditis (CAT) frequently alters thyroid vascularization, likely as a result of the autoimmune process. Objective. To evaluate the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on the thyroid vascularization of patients with hypothyroidism induced by CAT using color Doppler ultrasound parameters. Methods. In this randomized clinical trial, 43 patients who underwent levothyroxine replacement for CAT-induced hypothyroidism were randomly assigned to receive either 10 sessions of LLLT (L group, n = 23) or 10 sessions of a placebo treatment (P group, n = 20). Color Doppler ultrasounds were performed before and 30 days after interventions. To verify the vascularity of the thyroid parenchyma, power Doppler was performed. The systolic peak velocity (SPV) and resistance index (RI) in the superior (STA) and inferior thyroid arteries (ITAs) were measured by pulsed Doppler. Results. The frequency of normal vascularization of the thyroid lobes observed in the postintervention power Doppler examination was significantly higher in the L than in the P group (P = 0.023). The pulsed Doppler examination revealed an increase in the SPV of the ITA in the L group compared with the P group (P = 0.016). No significant differences in the SPV of the STA and in the RI were found between the groups. Conclusion. These results suggest that LLLT can ameliorate thyroid parenchyma vascularization and increase the SPV of the ITA of patients with hypothyroidism caused by CAT. PMID:23316383

  8. Thyroid dysfunction after radiotherapy in children with Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thyroid function was measured in 119 children, 16 years of age or less, after radiotherapy (XRT) for Hodgkin's disease. Thyroid abnormalities developed in 4 of 24 children (17%) who received 2600 rad or less, and in 74 of 95 children (78%) who received greater than 2600 rad to the cervical area, including the thyroid. The abnormality in all but three (one with hyperthyroidism and two with thyroid nodules) included the development of elevated levels of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). Age, sex, and administration of chemotherapy were not significant factors in the development of thyroid dysfunction. All children had lymphangiograms (LAG) and no time relationship was noted between thyroid dysfunction and LAG-XRT interval. The mean interval from radiotherapy to documented thyroid dysfunction was 18 months in the low-dose group and 31 months in the high-dose group, with most patients becoming abnormal within 3 to 5 years. Of interest was a spontaneous return of TSH to within normal limits in 20 children and substantial improvement in another 7. This study confirms the occurrence of dose-related occult hypothyroidism in children following external irradiation of the neck

  9. Development of a disease registry for autoimmune bullous diseases: initial analysis of the pemphigus vulgaris subset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Amit Aakash; Seiffert-Sinha, Kristina; Sirois, David; Werth, Victoria P; Rengarajan, Badri; Zrnchik, William; Attwood, Kristopher; Sinha, Animesh A

    2015-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is a rare, potentially life threatening, autoimmune blistering skin disease. The International Pemphigus and Pemphigoid Foundation (IPPF) has recently developed a disease registry with the aim to enhance our understanding of autoimmune bullous diseases with the long-term goal of acquiring information to improve patient care. Patients were recruited to the IPPF disease registry through direct mail, e-mail, advertisements, and articles in the IPPF-quarterly, -website, -Facebook webpage, and IPPF Peer Health Coaches to complete a 38-question survey. We present here the initial analysis of detailed clinical information collected on 393 PV patients. We report previously unrecognized gender differences in terms of lesion location, autoimmune comorbidity, and delay in diagnosis. The IPPF disease registry serves as a useful resource and guide for future clinical investigation. PMID:24691863

  10. Increased Prevalence of Cardiovascular and Autoimmune Diseases in Periodontitis Patients: A Cross-Sectional Study

    OpenAIRE

    Nesse, Willem; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Abbas, Frank; Spijkervet, Fred K. L.; Stijger, Astrid; Tromp, Jan A. H.; van Dijk, Johan L.; Vissink, Arjan

    2010-01-01

    Background: Associations between periodontitis and cardiovascular and autoimmune diseases are most often assessed in patients with a particular cardiovascular or autoimmune disease. To prevent selection bias, this study assesses the existence of associations between periodontitis and cardiovascular and autoimmune diseases in patients attending a dental or periodontal clinic. Methods: Data were collected from 1,276 randomly selected dental records from patients attending a dental (n = 588) or ...

  11. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Clustering in Systemic Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlon, Thomas; Bossini-Castillo, Lara; Carmona, F. David; Di Cara, Alessandro; Wojcik, Jérôme; Voloshynovskiy, Sviatoslav

    2016-01-01

    Systemic Autoimmune Diseases, a group of chronic inflammatory conditions, have variable symptoms and difficult diagnosis. In order to reclassify them based on genetic markers rather than clinical criteria, we performed clustering of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms. However naive approaches tend to group patients primarily by their geographic origin. To reduce this “ancestry signal”, we developed SNPClust, a method to select large sources of ancestry-independent genetic variations from all variations detected by Principal Component Analysis. Applied to a Systemic Lupus Erythematosus case control dataset, SNPClust successfully reduced the ancestry signal. Results were compared with association studies between the cases and controls without or with reference population stratification correction methods. SNPClust amplified the disease discriminating signal and the ratio of significant associations outside the HLA locus was greater compared to population stratification correction methods. SNPClust will enable the use of ancestry-independent genetic information in the reclassification of Systemic Autoimmune Diseases. SNPClust is available as an R package and demonstrated on the public Human Genome Diversity Project dataset at https://github.com/ThomasChln/snpclust. PMID:27490238

  12. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Clustering in Systemic Autoimmune Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlon, Thomas; Martínez-Bueno, Manuel; Bossini-Castillo, Lara; Carmona, F David; Di Cara, Alessandro; Wojcik, Jérôme; Voloshynovskiy, Sviatoslav; Martín, Javier; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E

    2016-01-01

    Systemic Autoimmune Diseases, a group of chronic inflammatory conditions, have variable symptoms and difficult diagnosis. In order to reclassify them based on genetic markers rather than clinical criteria, we performed clustering of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms. However naive approaches tend to group patients primarily by their geographic origin. To reduce this "ancestry signal", we developed SNPClust, a method to select large sources of ancestry-independent genetic variations from all variations detected by Principal Component Analysis. Applied to a Systemic Lupus Erythematosus case control dataset, SNPClust successfully reduced the ancestry signal. Results were compared with association studies between the cases and controls without or with reference population stratification correction methods. SNPClust amplified the disease discriminating signal and the ratio of significant associations outside the HLA locus was greater compared to population stratification correction methods. SNPClust will enable the use of ancestry-independent genetic information in the reclassification of Systemic Autoimmune Diseases. SNPClust is available as an R package and demonstrated on the public Human Genome Diversity Project dataset at https://github.com/ThomasChln/snpclust. PMID:27490238

  13. Elevated Adiponectin Serum Levels in Women with Systemic Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Éric Toussirot

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Adipose tissue produces a wide range of proteins that may influence the immune system. In this study, we assessed the serum levels of leptin, adiponectin, and ghrelin, in association with the measurements of body composition, in 15 female patients with various autoimmune diseases (systemic lupus erythematosus, primary Sjögren's syndrome, sarcoidosis, mixed connective tissue disease, vasculitis, CREST syndrome, and polymyositis and in 15 healthy female controls. There were no statistically significant differences between the patients and controls with regard to serum leptin, serum ghrelin, global fat mass, adiposity, and fat mass in the android or gynoid regions, whereas serum adiponectin levels were higher in patients than controls (16.3±1.6 μg/mL versus 9.7±0.6 μg/mL; =.01. As adiponectin is known to exhibit potent anti-inflammatory properties, a high adiponectinemia in patients with systemic autoimmune disease may mitigate the inflammatory response. However, the precise consequences of these elevated serum adiponectin levels on the metabolic syndrome development and atherosclerotic cardiovascular risk in this patient population still needs to be determined.

  14. Body mass index and risk of autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harpsøe, Maria C; Basit, Saima; Andersson, Mikael;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A possible aetiological link between obesity and certain autoimmune diseases (ADs) has been suggested. We investigated the associations between body mass index (BMI, kg/m2) and 43 ADs. METHODS: 75,008 women participating in the Danish National Birth Cohort were followed during a median......-up, 2430 women (3.2%) developed a total of 2607 new-onset ADs. Risk of any autoimmune disease was increased in obese women (HR, 1.27; 95% CI, 1.11 to 1.46) compared with normal weight women (18.5-≤25 kg/m2). Obese women (BMI≥30 kg/m2) were at increased risk of sarcoidosis (HR 3.59; 95% CI, 2.31 to 5.......57) and type 1 diabetes mellitus (HR 2.67; 95% CI, 1.71 to 4.17). Risk of dermatitis herpetiformis increased by 14% (95% CI, 1% to 30%) per BMI unit. Conversely, risk of celiac disease and Raynaud's phenomenon decreased by 7% (95% CI, 1% to 13%) and 12% (95% CI, 4% to 19%) per BMI unit, respectively...

  15. Transgenic expression of TGF-β on thyrocytes inhibits development of spontaneous autoimmune thyroiditis and increases regulatory T cells in thyroids of NOD.H-2h4 mice

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Shiguang; Fang, Yujiang; Sharp, Gordon C.; Braley-Mullen, Helen

    2010-01-01

    Transgenic NOD.H-2h4 mice expressing TGF-β under control of the thyroglobulin promoter were generated to address the role of TGF-β in development of thyrocyte hyperplasia. In contrast to non-transgenic (Tg−) littermates which develop lymphocytic spontaneous autoimmune thyroiditis (L-SAT), all TGF-β transgenic (Tg+) mice given NaI water for 2–7 mo develop thyroid lesions characterized by severe thyroid epithelial cell hyperplasia and proliferation (TEC H/P) with fibrosis and less lymphocyte in...

  16. Porous silicon biosensor for the detection of autoimmune diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jane, Andrew O.; Szili, Endre J.; Reed, Joanne H.; Gordon, Tom P.; Voelcker, Nicolas H.

    2007-12-01

    Advances in porous silicon (pSi) technology have led to the development of new sensitive biosensors. The unique optical properties of pSi renders the material a perfect candidate for optical transducers exploiting photoluminescence or white light interference effects. The ability of biosensors exploiting these transduction mechanisms to quickly and accurately detect biological target molecules affords an alternative to current bioassays such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). Here, we present a pSi biosensor that was developed to detect antibodies against the autoimmune protein La. This protein is associated with autoimmune diseases including rheumatic disorders, systematic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and Sjogren's syndrome (SS). A fast and sensitive detection platform such as the one described here can be applied to the rapid diagnosis of these debilitating autoimmune diseases. The immobilisation of the La protein onto pSi films gave a protein receptor-decorated sensor matrix. A cascade of immunological reactions was then initiated to detect anti-La antibody on the functionalised pSi surface. In the presence of o-phenylenediamine (OPD), horseradish peroxidase (HRP)/H IIO II catalysed the formation of an oxidised radical species that accelerated pSi corrosion. pSi corrosion was detected as a blue-shift in the generated interference pattern, corresponding to a decrease in the effective optical thickness (EOT) of the pSi film. Compared to an ELISA, the pSi biosensor could detect the anti-La antibody at a similar concentration (500 - 125 ng/ml). Furthermore, we found that the experimental process can be significantly shortened resulting in detection of the anti-La antibody in 80 minutes compared to a minimum of 5 hours required for ELISA.

  17. Current surgical status of thyroid diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touzopoulos, Panagiotis; Karanikas, Michael; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Mitrakas, Alexandros; Porpodis, Konstantinos; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Zervas, Vasilis; Kouroumichakis, Ioannis; Constantinidis, Theodoros C; Mikroulis, Dimitrios; Tsimogiannis, Konstantinos E

    2011-01-01

    Thyroid nodules are a common clinical problem for surgeons. The clinical importance of nodules is the need to exclude thyroid cancer, which occurs in 5%-15% of patients. If fine needle aspiration cytology is positive, or suspicious for malignancy, surgery is recommended. During the past decade, with the tendency to develop smaller incisions, an endoscopic approach has been applied to thyroid surgery, called minimally invasive video-assisted thyroidectomy. This approach was immediately followed by other minimally invasive or scarless neck techniques, such as the breast approach, axillary-breast approach, and robot-assisted method. All these techniques follow the same principles of surgery and oncology. This review presents the current surgical management of the thyroid gland, including the surgical techniques and compares them by describing benefits and drawbacks of each one. PMID:22247619

  18. Myasthenia gravis, a model of organ-specific autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrih-Aknin, S

    1995-04-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a neuromuscular disorder of autoimmune origin. Most patients have antibodies directed against the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) that interfere with neuromuscular transmission. MG is a model of organ-specific autoimmune disease in which the autoantigen, AChR, is well characterized. However, several questions remain unanswered. Why is AChR, which is present in the thymus, not tolerized? Why does the anti-AChR antibody titre not correlate with clinical manifestations, and why do some patients not have such antibodies? What genetic elements are involved in disease susceptibility? How is the expression of AChR regulated after its attack by autoantibodies? Could MG patients benefit from new immunomodulatory treatments? At the IVth EuroMyasthenia meeting, held in Versailles in April 1994, almost 200 researchers and physicians met to discuss the pathophysiology and treatment of myasthenia gravis and to provide answers to some of these questions. The sessions covered immunological, genetic and clinical aspects of MG. PMID:7612144

  19. Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Autoimmune or Immune-mediated Pathogenesis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhonghui Wen

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC, the two main forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, is still unclear, but both autoimmune and immune-mediated phenomena are involved. Autoimmune phenomena include the presence of serum and mucosal autoantibodies against intestinal epithelial cells in either form of IBD, and against human tropomyosin fraction five selectively in UC. In addition, perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (pANCA are common in UC, whereas antibodies against Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ASCA are frequently found in CD. Immune-mediate phenomena include a variety of abnormalities of humoral and cell-mediated immunity, and a generalized enhanced reactivity against intestinal bacterial antigens in both CD and UC. It is currently believed that loss of tolerance against the indigenous enteric flora is the central event in IBD pathogenesis. Various complementary factors probably contribute to the loss of tolerance to commensal bacteria in IBD. They include defects in regulatory T-cell function, excessive stimulation of mucosal dendritic cells, infections or variants of proteins critically involved in bacterial antigen recognition, such as the products of CD-associated NOD2/CARD15 mutations.

  20. Nuclear Medicine in Thyroid Diseases in Pediatric and Adolescent Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Bilge Volkan-Salancı; Pınar Özgen Kıratlı

    2015-01-01

    Both benign and malignant diseases of the thyroid are rare in the pediatric and adolescent population, except congenital hypothyroidism. Nuclear medicine plays a major role, both in the diagnosis and therapy of thyroid pathologies. Use of radioactivity in pediatric population is strictly controlled due to possible side effects such as secondary cancers; therefore, management of pediatric patients requires detailed literature knowledge. This article aims to overview current algorithms...